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Sample records for cyclotron wall conditioning

  1. Ion and electron cyclotron wall conditioning in stellarator and tokamak magnetic field configuration on WEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Wauters, T.; Louche, F.; Urlings, P.

    2014-02-12

    Discharge wall conditioning is an effective tool to improve plasma performance in tokamaks and stellarators. RF Discharge Conditioning (RFDC) techniques are envisaged for use during operational campaigns on superconducting devices like the ITER tokamak and W7-X stellarator, as alternative to DC Glow Discharge Conditioning which is inefficient in presence of magnetic fields. This contribution investigates RFDC in both the ion and electron cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF and ECRF) on the WEGA device (Max-Planck-Institute for Plasma Physics, Greifswald, Germany) as preparation for W7-X operation. ECRF discharges produced by localised absorption of RF power at EC resonance layers suffer from poor radial discharge homogeneity in the tokamak vacuum magnetic field configuration, severely limiting the plasma wetted wall areas and consequently the conditioning efficiency. The non-localised production of ICRF discharges by collisional RF power absorption features much improved discharge homogeneity making Ion Cyclotron Wall Conditioning (ICWC) the favoured RFDC technique for superconducting tokamaks. RFDC with the stellarator vacuum magnetic field needs to aim at sufficient plasma densities at and outside the last closed flux surface (LCFS), maximising the convective plasma flux along the open field lines to the wall. Whereas for ICRF discharges this condition is easily fulfilled, on WEGA for He-ECRF discharges this could be achieved as well by off axis heating close to the LCFS. In stellarator magnetic field configuration it is found that He-ICWC for wall desaturation is at least one order of magnitude more efficient than He-ECWC. Novel ECWC methods are proposed that can decrease this efficiency gap with ICWC to a factor 2-3. The efficiency difference is less pronounced in case of H{sub 2}-ICWC and ECWC for isotopic exchange.

  2. Ion and electron cyclotron wall conditioning in stellarator and tokamak magnetic field configuration on WEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wauters, T.; Laqua, H. P.; Otte, M.; Preynas, M.; Stange, T.; Urlings, P.; Altenburg, Y.; Aßmus, D.; Birus, D.; Louche, F.

    2014-02-01

    Discharge wall conditioning is an effective tool to improve plasma performance in tokamaks and stellarators. RF Discharge Conditioning (RFDC) techniques are envisaged for use during operational campaigns on superconducting devices like the ITER tokamak and W7-X stellarator, as alternative to DC Glow Discharge Conditioning which is inefficient in presence of magnetic fields. This contribution investigates RFDC in both the ion and electron cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF and ECRF) on the WEGA device (Max-Planck-Institute for Plasma Physics, Greifswald, Germany) as preparation for W7-X operation. ECRF discharges produced by localised absorption of RF power at EC resonance layers suffer from poor radial discharge homogeneity in the tokamak vacuum magnetic field configuration, severely limiting the plasma wetted wall areas and consequently the conditioning efficiency. The non-localised production of ICRF discharges by collisional RF power absorption features much improved discharge homogeneity making Ion Cyclotron Wall Conditioning (ICWC) the favoured RFDC technique for superconducting tokamaks. RFDC with the stellarator vacuum magnetic field needs to aim at sufficient plasma densities at and outside the last closed flux surface (LCFS), maximising the convective plasma flux along the open field lines to the wall. Whereas for ICRF discharges this condition is easily fulfilled, on WEGA for He-ECRF discharges this could be achieved as well by off axis heating close to the LCFS. In stellarator magnetic field configuration it is found that He-ICWC for wall desaturation is at least one order of magnitude more efficient than He-ECWC. Novel ECWC methods are proposed that can decrease this efficiency gap with ICWC to a factor 2-3. The efficiency difference is less pronounced in case of H2-ICWC and ECWC for isotopic exchange.

  3. Ion Cyclotron Wall Conditioning Experiments on Tore Supra in Presence of the Toroidal Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Wauters, T.; Douai, D.; Bremond, S.; Lombard, G.; Pegourie, B.; Tsitrone, E.; de la Cal, E.; Lyssoivan, A.; Van Schoor, M.

    2009-11-26

    Wall conditioning techniques applicable in the presence of the high toroidal magnetic field will be required for the operation of ITER for tritium removal, isotopic ratio control and recovery to normal operation after disruptions. Recently ion cyclotron wall conditioning (ICWC) experiments have been carried out on Tore Supra in order to assess the efficiency of this technique in ITER relevant conditions. The ICRF discharges were operated in He/H{sub 2} mixtures at the Tore Supra nominal field (3.8 T) and a RF frequency of 48 MHz, i.e. within the ITER operational space. RF pulses of 60 s (max.) were applied using a standard Tore Supra two-strap resonant double loop antenna in ICWC mode, operated either in {pi} or 0-phasing with a noticeable improvement of the RF coupling in the latter case. In order to assess the efficiency of the technique for the control of isotopic ratio the wall was first preloaded using a D{sub 2} glow discharge. After 15 minutes of ICWC in He/H{sub 2} gas mixtures the isotopic ratio was altered from 4% to 50% at the price of an important H implantation into the walls. An overall analysis comparing plasma production and the conditioning efficiency as a function of discharge parameters is given.

  4. Ion Cyclotron Wall Conditioning Experiments on Tore Supra in Presence of the Toroidal Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wauters, T.; Douai, D.; Brémond, S.; de la Cal, E.; Lombard, G.; Lyssoivan, A.; Pegourié, B.; Tsitrone, E.; Van Schoor, M.; Van Oost, G.

    2009-11-01

    Wall conditioning techniques applicable in the presence of the high toroidal magnetic field will be required for the operation of ITER for tritium removal, isotopic ratio control and recovery to normal operation after disruptions. Recently ion cyclotron wall conditioning (ICWC) experiments have been carried out on Tore Supra in order to assess the efficiency of this technique in ITER relevant conditions. The ICRF discharges were operated in He/H2 mixtures at the Tore Supra nominal field (3.8 T) and a RF frequency of 48 MHz, i.e. within the ITER operational space. RF pulses of 60 s (max.) were applied using a standard Tore Supra two-strap resonant double loop antenna in ICWC mode, operated either in π or 0-phasing with a noticeable improvement of the RF coupling in the latter case. In order to assess the efficiency of the technique for the control of isotopic ratio the wall was first preloaded using a D2 glow discharge. After 15 minutes of ICWC in He/H2 gas mixtures the isotopic ratio was altered from 4% to 50% at the price of an important H implantation into the walls. An overall analysis comparing plasma production and the conditioning efficiency as a function of discharge parameters is given.

  5. Isotope exchange experiments on TEXTOR and TORE SUPRA using Ion Cyclotron Wall Conditioning and Glow Discharge Conditioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wauters, T.; Douai, D.; Lyssoivan, A.; Philipps, V.; Brémond, S.; Freisinger, M.; Kreter, A.; Lombard, G.; Marchuk, O.; Mollard, P.; Paul, M. K.; Pegourié, B.; Reimer, H.; Sergienko, G.; Tsitrone, E.; Vervier, M.; Van Wassenhove, G.; Wünderlich, D.; Van Schoor, M.; Van Oost, G.

    2011-08-01

    This contribution reports on isotope exchange studies with both Ion Cyclotron Wall Conditioning (ICWC) and Glow Discharge Conditioning (GDC) in TEXTOR and TORE SUPRA. The discharges have been carried out in H2, D2 (ICWC and GDC) and He/H2 mixtures (ICWC). The higher reionization probability in ICWC compared to GDC, following from the 3 to 4 orders of magnitude higher electron density, leads to a lower pumping efficiency of wall desorbed species. GDC has in this analysis (5-10) times higher removal rates of wall desorbed species than ICWC, although the wall release rate is 10 times higher in ICWC. Also the measured high retention during ICWC can be understood as an effect of the high reionization probability. The use of short RF pulses (∼1 s) followed by a larger pumping time significantly improves the ratio of implanted over recovered particles, without severely lowering the total amount of removed particles.

  6. Impact of ion cyclotron wall conditioning on fuel removal from plasma-facing components at TEXTOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, A. G.; Möller, S.; Petersson, P.; Ivanova, D.; Kreter, A.; Rubel, M.; Wauters, T.

    2014-04-01

    Ion cyclotron wall conditioning (ICWC) is based on low temperature and low density plasmas produced and sustained by ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) pulses in reactive or noble gases. The technique is being developed for ITER. It is tested in tokamaks in the presence of toroidal magnetic field (0.2-3.8 T) and heating power of the order of 105 W. ICWC with hydrogen, deuterium and oxygen-helium mixture was studied in the TEXTOR tokamak. The exposed samples were pre-characterized limiter tiles mounted on specially designed probes. The objectives were to assess the reduction of deuterium content, the uniformity of the reduction and the retention of seeded oxygen. For the last objective oxygen-18 was used as a marker. ICWC in hydrogen caused a drop of deuterium content in the tile by a factor of more than 2: from 4.5 × 1018 to 1.9 × 1018 D cm-2. A decrease of the fuel content by approximately 25% was achieved by the ICWC in oxygen, while no reduction of the fuel content was measured after exposure to discharges in deuterium. These are the first data ever obtained showing quantitatively the local decrease of deuterium in wall components treated by ICWC in a tokamak. The oxygen retention in the tiles exposed to ICWC with oxygen-helium was analyzed for different orientations and radial positions with respect to plasma. An average retention of 1.38 × 1016 18O cm-2 was measured. A maximum of the retention, 4.4 × 1016 18O cm-2, was identified on a sample surface near the plasma edge. The correlation with the gas inlet and antennae location has been studied.

  7. Wall conditioning on ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Michiya; Pitts, Richard A.

    2011-08-01

    Like all tokamaks, ITER will require wall conditioning systems and strategies for successful operation from the point of view of plasma-facing surface preparation. Unlike today's devices however, ITER will have to manage large quantities of tritium fuel, imposing on wall conditioning a major responsibility for tritium inventory control. It will also feature the largest plasma-facing beryllium surface ever used in a tokamak and its high duty cycle and long pulse are expected to lead to the rapid formation of deposited layers in which tritium can accumulate. This paper summarises the currently planned ITER wall conditioning systems and describes the strategy for their use throughout exploitation of the device.

  8. Peculiarities of charged particle dynamics under cyclotron resonance conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Moiseev, S. S.; Buts, V. A.; Erokhin, N. S.

    2016-08-15

    Peculiarities of the dynamics of charged particles interacting with electromagnetic radiation under nearly autoresonance conditions are analyzed. In particular, analysis of nonlinear cyclotron resonances shows that their widths increase when the autoresonance conditions are approached. In this case, however, the distance between nonlinear resonances increases even faster, due to which nonlinear resonances do not overlap and, accordingly, regimes with dynamic chaos do not occur. According to calculations, the dynamics of charged particles under the autoresonance conditions is very sensitive to fluctuations, the effect of which can be anomalously large and lead to superdiffusion. It is shown that, under the autoresonance conditions, particle dynamics on small time intervals can differ significantly from that on large time intervals. This effect is most pronounced in the presence of fluctuations in the system.

  9. Ion cyclotron resonance frequency heating in JET during initial operations with the ITER-like wall

    SciTech Connect

    Jacquet, P. Monakhov, I.; Arnoux, G.; Brix, M.; Graham, M.; Meigs, A.; Sirinelli, A.; Colas, L.; Czarnecka, A.; Lerche, E.; Van-Eester, D.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Brezinsek, S.; Campergue, A.-L.; Klepper, C. C.; Milanesio, D.; and others

    2014-06-15

    In 2011/12, JET started operation with its new ITER-Like Wall (ILW) made of a tungsten (W) divertor and a beryllium (Be) main chamber wall. The impact of the new wall materials on the JET Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency (ICRF) operation is assessed and some important properties of JET plasmas heated with ICRF are highlighted. A ∼ 20% reduction of the antenna coupling resistance is observed with the ILW as compared with the JET carbon (JET-C) wall. Heat-fluxes on the protecting limiters close the antennas, quantified using Infra-Red thermography (maximum 4.5 MW/m{sup 2} in current drive phasing), are within the wall power load handling capabilities. A simple RF sheath rectification model using the antenna near-fields calculated with the TOPICA code can reproduce the heat-flux pattern around the antennas. ICRF heating results in larger tungsten and nickel (Ni) contents in the plasma and in a larger core radiation when compared to Neutral Beam Injection (NBI) heating. The location of the tungsten ICRF specific source could not be identified but some experimental observations indicate that main-chamber W components could be an important impurity source: for example, the divertor W influx deduced from spectroscopy is comparable when using RF or NBI at same power and comparable divertor conditions, and Be evaporation in the main chamber results in a strong reduction of the impurity level. In L-mode plasmas, the ICRF specific high-Z impurity content decreased when operating at higher plasma density and when increasing the hydrogen concentration from 5% to 15%. Despite the higher plasma bulk radiation, ICRF exhibited overall good plasma heating performance; the power is typically deposited at the plasma centre while the radiation is mainly from the outer part of the plasma bulk. Application of ICRF heating in H-mode plasmas has started, and the beneficial effect of ICRF central electron heating to prevent W accumulation in the plasma core has been observed.

  10. OTVE combustor wall condition monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szemenyei, Brian; Nelson, Robert S.; Barkhoudarian, S.

    1989-01-01

    Conventional ultrasonics, eddy current, and electromagnetic acoustic transduction (EMAT) technologies were evaluated to determine their capability of measuring wall thickness/wear of individual cooling channels in test specimens simulating conditions in the throat region of an OTVE combustion chamber liner. Quantitative results are presented for the eddy current technology, which was shown to measure up to the optimum 20-mil wall thickness with near single channel resolution. Additional results demonstrate the capability of the conventional ultrasonics and EMAT technologies to detect a thinning or cracked wall. Recommendations for additional eddy current and EMAT development tests are presented.

  11. Wall-loss distribution of charge breeding ions in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, S. C.; Oyaizu, M.; Imai, N.; Hirayama, Y.; Ishiyama, H.; Miyatake, H.; Niki, K.; Okada, M.; Watanabe, Y. X.; Otokawa, Y.; Osa, A.; Ichikawa, S.

    2012-02-15

    We investigated the ion-loss distribution on the sidewall of an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma chamber using the 18-GHz ECR charge breeder at the Tokai Radioactive Ion Accelerator Complex (TRIAC). Similarities and differences between the ion-loss distributions (longitudinal and azimuthal) of different ion species (i.e., radioactive {sup 111}In{sup 1+} and {sup 140}Xe{sup 1+} ions that are typical volatile and nonvolatile elements) was qualitatively discussed to understand the element dependence of the charge breeding efficiency. Especially, the similarities represent universal ion loss characteristics in an ECR charge breeder, which are different from the loss patterns of electrons on the ECRIS wall.

  12. Design of the shielding wall of a cyclotron room and the activation interpretation using the Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, D. G.; Kim, J. M.; Kim, J. H.

    2017-01-01

    Medical cyclotron is mainly a facility used for producing radiopharmaceutical products, which secondarily generate high energy radiation when producing a radiopharmaceutical product. In this study, the intention is that the reductions in spatial dose rate for the radiation generated when cyclotron is operated and the absorbed dose rate, according to the width of shielding wall, will be analyzed. The simulation planned targetry and protons of 16.5 MeV, 60μA through a Monte Carlo simulation, and as a result of the simulation, it has been found through an analysis that a concrete shielding wall of 200 cm is needed, according to the absorbed dose rate of the shielding wall thickness of cyclotron, and the concrete gives an external exposure level of 1 μSv/hr after 19 years of cyclotron operation as it is activated by the nuclear reaction of cyclotron. When taking into account the mechanical life span of cyclotron, it is deemed necessary to develop additional shielding and a low activation material.

  13. Wall-loss distribution of charge breeding ions in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, S. C.; Oyaizu, M.; Imai, N.; Hirayama, Y.; Ishiyama, H.; Miyatake, H.; Niki, K.; Okada, M.; Watanabe, Y. X.; Otokawa, Y.; Osa, A.; Ichikawa, S.

    2011-03-15

    The ion loss distribution in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) was investigated to understand the element dependence of the charge breeding efficiency in an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) charge breeder. The radioactive {sup 111}In{sup 1+} and {sup 140}Xe{sup 1+} ions (typical nonvolatile and volatile elements, respectively) were injected into the ECR charge breeder at the Tokai Radioactive Ion Accelerator Complex to breed their charge states. Their respective residual activities on the sidewall of the cylindrical plasma chamber of the source were measured after charge breeding as functions of the azimuthal angle and longitudinal position and two-dimensional distributions of ions lost during charge breeding in the ECRIS were obtained. These distributions had different azimuthal symmetries. The origins of these different azimuthal symmetries are qualitatively discussed by analyzing the differences and similarities in the observed wall-loss patterns. The implications for improving the charge breeding efficiencies of nonvolatile elements in ECR charge breeders are described. The similarities represent universal ion loss characteristics in an ECR charge breeder, which are different from the loss patterns of electrons on the ECRIS wall.

  14. Wall conditioning in JT-60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, T.; Yamamoto, M.; Akino, N.; Kodama, K.; Nakamura, H.; Niikura, S.; Takatsu, H.; Shimizu, M.; Ohkubo, M.; Ohta, M.; JT-60 Team

    1987-02-01

    The vacuum vessel of JT-60 has a volume of 160 m 3 and a vacuum side surface of 2750 m 2 containing the surfaces of the first wall and many types of ports. The first wall is made of 20 μm TiC coated molybdenum and Inconel 625, bolted to the inner surface of the vacuum vessel. The vacuum vessel is evacuated with four identical pumping systems with a total pumping speed of 29 m 3/s for hydrogen. The wall conditioning procedure consisted of two wipes with special cloths wetted by freon after hot water and freon jet cleaning, and three bakeouts were carried out before the first plasma production. An ultimate pressure of 7.4 × 10 -7 Pa and an outgassing rate of 6.8 × 10 -10 Pa m 3/s m 2 were obtained. Low current pulse discharge cleaning (TDC) was carried out for two weeks at a vacuum vessel temperature of 200°C. The TDC is performed typically with a plasma current of 30 kA, a pulse duration of 40 ms, a repetition period in the range from 0.3 s to 1.2 s, a hydrogen pressure of 5.0 × 10 -3 Pa, and a toroidal field of 0.45 T. The TDC conditioning for 50 h removed a quantity of water vapor corresponding to approximately 0.3 g. The main residual gases consisting of hydrocarbons, were monitored in addition to hydrogen and carbon monoxide.

  15. Prediction of neutron induced radioactivity in the concrete walls of a PET cyclotron vault room with MCNPX.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Serrano, J Javier; Díez de los Ríos, Antonio

    2010-11-01

    The authors want to assess the relevance of the neutron activation of the concrete vault of the PET cyclotron at CIMES (Universidad de Malaga) by predicting specific activities of the main activation products in the vault and their variation profiles as a function of penetration depth into concrete at present and after 10 yr of cyclotron operation. The dual proton cyclotron is used for PET isotopes production, mainly 18F. During the years 2006 and 2008, the using rate has been 1 h/day at single beam (40 microA). From January 2008, using rate is 4 h/day at dual beam (80 microA). The energy of the cyclotron proton beam is 18 MeV. Four point locations were chosen on the walls of the cyclotron room to assess neutron induced activity concentrations. In each wall point location, neutron induced radionuclide specific activity was assessed from the wall surface to a depth of 120 cm within concrete. Simulations were carried out with the Monte Carlo based radiation transport code MCNPX (v2.6.0). According to MCNPX calculations, activity depth profiles of activation products studied, except 54Mn, have a maximum at variable depths from the wall surface never beyond 12 cm. 54Mn activity decreases exponentially in all the studied depth ranges within wall concrete. The activity of 152Eu, 154Eu, 60CO, 134Cs, 46Sc, and 65Zn decreases exponentially beyond a 30 cm depth into concrete. 54Mn activity presents the faster decrease within a concrete vault with an attenuation length of 21 cm. According to MCNPX estimations, present activity in the cyclotron vault is mostly due to 46Sc and 60Co, with highest specific activity near the vault surface of 146 +/- 16 and 50 +/- 4.6 Bq/kg, respectively. 46Sc and 60Co activity measurements near the surface wall present an acceptable match with the estimation within the uncertainties, but measured activities of the other radionuclides are quite over the MCNPX estimations. The calculations after 10 yr of cyclotron operation predict a slight increase

  16. Residual long-lived radioactivity distribution in the inner concrete wall of a cyclotron vault.

    PubMed

    Kimura, K; Ishikawa, T; Kinno, M; Yamadera, A; Nakamura, T

    1994-12-01

    We measured the depth distribution of residual long-lived radioactivity in the inner concrete wall of a cyclotron vault by assaying concrete cores and we estimated the neutron flux distribution in the inner concrete wall by means of activation detectors. Nine long-lived radioactive nuclides (46Sc, 59Fe, 60Co, 65Zn, 134Cs, 152Eu, 154Eu, 22Na, and 54Mn) were identified from the gamma-ray spectra measured in the concrete samples. It was confirmed that the radionuclides induced by thermal neutrons through the (n, gamma) reaction are dominant, and that the induced activity by thermal neutrons is greatest at a depth of 5 to 10 cm rather than at the surface of the concrete and decreases exponentially beyond a depth of about 20 cm. By comparing the radioactivity and neutron flux distributions, we can estimate the induced long-lived radioactivity in concrete after a long period of operation from the short-term activation measurement.

  17. [Evaluation of Radio-activated Compounds Produced in the Walls and Adjacent Areas of a Small Medical Cyclotron].

    PubMed

    Saito, Kyoko; Takahashi, Yasuyuki; Yamaguchi, Ichiro; Kimura, Ken-Ichi; Kanzaki, Takao; Shimada, Hirotaka; Otake, Hidenori; Oriuchi, Noboru; Endo, Keigo

    2009-01-01

    According to the (18)O(p, n) (18)F reaction, fast neutrons produced in the target will cause residual radioactivity in a cyclotron itself and in the concrete walls mainly after thermalization of neutrons.As exploratory work prior to decommissioning of a medical cyclotron facility, surface and core samples of the facility's concrete walls were collected after confirming the external radiation was at a low level based on hollow ionization chamber-type survey meter and glass dosimeter measurements. The residual radioactivity in these samples was measured by gamma-spectrometry. Residual radioactivity was detected in all of the components of the cyclotron. In the concrete, eight residual radioactive nuclides were identified. However, radioactivity concentrations of these radionuclides were less than that of (40)K which may exist generally in a natural environment. A clearance level for radioactive solid waste has not been defined nor implemented at present in Japan, and reliable evaluation will be required to minimize radioactive waste at the time of decommissioning. The present results provide basic data for establishment of regulatory guidelines for decommissioning of medical cyclotrons.

  18. Distribution of residual long-lived radioactivity in the inner concrete walls of a compact medical cyclotron vault room.

    PubMed

    Fujibuchi, Toshioh; Nohtomi, Akihiro; Baba, Shingo; Sasaki, Masayuki; Komiya, Isao; Umedzu, Yoshiyuki; Honda, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Compact medical cyclotrons have been set up to generate the nuclides necessary for positron emission tomography. In accelerator facilities, neutrons activate the concrete used to construct the vault room; this activation increases with the use of an accelerator. The activation causes a substantial radioactive waste management problem when facilities are decommissioned. In the present study, several concrete cores from the walls, ceiling and floor of a compact medical cyclotron vault room were samples 2 years after the termination of operations, and the radioactivity concentrations of radionuclides were estimated. Cylindrical concrete cores 5 cm in diameter and 10 cm in length were bored from the concrete wall, ceiling and floor. Core boring was performed at 18 points. The gamma-ray spectrum of each sample was measured using a high-purity germanium detector. The degree of activation of the concrete in the cyclotron vault room was analyzed, and the range and tendency toward activation in the vault room were examined. (60)Co and (152)Eu were identified by gamma-ray spectrometry of the concrete samples. (152)Eu and (60)Co are produced principally from the stable isotopes of europium and cobalt by neutron capture reactions. The radioactivity concentration did not vary much between the surface of the concrete and at a depth of 10 cm. Although the radioactivity concentration near the target was higher than the clearance level for radioactive waste indicated in IAEA RS-G-1.7, the mean radioactivity concentration in the walls and floor was lower than the clearance level. The radioactivity concentration of the inner concrete wall of the medical cyclotron vault room was not uniform. The areas exceeding the clearance level were in the vicinity of the target, but most of the building did not exceed the clearance levels.

  19. Calculation of the spontaneous cyclotron emissivity using the complete relativistic resonance condition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freund, H. P.; Wu, C. S.; Gaffey, J. D., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    An expression for the spectral emissivity of spontaneous synchrotron radiation for a plasma which consists of both thermal and suprathermal electron components is derived using the complete relativistic cyclotron resonance condition. The expression is valid over all angles of propagation. The result is applied to the study of the emission of radiation from an energetic population of electrons with a loss-cone distribution in a relatively low-density plasma (i.e., the electron plasma frequency is less than the cyclotron frequency).

  20. Sawtooth control in JET with ITER relevant low field side resonance ion cyclotron resonance heating and ITER-like wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, J. P.; Lennholm, M.; Chapman, I. T.; Lerche, E.; Reich, M.; Alper, B.; Bobkov, V.; Dumont, R.; Faustin, J. M.; Jacquet, P.; Jaulmes, F.; Johnson, T.; Keeling, D. L.; Liu, Yueqiang; Nicolas, T.; Tholerus, S.; Blackman, T.; Carvalho, I. S.; Coelho, R.; Van Eester, D.; Felton, R.; Goniche, M.; Kiptily, V.; Monakhov, I.; Nave, M. F. F.; Perez von Thun, C.; Sabot, R.; Sozzi, C.; Tsalas, M.

    2015-01-01

    New experiments at JET with the ITER-like wall show for the first time that ITER-relevant low field side resonance first harmonic ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) can be used to control sawteeth that have been initially lengthened by fast particles. In contrast to previous (Graves et al 2012 Nat. Commun. 3 624) high field side resonance sawtooth control experiments undertaken at JET, it is found that the sawteeth of L-mode plasmas can be controlled with less accurate alignment between the resonance layer and the sawtooth inversion radius. This advantage, as well as the discovery that sawteeth can be shortened with various antenna phasings, including dipole, indicates that ICRH is a particularly effective and versatile tool that can be used in future fusion machines for controlling sawteeth. Without sawtooth control, neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) and locked modes were triggered at very low normalised beta. High power H-mode experiments show the extent to which ICRH can be tuned to control sawteeth and NTMs while simultaneously providing effective electron heating with improved flushing of high Z core impurities. Dedicated ICRH simulations using SELFO, SCENIC and EVE, including wide drift orbit effects, explain why sawtooth control is effective with various antenna phasings and show that the sawtooth control mechanism cannot be explained by enhancement of the magnetic shear. Hybrid kinetic-magnetohydrodynamic stability calculations using MISHKA and HAGIS unravel the optimal sawtooth control regimes in these ITER relevant plasma conditions.

  1. Influence of Wall Conditioning on ADITYA Plasma Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanna, R. L.; Jadeja, K. A.; Bhatt, S. B.; Bawankar, P. S.; Gupta, C. N.; Joisa, Y. S.; Atrey, P. K.; Manchanda, R.; Ramaiya, Nilam; Ghosh, J.; Raju, D.; Chattopadhyay, P. K.; Jha, R.; the Aditya Team

    2012-11-01

    ADITYA (R0 = 75 cm, a = 25 cm), an ohmically heated circular limiter tokamak is regularly being operated to carry out several experiments related to controlled thermonuclear fusion research. In recent operational campaign, various experiments have been carried out to enhance the discharge performance as well as improve the plasma parameters. A comparative plasma discharges study with SiC and Graphite limiter was carried out to increase the plasma heating and reduce runaways. Excellent plasma heating has been observed in many discharges using Graphite limiter. Good repeatability of low hard X-rays, high temperature discharges was obtained. The control of plasma impurities and hydrogen recycling is very much essential for high performance discharges. The wall conditioning in ADITYA tokamak is carried out by hydrogen glow discharge cleaning (GDC), Pulse discharge cleaning and electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) discharge cleaning techniques with and without lithium wall coating. GDC assisted Lithiumization was found to be the most effective technique for substantial reduction in Ha and low Z (CIII & O-I) impurities. The partial pressure of mass number 18 (H2O) and 28 (N2/C2H4/CO) were regularly monitored before plasma discharge operation. Furthermore, experiment on optimization of pulse gas feed was helped in reducing wall loading and recycling. However, hard X-rays suppression with the application of multiple gas puff has been successfully achieved during negative converter operation, which led to the extension of plasma pulse length up to ~ 250 ms. All the supporting facts and operation aspects are reported.

  2. Plasma Wall Interaction and Its Control by Wall Conditioning

    SciTech Connect

    Philipps, V

    2004-03-15

    The surrounding material walls in fusion devices must fulfil three important tasks:provide high vacuum conditions necessary to provide clean fusion plasmas absorb the power produced by the {alpha}-particles in the fusion processes and injected by auxiliary heating enable the exhaust of the helium ash by thermalisation of the helium plasma ions on material surfaces in the vicinity of helium pumps.The interaction of the plasma with the surrounding wall surfaces (PSI: plasma surface interaction) is therefore a necessary condition for fusion devices and not to avoid. In the plasma wall interaction a variety of bulk material and surface processes are involved on one side together with various special processes in the near surface plasma region on the other side. They can modify the properties of the boundary and main plasma in a feed back like behaviour. A prominent example is the release of impurities from the walls by plasma particle impact which increases the energy loss of the plasma by radiation and reduces thereby the particle fluxes to and impurity release from the walls.

  3. High-frequency conductivity of multilayer graphene and graphite under the conditions of quantum cyclotron resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, I. V.; Medina Pantoja, J. C.

    2014-06-01

    The conductivity tensor of a layered conductor with the Dirac-type energy spectrum of charge carriers placed in a quantizing magnetic field under the condition of normal skin-effect is investigated using the method of quantum kinetic equation. It is shown that under the cyclotron resonance conditions there appear high-temperature quantum oscillations of conductivity, which are weakly sensitive to thermal broadening of the Fermi level. We present the expressions for the classical and high-temperature contributions to the conductivity tensor which determine the conductivity in the range of not too low temperatures where the Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations are vanishing.

  4. Conditions for electron-cyclotron maser emission in the solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morosan, D. E.; Zucca, P.; Bloomfield, D. S.; Gallagher, P. T.

    2016-05-01

    Context. The Sun is an active source of radio emission ranging from long duration radio bursts associated with solar flares and coronal mass ejections to more complex, short duration radio bursts such as solar S bursts, radio spikes and fibre bursts. While plasma emission is thought to be the dominant emission mechanism for most radio bursts, the electron-cyclotron maser (ECM) mechanism may be responsible for more complex, short-duration bursts as well as fine structures associated with long-duration bursts. Aims: We investigate the conditions for ECM in the solar corona by considering the ratio of the electron plasma frequency ωp to the electron-cyclotron frequency Ωe. The ECM is theoretically possible when ωp/ Ωe< 1. Methods: Two-dimensional electron density, magnetic field, plasma frequency, and electron cyclotron frequency maps of the off-limb corona were created using observations from SDO/AIA and SOHO/LASCO, together with potential field extrapolations of the magnetic field. These maps were then used to calculate ωp/Ωe and Alfvén velocity maps of the off-limb corona. Results: We found that the condition for ECM emission (ωp/ Ωe< 1) is possible at heights <1.07 R⊙ in an active region near the limb; that is, where magnetic field strengths are >40 G and electron densities are >3 × 108 cm-3. In addition, we found comparatively high Alfvén velocities (>0.02c or >6000 km s-1) at heights <1.07 R⊙ within the active region. Conclusions: This demonstrates that the condition for ECM emission is satisfied within areas of the corona containing large magnetic fields, such as the core of a large active region. Therefore, ECM could be a possible emission mechanism for high-frequency radio and microwave bursts.

  5. Effect of the minority concentration on ion cyclotron resonance heating in presence of the ITER-like wall in JET

    SciTech Connect

    Van Eester, D.; Lerche, E.; Crombé, K.; Jachmich, S.; Bobkov, V.; Maggi, C.; Neu, R.; Pütterich, T.; Czarnecka, A.; Coenen, J. W.; and others

    2014-02-12

    The most recent JET campaign has focused on characterizing operation with the 'ITER-like' wall. One of the questions that needed to be answered is whether the auxiliary heating methods do not lead to unacceptably high levels of impurity influx, preventing fusion-relevant operation. In view of its high single pass absorption, hydrogen minority fundamental cyclotron heating in a deuterium plasma was chosen as the reference wave heating scheme in the ion cyclotron domain of frequencies. The present paper discusses the plasma behavior as a function of the minority concentration X[H] in L-mode with up to 4MW of RF power. It was found that the tungsten concentration decreases by a factor of 4 when the minority concentration is increased from X[H] ≈ 5% to X[H] % 20% and that it remains at a similar level when X[H] is further increased to 30%; a monotonic decrease in Beryllium emission is simultaneously observed. The radiated power drops by a factor of 2 and reaches a minimum at X[H] ≈ 20%. It is discussed that poor single pass absorption at too high minority concentrations ultimately tailors the avoidance of the RF induced impurity influx. The edge density being different for different minority concentrations, it is argued that the impact ICRH has on the fate of heavy ions is not only a result of core (wave and transport) physics but also of edge dynamics and fueling.

  6. Effect of the minority concentration on ion cyclotron resonance heating in presence of the ITER-like wall in JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Eester, D.; Lerche, E.; Jacquet, P.; Bobkov, V.; Czarnecka, A.; Coenen, J. W.; Colas, L.; Crombé, K.; Graham, M.; Jachmich, S.; Joffrin, E.; Klepper, C. C.; Kiptily, V.; Lehnen, M.; Maggi, C.; Marcotte, F.; Matthews, G.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Mc Cormick, K.; Monakhov, I.; Nave, M. F. F.; Neu, R.; Noble, C.; Ongena, J.; Pütterich, T.; Rimini, F.; Solano, E. R.; van Rooij, G.; JET-EFDA contributors

    2014-02-01

    The most recent JET campaign has focused on characterizing operation with the "ITER-like" wall. One of the questions that needed to be answered is whether the auxiliary heating methods do not lead to unacceptably high levels of impurity influx, preventing fusion-relevant operation. In view of its high single pass absorption, hydrogen minority fundamental cyclotron heating in a deuterium plasma was chosen as the reference wave heating scheme in the ion cyclotron domain of frequencies. The present paper discusses the plasma behavior as a function of the minority concentration X[H] in L-mode with up to 4MW of RF power. It was found that the tungsten concentration decreases by a factor of 4 when the minority concentration is increased from X[H] ≈ 5% to X[H] % 20% and that it remains at a similar level when X[H] is further increased to 30%; a monotonic decrease in Beryllium emission is simultaneously observed. The radiated power drops by a factor of 2 and reaches a minimum at X[H] ≈ 20%. It is discussed that poor single pass absorption at too high minority concentrations ultimately tailors the avoidance of the RF induced impurity influx. The edge density being different for different minority concentrations, it is argued that the impact ICRH has on the fate of heavy ions is not only a result of core (wave and transport) physics but also of edge dynamics and fueling.

  7. Accessibility condition of wave propagation and multicharged ion production in electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yushi; Yano, Keisuke; Nishiokada, Takuya; Nagaya, Tomoki; Kimura, Daiju; Kumakura, Sho; Imai, Youta; Hagino, Shogo; Otsuka, Takuro; Sato, Fuminobu

    2016-02-01

    A new tandem type source of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasmas has been constructing for producing synthesized ion beams in Osaka University. Magnetic mirror field configuration with octupole magnets can be controlled to various shape of ECR zones, namely, in the 2nd stage plasma to be available by a pair mirror and a supplemental coil. Noteworthy correlations between these magnetic configurations and production of multicharged ions are investigated in detail, as well as their optimum conditions. We have been considering accessibility condition of electromagnetic and electrostatic waves propagating in ECR ion source plasma, and then investigated their correspondence relationships with production of multicharged ions. It has been clarified that there exits efficient configuration of ECR zones for producing multicharged ion beams experimentally, and then has been suggested from detail accessibility conditions on the ECR plasma that new resonance, i.e., upper hybrid resonance, must have occurred.

  8. Accessibility condition of wave propagation and multicharged ion production in electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Yushi Yano, Keisuke; Nishiokada, Takuya; Nagaya, Tomoki; Kimura, Daiju; Kumakura, Sho; Imai, Youta; Hagino, Shogo; Otsuka, Takuro; Sato, Fuminobu

    2016-02-15

    A new tandem type source of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasmas has been constructing for producing synthesized ion beams in Osaka University. Magnetic mirror field configuration with octupole magnets can be controlled to various shape of ECR zones, namely, in the 2nd stage plasma to be available by a pair mirror and a supplemental coil. Noteworthy correlations between these magnetic configurations and production of multicharged ions are investigated in detail, as well as their optimum conditions. We have been considering accessibility condition of electromagnetic and electrostatic waves propagating in ECR ion source plasma, and then investigated their correspondence relationships with production of multicharged ions. It has been clarified that there exits efficient configuration of ECR zones for producing multicharged ion beams experimentally, and then has been suggested from detail accessibility conditions on the ECR plasma that new resonance, i.e., upper hybrid resonance, must have occurred.

  9. Accessibility condition of wave propagation and multicharged ion production in electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Yushi; Yano, Keisuke; Nishiokada, Takuya; Nagaya, Tomoki; Kimura, Daiju; Kumakura, Sho; Imai, Youta; Hagino, Shogo; Otsuka, Takuro; Sato, Fuminobu

    2016-02-01

    A new tandem type source of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasmas has been constructing for producing synthesized ion beams in Osaka University. Magnetic mirror field configuration with octupole magnets can be controlled to various shape of ECR zones, namely, in the 2nd stage plasma to be available by a pair mirror and a supplemental coil. Noteworthy correlations between these magnetic configurations and production of multicharged ions are investigated in detail, as well as their optimum conditions. We have been considering accessibility condition of electromagnetic and electrostatic waves propagating in ECR ion source plasma, and then investigated their correspondence relationships with production of multicharged ions. It has been clarified that there exits efficient configuration of ECR zones for producing multicharged ion beams experimentally, and then has been suggested from detail accessibility conditions on the ECR plasma that new resonance, i.e., upper hybrid resonance, must have occurred.

  10. Dry-Wall Survival Under IFE Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Raffray, A.R.; El-Guebaly, L.; Federici, G.; Haynes, D.; Najmabadi, F.; Petti, D.

    2004-11-15

    The chamber wall armor is subject to demanding conditions in inertial fusion energy (IFE) chambers. IFE operation is cyclic in nature, and key issues are (a) chamber evacuation to ensure that after each shot the chamber returns to a quiescent state in preparation for the target injection and the firing of the driver for the subsequent shot and (b) armor lifetime that requires that the armor accommodate the cyclic energy deposition while providing the required lifetime. Armor erosion would impact both of these requirements. Tungsten and carbon are considered as armor for IFE dry-wall chambers based on their high-temperature and high-heat-flux accommodation capabilities. This paper assesses the requirements on armor imposed by the operating conditions in IFE, including energy deposition density, time of deposition, and frequencies; describes their impact on the performance of the candidate armor materials; and discusses the major issues.

  11. Attenuation of wall disturbances in an electron cyclotron resonance oxygen–argon plasma using real time control

    SciTech Connect

    Keville, Bernard Gaman, Cezar; Turner, Miles M.; Zhang, Yang; Daniels, Stephen; Holohan, Anthony M.

    2014-07-01

    Present practice in plasma-assisted semiconductor manufacturing specifies recipes in terms of inputs such as gas flow rates, power and pressure. However, ostensibly identical chambers running identical recipes may produce very different results. Extensive chamber matching, i.e., initial iterative, empirical tuning of the process recipe, which entails time-consuming, ex situ statistical analysis of process metrics such as etch depth, uniformity, anisotropy and selectivity, is required to ensure acceptable results. Once matched, chambers are run open loop and are thus sensitive to disturbances such as actuator drift, wall seasoning and substrate loading, which may impact negatively on process reproducibility. An alternative approach, which may obviate the need for chamber matching and reduce the sensitivity of process metrics to exogenous disturbances, would be to specify a recipe in terms of quantities such as active species densities, and to regulate these in real time by adjusting the inputs with a suitable control algorithm. In this work, real time control of an electron cyclotron resonance O{sub 2}/Ar plasma used for photoresist ashing has been implemented. The design of elementary, model-based algorithms for the control of the argon 750 and oxygen 844 line intensities measured by optical emission spectroscopy is described. Fluorination of the chamber walls by means of an SF{sub 6} plasma prior to ashing inhibits wall recombination of oxygen radicals resulting in an approximately 20% increase in ash rate in the open loop case. However, closed loop control almost completely attenuates the effect of fluorination, thus demonstrating the efficacy of the control algorithms in ensuring a reproducible ash rate in the face of a wall disturbance.

  12. Predicting electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave amplitude from unstable ring current plasma conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xiangrong; Cowee, Misa M.; Jordanova, Vania K.; Gary, S. Peter; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Winske, Dan

    2016-11-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves in the Earth's inner magnetosphere are enhanced fluctuations driven unstable by ring current ion temperature anisotropy. EMIC waves can resonate with relativistic electrons and play an important role in precipitation of MeV radiation belt electrons. In this paper, we investigate the excitation and saturation of EMIC instability in a homogeneous plasma using both linear theory and nonlinear hybrid simulations. We have explored a four-dimensional parameter space, carried out a large number of simulations, and derived a scaling formula that relates the saturation EMIC wave amplitude to initial plasma conditions. Such scaling can be used in conjunction with ring current models like ring current-atmosphere interactions model with self-consistent magnetic field to provide global dynamic EMIC wave maps that will be more accurate inputs for radiation belt modeling than statistical models.

  13. Quantum quench with hard wall boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Garry; Andrei, Natan

    2015-03-01

    In this work we present analysis of a quench for the Lieb Liniger gas contained in a large box with hard wall boundary conditions. We study the time average of local correlation functions. We show that both the quench action logic and the GGE are applicable. We show that the time average of the system corresponds to an eigenstate of the Lieb Liniger Hamiltonian. We show that this eigenstate is related to an eigenstate of a Lieb Liniger Hamiltonian with periodic boundary conditions on an interval of twice the length and with twice as many particles (a doubled system). We further show that local operators with support far away from the boundaries of the hard wall Lieb Liniger gas have the same expectation values as corresponding operators for the doubled system. We present an example of a quench where the Lieb Liniger gas is initially confined in several traps and then released into a bigger container, an approximate description of the Newton cradle experiment. This research was supported by NSF Grant DMR 1006684 and Rutgers CMT fellowship.

  14. Experimental estimation of tungsten impurity sputtering due to Type I ELMs in JET-ITER-like wall using pedestal electron cyclotron emission and target Langmuir probe measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillemaut, C.; Jardin, A.; Horacek, J.; Borodkina, I.; Autricque, A.; Arnoux, G.; Boom, J.; Brezinsek, S.; Coenen, J. W.; De La Luna, E.; Devaux, S.; Eich, T.; Harting, D.; Kirschner, A.; Lipschultz, B.; Matthews, G. F.; Meigs, A.; Moulton, D.; O'Mullane, M.; Stamp, M.; contributors, JET

    2016-02-01

    The ITER baseline scenario, with 500 MW of DT fusion power and Q = 10, will rely on a Type I ELMy H-mode and will be achieved with a tungsten (W) divertor. W atoms sputtered from divertor targets during mitigated ELMs are expected to be the dominant source in ITER. W impurity concentration in the plasma core can dramatically degrade its performance and lead to potentially damaging disruptions. Understanding the physics of the target W source due to sputtering during ELMs and inter-ELMs is important and can be helped by experimental measurements with improved precision. It has been established that the ELMy target ion impact energy has a simple linear dependence with the pedestal electron temperature measured by Electron Cyclotron Emission (ECE). It has also been shown that Langmuir Probes (LP) ion flux measurements are reliable during ELMs due to the surprisingly low electron temperature. Therefore, in this paper, LP and ECE measurements in JET-ITER-Like-Wall (ILW) unseeded Type I ELMy H-mode experiments have been used to estimate the W sputtering flux from divertor targets in ELM and inter-ELM conditions. Comparison with similar estimates using W I spectroscopy measurements shows a reasonable agreement for the ELM and inter-ELM W source. The main advantage of the method involving LP measurements is the very high time resolution of the diagnostic (˜10 μs) allowing very precise description of the W sputtering source during ELMs.

  15. Low density gas dynamic wall boundary conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, F. G.

    1986-01-01

    Low density nozzles or large expansion ratio nozzles used in space experience rarefaction effects near their exit in the form of velocity slip and temperature jump at the walls. In addition, the boundary layers become very thick and there is a very strong viscous/inviscid interaction. For these reasons no existing design technique has been found to accurately predict the nozzle flow properties up to the nozzle exit. The objective of this investigation was to examine the slip boundary conditions and formulate them in a form appropriate for use with a full Navier-Stokes numerical code. The viscous/inviscid interaction would automatically be accounted for by using a compressible Navier-Stokes code. Through examination of the interaction of molecules with solid surfaces, a model for the distribution function of the reflected molecules has been determined and this distribution function has been used to develop a new slip boundary condition that can be shown to yield more realistic surface boundary conditions.

  16. Self-Induced Transparency and Electromagnetic Pulse Compression in a Plasma or an Electron Beam under Cyclotron Resonance Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ginzburg, N. S.; Zotova, I. V.; Sergeev, A. S.

    2010-12-30

    Based on analogy to the well-known process of the self-induced transparency of an optical pulse propagating through a passive two-level medium we describe similar effects for a microwave pulse interacting with a cold plasma or rectilinear electron beam under cyclotron resonance condition. It is shown that with increasing amplitude and duration of an incident pulse the linear cyclotron absorption is replaced by the self-induced transparency when the pulse propagates without damping. In fact, the initial pulse decomposes to one or several solitons with amplitude and duration defined by its velocity. In a certain parameter range, the single soliton formation is accompanied by significant compression of the initial electromagnetic pulse. We suggest using the effect of self-compression for producing multigigawatt picosecond microwave pulses.

  17. Overview of impurity control and wall conditioning in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    H.W. Kugel; R. Maingi; W. Wampler; R.E. Berry; et al

    2000-05-23

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) started plasma operations in February 1999, In the first extended period of experiments, NSTX achieved high current, inner wall limited, double null, and single null plasma discharges, initial Coaxial Helicity Injection, and High Harmonic Fast Wave results. As expected, discharge reproducibility and performance were strongly affected by wall condition. In this paper, the authors describe the internal geometry, and initial plasma discharge, impurity control, wall conditioning, erosion, and deposition results.

  18. Velocity boundary conditions at a tokamak resistive wall

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, H. R.

    2014-03-15

    Velocity boundary conditions appropriate for magnetohydrodynamic simulations have been controversial recently. A comparison of numerical simulations of sideways wall force in disruptions is presented for Dirichlet, Neumann, Robin, and DEBS boundary conditions. It is shown that all the boundary conditions give qualitatively similar results. It is shown that Dirichlet boundary conditions are valid in the small Larmor radius limit of electromagnetic sheath boundary conditions.

  19. Electron cyclotron emission spectra in X- and O-mode polarisation at JET: Martin-Puplett interferometer, absolute calibration, revised uncertainties, inboard/outboard temperature profile, and wall properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmuck, S.; Fessey, J.; Boom, J. E.; Meneses, L.; Abreu, P.; Belonohy, E.; Lupelli, I.

    2016-09-01

    At the tokamak Joint European Torus (JET), the electron cyclotron emission spectra in O-mode and X-mode polarisations are diagnosed simultaneous in absolute terms for several harmonics with two Martin-Puplett interferometers. From the second harmonic range in X-mode polarisation, the electron temperature profile can be deduced for the outboard side (low magnetic field strength) of JET but only for some parts of the inboard side (high magnetic field strength). This spatial restriction can be bypassed, if a cutoff is not present inside the plasma for O-mode waves in the first harmonic range. Then, from this spectral domain, the profile on the entire inboard side is accessible. The profile determination relies on the new absolute and independent calibration for both interferometers. During the calibration procedure, the antenna pattern was investigated as well, and, potentially, an increase in the diagnostic responsivity of about 5% was found for the domain 100-300 GHz. This increase and other uncertainty sources are taken into account in the thorough revision of the uncertainty for the diagnostic absolute calibration. The uncertainty deduced and the convolution inherent for Fourier spectroscopy diagnostics have implications for the temperature profile inferred. Having probed the electron cyclotron emission spectra in orthogonal polarisation directions for the first harmonic range, a condition is derived for the reflection and polarisation-scrambling coefficients of the first wall on the outboard side of JET.

  20. Monitoring of Double Stud Wall Moisture Conditions in the Northeast

    SciTech Connect

    Ueno, K.

    2015-03-01

    Double-stud walls insulated with cellulose or low-density spray foam can have R-values of 40 or higher. However, double stud walls have a higher risk of interior-sourced condensation moisture damage, when compared with high-R approaches using exterior insulating sheathing.; Moisture conditions in double stud walls were monitored in Zone 5A (Massachusetts); three double stud assemblies were compared.

  1. Arterial wall tethering as a distant boundary condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodis, S.; Zamir, M.

    2009-11-01

    A standing difficulty in the problem of blood vessel tethering has been that only one of the two required boundary conditions can be fully specified, namely, that at the inner (endothelial) wall surface. The other, at the outer layer of the vessel wall, is not known except in the limiting case where the wall is fully tethered such that its outer layer is prevented from any displacement. In all other cases, where the wall is either free or partially tethered, a direct boundary condition is not available. We present a method of determining this missing boundary condition by considering the limiting case of a semi-infinite wall. The result makes it possible to define the degree of tethering imposed by surrounding tissue more accurately in terms of the displacement of the outer layer of the vessel wall, rather than in terms of equivalent added mass which has been done in the past. This new approach makes it possible for the first time to describe the effect of partial tethering in its full range, from zero to full tethering. The results indicate that high tethering leads to high stresses and low displacements within the vessel wall, while low tethering leads to low stresses and high displacements. Since both extremes would be damaging to wall tissue, particularly elastin, this suggest that moderate tethering would be optimum in the physiological setting.

  2. Arterial wall tethering as a distant boundary condition.

    PubMed

    Hodis, S; Zamir, M

    2009-11-01

    A standing difficulty in the problem of blood vessel tethering has been that only one of the two required boundary conditions can be fully specified, namely, that at the inner (endothelial) wall surface. The other, at the outer layer of the vessel wall, is not known except in the limiting case where the wall is fully tethered such that its outer layer is prevented from any displacement. In all other cases, where the wall is either free or partially tethered, a direct boundary condition is not available. We present a method of determining this missing boundary condition by considering the limiting case of a semi-infinite wall. The result makes it possible to define the degree of tethering imposed by surrounding tissue more accurately in terms of the displacement of the outer layer of the vessel wall, rather than in terms of equivalent added mass which has been done in the past. This new approach makes it possible for the first time to describe the effect of partial tethering in its full range, from zero to full tethering. The results indicate that high tethering leads to high stresses and low displacements within the vessel wall, while low tethering leads to low stresses and high displacements. Since both extremes would be damaging to wall tissue, particularly elastin, this suggest that moderate tethering would be optimum in the physiological setting.

  3. The power absorption and the penetration depth of electromagnetic radiation in lead telluride under cyclotron resonance conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özalp, S.; Güngör, A.

    1999-10-01

    Cyclotron resonance absorption in n- and p-type PbTe was observed by Nii and was analysed under classical skin effect conditions. When the values of DC magnetic field corresponding to peaks are plotted against the field directions, a close fit is obtained between the calculated and observed results based on the assumption of a <1 1 1> ellipsoids of revolution model for the both conduction and valance band extrema. From the best fit mt=0.024 m0 and 0.03 m0 for the transverse effective masses and K= ml/ mt=9.8 and 12.2 for the anisotropic mass rations are obtained for the conduction and valance band, respectively. The observed absorption curve shows weak structures at low magnetic field. They are supposed to be due to second harmonics of Azbel'-Kaner cyclotron resonance. However, it turns out to be unnecessary to introduce other bands to explain the experimental results. The applicability of the classical magneto-optical theory is examined by calculating the power absorption coefficient and penetration depth as a function of DC magnetic field.

  4. Optimized calculation of the synergy conditions between electron cyclotron current drive and lower hybrid current drive on EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wei; Bo-Jiang, Ding; Y, Peysson; J, Decker; Miao-Hui, Li; Xin-Jun, Zhang; Xiao-Jie, Wang; Lei, Zhang

    2016-01-01

    The optimized synergy conditions between electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) and lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) with normal parameters of the EAST tokamak are studied by using the C3PO/LUKE code based on the understanding of the synergy mechanisms so as to obtain a higher synergistic current and provide theoretical reference for the synergistic effect in the EAST experiment. The dependences of the synergistic effect on the parameters of two waves (lower hybrid wave (LHW) and electron cyclotron wave (ECW)), including the radial position of the power deposition, the power value of the LH and EC waves, and the parallel refractive indices of the LHW (N∥) are presented and discussed. Project supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Grant Nos. 2011GB102000, 2012GB103000, and 2013GB106001), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11175206 and 11305211), the JSPS-NRF-NSFC A3 Foresight Program in the Field of Plasma Physics (Grant No. 11261140328), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (Grant No. JZ2015HGBZ0472).

  5. Semiflexible polymers under good solvent conditions interacting with repulsive walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, Sergei A.; Milchev, Andrey; Virnau, Peter; Binder, Kurt

    2016-05-01

    Solutions of semiflexible polymers confined by repulsive planar walls are studied by density functional theory and molecular dynamics simulations, to clarify the competition between the chain alignment favored by the wall and the depletion caused by the monomer-wall repulsion. A coarse-grained bead-spring model with a bond bending potential is studied, varying both the contour length and the persistence length of the polymers, as well as the monomer concentration in the solution (good solvent conditions are assumed throughout, and solvent molecules are not included explicitly). The profiles of monomer density and pressure tensor components near the wall are studied, and the surface tension of the solution is obtained. While the surface tension slightly decreases with chain length for flexible polymers, it clearly increases with chain length for stiff polymers. Thus, at fixed density and fixed chain length, the surface tension also increases with increasing persistence length. Chain ends always are enriched near the wall, but this effect is much larger for stiff polymers than for flexible ones. Also the profiles of the mean square gyration radius components near the wall and the nematic order parameter are studied to clarify the conditions where wall-induced nematic order occurs.

  6. Wall conditioning and particle control in Extrap T2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergsåker, H.; Larsson, D.; Brunsell, P.; Möller, A.; Tramontin, L.

    1997-02-01

    The Extrap T2 reversed field pinch experiment is operated with the former OHTE vacuum vessel, of dimensions R = 1.24 m and a = 0.18 m and with a complete graphite liner. It is shown that a rudimentary density control can be achieved by means of frequent helium glow discharge conditioning of the wall. The standard He-GDC is well characterized and reproducible. The trapping and release of hydrogen and impurities at the wall surfaces have been studied by mass spectrometry and surface analysis. The shot to shot particle exchange between wall and plasma can be approximately accounted for.

  7. Wall Conditioning and Impurity Measurements in the PEGASUS Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, M.; Fonck, R.; Toonen, R.; Thorson, T.; Tritz, K.; Winz, G.

    1999-11-01

    Wall conditioning and impurity effects on plasma evolution are increasingly relevant to the PEGASUS program. Surface conditioning consists of hydrogen glow discharge cleaning (GDC) to remove water and oxides, followed by He GDC to reduce the hydrogen inventory. Isotope exchange measurements indicate that periodic He GDC almost eliminates uncontrolled fueling from gas desorbed from the limiting surfaces. Additional wall conditioning will include Ti gettering and/or boronization. Impurity monitoring is provided by the recent installation of a SPRED multichannel VUV spectrometer (wavelength range = 10-110 nm; 1 msec time resolution), several interference filter (IF) monochromators, and a multichannel Ross-filter SXR diode assembly (for CV, CVI, OVII, and OVIII). The IF monitors indicate increased C radiation upon contact of the plasma with the upper and lower limiters for highly elongated plasmas. This radiation appears correlated with a subsequent rollover in the plasma current, and motivates an upgrade to the poloidal limiters to provide better plasma-wall interaction control.

  8. Exterior view of south and east walls of Oxidizer Conditioning ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Exterior view of south and east walls of Oxidizer Conditioning Structure (T-28D), looking northwest. This structure was designed to condition nitrogen tetroxide, the oxidizer used in the Titan II's fuel system, to specified temperatures. The taller structure to the rear is the Long-Term Oxidizer Silo (T-28B) - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Oxidizer Conditioning Structure, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  9. On RF heating of inhomogeneous collisional plasma under ion-cyclotron resonance conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Timofeev, A. V.

    2015-11-15

    During ion-cyclotron resonance (ICR) heating of plasma by the magnetic beach method, as well as in some other versions of ICR heating, it is necessary to excite Alfvén oscillations. In this case, it is difficult to avoid the phenomenon of the Alfvén resonance, in which Alfvén oscillations transform into lower hybrid oscillations. The latter efficiently interact with electrons, due to which most of the deposited RF energy is spent on electron (rather than ion) heating. The Alfvén resonance takes place due to plasma inhomogeneity across the external magnetic field. Therefore, it could be expected that variations in the plasma density profile would substantially affect the efficiency of the interaction of RF fields with charged particles. However, the results obtained for different plasma density profiles proved to be nearly the same. In the present work, a plasma is considered the parameters of which correspond to those planned in future ICR plasma heating experiments on the PS-1 facility at the Kurchatov Institute. When analyzing the interaction of RF fields with charged particles, both the collisionless resonance interaction and the interaction caused by Coulomb collisions are taken into account, because, in those experiments, the Coulomb collision frequency will be comparable with the frequency of the heating field. Antennas used for ICR heating excite RF oscillations with a wide spectrum of wavenumbers along the magnetic field. After averaging over the spectrum, the absorbed RF energy calculated with allowance for collisions turns out to be close to that absorbed in collisionless plasma, the energy fraction absorbed by electrons being substantially larger than that absorbed by ions.

  10. On RF heating of inhomogeneous collisional plasma under ion-cyclotron resonance conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeev, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    During ion-cyclotron resonance (ICR) heating of plasma by the magnetic beach method, as well as in some other versions of ICR heating, it is necessary to excite Alfvén oscillations. In this case, it is difficult to avoid the phenomenon of the Alfvén resonance, in which Alfvén oscillations transform into lower hybrid oscillations. The latter efficiently interact with electrons, due to which most of the deposited RF energy is spent on electron (rather than ion) heating. The Alfvén resonance takes place due to plasma inhomogeneity across the external magnetic field. Therefore, it could be expected that variations in the plasma density profile would substantially affect the efficiency of the interaction of RF fields with charged particles. However, the results obtained for different plasma density profiles proved to be nearly the same. In the present work, a plasma is considered the parameters of which correspond to those planned in future ICR plasma heating experiments on the PS-1 facility at the Kurchatov Institute. When analyzing the interaction of RF fields with charged particles, both the collisionless resonance interaction and the interaction caused by Coulomb collisions are taken into account, because, in those experiments, the Coulomb collision frequency will be comparable with the frequency of the heating field. Antennas used for ICR heating excite RF oscillations with a wide spectrum of wavenumbers along the magnetic field. After averaging over the spectrum, the absorbed RF energy calculated with allowance for collisions turns out to be close to that absorbed in collisionless plasma, the energy fraction absorbed by electrons being substantially larger than that absorbed by ions.

  11. Boundary conditions for the Boltzmann equation for rough walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brull, Stéphane; Charrier, Pierre

    2014-12-01

    In some applications, rarefied gases have to considered in a domain whose boundary presents some nanoscale roughness. That is why, we have considered (Brull,2014) a new derivation of boundary conditions for the Boltzmann equation, where the wall present some nanoscale roughness. In this paper, the interaction between the gas and the wall is represented by a kinetic equation defined in a surface layer at the scale of the nanometer close to the wall. The boundary conditions are obtained from a formal asymptotic expansion and are describded by a scattering kernel satisfying classical properties (non-negativeness, normalization, reciprocity). Finally, we present some numerical simulations of scattering diagrams showing the importance of the consideration of roughness for small scales in the model.

  12. Chloroplasts move towards the nearest anticlinal walls under dark condition.

    PubMed

    Tsuboi, Hidenori; Wada, Masamitsu

    2012-03-01

    Chloroplasts change their intracellular positions in response to their light environment. Under darkness, chloroplasts assume special positions that are different from those under light conditions. Here, we analyzed chloroplast dark positioning using Adiantum capillus-veneris gametophyte cells. When chloroplasts were transferred into darkness, during the first 1-5 h, they moved towards the anticlinal cell walls bordering the adjacent cells rather rapidly. Then, they slowed down and accumulated at the anticlinal walls gradually over the following 24-36 h. The chloroplast movements could be roughly classified into two different categories: initial rapid straight movement and later, slow staggering movement. When the chloroplast accumulation response was induced in dark-adapted cells by partial cell irradiation with a microbeam targeted to the center of the cells, chloroplasts moved towards the beam spot from the anticlinal walls. However, when the microbeam was switched off, they moved to the nearest anticlinal walls and not to their original positions if they were not the closest, indicating that they know the direction of the nearest anticlinal wall and do not have particular areas that they migrate to during dark positioning.

  13. Inflation and cyclotron motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greensite, Jeff

    2017-01-01

    We consider, in the context of a braneworld cosmology, the motion of the Universe coupled to a four-form gauge field, with constant field strength, defined in higher dimensions. It is found, under rather general initial conditions, that in this situation there is a period of exponential inflation combined with cyclotron motion in the inflaton field space. The main effect of the cyclotron motion is that slow roll conditions on the inflaton potential, which are typically necessary for exponential inflation, can be evaded. There are Landau levels associated with the four-form gauge field, and these correspond to quantum excitations of the inflaton field satisfying unconventional dispersion relations.

  14. Wall Conditioning and Power Balance for Spheromak Plasmas in SSPX

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, D N; Wood, R D; Bulmer, R; McLean, H S; Ryutov, D D; Stallard, B W; Woodruff, S

    2002-08-07

    We report here results from power balance measurements for ohmically-heated plasmas in the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX). The plasma is formed inside a close-fitting tungsten-coated copper shell; wall conditioning by baking, glow discharge cleaning (GDC), Ti gettering, and helium shot conditioning produces clean plasmas (Z{sub eff} < 2.5) and reduces impurity radiation to a small fraction of the input energy, except when the molybdenum divertor plate has been overheated. We find that most of the input energy is lost by conduction to the walls (the divertor plate and the inner electrode in the coaxial source region). Recently, carborane was added during GDC to boronize the plasma-facing surfaces, but little benefit was obtained.

  15. Mean wall shear stress boundary condition for large eddy simulation using near-wall streamwise momentum equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Minjeong; Choi, Haecheon; Lee, Jungil

    2014-11-01

    The mean wall shear stress boundary condition based on the log law has been proven as an appropriate boundary condition for large eddy simulations (LES) of turbulent channel and boundary layer flows without resolving near-wall region (Lee, Cho & Choi, PoF, 2013). In the present study, we use near-wall streamwise momentum equation following Chung & Pullin (JFM, 2009), to determine the mean shear stress at the wall. In this procedure, the near-wall streamwise momentum equation is averaged over a few off-wall grid points, in which the velocity at the first grid point is approximated with the Taylor series expansion. We test this wall boundary condition for turbulent channel and boundary layer flows, showing good prediction capability at high Reynolds numbers. The result of applying this boundary condition to a separating flow will be also shown at the presentation. Supported by NRF-2011-0028032, 2013055323.

  16. Complex Wall Boundary Conditions for Modeling Combustion in Catalytic Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Huayang; Jackson, Gregory

    2000-11-01

    Monolith catalytic reactors for exothermic oxidation are being used in automobile exhaust clean-up and ultra-low emissions combustion systems. The reactors present a unique coupling between mass, heat, and momentum transport in a channel flow configuration. The use of porous catalytic coatings along the channel wall presents a complex boundary condition when modeled with the two-dimensional channel flow. This current work presents a 2-D transient model for predicting the performance of catalytic combustion systems for methane oxidation on Pd catalysts. The model solves the 2-D compressible transport equations for momentum, species, and energy, which are solved with a porous washcoat model for the wall boundary conditions. A time-splitting algorithm is used to separate the stiff chemical reactions from the convective/diffusive equations for the channel flow. A detailed surface chemistry mechanism is incorporated for the catalytic wall model and is used to predict transient ignition and steady-state conversion of CH4-air flows in the catalytic reactor.

  17. Wall conditioning and plasma surface interactions in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, G.L.; Petersen, P.I.; Schaffer, M.S.; Taylor, P.L.; Taylor, T.S. ); Doyle, B.L.; Walsh, D.S. ); Hill, D.N. ); Hsu, W.L. ); Winter, J. . Inst. fuer Plasmaphysik)

    1990-09-01

    Wall conditioning is used in DIII-D for both reduction of impurity influxes and particle control. The methods used include: baking, pulsed discharge cleaning, hydrogen glow cleaning, helium and neon glow conditioning, and carbonization. Helium glow wall conditioning applied before every tokamak discharge has been effective in impurity removal and particle control and has significantly expanded the parameter space in which DIII-D operates to include limiter and ohmic H-mode discharges and higher {beta}{sub T} at low q. The highest values of divertor plasma current (3.0 MA) and stored energy (3.6 MJ) and peaked density profiles in H-mode discharges have been observed after carbonization. Divertor physics studies in DIII-D include sweeping the X-point to reduce peak heat loads, measurement of particle and heat fluxes in the divertor region, and erosion studies. The DIII-D Advanced Divertor has been installed and bias and baffle experiments will begin in the fall of 1991. 15 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Equilibration and generalized Gibbs ensemble for hard wall boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Garry; Andrei, Natan

    2015-10-01

    In this work we present an analysis of a quench for the repulsive Lieb-Liniger gas confined to a large box with hard wall boundary conditions. We study the time average of local correlation functions and show that both the quench action approach and the generalized Gibbs ensemble formalism are applicable for the long-time average of local correlation functions. We find that the time average of the system corresponds to an eigenstate of the Lieb-Liniger Hamiltonian and that this eigenstate is related to an eigenstate of a Lieb-Liniger Hamiltonian with periodic boundary conditions on an interval of twice the length and with twice as many particles (a doubled system). We further show that local operators with support far away from the boundaries of the hard wall have the same expectation values with respect to this eigenstate as corresponding operators for the doubled system. We present an example of a quench where the gas is initially confined in several moving traps and then released into a bigger container, an approximate description of the Newton's cradle experiment. We calculate the time average of various correlation functions for long times after the quench.

  19. Reconstruction of high temporal resolution Thomson scattering data during a modulated electron cyclotron resonance heating using conditional averaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, T. Yoshinuma, M.; Ohdachi, S.; Ida, K.; Itoh, K.; Moon, C.; Yamada, I.; Funaba, H.; Yasuhara, R.; Tsuchiya, H.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Shimozuma, T.; Kubo, S.; Tsujimura, T. I.; Inagaki, S.

    2016-04-15

    This paper provides a software application of the sampling scope concept for fusion research. The time evolution of Thomson scattering data is reconstructed with a high temporal resolution during a modulated electron cyclotron resonance heating (MECH) phase. The amplitude profile and the delay time profile of the heat pulse propagation are obtained from the reconstructed signal for discharges having on-axis and off-axis MECH depositions. The results are found to be consistent with the MECH deposition.

  20. Large-amplitude, circularly polarized, compressive, obliquely propagating electromagnetic proton cyclotron waves throughout the Earth's magnetosheath: low plasma β conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Remya, B.; Reddy, R. V.; Lakhina, G. S.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Falkowski, B. J.; Echer, E.; Glassmeier, K.-H.

    2014-09-20

    During 1999 August 18, both Cassini and WIND were in the Earth's magnetosheath and detected transverse electromagnetic waves instead of the more typical mirror-mode emissions. The Cassini wave amplitudes were as large as ∼14 nT (peak to peak) in a ∼55 nT ambient magnetic field B {sub 0}. A new method of analysis is applied to study these waves. The general wave characteristics found were as follows. They were left-hand polarized and had frequencies in the spacecraft frame (f {sub scf}) below the proton cyclotron frequency (f{sub p} ). Waves that were either right-hand polarized or had f {sub scf} > f{sub p} are shown to be consistent with Doppler-shifted left-hand waves with frequencies in the plasma frame f{sub pf} < f{sub p} . Thus, almost all waves studied are consistent with their being electromagnetic proton cyclotron waves. Most of the waves (∼55%) were found to be propagating along B {sub 0} (θ{sub kB{sub 0}}<30{sup ∘}), as expected from theory. However, a significant fraction of the waves were found to be propagating oblique to B {sub 0}. These waves were also circularly polarized. This feature and the compressive ([B {sub max} – B {sub min}]/B {sub max}, where B {sub max} and B {sub min} are the maximum and minimum field magnitudes) nature (ranging from 0.27 to 1.0) of the waves are noted but not well understood at this time. The proton cyclotron waves were shown to be quasi-coherent, theoretically allowing for rapid pitch-angle transport of resonant protons. Because Cassini traversed the entire subsolar magnetosheath and WIND was in the dusk-side flank of the magnetosheath, it is surmised that the entire region was filled with these waves. In agreement with past theory, it was the exceptionally low plasma β (0.35) that led to the dominance of the proton cyclotron wave generation during this interval. A high-speed solar wind stream ((V{sub sw} ) = 598 km s{sup –1}) was the source of this low-β plasma.

  1. CLOVERLEAF CYCLOTRON

    DOEpatents

    McMillan, E.M.; Judd, D.L.

    1959-02-01

    A cyclotron is presented embodying a unique magnetic field configuration, which configuration increases in intensity with radius and therefore compensates for the reltivistic mass effect, the field having further convolutions productive of axial stability in the particle beam. By reconciling the seemingly opposed requirements of mass increase compensation on one hand and anial stability on the other, the production of extremely high current particle beams in the relativistie energy range is made feasible. Certain further advantages inhere in the invention, notably an increase in the usable magnet gap, simplified and more efficient extraction of the beam from the accelerator, and ready adaptation to the use of multiply phased excitation as contrasted with the single phased systems herstofore utilized. General

  2. Conditionally-averaged structures in wall-bounded turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guezennec, Yann G.; Piomelli, Ugo; Kim, John

    1987-01-01

    The quadrant-splitting and the wall-shear detection techniques were used to obtain ensemble-averaged wall layer structures. The two techniques give similar results for Q4 events, but the wall-shear method leads to smearing of Q2 events. Events were found to maintain their identity for very long times. The ensemble-averaged structures scale with outer variables. Turbulence producing events were associated with one dominant vortical structure rather than a pair of counter-rotating structures. An asymmetry-preserving averaging scheme was devised that allowed a picture of the average structure which more closely resembles the instantaneous one, to be obtained.

  3. Tire shreds as lightweight retaining wall backfill: Active conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Tweedie, J.J.; Humphrey, D.N.; Sandford, T.C.

    1998-11-01

    A 4.88-m-high retaining wall test facility was constructed to test tire shreds as retaining wall backfill. The front wall of the facility could be rotated outward away from the fill and was instrumented to measure the horizontal stress. Measurement of movement within the backfill and settlement of the backfill surface during wall rotation allowed estimation of the pattern of movement within the fill. Tests were conducted with tire shreds from three suppliers. Moreover, horizontal stress at this rotation for tire shreds was about 35% less than the active stress expected for conventional granular backfill. Design parameters were developed using two procedures; the first used the coefficient of lateral earth pressure and the other was based on equivalent fluid pressure. The inclination of the sliding plane with respect to horizontal was estimated to range from 61{degree} to 70{degree} for the three types of shreds.

  4. Wall-resolved LES of high Reynolds number airfoil flow near stall condition for wall modeling in LES: LESFOIL revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asada, Kengo; Kawai, Soshi

    2016-11-01

    Wall-resolved large-eddy simulation (LES) of an airfoil flow involving a turbulent transition and separations near stall condition at a high Reynolds number 2.1 x 106 (based on the freestream velocity and the airfoil chord length) is conducted by using K computer. This study aims to provide the wall-resolved LES database including detailed turbulence statistics for near-wall modeling in LES and also to investigate the flow physics of the high Reynolds number airfoil flow near stall condition. The LES well predicts the laminar separation bubble, turbulent reattachment and turbulent separation. The LES also clarified unsteady flow features associated with shear-layer instabilities: high frequency unsteadiness at St = 130 at the laminar separation bubble near the leading edge and low frequency unsteadiness at St = 1.5 at the separated turbulent shear-layer near the trailing edge. Regarding the near-wall modeling in LES, the database indicates that the pressure term in the mean streamwise-momentum equation is not negligible at the laminar and turbulent separated regions. This fact suggests that widely used equilibrium wall model is not sufficient and the inclusion of the pressure term is necessary for wall modeling in LES of such flow. This research used computational resources of the K computer provided by the RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science through the HPCI System Research project (Project ID: hp140028). This work was supported by KAKENHI (Grant Number: 16K18309).

  5. Weak Dirichlet Boundary Conditions for Wall-Bounded Turbulent Flows

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    Streamline upwind / Petrov-Galerkin for- mulations for convection dominated flows with particular emphasis on the incompressible Navier - Stokes equations...yields an improvement over the original method. Key words: fluids, Navier - Stokes equations, boundary layers, turbulence, law of the wall, weakly imposed...The paper is organized as follows. In Section 2, we describe the weak formula- tion of the continuous problem for the incompressible Navier - Stokes

  6. Monitoring of Double-Stud Wall Moisture Conditions in the Northeast

    SciTech Connect

    Ueno, K.

    2015-03-01

    Double-stud walls insulated with cellulose or low-density spray foam can have R-values of 40 or higher. However, double-stud walls have a higher risk of interior-sourced condensation moisture damage when compared with high-R approaches using exterior insulating sheathing. Moisture conditions in double-stud walls were monitored in Zone 5A (Massachusetts); three double-stud assemblies were compared.

  7. Changes in levels of cell wall constituents in wheat seedlings grown under continuous hypergravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakabayashi, K.; Soga, K.; Kamisaka, S.; Hoson, T.

    Effects of continuous hypergravity stimuli on the amounts and composition of cell wall constituents were investigated in wheat shoots. Hypergravity (300 g) treatment for three days after germination increased the net amount of cell wall polysaccharides such as hemicellulose and cellulose, but reduced the shoot elongation. As a result, the amount of cell wall polysaccharides per unit length of shoot increased under hypergravity. The hemicellulose fraction contained polysaccharides in the middle and low molecular mass range (5 kDa-1 MDa) and increased in response to hypergravity. Also, the amounts of arabinose (Ara) and xylose (Xyl), the major sugar components of the hemicellulose fraction, increased under hypergravity conditions. In addition to wall polysaccharides, hypergravity increased the amounts of cell wall-bound phenolic acids, such as ferulic acid (FA) and diferulic acid (DFA). Furthermore, the activity of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL, EC 4.3.1.5) was enhanced under hypergravity conditions. These results suggest that continuous hypergravity stimulates the synthesis of cell wall constituents, especially hemicellulosic arabinoxylans and cell wall-bound FA and DFA in wheat shoots. The increased PAL activity may promote the formation of FA and DFA. These changes in cell wall architecture may be involved in making rigid and tough cell walls under hypergravity conditions and thereby contribute to the ability of plant to sustain their structures against gravitational stimuli.

  8. Neuroendocrine Tissue Engineering in Rotating Wall Vessel Bioreactors Under Simulated Microgravity Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-25

    NEUROENDOCRINE TISSUE ENGINEERING IN ROTATING WALL VESSEL BIOREACTORS UNDER SIMULATED MICROGRAVITY CONDITIONS P.I. Lelkes1, 4, N. Akhtar2, E...Abstract-The low-shear, microgravity-simulating cell culture environment in Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) Bioreactors RWV Bioreactors is well...microscopy. The unique culture environment of RWV Bioreactors facilitates the generation of macroscopic, functional neuroendocrine tissue-like

  9. Consistent HYLIFE wall design that withstands transient loading conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, J.H.

    1980-10-01

    The design for a first structural wall (FSW) promises to satisfy the impact and thermal stress loads for the 30-year lifetime anticipated for the HYLIFE reaction chamber. The FSW is a 50-mm-thick cylindrical plate that is 10 m in diameter; it can withstand a rapidly varying liquid metal impact stress up to a peak of 60 MPa, combined with slowly varying thermal stresses up to 86 MPa. We selected 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo ferritic steel as the structural material because it has adequate fatigue properties and yield strength at the peak operating temperature of 810/sup 0/K, is compatible with liquid lithium, and has good neutron activation characteristics.

  10. Velocity boundary condition at solid walls in rarefied gas calculations.

    PubMed

    Lockerby, Duncan A; Reese, Jason M; Emerson, David R; Barber, Robert W

    2004-01-01

    Maxwell's famous slip boundary condition is often misapplied in current rarefied gas flow calculations (e.g., in hypersonics, microfluidics). For simulations of gas flows over curved or moving surfaces, this means crucial physics can be lost. We give examples of such cases. We also propose a higher-order boundary condition based on Maxwell's general equation and the constitutive relations derived by Burnett. Unlike many other higher-order slip conditions these are applicable to any form of surface geometry. It is shown that these "Maxwell-Burnett" boundary conditions are in reasonable agreement with the limited experimental data available for Poiseuille flow and can also predict Sone's thermal-stress slip flow-a phenomenon which cannot be captured by conventional slip boundary conditions.

  11. Effect of different wall boundary conditions on the numerical simulation of bubbling fluidized beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghgoo, Mohammad Reza; Bergstrom, Donald J.; Spiteri, Raymond J.

    2015-11-01

    There are distinct wall boundary conditions proposed in the literature for the particulate phase in the context of a continuum description of gas-particle flows. It is not yet clear how these different wall boundary conditions affect the simulated flow behavior, nor is it clear which are the most realistic. To investigate this issue, an Eulerian-Eulerian two-fluid model was used to investigate the effect of different particle-phase wall boundary conditions on the numerical prediction of bubbling/slugging gas-particle fluidized beds. Because the bed dynamics are strongly influenced by the motion of the bubbles, the impact of wall boundary conditions on the bubble statistics was examined specifically. In addition, the averaged field variables, such as the particle velocity, were compared to published experimental measurements. The comparison shows good agreement between the numerical results, generated by the Mfix code, and their experimental counterparts. It is found that the particle wall boundary condition does play a significant role in predicting the flow behavior. However, it appears that the influence of the wall boundary conditions is more significant for the instantaneous flow variables and bubble statistics than for the averaged quantities.

  12. Flow conditions in intracranial aneurysm lumen associate with inflammation and degenerative changes of the aneurysm wall

    PubMed Central

    Cebral, Juan; Ollikainen, Eliisa; Chung, Bong Jae; Mut, Fernando; Sippola, Visa; Jahromi, Behnam Rezai; Tulamo, Riikka; Hernesniemi, Juha; Niemelä, Mika; Robertson, Anne; Frösen, Juhana

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Saccular intracranial aneurysm (sIA) is a common disease that may cause devastating intracranial hemorrhage. Hemodynamics, wall remodeling, and wall inflammation have been associated with sIA rupture. We investigated how sIA hemodynamics associates with wall remodeling and inflammation of the sIA wall. Methods Tissue samples resected during sIA surgery (11 unruptured, 9 ruptured sIAs) were studied with histology and immunohistochemistry. Patient-specific computational models of hemodynamics were created from preoperative CT-angiographies. Results More stable and less complex flows were associated with thick, hyperplastic sIA walls while slower flows with more diffuse inflow were associated with degenerated and decellularized sIA walls. Wall degeneration (p=0.041) and rupture was associated with increased inflammation (CD45+, p=0.031). High wall shear stress (WSS, p=0.018), higher vorticity (VO, p=0.046), higher viscous dissipation (VD, p=0.046), and high shear rate (SR, p=0.046) associated with increased inflammation. Inflammation was also associated with lack of intact endothelium (p=0.034), and presence of organized luminal thrombosis (p=0.018), although overall organized thrombosis was associated with low minimum WSS (p=0.034) and not with the flow conditions that associated with inflammation. Conclusions Flow conditions in the sIA associate with wall remodeling. Inflammation, which is associated with degenerative wall remodeling and rupture, is associated with high flow activity including elevated WSS. Endothelial injury may be a mechanism by which flow induces inflammation in the sIA wall. Hemodynamic simulations might prove to be useful in identifying sIAs at risk of developing inflammation, a potential biomarker for rupture. PMID:27686488

  13. Role of plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition reactor wall conditions on radical and ion substrate fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Sowa, Mark J.

    2014-01-15

    Chamber wall conditions, such as wall temperature and film deposits, have long been known to influence plasma source performance on thin film processing equipment. Plasma physical characteristics depend on conductive/insulating properties of chamber walls. Radical fluxes depend on plasma characteristics as well as wall recombination rates, which can be wall material and temperature dependent. Variations in substrate delivery of plasma generated species (radicals, ions, etc.) impact the resulting etch or deposition process resulting in process drift. Plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition is known to depend strongly on substrate radical flux, but film properties can be influenced by other plasma generated phenomena, such as ion bombardment. In this paper, the chamber wall conditions on a plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition process are investigated. The downstream oxygen radical and ion fluxes from an inductively coupled plasma source are indirectly monitored in temperature controlled (25–190 °C) stainless steel and quartz reactors over a range of oxygen flow rates. Etch rates of a photoresist coated quartz crystal microbalance are used to study the oxygen radical flux dependence on reactor characteristics. Plasma density estimates from Langmuir probe ion saturation current measurements are used to study the ion flux dependence on reactor characteristics. Reactor temperature was not found to impact radical and ion fluxes substantially. Radical and ion fluxes were higher for quartz walls compared to stainless steel walls over all oxygen flow rates considered. The radical flux to ion flux ratio is likely to be a critical parameter for the deposition of consistent film properties. Reactor wall material, gas flow rate/pressure, and distance from the plasma source all impact the radical to ion flux ratio. These results indicate maintaining chamber wall conditions will be important for delivering consistent results from plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition

  14. Generalized adjoint consistent treatment of wall boundary conditions for compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Ralf; Leicht, Tobias

    2015-11-01

    In this article, we revisit the adjoint consistency analysis of Discontinuous Galerkin discretizations of the compressible Euler and Navier-Stokes equations with application to the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes and k- ω turbulence equations. Here, particular emphasis is laid on the discretization of wall boundary conditions. While previously only one specific combination of discretizations of wall boundary conditions and of aerodynamic force coefficients has been shown to give an adjoint consistent discretization, in this article we generalize this analysis and provide a discretization of the force coefficients for any consistent discretization of wall boundary conditions. Furthermore, we demonstrate that a related evaluation of the cp- and cf-distributions is required. The freedom gained in choosing the discretization of boundary conditions without loosing adjoint consistency is used to devise a new adjoint consistent discretization including numerical fluxes on the wall boundary which is more robust than the adjoint consistent discretization known up to now. While this work is presented in the framework of Discontinuous Galerkin discretizations, the insight gained is also applicable to (and thus valuable for) other discretization schemes. In particular, the discretization of integral quantities, like the drag, lift and moment coefficients, as well as the discretization of local quantities at the wall like surface pressure and skin friction should follow as closely as possible the discretization of the flow equations and boundary conditions at the wall boundary.

  15. Characterization of Polyolefin Pyrolysis Species Produced Under Ambient Conditions by Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry and Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farenc, Mathilde; Witt, Matthias; Craven, Kirsten; Barrère-Mangote, Caroline; Afonso, Carlos; Giusti, Pierre

    2017-03-01

    Polyolefins such as polyethylene (PE) and polypropylene (PP) are often characterized from their pyrolysis products by Py-MS. Nowadays the development of plasma-based direct probe atmospheric pressure sources allow the direct analysis of these polymers. These sources operate at atmospheric pressure, which implies a limited control of the ionization conditions. It was shown that side reactions could occur with species present in air, such as O2, which may lead to the formation of oxidized compounds. In this work, ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR) were used for the exhaustive characterization of the PP and PE pyrolysis ions produced using plasma-based atmospheric pressure ion sources. Both PP and PE yielded distributions of pyrolysis products presenting different amounts of unsaturation but also different numbers of oxygen atoms. In addition, the ions produced from PP presented a lower collision cross-section (CCS) than those produced from PE. In the same way, both PP and PE present repeated patterns separated by 14 m/z in the bidimensional drift time versus m/z plots. Within these plots, several trend lines can be evidenced, which are specific of each polymer investigated. Differences were observed between isotactic and atactic samples concerning the pyrolysis profile relative abundance and collision cross-section.

  16. Characterization of Polyolefin Pyrolysis Species Produced Under Ambient Conditions by Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry and Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farenc, Mathilde; Witt, Matthias; Craven, Kirsten; Barrère-Mangote, Caroline; Afonso, Carlos; Giusti, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Polyolefins such as polyethylene (PE) and polypropylene (PP) are often characterized from their pyrolysis products by Py-MS. Nowadays the development of plasma-based direct probe atmospheric pressure sources allow the direct analysis of these polymers. These sources operate at atmospheric pressure, which implies a limited control of the ionization conditions. It was shown that side reactions could occur with species present in air, such as O2, which may lead to the formation of oxidized compounds. In this work, ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR) were used for the exhaustive characterization of the PP and PE pyrolysis ions produced using plasma-based atmospheric pressure ion sources. Both PP and PE yielded distributions of pyrolysis products presenting different amounts of unsaturation but also different numbers of oxygen atoms. In addition, the ions produced from PP presented a lower collision cross-section (CCS) than those produced from PE. In the same way, both PP and PE present repeated patterns separated by 14 m/z in the bidimensional drift time versus m/z plots. Within these plots, several trend lines can be evidenced, which are specific of each polymer investigated. Differences were observed between isotactic and atactic samples concerning the pyrolysis profile relative abundance and collision cross-section.

  17. Growth and cell wall changes in stem organs under microgravity and hypergravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoson, Takayuki; Soga, Kouichi; Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Kamisaka, Seiichiro

    Gravity strongly influences plant growth and development, which is fundamentally brought about by modifications to the properties of the cell wall. We have examined the changes in growth and cell wall properties in seedling organs under hypergravity conditions produced by centrifugation and under microgravity conditions in space. Hypergravity stimuli have been shown to decrease the growth rate of various seedling organs. When hypergravity suppressed elongation growth, a decrease in cell wall extensibility (an increase in cell wall rigidity) was induced. Hypergravity has also been shown to increase cell wall thickness in various mate-rials. In addition, a polymerization of certain matrix polysaccharides was brought about by hypergravity: in dicotyledons hypergravity increased the molecular size of xyloglucans, whereas hypergravity increased that of 1,3,1,4-β-glucans in monocotyledonous Gramineae. These mod-ifications to cell wall metabolism may be responsible for a decrease in cell wall extensibility, leading to growth suppression under hypergravity conditions. How then does microgravity in-fluence growth and cell wall properties? Here, there was a possibility that microgravity might induce changes similar to those by hypergravity, because plants have evolved and adapted to 1 g condition for more than 400 million years. However, the changes observed under microgravity conditions in space were just opposite to those induced by hypergravity: stimulation of elonga-tion growth, an increase in cell wall extensibility, and a decrease in cell wall thickness as well as depolymerization of cell wall polysaccharides were brought about in space. Furthermore, growth and cell wall properties varied in proportion to the logarithm of the magnitude of grav-ity in the range from microgravity to hypergravity, as shown in the dose-response relation in light and hormonal responses. Thus, microgravity may be a `stress-less' environment for plant seedlings to grow and develop

  18. First-wall and limiter conditioning in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Dylla, H.F.; Blanchard, W.R.; Hawryluk, R.J.; Hill, K.W.; Krawchuk, R.B.; Mueller, D.; Owens, D.K.; Ramsey, A.T.; Sesnic, S.; Tenney, F.H.

    1984-10-01

    A progress report on the experimental studies of vacuum vessel conditioning during the first year of TFTR operation is presented. A previous paper described the efforts expended to condition the TFTR vessel prior to and during the initial plasma start-up experiments. During the start-up phase, discharge cleaning was performed with the vessel at room temperature. For the second phase of TFTR operations, which was directed towards the optimization of ohmically heated plasmas, the vacuum vessel could be heated to 150/sup 0/C. The internal configuration of the TFTR vessel was more complex during the second phase with the addition of a TiC/C moveable limiter array, Inconel bellows cover plates, and ZrAl getter pumps. A quantitative comparison is given on the effectiveness of vessel bakeout, glow discharge cleaning, and pulse discharge cleaning in terms of the total quantity of removed carbon and oxygen, residual gas base pressures and the resulting plasma impurity levels as measured by visible, uv, and soft x-ray spectroscopy. The initial experience with hydrogen isotope changeover in TFTR is presented including the results of the attempt to hasten the changeover time by using a glow discharge to precondition the vessel with the new isotope.

  19. Spectroscopic Analysis of Wall Conditioning Methods in NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Eleanor; Soukhanovskii, Vlad

    2015-11-01

    Plasma confinement and performance in NSTX are reliant upon well-conditioned plasma facing components (PFCs). Past conditioning techniques used in NSTX include hot and cold boronization, lithium pellet injection (LPI), and lithium evaporation. The influx of hydrogen-containing molecules and radicals can be studied through spectroscopic observation of the hydrogen to deuterium (H/D) intensity ratio in the edge plasma. A code to determine H/D ratios has been developed and tested on known light sources before being applied to data from prior NSTX experiments. In general, boronization was found to reduce the H/D ratio, with further H reduction seen from cold boronization when compared to hot boronization. No correlation between LPI and H/D ratio was observed. Lithium evaporation produced a significant H decrease. In the future this analysis will be applied immediately following NSTX-U pulses to provide data on plasma-surface interactions. This work was made possible by funding from the Department of Energy for the Summer Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (SULI) program. This work is supported by the US DOE Contract No.DE-AC02-09CH11466 and DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  20. Quantitative analysis of cell walls of nutritionally variant streptococci grown under various growth conditions.

    PubMed Central

    van de Rijn, I

    1985-01-01

    Strains of nutritionally variant streptococci are usually isolated from patients with subacute bacterial endocarditis. Only recently have these strains been subdivided into three serotypes; however, no group-specific antigen has been described. To understand the immunochemical basis for the serology of these microorganisms as well as set the groundwork for adherence studies, quantitative analysis of the cell walls of nutritionally variant streptococci was undertaken. The bacteria were grown in semisynthetic medium or pyridoxal-supplemented Todd-Hewitt broth and harvested during the exponential or stationary phase. Cell walls were isolated and analyzed for amino sugars, sugars, polyalcohols, amino acids, and phosphorus by gas chromatography, high-pressure liquid chromatography, or colorimetric assays. The peptidoglycans of the cell walls of the prototype strains from the three serotypes were representative of other streptococcal cell walls, including the presence of alanine as the possible cross-bridge. The composition of the peptidoglycan was similar for all three strains and included a decreased concentration of peptidoglycan in their cell walls during the stationary phase. Glucosamine, glucose, galactose, ribitol, and a small amount of rhamnose were found in each of the cell wall polysaccharides. Galactosamine was only found in serotype II and III cell walls and might be responsible for the previously described cross-reaction between these strains. The concentration of the other sugars and amino sugars varied in each of the cell wall preparations, depending on the growth conditions. Finally, all three strains expressed both ribitol and phosphorus in their cell walls, characteristic of the presence of a ribitol teichoic acid. Therefore the cell wall composition of the nutritionally variant streptococci varies depending on the growth conditions, and their composition appears similar to that of strains of Streptococcus mitis. PMID:4030093

  1. An experimental search for near-wall boundary conditions for large eddy simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, S. K.

    1982-01-01

    Instantaneous wall shear stress and streamwise velocities have been measured simultaneously in a flat plate, turbulent boundary layer at moderate Reynolds number in an effort to provide experimental support for large eddy simulations. Data were obtained by using a buried-wire wall shear gage and a hot-wire rake positioned in the log region of the flow. All data processing was accomplished with digital data analysis techniques on a minicomputer. Fluctuations of the instantaneous U plus versus Y plus profiles about a mean law of the wall are shown to be significant and complex. Peak cross-correlation values between wall shear stress and the velocities are high and reflect the passage of a large structure inclined at a small angle to the wall. Estimates of this angle are consistent with those made by other investigators. Conditional sampling techniques were used to detect the passage of various sizes and types of flow disturbances (events) and to estimate their mean frequency of occurrence. Events characterized by large and sudden streamwise accelerations were found to be highly coherent throughout the log region and were strongly correlated with large fluctuations in wall shear-stress. Phase randomness between the near-wall quantities and the outer velocities was small. The results suggest that the flow events detected by conditional sampling applied to velocities in the log region may be related to the bursting process.

  2. Exterior view of south wall of Oxidizer Conditioning Structure (T28D), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Exterior view of south wall of Oxidizer Conditioning Structure (T-28D), looking north. The taller structure immediately to the rear in the upper left background is the Long-Term Oxidizer Silo (T-28B) - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Oxidizer Conditioning Structure, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  3. [Research on the inner wall condition monitoring method of ring forgings based on infrared spectra].

    PubMed

    Fu, Xian-bin; Liu, Bin; Wei, Bin; Zhang, Yu-cun; Liu, Zhao-lun

    2015-01-01

    In order to grasp the inner wall condition of ring forgings, an inner wall condition monitoring method based on infrared spectra for ring forgings is proposed in the present paper. Firstly, using infrared spectroscopy the forgings temperature measurement system was built based on the three-level FP-cavity LCTF. The two single radiation spectra from the forgings' surface were got using the three-level FP-cavity LCTF. And the temperature measuring of the surface forgings was achieved according to the infrared double-color temperature measuring principle. The measuring accuracy can be greatly improved by this temperature measurement method. Secondly, on the basis of the Laplace heat conduction differential equation the inner wall condition monitoring model was established by the method of separating variables. The inner wall condition monitoring of ring forgings was realized via combining the temperature data and the forgings own parameter information. Finally, this method is feasible according to the simulation experiment. The inner wall condition monitoring method can provide the theoretical basis for the normal operating of the ring forgings.

  4. Changes in cell wall architecture of wheat coleoptiles grown under continuous hypergravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakabayashi, K.; Soga, K.; Kamisaka, S.; Hoson, T.

    Modifications of cell wall structure of wheat coleoptiles in response to continuous hypergravity (300 g) treatment were investigated. Length of coleoptiles exposed to hypergravity for 2-4 days from germination stage was 60-70% of that of 1 g control. The net amounts of cell wall polysaccharides, such as hemicellulose and cellulose, of hypergravity-treated coleoptiles increased as much as those of 1 g control coleoptiles during the incubation period. As a result, the levels of cell wall polysaccharides per unit length of coleoptile, which mean the thickness of cell walls, largely increased under hypergravity conditions. Particularly, the amounts of hemicellulosic polymers with middle molecular mass (0.2-1 MDa) largely increased from day 2 to 3 under hypergravity conditions. The major sugar components of the hemicellulose fraction are arabinose, xylose and glucose. The ratios of arabinose and xylose to glucose were higher in hypergravity-treated coleoptiles than in control coleoptiles. The fractionation of hemicellulosic polymers into the neutral and acidic polymers by the anion-exchange column showed that the levels of acidic polymers (mainly composed of arabinoxylans) in cell walls of hypergravity-treated coleoptiles were higher than those of control coleoptiles. In addition to wall polysaccharides, the amounts of cell wall-bound phenolics, such as ferulic acid and diferulic acid, substantially increased during the incubation period both in 1 g control and hypergravity-treated coleoptiles. Especially, the levels of diferulic acid which cross-links hemicellulosic polymers were higher in hypergravity-treated coleoptiles than in control coleoptiles during the incubation period. These results suggest that hypergravity stimuli from the germination stage bias the type of synthesized hemicellulosic polysaccharides, although they do not restrict the net synthesis of cell wall constituents in wheat coleoptiles. The stimulation of the synthesis of arabinoxylans and of the

  5. Observations of multiharmonic ion cyclotron waves due to inverse ion cyclotron damping in the northern magnetospheric cusp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slapak, R.; Gunell, H.; Hamrin, M.

    2017-01-01

    We present a case study of inverse ion cyclotron damping taking place in the northern terrestrial magnetospheric cusp, exciting waves at the ion cyclotron frequency and its harmonics. The ion cyclotron waves are primarily seen as peaks in the magnetic-field spectral densities. The corresponding peaks in the electric-field spectral densities are not as profound, suggesting a background electric field noise or other processes of wave generation causing the electric spectral densities to smoothen out more compared to the magnetic counterpart. The required condition for inverse ion cyclotron damping is a velocity shear in the magnetic field-aligned ion bulk flow, and this condition is often naturally met for magnetosheath influx in the northern magnetospheric cusp, just as in the presented case. We note that some ion cyclotron wave activity is present in a few similar shear events in the southern cusp, which indicates that other mechanisms generating ion cyclotron waves may also be present during such conditions.

  6. Measurements and analysis of bremsstrahlung x-ray spectrum obtained in NANOGAN electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Baskaran, R.; Selvakumaran, T. S.; Rodrigues, G.; Kanjilal, D.; Roy, A.

    2008-02-15

    From the ECR plasma, hot electrons leak across the magnetic lines of force and by striking the plasma chamber produce bremsstrahlung x-rays. The wall bremsstrahlung gives information on the confinement status of hot electron. In our studies, experimental measurements are carried out in NANOGAN electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source for the wall bremsstrahlung x-rays and the results are presented. While optimizing a particular charge state in ECR ion source, experimental parameters are adjusted to get a maximum current. The wall bremsstrahlung components are studied in these cases for understanding the hot electron confinement conditions.

  7. Technology Solutions Case Study: Monitoring of Double Stud Wall Moisture Conditions in the Northeast, Devens, Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect

    2015-03-01

    Double stud walls have a higher risk of interior-sourced condensation moisture damage when compared with high-R approaches using exterior insulating sheathing. In this project, Building Science Corporation monitored moisture conditions in double-stud walls from 2011 through 2014 at a new production house located in Devens, Massachusetts. The builder, Transformations, Inc., has been using double-stud walls insulated with 12 in. of open cell polyurethane spray foam (ocSPF); however, the company has been considering a change to netted and blown cellulose insulation for cost reasons. Cellulose is a common choice for double-stud walls because of its lower cost (in most markets). However, cellulose is an air-permeable insulation, unlike spray foams, which increases interior moisture risks. The team compared three double-stud assemblies: 12 in. of ocSPF, 12 in. of cellulose, and 5-½ in. of ocSPF at the exterior of a double-stud wall (to approximate conventional 2 × 6 wall construction and insulation levels, acting as a control wall). These assemblies were repeated on the north and south orientations, for a total of six assemblies.

  8. Wall-boundary conditions in probability density function methods and application to a turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minier, Jean-Pierre; Pozorski, Jacek

    1999-09-01

    An application of a probability density function (PDF), or Lagrangian stochastic, approach to the case of high-Reynolds number wall-bounded turbulent flows is presented. The model simulates the instantaneous velocity and dissipation rate attached to a large number of particles and the wall-boundary conditions are formulated directly in terms of the particle properties. The present conditions aim at reproducing statistical results of the logarithmic region and are therefore in the spirit of wall functions. A new derivation of these boundary conditions and a discussion of the resulting behavior for different mean variables, such as the Reynolds stress components, is proposed. Thus, the present paper complements the work of Dreeben and Pope [Phys. Fluids 9, 2692 (1997)] who proposed similar wall-boundary particle conditions. Numerical implementation of these conditions in a standalone two-dimensional PDF code and a pressure-correction algorithm are detailed. Moments up to the fourth order are presented for a high-Reynolds number channel flow and are analyzed. This case helps to clarify how the method works in practice, to validate the boundary conditions and to assess the model and the code performance.

  9. 88-Inch Cyclotron newsletter

    SciTech Connect

    Stokstad, R.

    1987-02-01

    Activities at the 88-Inch Cyclotron are discussed. Increased beam time demand and operation of the ECR source and cyclotron are reported. Experimental facility improvements are reported, including improvements to the High Energy Resolution Array and to the Recoil Atom Mass Analyzer, a new capture beamline, development of a low background counting facility. Other general improvements are reported that relate to the facility computer network and electronics pool. Approved heavy nuclei research is briefly highlighted. Also listed are the beams accelerated by the cyclotron. (LEW)

  10. Slip-flow boundary condition for straight walls in the lattice Boltzmann model.

    PubMed

    Szalmás, Lajos

    2006-06-01

    A slip-flow boundary condition has been developed in the lattice Boltzmann model combining an interpolation method and a simple slip boundary condition for straight walls placed at arbitrary distance from the last fluid node. An analytical expression has been derived to connect the model parameters with the slip velocity for Couette and Poiseuille flows in the nearly continuum limit. The proposed interpolation method ensures that the slip velocity is independent of the wall position in first order of the Knudsen number. Computer simulations have been carried out to validate the model. The Couette and Poiseuille flows agree with the analytical results to machine order. Numerical simulation of a moving square demonstrates the accuracy of the model for walls moving in both the tangential and normal directions.

  11. Simulations of ion cyclotron anisotropy instabilities in the terrestrial magnetosheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, S. P.; Winske, Dan

    1993-01-01

    Enhanced transverse magnetic fluctuations observed below the proton cyclotron frequency in the terrestrial magnetosheath have been identified as due to the proton cyclotron and helium cyclotron instabilities driven by the T-perpendicular greater than T-parallel condition of the sheath ions. One-dimensional hybrid computer simulations are used here to examine the nonlinear properties of these two growing modes at relatively weak fluctuation energies and for wave vectors parallel to the background magnetic field. Second-order theory predicts fluctuating magnetic field energies at saturation of the proton cyclotron anisotropy instability in semiquantitative agreement with the simulation results. Introduction of the helium component enhances the wave-particle exchange rate for proton anisotropy reduction by that instability, thereby reducing the saturation energy of that mode. The simulations demonstrate that wave-particle interactions by the proton cyclotron and helium cyclotron instabilities lead to the anticorrelation observed by Anderson and Fuselier (1993).

  12. Cyclotron Institute Upgrade Project

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Henry; Yennello, Sherry; Tribble, Robert

    2014-08-26

    The Cyclotron Institute at Texas A&M University has upgraded its accelerator facilities to extend research capabilities with both stable and radioactive beams. The upgrade is divided into three major tasks: (1) re-commission the K-150 (88”) cyclotron, couple it to existing beam lines to provide intense stable beams into the K-500 experimental areas and use it as a driver to produce radioactive beams; (2) develop light ion and heavy ion guides for stopping radioactive ions created with the K-150 beams; and (3) transport 1+ ions from the ion guides into a charge-breeding electron-cyclotron-resonance ion source (CB-ECR) to produce highly-charged radioactive ions for acceleration in the K-500 cyclotron. When completed, the upgraded facility will provide high-quality re-accelerated secondary beams in a unique energy range in the world.

  13. Evaluation of wall boundary condition parameters for gas-solids fluidized bed simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tingwen; Benyahia, Sofiane

    2013-10-01

    Wall boundary conditions for the solids phase have significant effects on numerical predictions of various gas-solids fluidized beds. Several models for the granular flow wall boundary condition are available in the open literature for numerical modeling of gas-solids flow. In this study, a model for specularity coefficient used in Johnson and Jackson boundary conditions by Li and Benyahia (AIChE Journal, 2012, 58, 2058-2068) is implemented in the open-source CFD code-MFIX. The variable specularity coefficient model provides a physical way to calculate the specularity coefficient needed by the partial-slip boundary conditions for the solids phase. Through a series of 2-D numerical simulations of bubbling fluidized bed and circulating fluidized bed riser, the model predicts qualitatively consistent trends to the previous studies. Furthermore, a quantitative comparison is conducted between numerical results of variable and constant specularity coefficients to investigate the effect of spatial and temporal variations in specularity coefficient.

  14. Establishing the boundary temperature conditions causing the corrosion process in coke oven heating walls

    SciTech Connect

    Tsigler, V.D.; Bulakh, V.L.

    1982-01-01

    Corrosion in coke oven heating walls is discussed in the context of temperature boundary conditions. The corrosion for the Dinas in coke oven walls on the oven side was found to be chiefly caused by the process of slag erosion as a result of the effects of temperature and the reaction of the Dinas with the coking coal ash residues, and to a lesser degree by the process of reduction of silica. A temperature of 1200/sup 0/C on the surface of the working layer of the Dinas on the oven side was found to be the limit, above which the corrosion process will proceed with more intensity. (JMT)

  15. Radiation Sources at Electron Cyclotron Harmonic Frequencies.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-28

    KEY WORDS (Continue on reverse side it necesear and Identify by block number) Radiation source, electron cyclotron frequency, gyrotron, travelling ...investigation of gyrotron devices operating in cylindrical geometry. Specific topics include an analysis of oscillations in a gyrotron travelling wave...amplifier, the study of the effects of velocity spread and wall resistivity on gain and bandwidth in a gyrotron travell - ing wave amplifier, an

  16. Domain-wall free energy of spin-glass models: numerical method and boundary conditions.

    PubMed

    Hukushima, K

    1999-10-01

    An efficient Monte Carlo method is extended to evaluate directly domain-wall free energy for randomly frustrated spin systems. Using the method, critical phenomena of spin-glass phase transition are investigated in the 4d+/-J Ising model under the replica boundary condition. Our values of the critical temperature and exponent, obtained by finite-size scaling, are in good agreement with those of the standard Monte Carlo and the series expansion studies. In addition, two exponents, the stiffness exponent and the fractal dimension of the domain wall, which characterize the ordered phase, are obtained. The latter value is larger than d-1, indicating that the domain wall is really rough in the 4d Ising spin-glass phase.

  17. Effect of electron-cyclotron resonance plasma heating conditions on the low-frequency modulation of the gyrotron power at the L-2M stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Batanov, G. M.; Borzosekov, V. D.; Kolik, L. V.; Konchekov, E. M. Malakhov, D. V.; Petelin, M. I.; Petrov, A. E.; Sarksyan, K. A.; Skvortsova, N. N.; Stepakhin, V. D.; Kharchev, N. K.

    2015-08-15

    Low-frequency modulation of the gyrotron power at the L-2M stellarator was studied at different modes of plasma confinement. The plasma was heated at the second harmonic of the electron gyrofrequency. The effect of reflection of gyrotron radiation from the region of electron-cyclotron resonance plasma heating, as well as of backscattering of gyrotron radiation from fluctuations of the plasma density, on the modulation of the gyrotron power was investigated.

  18. Considerations, measurements and logistics associated with low-energy cyclotron decommissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Sunderland, J. J.; Erdahl, C. E.; Bender, B. R.; Sensoy, L.; Watkins, G. L.

    2012-12-19

    The University of Iowa's 20-year-old 17 MeV Scanditronix cyclotron underwent decommissioning in the summer of 2011. To satisfy local, state and federal regulations defining removal, transportation and long-term safe and environmentally secure disposal of the 22 ton activated cyclotron, a series of nuclear spectroscopic measurements were performed to characterize the nature and extent of proton and neutron activation of the 22-ton cyclotron, its associated targets, and the concrete wall that was demolished to remove the old cyclotron. Neutron activation of the concrete wall was minimal and below exempt concentrations resulting in standard landfill disposal. The cyclotron assessment revealed the expected array of short and medium-lived radionuclides. Subsequent calculations suggest that meaningful levels residual activity will have decayed virtually to background after 15 years, with the total residual activity of the entire cyclotron dropping below 37 MBq (1 mCi).

  19. Cell Wall Amine Oxidases: New Players in Root Xylem Differentiation under Stress Conditions.

    PubMed

    Ghuge, Sandip A; Tisi, Alessandra; Carucci, Andrea; Rodrigues-Pousada, Renato A; Franchi, Stefano; Tavladoraki, Paraskevi; Angelini, Riccardo; Cona, Alessandra

    2015-07-14

    Polyamines (PAs) are aliphatic polycations present in all living organisms. A growing body of evidence reveals their involvement as regulators in a variety of physiological and pathological events. They are oxidatively deaminated by amine oxidases (AOs), including copper amine oxidases (CuAOs) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-dependent polyamine oxidases (PAOs). The biologically-active hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) is a shared compound in all of the AO-catalyzed reactions, and it has been reported to play important roles in PA-mediated developmental and stress-induced processes. In particular, the AO-driven H₂O₂ biosynthesis in the cell wall is well known to be involved in plant wound healing and pathogen attack responses by both triggering peroxidase-mediated wall-stiffening events and signaling modulation of defense gene expression. Extensive investigation by a variety of methodological approaches revealed high levels of expression of cell wall-localized AOs in root xylem tissues and vascular parenchyma of different plant species. Here, the recent progresses in understanding the role of cell wall-localized AOs as mediators of root xylem differentiation during development and/or under stress conditions are reviewed. A number of experimental pieces of evidence supports the involvement of apoplastic H₂O₂ derived from PA oxidation in xylem tissue maturation under stress-simulated conditions.

  20. Cell Wall Amine Oxidases: New Players in Root Xylem Differentiation under Stress Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ghuge, Sandip A.; Tisi, Alessandra; Carucci, Andrea; Rodrigues-Pousada, Renato A.; Franchi, Stefano; Tavladoraki, Paraskevi; Angelini, Riccardo; Cona, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Polyamines (PAs) are aliphatic polycations present in all living organisms. A growing body of evidence reveals their involvement as regulators in a variety of physiological and pathological events. They are oxidatively deaminated by amine oxidases (AOs), including copper amine oxidases (CuAOs) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-dependent polyamine oxidases (PAOs). The biologically-active hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is a shared compound in all of the AO-catalyzed reactions, and it has been reported to play important roles in PA-mediated developmental and stress-induced processes. In particular, the AO-driven H2O2 biosynthesis in the cell wall is well known to be involved in plant wound healing and pathogen attack responses by both triggering peroxidase-mediated wall-stiffening events and signaling modulation of defense gene expression. Extensive investigation by a variety of methodological approaches revealed high levels of expression of cell wall-localized AOs in root xylem tissues and vascular parenchyma of different plant species. Here, the recent progresses in understanding the role of cell wall-localized AOs as mediators of root xylem differentiation during development and/or under stress conditions are reviewed. A number of experimental pieces of evidence supports the involvement of apoplastic H2O2 derived from PA oxidation in xylem tissue maturation under stress-simulated conditions. PMID:27135338

  1. Effect of thermal boundary condition on wall-bounded, stably-stratified turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Oscar; Garcia-Villalba, Manuel

    2012-11-01

    The dynamics of stably stratified wall-bounded turbulent flows are of great importance for many engineering and geophysical problems. In some cases, like the stably stratified atmospheric boundary layer, it is unclear which is the most appropriate thermal boundary condition, i.e. constant temperature or constant flux at the ground. Here, we analyze the effect that this boundary condition has on the dynamics of turbulent motions in the near-wall region in the case of strong stable stratification. Two Direct Numerical Simulations of turbulent channels will be used, at Reτ =uτ h / ν = 560 and Riτ = Δρgh /ρ0uτ2 = 600 - 900 , which are described in detail in Flores & Riley (2011, Boundary-Layer Meteorol) and Garcia-Villalba & del Alamo (2011, Phys.Fluids). For this range of Reynolds and Richardson numbers, the near-wall region is intermittent, with patches of laminar flow embedded in the otherwise turbulent flow. It is in this regime where the differences between the constant temperature and the constant flux boundary conditions are expected to be larger, with the thermal boundary condition affecting how the local relaminarization of the flow takes place. This research has been supported by ARO, NSF and the German Research Foundation.

  2. Spatial cyclotron damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, C. L.

    1970-01-01

    To examine spatial electron cyclotron damping in a uniform Vlasov plasma, it is noted that the plasma response to a steady-state transverse excitation consists of several terms (dielectric-pole, free-streaming, and branch-cut), but that the cyclotron-damped pole term is the dominant term for z l = c/w sub ce provided (w sub pe/w sub ce) squared (c/a) is much greater than 1. If the latter inequality does not hold, then the free-streaming and branch-cut terms persist well past z = c/w sub ce as w sub 1 approaches w sub ce, making experimental measurement of cyclotron damping essentially impossible. Considering only (w sub pe/w sub ce) squared (c/a) is much greater than 1, it is shown how collisional effects should be estimated and how a finite-width excitation usually has little effect on the cyclotron-damped part of the response. Criteria is established concerning collisional damping, measurable damping length sizes, and allowed uncertainty in the magnetic field Beta. Results of numerical calculations, showing the regions in the appropriate parameter spaces that meet these criteria, are presented. From these results, one can determine the feasibility of, or propose parameter values for, an experiment designed to measure spatial cyclotron damping. It is concluded that the electron temperature T sub e should be at least 1 ev., and preferably 10 ev. or higher, for a successful experiment.

  3. Coagulating activity of the blood, vascular wall, and myocardium under hypodynamia conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrovskiy, B. V. (Editor); Chazov, E. I. (Editor); Andreyev, S. V. (Editor)

    1980-01-01

    In order to study the effects of hypodynamia on the coagulating properties of the blood, vascular wall, and myocardium, chinchilla rabbits were kept for varying periods in special cages which restricted their movements. At the end of the experiment, blood samples were taken and the animals were sacrificed. Preparations were made from the myocardium venae cavae, and layers of the aorta. Two resultant interrelated and mutually conditioned syndromes were discovered: thrombohemorrhagic in the blood and hemorrago-thrombotic in the tissues.

  4. Deuterium uptake in magnetic-fusion devices with lithium-conditioned carbon walls.

    PubMed

    Krstic, P S; Allain, J P; Taylor, C N; Dadras, J; Maeda, S; Morokuma, K; Jakowski, J; Allouche, A; Skinner, C H

    2013-03-08

    Lithium wall conditioning has lowered hydrogenic recycling and dramatically improved plasma performance in many magnetic-fusion devices. In this Letter, we report quantum-classical atomistic simulations and laboratory experiments that elucidate the roles of lithium and oxygen in the uptake of hydrogen in amorphous carbon. Surprisingly, we show that lithium creates a high oxygen concentration on a carbon surface when bombarded by deuterium. Furthermore, surface oxygen, rather than lithium, plays the key role in trapping hydrogen.

  5. Enhanced-recycling H-mode regimes with edge coherent modes achieved by RF heating with lithium-wall conditioning in the EAST superconducting tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. Q.; Xu, G. S.; Guo, H. Y.; Wan, B. N.; Chen, R.; Ding, S. Y.; Yan, N.; Wang, L.; Gong, X. Z.; Liu, S. C.; Shao, L. M.; Chen, L.; Zhang, W.; Hu, G. H.; Liu, Y. L.; Li, Y. L.; Zhao, N.

    2014-12-01

    Two enhanced-recycling H-mode regimes, named low-enhanced-recycling (LER) and high-enhanced-recycling (HER) H-mode regimes, with edge coherent modes, have been achieved by lower hybrid current drive and ion cyclotron resonance heating with lithium-wall conditioning in the EAST superconducting tokamak. In the LER H-mode regime, the density and radiation increase during the ELM-free phase until the onset of edge-localized modes (ELMs), while in the HER H-mode regime, the density and radiation are well controlled without the presence of ELMs. Both LER and HER H-modes exhibit a low-frequency (frequency <100 kHz) edge quasi-coherent mode (ECM) with an initial frequency chirping down phase, following the L-H transition. In addition, an electromagnetic high-frequency coherent mode (HFM) with frequency >170 kHz appears shortly (<1 ms) after the transition during HER H-modes. Both ECM and HFM propagate in the electron diamagnetic drift direction in the lab frame with a low poloidal wavelength and may be responsible for enhanced recycling during the ELM-free phase. These two enhanced-recycling H-mode regimes may have significant implications for long-pulse high-performance operations in future fusion experiments.

  6. Electron Heating by the Ion Cyclotron Instability in Collisionless Accretion Flows. II. Electron Heating Efficiency as a Function of Flow Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sironi, Lorenzo

    2015-02-01

    In the innermost regions of low-luminosity accretion flows, including Sgr A* at the center of our Galaxy, the frequency of Coulomb collisions is so low that the plasma has two temperatures, with the ions substantially hotter than the electrons. This paradigm assumes that Coulomb collisions are the only channel for transferring the ion energy to the electrons. In this work, the second of a series, we assess the efficiency of electron heating by ion velocity-space instabilities in collisionless accretion flows. The instabilities are seeded by the pressure anisotropy induced by magnetic field amplification, coupled to the adiabatic invariance of the particle magnetic moments. Using two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, we showed in Paper I that if the electron-to-ion temperature ratio is T 0e /T 0i <~ 0.2, the ion cyclotron instability is the dominant mode for ion betas β0i ~ 5-30 (here, β0i is the ratio of ion thermal pressure to magnetic pressure), as appropriate for the midplane of low-luminosity accretion flows. In this work, we employ analytical theory and one-dimensional PIC simulations (with the box aligned with the fastest-growing wave vector of the ion cyclotron mode) to fully characterize how the electron heating efficiency during the growth of the ion cyclotron instability depends on the electron-to-proton temperature ratio, the plasma beta, the Alfvén speed, the amplification rate of the mean field (in units of the ion Larmor frequency), and the proton-to-electron mass ratio. Our findings can be incorporated as a physically grounded subgrid model into global fluid simulations of low-luminosity accretion flows, thus helping to assess the validity of the two-temperature assumption.

  7. ELECTRON HEATING BY THE ION CYCLOTRON INSTABILITY IN COLLISIONLESS ACCRETION FLOWS. II. ELECTRON HEATING EFFICIENCY AS A FUNCTION OF FLOW CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Sironi, Lorenzo

    2015-02-20

    In the innermost regions of low-luminosity accretion flows, including Sgr A* at the center of our Galaxy, the frequency of Coulomb collisions is so low that the plasma has two temperatures, with the ions substantially hotter than the electrons. This paradigm assumes that Coulomb collisions are the only channel for transferring the ion energy to the electrons. In this work, the second of a series, we assess the efficiency of electron heating by ion velocity-space instabilities in collisionless accretion flows. The instabilities are seeded by the pressure anisotropy induced by magnetic field amplification, coupled to the adiabatic invariance of the particle magnetic moments. Using two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, we showed in Paper I that if the electron-to-ion temperature ratio is T {sub 0e}/T {sub 0i} ≲ 0.2, the ion cyclotron instability is the dominant mode for ion betas β{sub 0i} ∼ 5-30 (here, β{sub 0i} is the ratio of ion thermal pressure to magnetic pressure), as appropriate for the midplane of low-luminosity accretion flows. In this work, we employ analytical theory and one-dimensional PIC simulations (with the box aligned with the fastest-growing wave vector of the ion cyclotron mode) to fully characterize how the electron heating efficiency during the growth of the ion cyclotron instability depends on the electron-to-proton temperature ratio, the plasma beta, the Alfvén speed, the amplification rate of the mean field (in units of the ion Larmor frequency), and the proton-to-electron mass ratio. Our findings can be incorporated as a physically grounded subgrid model into global fluid simulations of low-luminosity accretion flows, thus helping to assess the validity of the two-temperature assumption.

  8. Cyclotron Line Measurements with INTEGRAL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pottschmidt, K.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Caballero, I.; Fritz, S.; Schoenherr, G.; Kretschmar, P.; Wilms, J.; McBride, V. A.; Suchy, S.; Rothschild, R. E.

    2008-01-01

    Due to its broadband energy coverage, INTEGRAL has made important contributions to observing and interpreting cyclotron lines, which are present in the 10-100 keV range of a sample of accreting pulsars. In these systems photons with energies fulfilling the resonance condition inelastically Compton scatter off electrons quantized in the accretion column above the neutron star's magnetic pole(s). This process gives rise to the broad, absorption-like lines or 'cyclotron resonant scattering features' (CRSF). The observed lines allow to directly measure the B-fields of these sources, resulting in values of a few times 1E12G. In this overview I will present recent highlights regarding CRSF observations as well as discuss current ideas and models for the physical conditions in the accretion column. Among the former are the stability of the spectrum of Vela X-1 during giant flares in 2003, the observation of three cyclotron lines during the 2004 outburst of V0332+53, the confirmation of the fundamental line at approximately 45 keV during a 2005 normal outburst of A0535-26, and the simultaneous detection of the two lines in the dipping source 4U 1907+09 (for which also a torque reversal was detected for the first time). Through these and other observations it has become increasingly apparent that two types of observations can potentially be used to constrain the accretion column geometry: the determination of energy ratios for multiple harmonic lines (only two sources with greater than 2 lines are known), was well as the evolution of the fundamental line centroid, which, for different sources, may or may not be correlated with flux. Furthermore, first steps have been taken away from the usual phenomenological description of the lines, towards a physical approach based on self-consistent CRSF modeling. Initial applications are presented.

  9. Cyclotron Line Measurements with INTEGRAL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pottschmidt, K.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Caballero, I.; Fritz, S.; Schoenherr, G.; Kretschmar, P.; Wilms, J.; McBride, V. A.; Suchy, S.; Rothschild, R. E.

    2008-01-01

    Due to its broadband energy coverage, INTEGRAL has made important contributions to observing and interpreting cyclotron lines, which are present in the 10-100 keV range of a sample of accreting pulsars. In these systems photons with energies fulfilling the resonance condition inelastically Compton scatter off electrons quantized in the accretion column above the neutron star's magnetic pole(s). This process gives rise to the broad, absorption-like lines or 'cyclotron resonant scattering features' (CRSF). The observed lines allow to directly measure the B-fields of these sources, resulting in values of a few times 1E12G. In this overview I will present recent highlights regarding CRSF observations as well as discuss current ideas and models for the physical conditions in the accretion column. Among the former are the stability of the spectrum of Vela X-1 during giant flares in 2003, the observation of three cyclotron lines during the 2004 outburst of V0332+53, the confirmation of the fundamental line at approximately 45 keV during a 2005 normal outburst of A0535-26, and the simultaneous detection of the two lines in the dipping source 4U 1907+09 (for which also a torque reversal was detected for the first time). Through these and other observations it has become increasingly apparent that two types of observations can potentially be used to constrain the accretion column geometry: the determination of energy ratios for multiple harmonic lines (only two sources with greater than 2 lines are known), was well as the evolution of the fundamental line centroid, which, for different sources, may or may not be correlated with flux. Furthermore, first steps have been taken away from the usual phenomenological description of the lines, towards a physical approach based on self-consistent CRSF modeling. Initial applications are presented.

  10. Rayleigh-Ritz axial buckling analysis of single-walled carbon nanotubes with different boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, R.; Sahmani, S.; Rouhi, H.

    2011-02-01

    Eringen's nonlocality is incorporated into the shell theory to include the small-scale effects on the axial buckling of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with arbitrary boundary conditions. To this end, the Rayleigh-Ritz solution technique is implemented in conjunction with the set of beam functions as modal displacement functions. Then, molecular dynamics simulations are employed to obtain the critical buckling loads of armchair and zigzag SWCNTs, the results of which are matched with those of nonlocal shell model to extract the appropriate values of nonlocal parameter. It is found that in contrast to the chirality, boundary conditions have a considerable influence on the proper values of nonlocal parameter.

  11. Boundary conditions at the walls with thermionic electron emission in two temperature modeling of “thermal” plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Pekker, Leonid; Hussary, Nakhleh

    2015-08-15

    In this paper, we propose new boundary conditions for the electric potential, the electron energy equation, and the energy equation for heavy particles (ions and neutrals) at the hot walls with thermionic electron emission for two-temperature thermal arc models. The derived boundary conditions assume that the walls are made from refractory metals and, consequently, the erosion of the wall is small and can be neglected. In these boundary conditions, the plasma sheath formed at the electrode is viewed as the interface between the plasma and the wall. The derived boundary conditions allow the calculation of the heat flux to the walls from the plasma. This allows the calculation of the thermionic electron current that makes the model of electrode-plasma interaction self-consistent.

  12. Method and apparatus for preventing cyclotron breakdown in partially evacuated waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, C P

    1987-08-18

    It is an object of this invention to provide a method and apparatus for preventing cyclotron breakdown in a partially evacuated waveguide used to insert microwave energy for electron cyclotron heating in a plasma magnetic confinement device. An electrostatic field is applied along a section of such a waveguide in order to run seed electrons into the wall of the waveguide.

  13. Critical conditions for the buoyancy-driven detachment of a wall-bound pendant drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamorgese, A.; Mauri, R.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate numerically the critical conditions for detachment of an isolated, wall-bound emulsion droplet acted upon by surface tension and wall-normal buoyancy forces alone. To that end, we present a simple extension of a diffuse-interface model for partially miscible binary mixtures that was previously employed for simulating several two-phase flow phenomena far and near the critical point [A. G. Lamorgese et al. "Phase-field approach to multiphase flow modeling," Milan J. Math. 79(2), 597-642 (2011)] to allow for static contact angles other than 90°. We use the same formulation of the Cahn boundary condition as first proposed by Jacqmin ["Contact-line dynamics of a diffuse fluid interface," J. Fluid Mech. 402, 57-88 (2000)], which accommodates a cubic (Hermite) interpolation of surface tensions between the wall and each phase at equilibrium. We show that this model can be successfully employed for simulating three-phase contact line problems in stable emulsions with nearly immiscible components. We also show a numerical determination of critical Bond numbers as a function of static contact angle by phase-field simulation.

  14. Flow boundary conditions for fluid mixtures at solid walls and moving contact lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbins, Mark

    2005-11-01

    Molecular simulations of slip at solid surfaces have focused on single component systems, but polymers are frequently blended to optimize performance. This talk will examine counterintuitive behavior that can arise when binary fluid mixtures flow past stationary solid walls in simple shear and at moving contact lines. In general the velocities of the two species do not go to zero at the walls. In addition to the slip found for single fluids, there may be velocity discontinuities due to diffusive fluxes and to interfacial forces when there is a concentration gradient.^1 Cases where the fluid velocity is largest near the wall and where the apparent slip length diverges will be shown, and a general boundary condition for multi-phase flow presented. The no-slip boundary condition leads to singular dissipation when the contact line between a fluid interface and solid moves, but it was suggested that a diffusive flux could remove this singularity.^2 The flow and stress near moving contact lines are analyzed for a range of interfacial widths, velocities and interactions. A significant diffusive flux is only observed in the layer closest to the solid and is not sufficient to remove the singularity. Instead, the finite molecular size and non-Newtonian effects cutoff the singularity.1. C. Denniston and M. O. Robbins, Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 178302 (2001).2. H.-Y. Chen and D. Jasnow and J. Vinals, Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 1686 (2000).

  15. Effect of yeast strain and fermentation conditions on the release of cell wall polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Giovani, Giovanna; Canuti, Valentina; Rosi, Iolanda

    2010-02-28

    To improve our understanding of the factors involved in polysaccharide release during alcoholic fermentation, we investigated three Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains in fermentation trials conducted at two temperatures (25 degrees C and 32 degrees C) and three sugar concentrations (20%, 23.5%, and 27%), with or without supplementation of grape juice with diammonium phosphate (DAP) or microcrystalline cellulose. In two yeast strains, the release of cell wall polysaccharides increased significantly with an increase in fermentation temperature and sugar concentration of the grape juice; the polysaccharide release was greater in stressed conditions, in which the cells were less viable and less metabolically active. In the third strain, the average amount of polysaccharides released into the medium decreased significantly at 32 degrees C with 27% sugar, and increased in grape juice supplemented with DAP. Thus, this strain released more polysaccharides when conditions were nearer to optimal and the yeast cells were more viable and metabolically active. Our results suggest that the yeast strains released cell wall polysaccharides via different mechanisms, and that the cell wall integrity pathway may account for some of the differences in polysaccharide release among the strains.

  16. Numerical Simulation of Flow Through Equilateral Triangular Duct Under Constant Wall Heat Flux Boundary Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rajneesh; Kumar, Anoop; Goel, Varun

    2017-06-01

    The force convective heat transfer in an equilateral triangular duct of different wall heat flux configurations was analysed for the laminar hydro-dynamically developed and thermally developing flow by the use of finite volume method. Unstructured meshing was generated by multi-block technique and set of governing equations were discretized using second-order accurate up-wind scheme and numerically solved by SIMPLE Algorithm. For ensuring accuracy, grid independence study was also done. Numerical methodology was verified by comparing results with previous work and predicted results showed good agreement with them (within error of ±5 %). The different combinations of constant heat flux boundary condition were analysed and their effect on heat transfer and fluid flow for different Reynolds number was also studied. The results of different combinations were compared with the case of force convective heat transfer in the equilateral triangular duct with constant heat flux on all three walls.

  17. Cyclotron Research and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mach, Rostislav

    2010-01-05

    The twenty years old cyclotron U-120M was upgraded for R and D and Production of Radiopharmaceuticals. R and D on short-lived Radiopharmaceuticals production is done at this accelerator. These Radiopharmaceuticals are eventually delivered to nearby hospitals. Development of new diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals is also pursued at the facility. your paper.

  18. Entropy Stable Wall Boundary Conditions for the Three-Dimensional Compressible Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsani, Matteo; Carpenter, Mark H.; Nielsen, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    Non-linear entropy stability and a summation-by-parts framework are used to derive entropy stable wall boundary conditions for the three-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations. A semi-discrete entropy estimate for the entire domain is achieved when the new boundary conditions are coupled with an entropy stable discrete interior operator. The data at the boundary are weakly imposed using a penalty flux approach and a simultaneous-approximation-term penalty technique. Although discontinuous spectral collocation operators on unstructured grids are used herein for the purpose of demonstrating their robustness and efficacy, the new boundary conditions are compatible with any diagonal norm summation-by-parts spatial operator, including finite element, finite difference, finite volume, discontinuous Galerkin, and flux reconstruction/correction procedure via reconstruction schemes. The proposed boundary treatment is tested for three-dimensional subsonic and supersonic flows. The numerical computations corroborate the non-linear stability (entropy stability) and accuracy of the boundary conditions.

  19. Entropy Stable Wall Boundary Conditions for the Compressible Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsani, Matteo; Carpenter, Mark H.; Nielsen, Eric J.

    2014-01-01

    Non-linear entropy stability and a summation-by-parts framework are used to derive entropy stable wall boundary conditions for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. A semi-discrete entropy estimate for the entire domain is achieved when the new boundary conditions are coupled with an entropy stable discrete interior operator. The data at the boundary are weakly imposed using a penalty flux approach and a simultaneous-approximation-term penalty technique. Although discontinuous spectral collocation operators are used herein for the purpose of demonstrating their robustness and efficacy, the new boundary conditions are compatible with any diagonal norm summation-by-parts spatial operator, including finite element, finite volume, finite difference, discontinuous Galerkin, and flux reconstruction schemes. The proposed boundary treatment is tested for three-dimensional subsonic and supersonic flows. The numerical computations corroborate the non-linear stability (entropy stability) and accuracy of the boundary conditions.

  20. Building America Case Study: Monitoring of Double Stud Wall Moisture Conditions in the Northeast, Devens, Massachusetts (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2015-03-01

    Double-stud walls insulated with cellulose or low-density spray foam can have R-values of 40 or higher. However, double stud walls have a higher risk of interior-sourced condensation moisture damage, when compared with high-R approaches using exterior insulating sheathing. Moisture conditions in double stud walls were monitored in Zone 5A (Massachusetts); three double stud assemblies were compared.

  1. Technical Note: Formation of airborne ice crystals in a wall independent reactor (WIR) under atmospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fries, E.; Haunold, W.; Starokozhev, E.; Palitzsch, K.; Sitals, R.; Jaeschke, W.; Püttmann, W.

    2008-07-01

    Both, gas and particle scavenging contribute to the transport of organic compounds by ice crystals in the troposphere. To simulate these processes an experimental setup was developed to form airborne ice crystals under atmospheric conditions. Experiments were performed in a wall independent reactor (WIR) installed in a walk-in cold chamber maintained constantly at -20°C. Aerosol particles were added to the carrier gas of ambient air by an aerosol generator to allow heterogeneous ice formation. Temperature variations and hydrodynamic conditions of the WIR were investigated to determine the conditions for ice crystal formation and crystal growth by vapour deposition. In detail, the dependence of temperature variations from flow rate and temperature of the physical wall as well as temperature variations with an increasing reactor depth were studied. The conditions to provide a stable aerosol concentration in the carrier gas flow were also studied. The temperature distribution inside the reactor was strongly dependent on flow rate and physical wall temperature. At an inlet temperature of -20°C, a flow rate of 30 L•min-1 and a physical wall temperature of +5°C turned out to provide ideal conditions for ice formation. At these conditions a sharp and stable laminar down draft "jet stream" of cold air in the centre of the reactor was produced. Temperatures measured at the chamber outlet were kept well below the freezing point in the whole reactor depth of 1.0 m. Thus, melting did not affect ice formation and crystal growth. The maximum residence time for airborne ice crystals was calculated to at 40 s. Ice crystal growth rates increased also with increasing reactor depth. The maximum ice crystal growth rate was calculated at 2.82 mg• s-1. Further, the removal efficiency of the cleaning device for aerosol particles was 99.8% after 10 min. A reliable particle supply was attained after a preliminary lead time of 15 min. Thus, the minimum lead time was determined at 25

  2. Flow Conditions in the Intracranial Aneurysm Lumen Are Associated with Inflammation and Degenerative Changes of the Aneurysm Wall.

    PubMed

    Cebral, J; Ollikainen, E; Chung, B J; Mut, F; Sippola, V; Jahromi, B R; Tulamo, R; Hernesniemi, J; Niemelä, M; Robertson, A; Frösen, J

    2017-01-01

    Saccular intracranial aneurysm is a common disease that may cause devastating intracranial hemorrhage. Hemodynamics, wall remodeling, and wall inflammation have been associated with saccular intracranial aneurysm rupture. We investigated how saccular intracranial aneurysm hemodynamics is associated with wall remodeling and inflammation of the saccular intracranial aneurysm wall. Tissue samples resected during a saccular intracranial aneurysm operation (11 unruptured, 9 ruptured) were studied with histology and immunohistochemistry. Patient-specific computational models of hemodynamics were created from preoperative CT angiographies. More stable and less complex flows were associated with thick, hyperplastic saccular intracranial aneurysm walls, while slower flows with more diffuse inflow were associated with degenerated and decellularized saccular intracranial aneurysm walls. Wall degeneration (P = .041) and rupture were associated with increased inflammation (CD45+, P = .031). High wall shear stress (P = .018), higher vorticity (P = .046), higher viscous dissipation (P = .046), and high shear rate (P = .046) were associated with increased inflammation. Inflammation was also associated with lack of an intact endothelium (P = .034) and the presence of organized luminal thrombosis (P = .018), though overall organized thrombosis was associated with low minimum wall shear stress (P = .034) and not with the flow conditions associated with inflammation. Flow conditions in the saccular intracranial aneurysm are associated with wall remodeling. Inflammation, which is associated with degenerative wall remodeling and rupture, is related to high flow activity, including elevated wall shear stress. Endothelial injury may be a mechanism by which flow induces inflammation in the saccular intracranial aneurysm wall. Hemodynamic simulations might prove useful in identifying saccular intracranial aneurysms at risk of developing inflammation, a potential biomarker for rupture.

  3. Improvement of Plasma Performance with Lithium Wall Conditioning in Aditya Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    B. Chowdhuri, M.; Manchanda, R.; Ghosh, J.; B. Bhatt, S.; Ajai, Kumar; K. Das, B.; A. Jadeja, K.; A. Raijada, P.; Manoj, Kumar; Banerjee, S.; Nilam, Ramaiya; Aniruddh, Mali; Ketan, M. Patel; Vinay, Kumar; Vasu, P.; Bhattacharyay, R.; L. Tanna, R.; Y. Shankara, Joisa; K. Atrey, P.; V. S. Rao, C.; Chenna Reddy, D.; K. Chattopadhyay, P.; Jha, R.; C. Saxena, Y.; Aditya Team

    2013-02-01

    Lithiumization of the vacuum vessel wall of the Aditya tokamak using a lithium rod exposed to glow discharge cleaning plasma has been done to understand its effect on plasma performance. After the Li-coating, an increment of ~100 eV in plasma electron temperature has been observed in most of the discharges compared to discharges without Li coating, and the shot reproducibility is considerably improved. Detailed studies of impurity behaviour and hydrogen recycling are made in the Li coated discharges by observing spectral lines of hydrogen, carbon, and oxygen in the visible region using optical fiber, an interference filter, and PMT based systems. A large reduction in O I signal (up to ~40% to 50%) and a 20% to 30% decrease of Hα signal indicate significant reduction of wall recycling. Furthermore, VUV emissions from O V and Fe XV monitored by a grazing incidence monochromator also show the reduction. Lower Fe XV emission indicates the declined impurity penetration to the core plasma in the Li coated discharges. Significant increase of the particle and energy confinement times and the reduction of Zeff of the plasma certainly indicate the improved plasma parameters in the Aditya tokamak after lithium wall conditioning.

  4. The Fusarium oxysporum cell wall proteome under adhesion-inducing conditions.

    PubMed

    Prados-Rosales, Rafael; Luque-Garcia, Jose L; Martínez-López, Raquel; Gil, Concha; Di Pietro, Antonio

    2009-10-01

    Fusarium oxysporum is a soilborne fungus that causes vascular wilt disease on a wide range of crops. During initial stages of infection, fungal hyphae attach firmly to roots, penetrate the cortex and colonize xylem vessels. The mechanisms underlying root attachment are poorly understood, although it was previously shown that this process depends on Fmk1, a mitogen-activated protein kinase orthologous to the mating/filamentation mitogen-activated protein kinases Fus3/Kss1 in yeast. We investigated the hypothesis that root adhesion is mediated by fungal cell wall proteins (CWPs). To characterize the cell wall subproteome of F. oxysporum, we performed LC-MS/MS analysis of tryptic digests of purified cell walls obtained from adhesion-inducing conditions, identifying a total of 174 proteins, 19 of which contain a predicted signal peptide and 10 of which have a predicted glycosylphosphatidyl-inositol motif. 2-D DIGE was used to compare four different fractions of CWPs extracted from hyphae of the wild-type strain and the Deltafmk1 mutant. We detected 18 proteins differing significantly in abundance between the two strains. Differential expression of five of these proteins was confirmed by RT-PCR analysis. A significant fraction of the subproteome lacked functional information, highlighting the limitations in the current understanding of CWPs in F. oxysporum.

  5. RF physics of ICWC discharge at high cyclotron harmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Lyssoivan, A.; Van Eester, D.; Wauters, T.; Vervier, M.; Van Schoor, M.; Bobkov, V.; Rohde, V.; Schneider, P.; Douai, D.; Kogut, D.; Kreter, A.; Möller, S.; Philipps, V.; Sergienko, G.; Moiseenko, V.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Collaboration: TEXTOR Team; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2014-02-12

    Recent experiments on Ion Cyclotron Wall Conditioning (ICWC) performed in tokamaks TEXTOR and ASDEX Upgrade with standard ICRF antennas operated at fixed frequencies but variable toroidal magnetic field demonstrated rather contrasting parameters of ICWC discharge in scenarios with on-axis fundamental ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) for protons,ω=ω{sub H+}, and with its high cyclotron harmonics (HCH), ω=10ω{sub cH+}⋅ HCH scenario: very high antenna coupling to low density RF plasmas (P{sub pl}≈0.9P{sub RF-G}) and low energy Maxwellian distribution of CX hydrogen atoms with temperature T{sub H}≈350 eV. Fundamental ICR: lower antenna-plasma coupling efficiency (by factor of about 1.5 times) and generation of high energy non-Maxwellian CX hydrogen atoms (with local energy E{sub ⊥H} ≥1.0 keV). In the present paper, we analyze the obtained experimental results numerically using (i) newly developed 0-D transport code describing the process of plasma production with electron and ion collisional ionization in helium-hydrogen gas mixture and (ii) earlier developed 1-D Dispersion Relation Solver accounting for finite temperature effects and collision absorption mechanisms for all plasma species in addition to conventionally examined Landau/TTPM damping for electrons and cyclotron absorption for ions. The numerical study of plasma production in helium with minor hydrogen content in low and high toroidal magnetic fields is presented. The investigation of the excitation, conversion and absorption of plasma waves as function of B{sub T}-field suggests that only fast waves (FW) may give a crucial impact on antenna coupling and characteristics of the ICWC discharge using standard poloidally polarized ICRF antennas designed to couple RF power mainly to FW. The collisional (non-resonant) absorption by electrons and ions and IC absorption by resonant ions of minor concentration in low T{sub e} plasmas is studied at fundamental ICR and its high harmonics.

  6. Compositional changes in 'Bartlett' pear ( Pyrus communis L.) cell wall polysaccharides as affected by sunlight conditions.

    PubMed

    Raffo, María D; Ponce, Nora M A; Sozzi, Gabriel O; Vicente, Ariel R; Stortz, Carlos A

    2011-11-23

    Preharvest conditions can have a great impact on fruit quality attributes and postharvest responses. Firmness is an important quality attribute in pear, and excessive softening increases susceptibility to bruising and decay, thus limiting fruit postharvest life. Textural characteristics of fruits are determined at least in part by cell wall structure and disassembly. Few studies have analyzed the influence of fruit preharvest environment in softening, cell wall composition, and degradation. In the current work 'Bartlett' pears grown either facing the sun (S) or in the shade (H) were harvested and stored for 13 days at 20 °C. An evaluation of fruit soluble solids, acidity, color, starch degradation, firmness, cell wall yield, pectin and matrix glycan solubilization, depolymerization, and monosaccharide composition was carried out. Sun-exposed pears showed more advanced color development and similar levels of starch degradation, sugars, and acids than shaded fruit. Sunlight-grown pears were at harvest firmer than shade-grown pears. Both fruit groups softened during storage at 20 °C, but even after ripening, sun-exposed pears remained firmer. Sunlight exposure did not have a great impact on pectin molecular weight. Instead, at harvest a higher proportion of water-solubilized uronic acids and alkali-solubilized neutral sugars and a larger mean molecular size of tightly bound glycans was found in sun-exposed pears. During ripening cell wall catabolism took place in both sun- and shade-grown pears, but pectin solubilization was clearly delayed in sun-exposed fruit. This was associated with decreased removal of RG I-arabinan side chains rather than with reduced depolymerization.

  7. Evaluation of Wall Boundary Conditions for Impedance Eduction Using a Dual-Source Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, W. R.; Jones, M. G.

    2012-01-01

    The accuracy of the Ingard-Myers boundary condition and a recently proposed modified Ingard-Myers boundary condition is evaluated for use in impedance eduction under the assumption of uniform mean flow. The evaluation is performed at three centerline Mach numbers, using data acquired in a grazing flow impedance tube, using both upstream and downstream propagating sound sources, and on a database of test liners for which the expected behavior of the impedance spectra is known. The test liners are a hard-wall insert consisting of 12.6 mm thick aluminum, a linear liner without a facesheet consisting of a number of small diameter but long cylindrical channels embedded in a ceramic material, and two conventional nonlinear liners consisting of a perforated facesheet bonded to a honeycomb core. The study is restricted to a frequency range for which only plane waves are cut on in the hard-wall sections of the flow impedance tube. The metrics used to evaluate each boundary condition are 1) how well it educes the same impedance for upstream and downstream propagating sources, and 2) how well it predicts the expected behavior of the impedance spectra over the Mach number range. The primary conclusions of the study are that the same impedance is educed for upstream and downstream propagating sources except at the highest Mach number, that an effective impedance based on both the upstream and downstream measurements is more accurate than an impedance based on the upstream or downstream data alone, and that the Ingard-Myers boundary condition with an effective impedance produces results similar to that achieved with the modified Ingard-Myers boundary condition.

  8. Suppression of Hydroxycinnamate Network Formation in Cell Walls of Rice Shoots Grown under Microgravity Conditions in Space.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Soga, Kouichi; Hoson, Takayuki; Kotake, Toshihisa; Yamazaki, Takashi; Higashibata, Akira; Ishioka, Noriaki; Shimazu, Toru; Fukui, Keiji; Osada, Ikuko; Kasahara, Haruo; Kamada, Motoshi

    2015-01-01

    Network structures created by hydroxycinnamate cross-links within the cell wall architecture of gramineous plants make the cell wall resistant to the gravitational force of the earth. In this study, the effects of microgravity on the formation of cell wall-bound hydroxycinnamates were examined using etiolated rice shoots simultaneously grown under artificial 1 g and microgravity conditions in the Cell Biology Experiment Facility on the International Space Station. Measurement of the mechanical properties of cell walls showed that shoot cell walls became stiff during the growth period and that microgravity suppressed this stiffening. Amounts of cell wall polysaccharides, cell wall-bound phenolic acids, and lignin in rice shoots increased as the shoot grew. Microgravity did not influence changes in the amounts of cell wall polysaccharides or phenolic acid monomers such as ferulic acid (FA) and p-coumaric acid, but it suppressed increases in diferulic acid (DFA) isomers and lignin. Activities of the enzymes phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) and cell wall-bound peroxidase (CW-PRX) in shoots also increased as the shoot grew. PAL activity in microgravity-grown shoots was almost comparable to that in artificial 1 g-grown shoots, while CW-PRX activity increased less in microgravity-grown shoots than in artificial 1 g-grown shoots. Furthermore, the increases in expression levels of some class III peroxidase genes were reduced under microgravity conditions. These results suggest that a microgravity environment modifies the expression levels of certain class III peroxidase genes in rice shoots, that the resultant reduction of CW-PRX activity may be involved in suppressing DFA formation and lignin polymerization, and that this suppression may cause a decrease in cross-linkages within the cell wall architecture. The reduction in intra-network structures may contribute to keeping the cell wall loose under microgravity conditions.

  9. Suppression of Hydroxycinnamate Network Formation in Cell Walls of Rice Shoots Grown under Microgravity Conditions in Space

    PubMed Central

    Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Soga, Kouichi; Hoson, Takayuki; Kotake, Toshihisa; Yamazaki, Takashi; Higashibata, Akira; Ishioka, Noriaki; Shimazu, Toru; Fukui, Keiji; Osada, Ikuko; Kasahara, Haruo; Kamada, Motoshi

    2015-01-01

    Network structures created by hydroxycinnamate cross-links within the cell wall architecture of gramineous plants make the cell wall resistant to the gravitational force of the earth. In this study, the effects of microgravity on the formation of cell wall-bound hydroxycinnamates were examined using etiolated rice shoots simultaneously grown under artificial 1 g and microgravity conditions in the Cell Biology Experiment Facility on the International Space Station. Measurement of the mechanical properties of cell walls showed that shoot cell walls became stiff during the growth period and that microgravity suppressed this stiffening. Amounts of cell wall polysaccharides, cell wall-bound phenolic acids, and lignin in rice shoots increased as the shoot grew. Microgravity did not influence changes in the amounts of cell wall polysaccharides or phenolic acid monomers such as ferulic acid (FA) and p-coumaric acid, but it suppressed increases in diferulic acid (DFA) isomers and lignin. Activities of the enzymes phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) and cell wall-bound peroxidase (CW-PRX) in shoots also increased as the shoot grew. PAL activity in microgravity-grown shoots was almost comparable to that in artificial 1 g-grown shoots, while CW-PRX activity increased less in microgravity-grown shoots than in artificial 1 g-grown shoots. Furthermore, the increases in expression levels of some class III peroxidase genes were reduced under microgravity conditions. These results suggest that a microgravity environment modifies the expression levels of certain class III peroxidase genes in rice shoots, that the resultant reduction of CW-PRX activity may be involved in suppressing DFA formation and lignin polymerization, and that this suppression may cause a decrease in cross-linkages within the cell wall architecture. The reduction in intra-network structures may contribute to keeping the cell wall loose under microgravity conditions. PMID:26378793

  10. Endothelial Expression of Guidance Cues in Vessel Wall Homeostasis: Dysregulation under pro-atherosclerotic conditions

    PubMed Central

    van Gils, Janine M.; Ramkhelawon, Bhama; Fernandes, Luciana; Stewart, Merran C.; Guo, Liang; Seibert, Tara; Menezes, Gustavo B.; Cara, Denise C.; Chow, Camille; Kinane, T. Bernard; Fisher, Edward A.; Balcells, Mercedes; Alvarez-Leite, Jacqueline; Moore, Kathryn J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Emerging evidence suggests that neuronal guidance cues, typically expressed during development, are involved in both physiological and pathological immune responses. We hypothesized that endothelial expression of such guidance cues may regulate leukocyte trafficking into the vascular wall during atherogenesis. Approach/Results We demonstrate that members of the Netrin, Semaphorin and Ephrin family of guidance molecules are differentially regulated under conditions that promote or protect from atherosclerosis. Netrin-1 and Semaphorin3A are expressed by coronary artery endothelial cells and potently inhibit chemokine-directed migration of human monocytes. Endothelial expression of these negative guidance cues is down-regulated by pro-atherogenic factors, including oscillatory shear stress and pro-inflammatory cytokines associated with monocyte entry into the vessel wall. Furthermore, we show using intravital microscopy that inhibition of Netrin-1 or Semaphorin3A using blocking peptides increases leukocyte adhesion to the endothelium. Unlike Netrin-1 and Semaphorin3A, the guidance cue EphrinB2 is up-regulated under pro-atherosclerotic flow conditions and functions as a chemoattractant, increasing leukocyte migration in the absence of additional chemokines. Conclusions The concurrent regulation of negative and positive guidance cues may facilitate leukocyte infiltration of the endothelium through a balance between chemoattraction and chemorepulsion. These data indicate a previously unappreciated role for axonal guidance cues in maintaining the endothelial barrier and regulating leukocyte trafficking during atherogenesis. PMID:23430612

  11. Slip conditions with wall catalysis and radiation for multicomponent, nonequilibrium gas flow. [for predicting heat transfer to the space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, W. L.

    1974-01-01

    The slip conditions for a multicomponent mixture with diffusion, wall-catalyzed atom recombination and thermal radiation are derived, and simplified expressions for engineering applications are presented. The gas mixture may be in chemical nonequilibrium with finite-rate catalytic recombination occurring on the wall. These boundary conditions, which are used for rarefied flow regime flow field calculations, are shown to be necessary for accurate predictions of skin friction and heat transfer coefficients in the rarefied portion of the space shuttle trajectory.

  12. Development of micro engine oil condition sensor using multi-wall carbon nanotube films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Dae Seok; Jung-Ho Pak, James; Kyeong Kim, Jai

    2007-03-01

    A new interdigit-type micro oil condition sensor was designed and fabricated for monitoring the deterioration of lubricating and insulating oils. The designed sensor operates based on the change of the dielectric constant and electrical conductivity. In order to improve sensor performance, an oil condition sensor was fabricated using MEMS technology and multi-wall carbon nanotube film. The experiment was performed with automobile engine oils with the same brand and quality so as to ensure measurement reliability. Capacitance changes were measured according to increasing mileage and the sensors' performance was improved. These results show that the proposed sensor could measure the degree of oil deterioration with a high sensitivity and it is applicable to other lubricating systems as well as insulating systems.

  13. Physics of Cyclotron Resonance Scattering Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sschoenherr, Gabriele; Schwarm, Fritz-Walter; Falkner, Sebastian; Dauser, Thomas; Pottschmidt, Katja; Kretschmar, Peter; Klochkov, Dmitry; Ferrigno, Carlo; Britton Hemphill, Paul; Wilms, Joern

    2016-04-01

    Cyclotron resonant scattering features (short: cyclotron lines) are sensitive tracers of the physics of the accretion columns and mounds of X-ray pulsars. They form by interaction of X-ray photons with magnetically quantized electrons in the accreted plasma close to the neutron star. Such lines have been observed as absorption-like features for about 20 X-ray pulsars. Their energies provide a direct measure of the magnetic field strength in the line-forming region. By detailed modelling of the lines and of their parameter dependencies we can further decipher the physical conditions in the accretion column. For instance the fact that the complex scattering cross sections have a strong angle-dependence relates the phase-resolved cyclotron line shapes to parameters that constrain the systems’ still poorly understood geometry. Modelling the physics of cyclotron lines to a degree that allows for detailed and solid comparison to data therefore provides a unique access also to a better understanding of the overall picture of magnetically accreting neutron star systems.

  14. LES of the flow field around a 45 wing-wall abutment in different scour conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressan, Filippo; Armenio, Vincenzo; Ballio, Francesco

    2008-11-01

    Scouring process around bridge abutment is one of the main causes leading to the hydraulic structure failure, thus the determination of the maximum scour depth assumes a central role. Resolved LES of the turbulent flow field around a 45 wing wall abutment are carried out for three main scouring conditions: Initial phase (flat bed), logarithmic phase of scouring and equilibrium scour depth. The bathymetry and the flow parameters are taken from data of a laboratory experiment. Mean flow field, secondary flows and turbulent quantities such as Reynolds stresses and turbulent kinetic energy are calculated and compared for the three cases. The purpose of this study is to understand how the statistics of the wall stresses change with the increase of the scour depth. Preliminary results indicate that the bottom stresses decrease as the scour hole increases and that the bed deforms itself in order to minimize the effect of the obstacle on the Bernoulli trinomial. The results of this research will help in finding new erosion models based on the knowledge of turbulence-bed interaction.

  15. Numerical simulations of Ising spin glasses with free boundary conditions: The role of droplet excitations and domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenlong

    2017-03-01

    The relative importance of the contributions of droplet excitations and domain walls on the ordering of short-range Edwards-Anderson spin glasses in three and four dimensions is studied. We compare the spin overlap distribution functions of periodic and free boundary conditions using population annealing Monte Carlo. For system sizes up to about 1000 spins, spin glasses show nontrivial spin overlap distributions. Periodic boundary conditions may trap diffusive domain walls which can contribute to small spin overlaps, and the other contribution is the existence of low-energy droplet excitations within the system. We use free boundary conditions to minimize domain-wall effects, and show that low-energy droplet excitations are the major contribution to small overlaps in numerical simulations. Free boundary conditions has stronger finite-size effects, and is likely to have the same thermodynamic limit with periodic boundary conditions.

  16. Buoyant Jets in Stratification; Mixing Efficiencies, Entropy Conditions and Wall Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzou, Chung-Nan; Camassa, Roberto; Durbin, Marlow; McLaughlin, Richard; Ward, Jeremy; Whetstone, Cole; White, Brian; UNC Joint Fluids Lab Team

    2013-11-01

    An exact integral solution to the steady buoyant jet closure model in linearly stratified ambient environment is derived so that in the limit of a sharply stratified environment an entropy (nonlinear jump) condition can be established. Comparing the density evolution for the buoyant jet in the extremes of linear and sharp stratification using experiments and exact formulas, mixing efficiencies can be assessed. In turn, wall effects are explored experimentally in sharp stratification and compared to the closure theory. Lastly, the modeling of entrainment in these systems will be revisited. DMS-0502266, NSF RTG DMS-0943851, NSF RAPID CBET-1045653, NSF CMG ARC- 1025523, and NSF DMS-1009750, ONR DURIP N00014-09-1-0840.

  17. Wall catalytic recombination and boundary conditions in nonequilibrium hypersonic flows - With applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Carl D.

    1992-01-01

    The meaning of catalysis and its relation to aerodynamic heating in nonequilibrium hypersonic flows are discussed. The species equations are described and boundary conditions for them are derived for a multicomponent gas and for a binary gas. Slip effects are included for application of continuum methods to low-density flows. Measurement techniques for determining catalytic wall recombination rates are discussed. Among them are experiments carried out in arc jets as well as flow reactors. Diagnostic methods for determining the atom or molecule concentrations in the flow are included. Results are given for a number of materials of interest to the aerospace community, including glassy coatings such as the RCG coating of the Space Shuttle and for high temperature refractory metals such as coated niobium. Methods of calculating the heat flux to space vehicles in nonequilibrium flows are described. These methods are applied to the Space Shuttle, the planned Aeroassist Flight Experiment, and a hypersonic slender vehicle such as a transatmospheric vehicle.

  18. Lithium wall conditioning by high frequency pellet injection in RFX-mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Innocente, P.; Mansfield, D. K.; Roquemore, A. L.; Agostini, M.; Barison, S.; Canton, A.; Carraro, L.; Cavazzana, R.; De Masi, G.; Fassina, A.; Fiameni, S.; Grando, L.; Rais, B.; Rossetto, F.; Scarin, P.

    2015-08-01

    In the RFX-mod reversed field pinch experiment, lithium wall conditioning has been tested with multiple scopes: to improve density control, to reduce impurities and to increase energy and particle confinement time. Large single lithium pellet injection, lithium capillary-pore system and lithium evaporation has been used for lithiumization. The last two methods, which presently provide the best results in tokamak devices, have limited applicability in the RFX-mod device due to the magnetic field characteristics and geometrical constraints. On the other side, the first mentioned technique did not allow injecting large amount of lithium. To improve the deposition, recently in RFX-mod small lithium multi-pellets injection has been tested. In this paper we compare lithium multi-pellets injection to the other techniques. Multi-pellets gave more uniform Li deposition than evaporator, but provided similar effects on plasma parameters, showing that further optimizations are required.

  19. DSMC simulation of rarefied gas flows under cooling conditions using a new iterative wall heat flux specifying technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhlaghi, H.; Roohi, E.; Myong, R. S.

    2012-11-01

    Micro/nano geometries with specified wall heat flux are widely encountered in electronic cooling and micro-/nano-fluidic sensors. We introduce a new technique to impose the desired (positive/negative) wall heat flux boundary condition in the DSMC simulations. This technique is based on an iterative progress on the wall temperature magnitude. It is found that the proposed iterative technique has a good numerical performance and could implement both positive and negative values of wall heat flux rates accurately. Using present technique, rarefied gas flow through micro-/nanochannels under specified wall heat flux conditions is simulated and unique behaviors are observed in case of channels with cooling walls. For example, contrary to the heating process, it is observed that cooling of micro/nanochannel walls would result in small variations in the density field. Upstream thermal creep effects in the cooling process decrease the velocity slip despite of the Knudsen number increase along the channel. Similarly, cooling process decreases the curvature of the pressure distribution below the linear incompressible distribution. Our results indicate that flow cooling increases the mass flow rate through the channel, and vice versa.

  20. Casimir-Polder interaction between an atom and a cavity wall under the influence of real conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Babb, J.F.; Klimchitskaya, G.L.; Mostepanenko, V.M.

    2004-10-01

    The Casimir-Polder interaction between an atom and a metal wall is investigated under the influence of real conditions including the dynamic polarizability of the atom, finite conductivity of the wall metal, and nonzero temperature of the system. Both analytical and numerical results for the free energy and force are obtained over a wide range of atom-wall distances. Numerical computations are performed for an Au wall and metastable He*, Na, and Cs atoms. For the He* atom we demonstrate, as an illustration, that at short separations of about the Au plasma wavelength at room temperature the free energy deviates up to 35% and the force up to 57% from the classical Casimir-Polder result. Accordingly, such large deviations should be taken into account in precision experiments on atom-wall interactions. The combined account of different corrections to the Casimir-Polder interaction leads to the conclusion that at short separations the corrections due to the dynamic polarizability of an atom play a more important role than--and suppress--the corrections due to the nonideality of the metal wall. By comparison of the exact atomic polarizabilities with those in the framework of the single oscillator model, it is shown that the obtained asymptotic expressions enable calculation of the free energy and force for the atom-wall interaction under real conditions with a precision of 1%.

  1. Cyclotrons and positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, A.P.; Fowler, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    The state of the art of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) technology as related to cyclotron use and radiopharmaceutical production is reviewed. The paper discusses available small cyclotrons, the positron emitters which can be produced and the yields possible, target design, and radiopharmaceutical development and application. 97 refs., 12 tabs. (ACR)

  2. Fractal structures of single-walled carbon nanotubes in biologically relevant conditions: role of chirality vs. media conditions.

    PubMed

    Khan, Iftheker A; Aich, Nirupam; Afrooz, A R M Nabiul; Flora, Joseph R V; Schierz, P Ariette; Ferguson, P Lee; Sabo-Attwood, Tara; Saleh, Navid B

    2013-11-01

    Aggregate structure of covalently functionalized chiral specific semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) was systematically studied employing static light scattering (SLS). Fractal dimensions (Df) of two specific chirality SWNTs-SG65 and SG76 with (6, 5) and (7, 6) chiral enrichments-were measured under four biological exposure media conditions, namely: Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM), Minimum Essential Medium (MEM), Roswell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI) 1640 medium, and 0.9% saline solution. The SWNTs exhibited chiral dependence on Df with SG65 showing more fractal or loosely bound aggregate structures, i.e., lower Df values (range of 2.24±0.03 to 2.64±0.05), compared to the SG76 sample (range of 2.58±0.13 to 2.90±0.08). All the Df values reported are highly reproducible, measured from multiple SLS runs and estimated with 'random block-effects' statistical analysis that yielded all p values to be <0.001. The key mechanism for such difference in Df between the SWNT samples was identified as the difference in van der Waals (VDW) interaction energies of these samples, where higher VDW of SG76 resulted in tighter packing density. Effect of medium type showed lower sensitivity; however, presence of di-valent cations (Ca(2+)) in DMEM and MEM media resulted in relatively loose or more fractal aggregates. Moreover, presence of fetal bovine serum (FBS) and bovine serum albumin (BSA), used to mimic the in vitro cell culture condition, reduced the Df values, i.e., created more fractal structures. Steric hindrance to aggregation was identified as the key mechanism for creating the fractal structures. Also, increase in FBS concentration from 1% to 10% resulted in increasingly lower Df values. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Ion cyclotron resonance cell

    DOEpatents

    Weller, R.R.

    1995-02-14

    An ion cyclotron resonance cell is disclosed having two adjacent sections separated by a center trapping plate. The first section is defined by the center trapping plate, a first end trapping plate, and excitation and detector electrodes. The second section includes a second end trapping plate spaced apart from the center plate, a mirror, and an analyzer. The analyzer includes a wavelength-selective light detector, such as a detector incorporating an acousto-optical device (AOD) and a photodetector. One or more ion guides, grounded plates with holes for the ion beam, are positioned within the vacuum chamber of the mass spectrometer between the ion source and the cell. After ions are trapped and analyzed by ion cyclotron resonance techniques in the first section, the ions of interest are selected according to their mass and passed into the second section for optical spectroscopic studies. The trapped ions are excited by light from a laser and caused thereby to fluoresce. The fluorescent light emitted by the excited ions is reflected by the mirror and directed onto the detector. The AOD is scanned, and the photodetector output is recorded and analyzed. The ions remain in the second section for an extended period, enabling multiple studies to be carried out on the same ensemble of ions. 5 figs.

  4. Ion cyclotron resonance cell

    DOEpatents

    Weller, Robert R.

    1995-01-01

    An ion cyclotron resonance cell having two adjacent sections separated by a center trapping plate. The first section is defined by the center trapping plate, a first end trapping plate, and excitation and detector electrodes. The second section includes a second end trapping plate spaced apart from the center plate, a mirror, and an analyzer. The analyzer includes a wavelength-selective light detector, such as a detector incorporating an acousto-optical device (AOD) and a photodetector. One or more ion guides, grounded plates with holes for the ion beam, are positioned within the vacuum chamber of the mass spectrometer between the ion source and the cell. After ions are trapped and analyzed by ion cyclotron resonance techniques in the first section, the ions of interest are selected according to their mass and passed into the second section for optical spectroscopic studies. The trapped ions are excited by light from a laser and caused thereby to fluoresce. The fluorescent light emitted by the excited ions is reflected by the mirror and directed onto the detector. The AOD is scanned, and the photodetector output is recorded and analyzed. The ions remain in the second section for an extended period, enabling multiple studies to be carried out on the same ensemble of ions.

  5. Single-walled carbon nanotube transport in representative municipal solid waste landfill conditions.

    PubMed

    Khan, Iftheker A; Berge, Nicole D; Sabo-Attwood, Tara; Ferguson, P Lee; Saleh, Navid B

    2013-08-06

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are being used in many consumer products and devices. It is likely that as some of these products reach the end of their useful life, they will be discarded in municipal solid waste landfills. However, there has been little work evaluating the fate of nanomaterials in solid waste environments. The purpose of this study is to systematically evaluate the influence of organic matter type and concentration in landfill-relevant conditions on SWNT transport through a packed-bed of mixed municipal solid waste collectors. The influence of individual waste materials on SWNT deposition is also evaluated. Transport experiments were conducted through saturated waste-containing columns over a range of simulated leachate conditions representing both mature and young leachates. Results indicate that SWNT transport may be significant in mature waste environments, with mobility decreasing with decreasing humic acid concentration. SWNT mobility in the presence of acetic acid was inhibited, suggesting their mobility in young waste environments may be small. SWNTs also exhibited collector media-dependent transport, with greatest transport in glass and least in paper. These results represent the first study evaluating how leachate age and changes in waste composition influence potential SWNT mobility in landfills.

  6. The mirror and ion cyclotron anisotropy instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, S. P.

    1992-01-01

    The linear dispersion equation for fully electromagnetic waves and instabilities at arbitrary directions of propagation relative to a background magnetic field B(0) in a homogeneous Vlasov plasma is solved numerically for bi-Maxwellian particle distributions. For isotropic plasmas the dispersion and damping of the three modes below the proton cyclotron frequency are studied as functions of Beta(i) and T(e)/T(i). The transport ratios of helicity, cross-helicity, Alfven ratio, compressibility, and parallel compressibility are defined. Under the condition that the proton temperature perpendicular to B(0) is greater than the parallel temperature, the growth rates and transport ratios of the mirror instability and the ion cyclotron anisotropy instability are examined and compared. Both the proton parallel compressibility and the proton Alfven ratio are significantly different for the two growing modes.

  7. The cyclotron maser theory of AKR and Z-mode radiation. [Auroral Kilometric Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, C. S.

    1985-01-01

    The cyclotron maser mechanism which may be responsible for the generation of auroral kilometric radiation and Z-mode radiation is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the basic concepts of the cyclotron maser theory, particularly the relativistic effect of the cyclotron resonance condition. Recent development of the theory is reviewed. Finally, the results of a computer simulation study which helps to understand the nonlinear saturation of the maser instability are reported.

  8. ICRF wall conditioning at TEXTOR-94 in the presence of a 2.25 T magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esser, H. G.; Lyssoivan, A.; Freisinger, M.; Koch, R.; van Oost, G.; Weschenfelder, F.; Winter, J.; Textor-Icrh-Team

    1997-02-01

    To investigate alternative conditioning concepts for future fusion devices with permanent magnetic fields, plasmas produced by the coupling of ICRF power to He and gas mixtures of Helium + silane, have been analyzed in the presence of a 2.25 T toroidal magnetic field at TEXTOR-94. Their qualification for wall conditioning has been investigated for different He-pressures, PHe (1 × 10 -3 < PHe ( Pa) < 1 × 10 -1) and ICRF power, PICRF (100 < PICRF ( kW) < 800). Electron densities n e averaged along different radial lines of sight across the vacuum vessel from the top to the bottom have been obtained in the range 5 × 10 10 < ne ( cm-3) < 3 × 10 12. To study quantitatively the efficiency of hydrogen desorption from the first wall at different ICRF plasma conditions in a reproducible way, the first wall was presaturated by RG-glow discharges in H 2. The amount and the evolution of the H 2 desorption from rf discharge to rf discharge was determined by ion gauge measurements combined with mass spectrometry. To demonstrate the capability of the new method for plasma assisted thin film deposition, different amounts of silane (<50%) were added to the He gas. During the ICRF pulses, the silane molecules were dissociated in the plasma and the Si atoms stick to the wall. A good balance of the amount of Si disappearing from the gas phase and that measured by post mortem surface analyses of collector probes at the wall position was found.

  9. Broken Symmetry, Biundary Conditions, and Band Gap Oscillations in Finite Single-Wall Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayanthi, C. S.; Liu, Lei; Wu, Shi-Yu; Guo, Hong

    2001-03-01

    The characteristic oscillations of the HOMO-LUMO gap as a function of length of finite single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) of general chirality (p,q), characterized by p=k+l, q=k-l, p-q=2l, l=0,1,ldots,k, and k=1,2,ldots, are investigated in detail using the extended Hückel molecular orbital method. These oscillations are correlated to the bond-charge oscillations of NTs of finite lengths. The maxima of the HOMO-LUMO gap oscillations are found to have a periodicity of 3a/2 for an armchair SWCNT and 3a cos(30^0-φ) for general chiral SWCNTs, where φ is the chiral angle and a is the lattice constant. For SWCNTs belonging to a given family k, the amplitudes of oscillations diminish from the armchair, to chiral, and to the zig-zag SWCNTs. These results can be understood based on the interplay between the broken symmetry and the boundary conditions in sustaining one of the possible double-bond patterns of the graphene sheet. Implications of our results in fabricating molecular-scale conductors or semiconductors will be discussed.

  10. Performance of boron/carbon first wall materials under fusion relevant conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linke, J.; Bolt, H.; Doerner, R.; Grübmeier, H.; Hirooka, Y.; Hoven, H.; Mingam, C.; Schulze, H.; Seki, M.; Wallura, E.; Weber, T.; Winter, J.

    1990-12-01

    The conditioning of the plasma facing wall in thermonuclear confinement experiments has been performed very successfully by the application of amorphous boron containing hydrogenated carbon films. Boronization leads to tokamak discharges with significantly reduced oxygen and carbon contaminations. For high heat flux components (especially in future quasi-stationary confinement experiments) new boron/carbon materials have to be developed: monolithic tiles of boronated graphites which can be brazed to watercooled substrates or thick B 4C-coatings on graphite or high-Z coolant tubes. A variety of bulk materials (boronated graphites with boron contents in the range from 3 to 30%, so-called coat mix material on the basis of B 4C) and coatings (amorphous B/C films, thick B 4C layers applied by LPPS or CVD methods) were characterized systematically. In addition the behaviour of these materials was investigated under thermal loads; erosion and disruption simulation experiments were performed in electron and ion beam high heat flux test facilities. Physical and chemical sputtering of the coat-mix-material was studied in the PISCES-B facility in dependence on the hydrogen ions fluence.

  11. Superlubricity in centimetres-long double-walled carbon nanotubes under ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rufan; Ning, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Yingying; Zheng, Quanshui; Chen, Qing; Xie, Huanhuan; Zhang, Qiang; Qian, Weizhong; Wei, Fei

    2013-12-01

    Friction and wear are two main causes of mechanical energy dissipation and component failure, especially in micro/nanomechanical systems with large surface-to-volume ratios. In the past decade there has been an increasing level of research interest regarding superlubricity, a phenomenon, also called structural superlubricity, in which friction almost vanishes between two incommensurate solid surfaces. However, all experimental structural superlubricity has been obtained on the microscale or nanoscale, and predominantly under high vacuum. Here, we show that superlubricity can be realized in centimetres-long double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) under ambient conditions. Centimetres-long inner shells can be pulled out continuously from such nanotubes, with an intershell friction lower than 1 nN that is independent of nanotube length. The shear strength of the DWCNTs is only several pascals, four orders of magnitude lower than the lowest reported value in CNTs and graphite. The perfect structure of the ultralong DWCNTs used in our experiments is essential for macroscale superlubricity.

  12. Superlubricity in centimetres-long double-walled carbon nanotubes under ambient conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rufan; Ning, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Yingying; Zheng, Quanshui; Chen, Qing; Xie, Huanhuan; Zhang, Qiang; Qian, Weizhong; Wei, Fei

    2013-12-01

    Friction and wear are two main causes of mechanical energy dissipation and component failure, especially in micro/nanomechanical systems with large surface-to-volume ratios. In the past decade there has been an increasing level of research interest regarding superlubricity, a phenomenon, also called structural superlubricity, in which friction almost vanishes between two incommensurate solid surfaces. However, all experimental structural superlubricity has been obtained on the microscale or nanoscale, and predominantly under high vacuum. Here, we show that superlubricity can be realized in centimetres-long double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) under ambient conditions. Centimetres-long inner shells can be pulled out continuously from such nanotubes, with an intershell friction lower than 1 nN that is independent of nanotube length. The shear strength of the DWCNTs is only several pascals, four orders of magnitude lower than the lowest reported value in CNTs and graphite. The perfect structure of the ultralong DWCNTs used in our experiments is essential for macroscale superlubricity.

  13. Robust thermal boundary conditions applicable to a wall along which temperature varies in lattice-gas cellular automata.

    PubMed

    Shim, Jae Wan; Gatignol, Renée

    2010-04-01

    We show that the heat exchange between fluid particles and boundary walls can be achieved by controlling the velocity change rate following the particles' collision with a wall in discrete kinetic theory, such as the lattice-gas cellular automata and the lattice Boltzmann method. We derive a relation between the velocity change rate and temperature so that we can control the velocity change rate according to a given temperature boundary condition. This relation enables us to deal with the thermal boundary whose temperature varies along a wall in contrast to the previous works of the lattice-gas cellular automata. In addition, we present simulation results to compare our method to the existing and give an example in a microchannel with a high temperature gradient boundary condition by the lattice-gas cellular automata.

  14. Helium cyclotron resonance within the earth's magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Mauk, B.H.; McIlwain, C.E.; McPherron, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    A histogram of electromagnetic Alfven/ion cyclotron wave frequencies, sampled within the geostationary enviroment and normalized by the equatorial proton cyclotron frequency, shows a dramatic gap centered near the helium (He/sup +/) cyclotron frequency. Also, strongly cyclotron phase bunched helium ions (20--200 eV) have been observed directly within the vicinity of wave environments. These observations are interpreted as resulting from the absorption of the waves through cyclotron resonance by cool ambient populations of helium ions.

  15. ECR (Electron Cyclotron Resonance) ion sources for cyclotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Lyneis, C.M.

    1986-10-01

    In the last decade ECR (Electron Cyclotron Resonance) ion sources have evolved from a single large, power consuming, complex prototype into a variety of compact, simple, reliable, efficient, high performance sources of high charge state ions for accelerators and atomic physics. The coupling of ECR sources to cyclotrons has resulted in significant performance gains in energy, intensity, reliability, and variety of ion species. Seven ECR sources are in regular operation with cyclotrons and numerous other projects are under development or in the planning stag. At least four laboratories have ECR sources dedicated for atomic physics research and other atomic physics programs share ECR sources with cyclotrons. An ECR source is now installed on the injector for the CERN SPS synchrotron to accelerate O/sup 8 +/ to relativistic energies. A project is underway at Argonne to couple an ECR source to a superconducting heavy-ion linac. Although tremendous progress has been made, the field of ECR sources is still a relatively young technology and there is still the potential for further advances both in source development and understanding of the plasma physics. The development of ECR sources is reviewed. The important physics mechanisms which come into play in the operation of ECR Sources are discussed, along with various models for charge state distributions (CSD). The design and performance of several ECR sources are compared. The 88-Inch Cyclotron and the LBL ECR is used as an example of cyclotron+ECR operation. The future of ECR sources is considered.

  16. Development of steady-state scenarios compatible with ITER-like wall conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litaudon, X.; Arnoux, G.; Beurskens, M.; Brezinsek, S.; Challis, C. D.; Crisanti, F.; DeVries, P. C.; Giroud, C.; Pitts, R. A.; Rimini, F. G.; Andrew, Y.; Ariola, M.; Baranov, Yu F.; Brix, M.; Buratti, P.; Cesario, R.; Corre, Y.; DeLa Luna, E.; Fundamenski, W.; Giovannozzi, E.; Gryaznevich, M. P.; Hawkes, N. C.; Hobirk, J.; Huber, A.; Jachmich, S.; Joffrin, E.; Koslowski, H. R.; Liang, Y.; Loarer, Th; Lomas, P.; Luce, T.; Mailloux, J.; Matthews, G. F.; Mazon, D.; McCormick, K.; Moreau, D.; Pericoli, V.; Philipps, V.; Rachlew, E.; Reyes-Cortes, S. D. A.; Saibene, G.; Sharapov, S. E.; Voitsekovitch, I.; Zabeo, L.; Zimmermann, O.; Zastrow, K. D.; JET-EFDA Contributors, the

    2007-12-01

    A key issue for steady-state tokamak operation is to determine the edge conditions that are compatible both with good core confinement and with the power handling and plasma exhaust capabilities of the plasma facing components (PFCs) and divertor systems. A quantitative response to this open question will provide a robust scientific basis for reliable extrapolation of present regimes to an ITER compatible steady-state scenario. In this context, the JET programme addressing steady-state operation is focused on the development of non-inductive, high confinement plasmas with the constraints imposed by the PFCs. A new beryllium main chamber wall and tungsten divertor together with an upgrade of the heating/fuelling capability are currently in preparation at JET. Operation at higher power with this ITER-like wall will impose new constraints on non-inductive scenarios. Recent experiments have focused on the preparation for this new phase of JET operation. In this paper, progress in the development of advanced tokamak (AT) scenarios at JET is reviewed keeping this long-term objective in mind. The approach has consisted of addressing various critical issues separately during the 2006-2007 campaigns with a view to full scenario integration when the JET upgrades are complete. Regimes with internal transport barriers (ITBs) have been developed at q95 ~ 5 and high triangularity, δ (relevant to the ITER steady-state demonstration) by applying more than 30 MW of additional heating power reaching βN ~ 2 at Bo ~ 3.1 T. Operating at higher δ has allowed the edge pedestal and core densities to be increased pushing the ion temperature closer to that of the electrons. Although not yet fully integrated into a performance enhancing ITB scenario, Neon seeding has been successfully explored to increase the radiated power fraction (up to 60%), providing significant reduction of target tile power fluxes (and hence temperatures) and mitigation of edge localized mode (ELM) activity. At

  17. Ion-exchange properties of cell walls of Spinacia oleracea L. roots under different environmental salt conditions.

    PubMed

    Meychik, N R; Nikolaeva, Yu I; Yermakov, I P

    2006-07-01

    Ion-exchange properties of the polymeric matrix of cell walls isolated from roots of 55-day-old Spinacia oleracea L. (Matador cv.) plants grown in nutrient solution in the presence of 0.5, 150, and 250 mM NaCl and from roots of Suaeda altissima L. Pall plants of the same age grown in the presence of 0.5 and 250 mM NaCl were studied. The ion-exchange capacity of the spinach cell walls was determined at pH values from 2 to 12 and different ionic strength of the solution (10 and 250 mM NaCl). In the structure of the root cell walls, four types of ionogenic groups were found: amine, two types of carboxyl (the first being galacturonic acid residue), and phenolic groups. The content of each type of group and their ionization constants were evaluated. The ion-exchange properties of spinach and the halophyte Suaeda altissima L. Pall were compared, and the qualitative composition of the ion-exchange groups in the cell walls of roots of these plants appeared to be the same and not depend on conditions of the root nutrition. The content of carboxyl groups of polygalacturonic acid changed in the cell walls of the glycophyte and halophyte depending on the salt concentration in the medium. These changes in the composition of functional groups of the cell wall polymers seemed to be a response of these plants to salt and were more pronounced in the halophyte. A sharp increase in the NaCl concentration in the medium caused a decrease in pH in the extracellular water space as a result of exchange reactions between sodium ions entering from the external solution and protons of carboxyl groups of the cell walls. The findings are discussed from the standpoint of involvement of root cell walls of different plant species in response to salinity.

  18. EC-5 fifth international workshop on electron cyclotron emission and electron cyclotron heating

    SciTech Connect

    Prater, R.; Lohr, J.

    1985-12-31

    This report contains papers on the following topics: electron cyclotron emission measurements; electron cyclotron emission theory; electron cyclotron heating; gyrotron development; and ECH systems and waveguide development. These paper have been indexed separately elsewhere. (LSP).

  19. BEST medical radioisotope production cyclotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Sabaiduc, Vasile; Milton, Bruce; Suthanthiran, Krishnan; Johnson, Richard R.; Gelbart, W. Z.

    2013-04-19

    Best Cyclotron Systems Inc (BCSI) is currently developing 14 MeV, 25 MeV, 35MeV and 70MeV cyclotrons for radioisotope production and research applications as well as the entire spectrum of targets and nuclear synthesis modules for the production of Positron Emission Tomography (PET), Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) and radiation therapy isotopes. The company is a subsidiary of Best Medical International, renowned in the field of medical instrumentation and radiation therapy. All cyclotrons have external negative hydrogen ion sources, four radial sectors with two dees in opposite valleys, cryogenic vacuum system and simultaneous beam extraction on opposite lines. The beam intensity ranges from 400 {mu}A to 1000 {mu}A, depending on the cyclotron energy and application.

  20. BEST medical radioisotope production cyclotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabaiduc, Vasile; Milton, Bruce; Suthanthiran, Krishnan; Gelbart, W. Z.; Johnson, Richard R.

    2013-04-01

    Best Cyclotron Systems Inc (BCSI) is currently developing 14 MeV, 25 MeV, 35MeV and 70MeV cyclotrons for radioisotope production and research applications as well as the entire spectrum of targets and nuclear synthesis modules for the production of Positron Emission Tomography (PET), Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) and radiation therapy isotopes. The company is a subsidiary of Best Medical International, renowned in the field of medical instrumentation and radiation therapy. All cyclotrons have external negative hydrogen ion sources, four radial sectors with two dees in opposite valleys, cryogenic vacuum system and simultaneous beam extraction on opposite lines. The beam intensity ranges from 400 μA to 1000 μA, depending on the cyclotron energy and application [1].

  1. FEL on slow cyclotron wave

    SciTech Connect

    Silivra, A.

    1995-12-31

    A physical mechanism of interaction of fast electromagnetic wave with slow cyclotron wave of relativistic electron beam in a FEL with helical wiggler field is described. It is shown that: (1) interaction is possible for both group of steady state electron trajectories (2) positive gain is achieved within certain interval of guide field strength (3) operation wavelength for group 1 trajectories ({Omega}{sub 0}/{gamma} < k{omega}{upsilon}{parallel}) is shorter than for the conventional FEL synchronism. A nonlinear analysis shows that efficiency of slow cyclotron FEL is restricted mainly by a breakdown of a single electron synchronism due to dependence of (modified) electron cyclotron frequency on an energy of electron. Nevertheless, as numerical simulation shows, typical efficiency of 15 % order is achieved in millimeter wavelength band for the midrelativistic ({gamma}= 3 {divided_by} 4) slow cyclotron wave FEL. Tapering of magnetic field results in a substantial increase of efficiency.

  2. Boundary conditions at the ablative walls in two-temperature modelling of thermal plasmas with reactive working gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekker, Leonid; Murphy, Anthony B.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a new set of boundary conditions at ablative hot walls with thermionic electron emission for two-temperature thermal arc models in which the temperature of electrons can deviate from the temperature of heavy particles,~{{T}\\text{e}}\

  3. Inverse ion-cyclotron damping and excitation of multiharmonic ion-cyclotron waves in the northern magnetospheric cusp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slapak, Rikard; Gunell, Herbert; Hamrin, Maria

    2017-04-01

    We have investigated a case of inverse ion-cyclotron damping taking place in the northern terrestrial magnetospheric cusp, exciting waves at the ion-cyclotron frequency and its harmonics. Magnetosheath influx in the cusps and the effect of convection and magnetic mirroring give rise to parallel velocity shears, dvallel/dx\\perp, often associated with instabilities in the plasma and corresponding ion-cyclotron waves, whose evolution is described by a damping factor. This damping factor depends on, for example, the wave numbers and the velocity shear itself and can under certain conditions be negative, hence describing inverse damping (or wave growth). However, an additional required condition for inverse ion-cyclotron damping is a velocity shear in the magnetic field-aligned ion-bulk flow, and this condition is only met for magnetosheath influx in the northern cusp, as oppose to the southern cusp. The ion-cyclotron waves are primarily seen as peaks in the magnetic-field spectral densities, as presented by Slapak et al., [GRL (2016), doi:10.1002/2016GL071680]. The corresponding peaks in the electric-field spectral densities are not as profound, suggesting a background electric field noise or other processes of wave generation causing the electric spectral densities to smoothen out more compared to the magnetic counterpart. We note that some ion-cyclotron wave activity is present in a few similar shear events in the southern cusp, which indicates that other mechanisms generating ion-cyclotron waves may also be present during such conditions.

  4. Cyclotron Production of Medical Radioisotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Avila-Rodriguez, M. A.; Zarate-Morales, A.; Flores-Moreno, A.

    2010-08-04

    The cyclotron production of radioisotopes for medical applications is gaining increased significance in diagnostic molecular imaging techniques such as PET and SPECT. In this regard, radioisotope production has never been easier or more convenient until de introduction of compact medical cyclotrons in the last few decades, which allowed the use of short-lived radioisotopes in in vivo nuclear medicine studies on a routine basis. This review outlines some general considerations about the production of radioisotopes using charged particle accelerators.

  5. Calculation of cyclotron rf systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Genderen, W.; Van Der Heide, J. A.; Bräutigam, W.

    1987-08-01

    An approximate calculation of the characteristic properties of resonators for cyclotron rf systems is described. Formulas for the characteristic impedence of line segments are evaluated and an approximation for a dee-dummy dee system is given. A computer program has been written which also takes into account the capacity due to line discontinuities. The computed resonance frequency for cyclotrons in Eindhoven and Jülich agrees within 5% with experimental data. The power consumption is also computed and analyzed.

  6. Ultrasonic Estimation of Mechanical Properties of Pulmonary Arterial Wall Under Normoxic and Hypoxic Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, Kendall R.; Mukdadi, Osama M.

    2005-04-01

    Secondary pediatric pulmonary hypertension is a disease that could benefit from improved ultrasonic diagnostic techniques. We perform high-frequency in vitro ultrasound measurements (25 MHz to 100 MHz) on fresh and fixed pulmonary arterial walls excised from normoxic and hypoxic Long-Evans rat models. Estimates of the elastic stiffness coefficients are determined from measurements of the speed of sound. Preliminary results indicate that hypoxia leads to up to increase of 20 % in stiffening of the pulmonary arterial wall.

  7. The influence of boundary conditions on wall shear stress distribution in patients specific coronary trees.

    PubMed

    van der Giessen, Alina G; Groen, Harald C; Doriot, Pierre-André; de Feyter, Pim J; van der Steen, Antonius F W; van de Vosse, Frans N; Wentzel, Jolanda J; Gijsen, Frank J H

    2011-04-07

    Patient specific geometrical data on human coronary arteries can be reliably obtained multislice computer tomography (MSCT) imaging. MSCT cannot provide hemodynamic variables, and the outflow through the side branches must be estimated. The impact of two different models to determine flow through the side branches on the wall shear stress (WSS) distribution in patient specific geometries is evaluated. Murray's law predicts that the flow ratio through the side branches scales with the ratio of the diameter of the side branches to the third power. The empirical model is based on flow measurements performed by Doriot et al. (2000) in angiographically normal coronary arteries. The fit based on these measurements showed that the flow ratio through the side branches can best be described with a power of 2.27. The experimental data imply that Murray's law underestimates the flow through the side branches. We applied the two models to study the WSS distribution in 6 coronary artery trees. Under steady flow conditions, the average WSS between the side branches differed significantly for the two models: the average WSS was 8% higher for Murray's law and the relative difference ranged from -5% to +27%. These differences scale with the difference in flow rate. Near the bifurcations, the differences in WSS were more pronounced: the size of the low WSS regions was significantly larger when applying the empirical model (13%), ranging from -12% to +68%. Predicting outflow based on Murray's law underestimates the flow through the side branches. Especially near side branches, the regions where atherosclerotic plaques preferentially develop, the differences are significant and application of Murray's law underestimates the size of the low WSS region.

  8. The rotating wall machine: A device to study ideal and resistive magnetohydrodynamic stability under variable boundary conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Paz-Soldan, C.; Bergerson, W. F.; Brookhart, M. I.; Hannum, D. A.; Kendrick, R.; Fiksel, G.; Forest, C. B.

    2010-12-15

    The rotating wall machine, a basic plasma physics experimental facility, has been constructed to study the role of electromagnetic boundary conditions on current-driven ideal and resistive magnetohydrodynamic instabilities, including differentially rotating conducting walls. The device, a screw pinch magnetic geometry with line-tied ends, is described. The plasma is generated by an array of 19 plasma guns that not only produce high density plasmas but can also be independently biased to allow spatial and temporal control of the current profile. The design and mechanical performance of the rotating wall as well as diagnostic capabilities and internal probes are discussed. Measurements from typical quiescent discharges show the plasma to be high {beta} ({<=}p>2{mu}{sub 0}/B{sub z}{sup 2}), flowing, and well collimated. Internal probe measurements show that the plasma current profile can be controlled by the plasma gun array.

  9. The rotating wall machine: A device to study ideal and resistive magnetohydrodynamic stability under variable boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paz-Soldan, C.; Bergerson, W. F.; Brookhart, M. I.; Hannum, D. A.; Kendrick, R.; Fiksel, G.; Forest, C. B.

    2010-12-01

    The rotating wall machine, a basic plasma physics experimental facility, has been constructed to study the role of electromagnetic boundary conditions on current-driven ideal and resistive magnetohydrodynamic instabilities, including differentially rotating conducting walls. The device, a screw pinch magnetic geometry with line-tied ends, is described. The plasma is generated by an array of 19 plasma guns that not only produce high density plasmas but can also be independently biased to allow spatial and temporal control of the current profile. The design and mechanical performance of the rotating wall as well as diagnostic capabilities and internal probes are discussed. Measurements from typical quiescent discharges show the plasma to be high β ( {le} p> {2μ _0}/{B_z^2}), flowing, and well collimated. Internal probe measurements show that the plasma current profile can be controlled by the plasma gun array.

  10. The rotating wall machine: a device to study ideal and resistive magnetohydrodynamic stability under variable boundary conditions.

    PubMed

    Paz-Soldan, C; Bergerson, W F; Brookhart, M I; Hannum, D A; Kendrick, R; Fiksel, G; Forest, C B

    2010-12-01

    The rotating wall machine, a basic plasma physics experimental facility, has been constructed to study the role of electromagnetic boundary conditions on current-driven ideal and resistive magnetohydrodynamic instabilities, including differentially rotating conducting walls. The device, a screw pinch magnetic geometry with line-tied ends, is described. The plasma is generated by an array of 19 plasma guns that not only produce high density plasmas but can also be independently biased to allow spatial and temporal control of the current profile. The design and mechanical performance of the rotating wall as well as diagnostic capabilities and internal probes are discussed. Measurements from typical quiescent discharges show the plasma to be high β (≤p>2μ(0)/B(z)(2)), flowing, and well collimated. Internal probe measurements show that the plasma current profile can be controlled by the plasma gun array.

  11. Wall-function boundary conditions in the solution of the Navier-Stokes equations for complex compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viegas, J. R.; Rubesin, M. W.

    1983-01-01

    To make computer codes for two-dimensional compressible flows more robust and economical, wall functions for these flows, under adiabatic conditions, have been developed and tested. These wall functions have been applied to three two-equation models of turbulence. The tests consist of comparisons of calculated and experimental results for transonic and supersonic flow over a flat plate and for two-dimensional and axisymmetrical transonic shock-wave/boundary-layer interaction flows with and without separation. The calculations are performed with an implicit algorithm that solves the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. It is shown that results obtained agree very well with the data for the complex compressible flows tested, provided criteria for use of the wall functions are followed. The expected savings in cost of the computations and improved robustness of the code were achieved.

  12. Wall-function boundary conditions in the solution of the Navier-Stokes equations for complex compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viegas, J. R.; Rubesin, M. W.

    1983-01-01

    To make computer codes for two-dimensional compressible flows more robust and economical, wall functions for these flows, under adiabatic conditions, have been developed and tested. These wall functions have been applied to three two-equation models of turbulence. The tests consist of comparisons of calculated and experimental results for transonic and supersonic flow over a flat plate and for two-dimensional and axisymmetrical transonic shock-wave/boundary-layer interaction flows with and without separation. The calculations are performed with an implicit algorithm that solves the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. It is shown that results obtained agree very well with the data for the complex compressible flows tested, provided criteria for use of the wall functions are followed. The expected savings in cost of the computations and improved robustness of the code were achieved.

  13. Distribution of thermal neutron flux around a PET cyclotron.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Yoshimune; Ishigure, Nobuhito; Mochizuki, Shingo; Ito, Kengo; Hatano, Kentaro; Abe, Junichiro; Miyahara, Hiroshi; Masumoto, Kazuyoshi; Nakamura, Hajime

    2011-05-01

    The number of positron emission tomography (PET) examinations has greatly increased world-wide. Since positron emission nuclides for the PET examinations have short half-lives, they are mainly produced using on-site cyclotrons. During the production of the nuclides, significant quantities of neutrons are generated from the cyclotrons. Neutrons have potential to activate the materials around the cyclotrons and cause exposure to the staff. To investigate quantities and distribution of the thermal neutrons, thermal neutron fluxes were measured around a PET cyclotron in a laboratory associating with a hospital. The cyclotron accelerates protons up to 18 MeV, and the mean particle current is 20 μA. The neutron fluxes were measured during both 18F production and C production. Gold foils and thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) badges were used to measure the neutron fluxes. The neutron fluxes in the target box averaged 9.3 × 10(6) cm(-2) s(-1) and 1.7 × 10(6) cm(-2) s(-1) during 18F and 11C production, respectively. Those in the cyclotron room averaged 4.1 × 10(5) cm(-2) s(-1) and 1.2 × 10(5) cm(-2) s(-1), respectively. Those outside the concrete wall shielding were estimated as being equal to or less than ∼3 cm s, which corresponded to 0.1 μSv h(-1) in effective dose. The neutron fluxes outside the concrete shielding were confirmed to be quite low compared to the legal limit.

  14. Measurements of velocity and wall shear stress inside a PTFE vascular graft model under steady flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Loth, F; Jones, S A; Giddens, D P; Bassiouny, H S; Glagov, S; Zarins, C K

    1997-05-01

    The flow field inside a model of a polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE) canine artery end-to-side bypass graft was studied under steady flow conditions using laser-Doppler anemometry. The anatomically realistic in vitro model was constructed to incorporate the major geometric features of the in vivo canine anastomosis geometry, most notably a larger graft than host artery diameter. The velocity measurements at Reynolds number 208, based on the host artery diameter, show the flow field to be three dimensional in nature. The wall shear stress distribution, computed from the near-wall velocity gradients, reveals a relatively low wall shear stress region on the wall opposite to the graft near the stagnation point approximately one artery diameter in axial length at the midplane. This low wall shear stress region extends to the sidewalls, suture lines, and along the PTFE graft where its axial length at the midplane is more than two artery diameters. The velocity distribution inside the graft model presented here provides a data set well suited for validation of numerical solutions on a model of this type.

  15. Measurement of the absolute hohlraum wall albedo under ignition foot drive conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Suter, L J; Wallace, R J; Hammel, B A; Weber, F A; Landen, O L; Campbell, K M; DeWald, E L; Glenzer, S H; Rosen, M D; Jones, O S; Turner, R E; Kauffmann, R L; Hammer, J H

    2003-11-25

    We present the first measurements of the absolute albedos of hohlraums made from gold or from high-Z mixtures. The measurements are performed over the range of radiation temperatures (70-100 eV) expected during the foot of an indirect-drive temporally-shaped ignition laser pulse, where accurate knowledge of the wall albedo (i.e. soft x-ray wall re-emission) is most critical for determining capsule radiation symmetry. We find that the gold albedo agrees well with calculations using the super transition array opacity model, potentially providing additional margin for ICF ignition.

  16. In situ microscopic observation of chitin and fungal cells with chitinous cell walls in hydrothermal conditions.

    PubMed

    Deguchi, Shigeru; Tsujii, Kaoru; Horikoshi, Koki

    2015-07-07

    Recent findings of intact chitin in fossil records suggest surprisingly high recalcitrance of this biopolymer during hydrothermal treatments. We also know in the experience of everyday life that mushroom, cells of which have chitinous cell walls, do not fall apart however long they are simmered. We used in situ optical microscopy to examine chitin and fungal cells with chitinous cell walls during hydrothermal treatments, and obtained direct evidence that they remained undegraded at temperatures well over 200 °C. The results show very hot and compressed water is needed to make mushrooms mushy.

  17. In situ microscopic observation of chitin and fungal cells with chitinous cell walls in hydrothermal conditions

    PubMed Central

    Deguchi, Shigeru; Tsujii, Kaoru; Horikoshi, Koki

    2015-01-01

    Recent findings of intact chitin in fossil records suggest surprisingly high recalcitrance of this biopolymer during hydrothermal treatments. We also know in the experience of everyday life that mushroom, cells of which have chitinous cell walls, do not fall apart however long they are simmered. We used in situ optical microscopy to examine chitin and fungal cells with chitinous cell walls during hydrothermal treatments, and obtained direct evidence that they remained undegraded at temperatures well over 200 °C. The results show very hot and compressed water is needed to make mushrooms mushy. PMID:26148792

  18. A stable high-order finite difference scheme for the compressible Navier Stokes equations: No-slip wall boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svärd, Magnus; Nordström, Jan

    2008-05-01

    A stable wall boundary procedure is derived for the discretized compressible Navier-Stokes equations. The procedure leads to an energy estimate for the linearized equations. We discretize the equations using high-order accurate finite difference summation-by-parts (SBP) operators. The boundary conditions are imposed weakly with penalty terms. We prove linear stability for the scheme including the wall boundary conditions. The penalty imposition of the boundary conditions is tested for the flow around a circular cylinder at Ma=0.1 and Re=100. We demonstrate the robustness of the SBP-SAT technique by imposing incompatible initial data and show the behavior of the boundary condition implementation. Using the errors at the wall we show that higher convergence rates are obtained for the high-order schemes. We compute the vortex shedding from a circular cylinder and obtain good agreement with previously published (computational and experimental) results for lift, drag and the Strouhal number. We use our results to compare the computational time for a given for a accuracy and show the superior efficiency of the 5th-order scheme.

  19. Computational solution of the velocity and wall shear stress distribution inside a left carotid artery under pulsatile flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arslan, Nurullah; Turmuş, Hakan

    2014-08-01

    Stroke is still one of the leading causes for death after heart diseases and cancer in all over the world. Strokes happen because an artery that carries blood uphill from the heart to the head is clogged. Most of the time, as with heart attacks, the problem is atherosclerosis, hardening of the arteries, calcified buildup of fatty deposits on the vessel wall. In this study, the fluid dynamic simulations were done in a left carotid bifurcation under the pulsatile flow conditions computationally. Pulsatile flow waveform is given in the paper. In vivo geometry and boundary conditions were obtained from a patient who has stenosis located at external carotid artery (ECA) and internal carotid artery (ICA) of his common carotid artery (CCA). The location of critical flow fields such as low wall shear stress (WSS), stagnation regions and separation regions were detected near the highly stenosed region and at branching region.

  20. Radioactive by-products of a self-shielded cyclotron and the liquid target system for F-18 routine production.

    PubMed

    Kambali, I; Suryanto, H; Parwanto

    2016-06-01

    Routine production of F-18 radionuclide using proton beams accelerated in a cyclotron could potentially generate residual radioisotopes in the cyclotron vicinity which eventually become major safety concerns over radiation exposure to the workers. In this investigation, a typical 11-MeV proton, self-shielded cyclotron has been assessed for its residual radiation sources in the cyclotron's shielding, tank/chamber, cave wall as well as target system. Using a portable gamma ray spectroscopy system, the radiation measurement in the cyclotron environment has been carried out. Experimental results indicate that relatively long-lived radioisotopes such as Mn-54, Zn-65 and Eu-152 are detected in the inner and outer surface of the cyclotron shielding respectively while Mn-54 spectrum is observed around the cyclotron chamber. Weak intensity of Eu-152 radioisotope is again spotted in the inner and outer surface of the cyclotron cave wall. Angular distribution measurement of the Eu-152 shows that the intensity slightly drops with increasing observation angle relative to the proton beam incoming angle. In the target system, gamma rays from Co-56, Mn-52, Co-60, Mn-54, Ag-110 m are identified. TALYS-calculated nuclear cross-section data are used to study the origins of the radioactive by-products.

  1. Electron cyclotron harmonic wave acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karimabadi, H.; Menyuk, C. R.; Sprangle, P.; Vlahos, L.

    1987-01-01

    A nonlinear analysis of particle acceleration in a finite bandwidth, obliquely propagating electromagnetic cyclotron wave is presented. It has been suggested by Sprangle and Vlahos in 1983 that the narrow bandwidth cyclotron radiation emitted by the unstable electron distribution inside a flaring solar loop can accelerate electrons outside the loop by the interaction of a monochromatic wave propagating along the ambient magnetic field with the ambient electrons. It is shown here that electrons gyrating and streaming along a uniform, static magnetic field can be accelerated by interacting with the fundamental or second harmonic of a monochromatic, obliquely propagating cyclotron wave. It is also shown that the acceleration is virtually unchanged when a wave with finite bandwidth is considered. This acceleration mechanism can explain the observed high-energy electrons in type III bursts.

  2. Electron cyclotron harmonic wave acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karimabadi, H.; Menyuk, C. R.; Sprangle, P.; Vlahos, L.

    1987-01-01

    A nonlinear analysis of particle acceleration in a finite bandwidth, obliquely propagating electromagnetic cyclotron wave is presented. It has been suggested by Sprangle and Vlahos in 1983 that the narrow bandwidth cyclotron radiation emitted by the unstable electron distribution inside a flaring solar loop can accelerate electrons outside the loop by the interaction of a monochromatic wave propagating along the ambient magnetic field with the ambient electrons. It is shown here that electrons gyrating and streaming along a uniform, static magnetic field can be accelerated by interacting with the fundamental or second harmonic of a monochromatic, obliquely propagating cyclotron wave. It is also shown that the acceleration is virtually unchanged when a wave with finite bandwidth is considered. This acceleration mechanism can explain the observed high-energy electrons in type III bursts.

  3. Use of cyclotrons in medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qaim, S. M.

    2004-10-01

    Cyclotrons are versatile ion-accelerating machines which find many applications in medicine. In this short review their use in hadron therapy is briefly discussed. Proton therapy is gaining significance because of its capability to treat deep-lying tumours. A strong area of application of cyclotrons involves the production of short-lived neutron deficient radiotracers for use in emission tomography, especially positron emission tomography. This fast and quantitative in vivo diagnostic technique is being increasingly used in neurology, cardiology and oncology. Besides routine patient care, considerable interdisciplinary work on development of new positron emitters is under way. A short account of those efforts is given. The use of cyclotrons in the production of radionuclides for internal radiotherapy is also briefly described.

  4. Atmospheric pressure flow reactor: Gas phase chemical kinetics under tropospheric conditions without wall effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steven L. (Inventor); Davis, Dennis D. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A flow reactor for simulating the interaction in the troposphere is set forth. A first reactant mixed with a carrier gas is delivered from a pump and flows through a duct having louvers therein. The louvers straighten out the flow, reduce turbulence and provide laminar flow discharge from the duct. A second reactant delivered from a source through a pump is input into the flowing stream, the second reactant being diffused through a plurality of small diffusion tubes to avoid disturbing the laminar flow. The commingled first and second reactants in the carrier gas are then directed along an elongated duct where the walls are spaced away from the flow of reactants to avoid wall interference, disturbance or turbulence arising from the walls. A probe connected with a measuring device can be inserted through various sampling ports in the second duct to complete measurements of the first and second reactants and the product of their reaction at selected XYZ locations relative to the flowing system.

  5. Design study of the KIRAMS-430 superconducting cyclotron magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun Wook; Kang, Joonsun; Hong, Bong Hwan; Jung, In Su

    2016-07-01

    Design study of superconducting cyclotron magnet for the carbon therapy was performed at the Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Science (KIRAMS). The name of this project is The Korea Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator (KHIMA) project and a fixed frequency cyclotron with four spiral sector magnet was one of the candidate for the accelerator type. Basic parameters of the cyclotron magnet and its characteristics were studied. The isochronous magnetic field which can guide the 12C6+ ions up to 430 MeV/u was designed and used for the single particle tracking simulation. The isochronous condition of magnetic field was achieved by optimization of sector gap and width along the radius. Operating range of superconducting coil current was calculated and changing of the magnetic field caused by mechanical deformations of yokes was considered. From the result of magnetic field design, structure of the magnet yoke was planned.

  6. Vertical-viewing electron cyclotron emission diagnostic for the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    James, R.; Janz, S.; Ellis, R.; Boyd, D.; Lohr, J.

    1988-08-01

    The vertical-viewing electron cyclotron emission diagnostic on DIII-D will be used to assess the nonthermal electron distributions resulting from electron cyclotron heating and electron cyclotron current drive experiments. Electron cyclotron emission along a vertical chord is collected using an ellipsoidal focusing mirror and retroreflector (the latter to minimize wall reflections). The emission is then transported approx.20 m using a quasioptical transport system composed of eight lenses and three mirrors, and detected between the 2nd and the 10th harmonics by a fast-scanning (40-Hz) Michelson interferometer. The entire system has been aligned using a Gaussian beam simulator and absolutely calibrated in situ using a cold liquid-nitrogen bath. Details of the design, installation, and calibration will be discussed.

  7. The electron-cyclotron maser for astrophysical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treumann, Rudolf A.

    2006-08-01

    The electron-cyclotron maser is a process that generates coherent radiation from plasma. In the last two decades, it has gained increasing attention as a dominant mechanism of producing high-power radiation in natural high-temperature magnetized plasmas. Originally proposed as a somewhat exotic idea and subsequently applied to include non-relativistic plasmas, the electron-cyclotron maser was considered as an alternative to turbulent though coherent wave-wave interaction which results in radio emission. However, when it was recognized that weak relativistic corrections had to be taken into account in the radiation process, the importance of the electron-cyclotron maser rose to the recognition it deserves. Here we review the theory and application of the electron-cyclotron maser to the directly accessible plasmas in our immediate terrestrial and planetary environments. In situ access to the radiating plasmas has turned out to be crucial in identifying the conditions under which the electron-cyclotron maser mechanism is working. Under extreme astrophysical conditions, radiation from plasmas may provide a major energy loss; however, for generating the powerful radiation in which the electron-cyclotron maser mechanism is capable, the plasma must be in a state where release of susceptible amounts of energy in the form of radiation is favorable. Such conditions are realized when the plasma is unable to digest the available free energy that is imposed from outside and stored in its particle distribution. The lack of dissipative processes is a common property of collisionless plasmas. When, in addition, the plasma density becomes so low that the amount of free energy per particle is large, direct emission becomes favorable. This can be expressed as negative absorption of the plasma which, like in conventional masers, leads to coherent emission even though no quantum correlations are involved. The physical basis of this formal analogy between a quantum maser and the

  8. NACA Researcher Examines the Cyclotron

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1951-02-21

    Researcher James Blue examines the new cyclotron at the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) Lewis Flight Propulsion Laboratory. Researchers at NACA Lewis began postulating about the use of atomic power for propulsion immediately after World War II. The NACA concentrated its efforts on the study of high temperature materials and heat transfer since it did not have access to the top secret fission information. The military studied the plausibility of nuclear propulsion for aircraft in the late 1940s. The military program was cancelled after four years without any breakthroughs, but the Atomic Energy Commission took on the effort in 1951. The NACA Lewis laboratory was expanding its nuclear-related research during this period. In 1948, Lewis engineers were assigned to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to obtain expertise in high temperature heat transfer and advanced materials technology. The following year a new 80-person Nuclear Reactor Division was created, and an in-house nuclear school was established to train these researchers. The cyclotron was built behind the Materials and Structures Laboratory to support thermodynamic and materials research for both nuclear aircraft and nuclear rockets. The original NACA Lewis cyclotron was used to accelerate two kinds of particles. To better match the space radiation environment, the cyclotron was later modified to accelerate particles of the newly-discovered Van Allen radiation belts.

  9. Conditioning of Parsley (Petroselinum crispum L.) Suspension Cells Increases Elicitor-Induced Incorporation of Cell Wall Phenolics.

    PubMed Central

    Kauss, H.; Franke, R.; Krause, K.; Conrath, U.; Jeblick, W.; Grimmig, B.; Matern, U.

    1993-01-01

    The elicitor-induced incorporation of phenylpropanoid derivatives into the cell wall and the secretion of soluble coumarin derivatives (phytoalexins) by parsley (Petroselinum crispum L.) suspension cultures can be potentiated by pretreatment of the cultures with 2,6-dichloroisonicotinic acid or derivatives of salicylic acid. To investigate this phenomenon further, the cell walls and an extracellular soluble polymer were isolated from control cells or cells treated with an elicitor from Phytophthora megasperma f. sp. glycinea. After alkaline hydrolysis, both fractions from elicited cells showed a greatly increased content of 4-coumaric, ferulic, and 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, as well as 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde and vanillin. Two minor peaks were identified as tyrosol and methoxytyrosol. The pretreatment effect is most pronounced at a low elicitor concentration. Its specificity was elaborated for coumarin secretion. When the parsley suspension cultures were preincubated for 1 d with 2,6-dichloroisonicotinic, 4- or 5-chlorosalicylic, or 3,5- dichlorosalicylic acid, the cells exhibited a greatly increased elicitor response. Pretreatment with isonicotinic, salicylic, acetylsalicylic, or 2,6-dihydroxybenzoic acid was less efficient in enhancing the response, and some other isomers were inactive. This increase in elicitor response was also observed for the above-mentioned monomeric phenolics, which were liberated from cell walls upon alkaline hydrolysis and for "lignin-like" cell wall polymers determined by the thioglycolic acid method. It was shown for 5-chlorosalicylic acid that conditioning most likely improves the signal transduction leading to the activation of genes encoding phenylalanine ammonia lyase and 4-coumarate: coenzyme A ligase. The conditioning thus sensitizes the parsley suspension cells to respond to lower elicitor concentrations. If a similar mechanism were to apply to whole plants treated with 2,6-dichloroisonicotinic acid, a known inducer of systemic

  10. On the use of wall functions as boundary conditions for two-dimensional separated compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viegas, J. R.; Rubesin, M. W.; Horstman, C. C.

    1985-01-01

    A new and improved wall function method for compressible turbulent flows has been developed and tested. This method is applicable to attached and separated flows, to both high- and low-Reynolds number flows, and to flows with adiabatic and nonadiabatic surfaces. This wall function method has been applied to the Launder-Spalding k-epsilon two-equation model of turbulence. The tests consist of comparisons of calculated and experimental results for: (1) an axisymmetrical transonic shock-wave/boundary-wave interaction flow at low Reynolds number in an adiabatic tube, (2) an axisymmetrical high-Reynolds number transonic flow over a nonadiabatic bump, and (3) a two-dimensional supersonic high-Reynolds number flow on a nonadiabatic deflected flap. Each of these experiments had significant regions of flow separation. The calculations are performed with an implicit algorithm that solves the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. It is shown that the results obtained agree very well with the data for the complex compressible flows tested.

  11. Time-dependent Poiseuille flow of a viscous compressible fluid confined between two planar walls with dynamic partial slip boundary condition.

    PubMed

    Felderhof, B U

    2012-06-01

    Time-dependent Poiseuille flow of a viscous compressible fluid confined between two planar walls is studied for a partial slip boundary condition with frequency-dependent slip length. After an initial uniform impulse parallel to the walls, the flow pattern quickly becomes nearly parabolic. For a narrow gap, a dynamic slip length can lead to damped oscillations of total fluid momentum.

  12. The Origin of Narrow Band Cyclotron Wave Emissions Called Chorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skoug, Ruth Marie

    1995-01-01

    On May 6, 1993, a sounding rocket experiment designed to study microburst electron precipitation was launched from Poker Flat, Alaska, into a morningside auroral event. This was the first sounding rocket to simultaneously detect microburst electrons and associated very low frequency (VLF) waves. Both microbursts and narrow band VLF chorus (risers) were observed throughout the flight. Waves and electron bursts were observed in association with each other, but no one-to-one correlations were seen between the two phenomena. The association between waves and particles suggests that both phenomena may be produced by a wave -particle interaction. This dissertation discusses the design of the VLF wave antenna, a magnetic search coil, and the analysis of data from this instrument. The data are compared to chorus production theories to determine the source location and mechanism of the observed waves. In this work, the observed chorus emissions are interpreted in terms of a cyclotron resonance interaction. This is the first comprehensive test of the cyclotron resonance theory applied to chorus associated with microburst precipitation. The frequency range of the risers and the observed electron energy range agree with those required to satisfy the cyclotron resonance condition. Using a criterion derived from the conservation of energy during an interaction, it is determined that a cold plasma cyclotron resonance interaction could have produced only the lower frequency portions of the observed chorus risers. We present an extension of the cyclotron resonance theory which uses a warm plasma model of the wave-particle interaction. This model assumes a two-component plasma, with an isotropic cold component and a bi-Maxwellian warm component. The addition of the warm component produces sufficient changes in the wave dispersion relation that the interaction can produce the highest frequencies observed in our data set. As predicted by theory, an anisotropic plasma is required to

  13. Turbulent separation delay via tuned wall-impedance on a NACA 4412 airfoil in pre-stalled conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodart, Julien; Shelekhov, Grigory; Scalo, Carlo; Joly, Laurent

    2016-11-01

    We have performed large-eddy simulations of turbulent separation control via imposed wall-impedance on a NACA-4412 airfoil in near-stalled conditions (Mach, M∞ = 0 . 3 , and chord-Reynolds numbers, Rec = 1 . 5 ×106 and angle of attack, α =14°), inspired by the experimental setup of Coles & Woodcock (1979). We impose complex impedance boundary conditions (IBCs) using the implementation developed by Scalo, Bodart and Lele, representing an array of sub-surface-mounted tunable Helmholtz cavities with resonant frequency, fres, covered by a porous sheet with permeability inversely proportional to the impedance resistance. Generation of spanwise-oriented Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) rollers of size lKH , 0 =U∞ /fres is observed in areas of sustained mean shear, which are convectively amplified along the shear-layer and reenergizing the separated flow via vortical-induced mixing and entrainment of irrotational fluid. Their characteristic initial size lKH , 0 is determined by the periodic wall-transpiration pattern induced, in turn, by acoustic resonance in the cavities. Several resonant frequencies and impedance have been tested, bracketing optimal conditions for control.

  14. Liquid Metal Walls, Lithium, And Low Recycling Boundary Conditions In Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    R. Majeski

    2010-01-15

    At present, the only solid material believed to be a viable option for plasma-facing components (PFCs) in a fusion reactor is tungsten. Operated at the lower temperatures typical of present-day fusion experiments, tungsten is known to suffer from surface degradation during long-term exposure to helium-containing plasmas, leading to reduced thermal conduction to the bulk, and enhanced erosion. Existing alloys are also quite brittle at temperatures under 700oC. However, at a sufficiently high operating temperature (700 - 1000 oC), tungsten is selfannealing and it is expected that surface damage will be reduced to the point where tungsten PFCs will have an acceptable lifetime in a reactor environment. The existence of only one potentially viable option for solid PFCs, though, constitutes one of the most significant restrictions on design space for DEMO and follow-on fusion reactors. In contrast, there are several candidates for liquid metal-based PFCs, including gallium, tin, lithium, and tin-lithium eutectics. We will discuss options for liquid metal walls in tokamaks, looking at both high and low recycling materials. We will then focus in particular on one of the candidate liquids, lithium. Lithium is known to have a high chemical affinity for hydrogen, and has been shown in test stands1 and fusion experiments2,3 to produce a low recycling surface, especially when liquid. Because it is also low-Z and is usable in a tokamak over a reasonable temperature range (200 - 400 oC), it has been now been used as a PFC in several confinement experiments (TFTR, T11- M, CDX-U, NSTX, FTU, and TJ-II), with favorable results. The consequences of substituting low recycling walls for the traditional high recycling variety on tokamak equilibria are very extensive. We will discuss some of the expected modifications, briefly reviewing experimental results, and comparing the results to expectations.

  15. On the motion through a viscous fluid of a spherical particle touching a plane wall: Slip boundary conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, A.M.J.; Kezirian, M.T.; Brenner, H.

    1992-01-01

    Understanding the hydrodynamic forces acting upon immersed particles touching surfaces, is of central importance in clean room technology and a variety of rheological and biological applications. This paper addresses the translation and rotation of a sphere translating and rotating parallel to a nearby plane wall bounding an otherwise quiescent semi-infinite viscous fluid, allowing for slip on the wall and/or the sphere. The motivation for disregarding the classical, no-slip boundary condition on solid surfaces aries from an embarrassing discrepancy between theoretical and observed predictions of the translational velocity of a sphere rolling' under the influence of gravity down an inclined plane bounding an effectively semi-infinite viscous fluid. According to theory the force and torque on a translating and/or rotating sphere moving parallel to the plane wall become logarithmically infinite with the gap width as the gap between the sphere and well goes to zero. As such, the theoretical conclusion is that the sphere cannot translate down the plane, despite the gravity force that acts to animate it. Experiments, however, reveal that the sphere does, in fact, roll down the plane - at a reproducible mean terminal velocity. In the noninertial, small Reynolds number limit, the experimentally observed drag coefficient was found to be about 8.9 times that given by Stokes law for the unbounded case - thereby suggesting a conventional hydrodynamic wall effect, rather than the logarithmically singular behavior predicted by the theory. It was in an attempt to resolve this glaring contradiction that we have elected here to examine the possible effects of slip.

  16. On the motion through a viscous fluid of a spherical particle touching a plane wall: Slip boundary conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, A.M.J.; Kezirian, M.T.; Brenner, H.

    1992-12-31

    Understanding the hydrodynamic forces acting upon immersed particles touching surfaces, is of central importance in clean room technology and a variety of rheological and biological applications. This paper addresses the translation and rotation of a sphere translating and rotating parallel to a nearby plane wall bounding an otherwise quiescent semi-infinite viscous fluid, allowing for slip on the wall and/or the sphere. The motivation for disregarding the classical, no-slip boundary condition on solid surfaces aries from an embarrassing discrepancy between theoretical and observed predictions of the translational velocity of a sphere `rolling` under the influence of gravity down an inclined plane bounding an effectively semi-infinite viscous fluid. According to theory the force and torque on a translating and/or rotating sphere moving parallel to the plane wall become logarithmically infinite with the gap width as the gap between the sphere and well goes to zero. As such, the theoretical conclusion is that the sphere cannot translate down the plane, despite the gravity force that acts to animate it. Experiments, however, reveal that the sphere does, in fact, roll down the plane - at a reproducible mean terminal velocity. In the noninertial, small Reynolds number limit, the experimentally observed drag coefficient was found to be about 8.9 times that given by Stokes law for the unbounded case - thereby suggesting a conventional hydrodynamic wall effect, rather than the logarithmically singular behavior predicted by the theory. It was in an attempt to resolve this glaring contradiction that we have elected here to examine the possible effects of slip.

  17. New approximate boundary conditions for large eddy simulations of wall-bounded flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piomelli, Ugo; Ferziger, Joel; Moin, Parviz; Kim, John

    1989-01-01

    Two new approximate boundary conditions have been applied to the large eddy simulation of channel flow with and without transpiration. These new boundary conditions give more accurate results than those previously in use, and allow significant reduction of the required CPU time over simulations in which no-slip conditions are applied. Mean velocity profiles and turbulence intensities compare well both with experimental data and with the results of resolved simulations. The influence of the approximate boundary conditions remains confined near the point of application and does not affect the turbulence statistics in the core of the flow.

  18. New approximate boundary conditions for large eddy simulations of wall-bounded flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piomelli, Ugo; Ferziger, Joel; Moin, Parviz; Kim, John

    1989-01-01

    Two new approximate boundary conditions have been applied to the large eddy simulation of channel flow with and without transpiration. These new boundary conditions give more accurate results than those previously in use, and allow significant reduction of the required CPU time over simulations in which no-slip conditions are applied. Mean velocity profiles and turbulence intensities compare well both with experimental data and with the results of resolved simulations. The influence of the approximate boundary conditions remains confined near the point of application and does not affect the turbulence statistics in the core of the flow.

  19. Ion cyclotron emission studies: Retrospects and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelenkov, N. N.

    2016-05-01

    Ion cyclotron emission (ICE) studies emerged in part from the papers by A.B. Mikhailovskii published in the 1970s. Among the discussed subjects were electromagnetic compressional Alfvénic cyclotron instabilities with the linear growth rate √ {n_α /n_e } driven by fusion products, -particles which draw a lot of attention to energetic particle physics. The theory of ICE excited by energetic particles was significantly advanced at the end of the 20th century motivated by first DT experiments on TFTR and subsequent JET experimental studies which we highlight. More recently ICE theory was advanced by detailed theoretical and experimental studies on spherical torus (ST) fusion devices where the instability signals previously indistinguishable in high aspect ratio tokamaks due to high toroidal magnetic field became the subjects of experiments. We discuss further prospects of ICE theory applications for future burning plasma (BP) experiments such as those to be conducted in ITER device in France, where neutron and gamma rays escaping the plasma create extremely challenging conditions fusion alpha particle diagnostics.

  20. Ion cyclotron emission studies: Retrospects and prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Gorelenkov, N. N.

    2016-06-05

    Ion cyclotron emission (ICE) studies emerged in part from the papers by A.B. Mikhailovskii published in the 1970s. Among the discussed subjects were electromagnetic compressional Alfv,nic cyclotron instabilities with the linear growth rate similar ~ √(nα/ne) driven by fusion products, -particles which draw a lot of attention to energetic particle physics. The theory of ICE excited by energetic particles was significantly advanced at the end of the 20th century motivated by first DT experiments on TFTR and subsequent JET experimental studies which we highlight. Recently ICE theory was advanced by detailed theoretical and experimental studies on spherical torus (ST) fusion devices where the instability signals previously indistinguishable in high aspect ratio tokamaks due to high toroidal magnetic field became the subjects of experiments. Finally, we discuss prospects of ICE theory applications for future burning plasma (BP) experiments such as those to be conducted in ITER device in France, where neutron and gamma rays escaping the plasma create extremely challenging conditions fusion alpha particle diagnostics.

  1. Ion cyclotron emission studies: Retrospects and prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Gorelenkov, N. N.

    2016-06-05

    Ion cyclotron emission (ICE) studies emerged in part from the papers by A.B. Mikhailovskii published in the 1970s. Among the discussed subjects were electromagnetic compressional Alfv,nic cyclotron instabilities with the linear growth rate similar ~ √(nα/ne) driven by fusion products, -particles which draw a lot of attention to energetic particle physics. The theory of ICE excited by energetic particles was significantly advanced at the end of the 20th century motivated by first DT experiments on TFTR and subsequent JET experimental studies which we highlight. Recently ICE theory was advanced by detailed theoretical and experimental studies on spherical torus (ST) fusion devices where the instability signals previously indistinguishable in high aspect ratio tokamaks due to high toroidal magnetic field became the subjects of experiments. Finally, we discuss prospects of ICE theory applications for future burning plasma (BP) experiments such as those to be conducted in ITER device in France, where neutron and gamma rays escaping the plasma create extremely challenging conditions fusion alpha particle diagnostics.

  2. Ion cyclotron emission studies: Retrospects and prospects

    DOE PAGES

    Gorelenkov, N. N.

    2016-06-05

    Ion cyclotron emission (ICE) studies emerged in part from the papers by A.B. Mikhailovskii published in the 1970s. Among the discussed subjects were electromagnetic compressional Alfv,nic cyclotron instabilities with the linear growth rate similar ~ √(nα/ne) driven by fusion products, -particles which draw a lot of attention to energetic particle physics. The theory of ICE excited by energetic particles was significantly advanced at the end of the 20th century motivated by first DT experiments on TFTR and subsequent JET experimental studies which we highlight. Recently ICE theory was advanced by detailed theoretical and experimental studies on spherical torus (ST) fusionmore » devices where the instability signals previously indistinguishable in high aspect ratio tokamaks due to high toroidal magnetic field became the subjects of experiments. Finally, we discuss prospects of ICE theory applications for future burning plasma (BP) experiments such as those to be conducted in ITER device in France, where neutron and gamma rays escaping the plasma create extremely challenging conditions fusion alpha particle diagnostics.« less

  3. Boundary Behavior of Viscous Fluids: Influence of Wall Roughness and Friction-driven Boundary Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucur, Dorin; Feireisl, Eduard; Nečasová, Šárka

    2010-07-01

    We consider a family of solutions to the evolutionary Navier-Stokes system supplemented with the complete slip boundary conditions on domains with rough boundaries. We give a complete description of the asymptotic limit by means of Γ-convergence arguments, and identify a general class of boundary conditions.

  4. LES of fluid and heat flow over a wall-bounded short cylinder at different inflow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borello, D.; Hanjalić, K.

    2011-12-01

    We report on LES studies of flow patterns, vortical structures and heat transfer in flows over a short single cylinder of diameter D placed in a plane channel of height h = 0.4D in which the bottom wall is heated. The Reynolds number of 6150, based on D, corresponds to the water experiments reported by Sahin et al. (2008). For the basic computational domain of 24×14×0.4D three different inflow conditions have been considered: a non-turbulent flow with a uniform initial velocity developing along the channel (NT), a fully developed channel flows (FD) (generated a priori) and periodic conditions (PC). The latter boundary conditions have also been considered for two shorter domain lengths of 6D and 3D corresponding to a cylinder in a compact matrix. For the long domain, despite the length of the channel of 9.5 D before (and after) the cylinder, the inlet conditions show strong effects on the formation and evolution of the multiple vortex systems both in front and behind the cylinder, influencing significantly also friction and heat transfer. Simulations show some agreement with experimental data though the comparison is impaired by the uncertainty in the experimental inflow conditions. For the shortest cylinder spacing the wake never closes and the flow shows enhanced unsteadiness and turbulence level. Interestingly, the comparison for the same short domain (3Dx3D) using the mean temperature at the inflow to this domain as a reference shows the lowest average base-wall Nusselt number in the PC 3D case that corresponds to compact heat exchangers.

  5. TRIUMF cyclotron vacuum system refurbishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekachev, I.

    2008-03-01

    The cyclotron at TRIUMF was commissioned to full energy in 1974. The volume of the cyclotron vacuum tank is about 100 m3 and it operates at 5×10-8 Torr pressure during beam production. The pumping is mainly based on a Phillips B-20 cryogenerator (Stirling cycle 4-cylinder engine). The cryogenerator supplies helium gas at 16 K and 70 K to cryopanels in the tank. The decreasing reliability of the B-20 and demanding maintenance requirements triggered the decision to completely overhaul or replace the cryogenerator. Replacement with the LINDE-1630 helium refrigerator was found to be the most attractive (technically and economically) option. The details of the proposal with installation of the helium refrigerator and with a continuous flow liquid nitrogen shield cooling system are presented.

  6. Leaching of Terbutryn and Its Photodegradation Products from Artificial Walls under Natural Weather Conditions.

    PubMed

    Bollmann, Ulla E; Minelgaite, Greta; Schlüsener, Michael; Ternes, Thomas; Vollertsen, Jes; Bester, Kai

    2016-04-19

    Terbutryn is a commonly used biocide in construction materials. Especially polymer-resin-based renders and paints, used in external thermal insulation composite systems, are very susceptible to microbial deterioration. Previous studies have shown that biocides leach out of the material when contacted with rainwater; thus, they reach surface waters where they might have adverse effects on aquatic organisms. The knowledge on the long-term leaching performance and especially the formation and fate of degradation products is rare. In the present study, the leaching of terbutryn from artificial walls equipped with two types of render was observed for 19 months. In addition to concentration and mass load determinations for terbutryn, photodegradation products were identified and studied in the leachate and render. The results show that terbutryn leached mainly within the first 6-12 months. During the exposure, only 3% of the initial terbutryn was emitted to the runoff, while 64-80% remained in the coating. The overall mass balance could be closed by including several degradation products. Contrary to expectations, the major fraction of transformation products remained in the material and was not washed off immediately, which is of high importance for the long-term assessment of biocides in coating materials.

  7. Self-diffusion of methane in single-walled carbon nanotubes at sub- and supercritical conditions.

    PubMed

    Cao, Dapeng; Wu, Jianzhong

    2004-04-27

    The diffusivities of methane in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are investigated at various temperatures and pressures using classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations complemented with grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations. The carbon atoms at the nanotubes are structured according to the (m, m) armchair arrangement and the interactions between each methane molecule and all atoms of the confining surface are explicitly considered. It is found that the parallel self-diffusion coefficient of methane in an infinitely long, defect-free SWNT decreases dramatically as the temperature falls, especially at subcritical temperatures and high loading of gas molecules when the adsorbed gas forms a solidlike structure. With the increase in pressure, the diffusion coefficient first declines rapidly and then exhibits a nonmonotonic behavior due to the layering transitions of the adsorbed gas molecules as seen in the equilibrium density profiles. At a subcritical temperature, the diffusion of methane in a fully loaded SWNT follows a solidlike behavior, and the value of the diffusion coefficient varies drastically with the nanotube diameter. At a supercritical temperature, however, the diffusion coefficient at high pressure reaches a plateau, with the limiting value essentially independent of the nanotube size. For SWNTs with the radius larger than approximately 2 nm, capillary condensation occurs when the temperature is sufficiently low, following the layer-by-layer adsorption of gas molecules on the nanotube surface. For SWNTs with a diameter less than about 2 nm, no condensation is observed because the system becomes essentially one-dimensional.

  8. Implementation of wall boundary conditions for transpiration in F3D thin-layer Navier-Stokes code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandula, M.; Martin, F. W., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Numerical boundary conditions for mass injection/suction at the wall are incorporated in the thin-layer Navier-Stokes code, F3D. The accuracy of the boundary conditions and the code is assessed by a detailed comparison of the predictions of velocity distributions and skin-friction coefficients with exact similarity solutions for laminar flow over a flat plate with variable blowing/suction, and measurements for turbulent flow past a flat plate with uniform blowing. In laminar flow, F3D predictions for friction coefficient compare well with exact similarity solution with and without suction, but produces large errors at moderate-to-large values of blowing. A slight Mach number dependence of skin-friction coefficient due to blowing in turbulent flow is computed by F3D code. Predicted surface pressures for turbulent flow past an airfoil with mass injection are in qualitative agreement with measurements for a flat plate.

  9. Evaluation of the latent radiation dose from the activated radionuclides in a cyclotron vault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyunduk; Cho, Gyuseong; Kim, Sun A.; Kang, Bo Sun

    2015-02-01

    The production of short-lived radioisotopes for the synthesis of radiopharmaceuticals typically takes advantage of a cyclotron that accelerates a proton beam up to a few tens of MeV. The number of cyclotrons has been continuously increasing since the first operation of the MC-50 for the production of radiopharmaceuticals at the Korea Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences (KIRAMS) in 1986, and currently 35 cyclotrons are under operation throughout the nation. As the number of operating cyclotrons has increased, concerns about radiation safety for the persons who are working at the facilities and dwelling in the vicinity of the facilities are becoming important issues. Radiation that could emit a time-dependent dose was shown to exist in a cyclotron vault after its shutdown. The calculation of the latent radiation dose rate was performed by using the MCNPX and the FISPACT. The calculated results for the activated long-lived radioisotopes in the concrete wall and the structural components of the cyclotron facility were compared with the measured data that were obtained by using gamma-ray spectroscopy with a HPGe detector.

  10. Theoretical and Experimental Studies of the Transonic Flow Field and Associated Boundary Conditions near a Longitudinally-Slotted Wind-Tunnel Wall. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everhart, Joel Lee

    1988-01-01

    A theoretical examination of the slotted-wall flow field is conducted to determine the appropriate wall pressure drop (or boundary condition) equation. This analysis improves the understanding of the fluid physics of these types of flow fields and helps in evaluating the uncertainties and limitations existing in previous mathematical developments. It is shown that the resulting slotted-wall boundary condition contains contributions from the airfoil-induced streamline curvature and the non-linear, quadratic, slot crossflow in addition to an often neglected linear term which results from viscous shearing in the slot. Existing and newly acquired experimental data are examined in the light of this formulation and theoretical developments.

  11. Method and apparatus for ion cyclotron spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Dahl, David A [Idaho Falls, ID; Scott, Jill R [Idaho Falls, ID; McJunkin, Timothy R [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-08-17

    An ion cyclotron spectrometer may include a vacuum chamber that extends at least along a z-axis and means for producing a magnetic field within the vacuum chamber so that a magnetic field vector is generally parallel to the z-axis. The ion cyclotron spectrometer may also include means for producing a trapping electric field within the vacuum chamber that includes at least a first section that induces a first magnetron effect that increases a cyclotron frequency of an ion and at least a second section that induces a second magnetron effect that decreases the cyclotron frequency of an ion. The cyclotron frequency changes induced by the first and second magnetron effects substantially cancel one another so that an ion traversing the at least first and second sections will experience no net change in cyclotron frequency.

  12. Future cyclotron systems: An industrial perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, N.R.; Dickie, W.J.

    1995-09-01

    The use of commercial cyclotron systems for the production of radioisotopes continues to grow on a world-wide scale. Improvements in technology have significantly increased the production capabilities of modern cyclotron-based isotope production facilities. In particular, the change to negative ion acceleration and new high power systems have resulted in dramatic improvements in reliability, increases in capacity, and decreases in personnel radiation dose. As more and more older machines are retired, decisions regarding their replacement are made based on several factors including the market`s potential and the cyclotron system`s abilities. Taking the case of the recently upgraded TR30 cyclotron at TRIUMF/Nordion, the authors investigate the requirements industrial/medical users are likely to impose on future commercial cyclotron systems and the impact this will have on cyclotron technology by the end of the century.

  13. Commercial compact cyclotrons in the 90`s

    SciTech Connect

    Milton, B.F.

    1995-09-01

    Cyclotrons continue to be efficient accelerators for radio-isotope production. In recent years, developments in the accelerator technology have greatly increased the practical beam current in these machines while also improving the overall system reliability. These developments combined with the development of new isotopes for medicine and industry, and a retiring of older machines indicate a strong future for commercial cyclotrons. In this paper the authors will survey recent developments in the areas of cyclotron technology, as they relate to the new generation of commercial cyclotrons. Design criteria for the different types of commercial cyclotrons will be presented, with reference to those demands that differ from those in a research oriented cyclotron project. The authors also discuss the possibility of systems designed for higher energies and capable of extracted beam currents of up to 2.0 mA.

  14. DNA minor groove binding of cross-linked lexitropsins: experimental conditions required to observe the covalently linked WPPW (groove wall-peptide-peptide-groove wall) motif.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y H; Lown, J W

    1995-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of binding interactions between covalently cross-linked lexitropsins and DNA is undertaken, in which a novel cyclic symmetric 2:2 dimeric lexitropsin-DNA-binding model is proposed. Applicability of commonly used techniques including NMR, quantitative footprinting, CD, and ethidium fluorometry to differentiate the covalently linked WPPW (groove Wall-Peptide-Peptide-groove Wall) from a 2:2 cross-linked lexitropsin-DNA duplex structure is examined. PMID:7612846

  15. A study of wall shear stress in 12 aneurysms with respect to different viscosity models and flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Evju, Øyvind; Valen-Sendstad, Kristian; Mardal, Kent-André

    2013-11-15

    Recent computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies relate abnormal blood flow to rupture of cerebral aneurysms. However, it is still debated how to model blood flow with sufficient accuracy. Common assumptions made include Newtonian behaviour of blood, traction free outlet boundary conditions and inlet boundary conditions based on available literature. These assumptions are often required since the available patient specific data is usually restricted to the geometry of the aneurysm and the surrounding vasculature. However, the consequences of these assumptions have so far been inadequately addressed. This study investigates the effects of 4 different viscosity models, 2 different inflow conditions and 2 different outflow conditions in 12 middle cerebral artery aneurysms. The differences are quantified in terms of 3 different wall shear stress (WSS) metrics, involving maximal WSS, average WSS, and proportion of aneurysm sac area with low WSS. The results were compared with common geometrical metrics such as volume, aspect ratio, size ratio and parent vessel diameter and classifications in terms of sex and aneurysm type. The results demonstrate strong correlations between the different viscosity models and boundary conditions. The correlation between the different WSS metrics range from weak to medium. No strong correlations were found between the different WSS metrics and the geometrical metrics or classifications.

  16. SEPARATED FLOW CONDITIONS AT PIPE WALLS OF WATER DISTRIBUTION MAINS - Project Summary

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objectives of this research project were to develop and evaluate a method for determining residence times for separated recirculation cavity flow conditions, and to determine the rate of growth and surface ramp contours developed from particulate deposits at obstacles that i...

  17. Cyclotron maser emission of auroral Z mode radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melrose, D. B.; Hewitt, R. G.; Dulk, G. A.

    1983-01-01

    Results are presented suggesting that loss cone driven cyclotron maser emission by upgoing electrons, closely analogous to auroral kilometric radiation (AKR), may be the mechanism behind the observed Z mode radiation. With this hypothesis, the lack of a strong correlation between the Z mode radiation and AKR is not surprising; the ray paths for the X mode and the Z mode are markedly different, with the former directed upward and the latter downward. In addition, it is expected that the generation of the Z mode will be favored only in regions where the ratio of the plasma frequency to the electron cyclotron frequency is greater than or approximately equal to 0.3, that is, where the X mode radiation is suppressed. If the fraction of the radiation generated that crosses the cyclotron layer is large, then the argument in favor of the loss cone driven cyclotron maser as the source of the observed Z mode radiation is a strong one. The spatial growth rates are fairly large in comparison with those for the X mode, and there seems to be little doubt that Z mode radiation should be generated under conditions that differ only slightly from those for the generation of X mode radiation in AKR.

  18. The influence of culture conditions on vasculitis and anaphylactoid shock induced by fungal pathogen Candida albicans cell wall extract in mice.

    PubMed

    Tada, Rui; Nagi-Miura, Noriko; Adachi, Yoshiyuki; Ohno, Naohito

    2008-05-01

    To explore whether Candida cell wall mannan is responsible for induction of vasculitis similar to Kawasaki syndrome and anaphylactoid shock in mice, we examined the biological effects of various mannan structures from Candida cell wall extracts prepared using various culture conditions. Intraperitoneal injection of 3 of 4 Candida cell wall extracts dramatically induced coronary arteritis and acute anaphylactoid shock in mice; only the cell wall extract derived from YPD medium culture at 27 degrees C had no toxic effect. It is of note that these biological effects depended on culture conditions around the cells such as culture temperature and media. These conditions lead to the structural rearrangement of cell wall mannan as confirmed by reactivity against antisera and NMR spectroscopy. Since the expression of beta-1,2-linked mannan varies dramatically between biologically active and inactive mannan, beta-1,2-linked mannan might negatively affect Candida cell wall extract-induced coronary arteritis and acute anaphylactoid shock in mice. Our findings indicate that Candida cell wall mannan might contribute to coronary arteritis and acute shock, and that an alteration of mannan structure could be responsible for Candida pathogenicity.

  19. An atmospheric pressure flow reactor: Gas phase kinetics and mechanism in tropospheric conditions without wall effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steven L.; Davis, Dennis D.; Hansen, Merrill

    1988-01-01

    A new type of gas phase flow reactor, designed to permit the study of gas phase reactions near 1 atm of pressure, is described. A general solution to the flow/diffusion/reaction equations describing reactor performance under pseudo-first-order kinetic conditions is presented along with a discussion of critical reactor parameters and reactor limitations. The results of numerical simulations of the reactions of ozone with monomethylhydrazine and hydrazine are discussed, and performance data from a prototype flow reactor are presented.

  20. Silica-coated multi-walled carbon nanotubes impregnated with polyethyleneimine for carbon dioxide capture under the flue gas condition

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Min-Sang; Park, Soo-Jin

    2015-03-15

    In this study, silica-coated multi-walled carbon nanotubes impregnated with polyethyleneimine (PEI) were prepared via a two-step process: (i) hydrolysis of tetraethylorthosilicate onto multi-walled carbon nanotubes, and (ii) impregnation of PEI. The adsorption properties of CO{sub 2} were investigated using CO{sub 2} adsorption–desorption isotherms at 298 K and thermogravimetric analysis under the flue gas condition (15% CO{sub 2}/85% N{sub 2}). The results obtained in this study indicate that CO{sub 2} adsorption increases after impregnation of PEI. The increase in CO{sub 2} capture was attributed to the affinity between CO{sub 2} and the amine groups. CO{sub 2} adsorption–desorption experiments, which were repeated five times, also showed that the prepared adsorbents have excellent regeneration properties. - Graphical abstract: Fabrication and CO{sub 2} adsorption process of the S-MWCNTs impregnated with PEI. - Highlights: • Silica coated-MWCNT impregnated with PEI was synthesized. • Amine groups of PEI gave CO{sub 2} affinity sites on MWCNT surfaces. • The S-MWCNT/PEI(50) exhibited the highest CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity.

  1. Evaluation of equilibrium turbulence for a hypersonic boundary layer at nonadiabatic wall conditions. M.S. Thesis - Old Dominion Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albertson, Cindy W.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental study to characterize the naturally developing compressible turbulent boundary layer produced along a flat plate measuring 9.7 feet long in the NASA Langley 8-Foot High Temperature Tunnel and to determine the test conditions necessary to achieve equilibrium turbulence. The measurements consist of pitot pressure, static pressure, and total temperature distributions in the boundary layer. In addition, surface measurements consisting of heat transfer and pressure distributions were obtained. The tests were conducted at a nominal free-stream Mach number of 6.5, total temperatures of 2700 and 3300 R, and angles of attack of 5 and 13 degrees. The corresponding nominal boundary-layer edge Mach numbers were 6.2 and 5.0. The nominal ratios of adiabatic wall temperature to cold wall temperature were 4.4 and 5.4 and the momentum thickness Reynolds numbers at the boundary layer probe locations ranged from 400 to 7800. The results of this study indicate that momentum thickness Reynolds numbers of at least 4000 are required to obtain an equilibrium turbulent boundary layer in the Langley 8-Foot High Temperature Tunnel. This evaluation is based primarily on the behavior of shape factors inferred from the boundary-layer measurements.

  2. An adjoint view on flux consistency and strong wall boundary conditions to the Navier–Stokes equations

    SciTech Connect

    Stück, Arthur

    2015-11-15

    Inconsistent discrete expressions in the boundary treatment of Navier–Stokes solvers and in the definition of force objective functionals can lead to discrete-adjoint boundary treatments that are not a valid representation of the boundary conditions to the corresponding adjoint partial differential equations. The underlying problem is studied for an elementary 1D advection–diffusion problem first using a node-centred finite-volume discretisation. The defect of the boundary operators in the inconsistently defined discrete-adjoint problem leads to oscillations and becomes evident with the additional insight of the continuous-adjoint approach. A homogenisation of the discretisations for the primal boundary treatment and the force objective functional yields second-order functional accuracy and eliminates the defect in the discrete-adjoint boundary treatment. Subsequently, the issue is studied for aerodynamic Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes problems in conjunction with a standard finite-volume discretisation on median-dual grids and a strong implementation of noslip walls, found in many unstructured general-purpose flow solvers. Going out from a base-line discretisation of force objective functionals which is independent of the boundary treatment in the flow solver, two improved flux-consistent schemes are presented; based on either body wall-defined or farfield-defined control-volumes they resolve the dual inconsistency. The behaviour of the schemes is investigated on a sequence of grids in 2D and 3D.

  3. A Comprehensive Modelling Approach for the Neutral Atmospheric Boundary Layer: Consistent Inflow Conditions, Wall Function and Turbulence Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parente, Alessandro; Gorlé, Catherine; van Beeck, Jeroen; Benocci, Carlo

    2011-09-01

    We report on a novel approach for the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) modelling of the neutral atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), using the standard k-{\\varepsilon} turbulence model. A new inlet condition for turbulent kinetic energy is analytically derived from the solution of the k-{\\varepsilon} model transport equations, resulting in a consistent set of fully developed inlet conditions for the neutral ABL. A modification of the standard k-{\\varepsilon} model is also employed to ensure consistency between the inlet conditions and the turbulence model. In particular, the turbulence model constant C μ is generalized as a location-dependent parameter, and a source term is introduced in the transport equation for the turbulent dissipation rate. The application of the proposed methodology to cases involving obstacles in the flow is made possible through the implementation of an algorithm, which automatically switches the turbulence model formulation when going from the region where the ABL is undisturbed to the region directly affected by the building. Finally, the model is completed with a slightly modified version of the Richards and Hoxey rough-wall boundary condition. The methodology is implemented and tested in the commercial code Ansys Fluent 12.1. Results are presented for a neutral boundary layer over flat terrain and for the flow around a single building immersed in an ABL.

  4. Target foil rupture scenario and provision for handling different models of medical cyclotrons used in India

    PubMed Central

    Shaiju, V. S.; Sharma, S. D.; Kumar, Rajesh; Sarin, B.

    2009-01-01

    Medical cyclotron is a particle accelerator used in producing short lived radiotracers such as 18F, 11C, 15O, 13N etc. These radiotracers are labeled with suitable pharmaceuticals for use to gather information related to metabolic activity of the cell using Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scan. Target foil rupture is considered one of the major emergency situations during medical cyclotron operations because there is a potential of over exposure to the working personnel. Radiation protection survey of a self-shielded medical cyclotron installation was carried out during normal and emergency conditions. It is found that the induced activity in the target foil increases with its successive usages. As a case study, we have evaluated the emergency handling procedures of GE PETtrace-6 medical cyclotron. Recommendations have also been made to reduce personal exposure while handling the target foil rupture condition such as the use of L-Bench near the target area and participation of experienced personnel. PMID:20098564

  5. Target foil rupture scenario and provision for handling different models of medical cyclotrons used in India.

    PubMed

    Shaiju, V S; Sharma, S D; Kumar, Rajesh; Sarin, B

    2009-07-01

    Medical cyclotron is a particle accelerator used in producing short lived radiotracers such as (18)F, (11)C, (15)O, (13)N etc. These radiotracers are labeled with suitable pharmaceuticals for use to gather information related to metabolic activity of the cell using Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scan. Target foil rupture is considered one of the major emergency situations during medical cyclotron operations because there is a potential of over exposure to the working personnel. Radiation protection survey of a self-shielded medical cyclotron installation was carried out during normal and emergency conditions. It is found that the induced activity in the target foil increases with its successive usages. As a case study, we have evaluated the emergency handling procedures of GE PETtrace-6 medical cyclotron. Recommendations have also been made to reduce personal exposure while handling the target foil rupture condition such as the use of L-Bench near the target area and participation of experienced personnel.

  6. Electrical and mechanical properties as a processing condition in polyvinylchloride multi walled carbon nanotube composites.

    PubMed

    Song, Byung Ju; Ahn, Jin Woo; Cho, Kwon Koo; Roh, Jae Seung; Lee, Dong Yun; Yang, Yong Suk; Lee, Jae Beom; Hwang, Dae Youn; Kim, Hye Sung

    2013-11-01

    We investigated the electrical conductivity (sigma) and mechanical property of polyvinylchloride/carbon nanotube composites as a function of the CNT content and processing time during a solid-state process of high speed vibration mixing (HSVM) and high energy ball milling (HEBM). Both processes were suggested to avoid high temperatures, solvents, chemical modification of carbon nanotubes. In this study, the percolation threshold (phi(c)) for electrical conduction is about 1 wt% CNT with a sigma value of 0.21 S/m, and the electrical conductivity is higher value than that reported by other researchers from melt mixing process or obtained from the other solid-state processes. We found that the dispersion of CNTs and morphology change from CNT breaking are closely related to sigma. Especially, a large morphology change in the CNTs was occurred at the specific processing time, and a significant decrease in the electrical conductivity of polyvinylchloride/carbon nanotube composite occurred in this condition. A meaningful increase of electrical properties and mechanical property is observed in the sample with about 1-2 wt% CNT contents sintered at 200 degrees C after the milling for 20 min by HEBM process. Our study indicates the proper process condition required to improve sigma of PVC/CNT composites.

  7. 30-cm electron cyclotron plasma generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goede, Hank

    1987-01-01

    Experimental results on the development of a 30-cm-diam electron cyclotron resonance plasma generator are presented. This plasma source utilizes samarium-cobalt magnets and microwave power at a frequency of 4.9 GHz to produce a uniform plasma with densities of up to 3 x 10 to the 11th/cu cm in a continuous fashion. The plasma generator contains no internal structures, and is thus inherently simple in construction and operation and inherently durable. The generator was operated with two different magnetic geometries. One used the rare-earth magnets arranged in an axial line cusp configuration, which directly showed plasma production taking place near the walls of the generator where the electron temperature was highest but with the plasma density peaking in the central low B-field regions. The second configuration had magnets arranged to form azimuthal line cusps with approximately closed electron drift surfaces; this configuration showed an improved electrical efficiency of about 135 eV/ion.

  8. Preliminary Results Of Hydrodynamic Responses To Ship Movements And Weather Conditions Along The Coastal Walls Of Shallow Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acar, Dursun; Alpar, Bedri; Cagatay, Namık; Ozeren, Sinan; Sarı, Erol; Eris, Kadir; Vardar, Denizhan; Arslan, Tugce; Basegmez, Koray

    2016-04-01

    Water-level variations in coastal areas and shallow channels take place under the influence of more complex factors, compared to those in deeper areas. Atmospheric pressure, wind, and wave interactions with bottom morphological characteristics are some important natural features while human-induced factors are usually maritime traffic and manoeuvres the ships. While weather conditions cause long-term changes in water level, water level interactions in near shore areas, can occur very quickly depending on the ship manoeuvres and squat characteristics, and these rapid changes can lead to unpredictable water level lowering. Such rapid changes may cause various dangerous incidents and ship accidents, particularly in areas where rapid water oscillations occur. Improper calculations of propulsion power or orientation of the ship body, especially in the areas where geological and morphological characteristics permit fast water movements, are the most important additional causes of accidents due to sudden water level decreases. For an example, even though a 200-m-long vessel can complete its 35° rotation in a circular area with radius of 250 m, if it is calm and sufficiently deep, this diameter increases 5 times at the shallow waters also depending on the hydrodynamic flow conditions. In 2005, "Gerardus Mercator" has bumped into the inside bottom wall of the channel with a low speed (4 knots) turn of when she had just made a 200° turn. Seven years later the cruise ship "Costa Concordia" struck a rock, before she drifted and grounded, in the calm seas of the coast of Isola del Giglio in Italy, due to a combined effects of waves generated by side waves of ship manoeuvres, atmospheric pressure and squat specifications as well. The waves reflected from the seawalls complicate the navigation problems which should be examined in detail. Thus, three prototype models with various angular seawall features were prepared, simple in shape with perpendicular and sloped seawalls with

  9. Influences of rotation and thermophoresis on MHD peristaltic transport of Jeffrey fluid with convective conditions and wall properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, T.; Rafiq, M.; Ahmad, B.

    2016-07-01

    This article aims to predict the effects of convective condition and particle deposition on peristaltic transport of Jeffrey fluid in a channel. The whole system is in a rotating frame of reference. The walls of channel are taken flexible. The fluid is electrically conducting in the presence of uniform magnetic field. Non-uniform heat source/sink parameter is also considered. Mass transfer with chemical reaction is considered. Relevant equations for the problems under consideration are first modeled and then simplified using lubrication approach. Resulting equations for stream function and temperature are solved exactly whereas mass transfer equation is solved numerically. Impacts of various involved parameters appearing in the solutions are carefully analyzed.

  10. Interpopulational Variations in Sexual Chemical Signals of Iberian Wall Lizards May Allow Maximizing Signal Efficiency under Different Climatic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Sexual signals used in intraspecific communication are expected to evolve to maximize efficacy under a given climatic condition. Thus, chemical secretions of lizards might evolve in the evolutionary time to ensure that signals are perfectly tuned to local humidity and temperature conditions affecting their volatility and therefore their persistence and transmission through the environment. We tested experimentally whether interpopulational altitudinal differences in chemical composition of femoral gland secretions of male Iberian wall lizards (Podarcis hispanicus) have evolved to maximize efficacy of chemical signals in different environmental conditions. Chemical analyses first showed that the characteristics of chemical signals of male lizards differed between two populations inhabiting environments with different climatic conditions in spite of the fact that these two populations are closely related genetically. We also examined experimentally whether the temporal attenuation of the chemical stimuli depended on simulated climatic conditions. Thus, we used tongue-flick essays to test whether female lizards were able to detect male scent marks maintained under different conditions of temperature and humidity by chemosensory cues alone. Chemosensory tests showed that chemical signals of males had a lower efficacy (i.e. detectability and persistence) when temperature and dryness increase, but that these effects were more detrimental for signals of the highest elevation population, which occupies naturally colder and more humid environments. We suggest that the abiotic environment may cause a selective pressure on the form and expression of sexual chemical signals. Therefore, interpopulational differences in chemical profiles of femoral secretions of male P. hispanicus lizards may reflect adaptation to maximize the efficacy of the chemical signal in different climates. PMID:26121693

  11. Interpopulational Variations in Sexual Chemical Signals of Iberian Wall Lizards May Allow Maximizing Signal Efficiency under Different Climatic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Martín, José; Ortega, Jesús; López, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    Sexual signals used in intraspecific communication are expected to evolve to maximize efficacy under a given climatic condition. Thus, chemical secretions of lizards might evolve in the evolutionary time to ensure that signals are perfectly tuned to local humidity and temperature conditions affecting their volatility and therefore their persistence and transmission through the environment. We tested experimentally whether interpopulational altitudinal differences in chemical composition of femoral gland secretions of male Iberian wall lizards (Podarcis hispanicus) have evolved to maximize efficacy of chemical signals in different environmental conditions. Chemical analyses first showed that the characteristics of chemical signals of male lizards differed between two populations inhabiting environments with different climatic conditions in spite of the fact that these two populations are closely related genetically. We also examined experimentally whether the temporal attenuation of the chemical stimuli depended on simulated climatic conditions. Thus, we used tongue-flick essays to test whether female lizards were able to detect male scent marks maintained under different conditions of temperature and humidity by chemosensory cues alone. Chemosensory tests showed that chemical signals of males had a lower efficacy (i.e. detectability and persistence) when temperature and dryness increase, but that these effects were more detrimental for signals of the highest elevation population, which occupies naturally colder and more humid environments. We suggest that the abiotic environment may cause a selective pressure on the form and expression of sexual chemical signals. Therefore, interpopulational differences in chemical profiles of femoral secretions of male P. hispanicus lizards may reflect adaptation to maximize the efficacy of the chemical signal in different climates.

  12. Modifications of impurity transport and divertor sources by lithium wall conditioning in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Scotti, Filippo

    2014-01-01

    In the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX), lithium coatings are evaporated on graphite plasma facing components (PFCs) for wall conditioning. In lithium-conditioned H-mode discharges, carbon accumulation is observed with core concentrations <10%, leading to a lack of density control, while lithium ions have concentrations <0.1%. In this thesis, modifications of carbon and lithium divertor sources as well as scrape-off layer (SOL) and core transport due to lithium conditioning are studied. Spectroscopic impurity influxes (measured by filtered cameras) and 2D multi-fluid edge transport simulations via the UEDGE code are employed to study divertor impurity sources and SOL transport, respectively. Core transport of carbon and lithium is analyzed using the impurity transport code MIST and the neoclassical transport codes NEO and NCLASS. A reduction of the carbon sputtering yield in the lower divertor is observed with lithium evaporation. However, weaker divertor impurity retention resulting from reduced recycling (inferred from UEDGE simulations) and the possible importance of wall sources can counteract this reduction in divertor carbon influxes. The suppression of edge-localized-modes (ELMs) is the primary cause of the increased carbon inventories in lithium-conditioned discharges, leading to lack of density control. Deviations from neoclassical predictions for carbon transport are observed at the pedestal top in lithium-conditioned discharges, indicating the presence of anomalous outward convection. While the lithium sputtering yield from lithium-coated graphite in the divertor is consistent with physical and temperature-enhanced sputtering, a strong reduction in ionized lithium influxes is observed, possibly due to prompt re-deposition. The different poloidal source distribution and the stronger divertor retention for lithium (inferred from UEDGE simulations) contribute to a lower edge lithium source with respect to carbon. The latter is due to the shorter

  13. Prediction of Bubble Diameter at Detachment from a Wall Orifice in Liquid Cross Flow Under Reduced and Normal Gravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahra, Henry K.; Kamotani, Y.

    2003-01-01

    Bubble formation and detachment is an integral part of the two-phase flow science. The objective of the present work is to theoretically investigate the effects of liquid cross-flow velocity, gas flow rate embodied in the momentum flux force, and orifice diameter on bubble formation in a wall-bubble injection configuration. A two-dimensional one-stage theoretical model based on a global force balance on the bubble evolving from a wall orifice in a cross liquid flow is presented in this work. In this model, relevant forces acting on the evolving bubble are expressed in terms of the bubble center of mass coordinates and solved simultaneously. Relevant forces in low gravity included the momentum flux, shear-lift, surface tension, drag and inertia forces. Under normal gravity conditions, the buoyancy force, which is dominant under such conditions, can be added to the force balance. Two detachment criteria were applicable depending on the gas to liquid momentum force ratio. For low ratios, the time when the bubble acceleration in the direction of the detachment angle is greater or equal to zero is calculated from the bubble x and y coordinates. This time is taken as the time at which all the detaching forces that are acting on the bubble are greater or equal to the attaching forces. For high gas to liquid momentum force ratios, the time at which the y coordinate less the bubble radius equals zero is calculated. The bubble diameter is evaluated at this time as the diameter at detachment from the fact that the bubble volume is simply given by the product of the gas flow rate and time elapsed. Comparison of the model s predictions was also made with predictions from a two-dimensional normal gravity model based on Kumar-Kuloor formulation and such a comparison is presented in this work.

  14. Lawrence's Legacy : Seaborg's Cyclotron - The 88-Inch Cyclotron turns 40

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahan, Margaret; Clark, David

    2003-04-01

    In 1958, Sputnik had recently been launched by the Russians, leading to worry in Congress and increased funding for science and technology. Ernest Lawrence was director of the "Rad Lab" at Berkeley. Another Nobel Prize winner, Glenn Seaborg, was Associate Laboratory Director and Director of the Nuclear Chemistry Division. In this atmosphere, Lawrence was phoned by commissioners of the Atomic Energy Commission and asked what they could do for Seaborg, "because he did such a fine job of setting up the chemistry for extracting plutonium from spent reactor fuel" [1]. In this informal way, the 90-Inch (eventually 88-Inch) Cyclotron became a line item in the federal budget at a cost of 3M (later increased to 5M). The 88-Inch Cyclotron achieved first internal beam on Dec. 12, 1961 and first external beam in May 1962. Forty years later it is still going strong. Pieced together from interviews with the retirees who built it, Rad Lab reports and archives from the Seaborg and Lawrence collections, the story of its design and construction - on-time and under-budget - provides a glimpse into the early days of big science. [1] remarks made by Elmer Kelly, "Physicist-in-charge' of the project on the occasion of the 40th anniversary celebration.

  15. The Warsaw K=160 cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choinski, J.; Miszczak, J.; Sura, J.

    2001-12-01

    The overview of the Warsaw cyclotron facility is presented. The facility consists of K=160 cyclotron, 10 GHz ECR ion source, and several experimental stations. The cyclotron is of compact design with 2 straight dees. A yearly operation time is about 2900 hours on an average for the past few years. The cyclotron can deliver beams up to Ar with energy up to 10 MeV/amu to the experimental area. Experimental stations are: 1) The multidetector OSIRIS II, allows the study of exotic nuclei in the double magic 100Sn region. The experimental set-up consists of 8 HPGe detectors equipped with charged particle 4π multiplicity filter SiBall, 50 elements BGO γ-rays multiplicity filter, 4 sector polarimeter and electron conversion detector system. 2) CUDAC-Coulomb Universal Detector Scattering Chamber-an array of PIN-diodes in connection with HPGe detectors and the computer data analysis package GOSIA, maintained by the Laboratory allows investigation the Coulomb Excitation (COULEX) reactions. 3) IGISOL or Helium-jet transport system opened investigation of the reaction products by means of the online mass separator with ion-guide system. The system uses the Scandinavian-type mass separator built in INR Świerk, Poland. 4) Giant Dipole Resonance studies using experimental set-up JANOSIK developed for the detection of high-energy photons emitted in heavy-ion collisions. The set-up consists of a large NaI(Tl) detector (25 cm×29 cm) surrounded by shields: passive lead shield, active anticoincidence plastic shield and LiH shield to absorb neutrons, and a multiplicity filter of 32 small scintillator detectors (BaF2 and NaI(Tl)). 5) Laser spectroscopy stand now in test phase. The laser spectroscopy group at HIL has completed an equipment consisting of Argon ion Laser Innova 400-25W in all lines and coherent Ring Laser 669-21 as well as atomic beam apparatus.

  16. Influence of surface heating condition on local heat transfer in a rotating square channel with smooth walls and radial outward flow

    SciTech Connect

    Han, J.C.; Zhang, Y.M. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Lee, C.P. )

    1994-01-01

    The effect of a surface heating condition on the local heat transfer coefficient in a rotating square channel with smooth walls and radial outward flow was investigated for Reynolds numbers from 2,500 to 25,000 and rotation numbers from 0 to 0.352. The square channel, composed of six isolated copper sections, has a length-to-hydraulic diameter ratio of 12. The mean rotating radius to the channel hydraulic diameter ratio is kept at a constant value of 30. Four surface heating conditions were tested: (1) four walls at uniform temperature, (2) temperature ratio of leading surface to side wall and trailing surface to side wall is 1.05 and 1.10, respectively, (3) trailing surface hot and remaining three walls cold, and (4) leading surface not and remaining three walls cold. The results show that the heat transfer coefficients on the leading surface are much lower than that of the trailing surface due to rotation. For case (1) of four walls at uniform temperature, the leading surface heat transfer coefficient decreases and then increases with increasing rotation numbers, and the trailing surface heat transfer coefficient increases monotonically with rotation numbers. However, the trailing surface heat transfer coefficients for cases (2) and (3) are slightly lower than case (1), and the leading surface heat transfer coefficients for cases (2) and (4) are significantly higher than for case (1). The results suggest that the local wall heating condition creates the local buoyancy forces, which reduce the effects of the bulk buoyancy and Coriolis forces. Therefore, the local heat transfer coefficients on the leading and trailing surfaces are altered by the surface local heating condition.

  17. Cyclotron in the Materials and Stresses Building

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1976-11-21

    Researchers check the cyclotron in the Materials and Stresses Building at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Lewis Research Center. The Materials and Stresses Building, built in 1949, contained a number of laboratories to test the strength, diffusion, and other facets of materials. The materials could be subjected to high temperatures, high stresses, corrosion, irradiation, and hot gasses. The Physics of Solids Laboratory included a cyclotron, cloud chamber, helium cryostat, and metallurgy cave. The cyclotron was built in the early 1950s to test the effects of radiation on different materials so that the proper materials could be used to construct a nuclear aircraft engine and other components. By the late 1950s, the focus had shifted to similar studies for rockets. NASA cancelled its entire nuclear program in January 1973, and the cyclotron was mothballed. In 1975 the Cleveland Clinic Foundation partnered with NASA Lewis to use the cyclotron to treat cancer patients with a new type of radiation therapy. The cyclotron split beryllium atoms which caused neutrons to be released. The neutrons were streamed directly at the patient’s tumor. Over the course of five years, the cyclotron was used to treat 1200 patients. The program was terminated in 1980 as the Clinic shifted its efforts to concentrate on non-radiation treatments. The Lewis cyclotron was mothballed for a number of years before being demolished.

  18. Recent development and progress of IBA cyclotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleeven, W.; Abs, M.; Delvaux, J. L.; Forton, E.; Jongen, Y.; Medeiros Romao, L.; Nactergal, B.; Nuttens, V.; Servais, T.; Vanderlinden, T.; Zaremba, S.

    2011-12-01

    Several cyclotron development projects were recently realized by Ion Beam Applications S.A. (IBA). This contribution presents three of them: (i) the intensity enhancement of the Cyclone 30 cyclotron, a machine mainly used for the production of SPECT isotopes. This project is related with the increased demand for 201Tl because of the shortage of Mo/Tc generators from nuclear reactors, (ii) development of a new versatile multiple-particle K = 30 isotope-production cyclotron (the Cyclone 30XP) being able to accelerate H -, D - and also α-particles. The α-beam of this cyclotron will allow the production of new therapeutic isotopes (e.g. 211At) and (iii) commissioning of the Cyclone 70 cyclotron installed for Arronax in France. This machine is similar to the C30XP but provides higher energy ( K = 70) and allows research on new types of medical isotopes.

  19. Formation of cyclotron lines in gamma-ray burst spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, S. G.; Meszaros, P.

    1989-01-01

    A transmission model of gamma-ray burst sources is studied using the relativistic QED magnetic-resonant opacities including multiple photon scattering, incorporated into a discrete-ordinate radiative-transport scheme. The physics of the cyclotron line-producing region is discussed in general, and the expected line profiles, relative harmonic strengths, and polarizations are indicated under various conditions. The calculated spectra for these models show good agreement with the spectra reported from Ginga for GB 880205 and GB 870303.

  20. K-130 Cyclotron vacuum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, R. C.; Bhattacharya, S.; Bhole, R. B.; Roy, Anindya; Pal, Sarbajit; Mallik, C.; Bhandari, R. K.

    2012-11-01

    The vacuum system for K-130 cyclotron has been operational since 1977. It consists of two sub-systems, main vacuum system and beam line vacuum system. The main vacuum system is designed to achieve and maintain vacuum of about 1 × 10-6 mbar inside the 23 m3 volume of acceleration chamber comprising the Resonator tank and the Dee tank. The beam line vacuum system is required for transporting the extracted beam with minimum loss. These vacuum systems consist of diffusion pumps backed by mechanical pumps like roots and rotary pumps. The large vacuum pumps and valves of the cyclotron vacuum system were operational for more than twenty five years. In recent times, problems of frequent failures and maintenance were occurring due to aging and lack of appropriate spares. Hence, modernisation of the vacuum systems was taken up in order to ensure a stable high voltage for radio frequency system and the extraction system. This is required for efficient acceleration and transportation of high intensity ion beam. The vacuum systems have been upgraded by replacing several pumps, valves, gauges and freon units. The relay based control system for main vacuum system has also been replaced by PLC based state of the art control system. The upgraded control system enables inclusion of additional operational logics and safety interlocks into the system. The paper presents the details of the vacuum system and describes the modifications carried out for improving the performance and reliability of the vacuum system.

  1. Method and apparatus for preventing cyclotron breakdown in partially evacuated waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Moeller, Charles P.

    1987-01-01

    Cyclotron breakdown is prevented in a partially evacuated waveguide by providing a section of waveguide having an axial cut therein in order to apply a potential across the two halves of the waveguide. This section is positioned in the waveguide crossing the area of electron cyclotron resonance. The potential applied across the waveguide halves is used to deflect seed electrons into the wall of the waveguide in order to prevent ionization of gas molecules and creation of more electron ion pairs which would result in cyclotron breakdown. Support means is also disclosed for electrically isolating the waveguide halves and transition means is provided between the section of the waveguide with the axial cut and the solid waveguide at either end thereof.

  2. The Plant Cell Wall: A Complex and Dynamic Structure As Revealed by the Responses of Genes under Stress Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Houston, Kelly; Tucker, Matthew R.; Chowdhury, Jamil; Shirley, Neil; Little, Alan

    2016-01-01

    The plant cell wall has a diversity of functions. It provides a structural framework to support plant growth and acts as the first line of defense when the plant encounters pathogens. The cell wall must also retain some flexibility, such that when subjected to developmental, biotic, or abiotic stimuli it can be rapidly remodeled in response. Genes encoding enzymes capable of synthesizing or hydrolyzing components of the plant cell wall show differential expression when subjected to different stresses, suggesting they may facilitate stress tolerance through changes in cell wall composition. In this review we summarize recent genetic and transcriptomic data from the literature supporting a role for specific cell wall-related genes in stress responses, in both dicot and monocot systems. These studies highlight that the molecular signatures of cell wall modification are often complex and dynamic, with multiple genes appearing to respond to a given stimulus. Despite this, comparisons between publically available datasets indicate that in many instances cell wall-related genes respond similarly to different pathogens and abiotic stresses, even across the monocot-dicot boundary. We propose that the emerging picture of cell wall remodeling during stress is one that utilizes a common toolkit of cell wall-related genes, multiple modifications to cell wall structure, and a defined set of stress-responsive transcription factors that regulate them. PMID:27559336

  3. Excitation of low frequency waves by streaming ions via anomalous cyclotron resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, C. S.; Dillenburg, D.; Gaffey, J. D., Jr.; Ziebell, L. F.; Goedert, J.; Freund, H. P.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of a small population of streaming ions on low-frequency waves with frequencies below the ion cyclotron frequency is analyzed for three modes of interest: Alfven waves, magnetosonic waves, and ion-cyclotron waves. The instability mechanism is the anomalous cyclotron resonance of the waves with the streaming ions. Conditions for excitation of the three types of waves are derived and expressions for the growth rates are obtained. Excitation of Alfven waves is possible even if the ratio of the densities of the streaming ions to the thermal ions is very small. For magnetosonic waves, excitation can easily occur if waves are propagating parallel or nearly parallel to the ambient magnetic field. As for ion-cyclotron waves, it is found that for the ion-whistler branch the excitation is suppressed over a broader range of wave frequencies than for the fast magnetosonic branch.

  4. Optimal conditions for decorating outer surface of single-walled carbon nanotubes with RecA proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oura, Shusuke; Umemura, Kazuo

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we estimated the optimal reaction conditions for decorating the outer surface of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with RecA proteins by comparison with hybrids of RecA and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). To react SWNTs with RecA proteins, we first prepared ssDNA-SWNT hybrids. The heights of the ssDNA-SWNT hybrids increased as the amount of RecA used in the reaction increased, as determined from atomic force microscopy images. We further confirmed the increasing adsorption of RecA proteins onto ssDNA on SWNT surfaces by agarose gel electrophoresis. These results suggest that the combination of RecA proteins and ssDNA-SWNT hybrids forms RecA-ssDNA-SWNT hybrids. We also successfully controlled the amount of RecA adsorbed on the ssDNA-SWNT hybrids. Our results thus indicate the optimized reaction conditions for decorating the outer surface of SWNTs with RecA proteins, which is the key to the development of novel biosensors and nanomaterial-based bioelectronics.

  5. Effect of Commercial Enzymes on Berry Cell Wall Deconstruction in the Context of Intravineyard Ripeness Variation under Winemaking Conditions.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yu; Fangel, Jonatan U; Willats, William G T; Vivier, Melané A; Moore, John P

    2016-05-18

    Significant intravineyard variation in grape berry ripening occurs within vines and between vines. However, no cell wall data are available on such variation. Here we used a checkerboard panel design to investigate ripening variation in pooled grape bunches for enzyme-assisted winemaking. The vineyard was dissected into defined panels, which were selected for winemaking with or without enzyme addition. Cell wall material was prepared and subjected to high-throughput profiling combined with multivariate data analysis. The study showed that significant ripening-related variation was present at the berry cell wall polymer level and occurred within the experimental vineyard block. Furthemore, all enzyme treatments reduced cell wall variation via depectination. Interestingly, cell wall esterification levels were unaffected by enzyme treatments. This study provides clear evidence that enzymes can positively influence the consistency of winemaking and provides a foundation for further research into the relationship between grape berry cell wall architecture and enzyme formulations.

  6. Influence of injection beam emittance on beam transmission efficiency in a cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurashima, Satoshi; Kashiwagi, Hirotsugu; Miyawaki, Nobumasa; Yoshida, Ken-Ichi; Okumura, Susumu

    2014-02-01

    The JAEA AVF cyclotron accelerates various kinds of high-energy ion beams for research in biotechnology and materials science. Beam intensities of an ion species of the order of 10-9-10-6 ampere are often required for various experiments performed sequentially over a day. To provide ion beams with sufficient intensity and stability, an operator has to retune an ion source in a short time. However, the beam intensity downstream of the cyclotron rarely increases in proportion to the intensity at the ion source. To understand the cause of this beam behavior, transmission efficiencies of a 12C5+ beam from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source to the cyclotron were measured for various conditions of the ion source. Moreover, a feasible region for acceleration in the emittance of the injection beam was clarified using a transverse-acceptance measuring system. We confirmed that the beam emittance and profile were changed depending on the condition of the ion source and that matching between the beam emittance and the acceptance of the cyclotron was degraded. However, after fine-tuning to improve the matching, beam intensity downstream of the cyclotron increased.

  7. Advanced Techniques for Neoclassical Tearing Mode Control by Electron Cyclotron Current Drive in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpe, F.

    2008-11-01

    Novel techniques have been developed in DIII-D for (1) control of rapidly rotating neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) and (2) control of NTMs that have locked to a residual error field or the resistive wall. Electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) has been successful at suppression of NTMs in present tokamaks, but will face new challenges in ITER where NTMs are expected to be more prone to locking. In order to avoid locking, rotating islands must be controlled at small widths that are expected to be narrower than the ECCD deposition. Under these conditions, modulated ECCD is predicted to stabilize more efficiently than continuous current drive. (1) A new technique developed at DIII-D detects the island using oblique electron cyclotron emission with a line of sight equivalent to that of the ECCD. This removes much of the uncertainty in mapping the island structure from the detector to the current drive location. This method was used both to measure the radial alignment between ECCD and the island, and to synchronize the modulation in phase with the island O-point, successfully stabilizing an NTM with mode numbers m/n=3/2. (2) If islands do grow large enough to lock, locked mode control will be necessary for recovery or avoiding disruption in ITER. A potential difficulty associated with locking is that the mode can lock in a position not necessarily accessible to ECCD. To obviate this problem, magnetic perturbations were used for the first time to unlock and reposition a locked m/n=2/1 mode in order to bring it in view of the gyrotron beam, leading to a significant reduction in island size. Once unlocked, magnetic perturbations were also used to sustain and control the mode rotation, which has the potential for easier ECCD modulation

  8. Cyclotrons: From Science to Human Health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craddock, Michael

    2011-04-01

    Lawrence's invention of the cyclotron, whose 80th anniversary we have just celebrated, not only revolutionized nuclear physics, but proved the starting point for a whole variety of recirculating accelerators, from the smallest microtron to the largest synchrotron, that have had an enormous impact in almost every branch of science and in several areas of medicine and industry. Cyclotrons themselves have proved remarkably adaptable, incorporating a variety of new ideas and technologies over the years: frequency modulation, edge focusing, AG focusing, separate magnet sectors, axial and azimuthal injection, ring geometries, stripping extraction, superconducting magnets and rf...... Even FFAGs, those most complex members of the cyclotron (fixed-magnetic-field) family, are making a comeback. Currently there are more than 50 medium or large cyclotrons around the world devoted to research. These provide intense primary beams of protons or stable ions, and correspondingly intense secondary beams of neutrons, pions, muons and radioactive ions, for experiments in nuclear, particle and condensed-matter physics, and in the materials and life sciences. Far outnumbering these, however, are the 800 or so small and medium cyclotrons used to produce radioisotopes for medical and other purposes. In addition, a rapidly growing number of 230-MeV proton cyclotrons are being built for cancer therapy -12 brought into operation since 1998 and as many more in the works. Altogether, cyclotrons are flourishing!

  9. LH wave absorption by mode conversion near ion cyclotron harmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, K.; Bers, A.; Fuchs, V.

    1981-02-01

    Numerical studies of the dispersion relation near the lower-hybrid frequency in an inhomogeneous plasma (..delta.. n, ..delta.. T, ..delta.. B) show that portions of an incident lower-hybrid wave spectrum undergo successive but partial mode conversions to warm-plasma waves in the presence of ion cyclotron harmonics. Wave absorption beyond the first mode conversion occurs near an ion cyclotron harmonic where ion Landau damping is enhanced. A second-order dispersion relation numerically in good agreement with the full dispersion relation in the mode conversion region is derived using the condition par. delta D/par. delta k = 0. The mode conversion efficiency at each confluence is evaluated by solving the corresponding differential equation.

  10. Electromagnetic ion beam instabilities - Growth at cyclotron harmonic wave numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Charles W.; Gary, S. Peter

    1987-01-01

    The linear theory of electromagnetic ion beam instabilities for arbitrary angles of propagation is studied, with an emphasis on the conditions necessary to generate unstable modes at low harmonics of the ion cyclotron resonance condition. The present results extend the analysis of Smith et al. (1985). That paper considered only the plasma parameters at a time during which harmonic wave modes were observed in the earth's foreshock. The parameters of that paper are used as the basis of parametric variations here to establish the range of beam properties which may give rise to observable harmonic spectra. It is shown that the growth rates of both left-hand and right-hand cyclotron harmonic instabilities are enhanced by an increase in the beam temperature anisotropy and/or the beam speed. Decreases in the beam density and/or the core-ion beta reduce the overall growth of the cyclotron harmonic instabilities but favor the growth of these modes over the growth of the nonresonant instability and thereby enhance the observability of the harmonics.

  11. Electromagnetic ion beam instabilities - Growth at cyclotron harmonic wave numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Charles W.; Gary, S. Peter

    1987-01-01

    The linear theory of electromagnetic ion beam instabilities for arbitrary angles of propagation is studied, with an emphasis on the conditions necessary to generate unstable modes at low harmonics of the ion cyclotron resonance condition. The present results extend the analysis of Smith et al. (1985). That paper considered only the plasma parameters at a time during which harmonic wave modes were observed in the earth's foreshock. The parameters of that paper are used as the basis of parametric variations here to establish the range of beam properties which may give rise to observable harmonic spectra. It is shown that the growth rates of both left-hand and right-hand cyclotron harmonic instabilities are enhanced by an increase in the beam temperature anisotropy and/or the beam speed. Decreases in the beam density and/or the core-ion beta reduce the overall growth of the cyclotron harmonic instabilities but favor the growth of these modes over the growth of the nonresonant instability and thereby enhance the observability of the harmonics.

  12. Electron cyclotron resonance plasma photosa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rácz, R.; Biri, S.; Pálinkás, J.

    2010-02-01

    In order to observe and study systematically the plasma of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources (ECRIS) we made a high number of high-resolution visible light plasma photos and movies in the ATOMKI ECRIS Laboratory. This required building the ECR ion source into an open ECR plasma device, temporarily. An 8MP digital camera was used to record photos of plasmas made from Ne, Ar, and Kr gases and from their mixtures. We studied and recorded the effect of ion source setting parameters (gas pressure, gas composition, magnetic field, and microwave power) to the shape, color, and structure of the plasma. The analysis of the photo series gave us many qualitative and numerous valuable physical information on the nature of ECR plasmas.

  13. Electron cyclotron resonance plasma photos.

    PubMed

    Rácz, R; Biri, S; Pálinkás, J

    2010-02-01

    In order to observe and study systematically the plasma of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources (ECRIS) we made a high number of high-resolution visible light plasma photos and movies in the ATOMKI ECRIS Laboratory. This required building the ECR ion source into an open ECR plasma device, temporarily. An 8MP digital camera was used to record photos of plasmas made from Ne, Ar, and Kr gases and from their mixtures. We studied and recorded the effect of ion source setting parameters (gas pressure, gas composition, magnetic field, and microwave power) to the shape, color, and structure of the plasma. The analysis of the photo series gave us many qualitative and numerous valuable physical information on the nature of ECR plasmas.

  14. Electron cyclotron resonance plasma photos

    SciTech Connect

    Racz, R.; Palinkas, J.; Biri, S.

    2010-02-15

    In order to observe and study systematically the plasma of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources (ECRIS) we made a high number of high-resolution visible light plasma photos and movies in the ATOMKI ECRIS Laboratory. This required building the ECR ion source into an open ECR plasma device, temporarily. An 8MP digital camera was used to record photos of plasmas made from Ne, Ar, and Kr gases and from their mixtures. We studied and recorded the effect of ion source setting parameters (gas pressure, gas composition, magnetic field, and microwave power) to the shape, color, and structure of the plasma. The analysis of the photo series gave us many qualitative and numerous valuable physical information on the nature of ECR plasmas.

  15. Accumulation of N-Acetylglucosamine Oligomers in the Plant Cell Wall Affects Plant Architecture in a Dose-Dependent and Conditional Manner1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Vanholme, Bartel; Vanholme, Ruben; Turumtay, Halbay; Goeminne, Geert; Cesarino, Igor; Goubet, Florence; Morreel, Kris; Rencoret, Jorge; Bulone, Vincent; Hooijmaijers, Cortwa; De Rycke, Riet; Gheysen, Godelieve; Ralph, John; De Block, Marc; Meulewaeter, Frank; Boerjan, Wout

    2014-01-01

    To study the effect of short N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) oligosaccharides on the physiology of plants, N-ACETYLGLUCOSAMINYLTRANSFERASE (NodC) of Azorhizobium caulinodans was expressed in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The corresponding enzyme catalyzes the polymerization of GlcNAc and, accordingly, β-1,4-GlcNAc oligomers accumulated in the plant. A phenotype characterized by difficulties in developing an inflorescence stem was visible when plants were grown for several weeks under short-day conditions before transfer to long-day conditions. In addition, a positive correlation between the oligomer concentration and the penetrance of the phenotype was demonstrated. Although NodC overexpression lines produced less cell wall compared with wild-type plants under nonpermissive conditions, no indications were found for changes in the amount of the major cell wall polymers. The effect on the cell wall was reflected at the transcriptome level. In addition to genes encoding cell wall-modifying enzymes, a whole set of genes encoding membrane-coupled receptor-like kinases were differentially expressed upon GlcNAc accumulation, many of which encoded proteins with an extracellular Domain of Unknown Function26. Although stress-related genes were also differentially expressed, the observed response differed from that of a classical chitin response. This is in line with the fact that the produced chitin oligomers were too small to activate the chitin receptor-mediated signal cascade. Based on our observations, we propose a model in which the oligosaccharides modify the architecture of the cell wall by acting as competitors in carbohydrate-carbohydrate or carbohydrate-protein interactions, thereby affecting noncovalent interactions in the cell wall or at the interface between the cell wall and the plasma membrane. PMID:24664205

  16. Cyclotron resonance absorption in ionospheric plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villalon, Elena

    1991-04-01

    The mode conversion of ordinary polarized electromagnetic waves into electrostatic cyclotron waves in the inhomogeneous ionospheric plasma is investigated. Near resonance the warm plasma dispersion relation is a function of the angle theta between the geomagnetic field and the density gradient and of the wave frequency omega, which lies between the electron cyclotron frequency and its doubling. The differential equations describing the electric field amplitudes near the plasma resonance are studied, including damping at the second gyroharmonic. The energy transmission coefficients and power absorbed by the cyclotron waves are calculated. The vertical penetration of the plasma wave amplitudes is estimated using a WKB analysis of the wave equation.

  17. Combined complementary plasma diagnostics to characterize a 2f plasma with additional DC current with conditioning effects at the chamber wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klick, Michael; Rothe, Ralf; Baek, Kye Hyun; Lee, Eunwoo

    2016-09-01

    Multiple frequencies and DC current used in a low-pressure plasma rf discharge result in an increased complexity. This needs plasma diagnostics applied, in particular in a plasma process chamber. That is done under manufacturing conditions which restrict the applicable plasma diagnostics to non-invasive methods with small footprint. So plasma chamber parameters, optical emission spectroscopy (OES), and self-excited electron spectroscopy (SEERS) are used to characterize the plasma and to understand chamber wall conditioning effects in an Ar plasma. The parameters are classified according to their origin--the region they are representative for. The center ion density is estimated from the DC current and compared to the SEERS electron density reflecting the electron density close to that at the chamber wall. The conditioning effects are caused by Si sputtering at a Si wafer changing the chamber wall state only when the chamber is clean, subsequent plasmas in the same chamber are not affected in that way. Through the combination of the complementary methods it can be shown that the chamber wall condition finally changes the radial plasma density distribution. Also the heating of electrons in the sheath is shown to be influenced by conditioning effects.

  18. Experimental and numerical assessment of normal heat flux first wall qualification mock-ups under ITER relevant conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, J.; Bürger, A.; Pintsuk, G.; Linke, J.; Loewenhoff, Th; Bellin, B.; Zacchia, F.; Eaton, R.; Mitteau, R.; Raffray, R.

    2014-04-01

    The ITER first wall (FW) panel consists of beryllium in the form of tiles covering its surface, high strength copper alloy as the heat sink material and stainless steel as the structural material. Small-scale normal heat flux FW mock-ups, provided by Fusion for Energy, are tested in the electron beam facility JUDITH 2 at Forschungszentrum Jülich to determine the performance of this design under thermal fatigue. The mock-ups are loaded cyclically under a surface heat flux of 2 MW m-2 with ITER relevant water coolant conditions. In this study, three-dimensional finite element method thermo-mechanical analyses are performed with ANSYS to simulate the thermal fatigue behaviour of the mock-ups. The temperature results indicate that the beryllium surface temperature is below the maximum allowed temperature (600 °C) of beryllium to be tested. The thermal mechanical results indicate that copper rupture and debonding between Be and copper are the drivers of the failure of a mock-up. In addition, the experimental data, e.g. the surface temperature measured using an infrared camera and the bulk temperature measured using thermocouples, are reported. A comparative study between experimental and simulation results is performed.

  19. Activity of Co-N multi walled carbon nanotubes electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction in acid conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osmieri, Luigi; Monteverde Videla, Alessandro H. A.; Specchia, Stefania

    2015-03-01

    Two catalysts are synthesized by wet impregnation of multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) with a complex formed between Co(II) ions and the nitrogen-containing molecule 2,4,6-tris(2-pyridyl)-1,3,5-triazine (TPTZ), followed by one or two identical heat treatments in N2 atmosphere at 800 °C for 3 h. Catalysts are fully characterized by FESEM, EDX, BET, XRD, FTIR, TGA, XPS analyses, and electrochemical techniques. The electrocatalytic activity towards oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) of the catalysts in acid conditions is assessed by means of a rotating disk electrode (RDE) apparatus and a specific type of cell equipped with a gas diffusion working electrode (GDE). In both testing approaches, the catalyst heat-treated twice (Co-N/MWCNT-2) exhibits higher electroactivity than the catalyst heat-treated once (Co-N/MWCNT-1). Chronoamperometries both in RDE and GDE cell are also performed, showing less electroactivity decay and better current performance for the catalyst heat-treated twice.

  20. The impact of extraction with a chelating agent under acidic conditions on the cell wall polymers of mango peel.

    PubMed

    Jamsazzadeh Kermani, Zahra; Shpigelman, Avi; Kyomugasho, Clare; Van Buggenhout, Sandy; Ramezani, Mohsen; Van Loey, Ann M; Hendrickx, Marc E

    2014-10-15

    The objective of this research was to evaluate whether mango peel is a potential source of functional cell wall polymers. To reach this objective, the native pectin polymers (NPP) extracted as alcohol insoluble residue from mango peel, were characterised in terms of uronic acid content, degree of methoxylation, neutral sugar content, and molar mass and compared to citric acid (pH 2.5, 2h at 80°C) extracted polymers, mimicking industrial pectin extraction conditions. Water-solubilised NPP were highly methoxylated having two populations with a Mw of 904 and 83kDa and a degree of methoxylation of 66%. Citric acid extraction with a yield higher than H2SO4 extraction resulted in a very branched pectin with an extremely high DM (83%) and a high molar mass. Comparing the Fourier Transform Infra-Red spectroscopy of extracted and native WSF showed that citric acid remained partially associated to the extracted pectin due to its chelating properties.

  1. Human Saphenous Vein Response to Trans-wall Oxygen Gradients in a Novel Ex Vivo Conditioning Platform.

    PubMed

    Piola, Marco; Prandi, Francesca; Fiore, Gianfranco Beniamino; Agrifoglio, Marco; Polvani, Gianluca; Pesce, Maurizio; Soncini, Monica

    2016-05-01

    Autologous saphenous veins are commonly used for the coronary artery bypass grafting even if they are liable to progressive patency reduction, known as 'vein graft disease'. Although several cellular and molecular causes for vein graft disease have been identified using in vivo models, the metabolic cues induced by sudden interruption of vasa vasorum blood supply have remained unexplored. In the present manuscript, we describe the design of an ex vivo culture system allowing the generation of an oxygen gradient between the luminal and the adventitial sides of the vein. This system featured a separation between the inner and the outer vessel culture circuits, and integrated a purpose-developed de-oxygenator module enabling the trans-wall oxygen distribution (high oxygen level at luminal side and low oxygen level at the adventitial side) existing in arterialized veins. Compared with standard cultures the bypass-specific conditions determined a significant increase in the proliferation of cells around adventitial vasa vasorum and an elevation in the length density of small and large caliber vasa vasorum. These results suggest, for the first time, a cause-effect relationship between the vein adventitial hypoxia and a neo-vascularization process, a factor known to predispose the arterialized vein conduits to restenosis.

  2. Effects of catalyst support and chemical vapor deposition condition on synthesis of multi-walled carbon nanocoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suda, Yoshiyuki; Iida, Tetsuo; Takikawa, Hirofumi; Harigai, Toru; Ue, Hitoshi; Umeda, Yoshito

    2016-02-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanocoil (MWCNC) is a carbon nanotube (CNT) with helical shape. We have synthesized MWCNCs and MWCNTs hybrid by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). MWCNCs are considered to be a potential material in nanodevices, such as electromagnetic wave absorbers and field emitters. It is very important to take into account the purity of MWCNCs. In this study, we aimed to improve the composition ratio of MWCNCs to MWCNTs by changing catalyst preparation and CVD conditions. As a catalyst, Fe2O3/zeolite was prepared by dissolving Fe2O3 fine powder and Y-type zeolite (catalyst support material) in ethanol with an Fe density of 0.5wt.% and with a zeolite density of 3.5wt.%. The catalyst-coated Si substrate was transferred immediately onto a hotplate and was heated at 80°C for 5 min. Similarly, Fe2O3/Al2O3, Co/zeolite/Al2O3, Co/zeolite, and Co/Al2O3 were prepared. The effect of the difference of the composite catalysts on synthesis of MWCNCs was considered. The CVD reactor was heated in a tubular furnace to 660-790°C in a nitrogen atmosphere at a flow rate of 1000 ml/min. Subsequently, acetylene was mixed with nitrogen at a flow rate ratio of C2H2/N2 = 0.02-0.1. The reaction was kept under these conditions for 10 min. MWCNTs and MWCNCs were well grown by the catalysts of Co/zeolite and Co/Al2O3. The composition ratio of MWCNCs to MWCNTs was increased by using a combination of zeolite and Al2O3. The highest composition ratio of MWCNCs to MWCNTs was 12%.

  3. All-magnetic extraction for cyclotron beam reacceleration

    DOEpatents

    Hudson, E.D.; Mallory, M.L.

    1975-07-22

    An isochronous cyclotron can be modified to provide an initial electron stripping stage, a complete acceleration of the stripped ions through the cyclotron to a first energy state, means for returning the ions to an intermediate cyclotron orbit through a second stripping stage, further acceleration of the now higher energy stripped ions through the cyclotron to their final energy, and final extraction of the ions from the cyclotron. (auth)

  4. Experimental study on bubble dynamics and wall heat transfer arising from a single nucleation site at subcooled flow boiling conditions – Part 2: Data analysis on sliding bubble characteristics and associated wall heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Yooa, Junsoo; Estrada-Perez, Carlos E.; Hassan, Yassin A.

    2016-04-28

    In this second of two companion papers presents an analysis of sliding bubble and wall heat transfer parameters measured during subcooled boiling in a square, vertical, upward flow channel. Bubbles were generated only from a single nucleation site for better observation of both the sliding bubbles’ characteristics and their impact on wall heat transfer through optical measurement techniques. Specific interests include: (i) bubbles departure and subsequent growth while sliding, (ii) bubbles release frequency, (iii) coalescence of sliding bubbles, (iv) sliding bubbles velocity, (v) bubbles size distribution and (vi) wall heat transfer influenced by sliding bubbles. Our results showed that sliding bubbles involve two distinct growth behaviors: (i) at low mass fluxes, sliding bubbles grew fast near the nucleation site, subsequently shrank, and then grew again, (ii) as mass flux increased, however, sliding bubbles grew more steadily. The bubbles originating from the single nucleation site coalesced frequently while sliding, which showed close relation with bubbles release frequency. The sliding bubble velocity near the nucleation site consistently decreased by increasing mass flux, while the observation often became reversed as the bubbles slid downstream due to the effect of interfacial drag. The sliding bubbles moved faster than the local liquid (i.e., ur<0) at low mass flux conditions, but it became reversed as the mass flux increased. The size distribution of sliding bubbles followed Gaussian distribution well both near and far from the nucleation site. The standard deviation of bubble size varied insignificantly through sliding compared to the changes in mean bubble size. Lastly, the sliding bubbles enhanced the wall heat transfer and the effect became more noticeable as inlet subcooling/mass flux decreased or wall heat flux increased. Particularly, the sliding bubble characteristics such as bubble growth behavior observed near the nucleation site played a

  5. Experimental study on bubble dynamics and wall heat transfer arising from a single nucleation site at subcooled flow boiling conditions – Part 2: Data analysis on sliding bubble characteristics and associated wall heat transfer

    DOE PAGES

    Yooa, Junsoo; Estrada-Perez, Carlos E.; Hassan, Yassin A.

    2016-04-28

    In this second of two companion papers presents an analysis of sliding bubble and wall heat transfer parameters measured during subcooled boiling in a square, vertical, upward flow channel. Bubbles were generated only from a single nucleation site for better observation of both the sliding bubbles’ characteristics and their impact on wall heat transfer through optical measurement techniques. Specific interests include: (i) bubbles departure and subsequent growth while sliding, (ii) bubbles release frequency, (iii) coalescence of sliding bubbles, (iv) sliding bubbles velocity, (v) bubbles size distribution and (vi) wall heat transfer influenced by sliding bubbles. Our results showed that slidingmore » bubbles involve two distinct growth behaviors: (i) at low mass fluxes, sliding bubbles grew fast near the nucleation site, subsequently shrank, and then grew again, (ii) as mass flux increased, however, sliding bubbles grew more steadily. The bubbles originating from the single nucleation site coalesced frequently while sliding, which showed close relation with bubbles release frequency. The sliding bubble velocity near the nucleation site consistently decreased by increasing mass flux, while the observation often became reversed as the bubbles slid downstream due to the effect of interfacial drag. The sliding bubbles moved faster than the local liquid (i.e., ur<0) at low mass flux conditions, but it became reversed as the mass flux increased. The size distribution of sliding bubbles followed Gaussian distribution well both near and far from the nucleation site. The standard deviation of bubble size varied insignificantly through sliding compared to the changes in mean bubble size. Lastly, the sliding bubbles enhanced the wall heat transfer and the effect became more noticeable as inlet subcooling/mass flux decreased or wall heat flux increased. Particularly, the sliding bubble characteristics such as bubble growth behavior observed near the nucleation site played

  6. Wall turbulence without walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Yoshinori; Jimenez, Javier

    2008-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations are presented of isolated logarithmic layers without an underlying buffer zone. They are implemented by enforcing artificial boundary conditions within the logarithmic layer which are synthesized from values from the interior of the flow. As an example, simulations of a half-channel employing this technique are discussed. The results exhibit logarithmic mean velocity profiles, and velocity fluctuation intensities that are similar to those obtained by the full DNS of half or full channels. Those results strongly suggest that the formation of a logarithmic layer is not overly dependent on the presence of a near-wall region, and that such a flow can exist by itself. The technique enables us to perform conceptual experiments to clarify what is essential to the logarithmic layer. For example, preliminary results show that the logarithmic layer cannot be created only by a non-uniform shear, and requires a spatial gradient of the scales of the fluctuations. Somewhat surprisingly, some simulations result in Kármán constants fairly different from κ=0.4, providing clues to what determines κ in real wall turbulence.

  7. A π-electronic covalent organic framework catalyst: π-walls as catalytic beds for Diels-Alder reactions under ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yang; Xu, Hong; Chen, Xiong; Gao, Jia; Jiang, Donglin

    2015-06-25

    We report a strategy for developing π-electronic covalent organic frameworks as heterogeneous catalysts that enable the use of columnar π-walls as catalytic beds to facilitate organic transformations in their one-dimensional open channels. The π-frameworks exhibit outstanding catalytic activity, promote Diels-Alder reactions under ambient conditions and are robust for cycle use.

  8. Method and apparatuses for ion cyclotron spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Dahl, David A [Idaho Falls, ID; Scott, Jill R [Idaho Falls, ID; McJunkin, Timothy R [Idaho Falls, ID

    2012-03-06

    An ion cyclotron spectrometer may include a vacuum chamber that extends at least along a z-axis and means for producing a magnetic field within the vacuum chamber so that a magnetic field vector is generally parallel to the z-axis. The ion cyclotron spectrometer may also include means for producing a trapping electric field within the vacuum chamber. The trapping electric field may comprise a field potential that, when taken in cross-section along the z-axis, includes at least one section that is concave down and at least one section that is concave up so that ions traversing the field potential experience a net magnetron effect on a cyclotron frequency of the ions that is substantially equal to zero. Other apparatuses and a method for performing ion cyclotron spectrometry are also disclosed herein.

  9. Low energy cyclotron for radiocarbon dating

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    The author built and tested a low energy cyclotron for radiocarbon dating similar to a conventional mass spectrometer. These tests clearly show that with the addition of a conventional ion source, the low energy cyclotron can perform the extremely high sensitivity /sup 14/C measurements that are now done at accelerator facilities. The author found that no significant background is present when the cyclotron is tuned to accelerate /sup 14/C negative ions and the transmission efficiency is adequate to perform radiocarbon dating on milligram samples of carbon. The internal ion source used did not produce sufficient current to detect /sup 14/C directly at modern concentrations. The author shows how a conventional carbon negative ion source located outside the cyclotron magnet, would produce sufficient beam and provide for quick sample changing to make radiocarbon dating milligram samples with a modest laboratory instrument feasible.

  10. Development of a Medical Cyclotron Production Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Danny R.

    2003-08-26

    Development of a Cyclotron manufacturing facility begins with a business plan. Geographics, the size and activity of the medical community, the growth potential of the modality being served, and other business connections are all considered. This business used the customer base established by NuTech, Inc., an independent centralized nuclear pharmacy founded by Danny Allen. With two pharmacies in operation in Tyler and College Station and a customer base of 47 hospitals and clinics the existing delivery system and pharmacist staff is used for the cyclotron facility. We then added cyclotron products to contracts with these customers to guarantee a supply. We partnered with a company in the process of developing PET imaging centers. We then built an independent imaging center attached to the cyclotron facility to allow for the use of short-lived isotopes.

  11. Development of a Medical Cyclotron Production Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Danny R.

    2003-08-01

    Development of a Cyclotron manufacturing facility begins with a business plan. Geographics, the size and activity of the medical community, the growth potential of the modality being served, and other business connections are all considered. This business used the customer base established by NuTech, Inc., an independent centralized nuclear pharmacy founded by Danny Allen. With two pharmacies in operation in Tyler and College Station and a customer base of 47 hospitals and clinics the existing delivery system and pharmacist staff is used for the cyclotron facility. We then added cyclotron products to contracts with these customers to guarantee a supply. We partnered with a company in the process of developing PET imaging centers. We then built an independent imaging center attached to the cyclotron facility to allow for the use of short-lived isotopes.

  12. The superconducting separated orbit cyclotron tritron

    SciTech Connect

    Trinks, U.; Assmann, W.; Dietl, L.; Hinderer, H.J.; Korner, A; Platzer, A.; Rehm, B.; Rieger, K.; Riess, C.; Savoy, R.

    1985-10-01

    At the Munich Accelerator Laboratory a booster for the existing MP-tandem-the Tritron - is under construction for acceleration of heavy ions to specific energies up to 21 MeV/u. The Tritron/sup +/ is a separated orbit cyclotron similar to the SOC but with the magnets and cavities both superconducting. The Tritron fits well into the existing laboratory. It is projected to be a prototype to demonstrate the feasibility of this type of cyclotron, which may be suited to overcome the limits of the conventional cyclotron concept. First, there are no axial focusing problems. Secondly, there is no crossing of resonances in the betatron frequency diagram, and thirdly, there are no injection and extraction problems. Thus continuous ion beams of high intensity and high quality with energies up to about 1 GeV/u seem within reach by connecting several separated orbit cyclotrons with increasing radii in series.

  13. Building 211 cyclotron characterization survey report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-30

    The Building 211 Cyclotron Characterization Survey includes an assessment of the radioactive and chemical inventory of materials stored within the facility; an evaluation of the relative distribution of accelerator-produced activation products within various cyclotron components and adjacent structures; measurement of the radiation fields throughout the facility; measurement and assessment of internal and external radioactive surface contamination on various equipment, facility structures, and air-handling systems; and an assessment of lead (Pb) paint and asbestos hazards within the facility.

  14. Nonlinear heating of ions by electron cyclotron frequency waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zestanakis, P. A.; Hizanidis, K.; Ram, A. K.; Kominis, Y.

    2010-11-01

    We study the nonlinear interaction of ions with electron cyclotron (EC) wave packets in a magnetized plasma. Previous studies have shown that such interactions with high frequency electrostatic lower hybrid waves can lead to coherent energization of ions. It requires the frequency bandwidth of the wave packet to be broader than the ion cyclotron frequency [1,2]. For the electromagnetic high frequency EC waves we have developed a more general theory, based on the Lie transform canonical perturbation method [3,4]. We apply the theory to the case of two overlapping EC beams. The wave frequency of each beam is assumed to be frequency modulated with a modulation bandwidth comparable to the ion cyclotron frequency. We present results for both X-mode and O-mode and illustrate the conditions for ion energization. [4pt] [1] D. Benisti, A. K. Ram, and A. Bers, Phys. Plasmas 5, 3224 (1998). [0pt] [2] A. K. Ram, A. Bers, and D. Benisti , J. Geophys. Res. 103, 9431 (1998). [0pt] [3] J.R. Cary and A.N. Kaufman, Phys. Fluids 24, 1238 (1981). [0pt] [4] R.L. Dewar, J. Phys A-Math. Gen 9, 2043 (1976).

  15. Quench analysis of a novel compact superconducting cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Sundeep; Dutta Gupta, Anjan; Kanti Dey, Malay; Pal, Gautam

    2017-02-01

    Design and analysis of a compact superconducting cyclotron dedicated for medical applications in the fields of nuclear medicine and therapy is presently being pursued in our organization. The novelty of this cyclotron lies in the fact that it does not consist of any iron-pole. The cyclotron magnet will be made of a set of NbTi coils comprising of solenoid and sector coils which are housed in two halves on either sides of the median plane. The average magnetic field is 1.74 T and the maximum extraction energy is 25 MeV, which is sufficient for production of 99mTc from Mo. In this paper, quench analyses of the coils have been discussed in details considering adiabatic condition. The entire cryostat magnet along with coils, formers and support links were modelled for the quench simulation. Self and mutual inductances of all the coils were obtained from a separate magnetic analysis and used in the simulation. Parametric analyses were carried out with different quench initiation energy at various critical locations on the coil surface. The corresponding quench behaviour, i.e. maximum temperature rise, maximum voltage and current decay in each of the coils have been studied.

  16. EURAC: A liquid target neutron spallation source using cyclotron technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlado, J. M.; Mínguez, E.; Sanz, J.; Piera, M.

    1995-09-01

    Euratom/JRC Ispra led some years ago the design of an accelerator based neutron spallation source EURAC, with special emphasis as a fusion material testing device. DENIM was involved in the development of the last version of this source. EURAC proposes to use a beam of 600 MeV or 1.5 GeV protons, produced by an effective and low cost ring cyclotron with a current of 6 mA impinging in a liquid lead, or lead-bismuth, target. It will use an advanced cyclotron technology which can be implemented in the next future, in the line of the actual technology of the upgraded SIN-type cyclotron. The adjacent rows to the target correspond to the lead, or Li17Pb83, cooled channels where the samples will be located. The available volumes there were shown enough for material testing purposes. Here, proposal of using those experimental areas to introduce small masses of radioactive wastes for testing of transmutation in spallation source is made. In addition, extrapolation of present conceptual design to make available larger volumes under flexible conditions seems to be possible. Neutrons leaking from the test zone drive a subcritical booster (< 10 MW) which could provide a thermal neutron flux trap with a liquid hidrogen moderator in the center.

  17. Rotatable superconducting cyclotron adapted for medical use

    DOEpatents

    Blosser, Henry G.; Johnson, David A.; Riedel, Jack; Burleigh, Richard J.

    1985-01-01

    A superconducting cyclotron (10) rotatable on a support structure (11) in an arc of about 180.degree. around a pivot axis (A--A) and particularly adapted for medical use is described. The rotatable support structure (13, 15) is balanced by being counterweighted (14) so as to allow rotation of the cyclotron and a beam (12), such as a subparticle (neutron) or atomic particle beam, from the cyclotron in the arc around a patient. Flexible hose (25) is moveably attached to the support structure for providing a liquified gas which is supercooled to near 0.degree. K. to an inlet means (122) to a chamber (105) around superconducting coils (101, 102). The liquid (34) level in the cyclotron is maintained approximately half full so that rotation of the support structure and cyclotron through the 180.degree. can be accomplished without spilling the liquid from the cyclotron. With the coils vertically oriented, each turn of the winding is approximately half immersed in liquid (34) and half exposed to cold gas and adequate cooling to maintain superconducting temperatures in the section of coil above the liquid level is provided by the combination of cold gas/vapor and by the conductive flow of heat along each turn of the winding from the half above the liquid to the half below.

  18. Superthermal electron distribution measurements from polarized electron cyclotron emission

    SciTech Connect

    Luce, T.C.; Efthimion, P.C.; Fisch, N.J.

    1988-06-01

    Measurements of the superthermal electron distribution can be made by observing the polarized electron cyclotron emission. The emission is viewed along a constant magnetic field surface. This simplifies the resonance condition and gives a direct correlation between emission frequency and kinetic energy of the emitting electron. A transformation technique is formulated which determines the anisotropy of the distribution and number density of superthermals at each energy measured. The steady-state distribution during lower hybrid current drive and examples of the superthermal dynamics as the runaway conditions is varied are presented for discharges in the PLT tokamak. 15 refs., 8 figs.

  19. Effects of catalyst support and chemical vapor deposition condition on synthesis of multi-walled carbon nanocoils

    SciTech Connect

    Suda, Yoshiyuki Iida, Tetsuo; Takikawa, Hirofumi; Harigai, Toru; Ue, Hitoshi; Umeda, Yoshito

    2016-02-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanocoil (MWCNC) is a carbon nanotube (CNT) with helical shape. We have synthesized MWCNCs and MWCNTs hybrid by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). MWCNCs are considered to be a potential material in nanodevices, such as electromagnetic wave absorbers and field emitters. It is very important to take into account the purity of MWCNCs. In this study, we aimed to improve the composition ratio of MWCNCs to MWCNTs by changing catalyst preparation and CVD conditions. As a catalyst, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/zeolite was prepared by dissolving Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} fine powder and Y-type zeolite (catalyst support material) in ethanol with an Fe density of 0.5wt.% and with a zeolite density of 3.5wt.%. The catalyst-coated Si substrate was transferred immediately onto a hotplate and was heated at 80°C for 5 min. Similarly, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Co/zeolite/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Co/zeolite, and Co/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were prepared. The effect of the difference of the composite catalysts on synthesis of MWCNCs was considered. The CVD reactor was heated in a tubular furnace to 660-790°C in a nitrogen atmosphere at a flow rate of 1000 ml/min. Subsequently, acetylene was mixed with nitrogen at a flow rate ratio of C{sub 2}H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} = 0.02-0.1. The reaction was kept under these conditions for 10 min. MWCNTs and MWCNCs were well grown by the catalysts of Co/zeolite and Co/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The composition ratio of MWCNCs to MWCNTs was increased by using a combination of zeolite and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The highest composition ratio of MWCNCs to MWCNTs was 12%.

  20. Cyclotron autoresonance maser in the millimeter region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolov, N. A.; Spasovski, I. P.; Kostov, K. G.; Velichkov, J. N.; Spasov, V. A.

    1990-06-01

    This paper investigates the optimal experimental conditions for a cyclotron autoresonance maser (CARM) regime realized by a nonadiabatic magnetic beam pumping in the millimeter wavelength region. In the experiment, a Blumline-type accelerator with a voltage up to 650 kV and maximal current up to 10 kA is used to generate a hollow beam with a pulse duration of 30 ns. The electron beam, emitted from a graphite cathode with a 10-mm diameter, propagates in a cylindrical drift tube of 56 mm diam and a length of 500 mm. The external magnetic field B, provided by a solenoidal magnet, is homogeneous along the drift tube up to a distance of 300 mm from the cathode. The experiment demonstrated the generation of microwave radiation in the time interval from 0.0016 to 0.0023 sec after the switch-on of the external magnetic field. Two maxima of the output microwave power (8 and 10 MW) at a wavelength of 5 and 5.5 mm, respectively, were observed.

  1. The Utilization of Plant Facilities on the International Space Station—The Composition, Growth, and Development of Plant Cell Walls under Microgravity Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Jost, Ann-Iren Kittang; Hoson, Takayuki; Iversen, Tor-Henning

    2015-01-01

    In the preparation for missions to Mars, basic knowledge of the mechanisms of growth and development of living plants under microgravity (micro-g) conditions is essential. Focus has centered on the g-effects on rigidity, including mechanisms of signal perception, transduction, and response in gravity resistance. These components of gravity resistance are linked to the evolution and acquisition of responses to various mechanical stresses. An overview is given both on the basic effect of hypergravity as well as of micro-g conditions in the cell wall changes. The review includes plant experiments in the US Space Shuttle and the effect of short space stays (8–14 days) on single cells (plant protoplasts). Regeneration of protoplasts is dependent on cortical microtubules to orient the nascent cellulose microfibrils in the cell wall. The space protoplast experiments demonstrated that the regeneration capacity of protoplasts was retarded. Two critical factors are the basis for longer space experiments: a. the effects of gravity on the molecular mechanisms for cell wall development, b. the availability of facilities and hardware for performing cell wall experiments in space and return of RNA/DNA back to the Earth. Linked to these aspects is a description of existing hardware functioning on the International Space Station. PMID:27135317

  2. The Utilization of Plant Facilities on the International Space Station-The Composition, Growth, and Development of Plant Cell Walls under Microgravity Conditions.

    PubMed

    Jost, Ann-Iren Kittang; Hoson, Takayuki; Iversen, Tor-Henning

    2015-01-20

    In the preparation for missions to Mars, basic knowledge of the mechanisms of growth and development of living plants under microgravity (micro-g) conditions is essential. Focus has centered on the g-effects on rigidity, including mechanisms of signal perception, transduction, and response in gravity resistance. These components of gravity resistance are linked to the evolution and acquisition of responses to various mechanical stresses. An overview is given both on the basic effect of hypergravity as well as of micro-g conditions in the cell wall changes. The review includes plant experiments in the US Space Shuttle and the effect of short space stays (8-14 days) on single cells (plant protoplasts). Regeneration of protoplasts is dependent on cortical microtubules to orient the nascent cellulose microfibrils in the cell wall. The space protoplast experiments demonstrated that the regeneration capacity of protoplasts was retarded. Two critical factors are the basis for longer space experiments: a. the effects of gravity on the molecular mechanisms for cell wall development, b. the availability of facilities and hardware for performing cell wall experiments in space and return of RNA/DNA back to the Earth. Linked to these aspects is a description of existing hardware functioning on the International Space Station.

  3. Various computational conditions of oscillatory natural convection of zero Prandtl number fluid in an open boat heated and cooled from opposing vertical walls

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Kazuto . Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Science); Ozoe, Hiroyuki . Inst. of Advanced Material Study)

    1993-03-01

    The finite-difference computational scheme is developed for two-dimensional oscillatory natural convection of zero Prandtl number fluid in an open boat heated and cooled from opposing vertical walls. Various computational conditions are tested, such as the initial condition, time step length, finite-difference width, and finite-difference scheme. Instantaneous contour maps and velocity vectors in oscillatory states are presented in a series of maps to represent the fluctuating characteristics of two-dimensional roll cells. The physical conditions are for a boat with aspect ratio A = 3[minus]5 at Pr = 0 and Gr = 14,000-40,000.

  4. Laboratory study of pulsed regimes of electron cyclotron instabilities in a mirror-confined plasma for astrophysical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viktorov, Mikhail; Golubev, Sergey; Mansfeld, Dmitry; Izotov, Ivan; Gospodchikov, Egor; Shalashov, Alexander; Demekhov, Andrei

    2014-05-01

    We discuss the use of a mirror-confined plasma of the electron cyclotron resonance discharge for modeling of burst processes in the inner magnetosphere of the Earth associated with the implementation of the plasma cyclotron maser. Heating under the electron cyclotron resonance conditions allows to create two component plasma which is typical for the inner magnetosphere of the Earth. One of the most interesting electron cyclotron resonance manifestations is the generation of bursts of electromagnetic radiation that are related to the explosive growth of cyclotron instabilities of the magnetoactive plasma confined in magnetic traps of various kinds and that are accompanied by particle precipitations from the trap. We investigate several regimes of cyclotron maser which are realized in dense and rarefied plasma, in the presence and absence of a permanent powerful gyrotron microwave radiation as a source of nonequilibrium particles in the plasma. Using the new technique for detection of microwave radiation we studied the dynamical spectrum and the intensity of stimulated electromagnetic radiation from the plasma in a wide frequency band covering all types of cyclotron instabilities. Also possible applications for astrophysical plasma are discussed.

  5. Modelling of the material transport and layer formation in the divertor of JET: Comparison of ITER-like wall with full carbon wall conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschner, A.; Matveev, D.; Borodin, D.; Airila, M.; Brezinsek, S.; Groth, M.; Wiesen, S.; Widdowson, A.; Beal, J.; Esser, H. G.; Likonen, J.; Bekris, N.; Ding, R.

    2015-08-01

    Impurity transport within the inner JET divertor has been modelled with ERO to estimate the transport to and the resulting deposition at remote areas. Various parametric studies involving divertor plasma conditions and strike point position have been performed. In JET-ILW (beryllium main chamber and tungsten divertor) beryllium, flowing from the main chamber into the divertor and then effectively reflected at the tungsten divertor tiles, is transported to remote areas. The tungsten flux to remote areas in L-Mode is in comparison to the beryllium flux negligible due to small sputtering. However, tungsten is sputtered during ELMs in H-Mode conditions. Nevertheless, depending on the plasma conditions, strike point position and the location of the remote area, the maximum resulting tungsten flux to remote areas is at least ∼3 times lower than the corresponding beryllium flux. Modelled beryllium and tungsten deposition on a rotating collector probe located below tile 5 is in good agreement with measurements if the beryllium influx into the inner divertor is assumed to be in the range of 0.1% relative to the deuterium ion flux and erosion due to fast charge exchange neutrals is considered. Comparison between JET-ILW and JET-C is presented.

  6. Low energy cyclotron for radiocarbon dating

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, J.J.

    1984-12-01

    The measurement of naturally occurring radioisotopes whose half lives are less than a few hundred million years but more than a few years provides information about the temporal behavior of geologic and climatic processes, the temporal history of meteoritic bodies as well as the production mechanisms of these radioisotopes. A new extremely sensitive technique for measuring these radioisotopes at tandem Van de Graaff and cyclotron facilities has been very successful though the high cost and limited availability have been discouraging. We have built and tested a low energy cyclotron for radiocarbon dating similar in size to a conventional mass spectrometer. These tests clearly show that with the addition of a conventional ion source, the low energy cyclotron can perform the extremely high sensitivity /sup 14/C measurements that are now done at accelerator facilities. We found that no significant background is present when the cyclotron is tuned to accelerate /sup 14/C negative ions and the transmission efficiency is adequate to perform radiocarbon dating on milligram samples of carbon. The internal ion source used did not produce sufficient current to detect /sup 14/C directly at modern concentrations. We show how a conventional carbon negative ion source, located outside the cyclotron magnet, would produce sufficient beam and provide for quick sampling to make radiocarbon dating milligram samples with a modest laboratory instrument feasible.

  7. Recycling and recommissioning a used biomedical cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, L. R.; Ramsey, F.; Armbruster, J.; Montenero, M.

    2001-07-01

    Biomedical Cyclotrons have a very long life, but there eventually comes a time when any piece of equipment has to be retired from service. From time to time, we have the opportunity to help find new homes for used cyclotrons which, with relatively modest overhaul and refurbishment, can have many additional years of productive service, and thus represent a very valuable asset. The reasons for retiring a cyclotron vary, of course, but in our experience it is often due to an institution's changing priorities or changing needs, rather than the due to any fundamental age-related deficiency in the cyclotron itself. In this paper we will report on the relocation and successful restoration of a used TCC CP-42 cyclotron, which was moved from M.D. Anderson Hospital in Houston to Denton, Texas in early 1998, where it is presently being used for R&D and commercial production of biomedical isotopes. Ownership of the machine has been transferred to the University of North Texas; facility, manpower, and operational resources are provided by International Isotopes, Inc.

  8. Cyclotron Provides Neutron Therapy for Cancer Patients

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1978-01-21

    A cancer patient undergoes treatment in the Neutron Therapy Treatment Facility, or Cylotron, at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Lewis Research Center. After World War II Lewis researchers became interested in nuclear energy for propulsion. The focused their efforts on thermodynamics and strength of materials after radiation. In 1950 an 80-person Nuclear Reactor Division was created, and a cyclotron was built behind the Materials and Structures Laboratory. An in-house nuclear school was established to train these researchers in their new field. NASA cancelled its entire nuclear program in January 1973, just as the cyclotron was about to resume operations after a major upgrade. In 1975 the Cleveland Clinic Foundation partnered with NASA Lewis to use the cyclotron for a new type of radiation treatment for cancer patients. The cyclotron split beryllium atoms which caused neutrons to be released. The neutrons were streamed directly at the patient’s tumor. The facility had a dual-beam system that could target the tumor both vertically and horizontally. Over the course of five years, the cyclotron was used to treat 1200 patients. It was found to be particularly effective on salivary gland, prostrate, and other tumors. It was not as successful with tumors of the central nervous system. The program was terminated in 1980 as the Clinic began concentrating on non-radiation treatments.

  9. Installation of insecticide-treated durable wall lining: evaluation of attachment materials and product durability under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Messenger, Louisa A; Larsen, Marie Louise M; Thomas, John H; Rowland, Mark

    2014-11-18

    Insecticide-treated durable wall lining (DL) is a new method of vector control designed to supplement LLINs and overcome two inherent limitations of LLINs and IRS: nightly behavioural compliance and short residual activity, respectively. DL is a deltamethrin-treated polyethylene material, which when used to cover interior house walls, functions as long-lasting IRS. Because the DL concept anticipates minimal upkeep, a primary challenge is how to guarantee correct household installation and in situ longevity for several years. Field trials were undertaken on various wall surfaces in Ghana to identify a logistically feasible, durable and re-usable method for DL wall attachment and to pilot new methods for assessing DL durability. Over fifty-five candidate attachment or fixing products, including mechanical fasteners, material anchors and adhesives, were evaluated for their ability to tolerate static loads (simulating long-term installation) and short-term heavy weights (imitating shock damage). Attachment products were also scored using qualitative logistical and feasibility criteria, including ease of preparation, grip of fixing to DL and possibility of re-use. The stress tests provided a standardised, reproducible and reliable system for assessing fixing effectiveness and DL durability, with 64% (14/22) of adhesives and 15% (2/13) of mechanical fasteners failing to meet the minimum requirements of attaching DL to mud walls for set time periods. For most fixings, less outward load (0.2-8.0 kg) was required to detach DL from the wall, compared to downward load (0.2-19.2 kg). Fixings were better able to grip DL onto concrete than clay surfaces. Using a plastic nail cap to increase DL attachment area greatly improved grip and outward load tolerance, more so than varying nail size, length or texture. Based on a series of systematic stress tests, optimized fixing products for polyethylene DL wall attachment were identified. In parallel, a detailed and adaptable method of

  10. Electron cyclotron emission as a density fluctuation diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn, A.G.; Phillips, P.E.; Hubbard, A.

    2004-10-01

    A new technique for measuring density fluctuations using a high-resolution heterodyne electron cyclotron emission (ECE) radiometer has been developed. Although ECE radiometry is typically used for electron temperature measurements, the unique viewing geometry of this system's quasioptical antenna has been found to make the detected emission extremely sensitive to refractive effects under certain conditions. This sensitivity gives the diagnostic the ability to measure very low levels of density fluctuations in the core of Alcator C-Mod tokamak. The refractive effects have been modeled using ray-tracing methods, allowing estimates of the density fluctuation magnitude and spatial localization.

  11. Linear coupling of acoustic and cyclotron waves in plasma flows

    SciTech Connect

    Rogava, Andria; Gogoberidze, Grigol

    2005-05-15

    It is found that in magnetized electrostatic plasma flows the velocity shear couples ion-acoustic waves with ion-cyclotron waves and leads, under favorable conditions, to their efficient reciprocal transformations. It is shown that in a two-dimensional setup this coupling has a remarkable feature: it is governed by equations that are mathematically equal to the ones describing coupling of sound waves with internal gravity waves [Rogava and Mahajan, Phys. Rev. E 55, 1185 (1997)] in neutral fluids. For flows with low shearing rates a fully analytic, quantitative description of the coupling efficiency, based on a noteworthy quantum-mechanical analogy, is given and transformation coefficients are calculated.

  12. Improving cancer treatment with cyclotron produced radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, S.M. Finn, R.D.

    1992-08-04

    This report describes the author's continuing long term goal of promoting nuclear medicine applications by improving the scientific basis for tumor diagnosis treatment and treatment follow-up based on the use of cyclotron produced radiotracers in oncology. The program has 3 interactive components: Radiochemistry /Cyclotron; Pharmacology; and Immunology. An essential strategy is as follows: novel radionuclides and radiotracers developed in the Radiochemistry/Cyclotron section under the DOE grant during the 1989--1992 grant period, will be employed in the Pharmacology and Immunology sections of the DOE grant during the 1992--1995 grant period. The development of novel radionuclides and tracers is of course useful in and of itself, but their utility is greatly enhanced by the interaction with the immunology and pharmacology components of the program.

  13. The electromagnetic ion cyclotron beam anisotropy instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peter Gary, S.; Schriver, David

    1987-01-01

    Electromagnetic instabilities driven by an anisotropic, relatively cool ion beam are studied for the case in which both the beam and the instabilities propagate parallel or antiparallel to a uniform magnetic field. At modest beam-core relative drift speeds, sufficiently large perpendicular-to-parallel beam temperature ratios and sufficiently large plasma beta, the mode of fastest growth rate is the ion cyclotron beam anisotropy instability. Because the right-hand polarized waves observed upstream of slow shocks in the earth's magnetotail can lead to the appropriate beam anisotropy, the ion cyclotron instability may be present and account for the left-hand polarized magnetic waves observed there. Also, because of its relatively low phase speed, the ion cyclotron beam anisotropy instability may provide the scattering necessary for ion Fermi acceleration at slow shocks of sufficiently high plasma beta.

  14. A room temperature electron cyclotron resonance ion source for the DC-110 cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Efremov, A. Bogomolov, S.; Lebedev, A.; Loginov, V.; Yazvitsky, N.

    2014-02-15

    The project of the DC-110 cyclotron facility to provide applied research in the nanotechnologies (track pore membranes, surface modification of materials, etc.) has been designed by the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Dubna). The facility includes the isochronous cyclotron DC-110 for accelerating the intensive Ar, Kr, Xe ion beams with 2.5 MeV/nucleon fixed energy. The cyclotron is equipped with system of axial injection and ECR ion source DECRIS-5, operating at the frequency of 18 GHz. This article reviews the design and construction of DECRIS-5 ion source along with some initial commissioning results.

  15. Cyclotron Lines in Accreting Neutron Star Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilms, Jörn; Schönherr, Gabriele; Schmid, Julia; Dauser, Thomas; Kreykenbohm, Ingo

    2009-05-01

    Cyclotron lines are formed through transitions of electrons between discrete Landau levels in the accretion columns of accreting neutron stars with strong (1012 G) magnetic fields. We summarize recent results on the formation of the spectral continuum of such systems, describe recent advances in the modeling of the lines based on a modification of the commonly used Monte Carlo approach, and discuss new results on the dependence of the measured cyclotron line energy from the luminosity of transient neutron star systems. Finally, we show that Simbol-X will be ideally suited to build and improve the observational database of accreting and strongly magnetized neutron stars.

  16. Simulation of parameter scaling in electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasmas using the GEM code

    SciTech Connect

    Cluggish, B.; Zhao, L.; Kim, J. S.

    2010-02-15

    Although heating power and gas pressure are two of the two of primary experimental ''knobs'' available to users of electron cyclotron resonance ion sources, there is still no clear understanding of how they interact in order to provide optimal plasma conditions. FAR-TECH, Inc. has performed a series of simulations with its generalized electron cyclotron resonance ion source model in which the power and pressure were varied over a wide range. Analysis of the numerical data produces scaling laws that predict the plasma parameters as a function of the power and pressure. These scaling laws are in general agreement with experimental data.

  17. Effects of energetic heavy ions on electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave generation in the plasmapause region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozyra, J. U.; Cravens, T. E.; Nagy, A. F.; Fontheim, E. G.; Ong, R. S. B.

    1984-01-01

    An expression for electromagnetic ion cyclotron convective growth rates is derived. The derivation of the dispersion relation and convective growth rates in the presence of a multicomponent energetic and cold plasma is presented. The effects that multiple heavy ions in the ring current and cold plasma produce in the growth and propagation characteristics of ion cyclotron waves are explored. Results of growth rate calculations using parameters consistent with conditions in the plasmapause region during the early recovery phase of geomagnetic storms are presented and compared with ground-based and satellite observations of waves in this region. The geophysical implications of the results are discussed.

  18. Effects of energetic heavy ions on electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave generation in the plasmapause region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozyra, J. U.; Cravens, T. E.; Nagy, A. F.; Fontheim, E. G.; Ong, R. S. B.

    1984-01-01

    An expression for electromagnetic ion cyclotron convective growth rates is derived. The derivation of the dispersion relation and convective growth rates in the presence of a multicomponent energetic and cold plasma is presented. The effects that multiple heavy ions in the ring current and cold plasma produce in the growth and propagation characteristics of ion cyclotron waves are explored. Results of growth rate calculations using parameters consistent with conditions in the plasmapause region during the early recovery phase of geomagnetic storms are presented and compared with ground-based and satellite observations of waves in this region. The geophysical implications of the results are discussed.

  19. Ratchet transport of a two-dimensional electron gas at cyclotron resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budkin, G. V.; Tarasenko, S. A.

    2016-02-01

    The driving of charge carriers confined in a quantum well lacking the center of space inversion by an alternating electric field leads to the formation of a direct electric current. We develop a microscopic theory of such a quantum ratchet effect for quantum wells subjected to a static magnetic field. We show that the ratchet current emerges for a linearly polarized alternating electric field as well as a rotating electric field and drastically increases at the cyclotron resonance conditions. For the magnetic field tilted with respect to the quantum well normal, the ratchet current contains an additional resonance at the first subharmonic of the cyclotron resonance.

  20. Problems And Their Solutions When Thin-Walled Turned Parts Of High Precision With Quasi-Optical Surfaces Are Manufactured On A CNC Automatic Lathe Under Workshop Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, Valentin E.

    1989-04-01

    The geometrical accuracy and surface roughness of diamond-turned workpieces is influenced by several parameters: the properties of the machine tool, the cutting process and the environmental conditions. A thin-walled electrode made from an aluminium alloy (wall thickness: 1 mm, length: 169 mm, outer diameter: 126 mm) and intended for an electrostatic measuring instrument, serves as an example to show how quasi-optical surfaces with a surface roughness Rα < 10 nm and deviations from roundness of <= 5 μm can be achieved when some of these influence quantities are optimized. The cylindrical part of the electrode was turned by means of a rounded mirror-finish diamond tool, the width of the cutting edge being 2 mm, the rake angle -6° and the clearance angle 2°. Compliance with the tolerances of geometrical accuracy was particularly difficult. As age-hardened wrought aluminium alloys cannot be stress-relieved by annealing, or only insufficiently, the geometrical accuracy - in particular the roundness - of thin-walled, rotationally symmetric bodies decisively depends on the state of stress of the workpiece material, on the clamping fixture and on the balanced condition of this clamping fixture.

  1. Monte Carlo neutron doses estimations inside a PET cyclotron vault room.

    PubMed

    Barquero, R; Méndez, R; Martí-Climent, J M; Quincoces, G

    2007-01-01

    Neutron organ equivalent doses, effective doses and dose equivalents received inside a positron emission tomography vault room in a maximum credible accident have been estimated with the Monte Carlo code MCNPX. While an operator was inside the vault room of a Cyclone 18/9 IBA cyclotron, this was producing (18)F with 30 muA proton current in the target and the operator had to activate a stopped emergency device placed on the wall. MC simulation of the cyclotron vault were carried out to estimate the organ and tissue equivalent doses in a mathematical male mannequin simulating the operator facing the wall on which the emergency device is placed. Doses were calculated at two emergency devices for each one of the two targets of the cyclotron, which were able to produce (18)F. The maximum effective dose in the mannequin was 6.70 Sv/h and the maximum organ equivalent dose was 18.47 Sv/h in spleen.

  2. Electron-cyclotron-resonance ion sources (review)

    SciTech Connect

    Golovanivskii, K.S.; Dougar-Jabon, V.D.

    1992-01-01

    The physical principles are described and a brief survey of the present state is given of ion sources based on electron-cyclotron heating of plasma in a mirror trap. The characteristics of ECR sources of positive and negative ions used chiefly in accelerator technology are presented. 20 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Tokamak startup with electron cyclotron heating

    SciTech Connect

    Holly, D J; Prager, S C; Shepard, D A; Sprott, J C

    1980-04-01

    Experiments are described in which the startup voltage in a tokamak is reduced by approx. 60% by the use of a modest amount of electron cyclotron resonance heating power for preionization. A 50% reduction in volt-second requirement and impurity reflux are also observed.

  4. Ion-cyclotron instability in magnetic mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Pearlstein, L.D.

    1987-02-02

    This report reviews the role of ion-cyclotron frequency instability in magnetic mirrors. The modes discussed here are loss-cone or anisotropy driven. The discussion includes quasilinear theory, explosive instabilities of 3-wave interaction and non-linear Landau damping, and saturation due to non-linear orbits. (JDH)

  5. Cyclotron-based neutron source for BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Mitsumoto, T.; Yajima, S.; Tsutsui, H.; Ogasawara, T.; Fujita, K.; Tanaka, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Maruhashi, A.

    2013-04-19

    Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI) and Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd. (SHI) have developed a cyclotron-based neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). It was installed at KURRI in Osaka prefecture. The neutron source consists of a proton cyclotron named HM-30, a beam transport system and an irradiation and treatment system. In the cyclotron, H- ions are accelerated and extracted as 30 MeV proton beams of 1 mA. The proton beams is transported to the neutron production target made by a beryllium plate. Emitted neutrons are moderated by lead, iron, aluminum and calcium fluoride. The aperture diameter of neutron collimator is in the range from 100 mm to 250 mm. The peak neutron flux in the water phantom is 1.8 Multiplication-Sign 109 neutrons/cm{sup 2}/sec at 20 mm from the surface at 1 mA proton beam. The neutron source have been stably operated for 3 years with 30 kW proton beam. Various pre-clinical tests including animal tests have been done by using the cyclotron-based neutron source with {sup 10}B-p-Borono-phenylalanine. Clinical trials of malignant brain tumors will be started in this year.

  6. Stability of the Electron Cyclotron Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asch, Joachim; Bourget, Olivier; Meresse, Cédric

    2015-12-01

    We consider the magnetic AC Stark effect for the quantum dynamics of a single particle in the plane under the influence of an oscillating homogeneous electric and a constant perpendicular magnetic field. We prove that the electron cyclotron resonance is insensitive to impurity potentials.

  7. Currents driven by electron cyclotron waves

    SciTech Connect

    Karney, C.F.F.; Fisch, N.J.

    1981-07-01

    Certain aspects of the generation of steady-state currents by electron cyclotron waves are explored. A numerical solution of the Fokker-Planck equation is used to verify the theory of Fisch and Boozer and to extend their results into the nonlinear regime. Relativistic effects on the current generated are discussed. Applications to steady-state tokamak reactors are considered.

  8. Influence of arterial wall compliance on the pressure drop across coronary artery stenoses under hyperemic flow condition.

    PubMed

    Konala, Bhaskar Chandra; Das, Ashish; Banerjee, Rupak K

    2011-03-01

    Hemodynamic endpoints such as flow and pressure drop are often measured during angioplasty procedures to determine the functional severity of a coronary artery stenosis. There is a lack of knowledge regarding the influence of compliance of the arterial wall-stenosis on the pressure drop under hyperemic flows across coronary lesions. This study evaluates the influence in flow and pressure drop caused by variation in arterial-stenosis compliance for a wide range of stenosis severities. The flow and pressure drop were evaluated for three different severities of stenosis and tested for limiting scenarios of compliant models. The Mooney-Rivlin model defined the non-linear material properties of the arterial wall and the plaque regions. The non-Newtonian Carreau model was used to model the blood flow viscosity. The fluid (blood)-structure (arterial wall) interaction equations were solved numerically using the finite element method. Irrespective of the stenosis severity, the compliant models produced a lower pressure drop than the rigid artery due to compliance of the plaque region. A wide variation in the pressure drop was observed between different compliant models for significant (90% area occlusion) stenosis with 41.0, 32.1, and 29.8 mmHg for the rigid artery, compliant artery with calcified plaque, and compliant artery with smooth muscle cell proliferation, respectively. When compared with the rigid artery for significant stenosis the pressure drop decreased by 27.7% and 37.6% for the calcified plaque and for the smooth muscle cell proliferation case, respectively. These significant variations in pressure drop for the higher stenosis may lead to misinterpretation and misdiagnosis of the stenosis severity.

  9. Electromagnetic waves near the proton cyclotron frequency: Stereo observations

    SciTech Connect

    Jian, L. K.; Wei, H. Y.; Russell, C. T.; Luhmann, J. G.; Klecker, B.; Omidi, N.; Isenberg, P. A.; Goldstein, M. L.; Figueroa-Viñas, A.; Blanco-Cano, X.

    2014-05-10

    Transverse, near-circularly polarized, parallel-propagating electromagnetic waves around the proton cyclotron frequency were found sporadically in the solar wind throughout the inner heliosphere. They could play an important role in heating and accelerating the solar wind. These low-frequency waves (LFWs) are intermittent but often occur in prolonged bursts lasting over 10 minutes, named 'LFW storms'. Through a comprehensive survey of them from Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory A using dynamic spectral wave analysis, we have identified 241 LFW storms in 2008, present 0.9% of the time. They are left-hand (LH) or right-hand (RH) polarized in the spacecraft frame with similar characteristics, probably due to Doppler shift of the same type of waves or waves of intrinsically different polarities. In rare cases, the opposite polarities are observed closely in time or even simultaneously. Having ruled out interplanetary coronal mass ejections, shocks, energetic particles, comets, planets, and interstellar ions as LFW sources, we discuss the remaining generation scenarios: LH ion cyclotron instability driven by greater perpendicular temperature than parallel temperature or by ring-beam distribution, and RH ion fire hose instability driven by inverse temperature anisotropy or by cool ion beams. The investigation of solar wind conditions is compromised by the bias of the one-dimensional Maxwellian fit used for plasma data calibration. However, the LFW storms are preferentially detected in rarefaction regions following fast winds and when the magnetic field is radial. This preference may be related to the ion cyclotron anisotropy instability in fast wind and the minimum in damping along the radial field.

  10. Memory effect of a single-walled carbon nanotube on nitride-oxide structure under various bias conditions.

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H.; Shin, H.; Kim, J. H.; Hong, S.; Xu, J.; Materials Science Division; Brown Univ.; Kookmin Univ.

    2010-01-11

    We report on the memory effect of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) placed on a nitride-oxide layer structure designed as a charge storage medium. The conductance of the SWNT was modulated by the injected charge in the nitride-oxide interface and the polarities of injected charges were then detected. A large on/off-state current ratio (>10{sup 4}) was obtained at a small program/erase voltage range (<3 V). We also studied the effect of a half-selected cell on the conductance of the SWNTs to identify the issues with cross-point memory architecture.

  11. A study of density in electron-cyclotron-resonance plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Uhm, H.S.; Lee, P.H.; Kim, Y.I.; Kim, J.H.; Chang, H.Y.

    1995-08-01

    A theory is developed for the density profile of low-temperature plasmas confined by applied magnetic field and an experiment of the electron-cyclotron-resonance (ECR) plasma is conducted to compare the theoretical prediction and experimental measurements. Due to a large electron mobility along the magnetic field, electrons move quickly out of the system, leaving ions behind and building a space charge potential, which leads to the ambipolar diffusion of ions. In a steady-state condition, the plasma generation by ionization of neutral molecules is in balance with plasma loss due to the diffusion, leading to the electron temperature equation, which is expressed in terms of the plasma size, chamber pressure, and the ionization energy and cross section of neutrals. The power balance condition leads to the plasma density equation, which is also expressed in terms of the electron temperature, the input microwave power and the chamber pressure. It is shown that the plasma density increases, reaches its peak and decreases, as the chamber pressure increases from a small value (0.1 mTorr). These simple expressions of electron temperature and density provide a scaling law of ECR plasma in terms of system parameters. After carrying out an experimental observation, it is concluded that the theoretical predictions of the electron temperature and plasma density agree remarkably well with experimental data. A large-volume plasma generated by the electron-cyclotron-resonance (ECR) mechanism plays a pivotal role in the plasma processing, including thin-film depositions and plasma etching technologies.

  12. Cyclotron resonance cooling by strong laser field

    SciTech Connect

    Tagcuhi, Toshihiro; Mima, Kunioka

    1995-12-31

    Reduction of energy spread of electron beam is very important to increase a total output radiation power in free electron lasers. Although several cooling systems of particle beams such as a stochastic cooling are successfully operated in the accelerator physics, these cooling mechanisms are very slow and they are only applicable to high energy charged particle beams of ring accelerators. We propose here a new concept of laser cooling system by means of cyclotron resonance. Electrons being in cyclotron motion under a strong magnetic field can resonate with circular polarized electromagnetic field, and the resonance take place selectively depending on the velocity of the electrons. If cyclotron frequency of electrons is equal to the frequency of the electromagnetic field, they absorb the electromagnetic field energy strongly, but the other electrons remain unchanged. The absorbed energy will be converted to transverse kinetic energy, and the energy will be dumped into the radiation energy through bremastrahlung. To build a cooling system, we must use two laser beams, where one of them is counter-propagating and the other is co-propagating with electron beam. When the frequency of the counter-propagating laser is tuned with the cyclotron frequency of fast electrons and the co-propagating laser is tuned with the cyclotron frequency of slow electrons, the energy of two groups will approach and the cooling will be achieved. We solve relativistic motions of electrons with relativistic radiation dumping force, and estimate the cooling rate of this mechanism. We will report optimum parameters for the electron beam cooling system for free electron lasers.

  13. Helium retention and surface blistering characteristics of tungsten with regard to first wall conditions in an inertial fusion energy reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilliam, S. B.; Gidcumb, S. M.; Forsythe, D.; Parikh, N. R.; Hunn, J. D.; Snead, L. L.; Lamaze, G. P.

    2005-12-01

    The first wall of an inertial fusion energy reactor may suffer from surface blistering and exfoliation due to helium ion fluxes and extreme temperatures. Tungsten is a candidate for the first wall material. A study of helium retention and surface blistering with regard to helium dose, temperature and tungsten microstructure was conducted to learn how the damaging effects of helium may be diminished. Single crystal and polycrystalline tungsten samples were implanted with 1.3 MeV 3He in doses ranging from 1019/m2 to 1022/m2. Implanted samples were analyzed by 3He(d, p)4He nuclear reaction analysis and neutron depth profiling techniques. Surface blistering occurred for doses greater than 1021 He/m2 and was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Repeated cycles of implantation and flash annealing indicated that helium retention was reduced with decreasing implant dose per cycle. A carbon foil energy degrader, currently in development, will allow a continuous spectrum of helium implantation energy matching the theoretical models of He ion fluxes within the IFE reactor.

  14. Gamma ray facilities at the University of Maryland cyclotron. [data acquisition and radiation measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornyak, W. F.

    1978-01-01

    A special beam line was set up in a separate shielded experimental room to provide a low background station for gamma-ray measurements at the University of Maryland cyclotron. The transmitted beam leaving the target is gathered in by a magnetic quadrupole lens located 1.8 m further downstream and focused on a Faraday cup located on the far side of the 2.5 m thick concrete shielding wall of the experimental room. A software computer program permits timing information ot be obtained using the cyclotron beam fine structure as a time reference for the observed gamma-ray events. Measurements indicate a beam fine structure width of less than 1.2 nanoseconds repeated, for example, in the case of 140 MeV alpha particles every 90 nanoseconds. Twelve contiguous time channels of adjustable width may be set as desired with reference to the RF signal. This allows the creation of 12 separate 8192 channel analyzers.

  15. The negative hydrogen Penning ion gauge ion source for KIRAMS-13 cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    An, D. H.; Jung, I. S.; Kang, J.; Chang, H. S.; Hong, B. H.; Hong, S.; Lee, M. Y.; Kim, Y.; Yang, T. K.; Chai, J. S.

    2008-02-15

    The cold-cathode-type Penning ion gauge (PIG) ion source for the internal ion source of KIRAMS-13 cyclotron has been used for generation of negative hydrogen ions. The dc H-beam current of 650 {mu}A from the PIG ion source with the Dee voltage of 40 kV and arc current of 1.0 A is extrapolated from the measured dc extraction beam currents at the low extraction dc voltages. The output optimization of PIG ion source in the cyclotron has been carried out by using various chimneys with different sizes of the expansion gap between the plasma boundary and the chimney wall. This paper presents the results of the dc H-extraction measurement and the expansion gap experiment.

  16. Gamma ray facilities at the University of Maryland cyclotron. [data acquisition and radiation measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornyak, W. F.

    1978-01-01

    A special beam line was set up in a separate shielded experimental room to provide a low background station for gamma-ray measurements at the University of Maryland cyclotron. The transmitted beam leaving the target is gathered in by a magnetic quadrupole lens located 1.8 m further downstream and focused on a Faraday cup located on the far side of the 2.5 m thick concrete shielding wall of the experimental room. A software computer program permits timing information ot be obtained using the cyclotron beam fine structure as a time reference for the observed gamma-ray events. Measurements indicate a beam fine structure width of less than 1.2 nanoseconds repeated, for example, in the case of 140 MeV alpha particles every 90 nanoseconds. Twelve contiguous time channels of adjustable width may be set as desired with reference to the RF signal. This allows the creation of 12 separate 8192 channel analyzers.

  17. Omental infarction and its mimics: imaging features of acute abdominal conditions presenting with fat stranding greater than the degree of bowel wall thickening.

    PubMed

    Tonerini, Michele; Calcagni, Francesca; Lorenzi, Silvia; Scalise, Paola; Grigolini, Alessandro; Bemi, Pietro

    2015-08-01

    The segmental omental infarction is a rare self-limited disorder presenting with aspecific clinical symptoms that may mimic several acute abdominal conditions. Therefore, a correct noninvasive diagnosis is important because treatment approaches range from monitoring to surgery. As omental infarction results in an important fat stranding that is much greater than the degree of bowel wall thickening, it suggests a narrower differential diagnosis: appendicitis, diverticulitis, epiploic appendagitis, and mesenteric panniculitis. In this pictorial essay, we point out the importance of imaging in identifying this typical sign allowing alternate diagnoses such as segmental omental infarction that can be conservatively managed.

  18. Determinant representation of the domain-wall boundary condition partition function of a Richardson-Gaudin model containing one arbitrary spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faribault, Alexandre; Tschirhart, Hugo; Muller, Nicolas

    2016-05-01

    In this work we present a determinant expression for the domain-wall boundary condition partition function of rational (XXX) Richardson-Gaudin models which, in addition to N-1 spins \\frac{1}{2}, contains one arbitrarily large spin S. The proposed determinant representation is written in terms of a set of variables which, from previous work, are known to define eigenstates of the quantum integrable models belonging to this class as solutions to quadratic Bethe equations. Such a determinant can be useful numerically since systems of quadratic equations are much simpler to solve than the usual highly nonlinear Bethe equations. It can therefore offer significant gains in stability and computation speed.

  19. Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry at the Cyclotron Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagornov, Konstantin O.; Kozhinov, Anton N.; Tsybin, Yury O.

    2017-02-01

    The phenomenon of ion cyclotron resonance allows for determining mass-to-charge ratio, m/z, of an ensemble of ions by means of measurements of their cyclotron frequency, ω c . In Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS), the ω c quantity is usually unavailable for direct measurements: the resonant state is located close to the reduced cyclotron frequency (ω+), whereas the ω c and the corresponding m/z values may be calculated via theoretical derivation from an experimental estimate of the ω+ quantity. Here, we describe an experimental observation of a new resonant state, which is located close to the ω c frequency and is established because of azimuthally-dependent trapping electric fields of the recently developed ICR cells with narrow aperture detection electrodes. We show that in mass spectra, peaks close to ω+ frequencies can be reduced to negligible levels relative to peaks close to ω c frequencies. Due to reduced errors with which the ω c quantity is obtained, the new resonance provides a means of cyclotron frequency measurements with precision greater than that achieved when ω+ frequency peaks are employed. The described phenomenon may be considered for a development into an FT-ICR MS technology with increased mass accuracy for applications in basic research, life, and environmental sciences.

  20. Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry at the Cyclotron Frequency.

    PubMed

    Nagornov, Konstantin O; Kozhinov, Anton N; Tsybin, Yury O

    2017-04-01

    The phenomenon of ion cyclotron resonance allows for determining mass-to-charge ratio, m/z, of an ensemble of ions by means of measurements of their cyclotron frequency, ω c . In Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS), the ω c quantity is usually unavailable for direct measurements: the resonant state is located close to the reduced cyclotron frequency (ω+), whereas the ω c and the corresponding m/z values may be calculated via theoretical derivation from an experimental estimate of the ω+ quantity. Here, we describe an experimental observation of a new resonant state, which is located close to the ω c frequency and is established because of azimuthally-dependent trapping electric fields of the recently developed ICR cells with narrow aperture detection electrodes. We show that in mass spectra, peaks close to ω+ frequencies can be reduced to negligible levels relative to peaks close to ω c frequencies. Due to reduced errors with which the ω c quantity is obtained, the new resonance provides a means of cyclotron frequency measurements with precision greater than that achieved when ω+ frequency peaks are employed. The described phenomenon may be considered for a development into an FT-ICR MS technology with increased mass accuracy for applications in basic research, life, and environmental sciences. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  1. New magnet pole shape for isochronous cyclotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Thorn, C.E.; Chasman, C.; Baltz, A.J.

    1981-06-01

    A new design has been developed for shaping pole tips to produce the radially increasing fields required for isochronous cyclotrons. The conventional solid hillpoles are replaced by poles mounted over a small secondary gap which tapers radially from maximum at the magnet edge to zero near the center. Field measurements with a model magnet and calculations with the code TRIM show an increase in field at the edge of the magnet without the usual corresponding large increase in fringing, and a radial field shape more nearly field independent than for conventional hills. The flying hills have several advantages for variable energy multiparticle cyclotrons: (1) a large reduction in the power dissipated by isochronizing trim coils; (2) a more constant shape and magnitude flutter factor, eliminating flutter coils and increasing the operating range; and (3) a sharper fall-off of the fringe field, simplifying beam extraction. 6 figures.

  2. New magnet pole shape for isochronous cyclotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Thorn, C.E.; Chasman, C.; Baltz, A.J.

    1981-01-01

    A new design has been developed for shaping pole tips to produce the radially increasing fields required for isochronous cyclotrons. The conventional solid hill poles are replaced by poles mounted over a small secondary gap which tapers radially from maximum at the magnet edge to zero near the center. Field measurements with a model magnet and calculations with the code TRIM show an increase in field at the edge of the magnet without the usual corresponding large increase in fringing, and a radial field shape more nearly field independent than for conventional hills. The flying hills have several advantages for variable energy multiparticle cyclotrons: (1) a large reduction in the power dissipated by isochronizing trim coils; (2) a more constant shape and magnitude flutter factor, eliminating flutter coils and increasing the operating range; and (3) a sharper fall-off of the fringe field, simplifying beam extraction.

  3. Electrostatic ion cyclotron velocity shear instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemons, D. S.; Winske, D.; Gary, S. P.

    1992-01-01

    A local electrostatic dispersion equation is derived for a shear flow perpendicular to an ambient magnetic field, which includes all kinetic effects and involves only one important parameter. The dispersion equation is cast in the form of Gordeyev integrals and is solved numerically. Numerical solutions indicate that an ion cyclotron instability is excited. The instability occurs roughly at multiples of the ion cyclotron frequency (modified by the shear), with the growth rate or the individual harmonics overlapping in the wavenumber. At large values of the shear parameter, the instability is confined to long wavelengths, but at smaller shear, a second distinct branch at shorter wavelengths also appears. The properties of the instability obtained are compared with those obtained in the nonlocal limit by Ganguli et al. (1985, 1988).

  4. Ion cyclotron waves observed near the plasmapause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraser, B. J.; Samson, J. C.; Mcpherron, R. L.; Russell, C. T.

    1986-01-01

    Pc2 electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves at 0.1 Hz, near the oxygen cyclotron frequency, have been observed by ISEE-1 and -2 between L = 7.6 - 5.8 on an inbound near equatorial pass in the dusk sector. The waves occurred in a thick plasmapause of width about 1 earth radius and penetrated about 1 earth radius into the plasmasphere. Wave onset was accompanied by significant increases in the thermal (0-100 eV) He(+) and the warm (0.1-16 keV/e) O(+) and He(+) heavy ion populations. Wave polarization is predominantly left-handed with propagation almost parallel to the ambient magnetic field, and the spectral slot and polarization reversal predicted by multicomponent cold plasma propagation theory are identified in the wave data. The results are considered as an example of wave-particle interactions occurring during the outer plasmasphere refilling process at the time of the substorm recovery phase.

  5. Xe/+/ -induced ion-cyclotron harmonic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, D.

    Xenon ion sources on an ejectable package separated from the main payload during the flights of Porcupine rockets F3 and F4 which were launched from Kiruna, Sweden on March 19 and 31, 1979, respectively. The effects of the xenon ion beam, detected by the LF (f less than 16 kHz) wideband electric field experiment and analyzed by using a sonograph, are discussed. Particular attention is given to the stimulation of the ion-cyclotron harmonic waves which are usually linked to the local proton gyro-frequency, but are sometimes related to half that frequency. It was found that in a plasma dominated by O(+) ions, a small amount (1-10%) of protons could cause an effect such that the O(+) cyclotron harmonic waves are set up by the hydrogen ions, the net result being the observation of harmonic emissions separated by the hydrogen ion gyro frequency.

  6. Culture of bovine ovarian follicle wall sections maintained the highly estrogenic profile under basal and chemically defined conditions.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, R B; Salles, L P; Oliveira e Silva, I; Gulart, L V M; Souza, D K; Torres, F A G; Bocca, A L; Rosa e Silva, A A M

    2013-08-01

    Follicle cultures reproduce in vitro the functional features observed in vivo. In a search for an ideal model, we cultured bovine antral follicle wall sections (FWS) in a serum-free defined medium (DM) known to induce 17β-estradiol (E2) production, and in a nondefined medium (NDM) containing serum. Follicles were sectioned and cultured in NDM or DM for 24 or 48 h. Morphological features were determined by light microscopy. Gene expression of steroidogenic enzymes and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) receptor were determined by RT-PCR; progesterone (P4) and E2 concentrations in the media were measured by radioimmunoassay. DM, but not NDM, maintained an FWS morphology in vitro that was similar to fresh tissue. DM also induced an increase in the expression of all steroidogenic enzymes, except FSH receptor, but NDM did not. In both DM and NDM, there was a gradual increase in P4 throughout the culture period; however, P4 concentration was significantly higher in NDM. In both media, E2 concentration was increased at 24 h, followed by a decrease at 48 h. The E2:P4 ratio was higher in DM than in NDM. These results suggest that DM maintains morphological structure, upregulates the expression of steroidogenic enzyme genes, and maintains steroid production with a high E2:P4 ratio in FWS cultures.

  7. Effect of storage conditions on the microbial ecology and biochemical stability of cell wall components in brewers' spent grain.

    PubMed

    Robertson, James A; I'Anson, Kerry J A; Brocklehurst, Tim F; Faulds, Craig B; Waldron, Keith W

    2010-06-23

    The composition of brewers' spent grain (BSG) makes it susceptible to microbial attack and chemical deterioration. This can constrain its appeal as an industrial feedstock. The current study has monitored the effects of BSG storage as fresh material (20 degrees C), refrigerated and autoclaved, measured against frozen material in relation to microbial proliferation and modification to plant cell wall polysaccharides and component phenolic acids. At 20 degrees C there was a rapid colonization by microbes and an associated loss of components from BSG. Refrigeration gave a similar but lower level response. When stored frozen, BSG showed no changes in composition but autoclaving resulted in a solubilization of polysaccharides and associated phenolics. Changes were associated with the temperature profile determined during autoclaving and were also partially due to the breakdown of residual starch. Losses of highly branched arabinoxylan (AX) and the related decrease in ferulic acid cross-linking were also found. The results confirm the need for storage stabilization of BSG and demonstrate that the methods selected for stabilization can themselves lead to a substantial modification to BSG.

  8. Culture of bovine ovarian follicle wall sections maintained the highly estrogenic profile under basal and chemically defined conditions

    PubMed Central

    Vasconcelos, R.B.; Salles, L.P.; Silva, I. Oliveira e; Gulart, L.V.M.; Souza, D.K.; Torres, F.A.G.; Bocca, A.L.; Silva, A.A.M. Rosa e

    2013-01-01

    Follicle cultures reproduce in vitro the functional features observed in vivo. In a search for an ideal model, we cultured bovine antral follicle wall sections (FWS) in a serum-free defined medium (DM) known to induce 17β-estradiol (E2) production, and in a nondefined medium (NDM) containing serum. Follicles were sectioned and cultured in NDM or DM for 24 or 48 h. Morphological features were determined by light microscopy. Gene expression of steroidogenic enzymes and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) receptor were determined by RT-PCR; progesterone (P4) and E2 concentrations in the media were measured by radioimmunoassay. DM, but not NDM, maintained an FWS morphology in vitro that was similar to fresh tissue. DM also induced an increase in the expression of all steroidogenic enzymes, except FSH receptor, but NDM did not. In both DM and NDM, there was a gradual increase in P4 throughout the culture period; however, P4 concentration was significantly higher in NDM. In both media, E2 concentration was increased at 24 h, followed by a decrease at 48 h. The E2:P4 ratio was higher in DM than in NDM. These results suggest that DM maintains morphological structure, upregulates the expression of steroidogenic enzyme genes, and maintains steroid production with a high E2:P4 ratio in FWS cultures. PMID:23969977

  9. Hypersaline conditions induce changes in cell-wall melanization and colony structure in a halophilic and a xerophilic black yeast species of the genus Trimmatostroma.

    PubMed

    Kogej, Tina; Gorbushina, Anna A; Gunde-Cimerman, Nina

    2006-06-01

    Melanized yeast-like meristematic fungi are characteristic inhabitants of highly stressed environments and are rare eukaryotic extremophiles. Therefore, they are attractive organisms for studies of adaptations. In this study we compared two meristematic species of the genus Trimmatostroma on media of differing water potentials isolated from distinct water-stressed environments: T. salinum from the hypersaline water of a solar saltern, and T. abietis from a marble monument in Crimea. The morphology and melanization of both isolates in response to sodium chloride-induced water stress were investigated by means of light and electron microscopy. We describe and compare the colony form and structure, ultrastructure, and degree of cell-wall melanization of both species in reaction to salinity and to inhibited melanin synthesis. The halophilic T. salinum responded to changed salinity conditions on the level of individual cell ultrastructure and degree of cell wall melanization, whereas the xerophilic rock-inhabiting T. abietis responded with modification of its colony structure. Surprisingly, both the halophilic and the xerophilic Trimmatostroma species were able to adapt to hypersaline growth conditions, although their growth patterns show distinct adaptation of each species to their natural ecological niches.

  10. Cyclotron Wave Electrostatic and Parametric Amplifiers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-15

    Plasma Physics Division GEORGE EwEI.• Georgia Tech Research Institute Atlanta, Georgia, 30332 February 28, 1997 Approved for public release...and transmitted to the external circuit load. Thus, as far as the input resonator is concerned, noises of the electron gun on the fast cyclotron wave...characteristics of CWESA. Engineering the permanent magnet system is often the most challenging part CWESA design at ISTOK. The plane cathode electron gun

  11. Optimization of HIP bonding conditions for ITER shielding blanket/first wall made from austenitic stainless steel and dispersion strengthened copper alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, S.; Hatano, T.; Kuroda, T.; Furuya, K.; Hara, S.; Enoeda, M.; Takatsu, H.

    1998-10-01

    Optimum bonding conditions were studied on the Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) bonded joints of type 316L austenitic stainless steel and Dispersion Strengthened Copper alloy (DSCu) for application to the ITER shielding blanket / first wall. HIP bonded joints were fabricated at temperatures in a 980-1050°C range, and a series of mechanical tests and metallurgical observations were conducted on the joints. Also, bondability of two grades of DSCu (Glidcop Al-25 ® and Al-15 ®) with SS316L was examined in terms of mechanical properties of the HIP bonded joints. From those studies it was concluded that the HIP temperature of 1050°C was an optimal condition for obtaining higher ductility, impact values and fatigue strength. Also, SS316L/Al-15 joints showed better results in terms of ductility and impact values compared with SS316L/Al-25 joints.

  12. Improving cancer treatment with cyclotron produced radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, S.M.; Finn, R.D.

    1992-08-04

    Our goal is to improve the scientific basis for tumor diagnosis, treatment and treatment follow-up based on the use of cyclotron produced radiotracers in oncology. The grant includes 3 interactive components: Radiochemistry/Cyclotron; Pharmacology; and Immunology. The radiochemistry group seeks to develop innovative cyclotron targetry, radiopharmaceuticals, and radiolabeled antibodies, which are then used to assess important unanswered questions in tumor pharmacology and immunology. Examples include selected positron emitting radionuclides, such as Iodine-124, and Ga-66; I-124, I-123, I-131 labeled iododeoxyuridine, C-11 colchicine, and antimetabolites, like C-11 methotrexate; and radiolabeled antibodies, 3F8, M195, A33, and MRK16 for application in the pharmacology and immunology projects. The pharmacology program studies tumor resistance to chemotherapy, particularly the phenomenon of multidrug resistance and the relationship between tumor uptake and retention and the tumor response for anti-metabolite drugs. The immunology program studies the physiology of antibody localization at the tissue level as the basis for novel approaches to improving tumor localization such as through the use of an artificial lymphatic system which mechanically reduces intratumoral pressures in tumors in vivo. Quantitative imaging approaches based on PET and SPECT in radioimmunotherapy are studied to give greater insight into the physiology of tumor localization and dosimetry.

  13. Cyclotron Requirements for Multi-disciplinary Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armbruster, John M.

    2009-03-01

    As time has passed, the various Cyclotron programs have changed over the years. In the "early" times of Cyclotron operations, the emphasis was on a more single sided approach such as Clinical or Research or Production. However, as time passed, the disciplines became more interconnected until today, it is unusual to have a Cyclotron and only have a single program unless it is pure production. More and more, especially in public areas such as Universities or Health Centers, you are seeing programs that do all three types of disciplines: Production; Clinical or Patient Diagnostics and/or Treatment; and Research, either in the development and manufacture of new Radio-Isotopes, new Diagnostic or Therapeutic Compound Development, or Clinical Research involving subject testing. While all three of these disciplines have some common requirements, they also have some very different requirements that may be completely counterproductive to other requirements. For a program where all three disciplines are required to be successful, it is necessary come up with some sort of compromise that meets all the various requirements. During this talk, we will try to identify some of these different requirements for the various disciplines and how these could impact the other disciplines. We will also discuss ideas for some possible compromises that might reduce the conflict between the various disciplines.

  14. Transparency of Magnetized Plasma at Cyclotron Frequency

    SciTech Connect

    G. Shvets; J.S. Wurtele

    2002-03-14

    Electromagnetic radiation is strongly absorbed by a magnetized plasma if the radiation frequency equals the cyclotron frequency of plasma electrons. It is demonstrated that absorption can be completely canceled in the presence of a magnetostatic field of an undulator or a second radiation beam, resulting in plasma transparency at the cyclotron frequency. This effect is reminiscent of the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) of the three-level atomic systems, except that it occurs in a completely classical plasma. Unlike the atomic systems, where all the excited levels required for EIT exist in each atom, this classical EIT requires the excitation of the nonlocal plasma oscillation. The complexity of the plasma system results in an index of refraction at the cyclotron frequency that differs from unity. Lagrangian description was used to elucidate the physics and enable numerical simulation of the plasma transparency and control of group and phase velocity. This control naturally leads to applications for electromagnetic pulse compression in the plasma and electron/ion acceleration.

  15. Ion Cyclotron Heating on Proto-MPEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulding, R. H.; Caughman, J. B. O.; Rapp, J.; Biewer, T. M.; Campbell, I. H.; Caneses, J. F.; Kafle, N.; Ray, H. B.; Showers, M. A.; Piotrowicz, P. A.

    2016-10-01

    Ion cyclotron heating will be used on Proto-MPEX (Prototype Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment) to increase heat flux to the target, to produce varying ion energies without substrate biasing, and to vary the extent of the magnetic pre-sheath for the case of a tilted target. A 25 cm long, 9 cm diameter dual half-turn helical ion cyclotron antenna has been installed in the device located at the magnetic field maximum. It couples power to ions via single pass damping of the slow wave at the fundamental resonance, and operates with ω 0.8ωci at the antenna location. It is designed to operate at power levels up to 30 kW, with a later 200 kW upgrade planned. Near term experiments include measuring RF loading at low power as a function of frequency and antenna gap. The plasma is generated by a helicon plasma source that has achieved ne > 5 ×1019m-3 operating with deuterium, as measured downstream from the ion cyclotron antenna location. Measurements will be compared with 1-D and 2-D models of RF coupling. The latest results will be presented. This manuscript has been authored by UT-Battelle, LLC, under Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725 with the U.S. Department of Energy.

  16. Adaptation of multidimensional group particle tracking and particle wall-boundary condition model to the FDNS code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Y. S.; Farmer, R. C.

    1992-01-01

    A particulate two-phase flow CFD model was developed based on the FDNS code which is a pressure based predictor plus multi-corrector Navier-Stokes flow solver. Turbulence models with compressibility correction and the wall function models were employed as submodels. A finite-rate chemistry model was used for reacting flow simulation. For particulate two-phase flow simulations, a Eulerian-Lagrangian solution method using an efficient implicit particle trajectory integration scheme was developed in this study. Effects of particle-gas reaction and particle size change to agglomeration or fragmentation were not considered in this investigation. At the onset of the present study, a two-dimensional version of FDNS which had been modified to treat Lagrangian tracking of particles (FDNS-2DEL) had already been written and was operational. The FDNS-2DEL code was too slow for practical use, mainly because it had not been written in a form amenable to vectorization on the Cray, nor was the full three-dimensional form of FDNS utilized. The specific objective of this study was to reorder to calculations into long single arrays for automatic vectorization on the Cray and to implement the full three-dimensional version of FDNS to produce the FDNS-3DEL code. Since the FDNS-2DEL code was slow, a very limited number of test cases had been run with it. This study was also intended to increase the number of cases simulated to verify and improve, as necessary, the particle tracking methodology coded in FDNS.

  17. Looking beyond School Walls: Examining the Impact of Superintendent Longevity on Teachers' Perceptions of Their Working Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Derrick D.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if superintendent longevity significantly impacted teachers' perceptions of their working conditions. In addition, the study sought to determine if there were differences in perceptions among teachers whose superintendent was beginning (1 or fewer years in current position), emerging (between 2 to 6 years…

  18. Parametric Instabilities of Electron Cyclotron Waves in Plasmas.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    tokamaks eg. PLT. In the EBT, the electron cyclotron pump of finite wavenumber 1% decays into two Bernstein modes at the second harmonic cyclotron...convective threshold with finite k, is -200 W/ . For large tokamaks , the convective threshold for various decay channels turns out to be >200 KW/cu 2...efforts on the electron cyclotron heating of large devices, eg., Elmo bumpy torus, tokamak and mirrors. In the Elmo 1bumpy torus (EBT) the microwaves

  19. Functional Characterization of the Rice UDP-glucose 4-epimerase 1, OsUGE1: A Potential Role in Cell Wall Carbohydrate Partitioning during Limiting Nitrogen Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Guevara, David R.; El-Kereamy, Ashraf; Yaish, Mahmoud W.; Mei-Bi, Yong; Rothstein, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Plants grown under inadequate mineralized nitrogen (N) levels undergo N and carbon (C) metabolic re-programming which leads to significant changes in both soluble and insoluble carbohydrate profiles. However, relatively little information is available on the genetic factors controlling carbohydrate partitioning during adaptation to N-limitation conditions in plants. A gene encoding a uridine-diphospho-(UDP)-glucose 4-epimerase (OsUGE-1) from rice (Oryza sativa) was found to be N-responsive. We developed transgenic rice plants to constitutively over-express the OsUGE-1 gene (OsUGE1-OX1–2). The transgenic rice lines were similar in size to wild-type plants at the vegetative stage and at maturity regardless of the N-level tested. However, OsUGE1-OX lines maintained 18–24% more sucrose and 12–22% less cellulose in shoots compared to wild-type when subjected to sub-optimal N-levels. Interestingly, OsUGE1-OX lines maintained proportionally more galactose and glucose in the hemicellulosic polysaccharide profile of plants compared to wild-type plants when grown under low N. The altered cell wall C-partitioning during N-limitation in the OsUGE1-OX lines appears to be mediated by OsUGE1 via the repression of the cellulose synthesis associated genes, OsSus1, OsCesA4, 7, and 9. This relationship may implicate a novel control point for the deposition of UDP-glucose to the complex polysaccharide profiles of rice cell walls. However, a direct relationship between OsUGE1 and cell wall C-partitioning during N-limitation requires further investigation. PMID:24788752

  20. Functional characterization of the rice UDP-glucose 4-epimerase 1, OsUGE1: a potential role in cell wall carbohydrate partitioning during limiting nitrogen conditions.

    PubMed

    Guevara, David R; El-Kereamy, Ashraf; Yaish, Mahmoud W; Mei-Bi, Yong; Rothstein, Steven J

    2014-01-01

    Plants grown under inadequate mineralized nitrogen (N) levels undergo N and carbon (C) metabolic re-programming which leads to significant changes in both soluble and insoluble carbohydrate profiles. However, relatively little information is available on the genetic factors controlling carbohydrate partitioning during adaptation to N-limitation conditions in plants. A gene encoding a uridine-diphospho-(UDP)-glucose 4-epimerase (OsUGE-1) from rice (Oryza sativa) was found to be N-responsive. We developed transgenic rice plants to constitutively over-express the OsUGE-1 gene (OsUGE1-OX1-2). The transgenic rice lines were similar in size to wild-type plants at the vegetative stage and at maturity regardless of the N-level tested. However, OsUGE1-OX lines maintained 18-24% more sucrose and 12-22% less cellulose in shoots compared to wild-type when subjected to sub-optimal N-levels. Interestingly, OsUGE1-OX lines maintained proportionally more galactose and glucose in the hemicellulosic polysaccharide profile of plants compared to wild-type plants when grown under low N. The altered cell wall C-partitioning during N-limitation in the OsUGE1-OX lines appears to be mediated by OsUGE1 via the repression of the cellulose synthesis associated genes, OsSus1, OsCesA4, 7, and 9. This relationship may implicate a novel control point for the deposition of UDP-glucose to the complex polysaccharide profiles of rice cell walls. However, a direct relationship between OsUGE1 and cell wall C-partitioning during N-limitation requires further investigation.

  1. Geometric analysis of phase bunching in the central region of cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyawaki, Nobumasa; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro; Kurashima, Satoshi; Kashiwagi, Hirotsugu; Okumura, Susumu; Arakawa, Kazuo; Kamiya, Tomihiro

    2013-07-01

    An optimum condition for realizing phase bunching in the central region of a cyclotron was quantitatively clarified by a simplified geometric trajectory analysis of charged particles from the first to the second acceleration gap. The phase bunching performance was evaluated for a general case of a cyclotron. The phase difference of incident particles at the second acceleration gap depends on the combination of four parameters: the acceleration harmonic number h, the span angle θD of the dee electrode, the span angle θF from the first to the second acceleration gap, the ratio RV of the peak acceleration voltage between the cyclotron and ion source. Optimum values of θF for phase bunching were limited by the relationship between h and θD, which is 90°/h+θD/2≤θF≤180°/h+θD/2, and sin θF>0. The phase difference with respect to the reference particle at the second acceleration gap is minimized for voltage-ratios between two and four for an initial phase difference within 40 RF degrees. Although the slope of the first acceleration gap contributes to the RF phase at which the particles reach the second acceleration gap, phase bunching was not affected. An orbit simulation of the AVF cyclotron at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency verifies the evaluation based on geometric analysis.

  2. The Michigan State University Cyclotron Laboratory: Its Early Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Sam M.

    2016-01-01

    The Michigan State University Cyclotron Laboratory was founded in 1958 and over the years grew in stature, becoming the highest-ranked university-based program in nuclear science. Its K50 cyclotron had unmatched capability as a light-ion accelerator and helped to define what a modern cyclotron could do to advance our understanding of nuclei. This paper describes the first twenty years of the Cyclotron Laboratory's evolution and gives some insight into the cultural characteristics of the laboratory, and of its early members, that led it to thrive.

  3. In vitro measurements of velocity and wall shear stress in a novel sequential anastomotic graft design model under pulsatile flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Kabinejadian, Foad; Ghista, Dhanjoo N; Su, Boyang; Nezhadian, Mercedeh Kaabi; Chua, Leok Poh; Yeo, Joon Hock; Leo, Hwa Liang

    2014-10-01

    This study documents the superior hemodynamics of a novel coupled sequential anastomoses (SQA) graft design in comparison with the routine conventional end-to-side (ETS) anastomoses in coronary artery bypass grafts (CABG). The flow fields inside three polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) models of coronary artery bypass grafts, including the coupled SQA graft design, a conventional ETS anastomosis, and a parallel side-to-side (STS) anastomosis, are investigated under pulsatile flow conditions using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The velocity field and distributions of wall shear stress (WSS) in the models are studied and compared with each other. The measurement results and WSS distributions, computed from the near wall velocity gradients reveal that the novel coupled SQA design provides: (i) a uniform and smooth flow at its ETS anastomosis, without any stagnation point on the artery bed and vortex formation in the heel region of the ETS anastomosis within the coronary artery; (ii) more favorable WSS distribution; and (iii) a spare route for the blood flow to the coronary artery, to avoid re-operation in case of re-stenosis in either of the anastomoses. This in vitro investigation complements the previous computational studies of blood flow in this coupled SQA design, and is another necessary step taken toward the clinical application of this novel design. At this point and prior to the clinical adoption of this novel design, in vivo animal trials are warranted, in order to investigate the biological effects and overall performance of this anastomotic configuration in vivo.

  4. A Generalized Wall Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Povinelli, Louis A.; Liu, Nan-Suey; Potapczuk, Mark G.; Lumley, J. L.

    1999-01-01

    The asymptotic solutions, described by Tennekes and Lumley (1972), for surface flows in a channel, pipe or boundary layer at large Reynolds numbers are revisited. These solutions can be extended to more complex flows such as the flows with various pressure gradients, zero wall stress and rough surfaces, etc. In computational fluid dynamics (CFD), these solutions can be used as the boundary conditions to bridge the near-wall region of turbulent flows so that there is no need to have the fine grids near the wall unless the near-wall flow structures are required to resolve. These solutions are referred to as the wall functions. Furthermore, a generalized and unified law of the wall which is valid for whole surface layer (including viscous sublayer, buffer layer and inertial sublayer) is analytically constructed. The generalized law of the wall shows that the effect of both adverse and favorable pressure gradients on the surface flow is very significant. Such as unified wall function will be useful not only in deriving analytic expressions for surface flow properties but also bringing a great convenience for CFD methods to place accurate boundary conditions at any location away from the wall. The extended wall functions introduced in this paper can be used for complex flows with acceleration, deceleration, separation, recirculation and rough surfaces.

  5. Cyclotron resonant scattering and absorption. [in gamma ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.; Daugherty, Joseph K.

    1991-01-01

    The relativistic cross-sections for first-order absorption and second-order scattering are compared to determine the conditions under which the absorption cross-section is a good approximation to the much more complex scattering cross-section for purposes of modeling cyclotron lines in gamma-ray bursts. Differences in both the cross-sections and the line profiles are presented for a range of field strengths, angles, and electron temperatures. The relative difference of the cross-sections at one line width from resonance was found to increase with field strength and harmonic number. The difference is also strongly dependent on the photon angle to the magnetic field. For the field strength, 1.7 x 10 to the 12th G, and the angle inferred from the Ginga burst features, absorption is an excellent approximation for the profiles at the first and second harmonics.

  6. Nonresonant interactions of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves with relativistic electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lunjin; Thorne, Richard M.; Bortnik, Jacob; Zhang, Xiao-Jia

    2016-10-01

    The dynamics of relativistic electrons traveling through a parallel-propagating, monochromatic electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) wave in the Earth's dipole field are investigated via test particle simulations. Both resonant and nonresonant responses in electron pitch angle are considered, and the differences between the two are highlighted. Nonresonant electrons, with energies below the minimum resonant energy down to hundreds of keV, are scattered stochastically in pitch angle and can be scattered into the atmospheric loss cone. The nonresonant effect is attributed to the spatial edge associated with EMIC wave packets. A condition for effective nonresonant response is also provided. This effect is excluded from current quasi-linear theory and can be a potentially important loss mechanism of relativistic and subrelativistic electrons in the radiation belts.

  7. Excitation of Electron Cyclotron Harmonic Waves in Earth's Magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaojia

    This dissertation investigates the generation mechanism, spatial distribution and characteristics of electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic (ECH) waves under different plasma sheet conditions, and quantifies the role of these waves in producing the diffuse aurora. THEMIS observations from five magnetotail seasons, along with ray-tracing, and electron diffusion codes have been utilized towards that goal. By modeling the wave growth and quasi-linear pitch-angle diffusion of electrons with realistic parameters for the magnetic field, loss-cone distribution and wave intensity (obtained from observations as a function of magnetotail location), we estimate the loss-cone fill ratio and the contribution of auroral energy flux from wave-induced electron precipitation. We conclude that ECH waves are the dominant driver of electron precipitation in the middle to outer magnetotail.

  8. Studies on x-ray and UV emissions in electron cyclotron resonance x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Baskaran, R.; Selvakumaran, T. S.

    2008-02-15

    A novel electron cyclotron resonance x-ray source is constructed based on the ECR technique. In this paper, the possibility of using the ECR x-ray source for producing UV rays by optimizing the plasma parameters is explored. X-ray and UV emissions from the ECR x-ray source are carried out for argon, nitrogen, and CO{sub 2} plasma. The x-ray spectral and dose measurements are carried with NaI(Tl) based spectrometer and dosimeter, respectively. For UV measurement, a quartz window arrangement is made at the exit port and the UV intensity is measured at 5 cm from the quartz plate using UV meter. The x-ray and UV emissions are carried out for different microwave power levels and gas pressures. The x-ray emission is observed in the pressure range {<=}10{sup -5} Torr, whereas the UV emission is found to be negligible for the gas pressures <10{sup -5} Torr and it starts increasing in the pressure range between 10{sup -5} and 10{sup -3} Torr. At high-pressure range, collision frequency of electron-atom is large which leads to the higher UV flux. At low pressure, the electron-atom collision frequency is low and hence the electrons reach high energy and by hitting the cavity wall produces higher x-ray flux. By choosing proper experimental conditions and plasma gas species, the same source can be used as either an x-ray source or an UV source.

  9. Soft-spring wall based non-periodic boundary conditions for non-equilibrium molecular dynamics of dense fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Ghatage, Dhairyashil; Tomar, Gaurav Shukla, Ratnesh K.

    2015-03-28

    Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations require imposition of non-periodic boundary conditions (NPBCs) that seamlessly account for the effect of the truncated bulk region on the simulated MD region. Standard implementation of specular boundary conditions in such simulations results in spurious density and force fluctuations near the domain boundary and is therefore inappropriate for coupled atomistic-continuum calculations. In this work, we present a novel NPBC model that relies on boundary atoms attached to a simple cubic lattice with soft springs to account for interactions from particles which would have been present in an untruncated full domain treatment. We show that the proposed model suppresses the unphysical fluctuations in the density to less than 1% of the mean while simultaneously eliminating spurious oscillations in both mean and boundary forces. The model allows for an effective coupling of atomistic and continuum solvers as demonstrated through multiscale simulation of boundary driven singular flow in a cavity. The geometric flexibility of the model enables straightforward extension to nonplanar complex domains without any adverse effects on dynamic properties such as the diffusion coefficient.

  10. SPECE: a code for Electron Cyclotron Emission in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Farina, D.; Figini, L.; Platania, P.; Sozzi, C.

    2008-03-12

    The code SPECE has been developed for the analysis of electron cyclotron emission (ECE) in a general tokamak equilibrium. The code solves the radiation transport equation along the ray trajectories in a tokamak plasma, in which magnetic equilibrium and plasma profiles are given either analytically or numerically, for a Maxwellian plasma or a non thermal plasma characterized by a distribution function that is the sum of drifting Maxwellian distributions. Ray trajectories are computed making use of the cold dispersion relation, while the absorption and emission coefficients are obtained solving the relevant fully relativistic dispersion relation valid at high electron temperature. The actual antenna pattern is simulated by means of a multi-rays calculation, and the spatial resolution of the ECE measurements is computed by means of an algorithm that takes properly into account the emission along each ray of the beam. Wall effects are introduced in the code by means of a heuristic model. Results of ECE simulations in a standard ITER scenario are presented.

  11. Plume properties measurement of an Electron Cyclotron Resonance Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correyero, Sara; Vialis, Theo; Jarrige, Julien; Packan, Denis

    2016-09-01

    Some emergent technologies for Electric Propulsion, such as the Electron Cyclotron Resonance Accelerator (ECRA), include magnetic nozzles to guide and expand the plasma. The advantages of this concept are well known: wall-plasma contact is avoided, it provides a current-free plume, it can allow to control thrust by modifying the magnetic field geometry, etc. However, their industrial application requires the understanding of the physical mechanisms involved, such as the electron thermodynamics at the plasma plume expansion, which is crucial to determine propulsive performances. This work presents a detailed characterization of the plasma plume axial profile in an ECR plasma thruster developed at ONERA. Langmuir, emissive, Faraday and ion energy probes are used to measure the electric potential space evolution, the current and electron energy distribution function in the plume, from the near field to the far field. The experimental results are compared with a quasi-1D (paraxial) steady-state kinetic model of a quasineutral collisionless magnetized plasma which is able to determine consistently the axial evolution of the electric potential and the electron and ion distribution functions with their associated properties.

  12. Cyclotron resonance in plasma flow

    SciTech Connect

    Artemyev, A. V.; Agapitov, O. V.; Krasnoselskikh, V. V.

    2013-12-15

    This paper is devoted to the mechanism of particle acceleration via resonant interaction with the electromagnetic circular wave propagating along the inhomogeneous background magnetic field in the presence of a plasma flow. We consider the system where the plasma flow velocity is large enough to change the direction of wave propagation in the rest frame. This system mimics a magnetic field configuration typical for inner structure of a quasi-parallel shock wave. We consider conditions of gyroresonant interaction when the force corresponding to an inhomogeneity of the background magnetic field is compensated by the Lorentz force of the wave-magnetic field. The wave-amplitude is assumed to be about 10% of the background magnetic field. We show that particles can gain energy if kv{sub sw}>ω>kv{sub sw}−Ω{sub c} where k is the wave number, v{sub sw} is a plasma flow velocity, and ω and Ω{sub c} are the wave frequency and the particle gyrofrequency, respectively. This mechanism of acceleration resembles the gyrosurfing mechanism, but the effect of the electrostatic field is replaced by the effect of the magnetic field inhomogeneity.

  13. Growth of La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} nanofibers under a mild condition by using single walled carbon nanotubes as templates

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Lizhen . E-mail: lizhen@mech.uwa.edu.au; Wang Xiaolin; Chua, H.T.; Kawi, Sibudjing

    2006-07-15

    La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} nanofibers (ca. 30 nm in diameter and 3 {mu}m in length) have been grown in situ by using single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs; ca. 2 nm in inner diameter; made via cracking CH{sub 4} over the catalyst of Mg{sub 0.8}Mo{sub 0.05}Ni{sub 0.10}Co{sub 0.05}O {sub x} at 800 deg. C) as templates under mild hydrothermal conditions and a temperature around 60 deg. C. During synthesis, the surfactant poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(propylene glycol)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} were added to disperse SWNTs and oxidize the reactants, respectively. The structure of La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} nanofibers was confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and their morphologies were observed with field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) at the hydrothermal synthesis lasting for 5, 20 and 40 h, respectively. The La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} crystals grew from needle-like (5 h) through stick-like (20 h) and finally to plate-like (40 h) fibers. Twenty hours is an optimum reaction time to obtain regular crystal fibers. The La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} nanofibers are probably cubic rather than round and may capsulate SWNTs. - Graphical abstract: La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} nanofibers have been grown in situ by using single walled carbon nanotubes as templates under mild hydrothermal conditions and a temperature around 60 deg. C. The La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} crystals grew from needle-like (5 h) through stick-like (20 h) and finally to plate-like (40 h) fibers. The La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} nanofibers are probably cubic rather than round and may capsulate SWNTs.

  14. Numerical and Experimental Studies of the Natural Convection Flow Within a Horizontal Cylinder Subjected to a Uniformly Cold Wall Boundary Condition. Ph.D. Thesis - Va. Poly. Inst. and State Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, R. B.

    1972-01-01

    Numberical solutions are obtained for the quasi-compressible Navier-Stokes equations governing the time dependent natural convection flow within a horizontal cylinder. The early time flow development and wall heat transfer is obtained after imposing a uniformly cold wall boundary condition on the cylinder. Solutions are also obtained for the case of a time varying cold wall boundary condition. Windware explicit differ-encing is used for the numerical solutions. The viscous truncation error associated with this scheme is controlled so that first order accuracy is maintained in time and space. The results encompass a range of Grashof numbers from 8.34 times 10,000 to 7 times 10 to the 7th power which is within the laminar flow regime for gravitationally driven fluid flows. Experiments within a small scale instrumented horizontal cylinder revealed the time development of the temperature distribution across the boundary layer and also the decay of wall heat transfer with time.

  15. Status of the Cyclotron Institute Upgrade Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melconian, Dan

    2016-09-01

    The Texas A&M University Re-accelerated EXotics (T-REX) project, an upgrade to the Cyclotron Institute, will provide high-quality re-accelerated secondary beams of a unique energy range and the ability to provide primary beams to two experiments concurrently. The upgrade is nearing completion of its three major tasks: re-commissioning of the existing K150 cyclotron; construction of light- and heavy-ion guide transport systems; and charge-boosting the K150 RIB for re-acceleration using the K500 cyclotron. The light-ion guide transport system will utilize the high intensity (>= 10 μ A) proton beam from the K150 to produce rare ions via fusion-evapouration reactions or proton-induced fission fragments. These ions will be transported to an ECR charge breeder prior to injection in the K500. The heavy-ion guide will use deep inelastic, transfer and fragmentation reactions using the up to 25 MeV/u primary beams from the K150. The products will be separated by a superconducting solenoid and collected in a large gas-catcher, after which a multi-RFQ system will transport the RIB to any of: the charge-breeder and K500; the TAMU Penning Trap beamline; or an MR-TOF for beam analysis. The status of the T-REX upgrade and an overview of its capabilities will be presented Supported by DOE Grant Number DE-FG03-93ER40773 and the Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant Number H-A-0098.

  16. Interpretation of the effects of electron cyclotron power absorption in pre-disruptive tokamak discharges in ASDEX Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Nowak, S.; Lazzaro, E.; Granucci, G.; Esposito, B.; Maraschek, M.; Zohm, H.; Sauter, O.; Brunetti, D.; Collaboration: ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2012-09-15

    Tokamak disruptions are events of fatal collapse of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) confinement configuration, which cause a rapid loss of the plasma thermal energy and the impulsive release of magnetic energy and heat on the tokamak first wall components. The physics of the disruptions is very complex and non-linear, strictly associated with the dynamics of magnetic tearing perturbations. The crucial problem of the response to the effects of localized heat deposition and current driven by external (rf) sources to avoid or quench the MHD tearing instabilities has been investigated both experimentally and theoretically on the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. The analysis of the conditions under which a disruption can be prevented by injection of electron cyclotron (EC) rf power, or, alternatively, may be caused by it, shows that the local EC heating can be more significant than EC current drive in ensuring neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) stability, due to two main reasons: first, the drop of temperature associated with the island thermal short circuit tends to reduce the neoclassical character of the instability and to limit the EC current drive generation; second, the different effects on the mode evolution of both the location of the power deposition relative to the island separatrix and the island shape deformation lead to less strict requirements of precise power deposition focussing. A contribution to the validation of theoretical models of the events associated with NTM is given and can be used to develop concepts for their control, relevant also for ITER-like scenarios.

  17. Progress of a room temperature electron cyclotron resonance ion source using evaporative cooling technology at Institute of Modern Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, W.; Xiong, B.; Guo, S. Q.; Cao, R.; Ruan, L.; Zhang, X. Z.; Sun, L. T.; Feng, Y. C.; Ma, B. H.; Zhao, H. W.

    2014-02-15

    A new room temperature ECR ion source, Lanzhou Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source No. 4 (LECR4, previously named DRAGON), is under intense construction at Institute of Modern Physics. LECR4 is designed to operate with 18 GHz microwave frequency. The maximum axial magnetic fields are 2.3 T at injection and 1.3 T at extraction, and the radial field at the plasma chamber wall of 76 mm inner diameter is 1.0–1.2 T. One of the unique features for LECR4 is that its axial solenoids are winded with solid square copper wires which are immersed in a kind of special evaporative cooling medium for cooling purpose. Till now, a prototype of the cooling system has been successfully constructed and tested, which has demonstrated that the cooling efficiency of the designed system could meet the requirements of LECR4 under the routine operation conditions. All the main components of the ion source have been completed. Assembly and commissioning is ongoing. The latest developments and test results will be presented in this paper.

  18. Evidence of local power deposition and electron heating by a standing electromagnetic wave in electron-cyclotron-resonance plasma.

    PubMed

    Durocher-Jean, A; Stafford, L; Dap, S; Makasheva, K; Clergereaux, R

    2014-09-01

    Microwave plasmas excited at electron-cyclotron resonance were studied in the 0.5-15 mTorr pressure range. In contrast with low-limit pressure conditions where the plasma emission highlights a fairly homogeneous spatial structure, a periodic spatial modulation (period ∼6.2 cm) appeared as pressure increased. This feature is ascribed to a local power deposition (related to the electron density) due to the presence of a standing electromagnetic wave created by the feed electromagnetic field (2.45 GHz) in the cavity formed by the reactor walls. Analysis of the electron energy probability function by Langmuir probe and optical emission spectroscopy further revealed the presence of a high-energy tail that showed strong periodic spatial modulation at higher pressure. The spatial evolution of the electron density and of the characteristic temperature of these high-energy electrons coincides with the nodes (maximum) and antinodes (minimum) of the standing wave. These spatially-modulated power deposition and electron heating mechanisms are then discussed.

  19. Progress of a room temperature electron cyclotron resonance ion source using evaporative cooling technology at Institute of Modern Physics.

    PubMed

    Lu, W; Xiong, B; Zhang, X Z; Sun, L T; Feng, Y C; Ma, B H; Guo, S Q; Cao, R; Ruan, L; Zhao, H W

    2014-02-01

    A new room temperature ECR ion source, Lanzhou Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source No. 4 (LECR4, previously named DRAGON), is under intense construction at Institute of Modern Physics. LECR4 is designed to operate with 18 GHz microwave frequency. The maximum axial magnetic fields are 2.3 T at injection and 1.3 T at extraction, and the radial field at the plasma chamber wall of 76 mm inner diameter is 1.0-1.2 T. One of the unique features for LECR4 is that its axial solenoids are winded with solid square copper wires which are immersed in a kind of special evaporative cooling medium for cooling purpose. Till now, a prototype of the cooling system has been successfully constructed and tested, which has demonstrated that the cooling efficiency of the designed system could meet the requirements of LECR4 under the routine operation conditions. All the main components of the ion source have been completed. Assembly and commissioning is ongoing. The latest developments and test results will be presented in this paper.

  20. Electron cyclotron resonance acceleration of electrons to relativistic energies by a microwave field in a mirror trap

    SciTech Connect

    Sergeichev, K. F.; Karfidov, D. M.; Lukina, N. A.

    2007-06-15

    Results are presented from experiments on the acceleration of electrons by a 2.45-GHz microwave field in an adiabatic mirror trap under electron cyclotron resonance conditions, the electric and wave vectors of the wave being orthogonal to the trap axis. At a microwave electric field of {>=}10 V/cm and air pressures of 10{sup -6}-10{sup -4} Torr (the experiments were also performed with helium and argon), a self-sustained discharge was initiated in which a fraction of plasma electrons were accelerated to energies of 0.3-0.5 MeV. After the onset of instability, the acceleration terminated; the plasma decayed; and the accelerated electrons escaped toward the chamber wall, causing the generation of X-ray emission. Estimates show that electrons can be accelerated to the above energies only in the regime of self-phased interaction with the microwave field, provided that the electrons with a relativistically increased mass penetrate into the region with a higher magnetic field. It is shown that the negative-mass instability also can contribute to electron acceleration. The dynamic friction of the fast electrons by neutral particles in the drift space between the resonance zones does not suppress electron acceleration, so the electrons pass into a runaway regime. Since the air molecules excited by relativistic runaway electrons radiate primarily in the red spectral region, this experiment can be considered as a model of high-altitude atmospheric discharges, known as 'red sprites.'.

  1. Electron cyclotron emission diagnostics on KSTAR tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, S. H.; Lee, K. D.; Kwon, M.; Kogi, Y.; Kawahata, K.; Nagayama, Y.; Mase, A.

    2010-10-15

    A new electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostics system was installed for the Second Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) campaign. The new ECE system consists of an ECE collecting optics system, an overmode circular corrugated waveguide system, and 48 channel heterodyne radiometer with the frequency range of 110-162 GHz. During the 2 T operation of the KSTAR tokamak, the electron temperatures as well as its radial profiles at the high field side were measured and sawtooth phenomena were also observed. We also discuss the effect of a window on in situ calibration.

  2. Initial Operation of CIAE medically used cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Mingwu; Zhang, Tainjue

    1997-05-01

    CIAE medically used cyclotron is a 30 MeV fixed, isochronous field and fixed RF frequency machine with high -H beam intensity. -H beams with energy variable were obtained in December 1994 up to 0.4 mA. Two years operation has proved the design and manufacture successfully. The mapping results of magnetic field has shown the magnet perfect that would ensure the high intensity beam accelerated to the final energy. Now 7 medically useful isotopes were produced, e. g. thallium-201, cobalt-57, gallium-67, iodine-123 have been supplied for hospitals.

  3. Electron Cyclotron Heating on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Prater, R.; Petty, C.C.

    2005-10-15

    Electron cyclotron heating (ECH) has proved to be a very flexible system for heating applications in DIII-D. The outstanding characteristics of ECH - controllable heating location, a high degree of localization of the power, ability to heat without introducing particles, and ability to heat only the electron fluid - have been used in a wide variety of experiments to study wave physics and transport, to control magnetohydrodynamic activity, and to improve discharges. These characteristics along with relatively easy coupling to the plasma make ECH a valuable resource for both heating and instability control in burning plasmas.

  4. [Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma film deposition

    SciTech Connect

    1999-04-01

    During the third quarter of 1995, an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma film deposition facility was constructed at the University of New Mexico. This work was conducted in support of the Los Alamos/Tycom CRADA agreement to pursue methods of improving drill bit lifetime. Work in the fourth quarter will center on the coating of drill bits and the treating and testing of various test samples. New material systems as well as treatment techniques will be attempted during this period. The following is a brief description of the various subsystems of the film deposition facility. Particular emphasis is placed on the slotted waveguide system as requested.

  5. Electron cyclotron heating in TMX-Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Stallard, B.W.; Hooper, E.B. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    TMX-Upgrade, an improved tandem mirror experiment under construction at LLNL, will use electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) to create thermal barriers and to increase the center cell ion confining potential. Gyrotron oscillators (200 kW, 28 GHz) supply the heating power for the potential confined electron (fundamental heating) and the mirror-confined electrons (harmonic heating) in the thermal barriers. Important issues are temperature limitation and microstability for the hot electrons. Off-midplane heating can control anisotropy-driven microstability. Spacially restricting heating offers the possibility of temperature control by limiting the energy for resonant interaction.

  6. Method of enhancing cyclotron beam intensity

    DOEpatents

    Hudson, Ed D.; Mallory, Merrit L.

    1977-01-01

    When an easily ionized support gas such as xenon is added to the cold cathode in sources of the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron, large beam enhancements are produced. For example, .sup.20 Ne.sup.7+ is increased from 0.05 enA to 27 enA, and .sup.16 O.sup.5+ intensities in excess of 35 e.mu.A have been extracted for periods up to 30 minutes. Approximately 0.15 cc/min of the easily ionized support gas is supplied to the ion source through a separate gas feed line and the primary gas flow is reduced by about 30%.

  7. Cavity QED of the graphene cyclotron transition.

    PubMed

    Hagenmüller, David; Ciuti, Cristiano

    2012-12-28

    We investigate theoretically the cavity quantum electrodynamics of the cyclotron transition for Dirac fermions in graphene. We show that the ultrastrong coupling regime characterized by a vacuum Rabi frequency comparable or even larger than the transition frequency can be obtained for high enough filling factors of the graphene Landau levels. Important qualitative differences occur with respect to the corresponding physics of massive electrons in a semiconductor quantum well. In particular, an instability for the ground state analogous to the one occurring in the Dicke model is predicted for an increasing value of the electron density.

  8. Small scale effect on vibrational response of single-walled carbon nanotubes with different boundary conditions based on nonlocal beam models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, R.; Sahmani, S.

    2012-04-01

    The free vibration response of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is investigated in this work using various nonlocal beam theories. To this end, the nonlocal elasticity equations of Eringen are incorporated into the various classical beam theories namely as Euler-Bernoulli beam theory (EBT), Timoshenko beam theory (TBT), and Reddy beam theory (RBT) to consider the size-effects on the vibration analysis of SWCNTs. The generalized differential quadrature (GDQ) method is employed to discretize the governing differential equations of each nonlocal beam theory corresponding to four commonly used boundary conditions. Then molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is implemented to obtain fundamental frequencies of nanotubes with different chiralities and values of aspect ratio to compare them with the results obtained by the nonlocal beam models. Through the fitting of the two series of numerical results, appropriate values of nonlocal parameter are derived relevant to each type of chirality, nonlocal beam model, and boundary conditions. It is found that in contrast to the chirality, the type of nonlocal beam model and boundary conditions make difference between the calibrated values of nonlocal parameter corresponding to each one.

  9. Single-walled carbon nanotubes binding to human telomeric i-motif DNA under molecular-crowding conditions: more water molecules released.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chao; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2008-01-01

    The natural occurrence of the human telomeric G-quadruplex or i-motif in vivo has not been demonstrated and the biological effects of the induction of these structures need to be clarified. Intracellular environments are highly crowded with various biomolecules and in vitro studies under molecular-crowding conditions will provide important information on how biomolecules behave in cells. Here we report that cell-mimic crowding can increase i-motif stability at acid pH and cause dehydration. However, crowding can not induce i-motif formation at physiological pH. Intriguingly, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) can drive i-motif formation under cell-mimic crowding conditions and cause more water to be released. To our knowledge, there is no report to show how SWNTs can influence DNA under cell-mimic crowding conditions. Our results indicate that SWNTs may have the potential to modulate the structure of human telomeric DNA in vivo, like DNA B-A transitions and B-Z changes on SWNTs in live cells, which demonstrates potential for drug design and cancer therapy.

  10. Effects of the wall boundary conditions of a showerhead plasma reactor on the uniformity control of RF plasma deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ho Jun; Lee, Hae June

    2017-08-01

    Technical difficulties hinder the formation of uniform deposition profiles near the electrode edge during a deposition in a showerhead capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) reactor. The discharge structure, gas flow, and radial distribution of the source gas outward from the electrode edge are subject to change significantly, which in turn affects the spatial distributions of the radical fluxes toward the electrode. To control the local non-uniformity of deposition profiles in the SiH4/NH3/N2/He CCP discharges for a hydrogenated silicon nitride (SiNxHy) film, the effects of the reactor components―including the sidewall boundary condition, electrode spacing, and showerhead design―were investigated using an axisymmetric fluid model. When the sidewall is electrically grounded, the deposition rate profiles of the SiNxHy film remain consistently convex (in which the deposition rate at the reactor center is locally much higher than that near the electrode edge), regardless of electrode spacing. However, when the sidewall surface is dielectric, the deposition rate profile can be transformed between a convex and a concave shape (in which the deposition rate at the reactor center is locally much lower than that near the electrode edge) by varying electrode spacing. The showerhead design also enables the modification of edge deposition profiles by redistribution of the local depletion rate of radicals. The simulation results agree very well with the experimental measurement.

  11. Upstream proton cyclotron waves at Venus near solar maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delva, M.; Bertucci, C.; Volwerk, M.; Lundin, R.; Mazelle, C.; Romanelli, N.

    2015-01-01

    magnetometer data of Venus Express are analyzed for the occurrence of waves at the proton cyclotron frequency in the spacecraft frame in the upstream region of Venus, for conditions of rising solar activity. The data of two Venus years up to the time of highest sunspot number so far (1 Mar 2011 to 31 May 2012) are studied to reveal the properties of the waves and the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions under which they are observed. In general, waves generated by newborn protons from exospheric hydrogen are observed under quasi- (anti)parallel conditions of the IMF and the solar wind velocity, as is expected from theoretical models. The present study near solar maximum finds significantly more waves than a previous study for solar minimum, with an asymmetry in the wave occurrence, i.e., mainly under antiparallel conditions. The plasma data from the Analyzer of Space Plasmas and Energetic Atoms instrument aboard Venus Express enable analysis of the background solar wind conditions. The prevalence of waves for IMF in direction toward the Sun is related to the stronger southward tilt of the heliospheric current sheet for the rising phase of Solar Cycle 24, i.e., the "bashful ballerina" is responsible for asymmetric background solar wind conditions. The increase of the number of wave occurrences may be explained by a significant increase in the relative density of planetary protons with respect to the solar wind background. An exceptionally low solar wind proton density is observed during the rising phase of Solar Cycle 24. At the same time, higher EUV increases the ionization in the Venus exosphere, resulting in higher supply of energy from a higher number of newborn protons to the wave. We conclude that in addition to quasi- (anti)parallel conditions of the IMF and the solar wind velocity direction, the higher relative density of Venus exospheric protons with respect to the background solar wind proton density is the key parameter for the higher number of

  12. Nanoscopic vibrations of bacteria with different cell-wall properties adhering to surfaces under flow and static conditions.

    PubMed

    Song, Lei; Sjollema, Jelmer; Sharma, Prashant K; Kaper, Hans J; van der Mei, Henny C; Busscher, Henk J

    2014-08-26

    Bacteria adhering to surfaces demonstrate random, nanoscopic vibrations around their equilibrium positions. This paper compares vibrational amplitudes of bacteria adhering to glass. Spring constants of the bond are derived from vibrational amplitudes and related to the electrophoretic softness of the cell surfaces and dissipation shifts measured upon bacterial adhesion in a quartz-crystal-microbalance (QCM-D). Experiments were conducted with six bacterial strains with pairwise differences in cell surface characteristics. Vibrational amplitudes were highest in low ionic strength suspensions. Under fluid flow, vibrational amplitudes were lower in the direction of flow than perpendicular to it because stretching of cell surface polymers in the direction of flow causes stiffening of the polyelectrolyte network surrounding a bacterium. Under static conditions (0.57 mM), vibrational amplitudes of fibrillated Streptococcus salivarius HB7 (145 nm) were higher than that of a bald mutant HB-C12 (76 nm). Amplitudes of moderately extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) producing Staphylococcus epidermidis ATCC35983 (47 nm) were more than twice the amplitudes of strongly EPS producing S. epidermidis ATCC35984 (21 nm). No differences were found between Staphylococcus aureus strains differing in membrane cross-linking. High vibrational amplitudes corresponded with low dissipation shifts in QCM-D. In streptococci, the polyelectrolyte network surrounding a bacterium is formed by fibrillar surface appendages and spring constants derived from vibrational amplitudes decreased with increasing fibrillar density. In staphylococci, EPS constitutes the main network component, and larger amounts of EPS yielded higher spring constants. Spring constants increased with increasing ionic strength and strains with smaller electrophoretically derived bacterial cell surface softnesses possessed the highest spring constants.

  13. Cyclotrons and FFAG Accelerators as Drivers for ADS

    DOE PAGES

    Calabretta, Luciano; Méot, François

    2015-01-01

    Our review summarizes projects and studies on circular accelerators proposed for driving subcritical reactors. The early isochronous cyclotron cascades, proposed about 20 years ago, and the evolution of these layouts up to the most recent solutions or designs based on cyclotrons and fixed field alternating gradient accelerators, are reported. Additionally, the newest ideas and their prospects for development are discussed.

  14. Cyclotrons and FFAG Accelerators as Drivers for ADS

    SciTech Connect

    Calabretta, Luciano; Méot, François

    2015-01-01

    Our review summarizes projects and studies on circular accelerators proposed for driving subcritical reactors. The early isochronous cyclotron cascades, proposed about 20 years ago, and the evolution of these layouts up to the most recent solutions or designs based on cyclotrons and fixed field alternating gradient accelerators, are reported. Additionally, the newest ideas and their prospects for development are discussed.

  15. Lower hybrid current drive favoured by electron cyclotron radiofrequency heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesario, R.; Amicucci, L.; Cardinali, A.; Castaldo, C.; Marinucci, M.; Giruzzi, G.; Napoli, F.; Galli, A.; Schettini, G.; Tuccillo, A. A.

    2014-02-01

    The important goal of adding to the bootstrap a fraction of non-inductive plasma current, which would be controlled for obtaining and optimizing steady-state profiles, can be reached by using the Current Drive produced by Lower Hybrid waves (LHCD). FTU (Frascati Tokamak Upgrade) experiments demonstrated, indeed, that LHCD is effective at reactor-graded high plasma density, and the LH spectral broadening is reduced, operating with higher electron temperature in the outer region of plasma column (Te_periphery). This method was obtained following the guidelines of theoretical predictions indicating that the broadening of launched spectrum produced by parametric instability (PI) should be reduced, and the LHCD effect at high density consequently enabled, under higher (Te_periphery). In FTU, the temperature increase in the outer plasma region was obtained by operating with reduced particle recycling, lithized walls and deep gas fuelling by means of fast pellet. Heating plasma periphery with electron cyclotron resonant waves (ECRH) will provide a further tool for achieving steady-state operations. New FTU experimental results are presented here, demonstrating that temperature effect at the plasma periphery, affecting LH penetration, occurs in a range of plasma parameters broader than in previous work. New information is also shown on the modelling assessing frequencies and growth rates of the PI coupled modes responsible of spectral broadening. Finally, we present the design of an experiment scheduled on FTU next campaign, where ECRH power is used to slightly increase the electron temperature in the outer plasma region of a high-density discharge aiming at restoring LHCD. Consequent to model results, by operating with a toroidal magnetic field of 6.3 T, useful for locating the electron cyclotron resonant layer at the periphery of the plasma column (r/a˜0.8, f0=144 GHz), an increase of Te in the outer plasma (from 40 eV to 80 eV at r/a˜0.8) is expected by the JETTO code

  16. Lower hybrid current drive favoured by electron cyclotron radiofrequency heating

    SciTech Connect

    Cesario, R.; Cardinali, A.; Castaldo, C.; Marinucci, M.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Giruzzi, G.; Napoli, F.; Schettini, G.

    2014-02-12

    The important goal of adding to the bootstrap a fraction of non-inductive plasma current, which would be controlled for obtaining and optimizing steady-state profiles, can be reached by using the Current Drive produced by Lower Hybrid waves (LHCD). FTU (Frascati Tokamak Upgrade) experiments demonstrated, indeed, that LHCD is effective at reactor-graded high plasma density, and the LH spectral broadening is reduced, operating with higher electron temperature in the outer region of plasma column (T{sub e-periphery}). This method was obtained following the guidelines of theoretical predictions indicating that the broadening of launched spectrum produced by parametric instability (PI) should be reduced, and the LHCD effect at high density consequently enabled, under higher (T{sub e-periphery}). In FTU, the temperature increase in the outer plasma region was obtained by operating with reduced particle recycling, lithized walls and deep gas fuelling by means of fast pellet. Heating plasma periphery with electron cyclotron resonant waves (ECRH) will provide a further tool for achieving steady-state operations. New FTU experimental results are presented here, demonstrating that temperature effect at the plasma periphery, affecting LH penetration, occurs in a range of plasma parameters broader than in previous work. New information is also shown on the modelling assessing frequencies and growth rates of the PI coupled modes responsible of spectral broadening. Finally, we present the design of an experiment scheduled on FTU next campaign, where ECRH power is used to slightly increase the electron temperature in the outer plasma region of a high-density discharge aiming at restoring LHCD. Consequent to model results, by operating with a toroidal magnetic field of 6.3 T, useful for locating the electron cyclotron resonant layer at the periphery of the plasma column (r/a∼0.8, f{sub 0}=144 GHz), an increase of T{sub e} in the outer plasma (from 40 eV to 80 eV at r/a∼0.8) is

  17. New superconducting cyclotron driven scanning proton therapy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Hans-Udo; Baumgarten, Christian; Geisler, Andreas; Heese, Jürgen; Hobl, Achim; Krischel, Detlef; Schillo, Michael; Schmidt, Stefan; Timmer, Jan

    2005-12-01

    Since one and a half decades ACCEL is investing in development and engineering of state of the art particle-therapy systems. A new medical superconducting 250 MeV proton cyclotron with special focus on the present and future beam requirements of fast scanning treatment systems has been designed. The first new ACCEL medical proton cyclotron is under commissioning at PSI for their PROSCAN proton therapy facility having undergone successful factory tests especially of the closed loop cryomagnetic system. The second cyclotron is part of ACCEL's integrated proton therapy system for Europe's first clinical center, RPTC in Munich. The cyclotron, the energy selection system, the beamline as well as the four gantries and patient positioners have been installed. The scanning system and major parts of the control software have already been tested. We will report on the concept of ACCEL's superconducting cyclotron driven scanning proton therapy systems and the current status of the commissioning work at PSI and RPTC.

  18. Cyclotron resonance effects on stochastic acceleration of light ionospheric ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N.; Schunk, R. W.; Sojka, J. J.

    1982-01-01

    The production of energetic ions with conical pitch angle distributions along the auroral field lines is a subject of considerable current interest. There are several theoretical treatments showing the acceleration (heating) of the ions by ion cyclotron waves. The quasi-linear theory predicts no acceleration when the ions are nonresonant. In the present investigation, it is demonstrated that the cyclotron resonances are not crucial for the transverse acceleration of ions by ion cyclotron waves. It is found that transverse energization of ionospheric ions, such as He(+), He(++), O(++), and O(+), is possible by an Electrostatic Hydrogen Cyclotron (EHC) wave even in the absence of cyclotron resonance. The mechanism of acceleration is the nonresonant stochastic heating. However, when there are resonant ions both the total energy gain and the number of accelerated ions increase with increasing parallel wave number.

  19. Plasma processing of spent nuclear fuel by two-frequency ion cyclotron resonance heating

    SciTech Connect

    Timofeev, A. V.

    2009-11-15

    A previously developed method for analyzing the plasma processing of spent nuclear fuel is generalized to a plasma containing multicharged fuel ions. In such a plasma, ion cyclotron resonance heating of nuclear ash ions should be carried out in two monochromatic RF fields of different frequencies, provided that the fraction of {xi} multicharged ions is small, {xi} {<=} 0.1, a condition that substantially restricts the productivity of systems for processing spent nuclear fuel. Ways of overcoming this difficulty are discussed.

  20. Critical electron pitch angle anisotropy necessary for chorus generation. [Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, R. K.

    1976-01-01

    Simultaneous wave, resonant-particle, and ambient-plasma data from OGO 5 for chorus emissions on August 15, 1968, were found consistent with the theoretical critical pitch-angle-anisotropy condition for whistler-mode instability by Doppler-shifted electron cyclotron resonance. Local generation, as determined by wave normal measurements, occurred only when the pitch-angle anisotropy of resonant electrons required for instability substantially exceeded the critical anisotropy defined by Kennel and Petschek (1966).

  1. Cyclotron Resonances in Electron Cloud Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Celata, C M; Furman, M A; Vay, J L; Grote, D P; Ng, J T; Pivi, M F; Wang, L F

    2009-05-05

    A new set of resonances for electron cloud dynamics in the presence of a magnetic field has been found. For short beam bunch lengths and low magnetic fields where l{sub b} << 2{pi}{omega}{sub c}, (l{sub b} = bunch duration, {omega}{sub c} = non-relativistic cyclotron frequency) resonances between the bunch frequency and harmonics of the cyclotron frequency cause an increase in the electron cloud density in narrow ranges of magnetic field near the resonances. For ILC parameters the increase in the density is up to a factor {approx} 3, and the spatial distribution of the electrons is broader near resonances, lacking the well-defined density 'stripes' of multipactoring found for non-resonant cases. Simulations with the 2D computer code POSINST, as well as a single-particle tracking code, were used to elucidate the physics of the dynamics. The resonances are expected to affect the electron cloud dynamics in the fringe fields of conventional lattice magnets and in wigglers, where the magnetic fields are low. Results of the simulations, the reason for the bunch-length dependence, and details of the dynamics will be discussed.

  2. Cyclotron Resonances in Electron Cloud Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Celata, C. M.; Furman, Miguel A.; Vay, J.-L.; Ng, J. S.T.; Grote, D. P.; Pivi, M. T. F.; Wang, L. F.

    2009-04-29

    A new set of resonances for electron cloud dynamics in the presence of a magnetic field has been found. For short beam bunch lengths and low magnetic fields where lb<< 2pi c/omega c (with lb = bunch length, omega c = non-relativistic cyclotron frequency) resonances between the bunch frequency and harmonics of the electron cyclotron frequency cause an increase in the electron cloud density in narrow ranges of magnetic field near the resonances. For ILC parameters the increase in the density is up to a factor ~;;3, and the spatial distribution of the electrons is broader near resonances, lacking the well-defined vertical density"stripes" found for non-resonant cases. Simulations with the 2D computer code POSINST, as well as a single-particle tracking code, were used to elucidate the physics of the dynamics. The existence of the resonances has been confirmed in experiments at PEP-II. The resonances are expected to affect the electron cloud dynamics in the fringe fields of conventional lattice magnets and in wigglers, where the magnetic fields are low. Results of the simulations and experimental observations, the reason for the bunch-length dependence, and details of the dynamics are discussed here.

  3. Ion Cyclotron Waves in the VASIMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brukardt, M. S.; Bering, E. A.; Chang-Diaz, F. R.; Squire, J. P.; Longmier, B.

    2008-12-01

    The Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket is an electric propulsion system under development at Ad Astra Rocket Company that utilizes several processes of ion acceleration and heating that occur in the Birkeland currents of an auroral arc system. Among these processes are parallel electric field acceleration, lower hybrid resonance heating, and ion cyclotron resonance heating. The VASIMR is capable of laboratory simulation of electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave heating during a single pass of the plasma through the resonance region. The plasma is generated by a helicon discharge of about 25 kW then passes through an RF booster stage that shoots left hand polarized slow mode waves from the high field side of the resonance. This paper will focus on the upgrades to the VX-200 test model over the last year. After summarizing the VX- 50 and VX-100 results, the new data from the VX-200 model will be presented. Lastly, the changes to the VASIMR experiment due to Ad Astra Rocket Company's new facility in Webster, Texas will also be discussed, including the possibility of collaborative experiments at the new facility.

  4. Loss cone-driven cyclotron maser instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Yun; Yi, Sibaek; Lim, Dayeh; Kim, Hee-Eun; Seough, Jungjoon; Yoon, Peter H.

    2013-11-01

    The weakly (or mildly) relativistic cyclotron maser instability has been successfully applied to explain the Earth's auroral kilometric radiation and other radio sources in nature and laboratory. Among the most important physical parameters that determine the instability criteria is the ratio of plasma-to-electron cyclotron frequencies, ωp/Ω. It is therefore instructive to consider how the normalized maximum growth rate, γmax/Ω, varies as a function of ωp/Ω. Although many authors have already discussed this problem, in order to complete the analysis, one must also understand how the radiation emission angle corresponding to the maximum growth, θmax, scales with ωp/Ω, since the propagation angle determines the radiation beaming pattern. Also, the behavior of the frequency corresponding to the maximum growth rate at each harmonic, (ωmax-sΩ)/Ω, where s=1,2,3,ċ , as a function of ωp/Ωis of importance for a complete understanding of the maser excitation. The present paper computes these additional quantities for the first time, making use of a model loss cone electron distribution function.

  5. Electrostatic ion cyclotron velocity shear instability

    SciTech Connect

    Lemons, D.S.; Winske, D.; Gary, S.P. )

    1992-12-01

    An electrostatic ion cyclotron instability driven by sheared velocity flow perpendicular to a uniform magnetic field is investigated in the local approximation. The dispersion equation, which includes all kinetic effects and involves only one important parameter, is cast in the form of Gordeyev integrals and solved numerically. The instability occurs roughly at multiples of the ion cyclotron frequency (but modified by the shear) with the growth rate of the individual harmonics overlapping in wavenumber. At small values of the shear parameter, the instability exists in two branches, one at long wavelength, [kappa][rho][sub i] [approximately] 0.5, and one at short wavelength, [kappa][rho][sub i] > 1.5 ([kappa][rho][sub i] is the wavenumber normalized to the ion gyroradius). At larger values of the shear parameter only the longer wavelength branch persists. The growth rate of the long wavelength mode, maximized over wavenumber and frequency, increases monotonically with the shear parameter. Properties of the instability are compared to those of Ganguli et al. obtained in the nonlocal limit.

  6. Textures, paragenesis and wall-rock alteration of lode-gold deposits in the Charters Towers district, north Queensland: implications for the conditions of ore formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreuzer, Oliver P.

    2006-01-01

    Ore deposits of the Charters Towers Goldfield (CTGF) are mainly hosted by fault-fill veins. Extensional (˜8% of all veins) and stockwork-like (˜3%) veins are less common and of little economic significance. Crosscutting relationships and published structural and geochronological data indicate a Late Silurian to Early Devonian timing of gold mineralization, coincident with regional shortening (D4) and I-type magmatism. Paragenetic relationships, which are uniform in veins everywhere within the CTGF, suggest that vein formation commenced with the deposition of large volumes of buck quartz (stage I), followed by buck and comb quartz, and significant pyrite and arsenopyrite precipitation (stage II). Gold was introduced during stage III, after earlier sphalerite and coincident with galena and chalcopyrite. Narrow, discontinuous calcite veins of stage IV mark the waning of gold-related hydrothermal activity or a later unrelated episode. Ore zones within the veins are everywhere composed of comb and/or gray quartz, calcite and/or ankerite and bands or clusters of fractured pyrite that are spatially associated with galena, sphalerite or chalcopyrite. Low-grade or barren vein sections, on the other hand, are mainly composed of milky buck quartz with little evidence for modification, overprinting or interaction with later fluids. Gold-related hydrothermal wall-rock alteration is symmetrically zoned, displaying proximal sericite-ankerite and distal epidote-chlorite-hematite assemblages that may be taken to imply wall-rock interaction with near neutral fluids (pH 5-6). Isocon plots assuming immobile Al, P, Ti, Y and Zr consistently indicate As, K, Pb, S and Zn enrichment and Na, Si and Sr depletion in altered wall-rock specimens relative to the least altered rocks. Alteration assemblages, quartz textures, fault rocks and published fluid inclusion and stable isotope data imply that the veins were formed under conditions of episodic fluid overpressuring (˜0.9-3.8 kbar), at a

  7. Characterization of the osteoblast-like cell phenotype under microgravity conditions in the NASA-approved Rotating Wall Vessel bioreactor (RWV).

    PubMed

    Rucci, Nadia; Migliaccio, Silvia; Zani, Bianca Maria; Taranta, Anna; Teti, Anna

    2002-01-01

    Weightlessness induces bone loss in humans and animal models. We employed the NASA-approved Rotating Wall Vessel bioreactor (RWV) to develop osteoblast-like cell cultures under microgravity and evaluate osteoblast phenotype and cell function. Rat osteoblast-like cell line (ROS.SMER#14) was grown in the RWV at a calculated gravity of 0.008g. For comparison, aliquots of cells were grown in conventional tissue culture dishes or in Non-Rotating Wall Vessels (N-RWV) maintained at unit gravity. In RWV, osteoblasts showed high levels of alkaline phosphatase expression and activity, and elevated expression of osteopontin, osteocalcin, and bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP-4). In contrast, the expression of osteonectin, bone sialoprotein II and BMP-2 were unaltered compared to cells in conventional culture conditions. These observations are consistent with a marked osteoblast phenotype. However, we observed that in RWV osteoblasts showed reduced proliferation. Furthermore, DNA nucleosome-size fragmentation was revealed both morphologically, by in situ staining with the Thymine-Adenine binding dye bis-benzimide, and electrophoretically, by DNA laddering. Surprisingly, no p53, nor bcl-2/bax, nor caspase 8 pathways were activated by microgravity, therefore the intracellular cascade leading to programmed cell death remains to be elucidated. Finally, consistent with an osteoclast-stimulating effect by microgravity, osteoblasts cultured in RWV showed upregulation of interleukin-6 (IL-6) mRNA, and IL-6 proved to be active at stimulating osteoclast formation and resorbing activity in vitro. We conclude that under microgravity, reduced osteoblast life span and enhanced IL-6 expression may result in inefficient osteoblast- and increased osteoclast-activity, respectively, thus potentially contributing to bone loss in individuals subjected to weightlessness.

  8. Cyclotron Production of Technetium-99m

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Katherine M.

    Technetium-99m (99mTc) has emerged as the most widely used radionuclide in medicine and is currently obtained from a 99Mo/ 99mTc generator system. At present, there are only a handful of ageing reactors worldwide capable of producing large quantities of the parent isotope, 99Mo, and owing to the ever growing shutdown periods for maintenance and repair of these ageing reactors, the reliable supply 99mTc has been compromised in recent years. With an interest in alternative strategies for producing this key medical isotope, this thesis focuses on several technical challenges related to the direct cyclotron production of 99mTc via the 100Mo(p,2n)99mTc reaction. In addition to evaluating the 100Mo(p,2n)99mTc and 100Mo(p,x)99Mo reactions, this work presented the first experimental evaluation of the 100Mo(p,2n) 99gTc excitation function in the range of 8-18 MeV. Thick target calculations suggested that large quantities of cyclotron-produced 99mTc may be possible. For example, a 6 hr irradiation at 500 μA with an energy window of 18→10 MeV is expected to yield 1.15 TBq of 99mTc. The level of coproduced 99gTc contaminant was found to be on par with the current 99Mo/99mTc generator standard eluted with a 24 hr frequency. Highly enriched 100Mo was required as the target material for 99mTc production and a process for recycling of this expensive material is presented. An 87% recovery yield is reported, including metallic target preparation, irradiation, 99mTc extraction, molybdate isolation, and finally hydrogen reduction to the metal. Further improvements are expected with additional optimization experiments. A method for forming structurally stable metallic molybdenum targets has also been developed. These targets are capable of withstanding more than a kilowatt of beam power and the reliable production and extraction of Curie quantities of 99mTc has been demonstrated. With the end-goal of using the cyclotron-produced 99mTc clinically, the quality of the cyclotron

  9. The nonlinear theory of slow-wave electron cyclotron masers with inclusion of the beam velocity spread

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Ling-Bao; Wang, Hong-Yu; Hou, Zhi-Ling; Jin, Hai-Bo; Du, Chao-Hai

    2013-12-15

    The nonlinear theory of slow-wave electron cyclotron masers (ECM) with an initially straight electron beam is developed. The evolution equation of the nonlinear beam electron energy is derived. The numerical studies of the slow-wave ECM efficiency with inclusion of Gaussian beam velocity spread are presented. It is shown that the velocity spread reduces the interaction efficiency. -- Highlights: •The theory of slow-wave electron cyclotron masers is considered. •The calculation of efficiency under the resonance condition is presented. •The efficiency under Gaussian velocity spreads has been obtained.

  10. Ion cyclotron emission calculations using a 2D full wave numerical code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batchelor, D. B.; Jaeger, E. F.; Colestock, P. L.

    1987-09-01

    Measurement of radiation in the HF band due to cyclotron emission by energetic ions produced by fusion reactions or neutral beam injection promises to be a useful diagnostic on large devices which are entering the reactor regime of operation. A number of complications make the modelling and interpretation of such measurements difficult using conventional geometrical optics methods. In particular the long wavelength and lack of high directivity of antennas in this frequency regime make observation of a single path across the plasma into a viewing dump impractical. Pickup antennas effectively see the whole plasma and wall reflection effects are important. We have modified our 2D full wave ICRH code2 to calculate wave fields due to a distribution of energetic ions in tokamak geometry. The radiation is modeled as due to an ensemble of localized source currents distributed in space. The spatial structure of the coherent wave field is then calculated including cyclotron harmonic damping as compared to the usual procedure of incoherently summing powers of individual radiators. This method has the advantage that phase information from localized radiating currents is globally retained so the directivity of the pickup antennas is correctly represented. Also standing waves and wall reflections are automatically included.

  11. Development of ZL400 Mine Cooling Unit Using Semi-Hermetic Screw Compressor and Its Application on Local Air Conditioning in Underground Long-Wall Face

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Zhaoxiang; Ji, Jianhu; Zhang, Xijun; Yan, Hongyuan; Dong, Haomin; Liu, Junjie

    2016-12-01

    Aiming at heat injuries occurring in the process of deep coal mining in China, a ZL400 mine-cooling unit employing semi-hermetic screw compressor with a cooling capacity of 400 kW is developed. This paper introduced its operating principle, structural characteristics and technical indexes. By using the self-built testing platform, some parameters for indication of its operation conditions were tested on the ground. The results show that the aforementioned cooling unit is stable in operation: cooling capacity of the unit was 420 kW underground-test conditions, while its COP (coefficient of performance) reached 3.4. To address the issue of heat injuries existing in No. 16305 U-shaped long-wall ventilation face of Jining No. 3 coal mine, a local air conditioning system was developed with ZL400 cooling unit as the system's core. The paper presented an analysis of characteristics of the air current flowing in the air-mixing and cooling mode of ZL400 cooling unit used in air intake way. Through i-d patterns we described the process of the airflow treatment, such as cooling, mixing and heating, etc. The cooling system decreased dry bulb temperature on working face by 3°C on average and 3.8°C at most, while lowered the web bulb temperature by 3.6°C on average and 4.8°C at most. At the same time, it reduced relative humidity by 5% on average and 8.6% at most. The field application of the ZL400 cooling unit had gain certain effects in air conditioning and provided support for the solution of mine heat injuries in China in terms of technology and equipment.

  12. Measurements and analyses of the distribution of the radioactivity induced by the secondary neutrons produced by 17-MeV protons in compact cyclotron facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Norihiro; Izumi, Yuichi; Yamanaka, Yoshiyuki; Gandou, Toshiyuki; Yamada, Masaaki; Oishi, Koji

    2017-09-01

    Measurements of reaction rates by secondary neutrons produced from beam losses by 17-MeV protons are conducted at a compact cyclotron facility with the foil activation method. The experimentally obtained distribution of the reaction rates of 197Au (n, γ) 198Au on the concrete walls suggests that a target and an electrostatic deflector as machine components for beam extraction of the compact cyclotron are principal beam loss points. The measurements are compared with calculations by the Monte Carlo code: PHITS. The calculated results based on the beam losses are good agreements with the measured ones within 21%. In this compact cyclotron facility, exponential attenuations with the distance from the electrostatic deflector in the distributions of the measured reaction rates were observed, which was looser than that by the inverse square of distance.

  13. Ion cyclotron and spin-flip emissions from fusion products in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Arunasalam, V.; Greene, G.J.; Young, K.M.

    1993-02-01

    Power emission by fusion products of tokamak plasmas in their ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) and at their spin-flip resonance frequency is calculated for some specific model fusion product velocity-space distribution functions. The background plasma of say deuterium (D) is assumed to be in equilibrium with a Maxwellian distribution both for the electrons and ions. The fusion product velocity distributions analyzed here are: (1) A monoenergetic velocity space ring distribution. (2) A monoenergetic velocity space spherical shell distribution. (3) An anisotropic Maxwellian distribution with T [perpendicular] [ne] T[parallel]and with appreciable drift velocity along the confining magnetic field. Single dressed'' test particle spontaneous emission calculations are presented first and the radiation temperature for ion cyclotron emission (ICE) is analyzed both for black-body emission and nonequilibrium conditions. Thresholds for instability and overstability conditions are then examined and quasilinear and nonlinear theories of the electromagnetic ion cyclotron modes are discussed. Distinctions between kinetic or causal instabilities'' and hydrodynamic instabilities'' are drawn and some numerical estimates are presented for typical tokamak parameters. Semiquantitative remarks are offered on wave accessibility, mode conversion, and parametric decay instabilities as possible for spatially localized ICE. Calculations are carried out both for k[parallel] = 0 for k[parallel] [ne] 0. The effects of the temperature anisotropy and large drift velocities in the parallel direction are also examined. Finally, proton spin-flip resonance emission and absorption calculations are also presented both for thermal equilibrium conditions and for an inverted'' population of states.

  14. Ion cyclotron and spin-flip emissions from fusion products in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Arunasalam, V.; Greene, G.J.; Young, K.M.

    1993-02-01

    Power emission by fusion products of tokamak plasmas in their ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) and at their spin-flip resonance frequency is calculated for some specific model fusion product velocity-space distribution functions. The background plasma of say deuterium (D) is assumed to be in equilibrium with a Maxwellian distribution both for the electrons and ions. The fusion product velocity distributions analyzed here are: (1) A monoenergetic velocity space ring distribution. (2) A monoenergetic velocity space spherical shell distribution. (3) An anisotropic Maxwellian distribution with T {perpendicular} {ne} T{parallel}and with appreciable drift velocity along the confining magnetic field. Single ``dressed`` test particle spontaneous emission calculations are presented first and the radiation temperature for ion cyclotron emission (ICE) is analyzed both for black-body emission and nonequilibrium conditions. Thresholds for instability and overstability conditions are then examined and quasilinear and nonlinear theories of the electromagnetic ion cyclotron modes are discussed. Distinctions between ``kinetic or causal instabilities`` and ``hydrodynamic instabilities`` are drawn and some numerical estimates are presented for typical tokamak parameters. Semiquantitative remarks are offered on wave accessibility, mode conversion, and parametric decay instabilities as possible for spatially localized ICE. Calculations are carried out both for k{parallel} = 0 for k{parallel} {ne} 0. The effects of the temperature anisotropy and large drift velocities in the parallel direction are also examined. Finally, proton spin-flip resonance emission and absorption calculations are also presented both for thermal equilibrium conditions and for an ``inverted`` population of states.

  15. Electron cyclotron heating and current drive studies during current ramp-up in Tore-Supra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimini, F. G.; Basiuk, V.; Bourdelle, C.; Bucalossi, J.; Fenzi-Bonizec, C.; Giruzzi, G.; Hoang, G. T.; Lennholm, M.; Sabot, R.; Ségui, J. L.; Thomas, P. R.

    2005-06-01

    In a recent series of experiments, electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) has been successfully used, at a level of 0.75 MW, for current profile tailoring during the current ramp-up in Tore-Supra. The electron cyclotron resonance heating power deposition was varied from on-axis to off-axis and the direction of the driven current from co to counter. In these conditions, the current profile is significantly modified with respect to those typically obtained in pure ohmic scenarios. Central reversed magnetic shear conditions have been achieved with on-axis counter-ECCD, accompanied by high electron temperature gradients, exhibiting internal transport barrier features. This improved electron transport is maintained for some time on the current flat-top when combining ECCD with ion cyclotron resonance heating in a (H)D minority scheme. Integrated interpretative analysis with the CRONOS code confirms that deeply reversed magnetic shear is indeed attained by on-axis counter-ECCD in low density conditions and in combination with a relatively fast controlled current ramp. The high electron temperature gradient is found to be located inside the negative magnetic shear region.

  16. Laboratory modeling of pulsed regimes of cyclotron instability in an ECR heated mirror-confined plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansfeld, Dmitry; Viktorov, Mikhail; Golubev, Sergey; Vodopyanov, Alexander

    Despite more than half a century history, the studies of the interaction between electromagnetic waves and particles in magnetoactive plasma under electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) conditions still remain topical. One of the most interesting ECR manifestations is the generation of bursts of electromagnetic radiation that are related to the explosive growth of cyclotron instabilities of the magnetoactive plasma confined in magnetic traps of various kinds and that are accompanied by particle precipitations from the trap. Such phenomena are observed in a wide range of plasma parameters under various conditions: in the magnetospheres of the Earth and planets, in solar coronal loops, and in laboratory magnetic traps. We demonstrate the use of a laboratory setup based on a magnetic mirror trap with plasma sustained by a gyrotron radiation under ECR conditions for investigation of the cyclotron instabilities similar to the ones which take place in space plasmas. Three stages of pulsed ECR discharge offer the opportunity to study wave-particles interactions for essentially different plasma parameters: the initial stage, when the density of hot (relativistic) electrons (Nh) exceeds the density of cold electrons (Nc), the developed discharge (Nh<cyclotron instability of different electromagnetic modes. In cold dense plasma whistlers, propagating nearly parallel to the trap axis, are effectively excited, and in rarefied plasma - slow or fast extraordinary wave (Z- or X- mode), propagating across the external magnetic field. The detailed investigation of spectral and temporal characteristics of non-stationary bursts of electromagnetic emission is presented. The interrelationship between the observed time-frequency spectrograms of electromagnetic emission with similar effects

  17. Accurate Monte Carlo modeling of cyclotrons for optimization of shielding and activation calculations in the biomedical field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Infantino, Angelo; Marengo, Mario; Baschetti, Serafina; Cicoria, Gianfranco; Longo Vaschetto, Vittorio; Lucconi, Giulia; Massucci, Piera; Vichi, Sara; Zagni, Federico; Mostacci, Domiziano

    2015-11-01

    Biomedical cyclotrons for production of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) radionuclides and radiotherapy with hadrons or ions are widely diffused and established in hospitals as well as in industrial facilities and research sites. Guidelines for site planning and installation, as well as for radiation protection assessment, are given in a number of international documents; however, these well-established guides typically offer analytic methods of calculation of both shielding and materials activation, in approximate or idealized geometry set up. The availability of Monte Carlo codes with accurate and up-to-date libraries for transport and interactions of neutrons and charged particles at energies below 250 MeV, together with the continuously increasing power of nowadays computers, makes systematic use of simulations with realistic geometries possible, yielding equipment and site specific evaluation of the source terms, shielding requirements and all quantities relevant to radiation protection. In this work, the well-known Monte Carlo code FLUKA was used to simulate two representative models of cyclotron for PET radionuclides production, including their targetry; and one type of proton therapy cyclotron including the energy selection system. Simulations yield estimates of various quantities of radiological interest, including the effective dose distribution around the equipment, the effective number of neutron produced per incident proton and the activation of target materials, the structure of the cyclotron, the energy degrader, the vault walls and the soil. The model was validated against experimental measurements and comparison with well-established reference data. Neutron ambient dose equivalent H*(10) was measured around a GE PETtrace cyclotron: an average ratio between experimental measurement and simulations of 0.99±0.07 was found. Saturation yield of 18F, produced by the well-known 18O(p,n)18F reaction, was calculated and compared with the IAEA recommended

  18. Electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves observed near the oxygen cyclotron frequency by ISEE 1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraser, B. J.; Samson, J. C.; Hu, Y. D.; Mcpherron, R. L.; Russell, C. T.

    1992-01-01

    The first results of observations of ion cyclotron waves by the elliptically orbiting ISEE 1 and 2 pair of spacecraft are reported. The most intense waves (8 nT) were observed in the outer plasmasphere where convection drift velocities were largest and the Alfven velocity was a minimum. Wave polarization is predominantly left-handed with propagation almost parallel to the ambient magnetic field, and the spectral slot and polarization reversal predicted by cold plasma propagation theory are identified in the wave data. Computations of the experimental wave spectra during the passage through the plasmapause show that the spectral slots relate to the local plasma parameters, possibly suggesting an ion cyclotron wave growth source near the spacecraft. A regular wave packet structure seen over the first 30 min of the event is attributed to the modulation of this energy source by the Pc 5 waves seen at the same time.

  19. Performance of Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre superconducting cyclotron liquid nitrogen distribution system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Gautam; Nandi, Chinmay; Bhattacharyya, Tamal Kumar; Chakrabarti, Alok

    2014-01-01

    The liquid nitrogen distribution at Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata, India K500 superconducting cyclotron uses parallel branches to cool the thermal shield of helium vessel housing the superconducting coil and the cryopanels. Liquid nitrogen is supplied to the thermal shields from a pressurised liquid nitrogen dewar. Direct measurement of flow is quite difficult and seldom used in an operational cryogenic system. The total flow and heat load of the liquid nitrogen system was estimated indirectly by continuous measurement of level in the liquid nitrogen tanks. A mathematical model was developed to evaluate liquid nitrogen flow in the parallel branches. The model was used to generate flow distribution for different settings and the total flow was compared with measured data.

  20. Wind tunnels with adapted walls for reducing wall interference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganzer, U.

    1979-01-01

    The basic principle of adaptable wind tunnel walls is explained. First results of an investigation carried out at the Aero-Space Institute of Berlin Technical University are presented for two dimensional flexible walls and a NACA 0012 airfoil. With five examples exhibiting very different flow conditions it is demonstrated that it is possible to reduce wall interference and to avoid blockage at transonic speeds by wall adaptation.

  1. Cyclotrons and positron emission tomography radiopharmaceuticals for clinical imaging.

    PubMed

    Saha, G B; MacIntyre, W J; Go, R T

    1992-07-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) requires positron-emitting radionuclides that emit 511-keV photons detectable by PET imagers. Positron-emitting radionuclides are commonly produced in charged particle accelerators, eg, linear accelerators or cyclotrons. The most widely available radiopharmaceuticals for PET imaging are carbon-11-, nitrogen-13-, and oxygen-15-labeled compounds, many of which, either in their normal state or incorporated in other compounds, serve as physiological tracers. Other useful PET radiopharmaceuticals include fluorine-18-, bromine-75-, gallium-68 (68Ga)-, rubidium-82 (82Rb)-, and copper-62 (62Cu)-labeled compounds. Many positron emitters have short half-lives and thus require on-site cyclotrons for application, and others (68Ga, 82Rb, and 62Cu) are available from radionuclides generators using relatively long-lived parent radionuclides. This review is divided into two sections: cyclotrons and PET radiopharmaceuticals for clinical imaging. In the cyclotron section, the principle of operation of the cyclotron, types of cyclotrons, medical cyclotrons, and production of radionuclides are discussed. In the section on PET radiopharmaceuticals, the synthesis and clinical use of PET radiopharmaceuticals are described.

  2. Results of RIKEN superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source with 28 GHz.

    PubMed

    Higurashi, Y; Ohnishi, J; Nakagawa, T; Haba, H; Tamura, M; Aihara, T; Fujimaki, M; Komiyama, M; Uchiyama, A; Kamigaito, O

    2012-02-01

    We measured the beam intensity of highly charged heavy ions and x-ray heat load for RIKEN superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source with 28 GHz microwaves under the various conditions. The beam intensity of Xe(20+) became maximum at B(min) ∼ 0.65 T, which was ∼65% of the magnetic field strength of electron cyclotron resonance (B(ECR)) for 28 GHz microwaves. We observed that the heat load of x-ray increased with decreasing gas pressure and field gradient at resonance zone. It seems that the beam intensity of highly charged heavy ions with 28 GHz is higher than that with 18 GHz at same RF power.

  3. Stability of drift-cyclotron loss-cone waves in H-mode plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, W. A.; Morales, G. J.

    2016-05-24

    The drift-cyclotron loss-cone mode was first studied in mirror machines. In such devices, particles with small pitch angles are not confined, creating a hole in the velocity distribution function that is a source of free energy and leads to micro-instabilities in the cyclotron-range of frequencies. In the edge region of tokamak devices operating under H-mode conditions, ion loss also occurs. In this case, gradient drift carries ions moving opposite to the plasma current preferentially into the divertor, creating a one-sided loss cone. A simple analysis shows that for the quiescent H-mode plasmas in DIII-D the critical gradient for instability is exceeded within 2 cm of the separatrix, and the maximum growth rate at the separatrix is 3×107 s-1.

  4. Predicting long-lived, neutron-induced activation of concrete in a cyclotron vault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, L. R.

    2001-07-01

    Many elements in concrete can become activated by neutrons in a cyclotron vault, but only a few of the activation products are long-lived. The most prominent of these are Eu-152, Eu-154, Co-60, and Cs-134 which build up over time from (n, γ) reactions in trace amounts of stable Europium, Cobalt, and Cesium that are normally present in concrete in concentrations of a few parts per million, or less, by weight. A retrospective analysis of data taken in connection with a previous decommissioning of a cyclotron vault, coupled with independent published data, gives us an estimate of the concentrations of these elements in concrete. With that estimate as a benchmark, we then employ a Monte Carlo Radiation Transport Code to estimate the long-term activation profile in concrete for arbitrary irradiation conditions.

  5. MM-wave cyclotron auto-resonance maser for plasma heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceccuzzi, S.; Dattoli, G.; Di Palma, E.; Doria, A.; Gallerano, G. P.; Giovenale, E.; Mirizzi, F.; Spassovsky, I.; Ravera, G. L.; Surrenti, V.; Tuccillo, A. A.

    2014-02-01

    Heating and Current Drive systems are of outstanding relevance in fusion plasmas, magnetically confined in tokamak devices, as they provide the tools to reach, sustain and control burning conditions. Heating systems based on the electron cyclotron resonance (ECRH) have been extensively exploited on past and present machines DEMO, and the future reactor will require high frequencies. Therefore, high power (≥1MW) RF sources with output frequency in the 200 - 300 GHz range would be necessary. A promising source is the so called Cyclotron Auto-Resonance Maser (CARM). Preliminary results of the conceptual design of a CARM device for plasma heating, carried out at ENEA-Frascati will be presented together with the planned R&D development.

  6. Filamental quenching of the current-driven ion-cyclotron instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cartier, S. L.; Dangelo, N.; Merlino, R. L.; Krumm, P. H.

    1985-01-01

    Since their discovery by D'Angelo and Motley (1962), ion-cyclotron waves have been an area of active research. Drummond and Rosenbluth (1962) have first conducted a theoretical analysis of the current-driven ion-cyclotron wave instability, taking into account a uniform, magnetized plasma, without magnetic shear, in which electrons drift along B field lines with the same drift velocity at all points in the plasma. Bakshi et al. (1983) have found conditions for which the instability is completely quenched. This phenomenon has been referred to as filamental quenching. The present investigation is concerned with a systematic test of the filamental quenching effect. It is found that filamental quenching operates at widths of the current channel comparable to the local Larmor radius, in agreement with the conclusions of Bakshi et al.

  7. Filamental quenching of the current-driven ion-cyclotron instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cartier, S. L.; Dangelo, N.; Merlino, R. L.; Krumm, P. H.

    1985-01-01

    Since their discovery by D'Angelo and Motley (1962), ion-cyclotron waves have been an area of active research. Drummond and Rosenbluth (1962) have first conducted a theoretical analysis of the current-driven ion-cyclotron wave instability, taking into account a uniform, magnetized plasma, without magnetic shear, in which electrons drift along B field lines with the same drift velocity at all points in the plasma. Bakshi et al. (1983) have found conditions for which the instability is completely quenched. This phenomenon has been referred to as filamental quenching. The present investigation is concerned with a systematic test of the filamental quenching effect. It is found that filamental quenching operates at widths of the current channel comparable to the local Larmor radius, in agreement with the conclusions of Bakshi et al.

  8. MM-wave cyclotron auto-resonance maser for plasma heating

    SciTech Connect

    Ceccuzzi, S.; Ravera, G. L.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Dattoli, G.; Di Palma, E.; Doria, A.; Gallerano, G. P.; Giovenale, E.; Spassovsky, I.; Surrenti, V.; Mirizzi, F.

    2014-02-12

    Heating and Current Drive systems are of outstanding relevance in fusion plasmas, magnetically confined in tokamak devices, as they provide the tools to reach, sustain and control burning conditions. Heating systems based on the electron cyclotron resonance (ECRH) have been extensively exploited on past and present machines DEMO, and the future reactor will require high frequencies. Therefore, high power (≥1MW) RF sources with output frequency in the 200 - 300 GHz range would be necessary. A promising source is the so called Cyclotron Auto-Resonance Maser (CARM). Preliminary results of the conceptual design of a CARM device for plasma heating, carried out at ENEA-Frascati will be presented together with the planned R and D development.

  9. Sensitive test for ion-cyclotron resonant heating in the solar wind.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Justin C; Maruca, Bennett A; Stevens, Michael L; Zaslavsky, Arnaud

    2013-03-01

    Plasma carrying a spectrum of counterpropagating field-aligned ion-cyclotron waves can strongly and preferentially heat ions through a stochastic Fermi mechanism. Such a process has been proposed to explain the extreme temperatures, temperature anisotropies, and speeds of ions in the solar corona and solar wind. We quantify how differential flow between ion species results in a Doppler shift in the wave spectrum that can prevent this strong heating. Two critical values of differential flow are derived for strong heating of the core and tail of a given ion distribution function. Our comparison of these predictions to observations from the Wind spacecraft reveals excellent agreement. Solar wind helium that meets the condition for strong core heating is nearly 7 times hotter than hydrogen on average. Ion-cyclotron resonance contributes to heating in the solar wind, and there is a close link between heating, differential flow, and temperature anisotropy.

  10. Stability of drift-cyclotron loss-cone waves in H-mode plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, W. A.; Morales, G. J.

    2016-05-24

    The drift-cyclotron loss-cone mode was first studied in mirror machines. In such devices, particles with small pitch angles are not confined, creating a hole in the velocity distribution function that is a source of free energy and leads to micro-instabilities in the cyclotron-range of frequencies. In the edge region of tokamak devices operating under H-mode conditions, ion loss also occurs. In this case, gradient drift carries ions moving opposite to the plasma current preferentially into the divertor, creating a one-sided loss cone. A simple analysis shows that for the quiescent H-mode plasmas in DIII-D the critical gradient for instability is exceeded within 2 cm of the separatrix, and the maximum growth rate at the separatrix is 3×107 s-1.

  11. Stability of drift-cyclotron loss-cone waves in H-mode plasmas

    DOE PAGES

    Farmer, W. A.; Morales, G. J.

    2016-05-24

    The drift-cyclotron loss-cone mode was first studied in mirror machines. In such devices, particles with small pitch angles are not confined, creating a hole in the velocity distribution function that is a source of free energy and leads to micro-instabilities in the cyclotron-range of frequencies. In the edge region of tokamak devices operating under H-mode conditions, ion loss also occurs. In this case, gradient drift carries ions moving opposite to the plasma current preferentially into the divertor, creating a one-sided loss cone. A simple analysis shows that for the quiescent H-mode plasmas in DIII-D the critical gradient for instability ismore » exceeded within 2 cm of the separatrix, and the maximum growth rate at the separatrix is 3×107 s-1.« less

  12. Experimental Study of a Gyrotron with a Sectioned Klystron-Type Cavity Operated at Higher Cyclotron Harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandurkin, I. V.; Kalynov, Yu. K.; Savilov, A. V.

    2016-02-01

    We are planning to use extended cavities in order to excite gyrotrons with large electron orbits, which are operated at higher cyclotron harmonics in the terahertz frequency range. This is determined by both the weakness of the electron-wave interaction, and relatively low operating currents. Since the diffraction Q-factor of such cavities is high, a significant part of the highfrequency power produced by the electron beam is lost due to the ohmic loss in the cavity walls. As a way to solve this problem, we proposed a sectioned klystron-type cavity, where an extended length of the electron-wave interaction region can be combined with a relatively low diffraction Q-factor of the system. This work presents the results of the first experiment on a gyrotron with a sectioned cavity, where selective excitation of higher (second and third) cyclotron harmonics was observed in the terahertz frequency range (0 .55 and 0 .74 THz).

  13. Analytical study of effects of positron density and temperature anisotropy on electrostatic ion cyclotron instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barati Moqadam Niyat, M.; Khorashadizadeh, S. M.; Niknam, A. R.

    2017-03-01

    The effects of the positron concentration and ion temperature anisotropy on the electrostatic ion cyclotron instability are studied analytically, in a magnetized electron-positron-ion plasma with temperature anisotropy, using the linear kinetic theory. Positrons and electrons are supposed to drift either in the same direction or in opposite directions relative to singly ionized stationary ions and parallel to the magnetic field. The dispersion relation of the electrostatic ion cyclotron waves is derived, and then the conditions for exciting the instability of the waves are investigated. Moreover, the condition for the marginally stable state is also studied. It is found that as the positron concentration and perpendicular ion temperature increase, the growth rate of the electrostatic ion cyclotron instability decreases, whereas the critical drift velocity increases. It is also found that for the chosen set of parameters, with electrons and positrons drifting in the same direction, the instability in the plasma is stronger than when the electrons and positrons drift in opposite directions. In addition, a comparison is made to the normal electron-ion plasma.

  14. Generation of the jovian radio emission by the maser cyclotron instability: first lessons from JUNO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louarn, Philippe; Allegrini, Frederic; Kurth, WilliamS.; Valek, Philips. W.; McComas, Dave; Bagenal, Fran; Bolton, Scott; Connerney, John; Ebert, Robert W.; Levin, Steven; Szalay, Jamey; Wilson, Robert; Zink, Jenna; André, Nicolas; Imai, Masafumi

    2017-04-01

    Using JUNO plasma and wave observations (JADE and Waves instruments), the scenario for the generation of jovian auroral radio emissions are analyzed. The sources of radiation are identified by localized intensifications of the radio flux at frequencies close to the electron gyrofrequency. Not surprisingly, it is shown that the cyclotron maser instability is perfectly adapted to the plasma conditions prevailing in the radio sources. However, it appears that different forms of activation of the cyclotron maser are observed. For radiation at hectometric wavelengths (one of the main emissions), pronounced loss-cones in the electron distribution functions are likely the source of free energy. The sources would be extended over several thousand km in directions traverse to the magnetic field. The applications of the theory reveals that sufficient growth rates are obtained from the distributions functions that are actually measured by JADE. This differs from the Earth scenario for which 'trapped' distribution functions drive the maser. More localized sources are also observed, possibly linked to local acceleration process. These examples may present analogies with the 'Earth' scenario, with other forms of free energy than the loss-cone. A first lesson of these direct in-situ JADE and RPWS observations is thus to confirm the maser cyclotron scenario with, however, conditions for the wave amplification and detailed maser processes that appear to be different than at Earth.

  15. Electron Cyclotron Resonances in Electron Cloud Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Celata, Christine; Celata, C.M.; Furman, Miguel A.; Vay, J.-L.; Yu, Jennifer W.

    2008-06-25

    We report a previously unknown resonance for electron cloud dynamics. The 2D simulation code"POSINST" was used to study the electron cloud buildup at different z positions in the International Linear Collider positron damping ring wiggler. An electron equilibrium density enhancement of up to a factor of 3 was found at magnetic field values for which the bunch frequency is an integral multiple of the electron cyclotron frequency. At low magnetic fields the effects of the resonance are prominent, but when B exceeds ~;;(2 pi mec/(elb)), with lb = bunch length, effects of the resonance disappear. Thus short bunches and low B fields are required for observing the effect. The reason for the B field dependence, an explanation of the dynamics, and the results of the 2D simulations and of a single-particle tracking code used to elucidate details of the dynamics are discussed.

  16. Electron Cyclotron Emission Diagnostics on ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Richard; Austin, Max; Phillips, Perry; Rowan, William; Beno, Joseph; Auroua, Abelhamid; Feder, Russell; Patel, Ashish; Hubbard, Amanda; Pandya, Hitesh

    2010-11-01

    Electron cyclotron emission (ECE) will be employed on ITER to measure the radial profile of electron temperature and non thermal features of the electron distribution as well as measurements of ELMs, magnetic islands, high frequency instabilities, and turbulence. There are two quasioptical systems, designed with Gaussian beam analysis. One view is radial, primarily for temperature profile measurement, the other views at a small angle to radial for measuring non-thermal emission. Radiation is conducted to by a long corrugated waveguide to a multichannel Michelson interferometer which provides wide wavelength coverage but limited time response as well as two microwave radiometers which cover the fundamental and second harmonic ECE and provide excellent time response. Measurements will be made in both X and O mode. In-situ calibration is provided by a novel hot calibration source. We discuss spatial resolution and the implications for physics studies.

  17. Cyclotron maser using the anomalous Doppler effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didenko, A. N.; Borisov, A. R.; Fomenko, G. P.; Shlapakovskii, A. S.; Shtein, Iu. G.

    1983-11-01

    The operation of an anomalous-Doppler-effect cyclotron-resonance maser using a waveguide partially filled with dielectric as the slow-wave system is reported. The device investigated is similar to that of Didenko et al. (1983) and comprises a 300-mm-long 50-mm-o.d. 30-mm-i.d. waveguide with fabric-laminate dielectric, located 150 mm from the cathode in a 500-mm-long region of uniform 0-20-kG magnetic field, and a coaxial magnetic-insulation gun producing a 13-mm-i.d. 25-mm-o.d. hollow electron beam. Radiation at 12 + or - 1 mm wavelength and optimum power 20 MW is observed using hot-carrier detectors, with a clear peak in the power-versus-magnetic-field curve at about 6.4 kG.

  18. A simple electron cyclotron resonance ion sourcea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welton, R. F.; Moran, T. F.; Feeney, R. K.; Thomas, E. W.

    1996-04-01

    A simple, all permanent magnet, 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source has been developed for the production of stable beams of low charge state ions from gaseous feed materials. The source can produce ˜1 mA of low energy (3 kV) singly charged ion current in the 10-4 Torr pressure range. The source can also be operated in a more efficient low-pressure mode at an order of magnitude lower pressure. In this latter range, for example, the ionization efficiency of Ar is estimated to be 1% with charge states up to Ar8+ present. Operation in the low-pressure mode requires low power input (˜20 W). These features make the source especially suited for use with small accelerator systems for a number of applications including ion implantation, mass spectrometry, and atomic collision experiments where multiply charged ions are desirable. Design details and performance characteristics of the source are presented.

  19. Folded waveguide coupler for ion cyclotron heating

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, T.L.; Chen, G.L.

    1986-01-01

    A new type of waveguide coupler for plasma heating in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies is described. The coupler consists of a series of interleaved metallic vanes within a rectangular enclosure analogous to a wide rectangular waveguide that has been ''folded'' several times. At the mouth of the coupler, a plate is attached which contains coupling apertures in each fold or every other fold of the waveguide, depending upon the wavenumber spectrum desired. This plate serves primarily as a wave field polarizer that converts coupler fields to the polarization of the fast magnetosonic wave within the plasma. Theoretical estimates indicate that the folded waveguide is capable of high-efficiency, multimegawatt operation into a plasma. Bench tests have verified the predicted field structure within the waveguide in preparation for high-power tests on the Radio Frequency Test Facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  20. Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Jongen, Y.

    1984-05-01

    Starting with the pioneering work of R. Geller and his group in Grenoble (France), at least 14 ECR sources have been built and tested during the last five years. Most of those sources have been extremely successful, providing intense, stable and reliable beams of highly charged ions for cyclotron injection or atomic physics research. However, some of the operational features of those sources disagreed with commonly accepted theories on ECR source operation. To explain the observed behavior of actual sources, it was found necessary to refine some of the crude ideas we had about ECR sources. Some of those new propositions are explained, and used to make some extrapolations on the possible future developments in ECR sources.

  1. Shielding design of the Mayo Clinic Scottsdale cyclotron vault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riper, Kenneth A. Van; Metzger, Robert L.; Nelson, Kevin

    2017-09-01

    Mayo Clinic Scottsdale (Scottsdale, Arizona) is building a cyclotron vault containing a cyclotron with adjacent targets and a beam line leading to an external target. The targets are irradiated by high energy (15 to 16.5 MeV) protons for the production of radioisotopes. We performed Monte Carlo radiation transport simulations to calculate the radiation dose outside of the vault during irradiation of the cyclotron and external targets. We present the Monte Carlo model including the geometry, sources, and variance reduction methods. Mesh tallies surrounding the vault show the external dose rate is within acceptable limits.

  2. Ionospheric modification at twice the electron cyclotron frequency.

    PubMed

    Djuth, F T; Pedersen, T R; Gerken, E A; Bernhardt, P A; Selcher, C A; Bristow, W A; Kosch, M J

    2005-04-01

    In 2004, a new transmission band was added to the HAARP high-frequency ionospheric modification facility that encompasses the second electron cyclotron harmonic at altitudes between approximately 220 and 330 km. Initial observations indicate that greatly enhanced airglow occurs whenever the transmission frequency approximately matches the second electron cyclotron harmonic at the height of the upper hybrid resonance. This is the reverse of what happens at higher electron cyclotron harmonics. The measured optical emissions confirm the presence of accelerated electrons in the plasma.

  3. Accelerators for hadrontherapy: From Lawrence cyclotrons to linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaldi, U.; Bonomi, R.; Braccini, S.; Crescenti, M.; Degiovanni, A.; Garlasché, M.; Garonna, A.; Magrin, G.; Mellace, C.; Pearce, P.; Pittà, G.; Puggioni, P.; Rosso, E.; Verdú Andrés, S.; Wegner, R.; Weiss, M.; Zennaro, R.

    2010-08-01

    Hadrontherapy with protons and carbon ions is a fast developing methodology in radiation oncology. The accelerators used and planned for this purpose are reviewed starting from the cyclotrons used in the thirties. As discussed in the first part of this paper, normal and superconducting cyclotrons are still employed, together with synchrotrons, for proton therapy while for carbon ion therapy synchrotrons have been till now the only option. The latest developments concern a superconducting cyclotron for carbon ion therapy, fast-cycling high frequency linacs and 'single room' proton therapy facilities. These issues are discussed in the second part of the paper by underlining the present challenges, in particular the treatment of moving organs.

  4. ECR Ion Source for a High-Brightness Cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comeaux, Justin; McIntyre, Peter; Assadi, Saeed

    2011-10-01

    New technology is being developed for high-brightness, high-current cyclotrons with performance benefits for accelerator-driven subcritical fission power, medical isotope production, and proton beam cancer therapy. This paper describes the design for a 65 kV electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source that will provide high-brightness beam for injection into the cyclotron. The ion source is modeled closely upon the one that is used at the Paul Scherrer Institute. Modifications are being made to provide enhanced brightness and compatibility for higher-current operation.

  5. Improving cancer treatment with cyclotron produced radionuclides. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, S.M.; Finn, R.D.

    1993-11-01

    This report describes our continuing long term goal of promoting nuclear medicine applications by improving the scientific basis for tumor diagnosis, treatment and treatment follow-up based on the use of cyclotron produced radiotracers in oncology. The program includes 3 interactive components: Radiochemistry/Cyclotron; Pharmacology; and Immunology. An essential strategy is as follows: novel radionuclides and radiotracers developed in the Radiochemistry/Cyclotron section will be employed in the Pharmacology and Immunology sections during the next year. The development of novel radionuclides and tracers is of course useful in and of itself, but their utility is greatly enhanced by the interaction with the immunology and pharmacology components of the program.

  6. Radiation Monitoring System of 30 MeV Cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jin-Woo; Hur, Min-Goo; Jeong, Gyosung; Kim, Jongil

    2017-09-01

    A state-of-the-art radiation monitoring system was implemented at KAERI for a 30-MeV cyclotron. This system consists of several types of radiation measuring systems for ambient dose equivalent rate measurements of outside photon and neutron areas as well as inside the cyclotron, and monitors the alpha and beta particulates released from a stack, as well as the results of worker contamination at the portal of the cyclotron. In addition, an automatic alarm system is also mounted if there are alarms in the measuring systems.

  7. Cyclotron Maser Emission - Stars, Planets and Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorgul, Irena

    2010-11-01

    X-ray and radio observations of active stars over many years have shown that they frequently generate X-ray bursts that are quickly followed by radio bursts. In many cases the radio bursts are highly polarised. More recently, the star CU Virginis has been found to exhibit pulsar-like behaviour. In both these situations we believe that the radio emission can be best explained by a cyclotron maser type instability initiated by electron beams funnelling down converging magnetic field configurations typical of a dipole magnetic topology. Just such a geometry also exists in the Earth's auroral zone and so our model can explain the Earth's auroral kilometric radiation (AKR). Via a similar process, all the gas giant/magnetised planets in the solar system also emit radio emission. We have established a laboratory-based facility that has verified many of the details of our original theoretical description. The experiment has demonstrated, for example, that an electron beam entering a strongly converging magnetic field geometry does indeed produce a ``horse-shoe'' (or crescent-shaped) distribution in velocity space. It is the generation of this horse-shoe distribution, also observed in the Earth's auroral zone, which is vital for our theoretical model. It leads to a population inversion in the perpendicular velocity distribution and generation of electromagnetic waves close to the cyclotron frequency. We will discuss recent developments in the theory and simulation of the instability and relate these to the laboratory, space and astrophysical observations. The research was supported by UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council. The input of R.A. Cairns, R. Bingham, B.J. Kellett and the experimental and computer modelling team at Strathclyde University, Glasgow is gratefully acknowledged.

  8. Global Simulation of Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Gamayunov, K.; Gallagher, D. L.; Kozyra, J. U.

    2007-01-01

    It is well known that the effects of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves on ring current (RC) ion and radiation belt (RB) electron dynamics strongly depend on such particle/wave characteristics as the phase-space distribution function, frequency, wave-normal angle, wave energy, and the form of wave spectral energy density. The consequence is that accurate modeling of EMIC waves and RC particles requires robust inclusion of the interdependent dynamics of wave growth/damping, wave propagation, and particles. Such a self-consistent model is being progressively developed by Khazanov et al. [2002 - 2007]. This model is based on a system of coupled kinetic equations for the RC and EMIC wave power spectral density along with the ray tracing equations. We will discuss the recent progress in understanding EMIC waves formation mechanisms in the inner magnetosphere. This problem remains unsettled in spite of many years of experimental and theoretical studies. Modern satellite observations by CRRES, Polar and Cluster still do not reveal the whole picture experimentally since they do not stay long enough in the generation region to give a full account of all the spatio-temporal structure of EMIC waves. The complete self-consistent theory taking into account all factors significant for EMIC waves generation remains to be developed. Several mechanisms are discussed with respect to formation of EMIC waves, among them are nonlinear modification of the ionospheric reflection by precipitating energetic protons, modulation of ion-cyclotron instability by long-period (Pc3/4) pulsations, reflection of waves from layers of heavy-ion gyroresonances, and nonlinearities of wave generation process. We show that each of these mechanisms have their attractive features and explains certain part experimental data but any of them, if taken alone, meets some difficulties when compared to observations. We conclude that development of a refined nonlinear theory and further correlated analysis

  9. Global Simulation of Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, George V.; Gallagher, D. L.; Kozyra, J. U.

    2007-01-01

    It is very well known that the effects of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves on ring current (RC) ion and radiation belt (RB) electron dynamics strongly depend on such particle/wave characteristics as the phase-space distribution function, frequency, wave-normal angle, wave energy, and the form of wave spectral energy density. The consequence is that accurate modeling of EMIC waves and RC particles requires robust inclusion of the interdependent dynamics of wave growth/damping, wave propagation, and particles. Such a self-consistent model is being progressively developed by Khazanov et al. This model is based on a system of coupled kinetic equations for the RC and EMIC wave power spectral density along with the ray tracing equations. We will discuss the recent progress in understanding EMIC waves formation mechanisms in the inner magnetosphere. This problem remains unsettled in spite of many years of experimental and theoretical studies. Modern satellite observations by CRRES, Polar and Cluster still do not reveal the whole picture experimentally since they do not stay long enough in the generation region to give a full account of all the spatio-temporal structure of EMIC waves. The complete self-consistent theory taking into account all factors significant for EMIC waves generation remains to be developed. Several mechanisms are discussed with respect to formation of EMIC waves, among them are nonlinear modification of the ionospheric reflection by precipitating energetic protons, modulation of ion-cyclotron instability by long-period (Pc3/4) pulsations, reflection of waves from layers of heavy-ion gyroresonances, and nonlinearities of wave generation process. We show that each of these mechanisms have their attractive features and explains certain part experimental data but any of them, if taken alone, meets some difficulties when compared to observations. We conclude that development of a refined nonlinear theory and further correlated analysis of modern

  10. Global Simulation of Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Gamayunov, K.; Gallagher, D. L.; Kozyra, J. U.

    2007-01-01

    It is well known that the effects of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves on ring current (RC) ion and radiation belt (RB) electron dynamics strongly depend on such particle/wave characteristics as the phase-space distribution function, frequency, wave-normal angle, wave energy, and the form of wave spectral energy density. The consequence is that accurate modeling of EMIC waves and RC particles requires robust inclusion of the interdependent dynamics of wave growth/damping, wave propagation, and particles. Such a self-consistent model is being progressively developed by Khazanov et al. [2002 - 2007]. This model is based on a system of coupled kinetic equations for the RC and EMIC wave power spectral density along with the ray tracing equations. We will discuss the recent progress in understanding EMIC waves formation mechanisms in the inner magnetosphere. This problem remains unsettled in spite of many years of experimental and theoretical studies. Modern satellite observations by CRRES, Polar and Cluster still do not reveal the whole picture experimentally since they do not stay long enough in the generation region to give a full account of all the spatio-temporal structure of EMIC waves. The complete self-consistent theory taking into account all factors significant for EMIC waves generation remains to be developed. Several mechanisms are discussed with respect to formation of EMIC waves, among them are nonlinear modification of the ionospheric reflection by precipitating energetic protons, modulation of ion-cyclotron instability by long-period (Pc3/4) pulsations, reflection of waves from layers of heavy-ion gyroresonances, and nonlinearities of wave generation process. We show that each of these mechanisms have their attractive features and explains certain part experimental data but any of them, if taken alone, meets some difficulties when compared to observations. We conclude that development of a refined nonlinear theory and further correlated analysis

  11. The NSCL cyclotron gas stopper - Entering commissioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, S.; Bollen, G.; Chouhan, S.; Das, J. J.; Green, M.; Magsig, C.; Morrissey, D. J.; Ottarson, J.; Sumithrarachchi, C.; Villari, A. C. C.; Zeller, A.

    2016-06-01

    Linear gas stopping cells have been used successfully at NSCL to slow down ions produced by projectile fragmentation from the 100 MeV/u to the keV energy range. These 'stopped beams' have first been used for low-energy high precision experiments and more recently for NSCLs re-accelerator ReA. A gas-filled reverse cyclotron is currently under construction by the NSCL to complement the existing stopping cells: Due to its extended stopping length, efficient stopping and fast extraction is expected even for light and medium-mass ions, which are difficult to thermalize in linear gas cells. The device is based on a 2.6 T maximum-field cyclotron-type magnet to confine the injected beam while it is slowed down in ≈100 mbar of LN2-temperature helium gas. Once thermalized, the beam will be transported to the center of the device by a traveling-wave RF-carpet system, extracted along the symmetry axis with an ion conveyor and miniature RF-carpets, and accelerated to a few tens of keV of energy for delivery to the users. The superconducting magnet has been constructed on a 60 kV platform and energized to its nominal field strength. The magnet's two cryostats use 3 cryo-refrigerators each and liquid-nitrogen cooled thermal shields to cool the coil pair to superconductivity. This concept, chosen not to have to rely on external liquid helium, has been working well. Measurements of axial and radial field profiles confirm the field calculations. The individual RF-ion guiding components for low-energy ion transport through the device have been tested successfully. The beam stopping chamber with its 0.9 m-diameter RF carpet system and the ion extraction system are being prepared for installation inside the magnet for low-energy ion transport tests.

  12. Global Simulation of Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Gamayunov, K. V.; Gallagher, D. L.; Kozyra, J. U.

    2007-12-01

    It is well known that the effects of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves on ring current (RC) ion and radiation belt (RB) electron dynamics strongly depend on such particle/wave characteristics as the phase-space distribution function, frequency, wave-normal angle, wave energy, and the form of wave spectral energy density. The consequence is that accurate modeling of EMIC waves and RC particles requires robust inclusion of the interdependent dynamics of wave growth/damping, wave propagation, and particles. Such a self-consistent model is being progressively developed by Khazanov et al. [2002 - 2007]. This model is based on a system of coupled kinetic equations for the RC and EMIC wave power spectral density along with the ray tracing equations. We will discuss the recent progress in understanding EMIC waves formation mechanisms in the inner magnetosphere. This problem remains unsettled in spite of many years of experimental and theoretical studies. Modern satellite observations by CRRES, Polar and Cluster still do not reveal the whole picture experimentally since they do not stay long enough in the generation region to give a full account of all the spatio-temporal structure of EMIC waves. The complete self-consistent theory taking into account all factors significant for EMIC waves generation remains to be developed. Several mechanisms are discussed with respect to formation of EMIC waves, among them are nonlinear modification of the ionospheric reflection by precipitating energetic protons, modulation of ion-cyclotron instability by long-period (Pc3/4) pulsations, reflection of waves from layers of heavy-ion gyroresonances, and nonlinearities of wave generation process. We show that each of these mechanisms have their attractive features and explains certain part experimental data but any of them, if taken alone, meets some difficulties when compared to observations. We conclude that development of a refined nonlinear theory and further correlated analysis

  13. Observation of increased ion cyclotron resonance signal duration through electric field perturbations.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Nathan K; Bruce, James E

    2005-09-15

    Ion motion in Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) is complex and the subject of ongoing theoretical and experimental studies. Two predominant pathways for the loss of ICR signals are thought to include damping of cyclotron motion, in which ions lose kinetic energy and radially damp toward the center of the ICR cell, and dephasing of ion coherence, in which ions of like cyclotron frequency become distributed out of phase at similar cyclotron radii. Both mechanisms result in the loss of induced ion image current in FTICR-MS measurements and are normally inseparable during time-domain signal analysis. For conventional ICR measurements which take advantage of ion ensembles, maximization of the ion population size and density can produce the desired effect of increasing phase coherence of ions during cyclotron motion. However, this approach also presents the risk of coalescence of ion packets of similar frequencies. In general, ICR researchers in the past have lacked the tools necessary to distinguish or independently control dephasing and damping mechanisms for ICR signal loss. Nonetheless, the ability to impart greater phase coherence of ions in ICR measurements will allow significant advances in FTICR-MS research by improving the current understanding of ICR signal loss contributions of dephasing and damping of ion ensembles, increasing overall time-domain signal length, and possibly, resulting in more routine ultrahigh resolution measurements. The results presented here demonstrate the ability to employ a high density electron beam to perturb electric fields within the ICR cell during detection of cyclotron motion, in an approach we call electron-promoted ion coherence (EPIC). As such, EPIC reduces ICR signal degradation through loss of phase coherence, and much longer time-domain signals can be obtained. Our results demonstrate that time-domain signals can be extended by more than a factor of 4 with the implementation of EPIC, as

  14. Free vibration of an embedded single-walled carbon nanotube with various boundary conditions using the RMVT-based nonlocal Timoshenko beam theory and DQ method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chih-Ping; Lai, Wei-Wen

    2015-04-01

    The nonlocal Timoshenko beam theories (TBTs), based on the Reissner mixed variation theory (RMVT) and principle of virtual displacement (PVD), are derived for the free vibration analysis of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) embedded in an elastic medium and with various boundary conditions. The strong formulations of the nonlocal TBTs are derived using Hamilton's principle, in which Eringen's nonlocal constitutive relations are used to account for the small-scale effect. The interaction between the SWCNT and its surrounding elastic medium is simulated using the Winkler and Pasternak foundation models. The frequency parameters of the embedded SWCNT are obtained using the differential quadrature (DQ) method. In the cases of the SWCNT without foundations, the results of RMVT- and PVD-based nonlocal TBTs converge rapidly, and their convergent solutions closely agree with the exact ones available in the literature. Because the highest order with regard to the derivatives of the field variables used in the RMVT-based nonlocal TBT is lower than that used in its PVD-based counterpart, the former is more efficient than the latter with regard to the execution time. The former is thus both faster and obtains more accurate solutions than the latter for the numerical analysis of the embedded SWCNT.

  15. Comparison of interference-free numerical results with sample experimental data for the AEDC wall-interference model at transonic and subsonic flow conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, P. A.; Allison, D. O.

    1974-01-01

    Numerical results obtained from two computer programs recently developed with NASA support and now available for use by others are compared with some sample experimental data taken on a rectangular-wing configuration in the AEDC 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel at transonic and subsonic flow conditions. This data was used in an AEDC investigation as reference data to deduce the tunnel-wall interference effects for corresponding data taken in a smaller tunnel. The comparisons were originally intended to see how well a current state-of-the-art transonic flow calculation for a simple 3-D wing agreed with data which was felt by experimentalists to be relatively interference-free. As a result of the discrepancies between the experimental data and computational results at the quoted angle of attack, it was then deduced from an approximate stress analysis that the sting had deflected appreciably. Thus, the comparisons themselves are not so meaningful, since the calculations must be repeated at the proper angle of attack. Of more importance, however, is a demonstration of the utility of currently available computational tools in the analysis and correlation of transonic experimental data.

  16. Recent advances in physics and technology of ion cyclotron resonance heating in view of future fusion reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ongena, J.; Messiaen, A.; Kazakov, Ye O.; Koch, R.; Ragona, R.; Bobkov, V.; Crombé, K.; Durodié, F.; Goniche, M.; Krivska, A.; Lerche, E.; Louche, F.; Lyssoivan, A.; Vervier, M.; Van Eester, D.; Van Schoor, M.; Wauters, T.; Wright, J.; Wukitch, S.

    2017-05-01

    Ion temperatures of over 100 million degrees need to be reached in future fusion reactors for the deuterium-tritium fusion reaction to work. Ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) is a method that has the capability to directly heat ions to such high temperatures, via a resonant interaction between the plasma ions and radiofrequency waves launched in the plasma. This paper gives an overview of recent developments in this field. In particular a novel and recently developed three-ion heating scenario will be highlighted. It is a flexible scheme with the potential to accelerate heavy ions to high energies in high density plasmas as expected for future fusion reactors. New antenna designs will be needed for next step large future devices like DEMO, to deliver steady-state high power levels, cope with fast variations in coupling due to fast changes in the edge density and to reduce the possibility for impurity production. Such a new design is the traveling wave antenna (TWA) consisting of an array of straps distributed around the circumference of the machine, which is intrinsically resilient to edge density variations and has an optimized power coupling to the plasma. The structure of the paper is as follows: to provide the general reader with a basis for a good understanding of the later sections, an overview is given of wave propagation, coupling and RF power absorption in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies, including a brief summary of the traditionally used heating scenarios. A special highlight is the newly developed three-ion scenario together with its promising applications. A next section discusses recent developments to study edge-wave interaction and reduce impurity influx from ICRH: the dedicated devices IShTAR and Aline, field aligned and three-strap antenna concepts. The principles behind and the use of ICRH as an important option for first wall conditioning in devices with a permanent magnetic field is discussed next. The final section presents ongoing

  17. Toxicity assessment of multi-walled carbon nanotubes on Cucurbita pepo L. under well-watered and water-stressed conditions.

    PubMed

    Hatami, Mehrnaz

    2017-08-01

    The rapid increase in the production and application of various types of nanomaterials increases the possibility of their presence in total environment, which subsequently raises concerns about their potential threats to the first trophic level of organisms, specifically under varying environmental constraints. In this work, seeds of Cucurbita pepo L. were cultured in MS basal medium exposed to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) at different concentrations (0, 125, 250, 500 and 1000μgmL(-1)) under two levels of water potential, well-watered (0MPa) and water stress (-1.5MPa) induced by polyethylene glycol (PEG 6000) for 14 days. Seeds exposed to MWCNTs showed reduction in germination percentage, root and shoot length, biomass accumulation and vigor index in a dose-dependent manner. However, seedlings germinated in MWCNTs-fortified media had significantly lower germination and growth attributes than those of control under water stress conditions. This happened due to increased oxidative injury indices including hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and malondialdehyde (MDA) contents, as well as electrolyte leakage index (ELI) of tissues. The impaired morpho-physiological and biochemical processes of seedlings exposed to different concentrations of MWCNTs under both PEG-induced stress and non-stress growing conditions were consequence of changes in the activation of various cellular antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (POD). Taken together, our findings reveal that MWCNTs played negative role on seed germination and subsequent growth of C. pepo L. seedlings under both levels of water potential. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of the Polarization of Photon Splitting on the Cyclotron Lines in Large-Scale Atmospheres with Super-Strong Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Osamu

    2002-04-01

    The cyclotron lines are affected by photon splitting in super-strong magnetized atmospheres (~ 4.4 × 1013 G into which a power-law-type flux is injected. We studied the polarization effect of photon splitting on the cyclotron line formation by treating different modes of splitting. We calculated the emergent spectra for two conditions: only one splitting mode and three splitting modes that could operate in a neutron-star atmosphere with a subcritical magnetic field. Photon splitting can also operate over a larger scale than cyclotron resonant scattering in a neutron-star atmosphere, since photon splitting occurs in a super-strong magnetic field even in the absence of a plasma. We therefore considered atmospheres consisting of lower and higher density regions. Cyclotron resonant scattering is dominant in a higher density region, and photon splitting is dominant in a lower density region. In three splitting modes, we found that the cyclotron absorption l ines are strongly reprocessed by photon splitting, and thus may not be detected even for a magnetic field of about 1.0 × 1013 G in the power-law-type spectra. However, we confirmed that the cyclotron absorption lines are not mostly reprocessed by photon splitting in only one splitting mode.

  19. A line-of-sight electron cyclotron emission receiver for electron cyclotron resonance heating feedback control of tearing modes

    SciTech Connect

    Oosterbeek, J. W.; Buerger, A.; Westerhof, E.; Baar, M. R. de; Berg, M. A. van den; Bongers, W. A.; Graswinckel, M. F.; Hennen, B. A.; Kruijt, O. G.; Thoen, J.; Heidinger, R.; Korsholm, S. B.; Leipold, F.; Nielsen, S. K.

    2008-09-15

    An electron cyclotron emission (ECE) receiver inside the electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) transmission line has been brought into operation. The ECE is extracted by placing a quartz plate acting as a Fabry-Perot interferometer under an angle inside the electron cyclotron wave (ECW) beam. ECE measurements are obtained during high power ECRH operation. This demonstrates the successful operation of the diagnostic and, in particular, a sufficient suppression of the gyrotron component preventing it from interfering with ECE measurements. When integrated into a feedback system for the control of plasma instabilities this line-of-sight ECE diagnostic removes the need to localize the instabilities in absolute coordinates.

  20. Measurements of Escaping Fast Ions at the DIII-D Vessel Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickering, L. D.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Zhu, Y.

    2006-10-01

    The loss of fast ions is detected by two pairs of thin foil Faraday collectors [1] that are installed just behind the graphite first wall in a vacuum port. Collimating apertures select fast ions that have energies >10 keV and that travel either with or against the plasma current. The strong correlation of beam-ion loss detector (BILD) signals with neutral beam modulation shows that, under appropriate conditions, prompt losses from nearly every beam source are detected. Orbit calculations indicate that the correlation occurs when injected neutrals are deposited at a location that “connects” with an orbit observed by the detector; as expected, these correlations depend strongly on plasma current. In addition to these classical effects, enhanced signals sometimes occur during ion cyclotron heating (presumably due to parametric decay instabilities) and during Alfvén activity (due to transport by the instabilities). 6pt[1] F.E. Cecil, et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 74, 1747 (2003).

  1. Influence of the shear flow on electron cyclotron resonance plasma confinement in an axisymmetric magnetic mirror trap of the electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Izotov, I V; Razin, S V; Sidorov, A V; Skalyga, V A; Zorin, V G; Bagryansky, P A; Beklemishev, A D; Prikhodko, V V

    2012-02-01

    Influence of shear flows of the dense plasma created under conditions of the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) gas breakdown on the plasma confinement in the axisymmetric mirror trap ("vortex" confinement) was studied experimentally and theoretically. A limiter with bias potential was set inside the mirror trap for plasma rotation. The limiter construction and the optimal value of the potential were chosen according to the results of the preliminary theoretical analysis. This method of "vortex" confinement realization in an axisymmetric mirror trap for non-equilibrium heavy-ion plasmas seems to be promising for creation of ECR multicharged ion sources with high magnetic fields, more than 1 T.

  2. Ultradeep electron cyclotron resonance plasma etching of GaN

    DOE PAGES

    Harrison, Sara E.; Voss, Lars F.; Torres, Andrea M.; ...

    2017-07-25

    Here, ultradeep (≥5 μm) electron cyclotron resonance plasma etching of GaN micropillars was investigated. Parametric studies on the influence of the applied radio-frequency power, chlorine content in a Cl2/Ar etch plasma, and operating pressure on the etch depth, GaN-to-SiO2 selectivity, and surface morphology were performed. Etch depths of >10 μm were achieved over a wide range of parameters. Etch rates and sidewall roughness were found to be most sensitive to variations in RF power and % Cl2 in the etch plasma. Selectivities of >20:1 GaN:SiO2 were achieved under several chemically driven etch conditions where a maximum selectivity of ~39:1 wasmore » obtained using a 100% Cl2 plasma. The etch profile and (0001) surface morphology were significantly influenced by operating pressure and the chlorine content in the plasma. Optimized etch conditions yielded >10 μm tall micropillars with nanometer-scale sidewall roughness, high GaN:SiO2 selectivity, and nearly vertical etch profiles. These results provide a promising route for the fabrication of ultradeep GaN microstructures for use in electronic and optoelectronic device applications. In addition, dry etch induced preferential crystallographic etching in GaN microstructures is also demonstrated, which may be of great interest for applications requiring access to non- or semipolar GaN surfaces.« less

  3. Single-electron detection and spectroscopy via relativistic cyclotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Asner, D. M.; Bradley, R. F.; de Viveiros, L.; Doe, P. J.; Fernandes, J. L.; Fertl, M.; Finn, E. C.; Formaggio, J. A.; Furse, D.; Jones, A. M.; Kofron, J. N.; LaRoque, B. H.; Leber, M.; McBride, E. L.; Miller, M. L.; Mohanmurthy, P.; Monreal, B.; Oblath, N. S.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Rosenberg, L. J.; Rybka, G.; Rysewyk, D.; Sternberg, M. G.; Tedeschi, J. R.; Thummler, T.; VanDevender, B. A.; Woods, N. L.

    2015-04-20

    Since 1897, we've understood that accelerating charges must emit electromagnetic radiation. Cyclotron radiation, the particular form of radiation emitted by an electron orbiting in a magnetic field, was first derived in 1904. Despite the simplicity of this concept, and the enormous utility of electron spectroscopy in nuclear and particle physics, single-electron cyclotron radiation has never been observed directly. We demonstrate single-electron detection in a novel radiofrequency spec- trometer. Here, we observe the cyclotron radiation emitted by individual magnetically-trapped electrons that are produced with mildly-relativistic energies by a gaseous radioactive source. The relativistic shift in the cyclotron frequency permits a precise electron energy measurement. Precise beta electron spectroscopy from gaseous radiation sources is a key technique in modern efforts to measure the neutrino mass via the tritium decay endpoint, and this work demonstrates a fundamentally new approach to precision beta spectroscopy for future neutrino mass experiments.

  4. Single-electron detection and spectroscopy via relativistic cyclotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Asner, David M.; Bradley, Rich; De Viveiros Souza Filho, Luiz A.; Doe, Peter J.; Fernandes, Justin L.; Fertl, M.; Finn, Erin C.; Formaggio, Joseph; Furse, Daniel L.; Jones, Anthony M.; Kofron, Jared N.; LaRoque, Benjamin; Leber, Michelle; MCBride, Lisa; Miller, M. L.; Mohanmurthy, Prajwal T.; Monreal, Ben; Oblath, Noah S.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Rosenberg, Leslie; Rybka, Gray; Rysewyk, Devyn M.; Sternberg, Michael G.; Tedeschi, Jonathan R.; Thummler, Thomas; VanDevender, Brent A.; Woods, N. L.

    2015-04-01

    It has been understood since 1897 that accelerating charges should emit electromagnetic radiation. Cyclotron radiation, the particular form of radiation emitted by an electron orbiting in a magnetic field, was first derived in 1904. Despite the simplicity of this concept, and the enormous utility of electron spectroscopy in nuclear and particle physics, single-electron cyclotron radiation has never been observed directly. Here we demonstrate single-electron detection in a novel radiofrequency spectrometer. We observe the cyclotron radiation emitted by individual electrons that are produced with mildly-relativistic energies by a gaseous radioactive source and are magnetically trapped. The relativistic shift in the cyclotron frequency permits a precise electron energy measurement. Precise beta electron spectroscopy from gaseous radiation sources is a key technique in modern efforts to measure the neutrino mass via the tritium decay endpoint, and this work is a proof-of-concept for future neutrino mass experiments using this technique.

  5. Design Study Of Cyclotron Magnet With Permanent Magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyun Wook; Chai, Jong Seo

    2011-06-01

    Low energy cyclotrons for Positron emission tomography (PET) have been wanted for the production of radio-isotopes after 2002. In the low energy cyclotron magnet design, increase of magnetic field between the poles is needed to make a smaller size of magnet and decrease power consumption. The Permanent magnet can support this work without additional electric power consumption in the cyclotron. In this paper the study of cyclotron magnet design using permanent magnet is shown and also the comparison between normal magnet and the magnet which is designed with permanent magnet is shown. Maximum energy of proton is 8 MeV and RF frequency is 79.3 MHz. 3D CAD design was done by CATIA P3 V5 R18 and the All field calculations had been performed by OPERA-3D TOSCA. The self-made beam dynamics program OPTICY is used for making isochronous field and other calculations.

  6. Single-electron detection and spectroscopy via relativistic cyclotron radiation

    DOE PAGES

    Asner, D. M.; Bradley, R. F.; de Viveiros, L.; ...

    2015-04-20

    Since 1897, we've understood that accelerating charges must emit electromagnetic radiation. Cyclotron radiation, the particular form of radiation emitted by an electron orbiting in a magnetic field, was first derived in 1904. Despite the simplicity of this concept, and the enormous utility of electron spectroscopy in nuclear and particle physics, single-electron cyclotron radiation has never been observed directly. We demonstrate single-electron detection in a novel radiofrequency spec- trometer. Here, we observe the cyclotron radiation emitted by individual magnetically-trapped electrons that are produced with mildly-relativistic energies by a gaseous radioactive source. The relativistic shift in the cyclotron frequency permits a precisemore » electron energy measurement. Precise beta electron spectroscopy from gaseous radiation sources is a key technique in modern efforts to measure the neutrino mass via the tritium decay endpoint, and this work demonstrates a fundamentally new approach to precision beta spectroscopy for future neutrino mass experiments.« less

  7. Intensity limitations in compact H{sup minus} cyclotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Baartman, R.A.

    1995-12-31

    At TRIUMF, we have demonstrated 2.5 mA in a compact H{sup -} cyclotron. It is worthwhile to explore possibility of going to even higher intensity. In small cyclotrons, vertical focusing vanishes at the center. The space charge tune shift further reduces vertical focusing, thus determining an upper limit on instantaneous current. Limit on average current is of course also dependent upon phase acceptance, but this can be made quite large in an H{sup -} cyclotron. Longitudinal space charge on the first turn can reduce the phase acceptance as well. For finite ion source brightness, another limit comes from bunching efficiency in presence of space charge forces. We present methods of calculating and optimizing these limits. In particular, we show that it is possible to achieve 10mA in a 50 MeV compact H{sup -} cyclotron.

  8. Undergraduate Education with the Rutgers 12-Inch Cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koeth, Timothy W.

    The Rutgers 12-Inch Cyclotron is a research grade accelerator dedicated to undergraduate education. From its inception, it has been intended for instruction and has been designed to demonstrate classic beam physics phenomena and provides students hands on experience with accelerator technology. The cyclotron is easily reconfigured, allowing experiments to be designed and performed within one academic semester. Our cyclotron offers students the opportunity to operate an accelerator and directly observe many fundamental beam physics concepts, including axial and radial betatron motion, destructive resonances, weak and azimuthally varying field (AVF) focusing schemes, RF and DEE voltage effects, diagnostic techniques, and perform low energy nuclear reactions. This paper emphasizes the unique beam physics measurements and beam manipulations capable at the Rutgers 12-Inch Cyclotron.

  9. Some calculations of the resonator in INR cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.; Liu, X.L.

    1985-10-01

    Some calculation methods of the resonator parameters with single dee and two coaxial transmission lines in INR variable-energy cyclotron were described. Also calculated and experimental results have been compared with the original one (two dee system).

  10. Cyclotrons for clinical and biomedical research with PET

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, A.P.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this commentary is to present some background material on cyclotrons and other particle accelerators particularly with a view toward the considerations behind acquiring and installing such a machine for purely clinical and/or biomedical research use.

  11. Vacuum Control Systems of the Cyclotrons in VECC, Kolkata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Anindya; Akhtar, Javed; Yadav, R. C.; Bhole, R. B.; Pal, Sarbajit; Sarkar, D.; Bhandari, R. K.

    2012-11-01

    VECC has undertaken the modernization of the K-130 Room Temperature Cyclotron (RTC) (operational since 1978) and commissioning of K-500 Superconducting Cyclotron (SCC) at present. The control system of RTC vacuum system has been upgraded to Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) based automated system from relay based manual system. A distributed PLC based system is under installation for SCC vacuum system. The requirement of high vacuum in both the cyclotrons (1×10-6 mbar for RTC and 5 × 10-8 mbar SCC) imposes the reliable local and remote operation of all vacuum components and instrumentation. The design and development of the vacuum control system of two cyclotrons using the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) distributed real-time software tools are presented.

  12. Design Study Of Cyclotron Magnet With Permanent Magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun Wook; Chai, Jong Seo

    2011-06-01

    Low energy cyclotrons for Positron emission tomography (PET) have been wanted for the production of radio-isotopes after 2002. In the low energy cyclotron magnet design, increase of magnetic field between the poles is needed to make a smaller size of magnet and decrease power consumption. The Permanent magnet can support this work without additional electric power consumption in the cyclotron. In this paper the study of cyclotron magnet design using permanent magnet is shown and also the comparison between normal magnet and the magnet which is designed with permanent magnet is shown. Maximum energy of proton is 8 MeV and RF frequency is 79.3 MHz. 3D CAD design was done by CATIA P3 V5 R18 [1] and the All field calculations had been performed by OPERA-3D TOSCA [2]. The self-made beam dynamics program OPTICY [3] is used for making isochronous field and other calculations.

  13. PET computer programs for use with the 88-inch cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Gough, R.A.; Chlosta, L.

    1981-06-01

    This report describes in detail several offline programs written for the PET computer which provide an efficient data management system to assist with the operation of the 88-Inch Cyclotron. This function includes the capability to predict settings for all cyclotron and beam line parameters for all beams within the present operating domain of the facility. The establishment of a data base for operational records is also described from which various aspects of the operating history can be projected.

  14. Energy transfer between energetic ring current H(+) and O(+) by electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorne, Richard M.; Horne, Richard B.

    1994-01-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves in the frequency range below the helium gyrofrequency can be excited in the equatorial region of the outer magnetosphere by cyclotron resonant instability with anisotropic ring current H(+) ions. As the unducted waves propagate to higher latitudes, the wave normal should become highly inclined to the ambient magnetic field. Under such conditions, wave energy can be absorbed by cyclotron resonant interactions with ambient O(+), leading to ion heating perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field. Resonant wave absorption peaks in the vicinity of the bi-ion frequency and the second harmonic of the O(+) gyrofrequrency. This absorption should mainly occur at latitudes between 10 deg and 30 deg along auroral field lines (L is greater than or equal to 7) in the postnoon sector. The concomitant ion heating perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field can contribute to the isotropization and geomagnetic trapping of collapsed O(+) ion conics (or beams) that originate from a low-altitude ionospheric source region. During geomagnetic storms when the O(+) content of the magnetosphere is significantly enhanced, the absorption of EMIC waves should become more efficient, and it may contribute to the observed acceleration of O(+) ions of ionospheric origin up to ring current energies.

  15. Nonlinear analysis of a large-orbit coaxial-waveguide cyclotron autoresonance maser amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Ouyang Zhengbiao; Zhang Shichang

    2007-10-01

    Nonlinear simulations are presented to analyze the influences of the electron beam and the magnetic field parameters on the output power of a large-orbit coaxial-waveguide cyclotron autoresonance maser (CARM) amplifier. It is found that the guiding-center spread of the relativistic electrons has negligible impact on the output power due to the small field change felt by the large-orbit electrons. The electron-beam velocity spread and energy spread substantially decrease the output power, because these spreads directly affect the beam-wave interaction through the Doppler term and the relativistic cyclotron frequency term in the cyclotron resonance condition. However, this adverse effect may be offset by properly tapering the operating magnetic field. The output power is sensitive to both the slope and the amplitude of the tapered magnetic field. Nonlinear simulation demonstrates the feasibility that a large-orbit coaxial-waveguide CARM amplifier can be expected to provide output power with several megawatts, ultrahigh gain, and good bandwidth in the millimeter and submillimeter wavelength ranges.

  16. Energy transfer between energetic ring current H(+) and O(+) by electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorne, Richard M.; Horne, Richard B.

    1994-01-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves in the frequency range below the helium gyrofrequency can be excited in the equatorial region of the outer magnetosphere by cyclotron resonant instability with anisotropic ring current H(+) ions. As the unducted waves propagate to higher latitudes, the wave normal should become highly inclined to the ambient magnetic field. Under such conditions, wave energy can be absorbed by cyclotron resonant interactions with ambient O(+), leading to ion heating perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field. Resonant wave absorption peaks in the vicinity of the bi-ion frequency and the second harmonic of the O(+) gyrofrequrency. This absorption should mainly occur at latitudes between 10 deg and 30 deg along auroral field lines (L is greater than or equal to 7) in the postnoon sector. The concomitant ion heating perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field can contribute to the isotropization and geomagnetic trapping of collapsed O(+) ion conics (or beams) that originate from a low-altitude ionospheric source region. During geomagnetic storms when the O(+) content of the magnetosphere is significantly enhanced, the absorption of EMIC waves should become more efficient, and it may contribute to the observed acceleration of O(+) ions of ionospheric origin up to ring current energies.

  17. Wonderful Walls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenman, Jim

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author emphasizes the importance of "working" walls in children's programs. Children's programs need "working" walls (and ceilings and floors) which can be put to use for communication, display, storage, and activity space. The furnishings also work, or don't work, for the program in another sense: in aggregate, they serve as…

  18. Ion source and injection line for high intensity medical cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, XianLu Guan, Fengping; Yao, Hongjuan; Zhang, TianJue; Yang, Jianjun; Song, Guofang; Ge, Tao; Qin, Jiuchang

    2014-02-15

    A 14 MeV high intensity compact cyclotron, CYCIAE-14, was built at China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). An injection system based on the external H− ion source was used on CYCIAE-14 so as to provide high intensity beam, while most positron emission tomography cyclotrons adopt internal ion source. A beam intensity of 100 μA/14 MeV was extracted from the cyclotron with a small multi-cusp H− ion source (CIAE-CH-I type) and a short injection line, which the H− ion source of 3 mA/25 keV H− beam with emittance of 0.3π mm mrad and the injection line of with only 1.2 m from the extraction of ion source to the medial plane of the cyclotron. To increase the extracted beam intensity of the cyclotron, a new ion source (CIAE-CH-II type) of 9.1 mA was used, with maximum of 500 μA was achieved from the cyclotron. The design and test results of the ion source and injection line optimized for high intensity acceleration will be given in this paper.

  19. Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript peptide (CART) in the nerve fibers of the porcine gallbladder wall under physiological conditions and after Salmonella Enteritidis lipopolysaccharides administration.

    PubMed

    Mikołajczyk, Anita; Makowska, Krystyna

    2017-04-10

    Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) peptide is the substance distributed in various parts of the nervous system. The majority of previous studies described this substance in the brain, where it takes part in regulatory processes connected with the food intake. CART is also present in the peripheral nervous system, especially in the enteric neurons and nerves located in the wall of the stomach and intestine, but many aspects of distribution and functions of this peptide in the digestive organs remain unknown. The aim of the present study was to investigate the changes of CART-positive nerves in the porcine gallbladder after administration of Salmonella Enteritidis lipopolysaccharides (LPS) using the single immunofluorescence technique. In control animals the average number of CART-positive nerves per observation field (0.1mm²) amounted to 5.38±0.32, 11.11±1.56 and 2.97±0.24 in gallbladder neck, body and fundus, respectively. LPS administration caused the increase in the number of CART-positive fibers in all parts of gallbladder, and these values amounted to 12.74±0.51, 19.75±0.19 and 5,1±0,05 in the gallbladder neck, body and fundus respectively. The obtained results suggest that CART is involved in the neuronal regulatory processes in the porcine gallbladder under physiological conditions, but also during pathological processes, but exact functions of this peptide in this organ remain unexplained and require the further investigation.

  20. The distribution of organic-walled dinoflagellate cysts in marine surface samples of the eastern Indian Ocean in relation to environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hessler, I.; Young, M.; Mohtadi, M.; Lückge, A.; Behling, H.

    2012-04-01

    The eastern Indian Ocean is characterised by a complex system of surface currents that move according to the monsoon-dominated wind regime and show a strong seasonality. The Indonesian Throughflow, which originates in the northwestern and tropical Pacific and passes through the Indonesian archipelago into the Indian Ocean, is the only low-latitude oceanic connection between the Pacific and Indian Oceans and represents a key element in the global thermohaline circulation and hence the global climate system. In recent decades it has become increasingly important to understand the atmospheric and oceanographic processes involved in climate variations. Assemblages of organic-walled dinoflagellate cysts (dinocysts) from marine surface samples provide insights into the relationship between the spatial distribution of dinocysts and modern local environmental conditions (e.g. sea surface temperature, sea surface salinity, productivity). These information are of great value for the interpretation of past variations in surface water conditions. We present an extensive data-set of marine surface samples (n=116) from the Eastern Indian Ocean. The conducted Principal Component Analysis (PCA) illustrates the variation of species association between the sites and reveals a geographical affinity of the samples to the regions of (1) Western Indonesia, (2) Java, (3) the Indonesian Throughflow and (4) Western Australia including the Timor Sea. The results of the PCA further indicate the existence of two environmental gradients in the study area, a nutrient gradient increasing from Western Indonesia towards the Indonesian Throughflow region and a temperature gradient increasing from Western Australia towards Western Indonesia. The Redundancy Analysis indicates the presence of three dominating taxa in the sample set, namely Spiniferites spp., Operculodinium centrocarpum and Brigantedinium spp., and reveals significant correlations of the three dominant taxa to specific environmental

  1. Improvement of trace element analysis system using RIKEN electron cyclotron resonance ion source and linear accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Kidera, M.; Nakagawa, T.; Takahashi, K.; Enomoto, S.; Igarashi, K.; Fujimaki, M.; Ikezawa, E.; Kamigaito, O.; Kase, M.; Goto, A.; Yano, Y.

    2006-03-15

    We have developed a new analytical system that consists of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (RIKEN 18 GHz ECRIS) and a RIKEN heavy ion linear accelerator (RILAC). This system is called trace element analysis using electron cyclotron resonance ion source and RILAC (ECRIS-RILAC-TEA). ECRIS-RILAC-TEA has several advantages as described in the work of Kidera et al. [AIP Conf. Proc. 749, 85 (2005)]. However, many experimental results during the last several years revealed a few problems: (1) large background contamination in the ECRIS, particularly at the surface of the plasma chamber wall, (2) high counting of the ionization chamber and the data taking system that is monitored by the direct beam from the accelerator, and (3) difficulty in the selection of the pilot sample and pilot beam production from the ECRIS for the purpose of normalization. In order to overcome these problems, we conducted several test experiments over the past year. In this article, we report the experimental results in detail and future plans for improving this system.

  2. Broadband terahertz-power extracting by using electron cyclotron maser.

    PubMed

    Pan, Shi; Du, Chao-Hai; Qi, Xiang-Bo; Liu, Pu-Kun

    2017-08-04

    Terahertz applications urgently require high performance and room temperature terahertz sources. The gyrotron based on the principle of electron cyclotron maser is able to generate watt-to-megawatt level terahertz radiation, and becomes an exceptional role in the frontiers of energy, security and biomedicine. However, in normal conditions, a terahertz gyrotron could generate terahertz radiation with high efficiency on a single frequency or with low efficiency in a relatively narrow tuning band. Here a frequency tuning scheme for the terahertz gyrotron utilizing sequentially switching among several whispering-gallery modes is proposed to reach high performance with broadband, coherence and high power simultaneously. Such mode-switching gyrotron has the potential of generating broadband radiation with 100-GHz-level bandwidth. Even wider bandwidth is limited by the frequency-dependent effective electrical length of the cavity. Preliminary investigation applies a pre-bunched circuit to the single-mode wide-band tuning. Then, more broadband sweeping is produced by mode switching in great-range magnetic tuning. The effect of mode competition, as well as critical engineering techniques on frequency tuning is discussed to confirm the feasibility for the case close to reality. This multi-mode-switching scheme could make gyrotron a promising device towards bridging the so-called terahertz gap.

  3. Correlation electron cyclotron emission diagnostic in TCV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, M.; Porte, L.; Molina Cabrera, P.

    2017-08-01

    The correlation electron cyclotron emission diagnostic of tokamak à configuration variable has recently been upgraded. It now has the choice of three lines of sight: two horizontal lines placed on the low field side of the vessel, perpendicular to the magnetic field, and a dual-axis steerable antenna. The polarization of the radiation collected by the latter can be rotated using a universal polarizer situated in the transmission line. This line is also shared with a reflectometry system, allowing simultaneous measurements of temperature and density fluctuations in the same plasma volumes. When using this line, it is possible to choose between two dedicated front ends characterized by different local oscillator frequencies, adding flexibility in the choice of the plasma region to be studied. The intermediate frequency section is now equipped with six frequency tunable YIG filters allowing the study of turbulence properties in a wide range of radial positions. When studying fluctuations over the whole video bandwidth, the minimum detectable fluctuation level is δ Te/Te˜0.5 % . The new system has been used to measure electron temperature fluctuations over a large fraction of the plasma profiles in a series of plasmas with triangularity varying from 0.6 to -0.6 but comparable collisionality profiles.

  4. A storage ring for the JULIC cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, S. A.; Prasuhn, D.; Schott, W.; Wiedner, C. A.

    1985-05-01

    The storage ring COSY is planned to provide higher intensity and resolution for nuclear structure experiments using the light heavy ion beams (p, d, τ, α) of the JULIC cyclotron and the magnet spectrograph BIG KARL. The ring contains the measuring target of BIG KARL as an internal target, two rf cavities for compensating the mean energy loss in the target and providing additional acceleration of the stored beam and an e --cooling section. In the recirculator mode, i.e., without e --cooling, a luminosity of L = 3.64 × 10 30 particles/(cm 2 s) is obtained for an experiment with 41 MeV protons and a 50 μg/cm 212C target at a spectrograph resolution p/d p = 10 4 and 100% duty factor. This corresponds to a gain in L of 546.5 in comparison with the same experiment without a storage ring. In the recirculator mode with acceleration L = 1.17 × 10 32 p/(cm 2 s) and 98.8% duty factor results for 1500 MeV protons on the same target at the same resolution. Using e --cooling L and the feasible p/d p can be enhanced, however, at a reduced duty factor.

  5. Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Alan G.

    1998-06-01

    As for Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) interferometry and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, the introduction of pulsed Fourier transform techniques revolutionized ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry: increased speed (factor of 10,000), increased sensitivity (factor of 100), increased mass resolution (factor of 10,000-an improvement not shared by the introduction of FT techniques to IR or NMR spectroscopy), increased mass range (factor of 500), and automated operation. FT-ICR mass spectrometry is the most versatile technique for unscrambling and quantifying ion-molecule reaction kinetics and equilibria in the absence of solvent (i.e., the gas phase). In addition, FT-ICR MS has the following analytically important features: speed (~1 second per spectrum); ultrahigh mass resolution and ultrahigh mass accuracy for analysis of mixtures and polymers; attomole sensitivity; MSn with one spectrometer, including two-dimensional FT/FT-ICR/MS; positive and/or negative ions; multiple ion sources (especially MALDI and electrospray); biomolecular molecular weight and sequencing; LC/MS; and single-molecule detection up to 108 Dalton. Here, some basic features and recent developments of FT-ICR mass spectrometry are reviewed, with applications ranging from crude oil to molecular biology.

  6. Two Dimensional Synthetic Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lei; Valeo, Ernest J.; Tobias, Benjamin J.; Kramer, Gerrit J.; Liu, Chang; Tang, William M.

    2016-10-01

    Electron Cyclotron Emission (ECE) has been widely used as a measurement of the electron temperature profile in magnetically confined plasmas. The ECE Imaging (ECEI) system provides additional vertical resolutions, and is used to measure the electron temperature fluctuations. The vertical resolution is typically a few centi-meters which is sometimes comparable to the vertical wave length of the underlying fluctuations. The ray-tracing technique used in most synthetic ECE codes to determine the origin and spatial extent of the ECE radiations is not accurate when the refraction and diffraction due to the fluctuations are important. In this presentation, we introduce a new synthetic ECEI code which solves the wave propagation up to the 2nd order of the WKB approximation, and provides full 2D information of the ECE source. We'll show that when the ECE frequency is near the cutoff, the refraction due to the fluctuations is important. A ``trapping'' of the ECE source by the density fluctuations is identified, and is potentially useful for determining the cross phase between electron temperature and density fluctuations. The new formalism is also used to study the Runaway Electrons contribution to the ECE signal, and provides insights to the measured ECE spectrum on DIII-D. This work has been funded by the US Department of Energy under Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  7. Fourth generation electron cyclotron resonance ion sources.

    PubMed

    Lyneis, Claude M; Leitner, D; Todd, D S; Sabbi, G; Prestemon, S; Caspi, S; Ferracin, P

    2008-02-01

    The concepts and technical challenges related to developing a fourth generation electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source with a rf frequency greater than 40 GHz and magnetic confinement fields greater than twice B(ECR) will be explored in this article. Based on the semiempirical frequency scaling of ECR plasma density with the square of operating frequency, there should be significant gains in performance over current third generation ECR ion sources, which operate at rf frequencies between 20 and 30 GHz. While the third generation ECR ion sources use NbTi superconducting solenoid and sextupole coils, the new sources will need to use different superconducting materials, such as Nb(3)Sn, to reach the required magnetic confinement, which scales linearly with rf frequency. Additional technical challenges include increased bremsstrahlung production, which may increase faster than the plasma density, bremsstrahlung heating of the cold mass, and the availability of high power continuous wave microwave sources at these frequencies. With each generation of ECR ion sources, there are new challenges to be mastered, but the potential for higher performance and reduced cost of the associated accelerator continues to make this a promising avenue for development.

  8. Cyclotron-based effects on plant gravitropism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordyum, E.; Sobol, M.; Kalinina, Ia.; Bogatina, N.; Kondrachuk, A.

    Primary roots exhibit positive gravitropism and grow in the direction of the gravitational vector, while shoots respond negatively and grow opposite to the gravitational vector. We first demonstrated that the use of a weak combined magnetic field (CMF), which is comprised of a permanent magnetic field and an alternating magnetic field with the frequency resonance of the cyclotron frequency of calcium ions, can change root gravitropism from a positive direction to negative direction. Two-day-old cress seedlings were gravistimulated in a chamber that was placed into a μ-metal shield where this CMF was created. Using this "new model" of a root gravitropic response, we have studied some of its components including the movement of amyloplasts-statoliths in root cap statocytes and the distribution of Ca 2+ ions in the distal elongation zone during gravistimulation. Unlike results from the control, amyloplasts did not sediment in the distal part of a statocyte, and more Ca 2+ accumulation was observed in the upper side of a gravistimulated root for seedlings treated with the CMF. For plants treated with the CMF, it appears that a root gravitropic reaction occurs by a normal physiological process resulting in root bending although in the opposite direction. These results support the hypothesis that both the amyloplasts in the root cap statocytes and calcium are important signaling components in plant gravitropism.

  9. Fullerenes in electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Biri, S.; Fekete, E.; Kitagawa, A.; Muramatsu, M.; Janossy, A.; Palinkas, J.

    2006-03-15

    Fullerene plasmas and beams have been produced in our electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRIS) originally designed for other purposes. The ATOMKI-ECRIS is a traditional ion source with solenoid mirror coils to generate highly charged ions. The variable frequencies NIRS-KEI-1 and NIRS-KEI-2 are ECR ion sources built from permanent magnets and specialized for the production of carbon beams. The paper summarizes the experiments and results obtained by these facilities with fullerenes. Continuous effort has been made to get the highest C{sub 60} beam intensities. Surprisingly, the best result was obtained by moving the C{sub 60} oven deep inside the plasma chamber, very close to the resonance zone. Record intensity singly and doubly charged fullerene beams were obtained (600 and 1600 nA, respectively) at lower C{sub 60} material consumption. Fullerene derivatives were also produced. We mixed fullerenes with other plasmas (N, Fe) with the aim of making new materials. Nitrogen encapsulated fullerenes (mass: 720+14=734) were successfully produced. In the case of iron, two methods (ferrocene, oven) were tested. Molecules with mass of 720+56=776 were detected in the extracted beam spectra.

  10. Characterization of electron cyclotron resonance hydrogen plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Outten, C.A. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Barbour, J.C.; Wampler, W.R. )

    1990-01-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasmas yield low energy and high ion density plasmas. The characteristics downstream of an ECR hydrogen plasma were investigated as a function of microwave power and magnetic field. A fast-injection Langmuir probe and a carbon resistance probe were used to determine plasma potential (V{sub p}), electron density (N{sub e}), electron temperature (T{sub e}), ion energy (T{sub i}), and ion fluence. Langmuir probe results showed that at 17 cm downstream from the ECR chamber the plasma characteristics are approximately constant across the center 7 cm of the plasma for 50 Watts of absorbed power. These results gave V{sub p} = 30 {plus minus} 5 eV, N{sub e} = 1 {times} 10{sup 8} cm{sup {minus}3}, and T{sub e} = 10--13 eV. In good agreement with the Langmuir probe results, carbon resistance probes have shown that T{sub i} {le} 50 eV. Also, based on hydrogen chemical sputtering of carbon, the hydrogen (ion and energetic neutrals) fluence rate was determined to be 1 {times} 10{sup 16}/cm{sup 2}-sec. at a pressure of 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} Torr and for 50 Watts of absorbed power. 19 refs.

  11. The Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron Refurbishment Project

    SciTech Connect

    Mendez, II, Anthony J; Ball, James B; Dowling, Darryl T; Mosko, Sigmund W; Tatum, B Alan

    2011-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron (ORIC) has been in operation for nearly fifty years at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Presently, it serves as the driver accelerator for the ORNL Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF), where radioactive ion beams are produced using the Isotope Separation Online (ISOL) technique for post-acceleration by the 25URC tandem electrostatic accelerator. Operability and reliability of ORIC are critical issues for the success of HRIBF and have presented increasingly difficult operational challenges for the facility in recent years. In February 2010, a trim coil failure rendered ORIC inoperable for several months. This presented HRIBF with the opportunity to undertake various repairs and maintenance upgrades aimed at restoring the full functionality of ORIC and improving the reliability to a level better than what had been typical over the previous decade. In this paper, we present details of these efforts, including the replacement of the entire trim coil set and measurements of their radial field profile. Comparison of measurements and operating tune parameters with setup code predictions will also be presented.

  12. Optimization of zirconium-89 production in IBA Cyclone 18/9 cyclotron with COSTIS solid target system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabkowski, A. M.; Paisey, S. J.; Spezi, E.; Chester, J.; Marshall, C.

    2017-05-01

    Zirconium-89 is a promising radionuclide in the development of new immuno-PET agents for in vivo imaging of cancerous tumours and radioimmunotherapy (RIT) planning. Besides the convenient half-life of 78.4 h, 89Zr has a beta plus emission rate of 23% and a low maximum energy of 0.9 MeV, delivering good spatial resolution as a result of short positron range in tissue (around 1 mm). Cyclotron production for the radiometal of 89Zr was investigated to find optimal conditions according to results of FLUKA code Monte Carlo modelling of irradiation processes, nuclear reactions and target design. This was followed by reasonably detailed experimental validation (making cyclotron productions for expected high product yield and low impurities levels followed by activity measurements, spectra acquisitions and chemical separation procedures), in which the strategies developed by computer models were carried out in the IBA Cyclone 18/9 cyclotron, permitting a comparison of the predicted and actual yields of 89Zr and isotopic by-products (impurities). Once the in silica model was validated experimentally, then optimal method of the radiometal production in the cyclotron was developed.

  13. Useful technique for analysis and control of the acceleration beam phase in the azimuthally varying field cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurashima, Satoshi; Yuyama, Takahiro; Miyawaki, Nobumasa; Kashiwagi, Hirotsugu; Okumura, Susumu; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro

    2010-03-01

    We have developed a new technique for analysis and control of the acceleration beam phase in the cyclotron. In this technique, the beam current pattern at a fixed radius r is measured by slightly scanning the acceleration frequency in the cyclotron. The acceleration beam phase is obtained by analyzing symmetry of the current pattern. Simple procedure to control the acceleration beam phase by changing coil currents of a few trim coils was established. The beam phase width is also obtained by analyzing gradient of the decreasing part of the current pattern. We verified reliability of this technique with 260 MeV N20e7+ beams which were accelerated on different tuning condition of the cyclotron. When the acceleration beam phase was around 0°, top of the energy gain of cosine wave, and the beam phase width was about 6° in full width at half maximum, a clear turn pattern of the beam was observed with a differential beam probe in the extraction region. Beam phase widths of ion beams at acceleration harmonics of h =1 and h =2 were estimated without beam cutting by phase-defining slits. We also calculated the beam phase widths roughly from the beam current ratio between the injected beam and the accelerated beam in the cyclotron without operating the beam buncher. Both beam phase widths were almost the same for h =1, while phase compressions by a factor of about 3 were confirmed for h =2.

  14. Useful technique for analysis and control of the acceleration beam phase in the azimuthally varying field cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Kurashima, Satoshi; Yuyama, Takahiro; Miyawaki, Nobumasa; Kashiwagi, Hirotsugu; Okumura, Susumu; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro

    2010-03-15

    We have developed a new technique for analysis and control of the acceleration beam phase in the cyclotron. In this technique, the beam current pattern at a fixed radius r is measured by slightly scanning the acceleration frequency in the cyclotron. The acceleration beam phase is obtained by analyzing symmetry of the current pattern. Simple procedure to control the acceleration beam phase by changing coil currents of a few trim coils was established. The beam phase width is also obtained by analyzing gradient of the decreasing part of the current pattern. We verified reliability of this technique with 260 MeV {sup 20}Ne{sup 7+} beams which were accelerated on different tuning condition of the cyclotron. When the acceleration beam phase was around 0 deg., top of the energy gain of cosine wave, and the beam phase width was about 6 deg. in full width at half maximum, a clear turn pattern of the beam was observed with a differential beam probe in the extraction region. Beam phase widths of ion beams at acceleration harmonics of h=1 and h=2 were estimated without beam cutting by phase-defining slits. We also calculated the beam phase widths roughly from the beam current ratio between the injected beam and the accelerated beam in the cyclotron without operating the beam buncher. Both beam phase widths were almost the same for h=1, while phase compressions by a factor of about 3 were confirmed for h=2.

  15. A small low energy cyclotron for radioisotope measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bertsche, K.J.

    1989-11-01

    Direct detection of {sup 14}C by accelerator mass spectrometry has proved to be a much more sensitive method for radiocarbon dating than the decay counting method invented earlier by Libby. A small cyclotron (the cyclotrino'') was proposed for direct detection of radiocarbon in 1980. This combined the suppression of background through the use of negative ions, which had been used effectively in tandem accelerators, with the high intrinsic mass resolution of a cyclotron. Development of a small electrostatically-focused cyclotron for use as a mass spectrometer was previously reported but the sensitivity needed for detection of {sup 14}C at natural abundance was not achieved. The major contributions of this work are the integration of a high current external ion source with a small flat-field, electrostatically-focused cyclotron to comprise a system capable of measuring {sup 14}C at natural levels, and the analysis of ion motion in such a cyclotron, including a detailed analysis of phase bunching and its effect on mass resolution. A high current cesium sputter negative ion source generates a beam of carbon ions which is pre-separated with a Wien filter and is transported to the cyclotron via a series of electrostatic lenses. Beam is injected radially into the cyclotron using electrostatic deflectors and an electrostatic mirror. Axial focusing is entirely electrostatic. A microchannel plate detector is used with a phase-grated output. In its present form the system is capable of improving the sensitivity of detecting {sup 14}C in some biomedical experiments by a factor of 10{sup 4}. Modifications are discussed which could bring about an additional factor of 100 in sensitivity, which is important for archaeological and geological applications. Possibilities for measurements of other isotopes, such as {sup 3}H, and {sup 10}Be, and {sup 26}Al, are discussed. 70 refs.

  16. Wall Turbulence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanratty, Thomas J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper gives an account of research on the structure of turbulence close to a solid boundary. Included is a method to study the flow close to the wall of a pipe without interferring with it. (Author/JN)

  17. Electron cyclotron emissions from an electron cyclotron heated discharge in ISX-B

    SciTech Connect

    Elder, G.B.

    1983-01-01

    Observation of the electron cyclotron emissions (ECE) is especially effective when studying the effects of electron cyclotron heating (ECH). Two detectors were built to observe the optically thin third harmonic radiation from ISX B during the recent 28 GHz ECH experiments carried on at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These detectors supplemented existing detectors at the fundamental frequency and at the second harmonic frequency. Observations of the three frequencies during and after the ECH was pulsed into the plasma showed an unexpected rise in their intensity, occurring after the ECH pulse was over. This rise lasted for many tens of milliseconds, well beyond estimates of the electron energy confinement time. The rise in the third harmonic intensity was frequently to an intensity 100 times greater than the pre-ECH intensity. The fundamental frequency and the second harmonic had a much milder change in their intensities. The rises were seen to depend critically on the density of the plasma and the length of the ECH pulse but only weakly on the pre-ECH temperature. A computer code that predicts the ECE from an electron distribution in ISX-B, taking into a account the effect of the plasma's dielectric response to the emissions from a single electron, was developed.

  18. The Arabidopsis Class III Peroxidase AtPRX71 Negatively Regulates Growth under Physiological Conditions and in Response to Cell Wall Damage1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Raggi, Sara; Ranocha, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    The structure of the cell wall has a major impact on plant growth and development, and alteration of cell wall structural components is often detrimental to biomass production. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for these negative effects are largely unknown. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants with altered pectin composition because of either the expression of the Aspergillus niger polygalacturonase II (AnPGII; 35S:AnPGII plants) or a mutation in the QUASIMODO2 (QUA2) gene that encodes a putative pectin methyltransferase (qua2-1 plants), display severe growth defects. Here, we show that expression of Arabidopsis PEROXIDASE71 (AtPRX71), encoding a class III peroxidase, strongly increases in 35S:AnPGII and qua2-1 plants as well as in response to treatments with the cellulose synthase inhibitor isoxaben, which also impairs cell wall integrity. Analysis of atprx71 loss-of-function mutants and plants overexpressing AtPRX71 indicates that this gene negatively influences Arabidopsis growth at different stages of development, likely limiting cell expansion. The atprx71-1 mutation partially suppresses the dwarf phenotype of qua2-1, suggesting that AtPRX71 contributes to the growth defects observed in plants undergoing cell wall damage. Furthermore, AtPRX71 seems to promote the production of reactive oxygen species in qua2-1 plants as well as plants treated with isoxaben. We propose that AtPRX71 contributes to strengthen cell walls, therefore restricting cell expansion, during normal growth and in response to cell wall damage. PMID:26468518

  19. Plasma wall interaction in long-pulse helium discharge in LHD - Microscopic modification of the wall surface and its impact on particle balance and impurity generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokitani, M.; Kasahara, H.; Masuzaki, S.; Motojima, G.; Shoji, M.; Ueda, Y.; Yoshida, N.; Yoshimura, Y.; Nagasaki, K.; Ashikawa, N.; Mutoh, T.; Yamada, H.; Nagata, S.

    2015-08-01

    Ultra-long-pulse helium discharge with ion and electron cyclotron heating (ICH + ECH) in the Large Helical Device (LHD) was achieved in a 48 min plasma (ne ∼ 1.2 × 1019 m-3, Ti,e ∼ 2 keV) with an average heating power of 1.2 MW. The temperature of the first-wall surface during discharges remained at nearly room temperature. However, even in ultra-long-pulse helium discharge, the discharge conditions cannot be said to be in a steady-state, because of two major issues interrupting the steady-state condition. One is the "dynamic change of the wall pumping rate" and the other is the "termination of the discharge with the exfoliation of the mixed-material deposition layers." Microscopic modifications, such as helium radiation damage and the formation of the mixed-material deposition layers composed of C (∼98%) and Fe (∼2%), on the plasma facing components (PFMs) were clarified to possibly influence the major issues.

  20. The Effects of Weak Combined Magnetic Field on Cell Wall Regeneration and Frequency of Plant Protoplasts Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedukha, Olena

    The major purpose of these experiments was to investigate plant protoplast fusion frequency and regeneration of a cell wall by protoplasts at weak combined magnetic field (CMF) with the frequency resonance to the cyclotron frequency of Mg2+, Ca2+ and K+ ions. The protoplasts were isolated from Nicotiana lumbaginifolia and N. silvestris leaf mesophyll and from callus tissues (Nicotiana tabacum and Glycine max). The special extra apparatus with ferromagnetic shield was used for estimate of CMF with the frequency resonance to the cyclotron frequency of Mg2+, Ca2+ and K+ ions. The fusion of protoplasts is realized by using of parent protoplasts isolated from one plant species, as well as from various plant species. Control samples were situated near the apparatus with CMF. The laser confocal microscopy was used for study of cell wall regeneration by single and fused protoplasts. The cytochemical methods with DAPI and calcofluor dye were also applied as the detectors for protoplast fusion and regeneration of cell wall. We have been established that CMF with frequency adjusted to the cyclotron frequency Mg2+ ions have shown the most positive influence on regeneration of cell wall by protoplasts. CMF adjusted to the cyclotron frequency of K+ ions very weakly affected on the frequency of protoplast fusion. Largest frequency of protoplasts fusion is noted in the CMF adjusted to the cyclotron frequency of Ca2+ in comparison with the control samples.

  1. Linear analysis of a rectangular waveguide cyclotron maser with a sheet electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Ding; Ding Yaogen; Wang Yong; Ruan Cunjun

    2010-11-15

    A linear theory for a rectangular waveguide cyclotron maser with a sheet electron beam is developed by using the Laplace transformation approach. This theory can be applied to any TE{sub mn} rectangular waveguide mode. The corresponding equations for the TM{sub mn} mode in the rectangular waveguide are also derived as a useful reference. Especially, the effect from the coupling between degenerate modes, which is induced by the nonideal rectangular waveguide walls, on the dispersion relation is considered in order to provide a more accurate model for the real devices. Through numerical calculations, the linear growth rate, launching loss, and spontaneous oscillations (caused by the absolute instability and backward wave oscillation) of this new structure can be analyzed in detail. It is worthwhile to point out that the operation at higher power levels of the rectangular waveguide sheet beam system is possible.

  2. Means for obtaining a metal ion beam from a heavy-ion cyclotron source

    DOEpatents

    Hudson, E.D.; Mallory, M.L.

    1975-08-01

    A description is given of a modification to a cyclotron ion source used in producing a high intensity metal ion beam. A small amount of an inert support gas maintains the usual plasma arc, except that it is necessary for the support gas to have a heavy mass, e.g., xenon or krypton as opposed to neon. A plate, fabricated from the metal (or anything that can be sputtered) to be ionized, is mounted on the back wall of the ion source arc chamber and is bombarded by returning energetic low-charged gas ions that fail to cross the initial accelerating gap between the ion source and the accelerating electrode. Some of the atoms that are dislodged from the plate by the returning gas ions become ionized and are extracted as a useful beam of heavy ions. (auth)

  3. Analysis of x-ray spectrum obtained in electron cyclotron resonance x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Baskaran, R.; Selvakumaran, T.S.; Sunil Sunny, C.

    2006-03-15

    The analysis of the x-ray spectrum obtained in electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) x-ray source is carried out. Assuming single-particle motion, the electron acceleration and its final energy are calculated for TE{sub 111} cylindrical cavity field and uniform external dc magnetic field. In the calculation, initial coordinates of 40 000 electrons were uniformly selected over the central plane of the cavity using random number generator. The final energy of each electron when it hits the wall is stored and the electron energy distribution is obtained. Using the general purpose Monte Carlo N-particle transport code version 4A, the geometry of the ECR x-ray source is modeled. The x-ray energy spectrum is calculated for the geometry model and the numerically calculated electron energy distribution. The calculated x-ray spectrum is compared with the experimentally measured x-ray spectrum.

  4. Improved system for perpendicular electron-cyclotron emission measurements on TMX-Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Lasnier, C.J.; Ellis, R.F.; James, R.A.

    1986-03-07

    Perpendicular electron-cyclotron emission (PECE) is used on TMX-U to diagnose thermal-barrier hot electrons (T/sub H/ approx. 100 to 400 keV); yielding the time history of the temperature of these relativistic electrons. We describe an improved quasi-optical viewing system for these measurements that uses high sensitivity superheterodyne receivers at fixed frequencies of 60, 98, 130, and 196 GHz. The improved viewing and transport system consists of an off-axis ellipsoidal mirror that images the plasma onto a V-band conical collection horn, an overmoded circular waveguide (7/8'' diam) that transports the radiation outside the vacuum vessel where the polarization is selected, and a high absorptivity Macor beam dump to prevent internal wall reflections from entering the viewing system. A relativistic code is used to calculate optically thin PECE signals from relativistic electrons for various energy and pitch angle distributions. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Improved system for perpendicular electron-cyclotron emission measurements on TMX-U

    SciTech Connect

    Lasnier, C.J.; Ellis, R.F.; James, R.A.

    1986-08-01

    Perpendicular electron-cyclotron emission (PECE) is used on Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U) to diagnose thermal-barrier hot electrons (T-italic/sub H-italic/--100--400 keV, yielding the time history of the temperature of these relativistic electrons. We describe an improved quasioptical viewing system for these measurements that uses high-sensitivity superheterodyne receivers at fixed frequencies of 60, 98, 130, and 196 GHz. The improved viewing and transport system consists of an off-axis ellipsoidal mirror that images the plasma onto a V-band conical collection horn, an overmoded circular waveguide ( 7/8 in. diam) that transports the radiation outside the vacuum vessel where the polarization is selected, and a high-absorptivity Macor beam dump to prevent internal wall reflections from entering the viewing system. A relativistic code is used to calculate optically thin PECE signals from relativistic electrons for various energy and pitch angle distributions.

  6. Electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma characterization by energy dispersive x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rácz, R.; Mascali, D.; Biri, S.; Caliri, C.; Castro, G.; Galatà, A.; Gammino, S.; Neri, L.; Pálinkás, J.; Romano, F. P.; Torrisi, G.

    2017-07-01

    Pinhole and CCD based quasi-optical x-ray imaging technique was applied to investigate the plasma of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS). Spectrally integrated and energy resolved images were taken from an axial perspective. The comparison of integrated images taken of argon plasma highlights the structural changes affected by some ECRIS setting parameters, like strength of the axial magnetic confinement, RF frequency and microwave power. Photon counting analysis gives precise intensity distribution of the x-ray emitted by the argon plasma and by the plasma chamber walls. This advanced technique points out that the spatial positions of the electron losses are strongly determined by the kinetic energy of the electrons themselves to be lost and also shows evidences how strongly the plasma distribution is affected by slight changes in the RF frequency.

  7. Production of beams from solid materials at Center for Nuclear Study electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Ohshiro, Y; Yamaka, S; Watanabe, S; Kobayashi, K; Kotaka, Y; Nishimura, M; Kase, M; Muto, H; Yamaguchi, H; Shimoura, S

    2014-02-01

    Two methods for the feed of vapor from solid materials in the Center for Nuclear Study ECR ion source are described. A rod placed near the wall of the plasma chamber, operating up to a melting point of 2600 °C, has been used for CaO, SiO2, and FeO. An oven with a number of openings, operating up to 800 °C, has been used for P2O5, Li, and S. Typical ion beam intensities of (7)Li(2+), (6)Li(3+), (40)Ca(12+), and (56)Fe(15+) are achieved 280, 75, 28, and 7 eμA, respectively. High intensity heavy ion beams are stably supplied into the azimuthally varying field cyclotron.

  8. Design of RF system for CYCIAE-230 superconducting cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Zhiguo; Ji, Bin; Fu, Xiaoliang; Cao, Xuelong; Zhao, Zhenlu; Zhang, Tinajue

    2017-05-01

    The CYCIAE230 is a low-current, compact superconducting cyclotron designed for proton therapy. The Radio Frequency system consists of four RF cavities and applies second harmonic to accelerate beams. The driving power for the cavity system is estimated to be approximately 150 kW. The LLRF controller is a self-made device developed and tested at low power using a small-scale cavity model. In this paper, the resonator systems of an S.C. cyclotron in history are reviewed. Contrary to those RF systems, the cavities of the CYCIAE230 cyclotron connect two opposite dees. Two high-power RF windows are included in the system. Each window carries approximately 75 kW RF power from the driver to the cavities. Thus, the RF system for the CY-CIAE230 cyclotron is operated in driven push-pull mode. The two-way amplifier-coupler-cavity systems are operated with approximately the same amount of RF power but 180° out of phase compared with each other. The design, as well as the technical advantage and limitations of this operating mode, of the CYCIAE230 cyclotron RF system is analyzed.

  9. Heavy ion cocktail beams at the 88 inch Cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, Daniela; McMahan, Margaret A.; Argento, David; Gimpel, Thomas; Guy, Aran; Morel, James; Siero, Christine; Thatcher, Ray; Lyneis, Claude M.

    2002-09-03

    Cyclotrons in combination with ECR ion sources provide the ability to accelerate ''cocktails'' of ions. A cocktail is a mixture of ions of near-identical mass-to-charge (m/q) ratio. The different ions cannot be separated by the injector mass-analyzing magnet and are tuned out of the ion source together. The cyclotron then is utilized as a mass analyzer by shifting the accelerating frequency. This concept was developed soon after the first ECR ion source became operational at the 88-Inch Cyclotron and has since become a powerful tool in the field of heavy ion radiation effects testing. Several different ''cocktails'' at various energies are available at the 88-Inch cyclotron for radiation effect testing, covering a broad range of linear energy transfer and penetration depth. Two standard heavy ion cocktails at 4.5 MeV/nucleon and 10 MeV/nucleon have been developed over the years containing ions from boron to bismuth. Recently, following requests for higher penetration depths, a 15MeV/nucleon heavy ion cocktail has been developed. Up to nine different metal and gaseous ion beams at low to very high charge states are tuned out of the ion source simultaneously and injected together into the cyclotron. It is therefore crucial to balance the ion source very carefully to provide sufficient intensities throughout the cocktail. The paper describes the set-up and tuning of the ion source for the various heavy ion cocktails.

  10. Cyclotron targets and production technologies used for radiopharmaceuticals in NPI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fišer, M.; Kopička, K.; Hradilek, P.; Hanč, P.; Lebeda, O.; Pánek, J.; Vognar, M.

    2003-01-01

    This paper deals with some technical aspects of the development and production of cyclotronmade radiopharmaceuticals (excluding PET). In this field, nuclear chemistry and pharmacy are in a close contact; therefore, requirements of the both should be taken into account. The principles of cyclotron targetry, separation/recovery of materials and synthesis of active substances are given, as well as issues connected with formulation of pharmaceutical forms. As the radiopharmaceuticals should fulfil the requirements on in vivo preparations, there exist a variety of demands pertaining to Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) concept, which is also briefly discussed. A typical production chain is presented and practical examples of real technologies based on cyclotron-made radionuclides are given as they have been used in Nuclear Physics Institute of CAS (NPI). Special attention is devoted to the technology of enriched cyclotron targets. Frequently used medicinal products employing cyclotron-produced active substances are characterised (Rb/Kr generators, 123I-labelled MIBG, OIH and MAB's). The cyclotron produced radioactive implants for transluminal coronary angioplasty (radioactive stents) are introduced as an example of a medical device developed for therapeutic application.

  11. Potential of cyclotron based accelerators for energy production and transmutation

    SciTech Connect

    Stammbach, T.; Adam, S.; Fitze, H.R.

    1995-10-01

    PSI operates a 590 MeV-cyclotron facility for high intensity proton beams for the production of intense beams of pions and muons. The facility, commissioned in 1974, has been partially upgraded and is now operated routinely at a beam current of 1 mA, which corresponds to a beam power of 0.6 MW. At this current, the beam losses in the cyclotron are about 0.02%. By the end of 1995 the authors expect to have 1.5 mA of protons. Extensive theoretical investigations on beam current limitations in isochronous cyclotrons were undertaken. They show that the longitudinal space charge effects dominate. Based on their experience the authors present a preliminary design of a cyclotron scheme that could produce a 10 MW beam as a driver for an {open_quotes}energy amplifier{close_quotes} as proposed by C. Rubbia and his collaborators. The expected efficiency for the conversion of AC into beam power would be about 50% (for the RF-systems only). The beam losses in the cyclotron are expected to be a few {mu}A, leading to a tolerable activation level.

  12. Cyclotron-based of plant gravisensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordyum, E.; Kalinina, Ia.; Bogatina, N.; Kondrachuk, A.

    Roots exhibit positive gravitropism they grow in the direction of a gravitational vector while shoots respond negatively and grow opposite to a gravitational vector We first demonstrated the inversion of roots gravitropism from positive to negative one under gravistimulation in the weak combined magnetic field WCMF consisted of permanent magnetic field PMF with the magnitude of order of 50 mu T and altering magnetic field AMF with the 6 mu T magnitude and a frequency of 32 Hz It was found that the effect of inversion has a resonance nature It means that in the interval of frequencies 1-45 Hz inversion of root gravitropism occurs only at frequency 32 Hz 2-3-day old cress seedlings were gravistimulated in moist chambers which are placed in mu -metal shields Inside mu -metal shields combined magnetic fields have been created The magnitude of magnetic fields was measured by a flux-gate magnetometer Experiments were performed in darkness at temperature 20 pm 1 0 C We measured the divergence angle of a growing root from its horizontal position After 1 h of gravistimulation in the WCMF we observed negative gravitropism of cress roots i e they grow in the opposite direction to a gravitational vector Frequency of 32 Hz for the magnitude of the PMF applied formally corresponds to cyclotron frequency of Ca 2 ions This indicates possible participation of calcium ions in root gravitropism There are many evidences of resonance effects of the WCMF on the biological processes that involve Ca 2 but the nature of

  13. Electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic instability near Ganymede

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, A. K.; Singhal, R. P.; Singh, K. P.; Singh, O. N.

    2014-08-01

    Jupiter's moon—Ganymede—is the largest satellite in our solar system. Galileo spacecraft made six close flybys to explore Ganymede. More information was acquired about particle population, magnetic field and plasma waves during these encounters. In this paper, our aim is to study the generation of electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic (ECH) emissions in the vicinity of Ganymede using the observed particle data. The calculated ECH wave's growth rates are analyzed in the light of observations of plasma waves along the path of Galileo near Ganymede. Dispersion relation for electrostatic mode is solved to obtain the temporal growth rates. A new electron distribution function, fitted to distribution observed near Ganymede, is used in the calculations. A parametric study is performed to evaluate the effect of loss-cone angle and the ratio of plasma to gyro-frequency on growth rates. It is found that ECH waves growth rates generally decrease as the loss-cone angle is increased. However, the ratio plasma to gyro-frequency has almost no effect on the growth rates. These parameters vary considerably along the Galileo trajectory near Ganymede. This is the first study which relates the occurrence of ECH waves with the particle and magnetic field data in the vicinity of Ganymede. The study of ECH wave growth rate near Ganymede is important for the calculation of pitch angle scattering rates of low-energy electrons and their subsequent precipitation into the thin atmosphere of Ganymede producing ultraviolet emissions. Results of the present study may also be relevant for the upcoming JUNO and JUICE missions to Jupiter.

  14. Design, performance, and grounding aspects of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor ion cyclotron range of frequencies antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Durodié, F. Dumortier, P.; Vrancken, M.; Messiaen, A.; Huygen, S.; Louche, F.; Van Schoor, M.; Vervier, M.; Winkler, K.

    2014-06-15

    ITER's Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) system [Lamalle et al., Fusion Eng. Des. 88, 517–520 (2013)] comprises two antenna launchers designed by CYCLE (a consortium of European associations listed in the author affiliations above) on behalf of ITER Organisation (IO), each inserted as a Port Plug (PP) into one of ITER's Vacuum Vessel (VV) ports. Each launcher is an array of 4 toroidal by 6 poloidal RF current straps specified to couple up to 20 MW in total to the plasma in the frequency range of 40 to 55 MHz but limited to a maximum system voltage of 45 kV and limits on RF electric fields depending on their location and direction with respect to, respectively, the torus vacuum and the toroidal magnetic field. A crucial aspect of coupling ICRF power to plasmas is the knowledge of the plasma density profiles in the Scrape-Off Layer (SOL) and the location of the RF current straps with respect to the SOL. The launcher layout and details were optimized and its performance estimated for a worst case SOL provided by the IO. The paper summarizes the estimated performance obtained within the operational parameter space specified by IO. Aspects of the RF grounding of the whole antenna PP to the VV port and the effect of the voids between the PP and the Blanket Shielding Modules (BSM) surrounding the antenna front are discussed. These blanket modules, whose dimensions are of the order of the ICRF wavelengths, together with the clearance gaps between them will constitute a corrugated structure which will interact with the electromagnetic waves launched by ICRF antennas. The conditions in which the grooves constituted by the clearance gaps between the blanket modules can become resonant are studied. Simple analytical models and numerical simulations show that mushroom type structures (with larger gaps at the back than at the front) can bring down the resonance frequencies, which could lead to large voltages in the gaps between the blanket modules and perturb the

  15. FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF INNOVATIVE CONDITION ASSESSMENT TECHNOLOGIES FOR WATER MAINS: ACOUSTIC PIPE WALL ASSESSMENT, INTERNAL INSPECTION, AND EXTERNAL INSPECTIONVOLUME 1: TECHNICAL REPORT AND VOLUME 2: APPENDICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nine pipe wall integrity assessment technologies were demonstrated on a 76-year-old, 2,057-ft-long portion of a cement-lined, 24-in. cast iron water main in Louisville, KY. This activity was part of a series of field demonstrations of innovative leak detection/location and condi...

  16. FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF INNOVATIVE CONDITION ASSESSMENT TECHNOLOGIES FOR WATER MAINS: ACOUSTIC PIPE WALL ASSESSMENT, INTERNAL INSPECTION, AND EXTERNAL INSPECTIONVOLUME 1: TECHNICAL REPORT AND VOLUME 2: APPENDICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nine pipe wall integrity assessment technologies were demonstrated on a 76-year-old, 2,057-ft-long portion of a cement-lined, 24-in. cast iron water main in Louisville, KY. This activity was part of a series of field demonstrations of innovative leak detection/location and condi...

  17. [Callose content in cell walls of leaf epidermis and mesophyll in Alisma plantago-aquatica L. plants growing in different conditions of water supply].

    PubMed

    Ovruts'ka, I I

    2014-01-01

    The relative callose content in Alisma plantago-aquatica leaves has been studied at the phases of budding and flowering--fruiting. The callose content in cell walls was shown to vary depending on the type of tissue, phase of ontogenesis and of water supply.

  18. Theoretical determination of electron temperature in electron-cyclotron plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Uhm, H.S.; Lee, P.H.; Kim, Y.I.; Kim, J.H.; Chang, H.Y.

    1995-12-31

    A basic theory of the plasma electron temperature in ECR plasmas has been reported in recent studies in connection with application to the plasma etching technologies. However, the previous theoretical study of the ECR plasmas is primitive and ad hoc. The authors therefore develop a theory for plasmas generated by the electron-cyclotron-resonance (ECR) mechanism and an experiment is conducted to compare the theoretical prediction and experimental measurements. Due to a large electron mobility along the magnetic field, electrons move quickly out of the system, leaving ions behind and building a space charge potential, which leads to the ambipolar diffusion of ions. In a steady-state condition, the plasma generation by ionization of neutral molecules is in balance with plasma loss due to the diffusion, leading to the electron temperature equation, which is expressed in terms of the plasma size, chamber pressure, and the ionization energy and cross section of neutrals. The electron temperature decreases as the chamber pressure increases. Based on the ambipolar diffusion of ions, a self-consistent theory of the plasma density profile is developed. The power balance condition leads to the plasma density equation, which is also expressed in terms of the electron temperature, the input microwave power and the chamber pressure. It is shown that the plasma density increases, reaches its peak and decreases, as the chamber pressure increases from a small value (0.1 mTorr). After carrying out an experimental observation, it is concluded that the theoretical predictions of the electron temperature and plasma density agree remarkably well with experimental data.

  19. Performance optimization of H(-) multicusp ion source for KIRAMS-30 cyclotron.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kun Uk; An, Dong Hyun; Chang, Hong Suk; Chai, Jong Seo

    2008-02-01

    KIRAMS-30 cyclotron has been developed and implemented for radio isotope production. For the purpose of producing negative hydrogen ions and low energy beam injection to the central region of KIRAMS-30, 10 mA H(-) multicusp ion source with beam kinetic energies in the 20-30 keV range and the normalized 4 rms emittance less than 1 mm mrad was installed. The optimized ion source operating condition is presented and the correlation between the extracted beam current and ion source parameters is described for the performance enhancement of the ion source.

  20. A simple and efficient method of nickel electrodeposition for the cyclotron production of (64)Cu.

    PubMed

    Manrique-Arias, Juan C; Avila-Rodriguez, Miguel A

    2014-07-01

    Nickel targets for the cyclotron production of (64)Cu were prepared by electrodeposition on a gold backing from nickel chloride solutions using boric acid as buffer. Parameters studied were nickel chloride and boric acid concentration, temperature and current density. All plating conditions studied were successful obtaining efficiencies of approximately 90% in 2-3 h, reaching almost quantitative plating (>97%) in 10-20 h depending on the current density. All plated targets withstood proton irradiations up to 40 µA for 2 h. Recovered nickel was successfully recycled and reused with an overall efficiency >95%.