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Sample records for cylindrical geometry space-dependent

  1. Cylindrical geometry hall thruster

    DOEpatents

    Raitses, Yevgeny; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method for thrusting plasma, utilizing a Hall thruster with a cylindrical geometry, wherein ions are accelerated in substantially the axial direction. The apparatus is suitable for operation at low power. It employs small size thruster components, including a ceramic channel, with the center pole piece of the conventional annular design thruster eliminated or greatly reduced. Efficient operation is accomplished through magnetic fields with a substantial radial component. The propellant gas is ionized at an optimal location in the thruster. A further improvement is accomplished by segmented electrodes, which produce localized voltage drops within the thruster at optimally prescribed locations. The apparatus differs from a conventional Hall thruster, which has an annular geometry, not well suited to scaling to small size, because the small size for an annular design has a great deal of surface area relative to the volume.

  2. Dynamics of tilted cylindrical geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif, M.; Sadiq, Sobia

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we study the dynamics of tilted cylindrical model with imperfect matter distribution. We formulate the field equations and develop relations between tilted and non-tilted variables. We evaluate kinematical as well as dynamical quantities and discuss the inhomogeneity factor. We also obtain the Raychaudhuri equation to study evolution of expansion scalar. The solutions of field equations are also investigated for static cylinder under isotropy and conformally flat condition. Finally, we analyze some thermoinertial aspects of the system.

  3. Damage experiments in cylindrical geometry update

    SciTech Connect

    Kaul, Anne; Holtkamp, David; Rodriguez, George

    2009-01-01

    Using a cylindrical configuration to study spallation damage allows for a natural recollection of the damaged material under proper driving conditions. Previous experiments provided data about failure initiation in aluminum in a cylindrical geometry and the behavior of material recollected after damage from pressures in the damage initiation regime. The current series of experiments studied the behavior of material recollected after complete failure. Results from the current experiments will be presented.

  4. Damage experiments in a cylindrical geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kaul, Ann M

    2010-09-21

    Studying spallation damage with a cylindrical configuration allows for a natural recollection of the damaged material under proper driving conditions. Additionally, the damaged material can come to a complete rest without the application of further stopping forces. Specific areas of research include the damage initiation regime in convergent geometry, behavior of material recollected after damage, and effects of convergent geometry on the material response. Such experiments produce unique strain and shear stress states, motivating improvements in existing computational material models and increasing the predictive capabilities of codes. A LANL/VNIIEF joint experimental series has produced cylindrical aluminum failure initiation data and studied the behavior of material recollected after damage initiation and after complete failure. In addition to post-shot collection of the damaged target material for subsequent metallographic analysis, dynamic in-situ experimental diagnostics include velocimetry and transverse radial radiography. This paper will discuss the current experimental status.

  5. Rayleigh-Taylor instability experiments in a cylindrically convergent geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, B.; Weir, S.

    1995-08-25

    Due to the sensitivity of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities to initial conditions and due to the difficulty of forming well controlled cylindrical or spherical fluid interfaces, Rayleigh-Taylor experiments are often performed with simple, planar interfaces. Rayleigh-Taylor instability phenomena of practical interest, however, (e.g., underwater explosions, supernova core collapses, and inertial confinement fusion capsule implosions) are typically associated with cylindrical or spherical interfaces in which convergent flow effects have an important influence on the dynamics of instability growth. Recently, Meshkov et.al. have developed a novel technique for studying Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth in a cylindrically convergent geometry. Their experiments utilized low-strength gelatin rings which are imploded by a detonating gas mixture of oxygen and acetylene. Since the gelatin itself has sufficient strength to resist significant deformation by gravity, no membranes are needed to define the ring shape. This experimental technique is attractive because it offers a high degree of control over the interfacial geometry and over the material`s strength and rigidity, which can be varied by adjusting the gelatin concentration. Finally, since both the gelatin and the explosive product gases are transparent, optical diagnostics can be used.

  6. Selective decay in a long cylindrical geometry in SSX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, T.; Brown, M.; Dandurand, D.; Zhang, X.

    2010-11-01

    A helical, minimum-energy relaxed plasma state has been observed in a long cylindrical volume. The cylinder is long enough (L/R = 13) so that the predicted minimum energy state is a close approximation to the infinite cylinder solution. The plasma is injected at v >=50 km/s by a coaxial magnetized plasma gun located at one end of the cylindrical volume. The relaxed state is rapidly attained in 1--2 axial Alfvén times after initiation of the plasma. Magnetic data is favorably compared with an analytical model. Magnetic data exhibits broadband fluctuations of the measured axial modes during the formation period. The broadband activity rapidly decays as the energy condenses into the lowest energy mode, which is in agreement to the minimum energy eigenstate of ∇xB = λB. Merging experiments are planned and additional data will be presented if available.

  7. The Athena Astrophysical MHD Code in Cylindrical Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, M. A.; Ostriker, E. C.

    2011-10-01

    We have developed a method for implementing cylindrical coordinates in the Athena MHD code (Skinner & Ostriker 2010). The extension has been designed to alter the existing Cartesian-coordinates code (Stone et al. 2008) as minimally and transparently as possible. The numerical equations in cylindrical coordinates are formulated to maintain consistency with constrained transport, a central feature of the Athena algorithm, while making use of previously implemented code modules such as the eigensystems and Riemann solvers. Angular-momentum transport, which is critical in astrophysical disk systems dominated by rotation, is treated carefully. We describe modifications for cylindrical coordinates of the higher-order spatial reconstruction and characteristic evolution steps as well as the finite-volume and constrained transport updates. Finally, we have developed a test suite of standard and novel problems in one-, two-, and three-dimensions designed to validate our algorithms and implementation and to be of use to other code developers. The code is suitable for use in a wide variety of astrophysical applications and is freely available for download on the web.

  8. Stationary premixed flames in spherical and cylindrical geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronney, P. D.; Whaling, K. N.; Abbud-Madrid, A.; Gatto, J. L.; Pisowiscz, V. L.

    1994-01-01

    Stationary source-free spherical flames ('flame balls') in premixed combustible gases were studied by employing low-gravity (micro-g) environments in a drop tower and an aircraft flying parabolic trajectories to diminish the impact of buoyancy-induced convective flow. Flame balls were found in all mixture families tested when: (1) the Lewis number Le of the deficient reactant was sufficiently low; and (2) the compositions were sufficiently close to the flammability limits. Probably as a consequence of the reduction in buoyant convection, the flammability limits at micro-g were significantly more dilute than those at Earth gravity; for example, 3.35% H2 vs 4.0% H2 in lean H2-air mixtures. By comparison with analytical and computational models, it is inferred that the phenomenon is probably related to diffusive-thermal effects in low-Le mixtures in conjunction with flame-front curvature and radiative heat losses from the combustion products. The chemical reaction mechanism appears to play no qualitative role. In the aircraft experiments, the gravity levels (approximately equal 10(exp -2)g(sub 0)) were found to cause noticeable motion of flame balls due to buoyancy, which in turn influenced the behavior of flame balls. At these g levels, a new type of transient, nearly cylindrical flame structure, termed 'flame strings,' was observed.

  9. Multigroup Neutron/Gamma-Ray Direct Integration Transport Code System for Two-Dimensional Cylindrical Geometry.

    1980-10-15

    Version 00 PALLAS-2DCY-FX is a code for direct integration of the transport equation in two-dimensional (r,z) geometry. It solves the energy and angular-dependent Boltzmann transport equation with general anisotropic scattering in cylindrical geometry. Its principal applications are to neutron or gamma-ray transport problems in the forward mode. The code is particularly designed for and suited to the solution of deep penetration radiation transport problems with an external (fixed) source.

  10. Simulations of plasma dynamo in cylindrical and spherical geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalzov, Ivan; Forest, Cary; Schnack, Dalton; Ebrahimi, Fatima

    2010-11-01

    We have performed the numerical investigation of plasma flow and possibility of dynamo effect in Madison Plasma Couette Experiment (MPCX) and Madison Plasma Dynamo Experiment (MPDX), which are being installed at the University of Wisconsin- Madison. Using the extended MHD code, NIMROD, we have studied several types of plasma flows appropriate for dynamo excitation. Calculations are done for isothermal compressible plasma model including two-fluid effects (Hall term), which is beyond the standard incompressible MHD picture. It is found that for magnetic Reynolds numbers exceeding the critical one the counter-rotating Von Karman flow (in cylinder) and Dudley- James flow (in sphere) result in self-generation of magnetic field. Depending on geometry and plasma parameters this field can either saturate at certain amplitude corresponding to a new stable equilibrium (laminar dynamo) or lead to turbulent dynamo. It is shown that plasma compressibility results in increase of the critical magnetic Reynolds number while two- fluid effects change the level of saturated dynamo field. The work is supported by NSF.

  11. Slant Path Distances Through Cells in Cylindrical Geometry and an Application to the Computation of Isophotes

    SciTech Connect

    Rodney Whitaker Eugene Symbalisty

    2007-12-17

    In computer programs involving two-dimensional cylindrical geometry, it is often necessary to calculate the slant path distance in a given direction from a point to the boundary of a mesh cell. A subroutine, HOWFAR, has been written that accomplishes this, and is very economical in computer time. An example of its use is given in constructing the isophotes for a low altitude nuclear fireball.

  12. Rayleigh-taylor instability growth experiments in a cylindrically convergent geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Weir, S. T., LLNL

    1997-06-11

    Convergent geometry Rayleigh-Taylor experiments have been performed with a 122-point detonation initiation system on cylinders having sinusoidal perturbations on the outer surface ranging from mode-6 to mode-36. Experiments were performed with various perturbation mode numbers, perturbation amplitudes, and ring accelerations. Feedthrough perturbation growth on the inner surface was observed in several experiments, and in one experiment the feed through perturbation underwent a phase inversion. These experimental results were found to be in good agreement with linear, small-amplitude analysis of feedthrough growth in an incompressible, cylindrically convergent geometry.

  13. Multi-Group Reductions of LTE Air Plasma Radiative Transfer in Cylindrical Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scoggins, James; Magin, Thierry Edouard Bertran; Wray, Alan; Mansour, Nagi N.

    2013-01-01

    Air plasma radiation in Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE) within cylindrical geometries is studied with an application towards modeling the radiative transfer inside arc-constrictors, a central component of constricted-arc arc jets. A detailed database of spectral absorption coefficients for LTE air is formulated using the NEQAIR code developed at NASA Ames Research Center. The database stores calculated absorption coefficients for 1,051,755 wavelengths between 0.04 µm and 200 µm over a wide temperature (500K to 15 000K) and pressure (0.1 atm to 10.0 atm) range. The multi-group method for spectral reduction is studied by generating a range of reductions including pure binning and banding reductions from the detailed absorption coefficient database. The accuracy of each reduction is compared to line-by-line calculations for cylindrical temperature profiles resembling typical profiles found in arc-constrictors. It is found that a reduction of only 1000 groups is sufficient to accurately model the LTE air radiation over a large temperature and pressure range. In addition to the reduction comparison, the cylindrical-slab formulation is compared with the finite-volume method for the numerical integration of the radiative flux inside cylinders with varying length. It is determined that cylindrical-slabs can be used to accurately model most arc-constrictors due to their high length to radius ratios.

  14. An efficiency study of PVDF film transducers and their waveform modeling in cylindrical geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhong.

    1991-12-20

    In this thesis, the efficiency formulas for a transducer working as a transmitter or a receiver was derived directively from the piezoelectric constitutive equation. The transducer efficiency in a pulse-echo measurement was also given by multiplying the efficiencies for the transmitter and the receiver. The comparison between the PVDF (polyvinylidene fluoride) film transducer and the conventional PZT ceramic transducers was made based on the efficiency formulas. Based on the impulse response approach, an analytical model was built to predict the pulse waveform for through-transmission and pulse-echo measurements when the film transducer was applied in geometry. The experiments were also made to observe echo waveforms in cylindrical rod samples. The same approach was also expanded to evaluate the echo waveforms from artificial flaws inside the cylindrical rod. The model prediction and the experimental results were in reasonably good agreement. 26 refs.

  15. The influence of triggers geometry upon the stiffness of cylindrical thin walled tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soica, Adrian; Radu, Gheorghe N.

    2014-06-01

    Today's automobile manufacturers are increasingly using lightweight materials to reduce weight; these include plastics, composites, aluminium, magnesium alloys, and also new types of high strength steels. Many of these materials have limited strength or ductility, therefore in many cases the rupture being serious consequences during crashes, underscore Picketta et al. in their studies. Automotive structures must deform plastically in a short period of time, a few milliseconds, to absorb the crash energy in a controllable manner. It must be light and enable economically mass-production [1]. FE models rapidly gained acceptance among engineers. Many other factors facilitated the development of vehicle models by shell finite elements since most of the geometry of the structural surfaces was already on computer graphic files. Kee Poong Kim and Hoon Huh emphasize that the crashworthiness of each vehicle part needs to be evaluated at the initial stage of design for good performance of an assembled vehicle. As the dynamic behaviour of structural members is different from the static one, the crashworthiness of the vehicle structures has to be assessed by impact analysis. The paper analyzes the influence of trigger geometry upon the compression of thin-walled cylindrical tubes. Simulations performed on a simple model showed the dependence between triggers area and deformation times as well as the maximum deformations obtained for various speeds at which the simulations ware carried out. Likewise, the geometry of trigger leads to different results.

  16. STABILITY OF A CYLINDRICAL SOLUTE-SOLVENT INTERFACE: EFFECT OF GEOMETRY, ELECTROSTATICS, AND HYDRODYNAMICS*

    PubMed Central

    LI, BO; SUN, HUI; ZHOU, SHENGGAO

    2015-01-01

    The solute-solvent interface that separates biological molecules from their surrounding aqueous solvent characterizes the conformation and dynamics of such molecules. In this work, we construct a solvent fluid dielectric boundary model for the solvation of charged molecules and apply it to study the stability of a model cylindrical solute-solvent interface. The motion of the solute-solvent interface is defined to be the same as that of solvent fluid at the interface. The solvent fluid is assumed to be incompressible and is described by the Stokes equation. The solute is modeled simply by the ideal-gas law. All the viscous force, hydrostatic pressure, solute-solvent van der Waals interaction, surface tension, and electrostatic force are balanced at the solute-solvent interface. We model the electrostatics by Poisson’s equation in which the solute-solvent interface is treated as a dielectric boundary that separates the low-dielectric solute from the high-dielectric solvent. For a cylindrical geometry, we find multiple cylindrically shaped equilibrium interfaces that describe polymodal (e.g., dry and wet) states of hydration of an underlying molecular system. These steady-state solutions exhibit bifurcation behavior with respect to the charge density. For their linearized systems, we use the projection method to solve the fluid equation and find the dispersion relation. Our asymptotic analysis shows that, for large wavenumbers, the decay rate is proportional to wavenumber with the proportionality half of the ratio of surface tension to solvent viscosity, indicating that the solvent viscosity does affect the stability of a solute-solvent interface. Consequences of our analysis in the context of biomolecular interactions are discussed. PMID:26877555

  17. Multi-water-bag models of ion temperature gradient instability in cylindrical geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Coulette, David; Besse, Nicolas

    2013-05-15

    Ion temperature gradient instabilities play a major role in the understanding of anomalous transport in core fusion plasmas. In the considered cylindrical geometry, ion dynamics is described using a drift-kinetic multi-water-bag model for the parallel velocity dependency of the ion distribution function. In a first stage, global linear stability analysis is performed. From the obtained normal modes, parametric dependencies of the main spectral characteristics of the instability are then examined. Comparison of the multi-water-bag results with a reference continuous Maxwellian case allows us to evaluate the effects of discrete parallel velocity sampling induced by the Multi-Water-Bag model. Differences between the global model and local models considered in previous works are discussed. Using results from linear, quasilinear, and nonlinear numerical simulations, an analysis of the first stage saturation dynamics of the instability is proposed, where the divergence between the three models is examined.

  18. RECENT RESULTS OF RADIATION HYDRODYNAMICS AND TURBULENCE EXPERIMENTS IN CYLINDRICAL GEOMETRY.

    SciTech Connect

    Magelssen G. R.; Scott, J. M.; Batha, S. H.; Holmes, R. L.; Lanier, N. E.; Tubbs, D. L.; Elliott, N. E.; Dunne, A. M.; Rothman, S.; Parker, K. W.; Youngs, D.

    2001-01-01

    Cylindrical implosion experiments at the University of Rochester laser facility, OMEGA, were performed to study radiation hydrodynamics and compressible turbulence in convergent geometry. Laser beams were used to directly drive a cylinder with either a gold (AU) or dichloropolystyrene (C6H8CL2) marker layer placed between a solid CH ablator and a foam cushion. When the cylinder is imploded the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability and convergence cause the marker layer to increase in thickness. Marker thickness measurements were made by x-ray backlighting along the cylinder axis. Experimental results of the effect of surface roughness will be presented. Computational results with an AMR code are in good agreement with the experimental results from targets with the roughest surface. Computational results suggest that marker layer 'end effects' and bowing increase the effective thickness of the marker layer at lower levels of roughness.

  19. Fast magnetoacoustic solitary waves in dense magnetoplasmas in a cylindrical geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masood, W.; Mahmood, A.; Rizvi, H.

    2013-01-01

    Nonlinear properties of the quantum magnetoacoustic wave are studied in electron-ion magnetoplasmas. In this regard, cylindrical Korteweg deVries (CKdV) equation is derived for small amplitude perturbations. The solution of the planar KdV equation is obtained using the tanh method and is subsequently used as an initial profile to solve the CKdV equation. It is found that the system under consideration admits compressive solitary structures. Finally, it is found that the amplitude as well as the width of the nonplanar magnetosonic solitary structure increases with the increase in the magnetic field whereas a decrease is observed with the increase in number density of the system. The present study may be beneficial to understand the nonlinear wave propagation in nonplanar geometries in dense plasmas.

  20. Effects of Cylindrical Charge Geometry and Secondary Combustion Reactions on the Internal Blast Loading of Reinforced Concrete Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Matthew A.

    2005-05-01

    An understanding of the detonation phenomenon and airblast behavior for cylindrical high-explosive charges is essential in developing predictive capabilities for tests and scenarios involving these charge geometries. Internal tests on reinforced concrete structures allowed for the analysis of cylindrical charges and the effect of secondary reactions occurring in confined structures. The pressure profiles that occur close to a cylindrical explosive charge are strongly dependent on the length-to-diameter ratio (L/D) of the charge. This study presents a comparison of finite-element code models (i.e., AUTODYN) to empirical methods for predicting airblast behavior from cylindrical charges. Current finite element analysis (FEA) and blast prediction codes fail to account for the effects of secondary reactions (fireballs) that occur with underoxidized explosives. Theoretical models were developed for TNT and validated against literature. These models were then applied to PBX 9501 for predictions of the spherical fireball diameter and time duration. The following relationships for PBX 9501 were derived from this analysis (units of ft, lb, s). Comparison of centrally located equivalent weight charges using cylindrical and spherical geometries showed that the average impulse on the interior of the structure is ~3%–5% higher for the spherical charge. Circular regions of high impulse that occur along the axial direction of the cylindrical charge must be considered when analyzing structural response.

  1. Consideration of a ultracold neutron source in two-dimensional cylindrical geometry by taking simulated boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheisari, R.; Firoozabadi, M. M.; Mohammadi, H.

    2014-01-01

    A new idea to calculate ultracold neutron (UCN) production by using Monte Carlo simulation method to calculate the cold neutron (CN) flux and an analytical approach to calculate the UCN production from the simulated CN flux was given. A super-thermal source (UCN source) was modeled based on an arrangement of D2O and solid D2 (sD2). The D2O was investigated as the neutron moderator, and sD2 as the converter. In order to determine the required parameters, a two-dimensional (2D) neutron balance equation written in Matlab was combined with the MCNPX simulation code. The 2D neutron-transport equation in cylindrical (ρ - z) geometry was considered for 330 neutron energy groups in the sD2. The 2D balance equation for UCN and CN was solved using simulated CN flux as boundary value. The UCN source dimensions were calculated for the development of the next UCN source. In the optimal condition, the UCN flux and the UCN production rate (averaged over the sD2 volume) equal to 6.79 × 106 cm-2s-1 and 2.20 ×105 cm-3s-1, respectively.

  2. Simulations of Viscous Accretion Flow around Black Holes in a Two-dimensional Cylindrical Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seong-Jae; Chattopadhyay, Indranil; Kumar, Rajiv; Hyung, Siek; Ryu, Dongsu

    2016-11-01

    We simulate shock-free and shocked viscous accretion flows onto a black hole in a two-dimensional cylindrical geometry, where initial conditions were chosen from analytical solutions. The simulation code used the Lagrangian total variation diminishing plus remap routine, which enabled us to attain high accuracy in capturing shocks and to handle the angular momentum distribution correctly. The inviscid shock-free accretion disk solution produced a thick disk structure, while the viscous shock-free solution attained a Bondi-like structure, but in either case, no jet activity nor any quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO)-like activity developed. The steady-state shocked solution in the inviscid as well as in the viscous regime matched theoretical predictions well. However, increasing viscosity renders the accretion shock unstable. Large-amplitude shock oscillation is accompanied by intermittent, transient inner multiple shocks. This oscillation of the inner part of the disk is interpreted as the source of QPO in hard X-rays observed in micro-quasars. Strong shock oscillation induces strong episodic jet emission. The jets also show the existence of shocks, which are produced as one shell hits the preceding one. The periodicities of the jets and shock oscillation are similar; the jets for the higher viscosity parameter appear to be stronger and faster.

  3. Observation of Mix in a Compressible Plasma in a Convergent Cylindrical Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batha, Steven H.; Barnes, C. W.; Lanier, N. E.; Magelssen, G. R.; Scott, J. M.; Holmes, R. L.; Murphy, T. J.; Rothman, S.; Dunne, A. M.; Parker, K.; Youngs, D. L.

    2001-11-01

    Mixing of two materials may occur when the interface between them is shocked or accelerated. The mixing is exacerbated when the interface is imploding, highlighting the important effects of compressibility, miscibility, and convergence under strong-shock conditions. We present experiments and simulations of mix occurring in convergent cylindrical geometry. A hollow plastic 1-mm-diameter cylinder is imploded by ≈20 kJ of 351-nm laser light in a 1-ns square pulse from the OMEGA laser. The cylinder is filled with low-density foam that provides a back-pressure to the implosion. A higher density "marker layer" is placed at the interface between the plastic and foam. Both the plastic/marker and marker/foam interfaces are Richtmyer-Meshkov unstable. The marker material is chosen to produce either a large or small amount of mix. Experimentally, we measured the radial extent of the radiographically opaque marker layer. We found that the simulations were in excellent agreement in both cases with the experiments.

  4. Observation of Mix in a Compressible Plasma in a Convergent Cylindrical Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batha, Steven H.; Barnes, C. W.; Lanier, N. E.; Magelssen, G. R.; Scott, J. M.; Holmes, R. L.; Murphy, T. J.; Rothman, S.; Dunne, A. M.; Parker, K.; Youngs, D. L.

    2001-10-01

    Mixing of two materials may occur when the interface between them is shocked or accelerated. The mixing is exacerbated when the interface is imploding, highlighting the important effects of compressibility, miscibility, and convergence under strong-shock conditions. We present experiments and simulations of mix occurring in convergent cylindrical geometry. A hollow plastic 1-mm-diameter cylinder is imploded by ≈20 kJ of 351-nm laser light in a 1-ns square pulse from the OMEGA laser. The cylinder is filled with low-density foam that provides a back-pressure to the implosion. A higher density "marker layer" is placed at the interface between the plastic and foam. Both the plastic/marker and marker/foam interfaces are Richtmyer-Meshkov unstable. The marker material is chosen to produce either a large or small amount of mix. Experimentally, we measured the radial extent of the radiographically opaque marker layer. We found that the simulations were in excellent agreement in both cases with the experiments.

  5. Consideration of a ultracold neutron source in two-dimensional cylindrical geometry by taking simulated boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Gheisari, R.; Firoozabadi, M. M.; Mohammadi, H.

    2014-01-15

    A new idea to calculate ultracold neutron (UCN) production by using Monte Carlo simulation method to calculate the cold neutron (CN) flux and an analytical approach to calculate the UCN production from the simulated CN flux was given. A super-thermal source (UCN source) was modeled based on an arrangement of D{sub 2}O and solid D{sub 2} (sD{sub 2}). The D{sub 2}O was investigated as the neutron moderator, and sD{sub 2} as the converter. In order to determine the required parameters, a two-dimensional (2D) neutron balance equation written in Matlab was combined with the MCNPX simulation code. The 2D neutron-transport equation in cylindrical (ρ − z) geometry was considered for 330 neutron energy groups in the sD{sub 2}. The 2D balance equation for UCN and CN was solved using simulated CN flux as boundary value. The UCN source dimensions were calculated for the development of the next UCN source. In the optimal condition, the UCN flux and the UCN production rate (averaged over the sD{sub 2} volume) equal to 6.79 × 10{sup 6} cm{sup −2}s{sup −1} and 2.20 ×10{sup 5} cm{sup −3}s{sup −1}, respectively.

  6. Task order #24 update: exploration of damage mechanisms in cylindrical geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kaul, Ann M

    2011-01-14

    A typical method of failure for ductile materials is spallation damage, which is caused by the nucleation, growth and coalescence of voids due to the presence of high tensile stress in the material. Spallation damage models, such as TEPLA, are currently implemented in hydrodynamic computer codes used at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Parameters for such constitutive models are derived from data sets obtained primarily from gas gun and shock-driven experiments, which are designed to allow one-dimensional analysis of the evolution of the failure characteristics. However, in a non-planar geometry, advanced failure models predict failure to be a multi-dimensional process. Additionally, a limited amount of data exists for the process of void nucleation, growth and coalescence. Another lightly researched area is the state of the material in the event that the spallation layer is recollected and voids are closed. The experiments described here are being conducted as part of a Campaign-l effort to provide data addressing these issues. The Russian Damage Experimental Series is designed to provide fundamental non-planar (cylindrical) spallation damage data, including early time processes (void nucleation, growth and coalescence) and late time processes (recollection of the spallation layer). Previous experiments produced data addressing some of the early time processes. This presentation will be provided to LANL and VNIIEF colleagues as a means of assessing the status of Task Order No.24 at the current time.

  7. Jet mixing into a heated cross flow in a cylindrical duct: Influence of geometry and flow variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatch, M. S.; Sowa, W. A.; Samuelsen, G. S.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1992-01-01

    To examine the mixing characteristics of jets in an axi-symmetric can geometry, temperature measurements were obtained downstream of a row of cold jets injected into a heated cross stream. Parametric, non-reacting experiments were conducted to determine the influence of geometry and flow variations on mixing patterns in a cylindrical configuration. Results show that jet to mainstream momentum flux ratio and orifice geometry significantly impact the mixing characteristics of jets in a can geometry. For a fixed number of orifices, the coupling between momentum flux ratio and injector determines (1) the degree of jet penetration at the injection plane, and (2) the extent of circumferential mixing downstream of the injection plane. The results also show that, at a fixed momentum flux ratio, jet penetration decreases with (1) an increase in slanted slot aspect ratio, and (2) an increase in the angle of the slots with respect to the mainstream direction.

  8. Flows and torques in Brownian ferrofluids subjected to rotating uniform magnetic fields in a cylindrical and annular geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Torres-Diaz, I.; Cortes, A.; Rinaldi, C.; Cedeño-Mattei, Y.; Perales-Perez, O.

    2014-01-15

    Ferrofluid flow in cylindrical and annular geometries under the influence of a uniform rotating magnetic field was studied experimentally using aqueous ferrofluids consisting of low concentrations (<0.01 v/v) of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles with Brownian relaxation to test the ferrohydrodynamic equations, elucidate the existence of couple stresses, and determine the value of the spin viscosity in these fluids. An ultrasound technique was used to measure bulk velocity profiles in the spin-up (cylindrical) and annular geometries, varying the intensity and frequency of the rotating magnetic field generated by a two pole stator winding. Additionally, torque measurements in the cylindrical geometry were made. Results show rigid-body like velocity profiles in the bulk, and no dependence on the axial direction. Experimental velocity profiles were in quantitative agreement with the predictions of the spin diffusion theory, with a value of the spin viscosity of ∼10{sup −8} kg m/s, two orders of magnitude larger than the value estimated earlier for iron oxide based ferrofluids, and 12 orders of magnitude larger than estimated using dimensional arguments valid in the infinite dilution limit. These results provide further evidence of the existence of couple stresses in ferrofluids and their role in driving the spin-up flow phenomenon.

  9. Asymptotic expansions of solutions of the heat conduction equation in internally bounded cylindrical geometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ritchie, R.H.; Sakakura, A.Y.

    1956-01-01

    The formal solutions of problems involving transient heat conduction in infinite internally bounded cylindrical solids may be obtained by the Laplace transform method. Asymptotic series representing the solutions for large values of time are given in terms of functions related to the derivatives of the reciprocal gamma function. The results are applied to the case of the internally bounded infinite cylindrical medium with, (a) the boundary held at constant temperature; (b) with constant heat flow over the boundary; and (c) with the "radiation" boundary condition. A problem in the flow of gas through a porous medium is considered in detail.

  10. A Piecewise Linear Discontinuous Finite Element Spatial Discretization of the Transport Equation in 2D Cylindrical Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, T S; Adams, M L; Chang, J H

    2008-10-01

    We present a new spatial discretization of the discrete-ordinates transport equation in two-dimensional cylindrical (RZ) geometry for arbitrary polygonal meshes. This discretization is a discontinuous finite element method that utilizes the piecewise linear basis functions developed by Stone and Adams. We describe an asymptotic analysis that shows this method to be accurate for many problems in the thick diffusion limit on arbitrary polygons, allowing this method to be applied to radiative transfer problems with these types of meshes. We also present numerical results for multiple problems on quadrilateral grids and compare these results to the well-known bi-linear discontinuous finite element method.

  11. A One-group, One-dimensional Transport Benchmark in Cylindrical Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Barry Ganapol; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

    2006-06-01

    A 1-D, 1-group computational benchmark in cylndrical geometry is described. This neutron transport benchmark is useful for evaluating reactor concepts that possess azimuthal symmetry such as a pebble-bed reactor.

  12. Use of nondegeneracy in norminally axisymmetric structures for fault detection with application to cylindrical geometries.

    SciTech Connect

    Royston, T. J.; Spohnholtz, T.; Ellingson, W. A.; Energy Technology; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago

    2000-03-01

    A novel technique is proposed for the detection of localized flaws in otherwise axisymmetric structures. The technique is based on the split-mode phenomena that occurs when the degenerate vibratory modes of the axisymmetric structure become non-degenerate due to the flaw with altered mode shapes and shifted natural frequencies. A basic theoretical motivation is offered and computational and experimental studies on cylindrical structures are reported that verify the premises of the proposed methodology and provide an assessment of its specificity and sensitivity under confounding conditions, such as out-of-roundness.

  13. Numerical study of laminar plasma dynamo in cylindrical and spherical geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalzov, Ivan; Bayliss, Adam; Ebrahimi, Fatima; Forest, Cary; Schnack, Dalton

    2009-05-01

    We have performed the numerical investigation of possibility of laminar dynamo in two new experiments, Plasma Couette and Plasma Dynamo, which have been designed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The plasma is confined by a strong multipole magnetic field localized at the boundary of cylindrical (Plasma Couette) or spherical (Plasma Dynamo) chamber. Electrodes positioned between the magnet rings can be biased with arbitrary potentials so that Lorenz force ExB drives any given toroidal velocity profile at the surface. Using the extended MHD code, NIMROD, we have modeled several types of plasma flows appropriate for dynamo excitation. It is found that for high magnetic Reynolds numbers the counter-rotating von Karman flow (in cylinder) and Dudley-James flow (in sphere) can lead to self-generation of non-axisymmetric magnetic field. This field saturates at certain amplitude corresponding to a new stable equilibrium. The structure of this equilibrium is considered.

  14. Annular and Cylindrical Phased Array Geometries for Transrectal High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) using PZT and Piezocomposite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seip, Ralf; Chen, Wohsing; Carlson, Roy; Frizzell, Leon; Warren, Gary; Smith, Nadine; Saleh, Khaldon; Gerber, Gene; Shung, Kirk; Guo, Hongkai; Sanghvi, Narendra T.

    2005-03-01

    This paper presents engineering progress and the latest in-vitro and in-vivo results obtained with a 4.0 MHz, 20 element, PZT annular transrectal HIFU array and several 4.0 MHz, 211 element, PZT and piezocomposite cylindrical transrectal HIFU arrays for the treatment of prostate cancer. The geometries of both arrays were designed and analyzed to steer the HIFU beams to the desired sites in the prostate volume using multi-channel electronic drivers, with the intent to increase treatment efficiency and reliability for the next generation of HIFU systems. The annular array is able to focus in depth from 25 mm to 50 mm, generate total acoustic powers in excess of 60W, and has been integrated into a modified Sonablate®500 HIFU system capable of controlling such an applicator through custom treatment planning and execution software. Both PZT- and piezocomposite cylindrical arrays were constructed and their characteristics were compared for the transrectal applications. These arrays have been installed into appropriate transducer housings, and have undergone characterization tests to determine their total acoustic power output, focusing range (in depth and laterally), focus quality, efficiency, and comparison tests to determine the material and technology of choice (PZT or piezocomposite) for intra-cavity HIFU applications. Array descriptions, characterization results, in-vitro and in-vivo results, and an overview of their intended use through the application software is shown.

  15. Technique for fabrication of ultrathin foils in cylindrical geometry for liner-plasma implosion experiments with sub-megaampere currents.

    PubMed

    Yager-Elorriaga, D A; Steiner, A M; Patel, S G; Jordan, N M; Lau, Y Y; Gilgenbach, R M

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we describe a technique for fabricating ultrathin foils in cylindrical geometry for liner-plasma implosion experiments using sub-MA currents. Liners are formed by wrapping a 400 nm, rectangular strip of aluminum foil around a dumbbell-shaped support structure with a non-conducting center rod, so that the liner dimensions are 1 cm in height, 6.55 mm in diameter, and 400 nm in thickness. The liner-plasmas are imploded by discharging ∼600 kA with ∼200 ns rise time using a 1 MA linear transformer driver, and the resulting implosions are imaged four times per shot using laser-shadowgraphy at 532 nm. This technique enables the study of plasma implosion physics, including the magneto Rayleigh-Taylor, sausage, and kink instabilities on initially solid, imploding metallic liners with university-scale pulsed power machines. PMID:26628134

  16. Technique for fabrication of ultrathin foils in cylindrical geometry for liner-plasma implosion experiments with sub-megaampere currents

    SciTech Connect

    Yager-Elorriaga, D. A.; Steiner, A. M.; Patel, S. G.; Jordan, N. M.; Lau, Y. Y.; Gilgenbach, R. M.

    2015-11-19

    In this study, we describe a technique for fabricating ultrathin foils in cylindrical geometry for liner-plasma implosion experiments using sub-MA currents. Liners are formed by wrapping a 400 nm, rectangular strip of aluminum foil around a dumbbell-shaped support structure with a non-conducting center rod, so that the liner dimensions are 1 cm in height, 6.55 mm in diameter, and 400 nm in thickness. The liner-plasmas are imploded by discharging ~600 kA with ~200 ns rise time using a 1 MA linear transformer driver, and the resulting implosions are imaged four times per shot using laser-shadowgraphy at 532 nm. As a result, this technique enables the study of plasma implosion physics, including the magneto Rayleigh-Taylor, sausage, and kink instabilities on initially solid, imploding metallic liners with university-scale pulsed power machines.

  17. Technique for fabrication of ultrathin foils in cylindrical geometry for liner-plasma implosion experiments with sub-megaampere currents

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yager-Elorriaga, D. A.; Steiner, A. M.; Patel, S. G.; Jordan, N. M.; Lau, Y. Y.; Gilgenbach, R. M.

    2015-11-19

    In this study, we describe a technique for fabricating ultrathin foils in cylindrical geometry for liner-plasma implosion experiments using sub-MA currents. Liners are formed by wrapping a 400 nm, rectangular strip of aluminum foil around a dumbbell-shaped support structure with a non-conducting center rod, so that the liner dimensions are 1 cm in height, 6.55 mm in diameter, and 400 nm in thickness. The liner-plasmas are imploded by discharging ~600 kA with ~200 ns rise time using a 1 MA linear transformer driver, and the resulting implosions are imaged four times per shot using laser-shadowgraphy at 532 nm. As amore » result, this technique enables the study of plasma implosion physics, including the magneto Rayleigh-Taylor, sausage, and kink instabilities on initially solid, imploding metallic liners with university-scale pulsed power machines.« less

  18. Technique for fabrication of ultrathin foils in cylindrical geometry for liner-plasma implosion experiments with sub-megaampere currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yager-Elorriaga, D. A.; Steiner, A. M.; Patel, S. G.; Jordan, N. M.; Lau, Y. Y.; Gilgenbach, R. M.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we describe a technique for fabricating ultrathin foils in cylindrical geometry for liner-plasma implosion experiments using sub-MA currents. Liners are formed by wrapping a 400 nm, rectangular strip of aluminum foil around a dumbbell-shaped support structure with a non-conducting center rod, so that the liner dimensions are 1 cm in height, 6.55 mm in diameter, and 400 nm in thickness. The liner-plasmas are imploded by discharging ˜600 kA with ˜200 ns rise time using a 1 MA linear transformer driver, and the resulting implosions are imaged four times per shot using laser-shadowgraphy at 532 nm. This technique enables the study of plasma implosion physics, including the magneto Rayleigh-Taylor, sausage, and kink instabilities on initially solid, imploding metallic liners with university-scale pulsed power machines.

  19. New Geometry of Worm Face Gear Drives with Conical and Cylindrical Worms: Generation, Simulation of Meshing, and Stress Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, Faydor L.; Nava, Alessandro; Fan, Qi; Fuentes, Alfonso

    2002-01-01

    New geometry of face worm gear drives with conical and cylindrical worms is proposed. The generation of the face worm-gear is based on application of a tilted head-cutter (grinding tool) instead of application of a hob applied at present. The generation of a conjugated worm is based on application of a tilted head-cutter (grinding tool) as well. The bearing contact of the gear drive is localized and is oriented longitudinally. A predesigned parabolic function of transmission errors for reduction of noise and vibration is provided. The stress analysis of the gear drive is performed using a three-dimensional finite element analysis. The contacting model is automatically generated. The developed theory is illustrated with numerical examples.

  20. Experimental investigation of the shock wave in a fast discharge with cylindrical geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Antsiferov, P. S.; Dorokhin, L. A.

    2013-08-15

    The work is devoted to the registration and the study of the properties of cylindrical shock waves generated in the fast discharge (dI/dt ∼ 10{sup 12} A/s) inside the ceramic tube (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) filled by argon at pressures of 100 and 300 Pa. The shock wave appears at the inner wall of the insulator and moves to the discharge axis with a velocity of about (3−4) × 10{sup 6} cm/s with subsequent cumulation. The plasma behind the front is heated enough to produce radiation in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) region, which makes it possible to study its structure by means of a pinhole camera with a microchannel plate detector. The time resolution of the registration system was 10 ns. The analysis of VUV spectra of the plasma shows that the electron temperature behind the shock wave front is about several eV; after the moment of cumulation, its temperature increases to 20–30 eV.

  1. Design criteria for soil cleaning operations in electrokinetic remediation: hydrodynamic aspects in a cylindrical geometry.

    PubMed

    Oyanader, Mario A; Arce, Pedro; Dzurik, Andrew

    2005-08-01

    The applications of electrokinetics embrace a large family of important industrial, pharmaceutical, biomedical, and environmental applications. Processes such as separation, drug delivery, soil remediation, and others constitute alist of applications where electrical fields are used to induce the movement of solute species. Different transport driving forces participate in the motion of the solute. In the particular case of soil remediation, the electromechanisms may compete with buoyancy and advection, promoting distinct flow regimes. As a rule of thumb, some of the earlier applications of electrokinetic phenomena, mainly in the area of electrophoresis, neglected this competition, and therefore the hydrodynamics of the systems was considered simpler. The nature of the process in soil, a porous media, calls for a different approach and is in need of further analysis of the complete map of collaborating driving forces. The identification and analysis of the characteristic flow regimes may lead to important guidelines for improving the separation, avoiding the mixing, and more efficient cleaning in a given application. In this contribution, using a cylindrical capillary model, the basic aspects of the behavior of the system are captured. A differential model is formulated using simplifying assumptions, maintaining the mathematical aspects to a minimum level, and a solution is presented for the different fields, i.e., the temperature and the velocity. Based on the selection of values of the parameter space, several limiting cases and flow regimes are presented and discussed. Implications for the design of devices and cleaning strategies are also included. Needs for further research are identified. The main idea behind the study is to obtain a qualitative and semiquantitative description of the different flow regimes inside the channel. This information is useful to identify further aspects of the investigation and delineate a systematic approach for a more rigorous

  2. Geometry effects on cooling in a standing wave cylindrical thermoacousic resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohd-Ghazali, Normah; Ghazali, Ahmad Dairobi; Ali, Irwan Shah; Rahman, Muhammad Aminullah A.

    2012-06-01

    Numerous reports have established the refrigeration applications of thermoacoustic cooling without compressors and refrigerants. Significant cooling effects can be obtained in a thermoacoustic resonator fitted with a heat exchanging stack and operated at resonance frequency. Past studies, however, have hardly referred to the fundamental relationship between resonant frequency and the resonator geometry. This paper reports the thermoacoustic cooling effects at resonance obtained by changing the diameter of the resonator while holding the length constant and vice versa. Experiments were completed at atmospheric pressure with air as the working fluid using a number of pvc tubes having parallel plate stack from Mylar. The temperature difference measured across the stack showed that a volume increase in the working fluid in general increases the temperature gradient for the quarter-and half-wavelength resonators. Doubling the diameter from 30 mm to 60 mm produced the highest temperature difference due to the greater number of stack plates resulting in a higher overall thermoacaoustic cooling. Increasing the resonator length only produced a small increase in temperature gradient since the resonant frequency at operation is only slightly changed. Investigation on the aspect ratio exhibits no influence on the temperature difference across the stack. This study have shown that the resonator length and diameter do affect the temperature difference across the thermoacoustic stack, and further research should be done to consider the contribution of the stack mass on the overall desired thermoacoustic cooling.

  3. A cell-centered Lagrangian finite volume approach for computing elasto-plastic response of solids in cylindrical axisymmetric geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambasivan, Shiv Kumar; Shashkov, Mikhail J.; Burton, Donald E.

    2013-03-01

    A finite volume cell-centered Lagrangian formulation is presented for solving large deformation problems in cylindrical axisymmetric geometries. Since solid materials can sustain significant shear deformation, evolution equations for stress and strain fields are solved in addition to mass, momentum and energy conservation laws. The total strain-rate realized in the material is split into an elastic and plastic response. The elastic and plastic components in turn are modeled using hypo-elastic theory. In accordance with the hypo-elastic model, a predictor-corrector algorithm is employed for evolving the deviatoric component of the stress tensor. A trial elastic deviatoric stress state is obtained by integrating a rate equation, cast in the form of an objective (Jaumann) derivative, based on Hooke's law. The dilatational response of the material is modeled using an equation of state of the Mie-Grüneisen form. The plastic deformation is accounted for via an iterative radial return algorithm constructed from the J2 von Mises yield condition. Several benchmark example problems with non-linear strain hardening and thermal softening yield models are presented. Extensive comparisons with representative Eulerian and Lagrangian hydrocodes in addition to analytical and experimental results are made to validate the current approach.

  4. A project to experimentally and theoretically examine fluid interfacial wave phenomena in a rotating cylindrical geometry: Current results and future plans

    SciTech Connect

    Lawkins, W.F.; Thompson, S.; Sartory, W.K.; Gillies, G.T.; Ritter, R.C.

    1987-09-01

    A prototype of the new instrument for experimentally studying stratified fluid wave phenomena in a rotating cylindrical geometry, both of infinitesimal and nonlinear forms, has been designed, built, and partially characterized. Furthermore, a model for analyzing the use of control forces to eliminate infinitesimal instabilities from the fluid/mechanical system has been developed and used. Finally, a nonlinear model for analyzing forced interfacial waves has been defined and steps are currently being taken to implement that model. 28 refs., 50 figs., 7 tabs.

  5. Cylindrical wormholes

    SciTech Connect

    Bronnikov, K. A.; Lemos, Jose P. S.

    2009-05-15

    It is shown that the existence of static, cylindrically symmetric wormholes does not require violation of the weak or null energy conditions near the throat, and cylindrically symmetric wormhole geometries can appear with less exotic sources than wormholes whose throats have a spherical topology. Examples of exact wormhole solutions are given with scalar, spinor and electromagnetic fields as sources, and these fields are not necessarily phantom. In particular, there are wormhole solutions for a massless, minimally coupled scalar field in the presence of a negative cosmological constant, and for an azimuthal Maxwell electromagnetic field. All these solutions are not asymptotically flat. A no-go theorem is proved, according to which a flat (or string) asymptotic behavior on both sides of a cylindrical wormhole throat is impossible if the energy density of matter is everywhere nonnegative.

  6. Criticality Experiments with Mixed Plutonium and Uranium Nitrate Solution at a Plutonium Fraction of 0.2 and 1.0 in Annular Cylindrical Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, RC

    1988-04-01

    A series of critical experiments was completed with mixed plutoniumuranium solutions having Pu/(Pu + U) ratios of approximately 0.2 and 1.0. These experiments were a part of the Criticality Data Development Program between the United States Department of Energy (USDOE), and the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) of Japan. A complete description of, and data from, the experiments are included in this report. The experiments were performed with mixed plutonium-uranium solutions in annular cylindrical geometry. The measurements were made with a water reflector. The central region included a concrete, polyethylene or void annular cylindrical insert. Interior to the insert was a stainless steel bottle containing plutonium-uranium solution or a void region. In one experiment the central region was filled with a solid cadmium-covered polyethylene insert. The concentration of the solution in the annular region was varied from 61 to 489 g (Pu + U)/liter. The ratio of plutonium to total heavy metal (plutonium plus uranium) was 0.22 or 0.97 for all experiments.

  7. Criticality experiments with mixed plutonium and uranium nitrate solution at a plutonium fraction of 0.5 in slab and cylindrical geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, R.C.

    1986-12-01

    A series of critical experiments was completed with mixed plutonium-uranium solutions having Pu/(Pu + U) ratios of approximately 0.5. These experiments were a part of the Criticality Data Development Program between the United States Department of Energy (USDOE), and the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) of Japan. A complete description of, and data from, the experiments are included in this report. The experiments were performed with mixed plutonium-uranium solutions in cylindrical and slab geometries and included measurements with a water reflector, a concrete reflector, and without an added reflector. The concentration was varied from 112 to 332 g (Pu + U)/liter. The ratio of plutonium to total heavy metal (plutonium plus uranium) was 52% for all experiments.

  8. Criticality Experiments with Mixed Plutonium and Uranium Nitrate Solution at a Plutonium Fraction of 0.5 in Annular Cylindrical Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, RC

    1988-04-01

    A series of critical experiments was completed with mixed plutonium-uranium solutions having Pu/(Pu + U) ratios of approximately 0.5. These experiments were a part of the Criticality Data Development Program between the United States Department of Energy (USDOE), and the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) of Japan. A complete description of, and data from, the experiments are included in this report. The experiments were performed with mixed plutonium-uranium solutions in annular cylindrical geometry. The measurements were made with a water reflector. The central region included a concrete annular cylinder containing B{sub 4}C. Interior to the concrete insert was a stainless steel bottle containing plutonium-uranium solution. The concentration of the solution in the annular region was varied from 116 to 433 g (Pu + U)/liter. The ratio of plutonium to total heavy metal (plutonium plus uranium) was 52% for all experiments.

  9. The effect of geometry and operation conditions on the performance of a gas-liquid cylindrical cyclone separator with new structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Qing; Zhang, Chi; Xu, Bo; Chen, Jiangping

    2013-07-01

    The hydrodynamic flow behavior, effects of geometry and working conditions of a gas-liquid cylindrical cyclone separator with a new structure are investigated by computational fluid dynamic and experiment. Gas liquid cylindrical cyclone separator is widely used in oil industry, refrigeration system because of its simple structure, high separating efficiency, little maintenance and no moving parts nor internal devices. In this work, a gas liquid cylindrical cyclone separator with new structure used before evaporator in refrigeration system can remove the vapor from the mixture and make evaporator compact by improving its heat exchange efficiency with the lower inlet quality. It also decreases evaporator pressure drop and reduces compressor work. The two pipes are placed symmetrically which makes each of them can be treated as inlet. It means when the fluids flow reverse, the separator performance will not be influence. Four samples with different geometry parameters are tested by experiment with different inlet quality (0.18-0.33), inlet mass flow rate (65-100kg/h). Compared with the experimental data, CFD simulation results show a good agreement. Eulerian multiphase model and Reynolds Stress Turbulence model are applied in the CFD simulation and obtained the inner flow field such as phase path lines, tangential velocity profiles and pressure and volume of fraction distribution contours. The separator body diameter (24, 36, 48mm) and inlet diameter (3.84, 4.8, 5.76mm) decide the maximum tangential velocity which results in the centrifugal force. The tangential velocity profiles are simulated and compared among different models. The higher tangential velocity makes higher quality of gas outlet but high pressure drop at the same time. Decreasing the inlet diameter increases quality of gas outlet pipe and pressure drop. High gas outlet quality is cost at high pressure drop. Increasing of separator diameter makes gas outlet quality increase first and then decrease but

  10. Convergence of shock waves generated by underwater electrical explosion of cylindrical wire arrays between different boundary geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Yanuka, D.; Zinowits, H. E.; Krasik, Ya. E.; Kozlov, M.

    2015-10-15

    The results of experiments and numerical simulations of a shock wave propagating between either conical or parabolic bounding walls are presented. The shock wave was generated by a microsecond timescale underwater electrical explosion of a cylindrical wire array supplied by a current pulse having an amplitude of ∼230 kA and a rise time of ∼1 μs. It is shown that with the same energy density deposition into the exploding wire array, the shock wave converges faster between parabolic walls, and as a result, the pressure in the vicinity of convergence is ∼2.3 times higher than in the case of conical walls. The results obtained are compared to those of earlier experiments [Antonov et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 102, 124104 (2013)] with explosions of spherical wire arrays. It is shown that at a distance of ∼400 μm from the implosion origin the pressure obtained in the current experiments is higher than for the case of spherical wire arrays.

  11. Validation of the scale code system using criticality data from experiments performed with Pu + U solutions in cylindrical and slab geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Smolen, G.R.; Funabashi, H. )

    1988-01-01

    This paper outlines the results of a calculational study that was performed to validate two versions of the SCALE computer code system using data from critical experiments performed with mixed Pu + U aqueous solutions. The critical experiments were conducted in a 35-cm-diam cylinder and variable thickness slab tank. These experimental activities are part of a joint exchange program between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) of Japan in the area of criticality data development. The Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) manages the program for DOE. The experiments were conducted at the Battelle-Pacific Northwest Laboratories-Critical Mall Laboratory. Calculated multiplication factors have been examined for 36 critical experiments conducted in cylindrical and slab geometries with mixed Pu + U solutions. The results indicate that both the SCALE-2 and SCALE-4.0 computer code systems are capable of accurately modeling mixed fissile systems in simple geometry.

  12. Parallel implementation of a Fourier-Chebyshev spectral method for the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations and application to transitional flow in cylindrical geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Roger Wayne

    1998-12-01

    A Fourier-Chebyshev collocation spectral method is parallelized to solve the incompressible and unsteady three dimensional Navier-Stokes equations using distributed memory and shared memory computing platforms. Two temporal discretization approaches using different techniques for treating the diffusive terms, determining the pressure field, and enforcing mass conservation are applied to study transitional flow in three types of enclosed cylindrical geometries. The first type is between counter rotating disks, the second is between corotating disks, and the third is in a differentially heated vertical annulus. Matrix diagonalization is employed for solving the pressure Poisson equation and the Helmholtz equations for the velocity components, providing a fast and efficient solution scheme. The parallelization approach is described and scaling results are presented for both shared memory and distributed memory parallel computing platform types. Numerical results are also presented for both axisymmetric and fully three dimensional simulations and compared with selected experimental data to demonstrate the accuracy of the method and the importance of properly capturing the unsteady three dimensional effects even though the geometry under consideration is two dimensional. For the counter rotating disk geometry, three dimensional simulations reveal that the initial transition is to unsteady three dimensional flow and the onset of unsteady flow occurs at much lower disk spin speeds than predicted with two dimensional simulations. The three dimensional simulations also closely match experimental velocity profiles whereas two dimensional simulations agree poorly. The initial transition in the corotating disk geometry is also to an unsteady three dimensional flow and occurs at much lower disk spin speeds than indicated by two dimensional simulations. Agreement with experimental data is not particularly good, but it is shown that the discrepancy may be attributed to a boundary

  13. Conformal approach to cylindrical DLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taloni, A.; Caglioti, E.; Loreto, V.; Pietronero, L.

    2006-09-01

    We extend the conformal mapping approach elaborated for the radial diffusion limited aggregation model (DLA) to cylindrical geometry. We introduce in particular a complex function which allows a cylindrical cluster to be grown using as an intermediate step a radial aggregate. The aggregate grown exhibits the same self-affine features as the original cylindrical DLA. The specific choice of the transformation allows us to study the relationship between the radial and the cylindrical geometry. In particular the cylindrical aggregate can be seen as a radial aggregate with particles of size increasing with the radius. On the other hand, the radial aggregate can be seen as a cylindrical aggregate with particles of size decreasing with the height. This framework, which shifts the point of view from the geometry to the size of the particles, can open the way to more quantitative studies on the relationship between radial and cylindrical DLA.

  14. Light collectors in cylindrical geometry

    DOEpatents

    Winston, Roland

    1976-01-01

    A device is provided for collecting electromagnetic energy developed by an energy source of finite dimension and of finite distance from the collection device. It includes an energy absorber positioned between two side walls which reflects substantially all incident energy received from the energy source onto the energy absorber.

  15. Cylindrically symmetric wormholes

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhfittig, Peter K.F.

    2005-05-15

    This paper discusses traversable wormholes that differ slightly but significantly from those of the Morris-Thorne type under the assumption of cylindrical symmetry. The throat is a piecewise smooth cylindrical surface resulting in a shape function that is not differentiable at some value. It is proposed that the regular derivative be replaced by a one-sided derivative at this value. The resulting wormhole geometry satisfies the weak energy condition.

  16. Criticality Experiments with Mixed Plutonium and Uranium Nitrate Solution at a Plutonium Fraction of 0.4 in Slab and Cylindrical Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, RC

    1988-04-01

    A series of critical experiments was completed with mixed plutonium-uranium solutions having Pu/(Pu + U) ratios of approximately 0.4. These experiments were a part of the Criticality Data Development Program between the United States Department of Energy (USDOE), and the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) of Japan. A complete description of, and data from, the experiments are included in this report. The experiments were performed with mixed plutonium-uranium solutions in cylinqrical and slab geometries and included measurements with a water reflector, a concrete reflector, and without an added reflector. The concentration was varied from 105 to 436 g (Pu + U)/liter. The ratio of plutonium to total heavy metal (plutonium plus uranium) was 0.4 for all experiments.

  17. Electronic and Photonic Devices: Experimental Investigations of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Substrate N(+)/I/P(+) Solar Cell and Fundamental Properties of Quantum Wells with Cylindrical Geometry and Applications to Electronics and Photonics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, Er-Xuan

    1995-01-01

    This thesis consists of two different parts: (I) experimental investigations of hydrogenated amorphous silicon substrate rm n^+/i/p^+ solar cells and, (II) fundamental properties of quantum wells with cylindrical geometry and applications to electronics and photonics. Part I. The substrate structural rm n^+/i/p^+ solar cells based on a -Si:H materials are fabricated by a radio frequency (RF) triode geometric plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) system. The solar cells have been electrically and optically tested. Two different substrates, tin-oxide coated glass and stainless steel foil, are used. An RF magnetron sputtering system is used to deposit the indium -tin-oxide (ITO) conductive transparent film for the front contact. Semi-transparent chromium (Cr), deposited by thermal evaporation, is used as an Ohmic front contact to the boron-doped a-(Si,C):H p^+ layer. The p^+ layer was smoothly connected to the i layer by an a-(Si,C):H buffer layer in which the carbon concentration is varied. This results in an enhancement of open circuit voltage and collection of photo-generated carriers. Effects of sub ppm boron compensation in the intrinsic layer were investigated. Temperature grading in the intrinsic layer, which modifies the energy band gap, was also studied. The effects of n^+ layer on the performance of the cell are investigated. It is shown that the device with a thick n^+ layer maintains a stable efficiency. In conclusion, a technique for depositing substrate a-Si:H solar cells in a single chamber system has been developed. This process yields cells with fill factors better than 65%, open circuit voltages of 0.8 volts and short circuit currents of 10 mA/cm^2, and conversion efficiencies of 5% for non-textured stainless steel substrates. The devices made in this work show a degradation of the conversion efficiency of less than 10% under prolonged (40 hours) 1 W/cm^2 Xenon light soaking. Part II. The fundamental properties of cylindrical geometry

  18. Cylindrical Brushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt

    1998-03-01

    Homopolymerization of macromonomers, i.e. polymerizable oligomers, yields macromolecules of cylindrical shape, because the main chain is considerably stretched due to the steric overcrowding of the side chains.(M. Wintermantel et al., Macromolecules 1996, 29,978.) Irrespective of the chemical nature of the macromonomer (styrene, methylmethacrylate, vinylpyridine, propylene) the chain stiffness in terms of the Kuhn statistical segment length lk lies in the range of 50 nm < lk < 200 nm. In accordance to the high degree of stiffness polymacromonomers form lyotropic liquid crystalline phases in solution and in the bulk.(M. Wintermantel et. al, Angew. Chemie 1995, 107, 1606.) Upon drying a dilute solution on mica or silicon wafer ordered monolayers are formed.(S.S. Sheiko et al., Langmuir 1997, 13, 5368.)^, (P. Dziezok et al., Angew. Chemie 1997, 00, 000.) Recently, stable monolayers of polyvinylpyridine macromonomers were successfully prepared on a Langmuir-Blodgett trough. Up to 15 monolayers were transferred onto a planar silicon wafer and characterized by x-ray reflection. The individual brush molecules within the monolayer could be visualized by atomic force microscopy. Frequently occurring hairpin formations by one molecule could not yet be explained. AFM on isolated, single molecules, however, have confirmed the cylindrical structure of polymacromonomers.

  19. Cylindrical Scanner

    1999-04-29

    The CS system is designed to provide a very fast imaging system in order to search for weapons on persons in an airport environment. The Cylindrical Scanner moves a vertical transceiver array rapidly around a person standing stationary. The software can be segmented in to three specific tasks. The first task is data acquisition and scanner control. At the operator's request, this task commands the scanner to move and the radar transceiver array to sendmore » data to the computer system in a known and well-ordered manner. The array is moved over the complete aperture in 10 to 12 seconds. At the completion of the array movement the second software task automatically reconstructs the high-resolution image from the radar data utilizing the integrated DSP boards. The third task displays the resulting images, as they become available, to the computer screen for user review and analysis.« less

  20. Loads for pulsed power cylindrical implosion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, W.E.; Armijo, E.V.; Barthell, B.L.; Bartos, J.J.; Bush, H.; Foreman, L.R.; Garcia, F.P.; Gobby, P.L.; Gomez, V.M.; Gurule, V.A.

    1994-07-01

    Pulse power can be used to generate high energy density conditions in convergent hollow cylindrical geometry through the use of appropriate electrode configuration and cylindrical loads. Cylindrically symmetric experiments are conducted with the Pegasus-H inductive store, capacitor energized pulse power facility at Los Alamos using both precision machined cylindrical liner loads and low mass vapor deposited cylindrical foil loads. The liner experiments investigate solid density hydrodynamic topics. Foil loads vaporize from Joule heating to generate an imploding cylindrical plasma which can be used to simulate some fluxes associated with fusion energy processes. Similar experiments are conducted with {open_quotes}Procyon{close_quotes} inductive store pulse power assemblies energized by explosively driven magnetic flux compression.

  1. Crack problems in cylindrical and spherical shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.

    1976-01-01

    Standard plate or shell theories were used as a starting point to study the fracture problems in thin-walled cylindrical and spherical shells, assuming that the plane of the crack is perpendicular to the surface of the sheet. Since recent studies have shown that local shell curvatures may have a rather considerable effect on the stress intensity factor, the crack problem was considered in conjunction with a shell rather than a plate theory. The material was assumed to be isotropic and homogeneous, so that approximate solutions may be obtained by approximating the local shell crack geometry with an ideal shell which has a solution, namely a spherical shell with a meridional crack, a cylindrical shell with a circumferential crack, or a cylindrical shell with an axial crack. A method of solution for the specially orthotropic shells containing a crack was described; symmetric and skew-symmetric problems are considered in cylindrical shells with an axial crack.

  2. Multi-stable cylindrical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirrera, Alberto; Lachenal, Xavier; Daynes, Stephen; Weaver, Paul M.; Chenchiah, Isaac V.

    2013-11-01

    We present a cylindrical lattice structure that mimics the behaviour of the virus bacteriophage T4 in having two (or more) stable states which differ in their radii and length. While the virus achieves bistability through molecular mechanisms we use composite materials to exploit the interplay between pre-stress, material properties and structural geometry. We demonstrate (computationally) that multi-stability is a robust phenomenon. We also show (analytically) that it is possible to choose the design variables so that the energy is independent of the radius, thus resulting in every state of the structure being stable.

  3. Input space-dependent controller for multi-hazard mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Liang; Laflamme, Simon

    2016-04-01

    Semi-active and active structural control systems are advanced mechanical devices and systems capable of high damping performance, ideal for mitigation of multi-hazards. The implementation of these devices within structural systems is still in its infancy, because of the complexity in designing a robust closed-loop control system that can ensure reliable and high mitigation performance. Particular challenges in designing a controller for multi-hazard mitigation include: 1) very large uncertainties on dynamic parameters and unknown excitations; 2) limited measurements with probabilities of sensor failure; 3) immediate performance requirements; and 4) unavailable sets of input-output during design. To facilitate the implementation of structural control systems, a new type of controllers with high adaptive capabilities is proposed. It is based on real-time identification of an embedding that represents the essential dynamics found in the input space, or in the sensors measurements. This type of controller is termed input-space dependent controllers (ISDC). In this paper, the principle of ISDC is presented, their stability and performance derived analytically for the case of harmonic inputs, and their performance demonstrated in the case of different types of hazards. Results show the promise of this new type of controller at mitigating multi-hazards by 1) relying on local and limited sensors only; 2) not requiring prior evaluation or training; and 3) adapting to systems non-stationarities.

  4. Stage Cylindrical Immersive Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abramyan, Lucy; Norris, Jeffrey S.; Powell, Mark W.; Mittman, David S.; Shams, Khawaja S.

    2011-01-01

    Panoramic images with a wide field of view intend to provide a better understanding of an environment by placing objects of the environment on one seamless image. However, understanding the sizes and relative positions of the objects in a panorama is not intuitive and prone to errors because the field of view is unnatural to human perception. Scientists are often faced with the difficult task of interpreting the sizes and relative positions of objects in an environment when viewing an image of the environment on computer monitors or prints. A panorama can display an object that appears to be to the right of the viewer when it is, in fact, behind the viewer. This misinterpretation can be very costly, especially when the environment is remote and/or only accessible by unmanned vehicles. A 270 cylindrical display has been developed that surrounds the viewer with carefully calibrated panoramic imagery that correctly engages their natural kinesthetic senses and provides a more accurate awareness of the environment. The cylindrical immersive display offers a more natural window to the environment than a standard cubic CAVE (Cave Automatic Virtual Environment), and the geometry allows multiple collocated users to simultaneously view data and share important decision-making tasks. A CAVE is an immersive virtual reality environment that allows one or more users to absorb themselves in a virtual environment. A common CAVE setup is a room-sized cube where the cube sides act as projection planes. By nature, all cubic CAVEs face a problem with edge matching at edges and corners of the display. Modern immersive displays have found ways to minimize seams by creating very tight edges, and rely on the user to ignore the seam. One significant deficiency of flat-walled CAVEs is that the sense of orientation and perspective within the scene is broken across adjacent walls. On any single wall, parallel lines properly converge at their vanishing point as they should, and the sense of

  5. Evolution of space dependent growth in the teleost Astyanax mexicanus.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Natalya D; Jeffery, William R

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between growth rate and environmental space is an unresolved issue in teleosts. While it is known from aquaculture studies that stocking density has a negative relationship to growth, the underlying mechanisms have not been elucidated, primarily because the growth rate of populations rather than individual fish were the subject of all previous studies. Here we investigate this problem in the teleost Astyanax mexicanus, which consists of a sighted surface-dwelling form (surface fish) and several blind cave-dwelling (cavefish) forms. Surface fish and cavefish are distinguished by living in spatially contrasting environments and therefore are excellent models to study the effects of environmental size on growth. Multiple controlled growth experiments with individual fish raised in confined or unconfined spaces showed that environmental size has a major impact on growth rate in surface fish, a trait we have termed space dependent growth (SDG). In contrast, SDG has regressed to different degrees in the Pachón and Tinaja populations of cavefish. Mating experiments between surface and Pachón cavefish show that SDG is inherited as a dominant trait and is controlled by multiple genetic factors. Despite its regression in blind cavefish, SDG is not affected when sighted surface fish are raised in darkness, indicating that vision is not required to perceive and react to environmental space. Analysis of plasma cortisol levels showed that an elevation above basal levels occurred soon after surface fish were exposed to confined space. This initial cortisol peak was absent in Pachón cavefish, suggesting that the effects of confined space on growth may be mediated partly through a stress response. We conclude that Astyanax reacts to confined spaces by exhibiting SDG, which has a genetic component and shows evolutionary regression during adaptation of cavefish to confined environments.

  6. Evolution of space dependent growth in the teleost Astyanax mexicanus.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Natalya D; Jeffery, William R

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between growth rate and environmental space is an unresolved issue in teleosts. While it is known from aquaculture studies that stocking density has a negative relationship to growth, the underlying mechanisms have not been elucidated, primarily because the growth rate of populations rather than individual fish were the subject of all previous studies. Here we investigate this problem in the teleost Astyanax mexicanus, which consists of a sighted surface-dwelling form (surface fish) and several blind cave-dwelling (cavefish) forms. Surface fish and cavefish are distinguished by living in spatially contrasting environments and therefore are excellent models to study the effects of environmental size on growth. Multiple controlled growth experiments with individual fish raised in confined or unconfined spaces showed that environmental size has a major impact on growth rate in surface fish, a trait we have termed space dependent growth (SDG). In contrast, SDG has regressed to different degrees in the Pachón and Tinaja populations of cavefish. Mating experiments between surface and Pachón cavefish show that SDG is inherited as a dominant trait and is controlled by multiple genetic factors. Despite its regression in blind cavefish, SDG is not affected when sighted surface fish are raised in darkness, indicating that vision is not required to perceive and react to environmental space. Analysis of plasma cortisol levels showed that an elevation above basal levels occurred soon after surface fish were exposed to confined space. This initial cortisol peak was absent in Pachón cavefish, suggesting that the effects of confined space on growth may be mediated partly through a stress response. We conclude that Astyanax reacts to confined spaces by exhibiting SDG, which has a genetic component and shows evolutionary regression during adaptation of cavefish to confined environments. PMID:22870223

  7. Investigation of the asymmetric aerodynamic characteristics of cylindrical bodies of revolution with variations in nose geometry and rotational orientation at angles of attack to 58 degrees and Mach numbers to 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruse, R. L.; Keener, E. R.; Chapman, G. T.; Claser, G.

    1979-01-01

    Wind-tunnel tests were conducted to investigate the side forces and yawing moments that can occur at high angles of attack and zero sideslip for cylindrical bodies of revolution. Two bodies having several tangent ogive forebodies with fineness ratios of 0.5, 1.5, 2.5, and 3.5 were tested. The forebodies with fineness ratios of 2.5 and 3.5 had several bluntnesses. The cylindrical afterbodies had fineness ratios of 7 and 13. The model components - tip, forebody, and afterbody - were tested in various rotational positions about their axes of symmetry. Most of the tests were conducted at a Mach number of 0.25, a Reynolds number of 0.32 x 10 to the 6th power, and with the afterbody that had a fineness ratio of 7 and with selected forebodies. The effect of Mach number was determined with the afterbody that had a fineness ratio of 13 and with selected forebodies at mach numbers from 0.25 to 2 at Reynolds number = 0.32 X 10 to the 6th power. Maximum angle of attack was 58 deg.

  8. Current pulse effects on cylindrical damage experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kaul, Ann M; Rousculp, Christopher L

    2009-01-01

    A series of joint experiments between LANL and VNIIEF use a VNIIEF-designed helical generator to provide currents for driving a LANL-designed cylindrical spallation experimental load. Under proper driving conditions, a cylindrical configuration allows for a natural recollection of the damaged material. In addition, the damaged material is able to come to a complete stop due to its strength, avoiding application of further forces. Thus far, experiments have provided data about failure initiation of a well-characterized material (aluminum) in a cylindrical geometry, behavior of material recollected after damage from pressures in the damage initiation regime, and behavior of material recollected after complete failure. In addition to post-shot collection of the damaged target material for subsequent metallographic analysis, dynamic in-situ experimental diagnostics include velocimetry and transverse radial radiography. This paper will focus on the effects of tailoring the driving current pulse to obtain the desired data.

  9. Cylindrical neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2008-04-22

    A cylindrical neutron generator is formed with a coaxial RF-driven plasma ion source and target. A deuterium (or deuterium and tritium) plasma is produced by RF excitation in a cylindrical plasma ion generator using an RF antenna. A cylindrical neutron generating target is coaxial with the ion generator, separated by plasma and extraction electrodes which contain many slots. The plasma generator emanates ions radially over 360.degree. and the cylindrical target is thus irradiated by ions over its entire circumference. The plasma generator and target may be as long as desired. The plasma generator may be in the center and the neutron target on the outside, or the plasma generator may be on the outside and the target on the inside. In a nested configuration, several concentric targets and plasma generating regions are nested to increase the neutron flux.

  10. Cylindrical neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2005-06-14

    A cylindrical neutron generator is formed with a coaxial RF-driven plasma ion source and target. A deuterium (or deuterium and tritium) plasma is produced by RF excitation in a cylindrical plasma ion generator using an RF antenna. A cylindrical neutron generating target is coaxial with the ion generator, separated by plasma and extraction electrodes which contain many slots. The plasma generator emanates ions radially over 360.degree. and the cylindrical target is thus irradiated by ions over its entire circumference. The plasma generator and target may be as long as desired. The plasma generator may be in the center and the neutron target on the outside, or the plasma generator may be on the outside and the target on the inside. In a nested configuration, several concentric targets and plasma generating regions are nested to increase the neutron flux.

  11. Cylindrical neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2009-12-29

    A cylindrical neutron generator is formed with a coaxial RF-driven plasma ion source and target. A deuterium (or deuterium and tritium) plasma is produced by RF excitation in a cylindrical plasma ion generator using an RF antenna. A cylindrical neutron generating target is coaxial with the ion generator, separated by plasma and extraction electrodes which contain many slots. The plasma generator emanates ions radially over 360.degree. and the cylindrical target is thus irradiated by ions over its entire circumference. The plasma generator and target may be as long as desired. The plasma generator may be in the center and the neutron target on the outside, or the plasma generator may be on the outside and the target on the inside. In a nested configuration, several concentric targets and plasma generating regions are nested to increase the neutron flux.

  12. Multipole analysis of circular cylindrical magnetic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvaggi, Jerry P.

    This thesis deals with an alternate method for computing the external magnetic field from a circular cylindrical magnetic source. The primary objective is to characterize the magnetic source in terms of its equivalent multipole distribution. This multipole distribution must be valid at points close to the cylindrical source and a spherical multipole expansion is ill-equipped to handle this problem; therefore a new method must be introduced. This method, based upon the free-space Green's function in cylindrical coordinates, is developed as an alternative to the more familiar spherical harmonic expansion. A family of special functions, called the toroidal functions or Q-functions, are found to exhibit the necessary properties for analyzing circular cylindrical geometries. In particular, the toroidal function of zeroth order, which comes from the integral formulation of the free-space Green's function in cylindrical coordinates, is employed to handle magnetic sources which exhibit circular cylindrical symmetry. The toroidal functions, also called Q-functions, are the weighting coefficients in a "Fourier series-like" expansion which represents the free-space Green's function. It is also called a toroidal expansion. This expansion can be directly employed in electrostatic, magnetostatic, and electrodynamic problems which exhibit cylindrical symmetry. Also, it is shown that they can be used as an alternative to the Elliptic integral formulation. In fact, anywhere that an Elliptic integral appears, one can replace it with its corresponding Q-function representation. A number of problems, using the toroidal expansion formulation, are analyzed and compared to existing known methods in order to validate the results. Also, the equivalent multipole distribution is found for most of the solved problems along with its corresponding physical interpretation. The main application is to characterize the external magnetic field due to a six-pole permanent magnet motor in terms of its

  13. High convergence implosion symmetry in cylindrical hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Amendt, P A; Bradley, D K; Hammel, B A; Landen, O L; Suter, L J; Turner, R E; Wallace, R J

    1999-09-01

    High convergence, hohlraum-driven implosions will require control of time-integrated drive asymmetries to 1% levels for ignition to succeed on the NIF. We review how core imaging provides such asymmetry measurement accuracy for the lowest order asymmetry modes, and describe recent improvements in imaging techniques that should allow detection of higher order asymmetry modes. We also present a simple analytic model explaining how the sensitivity of symmetry control to beam pointing scales as we progress from single ring per side Nova cylindrical hohlraum illumination geometries to NIF-like multiple rings per side Omega hohlraum illumination geometries and ultimately to NIF-scale hohlraums.

  14. On the integrable elliptic cylindrical Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation.

    PubMed

    Khusnutdinova, K R; Klein, C; Matveev, V B; Smirnov, A O

    2013-03-01

    There exist two versions of the Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) equation, related to the Cartesian and cylindrical geometries of the waves. In this paper, we derive and study a new version, related to the elliptic cylindrical geometry. The derivation is given in the context of surface waves, but the derived equation is a universal integrable model applicable to generic weakly nonlinear weakly dispersive waves. We also show that there exist nontrivial transformations between all three versions of the KP equation associated with the physical problem formulation, and use them to obtain new classes of approximate solutions for water waves.

  15. Development of the Cylindrical Wire Electrical Discharge Machining Process.

    SciTech Connect

    McSpadden, SB

    2002-01-22

    Results of applying the wire Electrical Discharge Machining (EDM) process to generate precise cylindrical forms on hard, difficult-to-machine materials are presented. A precise, flexible, and corrosion-resistant underwater rotary spindle was designed and added to a conventional two-axis wire EDM machine to enable the generation of free-form cylindrical geometries. A detailed spindle error analysis identifies the major source of error at different frequency. The mathematical model for the material removal of cylindrical wire EDM process is derived. Experiments were conducted to explore the maximum material removal rate for cylindrical and 2D wire EDM of carbide and brass work-materials. Compared to the 2D wire EDM, higher maximum material removal rates may be achieved in the cylindrical wire EDM. This study also investigates the surface integrity and roundness of parts created by the cylindrical wire EDM process. For carbide parts, an arithmetic average surface roughness and roundness as low as 0.68 and 1.7 {micro}m, respectively, can be achieved. Surfaces of the cylindrical EDM parts were examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) to identify the craters, sub-surface recast layers and heat-affected zones under various process parameters. This study has demonstrated that the cylindrical wire EDM process parameters can be adjusted to achieve either high material removal rate or good surface integrity.

  16. Microfabricated cylindrical ion trap

    DOEpatents

    Blain, Matthew G.

    2005-03-22

    A microscale cylindrical ion trap, having an inner radius of order one micron, can be fabricated using surface micromachining techniques and materials known to the integrated circuits manufacturing and microelectromechanical systems industries. Micromachining methods enable batch fabrication, reduced manufacturing costs, dimensional and positional precision, and monolithic integration of massive arrays of ion traps with microscale ion generation and detection devices. Massive arraying enables the microscale cylindrical ion trap to retain the resolution, sensitivity, and mass range advantages necessary for high chemical selectivity. The microscale CIT has a reduced ion mean free path, allowing operation at higher pressures with less expensive and less bulky vacuum pumping system, and with lower battery power than conventional- and miniature-sized ion traps. The reduced electrode voltage enables integration of the microscale cylindrical ion trap with on-chip integrated circuit-based rf operation and detection electronics (i.e., cell phone electronics). Therefore, the full performance advantages of microscale cylindrical ion traps can be realized in truly field portable, handheld microanalysis systems.

  17. Examining Cylindrical Dice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Dustin L.

    2009-01-01

    The author describes an activity where prospective mathematics teachers made hypotheses about the dimensions of a fair cylindrical die and conducted experiments with different cylinders. He also provides a model that estimates the probability that a cylinder would land on the lateral surface, depending on the height and diameter of the cylinder.…

  18. Static cylindrical matter shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arık, Metin; Delice, Özgür

    2005-08-01

    Static cylindrical shells composed of massive particles arising from matching of two different Levi-Civita space-times are studied for the shell satisfying either an isotropic or an anisotropic equation of state. We find that these solutions satisfy the energy conditions for certain ranges of the parameters.

  19. Static cylindrically symmetric spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fjällborg, Mikael

    2007-05-01

    We prove the existence of static solutions to the cylindrically symmetric Einstein Vlasov system, and we show that the matter cylinder has finite extension in two of the three spatial dimensions. The same results are also proved for a quite general class of equations of state for perfect fluids coupled to the Einstein equations, extending the class of equations of state considered by Bicak et al (2004 Class. Quantum Grav.21 1583). We also obtain this result for the Vlasov Poisson system.

  20. Weakly nonlinear incompressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth at cylindrically convergent interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L. F.; He, X. T.; Wu, J. F.; Zhang, W. Y.; Ye, W. H.

    2013-04-15

    A weakly nonlinear (WN) model has been developed for the incompressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) in cylindrical geometry. The transition from linear to nonlinear growth is analytically investigated via a third-order solutions for the cylindrical RTI initiated by a single-mode velocity perturbation. The third-order solutions can depict the early stage of the interface asymmetry due to the bubble-spike formation, as well as the saturation of the linear (exponential) growth of the fundamental mode. The WN results in planar RTI [Wang et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 112706 (2012)] are recovered in the limit of high-mode number perturbations. The difference between the WN growth of the RTI in cylindrical geometry and in planar geometry is discussed. It is found that the interface of the inward (outward) development spike/bubble is extruded (stretched) by the additional inertial force in cylindrical geometry compared with that in planar geometry. For interfaces with small density ratios, the inward growth bubble can grow fast than the outward growth spike in cylindrical RTI. Moreover, a reduced formula is proposed to describe the WN growth of the RTI in cylindrical geometry with an acceptable precision, especially for small-amplitude perturbations. Using the reduced formula, the nonlinear saturation amplitude of the fundamental mode and the phases of the Fourier harmonics are studied. Thus, it should be included in applications where converging geometry effects play an important role, such as the supernova explosions and inertial confinement fusion implosions.

  1. Drag coefficient and settling velocity for particles of cylindrical shape

    SciTech Connect

    Gabitto, Jorge; Tsouris, Costas

    2008-01-01

    Solid particles of cylindrical shape play a significant role in many separations processes. Explicit equations for the drag coefficient and the terminal velocity of free-falling cylindrical particles have been developed in this work. The developed equations are based on available experimental data for falling cylindrical particles in all flow regimes. The aspect ratio (i.e., length-over-diameter ratio) has been used to account for the particle shape. Comparisons with correlations proposed by other researchers using different parameters to account for the geometry are presented. Good agreement is found for small aspect ratios, and increasing differences appear when the aspect ratio increases. The aspect ratio of cylindrical particles satisfactorily accounts for the geometrical influence on fluid flow of settling particles.

  2. Double focusing ion mass spectrometer of cylindrical symmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coplan, M. A.; Moore, J. H.; Hoffman, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    A mass spectrometer consisting of an electric sector followed by a magnetic sector is described. The geometry is a cylindrically symmetric generalization of the Mattauch-Herzog spectrometer (1934). With its large annular entrance aperture and a position-sensitive detector, the instrument provides a large geometric factor and 100-percent duty factor, making it appropriate for spacecraft experiments.

  3. Ultrasound Imaging Using Diffraction Tomography in a Cylindrical Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, D H; Littrup, P

    2002-01-24

    Tomographic images of tissue phantoms and a sample of breast tissue have been produced from an acoustic synthetic array system for frequencies near 500 kHz. The images for sound speed and attenuation show millimeter resolution and demonstrate the feasibility of obtaining high-resolution tomographic images with frequencies that can deeply penetrate tissue. The image reconstruction method is based on the Born approximation to acoustic scattering and is a simplified version of a method previously used by Andre (Andre, et. al., Int. J. Imaging Systems and Technology, Vol 8, No. 1, 1997) for a circular acoustic array system. The images have comparable resolution to conventional ultrasound images at much higher frequencies (3-5 MHz) but with lower speckle noise. This shows the potential of low frequency, deeply penetrating, ultrasound for high-resolution quantitative imaging.

  4. Length shortening and surfactant mixing behavior of nonionic/ionic mixed cylindrical micelle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sanghyun; Kwon, Su Yong; Moon, Jun hyuk; Kim, Mahn Won

    2008-10-01

    Cylindrical micelles, which are surfactant self-assembled structures with nm scale, usually grow in length as surfactant concentration increases. Small angle neutron scattering of nonionic/ionic (C 12E 5/DTAB) mixed cylindrical micellar solution showed the shape of aggregates maintained the cylindrical geometry while the micellar length shortened as the fraction of ionic surfactant increased. Unexpectedly, we observed, for the first time, the micellar length shortened as total surfactant concentration increased at constant DTAB mole fraction. This observation suggests that strong non-ideal mixing of the surfactants in the cylindrical micelles, leading to an end-cap energy lowering with increasing concentration, is responsible for the length shortening.

  5. Parametric Investigations of Miniaturized Cylindrical and Annular Hall Thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    A. Smirnov; Y. Raitses; N.J. Fisch

    2001-10-16

    A cylindrical geometry Hall thruster may overcome certain physical and technological limitations in scaling down of Hall thrusters to miniature sizes. The absence of the inner wall and use of the cusp magnetic field can potentially reduce heating of the thruster parts and erosion of the channel. A 2.6 cm miniaturized Hall thruster of a flexible design was built and successfully operated in the power range of 50-300 W. Comparison of preliminary results obtained for cylindrical and annular thruster configurations is presented.

  6. Shearfree cylindrical gravitational collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Di Prisco, A.; Herrera, L.; MacCallum, M. A. H.; Santos, N. O.

    2009-09-15

    We consider diagonal cylindrically symmetric metrics, with an interior representing a general nonrotating fluid with anisotropic pressures. An exterior vacuum Einstein-Rosen spacetime is matched to this using Darmois matching conditions. We show that the matching conditions can be explicitly solved for the boundary values of metric components and their derivatives, either for the interior or exterior. Specializing to shearfree interiors, a static exterior can only be matched to a static interior, and the evolution in the nonstatic case is found to be given in general by an elliptic function of time. For a collapsing shearfree isotropic fluid, only a Robertson-Walker dust interior is possible, and we show that all such cases were included in Cocke's discussion. For these metrics, Nolan and Nolan have shown that the matching breaks down before collapse is complete, and Tod and Mena have shown that the spacetime is not asymptotically flat in the sense of Berger, Chrusciel, and Moncrief. The issues about energy that then arise are revisited, and it is shown that the exterior is not in an intrinsic gravitational or superenergy radiative state at the boundary.

  7. Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov Instabilities and Mixing in Stratified Cylindrical Shells

    SciTech Connect

    Mikaelian, K O

    2004-04-15

    We study the linear stability of an arbitrary number N of cylindrical concentric shells undergoing a radial implosion or explosion.We derive the evolution equation for the perturbation {eta}{sub i} at interface i; it is coupled to the two adjacent interfaces via {eta}{sub i{+-}1}. For N=2, where there is only one interface, we verify Bell's conjecture as to the form of the evolution equation for arbitrary {rho}{sub 1} and {rho}{sub 2}, the fluid densities on either side of the interface. We obtain several analytic solutions for the N=2 and 3 cases. We discuss freeze-out, a phenomenon that can occur in all three geometries (planar, cylindrical, or spherical), and ''critical modes'' that are stable for any implosion or explosion history and occur only in cylindrical or spherical geometries. We present numerical simulations of possible gelatin-ring experiments illustrating perturbation feedthrough from one interface to another. We also develop a simple model for the evolution of turbulent mix in cylindrical geometry and define a geometrical factor G as the ratio h{sub cylindrical}/h{sub planar} between cylindrical and planar mixing layers. We find that G is a decreasing function of R/R{sub o}, implying that in our model h{sub cylindrical} evolves faster (slower) than h{sub planar} during an implosion (explosion).

  8. Molecular Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desseyn, H. O.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Compares linear-nonlinear and planar-nonplanar geometry through the valence-shell electron pairs repulsion (V.S.E.P.R.), Mulliken-Walsh, and electrostatic force theories. Indicates that although the V.S.E.P.R. theory has more advantages for elementary courses, an explanation of the best features of the different theories offers students a better…

  9. Optimization of Cylindrical Hall Thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Yevgeny Raitses, Artem Smirnov, Erik Granstedt, and Nathaniel J. Fi

    2007-07-24

    The cylindrical Hall thruster features high ionization efficiency, quiet operation, and ion acceleration in a large volume-to-surface ratio channel with performance comparable with the state-of-the-art annular Hall thrusters. These characteristics were demonstrated in low and medium power ranges. Optimization of miniaturized cylindrical thrusters led to performance improvements in the 50-200W input power range, including plume narrowing, increased thruster efficiency, reliable discharge initiation, and stable operation. __________________________________________________

  10. Optimization of Cylindrical Hall Thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Yevgeny Raitses, Artem Smirnov, Erik Granstedt, and Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2007-11-27

    The cylindrical Hall thruster features high ionization efficiency, quiet operation, and ion acceleration in a large volume-to-surface ratio channel with performance comparable with the state-of-the-art annular Hall thrusters. These characteristics were demonstrated in low and medium power ranges. Optimization of miniaturized cylindrical thrusters led to performance improvements in the 50-200W input power range, including plume narrowing, increased thruster efficiency, reliable discharge initiation, and stable operation.

  11. Adhesive contact of cylindrical lens and a flat sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhury, Manoj K.; Weaver, Timothy; Hui, C. Y.; Kramer, E. J.

    1996-07-01

    Methods are developed to estimate the adhesion and surface free energies of compliant materials from the contact deformations of cylindrical lenses with flat sheets. Some important differences are found between the cylindrical contact studied here and the widely studied geometry of spherical contact. For example, while the pull-off force is completely independent of the elastic constants (K) of the materials for spherical contacts, the pull-off force for cylindrical contact is proportional to K1/3. Furthermore, for cylindrical contacts the contact width at separation reaches to a value of 39% of the width (a0) at zero load, whereas the corresponding value is 0.63a0 for spherical contact. The feasibility of using cylindrical contacts to estimate the surface and adhesive energies of polymers was investigated using elastomeric polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) as a model system. PDMS was used in two ways: (1) unmodified and (2) with its surface hydrolyzed with dilute hydrochloric acid. Significant hysteresis of adhesion was observed with the hydrolyzed PDMS surfaces due to H-bonding interactions, which appeared to depend on normal stress.

  12. Thermal stress in high temperature cylindrical fasteners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blosser, Max L.

    1988-01-01

    Uninsulated structures fabricated from carbon or silicon-based materials, which are allowed to become hot during flight, are attractive for the design of some components of hypersonic vehicles. They have the potential to reduce weight and increase vehicle efficiency. Because of manufacturing contraints, these structures will consist of parts which must be fastened together. The thermal expansion mismatch between conventional metal fasteners and carbon or silicon-based structural materials may make it difficult to design a structural joint which is tight over the operational temperature range without exceeding allowable stress limits. In this study, algebraic, closed-form solutions for calculating the thermal stresses resulting from radial thermal expansion mismatch around a cylindrical fastener are developed. These solutions permit a designer to quickly evaluate many combinations of materials for the fastener and the structure. Using the algebraic equations developed, material properties and joint geometry were varied to determine their effect on thermal stresses. Finite element analyses were used to verify that the closed-form solutions derived give the correct thermal stress distribution around a cylindrical fastener and to investigate the effect of some of the simplifying assumptions made in developing the closed-form solutions for thermal stresses.

  13. Motion of a Cylindrical Dielectric Boundary.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Li-Tien; Li, Bo; White, Michael; Zhou, Shenggao

    2013-01-01

    The interplay between geometry and electrostatics contributes significantly to hydrophobic interactions of biomolecules in an aqueous solution. With an implicit solvent, such a system can be described macroscopically by the dielectric boundary that separates the high-dielectric solvent from low-dielectric solutes. This work concerns the motion of a model cylindrical dielectric boundary as the steepest descent of a free-energy functional that consists of both the surface and electrostatic energies. The effective dielectric boundary force is defined and an explicit formula of the force is obtained. It is found that such a force always points from the solvent region to solute region. In the case that the interior of a cylinder is of a lower dielectric, the motion of the dielectric boundary is initially driven dominantly by the surface force but is then driven inward quickly to the cylindrical axis by both the surface and electrostatic forces. In the case that the interior of a cylinder is of a higher dielectric, the competition between the geometrical and electrostatic contributions leads to the existence of equilibrium boundaries that are circular cylinders. Linear stability analysis is presented to show that such an equilibrium is only stable for a perturbation with a wavenumber larger than a critical value. Numerical simulations are reported for both of the cases, confirming the analysis on the role of each component of the driving force. Implications of the mathematical findings to the understanding of charged molecular systems are discussed.

  14. Indentation of Ellipsoidal and Cylindrical Elastic Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vella, Dominic; Ajdari, Amin; Vaziri, Ashkan; Boudaoud, Arezki

    2012-10-01

    Thin shells are found in nature at scales ranging from viruses to hens’ eggs; the stiffness of such shells is essential for their function. We present the results of numerical simulations and theoretical analyses for the indentation of ellipsoidal and cylindrical elastic shells, considering both pressurized and unpressurized shells. We provide a theoretical foundation for the experimental findings of Lazarus et al. [following paper, Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 144301 (2012)PRLTAO0031-9007] and for previous work inferring the turgor pressure of bacteria from measurements of their indentation stiffness; we also identify a new regime at large indentation. We show that the indentation stiffness of convex shells is dominated by either the mean or Gaussian curvature of the shell depending on the pressurization and indentation depth. Our results reveal how geometry rules the rigidity of shells.

  15. The geometric factor of a cylindrical plate electrostatic analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnstone, A. D.

    1971-01-01

    A method for calculating the geometric factor of cylindrical plate electrostatic energy analyzers with various detector geometries is described. The effects of the fringe-field are estimated. For a special simple case an exact geometric factor is calculated enabling an estimate of the inaccuracies of the approximations used in other cases. The results of some calculations are presented and a simple approximate expression for the geometric factor is deduced.

  16. Evaluation of direct-exchange areas for a cylindrical enclosure

    SciTech Connect

    Sika, J. )

    1991-11-01

    This paper reports on a method for calculating the radiative heat transfer direct-exchange areas for surface-to-surface, volume-to-surface, and volume-to-volume pairs of zones in axisymmetric cylindrical geometries. With this method the calculation of the direct-exchange areas can be transformed from the original four-, five-, and sixfold integrals in the defining relations to just single and/or double integrals. Gray gas with absorption coefficient K is assumed.

  17. Concentration profiles in drying cylindrical filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czaputa, Klaus; Brenn, Günter; Meile, Walter

    2008-12-01

    We analyze theoretically the drying of cylindrical filaments. For modelling the mass transfer on the gas side of the liquid-gas interface of the shrinking circular cylindrical filament, we apply the model of Abramzon and Sirignano, which was originally developed for spherical geometry. As a consequence of mass transfer at constant Sherwood number, we obtain a d2-law for the shrinkage of the cylinder as in the case of the spherical geometry, which expresses that the cross-sectional area of the cylinder shrinks at a constant rate with time. For this situation, the diffusion equation for the liquid phase mixture components becomes separable upon transformation into similarity coordinates and is solved analytically to obtain the concentration profiles inside the filament as functions of time. The dependency of the profiles on the radial coordinate is determined by a series of Kummer’s functions. Applying this result, we study the evolution of the concentration profiles in the liquid phase with time as dependent on a parameter given as the ratio of rate of shrinkage of the cross-sectional area of the cylinder to liquid-phase diffusion coefficient, which was identified as relevant for the shape of the concentration profiles formed in the liquid during the drying process. As an example, we present computed results for the constant evaporation rate regime in the dry-spinning process of a polyvinyl-alcohol (PVA)-water system. Comparison of our analytical results with full numerical solutions of the diffusion equation from the literature, achieved with concentration-dependent diffusion coefficient, reveals very good agreement.

  18. Space-dependent temperature increase in human skin subsurface chromophores immediately following pulsed laser exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, J. Stuart; Milner, Thomas E.; Tanenbaum, B. S.; Goodman, Dennis M.

    1996-01-01

    Specifying the distribution of laser energy within a tissue is the first step toward understanding and capitalizing on a variety of laser-tissue interactions. Whether photothermal, photochemical, or photomechanical in nature, laser-tissue interactions begin with the absorption of photon energy. The spatial distribution of photon absorption specifies the required laser exposure to be delivered and the extent of subsequent therapeutic action. Using infrared tomography (IRT), the broad, long term objective of this research is the development of a three-dimensional tomographic reconstruction algorithm (TRA) as a means to determine the: (1) initial space-dependent temperature increase in subsurface chromophores [(Delta) TCHR((xi) ,(eta) ,(zetz) ,t equals 0)] immediately following pulsed laser exposure; and (2) depths and physical dimensions of discrete subsurface chromophores. Analysis of the recorded time sequence of infrared emission images [(Delta) MCHR(x,y,t)] by longitudinal inversion and lateral deconvolution algorithms provides a direct means to determine the depths and physical dimensions of subsurface chromophores. Although our research is being shared with workers in a variety of disciplines, and pertinent to many clinical applications involving laser-induced photothermal mechanisms, we are particularly interested in addressing the problems associated with determination of the initial space-dependent temperature increase in subsurface chromophores in human skin in general, and port wine stain (PWS) blood vessels in particular.

  19. Cylindrical and spherical electron acoustic solitary waves with nonextensive hot electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Pakzad, Hamid Reza

    2011-08-15

    Nonlinear propagation of cylindrical and spherical electron-acoustic solitons in an unmagnetized plasma consisting cold electron fluid, hot electrons obeying a nonextensive distribution and stationary ions, are investigated. For this purpose, the standard reductive perturbation method is employed to derive the cylindrical/spherical Korteweg-de-Vries equation, which governs the dynamics of electron-acoustic solitons. The effects of nonplanar geometry and nonextensive hot electrons on the behavior of cylindrical and spherical electron acoustic solitons are also studied by numerical simulations.

  20. Cylindrical acoustic levitator/concentrator

    DOEpatents

    Kaduchak, Gregory; Sinha, Dipen N.

    2002-01-01

    A low-power, inexpensive acoustic apparatus for levitation and/or concentration of aerosols and small liquid/solid samples having particulates up to several millimeters in diameter in air or other fluids is described. It is constructed from a commercially available, hollow cylindrical piezoelectric crystal which has been modified to tune the resonance frequency of the breathing mode resonance of the crystal to that of the interior cavity of the cylinder. When the resonance frequency of the interior cylindrical cavity is matched to the breathing mode resonance of the cylindrical piezoelectric transducer, the acoustic efficiency for establishing a standing wave pattern in the cavity is high. The cylinder does not require accurate alignment of a resonant cavity. Water droplets having diameters greater than 1 mm have been levitated against the force of gravity using; less than 1 W of input electrical power. Concentration of aerosol particles in air is also demonstrated.

  1. Simultaneous determination of time and space-dependent coefficients in a parabolic equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, M. S.; Lesnic, D.

    2016-04-01

    This paper investigates a couple of inverse problems of simultaneously determining time and space dependent coefficients in the parabolic heat equation using initial and boundary conditions of the direct problem and overdetermination conditions. The measurement data represented by these overdetermination conditions ensure that these inverse problems have unique solutions. However, the problems are still ill-posed since small errors in the input data cause large errors in the output solution. To overcome this instability we employ the Tikhonov regularization method. The finite-difference method (FDM) is employed as a direct solver which is fed iteratively in a nonlinear minimization routine. Both exact and noisy data are inverted. Numerical results for a few benchmark test examples are presented, discussed and assessed with respect to the FDM mesh size discretization, the level of noise with which the input data is contaminated, and the chosen regularization parameters.

  2. Nonlinear inverse problem for the estimation of time-and-space dependent heat transfer coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osman, A. M.; Beck, J. V.

    1987-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe a method and an algorithm for the direct estimation of the time-and-space dependent heat transfer coefficients from transient temperature data measured at approximate points inside a heat conducting solid. This inverse estimation problem is called herein the inverse heat transfer coefficient problem. An application considered in the present is the quenching of a solid in a liquid. The solution method used here is an extension of the sequential temperature future-information method introduced by Beck for solving the inverse heat conduction problem. The finite-difference method, based on the control volume approach, was used for the discretization of the direct heat conduction problem. Numerical results show that the proposed method is accurate and efficient.

  3. Cylindrical Implosion Experiments using Laser Direct Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tubbs, David

    1998-11-01

    Development of high-gain targets for the National Ignition Facility relies considerably on computational modeling, and it is important that our codes are validated against relevant experimental data in convergent geometry.(W. J. Krauser et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 2084 (1996); D. C. Wilson et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 1953 (1998)) In collaboration with the University of Rochester, we have begun a campaign of hydrodynamic instability experiments in cylindrical geometry using direct drive,(D. L. Tubbs et al., submitted to Laser and Particle Beams (1998); C. W. Barnes et al., submitted to Rev. Sci. Instrm. (1998)) building on our success in indirect drive.( W. W. Hsing et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 1832 (1997); W. W. Hsing and N. M. Hoffman, Phys. Rev. Lett., 3876 (1997)) Cylindrical targets facilitate direct diagnostic access to the convergent, hydrodynamic flow. The energy advantage of direct drive and its excellent target-illumination symmetry (achieved at OMEGA through use of Distributed Phase Plates and SSD) permit more energetic implosions, larger target scale (hence greater diagnostic resolution), longer acceleration timescales, and higher convergence than were possible using indirect drive. We estimate that specific laser energy delivered to the target for direct drive at OMEGA is roughly 4 times that achieved for indirect drive at Nova. Our first experiments (January 1998) yield excellent data for the first highly symmetrical direct-drive implosions, with which we benchmark zeroth-order hydrodynamic simulations. Two-dimensional (2-D) LASNEX calculations, using as-shot laser power histories and no further physics adjustments, match measured target-implosion data within theoretical and experimental errors. In addition, 2-D LASNEX simulations of single-mode (m=28, azimuthally symmetric) perturbation growth agree well with data obtained during our first week of experiments. For 1.5-micron initial perturbation amplitude, we observe Rayleigh-Taylor growth factors of order 10

  4. Gamma-ray bursts: afterglows from cylindrical jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, K. S.; Huang, Y. F.; Lu, T.

    2001-08-01

    Nearly all previous discussions on beaming effects in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have assumed a conical geometry. However, more and more observations on relativistic jets in radio galaxies, active galactic nuclei, and `microquasars' in the Galaxy have shown that many of these outflows are not conical, but cylindrical, i.e. they maintain constant cross-sections at large scales. Thus it is necessary to discuss the possibility of gamma-ray bursts being due to highly collimated cylindrical jets, not conical ones. Here we study the dynamical evolution of cylindrical jets and discuss their afterglows. Both analytical and numerical results are presented. It is shown that when the lateral expansion is not taken into account, a cylindrical jet typically remains highly relativistic for ~108-109s. During this relativistic phase, the optical afterglow at first decays as Sν~t-p/2, where p is the index characterizing the power-law energy distribution of electrons. Then the light curve steepens to Sν~t-(p+1)/2 due to cooling of electrons. After entering the non-relativistic phase (i.e. t>=1011s), the afterglow is Sν~t-(5p-4)/6. However, if the cylindrical jet expands laterally at the comoving sound speed, then the decay becomes Sν~t-p and Sν~t-(15p-21)/10-t-(15p-20)/10 in the ultrarelativistic and in the non-relativistic phase respectively. Note that in both cases the light curve turns flatter after the relativistic-Newtonian transition point, which differs markedly from the behaviour of a conical jet. It is suggested that some GRBs with afterglows decaying as t-1.1-t-1.3 may be due to cylindrical jets, not necessarily isotropic fireballs.

  5. Telescoping cylindrical piezoelectric fiber composite actuator assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Sidney G. (Inventor); Shams, Qamar A. (Inventor); Fox, Robert L. (Inventor); Fox, legal representative, Christopher L. (Inventor); Fox Chattin, legal representative, Melanie L. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A telescoping actuator assembly includes a plurality of cylindrical actuators in a concentric arrangement. Each cylindrical actuator is at least one piezoelectric fiber composite actuator having a plurality of piezoelectric fibers extending parallel to one another and to the concentric arrangement's longitudinal axis. Each cylindrical actuator is coupled to concentrically-adjacent ones of the cylindrical actuators such that the plurality of cylindrical actuators can experience telescopic movement. An electrical energy source coupled to the cylindrical actuators applies actuation energy thereto to generate the telescopic movement.

  6. Optics Demonstrations Using Cylindrical Lenses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivanov, Dragia; Nikolov, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we consider the main properties of cylindrical lenses and propose several demonstrational experiments that can be performed with them. Specifically we use simple glasses full of water to demonstrate some basic geometrical optics principles and phenomena. We also present some less standard experiments that can be performed with such…

  7. Notes on static cylindrical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bicák, J.; Zofka, M.

    2002-07-01

    Static cylindrical shells made of various types of matter are studied as sources of the vacuum Levi-Civita metrics. Their internal physical properties are related to the two essential parameters of the metrics outside. The total mass per unit length of the cylinders is always less than ¼. The results are illustrated by a number of figures.

  8. Microfabrication of cylindrical microfluidic channel networks for microvascular research.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhouchun; Li, Xiang; Martins-Green, Manuela; Liu, Yuxin

    2012-10-01

    Current methods for formation of microvascular channel scaffolds are limited with non-circular channel cross-sections, complicated fabrication, and less flexibility in microchannel network design. To address current limitations in the creation of engineered microvascular channels with complex three-dimensional (3-D) geometries in the shape of microvessels, we have developed a reproducible, cost-effective, and flexible micromanufacturing process combined with photolithographic reflowable photoresist and soft lithography techniques to fabricate cylindrical microchannel and networks. A positive reflowable photoresist AZ P4620 was used to fabricate a master microchannel mold with semi-circular cross-sections. By the alignment and bonding of two polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannels replicated from the master mold together, a cylindrical microchannel or microchannel network was created. Further examination of the channel dimensions and surface profiles at different branching levels showed that the shape of the microfluidic channel was well approximated by a semi-circular surface, and a multi-level, multi-depth channel network was created. In addition, a computational fluidic dynamics (CFD) model was used to simulate shear flows and corresponding pressure distributions inside of the microchannel and channel network based on the dimensions of the fabricated channels. The fabricated multi-depth cylindrical microchannel network can provide platforms for the investigation of microvascular cells growing inside of cylindrical channels under shear flows and lumen pressures, and work as scaffolds for the investigation of morphogenesis and tubulogenesis. PMID:22729782

  9. Microfabrication of cylindrical microfluidic channel networks for microvascular research.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhouchun; Li, Xiang; Martins-Green, Manuela; Liu, Yuxin

    2012-10-01

    Current methods for formation of microvascular channel scaffolds are limited with non-circular channel cross-sections, complicated fabrication, and less flexibility in microchannel network design. To address current limitations in the creation of engineered microvascular channels with complex three-dimensional (3-D) geometries in the shape of microvessels, we have developed a reproducible, cost-effective, and flexible micromanufacturing process combined with photolithographic reflowable photoresist and soft lithography techniques to fabricate cylindrical microchannel and networks. A positive reflowable photoresist AZ P4620 was used to fabricate a master microchannel mold with semi-circular cross-sections. By the alignment and bonding of two polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannels replicated from the master mold together, a cylindrical microchannel or microchannel network was created. Further examination of the channel dimensions and surface profiles at different branching levels showed that the shape of the microfluidic channel was well approximated by a semi-circular surface, and a multi-level, multi-depth channel network was created. In addition, a computational fluidic dynamics (CFD) model was used to simulate shear flows and corresponding pressure distributions inside of the microchannel and channel network based on the dimensions of the fabricated channels. The fabricated multi-depth cylindrical microchannel network can provide platforms for the investigation of microvascular cells growing inside of cylindrical channels under shear flows and lumen pressures, and work as scaffolds for the investigation of morphogenesis and tubulogenesis.

  10. Unstable Mixing of Compressible Fluids Driven by Cylindrical Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Mary Jane; Zhang, Qiang

    1996-11-01

    As an incident shock wave hits a material interface between two compressible fluids of different densities, the interface becomes unstable. Small disturbances at the interface start to grow forming spikes and bubbles. This interfacial instability is known as the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability. To date, the majority of the numerical and theoretical studies are for the RM instability in plane geometry. We present a systematic study of the RM instabiliy in cylindrical geometry with curved shocks for all four classes: shock exploding from light fluid to heavy fluid; (2) shock imploding from light fluid to heavy fluid; (3) shock exploding from heavy fluid to light fluid; and (4) shock imploding from heavy fluid to light fluid. A careful study and understanding of the effects of various physical parameters will be presented: including the curvature of the geometry, the incident shock strength, the amplitude of the perturbation as well as the number of fingers at the material interface, and the phenomenon of reshock.

  11. Thin shells joining local cosmic string geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiroa, Ernesto F.; Rubín de Celis, Emilio; Simeone, Claudio

    2016-10-01

    In this article we present a theoretical construction of spacetimes with a thin shell that joins two different local cosmic string geometries. We study two types of global manifolds, one representing spacetimes with a thin shell surrounding a cosmic string or an empty region with Minkowski metric, and the other corresponding to wormholes which are not symmetric across the throat located at the shell. We analyze the stability of the static configurations under perturbations preserving the cylindrical symmetry. For both types of geometries we find that the static configurations can be stable for suitable values of the parameters.

  12. The Agent is Right: When Motor Embodied Cognition is Space-Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Gianelli, Claudia; Farnè, Alessandro; Salemme, Romeo; Jeannerod, Marc; Roy, Alice C.

    2011-01-01

    The role of embodied mechanisms in processing sentences endowed with a first person perspective is now widely accepted. However, whether embodied sentence processing within a third person perspective would also have motor behavioral significance remains unknown. Here, we developed a novel version of the Action-sentence Compatibility Effect (ACE) in which participants were asked to perform a movement compatible or not with the direction embedded in a sentence having a first person (Experiment 1: You gave a pizza to Louis) or third person perspective (Experiment 2: Lea gave a pizza to Louis). Results indicate that shifting perspective from first to third person was sufficient to prevent motor embodied mechanisms, abolishing the ACE. Critically, ACE was restored in Experiment 3 by adding a virtual “body” that allowed participants to know “where” to put themselves in space when taking the third person perspective, thus demonstrating that motor embodied processes are space-dependent. A fourth, control experiment, by dissociating motor response from the transfer verb's direction, supported the conclusion that perspective-taking may induce significant ACE only when coupled with the adequate sentence-response mapping. PMID:21966407

  13. Cylindrical magnets and ideal solenoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derby, Norman; Olbert, Stanislaw

    2010-03-01

    Both wire-wound solenoids and cylindrical magnets can be approximated as ideal azimuthally symmetric solenoids. We present an exact solution for the magnetic field of an ideal solenoid in an easy to use form. The field is expressed in terms of a single function that can be rapidly computed by means of a compact efficient algorithm, which can be coded as an add-in function to a spreadsheet, making field calculations accessible to introductory students. These expressions are not only accurate but are also as fast as most approximate expressions. We demonstrate their utility by simulating the dropping of a cylindrical magnet through a nonmagnetic conducting tube and comparing the calculation with data obtained from experiments suitable for an undergraduate laboratory.

  14. Cylindrical Piezoelectric Fiber Composite Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Sidney G.; Shams, Qamar A.; Fox, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    The use of piezoelectric devices has become widespread since Pierre and Jacques Curie discovered the piezoelectric effect in 1880. Examples of current applications of piezoelectric devices include ultrasonic transducers, micro-positioning devices, buzzers, strain sensors, and clocks. The invention of such lightweight, relatively inexpensive piezoceramic-fiber-composite actuators as macro fiber composite (MFC) actuators has made it possible to obtain strains and displacements greater than those that could be generated by prior actuators based on monolithic piezoceramic sheet materials. MFC actuators are flat, flexible actuators designed for bonding to structures to apply or detect strains. Bonding multiple layers of MFC actuators together could increase force capability, but not strain or displacement capability. Cylindrical piezoelectric fiber composite (CPFC) actuators have been invented as alternatives to MFC actuators for applications in which greater forces and/or strains or displacements may be required. In essence, a CPFC actuator is an MFC or other piezoceramic fiber composite actuator fabricated in a cylindrical instead of its conventional flat shape. Cylindrical is used here in the general sense, encompassing shapes that can have circular, elliptical, rectangular or other cross-sectional shapes in the planes perpendicular to their longitudinal axes.

  15. Jet mixing in a reacting cylindrical crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leong, M. Y.; Samuelsen, G. S.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1995-01-01

    This paper addresses the mixing of air jets into the hot, fuel-rich products of a gas turbine primary zone. The mixing, as a result, occurs in a reacting environment with chemical conversion and substantial heat release. The geometry is a crossflow confined in a cylindrical duct with side-wall injection of jets issuing from round orifices. A specially designed reactor, operating on propane, presents a uniform mixture without swirl to mixing modules consisting of 8, 9, 10, and 12 holes at a momentum-flux ratio of 57 and a jet-to-mainstream mass-flow ratio of 2.5. Concentrations of O2, CO2, CO, and HC are obtained upstream, downstream, and within the orifice plane. O2 profiles indicate jet penetration while CO2, CO, and HC profiles depict the extent of reaction. Jet penetration is observed to be a function of the number of orifices and is found to affect the mixing in the reacting system. The results demonstrate that one module (the 12-hole) produces near-optimal penetration defined here as a jet penetration closest to the module half-radius, and hence the best uniform mixture at a plane one duct radius from the orifice leading edge.

  16. Axial jet mixing of ethanol in cylindrical containers during weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aydelott, J. C.

    1979-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to examine the liquid flow patterns that result from the axial jet mixing of ethanol in 10-centimeter-diameter cylindrical tanks in weightlessness. A convex hemispherically ended tank and two Centaur liquid-hydrogen-tank models were used for the study. Four distinct liquid flow patterns were observed to be a function of the tank geometry, the liquid-jet velocity, the volume of liquid in the tank, and the location of the tube from which the liquid jet exited.

  17. Parallel algorithms for 2-D cylindrical transport equations of Eigenvalue problem

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, J.; Yang, S.

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, aimed at the neutron transport equations of eigenvalue problem under 2-D cylindrical geometry on unstructured grid, the discrete scheme of Sn discrete ordinate and discontinuous finite is built, and the parallel computation for the scheme is realized on MPI systems. Numerical experiments indicate that the designed parallel algorithm can reach perfect speedup, it has good practicality and scalability. (authors)

  18. Supercooling Water in Cylindrical Capsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman, J. J. Milón; Braga, S. L.

    2005-11-01

    An experimental apparatus was developed to investigate the supercooling phenomenon of water inside cylindrical capsules used for a cold storage process. The coolant is a water-alcohol mixture controlled by a constant temperature bath (CTB). Temperatures varying with time are measured inside and outside the capsule. Cylinders with an internal diameter and thickness of 45 and 1.5 mm, respectively, were made from four different materials: acrylic, PVC, brass, and aluminum. The supercooling period of the water and the nucleation temperature were investigated for different coolant temperatures. The supercooling and nucleation probabilities are shown as a function of the coolant temperature for the four different materials.

  19. From Cylindrical to Stretching Ridges and Wrinkles in Twisted Ribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham Dinh, Huy; Démery, Vincent; Davidovitch, Benny; Brau, Fabian; Damman, Pascal

    2016-09-01

    Twisted ribbons under tension exhibit a remarkably rich morphology, from smooth and wrinkled helicoids, to cylindrical or faceted patterns. This complexity emanates from the instability of the natural, helicoidal symmetry of the system, which generates both longitudinal and transverse stresses, thereby leading to buckling of the ribbon. Here, we focus on the tessellation patterns made of triangular facets. Our experimental observations are described within an "asymptotic isometry" approach that brings together geometry and elasticity. The geometry consists of parametrized families of surfaces, isometric to the undeformed ribbon in the singular limit of vanishing thickness and tensile load. The energy, whose minimization selects the favored structure among those families, is governed by the tensile work and bending cost of the pattern. This framework describes the coexistence lines in a morphological phase diagram, and determines the domain of existence of faceted structures.

  20. Planar and cylindrical active microwave temperature imaging: numerical simulations.

    PubMed

    Rius, J M; Pichot, C; Jofre, L; Bolomey, J C; Joachimowicz, N; Broquetas, A; Ferrando, M

    1992-01-01

    A comparative study at 2.45 GHz concerning both measurement and reconstruction parameters for planar and cylindrical configurations is presented. For the sake of comparison, a numerical model consisting of two nonconcentric cylinders is considered and reconstructed using both geometries from simulated experimental data. The scattered fields and reconstructed images permit extraction of very useful information about dynamic range, sensitivity, resolution, and quantitative image accuracy for the choice of the configuration in a particular application. Both geometries can measure forward and backward scattered fields. The backscattering measurement improves the image resolution and reconstruction in lossy mediums, but, on the other hand, has several dynamic range difficulties. This tradeoff between forward only and forward-backward field measurement is analyzed. As differential temperature imaging is a weakly scattering problem, Born approximation algorithms can be used. The simplicity of Born reconstruction algorithms and the use of FFT make them very attractive for real-time biomedical imaging systems. PMID:18222887

  1. From Cylindrical to Stretching Ridges and Wrinkles in Twisted Ribbons.

    PubMed

    Pham Dinh, Huy; Démery, Vincent; Davidovitch, Benny; Brau, Fabian; Damman, Pascal

    2016-09-01

    Twisted ribbons under tension exhibit a remarkably rich morphology, from smooth and wrinkled helicoids, to cylindrical or faceted patterns. This complexity emanates from the instability of the natural, helicoidal symmetry of the system, which generates both longitudinal and transverse stresses, thereby leading to buckling of the ribbon. Here, we focus on the tessellation patterns made of triangular facets. Our experimental observations are described within an "asymptotic isometry" approach that brings together geometry and elasticity. The geometry consists of parametrized families of surfaces, isometric to the undeformed ribbon in the singular limit of vanishing thickness and tensile load. The energy, whose minimization selects the favored structure among those families, is governed by the tensile work and bending cost of the pattern. This framework describes the coexistence lines in a morphological phase diagram, and determines the domain of existence of faceted structures. PMID:27636477

  2. Models of cylindrical bubble pulsation

    PubMed Central

    Ilinskii, Yurii A.; Zabolotskaya, Evgenia A.; Hay, Todd A.; Hamilton, Mark F.

    2012-01-01

    Three models are considered for describing the dynamics of a pulsating cylindrical bubble. A linear solution is derived for a cylindrical bubble in an infinite compressible liquid. The solution accounts for losses due to viscosity, heat conduction, and acoustic radiation. It reveals that radiation is the dominant loss mechanism, and that it is 22 times greater than for a spherical bubble of the same radius. The predicted resonance frequency provides a basis of comparison for limiting forms of other models. The second model considered is a commonly used equation in Rayleigh-Plesset form that requires an incompressible liquid to be finite in extent in order for bubble pulsation to occur. The radial extent of the liquid becomes a fitting parameter, and it is found that considerably different values of the parameter are required for modeling inertial motion versus acoustical oscillations. The third model was developed by V. K. Kedrinskii [Hydrodynamics of Explosion (Springer, New York, 2005), pp. 23–26] in the form of the Gilmore equation for compressible liquids of infinite extent. While the correct resonance frequency and loss factor are not recovered from this model in the linear approximation, it provides reasonable agreement with observations of inertial motion. PMID:22978863

  3. Propagation Mechanism of Cylindrical Cellular Detonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wen-Hu; Wang, Cheng; Ning, Jian-Guo

    2012-10-01

    We investigate the evolution of cylindrical cellular detonation with different instabilities. The numerical results show that with decreasing initial temperature, detonation becomes more unstable and the cells of the cylindrical detonation tend to be irregular. For stable detonation, a divergence of cylindrical detonation cells is formed eventually due to detonation instability resulting from a curved detonation front. For mildly unstable detonation, local overdriven detonation occurs. The detonation cell diverges and its size decreases. For highly unstable detonation, locally driven detonation is more obvious and the front is highly wrinkled. As a result, the diverging cylindrical detonation cell becomes highly irregular.

  4. Transient Eddy Current Response Due to a Conductive Cylindrical Rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Fangwei; Bowler, J. R.

    2007-03-01

    Transient eddy current test systems have been developed for the inspection of aircraft structures and for oil and gas pipelines. This work is supported by theoretical developments in which transient fields and time domain signals are determined for the geometry of interest. However most of the models to date have been aimed at structures that are planar, relatively little attention being paid to the corresponding problems in cylindrical geometries. In order to rectify this deficiency, we have examined theoretically the transient probe signal response due to a cylindrical conductive rod excited by an encircling coil. The transient fields can be calculated from a Fourier transform of the frequency domain solutions for infinite rods or tubes but, as with planar structures, we have found that it is better to use series solutions in the time domain since these provide more accurate and flexible representations of transient fields. Two types of series are used; one which converges faster at short times and one which converges faster at longer times. Calculations using these series show that they are in mutual agreement and agree with results computed using the fast Fourier transform.

  5. Fabrication and characterization of joined silicon carbide cylindrical components for nuclear applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalifa, H. E.; Deck, C. P.; Gutierrez, O.; Jacobsen, G. M.; Back, C. A.

    2015-02-01

    The use of silicon carbide (SiC) composites as structural materials in nuclear applications necessitates the development of a viable joining method. One critical application for nuclear-grade joining is the sealing of fuel within a cylindrical cladding. This paper demonstrates cylindrical joint feasibility using a low activation nuclear-grade joint material comprised entirely of β-SiC. While many papers have considered joining material, this paper takes into consideration the joint geometry and component form factor, as well as the material performance. Work focused specifically on characterizing the strength and permeability performance of joints between cylindrical SiC-SiC composites and monolithic SiC endplugs. The effects of environment and neutron irradiation were not evaluated in this study. Joint test specimens of different geometries were evaluated in their as-fabricated state, as well as after being subjected to thermal cycling and partial mechanical loading. A butted scarf geometry supplied the best combination of high strength and low permeability. A leak rate performance of 2 × 10-9 mbar l s-1 was maintained after thermal cycling and partial mechanical loading and sustained applied force of 3.4 kN, or an apparent strength of 77 MPa. This work shows that a cylindrical SiC-SiC composite tube sealed with a butted scarf endplug provides out-of-pile strength and permeability performance that meets light water reactor design requirements.

  6. Turbulence in the cylindrical slab

    SciTech Connect

    Gentle, K. W.; Rowan, W. L.; Williams, C. B.; Brookman, M. W.

    2014-09-15

    The cylindrical slab was the first and simplest model of intrinsically unstable microturbulence. The Helimak is an experimental realization of this model. Although finite, it is sufficiently large to escape boundary effects, with dimensionless parameters similar to those of a tokamak edge or scrape off layer. The essential drive is interchange-like, a pressure gradient with unfavorable magnetic curvature, leading to a non-linearly saturated state of large-amplitude turbulence, Δn{sub rms}/n ∼ 0.5. The nonlinear processes governing this saturation are unique, unlike any of those posited for the much weaker turbulence typical of confined plasma, e.g., in a tokamak. Neither linear stability theory, quasi-linear theory, zonal flows, nor flow shear stabilization is consistent with the observations. The mechanisms determining the non-linearly saturated state constitute an important challenge to our understanding of strongly nonlinear systems.

  7. Presentation of computer code SPIRALI for incompressible, turbulent, plane and spiral grooved cylindrical and face seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walowit, Jed A.

    1994-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation is made showing the capabilities of the computer code SPIRALI. Overall capabilities of SPIRALI include: computes rotor dynamic coefficients, flow, and power loss for cylindrical and face seals; treats turbulent, laminar, Couette, and Poiseuille dominated flows; fluid inertia effects are included; rotor dynamic coefficients in three (face) or four (cylindrical) degrees of freedom; includes effects of spiral grooves; user definable transverse film geometry including circular steps and grooves; independent user definable friction factor models for rotor and stator; and user definable loss coefficients for sudden expansions and contractions.

  8. Source Listings for Computer Code SPIRALI Incompressible, Turbulent Spiral Grooved Cylindrical and Face Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walowit, Jed A.; Shapiro, Wibur

    2005-01-01

    This is the source listing of the computer code SPIRALI which predicts the performance characteristics of incompressible cylindrical and face seals with or without the inclusion of spiral grooves. Performance characteristics include load capacity (for face seals), leakage flow, power requirements and dynamic characteristics in the form of stiffness, damping and apparent mass coefficients in 4 degrees of freedom for cylindrical seals and 3 degrees of freedom for face seals. These performance characteristics are computed as functions of seal and groove geometry, load or film thickness, running and disturbance speeds, fluid viscosity, and boundary pressures.

  9. High speed cylindrical roller bearing analysis, SKF computer program CYBEAN. Volume 2: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleckner, R. J.; Pirvics, J.

    1978-01-01

    The CYBEAN (Cylindrical Bearing Analysis) was created to detail radially loaded, aligned and misaligned cylindrical roller bearing performance under a variety of operating conditions. Emphasis was placed on detailing the effects of high speed, preload and system thermal coupling. Roller tilt, skew, radial, circumferential and axial displacement as well as flange contact were considered. Variable housing and flexible out-of-round outer ring geometries, and both steady state and time transient temperature calculations were enabled. The complete range of elastohydrodynamic contact considerations, employing full and partial film conditions were treated in the computation of raceway and flange contacts. Input and output architectures containing guidelines for use and a sample execution are detailed.

  10. Geometry in Medias Res

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cukier, Mimi; Asdourian, Tony; Thakker, Anand

    2012-01-01

    Geometry provides a natural window into what it is like to do mathematics. In the world of geometry, playful experimentation is often more fruitful than following a procedure, and logic plus a few axioms can open new worlds. Nonetheless, teaching a geometry course in a way that combines both rigor and play can be difficult. Many geometry courses…

  11. Experimental results for absolute cylindrical wavefront testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reardon, Patrick J.; Alatawi, Ayshah

    2014-09-01

    Applications for Cylindrical and near-cylindrical surfaces are ever-increasing. However, fabrication of high quality cylindrical surfaces is limited by the difficulty of accurate and affordable metrology. Absolute testing of such surfaces represents a challenge to the optical testing community as cylindrical reference wavefronts are difficult to produce. In this paper, preliminary results for a new method of absolute testing of cylindrical wavefronts are presented. The method is based on the merging of the random ball test method with the fiber optic reference test. The random ball test assumes a large number of interferograms of a good quality sphere with errors that are statistically distributed such that the average of the errors goes to zero. The fiber optic reference test utilizes a specially processed optical fiber to provide a clean high quality reference wave from an incident line focus from the cylindrical wave under test. By taking measurements at different rotation and translations of the fiber, an analogous procedure can be employed to determine the quality of the converging cylindrical wavefront with high accuracy. This paper presents and discusses the results of recent tests of this method using a null optic formed by a COTS cylindrical lens and a free-form polished corrector element.

  12. Growing yeast into cylindrical colonies.

    PubMed

    Vulin, Clément; Di Meglio, Jean-Marc; Lindner, Ariel B; Daerr, Adrian; Murray, Andrew; Hersen, Pascal

    2014-05-20

    Microorganisms often form complex multicellular assemblies such as biofilms and colonies. Understanding the interplay between assembly expansion, metabolic yield, and nutrient diffusion within a freely growing colony remains a challenge. Most available data on microorganisms are from planktonic cultures, due to the lack of experimental tools to control the growth of multicellular assemblies. Here, we propose a method to constrain the growth of yeast colonies into simple geometric shapes such as cylinders. To this end, we designed a simple, versatile culture system to control the location of nutrient delivery below a growing colony. Under such culture conditions, yeast colonies grow vertically and only at the locations where nutrients are delivered. Colonies increase in height at a steady growth rate that is inversely proportional to the cylinder radius. We show that the vertical growth rate of cylindrical colonies is not defined by the single-cell division rate, but rather by the colony metabolic yield. This contrasts with cells in liquid culture, in which the single-cell division rate is the only parameter that defines the population growth rate. This method also provides a direct, simple method to estimate the metabolic yield of a colony. Our study further demonstrates the importance of the shape of colonies on setting their expansion. We anticipate that our approach will be a starting point for elaborate studies of the population dynamics, evolution, and ecology of microbial colonies in complex landscapes. PMID:24853750

  13. Users' Manual for Computer Code SPIRALI Incompressible, Turbulent Spiral Grooved Cylindrical and Face Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walowit, Jed A.; Shapiro, Wilbur

    2005-01-01

    The SPIRALI code predicts the performance characteristics of incompressible cylindrical and face seals with or without the inclusion of spiral grooves. Performance characteristics include load capacity (for face seals), leakage flow, power requirements and dynamic characteristics in the form of stiffness, damping and apparent mass coefficients in 4 degrees of freedom for cylindrical seals and 3 degrees of freedom for face seals. These performance characteristics are computed as functions of seal and groove geometry, load or film thickness, running and disturbance speeds, fluid viscosity, and boundary pressures. A derivation of the equations governing the performance of turbulent, incompressible, spiral groove cylindrical and face seals along with a description of their solution is given. The computer codes are described, including an input description, sample cases, and comparisons with results of other codes.

  14. Plastic Limit Load Analysis of Cylindrical Pressure Vessels with Different Nozzle Inclination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Anupam; Raval, Harit Kishorchandra; Gandhi, Anish; Pawar, Dipak Bapu

    2016-04-01

    Sudden change in geometry of pressure vessel due to nozzle cutout, leads to local stress concentration and deformation, decreasing its strength. Elastic plastic analysis of cylindrical pressure vessels with different inclination angles of nozzle is important to estimate plastic limit load. In the present study, cylindrical pressure vessels with combined inclination of nozzles (i.e. in longitudinal and radial plane) are considered for elastic plastic limit load analysis. Three dimensional static nonlinear finite element analyses of cylindrical pressure vessels with nozzle are performed for incremental pressure loading. The von Mises stress distribution on pressure vessel shows higher stress zones at shell-nozzle junction. Approximate plastic limit load is obtained by twice elastic slope method. Variation in limit pressure with different combined inclination angle of nozzle is analyzed and found to be distinct in nature. Reported results can be helpful in optimizing pressure vessel design.

  15. Surface thermodynamics of planar, cylindrical, and spherical vapour-liquid interfaces of water.

    PubMed

    Lau, Gabriel V; Ford, Ian J; Hunt, Patricia A; Müller, Erich A; Jackson, George

    2015-03-21

    The test-area (TA) perturbation approach has been gaining popularity as a methodology for the direct computation of the interfacial tension in molecular simulation. Though originally implemented for planar interfaces, the TA approach has also been used to analyze the interfacial properties of curved liquid interfaces. Here, we provide an interpretation of the TA method taking the view that it corresponds to the change in free energy under a transformation of the spatial metric for an affine distortion. By expressing the change in configurational energy of a molecular configuration as a Taylor expansion in the distortion parameter, compact relations are derived for the interfacial tension and its energetic and entropic components for three different geometries: planar, cylindrical, and spherical fluid interfaces. While the tensions of the planar and cylindrical geometries are characterized by first-order changes in the energy, that of the spherical interface depends on second-order contributions. We show that a greater statistical uncertainty is to be expected when calculating the thermodynamic properties of a spherical interface than for the planar and cylindrical cases, and the evaluation of the separate entropic and energetic contributions poses a greater computational challenge than the tension itself. The methodology is employed to determine the vapour-liquid interfacial tension of TIP4P/2005 water at 293 K by molecular dynamics simulation for planar, cylindrical, and spherical geometries. A weak peak in the curvature dependence of the tension is observed in the case of cylindrical threads of condensed liquid at a radius of about 8 Å, below which the tension is found to decrease again. In the case of spherical drops, a marked decrease in the tension from the planar limit is found for radii below ∼ 15 Å; there is no indication of a maximum in the tension with increasing curvature. The vapour-liquid interfacial tension tends towards the planar limit for large

  16. Surface thermodynamics of planar, cylindrical, and spherical vapour-liquid interfaces of water

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, Gabriel V.; Müller, Erich A.; Jackson, George; Ford, Ian J.; Hunt, Patricia A.

    2015-03-21

    The test-area (TA) perturbation approach has been gaining popularity as a methodology for the direct computation of the interfacial tension in molecular simulation. Though originally implemented for planar interfaces, the TA approach has also been used to analyze the interfacial properties of curved liquid interfaces. Here, we provide an interpretation of the TA method taking the view that it corresponds to the change in free energy under a transformation of the spatial metric for an affine distortion. By expressing the change in configurational energy of a molecular configuration as a Taylor expansion in the distortion parameter, compact relations are derived for the interfacial tension and its energetic and entropic components for three different geometries: planar, cylindrical, and spherical fluid interfaces. While the tensions of the planar and cylindrical geometries are characterized by first-order changes in the energy, that of the spherical interface depends on second-order contributions. We show that a greater statistical uncertainty is to be expected when calculating the thermodynamic properties of a spherical interface than for the planar and cylindrical cases, and the evaluation of the separate entropic and energetic contributions poses a greater computational challenge than the tension itself. The methodology is employed to determine the vapour-liquid interfacial tension of TIP4P/2005 water at 293 K by molecular dynamics simulation for planar, cylindrical, and spherical geometries. A weak peak in the curvature dependence of the tension is observed in the case of cylindrical threads of condensed liquid at a radius of about 8 Å, below which the tension is found to decrease again. In the case of spherical drops, a marked decrease in the tension from the planar limit is found for radii below ∼ 15 Å; there is no indication of a maximum in the tension with increasing curvature. The vapour-liquid interfacial tension tends towards the planar limit for large

  17. Combinatorial Geometry Printer Plotting.

    1987-01-05

    Picture generates plots of two-dimensional slices through the three-dimensional geometry described by the combinatorial geometry (CG) package used in such codes as MORSE and QAD-CG. These plots are printed on a standard line printer.

  18. Geometry and Erdkinder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Nathaniel J.

    2001-01-01

    Chronicles a teacher's first year teaching geometry at the Hershey Montessori Farm School in Huntsburg, Ohio. Instructional methods relied on Euclid primary readings and combined pure abstract logic with practical applications of geometry on the land. The course included geometry background imparted by Montessori elementary materials as well as…

  19. Cylindrical Taylor states conserving total absolute magnetic helicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Low, B. C.; Fang, F.

    2014-09-01

    The Taylor state of a three-dimensional (3D) magnetic field in an upright cylindrical domain V is derived from first principles as an extremum of the total magnetic energy subject to a conserved, total absolute helicity Habs. This new helicity [Low, Phys. Plasmas 18, 052901 (2011)] is distinct from the well known classical total helicity and relative total helicity in common use to describe wholly-contained and anchored fields, respectively. A given field B, tangential along the cylindrical side of V, may be represented as a unique linear superposition of two flux systems, an axially extended system along V and a strictly transverse system carrying information on field-circulation. This specialized Chandrasekhar-Kendall representation defines Habs and permits a neat formulation of the boundary-value problem (BVP) for the Taylor state as a constant-α force-free field, treating 3D wholly-contained and anchored fields on the same conceptual basis. In this formulation, the governing equation is a scalar integro-partial differential equation (PDE). A family of series solutions for an anchored field is presented as an illustration of this class of BVPs. Past treatments of the constant-α field in 3D cylindrical geometry are based on a scalar Helmholtz PDE as the governing equation, with issues of inconsistency in the published field solutions discussed over time in the journal literature. The constant-α force-free equation reduces to a scalar Helmholtz PDE only as special cases of the 3D integro-PDE derived here. In contrast, the constant-α force-free equation and the scalar Helmholtz PDE are absolutely equivalent in the spherical domain as discussed in Appendix. This theoretical study is motivated by the investigation of the Sun's corona but the results are also relevant to laboratory plasmas.

  20. Stability analysis of cylindrical Vlasov equilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Short, R W

    1980-02-01

    A method is presented for the fully kinetic, nonlocal stability analysis of cylindrically symmetric equilibria. Applications to the lower hybrid drift instability and the modes associated with a finite-width relativistic E-layer are discussed.

  1. View factors of cylindrical spiral surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, Vladimir A.; Solovjov, Vladimir P.

    2016-03-01

    Analytical expressions are presented for the view factors (radiative configuration factors) associated with the flat right cylindrical spiral surface. Such cylindrical spiral systems are widely applied as electrical resistance heating elements for lighting devices, electronic radio tubes, high-speed gas flow heaters, and other appliances used for scientific, industrial and domestic purposes. Derivation of the view factors is based on the invariant principles and the results presented in Lebedev (2000, 2003,1988) [1-3].

  2. Experimental study of Richtmyer-Meshkov instability induced by cylindrical shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, S. H. R.; Takayama, K.

    2005-08-01

    The paper describes the results of holographic interferometric flow visualization of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability induced by cylindrical shock waves propagating across cylindrical interfaces. Experiments were conducted in an annular coaxial vertical diaphragmless shock tube, which can produce converging cylindrical shock waves with minimum disturbances. The shock wave converged and interacted with a cylindrical soap bubble filled with He, Ne, air, Ar, Kr, Xe, or SF6. The soap bubble was placed coaxially in the test section. The effects of density variation on the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability for a wide range of Atwood numbers were determined. Pressure histories at different radii during the shock wave implosion and reflection from the center were measured. Double-exposure holographic interferometry was used and the motion of the converging shock wave and its interaction with the gaseous interface were visualized. The variation of the pressure at the center with interface Atwood number for constant incident shock Mach number was studied. It is found that the dominant mechanism limiting the maximum pressure at the center of convergence is related to the instability of the converging shock wave induced by its interaction with the interface. A short time after the impulsive acceleration, the interface started deforming, and the growth of these perturbations is described. The results show that after diverging shock wave interaction, the reshocked cylindrical interfaces have a higher growth rate of the turbulent mixing zone than that of the reshocked interface in a plane geometry reported by previous works.

  3. Rotational statistics in dense granular flows of smooth cylindrical particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olafsen, Jeffrey; Jantzi, Jacob

    2011-03-01

    We report the results of an experiment to investigate the dissipation in the rotational degree of freedom for smooth cylindrical particles in a dense, driven granular flow. The flow is studied in a rotating drum of radius R = 30 cm for particles of radius r = 0.635 cm while the cell is rotated at speeds between 0.25 and 0.75 Hz. The 2D geometry of the experimental design allows for the measurement of two translational degrees of freedom as well as the rotation of the disks within the driven flow. The rotational velocity statistics demonstrate non-Gaussian behavior as well as a significant amount of energy being dissipated within the flow via the tangential friction between the particles. The results of this experiment are significant in that many driven granular experiments use smooth cylindrical or spherical particles to investigate granular dynamics, but the contribution from the rotational degrees of freedom are often unmeasured. A novel imaging technique is used to extract both the translational and rotational velocity statistics to a high degree of precision in the entire cell during the experiment.

  4. A cylindrical SPECT camera with de-centralized readout scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habte, F.; Stenström, P.; Rillbert, A.; Bousselham, A.; Bohm, C.; Larsson, S. A.

    2001-09-01

    An optimized brain single photon emission computed tomograph (SPECT) camera is being designed at Stockholm University and Karolinska Hospital. The design goal is to achieve high sensitivity, high-count rate and high spatial resolution. The sensitivity is achieved by using a cylindrical crystal, which gives a closed geometry with large solid angles. A de-centralized readout scheme where only a local environment around the light excitation is readout supports high-count rates. The high resolution is achieved by using an optimized crystal configuration. A 12 mm crystal plus 12 mm light guide combination gave an intrinsic spatial resolution better than 3.5 mm (140 keV) in a prototype system. Simulations show that a modified configuration can improve this value. A cylindrical configuration with a rotating collimator significantly simplifies the mechanical design of the gantry. The data acquisition and control system uses early digitization and subsequent digital signal processing to extract timing and amplitude information, and monitors the position of the collimator. The readout system consists of 12 or more modules each based on programmable logic and a digital signal processor. The modules send data to a PC file server-reconstruction engine via a Firewire (IEEE-1394) network.

  5. Quantum Hall physics with cold atoms in cylindrical optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łåcki, Mateusz; Pichler, Hannes; Sterdyniak, Antoine; Lyras, Andreas; Lembessis, Vassilis E.; Al-Dossary, Omar; Budich, Jan Carl; Zoller, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We propose and study various realizations of a Hofstadter-Hubbard model on a cylinder geometry with fermionic cold atoms in optical lattices. The cylindrical optical lattice is created by copropagating Laguerre-Gauss beams, i.e., light beams carrying orbital angular momentum. By strong focusing of the light beams we create a real-space optical lattice in the form of rings, which are offset in energy. A second set of Laguerre-Gauss beams then induces a Raman-hopping between these rings, imprinting phases corresponding to a synthetic magnetic field (artificial gauge field). In addition, by rotating the lattice potential, we achieve a slowly varying flux through the hole of the cylinder, which allows us to probe the Hall response of the system as a realization of Laughlin's thought experiment. We study how in the presence of interactions fractional quantum Hall physics could be observed in this setup.

  6. Nonlinear saturation amplitude of cylindrical Rayleigh—Taylor instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wan-Hai; Yu, Chang-Ping; Ye, Wen-Hua; Wang, Li-Feng

    2014-09-01

    The nonlinear saturation amplitude (NSA) of the fundamental mode in the classical Rayleigh—Taylor instability with a cylindrical geometry for an arbitrary Atwood number is analytically investigated by considering the nonlinear corrections up to the third order. The analytic results indicate that the effects of the initial radius of the interface (r0) and the Atwood number (A) play an important role in the NSA of the fundamental mode. The NSA of the fundamental mode first increases gently and then decreases quickly with increasing A. For a given A, the smaller the r0/λ (λ is the perturbation wavelength), the larger the NSA of the fundamental mode. When r0/λ is large enough (r0 ≫ λ), the NSA of the fundamental mode is reduced to the prediction in the previous literatures within the framework of the third-order perturbation theory.

  7. Simulating flow and segregation of cylindrical particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yongzhi; Umbanhowar, Paul B.; Lueptow, Richard M.

    2015-11-01

    Efficient and accurate simulation of cylindrical particles using discrete element method (DEM) is a challenge. Typical approaches to simulating cylindrical particle systems are based on the glued spheres method, which has low accuracy, or real shape models, which have high computational cost. In this work we utilize super-ellipsoids, which belong to super-quadrics, to model cylindrical particles in DEM simulations. Simulations of a single cylinder impacting a flat wall indicate that super-ellipsoids provide the same accuracy as real shape models and much better accuracy than the glued sphere method. Simulations of super-ellipsoid cylindrical particles in rotating tumblers result in nearly the same angle of repose as experiments and real shape simulations, demonstrating the accuracy of super-ellipsoid DEM simulations for multi-particle systems. The segregation of bidisperse cylindrical particles differing in length in a bounded heap was simulated by super-ellipsoid DEM, and the results are similar to the experiment. In spite of these advantages of using super-ellipsoid cylindrical particles, simulations of filling a box with particles indicate that the simulation times for super-ellipsoid cylinders is about an order of magnitude longer than that for the same number of spherical particles.

  8. Changing the Structure Boundary Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Karasev, Viktor; Dzlieva, Elena; Ivanov, Artyom

    2008-09-07

    Analysis of previously obtained results shows that hexagonal crystal lattice is the dominant type of ordering, in particular, in striated glow discharges. We explore the possibility for changing the dust distribution in horizontal cross sections of relatively highly ordered structures in a glow-discharge. Presuming that boundary geometry can affect dust distribution, we used cylindrical coolers held at 0 deg. C and placed against a striation containing a structure, to change the geometry of its outer boundary. By varying the number of coolers, their positions, and their separations from the tube wall, azimuthally asymmetric thermophoretic forces can be used to form polygonal boundaries and vary the angles between their segments (in a horizontal cross section). The corner in the structure's boundary of 60 deg. stimulates formation of hexagonal cells. The structure between the supported parallel boundaries is also characterized by stable hexagonal ordering. We found that a single linear boundary segment does not give rise to any sizable domain, but generates a lattice extending from the boundary (without edge defects). A square lattice can be formed by setting the angle equal to 90 deg. . However, angles of 45 deg. and 135 deg. turned out easier to form. Square lattice was created by forming a near-135 deg. corner with four coolers. It was noted that no grain ordering is observed in the region adjacent to corners of angles smaller than 30 deg. , which do not promote ordering into cells of any shape. Thus, manipulation of a structure boundary can be used to change dust distribution, create structures free of the ubiquitous edge defects that destroy orientation order, and probably change the crystal lattice type.

  9. Study of skin model and geometry effects on thermal performance of thermal protective fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Fanglong; Ma, Suqin; Zhang, Weiyuan

    2008-05-01

    Thermal protective clothing has steadily improved over the years as new materials and improved designs have reached the market. A significant method that has brought these improvements to the fire service is the NFPA 1971 standard on structural fire fighters’ protective clothing. However, this testing often neglects the effects of cylindrical geometry on heat transmission in flame resistant fabrics. This paper deals with methods to develop cylindrical geometry testing apparatus incorporating novel skin bioheat transfer model to test flame resistant fabrics used in firefighting. Results show that fabrics which shrink during the test can have reduced thermal protective performance compared with the qualities measured with a planar geometry tester. Results of temperature differences between skin simulant sensors of planar and cylindrical tester are also compared. This test method provides a new technique to accurately and precisely characterize the thermal performance of thermal protective fabrics.

  10. The Dizzying Depths of the Cylindrical Mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeWeerd, Alan J.; Hill, S. Eric

    2005-02-01

    A typical introduction to geometrical optics treats plane and spherical mirrors. At first glance, it may be surprising that texts seldom mention the cylindrical mirror, except for the occasional reference to use in fun houses and to viewing anamorphic art.1,2 However, even a cursory treatment reveals its complexity. Holzberlein used an extended object to qualitatively illustrate that images are produced both before and behind a concave cylindrical mirror.3 He also speculated on how this extreme astigmatism results in an observer's dizziness. By considering a simple point object, we make a more detailed analysis of the cylindrical mirror and the dizziness it induces. First, we illustrate how rays from a point object reflect to form not one point image but two line images. Next, we describe how an observer perceives a likeness of the object. Finally, we suggest how confusing depth cues induce dizziness. Although we focus on the concave cylindrical mirror, the discussion is easy to generalize to the convex cylindrical mirror.

  11. Scattering cancellation by metamaterial cylindrical multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tricarico, S.; Bilotti, F.; Vegni, L.

    2009-05-01

    In this paper, we present the theoretical analysis and the design of cylindrical multilayered electromagnetic cloaks based on the scattering cancellation technique. We propose at first the analysis and the design of bi-layered cylindrical shells, made of homogenous and isotropic metamaterials, in order to effectively reduce the scattered field from a dielectric cylindrical object. The single shell and the bi-layered shell cases are compared in terms of scattering reduction and loss effects. The comparison shows that the bi-layered configuration exhibits superior performances. The scattering cancellation approach, is, then, extended to the case of generic multilayered cylindrical shells, considering again homogeneous and isotropic metamaterials. The employment of the proposed technique to the case of cloaking devices working at multiple frequencies is also envisaged and discussed. Finally, some practical layouts of cylindrical electromagnetic cloaks working at optical frequencies are also proposed. In these configurations, the homogenous and isotropic metamaterials are replaced by their actual counterparts, obtained using alternating stacked plasmonic and non-plasmonic layers. The theoretical formulation and the design approaches presented throughout the paper are validated through proper full-wave numerical simulations.

  12. Antimicrobial Peptides in Toroidal and Cylindrical Pores

    PubMed Central

    Mihajlovic, Maja

    2010-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are small, usually cationic peptides, which permeabilize biological membranes. Their mechanism of action is still not well understood. Here we investigate the preference of alamethicin and melittin for pores of different shapes, using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the peptides in pre-formed toroidal and cylindrical pores. When an alamethicin hexamer is initially embedded in a cylindrical pore, at the end of the simulation the pore remains cylindrical or closes if glutamines in the N-termini are not located within the pore. On the other hand, when a melittin tetramer is embedded in toroidal pore or in a cylindrical pore, at the end of the simulation the pore is lined both with peptides and lipid headgroups, and, thus, can be classified as a toroidal pore. These observations agree with the prevailing views that alamethicin forms barrel-stave pores whereas melittin forms toroidal pores. Both alamethicin and melittin form amphiphilic helices in the presence of membranes, but their net charge differs; at pH ~7, the net charge of alamethicin is −1 whereas that of melittin is +5. This gives rise to stronger electrostatic interactions of melittin with membranes than those of alamethicin. The melittin tetramer interacts more strongly with lipids in the toroidal pore than in the cylindrical one, due to more favorable electrostatic interactions. PMID:20403332

  13. Investigation of Surface Phenomena in Shocked Tin in Converging Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Rousculp, Christopher L.; Oro, David Michael; Margolin, Len G.; Griego, Jeffrey Randall; Reinovsky, Robert Emil; Turchi, Peter John

    2015-08-06

    There is great interest in the behavior of the free surface of tin under shock loading. While it is known that meso-scale surface imperfections can seed the Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability (RMI) for a surface that is melted on release, much less is known about a tin surface that is solid, but plastically deforming. Here material properties such as shear and yield strength come into play especially in converging geometry. Previous experiments have been driven by direct contact HE. Usually a thin, flat target coupon is fielded with various single-mode, sinusoidal, machined, profiles on the free surface. The free surface is adjacent to either vacuum or an inert receiver gas. Most of these previous driver/target configurations have been nominal planer geometry. With modern HE it has been straightforward to shock tin into melt on release. However it has been challenging to achieve a low enough pressure for solid state on release. Here we propose to extend the existing base of knowledge to include the behavior of the free surface of tin in cylindrical converging geometry. By shock loading a cylindrical tin shell with a magnetically driven cylindrical liner impactor, the free surface evolution can be diagnosed with proton radiography. With the PHELIX capacitor bank, the drive can easily be varied to span the pressure range to achieve solid, mixed, and liquid states on release.

  14. Cylindrical electrochemical cells with a diaphragm seal

    SciTech Connect

    Georgopoulos, P.

    1993-07-13

    A cylindrical electrochemical cell is described comprising an anode, a cathode and electrolyte contained in a cylindrical container, the container having an open end and a closed end; wherein the open end of the container is sealed with a seal assembly comprising: (a) a disc-shaped seal member, made from an electrically insulative material, having an outer edge wall connected via a base to a centrally located cylindrical hub that defines an orifice; which base has a ventable diaphragm portion and a nonventable diaphragm portion that is thicker than the ventable diaphragm portion; and wherein the ventable diaphragm portion joins the hub at an interface and becomes gradually thicker in the direction away from the interface toward the outer edge wall so that the ventable diaphragm portion is thinnest at the interface; and (b) a current collector extending through the orifice defined by the hub into the cell's interior to contact one of the cell's electrodes.

  15. Laser diode assembly including a cylindrical lens

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, J.J.; Reichert, P.

    1992-01-14

    The present invention provides a diffraction limited, high numerical aperture (fast) cylindrical microlens. The method for making the microlens is adaptable to produce a cylindrical lens that has almost any shape on its optical surfaces. The cylindrical lens may have a shape, such as elliptical or hyperbolic, designed to transform some particular given input light distribution into some desired output light distribution. In the method, the desired shape is first formed in a glass preform. Then, the preform is heated to the minimum drawing temperature and a fiber is drawn from it. The cross-sectional shape of the fiber bears a direct relation to the shape of the preform from which it was drawn. During the drawing process, the surfaces become optically smooth due to fire polishing. 11 figs.

  16. Laser diode assembly including a cylindrical lens

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, James J.; Reichert, Patrick

    1992-01-01

    The present invention provides a diffraction limited, high numerical aperture (fast) cylindrical microlens. The method for making the microlens is adaptable to produce a cylindrical lens that has almost any shape on its optical surfaces. The cylindrical lens may have a shape, such as elliptical or hyperbolic, designed to transform some particular given input light distribution into some desired output light distribution. In the method, the desired shape is first formed in a glass preform. Then, the preform is heated to the minimum drawing temperature and a fiber is drawn from it. The cross-sectional shape of the fiber bears a direct relation to the shape of the preform from which it was drawn. During the drawing process, the surfaces become optically smooth due to fire polishing.

  17. Self-referenced interferometer for cylindrical surfaces.

    PubMed

    Šarbort, Martin; Řeřucha, Šimon; Holá, Miroslava; Buchta, Zdeněk; Lazar, Josef

    2015-11-20

    We present a new interferometric method for shape measurement of hollow cylindrical tubes. We propose a simple and robust self-referenced interferometer where the reference and object waves are represented by the central and peripheral parts, respectively, of the conical wave generated by a single axicon lens. The interferogram detected by a digital camera is characterized by a closed-fringe pattern with a circular carrier. The interference phase is demodulated using spatial synchronous detection. The capabilities of the interferometer are experimentally tested for various hollow cylindrical tubes with lengths up to 600 mm.

  18. Geometry + Technology = Proof

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyublinskaya, Irina; Funsch, Dan

    2012-01-01

    Several interactive geometry software packages are available today to secondary school teachers. An example is The Geometer's Sketchpad[R] (GSP), also known as Dynamic Geometry[R] software, developed by Key Curriculum Press. This numeric based technology has been widely adopted in the last twenty years, and a vast amount of creativity has been…

  19. Euclidean Geometry via Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filimonov, Rossen; Kreith, Kurt

    1992-01-01

    Describes the Plane Geometry System computer software developed at the Educational Computer Systems laboratory in Sofia, Bulgaria. The system enables students to use the concept of "algorithm" to correspond to the process of "deductive proof" in the development of plane geometry. Provides an example of the software's capability and compares it to…

  20. Geometry of membrane fission.

    PubMed

    Frolov, Vadim A; Escalada, Artur; Akimov, Sergey A; Shnyrova, Anna V

    2015-01-01

    Cellular membranes define the functional geometry of intracellular space. Formation of new membrane compartments and maintenance of complex organelles require division and disconnection of cellular membranes, a process termed membrane fission. Peripheral membrane proteins generally control membrane remodeling during fission. Local membrane stresses, reflecting molecular geometry of membrane-interacting parts of these proteins, sum up to produce the key membrane geometries of fission: the saddle-shaped neck and hour-glass hemifission intermediate. Here, we review the fundamental principles behind the translation of molecular geometry into membrane shape and topology during fission. We emphasize the central role the membrane insertion of specialized protein domains plays in orchestrating fission in vitro and in cells. We further compare individual to synergistic action of the membrane insertion during fission mediated by individual protein species, proteins complexes or membrane domains. Finally, we describe how local geometry of fission intermediates defines the functional design of the protein complexes catalyzing fission of cellular membranes. PMID:25062896

  1. Second order symmetry-preserving conservative Lagrangian scheme for compressible Euler equations in two-dimensional cylindrical coordinates

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Juan; Shu, Chi-Wang

    2014-09-01

    In applications such as astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion, there are many three-dimensional cylindrical-symmetric multi-material problems which are usually simulated by Lagrangian schemes in the two-dimensional cylindrical coordinates. For this type of simulation, a critical issue for the schemes is to keep spherical symmetry in the cylindrical coordinate system if the original physical problem has this symmetry. In the past decades, several Lagrangian schemes with such symmetry property have been developed, but all of them are only first order accurate. In this paper, we develop a second order cell-centered Lagrangian scheme for solving compressible Euler equations in cylindrical coordinates, based on the control volume discretizations, which is designed to have uniformly second order accuracy and capability to preserve one-dimensional spherical symmetry in a two-dimensional cylindrical geometry when computed on an equal-angle-zoned initial grid. The scheme maintains several good properties such as conservation for mass, momentum and total energy, and the geometric conservation law. Several two-dimensional numerical examples in cylindrical coordinates are presented to demonstrate the good performance of the scheme in terms of accuracy, symmetry, non-oscillation and robustness. The advantage of higher order accuracy is demonstrated in these examples.

  2. Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor Instability: Theory and simulation in planar and cylindrical pulsed power targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weis, Matthew R.

    Cylindrical liner implosions in the Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) concept are susceptible to the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability (MRT). The danger of MRT enters in two phases, (1) during the main implosion, the outer surface of the liner is MRT unstable, and (2) during the short time period when the liner decelerates onto hot fuel, the inner surface becomes unstable. Growth of MRT on the outer surface may also feedthrough, which may seed the inner surface leading to high MRT growth in the second phase. If MRT growth becomes large enough, confinement of the fuel is lost. To characterize MRT we solve the linearized, ideal MHD equations in both planar and cylindrical geometries, including the presence of an axial magnetic field and the effects of sausage and kink modes (present in cylindrical coordinates only). In general, the total instability growth rates in cylindrical geometry are found to be larger than those in planar geometry. MRT and feedthrough is shown to be suppressed by strong magnetic field line bending (tension). However, for the same amount of field line bending, feedthrough is the most stabilized. Application of the planar and the cylindrical model to results from the Z-machine at Sandia National Laboratories is presented. Analytic MRT growth rates for a typical magnetized MagLIF-like implosion show the kink mode to be the fastest growing early and very late in the liner implosion (during deceleration). 1D HYDRA MHD simulations are used to generate realistic, evolving profiles (in density, pressure, and magnetic field) during the implosion from which instantaneous growth rates can be computed exactly, using either the planar or cylindrical analytic formulae developed in this thesis. Sophisticated 2D HYDRA MHD simulations were also performed to compare with the analytic theory and experimental results. In 2D, highly compressed axial magnetic fields can reduce the growth of perturbations at the fuel/liner interface during the implosion

  3. Distributed neural signals on parabolic cylindrical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, S. D.; Li, H.; Tzou, H. S.

    2013-06-01

    Parabolic cylindrical shells are commonly used as key components in communication antennas, space telescopes, solar collectors, etc. This study focuses on distributed modal neural sensing signals on a flexible simply-supported parabolic cylindrical shell panel. The parabolic cylindrical shell is fully laminated with a piezoelectric layer on its outer surface and the piezoelectric layer is segmented into infinitesimal elements (neurons) to investigate the microscopic distributed neural sensing signals. Since the dominant vibration component of the shell is usually the transverse oscillation, a new transverse mode shape function is defined. Two shell cases, i.e., the ratio of the meridian height to the half span distance of a parabola at 1:4 (shallow) and 1:1 (deep), are studied to reveal the curvature effect to the neural sensing signals. Studies suggest that the membrane signal component dominates for lower natural modes and the bending signal component dominates for higher natural modes. The meridional membrane and bending signal components are mostly concentrated on the high-curvature areas, while the longitudinal bending component is mostly concentrated on the relatively flat areas. The concentration behavior becomes more prominent as the parabolic cylindrical shell deepens, primarily resulting from the enhanced membrane effect due to the increased curvature.

  4. Matching a static cylindrically symmetric elastic spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brito, I.; Carot, J.; Mena, F. C.; Vaz, E. G. L. R.

    2012-07-01

    We consider a static cylindrically symmetric spacetime with elastic matter and study the matching problem of this spacetime with a suitable exterior. For the exterior, we take the Levi-Civita spacetime and its generalization including a cosmological constant, the Linet-Tian spacetime. We show that the matching is only possible with the Linet-Tian solution.

  5. Borehole cylindrical noise during hole-surface and hole-hole resistivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osiensky, James L.; Nimmer, Robin; Binley, Andrew M.

    2004-04-01

    Drilled boreholes generally are the only feasible means to access the subsurface for the emplacement of downhole electrodes for most hole-hole and hole-surface resistivity experiments. However, the very existence of the borehole itself creates the potential for significant noise due to the inevitable conductivity contrast that develops between the borehole walls and the formation. Borehole cylindrical noise develops whenever a current source is placed in a drilled borehole. Borehole geometries may range from nearly perfect cylinders to highly, irregular, rugose holes in consolidated rock, to relatively minor, collapsed, disturbed zones in caving sediments. Boreholes in non-caving formations generally are filled with artificial, conductive materials to afford crucial, electrical continuity between downhole electrodes and the borehole walls. Filled boreholes form cylindrically shaped heterogeneities that create significant noise due to preferential current flow up and down the conductive columns. Selected conditions are simulated with a finite difference model to illustrate the significance of borehole cylindrical noise on hole-hole and hole-surface mise-à-la-masse electrical potentials near a current electrode. Mise-à-la-masse electrical potentials measured during a field tracer experiment also are presented. These measurements are used to illustrate significant errors may develop in the interpretation of apparent resistivity estimates out to a distance of several meters from the current source if borehole cylindrical noise is not recognized and accounted for in the analysis of electrical potential data.

  6. Interfacial geometry and D-variation effects in two-phase systems. [binary alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenney, D. R.; Unnam, J.

    1979-01-01

    Numerical solutions of the governing diffusion equation for two-phase concentration dependent diffusion coefficients are examined. Solutions were also calculated for planar, cylindrical, and spherical geometries to compare the effect of interface geometries with those caused by concentration-dependent diffusion coefficients, and two methods of averaging D were considered to determine the best averaging method for different types of D-variations. The effects of interface-location criteria on mass conservation and convergence of interface location, diffusion coefficient variation in the alpha and beta-phases of a two-phase binary alloy system, effect of D(alpha) variation in a cylindrical couple on beta-phase thickness, and geometry and D-variation effects on the degree of homogenization were determined. It is concluded that typical D(alpha)-variations can have a greater influence on the kinetics of interdiffusion than the geometry.

  7. Detonation diffraction through different geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorin, Rémy; Zitoun, Ratiba; Khasainov, Boris; Desbordes, Daniel

    2009-04-01

    We performed the study of the diffraction of a self-sustained detonation from a cylindrical tube (of inner diameter d) through different geometric configurations in order to characterise the transmission processes and to quantify the transmission criteria to the reception chamber. For the diffraction from a tube to the open space the transmission criteria is expressed by d c = k c · λ (with λ the detonation cell size and k c depending on the mixture and on the operture configuration, classically 13 for alkane mixtures with oxygen). The studied geometries are: (a) a sharp increase of diameter ( D/ d > 1) with and without a central obstacle in the diffracting section, (b) a conical divergent with a central obstacle in the diffracting section and (c) an inversed intermediate one end closed tube insuring a double reflection before a final diffraction between the initiator tube and the reception chamber. The results for case A show that the reinitiation process depends on the ratio d/ λ. For ratios below k c the re-ignition takes place at the receptor tube wall and at a fixed distance from the step, i.e. closely after the diffracted shock reflection shows a Mach stem configuration. For ratios below a limit ratio k lim (which depends on D/ d) the re-ignition distance increases with the decrease of d/λ. For both case A and B the introduction of a central obstacle (of blockage ratio BR = 0.5) at the exit of the initiator tube decreases the critical transmission ratio k c by 50%. The results in configuration C show that the re-ignition process depends both on d/ λ and the geometric conditions. Optimal configuration is found that provides the transmission through the two successive reflections (from d = 26 mm to D ch = 200 mm) at as small d/ λ as 2.2 whatever the intermediate diameter D is. This configuration provides a significant improvement in the detonation transmission conditions.

  8. Noncommutative Geometry and Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Connes, Alain

    2006-11-03

    In this very short essay we shall describe a 'spectral' point of view on geometry which allows to start taking into account the lessons from both renormalization and of general relativity. We shall first do that for renormalization and explain in rough outline the content of our recent collaborations with Dirk Kreimer and Matilde Marcolli leading to the universal Galois symmetry of renormalizable quantum field theories provided by the renormalization group in its cosmic Galois group incarnation. As far as general relativity is concerned, since the functional integral cannot be treated in the traditional perturbative manner, it relies heavily as a 'sum over geometries' on the chosen paradigm of geometric space. This will give us the occasion to discuss, in the light of noncommutative geometry, the issue of 'observables' in gravity and our joint work with Ali Chamseddine on the spectral action, with a first attempt to write down a functional integral on the space of noncommutative geometries.

  9. What Is Geometry?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chern, Shiing-Shen

    1990-01-01

    Discussed are the major historical developments of geometry. Euclid, Descartes, Klein's Erlanger Program, Gaus and Riemann, globalization, topology, Elie Cartan, and an application to molecular biology are included as topics. (KR)

  10. Proof in Transformation Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, A. W.

    1971-01-01

    The first of three articles showing how inductively-obtained results in transformation geometry may be organized into a deductive system. This article discusses two approaches to enlargement (dilatation), one using coordinates and the other using synthetic methods. (MM)

  11. Gingerbread-House Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emenaker, Charles E.

    1999-01-01

    Describes a sixth-grade interdisciplinary geometry unit based on Charles Dickens's "A Christmas Carol". Focuses on finding area, volume, and perimeter, and working with estimation, decimals, and fractions in the context of making gingerbread houses. (ASK)

  12. Induced geometry from disformal transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Fang-Fang; Huang, Peng

    2015-05-01

    In this note, we use the disformal transformation to induce a geometry from the manifold which is originally Riemannian. The new geometry obtained here can be considered as a generalization of Weyl integrable geometry. Based on these results, we further propose a geometry which is naturally a generalization of Weyl geometry.

  13. Software Geometry in Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alion, Tyler; Viren, Brett; Junk, Tom

    2015-04-01

    The Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) involves many detectors. The experiment's near detector (ND) facility, may ultimately involve several detectors. The far detector (FD) will be significantly larger than any other Liquid Argon (LAr) detector yet constructed; many prototype detectors are being constructed and studied to motivate a plethora of proposed FD designs. Whether it be a constructed prototype or a proposed ND/FD design, every design must be simulated and analyzed. This presents a considerable challenge to LBNE software experts; each detector geometry must be described to the simulation software in an efficient way which allows for multiple authors to easily collaborate. Furthermore, different geometry versions must be tracked throughout their use. We present a framework called General Geometry Description (GGD), written and developed by LBNE software collaborators for managing software to generate geometries. Though GGD is flexible enough to be used by any experiment working with detectors, we present it's first use in generating Geometry Description Markup Language (GDML) files to interface with LArSoft, a framework of detector simulations, event reconstruction, and data analyses written for all LAr technology users at Fermilab. Brett is the other of the framework discussed here, the General Geometry Description (GGD).

  14. Common Geometry Module

    2005-01-01

    The Common Geometry Module (CGM) is a code library which provides geometry functionality used for mesh generation and other applications. This functionality includes that commonly found in solid modeling engines, like geometry creation, query and modification; CGM also includes capabilities not commonly found in solid modeling engines, like geometry decomposition tools and support for shared material interfaces. CGM is built upon the ACIS solid modeling engine, but also includes geometry capability developed beside and onmore » top of ACIS. CGM can be used as-is to provide geometry functionality for codes needing this capability. However, CGM can also be extended using derived classes in C++, allowing the geometric model to serve as the basis for other applications, for example mesh generation. CGM is supported on Sun Solaris, SGI, HP, IBM, DEC, Linux and Windows NT platforms. CGM also indudes support for loading ACIS models on parallel computers, using MPI-based communication. Future plans for CGM are to port it to different solid modeling engines, including Pro/Engineer or SolidWorks. CGM is being released into the public domain under an LGPL license; the ACIS-based engine is available to ACIS licensees on request.« less

  15. The sound field in a finite cylindrical shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Junger, M. C.

    1985-01-01

    The sound field excited by vibrating boundaries in a finite cylindrical space, e.g., in a cylindrical shell, differs from the pressure distribution in an infinite cylindrical shell of comparable structural wavelength by the pressure diffracted by the end caps. The latter pressure component is comparable in magnitude to the pressure generated by the vibrating cylindrical boundary, but does not introduce additional resonances or antiresonances. Finally, a third pressure component associated with end cap vibrations is formulated.

  16. Density functional study of chemical reaction equilibrium for dimerization reactions in slit and cylindrical nanopores.

    PubMed

    Malijevský, Alexandr; Lísal, Martin

    2009-04-28

    We present a theoretical study of the effects of confinement on chemical reaction equilibrium in slit and cylindrical nanopores. We use a density functional theory (DFT) to investigate the effects of temperature, pore geometry, bulk pressure, transition layering, and capillary condensation on a dimerization reaction that mimics the nitric oxide dimerization reaction, 2NO <==> (NO)(2), in carbonlike slit and cylindrical nanopores in equilibrium with a vapor reservoir. In addition to the DFT calculations, we also utilize the reaction ensemble Monte Carlo method to supplement the DFT results for reaction conversion. This work is an extension of the previous DFT study by Tripathi and Chapman [J. Chem. Phys. 118, 7993 (2003)] on the dimerization reactions confined in the planar slits.

  17. Cylindrical ion-acoustic solitary waves in electronegative plasmas with superthermal electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Eslami, Parvin; Mottaghizadeh, Marzieh

    2012-06-15

    By using the standard reductive perturbation technique, a three-dimensional cylindrical Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation (CKPE), which governs the dynamics of ion acoustic solitary waves (IASWs), is derived for small but finite amplitude ion-acoustic waves in cylindrical geometry in a collisionless unmagnetized plasma with kappa distributed electrons, thermal positrons, and cold ions. The generalized expansion method is used to solve analytically the CKPE. The existence regions of localized pulses are investigated. It is found that the solution of the CKPE supports only compressive solitary waves. Furthermore, the effects of superthermal electrons, the ratio of the electron temperature to positron temperature, the ratio of the positron density to electron density and direction cosine of the wave propagation on the profiles of the amplitudes, and widths of the solitary structures are examined numerically. It is shown these parameters play a vital role in the formation of ion acoustic solitary waves.

  18. Cylindrical manifolds and tube dynamics in the restricted three-body problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Shane David

    Within the phase space of the planar circular restricted three-body problem, stable and unstable manifolds of periodic orbits with a S1 x R1 (cylindrical) geometry are shown to exist. The periodic orbits considered reside in bottleneck regions of the energy manifold, separating large zones associated with motion about one mass, the other mass, or both masses. The cylinders have the physical property that all motion through the bottleneck in which the periodic orbit resides must occur through the interior of these surfaces. The cylinders thus mediate the global transport of test particles between large zones of the energy surface which are separated by the bottlenecks. By elucidating the structuring role of the cylinders, we provide a new language for discussing some important problems in celestial mechanics. Furthermore, we propose that these cylindrical structures are the natural objects of study for the design of space mission trajectories which take advantage of three-body effects.

  19. Effects of Shell-Buckling Knockdown Factors in Large Cylindrical Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hrinda, Glenn A.

    2012-01-01

    Shell-buckling knockdown factors (SBKF) have been used in large cylindrical shell structures to account for uncertainty in buckling loads. As the diameter of the cylinder increases, achieving the manufacturing tolerances becomes increasingly more difficult. Knockdown factors account for manufacturing imperfections in the shell geometry by decreasing the allowable buckling load of the cylinder. In this paper, large-diameter (33 ft) cylinders are investigated by using various SBKF's. An investigation that is based on finite-element analysis (FEA) is used to develop design sensitivity relationships. Different manufacturing imperfections are modeled into a perfect cylinder to investigate the effects of these imperfections on buckling. The analysis results may be applicable to large- diameter rockets, cylindrical tower structures, bulk storage tanks, and silos.

  20. Molecular self-diffusion in nanoscale cylindrical pores and classical Fick's law predictions.

    PubMed

    Cui, S T

    2005-08-01

    Molecular-dynamics calculations are carried out to study the self-diffusion of water molecules confined in cylindrical pores. It is found that the classical Fick's law description provides a surprisingly accurate prediction for the general behaviors of self-diffusion even for pore size of a few molecular diameters. The diffusion coefficient in the axial direction is reduced relative to bulk fluids for pore size less than about ten molecular diameters. In the radial direction, the mean-square displacement accurately follows Fick's law prediction, but with an average diffusion coefficient slightly lower than the bulk value. The origin of the diffusion behaviors is traced to the molecular motion in the restricted geometry of the cylindrical pores.

  1. Van der waals-like isotherms in a confined electrolyte by spherical and cylindrical nanopores.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Pineda, Gabriel E; Jiménez-Angeles, Felipe; Yu, Jiang; Lozada-Cassou, Marcelo

    2007-03-01

    Electrolytes confined by spherical, cylindrical, and slit-like charged nanopores are studied. Results for ionic distribution profiles, pressures of the confined fluid, and absorption isotherms are obtained through the hypernetted chain/mean spherical approximation (HNC/MSA) integral equations theory. In spherical and cylindrical geometries, an inward, non-monotonic behavior of the pressure is found as confinement increases, implying a negative compressibility. The pressure vs volume isotherms resemble liquid-vapor van der Waals-like phase transition diagrams. This effect is correlated with a charge separation inside a spherical pore previously reported (Phys. Rev. Lett., 79, 3656, 1997). Here, the mechanism of charge separation and negative compressibility are explored in detail. When compared with the slit-like pore pressure, important qualitative differences are found.

  2. Impact of a shearless flow and cylindricity on interchange instability in magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Benilov, E.S.

    2005-05-15

    The stability of magnetically confined plasmas is sometimes examined using the so-called 'slab' model, where the toroidal geometry of the problem is approximated locally by the Cartesian one. In the present paper, a (more accurate) cylindrical approximation is considered and shown to yield results which are qualitatively different from those of the slab model. In particular, if the slab model is applied to the outboard region of the tokamak (where the gradient of the plasma's density and that of the magnetic field are of the same sign), disturbances remain unstable at all times. In the cylindrical model, on the other hand, the ExB flow carries disturbances around the cylinder and they alternate between the unstable and stable regions. Naturally, this reduces the growth rate of instability and makes it dependent on the angular velocity of the flow.

  3. Jet mixing and emission characteristics of transverse jets in annular and cylindrical confined crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bain, D. B.; Smith, C. E.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1995-01-01

    Three dimensional turbulent reacting CFD analyses were performed on transverse jets injected into annular and cylindrical (can) confined crossflows. The goal was to identify and assess mixing differences between annular and can geometries. The approach taken was to optimize both annular and can configurations by systematically varying orifice spacing until lowest emissions were achieved, and then compare the results. Numerical test conditions consisted of a jet-to-mainstream mass-flow ratio of 3.2 and a jet-to-mainstream momentum-flux ratio (J) of 30. The computational results showed that the optimized geometries had similar emission levels at the exit of the mixing section although the annular configuration did mix-out faster. For lowest emissions, the density correlation parameter (C = (S/H) square root of J) was 2.35 for the annular geometry and 3.5 for the can geometry. For the annular geometry, the constant was about twice the value seen for jet mixing at low mass-flow ratios (i.e., MR less than 0.5). For the can geometry, the constant was about 1 1/2 times the value seen for low mass-flow ratios.

  4. Ablation Front Rayleigh-Taylor Growth Experiments in Spherically Convergent Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Glendinning, S.G.; Cherfils, C.; Colvin, J.; Divol, L.; Galmiche, D.; Haan, S.; Marinak, M.M.; Remington, B.A.; Richard, A.L.; Wallace, R.

    1999-11-03

    Experiments were performed on the Nova laser, using indirectly driven capsules mounted in cylindrical gold hohlraums, to measure the Rayleigh-Taylor growth at the ablation front by time-resolved radiography. Modulations were preformed on the surface of Ge-doped plastic capsules. With initial modulations of 4 {micro}m, growth factors of about 6 in optical depth were seen, in agreement with simulations using the radiation hydrocode FCI2. With initial modulations of 1 {micro}m, growth factors of about 100-150 in optical depth were seen. The Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability at the ablation front in an inertial confinement fusion capsule has been the subject of considerable investigation. Much of this research has been concentrated on planar experiments, in which RT growth is inferred from radiography. The evolution is somewhat different in a converging geometry; the spatial wavelength decreases (affecting the onset of nonlinear saturation), and the shell thickens and compresses rather than decompressing as in a planar geometry. In a cylindrically convergent geometry, the latter effect is proportional to the radius, while in spherically convergent geometry, the latter effect is proportional to the radius squared. Experiments were performed on the Nova and Omega lasers in cylindrical geometry (using both direct and indirect drive) and have been performed in spherical geometry using direct drive.

  5. The effect of electric field geometry on the performance of electromembrane extraction systems: footprints of a third driving force along with migration and diffusion.

    PubMed

    Moazami, Hamid Reza; Hosseiny Davarani, Saied Saeed; Mohammadi, Jamil; Nojavan, Saeed; Abrari, Masoud

    2015-09-01

    The distribution of electric field vectors was first calculated for electromembrane extraction (EME) systems in classical and cylindrical electrode geometries. The results showed that supported liquid membrane (SLM) has a general field amplifying effect due to its lower dielectric constant in comparison with aqueous donor/acceptor solutions. The calculated norms of the electric field vector showed that a DC voltage of 50 V can create huge electric field strengths up to 64 kV m(-1) and 111 kV m(-1) in classical and cylindrical geometries respectively. In both cases, the electric field strength reached its peak value on the inner wall of the SLM. In the case of classical geometry, the field strength was a function of the polar position of the SLM whereas the field strength in cylindrical geometry was angularly uniform. In order to investigate the effect of the electrode geometry on the performance of real EME systems, the analysis was carried out in three different geometries including classical, helical and cylindrical arrangements using naproxen and sodium diclofenac as the model analytes. Despite higher field strength and extended cross sectional area, the helical and cylindrical geometries gave lower recoveries with respect to the classical EME. The observed decline of the signal was proved to be against the relations governing migration and diffusion processes, which means that a third driving force is involved in EME. The third driving force is the interaction between the radially inhomogeneous electric field and the analyte in its neutral form.

  6. Observation of a free-Shercliff-layer instability in cylindrical geometry.

    PubMed

    Roach, Austin H; Spence, Erik J; Gissinger, Christophe; Edlund, Eric M; Sloboda, Peter; Goodman, Jeremy; Ji, Hantao

    2012-04-13

    We report on observations of a free-Shercliff-layer instability in a Taylor-Couette experiment using a liquid metal over a wide range of Reynolds numbers, Re∼10(3)-10(6). The free Shercliff layer is formed by imposing a sufficiently strong axial magnetic field across a pair of differentially rotating axial end cap rings. This layer is destabilized by a hydrodynamic Kelvin-Helmholtz-type instability, characterized by velocity fluctuations in the r-θ plane. The instability appears with an Elsasser number above unity, and saturates with an azimuthal mode number m which increases with the Elsasser number. Measurements of the structure agree well with 2D global linear mode analyses and 3D global nonlinear simulations. These observations have implications for a range of rotating MHD systems in which similar shear layers may be produced.

  7. Recurrence relations for orthogonal polynomials for PDEs in polar and cylindrical geometries.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Megan; Lambers, James V

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces two families of orthogonal polynomials on the interval (-1,1), with weight function [Formula: see text]. The first family satisfies the boundary condition [Formula: see text], and the second one satisfies the boundary conditions [Formula: see text]. These boundary conditions arise naturally from PDEs defined on a disk with Dirichlet boundary conditions and the requirement of regularity in Cartesian coordinates. The families of orthogonal polynomials are obtained by orthogonalizing short linear combinations of Legendre polynomials that satisfy the same boundary conditions. Then, the three-term recurrence relations are derived. Finally, it is shown that from these recurrence relations, one can efficiently compute the corresponding recurrences for generalized Jacobi polynomials that satisfy the same boundary conditions. PMID:27652140

  8. Surface superconductivity in thin cylindrical Bi nanowire.

    PubMed

    Tian, Mingliang; Wang, Jian; Ning, Wei; Mallouk, Thomas E; Chan, Moses H W

    2015-03-11

    The physical origin and the nature of superconductivity in nanostructured Bi remains puzzling. Here, we report transport measurements of individual cylindrical single-crystal Bi nanowires, 20 and 32 nm in diameter. In contrast to nonsuperconducting Bi nanoribbons with two flat surfaces, cylindrical Bi nanowires show superconductivity below 1.3 K. However, their superconducting critical magnetic fields decrease with their diameter, which is the opposite of the expected behavior for thin superconducting wires. Quasiperiodic oscillations of magnetoresistance were observed in perpendicular fields but were not seen in the parallel orientation. These results can be understood by a model of surface superconductivity with an enhanced surface-to-bulk volume in small diameter wires, where the superconductivity originates from the strained surface states of the nanowires due to the surface curvature-induced stress.

  9. Buckling optimisation of sandwich cylindrical panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abouhamzeh, M.; Sadighi, M.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the buckling load optimisation is performed on sandwich cylindrical panels. A finite element program is developed in MATLAB to solve the governing differential equations of the global buckling of the structure. In order to find the optimal solution, the genetic algorithm Toolbox in MATLAB is implemented. Verifications are made for both the buckling finite element code and also the results from the genetic algorithm by comparisons to the results available in literature. Sandwich cylindrical panels are optimised for the buckling strength with isotropic or orthotropic cores with different boundary conditions. Results are presented in terms of stacking sequence of fibers in the face sheets and core to face sheet thickness ratio.

  10. Gravitational radiation from a cylindrical naked singularity

    SciTech Connect

    Nakao, Ken-ichi; Morisawa, Yoshiyuki

    2005-06-15

    We construct an approximate solution which describes the gravitational emission from a naked singularity formed by the gravitational collapse of a cylindrical thick shell composed of dust. The assumed situation is that the collapsing speed of the dust is very large. In this situation, the metric variables are obtained approximately by a kind of linear perturbation analysis in the background Morgan solution which describes the motion of cylindrical null dust. The most important problem in this study is what boundary conditions for metric and matter variables should be imposed at the naked singularity. We find a boundary condition that all the metric and matter variables are everywhere finite at least up to the first order approximation. This implies that the spacetime singularity formed by this high-speed dust collapse is very similar to that formed by the null dust and the final singularity will be a conical one. Weyl curvature is completely released from the collapsed dust.

  11. Cylindrically converging blast waves in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, H.; Nakamura, Y.

    1981-07-01

    Cylindrically converging shock waves are produced by utilizing the detonation of cylindrical explosive shells. The production and the propagation of shock waves are observed by framing and streak camera photographs, and the trajectory of shock propagations is determined by using an electrical ionization probing system. The effect of the quantity of explosives on the stability, or the axial symmetry, of shock fronts and on the strength of shocks produced is investigated. It has been shown that, for practical purposes, the approximation of shock trajectories by Guderley's formulas would be sufficiently acceptable in an unexpectedly wide region near the implosion center, and that the axial symmetry of the shock front is improved by increasing the quantity of explosives, and thus, strong shocks are produced by merely increasing the quantity of explosives. The reflected diverging shock seems to be very stable. Piezoelectric elements have also been used to detect reflected diverging waves.

  12. Design of magnets inside cylindrical superconducting shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigby, K. W.

    1988-01-01

    The design of magnets inside closed, cylindrical, superconducting shields is discussed. The Green function is given for the magnetic vector potential for cylindrically symmetric currents inside such a shield. The magnetic field everywhere inside the shield can be obtained from this function, which includes the effects of the induced shield currents exactly. The field is given for a thin solenoid as an example and the convergence of the series solution for this case is discussed. The shield can significantly reduce the strength and improve the homogeneity of a magnet. The improvement in homogeneity is of particular importance in the design of correction coils. These effects, and the maximum field on the shield, are examined for a typical solenoid. The results given are also useful, although not exact, for long shields with one or two open ends.

  13. Surface superconductivity in thin cylindrical Bi nanowire.

    PubMed

    Tian, Mingliang; Wang, Jian; Ning, Wei; Mallouk, Thomas E; Chan, Moses H W

    2015-03-11

    The physical origin and the nature of superconductivity in nanostructured Bi remains puzzling. Here, we report transport measurements of individual cylindrical single-crystal Bi nanowires, 20 and 32 nm in diameter. In contrast to nonsuperconducting Bi nanoribbons with two flat surfaces, cylindrical Bi nanowires show superconductivity below 1.3 K. However, their superconducting critical magnetic fields decrease with their diameter, which is the opposite of the expected behavior for thin superconducting wires. Quasiperiodic oscillations of magnetoresistance were observed in perpendicular fields but were not seen in the parallel orientation. These results can be understood by a model of surface superconductivity with an enhanced surface-to-bulk volume in small diameter wires, where the superconductivity originates from the strained surface states of the nanowires due to the surface curvature-induced stress. PMID:25658139

  14. Multiple Bifurcations of a Cylindrical Dynamical System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Ning; Cao, Qingjie

    2016-03-01

    This paper focuses on multiple bifurcations of a cylindrical dynamical system, which is evolved from a rotating pendulum with SD oscillator. The rotating pendulum system exhibits the coupling dynamics property of the bistable state and conventional pendulum with the ho- moclinic orbits of the first and second type. A double Andronov-Hopf bifurcation, two saddle-node bifurcations of periodic orbits and a pair of homoclinic bifurcations are detected by using analytical analysis and nu- merical calculation. It is found that the homoclinic orbits of the second type can bifurcate into a pair of rotational limit cycles, coexisting with the oscillating limit cycle. Additionally, the results obtained herein, are helpful to explore different types of limit cycles and the complex dynamic bifurcation of cylindrical dynamical system.

  15. Nanolaminate Membranes as Cylindrical Telescope Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dooley, Jennifer; Dragovan, Mark; Hickey, Gregory; Lih, Shyh-Shiu Lih

    2010-01-01

    A document discusses a proposal to use axially stretched metal nanolaminate membranes as lightweight parabolic cylindrical reflectors in the Dual Anamorphic Reflector Telescope (DART) - a planned spaceborne telescope in which the cylindrical reflectors would be arranged to obtain a point focus. The discussion brings together a combination of concepts reported separately in several prior NASA Tech Briefs articles, the most relevant being "Nanolaminate Mirrors With Integral Figure-Control Actuators" NPO -30221, Vol. 26, No. 5 (May 2002), page 90; and "Reflectors Made From Membranes Stretched Between Beams" NPO -30571, Vol. 33, No. 10 (October 2009), page 11a. The engineering issues receiving the greatest emphasis in the instant document are (1) the change in curvature associated with the Poisson contraction of a stretched nanolaminate reflector membrane and (2) the feasibility of using patches of poly(vinylidene fluoride) on the rear membrane surface as piezoelectric actuators to correct the surface figure for the effect of Poisson contraction and other shape errors.

  16. Omnidirectional, circularly polarized, cylindrical microstrip antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanton, Philip H. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A microstrip cylindrical antenna comprised of two concentric subelements on a ground cylinder, a vertically polarized (E-field parallel to the axis of the antenna cylinder) subelement on the inside and a horizontally polarized (E-field perpendicular to the axis) subelement on the outside. The vertical subelement is a wraparound microstrip radiator. A Y-shaped microstrip patch configuration is used for the horizontally polarized radiator that is wrapped 1.5 times to provide radiating edges on opposite sides of the cylindrical antenna for improved azimuthal pattern uniformity. When these subelements are so fed that their far fields are equal in amplitude and phased 90.degree. from each other, a circularly polarized EM wave results. By stacking a plurality of like antenna elements on the ground cylinder, a linear phased array antenna is provided that can be beam steered to the desired elevation angle.

  17. Jamming of Cylindrical Grains in Vertical Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, G. William; Spier, Gregory; Barr, Nicholas; Steel, Fiona

    2012-02-01

    We study jamming of low aspect-ratio cylindrical Delrin grains in a vertical channel. These cylindrical grains resemble antacid tablets, poker chips, or coins since their height is less than their diameter. Grains are allowed to fall through a vertical channel with a square cross section where the channel width is greater than the diameter of a grain and constant throughout the length of the channel with no obstructions or constrictions. Within this channel, grains are sometimes observed to form jams, stable structures supported by the channel walls with no support beneath them. The probability of jam occurrence and the strength or robustness of a jam is effected by the grain dimensions and channel size. We will present experimental measurements of the jamming probability and jam strength in this system and discuss the relationship of these results to other experiments and theories.

  18. Machining Thin-Walled Cylindrical Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cimbak, Joe; Spagnolo, Jim; Kraus, Dan

    1988-01-01

    Cylindrical walls only few thousandths of inch thick machined accurately and without tears or punctures with aid of beryllium copper mandrel. Chilled so it contracts, then inserted in cylinder. As comes to room temperature, mandrel expands and fits snugly inside cylinder. Will not allow part to slide and provides solid backup to prevent deflection when part machined by grinding wheel. When machining finished, cylinder-and-mandrel assembly inserted in dry ice, mandrel contracts and removed from part.

  19. Shock initiated instabilities in underwater cylindrical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Sachin; Matos, Helio; LeBlanc, James M.; Shukla, Arun

    2016-10-01

    An experimental investigation to understand the mechanisms of dynamic buckling instability in cylindrical structures due to underwater explosive loadings is conducted. In particular, the effects of initial hydrostatic pressure coupled with a dynamic pressure pulse on the stability of metallic cylindrical shells are evaluated. The experiments are conducted at varying initial hydrostatic pressures, below the critical buckling pressure, to estimate the threshold after which dynamic buckling will initiate. The transient underwater full-field deformations of the structures during shock wave loading are captured using high-speed stereo photography coupled with modified 3-D Digital Image Correlation (DIC) technique. Experimental results show that increasing initial hydrostatic pressure decreases the natural vibration frequency of the structure indicating loss in structural stiffness. DIC measurements reveal that the initial structural excitations primarily consist of axisymmetric vibrations due to symmetrical shock wave loading in the experiments. Following their decay after a few longitudinal reverberations, the primary mode of vibration evolves which continues throughout later in time. At the initial hydrostatic pressures below the threshold value, these vibrations are stable in nature. The analytical solutions for the vibration frequency and the transient response of cylindrical shell are discussed in the article by accounting for both (1) the added mass effect of the surrounding water and (2) the effect of initial stress on the shell imposed by the hydrostatic pressure. The analytical solutions match reasonably well with the experimental vibration frequencies. Later, the transient response of a cylindrical shell subjected to a general underwater pressure wave loading is derived which leads to the analytical prediction of dynamic stability.

  20. Electronic quantum confinement in cylindrical potential well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltenkov, Arkadiy S.; Msezane, Alfred Z.

    2016-04-01

    The effects of quantum confinement on the momentum distribution of electrons confined within a cylindrical potential well have been analyzed. The motivation is to understand specific features of the momentum distribution of electrons when the electron behavior is completely controlled by the parameters of a non-isotropic potential cavity. It is shown that studying the solutions of the wave equation for an electron confined in a cylindrical potential well offers the possibility to analyze the confinement behavior of an electron executing one- or two-dimensional motion in the three-dimensional space within the framework of the same mathematical model. Some low-lying electronic states with different symmetries have been considered and the corresponding wave functions have been calculated; the behavior of their nodes and their peak positions with respect to the parameters of the cylindrical well has been analyzed. Additionally, the momentum distributions of electrons in these states have been calculated. The limiting cases of the ratio of the cylinder length H and its radius R0 have been considered; when the cylinder length H significantly exceeds its radius R0 and when the cylinder radius is much greater than its length. The cylindrical quantum confinement effects on the momentum distribution of electrons in these potential wells have been analyzed. The possible application of the results obtained here for the description of the general features in the behavior of electrons in nanowires with metallic type of conductivity (or nanotubes) and ultrathin epitaxial films (or graphene sheets) are discussed. Possible experiments are suggested where the quantum confinement can be manifested. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Atomic Cluster Collisions (7th International Symposium)", edited by Gerardo Delgado Barrio, Andrey Solov'Yov, Pablo Villarreal, Rita Prosmiti.

  1. Aberrations of sphero-cylindrical ophthalmic lenses.

    PubMed

    Malacara, Z; Malacara, D

    1990-04-01

    The authors have presented in two previous articles the graphic solutions resembling Tscherning ellipses, for spherical as well as for aspherical ophthalmic lenses free of astigmatism or power error. These solutions were exact, inasmuch as they were based on exact ray tracing, and not third-order theory as frequently done. In this paper sphero-cylindrical lenses are now analyzed, also using exact ray tracing. The functional dependence of the astigmatism and the power error for these lenses is described extensively.

  2. Geometry and Cloaking Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochiai, T.; Nacher, J. C.

    2011-09-01

    Recently, the application of geometry and conformal mappings to artificial materials (metamaterials) has attracted the attention in various research communities. These materials, characterized by a unique man-made structure, have unusual optical properties, which materials found in nature do not exhibit. By applying the geometry and conformal mappings theory to metamaterial science, it may be possible to realize so-called "Harry Potter cloaking device". Although such a device is still in the science fiction realm, several works have shown that by using such metamaterials it may be possible to control the direction of the electromagnetic field at will. We could then make an object hidden inside of a cloaking device. Here, we will explain how to design invisibility device using differential geometry and conformal mappings.

  3. Origins of cellular geometry

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Cells are highly complex and orderly machines, with defined shapes and a startling variety of internal organizations. Complex geometry is a feature of both free-living unicellular organisms and cells inside multicellular animals. Where does the geometry of a cell come from? Many of the same questions that arise in developmental biology can also be asked of cells, but in most cases we do not know the answers. How much of cellular organization is dictated by global cell polarity cues as opposed to local interactions between cellular components? Does cellular structure persist across cell generations? What is the relationship between cell geometry and tissue organization? What ensures that intracellular structures are scaled to the overall size of the cell? Cell biology is only now beginning to come to grips with these questions. PMID:21880160

  4. Students Discovering Spherical Geometry Using Dynamic Geometry Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guven, Bulent; Karatas, Ilhan

    2009-01-01

    Dynamic geometry software (DGS) such as Cabri and Geometers' Sketchpad has been regularly used worldwide for teaching and learning Euclidean geometry for a long time. The DGS with its inductive nature allows students to learn Euclidean geometry via explorations. However, with respect to non-Euclidean geometries, do we need to introduce them to…

  5. Computational synthetic geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Sturmfels, B. )

    1988-01-01

    This book deals with methods for realizing abstract geometric objects in concrete vector spaces. It considers a large class of problems from convexity and discrete geometry including constructing convex polytopes from simplicial complexes, vector geometries from incidence structures and hyperplane arrangements from oriented matroids. It appears that algorithms for these constructions exist if and only if arbitrary polynomial equations are decidable with respect to the underlying field. Besides such complexity theorems, a variety of symbolic algorithms are discussed, and the methods are applied to obtain mathematical results on convex polytopes, projective configurations and the combinatories of Grassmann varieties.

  6. Acoustic resonance in MEMS scale cylindrical tubes with side branches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schill, John F.; Holthoff, Ellen L.; Pellegrino, Paul M.; Marcus, Logan S.

    2014-05-01

    Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is a useful monitoring technique that is well suited for trace gas detection. This method routinely exhibits detection limits at the parts-per-million (ppm) or parts-per-billion (ppb) level for gaseous samples. PAS also possesses favorable detection characteristics when the system dimensions are scaled to a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) design. One of the central issues related to sensor miniaturization is optimization of the photoacoustic cell geometry, especially in relationship to high acoustical amplification and reduced system noise. Previous work relied on a multiphysics approach to analyze the resonance structures of the MEMS scale photo acoustic cell. This technique was unable to provide an accurate model of the acoustic structure. In this paper we describe a method that relies on techniques developed from musical instrument theory and electronic transmission line matrix methods to describe cylindrical acoustic resonant cells with side branches of various configurations. Experimental results are presented that demonstrate the ease and accuracy of this method. All experimental results were within 2% of those predicted by this theory.

  7. Optoacoustic sensing for target detection inside cylindrical catheters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakoli, Behnoosh; Guo, Xiaoyu; Taylor, Russell H.; Kang, Jin U.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2014-03-01

    Optoacoustic sensing is a hybrid technique that combines the advantages of high sensing depth of ultrasound with contrast of optical absorption. In this study a miniature optoacoustic probe that can characterize the target properties located at the distal end of a catheter is investigated. The probe includes an optical fiber to illuminate the target with the pulsed laser light and a hydrophone to detect the generated optoacoustic signal. The probe is designed for the forwardsensing and therefore the acoustic signal propagates along the tube before being detected. Due to the circular geometry, the waves inside the tube are highly complex. A three dimensional numerical simulation is performed to model the optoacoustic wave generation and propagation inside the water filled cylindrical tubes. The effect of the boundary condition, tube diameter and target size on the detected signal is systematically evaluated. A prototype of the probe is made and tested for detecting an absorbing target inside a 2mm diameter tube submerged in water. The preliminary experimental results corresponding to the simulation is acquired. Although many different medical applications for this miniature probe may exist, our main focus is on detecting the occlusion inside the ventricular shunts. These catheters are used to divert the excess cerebrospinal fluid to the absorption site and regulate inter cranial pressure of hydrocephalous patients. Unfortunately the malfunction rate of these catheters due to blockage is very high. This sensing tool could locate the occluding tissue non-invasively and can potentially characterize the occlusion composites by scanning at different wavelengths of the light.

  8. Effect of plasma motion on tearing modes in cylindrical plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, J. Q.; Peng, X. D.

    2015-10-01

    The effect of equilibrium plasma motion on the resistive m/n = 2/1 tearing mode (TM) in low β plasmas is investigated in cylindrical geometry (with m and n being poloidal and toroidal mode numbers). Without equilibrium plasma motion but with viscosity, the TM stability is mainly determined by the Reynolds number S and reaches maximum near S = 104, which is consistent with previous findings. The poloidal plasma rotation has stabilizing effect on TM; however, the rotation shear has destabilization effect in the low viscosity regime. The axial plasma motion has strong stabilizing effect on TM in the low viscosity regime for Prandtl number Pr < 1, while its shear has slight stabilizing effect with the decrease of growth rate less than 15%. When the axial velocity becomes large enough, the mode frequency tends to be independent of the Prandtl number. In the presence of parallel plasma motion, the growth rate is determined by the axial component at low parallel velocity, while determined by poloidal component at large parallel velocity. The parallel plasma motion drives the TM rotating in the opposite direction. It is shown that the equilibrium motion reduces the growth rate of TM by changing the phase difference and coupling coefficient between potential perturbation and magnetic flux perturbation (deviating from π/2 ), which results in a lower mode frequency. Compared to the role of velocity shear, the magnitude of plasma velocity itself at the m/n = 2/1 rational surface is dominant in determining the TM characteristics.

  9. Contact condition for the density profiles in spherical and cylindrical double layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvestre-Alcantara, Whasington; Henderson, Douglas; Bari Bhuiyan, Lutful

    2015-11-01

    Exact sum rules involving the contact values of the density profiles and bulk osmotic pressure in spherical and cylindrical electric double layers are formulated. When the radius of curvature in these systems tends to infinity, the contact conditions reduce to the well-known contact condition in planar double layer due to Henderson, Blum, and Lebowitz (1979). However, unlike the latter relation, the contact conditions in the non-planar geometries are non-local, and require for their implementation full knowledge of the electrode-ion singlet distribution functions.

  10. Incident beam polarization for laser Doppler velocimetry employing a sapphire cylindrical window

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lock, J. A.; Schock, H. J.

    1985-01-01

    For laser Doppler velocimetry studies employing sapphire windows as optical access ports, the birefringency of sapphire produces an extra beam intersection volume which serves to effectively smear the acquired velocity flow field data. It is shown that for a cylindrical window geometry, the extra beam intersection volume may be eliminated with minimal decrease in the fringe visibility of the remaining intersection volume by suitably orienting the polarizations of the initial laser beams. For horizontally incident beams, these polarizations were measured at three intersection locations within the cylinder. It was found that the measured polarization angles agreed with the theoretical predictions.

  11. Forced-convection peak heat flux on cylindrical heaters in water and refrigerant 113

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, T. H.; Andracchio, C. R.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation was conducted of the peak heat flux on cylindrical heaters in a fluid flowing perpendicular to the major axis of the heater. The test fluids were water and Refrigerant 113. Heaters of 0.049 to 0.181 cm diameter were tested over a fluid velocity range of 10.1 to 81.1 cm/sec. The experimental results were observed to fall within two regions based on the vapor removal geometry: jets or sheets. Mathematical models for each region successfully correlated the data for both fluids.

  12. Advanced geometries and regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, S. S.; Bulanov, S. V.; Turchetti, G.; Limpouch, J.; Klimo, O.; Psikal, J.; Margarone, D.; Korn, G.

    2013-07-26

    We review and discuss different schemes of laser ion acceleration as well as advanced target geometries in connection with the development of the laser-driven proton source for hadron therapy of oncological diseases, which is a part of the ELIMED project.

  13. Spacetime and Euclidean geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brill, Dieter; Jacobson, Ted

    2006-04-01

    Using only the principle of relativity and Euclidean geometry we show in this pedagogical article that the square of proper time or length in a two-dimensional spacetime diagram is proportional to the Euclidean area of the corresponding causal domain. We use this relation to derive the Minkowski line element by two geometric proofs of the spacetime Pythagoras theorem.

  14. Listening to Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Brett D.; Barger, Rita

    2009-01-01

    The many connections between music and mathematics are well known. The length of a plucked string determines its tone, the time signature of a piece of music is a ratio, and note durations are measured in fractions. One connection commonly overlooked is that between music and geometry--specifically, geometric transformations, including…

  15. Making Solid Geometry Solid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartz, Viggo

    1981-01-01

    Allowing students to use a polystyrene cutter to fashion their own three-dimensional models is suggested as a means of allowing individuals to experience problems and develop ideas related to solid geometry. A list of ideas that can lead to mathematical discovery is provided. (MP)

  16. Teaching Geometry with Tangrams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Dorothy S.; Bologna, Elaine M.

    1982-01-01

    Geometry is viewed as the most neglected area of the elementary school mathematics curriculum. Tangram activities provide numerous worthwhile mathematical experiences for children. A method of constructing tangrams through paper folding is followed by suggested spatial visualization, measurement, and additional activities. (MP)

  17. Sliding vane geometry turbines

    DOEpatents

    Sun, Harold Huimin; Zhang, Jizhong; Hu, Liangjun; Hanna, Dave R

    2014-12-30

    Various systems and methods are described for a variable geometry turbine. In one example, a turbine nozzle comprises a central axis and a nozzle vane. The nozzle vane includes a stationary vane and a sliding vane. The sliding vane is positioned to slide in a direction substantially tangent to an inner circumference of the turbine nozzle and in contact with the stationary vane.

  18. Gravity is Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacKeown, P. K.

    1984-01-01

    Clarifies two concepts of gravity--those of a fictitious force and those of how space and time may have geometry. Reviews the position of Newton's theory of gravity in the context of special relativity and considers why gravity (as distinct from electromagnetics) lends itself to Einstein's revolutionary interpretation. (JN)

  19. The Helen of Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, John

    2010-01-01

    The cycloid has been called the Helen of Geometry, not only because of its beautiful properties but also because of the quarrels it provoked between famous mathematicians of the 17th century. This article surveys the history of the cycloid and its importance in the development of the calculus.

  20. Geometry and physics

    PubMed Central

    Atiyah, Michael; Dijkgraaf, Robbert; Hitchin, Nigel

    2010-01-01

    We review the remarkably fruitful interactions between mathematics and quantum physics in the past decades, pointing out some general trends and highlighting several examples, such as the counting of curves in algebraic geometry, invariants of knots and four-dimensional topology. PMID:20123740

  1. The Geometry of Viruses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Christine L.

    1991-01-01

    Presented is an activity in which students make models of viruses, which allows them to visualize the shape of these microorganisms. Included are some background on viruses, the biology and geometry of viruses, directions for building viruses, a comparison of cells and viruses, and questions for students. (KR)

  2. GEOMETRY, TENTATIVE GUIDES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KLIER, KATHERINE M.

    PRESENTED IS A FUSED COURSE IN PLANE, SOLID, AND COORDINATE GEOMETRY. ELEMENTARY SET THEORY, LOGIC, AND THE PRINCIPLE OF SEPARATION PROVIDE UNIFYING THREADS THROUGHOUT THE TEXT. THE TWO CURRICULUM GUIDES HAVE BEEN PREPARED FOR USE WITH TWO DIFFERENT TEXTS. EITHER CURRICULUM GUIDE MAY BE USED DEPENDING UPON THE CHOICE OF THE TEACHER AND THE NEEDS…

  3. Geometry of PDE's. IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prástaro, Agostino

    2008-02-01

    Following our previous results on this subject [R.P. Agarwal, A. Prástaro, Geometry of PDE's. III(I): Webs on PDE's and integral bordism groups. The general theory, Adv. Math. Sci. Appl. 17 (2007) 239-266; R.P. Agarwal, A. Prástaro, Geometry of PDE's. III(II): Webs on PDE's and integral bordism groups. Applications to Riemannian geometry PDE's, Adv. Math. Sci. Appl. 17 (2007) 267-285; A. Prástaro, Geometry of PDE's and Mechanics, World Scientific, Singapore, 1996; A. Prástaro, Quantum and integral (co)bordism in partial differential equations, Acta Appl. Math. (5) (3) (1998) 243-302; A. Prástaro, (Co)bordism groups in PDE's, Acta Appl. Math. 59 (2) (1999) 111-201; A. Prástaro, Quantized Partial Differential Equations, World Scientific Publishing Co, Singapore, 2004, 500 pp.; A. Prástaro, Geometry of PDE's. I: Integral bordism groups in PDE's, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 319 (2006) 547-566; A. Prástaro, Geometry of PDE's. II: Variational PDE's and integral bordism groups, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 321 (2006) 930-948; A. Prástaro, Th.M. Rassias, Ulam stability in geometry of PDE's, Nonlinear Funct. Anal. Appl. 8 (2) (2003) 259-278; I. Stakgold, Boundary Value Problems of Mathematical Physics, I, The MacMillan Company, New York, 1967; I. Stakgold, Boundary Value Problems of Mathematical Physics, II, Collier-MacMillan, Canada, Ltd, Toronto, Ontario, 1968], integral bordism groups of the Navier-Stokes equation are calculated for smooth, singular and weak solutions, respectively. Then a characterization of global solutions is made on this ground. Enough conditions to assure existence of global smooth solutions are given and related to nullity of integral characteristic numbers of the boundaries. Stability of global solutions are related to some characteristic numbers of the space-like Cauchy dataE Global solutions of variational problems constrained by (NS) are classified by means of suitable integral bordism groups too.

  4. Multigroup Complex Geometry Neutron Diffusion Code System.

    2002-12-18

    Version 01 SNAP-3D is based on SNAP2 and is a one- two- or three-dimensional multigroup diffusion code system. It is primarily intended for neutron diffusion calculations, but it can also carry out gamma-ray calculations if the diffusion approximation is accurate enough. It is suitable for fast and thermal reactor core calculations and for shield calculations. SNAP-3D can solve the multi-group neutron diffusion equations using finite difference methods in (x,y,z), (r,theta,z), (TRI,z), (HEX,z) or (spherical) coordinates.more » The one-dimensional slab and cylindrical geometries and the two-dimensional (x,y), (r,z), (r,theta), (HEX) and (TRI) are all treated as simple special cases of three-dimensional geometries. Numerous reflective and periodic symmetry options are available and may be used to reduce the number of mesh points necessary to represent the system. Extrapolation lengths can be specified at internal and external boundaries. The problem classes are: 1) eigenvalue search for critical k-effective, 2) eigenvalue search for critical buckling, 3) eigenvalue search for critical time-constant, 4) fixed source problems in which the sources are functions of regions, 5) fixed source problems in which the sources are provided, on disc, for every mesh point and group.« less

  5. Multigroup Complex Geometry Neutron Diffusion Code System.

    SciTech Connect

    MCCALLIEN, C. W.J.

    2002-12-18

    Version 01 SNAP-3D is based on SNAP2 and is a one- two- or three-dimensional multigroup diffusion code system. It is primarily intended for neutron diffusion calculations, but it can also carry out gamma-ray calculations if the diffusion approximation is accurate enough. It is suitable for fast and thermal reactor core calculations and for shield calculations. SNAP-3D can solve the multi-group neutron diffusion equations using finite difference methods in (x,y,z), (r,theta,z), (TRI,z), (HEX,z) or (spherical) coordinates. The one-dimensional slab and cylindrical geometries and the two-dimensional (x,y), (r,z), (r,theta), (HEX) and (TRI) are all treated as simple special cases of three-dimensional geometries. Numerous reflective and periodic symmetry options are available and may be used to reduce the number of mesh points necessary to represent the system. Extrapolation lengths can be specified at internal and external boundaries. The problem classes are: 1) eigenvalue search for critical k-effective, 2) eigenvalue search for critical buckling, 3) eigenvalue search for critical time-constant, 4) fixed source problems in which the sources are functions of regions, 5) fixed source problems in which the sources are provided, on disc, for every mesh point and group.

  6. Swimming Vorticella convallaria in various confined geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotelo, Luz; Lee, Donghee; Jung, Sunghwan; Ryu, Sangjin

    2014-11-01

    Vorticella convallaria is a stalked ciliate observed in the sessile form (trophont) or swimming form (telotroch). Trophonts are mainly composed of an inverted bell-shaped cell body generating vortical feeding currents, and a slender stalk attaching the cell body to a substrate. If the surrounding environment is no longer suitable, the trophont transforms into a telotroch by elongating its cell body into a cylindrical shape, resorbing its oral cilia and producing an aboral cilia wreath. After a series of contractions, the telotroch will completely detach from the stalk and swim away to find a better location. While sessile Vorticella has been widely studied because of its stalk contraction and usefulness in waste treatment, Vorticella's swimming has not yet been characterized. The purpose of this study is to describe V. convallaria's swimming modes, both in its trophont and telotroch forms, in different confined geometries. Using video microscopy, we observed Vorticellae swimming in semi-infinite field, in Hele-Shaw configurations, and in capillary tubes. Based on measured swimming displacement and velocity, we investigated how V. convallaria's mobility was affected by the geometry constrictions. We acknolwedge support from the First Award grant of Nebraska EPSCoR.

  7. Cylindrical nonlinear Schroedinger equation versus cylindrical Korteweg-de Vries equation

    SciTech Connect

    Fedele, Renato; De Nicola, Sergio; Grecu, Dan; Visinescu, Anca; Shukla, Padma K.

    2008-10-15

    A correspondence between the family of cylindrical nonlinear Schroedinger (cNLS) equations and the one of cylindrical Korteweg-de Vries (cKdV) equations is constructed. It associates non stationary solutions of the first family with the ones of the second family. This is done by using a correspondence, recently found, between the families of generalized NLS equation and generalized KdV equation, and their solutions in the form of travelling waves, respectively. In particular, non-stationary soliton-like solutions of the cNLS equation can be associated with non-stationary soliton-like solutions of cKdV equation.

  8. An introduction to Minkowski geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farnsworth, David L.

    2016-07-01

    The fundamental ideas of Minkowski geometries are presented. Learning about Minkowski geometries can sharpen our students' understanding of concepts such as distance measurement. Many of its ideas are important and accessible to undergraduate students. Following a brief overview, distance and orthogonality in Minkowski geometries are thoroughly discussed and many illustrative examples and applications are supplied. Suggestions for further study of these geometries are given. Indeed, Minkowski geometries are an excellent source of topics for undergraduate research and independent study.

  9. Motion parallax in immersive cylindrical display systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filliard, N.; Reymond, G.; Kemeny, A.; Berthoz, A.

    2012-03-01

    Motion parallax is a crucial visual cue produced by translations of the observer for the perception of depth and selfmotion. Therefore, tracking the observer viewpoint has become inevitable in immersive virtual (VR) reality systems (cylindrical screens, CAVE, head mounted displays) used e.g. in automotive industry (style reviews, architecture design, ergonomics studies) or in scientific studies of visual perception. The perception of a stable and rigid world requires that this visual cue be coherent with other extra-retinal (e.g. vestibular, kinesthetic) cues signaling ego-motion. Although world stability is never questioned in real world, rendering head coupled viewpoint in VR can lead to the perception of an illusory perception of unstable environments, unless a non-unity scale factor is applied on recorded head movements. Besides, cylindrical screens are usually used with static observers due to image distortions when rendering image for viewpoints different from a sweet spot. We developed a technique to compensate in real-time these non-linear visual distortions, in an industrial VR setup, based on a cylindrical screen projection system. Additionally, to evaluate the amount of discrepancies tolerated without perceptual distortions between visual and extraretinal cues, a "motion parallax gain" between the velocity of the observer's head and that of the virtual camera was introduced in this system. The influence of this artificial gain was measured on the gait stability of free-standing participants. Results indicate that, below unity, gains significantly alter postural control. Conversely, the influence of higher gains remains limited, suggesting a certain tolerance of observers to these conditions. Parallax gain amplification is therefore proposed as a possible solution to provide a wider exploration of space to users of immersive virtual reality systems.

  10. Single-mode cylindrical graphene plasmon waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jianfeng; Yang, Jingjing; Huang, Ming

    2016-08-01

    A cylindrical graphene plasmon waveguide (CGPW) which consists of two rolled graphene ribbons, a dielectric core and a dielectric interlayer is proposed. An analytical model for the single-mode condition and cutoff frequency of high-order graphene surface plasmon (GSP) modes is presented and verified by finite element method (FEM) simulations. Single-mode operation region of CGPW is identified in the frequency-radius space. By varying the separation between two graphene sheets and the Fermi level of graphene, a large tunability of the mode behavior is also demonstrated. The proposed structure may provide a new freedom to manipulate GSPs, and would lead to novel applications in optics.

  11. Cullet Manufacture Using the Cylindrical Induction Melter

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D. H.

    2000-01-20

    The base process for vitrification of the Am/Cm solution stored in F-canyon uses 25SrABS cullet as the glass former. A small portion of the cullet used in the SRTC development work was purchased from Corning while the majority was made in the 5 inch Cylindrical Induction Melter (CIM5). Task 1.01 of TTR-NMSS/SE-006, Additional Am-Cm Process Development Studies, requested that a process for the glass former (cullet) fabrication be specified. This report provides the process details for 25SrAB cullet production thereby satisfying Task 1.01.

  12. Periodic Arrays of Interfacial Cylindrical reverse Micelles

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson,M.; Cain, N.; Ocko, B.; Gin, D.; Hammond, S.; Schwartz, D.

    2005-01-01

    We report an approach for the fabrication of periodic molecular nanostructures on surfaces. The approach involves biomimetic self-organization of synthetic wedge-shaped amphiphilic molecules into multilayer arrays of cylindrical reverse micelles. The films were characterized by atomic force microscopy and X-ray reflectivity. These nanostructured films self-assemble in solution but remain stable upon removal and exposure to ambient conditions, making them potentially suitable for a variety of dry pattern transfer methods. We illustrate the generality of this approach by using two distinct molecular systems that vary in size by a factor of 2.

  13. Liquid crystal alignment in cylindrical microcapillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chychłowski, M.; Yaroshchuk, O.; Kravchuk, R.; Woliński, T.

    2011-09-01

    A variety of alignment configurations of liquid crystals (LCs) inside the glassy cylindrical capillaries is realized by using alignment materials providing different anchoring. The radial configuration with central disclination line is obtained for homeotropic boundary conditions. In turn, the axial, transversal and tilted alignment structures are realized by using materials for planar anchoring. The uniformity and controlling of the latter structures were provided by photoalignment method. This approach can be further used to control LC alignment in the photonic crystal fibers recognized as advanced elements for different optical devices.

  14. Liquid crystal alignment in cylindrical microcapillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chychłowski, M.; Yaroshchuk, O.; Kravchuk, R.; Woliński, T.

    2012-03-01

    A variety of alignment configurations of liquid crystals (LCs) inside the glassy cylindrical capillaries is realized by using alignment materials providing different anchoring. The radial configuration with central disclination line is obtained for homeotropic boundary conditions. In turn, the axial, transversal and tilted alignment structures are realized by using materials for planar anchoring. The uniformity and controlling of the latter structures were provided by photoalignment method. This approach can be further used to control LC alignment in the photonic crystal fibers recognized as advanced elements for different optical devices.

  15. Radiation of sound from unflanged cylindrical ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartharan, S. L.; Bayliss, A.

    1983-01-01

    Calculations of sound radiated from unflanged cylindrical ducts are presented. The numerical simulation models the problem of an aero-engine inlet. The time dependent linearized Euler equations are solved from a state of rest until a harmonic solution is attained. A fourth order accurate finite difference scheme is used and solutions are obtained from a fully vectorized Cyber-203 computer program. Cases of both plane waves and spin modes are treated. Spin modes model the sound generated by a turbofan engine. Boundary conditions for both plane waves and spin modes are treated. Solutions obtained are compared with experiments conducted at NASA Langley Research Center.

  16. Current to a moving cylindrical electrostatic probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoegy, W. R.; Wharton, L. E.

    1972-01-01

    The current collection characteristics of a moving cylindrical Langmuir probe are evaluated for a range of probe speeds and potentials which are applicable to earth and planetary measurements. The current expressions derived include the cases of the general accelerated current, sheath area limited current, orbital motion limited current, and retarded current. For the orbital motion limited current, a simple algebraic expression is obtained which includes and generalizes the Mott-Smith and Langmuir expressions for both a stationary probe and a rapidly moving probe. For a rapidly moving probe a single formula adequately represents both the accelerated and the retarded current.

  17. Natural and mixed convection in the cylindrical pool of TRIGA reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, R.; Tiselj, I.; Matkovič, M.

    2016-05-01

    Temperature fields within the pool of the JSI TRIGA MARK II nuclear research reactor were measured to collect data for validation of the thermal hydraulics computational model of the reactor tank. In this context temperature of the coolant was measured simultaneously at sixty different positions within the pool during steady state operation and two transients. The obtained data revealed local peculiarities of the cooling water dynamics inside the pool and were used to estimate the coolant bulk velocity above the reactor core. Mixed natural and forced convection in the pool were simulated with a Computational Fluid Dynamics code. A relatively simple CFD model based on Unsteady RANS turbulence model was found to be sufficient for accurate prediction of the temperature fields in the pool during the reactor operation. Our results show that the simple geometry of the TRIGA pool reactor makes it a suitable candidate for a simple natural circulation benchmark in cylindrical geometry.

  18. Coupling 2-D cylindrical and 3-D x-y-z transport computations

    SciTech Connect

    Abu-Shumays, I.K.; Yehnert, C.E.; Pitcairn, T.N.

    1998-06-30

    This paper describes a new two-dimensional (2-D) cylindrical geometry to three-dimensional (3-D) rectangular x-y-z splice option for multi-dimensional discrete ordinates solutions to the neutron (photon) transport equation. Of particular interest are the simple transformations developed and applied in order to carry out the required spatial and angular interpolations. The spatial interpolations are linear and equivalent to those applied elsewhere. The angular interpolations are based on a high order spherical harmonics representation of the angular flux. Advantages of the current angular interpolations over previous work are discussed. An application to an intricate streaming problem is provided to demonstrate the advantages of the new method for efficient and accurate prediction of particle behavior in complex geometries.

  19. Folding to Curved Surfaces: A Generalized Design Method and Mechanics of Origami-based Cylindrical Structures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Gong, Haoran; Chen, Xi; Chen, C Q

    2016-01-01

    Origami structures enrich the field of mechanical metamaterials with the ability to convert morphologically and systematically between two-dimensional (2D) thin sheets and three-dimensional (3D) spatial structures. In this study, an in-plane design method is proposed to approximate curved surfaces of interest with generalized Miura-ori units. Using this method, two combination types of crease lines are unified in one reprogrammable procedure, generating multiple types of cylindrical structures. Structural completeness conditions of the finite-thickness counterparts to the two types are also proposed. As an example of the design method, the kinematics and elastic properties of an origami-based circular cylindrical shell are analysed. The concept of Poisson's ratio is extended to the cylindrical structures, demonstrating their auxetic property. An analytical model of rigid plates linked by elastic hinges, consistent with numerical simulations, is employed to describe the mechanical response of the structures. Under particular load patterns, the circular shells display novel mechanical behaviour such as snap-through and limiting folding positions. By analysing the geometry and mechanics of the origami structures, we extend the design space of mechanical metamaterials and provide a basis for their practical applications in science and engineering.

  20. Folding to Curved Surfaces: A Generalized Design Method and Mechanics of Origami-based Cylindrical Structures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fei; Gong, Haoran; Chen, Xi; Chen, C. Q.

    2016-01-01

    Origami structures enrich the field of mechanical metamaterials with the ability to convert morphologically and systematically between two-dimensional (2D) thin sheets and three-dimensional (3D) spatial structures. In this study, an in-plane design method is proposed to approximate curved surfaces of interest with generalized Miura-ori units. Using this method, two combination types of crease lines are unified in one reprogrammable procedure, generating multiple types of cylindrical structures. Structural completeness conditions of the finite-thickness counterparts to the two types are also proposed. As an example of the design method, the kinematics and elastic properties of an origami-based circular cylindrical shell are analysed. The concept of Poisson’s ratio is extended to the cylindrical structures, demonstrating their auxetic property. An analytical model of rigid plates linked by elastic hinges, consistent with numerical simulations, is employed to describe the mechanical response of the structures. Under particular load patterns, the circular shells display novel mechanical behaviour such as snap-through and limiting folding positions. By analysing the geometry and mechanics of the origami structures, we extend the design space of mechanical metamaterials and provide a basis for their practical applications in science and engineering. PMID:27624892

  1. Folding to Curved Surfaces: A Generalized Design Method and Mechanics of Origami-based Cylindrical Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fei; Gong, Haoran; Chen, Xi; Chen, C. Q.

    2016-09-01

    Origami structures enrich the field of mechanical metamaterials with the ability to convert morphologically and systematically between two-dimensional (2D) thin sheets and three-dimensional (3D) spatial structures. In this study, an in-plane design method is proposed to approximate curved surfaces of interest with generalized Miura-ori units. Using this method, two combination types of crease lines are unified in one reprogrammable procedure, generating multiple types of cylindrical structures. Structural completeness conditions of the finite-thickness counterparts to the two types are also proposed. As an example of the design method, the kinematics and elastic properties of an origami-based circular cylindrical shell are analysed. The concept of Poisson’s ratio is extended to the cylindrical structures, demonstrating their auxetic property. An analytical model of rigid plates linked by elastic hinges, consistent with numerical simulations, is employed to describe the mechanical response of the structures. Under particular load patterns, the circular shells display novel mechanical behaviour such as snap-through and limiting folding positions. By analysing the geometry and mechanics of the origami structures, we extend the design space of mechanical metamaterials and provide a basis for their practical applications in science and engineering.

  2. Angles-Only Initial Relative Orbit Determination Performance Analysis using Cylindrical Coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geller, David K.; Lovell, T. Alan

    2016-09-01

    The solution of the initial relative orbit determination problem using angles-only measurements is important for orbital proximity operations, satellite inspection and servicing, and the identification of unknown space objects in similar orbits. In this paper, a preliminary relative orbit determination performance analysis is conducted utilizing the linearized relative orbital equations of motion in cylindrical coordinates. The relative orbital equations of motion in cylindrical coordinates are rigorously derived in several forms included the exact nonlinear two-body differential equations of motion, the linear-time-varying differential equations of motion for an elliptical orbit chief, and the linear-time-invariant differential equations of motion for a circular orbit chief. Using the nonlinear angles-only measurement equation in cylindrical coordinates, evidence of full-relative-state observability is found, contrary to the range observability problem exhibited in Cartesian coordinates. Based on these results, a geometric approach to assess initial relative orbit determination performance is formulated. To facilitate a better understanding of the problem, the focus is on the 2-dimensional initial orbit determination problem. The results clearly show the dependence of the relative orbit determination performance on the geometry of the relative motion and on the time-interval between observations. Analysis is conducted for leader-follower orbits and flyby orbits where the deputy passes directly above or below the chief.

  3. Design Considerations of Polishing Lap for Computer-Controlled Cylindrical Polishing Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, Gufran S.; Gubarev, Mikhail; Speegle, Chet; Ramsey, Brian

    2010-01-01

    The future X-ray observatory missions, such as International X-ray Observatory, require grazing incidence replicated optics of extremely large collecting area (3 m2) in combination with angular resolution of less than 5 arcsec half-power diameter. The resolution of a mirror shell depends ultimately on the quality of the cylindrical mandrels from which they are being replicated. Mid-spatial-frequency axial figure error is a dominant contributor in the error budget of the mandrel. This paper presents our efforts to develop a deterministic cylindrical polishing process in order to keep the mid-spatial-frequency axial figure errors to a minimum. Simulation studies have been performed to optimize the operational parameters as well as the polishing lap configuration. Furthermore, depending upon the surface error profile, a model for localized polishing based on dwell time approach is developed. Using the inputs from the mathematical model, a mandrel, having conical approximated Wolter-1 geometry, has been polished on a newly developed computer-controlled cylindrical polishing machine. We report our first experimental results and discuss plans for further improvements in the polishing process.

  4. Particle scavenging in a cylindrical ultrasonic standing wave field using levitated drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrell, Tyler; Saylor, J. R.

    2015-11-01

    A cylindrical ultrasonic standing wave field was generated in a tube containing a flow of particles and fog. Both the particles and fog drops were concentrated in the nodes of the standing wave field where they combined and then grew large enough to fall out of the system. In this way particles were scavenged from the system, cleaning the air. While this approach has been attempted using a standing wave field established between disc-shaped transducers, a cylindrical resonator has not been used for this purpose heretofore. The resonator was constructed by bolting three Langevin transducers to an aluminum tube. The benefit of the cylindrical geometry is that the acoustic energy is focused. Furthermore, the residence time of the particle in the field can be increased by increasing the length of the resonator. An additional benefit of this approach is that tubes located downstream of the resonator were acoustically excited, acting as passive resonators that enhanced the scavenging process. The performance of this system on scavenging particles is presented as a function of particle diameter and volumetric flow rate. It is noted that, when operated without particles, the setup can be used to remove drops and shows promise for liquid aerosol retention from systems where these losses can be financially disadvantageous and/or hazardous.

  5. Generalization of the optical theorem for monochromatic electromagnetic beams of arbitrary wavefront in cylindrical coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitri, F. G.

    2015-11-01

    The optical theorem constitutes of the fundamental theorems in optical, acoustical, quantum, and gravitational wave scattering, which relates the extinction cross-section to the forward scattering complex amplitude function of plane waves. In this analysis, a generalized formalism is presented for beams of arbitrary character in cylindrical coordinates without restriction to the plane wave case of the angles of incidence and scattering. Based on the partial-wave series expansion method of cylindrical multipole, analytical expressions for the extinction, absorption, scattering cross-sections and efficiency factors are derived for an object of arbitrary shape. An "interference scattering" term arises in the cross-section (or efficiency), which describes the mutual interference between the diffracted or specularly reflected waves. Examples for plane waves and 2D scalar quasi-Gaussian focused beams are also considered, which illustrate the theory. The generalized optical theorem in cylindrical coordinates can be applied to evaluate the extinction efficiency from any object of arbitrary geometry placed on or off the axis of the incident beam. Applications in the context of wave scattering theory by a single particle or multiple particles would benefit from the results of the present study, in addition to other phenomena such as the radiation force and torque.

  6. Folding to Curved Surfaces: A Generalized Design Method and Mechanics of Origami-based Cylindrical Structures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Gong, Haoran; Chen, Xi; Chen, C Q

    2016-01-01

    Origami structures enrich the field of mechanical metamaterials with the ability to convert morphologically and systematically between two-dimensional (2D) thin sheets and three-dimensional (3D) spatial structures. In this study, an in-plane design method is proposed to approximate curved surfaces of interest with generalized Miura-ori units. Using this method, two combination types of crease lines are unified in one reprogrammable procedure, generating multiple types of cylindrical structures. Structural completeness conditions of the finite-thickness counterparts to the two types are also proposed. As an example of the design method, the kinematics and elastic properties of an origami-based circular cylindrical shell are analysed. The concept of Poisson's ratio is extended to the cylindrical structures, demonstrating their auxetic property. An analytical model of rigid plates linked by elastic hinges, consistent with numerical simulations, is employed to describe the mechanical response of the structures. Under particular load patterns, the circular shells display novel mechanical behaviour such as snap-through and limiting folding positions. By analysing the geometry and mechanics of the origami structures, we extend the design space of mechanical metamaterials and provide a basis for their practical applications in science and engineering. PMID:27624892

  7. Geometry definition with MAZE

    SciTech Connect

    Nebeck, H.E.

    1986-08-01

    The MAZE mesh generator represents an arbitrary two dimensional region of space as an ordered collection of quadrilateral elements. Each element is defined by its four corner points (nodes) and an integer material number. Models are created by subdividing the region(s) of interest into one or more PARTS and specifying the element distribution in each part. Then, parts can be merged together to form the meshed representation of the entire region. Applying boundary conditions and describing material properties completes the model construction process. This activity takes place in three distinct phases: phase I-define geometry, subdivide regions into elements; phase II-refine geometry, establish interface and boundary conditions; phase III-describe material properties. This work presents explanations and examples of the phase I commands, along with an overview of the MAZE mesh generation process.

  8. Observing of tree trunks and other cylindrical objects using GPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jezova, Jana; Lambot, Sebastien

    2016-04-01

    Trees are a part of our everyday life, hence it is important to prevent their collapse to protect people and urban infrastructures. It is also important to characterize tree wood properties for usages in construction. In order to investigate internal parts of tree trunks non-invasively, ground-penetrating radar (GPR), or in this case, ultra-wideband microwave radar as a general tool, appears to be a very promising technology. Nevertheless, tree trunk tomography using microwave radar is a complicated task due to the circular shape of the trunk and the very complex (heterogeneous and anisotropic) internal structures of the trunk. Microwave sensing of tree trunks is also complicated due to the electromagnetic properties of living wood, which strongly depend on water content, density and temperature of wood. The objective of this study is to describe tree trunk radar cross sections including specific features originating from the particular circumferential data acquisition geometry. In that respect, three experiments were performed: (1) numerical simulations using a finite-difference time-domain software, namely, gprMax 2D, (2) measurements on a simplified laboratory trunk model including plastic and cardboard pipes, sand and air, and (3) measurements over a real tree trunk. The analysis was further deepened by considering: (1) common zero-offset reflection imaging, (2) imaging with a planar perfect electrical conductor (PEC) at the opposite side of the trunk, and (3) imaging with a PEC arc at the opposite side of the trunk. Furthermore, the shape of the reflection curve of a cylindrical target was analytically derived based on the straight-ray propagation approximation. Subsequently, the total internal reflection (TIR) phenomenon occurring in cylindrical objects was observed and analytically described. Both the straight-ray reflection curve and TIR were well observed on the simulated and laboratory radar data. A comparison between all experiments and radar

  9. Ultrasonic Concentration in a Line-Driven Cylindrical Tube

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard, Gregory Russ

    2004-01-01

    The fractionation of particles from their suspending fluid or noninvasive micromanipulation of particles in suspension has many applications ranging from the recovery of valuable reagents from process flows to the fabrication of microelectromechanical devices. Techniques based on size, density, solubility, or electromagnetic properties exist for fulfilling these needs, but many particles have traits that preclude their use such as small size, neutral buoyancy, or uniform electromagnetic characteristics. While separation by those techniques may not be possible, often compressibility differences exist between the particle and fluid that would allow fractionation by acoustic forces. The potential of acoustic separation is known, but due to inherent difficulties in achieving and maintaining accurate alignment of the transduction system, it is rarely utilized. The objective of this project is to investigate the use of structural excitation as a potentially efficient concentration/fractionation method for particles in suspension. It is demonstrated that structural excitation of a cylindrically symmetric cavity, such as a tube, allows non-invasive, fast, and low power concentration of particles suspended in a fluid. The inherent symmetry of the system eliminates the need for careful alignment inherent in current acoustic concentration devices. Structural excitation distributes the acoustic field throughout the volume of the cavity, which also significantly reduces temperature gradients and acoustic streaming in the fluid; cavitation is no longer an issue. The lowest-order coupled modes of a long cylindrical glass tube and fluid-filled cavity, driven by a line contact, are tuned, via material properties and aspect ratio, to achieve a coupled dipolar vibration of the system, shown to generate efficient concentration of particles to the central axis of the tube. A two dimensional elastodynamic model of the system was developed and subsequently utilized to optimize particle

  10. Inflation from quantum geometry.

    PubMed

    Bojowald, Martin

    2002-12-23

    Quantum geometry predicts that a universe evolves through an inflationary phase at small volume before exiting gracefully into a standard Friedmann phase. This does not require the introduction of additional matter fields with ad hoc potentials; rather, it occurs because of a quantum gravity modification of the kinetic part of ordinary matter Hamiltonians. An application of the same mechanism can explain why the present day cosmological acceleration is so tiny.

  11. Geometry of Quantum States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bengtsson, Ingemar; Zyczkowski, Karol

    2007-12-01

    Preface; 1. Convexity, colours and statistics; 2. Geometry of probability distributions; 3. Much ado about spheres; 4. Complex projective spaces; 5. Outline of quantum mechanics; 6. Coherent states and group actions; 7. The stellar representation; 8. The space of density matrices; 9. Purification of mixed quantum states; 10. Quantum operations; 11. Duality: maps versus states; 12. Density matrices and entropies; 13. Distinguishability measures; 14. Monotone metrics and measures; 15. Quantum entanglement; Epilogue; Appendices; References; Index.

  12. Freezing in confined geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokol, P. E.; Ma, W. J.; Herwig, K. W.; Snow, W. M.; Wang, Y.; Koplik, Joel; Banavar, Jayanth R.

    1992-01-01

    Results of detailed structural studies, using elastic neutron scattering, of the freezing of liquid O2 and D2 in porous vycor glass, are presented. The experimental studies have been complemented by computer simulations of the dynamics of freezing of a Lennard-Jones liquid in narrow channels bounded by molecular walls. Results point to a new simple physical interpretation of freezing in confined geometries.

  13. Design parameters for rotating cylindrical filtration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwille, John A.; Mitra, Deepanjan; Lueptow, Richard M.

    2002-01-01

    Rotating cylindrical filtration displays significantly reduced plugging of filter pores and build-up of a cake layer, but the number and range of parameters that can be adjusted complicates the design of these devices. Twelve individual parameters were investigated experimentally by measuring the build-up of particles on the rotating cylindrical filter after a fixed time of operation. The build-up of particles on the filter depends on the rotational speed, the radial filtrate flow, the particle size and the gap width. Other parameters, such as suspension concentration and total flow rate are less important. Of the four mechanisms present in rotating filters to reduce pore plugging and cake build-up, axial shear, rotational shear, centrifugal sedimentation and vortical motion, the evidence suggests rotational shear is the dominant mechanism, although the other mechanisms still play minor roles. The ratio of the shear force acting parallel to the filter surface on a particle to the Stokes drag acting normal to the filter surface on the particle due to the difference between particle motion and filtrate flow can be used as a non-dimensional parameter that predicts the degree of particle build-up on the filter surface for a wide variety of filtration conditions. c2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Design parameters for rotating cylindrical filtration.

    PubMed

    Schwille, John A; Mitra, Deepanjan; Lueptow, Richard M

    2002-07-15

    Rotating cylindrical filtration displays significantly reduced plugging of filter pores and build-up of a cake layer, but the number and range of parameters that can be adjusted complicates the design of these devices. Twelve individual parameters were investigated experimentally by measuring the build-up of particles on the rotating cylindrical filter after a fixed time of operation. The build-up of particles on the filter depends on the rotational speed, the radial filtrate flow, the particle size and the gap width. Other parameters, such as suspension concentration and total flow rate are less important. Of the four mechanisms present in rotating filters to reduce pore plugging and cake build-up, axial shear, rotational shear, centrifugal sedimentation and vortical motion, the evidence suggests rotational shear is the dominant mechanism, although the other mechanisms still play minor roles. The ratio of the shear force acting parallel to the filter surface on a particle to the Stokes drag acting normal to the filter surface on the particle due to the difference between particle motion and filtrate flow can be used as a non-dimensional parameter that predicts the degree of particle build-up on the filter surface for a wide variety of filtration conditions. PMID:12238523

  15. Thermal Convection in a cylindrical enclosure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, K.

    The microgravity experiment in the Apollo space mission during 1973 has established the importance of the surface tension as a propulsive force on the onset of convection because surface tension varies with temperature. Any temperature gradient established across the surface of the fluid is accompanied by a gradient in surface tension. However, the surface tension driven convection experiment flown in the shuttle flight has not shown any evidence of oscillatory flow even for Marangoni number as high as 105. The paper discusses thermal convection in a cylindrical enclosure with free boundary in a microgravity environment. The surface deformation caused by g-jitter and its relation to the oscillatory flow is studied. The system to be investigated in cylindrical layers of fluid heated from beneath with upper boundary free, initially in mechanical equilibrium, but subjected to the gradient of heat. At any instant of time, in a microgravity environment, the oscillatory part of g-jitter can be as high as 10 -3 g, where g is the gravitational acceleration on the surface of the earth [1]. The instability of a Boussinesq fluid [2] is analyzed in terms of the dimensionless parameters Raleigh number, Ra, Prandtl number, Pr, Marangoni number, M and the aspect ratio, A and relative importance of these parameters is established. References [1] Bannister, T C., etal, NASA, TMX-64772, 1973 [2] Shukla, K N, Applied Mechanics Review, Vol. 54, (5), PP 391-404, 2001

  16. Scattering and radiation from cylindrically conformal antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempel, Leo Charles

    Microstrip patch antennas offer considerable advantages in terms of weight, aerodynamic drag, cost, flexibility, and observability over more conventional protruding antennas. Two hybrid finite element methods are presented and are used to examine the scattering and radiation behavior of cylindrically conformal patches. In conjunction with a new divergence-free cylindrical shell element, the finite element-boundary integral method is shown to have low computational and memory requirements when compared with competing approaches. This method uses an efficient creeping wave series for the computation of the dyadic Green's function and a uniform surface mesh so that a fast Fourier transform may be used to reduce the computational and memory burden of the method. An alternative finite element-absorbing boundary condition approach incorporates a new conformal vector condition which minimizes the computational domain. The latter method is more flexible than the former because it can incorporate surface coatings and protruding antennas. Guidelines are established for minimal ABC displacement from the aperture. These two hybrid finite element methods are used to study the scattering, radiation, and input impedance of typical conformal antenna arrays. In particular, the effect of curvature and cavity size is examined for both discrete and wraparound antenna arrays.

  17. Optical inspection system for cylindrical objects

    DOEpatents

    Brenden, Byron B.; Peters, Timothy J.

    1989-01-01

    In the inspection of cylindrical objects, particularly O-rings, the object is translated through a field of view and a linear light trace is projected on its surface. An image of the light trace is projected on a mask, which has a size and shape corresponding to the size and shape which the image would have if the surface of the object were perfect. If there is a defect, light will pass the mask and be sensed by a detector positioned behind the mask. Preferably, two masks and associated detectors are used, one mask being convex to pass light when the light trace falls on a projection from the surface and the other concave, to pass light when the light trace falls on a depression in the surface. The light trace may be either dynamic, formed by a scanned laser beam, or static, formed by such a beam focussed by a cylindrical lens. Means are provided to automatically keep the illuminating receiving systems properly aligned.

  18. Propagation properties of cylindrical sinc Gaussian beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyyuboğlu, Halil T.; Bayraktar, Mert

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the propagation properties of cylindrical sinc Gaussian beam in turbulent atmosphere. Since an analytic solution is hardly derivable, the study is carried out with the aid of random phase screens. Evolutions of the beam intensity profile, beam size and kurtosis parameter are analysed. It is found that on the source plane, cylindrical sinc Gaussian beam has a dark hollow appearance, where the side lobes also start to emerge with increase in width parameter and Gaussian source size. During propagation, beams with small width and Gaussian source size exhibit off-axis behaviour, losing the dark hollow shape, accumulating the intensity asymmetrically on one side, whereas those with large width and Gaussian source size retain dark hollow appearance even at long propagation distances. It is seen that the beams with large widths expand more in beam size than the ones with small widths. The structure constant values chosen do not seem to alter this situation. The kurtosis parameters of the beams having small widths are seen to be larger than the ones with the small widths. Again the choice of the structure constant does not change this trend.

  19. Design parameters for rotating cylindrical filtration.

    PubMed

    Schwille, John A; Mitra, Deepanjan; Lueptow, Richard M

    2002-07-15

    Rotating cylindrical filtration displays significantly reduced plugging of filter pores and build-up of a cake layer, but the number and range of parameters that can be adjusted complicates the design of these devices. Twelve individual parameters were investigated experimentally by measuring the build-up of particles on the rotating cylindrical filter after a fixed time of operation. The build-up of particles on the filter depends on the rotational speed, the radial filtrate flow, the particle size and the gap width. Other parameters, such as suspension concentration and total flow rate are less important. Of the four mechanisms present in rotating filters to reduce pore plugging and cake build-up, axial shear, rotational shear, centrifugal sedimentation and vortical motion, the evidence suggests rotational shear is the dominant mechanism, although the other mechanisms still play minor roles. The ratio of the shear force acting parallel to the filter surface on a particle to the Stokes drag acting normal to the filter surface on the particle due to the difference between particle motion and filtrate flow can be used as a non-dimensional parameter that predicts the degree of particle build-up on the filter surface for a wide variety of filtration conditions.

  20. Electron Confinement in Cylindrical Potential Well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltenkov, A. S.; Msezane, A. Z.

    2016-05-01

    We show that studying the solutions of the wave equation for an electron confined in a cylindrical potential well offers the possibility to analyze the confinement behavior of an electron executing one- or two-dimensional motion in the remaining three-dimensional space within the framework of the same mathematical model of the potential well. Some low-lying electronic states with different symmetries are considered and the corresponding wave functions are calculated. The behavior of their nodes and their peak positions with respect to the parameters of the cylindrical well is analyzed. Additionally, the momentum distributions of electrons in these states are calculated. The limiting cases of the ratio of the cylinder length H to its radius R0 are considered; when H significantly exceeds R0 and when R0 is much greater than H. The possible application of the results obtained here for the description of the general features in the behavior of electrons in nanowires with metallic type of conductivity (or nanotubes) and ultrathin epitaxial films (or graphene sheets) are discussed. Possible experiments are suggested as well where the quantum confinement can be manifested. Work supported by the Uzbek Foundation (ASB) and by the U.S. DOE, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Energy Research (AZM).

  1. Integral geometry and holography

    SciTech Connect

    Czech, Bartlomiej; Lamprou, Lampros; McCandlish, Samuel; Sully, James

    2015-10-27

    We present a mathematical framework which underlies the connection between information theory and the bulk spacetime in the AdS3/CFT2 correspondence. A key concept is kinematic space: an auxiliary Lorentzian geometry whose metric is defined in terms of conditional mutual informations and which organizes the entanglement pattern of a CFT state. When the field theory has a holographic dual obeying the Ryu-Takayanagi proposal, kinematic space has a direct geometric meaning: it is the space of bulk geodesics studied in integral geometry. Lengths of bulk curves are computed by kinematic volumes, giving a precise entropic interpretation of the length of any bulk curve. We explain how basic geometric concepts -- points, distances and angles -- are reflected in kinematic space, allowing one to reconstruct a large class of spatial bulk geometries from boundary entanglement entropies. In this way, kinematic space translates between information theoretic and geometric descriptions of a CFT state. As an example, we discuss in detail the static slice of AdS3 whose kinematic space is two-dimensional de Sitter space.

  2. Integral geometry and holography

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Czech, Bartlomiej; Lamprou, Lampros; McCandlish, Samuel; Sully, James

    2015-10-27

    We present a mathematical framework which underlies the connection between information theory and the bulk spacetime in the AdS3/CFT2 correspondence. A key concept is kinematic space: an auxiliary Lorentzian geometry whose metric is defined in terms of conditional mutual informations and which organizes the entanglement pattern of a CFT state. When the field theory has a holographic dual obeying the Ryu-Takayanagi proposal, kinematic space has a direct geometric meaning: it is the space of bulk geodesics studied in integral geometry. Lengths of bulk curves are computed by kinematic volumes, giving a precise entropic interpretation of the length of any bulkmore » curve. We explain how basic geometric concepts -- points, distances and angles -- are reflected in kinematic space, allowing one to reconstruct a large class of spatial bulk geometries from boundary entanglement entropies. In this way, kinematic space translates between information theoretic and geometric descriptions of a CFT state. As an example, we discuss in detail the static slice of AdS3 whose kinematic space is two-dimensional de Sitter space.« less

  3. Emergent Complex Network Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhihao; Menichetti, Giulia; Rahmede, Christoph; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2015-05-01

    Networks are mathematical structures that are universally used to describe a large variety of complex systems such as the brain or the Internet. Characterizing the geometrical properties of these networks has become increasingly relevant for routing problems, inference and data mining. In real growing networks, topological, structural and geometrical properties emerge spontaneously from their dynamical rules. Nevertheless we still miss a model in which networks develop an emergent complex geometry. Here we show that a single two parameter network model, the growing geometrical network, can generate complex network geometries with non-trivial distribution of curvatures, combining exponential growth and small-world properties with finite spectral dimensionality. In one limit, the non-equilibrium dynamical rules of these networks can generate scale-free networks with clustering and communities, in another limit planar random geometries with non-trivial modularity. Finally we find that these properties of the geometrical growing networks are present in a large set of real networks describing biological, social and technological systems.

  4. Scintillation detectors in gamma spectral logging; geometry, absorption and calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schimschal, Ulrich

    1980-01-01

    The theory for the evaluation of the effects of geometry in gamma ray absorption is developed for cylindrical scintillation detectors as applicable to borehole gamma spectrometry. The results of a laboratory experiment are shown for comparison. A calibration procedure to determine detector efficiency is given for application to borehole probes. It is shown that the response of a crystal can be separated in terms of geometric effects and instrumentation effects. It is also shown that approximating crystal detectors with point detectors in mathematical theory is grossly oversimplified. (USGS)

  5. Note: Electrochemical etching of cylindrical nanoprobes using a vibrating electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yufeng; Zeng, Yongbin Qu, Ningsong; Zhu, Di

    2015-07-15

    An electrochemical etching process using a vibrating electrolyte of potassium hydroxide to prepare tungsten cylindrical nanotips is developed. The vibrating electrolyte eases the effects of a diffusion layer and extends the etching area, which aid in the production of cylindrical nanotips. Larger amplitudes and a vibration frequency of 35 Hz are recommended for producing cylindrical nanotips. Nanotips with a tip radius of approximately 43 nm and a conical angle of arctan 0.0216 are obtained.

  6. Static, cylindrically symmetric strings in general relativity with cosmological constant

    SciTech Connect

    Linet, B.

    1986-07-01

    The static, cylindrically symmetric solutions to Einstein's equations with a cosmological term describing cosmic strings are determined. The discussion depends on the sign of the cosmological constant.

  7. Numerical simulation of geometric scale effects in cylindrical self-field MPD thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lapointe, M.

    1992-01-01

    A 2-D, two-temperature, single fluid magnetohydrodynamic code which incorporates classical plasma transport coefficients and Hall effects was developed to predict steady-state, self-field magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster performance. The governing equations and numerical methods of solution are outlined and discussed. Experimental comparisons are used to validate model predictions. The model accurately predicts thrust and reproduces trends in the discharge voltage for discharge currents below experimentally measured onset values. However, because the model does not include electrode effects, the calculated voltage drops are significantly lower than experimentally measured values. Predictions of thrust and flow efficiency are made for a matrix of fifteen cylindrical thruster geometries, assuming a fully ionized argon propellant. A maximum predicted specific impulse of 1680 s is obtained for a thruster with an anode radius of 2.5 cm, a cathode radius of 0.5 cm, and equal electrode lengths of 2.5 cm. A scaling relation is developed to predict, within limits, the onset of cylindrical, self-field thruster instability as a function of geometry and operating condition.

  8. High-order conservative reconstruction schemes for finite volume methods in cylindrical and spherical coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignone, A.

    2014-08-01

    High-order reconstruction schemes for the solution of hyperbolic conservation laws in orthogonal curvilinear coordinates are revised in the finite volume approach. The formulation employs a piecewise polynomial approximation to the zone-average values to reconstruct left and right interface states from within a computational zone to arbitrary order of accuracy by inverting a Vandermonde-like linear system of equations with spatially varying coefficients. The approach is general and can be used on uniform and non-uniform meshes although explicit expressions are derived for polynomials from second to fifth degree in cylindrical and spherical geometries with uniform grid spacing. It is shown that, in regions of large curvature, the resulting expressions differ considerably from their Cartesian counterparts and that the lack of such corrections can severely degrade the accuracy of the solution close to the coordinate origin. Limiting techniques and monotonicity constraints are revised for conventional reconstruction schemes, namely, the piecewise linear method (PLM), third-order weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme and the piecewise parabolic method (PPM). The performance of the improved reconstruction schemes is investigated in a number of selected numerical benchmarks involving the solution of both scalar and systems of nonlinear equations (such as the equations of gas dynamics and magnetohydrodynamics) in cylindrical and spherical geometries in one and two dimensions. Results confirm that the proposed approach yields considerably smaller errors, higher convergence rates and it avoid spurious numerical effects at a symmetry axis.

  9. Cylindrical and spherical space equivalents to the plane wave expansion technique of Maxwell's wave equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, Robert C.; Alzahrani, Mohammed A.; Jafari, Seyed Hamed

    2015-02-01

    The plane wave expansion (PWM) technique applied to Maxwell's wave equations provides researchers with a supply of information regarding the optical properties of dielectric structures. The technique is well suited for structures that display a linear periodicity. When the focus is directed towards optical resonators and structures that lack linear periodicity the eigen-process can easily exceed computational resources and time constraints. In the case of dielectric structures which display cylindrical or spherical symmetry, a coordinate system specific set of basis functions have been employed to cast Maxwell's wave equations into an eigen-matrix formulation from which the resonator states associated with the dielectric profile can be obtained. As for PWM, the inverse of the dielectric and field components are expanded in the basis functions (Fourier-Fourier-Bessel, FFB, in cylindrical and Fourier- Bessel-Legendre, BLF, in spherical) and orthogonality is employed to form the matrix expressions. The theoretical development details will be presented indicating how certain mathematical complications in the process have been overcome and how the eigen-matrix can be tuned to a specific mode type. The similarities and differences in PWM, FFB and BLF are presented. In the case of structures possessing axial cylindrical symmetry, the inclusion of the z axis component of propagation constant makes the technique applicable to photonic crystal fibers and other waveguide structures. Computational results will be presented for a number of different dielectric geometries including Bragg ring resonators, cylindrical space slot channel waveguides and bottle resonators. Steps to further enhance the computation process will be reported.

  10. Geometry for the Secondary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moalem, D.

    1977-01-01

    A sequential but non-axiomatic high school geometry course which includes Euclidean, transformation, and analytic geometry and vectors and matrices, and emphasizes the invariance property of transformations, is outlined. Sample problems, solutions, and comments are included. (MN)

  11. Method for making generally cylindrical underground openings

    DOEpatents

    Routh, J.W.

    1983-05-26

    A rapid, economical and safe method for making a generally cylindrical underground opening such as a shaft or a tunnel is described. A borehole is formed along the approximate center line of where it is desired to make the underground opening. The borehole is loaded with an explodable material and the explodable material is detonated. An enlarged cavity is formed by the explosive action of the detonated explodable material forcing outward and compacting the original walls of the borehole. The enlarged cavity may be increased in size by loading it with a second explodable material, and detonating the second explodable material. The process may be repeated as required until the desired underground opening is made. The explodable material used in the method may be free-flowing, and it may be contained in a pipe.

  12. Naked singularity resolution in cylindrical collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Kurita, Yasunari; Nakao, Ken-ichi

    2006-03-15

    In this paper, we study the gravitational collapse of null dust in cylindrically symmetric spacetime. The naked singularity necessarily forms at the symmetry axis. We consider the situation in which null dust is emitted again from the naked singularity formed by the collapsed null dust and investigate the backreaction by this emission for the naked singularity. We show a very peculiar but physically important case in which the same amount of null dust as that of the collapsed one is emitted from the naked singularity as soon as the ingoing null dust hits the symmetry axis and forms the naked singularity. In this case, although this naked singularity satisfies the strong curvature condition by Krolak (limiting focusing condition), geodesics which hit the singularity can be extended uniquely across the singularity. Therefore, we may say that the collapsing null dust passes through the singularity formed by itself and then leaves for infinity. Finally, the singularity completely disappears and the flat spacetime remains.

  13. Electrochemical cell having cylindrical electrode elements

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Paul A.; Shimotake, Hiroshi

    1982-01-01

    A secondary, high temperature electrochemical cell especially adapted for lithium alloy negative electrodes, transition metal chalcogenide positive electrodes and alkali metal halide or alkaline earth metal halide electrolyte is disclosed. The cell is held within an elongated cylindrical container in which one of the active materials is filled around the outside surfaces of a plurality of perforate tubular current collectors along the length of the container. Each of the current collector tubes contain a concentric tubular layer of electrically insulative ceramic as an interelectrode separator. The active material of opposite polarity in elongated pin shape is positioned longitudinally within the separator layer. A second electrically conductive tube with perforate walls can be swagged or otherwise bonded to the outer surface of the pin as a current collector and the electrically insulative ceramic layer can be coated or otherwise layered onto the outer surface of this second current collector. Alternatively, the central pin electrode can include an axial core as a current collector.

  14. Scattering by buried dielectric cylindrical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Vico, M.; Frezza, F.; Pajewski, L.; Schettini, G.

    2005-12-01

    An analytical-numerical technique for the solution of the two-dimensional electromagnetic plane wave scattering by a finite set of dielectric circular cylinders buried in a dielectric half-space is presented. The problem is solved for both the near- and far-field regions, for transverse magnetic and transverse electric polarizations. The scattered field is represented in terms of a superposition of cylindrical waves, and use is made of the plane wave spectrum to take into account the reflection and transmission of such waves by the interface. The validity of the approach is confirmed by comparisons with results available in the literature, with very good agreement, and by self-consistency tests. Applications of the method to objects of arbitrary cross section simulated by suitable configurations of circular cylinders are shown.

  15. Polymer translocation through a cylindrical channel

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Chiu TaiAndrew; Muthukumar, M.

    2008-01-01

    A formalism of polymer translocation through a cylindrical channel of finite diameter and length between two spherical compartments is developed. Unlike previous simplified systems, the finite diameter of the channel allows the number of polymer segments inside the channel to be adjusted during translocation according to the free energy of possible conformations. The translocation process of a Gaussian chain without excluded volume and hydrodynamic interactions is studied using exact formulas of confinement free energy under this formalism. The free energy landscape for the translocation process, the distribution of the translocation time, and the average translocation time are presented. The complex dependencies of the average translocation time on the length and diameter of the channel, the sizes of the donor and receptor compartments, and the chain length are illustrated. PMID:18433273

  16. Stresses in rotating composite cylindrical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, James T.-S.; Lin, Chien-Chang

    Stresses in composite cylindrical shells rotating with a constant speed about their longitudinal axis are analyzed. Each ply or ply group is treated as a separate thin layer of homogeneous and orthotropic material under the interfacial stresses as surface loading. There is no limitation on the total thickness of the shell. The circumferential stress, motivated by the conventional thin shell theory, is assumed to vary linearly through the thickness of the layer. The radial stress is determined in terms of the circumferential stress through the equilibrium condition, and an average compatibility condition through the thickness of the thin layer is used. Numerical results using the present analysis show nearly perfect agreement with the exact solution for homogeneous and isotropic cylinders. Some results for cylinders having orthotropic layers are presented for illustrative purposes.

  17. Magnetosheath effects on cylindrical Langmuir probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szuszczewicz, E. P.; Takacs, P. Z.

    1979-01-01

    A study of the response of cylindrical Langmuir probes in magnetoplasmas focusing on the relative magnitudes of Larmor radius and sheath size is presented. The approach results in a classification of magnetic field effects which involves the magnetic field strength and plasma parameters of density, temperature, and the applied probe potential. It is shown that a 0.25 G field can have similar effects on the current collection properties of the probe in ionospheric plasma as a 30 kG field would have in a hot, dense laboratory plasma. The data also show: (1) the effects of probe orientation on electron current collection from magnetoplasmas; (2) that these effects can be important even when the electron Larmor radius is larger than the radius of the probe; and (3) that substantial magnetic field effects occur when the probe sheath is comparable to or greater than the Larmor radius.

  18. Cathode Effects in Cylindrical Hall Thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Granstedt, E.M.; Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N. J.

    2008-09-12

    Stable operation of a cylindrical Hall thruster (CHT) has been achieved using a hot wire cathode, which functions as a controllable electron emission source. It is shown that as the electron emission from the cathode increases with wire heating, the discharge current increases, the plasma plume angle reduces, and the ion energy distribution function shifts toward higher energies. The observed effect of cathode electron emission on thruster parameters extends and clarifies performance improvements previously obtained for the overrun discharge current regime of the same type of thruster, but using a hollow cathode-neutralizer. Once thruster discharge current saturates with wire heating, further filament heating does not affect other discharge parameters. The saturated values of thruster discharge parameters can be further enhanced by optimal placement of the cathode wire with respect to the magnetic field.

  19. Premixed flames in closed cylindrical tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzener, Philippe; Matalon, Moshe

    2001-09-01

    We consider the propagation of a premixed flame, as a two-dimensional sheet separating unburned gas from burned products, in a closed cylindrical tube. A nonlinear evolution equation, that describes the motion of the flame front as a function of its mean position, is derived. The equation contains a destabilizing term that results from the gas motion induced by thermal expansion and has a memory term associated with vorticity generation. Numerical solutions of this equation indicate that, when diffusion is stabilizing, the flame evolves into a non-planar form whose shape, and its associated symmetry properties, are determined by the Markstein parameter, and by the initial data. In particular, we observe the development of convex axisymmetric or non-axisymmetric flames, tulip flames and cellular flames.

  20. Cylindrical spreading due to downwind refraction.

    PubMed

    Makarewicz, Rufin

    2016-04-01

    Downwind propagation is analyzed for a low level jet (LLJ). The LLJ is characterized by a wind speed maximum (at least 10-20 m/s with peak speeds up to 30 m/s) a few hundred meters above the ground. Close to an elevated point source, such as a wind turbine or an aircraft, spherical spreading results in a 6 dB decrease in sound level per doubling of the distance. Wind turbine noise measurements show that at a transition distance, the downwind propagation changes the spherical spreading into a cylindrical spreading with a 3 dB decrease. It is shown how the transition distance and sound intensity depend on the LLJ parameters. The pivotal phenomenon is the non-coherent superposition of ground reflected rays in the turbulent atmosphere. PMID:27106309

  1. Ion orbits in a cylindrical Langmuir probe

    SciTech Connect

    Taccogna, Francesco; Longo, Savino; Capitelli, Mario

    2006-04-15

    It has been suggested that in weakly collisional sheaths, potential wells and barriers could appear due to ion-neutral momentum and charge transfer collisions. These can cause the presence of repulsed and trapped ions in the region surrounding a negatively biased Langmuir probe, invalidating the commonly used orbital-motion-limited theory of ion current. This is still an open question concerning also the charging and shielding of dust grains, and at present, no fully self-consistent treatment exists. For this reason, a particle-in-cell/test-particle Monte Carlo simulation of the dynamics of an argon plasma in the region surrounding an attracting cylindrical probe at medium gas pressure has been developed. The results of the present simulation for different probe potentials and discharge pressures demonstrate the complex structure of electric potential around the probe and the failure of collisionless theories.

  2. Unzipping of carbon nanotubes is geometry-dependent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Zhigong; Mu, Xin; Luo, Tengfei; Xu, Zhiping

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) unzipping is a facile and efficient technique to produce narrow graphene nanoribbons. The diameter and chirality of CNTs control the geometry of the unzipped nanoribbons. In this work, we analyze the energetics of oxidation- and hydrogenation-induced unzipping processes. Empirical reactive potential-based energy calculations show that there is a geometry-dependent energy barrier for oxidation-induced unzipping, which is absent in the exothermal hydrogenation process. These results are discussed by considering the unzipping process as crack nucleation and propagation processes in a pre-stressed cylindrical shell. Fitting our simulation data through the theoretical model provides a quantitative way to estimate the key parameters in CNT unzipping that can be used to optimize the experimental procedure.

  3. Computer-Aided Geometry Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoosmith, J. N. (Compiler); Fulton, R. E. (Compiler)

    1984-01-01

    Techniques in computer-aided geometry modeling and their application are addressed. Mathematical modeling, solid geometry models, management of geometric data, development of geometry standards, and interactive and graphic procedures are discussed. The applications include aeronautical and aerospace structures design, fluid flow modeling, and gas turbine design.

  4. Teaching of Geometry in Bulgaria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bankov, Kiril

    2013-01-01

    Geometry plays an important role in the school mathematics curriculum all around the world. Teaching of geometry varies a lot (Hoyls, Foxman, & Kuchemann, 2001). Many countries revise the objectives, the content, and the approaches to the geometry in school. Studies of the processes show that there are not common trends of these changes…

  5. Geometry of Quantum States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bengtsson, Ingemar; Zyczkowski, Karol

    2006-05-01

    Quantum information theory is at the frontiers of physics, mathematics and information science, offering a variety of solutions that are impossible using classical theory. This book provides an introduction to the key concepts used in processing quantum information and reveals that quantum mechanics is a generalisation of classical probability theory. After a gentle introduction to the necessary mathematics the authors describe the geometry of quantum state spaces. Focusing on finite dimensional Hilbert spaces, they discuss the statistical distance measures and entropies used in quantum theory. The final part of the book is devoted to quantum entanglement - a non-intuitive phenomenon discovered by Schrödinger, which has become a key resource for quantum computation. This richly-illustrated book is useful to a broad audience of graduates and researchers interested in quantum information theory. Exercises follow each chapter, with hints and answers supplied. The first book to focus on the geometry of quantum states Stresses the similarities and differences between classical and quantum theory Uses a non-technical style and numerous figures to make the book accessible to non-specialists

  6. Cylindrical thin-shell wormholes supported by phantom energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eid, A.

    2016-09-01

    In the framework of Darmois-Israel formalism, the general equations describing the motion of cylindrical thin-shell wormholes supported by equation of state of phantom energy are derived. The linear perturbation approach is used to investigate the stability of a cylindrical thin-shell wormhole of a static solution.

  7. Properties of cylindrical and spherical heavy ion-acoustic solitary and shock structures in a multispecies plasma with superthermal electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, M. G.; Rahman, M. M.; Hossen, M. R.; Mamun, A. A.

    2016-02-01

    A theoretical investigation on heavy ion-acoustic (HIA) solitary and shock structures has been accomplished in an unmagnetized multispecies plasma consisting of inertialess kappa-distributed superthermal electrons, Boltzmann light ions, and adiabatic positively charged inertial heavy ions. Using the reductive perturbation technique, the nonplanar (cylindrical and spherical) Kortewg-de Vries (KdV) and Burgers equations have been derived. The solitary and shock wave solutions of the KdV and Burgers equations, respectively, have been numerically analyzed. The effects of superthermality of electrons, adiabaticity of heavy ions, and nonplanar geometry, which noticeably modify the basic features (viz. polarity, amplitude, phase speed, etc.) of small but finite amplitude HIA solitary and shock structures, have been carefully investigated. The HIA solitary and shock structures in nonplanar geometry have been found to distinctly differ from those in planar geometry. Novel features of our present attempt may contribute to the physics of nonlinear electrostatic perturbation in astrophysical and laboratory plasmas.

  8. MHD Stability Trends from Perturbed Equilibria: Possible Limitations with Toroidal Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comer, K. J.; Callen, J. D.; Hegna, C. C.; Turnbull, A. D.; Cowley, S.

    2003-10-01

    The effects of equilibrium changes on ideal MHD properties are usually studied using numerical parameter scans. Previously, we introduced a new technique to explore these dependencies: changes in the potential energy δ W due to equilibrium changes are found with an expansion of the energy principle, rather than an eigenvalue-solver code. Validation of the approach in toroidal geometry attempted to use GATO (an ideal MHD stability code) and DIII-D shot 87009. The approach should succeed with the global modes of 87009; however, ˜ 0.1% changes to qo predicted δ W rapidly increasing. Perturbing β of other toroidal equilibria resulted in similar behavior. We first review results for a cylindrical equilibrium and for 87009. Between the cylindrical case and 87009 lie several other equilibria, which should produce intermediate results. We examine several of these intermediate equilibria, starting with the cylindrical case and changing aspect ratio, shape and profiles until ending at 87009.

  9. Geometry from Gauge Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Correa, Diego H.; Silva, Guillermo A.

    2008-07-28

    We discuss how geometrical and topological aspects of certain (1/2)-BPS type IIB geometries are captured by their dual operators in N = 4 Super Yang-Mills theory. The type IIB solutions are characterized by arbitrary droplet pictures in a plane and we consider, in particular, axially symmetric droplets. The 1-loop anomalous dimension of the dual gauge theory operators probed with single traces is described by some bosonic lattice Hamiltonians. These Hamiltonians are shown to encode the topology of the droplets. In appropriate BMN limits, the Hamiltonians spectrum reproduces the spectrum of near-BPS string excitations propagating along each of the individual edges of the droplet. We also study semiclassical regimes for the Hamiltonians. For droplets having disconnected constituents, the Hamiltonian admits different complimentary semiclassical descriptions, each one replicating the semiclassical description for closed strings extending in each of the constituents.

  10. Critique of information geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Skilling, John

    2014-12-05

    As applied to probability, information geometry fails because probability distributions do not form a metric space. Probability theory rests on a compelling foundation of elementary symmetries, which also support information (aka minus entropy, Kullback-Leibler) H(p;q) as the unique measure of divergence from source probability distribution q to destination p. Because the only compatible connective H is from≠to asymmetric, H(p;q)≠H(q;p), there can be no compatible geometrical distance (which would necessarily be from=to symmetric). Hence there is no distance relationship compatible with the structure of probability theory. Metrics g and densities sqrt(det(g)) interpreted as prior probabilities follow from the definition of distance, and must fail likewise. Various metrics and corresponding priors have been proposed, Fisher's being the most popular, but all must behave unacceptably. This is illustrated with simple counter-examples.

  11. Optically defined mechanical geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barasheed, Abeer Z.; Müller, Tina; Sankey, Jack C.

    2016-05-01

    In the field of optomechanics, radiation forces have provided a particularly high level of control over the frequency and dissipation of mechanical elements. Here we propose a class of optomechanical systems in which light exerts a similarly profound influence over two other fundamental parameters: geometry and mass. By applying an optical trap to one lattice site of an extended phononic crystal, we show it is possible to create a tunable, localized mechanical mode. Owing to light's simultaneous and constructive coupling with the structure's continuum of modes, we estimate that a trap power at the level of a single intracavity photon should be capable of producing a significant effect within a realistic, chip-scale device.

  12. Magnetism in curved geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streubel, Robert; Fischer, Peter; Kronast, Florian; Kravchuk, Volodymyr P.; Sheka, Denis D.; Gaididei, Yuri; Schmidt, Oliver G.; Makarov, Denys

    2016-09-01

    Extending planar two-dimensional structures into the three-dimensional space has become a general trend in multiple disciplines, including electronics, photonics, plasmonics and magnetics. This approach provides means to modify conventional or to launch novel functionalities by tailoring the geometry of an object, e.g. its local curvature. In a generic electronic system, curvature results in the appearance of scalar and vector geometric potentials inducing anisotropic and chiral effects. In the specific case of magnetism, even in the simplest case of a curved anisotropic Heisenberg magnet, the curvilinear geometry manifests two exchange-driven interactions, namely effective anisotropy and antisymmetric exchange, i.e. Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya-like interaction. As a consequence, a family of novel curvature-driven effects emerges, which includes magnetochiral effects and topologically induced magnetization patterning, resulting in theoretically predicted unlimited domain wall velocities, chirality symmetry breaking and Cherenkov-like effects for magnons. The broad range of altered physical properties makes these curved architectures appealing in view of fundamental research on e.g. skyrmionic systems, magnonic crystals or exotic spin configurations. In addition to these rich physics, the application potential of three-dimensionally shaped objects is currently being explored as magnetic field sensorics for magnetofluidic applications, spin-wave filters, advanced magneto-encephalography devices for diagnosis of epilepsy or for energy-efficient racetrack memory devices. These recent developments ranging from theoretical predictions over fabrication of three-dimensionally curved magnetic thin films, hollow cylinders or wires, to their characterization using integral means as well as the development of advanced tomography approaches are in the focus of this review.

  13. Magnetism in curved geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streubel, Robert; Fischer, Peter; Kronast, Florian; Kravchuk, Volodymyr P.; Sheka, Denis D.; Gaididei, Yuri; Schmidt, Oliver G.; Makarov, Denys

    2016-09-01

    Extending planar two-dimensional structures into the three-dimensional space has become a general trend in multiple disciplines, including electronics, photonics, plasmonics and magnetics. This approach provides means to modify conventional or to launch novel functionalities by tailoring the geometry of an object, e.g. its local curvature. In a generic electronic system, curvature results in the appearance of scalar and vector geometric potentials inducing anisotropic and chiral effects. In the specific case of magnetism, even in the simplest case of a curved anisotropic Heisenberg magnet, the curvilinear geometry manifests two exchange-driven interactions, namely effective anisotropy and antisymmetric exchange, i.e. Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya-like interaction. As a consequence, a family of novel curvature-driven effects emerges, which includes magnetochiral effects and topologically induced magnetization patterning, resulting in theoretically predicted unlimited domain wall velocities, chirality symmetry breaking and Cherenkov-like effects for magnons. The broad range of altered physical properties makes these curved architectures appealing in view of fundamental research on e.g. skyrmionic systems, magnonic crystals or exotic spin configurations. In addition to these rich physics, the application potential of three-dimensionally shaped objects is currently being explored as magnetic field sensorics for magnetofluidic applications, spin-wave filters, advanced magneto-encephalography devices for diagnosis of epilepsy or for energy-efficient racetrack memory devices. These recent developments ranging from theoretical predictions over fabrication of three-dimensionally curved magnetic thin films, hollow cylinders or wires, to their characterization using integral means as well as the development of advanced tomography approaches are in the focus of this review.

  14. Focal field interactions from cylindrical vector beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biss, David Paul

    In optical imaging there is always a push to improve image quality or find methods to gain new imaging information. This is apparent in the optical lithography and semiconductor inspection industries, where optical metrology and imaging systems are using larger numerical aperture systems and finding new imaging methods, such as immersion imaging, to shrink focal fields. At high numerical apertures, scalar diffraction theories break down and polarization effects play a large role in focal field interactions. With this interest in polarization, new models for local polarization effects are needed. Along with new models, cylindrically-symmetric polarized beams known as cylindrical vector (CV) beams, can provide new methods of imaging in this high NA regime. In this thesis, we examine the modeling of radially and azimuthally polarized beams focused at high numerical aperture in the presence of a planar interface. These focal fields are also modeled with primary spherical, coma, and astigmatism wavefront aberrations in the entrance pupil of the focusing system. Particular attention is given to the longitudinal field component generated by the focused radial beam, and the correlation between the magnetic and electric fields of radial and azimuthal beams. A scanning edge test using linearly polarized beams is modeled using a rigorous coupled wave (RCW) method and is compared to experimental data. The ability of the scanning edge test to predict spot asymmetry is investigated though the comparison of the RCW scanning edge model with free space vector diffraction theories. This RCW model is extended to include CV beam illumination and mode filtering of the system's exit pupil fields. This extension provides a model to accurately predict the performance of a dark-field imaging modality using radially and azimuthally polarized beams. Predictions from this model are compared to experimental results with attention given to defocus effects and the ability to accurately measure

  15. Converging cylindrical shocks in ideal magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Pullin, D. I.; Mostert, W.; Wheatley, V.; Samtaney, R.

    2014-09-15

    We consider a cylindrically symmetrical shock converging onto an axis within the framework of ideal, compressible-gas non-dissipative magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). In cylindrical polar co-ordinates we restrict attention to either constant axial magnetic field or to the azimuthal but singular magnetic field produced by a line current on the axis. Under the constraint of zero normal magnetic field and zero tangential fluid speed at the shock, a set of restricted shock-jump conditions are obtained as functions of the shock Mach number, defined as the ratio of the local shock speed to the unique magnetohydrodynamic wave speed ahead of the shock, and also of a parameter measuring the local strength of the magnetic field. For the line current case, two approaches are explored and the results compared in detail. The first is geometrical shock-dynamics where the restricted shock-jump conditions are applied directly to the equation on the characteristic entering the shock from behind. This gives an ordinary-differential equation for the shock Mach number as a function of radius which is integrated numerically to provide profiles of the shock implosion. Also, analytic, asymptotic results are obtained for the shock trajectory at small radius. The second approach is direct numerical solution of the radially symmetric MHD equations using a shock-capturing method. For the axial magnetic field case the shock implosion is of the Guderley power-law type with exponent that is not affected by the presence of a finite magnetic field. For the axial current case, however, the presence of a tangential magnetic field ahead of the shock with strength inversely proportional to radius introduces a length scale R=√(μ{sub 0}/p{sub 0}) I/(2 π) where I is the current, μ{sub 0} is the permeability, and p{sub 0} is the pressure ahead of the shock. For shocks initiated at r ≫ R, shock convergence is first accompanied by shock strengthening as for the strictly gas-dynamic implosion. The

  16. Converging cylindrical shocks in ideal magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullin, D. I.; Mostert, W.; Wheatley, V.; Samtaney, R.

    2014-09-01

    We consider a cylindrically symmetrical shock converging onto an axis within the framework of ideal, compressible-gas non-dissipative magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). In cylindrical polar co-ordinates we restrict attention to either constant axial magnetic field or to the azimuthal but singular magnetic field produced by a line current on the axis. Under the constraint of zero normal magnetic field and zero tangential fluid speed at the shock, a set of restricted shock-jump conditions are obtained as functions of the shock Mach number, defined as the ratio of the local shock speed to the unique magnetohydrodynamic wave speed ahead of the shock, and also of a parameter measuring the local strength of the magnetic field. For the line current case, two approaches are explored and the results compared in detail. The first is geometrical shock-dynamics where the restricted shock-jump conditions are applied directly to the equation on the characteristic entering the shock from behind. This gives an ordinary-differential equation for the shock Mach number as a function of radius which is integrated numerically to provide profiles of the shock implosion. Also, analytic, asymptotic results are obtained for the shock trajectory at small radius. The second approach is direct numerical solution of the radially symmetric MHD equations using a shock-capturing method. For the axial magnetic field case the shock implosion is of the Guderley power-law type with exponent that is not affected by the presence of a finite magnetic field. For the axial current case, however, the presence of a tangential magnetic field ahead of the shock with strength inversely proportional to radius introduces a length scale R=sqrt{μ _0/p_0} I/(2 π ) where I is the current, μ0 is the permeability, and p0 is the pressure ahead of the shock. For shocks initiated at r ≫ R, shock convergence is first accompanied by shock strengthening as for the strictly gas-dynamic implosion. The diverging magnetic field

  17. (3 + 1)-dimensional cylindrical Korteweg-de Vries equation for nonextensive dust acoustic waves: Symbolic computation and exact solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Shimin; Wang Hongli; Mei Liquan

    2012-06-15

    By combining the effects of bounded cylindrical geometry, azimuthal and axial perturbations, the nonlinear dust acoustic waves (DAWs) in an unmagnetized plasma consisting of negatively charged dust grains, nonextensive ions, and nonextensive electrons are studied in this paper. Using the reductive perturbation method, a (3 + 1)-dimensional variable-coefficient cylindrical Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation describing the nonlinear propagation of DAWs is derived. Via the homogeneous balance principle, improved F-expansion technique and symbolic computation, the exact traveling and solitary wave solutions of the KdV equation are presented in terms of Jacobi elliptic functions. Moreover, the effects of the plasma parameters on the solitary wave structures are discussed in detail. The obtained results could help in providing a good fit between theoretical analysis and real applications in space physics and future laboratory plasma experiments where long-range interactions are present.

  18. Surface tension and long range corrections of cylindrical interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Bourasseau, E.; Ghoufi, A.

    2015-12-21

    The calculation of the surface tension of curved interfaces has been deeply investigated from molecular simulation during this last past decade. Recently, the thermodynamic Test-Area (TA) approach has been extended to the calculation of surface tension of curved interfaces. In the case of the cylindrical vapour-liquid interfaces of water and Lennard-Jones fluids, it was shown that the surface tension was independent of the curvature of the interface. In addition, the surface tension of the cylindrical interface is higher than that of the planar interface. Molecular simulations of cylindrical interfaces have been so far performed (i) by using a shifted potential, (ii) by means of large cutoff without periodic boundary conditions, or (iii) by ignoring the long range corrections to the surface tension due to the difficulty to estimate them. Indeed, unlike the planar interfaces there are no available operational expressions to consider the tail corrections to the surface tension of cylindrical interfaces. We propose here to develop the long range corrections of the surface tension for cylindrical interfaces by using the non-exponential TA (TA2) method. We also extend the formulation of the Mecke-Winkelmann corrections initially developed for planar surfaces to cylindrical interfaces. We complete this study by the calculation of the surface tension of cylindrical surfaces of liquid tin and copper using the embedded atom model potentials.

  19. Theoretical study of interactions between striated cylindrical particles and membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing-Jing; Jia-Wei, Feng; Ren, Chun-Lai

    2015-08-01

    The interaction of nanoparticles with cell membranes is of great importance because of their potential biomedical applications. In this paper, we investigate the adhesion of stripe-patterned cylinders to a fluid membrane with a full consideration of the Helfrich free energy. Three situations are considered: one striated cylindrical particle, two pure cylindrical particles, and two Janus cylindrical particles. It is found that, with the adhesion of a single sparse striated cylinder, there are a variety of steady-states with energy barriers and the stable state is determined by the pattern of the cylinder. However, when the particle is densely striped, it has no effect on the stable state. By comparing the wrapping degree of two cylindrical particles with that of a single cylindrical particle, we find that two pure cylindrical particles can promote or suppress their interaction with the membrane under different situations. However, two Janus cylindrical particles can only inhibit their interaction with the membrane. Besides, this interaction is related to a first-order transition which is a shallow-to-deep wrapping transition for two pure cylinders while it is a shallow-to-half wrapping transition for two Janus cylinders. Furthermore, the position where the transition happens as a function of adhesion energy is given for fixed membrane tension and the precondition of the transition is presented. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 91027040 and 21274062).

  20. Surface tension and long range corrections of cylindrical interfaces.

    PubMed

    Bourasseau, E; Malfreyt, P; Ghoufi, A

    2015-12-21

    The calculation of the surface tension of curved interfaces has been deeply investigated from molecular simulation during this last past decade. Recently, the thermodynamic Test-Area (TA) approach has been extended to the calculation of surface tension of curved interfaces. In the case of the cylindrical vapour-liquid interfaces of water and Lennard-Jones fluids, it was shown that the surface tension was independent of the curvature of the interface. In addition, the surface tension of the cylindrical interface is higher than that of the planar interface. Molecular simulations of cylindrical interfaces have been so far performed (i) by using a shifted potential, (ii) by means of large cutoff without periodic boundary conditions, or (iii) by ignoring the long range corrections to the surface tension due to the difficulty to estimate them. Indeed, unlike the planar interfaces there are no available operational expressions to consider the tail corrections to the surface tension of cylindrical interfaces. We propose here to develop the long range corrections of the surface tension for cylindrical interfaces by using the non-exponential TA (TA2) method. We also extend the formulation of the Mecke-Winkelmann corrections initially developed for planar surfaces to cylindrical interfaces. We complete this study by the calculation of the surface tension of cylindrical surfaces of liquid tin and copper using the embedded atom model potentials.

  1. Cylindrical Hall Thrusters with Permanent Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Raitses, Yevgeny; Merino, Enrique; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2010-10-18

    The use of permanent magnets instead of electromagnet coils for low power Hall thrusters can offer a significant reduction of both the total electric power consumption and the thruster mass. Two permanent magnet versions of the miniaturized cylindrical Hall thruster (CHT) of different overall dimensions were operated in the power range of 50W-300 W. The discharge and plasma plume measurements revealed that the CHT thrusters with permanent magnets and electromagnet coils operate rather differently. In particular, the angular ion current density distribution from the permanent magnet thrusters has an unusual halo shape, with a majority of high energy ions flowing at large angles with respect to the thruster centerline. Differences in the magnetic field topology outside the thruster channel and in the vicinity of the channel exit are likely responsible for the differences in the plume characteristics measured for the CHTs with electromagnets and permanent magnets. It is shown that the presence of the reversing-direction or cusp-type magnetic field configuration inside the thruster channel without a strong axial magnetic field outside the thruster channel does not lead to the halo plasma plume from the CHT. __________________________________________________

  2. Force Balances in Systems of Cylindrical Polyelectrolytes

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, Stephen L.; McQuarrie, Donald A.

    1973-01-01

    A detailed analysis is made of the model system of two parallel cylindrical polyelectrolytes which contain ionizable groups on their surfaces and are immersed in an ionic bathing medium. The interaction between the cylinders is examined by considering the interplay between repulsive electrostatic forces and attractive forces of electrodynamic origin. The repulsive force arises from the screened coulomb interaction between the surface charge distributions on the cylinders and has been treated by developing a solution to the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation. The boundary condition at the cylinder surfaces is determined as a self-consistent functional of the potential, with the input consisting of the density of ionizable groups and their dissociation constants. It is suggested that a reasonably accurate representation for the form of the attractive force can be obtained by performing a pairwise summation of the individual interatomic forces. A quantitative estimate is obtained using a Hamaker constant chosen on the basis of rigorous calculations on simpler systems. It is found that a balance exists between these repulsive and attractive forces at separations in good agreement with those observed in arrays of tobacco mosaic virus and in the A band myosin lattice in striated muscle. The behavior of the balance point as a function of the pH and ionic strength of the bathing medium closely parallels that seen experimentally. PMID:4696760

  3. Cylindrical converging shock initiation of reactive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Charles M.; Horie, Yasuyuki; Lindsay, Christopher Michael; Butler, George C.; Lambert, David; Welle, Eric

    2012-03-01

    Recent research has been conducted that builds on the Forbes et al. (1997) study of inducing a rapid solid state reaction in a highly porous core using a converging cylindrical shock driven by a high explosive. The high explosive annular charge used in this research to compress the center reactive core was comparable to PBXN-110. Some modifications were made on the physical configuration of the test item for scale-up and ease of production. The reactive materials (I2O5/Al and I2O5/Al/Teflon) were hand mixed and packed to a tap density of about 32 percent. Data provided by a Cordon 114 high speed framing camera and a Photon Doppler Velocimetry instrument provided exit gas expansion, core particle and cylinder wall velocities. Analysis indicates that the case expansion velocity differs according to the core formulation and behaved similar to the baseline high explosive core with the exit gas of the reactive materials producing comparable velocities. Results from CTH hydrocode used to model the test item compares favorably to the experimental results.

  4. Technology Selections for Cylindrical Compact Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey A. Phillips

    2010-10-01

    A variety of process approaches are available and have been used historically for manufacture of cylindrical fuel compacts. The jet milling, fluid bed overcoating, and hot press compacting approach being adopted in the U.S. AGR Fuel Development Program for scale-up of the compacting process involves significant paradigm shifts from historical approaches. New methods are being pursued because of distinct advantages in simplicity, yield, and elimination of process mixed waste. Recent advances in jet milling technology allow simplified dry matrix powder preparation. The matrix preparation method is well matched with patented fluid bed powder overcoating technology recently developed for the pharmaceutical industry and directly usable for high density fuel particle matrix overcoating. High density overcoating places fuel particles as close as possible to their final position in the compact and is matched with hot press compacting which fully fluidizes matrix resin to achieve die fill at low compacting pressures and without matrix end caps. Overall the revised methodology provides a simpler process that should provide very high yields, improve homogeneity, further reduce defect fractions, eliminate intermediate grading and QC steps, and allow further increases in fuel packing fractions.

  5. Rotating cylindrical wormholes and energy conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronnikov, K. A.; Krechet, V. G.

    2016-01-01

    We seek wormholes among rotating cylindrically symmetric configurations in general relativity. Exact wormhole solutions are presented with such sources of gravity as a massless scalar field, a cosmological constant, and a scalar field with an exponential potential. However, none of these solutions are asymptotically flat, which excludes the existence of wormhole entrances as local objects in our Universe. To overcome this difficulty, we try to build configurations with flat asymptotic regions using the cut-and-paste procedure: on both sides of the throat, a wormhole solution is matched to a properly chosen region of flat space-time at some surfaces Σ- and Σ+. It is shown, however, that if the source of gravity in the throat region is a scalar field with an arbitrary potential, then one or both thin shells appearing on Σ- and Σ+ inevitably violate the null energy condition. Thus, although rotating wormhole solutions are easily found without exotic matter, such matter is still necessary for obtaining asymptotic flatness.

  6. Cylindrical isentropic compression by ultrahigh magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Zhuowei; Luo, Hao; Zhang, Hengdi; Zhao, Shichao; Tang, Xiaosong; Tong, Yanjin; Song, Zhenfei; Tan, Fuli; Zhao, Jianheng; Sun, Chengwei

    2014-05-01

    The cylindrical isentropic compression by ultrahigh magnetic field (MC-1) is a kind of unique high energy density technique. It has characters like ultrahigh pressure and low temperature rising, and would have widely used in areas like high pressure physics, new material synthesis and ultrahigh magnetic field physics. The Institute of Fluid Physics, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics (IFP, CAEP) has begun the experiment since 2011 and a primary experimental device had been set-up. In the experiments, a seed magnetic field of 5 Tesla were set-up first and compressed by a stainless steel liner which is driven by high explosive initiated synchronously. The internal diameter of the liner is 97 mm, and its thickness is 1.5 mm. The movement of liner was recorded optically and a typical turnaround phenomenon was observed. From the photography results the liner was compressed smoothly and evenly and its average velocity was about 5-6 km/s. In the experiment a axial magnetic field of over 1400 Tesla has been recorded. The MC-1 process was numerical simulated by 1D MHD code MC11D and the simulations are in accord with the experiments.

  7. Cylindrical gate valve apparatus and method

    SciTech Connect

    Hynes, J. H.; Morrill, C. D.

    1985-04-30

    A safety valve is disclosed which may be installed on an offshore wellhead above the tubing head and below the Christmas tree. The valve has a housing with upper and lower vertical passages and a lateral housing passage. A cylindrical gate is disposed within the lateral passage and includes a ''T'' shaped passage therein. The gate may be moved laterally and angularly within the lateral passage. During completion or workover of the well, the gate is moved laterally until the upper and lower vertical passages are in full open communication to run drills, hangers or other large diameter devices into the well via a BOP which may be attached to the top of the housing. During normal production, the gate may be laterally moved into the intersection of the vertical and lateral passages and the small through head part of the ''T'' passage serves to provide a vertical flow path through the production bore which is sealed off from the larger upper and lower vertical passages. Flow through side outlets in the housing is possible through the base of the ''T'' passage. The gate may be angularly moved to have production to the lateral outlets via the head part of the ''T'' when the base part of the ''T'' is aligned with production tubing. Should the need arise, the valve may be angularly rotated to a position where the fluid flow path of the production tubing is completely shut in.

  8. Electron emitter pulsed-type cylindrical IEC

    SciTech Connect

    Miley, G.H.; Gu, Y.; Stubbers, R.; Zich, R.; Sved, J.; Anderl, R.; Hartwell, J.

    1997-12-31

    A cylindrical version of the single grid Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) device (termed the C-device) has been developed for use as a 2.5-MeV D-D fusion neutron source for neutron activation analysis. The C-device employs a hollow-tube type cathode with similar anodes backed up by ``reflector`` dishes. The resulting discharge differs from a conventional hollow cathode discharge, by creating an explicit ion beam which is ``pinched`` in the cathode region. Resulting fusion reactions generate {approximately}10{sup 6} neutron/s. A pulsed version is under development for applications requiring higher fluxes. Several pulsing techniques are under study, including an electron emitter (e-emitter) assisted discharge in a thorated tungsten wire emitter located behind a slotted area in the reflector dishes. Pulsing is initiated after establishing a low power steady-state discharge by pulsing the e-emitter current using a capacitor switch type circuit. The resulting electron jet, coupled with the discharge by the biased slot array, creates a strong pulse in the pinched ion beam. The pulse length/repetition rate are controlled by the e-emitter pulse circuit. Typical parameters in present studies are {approximately}30{micro}s, 10Hz and 1-amp ion current. Corresponding neutron measurements are an In-foil type activation counter for time averaged rates. Results for a wide variety of operating conditions are presented.

  9. Planetary Image Geometry Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deen, Robert C.; Pariser, Oleg

    2010-01-01

    The Planetary Image Geometry (PIG) library is a multi-mission library used for projecting images (EDRs, or Experiment Data Records) and managing their geometry for in-situ missions. A collection of models describes cameras and their articulation, allowing application programs such as mosaickers, terrain generators, and pointing correction tools to be written in a multi-mission manner, without any knowledge of parameters specific to the supported missions. Camera model objects allow transformation of image coordinates to and from view vectors in XYZ space. Pointing models, specific to each mission, describe how to orient the camera models based on telemetry or other information. Surface models describe the surface in general terms. Coordinate system objects manage the various coordinate systems involved in most missions. File objects manage access to metadata (labels, including telemetry information) in the input EDRs and RDRs (Reduced Data Records). Label models manage metadata information in output files. Site objects keep track of different locations where the spacecraft might be at a given time. Radiometry models allow correction of radiometry for an image. Mission objects contain basic mission parameters. Pointing adjustment ("nav") files allow pointing to be corrected. The object-oriented structure (C++) makes it easy to subclass just the pieces of the library that are truly mission-specific. Typically, this involves just the pointing model and coordinate systems, and parts of the file model. Once the library was developed (initially for Mars Polar Lander, MPL), adding new missions ranged from two days to a few months, resulting in significant cost savings as compared to rewriting all the application programs for each mission. Currently supported missions include Mars Pathfinder (MPF), MPL, Mars Exploration Rover (MER), Phoenix, and Mars Science Lab (MSL). Applications based on this library create the majority of operational image RDRs for those missions. A

  10. Acoustic waves of different geometry in polydisperse bubble liquids: Theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigmatulin, R. I.; Gubaidullin, D. A.; Fedorov, Yu. V.

    2013-06-01

    A mathematical model that determines the propagation of acoustic waves of different geometry in two-fraction mixtures of liquids with polydispersed gas bubbles of various compositions is presented. A unique dispersion relationship, which takes into account the propagation of the plane, spherical, and cylindrical perturbations in these mixtures, is derived. It is shown that the theoretical curves of the phase velocity and the damping factor agree well with the experimental data involving the resonant frequency range.

  11. Phase retrieval in x-ray coherent Fresnel projection-geometry diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    De Caro, Liberato; Giannini, Cinzia; Cedola, Alessia; Pelliccia, Daniele; Lagomarsino, Stefano; Jark, Werner

    2007-01-22

    Coherent x-ray diffraction experiments were performed in Fresnel regime, within a line-projection geometry. A planar x-ray waveguide was used to focus coherent cylindrical waves onto a 7.2 {mu}m Kevlar fiber, which acts as a phase object for hard x rays. The phase was retrieved, by using a Fourier-based iterative phasing algorithm, consistent with measured diffraction data and known constraints in real space, with a submicrometer spatial resolution.

  12. Confined H(1s) and H(2p) under different geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micca Longo, G.; Longo, S.; Giordano, D.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper the diffusion Monte Carlo method is applied to the confined hydrogen atom with different confinement geometries. This approach is validated using the much studied spherical and cylindrical confinements and then applied to cubical and squared ones, for which data are not available, as new applications of the method relevant to solid state physics. The energy eigenvalues of the ground state and one low-lying excited state are reported as a function of the characteristic confinement length.

  13. Failure Waves in Cylindrical Glass Bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazamias, James U.; Bless, Stephan J.; Marder, Michael P.

    1997-07-01

    Failure waves, a propagating front separating virgin and comminuted material, have been receiving a fair amount of attention the last couple of years. While most scientists have been looking at failure waves in plate impact geometries, we have conducted a series of experiments on Pyrex bars. In this paper, we present two types of photographic data from a series of tests. A streak camera was used to determine velocities of the failure front as a function of impact stress. A polaroid camera and a flash lamp provide detailed pictures of the actual event. Attempts were made to observe failure waves in amorphous quartz and acrylic.

  14. Plasmonic Bloch oscillations in cylindrical metal-dielectric waveguide arrays.

    PubMed

    Shiu, Ruei-Cheng; Lan, Yung-Chiang; Chen, Chin-Min

    2010-12-01

    This study investigates plasmonic Bloch oscillations (PBOs) in cylindrical metal-dielectric waveguide arrays (MDWAs) by performing numerical simulations and theoretical analyses. Optical conformal mapping is used to transform cylindrical MDWAs into equivalent chirped structures with permittivity and permeability gradients across the waveguide arrays, which is caused by the curvature of the cylindrical waveguide. The PBOs are attributed to the transformed structure. The period of oscillation increases with the wavelength of the incident Gaussian beam. However, the amplitude of oscillation is almost independent of wavelength.

  15. Limit of concentration for cylindrical concentrators under extended light sources.

    PubMed

    Miñano, J C; Luque, A

    1983-08-15

    Cylindrical concentrators illuminated by an extended source with an arbitrary distribution of radiance are analyzed taking into account basic properties derived from the Fermat principle and not from the specific concentrator shape. The upper limit of concentration achievable with this type of concentrator is obtained and it is found to be lower than that of general (3-D) concentrators. Cylindrical compound parabolic concentrators are analyzed in the light of this theory, and it is shown that they achieve the highest optical concentration possible for a cylindrical concentrator. PMID:18196152

  16. Cylindrical array luminescent solar concentrators: performance boosts by geometric effects.

    PubMed

    Videira, Jose J H; Bilotti, Emiliano; Chatten, Amanda J

    2016-07-11

    This paper presents an investigation of the geometric effects within a cylindrical array luminescent solar concentrator (LSC). Photon concentration of a cylindrical LSC increases linearly with cylinder length up to 2 metres. Raytrace modelling on the shading effects of circles on their neighbours demonstrates effective incident light trapping in a cylindrical LSC array at angles of incidence between 60-70 degrees. Raytrace modelling with real-world lighting conditions shows optical efficiency boosts when the suns angle of incidence is within this angle range. On certain days, 2 separate times of peak optical efficiency can be attained over the course of sunrise-solar noon. PMID:27410904

  17. Investigating Fractal Geometry Using LOGO.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, David A.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses dimensionality in Euclidean geometry. Presents methods to produce fractals using LOGO. Uses the idea of self-similarity. Included are program listings and suggested extension activities. (MVL)

  18. Equilibrium state of a cylindrical particle with flat ends in nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, S Masoomeh; Ejtehadi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    A continuum theory is employed to numerically study the equilibrium orientation and defect structures of a circular cylindrical particle with flat ends under a homeotropic anchoring condition in a uniform nematic medium. Different aspect ratios of this colloidal geometry from thin discotic to long rodlike shapes and several colloidal length scales ranging from mesoscale to nanoscale are investigated. We show that the equilibrium state of this colloidal geometry is sensitive to the two geometrical parameters: aspect ratio and length scale of the particle. For a large enough mesoscopic particle, there is a specific asymptotic equilibrium angle associated to each aspect ratio. Upon reducing the particle size to nanoscale, the equilibrium angle follows a descending or ascending trend in such a way that the equilibrium angle of a particle with the aspect ratio bigger than 1:1 (a discotic particle) goes to a parallel alignment with respect to the far-field nematic, whereas the equilibrium angle for a particle with the aspect ratio 1:1 and smaller (a rodlike particle) tends toward a perpendicular alignment to the uniform nematic direction. The discrepancy between the equilibrium angles of the mesoscopic and nanoscopic particles originates from the significant differences between their defect structures. The possible defect structures related to mesoscopic and nanoscopic colloidal particles of this geometry are also introduced.

  19. Equilibrium state of a cylindrical particle with flat ends in nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi, S. Masoomeh; Ejtehadi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    A continuum theory is employed to numerically study the equilibrium orientation and defect structures of a circular cylindrical particle with flat ends under a homeotropic anchoring condition in a uniform nematic medium. Different aspect ratios of this colloidal geometry from thin discotic to long rodlike shapes and several colloidal length scales ranging from mesoscale to nanoscale are investigated. We show that the equilibrium state of this colloidal geometry is sensitive to the two geometrical parameters: aspect ratio and length scale of the particle. For a large enough mesoscopic particle, there is a specific asymptotic equilibrium angle associated to each aspect ratio. Upon reducing the particle size to nanoscale, the equilibrium angle follows a descending or ascending trend in such a way that the equilibrium angle of a particle with the aspect ratio bigger than 1:1 (a discotic particle) goes to a parallel alignment with respect to the far-field nematic, whereas the equilibrium angle for a particle with the aspect ratio 1:1 and smaller (a rodlike particle) tends toward a perpendicular alignment to the uniform nematic direction. The discrepancy between the equilibrium angles of the mesoscopic and nanoscopic particles originates from the significant differences between their defect structures. The possible defect structures related to mesoscopic and nanoscopic colloidal particles of this geometry are also introduced.

  20. Equilibrium state of a cylindrical particle with flat ends in nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, S Masoomeh; Ejtehadi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    A continuum theory is employed to numerically study the equilibrium orientation and defect structures of a circular cylindrical particle with flat ends under a homeotropic anchoring condition in a uniform nematic medium. Different aspect ratios of this colloidal geometry from thin discotic to long rodlike shapes and several colloidal length scales ranging from mesoscale to nanoscale are investigated. We show that the equilibrium state of this colloidal geometry is sensitive to the two geometrical parameters: aspect ratio and length scale of the particle. For a large enough mesoscopic particle, there is a specific asymptotic equilibrium angle associated to each aspect ratio. Upon reducing the particle size to nanoscale, the equilibrium angle follows a descending or ascending trend in such a way that the equilibrium angle of a particle with the aspect ratio bigger than 1:1 (a discotic particle) goes to a parallel alignment with respect to the far-field nematic, whereas the equilibrium angle for a particle with the aspect ratio 1:1 and smaller (a rodlike particle) tends toward a perpendicular alignment to the uniform nematic direction. The discrepancy between the equilibrium angles of the mesoscopic and nanoscopic particles originates from the significant differences between their defect structures. The possible defect structures related to mesoscopic and nanoscopic colloidal particles of this geometry are also introduced. PMID:25679634

  1. Chemistry as a diagnostic of prestellar core geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tritsis, A.; Tassis, K.; Willacy, K.

    2016-05-01

    We present a new method for assessing the intrinsic 3D shape of prestellar cores from molecular column densities. We have employed hydrodynamic simulations of contracting, isothermal cores considering three intrinsic geometries: spherical, cylindrical/filamentary and disc-like. We have coupled our hydrodynamic simulations with non-equilibrium chemistry. We find that (a) when cores are observed very elongated (i.e. for aspect ratios ≤0.15) the intrinsic 3D geometry can be probed by their 2D molecular emission maps, since these exhibit significant qualitative morphological differences between cylindrical and disc-like cores. Specifically, if a disc-like core is observed as a filamentary object in dust emission, then it will be observed as two parallel filaments in N2H+; (b) for cores with higher aspect ratios (i.e. 0.15-0.9) we define a metric Δ that quantifies whether a molecular column density profile is centrally peaked, depressed or flat. We have identified one molecule (CN) for which Δ as a function of the aspect ratio probes the 3D geometry of the core; and (c) for cores with almost circular projections (i.e. for aspect ratios ˜1), we have identified three molecules (OH, CO and H2CO) that can be used to probe the intrinsic 3D shape by close inspection of their molecular column density radial profiles. We alter the temperature and the cosmic ray ionization rate and demonstrate that our method is robust against the choice of parameters.

  2. Effect of cylindrical confinement on the determination of laminar flame speeds using outwardly propagating flames

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, Michael P.; Chen, Zheng; Ju, Yiguang; Dryer, Frederick L.

    2009-04-15

    The effect of nonspherical (i.e. cylindrical) bomb geometry on the evolution of outwardly propagating flames and the determination of laminar flame speeds using the conventional constant-pressure technique is investigated experimentally and theoretically. The cylindrical chamber boundary modifies the propagation rate through the interaction of the wall with the flow induced by thermal expansion across the flame (even with constant pressure), which leads to significant distortion of the flame surface for large flame radii. These departures from the unconfined case, especially the resulting nonzero burned gas velocities, can lead to significant errors in flame speeds calculated using the conventional assumptions, especially for large flame radii. For example, at a flame radius of 0.5 times the wall radius, the flame speed calculated neglecting confinement effects can be low by {proportional_to}15% (even with constant pressure). A methodology to estimate the effect of nonzero burned gas velocities on the measured flame speed in cylindrical chambers is presented. Modeling and experiments indicate that the effect of confinement can be neglected for flame radii less than 0.3 times the wall radius while still achieving acceptable accuracy (within 3%). The methodology is applied to correct the flame speed for nonzero burned gas speeds, in order to extend the range of flame radii useful for flame speed measurements. Under the proposed scaling, the burned gas speed can be well approximated as a function of only flame radius for a given chamber geometry - i.e. the correction function need only be determined once for an apparatus and then it can be used for any mixture. Results indicate that the flow correction can be used to extract flame speeds for flame radii up to 0.5 times the wall radius with somewhat larger, yet still acceptable uncertainties for the cases studied. Flow-corrected burning velocities are measured for hydrogen and syngas mixtures at atmospheric and

  3. Experimental study and finite element simulation of the effect of cone angle on drawing ratio and thickness distribution in hydroforming of conical-cylindrical cups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepehrizadeh, M.; Gorji, A.; Zareh, B.; Bakhshi-Jooybari, M.; Norouzi, S.

    2011-01-01

    Conical parts have a lot of usage in aerospace and special industries. These parts usually formed by spinning, explosive forming, multistage deep drawing. Due to their bad forming condition in conventional methods, some new forming methods have been explored to increase the drawing ratio, hydroforming is one of the more effective methods. In this study hydrodynamic deep drawing assisted by radial pressure is used to form the conical-cylindrical parts. Commercially pure copper is used in this research. The process is initially simulated using the FEM solver ABAQUS. Experiments have been conducted with different punch geometries. The punch geometries consist of conical and cylindrical wall segments. This paper examines the effect of cone angle on drawing ratio and thickness distribution of conical cups. Using the measurements of thickness variations on the cup wall, the quality of the cups drawn has been evaluated. The results of the study demonstrated that increasing the cone angle has a important effect on drawing ratio and cause uniform thickness distribution. Also it was concluded that the conical-cylindrical parts had two critical regions at contact area of punch tip with the blank and the transition zone between the conical and cylindrical portions that variation at cone angle affected these regions and resulted to variation of these areas. It was proved that the results from the experiment and the simulation were in a reasonable agreement.

  4. Computer-Controlled Cylindrical Polishing Process for Large X-Ray Mirror Mandrels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, Gufran S.; Gubarev, Mikhail; Speegle, Chet; Ramsey, Brian

    2010-01-01

    We are developing high-energy grazing incidence shell optics for hard-x-ray telescopes. The resolution of a mirror shells depends on the quality of cylindrical mandrel from which they are being replicated. Mid-spatial-frequency axial figure error is a dominant contributor in the error budget of the mandrel. This paper presents our efforts to develop a deterministic cylindrical polishing process in order to keep the mid-spatial-frequency axial figure errors to a minimum. Simulation software is developed to model the residual surface figure errors of a mandrel due to the polishing process parameters and the tools used, as well as to compute the optical performance of the optics. The study carried out using the developed software was focused on establishing a relationship between the polishing process parameters and the mid-spatial-frequency error generation. The process parameters modeled are the speeds of the lap and the mandrel, the tool s influence function, the contour path (dwell) of the tools, their shape and the distribution of the tools on the polishing lap. Using the inputs from the mathematical model, a mandrel having conical approximated Wolter-1 geometry, has been polished on a newly developed computer-controlled cylindrical polishing machine. The preliminary results of a series of polishing experiments demonstrate a qualitative agreement with the developed model. We report our first experimental results and discuss plans for further improvements in the polishing process. The ability to simulate the polishing process is critical to optimize the polishing process, improve the mandrel quality and significantly reduce the cost of mandrel production

  5. Cylindrically symmetric Einstein-Yang-Mills-Higgs gauge configurations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondaini, R. P.

    1985-02-01

    Two solutions are obtained for coupled Einstein-Yang-Mills-Higgs fields with cylindrical symmetry and rigid rotation. The Higgs fields are responsible for the creation of singularities and infinite energy densities at the cylinder's axis.

  6. Numerical analysis of cocurrent conical and cylindrical axial cyclone separators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nor, M. A. M.; Al-Kayiem, H. H.; Lemma, T. A.

    2015-12-01

    Axial concurrent liquid-liquid separator is seen as an alternative unit to the traditional tangential counter current cyclone due to lower droplet break ups, turbulence and pressure drop. This paper presents the numerical analysis of a new conical axial cocurrent design along with a comparison to the cylindrical axial cocurrent type. The simulation was carried out using CFD technique in ANSYS-FLUENT software. The simulation results were validated by comparison with experimental data from literature, and mesh independency and quality were performed. The analysis indicates that the conical version achieves better separation performance compared to the cylindrical type. Simulation results indicate tangential velocity with 8% higher and axial velocity with 80% lower recirculation compared to the cylindrical type. Also, the flow visualization counters shows smaller recirculation region relative to the cylindrical unit. The proposed conical design seems more efficient and suits the crude/water separation in O&G industry.

  7. Cylindrical deformity of the nail plate secondary to subungual myxoma.

    PubMed

    Gourdin, F W; Lang, P G

    1996-11-01

    Digital myxomas are rare neoplasms. We describe a subungual myxoma arising in a previously unreported location, the nail matrix. This produced an interesting cylindrical deformity of the nail. Complete surgical excision is usually curative. PMID:8912602

  8. 16. DETAIL OF SOUTH ABUTMENT, SHOWING GIRDER, CYLINDRICAL FIXED BEARING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. DETAIL OF SOUTH ABUTMENT, SHOWING GIRDER, CYLINDRICAL FIXED BEARING SHOE AND LATERAL BRACING. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Rio Puerco Bridge, Mainline Road, spanning Rio Puerco, Holbrook, Navajo County, AZ

  9. dc electrokinetic transport of cylindrical cells in straight microchannels

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Ye; Beskok, Ali; Gauthier, David T.; Joo, Sang W.; Qian, Shizhi

    2009-01-01

    Electrokinetic transport of cylindrical cells under dc electric fields in a straight microfluidic channel is experimentally and numerically investigated with emphasis on the dielectrophoretic (DEP) effect on their orientation variations. A two-dimensional multiphysics model, composed of the Navier–Stokes equations for the fluid flow and the Laplace equation for the electric potential defined in an arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian framework, is employed to capture the transient electrokinetic motion of cylindrical cells. The numerical predictions of the particle transport are in quantitative agreement with the obtained experimental results, suggesting that the DEP effect should be taken into account to study the electrokinetic transport of cylindrical particles even in a straight microchannel with uniform cross-sectional area. A comprehensive parametric study indicates that cylindrical particles would experience an oscillatory motion under low electric fields. However, they are aligned with their longest axis parallel to the imposed electric field under high electric fields due to the induced DEP effect. PMID:20216972

  10. 108. Cylindrical chamber where gas exits stove to below ground ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    108. Cylindrical chamber where gas exits stove to below ground flue that leads to stack. - Sloss-Sheffield Steel & Iron, First Avenue North Viaduct at Thirty-second Street, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  11. Laser differential confocal radius measurement method for the cylindrical surfaces.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Lirong; Xiao, Yang; Zhao, Weiqian

    2016-05-30

    This paper proposes a laser differential confocal cylindrical radius of curvature measurement (DCCRM) method for high accuracy measurement of the radius of curvature of the cylindrical lens. Based on the property that the null point of an axial intensity curve precisely corresponds to the focus of the objective in a differential confocal system (DCS), the DCCRM uses the null point of the DCS axial intensity curve to precisely identify the cat's eye position and confocal position of the test cylindrical lens. The distance between the two positions is measured accurately using a laser distance instrument, thus achieving high precision radius measurement. In comparison with existing measurement methods, the proposed DCCRM has high measurement precision and strong environmental anti-interference capability. Theoretical analyses and preliminary experimental results indicate that the DCCRM has a relative measurement uncertainty of better than 0.03% and provides a new approach for a high precision radius measurement of the cylindrical lens.

  12. Theory and modeling of cylindrical thermo-acoustic transduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Lihong; Lim, C. W.; Zhao, Xiushao; Geng, Daxing

    2016-06-01

    Models both for solid and thinfilm-solid cylindrical thermo-acoustic transductions are proposed and the corresponding acoustic pressure solutions are obtained. The acoustic pressure for an individual carbon nanotube (CNT) as a function of input power is investigated analytically and it is verified by comparing with the published experimental data. Further numerical analysis on the acoustic pressure response and characteristics for varying input frequency and distance are also examined both for solid and thinfilm-solid cylindrical thermo-acoustic transductions. Through detailed theoretical and numerical studies on the acoustic pressure solution for thinfilm-solid cylindrical transduction, it is concluded that a solid with smaller thermal conductivity favors to improve the acoustic performance. In general, the proposed models are applicable to a variety of cylindrical thermo-acoustic devices performing in different gaseous media.

  13. 109. Detail view of structural frame supporting torch arm; cylindrical ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    109. Detail view of structural frame supporting torch arm; cylindrical object in foreground is part of ventilating system. February 1984. - Statue of Liberty, Liberty Island, Manhattan, New York County, NY

  14. Multianode cylindrical proportional counter for high count rates

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, J.A.; Kopp, M.K.

    1980-05-23

    A cylindrical, multiple-anode proportional counter is provided for counting of low-energy photons (< 60 keV) at count rates of greater than 10/sup 5/ counts/sec. A gas-filled proportional counter cylinder forming an outer cathode is provided with a central coaxially disposed inner cathode and a plurality of anode wires disposed in a cylindrical array in coaxial alignment with and between the inner and outer cathodes to form a virtual cylindrical anode coaxial with the inner and outer cathodes. The virtual cylindrical anode configuration improves the electron drift velocity by providing a more uniform field strength throughout the counter gas volume, thus decreasing the electron collection time following the detection of an ionizing event. This avoids pulse pile-up and coincidence losses at these high count rates. Conventional RC position encoding detection circuitry may be employed to extract the spatial information from the counter anodes.

  15. Multianode cylindrical proportional counter for high count rates

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, James A.; Kopp, Manfred K.

    1981-01-01

    A cylindrical, multiple-anode proportional counter is provided for counting of low-energy photons (<60 keV) at count rates of greater than 10.sup.5 counts/sec. A gas-filled proportional counter cylinder forming an outer cathode is provided with a central coaxially disposed inner cathode and a plurality of anode wires disposed in a cylindrical array in coaxial alignment with and between the inner and outer cathodes to form a virtual cylindrical anode coaxial with the inner and outer cathodes. The virtual cylindrical anode configuration improves the electron drift velocity by providing a more uniform field strength throughout the counter gas volume, thus decreasing the electron collection time following the detection of an ionizing event. This avoids pulse pile-up and coincidence losses at these high count rates. Conventional RC position encoding detection circuitry may be employed to extract the spatial information from the counter anodes.

  16. GPS: Geometry, Probability, and Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Mike

    2012-01-01

    It might be said that for most occupations there is now less of a need for mathematics than there was say fifty years ago. But, the author argues, geometry, probability, and statistics constitute essential knowledge for everyone. Maybe not the geometry of Euclid, but certainly geometrical ways of thinking that might enable us to describe the world…

  17. Linguistic geometry for autonomous navigation

    SciTech Connect

    Stilman, B.

    1995-09-01

    To discover the inner properties of human expert heuristics, which were successful in a certain class of complex control systems, we develop a formal theory, the Linguistic Geometry. This paper reports two examples of application of Linguistic Geometry to autonomous navigation of aerospace vehicles that demonstrate dramatic search reduction.

  18. Interfacial slip friction at a fluid-solid cylindrical boundary.

    PubMed

    Kannam, Sridhar Kumar; Todd, B D; Hansen, J S; Daivis, Peter J

    2012-06-28

    Recently we proposed a method to calculate the interfacial friction coefficient between fluid and solid at a planar interface. In this work we extend the method to cylindrical systems where the friction coefficient is curvature dependent. We apply the method to methane flow in carbon nanotubes, and find good agreement with non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The proposed method is robust, general, and can be used to predict the slip for cylindrical nanofluidic systems.

  19. On cylindrically converging shock waves shaped by obstacles

    SciTech Connect

    Eliasson, V; Henshaw, W D; Appelo, D

    2007-07-16

    Motivated by recent experiments, numerical simulations were performed of cylindrically converging shock waves. The converging shocks impinged upon a set of zero to sixteen regularly space obstacles. For more than two obstacles the resulting diffracted shock fronts formed polygonal shaped patterns near the point of focus. The maximum pressure and temperature as a function of number of obstacles were studied. The self-similar behavior of cylindrical, triangular and square-shaped shocks were also investigated.

  20. Cylindrical bubbles and blobs from a Class II Hydrophobin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Paul; Pham, Michael; Blalock, Brad

    2012-02-01

    Cerato ulmin is a class II hydrophobin. In aqueous suspensions, it easily forms cylindrical air bubbles and cylindrical oil blobs. The conditions for formation of these unusual structures will be discussed, along with scattering and microscopic investigations of their remarkable stability. Possible applications in diverse fields including polymer synthesis and oil spill remediation will be considered. Acknowledgment is made to Dr. Wayne C. Richards of the Canadian Forest Service for the gift of Cerato ulmin.

  1. Extrusion printing for fabrication of spherical and cylindrical microlens arrays.

    PubMed

    Xing, Jiyao; Rong, Weibin; Sun, Ding; Wang, Lefeng; Sun, Lining

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we present an extrusion printing technique for producing spherical and cylindrical plano-convex microlens arrays with controllable feature dimensions. This technique employs a robotic adhesive dispenser for robotically controlled microextrusion of ultraviolet (UV) curable polymer onto a glass substrate surface to directly deposit the microlens arrays. It provides a simple and flexible alternative to fabricate both spherical and cylindrical microlens arrays. PMID:27607269

  2. Optical theorem for two-dimensional (2D) scalar monochromatic acoustical beams in cylindrical coordinates.

    PubMed

    Mitri, F G

    2015-09-01

    The optical theorem for plane waves is recognized as one of the fundamental theorems in optical, acoustical and quantum wave scattering theory as it relates the extinction cross-section to the forward scattering complex amplitude function. Here, the optical theorem is extended and generalized in a cylindrical coordinates system for the case of 2D beams of arbitrary character as opposed to plane waves of infinite extent. The case of scalar monochromatic acoustical wavefronts is considered, and generalized analytical expressions for the extinction, absorption and scattering cross-sections are derived and extended in the framework of the scalar resonance scattering theory. The analysis reveals the presence of an interference scattering cross-section term describing the interaction between the diffracted Franz waves with the resonance elastic waves. The extended optical theorem in cylindrical coordinates is applicable to any object of arbitrary geometry in 2D located arbitrarily in the beam's path. Related investigations in optics, acoustics and quantum mechanics will benefit from this analysis in the context of wave scattering theory and other phenomena closely connected to it, such as the multiple scattering by a cloud of particles, as well as the resulting radiation force and torque.

  3. Numerical simulation and experimental assessment for cold cylindrical deep drawing without blank-holder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiorescu, D.; Chiorescu, E.; Filipov, F.

    2016-08-01

    The metal forming process through plastic deformation, represented by deep drawing, is an extremely vast research field. In this article we analyse the influence of the die punch clearance, the average velocity in the active phase as well as of the lubrication on the deep drawing quality revealed by the thickness evenness on the finished product surface. For thorough research and in order to minimize the number of experimental trials, a fractional factorial design of TAGUCHI type was developed attached to an orthogonal array, thus analysing the contribution of the three aforementioned parameters to the quality of cylindrical deep drawing without a blank holder. In order to compare the experimental results, a conceptual 3D model of the system punch-blank-die was made, which respects entirely the geometry of the active elements and of the blank, but schematizes/approximates the material properties of the blank. Thus, using these simulations, we can investigate the variation of the deformation parameters throughout the drawing process: from the initial blank form to the final drawn part. The numerical simulation of the drawing of cylindrical cups was made using the ANSYS V14 program, the Explicit Dynamic module. Using the signal-to-noise ratio suggested by TAGUCHI, we determined the influence of each of the three parameters under study on deep drawing quality, as well as their optimal values.

  4. A Circular-cylindrical Flux-rope Analytical Model for Magnetic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieves-Chinchilla, T.; Linton, M. G.; Hidalgo, M. A.; Vourlidas, A.; Savani, N. P.; Szabo, A.; Farrugia, C.; Yu, W.

    2016-05-01

    We present an analytical model to describe magnetic flux-rope topologies. When these structures are observed embedded in Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs) with a depressed proton temperature, they are called Magnetic Clouds (MCs). Our model extends the circular-cylindrical concept of Hidalgo et al. by introducing a general form for the radial dependence of the current density. This generalization provides information on the force distribution inside the flux rope in addition to the usual parameters of MC geometrical information and orientation. The generalized model provides flexibility for implementation in 3D MHD simulations. Here, we evaluate its performance in the reconstruction of MCs in in situ observations. Four Earth-directed ICME events, observed by the Wind spacecraft, are used to validate the technique. The events are selected from the ICME Wind list with the magnetic obstacle boundaries chosen consistently with the magnetic field and plasma in situ observations and with a new parameter (EPP, the Electron Pitch angle distribution Parameter) which quantifies the bidirectionally of the plasma electrons. The goodness of the fit is evaluated with a single correlation parameter to enable comparative analysis of the events. In general, at first glance, the model fits the selected events very well. However, a detailed analysis of events with signatures of significant compression indicates the need to explore geometries other than the circular-cylindrical. An extension of our current modeling framework to account for such non-circular CMEs will be presented in a forthcoming publication.

  5. Circular-cylindrical flux-rope analytical model for Magnetic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieves-Chinchilla, Teresa; Linton, Mark; Hidalgo, Miguel A.; Vourlidas, Angelos; Savani, Neel P.; Szabo, Adam; Farrugia, Charlie; Yu, Wenyuan

    2016-05-01

    We present an analytical model to describe magnetic flux-rope topologies. When these structures are observed embedded in Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs) with a depressed proton temperature, they are called Magnetic Clouds ( MCs). The model extends the circular-cylindrical concept of Hidalgo et al. (2000) by introducing a general form for the radial dependence of the current density. This generalization provides information on the force distribution inside the flux rope in addition to the usual parameters of MC geometrical information and orientation.The generalized model provides flexibility for implementation in 3D MHD simulations. Here, we evaluate its performance in the reconstruction of MCs in in-situ observations. Four Earth directed ICME events, observed by the Wind spacecraft, are used to validate the technique. The events are selected from the ICME Wind list with the magnetic obstacle boundaries chosen consistently with the magnetic fi eld and plasma in situ observations and with a new parameter (EPP, Electron Pitch angle distribution Parameter) which quantifies the bidirectionally of theplasma electrons. The goodness of the fit is evaluated with a single correlation parameter to enable comparative analysis of the events. In general, at first glance, the model fits the selected events very well. However, a detailed analysis of events with signatures of significant compression indicates the need to explore geometries other than the circular-cylindrical.

  6. High speed cylindrical roller bearing analysis. SKF computer program CYBEAN. Volume 2: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyba, G. J.; Kleckner, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    CYBEAN (CYlindrical BEaring ANalysis) was created to detail radially loaded, aligned and misaligned cylindrical roller bearing performance under a variety of operating conditions. Emphasis was placed on detailing the effects of high speed, preload and system thermal coupling. Roller tilt, skew, radial, circumferential and axial displacement as well as flange contact were considered. Variable housing and flexible out-of-round outer ring geometries, and both steady state and time transient temperature calculations were enabled. The complete range of elastohydrodynamic contact considerations, employing full and partial film conditions were treated in the computation of raceway and flange contacts. The practical and correct implementation of CYBEAN is discussed. The capability to execute the program at four different levels of complexity was included. In addition, the program was updated to properly direct roller-to-raceway contact load vectors automatically in those cases where roller or ring profiles have small radii of curvature. Input and output architectures containing guidelines for use and two sample executions are detailed.

  7. Optical theorem for two-dimensional (2D) scalar monochromatic acoustical beams in cylindrical coordinates.

    PubMed

    Mitri, F G

    2015-09-01

    The optical theorem for plane waves is recognized as one of the fundamental theorems in optical, acoustical and quantum wave scattering theory as it relates the extinction cross-section to the forward scattering complex amplitude function. Here, the optical theorem is extended and generalized in a cylindrical coordinates system for the case of 2D beams of arbitrary character as opposed to plane waves of infinite extent. The case of scalar monochromatic acoustical wavefronts is considered, and generalized analytical expressions for the extinction, absorption and scattering cross-sections are derived and extended in the framework of the scalar resonance scattering theory. The analysis reveals the presence of an interference scattering cross-section term describing the interaction between the diffracted Franz waves with the resonance elastic waves. The extended optical theorem in cylindrical coordinates is applicable to any object of arbitrary geometry in 2D located arbitrarily in the beam's path. Related investigations in optics, acoustics and quantum mechanics will benefit from this analysis in the context of wave scattering theory and other phenomena closely connected to it, such as the multiple scattering by a cloud of particles, as well as the resulting radiation force and torque. PMID:25773968

  8. Electroosmotic flows of non-Newtonian power-law fluids in a cylindrical microchannel.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Cunlu; Yang, Chun

    2013-03-01

    EOF of non-Newtonian power-law fluids in a cylindrical microchannel is analyzed theoretically. Specially, exact solutions of electroosmotic velocity corresponding to two special fluid behavior indices (n = 0.5 and 1.0) are found, while approximate solutions are derived for arbitrary values of fluid behavior index. It is found that because of the approximation for the first-order modified Bessel function of the first kind, the approximate solutions introduce largest errors for predicting electroosmotic velocity when the thickness of electric double layer is comparable to channel radius, but can accurately predict the electroosmotic velocity when the thickness of electric double layer is much smaller or larger than the channel radius. Importantly, the analysis reveals that the Helmholtz-Smoluchowski velocity of power-law fluids in cylindrical microchannels becomes dependent on geometric dimensions (radius of channel), standing in stark contrast to the Helmholtz-Smoluchowski velocity over planar surfaces or in parallel-plate microchannels. Such interesting and counterintuitive effects can be attributed to the nonlinear coupling among the electrostatics, channel geometry, and non-Newtonian hydrodynamics. Furthermore, a method for enhancement of EOFs of power-law fluids is proposed under a combined DC and AC electric field.

  9. Enhanced thermal stability of functionally graded sandwich cylindrical shells by shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asadi, H.; Akbarzadeh, A. H.; Chen, Z. T.; Aghdam, M. M.

    2015-04-01

    The present paper deals with the nonlinear thermal instability of geometrically imperfect sandwich cylindrical shells under uniform heating. The sandwich shells are made of a shape memory alloy (SMA)-fiber-reinforced composite and functionally graded (FG) face sheets (FG/SMA/FG). The Brinson phenomenological model is used to express the constitutive characteristics of SMA fibers. The governing equations are established within the framework of the third-order shear deformation shell theory by taking into account the von Karman geometrical nonlinearity and initial imperfection. The material properties of constituents are assumed to be temperature dependent. The Galerkin technique is utilized to derive expressions of the bifurcation points and bifurcation paths of the sandwich cylindrical shells. Using the developed closed-form solutions, extensive numerical results are presented to provide an insight into the influence of the SMA fiber volume fraction, SMA pre-strain, core thickness, non-homogeneity index, geometrical imperfection, geometry parameters of sandwich shells and temperature dependency of materials on the stability of shells. The results reveal that proper application of SMA fibers postpones the thermal bifurcation point and dramatically decreases thermal post-buckling deflection. Moreover, the induced tensile recovery stress of SMA fibers could also stabilize the geometrically imperfect shells during the inverse martensite phase transformation.

  10. Lobachevsky's Geometry and Research of Geometry of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brylevskaya, L. I.

    2008-10-01

    For the first time N. I. Lobachevsky gave a talk on the new geometry in 1826; three years after he had published a work "On the fundamentals of geometry", containing all fundamental theorems and methods of non-Euclidean geometry. A small part of the article was devoted to the study of geometry of the Universe. The interpretation of geometrical concepts in pure empirical way was typical for mathematicians at the beginning of the XIX century; in this connection it was important for scientists to find application of his geometry. Having the purpose to determine experimentally the properties of real physical Space, Lobachevsky decided to calculate the sum of angles in a huge triangle with two vertexes in opposite points of the terrestrial orbit and the third -- on the remote star. Investigating the possibilities of solution of the set task, Lobachevsky faced the difficulties of theoretical, technical and methodological character. More detailed research of different aspects of the problem led Lobachevsky to the comprehension of impossibility to obtain the values required for the goal achievement, and he called his geometry an imaginary geometry.

  11. Numerical simulation of mixing in a jet agitated horizontal cylindrical tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zughbi, Habib D.

    2006-02-01

    Mixing in a fluid jet agitated large horizontal cylindrical tank is simulated using computational fluid dynamics. A known volume of hot fluid is mixed with a cooler main fluid in a large tank. Temperature measurements are used to quantify mixing. Results show that the blending time is largely dependent on the flow patterns generated inside the tank. These flow patterns are a function of the tank geometry, the location of the jet and the angle at which the jet is injected. The role played by the length of the jet in determining the blending time is not as great as was thought by earlier workers. A significant reduction in blending times, ranging from 600% at a Reynolds number of 40,000 to 350% at a Reynolds number of 60,000, is achieved by changing the location and/or the angle of the incoming jet in a way that results in a better flow circulation.

  12. A simplified method of elastic-stability analysis for thin cylindrical shells I : Donnell's equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batdorf, S B

    1947-01-01

    The equation for the equilibrium of cylindrical shells introduced by Donnell in NACA Technical Report no. 479 to find the critical stresses of cylinders in torsion is applied to find critical stresses for cylinders with simply supported edges under other loading conditions. It is shown that by this method solutions may be obtained very easily and the results in each case may be expressed in terms of two nondimensional parameters, one dependent on the critical stress and the other essentially determined by the geometry of the cylinder. The influence of boundary conditions related to edge displacements in the shell median surface is discussed. The accuracy of the solutions found is established by comparing them with previous theoretical solutions and with test results. The solutions to a number of problems concerned with the buckling of cylinders with simply supported edges on the basis of a unified viewpoint are presented in a convenient form for practical use. (author)

  13. Simplified calculation of solar flux distribution on the side wall of cylindrical cavity solar receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhandari, P.; Wu, Y. C.; Roschke, E. J.

    1989-01-01

    A simple solar flux calculation algorithm for a cylindrical cavity type solar receiver has been developed and implemented on an IBM PC-AT. Using cone optics, the contour error method is utilized to handle the slope error of a paraboloidal concentrator. The flux distribution on the side wall is calculated by integration of the energy incident from cones emanating from all the differential elements on the concentrator. The calculations are done for any set of dimensions and properties of the receiver and the concentrator, and account for any spillover on the aperture plate. The results of this algorithm compared excellently with those predicted by more complicated programs. Because of the utilization of axial symmetry and overall simplification, it is extremely fast. It can be esily extended to other axisymmetric receiver geometries.

  14. The effect of primary loading on fatigue life of cylindrical roller bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crețu, S. S.

    2016-08-01

    Experimental and theoretical works shown that if a roller-raceway rolling contact is loaded in the elastic-plastic domain then, after the first rolling cycles, the material elastically shakedowns to a slightly modified axial profile and stable compressive residual stresses. Fatigue life tests carried out on four groups of NJ206 cylindrical roller bearings pointed out the superiority of the bearings groups that primary supported a few cycles of rolling loading in the elastic-plastic domain. An elastic-perfect plastic analysis was performed to reveal the role played by the roller's crowning geometry, operating clearance, misalignment angle and operating loads on contact pressures distributions achieved between each roller and the corresponding inner and outer raceways. The modified reference rating lives, evaluated using the lamina technique, exposed a good agreement with the values provided by fatigue life tests.

  15. Integral-equation formulation for drift eigenmodes in cylindrically symmetric systems

    SciTech Connect

    Linsker, R.

    1980-12-01

    A method for solving the integral eigenmode equation for drift waves in cylindrical (or slab) geometry is presented. A leading-order kinematic effect that has been noted in the past, but incorrectly ignored in recent integral-equation calculations, is incorporated. The present method also allows electrons to be treated with a physical mass ratio (unlike earlier work that is restricted to artificially small m/sub i//m/sub e/ owing to resolution limitations). Results for the universal mode and for the ion-temperature-gradient driven mode are presented. The kinematic effect qualitatively changes the spectrum of the ion mode, and a new second region of instability for k/sub perpendicular to/rho/sub i/greater than or equal to 1 is found.

  16. Method for reinforcing threads in multilayer composite tubes and cylindrical structures

    SciTech Connect

    Romanoski, G.R.; Burchell, T.D.

    1996-04-01

    Multilayer techniques such as: tape wrapping, braiding, and filament winding represent versatile and economical routes for fabricating composite tubes and cylindrical structures. However, multilayer architectures lack the radial reinforcement required to retain threads when the desired means of connection or closure is a threaded joint. This issue was addressed in the development of a filament wound, carbon-carbon composite impact shell for the NASA radioisotope thermoelectric generator. The problem of poor thread shear strength was solved by incorporating a number of radial elements of triangular geometry around the circumference of the thread for the full length of thread engagement. The radial elements significantly increased the shear strength of the threaded joint by transmitting the applied force to the balance of composite structure. This approach is also applicable to ceramic composites.

  17. Wind Tunnel Test Results for Gas Flows Inside Axisymmetric Cavities on Cylindric Bodies with Nose Cones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shvets, A. L.; Gilinsky, M.; Blankson, I. M.

    2004-01-01

    Experimental test results of air flow inside and at the cylindrical cavity located on axisymmetric body are presented. These tests were conducted in the wind tunnel A-7 of Institute of Mechanics at Moscow State University. Pressure distribution along the cavities and optical measurements were obtained. Dependence of these characteristics of length of a cavity in the range: L/D = 0.5 - 14 and free stream Mach in the range: M(sub infinity) = 0.6 - 3.0 was determined. Flow structure inside the cavity, cause of flow regime change, separation zones geometry and others were studied. In particular, the flow modes of with open and closed separation zones are determined.

  18. The stability properties of cylindrical force-free fields - Effect of an external potential field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiuderi, C.; Einaudi, G.; Ma, S. S.; Van Hoven, G.

    1980-01-01

    A large-scale potential field with an embedded smaller-scale force-free structure gradient x B equals alpha B is studied in cylindrical geometry. Cases in which alpha goes continuously from a constant value alpha 0 on the axis to zero at large r are considered. Such a choice of alpha (r) produces fields which are realistic (few field reversals) but not completely stable. The MHD-unstable wavenumber regime is found. Since the considered equilibrium field exhibits a certain amount of magnetic shear, resistive instabilities can arise. The growth rates of the tearing mode in the limited MHD-stable region of k space are calculated, showing time-scales much shorter than the resistive decay time.

  19. Wightman function and scalar Casimir densities for a wedge with two cylindrical boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Saharian, A.A. Tarloyan, A.S.

    2008-07-15

    Wightman function, the vacuum expectation values of the field square and the energy-momentum tensor are investigated for a massive scalar field with general curvature coupling parameter inside a wedge with two coaxial cylindrical boundaries. It is assumed that the field obeys Dirichlet boundary condition on bounding surfaces. The application of a variant of the generalized Abel-Plana formula enables to extract from the expectation values the contribution corresponding to the geometry of a wedge with a single shell and to present the interference part in terms of exponentially convergent integrals. The local properties of the vacuum are investigated in various asymptotic regions of the parameters. The vacuum forces acting on the boundaries are presented as the sum of self-action and interaction terms. It is shown that the interaction forces between the separate parts of the boundary are always attractive. The generalization to the case of a scalar field with Neumann boundary condition is discussed.

  20. The influence of horizontal boundaries on Ekman circulation and angular momentum transport in a cylindrical annulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obabko, Aleksandr V.; Cattaneo, Fausto; F Fischer, Paul

    2008-12-01

    We present numerical simulations of circular Couette flow in axisymmetric and fully three-dimensional geometry of a cylindrical annulus inspired by Princeton magnetorotational instability (MRI) liquid gallium experiment. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved with the spectral element code Nek5000 incorporating realistic horizontal boundary conditions of differentially rotating rings. We investigate the effect of changing rotation rates (Reynolds number) and of the horizontal boundary conditions on flow structure, Ekman circulation and associated transport of angular momentum through the onset of unsteadiness and three-dimensionality. A mechanism for the explanation of the dependence of the Ekman flows and circulation on horizontal boundary conditions is proposed. First International Conference 'Turbulent Mixing and Beyond' held on 18-26 August 2007 at the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, Italy.

  1. Stepwise coupled mode scattering of ambient noise by a cylindrically symmetric seamount.

    PubMed

    Evans, Richard B

    2006-01-01

    The question of how underwater ambient noise, at low frequencies, interacts with seamounts is addressed. The vertical directivity of the ambient noise, with and without the seamount interaction, is of particular interest. The problem of ambient noise scattering by seamounts motivates the development of a numerical modeling procedure, based on stepwise coupled modes. The procedure is designed to analyze scattering from a cylindrically symmetric seamount. The stepwise coupled mode procedure is extended to more general boundary conditions and brought up to date in the process. An example, using the geometry of the Dickins seamount, suggests that the seamount removes energy from the steeply traveling ambient noise, for this case. The energy is not converted into angles near the horizontal; the energy is lost through bottom interaction and attenuation.

  2. Correcting for gain effects in an x-ray framing camera in a cylindrical implosion experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Horsfield, C.J.; Parker, K.W.; Rothman, S.D.; Fincke, J.; Lanier, N.E.

    2004-10-01

    A program to investigate the mixing of a marker layer in a convergent cylindrical geometry has been carried out on the Omega laser facility. The principal diagnostic for these experiments was the Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos, NM) QXI framing camera. The results obtained displayed an unphysical pattern, partly attributed to nonlinear gain effects. We propose a method to compensate for these effects, which relies only on shot data and so can be used retrospectively on previously obtained data. Modifications carried out on the camera to minimize the effect are described and the results are compared with compensated data from previous runs. We also present results which evaluate the state of gain effects in the camera during each experimental shot day.

  3. Leading edge reflection patterns for cylindrical converging shock waves over convex obstacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignati, F.; Guardone, A.

    2016-09-01

    The unsteady reflection of cylindrical converging shock waves over convex obstacles is investigated numerically. At the leading edge, numerical simulations show the occurrence of all types of regular and irregular reflections predicted by the pseudo-steady theory for planar shock-wave reflections over planar surfaces, although for different combinations of wedge angles and incident shock Mach number. The domain of occurrence of each reflection type and its evolution in time due to shock acceleration and to the non-planar geometry is determined and it is compared to the results of the pseudo-steady theory. The dependence of the reflection pattern on the (local) values of the wedge angle is in good agreement with the pseudo-steady theory. Less complex reflection patterns are instead observed at larger values of the leading edge shock Mach number at which the pseudo-steady theory predicts the occurrence of more complex reflection patterns.

  4. Generalized plane-wave expansion of cylindrical functions in lossy media convergent in the whole complex plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frezza, F.; Schettini, G.; Tedeschi, N.

    2011-08-01

    Electromagnetic scattering by buried objects may involve a plane-wave expansion of the related fields, which depends on the objects' geometry. Furthermore, involved media in realistic cases are lossy, which requires the analytic continuation of formulae known for the lossless cases, due to the complex nature of the wave vectors. This problem has been covered in a previous paper, but the expression found still does not converge in some areas of space. In this paper, a new, convergent, expression of the spectrum of cylindrical functions in lossy media is analytically computed and its convergence limits are discussed.

  5. Fluid damping of cylindrical liquid storage tanks.

    PubMed

    Habenberger, Joerg

    2015-01-01

    A method is proposed in order to calculate the damping effects of viscous fluids in liquid storage tanks subjected to earthquakes. The potential equation of an ideal fluid can satisfy only the boundary conditions normal to the surface of the liquid. To satisfy also the tangential interaction conditions between liquid and tank wall and tank bottom, the potential flow is superimposed by a one-dimensional shear flow. The shear flow in this boundary layer yields to a decrease of the mechanical energy of the shell-liquid-system. A damping factor is derived from the mean value of the energy dissipation in time. Depending on shell geometry and fluid viscosity, modal damping ratios are calculated for the convective component.

  6. SIMPLIFIED CALCULATION OF SOLAR FLUX ON THE SIDE WALL OF CYLINDRICAL CAVITY SOLAR RECEIVERS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhandari, P.

    1994-01-01

    The Simplified Calculation of Solar Flux Distribution on the Side Wall of Cylindrical Cavity Solar Receivers program employs a simple solar flux calculation algorithm for a cylindrical cavity type solar receiver. Applications of this program include the study of solar energy, heat transfer, and space power-solar dynamics engineering. The aperture plate of the receiver is assumed to be located in the focal plane of a paraboloidal concentrator, and the geometry is assumed to be axisymmetric. The concentrator slope error is assumed to be the only surface error; it is assumed that there are no pointing or misalignment errors. Using cone optics, the contour error method is utilized to handle the slope error of the concentrator. The flux distribution on the side wall is calculated by integration of the energy incident from cones emanating from all the differential elements on the concentrator. The calculations are done for any set of dimensions and properties of the receiver and the concentrator, and account for any spillover on the aperture plate. The results of this algorithm compared excellently with those predicted by more complicated programs. Because of the utilization of axial symmetry and overall simplification, it is extremely fast. It can be easily extended to other axi-symmetric receiver geometries. The program was written in Fortran 77, compiled using a Ryan McFarland compiler, and run on an IBM PC-AT with a math coprocessor. It requires 60K of memory and has been implemented under MS-DOS 3.2.1. The program was developed in 1988.

  7. Asymmetric Bulkheads for Cylindrical Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, Donald B.

    2007-01-01

    Asymmetric bulkheads are proposed for the ends of vertically oriented cylindrical pressure vessels. These bulkheads, which would feature both convex and concave contours, would offer advantages over purely convex, purely concave, and flat bulkheads (see figure). Intended originally to be applied to large tanks that hold propellant liquids for launching spacecraft, the asymmetric-bulkhead concept may also be attractive for terrestrial pressure vessels for which there are requirements to maximize volumetric and mass efficiencies. A description of the relative advantages and disadvantages of prior symmetric bulkhead configurations is prerequisite to understanding the advantages of the proposed asymmetric configuration: In order to obtain adequate strength, flat bulkheads must be made thicker, relative to concave and convex bulkheads; the difference in thickness is such that, other things being equal, pressure vessels with flat bulkheads must be made heavier than ones with concave or convex bulkheads. Convex bulkhead designs increase overall tank lengths, thereby necessitating additional supporting structure for keeping tanks vertical. Concave bulkhead configurations increase tank lengths and detract from volumetric efficiency, even though they do not necessitate additional supporting structure. The shape of a bulkhead affects the proportion of residual fluid in a tank that is, the portion of fluid that unavoidably remains in the tank during outflow and hence cannot be used. In this regard, a flat bulkhead is disadvantageous in two respects: (1) It lacks a single low point for optimum placement of an outlet and (2) a vortex that forms at the outlet during outflow prevents a relatively large amount of fluid from leaving the tank. A concave bulkhead also lacks a single low point for optimum placement of an outlet. Like purely concave and purely convex bulkhead configurations, the proposed asymmetric bulkhead configurations would be more mass-efficient than is the flat

  8. INTERCOMPARISON OF PERFORMANCE OF RF COIL GEOMETRIES FOR HIGH FIELD MOUSE CARDIAC MRI

    PubMed Central

    Constantinides, Christakis; Angeli, S.; Gkagkarellis, S.; Cofer, G.

    2012-01-01

    Multi-turn spiral surface coils are constructed in flat and cylindrical arrangements and used for high field (7.1 T) mouse cardiac MRI. Their electrical and imaging performances, based on experimental measurements, simulations, and MRI experiments in free space, and under phantom, and animal loading conditions, are compared with a commercially available birdcage coil. Results show that the four-turn cylindrical spiral coil exhibits improved relative SNR (rSNR) performance to the flat coil counterpart, and compares fairly well with a commercially available birdcage coil. Phantom experiments indicate a 50% improvement in the SNR for penetration depths ≤ 6.1 mm from the coil surface compared to the birdcage coil, and an increased penetration depth at the half-maximum field response of 8 mm in the 4-spiral cylindrical coil case, in contrast to 2.9 mm in the flat 4-turn spiral case. Quantitative comparison of the performance of the two spiral coil geometries in anterior, lateral, inferior, and septal regions of the murine heart yield maximum mean percentage rSNR increases of the order of 27–167% in vivo post-mortem (cylindrical compared to flat coil). The commercially available birdcage outperforms the cylindrical spiral coil in rSNR by a factor of 3–5 times. The comprehensive approach and methodology adopted to accurately design, simulate, implement, and test radiofrequency coils of any geometry and type, under any loading conditions, can be generalized for any application of high field mouse cardiac MRI. PMID:23204945

  9. Cross-code comparisons of mixing during the implosion of dense cylindrical and spherical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joggerst, C. C.; Nelson, Anthony; Woodward, Paul; Lovekin, Catherine; Masser, Thomas; Fryer, Chris L.; Ramaprabhu, P.; Francois, Marianne; Rockefeller, Gabriel

    2014-10-01

    We present simulations of the implosion of a dense shell in two-dimensional (2D) spherical and cylindrical geometry performed with four different compressible, Eulerian codes: RAGE, FLASH, CASTRO, and PPM. We follow the growth of instabilities on the inner face of the dense shell. Three codes employed Cartesian grid geometry, and one (FLASH) employed polar grid geometry. While the codes are similar, they employ different advection algorithms, limiters, adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) schemes, and interface-preservation techniques. We find that the growth rate of the instability is largely insensitive to the choice of grid geometry or other implementation details specific to an individual code, provided the grid resolution is sufficiently fine. Overall, all simulations from different codes compare very well on the fine grids for which we tested them, though they show slight differences in small-scale mixing. Simulations produced by codes that explicitly limit numerical diffusion show a smaller amount of small-scale mixing than codes that do not. This difference is most prominent for low-mode perturbations where little instability finger interaction takes place, and less prominent for high- or multi-mode simulations where a great deal of interaction takes place, though it is still present. We present RAGE and FLASH simulations to quantify the initial perturbation amplitude to wavelength ratio at which metrics of mixing agree across codes, and find that bubble/spike amplitudes are converged for low-mode and high-mode simulations in which the perturbation amplitude is more than 1% and 5% of the wavelength of the perturbation, respectively. Other metrics of small-scale mixing depend on details of multi-fluid advection and do not converge between codes for the resolutions that were accessible.

  10. Quantum Consequences of Parameterizing Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanas, M. I.

    2002-12-01

    The marriage between geometrization and quantization is not successful, so far. It is well known that quantization of gravity , using known quantization schemes, is not satisfactory. It may be of interest to look for another approach to this problem. Recently, it is shown that geometries with torsion admit quantum paths. Such geometries should be parameterizied in order to preserve the quantum properties appeared in the paths. The present work explores the consequences of parameterizing such geometry. It is shown that quantum properties, appeared in the path equations, are transferred to other geometric entities.

  11. CATIA-GDML geometry builder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belogurov, S.; Berchun, Yu; Chernogorov, A.; Malzacher, P.; Ovcharenko, E.; Semennikov, A.

    2011-12-01

    Due to conceptual difference between geometry descriptions in Computer-Aided Design (CAD) systems and particle transport Monte Carlo (MC) codes direct conversion of detector geometry in either direction is not feasible. An original set of tools has been developed for building a GEANT4/ROOT compatible geometry in the CATIA CAD system and exchanging it with mentioned MC packages using GDML file format. A Special structure of a CATIA product tree, a wide range of primitives, different types of multiple volume instantiation, and supporting macros have been implemented.

  12. The Speed of Axial Propagation of a Cylindrical Bubble Through a Cylindrical Vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shariff, Karim; Mansour, Nagi N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Inspired by the rapid elongation of air columns injected into vortices by dolphins, we present an exact inviscid solution for the axial speed (assumed steady) of propagation of the tip of a semi-infinite cylindrical bubble along the axis of a cylindrical vortex. The bubble is assumed to be held at constant pressure by being connected to a reservoir, the lungs of the dolphin, say. For a given bubble pressure, there is a modest critical rotation rate above which steadily propagating bubbles exist. For a bubble at ambient pressure, the propagation speed of the bubble (relative to axial velocity within the vortex) varies between 0.5 and 0.6 of the maximum rotational speed of the vortex. Surprisingly, the bubble tip can propagate (almost as rapidly) even when the pressure minimum in the vortex core is greater than the bubble pressure; in this case, solutions exhibit a dimple on the nose of the bubble. A situation important for incipient vortex cavitation, and one which dolphins also demonstrate, is elongation of a free bubble, i.e., one whose internal pressure may vary. Under the assumption that the acceleration term is small (checked a posteriori), the steady solution is applied at each instant during the elongation. Three types of behavior are then possible depending on physical parameters and initial conditions: (A) Unabated elongation with slowly increasing bubble pressure, and nearly constant volume. Volume begins to decrease in the late stages. (B1) Elongation with decreasing bubble pressure. A limit point of the steady solution is encountered at a finite bubble length. (B2) Unabated elongation with decreasing bubble pressure and indefinite creation of volume. This is made possible by the existence of propagating solutions at bubble pressures below the minimum vortex pressure. As the bubble stretches, its radius initially decreases but then becomes constant; this is also observed in experiments on incipient vortex cavitation.

  13. General approach to polymer chains confined by interacting boundaries. II. Flow through a cylindrical nano-tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freed, Karl F.; Wu, Chi

    2011-10-01

    The Laplace-Green's function methods of Paper I are extended to describe polymers confined in interacting, impenetrable cylindrical geometries, whose treatment is far more challenging than the slit and box geometries considered in Paper I. The general methods are illustrated with calculations (as a function of the polymer-surface interaction) of the free energy of confinement, the radial density profile, and the average of the drag force in the free draining limit, quantities that will be used elsewhere to analyze experiments of Wu and co-workers involving the flow of polymers through nanopores. All these properties are evaluated by numerical inverse Laplace transforms of closed form analytical expressions, a significant savings over the traditional eigenfunction approaches. The example of the confinement free energy for a 3-arm star polymer illustrates the treatment when a closed form expression for the Laplace transform is unavailable.

  14. Explicit approximations to estimate the perturbative diffusivity in the presence of convectivity and damping. II. Semi-infinite cylindrical approximations

    SciTech Connect

    Berkel, M. van; Hogeweij, G. M. D.; Tamura, N.; Ida, K.; Zwart, H. J.; Inagaki, S.; Baar, M. R. de

    2014-11-15

    In this paper, a number of new explicit approximations are introduced to estimate the perturbative diffusivity (χ), convectivity (V), and damping (τ) in a cylindrical geometry. For this purpose, the harmonic components of heat waves induced by localized deposition of modulated power are used. The approximations are based upon the heat equation in a semi-infinite cylindrical domain. The approximations are based upon continued fractions, asymptotic expansions, and multiple harmonics. The relative error for the different derived approximations is presented for different values of frequency, transport coefficients, and dimensionless radius. Moreover, it is shown how combinations of different explicit formulas can yield good approximations over a wide parameter space for different cases, such as no convection and damping, only damping, and both convection and damping. This paper is the second part (Part II) of a series of three papers. In Part I, the semi-infinite slab approximations have been treated. In Part III, cylindrical approximations are treated for heat waves traveling towards the center of the plasma.

  15. Instability of supersymmetric microstate geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eperon, Felicity C.; Reall, Harvey S.; Santos, Jorge E.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the classical stability of supersymmetric, asymptotically flat, microstate geometries with five non-compact dimensions. Such geometries admit an "evanescent ergosurface": a timelike hypersurface of infinite redshift. On such a surface, there are null geodesics with zero energy relative to infinity. These geodesics are stably trapped in the potential well near the ergosurface. We present a heuristic argument indicating that this feature is likely to lead to a nonlinear instability of these solutions. We argue that the precursor of such an instability can be seen in the behaviour of linear perturbations: nonlinear stability would require that all linear perturbations decay sufficiently rapidly but the stable trapping implies that some linear perturbation decay very slowly. We study this in detail for the most symmetric microstate geometries. By constructing quasinormal modes of these geometries we show that generic linear perturbations decay slower than any inverse power of time.

  16. Influence of the Geometry on Mantle Convection Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noack, L.; Tosi, N.

    2012-04-01

    Modelling of geodynamic processes like mantle or core convection has strongly improved over the last two decades thanks to the steady development of numerical codes that tend to incorporate a more and more realistic physics. High-performance parallel computations allow the simulation of complex problems, such as the self-consistent generation of tectonic plates or the formation of planetary magnetic fields. However, the need to perform broad explorations of the parameter space and the large computational demands imposed by the non-linear, multi-scale nature of convection require several simplifications, in the domain geometry as well as in the physical complexity of the problem. A straightforward approach to limit the computational complexity of the simulations is to decrease the total number of degrees of freedom of the problem by reducing either the number of dimensions or the size of the model domain. On the one hand, for a given resolution, a 3D spherical shell clearly needs a much larger number of grid points than a 2D cylindrical shell or a 2D Cartesian box. At the resolutions typically employed to solve mantle convection problems, this difference amounts to at least a factor of a few hundreds. On the other hand, for certain problems, only a relatively small part of the mantle may be of interest, as in the case of the modelling of subduction [1], mid-ocean ridges or transform faults [2]. We adapted the code GAIA [3] to solve the Stokes problem in several different geometries (Cartesian box, cylindrical, spherical and regional-spherical) and dimensions (2D and 3D) and started a benchmark along the lines of [4] to assess the loss of accuracy when using reduced domains instead of a 3D spherical shell [5]. In general, upwellings in Cartesian geometry are rather flat, whereas the spherical geometry changes their shape to more mushroom-like structures. Furthermore, the number of plumes, which is representative of the characteristic wavelength of convection, varies

  17. Geometry of the human erythrocyte. I. Effect of albumin on cell geometry.

    PubMed Central

    Jay, A W

    1975-01-01

    The effects of albumin on the geometry of human erythrocytes have been studied. Individual red cells, hanging on edge from coverslips were photographed. Enlarged cell profiles were digitized using a Gradicon digitizer (Instronics Ltd., Stittsville, Ontario). Geometric parameters including diameter, area, volume, minimum cylindrical diameter, sphericity index, swelling index, maximum and minimum cell thickness, were calculated for each cell using a CDC 6400 computer. Maximum effect of human serum albumin was reached at about 1 g/liter. Studies of cell populations showed decreases in mean cell diameter of up to 6%, area 6%, and volume 15%, varying from sample to sample. The thickness of the rim was increased while that at the dimple was decreased. Studies of single cells showed that area and volume changes do not occur equally in all cells. Cells with lower sphericity indices showed larger effects. In the presence of albumin, up to 50% of the cells assumed cup-shapes (stomatocytes). These cells had smaller volumes but the same area as biconcave cells. Mechanical agitation could reversibly induce biconcave cells to assume cup shapes without area or volume changes. Experiments with de-fatted human albumins showed that the presence of bound fatty acids in varying concentrations does not alter the observed effects. Bovine serum albumin has similar effects on human erythrocytes as human serum albumin. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 9 PMID:1122337

  18. Rigorous analysis of image force barrier lowering in bounded geometries: application to semiconducting nanowires.

    PubMed

    Calahorra, Yonatan; Mendels, Dan; Epstein, Ariel

    2014-04-11

    Bounded geometries introduce a fundamental problem in calculating the image force barrier lowering of metal-wrapped semiconductor systems. In bounded geometries, the derivation of the barrier lowering requires calculating the reference energy of the system, when the charge is at the geometry center. In the following, we formulate and rigorously solve this problem; this allows combining the image force electrostatic potential with the band diagram of the bounded geometry. The suggested approach is applied to spheres as well as cylinders. Furthermore, although the expressions governing cylindrical systems are complex and can only be evaluated numerically, we present analytical approximations for the solution, which allow easy implementation in calculated band diagrams. The results are further used to calculate the image force barrier lowering of metal-wrapped cylindrical nanowires; calculations show that although the image force potential is stronger than that of planar systems, taking the complete band-structure into account results in a weaker effect of barrier lowering. Moreover, when considering small diameter nanowires, we find that the electrostatic effects of the image force exceed the barrier region, and influence the electronic properties of the nanowire core. This study is of interest to the nanowire community, and in particular for the analysis of nanowire I-V measurements where wrapped or omega-shaped metallic contacts are used. PMID:24632879

  19. Monolithic Cylindrical Fused Silica Resonators with High Q Factors.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yao; Wang, Dongya; Wang, Yanyan; Liu, Jianping; Wu, Suyong; Qu, Tianliang; Yang, Kaiyong; Luo, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The cylindrical resonator gyroscope (CRG) is a typical Coriolis vibratory gyroscope whose performance is determined by the Q factor and frequency mismatch of the cylindrical resonator. Enhancing the Q factor is crucial for improving the rate sensitivity and noise performance of the CRG. In this paper, for the first time, a monolithic cylindrical fused silica resonator with a Q factor approaching 8 × 10⁵ (ring-down time over 1 min) is reported. The resonator is made of fused silica with low internal friction and high isotropy, with a diameter of 25 mm and a center frequency of 3974.35 Hz. The structure of the resonator is first briefly introduced, and then the experimental non-contact characterization method is presented. In addition, the post-fabrication experimental procedure of Q factor improvement, including chemical and thermal treatment, is demonstrated. The Q factor improvement by both treatments is compared and the primary loss mechanism is analyzed. To the best of our knowledge, the work presented in this paper represents the highest reported Q factor for a cylindrical resonator. The proposed monolithic cylindrical fused silica resonator may enable high performance inertial sensing with standard manufacturing process and simple post-fabrication treatment. PMID:27483263

  20. Elliptic cylindrical silicon nanowire hybrid surface plasmon polariton waveguide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Xiong, Qiulin; Li, Xiaopeng; Ma, Junxian

    2015-08-10

    We researched an elliptic cylindrical silicon nanowire hybrid surface plasmon polariton waveguide and evaluated its mode characteristics using the finite element method software COMSOL. The waveguide consists of three parts: an elliptic cylindrical silicon nanowire, a silver film layer, and a silica covering layer between them. All of the components are surrounded by air. After optimizing the geometrical parameters of the waveguide, we can achieve the waveguide's strong field confinement (ranging from λ2/270 to λ2/27) and long propagation distances (119-485 μm). In order to further understand the impact of the waveguide's architecture on its performance, we also studied the ridge hybrid waveguide. The results show that the ridge waveguide has moderate local field confinement ranging from λ2/190 to λ2/20 and its maximum propagation distance is about 340 μm. We compared the elliptic cylindrical and ridge nanowire hybrid waveguides with the cylindrical hybrid waveguide that we studied before. The elliptic cylindrical waveguide achieves a better trade-off between reasonable mode confinement and maximum propagation length in the three waveguides. The researched hybrid surface plasmon polaritons waveguides are useful to construct devices such as a directional coupler and may find potential applications in photonic integrated circuits or other novel SPP devices.

  1. Elliptic cylindrical silicon nanowire hybrid surface plasmon polariton waveguide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Xiong, Qiulin; Li, Xiaopeng; Ma, Junxian

    2015-08-10

    We researched an elliptic cylindrical silicon nanowire hybrid surface plasmon polariton waveguide and evaluated its mode characteristics using the finite element method software COMSOL. The waveguide consists of three parts: an elliptic cylindrical silicon nanowire, a silver film layer, and a silica covering layer between them. All of the components are surrounded by air. After optimizing the geometrical parameters of the waveguide, we can achieve the waveguide's strong field confinement (ranging from λ2/270 to λ2/27) and long propagation distances (119-485 μm). In order to further understand the impact of the waveguide's architecture on its performance, we also studied the ridge hybrid waveguide. The results show that the ridge waveguide has moderate local field confinement ranging from λ2/190 to λ2/20 and its maximum propagation distance is about 340 μm. We compared the elliptic cylindrical and ridge nanowire hybrid waveguides with the cylindrical hybrid waveguide that we studied before. The elliptic cylindrical waveguide achieves a better trade-off between reasonable mode confinement and maximum propagation length in the three waveguides. The researched hybrid surface plasmon polaritons waveguides are useful to construct devices such as a directional coupler and may find potential applications in photonic integrated circuits or other novel SPP devices. PMID:26368373

  2. Monolithic Cylindrical Fused Silica Resonators with High Q Factors

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yao; Wang, Dongya; Wang, Yanyan; Liu, Jianping; Wu, Suyong; Qu, Tianliang; Yang, Kaiyong; Luo, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The cylindrical resonator gyroscope (CRG) is a typical Coriolis vibratory gyroscope whose performance is determined by the Q factor and frequency mismatch of the cylindrical resonator. Enhancing the Q factor is crucial for improving the rate sensitivity and noise performance of the CRG. In this paper, for the first time, a monolithic cylindrical fused silica resonator with a Q factor approaching 8 × 105 (ring-down time over 1 min) is reported. The resonator is made of fused silica with low internal friction and high isotropy, with a diameter of 25 mm and a center frequency of 3974.35 Hz. The structure of the resonator is first briefly introduced, and then the experimental non-contact characterization method is presented. In addition, the post-fabrication experimental procedure of Q factor improvement, including chemical and thermal treatment, is demonstrated. The Q factor improvement by both treatments is compared and the primary loss mechanism is analyzed. To the best of our knowledge, the work presented in this paper represents the highest reported Q factor for a cylindrical resonator. The proposed monolithic cylindrical fused silica resonator may enable high performance inertial sensing with standard manufacturing process and simple post-fabrication treatment. PMID:27483263

  3. The geometry of folds in granitoid rocks of northeastern Alberta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willem Langenberg, C.; Ramsden, John

    1980-06-01

    Granitoid rocks which predominate in the Precambrian shield of northeastern Alberta show large-scale fold structures. A numerical procedure has been used to obtain modal foliation orientations. This procedure results in the smoothing of folded surfaces that show roughness on a detailed scale. Statistical tests are used to divide the study areas into cylindrical domains. Structural sections can be obtained for each domain, and horizontal and vertical sections are used to construct block diagrams. The projections are performed numerically and plotted by computer. This method permits blocks to be viewed from every possible angle. Both perspective and orthographic projections can be produced. The geometries of a dome in the Tulip Lake area and a synform in the Hooker Lake area have been obtained. The domal structure is compared with polyphase deformational interference patterns and with experimental diapiric structures obtained in a centrifuge system. The synform in the Hooker Lake area may be genetically related to the doming in the Tulip Lake area.

  4. Ion velocity distributions in the presence of cylindrically symmetric electric field perturbations: the collision-free case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, John Zhen Guo; Ma, John Zhen Guo; St-Maurice, Jean-Pierre

    Because of the strong ambient magnetic field, particularly at ionospheric altitudes, the auroral regions are flush with cylindrical structures covering an impressive range of scales which include lower hybrid cavities on decameter scales, auroral rays on km scales and vortices on tens to hundreds of km scales. In addition, a plethora of in-situ magnetic field and electric field observations and groundbased radar observations strongly suggests that very large parallel current densities are triggered in the upper ionosphere. These observations and just simple geometric considerations have motivated us to study the ion velocity distributions that would accompany strong perpendicular electric fields in a cylindrically symmetric geometry. The applications of the work have to do with the transport coefficients in such regions as well as with local instrumental observations of distribution functions with particle detectors. We have evolved a kinetic theoretical framework in which we have obtained analytical solutions for a number of important limits. We have also developed a semi-numerical method by which to obtain the ion velocity distribution under more general conditions for which analytical solutions are not possible. Our presentation will focus strongly on collision-free results, which stem from the following assumptions: (1) a perpendicular electric field is introduced initially on a time scale that is fast compared to the local ion gyrofrequency (but slow compared to electron plasma and gyrofrequencies); (2) the ion collision frequency is much smaller than the ion gyrofrequency, so that we can calculate meaningful collisionfree solutions. We will present analytical solutions for the distribution functions and their velocity moments inside regions for which the electric field can be assumed to increase linearly with distance from the axis of the cylindrical region, this for a number of initial cylindrically symmetric density distributions. We will also present our

  5. Resonance in cylindrical-rectangular and wraparound microstrip structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ali, Sami M.; Kong, Jin AU; Habashy, Tarek M.; Kiang, Jean-Fu

    1989-01-01

    A rigorous analysis of the resonance frequency problem of both the cylindrical-rectangular and the wraparound microstrip structure is presented. The problem is formulated in terms of a set of vector integral equations. Using Galerkin's method to solve the integral equations, the complex resonance frequencies are studied with sinusoidal basis functions which incorporate the edge singularity. The complex resonance frequencies are computed using a perturbation approach. Modes suitable for resonator or antenna applications are investigated. The edge singularity of the patch current is shown to have no significant effect on the accuracy of the results. It is shown that the HE10 modes of the cylindrical-rectangular and wraparound patches are more appropriate for resonator applications. The HE01 and TE01 modes of the cylindrical-rectangular and wraparound patches, respectively, are efficient radiating modes.

  6. Sound generation by flow over relatively deep cylindrical cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parthasarathy, S. P.; Cho, Y. I.; Back, L. H.

    1985-01-01

    To develop a system for acoustic coding of moving objects containing drilled cylindrical cavities, the production of high-intensity tones by deep cylindrical cavities in a flat surface at low (0.12-0.24) Mach numbers was investigated. The sound intensity and frequency have been determined as functions of flow velocity, diameter, and depth of the cavities. It is shown that whistles can be designed for a given frequency (in the range of 5-17 kHz) and flow, and the sound pressure levels can be calculated by the equations given. Using these equations a whistle producing 106 dB at a 30.5-cm distance from a cylindrical cavity of 0.508 cm in diameter and 1.32 cm in depth with an airflow of 57.7 m/s past the cavity was designed.

  7. Rotating cylindrical magnetron sputtering: Simulation of the reactive process

    SciTech Connect

    Depla, D.; Mahieu, S.; Van Aeken, K.; Leroy, W. P.; Haemers, J.; De Gryse, R.; Li, X. Y.; Bogaerts, A.

    2010-06-15

    A rotating cylindrical magnetron consists of a cylindrical tube, functioning as the cathode, which rotates around a stationary magnet assembly. In stationary mode, the cylindrical magnetron behaves similar to a planar magnetron with respect to the influence of reactive gas addition to the plasma. However, the transition from metallic mode to poisoned mode and vice versa depends on the rotation speed. An existing model has been modified to simulate the influence of target rotation on the well known hysteresis behavior during reactive magnetron sputtering. The model shows that the existing poisoning mechanisms, i.e., chemisorption, direct reactive ion implantation and knock on implantation, are insufficient to describe the poisoning behavior of the rotating target. A better description of the process is only possible by including the deposition of sputtered material on the target.

  8. Experiments of cylindrical isentropic compression by ultrahigh magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Zhuowei; Zhou, Zhongyu; Zhang, Chunbo; Tang, Xiaosong; Tong, Yanjin; Zhao, Jianheng; Sun, Chengwei

    2015-09-01

    The high Explosive Magnetic Flux Implosion Compression Generator (EMFICG) is a kind of unique high energy density dynamic technique with characters like ultrahigh pressure and low temperature rising and could be suitable as a tool of cylindrical isentropic compression. The Institute of Fluid Physics, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics (IFP, CAEP) have developed EMFICG technique and realized cylindrical isentropic compression. In the experiments, a seed magnetic field of 5-6 Tesla were built first and compressed by a stainless steel liner which is driven by high explosive. The inner free surface velocity of sample was measured by PDV. The isentropic compression of a copper sample was verified and the isentropic pressure is over 100 GPa. The cylindrical isentropic compression process has been numerical simulated by 1D MHD code and the simulation results were compared with the experiments. Compared with the transitional X-ray flash radiograph measurement, this method will probably promote the data accuracy.

  9. Radiation and scattering from printed antennas on cylindrically conformal platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempel, Leo C.; Volakis, John L.; Bindiganavale, Sunil

    1994-01-01

    The goal was to develop suitable methods and software for the analysis of antennas on cylindrical coated and uncoated platforms. Specifically, the finite element boundary integral and finite element ABC methods were employed successfully and associated software were developed for the analysis and design of wraparound and discrete cavity-backed arrays situated on cylindrical platforms. This work led to the successful implementation of analysis software for such antennas. Developments which played a role in this respect are the efficient implementation of the 3D Green's function for a metallic cylinder, the incorporation of the fast Fourier transform in computing the matrix-vector products executed in the solver of the finite element-boundary integral system, and the development of a new absorbing boundary condition for terminating the finite element mesh on cylindrical surfaces.

  10. Determination of thermal diffusivities of cylindrical bodies being cooled

    SciTech Connect

    Dincer, I.

    1996-09-01

    This paper deals with the development of an analytical model for determining the thermal diffusivities of the individual solid cylindrical bodies subjected to cooling is presented. Applications of this model were made using the experimental center temperature data obtained from the cylindrical products (e.g., cucumber and grape) during air cooling at the flow velocity of 2 m/s. As an experimental result, the thermal diffusivities of products were found to be 1.45{times}10{sup {minus}7} m{sup 2}/s for cucumber and 1.68{times}10{sup {minus}7} m{sup 2}/s for grape. It can be concluded that the present model is capable of determining the thermal diffusivities of cylindrical bodies during cooling in a simple and effective form.

  11. Nonlinear Local Bending Response and Bulging Factors for Longitudinal and Circumferential Cracks in Pressurized Cylindrical Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Richard D.; Rose, Cheryl A.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Results of a geometrically nonlinear finite element parametric study to determine curvature correction factors or bulging factors that account for increased stresses due to curvature for longitudinal and circumferential cracks in unstiffened pressurized cylindrical shells are presented. Geometric parameters varied in the study include the shell radius, the shell wall thickness, and the crack length. The major results are presented in the form of contour plots of the bulging factor as a function of two nondimensional parameters: the shell curvature parameter, lambda, which is a function of the shell geometry, Poisson's ratio, and the crack length; and a loading parameter, eta, which is a function of the shell geometry, material properties, and the applied internal pressure. These plots identify the ranges of the shell curvature and loading parameters for which the effects of geometric nonlinearity are significant. Simple empirical expressions for the bulging factor are then derived from the numerical results and shown to predict accurately the nonlinear response of shells with longitudinal and circumferential cracks. The numerical results are also compared with analytical solutions based on linear shallow shell theory for thin shells, and with some other semi-empirical solutions from the literature, and limitations on the use of these other expressions are suggested.

  12. Indoor Light Performance of Coil Type Cylindrical Dye Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Kapil, Gaurav; Ogomi, Yuhei; Pandey, Shyam S; Ma, Tingli; Hayase, Shuzi

    2016-04-01

    A very good performance under low/diffused light intensities is one of the application areas in which dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) can be utilized effectively compared to their inorganic silicon solar cell counterparts. In this article, we have investigated the 1 SUN and low intensity fluorescent light performance of Titanium (Ti)-coil based cylindrical DSSC (C-DSSC) using ruthenium based N719 dye and organic dyes such as D205 and Y123. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopic results were analyzed for variable solar cell performances. Reflecting mirror with parabolic geometry as concentrator was also utilized to tap diffused light for indoor applications. Fluorescent light at relatively lower illumination intensities (0.2 mW/cm2 to 0.5 mW/cm2) were used for the investigation of TCO-less C-DSSC performance with and without reflector geometry. Furthermore, the DSSC performances were analyzed and compared with the commercially available amorphous silicon based solar cell for indoor applications. PMID:27451601

  13. Radiative Heat Transfer in Finite Cylindrical Enclosures with Nonhomogeneous Participating Media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, Pei-Feng; Ku, Jerry C.

    1994-01-01

    Results of a numerical solution for radiative heat transfer in homogeneous and nonhomogeneous participating media are presented. The geometry of interest is a finite axisymmetric cylindrical enclosure. The integral formulation for radiative transport is solved by the YIX method. A three-dimensional solution scheme is applied to two-dimensional axisymmetric geometry to simplify kernel calculations and to avoid difficulties associated with treating boundary conditions. As part of the effort to improve modeling capabilities for turbulent jet diffusion flames, predicted distributions for flame temperature and soot volume fraction are used to calculate radiative heat transfer from soot particles in such flames. It is shown that the nonhomogeneity of radiative property has very significant effects. The peak value of the divergence of radiative heat flux could be underestimated by 2 factor of 7 if a mean homogeneous radiative property is used. Since recent studies have shown that scattering by soot agglomerates is significant in flames, the effect of magnitude of scattering is also investigated and found to be nonnegligible.

  14. Explicit approximations to estimate the perturbative diffusivity in the presence of convectivity and damping. III. Cylindrical approximations for heat waves traveling inwards

    SciTech Connect

    Berkel, M. van; Tamura, N.; Ida, K.; Hogeweij, G. M. D.; Zwart, H. J.; Inagaki, S.; Baar, M. R. de

    2014-11-15

    In this paper, a number of new explicit approximations are introduced to estimate the perturbative diffusivity (χ), convectivity (V), and damping (τ) in cylindrical geometry. For this purpose, the harmonic components of heat waves induced by localized deposition of modulated power are used. The approximations are based on the heat equation in cylindrical geometry using the symmetry (Neumann) boundary condition at the plasma center. This means that the approximations derived here should be used only to estimate transport coefficients between the plasma center and the off-axis perturbative source. If the effect of cylindrical geometry is small, it is also possible to use semi-infinite domain approximations presented in Part I and Part II of this series. A number of new approximations are derived in this part, Part III, based upon continued fractions of the modified Bessel function of the first kind and the confluent hypergeometric function of the first kind. These approximations together with the approximations based on semi-infinite domains are compared for heat waves traveling towards the center. The relative error for the different derived approximations is presented for different values of the frequency, transport coefficients, and dimensionless radius. Moreover, it is shown how combinations of different explicit formulas can be used to estimate the transport coefficients over a large parameter range for cases without convection and damping, cases with damping only, and cases with convection and damping. The relative error between the approximation and its underlying model is below 2% for the case, where only diffusivity and damping are considered. If also convectivity is considered, the diffusivity can be estimated well in a large region, but there is also a large region in which no suitable approximation is found. This paper is the third part (Part III) of a series of three papers. In Part I, the semi-infinite slab approximations have been treated. In Part II

  15. Proposed helmet PET geometries with add-on detectors for high sensitivity brain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tashima, Hideaki; Yamaya, Taiga

    2016-10-01

    For dedicated brain PET, we can significantly improve sensitivity for the cerebrum region by arranging detectors in a compact hemisphere. The geometrical sensitivity for the top region of the hemisphere is increased compared with conventional cylindrical PET consisting of the same number of detectors. However, the geometrical sensitivity at the center region of the hemisphere is still low because the bottom edge of the field-of-view is open, the same as for the cylindrical PET. In this paper, we proposed a helmet PET with add-on detectors for high sensitivity brain PET imaging for both center and top regions. The key point is the add-on detectors covering some portion of the spherical surface in addition to the hemisphere. As the location of the add-on detectors, we proposed three choices: a chin detector, ear detectors, and a neck detector. For example, the geometrical sensitivity for the region-of-interest at the center was increased by 200% by adding the chin detector which increased the size by 12% of the size of the hemisphere detector. The other add-on detectors gave almost the same increased sensitivity effect as the chin detector did. Compared with standard whole-body-cylindrical PET, the proposed geometries can achieve 2.6 times higher sensitivity for brain region even with less than 1/4 detectors. In addition, we conducted imaging simulations for geometries with a diameter of 250 mm and with high resolution depth-of-interaction detectors. The simulation results showed that the proposed geometries increased image quality, and all of the add-on detectors were equivalently effective. In conclusion, the proposed geometries have high potential for widespread applications in high-sensitivity, high-resolution, and low-cost brain PET imaging.

  16. Thermal Conductivity of Liquid He-4 near the Superfluid Transition in Restricted Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yuanming

    2003-01-01

    We present measurements of the thermal conductivity near the superfluid transition of He-4 in confined geometries. The confinements we have studied include: cylindrical geometries with radii L=.5 and 1.0 microns, and parallel plates with 5 micron spacing. For L=1.0 microns, measurements at six pressures were conducted, whereas only SVP measurements have been done for other geometries. For the 1-D confinement in cylinders, the data are consistent with a universal scaling for all pressures at and above T(sub lambda). There are indications of breakdown of scaling and universality below T(sub lambda). For the 2-D confinement between parallel plates, the preliminary results indicate that the thermal conductivity is finite at the bulk superfluid transition temperature. Further analyses are needed to compare the 2-D results with those in bulk and 1-D confinement.

  17. The effects of arcjet thruster operating condition constrictor geometry on the plasma plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carney, Lynnette M.; Sankovic, John M.

    1989-01-01

    Measurements of plasma number density and electron temperature were obtained in the plumes of lab arcjet thrusters using electrostatic probes of both spherical and cylindrical geometry. The two arcjet thrusters used had different constrictor and/or nozzle geometries and operated on mixtures of nitrogen, hydrogen, and ammonia to simulate the decomposition products of hydrazine and ammonia. An increase in the measured electron density was observed for both geometries with increasing arc power at a constant mass flow rate and with increasing mass flow rate at a constant arc current. For a given operating condition, the electron number density decreased exponentially off centerline and followed an inverse distance squared relationship along the thrust axis. Typical measured electron temperatures ranged from 0.1 to 0.2 eV.

  18. The effects of arcjet operating condition and constrictor geometry on the plasma plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carney, Lynnette M.; Sankovic, John M.

    1989-01-01

    Measurements of plasma number density and electron temperature were obtained in the plumes of lab arcjet thrusters using electrostatic probes of both spherical and cylindrical geometry. The two arcjet thrusters used had different constrictor and/or nozzle geometries and operated on mixtures of nitrogen, hydrogen, and ammonia to simulate the decomposition products of hydrazine and ammonia. An increase in the measured electron density was observed for both geometries with increasing arc power at a constant mass flow rate and with increasing mass flow rate at a constant arc current. For a given operating condition, the electron number density decreased exponentially off centerline and followed an inverse distance squared relationship along the thrust axis. Typical measured electron temperatures ranged from 0.1 to 0.2 eV.

  19. Experiments on cylindrically converging blast waves in atmospheric air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, Hideo; Nakamura, Yuichi

    1980-06-01

    Cylindrically converging blast waves have been produced in normal atmospheric conditions by the detonation of the explosives, pentaerythritoltetranitrate, (PETN), over cylindrical surfaces. The shocks generated in this way are so strong that the fronts propagating through the air become luminous of themselves. The production and the propagation of the shocks have been monitored with a framing camera and a streak camera, and the time-space relations of the shock propagations have been determined using an electrical ionization probing system. The results have shown that the trajectory of the shock fronts near the axis of the cylinder can be approximately represented by the Guderley's formula.

  20. Trapping of Microparticles in Cylindrical Standing Wave Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jeongwon; Hwang, Haerang; Bae, Young Min; Kim, Moojoon; Ha, Kanglyeol

    2013-07-01

    In this study, in order to determine the positions where microparticles are trapped in a cylindrical standing wave field, we derived equations giving the radiation force and potential energy distribution. Then, the trapped pattern and its variation with time in a hollow cylindrical transducer were simulated. The simulation results showed that polystyrene particles moved to and aggregated near positions corresponding to pressure nodes, which were estimated from the derived equations. These were confirmed by measurement. In addition, it was demonstrated that biological particles of the green algae chlorella show similar trapping phenomena to polystyrene particles.

  1. The magnetic properties of the hollow cylindrical ideal remanence magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjørk, R.

    2016-10-01

    We consider the magnetic properties of the hollow cylindrical ideal remanence magnet. This magnet is the cylindrical permanent magnet that generates a uniform field in the cylinder bore, using the least amount of magnetic energy to do so. The remanence distribution of this magnet is derived and the generated field is compared to that of a Halbach cylinder of equal dimensions. The ideal remanence magnet is shown in most cases to generate a significantly lower field than the equivalent Halbach cylinder, although the field is generated with higher efficiency. The most efficient Halbach cylinder is shown to generate a field exactly twice as large as the equivalent ideal remanence magnet.

  2. Aerodynamic sound generation induced by flow over small, cylindrical cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parthasarathy, S. P.; Cho, Y. I.; Back, L. H.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been conducted on the production of high intensity tones by small cylindrical cavities in a flat surface. The application of such a mechanism is to the acoustic coding of moving objects containing drilled holes. The sound intensity and frequency have been determined as functions of flow velocity, diameter and depth of the cavities. As a practical matter, it is possible to produce a whistle producing 106 dB at 30.5 cm distance from a cylindrical hole of 0.5 cm diameter and 1.2 cm deep with an airflow of 60 m/s past the hole.

  3. Microwave guiding in air by a cylindrical filament array waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Chateauneuf, M.; Dubois, J.; Payeur, S.; Kieffer, J.-C.

    2008-03-03

    Microwave guiding was demonstrated over 16 cm in air using a large diameter hollow plasma waveguide. The waveguide was generated with the 100 TW femtosecond laser system at the Advanced Laser Light Source facility. A deformable mirror was used to spatially shape the intense laser pulses in order to generate hundreds of filaments judiciously distributed in a cylindrical shape, creating a cylindrical plasma wall that acts as a microwave waveguide. The microwaves were confined for about 10 ns, which corresponds to the free electron plasma wall recombination time. The characteristics of the plasma waveguide and the results of microwave guiding are presented.

  4. Analytic descriptions of cylindrical electromagnetic waves in a nonlinear medium.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Hao; Si, Liu-Gang; Yang, Xiaoxue; Wu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    A simple but highly efficient approach for dealing with the problem of cylindrical electromagnetic waves propagation in a nonlinear medium is proposed based on an exact solution proposed recently. We derive an analytical explicit formula, which exhibiting rich interesting nonlinear effects, to describe the propagation of any amount of cylindrical electromagnetic waves in a nonlinear medium. The results obtained by using the present method are accurately concordant with the results of using traditional coupled-wave equations. As an example of application, we discuss how a third wave affects the sum- and difference-frequency generation of two waves propagation in the nonlinear medium.

  5. Analytic descriptions of cylindrical electromagnetic waves in a nonlinear medium

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Hao; Si, Liu-Gang; Yang, Xiaoxue; Wu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    A simple but highly efficient approach for dealing with the problem of cylindrical electromagnetic waves propagation in a nonlinear medium is proposed based on an exact solution proposed recently. We derive an analytical explicit formula, which exhibiting rich interesting nonlinear effects, to describe the propagation of any amount of cylindrical electromagnetic waves in a nonlinear medium. The results obtained by using the present method are accurately concordant with the results of using traditional coupled-wave equations. As an example of application, we discuss how a third wave affects the sum- and difference-frequency generation of two waves propagation in the nonlinear medium. PMID:26073066

  6. Cylindrical diffuser axial detection profile is dependent on fiber design

    PubMed Central

    Baran, Timothy M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. The axial emission and detection profiles of 1- and 2-cm cylindrical diffusing fibers based on concentration gradients of scatterers were measured. Based on these measurements, we describe a method for determination of the scatterer concentration gradient within the diffusers. Using a Monte Carlo model incorporating these concentrations, detection was simulated and found to agree with measurements. The measured and simulated detection profiles for these diffusers were found to be drastically different from those previously measured in an alternative diffuser design incorporating an end reflector. When using cylindrical diffusers as detection fibers, it is, therefore, important to understand the design of the fiber and characterize the detection behavior. PMID:25839428

  7. The evanescent wavefield part of a cylindrical vector beam

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rui-Pin; Li, Guoqiang

    2013-01-01

    The evanescent wave of the cylindrical vector field is analyzed using the vector angular spectrum of the electromagnetic beam. Comparison between the contributions of the TE and TM terms of both the propagating and the evanescent waves associated with the cylindrical vector field in free space is demonstrated. The physical pictures of the evanescent wave and the propagating wave are well illustrated from the vectorial structure, which provides a new approach to manipulating laser beams by choosing the states of polarization in the cross-section of the field. PMID:24104116

  8. Cylindrically symmetric distributions of matter taking into account pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Dandash, N.F.

    1986-06-01

    This paper considers a non-steady-state cosmological field for describing the distribution of matter with nonzero pressure; the assumption of cylindrical symmetry is taken into consideration. A new class of non-steady-state solutions to the Einstein equations is found. A homogeneous, anisotropic universe and an analog of the Schwarzschild solution are considered as particular cases. The obtained results can be used for describing cylindrical regions in the universe, especially in the vicinity of linear mass ejection from galaxies and quasars and linear super-large-scale structures.

  9. Real-time wideband cylindrical holographic surveillance system

    DOEpatents

    Sheen, David M.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Hall, Thomas E.; Severtsen, Ronald H.

    1999-01-01

    A wideband holographic cylindrical surveillance system including a transceiver for generating a plurality of electromagnetic waves; antenna for transmitting the electromagnetic waves toward a target at a plurality of predetermined positions in space; the transceiver also receiving and converting electromagnetic waves reflected from the target to electrical signals at a plurality of predetermined positions in space; a computer for processing the electrical signals to obtain signals corresponding to a holographic reconstruction of the target; and a display for displaying the processed information to determine nature of the target. The computer has instructions to apply Fast Fourier Transforms and obtain a three dimensional cylindrical image.

  10. Real-time wideband cylindrical holographic surveillance system

    DOEpatents

    Sheen, D.M.; McMakin, D.L.; Hall, T.E.; Severtsen, R.H.

    1999-01-12

    A wideband holographic cylindrical surveillance system is disclosed including a transceiver for generating a plurality of electromagnetic waves; antenna for transmitting the electromagnetic waves toward a target at a plurality of predetermined positions in space; the transceiver also receiving and converting electromagnetic waves reflected from the target to electrical signals at a plurality of predetermined positions in space; a computer for processing the electrical signals to obtain signals corresponding to a holographic reconstruction of the target; and a display for displaying the processed information to determine nature of the target. The computer has instructions to apply Fast Fourier Transforms and obtain a three dimensional cylindrical image. 13 figs.

  11. Numerical Simulations of High-Speed Flows Over Complex Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, Patrick Timothy

    The effects of surface roughness on the stability of hypersonic flow are of great importance to hypersonic vehicles. Surface roughness can greatly alter boundary-layer flow and cause transition to turbulence to occur much earlier compared to a smooth wall, which will result in a significant increase of wall heating and skin friction drag. The work presented in this dissertation was motivated by a desire to study the effects of isolated roughness elements on the stability of hypersonic boundary layers. A new code was developed which can perform high-order direct numerical simulations of high-speed flows over arbitrary geometries. A fifth-order hybrid weighted essentially non-oscillatory scheme was implemented to capture any steep gradients in the flow created by the geometries. The simulations are carried out on Cartesian grids with the geometries imposed by a third-order cut-cell method. A multi-zone refinement method is also implemented to provide extra resolution at locations with expected complex physics. The combination results in a globally fourth-order scheme. Results for two-dimensional and three-dimensional test cases show good agreement with previous results and will be presented. Results confirming the code's high order of convergence will also be shown. Two-dimensional simulations of flow over complex geometries will be presented to demonstrate the code's capabilities. Results for Mach 6 flow over a three-dimensional cylindrical roughness element will also be presented. The results will show that the code is a promising tool for the study of hypersonic roughness-induced transition.

  12. Roles of arbitrarily charged heavy ions and degenerate plasma pressure in cylindrical and spherical IA shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossen, M. R.; Nahar, L.; Mamun, A. A.

    2014-10-01

    A rigorous theoretical investigation has been made to study the existence and basic features of the ion acoustic (IA) shock structures in an unmagnetized, collisionless dense plasma system containing degenerate electron and ion fluids, and arbitrarily charged static heavy ions. This investigation is valid for both the non-relativistic limit and the ultra-relativistic limit. The reductive perturbation technique has been employed to derive the standard Burgers equation. The solution of this equation has been analyzed both for planar geometry and for nonplanar geometry. The basic features (speed, amplitude, width, and so on) of these electrostatic shock structures have been briefly discussed. The basic properties of the IA shock waves are found to be significantly modified by the effects of arbitrarily charged static heavy ions. It has also been found that the properties of IA shock waves in nonplanar (cylindrical or spherical) geometry significantly differ from those in planar (one-dimensional) geometry. The implications of our results for space and interstellar compact objects such as white dwarfs, neutron stars, black holes, and so on have been briefly discussed.

  13. Earthquake cycles in complex geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanet, Pierre; Bhat, Harsha; Madariaga, Raul

    2016-04-01

    Our understanding of earthquake cycles, from a modelling perspective, comes mainly from theoretical, and numerical, work on a single straight fault. However, natural fault systems are geometrically complex. Modelling complex fault geometry (bends, kinks and multiple faults) is in itself a challenge as it is computationally intensive. To overcome this difficulty, we appeal to the Fast Multipole Method which was developed in the context of modelling N-body problems. This method is then used to model the quasi-dynamic response of multiple faults, with complex geometries, that are governed by rate and state friction laws. Our preliminary findings tell us that when stress interaction between faults, due to complex geometry, is accounted then even strongly rate-weakening faults (a-b)<0 show a complex spectrum of slow slip and dynamic ruptures.

  14. Conventionalism and integrable Weyl geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pucheu, M. L.

    2015-03-01

    Since the appearance of Einstein's general relativity, gravitation has been associated to the space-time curvature. This theory introduced a geometrodynamic language which became a convenient tool to predict matter behaviour. However, the properties of space-time itself cannot be measurable by experiments. Taking Poincaré idea that the geometry of space-time is merely a convention, we show that the general theory of relativity can be completely reformulated in a more general setting, a generalization of Riemannian geometry, namely, the Weyl integrable geometry. The choice of this new mathematical language implies, among other things, that the path of particles and light rays should now correspond to Weylian geodesies. Such modification in the dynamic of bodies brings a new perception of physical phenomena that we will explore.

  15. Frustrated Order on Extrinsic Geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Mbanga, Badel L.; Grason, Gregory M.; Santangelo, Christian D.

    2012-01-03

    We study, numerically and theoretically, defects in an anisotropic liquid that couple to the extrinsic geometry of a surface. Though the intrinsic geometry tends to confine topological defects to regions of large Gaussian curvature, extrinsic couplings tend to orient the order along the local direction of maximum or minimum bending. This additional frustration is generically unavoidable, and leads to complex ground-state thermodynamics. Using the catenoid as a prototype, we show, in contradistinction to the well-known effects of intrinsic geometry, that extrinsic curvature expels disclinations from the region of maximum curvature above a critical coupling threshold. On catenoids lacking an “inside-outside” symmetry, defects are expelled altogether above a critical neck size.

  16. Quantum geometry and gravitational entropy

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Joan; Balasubramanian, Vijay; Czech, Bart Iomiej; Larjo, Klaus; Marolf, Donald; Simon, Joan

    2007-05-29

    Most quantum states have wavefunctions that are widely spread over the accessible Hilbert space and hence do not have a good description in terms of a single classical geometry. In order to understand when geometric descriptions are possible, we exploit the AdS/CFT correspondence in the half-BPS sector of asymptotically AdS_5 x S5 universes. In this sector we devise a"coarse-grained metric operator" whose eigenstates are well described by a single spacetime topology and geometry. We show that such half-BPS universes have a non-vanishing entropy if and only if the metric is singular, and that the entropy arises from coarse-graining the geometry. Finally, we use our entropy formula to find the most entropic spacetimes with fixed asymptotic moments beyond the global charges.

  17. Forward and backward motion of artificial helical swimmers in cylindrical channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acemoglu, Alperen; Temel, Fatma Zeynep; Yesilyurt, Serhat

    2013-11-01

    Motion of micro swimmers in confined geometries such as channels is important due to its relevance in in vivo medical applications such as minimally invasive surgery and drug delivery. Here, swimmers with diameters 0.8 mm and lengths 2 to 3 mm are produced with a 3D printer and cylindrical Nd2Fe14B magnets are placed inside the bodies. Rotating external magnetic field is used for the actuation of artificial swimmers. Different body and tail geometries are produced and experiments are conducted with a glycerol filled circular channel. Result demonstrate that decreasing channel diameter directly affects the forward motion of the swimmer due to the increasing drag. It is observed that step-out frequency, which defines maximum frequency at which the swimmer can establish a synchronous rotation with the external magnetic field, depends on the geometry of the swimmer and the channel diameter. There are significant differences between low and high frequency motion and forward and backward swimming. Longer tails enable higher forward velocities in high frequencies than backward ones, whereas forward and backward velocities are approximately the same at low frequencies. Furthermore backward motion is more stable than the forward one; at high frequencies, swimmers travel almost at the center of the channel for backward motion, and follow a helical trajectory near the wall during the forward motion. According to simulation results there is a flow which is induced by the rotation of the swimmer rotation that affects the swimmer's trajectory. We acknowledge the support from TUBITAK (Techonological & Research Council of Turkey) under the grant no: 111M376.

  18. RSRM Propellant Grain Geometry Modification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schorr, Andrew A.; Endicott, Joni B.; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This document is composed of viewgraphs about the RSRM propellant grain geometry modification project, which hopes to improve personnel and system safety by modifying propellant grain geometry to improve structural factors of safety. Using techniques such as Finite Element Analysis to determine blend radii required to reduce localized stresses, and ballistic predictions to ensure that the ballistics, ignition transient and Block Model have not been adversely affected, the project hopes to build and test FSM-10 with a new design, and determine flight effectivity pending successful test evaluation.

  19. Geometry, topology, and string theory

    SciTech Connect

    Varadarajan, Uday

    2003-07-10

    A variety of scenarios are considered which shed light upon the uses and limitations of classical geometric and topological notions in string theory. The primary focus is on situations in which D-brane or string probes of a given classical space-time see the geometry quite differently than one might naively expect. In particular, situations in which extra dimensions, non-commutative geometries as well as other non-local structures emerge are explored in detail. Further, a preliminary exploration of such issues in Lorentzian space-times with non-trivial causal structures within string theory is initiated.

  20. Geometry of generalized depolarizing channels

    SciTech Connect

    Burrell, Christian K.

    2009-10-15

    A generalized depolarizing channel acts on an N-dimensional quantum system to compress the 'Bloch ball' in N{sup 2}-1 directions; it has a corresponding compression vector. We investigate the geometry of these compression vectors and prove a conjecture of Dixit and Sudarshan [Phys. Rev. A 78, 032308 (2008)], namely, that when N=2{sup d} (i.e., the system consists of d qubits), and we work in the Pauli basis then the set of all compression vectors forms a simplex. We extend this result by investigating the geometry in other bases; in particular we find precisely when the set of all compression vectors forms a simplex.

  1. Analysis of cylindrical Langmuir probe using experiment and different theories

    SciTech Connect

    Hassouba, M. A.; Galaly, A. R.; Rashed, U. M.

    2013-03-15

    Cylindrical probe data have been analyzed using different theories in order to determine some plasma parameters (electron temperature and electron and ion densities). Langmuir probe data are obtained in a cylindrical DC glow discharge in the positive column plasma at argon gas pressures varied from 0.5 to 6 Torr and at constant discharge current equal to 10 mA. The electron density has calculated from the electron current at the space potential and from Orbital Motion Limited (OML) collisionless theory. Ion density has obtained from the OML analysis of the ion saturation currents. In addition, the electron temperature has measured by three different methods using probe and electrons currents. The electron temperature T{sub e}, plasma density n{sub e}, and space potential V{sub s}, have been obtained from the measured single cylindrical probe I-V characteristic curves. The radial distribution of the electron temperature and plasma density along the glow discharge are measured and discussed. Using the collisionless theories by Langmuir cylindrical probe and up to several Torr argon gas pressures the differences between the values of electron temperature and electron and ion densities stay within reasonable error limits.

  2. Calibrated cylindrical Mach probe in a plasma wind tunnel

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.; Dandurand, D.; Gray, T.; Brown, M. R.; Lukin, V. S.

    2011-03-15

    A simple cylindrical Mach probe is described along with an independent calibration procedure in a magnetized plasma wind tunnel. A particle orbit calculation corroborates our model. The probe operates in the weakly magnetized regime in which probe dimension and ion orbit are of the same scale. Analytical and simulation models are favorably compared with experimental calibration.

  3. QUASI-PML FOR WAVES IN CYLINDRICAL COORDINATES. (R825225)

    EPA Science Inventory

    We prove that the straightforward extension of Berenger's original perfectly matched layer (PML) is not reflectionless at a cylindrical interface in the continuum limit. A quasi-PLM is developed as an absorbing boundary condition (ABC) for the finite-difference time-domain method...

  4. Hypersonic Magneto-Fluid-Dynamic Compression in Cylindrical Inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shang, Joseph S.; Chang, Chau-Lyan

    2007-01-01

    Hypersonic magneto-fluid-dynamic interaction has been successfully performed as a virtual leading-edge strake and a virtual cowl of a cylindrical inlet. In a side-by-side experimental and computational study, the magnitude of the induced compression was found to be depended on configuration and electrode placement. To better understand the interacting phenomenon the present investigation is focused on a direct current discharge at the leading edge of a cylindrical inlet for which validating experimental data is available. The present computational result is obtained by solving the magneto-fluid-dynamics equations at the low magnetic Reynolds number limit and using a nonequilibrium weakly ionized gas model based on the drift-diffusion theory. The numerical simulation provides a detailed description of the intriguing physics. After validation with experimental measurements, the computed results further quantify the effectiveness of a magnet-fluid-dynamic compression for a hypersonic cylindrical inlet. At a minuscule power input to a direct current surface discharge of 8.14 watts per square centimeter of electrode area produces an additional compression of 6.7 percent for a constant cross-section cylindrical inlet.

  5. Static Solutions of Einstein's Equations with Cylindrical Symmetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trendafilova, C. S.; Fulling, S. A.

    2011-01-01

    In analogy with the standard derivation of the Schwarzschild solution, we find all static, cylindrically symmetric solutions of the Einstein field equations for vacuum. These include not only the well-known cone solution, which is locally flat, but others in which the metric coefficients are powers of the radial coordinate and the spacetime is…

  6. 15. CYLINDRICAL FISH SCALER Remnants of the wire screen remain, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. CYLINDRICAL FISH SCALER Remnants of the wire screen remain, through which the fish tumbled as the cylinder revolved. Note geared ring around cylinder, and the small drive shaft by which it was driven. - Hovden Cannery, 886 Cannery Row, Monterey, Monterey County, CA

  7. Efficient Generation of Truncated Bessel Beams using Cylindrical Waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilchenko, Vladimir S.; Mohageg, Makan; Savchenkov, Anatoliy A.; Matsko, Andrey B.; Maleki, Lute

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we address efficient conversion between a Gaussian beam (a truncated plane wave) and a truncated Bessel beam of agiven order, using cylindrical optical waveguides and whispering gallery mode resonators. Utilizing a generator based on waveguides combined with whispering gallery mode resonators, we have realized Bessel beams of the order of 200 with a conversion efficiency exceeding 10 %.

  8. Screen of cylindrical lenses produces stereoscopic television pictures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nork, C. L.

    1966-01-01

    Stereoscopic television pictures are produced by placing a colorless, transparent screen of adjacent parallel cylindrical lenses before a raster from two synchronized TV cameras. Alternate frames from alternate cameras are displayed. The viewers sensory perception fuses the two images into one three-dimensional picture.

  9. Dynamics of a Liquid Dielectric Attracted by a Cylindrical Capacitor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nardi, Rafael; Lemos, Nivaldo A.

    2007-01-01

    The dynamics of a liquid dielectric attracted by a vertical cylindrical capacitor are studied. Contrary to what might be expected from the standard calculation of the force exerted by the capacitor, the motion of the dielectric is different depending on whether the charge or the voltage of the capacitor is held constant. The problem turns out to…

  10. Electron beam current in high power cylindrical diode

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Amitava; Menon, R.; Mitra, S.; Sharma, Vishnu; Singh, S. K.; Nagesh, K. V.; Chakravarthy, D. P.

    2010-01-15

    Intense electron beam generation studies were carried out in high power cylindrical diode to investigate the effect of the accelerating gap and diode voltage on the electron beam current. The diode voltage has been varied from 130 to 356 kV, whereas the current density has been varied from 87 to 391 A/cm{sup 2} with 100 ns pulse duration. The experimentally obtained electron beam current in the cylindrical diode has been compared with the Langmuir-Blodgett law. It was found that the diode current can be explained by a model of anode and cathode plasma expanding toward each other. However, the diode voltage and current do not follow the bipolar space-charge limited flow model. It was also found that initially only a part of the cathode take part in the emission process. The plasma expands at 4.2 cm/mus for 1.7 cm anode-cathode gap and the plasma velocity decreases for smaller gaps. The electrode plasma expansion velocity of the cylindrical diode is much smaller as compared with the planar diode for the same accelerating gap and diode voltage. Therefore, much higher voltage can be obtained for the cylindrical diodes as compared with the planar diodes for the same accelerating gap.

  11. PCM thermal energy storage in cylindrical containers of various configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Mujumdar, A.S.; Ali Ashraf, F.; Menon, A.S.; Weber, M.E.

    1981-01-01

    Experimental measurements are reported for the time variation of surface-averaged rate of heat storage during melting in single, thin-walled cylindrical containers of copper filled with a commercially available paraffin wax. For the wax used the enthalpy-temperature curve was obtained using a differential scanning calorimeter according to the ASTM method. 12 refs.

  12. Applications of bent cylindrical mirrors to x-ray beamlines

    SciTech Connect

    Heald, S.M.

    1981-07-01

    Bent cylindrical mirrors are considered as substitutes for paraboloidal and ellipsoidal mirrors in x-ray beamlines. Analytic and raytracing studies are used to compare their optical performance with the corresponding ideal elements. Particular emphasis is placed on obtaining the practical limitations in the application of bent cylinders to typical beamline configurations.

  13. On Ideal Stability of Cylindrical Localized Interchange Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Umansky, M V

    2007-05-15

    Stability of cylindrical localized ideal pressure-driven interchange plasma modes is revisited. Converting the underlying eigenvalue problem into the form of the Schroedinger equation gives a new simple way of deriving the Suydam stability criterion and calculating the growth rates of unstable modes. Near the marginal stability limit the growth rate is exponentially small and the mode has a double-peak structure.

  14. Cylindrical surface profile and diameter measuring tool and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Currie, James R. (Inventor); Kissel, Ralph R. (Inventor); Smith, Earnest C. (Inventor); Oliver, Charles E. (Inventor); Redmon, John W., Sr. (Inventor); Wallace, Charles C. (Inventor); Swanson, Charles P. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A tool is shown having a cross beam assembly made of beams joined by a center box structure. The assembly is adapted to be mounted by brackets to the outer end of a cylindrical case. The center box structure has a vertical shaft rotatably mounted therein and extending beneath the assembly. Secured to the vertical shaft is a radius arm which is adapted to rotate with the shaft. On the longer end of the radius arm is a measuring tip which contacts the cylindrical surface to be measured and which provides an electric signal representing the radius of the cylindrical surface from the center of rotation of the radius arm. An electric servomotor rotates the vertical shaft and an electronic resolver provides an electric signal representing the angle of rotation of the shaft. The electric signals are provided to a computer station which has software for its computer to calculate and print out the continuous circumference profile of the cylindrical surface, and give its true diameter and the deviations from the ideal circle.

  15. Cylindrical surface profile and diameter measuring tool and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Currie, James R. (Inventor); Kissel, Ralph R. (Inventor); Oliver, Charles E. (Inventor); Smith, Earnest C. (Inventor); Redmon, John W. (Inventor); Wallace, Charles C. (Inventor); Swanson, Charles P. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A tool is shown having a cross beam assembly (15) made of beams (18, 19, 20, 21) joined by a center box structure (23). The assembly (15) is adapted to be mounted by brackets (16) to the outer end of a cylindrical case (11). The center box structure (23) has a vertical shaft (25) rotatably mounted therein and extending beneath the assembly (15). Secured to the vertical shaft (25) is a radius arm (28) which is adapted to rotate with shaft (25). On the longer end of the radius arm (28) is a measuring tip (30) which contacts the cylindrical surface to be measured and which provides an electric signal representing the radius of the cylindrical surface from the center of rotation of the radius arm (28). An electric servomotor (49) rotates the vertical shaft (25) and an electronic resolver (61) provides an electric signal representing the angle of rotation of the shaft (25). The electric signals are provided to a computer station (73) which has software for its computer to calculate and print out the continuous circumference profile of the cylindrical surface, and give its true diameter and the deviations from the ideal circle.

  16. Optical scanning apparatus for indicia imprinted about a cylindrical axis

    DOEpatents

    Villarreal, Richard A.

    1987-01-01

    An optical scanner employed in a radioactive environment for reading indicia imprinted about a cylindrical surface of an article by means of an optical system including metallic reflective and mirror surfaces resistant to degradation and discoloration otherwise imparted to glass surfaces exposed to radiation.

  17. Effect of nozzle geometry on the performance of laser ablative propulsion thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Long; Jiao, Long; Tang, Zhiping; Hu, Xiaojun; Peng, Jie

    2016-05-01

    The performance of "ablation mode" laser propulsion thrusters can be improved obviously by nozzle constraint. The nozzle geometry of "ablation mode" laser propulsion thrusters has been studied experimentally with CO2 lasers. Experimental results indicate that the propulsion performance of cylindrical nozzle thrusters is better than expansionary nozzle thrusters at the same lengths. The cylindrical nozzle thrusters were optimized by different laser energies. The results show that two important factors, the length-to-diameter ratio α and the thruster diameter to laser-spot diameter ratio β, affect the propulsion performance of the thruster obviously. The momentum coupling coefficient C m increases with the increase of α, while C m increases at first and then decreases with the increase of β.

  18. Computations of Viscous Flows in Complex Geometries Using Multiblock Grid Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinthorsson, Erlendur; Ameri, Ali A.

    1995-01-01

    Generating high quality, structured, continuous, body-fitted grid systems (multiblock grid systems) for complicated geometries has long been a most labor-intensive and frustrating part of simulating flows in complicated geometries. Recently, new methodologies and software have emerged that greatly reduce the human effort required to generate high quality multiblock grid systems for complicated geometries. These methods and software require minimal input form the user-typically, only information about the topology of the block structure and number of grid points. This paper demonstrates the use of the new breed of multiblock grid systems in simulations of internal flows in complicated geometries. The geometry used in this study is a duct with a sudden expansion, a partition, and an array of cylindrical pins. This geometry has many of the features typical of internal coolant passages in turbine blades. The grid system used in this study was generated using a commercially available grid generator. The simulations were done using a recently developed flow solver, TRAF3D.MB, that was specially designed to use multiblock grid systems.

  19. Teaching Activity-Based Taxicab Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ada, Tuba

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed on the process of teaching taxicab geometry, a non-Euclidean geometry that is easy to understand and similar to Euclidean geometry with its axiomatic structure. In this regard, several teaching activities were designed such as measuring taxicab distance, defining a taxicab circle, finding a geometric locus in taxicab geometry, and…

  20. LOGO Based Instruction in Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yusuf, Mian Muhammad

    The objective of this pretest-posttest Quasi-Experimental Design study was to determine the effects of LOGO Based Instruction (LBI) compared to instruction by teacher lecture and pencil-and-paper activities on: (1) students' understanding of the concepts of point, ray, line, and line segment; (2) students' attitudes toward learning geometry,…

  1. Exploring Bundling Theory with Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckalbar, John C.

    2006-01-01

    The author shows how instructors might successfully introduce students in principles and intermediate microeconomic theory classes to the topic of bundling (i.e., the selling of two or more goods as a package, rather than separately). It is surprising how much students can learn using only the tools of high school geometry. To be specific, one can…

  2. General Relativity: Geometry Meets Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomsen, Dietrick E.

    1975-01-01

    Observing the relationship of general relativity and the geometry of space-time, the author questions whether the rest of physics has geometrical explanations. As a partial answer he discusses current research on subatomic particles employing geometric transformations, and cites the existence of geometrical definitions of physical quantities such…

  3. Teaching Geometry According to Euclid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartshorne, Robin

    2000-01-01

    This essay contains some reflections and questions arising from encounters with the text of Euclid's Elements. The reflections arise out of the teaching of a course in Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry to undergraduates. It is concluded that teachers of such courses should read Euclid and ask questions, then teach a course on Euclid and later…

  4. Analogical Reasoning in Geometry Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magdas, Ioana

    2015-01-01

    The analogical reasoning isn't used only in mathematics but also in everyday life. In this article we approach the analogical reasoning in Geometry Education. The novelty of this article is a classification of geometrical analogies by reasoning type and their exemplification. Our classification includes: analogies for understanding and setting a…

  5. Foucault pendulum through basic geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Bergmann, Jens; von Bergmann, HsingChi

    2007-10-01

    We provide a thorough explanation of the Foucault pendulum that utilizes its underlying geometry on a level suitable for science students not necessarily familiar with calculus. We also explain how the geometrically understood Foucault pendulum can serve as a prototype for more advanced phenomena in physics known as Berry's phase or geometric phases.

  6. Spectral geometry of symplectic spinors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassilevich, Dmitri

    2015-10-01

    Symplectic spinors form an infinite-rank vector bundle. Dirac operators on this bundle were constructed recently by Habermann, K. ["The Dirac operator on symplectic spinors," Ann. Global Anal. Geom. 13, 155-168 (1995)]. Here we study the spectral geometry aspects of these operators. In particular, we define the associated distance function and compute the heat trace asymptotics.

  7. Exploring Fractal Geometry with Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vacc, Nancy Nesbitt

    1999-01-01

    Heightens the awareness of elementary school teachers, teacher educators, and teacher-education researchers of possible applications of fractal geometry with children and, subsequently, initiates discussion about the appropriateness of including this new mathematics in the elementary curriculum. Presents activities for exploring children's…

  8. Differential geometry meets the cell.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Wallace F

    2013-07-18

    A new study by Terasaki et al. highlights the role of physical forces in biological form by showing that connections between stacked endoplasmic reticulum cisternae have a shape well known in classical differential geometry, the helicoid, and that this shape is a predictable consequence of membrane physics.

  9. Instructional Identities of Geometry Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aaron, Wendy Rose; Herbst, Patricio

    2012-01-01

    We inspect the hypothesis that geometry students may be oriented toward how they expect that the teacher will evaluate them as students or otherwise oriented to how they expect that their work will give them opportunities to do mathematics. The results reported here are based on a mixed-methods analysis of twenty-two interviews with high school…

  10. Physiological optics and physical geometry.

    PubMed

    Hyder, D J

    2001-09-01

    Hermann von Helmholtz's distinction between "pure intuitive" and "physical" geometry must be counted as the most influential of his many contributions to the philosophy of science. In a series of papers from the 1860s and 70s, Helmholtz argued against Kant's claim that our knowledge of Euclidean geometry was an a priori condition for empirical knowledge. He claimed that geometrical propositions could be meaningful only if they were taken to concern the behaviors of physical bodies used in measurement, from which it followed that it was posterior to our acquaintance with this behavior. This paper argues that Helmholtz's understanding of geometry was fundamentally shaped by his work in sense-physiology, above all on the continuum of colors. For in the course of that research, Helmholtz was forced to realize that the color-space had no inherent metrical structure. The latter was a product of axiomatic definitions of color-addition and the empirical results of such additions. Helmholtz's development of these views is explained with detailed reference to the competing work of the mathematician Hermann Grassmann and that of the young James Clerk Maxwell. It is this separation between 1) essential properties of a continuum, 2) supplementary axioms concerning distance-measurement, and 3) the behaviors of the physical apparatus used to realize the axioms, which is definitive of Helmholtz's arguments concerning geometry.

  11. Noncommutative geometry inspired entropic inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozari, Kourosh; Akhshabi, Siamak

    2011-06-01

    Recently Verlinde proposed that gravity can be described as an emergent phenomena arising from changes in the information associated with the positions of material bodies. By using noncommutative geometry as a way to describe the microscopic microstructure of quantum spacetime, we derive modified Friedmann equation in this setup and study the entropic force modifications to the inflationary dynamics of early universe.

  12. Math Sense: Algebra and Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howett, Jerry

    This book is designed to help students gain the range of math skills they need to succeed in life, work, and on standardized tests; overcome math anxiety; discover math as interesting and purposeful; and develop good number sense. Topics covered in this book include algebra and geometry. Lessons are organized around four strands: (1) skill lessons…

  13. Signature geometry and quantum engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samociuk, Stefan

    2013-09-01

    As the operating frequency of electromagnetic based devices increase, physical design geometry is playing an ever more important role. Evidence is considered in support of a relationship between the dimensionality of primitive geometric forms, such as transistors, and corresponding electromagnetic coupling efficiency. The industry of electronics is defined as the construction of devices by the patterning of primitive forms to physical materials. Examples are given to show the evolution of these primitives, down to nano scales, are requiring exacting geometry and three dimensional content. Consideration of microwave monolithic integrated circuits,(MMIC), photonics and metamaterials,(MM), support this trend and also add new requirements of strict geometric periodicity and multiplicity. Signature geometries,(SG), are characterized by distinctive attributes and examples are given. The transcendent form transcode algorithm, (TTA) is introduced as a multi dimensional SG and its use in designing photonic integrated circuits and metamaterials is discussed . A creative commons licensed research database, TRANSFORM, containing TTA geometries in OASIS file formats is described. An experimental methodology for using the database is given. Multidimensional SG and extraction of three dimensional cross sections as primitive forms is discussed as a foundation for quantum engineering and the exploitation of phenomena other than the electromagnetic.

  14. Extended optical theorem for scalar monochromatic acoustical beams of arbitrary wavefront in cylindrical coordinates.

    PubMed

    Mitri, F G

    2016-04-01

    One of the fundamental theorems in (optical, acoustical, quantum, gravitational) wave scattering is the optical theorem for plane waves, which relates the extinction cross-section to the forward scattering complex amplitude function. In this analysis, the optical theorem is extended for the case of 3D-beams of arbitrary character in a cylindrical coordinates system for any angle of incidence and any scattering angle. Generalized analytical expressions for the extinction, absorption, scattering cross-sections and efficiency factors are derived in the framework of the scalar resonance scattering theory for an object of arbitrary shape. The analysis reveals the presence of an interference scattering cross-section term, which describes interference between the diffracted or specularly reflected inelastic (Franz) waves with the resonance elastic waves. Moreover, an alternate expression for the extinction cross-section, which relates the resonance cross-section with the scattering cross-section for an impenetrable object, is obtained, suggesting an improved method for particle characterization. Cross-section expressions are also derived for known acoustical wavefronts centered on the object, defined as the on-axis case. The extended optical theorem in cylindrical coordinates can be applied to evaluate the extinction efficiency from any object of arbitrary geometry placed on or off the axis of the incident beam. Applications in acoustics, optics, and quantum mechanics should benefit from this analysis in the context of wave scattering theory and other phenomena closely connected to it, such as the multiple scattering by many particles, as well as the radiation force and torque.

  15. Mixing of Multiple Jets with a Confined Subsonic Crossflow in a Cylindrical Duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, James D.; Liscinsky, David S.; Samuelsen, G. Scott; Smith, Clifford E.; Oechsle, Victor L.

    1996-01-01

    This paper summarizes NASA-supported experimental and computational results on the mixing of a row of jets with a confined subsonic crossflow in a cylindrical duct. The studies from which these results were derived investigated flow and geometric variations typical of the complex 3-D flowfield in the combustion chambers in gas turbine engines. The principal observations were that the momentum-flux ratio and the number of orifices were significant variables. Jet penetration was critical, and jet penetration decreased as either the number of orifices increased or the momentum-flux ratio decreased. It also appeared that jet penetration remained similar with variations in orifice size, shape, spacing, and momentum-flux ratio when the number of orifices was proportional to the square-root of the momentum-flux ratio. In the cylindrical geometry, planar variances are very sensitive to events in the near wall region, so planar averages must be considered in context with the distributions. The mass-flow ratios and orifices investigated were often very large (mass-flow ratio greater than 1 and ratio of orifice area-to-mainstream cross-sectional area up to 0.5), and the axial planes of interest were sometimes near the orifice trailing edge. Three-dimensional flow was a key part of efficient mixing and was observed for all configurations. The results shown also seem to indicate that non-reacting dimensionless scalar profiles can emulate the reacting flow equivalence ratio distribution reasonably well. The results cited suggest that further study may not necessarily lead to a universal 'rule of thumb' for mixer design for lowest emissions, because optimization will likely require an assessment for a specific application.

  16. Lubrication analysis of interacting rigid cylindrical particles in confined shear flow

    SciTech Connect

    Cardinaels, R.; Stone, H. A.

    2015-07-15

    Lubrication analysis is used to determine analytical expressions for the elements of the resistance matrix describing the interaction of two rigid cylindrical particles in two-dimensional shear flow in a symmetrically confined channel geometry. The developed model is valid for non-Brownian particles in a low-Reynolds-number flow between two sliding plates with thin gaps between the two particles and also between the particles and the walls. Using this analytical model, a comprehensive overview of the dynamics of interacting cylindrical particles in shear flow is presented. With only hydrodynamic interactions, rigid particles undergo a reversible interaction with no cross-streamline migration, irrespective of the confinement value. However, the interaction time of the particle pair substantially increases with confinement, and at the same time, the minimum distance between the particle surfaces during the interaction substantially decreases with confinement. By combining our purely hydrodynamic model with a simple on/off non-hydrodynamic attractive particle interaction force, the effects of confinement on particle aggregation are qualitatively mapped out in an aggregation diagram. The latter shows that the range of initial relative particle positions for which aggregation occurs is increased substantially due to geometrical confinement. The interacting particle pair exhibits tangential and normal lubrication forces on the sliding plates, which will contribute to the rheology of confined suspensions in shear flow. Due to the combined effects of the confining walls and the particle interaction, the particle velocities and resulting forces both tangential and perpendicular to the walls exhibit a non-monotonic evolution as a function of the orientation angle of the particle pair. However, by incorporating appropriate scalings of the forces, velocities, and doublet orientation angle with the minimum free fraction of the gap height and the plate speed, master curves for

  17. Extended optical theorem for scalar monochromatic acoustical beams of arbitrary wavefront in cylindrical coordinates.

    PubMed

    Mitri, F G

    2016-04-01

    One of the fundamental theorems in (optical, acoustical, quantum, gravitational) wave scattering is the optical theorem for plane waves, which relates the extinction cross-section to the forward scattering complex amplitude function. In this analysis, the optical theorem is extended for the case of 3D-beams of arbitrary character in a cylindrical coordinates system for any angle of incidence and any scattering angle. Generalized analytical expressions for the extinction, absorption, scattering cross-sections and efficiency factors are derived in the framework of the scalar resonance scattering theory for an object of arbitrary shape. The analysis reveals the presence of an interference scattering cross-section term, which describes interference between the diffracted or specularly reflected inelastic (Franz) waves with the resonance elastic waves. Moreover, an alternate expression for the extinction cross-section, which relates the resonance cross-section with the scattering cross-section for an impenetrable object, is obtained, suggesting an improved method for particle characterization. Cross-section expressions are also derived for known acoustical wavefronts centered on the object, defined as the on-axis case. The extended optical theorem in cylindrical coordinates can be applied to evaluate the extinction efficiency from any object of arbitrary geometry placed on or off the axis of the incident beam. Applications in acoustics, optics, and quantum mechanics should benefit from this analysis in the context of wave scattering theory and other phenomena closely connected to it, such as the multiple scattering by many particles, as well as the radiation force and torque. PMID:26836290

  18. Finite Element Analysis of Geodesically Stiffened Cylindrical Composite Shells Using a Layerwise Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhard, Craig Steven; Gurdal, Zafer; Kapania, Rakesh K.

    1996-01-01

    Layerwise finite element analyses of geodesically stiffened cylindrical shells are presented. The layerwise laminate theory of Reddy (LWTR) is developed and adapted to circular cylindrical shells. The Ritz variational method is used to develop an analytical approach for studying the buckling of simply supported geodesically stiffened shells with discrete stiffeners. This method utilizes a Lagrange multiplier technique to attach the stiffeners to the shell. The development of the layerwise shells couples a one-dimensional finite element through the thickness with a Navier solution that satisfies the boundary conditions. The buckling results from the Ritz discrete analytical method are compared with smeared buckling results and with NASA Testbed finite element results. The development of layerwise shell and beam finite elements is presented and these elements are used to perform the displacement field, stress, and first-ply failure analyses. The layerwise shell elements are used to model the shell skin and the layerwise beam elements are used to model the stiffeners. This arrangement allows the beam stiffeners to be assembled directly into the global stiffness matrix. A series of analytical studies are made to compare the response of geodesically stiffened shells as a function of loading, shell geometry, shell radii, shell laminate thickness, stiffener height, and geometric nonlinearity. Comparisons of the structural response of geodesically stiffened shells, axial and ring stiffened shells, and unstiffened shells are provided. In addition, interlaminar stress results near the stiffener intersection are presented. First-ply failure analyses for geodesically stiffened shells utilizing the Tsai-Wu failure criterion are presented for a few selected cases.

  19. A Comparison of Ultrasound Tomography Methods in Circular Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Leach, R R; Azevedo, S G; Berryman, J G; Bertete-Aquirre, H R; Chambers, D H; Mast, J E; Littrup, P; Duric, N; Johnson, S A; Wuebbeling, F

    2002-01-24

    Extremely high quality data was acquired using an experimental ultrasound scanner developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory using a 2D ring geometry with up to 720 transmitter/receiver transducer positions. This unique geometry allows reflection and transmission modes and transmission imaging and quantification of a 3D volume using 2D slice data. Standard image reconstruction methods were applied to the data including straight-ray filtered back projection, reflection tomography, and diffraction tomography. Newer approaches were also tested such as full wave, full wave adjoint method, bent-ray filtered back projection, and full-aperture tomography. A variety of data sets were collected including a formalin-fixed human breast tissue sample, a commercial ultrasound complex breast phantom, and cylindrical objects with and without inclusions. The resulting reconstruction quality of the images ranges from poor to excellent. The method and results of this study are described including like-data reconstructions produced by different algorithms with side-by-side image comparisons. Comparisons to medical B-scan and x-ray CT scan images are also shown. Reconstruction methods with respect to image quality using resolution, noise, and quantitative accuracy, and computational efficiency metrics will also be discussed.

  20. Improving FAIMS sensitivity using a planar geometry with slit interfaces.

    PubMed

    Mabrouki, Ridha; Kelly, Ryan T; Prior, David C; Shvartsburg, Alexandre A; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D

    2009-09-01

    Differential mobility spectrometry or field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) is gaining broad acceptance for analyses of gas-phase ions, especially in conjunction with largely orthogonal separation methods such as mass spectrometry (MS) and/or conventional (drift tube) ion mobility spectrometry. In FAIMS, ions are filtered while passing through a gap between two electrodes that may have planar or curved (in particular, cylindrical) geometry. Despite substantial inherent advantages of the planar configuration and its near-universal adoption in current stand-alone FAIMS devices, commercial FAIMS/MS systems have employed curved FAIMS geometries that can be more effectively interfaced to MS. Here we report a new planar (p-) FAIMS design with slit-shaped entrance and exit apertures that substantially increase ion transmission in and out of the analyzer. The entrance slit interface effectively couples p-FAIMS to multi-emitter electrospray ionization (ESI) sources, improving greatly the ion current introduced to the device and allowing liquid flow rates up to approximately 50 microL/min. The exit slit interface increases the transmission of ribbon-shaped ion beams output by the p-FAIMS to downstream stages such as a MS. Overall, the ion signal in ESI/FAIMS/MS analyses increases by over an order of magnitude without affecting FAIMS resolution.

  1. Improving FAIMS Sensitivity using a Planar Geometry with Slit Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Mabrouki, Ridha B.; Kelly, Ryan T.; Prior, David C.; Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2009-09-01

    Differential mobility spectrometry or field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) is gaining broad acceptance for analyses of gas-phase ions, especially in conjunction with largely orthogonal separation methods such as mass spectrometry (MS) and/or conventional (drift tube) ion mobility spectrometry. In FAIMS, ions are filtered while passing through a gap between two electrodes that may have planar or curved (in particular, cylindrical) geometry. Despite substantial inherent advantages of the planar configuration and its universal acceptance in stand-alone FAIMS devices, commercial FAIMS/MS systems have employed curved FAIMS geometries that could be interfaced to MS more effectively. Here we report a new planar (p-) FAIMS design with slit-shaped entrance and exit apertures that substantially increase ion transmission in and out of the analyzer. The front slit interface effectively couples p-FAIMS to multi-emitter electrospray ionization (ESI) sources, improving greatly the ion current introduced to the device. The back slit interface increases the transmission of ribbon-shaped ion beams output by the p-FAIMS to downstream stages such as a MS. Overall, the ion signal in ESI/FAIMS/MS analyses is raised by over an order of magnitude without affecting the FAIMS resolution.

  2. Modified Taylor-Couette Flow in Multiply-Waisted Hourglass Geometries Simulations based upon Reaction-Diffusion Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Thomas; Hou, Yu; Kowalski, Adam; Wiener, Richard

    2006-05-01

    The Reaction-Diffusion model predicted a period doubling cascade to chaos in a situation analagous Taylor- Couette flow with hourglass geometry. This cascade to chaos was discovered in the actual fluid flow experiments. We model Taylor-Couette flow in a cylindrical geometry with multiple waists of super-critical flow connected by regions of barely super-critical flow by corresponding Reaction-Diffusion models. We compare our results to the findings of an ongoing experimental program. H. Riecke and H.-G. Paap, Europhys. Lett. 14, 1235 (1991). Richard J. Wiener et al, Phys. Rev. E 55, 5489 (1997).

  3. Experimental Determination of the HPGe Spectrometer Efficiency Calibration Curves for Various Sample Geometry for Gamma Energy from 50 keV to 2000 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Saat, Ahmad; Hamzah, Zaini; Yusop, Mohammad Fariz; Zainal, Muhd Amiruddin

    2010-07-07

    Detection efficiency of a gamma-ray spectrometry system is dependent upon among others, energy, sample and detector geometry, volume and density of the samples. In the present study the efficiency calibration curves of newly acquired (August 2008) HPGe gamma-ray spectrometry system was carried out for four sample container geometries, namely Marinelli beaker, disc, cylindrical beaker and vial, normally used for activity determination of gamma-ray from environmental samples. Calibration standards were prepared by using known amount of analytical grade uranium trioxide ore, homogenized in plain flour into the respective containers. The ore produces gamma-rays of energy ranging from 53 keV to 1001 keV. Analytical grade potassium chloride were prepared to determine detection efficiency of 1460 keV gamma-ray emitted by potassium isotope K-40. Plots of detection efficiency against gamma-ray energy for the four sample geometries were found to fit smoothly to a general form of {epsilon} = A{Epsilon}{sup a}+B{Epsilon}{sup b}, where {epsilon} is efficiency, {Epsilon} is energy in keV, A, B, a and b are constants that are dependent on the sample geometries. All calibration curves showed the presence of a ''knee'' at about 180 keV. Comparison between the four geometries showed that the efficiency of Marinelli beaker is higher than cylindrical beaker and vial, while cylindrical disk showed the lowest.

  4. Comparison of flat cleaved and cylindrical diffusing fibers as treatment sources for interstitial photodynamic therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Baran, Timothy M. Foster, Thomas H.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: For interstitial photodynamic therapy (iPDT) of bulky tumors, careful treatment planning is required in order to ensure that a therapeutic dose is delivered to the tumor, while minimizing damage to surrounding normal tissue. In clinical contexts, iPDT has typically been performed with either flat cleaved or cylindrical diffusing optical fibers as light sources. Here, the authors directly compare these two source geometries in terms of the number of fibers and duration of treatment required to deliver a prescribed light dose to a tumor volume. Methods: Treatment planning software for iPDT was developed based on graphics processing unit enhanced Monte Carlo simulations. This software was used to optimize the number of fibers, total energy delivered by each fiber, and the position of individual fibers in order to deliver a target light dose (D{sub 90}) to 90% of the tumor volume. Treatment plans were developed using both flat cleaved and cylindrical diffusing fibers, based on tissue volumes derived from CT data from a head and neck cancer patient. Plans were created for four cases: fixed energy per fiber, fixed number of fibers, and in cases where both or neither of these factors were fixed. Results: When the number of source fibers was fixed at eight, treatment plans based on flat cleaved fibers required each to deliver 7180–8080 J in order to deposit 90 J/cm{sup 2} in 90% of the tumor volume. For diffusers, each fiber was required to deliver 2270–2350 J (333–1178 J/cm) in order to achieve this same result. For the case of fibers delivering a fixed 900 J, 13 diffusers or 19 flat cleaved fibers at a spacing of 1 cm were required to deliver the desired dose. With energy per fiber fixed at 2400 J and the number of fibers fixed at eight, diffuser fibers delivered the desired dose to 93% of the tumor volume, while flat cleaved fibers delivered this dose to 79%. With both energy and number of fibers allowed to vary, six diffusers delivering 3485–3600 J

  5. Semiconductor switch geometry with electric field shaping

    DOEpatents

    Booth, R.; Pocha, M.D.

    1994-08-23

    An optoelectric switch is disclosed that utilizes a cylindrically shaped and contoured GaAs medium or other optically active semiconductor medium to couple two cylindrically shaped metal conductors with flat and flared termination points each having an ovoid prominence centrally extending there from. Coupling the truncated ovoid prominence of each conductor with the cylindrically shaped optically active semiconductor causes the semiconductor to cylindrically taper to a triple junction circular line at the base of each prominence where the metal conductor conjoins with the semiconductor and a third medium such as epoxy or air. Tapering the semiconductor at the triple junction inhibits carrier formation and injection at the triple junction and thereby enables greater current carrying capacity through and greater sensitivity of the bulk area of the optically active medium. 10 figs.

  6. Semiconductor switch geometry with electric field shaping

    DOEpatents

    Booth, Rex; Pocha, Michael D.

    1994-01-01

    An optoelectric switch is disclosed that utilizes a cylindrically shaped and contoured GaAs medium or other optically active semiconductor medium to couple two cylindrically shaped metal conductors with flat and flared termination points each having an ovoid prominence centrally extending there from. Coupling the truncated ovoid prominence of each conductor with the cylindrically shaped optically active semiconductor causes the semiconductor to cylindrically taper to a triple junction circular line at the base of each prominence where the metal conductor conjoins with the semiconductor and a third medium such as epoxy or air. Tapering the semiconductor at the triple junction inhibits carrier formation and injection at the triple junction and thereby enables greater current carrying capacity through and greater sensitivity of the bulk area of the optically active medium.

  7. Shaping of parabolic cylindrical membrane reflectors for the DART precision test bed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, C.; Salama, M.; Dragovan, M.; Schroeder, J.; Barber, D.; Dooley, J.

    2003-01-01

    The DART is a new telescope architecture consisting of two cylindrical parabolic reflectors. The system is ideally suited to using tensioned membranes for the reflective surfaces, owing to the zero Gaussian curvature of a cylindrical parabola.

  8. An Interactive Point Kernel Program For Photon Dose Rate Prediction of Cylindrical Source/Shield Arrangements.

    1990-10-26

    Version 00 The program ZYLIND is an interactive point kernel program for photon dose rate prediction of a homogeneous cylindrical source shielded by cylindrical (radial) or plane (axial) layered shields.

  9. A Method to Calculate the Surface Tension of a Cylindrical Droplet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Xiaosong; Zhu, Ruzeng

    2010-01-01

    The history of Laplace's equations for spherical and cylindrical droplets and the concept of dividing surface in Gibbs' thermodynamic theory of capillary phenomena are briefly reviewed. The existing theories of surface tensions of cylindrical droplets are briefly reviewed too. For cylindrical droplets, a new method to calculate the radius and the…

  10. Stringy differential geometry, beyond Riemann

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Imtak; Lee, Kanghoon; Park, Jeong-Hyuck

    2011-08-01

    While the fundamental object in Riemannian geometry is a metric, closed string theories call for us to put a two-form gauge field and a scalar dilaton on an equal footing with the metric. Here we propose a novel differential geometry that treats the three objects in a unified manner, manifests not only diffeomorphism and one-form gauge symmetry but also O(D,D) T-duality, and enables us to rewrite the known low energy effective action of them as a single term. Further, we develop a corresponding vielbein formalism and gauge the internal symmetry that is given by a direct product of two local Lorentz groups, SO(1,D-1)×SŌ(1,D-1). We comment that the notion of cosmological constant naturally changes.

  11. Geometry-invariant resonant cavities

    PubMed Central

    Liberal, I.; Mahmoud, A. M.; Engheta, N.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant cavities are one of the basic building blocks in various disciplines of science and technology, with numerous applications ranging from abstract theoretical modelling to everyday life devices. The eigenfrequencies of conventional cavities are a function of their geometry, and, thus, the size and shape of a resonant cavity is selected to operate at a specific frequency. Here we demonstrate theoretically the existence of geometry-invariant resonant cavities, that is, resonators whose eigenfrequencies are invariant with respect to geometrical deformations of their external boundaries. This effect is obtained by exploiting the unusual properties of zero-index metamaterials, such as epsilon-near-zero media, which enable decoupling of the temporal and spatial field variations in the lossless limit. This new class of resonators may inspire alternative design concepts, and it might lead to the first generation of deformable resonant devices. PMID:27010103

  12. Geometry of area without length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Pei-Ming; Inami, Takeo

    2016-01-01

    To define a free string by the Nambu-Goto action, all we need is the notion of area, and mathematically the area can be defined directly in the absence of a metric. Motivated by the possibility that string theory admits backgrounds where the notion of length is not well defined but a definition of area is given, we study space-time geometries based on the generalization of a metric to an area metric. In analogy with Riemannian geometry, we define the analogues of connections, curvatures, and Einstein tensor. We propose a formulation generalizing Einstein's theory that will be useful if at a certain stage or a certain scale the metric is ill defined and the space-time is better characterized by the notion of area. Static spherical solutions are found for the generalized Einstein equation in vacuum, including the Schwarzschild solution as a special case.

  13. Hyperbolic geometry for colour metrics.

    PubMed

    Farup, Ivar

    2014-05-19

    It is well established from both colour difference and colour order perpectives that the colour space cannot be Euclidean. In spite of this, most colour spaces still in use today are Euclidean, and the best Euclidean colour metrics are performing comparably to state-of-the-art non-Euclidean metrics. In this paper, it is shown that a transformation from Euclidean to hyperbolic geometry (i.e., constant negative curvature) for the chromatic plane can significantly improve the performance of Euclidean colour metrics to the point where they are statistically significantly better than state-of-the-art non-Euclidean metrics on standard data sets. The resulting hyperbolic geometry nicely models both qualitatively and quantitatively the hue super-importance phenomenon observed in colour order systems.

  14. Geometry Dependence of Stellarator Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    H.E. Mynick, P. Xanthopoulos and A.H. Boozer

    2009-08-10

    Using the nonlinear gyrokinetic code package GENE/GIST, we study the turbulent transport in a broad family of stellarator designs, to understand the geometry-dependence of the microturbulence. By using a set of flux tubes on a given flux surface, we construct a picture of the 2D structure of the microturbulence over that surface, and relate this to relevant geometric quantities, such as the curvature, local shear, and effective potential in the Schrodinger-like equation governing linear drift modes.

  15. Orbit propagation in Minkowskian geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roa, Javier; Peláez, Jesús

    2015-09-01

    The geometry of hyperbolic orbits suggests that Minkowskian geometry, and not Euclidean, may provide the most adequate description of the motion. This idea is explored in order to derive a new regularized formulation for propagating arbitrarily perturbed hyperbolic orbits. The mathematical foundations underlying Minkowski space-time are exploited to describe hyperbolic orbits. Hypercomplex numbers are introduced to define the rotations, vectors, and metrics in the problem: the evolution of the eccentricity vector is described on the Minkowski plane in terms of hyperbolic numbers, and the orbital plane is described on the inertial reference using quaternions. A set of eight orbital elements is introduced, namely a time-element, the components of the eccentricity vector in , the semimajor axis, and the components of the quaternion defining the orbital plane. The resulting formulation provides a deep insight into the geometry of hyperbolic orbits. The performance of the formulation in long-term propagations is studied. The orbits of four hyperbolic comets are integrated and the accuracy of the solution is compared to other regularized formulations. The resulting formulation improves the stability of the integration process and it is not affected by the perihelion passage. It provides a level of accuracy that may not be reached by the compared formulations, at the cost of increasing the computational time.

  16. Pore Geometry and Nonoutflow of the Nonwetting Liquid Dispersed in Nanoporous Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belogorlov, A. A.; Bortnikova, S. A.; Mingalev, P. G.

    The phenomenon of transition to a metastable state of the liquid dispersed in confinement was investigated in this work. Two hydrophobic porous media with similar characteristics has been used. This porous media had identical material (SiO2), surface modification and comparable pore size distribution function, but different pores geometry: quasi-cylindrical (SBA) and quasi-spherical (KB). The characteristics of porous media and results of investigation the non-wetting liquid dispersion in porous media phenomenon at temperatures system from 293 to 343 К and filling the pores of porous media from 10 to 100 percents was presented.

  17. Layered reactive particles with controlled geometries, energies, and reactivities, and methods for making the same

    DOEpatents

    Fritz, Gregory M; Knepper, Robert Allen; Weihs, Timothy P; Gash, Alexander E; Sze, John S

    2013-04-30

    An energetic composite having a plurality of reactive particles each having a reactive multilayer construction formed by successively depositing reactive layers on a rod-shaped substrate having a longitudinal axis, dividing the reactive-layer-deposited rod-shaped substrate into a plurality of substantially uniform longitudinal segments, and removing the rod-shaped substrate from the longitudinal segments, so that the reactive particles have a controlled, substantially uniform, cylindrically curved or otherwise rod-contoured geometry which facilitates handling and improves its packing fraction, while the reactant multilayer construction controls the stability, reactivity and energy density of the energetic composite.

  18. Layered reactive particles with controlled geometries, energies, and reactivities, and methods for making the same

    DOEpatents

    Fritz, Gregory M.; Weihs, Timothy P.; Grzyb, Justin A.

    2016-07-05

    An energetic composite having a plurality of reactive particles each having a reactive multilayer construction formed by successively depositing reactive layers on a rod-shaped substrate having a longitudinal axis, dividing the reactive-layer-deposited rod-shaped substrate into a plurality of substantially uniform longitudinal segments, and removing the rod-shaped substrate from the longitudinal segments, so that the reactive particles have a controlled, substantially uniform, cylindrically curved or otherwise rod-contoured geometry which facilitates handling and improves its packing fraction, while the reactant multilayer construction controls the stability, reactivity and energy density of the energetic composite.

  19. Field emission of electrons from cylindrical metallic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sodha, Mahendra Singh; Dixit, Amrit

    2008-10-01

    In this communication the authors have derived an almost exact expression for the tunneling probability of an electron through the surface potential barrier on account of a negative charge on a cylindrical metallic dust particle and have used it to obtain the field emission current density from the surface of the particle. Based on these results, a parametric analysis of the phenomenon and comparison to the results of JWKB approximation (similar to Fowler-Nordheim theory) has been presented. These results are also applicable to a number of applications based on electric field emission from a thin metallic wire surrounded by a coaxial cylindrical surface at a high electric potential with respect to the wire. The investigation is of relevance to dusty plasmas in space and laboratory and carbon nanotubes.

  20. Sound Transmission through a Cylindrical Sandwich Shell with Honeycomb Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Yvette Y.; Robinson, Jay H.; Silcox, Richard J.

    1996-01-01

    Sound transmission through an infinite cylindrical sandwich shell is studied in the context of the transmission of airborne sound into aircraft interiors. The cylindrical shell is immersed in fluid media and excited by an oblique incident plane sound wave. The internal and external fluids are different and there is uniform airflow in the external fluid medium. An explicit expression of transmission loss is derived in terms of modal impedance of the fluids and the shell. The results show the effects of (a) the incident angles of the plane wave; (b) the flight conditions of Mach number and altitude of the aircraft; (c) the ratios between the core thickness and the total thickness of the shell; and (d) the structural loss factors on the transmission loss. Comparisons of the transmission loss are made among different shell constructions and different shell theories.

  1. Plasmon modes of circular cylindrical double-layer graphene.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tao; Hu, Min; Zhong, Renbin; Chen, Xiaoxing; Zhang, Ping; Gong, Sen; Zhang, Chao; Liu, Shenggang

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a theoretical investigation on plasmon modes in a circular cylindrical double-layer graphene structure is presented. Due to the interlayer electromagnetic interaction, there exist two branches of plasmon modes, the optical plasmon mode and the acoustic plasmon mode. The characteristics of these two modes, such as mode pattern, effective mode index and propagation loss, are analyzed. The modal behaviors can be effectively tuned by changing the distance between two graphene layers, the chemical potential of graphene and the permittivity of interlayer dielectric. Importantly, the breakup of tradeoff between mode confinement and propagation loss is discovered in the distance-dependent modal behavior, which originates from the unique dispersion properties of a double-layer graphene system. As a consequence, both strong mode confinement and longer propagation length can be achieved. Our results may provide good opportunities for developing applications based on graphene plasmonics in circular cylindrical structure. PMID:27607651

  2. Reflection of solar radiation by a cylindrical cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. L.

    1989-01-01

    Potential applications of an analytic method for computing the solar radiation reflected by a cylindrical cloud are discussed, including studies of radiative transfer within finite clouds and evaluations of these effects on other clouds and on remote sensing problems involving finite clouds. The pattern of reflected sunlight from a cylindrical cloud as seen at a large distance has been considered and described by the bidirectional function method for finite cloud analysis, as previously studied theoretically for plane-parallel atmospheres by McKee and Cox (1974); Schmetz and Raschke (1981); and Stuhlmann et al. (1985). However, the lack of three-dimensional radiative transfer solutions for anisotropic scattering media have hampered theoretical investigations of bidirectional functions for finite clouds. The present approach permits expression of the directional variation of the radiation field as a spherical harmonic series to any desired degree and order.

  3. Plasmon modes of circular cylindrical double-layer graphene.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tao; Hu, Min; Zhong, Renbin; Chen, Xiaoxing; Zhang, Ping; Gong, Sen; Zhang, Chao; Liu, Shenggang

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a theoretical investigation on plasmon modes in a circular cylindrical double-layer graphene structure is presented. Due to the interlayer electromagnetic interaction, there exist two branches of plasmon modes, the optical plasmon mode and the acoustic plasmon mode. The characteristics of these two modes, such as mode pattern, effective mode index and propagation loss, are analyzed. The modal behaviors can be effectively tuned by changing the distance between two graphene layers, the chemical potential of graphene and the permittivity of interlayer dielectric. Importantly, the breakup of tradeoff between mode confinement and propagation loss is discovered in the distance-dependent modal behavior, which originates from the unique dispersion properties of a double-layer graphene system. As a consequence, both strong mode confinement and longer propagation length can be achieved. Our results may provide good opportunities for developing applications based on graphene plasmonics in circular cylindrical structure.

  4. Coupled domain wall oscillations in magnetic cylindrical nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Murapaka, Chandrasekhar; Goolaup, S.; Purnama, I.; Lew, W. S.

    2015-02-07

    We report on transverse domain wall (DW) dynamics in two closely spaced cylindrical nanowires. The magnetostatically coupled DWs are shown to undergo an intrinsic oscillatory motion along the nanowire length in addition to their default rotational motion. In the absence of external forces, the amplitude of the DW oscillation is governed by the change in the frequency of the DW rotation. It is possible to sustain the DW oscillations by applying spin-polarized current to the nanowires to balance the repulsive magnetostatic coupling. The current density required to sustain the DW oscillation is found to be in the order of 10{sup 5 }A/cm{sup 2}. Morover, our analysis of the oscillation reveals that the DWs in cylindrical nanowires possess a finite mass.

  5. Nonlinear dynamo action in a cylindrical container driven by precession

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nore, C.; Léorat, J.; Guermond, J.-L.; Luddens, F.

    2011-12-01

    Precession, which results simply from the composition of two rotations with distinct axes, is an efficient way to drive a 3D flow in a closed rigid container. Are such flows relevant to dynamo action in some astrophysical bodies? Positive answers are available for a spherical and a spheroidal containers, using parameters which are, however, not realistic. An experimental approach could be relevant to natural dynamos and seems within reach using a cylindrical container (cf. the experiment now planned at the DREsden Sodium facility for DYNamo and thermohydraulic studies in Germany (DRESDYN), F. Stefani, personal communication, 2011). Using a nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code (SFEMaNS), we numerically demonstrate that precession is able to drive a cylindrical dynamo.

  6. Single-file diffusion of protein drugs through cylindrical nanochannels.

    PubMed

    Yang, Seung Yun; Yang, Jeong-A; Kim, Eung-Sam; Jeon, Gumhye; Oh, Eun Ju; Choi, Kwan Yong; Hahn, Sei Kwang; Kim, Jin Kon

    2010-07-27

    A new drug delivery device using cylindrical block copolymer nanochannels was successfully developed for controlled protein drug delivery applications. Depending on the hydrodynamic diameter of the protein drugs, the pore size in cylindrical nanochannels could be controlled precisely down to 6 nm by Au deposition. Zero-order release of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and human growth hormone (hGH) by single-file diffusion, which has been observed for gas diffusion through zeolite pores, was realized up to 2 months without protein denaturation. Furthermore, a nearly constant in vivo release of hGH from the drug delivery nanodevice implanted to Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats was continued up to 3 weeks, demonstrating the feasibility for long-term controlled delivery of therapeutic protein drugs.

  7. Precession of cylindrical dust particles in the plasma sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Banu, N.; Ticoş, C. M.

    2015-10-15

    The vertical precession of cylindrical dust particles levitated in the sheath of an rf plasma is experimentally investigated. Typically, the dust particles have two equilibrium positions depending on the orientation of their longitudinal axis: horizontal and vertical. A transition between these two states is induced by rapidly increasing the neutral gas pressure in the plasma chamber. During this transition, the cylindrical dust particles make an angle with the horizontal and rotate about their center of mass. The rotation speed increases as the dust rods aligned with the vertical axis. All dust particles will eventually end up in the vertical state while spinning fast about their longitudinal axis. Dust-dust interaction and the attracting ion wakes are possible mechanisms for inducing the observed dust precession.

  8. Novel design of a compact 'cylindrical mirror analyzer' array

    SciTech Connect

    Herting, C.; Juettemann, F.; Petuker, Z.; Schmitter, S.; Hanne, G. F.

    2008-02-15

    The design of a compact multiangle electron analyzer array for simultaneous detection of scattered and ejected electrons at nine different angles is described. It consists of eight slim 'simulated' cylindrical mirror analyzers (CMAs) providing electron detection for scattering/ejected angles of 14 deg. apart from each other. A ninth analyzer is arranged to a scattering angle on the opposite side. A single analyzer has cylindrical symmetry equipotential lines in the region of the beam trajectories, whereas its electrodes are noncylindrical, except for the inner cylinder. The new spectrometer is easy to build because only a few electrodes of simple shape are needed for each of the analyzers. The electron optical properties of the new device are very close to those of a true CMA. Its geometric width, however, is only less than one-fifth of that of a conventional CMA, which allows one to arrange several analyzers close to each other. Example results with the new device are presented.

  9. Cylindrical PVDF film transmitters and receivers for air ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Toda, Minoru

    2002-05-01

    Cylindrical polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) film transducers for transmission and reception of 40-kHz ultrasonic waves in air have been investigated. A key feature of such transducers is their omni-directional polar response. An optimized structure comprises a cylindrical PVDF film element resting on a spool without a mechanical bond to it. Various key design equations to obtain the required ultrasonic performance both as transmitter and receiver are shown, which include resonance frequency, acoustic pressure, angle performance, back air cavity effect, and receiver sensitivity. Measurements of actual frequency response of transmitter output and receiver sensitivity, angular performance, back air space effect, and temperature effect are presented. The results agree well with the theoretical predictions. It has been shown that this device is well-suited for practical application as an ultrasonic ranging device. PMID:12046938

  10. Study of the potential of three different MgB2 tapes for application in cylindrical coils operating at 20 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitel, J.; Kováč, P.; Tropeano, M.; Grasso, G.

    2015-05-01

    The goal of this theoretical study is to illustrate the potential of three different MgB2 tapes, developed by Columbus Superconductors, for application in cylindrical coils. First, the distribution of critical currents and electric fields of individual turns is compared when the winding of the model coil is made with tapes having different Ic(B) and anisotropy values. Second, the influence of the winding geometry on basic parameters of cylindrical coils which consist of a set of pancake coils, such as critical current Icmin, central magnetic field B0 and stored energy E, is analysed. The winding geometry of the coils, i.e. the outer winding radius and the coil length, with the same inner winding radius, was changed from a disc shape to a long thin solenoid in such a way that the overall tape length was held constant, and considered as a parameter. Finally, the winding cross-section of the coil is optimized with respect to the constant tape length in order to reach the maximum central field. The results of calculations show that for a given overall tape length and inner winding radius there exists only one winding geometry which generates the maximum central field. The overall tape length, as a parameter, is changed in a broad range from 500 m to 10 km. All calculations were performed using the experimental data measured at 20 K while the effect of the anisotropy in the Ic(B) characteristic of the short samples is taken into account.

  11. Laser holographic interferometry for investigations of cylindrical transparent tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralea, Mihai F.; Rosu, Nicu; Iova, Iancu

    1996-05-01

    A new double differential refractometer for student laboratories, based on holographic interferometry in real time with reference hologram and reference fringes, is presented. By studying the interferograms one gets a graphical record of the radial, axial, and temporal distribution of the refraction index in cylindrical tubes. This method permits the determination of the experimental parameters for cases when the relationship between these parameters and the refraction index is known. The paper presents experimental results for gas-discharge parameters.

  12. Charged cylindrical polytropes with generalized polytropic equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azam, M.; Mardan, S. A.; Noureen, I.; Rehman, M. A.

    2016-09-01

    We study the general formalism of polytropes in the relativistic regime with generalized polytropic equations of state in the vicinity of cylindrical symmetry. We take a charged anisotropic fluid distribution of matter with a conformally flat condition for the development of a general framework of the polytropes. We discuss the stability of the model by the Whittaker formula and conclude that one of the models developed is physically viable.

  13. Four-Sector Cylindrical Radio-Frequency Ion Trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melbourne, Ruthann K.; Prestage, John D.; Maleki, Lutfollah

    1992-01-01

    Proposed linear radio-frequency ion trap consists of closed metal cylinder partitioned into four equal cylindrical-sector electrodes and two circular end electrodes. Features include relatively large ion-storage capacity and shielding against external fields. Used in frequency-standard laboratories to confine 199Hg+ ions electrodynamically in isolation from external environment. Similar to device described in "Linear Ion Trap for Atomic Clock" (NPO-17758).

  14. Ideal internal kink modes in a differentially rotating cylindrical plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailovskii, A. B.; Lominadze, J. G.; Galvao, R. M. O.; Churikov, A. P.; Erokhin, N. N.; Pustovitov, V. D.; Konovalov, S. V.; Smolyakov, A. I.; Tsypin, V. S.

    2008-07-15

    The Velikhov effect leading to magnetorotational instability (MRI) is incorporated into the theory of ideal internal kink modes in a differentially rotating cylindrical plasma column. It is shown that this effect can play a stabilizing role for suitably organized plasma rotation profiles, leading to suppression of MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) instabilities in magnetic confinement systems. The role of this effect in the problem of the Suydam and the m = 1 internal kink modes is elucidated, where m is the poloidal mode number.

  15. Theory of semicollisional drift-interchange modes in cylindrical plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hahm, T.S.; Chen, L.

    1985-01-01

    Resistive interchange instabilities in cylindrical plasmas are studied, including the effects of electron diamagnetic drift, perpendicular resistivity, and plasma compression. The analyses are pertinent to the semicollisional regime where the effective ion gyro-radius is larger than the resistive layer width. Both analytical and numerical results show that the modes can be completely stabilized by the perpendicular plasma transport. Ion sound effects, meanwhile, are found to be negligible in the semicollisional regime.

  16. High power impulse magnetron sputtering using a rotating cylindrical magnetron

    SciTech Connect

    Leroy, W. P.; Mahieu, S.; Depla, D.; Ehiasarian, A. P.

    2010-01-15

    Both the industrially favorable deposition technique, high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS), and the industrially popular rotating cylindrical magnetron have been successfully combined. A stable operation without arcing, leaks, or other complications for the rotatable magnetron was attained, with current densities around 11 A cm{sup -2}. For Ti and Al, a much higher degree in ionization in the plasma region was observed for the HIPIMS mode compared to the direct current mode.

  17. Plane-wave expansion of elliptic cylindrical functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santini, Carlo; Frezza, Fabrizio; Tedeschi, Nicola

    2015-08-01

    Elliptic Cylindrical Waves (ECW), defined as the product of an angular Mathieu function by its corresponding radial Mathieu function, occur in the solution of scattering problems involving two-dimensional structures with elliptic cross sections. In this paper, we explicitly derive the expansion of ECW, along a plane surface, in terms of homogeneous and evanescent plane waves, showing the accuracy of the numerical implementation of the formulas and discussing possible applications of the result.

  18. Evolution of bulk strain solitons in cylindrical inhomogeneous shells

    SciTech Connect

    Shvartz, A. Samsonov, A.; Dreiden, G.; Semenova, I.

    2015-10-28

    Bulk strain solitary waves in nonlinearly elastic thin-walled cylindrical shells with variable geometrical and physical parameters are studied, and equation for the longitudinal strain component with the variable coefficients is derived. A conservative finite difference scheme is proposed, and the results of numerical simulation of the strain soliton evolution in a shell with the abrupt variations of cross section and physical properties of the material are presented.

  19. Transition in Electron Transport in a Cylindrical Hall Thruster

    SciTech Connect

    J.B. Parker, Y. Raitses, and N.J. Fisch

    2010-06-02

    Through the use of high-speed camera and Langmuir probe measurements in a cylindrical Hall thruster, we report the discovery of a rotating spoke of increased plasma density and light emission which correlates with increased electron transport across the magnetic field. As cathode electron emission is increased, a sharp transition occurs where the spoke disappears and electron transport decreases. This suggests that a significant fraction of the electron current might be directed through the spoke.

  20. Transition in electron transport in a cylindrical Hall thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, J. B.; Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N. J.

    2010-08-30

    Through the use of high-speed camera and Langmuir probe measurements in a cylindrical Hall thruster, we report the discovery of a rotating spoke of increased plasma density and light emission which correlates with increased electron transport across the magnetic field. As cathode electron emission is increased, a sharp transition occurs where the spoke disappears and electron transport decreases. This suggests that a significant fraction of the electron current might be directed through the spoke.