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Sample records for cyclotron resonance molecular

  1. Production of molecular ion beams using an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Draganić, I. N.; Bannister, M. E.; Meyer, F. W.; Vane, C. R.; Havener, C. C.

    2011-06-01

    An all-permanent magnet electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source is tuned to create a variety of intense molecular ion beams for basic energy research. Based on simultaneous injection of several gases with spectroscopic high purity or enriched isotope content (e.g., H2, D2, N2, O2, or CO) and lower power microwave heating, the ECR ion source produces diatomic molecular ion beams of H2+, D2+, HD+, HO+, DO+, NH+, ND+, and more complex polyatomic molecular ions such as H3+, D3+, HD2+, H2O+, D2O+, H3O+, D3O+, and NHn+, NDn+ with n=2,3,4 and possibly higher. Molecular ion beams have been produced with very high current intensities compared to other molecular beam sources. The recorded molecular ion beam spectra are discussed.

  2. Ion cyclotron resonance cell

    DOEpatents

    Weller, R.R.

    1995-02-14

    An ion cyclotron resonance cell is disclosed having two adjacent sections separated by a center trapping plate. The first section is defined by the center trapping plate, a first end trapping plate, and excitation and detector electrodes. The second section includes a second end trapping plate spaced apart from the center plate, a mirror, and an analyzer. The analyzer includes a wavelength-selective light detector, such as a detector incorporating an acousto-optical device (AOD) and a photodetector. One or more ion guides, grounded plates with holes for the ion beam, are positioned within the vacuum chamber of the mass spectrometer between the ion source and the cell. After ions are trapped and analyzed by ion cyclotron resonance techniques in the first section, the ions of interest are selected according to their mass and passed into the second section for optical spectroscopic studies. The trapped ions are excited by light from a laser and caused thereby to fluoresce. The fluorescent light emitted by the excited ions is reflected by the mirror and directed onto the detector. The AOD is scanned, and the photodetector output is recorded and analyzed. The ions remain in the second section for an extended period, enabling multiple studies to be carried out on the same ensemble of ions. 5 figs.

  3. Ion cyclotron resonance cell

    DOEpatents

    Weller, Robert R.

    1995-01-01

    An ion cyclotron resonance cell having two adjacent sections separated by a center trapping plate. The first section is defined by the center trapping plate, a first end trapping plate, and excitation and detector electrodes. The second section includes a second end trapping plate spaced apart from the center plate, a mirror, and an analyzer. The analyzer includes a wavelength-selective light detector, such as a detector incorporating an acousto-optical device (AOD) and a photodetector. One or more ion guides, grounded plates with holes for the ion beam, are positioned within the vacuum chamber of the mass spectrometer between the ion source and the cell. After ions are trapped and analyzed by ion cyclotron resonance techniques in the first section, the ions of interest are selected according to their mass and passed into the second section for optical spectroscopic studies. The trapped ions are excited by light from a laser and caused thereby to fluoresce. The fluorescent light emitted by the excited ions is reflected by the mirror and directed onto the detector. The AOD is scanned, and the photodetector output is recorded and analyzed. The ions remain in the second section for an extended period, enabling multiple studies to be carried out on the same ensemble of ions.

  4. Cyclotron resonance in epitaxial Bi1-xSbx films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heremans, J.; Partin, D. L.; Thrush, C. M.; Karczewski, G.; Richardson, M. S.; Furdyna, J. K.

    1993-10-01

    The far-infrared magnetotransmission of thin films of semiconducting and semimetallic Bi1-xSbx alloys grown by molecular-beam epitaxy has been measured at fixed photon energies between 2.5 and 21.4 meV in magnetic fields up to 6 T, at T=1.8 K. The samples, grown on BaF2 substrates with composition 0<=x<=22.5%, were monocrystalline, with the trigonal axis perpendicular to the surface plane. The measurements were carried out in Faraday and Voigt geometries, with the magnetic field oriented parallel to binary, bisectrix, and trigonal axes of the films. Cyclotron-resonance lines of both electrons and holes were observed. From them, we establish the composition dependence of the effective-mass tensor, of the direct L-point band gap, and of the energy overlap in the semimetallic samples. We conclude that all band-structure parameters are the same in the films as in bulk Bi1-xSbx alloys, except for the energy overlap, which is increased by 16 meV independently of composition, possibly because of the strain induced by the substrate.

  5. Helium cyclotron resonance within the earth's magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Mauk, B.H.; McIlwain, C.E.; McPherron, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    A histogram of electromagnetic Alfven/ion cyclotron wave frequencies, sampled within the geostationary enviroment and normalized by the equatorial proton cyclotron frequency, shows a dramatic gap centered near the helium (He/sup +/) cyclotron frequency. Also, strongly cyclotron phase bunched helium ions (20--200 eV) have been observed directly within the vicinity of wave environments. These observations are interpreted as resulting from the absorption of the waves through cyclotron resonance by cool ambient populations of helium ions.

  6. Weathering trend characterization of medium-molecular weight polycyclic aromatic disulfur heterocycles by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hegazi, Abdelrahman H; Fathalla, Eiman M; Andersson, Jan T

    2014-09-01

    Different weathering factors act to change petroleum composition once it is spilled into the environment. n-Alkanes, biomarkers, low-molecular weight polyaromatic hydrocarbons and sulfur heterocycles compositional changing in the environment have been extensively studied by different researchers and many parameters have been used for oil source identification and monitoring of weathering and biological degradation processes. In this work, we studied the fate of medium-molecular weight polycyclic aromatic disulfur heterocycles (PAS2Hs), up to ca. 900Da, of artificially weathered Flotta North Sea crude oil by ultra high-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. It was found that PAS2Hs in studied crude oil having double bond equivalents (DBE) from 5 to 8 with a mass range from ca 316 to 582Da were less influenced even after six months artificial weathering experiment. However, compounds having DBEs 12, 11 and 10 were depleted after two, four and six months weathering, respectively. In addition, DBE 9 series was more susceptible to weathering than those of DBE 7 and 8. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Photoconducting ultraviolet detectors based on GaN films grown by electron cyclotron resonance molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, M.; Shah, K.S.; Moustakas, T.D.; Vaudo, R.P.; Singh, R.

    1995-08-01

    We report for the first time, fabrication of photoconducting UV detectors made from GaN films grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Semi-instilating GaN films were grown by the method of electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (ECR-MBE). Photoconductive devices with interdigitated electrodes were fabricated and their photoconducting properties were investigated. In this paper we report on the performance of the detectors in terms of UV responsivity, gain-quantum efficiency product, spectral response and response time. We have measured responsivity of 125A/W and gain-quantum efficiency product of 600 at 254nm and 25V. The response time was measured to be on the order of 20ns for our detectors, corresponding to a bandwidth of 25Mhz. The spectral response showed a sharp long-wavelength cutoff at 365nm, and remained constant in the 200nm to 365nm range. The response of the detectors to low-energy x-rays was measured and found to be linear for x-rays with energies ranging from 60kVp to 90kVp.

  8. Electron cyclotron resonance plasma photosa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rácz, R.; Biri, S.; Pálinkás, J.

    2010-02-01

    In order to observe and study systematically the plasma of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources (ECRIS) we made a high number of high-resolution visible light plasma photos and movies in the ATOMKI ECRIS Laboratory. This required building the ECR ion source into an open ECR plasma device, temporarily. An 8MP digital camera was used to record photos of plasmas made from Ne, Ar, and Kr gases and from their mixtures. We studied and recorded the effect of ion source setting parameters (gas pressure, gas composition, magnetic field, and microwave power) to the shape, color, and structure of the plasma. The analysis of the photo series gave us many qualitative and numerous valuable physical information on the nature of ECR plasmas.

  9. Electron cyclotron resonance plasma photos.

    PubMed

    Rácz, R; Biri, S; Pálinkás, J

    2010-02-01

    In order to observe and study systematically the plasma of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources (ECRIS) we made a high number of high-resolution visible light plasma photos and movies in the ATOMKI ECRIS Laboratory. This required building the ECR ion source into an open ECR plasma device, temporarily. An 8MP digital camera was used to record photos of plasmas made from Ne, Ar, and Kr gases and from their mixtures. We studied and recorded the effect of ion source setting parameters (gas pressure, gas composition, magnetic field, and microwave power) to the shape, color, and structure of the plasma. The analysis of the photo series gave us many qualitative and numerous valuable physical information on the nature of ECR plasmas.

  10. Electron cyclotron resonance plasma photos

    SciTech Connect

    Racz, R.; Palinkas, J.; Biri, S.

    2010-02-15

    In order to observe and study systematically the plasma of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources (ECRIS) we made a high number of high-resolution visible light plasma photos and movies in the ATOMKI ECRIS Laboratory. This required building the ECR ion source into an open ECR plasma device, temporarily. An 8MP digital camera was used to record photos of plasmas made from Ne, Ar, and Kr gases and from their mixtures. We studied and recorded the effect of ion source setting parameters (gas pressure, gas composition, magnetic field, and microwave power) to the shape, color, and structure of the plasma. The analysis of the photo series gave us many qualitative and numerous valuable physical information on the nature of ECR plasmas.

  11. ECR (Electron Cyclotron Resonance) ion sources for cyclotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Lyneis, C.M.

    1986-10-01

    In the last decade ECR (Electron Cyclotron Resonance) ion sources have evolved from a single large, power consuming, complex prototype into a variety of compact, simple, reliable, efficient, high performance sources of high charge state ions for accelerators and atomic physics. The coupling of ECR sources to cyclotrons has resulted in significant performance gains in energy, intensity, reliability, and variety of ion species. Seven ECR sources are in regular operation with cyclotrons and numerous other projects are under development or in the planning stag. At least four laboratories have ECR sources dedicated for atomic physics research and other atomic physics programs share ECR sources with cyclotrons. An ECR source is now installed on the injector for the CERN SPS synchrotron to accelerate O/sup 8 +/ to relativistic energies. A project is underway at Argonne to couple an ECR source to a superconducting heavy-ion linac. Although tremendous progress has been made, the field of ECR sources is still a relatively young technology and there is still the potential for further advances both in source development and understanding of the plasma physics. The development of ECR sources is reviewed. The important physics mechanisms which come into play in the operation of ECR Sources are discussed, along with various models for charge state distributions (CSD). The design and performance of several ECR sources are compared. The 88-Inch Cyclotron and the LBL ECR is used as an example of cyclotron+ECR operation. The future of ECR sources is considered.

  12. Molecular characterization of inhibiting biochar water-extractable substances using electrospray ionization fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Smith, Cameron R; Sleighter, Rachel L; Hatcher, Patrick G; Lee, James W

    2013-01-01

    Biochar has gained significant interest worldwide for its potential use as both a carbon sequestration technique and soil amendment. Recently, research has shown that pinewood-derived biochar water extracts inhibited the growth of aquatic photosynthetic microorganisms, both prokaryotic and eukaryotic algae, while chicken litter- and peanut shell-derived biochar water extracts showed no growth inhibition. With the use of electrodialysis, the pinewood-derived biochar water extract is separated into 3 fractions (anode-isolated, center chamber retained, and cathode-isolated substances) all with varying toxic effects. Because of its ultrahigh resolution and mass precision, electrospray ionization (ESI) coupled to Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) is utilized in this study to analyze biochar water extracts at a molecular level to enhance our understanding of the toxic nature of pinewood-derived biochar water extracts as compared to benign peanut shell-derived biochar water extracts. The molecular composition of pinewood-derived biochar water extracts shows unique carbohydrate ligneous components and sulfur containing condensed ligneous components that are both absent from the peanut shell water extracts and more prevalent in the anode-isolated substances. Using Kendrick mass defect analysis, we also determine that the most likely inhibitor species contain carboxyl and hydroxyl homologous series, both of which are characteristic functional groups hypothesized in our previous research for the inhibitor species. We have suggested that inhibition of aquatic photosynthetic microorganism growth is most likely due to degraded lignin-like species rich in oxygen containing functionalities. From the study conducted here, we show the potential of ultrahigh resolution FTICR-MS as a valuable analytical technique for determining whether certain biochars are safe and benign for use as carbon sequestration and soil amendment.

  13. Cyclotron resonance absorption in ionospheric plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villalon, Elena

    1991-04-01

    The mode conversion of ordinary polarized electromagnetic waves into electrostatic cyclotron waves in the inhomogeneous ionospheric plasma is investigated. Near resonance the warm plasma dispersion relation is a function of the angle theta between the geomagnetic field and the density gradient and of the wave frequency omega, which lies between the electron cyclotron frequency and its doubling. The differential equations describing the electric field amplitudes near the plasma resonance are studied, including damping at the second gyroharmonic. The energy transmission coefficients and power absorbed by the cyclotron waves are calculated. The vertical penetration of the plasma wave amplitudes is estimated using a WKB analysis of the wave equation.

  14. Molecular and negative ion production by a standard electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Rácz, R; Biri, S; Juhász, Z; Sulik, B; Pálinkás, J

    2012-02-01

    Molecular and negative ion beams, usually produced in special ion sources, play an increasingly important role in fundamental and applied atomic physics. The ATOMKI-ECRIS is a standard ECR ion source, designed to provide highly charged ion (HCI) plasmas and beams. In the present work, H(-), O(-), OH(-), O(2)(-), C(-), C(60)(-) negative ions and H(2)(+), H(3)(+), OH(+), H(2)O(+), H(3)O(+), O(2)(+) positive molecular ions were generated in this HCI-ECRIS. Without any major modification in the source and without any commonly applied tricks (such as usage of cesium or magnetic filter), negative ion beams of several μA and positive molecular ion beams in the mA range were successfully obtained.

  15. Molecular and negative ion production by a standard electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Racz, R.; Biri, S.; Juhasz, Z.; Sulik, B.

    2012-02-15

    Molecular and negative ion beams, usually produced in special ion sources, play an increasingly important role in fundamental and applied atomic physics. The ATOMKI-ECRIS is a standard ECR ion source, designed to provide highly charged ion (HCI) plasmas and beams. In the present work, H{sup -}, O{sup -}, OH{sup -}, O{sub 2}{sup -}, C{sup -}, C{sub 60}{sup -} negative ions and H{sub 2}{sup +}, H{sub 3}{sup +}, OH{sup +}, H{sub 2}O{sup +}, H{sub 3}O{sup +}, O{sub 2}{sup +} positive molecular ions were generated in this HCI-ECRIS. Without any major modification in the source and without any commonly applied tricks (such as usage of cesium or magnetic filter), negative ion beams of several {mu}A and positive molecular ion beams in the mA range were successfully obtained.

  16. Molecular characterization of monoterpene ozonolysis products using ultrahigh-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, S.; Fisseha, R.; Putman, A.; Rahn, T.; Mazzoleni, L. R.

    2010-12-01

    A detailed knowledge of the chemical composition of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) is required to better understand their roles in climate change, biogeochemical cycling and public health. The chemical composition of the SOA produced by the ozonolysis of limonene was investigated using electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (ESI FT-ICR) mass spectrometry. SOA was generated in a 1.5 m3 teflon chamber with 500 ppb of limonene and 250 ppb of O3, without the presence of hydroxyl radical scavenger. We have identified approximately 1300-1500 molecular masses from negative-ion spectra in the range of 105 < m/z < 870 in each of two samples. The double bond equivalency (DBE), the number of rings and unsaturated bonds, values range from 1 to 13. This indicates the formation of a wide variety of chemical compounds. Several regions of high peak number density were observed in the mass ranges of 170 < m/z < 280, 350 < m/z < 480, 550 < m/z < 650 and 730 < m/z < 850. These regions are generally referred to as monomers, dimers, trimers, and tetramers of oxidized monoterpene units. The average DBE values for monomer to tetramer regions increase from 3.7 to 9.4 and the oxidation number decreases from -0.4 to -0.7. These results suggest that high MW organic compounds in the SOA samples are more unsaturated and less-oxidized. Both the oxygen to carbon (0.2-2) and hydrogen to carbon (0.5-1.1) ratios for limonene-SOA are different from those for α-pinene-SOA, 0.2-1 and 1.1-1.9 (Putman et al., 2010). We will compare the chemical composition of limonene-SOA with that of α- and β-pinene-SOA. We will also discuss the MSn fragmentation behavior of major ions for the structural elucidation of the oligomers. Putman, A., J. Offenberg, R. Fisseha, T. Rahn, and L. R. Mazzoleni, Ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry of the complex secondary organic aerosol products from ozonolysis of α-pinene: Investigating oligomers, in preparation, 2010.

  17. Combination of statistical methods and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry for more comprehensive, molecular-level interpretations of petroleum samples.

    PubMed

    Hur, Manhoi; Yeo, Injoon; Park, Eunsuk; Kim, Young Hwan; Yoo, Jongshin; Kim, Eunkyoung; No, Myoung-han; Koh, Jaesuk; Kim, Sunghwan

    2010-01-01

    Complex petroleum mass spectra obtained by Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS) were successfully interpreted at the molecular level by applying principle component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical clustering analysis (HCA). A total of 40 mass spectra were obtained from 20 crude oil samples using both positive and negative atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI). Approximately 400,000 peaks were identified at the molecular level. Conventional data analyses would have been impractical with so much data. However, PCA grouped samples into score plots based on their molecular composition. In this way, the overall compositional difference between samples could be easily displayed and identified by comparing score and loading plots. HCA was also performed to group and compare samples based on selected peaks that had been grouped by PCA. Subsequent heat map analyses revealed detailed compositional differences among grouped samples. This study demonstrates a promising new approach for studying multiple, complex petroleum samples at the molecular level.

  18. Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Alan G.

    1998-06-01

    As for Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) interferometry and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, the introduction of pulsed Fourier transform techniques revolutionized ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry: increased speed (factor of 10,000), increased sensitivity (factor of 100), increased mass resolution (factor of 10,000-an improvement not shared by the introduction of FT techniques to IR or NMR spectroscopy), increased mass range (factor of 500), and automated operation. FT-ICR mass spectrometry is the most versatile technique for unscrambling and quantifying ion-molecule reaction kinetics and equilibria in the absence of solvent (i.e., the gas phase). In addition, FT-ICR MS has the following analytically important features: speed (~1 second per spectrum); ultrahigh mass resolution and ultrahigh mass accuracy for analysis of mixtures and polymers; attomole sensitivity; MSn with one spectrometer, including two-dimensional FT/FT-ICR/MS; positive and/or negative ions; multiple ion sources (especially MALDI and electrospray); biomolecular molecular weight and sequencing; LC/MS; and single-molecule detection up to 108 Dalton. Here, some basic features and recent developments of FT-ICR mass spectrometry are reviewed, with applications ranging from crude oil to molecular biology.

  19. Stability of the Electron Cyclotron Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asch, Joachim; Bourget, Olivier; Meresse, Cédric

    2015-12-01

    We consider the magnetic AC Stark effect for the quantum dynamics of a single particle in the plane under the influence of an oscillating homogeneous electric and a constant perpendicular magnetic field. We prove that the electron cyclotron resonance is insensitive to impurity potentials.

  20. Cyclotron resonance cooling by strong laser field

    SciTech Connect

    Tagcuhi, Toshihiro; Mima, Kunioka

    1995-12-31

    Reduction of energy spread of electron beam is very important to increase a total output radiation power in free electron lasers. Although several cooling systems of particle beams such as a stochastic cooling are successfully operated in the accelerator physics, these cooling mechanisms are very slow and they are only applicable to high energy charged particle beams of ring accelerators. We propose here a new concept of laser cooling system by means of cyclotron resonance. Electrons being in cyclotron motion under a strong magnetic field can resonate with circular polarized electromagnetic field, and the resonance take place selectively depending on the velocity of the electrons. If cyclotron frequency of electrons is equal to the frequency of the electromagnetic field, they absorb the electromagnetic field energy strongly, but the other electrons remain unchanged. The absorbed energy will be converted to transverse kinetic energy, and the energy will be dumped into the radiation energy through bremastrahlung. To build a cooling system, we must use two laser beams, where one of them is counter-propagating and the other is co-propagating with electron beam. When the frequency of the counter-propagating laser is tuned with the cyclotron frequency of fast electrons and the co-propagating laser is tuned with the cyclotron frequency of slow electrons, the energy of two groups will approach and the cooling will be achieved. We solve relativistic motions of electrons with relativistic radiation dumping force, and estimate the cooling rate of this mechanism. We will report optimum parameters for the electron beam cooling system for free electron lasers.

  1. Cyclotron Resonances in Electron Cloud Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Celata, C. M.; Furman, Miguel A.; Vay, J.-L.; Ng, J. S.T.; Grote, D. P.; Pivi, M. T. F.; Wang, L. F.

    2009-04-29

    A new set of resonances for electron cloud dynamics in the presence of a magnetic field has been found. For short beam bunch lengths and low magnetic fields where lb<< 2pi c/omega c (with lb = bunch length, omega c = non-relativistic cyclotron frequency) resonances between the bunch frequency and harmonics of the electron cyclotron frequency cause an increase in the electron cloud density in narrow ranges of magnetic field near the resonances. For ILC parameters the increase in the density is up to a factor ~;;3, and the spatial distribution of the electrons is broader near resonances, lacking the well-defined vertical density"stripes" found for non-resonant cases. Simulations with the 2D computer code POSINST, as well as a single-particle tracking code, were used to elucidate the physics of the dynamics. The existence of the resonances has been confirmed in experiments at PEP-II. The resonances are expected to affect the electron cloud dynamics in the fringe fields of conventional lattice magnets and in wigglers, where the magnetic fields are low. Results of the simulations and experimental observations, the reason for the bunch-length dependence, and details of the dynamics are discussed here.

  2. Structure and morphology characters of GaN grown by ECR-MBE using hydrogen-nitrogen mixed gas plasma[Electron Cyclotron Resonance-Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Araki, Tsutomu; Chiba, Yasuo; Nanishi, Yasushi

    2000-07-01

    GaN growth by electron-cyclotron-resonance plasma-excited molecular beam epitaxy using hydrogen-nitrogen mixed gas plasma were carried out on GaN templates with a different polar-surface. Structure and surface morphology of the GaN layers were characterized using transmission electron microscopy. The GaN layer grown with hydrogen on N-polar template showed a relatively flat morphology including hillocks. Columnar domain existed in the center of the hillock, which might be attributed to the existence of tiny inversion domain with Ga-polarity. On the other hand, columnar structure was formed in the GaN layer grown with hydrogen on Ga-polar template.

  3. Cyclotron Resonances in Electron Cloud Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Celata, C M; Furman, M A; Vay, J L; Grote, D P; Ng, J T; Pivi, M F; Wang, L F

    2009-05-05

    A new set of resonances for electron cloud dynamics in the presence of a magnetic field has been found. For short beam bunch lengths and low magnetic fields where l{sub b} << 2{pi}{omega}{sub c}, (l{sub b} = bunch duration, {omega}{sub c} = non-relativistic cyclotron frequency) resonances between the bunch frequency and harmonics of the cyclotron frequency cause an increase in the electron cloud density in narrow ranges of magnetic field near the resonances. For ILC parameters the increase in the density is up to a factor {approx} 3, and the spatial distribution of the electrons is broader near resonances, lacking the well-defined density 'stripes' of multipactoring found for non-resonant cases. Simulations with the 2D computer code POSINST, as well as a single-particle tracking code, were used to elucidate the physics of the dynamics. The resonances are expected to affect the electron cloud dynamics in the fringe fields of conventional lattice magnets and in wigglers, where the magnetic fields are low. Results of the simulations, the reason for the bunch-length dependence, and details of the dynamics will be discussed.

  4. Physics of Cyclotron Resonance Scattering Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sschoenherr, Gabriele; Schwarm, Fritz-Walter; Falkner, Sebastian; Dauser, Thomas; Pottschmidt, Katja; Kretschmar, Peter; Klochkov, Dmitry; Ferrigno, Carlo; Britton Hemphill, Paul; Wilms, Joern

    2016-04-01

    Cyclotron resonant scattering features (short: cyclotron lines) are sensitive tracers of the physics of the accretion columns and mounds of X-ray pulsars. They form by interaction of X-ray photons with magnetically quantized electrons in the accreted plasma close to the neutron star. Such lines have been observed as absorption-like features for about 20 X-ray pulsars. Their energies provide a direct measure of the magnetic field strength in the line-forming region. By detailed modelling of the lines and of their parameter dependencies we can further decipher the physical conditions in the accretion column. For instance the fact that the complex scattering cross sections have a strong angle-dependence relates the phase-resolved cyclotron line shapes to parameters that constrain the systems’ still poorly understood geometry. Modelling the physics of cyclotron lines to a degree that allows for detailed and solid comparison to data therefore provides a unique access also to a better understanding of the overall picture of magnetically accreting neutron star systems.

  5. Cyclotron resonance in plasma flow

    SciTech Connect

    Artemyev, A. V.; Agapitov, O. V.; Krasnoselskikh, V. V.

    2013-12-15

    This paper is devoted to the mechanism of particle acceleration via resonant interaction with the electromagnetic circular wave propagating along the inhomogeneous background magnetic field in the presence of a plasma flow. We consider the system where the plasma flow velocity is large enough to change the direction of wave propagation in the rest frame. This system mimics a magnetic field configuration typical for inner structure of a quasi-parallel shock wave. We consider conditions of gyroresonant interaction when the force corresponding to an inhomogeneity of the background magnetic field is compensated by the Lorentz force of the wave-magnetic field. The wave-amplitude is assumed to be about 10% of the background magnetic field. We show that particles can gain energy if kv{sub sw}>ω>kv{sub sw}−Ω{sub c} where k is the wave number, v{sub sw} is a plasma flow velocity, and ω and Ω{sub c} are the wave frequency and the particle gyrofrequency, respectively. This mechanism of acceleration resembles the gyrosurfing mechanism, but the effect of the electrostatic field is replaced by the effect of the magnetic field inhomogeneity.

  6. Molecular evidence of heavy-oil weathering following the M/V Cosco Busan spill: insights from Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lemkau, Karin L; McKenna, Amy M; Podgorski, David C; Rodgers, Ryan P; Reddy, Christopher M

    2014-04-01

    Recent studies have highlighted a critical need to investigate oil weathering beyond the analytical window afforded by conventional gas chromatography (GC). In particular, techniques capable of detecting polar and higher molecular weight (HMW; > 400 Da) components abundant in crude and heavy fuel oils (HFOs) as well as transformation products. Here, we used atmospheric pressure photoionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (APPI FT-ICR MS) to identify molecular transformations in oil-residue samples from the 2007 M/V Cosco Busan HFO spill (San Francisco, CA). Over 617 days, the abundance and diversity of oxygen-containing compounds increased relative to the parent HFO, likely from bio- and photodegradation. HMW, highly aromatic, alkylated compounds decreased in relative abundance concurrent with increased relative abundance of less alkylated stable aromatic structures. Combining these results with GC-based data yielded a more comprehensive understanding of oil spill weathering. For example, dealkylation trends and the overall loss of HMW species observed by FT-ICR MS has not previously been documented and is counterintuitive given losses of lower molecular weight species observed by GC. These results suggest a region of relative stability at the interface of these techniques, which provides new indicators for studying long-term weathering and identifying sources.

  7. Electron Cyclotron Resonances in Electron Cloud Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Celata, Christine; Celata, C.M.; Furman, Miguel A.; Vay, J.-L.; Yu, Jennifer W.

    2008-06-25

    We report a previously unknown resonance for electron cloud dynamics. The 2D simulation code"POSINST" was used to study the electron cloud buildup at different z positions in the International Linear Collider positron damping ring wiggler. An electron equilibrium density enhancement of up to a factor of 3 was found at magnetic field values for which the bunch frequency is an integral multiple of the electron cyclotron frequency. At low magnetic fields the effects of the resonance are prominent, but when B exceeds ~;;(2 pi mec/(elb)), with lb = bunch length, effects of the resonance disappear. Thus short bunches and low B fields are required for observing the effect. The reason for the B field dependence, an explanation of the dynamics, and the results of the 2D simulations and of a single-particle tracking code used to elucidate details of the dynamics are discussed.

  8. [Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma film deposition

    SciTech Connect

    1999-04-01

    During the third quarter of 1995, an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma film deposition facility was constructed at the University of New Mexico. This work was conducted in support of the Los Alamos/Tycom CRADA agreement to pursue methods of improving drill bit lifetime. Work in the fourth quarter will center on the coating of drill bits and the treating and testing of various test samples. New material systems as well as treatment techniques will be attempted during this period. The following is a brief description of the various subsystems of the film deposition facility. Particular emphasis is placed on the slotted waveguide system as requested.

  9. Chemical cross-linking of the urease complex from Helicobacter pylori and analysis by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry and molecular modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsohn, Elisabet; Ångström, Jonas; Emmett, Mark R.; Marshall, Alan G.; Nilsson, Carol L.

    2004-05-01

    Chemical cross-linking of proteins is a well-established method for structural mapping of small protein complexes. When combined with mass spectrometry, cross-linking can reveal protein topology and identify contact sites between the peptide surfaces. When applied to surface-exposed proteins from pathogenic organisms, the method can reveal structural details that are useful in vaccine design. In order to investigate the possibilities of applying cross-linking on larger protein complexes, we selected the urease enzyme from Helicobacter pylori as a model. This membrane-associated protein complex consists of two subunits: [alpha] (26.5 kDa) and [beta] (61.7 kDa). Three ([alpha][beta]) heterodimers form a trimeric ([alpha][beta])3 assembly which further associates into a unique dodecameric 1.1 MDa complex composed of four ([alpha][beta])3 units. Cross-linked peptides from trypsin-digested urease complex were analyzed by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) and molecular modeling. Two potential cross-linked peptides (present in the cross-linked sample but undetectable in [alpha], [beta], and native complex) were assigned. Molecular modeling of urease [alpha][beta] complex and trimeric urease units ([alpha][beta])3 revealed a linkage site between the [alpha]-subunit and the [beta]-subunit, and an internal cross-linkage in the [beta]-subunit.

  10. High-molecular weight sulfur-containing aromatics refractory to weathering as determined by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hegazi, Abdelrahman H; Fathalla, Eiman M; Panda, Saroj K; Schrader, Wolfgang; Andersson, Jan T

    2012-09-01

    Biomarkers and low-molecular weight polyaromatic compounds have been extensively studied for their fate in the environment. They are used for oil spill source identification and monitoring of weathering and degradation processes. However, in some cases, the absence or presence of very low concentration of such components restricts the access of information to spill source. Here we followed the resistance of high-molecular weight sulfur-containing aromatics to the simulated weathering condition of North Sea crude oil by ultra high-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. The sulfur aromatics in North Sea crude having double bond equivalents (DBE) from 6 to 14 with a mass range 188-674Da were less influenced even after 6 months artificial weathering. Moreover, the ratio of dibenzothiophenes (DBE 9)/naphthenodibenzothiophenes (DBE 10) was 1.30 and 1.36 in crude oil and 6 months weathered sample, respectively reflecting its weathering stability. It also showed some differences within other oils. Hence, this ratio can be used as a marker of the studied crude and accordingly may be applied for spilled oil source identification in such instances where the light components have already been lost due to environmental influences.

  11. Comparing Laser Desorption Ionization and Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization Coupled to Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry To Characterize Shale Oils at the Molecular Level

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cho, Yunjo; Jin, Jang Mi; Witt, Matthias; Birdwell, Justin E.; Na, Jeong-Geol; Roh, Nam-Sun; Kim, Sunghwan

    2013-01-01

    Laser desorption ionization (LDI) coupled to Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) was used to analyze shale oils. Previous work showed that LDI is a sensitive ionization technique for assessing aromatic nitrogen compounds, and oils generated from Green River Formation oil shales are well-documented as being rich in nitrogen. The data presented here demonstrate that LDI is effective in ionizing high-double-bond-equivalent (DBE) compounds and, therefore, is a suitable method for characterizing compounds with condensed structures. Additionally, LDI generates radical cations and protonated ions concurrently, the distribution of which depends upon the molecular structures and elemental compositions, and the basicity of compounds is closely related to the generation of protonated ions. This study demonstrates that LDI FT-ICR MS is an effective ionization technique for use in the study of shale oils at the molecular level. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that LDI FT-ICR MS has been applied to shale oils.

  12. Reduced fragmentation in liquid injection field desorption/ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry by use of helium for the thermalization of molecular ions.

    PubMed

    Bernhard Linden, H; Gross, Jürgen H

    2012-02-15

    To exploit the softness of liquid injection field desorption/ionization (LIFDI), the molecular ions, M(+•), need to be transferred from their origin at the field emitter through the mass analyzer without disrupting their integrity. To preserve the molecular ions, ion-activating events like collisions must therefore be avoided. In hybrid quadrupole Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometers, however, multiple ion-guiding and ion-trapping events occur prior to mass analysis. The effects thereof compromised initial spectra from a LIFDI and electrospray ionization (ESI) combination (LIFDI-ESI) ion source and, thus, called for refined experimental conditions. A hybrid quadrupole FT-ICR instrument equipped with a new LIFDI-ESI combination ion source was used to obtain LIFDI spectra of polystyrene 1050, of 2,3,4-tridodecyloxybenzaldehyde, and of sewing machine oil as well as a field ionization (FI) spectrum of pentafluoroiodobenzene. The abundance of molecular ions, M(+•), was optimized, in particular by variation of the trapping conditions inside the instrument's accumulation RF-hexapole ion trap. Ion-buffer gas collisions in the instrument's accumulation RF-hexapole ion trap were detrimental to the easy-to-fragment molecular ions of hydrocarbon species, whereas more robust even-electron ions were not affected. Exchanging the instrument's standard supply of argon buffer gas for helium resulted in a remarkable improvement. Together with further adjustments of potentials applied along the ion transfer path, hydrocarbon species could be analyzed. The use of helium buffer gas remarkably improved LIFDI spectra, because the loss of molecular ions by dissociation during transfer from the LIFDI source into the ICR cell was significantly reduced. Hydrocarbon species could be analyzed while fragmentation of ions was avoided for the most part. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Characterization of low molecular weight dissolved natural organic matter along the treatment trait of a waterworks using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haifeng; Zhang, Yahe; Shi, Quan; Ren, Shuoyi; Yu, Jianwei; Ji, Feng; Luo, Wenbin; Yang, Min

    2012-10-15

    Dissolved natural organic matter (DOM), particularly the low molecular weight DOM, can affect the performance of water treatment processes and serve as a main precursor of disinfection by-products (DBPs) during chlorination. In this study, electrospray ionization coupled to Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI FT-ICR MS) was used to characterize the low molecular weight DOM along the treatment trait of a conventional drinking water treatment plant. The ESI FT-ICR MS data showed that various C, H, O-only class species were the major components in the source water. According to the van Krevelen diagram analysis, lignin- and tannin-like compounds were the most abundant components. Within an isobaric group, the DOM molecules with a high degree of oxidation (high O/C value) were preferentially removed during coagulation, while those with low degree of oxidation were found to be more reactive toward chlorine. In addition, 357 one-chlorine containing products and 199 two-chlorine containing products formed during chlorination were detected in the chlorination effluent sample at a high confidence level. The chlorinated products can be arranged into series, suggesting that they were originated from C, H, O-only precursor compounds, which were in series related by the replacement of CH(4) against oxygen. For the first time, this study explored the behavior of low molecular weight DOM along a drinking water treatment trait on the molecular level, and revealed the presence of abundant unknown chlorinated products, which are probably rich in carboxylic and phenolic groups, in drinking water. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Enhanced production of runaway electrons during electron cyclotron resonance heating and in the presence of supersonic molecular beam injection in the HL-2A tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y. P.; Liu, Yi; Yang, J. W.; Song, X. Y.; Yuan, G. L.; Zhou, J.; Yao, L. H.; Feng, B. B.; Li, X.; Yang, Q. W.; Duan, X. R.; Pan, C. H.; Liu, Y.

    2010-07-15

    In the present paper, it is reported that a large production of runaway electrons has been observed during the flattop phase of electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) discharges and in the presence of supersonic molecular beam injection (SMBI) in the HuanLiuqi-2A (commonly referred to as HL-2A) [Q. W. Yang, Nucl. Fusion 47, S635 (2007)] tokamak. For the set of discharges carried out in the present experiment, the ranges of ECRH power and plasma electron density are 0.8-1.0 MW and (3.0-4.0)x10{sup 19} m{sup -3}, respectively. A large number of superthermal electrons are produced through the avalanche effect [A. Lazaros, Phys. Plasmas 8, 1263 (2001)] during ECRH. The loop voltage increase due to SMBI gives rise to a decline in the critical runaway energy, which leads to that many superthermal electrons could be converted into runaway region. Therefore, this phenomenon may come from the synergetic effects of ECRH and SMBI. That is, the superthermal electrons created by ECRH are accelerated into runaway regime via the Dreicer process which is triggered by SMBI. The experimental results are in well agreement with the calculational ones based on the superthermal electron avalanche effect and the Dreicer runaway theory.

  15. Molecular Characterization of Thiols in Fossil Fuels by Michael Addition Reaction Derivatization and Electrospray Ionization Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Zhao, Suoqi; Liu, Xuxia; Shi, Quan

    2016-10-04

    Thiols widely occur in sediments and fossil fuels. However, the molecular composition of these compounds is unclear due to the lack of appropriate analytical methods. In this work, a characterization method for thiols in fossil fuels was developed on the basis of Michael addition reaction derivatization followed by electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI FT-ICR MS). Model thiol compound studies showed that thiols were selectively reacted with phenylvinylsulfone and transformed to sulfones with greater than 98% conversions. This method was applied to a coker naphtha, light and heavy gas oils, and crude oils from various geological sources. The results showed that long alkyl chain thiols are readily present in petroleum, which have up to 30 carbon atoms. Large DBE dispersity of thiols indicates that naphthenic and aromatic thiols are also present in the petroleum. This method is capable of detecting thiol compounds in the part per million range by weight. This method allows characterization of thiols in a complex hydrocarbon matrix, which is complementary to the comprehensive analysis of sulfur compounds in fossil fuels.

  16. A simple electron cyclotron resonance ion sourcea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welton, R. F.; Moran, T. F.; Feeney, R. K.; Thomas, E. W.

    1996-04-01

    A simple, all permanent magnet, 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source has been developed for the production of stable beams of low charge state ions from gaseous feed materials. The source can produce ˜1 mA of low energy (3 kV) singly charged ion current in the 10-4 Torr pressure range. The source can also be operated in a more efficient low-pressure mode at an order of magnitude lower pressure. In this latter range, for example, the ionization efficiency of Ar is estimated to be 1% with charge states up to Ar8+ present. Operation in the low-pressure mode requires low power input (˜20 W). These features make the source especially suited for use with small accelerator systems for a number of applications including ion implantation, mass spectrometry, and atomic collision experiments where multiply charged ions are desirable. Design details and performance characteristics of the source are presented.

  17. Cyclotron resonance effects on stochastic acceleration of light ionospheric ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N.; Schunk, R. W.; Sojka, J. J.

    1982-01-01

    The production of energetic ions with conical pitch angle distributions along the auroral field lines is a subject of considerable current interest. There are several theoretical treatments showing the acceleration (heating) of the ions by ion cyclotron waves. The quasi-linear theory predicts no acceleration when the ions are nonresonant. In the present investigation, it is demonstrated that the cyclotron resonances are not crucial for the transverse acceleration of ions by ion cyclotron waves. It is found that transverse energization of ionospheric ions, such as He(+), He(++), O(++), and O(+), is possible by an Electrostatic Hydrogen Cyclotron (EHC) wave even in the absence of cyclotron resonance. The mechanism of acceleration is the nonresonant stochastic heating. However, when there are resonant ions both the total energy gain and the number of accelerated ions increase with increasing parallel wave number.

  18. Simultaneous molecular formula determinations of natural compounds in a plant extract using 15 T Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Plant extracts are a reservoir of pharmacologically active substances; however, conventional analytical methods can analyze only a small portion of an extract. Here, we report a high-throughput analytical method capable of determining most phytochemicals in a plant extract and of providing their molecular formulae from a single experiment using ultra-high-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (UHR ESI MS). UHR mass profiling was used to analyze natural compounds in a 70% ethanol ginseng extract, which was directly infused into a 15 T Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer for less than 10 min without a separation process. Results The UHR FT-ICR MS yielded a mass accuracy of 0.5 ppm and a mass resolving power (m/Δm) of 1,000,000–270,000 for the range m/z 290–1,100. The mass resolution was sufficient to resolve the isotopic fine structure (IFS) of many compounds in the extract. After noise removal from 1,552 peaks, 405 compounds were detected. The molecular formulae of 123 compounds, including 33 ginsenosides, were determined using the observed IFS, exact monoisotopic mass, and exact mass difference. Liquid chromatography (LC)/FT-ICR MS of the extract was performed to compare the high-throughput performance of UHR ESI FT-ICR MS. The LC/FT-ICR MS detected only 129 compounds, including 19 ginsenosides. The result showed that UHR ESI FT-ICR MS identified three times more compounds than LC/FT-ICR MS and in a relatively shorter time. The molecular formula determination by UHR FT-ICR MS was validated by LC and tandem MS analyses of three known ginsenosides. Conclusions UHR mass profiling of a plant extract by 15 T FT-ICR MS showed that multiple compounds were simultaneously detected and their molecular formulae were decisively determined by a single experiment with ultra-high mass resolution and mass accuracy. Simultaneous molecular determination of multiple natural products by UHR ESI FT-ICR MS would be a

  19. Simultaneous molecular formula determinations of natural compounds in a plant extract using 15 T Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyu Hwan; Kim, Min Sun; Baek, Sun Jong; Bae, Ik Hyun; Seo, Sang-Wan; Kim, Jongjin; Shin, Yong Kook; Lee, Yong-Moon; Kim, Hyun Sik

    2013-01-01

    Plant extracts are a reservoir of pharmacologically active substances; however, conventional analytical methods can analyze only a small portion of an extract. Here, we report a high-throughput analytical method capable of determining most phytochemicals in a plant extract and of providing their molecular formulae from a single experiment using ultra-high-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (UHR ESI MS). UHR mass profiling was used to analyze natural compounds in a 70% ethanol ginseng extract, which was directly infused into a 15 T Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer for less than 10 min without a separation process. The UHR FT-ICR MS yielded a mass accuracy of 0.5 ppm and a mass resolving power (m/Δm) of 1,000,000-270,000 for the range m/z 290-1,100. The mass resolution was sufficient to resolve the isotopic fine structure (IFS) of many compounds in the extract. After noise removal from 1,552 peaks, 405 compounds were detected. The molecular formulae of 123 compounds, including 33 ginsenosides, were determined using the observed IFS, exact monoisotopic mass, and exact mass difference. Liquid chromatography (LC)/FT-ICR MS of the extract was performed to compare the high-throughput performance of UHR ESI FT-ICR MS. The LC/FT-ICR MS detected only 129 compounds, including 19 ginsenosides. The result showed that UHR ESI FT-ICR MS identified three times more compounds than LC/FT-ICR MS and in a relatively shorter time. The molecular formula determination by UHR FT-ICR MS was validated by LC and tandem MS analyses of three known ginsenosides. UHR mass profiling of a plant extract by 15 T FT-ICR MS showed that multiple compounds were simultaneously detected and their molecular formulae were decisively determined by a single experiment with ultra-high mass resolution and mass accuracy. Simultaneous molecular determination of multiple natural products by UHR ESI FT-ICR MS would be a powerful method to profile a wide

  20. Fullerenes in electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Biri, S.; Fekete, E.; Kitagawa, A.; Muramatsu, M.; Janossy, A.; Palinkas, J.

    2006-03-15

    Fullerene plasmas and beams have been produced in our electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRIS) originally designed for other purposes. The ATOMKI-ECRIS is a traditional ion source with solenoid mirror coils to generate highly charged ions. The variable frequencies NIRS-KEI-1 and NIRS-KEI-2 are ECR ion sources built from permanent magnets and specialized for the production of carbon beams. The paper summarizes the experiments and results obtained by these facilities with fullerenes. Continuous effort has been made to get the highest C{sub 60} beam intensities. Surprisingly, the best result was obtained by moving the C{sub 60} oven deep inside the plasma chamber, very close to the resonance zone. Record intensity singly and doubly charged fullerene beams were obtained (600 and 1600 nA, respectively) at lower C{sub 60} material consumption. Fullerene derivatives were also produced. We mixed fullerenes with other plasmas (N, Fe) with the aim of making new materials. Nitrogen encapsulated fullerenes (mass: 720+14=734) were successfully produced. In the case of iron, two methods (ferrocene, oven) were tested. Molecules with mass of 720+56=776 were detected in the extracted beam spectra.

  1. Some calculations of the resonator in INR cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.; Liu, X.L.

    1985-10-01

    Some calculation methods of the resonator parameters with single dee and two coaxial transmission lines in INR variable-energy cyclotron were described. Also calculated and experimental results have been compared with the original one (two dee system).

  2. Fourth generation electron cyclotron resonance ion sources.

    PubMed

    Lyneis, Claude M; Leitner, D; Todd, D S; Sabbi, G; Prestemon, S; Caspi, S; Ferracin, P

    2008-02-01

    The concepts and technical challenges related to developing a fourth generation electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source with a rf frequency greater than 40 GHz and magnetic confinement fields greater than twice B(ECR) will be explored in this article. Based on the semiempirical frequency scaling of ECR plasma density with the square of operating frequency, there should be significant gains in performance over current third generation ECR ion sources, which operate at rf frequencies between 20 and 30 GHz. While the third generation ECR ion sources use NbTi superconducting solenoid and sextupole coils, the new sources will need to use different superconducting materials, such as Nb(3)Sn, to reach the required magnetic confinement, which scales linearly with rf frequency. Additional technical challenges include increased bremsstrahlung production, which may increase faster than the plasma density, bremsstrahlung heating of the cold mass, and the availability of high power continuous wave microwave sources at these frequencies. With each generation of ECR ion sources, there are new challenges to be mastered, but the potential for higher performance and reduced cost of the associated accelerator continues to make this a promising avenue for development.

  3. Characterization of electron cyclotron resonance hydrogen plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Outten, C.A. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Barbour, J.C.; Wampler, W.R. )

    1990-01-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasmas yield low energy and high ion density plasmas. The characteristics downstream of an ECR hydrogen plasma were investigated as a function of microwave power and magnetic field. A fast-injection Langmuir probe and a carbon resistance probe were used to determine plasma potential (V{sub p}), electron density (N{sub e}), electron temperature (T{sub e}), ion energy (T{sub i}), and ion fluence. Langmuir probe results showed that at 17 cm downstream from the ECR chamber the plasma characteristics are approximately constant across the center 7 cm of the plasma for 50 Watts of absorbed power. These results gave V{sub p} = 30 {plus minus} 5 eV, N{sub e} = 1 {times} 10{sup 8} cm{sup {minus}3}, and T{sub e} = 10--13 eV. In good agreement with the Langmuir probe results, carbon resistance probes have shown that T{sub i} {le} 50 eV. Also, based on hydrogen chemical sputtering of carbon, the hydrogen (ion and energetic neutrals) fluence rate was determined to be 1 {times} 10{sup 16}/cm{sup 2}-sec. at a pressure of 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} Torr and for 50 Watts of absorbed power. 19 refs.

  4. Anomalous magnetotransport and cyclotron resonance of high mobility magnetic 2DHGs in the quantum Hall regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurstbauer, U.; Knott, S.; Westarp, C. G. v.; Mecking, N.; Rachor, K.; Heitmann, D.; Wegscheider, W.; Hansen, W.

    2010-02-01

    Low-temperature magnetotransport measurements and far-infrared transmission spectroscopy are reported in molecular beam epitaxial grown two-dimensional hole systems confined in strained InAs quantum wells with magnetic impurities in the channel. The interactions of the free holes spin with the magnetic moment of 5/2 provided by manganese features intriguing localization phenomena and anomalies in the Hall and the quantum Hall resistance. In magnetic field-dependent far-infrared spectroscopy measurements well-pronounced cyclotron resonance and an additional resonance are found that indicates an anti-crossing with the cyclotron resonance.

  5. Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry at the Cyclotron Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagornov, Konstantin O.; Kozhinov, Anton N.; Tsybin, Yury O.

    2017-02-01

    The phenomenon of ion cyclotron resonance allows for determining mass-to-charge ratio, m/z, of an ensemble of ions by means of measurements of their cyclotron frequency, ω c . In Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS), the ω c quantity is usually unavailable for direct measurements: the resonant state is located close to the reduced cyclotron frequency (ω+), whereas the ω c and the corresponding m/z values may be calculated via theoretical derivation from an experimental estimate of the ω+ quantity. Here, we describe an experimental observation of a new resonant state, which is located close to the ω c frequency and is established because of azimuthally-dependent trapping electric fields of the recently developed ICR cells with narrow aperture detection electrodes. We show that in mass spectra, peaks close to ω+ frequencies can be reduced to negligible levels relative to peaks close to ω c frequencies. Due to reduced errors with which the ω c quantity is obtained, the new resonance provides a means of cyclotron frequency measurements with precision greater than that achieved when ω+ frequency peaks are employed. The described phenomenon may be considered for a development into an FT-ICR MS technology with increased mass accuracy for applications in basic research, life, and environmental sciences.

  6. Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry at the Cyclotron Frequency.

    PubMed

    Nagornov, Konstantin O; Kozhinov, Anton N; Tsybin, Yury O

    2017-04-01

    The phenomenon of ion cyclotron resonance allows for determining mass-to-charge ratio, m/z, of an ensemble of ions by means of measurements of their cyclotron frequency, ω c . In Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS), the ω c quantity is usually unavailable for direct measurements: the resonant state is located close to the reduced cyclotron frequency (ω+), whereas the ω c and the corresponding m/z values may be calculated via theoretical derivation from an experimental estimate of the ω+ quantity. Here, we describe an experimental observation of a new resonant state, which is located close to the ω c frequency and is established because of azimuthally-dependent trapping electric fields of the recently developed ICR cells with narrow aperture detection electrodes. We show that in mass spectra, peaks close to ω+ frequencies can be reduced to negligible levels relative to peaks close to ω c frequencies. Due to reduced errors with which the ω c quantity is obtained, the new resonance provides a means of cyclotron frequency measurements with precision greater than that achieved when ω+ frequency peaks are employed. The described phenomenon may be considered for a development into an FT-ICR MS technology with increased mass accuracy for applications in basic research, life, and environmental sciences. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  7. Nonlinear wave-particle resonant interaction in the radiation belts: Landau resonance vs. fundamental cyclotron resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnoselskikh, V.; Artemyev, A.; Agapitov, O. V.; Mourenas, D.

    2013-12-01

    We present selected THEMIS observations of highly-oblique and large amplitude chorus waves at medium latitudes. The major part of observed waves propagates at nearly-electrostatic mode with normal angles close to resonance cone. We use test particle simulations and analytical theory to estimate efficiency of nonlinear particle acceleration by these waves via Landau and fundamental cyclotron resonances. We show that trapping into the Landau resonance corresponds to a decrease of electron equatorial pitch-angles, while trapping into the first cyclotron resonance increases electron equatorial pitch-angles. For 100 keV electrons, the energy gain is larger for the trapping due to Landau resonance. Moreover, trapping into the Landau resonance is accessible for a wider range of initial pitch-angles in comparison with the fundamental resonance.

  8. Electron-cyclotron-resonance ion sources (review)

    SciTech Connect

    Golovanivskii, K.S.; Dougar-Jabon, V.D.

    1992-01-01

    The physical principles are described and a brief survey of the present state is given of ion sources based on electron-cyclotron heating of plasma in a mirror trap. The characteristics of ECR sources of positive and negative ions used chiefly in accelerator technology are presented. 20 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Cyclotron Resonance of Electrons Trapped in a Microwave Cavity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elmore, W. C.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an experiment in which the free-electron cyclotron resonance of electrons trapped in a microwave cavity by a Penning trap is observed. The experiment constitutes an attractive alternative to one of the Gardner-Purcell variety. (Author/GS)

  10. Silicon meets cyclotron: muon spin resonance of organosilicon radicals.

    PubMed

    West, Robert; Samedov, Kerim; Percival, Paul W

    2014-07-21

    Muons, generated at a high-powered cyclotron, can capture electrons to form muonium atoms. Muon spin resonance spectra can be recorded for organosilyl radicals obtained by addition of muonium atoms to silylenes and silenes. We present a brief summary of progress in this new area since the first such experiments were reported in 2008.

  11. Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Jongen, Y.

    1984-05-01

    Starting with the pioneering work of R. Geller and his group in Grenoble (France), at least 14 ECR sources have been built and tested during the last five years. Most of those sources have been extremely successful, providing intense, stable and reliable beams of highly charged ions for cyclotron injection or atomic physics research. However, some of the operational features of those sources disagreed with commonly accepted theories on ECR source operation. To explain the observed behavior of actual sources, it was found necessary to refine some of the crude ideas we had about ECR sources. Some of those new propositions are explained, and used to make some extrapolations on the possible future developments in ECR sources.

  12. Electromagnetic ion cyclotron resonance heating in the VASIMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bering, E. A.; Chang-Díaz, F. R.; Squire, J. P.; Brukardt, M.; Glover, T. W.; Bengtson, R. D.; Jacobson, V. T.; McCaskill, G. E.; Cassady, L.

    2008-07-01

    Plasma physics has found an increasing range of practical industrial applications, including the development of electric spacecraft propulsion systems. One of these systems, the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) engine, both applies several important physical processes occurring in the magnetosphere. These processes include the mechanisms involved in the ion acceleration and heating that occur in the Birkeland currents of an auroral arc system. Auroral current region processes that are simulated in VASIMR include lower hybrid heating, parallel electric field acceleration and ion cyclotron acceleration. This paper will focus on using a physics demonstration model VASIMR to study ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH). The major purpose is to provide a VASIMR status report to the COSPAR community. The VASIMR uses a helicon antenna with up to 20 kW of power to generate plasma. This plasma is energized by an RF booster stage that uses left hand polarized slow mode waves launched from the high field side of the ion cyclotron resonance. The present setup for the booster uses 2 4 MHz waves with up to 20 kW of power. This process is similar to the ion cyclotron heating in tokamaks, but in the VASIMR the ions only pass through the resonance region once. The rapid absorption of ion cyclotron waves has been predicted in recent theoretical studies. These theoretical predictions have been supported with several independent measurements in this paper. The ICRH produced a substantial increase in ion velocity. Pitch angle distribution studies show that this increase takes place in the resonance region where the ion cyclotron frequency is equal to the frequency on the injected RF waves. Downstream of the resonance region the perpendicular velocity boost should be converted to axial flow velocity through the conservation of the first adiabatic invariant as the magnetic field decreases in the exhaust region of the VASIMR. In deuterium plasma, 80% efficient

  13. Cyclotron Auto-Resonance Accelerator for environmental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yong; Shchelkunov, Sergey V.; Hirshfield, Jay L.

    2017-03-01

    A MW-level CW electron beam source for environmental remediation based on extensions of the scientifically-proven Cyclotron Auto-Resonance Accelerator, dubbed CARA, is described here. CARA is distinguished by its exceptionally high RF-to-beam efficiency, by its production of a self-scanning beam, and by its proportionately lower specific power loading on a beam output window. Its environmental applications include sterilization, flue gas and waste water treatment.

  14. Mode converter for electron cyclotron resonance heating of toroidal plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Motley, R.W.; Hsuan, H.; Glanz, J.

    1980-09-01

    A method is proposed for improving the efficiency of cyclotron resonance heating of a toroidal plasma by ordinary mode radiation from the outside of the torus. Radiation not absorbed in the first pass is reflected from the inside of the torus by a corrugated surface which rotates the polarization by 90/sup 0/, so that a secondary source of extraordinary waves is created in the high field, accessible region of the plasma.

  15. Status of ECR (Electron Cyclotron Resonance) source technology

    SciTech Connect

    Lyneis, C.M.

    1987-03-01

    ECR (Electron Cyclotron Resonance) ion sources are now in widespread use for the production of high quality multiply charged ion beams for accelerators and atomic physics experiments, and industrial applications are being explored. Several general characteristics of ECR sources explain their widespread acceptance. For use with cyclotrons which require CW multiply charged ion beams, the ECR source has many advantages over heavy-ion PIG sources. Most important is the ability to produce higher charge states at useful intensities for nuclear physics experiments. Since the maximum energy set by the bending limit of a cyclotron scales with the square of the charge state, the installation of ECR sources on cyclotrons has provided an economical path to raise the energy. Another characteristic of ECR sources is that the discharge is produced without cathodes, so that only the source material injected into an ECR source is consumed. As a result, ECR sources can be operated continuously for periods of weeks without interruption. Techniques have been developed in the last few years, which allow these sources to produce beams from solid materials. The beam emittance from ECR sources is in the range of 50 to 200 ..pi.. mm-mrad at 10 kV. The principles of ECR ion sources are discussed, and present and future ECR sources are reviewed.

  16. Resonance of relativistic electrons with electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves

    DOE PAGES

    Denton, R. E.; Jordanova, V. K.; Bortnik, J.

    2015-06-29

    Relativistic electrons have been thought to more easily resonate with electromagnetic ion cyclotron EMIC waves if the total density is large. We show that, for a particular EMIC mode, this dependence is weak due to the dependence of the wave frequency and wave vector on the density. A significant increase in relativistic electron minimum resonant energy might occur for the H band EMIC mode only for small density, but no changes in parameters significantly decrease the minimum resonant energy from a nominal value. The minimum resonant energy depends most strongly on the thermal velocity associated with the field line motionmore » of the hot ring current protons that drive the instability. High density due to a plasmasphere or plasmaspheric plume could possibly lead to lower minimum resonance energy by causing the He band EMIC mode to be dominant. We demonstrate these points using parameters from a ring current simulation.« less

  17. Resonance of relativistic electrons with electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves

    SciTech Connect

    Denton, R. E.; Jordanova, V. K.; Bortnik, J.

    2015-06-29

    Relativistic electrons have been thought to more easily resonate with electromagnetic ion cyclotron EMIC waves if the total density is large. We show that, for a particular EMIC mode, this dependence is weak due to the dependence of the wave frequency and wave vector on the density. A significant increase in relativistic electron minimum resonant energy might occur for the H band EMIC mode only for small density, but no changes in parameters significantly decrease the minimum resonant energy from a nominal value. The minimum resonant energy depends most strongly on the thermal velocity associated with the field line motion of the hot ring current protons that drive the instability. High density due to a plasmasphere or plasmaspheric plume could possibly lead to lower minimum resonance energy by causing the He band EMIC mode to be dominant. We demonstrate these points using parameters from a ring current simulation.

  18. Nonlinear electron acceleration by oblique whistler waves: Landau resonance vs. cyclotron resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Artemyev, A. V.; Agapitov, O. V.; Krasnoselskikh, V. V.; Mourenas, D.

    2013-12-15

    This paper is devoted to the study of the nonlinear interaction of relativistic electrons and high amplitude strongly oblique whistler waves in the Earth's radiation belts. We consider electron trapping into Landau and fundamental cyclotron resonances in a simplified model of dipolar magnetic field. Trapping into the Landau resonance corresponds to a decrease of electron equatorial pitch-angles, while trapping into the first cyclotron resonance increases electron equatorial pitch-angles. For 100 keV electrons, the energy gained due to trapping is similar for both resonances. For electrons with smaller energy, acceleration is more effective when considering the Landau resonance. Moreover, trapping into the Landau resonance is accessible for a wider range of initial pitch-angles and initial energies in comparison with the fundamental resonance. Thus, we can conclude that for intense and strongly oblique waves propagating in the quasi-electrostatic mode, the Landau resonance is generally more important than the fundamental one.

  19. Increasing Polyaromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) Molecular Coverage during Fossil Oil Analysis by Combining Gas Chromatography and Atmospheric-Pressure Laser Ionization Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (FT-ICR MS).

    PubMed

    Benigni, Paolo; DeBord, J Daniel; Thompson, Christopher J; Gardinali, Piero; Fernandez-Lima, Francisco

    2016-01-21

    Thousands of chemically distinct compounds are encountered in fossil oil samples that require rapid screening and accurate identification. In the present paper, we show for the first time, the advantages of gas chromatography (GC) separation in combination with atmospheric-pressure laser ionization (APLI) and ultrahigh-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) for the screening of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in fossil oils. In particular, reference standards of organics in shale oil, petroleum crude oil, and heavy sweet crude oil were characterized by GC-APLI-FT-ICR MS and APLI-FT-ICR MS. Results showed that, while APLI increases the ionization efficiency of PAHs, when compared to other ionization sources, the complexity of the fossil oils reduces the probability of ionizing lower-concentration compounds during direct infusion. When gas chromatography precedes APLI-FT-ICR MS, an increase (more than 2-fold) in the ionization efficiency and an increase in the signal-to-noise ratio of lower-concentration fractions are observed, giving better molecular coverage in the m/z 100-450 range. That is, the use of GC prior to APLI-FT-ICR MS resulted in higher molecular coverage, higher sensitivity, and the ability to separate and characterize molecular isomers, while maintaining the ultrahigh resolution and mass accuracy of the FT-ICR MS separation.

  20. Permanent magnet electron cyclotron resonance plasma source with remote window

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, L.A.; Gorbatkin, S.M. )

    1995-03-01

    An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma has been used in conjunction with a solid metal sputter target for Cu deposition over 200 mm diameters. The goal is to develop a deposition system and process suitable for filling submicron, high-aspect ratio ULSI features. The system uses a permanent magnet for creation of the magnetic field necessary for ECR, and is significantly more compact than systems equipped with electromagnets. A custom launcher design allows remote microwave injection with the microwave entrance window shielded from the copper flux. When microwaves are introduced at an angle with respect to the plasma, high electron densities can be produced with a plasma frequency significantly greater than the electron cyclotron frequency. Copper deposition rates of 1000 A/min have been achieved.

  1. Cyclotron resonance in topological insulators: non-relativistic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabert, C. J.; Carbotte, J. P.

    2015-09-01

    The low-energy Hamiltonian used to describe the dynamics of the helical Dirac fermions on the surface of a topological insulator contains a subdominant non-relativistic (Schrödinger) contribution. This term can have an important effect on some properties while having no effect on others. The Hall plateaus retain the same relativistic quantization as the pure Dirac case. The height of the universal interband background conductivity is unaltered, but its onset is changed. However, the non-relativistic term leads directly to particle-hole asymmetry. It also splits the interband magneto-optical lines into doublets. Here, we find that, while the shape of the semiclassical cyclotron resonance line is unaltered, the cyclotron frequency and its optical spectral weight are changed. There are significant differences in both of these quantities for a fixed value of chemical potential or fixed doping away from charge neutrality depending on whether the Fermi energy lies in the valence or conduction band.

  2. Peculiarities of charged particle dynamics under cyclotron resonance conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Moiseev, S. S.; Buts, V. A.; Erokhin, N. S.

    2016-08-15

    Peculiarities of the dynamics of charged particles interacting with electromagnetic radiation under nearly autoresonance conditions are analyzed. In particular, analysis of nonlinear cyclotron resonances shows that their widths increase when the autoresonance conditions are approached. In this case, however, the distance between nonlinear resonances increases even faster, due to which nonlinear resonances do not overlap and, accordingly, regimes with dynamic chaos do not occur. According to calculations, the dynamics of charged particles under the autoresonance conditions is very sensitive to fluctuations, the effect of which can be anomalously large and lead to superdiffusion. It is shown that, under the autoresonance conditions, particle dynamics on small time intervals can differ significantly from that on large time intervals. This effect is most pronounced in the presence of fluctuations in the system.

  3. Glow plasma trigger for electron cyclotron resonance ion sources.

    PubMed

    Vodopianov, A V; Golubev, S V; Izotov, I V; Nikolaev, A G; Oks, E M; Savkin, K P; Yushkov, G Yu

    2010-02-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRISs) are particularly useful for nuclear, atomic, and high energy physics, as unique high current generators of multicharged ion beams. Plasmas of gas discharges in an open magnetic trap heated by pulsed (100 micros and longer) high power (100 kW and higher) high-frequency (greater than 37.5 GHz) microwaves of gyrotrons is promising in the field of research in the development of electron cyclotron resonance sources for high charge state ion beams. Reaching high ion charge states requires a decrease in gas pressure in the magnetic trap, but this method leads to increases in time, in which the microwave discharge develops. The gas breakdown and microwave discharge duration becomes greater than or equal to the microwave pulse duration when the pressure is decreased. This makes reaching the critical plasma density initiate an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) discharge during pulse of microwave gyrotron radiation with gas pressure lower than a certain threshold. In order to reduce losses of microwave power, it is necessary to shorten the time of development of the ECR discharge. For fast triggering of ECR discharge under low pressure in an ECRIS, we initially propose to fill the magnetic trap with the plasmas of auxiliary pulsed discharges in crossed ExB fields. The glow plasma trigger of ECR based on a Penning or magnetron discharge has made it possible not only to fill the trap with plasma with density of 10(12) cm(-3), required for a rapid increase in plasma density and finally for ECR discharge ignition, but also to initially heat the plasma electrons to T(e) approximately = 20 eV.

  4. A line-of-sight electron cyclotron emission receiver for electron cyclotron resonance heating feedback control of tearing modes

    SciTech Connect

    Oosterbeek, J. W.; Buerger, A.; Westerhof, E.; Baar, M. R. de; Berg, M. A. van den; Bongers, W. A.; Graswinckel, M. F.; Hennen, B. A.; Kruijt, O. G.; Thoen, J.; Heidinger, R.; Korsholm, S. B.; Leipold, F.; Nielsen, S. K.

    2008-09-15

    An electron cyclotron emission (ECE) receiver inside the electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) transmission line has been brought into operation. The ECE is extracted by placing a quartz plate acting as a Fabry-Perot interferometer under an angle inside the electron cyclotron wave (ECW) beam. ECE measurements are obtained during high power ECRH operation. This demonstrates the successful operation of the diagnostic and, in particular, a sufficient suppression of the gyrotron component preventing it from interfering with ECE measurements. When integrated into a feedback system for the control of plasma instabilities this line-of-sight ECE diagnostic removes the need to localize the instabilities in absolute coordinates.

  5. Ion cyclotron resonance heated conics - Theory and observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crew, G. B.; Chang, Tom; Retterer, J. M.; Peterson, W. K.; Gurnett, D. A.

    1990-01-01

    A general theoretical treatment of energetic oxygen ion conic formation through cyclotron resonance with magnetospheric electromagnetic plasma turbulence is presented. With suitable assumptions, there exists a similarity regime in which the process may be profitably characterized by two parameters corresponding roughly to the velocity scale and pitch angle of the ion distribution. These may be independently determined from the wave and particle observations of a conic event, as is illustrated here using typical auroral passes of the Dynamics Explorer 1 satellite. The predictions of the theory are found to be in excellent agreement with the observations.

  6. Personal computer based Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Shenheng; Jones, Patrick R.

    1988-12-01

    An IBM PC AT compatible computer is used to host the interface of a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer or FTMS. A common fast memory bank for both ion-excitation waveform and data acquisition is reserved in the computer's system memory space. All the digital electronics circuitry is assembled on an IBM PC AT extension board. Neither an external frequency synthesizer nor a waveform digitizer is needed. Ion-excitation waveforms can be generated in either frequency-sweeping or inverse-Fourier transform modes. Both excitation and data acquisition can be carried out at eight megawords per second.

  7. Potential applications of an electron cyclotron resonance multicusp plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, C.C.; Berry, L.A.; Gorbatkin, S.M.; Haselton, H.H.; Roberto, J.B.; Stirling, W.L.

    1989-01-01

    An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) multicusp plasmatron has been developed by feeding a multicusp bucket arc chamber with a compact ECR plasma source. This novel source produced large (about 25-cm-diam), uniform (to within {plus minus}10%), dense (>10{sup 11}-cm{sup -3}) plasmas of argon, helium, hydrogen, and oxygen. It has been operated to produce an oxygen plasma for etching 12.7-cm (5-in.) positive photoresist-coated silicon wafers with uniformity within {plus minus}8%. Results and potential applications of this new ECR plasma source for plasma processing of thin films are discussed. 21 refs., 10 figs.

  8. Miniature cyclotron resonance ion source using small permanent magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anicich, V. G.; Huntress, W. T., Jr. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An ion source using the cyclotron resonance principle is described. A miniaturized ion source device is used in an air gap of a small permanent magnet with a substantially uniform field in the air gap of about 0.5 inch. The device and permanent magnet are placed in an enclosure which is maintained at a high vacuum (typically 10 to the minus 7th power) into which a sample gas can be introduced. The ion beam end of the device is placed very close to an aperture through which an ion beam can exit into the apparatus for an experiment.

  9. A study of density in electron-cyclotron-resonance plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Uhm, H.S.; Lee, P.H.; Kim, Y.I.; Kim, J.H.; Chang, H.Y.

    1995-08-01

    A theory is developed for the density profile of low-temperature plasmas confined by applied magnetic field and an experiment of the electron-cyclotron-resonance (ECR) plasma is conducted to compare the theoretical prediction and experimental measurements. Due to a large electron mobility along the magnetic field, electrons move quickly out of the system, leaving ions behind and building a space charge potential, which leads to the ambipolar diffusion of ions. In a steady-state condition, the plasma generation by ionization of neutral molecules is in balance with plasma loss due to the diffusion, leading to the electron temperature equation, which is expressed in terms of the plasma size, chamber pressure, and the ionization energy and cross section of neutrals. The power balance condition leads to the plasma density equation, which is also expressed in terms of the electron temperature, the input microwave power and the chamber pressure. It is shown that the plasma density increases, reaches its peak and decreases, as the chamber pressure increases from a small value (0.1 mTorr). These simple expressions of electron temperature and density provide a scaling law of ECR plasma in terms of system parameters. After carrying out an experimental observation, it is concluded that the theoretical predictions of the electron temperature and plasma density agree remarkably well with experimental data. A large-volume plasma generated by the electron-cyclotron-resonance (ECR) mechanism plays a pivotal role in the plasma processing, including thin-film depositions and plasma etching technologies.

  10. Influences of residual oxygen impurities, cubic indium oxide grains and indium oxy-nitride alloy grains in hexagonal InN crystalline films grown on Si(111) substrates by electron cyclotron resonance plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yodo, T.; Nakamura, T.; Kouyama, T.; Harada, Y.

    2005-05-01

    We investigated the influences of residual oxygen (O) impurities, cubic indium oxide (-In2O3) grains and indium oxy-nitride (InON) alloy grains in 200 nm-thick hexagonal ()-InN crystalline films grown on Si(111) substrates by electron cyclotron resonance plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Although -In2O3 grains with wide band-gap energy were formed in In film by N2 annealing, they were not easily formed in N2-annealed InN films. Even if they were not detected in N2-annealed InN films, the as-grown films still contained residual O impurities with concentrations of less than 0.5% ([O]0.5%). Although [O]1% could be estimated by investigating In2O3 grains formed in N2-annealed InN films, [O]0.5% could not be measured by it. However, we found that they can be qualitatively measured by investigating In2O3 grains formed by H2 annealing with higher reactivity with InN and O2, using X-ray diffraction and PL spectroscopy. In this paper, we discuss the formation mechanism of InON alloy grains in InN films.

  11. Plasma injection and capture at electron cyclotron resonance in a mirror system with additional rf fields

    SciTech Connect

    Golovanivskii, K.S.; Dugar-Zhabon, V.D.; Karyaka, V.I.; Milant'ev, V.P.; Turikov, V.A.

    1980-03-01

    Experiments and numerical simulations have been carried out to determine how cyclotron-resonance rf fields in an open magnetic mirror system affect the capture and confinement of a plasma injected along the axis. The results show that at electron cyclotron resonance the fields greatly improve the longitudinal plasma confinement.

  12. FEL's with bragg reflection resonators: cyclotron auto resonance masers versus ubitrons

    SciTech Connect

    Bratman, V.L.; Denisov, G.G.; Ginzburg, N.S.; Petelin, M.I.

    1983-03-01

    FEL's based on the stimulated undulator radiation (ubitrons) are compared with those based on the stimulated cyclotron radiation (cyclotron autoresonance masers (CARM's)). If the high-current accelerators are used as electron injectors, then from the viewpoint of simplicity of oscillatory electron energy pumping, criticality with respect to electron velocity dispersion, and efficiency, CARM's seem to be more effective than ubitrons at mm and sbmm waves. For such HF generators, resonators based on selective Bragg reflection of electromagnetic waves in corrugated metallic tubes are most attractive. CARM's of this type yield 6 MW at a 4 mm wavelength and 10 MW at a 2 mm wavelength in the single-mode regime.

  13. Cyclotron resonant scattering and absorption. [in gamma ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.; Daugherty, Joseph K.

    1991-01-01

    The relativistic cross-sections for first-order absorption and second-order scattering are compared to determine the conditions under which the absorption cross-section is a good approximation to the much more complex scattering cross-section for purposes of modeling cyclotron lines in gamma-ray bursts. Differences in both the cross-sections and the line profiles are presented for a range of field strengths, angles, and electron temperatures. The relative difference of the cross-sections at one line width from resonance was found to increase with field strength and harmonic number. The difference is also strongly dependent on the photon angle to the magnetic field. For the field strength, 1.7 x 10 to the 12th G, and the angle inferred from the Ginga burst features, absorption is an excellent approximation for the profiles at the first and second harmonics.

  14. Pulsed magnetic field-electron cyclotron resonance ion source operation

    SciTech Connect

    Muehle, C.; Ratzinger, U.; Joest, G.; Leible, K.; Schennach, S.; Wolf, B.H.

    1996-03-01

    The pulsed magnetic field (PuMa)-electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source uses a pulsed coil to improve the peak current by opening the magnetic bottle along the beam axis. After demonstration of the principle of the pulsed magnetic extraction, the ion source was tested with different gases. We received promising results from helium to krypton. The influence of the current in the pulsed coil on the analyzed ion current was measured. With increased current levels within the pulsed coil not only the pulse height of the PuMa pulse, but the pulse length can also be controlled. By using the pulsed coil the maximum of the charge state distribution can be shifted to higher charge states. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. A simple electron cyclotron resonance ion source (abstract)a)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welton, R. F.; Moran, T. F.; Feeney, R. K.; Thomas, E. W.

    1996-03-01

    A simple, all permanent magnet, 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source has been developed for the production of stable beams of low charge state ions from gaseous feed materials. The source can produce ˜1 mA of low energy (3 kV) singly charged ion current in the 10-4 Torr pressure range. The source can also be operated in a more efficient low-pressure mode at an order of magnitude lower pressure. In this latter range, for example, the ionization efficiency of Ar is estimated to be 1% with charge states up to Ar8+ present. Operation in the low-pressure mode requires low power input (˜20 W). These features make the source especially suited for use with small accelerator systems for a number of applications including ion implantation, mass spectrometry, and atomic collision experiments where multiply charged ions are desirable. Design details and performance characteristics of the source are presented.

  16. Characteristics of surface sterilization using electron cyclotron resonance plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonesu, Akira; Hara, Kazufumi; Nishikawa, Tatsuya; Hayashi, Nobuya

    2016-07-01

    The characteristics of surface sterilization using electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma were investigated. High-energy electrons and oxygen radicals were observed in the ECR zone using electric probe and optical emission spectroscopic methods. A biological indicator (BI), Geobacillus stearothermophilus, containing 1 × 106 spores was sterilized in 120 s by exposure to oxygen discharges while maintaining a temperature of approximately 55 °C at the BI installation position. Oxygen radicals and high-energy electrons were found to be the sterilizing species in the ECR region. It was demonstrated that the ECR plasma could be produced in narrow tubes with an inner diameter of 5 mm. Moreover, sterilization tests confirmed that the spores present inside the narrow tube were successfully inactivated by ECR plasma irradiation.

  17. Cyclotron resonance maser experiment in a nondispersive waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Jerby, E.; Shahadi, A.; Drori, R.

    1996-06-01

    A cyclotron-resonance maser (CRM) oscillator experiment in which a spiraling electron beam interacts with a transverse electromagnetic wave in a nondispersive waveguide is presented. The experiment employs a low-energy low-current electron beam in a two-wire (Lecher type) waveguide. The microwave output frequency is tuned in this experiment by the axial magnetic field in the range 3.5--6.0 GHz. A second harmonic emission is observed at {approximately}7 GHz. CRM theory shows that in a free-space TEM-mode interaction, the gain might be canceled due to the equal and opposite effects of the axial (Weibel) and the azimuthal bunching mechanisms. This balance is violated in the large transverse velocity regime (V{sub {perpendicular}} {much_gt} V{sub z}) in which the experiment operates. The tunability measurements of the CRM oscillator experiment in the nondispersive waveguide are discussed in view of the CRM theory.

  18. Application of compact electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Muramatsu, M.; Kitagawa, A.; Iwata, Y.; Ogawa, H.; Hojo, S.; Kubo, T.; Kato, Y.; Biri, S.; Fekete, E.; Yoshida, Y.; Drentje, A. G.

    2008-02-15

    The compact electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source with a permanent magnet configuration (Kei2 source) has been developed at National Institute of Radiological Sciences for a new carbon therapy facility. The Kei2 source was designed for production of C{sup 4+} ions; its performance such as beam intensity and stability has already reached the medical requirements. Therefore, the prototype development of the source for medical use is essentially finished. Recently, we have started a few studies on other applications of the source. One is the production of fullerenes in the ECR plasma and modified fullerenes with various atoms for new materials. A second application is the production of multiply charged ions (not only carbon) for ion implantation. In this paper, some basic experiments for these applications are reported.

  19. Integrated modeling for ion cyclotron resonant heating in toroidal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jucker, M.; Graves, J. P.; Cooper, W. A.; Mellet, N.; Johnson, T.; Brunner, S.

    2011-04-01

    An integrated model capable of self-consistent Ion Cyclotron Resonant Heating (ICRH) simulations has been developed. This model includes both full shaping and pressure effects, warm contributions to the dielectric tensor, pressure anisotropy and finite orbit width. It evolves the equilibrium, wave field and full hot particle distribution function until a self-consistent solution is found. This article describes the workings of the three codes VMEC, LEMan and VENUS and how they are linked for iterated computations in a code package we have named SCENIC. The package is thoroughly tested and it is demonstrated that a number of iterations have to be performed in order to find a consistent solution. Since the formulation of the problem can treat general 3D systems, we show a quasi-axisymmetric stellarator low power test case, and then concentrate on experimentally relevant Joint European Torus (JET) 2D configurations.

  20. Dynamic regimes of cyclotron instability in the afterglow mode of minimum-B electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansfeld, D.; Izotov, I.; Skalyga, V.; Tarvainen, O.; Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H.; Komppula, J.; Kronholm, R.; Laulainen, J.

    2016-04-01

    The paper is concerned with the dynamic regimes of cyclotron instabilities in non-equilibrium plasma of a minimum-B electron cyclotron resonance ion source operated in pulsed mode. The instability appears in decaying ion source plasma shortly (1-10 ms) after switching off the microwave radiation of the klystron, and manifests itself in the form of powerful pulses of electromagnetic emission associated with precipitation of high-energy electrons along the magnetic field lines. Recently it was shown that this plasma instability causes perturbations of the extracted ion current, which limits the performance of the ion source and generates strong bursts of bremsstrahlung emission. In this article we present time-resolved diagnostics of electromagnetic emission bursts related to cyclotron instability in the decaying plasma. The temporal resolution is sufficient to study the fine structure of the dynamic spectra of the electromagnetic emission at different operating regimes of the ion source. It was found that at different values of magnetic field and heating power the dynamic spectra demonstrate common features: Decreasing frequency from burst to burst and an always falling tone during a single burst of instability. The analysis has shown that the instability is driven by the resonant interaction of hot electrons, distributed between the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) zone and the trap center, with slow extraordinary wave propagation quasi-parallel with respect to the external magnetic field.

  1. Differential turbulent heating of different ions in electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Elizarov, L.I.; Ivanov, A.A.; Serebrennikov, K.S.; Vostrikova, E.A.

    2006-03-15

    The article considers the collisionless ion sound turbulent heating of different ions in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS). The ion sound arises due to parametric instability of pumping wave propagating along the magnetic field with the frequency close to that of electron cyclotron. Within the framework of turbulent heating model the different ions temperatures are calculated in gas-mixing ECRIS plasma.

  2. A room temperature electron cyclotron resonance ion source for the DC-110 cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Efremov, A. Bogomolov, S.; Lebedev, A.; Loginov, V.; Yazvitsky, N.

    2014-02-15

    The project of the DC-110 cyclotron facility to provide applied research in the nanotechnologies (track pore membranes, surface modification of materials, etc.) has been designed by the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Dubna). The facility includes the isochronous cyclotron DC-110 for accelerating the intensive Ar, Kr, Xe ion beams with 2.5 MeV/nucleon fixed energy. The cyclotron is equipped with system of axial injection and ECR ion source DECRIS-5, operating at the frequency of 18 GHz. This article reviews the design and construction of DECRIS-5 ion source along with some initial commissioning results.

  3. Molecular Characterization and Reactivity of Dissolved Organic Matter by High Resolution Nanospray Ionization Fourier Transform-Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (FTICR-MS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleighter, R. L.; Hatcher, S. A.; Hatcher, P. G.

    2006-12-01

    The ultrahigh resolving power of FTICR-MS allows for the intense characterization of dissolved organic matter (DOM). DOM is the largest reactive component of the global carbon cycle, and an improved understanding of its composition is necessary to determine the transport and eventual fate of pollutants. The seasonal and spatial variations in DOM composition are investigated by taking surface water samples from five different sampling sites, four times a year. Water sampling begins at the Dismal Swamp in North Carolina, continues north up the Elizabeth River to the Chesapeake Bay, and concludes approximately ten miles off the coast in the Atlantic Ocean. DOM was extracted from the water samples using C18 extraction disks and were prepared in 50:50 methanol:water. Ammonium hydroxide was added prior to nanospray in order to solubilize the DOM as well as to increase the ionization efficiency. The samples were continuously infused into the Apollo II ion source with an Advion TriVersa NanoMate system of a Bruker 12 Tesla Apex QE FTICR-MS with resolving powers exceeding 400,000. All samples were analyzed in negative ion mode and were externally and internally calibrated prior to data analysis. Our DOM mass spectra consist of a multitude of peaks spanning the range of 200-850 m/z. Complexity is apparent from the detection of up to 20 peaks per nominal mass at nearly every mass throughout that range. A molecular formula calculator generated molecular formula matches from which van Krevelen plots were constructed for characterization purposes. A wide range of molecules were observed each containing oxygen, sulfur and nitrogen functional groups. We utilize the van Krevelen diagram to assist in clustering the molecules according to their functional group compositions. To test the hypothesis that formation of adducts to DOM serve to protect peptides from bacterial degradation, microcosm experiments were performed with a small isotopically enriched peptide, GGGR. This peptide

  4. Understanding molecular formula assignment of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry data of natural organic matter from a chemical point of view.

    PubMed

    Herzsprung, Peter; Hertkorn, Norbert; von Tümpling, Wolf; Harir, Mourad; Friese, Kurt; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe

    2014-12-01

    Formula assignment is one of the key challenges in evaluation of dissolved organic matter analyses using ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry (FTICR MS). The number of possible solutions for elemental formulas grows exponentially with increasing nominal mass, especially when non-oxygen heteroatoms like N, S or P are considered. Until now, no definitive solution for finding the correct elemental formula has been given. For that reason an approach from the viewpoint of chemical feasibility was elucidated. To illustrate the new chemical formula assignment principle, a literature data set was used and evaluated by simplified chemical constraints. Only formulas containing a maximum of one sulphur and five nitrogen atoms were selected for further data processing. The resulting data table was then divided into mass peaks with unique component solutions (singlets, representing unequivocal formula assignments) and those with two or more solutions (multiple formula assignments, representing equivocal formula assignments). Based on a [double bond equivalent (DBE) versus the number of oxygen atoms (o)] frequency contour plot and a frequency versus [DBE minus o] diagram, a new assessment and decision strategy was developed to differentiate multiple formula assignments into chemically reliable and less reliable molecular formulas. Using this approach a considerable number of reliable components were identified within the equivocal part of the data set. As a control, a considerable proportion of the assigned formulas deemed to be reliable correspond to those which would have been obtained by CH 2 -based Kendrick mass defect analysis. We conclude that formula assignment in complex mixtures can be improved by group-wise decisions based on the frequency and the [DBE minus o] values of multiple formula assignments.

  5. Production of large resonant plasma volumes in microwave electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    DOEpatents

    Alton, Gerald D.

    1998-01-01

    Microwave injection methods for enhancing the performance of existing electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources. The methods are based on the use of high-power diverse frequency microwaves, including variable-frequency, multiple-discrete-frequency, and broadband microwaves. The methods effect large resonant "volume" ECR regions in the ion sources. The creation of these large ECR plasma volumes permits coupling of more microwave power into the plasma, resulting in the heating of a much larger electron population to higher energies, the effect of which is to produce higher charge state distributions and much higher intensities within a particular charge state than possible in present ECR ion sources.

  6. Production of large resonant plasma volumes in microwave electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    DOEpatents

    Alton, G.D.

    1998-11-24

    Microwave injection methods are disclosed for enhancing the performance of existing electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources. The methods are based on the use of high-power diverse frequency microwaves, including variable-frequency, multiple-discrete-frequency, and broadband microwaves. The methods effect large resonant ``volume`` ECR regions in the ion sources. The creation of these large ECR plasma volumes permits coupling of more microwave power into the plasma, resulting in the heating of a much larger electron population to higher energies, the effect of which is to produce higher charge state distributions and much higher intensities within a particular charge state than possible in present ECR ion sources. 5 figs.

  7. Ultradeep electron cyclotron resonance plasma etching of GaN

    DOE PAGES

    Harrison, Sara E.; Voss, Lars F.; Torres, Andrea M.; ...

    2017-07-25

    Here, ultradeep (≥5 μm) electron cyclotron resonance plasma etching of GaN micropillars was investigated. Parametric studies on the influence of the applied radio-frequency power, chlorine content in a Cl2/Ar etch plasma, and operating pressure on the etch depth, GaN-to-SiO2 selectivity, and surface morphology were performed. Etch depths of >10 μm were achieved over a wide range of parameters. Etch rates and sidewall roughness were found to be most sensitive to variations in RF power and % Cl2 in the etch plasma. Selectivities of >20:1 GaN:SiO2 were achieved under several chemically driven etch conditions where a maximum selectivity of ~39:1 wasmore » obtained using a 100% Cl2 plasma. The etch profile and (0001) surface morphology were significantly influenced by operating pressure and the chlorine content in the plasma. Optimized etch conditions yielded >10 μm tall micropillars with nanometer-scale sidewall roughness, high GaN:SiO2 selectivity, and nearly vertical etch profiles. These results provide a promising route for the fabrication of ultradeep GaN microstructures for use in electronic and optoelectronic device applications. In addition, dry etch induced preferential crystallographic etching in GaN microstructures is also demonstrated, which may be of great interest for applications requiring access to non- or semipolar GaN surfaces.« less

  8. Fourth generation electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Lyneis, Claude M.; Leitner, D.; Todd, D. S.; Sabbi, G.; Prestemon, S.; Caspi, S.; Ferracin, P.

    2008-02-15

    The concepts and technical challenges related to developing a fourth generation electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source with a rf frequency greater than 40 GHz and magnetic confinement fields greater than twice B{sub ECR} will be explored in this article. Based on the semiempirical frequency scaling of ECR plasma density with the square of operating frequency, there should be significant gains in performance over current third generation ECR ion sources, which operate at rf frequencies between 20 and 30 GHz. While the third generation ECR ion sources use NbTi superconducting solenoid and sextupole coils, the new sources will need to use different superconducting materials, such as Nb{sub 3}Sn, to reach the required magnetic confinement, which scales linearly with rf frequency. Additional technical challenges include increased bremsstrahlung production, which may increase faster than the plasma density, bremsstrahlung heating of the cold mass, and the availability of high power continuous wave microwave sources at these frequencies. With each generation of ECR ion sources, there are new challenges to be mastered, but the potential for higher performance and reduced cost of the associated accelerator continues to make this a promising avenue for development.

  9. Electron cyclotron resonance deposition of diamond-like films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shing, Y. H.; Pool, F. S.

    1990-01-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) microwave plasma CVD has been developed at low pressures (0.0001 - 0.01 torr) and at ambient and high substrate temperatures (up to 750 C), to achieve large-area (greater than 4 in. diameter) depositions of diamondlike amorphous carbon (a - C:H) films. The application of a RF bias to the substrate stage, which induces a negative self-bias voltage, is found to play a critical role in determining carbon bonding configurations and in modifying the film morphology. There are two distinct types of ECR-deposited diamondlike films. One type of diamondlike film exhibits a Raman spectrum consisting of broad and overlapping, graphitic D (1360/cm, line width = 280/cm) and G (1590/cm, line width 140/cm) lines, and the other type has a broad Raman peak centered at appoximately 1500/cm. Examination of plasma species by optical emission spectroscopy shows no correlation between the CH-asterisk emission intensity and the deposition rate of diamondklike films.

  10. Ion cyclotron resonance heating in SST-1 tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Bora, D.; Mukherjee, A.; Singh, J. P.; Gangopadhyay, S.; Kumar, Sunil; Singh RF Group, Raj

    1999-09-20

    Multimegawatt ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) system is being developed for the steady state superconducting takamak SST-1 (1), which would form an important heating scheme during non-inductive steady state operation. 1.5 MW of RF power at different frequencies between 22-92 MHz is to be delivered to the plasma for pulse lengths of upto 1000 s. Water cooled antenna, interface and 9 inch Tx-line will ensure safe operation for long pulse operation. Three stages of matching would ensure maximum power coupling to the plasma. Power would be coupled to the plasma through two sets of antennae consisting of two strips in antenna box positioned 180 degree opposite to each other with capability of handling 0.8 MW/m{sup 2} heat load. Electromagnetic stress analysis of the antenna assembly shows that maximum 1.37 kNm torque would be exerted during plasma disruption operating at 3.0 T, 220 kA plasma current. Impurity generation by ICRH antennae is not so severe.

  11. Plume properties measurement of an Electron Cyclotron Resonance Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correyero, Sara; Vialis, Theo; Jarrige, Julien; Packan, Denis

    2016-09-01

    Some emergent technologies for Electric Propulsion, such as the Electron Cyclotron Resonance Accelerator (ECRA), include magnetic nozzles to guide and expand the plasma. The advantages of this concept are well known: wall-plasma contact is avoided, it provides a current-free plume, it can allow to control thrust by modifying the magnetic field geometry, etc. However, their industrial application requires the understanding of the physical mechanisms involved, such as the electron thermodynamics at the plasma plume expansion, which is crucial to determine propulsive performances. This work presents a detailed characterization of the plasma plume axial profile in an ECR plasma thruster developed at ONERA. Langmuir, emissive, Faraday and ion energy probes are used to measure the electric potential space evolution, the current and electron energy distribution function in the plume, from the near field to the far field. The experimental results are compared with a quasi-1D (paraxial) steady-state kinetic model of a quasineutral collisionless magnetized plasma which is able to determine consistently the axial evolution of the electric potential and the electron and ion distribution functions with their associated properties.

  12. Parallel Spectral Acquisition with an Ion Cyclotron Resonance Cell Array.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Gun; Anderson, Gordon A; Navare, Arti T; Bruce, James E

    2016-01-19

    Mass measurement accuracy is a critical analytical figure-of-merit in most areas of mass spectrometry application. However, the time required for acquisition of high-resolution, high mass accuracy data limits many applications and is an aspect under continual pressure for development. Current efforts target implementation of higher electrostatic and magnetic fields because ion oscillatory frequencies increase linearly with field strength. As such, the time required for spectral acquisition of a given resolving power and mass accuracy decreases linearly with increasing fields. Mass spectrometer developments to include multiple high-resolution detectors that can be operated in parallel could further decrease the acquisition time by a factor of n, the number of detectors. Efforts described here resulted in development of an instrument with a set of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) cells as detectors that constitute the first MS array capable of parallel high-resolution spectral acquisition. ICR cell array systems consisting of three or five cells were constructed with printed circuit boards and installed within a single superconducting magnet and vacuum system. Independent ion populations were injected and trapped within each cell in the array. Upon filling the array, all ions in all cells were simultaneously excited and ICR signals from each cell were independently amplified and recorded in parallel. Presented here are the initial results of successful parallel spectral acquisition, parallel mass spectrometry (MS) and MS/MS measurements, and parallel high-resolution acquisition with the MS array system.

  13. Multi-Species Test of Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating at High Altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Persoon, A. M.; Peterson, W. K.; Andre, M.; Chang, T.; Gurnett, D. A.; Retterer, J. M.; Crew, G. B.

    1997-01-01

    Observations of ion distributions and plasma waves obtained by the Dynamics Explorer 1 satellite in the high-altitude, nightside auroral zone are used to study ion energization for three ion species. A number of theoretical models have been proposed to account for the transverse heating of these ion populations. One of these, the ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) mechanism, explains ion conic formation through ion cyclotron resonance with broadband electromagnetic wave turbulence in the vicinity of the characteristic ion cyclotron frequency. The cyclotron resonant heating of the ions by low- frequency electromagnetic waves is an important energy source for the transport of ions from the ionosphere to the magnetosphere. In this paper we test the applicability of the ICRH mechanism to three simultaneously heated and accelerated ion species by modelling the ion conic formation in terms of a resonant wave-particle interaction in which the ions extract energy from the portion of the broadband electromagnetic wave spectrum which includes the ion cyclotron frequency. Using a Monte Carlo technique we evaluate the ion heating produced by the electromagnetic turbulence at low frequencies and find that the wave amplitudes near the ion cyclotron frequencies are sufficient to explain the observed ion energies.

  14. Multi-Species Test of Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating at High Altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Persoon, A. M.; Peterson, W. K.; Andre, M.; Chang, T.; Gurnett, D. A.; Retterer, J. M.; Crew, G. B.

    1997-01-01

    Observations of ion distributions and plasma waves obtained by the Dynamics Explorer 1 satellite in the high-altitude, nightside auroral zone are used to study ion energization for three ion species. A number of theoretical models have been proposed to account for the transverse heating of these ion populations. One of these, the ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) mechanism, explains ion conic formation through ion cyclotron resonance with broadband electromagnetic wave turbulence in the vicinity of the characteristic ion cyclotron frequency. The cyclotron resonant heating of the ions by low-frequency electromagnetic waves is an important energy source for the transport of ions from the ionosphere to the magnetosphere. In this paper we test the applicability of the ICRH mechanism to three simultaneously heated and accelerated ion species by modelling the ion conic formation in terms of a resonant wave-particle interaction in which the ions extract energy from the portion of the broadband electromagnetic wave spectrum which includes the ion cyclotron frequency. Using a Monte Carlo technique we evaluate the ion heating produced by the electromagnetic turbulence at low frequencies and find that the wave amplitudes near the ion cyclotron frequencies are sufficient to explain the observed ion energies.

  15. High power Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) in JET

    SciTech Connect

    Jacquinot, J.

    1988-01-01

    Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) powers of up to 17 MW have been coupled to JET limiter plasmas. The plasma stored energy has reached 7 MJ with 13 MW of RF in 5 MA discharges with Z/sub eff/ = 2. When I/sub p//B/sub /phi// = 1 MA/T the stored energy can be 50% greater than the Goldston L mode scaling. This is due to transient stabilisation of sawteeth (up to 3 s) and to a significant energy content in the minority particles accelerated by RF (up to 30% of the total stored energy). Central temperatures of T/sub e/ - 11 keV and T/sub i/ = 8 keV have been reached with RF alone. (He/sup 3/)D fusion experiments have given a 60 kW fusion yield (fusion rate of 2 /times/ 10/sup 16/ s/sup /minus/1/ in the form of energetic fast particles (14.7 MeV(H), 3.6 MeV(He/sup 4/)) in agreement with modelling. When transposing the same calculation to a (D)T scenario, Q is predicted to be between 0.l2 and 0.8 using plasma parameters already achieved. For the first time, a peaked density profile generated by pellet injection could be reheated and sustained by ICRF for 1.2 s. Electron heat transport in the central region is reduced by a factor 2 to 3. The fusion product n/sub io//tau//sub E/T/sub io/ reaches 2.2 /times/ 10/sup 20/ m/sup /minus/3//center dot/s/center dot/kev in 3 MA discharges which is a factor of 2.3 times larger than with normal density profile. 18 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Microwave emission related to cyclotron instabilities in a minimum-B electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izotov, I.; Tarvainen, O.; Mansfeld, D.; Skalyga, V.; Koivisto, H.; Kalvas, T.; Komppula, J.; Kronholm, R.; Laulainen, J.

    2015-08-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRIS) have been essential in the research and applications of nuclear physics over the past 40 years. They are extensively used in a wide range of large-scale accelerator facilities for the production of highly charged heavy ion beams of stable and radioactive elements. ECRISs are susceptible to kinetic instabilities due to resonance heating mechanism leading to anisotropic electron velocity distribution function. Instabilities of cyclotron type are a proven cause of frequently observed periodic bursts of ‘hot’ electrons and bremsstrahlung, accompanied with emission of microwave radiation and followed by considerable drop of multiply charged ions current. Detailed studies of the microwave radiation associated with the instabilities have been performed with a minimum-B 14 GHz ECRIS operating on helium, oxygen and argon plasmas. It is demonstrated that during the development of cyclotron instability ‘hot’ electrons emit microwaves in sub-microsecond scale bursts at temporally descending frequencies in the 8-15 GHz range with two dominant frequencies of 11.09 and 12.59 GHz regardless of ECRIS settings i.e. magnetic field strength, neutral gas pressure or species and microwave power. The experimental data suggest that the most probable excited plasma wave is a slow extraordinary Z-mode propagating quasi-longitudinally with respect to the external magnetic field.

  17. New method for comprehensive detection of chemical warfare agents using an electron-cyclotron-resonance ion-source mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidera, Masanori; Seto, Yasuo; Takahashi, Kazuya; Enomoto, Shuichi; Kishi, Shintaro; Makita, Mika; Nagamatsu, Tsuyoshi; Tanaka, Tatsuhiko; Toda, Masayoshi

    2011-03-01

    We developed a detection technology for vapor forms of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) with an element analysis system using an electron cyclotron resonance ion source. After the vapor sample was introduced directly into the ion source, the molecular material was decomposed into elements using electron cyclotron resonance plasma and ionized. The following CWAs and stimulants were examined: diisopropyl fluorophosphonate (DFP), 2-chloroethylethylsulfide (2CEES), cyanogen chloride (CNCl), and hydrogen cyanide (HCN). The type of chemical warfare agents, specifically, whether it was a nerve agent, blister agent, blood agent, or choking agent, could be determined by measuring the quantities of the monatomic ions or CN + using mass spectrometry. It was possible to detect gaseous CWAs that could not be detected by a conventional mass spectrometer. The distribution of electron temperature in the plasma could be closely controlled by adjusting the input power of the microwaves used to generate the electron cyclotron resonance plasma, and the target compounds could be detected as molecular ions or fragment ions, enabling identification of the target agents.

  18. New method for comprehensive detection of chemical warfare agents using an electron-cyclotron-resonance ion-source mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Kidera, Masanori; Seto, Yasuo; Takahashi, Kazuya; Enomoto, Shuichi; Kishi, Shintaro; Makita, Mika; Nagamatsu, Tsuyoshi; Tanaka, Tatsuhiko; Toda, Masayoshi

    2011-03-01

    We developed a detection technology for vapor forms of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) with an element analysis system using an electron cyclotron resonance ion source. After the vapor sample was introduced directly into the ion source, the molecular material was decomposed into elements using electron cyclotron resonance plasma and ionized. The following CWAs and stimulants were examined: diisopropyl fluorophosphonate (DFP), 2-chloroethylethylsulfide (2CEES), cyanogen chloride (CNCl), and hydrogen cyanide (HCN). The type of chemical warfare agents, specifically, whether it was a nerve agent, blister agent, blood agent, or choking agent, could be determined by measuring the quantities of the monatomic ions or CN(+) using mass spectrometry. It was possible to detect gaseous CWAs that could not be detected by a conventional mass spectrometer. The distribution of electron temperature in the plasma could be closely controlled by adjusting the input power of the microwaves used to generate the electron cyclotron resonance plasma, and the target compounds could be detected as molecular ions or fragment ions, enabling identification of the target agents.

  19. Experiment study of an electron cyclotron resonant ion source based on a tapered resonance cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Juan; Shi, Feng; Jin, Yizhou; Wang, Yunmin; Komurasaki, Kimiya

    2013-12-15

    Electron cyclotron resonant plasma is one type of magnetised plasma generated by continuous microwave energy. It has the property of high degree of ionization and large volume at low gas pressure, which makes it useful for space propulsion and material processing. This article presents the experiment study of the plasma properties and ion beam extraction from an electron cyclotron resonant ion source based on a tapered resonance cavity. Optical emission spectroscopy based on a simple collisional radiation model was used for plasma diagnosis. Experiment results show that, at microwave power setting ranging from 7.06 to 17.40 W and mass flow rate ranging from 1 to 10 sccm, argon gas can be ionized. Ion beam of 109.1 mA from the ion source can be extracted at microwave power of 30 W, mass flow rate of 10 sccm, and accel voltage of 800 V. The diagnosed plasma temperature and density are 2.4–5.2 eV and 2 × 10{sup 16}–4.8 × 10{sup 17} m{sup −3}, respectively.

  20. Status of a compact electron cyclotron resonance ion source for National Institute of Radiological Sciences-930 cyclotron.

    PubMed

    Hojo, S; Katagiri, K; Nakao, M; Sugiura, A; Muramatsu, M; Noda, A; Okada, T; Takahashi, Y; Komiyama, A; Honma, T; Noda, K

    2014-02-01

    The Kei-source is a compact electron cyclotron resonance ion source using only permanent magnets and a frequency of 10 GHz. It was developed at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) for producing C(4+) ions oriented for high-energy carbon therapy. It has also been used as an ion source for the NIRS-930 cyclotron. Its microwave band region for the traveling-wave-tube amplifier and maximum output power are 8-10 GHz and 350 W, respectively. Since 2006, it has provided various ion beams such as proton, deuteron, carbon, oxygen, and neon with sufficient intensity (200 μA for proton and deuteron, 50 μA for C(4+), for example) and good stability for radioisotope production, tests of radiation damage, and basic research experiments. Its horizontal and vertical emittances were measured using a screen monitor and waist-scan. The present paper reports the current status of the Kei-source.

  1. Nonlinear Fundamental and Harmonic Cyclotron Resonant Scattering of Radiation Belt Ultra-Relativistic Electrons by Oblique Monochromatic EMIC Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G.; Su, Z.; Zheng, H.

    2016-12-01

    Cyclotron resonant scattering by electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves has been considered to be responsible for the rapid loss of radiation belt high-energy electrons. Recent studies have revealed the nonlinear character of cyclotron resonance with parallel-propagating EMIC waves. Here we investigate the fundamental and harmonic cyclotron resonance between radiation belt ultra-relativistic electrons and oblique monochromatic EMIC waves. We show that both fundamental and harmonic cyclotron resonance can exhibit significant nonlinearity for oblique EMIC waves. Higher wave obliquity allows stronger nonlinearity of harmonic resonance but weaker nonlinearity of fundamental resonance. The total transport coefficients of nonlinear resonances are found to deviate significantly from the quasi-linear predication. Increase of wave obliquity tends to reduce, to some extent, the difference between nonlinear and quasi-linear transport coefficients. These results suggest that the nonlinear resonant scattering even by oblique EMIC waves should be taken into account in future radiation belt modeling.

  2. Photoionization and ion cyclotron resonance studies of the ion chemistry of ethylene oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corderman, R. R.; Williamson, A. D.; Lebreton, P. R.; Buttrill, S. E., Jr.; Beauchamp, J. L.

    1976-01-01

    The formation of the ethylene oxide molecular ion and its subsequent ion-molecule reactions leading to the products C2H5O(+) and C3H5O(+) have been studied using time-resolved photoionization mass spectroscopy, ion cyclotron resonance spectroscopy, and photoelectron spectroscopy. An examination of the effects of internal energy on reactivity shows that the ratio of C3H5O(+) to C2H5O(+) increases by an order of magnitude with a single quantum of vibrational energy. The formation of (C2H4O/+/)-asterisk in a collision-induced isomerization is found which yields a ring-opened structure by C-C bond cleavage. The relaxed ring-opened C2H4O(+) ion reacts with neutral ethylene oxide by CH2(+) transfer to yield an intermediate product ion C3H6O(+) which gives C3H5O(+) by loss of H.

  3. Cyclotron resonance of figure-of-eight orbits in a type-II Weyl semimetal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshino, Mikito

    2016-07-01

    We study the cyclotron resonance in the electron-hole joint Fermi surface of a type-II Weyl semimetal. In magnetic field, the electron and hole pockets touching at the Weyl node are hybridized to form quantized Landau levels corresponding to semiclassical 8-shaped orbits. We calculate the dynamical conductivities for the electric fields oscillating in x and y directions and find that the resonant frequencies in x and y differ by a factor of two, reflecting the figure-of-eight electron motion in real space. The peculiar anisotropy in the cyclotron resonance serves as a unique characteristic of the dumbbell-like Fermi surface.

  4. Ratchet transport of a two-dimensional electron gas at cyclotron resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budkin, G. V.; Tarasenko, S. A.

    2016-02-01

    The driving of charge carriers confined in a quantum well lacking the center of space inversion by an alternating electric field leads to the formation of a direct electric current. We develop a microscopic theory of such a quantum ratchet effect for quantum wells subjected to a static magnetic field. We show that the ratchet current emerges for a linearly polarized alternating electric field as well as a rotating electric field and drastically increases at the cyclotron resonance conditions. For the magnetic field tilted with respect to the quantum well normal, the ratchet current contains an additional resonance at the first subharmonic of the cyclotron resonance.

  5. Aging effects on macadamia nut oil studied by electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Proschogo, Nicholas W; Albertson, Peter L; Bursle, Johanna; McConchie, Cameron A; Turner, Athol G; Willett, Gary D

    2012-02-29

    High-resolution electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry is successfully used in the detailed molecular analysis of aged macadamia nut oils. The results are consistent with peroxide values, the current industry measure for rancidity, and provide detailed molecular information on the oxidative and hydrolytic degeneration of such oils. Mass analysis of macadamia oil samples stored for extended periods at 6 °C revealed that oils obtained by the cold press method are more susceptible to aging than those obtained using modified Soxhlet or accelerated solvent extraction methods.

  6. Differentiating Fragmentation Pathways of Cholesterol by Two-Dimensional Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Agthoven, Maria A.; Barrow, Mark P.; Chiron, Lionel; Coutouly, Marie-Aude; Kilgour, David; Wootton, Christopher A.; Wei, Juan; Soulby, Andrew; Delsuc, Marc-André; Rolando, Christian; O'Connor, Peter B.

    2015-12-01

    Two-dimensional Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry is a data-independent analytical method that records the fragmentation patterns of all the compounds in a sample. This study shows the implementation of atmospheric pressure photoionization with two-dimensional (2D) Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. In the resulting 2D mass spectrum, the fragmentation patterns of the radical and protonated species from cholesterol are differentiated. This study shows the use of fragment ion lines, precursor ion lines, and neutral loss lines in the 2D mass spectrum to determine fragmentation mechanisms of known compounds and to gain information on unknown ion species in the spectrum. In concert with high resolution mass spectrometry, 2D Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry can be a useful tool for the structural analysis of small molecules.

  7. Differentiating Fragmentation Pathways of Cholesterol by Two-Dimensional Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    van Agthoven, Maria A; Barrow, Mark P; Chiron, Lionel; Coutouly, Marie-Aude; Kilgour, David; Wootton, Christopher A; Wei, Juan; Soulby, Andrew; Delsuc, Marc-André; Rolando, Christian; O'Connor, Peter B

    2015-12-01

    Two-dimensional Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry is a data-independent analytical method that records the fragmentation patterns of all the compounds in a sample. This study shows the implementation of atmospheric pressure photoionization with two-dimensional (2D) Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. In the resulting 2D mass spectrum, the fragmentation patterns of the radical and protonated species from cholesterol are differentiated. This study shows the use of fragment ion lines, precursor ion lines, and neutral loss lines in the 2D mass spectrum to determine fragmentation mechanisms of known compounds and to gain information on unknown ion species in the spectrum. In concert with high resolution mass spectrometry, 2D Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry can be a useful tool for the structural analysis of small molecules. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  8. Excitation of low frequency waves by streaming ions via anomalous cyclotron resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, C. S.; Dillenburg, D.; Gaffey, J. D., Jr.; Ziebell, L. F.; Goedert, J.; Freund, H. P.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of a small population of streaming ions on low-frequency waves with frequencies below the ion cyclotron frequency is analyzed for three modes of interest: Alfven waves, magnetosonic waves, and ion-cyclotron waves. The instability mechanism is the anomalous cyclotron resonance of the waves with the streaming ions. Conditions for excitation of the three types of waves are derived and expressions for the growth rates are obtained. Excitation of Alfven waves is possible even if the ratio of the densities of the streaming ions to the thermal ions is very small. For magnetosonic waves, excitation can easily occur if waves are propagating parallel or nearly parallel to the ambient magnetic field. As for ion-cyclotron waves, it is found that for the ion-whistler branch the excitation is suppressed over a broader range of wave frequencies than for the fast magnetosonic branch.

  9. Critical electron pitch angle anisotropy necessary for chorus generation. [Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, R. K.

    1976-01-01

    Simultaneous wave, resonant-particle, and ambient-plasma data from OGO 5 for chorus emissions on August 15, 1968, were found consistent with the theoretical critical pitch-angle-anisotropy condition for whistler-mode instability by Doppler-shifted electron cyclotron resonance. Local generation, as determined by wave normal measurements, occurred only when the pitch-angle anisotropy of resonant electrons required for instability substantially exceeded the critical anisotropy defined by Kennel and Petschek (1966).

  10. Kinetic instabilities in pulsed operation mode of a 14 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Tarvainen, O. Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H.; Komppula, J.; Kronholm, R.; Laulainen, J.; Izotov, I.; Mansfeld, D.; Skalyga, V.

    2016-02-15

    The occurrence of kinetic plasma instabilities is studied in pulsed operation mode of a 14 GHz A-electron cyclotron resonance type electron cyclotron resonance ion source. It is shown that the temporal delay between the plasma breakdown and the appearance of the instabilities is on the order of 10-100 ms. The most important parameters affecting the delay are magnetic field strength and neutral gas pressure. It is demonstrated that kinetic instabilities limit the high charge state ion beam production in the unstable operating regime.

  11. Simulation of parameter scaling in electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasmas using the GEM code

    SciTech Connect

    Cluggish, B.; Zhao, L.; Kim, J. S.

    2010-02-15

    Although heating power and gas pressure are two of the two of primary experimental ''knobs'' available to users of electron cyclotron resonance ion sources, there is still no clear understanding of how they interact in order to provide optimal plasma conditions. FAR-TECH, Inc. has performed a series of simulations with its generalized electron cyclotron resonance ion source model in which the power and pressure were varied over a wide range. Analysis of the numerical data produces scaling laws that predict the plasma parameters as a function of the power and pressure. These scaling laws are in general agreement with experimental data.

  12. Beam-driven ion cyclotron harmonic resonances in the terrestrial foreshock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, C. W.; Goldstein, M. L.; Gary, S. P.; Russell, C. T.

    1985-01-01

    A terrestrial upstream wave event which demonstrates multiple, ion cyclotron harmonic resonances between the interplanetary wave population and an observed proton beam is analyzed. The techniques and parameters employed in the data analysis are discussed, including the use of differential and band-pass filters. An upstream wave event demonstrating multiple harmonic waves is examined, and the instability analysis relevant to the ion beam observations thought to be responsible for that event is discussed. It is shown that an observed bi-Maxwellian ion beam is capable of generating right and left-hand polarized waves through ion cyclotron harmonic resonance.

  13. Plasma ion dynamics and beam formation in electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Mascali, D.; Neri, L.; Miracoli, R.; Gammino, S.; Celona, L.; Ciavola, G.; Gambino, N.; Chikin, S.

    2010-02-15

    In electron cyclotron resonance ion sources it has been demonstrated that plasma heating may be improved by means of different microwave to plasma coupling mechanisms, including the ''frequency tuning'' and the ''two frequency heating''. These techniques affect evidently the electron dynamics, but the relationship with the ion dynamics has not been investigated in details up to now. Here we will try to outline these relations: through the study of ion dynamics we may try to understand how to optimize the electron cyclotron resonance ion sources brightness. A simple model of the ion confinement and beam formation will be presented, based on particle-in-cell and single particle simulations.

  14. Collisional activation of ions by off-resonance irradiation in ion cyclotron resonance spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Seung Koo; Han, Seung-Jin; Seo, Jongcheol

    2009-06-01

    Collisional activation of ions in the ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) cell by short off-resonance burst irradiation (ORBI) was studied by time-resolved photodissociation of the meta-bromotoluene radical cation. Off-resonance chirp or single-frequency burst was applied for 2 ms to the probe ion in the presence of Ar buffer gas. The amount of internal energy imparted to the probe ion by collision under ORBI was precisely determined by time-resolved photodissociation spectroscopy. The rate of unimolecular dissociation of the probe ion following the photolysis at 532 nm was measured by monitoring the real-time appearance of the C7H7+ product ion. The internal energy of the probe ion was extracted from the known rate-energy curve. To help understand the collisional activation of an ion under ORBI, we simulated the radial trajectory of the ion using Green's method. The calculated radial kinetic energy was converted to the collision energy in the center-of-mass frame, and the collision frequency was estimated by using a reactive hard-sphere collision model with an ion-induced dipole potential. Both experiments and trajectory simulations suggest that chirp irradiation leads to less collisional activation of ions than other waveforms.

  15. Electron cyclotron harmonic resonances in high-frequency heating of the ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Spencer P.

    2013-09-15

    Electron acceleration by upper hybrid waves under cyclotron harmonic resonance interaction is studied. Theory is formulated; the analytical solutions in the second and fourth harmonic cyclotron resonance cases are obtained, and in the third harmonic case, a first order differential equation governing the evolution of the electron energy is derived. The theory is applied for explaining the generation of artificial ionization layers observed in high-frequency (HF) ionospheric heating experiments. The upper hybrid waves are assumed to be excited parametrically by the O-mode HF heating wave. As the decay mode is the lower hybrid wave, the excited upper hybrid waves have wavelengths ranging from 0.25 to 0.5 m, which are short enough to effectively incorporate the finite Larmour radius effect for the harmonic cyclotron resonance interactions as well as have a frequency bandwidth of about 20 kHz, which provides an altitude region of about 10 km for continuous harmonic cyclotron resonance interaction between electrons and descending waves in the slightly inhomogeneous geomagnetic field. The numerical results on electron acceleration show that electron fluxes with energies larger than 14 eV are generated in the three harmonic cases. These energetic electrons cause impact ionizations, which are descending to form artificial ionization layers at the bottom of the ionospheric F region.

  16. Status of the PHOENIX electron cyclotron resonance charge breeder at ISOLDE, CERN.

    PubMed

    Barton, Charles; Cederkall, Joakim; Delahaye, Pierre; Kester, Oliver; Lamy, Thierry; Marie-Jeanne, Mélanie

    2008-02-01

    We report here on the last progresses made with the PHOENIX electron cyclotron resonance charge breeder test bench at ISOLDE. Recently, an experiment was performed to test the trapping of (61)Fe daughter nuclides from the decay of (61)Mn nuclides. Preliminary results are given.

  17. Influence of static electron beam`s self-fields on the cyclotron-undulator resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Rozanov, N.E.; Golub, Yu.Ya. |

    1995-12-31

    When undulators with a leading magnetic field B are used, the regime of double resonance is possible in which an undulator period is equal to an electron cyclotron wavelength. In the vicinity of this resonance an amplitude of particle oscillations in the undulator strongly depends on a difference between B and a resonant value of the leading magnetic field. Consequently, it is important to investigate a role of self-fields of the electron beam, in particular, due to its influence on the electron cyclotron wavelength. At the paper analytically and by numerical simulation the influence of the static fields of the annular electron beam on its dynamics in the axisymmetrical magnetic undulator with the leading magnetic field in the vicinity of the cyclotron-undulator resonance is investigated. It is shown that the value of the resonant magnetic field is changed with the rise of beam`s current. A shift of the resonant magnetic field may be both to larger values of B and to smaller ones, when different values of beam and waveguide radii, beam energy and undulator period are considered. A width of the resonance (on B - scale) is increased with the beam current.

  18. Construction of the RF-resonator for the RIKEN intermediate-stage ring cyclotron (IRC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, N.; Kamigaito, O.; Miyazawa, Y.; Mitsumoto, T.; Goto, A.; Yano, Y.

    2001-12-01

    A frequency tunable resonator for the RIKEN-IRC(intermediate stage ring cyclotron) [1] has been constructed and its rf characteristics were measured. The dimension of the resonator was optimized by using a three-dimensional rf calculation code, MAFIA. The measured frequency range covers the required range of 18˜40.5 MHz as expected and Q-values are as large as 74-79% of the calculated values.

  19. Nonlinear sub-cyclotron resonance as a formation mechanism for gaps in banded chorus

    DOE PAGES

    Fu, Xiangrong; Guo, Zehua; Dong, Chuanfei; ...

    2015-05-14

    An interesting characteristic of magnetospheric chorus is the presence of a frequency gap at ω ≃ 0.5Ωe, where Ωe is the electron cyclotron angular frequency. Recent chorus observations sometimes show additional gaps near 0.3Ωe and 0.6Ωe. Here we present a novel nonlinear mechanism for the formation of these gaps using Hamiltonian theory and test particle simulations in a homogeneous, magnetized, collisionless plasma. We find that an oblique whistler wave with frequency at a fraction of the electron cyclotron frequency can resonate with electrons, leading to effective energy exchange between the wave and particles.

  20. Development of an 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source at RCNP.

    PubMed

    Yorita, Tetsuhiko; Hatanaka, Kichiji; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro; Kibayashi, Mitsuru; Morinobu, Shunpei; Okamura, Hiroyuki; Tamii, Atsushi

    2008-02-01

    An 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source has recently been developed and installed in order to extend the variety and the intensity of ions at the RCNP coupled cyclotron facility. Production of several ions such as O, N, Ar, Kr, etc., is now under development and some of them have already been used for user experiments. For example, highly charged heavy ion beams like (86)Kr(21+,23+) and intense (16)O(5+,6+) and (15)N(6+) ion beams have been provided for experiments. The metal ion from volatile compounds method for boron ions has been developed as well.

  1. Calculation of the spontaneous cyclotron emissivity using the complete relativistic resonance condition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freund, H. P.; Wu, C. S.; Gaffey, J. D., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    An expression for the spectral emissivity of spontaneous synchrotron radiation for a plasma which consists of both thermal and suprathermal electron components is derived using the complete relativistic cyclotron resonance condition. The expression is valid over all angles of propagation. The result is applied to the study of the emission of radiation from an energetic population of electrons with a loss-cone distribution in a relatively low-density plasma (i.e., the electron plasma frequency is less than the cyclotron frequency).

  2. C60 Secondary Ion Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Donald F.; Robinson, Errol W.; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Heeren, Ronald M.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

    2011-12-15

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) has seen increased application for high spatial chemical imaging of complex biological surfaces. The advent and commercial availability of cluster and polyatomic primary ion sources (e.g. Au and Bi cluster and buckminsterfullerene (C60)) provide improved secondary ion yield and decreased fragmentation of surface species, thus accessibility to intact molecular ions. Despite developments in primary ion sources, development of mass spectrometers to fully exploit their advantages has been limited. Tandem mass spectrometry for identification of secondary ions is highly desirable, but implementation has proven to be difficult. Similarly, high mass resolution and high mass measurement accuracy would greatly improve the chemical specificity of SIMS. Here we combine, for the first time, the advantages of a C60 primary ion source with the ultra-high mass resolving power and high mass measurement accuracy of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. Mass resolving power in excess of 100,000 (m/Δm50%) is demonstrated, with mass measurement accuracies below 3 parts-per-million. Imaging of mouse brain tissue at 40 μm pixel size is shown. Tandem mass spectrometry of ions from biological tissue is demonstrated and molecular formulae can be assigned to fragment ions.

  3. 21 Tesla Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer Greatly Expands Mass Spectrometry Toolbox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Jared B.; Lin, Tzu-Yung; Leach, Franklin E.; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Tolić, Nikola; Robinson, Errol W.; Koppenaal, David W.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana

    2016-12-01

    We provide the initial performance evaluation of a 21 Tesla Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer operating at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The spectrometer constructed for the 21T system employs a commercial dual linear ion trap mass spectrometer coupled to a FTICR spectrometer designed and built in-house. Performance gains from moving to higher magnetic field strength are exemplified by the measurement of peptide isotopic fine structure, complex natural organic matter mixtures, and large proteins. Accurate determination of isotopic fine structure was demonstrated for doubly charged Substance P with minimal spectral averaging, and 8158 molecular formulas assigned to Suwannee River Fulvic Acid standard with root-mean-square (RMS) error of 10 ppb. We also demonstrated superior performance for intact proteins; namely, broadband isotopic resolution of the entire charge state distribution of apo-transferrin (78 kDa) and facile isotopic resolution of monoclonal antibody under a variety of acquisition parameters (e.g., 6 s time-domains with absorption mode processing yielded resolution of approximately 1 M at m/z = 2700).

  4. 21 Tesla Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer Greatly Expands Mass Spectrometry Toolbox

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, Jared B.; Lin, Tzu-Yung; Leach, Franklin E.; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Tolić, Nikola; Robinson, Errol W.; Koppenaal, David W.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana

    2016-10-12

    We provide the initial performance evaluation of a 21 Tesla Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer operating at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The spectrometer constructed for the 21T system employs a commercial dual linear ion trap mass spectrometer coupled to a FTICR spectrometer designed and built in-house. Performance gains from moving to higher magnetic field strength are exemplified by the measurement of peptide isotopic fine structure, complex natural organic matter mixtures, and large proteins. Accurate determination of isotopic fine structure was demonstrated for doubly charged substance P with minimal spectral averaging, and 8,158 molecular formulas assigned to Suwannee River Fulvic Acid standard with RMS error of 10 ppb. We also demonstrated superior performance for intact proteins; namely, broadband isotopic resolution of the entire charge state distribution of apotransferrin (78 kDa) and facile isotopic resolution of monoclonal antibody under a variety of acquisition parameters (e.g. 6 s time-domains with absorption mode processing yielded resolution of approximately 1M at m/z =2,700).

  5. Numerical study of ion-cyclotron resonant interaction via hybrid-Vlasov simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Valentini, Francesco; Iazzolino, Antonio; Veltri, Pierluigi

    2010-05-15

    Hybrid Vlasov-Maxwell numerical simulations are used to investigate the collisionless resonant interaction of ions with ion-cyclotron waves in parallel propagation with respect to a background magnetic field. In linear regime, analytical results on wave damping, obtained by integrating the linearized Vlasov equation through the well-known characteristics method, are compared with the numerical results. Then, the ion heating process and the consequent generation of temperature anisotropy in the direction perpendicular to the background magnetic field are investigated numerically in detail. In nonlinear regime, the numerical results show that the distribution of particle velocities is strongly distorted due to the resonant ion-cyclotron interaction with the formation of diffusive plateaus in the longitudinal direction (with respect to the ambient field) and significantly departs from the Maxwellian equilibrium. These results are relevant in many plasma physics environments, such as the solar wind, where the process of ion-cyclotron heating and the generation of temperature anisotropy and non-Maxwellian velocity distributions are routinely recovered in many in situ measurements, or the laboratory plasmas, where the resonant interaction of ions with ion-cyclotron waves is the primary source of auxiliary heating in the confining apparatus.

  6. Ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) systems for the Keda Mirror with AXisymmetry (KMAX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming; Yi, Hongshen; Lin, Munan; Wang, Yanpeng; Shi, Peiyun; Zheng, Jian; Sun, Xuan

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, we describe the engineering work involved in constructing two ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) systems for use in the Keda Mirror with AXisymmetry tandem mirror experiment. Because they offer an effective and robust heating method, ICRH systems have been widely used in a variety of plasma experiments. The goal of our system is to heat the hydrogen plasma contained in the central cell using the fundamental ion cyclotron frequency. Both systems can deliver a radiofrequency power of ˜120 kW with adjustable operating frequencies that are tuned to be slightly lower than their local ion cyclotron frequencies. Two types of antennas are installed in the central cell in an attempt to launch both slow and fast waves. The heating mechanism is reliant on the magnetic beach effect for slow waves.

  7. Narrow heavy-hole cyclotron resonances split by the cubic Rashba spin-orbit interaction in strained germanium quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Failla, M.; Myronov, M.; Morrison, C.; Leadley, D. R.; Lloyd-Hughes, J.

    2015-07-01

    The spin-orbit interaction was found to split the cyclotron resonance of heavy holes confined in high-mobility, compressively strained germanium quantum wells. The interference between coherent spin-split cyclotron resonances was tracked on picosecond time scales using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. Analysis in the time domain, or using a time-frequency decomposition based on the Gabor-Morlet wavelet, was necessary when the difference between cyclotron frequencies was comparable to the linewidth. The cubic Rashba spin-orbit coefficient β was determined via two methods: (i) the magnetic-field dependence of the cyclotron frequencies, and (ii) the spin-resolved subband densities. An enhanced β and spin polarization was created by tailoring the strain to enhance the spin-orbit interaction. The amplitude modulation of the narrow, interfering cyclotron resonances is a signature of spin coherences persisting for more than 10 ps.

  8. Grating monochromator for electron cyclotron resonance ion source operation

    SciTech Connect

    Muto, Hideshi; Ohshiro, Yukimitsu; Yamaka, Shouichi; Watanabe, Shin-ichi; Yamaguchi, Hidetoshi; Shimoura, Susumu; Oyaizu, Michihiro; Kase, Masayuki; Kubono, Shigeru; Hattori, Toshiyuki

    2013-07-15

    Recently, we started to observe optical line spectra from an ECR plasma using a grating monochromator with a photomultiplier. The light intensity of line spectrum from the ECR plasma had a strong correlation with ion beam intensity measured by a magnetic mass analyzer. This correlation is a significant information for beam tuning because it allows the extraction of the desired ion species from the ECR plasma. Separation of ion species of the same charge to mass ratio with an electromagnetic mass analyzer is known to be an exceptionally complex process, but this research gives new insights into its simplification. In this paper, the grating monochromator method for beam tuning of a Hyper-ECR ion source as an injector for RIKEN azimuthal varying field (AVF) cyclotron is described.

  9. Results of RIKEN superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source with 28 GHz.

    PubMed

    Higurashi, Y; Ohnishi, J; Nakagawa, T; Haba, H; Tamura, M; Aihara, T; Fujimaki, M; Komiyama, M; Uchiyama, A; Kamigaito, O

    2012-02-01

    We measured the beam intensity of highly charged heavy ions and x-ray heat load for RIKEN superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source with 28 GHz microwaves under the various conditions. The beam intensity of Xe(20+) became maximum at B(min) ∼ 0.65 T, which was ∼65% of the magnetic field strength of electron cyclotron resonance (B(ECR)) for 28 GHz microwaves. We observed that the heat load of x-ray increased with decreasing gas pressure and field gradient at resonance zone. It seems that the beam intensity of highly charged heavy ions with 28 GHz is higher than that with 18 GHz at same RF power.

  10. The surface-state of the topological insulator Bi2Se3 revealed by cyclotron resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Mcdonald, Ross D; Ayala - Valenzuela, Oscar E; Altarawneh, Moaz M; Analytis, James G

    2011-01-14

    Transport measurements of topological insulators are dominated by the conductivity of the bulk, leading to substantial difficulties in resolving the properties of the surface. To this end, we use high magnetic field, rf- and microwave-spectroscopy to selectively couple to the surface conductivity of Bi2Se3 at high frequency. In the frequency range of a few GHz we observe a crossover from quantum oscillations indicative of a small 3D Fermi surface, to cyclotron resonance indicative of a 2D surface state. By probing the conductivity at reduced skin depths, we have observed a 2D cyclotron resonance from a material whose bulk Fermi-surface is 3D. The frequency-magnetic field scaling of this resonance is inconsistent with the bulk effective mass, but more consistent with the dispersion and band filling of a Dirac-like surface state as observed by ARPES, with substantial manybody renormalization.

  11. Design of an ion cyclotron resonance heating system for the Compact Ignition Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Yugo, J.J.; Goranson, P.L.; Swain, D.W.; Baity, F.W.; Vesey, R.

    1987-01-01

    The Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) requires 10-20 MW of ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) power to raise the plasma temperature to ignition. The initial ICRH system will provide 10 MW of power to the plasma, utilizing a total of six rf power units feeding six current straps in three ports. The systems may be expanded to 20 MW with additional rf power units, antennas, and ports. Plasma heating will be achieved through coupling to the fundamental ion cyclotron resonance of a /sup 3/He minority species (also the second harmonic of tritium). The proposed antenna is a resonant double loop (RDL) structure with vacuum, shorted stubs at each end for tuning and impedance matching. The antennas are of modular, compact construction for installation and removal through the midplane port. Remote maintainability and the reactorlike operating environment have a major impact on the design of the launcher for this machine. 6 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. Lorentz force in water: evidence that hydronium cyclotron resonance enhances polymorphism.

    PubMed

    D'Emilia, E; Giuliani, L; Lisi, A; Ledda, M; Grimaldi, S; Montagnier, L; Liboff, A R

    2015-01-01

    There is an ongoing question regarding the structure forming capabilities of water at ambient temperatures. To probe for different structures, we studied effects in pure water following magnetic field exposures corresponding to the ion cyclotron resonance of H3O(+). Included were measurements of conductivity and pH. We find that under ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) stimulation, water undergoes a transition to a form that is hydroxonium-like, with the subsequent emission of a transient 48.5 Hz magnetic signal, in the absence of any other measurable field. Our results indicate that hydronium resonance stimulation alters the structure of water, enhancing the concentration of EZ-water. These results are not only consistent with Del Giudice's model of electromagnetically coherent domains, but they can also be interpreted to show that these domains exist in quantized spin states.

  13. Ion beam driven resonant ion-cyclotron instability in a magnetized dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, Ved; Vijayshri; Sharma, Suresh C.; Gupta, Ruby

    2014-03-15

    Electrostatic ion cyclotron waves are excited by axial ion beam in a dusty plasma via Cerenkov and slow cyclotron interaction. The dispersion relation of the instability is derived in the presence of positively/negatively charged dust grains. The minimum beam velocity needed for the excitation is estimated for different values of relative density of negatively charged dust grains. It is shown that the minimum beam velocity needed for excitation increases as the charge density carried by dust increases. Temperature of electrons and ions, charge and mass of dust grains, external static magnetic field and finite boundary of dusty plasma significantly modify the dispersion properties of these waves and play a crucial role in the growth of resonant ion cyclotron instability. The ion cyclotron modes with phase velocity comparable to the beam velocity possess a large growth rate. The maximum value of growth rate increases with the beam density and scales as the one-third power of the beam density in Cerenkov interaction and is proportional to the square root of beam density in slow cyclotron interaction.

  14. Influence of the shear flow on electron cyclotron resonance plasma confinement in an axisymmetric magnetic mirror trap of the electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Izotov, I V; Razin, S V; Sidorov, A V; Skalyga, V A; Zorin, V G; Bagryansky, P A; Beklemishev, A D; Prikhodko, V V

    2012-02-01

    Influence of shear flows of the dense plasma created under conditions of the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) gas breakdown on the plasma confinement in the axisymmetric mirror trap ("vortex" confinement) was studied experimentally and theoretically. A limiter with bias potential was set inside the mirror trap for plasma rotation. The limiter construction and the optimal value of the potential were chosen according to the results of the preliminary theoretical analysis. This method of "vortex" confinement realization in an axisymmetric mirror trap for non-equilibrium heavy-ion plasmas seems to be promising for creation of ECR multicharged ion sources with high magnetic fields, more than 1 T.

  15. Discovery of Cyclotron Resonance Features in the Soft Gamma Repeater SGR 1806-20

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibrahim, Alaa I.; Safi-Harb, Samar; Swank, Jean H.; Parke, William; Zane, Silvia; Turolla, Roberto

    2002-01-01

    We report evidence of cyclotron resonance features from the Soft Gamma Repeater SGR 1806-20 in outburst, detected with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer in the spectrum of a long, complex precursor that preceded a strong burst. The features consist of a narrow 5.0 keV absorption line with modulation near its second and third harmonics (at 11.2 keV and 17.5 keV respectively). The line features are transient and are detected in the harder part of the precursor. The 5.0 keV feature is strong, with an equivalent width of approx. 500 eV and a narrow width of less than 0.4 keV. Interpreting the features as electron cyclotron lines in the context of accretion models leads to a large mass-radius ratio (M/R greater than 0.3 solar mass/km) that is inconsistent with neutron stars or that requires a low (5-7) x 10(exp 11) G magnetic field that is unlikely for SGRs. The line widths are also narrow compared with those of electron cyclotron resonances observed so far in X-ray pulsars. In the magnetar picture, the features are plausibly explained as ion cyclotron resonances in an ultra-strong magnetic field that have recently been predicted from magnetar candidates. In this view, the 5.0 keV feature is consistent with a proton cyclotron fundamental whose energy and width are close to model predictions. The line energy would correspond to a surface magnetic field of 1.0 x 10(exp 15) G for SGR 1806-20, in good agreement with that inferred from the spin-down measure in the source.

  16. Discovery of Cyclotron Resonance Features in the Soft Gamma Repeater SGR 1806-20

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibrahim, A. I.; Safi-Harb, Samar; Swank, Jean H.; Parke, William; Zane, Silvia; Turolla, Roberto; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We report evidence for cyclotron resonance features from the Soft Gamma Repeater SCR 1806-20 in outburst, detected with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer in the spectrum of a long, complex precursor that preceded a strong burst. The features consist of a narrow 5.0 keV absorption line with modulation near its second and third harmonics (at 11.2 keV and 17.5 keV respectively). The line features are transient and are detected in the harder part of the precursor. The 5.0 keV feature is strong, with an equivalent width of approx. 500 eV, and a narrow width of < 0.4 keV. Interpreting the features as electron cyclotron lines in the context of accretion models leads to a large mass-radius ratio (M/R > 0.3 Solar Mass/km) that is inconsistent with neutron stars, or requires a low (5 - 7) x 10(exp 11) G magnetic field that is unlikely for SGRs. The line widths are also narrow compared to those of electron cyclotron resonances observed so far in X-ray pulsars. In the magnetar picture, the features are plausibly explained as ion cyclotron resonances in an ultra-strong magnetic field, which have recently been predicted from magnetar candidates. In this view, the 5.0 keV feature is consistent with a proton cyclotron fundamental whose energy and width are close to model predictions. The line energy would correspond to a surface magnetic field of 1.0 x 10(exp 15) G for SGR 1806-20, in good agreement with that inferred from the spin-down measure in the source.

  17. Fast neutral beam ion source coupled to a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Nicholas C.; Limbach, Patrick A.; Shomo, Ronald E., II; Marshall, Alan G.; Appelhans, Anthony D.; Delmore, James E.

    1991-11-01

    The coupling of an autoneutralizing SF-6 fast ion-beam gun to a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT/ICR) mass spectrometer is described. The fast neutral beam provides for secondary-ion-type FT/ICR mass analysis [e.g., production of abundant pseudomolecular (M+H)+ ions] of involatile samples without the need for external ion injection, since ions are formed at the entrance to the ICR ion trap. The design, construction, and testing of the hybrid instrument are described. The feasibility of the experiment (for both broadband and high-resolution FT/ICR positive-ion mass spectra) is demonstrated with tetra-butylammonium bromide and a Tylenol■ sample. The ability to analyze high molecular weight polymers with high mass resolution is demonstrated for Teflon■. All of the advantages of the fast neutral beam ion source previously demonstrated with quadrupole mass analysis are preserved, and the additional advantages of FT/ICR mass analysis (e.g., high mass resolving power, ion trapping) are retained.

  18. Fast neutral beam ion source coupled to a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, N.C.; Limbach, P.A.; Shomo, R.E. II; Marshall, A.G. ); Appelhans, A.D.; Delmore, J.E. )

    1991-11-01

    The coupling of an autoneutralizing SF{sup {minus}}{sub 6} fast ion-beam gun to a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT/ICR) mass spectrometer is described. The fast neutral beam provides for secondary-ion-type FT/ICR mass analysis (e.g., production of abundant pseudomolecular (M+H){sup +} ions) of involatile samples without the need for external ion injection, since ions are formed at the entrance to the ICR ion trap. The design, construction, and testing of the hybrid instrument are described. The feasibility of the experiment (for both broadband and high-resolution FT/ICR positive-ion mass spectra) is demonstrated with {ital tetra}-butylammonium bromide and a Tylenol{sup ( )} sample. The ability to analyze high molecular weight polymers with high mass resolution is demonstrated for Teflon{sup ( )}. All of the advantages of the fast neutral beam ion source previously demonstrated with quadrupole mass analysis are preserved, and the additional advantages of FT/ICR mass analysis (e.g., high mass resolving power, ion trapping) are retained.

  19. Studies on a Q/A selector for the SECRAL electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.; Sun, L. T.; Feng, Y. C.; Fang, X.; Lu, W.; Zhang, W. H.; Cao, Y.; Zhang, X. Z.; Zhao, H. W.

    2014-08-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance ion sources are widely used in heavy ion accelerators in the world because they are capable of producing high current beams of highly charged ions. However, the design of the Q/A selector system for these devices is challenging, because it must have a sufficient ion resolution while controlling the beam emittance growth. Moreover, this system has to be matched for a wide range of ion beam species with different intensities. In this paper, research on the Q/A selector system at the SECRAL (Superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source with Advanced design in Lanzhou) platform both in experiment and simulation is presented. Based on this study, a new Q/A selector system has been designed for SECRAL II. The features of the new design including beam simulations are also presented.

  20. MM-wave cyclotron auto-resonance maser for plasma heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceccuzzi, S.; Dattoli, G.; Di Palma, E.; Doria, A.; Gallerano, G. P.; Giovenale, E.; Mirizzi, F.; Spassovsky, I.; Ravera, G. L.; Surrenti, V.; Tuccillo, A. A.

    2014-02-01

    Heating and Current Drive systems are of outstanding relevance in fusion plasmas, magnetically confined in tokamak devices, as they provide the tools to reach, sustain and control burning conditions. Heating systems based on the electron cyclotron resonance (ECRH) have been extensively exploited on past and present machines DEMO, and the future reactor will require high frequencies. Therefore, high power (≥1MW) RF sources with output frequency in the 200 - 300 GHz range would be necessary. A promising source is the so called Cyclotron Auto-Resonance Maser (CARM). Preliminary results of the conceptual design of a CARM device for plasma heating, carried out at ENEA-Frascati will be presented together with the planned R&D development.

  1. Potential of ion cyclotron resonance frequency current drive via fast waves in DEMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazakov, Ye O.; Van Eester, D.; Wauters, T.; Lerche, E.; Ongena, J.

    2015-02-01

    For the continuous operation of future tokamak-reactors like DEMO, non-inductively driven toroidal plasma current is needed. Bootstrap current, due to the pressure gradient, and current driven by auxiliary heating systems are currently considered as the two main options. This paper addresses the current drive (CD) potential of the ion cyclotron resonance frequency (ICRF) heating system in DEMO-like plasmas. Fast wave CD scenarios are evaluated for both the standard midplane launch and an alternative case of exciting the waves from the top of the machine. Optimal ICRF frequencies and parallel wave numbers are identified to maximize the CD efficiency. Limitations of the high frequency ICRF CD operation are discussed. A simplified analytical method to estimate the fast wave CD efficiency is presented, complemented with the discussion of its dependencies on plasma parameters. The calculated CD efficiency for the ICRF system is shown to be similar to those for the negative neutral beam injection and electron cyclotron resonance heating.

  2. MM-wave cyclotron auto-resonance maser for plasma heating

    SciTech Connect

    Ceccuzzi, S.; Ravera, G. L.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Dattoli, G.; Di Palma, E.; Doria, A.; Gallerano, G. P.; Giovenale, E.; Spassovsky, I.; Surrenti, V.; Mirizzi, F.

    2014-02-12

    Heating and Current Drive systems are of outstanding relevance in fusion plasmas, magnetically confined in tokamak devices, as they provide the tools to reach, sustain and control burning conditions. Heating systems based on the electron cyclotron resonance (ECRH) have been extensively exploited on past and present machines DEMO, and the future reactor will require high frequencies. Therefore, high power (≥1MW) RF sources with output frequency in the 200 - 300 GHz range would be necessary. A promising source is the so called Cyclotron Auto-Resonance Maser (CARM). Preliminary results of the conceptual design of a CARM device for plasma heating, carried out at ENEA-Frascati will be presented together with the planned R and D development.

  3. Studies on a Q/A selector for the SECRAL electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Sun, L T; Feng, Y C; Fang, X; Lu, W; Zhang, W H; Cao, Y; Zhang, X Z; Zhao, H W

    2014-08-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance ion sources are widely used in heavy ion accelerators in the world because they are capable of producing high current beams of highly charged ions. However, the design of the Q/A selector system for these devices is challenging, because it must have a sufficient ion resolution while controlling the beam emittance growth. Moreover, this system has to be matched for a wide range of ion beam species with different intensities. In this paper, research on the Q/A selector system at the SECRAL (Superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source with Advanced design in Lanzhou) platform both in experiment and simulation is presented. Based on this study, a new Q/A selector system has been designed for SECRAL II. The features of the new design including beam simulations are also presented.

  4. Cyclotron resonances of ions with obliquely propagating waves in coronal holes and the fast solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollweg, Joseph V.; Markovskii, S. A.

    2002-06-01

    There is a growing consensus that cyclotron resonances play important roles in heating protons and ions in coronal holes where the fast solar wind originates and throughout interplanetary space as well. Most work on cyclotron resonant interactions has concentrated on the special, but unrealistic, case of propagation along the ambient magnetic field, B0, because of the great simplification it gives. This paper offers a physical discussion of how the cyclotron resonances behave when the waves propagate obliquely to B0. We show how resonances at harmonics of the cyclotron frequency come about, and how the physics can be different depending on whether E⊥ is in or perpendicular to the plane containing k and B0 (k is wave vector, and E⊥ is the component of the wave electric field perpendicular to B0). If E⊥ is in the k-B0 plane, the resonances are analogous to the Landau resonance and arise because the particle tends to stay in phase with the wave during the part of its orbit when it is interacting most strongly with E⊥. If E⊥ is perpendicular to the k-B0 plane, then the resonances depend on the fact that the particle is at different positions during the parts of its orbit when it is interacting most strongly with E⊥. Our main results are our equations (10), (11), and (13) for the secular rate of energy gain (or loss) by a resonant particle and the unfamiliar result that ions can resonate with a purely right-hand circularly polarized wave if the propagation is oblique. We conclude with some speculations about the origin of highly obliquely propagating ion resonant waves in the corona and solar wind. We point out that there are a number of instabilities that may generate such waves locally in the corona and solar wind.

  5. Production of electron cyclotron resonance plasma by using multifrequencies microwaves and active beam profile control on a large bore electron cyclotron resonance ion source with permanent magnets.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yushi; Watanabe, Takeyoshi; Matsui, Yuuki; Hirai, Yoshiaki; Kutsumi, Osamu; Sakamoto, Naoki; Sato, Fuminobu; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2010-02-01

    A new concept on magnetic field with all magnets on plasma production and confinement has been proposed to enhance efficiency of an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma for broad and dense ion beam source under the low pressure. The magnetic field configuration is constructed by a pair of magnets assembly, i.e., comb-shaped magnet which cylindrically surrounds the plasma chamber. The resonance zones corresponding to the fundamental ECR for 2.45 GHz and 11-13 GHz frequencies are constructed at different positions. The profiles of the plasma parameters in the ECR ion source are different from each frequency of microwave. Large bore extractor is set at the opposite side against the microwave feeds. It is found that differences of their profiles also appear at those of ion beam profiles. We conducted to launch simultaneously multiplex frequencies microwaves controlled individually, and tried to control the profiles of the plasma parameters and then those of extracted ion beam.

  6. Plasma processing of spent nuclear fuel by two-frequency ion cyclotron resonance heating

    SciTech Connect

    Timofeev, A. V.

    2009-11-15

    A previously developed method for analyzing the plasma processing of spent nuclear fuel is generalized to a plasma containing multicharged fuel ions. In such a plasma, ion cyclotron resonance heating of nuclear ash ions should be carried out in two monochromatic RF fields of different frequencies, provided that the fraction of {xi} multicharged ions is small, {xi} {<=} 0.1, a condition that substantially restricts the productivity of systems for processing spent nuclear fuel. Ways of overcoming this difficulty are discussed.

  7. INSTRUMENTS AND METHODS OF INVESTIGATION: Plasma isotope separation based on ion cyclotron resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgolenko, Dmitrii A.; Muromkin, Yurii A.

    2009-04-01

    Experiments that have been conducted in the USA, France, and Russia to investigate isotopically selective ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) as a tool for plasma isotope separation are analyzed. Because this method runs into difficulties at low values of the relative isotope mass difference ΔM/M, for some elements (for gadolinium, as an example) isotope separation still remains a problem. There are ways to solve it, however, as experimental results and theoretical calculations suggest.

  8. Note: Production of a mercury beam with an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Vondrasek, R.; Pardo, R.; Scott, R.

    2013-11-15

    An electron cyclotron resonance ion source has been utilized to produce mercury beams with intensities of 4.5 eμA of {sup 202}Hg{sup 29+} and 3.0 eμA of {sup 202}Hg{sup 31+} from natural abundance mercury metal. The production technique relies on the evaporation of liquid mercury into the source plasma vacuum region and utilizes elemental mercury instead of a volatile organic compound as the neutral feed material.

  9. Note: Production of a mercury beam with an electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Vondrasek, R; Pardo, R; Scott, R

    2013-11-01

    An electron cyclotron resonance ion source has been utilized to produce mercury beams with intensities of 4.5 eμA of (202)Hg(29+) and 3.0 eμA of (202)Hg(31+) from natural abundance mercury metal. The production technique relies on the evaporation of liquid mercury into the source plasma vacuum region and utilizes elemental mercury instead of a volatile organic compound as the neutral feed material.

  10. An ion cyclotron resonance study of reactions of some atomic and simple polyatomic ions with water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpas, Z.; Anicich, V. G.; Huntress, W. T., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Reactions of various positive ions with water vapor were studied by ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometric techniques. Rate constants and product distributions were determined for reactions of the ions: Ar(+), Co(+), N2(+), and CO2(+), CH2(+), and CH4(+), CH2Cl(+), HCO(+), H2CO(+), H2COH(+), H2S(+) and HS(+). The results obtained in this work are compared with earlier reported data where available.

  11. Cyclotron auto resonance maser and free electron laser devices: a unified point of view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Palma, E.; Sabia, E.; Dattoli, G.; Licciardi, S.; Spassovsky, I.

    2017-02-01

    We take advantage of previous research in the field of cyclotron auto resonance maser (CARM) and undulator-based free electron laser (U-FEL) sources to establish a common formalism for the relevant description of the underlying physical mechanisms. This strategy is aimed at stressing the deep analogies between the two devices and at providing a practical tool for their study based on the use of well-tested scaling formulae developed independently for the two systems.

  12. Experimental Research on the Laser Cyclotron Auto-Resonance Accelerator “LACARA”

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, T C

    2008-11-11

    The Laser Cyclotron Auto-Resonant Accelerator LACARA has successfully operated this year. Results are summarized, an interpretation of operating data is provided in the body of the report, and recommendations are made how the experiment should be carried forward. The Appendix A contains a description of the LACARA apparatus, currently installed at the Accelerator Test Facility, Brookhaven National Laboratory. This report summarizes the project, extending over three grant-years.

  13. Acoustic mode driven by fast electrons in TJ-II Electron Cyclotron Resonance plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, B. J.; Ochando, M. A.; López-Bruna, D.

    2016-08-01

    Intense harmonic oscillations in radiation signals (δ I/I∼ 5{%}) are commonly observed during Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) heating in TJ-II stellarator plasmas at low line-averaged electron density, 0.15 < \\bar{n}e < 0.6 ×1019 \\text{m}-3 . The frequency agrees with acoustic modes. The poloidal modal structure is compatible with Geodesic Acoustic Modes (GAM) but an n \

  14. ENSEMBLE SIMULATIONS OF PROTON HEATING IN THE SOLAR WIND VIA TURBULENCE AND ION CYCLOTRON RESONANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Cranmer, Steven R.

    2014-07-01

    Protons in the solar corona and heliosphere exhibit anisotropic velocity distributions, violation of magnetic moment conservation, and a general lack of thermal equilibrium with the other particle species. There is no agreement about the identity of the physical processes that energize non-Maxwellian protons in the solar wind, but a traditional favorite has been the dissipation of ion cyclotron resonant Alfvén waves. This paper presents kinetic models of how ion cyclotron waves heat protons on their journey from the corona to interplanetary space. It also derives a wide range of new solutions for the relevant dispersion relations, marginal stability boundaries, and nonresonant velocity-space diffusion rates. A phenomenological model containing both cyclotron damping and turbulent cascade is constructed to explain the suppression of proton heating at low alpha-proton differential flow speeds. These effects are implemented in a large-scale model of proton thermal evolution from the corona to 1 AU. A Monte Carlo ensemble of realistic wind speeds, densities, magnetic field strengths, and heating rates produces a filled region of parameter space (in a plane described by the parallel plasma beta and the proton temperature anisotropy ratio) similar to what is measured. The high-beta edges of this filled region are governed by plasma instabilities and strong heating rates. The low-beta edges correspond to weaker proton heating and a range of relative contributions from cyclotron resonance. On balance, the models are consistent with other studies that find only a small fraction of the turbulent power spectrum needs to consist of ion cyclotron waves.

  15. Cyclotron resonance in InAs/AlSb quantum wells in magnetic fields up to 45 T

    SciTech Connect

    Spirin, K. E. Krishtopenko, S. S.; Sadofyev, Yu. G.; Drachenko, O.; Helm, M.; Teppe, F.; Knap, W.; Gavrilenko, V. I.

    2015-12-15

    Electron cyclotron resonance in InAs/AlSb heterostructures with quantum wells of various widths in pulsed magnetic fields up to 45 T are investigated. Our experimental cyclotron energies are in satisfactory agreement with the results of theoretical calculations performed using the eight-band kp Hamiltonian. The shift of the cyclotron resonance (CR) line, which corresponds to the transition from the lowest Landau level to the low magnetic-field region, is found upon varying the electron concentration due to the negative persistent photoconductivity effect. It is shown that the observed shift of the CR lines is associated with the finite width of the density of states at the Landau levels.

  16. A cyclotron resonance model of VLF chorus emissions detected during electron microburst precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skoug, R. M.; Datta, S.; McCarthy, M. P.; Parks, G. K.

    1996-10-01

    VLF chorus, consisting of narrowband rising frequency emissions, has often been observed in association with microburst electron precipitation. We present the first simultaneous rocket observations of these two phenomena, with emphasis on understanding the source of the VLF emissions. The rocket experiment was launched on May 6, 1993, from Poker Flat, Alaska (L=5.6). In this work, the observed 1-4 kHz chorus emissions are interpreted in terms of a cyclotron resonance interaction. The frequency range of the risers and the observed electron energy range agree with those required for this interaction. Using a criterion derived from the conservation of energy during an interaction, it is shown that a cold plasma cyclotron resonance interaction can produce the lower-frequency portions of the observed chorus risers, from ~1000 Hz to ~2500 Hz, while a warm plasma model is required to produce frequencies >2500 Hz. The warm plasma model assumes a two-component plasma, with an isotropic cold component and a bi-Maxwellian warm component. The effect of the warm component is to change the wave dispersion relation, allowing the production of the higher-frequency risers. A portion of the anisotropy required to produce the high-frequency emissions can also be provided by a loss cone distribution. The chorus source is estimated from this cyclotron resonance theory to be located near the equatorial plane.

  17. Observations of rotation in JET plasmas with electron heating by ion cyclotron resonance heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellsten, T.; Johnson, T. J.; Van Eester, D.; Lerche, E.; Lin, Y.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Ongena, J.; Calabro, G.; Crombé, K.; Frigione, D.; Giroud, C.; Lennholm, M.; Mantica, P.; Nave, M. F. F.; Naulin, V.; Sozzi, C.; Studholme, W.; Tala, T.; Versloot, T.; Contributors, JET-EFDA

    2012-07-01

    The rotation of L-mode plasmas in the JET tokamak heated by waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) damped on electrons, is reported. The plasma in the core is found to rotate in the counter-current direction with a high shear and in the outer part of the plasma with an almost constant angular rotation. The core rotation is stronger in magnitude than observed for scenarios with dominating ion cyclotron absorption. Two scenarios are considered: the inverted mode conversion scenarios and heating at the second harmonic 3He cyclotron resonance in H plasmas. In the latter case, electron absorption of the fast magnetosonic wave by transit time magnetic pumping and electron Landau damping (TTMP/ELD) is the dominating absorption mechanism. Inverted mode conversion is done in (3He)-H plasmas where the mode converted waves are essentially absorbed by electron Landau damping. Similar rotation profiles are seen when heating at the second harmonic cyclotron frequency of 3He and with mode conversion at high concentrations of 3He. The magnitude of the counter-rotation is found to decrease with an increasing plasma current. The correlation of the rotation with the electron temperature is better than with coupled power, indicating that for these types of discharges the dominating mechanism for the rotation is related to indirect effects of electron heat transport, rather than to direct effects of ICRF heating. There is no conclusive evidence that mode conversion in itself affects rotation for these discharges.

  18. Structural characterization of phospholipids by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Marto, J A; White, F M; Seldomridge, S; Marshall, A G

    1995-11-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry provides for structural analysis of the principal biological phospholipids: glycerophosphatidylcholine, -ethanolamine, -serine, and -inositol. Both positive and negative molecular or quasimolecular ions are generated in high abundance. Isolated molecular ions may be collisionally activated in the source side of a dual trap mass analyzer, yielding fragments serving to identify the polar head group (positive ion mode) and fatty acid side chains (negative ion mode). Azimuthal quadrupolar excitation following collisionally activated dissociation refocuses productions close to the solenoid axis; subsequent transfer of product ions to the analyzer ion trap allows for high-resolution mass analysis. Cyro-cooling of the sample probe with liquid nitrogen greatly reduces matrix adduction encountered in the negative ion mode.

  19. Bio-Nano ECRIS: An electron cyclotron resonance ion source for new materials production

    SciTech Connect

    Uchida, T.; Minezaki, H.; Tanaka, K.; Asaji, T.; Muramatsu, M.; Kitagawa, A.; Kato, Y.; Biri, S.

    2010-02-15

    We developed an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) for new materials production on nanoscale. Our main target is the endohedral fullerenes, which have potential in medical care, biotechnology, and nanotechnology. In particular, iron-encapsulated fullerene can be applied as a contrast material for magnetic resonance imaging or microwave heat therapy. Thus, our new ECRIS is named the Bio-Nano ECRIS. In this article, the recent progress of the development of the Bio-Nano ECRIS is reported: (i) iron ion beam production using induction heating oven and (ii) optimization of singly charged C{sub 60} ion beam production.

  20. Bio-Nano ECRIS: An electron cyclotron resonance ion source for new materials productiona)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, T.; Minezaki, H.; Tanaka, K.; Muramatsu, M.; Asaji, T.; Kato, Y.; Kitagawa, A.; Biri, S.; Yoshida, Y.

    2010-02-01

    We developed an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) for new materials production on nanoscale. Our main target is the endohedral fullerenes, which have potential in medical care, biotechnology, and nanotechnology. In particular, iron-encapsulated fullerene can be applied as a contrast material for magnetic resonance imaging or microwave heat therapy. Thus, our new ECRIS is named the Bio-Nano ECRIS. In this article, the recent progress of the development of the Bio-Nano ECRIS is reported: (i) iron ion beam production using induction heating oven and (ii) optimization of singly charged C60 ion beam production.

  1. Electron Cloud Cyclotron Resonances in the Presence of a Short-bunch-length Relativistic Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Celata, C.M.; Furman, Miguel A.; Vay, J.-L.; Yu, Jennifer W.

    2008-09-02

    Computer simulations using the 2D code"POSINST" were used to study the formation of the electron cloud in the wiggler section of the positron damping ring of the International Linear Collider. In order to simulate an x-y slice of the wiggler (i.e., a slice perpendicular to the beam velocity), each simulation assumed a constant vertical magnetic field. At values of the magnetic field where the cyclotron frequency was an integral multiple of the bunch frequency, and where the field strength was less than approximately 0.6 T, equilibrium average electron densities were up to three times the density found at other neighboring field values. Effects of this resonance between the bunch and cyclotron frequency are expected to be non-negligible when the beam bunch length is much less than the product of the electron cyclotron period and the beam velocity, for a beam moving at v~;;c. Details of the dynamics of the resonance are described.

  2. EVIDENCE OF LANDAU AND CYCLOTRON RESONANCE BETWEEN PROTONS AND KINETIC WAVES IN SOLAR WIND TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    He, Jiansen; Wang, Linghua; Tu, Chuanyi; Zong, Qiugang; Marsch, Eckart

    2015-02-20

    The wave–particle interaction processes occurring in the solar wind provide crucial information to understand the wave dissipation and simultaneous particle heating in plasma turbulence. One requires observations of both wave fluctuations and particle kinetics near the dissipation range, which have, however, not yet been analyzed simultaneously. Here we show new evidence of wave–particle interactions by combining the diagnosis of wave modes with the analysis of particle kinetics on the basis of measurements from the WIND spacecraft with a high cadence of about 3 s. Solar wind protons appear to be highly dynamic in their velocity distribution consisting of varying anisotropic core and beam components. The basic scenario of solar wind proton heating through wave–particle interaction is suggested to be the following. Left-handed cyclotron resonance occurs continuously, and is evident from the observed proton core velocity distribution and the concurrent quasi-parallel left-handed Alfvén cyclotron waves. Landau and right-handed cyclotron resonances are persistent and indicated by the observed drifting anisotropic beam and the simultaneous quasi-perpendicular right-handed kinetic Alfvén waves in a general sense. The persistence of non-gyrotropic proton distributions may cast new light on the nature of the interaction between particles and waves near and beyond the proton gyro-frequency.

  3. Nonlinear sub-cyclotron resonance as a formation mechanism for gaps in banded chorus

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Xiangrong; Guo, Zehua; Dong, Chuanfei; Gary, S. Peter

    2015-05-14

    An interesting characteristic of magnetospheric chorus is the presence of a frequency gap at ω ≃ 0.5Ωe, where Ωe is the electron cyclotron angular frequency. Recent chorus observations sometimes show additional gaps near 0.3Ωe and 0.6Ωe. Here we present a novel nonlinear mechanism for the formation of these gaps using Hamiltonian theory and test particle simulations in a homogeneous, magnetized, collisionless plasma. We find that an oblique whistler wave with frequency at a fraction of the electron cyclotron frequency can resonate with electrons, leading to effective energy exchange between the wave and particles.

  4. Ion cyclotron resonance heating system in the RT-1 magnetospheric plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiura, M.; Kawazura, Y.; Yoshida, Z.; Kenmochi, N.; Yano, Y.; Saitoh, H.; Yamasaki, M.; Mushiake, T.; Kashyap, A.; Takahashi, N.; Nakatsuka, M.; Fukuyama, A.

    2017-08-01

    We have developed an ion cyclotron resonance frequency (ICRF) heating system for the Ring Trap 1 (RT-1) magnetospheric device. We excite slow waves from the polar region of the dipole magnetic field. The target helium plasma is produced by electron cyclotron heating. The electrons comprise high-temperature (>10 keV) and low-temperature (<100 eV) components with both typically exhibiting densities of the same order of magnitude. The ICRF heating causes an increase in the ion temperatures and toroidal flow velocities in the core plasma region. We observe appreciable temperature differences between the different ion species (main He+ and impurity C2+), suggesting a strong influence of the charge-exchange loss, which caused the bulk ions to remain relatively cold (~20 eV) compared to the impurity ions (~40 eV). By developing an electro-optical measurement system, we have measured the local wave electric field in the plasma.

  5. Sensitive test for ion-cyclotron resonant heating in the solar wind.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Justin C; Maruca, Bennett A; Stevens, Michael L; Zaslavsky, Arnaud

    2013-03-01

    Plasma carrying a spectrum of counterpropagating field-aligned ion-cyclotron waves can strongly and preferentially heat ions through a stochastic Fermi mechanism. Such a process has been proposed to explain the extreme temperatures, temperature anisotropies, and speeds of ions in the solar corona and solar wind. We quantify how differential flow between ion species results in a Doppler shift in the wave spectrum that can prevent this strong heating. Two critical values of differential flow are derived for strong heating of the core and tail of a given ion distribution function. Our comparison of these predictions to observations from the Wind spacecraft reveals excellent agreement. Solar wind helium that meets the condition for strong core heating is nearly 7 times hotter than hydrogen on average. Ion-cyclotron resonance contributes to heating in the solar wind, and there is a close link between heating, differential flow, and temperature anisotropy.

  6. Observation of increased ion cyclotron resonance signal duration through electric field perturbations.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Nathan K; Bruce, James E

    2005-09-15

    Ion motion in Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) is complex and the subject of ongoing theoretical and experimental studies. Two predominant pathways for the loss of ICR signals are thought to include damping of cyclotron motion, in which ions lose kinetic energy and radially damp toward the center of the ICR cell, and dephasing of ion coherence, in which ions of like cyclotron frequency become distributed out of phase at similar cyclotron radii. Both mechanisms result in the loss of induced ion image current in FTICR-MS measurements and are normally inseparable during time-domain signal analysis. For conventional ICR measurements which take advantage of ion ensembles, maximization of the ion population size and density can produce the desired effect of increasing phase coherence of ions during cyclotron motion. However, this approach also presents the risk of coalescence of ion packets of similar frequencies. In general, ICR researchers in the past have lacked the tools necessary to distinguish or independently control dephasing and damping mechanisms for ICR signal loss. Nonetheless, the ability to impart greater phase coherence of ions in ICR measurements will allow significant advances in FTICR-MS research by improving the current understanding of ICR signal loss contributions of dephasing and damping of ion ensembles, increasing overall time-domain signal length, and possibly, resulting in more routine ultrahigh resolution measurements. The results presented here demonstrate the ability to employ a high density electron beam to perturb electric fields within the ICR cell during detection of cyclotron motion, in an approach we call electron-promoted ion coherence (EPIC). As such, EPIC reduces ICR signal degradation through loss of phase coherence, and much longer time-domain signals can be obtained. Our results demonstrate that time-domain signals can be extended by more than a factor of 4 with the implementation of EPIC, as

  7. Accessibility condition of wave propagation and multicharged ion production in electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yushi; Yano, Keisuke; Nishiokada, Takuya; Nagaya, Tomoki; Kimura, Daiju; Kumakura, Sho; Imai, Youta; Hagino, Shogo; Otsuka, Takuro; Sato, Fuminobu

    2016-02-01

    A new tandem type source of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasmas has been constructing for producing synthesized ion beams in Osaka University. Magnetic mirror field configuration with octupole magnets can be controlled to various shape of ECR zones, namely, in the 2nd stage plasma to be available by a pair mirror and a supplemental coil. Noteworthy correlations between these magnetic configurations and production of multicharged ions are investigated in detail, as well as their optimum conditions. We have been considering accessibility condition of electromagnetic and electrostatic waves propagating in ECR ion source plasma, and then investigated their correspondence relationships with production of multicharged ions. It has been clarified that there exits efficient configuration of ECR zones for producing multicharged ion beams experimentally, and then has been suggested from detail accessibility conditions on the ECR plasma that new resonance, i.e., upper hybrid resonance, must have occurred.

  8. Accessibility condition of wave propagation and multicharged ion production in electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Yushi Yano, Keisuke; Nishiokada, Takuya; Nagaya, Tomoki; Kimura, Daiju; Kumakura, Sho; Imai, Youta; Hagino, Shogo; Otsuka, Takuro; Sato, Fuminobu

    2016-02-15

    A new tandem type source of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasmas has been constructing for producing synthesized ion beams in Osaka University. Magnetic mirror field configuration with octupole magnets can be controlled to various shape of ECR zones, namely, in the 2nd stage plasma to be available by a pair mirror and a supplemental coil. Noteworthy correlations between these magnetic configurations and production of multicharged ions are investigated in detail, as well as their optimum conditions. We have been considering accessibility condition of electromagnetic and electrostatic waves propagating in ECR ion source plasma, and then investigated their correspondence relationships with production of multicharged ions. It has been clarified that there exits efficient configuration of ECR zones for producing multicharged ion beams experimentally, and then has been suggested from detail accessibility conditions on the ECR plasma that new resonance, i.e., upper hybrid resonance, must have occurred.

  9. Accessibility condition of wave propagation and multicharged ion production in electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Yushi; Yano, Keisuke; Nishiokada, Takuya; Nagaya, Tomoki; Kimura, Daiju; Kumakura, Sho; Imai, Youta; Hagino, Shogo; Otsuka, Takuro; Sato, Fuminobu

    2016-02-01

    A new tandem type source of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasmas has been constructing for producing synthesized ion beams in Osaka University. Magnetic mirror field configuration with octupole magnets can be controlled to various shape of ECR zones, namely, in the 2nd stage plasma to be available by a pair mirror and a supplemental coil. Noteworthy correlations between these magnetic configurations and production of multicharged ions are investigated in detail, as well as their optimum conditions. We have been considering accessibility condition of electromagnetic and electrostatic waves propagating in ECR ion source plasma, and then investigated their correspondence relationships with production of multicharged ions. It has been clarified that there exits efficient configuration of ECR zones for producing multicharged ion beams experimentally, and then has been suggested from detail accessibility conditions on the ECR plasma that new resonance, i.e., upper hybrid resonance, must have occurred.

  10. Observation of fast-ion Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance with shear Alfven waves

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yang; Heidbrink, W. W.; Boehmer, H.; McWilliams, R.; Vincena, S.; Carter, T. A.; Gekelman, W.; Leneman, D.; Pribyl, P.

    2008-10-15

    The Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance ({omega}-k{sub z}v{sub z}={omega}{sub f}) between fast ions and shear Alfven waves is experimentally investigated ({omega}, wave frequency; k{sub z}, axial wavenumber; v{sub z}, fast-ion axial speed; {omega}{sub f}, fast-ion cyclotron frequency). A test particle beam of fast ions is launched by a Li{sup +} source in the helium plasma of the LArge Plasma Device (LAPD) [W. Gekelman, H. Pfister, Z. Lucky, J. Bamber, D. Leneman, and J. Maggs, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 62, 2875 (1991)], with shear Alfven waves (SAW) (amplitude {delta} B/B up to 1%) launched by a loop antenna. A collimated fast-ion energy analyzer measures the nonclassical spreading of the beam, which is proportional to the resonance with the wave. A resonance spectrum is observed by launching SAWs at 0.3-0.8{omega}{sub ci}. Both the magnitude and frequency dependence of the beam-spreading are in agreement with the theoretical prediction using a Monte Carlo Lorentz code that launches fast ions with an initial spread in real/velocity space and random phases relative to the wave. Measured wave magnetic field data are used in the simulation.

  11. Limitations of electron cyclotron resonance ion source performances set by kinetic plasma instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Tarvainen, O. Laulainen, J.; Komppula, J.; Kronholm, R.; Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H.; Izotov, I.; Mansfeld, D.; Skalyga, V.

    2015-02-15

    Electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) plasmas are prone to kinetic instabilities due to anisotropy of the electron energy distribution function stemming from the resonant nature of the electron heating process. Electron cyclotron plasma instabilities are related to non-linear interaction between plasma waves and energetic electrons resulting to strong microwave emission and a burst of energetic electrons escaping the plasma, and explain the periodic oscillations of the extracted beam currents observed in several laboratories. It is demonstrated with a minimum-B 14 GHz ECRIS operating on helium, oxygen, and argon plasmas that kinetic instabilities restrict the parameter space available for the optimization of high charge state ion currents. The most critical parameter in terms of plasma stability is the strength of the solenoid magnetic field. It is demonstrated that due to the instabilities the optimum B{sub min}-field in single frequency heating mode is often ≤0.8B{sub ECR}, which is the value suggested by the semiempirical scaling laws guiding the design of modern ECRISs. It is argued that the effect can be attributed not only to the absolute magnitude of the magnetic field but also to the variation of the average magnetic field gradient on the resonance surface.

  12. Limitations of electron cyclotron resonance ion source performances set by kinetic plasma instabilities.

    PubMed

    Tarvainen, O; Laulainen, J; Komppula, J; Kronholm, R; Kalvas, T; Koivisto, H; Izotov, I; Mansfeld, D; Skalyga, V

    2015-02-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) plasmas are prone to kinetic instabilities due to anisotropy of the electron energy distribution function stemming from the resonant nature of the electron heating process. Electron cyclotron plasma instabilities are related to non-linear interaction between plasma waves and energetic electrons resulting to strong microwave emission and a burst of energetic electrons escaping the plasma, and explain the periodic oscillations of the extracted beam currents observed in several laboratories. It is demonstrated with a minimum-B 14 GHz ECRIS operating on helium, oxygen, and argon plasmas that kinetic instabilities restrict the parameter space available for the optimization of high charge state ion currents. The most critical parameter in terms of plasma stability is the strength of the solenoid magnetic field. It is demonstrated that due to the instabilities the optimum Bmin-field in single frequency heating mode is often ≤0.8BECR, which is the value suggested by the semiempirical scaling laws guiding the design of modern ECRISs. It is argued that the effect can be attributed not only to the absolute magnitude of the magnetic field but also to the variation of the average magnetic field gradient on the resonance surface.

  13. Mitigation of energetic electrons in the magnetosphere by amplified whistler wave under double cyclotron resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, S. P.

    2008-10-01

    An optimal approach reducing the population of MeV electrons in the magnetosphere is presented. Under a double resonance condition, whistler wave is simultaneously in cyclotron resonance with keV and MeV electrons. The injected whistler waves is first amplified by the background keV electrons via loss-cone negative mass instability to become effective in precipitating MeV electrons via cyclotron resonance elevated chaotic scattering. The numerical results show that a small amplitude whistler wave can be amplified by more than 25 dB. The amplification factor reduces only about 10 dB with a 30 dB increase of the initial wave intensity. Use of an amplified whistler wave to scatter 1.5 MeV electrons from an initial pitch angle of 86.5°to a pitch angle <50° is demonstrated. The ratio of the required wave magnetic field to the background magnetic field is calculated to be about 8×10-4.

  14. Design of a new electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Oshima National College of Maritime Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Asaji, T. Hirabara, N.; Izumihara, T.; Nakamizu, T.; Ohba, T.; Nakamura, T.; Furuse, M.; Hitobo, T.; Kato, Y.

    2014-02-15

    A new electron cyclotron resonance ion/plasma source has been designed and will be built at Oshima National College of Maritime Technology by early 2014. We have developed an ion source that allows the control of the plasma parameters over a wide range of electron temperatures for material research. A minimum-B magnetic field composed of axial mirror fields and radial cusp fields was designed using mainly Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets. The axial magnetic field can be varied by three solenoid coils. The apparatus has 2.45 GHz magnetron and 2.5–6.0 GHz solid-state microwave sources.

  15. Calculating method for confinement time and charge distribution of ions in electron cyclotron resonance sources

    SciTech Connect

    Dougar-Jabon, V.D.; Umnov, A.M.; Kutner, V.B.

    1996-03-01

    It is common knowledge that the electrostatic pit in a core plasma of electron cyclotron resonance sources exerts strict control over generation of ions in high charge states. This work is aimed at finding a dependence of the lifetime of ions on their charge states in the core region and to elaborate a numerical model of ion charge dispersion not only for the core plasmas but for extracted beams as well. The calculated data are in good agreement with the experimental results on charge distributions and magnitudes for currents of beams extracted from the 14 GHz DECRIS source. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Laser desorption studies of high mass biomolecules in Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed Central

    Solouki, T; Russell, D H

    1992-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization is used to obtain Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectra of model peptides (e.g., gramicidin S, angiotensin I, renin substrate, melittin, and bovine insulin). Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization yields ions having appreciable kinetic energies. Two methods for trapping the high kinetic energy ions are described: (i) the ion signal for [M+H]+ ions is shown to increase with increasing trapping voltages, and (ii) collisional relaxation is used for the detection of [M+H]+ ions of bovine insulin. Images PMID:1378614

  17. Performance of the Argonne National Laboratory electron cyclotron resonance charge breeder

    SciTech Connect

    Vondrasek, R.; Kolomiets, A.; Levand, A.; Pardo, R.; Savard, G.; Scott, R.

    2011-05-15

    An electron cyclotron resonance charge breeder for the Californium rare ion breeder upgrade (CARIBU), a new radioactive beam facility for the Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS), has been constructed and commissioned. Charge breeding efficiencies up to 15.6% have been realized for stable beams with a typical breeding time of 10 ms/charge state. The CARIBU system has been undergoing commissioning tests utilizing a 100 mCi {sup 252}Cf fission source. A charge breeding efficiency of 14.8 {+-} 5% has been achieved for the first radioactive beam of {sup 143}Cs{sup 27+}.

  18. Performance of the Argonne National Laboratory electron cyclotron resonance charge breeder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vondrasek, R.; Kolomiets, A.; Levand, A.; Pardo, R.; Savard, G.; Scott, R.

    2011-05-01

    An electron cyclotron resonance charge breeder for the Californium rare ion breeder upgrade (CARIBU), a new radioactive beam facility for the Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS), has been constructed and commissioned. Charge breeding efficiencies up to 15.6% have been realized for stable beams with a typical breeding time of 10 ms/charge state. The CARIBU system has been undergoing commissioning tests utilizing a 100 mCi 252Cf fission source. A charge breeding efficiency of 14.8 ± 5% has been achieved for the first radioactive beam of 143Cs27+.

  19. Wall-loss distribution of charge breeding ions in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, S. C.; Oyaizu, M.; Imai, N.; Hirayama, Y.; Ishiyama, H.; Miyatake, H.; Niki, K.; Okada, M.; Watanabe, Y. X.; Otokawa, Y.; Osa, A.; Ichikawa, S.

    2012-02-15

    We investigated the ion-loss distribution on the sidewall of an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma chamber using the 18-GHz ECR charge breeder at the Tokai Radioactive Ion Accelerator Complex (TRIAC). Similarities and differences between the ion-loss distributions (longitudinal and azimuthal) of different ion species (i.e., radioactive {sup 111}In{sup 1+} and {sup 140}Xe{sup 1+} ions that are typical volatile and nonvolatile elements) was qualitatively discussed to understand the element dependence of the charge breeding efficiency. Especially, the similarities represent universal ion loss characteristics in an ECR charge breeder, which are different from the loss patterns of electrons on the ECRIS wall.

  20. High-frequency conductivity of multilayer graphene and graphite under the conditions of quantum cyclotron resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, I. V.; Medina Pantoja, J. C.

    2014-06-01

    The conductivity tensor of a layered conductor with the Dirac-type energy spectrum of charge carriers placed in a quantizing magnetic field under the condition of normal skin-effect is investigated using the method of quantum kinetic equation. It is shown that under the cyclotron resonance conditions there appear high-temperature quantum oscillations of conductivity, which are weakly sensitive to thermal broadening of the Fermi level. We present the expressions for the classical and high-temperature contributions to the conductivity tensor which determine the conductivity in the range of not too low temperatures where the Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations are vanishing.

  1. Status of the Bio-Nano electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Toyo University.

    PubMed

    Uchida, T; Minezaki, H; Ishihara, S; Muramatsu, M; Rácz, R; Asaji, T; Kitagawa, A; Kato, Y; Biri, S; Drentje, A G; Yoshida, Y

    2014-02-01

    In the paper, the material science experiments, carried out recently using the Bio-Nano electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) at Toyo University, are reported. We have investigated several methods to synthesize endohedral C60 using ion-ion and ion-molecule collision reaction in the ECRIS. Because of the simplicity of the configuration, we can install a large choice of additional equipment in the ECRIS. The Bio-Nano ECRIS is suitable not only to test the materials production but also to test technical developments to improve or understand the performance of an ECRIS.

  2. An ICR investigation of ion-molecule reactions of HCN. [Ion Cyclotron Resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcewan, M. J.; Anicich, V. G.; Huntress, W. T., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Laboratory reaction rates and product distributions measured by the ion cyclotron resonance technique are reported for a series of reactions of HCN(+) ions with the neutral molecules HCN, CH4, NH3, H2O, CO, CO2, N2 and O2. Rate coefficients are also reported for reactions of positive ions derived from these molecules with HCN. A comparison of the results with a survey of literature values for rate coefficients of HCN(+) reactions shows some exothermic proton transfers from HCN(+) to be inefficient.

  3. Two-dimensional numerical model of electron cyclotron resonance discharge with pointwise mappings

    SciTech Connect

    Eruhimov, V.; Semenov, V.

    2006-03-15

    We suggest a new approach to numerical modeling of electron distribution function in an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) discharge. The method is based on a pointwise mapping of electron velocity over a single bounce oscillation. We limit our consideration to ECR heating, collisions, ionization, and ambipolar losses from the trap although other processes can be accounted for as well. The method gives a solution close to the brute-force particle-in-cell integration but is incomparably faster. Initial results of experiments are presented.

  4. A 250-GHz CARM (Cyclotron Auto Resonance Maser) oscillator experiment driven by an induction linac

    SciTech Connect

    Caplan, M.; Kulke, B.; Bubp, D.G. ); McDermott, D.; Luhmann, N. )

    1990-09-14

    A 250-GHz Cyclotron Auto Resonance Maser (CARM) oscillator has been designed and constructed and will be tested using a 1-kA, 2-MeV electron beam produced by the induction linac at the Accelerator Research Center (ARC) facility of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The oscillator circuit was made to operate in the TE{sub 11} mode at ten times cutoff using waveguide Bragg reflectors to create an external cavity Q of 8000. Theory predicts cavity fill times of less than 30 ns (pulse length) and efficiencies approaching 20% is sufficiently low transverse electron velocity spreads are maintained (2%).

  5. Application of terahertz quantum-cascade lasers to semiconductor cyclotron resonance.

    PubMed

    Larrabee, Diane C; Khodaparast, Giti A; Tittel, Frank K; Kono, Jun; Scalari, Giacomo; Ajili, Lassaad; Faist, Jerome; Beere, Harvey; Davies, Giles; Linfield, Edmund; Ritchie, David; Nakajima, Yoji; Nakai, Masato; Sasa, Shigehiko; Inoue, Masataka; Chung, Seokjae; Santos, Michael B

    2004-01-01

    Quantum-cascade lasers operating at 4.7, 3.5, and 2.3 THz have been used to achieve cyclotron resonance in InAs and InSb quantum wells from liquid-helium temperatures to room temperature. This represents one of the first spectroscopic applications of terahertz quantum-cascade lasers. Results show that these compact lasers are convenient and reliable sources with adequate power and stability for this type of far-infrared magneto-optical study of solids. Their compactness promises interesting future applications in solid-state spectroscopy.

  6. Fullerene-rare gas mixed plasmas in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Asaji, T. Ohba, T.; Uchida, T.; Yoshida, Y.; Minezaki, H.; Ishihara, S.; Racz, R.; Biri, S.; Kato, Y.

    2014-02-15

    A synthesis technology of endohedral fullerenes such as Fe@C{sub 60} has developed with an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source. The production of N@C{sub 60} was reported. However, the yield was quite low, since most fullerene molecules were broken in the ECR plasma. We have adopted gas-mixing techniques in order to cool the plasma and then reduce fullerene dissociation. Mass spectra of ion beams extracted from fullerene-He, Ar or Xe mixed plasmas were observed with a Faraday cup. From the results, the He gas mixing technique is effective against fullerene destruction.

  7. X-ray-spectroscopy analysis of electron-cyclotron-resonance ion-source plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, J. P.; Martins, M. C.; Parente, F.; Costa, A. M.; Marques, J. P.; Indelicato, P.

    2010-12-15

    Analysis of x-ray spectra emitted by highly charged ions in an electron-cyclotron-resonance ion source (ECRIS) may be used as a tool to estimate the charge-state distribution (CSD) in the source plasma. For that purpose, knowledge of the electron energy distribution in the plasma, as well as the most important processes leading to the creation and de-excitation of ionic excited states are needed. In this work we present a method to estimate the ion CSD in an ECRIS through the analysis of the x-ray spectra emitted by the plasma. The method is applied to the analysis of a sulfur ECRIS plasma.

  8. Circular waveguide systems for electron-cyclotron-resonant heating of the tandem mirror experiment-upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Felker, B.; Calderon, M.O.; Chargin, A.K.; Coffield, F.E.; Gallagher, N.C. Jr.; Lang, D.D.; Pedrotti, L.R.; Rubert, R.R.; Stallard, B.W.; Sweeney, D.W.

    1983-11-18

    Extensive use of electron cyclotron resonant heating (ECRH) in the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U) requires continuous development of components to improve efficiency, increase reliability, and deliver power to new locations with respect to the plasma. We have used rectangular waveguide components on the experiment and have developed, tested, and installed circular waveguide components. We replaced the rectangular with the circular components because of the greater transmission efficiency and power-handling capability of the circular ones. Design, fabrication, and testing of all components are complete for all systems. In this paper we describe the design criteria for the system.

  9. Quasilinear theory of the ordinary-mode electron-cyclotron resonance in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Arunasalam, V.; Efthimion, P.C.; Hosea, J.C.; Hsuan, H.; Taylor, G.

    1983-11-01

    A coupled set of equations, one describing the time evolution of the ordinary-mode wave energy and the other describing the time evolution of the electron distribution function is presented. The wave damping is mainly determined by T/sub parallel/ while the radiative equilibrium is mainly an equipartition with T/sub perpendicular/. The time rate of change of T/sub perpendicular/, T/sub parallel/, particle (N/sub 0/), and current (J/sub parellel/) densities are examined for finite k/sub parallel/ electron-cyclotron-resonance heating of plasmas.

  10. Multicusp type machine for electron cyclotron resonance plasma with reduced dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amemiya, H.; Maeda, M.

    1996-03-01

    Plasmas are created in a cusp type magnetic trap using electron cyclotron resonance heating. The magnetic field is generated with permanent magnets forming a 12-pole, whereby the polarity at the ends of the rods has been reversed in order to obtain end plugs and to improve the plasma confinement. In this way, the plasma volume could be reduced such that the cross section was close to or smaller than the cutoff width of a circular waveguide. This increases the microwave power absorbed and gives a high plasma density even above the cutoff value.

  11. Multi-photon transitions in coupled plasmon-cyclotron resonance measured by millimeter-wave reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Liu, Ruiyuan; Du, Rui-Rui; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.

    2017-04-01

    We construct a low-temperature microwave waveguide interferometer for measuring the high-frequency properties of two-dimensional electron gases. Coupled plasmon-cyclotron resonance (PCR) spectra are used to extract effective mass, bulk plasmon frequency, and carrier relaxation times. In contrast to traditional transmission spectroscopy, this method does not require sample preparation and is nondestructive. PCR signals can be resolved with a microwave power source as low as 10 nW. We observe PCR in the multi-photon transition regime, which has been proposed to be relevant to the microwave-induced resistance oscillations.

  12. Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Permanent Magnet Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Vilkov, Andrey N.; Gamage, Chaminda M.; Misharin, Alexander S.; Doroshenko, Vladimir M.; Tolmachev, Dmitry A.; Tarasova, Irina A.; Kharybin, Oleg N.; Novoselov, Konstantin P.; Gorshkov, Michael V.

    2007-01-01

    A new Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance mass spectrometer based on a permanent magnet with an atmospheric pressure ionization source was designed and constructed. A mass resolving power (full-width-at-half-maximum) of up to 80,000 in the electron ionization mode and 25,000 in the electrospray mode was obtained. Also, a mass measurement accuracy at low-ppm level has been demonstrated for peptide mixtures in a mass range of up to 1,200 m/z in the isotopically resolved mass spectra. PMID:17587594

  13. Monte Carlo modeling of ionospheric oxygen acceleration by cyclotron resonance with broad-band electromagnetic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Retterer, John M.; Chang, Tom; Crew, G. B.; Jasperse, J. R.; Winningham, J. D.

    1987-01-01

    It is demonstrated that cyclotron resonance with observed electric field fluctuations is responsible for production of the oxygen-ion conics that are observed by the Dynamics Explorer 1 satellite in the central plasma-sheet region of the earth's magnetosphere. The ion-velocity distribution is described by a quasi-linear diffusion equation which is solved by the Monte Carlo technique. The acceleration produced by the observed wave spectrum agrees well with the ion observations, in both form and magnitude. This is believed to represent the first successful comparison of an observed conic with any theoretical model.

  14. First results of an auxiliary electron cyclotron resonance heating experiment in the GDT magnetic mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagryansky, P. A.; Kovalenko, Yu. V.; Savkin, V. Ya.; Solomakhin, A. L.; Yakovlev, D. V.

    2014-08-01

    The axially symmetric magnetic mirror device gas-dynamic trap (GDT, Budker Institute, Novosibirsk) has recently demonstrated a tangible increase in plasma electron temperature. According to laser scattering, a value of 0.4 keV has been achieved (a twofold increase). In addition to standard machine operation, utilizing a 5 MW neutral beam injection, a newly installed electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) system was employed (54.5 GHz, 0.4 MW). The reported progress in electron temperature, along with previous experiments, which demonstrated plasma confinement at beta as high as 60%, is a significant advancement towards an energy efficient fusion neutron source based on GDT physics.

  15. The third generation superconducting 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source VENUS (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Lyneis, C.; Leitner, D.; Leitner, M.; Taylor, C.; Abbott, S.

    2010-02-15

    VENUS is a third generation electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source, which incorporates a high field superconducting NbTi magnet structure, a 28 GHz gryotron microwave source and a state of the art closed cycle cryosystem. During the decade from initial concept to regular operation, it has demonstrated both the feasibility and the performance levels of this new generation of ECR ion sources and required innovation on magnet construction, plasma chamber design, and beam transport. In this paper, the development, performance, and major innovations are described as well as a look to the potential to construct a fourth generation ECR ion source.

  16. Simulation and beamline experiments for the superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source VENUS

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, Damon S.; Leitner, Daniela; Lyneis, Claude M.; Grote, David P.

    2008-02-15

    The particle-in-cell code WARP has been enhanced to incorporate both two- and three-dimensional sheath extraction models giving WARP the capability of simulating entire ion beam transport systems including the extraction of beams from plasma sources. In this article, we describe a method of producing initial ion distributions for plasma extraction simulations in electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources based on experimentally measured sputtering on the source biased disk. Using this initialization method, we present preliminary results for extraction and transport simulations of an oxygen beam and compare them with experimental beam imaging on a quartz viewing plate for the superconducting ECR ion source VENUS.

  17. Development of DRAGON electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Institute of Modern Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, W.; Lin, S. H.; Xie, D. Z.; Zhang, X. Z.; Sha, S.; Zhang, W. H.; Cao, Y.; Guo, J. W.; Fang, X.; Guo, X. H.; Li, X. X.; Ma, H. Y.; Wu, Q.; Zhao, H. Y.; Ma, B. H.; Wang, H.; Zhu, Y. H.; Feng, Y. C.; Li, J. Y.; Li, J. Q.; and others

    2012-02-15

    A new room temperature electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source, DRAGON, is under construction at IMP. DRAGON is designed to operate at microwaves of frequencies of 14.5-18 GHz. Its axial solenoid coils are cooled with evaporative medium to provide an axial magnetic mirror field of 2.5 T at the injection and 1.4 T at the extraction, respectively. In comparison to other conventional room temperature ECR ion sources, DRAGON has so far the largest bore plasma chamber of inner diameter of 126 mm with maximum radial fields of 1.4-1.5 T produced by a non-Halbach permanent sextupole magnet.

  18. Effect of pulse-modulated microwaves on fullerene ion production with electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Asaji, T; Uchida, T; Minezaki, H; Oshima, K; Racz, R; Muramatsu, M; Biri, S; Kitagawa, A; Kato, Y; Yoshida, Y

    2012-02-01

    Fullerene plasmas generated by pulse-modulated microwaves have been investigated under typical conditions at the Bio-Nano electron cyclotron resonance ion source. The effect of the pulse modulation is distinct from that of simply structured gases, and then the density of the fullerene plasmas increased as decreasing the duty ratio. The density for a pulse width of 10 μs at the period of 100 μs is 1.34 times higher than that for CW mode. We have studied the responses of fullerene and argon plasmas to pulsed microwaves. After the turnoff of microwave power, fullerene plasmas lasted ∼30 times longer than argon plasmas.

  19. Production of a highly charged uranium ion beam with RIKEN superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Higurashi, Y.; Ohnishi, J.; Nakagawa, T.; Haba, H.; Fujimaki, M.; Komiyama, M.; Kamigaito, O.; Tamura, M.; Aihara, T.; Uchiyama, A.

    2012-02-15

    A highly charged uranium (U) ion beam is produced from the RIKEN superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source using 18 and 28 GHz microwaves. The sputtering method is used to produce this U ion beam. The beam intensity is strongly dependent on the rod position and sputtering voltage. We observe that the emittance of U{sup 35+} for 28 GHz microwaves is almost the same as that for 18 GHz microwaves. It seems that the beam intensity of U ions produced using 28 GHz microwaves is higher than that produced using 18 GHz microwaves at the same Radio Frequency (RF) power.

  20. A preliminary study of the electron cyclotron resonance ion source for the RAON injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, I. S.; Kim, Y.; Choi, S. J.; Heo, J. I.; Jin, H. C.; Park, B. S.

    2016-09-01

    We have built and tested an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source for the Rare Isotope Accelerator of Newness (RAON) injector. Fully superconducting magnets were developed for the ECR ion source. First, an oxygen plasma was ignited, and a preliminary highly-charged oxygen beam was extracted. Next, a 100 μA beam current of oxygen 5+ was extracted when a 1 kW microwave power was injected using a 28 GHz gyrotron. Finally, an off-site test facility was proposed to test the components of the injector by using heavy-ion beams generated by the ECR ion source.

  1. Development of DRAGON electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Institute of Modern Physics.

    PubMed

    Lu, W; Xie, D Z; Zhang, X Z; Xiong, B; Ruan, L; Sha, S; Zhang, W H; Cao, Y; Lin, S H; Guo, J W; Fang, X; Guo, X H; Li, X X; Ma, H Y; Yang, Y; Wu, Q; Zhao, H Y; Ma, B H; Wang, H; Zhu, Y H; Feng, Y C; Li, J Y; Li, J Q; Sun, L T; Zhao, H W

    2012-02-01

    A new room temperature electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source, DRAGON, is under construction at IMP. DRAGON is designed to operate at microwaves of frequencies of 14.5-18 GHz. Its axial solenoid coils are cooled with evaporative medium to provide an axial magnetic mirror field of 2.5 T at the injection and 1.4 T at the extraction, respectively. In comparison to other conventional room temperature ECR ion sources, DRAGON has so far the largest bore plasma chamber of inner diameter of 126 mm with maximum radial fields of 1.4-1.5 T produced by a non-Halbach permanent sextupole magnet.

  2. Drude weight, cyclotron resonance, and the Dicke model of graphene cavity QED.

    PubMed

    Chirolli, Luca; Polini, Marco; Giovannetti, Vittorio; MacDonald, Allan H

    2012-12-28

    The unique optoelectronic properties of graphene make this two-dimensional material an ideal platform for fundamental studies of cavity quantum electrodynamics in the strong-coupling regime. The celebrated Dicke model of cavity quantum electrodynamics can be approximately realized in this material when the cyclotron transition of its 2D massless Dirac fermion carriers is nearly resonant with a cavity photon mode. We develop the theory of strong matter-photon coupling in this circumstance, emphasizing the essential role of a dynamically generated matter energy term that is quadratic in the photon field and absent in graphene's low-energy Dirac model.

  3. Gas phase ion - molecule reactions studied by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, C.W. III.

    1993-01-01

    Intrinsic thermodynamic information of molecules can easily be determined in the low pressure FT/ICR mass spectrometer. The gas phase basicity of two carbenes were measured by isolating the protonated carbene ion and reacting it with neutral reference compounds by the bracketing method. A fundamentally new-dimensional FT/ICR/MS experiment, SWIM (stored waveform ion modulation) 2D-FT/ICR MS/MS, is described. Prior encodement of the second dimension by use of two identical excitation waveforms separated by a variable delay period is replaced by a new encodement in which each row of the two-dimensional data array is obtained by use of a single stored excitation waveform whose frequency-domain magnitude spectrum is a sinusoid whose frequency increases from one row to the next. In the two-dimensional mass spectrum, the conventional one-dimensional FT/ICR mass spectrum appears along the diagonal, and each off-diagonal peak corresponds to an ion-neutral reaction whose ionic components may be identified by horizontal and vertical projections to the diagonal spectrum. All ion-molecule reactions in a gaseous mixture may be identified from a single 2D-FT/ICR MS/MS experiment, without any prior knowledge of the system. In some endoergic reactions there is a minimum energy threshold that must overcome for a reaction to occur. Hence, a simple sinusoidal modulation of parent ion cyclotron radius leads to a clipped sinusoidal signal of the product ion abundance in the second dimension, which upon Fourier transformation produces signals with harmonic and combination ion cyclotron resonance frequencies. Moreover, ion-molecule reaction rates may vary directly within kinetic energy rather than cyclotron radius. With SWIM, it is possible to tailor the excitation profile so as to produce a sinusoidal modulation of ion kinetic energy as a function of cyclotron frequency.

  4. Nonlinear fundamental and harmonic cyclotron resonant scattering of radiation belt ultrarelativistic electrons by oblique monochromatic EMIC waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Geng; Su, Zhenpeng; Zheng, Huinan; Wang, Yuming; Zhang, Min; Wang, Shui

    2017-02-01

    Cyclotron resonant scattering by electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves has been considered to be responsible for the rapid loss of radiation belt high-energy electrons. For parallel-propagating EMIC waves, the nonlinear character of cyclotron resonance has been revealed in recent studies. Here we present the first study on the nonlinear fundamental and harmonic cyclotron resonant scattering of radiation belt ultrarelativistic electrons by oblique EMIC waves on the basis of test particle simulations. Higher wave obliquity produces stronger nonlinearity of harmonic resonances but weaker nonlinearity of fundamental resonance. Compared to the quasi-linear prediction, these nonlinear resonances yield a more rapid loss of electrons over a wider pitch angle range. In the quasi-linear regime, the ultrarelativistic electrons are lost in the equatorial pitch angle range αeq<75°, nearly independent of wave normal angle ψ. In contrast, the upper pitch angle cutoff of nonlinear losses tends to increase with the wave normal angle increasing, which is about αeq=82° at ψ = 0° and αeq>87.5° at ψ = 20° and 40°. At the resonant pitch angles αeq<75°, the difference between quasi-linear and nonlinear loss timescales tends to decrease with the wave normal angle increasing. At ψ = 0° and 20°, the nonlinear electron loss timescale is 10% shorter than the quasi-linear prediction; at ψ = 40°, the difference in loss timescales is reduced to <5%.

  5. Wall-loss distribution of charge breeding ions in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, S. C.; Oyaizu, M.; Imai, N.; Hirayama, Y.; Ishiyama, H.; Miyatake, H.; Niki, K.; Okada, M.; Watanabe, Y. X.; Otokawa, Y.; Osa, A.; Ichikawa, S.

    2011-03-15

    The ion loss distribution in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) was investigated to understand the element dependence of the charge breeding efficiency in an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) charge breeder. The radioactive {sup 111}In{sup 1+} and {sup 140}Xe{sup 1+} ions (typical nonvolatile and volatile elements, respectively) were injected into the ECR charge breeder at the Tokai Radioactive Ion Accelerator Complex to breed their charge states. Their respective residual activities on the sidewall of the cylindrical plasma chamber of the source were measured after charge breeding as functions of the azimuthal angle and longitudinal position and two-dimensional distributions of ions lost during charge breeding in the ECRIS were obtained. These distributions had different azimuthal symmetries. The origins of these different azimuthal symmetries are qualitatively discussed by analyzing the differences and similarities in the observed wall-loss patterns. The implications for improving the charge breeding efficiencies of nonvolatile elements in ECR charge breeders are described. The similarities represent universal ion loss characteristics in an ECR charge breeder, which are different from the loss patterns of electrons on the ECRIS wall.

  6. Development of a miniature microwave electron cyclotron resonance plasma ion thruster for exospheric micro-propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, Indranuj; Toyoda, Yuji; Yamamoto, Naoji; Nakashima, Hideki

    2015-12-15

    A miniature microwave electron cyclotron resonance plasma source [(discharge diameter)/(microwave cutoff diameter) < 0.3] has been developed at Kyushu University to be used as an ion thruster in micro-propulsion applications in the exosphere. The discharge source uses both radial and axial magnetostatic field confinement to facilitate electron cyclotron resonance and increase the electron dwell time in the volume, thereby enhancing plasma production efficiency. Performance of the ion thruster is studied at 3 microwave frequencies (1.2 GHz, 1.6 GHz, and 2.45 GHz), for low input powers (<15 W) and small xenon mass flow rates (<40 μg/s), by experimentally measuring the extracted ion beam current through a potential difference of ≅1200 V. The discharge geometry is found to operate most efficiently at an input microwave frequency of 1.6 GHz. At this frequency, for an input power of 8 W, and propellant (xenon) mass flow rate of 21 μg/s, 13.7 mA of ion beam current is obtained, equivalent to an calculated thrust of 0.74 mN.

  7. Development of a miniature microwave electron cyclotron resonance plasma ion thruster for exospheric micro-propulsion.

    PubMed

    Dey, Indranuj; Toyoda, Yuji; Yamamoto, Naoji; Nakashima, Hideki

    2015-12-01

    A miniature microwave electron cyclotron resonance plasma source [(discharge diameter)/(microwave cutoff diameter) < 0.3] has been developed at Kyushu University to be used as an ion thruster in micro-propulsion applications in the exosphere. The discharge source uses both radial and axial magnetostatic field confinement to facilitate electron cyclotron resonance and increase the electron dwell time in the volume, thereby enhancing plasma production efficiency. Performance of the ion thruster is studied at 3 microwave frequencies (1.2 GHz, 1.6 GHz, and 2.45 GHz), for low input powers (<15 W) and small xenon mass flow rates (<40 μg/s), by experimentally measuring the extracted ion beam current through a potential difference of ≅1200 V. The discharge geometry is found to operate most efficiently at an input microwave frequency of 1.6 GHz. At this frequency, for an input power of 8 W, and propellant (xenon) mass flow rate of 21 μg/s, 13.7 mA of ion beam current is obtained, equivalent to an calculated thrust of 0.74 mN.

  8. Improvement of trace element analysis system using RIKEN electron cyclotron resonance ion source and linear accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Kidera, M.; Nakagawa, T.; Takahashi, K.; Enomoto, S.; Igarashi, K.; Fujimaki, M.; Ikezawa, E.; Kamigaito, O.; Kase, M.; Goto, A.; Yano, Y.

    2006-03-15

    We have developed a new analytical system that consists of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (RIKEN 18 GHz ECRIS) and a RIKEN heavy ion linear accelerator (RILAC). This system is called trace element analysis using electron cyclotron resonance ion source and RILAC (ECRIS-RILAC-TEA). ECRIS-RILAC-TEA has several advantages as described in the work of Kidera et al. [AIP Conf. Proc. 749, 85 (2005)]. However, many experimental results during the last several years revealed a few problems: (1) large background contamination in the ECRIS, particularly at the surface of the plasma chamber wall, (2) high counting of the ionization chamber and the data taking system that is monitored by the direct beam from the accelerator, and (3) difficulty in the selection of the pilot sample and pilot beam production from the ECRIS for the purpose of normalization. In order to overcome these problems, we conducted several test experiments over the past year. In this article, we report the experimental results in detail and future plans for improving this system.

  9. Development of a miniature microwave electron cyclotron resonance plasma ion thruster for exospheric micro-propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Indranuj; Toyoda, Yuji; Yamamoto, Naoji; Nakashima, Hideki

    2015-12-01

    A miniature microwave electron cyclotron resonance plasma source [(discharge diameter)/(microwave cutoff diameter) < 0.3] has been developed at Kyushu University to be used as an ion thruster in micro-propulsion applications in the exosphere. The discharge source uses both radial and axial magnetostatic field confinement to facilitate electron cyclotron resonance and increase the electron dwell time in the volume, thereby enhancing plasma production efficiency. Performance of the ion thruster is studied at 3 microwave frequencies (1.2 GHz, 1.6 GHz, and 2.45 GHz), for low input powers (<15 W) and small xenon mass flow rates (<40 μg/s), by experimentally measuring the extracted ion beam current through a potential difference of ≅1200 V. The discharge geometry is found to operate most efficiently at an input microwave frequency of 1.6 GHz. At this frequency, for an input power of 8 W, and propellant (xenon) mass flow rate of 21 μg/s, 13.7 mA of ion beam current is obtained, equivalent to an calculated thrust of 0.74 mN.

  10. Self-consistent simulation of a planar electron-cyclotron-wave-resonance discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Krimke, R.; Urbassek, H.M.

    1997-06-01

    A discharge heated inductively by resonant absorption of electron cyclotron waves discharge is modeled in a planar geometry. The simulation algorithm is based on a kinetic particle-in-cell (PIC/MC) simulation of the plasma properties; the electromagnetic field is calculated macroscopically using the Appleton{endash}Hartree theory for the dielectric tensor. The results are checked against a simplified analytical theory and experimental data by B. Pfeiffer [J. Appl. Phys. {bold 37}, 1624,1628 (1966)] for a 15 mTorr argon discharge. As a result, we show that an inhomogeneous density profile in the discharge strongly affects the electromagnetic fields in the plasma. Power deposition is calculated both in and outside of the resonance. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Integrated modeling of electron cyclotron resonance ion sources and charge breeders with GEM, MCBC, and IonEx

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J. S.; Zhao, L.; Cluggish, B. P.; Galkin, S. A.; Grubert, J. E.; Pardo, R. C.; Vondrasek, R. C.

    2010-02-15

    A numerical toolset to help in understanding physical processes in the electron cyclotron resonance charge breeder (ECRCB) and further to help optimization and design of current and future machines is presented. The toolset consists of three modules (Monte Carlo charge breeding code, generalized electron cyclotron resonance ion source modeling, and ion extraction), each modeling different processes occurring in the ECRCB from beam injection to extraction. The toolset provides qualitative study, such as parameter studies, and scaling of the operation, and physical understanding in the ECRCB. The methodology and a sample integrated modeling are presented.

  12. Study of ion beam transport from the SECRAL electron cyclotron resonance ion source at the Institute of Modern Physics.

    PubMed

    Cao, Y; Lu, W; Zhang, W H; Sha, S; Yang, Y; Ma, B H; Wang, H; Zhu, Y H; Guo, J W; Fang, X; Lin, S H; Li, X X; Feng, Y C; Li, J Y; Zhao, H Y; Ma, H Y; Zhang, X Z; Guo, X H; Wu, Q; Sun, L T; Zhao, H W; Xie, D Z

    2012-02-01

    Ion beam transport from the Superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source with Advanced design in Lanzhou (SECRAL) electron cyclotron resonance ion source was studied at the Institute of Modern Physics during 2010. Particle-in-cell simulations and experimental results have shown that both space charge and magnetic aberrations lead to a larger beam envelope and emittance growth. In the existing SECRAL extraction beam line, it has been shown that raising the solenoid lens magnetic field reduces aberrations in the subsequent dipole and results in lower emittance. Detailed beam emittance measurements are presented in this paper.

  13. Photochemically induced changes in dissolved organic matter identified by ultrahigh resolution fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gonsior, Michael; Peake, Barrie M; Cooper, William T; Podgorski, David; D'Andrilli, Juliana; Cooper, William J

    2009-02-01

    Sunlight-induced molecular changes have been observed in two samples of dissolved organic matter (DOM) collected in the Cape Fear River system, North Carolina, USA. The molecular composition of a water sample collected in the Black River (sample B210, salinity 0) and another water sample collected within the Cape Fear River estuary (sample M61, salinity 13.7) were analyzed using an ultrahigh resolution 9.4 Tesla (T) electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. Additionally, the Ultraviolet/Visible (UV/vis) absorbance as well as the excitation emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectra were determined to identify changes in the optical properties associated with photochemical reactions of the chromophoric DOM (CDOM). The molecular formulas forthe Cape Fear River Estuary (M61) sample before the irradiation experiments indicated the presence of highly aromatic compounds which were not present in the unirradiated Black River sample (B210). These aromatic compounds, with oxygen-subtracted double bond equivalents (DBE-O) values greater than nine, are more photoreactive and readily photodegraded relative to saturated compounds. Compounds with DBE-O values below nine are less photoreactive. The UV/vis absorbance and EEM fluorescence results supported this different photodegradation behavior, suggesting that the photoreactivity of CDOM is highly dependent on the molecular composition of the CDOM.

  14. ARTEMIS-B: A room-temperature test electron cyclotron resonance ion source for the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University

    SciTech Connect

    Machicoane, G.; Cole, D.; Ottarson, J.; Stetson, J.; Zavodszky, P.

    2006-03-15

    The current scheme for ion-beam injection into the coupled cyclotron accelerator at the NSCL involves the use of two electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources. The first one is a 6.4 GHz fully superconducting that will be replaced within two years by SUSI, a third generation 18 GHz superconducting ECR ion source. The other source, ARTEMIS, is a room-temperature source based on the AECR-U design and built in collaboration with the University of Jyvaeskylae in 1999. Due to cyclotron operation constraint, very little time can be allowed to ion source development and optics studies of the cyclotron injection beam line. In this context, NSCL has decided to build ARTEMIS-B an exact replica of its room-temperature ECR ion source. The goal of this project is threefold. One is to improve the overall reliability of cyclotron operation through tests and studies of various ion source parameters that could benefit beam stability, tuning reproducibility, and of course overall extracted currents performance. Second is to implement and test modifications or upgrade made to the ion source: extraction geometry, new resistive or rf oven design, dual frequency use, liner, etc. Finally, this test source will be used to study various ion optics schemes such as electrostatic quadrupole doublet or triplet at the source extraction or the use of a correction sextupole and assess their effect on the ion beam through the use of an emittance scanner and imaging viewer that will be incorporated into ARTEMIS-B beam line. This article reviews the design and construction of ARTEMIS-B along with some initial commissioning results.

  15. The development of a room temperature electron cyclotron resonance ion source (Lanzhou electron cyclotron resonance ion source No. 4) with evaporative cooling technology at Institute of Modern Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, W. Sun, L. T.; Qian, C.; Feng, Y. C.; Ma, H. Y.; Zhang, X. Z.; Ma, B. H.; Zhao, H. W.; Guo, J. W.; Fang, X.; Yang, Y.; Xiong, B.; Guo, S. Q.; Ruan, L.

    2015-04-15

    LECR4 (Lanzhou electron cyclotron resonance ion source No. 4) has been successfully constructed at IMP and has also been connected with the Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) and Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) systems. These source magnet coils are cooled through evaporative cooling technology, which is the first attempt with an ECR ion source in the world. The maximum mirror field is 2.5 T (with iron plug) and the effective plasma chamber volume is 1.2 l. It was designed to be operated at 18 GHz and aimed to produce intense multiple charge state heavy ion beams for the linear injector project SSC-Linac at IMP. In February 2014, the first analyzed beam at 18 GHz was extracted. During about three months’ commissioning, some outstanding results have been achieved, such as 1.97 emA of O{sup 6+}, 1.7 emA of Ar{sup 8+}, 1.07 emA of Ar{sup 9+}, and 118 euA of Bi{sup 28+}. The source has also successfully delivered O{sup 5+} and Ar{sup 8+} ion beams for RFQ commissioning in April 2014. This paper will give a brief overview of the design of LECR4. Then, the latest results of this source at 18 GHz will be presented.

  16. The development of a room temperature electron cyclotron resonance ion source (Lanzhou electron cyclotron resonance ion source No. 4) with evaporative cooling technology at Institute of Modern Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, W.; Sun, L. T.; Qian, C.; Guo, J. W.; Fang, X.; Feng, Y. C.; Yang, Y.; Ma, H. Y.; Zhang, X. Z.; Ma, B. H.; Xiong, B.; Guo, S. Q.; Ruan, L.; Zhao, H. W.

    2015-04-01

    LECR4 (Lanzhou electron cyclotron resonance ion source No. 4) has been successfully constructed at IMP and has also been connected with the Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) and Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) systems. These source magnet coils are cooled through evaporative cooling technology, which is the first attempt with an ECR ion source in the world. The maximum mirror field is 2.5 T (with iron plug) and the effective plasma chamber volume is 1.2 l. It was designed to be operated at 18 GHz and aimed to produce intense multiple charge state heavy ion beams for the linear injector project SSC-Linac at IMP. In February 2014, the first analyzed beam at 18 GHz was extracted. During about three months' commissioning, some outstanding results have been achieved, such as 1.97 emA of O6+, 1.7 emA of Ar8+, 1.07 emA of Ar9+, and 118 euA of Bi28+. The source has also successfully delivered O5+ and Ar8+ ion beams for RFQ commissioning in April 2014. This paper will give a brief overview of the design of LECR4. Then, the latest results of this source at 18 GHz will be presented.

  17. The development of a room temperature electron cyclotron resonance ion source (Lanzhou electron cyclotron resonance ion source No. 4) with evaporative cooling technology at Institute of Modern Physics.

    PubMed

    Lu, W; Sun, L T; Qian, C; Guo, J W; Fang, X; Feng, Y C; Yang, Y; Ma, H Y; Zhang, X Z; Ma, B H; Xiong, B; Guo, S Q; Ruan, L; Zhao, H W

    2015-04-01

    LECR4 (Lanzhou electron cyclotron resonance ion source No. 4) has been successfully constructed at IMP and has also been connected with the Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) and Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) systems. These source magnet coils are cooled through evaporative cooling technology, which is the first attempt with an ECR ion source in the world. The maximum mirror field is 2.5 T (with iron plug) and the effective plasma chamber volume is 1.2 l. It was designed to be operated at 18 GHz and aimed to produce intense multiple charge state heavy ion beams for the linear injector project SSC-Linac at IMP. In February 2014, the first analyzed beam at 18 GHz was extracted. During about three months' commissioning, some outstanding results have been achieved, such as 1.97 emA of O(6+), 1.7 emA of Ar(8+), 1.07 emA of Ar(9+), and 118 euA of Bi(28+). The source has also successfully delivered O(5+) and Ar(8+) ion beams for RFQ commissioning in April 2014. This paper will give a brief overview of the design of LECR4. Then, the latest results of this source at 18 GHz will be presented.

  18. Cyclotron resonant scattering feature simulations. II. Description of the CRSF simulation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarm, F.-W.; Ballhausen, R.; Falkner, S.; Schönherr, G.; Pottschmidt, K.; Wolff, M. T.; Becker, P. A.; Fürst, F.; Marcu-Cheatham, D. M.; Hemphill, P. B.; Sokolova-Lapa, E.; Dauser, T.; Klochkov, D.; Ferrigno, C.; Wilms, J.

    2017-05-01

    Context. Cyclotron resonant scattering features (CRSFs) are formed by scattering of X-ray photons off quantized plasma electrons in the strong magnetic field (of the order 1012 G) close to the surface of an accreting X-ray pulsar. Due to the complex scattering cross-sections, the line profiles of CRSFs cannot be described by an analytic expression. Numerical methods, such as Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of the scattering processes, are required in order to predict precise line shapes for a given physical setup, which can be compared to observations to gain information about the underlying physics in these systems. Aims: A versatile simulation code is needed for the generation of synthetic cyclotron lines. Sophisticated geometries should be investigatable by making their simulation possible for the first time. Methods: The simulation utilizes the mean free path tables described in the first paper of this series for the fast interpolation of propagation lengths. The code is parallelized to make the very time-consuming simulations possible on convenient time scales. Furthermore, it can generate responses to monoenergetic photon injections, producing Green's functions, which can be used later to generate spectra for arbitrary continua. Results: We develop a new simulation code to generate synthetic cyclotron lines for complex scenarios, allowing for unprecedented physical interpretation of the observed data. An associated XSPEC model implementation is used to fit synthetic line profiles to NuSTAR data of Cep X-4. The code has been developed with the main goal of overcoming previous geometrical constraints in MC simulations of CRSFs. By applying this code also to more simple, classic geometries used in previous works, we furthermore address issues of code verification and cross-comparison of various models. The XSPEC model and the Green's function tables are available online (see link in footnote, page 1).

  19. Collision Cross Sections for 20 Protonated Amino Acids: Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance and Ion Mobility Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anupriya; Jones, Chad A.; Dearden, David V.

    2016-08-01

    We report relative dephasing cross sections for the 20 biogenic protonated amino acids measured using the cross sectional areas by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (CRAFTI) technique at 1.9 keV in the laboratory reference frame, as well as momentum transfer cross sections for the same ions computed from Boltzmann-weighted structures determined using molecular mechanics. Cross sections generally increase with increasing molecular weight. Cross sections for aliphatic and aromatic protonated amino acids are larger than the average trend, suggesting these side chains do not fold efficiently. Sulfur-containing protonated amino acids have smaller than average cross sections, reflecting the mass of the S atom. Protonated amino acids that can internally hydrogen-bond have smaller than average cross sections, reflecting more extensive folding. The CRAFTI measurements correlate well with results from drift ion mobility (IMS) and traveling wave ion mobility (TWIMS) spectrometric measurements; CRAFTI results correlate with IMS values approximately as well as IMS and TWIMS values from independent measurements correlate with each other. Both CRAFTI and IMS results correlate well with the computed momentum transfer cross sections, suggesting both techniques provide accurate molecular structural information. Absolute values obtained using the various methods differ significantly; in the case of CRAFTI, this may be due to errors in measurements of collision gas pressure, measurement of excitation voltage, and/or dependence of cross sections on kinetic energy.

  20. Ionization and fragmentation of humic substances in electrospray ionization Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Stenson, Alexandra C; Landing, William M; Marshall, Alan G; Cooper, William T

    2002-09-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) was combined with ultra-high-resolution Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS) to characterize complex humic and fulvic acid mixtures. Lower than expected molecular weight distributions previously observed for humics when analyzed by ESI-MS have fueled speculation about a bias in favor of low molecular weight. Multiply charged ions, ionization suppression, and sample fragmentation have all been suggested as sources of this low molecular weight bias. In this work, resolution of the individual components of humic mixtures within a 1 mass-to-charge unit window was accomplished by FTICR MS at 9.4 T. At mass resolving powers between 60,000 (high mass) and 120,000 (low mass), it was possible to determine that virtually all ions present in spectra of Suwannee River fulvic and humic acid are singly charged, thus eliminating inadequate accounting for multiply charged ions as a primary source of any low molecular weight bias. The high-resolution mass spectra also revealed the presence of molecular families containing ions that differ from each other in degree of saturation, functional group substitution (primarily CH vs N and CH4 vs O), and number of CH2 groups. Ionization suppression and ion fragmentation were addressed for humic and fulvic acid mixtures and well-characterized poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) mixtures with average molecular weights of 8000 and 10,000. Although these high molecular weight PEG mixtures fragment extensively under traditional positive-ion mode ESI conditions, similar fragmentation could not be confirmed for humic and fulvic acid mixtures.

  1. Sawtooth control in JET with ITER relevant low field side resonance ion cyclotron resonance heating and ITER-like wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, J. P.; Lennholm, M.; Chapman, I. T.; Lerche, E.; Reich, M.; Alper, B.; Bobkov, V.; Dumont, R.; Faustin, J. M.; Jacquet, P.; Jaulmes, F.; Johnson, T.; Keeling, D. L.; Liu, Yueqiang; Nicolas, T.; Tholerus, S.; Blackman, T.; Carvalho, I. S.; Coelho, R.; Van Eester, D.; Felton, R.; Goniche, M.; Kiptily, V.; Monakhov, I.; Nave, M. F. F.; Perez von Thun, C.; Sabot, R.; Sozzi, C.; Tsalas, M.

    2015-01-01

    New experiments at JET with the ITER-like wall show for the first time that ITER-relevant low field side resonance first harmonic ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) can be used to control sawteeth that have been initially lengthened by fast particles. In contrast to previous (Graves et al 2012 Nat. Commun. 3 624) high field side resonance sawtooth control experiments undertaken at JET, it is found that the sawteeth of L-mode plasmas can be controlled with less accurate alignment between the resonance layer and the sawtooth inversion radius. This advantage, as well as the discovery that sawteeth can be shortened with various antenna phasings, including dipole, indicates that ICRH is a particularly effective and versatile tool that can be used in future fusion machines for controlling sawteeth. Without sawtooth control, neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) and locked modes were triggered at very low normalised beta. High power H-mode experiments show the extent to which ICRH can be tuned to control sawteeth and NTMs while simultaneously providing effective electron heating with improved flushing of high Z core impurities. Dedicated ICRH simulations using SELFO, SCENIC and EVE, including wide drift orbit effects, explain why sawtooth control is effective with various antenna phasings and show that the sawtooth control mechanism cannot be explained by enhancement of the magnetic shear. Hybrid kinetic-magnetohydrodynamic stability calculations using MISHKA and HAGIS unravel the optimal sawtooth control regimes in these ITER relevant plasma conditions.

  2. Modelling of the ion cyclotron resonance heating scenarios for W7-X stellarator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazakov, Ye. O.; Van Eester, D.; Ongena, J.; Fülöp, T.

    2014-02-01

    The construction of the world largest superconducting stellarator Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) has reached the final stage. One of the main scientific objectives of the W7-X project is to prove experimentally the predicted good confinement of high-energy ions. Ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) system is considered to be installed in W7-X to serve as a localized source of high energy ions. ICRH heating scenarios relevant for hydrogen and deuterium phases of W7-X operation are summarized. The heating efficiency in (3He)-H plasmas is qualitatively analyzed using a modified version of the 1D TOMCAT code able to account for stellarator geometry. The minority ion absorption is shown to be maximized at the helium-3 concentration ˜2% for the typical plasma and ICRH parameters to be available during the initial phase of W7-X.

  3. Control system renewal for efficient operation in RIKEN 18 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Uchiyama, A. Ozeki, K.; Higurashi, Y.; Kidera, M.; Komiyama, M.; Nakagawa, T.

    2016-02-15

    A RIKEN 18 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source (18 GHz ECRIS) is used as an external ion source at the Radioactive Ion Beam Factory (RIBF) accelerator complex to produce an intense beam of medium-mass heavy ions (e.g., Ca and Ar). In most components that comprise the RIBF, the control systems (CSs) are integrated by the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS). On the other hand, a non-EPICS-based system has hardwired controllers, and it is used in the 18 GHz ECRIS CS as an independent system. In terms of efficient and effective operation, the 18 GHz ECRIS CS as well as the RIBF CS should be renewed using EPICS. Therefore, we constructed an 18 GHz ECRIS CS by using programmable logic controllers with embedded EPICS technology. In the renewed system, an operational log system was developed as a new feature, for supporting of the 18 GHz ECRIS operation.

  4. Some aspects of electron dynamics in electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironov, V.; Bogomolov, S.; Bondarchenko, A.; Efremov, A.; Loginov, V.

    2017-07-01

    Electron dynamics in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source is numerically simulated by using a particle-in-cell code combined with simulations of the ion dynamics. Mean electron energies are found to be around 70 keV, close to values that are derived from spectra of x-ray emission out of the source. The electron lifetime is defined by losses of low-energy electrons created in ionizing collisions; the losses are regulated by electron heating rate, which depends on the magnitude of the microwave electric field. Changes in the ion confinement with variations in the microwave electric field and gas flow are simulated. The influence of electron dynamics on the afterglow and two-frequency heating effects is discussed.

  5. Production of beam of negative hydrogen and deuterium ions from source with electron cyclotron resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Golovanivskii, K.S.; Dzhayamanna, K.; Dugar-Zhabon, V.D.

    1988-09-01

    The GELIOS-H/sup /minus// ion source is described; it has electron cyclotron resonance and is designed for generation of negative hydrogen and deuterium ions. The source consumes up to 100 W of microwave power at a frequency of 2.4 GHz and provides a stationary beam of H/sup /minus// ions of up to 1.5 mA and D/sup /minus// ions of up to 1.0 mA for an exit-aperture diameter of 6.2 mm and an extraction voltage of 4.5 kV. The life of the source is limited only by the life of the microwave generator.

  6. Influence of Bernstein modes on the efficiency of electron cyclotron resonance x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, V. V.; Nikitin, G.V.; Savanovich, V.Yu.; Umnov, A.M.; Elizarov, L.I.; Serebrennikov, K.S.; Vostrikova, E.A.

    2006-03-15

    The article considers the factors influencing the temperature of hot electron component in an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) x-ray source. In such sources the electron heating occurs often due to extraordinary electromagnetic wave propagating perpendicularly to the magnetic field. In this case the possibility of the absorption of Bernstein modes is regarded as an additional mechanism of electron heating. The Bernstein modes in an ECR x-ray source can arise due to either linear transformation or parametric instability of external transversal wave. The article briefly reviews also the further experiments which will be carried out to study the influence of Bernstein modes on the increase of hot electron temperature and consequently of x-ray emission.

  7. Two-chamber configuration of Bio-Nano electron cyclotron resonance ion source for fullerene modification.

    PubMed

    Uchida, T; Rácz, R; Muramatsu, M; Kato, Y; Kitagawa, A; Biri, S; Yoshida, Y

    2016-02-01

    We report on the modification of fullerenes with iron and chlorine using two individually controllable plasmas in the Bio-Nano electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS). One of the plasmas is composed of fullerene and the other one is composed of iron and chlorine. The online ion beam analysis allows one to investigate the rate of the vapor-phase collisional modification process in the ECRIS, while the offline analyses (e.g., liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry) of the materials deposited on the plasma chamber can give information on the surface-type process. Both analytical methods show the presence of modified fullerenes such as fullerene-chlorine, fullerene-iron, and fullerene-chlorine-iron.

  8. Review of highly charged heavy ion production with electron cyclotron resonance ion source (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, T.

    2014-02-01

    The electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) plays an important role in the advancement of heavy ion accelerators and other ion beam applications worldwide, thanks to its remarkable ability to produce a great variety of intense highly charged heavy ion beams. Great efforts over the past decade have led to significant ECRIS performance improvements in both the beam intensity and quality. A number of high-performance ECRISs have been built and are in daily operation or are under construction to meet the continuously increasing demand. In addition, comprehension of the detailed and complex physical processes in high-charge-state ECR plasmas has been enhanced experimentally and theoretically. This review covers and discusses the key components, leading-edge developments, and enhanced ECRIS performance in the production of highly charged heavy ion beams.

  9. First results of the 2.45 GHz Oshima electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Asaji, T.; Nakamura, T.; Furuse, M.; Hitobo, T.; Uchida, T.; Muramatsu, M.; Kato, Y.

    2016-02-15

    A new electron cyclotron resonance ion source has been constructed at Oshima College with a 2.45 GHz magnetron microwave source and permanent magnets employed as the main components. In addition, a solid-state power amplifier with a frequency range of 2.5–6.0 GHz was installed to study two-frequency plasma heating. Three solenoid coils were set up for adjusting the axial magnetic fields. Argon plasma generation and ion beam production have been conducted during the first year of operation. Ion current densities in the ECR plasma were measured using a biased disk. For 2.45 and 4.65 GHz two-frequency plasma heating, the ion density was approximately 1.5 times higher than that of 2.45 GHz single-frequency heating.

  10. Prospects for advanced electron cyclotron resonance and electron beam ion source charge breeding methods for EURISOL

    SciTech Connect

    Delahaye, P.; Jardin, P.; Maunoury, L.; Traykov, E.; Varenne, F.; Angot, J.; Lamy, T.; Sortais, P.; Thuillier, T.; Ban, G.; Celona, L.; Lunney, D.; Choinski, J.; Gmaj, P.; Jakubowski, A.; Steckiewicz, O.; Kalvas, T.; and others

    2012-02-15

    As the most ambitious concept of isotope separation on line (ISOL) facility, EURISOL aims at producing unprecedented intensities of post-accelerated radioactive isotopes. Charge breeding, which transforms the charge state of radioactive beams from 1+ to an n+ charge state prior to post-acceleration, is a key technology which has to overcome the following challenges: high charge states for high energies, efficiency, rapidity and purity. On the roadmap to EURISOL, a dedicated R and D is being undertaken to push forward the frontiers of the present state-of-the-art techniques which use either electron cyclotron resonance or electron beam ion sources. We describe here the guidelines of this R and D.

  11. Two-chamber configuration of Bio-Nano electron cyclotron resonance ion source for fullerene modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, T.; Rácz, R.; Muramatsu, M.; Kato, Y.; Kitagawa, A.; Biri, S.; Yoshida, Y.

    2016-02-01

    We report on the modification of fullerenes with iron and chlorine using two individually controllable plasmas in the Bio-Nano electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS). One of the plasmas is composed of fullerene and the other one is composed of iron and chlorine. The online ion beam analysis allows one to investigate the rate of the vapor-phase collisional modification process in the ECRIS, while the offline analyses (e.g., liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry) of the materials deposited on the plasma chamber can give information on the surface-type process. Both analytical methods show the presence of modified fullerenes such as fullerene-chlorine, fullerene-iron, and fullerene-chlorine-iron.

  12. Progress towards the development of a realistic electron cyclotron resonance ion source extraction model

    SciTech Connect

    Winklehner, D.; Leitner, D.; Benitez, J. Y.; Lyneis, C. M.; Strohmeier, M. M.

    2012-02-15

    In this paper, an ongoing effort to provide a simulation and design tool for electron cyclotron resonance ion source extraction and low energy beam transport is described and benchmarked against experimental results. Utilizing the particle-in-cell code WARP, a set of scripts has been developed: A semiempirical method of generating initial conditions, a 2D-3D hybrid method of plasma extraction and a simple beam transport deck. Measured emittances and beam profiles of uranium and helium beams are shown and the influence of the sextupole part of the plasma confinement field is investigated. The results are compared to simulations carried out using the methods described above. The results show that the simulation model (with some additional refinements) represents highly charged, well-confined ions well, but that the model is less applicable for less confined, singly charged ions.

  13. Progress in high-temperature oven development for 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnishi, J. Higurashi, Y.; Nakagawa, T.

    2016-02-15

    We have been developing a high-temperature oven using UO{sub 2} in the 28 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source at RIKEN since 2013. A total of eleven on-line tests were performed. The longest operation time in a single test was 411 h, and the consumption rate of UO{sub 2} was approximately 2.4 mg/h. In these tests, we experienced several problems: the ejection hole of a crucible was blocked with UO{sub 2} and a crucible was damaged because of the reduction of tungsten strength at high temperature. In order to solve these problems, improvements to the crucible shape were made by simulations using ANSYS.

  14. Optimization of a coaxial electron cyclotron resonance plasma thruster with an analytical model

    SciTech Connect

    Cannat, F. E-mail: felix.cannat@gmail.com; Lafleur, T.; Jarrige, J.; Elias, P.-Q.; Packan, D.; Chabert, P.

    2015-05-15

    A new cathodeless plasma thruster currently under development at Onera is presented and characterized experimentally and analytically. The coaxial thruster consists of a microwave antenna immersed in a magnetic field, which allows electron heating via cyclotron resonance. The magnetic field diverges at the thruster exit and forms a nozzle that accelerates the quasi-neutral plasma to generate a thrust. Different thruster configurations are tested, and in particular, the influence of the source diameter on the thruster performance is investigated. At microwave powers of about 30 W and a xenon flow rate of 0.1 mg/s (1 SCCM), a mass utilization of 60% and a thrust of 1 mN are estimated based on angular electrostatic probe measurements performed downstream of the thruster in the exhaust plume. Results are found to be in fair agreement with a recent analytical helicon thruster model that has been adapted for the coaxial geometry used here.

  15. Fabrication of ultrathin Ni-Zn ferrite films using electron cyclotron resonance sputtering method

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Terumitsu; Kurisu, Hiroki; Matsuura, Mitsuru; Shimosato, Yoshihiro; Okada, Shigenobu; Oshiro, Kazunori; Fujimori, Hirotaka; Yamamoto, Setsuo

    2006-04-15

    Well-crystallized Ni-Zn ferrite (Ni{sub 0.4}Zn{sub 0.6}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) highly oriented ultrathin films were obtained at a substrate temperature of 200 deg. C by a reactive sputtering method utilizing electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma, which is very effective to crystallize oxide or nitride materials without heat treatment. Thin films of Ni-Zn ferrite deposited on a MgO (100) underlayer showed an intense X-ray-diffraction peak of (400) from the Ni-Zn ferrite as compared to similar films deposited directly onto thermally oxidized Si substrates. A 1.5-nm-thick Ni-Zn ferrite film, which corresponds to twice the lattice constant for bulk Ni-Zn ferrite, crystallized on a MgO (100) underlayer.

  16. Status report on electron cyclotron resonance ion sources at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitagawa, A.; Muramatsu, M.; Sekiguchi, M.; Yamada, S.; Jincho, K.; Okada, T.; Yamamoto, M.; Hattori, T.; Biri, S.; Baskaran, R.; Sakata, T.; Sawada, K.; Uno, K.

    2000-02-01

    The Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) is not only dedicated to cancer therapy, it is also utilized with various ion species for basic experiments of biomedical science, physics, chemistry, etc. Two electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources are installed for production of gaseous ions. One of them, the NIRS-ECR, is a 10 GHz ECR ion source, and is mainly operated to produce C4+ ions for daily clinical treatment. This source realizes good reproducibility and reliability and it is easily operated. The other source, the NIRS-HEC, is an 18 GHz ECR ion source that is expected to produce heavier ion species. The output ion currents of the NIRS-ECR and the NIRS-HEC are 430e μA for C4+ and 1.1e mA for Ar8+, respectively.

  17. Spectroscopic ellipsometry analysis of silicon nanotips obtained by electron cyclotron resonance plasma etching.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Galván, Arturo; Järrendahl, Kenneth; Arwin, Hans; Huang, Yi-Fan; Chen, Li-Chyong; Chen, Kuei-Hsien

    2009-09-10

    Silicon nanotips fabricated by electron cyclotron resonance plasma etching of silicon wafers are studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry. The structure of the nanotips is composed of columns 100-140 nm wide and spaced by about 200 nm. Ellipsometry data covering a wide spectral range from the midinfrared to the visible are described by modeling the nanotip layer as a graded uniaxial film using the Bruggeman effective medium approximation. The ellipsometry data in the infrared range reveal two absorption bands at 754 and 955 cm(-1), which cannot be resolved with transmittance measurements. These bands indicate that the etching process is accompanied with formation of carbonaceous SiC and CH(n) species that largely modify the composition of the original crystalline silicon material affecting the optical response of the nanotips.

  18. Two-chamber configuration of Bio-Nano electron cyclotron resonance ion source for fullerene modification

    SciTech Connect

    Uchida, T.; Rácz, R.; Biri, S.; Kato, Y.; Yoshida, Y.

    2016-02-15

    We report on the modification of fullerenes with iron and chlorine using two individually controllable plasmas in the Bio-Nano electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS). One of the plasmas is composed of fullerene and the other one is composed of iron and chlorine. The online ion beam analysis allows one to investigate the rate of the vapor-phase collisional modification process in the ECRIS, while the offline analyses (e.g., liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry) of the materials deposited on the plasma chamber can give information on the surface-type process. Both analytical methods show the presence of modified fullerenes such as fullerene-chlorine, fullerene-iron, and fullerene-chlorine-iron.

  19. Development of Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source for Synthesis of Endohedral Metallofullerenes

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, K.; Muramatsu, M.; Uchida, T.; Hanajiri, T.; Yoshida, Y.; Biri, S.; Kitagawa, A.; Kato, Y.

    2008-11-03

    A new electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) has been constructed for synthesis of endohedral metallofullerenes. The main purpose of the ion source is to produce new biological and medical materials. The design is based on ECRIS for production of multicharged ion beams with a traditional minimum-B magnetic field. An 8-10 GHz traveling wave tube (TWT) amplifier and a 2.45 GHz magnetron have been applied as microwave sources. Fullerene and metal vapor are introduced with a filament heating micro-oven and an induction heating oven, respectively. In preliminary ion-extraction test, Ar{sup +} is 54 {mu}A. Many broken fullerenes such as C{sub 58} and C{sub 56} are observed in fullerene ion beams.

  20. Refractory rf ovens and sputter probes for electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Cavenago, M.; Galata, A.; Kulevoy, T.; Petrenko, S.; Sattin, M.; Facco, A.

    2008-02-15

    Beams from electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) with radio frequency ovens for refractory material (using a Mo coil) were recently demonstrated; results for Ti and V are here discussed, with temperature T{sub s}{>=}2300 K stably maintained and extracted current of about 1000 nA for V{sup 8+} and V{sup 9+}. The status of sputter probes is also reported, and the reason why trapping efficiency may be lower than in the oven case are investigated. The simple tubular probe concept show typical currents of Sn{sup 18+} about 250 nA, for the most abundant isotopes, but an operating pressure of about 300 {mu}Pa may be required. Some preliminary experiments were performed with Penning probes, showing that transmission of Sn or Pr from Penning cathode to ECRIS plasma is limited. Placement of tin onto anticathode and use of collimator between Penning and ECRIS are also discussed.

  1. Control system renewal for efficient operation in RIKEN 18 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchiyama, A.; Ozeki, K.; Higurashi, Y.; Kidera, M.; Komiyama, M.; Nakagawa, T.

    2016-02-01

    A RIKEN 18 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source (18 GHz ECRIS) is used as an external ion source at the Radioactive Ion Beam Factory (RIBF) accelerator complex to produce an intense beam of medium-mass heavy ions (e.g., Ca and Ar). In most components that comprise the RIBF, the control systems (CSs) are integrated by the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS). On the other hand, a non-EPICS-based system has hardwired controllers, and it is used in the 18 GHz ECRIS CS as an independent system. In terms of efficient and effective operation, the 18 GHz ECRIS CS as well as the RIBF CS should be renewed using EPICS. Therefore, we constructed an 18 GHz ECRIS CS by using programmable logic controllers with embedded EPICS technology. In the renewed system, an operational log system was developed as a new feature, for supporting of the 18 GHz ECRIS operation.

  2. H- extraction from electron-cyclotron-resonance-driven multicusp volume source operated in pulsed mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svarnas, P.; Bacal, M.; Auvray, P.; Béchu, S.; Pelletier, J.

    2006-03-01

    H2 microwave (2.45GHz) pulsed plasma is produced from seven elementary electron cyclotron resonance sources installed into the magnetic multipole chamber "Camembert III" (École Polytechnique—Palaiseau) from which H- extraction takes place. The negative-ion and electron extracted currents are studied through electrical measurements and the plasma parameters by means of electrostatic probe under various experimental conditions. The role of the plasma electrode bias and the discharge duty cycle in the extraction process is emphasized. The gas breakdown at the beginning of every pulse gives rise to variations of the plasma characteristic parameters in comparison with those established at the later time of the pulse, where the electron temperature, the plasma potential, and the floating potential converge to the values obtained for a continuous plasma. The electron density is significantly enhanced in the pulsed mode.

  3. Roadmap for the design of a superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source for Spiral2

    SciTech Connect

    Thuillier, T.; Angot, J.; Lamy, T.; Peaucelle, C.

    2012-02-15

    A review of today achieved A/Q = 3 heavy ions beams is proposed. The daily operation A/Q = 3 ion beam intensities expected at Spiral2 are at the limit or above best record 3rd generation electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) intensities. The necessity to build a new fully superconducting to fulfill these requirements is outlined. A discussion on the volume of the future source is proposed and the minimum value of 12 liters is derived. An analysis of the x-ray absorption superconducting ECRIS is presented based on VENUS experimental data and geometry. This study underlines the necessity to include a complete x-ray study at the time of source conception. The specifications foreseen for the new ECRIS are presented, followed with the roadmap for the design.

  4. Electron cyclotron resonance plasma deposition of silicon nitride: Effect of very low rf substrate bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckle, K. A.; Rodgers, J.; Pastor, K.; Constantine, C.; Johnson, D.

    1992-05-01

    Plasma deposition of SiN on silicon substrates in a microwave (2.45 GHz) electron cyclotron resonance SiH4/N2/He, in the ratio 4/10/10, discharge has been investigated as a function of rf (40 MHz) self-biasing of the sample. Low levels of rf bias (0-10 W) were investigated and are reported in this letter. The effect of bias was measured for the deposited films with respect to refractive index, etch rate in BHF, Si—H bonding, and the intrinsic film stress. All depositions were conducted at or near room temperature to evaluate the effect of the applied rf bias on film density. All parameters examined indicated that low levels of rf bias help prepare a high quality, dense film at very low substrate temperatures.

  5. Experiment and analysis of the neutralization of the electron cyclotron resonance ion thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yizhou; Yang, Juan; Sun, Jun; Liu, Xianchuang; Huang, Yizhi

    2017-10-01

    An electron cyclotron resonance ion thruster must emit an electron current equivalent to its ion beam current to prevent the thruster system from being electrically charged. This operation is defined as neutralization. The factors which influence neutralization are categorized into the ion beam current parameters, the neutralizer input parameters, and the neutralizer position. To understand the mechanism of neutralization, an experiment and a calculation study on how these factors influence thruster neutralization are presented. The experiment results show that the minimum bias voltage of the neutralizer was -60 V at the ion beam current of 80 mA for the argon propellant, and a critical gas flow rate existed, below which the coupling voltage increased sharply. Based on the experiment, the neutralization was analyzed by means of a one-dimensional calculation model. The computation results show that the coupling voltage was influenced by the beam divergence and the negative potential zone near the grids.

  6. Status of the pulsed magnetic field electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mühle, C.; Ratzinger, U.; Bleuel, W.; Jöst, G.; Leible, K.; Schennach, S.; Wolf, B. H.

    1994-04-01

    Synchrotrons like the heavy-ion synchrotron SIS at GSI need an efficient low duty cycle injector (typical 1-pulse/s and 200-μs pulse length). To improve the peak current, an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source has been designed using a pulsed magnetic field (PuMa) to force ion extraction. We replaced the hexapole of a 10-GHz Minimafios ECR ion source by a vacuum chamber containing a water-cooled bilayered solenoid coil and a decapole permanent magnetic structure. A pulse line feeds the solenoid with a 250-μs pulse which increases the magnetic field in the minimum B region by 0.3 T. This process opens the magnetic bottle along the beam axis resulting in an extracted ion pulse. First tests of the PuMa ECR configuration in cw and pulsed operation are presented and analyzed.

  7. Electron effective mass enhancement in Ga(AsBi) alloys probed by cyclotron resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettinari, G.; Drachenko, O.; Lewis, R. B.; Tiedje, T.

    2016-12-01

    The effect of Bi incorporation on the conduction band structure of Ga(AsBi) alloys is revealed by a direct estimation of the electron effective mass via cyclotron resonance absorption spectroscopy at THz frequencies in pulsed magnetic fields up to 65 T. A strong enhancement in the electron effective mass with increasing Bi content is reported, with a value of mass ˜40 % higher than that in GaAs for ˜1.7 % of Bi. This experimental evidence unambiguously indicates a Bi-induced perturbation of the host conduction band states and calls for a deep revision of the theoretical models describing dilute bismides currently proposed in the literature, the majority of which neglect or exclude that the incorporation of a small percentage of Bi may affect the conduction band states of the host material.

  8. Trap density of GeNx/Ge interface fabricated by electron-cyclotron-resonance plasma nitridation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Yukio; Otani, Yohei; Toyota, Hiroshi; Ono, Toshiro

    2011-07-01

    We have investigated GeNx/Ge interface properties using Si3N4(7 nm)/GeNx(2 nm)/Ge metal-insulator-semiconductor structures fabricated by the plasma nitridation of Ge substrates using an electron-cyclotron-resonance-generated nitrogen plasma. The interface trap density (Dit) measured by the conductance method is found to be distributed symmetrically in the Ge band gap with a minimum Dit value lower than 3 × 1011 cm-2eV-1 near the midgap. This result may lead to the development of processes for the fabrication of p- and n-Ge Schottky-barrier (SB) source/drain metal-insulator-semiconductor field-effect transistors using chemically and thermally robust GeNx dielectrics as interlayers for SB source/drain contacts and high-κ gate dielectrics.

  9. Impurity cyclotron resonance in InGaAs/AlAs superlattice under ultra high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momose, H.; Deguchi, H.; Okai, H.; Mori, N.; Takeyama, S.

    2005-11-01

    We have carried out cyclotron resonance (CR) measurements of (InGaAs) 8/(AlAs) 8 superlattice (SL) to investigate electronic properties of the SL under pulsed ultra-high magnetic fields. The magnetic fields up to 160 T were generated by using the single-turn-coil technique. Clear CR signals were obtained in the transmission of far-infrared laser through the SL at room temperature and lower temperature. We observed a shift of CR peak to lower magnetic field caused by transition from free-electron CR to impurity CR below ∼90 K. Compared with the previous works of GaAs/AlAs SL, the peak shift was small and the transition temperature was low. This result suggests that a binding energy of the impurity in the InGaAs/AlAs SL is smaller than the GaAs/AlAs SL.

  10. Potential applications of a new microwave ECR (electron cyclotron resonance) multicusp plasma ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, C.C.

    1990-01-01

    A new microwave electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) multicusp plasma ion source using two ECR plasma production regions and multicusp plasma confinement has been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This source has been operated to produce uniform and dense plasmas over large areas of 300 to 400 cm{sup 2}. The plasma source has been operated with continuous argon gas feed and pulsed microwave power. The discharge initiation phenomena and plasma properties have been investigated and studied as functions of discharge parameters. Together with the discharge characteristics observed, a hypothetical discharge mechanism for this plasma source is reported and discussed. Potential applications, including plasma and ion-beam processing for manufacturing advanced microelectronics and for space electric propulsion, are discussed. 7 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Diffusion coefficients from resonant interactions with electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, A. K.; Singhal, R. P.

    2009-11-15

    Pitch-angle diffusion coefficients have been calculated for resonant interaction with electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic (ECH) waves using quasilinear diffusion theory. Unlike previous calculations, the parallel group velocity has been included in this study. Further, ECH wave intensity is expressed as a function of wave frequency and wave normal angle with respect to ambient magnetic field. It is found that observed wave electric field amplitudes in Earth's magnetosphere are sufficient to set electrons on strong diffusion in the energy ranges of a few hundred eV. However, the required amplitudes are larger than the observed values for keV electrons and higher by about a factor of 3 compared to past calculations. Required electric field amplitudes are smaller at larger radial distances. It is concluded that ECH waves are responsible for diffuse auroral precipitation of electrons with energies less than about 500 eV.

  12. Analysis of x-ray spectrum obtained in electron cyclotron resonance x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Baskaran, R.; Selvakumaran, T.S.; Sunil Sunny, C.

    2006-03-15

    The analysis of the x-ray spectrum obtained in electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) x-ray source is carried out. Assuming single-particle motion, the electron acceleration and its final energy are calculated for TE{sub 111} cylindrical cavity field and uniform external dc magnetic field. In the calculation, initial coordinates of 40 000 electrons were uniformly selected over the central plane of the cavity using random number generator. The final energy of each electron when it hits the wall is stored and the electron energy distribution is obtained. Using the general purpose Monte Carlo N-particle transport code version 4A, the geometry of the ECR x-ray source is modeled. The x-ray energy spectrum is calculated for the geometry model and the numerically calculated electron energy distribution. The calculated x-ray spectrum is compared with the experimentally measured x-ray spectrum.

  13. Optimization of a coaxial electron cyclotron resonance plasma thruster with an analytical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannat, F.; Lafleur, T.; Jarrige, J.; Chabert, P.; Elias, P.-Q.; Packan, D.

    2015-05-01

    A new cathodeless plasma thruster currently under development at Onera is presented and characterized experimentally and analytically. The coaxial thruster consists of a microwave antenna immersed in a magnetic field, which allows electron heating via cyclotron resonance. The magnetic field diverges at the thruster exit and forms a nozzle that accelerates the quasi-neutral plasma to generate a thrust. Different thruster configurations are tested, and in particular, the influence of the source diameter on the thruster performance is investigated. At microwave powers of about 30 W and a xenon flow rate of 0.1 mg/s (1 SCCM), a mass utilization of 60% and a thrust of 1 mN are estimated based on angular electrostatic probe measurements performed downstream of the thruster in the exhaust plume. Results are found to be in fair agreement with a recent analytical helicon thruster model that has been adapted for the coaxial geometry used here.

  14. Application of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry to oligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Park, Youmie; Lebrilla, Carlito B

    2005-01-01

    The application of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS) to the structural elucidation of oligosaccharides is described. This review covers the analyses of oligosaccharides in the context of the unique features of FTICR MS and the improvements in instrumentation that make it possible to study this class of compounds. It consists of work performed initially to understand the fundamental aspects of oligosaccharide ionization and unimolecular fragmentation. More recent investigation includes the application of the technique to samples of direct biological origin. Chemical and enzymatic degradation methods in conjunction with mass spectrometry (MS) and the use front-end methods with FTICR MS are also discussed. The current applications including the characterization of bacterial lipooligosaccharides and phosporylated carbohydrates are described.

  15. Multilayer coatings for x-ray optics made by distributed electron cyclotron resonance (DECR) plasma sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoghoj, Peter; Ziegler, Eric; Lueken, Eike; Peffen, Jean-Christophe; Freund, Andreas K.

    1994-11-01

    Distributed electron cyclotron resonance (DECR) plasma sputtering was used for depositing W/Si multilayers for x-rya optics. The argon plasma used in the sputtering process was excited by the DECR method. The DECR argon plasma diffusing the middle of the deposition chamber was characterized with a Langmuir probe. The ionization rate was found to be 7 X 10-4. This allowed us to sputter W and Si with a large range of target bias values at low pressures. Deposited single layers and W/Si multilayers were characterized with grazing incidence x-ray reflectometry. As an illustration of the capabilities, data is shown for a W/Si multilayer with period d equals 3.0 nm and an interface roughness (sigma) < 0.47 nm.

  16. Roadmap for the design of a superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source for Spiral2a)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuillier, T.; Angot, J.; Barué, C.; Canet, C.; Lamy, T.; Lehérissier, P.; Lemagnen, F.; Maunoury, L.; Peaucelle, C.

    2012-02-01

    A review of today achieved A/Q = 3 heavy ions beams is proposed. The daily operation A/Q = 3 ion beam intensities expected at Spiral2 are at the limit or above best record 3rd generation electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) intensities. The necessity to build a new fully superconducting to fulfill these requirements is outlined. A discussion on the volume of the future source is proposed and the minimum value of 12 liters is derived. An analysis of the x-ray absorption superconducting ECRIS is presented based on VENUS experimental data and geometry. This study underlines the necessity to include a complete x-ray study at the time of source conception. The specifications foreseen for the new ECRIS are presented, followed with the roadmap for the design.

  17. Cyclotron resonance and Faraday rotation in topological insulator (Bi,Sb)2 Te3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Yinming; Post, Kirk; Wu, Jhih-Sheng; Richardella, Anthony; Lee, Joon Sue; Fogler, Michael; Samarth, Nitin; Basov, Dimitri

    Using magneto-optical spectroscopy, we have explored the complex electronic structure of (Bi,Sb)2 Te3 (BST) film. From the magneto-optical transmission spectra, we extracted the cyclotron resonance (CR) energy, and subsequently measured the broadband Faraday rotation spectra (FR). From these complementary FR-CR datasets, we were able to identify the conducting channels associated with the topological surface states of the film at the interface with the substrate and with the amorphous capping layer on top of the film. According to the FR data the two surfaces are dominated by carriers of opposite sign, in accord with earlier transport measurements. These results elucidate the origin of the zero-field optical response, observed previously, and give direct evidence of significant SS contribution using a bulk sensitive probe.

  18. Investigations on the structure of the extracted ion beam from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Spaedtke, P.; Lang, R.; Maeder, J.; Rossbach, J.; Tinschert, K.; Maimone, F.

    2012-02-15

    Using improved beam diagnostic tools, the structure of an ion beam extracted from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) becomes visible. Especially viewing targets to display the beam profile and pepper pot devices for emittance measurements turned out to be very useful. On the contrary, diagnostic tools integrating over one space coordinate like wire harps for profile measurements or slit-slit devices, respectively slit-grid devices to measure the emittance might be applicable for beam transport investigations in a quadrupole channel, but are not very meaningful for investigations regarding the given ECRIS symmetry. Here we try to reproduce the experimentally found structure on the ion beam by simulation. For the simulation, a certain model has to be used to reproduce the experimental results. The model is also described in this paper.

  19. Electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma characterization by energy dispersive x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rácz, R.; Mascali, D.; Biri, S.; Caliri, C.; Castro, G.; Galatà, A.; Gammino, S.; Neri, L.; Pálinkás, J.; Romano, F. P.; Torrisi, G.

    2017-07-01

    Pinhole and CCD based quasi-optical x-ray imaging technique was applied to investigate the plasma of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS). Spectrally integrated and energy resolved images were taken from an axial perspective. The comparison of integrated images taken of argon plasma highlights the structural changes affected by some ECRIS setting parameters, like strength of the axial magnetic confinement, RF frequency and microwave power. Photon counting analysis gives precise intensity distribution of the x-ray emitted by the argon plasma and by the plasma chamber walls. This advanced technique points out that the spatial positions of the electron losses are strongly determined by the kinetic energy of the electrons themselves to be lost and also shows evidences how strongly the plasma distribution is affected by slight changes in the RF frequency.

  20. Simulations of peeling-ballooning modes with electron cyclotron resonance heating

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J.; Tang, C. J.; Chen, S. Y.

    2016-05-15

    The effects of the deposited power and deposited position of Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH) on Peeling-Ballooning (P-B) modes are simulated using BOUT++ code in this paper. The simulation results show that as the deposited position moves from the top to the bottom of the pedestal, the edge localized mode (ELM) size decreases first and then increases, finally decreases again. For ECRH with different deposited power, the effects on P-B modes are similar if they have the same peak value of the power deposition profile. These results show that the effects of ECRH on P-B modes are primarily determined by the change in pressure profile caused by ECRH. As long as ECRH can lead to large enough change in pressure profile, ECRH can efficiently affect the dynamics of P-B modes.

  1. Modelling of the ion cyclotron resonance heating scenarios for W7-X stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Kazakov, Ye. O.

    2014-02-12

    The construction of the world largest superconducting stellarator Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) has reached the final stage. One of the main scientific objectives of the W7-X project is to prove experimentally the predicted good confinement of high-energy ions. Ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) system is considered to be installed in W7-X to serve as a localized source of high energy ions. ICRH heating scenarios relevant for hydrogen and deuterium phases of W7-X operation are summarized. The heating efficiency in ({sup 3}He)-H plasmas is qualitatively analyzed using a modified version of the 1D TOMCAT code able to account for stellarator geometry. The minority ion absorption is shown to be maximized at the helium-3 concentration ∼2% for the typical plasma and ICRH parameters to be available during the initial phase of W7-X.

  2. ECR (electron cyclotron resonance) ion sources and applications with heavy-ion linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Pardo, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    The electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source has been developed in the last few years into a reliable source of high charge-state heavy ions. The availability of heavy ions with relatively large charge-to-mass ratios (0.1--0.5) has made it possible to contemplate essentially new classes of heavy-ion linear accelerators. In this talk, I shall review the state-of-the-art in ECR source performance and describe some of the implications this performance level has for heavy-ion linear accelerator design. The present linear accelerator projects using ECR ion sources will be noted and the performance requirements of the ECR source for these projects will be reviewed. 30 refs., 3 figs.

  3. Effects of fundamental and second harmonic electron cyclotron resonances on ECRIS.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yushi; Satani, Takashi; Asaji, Toyohisa; Sato, Fuminobu; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2008-02-01

    A new concept on magnetic field of plasma production and confinement has been proposed to enhance efficiency of an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma for broad and dense ion beam source under the low pressure. The magnetic field configuration is constructed by a pair of comb-shaped magnet which has opposite polarity to each other, and which cylindrically surrounds the plasma chamber. This magnetic configuration suppresses the loss due to E x B drift, and then plasma confinement is enhanced. The profiles of the electron temperature and density are measured around the ECR zones of the fundamentals and the second harmonics for 2.45 GHz and 11-13 GHz microwaves by using Langmuir probe. Their characteristics and effects are clarified under various operating conditions in both of simple multipole and comb-shaped magnetic configurations.

  4. Intense highly charged ion beam production and operation with a superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, H. W.; Sun, L. T.; Guo, J. W.; Lu, W.; Xie, D. Z.; Hitz, D.; Zhang, X. Z.; Yang, Y.

    2017-09-01

    The superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source with advanced design in Lanzhou (SECRAL) is a superconducting-magnet-based electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) for the production of intense highly charged heavy ion beams. It is one of the best performing ECRISs worldwide and the first superconducting ECRIS built with an innovative magnet to generate a high strength minimum-B field for operation with heating microwaves up to 24-28 GHz. Since its commissioning in 2005, SECRAL has so far produced a good number of continuous wave intensity records of highly charged ion beams, in which recently the beam intensities of 40Ar+ and 129Xe26+ have, for the first time, exceeded 1 emA produced by an ion source. Routine operations commenced in 2007 with the Heavy Ion accelerator Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL), China. Up to June 2017, SECRAL has been providing more than 28,000 hours of highly charged heavy ion beams to the accelerator demonstrating its great capability and reliability. The great achievement of SECRAL is accumulation of numerous technical advancements, such as an innovative magnetic system and an efficient double-frequency (24 +18 GHz ) heating with improved plasma stability. This article reviews the development of SECRAL and production of intense highly charged ion beams by SECRAL focusing on its unique magnet design, source commissioning, performance studies and enhancements, beam quality and long-term operation. SECRAL development and its performance studies representatively reflect the achievements and status of the present ECR ion source, as well as the ECRIS impacts on HIRFL.

  5. Microwave-Excited Microplasma Thrusters Using Surface Wave and Electron Cyclotron Resonance Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Daisuke; Kawanabe, Tetsuo; Takao, Yoshinori; Eriguchi, Koji; Ono, Kouichi

    2012-10-01

    Downsizing spacecrafts has recently been focused on to decrease mission costs and to increase launch rates, and missions with small satellites would bring a great advantage of reducing their risks. Such a concept supports a new approach to developing precise, reliable, and low-cost micropropulsion systems. We have studied two types of microwave-excited microplasma thrusters, using surface wave-excited and electron cyclotron resonance-excited discharges. Microwaves of S-band (4 GHz) and X-band (11 GHz) were employed to excite the plasma in these experiments, with the feed or propellant gases of Ar and He. A microplasma thruster of electrothermal type consisted of a surface wave-excited microplasma source, and a converging-diverging micronozzle to obtain the thrust. For 11-GHz microwaves at a power of 6 W, a thrust of 1.1 mN and a specific impulse of 90 s were obtained at an Ar gas flow rate of 40 sccm, where the plasma electron density was 1.2x10^20 m-3, and the gas temperature was 1.5x10^3 K; under the same conditions for 4-GHz microwaves, the thrust, specific impulse, electron density, and gas temperature were 0.93 mN, 80 s, 7.0x10^19 m-3, and 8.0x10^2 K, respectively. A microplasma thruster of electromagnetic type had a microplasma source excited by electron cyclotron resonance with external magnetic fields, to obtain the thrust through accelerating ions by ambipolar electric fields. Optical emission spectrum was dominated by Ar^+ ion lines in the microplasma thruster of electromagnetic type, owing to higher electron temperatures at lower feed-gas pressures.

  6. Structure characterization of polyaromatic hydrocarbons in Arabian mix vacuum residue by electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyabayashi, Keiko; Naito, Yasuhide; Tsujimoto, Kazuo; Miyake, Mikio

    2004-06-01

    Molecular formulas of constituents in vacuum residue were characterized by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS). Evaluation of electrospray ionization (ESI) ability for hydrocarbons by using model compounds indicates that aromatic compounds having more than two fused rings without functional group are detectable as molecular ions, while that basic nitrogen-containing compounds produce protonated ions in the ESI solvent of methanol/chloroform. Thus, even peaks appear for both hydrocarbons and nitrogen-containing compounds in methanol/chloroform. Although basic nitrogen compound detected selectively in mixture of equal molar concentration of hydrocarbons, hydrocarbon could be observed almost the same intensity when the concentration of nitrogen compounds was adjusted as low as that of Arabian mix vacuum residue (AM-VR: N 0.4 wt.%). When ESI solvent of methanol/chloroform/trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) was used, protonated hydrocarbons produced predominantly as odd peaks. Thus, it was revealed that peaks originating from nitrogen-containing compounds and hydrocarbons can be clearly distinguished by changing composition of ESI solvents. In application to AM-VR, protonated nitrogen-containing compounds ([CnH2n+ZN + H]+ and [CnH2n+ZNS + H]+; even masses) were observed selectively in methanol/chloroform, and both protonated nitrogen-containing compounds and protonated or sodium-cationized hydrocarbons ([M + H]+ or [M + Na]+; odd masses) were observed simultaneously in the solvent composition of methanol/chloroform/TFA.

  7. Unambiguous identification and discovery of bacterial siderophores by direct injection 21 Tesla Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Lawrence R.; Tfaily, Malak M.; Shaw, Jared B.; Hess, Nancy J.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Koppenaal, David W.

    2017-01-01

    Under iron-limiting conditions, bacteria produce low molecular mass Fe(III) binding molecules known as siderophores to sequester the Fe(III), along with other elements, increasing their bioavailibility. Siderophores are thought to influence iron cycling and biogeochemistry in both marine and terrestrial ecosystems and hence the need for rapid, confident characterization of these compounds has increased. In this study, the type of siderophores produced by two marine bacterial species, Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 and Vibrio cyclitrophicus 1F53, were characterized using a newly developed 21T Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer (FTICR MS) with direct injection electrospray ionization. This technique allowed for the rapid detection of synechobactins from Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 as well as amphibactins from Vibrio cyclitrophicus 1F53 based on high mass accuracy and resolution allowing for observation of specific Fe isotopic peaks and fine isotopic structure enables highly confident identification of these sideropohores. When combined with molecular network analysis two new amphibactins were discovered and verified by tandem MS. These results show that high-field FTICR MS is a powerful technique that will greatly improve the ability to rapidly identify and discover metal binding species in the environment.

  8. Design study of electron cyclotron resonance-ion plasma accelerator for heavy ion cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, T. Sugimoto, S.; Sasai, K.; Hattori, T.

    2014-02-15

    Electron Cyclotron Resonance-Ion Plasma Accelerator (ECR-IPAC) device, which theoretically can accelerate multiple charged ions to several hundred MeV with short acceleration length, has been proposed. The acceleration mechanism is based on the combination of two physical principles, plasma electron ion adiabatic ejection (PLEIADE) and Gyromagnetic Autoresonance (GYRAC). In this study, we have designed the proof of principle machine ECR-IPAC device and simulated the electromagnetic field distribution generating in the resonance cavity. ECR-IPAC device consisted of three parts, ECR ion source section, GYRAC section, and PLEIADE section. ECR ion source section and PLEIADE section were designed using several multi-turn solenoid coils and sextupole magnets, and GYRAC section was designed using 10 turns coil. The structure of ECR-IPAC device was the cylindrical shape, and the total length was 1024 mm and the maximum diameter was 580 mm. The magnetic field distribution, which maintains the stable acceleration of plasma, was generated on the acceleration center axis throughout three sections. In addition, the electric field for efficient acceleration of electrons was generated in the resonance cavity by supplying microwave of 2.45 GHz.

  9. Design study of electron cyclotron resonance-ion plasma accelerator for heavy ion cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Inoue, T; Hattori, T; Sugimoto, S; Sasai, K

    2014-02-01

    Electron Cyclotron Resonance-Ion Plasma Accelerator (ECR-IPAC) device, which theoretically can accelerate multiple charged ions to several hundred MeV with short acceleration length, has been proposed. The acceleration mechanism is based on the combination of two physical principles, plasma electron ion adiabatic ejection (PLEIADE) and Gyromagnetic Autoresonance (GYRAC). In this study, we have designed the proof of principle machine ECR-IPAC device and simulated the electromagnetic field distribution generating in the resonance cavity. ECR-IPAC device consisted of three parts, ECR ion source section, GYRAC section, and PLEIADE section. ECR ion source section and PLEIADE section were designed using several multi-turn solenoid coils and sextupole magnets, and GYRAC section was designed using 10 turns coil. The structure of ECR-IPAC device was the cylindrical shape, and the total length was 1024 mm and the maximum diameter was 580 mm. The magnetic field distribution, which maintains the stable acceleration of plasma, was generated on the acceleration center axis throughout three sections. In addition, the electric field for efficient acceleration of electrons was generated in the resonance cavity by supplying microwave of 2.45 GHz.

  10. Design study of electron cyclotron resonance-ion plasma accelerator for heavy ion cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, T.; Hattori, T.; Sugimoto, S.; Sasai, K.

    2014-02-01

    Electron Cyclotron Resonance-Ion Plasma Accelerator (ECR-IPAC) device, which theoretically can accelerate multiple charged ions to several hundred MeV with short acceleration length, has been proposed. The acceleration mechanism is based on the combination of two physical principles, plasma electron ion adiabatic ejection (PLEIADE) and Gyromagnetic Autoresonance (GYRAC). In this study, we have designed the proof of principle machine ECR-IPAC device and simulated the electromagnetic field distribution generating in the resonance cavity. ECR-IPAC device consisted of three parts, ECR ion source section, GYRAC section, and PLEIADE section. ECR ion source section and PLEIADE section were designed using several multi-turn solenoid coils and sextupole magnets, and GYRAC section was designed using 10 turns coil. The structure of ECR-IPAC device was the cylindrical shape, and the total length was 1024 mm and the maximum diameter was 580 mm. The magnetic field distribution, which maintains the stable acceleration of plasma, was generated on the acceleration center axis throughout three sections. In addition, the electric field for efficient acceleration of electrons was generated in the resonance cavity by supplying microwave of 2.45 GHz.

  11. Characterization of the chemical composition of soil humic acids using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeya, Kosuke; Sleighter, Rachel L.; Hatcher, Patrick G.; Watanabe, Akira

    2015-03-01

    The composition of humic acids (HAs) with varying degrees of humification isolated from 10 common Japanese soils was characterized using negative ion mode electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry at 12 T. In particular, attention was paid to polynuclear aromatic components, which are more associated with the refractory nature of HAs and their resistance to biodegradation in soil than single C ring aromatic entities, such as lignin-like components, and aliphatic functionalities. Thousands of peaks were observed in the m/z range of 200-700, and molecular formulas were assigned to 817-2457 peaks in each sample. The molecular formulas having H/C and O/C ratios similar to those of lipid, protein, and other aliphatics with low double bond equivalents (DBE) of 0-7 were generally observed across the m/z range of 200-700. Although there were a number of molecular formulas having H/C and O/C values similar to those of lignin across the wide m/z range in the HAs with a low degree of humification, most lignin-like molecular formulas in the larger m/z range (450-650) or irrespective of m/z were lacking in the HAs with middle and high degrees of humification, respectively. These observations suggest a longer residence time for lignin monomers/dimers (and their derivatives; m/z 200-400) than larger lignin oligomers (m/z 450-650) in HA structural domains. The number of molecular formulas having H/C and O/C values similar to condensed aromatics increased with increasing degree of humification. The m/z and DBE values of condensed aromatic-like molecular formulas in the HAs with a lower degree of humification were <500 and 10-25, respectively, whilst the ranges expanded to 600 and 30-33, respectively, in the highly-humified black HAs. Kendrick mass defect analysis using a carboxyl group as the characteristic functional group found that 31, 73, and 39 molecular formulas had chain-type, net-type, and biphenyl-type condensed aromatic acids

  12. Electron cyclotron resonant heating: A simpler method for deriving the linear wave equations in a nonuniform magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, D. C.; Cairns, R. A.; Lashmore-Davies, C. N.

    1994-04-01

    In a recent article Cairns et al. [Phys. Fluids B 3, 2953 (1991)] gave a method for the derivation of full wave equations describing propagation through a cyclotron resonance in an inhomogeneous plasma. The simplicity of this method compares favorably with previous derivations, and the damping resulting from the variation in the magnetic field across a Larmor orbit, described by Lashmore-Davies and Dendy [Phys. Fluids B 1, 1565 (1989)], is included. The effect of the relativistic mass shift on the cyclotron frequency, which plays an important role in the electron cyclotron range of frequencies, was not taken into account, however, and the object of the present work is to remedy this omission. It is shown how equations, valid in the weakly relativistic regime, may be obtained in a rather straightforward way. Results obtained by a number of earlier workers are recovered and can be extended.

  13. Cyclotron-resonance transmission through potassium in a perpendicular magnetic field: Effects of the charge-density wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Mi-Ae; Overhauser, A. W.

    1997-01-01

    Microwave transmission through potassium by Dunifer, Sambles, and Mace [J. Phys. Condens. Matter 1, 875 (1989)] in a perpendicular magnetic field shows five signals. They are Gantmakher-Kaner (GK) oscillations, conduction-electron-spin resonance, high-frequency oscillations, cyclotron resonance, and cyclotron-resonance subharmonics. Only the spin resonance has been successfully explained using a free-electron model. However, such a model predicts GK oscillations which are too large by several orders of magnitude. Lacueva and Overhauser [Phys. Rev. B 48, 16t935 (1993)] have shown that charge-density-wave (CDW) energy gaps which cut through the Fermi surface reduce the GK signal. CDW gaps also create a small Fermi-surface cylinder. The high-frequency oscillations were shown to result from Landau-level quantization in the cylinder. Recently we found that the anomalous microwave surface resistance, observed by Grimes and Kip [Phys. Rev. 132, 1991 (1963)], can be explained only if the cylinder axis is tilted ~45° with respect to the [110] crystal direction perpendicular to the surface. (Such a tilt was predicted by Giuliani and Overhauser [Phys. Rev. B 20, 1328 (1979)].) In this study we show that oscillatory motions, parallel to the field, of electrons in the tilted cylinder cause the cyclotron-resonance transmission. This signal and its subharmonics would be completely absent without the tilt. Consequently, four of the five transmission signals require a CDW broken symmetry.

  14. Plasma heating in stellarators by radio frequency electromagnetic waves at the fundamental ion cyclotron resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svidzinski, Vladimir A.

    1998-11-01

    A perturbation method is developed to find the structure of Alfven wave modes in a cylindrical waveguide filled with a cold, collisional, uniform plasma with a vacuum layer between the plasma and a conducting wall when the magnetic field in the waveguide is a superposition of a uniform and an inhomogeneous /ell=2 (quadrupole) field created by helical windings. The influence of the helical field on the wave mode structure is treated as a perturbation. This innovative technique is applied in order to investigate the possibility of direct heating of plasma ions at the fundamental ion cyclotron resonance in stellarator magnetic field configuration. However, the theoretical development itself is unique and complete, and it can be useful for the analysis of other similar plasma models. We investigated the mode structure of an m=[+]1 (azimuthal wave number) fast wave which is modified by the magnetic field inhomogeneity. We found that the m=[- ]1 azimuthal component of the modified m=[+]1 fast Alfven wave is left-hand polarized in the central part of the plasma. This implies a coupling between the m=[+]1 fast (right-hand polarized) wave and m=[-]1 slow (left- hand polarized) waves due to the inhomogeneity of the /ell=2 fields. The coupling efficiency is examined for different plasma parameters. Results demonstrate that efficient coupling between the modes occurs for appropriate plasma parameters in this model, indicating that efficient plasma heating at the fundamental ion cyclotron frequency is possible in stellarators. The results of the analysis also point the way to a general theory of linear wave coupling in any inhomogeneous, anisotropic medium, since conventional mode conversion theory may be seen as just another example of this general theory.

  15. Manipulating internal energy of protonated biomolecules in electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xinghua; Duursma, Marc C; Kistemaker, Piet G; Nibbering, Nico M M; Vekey, Karoly; Drahos, Laszlo; Heeren, Ron M A

    2003-06-01

    The internal energy of protonated leucine enkephalin has been manipulated in electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry with two newly designed pump-probe experiments. Blackbody infrared radiation was applied to pump an ion population into a well-defined internal energy distribution below the dissociation threshold. Following this pumping stage, the internal energy distribution was probed using on-resonance collisional activation to dissociate the ions. These pump-probe experiments were carried out in two different ways: (a) using on-resonance collisional activation with variable kinetic energies to dissociate the ions at a constant initial ion temperature (determining the precursor ion survival percentage as a function of kinetic energy) and (b) using on-resonance collisional activation with a constant kinetic energy to dissociate the ions at variable initial ion temperatures (to investigate the ion survival yield-initial ion temperature dependence). Using this approach, a detailed study of the effects of the initial ion temperature, the probing kinetic energy and the internal energy loss rate on the effective conversion efficiency of (laboratory-frame) kinetic energy to internal energy was conducted. This conversion efficiency was found to be dependent on the initial ion temperature. Depending on the experimental conditions the conversion efficiency (for collisions with argon) was estimated to be about 4.0 +/- 1.7%, which agrees with that obtained from a theoretical modeling. Finally, the reconstructed curves of the ion survival yield versus the mode of the (final) total internal energy distribution of the activated ion population (after pump and probe events) at different pump-probe conditions reveal the internal energy content of the activated ions. Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. On RF heating of inhomogeneous collisional plasma under ion-cyclotron resonance conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Timofeev, A. V.

    2015-11-15

    During ion-cyclotron resonance (ICR) heating of plasma by the magnetic beach method, as well as in some other versions of ICR heating, it is necessary to excite Alfvén oscillations. In this case, it is difficult to avoid the phenomenon of the Alfvén resonance, in which Alfvén oscillations transform into lower hybrid oscillations. The latter efficiently interact with electrons, due to which most of the deposited RF energy is spent on electron (rather than ion) heating. The Alfvén resonance takes place due to plasma inhomogeneity across the external magnetic field. Therefore, it could be expected that variations in the plasma density profile would substantially affect the efficiency of the interaction of RF fields with charged particles. However, the results obtained for different plasma density profiles proved to be nearly the same. In the present work, a plasma is considered the parameters of which correspond to those planned in future ICR plasma heating experiments on the PS-1 facility at the Kurchatov Institute. When analyzing the interaction of RF fields with charged particles, both the collisionless resonance interaction and the interaction caused by Coulomb collisions are taken into account, because, in those experiments, the Coulomb collision frequency will be comparable with the frequency of the heating field. Antennas used for ICR heating excite RF oscillations with a wide spectrum of wavenumbers along the magnetic field. After averaging over the spectrum, the absorbed RF energy calculated with allowance for collisions turns out to be close to that absorbed in collisionless plasma, the energy fraction absorbed by electrons being substantially larger than that absorbed by ions.

  17. On RF heating of inhomogeneous collisional plasma under ion-cyclotron resonance conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeev, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    During ion-cyclotron resonance (ICR) heating of plasma by the magnetic beach method, as well as in some other versions of ICR heating, it is necessary to excite Alfvén oscillations. In this case, it is difficult to avoid the phenomenon of the Alfvén resonance, in which Alfvén oscillations transform into lower hybrid oscillations. The latter efficiently interact with electrons, due to which most of the deposited RF energy is spent on electron (rather than ion) heating. The Alfvén resonance takes place due to plasma inhomogeneity across the external magnetic field. Therefore, it could be expected that variations in the plasma density profile would substantially affect the efficiency of the interaction of RF fields with charged particles. However, the results obtained for different plasma density profiles proved to be nearly the same. In the present work, a plasma is considered the parameters of which correspond to those planned in future ICR plasma heating experiments on the PS-1 facility at the Kurchatov Institute. When analyzing the interaction of RF fields with charged particles, both the collisionless resonance interaction and the interaction caused by Coulomb collisions are taken into account, because, in those experiments, the Coulomb collision frequency will be comparable with the frequency of the heating field. Antennas used for ICR heating excite RF oscillations with a wide spectrum of wavenumbers along the magnetic field. After averaging over the spectrum, the absorbed RF energy calculated with allowance for collisions turns out to be close to that absorbed in collisionless plasma, the energy fraction absorbed by electrons being substantially larger than that absorbed by ions.

  18. Temperature and density evolution during decay in a 2.45 GHz hydrogen electron cyclotron resonance plasma: Off-resonant and resonant cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortázar, O. D.; Megía-Macías, A.; Vizcaíno-de-Julián, A.

    2013-09-01

    Time resolved electron temperature and density measurements during the decay stage in a hydrogen electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma are presented for a resonance and off-resonance magnetic field configurations. The measurements are conducted on a ECR plasma generator excited at 2.45 GHz denominated test-bench for ion-sources plasma studies at ESS Bilbao. The plasma parameters evolution is studied by Langmuir probe diagnostic with synchronized sample technique developed for repetitive pulsed plasmas with a temporal resolution of 200 ns in typical decay processes of about 40 μs. An afterglow transient is clearly observed in the reflected microwave power signal from the plasma. Simultaneously, the electron temperature evolution shows rebounding peaks that may be related to the interplay between density drop and microwave coupling with deep impact on the Electron Energy Distribution Function. The correlation of such structures with the plasma absorbed power and the coupling quality is also reported.

  19. Temperature and density evolution during decay in a 2.45 GHz hydrogen electron cyclotron resonance plasma: Off-resonant and resonant cases

    SciTech Connect

    Cortázar, O. D.

    2013-09-15

    Time resolved electron temperature and density measurements during the decay stage in a hydrogen electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma are presented for a resonance and off-resonance magnetic field configurations. The measurements are conducted on a ECR plasma generator excited at 2.45 GHz denominated test-bench for ion-sources plasma studies at ESS Bilbao. The plasma parameters evolution is studied by Langmuir probe diagnostic with synchronized sample technique developed for repetitive pulsed plasmas with a temporal resolution of 200 ns in typical decay processes of about 40 μs. An afterglow transient is clearly observed in the reflected microwave power signal from the plasma. Simultaneously, the electron temperature evolution shows rebounding peaks that may be related to the interplay between density drop and microwave coupling with deep impact on the Electron Energy Distribution Function. The correlation of such structures with the plasma absorbed power and the coupling quality is also reported.

  20. Temperature and density evolution during decay in a 2.45 GHz hydrogen electron cyclotron resonance plasma: off-resonant and resonant cases.

    PubMed

    Cortázar, O D; Megía-Macías, A; Vizcaíno-de-Julián, A

    2013-09-01

    Time resolved electron temperature and density measurements during the decay stage in a hydrogen electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma are presented for a resonance and off-resonance magnetic field configurations. The measurements are conducted on a ECR plasma generator excited at 2.45 GHz denominated test-bench for ion-sources plasma studies at ESS Bilbao. The plasma parameters evolution is studied by Langmuir probe diagnostic with synchronized sample technique developed for repetitive pulsed plasmas with a temporal resolution of 200 ns in typical decay processes of about 40 μs. An afterglow transient is clearly observed in the reflected microwave power signal from the plasma. Simultaneously, the electron temperature evolution shows rebounding peaks that may be related to the interplay between density drop and microwave coupling with deep impact on the Electron Energy Distribution Function. The correlation of such structures with the plasma absorbed power and the coupling quality is also reported.

  1. Study and design of the ion cyclotron resonance heating system for the stellarator Wendelstein 7-X

    SciTech Connect

    Ongena, J.; Messiaen, A.; Van Eester, D.; Schweer, B.; Dumortier, P.; Durodie, F.; Kazakov, Ye. O.; Louche, F.; Vervier, M.; Koch, R.; Krivska, A.; Lyssoivan, A.; Van Schoor, M.; Wauters, T.; Borsuk, V.; Neubauer, O.; Schmitz, O.; Altenburg, Y.; Baylard, C.; and others

    2014-06-15

    The current status of the mechanical and electromagnetic design for the ICRF antenna system for W7-X is presented. Two antenna plugins are discussed: one consisting of a pair of straps with pre-matching to cover the first frequency band, 25–38 MHz, and a second one consisting of two short strap triplets to cover a frequency band around 76 MHz. This paper focusses on the two strap antenna for the lower frequency band. Power coupling of the antenna to a reference plasma profile is studied with the help of the codes TOPICA and Microwave Studio that deliver the scattering matrix needed for the optimization of the geometric parameters of the straps and antenna box. Radiation power spectra for different phasings of the two straps are obtained using the code ANTITER II and different heating scenario are discussed. The potential for heating, fast particle generation, and current drive is discussed. The problem of RF coupling through the plasma edge and of edge power deposition is summarized. Important elements of the complete ion cyclotron resonance heating system are discussed: a resonator circuit with tap feed to limit the maximum voltage in the system, and a decoupler to counterbalance the large mutual coupling between the 2 straps. The mechanical design highlights the challenges encountered with this antenna: adaptation to a large variety of plasma configurations, the limited space within the port to accommodate the necessary matching components and the watercooling needed for long pulse operation.

  2. Study and design of the ion cyclotron resonance heating system for the stellarator Wendelstein 7-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ongena, J.; Messiaen, A.; Van Eester, D.; Schweer, B.; Dumortier, P.; Durodie, F.; Kazakov, Ye. O.; Louche, F.; Vervier, M.; Koch, R.; Krivska, A.; Lyssoivan, A.; Van Schoor, M.; Wauters, T.; Borsuk, V.; Neubauer, O.; Schmitz, O.; Offermans, G.; Altenburg, Y.; Baylard, C.; Birus, D.; Bozhenkov, S.; Hartmann, D. A.; Kallmeyer, J. P.; Renard, S.; Wolf, R. C.; Fülöp, T.

    2014-06-01

    The current status of the mechanical and electromagnetic design for the ICRF antenna system for W7-X is presented. Two antenna plugins are discussed: one consisting of a pair of straps with pre-matching to cover the first frequency band, 25-38 MHz, and a second one consisting of two short strap triplets to cover a frequency band around 76 MHz. This paper focusses on the two strap antenna for the lower frequency band. Power coupling of the antenna to a reference plasma profile is studied with the help of the codes TOPICA and Microwave Studio that deliver the scattering matrix needed for the optimization of the geometric parameters of the straps and antenna box. Radiation power spectra for different phasings of the two straps are obtained using the code ANTITER II and different heating scenario are discussed. The potential for heating, fast particle generation, and current drive is discussed. The problem of RF coupling through the plasma edge and of edge power deposition is summarized. Important elements of the complete ion cyclotron resonance heating system are discussed: a resonator circuit with tap feed to limit the maximum voltage in the system, and a decoupler to counterbalance the large mutual coupling between the 2 straps. The mechanical design highlights the challenges encountered with this antenna: adaptation to a large variety of plasma configurations, the limited space within the port to accommodate the necessary matching components and the watercooling needed for long pulse operation.

  3. Ion cyclotron resonance heating systems upgrade toward high power and CW operations in WEST

    SciTech Connect

    Hillairet, Julien Mollard, Patrick; Bernard, Jean-Michel; Argouarch, Arnaud; Berger-By, Gilles; Charabot, Nicolas; Colas, Laurent; Delaplanche, Jean-Marc; Ekedahl, Annika; Fedorczak, Nicolas; Ferlay, Fabien; Goniche, Marc; Hatchressian, Jean-Claude; Helou, Walid; Jacquot, Jonathan; Joffrin, Emmanuel; Litaudon, Xavier; Lombard, Gilles; Magne, Roland; Patterlini, Jean-Claude; and others

    2015-12-10

    The design of the WEST (Tungsten-W Environment in Steady-state Tokamak) Ion cyclotron resonance heating antennas is based on a previously tested conjugate-T Resonant Double Loops prototype equipped with internal vacuum matching capacitors. The design and construction of three new WEST ICRH antennas are being carried out in close collaboration with ASIPP, within the framework of the Associated Laboratory in the fusion field between IRFM and ASIPP. The coupling performance to the plasma and the load-tolerance have been improved, while adding Continuous Wave operation capability by introducing water cooling in the entire antenna. On the generator side, the operation class of the high power tetrodes is changed from AB to B in order to allow high power operation (up to 3 MW per antenna) under higher VSWR (up to 2:1). Reliability of the generators is also improved by increasing the cavity breakdown voltage. The control and data acquisition system is also upgraded in order to resolve and react on fast events, such as ELMs. A new optical arc detection system comes in reinforcement of the V{sub r}/V{sub f} and SHAD systems.

  4. Ion cyclotron resonance heating systems upgrade toward high power and CW operations in WEST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillairet, Julien; Mollard, Patrick; Zhao, Yanping; Bernard, Jean-Michel; Song, Yuntao; Argouarch, Arnaud; Berger-By, Gilles; Charabot, Nicolas; Chen, Gen; Chen, Zhaoxi; Colas, Laurent; Delaplanche, Jean-Marc; Dumortier, Pierre; Durodié, Frédéric; Ekedahl, Annika; Fedorczak, Nicolas; Ferlay, Fabien; Goniche, Marc; Hatchressian, Jean-Claude; Helou, Walid; Jacquot, Jonathan; Joffrin, Emmanuel; Litaudon, Xavier; Lombard, Gilles; Maggiora, Riccardo; Magne, Roland; Milanesio, Daniele; Patterlini, Jean-Claude; Prou, Marc; Verger, Jean-Marc; Volpe, Robert; Vulliez, Karl; Wang, Yongsheng; Winkler, Konstantin; Yang, Qingxi; Yuan, Shuai

    2015-12-01

    The design of the WEST (Tungsten-W Environment in Steady-state Tokamak) Ion cyclotron resonance heating antennas is based on a previously tested conjugate-T Resonant Double Loops prototype equipped with internal vacuum matching capacitors. The design and construction of three new WEST ICRH antennas are being carried out in close collaboration with ASIPP, within the framework of the Associated Laboratory in the fusion field between IRFM and ASIPP. The coupling performance to the plasma and the load-tolerance have been improved, while adding Continuous Wave operation capability by introducing water cooling in the entire antenna. On the generator side, the operation class of the high power tetrodes is changed from AB to B in order to allow high power operation (up to 3 MW per antenna) under higher VSWR (up to 2:1). Reliability of the generators is also improved by increasing the cavity breakdown voltage. The control and data acquisition system is also upgraded in order to resolve and react on fast events, such as ELMs. A new optical arc detection system comes in reinforcement of the Vr/Vf and SHAD systems.

  5. Wave propagation near a cyclotron resonance in a nonuniform equilibrium magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cairns, R. A.; Lashmore-Davies, C. N.; Dendy, R. O.; Harvey, B. M.; Hastie, R. J.; Holt, H.

    1991-11-01

    The inclusion of the variation of the equilibrium magnetic field across the Larmor orbits of the resonant particles is crucial for a self-consistent treatment of cyclotron resonance in plasmas. Two contrasting nonrelativistic self-consistent calculations [T. M. Antonsen and W. M. Manheimer, Phys. Fluids 21, 2295 (1978); C. N. Lashmore-Davies and R. O. Dendy, Phys. Fluids B 1, 1565 (1989)] which analyze perpendicular propagation in the same nonuniform magnetic field are compared. It is shown that the first of these, which is a full wave calculation, makes an approximation that eliminates the damping found in the second, which calculates optical depth via a Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) approximation. A new expansion of the exact integral equation describing the problem is given, producing full wave equations which incorporate the perpendicular damping. The equations are of the correct form to ensure energy conservation and can easily be obtained to any order in an expansion in terms of the ratio of Larmor radius to perpendicular wavelength.

  6. Vacuum compatible sample positioning device for matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry imaging

    PubMed Central

    Aizikov, Konstantin; Smith, Donald F.; Chargin, David A.; Ivanov, Sergei; Lin, Tzu-Yung; Heeren, Ron M. A.; O’Connor, Peter B.

    2011-01-01

    The high mass accuracy and resolving power of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometers (FT-ICR MS) make them ideal mass detectors for mass spectrometry imaging (MSI), promising to provide unmatched molecular resolution capabilities. The intrinsic low tolerance of FT-ICR MS to RF interference, however, along with typically vertical positioning of the sample, and MSI acquisition speed requirements present numerous engineering challenges in creating robotics capable of achieving the spatial resolution to match. This work discusses a two-dimensional positioning stage designed to address these issues. The stage is capable of operating in ∼1 × 10–8 mbar vacuum. The range of motion is set to 100 mm × 100 mm to accommodate large samples, while the positioning accuracy is demonstrated to be less than 0.4 micron in both directions under vertical load over the entire range. This device was integrated into three different matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) FT-ICR instruments and showed no detectable RF noise. The “oversampling” MALDI-MSI experiments, under which the sample is completely ablated at each position, followed by the target movement of the distance smaller than the laser beam, conducted on the custom-built 7T FT-ICR MS demonstrate the stability and positional accuracy of the stage robotics which delivers high spatial resolution mass spectral images at a fraction of the laser spot diameter. PMID:21639522

  7. Vacuum compatible sample positioning device for matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Aizikov, Konstantin; Lin, Tzu-Yung; Smith, Donald F.; Heeren, Ron M. A.; Chargin, David A.; Ivanov, Sergei; O'Connor, Peter B.

    2011-05-15

    The high mass accuracy and resolving power of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometers (FT-ICR MS) make them ideal mass detectors for mass spectrometry imaging (MSI), promising to provide unmatched molecular resolution capabilities. The intrinsic low tolerance of FT-ICR MS to RF interference, however, along with typically vertical positioning of the sample, and MSI acquisition speed requirements present numerous engineering challenges in creating robotics capable of achieving the spatial resolution to match. This work discusses a two-dimensional positioning stage designed to address these issues. The stage is capable of operating in {approx}1 x 10{sup -8} mbar vacuum. The range of motion is set to 100 mm x 100 mm to accommodate large samples, while the positioning accuracy is demonstrated to be less than 0.4 micron in both directions under vertical load over the entire range. This device was integrated into three different matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) FT-ICR instruments and showed no detectable RF noise. The ''oversampling'' MALDI-MSI experiments, under which the sample is completely ablated at each position, followed by the target movement of the distance smaller than the laser beam, conducted on the custom-built 7T FT-ICR MS demonstrate the stability and positional accuracy of the stage robotics which delivers high spatial resolution mass spectral images at a fraction of the laser spot diameter.

  8. Status report of the 28 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source VENUS (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, D.; Lyneis, C.M.; Loew, T.; Todd, D.S.; Virostek, S.; Tarvainen, O.

    2006-03-15

    The superconducting versatile electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source for nuclear science (VENUS) is a next generation superconducting ECR ion source designed to produce high-current, high-charge-state ions for the 88-Inch Cyclotron at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. VENUS also serves as the prototype ion source for the rare isotope accelerator (RIA) front end, where the goal is to produce intense beams of medium-charge-state ions. Example beams for the RIA accelerator are 15 p {mu}A of Kr{sup 17+}(260 e {mu}A), 12 p {mu}A of Xe{sup 20+} (240 e {mu}A of Xe{sup 20+}), and 8 p {mu}A of U{sup 28+}(230 e {mu}A). To achieve these high currents, VENUS has been optimized for operation at 28 GHz, reaching maximal confinement fields of 4 and 3 T axially and over 2.2 T on the plasma chamber wall radially. After a commissioning phase at 18 GHz, the source started the 28 GHz operation in the summer of 2004. During that ongoing 28 GHz commissioning process, record ion-beam intensities have been extracted. For instance, measured extracted currents for the low to medium charge states were 270 e {mu}A of Xe{sup 27+} and 245 e {mu}A of Bi{sup 29+}, while for the higher charge states 15 e {mu}A of Xe{sup 34+}, 15 e {mu}A of Bi{sup 41+}, and 0.5 e {mu}A of Bi{sup 50+} could be produced. Results from the ongoing 28 GHz commissioning as well as results using double-frequency heating with 18 and 28 GHz for oxygen and xenon are presented. The effect of the minimum B field on the ion source performance has been systematically measured for 18 and 28 GHz. In both cases the performance peaked at a minimum B field of about 80% of the resonance field. In addition, a strong dependence of the x-ray flux and energy on the minimum B field value was found.

  9. New development of advanced superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source SECRAL (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, H. W.; Sun, L. T.; Zhang, X. Z.; Guo, X. H.; Zhao, H. Y.; Feng, Y. C.; Li, J. Y.; Ma, H. Y.; Ma, B. H.; Wang, H.; Li, X. X.; Xie, D. Z.; Lu, W.; Cao, Y.; Shang, Y.

    2010-02-15

    Superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source with advance design in Lanzhou (SECRAL) is an 18-28 GHz fully superconducting electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source dedicated for highly charged heavy ion beam production. SECRAL, with an innovative superconducting magnet structure of solenoid-inside-sextupole and at lower frequency and lower rf power operation, may open a new way for developing compact and reliable high performance superconducting ECR ion source. One of the recent highlights achieved at SECRAL is that some new record beam currents for very high charge states were produced by 18 GHz or 18+14.5 GHz double frequency heating, such as 1 e {mu}A of {sup 129}Xe{sup 43+}, 22 e {mu}A of {sup 209}Bi{sup 41+}, and 1.5 e {mu}A of {sup 209}Bi{sup 50+}. To further enhance the performance of SECRAL, a 24 GHz/7 kW gyrotron microwave generator was installed and SECRAL was tested at 24 GHz. Some promising and exciting results at 24 GHz with new record highly charged ion beam intensities were produced, such as 455 e {mu}A of {sup 129}Xe{sup 27+} and 152 e {mu}A of {sup 129}Xe{sup 30+}, although the commissioning time was limited within 3-4 weeks and rf power only 3-4 kW. Bremsstrahlung measurements at 24 GHz show that x-ray is much stronger with higher rf frequency, higher rf power. and higher minimum mirror magnetic field (minimum B). Preliminary emittance measurements indicate that SECRAL emittance at 24 GHz is slightly higher that at 18 GHz. SECRAL has been put into routine operation at 18 GHz for heavy ion research facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL) accelerator complex since May 2007. The total operation beam time from SECRAL for HIRFL accelerator has been more than 2000 h, and {sup 129}Xe{sup 27+}, {sup 78}Kr{sup 19+}, {sup 209}Bi{sup 31+}, and {sup 58}Ni{sup 19+} beams were delivered. All of these new developments, the latest results, and long-term operation for the accelerator have again demonstrated that SECRAL is one of the best in the performance of

  10. A Proposal for a Novel H{sup -} Ion Source Based on Electron Cyclotron Resonance Plasma Heating and Surface Ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Tarvainen, O.; Kurennoy, S.

    2009-03-12

    A design for a novel H{sup -} ion source based on electron cyclotron resonance plasma heating and surface ionization is presented. The plasma chamber of the source is an rf-cavity designed for TE{sub 111} eigenmode at 2.45 GHz. The desired mode is excited with a loop antenna. The ionization process takes place on a cesiated surface of a biased converter electrode. The H{sup -} ion beam is further ''self-extracted'' through the plasma region. The magnetic field of the source is optimized for plasma generation by electron cyclotron resonance heating, and beam extraction. The design features of the source are discussed in detail and the attainable H{sup -} ion current, beam emittance and duty factor of the novel source are estimated.

  11. Non-linear transport in microwave-irradiated 2D electron systems at the cyclotron resonance subharmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Hung-Sheng; Hatke, Anthony; Zudov, Michael; Pfeiffer, Loren; West, Ken

    2009-03-01

    We study microwave photoresistivity oscillations in a high mobility two-dimensional electron system subject to strong dc electric fields. We find [1] that near the second subharmonic of the cyclotron resonance the frequency of the resistivity oscillations with dc electric field is twice the frequency of the oscillations at the cyclotron resonance, its harmonics, or in the absence of microwave radiation. This observation is discussed in terms of the microwave-induced sidebands in the density of states and the interplay between different scattering processes in the separated Landau level regime. [1] A. T. Hatke, H.-S. Chiang, M. A. Zudov, L. N. Pfeiffer, and K. W. West, Phys. Rev. Lett. accepted for publication.

  12. A proposal for a novel H ion source based on electron cyclotron resonance heating and surface ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Tarvainen, Ollie A; Kurennoy, Sergey

    2008-01-01

    A design for a novel H{sup -} ion source based on electron cyclotron resonance plasma heating and surface ionization is presented. The plasma chamber of the source is an rf-cavity designed for TE{sub 111} eigenmode at 2.45 GHz. The desired mode is excited with a loop antenna. The ionization process takes place on a cesiated surface of a biased converter electrode. The H{sup -} ion beam is further 'self-extracted' through the plasma region. The magnetic field of the source is optimized for plasma generation by electron cyclotron resonance heating, and beam extraction. The design features of the source are discussed in detail and the attainable H{sup -} ion current, beam emittance and duty factor of the novel source are estimated.

  13. Classical to quantum crossover of the cyclotron resonance in graphene: a study of the strength of intraband absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlita, M.; Crassee, I.; Faugeras, C.; Kuzmenko, A. B.; Fromm, F.; Ostler, M.; Seyller, Th; Martinez, G.; Polini, M.; Potemski, M.

    2012-09-01

    We report on absolute magneto-transmission experiments on highly doped quasi-free-standing epitaxial graphene targeting the classical-to-quantum crossover of the cyclotron resonance. This study allows us to directly extract the carrier density and also other relevant quantities such as the quasiparticle velocity and the Drude weight, which is precisely measured from the strength of the cyclotron resonance. We find that the Drude weight is renormalized with respect to its non-interacting (or random phase approximation) value and that the renormalization is tied to the quasiparticle velocity enhancement. This finding is in agreement with recent theoretical predictions, which attribute the renormalization of the Drude weight in graphene to the interplay between broken Galilean invariance and electron-electron interactions.

  14. Measurements of the fast electron bremsstrahlung emission during electron cyclotron resonance heating in the HL-2A tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y. P.; Liu, Yi; Song, X. Y.; Yuan, G. L.; Chen, W.; Ji, X. Q.; Ding, X. T.; Yang, J. W.; Zhou, J.; Li, X.; Yang, Q. W.; Duan, X. R.; Pan, C. H.; Liu, Y.

    2010-10-15

    A fast electron bremsstrahlung (FEB) diagnostic technique based on cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector has been developed recently in the HL-2A tokamak for measurements of the temporal evolution of FEB emission in the energy range of 10-200 keV. With a perpendicular viewing into the plasma on the equatorial plane, the hard x-ray spectra with eight different energy channels are measured. The discrimination of the spectra is implemented by an accurate spectrometry. The system also makes use of fast digitization and software signal processing technology. An ambient environment of neutrons, gammas, and magnetic disturbance requires careful shielding. During electron cyclotron resonance heating, the generation of fast electrons and the oscillations of electron fishbone (e-fishbone) have been found. Using the FEB measurement system, it has been experimentally identified that the mode strongly correlates with the electron cyclotron resonance heating produced fast electrons with 30-70 keV.

  15. Reconstruction of high temporal resolution Thomson scattering data during a modulated electron cyclotron resonance heating using conditional averaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, T. Yoshinuma, M.; Ohdachi, S.; Ida, K.; Itoh, K.; Moon, C.; Yamada, I.; Funaba, H.; Yasuhara, R.; Tsuchiya, H.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Shimozuma, T.; Kubo, S.; Tsujimura, T. I.; Inagaki, S.

    2016-04-15

    This paper provides a software application of the sampling scope concept for fusion research. The time evolution of Thomson scattering data is reconstructed with a high temporal resolution during a modulated electron cyclotron resonance heating (MECH) phase. The amplitude profile and the delay time profile of the heat pulse propagation are obtained from the reconstructed signal for discharges having on-axis and off-axis MECH depositions. The results are found to be consistent with the MECH deposition.

  16. Investigation of relativistic runaway electrons in electron cyclotron resonance heating discharges on Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, C. S.; Lee, S. G.

    2014-07-15

    The behavior of relativistic runaway electrons during Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH) discharges is investigated in the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research device. The effect of the ECRH on the runaway electron population is discussed. Observations on the generation of superthermal electrons during ECRH will be reported, which will be shown to be consistent with existing theory for the development of a superthermal electron avalanche during ECRH [A. Lazaros, Phys. Plasmas 8, 1263 (2001)].

  17. Electron cyclotron maser based on the combination two-wave resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Savilov, A. V.

    2012-11-01

    A mechanism of a combination two-wave cyclotron interaction between an electron beam and the forward/backward components of a far-from-cutoff standing wave is analyzed. This regime can be promising for the realization of high-power continuous-wave electron cyclotron masers operating in the THz frequency range.

  18. Microstructural studies of diamond thin films grown by electron cyclotron resonance-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, S.; Katiyar, R. S.; Gilbert, D. R.; Singh, R. K.; Morell, G.

    2000-11-15

    A detailed investigation of the correlation among intrinsic stress ({sigma}{sub int}), nonuniform stress ({sigma}{sub nu}), and phonon lifetime (1/{Gamma}) was performed in order to obtain a coherent and comprehensive picture of the microstructure of diamond thin films grown by the electron cyclotron resonance-assisted chemical vapor deposition (ECR-CVD) technique. It was found that the diamond growth taking place by the ECR-CVD is different to that taking place by the microwave CVD and hot-filament CVD. Point and line defects, rather than sp{sup 2} C bonds, were found to be the dominant source of both nonuniform stress and reduced phonon lifetime. The surface relaxation mechanism in these films yields sp{sup 2} C at the expense of strained sp{sup 3} C, resulting in a trade off between diamond yield and crystalline quality. The diamond precursor that spontaneously forms on the unseeded substrates yielded higher quality diamond than planted diamond seeds. The grain boundary relaxation model proposed by Hoffman accounts well for the observed behavior of the intrinsic stress, thus indicating that microstructural restructuration takes place at the grain boundaries when sufficient time and thermal energy are provided.

  19. Electric polarization and the viability of living systems: ion cyclotron resonance-like interactions.

    PubMed

    Liboff, A R

    2009-01-01

    Wellness can be described in physical terms as a state that is a function of the organism's electric polarization vector P(r, t). One can alter P by invasive application of electric fields or by non invasive external pulsed magnetic fields (PMF) or ion cyclotron resonance (ICR)-like combinations of static and sinusoidal magnetic fields. Changes in human (total) body bioimpedance are significantly altered during exposure to ICR magnetic field combinations. The conductivities of polar amino acids in solution exhibit sharp discontinuities at ICR magnetic fields tuned to the specific charge to mass ratio of the amino acid. It has been reported that protein peptide bonds are broken by such amino acid ICR fields. Remarkably, some of these effects are only found at ultra-low AC magnetic intensities, on the order of .05 muT. This is approximately 10(3) below accepted levels determined by engineering estimates. Such strikingly low magnetic intensities imply the existence of physically equivalent endogenous weak electric field oscillations. These observations not only make claims related to electromagnetic pollution more credible but also provide a basis for future electromagnetic applications in medicine. They also reinforce the notion that physical factors acting to influence the electric polarization in living organisms play a key role in biology.

  20. Development of a novel mass spectrometer equipped with an electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Kidera, Masanori; Takahashi, Kazuya; Enomoto, Shuichi; Mitsubori, Youhei; Goto, Akira; Yano, Yasushige

    2007-01-01

    The ionization efficiency of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) is generally high, and all elements can be fundamentally ionized by the high-temperature plasma. We focused our attention on the high potentiality of ECRIS as an ion source for mass spectrometers and attempted to customize the mass spectrometer equipped with an ECRIS. Precise measurements were performed by using an ECRIS that was specialized and customized for elemental analysis. By using the charge-state distribution and the isotope ratio, the problem of overlap such as that observed in the spectra of isobars could be solved without any significant improvement in the mass resolution. When the isotope anomaly (or serious mass discrimination effect) was not observed in ECR plasma, the system was found to be very effective for isotope analysis. In this paper, based on the spectrum (ion current as a function of an analyzing magnet current) results of low charged state distributions (2+, 3+, 4+, ...) of noble gases, we discuss the feasibility of an elemental analysis system employing an ECRIS, particularly for isotopic analysis. The high-performance isotopic analysis obtained for ECRIS mass spectrometer in this study suggests that it can be widely applied to several fields of scientific study that require elemental or isotopic analyses with high sensitivity.

  1. Identification of sites of ubiquitination in proteins: a fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry approach.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Helen J; Heath, John K; Jaffray, Ellis; Hay, Ronald T; Lam, Tukiet T; Marshall, Alan G

    2004-12-01

    Structural elucidation of posttranslationally modified peptides and proteins is of key importance in the understanding of an array of biological processes. Ubiquitination is a reversible modification that regulates many cellular functions. Consequences of ubiquitination depend on whether a single ubiquitin or polyubiquitin chain is added to the tagged protein. The lysine residue through which the polyubiquitin chain is formed is also critical for biological activity. Robust methods are therefore required to identify sites of ubiquitination modification, both in the target protein and in ubiquitin. Here, we demonstrate the suitability of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry, in conjunction with activated ion electron capture dissociation (AI ECD) or infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD), for the analysis of ubiquitinated proteins. Polyubiquitinated substrate protein GST-Ubc5 was generated in vitro. Tryptic digests of polyubiquitinated species contain modified peptides in which the ubiquitin C-terminal Gly-Gly residues are retained on the modified lysine residues. Direct infusion microelectrospray FT-ICR of the digest and comparison with an in silico digest enables identification of modified peptides and therefore sites of ubiquitination. Fifteen sites of ubiquitination were identified in GST-Ubc5 and four sites in ubiquitin. Assignments were confirmed by AI ECD or IRMPD. The Gly-Gly modification is stable and both tandem mass spectrometric techniques are suitable, providing extensive sequence coverage and retention of the modification on backbone fragments.

  2. Evolutions of zonal flows and turbulence in a tokamak edge plasma during electron cyclotron resonance heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, D. F.; Liu, A. D.; Lan, T.; Cui, Z. Y.; Yu, D. L.; Yan, L. W.; Zhao, H. L.; Sheng, H. G.; Chen, R.; Xie, J. L.; Li, H.; Liu, W. D.; Yu, C. X.; Ding, W. X.; Sun, X.; Hong, W. Y.; Cheng, J.; Zhao, K. J.; Dong, J. Q.; Duan, X. R.

    2013-12-01

    Geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) and low-frequency zonal flow (LFZF) are both observed through Langmuir probe arrays during electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) on the HL-2A tokamak edge. The radial distributions of the amplitude and peak frequency of GAM in floating potential fluctuations are investigated through rake probe arrays under different ECRH powers. It is observed that the GAM frequency would decrease and the intensity of carbon line emission would increase as the ECRH power exceeds a certain threshold. The analyses suggest that the impurity ions may play an important role in the GAM frequency at the edge region. It is also found that during the ECRH phase besides the mean flow, both GAM and LFZF are strengthened. The total fluctuation power and the fraction of that power associated with zonal flows both increase with the ECRH power, consistent with a predator-prey model. The auto- and cross-bicoherence analyses show the coupling between GAM and its second harmonic during the ECRH phase. Moreover, the results also suggest that the couplings between GAM and the components with multiple GAM frequency are strengthened. These couplings may be important for GAM saturation during the ECRH phase.

  3. Project of electro-cyclotron resonance ion source test-bench for material investigation.

    PubMed

    Kulevoy, T V; Chalykh, B B; Kuibeda, R P; Kropachev, G N; Ziiatdinova, A V

    2014-02-01

    Development of new materials for future energy facilities with higher operating efficiency is a challenging and crucial task. However, full-scale testing of radiation hardness for reactor materials is quite sophisticated and difficult as it requires long session of reactor irradiation; moreover, induced radioactivity considerably complicates further investigation. Ion beam irradiation does not have such a drawback; on the contrary, it has certain advantages. One of them is high speed of defect formation. Therefore, it provides a useful tool for modeling of different radiation damages. Improved understanding of material behavior under high dose irradiation will probably allow to simulate reactor irradiation close to real conditions and to make an adequate estimation of material radiation hardness. Since 2008 in Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, the ion beam irradiation experiments are under development at the heavy ion radio frequency quadrupole linac and very important results are obtained already [T. V. Kulevoy et al., in Proceedings of the International Topical Meeting on Nuclear Research Applications and Utilization of Accelerators, IAEA Vienna, Austria, 2009, http://www.pub.iaea.org/MTCD/publications/PDF/P1433_CD/darasets/papers/ap_p5_07.pdf]. Nevertheless, the new test bench based on electro-cyclotron resonance ion source and high voltage platform is developed. The project of the test bench is presented and discussed.

  4. Development of gas pulsing system for electron cyclotron resonance ion sourcea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hojo, S.; Honma, T.; Muramatsu, M.; Sakamoto, Y.; Sugiura, A.

    2008-02-01

    A gas-pulsing system for an electron cyclotron resonance ion source with all permanent magnets (Kei2 source) at NIRS has been developed and tested. The system consists of a small vessel (30ml) to reserve CH4 gas and two fast solenoid valves that are installed at both sides of the vessel. They are connected to each other and to the Kei2 source by using a stainless-steel pipe (4mm inner diameter), where the length of the pipe from the valve to the source is 60cm and the conductance is 1.2l /s. From the results of the test, almost 300eμA for a pulsed C4+12 beam was obtained at a Faraday cup in an extraction-beam channel with a pressure range of 4000Pa in the vessel. At this time, the valve has an open time of 10ms and the delay time between the valve open time and the application of microwave power is 100ms. In experiments, the conversion efficiency for input CH4 molecules to the quantity of extracted C4+12 ions in one beam pulse was found to be around 3% and the ratio of the total amount of the gas requirement was only 10% compared with the case of continuous gas provided in 3.3s of repetition in HIMAC.

  5. An all permanent magnet electron cyclotron resonance ion source for heavy ion therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yun; Li, Jia Qing; Sun, Liang Ting; Zhang, Xue Zhen; Feng, Yu Cheng; Wang, Hui; Ma, Bao Hua; Li, Xi Xia

    2014-02-01

    A high charge state all permanent Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source, Lanzhou All Permanent ECR ion source no. 3-LAPECR3, has been successfully built at IMP in 2012, which will serve as the ion injector of the Heavy Ion Medical Machine (HIMM) project. As a commercial device, LAPECR3 features a compact structure, small size, and low cost. According to HIMM scenario more than 100 eμA of C5+ ion beam should be extracted from the ion source, and the beam emittance better than 75 π*mm*mrad. In recent commissioning, about 120 eμA of C5+ ion beam was got when work gas was CH4 while about 262 eμA of C5+ ion beam was obtained when work gas was C2H2 gas. The design and construction of the ion source and its low-energy transportation beam line, and the preliminary commissioning results will be presented in detail in this paper.

  6. First results of 28 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source for KBSI accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jin Yong; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Choi, Seyong; Kim, Seong Jun; Ok, Jung-Woo; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Kim, Hyun Gyu; Shin, Chang Seouk; Hong, Jonggi; Bahng, Jungbae; Won, Mi-Sook

    2016-02-01

    The 28 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source has been developed to produce a high current heavy ion for the linear accelerator at KBSI (Korea Basic Science Institute). The objective of this study is to generate fast neutrons with a proton target via a p(Li,n)Be reaction. The design and fabrication of the essential components of the ECR ion source, which include a superconducting magnet with a liquid helium re-condensed cryostat and a 10 kW high-power microwave, were completed. The waveguide components were connected with a plasma chamber including a gas supply system. The plasma chamber was inserted into the warm bore of the superconducting magnet. A high voltage system was also installed for the ion beam extraction. After the installation of the ECR ion source, we reported the results for ECR plasma ignition at ECRIS 2014 in Russia. Following plasma ignition, we successfully extracted multi-charged ions and obtained the first results in terms of ion beam spectra from various species. This was verified by a beam diagnostic system for a low energy beam transport system. In this article, we present the first results and report on the current status of the KBSI accelerator project.

  7. Improved charge breeding efficiency of light ions with an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vondrasek, R.; Delahaye, P.; Kutsaev, Sergey; Maunoury, L.

    2012-11-01

    The Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade is a new radioactive beam facility for the Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS). The facility utilizes a 252Cf fission source coupled with an electron cyclotron resonance ion source to provide radioactive beam species for the ATLAS experimental program. The californium fission fragment distribution provides nuclei in the mid-mass range which are difficult to extract from production targets using the isotope separation on line technique and are not well populated by low-energy fission of uranium. To date the charge breeding program has focused on optimizing these mid-mass beams, achieving high charge breeding efficiencies of both gaseous and solid species including 14.7% for the radioactive species 143Ba27+. In an effort to better understand the charge breeding mechanism, we have recently focused on the low-mass species sodium and potassium which up to present have been difficult to charge breed efficiently. Unprecedented charge breeding efficiencies of 10.1% for 23Na7+ and 17.9% for 39K10+ were obtained injecting stable Na+ and K+ beams from a surface ionization source.

  8. Improved charge breeding efficiency of light ions with an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Vondrasek, R.; Kutsaev, Sergey; Delahaye, P.; Maunoury, L.

    2012-11-15

    The Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade is a new radioactive beam facility for the Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS). The facility utilizes a {sup 252}Cf fission source coupled with an electron cyclotron resonance ion source to provide radioactive beam species for the ATLAS experimental program. The californium fission fragment distribution provides nuclei in the mid-mass range which are difficult to extract from production targets using the isotope separation on line technique and are not well populated by low-energy fission of uranium. To date the charge breeding program has focused on optimizing these mid-mass beams, achieving high charge breeding efficiencies of both gaseous and solid species including 14.7% for the radioactive species {sup 143}Ba{sup 27+}. In an effort to better understand the charge breeding mechanism, we have recently focused on the low-mass species sodium and potassium which up to present have been difficult to charge breed efficiently. Unprecedented charge breeding efficiencies of 10.1% for {sup 23}Na{sup 7+} and 17.9% for {sup 39}K{sup 10+} were obtained injecting stable Na{sup +} and K{sup +} beams from a surface ionization source.

  9. An inverted cylindrical sputter magnetron as metal vapor supply for electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Weichsel, T. Hartung, U.; Kopte, T.; Zschornack, G.; Kreller, M.; Silze, A.

    2014-05-15

    An inverted cylindrical sputter magnetron device has been developed. The magnetron is acting as a metal vapor supply for an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source. FEM simulation of magnetic flux density was used to ensure that there is no critical interaction between both magnetic fields of magnetron and ECR ion source. Spatially resolved double Langmuir probe and optical emission spectroscopy measurements show an increase in electron density by one order of magnitude from 1 × 10{sup 10} cm{sup −3} to 1 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup −3}, when the magnetron plasma is exposed to the magnetic mirror field of the ECR ion source. Electron density enhancement is also indicated by magnetron plasma emission photography with a CCD camera. Furthermore, photographs visualize the formation of a localized loss-cone - area, when the magnetron is operated at magnetic mirror field conditions. The inverted cylindrical magnetron supplies a metal atom load rate of R > 1 × 10{sup 18} atoms/s for aluminum, which meets the demand for the production of a milliampere Al{sup +} ion beam.

  10. Langmuir probe diagnostics of plasma in high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Roychowdhury, P.; Kewlani, H.; Mishra, L.; Mittal, K. C.; Patil, D. S.

    2013-07-15

    A high current Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) proton ion source has been developed for low energy high intensity proton accelerator at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. Langmuir probe diagnostics of the plasma generated in this proton ion source is performed using Langmuir probe. The diagnostics of plasma in the ion source is important as it determines beam parameters of the ion source, i.e., beam current, emittance, and available species. The plasma parameter measurement in the ion source is performed in continuously working and pulsed mode using hydrogen as plasma generation gas. The measurement is performed in the ECR zone for operating pressure and microwave power range of 10{sup −4}–10{sup −3} mbar and 400–1000 W. An automated Langmuir probe diagnostics unit with data acquisition system is developed to measure these parameters. The diagnostics studies indicate that the plasma density and plasma electron temperature measured are in the range 5.6 × 10{sup 10} cm{sup −3} to 3.8 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup −3} and 4–14 eV, respectively. Using this plasma, ion beam current of tens of mA is extracted. The variations of plasma parameters with microwave power, gas pressure, and radial location of the probe have been studied.

  11. Fluctuations in electron cyclotron resonance plasma in a divergent magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Sudeep; Fredriksen, Åshild; Chandra, Sayan

    2016-02-01

    The dependence of fluctuations on electron-neutral collision frequency (νen) and the radial location is investigated in an electron cyclotron resonance plasma in a divergent magnetic field region for a set of magnetic fields. Results indicate that the fluctuations depend strongly on the collision frequency. At lower magnetic fields and νen, the fluctuation levels are small and are observed to peak around 3-5 cm from the central plasma region. Coherent wave modes are found to contribute up to about 30% of the total fluctuation power, and two to three harmonics are present in the power spectra. There are two principal modes present in the discharge: one appears to be a dissipative mode associated with a collisional drift wave instability initiated at a lower pressure (collision frequencies) (˜0.5 mTorr) and is stabilized at a higher pressure (≳3 mTorr). The other mode appears at intermediate pressure (≳1.75 mTorr) and possesses the signature of a flute instability. The fluctuation levels indicate that flute modes are predominant in the discharge at higher pressures ( >1.75 mTorr) and at higher values of the magnetic field (˜540 Gauss).

  12. First results of 28 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source for KBSI accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jin Yong; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Choi, Seyong; Kim, Seong Jun; Ok, Jung-Woo; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Kim, Hyun Gyu; Shin, Chang Seouk; Hong, Jonggi; Bahng, Jungbae; Won, Mi-Sook

    2016-02-15

    The 28 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source has been developed to produce a high current heavy ion for the linear accelerator at KBSI (Korea Basic Science Institute). The objective of this study is to generate fast neutrons with a proton target via a p(Li,n)Be reaction. The design and fabrication of the essential components of the ECR ion source, which include a superconducting magnet with a liquid helium re-condensed cryostat and a 10 kW high-power microwave, were completed. The waveguide components were connected with a plasma chamber including a gas supply system. The plasma chamber was inserted into the warm bore of the superconducting magnet. A high voltage system was also installed for the ion beam extraction. After the installation of the ECR ion source, we reported the results for ECR plasma ignition at ECRIS 2014 in Russia. Following plasma ignition, we successfully extracted multi-charged ions and obtained the first results in terms of ion beam spectra from various species. This was verified by a beam diagnostic system for a low energy beam transport system. In this article, we present the first results and report on the current status of the KBSI accelerator project.

  13. Microstructural studies of diamond thin films grown by electron cyclotron resonance-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, S.; Katiyar, R. S.; Gilbert, D. R.; Singh, R. K.; Morell, G.

    2000-11-01

    A detailed investigation of the correlation among intrinsic stress (σint), nonuniform stress (σnu), and phonon lifetime (1/Γ) was performed in order to obtain a coherent and comprehensive picture of the microstructure of diamond thin films grown by the electron cyclotron resonance-assisted chemical vapor deposition (ECR-CVD) technique. It was found that the diamond growth taking place by the ECR-CVD is different to that taking place by the microwave CVD and hot-filament CVD. Point and line defects, rather than sp2 C bonds, were found to be the dominant source of both nonuniform stress and reduced phonon lifetime. The surface relaxation mechanism in these films yields sp2 C at the expense of strained sp3 C, resulting in a trade off between diamond yield and crystalline quality. The diamond precursor that spontaneously forms on the unseeded substrates yielded higher quality diamond than planted diamond seeds. The grain boundary relaxation model proposed by Hoffman accounts well for the observed behavior of the intrinsic stress, thus indicating that microstructural restructuration takes place at the grain boundaries when sufficient time and thermal energy are provided.

  14. Progress in producing megawatt gyrotrons for ECR (electron cyclotron resonance) heating

    SciTech Connect

    Felch, K.; Hess, C.; Huey, H.; Jongewaard, E.; Jory, H.; Neilson, J.; Pendleton, R.; Tsirulnikov, M. )

    1990-10-01

    Varian is carrying out the development of high-power, CW gyrotrons at frequencies ranging from 100--500 GHz for use in electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) heating of magnetically-confined plasma. Initial test vehicles at 140 GHz have utilized TE{sub 15,2,1} interaction cavities, and have been designed to generate short-pulse (up to 20 ms) power levels of 1 MW and up to 400 kW CW. Recently, short-pulse power levels of 940 kW at 35% efficiency have been obtained and average powers of 200 kW have been achieved at peak powers of 400 kW. Long-pulse testing is currently underway. Initial test have resulted in output levels of 400 kW for pulse durations of 380 ms. Design work on 110 GHz, 500 kW CW gyrotron oscillators has recently been completed and a prototype tube has been assembled and is currently being tested. The design of a 110 GHz, 1 MW CW gyrotron, using a novel output coupling approach, is nearly complete. Fabrication of the first 1 MW CW experimental tube is in progress.

  15. Electron cyclotron resonance heating by magnetic filter field in a negative hydrogen ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, June Young Cho, Won-Hwi; Dang, Jeong-Jeung; Chung, Kyoung-Jae Hwang, Y. S.

    2016-02-15

    The influence of magnetic filter field on plasma properties in the heating region has been investigated in a planar-type inductively coupled radio-frequency (RF) H{sup −} ion source. Besides filtering high energy electrons near the extraction region, the magnetic filter field is clearly observed to increase the electron temperature in the heating region at low pressure discharge. With increasing the operating pressure, enhancement of electron temperature in the heating region is reduced. The possibility of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) heating in the heating region due to stray magnetic field generated by a filter magnet located at the extraction region is examined. It is found that ECR heating by RF wave field in the discharge region, where the strength of an axial magnetic field is approximately ∼4.8 G, can effectively heat low energy electrons. Depletion of low energy electrons in the electron energy distribution function measured at the heating region supports the occurrence of ECR heating. The present study suggests that addition of axial magnetic field as small as several G by an external electromagnet or permanent magnets can greatly increase the generation of highly ro-vibrationally excited hydrogen molecules in the heating region, thus improving the performance of H{sup −} ion generation in volume-produced negative hydrogen ion sources.

  16. Silicon carbon alloy thin film depositions using electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shing, Y. H.; Pool, F. S.

    1990-01-01

    Amorphous and microcrystalline silicon carbon films (a-SiC:H, micro-c-SiC:H) have been deposited using SiH4, CH4 and H2 mixed gas ECR (electron cyclotron resonance) plasmas. The optical bandgap of a-SiC:H films is not dependent on the hydrogen dilution in the ECR plasma. The deposition rate of a-SiC:H films is found to be strongly dependent on the ECR magnetic field and the hydrogen dilution. The hydrogen dilution effect on the deposition rate indicates that the etching in ECR hydrogen plasmas plays an important role in the deposition of a-SiC:H films. The optical constants n and k of ECR-deposited a-SiC:H films in the wavelength region of 0.4 to 1.0 micron are determined to be 2.03-1.90 and 0.04-0.00, respectively. The microstructures of ECR-deposited micro-c-SiC:H films are shown by X-ray diffraction and SEM (scanning electron microscopy) to be composed of 1000-A alpha-SiC microcrystallites and amorphous network structures.

  17. Method for calibrating a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard D.; Masselon, Christophe D.; Tolmachev, Aleksey

    2003-08-19

    A method for improving the calibration of a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer wherein the frequency spectrum of a sample has been measured and the frequency (f) and intensity (I) of at least three species having known mass to charge (m/z) ratios and one specie having an unknown (m/z) ratio have been identified. The method uses the known (m/z) ratios, frequencies, and intensities at least three species to calculate coefficients A, B, and C, wherein the mass to charge ratio of a least one of the three species (m/z).sub.i is equal to ##EQU1## wherein f.sub.i is the detected frequency of the specie, G(I.sub.i) is a predetermined function of the intensity of the species, and Q is a predetermined exponent. Using the calculated values for A, B, and C, the mass to charge ratio of the unknown specie (m/z).sub.ii is calculated as the sum of ##EQU2## wherein f.sub.ii is the measured frequency of the unknown specie, and (I.sub.ii) is the measured intensity of the unknown specie.

  18. In vacuo substrate pretreatments for enhancing nanodiamond formation in electron cyclotron resonance plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Teii, Kungen; Kouzuma, Yutaka; Uchino, Kiichiro

    2006-09-15

    Substrate pretreatment conditions at low pressures have been examined for enhancing nanocrystalline diamond formation on silicon in electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma. Three kinds of pretreatments (I) exposure to an ECR H{sub 2} plasma with application of a substrate bias from -100 to +30 V (II) hot-filament heating in H{sub 2} gas, and (III) hot-filament heating in vacuum, were used alone or followed by carburization prior to a two-step process of ion-enhanced nucleation in an ECR plasma and subsequent growth in a hot-filament system. The number density of diamond particles after the final growth step was greatly increased up to the order of 10{sup 7}-10{sup 8} cm{sup -2} when applying pretreatment (I) at the bias of 0 V corresponding to the ion-bombardment energy of around 10 eV. In this treatment, a clean and smooth surface with minimal damage was made by the dominance of anisotropic etching by hydrogen ions over isotropic etching by hydrogen atoms. The number density of diamond particles was still more increased when applying pretreatment (II), but the treated surface was unfavorably contaminated and roughened.

  19. Model for the description of ion beam extraction from electron cyclotron resonance ion sources.

    PubMed

    Spädtke, P

    2010-02-01

    The finite difference method trajectory code KOBRA3-INP has been developed now for 25 years to perform the simulation of ion beam extraction in three dimensions. Meanwhile, the code has been validated for different applications: high current ion beam extraction from plasma sources for ion implantation technology, neutral gas heating in fusion devices, or ion thrusters for space propulsion. One major issue of the development of this code was to improve the flexibility of the applied model for the simulation of different types of particle sources. Fixed emitter sources might be simulated with that code as well as laser ion sources, Penning ion sources, electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRISs), or H(-) sources, which require the simulation of negative ions, negative electrons, and positive charges simultaneously. The model which has been developed for ECRIS has now been used to explore the conditions for the ion beam extraction from a still nonexisting ion source, a so called ARC-ECRIS [P. Suominen and F. Wenander, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 02A305 (2008)]. It has to be shown whether the plasma generator has similar properties like regular ECRIS. However, the emittance of the extracted beam seems to be much better compared to an ECRIS equipped with a hexapole.

  20. High-Throughput Metabolic Profiling of Soybean Leaves by Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Ali; Rudolph, Heather L; Hurst, Jerod J; Wood, Troy D

    2016-01-19

    As a relatively recent research field, plant metabolomics has gained increasing interest in the past few years and has been applied to answer biological questions through large-scale qualitative and quantitative analyses of the plant metabolome. The combination of sensitivity and selectivity offered by mass spectrometry (MS) for measurement of many metabolites in a single shot makes it an indispensable platform in metabolomics. In this regard, Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) has the unique advantage of delivering high mass resolving power and mass accuracy simultaneously, making it ideal for the study of complex mixtures such as plant extracts. Here we optimize soybean leaf extraction methods compatible with high-throughput reproducible MS-based metabolomics. In addition, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) and direct LDI of soybean leaves are compared for metabolite profiling. The extraction method combined with electrospray (ESI)-FTICR is supported by the significant reduction of chlorophyll and its related metabolites as the growing season moves from midsummer to the autumn harvest day. To our knowledge for the first time, the use of ESI-FTICR MS and MALDI-FTICR MS is described in a complementary manner with the aim of metabolic profiling of plant leaves that have been collected at different time points during the growing season.

  1. Electron cyclotron resonance deposition of a-Si:H and a-C:H films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shing, Y. H.; Yang, C. L.; Allevato, C. E.; Pool, F. S.

    1989-01-01

    Amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films have been deposited by electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) microwave plasma enhanced CVD. A high deposition rate of 25 A/sec and a light-to-dark conductivity ratio of 500,000 for a-Si:H films have been achieved by the ECR process using a pure silane plasma. ECR microwave plasmas have been analyzed by in situ optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and have shown a strong H-asterisk emission at 434 nm indicating higher chemical reactivity than RF plasmas. The linear correlation between the film deposition rate and the SiH-asterisk emission intensity of ECR silane plasma suggests that SiH-asterisk species are related to the neutral radicals which are responsible for the a-Si:H film deposition. Hard and soft a-C:H films have been deposited by ECR with and without RF bias power, respectively. The RF bias to the substrate is found to play a critical role in determining the film structure and the carbon bonding configuration of ECR deposited a-C:H films. Raman spectra of these films indicate that ECR deposition conditions can be optimized to produce diamond films.

  2. Liquid chromatography-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometric characterization of protein kinase C phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, Michael J; Quinn, John P; Blakney, Greg T; Emmett, Mark R; Mischak, Harold; Gaskell, Simon J; Marshall, Alan G

    2003-01-01

    A vented column, capillary liquid chromatography (LC) microelectrospray ionization (ESI) Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR (9.4 T)) mass spectrometry (MS) approach to phosphopeptide identification is described. A dual-ESI source capable of rapid (approximately 200 ms) switching between two independently controlled ESI emitters was constructed. The dual-ESI source, combined with external ion accumulation in a linear octopole ion trap, allowed for internal calibration of every mass spectrum during LC. LC ESI FT-ICR positive-ion MS of protein kinase C (PKC) revealed four previously unidentified phosphorylated peptides (one within PKC(alpha), one within PKC(delta), and two within PKC(zeta)). Internal calibration improved the mass accuracy for LC MS spectra from an absolute mean (47 peptide ions) of 11.5 ppm to 1.5 ppm. Five additional (out of eight known) activating sites of PKC phosphorylation, not detected in positive-ion experiments, were observed by subsequent negative-ion direct infusion nanoelectrospray. Extension of the method to enable infrared multiphoton dissociation of all ions in the ICR cell prior to every other mass measurement revealed the diagnostic neutral loss of H3PO4 from phosphorylated peptide ions. The combination of accurate-mass MS and MS/MS offers a powerful new tool for identifying the presence and site(s) of phosphorylation in peptides, without the need for additional wet chemical derivatization.

  3. Silicon carbon alloy thin film depositions using electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shing, Y. H.; Pool, F. S.

    1990-01-01

    Amorphous and microcrystalline silicon carbon films (a-SiC:H, micro-c-SiC:H) have been deposited using SiH4, CH4 and H2 mixed gas ECR (electron cyclotron resonance) plasmas. The optical bandgap of a-SiC:H films is not dependent on the hydrogen dilution in the ECR plasma. The deposition rate of a-SiC:H films is found to be strongly dependent on the ECR magnetic field and the hydrogen dilution. The hydrogen dilution effect on the deposition rate indicates that the etching in ECR hydrogen plasmas plays an important role in the deposition of a-SiC:H films. The optical constants n and k of ECR-deposited a-SiC:H films in the wavelength region of 0.4 to 1.0 micron are determined to be 2.03-1.90 and 0.04-0.00, respectively. The microstructures of ECR-deposited micro-c-SiC:H films are shown by X-ray diffraction and SEM (scanning electron microscopy) to be composed of 1000-A alpha-SiC microcrystallites and amorphous network structures.

  4. Nitrogen ion implantation into various materials using 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Chang Seouk; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Choi, Seyong; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Kim, Hyun Gyu; Ok, Jung-Woo; Park, Jin Yong; Kim, Seong Jun; Bahng, Jungbae; Hong, Jonggi; Won, Mi-Sook; Lee, Seung Wook

    2016-02-15

    The installation of the 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) ion implantation beamline was recently completed at the Korea Basic Science Institute. The apparatus contains a beam monitoring system and a sample holder for the ion implantation process. The new implantation system can function as a multipurpose tool since it can implant a variety of ions, ranging hydrogen to uranium, into different materials with precise control and with implantation areas as large as 1–10 mm{sup 2}. The implantation chamber was designed to measure the beam properties with a diagnostic system as well as to perform ion implantation with an in situ system including a mass spectrometer. This advanced implantation system can be employed in novel applications, including the production of a variety of new materials such as metals, polymers, and ceramics and the irradiation testing and fabrication of structural and functional materials to be used in future nuclear fusion reactors. In this investigation, the first nitrogen ion implantation experiments were conducted using the new system. The 28 GHz ECRIS implanted low-energy, multi-charged nitrogen ions into copper, zinc, and cobalt substrates, and the ion implantation depth profiles were obtained. SRIM 2013 code was used to calculate the profiles under identical conditions, and the experimental and simulation results are presented and compared in this report. The depths and ranges of the ion distributions in the experimental and simulation results agree closely and demonstrate that the new system will enable the treatment of various substrates for advanced materials research.

  5. Design of coupled cavity with energy modulated electron cyclotron resonance ion source for materials irradiation research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Chen, J. E.; Kang, M. L.; Lu, Y. R.; Xia, W. L.; Gao, S. L.; Guo, Z. Y.; Liu, G.; Peng, S. X.; Ren, H. T.; Yan, X. Q.; Zhao, J.; Zhu, K.

    2012-05-01

    The surface topography of samples after irradiation with heavy ions, protons, and helium ions based on accelerators is an important issue in the study of materials irradiation. We have coupled the separated function radio frequency quadrupole (SFRFQ) electrodes and the traditional RFQ electrodes into a single cavity that can provide a 0.8 MeV helium beam for our materials irradiation project. The higher accelerating efficiency has been verified by the successful commissioning of the prototype SFRFQ cavity. An energy modulated electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source can achieve a well-bunched beam by loading a sine wave voltage onto the extracted electrodes. Bunching is achieved without the need for an external bunch cavity, which can substantially reduce the cost of the system and the length of the beam line. The coupled RFQ-SFRFQ with an energy modulated ECR ion source will lead to a more compact accelerator system. The conceptual design of this novel structure is presented in this paper.

  6. Ion Extraction from a Toroidal Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source: a Numerical Feasibility Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caliri, Claudia; Volpe, Francesco; Gammino, Santo; Mascali, David

    2013-10-01

    Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources (ECRIS) are magnetic mirror plasmas of microwave-heated electrons and cold multi-charged ions. The ions are extracted from one end of the mirror and injected in accelerators for nuclear and particle physics studies, hadrontherapy, or neutral beam injection in fusion plasmas. ECRIS devices progressed to higher and higher ion currents and charge states by adopting stronger magnetic fields (beneficial for confinement) and proportionally higher ECR frequencies. Further improvements would require the attainment of ``triple products'' comparable with major fusion experiments. For this, we propose a new, toroidal rather than linear, ECRIS geometry, which would at the same time improve confinement and make better use of the magnetic field. Ion extraction is more complicated than from a linear device, but feasible, as our modeling indicates. Possible techniques involve charge-dependent drifts, divertors, specially designed magnetic fields and associated loss-cones, electrostatic and/or magnetic deflectors, or techniques used in accelerators to transfer particles from one storage ring or accelerator to the next. Here we present single-particle tracings assessing and comparing these extraction techniques.

  7. Cyclotron resonant scattering in the spectra of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. C. L.; Lamb, D. Q.; Loredo, T. J.; Wasserman, I. M.; Salpeter, E. E.

    1989-01-01

    Fits of theoretical spectra from Monte Carlo radiation-transfer calculations to dips at approximately 20 and 40 keV in a spectrum of the gamma-ray burst source GB 880 205 give best-fit values and 68 percent-confidence intervals for the magnetic field of (1.71 + or - 0.07) x 10 to the 12th G, the electron density of (1.2 + or - 0.6) x 10 to the 21st electrons/cm-squared, and the cosine of the viewing angle relative to the field of 0.31 + or - 0.05. The dips observed at approximately 20 keV in the spectra are interpreted as cyclotron resonant scattering, in which electrons undergo radiative 0 to 1 to 0 Landau transitions initiated by photons near the first harmonic. Physical self-consistency fixes the temperature, and the equilibrium temperature equals 5.3 + 0.3 or - 0.2 keV. These results suggest that this gamma-ray burst and many others which exhibit a low-energy dip originate from strongly magnetic neutron stars and are galactic in origin.

  8. Nitrogen ion implantation into various materials using 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Shin, Chang Seouk; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Choi, Seyong; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Kim, Hyun Gyu; Ok, Jung-Woo; Park, Jin Yong; Kim, Seong Jun; Bahng, Jungbae; Hong, Jonggi; Lee, Seung Wook; Won, Mi-Sook

    2016-02-01

    The installation of the 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) ion implantation beamline was recently completed at the Korea Basic Science Institute. The apparatus contains a beam monitoring system and a sample holder for the ion implantation process. The new implantation system can function as a multipurpose tool since it can implant a variety of ions, ranging hydrogen to uranium, into different materials with precise control and with implantation areas as large as 1-10 mm(2). The implantation chamber was designed to measure the beam properties with a diagnostic system as well as to perform ion implantation with an in situ system including a mass spectrometer. This advanced implantation system can be employed in novel applications, including the production of a variety of new materials such as metals, polymers, and ceramics and the irradiation testing and fabrication of structural and functional materials to be used in future nuclear fusion reactors. In this investigation, the first nitrogen ion implantation experiments were conducted using the new system. The 28 GHz ECRIS implanted low-energy, multi-charged nitrogen ions into copper, zinc, and cobalt substrates, and the ion implantation depth profiles were obtained. SRIM 2013 code was used to calculate the profiles under identical conditions, and the experimental and simulation results are presented and compared in this report. The depths and ranges of the ion distributions in the experimental and simulation results agree closely and demonstrate that the new system will enable the treatment of various substrates for advanced materials research.

  9. Production of charged (singly and multiply) phosphorous beams with electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maunoury, L.; Kantas, S.; Leroy, R.; Pacquet, J. Y.

    2006-03-01

    Within the framework of biological application linked to ion irradiation, the fabrication of radioactive stents by ion implantation provides a significant improvement of the recovery of arteries after a treatment of stenosed coronary arteries [P. Fehsenfeld et al., Semin Interv Cardiol. 3, 157 (1998); E. Huttel et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 73, 825 (2002); M.-A. Golombeck et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. B 206, 495 (2003)]. For this appliance, the suitable radioactive ion is P32. Obviously, in order to have a minimum loss of these radioactive ions through the ionization process, it is imperative to have high ionization efficiency. In this article, the production of such singly and multiply charged phosphorous beams is investigated using two different electron cyclotron resonance ion sources: MONO1000/1001 [P. Jardin et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 73, 789 (2002)] and SUPERSHyPIE [J. Y. Pacquet et al., EP Patent No. 97 401294 (pending); R. Leroy et al., 14th International Workshop on ECR Ion Sources, May 1999 (unpublished)]. Spectra and above all efficiencies [J. Y. Pacquet et al., GANIL R 02 07; GANIL R 03 08] (31% of ionization efficiency for phosphorous atoms and compound with MONO1000/1001 and 43% of ionization efficiency for phosphorous atoms with SUPERSHyPIE) of these beams will be presented as well as the intensities (227eμA for P+ with MONO1000/1001 and 145eμA for P7+ with SUPERSHyPIE) of such beams.

  10. H- ion production in electron cyclotron resonance driven multicusp volume source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, A. A.; Rouillé, C.; Bacal, M.; Arnal, Y.; Béchu, S.; Pelletier, J.

    2004-05-01

    We have used the existing magnetic multicusp configuration of the large volume H- source Camembert III to confine the plasma created by seven elementary multidipolar electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) sources, operating at 2.45 GHz. We varied the pressure from 1 to 4 mTorr, while the total power of the microwave generator was varied between 500 W and 1 kW. We studied the plasma created by this system and measured the various plasma parameters, including the density and temperature of the negative hydrogen ions which are compared to the data obtained in a chamber with elementary ECR sources without multicusp magnetic confinement. The electron temperature is lower than that obtained with similar elementary sources in the absence of the magnetic multicusp field. We found that at pressures in the range from 2 to 4 mTorr and microwave power of up to 1 kW, the electron temperature is optimal for H- ion production (0.6-0.8 eV). This could indicate that the multicusp configuration effectively traps the fast electrons produced by the ECR discharge.

  11. Optimizing ion-cyclotron resonance frequency heating for ITER: dedicated JET experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerche, E.; Van Eester, D.; Ongena, J.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Laxaback, M.; Rimini, F.; Argouarch, A.; Beaumont, P.; Blackman, T.; Bobkov, V.; Brennan, D.; Brett, A.; Calabro, G.; Cecconello, M.; Coffey, I.; Colas, L.; Coyne, A.; Crombe, K.; Czarnecka, A.; Dumont, R.; Durodie, F.; Felton, R.; Frigione, D.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Giroud, C.; Gorini, G.; Graham, M.; Hellesen, C.; Hellsten, T.; Huygen, S.; Jacquet, P.; Johnson, T.; Kiptily, V.; Knipe, S.; Krasilnikov, A.; Lamalle, P.; Lennholm, M.; Loarte, A.; Maggiora, R.; Maslov, M.; Messiaen, A.; Milanesio, D.; Monakhov, I.; Nightingale, M.; Noble, C.; Nocente, M.; Pangioni, L.; Proverbio, I.; Sozzi, C.; Stamp, M.; Studholme, W.; Tardocchi, M.; Versloot, T. W.; Vdovin, V.; Vrancken, M.; Whitehurst, A.; Wooldridge, E.; Zoita, V.; EFDA Contributors, JET

    2011-12-01

    In the past years, one of the focal points of the JET experimental programme was on ion-cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) studies in view of the design and exploitation of the ICRH system being developed for ITER. In this brief review, some of the main achievements obtained in JET in this field during the last 5 years will be summarized. The results reported here include important aspects of a more engineering nature, such as (i) the appropriate design of the RF feeding circuits for optimal load resilient operation and (ii) the test of a compact high-power density antenna array, as well as RF physics oriented studies aiming at refining the numerical models used for predicting the performance of the ICRH system in ITER. The latter include (i) experiments designed for improving the modelling of the antenna coupling resistance under various plasma conditions and (ii) the assessment of the heating performance of ICRH scenarios to be used in the non-active operation phase of ITER.

  12. Ion cyclotron resonance heating for tungsten control in various JET H-mode scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goniche, M.; Dumont, R. J.; Bobkov, V.; Buratti, P.; Brezinsek, S.; Challis, C.; Colas, L.; Czarnecka, A.; Drewelow, P.; Fedorczak, N.; Garcia, J.; Giroud, C.; Graham, M.; Graves, J. P.; Hobirk, J.; Jacquet, P.; Lerche, E.; Mantica, P.; Monakhov, I.; Monier-Garbet, P.; Nave, M. F. F.; Noble, C.; Nunes, I.; Pütterich, T.; Rimini, F.; Sertoli, M.; Valisa, M.; Van Eester, D.; Contributors, JET

    2017-05-01

    Ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) in the hydrogen minority scheme provides central ion heating and acts favorably on the core tungsten transport. Full wave modeling shows that, at medium power level (4 MW), after collisional redistribution, the ratio of power transferred to the ions and the electrons vary little with the minority (hydrogen) concentration n H/n e but the high-Z impurity screening provided by the fast ions temperature increases with the concentration. The power radiated by tungsten in the core of the JET discharges has been analyzed on a large database covering the 2013-2014 campaign. In the baseline scenario with moderate plasma current (I p = 2.5 MA) ICRH modifies efficiently tungsten transport to avoid its accumulation in the plasma centre and, when the ICRH power is increased, the tungsten radiation peaking evolves as predicted by the neo-classical theory. At higher current (3-4 MA), tungsten accumulation can be only avoided with 5 MW of ICRH power with high gas injection rate. For discharges in the hybrid scenario, the strong initial peaking of the density leads to strong tungsten accumulation. When this initial density peaking is slightly reduced, with an ICRH power in excess of 4 MW,very low tungsten concentration in the core (˜10-5) is maintained for 3 s. MHD activity plays a key role in tungsten transport and modulation of the tungsten radiation during a sawtooth cycle is correlated to the fishbone activity triggered by the fast ion pressure gradient.

  13. Model for the description of ion beam extraction from electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Spaedtke, P.

    2010-02-15

    The finite difference method trajectory code KOBRA3-INP has been developed now for 25 years to perform the simulation of ion beam extraction in three dimensions. Meanwhile, the code has been validated for different applications: high current ion beam extraction from plasma sources for ion implantation technology, neutral gas heating in fusion devices, or ion thrusters for space propulsion. One major issue of the development of this code was to improve the flexibility of the applied model for the simulation of different types of particle sources. Fixed emitter sources might be simulated with that code as well as laser ion sources, Penning ion sources, electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRISs), or H{sup -} sources, which require the simulation of negative ions, negative electrons, and positive charges simultaneously. The model which has been developed for ECRIS has now been used to explore the conditions for the ion beam extraction from a still nonexisting ion source, a so called ARC-ECRIS [P. Suominen and F. Wenander, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 02A305 (2008)]. It has to be shown whether the plasma generator has similar properties like regular ECRIS. However, the emittance of the extracted beam seems to be much better compared to an ECRIS equipped with a hexapole.

  14. Bias voltage and corrosion effects in rf ovens in electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Cavenago, M.; Galata, A.; Kulevoy, T.; Petrenko, S.

    2006-03-15

    Induction-heated miniaturized ovens were successfully coupled to electron cyclotron resonance ion sources for the production of copper and silver ion beams. Experiments with tin and praseodymium ion beams are here presented; some preliminary tests for titanium are also described. In the latter case (and in general over a 1800 K temperature) a molybdenum rf coil is used. The results with tin show currents comparable to silver (after obvious correction for isotopic abundance), with some operational difficulty due to frequent pouring of liquid sample out of crucible. The effects of a bias voltage V{sub b} applied to the Sn sample are reported. Cold sputter probes are compared. The results with praseodymium show lower currents than tin and large sensitivity to mixing gas used: nitrogen emerged as the best compromise against oxygen (possibly because this oxidizes the sample) and against inert noble gases. Optimal bias voltage for Pr (V{sub b} from -50 to -300 V) is much smaller than for silver (V{sub b} congruent with -1 kV)

  15. Pure Material Vapor Source by Induction Heating Evaporator for an Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source

    SciTech Connect

    Matsui, Y.; Watanabe, T.; Satani, T.; Sato, F.; Kato, Y.; Iida, T.; Muramatsu, M.; Kitagawa, A.; Tanaka, K.; Yoshida, Y.

    2008-11-03

    Multiply charged iron ions are produced from solid pure material in an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source. We develop an evaporator by using induction heating with the induction coil which is made from bare molybdenum wire and surrounding the pure iron rod. We optimize the shape of induction heating coil and operation of rf power supply. We conduct experiment to investigate reproducibility and stability in the operation and heating efficiency. Induction heating evaporator produces pure material vapor, because materials directly heated by eddy currents have non-contact with insulated materials which are impurity gas sources. The power and the frequency of the induction currents range from 100 to 900 W and from 48 to 23 kHz, respectively. The working pressure is about 10{sup -4} to 10{sup -3} Pa. We measure temperature of iron rod and film deposition rate by depositing iron vapor to crystal oscillator. We confirm stability and reproducibility of evaporator enough to conduct experiment in ECR ion source. We can obtain required temperature of iron under maximum power of power supply. We are aiming the evaporator higher melting point material than iron.

  16. A gain and bandwidth enhanced transimpedance preamplifier for Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tzu-Yung; Green, Roger J.; O'Connor, Peter B.

    2011-01-01

    The nature of the ion signal from a 12-T Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer and the electronic noise were studied to further understand the electronic detection limit. At minimal cost, a new transimpedance preamplifier was designed, computer simulated, built, and tested. The preamplifier design pushes the electronic signal-to-noise performance at room temperature to the limit, because of its enhanced tolerance of the capacitance of the detection device, lower intrinsic noise, and larger flat mid-band gain (input current noise spectral density of around 1 pA/\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal}\\begin{document}$\\sqrt{\\mbox{Hz}}$\\end{document}Hz when the transimpedance is about 85 dBΩ). The designed preamplifier has a bandwidth of ∼3 kHz to 10 MHz, which corresponds to the mass-to-charge ratio, m/z, of approximately 18 to 61 k at 12 T. The transimpedance and the bandwidth can be easily adjusted by changing the value of passive components. The feedback limitation of the circuit is discussed. With the maximum possible transimpedance of 5.3 MΩ when using an 0402 surface mount resistor, the preamplifier was estimated to be able to detect ∼110 charges in a single scan. PMID:22225232

  17. Electron cyclotron resonance deposition of amorphous silicon alloy films and devices

    SciTech Connect

    Shing, Y.H. )

    1992-10-01

    This report describes work to develop a state-of-the-art electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) system. The objective was to understand the deposition processes of amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and related alloys, with a best-effort improvement of optoelectronic material properties and best-effort stabilization of solar cell performance. ECR growth parameters were systematically and extensively investigated; materials characterization included constant photocurrent measurement (CPM), junction capacitance, drive-level capacitance profiling (DLCP), optical transmission, light and dark photoconductivity, and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Conventional ECR-deposited a-Si:H was compared to a new form, a-Si:(Xe, H), in which xenon gas was added to the ECR plasma. a-Si:(Xe,H) possessed low, stable dark conductivities and high photosensitivites. Light-soaking revealed photodegradation rates about 35% lower than those of comparable radio frequency (rf)-deposited material. ECR-deposited p-type a SiC:H and intrinsic a-Si:H films underwent evaluation as components of p-i-n solar cells with standard rf films for the remaining layers.

  18. Use of electron cyclotron resonance x-ray source for nondestructive testing application

    SciTech Connect

    Baskaran, R.; Selvakumaran, T.S.

    2006-03-15

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) technique is being used for generating x rays in the low-energy region (<150 keV). Recently, the source is used for the calibration of thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) badges. In order to qualify the ECR x-ray source for imaging application, the source should give uniform flux over the area under study. Lead collimation arrangement is made to get uniform flux. The flux profile is measured using a teletector at different distance from the port and uniform field region of 10x10 cm{sup 2} has been marked at 20 cm from the x-ray exit port. A digital-to-analog converter (DAC) circuit pack is used for examining the source performance. The required dose for nondestructive testing examination has been estimated using a hospital x-ray machine and it is found to be 0.05 mSv. Our source experimental parameters are tuned and the DAC circuit pack was exposed for nearly 7 min to get the required dose value. The ECR x-ray source operating parameters are argon pressure: 10{sup -5} Torr, microwave power: 350 W, and coil current: 0 A. The effective energy of the x-ray spectrum is nearly 40 keV. The x-ray images obtained from ECR x-ray source and hospital medical radiography machine are compared. It is found that the image obtained from ECR x-ray source is suitable for NDT application.

  19. Radiofrequency and 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance H- volume production ion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarvainen, O.; Peng, S. X.

    2016-10-01

    The volume production of negative hydrogen ions ({{{H}}}-) in plasma ion sources is based on dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to rovibrationally excited hydrogen molecules (H2), which is a two-step process requiring both, hot electrons for ionization, and vibrational excitation of the H2 and cold electrons for the {{{H}}}- formation through DEA. Traditionally {{{H}}}- ion sources relying on the volume production have been tandem-type arc discharge sources equipped with biased filament cathodes sustaining the plasma by thermionic electron emission and with a magnetic filter separating the main discharge from the {{{H}}}- formation volume. The main motivation to develop ion sources based on radiofrequency (RF) or electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma discharges is to eliminate the apparent limitation of the cathode lifetime. In this paper we summarize the principles of {{{H}}}- volume production dictating the ion source design and highlight the differences between the arc discharge and RF/ECR ion sources from both, physics and technology point-of-view. Furthermore, we introduce the state-of-the-art RF and ECR {{{H}}}- volume production ion sources and review the challenges and future prospects of these yet developing technologies.

  20. Observation of plasma instabilities related to dust particle growth mechanisms in electron cyclotron resonance plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Drenik, A.; Margot, J.

    2013-10-15

    Instabilities are observed in the self-bias voltage measured on a probe immersed in microwave plasma excited at Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR). Observed in the MHz range, they were systematically measured in dust-free or dusty plasmas (obtained for different conditions of applied microwave powers and acetylene flow rates). Two characteristic frequencies, well described as lower hybrid oscillations, can be defined. The first one, in the 60–70 MHz range, appears as a sharp peak in the frequency spectra and is observed in every case. Attributed to ions, its position shift observed with the output power highlights that nucleation process takes place in the dusty plasma. Attributed to lower hybrid oscillation of powders, the second broad peak in the 10–20 MHz range leads to the characterization of dust particles growth mechanisms: in the same way as in capacitively coupled plasmas, accumulation of nucleus confined near the probe in the magnetic field followed by aggregation takes place. Then, the measure of electrical instabilities on the self-bias voltage allows characterizing the discharge as well as the chemical processes that take place in the magnetic field region and their kinetics.

  1. Nitrogen ion implantation into various materials using 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Chang Seouk; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Choi, Seyong; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Kim, Hyun Gyu; Ok, Jung-Woo; Park, Jin Yong; Kim, Seong Jun; Bahng, Jungbae; Hong, Jonggi; Lee, Seung Wook; Won, Mi-Sook

    2016-02-01

    The installation of the 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) ion implantation beamline was recently completed at the Korea Basic Science Institute. The apparatus contains a beam monitoring system and a sample holder for the ion implantation process. The new implantation system can function as a multipurpose tool since it can implant a variety of ions, ranging hydrogen to uranium, into different materials with precise control and with implantation areas as large as 1-10 mm2. The implantation chamber was designed to measure the beam properties with a diagnostic system as well as to perform ion implantation with an in situ system including a mass spectrometer. This advanced implantation system can be employed in novel applications, including the production of a variety of new materials such as metals, polymers, and ceramics and the irradiation testing and fabrication of structural and functional materials to be used in future nuclear fusion reactors. In this investigation, the first nitrogen ion implantation experiments were conducted using the new system. The 28 GHz ECRIS implanted low-energy, multi-charged nitrogen ions into copper, zinc, and cobalt substrates, and the ion implantation depth profiles were obtained. SRIM 2013 code was used to calculate the profiles under identical conditions, and the experimental and simulation results are presented and compared in this report. The depths and ranges of the ion distributions in the experimental and simulation results agree closely and demonstrate that the new system will enable the treatment of various substrates for advanced materials research.

  2. Gated Trapped Ion Mobility Spectrometry Coupled to Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ridgeway, Mark E; Wolff, Jeremy J; Silveira, Joshua A; Lin, Cheng; Costello, Catherine E; Park, Melvin A

    2016-09-01

    Analysis of molecules by ion mobility spectrometry coupled with mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) provides chemical information on the three dimensional structure and mass of the molecules. The coupling of ion mobility to trapping mass spectrometers has historically been challenging due to the large differences in analysis time between the two devices. In this paper we present a modification of the trapped ion mobility (TIMS) analysis scheme termed "Gated TIMS" that allows efficient coupling to a Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance (FT-ICR) analyzer. Analyses of standard compounds and the influence of source conditions on the TIMS distributions produced by ion mobility spectra of labile ubiquitin protein ions are presented. Ion mobility resolving powers up to 100 are observed. Measured collisional cross sections of ubiquitin ions are in excellent qualitative and quantitative agreement to previous measurements. Gated TIMS FT-ICR produces results comparable to those acquired using TIMS/time-of-flight MS instrument platforms as well as numerous drift tube IMS-MS studies published in the literature.

  3. An electron cyclotron resonance ion source based low energy ion beam platform

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, L. T.; Shang, Y.; Ma, B. H.; Zhang, X. Z.; Feng, Y. C.; Li, X. X.; Wang, H.; Guo, X. H.; Song, M. T.; Zhao, H. Y.; Zhang, Z. M.; Zhao, H. W.; Xie, D. Z.

    2008-02-15

    To satisfy the requirements of surface and atomic physics study in the field of low energy multiple charge state ion incident experiments, a low energy (10 eV/q-20 keV/q) ion beam platform is under design at IMP. A simple test bench has been set up to test the ion beam deceleration systems. Considering virtues such as structure simplicity, easy handling, compactness, cost saving, etc., an all-permanent magnet ECRIS LAPECR1 [Lanzhou all-permanent magnet electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source No. 1] working at 14.5 GHz has been adopted to produce intense medium and low charge state ion beams. LAPECR1 source has already been ignited. Some intense low charge state ion beams have been produced on it, but the first test also reveals that many problems are existing on the ion beam transmission line. The ion beam transmission mismatches result in the depressed performance of LAPECR1, which will be discussed in this paper. To obtain ultralow energy ion beam, after being analyzed by a double-focusing analyzer magnet, the selected ion beam will be further decelerated by two afocal deceleration lens systems, which is still under design. This design has taken into consideration both ions slowing down and also ion beam focusing. In this paper, the conceptual design of deceleration system will be discussed.

  4. An all permanent magnet electron cyclotron resonance ion source for heavy ion therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Yun Li, Jia Qing; Sun, Liang Ting; Zhang, Xue Zhen; Feng, Yu Cheng; Wang, Hui; Ma, Bao Hua; Li, Xi Xia

    2014-02-15

    A high charge state all permanent Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source, Lanzhou All Permanent ECR ion source no. 3-LAPECR3, has been successfully built at IMP in 2012, which will serve as the ion injector of the Heavy Ion Medical Machine (HIMM) project. As a commercial device, LAPECR3 features a compact structure, small size, and low cost. According to HIMM scenario more than 100 eμA of C{sup 5+} ion beam should be extracted from the ion source, and the beam emittance better than 75 π*mm*mrad. In recent commissioning, about 120 eμA of C{sup 5+} ion beam was got when work gas was CH{sub 4} while about 262 eμA of C{sup 5+} ion beam was obtained when work gas was C{sub 2}H{sub 2} gas. The design and construction of the ion source and its low-energy transportation beam line, and the preliminary commissioning results will be presented in detail in this paper.

  5. High yield neutron generator based on a high-current gasdynamic electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Skalyga, V.; Sidorov, A.; Izotov, I.; Golubev, S.; Razin, S.; Strelkov, A.; Tarvainen, O.; Koivisto, H.; Kalvas, T.

    2015-09-07

    In present paper, an approach for high yield compact D-D neutron generator based on a high current gasdynamic electron cyclotron resonance ion source is suggested. Results on dense pulsed deuteron beam production with current up to 500 mA and current density up to 750 mA/cm{sup 2} are demonstrated. Neutron yield from D{sub 2}O and TiD{sub 2} targets was measured in case of its bombardment by pulsed 300 mA D{sup +} beam with 45 keV energy. Neutron yield density at target surface of 10{sup 9} s{sup −1} cm{sup −2} was detected with a system of two {sup 3}He proportional counters. Estimations based on obtained experimental results show that neutron yield from a high quality TiD{sub 2} target bombarded by D{sup +} beam demonstrated in present work accelerated to 100 keV could reach 6 × 10{sup 10} s{sup −1} cm{sup −2}. It is discussed that compact neutron generator with such characteristics could be perspective for a number of applications like boron neutron capture therapy, security systems based on neutron scanning, and neutronography.

  6. A simulation of X-ray shielding for a superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jin Yong; Won, Mi-Sook; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Choi, Seyong; Ok, Jung-Woo; Choi, Jeong-Sik; Kim, Byoung-Chul

    2014-02-15

    It is generally assumed that large amounts of x-rays are emitted from the ion source of an Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) instrument. The total amount of x-rays should be strictly limited to avoid the extra heat load to the cryostat of the superconducting ECR ion source, since they are partly absorbed by the cold mass into the cryostat. A simulation of x-ray shielding was carried out to determine the effective thickness of the x-ray shield needed via the use of Geant4. X-ray spectra of the 10 GHz Nanogan ECR ion source were measured as a function of the thickness variation in the x-ray shield. The experimental results were compared with Geant4 results to verify the effectiveness of the x-ray shield. Based on the validity in the case of the 10 GHz ECR ion source, the x-ray shielding results are presented by assuming the spectral temperature of the 28 GHz ECR ion source.

  7. An all permanent magnet electron cyclotron resonance ion source for heavy ion therapy.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yun; Li, Jia Qing; Sun, Liang Ting; Zhang, Xue Zhen; Feng, Yu Cheng; Wang, Hui; Ma, Bao Hua; Li, Xi Xia

    2014-02-01

    A high charge state all permanent Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source, Lanzhou All Permanent ECR ion source no. 3-LAPECR3, has been successfully built at IMP in 2012, which will serve as the ion injector of the Heavy Ion Medical Machine (HIMM) project. As a commercial device, LAPECR3 features a compact structure, small size, and low cost. According to HIMM scenario more than 100 eμA of C(5+) ion beam should be extracted from the ion source, and the beam emittance better than 75 π*mm*mrad. In recent commissioning, about 120 eμA of C(5+) ion beam was got when work gas was CH4 while about 262 eμA of C(5+) ion beam was obtained when work gas was C2H2 gas. The design and construction of the ion source and its low-energy transportation beam line, and the preliminary commissioning results will be presented in detail in this paper.

  8. An inverted cylindrical sputter magnetron as metal vapor supply for electron cyclotron resonance ion sources.

    PubMed

    Weichsel, T; Hartung, U; Kopte, T; Zschornack, G; Kreller, M; Silze, A

    2014-05-01

    An inverted cylindrical sputter magnetron device has been developed. The magnetron is acting as a metal vapor supply for an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source. FEM simulation of magnetic flux density was used to ensure that there is no critical interaction between both magnetic fields of magnetron and ECR ion source. Spatially resolved double Langmuir probe and optical emission spectroscopy measurements show an increase in electron density by one order of magnitude from 1 × 10(10) cm(-3) to 1 × 10(11) cm(-3), when the magnetron plasma is exposed to the magnetic mirror field of the ECR ion source. Electron density enhancement is also indicated by magnetron plasma emission photography with a CCD camera. Furthermore, photographs visualize the formation of a localized loss-cone - area, when the magnetron is operated at magnetic mirror field conditions. The inverted cylindrical magnetron supplies a metal atom load rate of R > 1 × 10(18) atoms/s for aluminum, which meets the demand for the production of a milliampere Al(+) ion beam.

  9. Enhancement of octacalcium phosphate deposition on a titanium surface activated by electron cyclotron resonance plasma oxidation.

    PubMed

    Orii, Yusuke; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Honda, Yoshitomo; Anada, Takahisa; Goto, Takashi; Sasaki, Keiichi; Suzuki, Osamu

    2010-05-01

    The present study was designed to investigate whether the formation of octacalcium phosphate (OCP) is accelerated on titanium (Ti) surface by an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma oxidation at various pressures and temperatures. X-ray diffraction (XRD) of Ti-oxidized substrates showed that the rutile TiO(2) phase on its surfaces appeared at 300 degrees C and was crystallized when the oxidation temperature increased up to 600 degrees C. The thickness of TiO(2) film on the substrates increased progressively as the temperature increased. The oxidized Ti surfaces were soaked in calcium and phosphate solutions supersaturated with respect to both hydroxyapatite (HA) and OCP but slightly supersaturated with dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD). OCP crystals with a blade-like morphology were deposited as the primary crystalline phase on Ti substrates, while DCPD was included as a minor constituent. The amount of OCP deposition was maximized under 0.015 Pa in 300 degrees C. On the other hand, the oxidation temperature did not show a significant effect on the deposit in the range examined. The phase conversion from OCP to HA, determined by XRD, was demonstrated to occur even at 1 day and to advance until 7 days by immersing the Ti substrate with the deposit in simulated body fluid at 37 degrees C. The present results suggest that ECR plasma oxidation could be used to improve a Ti surface regarding its bioactivity due to the enhancement of osteoconductive OCP deposition. (c) 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Experiments with biased side electrodes in electron cyclotron resonance ion sources.

    PubMed

    Drentje, A G; Kitagawa, A; Uchida, T; Rácz, R; Biri, S

    2014-02-01

    The output of highly charged ions from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) consists of ionic losses from a highly confined plasma. Therefore, an increase of the output of the ions of interest always is a compromise between an increase in the confinement and an increase of the losses. One route towards a solution consists of attacking the losses in directions - i.e., radial directions - that do not contribute to the required output. This was demonstrated in an experiment (using the Kei ECRIS at NIRS, Japan) where radial losses were electrostatically reduced by positively biasing one set of six "side" electrodes surrounding the plasma in side-ward directions attached (insulated) to the cylindrical wall of the plasma chamber. Recently new studies were performed in two laboratories using two essentially different ion sources. At the BioNano ECRIS (Toyo University, Japan) various sets of electrodes were used; each of the electrodes could be biased individually. At the Atomki ECRIS (Hungary), one movable, off-axis side electrode was applied in technically two versions. The measurements show indeed a decrease of ionic losses but different effectivities as compared to the biased disk.

  11. First results from the new RIKEN superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source (invited).

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, T; Higurashi, Y; Ohnishi, J; Aihara, T; Tamura, M; Uchiyama, A; Okuno, H; Kusaka, K; Kidera, M; Ikezawa, E; Fujimaki, M; Sato, Y; Watanabe, Y; Komiyama, M; Kase, M; Goto, A; Kamigaito, O; Yano, Y

    2010-02-01

    The next generation heavy ion accelerator facility, such as the RIKEN radio isotope (RI) beam factory, requires an intense beam of high charged heavy ions. In the past decade, performance of the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources has been dramatically improved with increasing the magnetic field and rf frequency to enhance the density and confinement time of plasma. Furthermore, the effects of the key parameters (magnetic field configuration, gas pressure, etc.) on the ECR plasma have been revealed. Such basic studies give us how to optimize the ion source structure. Based on these studies and modern superconducting (SC) technology, we successfully constructed the new 28 GHz SC-ECRIS, which has a flexible magnetic field configuration to enlarge the ECR zone and to optimize the field gradient at ECR point. Using it, we investigated the effect of ECR zone size, magnetic field configuration, and biased disk on the beam intensity of the highly charged heavy ions with 18 GHz microwaves. In this article, we present the structure of the ion source and first experimental results with 18 GHz microwave in detail.

  12. Development of gas pulsing system for electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Hojo, S; Honma, T; Muramatsu, M; Sakamoto, Y; Sugiura, A

    2008-02-01

    A gas-pulsing system for an electron cyclotron resonance ion source with all permanent magnets (Kei2 source) at NIRS has been developed and tested. The system consists of a small vessel (30 ml) to reserve CH(4) gas and two fast solenoid valves that are installed at both sides of the vessel. They are connected to each other and to the Kei2 source by using a stainless-steel pipe (4 mm inner diameter), where the length of the pipe from the valve to the source is 60 cm and the conductance is 1.2 l/s. From the results of the test, almost 300 e microA for a pulsed (12)C(4+) beam was obtained at a Faraday cup in an extraction-beam channel with a pressure range of 4000 Pa in the vessel. At this time, the valve has an open time of 10 ms and the delay time between the valve open time and the application of microwave power is 100 ms. In experiments, the conversion efficiency for input CH(4) molecules to the quantity of extracted (12)C(4+) ions in one beam pulse was found to be around 3% and the ratio of the total amount of the gas requirement was only 10% compared with the case of continuous gas provided in 3.3 s of repetition in HIMAC.

  13. First Signal on the Cryogenic Fourier-Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cheng; Mathur, Raman; Aizikov, Kostantin; O'Connor, Peter B.

    2009-01-01

    The construction and achievement of the first signal on a cryogenic Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR-MS) are reported here, demonstrating proof-of-concept of this new instrument design. Building the FTICR cell into the cold bore of a superconducting magnet provided advantages over conventional warm bore design. At 4.2 K, the vacuum system cryopumps itself, thus removing the requirement for a large bore to achieve the desired pumping speed for maintaining base pressure. Furthermore, because the bore diameter has been reduced, the amount of magnet wire needed to achieve high field and homogeneity was also reduced, greatly decreasing the cost/Tesla of the magnet. The current instrument implements an actively shielded 14-Tesla magnet of vertical design with an external matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) source. The first signal was obtained by detecting the laser desorbed/ionized (LDI) C60+• ions, with the magnet at 7 Tesla, unshimmed, and the preamplifier mounted outside of the vacuum chamber at room temperature. A subsequent experiment done with the magnet at 14 Tesla and properly shimmed produced a C60 spectrum showing ∼350,000 resolving power at m/z ∼720. Increased magnetic field strength improves many FTMS performance parameters simultaneously, particularly mass resolving power and accuracy. PMID:17931882

  14. Experiments with biased side electrodes in electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Drentje, A. G. Kitagawa, A.; Uchida, T.; Rácz, R.; Biri, S.

    2014-02-15

    The output of highly charged ions from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) consists of ionic losses from a highly confined plasma. Therefore, an increase of the output of the ions of interest always is a compromise between an increase in the confinement and an increase of the losses. One route towards a solution consists of attacking the losses in directions – i.e., radial directions – that do not contribute to the required output. This was demonstrated in an experiment (using the Kei ECRIS at NIRS, Japan) where radial losses were electrostatically reduced by positively biasing one set of six “side” electrodes surrounding the plasma in side-ward directions attached (insulated) to the cylindrical wall of the plasma chamber. Recently new studies were performed in two laboratories using two essentially different ion sources. At the BioNano ECRIS (Toyo University, Japan) various sets of electrodes were used; each of the electrodes could be biased individually. At the Atomki ECRIS (Hungary), one movable, off-axis side electrode was applied in technically two versions. The measurements show indeed a decrease of ionic losses but different effectivities as compared to the biased disk.

  15. An inverted cylindrical sputter magnetron as metal vapor supply for electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weichsel, T.; Hartung, U.; Kopte, T.; Zschornack, G.; Kreller, M.; Silze, A.

    2014-05-01

    An inverted cylindrical sputter magnetron device has been developed. The magnetron is acting as a metal vapor supply for an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source. FEM simulation of magnetic flux density was used to ensure that there is no critical interaction between both magnetic fields of magnetron and ECR ion source. Spatially resolved double Langmuir probe and optical emission spectroscopy measurements show an increase in electron density by one order of magnitude from 1 × 1010 cm-3 to 1 × 1011 cm-3, when the magnetron plasma is exposed to the magnetic mirror field of the ECR ion source. Electron density enhancement is also indicated by magnetron plasma emission photography with a CCD camera. Furthermore, photographs visualize the formation of a localized loss-cone - area, when the magnetron is operated at magnetic mirror field conditions. The inverted cylindrical magnetron supplies a metal atom load rate of R > 1 × 1018 atoms/s for aluminum, which meets the demand for the production of a milliampere Al+ ion beam.

  16. Cyclotron resonance of composite fermions with two and four flux quanta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukushkin, I. V.; Smet, J. H.; von Klitzing, K.; Wegscheider, W.

    2003-12-01

    The application of quantum field theoretical methods to strongly interacting many-body problems has reaped rich rewards. Foremost, it has nurtured the quasi-particle notion. The introduction of suitable fictitious entities permits to cast otherwise notoriously difficult many-body systems in a single-particle form. We can then take the customary physical approach, using concepts and representations which formerly could only be applied to systems with weak interactions, and still capture the essential physics. A most notable recent example occurs in the conduction properties of a two-dimensional electron system, when exposed to a strong perpendicular magnetic field B. They are governed by electron-electron interactions, that bring about the Nobel prize winning fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE) (Perspectives on Quantum Hall effects, Wiley, New York, 1996). Composite fermions (CFs), that do not experience the external magnetic field but a drastically reduced effective magnetic field B ∗, were identified as opposite quasi-particles that simplify enormously the understanding of the FQHE (Phys. Today (2000) 39; Phys. Rev. Lett. 63 (1989) 199). They behave as legitimate particles with well-defined charge, spin and statistics (Phys. Rev. B 47 (1993) 7312; Composite Fermions, World Scientific, Singapore, 1998; Phys. Rev. Lett. 70 (1993) 2944; 75 (1995) 3926; 71 (1993) 3846; 72 (1994) 2065; 77 (1996) 2272). They precess, like electrons, along circular orbits, with a diameter determined by B ∗ rather than B, and with a frequency that is hard to predict, since the effective mass remains enigmatic. Ever since their prediction, the demonstration of enhanced absorption of a microwave field that resonates with the frequency of their circular motion was considered the ultimate experiment to unravel this issue. Here, we report the observation of this cyclotron resonance of CFs with two and four flux quanta and extract their effective mass.

  17. A study on vacuum aspects of electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, S.; Taki, G. S.; Mallick, C.; Bhandari, R. K.

    2008-05-01

    The electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source is special type hot plasma machine where the high temperature electrons co-exist with multiply charge state ions and neutrals. A few years ago 6.4 GHz. ECR ion source (VEC-ECR) was developed indigenously at VECC. This multiply charged ion source is being used continuously to inject heavy ion beams into the cyclotron. Vacuum plays the major role in ECR ion source. The water cooled plasma chamber is made from an oxygen free high conductivity copper billet to meet the suitable surface condition for vacuum purpose. The entire volume of the ion source is pumped by two 900 1/s special type oil diffusion pumps to achieve 5×10-8 Torr. Usually main plasma chamber is pumped by the plasma itself. Moreover a few 1/s additional pumping speed is provided through extraction hole and pumping slot on the extraction electrode. A study has been carried out to understand the role of vacuum on the multiply charged heavy ion production process. Considering the ion production and loss criteria, it is seen that for getting Ar18+ better vacuum is essential for lower frequency operation. So, an ECR ion source can give better charge state current output operating at higher frequency and stronger confining magnetic field under a specific vacuum condition. The low pressure condition is essential to minimize charge exchange loss due to recombination of multiply charged ions with the neutral atoms. A fixed ratio of neutral to electron density must be maintained for optimizing a particular charge state in the steady state condition. As the electron density is proportional to square of the injected microwave frequency (nevpropf2) a particular operating pressure is essential for a specific charge state. From the study, it has been obtained that the production of Ar18+ ions needs a pressure ~ 9.6×10-8 Torr for 6.4 GHz. ECR ion source. It is also obtained that an ECR ion source, works at a particular vacuum level, can give better charge state

  18. Ion Cyclotron Resonant Heating (ICRH) system used on the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U)

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, S.W.; Maxwell, T.M.; Antelman, D.R.; Scofield, D.W.; Brooksby, C.A.; Karsner, P.G.; Molvik, A.W.; Cummins, W.F.; Falabella, S.; Poulsen, P.

    1985-11-11

    Ion Cyclotron Resonant Heating (ICRH) is part of the plasma heating system used on the TMX-U experiment. Radio frequency (RF) energy is injected into the TMX-U plasma at a frequency near the fundamental ion resonance (2 to 5 MHz). The RF fields impart high velocities to the ions in a direction perpendicular to the TMX-U magnetic field. Particle collision then converts this perpendicular heating to uniform plasma heating. This paper describes the various aspects of the ICRH system: antennas, power supplies, computer control, and data acquisition. 4 refs., 10 figs.

  19. Observations of compound sawteeth in ion cyclotron resonant heating plasma using ECE imaging on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Azam; Zhao, Zhenling; Xie, Jinlin; Zhu, Ping; Liu, Wandong; Ti, Ang

    2016-04-01

    The spatial and temporal evolutions of compound sawteeth were directly observed using 2D electron cyclotron emission imaging on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak. The compound sawtooth consists of partial and full collapses. After partial collapse, the hot core survives as only a small amount of heat disperses outwards, whereas in the following full collapse a large amount of heat is released and the hot core dissipates. The presence of two q = 1 surfaces was not observed. Instead, the compound sawtooth occurs mainly at the beginning of an ion cyclotron resonant frequency heating pulse and during the L-H transition phase, which may be related to heat transport suppression caused by a decrease in electron heat diffusivity.

  20. Self-Induced Transparency and Electromagnetic Pulse Compression in a Plasma or an Electron Beam under Cyclotron Resonance Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ginzburg, N. S.; Zotova, I. V.; Sergeev, A. S.

    2010-12-30

    Based on analogy to the well-known process of the self-induced transparency of an optical pulse propagating through a passive two-level medium we describe similar effects for a microwave pulse interacting with a cold plasma or rectilinear electron beam under cyclotron resonance condition. It is shown that with increasing amplitude and duration of an incident pulse the linear cyclotron absorption is replaced by the self-induced transparency when the pulse propagates without damping. In fact, the initial pulse decomposes to one or several solitons with amplitude and duration defined by its velocity. In a certain parameter range, the single soliton formation is accompanied by significant compression of the initial electromagnetic pulse. We suggest using the effect of self-compression for producing multigigawatt picosecond microwave pulses.

  1. Cyclotron resonance phenomena in a non-neutral multispecies ion plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sarid, E.; Anderegg, F.; Driscoll, C.F.

    1995-08-01

    Cyclotron modes of a non-neutral Mg ion plasma were studied in a long cylindrical Penning--Malmberg trap. Several modes with angular dependence exp({ital il}{theta}), {ital l}{ge}1, are observed near the cyclotron frequencies of the various Mg ions. The {ital l}=1 modes for the majority species are downshifted from the cyclotron frequencies, with downshifts as large as four times the diocotron frequency. These large shifts are quantitatively explained by a multispecies cold-plasma theory, including the dependence on the plasma size and composition. These dependencies allow the plasma size and composition to be obtained from the measured mode frequencies. In contrast, the {ital l}=1 downshifts for minority species are generally close to twice the diocotron frequency, and remain unexplained. Cyclotron heating of the plasma ions was also observed with a surprising effect of improving the plasma confinement. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  2. Cyclotron resonant scattering feature simulations. I. Thermally averaged cyclotron scattering cross sections, mean free photon-path tables, and electron momentum sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarm, F.-W.; Schönherr, G.; Falkner, S.; Pottschmidt, K.; Wolff, M. T.; Becker, P. A.; Sokolova-Lapa, E.; Klochkov, D.; Ferrigno, C.; Fürst, F.; Hemphill, P. B.; Marcu-Cheatham, D. M.; Dauser, T.; Wilms, J.

    2017-01-01

    Context. Electron cyclotron resonant scattering features (CRSFs) are observed as absorption-like lines in the spectra of X-ray pulsars. A significant fraction of the computing time for Monte Carlo simulations of these quantum mechanical features is spent on the calculation of the mean free path for each individual photon before scattering, since it involves a complex numerical integration over the scattering cross section and the (thermal) velocity distribution of the scattering electrons. Aims: We aim to numerically calculate interpolation tables which can be used in CRSF simulations to sample the mean free path of the scattering photon and the momentum of the scattering electron. The tables also contain all the information required for sampling the scattering electron's final spin. Methods: The tables were calculated using an adaptive Simpson integration scheme. The energy and angle grids were refined until a prescribed accuracy is reached. The tables are used by our simulation code to produce artificial CRSF spectra. The electron momenta sampled during these simulations were analyzed and justified using theoretically determined boundaries. Results: We present a complete set of tables suited for mean free path calculations of Monte Carlo simulations of the cyclotron scattering process for conditions expected in typical X-ray pulsar accretion columns (0.01 ≤ B/Bcrit ≤ 0.12, where Bcrit = 4.413 × 1013 G, and 3 keV ≤ kBT ≤ 15 keV). The sampling of the tables is chosen such that the results have an estimated relative error of at most 1/15 for all points in the grid. The tables are available online (see link in footnote, page 1). The electronic tables described here are available at http://www.sternwarte.uni-erlangen.de/research/cyclo

  3. Beam extraction and high stability operation of high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Roychowdhury, P. Mishra, L.; Kewlani, H.; Mittal, K. C.; Patil, D. S.

    2014-03-15

    A high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source is designed and developed for the low energy high intensity proton accelerator at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. The plasma discharge in the ion source is stabilized by minimizing the reflected microwave power using four stub auto tuner and magnetic field. The optimization of extraction geometry is performed using PBGUNS code by varying the aperture, shape, accelerating gap, and the potential on the electrodes. While operating the source, it was found that the two layered microwave window (6 mm quartz plate and 2 mm boron nitride plate) was damaged (a fine hole was drilled) by the back-streaming electrons after continuous operation of the source for 3 h at beam current of 20–40 mA. The microwave window was then shifted from the line of sight of the back-streaming electrons and located after the water-cooled H-plane bend. In this configuration the stable operation of the high current ion source for several hours is achieved. The ion beam is extracted from the source by biasing plasma electrode, puller electrode, and ground electrode to +10 to +50 kV, −2 to −4 kV, and 0 kV, respectively. The total ion beam current of 30–40 mA is recorded on Faraday cup at 40 keV of beam energy at 600–1000 W of microwave power, 800–1000 G axial magnetic field and (1.2–3.9) × 10{sup −3} mbar of neutral hydrogen gas pressure in the plasma chamber. The dependence of beam current on extraction voltage, microwave power, and gas pressure is investigated in the range of operation of the ion source.

  4. Beam extraction and high stability operation of high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roychowdhury, P.; Mishra, L.; Kewlani, H.; Patil, D. S.; Mittal, K. C.

    2014-03-01

    A high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source is designed and developed for the low energy high intensity proton accelerator at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. The plasma discharge in the ion source is stabilized by minimizing the reflected microwave power using four stub auto tuner and magnetic field. The optimization of extraction geometry is performed using PBGUNS code by varying the aperture, shape, accelerating gap, and the potential on the electrodes. While operating the source, it was found that the two layered microwave window (6 mm quartz plate and 2 mm boron nitride plate) was damaged (a fine hole was drilled) by the back-streaming electrons after continuous operation of the source for 3 h at beam current of 20-40 mA. The microwave window was then shifted from the line of sight of the back-streaming electrons and located after the water-cooled H-plane bend. In this configuration the stable operation of the high current ion source for several hours is achieved. The ion beam is extracted from the source by biasing plasma electrode, puller electrode, and ground electrode to +10 to +50 kV, -2 to -4 kV, and 0 kV, respectively. The total ion beam current of 30-40 mA is recorded on Faraday cup at 40 keV of beam energy at 600-1000 W of microwave power, 800-1000 G axial magnetic field and (1.2-3.9) × 10-3 mbar of neutral hydrogen gas pressure in the plasma chamber. The dependence of beam current on extraction voltage, microwave power, and gas pressure is investigated in the range of operation of the ion source.

  5. Current density distributions and sputter marks in electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Panitzsch, Lauri; Peleikis, Thies; Boettcher, Stephan; Stalder, Michael; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.

    2013-01-15

    Most electron cyclotron resonance ion sources use hexapolar magnetic fields for the radial confinement of the plasma. The geometry of this magnetic structure is then-induced by charged particles-mapped onto the inner side of the plasma electrode via sputtering and deposition. The resulting structures usually show two different patterns: a sharp triangular one in the central region which in some cases is even sputtered deep into the material (referred to as thin groove or sharp structure), and a blurred but still triangular-like one in the surroundings (referred to as broad halo). Therefore, both patterns seem to have different sources. To investigate their origins we replaced the standard plasma electrode by a custom-built plasma electrode acting as a planar, multi-segment current-detector. For different biased disc voltages, detector positions, and source biases (referred to the detector) we measured the electrical current density distributions in the plane of the plasma electrode. The results show a strong and sharply confined electron population with triangular shape surrounded by less intense and spatially less confined ions. Observed sputter- and deposition marks are related to the analysis of the results. Our measurements suggest that the two different patterns (thin and broad) indeed originate from different particle populations. The thin structures seem to be caused by the hot electron population while the broad marks seem to stem from the medium to highly charged ions. In this paper we present our measurements together with theoretical considerations and substantiate the conclusions drawn above. The validity of these results is also discussed.

  6. Towards high-throughput metabolomics using ultrahigh-field Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jun; Danell, Ryan M.; Patel, Jayanti R.; Gumerov, Dmitry R.; Scarlett, Cameron O.; Speir, J. Paul; Parker, Carol E.; Rusyn, Ivan; Zeisel, Steven; Borchers, Christoph H.

    2008-01-01

    With unmatched mass resolution, mass accuracy, and exceptional detection sensitivity, Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (FTICR-MS) has the potential to be a powerful new technique for high-throughput metabolomic analysis. In this study, we examine the properties of an ultrahigh-field 12-Tesla (12T) FTICR-MS for the identification and absolute quantitation of human plasma metabolites, and for the untargeted metabolic fingerprinting of inbred-strain mouse serum by direct infusion (DI). Using internal mass calibration (mass error ≤1 ppm), we determined the rational elemental compositions (incorporating unlimited C, H, N and O, and a maximum of two S, three P, two Na, and one K per formula) of approximately 250 out of 570 metabolite features detected in a 3-min infusion analysis of aqueous extract of human plasma, and were able to identify more than 100 metabolites. Using isotopically-labeled internal standards, we were able to obtain excellent calibration curves for the absolute quantitation of choline with sub-pmol sensitivity, using 500 times less sample than previous LC/MS analyses. Under optimized serum dilution conditions, chemical compounds spiked into mouse serum as metabolite mimics showed a linear response over a 600-fold concentration range. DI/FTICR-MS analysis of serum from 26 mice from 2 inbred strains, with and without acute trichloroethylene (TCE) treatment, gave a relative standard deviation (RSD) of 4.5%. Finally, we extended this method to the metabolomic fingerprinting of serum samples from 49 mice from 5 inbred strains involved in an acute alcohol toxicity study, using both positive and negative electrospray ionization (ESI). Using these samples, we demonstrated the utility of this method for high-throughput metabolomics, with more than 400 metabolites profiled in only 24 h. Our experiments demonstrate that DI/FTICR-MS is well-suited for high-throughput metabolomic analysis. PMID:19081807

  7. Numerical simulations of gas mixing effect in electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironov, V.; Bogomolov, S.; Bondarchenko, A.; Efremov, A.; Loginov, V.

    2017-01-01

    The particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collisions code nam-ecris is used to simulate the electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) plasma sustained in a mixture of Kr with O2 , N2 , Ar, Ne, and He. The model assumes that ions are electrostatically confined in the ECR zone by a dip in the plasma potential. A gain in the extracted krypton ion currents is seen for the highest charge states; the gain is maximized when oxygen is used as a mixing gas. The special feature of oxygen is that most of the singly charged oxygen ions are produced after the dissociative ionization of oxygen molecules with a large kinetic energy release of around 5 eV per ion. The increased loss rate of energetic lowly charged ions of the mixing element requires a building up of the retarding potential barrier close to the ECR surface to equilibrate electron and ion losses out of the plasma. In the mixed plasmas, the barrier value is large (˜1 V ) compared to pure Kr plasma (˜0.01 V ), with longer confinement times of krypton ions and with much higher ion temperatures. The temperature of the krypton ions is increased because of extra heating by the energetic oxygen ions and a longer time of ion confinement. In calculations, a drop of the highly charged ion currents of lighter elements is observed when adding small fluxes of krypton into the source. This drop is caused by the accumulation of the krypton ions inside plasma, which decreases the electron and ion confinement times.

  8. Measurements of radial profiles of ion cyclotron resonance heating on the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Falabella, S.

    1988-05-11

    A small Radial Energy Analyzer (REA) was used on the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U), at Lawerence Livermore National Laboratory, to investigate the radial profiles of ion temperature, density, and plasma potential during Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH). The probe has been inserted into the central-cell plasma at temperatures of 200 eV and densities of 3 x 10/sup 12/cm/sup /minus 3// without damage to the probe, or major degradation of the plasma. This analyzer has indicated an increase in ion temperature from near 20 eV before ICRH to near 150 eV during ICRH, with about 60 kW of broadcast power. The REA measurements were cross-checked against other diagnostics on TMX-U and found to be consistent. The ion density measurement was compared to the line-density measured by microwave interferometry and found to agree within 10 to 20%. A radial intergral of n/sub i/T/sub i/ as measured by the REA shows good agreement with the diamagnetic loop measurement of plasma energy. The radial density profile is observed to broaden during the RF heating pulses, without inducing additional radial losses in the core plasma. The radial profile of plasma is seen to vary from axially peaked, to nearly flat as the plasma conditions carried over the series of experiments. To relate the increase in ion temperature to power absorbed by the plasma, a power balance as a function of radius was performed. The RF power absorbed is set equal to the sum of the losses during ICRH, minus those without ICRH. This method accounts for more than 70% of the broadcast power using a simple power balance model. The measured radial profile of the RF heating was compared to the calculations of two codes, ANTENA and GARFIELD, to test their effectiveness as predictors of power absorption profiles for TMX-U. 62 refs., 63 figs., 7 tabs.

  9. Studies on x-ray and UV emissions in electron cyclotron resonance x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Baskaran, R.; Selvakumaran, T. S.

    2008-02-15

    A novel electron cyclotron resonance x-ray source is constructed based on the ECR technique. In this paper, the possibility of using the ECR x-ray source for producing UV rays by optimizing the plasma parameters is explored. X-ray and UV emissions from the ECR x-ray source are carried out for argon, nitrogen, and CO{sub 2} plasma. The x-ray spectral and dose measurements are carried with NaI(Tl) based spectrometer and dosimeter, respectively. For UV measurement, a quartz window arrangement is made at the exit port and the UV intensity is measured at 5 cm from the quartz plate using UV meter. The x-ray and UV emissions are carried out for different microwave power levels and gas pressures. The x-ray emission is observed in the pressure range {<=}10{sup -5} Torr, whereas the UV emission is found to be negligible for the gas pressures <10{sup -5} Torr and it starts increasing in the pressure range between 10{sup -5} and 10{sup -3} Torr. At high-pressure range, collision frequency of electron-atom is large which leads to the higher UV flux. At low pressure, the electron-atom collision frequency is low and hence the electrons reach high energy and by hitting the cavity wall produces higher x-ray flux. By choosing proper experimental conditions and plasma gas species, the same source can be used as either an x-ray source or an UV source.

  10. High intensity electron cyclotron resonance proton source for low energy high intensity proton accelerator.

    PubMed

    Roychowdhury, P; Chakravarthy, D P

    2009-12-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) proton source at 50 keV, 50 mA has been designed, developed, and commissioned for the low energy high intensity proton accelerator (LEHIPA). Plasma characterization of this source has been performed. ECR plasma was generated with 400-1100 W of microwave power at 2.45 GHz, with hydrogen as working gas. Microwave was fed in the plasma chamber through quartz window. Plasma density and temperature was studied under various operating conditions, such as microwave power and gas pressure. Langmuir probe was used for plasma characterization using current voltage variation. The typical hydrogen plasma density and electron temperature measured were 7x10(11) cm(-3) and 6 eV, respectively. The total ion beam current of 42 mA was extracted, with three-electrode extraction geometry, at 40 keV of beam energy. The extracted ion current was studied as a function of microwave power and gas pressure. Depending on source pressure and discharge power, more than 30% total gas efficiency was achieved. The optimization of the source is under progress to meet the requirement of long time operation. The source will be used as an injector for continuous wave radio frequency quadrupole, a part of 20 MeV LEHIPA. The required rms normalized emittance of this source is less than 0.2 pi mm mrad. The simulated value of normalized emittance is well within this limit and will be measured shortly. This paper presents the study of plasma parameters, first beam results, and the status of ECR proton source.

  11. Beam extraction and high stability operation of high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source.

    PubMed

    Roychowdhury, P; Mishra, L; Kewlani, H; Patil, D S; Mittal, K C

    2014-03-01

    A high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source is designed and developed for the low energy high intensity proton accelerator at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. The plasma discharge in the ion source is stabilized by minimizing the reflected microwave power using four stub auto tuner and magnetic field. The optimization of extraction geometry is performed using PBGUNS code by varying the aperture, shape, accelerating gap, and the potential on the electrodes. While operating the source, it was found that the two layered microwave window (6 mm quartz plate and 2 mm boron nitride plate) was damaged (a fine hole was drilled) by the back-streaming electrons after continuous operation of the source for 3 h at beam current of 20-40 mA. The microwave window was then shifted from the line of sight of the back-streaming electrons and located after the water-cooled H-plane bend. In this configuration the stable operation of the high current ion source for several hours is achieved. The ion beam is extracted from the source by biasing plasma electrode, puller electrode, and ground electrode to +10 to +50 kV, -2 to -4 kV, and 0 kV, respectively. The total ion beam current of 30-40 mA is recorded on Faraday cup at 40 keV of beam energy at 600-1000 W of microwave power, 800-1000 G axial magnetic field and (1.2-3.9) × 10(-3) mbar of neutral hydrogen gas pressure in the plasma chamber. The dependence of beam current on extraction voltage, microwave power, and gas pressure is investigated in the range of operation of the ion source.

  12. High intensity electron cyclotron resonance proton source for low energy high intensity proton accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Roychowdhury, P.; Chakravarthy, D. P.

    2009-12-15

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) proton source at 50 keV, 50 mA has been designed, developed, and commissioned for the low energy high intensity proton accelerator (LEHIPA). Plasma characterization of this source has been performed. ECR plasma was generated with 400-1100 W of microwave power at 2.45 GHz, with hydrogen as working gas. Microwave was fed in the plasma chamber through quartz window. Plasma density and temperature was studied under various operating conditions, such as microwave power and gas pressure. Langmuir probe was used for plasma characterization using current voltage variation. The typical hydrogen plasma density and electron temperature measured were 7x10{sup 11} cm{sup -3} and 6 eV, respectively. The total ion beam current of 42 mA was extracted, with three-electrode extraction geometry, at 40 keV of beam energy. The extracted ion current was studied as a function of microwave power and gas pressure. Depending on source pressure and discharge power, more than 30% total gas efficiency was achieved. The optimization of the source is under progress to meet the requirement of long time operation. The source will be used as an injector for continuous wave radio frequency quadrupole, a part of 20 MeV LEHIPA. The required rms normalized emittance of this source is less than 0.2 {pi} mm mrad. The simulated value of normalized emittance is well within this limit and will be measured shortly. This paper presents the study of plasma parameters, first beam results, and the status of ECR proton source.

  13. Electron cyclotron resonance deposition, structure, and properties of oxygen incorporated hydrogenated diamondlike amorphous carbon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamopoulos, G.; Godet, C.; Zorba, T.; Paraskevopoulos, K. M.; Ballutaud, D.

    2004-11-01

    Oxygen-incorporated hydrogenated amorphous carbon films were grown by the integrated distributed electron cyclotron resonance plasma technique from a mixture of acetylene and oxygen. It has been found that the increase of the oxygen to acetylene gas ratio results in more oxygen incorporation up to O /(O+C)=0.2 with a decrease in the hydrogen concentration within the film as measured by the nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) and a combination of the elastic recoil detection analysis and Rutherford backscattering techniques. The spectroscopic ellipsometry in the range of 1.5-5eV showed a negligible decrease of the E04 optical band gap for increasing the oxygen content. At the same time, the decrease of the refractive index from 2.2 to 2.0 denotes the decrease of the films density, which was independently estimated by NRA. The visible (488nm) Raman spectroscopy showed that the increase of the oxygen content favors the clustering of the six-fold sp2C rings. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy gives evidence of both C-O and C O bonding configurations. No evidence of O-H bonds formation is found. Simultaneously, the chemisorption of CO2 seems to increased with increasing the oxygen to acetylene gas ratio, which is consistent with the lower film density. The previously trends denote the "softening" of the films, which is consistent with the significant decrease (of about 35%) of the compressive stress allowing the growth of thicker but still transparent films.

  14. Towards analytically useful two-dimensional Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    van Agthoven, Maria A; Delsuc, Marc-André; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Rolando, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry (MS) achieves high resolution and mass accuracy, allowing the identification of the raw chemical formulae of ions in complex samples. Using ion isolation and fragmentation (MS/MS), we can obtain more structural information, but MS/MS is time- and sample-consuming because each ion must be isolated before fragmentation. In 1987, Pfändler et al. proposed an experiment for 2D FT-ICR MS in order to fragment ions without isolating them and to visualize the fragmentations of complex samples in a single 2D mass spectrum, like 2D NMR spectroscopy. Because of limitations of electronics and computers, few studies have been conducted with this technique. The improvement of modern computers and the use of digital electronics for FT-ICR hardware now make it possible to acquire 2D mass spectra over a broad mass range. The original experiments used in-cell collision-induced dissociation, which caused a loss of resolution. Gas-free fragmentation modes such as infrared multiphoton dissociation and electron capture dissociation allow one to measure high-resolution 2D mass spectra. Consequently, there is renewed interest to develop 2D FT-ICR MS into an efficient analytical method. Improvements introduced in 2D NMR spectroscopy can also be transposed to 2D FT-ICR MS. We describe the history of 2D FT-ICR MS, introduce recent improvements, and present analytical applications to map the fragmentation of peptides. Finally, we provide a glossary which defines a few keywords for the 2D FT-ICR MS field.

  15. Development and studies on a compact electron cyclotron resonance plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguli, A.; Tarey, R. D.; Arora, N.; Narayanan, R.

    2016-04-01

    It is well known that electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) produced plasmas are efficient, high-density plasma sources and have many industrial applications. The concept of a portable compact ECR plasma source (CEPS) would thus become important from an application point of view. This paper gives details of such a CEPS that is both portable and easily mountable on a chamber of any size. It uses a fully integrated microwave line operating at 2.45 GHz, up to 800 W, cw. The required magnetic field is produced by a set of suitably designed NdFeB ring magnets; the device has an overall length of  ≈60 cm and weighs  ≈14 kg including the permanent magnets. The CEPS was attached to a small experimental chamber to judge its efficacy for plasma production. In the pressure range of 0.5-10 mTorr and microwave power of  ≈400-500 W the experiments indicate that the CEPS is capable of producing high-density plasma (≈9  ×  1011-1012 cm-3) with bulk electron temperature in the range  ≈2-3 eV. In addition, a warm electron population with density and temperature in the range ≈7  ×  108-109 cm-3 and  ≈45-80 eV, respectively has been detected. This warm population plays an important role at high pressures in maintaining the high-density plasma, when plasma flow from the CEPS into the test chamber is strongly affected.

  16. Current density distributions and sputter marks in electron cyclotron resonance ion sources.

    PubMed

    Panitzsch, Lauri; Peleikis, Thies; Böttcher, Stephan; Stalder, Michael; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F

    2013-01-01

    Most electron cyclotron resonance ion sources use hexapolar magnetic fields for the radial confinement of the plasma. The geometry of this magnetic structure is then--induced by charged particles--mapped onto the inner side of the plasma electrode via sputtering and deposition. The resulting structures usually show two different patterns: a sharp triangular one in the central region which in some cases is even sputtered deep into the material (referred to as thin groove or sharp structure), and a blurred but still triangular-like one in the surroundings (referred to as broad halo). Therefore, both patterns seem to have different sources. To investigate their origins we replaced the standard plasma electrode by a custom-built plasma electrode acting as a planar, multi-segment current-detector. For different biased disc voltages, detector positions, and source biases (referred to the detector) we measured the electrical current density distributions in the plane of the plasma electrode. The results show a strong and sharply confined electron population with triangular shape surrounded by less intense and spatially less confined ions. Observed sputter- and deposition marks are related to the analysis of the results. Our measurements suggest that the two different patterns (thin and broad) indeed originate from different particle populations. The thin structures seem to be caused by the hot electron population while the broad marks seem to stem from the medium to highly charged ions. In this paper we present our measurements together with theoretical considerations and substantiate the conclusions drawn above. The validity of these results is also discussed.

  17. Variations in the cyclotron resonant scattering features during 2011 outburst of 4U 0115+63

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, N.; Mukherjee, D.; Dewangan, G. C.; Bhattacharya, D.; Seetha, S.

    2015-11-01

    We study the variations in the Cyclotron Resonant Scattering Feature (CRSF) during 2011 outburst of the high mass X-ray binary 4U 0115+63 using observations performed with Suzaku, RXTE, Swift and INTEGRAL satellites. The wide-band spectral data with low-energy coverage allowed us to characterize the broad-band continuum and detect the CRSFs. We find that the broad-band continuum is adequately described by a combination of a low temperature (kT ˜ 0.8 keV) blackbody and a power law with high energy cutoff (Ecut ˜ 5.4 keV) without the need for a broad Gaussian at ˜10 keV as used in some earlier studies. Though winds from the companion can affect the emission from the neutron star at low energies (<3 keV), the blackbody component shows a significant presence in our continuum model. We report evidence for the possible presence of two independent sets of CRSFs with fundamentals at ˜11 and ˜15 keV. These two sets of CRSFs could arise from spatially distinct emitting regions. We also find evidence for variations in the line equivalent widths, with the 11 keV CRSF weakening and the 15 keV line strengthening with decreasing luminosity. Finally, we propose that the reason for the earlier observed anticorrelation of line energy with luminosity could be due to modelling of these two independent line sets (˜11 and ˜15 keV) as a single CRSF.

  18. Detailed characterization of polar compounds of residual oil in contaminated soil revealed by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Zhang, Xu; Li, Guanghe

    2011-10-01

    Effects of remediation technologies on polar compounds of crude oil in contaminated soils have not been well understood when compared to hydrocarbons. In this study, ultrahigh resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) was used to characterize the changes in NSO polar compounds of crude oil and residual oil after long-term natural attenuation, biostimulation and subsequent ozonation following biostimulation of contaminated soils. N1 and O1 species, which were abundant in the crude oil, were selectively biodegraded, and species with higher double bond equivalent values and smaller carbon numbers appeared to be more resistant to microbial alteration. O2-O6 species were enriched by biodegradation and contained a large number of compounds with a high degree of unsaturation. Ozone could react with a variety of polar compounds in residual oil after biodegradation and showed high reactivity with polar species containing aromatic or multi-aliphatic rings, including the residual N1 and O1 species, naphthenic acids and unsaturated O3-O6 compounds. Fatty acids and O3-O8 species dominated by saturated alkyl compounds were resistant to ozonation or the primarily incomplete ozonation products. Principal component analysis of identified peaks in the FT-ICR MS spectra provided a comprehensive overview of the complex samples at the molecular level and the results were consistent with the detailed analysis. Taken together, these results showed the high complexity of polar compounds in residual oils after biodegradation or ozonation in contaminated soil and would contribute to a better understanding of bioremediation and ozonation processes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Development of portable mass spectrometer with electron cyclotron resonance ion source for detection of chemical warfare agents in air.

    PubMed

    Urabe, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Kazuya; Kitagawa, Michiko; Sato, Takafumi; Kondo, Tomohide; Enomoto, Shuichi; Kidera, Masanori; Seto, Yasuo

    2014-01-01

    A portable mass spectrometer with an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (miniECRIS-MS) was developed. It was used for in situ monitoring of trace amounts of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) in atmospheric air. Instrumental construction and parameters were optimized to realize a fast response, high sensitivity, and a small body size. Three types of CWAs, i.e., phosgene, mustard gas, and hydrogen cyanide were examined to check if the mass spectrometer was able to detect characteristic elements and atomic groups. From the results, it was found that CWAs were effectively ionized in the miniECRIS-MS, and their specific signals could be discerned over the background signals of air. In phosgene, the signals of the 35Cl+ and 37Cl+ ions were clearly observed with high dose-response relationships in the parts-per-billion level, which could lead to the quantitative on-site analysis of CWAs. A parts-per-million level of mustard gas, which was far lower than its lethal dosage (LCt50), was successfully detected with a high signal-stability of the plasma ion source. It was also found that the chemical forms of CWAs ionized in the plasma, i.e., monoatomic ions, fragment ions, and molecular ions, could be detected, thereby enabling the effective identification of the target CWAs. Despite the disadvantages associated with miniaturization, the overall performance (sensitivity and response time) of the miniECRIS-MS in detecting CWAs exceeded those of sector-type ECRIS-MS, showing its potential for on-site detection in the future. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Resolution and Dynamic Range Limits Calculated by Computer Modeling of Ion Cloud Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladimirov, Gleb; Hendrickson, Christopher L.; Blakney, Greg T.; Marshall, Alan G.; Heeren, Ron M. A.; Nikolaev, Eugene N.

    2012-02-01

    Particle-in-Cell (PIC) ion trajectory calculations provide the most realistic simulation of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) experiments by efficient and accurate calculation of the forces acting on each ion in an ensemble (cloud), including Coulomb interactions (space charge), the electric field of the ICR trap electrodes, image charges on the trap electrodes, the magnetic field, and collisions with neutral gas molecules. It has been shown recently that ion cloud collective behavior is required to generate an FT-ICR signal and that two main phenomena influence mass resolution and dynamic range. The first is formation of an ellipsoidal ion cloud (termed "condensation") at a critical ion number (density), which facilitates signal generation in an FT-ICR cell of arbitrary geometry because the condensed cloud behaves as a quasi-ion. The second phenomenon is peak coalescence. Ion resonances that are closely spaced in m/z coalesce into one resonance if the ion number (density) exceeds a threshold that depends on magnetic field strength, ion cyclotron radius, ion masses and mass difference, and ion initial spatial distribution. These two phenomena decrease dynamic range by rapid cloud dephasing at small ion density and by cloud coalescence at high ion density. Here, we use PIC simulations to quantitate the dependence of coalescence on each critical parameter. Transitions between independent and coalesced motion were observed in a series of the experiments that systematically varied ion number, magnetic field strength, ion radius, ion m/z, ion m/z difference, and ion initial spatial distribution (the present simulations begin from elliptically-shaped ion clouds with constant ion density distribution). Our simulations show that mass resolution is constant at a given magnetic field strength with increasing ion number until a critical value (N) is reached. N dependence on magnetic field strength, cyclotron radius, ion mass, and difference between ion masses

  1. Utilizing artificial neural networks in MATLAB to achieve parts-per-billion mass measurement accuracy with a fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Williams, D Keith; Kovach, Alexander L; Muddiman, David C; Hanck, Kenneth W

    2009-07-01

    Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry has the ability to realize exceptional mass measurement accuracy (MMA); MMA is one of the most significant attributes of mass spectrometric measurements as it affords extraordinary molecular specificity. However, due to space-charge effects, the achievable MMA significantly depends on the total number of ions trapped in the ICR cell for a particular measurement, as well as relative ion abundance of a given species. Artificial neural network calibration in conjunction with automatic gain control (AGC) is utilized in these experiments to formally account for the differences in total ion population in the ICR cell between the external calibration spectra and experimental spectra. In addition, artificial neural network calibration is used to account for both differences in total ion population in the ICR cell as well as relative ion abundance of a given species, which also affords mean MMA values at the parts-per-billion level.

  2. Exact masses and chemical formulas of individual Suwannee River fulvic acids from ultrahigh resolution electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectra.

    PubMed

    Stenson, Alexandra C; Marshall, Alan G; Cooper, William T

    2003-03-15

    Molecular formulas have been assigned for 4626 individual Suwannee River fulvic acids based on accurate mass measurements from ions generated by electrospray ionization and observed by ultrahigh-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS). Formula assignments were possible because of the mass accuracy of FTICR MS at high field (9.4 T) and the regular mass spacing patterns found in fulvic acid mixtures. Sorting the 4626 individually observed ions according to Kendrick mass defect and nominal mass series (z* score) revealed that all could be assigned to 1 of 266 distinct homologous series that differ in oxygen content and double bond equivalence. Tandem mass spectrometry based on infrared multiphoton dissociation identified labile fragments of fulvic acid molecules, whose chemical formulas led to plausible structures consistent with degraded lignin as a source of Suwannee River fulvic acids.

  3. Direct Analysis in Real Time (DART) of an Organothiophosphate at Ultrahigh Resolution by Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry and Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Prokai, Laszlo; Stevens, Stanley M

    2016-01-16

    Direct analysis in real time (DART) is a recently developed ambient ionization technique for mass spectrometry to enable rapid and sensitive analyses with little or no sample preparation. After swab-based field sampling, the organothiophosphate malathion was analyzed using DART-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry (MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Mass resolution was documented to be over 800,000 in full-scan MS mode and over 1,000,000 for an MS/MS product ion produced by collision-induced dissociation of the protonated analyte. Mass measurement accuracy below 1 ppm was obtained for all DART-generated ions that belonged to the test compound in the mass spectra acquired using only external mass calibration. This high mass measurement accuracy, achievable at present only through FTMS, was required for unequivocal identification of the corresponding molecular formulae.

  4. Direct Analysis in Real Time (DART) of an Organothiophosphate at Ultrahigh Resolution by Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry and Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Prokai, Laszlo; Stevens, Stanley M.

    2016-01-01

    Direct analysis in real time (DART) is a recently developed ambient ionization technique for mass spectrometry to enable rapid and sensitive analyses with little or no sample preparation. After swab-based field sampling, the organothiophosphate malathion was analyzed using DART-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry (MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Mass resolution was documented to be over 800,000 in full-scan MS mode and over 1,000,000 for an MS/MS product ion produced by collision-induced dissociation of the protonated analyte. Mass measurement accuracy below 1 ppm was obtained for all DART-generated ions that belonged to the test compound in the mass spectra acquired using only external mass calibration. This high mass measurement accuracy, achievable at present only through FTMS, was required for unequivocal identification of the corresponding molecular formulae. PMID:26784186

  5. Impurity cyclotron resonance in InGaAs/GaAs superlattice and InGaAs/AlAs superlattice grown on GaAs substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momose, H.; Okai, H.; Deguchi, H.; Mori, N.; Takeyama, S.

    2006-05-01

    Various temperature measurements of cyclotron resonance (CR) under pulsed ultra-high magnetic field up to 160 T were carried out in InGaAs/GaAs superlattice (SL) and InGaAs/AlAs SL samples grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaAs substrates. Clear free-electron CR and impurity CR signals were observed in transmission of CO 2 laser with wavelength of 10.6 μm. A binding energy of impurities in these SLs was roughly estimated based on the experiment as result, and we found it was smaller than the previous experimental result of GaAs/AlAs SLs and theoretical calculation with a simple model.

  6. Cyclotron Splittings in the Plasmon Resonances of Electronically Doped Semiconductor Nanocrystals Probed by Magnetic Circular Dichroism Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hartstein, Kimberly H; Schimpf, Alina M; Salvador, Michael; Gamelin, Daniel R

    2017-04-10

    A fundamental understanding of the rich electronic structures of electronically doped semiconductor nanocrystals is vital for assessing the utility of these materials for future applications from solar cells to redox catalysis. Here, we examine the use of magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectroscopy to probe the infrared localized surface plasmon resonances of p-Cu2-xSe, n-ZnO, and tin-doped In2O3 (n-ITO) nanocrystals. We demonstrate that the MCD spectra of these nanocrystals can be analyzed by invoking classical cyclotron motions of their excess charge carriers, with experimental MCD signs conveying the carrier types (n or p) and experimental MCD intensities conveying the cyclotron splitting magnitudes. The experimental cyclotron splittings can then be used to quantify carrier effective masses (m*), with results that agree with bulk in most cases. MCD spectroscopy thus offers a unique measure of m* in free-standing colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals, raising new opportunities to investigate the influence of various other synthetic or environmental parameters on this fundamentally important electronic property.

  7. Production of highly charged heavy ions by 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance at Research Center for Nuclear Physics.

    PubMed

    Yorita, Tetsuhiko; Hatanaka, Kichiji; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro; Kibayashi, Mitsuru; Morinobu, Shunpei; Okamura, Hiroyuki; Tamii, Atsushi

    2010-02-01

    An 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source has been installed as a subject of the azimuthally varying field cyclotron upgrade project (K. Hatanaka et al., in Proceedings of the 17th International Conference on Cyclotrons and Their Applications, Tokyo, Japan, 18-22 October 2004, pp. 115-117), in order to increase beam currents and to extend the variety of ions. The production development of several ions has been performed since 2006 and some of them have already been used for user experiments [T. Yorita et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 02A311 (2008)]. Further optimizations for each component such as the material of plasma electrode, material, and shape of bias probe and mirror field have been continued and more intense ion beams have been obtained for O, N, and Ar. For the purpose of obtaining highly charged Xe with several microamperes, the optimization of position and shape of plasma electrode and bias disk has also been done and highly charged Xe(32+) beam has been obtained successfully.

  8. Compton Gamma Ray Observatory/BATSE observations of energetic electrons scattered by cyclotron resonance with waves from powerful VLF transmitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datlowe, Dayton W.; Imhof, William L.

    1994-01-01

    To obtain a better understanding of the wave-particle mechanisms responsible for the loss of electrons from the radiation belts, energetic electron data from the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the NASA's Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) was studied. Powerful ground-based VLF transmitters resonantly scatter electrons from the inner radiation belt onto trajectories from which they precipitate into the atmosphere as they drift eastward. 563 instances in which the satellite traversed a cloud of energetic electrons which had been scattered into quasi-trapped trajectories were identified. From the longitude distribution, it was concluded that waves from the VLF transmitter NWC at 114 deg E are the origin of 257 of the events, and waves from UMSat 44 deg E related to 45 more. In another 177 cases the electrons had drifted from the longitude of these transmitters to a location in the western hemisphere. The previously reported seasonal variation in the frequency of occurrence of cyclotron resonance interaction is confirmed with the continuous coverage provided by GRO. The frequency of occurrence of the cyclotron resonance interactions is largest before sunrise, which we attribute to the diurnal variations in the transmission VLF waves through the ionosphere. For the first time, unique very narrow sheets of electrons occurring in the aftermath of a large geomagnetic storm are reported.

  9. Microwave electron cyclotron electron resonance (ECR) ion source with a large, uniformly distributed, axially symmetric, ECR plasma volume

    DOEpatents

    Alton, Gerald D.

    1996-01-01

    An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source includes a primary mirror coil disposed coaxially around a vacuum vessel in which a plasma is induced and introducing a solenoidal ECR-producing field throughout the length of the vacuum vessel. Radial plasma confinement is provided by a multi-cusp, multi-polar permanent magnet array disposed azimuthally around the vessel and within the primary mirror coil. Axial confinement is provided either by multi-cusp permanent magnets at the opposite axial ends of the vessel, or by secondary mirror coils disposed on opposite sides of the primary coil.

  10. Emittance study of a 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source for the Rare Isotope Science Project superconducting linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Park, Bum-Sik; Hong, In-Seok; Jang, Ji-Ho; Jin, Hyunchang; Choi, Sukjin; Kim, Yonghwan

    2016-02-01

    A 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source is being developed for use as an injector for the superconducting linear accelerator of the Rare Isotope Science Project. Beam extraction from the ECR ion source has been simulated using the KOBRA3-INP software. The simulation software can calculate charged particle trajectories in three dimensional complex magnetic field structures, which in this case are formed by the arrangement of five superconducting magnets. In this study, the beam emittance is simulated to understand the effects of plasma potential, mass-to-charge ratio, and spatial distribution. The results of these simulations and their comparison to experimental results are presented in this paper.

  11. Improved ion optics for introduction of ions into a 9.4-T Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yu; Leach, Franklin E.; Kaiser, Nathan K.; Dang, Xibei; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Marshall, Alan G.

    2015-01-19

    Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry provides unparalleled mass accuracy and resolving power.[1],[2] With electrospray ionization (ESI), ions are typically transferred into the mass spectrometer through a skimmer, which serves as a conductance-limiting orifice. However, the skimmer allows only a small fraction of incoming ions to enter the mass spectrometer. An ion funnel, originally developed by Smith and coworkers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)[3-5] provides much more efficient ion focusing and transfer. The large entrance aperture of the ion funnel allows almost all ions emanating from a heated capillary to be efficiently captured and transferred, resulting in nearly lossless transmission.

  12. Effect of microwave reflection from the region of electron cyclotron resonance heating in the L-2M stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Batanov, G. M.; Borzosekov, V. D.; Kolik, L. V.; Konchekov, E. M.; Malakhov, D. V.; Petrov, A. E.; Sarksyan, K. A.; Sakharov, A. S. Skvortsova, N. N.; Stepakhin, V. D.; Kharchev, N. K.

    2013-11-15

    In experiments on electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) heating of plasma at the second harmonic of the electron gyrofrequency in the L-2M stellarator, the effect of partial reflection of high-power gyrotron radiation from the ECR heating region located in the center of the plasma column was revealed. The reflection coefficient is found to be on the order of 10{sup −3}. The coefficient of reflection of an extraordinary wave from the second-harmonic ECR region is calculated in the one-dimensional full-wave model. The calculated and measured values of the reflection coefficient are found to coincide in order of magnitude.

  13. Emittance study of a 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source for the Rare Isotope Science Project superconducting linear accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Bum-Sik Hong, In-Seok; Jang, Ji-Ho; Jin, Hyunchang; Choi, Sukjin; Kim, Yonghwan

    2016-02-15

    A 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source is being developed for use as an injector for the superconducting linear accelerator of the Rare Isotope Science Project. Beam extraction from the ECR ion source has been simulated using the KOBRA3-INP software. The simulation software can calculate charged particle trajectories in three dimensional complex magnetic field structures, which in this case are formed by the arrangement of five superconducting magnets. In this study, the beam emittance is simulated to understand the effects of plasma potential, mass-to-charge ratio, and spatial distribution. The results of these simulations and their comparison to experimental results are presented in this paper.

  14. Improved ion optics for introduction of ions into a 9.4-T Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Leach, Franklin E; Kaiser, Nathan K; Dang, Xibei; Ibrahim, Yehia M; Norheim, Randolph V; Anderson, Gordon A; Smith, Richard D; Marshall, Alan G

    2015-01-01

    Enhancements to the ion source and transfer optics of our 9.4 T Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) mass spectrometer have resulted in improved ion transmission efficiency for more sensitive mass measurement of complex mixtures at the MS and MS/MS levels. The tube lens/skimmer has been replaced by a dual ion funnel and the following octopole by a quadrupole for reduced ion cloud radial expansion before transmission into a mass-selective quadrupole. The number of ions that reach the ICR cell is increased by an order of magnitude for the funnel/quadrupole relative to the tube lens/skimmer/octopole.

  15. Effects of electron-cyclotron-resonance-heating-induced internal kink mode on the toroidal rotation in the KSTAR Tokamak.

    PubMed

    Seol, J; Lee, S G; Park, B H; Lee, H H; Terzolo, L; Shaing, K C; You, K I; Yun, G S; Kim, C C; Lee, K D; Ko, W H; Kwak, J G; Kim, W C; Oh, Y K; Kim, J Y; Kim, S S; Ida, K

    2012-11-09

    It is observed that the magnitude of the toroidal rotation speed is reduced by the central electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) regardless of the direction of the toroidal rotation. The magnetohydrodynamics activities generally appear with the rotation change due to ECRH. It is shown that the internal kink mode is induced by the central ECRH and breaks the toroidal symmetry. When the magnetohydrodynamics activities are present, the toroidal plasma viscosity is not negligible. The observed effects of ECRH on the toroidal plasma rotation are explained by the neoclassical toroidal viscosity in this Letter. It is found that the neoclassical toroidal viscosity torque caused by the internal kink mode damps the toroidal rotation.

  16. Polarizing holographic reflector for electron cyclotron resonant heating (ECRH) on the Tandem Mirror Experiment Upgrade (TMX-U)

    SciTech Connect

    Coffield, F.E.; Felker, B.; Gallagher, N.C. Jr.; Pedrotti, L.R.; Stallard, B.W.; Sweeney, D.W.; Wyman, E.W.; Christensen, T.E.

    1983-11-14

    A reflector for electron cyclotron resonant heating on the Tandem Mirror Experiment Upgrade has been designed to convert the high-power TE/sub 01/ output of the circular waveguide system into a linearly polarized gaussian intensity pattern in the plasma. The reflector is a computer-generated holographic optical element with a twist polarizer. Its design, fabrication, and performance are discussed. Results of the low- and high-power tests are presented. Low-power tests were used to determine the beam pattern and the degree of cross-polarization. High-power tests verified that arcing across the grooves of the twist polarizer does not occur.

  17. Lifetime measurement of a collision complex using ion cyclotron double resonance - H2C6N2(+)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anicich, Vincent G.; Sen, Atish D.; Huntress, Wesley T., Jr.; Mcewan, Murray J.

    1991-01-01

    In the ion-molecule reaction between HC3N(+) and HC3N, the lifetime of the collision complex (H2C6N2+)-asterisk was long enough that ion cyclotron double-resonance techniques could be used to probe the distribution of the lifetimes of the collision complex. The mean lifetime of the collision complex at room temperature was measured as 180 microsec with a distribution ranging from 60 to 260 microsec as measured at the half-heights in the distribution. Lifetimes of this magnitude with respect to unimolecular dissociation allow for some stabilization of the collision complex by the slower process of infrared photon emission.

  18. Design and Research of Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating and Current Dive System on HL-2M Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Mei; Rao, Jao; Song, Shaodong; Wang, He; Chen, Gangyu; Kang, Zhihua; Zhang, Feng; Wang, Jieqiong; Ye, Jiruo; Feng, Kun; Lu, Bo; Huang, Bo; Wang, Chao; Wang, Mingwei; Xuan, Weimin; Rao, Lieying; Li, Qing; Mao, Xiaohui; Duan, Xuru; Liu, Yong

    2017-07-01

    A research has been conducted to develop an 8MW electron cyclotron resonance heating and current drive (ECRH/ECCD) system on HL-2M tokamak. The ECRH system compromise eight 1MW gyrotrons, eight evacuated transmission lines and three launchers. The main purpose of the ECRH system was to suppress the neo-classical tearing modes and control the plasma profile. This paper presents an overview of the design and studies performed in this framework. Some primary test results of the critical components have been released in this paper, e.g. polarizers, power monitor and fast steering launchers.

  19. Electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma deposition of a-Si:H and a-SiC:H films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shing, Y. H.; Pool, F. S.

    1991-01-01

    The paper reports electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) deposition of a-Si:H and a-SiC:H thin films using SiH4, CH4, and hydrogen mixed gas plasmas. The ECR deposition conditions were investigated in the pressure region of 0.1 to 100 mtorr, and the film properties were characterized by light and dark conductivity measurements, XRD, Raman spectroscopy, optical transmission, and IR spectroscopy. In addition, the hydrogen dilution effect on ECR-deposited a-SiC:H was investigated.

  20. Emittance study of a 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source for the Rare Isotope Science Project superconducting linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Bum-Sik; Hong, In-Seok; Jang, Ji-Ho; Jin, Hyunchang; Choi, Sukjin; Kim, Yonghwan

    2016-02-01

    A 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source is being developed for use as an injector for the superconducting linear accelerator of the Rare Isotope Science Project. Beam extraction from the ECR ion source has been simulated using the KOBRA3-INP software. The simulation software can calculate charged particle trajectories in three dimensional complex magnetic field structures, which in this case are formed by the arrangement of five superconducting magnets. In this study, the beam emittance is simulated to understand the effects of plasma potential, mass-to-charge ratio, and spatial distribution. The results of these simulations and their comparison to experimental results are presented in this paper.

  1. Measurements and analysis of bremsstrahlung x-ray spectrum obtained in NANOGAN electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Baskaran, R.; Selvakumaran, T. S.; Rodrigues, G.; Kanjilal, D.; Roy, A.

    2008-02-15

    From the ECR plasma, hot electrons leak across the magnetic lines of force and by striking the plasma chamber produce bremsstrahlung x-rays. The wall bremsstrahlung gives information on the confinement status of hot electron. In our studies, experimental measurements are carried out in NANOGAN electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source for the wall bremsstrahlung x-rays and the results are presented. While optimizing a particular charge state in ECR ion source, experimental parameters are adjusted to get a maximum current. The wall bremsstrahlung components are studied in these cases for understanding the hot electron confinement conditions.

  2. The Design of a 100 GHz CARM (Cyclotron Auto-Resonance Maser) Oscillator Experiment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-14

    2364. (Radio Engng. Electron. Phys., 21, 78-73). 5) Ginzburg , N. S., Zarnitsyna, I. G., and Nusinovich, G. S., 1981, Theory of relativistic cyclotron...An efficient Doppler-shifted electron-cyclotron maser oscillator. Int J. Electron., 53, 555-57 1. 7) Bratman, V. L., Ginzburg , N. S., Nusinovich, G...1386-1389. (Sov. Tech. Phys. Lett., 8, 596-597). 12) Botvinnik, I. E., Bratman, V. L., Volkov, A. B., Ginzburg , N. S, Denisov, G. G., Kol’chugin, B

  3. Ultracompact/ultralow power electron cyclotron resonance ion source for multipurpose applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sortais, P.; Lamy, T.; Medard, J.; Angot, J.; Latrasse, L.; Thuillier, T.

    2010-02-15

    In order to drastically reduce the power consumption of a microwave ion source, we have studied some specific discharge cavity geometries in order to reduce the operating point below 1 W of microwave power (at 2.45 GHz). We show that it is possible to drive an electron cyclotron resonance ion source with a transmitter technology similar to those used for cellular phones. By the reduction in the size and of the required microwave power, we have developed a new type of ultralow cost ion sources. This microwave discharge system (called COMIC, for COmpact MIcrowave and Coaxial) can be used as a source of light, plasma or ions. We will show geometries of conductive cavities where it is possible, in a 20 mm diameter chamber, to reduce the ignition of the plasma below 100 mW and define typical operating points around 5 W. Inside a simple vacuum chamber it is easy to place the source and its extraction system anywhere and fully under vacuum. In that case, current densities from 0.1 to 10 mA/cm{sup 2} (Ar, extraction 4 mm, 1 mAe, 20 kV) have been observed. Preliminary measurements and calculations show the possibility, with a two electrodes system, to extract beams within a low emittance. The first application for these ion sources is the ion injection for charge breeding, surface analyzing system and surface treatment. For this purpose, a very small extraction hole is used (typically 3/10 mm for a 3 {mu}A extracted current with 2 W of HF power). Mass spectrum and emittance measurements will be presented. In these conditions, values down to 1 {pi} mm mrad at 15 kV (1{sigma}) are observed, thus very close to the ones currently observed for a surface ionization source. A major interest of this approach is the possibility to connect together several COMIC devices. We will introduce some new on-going developments such as sources for high voltage implantation platforms, fully quartz radioactive ion source at ISOLDE or large plasma generators for plasma immersion, broad or ribbon

  4. Ion cyclotron resonance frequency heating in JET during initial operations with the ITER-like wall

    SciTech Connect

    Jacquet, P. Monakhov, I.; Arnoux, G.; Brix, M.; Graham, M.; Meigs, A.; Sirinelli, A.; Colas, L.; Czarnecka, A.; Lerche, E.; Van-Eester, D.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Brezinsek, S.; Campergue, A.-L.; Klepper, C. C.; Milanesio, D.; and others

    2014-06-15

    In 2011/12, JET started operation with its new ITER-Like Wall (ILW) made of a tungsten (W) divertor and a beryllium (Be) main chamber wall. The impact of the new wall materials on the JET Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency (ICRF) operation is assessed and some important properties of JET plasmas heated with ICRF are highlighted. A ∼ 20% reduction of the antenna coupling resistance is observed with the ILW as compared with the JET carbon (JET-C) wall. Heat-fluxes on the protecting limiters close the antennas, quantified using Infra-Red thermography (maximum 4.5 MW/m{sup 2} in current drive phasing), are within the wall power load handling capabilities. A simple RF sheath rectification model using the antenna near-fields calculated with the TOPICA code can reproduce the heat-flux pattern around the antennas. ICRF heating results in larger tungsten and nickel (Ni) contents in the plasma and in a larger core radiation when compared to Neutral Beam Injection (NBI) heating. The location of the tungsten ICRF specific source could not be identified but some experimental observations indicate that main-chamber W components could be an important impurity source: for example, the divertor W influx deduced from spectroscopy is comparable when using RF or NBI at same power and comparable divertor conditions, and Be evaporation in the main chamber results in a strong reduction of the impurity level. In L-mode plasmas, the ICRF specific high-Z impurity content decreased when operating at higher plasma density and when increasing the hydrogen concentration from 5% to 15%. Despite the higher plasma bulk radiation, ICRF exhibited overall good plasma heating performance; the power is typically deposited at the plasma centre while the radiation is mainly from the outer part of the plasma bulk. Application of ICRF heating in H-mode plasmas has started, and the beneficial effect of ICRF central electron heating to prevent W accumulation in the plasma core has been observed.

  5. Ultracompact/ultralow power electron cyclotron resonance ion source for multipurpose applicationsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sortais, P.; Lamy, T.; Médard, J.; Angot, J.; Latrasse, L.; Thuillier, T.

    2010-02-01

    In order to drastically reduce the power consumption of a microwave ion source, we have studied some specific discharge cavity geometries in order to reduce the operating point below 1 W of microwave power (at 2.45 GHz). We show that it is possible to drive an electron cyclotron resonance ion source with a transmitter technology similar to those used for cellular phones. By the reduction in the size and of the required microwave power, we have developed a new type of ultralow cost ion sources. This microwave discharge system (called COMIC, for COmpact MIcrowave and Coaxial) can be used as a source of light, plasma or ions. We will show geometries of conductive cavities where it is possible, in a 20 mm diameter chamber, to reduce the ignition of the plasma below 100 mW and define typical operating points around 5 W. Inside a simple vacuum chamber it is easy to place the source and its extraction system anywhere and fully under vacuum. In that case, current densities from 0.1 to 10 mA/cm2 (Ar, extraction 4 mm, 1 mAe, 20 kV) have been observed. Preliminary measurements and calculations show the possibility, with a two electrodes system, to extract beams within a low emittance. The first application for these ion sources is the ion injection for charge breeding, surface analyzing system and surface treatment. For this purpose, a very small extraction hole is used (typically 3/10 mm for a 3 μA extracted current with 2 W of HF power). Mass spectrum and emittance measurements will be presented. In these conditions, values down to 1 π mm mrad at 15 kV (1σ) are observed, thus very close to the ones currently observed for a surface ionization source. A major interest of this approach is the possibility to connect together several COMIC devices. We will introduce some new on-going developments such as sources for high voltage implantation platforms, fully quartz radioactive ion source at ISOLDE or large plasma generators for plasma immersion, broad or ribbon beams

  6. Nb{sub 3}Sn superconducting magnets for electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Ferracin, P.; Caspi, S.; Felice, H.; Leitner, D.; Lyneis, C. M.; Prestemon, S.; Sabbi, G. L.; Todd, D. S.

    2010-02-15

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources are an essential component of heavy-ion accelerators. Over the past few decades advances in magnet technology and an improved understanding of the ECR ion source plasma physics have led to remarkable performance improvements of ECR ion sources. Currently third generation high field superconducting ECR ion sources operating at frequencies around 28 GHz are the state of the art ion injectors and several devices are either under commissioning or under design around the world. At the same time, the demand for increased intensities of highly charged heavy ions continues to grow, which makes the development of even higher performance ECR ion sources a necessity. To extend ECR ion sources to frequencies well above 28 GHz, new magnet technology will be needed in order to operate at higher field and force levels. The superconducting magnet program at LBNL has been developing high field superconducting magnets for particle accelerators based on Nb{sub 3}Sn superconducting technology for several years. At the moment, Nb{sub 3}Sn is the only practical conductor capable of operating at the 15 T field level in the relevant configurations. Recent design studies have been focused on the possibility of using Nb{sub 3}Sn in the next generation of ECR ion sources. In the past, LBNL has worked on the VENUS ECR, a 28 GHz source with solenoids and a sextupole made with NbTi operating at fields of 6-7 T. VENUS has now been operating since 2004. We present in this paper the design of a Nb{sub 3}Sn ECR ion source optimized to operate at an rf frequency of 56 GHz with conductor peak fields of 13-15 T. Because of the brittleness and strain sensitivity of Nb{sub 3}Sn, particular care is required in the design of the magnet support structure, which must be capable of providing support to the coils without overstressing the conductor. In this paper, we present the main features of the support structure, featuring an external aluminum shell

  7. Nb3Sn superconducting magnets for electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Ferracin, P.; Caspi, S.; Felice, H.; Leitner, D.; Lyneis, C. M.; Prestemon, S.; Sabbi, G. L.; Todd, D. S.

    2009-05-04

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources are an essential component of heavy-ion accelerators. Over the past few decades advances in magnet technology and an improved understanding of the ECR ion source plasma physics have led to remarkable performance improvements of ECR ion sources. Currently third generation high field superconducting ECR ion sources operating at frequencies around 28 GHz are the state of the art ion injectors and several devices are either under commissioning or under design around the world. At the same time, the demand for increased intensities of highly charged heavy ions continues to grow, which makes the development of even higher performance ECR ion sources a necessity. To extend ECR ion sources to frequencies well above 28 GHz, new magnet technology will be needed in order to operate at higher field and force levels. The superconducting magnet program at LBNL has been developing high field superconducting magnets for particle accelerators based on Nb{sub 3}Sn superconducting technology for several years. At the moment, Nb{sub 3}Sn is the only practical conductor capable of operating at the 15 T field level in the relevant configurations. Recent design studies have been focused on the possibility of using Nb{sub 3}Sn in the next generation of ECR ion sources. In the past, LBNL has worked on the VENUS ECR, a 28 GHz source with solenoids and a sextupole made with NbTi operating at fields of 6-7 T. VENUS has now been operating since 2004. We present in this paper the design of a Nb{sub 3}Sn ECR ion source optimized to operate at an rf frequency of 56 GHz with conductor peak fields of 13-15 T. Because of the brittleness and strain sensitivity of Nb{sub 3}Sn- , particular care is required in the design of the magnet support structure, which must be capable of providing support to the coils without overstressing the conductor. In this paper, we present the main features of the support structure, featuring an external aluminum shell

  8. Nb3Sn superconducting magnets for electron cyclotron resonance ion sources.

    PubMed

    Ferracin, P; Caspi, S; Felice, H; Leitner, D; Lyneis, C M; Prestemon, S; Sabbi, G L; Todd, D S

    2010-02-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources are an essential component of heavy-ion accelerators. Over the past few decades advances in magnet technology and an improved understanding of the ECR ion source plasma physics have led to remarkable performance improvements of ECR ion sources. Currently third generation high field superconducting ECR ion sources operating at frequencies around 28 GHz are the state of the art ion injectors and several devices are either under commissioning or under design around the world. At the same time, the demand for increased intensities of highly charged heavy ions continues to grow, which makes the development of even higher performance ECR ion sources a necessity. To extend ECR ion sources to frequencies well above 28 GHz, new magnet technology will be needed in order to operate at higher field and force levels. The superconducting magnet program at LBNL has been developing high field superconducting magnets for particle accelerators based on Nb(3)Sn superconducting technology for several years. At the moment, Nb(3)Sn is the only practical conductor capable of operating at the 15 T field level in the relevant configurations. Recent design studies have been focused on the possibility of using Nb(3)Sn in the next generation of ECR ion sources. In the past, LBNL has worked on the VENUS ECR, a 28 GHz source with solenoids and a sextupole made with NbTi operating at fields of 6-7 T. VENUS has now been operating since 2004. We present in this paper the design of a Nb(3)Sn ECR ion source optimized to operate at an rf frequency of 56 GHz with conductor peak fields of 13-15 T. Because of the brittleness and strain sensitivity of Nb(3)Sn, particular care is required in the design of the magnet support structure, which must be capable of providing support to the coils without overstressing the conductor. In this paper, we present the main features of the support structure, featuring an external aluminum shell pretensioned with water

  9. The power absorption and the penetration depth of electromagnetic radiation in lead telluride under cyclotron resonance conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özalp, S.; Güngör, A.

    1999-10-01

    Cyclotron resonance absorption in n- and p-type PbTe was observed by Nii and was analysed under classical skin effect conditions. When the values of DC magnetic field corresponding to peaks are plotted against the field directions, a close fit is obtained between the calculated and observed results based on the assumption of a <1 1 1> ellipsoids of revolution model for the both conduction and valance band extrema. From the best fit mt=0.024 m0 and 0.03 m0 for the transverse effective masses and K= ml/ mt=9.8 and 12.2 for the anisotropic mass rations are obtained for the conduction and valance band, respectively. The observed absorption curve shows weak structures at low magnetic field. They are supposed to be due to second harmonics of Azbel'-Kaner cyclotron resonance. However, it turns out to be unnecessary to introduce other bands to explain the experimental results. The applicability of the classical magneto-optical theory is examined by calculating the power absorption coefficient and penetration depth as a function of DC magnetic field.

  10. First operation and effect of a new tandem-type ion source based on electron cyclotron resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Yushi; Kimura, Daiju; Yano, Keisuke; Kumakura, Sho; Imai, Youta; Nishiokada, Takuya; Nagaya, Tomoki; Hagino, Shogo; Otsuka, Takuro; Sato, Fuminobu

    2016-02-01

    A new tandem type source has been constructed on the basis of electron cyclotron resonance plasma for producing synthesized ion beams in Osaka University. Magnetic field in the first stage consists of all permanent magnets, i.e., cylindrically comb shaped one, and that of the second stage consists of a pair of mirror coil, a supplemental coil and the octupole magnets. Both stage plasmas can be individually operated, and produced ions in which is energy controlled by large bore extractor also can be transported from the first to the second stage. We investigate the basic operation and effects of the tandem type electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS). Analysis of ion beams and investigation of plasma parameters are conducted on produced plasmas in dual plasmas operation as well as each single operation. We describe construction and initial experimental results of the new tandem type ion source based on ECRIS with wide operation window for aiming at producing synthesized ion beams as this new source can be a universal source in future.

  11. First operation and effect of a new tandem-type ion source based on electron cyclotron resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Yushi Kimura, Daiju; Yano, Keisuke; Kumakura, Sho; Imai, Youta; Nishiokada, Takuya; Nagaya, Tomoki; Hagino, Shogo; Otsuka, Takuro; Sato, Fuminobu

    2016-02-15

    A new tandem type source has been constructed on the basis of electron cyclotron resonance plasma for producing synthesized ion beams in Osaka University. Magnetic field in the first stage consists of all permanent magnets, i.e., cylindrically comb shaped one, and that of the second stage consists of a pair of mirror coil, a supplemental coil and the octupole magnets. Both stage plasmas can be individually operated, and produced ions in which is energy controlled by large bore extractor also can be transported from the first to the second stage. We investigate the basic operation and effects of the tandem type electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS). Analysis of ion beams and investigation of plasma parameters are conducted on produced plasmas in dual plasmas operation as well as each single operation. We describe construction and initial experimental results of the new tandem type ion source based on ECRIS with wide operation window for aiming at producing synthesized ion beams as this new source can be a universal source in future.

  12. Development of a Fourier-Transform Ion-Cyclotron-Resonance detection for short-lived radionuclides at SHIPTRAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer, R.; Blaum, K.; Block, M.; Herfurth, F.; Ketelaer, J.; Nagy, Sz.; Neidherr, D.; Weber, C.; Shiptrap Collaboration

    2007-11-01

    The Penning-trap mass spectrometer SHIPTRAP at GSI is designed to provide clean and cooled beams of singly charged radioactive ions produced in fusion-evaporation reactions and separated in-flight by the velocity filter SHIP. The scientific goals include mass spectrometry, atomic and nuclear spectroscopy, and chemistry of transuranium species which are not available at ISOL- or fragmentation facilities Penning-trap based mass measurements on radionuclides relies up to now on the destructive time-of-flight ion-cyclotron-resonance method. One of the main limitations to the experimental investigations is the low production rate of most of these exotic nuclides, for which the use of this detection scheme is not applicable. A sensitive and non-destructive method, like the narrow-band Fourier Transform ion-cyclotron-resonance technique, is ideally suited for the identification and characterization of these species. A new cryogenic trap setup for SHIPTRAP exploiting this detection technique as well as some results of first preparatory tests are presented.

  13. Electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma characterization by X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Mascali, David Castro, Giuseppe; Celona, Luigi; Neri, Lorenzo; Gammino, Santo; Biri, Sándor; Rácz, Richárd; Pálinkás, József; Romano, Francesco Paolo; Torrisi, Giuseppe

    2016-02-15

    An experimental campaign aiming to investigate electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma X-ray emission has been recently carried out at the ECRISs—Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources laboratory of Atomki based on a collaboration between the Debrecen and Catania ECR teams. In a first series, the X-ray spectroscopy was performed through silicon drift detectors and high purity germanium detectors, characterizing the volumetric plasma emission. The on-purpose developed collimation system was suitable for direct plasma density evaluation, performed “on-line” during beam extraction and charge state distribution characterization. A campaign for correlating the plasma density and temperature with the output charge states and the beam intensity for different pumping wave frequencies, different magnetic field profiles, and single-gas/gas-mixing configurations was carried out. The results reveal a surprisingly very good agreement between warm-electron density fluctuations, output beam currents, and the calculated electromagnetic modal density of the plasma chamber. A charge-coupled device camera coupled to a small pin-hole allowing X-ray imaging was installed and numerous X-ray photos were taken in order to study the peculiarities of the ECRIS plasma structure.

  14. Performance Evaluation of a Dual Linear Ion Trap-Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer for Proteomics Research

    PubMed Central

    Weisbrod, Chad R.; Hoopmann, Michael R.; Senko, Michael W.; Bruce, James E.

    2014-01-01

    A novel dual cell linear ion trap Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR MS) and its performance characteristics are reported. A linear ion trap-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer has been modified to incorporate a LTQ-Velos mass spectrometer. This modified instrument features efficient ion accumulation and fast MS/MS acquisition capabilities of dual cell linear RF ion trap instruments coupled to the high mass accuracy, resolution, and dynamic range of a FT-ICR for improved proteomic coverage. The ion accumulation efficiency is demonstrated to be an order of magnitude greater than that observed with LTQ-FT Ultra instrumentation. The proteome coverage with yeast was shown to increase over the previous instrument generation by 50% (100% increase on the peptide level). In addition, many lower abundance level yeast proteins were only detected with this modified instrument. This novel configuration also enables beam type CID fragmentation using a dual cell RF ion trap mass spectrometer. This technique involves accelerating ions between traps while applying an elevated DC offset to one of the traps to accelerate ions and induce fragmentation. This instrument design may serve as a useful option for labs currently considering purchasing new instrumentation or upgrading existing instruments. PMID:23590889

  15. A study on interactions between ions and polarized Alfvén waves below cyclotron resonance frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xing-Qiang; Tang, Wei-Zhong; Guo, Wei; Gong, Xue-Yu

    2016-12-01

    Ion heating by different polarized Alfvén waves below the cyclotron resonance frequency is studied using test-particle simulation. The results indicate that the interactions between ions and waves are affected by the polarization and frequency of the waves. If the frequency of waves is higher ( ω > 0.1 Ω p ), the interactions between ions and left-hand (LH) waves are stronger than right-hand (RH) waves due to the sub-cyclotron resonance. However, with the decrease of the frequency, the interactions between different polarized Alfvén waves and particles tend to be the same. The heating effects of LH waves on ions are better than RH waves at higher frequencies. When the frequency of the waves is lower enough ( ω < 0.1 Ω p ), the heating effects of LH waves and RH waves on ions are almost identical. The change of heating efficiency with the polarization and frequency of the waves is consistent with the change of the heating effect.

  16. Electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma characterization by X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascali, David; Castro, Giuseppe; Biri, Sándor; Rácz, Richárd; Pálinkás, József; Caliri, Claudia; Celona, Luigi; Neri, Lorenzo; Romano, Francesco Paolo; Torrisi, Giuseppe; Gammino, Santo

    2016-02-01

    An experimental campaign aiming to investigate electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma X-ray emission has been recently carried out at the ECRISs—Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources laboratory of Atomki based on a collaboration between the Debrecen and Catania ECR teams. In a first series, the X-ray spectroscopy was performed through silicon drift detectors and high purity germanium detectors, characterizing the volumetric plasma emission. The on-purpose developed collimation system was suitable for direct plasma density evaluation, performed "on-line" during beam extraction and charge state distribution characterization. A campaign for correlating the plasma density and temperature with the output charge states and the beam intensity for different pumping wave frequencies, different magnetic field profiles, and single-gas/gas-mixing configurations was carried out. The results reveal a surprisingly very good agreement between warm-electron density fluctuations, output beam currents, and the calculated electromagnetic modal density of the plasma chamber. A charge-coupled device camera coupled to a small pin-hole allowing X-ray imaging was installed and numerous X-ray photos were taken in order to study the peculiarities of the ECRIS plasma structure.

  17. Experimental study on the electric-sweep scanner and ion beam emittance of electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Y.; Sun, L.T.; Ma, L.; Ma, B.H.; Wang, H.; Feng, Y.C.; Li, J.Y.; Zhao, H.W.; Zhang, Z.M.; Zhang, X.Z.; He, W.; Zhao, H.Y.; Guo, X.; Li, X.X.

    2006-03-15

    With a latest developed electric-sweep scanner system, we have done a lot of experiments for studying this scanner system and ion beam emittance of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source. The electric-sweep scanner system was installed on the beam line of Lanzhou electron resonance ion source No. 3 experimental platform of Institute of Modern Physics. The repetition experiments have proven that the system is a relatively dependable and reliable emittance scanner, and its experiment error is about 10%. We have studied the influences of the major parameters of ECR ion source on the extracted ion beam emittance. The typical results of the experiments and the conclusions are presented in this article.

  18. Growth of etiolated barley plants in weak static and 50 Hz electromagnetic fields tuned to calcium ion cyclotron resonance.

    PubMed

    Pazur, Alexander; Rassadina, Valentina; Dandler, Jörg; Zoller, Jutta

    2006-02-03

    The effects of weak magnetic and electromagnetic fields in biology have been intensively studied on animals, microorganisms and humans, but comparably less on plants. Perception mechanisms were attributed originally to ferrimagnetism, but later discoveries required additional explanations like the "radical pair mechanism" and the "Ion cyclotron resonance" (ICR), primarily considered by Liboff. The latter predicts effects by small ions involved in biological processes, that occur in definite frequency- and intensity ranges ("windows") of simultaneously impacting magnetic and electromagnetic fields related by a linear equation, which meanwhile is proven by a number of in vivo and in vitro experiments. Barley seedlings (Hordeum vulgare, L. var. Steffi) were grown in the dark for 5 and 6 days under static magnetic and 50 Hz electromagnetic fields matching the ICR conditions of Ca2+. Control cultures were grown under normal geomagnetic conditions, not matching this ICR. Morphology, pigmentation and long-term development of the adult plants were subsequently investigated. The shoots of plants exposed to Ca2+-ICR exposed grew 15-20% shorter compared to the controls, the plant weight was 10-12% lower, and they had longer coleoptiles that were adhering stronger to the primary leaf tissue. The total pigment contents of protochlorophyllide (PChlide) and carotenoids were significantly decreased. The rate of PChlide regeneration after light irradiation was reduced for the Ca2+-ICR exposed plants, also the Shibata shift was slightly delayed. Even a longer subsequent natural growing phase without any additional fields could only partially eliminate these effects: the plants initially exposed to Ca2+-ICR were still significantly shorter and had a lower chlorophyll (a+b) content compared to the controls. A continued cultivation and observation of the adult plants under natural conditions without any artificial electromagnetic fields showed a retardation of the originally Ca2+-ICR

  19. Growth of etiolated barley plants in weak static and 50 Hz electromagnetic fields tuned to calcium ion cyclotron resonance

    PubMed Central

    Pazur, Alexander; Rassadina, Valentina; Dandler, Jörg; Zoller, Jutta

    2006-01-01

    Background The effects of weak magnetic and electromagnetic fields in biology have been intensively studied on animals, microorganisms and humans, but comparably less on plants. Perception mechanisms were attributed originally to ferrimagnetism, but later discoveries required additional explanations like the "radical pair mechanism" and the "Ion cyclotron resonance" (ICR), primarily considered by Liboff. The latter predicts effects by small ions involved in biological processes, that occur in definite frequency- and intensity ranges ("windows") of simultaneously impacting magnetic and electromagnetic fields related by a linear equation, which meanwhile is proven by a number of in vivo and in vitro experiments. Methods Barley seedlings (Hordeum vulgare, L. var. Steffi) were grown in the dark for 5 and 6 days under static magnetic and 50 Hz electromagnetic fields matching the ICR conditions of Ca2+. Control cultures were grown under normal geomagnetic conditions, not matching this ICR. Morphology, pigmentation and long-term development of the adult plants were subsequently investigated. Results The shoots of plants exposed to Ca2+-ICR exposed grew 15–20% shorter compared to the controls, the plant weight was 10–12% lower, and they had longer coleoptiles that were adhering stronger to the primary leaf tissue. The total pigment contents of protochlorophyllide (PChlide) and carotenoids were significantly decreased. The rate of PChlide regeneration after light irradiation was reduced for the Ca2+-ICR exposed plants, also the Shibata shift was slightly delayed. Even a longer subsequent natural growing phase without any additional fields could only partially eliminate these effects: the plants initially exposed to Ca2+-ICR were still significantly shorter and had a lower chlorophyll (a+b) content compared to the controls. A continued cultivation and observation of the adult plants under natural conditions without any artificial electromagnetic fields showed a

  20. Effects of the Geometry of the Line-forming Region on the Properties of Cyclotron Resonant Scattering Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isenberg, Michael; Lamb, D. Q.; Wang, John C. L.

    1998-10-01

    We use a Monte Carlo radiative transfer code to examine the dependence of the properties of cyclotron resonant scattering lines on the spatial geometry and the optical depth of the line-forming region. We focus most of our attention on a line-forming region that is a plane-parallel slab threaded by a uniform magnetic field oriented at an angle Ψ to the slab normal. We also consider a cylindrical line-forming region with the magnetic field oriented along the cylinder axis. In both cases, the line-forming region contains an electron-proton plasma at the equilibrium Compton temperature, TC, and the field strength is ~1012 gauss. We consider geometries in which the photon source illuminates the line-forming region from below and in which the photon source is embedded in the line-forming region. The former may correspond to a line-forming region in the magnetosphere of a neutron star, illuminated from below, the latter to a line-forming region on or near the surface of a neutron star as in an accretion column. We calculate the cyclotron line spectra produced by line-forming regions having a range of Thomson optical depths from τTo = 8 × 10-4 to τTo = 10. Our findings have implications for accretion-powered pulsars and gamma-ray bursters. In particular, the absence of pronounced shoulders on both sides of the cyclotron first harmonic line in the spectra of accretion-powered pulsars suggests that the line-forming region is either illuminated from below or has a large optical depth (Thomson optical depth τTo >~ 10). However, we (like earlier workers) find that models in which the line-forming region is either a static slab or a static cylinder and has a large optical depth are unable to explain the modest equivalent widths WE of the cyclotron lines in the observed spectra of accretion-powered pulsars. In addition, we find that approximating the injected photon spectrum as a Wien spectrum, an approximation made by almost all workers to date, is not valid because of the

  1. Cyclotron mode frequencies and resonant absorption in multi-species ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Affolter, M.; Anderegg, F.; Dubin, D. H. E.; Driscoll, C. F.

    2015-05-15

    Cyclotron mode frequencies are studied on trapped rigid-rotor multi-species ion plasmas. Collective effects and radial electric fields shift the mode frequencies away from the “bare” cyclotron frequencies 2πF{sub c}{sup (s)}≡(q{sub s}B/M{sub s}c) for each species s. These frequency shifts are measured on the distinct cyclotron modes (m=0,1, and 2) with cos(mθ) azimuthal dependence. We find that for radially uniform plasmas the frequency shifts corroborate a simple theory expression, in which collective effects enter only through the E × B rotation frequency f{sub E} and the species fraction δ{sub s}. The m = 1 center-of-mass mode is in agreement with a simple “clump” model. Additionally, ultra-cold ion plasmas exhibit centrifugal separation by mass, and additional frequency shifts are observed, in agreement with a more general theory.

  2. Transverse acceleration of oxygen ions by electromagnetic ion cyclotron resonance with broad band left-hand polarized waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, T.; Crew, G. B.; Hershkowitz, N.; Jasperse, J. R.; Retterer, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    Central plasma sheet (CPS) ion conics are oxygen-dominated, with peak energies ranging from tens to hundreds of eV centered around pitch-angles between 115 and 130 degrees. Because of the lack of correlation between the CPS conics and the observed currents and/or electron beam-like structures, it is not likely that all of these conics are generated by interactions with electrostatic ion cyclotron waves or lower hybrid waves. Instead, it is suggested that the observed intense broad band electric field fluctuations in the frequency range between 0 and 100 Hz can be responsible for the transverse energization of the ions through cyclotron resonance heating with the left-hand polarized electromagnetic waves. This process is much more efficient for heating the oxygen ions than hydrogen ions, thus providing a plausible explanation of the oxygen dominance in CPS conics. Simple algebraic expressions are given from which estimates of conic energy and pitch angle can be easily calculated. This suggested mechanism can also provide some preheating of the oxygen ions in the boundary plasma sheet (BPS) where discrete aurorae form.

  3. Measurements of plasma bremsstrahlung and plasma energy density produced by electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noland, Jonathan David

    2011-12-01

    The goal of this dissertation was to gain an understanding on the relative importance of microwave power, neutral pressure, and magnetic field configuration on the behavior of the hot electrons within an Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source (ECRIS) plasma. This was carried out through measurement of plasma bremsstrahlung with both NaI(Tl) (hv > 30 keV) and CdTe (2 keV < hv < 70 keV) x-ray detectors, and through measurement of the plasma energy density with a diamagnetic loop placed around the plasma chamber. We also examined the anisotropy in x-ray power by simultaneously measuring the x-ray spectra in two orthogonal directions: radially and axially, using NaI(Tl) detectors. We have seen that for a 6.4 GHz ECRIS, both the x-ray power produced by confined electrons and the plasma energy density behave logarithmically with microwave power. The x-ray flux created by electrons lost from the plasma, however, does not saturate. Thus, the small increase in plasma density that occurred at high microwave powers (> 150 W on a 6.4 GHz ECRIS) was accompanied by a large increase in total x-ray power. We suggest that the saturation of x-ray power and plasma energy density was due to rf-induced pitch-angle scattering of the electrons. X-ray power and plasma energy density were also shown to saturate with neutral pressure, and to increase nearly linearly as the gradient of the magnetic field in the resonance zone was decreased. All of these findings were in agreement with the theoretical models describing ECRIS plasmas. We have discussed the use of a diamagnetic loop as a means of exploring various plasma time scales on a relative basis. Specifically, we focused much of our attention on studying how changing ion source parameters, such as microwave power and neutral pressure, would effect the rise and decay of the integrated diamagnetic signal, which can be related to plasma energy density. We showed that increasing microwave power lowers the e-fold times at both the leading

  4. An ICR study of ion-molecule reactions of PH(n)+ ions. [of importance to interstellar chemistry, using ion cyclotron resonance techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorne, L. R.; Anicich, V. G.; Huntress, W. T.

    1983-01-01

    The reactions of PH(n)+ ions (n = 0-3) were examined with a number of neutrals using ion-cyclotron-resonance techniques. The reactions examined have significance for the distribution of phosphorus in interstellar molecules. The results indicate that interstellar molecules containing the P-O bond are likely to be more abundant than those containing the P-H bond.

  5. Cyclotron resonant scattering in gamma-ray bursts - Further analysis of GB880205

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, P. E.; Lamb, D. Q.; Wang, J. C. L.; Loredo, T. J.; Fenimore, E. E.; Murakami, T.; Yoshida, A.

    1992-01-01

    We have extended our previous work by exploring several plane-parallel slab geometries to model the formation of cyclotron line features. We calculated the Compton temperature T(C) as a function of column density Ne for each of the new geometries. We then fit the resulting spectra to GB880205 exactly as described in Wang et al. (1989). The results show that the addition of column depth below the photon source plane leads to a modest improvement in chi-squared which, although not statistically significant, is pleasing because these geometries are more physically realistic.

  6. Ohm's law at strong coupling: S duality and the cyclotron resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Hartnoll, Sean A.; Herzog, Christopher P.

    2007-11-15

    We calculate the electrical and thermal conductivities and the thermoelectric coefficient of a class of strongly interacting 2+1-dimensional conformal field theories with anti-de Sitter space duals. We obtain these transport coefficients as a function of charge density, background magnetic field, temperature, and frequency. We show that the thermal conductivity and thermoelectric coefficient are determined by the electrical conductivity alone. At small frequency, in the hydrodynamic limit, we are able to provide a number of analytic formulas for the electrical conductivity. A dominant feature of the conductivity is the presence of a cyclotron pole. We show how bulk electromagnetic duality acts on the transport coefficients.

  7. Cyclotron resonant scattering in gamma-ray bursts - Further analysis of GB880205

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, P. E.; Lamb, D. Q.; Wang, J. C. L.; Loredo, T. J.; Fenimore, E. E.; Murakami, T.; Yoshida, A.

    1992-01-01

    We have extended our previous work by exploring several plane-parallel slab geometries to model the formation of cyclotron line features. We calculated the Compton temperature T(C) as a function of column density Ne for each of the new geometries. We then fit the resulting spectra to GB880205 exactly as described in Wang et al. (1989). The results show that the addition of column depth below the photon source plane leads to a modest improvement in chi-squared which, although not statistically significant, is pleasing because these geometries are more physically realistic.

  8. Plasma diagnostics of low pressure high power impulse magnetron sputtering assisted by electron cyclotron wave resonance plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Stranak, Vitezslav; Herrendorf, Ann-Pierra; Drache, Steffen; Bogdanowicz, Robert; Hippler, Rainer; Cada, Martin; Hubicka, Zdenek; Tichy, Milan

    2012-11-01

    This paper reports on an investigation of the hybrid pulsed sputtering source based on the combination of electron cyclotron wave resonance (ECWR) inductively coupled plasma and high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) of a Ti target. The plasma source, operated in an Ar atmosphere at a very low pressure of 0.03 Pa, provides plasma where the major fraction of sputtered particles is ionized. It was found that ECWR assistance increases the electron temperature during the HiPIMS pulse. The discharge current and electron density can achieve their stable maximum 10 {mu}s after the onset of the HiPIMS pulse. Further, a high concentration of double charged Ti{sup ++} with energies of up to 160 eV was detected. All of these facts were verified experimentally by time-resolved emission spectroscopy, retarding field analyzer measurement, Langmuir probe, and energy-resolved mass spectrometry.

  9. The effects of gas mixing and plasma electrode position on the emittance of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suominen, P.; Tarvainen, O.; Koivisto, H.

    2004-05-01

    Gas mixing is a commonly used method to improve the intensities and the charge state distribution of ion beams extracted from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS). At the same time, the emittance of the ion beam should be as small as possible. In this work we have studied the effect of the gas mixing method on the ion beam quality by measuring the emittance and brightness of different ion beams using helium, oxygen, and argon with several gas feeding ratios. All measurements were performed with the JYFL 6.4 GHz ECRIS. At the second stage of the experiments the emittance and the ion beam brightness were studied as a function of the plasma electrode position. The extraction system constructed for this experiment can be moved online.

  10. Improved ion optics for introduction of ions into a 9.4-T Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Yu; Leach, Franklin E.; Kaiser, Nathan K.; ...

    2015-01-19

    Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry provides unparalleled mass accuracy and resolving power.[1],[2] With electrospray ionization (ESI), ions are typically transferred into the mass spectrometer through a skimmer, which serves as a conductance-limiting orifice. However, the skimmer allows only a small fraction of incoming ions to enter the mass spectrometer. An ion funnel, originally developed by Smith and coworkers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)[3-5] provides much more efficient ion focusing and transfer. The large entrance aperture of the ion funnel allows almost all ions emanating from a heated capillary to be efficiently captured and transferred, resulting inmore » nearly lossless transmission.« less

  11. New tandem type ion source based on electron cyclotron resonance for universal source of synthesized ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Yushi Kurisu, Yosuke; Nozaki, Dai; Yano, Keisuke; Kimura, Daiju; Kumakura, Sho; Imai, Youta; Nishiokada, Takuya; Sato, Fuminobu; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2014-02-15

    A new tandem type source has been constructed on the basis of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma for producing synthesized ion beams. We investigate feasibility and hope to realize the device which has wide range operation window in a single device to produce many kinds of ion beams based on ECR ion source (ECRIS). It is considered that ECR plasmas are necessary to be available to individual operations with different plasma parameters. Both of analysis of ion beams and investigation of plasma parameters are conducted on produced plasmas. We describe construction of the new tandem type ion source based on ECRIS with wide operation window for aiming at producing synthesized ion beams as this new source can be a universal source.

  12. New tandem type ion source based on electron cyclotron resonance for universal source of synthesized ion beams.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yushi; Kurisu, Yosuke; Nozaki, Dai; Yano, Keisuke; Kimura, Daiju; Kumakura, Sho; Imai, Youta; Nishiokada, Takuya; Sato, Fuminobu; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2014-02-01

    A new tandem type source has been constructed on the basis of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma for producing synthesized ion beams. We investigate feasibility and hope to realize the device which has wide range operation window in a single device to produce many kinds of ion beams based on ECR ion source (ECRIS). It is considered that ECR plasmas are necessary to be available to individual operations with different plasma parameters. Both of analysis of ion beams and investigation of plasma parameters are conducted on produced plasmas. We describe construction of the new tandem type ion source based on ECRIS with wide operation window for aiming at producing synthesized ion beams as this new source can be a universal source.

  13. Observation of turbulence suppression after electron-cyclotron-resonance-heating switch-off on the HL-2A tokamak.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Shi, Z B; Dong, Y B; Sun, H J; Sun, A P; Li, Y G; Xia, Z W; Li, W; Ding, X T; Xiao, W W; Zhou, Y; Zhou, J; Rao, J; Liu, Z T; Yang, Q W; Duan, X R

    2011-07-01

    The formation of a transient internal transport barrier (ITB) is observed after the electron-cyclotron-resonance-heating (ECRH) switch-off in the HL-2A plasmas, characterized by transient increase of central electron temperature. The newly developed correlation reflectometer provided direct measurements showing reduction of turbulence in the region of steepened gradients for the period of ITB formation triggered by the ECRH switch-off. Furthermore, the reduction of core turbulence is correlated in time with the appearance of a low-frequency mode with a spectrally broad poloidal structure that peaks near zero frequency in the core region. These structures have low poloidal mode number, high poloidal correlation, and short radial correlation and are strongly coupled with high-frequency ambient turbulence. Observation indicates that these structures play important roles in the reduction of the core turbulence and in improvements of the core transport after the off-axis ECRH is turned off.

  14. Evolution of the photoresponse time of the GaAs/AlGaAs cyclotron resonance quantum Hall effect detector

    SciTech Connect

    Antonov, A. V.; Gavrilenko, V. I.; Kuritsyn, D. I.; Morozov, S. V.; Spirin, K. E. Kawaguchi, Y.; Komiyama, S.

    2009-02-15

    The photoresponse time of the cyclotron resonance detector to terahertz radiation under integer quantum Hall effect conditions in the GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure is shown to have a deep minimum at the Hall plateau center and two sharp maxima at the plateau edges. The minimum at the plateau center is associated with the fundamental property of vanishing of the random impurity potential screening under quantum Hall effect conditions. The decrease in the response time outside the plateau is related to the equilibrium population of the Landau level above (under) the Fermi level by electrons (holes), respectively, which increases the probability of photoexcited carrier recombination. It is shown that, under conditions of background radiation (300 K), relaxation times decrease by two orders of magnitude while retaining the characteristic magnetic field dependence.

  15. The compact electron cyclotron resonance ion source KeiGM for the carbon ion therapy facility at Gunma Universitya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramatsu, M.; Kitagawa, A.; Drentje, A. G.; Hojo, S.; Ueda, T.; Miyazaki, H.; Yusa, K.; Tashiro, M.; Torikai, K.; Sakama, M.; Kanai, T.; Yamada, S.

    2010-02-01

    A high-energy carbon-ion radiotherapy facility is under construction at Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Centre (GHMC). Its design was based on a study of the heavy ion radiotherapy at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) in order to reduce the size and construction cost of the facility. A compact electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) for Gunma University, called KeiGM, was installed in 2008. It is almost a copy of the prototype ECRIS Kei2 which was developed by NIRS; meanwhile this prototype produced over 1 e mA of C4+ using C2H2 gas (660 W and 40 kV). The beam intensity of C4+ was 600 e μA with CH4 gas (250 W and 30 kV). The beam intensity satisfies the required value of 300 e μA.

  16. Superconducting magnet performance for 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source developed at the Korea Basic Science Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jin Yong; Choi, Seyong; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Ok, Jung-Woo; Shin, Chang Seouk; Won, Mi-Sook; Kim, Byoung Chul; Ahn, Jung Keun

    2014-02-15

    A superconducting magnet for use in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source was developed at the Korea Basic Science Institute. The superconducting magnet is comprised of three solenoids and a hexapole magnet. According to the design value, the solenoid magnets can generate a mirror field, resulting in axial magnetic fields of 3.6 T at the injection area and 2.2 T at the extraction region. A radial field strength of 2.1 T can also be achieved by hexapole magnet on the plasma chamber wall. NbTi superconducting wire was used in the winding process following appropriate techniques for magnet structure. The final assembly of the each magnet involved it being vertically inserted into the cryostat to cool down the temperature using liquid helium. The performance of each solenoid and hexapole magnet was separately verified experimentally. The construction of the superconducting coil, the entire magnet assembly for performance testing and experimental results are reported herein.

  17. Observation of turbulence suppression after electron-cyclotron-resonance-heating switch-off on the HL-2A tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Shi, Z. B.; Dong, Y. B.; Sun, H. J.; Sun, A. P.; Li, Y. G.; Xia, Z. W.; Li, W.; Ding, X. T.; Xiao, W. W.; Zhou, Y.; Zhou, J.; Rao, J.; Liu, Z. T.; Yang, Q. W.; Duan, X. R.

    2011-07-15

    The formation of a transient internal transport barrier (ITB) is observed after the electron-cyclotron-resonance-heating (ECRH) switch-off in the HL-2A plasmas, characterized by transient increase of central electron temperature. The newly developed correlation reflectometer provided direct measurements showing reduction of turbulence in the region of steepened gradients for the period of ITB formation triggered by the ECRH switch-off. Furthermore, the reduction of core turbulence is correlated in time with the appearance of a low-frequency mode with a spectrally broad poloidal structure that peaks near zero frequency in the core region. These structures have low poloidal mode number, high poloidal correlation, and short radial correlation and are strongly coupled with high-frequency ambient turbulence. Observation indicates that these structures play important roles in the reduction of the core turbulence and in improvements of the core transport after the off-axis ECRH is turned off.

  18. The coordinate transformation method for design of polarizers on HL-2A electron cyclotron resonance heating and current drive systems

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, D. H.; Huang, M.; Zhou, J.; Rao, J.; Zhuang, G.

    2013-10-15

    Polarizers are widely used to change the polarization of millimeter waves on the electron cyclotron resonance heating and current drive (ECRH and CD) systems. A new method based on the coordinate transformation and the Fourier expansion (the so-called C-method) has been developed for design of polarizers on the HL-2A ECRH and CD systems. This method transforms the grating problem to an eigenvalue problem, making it easy and clear to understand and solve. The comparison between the C-method, the integral method, and the low power test results is presented. It indicates that the C-method can be considered as a rigorous numerical method for the design of polarizers. Finally, two polarizers were designed based on the C-method which can be used together to achieve almost arbitrary polarization.

  19. Device Quality SiO2 Deposited by Distributed Electron Cyclotron Resonance Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition without Substrate Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Nan; Hugon, Marie-Christine; Agius, Bernard; Kretz, Thierry; Plais, François; Pribat, Didier; Carriere, Thierry; Puech, Michel

    1992-10-01

    The deposition of high electrical quality SiO2 films on Si wafers has been achieved without substrate heating, (T<˜ 100°C), using distributed electron cyclotron resonance (DECR) microwave plasmas. We have studied the effects of the reactant gas mixture composition (O2/SiH4) on the dielectric behavior of DECR SiO2. The electrical performances of both Si-SiO2 interfaces and SiO2 films in metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structures were assessed by several characterization methods including critical field (Ec) evaluation, fixed charge densities (Qox) and interface traps densities (Dit) determinations. We report typical values of Ec around 6 MV\\cdotcm-1, and Qox and Dit densities around 2× 1010 cm-2 and 3× 1010 cm-2\\cdoteV-1 respectively. Thin film SOI-MOSFETs have also been fabricated to prove the DECR oxide quality.

  20. Studies of the beam extraction system of the GTS-LHC electron cyclotron resonance ion source at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Toivanen, V. Küchler, D.

    2016-02-15

    The 14.5 GHz GTS-LHC Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source (ECRIS) provides multiply charged heavy ion beams for the CERN experimental program. The GTS-LHC beam formation has been studied extensively with lead, argon, and xenon beams with varied beam extraction conditions using the ion optical code IBSimu. The simulation model predicts self-consistently the formation of triangular and hollow beam structures which are often associated with ECRIS ion beams, as well as beam loss patterns which match the observed beam induced markings in the extraction region. These studies provide a better understanding of the properties of the extracted beams and a way to diagnose the extraction system performance and limitations, which is otherwise challenging due to the lack of direct diagnostics in this region and the limited availability of the ion source for development work.

  1. Studies of the beam extraction system of the GTS-LHC electron cyclotron resonance ion source at CERN.

    PubMed

    Toivanen, V; Küchler, D

    2016-02-01

    The 14.5 GHz GTS-LHC Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source (ECRIS) provides multiply charged heavy ion beams for the CERN experimental program. The GTS-LHC beam formation has been studied extensively with lead, argon, and xenon beams with varied beam extraction conditions using the ion optical code IBSimu. The simulation model predicts self-consistently the formation of triangular and hollow beam structures which are often associated with ECRIS ion beams, as well as beam loss patterns which match the observed beam induced markings in the extraction region. These studies provide a better understanding of the properties of the extracted beams and a way to diagnose the extraction system performance and limitations, which is otherwise challenging due to the lack of direct diagnostics in this region and the limited availability of the ion source for development work.

  2. Improvement of efficiency and temperature control of induction heating vapor source on electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, T; Kiriyama, R; Muramatsu, M; Kitagawa, A; Uchida, T; Kurisu, Y; Nozaki, D; Yano, K; Yoshida, Y; Sato, F; Kato, Y; Iida, T

    2012-02-01

    An electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) is used to generate multicharged ions for many kinds of the fields. We have developed an evaporator by using induction heating method that can generate pure vapor from solid state materials in ECRIS. We develop the new matching and protecting circuit by which we can precisely control the temperature of the induction heating evaporator. We can control the temperature within ±15 °C around 1400 °C under the operation pressure about 10(-4) Pa. We are able to use this evaporator for experiment of synthesizing process to need pure vapor under enough low pressure, e.g., experiment of generation of endohedral Fe-fullerene at the ECRIS.

  3. Improvement of efficiency and temperature control of induction heating vapor source on electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Takenaka, T.; Kiriyama, R.; Kurisu, Y.; Nozaki, D.; Yano, K.; Sato, F.; Kato, Y.; Iida, T.; Muramatsu, M.; Kitagawa, A.; Uchida, T.; Yoshida, Y.

    2012-02-15

    An electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) is used to generate multicharged ions for many kinds of the fields. We have developed an evaporator by using induction heating method that can generate pure vapor from solid state materials in ECRIS. We develop the new matching and protecting circuit by which we can precisely control the temperature of the induction heating evaporator. We can control the temperature within {+-}15 deg. C around 1400 deg. C under the operation pressure about 10{sup -4} Pa. We are able to use this evaporator for experiment of synthesizing process to need pure vapor under enough low pressure, e.g., experiment of generation of endohedral Fe-fullerene at the ECRIS.

  4. A multi-sample changer coupled to an electron cyclotron resonance source for accelerator mass spectrometry experiments.

    PubMed

    Vondrasek, R; Palchan, T; Pardo, R; Peters, C; Power, M; Scott, R

    2014-02-01

    A new multi-sample changer has been constructed allowing rapid changes between samples. The sample changer has 20 positions and is capable of moving between samples in 1 min. The sample changer is part of a project using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) at the Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS) facility to measure neutron capture rates on a wide range of actinides in a reactor environment. This project will require the measurement of a large number of samples previously irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory. The AMS technique at ATLAS is based on production of highly charged positive ions in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source followed by acceleration in the ATLAS linac. The sample material is introduced into the plasma via laser ablation chosen to limit the dependency of material feed rates upon the source material composition as well as minimize cross-talk between samples.

  5. Detection of electron energy distribution function anisotropy in a magnetized electron cyclotron resonance plasma by using a directional Langmuir probe

    SciTech Connect

    Shikama, T. Hasuo, M.; Kitaoka, H.

    2014-07-15

    Anisotropy in the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) in an electron cyclotron resonance plasma with magnetized electrons and weakly magnetized ions is experimentally investigated using a directional Langmuir probe. Under an assumption of independent EEDFs in the directions parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field, the directional variation of the EEDF is evaluated. In the measured EEDFs, a significantly large population density of electrons with energies larger than 30 eV is found in one of the cross-field directions depending on the magnetic field direction. With the aid of an electron trajectory calculation, it is suggested that the observed anisotropic electrons originate from the EEDF anisotropy and the cross-field electron drift.

  6. Superconducting magnet performance for 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source developed at the Korea Basic Science Institute.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Yong; Choi, Seyong; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Ok, Jung-Woo; Kim, Byoung Chul; Shin, Chang Seouk; Ahn, Jung Keun; Won, Mi-Sook

    2014-02-01

    A superconducting magnet for use in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source was developed at the Korea Basic Science Institute. The superconducting magnet is comprised of three solenoids and a hexapole magnet. According to the design value, the solenoid magnets can generate a mirror field, resulting in axial magnetic fields of 3.6 T at the injection area and 2.2 T at the extraction region. A radial field strength of 2.1 T can also be achieved by hexapole magnet on the plasma chamber wall. NbTi superconducting wire was used in the winding process following appropriate techniques for magnet structure. The final assembly of the each magnet involved it being vertically inserted into the cryostat to cool down the temperature using liquid helium. The performance of each solenoid and hexapole magnet was separately verified experimentally. The construction of the superconducting coil, the entire magnet assembly for performance testing and experimental results are reported herein.

  7. The impact of UVCS/SOHO observations on models of ion-cyclotron resonance heating of the solar corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cranmer, S. R.; Field, G. B.; Noci, G.; Kohl, J. L.

    1997-01-01

    The compatibility between theoretical models and observations of the temperatures and anisotropic distributions of hydrogen and minor ions in the solar corona is examined. The ultraviolet coronagraph spectrometer (UVCS) instrument onboard SOHO measured hydrogen kinetic temperatures along lines of sight in coronal holes in excess of 3 x 10(exp 6) K and O(+5) ion kinetic temperatures of at least 2 x 10(exp 8) K. Various features of plasma heating by the dissipation of high-frequency ion-cyclotron resonance Alfven waves, which may be the most natural physical mechanism to produce certain plasma conditions, are examined. Preliminary quantitative models of the ion motion in polar coronal holes are presented, and it is shown that such models can be used to predict the spectrum of waves required to reproduce the observations. Indeed, the more ionic species that are observed spectroscopically, the greater the extent in frequency space the wave spectrum can be inferred.

  8. Studies of emittance of multiply charged ions extracted from high temperature superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source, PKDELIS

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, G.; Lakshmy, P. S.; Kumar, Sarvesh; Mandal, A.; Kanjilal, D.; Roy, A.; Baskaran, R.

    2010-02-15

    For the high current injector project at Inter University Accelerator Centre, a high temperature superconducting electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source, PKDELIS, would provide the high charge state ions. The emittance of the ECR ion source is an important parameter to design further beam transport system and to match the acceptances of the downstream radio frequency quadrupole and drift tube linac accelerators of the high current injector. The emittance of the analyzed beam of PKDELIS ECR source has been measured utilizing the three beam size technique. A slit and two beam profile monitors positioned at fixed distances from each other were used to measure the beam size. The digitized beam profiles have been analyzed to determine the emittance of various multiply charged ions. The variation of emittance with gas mixing, ultrahigh frequency power, and extraction energy are discussed in this presentation.

  9. Note: Studies on x-ray production in electron cyclotron resonance x-ray source based on ridged cylindrical cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Selvakumaran, T. S.; Baskaran, R.

    2012-02-15

    A ridged cylindrical cavity has been designed using MICROWAVE STUDIO programme and it is used in the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) x-ray source. The experimental parameters of the source are optimized for maximizing the x-ray output, and an x-ray dose rate of {approx}1000 {mu}Sv/h was observed at 20 cm from the port, for 500 W of microwave power without using any target. With the molybdenum target located at optimum position of the ridged cavity, the dose rate is found to be increased only by 10%. In order to understand the experimental observation, the electric field pattern of the cavity with the target placed at various radial distances is studied. In this note, the experimental and theoretical studies on ECR x-ray source using the ridged cylindrical cavity are presented.

  10. The impact of UVCS/SOHO observations on models of ion-cyclotron resonance heating of the solar corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cranmer, S. R.; Field, G. B.; Noci, G.; Kohl, J. L.

    1997-01-01

    The compatibility between theoretical models and observations of the temperatures and anisotropic distributions of hydrogen and minor ions in the solar corona is examined. The ultraviolet coronagraph spectrometer (UVCS) instrument onboard SOHO measured hydrogen kinetic temperatures along lines of sight in coronal holes in excess of 3 x 10(exp 6) K and O(+5) ion kinetic temperatures of at least 2 x 10(exp 8) K. Various features of plasma heating by the dissipation of high-frequency ion-cyclotron resonance Alfven waves, which may be the most natural physical mechanism to produce certain plasma conditions, are examined. Preliminary quantitative models of the ion motion in polar coronal holes are presented, and it is shown that such models can be used to predict the spectrum of waves required to reproduce the observations. Indeed, the more ionic species that are observed spectroscopically, the greater the extent in frequency space the wave spectrum can be inferred.

  11. Fishbones in Joint European Torus plasmas with high ion-cyclotron-resonance-heated fast ions energy content

    SciTech Connect

    Nabais, F.; Borba, D.; Mantsinen, M.; Nave, M.F.F.; Sharapov, S.E.; Joint

    2005-10-01

    In Joint European Torus (JET) [P. J. Lomas, Plasma Phys. Controled Fusion 31, 1481 (1989)], discharges with ion cyclotron resonance heating only, low-density plasmas and high fast ions energy contents provided a scenario where fishbones behavior has been observed to be related with sawtooth activity: Crashes of monster sawteeth abruptly changed the type of observed fishbones from low-frequency fishbones [B. Coppi and F. Porcelli, Phys. Rev. Lett. 57, 2272 (1986)] to high-frequency fishbones [L. Chen, R. White, and M. Rosenbluth, Phys. Rev. Lett. 52, 1122 (1984)]. During periods between crashes, the type of observed fishbones gradually changed in the opposite way. Two new fishbones regimes have been observed in intermediate stages: Fishbones bursts covering both high and low frequencies and low amplitude bursts of both types occurring simultaneously. Both sawtooth and fishbones behavior have been explained using a variational formalism.

  12. Possible Detection of an Emission Cyclotron Resonance Scattering Feature from the Accretion-Powered Pulsar 4U 1626-67

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwakiri, W. B.; Terada, Y.; Tashiro, M. S.; Mihara, T.; Angelini, L.; Yamada, S.; Enoto, T.; Makishima, K.; Nakajima, M.; Yoshida, A.

    2012-01-01

    We present analysis of 4U 1626-67, a 7.7 s pulsar in a low-mass X-ray binary system, observed with the hard X-ray detector of the Japanese X-ray satellite Suzaku in 2006 March for a net exposure of 88 ks. The source was detected at an average 10-60 keY flux of approx 4 x 10-10 erg / sq cm/ s. The phase-averaged spectrum is reproduced well by combining a negative and positive power-law times exponential cutoff (NPEX) model modified at approx 37 keY by a cyclotron resonance scattering feature (CRSF). The phase-resolved analysis shows that the spectra at the bright phases are well fit by the NPEX with CRSF model. On the other hand. the spectrum in the dim phase lacks the NPEX high-energy cutoff component, and the CRSF can be reproduced by either an emission or an absorption profile. When fitting the dim phase spectrum with the NPEX plus Gaussian model. we find that the feature is better described in terms of an emission rather than an absorption profile. The statistical significance of this result, evaluated by means of an F test, is between 2.91 x 10(exp -3) and 1.53 x 10(exp -5), taking into account the systematic errors in the background evaluation of HXD-PIN. We find that the emission profile is more feasible than the absorption one for comparing the physical parameters in other phases. Therefore, we have possibly detected an emission line at the cyclotron resonance energy in the dim phase.

  13. Observation of vanadyl porphyrins and sulfur-containing vanadyl porphyrins in a petroleum asphaltene by atmospheric pressure photonionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Qian, Kuangnan; Mennito, Anthony S; Edwards, Kathleen E; Ferrughelli, Dave T

    2008-07-01

    Vanadyl (VO) porphyrins and sulfur-containing vanadyl (VOS) porphyrins of a wide carbon number range (C(26) to C(52)) and Z-number range (-28 to -54) were detected and identified in a petroleum asphaltene by atmospheric pressure photonionization (APPI) and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS). APPI provides soft ionization of asphaltene molecules (including VO and VOS porphyrins), generating primarily molecular ions (M(+.)). The ultra-high mass resolving power (m/Delta m(FWHM) approximately 500 K) of FTICR-MS enabled resolution and positive identification of elemental formulae for the entire family of VO and VOS porphyrins in a complicated asphaltene matrix. Deocophylerythro-etioporphyrin (DPEP) is found to be the most prevalent structure, followed by etioporphyrins (etio)- and rhodo (benzo)-DPEP. The characteristic Z-distribution of VO porphyrins suggests benzene and naphthene increment in the growth of porphyrin ring structures. Bimodal carbon number distributions of VO porphyrins suggest possible different origins of low and high molecular weight species. To our knowledge, the observation of VOS porphyrins in a petroleum product has not previously been reported. The work is also the first direct identification of the entire vanadyl porphyrin family by ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry without chromatographic separation or demetallation.

  14. Characterization of organic material in ice core samples from North America, Greenland, and Antarctica using ultrahigh resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catanzano, V.; Grannas, A. M.; Sleighter, R. L.; Hatcher, P. G.

    2013-12-01

    Historically, it has been an analytical challenge to detect and identify the organic components present in ice cores, due to the low abundance of organic carbon. In order to detect and characterize the small amounts of organic matter in ice cores, ultra high resolution instrumentation is required. Here we report the use of ultrahigh resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry, coupled with electrospray ionization, to identify the molecular formulas and compound classes of organic matter in both modern and ancient ice core and glacial samples from Wyoming, Greenland, and Antarctica. A suite of 21 samples were analyzed and thousands of distinct molecular species were identified in each sample, providing clues to the nature and sources of organic matter in these regions. Major biochemical classes of compounds were detected such as lignins, tannins, carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, unsaturated hydrocarbons, and condensed aromatic compounds. We will compare the nature of the organic matter present in the samples in order to determine the differences in dominant organic compound classes and in heteroatom (nitrogen and sulfur) abundance. By analyzing these differences, it is possible to investigate the historical patterns of organic matter deposition/source, and begin to investigate the influence of climate change, volcanism, and onset of the industrial revolution on the nature of organic matter preserved in ice cores.

  15. Optimization of an electron cyclotron resonance plasma etch process for [ital n][sup +] polysilicon: HBr process chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Tipton, G.D.; Blain, M.G. ); Westerfield, P.L.; Trutna, L.S.; Maxwell, K.L. )

    1994-01-01

    Designed experiments were employed to characterize a process for etching phosphorus doped polycrystalline silicon with HBr in a close-coupled electron cyclotron resonance plasma reactor configured for 200 mm wafers. A fractional factorial screening experiment was employed to determine the principal input factors and the main etch effects. Linear models of the process responses indicate rf power, O[sub 2] flow rate, and the position of the resonance zone (with respect to the wafer) as the three strongest factors influencing process performance. Response surfaces generated using data from a follow-on response surface methodology experiment predicted an optimum operating region characterized by relatively low rf power, a small O[sub 2] flow, and a resonance zone position close to the wafer. One operating point in this region demonstrated a polysilicon etch rate of 270 nm/min, an etch rate nonuniformity of 2.2% (1 std. dev.), an etch selectivity to oxide greater than 100:1, and anisotropic profiles. Particle test results for the optimized process indicated that careful selection of the O[sub 2] fraction is required to avoid residue deposition and particle formation.

  16. Characterization of petroleum products by laser-induced acoustic desorption in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinkston, David S.

    Many petroleum products, in particular large nonpolar saturated hydrocarbons, have proven difficult to analyze via mass spectrometry due to their low volatility, lack of basic or acidic groups needed for most ionization methods, and low activation energies for fragmentation after ionization. The above limitation has been addressed by using laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) to evaporate nonvolatile and thermally labile petroleum components for analysis in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer. The gaseous neutral analytes were ionized by electron impact. Model compounds were studied first to test the viability of this method. After that, different types of asphaltenes were characterized successfully. For example, the molecular weight distribution of a North American asphaltene was determined. A comparison between asphaltene samples obtained from different geographical locations showed distinct molecular weight characteristics, possibly allowing for the determination of an unknown asphaltene sample's geographic origin. Asphaltenes were also characterized via electrospray ionization (ESI) in a linear quadrupole ion trap (LQIT). The observed molecular weight distribution had an extended tail past 2000 Da. Collision-activated dissociation (CAD) experiments on isolated ions revealed that water aggregation was present in this analysis. The observed molecular weight distribution of asphaltenes reduced dramatically when water was eliminated from the system. The usefulness of a new chemical ionization reagent, ClMn(H2O) +, is also discussed. This reagent has been shown to ionize hydrocarbons without fragmentation to yield [ClMnR]+, where R is the hydrocarbon, thus providing molecular weight information. CAD of the [ClMnR]+ ions is demonstrated to allow the differentiation of isomeric hydrocarbons. Finally, the LIAD/ClMn(H2O)+ mass spectrometric method was applied to the successful analysis of various petroleum fractions and asphaltene

  17. Terahertz molecular resonance of cancer DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheon, Hwayeong; Yang, Hee-Jin; Lee, Sang-Hun; Kim, Young A.; Son, Joo-Hiuk

    2016-11-01

    Carcinogenesis involves the chemical and structural alteration of biomolecules in cells. Aberrant methylation of DNA is a well-known carcinogenic mechanism and a common chemical modification of DNA. Terahertz waves can directly observe changes in DNA because the characteristic energies lie in the same frequency region. In addition, terahertz energy levels are not high enough to damage DNA by ionization. Here, we present terahertz molecular resonance fingerprints of DNA methylation in cancer DNA. Methylated cytidine, a nucleoside, has terahertz characteristic energies that give rise to the molecular resonance of methylation in DNA. Molecular resonance is monitored in aqueous solutions of genomic DNA from cancer cell lines using a terahertz time-domain spectroscopic technique. Resonance signals can be quantified to identify the types of cancer cells with a certain degree of DNA methylation. These measurements reveal the existence of molecular resonance fingerprints of cancer DNAs in the terahertz region, which can be utilized for the early diagnosis of cancer cells at the molecular level.

  18. Terahertz molecular resonance of cancer DNA

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, Hwayeong; Yang, Hee-jin; Lee, Sang-Hun; Kim, Young A; Son, Joo-Hiuk

    2016-01-01

    Carcinogenesis involves the chemical and structural alteration of biomolecules in cells. Aberrant methylation of DNA is a well-known carcinogenic mechanism and a common chemical modification of DNA. Terahertz waves can directly observe changes in DNA because the characteristic energies lie in the same frequency region. In addition, terahertz energy levels are not high enough to damage DNA by ionization. Here, we present terahertz molecular resonance fingerprints of DNA methylation in cancer DNA. Methylated cytidine, a nucleoside, has terahertz characteristic energies that give rise to the molecular resonance of methylation in DNA. Molecular resonance is monitored in aqueous solutions of genomic DNA from cancer cell lines using a terahertz time-domain spectroscopic technique. Resonance signals can be quantified to identify the types of cancer cells with a certain degree of DNA methylation. These measurements reveal the existence of molecular resonance fingerprints of cancer DNAs in the terahertz region, which can be utilized for the early diagnosis of cancer cells at the molecular level. PMID:27845398

  19. The preliminary tests of the superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source DECRIS-SC2.

    PubMed

    Efremov, A; Bekhterev, V; Bogomolov, S; Drobin, V; Loginov, V; Lebedev, A; Yazvitsky, N; Yakovlev, B

    2012-02-01

    A new compact version of the "liquid He-free" superconducting ECR ion source, to be used as an injector of highly charged heavy ions for the MC-400 cyclotron, is designed and built at the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions in collaboration with the Laboratory of High Energy Physics of JINR. The axial magnetic field of the source is created by the superconducting magnet and the NdFeB hexapole is used for the radial plasma confinement. The microwave frequency of 14 GHz is used for ECR plasma heating. During the first tests, the source shows a good enough performance for the production of medium charge state ions. In this paper, we will present the design parameters and the preliminary results with gaseous ions.

  20. Beam experiments with the Grenoble test electron cyclotron resonance ion source at iThemba LABS

    SciTech Connect

    Thomae, R. Conradie, J.; Fourie, D.; Mira, J.; Nemulodi, F.; Kuechler, D.; Toivanen, V.

    2016-02-15

    At iThemba Laboratory for Accelerator Based Sciences (iThemba LABS) an electron cyclotron ion source was installed and commissioned. This source is a copy of the Grenoble Test Source (GTS) for the production of highly charged ions. The source is similar to the GTS-LHC at CERN and named GTS2. A collaboration between the Accelerators and Beam Physics Group of CERN and the Accelerator and Engineering Department of iThemba LABS was proposed in which the development of high intensity argon and xenon beams is envisaged. In this paper, we present beam experiments with the GTS2 at iThemba LABS, in which the results of continuous wave and afterglow operation of xenon ion beams with oxygen as supporting gases are presented.

  1. Production of beams from solid materials at Center for Nuclear Study electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Ohshiro, Y; Yamaka, S; Watanabe, S; Kobayashi, K; Kotaka, Y; Nishimura, M; Kase, M; Muto, H; Yamaguchi, H; Shimoura, S

    2014-02-01

    Two methods for the feed of vapor from solid materials in the Center for Nuclear Study ECR ion source are described. A rod placed near the wall of the plasma chamber, operating up to a melting point of 2600 °C, has been used for CaO, SiO2, and FeO. An oven with a number of openings, operating up to 800 °C, has been used for P2O5, Li, and S. Typical ion beam intensities of (7)Li(2+), (6)Li(3+), (40)Ca(12+), and (56)Fe(15+) are achieved 280, 75, 28, and 7 eμA, respectively. High intensity heavy ion beams are stably supplied into the azimuthally varying field cyclotron.

  2. Development of a new superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source for operations up to 18 GHz at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, D. Z. Benitez, J. Y.; Hodgkinson, A.; Lyneis, C. M.; Phair, L. W.; Strohmeier, M. M.; Thuillier, T. P.; Todd, D. S.; Caspi, S.; Prestemon, S. O.

    2014-02-15

    A new superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source (ECRIS) is under development at LBNL to harness the winding techniques of a closed-loop sextupole coil for the next generation ECRIS and to enhance the capability of the 88-in. cyclotron facility. The proposed ECRIS will use a superconducting closed-loop sextupole coil to produce the radial field and a substantial portion of the axial field. The field strengths of the injection, central and extraction regions are adjusted by a three solenoids outside the closed-loop sextupole coil. In addition to maintaining the typical ECRIS magnetic field configuration, this new source will also be able to produce a dustpan-like minimum-B field to explore possible ECRIS performance enhancement. The dustpan-like minimum-B field configuration has about the same strengths for the maximum axial field at the injection region and the maximum radial pole fields at the plasma chamber walls but it can be substantially lower at the extraction region. The dustpan-like minimum-B will have a field maximum B{sub max} ≥ 2.6 T for operations up to 18 GHz with a ratio of B{sub max}/B{sub res} ≥ 4 and higher ratios for lower frequencies. The field maxima of this new source can reach over 3 T both at the injection and the plasma chamber walls which could also support operation at 28 GHz. The source will be built of cryogen-free with the magnets directly cooled by cryo-coolers to simplify the cryostat structure. The source design features will be presented and discussed.

  3. Development of a new superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source for operations up to 18 GHz at LBNL.

    PubMed

    Xie, D Z; Benitez, J Y; Caspi, S; Hodgkinson, A; Lyneis, C M; Phair, L W; Prestemon, S O; Strohmeier, M M; Thuillier, T P; Todd, D S

    2014-02-01

    A new superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source (ECRIS) is under development at LBNL to harness the winding techniques of a closed-loop sextupole coil for the next generation ECRIS and to enhance the capability of the 88-in. cyclotron facility. The proposed ECRIS will use a superconducting closed-loop sextupole coil to produce the radial field and a substantial portion of the axial field. The field strengths of the injection, central and extraction regions are adjusted by a three solenoids outside the closed-loop sextupole coil. In addition to maintaining the typical ECRIS magnetic field configuration, this new source will also be able to produce a dustpan-like minimum-B field to explore possible ECRIS performance enhancement. The dustpan-like minimum-B field configuration has about the same strengths for the maximum axial field at the injection region and the maximum radial pole fields at the plasma chamber walls but it can be substantially lower at the extraction region. The dustpan-like minimum-B will have a field maximum Bmax ≥ 2.6 T for operations up to 18 GHz with a ratio of Bmax/Bres ≥ 4 and higher ratios for lower frequencies. The field maxima of this new source can reach over 3 T both at the injection and the plasma chamber walls which could also support operation at 28 GHz. The source will be built of cryogen-free with the magnets directly cooled by cryo-coolers to simplify the cryostat structure. The source design features will be presented and discussed.

  4. On the second harmonic electron cyclotron resonance heating and current drive experiments on T-10 and DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Lohr, J.; Forest, C.B.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Luce, T.C.; Harvey, R.W.; Downs, E.A. |; James, R.A. |; Bagdasarov, A.A.; Borshegovskii, A.A.; Chistyakov, V.V.; Dremin, M.M.; Gorshkov, A.V.; Gorelov, Y.A.; Esipchuk, Y.V.; Ivanov, N.V.; Kislov, A.Y.; Kislov, D.A.; Lysenko, S.E.; Medvedev, A.A.; Mirenskii, V.Y.; Notkin, G.E.; Parail, V.V.; Pavlov, Y.D.; Razumova, K.A.; Roi, I.N.; Savrukhin, P.V.; Sannikov, V.V.; Sushkov, A.V.; Trukhin, V.M.; Vasin, N.L.; Volkov, V.V.; Denisov, G.G.; Petelin, M.I.; Flyagin, V.A.

    1993-02-01

    Studies of electron cyclotron current drive at the second harmonic resonance have been performed both on the DIII-D and T-10 tokamaks at injected power levels of approximately 0.5 MW. The DIII-D experiment used high held launch of the extraordinary mode at an angle of 15{degree} to the radial. In this experiment, with pulse lengths {approx_equal} 500 msec, a loop voltage difference, compared to the value expected from the measured profiles, of {approx_equal} 50 mV was ascribed to approximately 50 kA of rf-driven current. When dc electric field and trapped particle effects were considered, this was consistent with theoretical predictions. T-10 experiments planned for the fall of 1992 will use low field launch of the extraordinary mode and an injection angle of 21{degree} off-radial. In preliminary experiments with relatively poor machine conditions and pulse lengths {approx_equal} 400 msec, rf current drive was not observed despite the fact that driven currents as low as 10 kA, corresponding to a loop voltage difference for co- versus counter-injection of 20 mV, could have been detected. In this paper we examine the T-10 experiments using ray tracing and transport calculations in an attempt to understand the results. The dependence of the current drive efficiency on discharge parameters, flux penetration, and non-linear effects will be discussed. The results show that the launching geometry can have a significant effect on the observation of electron cyclotron current drive using the loop voltage as a diagnostic. In addition, predictions for the next series of experiments on T-10, for which greater than 2 MW of high frequency power should be available, will be presented.

  5. Design of a compact, permanent magnet electron cyclotron resonance ion source for proton and H2(+) beam production.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xianlu; Zhang, Tianjue; Luo, Shan; Wang, Chuan; Zheng, Xia; Yin, Zhiguo; Zhong, Junqing; Wu, Longcheng; Qin, Jiuchang

    2010-02-01

    A 2.45 GHz microwave ion source was developed at China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE) for proton beam production of over 60 mA [B.-Q. Cui, Y.-W. Bao, L.-Q. Li, W.-S. Jiang, and R.-W. Wang, Proceedings of the High Current Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) Ion Source for Proton Accelerator, APAC-2001, 2001 (unpublished)]. For various proton beam applications, another 2.45 GHz microwave ion source with a compact structure is designed and will be built at CIAE as well for high current proton beam production. It is also considered to be used for the test of H(2)(+) beam, which could be injected into the central region model cyclotron at CIAE, and accelerated to 5 MeV before extraction by stripping. The required ECR magnetic field is supplied by all the permanent magnets rather than electrical solenoids and six poles. The magnetic field distribution provided by this permanent magnets configuration is a large and uniformly volume of ECR zone, with central magnetic field of a magnitude of approximately 875 Gs [T. Taylor and J. S. C. Wills, Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. A 309, 37 (1991)]. The field adjustment at the extraction end can be implemented by moving the position of the magnet blocks. The results of plasma, coupling with 2.45 GHz microwave in the ECR zone inside the ion source are simulated by particle-in-cell code to optimize the density by adjusting the magnetic field distribution. The design configuration of the ion source will be summarized in the paper.

  6. THz Magneto-photoresponse of an InAs-based Quantum Point Contact Structure in the Region of Cyclotron Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakmehr, Mehdi; Whiteside, Vincent; Bhandari, Nikhil; Cahay, Marc; Newrock, Richard; McCombe, Bruce

    2013-03-01

    We have studied the THz magneto-photoresponse of a 2DEG in an InAs quantum well with an embedded Quantum Point Contact in the frequency/field region where electron cyclotron resonance (CR) dominates the response suing several lines from an optically pumped THz laser. The photoresponse near CR is manifested as an envelope of the amplitude of the Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations of the 2DEG with a peak near the CR field. Clear spin-splitting of the quantum oscillations is observed for B > 4, while the SdH oscillations do not show resolved spin-splitting up to 10 T. Data were simulated by a model of resonant carrier heating (due to CR), and from the simulations the carrier density, the CR effective mass, scattering times and the g-factor were obtained. We find a significantly enhanced g-factor, apparently due to many-electron exchange interaction effects. The g-factor determined from fitting spin-split Landau level peaks increases with magnetic field. Work at UB was supported by NSF DMR 1008138 and the Office of the Provost; work at the University of Cincinnati was supported by NSF ECCE 1028483.

  7. Electron cyclotron resonance acceleration of electrons to relativistic energies by a microwave field in a mirror trap

    SciTech Connect

    Sergeichev, K. F.; Karfidov, D. M.; Lukina, N. A.

    2007-06-15

    Results are presented from experiments on the acceleration of electrons by a 2.45-GHz microwave field in an adiabatic mirror trap under electron cyclotron resonance conditions, the electric and wave vectors of the wave being orthogonal to the trap axis. At a microwave electric field of {>=}10 V/cm and air pressures of 10{sup -6}-10{sup -4} Torr (the experiments were also performed with helium and argon), a self-sustained discharge was initiated in which a fraction of plasma electrons were accelerated to energies of 0.3-0.5 MeV. After the onset of instability, the acceleration terminated; the plasma decayed; and the accelerated electrons escaped toward the chamber wall, causing the generation of X-ray emission. Estimates show that electrons can be accelerated to the above energies only in the regime of self-phased interaction with the microwave field, provided that the electrons with a relativistically increased mass penetrate into the region with a higher magnetic field. It is shown that the negative-mass instability also can contribute to electron acceleration. The dynamic friction of the fast electrons by neutral particles in the drift space between the resonance zones does not suppress electron acceleration, so the electrons pass into a runaway regime. Since the air molecules excited by relativistic runaway electrons radiate primarily in the red spectral region, this experiment can be considered as a model of high-altitude atmospheric discharges, known as 'red sprites.'.

  8. The significance of monoisotopic and carbon-13 isobars for the identification of a 19-component dodecapeptide library by positive ion electrospray Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ramjit, H G; Kruppa, G H; Spier, J P; Ross, C W; Garsky, V M

    2000-01-01

    Harnessing the ultra high resolution capabilities of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) and positive ion electrospray, we have demonstrated the significance and utility of cumulative mass defect high resolution mass separation stable isotope distribution, exact mass measurement and elemental formula as a means of simultaneously identifying 19 components of the dodecapeptide library Ac-ANKISYQS[X]STE-NH(2). With an instrument resolution of 275 000 (average), isobaric multiplets attributed to monoisotopic and carbon-13 components of peptides: Ac approximately SLS approximately NH(2); Ac approximately SNS approximately NH(2); Ac approximately SOS approximately NH(2); Ac approximately SDS approximately NH(2); within the mass window of 1380-1385 Da, and Ac approximately SQS approximately NH(2); Ac approximately SKS approximately NH(2); Ac approximately SES approximately NH(2); Ac approximately SMS approximately NH(2), within the mass window 1395-1400 Da, were mass resolved, accurately mass measured and identified from the computed molecular formulas. This experimental procedure enabled the separation of monoisotopic and carbon-13 isobars yielding enhanced selectivity and specificity and serves to illustrate the significance of monoisotopic and carbon-13 isobars in final product analysis. Chromatographic separation (HPLC) was of limited utility except for monitoring the overall extent of reaction and apparent product distribution. Positive ion electrospray-FTICR-MS and fast atom bombardment (FAB) MS were used to assess final product quality and apparent component distribution.

  9. Sample handling and contamination encountered when coupling offline normal phase high performance liquid chromatography fraction collection of petroleum samples to Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Oro, Nicole E; Whittal, Randy M; Lucy, Charles A

    2012-09-05

    Normal phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is used to separate a gas oil petroleum sample, and the fractions are collected offline and analyzed on a high resolution Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer (FT-ICR MS). The separation prior to MS analysis dilutes the sample significantly; therefore the fractions need to be prepared properly to achieve the best signal possible. The methods used to prepare the HPLC fractions for MS analysis are described, with emphasis placed on increasing the concentration of analyte species. The dilution effect also means that contamination in the MS spectra needs to be minimized. The contamination from molecular sieves, plastics, soap, etc. and interferences encountered during the offline fraction collection process are described and eliminated. A previously unreported MS contamination of iron formate clusters with a 0.8 mass defect in positive mode electrospray is also described. This interference resulted from the stainless steel tubing in the HPLC system. Contamination resulting from what has tentatively been assigned as palmitoylglycerol and stearoylglycerol was also observed; these compounds have not previously been reported as contaminant peaks. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. High-Power Arctic Lidar for observations of Sodium layer and Calcium Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuerker, R. F.; Foley, J.; Kidd, P.; Wong, A. Y.

    1998-11-01

    The UCLA HIPAS Observatory is located at 64o 54' 22"N, 146o 50' 33" W. It passes under the auroral oval, has a 2.7 m diameter liquid mirror collector (LMT), and two bistatic laser illuminators; a Doubled YAG pumped dye laser and a Doubled (tunable) Alexandrite laser. The first emits 0.1 J - 10 ns pulses at 590nm (Na) at 20 Hz. The second laser emits 0.15 J -10 ns pulses at 393 nm (Ca+) and 391.4 nm (N2) at 10 Hz. New sporadic sodium layers have been observed during the passage of the electrojet and auroras in periods of 20-30 seconds, indicating that sodium is liberated from micrometeors during auroral precipitations. The Laser Induced Fluorescence techniques will be used to observe the acceleration of the Ca+ ions when they are driven by the 80 MW (ERP) 2.85MHz RF array, modulated at the Ca+ ion Cyclotron Frequency. 1. Ionospheric Modifaction and Enviromental Research in the Auroral Region in Plasma Science and the Environment. Publisher: AIP Press, Woodbury, NY. Editors: W. Manheimer, L. Sugiyama, T. Stix; Chapter 3, pgs. 41-75, 1997. Research supported by ONR N00014-96-C-0040

  11. Nonlinear Effects at Tokamak Electron Cyclotron Resonance in Inhomogeneous Magnetic Field.*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, V.

    1996-11-01

    Nonlinear interaction of X- and O- modes with drift plasma waves is studied. The drift waves with frequency given by ωD ~ Ωc (ρ_e/r)^2 (ρe electron Larmor radius, Ωe electron cyclotron frequency, r small tokamak radius, where nabla Ω / Ωe ~ 1/R (for large tokamaks R ~ r)), are coupled to driver pump via scattering instability. Nonlocality of the interaction is taken into account. It is shown that nonlinear mechanism of interaction (Brillouin scattering) can be used as a tool for dynamic rf confinement^1 of tokamak plasmas. Particularly, it is possible to achieve longer confinement times due to suppression of drift wave turbulence. Supported by Tesla Laboratories, Inc., La Jolla, CA 92038-2946. ^1M.N. Rosenbluth (Editor-in-Chief). New Ideas in Tokamak Confinement. Research Trends in Physics Series of the La Jolla International School of Physics, The Institute for Advanced Physics Studies, La Jolla, CA (AIP Press, New York, 1994).

  12. Calculation of plasma dielectric response in inhomogeneous magnetic field near electron cyclotron resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evstatiev, Evstati; Svidzinski, Vladimir; Spencer, Andy; Galkin, Sergei

    2014-10-01

    Full wave 3-D modeling of RF fields in hot magnetized nonuniform plasma requires calculation of nonlocal conductivity kernel describing the dielectric response of such plasma to the RF field. In many cases, the conductivity kernel is a localized function near the test point which significantly simplifies numerical solution of the full wave 3-D problem. Preliminary results of feasibility analysis of numerical calculation of the conductivity kernel in a 3-D hot nonuniform magnetized plasma in the electron cyclotron frequency range will be reported. This case is relevant to modeling of ECRH in ITER. The kernel is calculated by integrating the linearized Vlasov equation along the unperturbed particle's orbits. Particle's orbits in the nonuniform equilibrium magnetic field are calculated numerically by one of the Runge-Kutta methods. RF electric field is interpolated on a specified grid on which the conductivity kernel is discretized. The resulting integrals in the particle's initial velocity and time are then calculated numerically. Different optimization approaches of the integration are tested in this feasibility analysis. Work is supported by the U.S. DOE SBIR program.

  13. Millimeter-wave, megawatt gyrotron development for ECR (electron cyclotron resonance) heating applications

    SciTech Connect

    Jory, H.; Felch, K.; Hess, C.; Huey, H.; Jongewaard, E.; Neilson, J.; Pendleton, R.; Tsirulnikov, M. )

    1990-09-17

    To address the electron cyclotron heating requirements of planned fusion experiments such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT), Varian is developing gyrotrons at frequencies ranging from 100--300 GHz with output power capabilities up to 1 MW CW. Experimental gyrotrons have been built at frequencies between 100--140 GHz, and a study program has addressed the critical elements of designing 280--300 GHz gyrotrons capable of generating CW power levels up to 1 MW. Initial test vehicles at 140 GHz have utilized TE{sub 15,2,1} interaction cavities, and have been designed to generate short-pulse (up to 20 ms) power levels of 1 MW and up to 400 kW CW. Recently, short-pulse power levels of 1040 kW at 38% efficiency have been obtained and average powers of 200 kW have been achieved. Long-pulse operation has been extended to pulse durations of 0.5 seconds at power levels of 400 kW. Gyrotron oscillators capable of generating output powers of 500 kW CW at a frequency of 110 GHz have recently been designed and a prototype is currently being tested. Design work for a 1 MW CW gyrotron at 110 GHz, is in progress. The 1 MW CW tube will employ an output coupling approach where the microwave output is separated from the microwave output. 15 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Recent advances in physics and technology of ion cyclotron resonance heating in view of future fusion reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ongena, J.; Messiaen, A.; Kazakov, Ye O.; Koch, R.; Ragona, R.; Bobkov, V.; Crombé, K.; Durodié, F.; Goniche, M.; Krivska, A.; Lerche, E.; Louche, F.; Lyssoivan, A.; Vervier, M.; Van Eester, D.; Van Schoor, M.; Wauters, T.; Wright, J.; Wukitch, S.

    2017-05-01

    Ion temperatures of over 100 million degrees need to be reached in future fusion reactors for the deuterium-tritium fusion reaction to work. Ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) is a method that has the capability to directly heat ions to such high temperatures, via a resonant interaction between the plasma ions and radiofrequency waves launched in the plasma. This paper gives an overview of recent developments in this field. In particular a novel and recently developed three-ion heating scenario will be highlighted. It is a flexible scheme with the potential to accelerate heavy ions to high energies in high density plasmas as expected for future fusion reactors. New antenna designs will be needed for next step large future devices like DEMO, to deliver steady-state high power levels, cope with fast variations in coupling due to fast changes in the edge density and to reduce the possibility for impurity production. Such a new design is the traveling wave antenna (TWA) consisting of an array of straps distributed around the circumference of the machine, which is intrinsically resilient to edge density variations and has an optimized power coupling to the plasma. The structure of the paper is as follows: to provide the general reader with a basis for a good understanding of the later sections, an overview is given of wave propagation, coupling and RF power absorption in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies, including a brief summary of the traditionally used heating scenarios. A special highlight is the newly developed three-ion scenario together with its promising applications. A next section discusses recent developments to study edge-wave interaction and reduce impurity influx from ICRH: the dedicated devices IShTAR and Aline, field aligned and three-strap antenna concepts. The principles behind and the use of ICRH as an important option for first wall conditioning in devices with a permanent magnetic field is discussed next. The final section presents ongoing

  15. Development of a pepper-pot device to determine the emittance of an ion beam generated by electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Strohmeier, M.; Benitez, J. Y.; Leitner, D.; Lyneis, C. M.; Todd, D. S.; Bantel, M.

    2010-02-15

    This paper describes the recent development and commissioning of a pepper-pot emittance meter at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). It is based on a potassium bromide (KBr) scintillator screen in combination with a charged coupled device camera. Pepper-pot scanners record the full four-dimensional transverse phase space emittances which are particularly interesting for electron cyclotron resonance ion sources. The strengths and limitations of evaluating emittances using optical pepper-pot scanners are described and systematic errors induced by the optical data acquisition system will be presented. Light yield tests of KBr exposed to different ion species and first emittance measurement data using ion beams extracted from the 6.4 GHz LBNL electron cyclotron resonance ion source are presented and discussed.

  16. Terahertz Dynamics of a Topologically Protected State: Quantum Hall Effect Plateaus near the Cyclotron Resonance of a Two-Dimensional Electron Gas.

    PubMed

    Stier, A V; Ellis, C T; Kwon, J; Xing, H; Zhang, H; Eason, D; Strasser, G; Morimoto, T; Aoki, H; Zeng, H; McCombe, B D; Cerne, J

    2015-12-11

    We measure the Hall conductivity of a two-dimensional electron gas formed at a GaAs/AlGaAs heterojunction in the terahertz regime close to the cyclotron resonance frequency using highly sensitive Faraday rotation measurements. The sample is electrically gated, allowing the electron density to be changed continuously by more than a factor of 3. We observe clear plateaulike and steplike features in the Faraday rotation angle vs electron density and magnetic field (Landau-level filling factor) even at fields or frequencies very close to cyclotron resonance absorption. These features are the high frequency manifestation of quantum Hall plateaus-a signature of topologically protected edge states. We observe both odd and even filling factor plateaus and explore the temperature dependence of these plateaus. Although dynamical scaling theory begins to break down in the frequency region of our measurements, we find good agreement with theory.

  17. Terahertz cyclotron resonance spectroscopy of an AlGaN/GaN heterostructure using a high-field pulsed magnet and an asynchronous optical sampling technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, B. F.; Smith, W. F.; Hibberd, M. T.; Dawson, P.; Beck, M.; Bartels, A.; Guiney, I.; Humphreys, C. J.; Graham, D. M.

    2016-05-01

    The effective mass, sheet carrier concentration, and mobility of electrons within a two-dimensional electron gas in an AlGaN/GaN heterostructure were determined using a laboratory-based terahertz cyclotron resonance spectrometer. The ability to perform terahertz cyclotron resonance spectroscopy with magnetic fields of up to 31 T was enabled by combining a high-field pulsed magnet with a modified asynchronous optical sampling terahertz detection scheme. This scheme allowed around 100 transmitted terahertz waveforms to be recorded over the 14 ms magnetic field pulse duration. The sheet density and mobility were measured to be 8.0 × 1012 cm-2 and 9000 cm2 V-1 s-1 at 77 K. The in-plane electron effective mass at the band edge was determined to be 0.228 ± 0.002m0.

  18. Monte Carlo simulation of electron behavior in an electron cyclotron resonance microwave discharge sustained by circular TM{sub 11} mode fields

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, S.C.; Kuo, S.P.

    1996-08-01

    Electron behavior in an electron cyclotron resonance microwave discharge sustained by TM{sub 11} mode fields of a cylindrical waveguide has been investigated via a Monte Carlo simulation. The time averaged, spatially dependent electron energy distribution is computed self-consistently. At low pressures ({approximately}0.5 mTorr), the temperature of the tail portion of the electron energy distribution exceeds 40 eV, and the sheath potential is about {minus}250 V. These results, which are about twice as high as the previous results for TM{sub 01} mode fields [S. C. Kuo, E. E. Kunhardt, and S. P. Kuo, J. Appl. Phys. {bold 73}, 4197 (1993)], suggest that TM{sub 11} mode fields have a stronger electron cyclotron resonance effect than TM{sub 01} mode fields in a cylindrical waveguide. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Optical Emission Spectroscopy of Electron Cyclotron Resonance-Plasma Enchanced Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition Process for Deposition of GaN Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Silie; Chen, Junfang; Li, Yun; Li, Wei; Zhang, Maoping; Hu, Shejun

    2008-02-01

    An investigation was made into the nitrogen-trimethylgallium mixed electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma by optical emission spectroscopy (OES). The ECR plasma enhanced metalorganic chemical vapour deposition technology was adopted to grow GaN film on an α-Al2O3 substrate. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses showed that the peak of GaN (0002) was at 2θ = 34.48°, being sharper and more intense with the increase in the N2: trimethylgallium(TMG) flow ratio. The results demonstrate that the electron cyclotron resonance-plasma enchanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (ECR-MOPECVD) technology is evidently advantageous for the deposition of GaN film at a low growth temperature.

  20. Effect of electron-cyclotron resonance plasma heating conditions on the low-frequency modulation of the gyrotron power at the L-2M stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Batanov, G. M.; Borzosekov, V. D.; Kolik, L. V.; Konchekov, E. M. Malakhov, D. V.; Petelin, M. I.; Petrov, A. E.; Sarksyan, K. A.; Skvortsova, N. N.; Stepakhin, V. D.; Kharchev, N. K.

    2015-08-15

    Low-frequency modulation of the gyrotron power at the L-2M stellarator was studied at different modes of plasma confinement. The plasma was heated at the second harmonic of the electron gyrofrequency. The effect of reflection of gyrotron radiation from the region of electron-cyclotron resonance plasma heating, as well as of backscattering of gyrotron radiation from fluctuations of the plasma density, on the modulation of the gyrotron power was investigated.

  1. Spectra of low-frequency modulation of gyrotron radiation during electron-cyclotron resonance heating of plasma in the L-2M stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Batanov, G. M.; Kolik, L. V.; Konchekov, E. M.; Malakhov, D. V.; Novozhilova, Yu. V.; Petelin, M. I.; Petrov, A. E.; Pshenichnikov, A. A.; Sarksyan, K. A.; Skvortsova, N. N.; Kharchev, N. K.

    2011-05-15

    Results from experimental studies of the modulation of the gyrotron power during electron cyclotron resonance heating of plasma L-2M stellarator are presented. It is shown that the modulation spectrum consists of separate spectral bands, among which a 20-kHz peak with a spectral density exceeding by one order of magnitude the spectral density of the other peaks is observed. This can be explained by the gyrotron operation being affected by the wave reflected from long-wavelength plasma fluctuations.

  2. Evidence for a resonant cyclotron line in IGR J16493-4348 from the Swift-BAT hard X-ray survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Aì, A.; Cusumano, G.; La Parola, V.; Segreto, A.; di Salvo, T.; Iaria, R.; Robba, N. R.

    2011-08-01

    Context. Resonant absorption cyclotron features are a key diagnostic tool to directly measure the strength of the magnetic field of accreting neutron stars. However, typical values of cyclotron features lie in the high-energy part of the spectrum between 20 keV and 50 keV, where detection is often damped by the low quality statistics of results derived from single pointed observations. Aims: We show that long-term monitoring campaign performed with Swift-BAT of persistently, but faint, accreting high-mass X-ray binaries is able to reveal in their spectra the presence of cyclotron features. Methods: We extracted the average Swift-BAT 15-150 keV spectrum from the 54 months long Swift-BAT survey of the high-mass X-ray source IGR J16493-4348. To constrain the broadband spectrum, we used soft X-ray spectra from Swift-XRT and Suzaku pointed observations. Results: We model the spectra using a set of phenomenological models usually adopted to describe the energy spectrum of accreting high-mass X-ray binaries. Irrespective of the models we used, we found significant improvements in the spectral fits adding to the models a broad (10 keV width) absorption feature, with best-fitting energy estimate between 30 and 33 keV, that we interpret as evidence of a resonant cyclotron absorption feature. We also discuss possible instrumental biases related to the use of Swift-BAT for this kind of study and the statistical method to weight the confidence level of this detection. Correcting for the gravitational redshift of a 1.4 M⊙ neutron star, the inferred surface magnetic field is Bsurf ~ 3.7 × 1012 gauss. The spectral parameters of IGR J16493-4348 fit well with empirical correlations observed when the whole sample of high-mass binaries with detected cyclotron features is considered.

  3. Impedance matched, high-power, rf antenna for ion cyclotron resonance heating of a plasma

    DOEpatents

    Baity, Jr., Frederick W.; Hoffman, Daniel J.; Owens, Thomas L.

    1988-01-01

    A resonant double loop radio frequency (rf) antenna for radiating high-power rf energy into a magnetically confined plasma. An inductive element in the form of a large current strap, forming the radiating element, is connected between two variable capacitors to form a resonant circuit. A real input impedance results from tapping into the resonant circuit along the inductive element, generally near the midpoint thereof. The impedance can be matched to the source impedance by adjusting the separate capacitors for a given tap arrangement or by keeping the two capacitances fixed and adjustng the tap position. This results in a substantial reduction in the voltage and current in the transmission system to the antenna compared to unmatched antennas. Because the complete circuit loop consisting of the two capacitors and the inductive element is resonant, current flows in the same direction along the entire length of the radiating element and is approximately equal in each branch of the circuit. Unidirectional current flow permits excitation of low order poloidal modes which penetrate more deeply into the plasma.

  4. Generation of high charge state metal ion beams by electron cyclotron resonance heating of vacuum arc plasma in cusp trap.

    PubMed

    Nikolaev, A G; Savkin, K P; Oks, E M; Vizir, A V; Yushkov, G Yu; Vodopyanov, A V; Izotov, I V; Mansfeld, D A

    2012-02-01

    A method for generating high charge state heavy metal ion beams based on high power microwave heating of vacuum arc plasma confined in a magnetic trap under electron cyclotron resonance conditions has been developed. A feature of the work described here is the use of a cusp magnetic field with inherent "minimum-B" structure as the confinement geometry, as opposed to a simple mirror device as we have reported on previously. The cusp configuration has been successfully used for microwave heating of gas discharge plasma and extraction from the plasma of highly charged, high current, gaseous ion beams. Now we use the trap for heavy metal ion beam generation. Two different approaches were used for injecting the vacuum arc metal plasma into the trap--axial injection from a miniature arc source located on-axis near the microwave window, and radial injection from sources mounted radially at the midplane of the trap. Here, we describe preliminary results of heating vacuum arc plasma in a cusp magnetic trap by pulsed (400 μs) high power (up to 100 kW) microwave radiation at 37.5 GHz for the generation of highly charged heavy metal ion beams.

  5. Generation of high charge state metal ion beams by electron cyclotron resonance heating of vacuum arc plasma in cusp trapa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaev, A. G.; Savkin, K. P.; Oks, E. M.; Vizir, A. V.; Yushkov, G. Yu.; Vodopyanov, A. V.; Izotov, I. V.; Mansfeld, D. A.

    2012-02-01

    A method for generating high charge state heavy metal ion beams based on high power microwave heating of vacuum arc plasma confined in a magnetic trap under electron cyclotron resonance conditions has been developed. A feature of the work described here is the use of a cusp magnetic field with inherent "minimum-B" structure as the confinement geometry, as opposed to a simple mirror device as we have reported on previously. The cusp configuration has been successfully used for microwave heating of gas discharge plasma and extraction from the plasma of highly charged, high current, gaseous ion beams. Now we use the trap for heavy metal ion beam generation. Two different approaches were used for injecting the vacuum arc metal plasma into the trap - axial injection from a miniature arc source located on-axis near the microwave window, and radial injection from sources mounted radially at the midplane of the trap. Here, we describe preliminary results of heating vacuum arc plasma in a cusp magnetic trap by pulsed (400 μs) high power (up to 100 kW) microwave radiation at 37.5 GHz for the generation of highly charged heavy metal ion beams.

  6. High intensity beams from electron cyclotron resonance ion sources: A study of efficient extraction and transport system (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gammino, S.; Ciavola, G.; Celona, L.; Andò, L.; Passarello, S.; Zhang, X. Zh.; Spädtke, P.; Winkler, M.

    2004-05-01

    A study of the design of extraction and transport system for high intensity beams that will be produced by the next generation electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) was carried out in the frame of a European collaboration devoted to the definition of the main parameters of third generation ECRIS. High intensity production tests carried out in the previous years at INFN-LNS have shown evidence for the need to review the main concepts of the beam analysis and transport when high currents of low energy highly charged ions are extracted from the source. The transport of such low energy beams becomes critical as soon as the total current exceeds a few mA. The study reported here is based on the calculated parameters for the GyroSERSE source and the computer simulations have been carried out to obtain low emittance beams. The design of the extraction system was carried out by means of the KOBRA (three dimensional) code. The study of the beam line has been carried out with the codes GIOS, GICO, and TRANSPORT by taking into account both the phase space growth due to space charge and to the aberrations inside the magnets. The description of some different beam line options will be also given.

  7. Diagnostics of a charge breeder electron cyclotron resonance ion source helium plasma with the injection of 23Na1+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarvainen, O.; Koivisto, H.; Galatà, A.; Angot, J.; Lamy, T.; Thuillier, T.; Delahaye, P.; Maunoury, L.; Mascali, D.; Neri, L.

    2016-05-01

    This work describes the utilization of an injected 23Na1+ ion beam as a diagnostics of the helium plasma of a charge breeder electron cyclotron resonance ion source. The obtained data allows estimating the upper limit for the ion-ion collision mean-free path of the incident sodium ions, the lower limit of ion-ion collision frequencies for all charge states of the sodium ions and the lower limit of the helium plasma density. The ion-ion collision frequencies of high charge state ions are shown to be at least on the order of 1-10 MHz and the plasma density is estimated to be on the order of 1011 cm-3 or higher. The experimental results are compared to simulations of the 23Na1+ capture into the helium plasma. The results indicate that the lower breeding efficiency of light ions in comparison to heavier elements is probably due to different capture efficiencies in which the in-flight ionization of the incident 1 + ions plays a vital role.

  8. Upgrade of the beam extraction system of the GTS-LHC electron cyclotron resonance ion source at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toivanen, V.; Bellodi, G.; Dimov, V.; Küchler, D.; Lombardi, A. M.; Maintrot, M.

    2016-02-01

    Linac3 is the first accelerator in the heavy ion injector chain of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), providing multiply charged heavy ion beams for the CERN experimental program. The ion beams are produced with GTS-LHC, a 14.5 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source, operated in afterglow mode. Improvement of the GTS-LHC beam formation and beam transport along Linac3 is part of the upgrade program of the injector chain in preparation for the future high luminosity LHC. A mismatch between the ion beam properties in the ion source extraction region and the acceptance of the following Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) section has been identified as one of the factors limiting the Linac3 performance. The installation of a new focusing element, an einzel lens, into the GTS-LHC extraction region is foreseen as a part of the Linac3 upgrade, as well as a redesign of the first section of the LEBT. Details of the upgrade and results of a beam dynamics study of the extraction region and LEBT modifications will be presented.

  9. Operational experience with the Argonne National Laboratory Californium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade facility and electron cyclotron resonance charge breeder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vondrasek, R.; Clark, J.; Levand, A.; Palchan, T.; Pardo, R.; Savard, G.; Scott, R.

    2014-02-01

    The Californium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) of the Argonne National Laboratory Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS) facility provides low-energy and accelerated neutron-rich radioactive beams to address key nuclear physics and astrophysics questions. A 350 mCi 252Cf source produces fission fragments which are thermalized and collected by a helium gas catcher into a low-energy particle beam with a charge of 1+ or 2+. An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source functions as a charge breeder in order to raise the ion charge sufficiently for acceleration in the ATLAS linac. The ECR charge breeder has achieved stable beam charge breeding efficiencies of 10.1% for 23Na7+, 17.9% for 39K10+, 15.6% for 84Kr17+, and 12.4% for 133Cs27+. For the radioactive beams, a charge breeding efficiency of 11.7% has been achieved for 143Cs27+ and 14.7% for 143Ba27+. The typical breeding times are 10 ms/charge state, but the source can be tuned such that this value increases to 100 ms/charge state with the best breeding efficiency corresponding to the longest breeding times—the variation of efficiencies with breeding time will be discussed. Efforts have been made to characterize and reduce the background contaminants present in the ion beam through judicious choice of q/m combinations. Methods of background reduction are being investigated based upon plasma chamber cleaning and vacuum practices.

  10. Operational experience with the Argonne National Laboratory Californium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade facility and electron cyclotron resonance charge breeder.

    PubMed

    Vondrasek, R; Clark, J; Levand, A; Palchan, T; Pardo, R; Savard, G; Scott, R

    2014-02-01

    The Californium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) of the Argonne National Laboratory Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS) facility provides low-energy and accelerated neutron-rich radioactive beams to address key nuclear physics and astrophysics questions. A 350 mCi (252)Cf source produces fission fragments which are thermalized and collected by a helium gas catcher into a low-energy particle beam with a charge of 1+ or 2+. An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source functions as a charge breeder in order to raise the ion charge sufficiently for acceleration in the ATLAS linac. The ECR charge breeder has achieved stable beam charge breeding efficiencies of 10.1% for (23)Na(7+), 17.9% for (39)K(10+), 15.6% for (84)Kr(17+), and 12.4% for (133)Cs(27+). For the radioactive beams, a charge breeding efficiency of 11.7% has been achieved for (143)Cs(27+) and 14.7% for (143)Ba(27+). The typical breeding times are 10 ms/charge state, but the source can be tuned such that this value increases to 100 ms/charge state with the best breeding efficiency corresponding to the longest breeding times-the variation of efficiencies with breeding time will be discussed. Efforts have been made to characterize and reduce the background contaminants present in the ion beam through judicious choice of q/m combinations. Methods of background reduction are being investigated based upon plasma chamber cleaning and vacuum practices.

  11. Clarification of pathway-specific inhibition by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance/mass spectrometry-based metabolic phenotyping studies.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, Akira; Nakamura, Yukiko; Ogura, Tomonori; Kimura, Atsuko; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Sakurai, Nozomu; Shinbo, Yoko; Shibata, Daisuke; Kanaya, Shigehiko; Ohta, Daisaku

    2006-10-01

    We have developed a metabolic profiling scheme based on direct-infusion Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR/MS). The scheme consists of: (1) reproducible data collection under optimized FT-ICR/MS analytical conditions; (2) automatic mass-error correction and multivariate analyses for metabolome characterization using a newly developed metabolomics tool (DMASS software); (3) identification of marker metabolite candidates by searching a species-metabolite relationship database, KNApSAcK; and (4) structural analyses by an MS/MS method. The scheme was applied to metabolic phenotyping of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings treated with different herbicidal chemical classes for pathway-specific inhibitions. Arabidopsis extracts were directly infused into an electrospray ionization source on an FT-ICR/MS system. Acquired metabolomics data were comprised of mass-to-charge ratio values with ion intensity information subjected to principal component analysis, and metabolic phenotypes from the herbicide treatments were clearly differentiated from those of the herbicide-free treatment. From each herbicide treatment, candidate metabolites representing such metabolic phenotypes were found through the KNApSAcK database search. The database search and MS/MS analyses suggested dose-dependent accumulation patterns of specific metabolites including several flavonoid glycosides. The metabolic phenotyping scheme on the basis of FT-ICR/MS coupled with the DMASS program is discussed as a general tool for high throughput metabolic phenotyping studies.

  12. Neoclassical transport of energetic minority tail ions generated by ion-cyclotron resonance heating in tokamak geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.S. . Courant Inst. of Mathematical Sciences); Hammett, G.W.; Goldston, R.J. . Plasma Physics Lab.)

    1990-01-01

    Neoclassical transport of energetic minority tail ions, which are generated by high powered electromagnetic waves of the Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) at the fundamental harmonic resonance, is studied analytically in tokamak geometry. The effect of Coulomb collisions on the tail ion transport is investigated in the present work. The total tail ion transport will be the sum of the present collision-driven transport and the wave-driven transport, which is due to the ICRF-wave scattering of the tail particles as reported in the literature. The transport coefficients have been calculated kinetically, and it is found that the large tail ion viscosity, driven by the localized ICRF-heating and Coulomb slowing-down collisions, induces purely convective particle transport of the tail species, while the energy transport is both convective and diffusive. The rate of radial particle transport is shown to be usually small, but the rate of radial energy transport is larger and may not be negligible compared to the Coulomb slowing-down rate. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Effect of electron-electron interaction on cyclotron resonance in high-mobility InAs/AlSb quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Krishtopenko, S. S. Gavrilenko, V. I.; Ikonnikov, A. V.; Orlita, M.; Sadofyev, Yu. G.; Goiran, M.; Teppe, F.; Knap, W.

    2015-03-21

    We report observation of electron-electron (e-e) interaction effect on cyclotron resonance (CR) in InAs/AlSb quantum well heterostructures. High mobility values allow us to observe strongly pronounced triple splitting of CR line at noninteger filling factors of Landau levels ν. At magnetic fields, corresponding to ν > 4, experimental values of CR energies are in good agreement with single-electron calculations on the basis of eight-band k ⋅ p Hamiltonian. In the range of filling factors 3 < ν < 4 pronounced, splitting of CR line, exceeding significantly the difference in single-electron CR energies, is discovered. The strength of the splitting increases when occupation of the partially filled Landau level tends to a half, being in qualitative agreement with previous prediction by MacDonald and Kallin [Phys. Rev. B 40, 5795 (1989)]. We demonstrate that such behaviour of CR modes can be quantitatively described if one takes into account both electron correlations and the mixing between conduction and valence bands in the calculations of matrix elements of e-e interaction.

  14. Top-Down Analysis of Highly Post-Translationally Modified Peptides by Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, Andres; Lerno, Larry; Barile, Daniela; Lebrilla, Carlito B.

    2015-03-01

    Bovine κ-caseinoglycomacropeptide (GMP) is a highly modified peptide from κ-casein produced during the cheese making process. The chemical nature of GMP makes analysis by traditional proteomic approaches difficult, as the peptide bears a strong net negative charge and a variety of post-translational modifications. In this work, we describe the use of electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI FT-ICR MS) for the top-down analysis of GMP. The method allows the simultaneous detection of different GMP forms that result from the combination of amino acid genetic variations and post-translational modifications, specifically phosphorylation and O-glycosylation. The different GMP forms were identified by high resolution mass spectrometry in both negative and positive mode and confirmation was achieved by tandem MS. The results showed the predominance of two genetic variants of GMP that occur as either mono- or bi-phosphorylated species. Additionally, these four forms can be modified with up to two O-glycans generally sialylated. The results demonstrate the presence of glycosylated, bi-phosphorylated forms of GMP never described before.

  15. Progress of a room temperature electron cyclotron resonance ion source using evaporative cooling technology at Institute of Modern Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, W.; Xiong, B.; Guo, S. Q.; Cao, R.; Ruan, L.; Zhang, X. Z.; Sun, L. T.; Feng, Y. C.; Ma, B. H.; Zhao, H. W.

    2014-02-15

    A new room temperature ECR ion source, Lanzhou Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source No. 4 (LECR4, previously named DRAGON), is under intense construction at Institute of Modern Physics. LECR4 is designed to operate with 18 GHz microwave frequency. The maximum axial magnetic fields are 2.3 T at injection and 1.3 T at extraction, and the radial field at the plasma chamber wall of 76 mm inner diameter is 1.0–1.2 T. One of the unique features for LECR4 is that its axial solenoids are winded with solid square copper wires which are immersed in a kind of special evaporative cooling medium for cooling purpose. Till now, a prototype of the cooling system has been successfully constructed and tested, which has demonstrated that the cooling efficiency of the designed system could meet the requirements of LECR4 under the routine operation conditions. All the main components of the ion source have been completed. Assembly and commissioning is ongoing. The latest developments and test results will be presented in this paper.

  16. Extension of high T{sub e} regime with upgraded electron cyclotron resonance heating system in the Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, H. Shimozuma, T.; Kubo, S.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Ito, S.; Kobayashi, S.; Mizuno, Y.; Okada, K.; Mutoh, T.; Nagaoka, K.; Osakabe, M.; Yamada, I.; Nakano, H.; Yokoyama, M.; Ido, T.; Shimizu, A.; Seki, R.; Ida, K.; Yoshinuma, M.; and others

    2014-06-15

    Enhancement of the output power per gyrotron has been planned in the Large Helical Device (LHD). Three 77-GHz gyrotrons with an output power of more than 1 MW have been operated. In addition, a high power gyrotron with the frequency of 154 GHz (1 MW/5 s, 0.5 MW/CW) was newly installed in 2012, and the total injection power of Electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) reached 4.6 MW. The operational regime of ECRH plasma on the LHD has been extended due to the upgraded ECRH system such as the central electron temperature of 13.5 keV with the line-averaged electron density n{sub e-fir} = 1 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −3}. The electron thermal confinement clearly improved inside the electron internal transport barrier, and the electron thermal diffusivity reached neoclassical level. The global energy confinement time increased with increase of n{sub e-fir}. The plasma stored energy of 530 kJ with n{sub e-fir} = 3.2 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −3}, which is 1.7 times larger than the previous record in the ECRH plasma in the LHD, has been successfully achieved.

  17. Spatially resolved charge-state and current-density distributions at the extraction of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Panitzsch, Lauri; Peleikis, Thies; Stalder, Michael; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.

    2011-09-15

    In this paper we present our measurements of charge-state and current-density distributions performed in very close vicinity (15 mm) of the extraction of our hexapole geometry electron cyclotron resonance ion source. We achieved a relatively high spatial resolution reducing the aperture of our 3D-movable extraction (puller) electrode to a diameter of only 0.5 mm. Thus, we are able to limit the source of the extracted ion beam to a very small region of the plasma electrode's hole (O = 4 mm) and therefore to a very small region of the neutral plasma sheath. The information about the charge-state distribution and the current density in the plane of the plasma electrode at each particular position is conserved in the ion beam. We determined the total current density distribution at a fixed coaxial distance of only 15 mm to the plasma electrode by remotely moving the small-aperture puller electrode which contained a dedicated Faraday cup (FC) across the aperture of the plasma electrode. In a second measurement we removed the FC and recorded m/q-spectra for the different positions using a sector magnet. From our results we can deduce that different ion charge-states can be grouped into bloated triangles of different sizes and same orientation at the extraction with the current density peaking at centre. This confirms observations from other groups based on simulations and emittance measurements. We present our measurements in detail and discuss possible systematic errors.

  18. Design and fabrication of circular and rectangular components for electron-cyclotron-resonant heating of tandem mirror experiment-upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Felker, B.; Calderon, M.O.; Chargin, A.K.; Coffield, F.E.; Lang, D.D.; Rubert, R.R.; Pedrotti, L.R.; Stallard, B.W.; Gallagher, N.C. Jr.; Sweeney, D.W.

    1983-11-18

    The electron-cyclotron-resonant heating (ECRH) systems of rectangular waveguides on Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U) operated with a overall efficiency of 50%, each system using a 28-GHz, 200-kW pulsed gyrotron. We designed and built four circular-waveguide systems with greater efficiency and greater power-handling capabilities to replace the rectangular waveguides. Two of these circular systems, at the 5-kG second-harmonic heating locations, have a total transmission efficiency of >90%. The two systems at the 10-kG fundamental heating locations have a total transmission efficiency of 80%. The difference in efficiency is due to the additional components required to launch the microwaves in the desired orientation and polarization with respect to magnetic-field lines at the 10-kG points. These systems handle the total power available from each gyrotron but do not have the arcing limitation problem of the rectangular waveguide. Each system requires several complex components. The overall physical layout and the design considerations for the rectangular and circular waveguide components are described here.

  19. Upgrade of the beam extraction system of the GTS-LHC electron cyclotron resonance ion source at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Toivanen, V. Bellodi, G.; Dimov, V.; Küchler, D.; Lombardi, A. M.; Maintrot, M.

    2016-02-15

    Linac3 is the first accelerator in the heavy ion injector chain of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), providing multiply charged heavy ion beams for the CERN experimental program. The ion beams are produced with GTS-LHC, a 14.5 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source, operated in afterglow mode. Improvement of the GTS-LHC beam formation and beam transport along Linac3 is part of the upgrade program of the injector chain in preparation for the future high luminosity LHC. A mismatch between the ion beam properties in the ion source extraction region and the acceptance of the following Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) section has been identified as one of the factors limiting the Linac3 performance. The installation of a new focusing element, an einzel lens, into the GTS-LHC extraction region is foreseen as a part of the Linac3 upgrade, as well as a redesign of the first section of the LEBT. Details of the upgrade and results of a beam dynamics study of the extraction region and LEBT modifications will be presented.

  20. Surface-Induced Dissociation of Protein Complexes in a Hybrid Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jing; Zhou, Mowei; Gilbert, Joshua D; Wolff, Jeremy J; Somogyi, Árpád; Pedder, Randall E; Quintyn, Royston S; Morrison, Lindsay J; Easterling, Michael L; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Wysocki, Vicki H

    2017-01-03

    Mass spectrometry continues to develop as a valuable tool in the analysis of proteins and protein complexes. In protein complex mass spectrometry studies, surface-induced dissociation (SID) has been successfully applied in quadrupole time-of-flight (Q-TOF) instruments. SID provides structural information on noncovalent protein complexes that is complementary to other techniques. However, the mass resolution of Q-TOF instruments can limit the information that can be obtained for protein complexes by SID. Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) provides ultrahigh resolution and ultrahigh mass accuracy measurements. In this study, an SID device was designed and successfully installed in a hybrid FT-ICR instrument in place of the standard gas collision cell. The SID-FT-ICR platform has been tested with several protein complex systems (homooligomers, a heterooligomer, and a protein-ligand complex, ranging from 53 to 85 kDa), and the results are consistent with data previously acquired on Q-TOF platforms, matching predictions from known protein interface information. SID fragments with the same m/z but different charge states are well-resolved based on distinct spacing between adjacent isotope peaks, and the addition of metal cations and ligands can also be isotopically resolved with the ultrahigh mass resolution available in FT-ICR.