Science.gov

Sample records for cyclotron beam intensity

  1. Method of enhancing cyclotron beam intensity

    DOEpatents

    Hudson, Ed D.; Mallory, Merrit L.

    1977-01-01

    When an easily ionized support gas such as xenon is added to the cold cathode in sources of the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron, large beam enhancements are produced. For example, .sup.20 Ne.sup.7+ is increased from 0.05 enA to 27 enA, and .sup.16 O.sup.5+ intensities in excess of 35 e.mu.A have been extracted for periods up to 30 minutes. Approximately 0.15 cc/min of the easily ionized support gas is supplied to the ion source through a separate gas feed line and the primary gas flow is reduced by about 30%.

  2. Approach to increase beam intensity extracted from a cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakao, M.; Hojo, S.; Katagiri, K.; Miyahara, N.; Noda, A.; Noda, K.; Sugiura, A.; Wakui, T.; Smirnov, V.; Vorozhtsov, S.; Goto, A.

    2017-09-01

    To increase the beam intensity of cyclotrons used for producing radionuclides, beam loss during extraction must be reduced. Extraction efficiency is limited by the beam parameters in front of the deflector, especially angular distribution. Computer simulation of the second harmonic mode for 18 MeV protons, which is frequently used, has been carried out to understand beam behavior in a cyclotron. The extraction efficiency is determined by the width of the angular distribution of particles in the phase space plot at the deflector. An effective method to reduce the width is to shorten the bunch at injection. The simulation shows that the bunch phase length at injection must be ⩽30° to realize a 30 μA extraction beam current and satisfy the deflector heat limit of 200 W.

  3. SPES: A new cyclotron-based facility for research and applications with high-intensity beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggiore, M.; Campo, D.; Antonini, P.; Lombardi, A.; Manzolaro, M.; Andrighetto, A.; Monetti, A.; Scarpa, D.; Esposito, J.; Silvestrin, L.

    2017-06-01

    In 2016, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (Italy) started the commissioning of a new accelerator facility based on a high-power cyclotron able to deliver proton beams up to 70 MeV of energy and 700 μA current. Such a machine is the core of the Selective Production of Exotic Species (SPES) project whose main goal is to provide exotics beam for nuclear and astrophysics research and to deliver high-intensity proton beams for medical applications and neutrons generator.

  4. High intensity proton beam transportation through fringe field of 70 MeV compact cyclotron to beam line targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xu; Li, Ming; Wei, Sumin; Xing, Jiansheng; Hu, Yueming; Johnson, Richard R.; Piazza, Leandro; Ryjkov, Vladimir

    2016-06-01

    From the stripping points, the high intensity proton beam of a compact cyclotron travels through the fringe field area of the machine to the combination magnet. Starting from there the beams with various energy is transferred to the switching magnet for distribution to the beam line targets. In the design of the extraction and transport system for the compact proton cyclotron facilities, such as the 70 MeV in France and the 100 MeV in China, the space charge effect as the beam crosses the fringe field has not been previously considered; neither has the impact on transverse beam envelope coupled from the longitudinal direction. Those have been concerned much more with the higher beam-power because of the beam loss problem. In this paper, based on the mapping data of 70 MeV cyclotron including the fringe field by BEST Cyclotron Inc (BEST) and combination magnet field by China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE), the beam extraction and transport are investigated for the 70 MeV cyclotron used on the SPES project at Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (INFN-LNL). The study includes the space charge effect and longitudinal and transverse coupling mentioned above, as well as the matching of beam optics using the beam line for medical isotope production as an example. In addition, the designs of the ±45° switching magnets and the 60° bending magnet for the extracted beam with the energy from 35 MeV to 70 MeV have been made. Parts of the construction and field measurements of those magnets have been done as well. The current result shows that, the design considers the complexity of the compact cyclotron extraction area and fits the requirements of the extraction and transport for high intensity proton beam, especially at mA intensity levels.

  5. The design and construction of a pulsed beam generation system based on high intensity cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, ShiZhong; Yin, ZhiGuo; Li, PengZhan; Song, GuoFang; Wu, LongCheng; Guan, FengPing; Xie, HuaiDong; Jia, XianLu; Lu, YinLong; Zhang, TianJue

    2011-12-01

    In order to perform the studies on a pulsed beam generation system based on a high intensity cyclotron, a test beam line with a pulsed beam generation for a 10 MeV compact cyclotron (CYCIAE-10) has been designed and constructed at China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). A 70 MHz continuous H-beam can be pulsed to the pulse length of less than 10 ns with a repetition rate of 4.4 MHz. The sine waveform with a frequency of 2.2 MHz is adopted for the chopper and a mesh structure with single drift and dual gaps is used for the 70 MHz buncher. A helical resonator is designed and constructed based on simulations and experiments on the RF matching for the chopper. A helical inductance loop that is exceptionally large of its kind and equipped with water cooling for the resonator has been successfully wound and a 500 W solid RF amplifier has been manufactured. A special measuring device has been designed, which can be used to measure both the DC beam and the pulsed beam. The required pulsed beam was obtained after pulsed beam tuning.

  6. Intense highly charged ion beam production and operation with a superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, H. W.; Sun, L. T.; Guo, J. W.; Lu, W.; Xie, D. Z.; Hitz, D.; Zhang, X. Z.; Yang, Y.

    2017-09-01

    The superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source with advanced design in Lanzhou (SECRAL) is a superconducting-magnet-based electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) for the production of intense highly charged heavy ion beams. It is one of the best performing ECRISs worldwide and the first superconducting ECRIS built with an innovative magnet to generate a high strength minimum-B field for operation with heating microwaves up to 24-28 GHz. Since its commissioning in 2005, SECRAL has so far produced a good number of continuous wave intensity records of highly charged ion beams, in which recently the beam intensities of 40Ar+ and 129Xe26+ have, for the first time, exceeded 1 emA produced by an ion source. Routine operations commenced in 2007 with the Heavy Ion accelerator Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL), China. Up to June 2017, SECRAL has been providing more than 28,000 hours of highly charged heavy ion beams to the accelerator demonstrating its great capability and reliability. The great achievement of SECRAL is accumulation of numerous technical advancements, such as an innovative magnetic system and an efficient double-frequency (24 +18 GHz ) heating with improved plasma stability. This article reviews the development of SECRAL and production of intense highly charged ion beams by SECRAL focusing on its unique magnet design, source commissioning, performance studies and enhancements, beam quality and long-term operation. SECRAL development and its performance studies representatively reflect the achievements and status of the present ECR ion source, as well as the ECRIS impacts on HIRFL.

  7. Advances in intense beams, beam delivery, targetry, and radiochemistry at advanced cyclotron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, R. R.; Watt, R.; Kovac, B.; Zyuzin, A.; Van Lier, E.; Erdman, K. L.; Gyles, Wm.; Sabaiduc, V.; McQuarrie, S. A.; Wilson, J.; Backhouse, C.; Gelbart, Wm.; Kuo, T.

    2007-08-01

    The increasing demand for radionuclides for PET and SPECT has resulted in ACSI system improvements starting from the cyclotron and proceeding to the Radiochemistry Modules. With more TR30 cyclotrons installed and operating at full capacity, emphasis has been placed on improving the operational components to reduce both the incidence of failure and subsequent maintenance time. A cyclotron system has been developed that meets the needs of a regional radiopharmacy that supplies both positron and single photon emitters that would not otherwise be available. This new system has been named the TR24. In order to deal with some of the challenges of high currents, a method has been developed for passivating the entrance window foil during high current irradiation of a water target used to produce F-18. A method has been developed for passivating the entrance window foil to reduce unwanted chemical species that interfere with radiopharmaceutical production. Preliminary results for novel radioiodine production technique using the TR19/9 are also discussed.

  8. High intensity beams from electron cyclotron resonance ion sources: A study of efficient extraction and transport system (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gammino, S.; Ciavola, G.; Celona, L.; Andò, L.; Passarello, S.; Zhang, X. Zh.; Spädtke, P.; Winkler, M.

    2004-05-01

    A study of the design of extraction and transport system for high intensity beams that will be produced by the next generation electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) was carried out in the frame of a European collaboration devoted to the definition of the main parameters of third generation ECRIS. High intensity production tests carried out in the previous years at INFN-LNS have shown evidence for the need to review the main concepts of the beam analysis and transport when high currents of low energy highly charged ions are extracted from the source. The transport of such low energy beams becomes critical as soon as the total current exceeds a few mA. The study reported here is based on the calculated parameters for the GyroSERSE source and the computer simulations have been carried out to obtain low emittance beams. The design of the extraction system was carried out by means of the KOBRA (three dimensional) code. The study of the beam line has been carried out with the codes GIOS, GICO, and TRANSPORT by taking into account both the phase space growth due to space charge and to the aberrations inside the magnets. The description of some different beam line options will be also given.

  9. Intense beam production of highly charged heavy ions by the superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source SECRAL.

    PubMed

    Zhao, H W; Sun, L T; Zhang, X Z; Guo, X H; Cao, Y; Lu, W; Zhang, Z M; Yuan, P; Song, M T; Zhao, H Y; Jin, T; Shang, Y; Zhan, W L; Wei, B W; Xie, D Z

    2008-02-01

    There has been increasing demand to provide higher beam intensity and high enough beam energy for heavy ion accelerator and some other applications, which has driven electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source to produce higher charge state ions with higher beam intensity. One of development trends for highly charged ECR ion source is to build new generation ECR sources by utilization of superconducting magnet technology. SECRAL (superconducting ECR ion source with advanced design in Lanzhou) was successfully built to produce intense beams of highly charged ion for Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL). The ion source has been optimized to be operated at 28 GHz for its maximum performance. The superconducting magnet confinement configuration of the ion source consists of three axial solenoid coils and six sextupole coils with a cold iron structure as field booster and clamping. An innovative design of SECRAL is that the three axial solenoid coils are located inside of the sextupole bore in order to reduce the interaction forces between the sextupole coils and the solenoid coils. For 28 GHz operation, the magnet assembly can produce peak mirror fields on axis of 3.6 T at injection, 2.2 T at extraction, and a radial sextupole field of 2.0 T at plasma chamber wall. During the commissioning phase at 18 GHz with a stainless steel chamber, tests with various gases and some metals have been conducted with microwave power less than 3.5 kW by two 18 GHz rf generators. It demonstrates the performance is very promising. Some record ion beam intensities have been produced, for instance, 810 e microA of O(7+), 505 e microA of Xe(20+), 306 e microA of Xe(27+), and so on. The effect of the magnetic field configuration on the ion source performance has been studied experimentally. SECRAL has been put into operation to provide highly charged ion beams for HIRFL facility since May 2007.

  10. Note: {sup 6}Li III light intensity observation for {sup 6}Li{sup 3+} ion beam operation at Hyper-Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Muto, Hideshi; Ohshiro, Yukimitsu; Yamaka, Shoichi; Yamaguchi, Hidetoshi; Shimoura, Susumu; Watanabe, Shin-ichi; Oyaizu, Michihiro; Kobayashi, Kiyoshi; Kotaka, Yasuteru; Nishimura, Makoto; Kase, Masayuki; Kubono, Shigeru; Hattori, Toshiyuki

    2014-12-15

    The light intensity of {sup 6}Li III line spectrum at λ = 516.7 nm was observed during {sup 6}Li{sup 3+} beam tuning at the Hyper-Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source. Separation of ion species of the same charge to mass ratio with an electromagnetic mass analyzer is known to be an exceptionally complex process. However, {sup 6}Li III line intensity observation conducted in this study gives new insights into its simplification of this process. The light intensity of {sup 6}Li III line spectrum from the ECR plasma was found to have a strong correlation with the extracted {sup 6}Li{sup 3+} beam intensity from the RIKEN Azimuthal Varying Field cyclotron.

  11. Comparison of cyclotron and linacs for high-intensity-beam applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatia, T.S.; Jason, A.; Mottershead, C.T.; Cooper, R.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The goals of this project were three-fold: (1) to understand the current level of cyclotron design expertise especially in the areas of space-charge modeling and simulation codes, (2) to develop a better understanding of the capabilities and limitations of circular machines, especially in the area of current limits, and (3) to stay abreast of the developments at other institutions in the area of high-current circular machines. These goals were partially met especially in the area of code development for the application of linac codes to motion of ions in a circular orbit. The authors were also able to continue their interactions with the other institutions working in this area.

  12. Ion source and injection line for high intensity medical cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, XianLu Guan, Fengping; Yao, Hongjuan; Zhang, TianJue; Yang, Jianjun; Song, Guofang; Ge, Tao; Qin, Jiuchang

    2014-02-15

    A 14 MeV high intensity compact cyclotron, CYCIAE-14, was built at China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). An injection system based on the external H− ion source was used on CYCIAE-14 so as to provide high intensity beam, while most positron emission tomography cyclotrons adopt internal ion source. A beam intensity of 100 μA/14 MeV was extracted from the cyclotron with a small multi-cusp H− ion source (CIAE-CH-I type) and a short injection line, which the H− ion source of 3 mA/25 keV H− beam with emittance of 0.3π mm mrad and the injection line of with only 1.2 m from the extraction of ion source to the medial plane of the cyclotron. To increase the extracted beam intensity of the cyclotron, a new ion source (CIAE-CH-II type) of 9.1 mA was used, with maximum of 500 μA was achieved from the cyclotron. The design and test results of the ion source and injection line optimized for high intensity acceleration will be given in this paper.

  13. Development of a fast cyclotron gas stopper for intense rare isotope beams from projectile fragmentation: Study of ion extraction with a radiofrequency carpet

    SciTech Connect

    Bollen, Georg; Morrissey, David

    2011-01-16

    Research and development has been performed in support of the design of a future rare isotope beam facility in the US. An important aspect of plans for earlier RIA (Rare Isotope Accelerator) and a requirement of FRIB (Facility of Rare Isotope Beams) to be built at Michigan State University are the availability of so-called “stopped beams” for research that contributes to answering questions like how elements in the universe are created and to provide better insight into the nature of Fundamental Interactions. In order to create “stopped beams” techniques are required that transform fast rare isotopes beams as they are available directly after addresses questions like the origin of that will allow and High priority is given to the evaluation of intensity limitations and the efficiency of stopping of fast fragment beams in gas cells and to the exploration of options to increase the efficiency and the reduction of space charge effects. Systematic studies performed at MSU as part of the RIA R&D with a linear gas cell under conditions close to those expected at RIA and related simulations confirm that the efficiency of stopping and extracting ions decreases with increasing beam intensity. Similar results have also been observed at RIKEN in Japan. These results indicate the concepts presently under study will not be able to cover the full range of intensities of fast beams expected at RIA without major losses. The development of a more robust concept is therefore critical to the RIA concept. Recent new beam simulation studies performed at the NSCL show that the stopping of heavy ions in a weakly focusing gas-filled magnetic field can overcome the intensity limitation of present systems while simultaneously providing a much faster ion extraction. We propose to design and build such a cyclotron gas stopper and to test it at the NSCL under conditions as close as possible to those found at RIA.

  14. Influence of injection beam emittance on beam transmission efficiency in a cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurashima, Satoshi; Kashiwagi, Hirotsugu; Miyawaki, Nobumasa; Yoshida, Ken-Ichi; Okumura, Susumu

    2014-02-01

    The JAEA AVF cyclotron accelerates various kinds of high-energy ion beams for research in biotechnology and materials science. Beam intensities of an ion species of the order of 10-9-10-6 ampere are often required for various experiments performed sequentially over a day. To provide ion beams with sufficient intensity and stability, an operator has to retune an ion source in a short time. However, the beam intensity downstream of the cyclotron rarely increases in proportion to the intensity at the ion source. To understand the cause of this beam behavior, transmission efficiencies of a 12C5+ beam from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source to the cyclotron were measured for various conditions of the ion source. Moreover, a feasible region for acceleration in the emittance of the injection beam was clarified using a transverse-acceptance measuring system. We confirmed that the beam emittance and profile were changed depending on the condition of the ion source and that matching between the beam emittance and the acceptance of the cyclotron was degraded. However, after fine-tuning to improve the matching, beam intensity downstream of the cyclotron increased.

  15. The electromagnetic ion cyclotron beam anisotropy instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peter Gary, S.; Schriver, David

    1987-01-01

    Electromagnetic instabilities driven by an anisotropic, relatively cool ion beam are studied for the case in which both the beam and the instabilities propagate parallel or antiparallel to a uniform magnetic field. At modest beam-core relative drift speeds, sufficiently large perpendicular-to-parallel beam temperature ratios and sufficiently large plasma beta, the mode of fastest growth rate is the ion cyclotron beam anisotropy instability. Because the right-hand polarized waves observed upstream of slow shocks in the earth's magnetotail can lead to the appropriate beam anisotropy, the ion cyclotron instability may be present and account for the left-hand polarized magnetic waves observed there. Also, because of its relatively low phase speed, the ion cyclotron beam anisotropy instability may provide the scattering necessary for ion Fermi acceleration at slow shocks of sufficiently high plasma beta.

  16. Emittance improvement of the electron cyclotron resonance high intensity light ion source proton beam by gas injection in the low energy beam transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beauvais, P.-Y.; Ferdinand, R.; Gobin, R.; Lagniel, J. M.; Leroy, P.-A.; Celona, L.; Ciavola, G.; Gammino, S.; Pottin, B.; Sherman, J.

    2000-03-01

    SILHI is the ECR high intensity light ion source studied in France at C.E.A. Saclay. This is the source for the injector of the high intensity proton injector prototype developed by a CNRS-IN2P3 collaboration. 80 mA at 95 keV beams with a rms normalized r-r' emittance lower than 0.3 π mm mrad and a proton fraction better than 85% are currently produced. Recently, it has been found that the injection in the low energy beam transport of a buffer gas had a strong effect on the emittance measured 1 m downstream of the focusing solenoid. By adding several gases (H2, N2, Ar, Kr), improvements as great as a factor of 3 have been observed. The emittance has been measured by means of an r-r' emittance measurement unit equipped with a sampling hole and a wire profile monitor, both moving across the beam. Simultaneously, the space charge compensation factor is measured using a four-grid analyzer unit. In this article all results of these experiments are presented and discussed. A first explanation of the emittance reduction phenomenon and possible consequences on the injector operation is given.

  17. Effect of frequency tuning on bremsstrahlung spectra, beam intensity, and shape in the 10 GHz NANOGAN electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, G. Mal, Kedar; Kumar, Narender; Lakshmy, P. S.; Mathur, Y.; Kumar, P.; Kanjilal, D.; Roy, A.; Baskaran, R.

    2014-02-15

    Studies on the effect of the frequency tuning on the bremsstrahlung spectra, beam intensities, and beam shape of various ions have been carried out in the 10 GHz NANOGAN ECR ion source. The warm and cold components of the electrons were found to be directly correlated with beam intensity enhancement in case of Ar{sup 9+} but not so for O{sup 5+}. The warm electron component was, however, much smaller compared to the cold component. The effect of the fine tuning of the frequency on the bremsstrahlung spectrum, beam intensities and beam shape is presented.

  18. Heavy ion cocktail beams at the 88 inch Cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, Daniela; McMahan, Margaret A.; Argento, David; Gimpel, Thomas; Guy, Aran; Morel, James; Siero, Christine; Thatcher, Ray; Lyneis, Claude M.

    2002-09-03

    Cyclotrons in combination with ECR ion sources provide the ability to accelerate ''cocktails'' of ions. A cocktail is a mixture of ions of near-identical mass-to-charge (m/q) ratio. The different ions cannot be separated by the injector mass-analyzing magnet and are tuned out of the ion source together. The cyclotron then is utilized as a mass analyzer by shifting the accelerating frequency. This concept was developed soon after the first ECR ion source became operational at the 88-Inch Cyclotron and has since become a powerful tool in the field of heavy ion radiation effects testing. Several different ''cocktails'' at various energies are available at the 88-Inch cyclotron for radiation effect testing, covering a broad range of linear energy transfer and penetration depth. Two standard heavy ion cocktails at 4.5 MeV/nucleon and 10 MeV/nucleon have been developed over the years containing ions from boron to bismuth. Recently, following requests for higher penetration depths, a 15MeV/nucleon heavy ion cocktail has been developed. Up to nine different metal and gaseous ion beams at low to very high charge states are tuned out of the ion source simultaneously and injected together into the cyclotron. It is therefore crucial to balance the ion source very carefully to provide sufficient intensities throughout the cocktail. The paper describes the set-up and tuning of the ion source for the various heavy ion cocktails.

  19. Neutron Beams from Deuteron Breakup at the 88-Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    McMahan, M.A.; Ahle, L.; Bleuel, D.L.; Bernstein, L.; Braquest, B.R.; Cerny, J.; Heilbronn, L.H.; Jewett, C.C.; Thompson, I.; Wilson, B.

    2007-07-31

    Accelerator-based neutron sources offer many advantages, in particular tunability of the neutron beam in energy and width to match the needs of the application. Using a recently constructed neutron beam line at the 88-Inch Cyclotron at LBNL, tunable high-intensity sources of quasi-monoenergetic and broad spectrum neutrons from deuteron breakup are under development for a variety of applications.

  20. A real-time beam-profile monitor for a PET cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Hoehr, C.; Uittenbosch, T.; Verzilov, V.; English, W.; Buckley, K.; Gray, D.; Kellog, S.; Cameron, D.; Schaffer, P.

    2012-12-19

    Beam profiles in medical cyclotrons are traditionally measured using techniques that do not provide any information about short-term fluctuations of the beam shape or beam intensity. To overcome this, we have developed a real-time harp beam profile monitor which can withstand beam power in excess of 300 W. The monitor and electronics were constructed and applied toward a 13 MeV proton beam with current of up to 25 {mu}A. Herein are reported preliminary beam-profile measurement results.

  1. A real-time beam-profile monitor for a PET cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoehr, C.; Uittenbosch, T.; Verzilov, V.; English, W.; Buckley, K.; Gray, D.; Kellog, S.; Cameron, D.; Schaffer, P.

    2012-12-01

    Beam profiles in medical cyclotrons are traditionally measured using techniques that do not provide any information about short-term fluctuations of the beam shape or beam intensity. To overcome this, we have developed a real-time harp beam profile monitor which can withstand beam power in excess of 300 W. The monitor and electronics were constructed and applied toward a 13 MeV proton beam with current of up to 25 μA. Herein are reported preliminary beam-profile measurement results.

  2. The direct injection of intense ion beams from a high field electron cyclotron resonance ion source into a radio frequency quadrupole

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, G. Kanjilal, D.; Roy, A.; Becker, R.; Baskaran, R.

    2014-02-15

    The ion current achievable from high intensity ECR sources for highly charged ions is limited by the high space charge. This makes classical extraction systems for the transport and subsequent matching to a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator less efficient. The direct plasma injection (DPI) method developed originally for the laser ion source avoids these problems and uses the combined focusing of the gap between the ion source and the RFQ vanes (or rods) and the focusing of the rf fields from the RFQ penetrating into this gap. For high performance ECR sources that use superconducting solenoids, the stray magnetic field of the source in addition to the DPI scheme provides focusing against the space charge blow-up of the beam. A combined extraction/matching system has been designed for a high performance ECR ion source injecting into an RFQ, allowing a total beam current of 10 mA from the ion source for the production of highly charged {sup 238}U{sup 40+} (1.33 mA) to be injected at an ion source voltage of 60 kV. In this design, the features of IGUN have been used to take into account the rf-focusing of an RFQ channel (without modulation), the electrostatic field between ion source extraction and the RFQ vanes, the magnetic stray field of the ECR superconducting solenoid, and the defocusing space charge of an ion beam. The stray magnetic field is shown to be critical in the case of a matched beam.

  3. The direct injection of intense ion beams from a high field electron cyclotron resonance ion source into a radio frequency quadrupole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, G.; Becker, R.; Hamm, R. W.; Baskaran, R.; Kanjilal, D.; Roy, A.

    2014-02-01

    The ion current achievable from high intensity ECR sources for highly charged ions is limited by the high space charge. This makes classical extraction systems for the transport and subsequent matching to a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator less efficient. The direct plasma injection (DPI) method developed originally for the laser ion source avoids these problems and uses the combined focusing of the gap between the ion source and the RFQ vanes (or rods) and the focusing of the rf fields from the RFQ penetrating into this gap. For high performance ECR sources that use superconducting solenoids, the stray magnetic field of the source in addition to the DPI scheme provides focusing against the space charge blow-up of the beam. A combined extraction/matching system has been designed for a high performance ECR ion source injecting into an RFQ, allowing a total beam current of 10 mA from the ion source for the production of highly charged 238U40+ (1.33 mA) to be injected at an ion source voltage of 60 kV. In this design, the features of IGUN have been used to take into account the rf-focusing of an RFQ channel (without modulation), the electrostatic field between ion source extraction and the RFQ vanes, the magnetic stray field of the ECR superconducting solenoid, and the defocusing space charge of an ion beam. The stray magnetic field is shown to be critical in the case of a matched beam.

  4. The direct injection of intense ion beams from a high field electron cyclotron resonance ion source into a radio frequency quadrupole.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, G; Becker, R; Hamm, R W; Baskaran, R; Kanjilal, D; Roy, A

    2014-02-01

    The ion current achievable from high intensity ECR sources for highly charged ions is limited by the high space charge. This makes classical extraction systems for the transport and subsequent matching to a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator less efficient. The direct plasma injection (DPI) method developed originally for the laser ion source avoids these problems and uses the combined focusing of the gap between the ion source and the RFQ vanes (or rods) and the focusing of the rf fields from the RFQ penetrating into this gap. For high performance ECR sources that use superconducting solenoids, the stray magnetic field of the source in addition to the DPI scheme provides focusing against the space charge blow-up of the beam. A combined extraction/matching system has been designed for a high performance ECR ion source injecting into an RFQ, allowing a total beam current of 10 mA from the ion source for the production of highly charged (238)U(40+) (1.33 mA) to be injected at an ion source voltage of 60 kV. In this design, the features of IGUN have been used to take into account the rf-focusing of an RFQ channel (without modulation), the electrostatic field between ion source extraction and the RFQ vanes, the magnetic stray field of the ECR superconducting solenoid, and the defocusing space charge of an ion beam. The stray magnetic field is shown to be critical in the case of a matched beam.

  5. Coherent Cherenkov-Cyclotron Radiation Excited by an Electron Beam in a Metamaterial Waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummelt, J. S.; Lu, X.; Xu, H.; Mastovsky, I.; Shapiro, M. A.; Temkin, R. J.

    2016-12-01

    An electron beam passing through a metamaterial structure is predicted to generate reversed Cherenkov radiation, an unusual and potentially very useful property. We present an experimental test of this phenomenon using an intense electron beam passing through a metamaterial loaded waveguide. Power levels of up to 5 MW are observed in backward wave modes at a frequency of 2.40 GHz using a one microsecond pulsed electron beam of 490 keV, 84 A in a 400 G magnetic field. Contrary to expectations, the output power is not generated in the Cherenkov mode. Instead, the presence of the magnetic field, which is required to transport the electron beam, induces a Cherenkov-cyclotron (or anomalous Doppler) instability at a frequency equal to the Cherenkov frequency minus the cyclotron frequency. Nonlinear simulations indicate that the Cherenkov-cyclotron mode should dominate over the Cherenkov instability at a lower magnetic field where the highest output power is obtained.

  6. A hybrid electron cyclotron resonance metal ion source with integrated sputter magnetron for the production of an intense Al+ ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weichsel, T.; Hartung, U.; Kopte, T.; Zschornack, G.; Kreller, M.; Philipp, A.

    2015-09-01

    A metal ion source prototype has been developed: a combination of magnetron sputter technology with 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source technology—a so called magnetron ECR ion source (MECRIS). An integrated ring-shaped sputter magnetron with an Al target is acting as a powerful metal atom supply in order to produce an intense current of singly charged metal ions. Preliminary experiments show that an Al+ ion current with a density of 167 μA/cm2 is extracted from the source at an acceleration voltage of 27 kV. Spatially resolved double Langmuir probe measurements and optical emission spectroscopy were used to study the plasma states of the ion source: sputter magnetron, ECR, and MECRIS plasma. Electron density and temperature as well as Al atom density were determined as a function of microwave and sputter magnetron power. The effect of ECR heating is strongly pronounced in the center of the source. There the electron density is increased by one order of magnitude from 6 × 109 cm-3 to 6 × 1010 cm-3 and the electron temperature is enhanced from about 5 eV to 12 eV, when the ECR plasma is ignited to the magnetron plasma. Operating the magnetron at constant power, it was observed that its discharge current is raised from 1.8 A to 4.8 A, when the ECR discharge was superimposed with a microwave power of 2 kW. At the same time, the discharge voltage decreased from about 560 V to 210 V, clearly indicating a higher plasma density of the MECRIS mode. The optical emission spectrum of the MECRIS plasma is dominated by lines of excited Al atoms and shows a significant contribution of lines arising from singly ionized Al. Plasma emission photography with a CCD camera was used to prove probe measurements and to identify separated plasma emission zones originating from the ECR and magnetron discharge.

  7. A hybrid electron cyclotron resonance metal ion source with integrated sputter magnetron for the production of an intense Al⁺ ion beam.

    PubMed

    Weichsel, T; Hartung, U; Kopte, T; Zschornack, G; Kreller, M; Philipp, A

    2015-09-01

    A metal ion source prototype has been developed: a combination of magnetron sputter technology with 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source technology-a so called magnetron ECR ion source (MECRIS). An integrated ring-shaped sputter magnetron with an Al target is acting as a powerful metal atom supply in order to produce an intense current of singly charged metal ions. Preliminary experiments show that an Al(+) ion current with a density of 167 μA/cm(2) is extracted from the source at an acceleration voltage of 27 kV. Spatially resolved double Langmuir probe measurements and optical emission spectroscopy were used to study the plasma states of the ion source: sputter magnetron, ECR, and MECRIS plasma. Electron density and temperature as well as Al atom density were determined as a function of microwave and sputter magnetron power. The effect of ECR heating is strongly pronounced in the center of the source. There the electron density is increased by one order of magnitude from 6 × 10(9) cm(-3) to 6 × 10(10) cm(-3) and the electron temperature is enhanced from about 5 eV to 12 eV, when the ECR plasma is ignited to the magnetron plasma. Operating the magnetron at constant power, it was observed that its discharge current is raised from 1.8 A to 4.8 A, when the ECR discharge was superimposed with a microwave power of 2 kW. At the same time, the discharge voltage decreased from about 560 V to 210 V, clearly indicating a higher plasma density of the MECRIS mode. The optical emission spectrum of the MECRIS plasma is dominated by lines of excited Al atoms and shows a significant contribution of lines arising from singly ionized Al. Plasma emission photography with a CCD camera was used to prove probe measurements and to identify separated plasma emission zones originating from the ECR and magnetron discharge.

  8. Focusing and bunching of ion beam in axial injection channel of IPHC cyclotron TR24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, T.; Ivanenko, I.; Kazarinov, N.; Osswald, F.; Traykov, E.

    2017-07-01

    The CYRCe cyclotron (CYclotron pour la ReCherche et l’Enseignement) is used at IPHC (Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien) for the production of radio-isotopes for diagnostics, medical treatments and fundamental research in radiobiology. The TR24 cyclotron produced and commercialized by ACSI (Canada) delivers a 16-25 MeV proton beam with intensity from few nA up to 500 μA. The solenoidal focusing instead of existing quadrupole one is proposed in this report. The changing of the focusing elements will give the better beam matching with the acceptance of the spiral inflector of the cyclotron. The parameters of the focusing solenoid are found. Additionally, the main parameters of the bunching system are evaluated in the presence of the beam space charge. This system consists of the buncher installed in the axial injection beam line of the cyclotron. The using of the grid-less multi harmonic buncher may increase the accelerated beam current and will give the opportunity to new proton beam applications.

  9. Current monitors for intensity modulated beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Mark; Hamilton, Brett

    1995-05-01

    A beam intensity modulation system (BIMPS), that works in conjunction with the beam splitting system to allow beams of different intensities to be sequentially delivered to two different areas, has already been in use for many years. The operators could not, however, tune the cyclotrons with the BIMPS in operation using the existing beam instrumentation systems in the cyclotron beamlines which consisted mostly of non-electron-suppressed stops. Since the BIMPS duty factor (e.g. as low as 1/100 when operating with a 100 μs high intensity (HI) pulse at 10 Hz) usually exceed the ratio of the HI to LOW beam intensities (varying in the range from 10 to 100), the stops would, to first order, merely read out the LOW beam intensity. Thus there existed no way to monitor the HI beam intensity and transmission efficiency unless operating continuously in the HI beam mode. To allow BIMPS operation at all times, a new system of intercepting and nonintercepting beam current monitors have been added to the cyclotron beamlines. The system consists of electron suppressed stops and nonintercepting beam pickups with high output bandwidth of (10 kHz) signal processors to allow accurate sampling of the short duration HI beam pulses. The electronics for the stops are straightforward; there are, however, important technical trade-off in the design of the nonintercepting system design. The amplifier input voltage noise and relatively low coupling impedance of the nonintercepting pickups cause the minimum detectable HI current to decrease with the square root of the HI beam pulse length; as the pulse length is shortened, the system timing constraints also become more critical. Although the BIMPS is capable of providing beam pulse durations as short at 10 μs, the minimum pulse length for operation was chosen to be 100 μs. The electronics have time constants of 200 μs allowing measurement accuracies of better than a percent. Since the most rapid modulation frequency used for filling the

  10. A hybrid electron cyclotron resonance metal ion source with integrated sputter magnetron for the production of an intense Al{sup +} ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Weichsel, T. Hartung, U.; Kopte, T.; Zschornack, G.; Kreller, M.; Philipp, A.

    2015-09-15

    A metal ion source prototype has been developed: a combination of magnetron sputter technology with 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source technology—a so called magnetron ECR ion source (MECRIS). An integrated ring-shaped sputter magnetron with an Al target is acting as a powerful metal atom supply in order to produce an intense current of singly charged metal ions. Preliminary experiments show that an Al{sup +} ion current with a density of 167 μA/cm{sup 2} is extracted from the source at an acceleration voltage of 27 kV. Spatially resolved double Langmuir probe measurements and optical emission spectroscopy were used to study the plasma states of the ion source: sputter magnetron, ECR, and MECRIS plasma. Electron density and temperature as well as Al atom density were determined as a function of microwave and sputter magnetron power. The effect of ECR heating is strongly pronounced in the center of the source. There the electron density is increased by one order of magnitude from 6 × 10{sup 9} cm{sup −3} to 6 × 10{sup 10} cm{sup −3} and the electron temperature is enhanced from about 5 eV to 12 eV, when the ECR plasma is ignited to the magnetron plasma. Operating the magnetron at constant power, it was observed that its discharge current is raised from 1.8 A to 4.8 A, when the ECR discharge was superimposed with a microwave power of 2 kW. At the same time, the discharge voltage decreased from about 560 V to 210 V, clearly indicating a higher plasma density of the MECRIS mode. The optical emission spectrum of the MECRIS plasma is dominated by lines of excited Al atoms and shows a significant contribution of lines arising from singly ionized Al. Plasma emission photography with a CCD camera was used to prove probe measurements and to identify separated plasma emission zones originating from the ECR and magnetron discharge.

  11. Nonlinear analysis of a relativistic beam-plasma cyclotron instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sprangle, P.; Vlahos, L.

    1986-01-01

    A self-consistent set of nonlinear and relativistic wave-particle equations are derived for a magnetized beam-plasma system interacting with electromagnetic cyclotron waves. In particular, the high-frequency cyclotron mode interacting with a streaming and gyrating electron beam within a background plasma is considered in some detail. This interaction mode may possibly find application as a high-power source of coherent short-wavelength radiation for laboratory devices. The background plasma, although passive, plays a central role in this mechanism by modifying the dielectric properties in which the magnetized electron beam propagates. For a particular choice of the transverse beam velocity (i.e., the speed of light divided by the relativistic mass factor), the interaction frequency equals the nonrelativistic electron cyclotron frequency times the relativistic mass factor. For this choice of transverse beam velocity the detrimental effects of a longitudinal beam velocity spread is virtually removed. Power conversion efficiencies in excess of 18 percent are both analytically calculated and obtained through numerical simulations of the wave-particle equations. The quality of the electron beam, degree of energy and pitch angle spread, and its effect on the beam-plasma cyclotron instability is studied.

  12. Production of a highly charged uranium ion beam with RIKEN superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Higurashi, Y.; Ohnishi, J.; Nakagawa, T.; Haba, H.; Fujimaki, M.; Komiyama, M.; Kamigaito, O.; Tamura, M.; Aihara, T.; Uchiyama, A.

    2012-02-15

    A highly charged uranium (U) ion beam is produced from the RIKEN superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source using 18 and 28 GHz microwaves. The sputtering method is used to produce this U ion beam. The beam intensity is strongly dependent on the rod position and sputtering voltage. We observe that the emittance of U{sup 35+} for 28 GHz microwaves is almost the same as that for 18 GHz microwaves. It seems that the beam intensity of U ions produced using 28 GHz microwaves is higher than that produced using 18 GHz microwaves at the same Radio Frequency (RF) power.

  13. Intensity limitations in compact H{sup minus} cyclotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Baartman, R.A.

    1995-12-31

    At TRIUMF, we have demonstrated 2.5 mA in a compact H{sup -} cyclotron. It is worthwhile to explore possibility of going to even higher intensity. In small cyclotrons, vertical focusing vanishes at the center. The space charge tune shift further reduces vertical focusing, thus determining an upper limit on instantaneous current. Limit on average current is of course also dependent upon phase acceptance, but this can be made quite large in an H{sup -} cyclotron. Longitudinal space charge on the first turn can reduce the phase acceptance as well. For finite ion source brightness, another limit comes from bunching efficiency in presence of space charge forces. We present methods of calculating and optimizing these limits. In particular, we show that it is possible to achieve 10mA in a 50 MeV compact H{sup -} cyclotron.

  14. Enhancement of beam pulse controllability for a single-pulse formation system of a cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Kurashima, Satoshi Miyawaki, Nobumasa; Kashiwagi, Hirotsugu; Okumura, Susumu; Taguchi, Mitsumasa; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro

    2015-07-15

    The single-pulse formation technique using a beam chopping system consisting of two types of high-voltage beam kickers was improved to enhance the quality and intensity of the single-pulse beam with a pulse interval over 1 μs at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency cyclotron facility. A contamination rate of neighboring beam bunches in the single-pulse beam was reduced to less than 0.1%. Long-term purification of the single pulse beam was guaranteed by the well-controlled magnetic field stabilization system for the cyclotron magnet. Reduction of the multi-turn extraction number for suppressing the neighboring beam bunch contamination was achieved by restriction of a beam phase width and precise optimization of a particle acceleration phase. In addition, the single-pulse beam intensity was increased by a factor of two or more by a combination of two types of beam bunchers using sinusoidal and saw-tooth voltage waveforms. Provision of the high quality intense single-pulse beam contributed to improve the accuracy of experiments for investigation of scintillation light time-profile and for neutron energy measurement by a time-of-flight method.

  15. High intensity neutrino beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ichikawa, A. K.

    2015-07-15

    High-intensity proton accelerator complex enabled long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments with a precisely controlled neutrino beam. The beam power so far achieved is a few hundred kW with enourmorous efforts of accelerator physicists and engineers. However, to fully understand the lepton mixing structure, MW-class accelerators are desired. We describe the current intensity-frontier high-energy proton accelerators, their plans to go beyond and technical challenges in the neutrino beamline facilities.

  16. Pencil Beam Scanning System Based On A Cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Tachikawa, Toshiki; Nonaka, Hideki; Kumata, Yukio; Nishio, Teiji; Ogino, Takashi

    2011-06-01

    Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd. (SHI) has developed a new pencil beam scanning system (PBS) for proton therapy in collaboration with National Cancer Center Hospital East (NCCHE). Taking advantage of the continuous beam from the cyclotron P235, the line scanning method is employed in order to realize continuous irradiation with high dose rate. 3D uniform and sphere field was irradiated and compared with the simulation.

  17. An intense alpha ion source for INRS cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Ling,-xing; Chen Mao-bei

    1985-10-01

    An intense PIG alpha source for INRS has been developed with low arc power and low gas flow. Generally, the alpha yield of the new source is twice as much as the old one. The structure and character of the source and its experimental results both on the bench and cyclotron are described in this paper.

  18. Intense ion beam generator

    DOEpatents

    Humphries, Jr., Stanley; Sudan, Ravindra N.

    1977-08-30

    Methods and apparatus for producing intense megavolt ion beams are disclosed. In one embodiment, a reflex triode-type pulsed ion accelerator is described which produces ion pulses of more than 5 kiloamperes current with a peak energy of 3 MeV. In other embodiments, the device is constructed so as to focus the beam of ions for high concentration and ease of extraction, and magnetic insulation is provided to increase the efficiency of operation.

  19. Electromagnetic ion beam instabilities - Growth at cyclotron harmonic wave numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Charles W.; Gary, S. Peter

    1987-01-01

    The linear theory of electromagnetic ion beam instabilities for arbitrary angles of propagation is studied, with an emphasis on the conditions necessary to generate unstable modes at low harmonics of the ion cyclotron resonance condition. The present results extend the analysis of Smith et al. (1985). That paper considered only the plasma parameters at a time during which harmonic wave modes were observed in the earth's foreshock. The parameters of that paper are used as the basis of parametric variations here to establish the range of beam properties which may give rise to observable harmonic spectra. It is shown that the growth rates of both left-hand and right-hand cyclotron harmonic instabilities are enhanced by an increase in the beam temperature anisotropy and/or the beam speed. Decreases in the beam density and/or the core-ion beta reduce the overall growth of the cyclotron harmonic instabilities but favor the growth of these modes over the growth of the nonresonant instability and thereby enhance the observability of the harmonics.

  20. Electromagnetic ion beam instabilities - Growth at cyclotron harmonic wave numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Charles W.; Gary, S. Peter

    1987-01-01

    The linear theory of electromagnetic ion beam instabilities for arbitrary angles of propagation is studied, with an emphasis on the conditions necessary to generate unstable modes at low harmonics of the ion cyclotron resonance condition. The present results extend the analysis of Smith et al. (1985). That paper considered only the plasma parameters at a time during which harmonic wave modes were observed in the earth's foreshock. The parameters of that paper are used as the basis of parametric variations here to establish the range of beam properties which may give rise to observable harmonic spectra. It is shown that the growth rates of both left-hand and right-hand cyclotron harmonic instabilities are enhanced by an increase in the beam temperature anisotropy and/or the beam speed. Decreases in the beam density and/or the core-ion beta reduce the overall growth of the cyclotron harmonic instabilities but favor the growth of these modes over the growth of the nonresonant instability and thereby enhance the observability of the harmonics.

  1. Electron cyclotron beam measurement system in the Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect

    Kamio, S. Takahashi, H.; Kubo, S.; Shimozuma, T.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Ito, S.; Kobayashi, S.; Mizuno, Y.; Okada, K.; Osakabe, M.; Mutoh, T.

    2014-11-15

    In order to evaluate the electron cyclotron (EC) heating power inside the Large Helical Device vacuum vessel and to investigate the physics of the interaction between the EC beam and the plasma, a direct measurement system for the EC beam transmitted through the plasma column was developed. The system consists of an EC beam target plate, which is made of isotropic graphite and faces against the EC beam through the plasma, and an IR camera for measuring the target plate temperature increase by the transmitted EC beam. This system is applicable to the high magnetic field (up to 2.75 T) and plasma density (up to 0.8 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −3}). This system successfully evaluated the transmitted EC beam profile and the refraction.

  2. Production of high intensity 48Ca for the 88-Inch Cyclotron and other updates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benitez, J. Y.; Franzen, K. Y.; Hodgkinson, A.; Lyneis, C. M.; Strohmeier, M.; Thullier, T.; Todd, D.; Xie, D.

    2014-02-01

    Recently the Versatile ECR for NUclear Science (VENUS) ion source was engaged in a 60-day long campaign to deliver high intensity 48Ca11+ beam to the 88-Inch Cyclotron. As the first long term use of VENUS for multi-week heavy-element research, new methods were developed to maximize oven to target efficiency. First, the tuning parameters of VENUS for injection into the cyclotron proved to be very different than those used to tune VENUS for maximum beam output of the desired charge state immediately following its bending magnet. Second, helium with no oxygen support gas was used to maximize the efficiency. The performance of VENUS and its low temperature oven used to produce the stable requested 75 eμA of 48Ca11+ beam current was impressive. The consumption of 48Ca in VENUS using the low temperature oven was checked roughly weekly, and was found to be on average 0.27 mg/h with an ionization efficiency into the 11+ charge state of 5.0%. No degradation in performance was noted over time. In addition, with the successful operation of VENUS the 88-Inch cyclotron was able to extract a record 2 pμA of 48Ca11+, with a VENUS output beam current of 219 eμA. The paper describes the characteristics of the VENUS tune used for maximum transport efficiency into the cyclotron as well as ongoing efforts to improve the transport efficiency from VENUS into the cyclotron. In addition, we briefly present details regarding the recent successful repair of the cryostat vacuum system.

  3. Production of high intensity {sup 48}Ca for the 88-Inch Cyclotron and other updates

    SciTech Connect

    Benitez, J. Y.; Hodgkinson, A.; Lyneis, C. M. Strohmeier, M.; Thullier, T.; Todd, D.; Xie, D.; Franzen, K. Y.

    2014-02-15

    Recently the Versatile ECR for NUclear Science (VENUS) ion source was engaged in a 60-day long campaign to deliver high intensity {sup 48}Ca{sup 11+} beam to the 88-Inch Cyclotron. As the first long term use of VENUS for multi-week heavy-element research, new methods were developed to maximize oven to target efficiency. First, the tuning parameters of VENUS for injection into the cyclotron proved to be very different than those used to tune VENUS for maximum beam output of the desired charge state immediately following its bending magnet. Second, helium with no oxygen support gas was used to maximize the efficiency. The performance of VENUS and its low temperature oven used to produce the stable requested 75 eμA of {sup 48}Ca{sup 11+} beam current was impressive. The consumption of {sup 48}Ca in VENUS using the low temperature oven was checked roughly weekly, and was found to be on average 0.27 mg/h with an ionization efficiency into the 11+ charge state of 5.0%. No degradation in performance was noted over time. In addition, with the successful operation of VENUS the 88-Inch cyclotron was able to extract a record 2 pμA of {sup 48}Ca{sup 11+}, with a VENUS output beam current of 219 eμA. The paper describes the characteristics of the VENUS tune used for maximum transport efficiency into the cyclotron as well as ongoing efforts to improve the transport efficiency from VENUS into the cyclotron. In addition, we briefly present details regarding the recent successful repair of the cryostat vacuum system.

  4. Note: Production of a mercury beam with an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Vondrasek, R.; Pardo, R.; Scott, R.

    2013-11-15

    An electron cyclotron resonance ion source has been utilized to produce mercury beams with intensities of 4.5 eμA of {sup 202}Hg{sup 29+} and 3.0 eμA of {sup 202}Hg{sup 31+} from natural abundance mercury metal. The production technique relies on the evaporation of liquid mercury into the source plasma vacuum region and utilizes elemental mercury instead of a volatile organic compound as the neutral feed material.

  5. Note: Production of a mercury beam with an electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Vondrasek, R; Pardo, R; Scott, R

    2013-11-01

    An electron cyclotron resonance ion source has been utilized to produce mercury beams with intensities of 4.5 eμA of (202)Hg(29+) and 3.0 eμA of (202)Hg(31+) from natural abundance mercury metal. The production technique relies on the evaporation of liquid mercury into the source plasma vacuum region and utilizes elemental mercury instead of a volatile organic compound as the neutral feed material.

  6. Production of molecular ion beams using an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Draganić, I. N.; Bannister, M. E.; Meyer, F. W.; Vane, C. R.; Havener, C. C.

    2011-06-01

    An all-permanent magnet electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source is tuned to create a variety of intense molecular ion beams for basic energy research. Based on simultaneous injection of several gases with spectroscopic high purity or enriched isotope content (e.g., H2, D2, N2, O2, or CO) and lower power microwave heating, the ECR ion source produces diatomic molecular ion beams of H2+, D2+, HD+, HO+, DO+, NH+, ND+, and more complex polyatomic molecular ions such as H3+, D3+, HD2+, H2O+, D2O+, H3O+, D3O+, and NHn+, NDn+ with n=2,3,4 and possibly higher. Molecular ion beams have been produced with very high current intensities compared to other molecular beam sources. The recorded molecular ion beam spectra are discussed.

  7. Performance of the beam chamber vacuum system of K = 500 cyclotron at Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre Kolkata.

    PubMed

    Pal, Gautam; DuttaGupta, Anjan; Chakrabarti, Alok

    2014-07-01

    The beam chamber of Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata's K = 500 superconducting cyclotron is pumped by liquid helium cooled cryopanel with liquid nitrogen cooled radiation shield. Performance of the vacuum system was evaluated by cooling the cryopanel assembly with liquid nitrogen and liquid helium. Direct measurement of beam chamber pressure is quite difficult because of space restrictions and the presence of high magnetic field. Pressure gauges were placed away from the beam chamber. The beam chamber pressure was evaluated using a Monte Carlo simulation software for vacuum system and compared with measurements. The details of the vacuum system, measurements, and estimation of pressure of the beam chamber are described in this paper.

  8. Electrostatic ion cyclotron, beam-plasma, and lower hybrid waves excited by an electron beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N.; Conrad, J. R.; Schunk, R. W.

    1985-01-01

    It is pointed out that electrostatic ion cyclotron (EIC) waves have been extensively investigated in connection with both space and laboratory plasmas. The present investigation has the objective to study the excitation of low-frequency waves in a multiion plasma by electron beams. The frequencies considered range from below the lowest gyrofrequency of the heaviest ion to about the lower hybrid frequency. It is shown that electron-beam instabilities can produce peaks in the growth rate below the cyclotron frequency of each ion species if nonzero perpendicular wave number effects are included in the ion dynamics. The dispersion relations for neutralized ion Bernstein (NIB) and pure ion Bernstein (PIB) waves are considered along with an instability analysis for a cold plasma and warm electron beam, the electron beam-plasma mode, banded ion cyclotron (EIC) waves with small perpendicular wavelengths, and the growth lengths of the waves.

  9. Electrostatic ion cyclotron, beam-plasma, and lower hybrid waves excited by an electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, N.; Conrad, J.R.; Schunk, R.W.

    1985-06-01

    It is pointed out that electrostatic ion cyclotron (EIC) waves have been extensively investigated in connection with both space and laboratory plasmas. The present investigation has the objective to study the excitation of low-frequency waves in a multiion plasma by electron beams. The frequencies considered range from below the lowest gyrofrequency of the heaviest ion to about the lower hybrid frequency. It is shown that electron-beam instabilities can produce peaks in the growth rate below the cyclotron frequency of each ion species if nonzero perpendicular wave number effects are included in the ion dynamics. The dispersion relations for neutralized ion Bernstein (NIB) and pure ion Bernstein (PIB) waves are considered along with an instability analysis for a cold plasma and warm electron beam, the electron beam-plasma mode, banded ion cyclotron (EIC) waves with small perpendicular wavelengths, and the growth lengths of the waves. 39 references.

  10. Electrostatic ion cyclotron, beam-plasma, and lower hybrid waves excited by an electron beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N.; Conrad, J. R.; Schunk, R. W.

    1985-01-01

    It is pointed out that electrostatic ion cyclotron (EIC) waves have been extensively investigated in connection with both space and laboratory plasmas. The present investigation has the objective to study the excitation of low-frequency waves in a multiion plasma by electron beams. The frequencies considered range from below the lowest gyrofrequency of the heaviest ion to about the lower hybrid frequency. It is shown that electron-beam instabilities can produce peaks in the growth rate below the cyclotron frequency of each ion species if nonzero perpendicular wave number effects are included in the ion dynamics. The dispersion relations for neutralized ion Bernstein (NIB) and pure ion Bernstein (PIB) waves are considered along with an instability analysis for a cold plasma and warm electron beam, the electron beam-plasma mode, banded ion cyclotron (EIC) waves with small perpendicular wavelengths, and the growth lengths of the waves.

  11. Coherent Cherenkov-Cyclotron Radiation Excited by an Electron Beam in a Metamaterial Waveguide.

    PubMed

    Hummelt, J S; Lu, X; Xu, H; Mastovsky, I; Shapiro, M A; Temkin, R J

    2016-12-02

    An electron beam passing through a metamaterial structure is predicted to generate reversed Cherenkov radiation, an unusual and potentially very useful property. We present an experimental test of this phenomenon using an intense electron beam passing through a metamaterial loaded waveguide. Power levels of up to 5 MW are observed in backward wave modes at a frequency of 2.40 GHz using a one microsecond pulsed electron beam of 490 keV, 84 A in a 400 G magnetic field. Contrary to expectations, the output power is not generated in the Cherenkov mode. Instead, the presence of the magnetic field, which is required to transport the electron beam, induces a Cherenkov-cyclotron (or anomalous Doppler) instability at a frequency equal to the Cherenkov frequency minus the cyclotron frequency. Nonlinear simulations indicate that the Cherenkov-cyclotron mode should dominate over the Cherenkov instability at a lower magnetic field where the highest output power is obtained.

  12. Superconducting Ring Cyclotron for Riken RI Beam Factory in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuno, H.; Dantsuka, T.; Yamada, K.; Kase, M.; Maie, T.; Kamigaito, O.

    2010-04-01

    Since 1997, RIKEN Nishina Center has been constructing the Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory (RIBF) and succeeded in beam commissioning of its accelerator complex at the end of 2006. The world's first superconducting ring cyclotron (SRC) is the final booster in the RIBF accelerator complex which is able to accelerate all-element heavy ions to a speed of about 70% of the velocity of light. The ring cyclotron consists of 6 major superconducting sector magnets with a maximum field of 3.8 T. The total stored energy is 235 MJ, and its overall sizes are 19 m diameter, 8 m height and 8,300 tons. The magnet system assembly was completed in August 2005, and successfully reached the maximum field in November 2005. The first beam was extracted at the end of 2006 and the first uranium beam was extracted in March 2007. However operation of the helium refrigerator was not satisfactory although the commissioning of SRC was successful. Operation was stopped every two month due to degradation of its cooling power. In February 2008 the reason of the degradation was revealed to be oil contamination. Operation of the cryogenic system was restarted from August 2008 after hard task to clean up the helium refrigerator and to add oil separators to the compressor. After restoration long-term steady operation to keep the magnet superconducting continued for about 8 months with no sign of degradation of cooling capacity.

  13. Neutral particle beam intensity controller

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, W.K.

    1984-05-29

    The neutral beam intensity controller is based on selected magnetic defocusing of the ion beam prior to neutralization. The defocused portion of the beam is dumped onto a beam dump disposed perpendicular to the beam axis. Selective defocusing is accomplished by means of a magnetic field generator disposed about the neutralizer so that the field is transverse to the beam axis. The magnetic field intensity is varied to provide the selected partial beam defocusing of the ions prior to neutralization. The desired focused neutral beam portion passes along the beam path through a defining aperture in the beam dump, thereby controlling the desired fraction of neutral particles transmitted to a utilization device without altering the kinetic energy level of the desired neutral particle fraction. By proper selection of the magnetic field intensity, virtually zero through 100% intensity control of the neutral beam is achieved.

  14. The new bern PET cyclotron, its research beam line, and the development of an innovative beam monitor detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braccini, Saverio

    2013-04-01

    The new Bern cyclotron laboratory aims at industrial radioisotope production for PET diagnostics and multidisciplinary research by means of a specifically conceived beam transfer line, terminated in a separate bunker. In this framework, an innovative beam monitor detector based on doped silica and optical fibres has been designed, constructed, and tested. Scintillation light produced by Ce and Sb doped silica fibres moving across the beam is measured, giving information on beam position, shape, and intensity. The doped fibres are coupled to commercial optical fibres, allowing the read-out of the signal far away from the radiation source. This general-purpose device can be easily adapted for any accelerator used in medical applications and is suitable either for low currents used in hadrontherapy or for currents up to a few μA for radioisotope production, as well as for both pulsed and continuous beams.

  15. An electron cyclotron resonance ion source based low energy ion beam platform

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, L. T.; Shang, Y.; Ma, B. H.; Zhang, X. Z.; Feng, Y. C.; Li, X. X.; Wang, H.; Guo, X. H.; Song, M. T.; Zhao, H. Y.; Zhang, Z. M.; Zhao, H. W.; Xie, D. Z.

    2008-02-15

    To satisfy the requirements of surface and atomic physics study in the field of low energy multiple charge state ion incident experiments, a low energy (10 eV/q-20 keV/q) ion beam platform is under design at IMP. A simple test bench has been set up to test the ion beam deceleration systems. Considering virtues such as structure simplicity, easy handling, compactness, cost saving, etc., an all-permanent magnet ECRIS LAPECR1 [Lanzhou all-permanent magnet electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source No. 1] working at 14.5 GHz has been adopted to produce intense medium and low charge state ion beams. LAPECR1 source has already been ignited. Some intense low charge state ion beams have been produced on it, but the first test also reveals that many problems are existing on the ion beam transmission line. The ion beam transmission mismatches result in the depressed performance of LAPECR1, which will be discussed in this paper. To obtain ultralow energy ion beam, after being analyzed by a double-focusing analyzer magnet, the selected ion beam will be further decelerated by two afocal deceleration lens systems, which is still under design. This design has taken into consideration both ions slowing down and also ion beam focusing. In this paper, the conceptual design of deceleration system will be discussed.

  16. Beam experiments with the Grenoble test electron cyclotron resonance ion source at iThemba LABS

    SciTech Connect

    Thomae, R. Conradie, J.; Fourie, D.; Mira, J.; Nemulodi, F.; Kuechler, D.; Toivanen, V.

    2016-02-15

    At iThemba Laboratory for Accelerator Based Sciences (iThemba LABS) an electron cyclotron ion source was installed and commissioned. This source is a copy of the Grenoble Test Source (GTS) for the production of highly charged ions. The source is similar to the GTS-LHC at CERN and named GTS2. A collaboration between the Accelerators and Beam Physics Group of CERN and the Accelerator and Engineering Department of iThemba LABS was proposed in which the development of high intensity argon and xenon beams is envisaged. In this paper, we present beam experiments with the GTS2 at iThemba LABS, in which the results of continuous wave and afterglow operation of xenon ion beams with oxygen as supporting gases are presented.

  17. High intensity electron cyclotron resonance proton source for low energy high intensity proton accelerator.

    PubMed

    Roychowdhury, P; Chakravarthy, D P

    2009-12-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) proton source at 50 keV, 50 mA has been designed, developed, and commissioned for the low energy high intensity proton accelerator (LEHIPA). Plasma characterization of this source has been performed. ECR plasma was generated with 400-1100 W of microwave power at 2.45 GHz, with hydrogen as working gas. Microwave was fed in the plasma chamber through quartz window. Plasma density and temperature was studied under various operating conditions, such as microwave power and gas pressure. Langmuir probe was used for plasma characterization using current voltage variation. The typical hydrogen plasma density and electron temperature measured were 7x10(11) cm(-3) and 6 eV, respectively. The total ion beam current of 42 mA was extracted, with three-electrode extraction geometry, at 40 keV of beam energy. The extracted ion current was studied as a function of microwave power and gas pressure. Depending on source pressure and discharge power, more than 30% total gas efficiency was achieved. The optimization of the source is under progress to meet the requirement of long time operation. The source will be used as an injector for continuous wave radio frequency quadrupole, a part of 20 MeV LEHIPA. The required rms normalized emittance of this source is less than 0.2 pi mm mrad. The simulated value of normalized emittance is well within this limit and will be measured shortly. This paper presents the study of plasma parameters, first beam results, and the status of ECR proton source.

  18. High intensity electron cyclotron resonance proton source for low energy high intensity proton accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Roychowdhury, P.; Chakravarthy, D. P.

    2009-12-15

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) proton source at 50 keV, 50 mA has been designed, developed, and commissioned for the low energy high intensity proton accelerator (LEHIPA). Plasma characterization of this source has been performed. ECR plasma was generated with 400-1100 W of microwave power at 2.45 GHz, with hydrogen as working gas. Microwave was fed in the plasma chamber through quartz window. Plasma density and temperature was studied under various operating conditions, such as microwave power and gas pressure. Langmuir probe was used for plasma characterization using current voltage variation. The typical hydrogen plasma density and electron temperature measured were 7x10{sup 11} cm{sup -3} and 6 eV, respectively. The total ion beam current of 42 mA was extracted, with three-electrode extraction geometry, at 40 keV of beam energy. The extracted ion current was studied as a function of microwave power and gas pressure. Depending on source pressure and discharge power, more than 30% total gas efficiency was achieved. The optimization of the source is under progress to meet the requirement of long time operation. The source will be used as an injector for continuous wave radio frequency quadrupole, a part of 20 MeV LEHIPA. The required rms normalized emittance of this source is less than 0.2 {pi} mm mrad. The simulated value of normalized emittance is well within this limit and will be measured shortly. This paper presents the study of plasma parameters, first beam results, and the status of ECR proton source.

  19. Influence of static electron beam`s self-fields on the cyclotron-undulator resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Rozanov, N.E.; Golub, Yu.Ya. |

    1995-12-31

    When undulators with a leading magnetic field B are used, the regime of double resonance is possible in which an undulator period is equal to an electron cyclotron wavelength. In the vicinity of this resonance an amplitude of particle oscillations in the undulator strongly depends on a difference between B and a resonant value of the leading magnetic field. Consequently, it is important to investigate a role of self-fields of the electron beam, in particular, due to its influence on the electron cyclotron wavelength. At the paper analytically and by numerical simulation the influence of the static fields of the annular electron beam on its dynamics in the axisymmetrical magnetic undulator with the leading magnetic field in the vicinity of the cyclotron-undulator resonance is investigated. It is shown that the value of the resonant magnetic field is changed with the rise of beam`s current. A shift of the resonant magnetic field may be both to larger values of B and to smaller ones, when different values of beam and waveguide radii, beam energy and undulator period are considered. A width of the resonance (on B - scale) is increased with the beam current.

  20. All-magnetic extraction for cyclotron beam reacceleration

    DOEpatents

    Hudson, E.D.; Mallory, M.L.

    1975-07-22

    An isochronous cyclotron can be modified to provide an initial electron stripping stage, a complete acceleration of the stripped ions through the cyclotron to a first energy state, means for returning the ions to an intermediate cyclotron orbit through a second stripping stage, further acceleration of the now higher energy stripped ions through the cyclotron to their final energy, and final extraction of the ions from the cyclotron. (auth)

  1. Neutral particle beam intensity controller

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, William K.

    1986-01-01

    A neutral beam intensity controller is provided for a neutral beam generator in which a neutral beam is established by accelerating ions from an ion source into a gas neutralizer. An amplitude modulated, rotating magnetic field is applied to the accelerated ion beam in the gas neutralizer to defocus the resultant neutral beam in a controlled manner to achieve intensity control of the neutral beam along the beam axis at constant beam energy. The rotating magnetic field alters the orbits of ions in the gas neutralizer before they are neutralized, thereby controlling the fraction of neutral particles transmitted out of the neutralizer along the central beam axis to a fusion device or the like. The altered path or defocused neutral particles are sprayed onto an actively cooled beam dump disposed perpendicular to the neutral beam axis and having a central open for passage of the focused beam at the central axis of the beamline. Virtually zero therough 100% intensity control is achieved by varying the magnetic field strength without altering the ion source beam intensity or its species yield.

  2. Coherent and Tunable Terahertz Radiation from Graphene Surface Plasmon Polarirons Excited by Cyclotron Electron Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Tao; Gong, Sen; Hu, Min; Zhong, Renbin; Liu, Diwei; Chen, Xiaoxing; Zhang, Ping; Wang, Xinran; Zhang, Chao; Wu, Peiheng; Liu, Shenggang

    2015-11-01

    Terahertz (THz) radiation can revolutionize modern science and technology. To this date, it remains big challenges to develop intense, coherent and tunable THz radiation sources that can cover the whole THz frequency region either by means of only electronics (both vacuum electronics and semiconductor electronics) or of only photonics (lasers, for example, quantum cascade laser). Here we present a mechanism which can overcome these difficulties in THz radiation generation. Due to the natural periodicity of 2π of both the circular cylindrical graphene structure and cyclotron electron beam (CEB), the surface plasmon polaritions (SPPs) dispersion can cross the light line of dielectric, making transformation of SPPs into radiation immediately possible. The dual natural periodicity also brings significant excellences to the excitation and the transformation. The fundamental and hybrid SPPs modes can be excited and transformed into radiation. The excited SPPs propagate along the cyclotron trajectory together with the beam and gain energy from the beam continuously. The radiation density is enhanced over 300 times, up to 105 W/cm2. The radiation frequency can be widely tuned by adjusting the beam energy or chemical potential. This mechanism opens a way for developing desired THz radiation sources to cover the whole THz frequency regime.

  3. Coherent and Tunable Terahertz Radiation from Graphene Surface Plasmon Polarirons Excited by Cyclotron Electron Beam

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Tao; Gong, Sen; Hu, Min; Zhong, Renbin; Liu, Diwei; Chen, Xiaoxing; Zhang, Ping; Wang, Xinran; Zhang, Chao; Wu, Peiheng; Liu, Shenggang

    2015-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) radiation can revolutionize modern science and technology. To this date, it remains big challenges to develop intense, coherent and tunable THz radiation sources that can cover the whole THz frequency region either by means of only electronics (both vacuum electronics and semiconductor electronics) or of only photonics (lasers, for example, quantum cascade laser). Here we present a mechanism which can overcome these difficulties in THz radiation generation. Due to the natural periodicity of 2π of both the circular cylindrical graphene structure and cyclotron electron beam (CEB), the surface plasmon polaritions (SPPs) dispersion can cross the light line of dielectric, making transformation of SPPs into radiation immediately possible. The dual natural periodicity also brings significant excellences to the excitation and the transformation. The fundamental and hybrid SPPs modes can be excited and transformed into radiation. The excited SPPs propagate along the cyclotron trajectory together with the beam and gain energy from the beam continuously. The radiation density is enhanced over 300 times, up to 105 W/cm2. The radiation frequency can be widely tuned by adjusting the beam energy or chemical potential. This mechanism opens a way for developing desired THz radiation sources to cover the whole THz frequency regime. PMID:26525516

  4. Production of beams from solid materials at Center for Nuclear Study electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Ohshiro, Y; Yamaka, S; Watanabe, S; Kobayashi, K; Kotaka, Y; Nishimura, M; Kase, M; Muto, H; Yamaguchi, H; Shimoura, S

    2014-02-01

    Two methods for the feed of vapor from solid materials in the Center for Nuclear Study ECR ion source are described. A rod placed near the wall of the plasma chamber, operating up to a melting point of 2600 °C, has been used for CaO, SiO2, and FeO. An oven with a number of openings, operating up to 800 °C, has been used for P2O5, Li, and S. Typical ion beam intensities of (7)Li(2+), (6)Li(3+), (40)Ca(12+), and (56)Fe(15+) are achieved 280, 75, 28, and 7 eμA, respectively. High intensity heavy ion beams are stably supplied into the azimuthally varying field cyclotron.

  5. Intense low energy positron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn, K.G.; Jacobsen, F.M.

    1993-12-31

    Intense positron beams are under development or being considered at several laboratories. Already today a few accelerator based high intensity, low brightness e{sup +} beams exist producing of the order of 10{sup 8} {minus} 10{sup 9} e{sup +}/sec. Several laboratories are aiming at high intensity, high brightness e{sup +} beams with intensities greater than 10{sup 9} e{sup +}/sec and current densities of the order of 10{sup 13} {minus} 10{sup 14} e{sup +} sec{sup {minus}} {sup 1}cm{sup {minus}2}. Intense e{sup +} beams can be realized in two ways (or in a combination thereof) either through a development of more efficient B{sup +} moderators or by increasing the available activity of B{sup +} particles. In this review we shall mainly concentrate on the latter approach. In atomic physics the main trust for these developments is to be able to measure differential and high energy cross-sections in e{sup +} collisions with atoms and molecules. Within solid state physics high intensity, high brightness e{sup +} beams are in demand in areas such as the re-emission e{sup +} microscope, two dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation, low energy e{sup +} diffraction and other fields. Intense e{sup +} beams are also important for the development of positronium beams, as well as exotic experiments such as Bose condensation and Ps liquid studies.

  6. mA beam acceleration efforts on 100 MeV H- cyclotron at CIAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tianjue; An, Shizhong; Lv, Yinlong; Ge, Tao; Jia, Xianlu; Ji, Bin; Yin, Zhiguo; Pan, Gaofeng; Cao, Lei; Guan, Fengping; Yang, Jianjun; Li, Zhenguo; Zhao, Zhenlu; Wu, Longcheng; Zhang, He; Wang, Jingfeng; Zhang, Yiwang; Liu, Jingyuan; Li, Shiqiang; Lu, Xiaotong; Liu, Zhenwei; Li, Yaoqian; Guo, Juanjuan; Cao, Xuelong; Guan, Leilei; Wang, Fei; Wang, Yang; Yang, Guang; Zhang, Suping; Hou, Shigang; Wang, Feng

    2017-09-01

    Various technologies for high current compact H- cyclotron have been developed at CIAE since 1990s. A 375 μA proton beam was extracted from a 30 MeV compact H- cyclotron CYCIAE-30 at the end of 1994. A central region model cyclotron CYCIAE-CRM was developed for the design verification of a 100 MeV high current compact H- cyclotron CYCIAE-100. It is also a 10 MeV proton machine as a prototype for PET application. A 430 μA beam was achieved in 2009. The first beam was extracted from the CYCIAE-100 cyclotron on July 4, 2014, the operation stability has been improved and beam current has been increased gradually. A 1.1 mA proton beam was measured on the internal target in July 2016. The effort for an increasing of proton beam has continued till now. In this paper, the effort on several aspects for mA beam development will be presented, including the multi-cusp source, buncher, matching from the energy of the injected beam, vertical beam line and central region, beam loading of the RF system and instrumentation for beam diagnostics etc.

  7. Design of a superconducting beam transport channel and beam dynamics for a strong-focusing cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badgley, Karie Elizabeth

    There is an increasing interest in high power proton accelerators for use as neutron and muon sources, accelerator driven systems (ADS) for nuclear waste transmutation, high energy physics, medical physics, nuclear physics, and medical isotope production. Accelerating high current beams has a number of challenges; including avoiding harmful resonance crossing, space charge effects and, specific to cyclotrons, sufficient turn separation at injection and extraction. The Accelerator Research Laboratory at Texas A&M University is developing a high-power strong-focusing cyclotron with two main technologies to overcome these challenges. The first is a superconducting RF cavity to provide the energy gain required for fully separated turns. The second is the use of superconducting beam transport channels within the sectors of the cyclotron to provide strong-focusing with alternating focusing and defocusing quadrupoles. A method has been developed to find the equilibrium spiral orbit through the cyclotron which maintains isochronicity. The isochronous spiral orbit was then used to perform full linear optics calculations. The strengths of the quadrupoles were adjusted to hold the horizontal and vertical betatron tunes constant per turn to avoid resonance crossing. Particle tracking was performed with a modified MAD-X-PTC code and Synergia to provide a framework for future space charge studies. Magnetic modeling was performed on a 2D cross section of the beam transport channel. The wire locations were adjusted to reduce the higher order multipoles and a good field region was obtained at 70% of the beam pipe aperture with multipoles less than 10-4 . The 2D model was also used to determine the required current density needed to produce the quadrupole gradients. MgB2 superconducting wire was chosen as it meets all the field and current requirements and can operate at a reduced cryogenic cost. A winding mandrel was also designed and fabricated which minimized the bend radius for

  8. Prospects for advanced electron cyclotron resonance and electron beam ion source charge breeding methods for EURISOL

    SciTech Connect

    Delahaye, P.; Jardin, P.; Maunoury, L.; Traykov, E.; Varenne, F.; Angot, J.; Lamy, T.; Sortais, P.; Thuillier, T.; Ban, G.; Celona, L.; Lunney, D.; Choinski, J.; Gmaj, P.; Jakubowski, A.; Steckiewicz, O.; Kalvas, T.; and others

    2012-02-15

    As the most ambitious concept of isotope separation on line (ISOL) facility, EURISOL aims at producing unprecedented intensities of post-accelerated radioactive isotopes. Charge breeding, which transforms the charge state of radioactive beams from 1+ to an n+ charge state prior to post-acceleration, is a key technology which has to overcome the following challenges: high charge states for high energies, efficiency, rapidity and purity. On the roadmap to EURISOL, a dedicated R and D is being undertaken to push forward the frontiers of the present state-of-the-art techniques which use either electron cyclotron resonance or electron beam ion sources. We describe here the guidelines of this R and D.

  9. Means for obtaining a metal ion beam from a heavy-ion cyclotron source

    DOEpatents

    Hudson, E.D.; Mallory, M.L.

    1975-08-01

    A description is given of a modification to a cyclotron ion source used in producing a high intensity metal ion beam. A small amount of an inert support gas maintains the usual plasma arc, except that it is necessary for the support gas to have a heavy mass, e.g., xenon or krypton as opposed to neon. A plate, fabricated from the metal (or anything that can be sputtered) to be ionized, is mounted on the back wall of the ion source arc chamber and is bombarded by returning energetic low-charged gas ions that fail to cross the initial accelerating gap between the ion source and the accelerating electrode. Some of the atoms that are dislodged from the plate by the returning gas ions become ionized and are extracted as a useful beam of heavy ions. (auth)

  10. Intensity-symmetric Airy beams.

    PubMed

    Vaveliuk, P; Lencina, Alberto; Rodrigo, Jose A; Martnez-Matos, Ó

    2015-03-01

    Theoretical, numerical, and experimental research on a novel family of Airy beams in rectangular coordinates having a symmetric transverse pattern of light intensity is presented. The intensity-symmetric Airy beams include both the symmetric Airy beam whose field amplitude is an even function of the transverse coordinates and the antisymmetric Airy beam whose field amplitude is an odd function of such coordinates. The theoretical foundations are based on the relationship of the symmetries of the spectral phase with the cosine and sine Fourier transforms. These beams are analyzed in a propagation range also including the region preceding the Fourier plane. These beams exhibit autofocusing, collapse, self-bending, and reversal propagation. Moreover, the intensity distribution is strongly asymmetric with respect to the Fourier plane. All these peculiar features were not reported for other classes of paraxial beams in a rectangular frame. The experimental generation of intensity-symmetric Airy beams is demonstrated supporting the theoretical predictions. Possible applications in planar waveguide writing and optical trapping are also discussed.

  11. Optimization of beam dump shielding for K-130 cyclotron at VECC.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, S; Banerjee, K; Pandit, Deepak; Roy, Pratap; Bandyopadhyay, T; Ravishankar, R; Bhattacharya, C; Bhattacharya, S; Datta, D; Banerjee, S R

    2017-10-01

    A compact and efficient beam dump shield has been designed using Monte Carlo simulation code FLUKA to facilitate low background measurement of neutron and gamma rays using K130 cyclotron at Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata (VECC). Iron, lead and high density Polyethylene (HDPE) were considered in the design of the beam dump shield. Representative FLUKA simulation results have been validated using in-beam experiment performed on the same beam dump constituents. Experimental neutron and gamma-rays energy spectra have been found to be in fair agreement with the simulation results. Activation of various beam dump shield components were also carried out. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Cyclotron Institute Upgrade Project

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Henry; Yennello, Sherry; Tribble, Robert

    2014-08-26

    The Cyclotron Institute at Texas A&M University has upgraded its accelerator facilities to extend research capabilities with both stable and radioactive beams. The upgrade is divided into three major tasks: (1) re-commission the K-150 (88”) cyclotron, couple it to existing beam lines to provide intense stable beams into the K-500 experimental areas and use it as a driver to produce radioactive beams; (2) develop light ion and heavy ion guides for stopping radioactive ions created with the K-150 beams; and (3) transport 1+ ions from the ion guides into a charge-breeding electron-cyclotron-resonance ion source (CB-ECR) to produce highly-charged radioactive ions for acceleration in the K-500 cyclotron. When completed, the upgraded facility will provide high-quality re-accelerated secondary beams in a unique energy range in the world.

  13. The beam commissioning of BRIF and future cyclotron development at CIAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tianjue; Yang, Jianjun

    2016-06-01

    As an upgrade project of the existing HI-13 tandem accelerator facility, the Beijing Radioactive Ion-beam Facility (BRIF) is being constructed in China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). This project consists of an 100 MeV proton compact cyclotron, a two-stage ISOL system, a superconducting linac booster and various experimental terminals. The beam commissioning of the cyclotron was launched by the end of 2013 and on July 4, 2014 the first 100 MeV proton beam was received on a temporary target which was positioned at the outlet of the cyclotron. The beam current was stably maintained at above 25 μA for about 9 h on July 25, 2014 and the cyclotron is now ready for providing CW proton beam on target-source for RIB production. The beam current is expected to be increased to 200-500 μA in the coming years. The installation of the ISOL system is finished and the stable ion beam test shows it can reach a mass resolution better than 10,000. It is expected to generate dozens of RIB by 100 MeV proton beam. In addition, this paper also introduces the recent progress of the pre-study of an 800 MeV, 3-4 MW separate-sector proton cyclotron, which is aimed to provide high power proton beam for various applications, such as neutron and neutrino physics, proton radiography and nuclear data measurement and ADS system.

  14. Electron Cyclotron Maser Emissions from Evolving Fast Electron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, J. F.; Wu, D. J.; Chen, L.; Zhao, G. Q.; Tan, C. M.

    2016-05-01

    Fast electron beams (FEBs) are common products of solar active phenomena. Solar radio bursts are an important diagnostic tool for understanding FEBs and the solar plasma environment in which they propagate along solar magnetic fields. In particular, the evolution of the energy spectrum and velocity distribution of FEBs due to the interaction with the ambient plasma and field during propagation can significantly influence the efficiency and properties of their emissions. In this paper, we discuss the possible evolution of the energy spectrum and velocity distribution of FEBs due to energy loss processes and the pitch-angle effect caused by magnetic field inhomogeneity, and we analyze the effects of the evolution on electron-cyclotron maser (ECM) emission, which is one of the most important mechanisms for producing solar radio bursts by FEBs. Our results show that the growth rates all decrease with the energy loss factor Q, but increase with the magnetic mirror ratio σ as well as with the steepness index δ. Moreover, the evolution of FEBs can also significantly influence the fastest growing mode and the fastest growing phase angle. This leads to the change of the polarization sense of the ECM emission. In particular, our results also reveal that an FEB that undergoes different evolution processes will generate different types of ECM emission. We believe the present results to be very helpful for a more comprehensive understanding of the dynamic spectra of solar radio bursts.

  15. A real-time intercepting beam-profile monitor for a medical cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendriks, C.; Uittenbosch, T.; Cameron, D.; Kellogg, S.; Gray, D.; Buckley, K.; Schaffer, P.; Verzilov, V.; Hoehr, C.

    2013-11-01

    There is a lack of real-time continuous beam-diagnostic tools for medical cyclotrons due to high power deposition during proton irradiation. To overcome this limitation, we have developed a profile monitor that is capable of providing continuous feedback about beam shape and current in real time while it is inserted in the beam path. This enables users to optimize the beam profile and observe fluctuations in the beam over time with periodic insertion of the monitor.

  16. Ion beam driven resonant ion-cyclotron instability in a magnetized dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, Ved; Vijayshri; Sharma, Suresh C.; Gupta, Ruby

    2014-03-15

    Electrostatic ion cyclotron waves are excited by axial ion beam in a dusty plasma via Cerenkov and slow cyclotron interaction. The dispersion relation of the instability is derived in the presence of positively/negatively charged dust grains. The minimum beam velocity needed for the excitation is estimated for different values of relative density of negatively charged dust grains. It is shown that the minimum beam velocity needed for excitation increases as the charge density carried by dust increases. Temperature of electrons and ions, charge and mass of dust grains, external static magnetic field and finite boundary of dusty plasma significantly modify the dispersion properties of these waves and play a crucial role in the growth of resonant ion cyclotron instability. The ion cyclotron modes with phase velocity comparable to the beam velocity possess a large growth rate. The maximum value of growth rate increases with the beam density and scales as the one-third power of the beam density in Cerenkov interaction and is proportional to the square root of beam density in slow cyclotron interaction.

  17. 150 μA 18F- target and beam port upgrade for the IBA 18/9 cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokely, M. H.; Peeples, J. L.; Poorman, M. C.; Magerl, M.; Siemer, T.; Brisard, P.; Wieland, B. W.

    2012-12-01

    A high power (˜3 kW) target platform has been developed for the IBA 18/9 cyclotron. New designs for the airlock, collimator and target subsystems have been fabricated and deployed. The primary project goal is reliable commercial production of 18F- at 150 μA or greater, while secondary goals include improving serviceability and extending service intervals relative to OEM systems. Reliable operation in a production environment has been observed at beam currents up to 140 μA. Challenges include ion source lifetime and localized peaking in the beam intensity distribution.

  18. 150 {mu}A 18F{sup -} target and beam port upgrade for the IBA 18/9 cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Stokely, M. H.; Peeples, J. L.; Poorman, M. C.; Magerl, M.; Siemer, T.; Brisard, P.; Wieland, B. W.

    2012-12-19

    A high power ({approx}3 kW) target platform has been developed for the IBA 18/9 cyclotron. New designs for the airlock, collimator and target subsystems have been fabricated and deployed. The primary project goal is reliable commercial production of 18F{sup -} at 150 {mu}A or greater, while secondary goals include improving serviceability and extending service intervals relative to OEM systems. Reliable operation in a production environment has been observed at beam currents up to 140 {mu}A. Challenges include ion source lifetime and localized peaking in the beam intensity distribution.

  19. Intelligent low-level RF system by non-destructive beam monitoring device for cyclotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifi Asadi Malafeh, M. S.; Ghergherehchi, M.; Afarideh, H.; Chai, J. S.; Yoon, Sang Kim

    2016-04-01

    The project of a 10 MeV PET cyclotron accelerator for medical diagnosis and treatment was started at Amirkabir University of Technology in 2012. The low-level RF system of the cyclotron accelerator is designed to stabilize acceleration voltage and control the resonance frequency of the cavity. In this work an Intelligent Low Level Radio Frequency Circuit or ILLRF, suitable for most AVF cyclotron accelerators, is designed using a beam monitoring device and narrow band tunable band-pass filter. In this design, the RF phase detection does not need signal processing by a microcontroller.

  20. A generalised formulation of beam-shadow measurement in spiral-sector superconducting cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Jedidiah; Dey, Malay Kanti; Chakrabarti, Alok

    2014-06-01

    A generalised analysis of coherent radial oscillation through shadow measurements on the beam in a spiral-sector, superconducting cyclotron is discussed here. Experimental measurements of shadow cast by one beam-probe on another have been used to study beam behaviour at different radial positions of the K500 superconducting cyclotron at this institute. The correlation of radial oscillation and shadow measurements as well as the motion of orbit centre are also described. The modulation of turn separation by coherent radial oscillation is used to estimate the oscillation amplitude and dee voltage.

  1. Monitoring and managing of cyclotron beam distribution on the surface of irradiated targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirsanov, B. N.; Obleukhov, A. B.; Razbash, A. A.

    2016-12-01

    A system for monitoring and managing of the proton-beam distribution on the surface of the targets in the cyclotrons of the Cyclotron Co. is presented in this report. Parameters of proton beams, designs of the target and target devices, used for isotope production, and the system of the managing of the beam distribution on the target are given. The control is fulfilled via monitoring of the temperature distributions using infrared radiation from the target surface. The need in such system for increasing of the isotope productivity and reducing of the likelihood of the target damage is substantiated.

  2. Beam-driven ion cyclotron harmonic resonances in the terrestrial foreshock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, C. W.; Goldstein, M. L.; Gary, S. P.; Russell, C. T.

    1985-01-01

    A terrestrial upstream wave event which demonstrates multiple, ion cyclotron harmonic resonances between the interplanetary wave population and an observed proton beam is analyzed. The techniques and parameters employed in the data analysis are discussed, including the use of differential and band-pass filters. An upstream wave event demonstrating multiple harmonic waves is examined, and the instability analysis relevant to the ion beam observations thought to be responsible for that event is discussed. It is shown that an observed bi-Maxwellian ion beam is capable of generating right and left-hand polarized waves through ion cyclotron harmonic resonance.

  3. A 600 MeV cyclotron for radioactive beam production

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.J.

    1993-05-17

    The magnetic field design for a 600 MeV proton cyclotron is described. The cyclotron has a single stage, a normal conducting magnet coil and a 9.8 m outside yoke diameter. It has 8 sectors, with a transition to 4 sectors in the center region. The magnetic field design was done using 1958 Harwell rectangular ridge system measurements and was compared with recent 3-dimensional field calculations with the program TOSCA at NSCL. The center region 4--8 sector transition focussing was also checked with TOSCA.

  4. A CW radiofrequency ion source for production of negative hydrogen ion beams for cyclotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Kalvas, T.; Tarvainen, O.; Komppula, J.; Koivisto, H.; Tuunanen, J.; Potkins, D.; Stewart, T.; Dehnel, M. P.

    2015-04-08

    A CW 13.56 MHz radiofrequency-driven ion source RADIS for production of H{sup −} and D{sup −} beams is under development for replacing the filament-driven ion source of the MCC30/15 cyclotron. The RF ion source has a 16-pole multicusp plasma chamber, an electromagnet-based magnetic filter and an external planar spiral RF antenna behind an AlN window. The extraction is a 5-electrode system with an adjustable puller electrode voltage for optimizing the beam formation, a water-cooled electron dump electrode and an accelerating einzel lens. At 2650 W of RF power, the source produces 1 mA of H{sup −} (2.6 mA/cm{sup 2}), which is the intensity needed at injection for production of 200 µA H{sup +} with the filament-driven ion source. A simple pepperpot device has been developed for characterizing the beam emittance. Plans for improving the power efficiency with the use of a new permanent magnet front plate is discussed.

  5. Production of charged (singly and multiply) phosphorous beams with electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maunoury, L.; Kantas, S.; Leroy, R.; Pacquet, J. Y.

    2006-03-01

    Within the framework of biological application linked to ion irradiation, the fabrication of radioactive stents by ion implantation provides a significant improvement of the recovery of arteries after a treatment of stenosed coronary arteries [P. Fehsenfeld et al., Semin Interv Cardiol. 3, 157 (1998); E. Huttel et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 73, 825 (2002); M.-A. Golombeck et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. B 206, 495 (2003)]. For this appliance, the suitable radioactive ion is P32. Obviously, in order to have a minimum loss of these radioactive ions through the ionization process, it is imperative to have high ionization efficiency. In this article, the production of such singly and multiply charged phosphorous beams is investigated using two different electron cyclotron resonance ion sources: MONO1000/1001 [P. Jardin et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 73, 789 (2002)] and SUPERSHyPIE [J. Y. Pacquet et al., EP Patent No. 97 401294 (pending); R. Leroy et al., 14th International Workshop on ECR Ion Sources, May 1999 (unpublished)]. Spectra and above all efficiencies [J. Y. Pacquet et al., GANIL R 02 07; GANIL R 03 08] (31% of ionization efficiency for phosphorous atoms and compound with MONO1000/1001 and 43% of ionization efficiency for phosphorous atoms with SUPERSHyPIE) of these beams will be presented as well as the intensities (227eμA for P+ with MONO1000/1001 and 145eμA for P7+ with SUPERSHyPIE) of such beams.

  6. Note: Effect of hot liner in producing {sup 40,48}Ca beam from RIKEN 18-GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Ozeki, K. Higurashi, Y.; Kidera, M.; Nakagawa, T.

    2015-01-15

    In order to produce a high-intensity and stable {sup 48}Ca beam from the RIKEN 18-GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source, we have begun testing the production of a calcium beam using a micro-oven. To minimize the consumption rate of the material ({sup 48}Ca), we introduced the “hot liner” method and investigated the effect of the liner on the material consumption rate. The micro-oven was first used to produce the {sup 48}Ca beam for experiments in the RIKEN radioisotope beam factory, and a stable beam could be supplied for a long time with low consumption rate.

  7. Pulsed laser beam intensity monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Cason, C.M.; Jones, R.W.

    1982-07-13

    A pulsed laser beam intensity monitor measures the peak power within a selectable cross section of a test laser beam and measures integrated energy of the beam during the pulse period of a test laser. A continuous wave laser and a pulsed ruby laser are coaxially arranged for simultaneously transmitting optical output energy through a crystal flat during the time a test laser pulse is transmitted through the flat. Due to stress birefringence in the crystal, the ruby laser pulse transmitted through the flat is recorded and analyzed to provide peak power information about the test laser output pulse, and the continuous wave laser output reflected from the crystal flat provides a measurement of energy during the test laser pulse.

  8. Beam extraction and high stability operation of high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Roychowdhury, P. Mishra, L.; Kewlani, H.; Mittal, K. C.; Patil, D. S.

    2014-03-15

    A high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source is designed and developed for the low energy high intensity proton accelerator at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. The plasma discharge in the ion source is stabilized by minimizing the reflected microwave power using four stub auto tuner and magnetic field. The optimization of extraction geometry is performed using PBGUNS code by varying the aperture, shape, accelerating gap, and the potential on the electrodes. While operating the source, it was found that the two layered microwave window (6 mm quartz plate and 2 mm boron nitride plate) was damaged (a fine hole was drilled) by the back-streaming electrons after continuous operation of the source for 3 h at beam current of 20–40 mA. The microwave window was then shifted from the line of sight of the back-streaming electrons and located after the water-cooled H-plane bend. In this configuration the stable operation of the high current ion source for several hours is achieved. The ion beam is extracted from the source by biasing plasma electrode, puller electrode, and ground electrode to +10 to +50 kV, −2 to −4 kV, and 0 kV, respectively. The total ion beam current of 30–40 mA is recorded on Faraday cup at 40 keV of beam energy at 600–1000 W of microwave power, 800–1000 G axial magnetic field and (1.2–3.9) × 10{sup −3} mbar of neutral hydrogen gas pressure in the plasma chamber. The dependence of beam current on extraction voltage, microwave power, and gas pressure is investigated in the range of operation of the ion source.

  9. Beam extraction and high stability operation of high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roychowdhury, P.; Mishra, L.; Kewlani, H.; Patil, D. S.; Mittal, K. C.

    2014-03-01

    A high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source is designed and developed for the low energy high intensity proton accelerator at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. The plasma discharge in the ion source is stabilized by minimizing the reflected microwave power using four stub auto tuner and magnetic field. The optimization of extraction geometry is performed using PBGUNS code by varying the aperture, shape, accelerating gap, and the potential on the electrodes. While operating the source, it was found that the two layered microwave window (6 mm quartz plate and 2 mm boron nitride plate) was damaged (a fine hole was drilled) by the back-streaming electrons after continuous operation of the source for 3 h at beam current of 20-40 mA. The microwave window was then shifted from the line of sight of the back-streaming electrons and located after the water-cooled H-plane bend. In this configuration the stable operation of the high current ion source for several hours is achieved. The ion beam is extracted from the source by biasing plasma electrode, puller electrode, and ground electrode to +10 to +50 kV, -2 to -4 kV, and 0 kV, respectively. The total ion beam current of 30-40 mA is recorded on Faraday cup at 40 keV of beam energy at 600-1000 W of microwave power, 800-1000 G axial magnetic field and (1.2-3.9) × 10-3 mbar of neutral hydrogen gas pressure in the plasma chamber. The dependence of beam current on extraction voltage, microwave power, and gas pressure is investigated in the range of operation of the ion source.

  10. Beam extraction and high stability operation of high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source.

    PubMed

    Roychowdhury, P; Mishra, L; Kewlani, H; Patil, D S; Mittal, K C

    2014-03-01

    A high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source is designed and developed for the low energy high intensity proton accelerator at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. The plasma discharge in the ion source is stabilized by minimizing the reflected microwave power using four stub auto tuner and magnetic field. The optimization of extraction geometry is performed using PBGUNS code by varying the aperture, shape, accelerating gap, and the potential on the electrodes. While operating the source, it was found that the two layered microwave window (6 mm quartz plate and 2 mm boron nitride plate) was damaged (a fine hole was drilled) by the back-streaming electrons after continuous operation of the source for 3 h at beam current of 20-40 mA. The microwave window was then shifted from the line of sight of the back-streaming electrons and located after the water-cooled H-plane bend. In this configuration the stable operation of the high current ion source for several hours is achieved. The ion beam is extracted from the source by biasing plasma electrode, puller electrode, and ground electrode to +10 to +50 kV, -2 to -4 kV, and 0 kV, respectively. The total ion beam current of 30-40 mA is recorded on Faraday cup at 40 keV of beam energy at 600-1000 W of microwave power, 800-1000 G axial magnetic field and (1.2-3.9) × 10(-3) mbar of neutral hydrogen gas pressure in the plasma chamber. The dependence of beam current on extraction voltage, microwave power, and gas pressure is investigated in the range of operation of the ion source.

  11. Transport in JET H-mode Plasmas with Beam and Ion Cyclotron Heating

    SciTech Connect

    R.V. Budny, et. al.

    2012-07-13

    Ion Cyclotron (IC) Range of Frequency waves and neutral beam (NB) injection are planned for heating in ITER and other future tokamaks. It is important to understand transport in plasmas with NB and IC to plan, predict, and improve transport and confinement. Transport predictions require simulations of the heating profiles, and for this, accurate modeling of the IC and NB heating is needed.

  12. Useful technique for analysis and control of the acceleration beam phase in the azimuthally varying field cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurashima, Satoshi; Yuyama, Takahiro; Miyawaki, Nobumasa; Kashiwagi, Hirotsugu; Okumura, Susumu; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro

    2010-03-01

    We have developed a new technique for analysis and control of the acceleration beam phase in the cyclotron. In this technique, the beam current pattern at a fixed radius r is measured by slightly scanning the acceleration frequency in the cyclotron. The acceleration beam phase is obtained by analyzing symmetry of the current pattern. Simple procedure to control the acceleration beam phase by changing coil currents of a few trim coils was established. The beam phase width is also obtained by analyzing gradient of the decreasing part of the current pattern. We verified reliability of this technique with 260 MeV N20e7+ beams which were accelerated on different tuning condition of the cyclotron. When the acceleration beam phase was around 0°, top of the energy gain of cosine wave, and the beam phase width was about 6° in full width at half maximum, a clear turn pattern of the beam was observed with a differential beam probe in the extraction region. Beam phase widths of ion beams at acceleration harmonics of h =1 and h =2 were estimated without beam cutting by phase-defining slits. We also calculated the beam phase widths roughly from the beam current ratio between the injected beam and the accelerated beam in the cyclotron without operating the beam buncher. Both beam phase widths were almost the same for h =1, while phase compressions by a factor of about 3 were confirmed for h =2.

  13. Useful technique for analysis and control of the acceleration beam phase in the azimuthally varying field cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Kurashima, Satoshi; Yuyama, Takahiro; Miyawaki, Nobumasa; Kashiwagi, Hirotsugu; Okumura, Susumu; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro

    2010-03-15

    We have developed a new technique for analysis and control of the acceleration beam phase in the cyclotron. In this technique, the beam current pattern at a fixed radius r is measured by slightly scanning the acceleration frequency in the cyclotron. The acceleration beam phase is obtained by analyzing symmetry of the current pattern. Simple procedure to control the acceleration beam phase by changing coil currents of a few trim coils was established. The beam phase width is also obtained by analyzing gradient of the decreasing part of the current pattern. We verified reliability of this technique with 260 MeV {sup 20}Ne{sup 7+} beams which were accelerated on different tuning condition of the cyclotron. When the acceleration beam phase was around 0 deg., top of the energy gain of cosine wave, and the beam phase width was about 6 deg. in full width at half maximum, a clear turn pattern of the beam was observed with a differential beam probe in the extraction region. Beam phase widths of ion beams at acceleration harmonics of h=1 and h=2 were estimated without beam cutting by phase-defining slits. We also calculated the beam phase widths roughly from the beam current ratio between the injected beam and the accelerated beam in the cyclotron without operating the beam buncher. Both beam phase widths were almost the same for h=1, while phase compressions by a factor of about 3 were confirmed for h=2.

  14. Plasma ion dynamics and beam formation in electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Mascali, D.; Neri, L.; Miracoli, R.; Gammino, S.; Celona, L.; Ciavola, G.; Gambino, N.; Chikin, S.

    2010-02-15

    In electron cyclotron resonance ion sources it has been demonstrated that plasma heating may be improved by means of different microwave to plasma coupling mechanisms, including the ''frequency tuning'' and the ''two frequency heating''. These techniques affect evidently the electron dynamics, but the relationship with the ion dynamics has not been investigated in details up to now. Here we will try to outline these relations: through the study of ion dynamics we may try to understand how to optimize the electron cyclotron resonance ion sources brightness. A simple model of the ion confinement and beam formation will be presented, based on particle-in-cell and single particle simulations.

  15. Beam experiments towards high-intensity beams in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Montag C.; Ahrens, L.; Brennan, J.M.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Drees, A.; Fischer, W.; Hayes, T.; Huang, H.; Mernick, K.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Smith, K.; Than, R.; Thieberger, P.; Yip, K.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2012-05-20

    Proton bunch intensities in RHIC are planned to be increased from 2 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} to 3 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch to increase the luminosity, together with head-on beam-beam compensation using electron lenses. To study the feasibility of the intensity increase, beam experiments are being performed. Recent experimental results are presented.

  16. Influence of the injected beam parameters on the capture efficiency of an electron cyclotron resonance based charge breeder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galatà, A.; Mascali, D.; Torrisi, G.; Neri, L.; Celona, L.; Angot, J.

    2017-06-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance ion sources based charge breeders (ECR-CB) are fundamental devices for Isotope Separation On Line (ISOL) facilities aiming at postaccelerating radioactive ion beams (RIBs). Presently, low intensity RIBs do not allow a conventional tuning of the ECR-CB: as a consequence, it has to be set with a stable 1+ pilot beam first, switching then to the radioactive one without changing any parameter; this procedure is usually called "blind tuning." Besides having different masses, pilot and radioactive beams can also differ in terms of the rms transverse emittance ɛrms and/or longitudinal energy spread Δ E , so the choice of a given pilot beam can determine the overall performances of the final breeding stage. This paper shows a numerical study of how the capture efficiency of the PHOENIX charge breeder is affected by the aforementioned beam paramaters: the analysis reveals the two-step nature of the process, highlighting the role of the injection optics and the plasma capture capability in the overall performances of this device. The simulations predict highest efficiency for ɛrms<5 π mm mrad and Δ E <5 eV in a optimum energy range between 2 and 6 eV, thus giving important information on the possibility of blindly tuning an ECR-CB. No isotopical effects were observed, while it clearly came out the necessity to improve the 1 + beam characteristics with a rf beam cooler prior to the injection into an ECR-CB.

  17. Beam dynamics of mixed high intensity highly charged ion Beams in the Q/A selector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. H.; Yuan, Y. J.; Yin, X. J.; Qian, C.; Sun, L. T.; Du, H.; Li, Z. S.; Qiao, J.; Wang, K. D.; Zhao, H. W.; Xia, J. W.

    2017-06-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources are widely used in heavy ion accelerators for their advantages in producing high quality intense beams of highly charged ions. However, it exists challenges in the design of the Q/A selection systems for mixed high intensity ion beams to reach sufficient Q/A resolution while controlling the beam emittance growth. Moreover, as the emittance of beam from ECR ion sources is coupled, the matching of phase space to post accelerator, for a wide range of ion beam species with different intensities, should be carefully studied. In this paper, the simulation and experimental results of the Q/A selection system at the LECR4 platform are shown. The formation of hollow cross section heavy ion beam at the end of the Q/A selector is revealed. A reasonable interpretation has been proposed, a modified design of the Q/A selection system has been committed for HIRFL-SSC linac injector. The features of the new design including beam simulations and experiment results are also presented.

  18. Electron Cloud Cyclotron Resonances in the Presence of a Short-bunch-length Relativistic Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Celata, C.M.; Furman, Miguel A.; Vay, J.-L.; Yu, Jennifer W.

    2008-09-02

    Computer simulations using the 2D code"POSINST" were used to study the formation of the electron cloud in the wiggler section of the positron damping ring of the International Linear Collider. In order to simulate an x-y slice of the wiggler (i.e., a slice perpendicular to the beam velocity), each simulation assumed a constant vertical magnetic field. At values of the magnetic field where the cyclotron frequency was an integral multiple of the bunch frequency, and where the field strength was less than approximately 0.6 T, equilibrium average electron densities were up to three times the density found at other neighboring field values. Effects of this resonance between the bunch and cyclotron frequency are expected to be non-negligible when the beam bunch length is much less than the product of the electron cyclotron period and the beam velocity, for a beam moving at v~;;c. Details of the dynamics of the resonance are described.

  19. Cyclotron accelerated beams applied in wear and corrosion studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racolta, P. M.; Popa-Simil, L.; Ivanov, E. A.; Alexandreanu, B.

    1996-05-01

    Wear and corrosion processes are characterized by a loss of material that is, for machine parts and components, usually in a micrometer's range. That is why, in the last two decades, many direct applications in machine construction, petrochemical and metallurgical industries based on the Thin Layer Activation (TLA) technique have been developed. In this paper general working patterns together with a few examples of TLA applications carried out using our laboratory's U-120 Cyclotron are presented. The relation between the counting rate of the radiation originating from the component's irradiated zone and the loss of the worn material can be determined mainly by two methods: the oil circulation method and the remnant radioactivity measuring method. The first method is illustrated with some typical examples such as the optimization of the running-in program of a diesel engine and anti-wear features certifying of lubricant oils. There is also presented an example where the second method mentioned above has been applied to corrosion rate determinations for different kinds of unoxidable steels used in inert gas generator construction.

  20. CLOVERLEAF CYCLOTRON

    DOEpatents

    McMillan, E.M.; Judd, D.L.

    1959-02-01

    A cyclotron is presented embodying a unique magnetic field configuration, which configuration increases in intensity with radius and therefore compensates for the reltivistic mass effect, the field having further convolutions productive of axial stability in the particle beam. By reconciling the seemingly opposed requirements of mass increase compensation on one hand and anial stability on the other, the production of extremely high current particle beams in the relativistie energy range is made feasible. Certain further advantages inhere in the invention, notably an increase in the usable magnet gap, simplified and more efficient extraction of the beam from the accelerator, and ready adaptation to the use of multiply phased excitation as contrasted with the single phased systems herstofore utilized. General

  1. Investigations on the structure of the extracted ion beam from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Spaedtke, P.; Lang, R.; Maeder, J.; Rossbach, J.; Tinschert, K.; Maimone, F.

    2012-02-15

    Using improved beam diagnostic tools, the structure of an ion beam extracted from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) becomes visible. Especially viewing targets to display the beam profile and pepper pot devices for emittance measurements turned out to be very useful. On the contrary, diagnostic tools integrating over one space coordinate like wire harps for profile measurements or slit-slit devices, respectively slit-grid devices to measure the emittance might be applicable for beam transport investigations in a quadrupole channel, but are not very meaningful for investigations regarding the given ECRIS symmetry. Here we try to reproduce the experimentally found structure on the ion beam by simulation. For the simulation, a certain model has to be used to reproduce the experimental results. The model is also described in this paper.

  2. Study of ion beam transport from the SECRAL electron cyclotron resonance ion source at the Institute of Modern Physics.

    PubMed

    Cao, Y; Lu, W; Zhang, W H; Sha, S; Yang, Y; Ma, B H; Wang, H; Zhu, Y H; Guo, J W; Fang, X; Lin, S H; Li, X X; Feng, Y C; Li, J Y; Zhao, H Y; Ma, H Y; Zhang, X Z; Guo, X H; Wu, Q; Sun, L T; Zhao, H W; Xie, D Z

    2012-02-01

    Ion beam transport from the Superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source with Advanced design in Lanzhou (SECRAL) electron cyclotron resonance ion source was studied at the Institute of Modern Physics during 2010. Particle-in-cell simulations and experimental results have shown that both space charge and magnetic aberrations lead to a larger beam envelope and emittance growth. In the existing SECRAL extraction beam line, it has been shown that raising the solenoid lens magnetic field reduces aberrations in the subsequent dipole and results in lower emittance. Detailed beam emittance measurements are presented in this paper.

  3. Beam tracking simulation in the central region of a 13 MeV PET cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anggraita, Pramudita; Santosa, Budi; Taufik, Mulyani, Emy; Diah, Frida Iswinning

    2012-06-01

    This paper reports the trajectories simulation of proton beam in the central region of a 13 MeV PET cyclotron, operating with negative proton beam (for easier beam extraction using a stripper foil), 40 kV peak accelerating dee voltage at fourth harmonic frequency of 77.88 MHz, and average magnetic field of 1.275 T. The central region covers fields of 240mm × 240mm × 30mm size at 1mm resolution. The calculation was also done at finer 0.25mm resolution covering fields of 30mm × 30mm × 4mm size to see the effects of 0.55mm horizontal width of the ion source window and the halted trajectories of positive proton beam. The simulations show up to 7 turns of orbital trajectories, reaching about 1 MeV of beam energy. The distribution of accelerating electric fields and magnetic fields inside the cyclotron were calculated in 3 dimension using Opera3D code and Tosca modules for static magnetic and electric fields. The trajectory simulation was carried out using Scilab 5.3.3 code.

  4. Beam Splitter Intensities Are Preselected

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, W.; Owen, R. B.

    1982-01-01

    New beam splitter is a block of optically clear material with two parallel polish faces. Some of area of one surface is coated with totally reflecting layer, which may be metal or dielectric. On opposite surface, a metal coating of stepped thickness offers a different reflectivity at each step. Width and spacing of reflecting zones are chosen to accommodate angle of spacing of incidence of input beam and desired spacing of ouput beams.

  5. Beam Splitter Intensities Are Preselected

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, W.; Owen, R. B.

    1982-01-01

    New beam splitter is a block of optically clear material with two parallel polish faces. Some of area of one surface is coated with totally reflecting layer, which may be metal or dielectric. On opposite surface, a metal coating of stepped thickness offers a different reflectivity at each step. Width and spacing of reflecting zones are chosen to accommodate angle of spacing of incidence of input beam and desired spacing of ouput beams.

  6. Electron Cooling of Intense Ion Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, J.; Kamerdjiev, V.; Maier, R.; Prasuhn, D.; Stein, J.; Stockhorst, H.; Korotaev, Yu.; Meshkov, I.; Sidorin, A.; Smirnov, A.

    2006-03-20

    Results of experimental studies of the electron cooling of a proton beam at COSY (Juelich, Germany) are presented. Intensity of the proton beam is limited by two general effects: particle loss directly after the injection and development of instability in a deep cooled ion beam. Results of the instability investigations performed at COSY during last years are presented in this report in comparison with previous results from HIMAC (Chiba, Japan) CELSIUS (Uppsala, Sweden) and LEAR (CERN). Methods of the instability suppression, which allow increasing the cooled beam intensity, are described. This work is supported by RFBR grant no. 05-02-16320 and INTAS grant no. 03-54-5584.

  7. Experimental observation of acoustic emissions generated by a pulsed proton beam from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Kevin C.; Solberg, Timothy D.; Avery, Stephen; Vander Stappen, François; Janssens, Guillaume; Prieels, Damien; Bawiec, Christopher R.; Lewin, Peter A.; Sehgal, Chandra M.

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: To measure the acoustic signal generated by a pulsed proton spill from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron. Methods: An electronic function generator modulated the IBA C230 isochronous cyclotron to create a pulsed proton beam. The acoustic emissions generated by the proton beam were measured in water using a hydrophone. The acoustic measurements were repeated with increasing proton current and increasing distance between detector and beam. Results: The cyclotron generated proton spills with rise times of 18 μs and a maximum measured instantaneous proton current of 790 nA. Acoustic emissions generated by the proton energy deposition were measured to be on the order of mPa. The origin of the acoustic wave was identified as the proton beam based on the correlation between acoustic emission arrival time and distance between the hydrophone and proton beam. The acoustic frequency spectrum peaked at 10 kHz, and the acoustic pressure amplitude increased monotonically with increasing proton current. Conclusions: The authors report the first observation of acoustic emissions generated by a proton beam from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron. When modulated by an electronic function generator, the cyclotron is capable of creating proton spills with fast rise times (18 μs) and high instantaneous currents (790 nA). Measurements of the proton-generated acoustic emissions in a clinical setting may provide a method for in vivo proton range verification and patient monitoring.

  8. Experimental observation of acoustic emissions generated by a pulsed proton beam from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron.

    PubMed

    Jones, Kevin C; Vander Stappen, François; Bawiec, Christopher R; Janssens, Guillaume; Lewin, Peter A; Prieels, Damien; Solberg, Timothy D; Sehgal, Chandra M; Avery, Stephen

    2015-12-01

    To measure the acoustic signal generated by a pulsed proton spill from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron. An electronic function generator modulated the IBA C230 isochronous cyclotron to create a pulsed proton beam. The acoustic emissions generated by the proton beam were measured in water using a hydrophone. The acoustic measurements were repeated with increasing proton current and increasing distance between detector and beam. The cyclotron generated proton spills with rise times of 18 μs and a maximum measured instantaneous proton current of 790 nA. Acoustic emissions generated by the proton energy deposition were measured to be on the order of mPa. The origin of the acoustic wave was identified as the proton beam based on the correlation between acoustic emission arrival time and distance between the hydrophone and proton beam. The acoustic frequency spectrum peaked at 10 kHz, and the acoustic pressure amplitude increased monotonically with increasing proton current. The authors report the first observation of acoustic emissions generated by a proton beam from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron. When modulated by an electronic function generator, the cyclotron is capable of creating proton spills with fast rise times (18 μs) and high instantaneous currents (790 nA). Measurements of the proton-generated acoustic emissions in a clinical setting may provide a method for in vivo proton range verification and patient monitoring.

  9. External beam's nozzle design for the CRC cyclotron PIXE/PIGE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yeon-Gyeong; Kim, Yu-Seok

    2015-02-01

    Recently, 13-MeV proton cyclotrons have been applied to non-destructive trace element analytical techniques, such as proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and proton-induced gamma-ray emission (PIGE). A new extended beam line has been designed for PIXE/PIGE measurements in order to deliver protons to the target with minimal losses, thus reducing secondary radiation. A target chamber for PIXE/PIGE measurements is installed at the end of the extended beam line, and the beam size may be optimized by using a series of collimators that are located in front of the target. The optimized proton beam, with low currents (˜nA) for PIXE/PIGE experiments, requires a small beam size with variable energies from ˜10 keV to 3 MeV. Based on the ionization cross-section curve, a 3-MeV proton beam has been determined to be suitable for PIXE/PIGE measurements. Therefore, the 13-MeV protons extracted from the cyclotron must be reduced to 3 MeV, and this is achieved through the incorporation of an energy degrader. The appropriate thickness of the energy degrader has been estimated by using the stopping range in matter (SRIM) program. Also, suitable materials must be used for the construction of the collimator and the energy degrader in order to meet the requirements of low neutron activation due to the application of protons. In this study, we evaluated a number of suitable materials with low neutron yields and with little energy spread as the beam passes through the energy degrader and collimator. The appropriate thickness of the energy degrader for the reduction of the proton energy from 13 MeV to 3 MeV was determined using the SRIM code. Also, the neutron yield at the nozzle was estimated using the MCNPX code.

  10. The nonlinear theory of slow-wave electron cyclotron masers with inclusion of the beam velocity spread

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Ling-Bao; Wang, Hong-Yu; Hou, Zhi-Ling; Jin, Hai-Bo; Du, Chao-Hai

    2013-12-15

    The nonlinear theory of slow-wave electron cyclotron masers (ECM) with an initially straight electron beam is developed. The evolution equation of the nonlinear beam electron energy is derived. The numerical studies of the slow-wave ECM efficiency with inclusion of Gaussian beam velocity spread are presented. It is shown that the velocity spread reduces the interaction efficiency. -- Highlights: •The theory of slow-wave electron cyclotron masers is considered. •The calculation of efficiency under the resonance condition is presented. •The efficiency under Gaussian velocity spreads has been obtained.

  11. Intense Electron Beam Cyclotron Masers with Microsecond Pulselengths

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-20

    undesired oscillations, M412l absolute instability, TB1 Igyro-BWO, TESI second and Oird harmonic), were te most serious competing modes in the prsent Bragg...high harmonic interactions such as the second harmonic TESI gyrotron interaction and the third harmonic TE51 absolute instability interaction. We...We ruled out the TE31 CARM and high harmonic gyrotron modes such as a second harmonic TBE5 or third harmonic TESI in interpreting the breakdown pattern

  12. Charge breeding results and future prospects with electron cyclotron resonance ion source and electron beam ion source (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Vondrasek, R.; Levand, A.; Pardo, R.; Savard, G.; Scott, R.

    2012-02-15

    The Californium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) of the Argonne National Laboratory ATLAS facility will provide low-energy and reaccelerated neutron-rich radioactive beams for the nuclear physics program. A 70 mCi {sup 252}Cf source produces fission fragments which are thermalized and collected by a helium gas catcher into a low-energy particle beam with a charge of 1+ or 2+. An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source functions as a charge breeder in order to raise the ion charge sufficiently for acceleration in the ATLAS linac. The final CARIBU configuration will utilize a 1 Ci {sup 252}Cf source to produce radioactive beams with intensities up to 10{sup 6} ions/s for use in the ATLAS facility. The ECR charge breeder has been tested with stable beam injection and has achieved charge breeding efficiencies of 3.6% for {sup 23}Na{sup 8+}, 15.6% for {sup 84}Kr{sup 17+}, and 13.7% for {sup 85}Rb{sup 19+} with typical breeding times of 10 ms/charge state. For the first radioactive beams, a charge breeding efficiency of 11.7% has been achieved for {sup 143}Cs{sup 27+} and 14.7% for {sup 143}Ba{sup 27+}. The project has been commissioned with a radioactive beam of {sup 143}Ba{sup 27+} accelerated to 6.1 MeV/u. In order to take advantage of its lower residual contamination, an EBIS charge breeder will replace the ECR charge breeder in the next two years. The advantages and disadvantages of the two techniques are compared taking into account the requirements of the next generation radioactive beam facilities.

  13. Charge breeding results and future prospects with electron cyclotron resonance ion source and electron beam ion source (invited)a)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vondrasek, R.; Levand, A.; Pardo, R.; Savard, G.; Scott, R.

    2012-02-01

    The Californium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) of the Argonne National Laboratory ATLAS facility will provide low-energy and reaccelerated neutron-rich radioactive beams for the nuclear physics program. A 70 mCi 252Cf source produces fission fragments which are thermalized and collected by a helium gas catcher into a low-energy particle beam with a charge of 1+ or 2+. An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source functions as a charge breeder in order to raise the ion charge sufficiently for acceleration in the ATLAS linac. The final CARIBU configuration will utilize a 1 Ci 252Cf source to produce radioactive beams with intensities up to 106 ions/s for use in the ATLAS facility. The ECR charge breeder has been tested with stable beam injection and has achieved charge breeding efficiencies of 3.6% for 23Na8+, 15.6% for 84Kr17+, and 13.7% for 85Rb19+ with typical breeding times of 10 ms/charge state. For the first radioactive beams, a charge breeding efficiency of 11.7% has been achieved for 143Cs27+ and 14.7% for 143Ba27+. The project has been commissioned with a radioactive beam of 143Ba27+ accelerated to 6.1 MeV/u. In order to take advantage of its lower residual contamination, an EBIS charge breeder will replace the ECR charge breeder in the next two years. The advantages and disadvantages of the two techniques are compared taking into account the requirements of the next generation radioactive beam facilities.

  14. Preliminary design of a RFQ direct injection scheme for the IsoDAR high intensity H₂⁺ cyclotron.

    PubMed

    Winklehner, D; Hamm, R; Alonso, J; Conrad, J M; Axani, S

    2016-02-01

    IsoDAR (Isotope Decay-At-Rest) is a novel experiment designed to measure neutrino oscillations through ν̄(e) disappearance, thus providing a definitive search for sterile neutrinos. In order to generate the necessary anti-neutrino flux, a high intensity primary proton beam is needed. In IsoDAR, H2(+) is accelerated and is stripped into protons just before the target, to overcome space charge issues at injection. As part of the design, we have refined an old proposal to use a RFQ to axially inject bunched H2(+) ions into the driver cyclotron. This method has several advantages over a classical low energy beam transport (LEBT) design: (1) The bunching efficiency is higher than for the previously considered two-gap buncher and thus the overall injection efficiency is higher. This relaxes the constraints on the H2(+) current required from the ion source. (2) The overall length of the LEBT can be reduced. (3) The RFQ can also accelerate the ions. This enables the ion source platform high voltage to be reduced from 70 kV to 15 kV, making underground installation easier. We are presenting the preliminary RFQ design parameters and first beam dynamics simulations from the ion source to the spiral inflector entrance.

  15. Beam imaging in the injection line of the INFN-LNS superconducting cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolosi, Dario Cosentino, Luigi; Mascali, David; Pappalardo, Alfio; Castro, Maurizio; Celona, Luigi; Marchetta, Carmelo; Marletta, Salvatore; Maugeri, Antonio; Rifuggiato, Danilo; Seminara, Angelo; Gammino, Santo

    2016-02-15

    A cheap and efficient diagnostic system for beam monitoring has been recently developed at INFN-LNS in Catania. It consists of a high sensitivity CCD camera detecting the light produced by an ion beam hitting the surface of a scintillating screen and a frame grabber for image acquisition. A scintillating screen, developed at INFN-LNS and consisting of a 2 μm BaF{sub 2} layer evaporated on an aluminium plate, has been tested by using {sup 20}Ne and {sup 40}Ar beams in the keV energy range. The CAESAR ECR ion source has been used for investigating the influence of the frequency and magnetic field tuning effects, the impact of the microwave injected power, and of the focusing solenoids along the low energy beam transport on the beam shape and current. These tests will allow to better understand the interplay between the plasma and beam dynamics and, moreover, to improve the transport efficiency along the low energy beam line and the matching with the superconducting cyclotron, particularly relevant in view of the expected upgrade of the machine.

  16. ARRONAX, a high-energy and high-intensity cyclotron for nuclear medicine.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Ferid; Ferrer, Ludovic; Guertin, Arnaud; Carlier, Thomas; Michel, Nathalie; Barbet, Jacques; Chatal, Jean-François

    2008-07-01

    This study was aimed at establishing a list of radionuclides of interest for nuclear medicine that can be produced in a high-intensity and high-energy cyclotron. We have considered both therapeutic and positron emission tomography radionuclides that can be produced using a high-energy and a high-intensity cyclotron such as ARRONAX, which will be operating in Nantes (France) by the end of 2008. Novel radionuclides or radionuclides of current limited availability have been selected according to the following criteria: emission of positrons, low-energy beta or alpha particles, stable or short half-life daughters, half-life between 3 h and 10 days or generator-produced, favourable dosimetry, production from stable isotopes with reasonable cross sections. Three radionuclides appear well suited to targeted radionuclide therapy using beta ((67)Cu, (47)Sc) or alpha ((211)At) particles. Positron emitters allowing dosimetry studies prior to radionuclide therapy ((64)Cu, (124)I, (44)Sc), or that can be generator-produced ((82)Rb, (68)Ga) or providing the opportunity of a new imaging modality ((44)Sc) are considered to have a great interest at short term whereas (86)Y, (52)Fe, (55)Co, (76)Br or (89)Zr are considered to have a potential interest at middle term. Several radionuclides not currently used in routine nuclear medicine or not available in sufficient amount for clinical research have been selected for future production. High-energy, high-intensity cyclotrons are necessary to produce some of the selected radionuclides and make possible future clinical developments in nuclear medicine. Associated with appropriate carriers, these radionuclides will respond to a maximum of unmet clinical needs.

  17. Particle simulation of intense electron cyclotron heating and beat-wave current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.I.

    1987-10-12

    High-power free-electron lasers make new methods possible for heating plasmas and driving current in toroidal plasmas with electromagnetic waves. We have undertaken particle simulation studies with one and two dimensional, relativistic particle simulation codes of intense pulsed electron cyclotron heating and beat-wave current drive. The particle simulation methods here are conventional: the algorithms are time-centered, second-order-accurate, explicit, leap-frog difference schemes. The use of conventional methods restricts the range of space and time scales to be relatively compact in the problems addressed. Nevertheless, experimentally relevant simulations have been performed. 10 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Short rise time intense electron beam generator

    DOEpatents

    Olson, C.L.

    1984-03-16

    A generator for producing an intense relativisitc electron beam having a subnanosecond current rise time includes a conventional generator of intense relativistic electrons feeding into a short electrically conductive drift tube including a cavity containing a working gas at a low enough pressure to prevent the input beam from significantly ionizing the working gas. Ionizing means such as a laser simultaneously ionize the entire volume of working gas in the cavity to generate an output beam having a rise time less than one nanosecond.

  19. Short rise time intense electron beam generator

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Craig L.

    1987-01-01

    A generator for producing an intense relativistic electron beam having a subnanosecond current rise time includes a conventional generator of intense relativistic electrons feeding into a short electrically conductive drift tube including a cavity containing a working gas at a low enough pressure to prevent the input beam from significantly ionizing the working gas. Ionizing means such as a laser simultaneously ionize the entire volume of working gas in the cavity to generate an output beam having a rise time less than one nanosecond.

  20. Intense Relativistic Electron Beam Investigations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-04-01

    dielectric wall and causing surface flashover and the liberation of ions. These ions provide sufficient charge neutralization for the beam to propagate a...University Raleigh, North Carolina 27650 ABSTRACT The propagation speed of the flashover light produced by the filament- azy surface breakdwn of... flashover between the transmission line electrodes. Then, a spark switch is closed, propagating a backward and forward T.E.M. wave from the spark switch

  1. BEST medical radioisotope production cyclotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Sabaiduc, Vasile; Milton, Bruce; Suthanthiran, Krishnan; Johnson, Richard R.; Gelbart, W. Z.

    2013-04-19

    Best Cyclotron Systems Inc (BCSI) is currently developing 14 MeV, 25 MeV, 35MeV and 70MeV cyclotrons for radioisotope production and research applications as well as the entire spectrum of targets and nuclear synthesis modules for the production of Positron Emission Tomography (PET), Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) and radiation therapy isotopes. The company is a subsidiary of Best Medical International, renowned in the field of medical instrumentation and radiation therapy. All cyclotrons have external negative hydrogen ion sources, four radial sectors with two dees in opposite valleys, cryogenic vacuum system and simultaneous beam extraction on opposite lines. The beam intensity ranges from 400 {mu}A to 1000 {mu}A, depending on the cyclotron energy and application.

  2. BEST medical radioisotope production cyclotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabaiduc, Vasile; Milton, Bruce; Suthanthiran, Krishnan; Gelbart, W. Z.; Johnson, Richard R.

    2013-04-01

    Best Cyclotron Systems Inc (BCSI) is currently developing 14 MeV, 25 MeV, 35MeV and 70MeV cyclotrons for radioisotope production and research applications as well as the entire spectrum of targets and nuclear synthesis modules for the production of Positron Emission Tomography (PET), Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) and radiation therapy isotopes. The company is a subsidiary of Best Medical International, renowned in the field of medical instrumentation and radiation therapy. All cyclotrons have external negative hydrogen ion sources, four radial sectors with two dees in opposite valleys, cryogenic vacuum system and simultaneous beam extraction on opposite lines. The beam intensity ranges from 400 μA to 1000 μA, depending on the cyclotron energy and application [1].

  3. Absolute beam intensity measurements at the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Iverson, Erik B.; Carpenter, J. M.; Hill, E. J.

    1997-01-01

    The three moderators at the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source are of cryogenic methane (CH4): one of liquid methane at 100 K, and two of solid methane at 30 K. These moderators produce intense beams of both cold and thermal neutrons. The moderators are each of a different physical configuration in order to tailor their performance for the fourteen instruments and test facilities that operate on the twelve neutron beams. IPNS has started a program to enhance the effectiveness of its target/moderator/reflector system. This program involves both Monte Carlo computer modeling of the system and measuring the characteristics of the neutron beams. The measurements reported here provide absolute spectra using foil activation techniques joined with time-of-flight measurements performed with thin beam monitor detectors installed at the neutron scattering instruments. We also outline a codified procedure which we believe will be useful at other pulsed neutron sources to perform equivalent measurements. (auth)

  4. Linear analysis of a rectangular waveguide cyclotron maser with a sheet electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Ding; Ding Yaogen; Wang Yong; Ruan Cunjun

    2010-11-15

    A linear theory for a rectangular waveguide cyclotron maser with a sheet electron beam is developed by using the Laplace transformation approach. This theory can be applied to any TE{sub mn} rectangular waveguide mode. The corresponding equations for the TM{sub mn} mode in the rectangular waveguide are also derived as a useful reference. Especially, the effect from the coupling between degenerate modes, which is induced by the nonideal rectangular waveguide walls, on the dispersion relation is considered in order to provide a more accurate model for the real devices. Through numerical calculations, the linear growth rate, launching loss, and spontaneous oscillations (caused by the absolute instability and backward wave oscillation) of this new structure can be analyzed in detail. It is worthwhile to point out that the operation at higher power levels of the rectangular waveguide sheet beam system is possible.

  5. Modelling third harmonic ion cyclotron acceleration of deuterium beams for JET fusion product studies experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, M.; Johnson, T.; Dumont, R.; Eriksson, J.; Eriksson, L.-G.; Giacomelli, L.; Girardo, J.-B.; Hellsten, T.; Khilkevitch, E.; Kiptily, V. G.; Koskela, T.; Mantsinen, M.; Nocente, M.; Salewski, M.; Sharapov, S. E.; Shevelev, A. E.; Contributors, JET

    2016-11-01

    Recent JET experiments have been dedicated to the studies of fusion reactions between deuterium (D) and Helium-3 (3He) ions using neutral beam injection (NBI) in synergy with third harmonic ion cyclotron radio-frequency heating (ICRH) of the beam. This scenario generates a fast ion deuterium tail enhancing DD and D3He fusion reactions. Modelling and measuring the fast deuterium tail accurately is essential for quantifying the fusion products. This paper presents the modelling of the D distribution function resulting from the NBI+ICRF heating scheme, reinforced by a comparison with dedicated JET fast ion diagnostics, showing an overall good agreement. Finally, a sawtooth activity for these experiments has been observed and interpreted using SPOT/RFOF simulations in the framework of Porcelli’s theoretical model, where NBI+ICRH accelerated ions are found to have a strong stabilizing effect, leading to monster sawteeth.

  6. The effect of electron beams on cyclotron maser emission excited by lower-energy cutoffs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, G. Q.; Feng, H. Q.; Wu, D. J.

    2016-05-01

    Electron-cyclotron maser (ECM) is one of the most important emission mechanisms in astrophysics and can be excited efficiently by lower-energy cutoffs of power-law electrons. These non-thermal electrons probably propagate as a directed collimated beam along ambient magnetic fields. This paper investigates the ECM, in which the effect of electron beams is emphasized. Results show the dependence of emission properties of the ECM on the beam feature. The maximum growth rate of the extraordinary mode (X2) rapidly decreases as the beam momentum increases, while the growth rate of the ordinary mode (O1) changes slightly. In particular, the ordinary mode can overcome the extraordinary mode and becomes the fastest growth mode once the beam momentum is large enough. This research presents an extension of the conventional studies on ECM driven by lower-energy cutoffs and may be helpful to understand better the emission process of solar type I radio bursts, which are dominated by the ordinary mode emission.

  7. The effect of electron beams on cyclotron maser emission excited by lower-energy cutoffs

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, G. Q.; Feng, H. Q.; Wu, D. J.

    2016-05-15

    Electron-cyclotron maser (ECM) is one of the most important emission mechanisms in astrophysics and can be excited efficiently by lower-energy cutoffs of power-law electrons. These non-thermal electrons probably propagate as a directed collimated beam along ambient magnetic fields. This paper investigates the ECM, in which the effect of electron beams is emphasized. Results show the dependence of emission properties of the ECM on the beam feature. The maximum growth rate of the extraordinary mode (X2) rapidly decreases as the beam momentum increases, while the growth rate of the ordinary mode (O1) changes slightly. In particular, the ordinary mode can overcome the extraordinary mode and becomes the fastest growth mode once the beam momentum is large enough. This research presents an extension of the conventional studies on ECM driven by lower-energy cutoffs and may be helpful to understand better the emission process of solar type I radio bursts, which are dominated by the ordinary mode emission.

  8. BEAM LOSS MECHANISMS IN HIGH INTENSITY LINACS

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    In the present operation of the Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source, 60-Hz, 825-us H beam pulses are accelerated to 910 MeV, and then compressed to less than a microsecond in the storage ring, to deliver 1 MW of beam power to the spallation target. The beam loss in the superconducting portion of the linac is higher than expected, and it has shown a surprising counter-intuitive correlation with quadrupole magnetic fields, with a loss minimum occurring when the quadrupoles are set to approximately half their design values. This behavior can now be explained by a recent set of experiments that show the beam loss is primarily due to intra-beam stripping. Beam halo is another important beam loss contributor, and collimation in the 2.5 MeV Medium Energy Beam Transport has proven to be an effective mitigation strategy. In this presentation, we will summarize these and other beam loss mechanisms that are important for high intensity linacs.

  9. Intense steady state electron beam generator

    DOEpatents

    Hershcovitch, Ady; Kovarik, Vincent J.; Prelec, Krsto

    1990-01-01

    An intense, steady state, low emittance electron beam generator is formed by operating a hollow cathode discharge plasma source at critical levels in combination with an extraction electrode and a target electrode that are operable to extract a beam of fast primary electrons from the plasma source through a negatively biased grid that is critically operated to repel bulk electrons toward the plasma source while allowing the fast primary electrons to move toward the target in the desired beam that can be successfully transported for relatively large distances, such as one or more meters away from the plasma source.

  10. Delivering the world's most intense muon beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, S.; D'Arcy, R.; Edmonds, A.; Fukuda, M.; Hatanaka, K.; Hino, Y.; Kuno, Y.; Lancaster, M.; Mori, Y.; Ogitsu, T.; Sakamoto, H.; Sato, A.; Tran, N. H.; Truong, N. M.; Wing, M.; Yamamoto, A.; Yoshida, M.

    2017-03-01

    A new muon beam line, the muon science innovative channel, was set up at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, in Osaka, Japan, using the 392 MeV proton beam impinging on a target. The production of an intense muon beam relies on the efficient capture of pions, which subsequently decay to muons, using a novel superconducting solenoid magnet system. After the pion-capture solenoid, the first 36° of the curved muon transport line was commissioned and the muon flux was measured. In order to detect muons, a target of either copper or magnesium was placed to stop muons at the end of the muon beam line. Two stations of plastic scintillators located upstream and downstream from the muon target were used to reconstruct the decay spectrum of muons. In a complementary method to detect negatively charged muons, the x-ray spectrum yielded by muonic atoms in the target was measured in a germanium detector. Measurements, at a proton beam current of 6 pA, yielded (10.4 ±2.7 )×1 05 muons per watt of proton beam power (μ+ and μ-), far in excess of other facilities. At full beam power (400 W), this implies a rate of muons of (4.2 ±1.1 )×1 08 muons s-1 , among the highest in the world. The number of μ- measured was about a factor of 10 lower, again by far the most efficient muon beam produced. The setup is a prototype for future experiments requiring a high-intensity muon beam, such as a muon collider or neutrino factory, or the search for rare muon decays which would be a signature for phenomena beyond the Standard Model of particle physics. Such a muon beam can also be used in other branches of physics, nuclear and condensed matter, as well as other areas of scientific research.

  11. Production of U beam from RIKEN 18 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Higurashi, Y.; Nakagawa, T.; Kidera, M.; Haba, H.; Aihara, T.; Kase, M.; Goto, A.; Yano, Y.

    2008-02-15

    For the RIKEN radio isotope factory (RIBF) project, we produced the multicharged uranium beam with two methods. To produce lower charge state U ion beams (14+-20+) we used the UF{sub 6} gas as an ionized gas. The typical beam intensity of U{sup 14+-20+} was 2-1 particle {mu}A at the extraction voltage of 14 kV. To produce higher charge state U ion beam (U{sup 35+}), we chose the sputtering method. The beam intensity was 70 particle nA at the extraction voltage of 5.4 kV. Using this method, we successfully produced multicharged U beam continuously for one month without break for RIBF commissioning.

  12. Fan-beam intensity modulated proton therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Patrick; Westerly, David; Mackie, Thomas

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: This paper presents a concept for a proton therapy system capable of delivering intensity modulated proton therapy using a fan beam of protons. This system would allow present and future gantry-based facilities to deliver state-of-the-art proton therapy with the greater normal tissue sparing made possible by intensity modulation techniques.Methods: A method for producing a divergent fan beam of protons using a pair of electromagnetic quadrupoles is described and particle transport through the quadrupole doublet is simulated using a commercially available software package. To manipulate the fan beam of protons, a modulation device is developed. This modulator inserts or retracts acrylic leaves of varying thickness from subsections of the fan beam. Each subsection, or beam channel, creates what effectively becomes a beam spot within the fan area. Each channel is able to provide 0–255 mm of range shift for its associated beam spot, or stop the beam and act as an intensity modulator. Results of particle transport simulations through the quadrupole system are incorporated into the MCNPX Monte Carlo transport code along with a model of the range and intensity modulation device. Several design parameters were investigated and optimized, culminating in the ability to create topotherapy treatment plans using distal-edge tracking on both phantom and patient datasets.Results: Beam transport calculations show that a pair of electromagnetic quadrupoles can be used to create a divergent fan beam of 200 MeV protons over a distance of 2.1 m. The quadrupole lengths were 30 and 48 cm, respectively, with transverse field gradients less than 20 T/m, which is within the range of water-cooled magnets for the quadrupole radii used. MCNPX simulations of topotherapy treatment plans suggest that, when using the distal edge tracking delivery method, many delivery angles are more important than insisting on narrow beam channel widths in order to obtain conformal target coverage

  13. Fan-beam intensity modulated proton therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Patrick; Westerly, David; Mackie, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This paper presents a concept for a proton therapy system capable of delivering intensity modulated proton therapy using a fan beam of protons. This system would allow present and future gantry-based facilities to deliver state-of-the-art proton therapy with the greater normal tissue sparing made possible by intensity modulation techniques. Methods: A method for producing a divergent fan beam of protons using a pair of electromagnetic quadrupoles is described and particle transport through the quadrupole doublet is simulated using a commercially available software package. To manipulate the fan beam of protons, a modulation device is developed. This modulator inserts or retracts acrylic leaves of varying thickness from subsections of the fan beam. Each subsection, or beam channel, creates what effectively becomes a beam spot within the fan area. Each channel is able to provide 0–255 mm of range shift for its associated beam spot, or stop the beam and act as an intensity modulator. Results of particle transport simulations through the quadrupole system are incorporated into the MCNPX Monte Carlo transport code along with a model of the range and intensity modulation device. Several design parameters were investigated and optimized, culminating in the ability to create topotherapy treatment plans using distal-edge tracking on both phantom and patient datasets. Results: Beam transport calculations show that a pair of electromagnetic quadrupoles can be used to create a divergent fan beam of 200 MeV protons over a distance of 2.1 m. The quadrupole lengths were 30 and 48 cm, respectively, with transverse field gradients less than 20 T/m, which is within the range of water-cooled magnets for the quadrupole radii used. MCNPX simulations of topotherapy treatment plans suggest that, when using the distal edge tracking delivery method, many delivery angles are more important than insisting on narrow beam channel widths in order to obtain conformal target coverage

  14. Terahertz electron cyclotron maser interactions with an axis-encircling electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Li, G. D.; Kao, S. H.; Chang, P. C.; Chu, K. R.

    2015-04-15

    To generate terahertz radiation via the electron cyclotron maser instability, harmonic interactions are essential in order to reduce the required magnetic field to a practical value. Also, high-order mode operation is required to avoid excessive Ohmic losses. The weaker harmonic interaction and mode competition associated with an over-moded structure present challenging problems to overcome. The axis-encircling electron beam is a well-known recipe for both problems. It strengthens the harmonic interaction, as well as minimizing the competing modes. Here, we examine these advantages through a broad data base obtained for a low-power, step-tunable, gyrotron oscillator. Linear results indicate far more higher-harmonic modes can be excited with an axis-encircling electron beam than with an off-axis electron beam. However, multi-mode, time-dependent simulations reveal an intrinsic tendency for a higher-harmonic mode to switch over to a lower-harmonic mode at a high beam current or upon a rapid current rise. Methods are presented to identify the narrow windows in the parameter space for stable harmonic interactions.

  15. Model for the description of ion beam extraction from electron cyclotron resonance ion sources.

    PubMed

    Spädtke, P

    2010-02-01

    The finite difference method trajectory code KOBRA3-INP has been developed now for 25 years to perform the simulation of ion beam extraction in three dimensions. Meanwhile, the code has been validated for different applications: high current ion beam extraction from plasma sources for ion implantation technology, neutral gas heating in fusion devices, or ion thrusters for space propulsion. One major issue of the development of this code was to improve the flexibility of the applied model for the simulation of different types of particle sources. Fixed emitter sources might be simulated with that code as well as laser ion sources, Penning ion sources, electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRISs), or H(-) sources, which require the simulation of negative ions, negative electrons, and positive charges simultaneously. The model which has been developed for ECRIS has now been used to explore the conditions for the ion beam extraction from a still nonexisting ion source, a so called ARC-ECRIS [P. Suominen and F. Wenander, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 02A305 (2008)]. It has to be shown whether the plasma generator has similar properties like regular ECRIS. However, the emittance of the extracted beam seems to be much better compared to an ECRIS equipped with a hexapole.

  16. Model for the description of ion beam extraction from electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Spaedtke, P.

    2010-02-15

    The finite difference method trajectory code KOBRA3-INP has been developed now for 25 years to perform the simulation of ion beam extraction in three dimensions. Meanwhile, the code has been validated for different applications: high current ion beam extraction from plasma sources for ion implantation technology, neutral gas heating in fusion devices, or ion thrusters for space propulsion. One major issue of the development of this code was to improve the flexibility of the applied model for the simulation of different types of particle sources. Fixed emitter sources might be simulated with that code as well as laser ion sources, Penning ion sources, electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRISs), or H{sup -} sources, which require the simulation of negative ions, negative electrons, and positive charges simultaneously. The model which has been developed for ECRIS has now been used to explore the conditions for the ion beam extraction from a still nonexisting ion source, a so called ARC-ECRIS [P. Suominen and F. Wenander, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 02A305 (2008)]. It has to be shown whether the plasma generator has similar properties like regular ECRIS. However, the emittance of the extracted beam seems to be much better compared to an ECRIS equipped with a hexapole.

  17. Beam intensity increases at the intense pulsed neutron source accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Potts, C.; Brumwell, F.; Norem, J.; Rauchas, A.; Stipp, V.; Volk, G.

    1985-01-01

    The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) accelerator system has managed a 40% increase in time average beam current over the last two years. Currents of up to 15.6..mu..A (3.25 x 10/sup 12/ protons at 30 Hz) have been successfully accelerated and cleanly extracted. Our high current operation demands low loss beam handling to permit hands-on maintenance. Synchrotron beam handling efficiencies of 90% are routine. A new H/sup -/ ion source which was installed in March of 1983 offered the opportunity to get above 8 ..mu..A but an instability caused unacceptable losses when attempting to operate at 10 ..mu..A and above. Simple techniques to control the instabilities were introduced and have worked well. These techniques are discussed below. Other improvements in the regulation of various power supplies have provided greatly improved low energy orbit stability and contributed substantially to the increased beam current.

  18. Studies of the beam extraction system of the GTS-LHC electron cyclotron resonance ion source at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Toivanen, V. Küchler, D.

    2016-02-15

    The 14.5 GHz GTS-LHC Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source (ECRIS) provides multiply charged heavy ion beams for the CERN experimental program. The GTS-LHC beam formation has been studied extensively with lead, argon, and xenon beams with varied beam extraction conditions using the ion optical code IBSimu. The simulation model predicts self-consistently the formation of triangular and hollow beam structures which are often associated with ECRIS ion beams, as well as beam loss patterns which match the observed beam induced markings in the extraction region. These studies provide a better understanding of the properties of the extracted beams and a way to diagnose the extraction system performance and limitations, which is otherwise challenging due to the lack of direct diagnostics in this region and the limited availability of the ion source for development work.

  19. Studies of the beam extraction system of the GTS-LHC electron cyclotron resonance ion source at CERN.

    PubMed

    Toivanen, V; Küchler, D

    2016-02-01

    The 14.5 GHz GTS-LHC Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source (ECRIS) provides multiply charged heavy ion beams for the CERN experimental program. The GTS-LHC beam formation has been studied extensively with lead, argon, and xenon beams with varied beam extraction conditions using the ion optical code IBSimu. The simulation model predicts self-consistently the formation of triangular and hollow beam structures which are often associated with ECRIS ion beams, as well as beam loss patterns which match the observed beam induced markings in the extraction region. These studies provide a better understanding of the properties of the extracted beams and a way to diagnose the extraction system performance and limitations, which is otherwise challenging due to the lack of direct diagnostics in this region and the limited availability of the ion source for development work.

  20. Production of electron cyclotron resonance plasma by using multifrequencies microwaves and active beam profile control on a large bore electron cyclotron resonance ion source with permanent magnets.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yushi; Watanabe, Takeyoshi; Matsui, Yuuki; Hirai, Yoshiaki; Kutsumi, Osamu; Sakamoto, Naoki; Sato, Fuminobu; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2010-02-01

    A new concept on magnetic field with all magnets on plasma production and confinement has been proposed to enhance efficiency of an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma for broad and dense ion beam source under the low pressure. The magnetic field configuration is constructed by a pair of magnets assembly, i.e., comb-shaped magnet which cylindrically surrounds the plasma chamber. The resonance zones corresponding to the fundamental ECR for 2.45 GHz and 11-13 GHz frequencies are constructed at different positions. The profiles of the plasma parameters in the ECR ion source are different from each frequency of microwave. Large bore extractor is set at the opposite side against the microwave feeds. It is found that differences of their profiles also appear at those of ion beam profiles. We conducted to launch simultaneously multiplex frequencies microwaves controlled individually, and tried to control the profiles of the plasma parameters and then those of extracted ion beam.

  1. Intense diagnostic neutral beam development for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Rej, D.J.; Henins, I.; Fonck, R.J.; Kim, Y.J.

    1992-05-01

    For the next-generation, burning tokamak plasmas such as ITER, diagnostic neutral beams and beam spectroscopy will continue to be used to determine a variety of plasma parameters such as ion temperature, rotation, fluctuations, impurity content, current density profile, and confined alpha particle density and energy distribution. Present-day low-current, long-pulse beam technology will be unable to provide the required signal intensities because of higher beam attenuation and background bremsstrahlung radiation in these larger, higher-density plasmas. To address this problem, we are developing a short-pulse, intense diagnostic neutral beam. Protons or deuterons are accelerated using magnetic-insulated ion-diode technology, and neutralized in a transient gas cell. A prototype 25-kA, 100-kV, 1-{mu}s accelerator is under construction at Los Alamos. Initial experiments will focus on ITER-related issues of beam energy distribution, current density, pulse length, divergence, propagation, impurity content, reproducibility, and maintenance.

  2. Intense diagnostic neutral beam development for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Rej, D.J.; Henins, I. ); Fonck, R.J.; Kim, Y.J. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics)

    1992-01-01

    For the next-generation, burning tokamak plasmas such as ITER, diagnostic neutral beams and beam spectroscopy will continue to be used to determine a variety of plasma parameters such as ion temperature, rotation, fluctuations, impurity content, current density profile, and confined alpha particle density and energy distribution. Present-day low-current, long-pulse beam technology will be unable to provide the required signal intensities because of higher beam attenuation and background bremsstrahlung radiation in these larger, higher-density plasmas. To address this problem, we are developing a short-pulse, intense diagnostic neutral beam. Protons or deuterons are accelerated using magnetic-insulated ion-diode technology, and neutralized in a transient gas cell. A prototype 25-kA, 100-kV, 1-{mu}s accelerator is under construction at Los Alamos. Initial experiments will focus on ITER-related issues of beam energy distribution, current density, pulse length, divergence, propagation, impurity content, reproducibility, and maintenance.

  3. Recent development and progress of IBA cyclotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleeven, W.; Abs, M.; Delvaux, J. L.; Forton, E.; Jongen, Y.; Medeiros Romao, L.; Nactergal, B.; Nuttens, V.; Servais, T.; Vanderlinden, T.; Zaremba, S.

    2011-12-01

    Several cyclotron development projects were recently realized by Ion Beam Applications S.A. (IBA). This contribution presents three of them: (i) the intensity enhancement of the Cyclone 30 cyclotron, a machine mainly used for the production of SPECT isotopes. This project is related with the increased demand for 201Tl because of the shortage of Mo/Tc generators from nuclear reactors, (ii) development of a new versatile multiple-particle K = 30 isotope-production cyclotron (the Cyclone 30XP) being able to accelerate H -, D - and also α-particles. The α-beam of this cyclotron will allow the production of new therapeutic isotopes (e.g. 211At) and (iii) commissioning of the Cyclone 70 cyclotron installed for Arronax in France. This machine is similar to the C30XP but provides higher energy ( K = 70) and allows research on new types of medical isotopes.

  4. Production of beam of negative hydrogen and deuterium ions from source with electron cyclotron resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Golovanivskii, K.S.; Dzhayamanna, K.; Dugar-Zhabon, V.D.

    1988-09-01

    The GELIOS-H/sup /minus// ion source is described; it has electron cyclotron resonance and is designed for generation of negative hydrogen and deuterium ions. The source consumes up to 100 W of microwave power at a frequency of 2.4 GHz and provides a stationary beam of H/sup /minus// ions of up to 1.5 mA and D/sup /minus// ions of up to 1.0 mA for an exit-aperture diameter of 6.2 mm and an extraction voltage of 4.5 kV. The life of the source is limited only by the life of the microwave generator.

  5. Proton heating and beam formation via parametrically unstable Alfven-cyclotron waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsch, Eckart; Araneda, Jaime; -Vinas, Adolfo F.

    Vlasov theory and one-dimensional hybrid simulations are used to study the effects that compressible fluctuations driven by parametric instabilities of Alfvén/cyclotron waves have on proe ton velocity distributions. Field-aligned proton beams are generated during the saturation phase of the wave-particle interaction, with a drift speed which is slightly greater than the Alfvén speed and is maintained until the end of the simulation. The main part of the dise tribution becomes anisotropic due to phase mixing as is typically observed in the velocity distributions measured in the fast solar wind. We identify the key instabilities and also find that even in the parameter regime, where fluid theory appears to be appropriate, strong kinetic effects still prevail.

  6. Proton Core Heating and Beam Formation via Parametrically Unstable Alfven-Cyclotron Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Araneda, Jaime A.; Marsch, Eckart F.; Vinas, Adolfo

    2008-03-28

    Vlasov theory and one-dimensional hybrid simulations are used to study the effects that compressible fluctuations driven by parametric instabilities Alfven-cyclotron waves have on proton velocity distributions. Field-aligned proton beams are generated during the saturation phase of the wave-particle interaction, with a drift speed which is slightly greater than the Alfven speed and is maintained until the end of the simulation. The main part of the distribution becomes anisotropic due to phase mixing as is typically observed in the velocity distributions measured in the fast solar wind. We identify the key instabilities and also find that, even in the parameter regime where fluid theory appears to be appropriate, strong kinetic effects still prevail.

  7. A new and simple calibration-independent method for measuring the beam energy of a cyclotron.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Katherine; Jensen, Mikael; Thisgaard, Helge; Publicover, Julia; Lapi, Suzanne; McQuarrie, Steve A; Ruth, Thomas J

    2011-01-01

    This work recommends a new and simple-to-perform method for measuring the beam energy of an accelerator. The proposed method requires the irradiation of two monitor foils interspaced by an energy degrader. The primary advantage of the proposed method, which makes this method unique from previous energy evaluation strategies that employ the use of monitor foils, is that this method is independent of the detector efficiency calibration. This method was evaluated by performing proton activation of (nat)Cu foils using both a cyclotron and a tandem Van de Graaff accelerator. The monitor foil activities were read using a dose calibrator set to an arbitrary calibration setting. Excellent agreement was noted between the nominal and measured proton energies.

  8. Fast neutral beam ion source coupled to a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Nicholas C.; Limbach, Patrick A.; Shomo, Ronald E., II; Marshall, Alan G.; Appelhans, Anthony D.; Delmore, James E.

    1991-11-01

    The coupling of an autoneutralizing SF-6 fast ion-beam gun to a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT/ICR) mass spectrometer is described. The fast neutral beam provides for secondary-ion-type FT/ICR mass analysis [e.g., production of abundant pseudomolecular (M+H)+ ions] of involatile samples without the need for external ion injection, since ions are formed at the entrance to the ICR ion trap. The design, construction, and testing of the hybrid instrument are described. The feasibility of the experiment (for both broadband and high-resolution FT/ICR positive-ion mass spectra) is demonstrated with tetra-butylammonium bromide and a Tylenol■ sample. The ability to analyze high molecular weight polymers with high mass resolution is demonstrated for Teflon■. All of the advantages of the fast neutral beam ion source previously demonstrated with quadrupole mass analysis are preserved, and the additional advantages of FT/ICR mass analysis (e.g., high mass resolving power, ion trapping) are retained.

  9. Fast neutral beam ion source coupled to a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, N.C.; Limbach, P.A.; Shomo, R.E. II; Marshall, A.G. ); Appelhans, A.D.; Delmore, J.E. )

    1991-11-01

    The coupling of an autoneutralizing SF{sup {minus}}{sub 6} fast ion-beam gun to a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT/ICR) mass spectrometer is described. The fast neutral beam provides for secondary-ion-type FT/ICR mass analysis (e.g., production of abundant pseudomolecular (M+H){sup +} ions) of involatile samples without the need for external ion injection, since ions are formed at the entrance to the ICR ion trap. The design, construction, and testing of the hybrid instrument are described. The feasibility of the experiment (for both broadband and high-resolution FT/ICR positive-ion mass spectra) is demonstrated with {ital tetra}-butylammonium bromide and a Tylenol{sup ( )} sample. The ability to analyze high molecular weight polymers with high mass resolution is demonstrated for Teflon{sup ( )}. All of the advantages of the fast neutral beam ion source previously demonstrated with quadrupole mass analysis are preserved, and the additional advantages of FT/ICR mass analysis (e.g., high mass resolving power, ion trapping) are retained.

  10. Design of large vacuum chamber for VEC superconducting cyclotron beam line switching magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Sumantra; Nandi, Chinmoy; Gayen, Subhasis; Roy, Suvadeep; Mishra, Santosh Kumar; Ramrao Bajirao, Sanjay; Pal, Gautam; Mallik, C.

    2012-11-01

    VEC K500 superconducting cyclotron will be used to accelerate heavy ion. The accelerated beam will be transported to different beam halls by using large switching magnets. The vacuum chamber for the switching magnet is around 1000 mm long. It has a height of 85 mm and width varying from 100 mm to 360 mm. The material for the chamber has been chosen as SS304.The material for the vacuum chamber for the switching magnet has been chosen as SS304. Design of the vessel was done as per ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section VIII, Division 1. It was observed that primary stress values exceed the allowable limit. Since, the magnet was already designed with a fixed pole gap; increase of the vacuum chamber plate thickness restricts the space for beam transport. Design was optimized using stress analysis software ANSYS. Analysis was started using plate thickness of 4 mm. The stress was found higher than the allowable level. The analysis was repeated by increasing plate thickness to 6 mm, resulting in the reduction of stress level below the allowable level. In order to reduce the stress concentration due to sharp bend, chamfering was done at the corner, where the stress level was higher. The thickness of the plate at the corner was increased from 6 mm to 10 mm. These measures resulted in reduction of localized stress.

  11. Plating Processes Utilizing High Intensity Acoustic Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C. (Inventor); Denofrio, Charles (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A system and a method for selective plating processes are disclosed which use directed beams of high intensity acoustic waves to create non-linear effects that alter and improve the plating process. The directed beams are focused on the surface of an object, which in one embodiment is immersed in a plating solution, and in another embodiment is suspended above a plating solution. The plating processes provide precise control of the thickness of the layers of the plating, while at the same time, in at least some incidents, eliminates the need for masking.

  12. A gas-jet transport and catcher technique for on-line production of radioactive ion beams using an electron cyclotron resonance ion-source.

    PubMed

    Naik, V; Chakrabarti, A; Bhattacharjee, M; Karmakar, P; Bandyopadhyay, A; Bhattacharjee, S; Dechoudhury, S; Mondal, M; Pandey, H K; Lavanyakumar, D; Mandi, T K; Dutta, D P; Kundu Roy, T; Bhowmick, D; Sanyal, D; Srivastava, S C L; Ray, A; Ali, Md S

    2013-03-01

    Radioactive ion beams (RIB) have been produced on-line, using a gas-jet recoil transport coupled Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion-source at the VECC-RIB facility. Radioactive atoms∕molecules carried through the gas-jet were stopped in a catcher placed inside the ECR plasma chamber. A skimmer has been used to remove bulk of the carrier gas at the ECR entrance. The diffusion of atoms∕molecules through the catcher has been verified off-line using stable isotopes and on-line through transmission of radioactive reaction products. Beams of (14)O (71 s), (42)K (12.4 h), (43)K (22.2 h), and (41)Ar (1.8 h) have been produced by bombarding nitrogen and argon gas targets with proton and alpha particle beams from the K130 cyclotron at VECC. Typical measured intensity of RIB at the separator focal plane is found to be a few times 10(3) particles per second (pps). About 3.2 × 10(3) pps of 1.4 MeV (14)O RIB has been measured after acceleration through a radiofrequency quadrupole linac. The details of the gas-jet coupled ECR ion-source and RIB production experiments are presented along with the plans for the future.

  13. SU-E-T-388: Estimating the Radioactivity Inventory of a Cyclotron Based Pencil Beam Proton Therapy Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Langen, K; Chen, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Parts of the cyclotron and energy degrader are incidentally activated by protons lost during the acceleration and transport of protons for radiation therapy. An understanding of the radioactive material inventory is needed when regulatory requirements are assessed. Methods: First, the tumor dose and volume is used to determine the required energy deposition. For spot scanning, the tumor length along the beam path determines the number of required energy layers. For each energy layer the energy deposition per proton can be calculated from the residual proton range within the tumor. Assuming a typical layer weighting, an effective energy deposition per proton can then be calculated. The total number of required protons and the number of protons per energy layer can then be calculated. For each energy layer, proton losses in the energy degrader are calculated separately since its transmission efficiency, and hence the amount of protons lost, is energy dependent. The degrader efficiency also determines the number of protons requested from the cyclotron. The cyclotron extraction efficiency allows a calculation of the proton losses within the cyclotron. The saturation activity induced in the cyclotron and the degrader is equal to the production rate R for isotopes whose half-life is shorter that the projected cyclotron life time. R can be calculated from the proton loss rate and published production cross sections. Results: About 1/3 of the saturation activity is produced in the cyclotron and 2/3 in the energy degrader. For a projected case mix and a patient load of 1100 fractions per week at 1.8 Gy per fraction a combined activity of 180 mCi was estimated at saturation. Conclusion: Calculations were used to support to application of a radioactive materials license for the possession of 200 mCi of activity for isotopes with atomic numbers ranging from 1-83.

  14. A measurement of the fast-neutron sensitivity of a Geiger - Müller detector in the pulsed neutron beam from a superconducting cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maughan, R. L.; Yudelev, M.; Kota, C.

    1996-08-01

    The value of a commercially available miniature energy compensated Geiger - Müller (GM) detector has been determined using the modified lead attenuation method of Hough. The measurements were made in a d(48.5) - Be neutron beam produced by the superconducting cyclotron based neutron therapy facility at Harper Hospital. The unique problems associated with making measurements in a 2 ms duration pulsed beam with a 20% duty cycle are discussed. The beam monitoring system, which allows the beam pulse shape at low beam intensities to be measured, is described. By gating the GM output with a discriminator pulse derived from the beam pulse shape, the gamma-ray count rates and dead-time corrections within the 2 ms pulse and between pulses can be measured separately. The value of determined for this GM detector is consistent with the values measured by other workers with identical and similar detectors in neutron beams with comparable, but not identical, neutron spectra.

  15. Coherent light in intense spatiospectral twin beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peřina, Jan

    2016-06-01

    Intense spatio-spectral twin beams generated in the regime with pump depletion are analyzed applying a suggested quantum model that treats the signal, idler, and pump fields in the same way. The model assumes the signal and idler fields in the form of the generalized superposition of signal and noise and reveals nonzero signal coherent components in both fields, contrary to the models developed earlier. The influence of coherent components on the properties of intense twin beams is elucidated. The interference pattern formed in the process of sum-frequency generation and that of the Hong-Ou-Mandel interferometer are shown to be able to experimentally confirm the presence of coherent components.

  16. Ion cyclotron emission due to collective instability of fusion products and beam ions in TFTR and JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dendy, R. O.; McClements, K. G.; Lashmore-Davies, C. N.; Cottrell, G. A.; Majeski, R.; Cauffman, S.

    1995-12-01

    Ion cyclotron emission (ICE) has been observed from neutral beam heated TFTR, and JET tritium experiments at sequential cyclotron harmonics of both fusion products and beam ions. The emission originates from the outer midplane plasma, where fusion products and beam ions are likely to have a drifting ring-type velocity-space distribution that is anisotropic and sharply peaked. Fusion product driven ICE in both TFTR and JET can be attributed to the magnetoacoustic cyclotron instability, which involves the excitation of obliquely propagating waves on the fast Alfven/ion Bernstein branch at cyclotron harmonics of the fusion products. Differences between ICE observations in JET and TFTR appear to reflect the sensitivity of the instability growth rate to the ratio vbirth/cA where vbirth is the fusion product birth speed and cA is the local Alfven speed for fusion products in the outer midplane edge of TFTR supershots, vbirth < cA for alpha particles in the outer midplane edge of JET, the opposite inequality applies. If sub-Alfvenic fusion products are isotropic or have undergone even a moderate degree of thermalization, the magnetoacoustic instability cannot occur. In contrast, the super-Alfvenic alpha particles that are present in the outer midplane of JET can drive the magnetoacoustic cyclotron instability even if they are isotropic or have a relatively broad distribution of speeds. These conclusions may account for the observation that fusion product driven ICE in JET persists for longer than fusion product driven ICE in TFTR. Moreover, the time evolution of the maximum growth rate, obtained using the Sigmar model for the alpha particle distribution and TFTR data for the fusion product source rate, closely follows the observed time evolution of the ICE amplitude in TFTR supershot discharges. Other observed features of fusion product driven ICE that match the linear instability include the scaling with fusion product density, doublet splitting of spectral peaks, the

  17. Positron microanalysis with high intensity beams

    SciTech Connect

    Hulett, L.D. Jr.; Donohue, D.L.

    1990-01-01

    One of the more common applications for a high intensity slow positron facility will be microanalysis of solid materials. In the first section of this paper some examples are given of procedures that can be developed. Since most of the attendees of this workshop are experts in positron spectroscopy, comprehensive descriptions will be omitted. With the exception of positron emission microscopy, most of the procedures will be based on those already in common use with broad beams. The utility of the methods have all been demonstrated, but material scientists use very few of them because positron microbeams are not generally available. A high intensity positron facility will make microbeams easier to obtain and partially alleviate this situation. All microanalysis techniques listed below will have a common requirement, which is the ability to locate the microscopic detail or area of interest and to focus the positron beam exclusively on it. The last section of this paper is a suggestion of how a high intensity positron facility might be designed so as to have this capability built in. The method will involve locating the specimen by scanning it with the microbeam of positrons and inducing a secondary electron image that will immediately reveal whether or not the positron beam is striking the proper portion of the specimen. This scanning positron microscope' will be a somewhat prosaic analog of the conventional SEM. It will, however, be an indispensable utility that will enhance the practicality of positron microanalysis techniques. 6 refs., 1 fig.

  18. Comparison of short-lived medical isotopes activation by laser thin target induced protons and conventional cyclotron proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Joseph; Dudnikova, Galina; Liu, Tung-Chang; Papadopoulos, Dennis; Sagdeev, Roald; Su, J. J.; UMD MicroPET Team

    2014-10-01

    Production diagnostic or therapeutic nuclear medicines are either by nuclear reactors or by ion accelerators. In general, diagnostic nuclear radioisotopes have a very short half-life varying from tens of minutes for PET tracers and few hours for SPECT tracers. Thus supplies of PET and SPECT radiotracers are limited by regional production facilities. For example 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) is the most desired tracer for positron emission tomography because its 110 minutes half-life is sufficient long for transport from production facilities to nearby users. From nuclear activation to completing image taking must be done within 4 hours. Decentralized production of diagnostic radioisotopes will be idea to make high specific activity radiotracers available to researches and clinicians. 11 C, 13 N, 15 O and 18 F can be produced in the energy range from 10-20 MeV by protons. Protons of energies up to tens of MeV generated by intense laser interacting with hydrogen containing targets have been demonstrated by many groups in the past decade. We use 2D PIC code for proton acceleration, Geant4 Monte Carlo code for nuclei activation to compare the yields and specific activities of short-lived isotopes produced by cyclotron proton beams and laser driven protons.

  19. A 2D simulation study of Langmuir, whistler, and cyclotron maser instabilities induced by an electron ring-beam distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K. H.; Lee, L. C.; Omura, Y.

    2011-09-15

    We carried out a series of 2D simulations to study the beam instability and cyclotron maser instability (CMI) with the initial condition that a population of tenuous energetic electrons with a ring-beam distribution is present in a magnetized background plasma. In this paper, weakly relativistic cases are discussed with the ring-beam kinetic energy ranging from 25 to 100 keV. The beam component leads to the two-stream or beam instability at an earlier stage, and the beam mode is coupled with Langmuir or whistler mode, leading to excitation of beam-Langmuir or beam-whistler waves. When the beam velocity is large with a strong beam instability, the initial ring-beam distribution is diffused in the parallel direction rapidly. The diffused distribution may still support CMI to amplify the X1 mode (the fundamental X mode). On the contrary, when the beam velocity is small and the beam instability is weak, CMI can amplify the Z1 (the fundamental Z mode) effectively while the O1 (the fundamental O mode) and X2 (the second harmonic X mode) modes are very weak and the X1 mode is not excited. In this report, different cases with various parameters are presented and discussed for a comprehensive understanding of ring-beam instabilities.

  20. Development of a laser ion source for production of high-intensity heavy-ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashiwagi, H.; Yamada, K.; Kurashima, S.

    2017-09-01

    A laser ion source has been developed as a high-intensity source for the ion implanter and the single pulsed beam of the azimuthally varying field cyclotron at TIARA. Highly charged beams of C5+ and C6+ ions and low-charged beams of heavy ions such as C, Al, Ti, Cu, Au, and Pt are required for the single-pulse acceleration in the cyclotron and for the ion implanter, respectively. In the vacuum chamber of the ion source, a target holder on a three-dimensional linear-motion stage provides a fresh surface for each laser shot. A large-sized target with a maximum size of 300 mm × 135 mm is mounted on the holder for long-term operation. The ion current (ion charge flux) in the laser-produced plasma is measured by a Faraday cup and time-of-flight spectra of each charge state are measured using a 90° cylindrical electrostatic analyzer just behind the Faraday cup. Carbon-plasma-generation experiments indicate that the source produces intense high- and low-charged pulsed ion beams. At a laser energy of 483 mJ (2.3 × 1013 W/cm2), average C6+ current of 13 mA and average C5+ current of 23 mA were obtained over the required time duration for single-pulse acceleration in the cyclotron (49 ns for C6+ and 80 ns for C5+). Furthermore, at 45 mJ (2.1 × 1012 W/cm2), an average C2+ current of 1.6 mA over 0.88 μs is obtained.

  1. Influence of constant, alternating and cyclotron low-intensity electromagnetic fields on fibroblast proliferative activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Afinogenov, Gennadi; Afinogenova, Anna; Kalinin, Andrey

    2009-12-16

    Available data allow assuming the presence of stimulation of reparative processes under influence of low-intensity electromagnetic field, commensurable with a magnetic field of the Earth. Research of effects of low-intensity electromagnetic fields on fibroblast proliferative activity in human lungs in cell culture was performed.The influence of a constant electromagnetic field, an alternating electromagnetic field by frequency of 50 Hz and cyclotron electromagnetic field with identical intensity for all kinds of fields - 80 mcTl - on value of cellular mass and a correlation of live and dead cells in culture is investigated in three series of experiments. We used the universal electromagnetic radiator generating all three kinds of fields and supplied by a magnetometer which allows measuring the intensity of accurate within 0.1 mcTl including taking into account the Earth's magnetic field intensity.The peak value for stimulation cellular proliferation in the present experiences was two-hour influence by any of the specified kinds of electromagnetic fields. The irradiation by cyclotron electromagnetic field conducts positive dynamics in growth of live cells (up to 206+/-22%) and decreases the number of dead cells (down to 31+/-6%). Application of cyclotron magnetic fields promoted creation of optimum conditions for proliferation. As a result of researches we observed the reliable 30% increase of nitro-tetrazolium index (in nitro-tetrazolium blue test) after irradiation by cyclotron electromagnetic field in experience that testifies to strengthening of the cell breathing of living cells.In our opinion, it is necessary to pay attention not only to a pure gain of cells, but also to reduction of number dead cells that can be criterion of creation of optimum conditions for their specific development and valuable functioning.

  2. Cyclotron resonance in epitaxial Bi1-xSbx films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heremans, J.; Partin, D. L.; Thrush, C. M.; Karczewski, G.; Richardson, M. S.; Furdyna, J. K.

    1993-10-01

    The far-infrared magnetotransmission of thin films of semiconducting and semimetallic Bi1-xSbx alloys grown by molecular-beam epitaxy has been measured at fixed photon energies between 2.5 and 21.4 meV in magnetic fields up to 6 T, at T=1.8 K. The samples, grown on BaF2 substrates with composition 0<=x<=22.5%, were monocrystalline, with the trigonal axis perpendicular to the surface plane. The measurements were carried out in Faraday and Voigt geometries, with the magnetic field oriented parallel to binary, bisectrix, and trigonal axes of the films. Cyclotron-resonance lines of both electrons and holes were observed. From them, we establish the composition dependence of the effective-mass tensor, of the direct L-point band gap, and of the energy overlap in the semimetallic samples. We conclude that all band-structure parameters are the same in the films as in bulk Bi1-xSbx alloys, except for the energy overlap, which is increased by 16 meV independently of composition, possibly because of the strain induced by the substrate.

  3. Proton beam dosimetry for radiosurgery: implementation of the ICRU Report 59 at the Harvard Cyclotron Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Newhauser, Wayne D; Myers, Karla D; Rosenthal, Stanley J; Smith, Alfred R

    2002-04-21

    Recent proton dosimetry intercomparisons have demonstrated that the adoption of a common protocol, e.g. ICRU Report 59, can lead to improved consistency in absorbed dose determinations. We compared absorbed dose values, measured in the 160 MeV proton radiosurgery beamline at the Harvard Cyclotron Laboratory, based on ionization chamber methods with those from a Faraday cup technique. The Faraday cup method is based on a proton fluence determination that allows the estimation of absorbed dose with the CEMA approximation, under which the dose is equal to the fluence times the mean mass stopping power. The ionization chamber technique employs an air-kerma calibration coefficient for 60Co radiation and a calculated correction in order to take into account the differences in response to 60Co and proton beam radiations. The absorbed dose to water, based on a diode measurement calibrated with a Faraday cup technique, is approximately 2% higher than was obtained from an ionization chamber measurement. At the Bragg peak depth, the techniques agree to within their respective uncertainties, which are both approximately 4% (1 standard deviation). The ionization chamber technique exhibited superior reproducibility and was adopted in our standard clinical practice for radiosurgery.

  4. Proton beam dosimetry for radiosurgery: implementation of the ICRU Report 59 at the Harvard Cyclotron Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newhauser, Wayne D.; Myers, Karla D.; Rosenthal, Stanley J.; Smith, Alfred R.

    2002-04-01

    Recent proton dosimetry intercomparisons have demonstrated that the adoption of a common protocol, e.g. ICRU Report 59, can lead to improved consistency in absorbed dose determinations. We compared absorbed dose values, measured in the 160 MeV proton radiosurgery beamline at the Harvard Cyclotron Laboratory, based on ionization chamber methods with those from a Faraday cup technique. The Faraday cup method is based on a proton fluence determination that allows the estimation of absorbed dose with the CEMA approximation, under which the dose is equal to the fluence times the mean mass stopping power. The ionization chamber technique employs an air-kerma calibration coefficient for 60Co radiation and a calculated correction in order to take into account the differences in response to 60Co and proton beam radiations. The absorbed dose to water, based on a diode measurement calibrated with a Faraday cup technique, is approximately 2% higher than was obtained from an ionization chamber measurement. At the Bragg peak depth, the techniques agree to within their respective uncertainties, which are both approximately 4% (1 standard deviation). The ionization chamber technique exhibited superior reproducibility and was adopted in our standard clinical practice for radiosurgery.

  5. Cyclotrons: From Science to Human Health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craddock, Michael

    2011-04-01

    Lawrence's invention of the cyclotron, whose 80th anniversary we have just celebrated, not only revolutionized nuclear physics, but proved the starting point for a whole variety of recirculating accelerators, from the smallest microtron to the largest synchrotron, that have had an enormous impact in almost every branch of science and in several areas of medicine and industry. Cyclotrons themselves have proved remarkably adaptable, incorporating a variety of new ideas and technologies over the years: frequency modulation, edge focusing, AG focusing, separate magnet sectors, axial and azimuthal injection, ring geometries, stripping extraction, superconducting magnets and rf...... Even FFAGs, those most complex members of the cyclotron (fixed-magnetic-field) family, are making a comeback. Currently there are more than 50 medium or large cyclotrons around the world devoted to research. These provide intense primary beams of protons or stable ions, and correspondingly intense secondary beams of neutrons, pions, muons and radioactive ions, for experiments in nuclear, particle and condensed-matter physics, and in the materials and life sciences. Far outnumbering these, however, are the 800 or so small and medium cyclotrons used to produce radioisotopes for medical and other purposes. In addition, a rapidly growing number of 230-MeV proton cyclotrons are being built for cancer therapy -12 brought into operation since 1998 and as many more in the works. Altogether, cyclotrons are flourishing!

  6. Adaptive Vlasov Simulations of Intense Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnendruecker, Eric; Gutnic, Michael; Haefele, Matthieu; Lemaire, Jean-Louis

    2005-06-08

    Most simulations of intense particle beams are performed nowadays using Particle In Cell (PIC) techniques. Direct grid based Vlasov methods have also been used but mostly for 1D simulations as they become very costly in higher dimensions when using uniform phase space grids. We have recently introduced adaptive mesh refinement techniques that allow us to automatically concentrate the grid points at places where the distribution function is varying most. In this paper we shall introduce this technique and show how it can be used to improve the efficiency of grid based Vlasov solvers.

  7. Beam loss studies in high-intensity heavy-ion linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Aseev, V. N.; Mustapha, B.

    2004-09-01

    The proposed Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) Facility, an innovative exotic-beam facility for the production of high-quality beams of short-lived isotopes, consists of a fully superconducting 1.4GV driver linac and a 140MV postaccelerator. To produce sufficient intensities of secondary beams the driver linac will provide 400kW primary beams of any ion from hydrogen to uranium. Because of the high intensity of the primary beams the beam losses must be minimized to avoid radioactivation of the accelerator equipment. To keep the power deposited by the particles lost on the accelerator structures below 1 W/m, the relative beam losses per unit length should be less than 10-5, especially along the high-energy section of the linac. A new beam dynamics simulation code TRACK has been developed and used for beam loss studies in the RIA driver linac. In the TRACK code, ions are tracked through the three-dimensional electromagnetic fields of every element of the linac starting from the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source to the production target. The simulation starts with a multicomponent dc ion beam extracted from the ECR. The space charge forces are included in the simulations. They are especially important in the front end of the driver linac. Beam losses are studied by tracking a large number of particles (up to 106) through the whole linac considering all sources of error such us element misalignments, rf field errors, and stripper thickness fluctuations. For each configuration of the linac, multiple sets of error values have been randomly generated and used in the calculations. The results are then combined to calculate important beam parameters, estimate beam losses, and characterize the corresponding linac configuration. To track a large number of particles for a comprehensive number of error sets (up to 500), the code TRACK was parallelized and run on the Jazz computer cluster at ANL.

  8. Final report to US Department of Energy: Cyclotron autoresonance accelerator for electron beam dry scrubbing of flue gases

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, J.L.

    2001-05-25

    Several designs have been built and operated of microwave cyclotron autoresonance accelerators (CARA's) with electron beam parameters suitable for remediation of pollutants in flue gas emissions from coal-burning power plants. CARA designs have also been developed with a TW-level 10.6 micron laser driver for electron acceleration from 50 to 100 MeV, and with UHF drivers for proton acceleration to over 500 MeV. Dose requirements for reducing SO2, NOx, and particulates in flue gas emissions to acceptable levels have been surveyed, and used to optimize the design of an electron beam source to deliver this dose.

  9. Progress toward a microsecond duration, repetitively pulsed, intense- ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, H.A.; Olson, J.C.; Reass, W.A.; Coates, D.M.; Hunt, J.W.; Schleinitz, H.M.; Lovberg, R.H.; Greenly, J.B.

    1996-07-01

    A number of intense ion beams applications are emerging requiring repetitive high-average-power beams. These applications include ablative deposition of thin films, rapid melt and resolidification for surface property enhancement, advanced diagnostic neutral beams for the next generation of Tokamaks, and intense pulsed-neutron sources. We are developing a 200-250 keV, 15 kA, 1 {mu}s duration, 1-30 Hz intense ion beam accelerator to address these applications.

  10. New tandem type ion source based on electron cyclotron resonance for universal source of synthesized ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Yushi Kurisu, Yosuke; Nozaki, Dai; Yano, Keisuke; Kimura, Daiju; Kumakura, Sho; Imai, Youta; Nishiokada, Takuya; Sato, Fuminobu; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2014-02-15

    A new tandem type source has been constructed on the basis of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma for producing synthesized ion beams. We investigate feasibility and hope to realize the device which has wide range operation window in a single device to produce many kinds of ion beams based on ECR ion source (ECRIS). It is considered that ECR plasmas are necessary to be available to individual operations with different plasma parameters. Both of analysis of ion beams and investigation of plasma parameters are conducted on produced plasmas. We describe construction of the new tandem type ion source based on ECRIS with wide operation window for aiming at producing synthesized ion beams as this new source can be a universal source.

  11. New tandem type ion source based on electron cyclotron resonance for universal source of synthesized ion beams.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yushi; Kurisu, Yosuke; Nozaki, Dai; Yano, Keisuke; Kimura, Daiju; Kumakura, Sho; Imai, Youta; Nishiokada, Takuya; Sato, Fuminobu; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2014-02-01

    A new tandem type source has been constructed on the basis of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma for producing synthesized ion beams. We investigate feasibility and hope to realize the device which has wide range operation window in a single device to produce many kinds of ion beams based on ECR ion source (ECRIS). It is considered that ECR plasmas are necessary to be available to individual operations with different plasma parameters. Both of analysis of ion beams and investigation of plasma parameters are conducted on produced plasmas. We describe construction of the new tandem type ion source based on ECRIS with wide operation window for aiming at producing synthesized ion beams as this new source can be a universal source.

  12. Intense ion beam optimization and characterization with thermal imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, H.A.; Bartsch, R.R.; Rej, D.J.; Waganaar, W.J.

    1994-08-01

    The authors have developed thermal imaging of beam targets to optimize and characterize intense ion beams. The technique, which measures the beam energy-density distribution on each machine firing, has been used to rapidly develop and characterize two very different beams--a 400 kV beam used to study materials processing, and an 80 kV beam use for magnetic fusion diagnostics.

  13. Self-Induced Transparency and Electromagnetic Pulse Compression in a Plasma or an Electron Beam under Cyclotron Resonance Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ginzburg, N. S.; Zotova, I. V.; Sergeev, A. S.

    2010-12-30

    Based on analogy to the well-known process of the self-induced transparency of an optical pulse propagating through a passive two-level medium we describe similar effects for a microwave pulse interacting with a cold plasma or rectilinear electron beam under cyclotron resonance condition. It is shown that with increasing amplitude and duration of an incident pulse the linear cyclotron absorption is replaced by the self-induced transparency when the pulse propagates without damping. In fact, the initial pulse decomposes to one or several solitons with amplitude and duration defined by its velocity. In a certain parameter range, the single soliton formation is accompanied by significant compression of the initial electromagnetic pulse. We suggest using the effect of self-compression for producing multigigawatt picosecond microwave pulses.

  14. Transverse beam shape measurements of intense proton beams using optical transition radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Scarpine, Victor E.; /Fermilab

    2012-03-01

    A number of particle physics experiments are being proposed as part of the Department of Energy HEP Intensity Frontier. Many of these experiments will utilize megawatt level proton beams onto targets to form secondary beams of muons, kaons and neutrinos. These experiments require transverse size measurements of the incident proton beam onto target for each beam spill. Because of the high power levels, most beam intercepting profiling techniques will not work at full beam intensity. The possibility of utilizing optical transition radiation (OTR) for high intensity proton beam profiling is discussed. In addition, previous measurements of OTR beam profiles from the NuMI beamline are presented.

  15. Transverse Beam Shape Measurements of Intense Proton Beams Using Optical Transition Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarpine, Victor E.

    A number of particle physics experiments are being proposed as part of the Department of Energy HEP Intensity Frontier. Many of these experiments will utilize megawatt level proton beams onto targets to form secondary beams of muons, kaons and neutrinos. These experiments require transverse size measurements of the incident proton beam onto target for each beam spill. Because of the high power levels, most beam intercepting profiling techniques will not work at full beam intensity. The possibility of utilizing optical transition radiation (OTR) for high intensity proton beam profiling is discussed. In addition, previous measurements of OTR beam profiles from the NuMI beamline are presented.

  16. Funnel cone for focusing intense ion beams on a target

    SciTech Connect

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Ni, P.

    2009-10-05

    We describe a funnel cone for concentrating an ion beam on a target. The cone utilizes the reflection characteristic of ion beams on solid walls to focus the incident beam andincrease beam intensity on target. The cone has been modeled with the TRIM code. A prototype has been tested and installed for use in the 350-keV K+ NDCX target chamber.

  17. Intense muon beams and neutrino factories

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.

    2000-10-05

    High intensity muon sources are needed in exploring neutrino factories, lepton flavor violating muon processes, and lower energy experiments as the stepping phase towards building higher energy {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} colliders. We present a brief overview, sketch of a neutrino source, and an example of a muon storage ring at BNL with detector(s) at Fermilab, Sudan, etc. Physics with low energy neutrino beams based on muon storage rings ({mu}SR) and conventional Horn Facilities are described and compared. CP violation Asymmetries and a new Statistical Figure of Merit to be used for comparison is given. Improvements in the sensitivity of low energy experiments to study Flavor changing neutral currents are also included.

  18. Materials processing with intense pulsed ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Rej, D.J.; Davis, H.A.; Olson, J.C.

    1996-12-31

    We review research investigating the application of intense pulsed ion beams (IPIBs) for the surface treatment and coating of materials. The short range (0.1-10 {mu}m) and high-energy density (1-50 J/cm{sup 2}) of these short-pulsed ({le} 1 {mu}s) beams (with ion currents I = 5 - 50 kA, and energies E = 100 - 1000 keV) make them ideal to flash-heat a target surface, similar to the more familiar pulsed laser processes. IPIB surface treatment induces rapid melt and solidification at up to 10{sup 10} K/s to cause amorphous layer formation and the production of non-equilibrium microstructures. At higher energy density the target surface is vaporized, and the ablated vapor is condensed as coatings onto adjacent substrates or as nanophase powders. Progress towards the development of robust, high-repetition rate IPIB accelerators is presented along with economic estimates for the cost of ownership of this technology.

  19. A room temperature electron cyclotron resonance ion source for the DC-110 cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Efremov, A. Bogomolov, S.; Lebedev, A.; Loginov, V.; Yazvitsky, N.

    2014-02-15

    The project of the DC-110 cyclotron facility to provide applied research in the nanotechnologies (track pore membranes, surface modification of materials, etc.) has been designed by the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Dubna). The facility includes the isochronous cyclotron DC-110 for accelerating the intensive Ar, Kr, Xe ion beams with 2.5 MeV/nucleon fixed energy. The cyclotron is equipped with system of axial injection and ECR ion source DECRIS-5, operating at the frequency of 18 GHz. This article reviews the design and construction of DECRIS-5 ion source along with some initial commissioning results.

  20. Far-field intensity of Lorentz related beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Xi; Chen, Chidao; Chen, Bo; Peng, Yulian; Zhou, Meiling; Zhang, Liping; Li, Dongdong; Deng, Dongmei

    2016-12-01

    We introduce a sufficient condition under which the Lorentz beam convolution with other beams constitutes valid cross-spectral densities. Two examples are given to show how the Lorentz related beam can be used for generation of a far field being a modulated version of another one. The far-field intensity patterns in the Cartesian symmetries by the convolution operation of the Lorentz beams with multi-sinc beams, and the convolution operation of the Lorentz beams with multi-sinc Gaussian beams, are shown respectively. We find that different beam order can result distinct far field changes.

  1. Potential of cyclotron based accelerators for energy production and transmutation

    SciTech Connect

    Stammbach, T.; Adam, S.; Fitze, H.R.

    1995-10-01

    PSI operates a 590 MeV-cyclotron facility for high intensity proton beams for the production of intense beams of pions and muons. The facility, commissioned in 1974, has been partially upgraded and is now operated routinely at a beam current of 1 mA, which corresponds to a beam power of 0.6 MW. At this current, the beam losses in the cyclotron are about 0.02%. By the end of 1995 the authors expect to have 1.5 mA of protons. Extensive theoretical investigations on beam current limitations in isochronous cyclotrons were undertaken. They show that the longitudinal space charge effects dominate. Based on their experience the authors present a preliminary design of a cyclotron scheme that could produce a 10 MW beam as a driver for an {open_quotes}energy amplifier{close_quotes} as proposed by C. Rubbia and his collaborators. The expected efficiency for the conversion of AC into beam power would be about 50% (for the RF-systems only). The beam losses in the cyclotron are expected to be a few {mu}A, leading to a tolerable activation level.

  2. Experimental study on the electric-sweep scanner and ion beam emittance of electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Y.; Sun, L.T.; Ma, L.; Ma, B.H.; Wang, H.; Feng, Y.C.; Li, J.Y.; Zhao, H.W.; Zhang, Z.M.; Zhang, X.Z.; He, W.; Zhao, H.Y.; Guo, X.; Li, X.X.

    2006-03-15

    With a latest developed electric-sweep scanner system, we have done a lot of experiments for studying this scanner system and ion beam emittance of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source. The electric-sweep scanner system was installed on the beam line of Lanzhou electron resonance ion source No. 3 experimental platform of Institute of Modern Physics. The repetition experiments have proven that the system is a relatively dependable and reliable emittance scanner, and its experiment error is about 10%. We have studied the influences of the major parameters of ECR ion source on the extracted ion beam emittance. The typical results of the experiments and the conclusions are presented in this article.

  3. Longitudinal Density Modulation and Energy Conversion in Intense Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J; Neumann, J; Tian, K; O'Shea, P

    2006-02-17

    Density modulation of charged particle beams may occur as a consequence of deliberate action, or may occur inadvertently because of imperfections in the particle source or acceleration method. In the case of intense beams, where space charge and external focusing govern the beam dynamics, density modulation may under some circumstances be converted to velocity modulation, with a corresponding conversion of potential energy to kinetic energy. Whether this will occur depends on the properties of the beam and the initial modulation. This paper describes the evolution of discrete and continuous density modulations on intense beams, and discusses three recent experiments related to the dynamics of density-modulated electron beams.

  4. The Influence of Neutral Beam Injection on the Heating and Current Drive with Electron Cyclotron Wave on EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Pengxiang; Wu, Bin; Wang, Jinfang; Li, Yingying; Wang, Xiaoguang; Xu, Handong; Wang, Xiaojie; Liu, Yong; Zhao, Hailin; Hao, Baolong; Yang, Zhen; Zheng, Ting; Hu, Chundong

    2016-11-01

    Both neutral beam injection (NBI) and electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) have been applied on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) in the 2015 campaign. In order to achieve more effective heating and current drive, the effects of NBI on the heating and current drive with electron cyclotron wave (ECW) are analyzed utilizing the code TORAY and experimental data in the shot #54411 and #54417. According to the experimental and simulated results, for the heating with ECW, NBI can improve the heating efficiency and move the power deposition place towards the inside of the plasma. On the other hand, for the electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD), NBI can also improve the efficiency of ECCD and move the place of ECCD inward. These results will be valuable for the center heating, the achievement of fully non-inductive current drive operation and the suppression of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities with ECW on EAST or ITER with many auxiliary heating methods. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Nos. 2013GB101001 and 2014DFG61950) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11405212 and 11175211)

  5. On-line measurements of proton beam current from a PET cyclotron using a thin aluminum foil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghithan, S.; do Carmo, S. J. C.; Ferreira Marques, R.; Fraga, F. A. F.; Simões, H.; Alves, F.; Crespo, P.

    2013-07-01

    The number of cyclotrons capable of accelerating protons to about 20 MeV is increasing throughout the world. Originally aiming at the production of positron emission tomography (PET) radionuclides, some of these facilities are equipped with several beam lines suitable for scientific research. Radiobiology, radiophysiology, and other dosimetric studies can be performed using these beam lines. In this work, we measured the Bragg peak of the protons from a PET cyclotron using a stacked target consisting of several aluminum foils interleaved with polyethylene sheets, readout by in-house made transimpedance electronics. The measured Bragg peak is consistent with simulations performed using the SRIM/TRIM simulation toolkit. Furthermore, we report on experimental results aiming at measuring proton beam currents down to 10 pA using a thin aluminum foil (20-μm-thick). The aluminum was chosen for this task because it is radiation hard, it has low density and low radiation activity, and finally because it is easily available at negligible cost. This method allows for calculating the dose delivered to a target during an irradiation with high efficiency, and with minimal proton energy loss and scattering.

  6. Upgrade of the beam extraction system of the GTS-LHC electron cyclotron resonance ion source at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toivanen, V.; Bellodi, G.; Dimov, V.; Küchler, D.; Lombardi, A. M.; Maintrot, M.

    2016-02-01

    Linac3 is the first accelerator in the heavy ion injector chain of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), providing multiply charged heavy ion beams for the CERN experimental program. The ion beams are produced with GTS-LHC, a 14.5 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source, operated in afterglow mode. Improvement of the GTS-LHC beam formation and beam transport along Linac3 is part of the upgrade program of the injector chain in preparation for the future high luminosity LHC. A mismatch between the ion beam properties in the ion source extraction region and the acceptance of the following Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) section has been identified as one of the factors limiting the Linac3 performance. The installation of a new focusing element, an einzel lens, into the GTS-LHC extraction region is foreseen as a part of the Linac3 upgrade, as well as a redesign of the first section of the LEBT. Details of the upgrade and results of a beam dynamics study of the extraction region and LEBT modifications will be presented.

  7. Upgrade of the beam extraction system of the GTS-LHC electron cyclotron resonance ion source at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Toivanen, V. Bellodi, G.; Dimov, V.; Küchler, D.; Lombardi, A. M.; Maintrot, M.

    2016-02-15

    Linac3 is the first accelerator in the heavy ion injector chain of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), providing multiply charged heavy ion beams for the CERN experimental program. The ion beams are produced with GTS-LHC, a 14.5 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source, operated in afterglow mode. Improvement of the GTS-LHC beam formation and beam transport along Linac3 is part of the upgrade program of the injector chain in preparation for the future high luminosity LHC. A mismatch between the ion beam properties in the ion source extraction region and the acceptance of the following Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) section has been identified as one of the factors limiting the Linac3 performance. The installation of a new focusing element, an einzel lens, into the GTS-LHC extraction region is foreseen as a part of the Linac3 upgrade, as well as a redesign of the first section of the LEBT. Details of the upgrade and results of a beam dynamics study of the extraction region and LEBT modifications will be presented.

  8. Upgrade of the beam extraction system of the GTS-LHC electron cyclotron resonance ion source at CERN.

    PubMed

    Toivanen, V; Bellodi, G; Dimov, V; Küchler, D; Lombardi, A M; Maintrot, M

    2016-02-01

    Linac3 is the first accelerator in the heavy ion injector chain of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), providing multiply charged heavy ion beams for the CERN experimental program. The ion beams are produced with GTS-LHC, a 14.5 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source, operated in afterglow mode. Improvement of the GTS-LHC beam formation and beam transport along Linac3 is part of the upgrade program of the injector chain in preparation for the future high luminosity LHC. A mismatch between the ion beam properties in the ion source extraction region and the acceptance of the following Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) section has been identified as one of the factors limiting the Linac3 performance. The installation of a new focusing element, an einzel lens, into the GTS-LHC extraction region is foreseen as a part of the Linac3 upgrade, as well as a redesign of the first section of the LEBT. Details of the upgrade and results of a beam dynamics study of the extraction region and LEBT modifications will be presented.

  9. Intense beams: The past, present, and future

    SciTech Connect

    Yonas, G.; Sweeney, M.A.

    1998-06-01

    Nobody could have predicted the circuitous course of the last 30 years of progress in intense beams and pulsed power. There were many discoveries and twists and turns along the way, but the steady flow of understanding and technological advances has sustained the field. Pulsed power research began in the early 1960s with the development of the technology to test the reliability of nuclear weapons in a pulsed radiation environment. Because of the effort in the 1970s on an electron beam approach to inertial confinement fusion (ICF) at Sandia National Laboratories and at the Kurchatov Institute, simulation codes, diagnostics, and innovative pulsed power techniques such as self-magnetic insulation were developed. The electron approach ended in 1979, and the more promising ion approach continued. At the same time, z pinches, used since the early 1970s to evaluate the response of materials to keV X rays, were considered as an alternative to drive ICF capsules. The use of z pinches for ICF was discontinued in 1984 because of budget cuts and the belief that ions offered a route to the standoff requirement for energy applications. Now, in 1998, because of budget limitations and the 1995 discovery that the soft x-ray power achievable in a z-pinch implosion can be greatly enhanced, the ion approach has been suspended, and a new facility, X-1, proposed to achieve high yield in the laboratory with z pinches. In this paper the authors review the research paths that led to these changes, describe the present status of z pinches, and predict what the future holds. Although nobody can predict the future, the past 30 years have taught us some lessons that can be applied to the next 30 years. The paper concludes with some of these lessons learned.

  10. Intense beams from gases generated by a permanent magnet ECR ion source at PKUa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, H. T.; Peng, S. X.; Lu, P. N.; Yan, S.; Zhou, Q. F.; Zhao, J.; Yuan, Z. X.; Guo, Z. Y.; Chen, J. E.

    2012-02-01

    An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source is designed for the production of high-current ion beams of various gaseous elements. At the Peking University (PKU), the primary study is focused on developing suitable permanent magnet ECR ion sources (PMECRs) for separated function radio frequency quadrupole (SFRFQ) accelerator and for Peking University Neutron Imaging Facility. Recently, other kinds of high-intensity ion beams are required for new acceleration structure demonstration, simulation of fusion reactor material irradiation, aviation bearing modification, and other applications. So we expanded the ion beam category from O+, H+, and D+ to N+, Ar+, and He+. Up to now, about 120 mA of H+, 83 mA of D+, 50 mA of O+, 63 mA of N+, 70 mA of Ar+, and 65 mA of He+ extracted at 50 kV through a ϕ 6 mm aperture were produced by the PMECRs at PKU. Their rms emittances are less than 0.2 π mm mrad. Tungsten samples were irradiated by H+ or He+ beam extracted from this ion source and H/He holes and bubbles have been observed on the samples. A method to produce a high intensity H/He mixed beam to study synergistic effect is developed for nuclear material irradiation. To design a He+ beam injector for coupled radio frequency quadruple and SFRFQ cavity, He+ beam transmission experiments were carried out on PKU low energy beam transport test bench and the transmission was less than 50%. It indicated that some electrode modifications must be done to decrease the divergence of He+ beam.

  11. Intense beams from gases generated by a permanent magnet ECR ion source at PKU

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, H. T.; Chen, J. E.; Peng, S. X.; Lu, P. N.; Yan, S.; Zhou, Q. F.; Zhao, J.; Yuan, Z. X.; Guo, Z. Y.

    2012-02-15

    An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source is designed for the production of high-current ion beams of various gaseous elements. At the Peking University (PKU), the primary study is focused on developing suitable permanent magnet ECR ion sources (PMECRs) for separated function radio frequency quadrupole (SFRFQ) accelerator and for Peking University Neutron Imaging Facility. Recently, other kinds of high-intensity ion beams are required for new acceleration structure demonstration, simulation of fusion reactor material irradiation, aviation bearing modification, and other applications. So we expanded the ion beam category from O{sup +}, H{sup +}, and D{sup +} to N{sup +}, Ar{sup +}, and He{sup +}. Up to now, about 120 mA of H{sup +}, 83 mA of D{sup +}, 50 mA of O{sup +}, 63 mA of N{sup +}, 70 mA of Ar{sup +}, and 65 mA of He{sup +} extracted at 50 kV through a {phi} 6 mm aperture were produced by the PMECRs at PKU. Their rms emittances are less than 0.2 {pi} mm mrad. Tungsten samples were irradiated by H{sup +} or He{sup +} beam extracted from this ion source and H/He holes and bubbles have been observed on the samples. A method to produce a high intensity H/He mixed beam to study synergistic effect is developed for nuclear material irradiation. To design a He{sup +} beam injector for coupled radio frequency quadruple and SFRFQ cavity, He{sup +} beam transmission experiments were carried out on PKU low energy beam transport test bench and the transmission was less than 50%. It indicated that some electrode modifications must be done to decrease the divergence of He{sup +} beam.

  12. Fermilab main injector: High intensity operation and beam loss control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Bruce C.; Adamson, Philip; Capista, David; Chou, Weiren; Kourbanis, Ioanis; Morris, Denton K.; Seiya, Kiyomi; Wu, Guan Hong; Yang, Ming-Jen

    2013-07-01

    From 2005 through 2012, the Fermilab Main Injector provided intense beams of 120 GeV protons to produce neutrino beams and antiprotons. Hardware improvements in conjunction with improved diagnostics allowed the system to reach sustained operation at 400 kW beam power. Transmission was very high except for beam lost at or near the 8 GeV injection energy where 95% beam transmission results in about 1.5 kW of beam loss. By minimizing and localizing loss, residual radiation levels fell while beam power was doubled. Lost beam was directed to either the collimation system or to the beam abort. Critical apertures were increased while improved instrumentation allowed optimal use of available apertures. We will summarize the improvements required to achieve high intensity, the impact of various loss control tools and the status and trends in residual radiation in the Main Injector.

  13. HIGH INTENSITY BEAM OPERATION OF THE BROOKHAVEN AGS

    SciTech Connect

    ROSER,T.

    1999-06-28

    For the last few years the Brookhaven AGS has operated at record proton intensities. This high beam intensity allowed for the simultaneous operation of several high precision rare kaon decay experiments. The record beam intensities were achieved after the AGS Booster was commissioned and a transition jump system, a powerful transverse damper, and an rf upgrade in the AGS were completed. The intensity is presently limited by space charge effects at both Booster and AGS injection and transverse instabilities in the AGS.

  14. Monte Carlo simulation to evaluate the contamination in an energy modulated carbon ion beam for hadron therapy delivered by cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morone, M. Cristina; Calabretta, Luciano; Cuttone, Giacomo; Fiorini, Francesca

    2008-11-01

    Protons and carbon ion beams for hadron therapy can be delivered by cyclotrons with a fixed energy. In order to treat patients, an energy degrader along the beam line will be used to match the particle range with the target depth. Fragmentation reactions of carbon ions inside the degrader material could introduce a small amount of unwanted contaminants to the beam, giving additional dose to the patient out of the target volume. A simulation study using the FLUKA Monte Carlo code has been carried out by considering three different materials as the degrader. Two situations have been studied: a realistic one, lowering the carbon beam energy from 300 MeV/n to 220 MeV/n, corresponding to a range of 10 cm in water, and the worst possible case, lowering the carbon energy to 50 MeV/n, corresponding to the millimeter range. The main component of the contaminant is represented by alpha particles and protons, with a typical momentum after the degrader greater than that of the primary beam, and can be eliminated by the action of a momentum analyzing system and slits, and by a second thin absorber. The residual component of fragments reaching the patient is negligible with respect to the fragment quantity generated by the primary beam inside the patient before arriving at the end of the target volume.

  15. The superconducting separated orbit cyclotron tritron

    SciTech Connect

    Trinks, U.; Assmann, W.; Dietl, L.; Hinderer, H.J.; Korner, A; Platzer, A.; Rehm, B.; Rieger, K.; Riess, C.; Savoy, R.

    1985-10-01

    At the Munich Accelerator Laboratory a booster for the existing MP-tandem-the Tritron - is under construction for acceleration of heavy ions to specific energies up to 21 MeV/u. The Tritron/sup +/ is a separated orbit cyclotron similar to the SOC but with the magnets and cavities both superconducting. The Tritron fits well into the existing laboratory. It is projected to be a prototype to demonstrate the feasibility of this type of cyclotron, which may be suited to overcome the limits of the conventional cyclotron concept. First, there are no axial focusing problems. Secondly, there is no crossing of resonances in the betatron frequency diagram, and thirdly, there are no injection and extraction problems. Thus continuous ion beams of high intensity and high quality with energies up to about 1 GeV/u seem within reach by connecting several separated orbit cyclotrons with increasing radii in series.

  16. Beam diagnostics at high-intensity storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M.

    1993-11-01

    Beam diagnostics at high-intensity facilities feature their own special set of problems and characteristics. Issues peculiar to high-intensity storage rings include beam loss, beam halos, extraction efficiency, beam in the gap, clearing electrodes, and beam-profile measurement. The Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR) is a nice example of a high-intensity storage ring. The author discusses in some detail three diagnostic systems currently in use at the PSR: the beam-loss-monitor system, the electron-clearing system, and the beam-in-the-gap monitor. Much of the discussion is inspired by the problems that were encountered and the useful things learned while commissioning and developing the PSR. Another inspiration is the work on the next-generation neutron-spallation source, also known as the National Center for Neutron Research (NCNR).

  17. Beam diagnostics at high-intensity storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M. )

    1994-10-10

    Beam diagnostics at high-intensity facilities feature their own special set of problems and characteristics, issues peculiar to high-intensity storage rings include beam loss, beam halos, extraction efficiency, beam in the gap, clearing electrodes, and beam-profile measurement. The Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR) is a nice example of a high-intensity storage ring. I will discuss in some detail three diagnostic systems currently in use at the PSR: the beam-loss-monitor system, the electron-clearing system, and the beam-in-the-gap monitor. Much of our discussion is inspired by the problems we have encountered and the useful things we have learned while commissioning and developing the PSR. Another inspiration is our work on the next-generation neutron-spallation source, also known as the National Center for Neutron Research (NCNR).

  18. Intense microwave and particle beams; Proceedings of the Meeting, Los Angeles, CA, Jan. 16-19, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, H.E.

    1990-01-01

    Various papers on intense microwave and particle beams are presented. Individual topics addressed include: influence of beam loading on the operation of the relativistic klystron amplifier, gain and efficiency studies of a high-power traveling-wave-tube amplifier, relativistic O-type oscillator-amplifier systems, stability of mutually coupled oscillators, effects of a dense background plasma on the dispersion of backward wave oscillators, scalarized photon analysis of spontaneous emission in the uniform magnetic field FEL, tunable 200-GHz electron cyclotron maser, plasma-filled dielectric Cerenkov maser, MIT 35-GHz cyclotron autoresonance maser amplifier, array feed/reflector antenna design for intense microwave beams, propagation of an intense microwave beam from a phased array. Also discussed are: electromagnetic missile from a nonuniform aperture field, backscattering of electromagnetic missiles, plasma waveguide, electromagnetic missiles from currents on fractal sets, effects of high-power RF fields in the atmosphere and the ionosphere, pulsed sources and currents for acoustic and electromagnetic bullets, digital transmitter array for producing enhanced ionization.

  19. Design of a compact, permanent magnet electron cyclotron resonance ion source for proton and H2(+) beam production.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xianlu; Zhang, Tianjue; Luo, Shan; Wang, Chuan; Zheng, Xia; Yin, Zhiguo; Zhong, Junqing; Wu, Longcheng; Qin, Jiuchang

    2010-02-01

    A 2.45 GHz microwave ion source was developed at China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE) for proton beam production of over 60 mA [B.-Q. Cui, Y.-W. Bao, L.-Q. Li, W.-S. Jiang, and R.-W. Wang, Proceedings of the High Current Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) Ion Source for Proton Accelerator, APAC-2001, 2001 (unpublished)]. For various proton beam applications, another 2.45 GHz microwave ion source with a compact structure is designed and will be built at CIAE as well for high current proton beam production. It is also considered to be used for the test of H(2)(+) beam, which could be injected into the central region model cyclotron at CIAE, and accelerated to 5 MeV before extraction by stripping. The required ECR magnetic field is supplied by all the permanent magnets rather than electrical solenoids and six poles. The magnetic field distribution provided by this permanent magnets configuration is a large and uniformly volume of ECR zone, with central magnetic field of a magnitude of approximately 875 Gs [T. Taylor and J. S. C. Wills, Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. A 309, 37 (1991)]. The field adjustment at the extraction end can be implemented by moving the position of the magnet blocks. The results of plasma, coupling with 2.45 GHz microwave in the ECR zone inside the ion source are simulated by particle-in-cell code to optimize the density by adjusting the magnetic field distribution. The design configuration of the ion source will be summarized in the paper.

  20. Fast wire scanner for intense electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, T.; Agladze, N. I.; Bazarov, I. V.; Bartnik, A.; Dobbins, J.; Dunham, B.; Full, S.; Li, Y.; Liu, X.; Savino, J.; Smolenski, K.

    2014-02-01

    We have developed a cost-effective, fast rotating wire scanner for use in accelerators where high beam currents would otherwise melt even carbon wires. This new design uses a simple planetary gear setup to rotate a carbon wire, fixed at one end, through the beam at speeds in excess of 20 m/s. We present results from bench tests, as well as transverse beam profile measurements taken at Cornell's high-brightness energy recovery linac photoinjector, for beam currents up to 35 mA.

  1. Intense non-relativistic cesium ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Lampel, M.C.

    1984-02-01

    The Heavy Ion Fusion group at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory has constructed the One Ampere Cesium Injector as a proof of principle source to supply an induction linac with a high charge density and high brightness ion beam. This is studied here. An electron beam probe was developed as the major diagnostic tool for characterizing ion beam space charge. Electron beam probe data inversion is accomplished with the EBEAM code and a parametrically adjusted model radial charge distribution. The longitudinal charge distribution was not derived, although it is possible to do so. The radial charge distribution that is derived reveals an unexpected halo of trapped electrons surrounding the ion beam. A charge fluid theory of the effect of finite electron temperature on the focusing of neutralized ion beams (Nucl. Fus. 21, 529 (1981)) is applied to the problem of the Cesium beam final focus at the end of the injector. It is shown that the theory's predictions and assumptions are consistent with the experimental data, and that it accounts for the observed ion beam radius of approx. 5 cm, and the electron halo, including the determination of an electron Debye length of approx. 10 cm.

  2. Generation of high charge state metal ion beams by electron cyclotron resonance heating of vacuum arc plasma in cusp trap.

    PubMed

    Nikolaev, A G; Savkin, K P; Oks, E M; Vizir, A V; Yushkov, G Yu; Vodopyanov, A V; Izotov, I V; Mansfeld, D A

    2012-02-01

    A method for generating high charge state heavy metal ion beams based on high power microwave heating of vacuum arc plasma confined in a magnetic trap under electron cyclotron resonance conditions has been developed. A feature of the work described here is the use of a cusp magnetic field with inherent "minimum-B" structure as the confinement geometry, as opposed to a simple mirror device as we have reported on previously. The cusp configuration has been successfully used for microwave heating of gas discharge plasma and extraction from the plasma of highly charged, high current, gaseous ion beams. Now we use the trap for heavy metal ion beam generation. Two different approaches were used for injecting the vacuum arc metal plasma into the trap--axial injection from a miniature arc source located on-axis near the microwave window, and radial injection from sources mounted radially at the midplane of the trap. Here, we describe preliminary results of heating vacuum arc plasma in a cusp magnetic trap by pulsed (400 μs) high power (up to 100 kW) microwave radiation at 37.5 GHz for the generation of highly charged heavy metal ion beams.

  3. Generation of high charge state metal ion beams by electron cyclotron resonance heating of vacuum arc plasma in cusp trapa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaev, A. G.; Savkin, K. P.; Oks, E. M.; Vizir, A. V.; Yushkov, G. Yu.; Vodopyanov, A. V.; Izotov, I. V.; Mansfeld, D. A.

    2012-02-01

    A method for generating high charge state heavy metal ion beams based on high power microwave heating of vacuum arc plasma confined in a magnetic trap under electron cyclotron resonance conditions has been developed. A feature of the work described here is the use of a cusp magnetic field with inherent "minimum-B" structure as the confinement geometry, as opposed to a simple mirror device as we have reported on previously. The cusp configuration has been successfully used for microwave heating of gas discharge plasma and extraction from the plasma of highly charged, high current, gaseous ion beams. Now we use the trap for heavy metal ion beam generation. Two different approaches were used for injecting the vacuum arc metal plasma into the trap - axial injection from a miniature arc source located on-axis near the microwave window, and radial injection from sources mounted radially at the midplane of the trap. Here, we describe preliminary results of heating vacuum arc plasma in a cusp magnetic trap by pulsed (400 μs) high power (up to 100 kW) microwave radiation at 37.5 GHz for the generation of highly charged heavy metal ion beams.

  4. Generation of high charge state metal ion beams by electron cyclotron resonance heating of vacuum arc plasma in cusp trap

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolaev, A. G.; Savkin, K. P.; Oks, E. M.; Vizir, A. V.; Yushkov, G. Yu.; Vodopyanov, A. V.; Izotov, I. V.; Mansfeld, D. A.

    2012-02-15

    A method for generating high charge state heavy metal ion beams based on high power microwave heating of vacuum arc plasma confined in a magnetic trap under electron cyclotron resonance conditions has been developed. A feature of the work described here is the use of a cusp magnetic field with inherent ''minimum-B'' structure as the confinement geometry, as opposed to a simple mirror device as we have reported on previously. The cusp configuration has been successfully used for microwave heating of gas discharge plasma and extraction from the plasma of highly charged, high current, gaseous ion beams. Now we use the trap for heavy metal ion beam generation. Two different approaches were used for injecting the vacuum arc metal plasma into the trap - axial injection from a miniature arc source located on-axis near the microwave window, and radial injection from sources mounted radially at the midplane of the trap. Here, we describe preliminary results of heating vacuum arc plasma in a cusp magnetic trap by pulsed (400 {mu}s) high power (up to 100 kW) microwave radiation at 37.5 GHz for the generation of highly charged heavy metal ion beams.

  5. Cold and intense OH radical beam sources

    SciTech Connect

    Ploenes, Ludger; Meerakker, Sebastiaan Y. T. van de; Haas, Dominik; Zhang, Dongdong E-mail: stefan.willitsch@unibas.ch; Willitsch, Stefan E-mail: stefan.willitsch@unibas.ch

    2016-05-15

    We present the design and performance of two supersonic radical beam sources: a conventional pinhole-discharge source and a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) source, both based on the Nijmegen pulsed valve. Both designs have been characterized by discharging water molecules seeded in the rare gases Ar, Kr, or Xe. The resulting OH radicals have been detected by laser-induced fluorescence. The measured OH densities are (3.0 ± 0.6) × 10{sup 11} cm{sup -3} and (1.0 ± 0.5) × 10{sup 11} cm{sup -3} for the pinhole-discharge and DBD sources, respectively. The beam profiles for both radical sources show a relative longitudinal velocity spread of about 10%. The absolute rotational ground state population of the OH beam generated from the pinhole-discharge source has been determined to be more than 98%. The DBD source even produces a rotationally colder OH beam with a population of the ground state exceeding 99%. For the DBD source, addition of O{sub 2} molecules to the gas mixture increases the OH beam density by a factor of about 2.5, improves the DBD valve stability, and allows to tune the mean velocity of the radical beam.

  6. Studies of extraction and transport system for highly charged ion beam of 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Research Center for Nuclear Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yorita, T.; Hatanaka, K.; Fukuda, M.; Ueda, H.; Yasuda, Y.; Morinobu, S.; Tamii, A.; Kamakura, K.

    2014-02-01

    An 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source is installed to increase beam currents and to extend the variety of ions especially for highly charged heavy ions which can be accelerated by cyclotrons of Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University. The beam production developments of several ions from B to Xe have been already done [T. Yorita, K. Hatanaka, M. Fukuda, M. Kibayashi, S. Morinobu, H.Okamura, and A. Tamii, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 02A311 (2008) and T. Yorita, K. Hatanaka, M. Fukuda, M. Kibayashi, S. Morinobu, H.Okamura, and A. Tamii, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 02A332 (2010)] and the further studies for those beam extraction and its transport have been done in order to increase the beam current more. The plasma electrode, extraction electrode, and einzel lens are modified. Especially extraction electrode can be applied minus voltage for the beam extraction and it works well to improve the extracted beam current. The extraction voltage dependences of transmission and emittance also have been studied for beam current improvement which is injected into azimuthally varying field cyclotron at RCNP.

  7. Studies of extraction and transport system for highly charged ion beam of 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Research Center for Nuclear Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Yorita, T. Hatanaka, K.; Fukuda, M.; Ueda, H.; Yasuda, Y.; Morinobu, S.; Tamii, A.; Kamakura, K.

    2014-02-15

    An 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source is installed to increase beam currents and to extend the variety of ions especially for highly charged heavy ions which can be accelerated by cyclotrons of Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University. The beam production developments of several ions from B to Xe have been already done [T. Yorita, K. Hatanaka, M. Fukuda, M. Kibayashi, S. Morinobu, H.Okamura, and A. Tamii, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 02A311 (2008) and T. Yorita, K. Hatanaka, M. Fukuda, M. Kibayashi, S. Morinobu, H.Okamura, and A. Tamii, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 02A332 (2010)] and the further studies for those beam extraction and its transport have been done in order to increase the beam current more. The plasma electrode, extraction electrode, and einzel lens are modified. Especially extraction electrode can be applied minus voltage for the beam extraction and it works well to improve the extracted beam current. The extraction voltage dependences of transmission and emittance also have been studied for beam current improvement which is injected into azimuthally varying field cyclotron at RCNP.

  8. Studies of extraction and transport system for highly charged ion beam of 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Research Center for Nuclear Physics.

    PubMed

    Yorita, T; Hatanaka, K; Fukuda, M; Ueda, H; Yasuda, Y; Morinobu, S; Tamii, A; Kamakura, K

    2014-02-01

    An 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source is installed to increase beam currents and to extend the variety of ions especially for highly charged heavy ions which can be accelerated by cyclotrons of Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University. The beam production developments of several ions from B to Xe have been already done [T. Yorita, K. Hatanaka, M. Fukuda, M. Kibayashi, S. Morinobu, H.Okamura, and A. Tamii, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 02A311 (2008) and T. Yorita, K. Hatanaka, M. Fukuda, M. Kibayashi, S. Morinobu, H.Okamura, and A. Tamii, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 02A332 (2010)] and the further studies for those beam extraction and its transport have been done in order to increase the beam current more. The plasma electrode, extraction electrode, and einzel lens are modified. Especially extraction electrode can be applied minus voltage for the beam extraction and it works well to improve the extracted beam current. The extraction voltage dependences of transmission and emittance also have been studied for beam current improvement which is injected into azimuthally varying field cyclotron at RCNP.

  9. Compact antenna for two-dimensional beam scan in the JT-60U electron cyclotron heating/current drive system

    SciTech Connect

    Moriyama, S.; Kajiwara, K.; Takahashi, K.; Kasugai, A.; Seki, M.; Ikeda, Y.; Fujii, T.

    2005-11-15

    A compact antenna system was designed and fabricated to enable millimeter-wave beam scanning in the toroidal and poloidal directions of the JT-60U tokamak for electron cyclotron heating (ECH) and electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) experiments. The antenna consists of a fast movable flat mirror mounted on the tokamak vacuum vessel and a rotary focusing mirror attached at the end of the waveguide that is supported from outside the vacuum vessel. This separate support concept enables a compact structure inside a shallow port (0.68x0.54x0.2 m) that is shared with a subport for an independent diagnostic system. During a plasma shot, the flat mirror is driven by a servomotor with a 3-m-long drive shaft to reduce the influence of the high magnetic field on the motor. The focusing mirror is rotated by a simple mechanism utilizing a push rod and an air cylinder. The antenna has been operated reliably for 3 years after a small improvement to the rotary drive mechanism. It has made significant contributions to ECH and ECCD experiments, especially the current profile control in JT-60U.

  10. Initial Operation of CIAE medically used cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Mingwu; Zhang, Tainjue

    1997-05-01

    CIAE medically used cyclotron is a 30 MeV fixed, isochronous field and fixed RF frequency machine with high -H beam intensity. -H beams with energy variable were obtained in December 1994 up to 0.4 mA. Two years operation has proved the design and manufacture successfully. The mapping results of magnetic field has shown the magnet perfect that would ensure the high intensity beam accelerated to the final energy. Now 7 medically useful isotopes were produced, e. g. thallium-201, cobalt-57, gallium-67, iodine-123 have been supplied for hospitals.

  11. Gridded Electron Guns and Modulation of Intense Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J R; O'Shea, P G

    2006-05-02

    Gridded guns are useful for producing modulated electron beams. This modulation is generally limited to simple gating of the beam, but may be used to apply structure to the beam pulse shape. In intense beams, this structure spawns space charge waves whose dynamics depend in part on the relative strengths of the velocity and density variations which comprise the initial current modulation. In this paper, we calculate the strengths of beam current and velocity modulation produced in a gridded electron gun, and show that under normal conditions the initial modulation is dominated by density variation rather than velocity variation.

  12. An intense polarized beam by a laser ionization injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmori, Chihiro; Hiramatsu, Shigenori; Nakamura, Takeshi

    1990-12-01

    Accumulation of protons and polarized protons by photo-ionization injection are described. This method consists of: (1) producing the neutral hydrogen beam by Lorentz stripping; (2) excitation of the neutral hydrogen beam with a laser; and (3) ionization of the hydrogen beam in the 2P excited state with another laser. When the laser for the excitation is circularly polarized, we can get a polarized proton beam. An ionization efficiency of 98 percent and a polarization of 80 percent can be expected by an intense laser beam from a free electron laser (FEL).

  13. High intensity production of high and medium charge state uranium and other heavy ion beams with VENUS

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, D.; Galloway, M. L.; Loew, T. J.; Lyneis, C. M.; Castro Rodriguez, I.; Todd, D. S.

    2008-02-15

    The next generation, superconducting electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source VENUS (versatile ECR ion source for nuclear science) started operation with 28 GHz microwave heating in 2004. Since then it has produced world record ion beam intensities. For example, 2850 e {mu}A of O{sup 6+}, 200 e {mu}A of U{sup 33+} or U{sup 34+}, and in respect to high charge state ions, 1 e {mu}A of Ar{sup 18+}, 270 e {mu}A of Ar{sup 16+}, 28 e {mu}A of Xe{sup 35+}, and 4.9 e {mu}A of U{sup 47+} have been produced. A brief overview of the latest developments leading to these record intensities is given and the production of high intensity uranium beams is discussed in more detail.

  14. Design and development of a MgB{sub 2}-based sector dipole and beam transport channel for a strong-focusing cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Melconian, K.; Damborsky, K.; Glasser, N.; Holik, E.; Kellams, J.; McIntyre, P.; Pogue, N.; Sattarov, A.

    2014-01-29

    A superconducting strong focusing cyclotron is being developed for high current applications. The ∼1 T sector dipoles incorporate superconducting main windings, and alternating-gradient focusing is provided by ∼6 Tm{sup –1} superconducting beam transport channels along the arced beam trajectory of each orbit of the cyclotron. All windings utilize MgB{sub 2} superconductor operating in the temperature window 15–20K. The main dipole windings are fabricated using the react-and-wind method; the beam transport channel windings are fabricated using the wind-and-react method. Previous reports have indicated that even wind and react MgB{sub 2} conductors can be irreversibly damaged by bending strain in the unreacted state. To determine the feasibility of MgB{sub 2} conductors for the beam transport channel windings, the dependence of critical current on bending radius of commercial wires was measured.

  15. The development of an injection system for a compact H(-) cyclotron, the concomitant measurement of injected beam properties and the experimental characterization of the spiral inflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehnel, Morgan Patrick

    1998-11-01

    This thesis addresses two major problems. One is of interest to commercial cyclotron manufacturers and the other is of interest to the accelerator physics community. The industrial problem was to produce a compact and modular ion source and injection system for the new TR13 H- cyclotron, which is capable of transporting and injecting a high quality and well matched beam into the cyclotron. The accelerator physics problem was to advance the science of inflector ion optical design, analysis and troubleshooting from the realm of pure simulation to the realm of measurement and experimentation. The industrial problem was solved by designing candidate injection systems in parallel with the TR13 cyclotron design. These systems were fabricated and then experimentally optimized along with the ion source on a 1 MeV test cyclotron. This work resulted in a set of ion source and injection systems with well documented and understood properties. The recommended solution for the TR13 was a cost effective injection system composed of only two axially rotated quadrupole magnets. The accelerator physics problem is the lack of measured cyclotron inflector optical data and beam related properties in the immediate vicinity of a cyclotron inflector. This required the development of an experimental technique to overcome the numerous technical difficulties associated with making measurements near a device as inaccessible as a cyclotron inflector. A diverse assembly of equipment and procedures was required: a well understood injection system, a pinhole collimator for producing beamlets for ray-tracing, a specially configured center region to expose the inflector to view, a system of scintillators in close proximity to the inflector for producing visible beamspots, a TV camera and frame grabber to record images and a set of image analysis and data processing procedures. The results obtained using this technique were: (a) measured constraints on the coefficients of an inflector's transport

  16. Anisotropy-driven collective instability in intense charged particle beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Startsev, Edward A.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Qin, Hong

    2005-12-01

    The classical electrostatic Harris instability is generalized to the case of a one-component intense charged particle beam with anisotropic temperature including the important effects of finite transverse geometry and beam space charge. For a long, coasting beam, the eigenmode code bEASt have been used to determine detailed 3D stability properties over a wide range of temperature anisotropy and beam intensity. A simple theoretical model is developed which describes the essential features of the linear stage of the instability. Both the simulations and the analytical theory clearly show that moderately intense beams are linearly unstable to short-wavelength perturbations provided the ratio of the longitudinal temperature to the transverse temperature is smaller than some threshold value. The delta-f particle-in-cell code BEST has been used to study the detailed nonlinear evolution and saturation of the instability.

  17. Intense electron beam propagation across a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.; Striffler, C.D.; Yao, R.L.; Destler, W.W.; Reiser, M.P.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper we consider the propagation of an intense electron-ion beam across an applied magnetic field. In the absence of the applied field, the beam system is in a Bennett equilibrium state that involves electrons with both large axial and thermal velocities and a cold stationary space-charge neutralizing ion species. Typical parameters under consideration are V{sub o} {approximately} 1 MV, I {approximately} 5 kA, T{sub e} {approximately} 100 keV, and beam radii {approximately} 1 cm. We find that in the intense beam regime, the propagation is limited due to space-charge depression caused by the deflection of the electron beam by the transverse field. This critical field is of the order of the peak self-magnetic field of the electron beam which is substantially higher than the single particle cut-off field. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  18. Excitation of the surface flute waves in electron cyclotron frequency range by internal rotating electron beam in a coaxial waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blednov, O.; Girka, I.; Girka, V.; Pavlenko, I.; Sydora, R.

    2014-12-01

    The initial stage of interaction between a gyrating beam of electrons, which move along Larmor orbits in a narrow gap between a cylindrical plasma layer and an internal screen of a metal coaxial waveguide and electromagnetic eigen waves, is studied theoretically. These waves are extraordinary polarized ones; they propagate along the azimuthal angle across an axial external steady magnetic field in the electron cyclotron frequency range. The numerical analysis shows that the excitation process is stable enough in respect to changing plasma waveguide parameters. The wider the plasma layer, the broader the range of plasma waveguide parameters within which effective wave excitation takes place. The main influence on the excitation of these modes is performed by the applied axial magnetic field, namely: its increase leads to an increase of growth rate and a broadening of the range of the waveguide parameters within which wave excitation is effective.

  19. Development of a high intensity 48Ca ion beam for the heavy element program

    SciTech Connect

    Wutte, Daniela; Leitner, Mattheus; Lyneis, Claude

    2002-02-02

    A high intensity {sup 48}Ca ion beam has been developed at the 88 Inch Cyclotron for the synthesis of {sup 283}112 using the reaction {sup 238}U({sup 48}Ca, 3n). An ion beam intensity of {approx} 700 pnA was delivered on target, resulting in a total dose of 2 x 10{sup 18} ions over a six day period. Since {sup 48}Ca is a very expensive and rare isotope minimal consumption is essential. Therefore a new oven [1] and special tantalum liner [2] have been developed for the AECR-U ion source during the last year to improve the metal ion beam efficiency. Both the LBL ECR and the AECR-U ion sources are built with radial access. Six radial slots between the sextupole magnet bars provide additional pumping and easy access to the plasma chamber for ovens and feedthroughs. Two types of radial ovens have been used at LBNL in the past, operating at temperatures up to 2100 C.

  20. Drift compression of an intense neutralized ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, P.K.; Yu, S.S.; Henestroza, E.; Anders, A.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Coleman, J.; Eylon, S.; Greenway, W.G.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; Waldron, W.L.; Welch, D.R.; Thoma, C.; Sefkow, A.B.; Gilson, E.P.; Efthimion, P.C.; Davidson, R.C.

    2004-10-25

    Longitudinal compression of a tailored-velocity, intense neutralized ion beam has been demonstrated. The compression takes place in a 1-2 m drift section filled with plasma to provide space-charge neutralization. An induction cell produces a head-to-tail velocity ramp that longitudinally compresses the neutralized beam, enhancing the beam peak current by a factor of 50 and producing a pulse duration of about 3 ns. this measurement has been confirmed independently with two different diagnostic systems.

  1. Improving Plating by Use of Intense Acoustic Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C.; Denofrio, Charles

    2003-01-01

    An improved method of selective plating of metals and possibly other materials involves the use of directed high-intensity acoustic beams. The beams, typically in the ultrasonic frequency range, can be generated by fixed-focus transducers (see figure) or by phased arrays of transducers excited, variously, by continuous waves, tone bursts, or single pulses. The nonlinear effects produced by these beams are used to alter plating processes in ways that are advantageous.

  2. Spatially resolved measurements of electron cyclotron resonance ion source beam profile characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Panitzsch, Lauri; Stalder, Michael; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.

    2011-03-15

    Simulations predict that the concentric rings and the triangular structures in the profiles of strongly focused ion beams that are found in different experiments should be dominated by ion species with the same or at least similar m/q-ratio. To verify these theoretical predictions we have tuned our ECR ion source to deliver a beam consisting of multiple ion species whose particular m/q-depending focusing ranges from weakly focused to overfocused. We then recorded spatially resolved charge-state distributions of the beam profile at characteristic positions in the plane perpendicular to the beam line. The results validate theoretical predictions and are summarized in this paper. To achieve the required beam profile characteristics we moved the extraction along the beam line to achieve stronger focusing than by only changing the extraction voltage. To fit the regions of interest of the beam profile into the transmission area of the sector magnet, we steered the beam by moving the extraction in the plane perpendicular to the beam axis. The results of both investigations, beam focusing and beam steering by using a 3D-movable extraction, are also reported in this paper. A brief overview of the new beam monitor extensively used during these measurements, the Faraday cup array, is also given.

  3. 88-Inch Cyclotron newsletter

    SciTech Connect

    Stokstad, R.

    1987-02-01

    Activities at the 88-Inch Cyclotron are discussed. Increased beam time demand and operation of the ECR source and cyclotron are reported. Experimental facility improvements are reported, including improvements to the High Energy Resolution Array and to the Recoil Atom Mass Analyzer, a new capture beamline, development of a low background counting facility. Other general improvements are reported that relate to the facility computer network and electronics pool. Approved heavy nuclei research is briefly highlighted. Also listed are the beams accelerated by the cyclotron. (LEW)

  4. Tolerable Beam Loss at High-Intensity Machines

    SciTech Connect

    Oleg E. Krivosheev, Nikolai V. Mokhov

    2000-08-28

    Tolerable beam losses are estimated for high-intensity ring accelerators with proton energy of 3 to 16 GeV. Dependence on beam energy, lattice and magnet geometry is studied via full Monte Carlo MARS14 simulations in lattice elements, shielding, tunnel and surrounding dirt with realistic geometry, materials and magnetic fields.

  5. Low Intensity Beam Imaging - Position Sensitive Avalanche Counter

    SciTech Connect

    Mas, J.; Shapira, D; T.A. Lewis

    1998-11-04

    Monitors of this type are mostly intended for the lowest intensity beams at the HRIBF at ORNL. They are used to aid the accelerator operator in focusing and steering the beam and by the experimenters at the focal plane of the spectrometers.

  6. Intense e-beam interaction with matter

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, R.H.; Crawford, O.H.

    1984-01-01

    This document describes work done in this period on certain nonlinear processes of potential importance at high energy densities in condensed matter, and on the theory of the electron slowing-down-cascade spectrum engendered in solids by e-beams.

  7. Harvesting (67)Cu from the Collection of a Secondary Beam Cocktail at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Mastren, Tara; Pen, Aranh; Loveless, Shaun; Marquez, Bernadette V; Bollinger, Elizabeth; Marois, Boone; Hubley, Nicholas; Brown, Kyle; Morrissey, David J; Peaslee, Graham F; Lapi, Suzanne E

    2015-10-20

    Isotope harvesting is a promising new method to obtain isotopes for which there is no reliable continuous supply at present. To determine the possibility of obtaining radiochemically pure radioisotopes from an aqueous beam dump at a heavy-ion fragmentation facility, preliminary experiments were performed to chemically extract a copper isotope from a large mixture of projectile fragmentation products in an aqueous medium. In this work a 93 MeV/u secondary beam cocktail was collected in an aqueous beam stop at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) located on the Michigan State University (MSU) campus. The beam cocktail consisted of ∼2.9% (67)Cu in a large mixture of co-produced isotopes ranging in atomic number from ∼19 to 34. The chemical extraction of (67)Cu was achieved via a two-step process: primary extraction using a divalent metal chelation disk followed by anion-exchange chromatography. A significant fraction (74 ± 4%) of the (67)Cu collected in the aqueous beam stop was recovered with >99% radiochemical purity. To illustrate the utility of this product, the purified (67)Cu material was then used to radiolabel an anti-EGFR antibody, Panitumumab, and injected into mice bearing colon cancer xenografts. The tumor uptake at 5 days postinjection was found to be 12.5 ± 0.7% which was in very good agreement with previously reported studies with this radiolabeled antibody. The present results demonstrate that harvesting isotopes from a heavy-ion fragmentation facility could be a promising new method for obtaining high-quality isotopes that are not currently available by traditional methods.

  8. Transverse-longitudinal coupling in intense beams

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.S.F.; Smith, L.

    1981-03-01

    The coupling between transverse and longitudinal perturbations is studied self-consistently by considering a beam of K-V distribution. The analysis is carried out within the context of linearized Vlasov-Maxwell equations and electrostatic approximation. The perturbation is assumed to be azimuthally symmetric but axially non-uniform (k/sub z/ is not equal to 0). It is shown that the coupling affects both the longitudinal and transverse modes significantly in the high density and low frequency region. Two new classes of longitudinal modes are found which would not exist if the transverse motions of particles are neglected. The effect of resistive wall impedance on beam stability is also studied. It is found that the longitudinal impedance can cause the transverse modes also to be weakly unstable.

  9. Optimization of a charge-state analyzer for electron cyclotron resonance ion source beams.

    PubMed

    Saminathan, S; Beijers, J P M; Kremers, H R; Mironov, V; Mulder, J; Brandenburg, S

    2012-07-01

    A detailed experimental and simulation study of the extraction of a 24 keV He(+) beam from an ECR ion source and the subsequent beam transport through an analyzing magnet is presented. We find that such a slow ion beam is very sensitive to space-charge forces, but also that the neutralization of the beam's space charge by secondary electrons is virtually complete for beam currents up to at least 0.5 mA. The beam emittance directly behind the extraction system is 65 π mm mrad and is determined by the fact that the ion beam is extracted in the strong magnetic fringe field of the ion source. The relatively large emittance of the beam and its non-paraxiality lead, in combination with a relatively small magnet gap, to significant beam losses and a five-fold increase of the effective beam emittance during its transport through the analyzing magnet. The calculated beam profile and phase-space distributions in the image plane of the analyzing magnet agree well with measurements. The kinematic and magnet aberrations have been studied using the calculated second-order transfer map of the analyzing magnet, with which we can reproduce the phase-space distributions of the ion beam behind the analyzing magnet. Using the transfer map and trajectory calculations we have worked out an aberration compensation scheme based on the addition of compensating hexapole components to the main dipole field by modifying the shape of the poles. The simulations predict that by compensating the kinematic and geometric aberrations in this way and enlarging the pole gap the overall beam transport efficiency can be increased from 16% to 45%.

  10. Raman conversion in intense femtosecond Bessel beams in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheller, Maik; Chen, Xi; Ariunbold, Gombojav O.; Born, Norman; Moloney, Jerome; Kolesik, Miroslav; Polynkin, Pavel

    2014-05-01

    We demonstrate experimentally that bright and nearly collimated radiation can be efficiently generated in air pumped by an intense femtosecond Bessel beam. We show that this nonlinear conversion process is driven by the rotational Raman response of air molecules. Under optimum conditions, the conversion efficiency from the Bessel pump into the on-axis propagating beam exceeds 15% and is limited by the onset of intensity clamping and plasma refraction on the beam axis. Our experimental findings are in excellent agreement with numerical simulations based on the standard model for the ultrafast nonlinear response of air.

  11. Longitudinal Control of Intense Charged Particle Beams

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    contained using longitudinal focusing, I have shown that errors in the applied focusing fields induce space-charge waves at the bunch edges that...profile along the bunch length. When the bunch is contained using longitudinal focusing, I have shown that errors in the applied focusing fields ...90 5.1.1 Beam Expansion without Longitudinal Containment................................ 90 5.1.2 Application of Focusing Fields

  12. Beam instrumentation for future high intense hadron accelerators at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, M.; Hu, M.; Tassotto, G.; Thurman-Keup, R.; Scarpine, V.; Shin, S.; Zagel, J.; /Fermilab

    2008-08-01

    High intensity hadron beams of up to 2 MW beam power are a key element of new proposed experimental facilities at Fermilab. Project X, which includes a SCRF 8 GeV H{sup -} linac, will be the centerpiece of future HEP activities in the neutrino sector. After a short overview of this, and other proposed projects, we present the current status of the beam instrumentation activities at Fermilab with a few examples. With upgrades and improvements they can meet the requirements of the new beam facilities, however design and development of new instruments is needed, as shown by the prototype and conceptual examples in the last section.

  13. Applications with Intense OTR Images II: Microbunched Electron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumpkin, A. H.; Dejus, R. J.; Rule, D. W.

    2004-12-01

    In this second application for intense images we take advantage of the coherent enhancement of optical transition radiation (OTR) due to self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) free-electron laser (FEL)-induced microbunching of the beam. A much smaller number of total particles is involved, but the microbunched fraction (NB) gives a NB2 enhancement. We report measurements on the z-dependent growth of the coherent OTR (COTR) and the effects of beam size and electron beam/photon beam coalignment in the COTR interferograms.

  14. Diagnostic Tools For Low Intensity Ion Micro-Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Finocchiaro, P.; Cosentino, L.; Pappalardo, A.; Vervaeke, M.; Volckaerts, B.; Vynck, P.; Hermanne, A.; Thienpont, H.

    2003-08-26

    We have developed two techniques for microscopic ion beam imaging and profiling, both based on scintillators, particularly suitable for applications in Deep Lithography with Protons (DLP) or with heavier ions. The first one employs a scintillating fiberoptic plate and a CCD camera with suitable lenses, the second makes use of a small scintillator optically coupled to a compact photomultiplier. We have proved the possibility of spanning from single beam particles counting up to several nA currents. Both devices are successfully being exploited for on-line control of low and very low intensity proton beams, down to a beam size of less than 50{mu}m.

  15. New techniques in hadrontherapy: intensity modulated proton beams.

    PubMed

    Cella, L; Lomax, A; Miralbell, R

    2001-01-01

    Inverse planning and intensity modulated (IM) X-ray beam treatment techniques can achieve significant improvements in dose distributions comparable to those obtained with forward planned proton beams. However, intensity modulation can also be applied to proton beams and further optimization in dose distribution can reasonably be expected. A comparative planning exercise between IM X-rays and IM proton beams was carried out on two different tumor cases: a pediatric rhabdomyosarcoma and a prostate cancer. Both IM X-rays and IM protons achieved equally homogenous coverage of the target volume in the two tumor sites. Predicted NTCPs were equally low for both treatment techniques. Nevertheless, a reduced low-to-medium dose to the organs at risk and a lesser integral non-target mean dose for IM protons in the two cases favored the use of IM proton beams.

  16. Limiting current of intense electron beams in a decelerating gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nusinovich, G. S.; Beaudoin, B. L.; Thompson, C.; Karakkad, J. A.; Antonsen, T. M.

    2016-02-01

    For numerous applications, it is desirable to develop electron beam driven efficient sources of electromagnetic radiation that are capable of producing the required power at beam voltages as low as possible. This trend is limited by space charge effects that cause the reduction of electron kinetic energy and can lead to electron reflection. So far, this effect was analyzed for intense beams propagating in uniform metallic pipes. In the present study, the limiting currents of intense electron beams are analyzed for the case of beam propagation in the tubes with gaps. A general treatment is illustrated by an example evaluating the limiting current in a high-power, tunable 1-10 MHz inductive output tube (IOT), which is currently under development for ionospheric modification. Results of the analytical theory are compared to results of numerical simulations. The results obtained allow one to estimate the interaction efficiency of IOTs.

  17. Stopping intense beams of internally cold molecules via centrifugal forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xing; Gantner, Thomas; Zeppenfeld, Martin; Chervenkov, Sotir; Rempe, Gerhard

    2016-05-01

    Cryogenic buffer-gas cooling produces intense beams of internally cold molecules. It offers a versatile source for studying collision dynamics and reaction pathways in the cold regime, and could open new avenues for controlled chemistry, precision spectroscopy, and exploration of fundamental physics. However, an efficient deceleration of these beams still presents a challenge. Here, we demonstrate that intense and continuous beams of electrically guided molecules produced by a cryogenic buffer-gas cell can be brought to a halt by the centrifugal force in a rotating frame. Various molecules (e.g. CH3F and CF3CCH) are decelerated to below 20m /s at a corresponding output intensity of ~ 6 ×109mm-2 .s-1 . In addition, our RF-resonant depletion detection shows that up to 90 % rotational-state purity can be achieved in the so-produced slow molecular beams.

  18. Emittance Growth in Intense Non-Circular Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, O. A.

    1997-05-01

    The electrostatic energy of intense beams in linear uniform focusing channels is minimized when the initial beam configuration is both uniform and round.(In the case of quadrupole focusing, this means round on the average.) Deviations from either uniformity or roundness produce free energy and emittance growth. Over the past 25 years, the consequences of beam nonuniformity have been thoroughly investigated for the case of round beams. Recently, there has been interest in more complex beam configurations such as those that occur in Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) combiners or splitters. We discuss free energy and emittance growth for a variety of cases: (a) square beams, (b) hexagonal beams, (c) beams bounded by a quadrant or sextant of a circle, (d) rectangular beams, (e) elliptical beams, (f) pairs of beamlets, and (g) arrays of many beamlets. Cases (a) and (b) are approximations for large arrays of beamlets as proposed for HIF combiners or for negative-ion sources. Beam splitting, suggested for a particular HIF final focus scheme, leads to (c). The large emittance growth in cases (d)-(f), calculated by a new method,(O.A. Anderson, Proceedings of EPAC 96 conference.) illustrates the importance of maintaining symmetry. Practical examples are given for several cases.

  19. Space-Charge Waves and Instabilities in Intense Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. G.

    1997-11-01

    Advancced accelerator applications, such as drivers for heavy ion inertial fusion, high-intensity synchrotrons for spallation neutron sources, high energy boosters, free electron lasers, high-power microwave generators, etc., require ever-increasing beam intensity. An important beam dynamics issue in such beams is the collective behavior of charged particles due to their space charge effects. This includes the phenomena of space-charge waves and instabilities excited on beams by external perturbations. It is very crucial to fully understand these phenomena in order to develop advanced accelerators for various applications. At the University of Maryland we have been conducting experimental programs to study space-charge waves and longitudinal instabilities by employing low-energy, high-current, space-charge dominated electron beams. Localized perturbations on the beams are generated from a gridded electron gun. In a conducting transport channel focused by short solenoids, these perturbations evolve into space-charge waves propagating on the beams. The wave speed is measured and many beam parameters are determined with this technique. The reflection of space-charge waves at the shoulder of an initially rectangular beam bunch is also observed. In a resistive-wall channel focused by a uniform long solenoid, the space-charge waves suffer longitudinal instability. The properties of the instabilities are studied in detail in the long wavelength range. In this talk we review our experimental results on the waves and instabilities and compare with theory.

  20. Mean intensity of vortex Bessel beams propagating in turbulent atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Lukin, Igor P

    2014-05-20

    Transformation of vortex Bessel beams during propagation in turbulent atmosphere is theoretically analyzed. Deforming influence of the random inhomogeneity of the turbulent medium on propagation of diffraction-free beams leads to disappearance of their invariant properties. In the given research, features of evolution of the spatial structure of distribution of mean intensity of vortex Bessel beams in turbulent atmosphere are analyzed. A quantitative criterion of possibility of carrying over of a dark central domain by vortex Bessel beams in a turbulent atmosphere is derived. The analysis of the behavior of several physical parameters of mean-level optical radiation shows that the shape stability of a vortex Bessel beam increases with the topological charge of this beam during its propagation in a turbulent atmosphere.

  1. Photoconducting ultraviolet detectors based on GaN films grown by electron cyclotron resonance molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, M.; Shah, K.S.; Moustakas, T.D.; Vaudo, R.P.; Singh, R.

    1995-08-01

    We report for the first time, fabrication of photoconducting UV detectors made from GaN films grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Semi-instilating GaN films were grown by the method of electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (ECR-MBE). Photoconductive devices with interdigitated electrodes were fabricated and their photoconducting properties were investigated. In this paper we report on the performance of the detectors in terms of UV responsivity, gain-quantum efficiency product, spectral response and response time. We have measured responsivity of 125A/W and gain-quantum efficiency product of 600 at 254nm and 25V. The response time was measured to be on the order of 20ns for our detectors, corresponding to a bandwidth of 25Mhz. The spectral response showed a sharp long-wavelength cutoff at 365nm, and remained constant in the 200nm to 365nm range. The response of the detectors to low-energy x-rays was measured and found to be linear for x-rays with energies ranging from 60kVp to 90kVp.

  2. Proton Beam Intensity Upgrades for the Neutrino Program at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, C. M.

    2016-12-15

    Fermilab is committed to upgrading its accelerator complex towards the intensity frontier to pursue HEP research in the neutrino sector and beyond. The upgrade has two steps: 1) the Proton Improvement Plan (PIP), which is underway, has its primary goal to start providing 700 kW beam power on NOvA target by the end of 2017 and 2) the foreseen PIP–II will replace the existing LINAC, a 400 MeV injector to the Booster, by an 800 MeV superconducting LINAC by the middle of next decade, with output beam intensity from the Booster increased significantly and the beam power on the NOvA target increased to <1.2 MW. In any case, the Fermilab Booster is going to play a very significant role for the next two decades. In this context, we have recently developed and commissioned an innovative beam injection scheme for the Booster called "early injection scheme". This scheme is already in operation and has a potential to increase the Booster beam intensity from the PIP design goal by a considerable amount with a reduced beam emittance and beam loss. In this paper, we will present results from our experience from the new scheme in operation, current status and future plans.

  3. Profiles of ion beams and plasma parameters on a multi-frequencies microwaves large bore electron cyclotron resonance ion source with permanent magnets.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yushi; Sakamoto, Naoki; Kiriyama, Ryutaro; Takenaka, Tomoya; Kurisu, Yosuke; Nozaki, Dai; Sato, Fuminobu; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2012-02-01

    In order to contribute to various applications of plasma and beams based on an electron cyclotron resonance, a new concept on magnetic field with all magnets on plasma production and confinement has been proposed with enhanced efficiency for broad and dense ion beam. The magnetic field configuration consists of a pair of comb-shaped magnet surrounding plasma chamber cylindrically. Resonance zones corresponding for 2.45 GHz and 11-13 GHz frequencies are positioned at spatially different positions. We launch simultaneously multiplex frequencies microwaves operated individually, try to control profiles of the plasma parameters and the extracted ion beams, and to measure them in detail.

  4. Profiles of ion beams and plasma parameters on a multi-frequencies microwaves large bore electron cyclotron resonance ion source with permanent magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Yushi; Sakamoto, Naoki; Kiriyama, Ryutaro; Takenaka, Tomoya; Kurisu, Yosuke; Nozaki, Dai; Sato, Fuminobu; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2012-02-15

    In order to contribute to various applications of plasma and beams based on an electron cyclotron resonance, a new concept on magnetic field with all magnets on plasma production and confinement has been proposed with enhanced efficiency for broad and dense ion beam. The magnetic field configuration consists of a pair of comb-shaped magnet surrounding plasma chamber cylindrically. Resonance zones corresponding for 2.45 GHz and 11-13 GHz frequencies are positioned at spatially different positions. We launch simultaneously multiplex frequencies microwaves operated individually, try to control profiles of the plasma parameters and the extracted ion beams, and to measure them in detail.

  5. Intense slow beams of bosonic potassium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catani, J.; Maioli, P.; de Sarlo, L.; Minardi, F.; Inguscio, M.

    2006-03-01

    We report on an experimental realization of a two-dimensional magneto-optical trap (2D-MOT) that allows the generation of cold atomic beams of K39 and K41 bosonic potassium isotopes. The high measured fluxes up to 1.0×1011atoms/s and low atomic velocities around 33m/s are well suited for a fast and reliable three-dimensional magneto-optical trap loading, a basilar feature for new generation experiments on Bose-Einstein condensation of dilute atomic samples. We also present a simple multilevel theoretical model for the calculation of the light-induced force acting on an atom moving in a MOT. The model gives a good agreement between predicted and measured flux and velocity values for our 2D-MOT.

  6. Population Inversions in Ablation Plasmas Generated by Intense Electron Beams.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-11-01

    light weight design, and moderate cost. The Soviets have investigated intense proton beam pumped plasma lasers , however, the University of Michigan...interpretations have been verified by moving the position of the probe laser beam away from the surface of the anode (from 0.1 cm to 0.4 cm) and noting the changes...Properties Effects on Ultraviolet Laser induced Flashover of Angled Plastic insulators in Vacuum", C.L. Ensloe and R. M. Gilgenbach, IEEE 3 Trans. on

  7. High power target approaches for intense radioactive ion beam facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Talbert, W.L. ||; Hodges, T.A.; Hsu, H.; Fikani, M.M.

    1997-02-01

    Development of conceptual approaches for targets to produce intense radioactive ion beams is needed in anticipation of activity for a next-generation, intense ISOL-type radioactive beams facility, strongly recommended in the NSAC 1995 Long Range Plan for Nuclear Science. The production of isotopes in vapor form for subsequent mass separation and acceleration will depend on the ability to control target temperature profiles within the target resulting from interactions of the intense production beams with the target material. A number of earlier studies have identified promising approaches which need, however, to be carefully analyzed for specific target systems. A survey will be made of these earlier concepts employing various cooling techniques, including imposition of thermal barriers between the target materials and cooling systems. Some results of preliminary analyses are summarized. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Simulating Intense Ion Beams for Inertial Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A

    2001-02-20

    The Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) program's goal is the development of the body of knowledge needed for Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) to realize its promise. The intense ion beams that will drive HIF targets are nonneutral plasmas and exhibit collective, nonlinear dynamics which must be understood using the kinetic models of plasma physics. This beam physics is both rich and subtle: a wide range in spatial and temporal scales is involved, and effects associated with both instabilities and non-ideal processes must be understood. Ion beams have a ''long memory'', and initialization of a beam at mid-system with an idealized particle distribution introduces uncertainties; thus, it will be crucial to develop, and to extensively use, an integrated and detailed ''source-to-target'' HIF beam simulation capability. We begin with an overview of major issues.

  9. Simulating Intense Ion Beams for Inertial Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A.

    2001-02-20

    The Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) program's goal is the development of the body of knowledge needed for Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) to realize its promise. The intense ion beams that will drive HIF targets are rzonneutral plasmas and exhibit collective, nonlinear dynamics which must be understood using the kinetic models of plasma physics. This beam physics is both rich and subtle: a wide range in spatial and temporal scales is involved, and effects associated with both instabilities and non-ideal processes must be understood. Ion beams have a ''long memory,'' and initialization of a beam at mid-system with an idealized particle distribution introduces uncertainties; thus, it will be crucial to develop, and to extensively use, an integrated and detailed ''source-to-target'' HIF beam simulation capability. We begin with an overview of major issues.

  10. Intense ion beam neutralization using underdense background plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Berdanier, William; Roy, Prabir K.; Kaganovich, Igor

    2015-01-15

    Producing an overdense background plasma for neutralization purposes with a density that is high compared to the beam density is not always experimentally possible. We show that even an underdense background plasma with a small relative density can achieve high neutralization of intense ion beam pulses. Using particle-in-cell simulations, we show that if the total plasma electron charge is not sufficient to neutralize the beam charge, electron emitters are necessary for effective neutralization but are not needed if the plasma volume is so large that the total available charge in the electrons exceeds that of the ion beam. Several regimes of possible underdense/tenuous neutralization plasma densities are investigated with and without electron emitters or dense plasma at periphery regions, including the case of electron emitters without plasma, which does not effectively neutralize the beam. Over 95% neutralization is achieved for even very underdense background plasma with plasma density 1/15th the beam density. We compare results of particle-in-cell simulations with an analytic model of neutralization and find close agreement with the particle-in-cell simulations. Further, we show experimental data from the National Drift Compression experiment-II group that verifies the result that underdense plasma can neutralize intense heavy ion beams effectively.

  11. K-130 Cyclotron vacuum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, R. C.; Bhattacharya, S.; Bhole, R. B.; Roy, Anindya; Pal, Sarbajit; Mallik, C.; Bhandari, R. K.

    2012-11-01

    The vacuum system for K-130 cyclotron has been operational since 1977. It consists of two sub-systems, main vacuum system and beam line vacuum system. The main vacuum system is designed to achieve and maintain vacuum of about 1 × 10-6 mbar inside the 23 m3 volume of acceleration chamber comprising the Resonator tank and the Dee tank. The beam line vacuum system is required for transporting the extracted beam with minimum loss. These vacuum systems consist of diffusion pumps backed by mechanical pumps like roots and rotary pumps. The large vacuum pumps and valves of the cyclotron vacuum system were operational for more than twenty five years. In recent times, problems of frequent failures and maintenance were occurring due to aging and lack of appropriate spares. Hence, modernisation of the vacuum systems was taken up in order to ensure a stable high voltage for radio frequency system and the extraction system. This is required for efficient acceleration and transportation of high intensity ion beam. The vacuum systems have been upgraded by replacing several pumps, valves, gauges and freon units. The relay based control system for main vacuum system has also been replaced by PLC based state of the art control system. The upgraded control system enables inclusion of additional operational logics and safety interlocks into the system. The paper presents the details of the vacuum system and describes the modifications carried out for improving the performance and reliability of the vacuum system.

  12. Improving the intensity of a focused laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddadi, Sofiane; Fromager, Michael; Louhibi, Djelloul; Hasnaoui, Abdelkrim; Harfouche, Ali; Cagniot, Emmanuel; ńit-Ameur, Kamel

    2015-03-01

    Let us consider the family of symmetrical Laguerre-Gaus modes of zero azimuthal order which will be denoted as LGp0 . The latter is made up of central lobe surrounded by p concentric rings of light. The fundamental mode LG00 is a Gaussian beam of width W. The focusing of a LGp0 beam of power P by a converging lens of focal length f produces a focal spot keeping the LGp0 -shape and having a central intensity I0= 2PW2/(λf)2 whatever the value of the radial order p. Many applications of lasers (laser marking, laser ablation, …) seek nowadays for a focal laser spot with the highest as possible intensity. For a given power P, increasing intensity I0 can be achieved by increasing W and reducing the focal length f. However, this way of doing is in fact limited because the ratio W/f cannot increase indefinitely at the risk of introducing a huge truncation upon the edge of the lens. In fact, it is possible to produce a single-lobed focal spot with a central intensity of about p times the intensity I0. This result has been obtained by reshaping (rectification) a LGp0 beam thanks to a proper Binary Diffractive Optical Element (BDOE). In addition, forcing a laser cavity to oscillate upon a LGp0 can improve the power extract due to a mode volume increasing with the mode order p. This could allow envisaging an economy of scale in term of laser pumping power for producing a given intensity I0. In addition, we have demonstrated that a rectified LGp0 beam better stand the lens spherical aberration than the usual Gaussian beam.

  13. High power targets for production of intense radioactive ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Talbert, W. L.; Drake, D. M.; Wilson, M. T.; Walker, J. J.; Lenz, J. W.

    1999-04-26

    Issues are discussed in producing intense Radioactive Ion Beams (RIB) using the Isotope Separator On-Line (ISOL) approach, based on the use of thick targets employed at existing facilities. Some new physics studies may possibly be addressed by improving the performance of these existing targets through improvements in release and effusion properties to optimize the RIB yields. It is, however, acknowledged that many desired physics objectives using RIB can be met only by employing production beams of energetic light ions or protons with currents up to 100 {mu}A. Development of targets that use such intense production beams needs to address the requirement to control operational temperatures derived from internal production beam interactions with the target materials. In addition, issues arise for target materials in terms of their thermal characteristics, such as thermal conductivity and thermo-mechanical properties. A target concept is described for an in-beam test of a prototype target for actual thermal behavior under RIB production conditions. For such a test, a high-power test facility is needed; fortunately, the prototypical production beam currents required exist at the TRIUMF accelerator facility. An experimental proposal has been approved for such a test.

  14. Experimental and numerical study of high intensity argon cluster beams

    SciTech Connect

    Korobeishchikov, N. G.; Kalyada, V. V.; Shmakov, A. A.; Zarvin, A. E.; Skovorodko, P. A.

    2014-12-09

    Experimental and numerical investigations of expansion of argon with homogeneous condensation in supersonic conical nozzle and in free jet behind it were carried out. Optimal parameters (stagnation pressure, nozzle-skimmer distance) for the formation of cluster beam with maximum intensity were determined. Two available models for nonequilibrium nucleation were tested. The numerical results are in satisfactory agreement with the measured data.

  15. Internal dynamics of intense twin beams and their coherence

    PubMed Central

    Peřina, Jan; Haderka, Ondřej; Allevi, Alessia; Bondani, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of intense twin beams in pump-depleted parametric down-conversion is studied. A generalized parametric approximation is suggested to solve the quantum model. Its comparison with a semiclassical model valid for larger twin-beam intensities confirms its applicability. The experimentally observed maxima in the spectral and spatial intensity auto- and cross- correlation functions depending on pump power are explained in terms of different speeds of the (back-) flow of energy between the individual down-converted modes and the corresponding pump modes. This effect is also responsible for the gradual replacement of the initial exponential growth of the down-converted fields by the linear one. Furthermore, it forms a minimum in the curve giving the effective number of twin-beam modes. These effects manifest a tight relation between the twin-beam coherence and its internal structure, as clearly visible in the model. Multiple maxima in the intensity correlation functions originating in the oscillations of energy flow between the pump and down-converted modes are theoretically predicted. PMID:26924749

  16. Measuring the neutrino mass using intense photon and neutrino beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dicus, Duane A.; Repko, Wayne W.; Vega, Roberto

    2000-11-01

    We compute the cross section for neutrino-photon scattering taking into account a neutrino mass. We explore the possibility of using intense neutrino beams, such as those available at proposed muon colliders, together with high powered lasers to probe the neutrino mass in photon-neutrino collisions.

  17. Internal dynamics of intense twin beams and their coherence.

    PubMed

    Peřina, Jan; Haderka, Ondřej; Allevi, Alessia; Bondani, Maria

    2016-02-29

    The dynamics of intense twin beams in pump-depleted parametric down-conversion is studied. A generalized parametric approximation is suggested to solve the quantum model. Its comparison with a semiclassical model valid for larger twin-beam intensities confirms its applicability. The experimentally observed maxima in the spectral and spatial intensity auto- and cross- correlation functions depending on pump power are explained in terms of different speeds of the (back-) flow of energy between the individual down-converted modes and the corresponding pump modes. This effect is also responsible for the gradual replacement of the initial exponential growth of the down-converted fields by the linear one. Furthermore, it forms a minimum in the curve giving the effective number of twin-beam modes. These effects manifest a tight relation between the twin-beam coherence and its internal structure, as clearly visible in the model. Multiple maxima in the intensity correlation functions originating in the oscillations of energy flow between the pump and down-converted modes are theoretically predicted.

  18. Deflection of a Reflected Intense Vortex Laser Beam.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lingang; Shen, Baifei; Zhang, Xiaomei; Huang, Shan; Shi, Yin; Liu, Chen; Wang, Wenpeng; Xu, Jiancai; Pei, Zhikun; Xu, Zhizhan

    2016-09-09

    An interesting deflection effect deviating the optical reflection law is revealed in the relativistic regime of intense vortex laser plasma interaction. When an intense vortex laser obliquely impinges onto an overdense plasma target, the reflected beam deflects out of the plane of incidence with an experimentally observable deflection angle. The mechanism is demonstrated by full three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation as well as analytical modeling using the Maxwell stress tensor. The deflection results from the rotational symmetry breaking of the foil driven by the unsymmetrical shear stress of the vortex beam. The l-dependent shear stress, where l is the topological charge, as an intrinsic characteristic to the vortex beam, plays an important role as the ponderomotive force in relativistic vortex laser matter interaction.

  19. Deflection of a Reflected Intense Vortex Laser Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lingang; Shen, Baifei; Zhang, Xiaomei; Huang, Shan; Shi, Yin; Liu, Chen; Wang, Wenpeng; Xu, Jiancai; Pei, Zhikun; Xu, Zhizhan

    2016-09-01

    An interesting deflection effect deviating the optical reflection law is revealed in the relativistic regime of intense vortex laser plasma interaction. When an intense vortex laser obliquely impinges onto an overdense plasma target, the reflected beam deflects out of the plane of incidence with an experimentally observable deflection angle. The mechanism is demonstrated by full three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation as well as analytical modeling using the Maxwell stress tensor. The deflection results from the rotational symmetry breaking of the foil driven by the unsymmetrical shear stress of the vortex beam. The l -dependent shear stress, where l is the topological charge, as an intrinsic characteristic to the vortex beam, plays an important role as the ponderomotive force in relativistic vortex laser matter interaction.

  20. Deposition and surface treatment with intense pulsed ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, J.C.; Davis, H.A.; Rej, D.J.; Waganaar, W.J.; Stinnett, R.W.; McIntyre, D.C.

    1995-02-08

    Intense pulsed ion beams (500 keV, 30 kA, 0.5 {mu}s) are being investigated for materials processing. Demonstrated and potential applications include film deposition, glazing and joining, alloying and mixing, cleaning and polishing, corrosion improvement, polymer surface treatments, and nanophase powder synthesis. Initial experiments at Los Alamos have emphasized thin-film formation by depositing beam ablated target material on substrates. We have deposited films with complex stoichiometry such as YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x}, and formed diamond-like-carbon films. Instantaneous deposition rates of 1 mm/sec have been achieved because of the short ion range (typically 1{mu}m), excellent target coupling, and the inherently high energy of these beams. Currently the beams are produced in single shot uncomplicated diodes with good electrical efficiency. High-voltage modulator technology and diodes capable of repetitive firing, needed for commercial application, are being developed.

  1. Intense Ion Beam for Warm Dense Matter Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, Joshua Eugene

    2008-01-01

    The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is exploring the physical limits of compression and focusing of ion beams for heating material to warm dense matter (WDM) and fusion ignition conditions. The NDCX is a beam transport experiment with several components at a scale comparable to an inertial fusion energy driver. The NDCX is an accelerator which consists of a low-emittance ion source, high-current injector, solenoid matching section, induction bunching module, beam neutralization section, and final focusing system. The principal objectives of the experiment are to control the beam envelope, demonstrate effective neutralization of the beam space-charge, control the velocity tilt on the beam, and understand defocusing effects, field imperfections, and limitations on peak intensity such as emittance and aberrations. Target heating experiments with space-charge dominated ion beams require simultaneous longitudinal bunching and transverse focusing. A four-solenoid lattice is used to tune the beam envelope to the necessary focusing conditions before entering the induction bunching module. The induction bunching module provides a head-to-tail velocity ramp necessary to achieve peak axial compression at the desired focal plane. Downstream of the induction gap a plasma column neutralizes the beam space charge so only emittance limits the focused beam intensity. We present results of beam transport through a solenoid matching section and simultaneous focusing of a singly charged K+ ion bunch at an ion energy of 0.3 MeV. The results include a qualitative comparison of experimental and calculated results after the solenoid matching section, which include time resolved current density, transverse distributions, and phase-space of the beam at different diagnostic planes. Electron cloud and gas measurements in the solenoid lattice and in the vicinity of intercepting diagnostics are also presented. Finally

  2. Gas Filled RF Resonator Hadron Beam Monitor for Intense Neutrino Beam Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Yonehara, Katsuya; Abrams, Robert; Dinkel, Holly; Freemire, Ben; Johnson, Rolland; Kazakevich, Grigory; Tollestrup, Alvin; Zwaska, Robert

    2016-06-01

    MW-class beam facilities are being considered all over the world to produce an intense neutrino beam for fundamental particle physics experiments. A radiation-robust beam monitor system is required to diagnose the primary and secondary beam qualities in high-radiation environments. We have proposed a novel gas-filled RF-resonator hadron beam monitor in which charged particles passing through the resonator produce ionized plasma that changes the permittivity of the gas. The sensitivity of the monitor has been evaluated in numerical simulation. A signal manipulation algorithm has been designed. A prototype system will be constructed and tested by using a proton beam at the MuCool Test Area at Fermilab.

  3. Intense Muon Beams for Experiments at Project X

    SciTech Connect

    C.M. Ankenbrandt, R.P. Johnson, C. Y. Yoshikawa, V.S. Kashikhin, D.V. Neuffer, J. Miller, R.A. Rimmer

    2011-03-01

    A coherent approach for providing muon beams to several experiments for the intensity-frontier program at Project X is described. Concepts developed for the front end of a muon collider/neutrino factory facility, such as phase rotation and ionization cooling, are applied, but with significant differences. High-intensity experiments typically require high-duty-factor beams pulsed at a time interval commensurate with the muon lifetime. It is challenging to provide large RF voltages at high duty factor, especially in the presence of intense radiation and strong magnetic fields, which may preclude the use of superconducting RF cavities. As an alternative, cavities made of materials such as ultra-pure Al and Be, which become very good –but not super– conductors at cryogenic temperatures, can be used.

  4. Survey of Collective Instabilities and Beam-Plasma Interactions in Intense Heavy Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, Ronald C.; Dorf, Mikhail A.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Qin, Hong; Startsev, Edward A.; Rose, David V.; Lund, Steven M.; Welch, Dale R.; Sefkow, Adam

    2008-06-19

    This paper presents a survey of the present theoretical understanding based on advanced analytical and numerical studies of collective processes and beam-plasma interactions in intense heavy ion beams for applications to ion-beam-driven high energy density physics and heavy ion fusion. The topics include: discussion of the conditions for quiescent beam propagation over long distances; and the electrostatic Harris instability and the transverse electromagnetic Weibel instability in highly anisotropic, intense one-component ion beams. In the longitudinal drift compression and transverse compression regions, collective processes associated with the interaction of the intense ion beam with a charge-neutralizing background plasma are described, including the electrostatic electron-ion two-stream instability, the multispecies electromagnetic Weibel instability, and collective excitations in the presence of a solenoidal magnetic field. The effects of a velocity tilt on reducing two-stream instability growth rates are also discussed. Operating regimes are identified where the possible deleterious effects of collective processes on beam quality are minimized.

  5. HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS WITH INTENSE HEAVY ION BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; More, R.M.; Roy, P.K.; Ni, P.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.L.; Barnard, J.J.

    2010-03-16

    The US heavy ion fusion science program has developed techniques for heating ion-beam-driven warm dense matter (WDM) targets. The WDM conditions are to be achieved by combined longitudinal and transverse space-charge neutralized drift compression of the ion beam to provide a hot spot on the target with a beam spot size of about 1 mm, and pulse length about 1-2 ns. As a technique for heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density, intense beams of heavy ions are capable of delivering precise and uniform beam energy deposition dE/dx, in a relatively large sample size, and the ability to heat any solid-phase target material. Initial experiments use a 0.3 MeV K+ beam (below the Bragg peak) from the NDCX-I accelerator. Future plans include target experiments using the NDCX-II accelerator, which is designed to heat targets at the Bragg peak using a 3-6 MeV lithium ion beam. The range of the beams in solid matter targets is about 1 micron, which can be lengthened by using porous targets at reduced density. We have completed the fabrication of a new experimental target chamber facility for WDM experiments, and implemented initial target diagnostics to be used for the first target experiments in NDCX-1. The target chamber has been installed on the NDCX-I beamline. The target diagnostics include a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, VISAR, and high-speed gated cameras. Initial WDM experiments will heat targets by compressed NDCX-I beams and will explore measurement of temperature and other target parameters. Experiments are planned in areas such as dense electronegative targets, porous target homogenization and two-phase equation of state.

  6. Transport of intense ion beams and space charge compensation issues in low energy beam lines (invited).

    PubMed

    Chauvin, N; Delferrière, O; Duperrier, R; Gobin, R; Nghiem, P A P; Uriot, D

    2012-02-01

    Over the last few years, the interest of the international scientific community for high power accelerators in the megawatt range has been increasing. For such machines, the ion source has to deliver a beam intensity that ranges from several tens up to a hundred of mA. One of the major challenges is to extract and transport the beam while minimizing the emittance growth and optimizing its injection into the radio frequency quadrupole. Consequently, it is crucial to perform precise simulations and cautious design of the low energy beam transport (LEBT) line. In particular, the beam dynamics calculations have to take into account not only the space charge effects but also the space charge compensation of the beam induced by ionization of the residual gas. The physical phenomena occurring in a high intensity LEBT and their possible effects on the beam are presented, with a particular emphasis on space charge compensation. Then, beam transport issues in different kind of LEBTs are briefly reviewed. The SOLMAXP particle-in-cell code dedicated to the modeling of the transport of charge particles under a space charge compensation regime is described. Finally, beam dynamics simulations results obtained with SOLMAXP are presented in the case of international fusion materials irradiation facility injector.

  7. Transport of intense beams of highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, M.; Gammino, S.; Ciavola, G.; Celona, L.; Spadtke, P.; Tinschert, K.

    2005-10-01

    The new generation of ion sources delivers beams with intensities of several mA. This requires a careful design of the analysing system and the low-energy beam transport (LEBT) from the source to the subsequent systems. At INFN-LNS, high intensity proton sources (TRIPS [L. Celona, G. Ciavola, S. Gammino et al ., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75(5) 1423 (2004)], PM-TRIPS [G. Ciavola, L. Celona, S. Gammino et al ., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75(5) 1453 (2004)]) as well as ECR ion sources for the production of highly charged high-intensity heavy ion beams are developed (SERSE [S. Gammino, G. Ciavola, L. Celona et al ., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 72(11) 4090 (2001), and references therein], GyroSERSE [S. Gammino et al ., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75(5) 1637 (2004)], MS-ECRIS [G. Ciavola et al ., (2005), 11th Int. Conf. on Ion Sources, Caen, (in press)]). In this paper, we present ion-optical design studies of various LEBT systems for ion-sources devoted to the production of intense beams. Calculations were performed using the computer codes GIOS [H. Wollnik, J. Brezina and M. Berz, NIM A 258 (1987)], GICO [M. Berz, H.C. Hoffmann, and H. Wollnik, NIM A 258 (1987)], and TRANSPORT [K.L. Brown, F. Rothacker and D.C. Carey, SLAC-R-95-462, Fermilab-Pub-95/069, UC-414 (1995)]. Simulations take into account the expected phase space growth of the beam emittance due to space-charge effects and image aberrations introduced by the magnetic elements.

  8. Intense ion-beam dynamics in the NICA collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, O. S.; Meshkov, I. N.; Sidorin, A. O.; Trubnikov, G. V.

    2016-12-01

    The problems of intense ion-beam dynamics in the developed and optimized optical structure of the NICA collider are considered. Conditions for beam collisions and obtaining the required parameters of luminosity in the operation energy range are discussed. The restriction on collider luminosity is related to effects of the domination of the space charge and intrabeam scattering. Applying methods of cooling, electron and stochastic ones, will permit one to suppress these effects and reach design luminosity. The work also deals with systems of magnetic field correction and problems of calculating the dynamic aperture of the collider.

  9. High intensity positron beam and angular correlation experiments at Livermore

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, R.H.; Rosenberg, I.J.; Meyer, P.; Fluss, M.J.

    1985-03-01

    A positron beam apparatus that produces a variable energy positron beam with sufficient intensity to perform new positron experiments in an ultrahigh vacuum environment has been installed at the Lawrence Livermore 100 MeV electron linac. We have installed two large area position sensitive gamma-ray detectors to measure angular correlations in two dimensions and a separate highly collimated detector to measure positronium energy distributions by time-of-flight velocity determination. Data from measurements on single crystals of Cu will be described.

  10. Generalized phase-space tomography for intense beams

    SciTech Connect

    Stratakis, D; Bernal, S; Fiorito, R B; Haber, I; Reiser, M; O'Shea, P G; Tian, K; Thangaraj, J.C.T.

    2010-02-01

    Tomographic phase-space mapping in an intense particle beam is reviewed. The diagnostic is extended to beams with space-charge by assuming linear forces and is implemented using either solenoidal or quadrupole focusing lattices. The technique is benchmarked against self-consistent simulation and against a direct experimental sampling of phase-space using a pinhole scan. It is demonstrated that tomography can work for time-resolved phase-space mapping and slice emittance measurement. The technique is applied to a series of proof-of-principle tests conducted at the University of Maryland.

  11. Fast damping in mismatched high intensity beam transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Variale, V.

    2001-08-01

    A very fast damping of beam envelope oscillation amplitudes was recently observed in simulations of high intensity beam transport, through periodic FODO cells, in mismatched conditions [V. Variale, Nuovo Cimento Soc. Ital. Fis. 112A, 1571-1582 (1999) and T. Clauser et al., in Proceedings of the Particle Accelerator Conference, New York, 1999 (IEEE, Piscataway, NJ, 1999), p. 1779]. A Landau damping mechanism was proposed at the origin of observed effect. In this paper, to further investigate the source of this fast damping, extensive simulations have been carried out. The results presented here support the interpretation of the mechanism at the origin of the fast damping as a Landau damping effect.

  12. Dosimetry in radiobiological studies with the heavy ion beam of the Warsaw cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaźmierczak, U.; Banaś, D.; Braziewicz, J.; Czub, J.; Jaskóła, M.; Korman, A.; Kruszewski, M.; Lankoff, A.; Lisowska, H.; Malinowska, A.; Stępkowski, T.; Szefliński, Z.; Wojewódzka, M.

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to verify various dosimetry methods in the irradiation of biological materials with a 12C ion beam at the Heavy Ion Laboratory of the University of Warsaw. To this end the number of ions hitting the cell nucleus, calculated on the basis of the Si-detector system used in the set-up, was compared with the number of ion tracks counted in irradiated Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors and with the number of ion tracks detected in irradiated Chinese Hamster Ovary cells processed for the γ-H2AX assay. Tests results were self-consistent and confirmed that the system serves its dosimetric purpose.

  13. High intensity laser beam propagation through a relativistic warm magnetoplasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei, S.; Jafari Milani, M. R.; Jafari, M. J.

    2017-04-01

    In this work, nonlinear aspects of a circularly polarized high intensity Gaussian laser beam propagating in a relativistic warm magnetized plasma are studied, taking into account the relativistic ponderomotive force. The differential equation governing the dimensionless beam width parameter is achieved and numerically solved by introducing the dielectric permittivity of such plasma and using the paraxial ray approximation. The effects of entrance laser intensity and its polarization state, external magnetic field, and electron temperature on the laser spot size evolution are studied. It is found that for both right and left-handed polarization states increasing initial laser intensity deteriorates the self-focusing mechanism while rising electron temperature improves it. It is also observed that enhancing magnetic field leads to faster and stronger self-focusing in the case of right-handed polarization and an attenuation in the self-focusing process in the case of left-handed one. In addition, the spatial distribution of normalized modified electron density as well as laser intensity profiles as a function of plasma length and beam radius is plotted and discussed for three self-focusing, self-trapping, and defocusing regimes.

  14. Nonlinear stability in the transport of intense bunched beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrêa da Silva, Thales M.; Rizzato, Felipe B.; Pakter, Renato; Levin, Yan

    2016-11-01

    The paper investigates the nonlinear coupling of envelope modes of oscillation for intense bunched beams. Initially, the analysis concentrates on the case of spherically symmetric beams for which longitudinal and transverse focusing forces are assumed to be the same. It is investigated how externally induced spherically symmetric breathing oscillations may nonlinearly drive the growth of ellipsoidal modes which can break the spherical beam symmetry. Next, a more general case in which the focusing forces are not symmetric such that the matched beam already presents an ellipsoidal shape is studied. It is found that depending on the parameters of the system, even a very small mismatch amplitude can drive an instability, which leads to an effective coupling of longitudinal and transversal envelope oscillations by means of the space-charge forces. Use is made of Poincaré plots and the stability index of periodic orbits to perform a detailed analysis of the location of the instability in the parameter space and how it affects the beam transport. Self-consistent numerical simulations are performed in order to verify the onset of the nonlinear instability and its effect on the evolution of the RMS size and emittance of the beam.

  15. Development of a pepper-pot device to determine the emittance of an ion beam generated by electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Strohmeier, M.; Benitez, J. Y.; Leitner, D.; Lyneis, C. M.; Todd, D. S.; Bantel, M.

    2010-02-15

    This paper describes the recent development and commissioning of a pepper-pot emittance meter at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). It is based on a potassium bromide (KBr) scintillator screen in combination with a charged coupled device camera. Pepper-pot scanners record the full four-dimensional transverse phase space emittances which are particularly interesting for electron cyclotron resonance ion sources. The strengths and limitations of evaluating emittances using optical pepper-pot scanners are described and systematic errors induced by the optical data acquisition system will be presented. Light yield tests of KBr exposed to different ion species and first emittance measurement data using ion beams extracted from the 6.4 GHz LBNL electron cyclotron resonance ion source are presented and discussed.

  16. Location of intense electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) wave events relative to the plasmapause: Van Allen Probes observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tetrick, S. S.; Engebretson, M. J.; Posch, J. L.; Olson, C. N.; Smith, C. W.; Denton, R. E.; Thaller, S. A.; Wygant, J. R.; Reeves, G. D.; MacDonald, E. A.; Fennell, J. F.

    2017-04-01

    We have studied the spatial location relative to the plasmapause (PP) of the most intense electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves observed on Van Allen Probes A and B during their first full precession in local time. Most of these waves occurred over an L range of from -1 to +2 RE relative to the PP. Very few events occurred only within 0.1 RE of the PP, and events with a width in L of < 0.2 RE occurred both inside and outside the PP. Wave occurrence was always associated with high densities of ring current ions; plasma density gradients or enhancements were associated with some events but were not dominant factors in determining the sites of wave generation. Storm main and recovery phase events in the dusk sector were often inside the PP, and dayside events during quiet times and compressions of the magnetosphere were more evenly distributed both inside and outside the PP. Superposed epoch analyses of the dependence of wave onset on solar wind dynamic pressure (Psw), the SME (SuperMAG auroral electrojet) index, and the SYM-H index showed that substorm injections and solar wind compressions were temporally closely associated with EMIC wave onset but to an extent that varied with frequency band, magnetic local time, and storm phase, and location relative to the PP. The fact that increases in SME and Psw were less strongly correlated with events at the PP than with other events might suggest that the occurrence of those events was affected by the density gradient.

  17. Energy gain and spectral tailoring of ion beams using ultra-high intensity laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Rajendra; Swantusch, Marco; Cerchez, Mirela; Spickermann, Sven; Auorand, Bastian; Wowra, Thomas; Boeker, Juergen; Willi, Oswald

    2015-11-01

    The field of laser driven ion acceleration over the past decade has produced a huge amount of research. Nowadays, several multi-beam facilities with high rep rate system, e.g. ELI, are being developed across the world for different kinds of experiments. The study of interaction dynamics of multiple beams possessing ultra-high intensity and ultra-short pulse duration is of vital importance. Here, we present the first experimental results on ion acceleration using two ultra-high intensity beams. Thanks to the unique capability of Arcturus laser at HHU Düsseldorf, two almost identical, independent beams in laser parameters such as intensity (>1020 W/cm2), pulse duration (30 fs) and contrast (>1010), could be accessed. Both beams are focused onto a 5 μm thin Ti target. While ensuring spatial overlap of the two beams, at relative temporal delay of ~ 50 ps (optimum delay), the proton and carbon ion energies were enhanced by factor of 1.5. Moreover, strong modulation in C4+ions near the high energy cut-off is observed later than the optimum delay for the proton enhancement. This offers controlled tailoring of the spectral content of heavy ions.

  18. Nondestructive synchronous beam current monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Covo, Michel Kireeff

    2014-12-15

    A fast current transformer is mounted after the deflectors of the Berkeley 88-Inch Cyclotron. The measured signal is amplified and connected to the input of a lock-in amplifier. The lock-in amplifier performs a synchronous detection of the signal at the cyclotron second harmonic frequency. The magnitude of the signal detected is calibrated against a Faraday cup and corresponds to the beam intensity. It has exceptional resolution, long term stability, and can measure the beam current leaving the cyclotron as low as 1 nA.

  19. Facility for intense diagnostic neutral beam (IDNB) development

    SciTech Connect

    Kasik, R.J.; Hinckley, W.B.; Bartsch, R.R.; Rej, D.J.; Henins, I.; Greenly, J.B.

    1993-08-01

    An intense, pulsed neutral beam source is under development for use as a probe beam on hot, burning plasmas such as in the international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER) which is presently in the planning stage. A pulsed, neutral hydrogen beam of 10s of kilo amperes of current can have an alpha particle, charge-exchange-recombination-spectroscopy (alpha-CHERS) signal-to-noise ratio of {approximately} 10. This beam would allow the measurement, on a single pulse of a few hundred nanoseconds duration, of the local alpha particle distribution function as well as other features of the tokamak plasma such as current density profile, impurity density, and microturbulence spectrum. The cross-sections for the CHERS diagnostic dictate operation with proton energies greater than {approximately}50keV. A pulsed neutral hydrogen source of this voltage and intensity can be achieved by neutralizing the ion flux from a magnetized ion-diode. The cross-sections for attachment and stripping, when coupled with scaling from Child-Langmiur, space-charge-limited, ion-current flow imply operation below - 100keV for maximum neutral fluence. The development of a flashover-anode, ion source for forthcoming evaluation of a neutralizing section is described below. This source operates in the accelerator voltage range 70 to 100keV. Eventually, the flashover-anode, magnetized ion-diode will be replaced with a plasma-anode, magnetized ion-diode.

  20. Time Resolved Imaging of Longitudinal Modulations in Intense Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Kai

    2007-11-01

    The longitudinal evolution of high intensity beams is not well understood despite its importance to the success of such applications as free electron lasers and light sources, heavy ion inertial fusion, and high energy colliders. For example any amplification of current modulations in an FEL photoinjector can lead to unwanted coherent synchrotron radiation further downstream in compression chicanes or bends. A significant factor usually neglected is the coupling to the transverse dynamics which can strongly affect the longitudinal evolution. Previous experiments at the University of Maryland have revealed much about the longitudinal physics of space-charge dominated beams by monitoring the evolution of longitudinal perturbations. For the first time, experimental results are presented here which reveal the effect of longitudinal perturbations on the transverse beam distribution, with the aid of several new diagnostics that capture detailed time-resolved density images. A longitudinal modulation of the particle density is deliberately generated at the source, and its evolution is tracked downstream using a number of diagnostics such as current monitors, high-resolution energy analyzers, as well as the transverse imaging devices. The latter consist of a high-resolution 16-bit gated camera coupled with very fast emitters such as prompt optical transition radiation (OTR) from an alumina screen, or fast Phosphor screens with 3-ns time resolution. Simulations using the particle-in-cell code WARP are applied to cross-check the experimental results. These experiments and especially the comparisons to simulation represent significant progress towards understanding the longitudinal physics of intense beams.

  1. A microsecond-pulsewidth, intense, light-ion beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Rej, D.J.; Bartsch, R.R.; Davis, H.A.; Greenly, J.B.; Waganaar, W.J.

    1993-07-01

    A relatively long-pulsewidth (0.1-1 {mu}s) intense ion beam accelerator has been built for materials processing applications. An applied-B{sub r}, magnetically-insulated extraction ion diode with dielectric flashover ion source is installed directly onto the output of a 1.2-MV, 300-kJ Marx generator. Initial operation of the accelerator at 0.4 MV indicates satisfactory performance without the need for additional pulse-shaping.

  2. Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy with High Energy Photon and Hadron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oelfke, U.

    2004-07-01

    This short contribution will briefly describe the basic concepts of intensity modulated radiation therapy with high energy photons (IMRT) and charged particle beams (IMPT). Dose delivery and optimization strategies like the `Inverse Planning' approach will be explained for both radiation modalities and their potential advantages are demonstrated for characteristic clinical examples. Finally, future development like image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) and adaptive radiation therapy, based on functional imaging methods, will be introduced.

  3. High Intensity Superconducting Cyclotron

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    10 20 30 40 50 60 R  (cm) Bav  (G) Btarget  (G) -­‐0.5 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 R  (cm) nu_r nu_z dB  (G) 0 5000 10000 15000...38000 40000 42000 44000 46000 48000 50000 52000 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 R  (cm) Bav  (G) Btarget  (G) -­‐0.2 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1 1.2 1.4 1.6 1.8 2 0

  4. Beam size versus intensity for resonant extracted beam at the Brookhaven AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.A.; Thern, R.; Huang, H.

    1995-05-01

    Transverse beam sizes were measured in the AGS prior to the initiation of the third order resonance ({nu}{sub H} = 8 2/3; driven by sextupoles) used for the slow extraction and again in the external beam lines. The measurements were made using the AGS Ionization Profile Monitor (IPM) and an External Profile Monitor (EPM). Both of these monitors use the ionized residual gas to image the beam on arrays of wires that are aligned parallel to the direction of the beam. The effects of space charge on the IPM are significant at the intensities measured, but the EPM measurements are not affected by space charge. Two measurements are reported. First is the intensity dependence of the resonant beam size, and secondly, an indirect measure of the space charge effect on the IPM. A differential comparison of the two monitors in the vertical plane allows unfolding the effect of the space charge on the measurements. These measurements were made over an intensity range between 15 {times} 10{sup 12} and 36 {times} 10{sup 12} protons per AGS pulse.

  5. SIMULATION OF INTENSE BEAMS FOR HEAVY ION FUSION

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A

    2004-06-10

    Computer simulations of intense ion beams play a key role in the Heavy Ion Fusion research program. Along with analytic theory, they are used to develop future experiments, guide ongoing experiments, and aid in the analysis and interpretation of experimental results. They also afford access to regimes not yet accessible in the experimental program. The U.S. Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory and its collaborators have developed state-of-the art computational tools, related both to codes used for stationary plasmas and to codes used for traditional accelerator applications, but necessarily differing from each in important respects. These tools model beams in varying levels of detail and at widely varying computational cost. They include moment models (envelope equations and fluid descriptions), particle-in-cell methods (electrostatic and electromagnetic), nonlinear-perturbative descriptions (''{delta}f''), and continuum Vlasov methods. Increasingly, it is becoming clear that it is necessary to simulate not just the beams themselves, but also the environment in which they exist, be it an intentionally-created plasma or an unwanted cloud of electrons and gas. In this paper, examples of the application of simulation tools to intense ion beam physics are presented, including support of present-day experiments, fundamental beam physics studies, and the development of future experiments. Throughout, new computational models are described and their utility explained. These include Mesh Refinement (and its dynamic variant, Adaptive Mesh Refinement); improved electron cloud and gas models, and an electron advance scheme that allows use of larger time steps; and moving-mesh and adaptive-mesh Vlasov methods.

  6. Beam dynamics and stability analysis of an intense beam in a continuously twisted quadrupole focusing channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, A.; Sing Babu, P.; Pandit, V. S.

    2016-11-01

    This paper describes the dynamics of a space-charge-dominated beam through a continuously twisted quadrupole magnet using ten independent first-order differential equations of the beam matrix elements under the assumption of linear space-charge force. Various beam optical properties of the magnet and the evolution of the emittance that results from the coupling between the two transverse planes are studied. The perturbed equations of motion around the matched beam envelopes have been derived and utilized to analyze the stability properties of the intense beam transport by calculating the eigenvalues of the transfer map over one lattice period. Detailed analysis shows the presence of instability due to parametric resonances in a twisted quadrupole channel which generally does not appear in the FODO quadrupole channel. A 2D particle-in-cell simulation code has been developed and utilized to verify the analytical results and to examine the behavior of the intense beam with Gaussian (GA) distribution in the twisted quadrupole channel.

  7. Evolution of the axial electron cyclotron maser instability, with applications to solar microwave spikes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlahos, Loukas; Sprangle, Phillip

    1987-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution of cyclotron radiation from streaming and gyrating electrons in an external magnetic field is analyzed. The nonlinear dynamics of both the fields and the particles are treated fully relativistically and self-consistently. The model includes a background plasma and electrostatic effects. The analytical and numerical results show that a substantial portion of the beam particle energy can be converted to electromagnetic wave energy at frequencies far above the electron cyclotron frequency. In general, the excited radiation can propagate parallel to the magnetic field and, hence, escape gyrothermal absorption at higher cyclotron harmonics. The high-frequency Doppler-shifted cyclotron instability can have saturation efficiencies far higher than those associated with well-known instabilities of the electron cyclotron maser type. Although the analysis is general, the possibility of using this model to explain the intense radio emission observed from the sun is explored in detail.

  8. Gas Feeding System Supplying the U-400M Cyclotron Ion Source with Hydrogen Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yukhimchuk, A. A.; Antilopov, V. V.; Apasov, V. A.; Vinogradov, Yu. I.; Golubkov, A. N.; Gornostaev, Ye. V.; Grishechkin, S. K.; Demin, A. M.; Zlatoustovski, S. V.; Klevtsov, V. G.; Kuryakin, A. V.; Malkov, I. N.; Musyaev, R. K.; Pustovoi, V. I.; Bekhterev, V. V.; Bogomolov, S. L.; Gulbekian, G. G.; Yefremov, A. A.; Zelenak, A.; Leporis, M.; Loginov, V. N.; Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Pashchenko, S. V.; Rodin, A. M.; Smirnov, Yu. I.; Ter-Akopian, G. M.; Yazvitski, N. Yu.

    2005-09-01

    Automated system feeding into ion source hydrogen isotopes as molecules with preset ratio of the fluxes is described. The control system automatically maintained the working parameters and provided graphic and digital representation of the controlled processes. The radiofrequency (RF) ion source installed at the axial injection line of the cyclotron produced ion beams of HD+, HT+, DT+, D2H+, etc. At a several months DT+ beam acceleration the tritium consumption was less than 108 Bq/hr. The intensity of a 58.2 MeV triton beam (T+ ions) extracted from the cyclotron chamber was about 10 nA.

  9. Development of an 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source at RCNP.

    PubMed

    Yorita, Tetsuhiko; Hatanaka, Kichiji; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro; Kibayashi, Mitsuru; Morinobu, Shunpei; Okamura, Hiroyuki; Tamii, Atsushi

    2008-02-01

    An 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source has recently been developed and installed in order to extend the variety and the intensity of ions at the RCNP coupled cyclotron facility. Production of several ions such as O, N, Ar, Kr, etc., is now under development and some of them have already been used for user experiments. For example, highly charged heavy ion beams like (86)Kr(21+,23+) and intense (16)O(5+,6+) and (15)N(6+) ion beams have been provided for experiments. The metal ion from volatile compounds method for boron ions has been developed as well.

  10. STEREO and Wind observations of intense cyclotron harmonic waves at the Earth's bow shock and inside the magnetosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breneman, A. W.; Cattell, C. A.; Kersten, K.; Paradise, A.; Schreiner, S.; Kellogg, P. J.; Goetz, K.; Wilson, L. B.

    2013-12-01

    We present the first observations of electron cyclotron harmonic waves at the Earth's bow shock from STEREO and Wind burst waveform captures. These waves are observed at magnetic field gradients at a variety of shock geometries ranging from quasi-parallel to nearly perpendicular along with whistler mode waves, ion acoustic waves, and electrostatic solitary waves. Large amplitude cyclotron harmonic waveforms are also observed in the magnetosheath in association with magnetic field gradients convected past the bow shock. Amplitudes of the cyclotron harmonic waves range from a few tens to more than 500 mV/m peak-peak. A comparison between the short (15 m) and long (100 m) Wind spin plane antennas shows a similar response at low harmonics and a stronger response on the short antenna at higher harmonics. This indicates that wavelengths are not significantly larger than 100 m, consistent with the electron cyclotron radius. Waveforms are broadband and polarizations are distinctively comma-shaped with significant power both perpendicular and parallel to the magnetic field. Harmonics tend to be more prominent in the perpendicular directions. These observations indicate that the waves consist of a combination of perpendicular Bernstein waves and field-aligned waves without harmonics. A likely source is the electron cyclotron drift instability which is a coupling between Bernstein and ion acoustic waves. These waves are the most common type of high-frequency wave seen by STEREO during bow shock crossings and magnetosheath traversals and our observations suggest that they are an important component of the high-frequency turbulent spectrum in these regions.

  11. STEREO and Wind Observations of Intense Cyclotron Harmonic Waves at the Earth's Bow Shock and Inside the Magnetosheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breneman, A. W.; Cattell, C.

    2013-01-01

    We present the first observations of electron cyclotron harmonic waves at the Earth's bow shock from STEREO and Wind burst waveform captures. These waves are observed at magnetic field gradients at a variety of shock geometries ranging from quasi-parallel to nearly perpendicular along with whistler mode waves, ion acoustic waves, and electrostatic solitary waves. Large amplitude cyclotron harmonic waveforms are also observed in the magnetosheath in association with magnetic field gradients convected past the bow shock. Amplitudes of the cyclotron harmonic waves range from a few tens to more than 500 millivolts/meter peak-peak. A comparison between the short (15 meters) and long (100 meters) Wind spin plane antennas shows a similar response at low harmonics and a stronger response on the short antenna at higher harmonics. This indicates that wavelengths are not significantly larger than 100 meters, consistent with the electron cyclotron radius. Waveforms are broadband and polarizations are distinctively comma-shaped with significant power both perpendicular and parallel to the magnetic field. Harmonics tend to be more prominent in the perpendicular directions. These observations indicate that the waves consist of a combination of perpendicular Bernstein waves and field-aligned waves without harmonics. A likely source is the electron cyclotron drift instability which is a coupling between Bernstein and ion acoustic waves. These waves are the most common type of high-frequency wave seen by STEREO during bow shock crossings and magnetosheath traversals and our observations suggest that they are an important component of the high-frequency turbulent spectrum in these regions.

  12. Modeling nitrogen plasmas produced by intense electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Angus, J. R.; Swanekamp, S. B.; Schumer, J. W.; Hinshelwood, D. D.; Mosher, D.; Ottinger, P. F.

    2016-05-15

    A new gas–chemistry model is presented to treat the breakdown of a nitrogen gas with pressures on the order of 1 Torr from intense electron beams with current densities on the order of 10 kA/cm{sup 2} and pulse durations on the order of 100 ns. For these parameter regimes, the gas transitions from a weakly ionized molecular state to a strongly ionized atomic state on the time scale of the beam pulse. The model is coupled to a 0D–circuit model using the rigid–beam approximation that can be driven by specifying the time and spatial profiles of the beam pulse. Simulation results are in good agreement with experimental measurements of the line–integrated electron density from experiments done using the Gamble II generator at the Naval Research Laboratory. It is found that the species are mostly in the ground and metastable states during the atomic phase, but that ionization proceeds predominantly through thermal ionization of optically allowed states with excitation energies close to the ionization limit.

  13. Modeling nitrogen plasmas produced by intense electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angus, J. R.; Mosher, D.; Swanekamp, S. B.; Ottinger, P. F.; Schumer, J. W.; Hinshelwood, D. D.

    2016-05-01

    A new gas-chemistry model is presented to treat the breakdown of a nitrogen gas with pressures on the order of 1 Torr from intense electron beams with current densities on the order of 10 kA/cm2 and pulse durations on the order of 100 ns. For these parameter regimes, the gas transitions from a weakly ionized molecular state to a strongly ionized atomic state on the time scale of the beam pulse. The model is coupled to a 0D-circuit model using the rigid-beam approximation that can be driven by specifying the time and spatial profiles of the beam pulse. Simulation results are in good agreement with experimental measurements of the line-integrated electron density from experiments done using the Gamble II generator at the Naval Research Laboratory. It is found that the species are mostly in the ground and metastable states during the atomic phase, but that ionization proceeds predominantly through thermal ionization of optically allowed states with excitation energies close to the ionization limit.

  14. Irradiation of Materials using Short, Intense Ion Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidl, Peter; Ji, Q.; Persaud, A.; Feinberg, E.; Silverman, M.; Sulyman, A.; Waldron, W. L.; Schenkel, T.; Barnard, J. J.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D. P.; Gilson, E. P.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Stepanov, A.; Zimmer, M.

    2016-10-01

    We present experiments studying material properties created with nanosecond and millimeter-scale ion beam pulses on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-II at Berkeley Lab. The explored scientific topics include the dynamics of ion induced damage in materials, materials synthesis far from equilibrium, warm dense matter and intense beam-plasma physics. We describe the improved accelerator performance, diagnostics and results of beam-induced irradiation of thin samples of, e.g., tin and silicon. Bunches with >3x1010 ions/pulse with 1-mm radius and 2-30 ns FWHM duration and have been created. To achieve the short pulse durations and mm-scale focal spot radii, the 1.2 MeV He+ ion beam is neutralized in a drift compression section which removes the space charge defocusing effect during the final compression and focusing. Quantitative comparison of detailed particle-in-cell simulations with the experiment play an important role in optimizing the accelerator performance and keep pace with the accelerator repetition rate of <1/minute. This work was supported by the Office of Science of the US Department of Energy under contracts DE-AC0205CH11231 (LBNL), DE-AC52-07NA27344 (LLNL) and DE-AC02-09CH11466 (PPPL).

  15. INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, W. M.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D. P.; Barnard, J. J.; Cohen, R. H.; Dorf, M. A.; Lund, S. M.; Perkins, L. J.; Terry, M. R.; Logan, B. G.; Bieniosek, F. M.; Faltens, A.; Henestroza, E.; Jung, J. Y.; Kwan, J. W.; Lee, E. P.; Lidia, S. M.; Ni, P. A.; Reginato, L. L.; Roy, P. K.; Seidl, P. A.; Takakuwa, J. H.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W. L.; Davidson, R. C.; Gilson, E. P.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Qin, H.; Startsev, E.; Haber, I.; Kishek, R. A.; Koniges, A. E.

    2011-03-31

    Intense heavy-ion beams have long been considered a promising driver option for inertial-fusion energy production. This paper briefly compares inertial confinement fusion (ICF) to the more-familiar magnetic-confinement approach and presents some advantages of using beams of heavy ions to drive ICF instead of lasers. Key design choices in heavy-ion fusion (HIF) facilities are discussed, particularly the type of accelerator. We then review experiments carried out at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) over the past thirty years to understand various aspects of HIF driver physics. A brief review follows of present HIF research in the US and abroad, focusing on a new facility, NDCX-II, being built at LBNL to study the physics of warm dense matter heated by ions, as well as aspects of HIF target physics. Future research directions are briefly summarized.

  16. Beam Phase Space of an Intense Ion Beam in a Neutralizing Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidl, Peter A.; Bazouin, Guillaume; Beneytout, Alice; Lidia, Steven M.; Vay, Jean-Luc; Grote, David P.

    2011-10-01

    The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-I) generates high intensity ion beams to explore warm dense matter physics. Transverse final focusing is accomplished with an 8-Tesla, 10-cm long pulsed solenoid magnet combined with a background neutralizing plasma to effectively cancel the space charge field of the ion beam. We report on phase space measurements of the beam before the neutralization channel and of the focused ion beam at the target plane. These are compared to WARP particle-in-cell simulations of the ion beam propagation through the focusing system and neutralizing plasma. Due to the orientation of the plasma sources with respect to the focusing magnet, the plasma distribution within the final focusing lens is strongly affected by the magnetic field, an effect which can influence the peak intensity at the target and which is included in the model of the experiment. Work performed under auspices of U.S. DoE by LLNL, LBNL under Contracts DE-AC52-07NA27344, DE-AC02-05CH1123.

  17. [The effect of combined magnetic fields, adjusted to ion-cyclotron resonance for Ca ions, on intensity of division in planaria].

    PubMed

    Novikov, V V; Sheĭman, I M

    2012-01-01

    The combination of a constant (42 mkT1) and parallel to it a changing magnetic field on a frequency of 32 Hz (it corresponds to cyclotron frequency for Ca2+ ions) is shown to have a changing magnetic field amplitude-dependent effect on intensity of division in planaria. A stimulating effect has been observed at the magnitude of a changing component equal to 100 nT, but the amount of division significantly decreased at 250 nT and no impact of the magnetic field was registered at 500 nT1.

  18. Design Aspects of Focal Beams From High-Intensity Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Douglas N.; Kruse, Dustin E.; Qin, Shengping; Ferrara, Katherine W.

    2011-01-01

    As the applications of ultrasonic thermal therapies expand, the design of the high-intensity array must address both the energy delivery of the main beam and the character and relevance of off-target beam energy. We simulate the acoustic field performance of a selected set of circular arrays organized by array format, including flat versus curved arrays, periodic versus random arrays, and center void diameter variations. Performance metrics are based on the −3-dB focal main lobe (FML) positioning range, axial grating lobe (AGL) temperatures, and side lobe levels. Using finite-element analysis, we evaluate the relative heating of the FML and the AGLs. All arrays have a maximum diameter of 100λ, with element count ranging from 64 to 1024 and continuous wave frequency of 1.5 MHz. First, we show that a 50% spherical annulus produces focus beam side lobes which decay as a function of lateral distance at nearly 87% of the exponential rate of a full aperture. Second, for the arrays studied, the efficiency of power delivery over the −3-dB focus positioning range for spherical arrays is at least 2-fold greater than for flat arrays; the 256-element case shows a 5-fold advantage for the spherical array. Third, AGL heating can be significant as the focal target is moved to its distal half-intensity depth from the natural focus. Increasing the element count of a randomized array to 256 elements decreases the AGL-to-FML heating ratio to 0.12 at the distal half-intensity depth. Further increases in element count yield modest improvements. A 49% improvement in the AGL-to-peak heating ratio is predicted by using the Sumanaweera spiral element pattern with randomization. PMID:21859578

  19. Microsecond pulse width, intense, light-ion beam accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rej, D. J.; Bartsch, R. R.; Davis, H. A.; Faehl, R. J.; Greenly, J. B.; Waganaar, W. J.

    1993-10-01

    A relatively long-pulse width (0.1-1 μs) intense ion beam accelerator has been built for materials processing applications. An applied Br, magnetically insulated extraction ion diode with dielectric flashover ion source is installed directly onto the output of a 1.2 MV, 300-kJ Marx generator. The diode is designed with the aid of multidimensional particle-in-cell simulations. Initial operation of the accelerator at 0.4 MV indicates satisfactory performance without the need for additional pulse shaping. The effect of a plasma opening switch on diode behavior is considered.

  20. Ozone Production by Irradiation of Intense, Pulsed Relativistic Electron Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imada, Go; Morishima, Nobuyuki; Yatsui, Kiyoshi

    Characteristics of ozone production have been investigated by irradiation of intense, pulsed relativistic electron beam (IREB). The 1.8-m-long gas-treatment chamber is filled up with dry-N2-balanced O2 gas mixture with the pressure of 98 kPa and is irradiated by IREB. The kinetic energy, current and pulse width of the IREB are - 2 MeV, - 2.9 kA, and - 80 ns (FWHM), respectively. It is found that - 340 ppm of ozone is produced by firing 10 shots of the IREB. We have also obtained the production yield of ozone of 9 - 21 g/kWh.

  1. Flue Gas Treatment by Intense Pulsed Relativistic Electron Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikegaki, Takuro; Seino, Satoshi; Oda, Yasuyuki; Matsuda, Takuya; Imada, Go; Jiang, Weihua; Yatsui, Kiyoshi

    2001-02-01

    Removal of NOX has been studied using an intense pulsed relativistic electron beam (IREB). The chamber is 20 cm long, and is irradiated by the IREB of 2 MV or 8 MV with the pulse width of 50 ns (full width at half maximum: FWHM). With the initial NO concentration of 100 ppm and pressure of 120 kPa, ˜50% of NO is removed by firing of 10 shots of IREB, yielding 5 ppm/shot. The NOX removal amount in one shot does not depend on the initial NO concentration and electron energy.

  2. Radioactive by-products of a self-shielded cyclotron and the liquid target system for F-18 routine production.

    PubMed

    Kambali, I; Suryanto, H; Parwanto

    2016-06-01

    Routine production of F-18 radionuclide using proton beams accelerated in a cyclotron could potentially generate residual radioisotopes in the cyclotron vicinity which eventually become major safety concerns over radiation exposure to the workers. In this investigation, a typical 11-MeV proton, self-shielded cyclotron has been assessed for its residual radiation sources in the cyclotron's shielding, tank/chamber, cave wall as well as target system. Using a portable gamma ray spectroscopy system, the radiation measurement in the cyclotron environment has been carried out. Experimental results indicate that relatively long-lived radioisotopes such as Mn-54, Zn-65 and Eu-152 are detected in the inner and outer surface of the cyclotron shielding respectively while Mn-54 spectrum is observed around the cyclotron chamber. Weak intensity of Eu-152 radioisotope is again spotted in the inner and outer surface of the cyclotron cave wall. Angular distribution measurement of the Eu-152 shows that the intensity slightly drops with increasing observation angle relative to the proton beam incoming angle. In the target system, gamma rays from Co-56, Mn-52, Co-60, Mn-54, Ag-110 m are identified. TALYS-calculated nuclear cross-section data are used to study the origins of the radioactive by-products.

  3. Formation of a conical distribution and intense ion heating in the presence of hydrogen cyclotron waves. [in earth ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okuda, H.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.

    1981-01-01

    In the considered investigation, it is assumed that the field aligned currents are responsible for producing electrostatic harmonic cyclotron waves (EHC). Using a one-dimensional simulation model in which the electron velocity distribution is maintained by a constant injection of the initial distribution, it is shown that, in contrast to earlier initial value simulations, EHC waves grow to a large amplitude, resulting in the formation of an anisotropic ion velocity distribution. Both the heating rate and the anisotropy are in reasonable agreement with the quasi-linear theory, taking into account the cyclotron resonance. The results show that the saturation is due to the combined effects of wave induced diffusion in an electron velocity space and the heating of ions perpendicularly. Both these effects reduce the growth rate.

  4. Formation of a conical distribution and intense ion heating in the presence of hydrogen cyclotron waves. [in earth ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okuda, H.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.

    1981-01-01

    In the considered investigation, it is assumed that the field aligned currents are responsible for producing electrostatic harmonic cyclotron waves (EHC). Using a one-dimensional simulation model in which the electron velocity distribution is maintained by a constant injection of the initial distribution, it is shown that, in contrast to earlier initial value simulations, EHC waves grow to a large amplitude, resulting in the formation of an anisotropic ion velocity distribution. Both the heating rate and the anisotropy are in reasonable agreement with the quasi-linear theory, taking into account the cyclotron resonance. The results show that the saturation is due to the combined effects of wave induced diffusion in an electron velocity space and the heating of ions perpendicularly. Both these effects reduce the growth rate.

  5. Status of ECR (Electron Cyclotron Resonance) source technology

    SciTech Connect

    Lyneis, C.M.

    1987-03-01

    ECR (Electron Cyclotron Resonance) ion sources are now in widespread use for the production of high quality multiply charged ion beams for accelerators and atomic physics experiments, and industrial applications are being explored. Several general characteristics of ECR sources explain their widespread acceptance. For use with cyclotrons which require CW multiply charged ion beams, the ECR source has many advantages over heavy-ion PIG sources. Most important is the ability to produce higher charge states at useful intensities for nuclear physics experiments. Since the maximum energy set by the bending limit of a cyclotron scales with the square of the charge state, the installation of ECR sources on cyclotrons has provided an economical path to raise the energy. Another characteristic of ECR sources is that the discharge is produced without cathodes, so that only the source material injected into an ECR source is consumed. As a result, ECR sources can be operated continuously for periods of weeks without interruption. Techniques have been developed in the last few years, which allow these sources to produce beams from solid materials. The beam emittance from ECR sources is in the range of 50 to 200 ..pi.. mm-mrad at 10 kV. The principles of ECR ion sources are discussed, and present and future ECR sources are reviewed.

  6. The Development of High-Intensity Negative Ion Sources and Beams in the USSR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    ion beams as the basis for creating neutral beams for injection into mirror traps and tokamaks , for inertial confinement fusion, and possibly for...ion beams relates directly to the creation of intense neutral beams for injection into magnetic traps and tokamaks , for inertial confine- ment fusion...create intense neutral beams for injection systems for mirror traps and tokamaks and for inertial confinement fusion. These applications require high

  7. Design of a compact, permanent magnet electron cyclotron resonance ion source for proton and H{sub 2}{sup +} beam production

    SciTech Connect

    Jia Xianlu; Zhang Tianjue; Wang Chuan; Zheng Xia; Yin Zhiguo; Zhong Junqing; Wu Longcheng; Qin Jiuchang; Luo Shan

    2010-02-15

    A 2.45 GHz microwave ion source was developed at China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE) for proton beam production of over 60 mA [B.-Q. Cui, Y.-W. Bao, L.-Q. Li, W.-S. Jiang, and R.-W. Wang, Proceedings of the High Current Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) Ion Source for Proton Accelerator, APAC-2001, 2001 (unpublished)]. For various proton beam applications, another 2.45 GHz microwave ion source with a compact structure is designed and will be built at CIAE as well for high current proton beam production. It is also considered to be used for the test of H{sub 2}{sup +} beam, which could be injected into the central region model cyclotron at CIAE, and accelerated to 5 MeV before extraction by stripping. The required ECR magnetic field is supplied by all the permanent magnets rather than electrical solenoids and six poles. The magnetic field distribution provided by this permanent magnets configuration is a large and uniformly volume of ECR zone, with central magnetic field of a magnitude of {approx}875 Gs[T. Taylor and J. S. C. Wills, Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. A 309, 37 (1991)]. The field adjustment at the extraction end can be implemented by moving the position of the magnet blocks. The results of plasma, coupling with 2.45 GHz microwave in the ECR zone inside the ion source are simulated by particle-in-cell code to optimize the density by adjusting the magnetic field distribution. The design configuration of the ion source will be summarized in the paper.

  8. Simultaneous beam geometry and intensity map optimization in intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eva K; Fox, Tim; Crocker, Ian

    2006-01-01

    In current intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plan optimization, the focus is on either finding optimal beam angles (or other beam delivery parameters such as field segments, couch angles, gantry angles) or optimal beam intensities. In this article we offer a mixed integer programming (MIP) approach for simultaneously determining an optimal intensity map and optimal beam angles for IMRT delivery. Using this approach, we pursue an experimental study designed to (a) gauge differences in plan quality metrics with respect to different tumor sites and different MIP treatment planning models, and (b) test the concept of critical-normal-tissue-ring--a tissue ring of 5 mm thickness drawn around the planning target volume (PTV)--and its use for designing conformal plans. Our treatment planning models use two classes of decision variables to capture the beam configuration and intensities simultaneously. Binary (0/1) variables are used to capture "on" or "off" or "yes" or "no" decisions for each field, and nonnegative continuous variables are used to represent intensities of beamlets. Binary and continuous variables are also used for each voxel to capture dose level and dose deviation from target bounds. Treatment planning models were designed to explicitly incorporate the following planning constraints: (a) upper/lower/mean dose-based constraints, (b) dose-volume and equivalent-uniform-dose (EUD) constraints for critical structures, (c) homogeneity constraints (underdose/overdose) for PTV, (d) coverage constraints for PTV, and (e) maximum number of beams allowed. Within this constrained solution space, five optimization strategies involving clinical objectives were analyzed: optimize total intensity to PTV, optimize total intensity and then optimize conformity, optimize total intensity and then optimize homogeneity, minimize total dose to critical structures, minimize total dose to critical structures and optimize conformity simultaneously. We emphasize that the

  9. Broadband source localization using horizontal-beam acoustic intensity striations.

    PubMed

    Turgut, Altan; Orr, Marshall; Rouseff, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Waveguide invariant theory is applied to horizontal line array (HLA) beamformer output to localize moving broadband noise sources from measured acoustic intensity striation patterns. Acoustic signals emitted by ships of opportunity (merchant ships) were simultaneously recorded on a HLA and three hydrophones separated by 10 km during the RAGS03 (relationship between array gain and shelf-break fluid processes) experiment. Hough transforms are used to estimate both the waveguide invariant parameter "beta" and the ratio of source range at the closest point of approach to source speed from the observed striation patterns. Broadband (50-150-Hz) acoustic data-sets are used to demonstrate source localization capability as well as inversion capability of waveguide invariant parameter beta. Special attention is paid to bathymetric variability since the acoustic intensity striation patterns seem to be influenced by range-dependent bathymetry of the experimental area. The Hough transform method is also applied to the HLA beam-time record data and to the acoustic intensity data from three distant receivers to validate the estimation results from HLA beamformer output. Good agreement of the results from all three approaches suggests the feasibility of locating broadband noise sources and estimating waveguide invariant parameter beta in shallow waters.

  10. Varying stopping and self-focusing of intense proton beams as they heat solid density matter

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.; McGuffey, C. Qiao, B.; Beg, F. N.; Wei, M. S.; Grabowski, P. E.

    2016-04-15

    Transport of intense proton beams in solid-density matter is numerically investigated using an implicit hybrid particle-in-cell code. Both collective effects and stopping for individual beam particles are included through the electromagnetic fields solver and stopping power calculations utilizing the varying local target conditions, allowing self-consistent transport studies. Two target heating mechanisms, the beam energy deposition and Ohmic heating driven by the return current, are compared. The dependences of proton beam transport in solid targets on the beam parameters are systematically analyzed, i.e., simulations with various beam intensities, pulse durations, kinetic energies, and energy distributions are compared. The proton beam deposition profile and ultimate target temperature show strong dependence on intensity and pulse duration. A strong magnetic field is generated from a proton beam with high density and tight beam radius, resulting in focusing of the beam and localized heating of the target up to hundreds of eV.

  11. Varying stopping and self-focusing of intense proton beams as they heat solid density matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; McGuffey, C.; Qiao, B.; Wei, M. S.; Grabowski, P. E.; Beg, F. N.

    2016-04-01

    Transport of intense proton beams in solid-density matter is numerically investigated using an implicit hybrid particle-in-cell code. Both collective effects and stopping for individual beam particles are included through the electromagnetic fields solver and stopping power calculations utilizing the varying local target conditions, allowing self-consistent transport studies. Two target heating mechanisms, the beam energy deposition and Ohmic heating driven by the return current, are compared. The dependences of proton beam transport in solid targets on the beam parameters are systematically analyzed, i.e., simulations with various beam intensities, pulse durations, kinetic energies, and energy distributions are compared. The proton beam deposition profile and ultimate target temperature show strong dependence on intensity and pulse duration. A strong magnetic field is generated from a proton beam with high density and tight beam radius, resulting in focusing of the beam and localized heating of the target up to hundreds of eV.

  12. Electron Production and Collective Field Generation in Intense Particle Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Molvik, A W; Vay, J; Cohen, R; Friedman, A; Lee, E; Verboncoeur, J; Covo, M K

    2006-02-09

    Electron cloud effects (ECEs) are increasingly recognized as important, but incompletely understood, dynamical phenomena, which can severely limit the performance of present electron colliders, the next generation of high-intensity rings, such as PEP-II upgrade, LHC, and the SNS, the SIS 100/200, or future high-intensity heavy ion accelerators such as envisioned in Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion (HIF). Deleterious effects include ion-electron instabilities, emittance growth, particle loss, increase in vacuum pressure, added heat load at the vacuum chamber walls, and interference with certain beam diagnostics. Extrapolation of present experience to significantly higher beam intensities is uncertain given the present level of understanding. With coordinated LDRD projects at LLNL and LBNL, we undertook a comprehensive R&D program including experiments, theory and simulations to better understand the phenomena, establish the essential parameters, and develop mitigating mechanisms. This LDRD project laid the essential groundwork for such a program. We developed insights into the essential processes, modeled the relevant physics, and implemented these models in computational production tools that can be used for self-consistent study of the effect on ion beams. We validated the models and tools through comparison with experimental data, including data from new diagnostics that we developed as part of this work and validated on the High-Current Experiment (HCX) at LBNL. We applied these models to High-Energy Physics (HEP) and other advanced accelerators. This project was highly successful, as evidenced by the two paragraphs above, and six paragraphs following that are taken from our 2003 proposal with minor editing that mostly consisted of changing the tense. Further benchmarks of outstanding performance are: we had 13 publications with 8 of them in refereed journals, our work was recognized by the accelerator and plasma physics communities by 8 invited papers and we have 5

  13. Beam characterization of FLASH from beam profile measurement by intensity transport equation and reconstruction of the Wigner distribution function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, Bernd; Mey, Tobias; Mann, Klaus; Keitel, Barbara; Kreis, Svea; Kuhlmann, Marion; Plönjes, Elke; Tiedtke, Kai

    2013-05-01

    Beam parameters of the free-electron laser FLASH @13.5 nm in two different operation modes were determined from beam profile measurements and subsequent reconstruction of the Wigner distribution function behind the ellipsoidal focusing mirror at beamline BL2. 40 two-dimensional single pulse intensity distributions were recorded at each of 65 axial positions around the waist of the FEL beam with a magnifying EUV sensitized CCD camera. From these beam profile data the Wigner distribution function based on different levels of averaging could be reconstructed by an inverse Radon transform. For separable beams this yields the complete Wigner distribution, and for beams with zero twist the information is still sufficient for wavefront determination and beam propagation through stigmatic systems. The obtained results are compared to wavefront reconstructions based on the transport of intensity equation. A future setup for Wigner distribution measurements of general beams is discussed.

  14. Status of the Cyclotron Institute Upgrade Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melconian, Dan

    2016-09-01

    The Texas A&M University Re-accelerated EXotics (T-REX) project, an upgrade to the Cyclotron Institute, will provide high-quality re-accelerated secondary beams of a unique energy range and the ability to provide primary beams to two experiments concurrently. The upgrade is nearing completion of its three major tasks: re-commissioning of the existing K150 cyclotron; construction of light- and heavy-ion guide transport systems; and charge-boosting the K150 RIB for re-acceleration using the K500 cyclotron. The light-ion guide transport system will utilize the high intensity (>= 10 μ A) proton beam from the K150 to produce rare ions via fusion-evapouration reactions or proton-induced fission fragments. These ions will be transported to an ECR charge breeder prior to injection in the K500. The heavy-ion guide will use deep inelastic, transfer and fragmentation reactions using the up to 25 MeV/u primary beams from the K150. The products will be separated by a superconducting solenoid and collected in a large gas-catcher, after which a multi-RFQ system will transport the RIB to any of: the charge-breeder and K500; the TAMU Penning Trap beamline; or an MR-TOF for beam analysis. The status of the T-REX upgrade and an overview of its capabilities will be presented Supported by DOE Grant Number DE-FG03-93ER40773 and the Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant Number H-A-0098.

  15. Accessing defect dynamics using intense, nanosecond pulsed ion beams

    DOE PAGES

    Persaud, A.; Barnard, J. J.; Guo, H.; ...

    2015-06-18

    Gaining in-situ access to relaxation dynamics of radiation induced defects will lead to a better understanding of materials and is important for the verification of theoretical models and simulations. We show preliminary results from experiments at the new Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-II) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory that will enable in-situ access to defect dynamics through pump-probe experiments. Here, the unique capabilities of the NDCX-II accelerator to generate intense, nanosecond pulsed ion beams are utilized. Preliminary data of channeling experiments using lithium and potassium ions and silicon membranes are shown. We compare these data to simulation results using Crystalmore » Trim. Furthermore, we discuss the improvements to the accelerator to higher performance levels and the new diagnostics tools that are being incorporated.« less

  16. Accessing Defect Dynamics using Intense, Nanosecond Pulsed Ion Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persaud, A.; Barnard, J. J.; Guo, H.; Hosemann, P.; Lidia, S.; Minor, A. M.; Seidl, P. A.; Schenkel, T.

    Gaining in-situ access to relaxation dynamics of radiation induced defects will lead to a better understanding of materials and is important for the verification of theoretical models and simulations. We show preliminary results from experiments at the new Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-II) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory that will enable in-situ access to defect dynamics through pump-probe experiments. Here, the unique capabilities of the NDCX-II accelerator to generate intense, nanosecond pulsed ion beams are utilized. Preliminary data of channeling experiments using lithium and potassium ions and silicon membranes are shown. We compare these data to simulation results using Crystal Trim. Furthermore, we discuss the improvements to the accelerator to higher performance levels and the new diagnostics tools that are being incorporated.

  17. Accessing defect dynamics using intense, nanosecond pulsed ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Persaud, A.; Barnard, J. J.; Guo, H.; Hosemann, P.; Lidia, S.; Minor, A. M.; Seidl, P. A.; Schenkel, T.

    2015-06-18

    Gaining in-situ access to relaxation dynamics of radiation induced defects will lead to a better understanding of materials and is important for the verification of theoretical models and simulations. We show preliminary results from experiments at the new Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-II) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory that will enable in-situ access to defect dynamics through pump-probe experiments. Here, the unique capabilities of the NDCX-II accelerator to generate intense, nanosecond pulsed ion beams are utilized. Preliminary data of channeling experiments using lithium and potassium ions and silicon membranes are shown. We compare these data to simulation results using Crystal Trim. Furthermore, we discuss the improvements to the accelerator to higher performance levels and the new diagnostics tools that are being incorporated.

  18. Infrared imaging diagnostics for intense pulsed electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Xiao; Shen, Jie; Liu, Wenbin; Zhong, Haowen; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Gaolong; Le, Xiaoyun; Qu, Miao; Yan, Sha

    2015-08-15

    Infrared imaging diagnostic method for two-dimensional calorimetric diagnostics has been developed for intense pulsed electron beam (IPEB). By using a 100-μm-thick tungsten film as the infrared heat sink for IPEB, the emitting uniformity of the electron source can be analyzed to evaluate the efficiency and stability of the diode system. Two-dimensional axisymmetric finite element method heat transfer simulation, combined with Monte Carlo calculation, was performed for error estimation and optimization of the method. The test of the method was finished with IPEB generated by explosive emission electron diode with pulse duration (FWHM) of 80 ns, electron energy up to 450 keV, and a total beam current of over 1 kA. The results showed that it is possible to measure the cross-sectional energy density distribution of IPEB with energy sensitivity of 0.1 J/cm{sup 2} and spatial resolution of 1 mm. The technical details, such as irradiation protection of bremsstrahlung γ photons and the functional extensibility of the method were discussed in this work.

  19. Infrared imaging diagnostics for intense pulsed electron beam.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiao; Shen, Jie; Qu, Miao; Liu, Wenbin; Zhong, Haowen; Zhang, Jie; Yan, Sha; Zhang, Gaolong; Le, Xiaoyun

    2015-08-01

    Infrared imaging diagnostic method for two-dimensional calorimetric diagnostics has been developed for intense pulsed electron beam (IPEB). By using a 100-μm-thick tungsten film as the infrared heat sink for IPEB, the emitting uniformity of the electron source can be analyzed to evaluate the efficiency and stability of the diode system. Two-dimensional axisymmetric finite element method heat transfer simulation, combined with Monte Carlo calculation, was performed for error estimation and optimization of the method. The test of the method was finished with IPEB generated by explosive emission electron diode with pulse duration (FWHM) of 80 ns, electron energy up to 450 keV, and a total beam current of over 1 kA. The results showed that it is possible to measure the cross-sectional energy density distribution of IPEB with energy sensitivity of 0.1 J/cm(2) and spatial resolution of 1 mm. The technical details, such as irradiation protection of bremsstrahlung γ photons and the functional extensibility of the method were discussed in this work.

  20. The stress intensity factor for the double cantilever beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichter, W. B.

    1983-01-01

    Fourier transforms and the Wiener-Hopf technique are used in conjunction with plane elastostatics to examine the singular crack tip stress field in the double cantilever beam (DCB) specimen. In place of the Dirac delta function, a family of functions which duplicates the important features of the concentrated forces without introducing unmanageable mathematical complexities is used as a loading function. With terms of order h-squared/a-squared retained in the series expansion, the dimensionless stress intensity factor is found to be K (h to the 1/2)/P = 12 to the 1/2 (a/h + 0.6728 + 0.0377 h-squared/a-squared), in which P is the magnitude of the concentrated forces per unit thickness, a is the distance from the crack tip to the points of load application, and h is the height of each cantilever beam. The result is similar to that obtained by Gross and Srawley by fitting a line to discrete results from their boundary collocation analysis.

  1. 14 CFR 23.1395 - Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AIRPLANES Equipment Lights § 23.1395 Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of position lights. No position light intensity may exceed the applicable values in the following equal or exceed the applicable... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Maximum intensities in overlapping beams...

  2. 14 CFR 23.1395 - Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AIRPLANES Equipment Lights § 23.1395 Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of position lights. No position light intensity may exceed the applicable values in the following equal or exceed the applicable... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Maximum intensities in overlapping beams...

  3. 14 CFR 23.1395 - Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AIRPLANES Equipment Lights § 23.1395 Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of position lights. No position light intensity may exceed the applicable values in the following equal or exceed the applicable... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Maximum intensities in overlapping beams...

  4. 14 CFR 23.1395 - Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AIRPLANES Equipment Lights § 23.1395 Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of position lights. No position light intensity may exceed the applicable values in the following equal or exceed the applicable... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Maximum intensities in overlapping beams...

  5. Phase and synchronous detector theory as applied to beam position and intensity measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Gilpatrick, J.D.

    1995-05-01

    A popular signal processing technique for beam position measurements uses the principle of amplitude-to-phase (AM/PM) conversion and phase detection. This technique processes position-sensitive beam-image-current probe-signals into output signals that are proportional to the beam`s position. These same probe signals may be summed and processed in a different fashion to provide output signals that are proportional to the peak beam current which is typically referred to as beam intensity. This paper derives the transfer functions for the AM/PM beam position and peak beam current processors.

  6. Hollow structure formation of intense ion beams with sharp edge in background plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Zhang-Hu; Wang, You-Nian

    2016-02-15

    The transport of intense ion beams with sharp radial beam edge in plasmas has been studied with two-dimensional electromagnetic particle simulations. The initial solid beam evolves into a hollow beam due to the nonlinear sharp transverse force peak in the regions of beam edge. The magnitude and nonlinearity of this peak are enhanced as the ion beam travels further into the plasma, due to the self-consistent interactions between the beam ions and the plasma electrons. This structure formation is shown to be independent on the beam radius.

  7. Operation of the intensity monitors in beam transport lines at Fermilab during Run II¹

    DOE PAGES

    Crisp, J.; Fellenz, B.; Fitzgerald, J.; ...

    2011-10-06

    The intensity of charged particle beams at Fermilab must be kept within pre-determined safety and operational envelopes in part by assuring all beam within a few percent has been transported from any source to destination. Beam instensity monitors with toroidial pickups provide such beam intensity measurements in the transport lines between accelerators at FNAL. With Run II, much effort was made to continually improve the resolution and accuracy of the system.

  8. The ADRIA project for high intensity radioactive beams production

    SciTech Connect

    Bisoffi, G.; Cavenago, M.; Dainelli, A.; Facco, A.; Fortuna, G.; Lombardi, A.; Moisio, M.F.; Pisent, A.; Spolaore, P.; Tiveron, B. ); Ruggiero, A.G. ); Tecchio, L. Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Turin )

    1992-01-01

    A proposal of an accelerator complex (ADRIA) for the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (LNL) is described in this report. The main components of the complex are a Heavy Ion Injection system and two rings, a Booster and a Decelerator, both with a maximum rigidity of 22.25 Tm, connected by a Transfer Line where exotic proposal has two main goals consisting in the isotopes are produced and selected. The proposal has two main goals consisting in the acceleration of stable ion species up to kinetic energies of the order of few GeV/u, at a repetition rate of 10 Hz with intensities of about 10[sup 12] ions per second, for fixed target experiments in nuclear physics and for the production of fully stripped radioactive beams, using particle fragmentation method for nuclear spectroscopy experiments. Fragments are accumulated in the Decelerator, with intensities 10[sup 8] [divided by] 10[sup 9] ions/s, cooled and delivered at the production energies or decelerated down to energies of few MeV/u, in proximity of the Coulomb barrier.

  9. The ADRIA project for high intensity radioactive beams production

    SciTech Connect

    Bisoffi, G.; Cavenago, M.; Dainelli, A.; Facco, A.; Fortuna, G.; Lombardi, A.; Moisio, M.F.; Pisent, A.; Spolaore, P.; Tiveron, B.; Ruggiero, A.G.; Tecchio, L. |

    1992-12-31

    A proposal of an accelerator complex (ADRIA) for the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (LNL) is described in this report. The main components of the complex are a Heavy Ion Injection system and two rings, a Booster and a Decelerator, both with a maximum rigidity of 22.25 Tm, connected by a Transfer Line where exotic proposal has two main goals consisting in the isotopes are produced and selected. The proposal has two main goals consisting in the acceleration of stable ion species up to kinetic energies of the order of few GeV/u, at a repetition rate of 10 Hz with intensities of about 10{sup 12} ions per second, for fixed target experiments in nuclear physics and for the production of fully stripped radioactive beams, using particle fragmentation method for nuclear spectroscopy experiments. Fragments are accumulated in the Decelerator, with intensities 10{sup 8} {divided_by} 10{sup 9} ions/s, cooled and delivered at the production energies or decelerated down to energies of few MeV/u, in proximity of the Coulomb barrier.

  10. Evidence that the electrostatic ion cyclotron instability is saturated by ion heating. [in auroral arc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, M. C.; Bering, E. A.; Mozer, F. S.

    1975-01-01

    Observations have been made of electric field oscillations near the local ion gyro frequency and of an intense beam of plasma ions at the edge of an auroral arc. The observations are in good agreement with ion heating as the saturation mechanism for electrostatic ion cyclotron waves.

  11. Structure and morphology characters of GaN grown by ECR-MBE using hydrogen-nitrogen mixed gas plasma[Electron Cyclotron Resonance-Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Araki, Tsutomu; Chiba, Yasuo; Nanishi, Yasushi

    2000-07-01

    GaN growth by electron-cyclotron-resonance plasma-excited molecular beam epitaxy using hydrogen-nitrogen mixed gas plasma were carried out on GaN templates with a different polar-surface. Structure and surface morphology of the GaN layers were characterized using transmission electron microscopy. The GaN layer grown with hydrogen on N-polar template showed a relatively flat morphology including hillocks. Columnar domain existed in the center of the hillock, which might be attributed to the existence of tiny inversion domain with Ga-polarity. On the other hand, columnar structure was formed in the GaN layer grown with hydrogen on Ga-polar template.

  12. Deuterium beam acceleration with 3rd harmonic ion cyclotron resonance heating in Joint European Torus: Sawtooth stabilization and Alfvén eigenmodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gassner, T.; Schoepf, K.; Sharapov, S. E.; Kiptily, V. G.; Pinches, S. D.; Hellesen, C.; Eriksson, J.; JET-EFDA contributors

    2012-03-01

    Experiments on accelerating NBI-produced deuterium (D) beam ions from their injection energy of ˜110 keV up to the MeV energy range with 3rd harmonic ion cyclotron resonance heating were performed on the Joint European Torus [P. H. Rebut and B. E. Keen, Fusion Technol. 11, 13 (1987)]. A renewed set of nuclear diagnostics was used for analysing fast D ions during sawtooth stabilization, monster sawtooth crashes, and during excitation of Alfvén eigenmodes (AEs) residing inside the q = 1 radius. The measurements and modeling of the fast ions with the nonlinear HAGIS code [S. D. Pinches et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 111, 133 (1998)] show that monster sawtooth crashes are strongly facilitated by the AE-induced re-distribution of the fast D ions from inside the q = 1 radius to the plasma edge.

  13. Dependence of ion beam current on position of mobile plate tuner in multi-frequencies microwaves electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Kurisu, Yosuke; Kiriyama, Ryutaro; Takenaka, Tomoya; Nozaki, Dai; Sato, Fuminobu; Kato, Yushi; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2012-02-15

    We are constructing a tandem-type electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS). The first stage of this can supply 2.45 GHz and 11-13 GHz microwaves to plasma chamber individually and simultaneously. We optimize the beam current I{sub FC} by the mobile plate tuner. The I{sub FC} is affected by the position of the mobile plate tuner in the chamber as like a circular cavity resonator. We aim to clarify the relation between the I{sub FC} and the ion saturation current in the ECRIS against the position of the mobile plate tuner. We obtained the result that the variation of the plasma density contributes largely to the variation of the I{sub FC} when we change the position of the mobile plate tuner.

  14. Dependence of ion beam current on position of mobile plate tuner in multi-frequencies microwaves electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Kurisu, Yosuke; Kiriyama, Ryutaro; Takenaka, Tomoya; Nozaki, Dai; Sato, Fuminobu; Kato, Yushi; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2012-02-01

    We are constructing a tandem-type electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS). The first stage of this can supply 2.45 GHz and 11-13 GHz microwaves to plasma chamber individually and simultaneously. We optimize the beam current I(FC) by the mobile plate tuner. The I(FC) is affected by the position of the mobile plate tuner in the chamber as like a circular cavity resonator. We aim to clarify the relation between the I(FC) and the ion saturation current in the ECRIS against the position of the mobile plate tuner. We obtained the result that the variation of the plasma density contributes largely to the variation of the I(FC) when we change the position of the mobile plate tuner.

  15. Analytical Solutions for the Nonlinear Longitudinal Drift Compression (Expansion) of Intense Charged Particle Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Edward A. Startsev; Ronald C. Davidson

    2004-04-09

    To achieve high focal spot intensities in heavy ion fusion, the ion beam must be compressed longitudinally by factors of ten to one hundred before it is focused onto the target. The longitudinal compression is achieved by imposing an initial velocity profile tilt on the drifting beam. In this paper, the problem of longitudinal drift compression of intense charged particle beams is solved analytically for the two important cases corresponding to a cold beam, and a pressure-dominated beam, using a one-dimensional warm-fluid model describing the longitudinal beam dynamics.

  16. Average intensity and spreading of a Lorentz-Gauss beam in turbulent atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guoquan; Chu, Xiuxiang

    2010-01-18

    The propagation of a Lorentz-Gauss beam in turbulent atmosphere is investigated. Based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel integral and the Hermite-Gaussian expansion of a Lorentz function, analytical formulae for the average intensity and the effective beam size of a Lorentz-Gauss beam are derived in turbulent atmosphere. The average intensity distribution and the spreading properties of a Lorentz-Gauss beam in turbulent atmosphere are numerically demonstrated. The influences of the beam parameters and the structure constant of the atmospheric turbulence on the propagation of a Lorentz-Gauss beam in turbulent atmosphere are also discussed in detail.

  17. RF control hardware design for CYCIAE-100 cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Zhiguo; Fu, Xiaoliang; Ji, Bin; Zhao, Zhenlu; Zhang, Tianjue; Li, Pengzhan; Wei, Junyi; Xing, Jiansheng; Wang, Chuan

    2015-11-01

    The Beijing Radioactive Ion-beam Facility project is being constructed by BRIF division of China Institute of Atomic Energy. In this project, a 100 MeV high intensity compact proton cyclotron is built for multiple applications. The first successful beam extraction of CYCIAE-100 cyclotron was done in the middle of 2014. The extracted proton beam energy is 100 MeV and the beam current is more than 20 μA. The RF system of the CYCIAE-100 cyclotron includes two half-wavelength cavities, two 100 kW tetrode amplifiers and power transmission line systems (all above are independent from each other) and two sets of Low Level RF control crates. Each set of LLRF control includes an amplitude control unit, a tuning control unit, a phase control unit, a local Digital Signal Process control unit and an Advanced RISC Machines based EPICS IOC unit. These two identical LLRF control crates share one common reference clock and take advantages of modern digital technologies (e.g. DSP and Direct Digital Synthesizer) to achieve closed loop voltage and phase regulations of the dee-voltage. In the beam commission, the measured dee-voltage stability of RF system is better than 0.1% and phase stability is better than 0.03°. The hardware design of the LLRF system will be reviewed in this paper.

  18. Static analysis of possible emittance growth of intense charged particle beams with thermal equilibrium distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuchi, Takashi; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2009-05-15

    Possible emittance growths of intense, nonuniform beams during a transport in a focusing channel are derived as a function of nonlinear field energy and space charge tune depression factors. The nonlinear field energy of the beam with thermal equilibrium distribution is estimated by considering the particle distribution across the cross section of the beam. The results show that the possible emittance growth can be suppressed by keeping the beam particle in thermal equilibrium distribution during the beam transport.

  19. In-situ determination of energy species yields of intense particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Kugel, Henry W.; Kaita, Robert

    1987-01-01

    An arrangement is provided for the in-situ determination of energy species yields of intense particle beams. The beam is directed onto a target surface of known composition, such that Rutherford backscattering of the beam occurs. The yield-energy characteristic response of the beam to backscattering from the target is analyzed using Rutherford backscattering techniques to determine the yields of energy species components of the beam.

  20. In-situ determination of energy species yields of intense particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Kugel, Henry W.; Kaita, Robert

    1987-03-03

    An arrangement is provided for the in-situ determination of energy species yields of intense particle beams. The beam is directed onto a target surface of known composition, such that Rutherford backscattering of the beam occurs. The yield-energy characteristic response of the beam to backscattering from the target is analyzed using Rutherford backscattering techniques to determine the yields of energy species components of the beam.

  1. Commercial compact cyclotrons in the 90`s

    SciTech Connect

    Milton, B.F.

    1995-09-01

    Cyclotrons continue to be efficient accelerators for radio-isotope production. In recent years, developments in the accelerator technology have greatly increased the practical beam current in these machines while also improving the overall system reliability. These developments combined with the development of new isotopes for medicine and industry, and a retiring of older machines indicate a strong future for commercial cyclotrons. In this paper the authors will survey recent developments in the areas of cyclotron technology, as they relate to the new generation of commercial cyclotrons. Design criteria for the different types of commercial cyclotrons will be presented, with reference to those demands that differ from those in a research oriented cyclotron project. The authors also discuss the possibility of systems designed for higher energies and capable of extracted beam currents of up to 2.0 mA.

  2. Truncated Thermal Equilibrium Distribution for Intense Beam Propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald C. Davidson; Hong Qin; Steven M. Lund

    2003-02-26

    An intense charged-particle beam with directed kinetic energy ({lambda}{sub b}-1)m{sub b}c{sup 2} propagates in the z-direction through an applied focusing field with transverse focusing force modeled by F{sub foc} = -{lambda}{sub b}m{sub b}{omega}{sub beta}{sup 2} {perpendicular} x {perpendicular} in the smooth focusing approximation. This paper examines properties of the axisymmetric, truncated thermal equilibrium distribution F(sub)b(r,p perpendicular) = A exp (-H Perpendicular/T perpendicular (sub)b) = (H perpendicular-E(sub)b), where A, T perpendicular (sub)b, and E (sub)b are positive constants, and H perpendicular is the Hamiltonian for transverse particle motion. The equilibrium profiles for beam number density, n(sub)b(r) = * d{sup 2}pF(sub)b(r,p perpendicular), and transverse temperature, T perpendicular (sub)b(r) = * d{sup 2}p(p{sup 2} perpendicular/2 lambda (sbu)bm (sub)b)F(sub)b(r,p perpendicular), are calculated self-consistently including space-charge effects. Several properties of the equilibrium profiles are noteworthy. For example, the beam has a sharp outer edge radius r(sub)b with n(sub)b(r greater than or equal to rb) = 0, where r(sub)b depends on the value of E(sub)b/T (sub)perpendicular(sub)b. In addition, unlike the choice of a semi-Gaussian distribution, F{sup SG}(sub)b = A exp (-p{sup 2}(sub)perpendicular/2lambda(sub)bm(sub)bTperpendicular(sub)b) = (r-r(sub)b), the truncated thermal equilibrium distribution F(sub)b(r,p) depends on (r,p) only through the single-particle constant of the motion Hperpendiuclar and is therefore a true steady-state solution (*/*t = 0) of the nonlinear Vlasov-Maxwell equations.

  3. Fiber-optic holography employing multiple beam fringe stabilization and object/reference beam intensity variability.

    PubMed

    Muhs, J D; Leilabady, P A; Corke, M

    1988-09-01

    The use of fiber optics in the field of optical holography is discussed with emphasis on the design of systems used to overcome several inherent shortcomings associated with fiber-optic holographic systems. Specifically, random environmentally induced optical phase changes within the fiber are minimized by employing a Michelson interferometer in conjunction with a closed loop feedback system. Furthermore, by using several passive single-mode couplers, complete object illumination via several illumination fibers is observed. Finally, by implementing a Mach-Zehnder interferometric technique, control of the object and reference beam intensity ratios in a fiber-optic holographic system can be accomplished. The resulting schemes are very stable and highly versatile systems suitable for remote holographic interferometric sensing and other applications where conventional holography techniques are impractical. Experimental results on fringe visibility, fringe stability, and the stabilization of object/reference beam intensity ratios are also given along with a composite summary of the overall system constraints associated with fiber-optic holographic systems.

  4. Phase Rotation of Muon Beams for Producing Intense Low-Energy Muon Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Neuffer, D.; Bao, Y.; Hansen, G.

    2016-01-01

    Low-energy muon beams are useful for rare decay searches, which provide access to new physics that cannot be addressed at high-energy colliders. However, muons are produced within a broad energy spread unmatched to the low-energy required. In this paper we outline a phase rotation method to significantly increase the intensity of low-energy muons. The muons are produced from a short pulsed proton driver, and develop a time-momentum correlation in a drift space following production. A series of rf cavities is used to bunch the muons and phase-energy rotate the bunches to a momentum of around 100 MeV/c. Then another group of rf cavities is used to decelerate the muon bunches to low-energy. This obtains ~0.1 muon per 8 GeV proton, which is significantly higher than currently planned Mu2e experiments, and would enable a next generation of rare decay searches, and other intense muon beam applications.

  5. First charge breeding of a rare-isotope beam with the electron-beam ion trap of the ReA post-accelerator at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapierre, A.; Schwarz, S.; Baumann, T. M.; Cooper, K.; Kittimanapun, K.; Rodriguez, A. J.; Sumithrarachchi, C.; Williams, S. J.; Wittmer, W.; Leitner, D.; Bollen, G.

    2014-02-01

    An electron-beam ion trap (EBIT) charge breeder is being brought into operation at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University. The EBIT is part of the ReA post-accelerator for reacceleration of rare isotopes, which are thermalized in a gas "stopping" cell after being produced at high energy by projectile fragmentation. The ReA EBIT has a distinctive design; it is characterized by a high-current electron gun and a two-field superconducting magnet to optimize the capture and charge-breeding efficiency of continuously injected singly charged ion beams. Following a brief overview of the reaccelerator system and the ReA EBIT, this paper presents the latest commissioning results, particularly, charge breeding and reacceleration of the highly charged rare isotopes, 76Ga24 +, 25 +.

  6. The WARP Code: Modeling High Intensity Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Grote, D P; Friedman, A; Vay, J L; Haber, I

    2004-12-09

    The Warp code, developed for heavy-ion driven inertial fusion energy studies, is used to model high intensity ion (and electron) beams. Significant capability has been incorporated in Warp, allowing nearly all sections of an accelerator to be modeled, beginning with the source. Warp has as its core an explicit, three-dimensional, particle-in-cell model. Alongside this is a rich set of tools for describing the applied fields of the accelerator lattice, and embedded conducting surfaces (which are captured at sub-grid resolution). Also incorporated are models with reduced dimensionality: an axisymmetric model and a transverse ''slice'' model. The code takes advantage of modern programming techniques, including object orientation, parallelism, and scripting (via Python). It is at the forefront in the use of the computational technique of adaptive mesh refinement, which has been particularly successful in the area of diode and injector modeling, both steady-state and time-dependent. In the presentation, some of the major aspects of Warp will be overviewed, especially those that could be useful in modeling ECR sources. Warp has been benchmarked against both theory and experiment. Recent results will be presented showing good agreement of Warp with experimental results from the STS500 injector test stand. Additional information can be found on the web page http://hif.lbl.gov/theory/WARP{_}summary.html.

  7. The WARP Code: Modeling High Intensity Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Grote, David P.; Friedman, Alex; Vay, Jean-Luc; Haber, Irving

    2005-03-15

    The Warp code, developed for heavy-ion driven inertial fusion energy studies, is used to model high intensity ion (and electron) beams. Significant capability has been incorporated in Warp, allowing nearly all sections of an accelerator to be modeled, beginning with the source. Warp has as its core an explicit, three-dimensional, particle-in-cell model. Alongside this is a rich set of tools for describing the applied fields of the accelerator lattice, and embedded conducting surfaces (which are captured at sub-grid resolution). Also incorporated are models with reduced dimensionality: an axisymmetric model and a transverse 'slice' model. The code takes advantage of modern programming techniques, including object orientation, parallelism, and scripting (via Python). It is at the forefront in the use of the computational technique of adaptive mesh refinement, which has been particularly successful in the area of diode and injector modeling, both steady-state and time-dependent. In the presentation, some of the major aspects of Warp will be overviewed, especially those that could be useful in modeling ECR sources. Warp has been benchmarked against both theory and experiment. Recent results will be presented showing good agreement of Warp with experimental results from the STS500 injector test stand. Additional information can be found on the web page http://hif.lbl.gov/theory/WARP{sub s}ummary.html.

  8. Particle Simulation Schemes for High Intensity Charged Particle Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wei-Li; Startsev, Edward; Qin, Hong; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2003-10-01

    Numerical schemes for the electromagnetic particle simulations of high intensity charged particle beams have been developed. The purpose of devising these schemes is to avoid the numerical difficulties associated with the direct calculation of the time derivatives of the vector potential, partial A / partial t, in the Darwin model, for which the transverse induction current in Ampere's law is neglected. The first scheme requires the calculations of higher order velocity moments of the distribution function to obtain the time derivatives for both the scalar potential Φ and A, similar to the method used for shear-Alfven waves.[1] The second uses the canonical momentum P = p + q A/c in the equations of motion as a means to eliminate the troublesome time derivatives.[2] The use of these schemes for physics problems in heavy ion fusion systems will be reported. [1] W. W. Lee, J. L. V. Lewandowski, T. S. Hahm, and Z. Lin, Phys. Plasmas 8, 4435 (2001). [2] W. W. Lee, E. Startsev, H. Qin and R. C. Davidson, Proceedings of 2001 Particle Accelerator Conference 1906 (2001).

  9. Simulations of the effects of mobile ions on the relativistic beam-plasma instability for intense beams

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, M.E.; Lemons, D.S.; Lee, H.

    1983-01-01

    Particle-in-cell simulations of the beam-plasma instability for intense relativistic electron beams in dense plasmas show rapid heating of the electrons to multi-kilovolt temperatures. The resulting hydrodynamic motion of the plasma results in density gradients that degrade the interaction. Heat flow out of the plasma is found in some instances to limit the gradient formation process.

  10. Results of RIKEN superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source with 28 GHz.

    PubMed

    Higurashi, Y; Ohnishi, J; Nakagawa, T; Haba, H; Tamura, M; Aihara, T; Fujimaki, M; Komiyama, M; Uchiyama, A; Kamigaito, O

    2012-02-01

    We measured the beam intensity of highly charged heavy ions and x-ray heat load for RIKEN superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source with 28 GHz microwaves under the various conditions. The beam intensity of Xe(20+) became maximum at B(min) ∼ 0.65 T, which was ∼65% of the magnetic field strength of electron cyclotron resonance (B(ECR)) for 28 GHz microwaves. We observed that the heat load of x-ray increased with decreasing gas pressure and field gradient at resonance zone. It seems that the beam intensity of highly charged heavy ions with 28 GHz is higher than that with 18 GHz at same RF power.

  11. FEL on slow cyclotron wave

    SciTech Connect

    Silivra, A.

    1995-12-31

    A physical mechanism of interaction of fast electromagnetic wave with slow cyclotron wave of relativistic electron beam in a FEL with helical wiggler field is described. It is shown that: (1) interaction is possible for both group of steady state electron trajectories (2) positive gain is achieved within certain interval of guide field strength (3) operation wavelength for group 1 trajectories ({Omega}{sub 0}/{gamma} < k{omega}{upsilon}{parallel}) is shorter than for the conventional FEL synchronism. A nonlinear analysis shows that efficiency of slow cyclotron FEL is restricted mainly by a breakdown of a single electron synchronism due to dependence of (modified) electron cyclotron frequency on an energy of electron. Nevertheless, as numerical simulation shows, typical efficiency of 15 % order is achieved in millimeter wavelength band for the midrelativistic ({gamma}= 3 {divided_by} 4) slow cyclotron wave FEL. Tapering of magnetic field results in a substantial increase of efficiency.

  12. 14 CFR 29.1395 - Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights. 29.1395 Section 29.1395 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Equipment Lights § 29.1395 Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights. No...

  13. 14 CFR 29.1395 - Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights. 29.1395 Section 29.1395 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Equipment Lights § 29.1395 Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights. No...

  14. 14 CFR 27.1395 - Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights. 27.1395 Section 27.1395 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Equipment Lights § 27.1395 Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights. No...

  15. 14 CFR 27.1395 - Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights. 27.1395 Section 27.1395 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Equipment Lights § 27.1395 Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights. No...

  16. 14 CFR 27.1395 - Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights. 27.1395 Section 27.1395 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Equipment Lights § 27.1395 Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights. No...

  17. 14 CFR 29.1395 - Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights. 29.1395 Section 29.1395 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Equipment Lights § 29.1395 Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights. No...

  18. 14 CFR 27.1395 - Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights. 27.1395 Section 27.1395 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Equipment Lights § 27.1395 Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights. No...

  19. 14 CFR 29.1395 - Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights. 29.1395 Section 29.1395 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Equipment Lights § 29.1395 Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights. No...

  20. 14 CFR 27.1395 - Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights. 27.1395 Section 27.1395 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Equipment Lights § 27.1395 Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights. No...

  1. 14 CFR 29.1395 - Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights. 29.1395 Section 29.1395 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Equipment Lights § 29.1395 Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights. No...

  2. 14 CFR 23.1395 - Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of position lights. 23.1395 Section 23.1395 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... AIRPLANES Equipment Lights § 23.1395 Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of position lights. No...

  3. New and improved apparatus and method for monitoring the intensities of charged-particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Varma, M.N.; Baum, J.W.

    1981-01-16

    Charged particle beam monitoring means are disposed in the path of a charged particle beam in an experimental device. The monitoring means comprise a beam monitoring component which is operable to prevent passage of a portion of beam, while concomitantly permitting passage of another portion thereof for incidence in an experimental chamber, and providing a signal (I/sub m/) indicative of the intensity of the beam portion which is not passed. Caibration means are disposed in the experimental chamber in the path of the said another beam portion and are operable to provide a signal (I/sub f/) indicative of the intensity thereof. Means are provided to determine the ratio (R) between said signals whereby, after suitable calibration, the calibration means may be removed from the experimental chamber and the intensity of the said another beam portion determined by monitoring of the monitoring means signal, per se.

  4. Apparatus and method for monitoring the intensities of charged particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Varma, Matesh N.; Baum, John W.

    1982-11-02

    Charged particle beam monitoring means (40) are disposed in the path of a charged particle beam (44) in an experimental device (10). The monitoring means comprise a beam monitoring component (42) which is operable to prevent passage of a portion of beam (44), while concomitantly permitting passage of another portion thereof (46) for incidence in an experimental chamber (18), and providing a signal (I.sub.m) indicative of the intensity of the beam portion which is not passed. Calibration means (36) are disposed in the experimental chamber in the path of the said another beam portion and are operable to provide a signal (I.sub.f) indicative of the intensity thereof. Means (41 and 43) are provided to determine the ratio (R) between said signals whereby, after suitable calibration, the calibration means may be removed from the experimental chamber and the intensity of the said another beam portion determined by monitoring of the monitoring means signal, per se.

  5. Localization from the unique intensity gradient of an orbital-angular-momentum beam.

    PubMed

    Xie, Guodong; Li, Long; Ren, Yongxiong; Yan, Yan; Ahmed, Nisar; Zhao, Zhe; Bao, Changjing; Wang, Zhe; Liu, Cong; Song, Haoqian; Zhang, Runzhou; Pang, Kai; Ashrafi, Solyman; Tur, Moshe; Willner, Alan E

    2017-02-01

    We propose and simulate the use of the unique intensity gradient of beams carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) for tracking and localization of an object. We design a three-pixel detector structure to efficiently determine the intensity gradient of an OAM beam. The resultant intensity gradient is then used to calculate the offset direction and distance of the target object from the center of the OAM beam. Our simulation results indicate the following: (i) an OAM-based localization system can have a stronger control signal than the one generated from a Gaussian beam; (ii) an OAM+2 beam may generate a ∼5× stronger localization feedback signal but operates over half the target capture area as an OAM+1 beam; and (iii) our scheme will generally have two orders of magnitude lower accuracy but ∼2× larger coverage area as the distance from the beam emitter to the target increases from 200 to 1000 m.

  6. The effect of cavity tuning on oxygen beam currents of an A-ECR type 14 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Tarvainen, O. Orpana, J.; Kronholm, R.; Kalvas, T.; Laulainen, J.; Koivisto, H.; Izotov, I.; Skalyga, V.; Toivanen, V.

    2016-09-15

    The efficiency of the microwave-plasma coupling plays a significant role in the production of highly charged ion beams with electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRISs). The coupling properties are affected by the mechanical design of the ion source plasma chamber and microwave launching system, as well as damping of the microwave electric field by the plasma. Several experiments attempting to optimize the microwave-plasma coupling characteristics by fine-tuning the frequency of the injected microwaves have been conducted with varying degrees of success. The inherent difficulty in interpretation of the frequency tuning results is that the effects of microwave coupling system and the cavity behavior of the plasma chamber cannot be separated. A preferable approach to study the effect of the cavity properties of the plasma chamber on extracted beam currents is to adjust the cavity dimensions. The results of such cavity tuning experiments conducted with the JYFL 14 GHz ECRIS are reported here. The cavity properties were adjusted by inserting a conducting tuner rod axially into the plasma chamber. The extracted beam currents of oxygen charge states O{sup 3+}–O{sup 7+} were recorded at various tuner positions and frequencies in the range of 14.00–14.15 GHz. It was observed that the tuner position affects the beam currents of high charge state ions up to several tens of percent. In particular, it was found that at some tuner position / frequency combinations the plasma exhibited “mode-hopping” between two operating regimes. The results improve the understanding of the role of plasma chamber cavity properties on ECRIS performances.

  7. The effect of cavity tuning on oxygen beam currents of an A-ECR type 14 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarvainen, O.; Orpana, J.; Kronholm, R.; Kalvas, T.; Laulainen, J.; Koivisto, H.; Izotov, I.; Skalyga, V.; Toivanen, V.

    2016-09-01

    The efficiency of the microwave-plasma coupling plays a significant role in the production of highly charged ion beams with electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRISs). The coupling properties are affected by the mechanical design of the ion source plasma chamber and microwave launching system, as well as damping of the microwave electric field by the plasma. Several experiments attempting to optimize the microwave-plasma coupling characteristics by fine-tuning the frequency of the injected microwaves have been conducted with varying degrees of success. The inherent difficulty in interpretation of the frequency tuning results is that the effects of microwave coupling system and the cavity behavior of the plasma chamber cannot be separated. A preferable approach to study the effect of the cavity properties of the plasma chamber on extracted beam currents is to adjust the cavity dimensions. The results of such cavity tuning experiments conducted with the JYFL 14 GHz ECRIS are reported here. The cavity properties were adjusted by inserting a conducting tuner rod axially into the plasma chamber. The extracted beam currents of oxygen charge states O3+-O7+ were recorded at various tuner positions and frequencies in the range of 14.00-14.15 GHz. It was observed that the tuner position affects the beam currents of high charge state ions up to several tens of percent. In particular, it was found that at some tuner position / frequency combinations the plasma exhibited "mode-hopping" between two operating regimes. The results improve the understanding of the role of plasma chamber cavity properties on ECRIS performances.

  8. The effect of cavity tuning on oxygen beam currents of an A-ECR type 14 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Tarvainen, O; Orpana, J; Kronholm, R; Kalvas, T; Laulainen, J; Koivisto, H; Izotov, I; Skalyga, V; Toivanen, V

    2016-09-01

    The efficiency of the microwave-plasma coupling plays a significant role in the production of highly charged ion beams with electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRISs). The coupling properties are affected by the mechanical design of the ion source plasma chamber and microwave launching system, as well as damping of the microwave electric field by the plasma. Several experiments attempting to optimize the microwave-plasma coupling characteristics by fine-tuning the frequency of the injected microwaves have been conducted with varying degrees of success. The inherent difficulty in interpretation of the frequency tuning results is that the effects of microwave coupling system and the cavity behavior of the plasma chamber cannot be separated. A preferable approach to study the effect of the cavity properties of the plasma chamber on extracted beam currents is to adjust the cavity dimensions. The results of such cavity tuning experiments conducted with the JYFL 14 GHz ECRIS are reported here. The cavity properties were adjusted by inserting a conducting tuner rod axially into the plasma chamber. The extracted beam currents of oxygen charge states O(3+)-O(7+) were recorded at various tuner positions and frequencies in the range of 14.00-14.15 GHz. It was observed that the tuner position affects the beam currents of high charge state ions up to several tens of percent. In particular, it was found that at some tuner position / frequency combinations the plasma exhibited "mode-hopping" between two operating regimes. The results improve the understanding of the role of plasma chamber cavity properties on ECRIS performances.

  9. Average intensity and directionality of partially coherent model beams propagating in turbulent ocean.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuqian; Zhang, Yixin; Zhu, Yun

    2016-08-01

    We studied Gaussian beams with three different partially coherent models, including the Gaussian-Schell model (GSM), Laguerre-Gaussian Schell model (LGSM), and Bessel-Gaussian Schell model (BGSM), propagating through oceanic turbulence. The expressions of average intensity, beam spreading, and beam wander for GSM, LGSM, and BGSM beams in the paraxial channel are derived. We make a contrast for the three models in numerical simulations and find that the GSM beam has smaller spreading than the others, and the LGSM beam needs longer propagation distance to transform into a well-like profile of average intensity than the BGSM beam in the same conditions. The salinity fluctuation has a greater contribution to the wander of LGSM and BGSM beams than that of the temperature fluctuation. Our results can be helpful in the design of an optical wireless communication link operating in oceanic environment.

  10. Determination of beam intensity in a single step for IMRT inverse planning.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Keh-Shih; Chen, Tzong-Jer; Kuo, Shan-Chi; Jan, Meei-Ling; Hwang, Ing-Ming; Chen, Sharon; Lin, Ying-Chuan; Wu, Jay

    2003-02-07

    In intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), targets are treated by multiple beams at different orientations each with spatially-modulated beam intensities. This approach spreads the normal tissue dose to a greater volume and produces a higher dose conformation to the target. In general, inverse planning is used for IMRT treatment planning. The inverse planning requires iterative calculation of dose distribution in order to optimize the intensity profile for each beam and is very computation intensive. In this paper, we propose a single-step method utilizing a figure of merit (FoM) to estimate the beam intensities for IMRT treatment planning. The FoM of a ray is defined as the ratio between the delivered tumour dose and normal tissue dose and is a good index for the dose efficacy of the ray. To maximize the beam utility, it is natural to irradiate the tumour with intensity of each ray proportional to the value of the FoM. The nonuniform beam intensity profiles are then fixed and the weights of the beam are determined iteratively in order to yield a uniform tumour dose. In this study, beams are employed at equispaced angles around the patient. Each beam with its field size that just covers the tumour is divided into a fixed number of beamlets. The FoM is calculated for each beamlet and this value is assigned to be the beam intensity. Various weighting factors are incorporated in the FoM computation to accommodate different clinical considerations. Two clinical datasets are used to test the feasibility of the algorithm. The resultant dose-volume histograms of this method are presented and compared to that of conformal therapy. Preliminary results indicate that this method reduces the critical organ doses at a small expense of uniformity in tumour dose distribution. This method estimates the beam intensity in one single step and the computation time is extremely fast and can be finished in less than one minute using a regular PC.

  11. Spatial correlation properties and the spectral intensity distributions of focused Gaussian Schell-model array beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Xiaoling; Pu, Zhengcai; Jia, Xinhong

    2009-07-01

    The spatial correlation properties and the spectral intensity distributions of focused Gaussian Schell-model (GSM) array beams are studied in detail. The closed-form expressions for the spectral degree of coherence and the spectral intensity of focused GSM array beams are derived. It is shown that the spectral degree of coherence of focused GSM array beams is the same as that of focused GSM beams in the focal plane. On the other hand, it is found that, in the focal plane the spectral intensity distribution of focused GSM array beams is the fringe pattern when the value of the coherence length is small. However, it becomes one peak located at the center as the value of the coherence length is large enough. In the focal plane, the spectral intensity maximum increases and the width of the normalized spectral intensity distribution decreases as the beam number increases. In general, for GSM array beams, the width of the modulus of the spectral degree of coherence in the focal plane always exceeds that of the normalized spectral intensity distribution, which is different from the behavior of focused GSM beams. In addition, the power in the bucket (PIB) and the beam propagation factor ( M2 factor) are also discussed. The main results are explained physically.

  12. Beaming of intense AKR seen from the Interball-2 spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, R.; Panchenko, M.; Hanasz, J.; Mutel, R.; Christopher, I.

    2017-01-01

    We present results of intense auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) sources direction finding based on single-spacecraft k→ vector source location performed in the frame of Interball-2 mission (POLRAD experiment on board Auroral Probe). With our swept frequency analyzer we are not able to work with single AKR bursts generated in small, elementary sources, but we improve our signal-to-noise (s/n) ratio and determine direction to the AKR source region averaging data over 10 consecutive 4 kHz frequency steps. Measurements of directions to the AKR sources confirm recent Mutel et al. () findings based on Cluster Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) data - AKR rays are mostly confined to the direction tangent to the auroral oval as measured in Mutel's tangent plane (TP) coordinates. In this paper we use additional coordinate system rotated with respect to TP coordinates in order to determine azimuths of AKR rays with respect to the auroral oval. We see cases of AKR propagation significantly deflected from the tangent plane. Additional information concerning geometry of auroral arc at the AKR source can help to distinguish between propagation along and propagation across the auroral cavity. Examples of instantaneous AKR visibility maps defined in this paper for both coordinate systems are shown and discussed. Using such map (valid for our spacecraft for relatively short observational periods of the order of 10 min), it is possible for known positions of the AKR sources in invariant latitude-magnetic local time coordinates to visualize direction angles of AKR beams reaching the observer.

  13. Effect of turbulent atmosphere on the on-axis average intensity of Pearcey-Gaussian beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    F, Boufalah; L, Dalil-Essakali; H, Nebdi; A, Belafhal

    2016-06-01

    The propagation characteristics of the Pearcey-Gaussian (PG) beam in turbulent atmosphere are investigated in this paper. The Pearcey beam is a new kind of paraxial beam, based on the Pearcey function of catastrophe theory, which describes diffraction about a cusp caustic. By using the extended Huygens-Fresnel integral formula in the paraxial approximation and the Rytov theory, an analytical expression of axial intensity for the considered beam family is derived. Some numerical results for PG beam propagating in atmospheric turbulence are given by studying the influences of some factors, including incident beam parameters and turbulence strengths.

  14. Using an intense laser beam in interaction with muon/electron beam to probe the noncommutative QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tizchang, S.; Batebi, S.; Haghighat, M.; Mohammadi, R.

    2017-02-01

    It is known that the linearly polarized photons can partly transform to circularly polarized ones via forward Compton scattering in a background such as the external magnetic field or noncommutative space time. Based on this fact we explore the effects of the NC-background on the scattering of a linearly polarized laser beam from an intense beam of charged leptons. We show that for a muon/electron beam flux {overline{ɛ}}_{μ, e}˜ 1{0}^{12}/{10}^{10} TeV cm-2 sec-1 and a linearly polarized laser beam with energy k 0 ˜1 eV and average power {overline{P}}_{laser}˜eq 1{0}^3 KW, the generation rate of circularly polarized photons is about R V ˜ 104 /sec for noncommutative energy scale ΛNC ˜ 10 TeV. This is fairly large and can grow for more intense beams in near future.

  15. FINAL FOCUS ION BEAM INTENSITY FROM TUNGSTEN FOIL CALORIMETER AND SCINTILLATOR IN NDCX-I

    SciTech Connect

    Lidia, S.M.; Bieniosek, F.; Henestroza, E.; Ni, P.; Seidl, P.

    2010-04-30

    Laboratory high energy density experiments using ion beam drivers rely upon the delivery of high-current, high-brightness ion beams with high peak intensity onto targets. Solid-state scintillators are typically used to measure the ion beam spatial profile but they display dose-dependent degradation and aging effects. These effects produce uncertainties and limit the accuracy of measuring peak beam intensities delivered to the target. For beam tuning and characterizing the incident beam intensity, we have developed a cross-calibrating diagnostic suite that extends the upper limit of measurable peak intensity dynamic range. Absolute intensity calibration is obtained with a 3 {micro}m thick tungsten foil calorimeter and streak spectrometer. We present experimental evidence for peak intensity measures in excess of 400 kW/cm{sup 2} using a 0.3 MV, 25 mA, 5-20 {micro}sec K{sup +1} beam. Radiative models and thermal diffusion effects are discussed because they affect temporal and spatial resolution of beam intensity profiles.

  16. Studies on low energy beam transport for high intensity high charged ions at IMP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.; Sun, L. T.; Hu, Q.; Cao, Y.; Lu, W.; Feng, Y. C.; Fang, X.; Zhang, X. Z.; Zhao, H. W.; Xie, D. Z.

    2014-02-01

    Superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source with Advanced design in Lanzhou (SECRAL) is an advanced fully superconducting ECR ion source at IMP designed to be operational at the microwave frequency of 18-24 GHz. The existing SECRAL beam transmission line is composed of a solenoid lens and a 110° analyzing magnet. Simulations of particle tracking with 3D space charge effect and realistic 3D magnetic fields through the line were performed using particle-in-cell code. The results of the beam dynamics show that such a low energy beam is very sensitive to the space charge effect and significantly suffers from the second-order aberration of the analyzing magnet resulting in large emittance. However, the second-order aberration could be reduced by adding compensating sextupole components in the beam line. On this basis, a new 110° analyzing magnet with relatively larger acceptance and smaller aberration is designed and will be used in the design of low energy beam transport line for a new superconducting ECR ion source SECRAL-II. The features of the analyzer and the corresponding beam trajectory calculation will be detailed and discussed in this paper.

  17. Studies on low energy beam transport for high intensity high charged ions at IMP

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Y. Lu, W.; Fang, X.; Sun, L. T.; Hu, Q.; Cao, Y.; Feng, Y. C.; Zhang, X. Z.; Zhao, H. W.; Xie, D. Z.

    2014-02-15

    Superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source with Advanced design in Lanzhou (SECRAL) is an advanced fully superconducting ECR ion source at IMP designed to be operational at the microwave frequency of 18–24 GHz. The existing SECRAL beam transmission line is composed of a solenoid lens and a 110° analyzing magnet. Simulations of particle tracking with 3D space charge effect and realistic 3D magnetic fields through the line were performed using particle-in-cell code. The results of the beam dynamics show that such a low energy beam is very sensitive to the space charge effect and significantly suffers from the second-order aberration of the analyzing magnet resulting in large emittance. However, the second-order aberration could be reduced by adding compensating sextupole components in the beam line. On this basis, a new 110° analyzing magnet with relatively larger acceptance and smaller aberration is designed and will be used in the design of low energy beam transport line for a new superconducting ECR ion source SECRAL-II. The features of the analyzer and the corresponding beam trajectory calculation will be detailed and discussed in this paper.

  18. Arc-based smoothing of ion beam intensity on targets

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Alex

    2012-06-15

    By manipulating a set of ion beams upstream of a target, it is possible to arrange for a smoother deposition pattern, so as to achieve more uniform illumination of the target. A uniform energy deposition pattern is important for applications including ion-beam-driven high energy density physics and heavy-ion beam-driven inertial fusion energy ('heavy-ion fusion'). Here, we consider an approach to such smoothing that is based on rapidly 'wobbling' each of the beams back and forth along a short arc-shaped path, via oscillating fields applied upstream of the final pulse compression. In this technique, uniformity is achieved in the time-averaged sense; this is sufficient provided the beam oscillation timescale is short relative to the hydrodynamic timescale of the target implosion. This work builds on two earlier concepts: elliptical beams applied to a distributed-radiator target [D. A. Callahan and M. Tabak, Phys. Plasmas 7, 2083 (2000)] and beams that are wobbled so as to trace a number of full rotations around a circular or elliptical path [R. C. Arnold et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods 199, 557 (1982)]. Here, we describe the arc-based smoothing approach and compare it to results obtainable using an elliptical-beam prescription. In particular, we assess the potential of these approaches for minimization of azimuthal asymmetry, for the case of a ring of beams arranged on a cone. It is found that, for small numbers of beams on the ring, the arc-based smoothing approach offers superior uniformity. In contrast with the full-rotation approach, arc-based smoothing remains usable when the geometry precludes wobbling the beams around a full circle, e.g., for the X-target [E. Henestroza, B. G. Logan, and L. J. Perkins, Phys. Plasmas 18, 032702 (2011)] and some classes of distributed-radiator targets.

  19. Arc-based smoothing of ion beam intensity on targets

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Alex

    2012-06-20

    Manipulating a set of ion beams upstream of a target, makes it possible to arrange a smoother deposition pattern, so as to achieve more uniform illumination of the target. A uniform energy deposition pattern is important for applications including ion-beam-driven high energy density physics and heavy-ion beam-driven inertial fusion energy (“heavy-ion fusion”). Here, we consider an approach to such smoothing that is based on rapidly “wobbling” each of the beams back and forth along a short arc-shaped path, via oscillating fields applied upstream of the final pulse compression. In this technique, uniformity is achieved in the time-averaged sense; this is sufficient provided the beam oscillation timescale is short relative to the hydrodynamic timescale of the target implosion. This work builds on two earlier concepts: elliptical beams applied to a distributed-radiator target [D. A. Callahan and M. Tabak, Phys. Plasmas 7, 2083 (2000)] and beams that are wobbled so as to trace a number of full rotations around a circular or elliptical path [R. C. Arnold et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods 199, 557 (1982)]. Here, we describe the arc-based smoothing approach and compare it to results obtainable using an elliptical-beam prescription. In particular, we assess the potential of these approaches for minimization of azimuthal asymmetry, for the case of a ring of beams arranged on a cone. We also found that, for small numbers of beams on the ring, the arc-based smoothing approach offers superior uniformity. In contrast with the full-rotation approach, arc-based smoothing remains usable when the geometry precludes wobbling the beams around a full circle, e.g., for the X-target [E. Henestroza, B. G. Logan, and L. J. Perkins, Phys. Plasmas 18, 032702 (2011)] and some classes of distributed-radiator targets.

  20. Arc-based smoothing of ion beam intensity on targets

    DOE PAGES

    Friedman, Alex

    2012-06-20

    Manipulating a set of ion beams upstream of a target, makes it possible to arrange a smoother deposition pattern, so as to achieve more uniform illumination of the target. A uniform energy deposition pattern is important for applications including ion-beam-driven high energy density physics and heavy-ion beam-driven inertial fusion energy (“heavy-ion fusion”). Here, we consider an approach to such smoothing that is based on rapidly “wobbling” each of the beams back and forth along a short arc-shaped path, via oscillating fields applied upstream of the final pulse compression. In this technique, uniformity is achieved in the time-averaged sense; this ismore » sufficient provided the beam oscillation timescale is short relative to the hydrodynamic timescale of the target implosion. This work builds on two earlier concepts: elliptical beams applied to a distributed-radiator target [D. A. Callahan and M. Tabak, Phys. Plasmas 7, 2083 (2000)] and beams that are wobbled so as to trace a number of full rotations around a circular or elliptical path [R. C. Arnold et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods 199, 557 (1982)]. Here, we describe the arc-based smoothing approach and compare it to results obtainable using an elliptical-beam prescription. In particular, we assess the potential of these approaches for minimization of azimuthal asymmetry, for the case of a ring of beams arranged on a cone. We also found that, for small numbers of beams on the ring, the arc-based smoothing approach offers superior uniformity. In contrast with the full-rotation approach, arc-based smoothing remains usable when the geometry precludes wobbling the beams around a full circle, e.g., for the X-target [E. Henestroza, B. G. Logan, and L. J. Perkins, Phys. Plasmas 18, 032702 (2011)] and some classes of distributed-radiator targets.« less

  1. A high-current electron gun for the electron beam ion trap at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, S. Baumann, T. M.; Kittimanapun, K.; Lapierre, A.; Snyder, A.

    2014-02-15

    The Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) in NSCL’s reaccelerator ReA uses continuous ion injection and accumulation. In order to maximize capture efficiency and minimize breeding time into high charge states, the EBIT requires a high-current/high current-density electron beam. A new electron gun insert based on a concave Ba-dispenser cathode has been designed and built to increase the current transmitted through the EBIT’s superconducting magnet. With the new insert, stable EBIT operating conditions with 0.8 A of electron beam have been established. The design of the electron gun is presented together with calculated and measured perveance data. In order to assess the experimental compression of the electron beam, a pinhole CCD camera has been set up to measure the electron beam radius. The camera observes X-rays emitted from highly charged ions, excited by the electron beam. Initial tests with this camera setup will be presented. They indicate that a current density of 640 A/cm{sup 2} has been reached when the EBIT magnet was operated at 4 T.

  2. A high-current electron gun for the electron beam ion trap at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, S.; Baumann, T. M.; Kittimanapun, K.; Lapierre, A.; Snyder, A.

    2014-02-01

    The Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) in NSCL's reaccelerator ReA uses continuous ion injection and accumulation. In order to maximize capture efficiency and minimize breeding time into high charge states, the EBIT requires a high-current/high current-density electron beam. A new electron gun insert based on a concave Ba-dispenser cathode has been designed and built to increase the current transmitted through the EBIT's superconducting magnet. With the new insert, stable EBIT operating conditions with 0.8 A of electron beam have been established. The design of the electron gun is presented together with calculated and measured perveance data. In order to assess the experimental compression of the electron beam, a pinhole CCD camera has been set up to measure the electron beam radius. The camera observes X-rays emitted from highly charged ions, excited by the electron beam. Initial tests with this camera setup will be presented. They indicate that a current density of 640 A/cm2 has been reached when the EBIT magnet was operated at 4 T.

  3. Fullerenes in electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Biri, S.; Fekete, E.; Kitagawa, A.; Muramatsu, M.; Janossy, A.; Palinkas, J.

    2006-03-15

    Fullerene plasmas and beams have been produced in our electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRIS) originally designed for other purposes. The ATOMKI-ECRIS is a traditional ion source with solenoid mirror coils to generate highly charged ions. The variable frequencies NIRS-KEI-1 and NIRS-KEI-2 are ECR ion sources built from permanent magnets and specialized for the production of carbon beams. The paper summarizes the experiments and results obtained by these facilities with fullerenes. Continuous effort has been made to get the highest C{sub 60} beam intensities. Surprisingly, the best result was obtained by moving the C{sub 60} oven deep inside the plasma chamber, very close to the resonance zone. Record intensity singly and doubly charged fullerene beams were obtained (600 and 1600 nA, respectively) at lower C{sub 60} material consumption. Fullerene derivatives were also produced. We mixed fullerenes with other plasmas (N, Fe) with the aim of making new materials. Nitrogen encapsulated fullerenes (mass: 720+14=734) were successfully produced. In the case of iron, two methods (ferrocene, oven) were tested. Molecules with mass of 720+56=776 were detected in the extracted beam spectra.

  4. Inferring electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave intensity from low altitude POES proton flux measurements: A detailed case study with conjugate Van Allen Probes observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Shi, Run; Ni, Binbin; Gu, Xudong; Zhang, Xianguo; Zuo, Pingbing; Fu, Song; Xiang, Zheng; Wang, Qi; Cao, Xing; Zou, Zhengyang

    2017-03-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves play an important role in the magnetospheric particle dynamics and can lead to resonant pitch-angle scattering and ultimate precipitation of ring current protons. Commonly, the statistics of in situ EMIC wave measurements is adopted for quantitative investigation of wave-particle interaction processes, which however becomes questionable for detailed case studies especially during geomagnetic storms and substorms. Here we establish a novel technique to infer EMIC wave amplitudes from low-altitude proton measurements onboard the Polar Operational Environmental Satellites (POES). The detailed procedure is elaborated regarding how to infer the EMIC wave intensity for one specific time point. We then test the technique with a case study comparing the inferred root-mean-square (RMS) EMIC wave amplitude with the conjugate Van Allen Probes EMFISIS wave measurements. Our results suggest that the developed technique can reasonably estimate EMIC wave intensities from low-altitude POES proton flux data, thereby providing a useful tool to construct a data-based, near-real-time, dynamic model of the global distribution of EMIC waves once the proton flux measurements from multiple POES satellites are available for any specific time period.

  5. High intensity high charge state ion beam production with an evaporative cooling magnet ECRIS

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, W. Qian, C.; Sun, L. T.; Zhang, X. Z.; Feng, Y. C.; Ma, B. H.; Zhao, H. W.; Zhan, W. L.; Fang, X.; Guo, J. W.; Yang, Y.; Xiong, B.; Ruan, L.; Xie, D.

    2016-02-15

    LECR4 (Lanzhou ECR ion source No. 4) is a room temperature electron cyclotron resonance ion source, designed to produce high current, high charge state ion beams for the SSC-LINAC injector (a new injector for sector separated cyclotron) at the Institute of Modern Physics. LECR4 also serves as a PoP machine for the application of evaporative cooling technology in accelerator field. To achieve those goals, LECR4 ECR ion source has been optimized for the operation at 18 GHz. During 2014, LECR4 ion source was commissioned at 18 GHz microwave of 1.6 kW. To further study the influence of injection stage to the production of medium and high charge state ion beams, in March 2015, the injection stage with pumping system was installed, and some optimum results were produced, such as 560 eμA of O{sup 7+}, 620 eμA of Ar{sup 11+}, 430 eμA of Ar{sup 12+}, 430 eμA of Xe{sup 20+}, and so on. The comparison will be discussed in the paper.

  6. High intensity high charge state ion beam production with an evaporative cooling magnet ECRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, W.; Qian, C.; Sun, L. T.; Zhang, X. Z.; Fang, X.; Guo, J. W.; Yang, Y.; Feng, Y. C.; Ma, B. H.; Xiong, B.; Ruan, L.; Zhao, H. W.; Zhan, W. L.; Xie, D.

    2016-02-01

    LECR4 (Lanzhou ECR ion source No. 4) is a room temperature electron cyclotron resonance ion source, designed to produce high current, high charge state ion beams for the SSC-LINAC injector (a new injector for sector separated cyclotron) at the Institute of Modern Physics. LECR4 also serves as a PoP machine for the application of evaporative cooling technology in accelerator field. To achieve those goals, LECR4 ECR ion source has been optimized for the operation at 18 GHz. During 2014, LECR4 ion source was commissioned at 18 GHz microwave of 1.6 kW. To further study the influence of injection stage to the production of medium and high charge state ion beams, in March 2015, the injection stage with pumping system was installed, and some optimum results were produced, such as 560 eμA of O7+, 620 eμA of Ar11+, 430 eμA of Ar12+, 430 eμA of Xe20+, and so on. The comparison will be discussed in the paper.

  7. Higher order mode beams mitigate halos in high intensity proton linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Abhishek; Krishnagopal, Srinivas

    2017-01-01

    High intensity proton linacs (HIPLs) for applications such as Accelerator Driven Reactor Systems (ADRS) have serious beam dynamics issues related to beam halo formation. This can lead to particle loss and radioactivation of the surroundings which consequently limit the beam current. Beam halos are largely driven by the nonlinear space-charge force of the beam, which depends strongly on the beam distribution and also on the initial beam mismatch. We propose here the use of a higher order mode beam (HOMB), that has a weaker nonlinear force, to mitigate beam halos. We first show how the nonlinear space-charge force can itself be exploited in the presence of nonlinear solenoid fields, to produce a HOMB in the low energy beam transport (LEBT) line. We then study the transport of such a beam through a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ), and show that the HOMB has a significant advantage in terms of emittance blow-up, halo formation and beam loss, over a Gaussian beam, even with a finite initial mismatch. For example, for the transport of a 30 mA beam through the RFQ, with an initial beam mismatch of 45%, the Gaussian beam sees an emittance blow-up of 125%, while the HOMB sees a blow-up of only 35% (relative to the initial emittance of 0.2 π mm -mrad ). Similarly, the beam halo parameter and beam loss are 0.95 and 25% respectively for a Gaussian beam, but only 0.35 and 15% for a HOMB. The beam dynamics of the HOMB agrees quite well with the particle-core model, because of the more linear space-charge force, while for the Gaussian beam there are additional particle loss mechanisms arising from nonlinear resonances. Therefore, the HOMB suppresses emittance blow-up and halo formation, and can make high current ADRS systems more viable.

  8. A new luminescence beam profile monitor for intense proton and heavy ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang,T.; Bellavia, S.; Connolly, R.; Gassner, D.; Makdisi, Y.; Russo, T.; Thieberger, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Zelenski, A.

    2008-10-01

    A new luminescence beam profile monitor is realized in the polarized hydrogen gas jet target at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) facility. In addition to the spin polarization of the proton beam being routinely measured by the hydrogen gas jet, the luminescence produced by beam-hydrogen excitation leads to a strong Balmer series lines emission. A selected hydrogen Balmer line is spectrally filtered and imaged to produce the transverse RHIC proton beam shape with unprecedented details on the RHIC beam profile. Alternatively, when the passage of the high energy RHIC gold ion beam excited only the residual gas molecules in the beam path, sufficient ion beam induced luminescence is produced and the transverse gold ion beam profile is obtained. The measured transverse beam sizes and the calculated emittances provide an independent confirmation of the RHIC beam characteristics and to verify the emittance conservation along the RHIC accelerator. This optical beam diagnostic technique by making use of the beam induced fluorescence from injected or residual gas offers a truly noninvasive particle beam characterization, and provides a visual observation of proton and heavy ion beams. Combined with a longitudinal bunch measurement system, a 3-dimensional spatial particle beam profile can be reconstructed tomographically.

  9. Systems for controlling the intensity variations in a laser beam and for frequency conversion thereof

    DOEpatents

    Skupsky, Stanley; Craxton, R. Stephen; Soures, John

    1990-01-01

    In order to control the intensity of a laser beam so that its intensity varies uniformly and provides uniform illumination of a target, such as a laser fusion target, a broad bandwidth laser pulse is spectrally dispersed spatially so that the frequency components thereof are spread apart. A disperser (grating) provides an output beam which varies spatially in wavelength in at least one direction transverse to the direction of propagation of the beam. Temporal spread (time delay) across the beam is corrected by using a phase delay device (a time delay compensation echelon). The dispersed beam may be amplified with laser amplifiers and frequency converted (doubled, tripled or quadrupled in frequency) with nonlinear optical elements (birefringent crystals). The spectral variation across the beam is compensated by varying the angle of incidence on one of the crystals with respect to the crystal optical axis utilizing a lens which diverges the beam. Another lens after the frequency converter may be used to recollimate the beam. The frequency converted beam is recombined so that portions of different frequency interfere and, unlike interference between waves of the same wavelength, there results an intensity pattern with rapid temoral oscillations which average out rapidly in time thereby producing uniform illumination on target. A distributed phase plate (also known as a random phase mask), through which the spectrally dispersed beam is passed and then focused on a target, is used to provide the interference pattern which becomes nearly modulation free and uniform in intensity in the direction of the spectral variation.

  10. Systems for controlling the intensity variations in a laser beam and for frequency conversion thereof

    DOEpatents

    Skupsky, S.; Craxton, R.S.; Soures, J.

    1990-10-02

    In order to control the intensity of a laser beam so that its intensity varies uniformly and provides uniform illumination of a target, such as a laser fusion target, a broad bandwidth laser pulse is spectrally dispersed spatially so that the frequency components thereof are spread apart. A disperser (grating) provides an output beam which varies spatially in wavelength in at least one direction transverse to the direction of propagation of the beam. Temporal spread (time delay) across the beam is corrected by using a phase delay device (a time delay compensation echelon). The dispersed beam may be amplified with laser amplifiers and frequency converted (doubled, tripled or quadrupled in frequency) with nonlinear optical elements (birefringent crystals). The spectral variation across the beam is compensated by varying the angle of incidence on one of the crystals with respect to the crystal optical axis utilizing a lens which diverges the beam. Another lens after the frequency converter may be used to recollimate the beam. The frequency converted beam is recombined so that portions of different frequency interfere and, unlike interference between waves of the same wavelength, there results an intensity pattern with rapid temporal oscillations which average out rapidly in time thereby producing uniform illumination on target. A distributed phase plate (also known as a random phase mask), through which the spectrally dispersed beam is passed and then focused on a target, is used to provide the interference pattern which becomes nearly modulation free and uniform in intensity in the direction of the spectral variation. 16 figs.

  11. Note: Design and initial results of a multi-pulsed intense electron beam source

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, L. Zhang, H.; Yang, A.; Shen, Y.; Wang, W.; Wen, L.; Zhang, K.; Shi, J.; Zhang, L.; Deng, J.

    2014-06-15

    A multi-pulsed intense electron beam source is introduced, including the design and the initial experimental results. The source can generate a burst of three pulses of intense electron beams with energy of 2–3 MeV and beam intensities of around 2.5 kA. An inductive adder is chosen to generate the pulsed diode voltages and a dispenser cathode is chosen to emit electron beams. The test results indicate that the design of the source is reliable. The multi-pulsed diode voltage is up to 2.5 MV and the beam intensities are more than 2 kA at the exit of the source with small variation.

  12. Design and development of a radio frequency quadrupole linac postaccelerator for the Variable Energy Cyclotron Center rare ion beam project.

    PubMed

    Dechoudhury, S; Naik, V; Mondal, M; Chatterjee, A; Pandey, H K; Mandi, T K; Bandyopadhyay, A; Karmakar, P; Bhattacharjee, S; Chouhan, P S; Ali, S; Srivastava, S C L; Chakrabarti, A

    2010-02-01

    A four-rod type heavy-ion radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac has been designed, constructed, and tested for the rare ion beam (RIB) facility project at VECC. Designed for cw operation, this RFQ is the first postaccelerator in the RIB beam line. It will accelerate A/q < or = 14 heavy ions coming from the ion source to the energy of around 100 keV/u for subsequent acceleration in a number of Interdigital H-Linac. Operating at a resonance frequency of 37.83 MHz, maximum intervane voltage of around 54 kV will be needed to achieve the final energy over a vane length of 3.12 m for a power loss of 35 kW. In the first beam tests, transmission efficiency of about 90% was measured at the QQ focus after the RFQ for O(5+) beam. In this article the design of the RFQ including the effect of vane modulation on the rf characteristics and results of beam tests will be presented.

  13. Emission of an intense electron beam from a ceramic honeycomb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, M.; Myers, M.; Hegeler, F.; Swanekamp, S. B.; Sethian, J. D.; Ludeking, L.

    2003-01-01

    Inserting a slab of honeycomb ceramic in front of the emitting surface of a large-area cathode improves the electron beam emission uniformity, decreases the beam current rise and fall times, and maintains a more constant diode impedance. Moreover, changing the cathode material from velvet to carbon fiber achieved a more robust cathode that starts to emit at a higher electric field without a degradation in beam uniformity. In addition, an 80% reduction in the postshot diode pressure was also observed when gamma alumina was deposited on the ceramic. A possible explanation is that reabsorption and recycling of adsorbed gases takes place.

  14. Excitation of broadband electrostatic noise and of hydrogen cyclotron waves by a perpendicular ion beam in multi-ion plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malingre, M.; Pottelette, R.

    1985-05-01

    Results from the PORCUPINE experiment show that a perpendicular heavy ion beams, injected into an O(+) dominated plasma which contains a small concentration of H(+), induces a broadband electrostatic noise near the lower hybrid frequency and also discrete elecrostatic emissions at frequencies close to multiples of the hydrogen gyrofrequency. The dependence of these instabilities on the parameters characteristics of the beam-background plasma system is studied. It is shown that, provided the beam is of sufficiently high density and low temperature, the frequency range of the broadband noise extends continuously from zero frequency up to the lower hybrid frequency. In this case the harmonics of the hydrogen gyrofrequency are also excited but their growth rates are much lower than that of the broadband emission, up to two of three orders of magnitude for the first harmonics.

  15. A 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source and a dual-lens low energy beam transporta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W. H.; Ma, H. Y.; Yang, Y.; Wu, Q.; Zhang, X. Z.; Wang, H.; Ma, B. H.; Feng, Y. C.; Fang, X.; Guo, J. W.; Cao, Y.; Li, X. X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Li, J. Y.; Sha, S.; Lu, W.; Lin, S. H.; Guo, X. H.; Zhao, H. Y.; Sun, L. T.; Xie, D. Z.; Peng, S. X.; Liu, Z. W.; Zhao, H. W.

    2012-02-01

    The structure and preliminary commissioning results of a new 2.45 GHz ECR proton ion source and a dual-lens low energy beam transport (LEBT) system are presented in this paper. The main magnetic field of the ion source is provided by a set of permanent magnets with two small electro-solenoid magnets at the injection and the extraction to fine tune the magnetic field for better microwave coupling. A 50 keV pulsed proton beam extracted by a three-electrode mechanism passes through the LEBT system of length of 1183 mm. This LEBT consists of a diagnosis chamber, two Glaser lenses, two steering magnets, and a final beam defining cone. A set of inner permanent magnetic rings is embedded in each of the two Glaser lenses to produce a flatter axial-field to reduce the lens aberrations.

  16. A 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source and a dual-lens low energy beam transport

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, W. H.; Ma, H. Y.; Wu, Q.; Zhang, X. Z.; Wang, H.; Ma, B. H.; Feng, Y. C.; Fang, X.; Guo, J. W.; Li, X. X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Li, J. Y.; Guo, X. H.; Zhao, H. Y.; Sun, L. T.; Xie, D. Z.; Liu, Z. W.; Zhao, H. W.; Yang, Y.; Cao, Y.; and others

    2012-02-15

    The structure and preliminary commissioning results of a new 2.45 GHz ECR proton ion source and a dual-lens low energy beam transport (LEBT) system are presented in this paper. The main magnetic field of the ion source is provided by a set of permanent magnets with two small electro-solenoid magnets at the injection and the extraction to fine tune the magnetic field for better microwave coupling. A 50 keV pulsed proton beam extracted by a three-electrode mechanism passes through the LEBT system of length of 1183 mm. This LEBT consists of a diagnosis chamber, two Glaser lenses, two steering magnets, and a final beam defining cone. A set of inner permanent magnetic rings is embedded in each of the two Glaser lenses to produce a flatter axial-field to reduce the lens aberrations.

  17. Spontaneous excitation of waves by an intense ion beam on the Large Plasma Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Shreekrishna; van Compernolle, Bart; Gekelman, Walter; Pribyl, Patrick; Heidbrink, William

    2016-10-01

    A hydrogen ion beam (15 keV, 10 A) has been injected into a large magnetized plasma (n 1010 -1013 cm-3, Te = 5.0 - 15.0 eV, B = 0.6 - 1.8 kG, He+ and H+ ions, 19 m long, 0.6 m diameter) for performing fast-ion studies on the Large Plasma Device (LAPD). The beam forms a helical orbit (pitch-angle 7° -55°), propagates with an Alfvénic speed (beam-speed/Alfvén-speed = 0.2 - 3.0), and significantly enhances the electron temperature and density when injected during the plasma afterglow. We report results on spontaneous generation of Alfvén waves and electrostatic waves in the lower-hybrid range of frequencies by the beam. Roles of normal and anomalous Doppler-shifted ion-cyclotron resonances in destabilizing the Alfvén waves were examined by measuring the phase-speed of waves and relevant parameters of the plasma using a variety of diagnostic tools (retarding-field energy analyzer, three-axis magnetic-loop, Dipole, and Langmuir probes). Conditions for the maximum growth of these waves were determined by varying the parameters of the beam and ambient plasma and examining the mode-structures in the fluctuation-spectra. Work jointly supported by US DOE and NSF and performed at the Basic Plasma Science Facility, UCLA.

  18. Experimental observation of nonlinear effects upon the excitation of large-amplitude cyclotron waves in a plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Zaleskii, Y.G.; Zinchenko, V.I.; Nazarov, N.I.; Demchenko, V.V.

    1982-04-05

    A diamagnetic current flowing across the magnetic field has been detected in a system of a rotating electron beam and a plasma. This current is caused by the rf pressure of a packet of cyclotron waves excited in the plasma. The current flow is accompanied by intense electromagnetic emission from the plasma and by the appearance of electrons with a large transverse energy.

  19. Population Inversions in Ablation Plasmas Generated by Intense Electron Beams.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-11-30

    beam driven carbon anode plasmas. Diode closure results ..,.in three phases of beam-plasma evolution which are summarized below: Stage I: Deposited...enough for anode plasma forma- tion before the diode shorts. Spectroscopic data for noncrowbarred shots (dose 1 500-800 J/g) indicate the presence of CII...inconsistent with previously proposed kinetic mechanisms for the N2 laser pumped by helium. With a simple- model of the chemical kinetics, we have shown

  20. A high intensity H2 + multicusp ion source for the isotope decay-at-rest experiment, IsoDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axani, S.; Winklehner, D.; Alonso, J.; Conrad, J. M.

    2016-02-01

    The Isotope Decay-At-Rest (IsoDAR) experimental program aims to decisively test the sterile neutrino hypothesis. In essence, it is a novel cyclotron based neutrino factory that will improve the frontiers in both high-intensity cyclotrons and electron flavor anti-neutrino sources. By using a source in which the usual H- ions are replaced with the more tightly bound H2 + ions, we can negate the effects of Lorentz stripping in a cyclotron, reduce the overall perveance due to the space-charge effect, and deliver twice the number of protons per nuclei on target. To produce the H2 + , we are currently developing a dedicated multicusp ion source, MIST-1 (generation-1 Multicusp Ion Source Technologies at MIT), and a low-energy beam transport system for the IsoDAR cyclotron. This will increase the overall H2 + current leading up to the cyclotron and improve the emittance of the beam injected into the cyclotron.

  1. Radiological concerns in operation of intense low-energy deuteron beams.

    PubMed

    Weissman, Leo; Berkovits, Dan; Grof, Yair; Ben-Dov, Yair

    2008-12-01

    A 40-keV, 5-mA DC deuteron beam was operated at the SARAF with the purpose of characterizing the ion source and the low-energy beam transport system. We used this opportunity to address radiological concern of operating an intense deuteron beam. Fast and thermal neutrons produced via the D(d,n) reaction were measured in the vicinity of the components intercepting the beam using various methods. We found that the neutron yield from implantation of a deuteron beam in a graphite matrix is of the order of 2 x 10(6) n s(-1) mA(-1) into 4pi.

  2. Propagation instabilities of high-intensity laser-produced electron beams.

    PubMed

    Tatarakis, M; Beg, F N; Clark, E L; Dangor, A E; Edwards, R D; Evans, R G; Goldsack, T J; Ledingham, K W D; Norreys, P A; Sinclair, M A; Wei, M-S; Zepf, M; Krushelnick, K

    2003-05-02

    Measurements of energetic electron beams generated from ultrahigh intensity laser interactions (I>10(19) W/cm(2)) with dense plasmas are discussed. These interactions have been shown to produce very directional beams, although with a broad energy spectrum. In the regime where the beam density approaches the density of the background plasma, we show that these beams are unstable to filamentation and "hosing" instabilities. Particle-in-cell simulations also indicate the development of such instabilities. This is a regime of particular interest for inertial confinement fusion applications of these beams (i.e., "fast ignition").

  3. Key elements of space charge compensation on a low energy high intensity beam injector

    SciTech Connect

    Peng Shixiang; Lu Pengnan; Ren Haitao; Zhao Jie; Chen Jia; Xu Yuan; Guo Zhiyu; Chen Jia'er; Zhao Hongwei; Sun Liangting

    2013-03-15

    Space charge effect (SCE) along the beam line will decrease beam quality. Space charge compensation (SCC) with extra gas injection is a high-efficiency method to reduce SCE. In this paper, we will report the experimental results on the beam profile, potential distribution, beam emittance, and beam transmission efficiency of a 35 keV/90 mA H{sup +} beam and a 40 keV/10 mA He{sup +} beam compensated by Ar/Kr. The influence of gas type, gas flow, and injection location will be discussed. Emphasis is laid on the consideration of SCC when designing and commissioning a high intensity ion beam injector. Based on measured data, a new definition of space charge compensation degree is proposed.

  4. Studies on a Q/A selector for the SECRAL electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.; Sun, L. T.; Feng, Y. C.; Fang, X.; Lu, W.; Zhang, W. H.; Cao, Y.; Zhang, X. Z.; Zhao, H. W.

    2014-08-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance ion sources are widely used in heavy ion accelerators in the world because they are capable of producing high current beams of highly charged ions. However, the design of the Q/A selector system for these devices is challenging, because it must have a sufficient ion resolution while controlling the beam emittance growth. Moreover, this system has to be matched for a wide range of ion beam species with different intensities. In this paper, research on the Q/A selector system at the SECRAL (Superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source with Advanced design in Lanzhou) platform both in experiment and simulation is presented. Based on this study, a new Q/A selector system has been designed for SECRAL II. The features of the new design including beam simulations are also presented.

  5. Studies on a Q/A selector for the SECRAL electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Sun, L T; Feng, Y C; Fang, X; Lu, W; Zhang, W H; Cao, Y; Zhang, X Z; Zhao, H W

    2014-08-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance ion sources are widely used in heavy ion accelerators in the world because they are capable of producing high current beams of highly charged ions. However, the design of the Q/A selector system for these devices is challenging, because it must have a sufficient ion resolution while controlling the beam emittance growth. Moreover, this system has to be matched for a wide range of ion beam species with different intensities. In this paper, research on the Q/A selector system at the SECRAL (Superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source with Advanced design in Lanzhou) platform both in experiment and simulation is presented. Based on this study, a new Q/A selector system has been designed for SECRAL II. The features of the new design including beam simulations are also presented.

  6. Enhanced production of runaway electrons during electron cyclotron resonance heating and in the presence of supersonic molecular beam injection in the HL-2A tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y. P.; Liu, Yi; Yang, J. W.; Song, X. Y.; Yuan, G. L.; Zhou, J.; Yao, L. H.; Feng, B. B.; Li, X.; Yang, Q. W.; Duan, X. R.; Pan, C. H.; Liu, Y.

    2010-07-15

    In the present paper, it is reported that a large production of runaway electrons has been observed during the flattop phase of electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) discharges and in the presence of supersonic molecular beam injection (SMBI) in the HuanLiuqi-2A (commonly referred to as HL-2A) [Q. W. Yang, Nucl. Fusion 47, S635 (2007)] tokamak. For the set of discharges carried out in the present experiment, the ranges of ECRH power and plasma electron density are 0.8-1.0 MW and (3.0-4.0)x10{sup 19} m{sup -3}, respectively. A large number of superthermal electrons are produced through the avalanche effect [A. Lazaros, Phys. Plasmas 8, 1263 (2001)] during ECRH. The loop voltage increase due to SMBI gives rise to a decline in the critical runaway energy, which leads to that many superthermal electrons could be converted into runaway region. Therefore, this phenomenon may come from the synergetic effects of ECRH and SMBI. That is, the superthermal electrons created by ECRH are accelerated into runaway regime via the Dreicer process which is triggered by SMBI. The experimental results are in well agreement with the calculational ones based on the superthermal electron avalanche effect and the Dreicer runaway theory.

  7. Neutron spectra produced by 30, 35 and 40 MeV proton beams at KIRAMS MC-50 cyclotron with a thick beryllium target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jae Won; Bak, Sang-In; Ham, Cheolmin; In, Eun Jin; Kim, Do Yoon; Min, Kyung Joo; Zhou, Yujie; Park, Tae-Sun; Hong, Seung-Woo; Bhoraskar, V. N.

    2015-10-01

    Neutrons over a wide range of energies are produced by bombarding a 1.05 cm thick beryllium target with protons of different energies delivered by the MC-50 Cyclotron of the Korea Institute of Radiological Medical Sciences (KIRAMS). The neutron flux Φ(En) versus neutron energy En, produced by protons of 30, 35, and 40 MeV energies, was obtained by using the GEANT4 code with a data-based hadronic model. For the experimental validation of the simulated neutron spectra, a number of pure aluminum and iron oxide samples were irradiated with the neutrons produced by 30, 35, and 40 MeV protons at 20 μA beam current. The gamma-ray activities of 24Na and 56Mn produced, respectively, through 27Al(n,α)24Na and 56Fe(n,p)56Mn reactions were measured by a HPGe detector. The neutron flux Φ(En) at each neutron energy from the simulation was multiplied with the evaluated cross-sections σ(En) of the respective nuclear reaction, and the summation ∑ Φ(En) σ(En) was calculated over the neutron spectrum for each proton energy of 30, 35, and 40 MeV. The measured gamma-ray activities of 24Na and 56Mn were found in good agreement with the activities estimated by using the summed values of ∑ Φ(En) σ(En) along with other parameters in a neutron activation method.

  8. Non-inductive current built-up by local electron cyclotron heating and current drive with a 28 GHz focused beam on QUEST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onchi, Takumi; Idei, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Makoto; Ohwada, Hiroaki; Zushi, Hideki; Hanada, Kazuaki; Kariya, Tsuyoshi; Mishra, Kishore; Shikama, Taichi; Quest Team

    2016-10-01

    The plasma current can be driven solely by injecting electron cyclotron waves (ECWs) in spherical tokamak (ST) configuration. A system of 28 GHz gyrotron (maximum power: 270 kW) is renewed and reinstalled on QUEST. A focused ECW beam, whose diameter is about 5 cm at the second harmonic resonance, is injected for local ECW heating and current drive. The local power density at resonance exceeds 75 MW/m2 at an injection power of 150 kW. The incident ECW polarization can be adjusted employing the phase shifter consisting of two corrugated plates. During 1.25 second pulse of ECH, plasma current is built up to Ip = 70 kA fully non-inductively with a core electron density of ne > 1018 m-3. The closed flux in such ST plasma is determined at the inboard limiter on the center stack. Energetic electrons are also responsible for the pressure and equilibrium. This work is supported by JSPS KAKENHI (15H04231, 15K17800), NIFS Collaboration Research program (NIFS13KUTR085, NIFS11KUTR069, NIFS16KUTR114).

  9. Modeling of scattering intensity of spheroid particles with a Gaussian beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Hong; Zheng, Wenbin

    2017-04-01

    Based on the Generalized Lorenz Mie Theory (GLMT), the scattering intensity of spheroid particles is investigated within the Gaussian beam. The spheroid model is applied to represent the real non-spherical particles, and the scattering intensity of particles is deduced according to the GLMT. On the other hand, the sphere of the same volume for the spheroid is used for calculating the scattering intensity of the spheroid within the Gaussian beam. For a comparison, the scattering intensity of the spheroid with the pane wave is also calculated. Simulation data results indicate that fairly reasonable results of the scattering intensity for the spheroids can be obtained with this model, and it can provide a reliable and efficient approach to research the scattering intensity of the non-spherical particles by the Gaussian beam.

  10. Plasma Wakefield Acceleration of an Intense Positron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Blue, B

    2004-04-21

    The Plasma Wakefield Accelerator (PWFA) is an advanced accelerator concept which possess a high acceleration gradient and a long interaction length for accelerating both electrons and positrons. Although electron beam-plasma interactions have been extensively studied in connection with the PWFA, very little work has been done with respect to positron beam-plasma interactions. This dissertation addresses three issues relating to a positron beam driven plasma wakefield accelerator. These issues are (a) the suitability of employing a positron drive bunch to excite a wake; (b) the transverse stability of the drive bunch; and (c) the acceleration of positrons by the plasma wake that is driven by a positron bunch. These three issues are explored first through computer simulations and then through experiments. First, a theory is developed on the impulse response of plasma to a short drive beam which is valid for small perturbations to the plasma density. This is followed up with several particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations which study the experimental parameter (bunch length, charge, radius, and plasma density) range. Next, the experimental setup is described with an emphasis on the equipment used to measure the longitudinal energy variations of the positron beam. Then, the transverse dynamics of a positron beam in a plasma are described. Special attention is given to the way focusing, defocusing, and a tilted beam would appear to be energy variations as viewed on our diagnostics. Finally, the energy dynamics imparted on a 730 {micro}m long, 40 {micro}m radius, 28.5 GeV positron beam with 1.2 x 10{sup 10} particles in a 1.4 meter long 0-2 x 10{sup 14} e{sup -}/cm{sup 3} plasma is described. First the energy loss was measured as a function of plasma density and the measurements are compared to theory. Then, an energy gain of 79 {+-} 15 MeV is shown. This is the first demonstration of energy gain of a positron beam in a plasma and it is in good agreement with the predictions

  11. Generalized Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij Distribution and Beam Matrix for Phase-Space Manipulations of High-Intensity Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Moses; Qin, Hong; Davidson, Ronald C.; Groening, Lars; Xiao, Chen

    2016-11-01

    In an uncoupled linear lattice system, the Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij (KV) distribution formulated on the basis of the single-particle Courant-Snyder invariants has served as a fundamental theoretical basis for the analyses of the equilibrium, stability, and transport properties of high-intensity beams for the past several decades. Recent applications of high-intensity beams, however, require beam phase-space manipulations by intentionally introducing strong coupling. In this Letter, we report the full generalization of the KV model by including all of the linear (both external and space-charge) coupling forces, beam energy variations, and arbitrary emittance partition, which all form essential elements for phase-space manipulations. The new generalized KV model yields spatially uniform density profiles and corresponding linear self-field forces as desired. The corresponding matrix envelope equations and beam matrix for the generalized KV model provide important new theoretical tools for the detailed design and analysis of high-intensity beam manipulations, for which previous theoretical models are not easily applicable.

  12. Modeling nitrogen plasmas produced by intense electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angus, Justin; Swanekamp, Steve; Richardson, Andrew; Schumer, Joseph; Mosher, David; Ottinger, Paul

    2016-10-01

    The Gamble II generator at the Naval Research Laboratory produces 100ns pulse duration, relativistic-electron beams with peak energies on the order of 1MV and peak currents of about 800kA with annular beam areas between 40-80cm2. This gives peak current densities 10 kA/cm2. For many different applications, a nitrogen gas in the 1Torr range is used as a charge- and current-neutralizing background to achieve beam transport. For these parameter regimes, the gas transitions from a weakly-ionized molecular state to a strongly-ionized atomic state on the time scale of the beam pulse. A detailed gas-chemistry model is presented for a dynamical description of the nitrogen plasmas produced in such experiments. The model is coupled to a 0D circuit model representative of annular beams, and results for 1Torr nitrogen are in good agreement with experimental measurements of the line-integrated electron density and the net current. It is found that the species are mostly in the ground and metastable states during the atomic phase, but that ionization proceeds predominantly through thermal ionization of the higher-lying optically-allowed states with excitation energies close to the ionization limit. Work is supported by AWE through NNSA.

  13. Longitudinal confinement and matching of an intense electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaudoin, B.; Haber, I.; Kishek, R. A.; Bernal, S.; Koeth, T.; Sutter, D.; O'Shea, P. G.; Reiser, M.

    2011-01-01

    An induction cell has successfully been demonstrated to longitudinally confine a space-charge dominated bunch for over a thousand turns (>11.52 km) in the University of Maryland Electron Ring [Haber et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. A 606, 64 (2009) and R. A. Kishek et al., Int. J. Mod. Phys. A 22, 3838 (2007)]. With the use of synchronized periodic focusing fields, the beam is confined for multiple turns overcoming the longitudinal space-charge forces. Experimental results show that an optimum longitudinal match is obtained when the focusing frequency for containment of the 0.52 mA beam is applied at every fifth turn. Containment of the beam bunch is achievable at lower focusing frequencies, at the cost of a reduction in the transported charge from the lack of sufficient focusing. Containment is also obtainable, if the confinement fields overfocus the bunch, exciting multiple waves at the bunch ends, which propagate into the central region of the beam, distorting the overall constant current beam shape.

  14. Longitudinal confinement and matching of an intense electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Beaudoin, B.; Haber, I.; Kishek, R. A.; Bernal, S.; Koeth, T.; Sutter, D.; O'Shea, P. G.; Reiser, M.

    2011-01-15

    An induction cell has successfully been demonstrated to longitudinally confine a space-charge dominated bunch for over a thousand turns (>11.52 km) in the University of Maryland Electron Ring [Haber et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. A 606, 64 (2009) and R. A. Kishek et al., Int. J. Mod. Phys. A 22, 3838 (2007)]. With the use of synchronized periodic focusing fields, the beam is confined for multiple turns overcoming the longitudinal space-charge forces. Experimental results show that an optimum longitudinal match is obtained when the focusing frequency for containment of the 0.52 mA beam is applied at every fifth turn. Containment of the beam bunch is achievable at lower focusing frequencies, at the cost of a reduction in the transported charge from the lack of sufficient focusing. Containment is also obtainable, if the confinement fields overfocus the bunch, exciting multiple waves at the bunch ends, which propagate into the central region of the beam, distorting the overall constant current beam shape.

  15. Implications of the Electrostatic Approximation in the Beam Frame on the Nonlinear Vlasov-Maxwell Equations for Intense Beam Propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald C. Davidson; W. Wei-li Lee; Hong Qin; Edward Startsev

    2001-11-08

    This paper develops a clear procedure for solving the nonlinear Vlasov-Maxwell equations for a one-component intense charged particle beam or finite-length charge bunch propagating through a cylindrical conducting pipe (radius r = r(subscript)w = const.), and confined by an applied focusing force. In particular, the nonlinear Vlasov-Maxwell equations are Lorentz-transformed to the beam frame ('primed' variables) moving with axial velocity relative to the laboratory. In the beam frame, the particle motions are nonrelativistic for the applications of practical interest, already a major simplification. Then, in the beam frame, we make the electrostatic approximation which fully incorporates beam space-charge effects, but neglects any fast electromagnetic processes with transverse polarization (e.g., light waves). The resulting Vlasov-Maxwell equations are then Lorentz-transformed back to the laboratory frame, and properties of the self-generated fields and resulting nonlinear Vlasov-Maxwell equations in the laboratory frame are discussed.

  16. ECR (Electron Cyclotron Resonance) ion sources for cyclotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Lyneis, C.M.

    1986-10-01

    In the last decade ECR (Electron Cyclotron Resonance) ion sources have evolved from a single large, power consuming, complex prototype into a variety of compact, simple, reliable, efficient, high performance sources of high charge state ions for accelerators and atomic physics. The coupling of ECR sources to cyclotrons has resulted in significant performance gains in energy, intensity, reliability, and variety of ion species. Seven ECR sources are in regular operation with cyclotrons and numerous other projects are under development or in the planning stag. At least four laboratories have ECR sources dedicated for atomic physics research and other atomic physics programs share ECR sources with cyclotrons. An ECR source is now installed on the injector for the CERN SPS synchrotron to accelerate O/sup 8 +/ to relativistic energies. A project is underway at Argonne to couple an ECR source to a superconducting heavy-ion linac. Although tremendous progress has been made, the field of ECR sources is still a relatively young technology and there is still the potential for further advances both in source development and understanding of the plasma physics. The development of ECR sources is reviewed. The important physics mechanisms which come into play in the operation of ECR Sources are discussed, along with various models for charge state distributions (CSD). The design and performance of several ECR sources are compared. The 88-Inch Cyclotron and the LBL ECR is used as an example of cyclotron+ECR operation. The future of ECR sources is considered.

  17. Influence of Conducting Plate Boundary Conditions on the Transverse Envelope Equations Describing Intense Ion Beam Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, S M; Bukh, B

    2003-07-23

    In typical diagnostic applications, intense ion beams are intercepted by a conducting plate associated with devices used to measure beam phase-space projections. This results in the transverse space-charge field near the plate being shorted out, rendering simple envelope models with constant space-charge strength inaccurate. Here we develop corrected envelope models based on analytical calculations to account for this effect on the space-charge term of the envelope equations, thereby removing a systematic source of error in the equations and enabling more accurate comparisons with experiment. For common intense beam parameters, we find that the correction occurs primarily in the envelope angles and that the effect can be large enough to degrade precision beam matching. Results are verified with 3D self-consistent PIC simulations based on intense beam experiments associated with driver developments for Heavy-Ion Fusion.

  18. Experimental study of magnetically confined hollow electron beams in the Tevatron as collimators for intense high-energy hadron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Stancari, G.; Annala, G.; Shiltsev, V.; Still, D.; Valishev, A.; Vorobiev, L.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Magnetically confined hollow electron beams for controlled halo removal in high-energy colliders such as the Tevatron or the LHC may extend traditional collimation systems beyond the intensity limits imposed by tolerable losses. They may also improve collimation performance by suppressing loss spikes due to beam jitter and by increasing capture efficiency. A hollow electron gun was designed and tested at Fermilab for this purpose. It was installed in one of the Tevatron electron lenses in the summer of 2010. We present the results of the first experimental tests of the hollow-beam collimation concept on 980-GeV antiproton bunches in the Tevatron.

  19. Controlling precise magnetic field configuration around electron cyclotron resonance zone for enhancing plasma parameters and beam current.

    PubMed

    Yano, Keisuke; Kurisu, Yosuke; Nozaki, Dai; Kimura, Daiju; Imai, Youta; Kumakura, Sho; Sato, Fuminobu; Kato, Yushi; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2014-02-01

    Multi-charged ion source which has wide operating conditions is required in various application fields. We have constructed tandem type ECR ion source (ECRIS); one of the features of its main stage is an additional coil for controlling magnetic field distribution around the mirror bottom precisely. Here the effect of magnetic field variation caused by the additional coil is experimentally considered in terms of plasma parameters and beam current as the first investigation of the main stage plasma. Furthermore, behavior of magnetic lines of force flowing from the ECR zone is calculated, and is compared with measurement results aiming for better understanding of interrelationship between plasma production and ion beam generation on the ECRIS.

  20. Array feed/reflector antenna design for intense microwave beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blank, Stephen J.

    1990-04-01

    It is shown that a planar-array feed has excellent potential as a solution to paraboloidal reflector distortion problems and beam-steering requirements. Numerical results from an algorithmic procedure are presented which show that, for a range of distortion models, appreciable on-axis gain restoration can be achieved with as few as seven elements. For beam-steering to + or - 1 MW, 19 elements are required. For arrays with either seven or 19 elements, high effective aperture elements give higher system gain than elements having lower effective apertures. With 37 elements, excellent gain and beam-steering performance to + or - 1.5 BW is obtained independently of assumed effective aperture of the array element. A few simple rules of thumb are presented for the design of the planar-array feed configuration.

  1. Control of the intensity fluctuations of random electromagnetic beams on propagation in weak atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korotkova, O.

    2006-02-01

    The intensity fluctuations of random electromagnetic beams propagating in the atmosphere are studied. For such beams it is shown that when the atmospheric fluctuations are weak then the scintillation index (the normalized variance of intensity fluctuations) of the beam at any distance from the source depends not only on the state of coherence but also on the degree of polarization of the beam in the source plane. In particular, we found that for initially unpolarized beams the scintillation index generally takes on smaller values than that for completely polarized beams. The presented analysis might be useful in the applications (e.g. communications, laser radars) where atmospheric effects can be mitigated by adjusting the coherence properties and the polarization properties of the source.

  2. Optical apparatus using liquid crystals for shaping the spatial intensity of optical beams having designated wavelengths

    DOEpatents

    Jacobs, S.D.; Cerqua, K.A.

    1987-07-14

    The spatial intensity profile of an optical beam of designated wavelengths, such as a laser beam, is shaped (the beam is apodized) by means of cholesteric liquid crystals of opposite chirality disposed successively along the path of the beam. The crystals have curved surfaces, which may be defined by a lens which defines the thickness of the liquid crystal fluid gap in a liquid crystal cell, so as to vary the selective reflection of the designated wavelength across the aperture of the beam. In this way, a soft aperture is provided. By using tandem cell pairs having liquid crystals of opposite chirality, but of different pitch, and with lenses of different curvature, beams of different wavelengths which are projected colinearly along the path may be individually tailored in spatial intensity profile. 11 figs.

  3. Optical apparatus using liquid crystals for shaping the spatial intensity of optical beams having designated wavelengths

    DOEpatents

    Jacobs, Stephen D.; Cerqua, Kathleen A.

    1987-01-01

    The spatial intensity profile of an optical beam of designated wavelengths, such as a laser beam, is shaped (the beam is apodized) by means of cholesteric liquid crystals of opposite chirality disposed successively along the path of the beam. The crystals have curved surfaces, which may be defined by a lens which defines the thickness of the liquid crystal fluid gap in a liquid crystal cell, so as to vary the selective reflection of the designated wavelength across the aperture of the beam. In this way, a soft aperture is provided. By using tandem cell pairs having liquid crystals of opposite chirality, but of different pitch, and with lenses of different curvature, beams of different wavelengths which are projected colinearly along the path may be individually tailored in spatial intensity profile.

  4. Transverse Beam Halo Measurements at High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) using Vibrating Wire Monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, M.; Hanna, B.; Scarpine, V.; Shiltsev, V.; Steimel, J.; Artinian, S.; Arutunian, S.

    2015-02-26

    The measurement and control of beam halos will be critical for the applications of future high-intensity hadron linacs. In particular, beam profile monitors require a very high dynamic range when used for the transverse beam halo measurements. In this study, the Vibrating Wire Monitor (VWM) with aperture 60 mm was installed at the High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) front-end to measure the transverse beam halo. A vibrating wire is excited at its resonance frequency with the help of a magnetic feedback loop, and the vibrating and sensitive wires are connected through a balanced arm. The sensitive wire is moved into the beam halo region by a stepper motor controlled translational stage. We study the feasibility of the vibrating wire for the transverse beam halo measurements in the low-energy front-end of the proton linac.

  5. Intense high-quality medical proton beams via laser fields.

    PubMed

    Galow, Benjamin J; Harman, Zoltán; Keitel, Christoph H

    2010-12-06

    Simulations based on the coupled relativistic equations of motion show that protons stemming from laser-plasma processes can be efficiently post-accelerated employing single and crossed pulsed laser beams focused to spot radii on the order of the laser wavelength. We demonstrate that the crossed beams produce quasi-monoenergetic accelerated protons with kinetic energies exceeding 200 MeV, small energy spreads of about 1% and high densities as required for hadron cancer therapy. To our knowledge, this is the first scheme allowing for this important application based on an all-optical set-up.

  6. Apparatus and process for active pulse intensity control of laser beam

    DOEpatents

    Wilcox, Russell B.

    1992-01-01

    An optically controlled laser pulse energy control apparatus and process is disclosed wherein variations in the energy of a portion of the laser beam are used to vary the resistance of a photodetector such as a photoresistor through which a control voltage is fed to a light intensity controlling device through which a second portion of the laser beam passes. Light attenuation means are provided to vary the intensity of the laser light used to control the resistance of the photodetector. An optical delay path is provided through which the second portion of the beam travels before reaching the light intensity controlling device. The control voltage is supplied by a variable power supply. The apparatus may be tuned to properly attenuate the laser beam passing through the intensity controlling device by adjusting the power supply, the optical delay path, or the light attenuating means.

  7. Increase of the beam intensity for BNCT by changing the core configuration at THOR.

    PubMed

    Liu, H M; Peir, J J; Liu, Y H; Tsai, P E; Jiang, S H

    2009-07-01

    In this article, we will consider several core configurations and run the core calculation with MCNP to obtain the neutrons distribution at THOR. The thermal neutron flux inside the vertical tubes (VT-B-VT-E) and the fast neutron flux in the first row facing to the boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) facility (I3-I5) were tallied for indication. Based on these simulation results, the fuel elements were rearranged during the annual repair period in 2007. The epithermal neutron flux at the center of BNCT beam exit in air was measured again, and the results showed that the beam intensity increased by 50%. Comparing the neutron intensities both in reactor core and at the BNCT beam exit for several core configurations, the results show that the BNCT beam intensity can be increased without decreasing the neutron intensity in core.

  8. Spatial and spectral coherence in propagating high-intensity twin beams.

    PubMed

    Haderka, Ondřej; Machulka, Radek; Peřina, Jan; Allevi, Alessia; Bondani, Maria

    2015-09-25

    Spatial and spectral coherence of high-intensity twin-beam states propagating from the near-field to the far-field configurations is experimentally investigated by measuring intensity auto- and cross-correlation functions. The experimental setup includes a moving crystal and an iCCD camera placed at the output plane of an imaging spectrometer. Evolution from the tight near-field spatial position cross-correlations to the far-field momentum cross-correlations, accompanied by changeless spectral cross-correlations, is observed. Intensity autocorrelation functions and beam profiles are also monitored as they provide the number of degrees of freedom constituting the down-converted beams. The strength of intensity cross-correlations as an alternative quantity for the determination of the number of degrees of freedom is also measured. The relation between the beam coherence and the number of degrees of freedom is discussed.

  9. Intensity-based modal analysis of partially coherent beams with Hermite-Gaussian modes.

    PubMed

    Gori, F; Santarsiero, M; Borghi, R; Guattari, G

    1998-07-01

    Many partially coherent beams are made up of a superposition of mutually uncorrelated Hermite-Gaussian modes. We prove that knowledge of the transverse intensity profile of such a beam is sufficient for evaluating the weights of the modes in an exact way. Simulations indicate that the proposed method resists noise well.

  10. Production of intense negative hydrogen beams with polarized nuclei by selective neutralization of cold negative ions

    DOEpatents

    Hershcovitch, A.

    1984-02-13

    A process for selectively neutralizing H/sup -/ ions in a magnetic field to produce an intense negative hydrogen ion beam with spin polarized protons. Characteristic features of the process include providing a multi-ampere beam of H/sup -/ ions that are

  11. Selected List of Low Energy Beam Transport Facilities for Light-Ion, High-Intensity Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Prost, L. R.

    2016-02-17

    This paper presents a list of Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) facilities for light-ion, high-intensity accelerators. It was put together to facilitate comparisons with the PXIE LEBT design choices. A short discussion regarding the importance of the beam perveance in the choice of the transport scheme follows.

  12. Device to color modulate a stationary light beam gives high intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gantz, W. A.

    1966-01-01

    Signal controlled system color modulates a beam of light while also providing high intensity and a stationary beam, either collimated or focused. The color modulation acquired by the presented system can be compatible with any color film by employing color filters formed to provide a color wedge having a color distribution compatible with the films color sensitivity.

  13. Neutral and color-selective beam splitting assemblies with polarization-independent intensities.

    PubMed

    Ho, F C; Dobrowolski, J A

    1992-07-01

    Arrangements consisting of at least three beam splitting surfaces are described that give rise to at least four different beams, of which at least two have polarization-independent spectral intensities. They can act over a wide spectral region and can be designed to be either achromatic or color selective. The performance of an experimentally produced device is described.

  14. High-intensity pulsed beam source with tunable operation mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nashilevskiy, A. V.; Kanaev, G. G.; Ezhov, V. V.; Shamanin, V. I.

    2017-05-01

    The report presents the design of an electron and an ion pulsed accelerator. The powerful high-voltage pulse generator of the accelerator and the vacuum bushing insulator is able to change the polarity of the output voltage. The low-inductance matching transformer provides an increase in the DFL output impedance by 4 times. The generator based on a high voltage pulse transformer and a pseudo spark switch is applied for DFL charging. The high-impedance magnetically insulated focusing diode with Br magnetic field and the “passive” anode was used to realize the ion beam generation mode. The plasma is formed on the surface of the anode caused by an electrical breakdown at the voltage edge pulse; as a result, the carbon ion and proton beam is generated. This beam has the following parameters: the current density is about 400 A/cm2 (in focus): the applied voltage is up to 450 kV. The accelerator is designed for the research on the interaction of the charged particle pulsed beams with materials and for the development of technological processes of a material modification.

  15. Grating monochromator for electron cyclotron resonance ion source operation

    SciTech Connect

    Muto, Hideshi; Ohshiro, Yukimitsu; Yamaka, Shouichi; Watanabe, Shin-ichi; Yamaguchi, Hidetoshi; Shimoura, Susumu; Oyaizu, Michihiro; Kase, Masayuki; Kubono, Shigeru; Hattori, Toshiyuki

    2013-07-15

    Recently, we started to observe optical line spectra from an ECR plasma using a grating monochromator with a photomultiplier. The light intensity of line spectrum from the ECR plasma had a strong correlation with ion beam intensity measured by a magnetic mass analyzer. This correlation is a significant information for beam tuning because it allows the extraction of the desired ion species from the ECR plasma. Separation of ion species of the same charge to mass ratio with an electromagnetic mass analyzer is known to be an exceptionally complex process, but this research gives new insights into its simplification. In this paper, the grating monochromator method for beam tuning of a Hyper-ECR ion source as an injector for RIKEN azimuthal varying field (AVF) cyclotron is described.

  16. The upgraded rf system for the AGS and high intensity proton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, J.M.

    1995-05-01

    The AGS has been upgraded over the past three years to produce a record beam intensity of 6 {times} 10{sup 13} protons per pulse for the fixed-target physics program. The major elements of the upgrade are: the new 1.5 GeV Booster synchrotron, the main magnet power supply, a high frequency longitudinal dilution cavity, a feedback damper for transverse instabilities, a fast gamma transition jump system, and a new high-power rf system. The new rf system and its role in achieving the high intensity goal are the subjects of this report. The rf system is heavily beam loaded, with 7 Amps of rf current in the beam and a peak power of 0.75 MW delivered to the beam by ten cavities. As an example of the scale of beam loading, at one point in the acceleration cycle the cavities are operated at 1.5 kV/gap; whereas, were it not for the new power amplifiers, the beam-induced voltage on the cavities would be over 25 kV/gap. The upgraded rf system, comprising: new power amplifiers, wide band rf feedback, improved cavities, and new low-level beam control electronics, is described. Results of measurements with beam, which characterize the system`s performance, are presented. A typical high intensity acceleration cycle is described with emphasis on the key challenges of beam loading.

  17. A 3 Ghz photoelectron gun for high beam intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Bossart, R.; Braun, H.; Dehler, M.

    1995-12-31

    The CLIC Test Facility (CTF) for new accelerator structures of the proposed Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is to be equipped with a new RF gun containing a laser driven photocathode. The new 3 GHz gun with photocathode shall produce a bunch train of 48 electron bunches of 25 nC charge each with a bunch length of 8 - 15 ps fwhm. The new RF gun consists of 2{1/2} cells and accelerates the beam to an energy of 7 MeV with a peak field gradient Ez = 100 MV/m. The strong space charge forces at low beam energy caused by the high charge density of the electron bunches must be contained by radial and longitudinal RF focusing in the RF gun. Radial RF focusing is applied by a conical backplane around the photocathode in the first cell where the electrons have a low energy. Longitudinal RF focusing is obtained by varying the length of each of the three cells of the gun. The total electric charge of the bunch train exceeds 1{mu}C and causes strong beam loading to the RF structures so that the stored energy is reduced to half of the unloaded RF energy. The RF gun under construction is being optimized by MAFIA beam simulations for an injector assembly comprising a second accelerating RF structure of 4 cells and an intermediate solenoid magnet correcting the beam divergence of the 2{1/2} cell gun. The scheme with two accelerating RF sections will provide a linear energy increase along the bunch suitable for further compression of the bunch length in a magnetic chicane.

  18. Quantification of beam complexity in intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatment plans

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Weiliang Cho, Sang Hyun; Zhang, Xiaodong; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Hoffman, Karen E.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Excessive complexity in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans increases the dose uncertainty, prolongs the treatment time, and increases the susceptibility to changes in patient or target geometry. To date, the tools for quantitative assessment of IMRT beam complexity are still lacking. In this study, The authors have sought to develop metrics to characterize different aspects of beam complexity and investigate the beam complexity for IMRT plans of different disease sites. Methods: The authors evaluated the beam complexity scores for 65 step-and-shoot IMRT plans from three sites (prostate, head and neck, and spine) and 26 volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans for the prostate. On the basis of the beam apertures and monitor unit weights of all segments, the authors calculated the mean aperture area, extent of aperture shape irregularity, and degree of beam modulation for each beam. Then the beam complexity values were averaged to obtain the complexity metrics of the IMRT plans. The authors studied the correlation between the beam complexity metrics and the quality assurance (QA) results. Finally, the effects of treatment planning parameters on beam complexity were studied. Results: The beam complexity scores were not uniform among the prostate IMRT beams from different gantry angles. The lateral beams had larger monitor units and smaller shape irregularity, while the anterior-posterior beams had larger modulation values. On average, the prostate IMRT plans had the smallest aperture irregularity, beam modulation, and normalized monitor units; the head and neck IMRT plans had large beam irregularity and beam modulation; and the spine stereotactic radiation therapy plans often had small beam apertures, which may have been associated with the relatively large discrepancies between planned and QA measured doses. There were weak correlations between the beam complexity scores and the measured dose errors. The prostate VMAT beams showed

  19. Emittance growth of an nonequilibrium intense electron beam in a transport channel with discrete focusing

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsten, B.E.

    1997-02-01

    The author analyzes the emittance growth mechanisms for a continuous, intense electron beam in a focusing transport channel, over distances short enough that the beam does not reach equilibrium. The emittance grows from the effect of nonlinear forces arising from (1) current density nonuniformities, (2) energy variations leading to nonlinearities in the space-charge force even if the current density is uniform, (3) axial variations in the radial vector potential, (4) an axial velocity shear along the beam, and (5) an energy redistribution of the beam as the beam compresses or expands. The emittance growth is studied analytically and numerically for the cases of balanced flow, tight focusing, and slight beam scalloping, and is additionally studied numerically for an existing 6-MeV induction linear accelerator. Rules for minimizing the emittance along a beamline are established. Some emittance growth will always occur, both from current density nonuniformities that arise along the transport and from beam radius changes along the transport.

  20. Harmonic plasma waves excitation and structure evolution of intense ion beams in background plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Zhang-Hu Wang, You-Nian

    2016-08-15

    The long-term dynamic evolutions of intense ion beams in plasmas have been investigated with two-dimensional electromagnetic particle simulations, taking into account the effect of the two-stream instability between beam ions and plasma electrons. Depending on the initial beam radial density profile and velocity distribution, ring structures may be formed in the beam edge regions. At the later stage of beam-plasma interactions, the ion beams are strongly modulated by the two-stream instability and multiple density spikes are formed in the longitudinal direction. The formation of these density spikes is shown to result from the excitation of harmonic plasma waves when the instability gets saturated. Comparisons between the beam cases with initial flat-top and Gaussian radial density profiles are made, and a higher instability growth rate is observed for the flat-top profile case.

  1. Transformation of a high-order mode-intensity distribution to a nearly Gaussian beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machavariani, G.; Davidson, Nir; Ishaaya, Amiel A.; Friesem, Asher A.; Hasman, Erez

    2003-11-01

    A simple method for obtaining a nearly Gaussian laser beam from a high order Hermite-Gaussian mode is presented. The method is based on separating the equal lobes of the high order mode and combining them together coherently. The method was experimentally verified with an arrangement of three mirrors, a 50% beam splitter and a phase tuning plate. The beam quality factor calculated in x-direction for the resulting output beam is 1.045, being very close to that of ideal Gaussian beam. The calculated power leakage is only 1.5%. The experimental near-field and far-field intensity distributions of the output beam have nearly Gaussian cross sections in both the x and y directions, with M2x=1.34 and M2y=1.32. With some modifications, it is possible to obtain an output beam with M2x=1.15 and no power leakage.

  2. Average intensity and spreading of partially coherent model beams propagating in a turbulent biological tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yuqian; Zhang, Yixin; Wang, Qiu; Hu, Zhengda

    2016-11-01

    For Gaussian beams with three different partially coherent models, including Gaussian-Schell model (GSM), Laguerre-Gaussian Schell-model (LGSM) and Bessel-Gaussian Schell-model (BGSM) beams propagating through a biological turbulent tissue, the expression of the spatial coherence radius of a spherical wave propagating in a turbulent biological tissue, and the average intensity and beam spreading for GSM, LGSM and BGSM beams are derived based on the fractal model of power spectrum of refractive-index variations in biological tissue. Effects of partially coherent model and parameters of biological turbulence on such beams are studied in numerical simulations. Our results reveal that the spreading of GSM beams is smaller than LGSM and BGSM beams on the same conditions, and the beam with larger source coherence width has smaller beam spreading than that with smaller coherence width. The results are useful for any applications involved light beam propagation through tissues, especially the cases where the average intensity and spreading properties of the light should be taken into account to evaluate the system performance and investigations in the structures of biological tissue.

  3. Non-perturbative measurement of low-intensity charged particle beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, M.; Geithner, R.; Golm, J.; Neubert, R.; Schwickert, M.; Stöhlker, T.; Tan, J.; Welsch, C. P.

    2017-01-01

    Non-perturbative measurements of low-intensity charged particle beams are particularly challenging to beam diagnostics due to the low amplitude of the induced electromagnetic fields. In the low-energy antiproton decelerator (AD) and the future extra low energy antiproton rings at CERN, an absolute measurement of the beam intensity is essential to monitor the operation efficiency. Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) based cryogenic current comparators (CCC) have been used for measuring slow charged beams in the nA range, showing a very good current resolution. But these were unable to measure fast bunched beams, due to the slew-rate limitation of SQUID devices and presented a strong susceptibility to external perturbations. Here, we present a CCC system developed for the AD machine, which was optimised in terms of its current resolution, system stability, ability to cope with short bunched beams, and immunity to mechanical vibrations. This paper presents the monitor design and the first results from measurements with a low energy antiproton beam obtained in the AD in 2015. These are the first CCC beam current measurements ever performed in a synchrotron machine with both coasting and short bunched beams. It is shown that the system is able to stably measure the AD beam throughout the entire cycle, with a current resolution of 30 {nA}.

  4. Intelligence-guided beam angle optimization in treatment planning of intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hui; Dai, Jian-Rong

    2016-10-01

    An intelligence guided approach based on fuzzy inference system (FIS) was proposed to automate beam angle optimization in treatment planning of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The model of FIS is built on inference rules in describing the relationship between dose quality of IMRT plan and irradiated region of anatomical structure. Dose quality of IMRT plan is quantified by the difference between calculated and constraint doses of the anatomical structures in an IMRT plan. Irradiated region of anatomical structure is characterized by the metric, covered region of interest, which is the region of an anatomical structure under radiation field while beam's eye-view is conform to target volume. Initially, an IMRT plan is created with a single beam. The dose difference is calculated for the input of FIS and the output of FIS is obtained with processing of fuzzy inference. Later, a set of candidate beams is generated for replacing the current beam. This process continues until no candidate beams is found. Then the next beam is added to the IMRT plan and optimized in the same way as the previous beam. The new beam keeps adding to the IMRT plan until the allowed beam number is reached. Two spinal cases were investigated in this study. The preliminary results show that dose quality of IMRT plans achieved by this approach is better than those achieved by the default approach with equally spaced beam setting. It is effective to find the optimal beam combination of IMRT plan with the intelligence-guided approach.

  5. The electron-cyclotron maser for astrophysical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treumann, Rudolf A.

    2006-08-01

    electron-cyclotron maser is that in the electron-cyclotron maser the free-space radiation modes can be amplified directly. Several models have been proposed for such a process. The most famous one is the so-called loss-cone maser. However, as argued in this review, the loss-cone maser is rather inefficient. Available in situ measurements indicate that the loss-cone maser plays only a minor role. Instead, the main source for any strong electron-cyclotron maser is found in the presence of a magnetic-field-aligned electric potential drop which has several effects: (1) it dilutes the local plasma to such an extent that the plasma enters the regime in which the electron-cyclotron maser becomes effective; (2) it generates energetic relativistic electron beams and field-aligned currents; (3) it deforms, together with the magnetic mirror force, the electron distribution function, thereby mimicking a high energy level sufficiently far above the Maxwellian ground state of an equilibrium plasma; (4) it favors emission in the free-space RX mode in a direction roughly perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field; (5) this emission is the most intense, since it implies the coherent resonant contribution of a maximum number of electrons in the distribution function to the radiation (i.e., to the generation of negative absorption); (6) it generates a large number of electron holes via the two-stream instability, and ion holes via the current-driven ion-acoustic instability which manifest themselves as subtle fine structures moving across the radiation spectrum and being typical for the electron-cyclotron maser emission process. These fine structures can thus be taken as the ultimate identifier of the electron-cyclotron maser. The auroral kilometric radiation of Earth is taken here as the paradigm for other manifestations of intense radio emissions such as the radiation from other planets in the solar system, from exoplanets, the Sun and other astrophysical objects.

  6. Scintillating screens sensitivity and resolution studies for low energy, low intensity beam diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Harasimowicz, Janusz; Cosentino, Luigi; Finocchiaro, Paolo; Pappalardo, Alfio; Welsch, Carsten P

    2010-10-01

    In order to investigate the limits of scintillating screens for beam profile monitoring in the ultra-low energy, ultra-low intensity regime, CsI:Tl, YAG:Ce, and a Tb glass-based scintillating fiber optic plate (SFOP) were tested. The screens response to 200 and 50 keV proton beams with intensities ranging from a few picoampere down to the subfemtoampere region was examined. In the following paper, the sensitivity and resolution studies are presented in detail for CsI:Tl and the SFOP, the two most sensitive screens. In addition, a possible use of scintillators for ultra-low energy antiproton beam monitoring is discussed.

  7. Scintillating screens sensitivity and resolution studies for low energy, low intensity beam diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Harasimowicz, Janusz; Welsch, Carsten P.; Cosentino, Luigi; Finocchiaro, Paolo; Pappalardo, Alfio

    2010-10-15

    In order to investigate the limits of scintillating screens for beam profile monitoring in the ultra-low energy, ultra-low intensity regime, CsI:Tl, YAG:Ce, and a Tb glass-based scintillating fiber optic plate (SFOP) were tested. The screens response to 200 and 50 keV proton beams with intensities ranging from a few picoampere down to the subfemtoampere region was examined. In the following paper, the sensitivity and resolution studies are presented in detail for CsI:Tl and the SFOP, the two most sensitive screens. In addition, a possible use of scintillators for ultra-low energy antiproton beam monitoring is discussed.

  8. Intense electron-beam excitation of organic dye vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Marowsky, G.; Tittel, F.K.; Wilson, W.L.

    1981-01-01

    Experimental studies of electron-beam excitation of organic dye vapors of p-phenylene-bis-(5-phenyl-2-oxazole) POPOP and p-quaterphenyl have demonstrated short-duration high-gain and super-radiant laser behavior accompanied by severe fluorescence quenching due to dye fragmentation. This has been analyzed quantitatively by evaluation of the nitrogen fluorescence, originating from the complete breakdown of the POPOP structure.

  9. Second-order intensity-moment characteristics for broadband partially coherent flat-topped beams in atmospheric turbulence.

    PubMed

    Mao, Haidan; Zhao, Daomu

    2010-01-18

    Based on the intensity moments and Wigner distribution function, the second-order moments for broadband partially coherent flat-topped (BPCFT) beams in atmospheric turbulence are studied. The beam width of BPCFT beams in atmospheric turbulence is larger than that in free space. The beam width of BPCFT beams in atmospheric turbulence is larger than that of broadband fully coherent flat-topped (BFCFT) beams in atmospheric turbulence. The broader the bandwidth is, the larger the beam width of BPCFT beams becomes. Similar conclusion can be obtained by analyzing the divergence angle and beam propagation factor of BPCFT beams. The beam width of BPCFT beams in atmospheric turbulence is less affected by the broad spectral bandwidth than that in free space. The beam width of BFCFT beams in atmospheric turbulence is less affected by the broad spectral bandwidth than that of BPCFT beams in atmospheric turbulence.

  10. Density and potential measurements in an intense ion-beam-generated plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Abt, N.E.

    1982-05-01

    Neutral beams are created by intense large area ion beams which are neutralized in a gas cell. The interaction of the beam with the gas cell creates a plasma. Such a plasma is studied here. The basic plasma parameters, electron temperature, density, and plasma potential, are measured as a function of beam current and neutral gas pressure. These measurements are compared to a model based on the solution of Poisson's equation. Because of the cylindrical geometry the equation cannot be solved analytically. Details of the numerical method are presented.

  11. Core-halo limit and internal dynamics of high intensity beams

    SciTech Connect

    Nghiem, P. A. P.; Valette, M.; Chauvin, N.; Pichoff, N.; Uriot, D.

    2015-08-15

    The dynamics of high-intensity beams largely depends on their internal space charge forces. These forces are responsible of non-linear coupling, emittance growth, and halo generation. They contribute to shape the beam density profile. As a consequence, an analysis of this profile can be a precious indicator capable of revealing the internal dynamics of the beam. This paper recalls the precise core-halo limit determination proposed earlier, then studies its behavior through a wide range of beam profiles, and finally shows its relevance as an indicator of the limit separating the two space charge field regimes of the core and the halo.

  12. Shaping the longitudinal intensity pattern of Cartesian beams in lossless and lossy media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corato-Zanarella, Mateus; Corato-Zanarella, Henrique; Zamboni-Rached, Michel

    2017-09-01

    Several applications, such as optical tweezers and atom guiding, benefit from techniques that allow the engineering of spatial field profiles, in particular their longitudinal intensity patterns. In cylindrical coordinates, methods such as frozen waves allow an advanced control of beam characteristics, but in Cartesian coordinates there is no analogous technique. Since Cartesian beams may also be useful in applications, we develop here a method to modulate on demand the longitudinal intensity pattern of any (initially) unidimensional Cartesian beam with concentrated angular spectrum (thus encompassing all unidimensional paraxial beams) in lossless and lossy media. To this end, we write the total beam as a product of two unidimensional beams and explore the degree of freedom provided by the additional Cartesian coordinate. While in the plane where this coordinate is zero the chosen unidimensional beam keeps its structure with the additional desired intensity modulation, a sinusoidal-like oscillation appears in the direction of this variable and creates a spot whose size is tunable. Examples with Gaussian and Airy beams are presented and their corresponding experimental demonstrations in free-space are performed to show the validity of the method.

  13. Correction of linear-array lidar intensity data using an optimal beam shaping approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Fan; Wang, Yuanqing; Yang, Xingyu; Zhang, Bingqing; Li, Fenfang

    2016-08-01

    The linear-array lidar has been recently developed and applied for its superiority of vertically non-scanning, large field of view, high sensitivity and high precision. The beam shaper is the key component for the linear-array detection. However, the traditional beam shaping approaches can hardly satisfy our requirement for obtaining unbiased and complete backscattered intensity data. The required beam distribution should roughly be oblate U-shaped rather than Gaussian or uniform. Thus, an optimal beam shaping approach is proposed in this paper. By employing a pair of conical lenses and a cylindrical lens behind the beam expander, the expanded Gaussian laser was shaped to a line-shaped beam whose intensity distribution is more consistent with the required distribution. To provide a better fit to the requirement, off-axis method is adopted. The design of the optimal beam shaping module is mathematically explained and the experimental verification of the module performance is also presented in this paper. The experimental results indicate that the optimal beam shaping approach can effectively correct the intensity image and provide ~30% gain of detection area over traditional approach, thus improving the imaging quality of linear-array lidar.

  14. High-energy-density electron beam generation in ultra intense laser-plasma interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianxun; Ma, Yanyun; Yang, Xiaohu; Zhao, Jun; Yu, Tongpu; Shao, Fuqiu; Zhuo, Hongbin; Gan, Longfei; Zhang, Guobo; Zhao, Yuan; Yang, Jingkang

    2017-01-01

    By using a two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation, we demonstrate a scheme for high-energy-density electron beam generation by irradiating an ultra intense laser pulse onto an aluminum (Al) target. With the laser having a peak intensity of 4 × 1023 W cm‑2, a high quality electron beam with a maximum density of 117nc and a kinetic energy density up to 8.79 × 1018 J m‑3 is generated. The temperature of the electron beam can be 416 MeV, and the beam divergence is only 7.25°. As the laser peak intensity increases (e.g., 1024 W cm‑2), both the beam energy density (3.56 × 1019 J m‑3) and the temperature (545 MeV) are increased, and the beam collimation is well controlled. The maximum density of the electron beam can even reach 180nc. Such beams should have potential applications in the areas of antiparticle generation, laboratory astrophysics, etc. This work is financially supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11475260, 11305264, 11622547, 91230205, and 11474360), the National Basic Research Program of China (No. 2013CBA01504), and the Research Project of NUDT (No. JC14-02-02).

  15. Cryogenic gas target system for intense RI beam productions in nuclear astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakabayashi, Y.; Yamaguchi, H.; Hayakawa, S.; Kurihara, Y.; Amadio, G.; Fujikawa, H.; Binh, D. N.; He, J. J.; Kim, A.; Kubono, S.

    2008-05-01

    A cryogenic gas target system was newly developed to produce intense RI beams at the low-energy in-flight radio-isotope beam separator (CRIB) of the University of Tokyo. The main features of the cryogenic gas target system are the direct cooling of the target cell by a liquid N2 finger and the circulation of the target gas that goes through the liquid N2 tank. Hydrogen gas was cooled down to 85-90 K by liquid nitrogen and used as a secondary beam production target which has a thickness of 2.3 mg/cm2 at the gas pressure of 760 Torr. Intense RI beams, such as a 7Be beam of 2×108 particles per second, were successfully produced using the target.

  16. Cryogenic gas target system for intense RI beam productions in nuclear astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Wakabayashi, Y.; Yamaguchi, H.; Hayakawa, S.; Kurihara, Y.; Amadio, G.; Fujikawa, H.; Kubono, S.; Binh, D. N.; He, J. J.; Kim, A.

    2008-05-21

    A cryogenic gas target system was newly developed to produce intense RI beams at the low-energy in-flight radio-isotope beam separator (CRIB) of the University of Tokyo. The main features of the cryogenic gas target system are the direct cooling of the target cell by a liquid N{sub 2} finger and the circulation of the target gas that goes through the liquid N{sub 2} tank. Hydrogen gas was cooled down to 85-90 K by liquid nitrogen and used as a secondary beam production target which has a thickness of 2.3 mg/cm{sup 2} at the gas pressure of 760 Torr. Intense RI beams, such as a {sup 7}Be beam of 2x10{sup 8} particles per second, were successfully produced using the target.

  17. Method and apparatus for measuring the momentum, energy, power, and power density profile of intense particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Gammel, George M.; Kugel, Henry W.

    1992-10-06

    A method and apparatus for determining the power, momentum, energy, and power density profile of high momentum mass flow. Small probe projectiles of appropriate size, shape and composition are propelled through an intense particle beam at equal intervals along an axis perpendicular to the beam direction. Probe projectiles are deflected by collisions with beam particles. The net beam-induced deflection of each projectile is measured after it passes through the intense particle beam into an array of suitable detectors.

  18. Formation of hot image in an intense laser beam through a saturable nonlinear medium slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Youwen; Ling, Xiaohui; Dai, Zhiping; Chen, Liezun; Lu, Shizhuan; You, Kaiming

    2016-11-01

    In high-power laser system such as Petawatt lasers, the laser beam can be intense enough to result in saturation of nonlinear refraction index of medium. We present an analytical and simulative investigation of hot image formation in an intense laser beam through a saturable nonlinear medium slab based on Fresnel-Kirchhoff diffraction integral and the standard split-step Fourier method. The analytical results are found in agreement with the simulative ones. It is shown that, hot images can still form in an intense laser beam through a saturable nonlinear medium slab, additionally, the saturable nonlinearity does not change the location of hot images, while may decrease the intensity of hot images, i.e., the intensity of hot images decreases with the saturation light intensity lowering, and can stop to increase with the intensity of the incident laser beam heightening due to saturation of nonlinearity. Moreover, variations of intensity of hot images with the obscuration type and the slab thickness are discussed.

  19. Characterization of intense ion beam energy density and beam induced pressure on the target with acoustic diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Pushkarev, A. I.; Isakova, Yu. I.; Khailov, I. P.; Yu, Xiao

    2013-08-15

    We have developed the acoustic diagnostics based on a piezoelectric transducer for characterization of high-intensity pulsed ion beams. The diagnostics was tested using the TEMP-4M accelerator (150 ns, 250–300 kV). The beam is composed of C{sup +} ions (85%) and protons, the beam energy density is 0.5–5 J/cm{sup 2} (depending on diode geometry). A calibration dependence of the signal from a piezoelectric transducer on the ion beam energy density is obtained using thermal imaging diagnostics. It is shown that the acoustic diagnostics allows for measurement of the beam energy density in the range of 0.1–2 J/cm{sup 2}. The dependence of the beam generated pressure on the input energy density is also determined and compared with the data from literature. The developed acoustic diagnostics do not require sophisticated equipment and can be used for operational control of pulsed ion beam parameters with a repetition rate of 10{sup 3} pulses/s.

  20. A high intensity H₂⁺ multicusp ion source for the isotope decay-at-rest experiment, IsoDAR.

    PubMed

    Axani, S; Winklehner, D; Alonso, J; Conrad, J M

    2016-02-01

    The Isotope Decay-At-Rest (IsoDAR) experimental program aims to decisively test the sterile neutrino hypothesis. In essence, it is a novel cyclotron based neutrino factory that will improve the frontiers in both high-intensity cyclotrons and electron flavor anti-neutrino sources. By using a source in which the usual H(-) ions are replaced with the more tightly bound H2(+) ions, we can negate the effects of Lorentz stripping in a cyclotron, reduce the overall perveance due to the space-charge effect, and deliver twice the number of protons per nuclei on target. To produce the H2(+), we are currently developing a dedicated multicusp ion source, MIST-1 (generation-1 Multicusp Ion Source Technologies at MIT), and a low-energy beam transport system for the IsoDAR cyclotron. This will increase the overall H2(+) current leading up to the cyclotron and improve the emittance of the beam injected into the cyclotron.

  1. Optimizing the emission, propagation, and focusing of an intense electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Pepitone, K. Gardelle, J. Modin, P.

    2015-05-14

    Intense electron beams can be used to study the dynamical response of materials under shocks in order to adjust the models developed for hydrodynamics simulations. We present in this paper a characterization of beams produced in a field emission diode coupled to the generator RKA at CEA/CESTA. Cherenkov emission, produced by the beam interacting in a fused silica disk, was observed by fast optical cameras to estimate beam homogeneity. GEANT4 simulations were performed to estimate the transfer function of the silica target and to optimize the anode foil. First, we chose the best cathode material available among the most common materials used in field emission systems. In addition, we found that by optimization of the anode thickness, we could improve the spatial homogeneity of the beam which is of prime importance for computing the interaction of the beam with materials. Next, we changed the beam fluence by increasing the beam current and by reducing the beam radius. Finally, we studied the propagation and focusing of the electron beam in low pressure gases and observed that we could use self-magnetic field focusing in order to increase beam fluence at the target location. The experimental results are in good agreement with PIC simulations.

  2. Status of a compact electron cyclotron resonance ion source for National Institute of Radiological Sciences-930 cyclotron.

    PubMed

    Hojo, S; Katagiri, K; Nakao, M; Sugiura, A; Muramatsu, M; Noda, A; Okada, T; Takahashi, Y; Komiyama, A; Honma, T; Noda, K

    2014-02-01

    The Kei-source is a compact electron cyclotron resonance ion source using only permanent magnets and a frequency of 10 GHz. It was developed at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) for producing C(4+) ions oriented for high-energy carbon therapy. It has also been used as an ion source for the NIRS-930 cyclotron. Its microwave band region for the traveling-wave-tube amplifier and maximum output power are 8-10 GHz and 350 W, respectively. Since 2006, it has provided various ion beams such as proton, deuteron, carbon, oxygen, and neon with sufficient intensity (200 μA for proton and deuteron, 50 μA for C(4+), for example) and good stability for radioisotope production, tests of radiation damage, and basic research experiments. Its horizontal and vertical emittances were measured using a screen monitor and waist-scan. The present paper reports the current status of the Kei-source.

  3. A beam intensity monitor for the Loma Linda cancer therapy proton accelerator.

    PubMed

    Coutrakon, G; Miller, D; Kross, B J; Anderson, D F; DeLuca, P; Siebers, J

    1991-01-01

    A beam intensity monitor was tested in a 230-MeV proton beam at the Loma Linda Proton Therapy Accelerator during its commissioning at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The intensity monitor was designed to regulate the beam intensity extracted from the proton synchrotron. The proton beam is tunable between 70 and 250 MeV with an adjustable intensity between 10(10) and 10(11) protons per spill. A beam spill is typically 1 s long with a 2-s repetition period. The intensity monitor must be radiation hard, expose minimum mass to the beam, and measure intensity to 1% in 1-ms time intervals. To this end, a 5-cm-thick xenon gas scintillator optically coupled to a photomultiplier tube (PMT) was tested to measure its response to the proton beam. The gas cell was operated at 1.2 atm of pressure and has 12.7-microns-thick titanium entrance and exit foils. The total mass exposed to the beam is 0.14 g/cm2 and is dominated by the titanium windows. This mass corresponds to a range attenuation equal to 1.4 mm of water. The energy lost to the xenon gas is about 70 keV per proton. Each passing proton will produce approximately 2000 photons. With a detection efficiency on the order of 0.05% for this UV light, one would anticipate over 10(10) photoelectrons per second. In a 1-ms time bin there will be approximately 10(7) photoelectrons. This yields a resolution limited by systematics. For unregulated 0.4-s proton spills, we observe a response bandwidth in excess of 10(4) Hz. While signal-to-noise and linearity were not easily measured, we estimate as few as 10(3) protons can be observed suggesting a dynamic range in excess of 10(5) is available.

  4. Intense ion beam applications to magnetic confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Sudan, R N

    1980-08-18

    The ion ring project objective is to trap a ring of high energy, axis-encircling ions in a magnetic mirror. The number of ring ions should be such as to produce deltaB/B on the ring axis of order 10%. The second experiment, LONGSHOT, is directed to producing a long pulse ion beam source so that the total number of protons required for an ion ring can be provided a lower diode power and, hence, at much less cost than that of 100 nsec pulsed power generators like the NRL GAMBLE II. A detailed report of the progress on IREX and LONGSHOT is given. (MOW)

  5. Intense Microsecond Electron Beam Interactions with Low-Pressure Gases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-02-28

    Diffusion in a Magnetic Cusp ", R.A. Bosch and R. M. Gilgenbach, Physics Letters A, 28. 437, (1988). 9) "Transport and Modulation of Relativistic...Graduate Students Receiving Support from this Contract 1) J. D. Miller 2) T. Repetti Postdoctoral Researchers Supported by This Contract 1) R.A. Bosch ...Electron Beams in UV Laser Induced Ion Channels," R. F. Lucey, R. M. Gilgenbach, J. D. Miller, J. E. Tucker, and R. A. Bosch , The Physics of Fluids B, 1

  6. Commissioning and first results of the Intense Beam EXperiment (IBEX) linear Paul trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehy, S. L.; Carr, E. J.; Martin, L. K.; Budzik, K.; Kelliher, D. J.; Machida, S.; Prior, C. R.

    2017-07-01

    The Intense Beam Experiment (IBEX) is a linear Paul trap designed to replicate the dynamics of intense particle beams in accelerators. Similar to the S-POD apparatus at Hiroshima University, IBEX is a small scale experiment which has been constructed and recently commissioned at the STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the UK. The aim of the experiment is to support theoretical studies of next-generation high intensity proton and ion accelerators, complementing existing computer simulation approaches. Here we report on the status of commissioning and first results obtained.

  7. Status and plans for recoil separators for experiments with intense stable beams from ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seweryniak, D.

    2013-12-01

    The Argonne fragment mass analyzer (FMA) has been a very important component of the experimental program at the ATLAS facility for many years and is expected to be a viable instrument for experiments with more intense beams which will become available when the ATLAS intensity upgrade is completed. Several upgrades of FMA itself and of the FMA detector suite in preparation for high-intensity beams will be presented. To accommodate experiments with extremely low cross sections, such as studies of super-heavy nuclei, construction of the Argonne gas-filled analyzer (AGFA), which will be complementary to FMA, was proposed. The design considerations for AGFA will be discussed.

  8. Cathode Plasma Formation in High Intensity Electron Beam Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Mark; Kiefer, Mark; Oliver, Bryan; Bennett, Nichelle; Droemer, Darryl; Bernshtam, V.; Doron, R.; Maron, Yitzhak

    2013-10-01

    This talk will detail the experimental results and conclusions obtained for cathode plasma formation on the Self-Magnetic Pinch (SMP) diode fielded on the RITS-6 accelerator (4-7.5 MeV) at Sandia National Laboratories. The SMP diode utilizes a hollowed metal cathode to produce high power (TW), focused electron beams (<3 mm diameter) which are used for flash x-ray radiography applications. Optical diagnostics include high speed (<10 ns) framing cameras, optical streak cameras, and spectroscopy. The cathode plasma in this high electric (MV/cm) and magnetic (>10 Tesla) field environment forms well-defined striations. These striations have been examined for a number of different cathode sizes, vacuum gap spacings, and diode voltages. Optical streak images have been taken to determine the time evolution of the plasma, and optical spectroscopy has been employed to determine its constituents as well as their densities and temperatures inferred from detailed time-dependent, collisional-radiative (CR) and radiation transport modelings. Comments will be made as to the overall effect of the cathode plasma in regards to the diode impedance and electron beam focusing. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  9. Hyperenergetic manned aerospacecraft propelled by intense pulsed microwave power beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myrabo, Leik N.

    1995-09-01

    The objective of this research was to exploit wireless power transmission (microwave/millimeter)--to lower manned space transportation costs by two or three orders of magnitude. Concepts have been developed for lightweight, mass-producible, beam-propelled aerospacecraft called Lightcraft. The vehicles are designed for a 'mass-poor, energy-rich' (i.e. hyper-energentic flight infrastructure which utilizes remote microwave power stations to build an energy-beam highway to space. Although growth in laser power levels has lagged behind expectations, microwave and millimeter-wave source technology now exists for rapid scaling to the megawatt and gigawatt time-average power levels. The design exercise focused on the engine, structure, and receptive optics requirements for a 15 meter diameter, 5 person Earth- to-moon aerospacecraft. Key elements in the airbreathing accelerator propulsion system are: a) a 'flight-weight' 35GHz rectenna electric powerplant, b) microwave-induced 'Air Spike' and perimeter air-plasma generators, and c) MagnetoHydroDynamic-Fanjet engine with its superconducting magnets and external electrodes.

  10. Space-charge limiting currents in magnetically focused intense relativistic beams with an ion channel

    SciTech Connect

    Li Jianqing; Mo Yuanlong

    2006-12-15

    The intense relativistic beam propagation through the drift tube filled with background plasma is investigated. The self-consistent differential equations, which describe the laminar-flow equilibria state in magnetically focused relativistic beams with an ion channel, are presented. By solving these equations using the Runge-Kutta method, the azimuthal velocity, the axial velocity, and the electron beam density, which are functions of radial position, can be calculated. Then the space-charge limiting current and the externally applied magnetic field can be obtained for solid beams and hollow beams. In the case of plasma fill, the axial velocity of the laminar flow is a nonuniform radial profile. The simulated results show that the background plasma can increase the space-charge limiting current, reduce the externally applied magnetic field, and improve the electron beam propagation through the drift tube.

  11. Approaches to develop targets for production of intense radioactive ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Talbert, W. L.; Drake, D. M.; Wilson, M. T.; Walker, J. J.; Lenz, J. W.

    1999-06-10

    Approaches to develop targets for production of intense radioactive ion beams (RIBs) have been evaluated over the past five years. It is acknowledged that many desired physics objectives using RIBs can be met only by using production beams of energetic protons with currents up to 100 {mu}A. Such beams can be made available at future spallation neutron facilities. The production targets will require active cooling to control operational temperatures due to internal heating caused by the production beam. A target concept has been selected, and calculational analyses of the target concept have been performed to guide the design of a prototype target for an in-beam test of the actual thermal behavior. For this test, a high-power test facility is needed; fortunately, the beam currents required exist at the TRIUMF accelerator facility. An experimental proposal has been approved for such a test.

  12. Gas Feeding System Supplying the U-400M Cyclotron Ion Source with Hydrogen Isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Yukhimchuk, A.A.; Angilopov, V.V.; Apasov, V.A.

    2005-07-15

    Automated system feeding into ion source hydrogen isotopes as molecules with preset ratio of the fluxes is described. The control system automatically maintained the working parameters and provided graphic and digital representation of the controlled processes. The radiofrequency (RF) ion source installed at the axial injection line of the cyclotron produced ion beams of HD{sup +}, HT{sup +}, DT{sup +}, D{sub 2}H{sup +}, etc. At a several months DT{sup +} beam acceleration the tritium consumption was less than 108 Bq/hr. The intensity of a 58.2 MeV triton beam (T{sup +} ions) extracted from the cyclotron chamber was about 10 nA.

  13. Non-coplanar beam direction optimization for intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meedt, G.; Alber, M.; Nüsslin, F.

    2003-09-01

    An algorithm for the optimization of the direction of intensity-modulated beams is presented. Although the global optimum dose distribution cannot be predicted, usually a large number of equivalent beam configurations exists. This degeneracy facilitates beam direction optimization (BDO) through a number of possible approximations and because the target set of good beam configurations is very large. Usually, the target volume is accessible through a finite number of paths of little resistance, which are defined by the properties of the objective function and the global optimum dose distribution. Since these paths can be occupied by a finite number of beams, it is reasonable to assume that a minimum number of beams for a configuration that is degenerate to the global optimum exists. Efficiency of the BDO will be characterized by detecting this degeneracy threshold. Beam configurations are altered by adding and deleting beams. A fast exhaustive (up to 3500 non-coplanar orientations) search finds beam directions that improve a configuration. Redundant beams of a configuration can be identified by a fast criterion based on second-order derivative information of the objective function. This offers a fast means of iteratively substituting redundant beams from a configuration. Inferior stationary states can be evaded by adding more beams than the desired number to the current configuration, followed by the subsequent cancellation of superfluous beams. The significance of BDO is examined in a coplanar and a non-coplanar test case. The existence of a threshold number for the minimum configuration and its dependence on the complexity of the problem are shown. BDO outperforms manual configurations and equispaced coplanar beam arrangements in both example cases.

  14. Energy Loss of High Intensity Focused Proton Beams Penetrating Metal Foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuffey, C.; Qiao, B.; Kim, J.; Beg, F. N.; Wei, M. S.; Evans, M.; Fitzsimmons, P.; Stephens, R. B.; Chen, S. N.; Fuchs, J.; Nilson, P. M.; Canning, D.; Mastrosimone, D.; Foord, M. E.

    2014-10-01

    Shortpulse-laser-driven intense ion beams are appealing for applications in probing and creating high energy density plasmas. Such a beam isochorically heats and rapidly ionizes any target it enters into warm dense matter with uncertain transport and stopping properties. Here we present experimental measurements taken with the 1.25 kJ, 10 ps OMEGA EP BL shortpulse laser of the proton and carbon spectra after passing through metal foils. The laser irradiated spherically curved C targets with intensity 4×1018 W/cm2, producing proton beams with 3 MeV slope temperature and a sharp low energy cutoff at 5 MeV which has not been observed on lower energy, shorter pulse intense lasers. The beam either diverged freely or was focused to estimated 1016 p +/cm2 ps by a surrounding structure before entering the metal foils (Al or Ag and a Cu tracer layer). The proton and ion spectra were altered by the foil depending on material and whether or not the beam was focused. Transverse proton radiography probed the target with ps temporal and 10 micron spatial resolution, indicating an electrostatic field on the foil may also have affected the beam. We present complementary particle-in-cell simulations of the beam generation and transport to the foils. This work was supported by the DOE/NNSA National Laser User Facility program, Contract DE-SC0001265.

  15. Intense electron beam application for flue gas treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Chmielewski, A.G.; Zimek, Z.; Iller, E.; Tyminski, B.; Licki, J.

    1997-12-31

    Systematic work concerning electron beam flue gas treatment process upscaling has been performed at the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology since 1986. Laboratory unit with gas flow 400 Nm{sup 3}/h has been constructed. An industrial plant with gas flow 20,000 Nm{sup 3}/h (two accelerators 50 kW, 0.8 MeV) has been built at EPS Kaweczyn. Finally design of 270,000 Nm{sup 3}/h industrial plant (four accelerators 300 kW, 0.8 MeV) to be built at EPS Pomorzany has been prepared. Several new solutions mostly leading to power consumption reduction were introduced. The longitudinal, double gas irradiation was applied among them. The technical-economical analysis proved that process is very competitive with conventional technologies widely used for flue gas purification.

  16. Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Jongen, Y.

    1984-05-01

    Starting with the pioneering work of R. Geller and his group in Grenoble (France), at least 14 ECR sources have been built and tested during the last five years. Most of those sources have been extremely successful, providing intense, stable and reliable beams of highly charged ions for cyclotron injection or atomic physics research. However, some of the operational features of those sources disagreed with commonly accepted theories on ECR source operation. To explain the observed behavior of actual sources, it was found necessary to refine some of the crude ideas we had about ECR sources. Some of those new propositions are explained, and used to make some extrapolations on the possible future developments in ECR sources.

  17. Laser-driven beam lines for delivering intensity modulated radiation therapy with particle beams

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Kerstin M; Schell, Stefan; Wilkens, Jan J

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Laser-accelerated particles are a promising option for radiation therapy of cancer by potentially combining a compact, cost-efficient treatment unit with the physical advantages of charged particle beams. To design such a treatment unit we consider different dose delivery schemes and analyze the necessary devices in the required particle beam line for each case. Furthermore, we point out that laser-driven treatment units may be ideal tools for motion adaptation during radiotherapy. Reasons for this are the potential of a flexible gantry and the time structure of the beam with high particle numbers in ultrashort bunches. One challenge that needs to be addressed is the secondary radiation produced in several beam line elements. (© 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim) PMID:22930653

  18. Laser-driven beam lines for delivering intensity modulated radiation therapy with particle beams.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Kerstin M; Schell, Stefan; Wilkens, Jan J

    2012-11-01

    Laser-accelerated particles are a promising option for radiation therapy of cancer by potentially combining a compact, cost-efficient treatment unit with the physical advantages of charged particle beams. To design such a treatment unit we consider different dose delivery schemes and analyze the necessary devices in the required particle beam line for each case. Furthermore, we point out that laser-driven treatment units may be ideal tools for motion adaptation during radiotherapy. Reasons for this are the potential of a flexible gantry and the time structure of the beam with high particle numbers in ultrashort bunches. One challenge that needs to be addressed is the secondary radiation produced in several beam line elements.

  19. Laser-driven beam lines for delivering intensity modulated radiation therapy with particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, K. M.; Schell, S.; Wilkens, J. J.

    2013-07-26

    Laser-accelerated particles can provide a promising opportunity for radiation therapy of cancer. Potential advantages arise from combining a compact, cost-efficient treatment unit with the physical advantages in dose delivery of charged particle beams. We consider different dose delivery schemes and the required devices to design a possible treatment unit. The secondary radiation produced in several beam line elements remains a challenge to be addressed.

  20. Laser-driven beam lines for delivering intensity modulated radiation therapy with particle beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, K. M.; Schell, S.; Wilkens, J. J.

    2013-07-01

    Laser-accelerated particles can provide a promising opportunity for radiation therapy of cancer. Potential advantages arise from combining a compact, cost-efficient treatment unit with the physical advantages in dose delivery of charged particle beams. We consider different dose delivery schemes and the required devices to design a possible treatment unit. The secondary radiation produced in several beam line elements remains a challenge to be addressed.

  1. Modulation of spectral intensity, polarization and coherence of a stochastic electromagnetic beam.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gaofeng; Cai, Yangjian

    2011-04-25

    Analytical formula for the cross-spectral density matrix of a stochastic electromagnetic Gaussian Schell-model (EGSM) beam truncated by a circular phase aperture propagating in free space is derived with the help of a tensor method, which provides a reliable and fast way for studying the propagation and transformation of a truncated EGSM beam. Statistics properties, such as the spectral intensity, the degree of coherence, the degree of polarization and the polarization ellipse of a truncated EGSM beam in free space are studied numerically. The propagation factor of a truncated EGSM beam is also analyzed. Our numerical results show that we can modulate the spectral intensity, the polarization, the coherence and the propagation factor of an EGSM beam by a circular phase aperture. It is found that the phase aperture can be used to shape the beam profile of an EGSM beam and generate electromagnetic partially coherent dark hollow or flat-topped beam, which is useful in some applications, such as optical trapping, material processing, free-space optical communications.

  2. INJECTION ACCELERATION AND EXTRACTION OF HIGH INTENSITY PROTON BEAM FOR THE NEUTRINO FACILITY PROJECT AT BNL.

    SciTech Connect

    Tsoupas, N; Barton, D; Ganetis, G; Jain, A; Lee, Y; Marneris, I; Meng, W; Raparia, D; Roser, T; Ruggiero, A; Tuozzolo, J; Wanderer, P; Weng, W

    2003-05-12

    The proposed ''neutrino-production'' project [1.2] to be built at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) requires that the neutrino-production target be bombarded by a high intensity proton beam-pulse of {approx} 90 x 10{sup 12} protons of 28 GeV in energy and at a rate of 2.5 Hz, resulting in a 1 MW power of proton beam deposited on the target for the production of the neutrinos. In this paper we investigate the possibility of producing this high intensity proton beam, using as the main accelerator the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The following aspects of the project are reported in this paper: (a) The beam injection into the AGS synchrotron of 1.2 GeV H{sup -} beam produced by a super-conducting LINAC[3]; (b) The effect of the eddy currents induced on the vacuum chamber of the circulating beam during the ''ramping'' of the main magnets of the AGS; (c) The method of the beam extraction from the AGS and the optics of the 28 GeV beam extracted from the AGS.

  3. Phase-contrast tomography with low-intensity beams

    SciTech Connect

    Rehacek, J.; Hradil, Z.; Zawisky, M.; Dubus, F.; Bonse, U.

    2005-02-01

    In newly developed neutron phase tomography, wave properties of neutrons are exploited for the nondestructive testing of the internal structure of matter. We show how limitations due to small available intensities of present neutron sources can be overcome by using an advanced maximum-likelihood reconstruction algorithm. Unlike the standard filtered back-projection, the developed procedure gives reasonable results also when used on very noisy data or data consisting of only a few measured projections. This is demonstrated by means of simulations and also experimentally. The proposed method leads to considerably shorter measuring times and/or increased precision.

  4. Soft x-ray intensity profile measurements of electron cyclotron heated plasmas using semiconductor detector arrays in GAMMA 10 tandem mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Minami, R. Imai, T.; Kariya, T.; Numakura, T.; Eguchi, T.; Kawarasaki, R.; Nakazawa, K.; Kato, T.; Sato, F.; Nanzai, H.; Uehara, M.; Endo, Y.; Ichimura, M.

    2014-11-15

    Temporally and spatially resolved soft x-ray analyses of electron cyclotron heated plasmas are carried out by using semiconductor detector arrays in the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror. The detector array has 16-channel for the measurements of plasma x-ray profiles so as to make x-ray tomographic reconstructions. The characteristics of the detector array make it possible to obtain spatially resolved plasma electron temperatures down to a few tens eV and investigate various magnetohydrodynamic activities. High power electron cyclotron heating experiment for the central-cell region in GAMMA 10 has been started in order to reduce the electron drag by increasing the electron temperature.

  5. Soft x-ray intensity profile measurements of electron cyclotron heated plasmas using semiconductor detector arrays in GAMMA 10 tandem mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minami, R.; Imai, T.; Kariya, T.; Numakura, T.; Eguchi, T.; Kawarasaki, R.; Nakazawa, K.; Kato, T.; Sato, F.; Nanzai, H.; Uehara, M.; Endo, Y.; Ichimura, M.

    2014-11-01

    Temporally and spatially resolved soft x-ray analyses of electron cyclotron heated plasmas are carried out by using semiconductor detector arrays in the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror. The detector array has 16-channel for the measurements of plasma x-ray profiles so as to make x-ray tomographic reconstructions. The characteristics of the detector array make it possible to obtain spatially resolved plasma electron temperatures down to a few tens eV and investigate various magnetohydrodynamic activities. High power electron cyclotron heating experiment for the central-cell region in GAMMA 10 has been started in order to reduce the electron drag by increasing the electron temperature.

  6. A compound detector array for the measurement of large area laser beam intensity distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fei; Xie, Yongjie; Ji, Yunfeng; Duan, Liuhua; Ye, Xisheng

    2013-05-01

    A synthesis of the calorimetric and photoelectric method on the high energy laser beams measurement is presented. Data fusion of the two kinds of detector units is achieved with real-time scaling onsite. A set of compound diagnostic system is developed for the large area laser beam intensity distribution measurement, which is mainly composed of 256 calorimetric detectors, 120 photoelectric detectors, multi-channel data sampling module and one central processing computer. The total energy of the laser beam is accurately measured with calorimetric detectors, and the spatial intensity distribution with high temporal resolution is given by the photoelectric detectors. With the merits of energy accuracy and the temporal resolution based on the two kinds of detector units, the compound diagnostic system can be used to measure accurately the far-field temporal and spatial distribution of high energy laser beams.

  7. Improvement of beam emittance of the CEA high intensity proton source SILHI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobin, R.; Beauvais, P.-Y.; Ferdinand, R.; Leroy, P.-A.; Celona, L.; Ciavola, G.; Gammino, S.

    1999-06-01

    The emittance of the intense proton beam extracted by the source SILHI at Commisariat à l'Energie Atomique (CEA)-Saclay is a key parameter for the design of the IPHI Project RFQ. This parameter has a relevant role even for the design of an intense proton source for the TRASCO project of Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN). The tests performed in the framework of CEA-INFN collaboration have been mainly devoted to a 75 mA beam emittance investigation injecting different gases in the beam line. The results show that the rms normalized emittance decreases up to a factor 3 while the beam losses induced by recombination are contained within 5%. Normalized emittance in r-r' plane of about 0.1 π min mrad have been obtained using Ar and Kr.

  8. Physics of Neutralization of Intense High-Energy Ion Beam Pulses by Electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganovich, I. D.; Davidson, R. C.; Dorf, M. A.; Startsev, E. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Lee, E. P.; Friedman, A.

    2010-04-28

    Neutralization and focusing of intense charged particle beam pulses by electrons forms the basis for a wide range of applications to high energy accelerators and colliders, heavy ion fusion, and astrophysics. For example, for ballistic propagation of intense ion beam pulses, background plasma can be used to effectively neutralize the beam charge and current, so that the self-electric and self- magnetic fields do not affect the ballistic propagation of the beam. From the practical perspective of designing advanced plasma sources for beam neutralization, a robust theory should be able to predict the self-electric and self-magnetic fields during beam propagation through the background plasma. The major scaling relations for the self-electric and self-magnetic fields of intense ion charge bunches propagating through background plasma have been determined taking into account the effects of transients during beam entry into the plasma, the excitation of collective plasma waves, the effects of gas ionization, finite electron temperature, and applied solenoidal and dipole magnetic fields. Accounting for plasma production by gas ionization yields a larger self-magnetic field of the ion beam compared to the case without ionization, and a wake of current density and self-magnetic field perturbations is generated behind the beam pulse. A solenoidal magnetic field can be applied for controlling the beam propagation. Making use of theoretical models and advanced numerical simulations, it is shown that even a small applied magnetic field of about 100G can strongly affect the beam neutralization. It has also been demonstrated that in the presence of an applied magnetic field the ion beam pulse can excite large-amplitude whistler waves, thereby producing a complex structure of self-electric and self-magnetic fields. The presence of an applied solenoidal magnetic field may also cause a strong enhancement of the radial self-electric field of the beam pulse propagating through the

  9. Physics of neutralization of intense high-energy ion beam pulses by electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganovich, I. D.; Davidson, R. C.; Dorf, M. A.; Startsev, E. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Lee, E. P.; Friedman, A.

    2010-05-15

    Neutralization and focusing of intense charged particle beam pulses by electrons form the basis for a wide range of applications to high energy accelerators and colliders, heavy ion fusion, and astrophysics. For example, for ballistic propagation of intense ion beam pulses, background plasma can be used to effectively neutralize the beam charge and current, so that the self-electric and self-magnetic fields do not affect the ballistic propagation of the beam. From the practical perspective of designing advanced plasma sources for beam neutralization, a robust theory should be able to predict the self-electric and self-magnetic fields during beam propagation through the background plasma. The major scaling relations for the self-electric and self-magnetic fields of intense ion charge bunches propagating through background plasma have been determined taking into account the effects of transients during beam entry into the plasma, the excitation of collective plasma waves, the effects of gas ionization, finite electron temperature, and applied solenoidal and dipole magnetic fields. Accounting for plasma production by gas ionization yields a larger self-magnetic field of the ion beam compared to the case without ionization, and a wake of current density and self-magnetic field perturbations is generated behind the beam pulse. A solenoidal magnetic field can be applied for controlling the beam propagation. Making use of theoretical models and advanced numerical simulations, it is shown that even a small applied magnetic field of about 100 G can strongly affect the beam neutralization. It has also been demonstrated that in the presence of an applied magnetic field the ion beam pulse can excite large-amplitude whistler waves, thereby producing a complex structure of self-electric and self-magnetic fields. The presence of an applied solenoidal magnetic field may also cause a strong enhancement of the radial self-electric field of the beam pulse propagating through the

  10. Physics of Neutralization of Intense Charged Particle Beam Pulses by a Background Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganovich, I.D.; Davidson, R.C.; Dorf, M.A.; Startsev, E.A.; Sefkow, A.B; Friedman, A.F.; Lee, E.P.

    2009-09-03

    Neutralization and focusing of intense charged particle beam pulses by a background plasma forms the basis for a wide range of applications to high energy accelerators and colliders, heavy ion fusion, and astrophysics. For example, for ballistic propagation of intense ion beam pulses, background plasma can be used to effectively neutralize the beam charge and current, so that the self-electric and self-magnetic fields do not affect the ballistic propagation of the beam. From the practical perspective of designing advanced plasma sources for beam neutralization, a robust theory should be able to predict the self-electric and self-magnetic fields during beam propagation through the background plasma. The major scaling relations for the self-electric and self-magnetic fields of intense ion charge bunches propagating through background plasma have been determined taking into account the effects of transients during beam entry into the plasma, the excitation of collective plasma waves, the effects of gas ionization, finite electron temperature, and applied solenoidal and dipole magnetic fields. Accounting for plasma production by gas ionization yields a larger self-magnetic field of the ion beam compared to the case without ionization, and a wake of current density and self-magnetic field perturbations is generated behind the beam pulse. A solenoidal magnetic field can be applied for controlling the beam propagation. Making use of theoretical models and advanced numerical simulations, it is shown that even a small applied magnetic field of about 100G can strongly affect the beam neutralization. It has also been demonstrated that in the presence of an applied magnetic field the ion beam pulse can excite large-amplitude whistler waves, thereby producing a complex structure of self-electric and self-magnetic fields. The presence of an applied solenoidal magnetic field may also cause a strong enhancement of the radial self-electric field of the beam pulse propagating

  11. Nonlinear delta(f) Simulations of Collective Effects in Intense Charged Particle Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Hong Qin

    2003-01-21

    A nonlinear delta(f) particle simulation method based on the Vlasov-Maxwell equations has been recently developed to study collective processes in high-intensity beams, where space-charge and magnetic self-field effects play a critical role in determining the nonlinear beam dynamics. Implemented in the Beam Equilibrium, Stability and Transport (BEST) code [H. Qin, R.C. Davidson, and W.W. Lee, Physical Review -- Special Topics on Accelerator and Beams 3 (2000) 084401; 3 (2000) 109901.], the nonlinear delta(f) method provides a low-noise and self-consistent tool for simulating collective interactions and nonlinear dynamics of high-intensity beams in modern and next-generation accelerators and storage rings, such as the Spallation Neutron Source and heavy ion fusion drivers. A wide range of linear eigenmodes of high-intensity charged-particle beams can be systematically studied using the BEST code. Simulation results for the electron-proton two-stream instability in the Proton Storage Ring experiment [R. Macek, et al., in Proc. of the Particle Accelerator Conference, Chicago, 2001 (IEEE, Piscataway, NJ, 2001), Vol. 1, p. 688.] at the Los Alamos National Laboratory agree well with experimental observations. Large-scale parallel simulations have also been carried out for the ion-electron two-stream instability in the very-high-intensity heavy ion beams envisioned for heavy ion fusion applications. In both cases, the simulation results indicate that the dominant two-stream instability has a dipole-mode (hose-like) structure and can be stabilized by a modest axial momentum spread of the beam particles.

  12. High-intensity ion sources for accelerators with emphasis on H- beam formation and transport (invited)a)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, R.

    2010-02-01

    This paper lays out the fundamental working principles of a variety of high-current ion sources for accelerators in a tutorial manner, and gives examples of specific source types such as dc discharge-driven and rf-driven multicusp sources, Penning-type, and electron cyclotron resonance-based sources while discussing those principles, pointing out general performance limits as well as the performance parameters of specific sources. Laser-based, two-chamber, and surface-ionization sources are briefly mentioned. Main aspects of this review are particle feed, ionization mechanism, beam formation, and beam transport. Issues seen with beam formation and low-energy transport of negative hydrogen-ion beams are treated in detail.

  13. Polymer electrolyte fuel cell performance degradation at different synchrotron beam intensities.

    PubMed

    Eller, Jens; Büchi, Felix N

    2014-01-01

    The degradation of cell performance of polymer electrolyte fuel cells under monochromatic X-ray irradiation at 13.5 keV was studied in galvanostatic and potentiostatic operation modes in a through-plane imaging direction over a range of two orders of magnitude beam intensity at the TOMCAT beamline of the Swiss Light Source. The performance degradation was found to be a function of X-ray dose and independent of beam intensity, whereas the degradation rate correlates with beam intensity. The cell performance was more sensitive to X-ray irradiation at higher temperature and gas feed humidity. High-frequency resistance measurements and the analysis of product water allow conclusions to be drawn on the dominating degradation processes, namely change of hydrophobicity of the electrode and sulfate contamination of the electrocatalyst.

  14. Intial characterization fo a commerical electron gun for profiling high intensity proton beams in Project X

    SciTech Connect

    Thurman-Keup, R.; Johnson, A.S.; Lumpkin, A.H.; Thangaraj, J.C.T.; Zhang, D.; Blokland, W.; /Oak Ridge

    2011-03-01

    Measuring the profile of a high-intensity proton beam is problematic in that traditional invasive techniques such as flying wires don't survive the encounter with the beam. One alternative is the use of an electron beam as a probe of the charge distribution in the proton beam as was done at the Spallation Neutron Source at ORNL. Here we present an initial characterization of the beam from a commercial electron gun from Kimball Physics, intended for use in the Fermilab Main Injector for Project X. Despite the fact that the horizontal spot size is abnormally large in the high current measurement, the spot size at the downstream cross X2 is reasonable in the context of measuring the deflection. A thin foil OTR would help with the beam heating and should be tried. The next phase of this experiment is to simulate the proton beam with a pair of current carrying wires and to design and construct a fast deflector. Some of the remaining issues to be considered include determining the minimum beam current needed to observe the deflected beam for a given sweep time and the impact of longitudinal variations in the charge density of the bunch.

  15. Ion cyclotron resonance cell

    DOEpatents

    Weller, R.R.

    1995-02-14

    An ion cyclotron resonance cell is disclosed having two adjacent sections separated by a center trapping plate. The first section is defined by the center trapping plate, a first end trapping plate, and excitation and detector electrodes. The second section includes a second end trapping plate spaced apart from the center plate, a mirror, and an analyzer. The analyzer includes a wavelength-selective light detector, such as a detector incorporating an acousto-optical device (AOD) and a photodetector. One or more ion guides, grounded plates with holes for the ion beam, are positioned within the vacuum chamber of the mass spectrometer between the ion source and the cell. After ions are trapped and analyzed by ion cyclotron resonance techniques in the first section, the ions of interest are selected according to their mass and passed into the second section for optical spectroscopic studies. The trapped ions are excited by light from a laser and caused thereby to fluoresce. The fluorescent light emitted by the excited ions is reflected by the mirror and directed onto the detector. The AOD is scanned, and the photodetector output is recorded and analyzed. The ions remain in the second section for an extended period, enabling multiple studies to be carried out on the same ensemble of ions. 5 figs.

  16. Ion cyclotron resonance cell

    DOEpatents

    Weller, Robert R.

    1995-01-01

    An ion cyclotron resonance cell having two adjacent sections separated by a center trapping plate. The first section is defined by the center trapping plate, a first end trapping plate, and excitation and detector electrodes. The second section includes a second end trapping plate spaced apart from the center plate, a mirror, and an analyzer. The analyzer includes a wavelength-selective light detector, such as a detector incorporating an acousto-optical device (AOD) and a photodetector. One or more ion guides, grounded plates with holes for the ion beam, are positioned within the vacuum chamber of the mass spectrometer between the ion source and the cell. After ions are trapped and analyzed by ion cyclotron resonance techniques in the first section, the ions of interest are selected according to their mass and passed into the second section for optical spectroscopic studies. The trapped ions are excited by light from a laser and caused thereby to fluoresce. The fluorescent light emitted by the excited ions is reflected by the mirror and directed onto the detector. The AOD is scanned, and the photodetector output is recorded and analyzed. The ions remain in the second section for an extended period, enabling multiple studies to be carried out on the same ensemble of ions.

  17. The SPIRAL2 Project and experiments with high-intensity rare isotope beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewitowicz, Marek

    2011-09-01

    The SPIRAL2 facility at GANIL, which entered recently in the construction phase consists of a new superconducting linear accelerator delivering high intensity, up to 40 MeV, light (proton, deuteron, 3-4He) beams as well as a large variety of 14.5 MeV/nucleon heavy-ion beams and the associated Rare Isotope Beam facility. Using a dedicated converter and the 5 mA deuteron beam, a neutron-induced fission rate is expected to approach 1014 fissions/s for high-density UCx target. The energies of accelerated RIBs will reach 5-10 MeV/nucleon for fission fragments and 20 MeV/nucleon for neutron-deficient nuclei. The physics case of SPIRAL2 is based on the use of high intensity RIBs & stable-ion beams and on possibilities to perform several experiments simultaneously. A use of these beams at a new low-energy ISOL facility (DESIR) and their acceleration to several MeV/nucleon will open new possibilities in nuclear structure physics, nuclear astrophysics and reaction dynamics studies. The high intensities (up to 1011pps) and a high cost of RIBs impose a use of the most efficient and innovative detection systems like ACTAR, FAZIA, GASPARD, HELIOS, NEDA, PARIS and a new separator/spectrometer S3.

  18. Optimized treatment planning using intensity and energy modulated proton and very-high energy electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeboah, Collins

    2002-09-01

    Intensity and energy modulated radiotherapy dose planning with protons and very-high energy (50--250 MeV) electron beams has been investigated. A general-purpose inverse treatment planning (ITP) system that can be applied to any combination of proton, electron and photon radiation modalities in therapy has been developed. The new ITP program uses a very fast proton dose calculation engine and employs one of the most efficient optimization algorithms currently available. First, the ITP program was employed to investigate intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) dose optimization for prostate cancer. The second application was to evaluate the potential of intensity-modulated very-high energy electron therapy (VHEET) for dose conformation. For an active proton beam delivery system the required energy resolution to reasonably implement energy modulation was found to be a function of the incident beams' energy spread and became coarser with increasing energy spread. For passive proton beam delivery systems the selection of the required depth resolution for inverse planning may not be critical as long as the depth resolution chosen is at least equal to FWHM/2 of the primary beam Bragg peak. In the study of the number of beam ports selected for IMPT treatment of the prostate, it was found that a maximum of three to four beams is required. Using proton beams for inverse planning of the prostate instead of photon beams gave the same or better target coverage while reducing the sensitive structure dose and normal tissue integral dose by up to 30% and 28% of the prescribed target dose, respectively. In evaluating the potential of VHEET beams for dose conformation, it was found that electron energies greater than 100 MeV are preferable for VHEET treatment of the prostate and that implementation of energy modulation in addition to intensity modulation has only a modest effect on the final dose distribution. VHEET treatment employing approximately nine beams was sufficient to

  19. Self-consistent simulation studies of periodically focused intense charged-particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.; Jameson, R.A.

    1995-09-01

    A self-consistent two-dimensional model is used to investigate intense charged-particle beam propagation through a periodic solenoidal focusing channel, particularly in the regime in which there is a mismatch between the beam and the focusing channel. The present self-consistent studies confirm that mismatched beams exhibit nonlinear resonances and chaotic behavior in the envelope evolution, as predicted by an earlier envelope analysis [C. Chen and R. C. Davidson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 72, 2195 (1994)]. Transient effects due to emittance growth are studied, and halo formation is investigated. The halo size is estimated. The halo characteristics for a periodic focusing channel are found to be qualitatively the same as those for a uniform focusing channel. A threshold condition is obtained numerically for halo formation in mismatched beams in a uniform focusing channel, which indicates that relative envelope mismatch must be kept well below 20% to prevent space-charge-dominated beams from developing halos.

  20. A mask for high-intensity heavy-ion beams in the MAYA active target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Tajes, C.; Pancin, J.; Damoy, S.; Roger, T.; Babo, M.; Caamaño, M.; Farget, F.; Grinyer, G. F.; Jacquot, B.; Pérez-Loureiro, D.; Ramos, D.; Suzuki, D.

    2014-12-01

    The use of high-intensity and/or heavy-ion beams in active targets and time-projection chambers is often limited by the strong ionization produced by the beam. Besides the difficulties associated with the saturation of the detector and electronics, beam-related signals may hide the physical events of interest or reduce the detector performance. In addition, space-charge effects may deteriorate the homogeneity of the electric drift field and distort the subsequent reconstruction of particle trajectories. In anticipation of future projects involving such conditions, a dedicated beam mask has been developed and tested in the MAYA active target. Experimental results with a 136Xe beam are presented.