Science.gov

Sample records for cylindrical grinding operation

  1. Surface waviness resulting from single point diamond dressing in cylindrical grinding

    SciTech Connect

    Redmond, J.; Hinnerichs, T.; Apodaca, E.

    1996-05-01

    This paper describes an experimental investigation of workpiece surface waviness that stems from poor single point diamond wheel dressing procedures in cylindrical grinding. If done improperly, single point dressing can produce a thread on the grinding wheel surface that is then imposed on the workpiece during machining. The circumferential waviness exhibited by the threaded workpiece is similar to that resulting from one per rev vibrations of the grinding wheel. In order to differentiate between these two sources of waviness, a geometrical approach to predicting the circumferential and axial waves produced during grinding is presented. The concepts presented are illustrated through a series of plunge grinding tests incorporating dressing procedures of varying quality. Test results verify that dressing induced circumferential waviness is similar to waviness resulting from one per rev type vibrations of the grinding wheel. The two sources can be distinguished, however, through examination of the workpiece waviness in the axial direction.

  2. Optimization of the dressing parameters in cylindrical grinding based on a generalized utility function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrova, Irina

    2016-01-01

    The existing studies, concerning the dressing process, focus on the major influence of the dressing conditions on the grinding response variables. However, the choice of the dressing conditions is often made, based on the experience of the qualified staff or using data from reference books. The optimal dressing parameters, which are only valid for the particular methods and dressing and grinding conditions, are also used. The paper presents a methodology for optimization of the dressing parameters in cylindrical grinding. The generalized utility function has been chosen as an optimization parameter. It is a complex indicator determining the economic, dynamic and manufacturing characteristics of the grinding process. The developed methodology is implemented for the dressing of aluminium oxide grinding wheels by using experimental diamond roller dressers with different grit sizes made of medium- and high-strength synthetic diamonds type ??32 and ??80. To solve the optimization problem, a model of the generalized utility function is created which reflects the complex impact of dressing parameters. The model is built based on the results from the conducted complex study and modeling of the grinding wheel lifetime, cutting ability, production rate and cutting forces during grinding. They are closely related to the dressing conditions (dressing speed ratio, radial in-feed of the diamond roller dresser and dress-out time), the diamond roller dresser grit size/grinding wheel grit size ratio, the type of synthetic diamonds and the direction of dressing. Some dressing parameters are determined for which the generalized utility function has a maximum and which guarantee an optimum combination of the following: the lifetime and cutting ability of the abrasive wheels, the tangential cutting force magnitude and the production rate of the grinding process. The results obtained prove the possibility of control and optimization of grinding by selecting particular dressing

  3. 30 CFR 56.15014 - Eye protection when operating grinding wheels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Eye protection when operating grinding wheels. 56.15014 Section 56.15014 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... MINES Personal Protection § 56.15014 Eye protection when operating grinding wheels. Face shields...

  4. 30 CFR 56.15014 - Eye protection when operating grinding wheels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Eye protection when operating grinding wheels. 56.15014 Section 56.15014 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... MINES Personal Protection § 56.15014 Eye protection when operating grinding wheels. Face shields...

  5. 30 CFR 56.15014 - Eye protection when operating grinding wheels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Eye protection when operating grinding wheels. 56.15014 Section 56.15014 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... MINES Personal Protection § 56.15014 Eye protection when operating grinding wheels. Face shields...

  6. 30 CFR 56.15014 - Eye protection when operating grinding wheels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Eye protection when operating grinding wheels. 56.15014 Section 56.15014 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... MINES Personal Protection § 56.15014 Eye protection when operating grinding wheels. Face shields...

  7. 30 CFR 56.15014 - Eye protection when operating grinding wheels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Eye protection when operating grinding wheels. 56.15014 Section 56.15014 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... MINES Personal Protection § 56.15014 Eye protection when operating grinding wheels. Face shields...

  8. Mechanism of Improvement Effect of Ultrasonically Activated Coolant on Finished Surface Roughness in Cylindrical Grinding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Haruhisa; Kajiwara, Kunio; Shimizu, Shinji; Ohmori, Shigetoshi

    The use of an ultrasonically activated coolant improves the roughness of a ground surface compared with that of an ordinary coolant. By evaluating the change in working surface conditions, it has been clarified that the ultrasonically activated coolant suppresses loading and wheel wear, and maintains a good the working surface condition. The flushing effect of the ultrasonically activated coolant, promoted by giant vibration acceleration, prevents the deposition and welding of chips on the working surface. Since the density of kinetic energy in the coolant stream increases, the activation helps the coolant to overcome the airflow due to wheel rotation and to reach the grinding point efficiently. This promotes the cooling and lubricating effects of coolant, and then protects the cutting edges from crushing, falling off and dulling. On the basis of the results, it can be said that the effects of coolant activation suppress the generation of scratches, and consequently improve the finished surface roughness.

  9. 30 CFR 57.15014 - Eye protection when operating grinding wheels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Eye protection when operating grinding wheels. 57.15014 Section 57.15014 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... NONMETAL MINES Personal Protection Surface and Underground § 57.15014 Eye protection when...

  10. 30 CFR 57.15014 - Eye protection when operating grinding wheels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Eye protection when operating grinding wheels. 57.15014 Section 57.15014 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... NONMETAL MINES Personal Protection Surface and Underground § 57.15014 Eye protection when...

  11. 30 CFR 57.15014 - Eye protection when operating grinding wheels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Eye protection when operating grinding wheels. 57.15014 Section 57.15014 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... NONMETAL MINES Personal Protection Surface and Underground § 57.15014 Eye protection when...

  12. 30 CFR 57.15014 - Eye protection when operating grinding wheels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Eye protection when operating grinding wheels. 57.15014 Section 57.15014 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... NONMETAL MINES Personal Protection Surface and Underground § 57.15014 Eye protection when...

  13. 30 CFR 57.15014 - Eye protection when operating grinding wheels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Eye protection when operating grinding wheels. 57.15014 Section 57.15014 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... NONMETAL MINES Personal Protection Surface and Underground § 57.15014 Eye protection when...

  14. Improved tool grinding machine

    DOEpatents

    Dial, C.E. Sr.

    The present invention relates to an improved tool grinding mechanism for grinding single point diamond cutting tools to precise roundness and radius specifications. The present invention utilizes a tool holder which is longitudinally displaced with respect to the remainder of the grinding system due to contact of the tool with the grinding surface with this displacement being monitored so that any variation in the grinding of the cutting surface such as caused by crystal orientation or tool thicknesses may be compensated for during the grinding operation to assure the attainment of the desired cutting tool face specifications.

  15. Force characteristics in continuous path controlled crankpin grinding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Manchao; Yao, Zhenqiang

    2015-03-01

    Recent research on the grinding force involved in cylindrical plunge grinding has focused mainly on steady-state conditions. Unlike in conventional external cylindrical plunge grinding, the conditions between the grinding wheel and the crankpin change periodically in path controlled grinding because of the eccentricity of the crankpin and the constant rotational speed of the crankshaft. The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of various grinding conditions on the characteristics of the grinding force during continuous path controlled grinding. Path controlled plunge grinding is conducted at a constant rotational speed using a cubic boron nitride (CBN) wheel. The grinding force is determined by measuring the torque. The experimental results show that the force and torque vary sinusoidally during dry grinding and load grinding. The variations in the results reveal that the resultant grinding force and torque decrease with higher grinding speeds and increase with higher peripheral speeds of the pin and higher grinding depths. In path controlled grinding, unlike in conventional external cylindrical plunge grinding, the axial grinding force cannot be disregarded. The speeds and speed ratios of the workpiece and wheel are also analyzed, and the analysis results show that up-grinding and down-grinding occur during the grinding process. This paper proposes a method for describing the force behavior under varied process conditions during continuous path controlled grinding, which provides a beneficial reference for describing the material removal mechanism and for optimizing continuous controlled crankpin grinding.

  16. Combined Grinding and Drying of Biomass in One Operation Phase I

    SciTech Connect

    Sokhansanj, S

    2008-06-26

    First American Scientific Corporation (FASC) has developed a unique and innovative grinder/dryer called KDS Micronex. The KS (Kinetic Disintegration System) combines two operations of grinding and drying into a single operation which reduces dependence on external heat input. The machine captures the heat of comminution and combines it will centrifugal forces to expedite moisture extraction from wet biomass. Because it uses mechanical forces rather than providing direct heat to perform the drying operation, it is a simpler machine and uses less energy than conventional grinding and drying operations which occur as two separate steps. The entire compact unit can be transported on a flatbed trailer to the site where biomass is available. Hence, the KDS Micronex is a technology that enables inexpensive pretreatment of waste materials and biomass. A well prepared biomass can be used as feed, fuel or fertilizer instead of being discarded. Electricity and chemical feedstock produced from such biomass would displace the use of fossil fuels and no net greenhouse gas emissions would result from such bio-based operations. Organic fertilizers resulting from the KS Micronex grinding/drying process will be pathogen-free unlike raw animal manures. The feasibility tests on KS during Phase I showed that a prototype machine can be developed, field tested and the technology demonstrated for commercial applications. The present KDS machine can remove up to 400 kg/h of water from a wet feed material. Since biomass processors demand a finished product that is only 10% moist and most raw materials like corn stover, bagasse, layer manure, cow dung, and waste wood have moisture contents of the order of 50%, this water removal rate translates to a production rate of roughly half a ton per hour. this is too small for most processors who are unwilling to acquire multiple machines because of the added complexity to the feed and product removal systems. The economics suffer due to small

  17. Performing in-feed type centerless grinding process on a surface grinder

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, W.; Wu, Y.; Sato, T.; Lin, W.

    2011-01-17

    In our previous study, a new centerless grinding method using surface grinder was proposed. In this method, centerless grinding operations are performed by installing a compact centerless grinding unit, consisting mainly of an ultrasonic elliptic-vibration shoe, a blade and their respective holders, on the worktable of a surface grinder. During grinding, the cylindrical workpiece is held on the ultrasonic shoe and the blade, and its rotational motion is controlled by the elliptic motion of the shoe end-face. An actual unit had been produced and its performance in tangential-feed type centerless grinding using a surface grinder had been confirmed in the previous workd. In this paper, the performance of the grinding unit in in-feed centerless grinding operation was confirmed, and the effects of the main process parameter, i.e., eccentric angle, on the workpiece roundness was investigated experimentally. The obtained results showed that: (1) the centerless grinding unit performed well in in-feed type centerless grinding; (2) the eccentric angle affects roundness significantly, and its optimal angle is 6 deg.; (3) the workpiece roundness can be further improved by varying the eccentric angle during grinding, and the final roundness reached 0.65 {mu}m after grinding as the eccentric angle varied from 9 deg. to 6 deg. and to 3 deg.

  18. A Guide for Developing Standard Operating Job Procedures for the Screening & Grinding Process Wastewater Treatment Facility. SOJP No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deal, Gerald A.; Montgomery, James A.

    This guide describes standard operating job procedures for the screening and grinding process of wastewater treatment facilities. The objective of this process is the removal of coarse materials from the raw waste stream for the protection of subsequent equipment and processes. The guide gives step-by-step instructions for safety inspection,…

  19. Forecasting of operational indicators of grinding tools with the controlled form and orientation of abrasive grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korotkov, V. A.; Minkin, E. M.

    2015-09-01

    rational angle of grain orientation for cutting disc are in range Θ=65°÷75°. The joint analysis of dependences of front angles and tension in grains from factors of their form and orientation allows the prediction of operating characteristics of grinding tools at the design stage for specific tasks and processing conditions.

  20. Innovative grinding wheel design for cost-effective machining of advanced ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Licht, R.H.; Kuo, P.; Liu, S.; Murphy, D.; Picone, J.W.; Ramanath, S.

    2000-05-01

    This Final Report covers the Phase II Innovative Grinding Wheel (IGW) program in which Norton Company successfully developed a novel grinding wheel for cost-effective cylindrical grinding of advanced ceramics. In 1995, Norton Company successfully completed the 16-month Phase I technical effort to define requirements, design, develop, and evaluate a next-generation grinding wheel for cost-effective cylindrical grinding of advanced ceramics using small prototype wheels. The Phase II program was initiated to scale-up the new superabrasive wheel specification to larger diameters, 305-mm to 406-mm, required for most production grinding of cylindrical ceramic parts, and to perform in-house and independent validation grinding tests.

  1. Crush Grinding

    SciTech Connect

    T. Q. Nguyen

    2005-04-01

    Crush Grinding is a special process used at the Kansas City Plant to finish stem sections of reservoir products. In this process, a precise profile of the desired product is formed on a tungsten carbide roll. This roll slowly transfers a mirror image of the profile onto the grinding surface of a wheel. The transfer rate of the profile is between 0.001 and 0.010 inches per minute. Crush grinding is desirable since it provides consistent surface finishes and thin walls at a high production rate. In addition, it generates very sharp fillet radii. However, crush grinding is a complex process since many variables affect the final product. Therefore, the process requires more attention and knowledge beyond basic metal removal practices. While the Kansas City Plant began using these machines in 1995, a formal study regarding crush grinding has not been conducted there. In addition, very little literature is available in the grinding industry regarding this process. As a result, new engineers at the Kansas City Plant must learn the process through trial and error. The purpose of this document is to address this literature deficit while specifically promoting a better understanding of the stem crush grinding process at the Kansas City Plant.

  2. Apparatus for and method of operating a cylindrical pulsed induction mass launcher

    DOEpatents

    Cowan, M. Jr.; Duggin, B.W.; Widner, M.M.

    1992-06-30

    An electromagnetic cylindrical projectile mass launcher and a method of operation is provided which includes a cylindrical projectile having a conducting armature, a cylindrical barrel in which the armature is received, a plurality of electromagnetic drive coil stages, a plurality of pulse energy sources, and a pulsed power arrangement for generating magnetic pulses forming a pulsed magnetic wave along the length of the launcher barrel. The pulsed magnetic wave provides a propelling force on the projectile along the drive coil. The pulsed magnetic wave of the drive coil stages is advanced along the armature faster than the projectile to thereby generate an induced current wave in the armature. The pulsed generation of the magnetic wave minimizes electromagnetic heating of the projectile and provides for smooth acceleration of the projectile through the barrel of the launcher. 2 figs.

  3. Apparatus for and method of operating a cylindrical pulsed induction mass launcher

    DOEpatents

    Cowan, Jr., Maynard; Duggin, Billy W.; Widner, Melvin M.

    1992-01-01

    An electromagnetic cylindrical projectile mass launcher and a method of operation is provided which includes a cylindrical projectile having a conducting armature, a cylindrical barrel in which the armature is received, a plurality of electromagnetic drive coil stages, a plurality of pulse energy sources, and a pulsed power arrangement for generating magnetic pulses forming a pulsed magnetic wave along the length of the launcher barrel. The pulsed magnetic wave provides a propelling force on the projectile along the drive coil. The pulsed magnetic wave of the drive coil stages is advanced along the armature faster than the projectile to thereby generate an induced current wave in the armature. The pulsed generation of the magnetic wave minimizes electromagnetic heating of the projectile and provides for smooth acceleration of the projectile through the barrel of the launcher.

  4. Standard Operating Procedure for the Grinding and Extraction of Lead in Paint using Nitric Acid and a Rotor/Stator System Powered by a High Speed Motor

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) describes a new, rapid, and relatively inexpensive one step procedure which grinds the paint samples removed from the substrate and simultaneously quantitatively extracts the Pb from the paint in only one step in preparation for quantitativ...

  5. Grinding assembly, grinding apparatus, weld joint defect repair system, and methods

    DOEpatents

    Larsen, Eric D.; Watkins, Arthur D.; Bitsoi, Rodney J.; Pace, David P.

    2005-09-27

    A grinding assembly for grinding a weld joint of a workpiece includes a grinder apparatus, a grinder apparatus includes a grinding wheel configured to grind the weld joint, a member configured to receive the grinding wheel, the member being configured to be removably attached to the grinder apparatus, and a sensor assembly configured to detect a contact between the grinding wheel and the workpiece. The grinding assembly also includes a processing circuitry in communication with the grinder apparatus and configured to control operations of the grinder apparatus, the processing circuitry configured to receive weld defect information of the weld joint from an inspection assembly to create a contour grinding profile to grind the weld joint in a predetermined shape based on the received weld defect information, and a manipulator having an end configured to carry the grinder apparatus, the manipulator further configured to operate in multiple dimensions.

  6. Micronized grinding apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.M.

    1985-06-11

    Apparatus for grinding coal to micron fineness having a grinding chamber with a grinding surface supported by a circumferential wall in the grinding chamber, a plurality of grinding rolls orbiting in the grinding chamber for grinding the coal, air supply bustle surrounding the grinding chamber, air flow restrictor means opening from the air supply bustle to the grinding chamber to create a back pressure in the air supply bustle for substantially evenly distributing the air supplied to the grinding chamber around the circumference of the grinding chamber, and wherein the restrictor means directs the air flow tangentially relative to the circumferential wall of the grinding chamber so that the coal particles are caught up in a cyclonic movement having a large initial horizontally directed force to maintain a body of coal particles in the orbit of the grinding rolls, which horizontal force gradually diminishes as the vertical force component of the air flow lifts the ground coal particles out of the grinding chamber.

  7. Method for grinding precision components

    DOEpatents

    Ramanath, Srinivasan; Kuo, Shih Yee; Williston, William H.; Buljan, Sergej-Tomislav

    2000-01-01

    A method for precision cylindrical grinding of hard brittle materials, such as ceramics or glass and composites comprising ceramics or glass, provides material removal rates as high as 19-380 cm.sup.3 /min/cm. The abrasive tools used in the method comprise a strong, light weight wheel core bonded to a continuous rim of abrasive segments containing superabrasive grain in a dense metal bond matrix.

  8. Visual enhancements in pick-and-place tasks: Human operators controlling a simulated cylindrical manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Won S.; Tendick, Frank; Stark, Lawrence

    1989-01-01

    A teleoperation simulator was constructed with vector display system, joysticks, and a simulated cylindrical manipulator, in order to quantitatively evaluate various display conditions. The first of two experiments conducted investigated the effects of perspective parameter variations on human operators' pick-and-place performance, using a monoscopic perspective display. The second experiment involved visual enhancements of the monoscopic perspective display, by adding a grid and reference lines, by comparison with visual enhancements of a stereoscopic display; results indicate that stereoscopy generally permits superior pick-and-place performance, but that monoscopy nevertheless allows equivalent performance when defined with appropriate perspective parameter values and adequate visual enhancements.

  9. Operation characteristics of cylindrical miniature grooved heat pipe using aqueous CuO nanofluids

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Guo-Shan; Song, Bin; Liu, Zhen-Hua

    2010-11-15

    An experimental study was performed to investigate the operation characteristics of a cylindrical miniature grooved heat pipe using aqueous CuO nanofluid as the working fluid at some steady cooling conditions. The experiments were carried out under both the steady operation process and the unsteady startup process. The experiment results show that substituting the nanofluid for water as the working fluid can apparently improve the thermal performance of the heat pipe for steady operation. The total heat resistance and the maximum heat removal capacity of the heat pipe using nanofluids can maximally reduce by 50% and increase by 40% compared with that of the heat pipe using water, respectively. For unsteady startup process, substituting the nanofluid for water as the working fluid, cannot only improve the thermal performance, but also reduce significantly the startup time. (author)

  10. Operating regimes of corona and silent discharges in coaxial cylindrical reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Yehia, Ashraf

    2008-04-01

    The physical mechanisms of the electrical discharges formed in coaxial cylindrical reactors have been investigated in this paper under different operating conditions for the reactors. The reactors were fed by natural air flowing with a constant rate at atmospheric conditions and stressed by an ac voltage. The wave form of the ac voltage applied to the reactors has been studied corresponding to the discharge current, over the whole range of the operating conditions. The results have shown that the operating conditions for the reactor modify the physical mechanism inside it in the form of either corona or silent discharges or spark over. The onset voltage of the different electrical discharges formed inside the reactors has agreed with Peek's equation, whatever the operating conditions. Subsequently, empirical equations concerning the operating conditions for the reactors have been derived by using Peek's and Townsend's equations. The derived equations represent suitable criterions to predict the different types of the electrical discharges that will form inside the reactors under any operating conditions. The results have been illustrated by recorded oscillograms showing the wave form of the ac voltage applied to the reactors and the corresponding current pulses.

  11. Modelling of dynamic contact length in rail grinding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhi, Shaodan; Li, Jianyong; Zarembski, A. M.

    2014-09-01

    Rails endure frequent dynamic loads from the passing trains for supporting trains and guiding wheels. The accumulated stress concentrations will cause the plastic deformation of rail towards generating corrugations, contact fatigue cracks and also other defects, resulting in more dangerous status even the derailment risks. So the rail grinding technology has been invented with rotating grinding stones pressed on the rail with defects removal. Such rail grinding works are directed by experiences rather than scientifically guidance, lacking of flexible and scientific operating methods. With grinding control unit holding the grinding stones, the rail grinding process has the characteristics not only the surface grinding but also the running railway vehicles. First of all, it's important to analyze the contact length between the grinding stone and the rail, because the contact length is a critical parameter to measure the grinding capabilities of stones. Moreover, it's needed to build up models of railway vehicle unit bonded with the grinding stone to represent the rail grinding car. Therefore the theoretical model for contact length is developed based on the geometrical analysis. And the calculating models are improved considering the grinding car's dynamic behaviors during the grinding process. Eventually, results are obtained based on the models by taking both the operation parameters and the structure parameters into the calculation, which are suitable for revealing the process of rail grinding by combining the grinding mechanism and the railway vehicle systems.

  12. Wire Electrical Discharge Truing of Metal Bond Diamond Grinding Wheels

    SciTech Connect

    McSpadden, SB

    2002-01-24

    Cylindrical wire EDM profile truing of the metal bond diamond wheel for precision form grinding of ceramics is presented in this report. First a corrosion-resistant, precise spindle with the high-electrical current capability for wire EDM truing of grinding wheel was fabricated. An arc profile was adopted in order to determine form tolerances capabilities of this process. Results show the wire EDM process can generate {micro}m-scale precision form on the diamond wheel efficiently. The wheel, after truing, was used to grind silicon nitride. Grinding forces, surface finish of ground components, and wheel wear were measured. The EDM trued wheel showed a reduction in grinding force from that of the stick dressed wheel. Surface finishes between the two truing methods were similar. In the beginning of the grinding, significant wheel wear rate was identified. The subsequent wheel wear rate stabilized and became considerably lower.

  13. Design and Operating Characteristics of High-Speed, Small-Bore Cylindrical-Roller Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinel, Stanley, I.; Signer, Hans R.; Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    2000-01-01

    The computer program SHABERTH was used to analyze 35-mm-bore cylindrical roller bearings designed and manufactured for high-speed turbomachinery applications. Parametric tests of the bearings were conducted on a high-speed, high-temperature bearing tester and the results were compared with the computer predictions. Bearings with a channeled inner ring were lubricated through the inner ring, while bearings with a channeled outer ring were lubricated with oil jets. Tests were run with and without outer-ring cooling. The predicted bearing life decreased with increasing speed because of increased contact stresses caused by centrifugal load. Lower temperatures, less roller skidding, and lower power losses were obtained with channeled inner rings. Power losses calculated by the SHABERTH computer program correlated reasonably well with the test results. The Parker formula for XCAV (used in SHABERTH as a measure of oil volume in the bearing cavity) needed to be adjusted to reflect the prevailing operating conditions. The XCAV formula will need to be further refined to reflect roller bearing lubrication, ring design, cage design, and location of the cage-controlling land.

  14. Grinding Parts For Automatic Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burley, Richard K.; Hoult, William S.

    1989-01-01

    Rollers guide grinding tool along prospective welding path. Skatelike fixture holds rotary grinder or file for machining large-diameter rings or ring segments in preparation for welding. Operator grasps handles to push rolling fixture along part. Rollers maintain precise dimensional relationship so grinding wheel cuts precise depth. Fixture-mounted grinder machines surface to quality sufficient for automatic welding; manual welding with attendant variations and distortion not necessary. Developed to enable automatic welding of parts, manual welding of which resulted in weld bead permeated with microscopic fissures.

  15. Conduit grinding apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Nachbar, Henry D.; Korytkowski, Alfred S.

    1991-01-01

    A grinding apparatus for grinding the interior portion of a valve stem receiving area of a valve. The apparatus comprises a faceplate, a plurality of cams mounted to an interior face of the faceplate, a locking bolt to lock the faceplate at a predetermined position on the valve, a movable grinder and a guide tube for positioning an optical viewer proximate the area to be grinded. The apparatus can either be rotated about the valve for grinding an area of the inner diameter of a valve stem receiving area or locked at a predetermined position to grind a specific point in the receiving area.

  16. Coal grinding by roller grinding mills for pulverized coal injection in blast furnaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kasseck, K.; Salewski, G.

    1995-10-01

    Roller grinding mills are increasingly being used for producing the pulverized coal required for injection into blast furnaces, an accepted technology worldwide for lowering coke consumption in blast furnaces. Coal is currently being injected into blast furnaces at the rate of 80 to 200 kg/tonne of hot metal which results in a coke savings of 72 to 180 kg/tonne of hot metal. The pulverized coal for coal injection is produced in coal grinding and drying plants currently having a capacity from 15 to 240 tonnes/hr. The grinding plant with Loesche roller grinding mills at the Ilva steelworks, Taranto, Italy, that is described, illustrates design concepts and operation.

  17. The Effect of Cutting Speed in Metallic Glass Grinding

    SciTech Connect

    Serbest, Erdinc; Bakkal, Mustafa; Karipcin, Ilker; Derin, Bora

    2011-01-17

    In this paper, the effects of the cutting speed in metallic glass grinding were investigated in dry conditions. The results showed that grinding forces decrease as grinding energy increase with the increasing cutting speeds. The present investigations on ground surface and grinding chips morphologies -shows that material removal and surface formation of the BMG are mainly due to the ductile chip deformation and ploughing as well as brittle fracture of some particles from the edges of the tracks. The roughness values obtained with the Cubic Boron Nitride wheels are acceptable for the grinding operation.

  18. Use of in-process EDM truing to generate complex contours on metal-bond, superabrasive grinding wheels for precision grinding structural ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Piscotty, M. A., LLNL

    1997-08-01

    This paper presents recent work performed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to develop cost-effective, versatile and robust manufacturing methods for grinding precision features in structural ceramics using metal-bond, superabrasive grinding wheels. The developed processes include utilizing specialized, on-machine hardware to generate precision profiles onto grinding wheels using electrical-discharge machining (EDM) and a contoured rotating electrode. The production grinding processes are described, which were developed and used to grind various precision details into a host of structural ceramics such as Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, and BeO. The methodologies, hardware and results of both creep-feed and cylindrical grinding are described. A discussion of imparted grinding damage and wheel wear is also presented.

  19. Grinding Wheel System

    DOEpatents

    Malkin, Stephen; Gao, Robert; Guo, Changsheng; Varghese, Biju; Pathare, Sumukh

    2003-08-05

    A grinding wheel system includes a grinding wheel with at least one embedded sensor. The system also includes an adapter disk containing electronics that process signals produced by each embedded sensor and that transmits sensor information to a data processing platform for further processing of the transmitted information.

  20. Grinding Wheel System

    DOEpatents

    Malkin, Stephen; Gao, Robert; Guo, Changsheng; Varghese, Biju; Pathare, Sumukh

    2006-01-10

    A grinding wheel system includes a grinding wheel with at least one embedded sensor. The system also includes an adapter disk containing electronics that process signals produced by each embedded sensor and that transmits sensor information to a data processing platform for further processing of the transmitted information.

  1. Grinding Away Microfissures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, Gary N.; Malinzak, R. Michael

    1990-01-01

    Treatment similar to dental polishing used to remove microfissures from metal parts without reworking adjacent surfaces. Any variety of abrasive tips attached to small motor used to grind spot treated. Configuration of grinding head must be compatible with configurations of motor and workpiece. Devised to eliminate spurious marks on welded parts.

  2. Crystalline silica dust and respirable particulate matter during indoor concrete grinding - wet grinding and ventilated grinding compared with uncontrolled conventional grinding.

    PubMed

    Akbar-Khanzadeh, Farhang; Milz, Sheryl; Ames, April; Susi, Pamela P; Bisesi, Michael; Khuder, Sadik A; Akbar-Khanzadeh, Mahboubeh

    2007-10-01

    The effectiveness of wet grinding (wet dust reduction method) and ventilated grinding (local exhaust ventilation method, LEV) in reducing the levels of respirable crystalline silica dust (quartz) and respirable suspended particulate matter (RSP) were compared with that of uncontrolled (no dust reduction method) conventional grinding. A field laboratory was set up to simulate concrete surface grinding using hand-held angle grinders in an enclosed workplace. A total of 34 personal samples (16 pairs side-by-side and 2 singles) and 5 background air samples were collected during 18 concrete grinding sessions ranging from 15-93 min. General ventilation had no statistically significant effect on operator's exposure to dust. Overall, the arithmetic mean concentrations of respirable crystalline silica dust and RSP in personal air samples during: (i) five sessions of uncontrolled conventional grinding were respectively 61.7 and 611 mg/m(3) (ii) seven sessions of wet grinding were 0.896 and 11.9 mg/m(3) and (iii) six sessions of LEV grinding were 0.155 and 1.99 mg/m(3). Uncontrolled conventional grinding generated relatively high levels of respirable silica dust and proportionally high levels of RSP. Wet grinding was effective in reducing the geometric mean concentrations of respirable silica dust 98.2% and RSP 97.6%. LEV grinding was even more effective and reduced the geometric mean concentrations of respirable silica dust 99.7% and RSP 99.6%. Nevertheless, the average level of respirable silica dust (i) during wet grinding was 0.959 mg/m(3) (38 times the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists [ACGIH] threshold limit value [TLV] of 0.025 mg/m(3)) and (ii) during LEV grinding was 0.155 mg/m(3) (6 times the ACGIH TLV). Further studies are needed to examine the effectiveness of a greater variety of models, types, and sizes of grinders on different types of cement in different positions and also to test the simulated field lab experimentation in the field.

  3. Bearing restoration by grinding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanau, H.; Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.; Chen, S. M.; Bull, H. L.

    1976-01-01

    A joint program was undertaken by the NASA Lewis Research Center and the Army Aviation Systems Command to restore by grinding those rolling-element bearings which are currently being discarded at aircraft engine and transmission overhaul. Three bearing types were selected from the UH-1 helicopter engine (T-53) and transmission for the pilot program. No bearing failures occurred related to the restoration by grinding process. The risk and cost of a bearing restoration by grinding programs was analyzed. A microeconomic impact analysis was performed.

  4. Vitreous bond CBN high speed and high material removal rate grinding of ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, A.J.; Grant, M.B.; Yonushonis, T.M.; Morris, T.O.; McSpadden, S.B.

    1998-08-01

    High speed (up to 127 m/s) and high material removal rate (up to 10 mm{sup 3}/s/mm) grinding experiments using a vitreous bond CBN wheel were conducted to investigate the effects of material removal rate, wheel speed, dwell time and truing speed ratio on cylindrical grinding of silicon nitride and zirconia. Experimental results show that the high grinding wheel surface speed can reduce the effective chip thickness, lower grinding forces, enable high material removal rate grinding and achieve a higher G-ratio. The radial feed rate was increased to as high as 0.34 {micro}m/s for zirconia and 0.25 {micro}m/s for silicon nitride grinding to explore the advantage of using high wheel speed for cost-effective high material removal rate grinding of ceramics.

  5. Ultra-fine grinding of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Shoulu; Wang Xinguo; Gao Ying

    1997-12-31

    Clean coal is known by its low ash content. Most coals contain a large amount of ash, some of which are finely distributed in the coal matrix. With the conventional cleaning process, such ash can not be removed efficiently. From existing coal preparation plants, much middling and high-ash slime come out as by-products and are used only as inferior fuel. Beijing Graduate School, China University of Mining and Technology, has developed a process for deep-cleaning of coal. This process includes ultra-fine grinding of coal to liberate the locked ash minerals followed by efficient separation with selective coagulation-flotation. With this process, concentrate can be extracted from inferior coal or ultra-clean coal can be obtained from conventional concentrate. Tumbling and vibrating ball mills are conventional for general grinding. However, for ultra-fine grinding they are inefficient and consume much more power. This paper gives some aspects of an ultra-fine grinding mill developed by Beijing Graduate School. The Ultra-Fine Grinding Mill is a JMI series wet grinding mill, and consists of a static horizontal closed tube with a rotor inside. The rotor assembly includes: a horizontal shaft, two vaned disks being fixed apart at the shaft, and longitudinal bar deflectors fixed across the disks. Sufficient clearance is allowed between the disk and end plates of the tube and between the disk rim and tube wall. This configuration enables free passage of grinding medium and pulp within the mill. While the mill is in operation, four principal movements of grinding medium and pulp are created: inward radially by deflectors, oppositely axial by vanes, tangential by rotation, and vibrating due to vortices behind the deflectors.

  6. Design criteria for soil cleaning operations in electrokinetic remediation: hydrodynamic aspects in a cylindrical geometry.

    PubMed

    Oyanader, Mario A; Arce, Pedro; Dzurik, Andrew

    2005-08-01

    The applications of electrokinetics embrace a large family of important industrial, pharmaceutical, biomedical, and environmental applications. Processes such as separation, drug delivery, soil remediation, and others constitute alist of applications where electrical fields are used to induce the movement of solute species. Different transport driving forces participate in the motion of the solute. In the particular case of soil remediation, the electromechanisms may compete with buoyancy and advection, promoting distinct flow regimes. As a rule of thumb, some of the earlier applications of electrokinetic phenomena, mainly in the area of electrophoresis, neglected this competition, and therefore the hydrodynamics of the systems was considered simpler. The nature of the process in soil, a porous media, calls for a different approach and is in need of further analysis of the complete map of collaborating driving forces. The identification and analysis of the characteristic flow regimes may lead to important guidelines for improving the separation, avoiding the mixing, and more efficient cleaning in a given application. In this contribution, using a cylindrical capillary model, the basic aspects of the behavior of the system are captured. A differential model is formulated using simplifying assumptions, maintaining the mathematical aspects to a minimum level, and a solution is presented for the different fields, i.e., the temperature and the velocity. Based on the selection of values of the parameter space, several limiting cases and flow regimes are presented and discussed. Implications for the design of devices and cleaning strategies are also included. Needs for further research are identified. The main idea behind the study is to obtain a qualitative and semiquantitative description of the different flow regimes inside the channel. This information is useful to identify further aspects of the investigation and delineate a systematic approach for a more rigorous

  7. Centerless grinding of TiAl using conventional grinding wheels

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, P.E.; Smits, D.; Eylon, D.; Smits, C.

    1995-12-31

    Ordered gamma titanium aluminide (TiAl) based alloys are now under consideration for automotive valves because of their light weight and high strength at temperatures up to 850 C. Finishing comprises as much as 70% of the cost of an automotive valve, therefore the grindability of TiAl valves will influence their commercial viability. This study compared the grindability of the TiAl alloy Ti-47Al-2Nb-1.75Cr (at%) to standard valve steels, nickel base superalloys, and conventional titanium alloys using the centerless grinding process. Three grinding conditions simulating stem grinding were selected. The power requirements, grinding time, and grinding wheel consumption were used to estimate the cost to grind TiAl on conventional centerless grinding equipment using vitrified bonded silicon carbide wheels. The metallurgical effects of rough and finish stem grinding cycles on the surface were determined. The grindability factor of TiAl, a measure of grinding cost, was slightly inferior to conventional valve steels, but much better than conventional titanium alloys. The high work hardening rate of the TiAl resulted in much better surface finish at high metal removal rates than that achieved in steels. No grinding cracks were observed, even under the rough grinding conditions. Microhardness profiles indicated significant work hardening of the surface under all three grinding conditions.

  8. Cylindrical Scanner

    1999-04-29

    The CS system is designed to provide a very fast imaging system in order to search for weapons on persons in an airport environment. The Cylindrical Scanner moves a vertical transceiver array rapidly around a person standing stationary. The software can be segmented in to three specific tasks. The first task is data acquisition and scanner control. At the operator's request, this task commands the scanner to move and the radar transceiver array to sendmore » data to the computer system in a known and well-ordered manner. The array is moved over the complete aperture in 10 to 12 seconds. At the completion of the array movement the second software task automatically reconstructs the high-resolution image from the radar data utilizing the integrated DSP boards. The third task displays the resulting images, as they become available, to the computer screen for user review and analysis.« less

  9. Grinding kinetics and equilibrium states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opoczky, L.; Farnady, F.

    1984-01-01

    The temporary and permanent equilibrium occurring during the initial stage of cement grinding does not indicate the end of comminution, but rather an increased energy consumption during grinding. The constant dynamic equilibrium occurs after a long grinding period indicating the end of comminution for a given particle size. Grinding equilibrium curves can be constructed to show the stages of comminution and agglomeration for certain particle sizes.

  10. Electro-chemical grinding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feagans, P. L.

    1972-01-01

    Electro-chemical grinding technique has rotation speed control, constant feed rates, and contour control. Hypersonic engine parts of nickel alloys can be almost 100% machined, keeping tool pressure at virtual zero. Technique eliminates galling and permits constant surface finish and burr-free interrupted cutting.

  11. Grinding Wheel Profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This graphic dubbed by engineers as the 'Grinding Wheel Profile' is the detective's tool used by the Opportunity team to help them understand one of the processes that formed the interior of a rock called 'McKittrick.' Scientists are looking for clues as to how layers, grains and minerals helped create this rock, and the engineers who built the rock abrasion tool (RAT) wanted to ensure that their instrument's handiwork did not get confused with natural processes.

    In the original microscopic image underlaying the graphics, engineers and scientists noticed 'layers' or 'scratches' on the spherical object nicknamed 'blueberry' in the lower right part of the image. The designers of the rock abrasion tool noticed that the arc length and width of the scratches were similar to the shape and size of the rock abrasion tool's grinding wheel, which is made out of a pad of diamond teeth.

    The scrapes on the bottom right blueberry appear to be caused by the fact that the berry got dislodged slightly and its surface was scraped with the grinding pad. In this image, the largest yellow circle is the overall diameter of the hole ground by the rock abrasion tool and the largest yellow rectangular shape is the area of the grinding wheel bit. The smaller yellow semi-circle is the path that the center of the grinding tool follows. The orange arrow arcing around the solid yellow circle (center of grinding tool) indicates the direction that the grinding tool spins around its own center at 3,000 revolutions per minute. The tool simultaneously spins in an orbit around the center of the hole, indicated by the larger orange arrow to the left.

    The grinding tool is 22 millimeters (0.9 inches) in length and the actual grinding surface, which consists of the diamond pad, is 1.5 millimeters (0.06 inches) in length, indicated by the two smaller rectangles. You can see that the smaller bottom rectangle fits exactly the width of the scrape marks.

    The grooves on the blueberry are also the

  12. Medical insurance claims and surveillance for occupational disease: analysis of respiratory, cardiac, and cancer outcomes in auto industry tool grinding operations.

    PubMed

    Park, R M

    2001-04-01

    To evaluate medical insurance claims for chronic disease investigation, claims from eight automotive machining plants (1984 to 1993) were linked with work histories (1967 to 1993), and associations with respiratory, cardiac, and cancer conditions were investigated, in a case-control design analyzed with logistic regression. The primary focus was tool grinding, but other important processes examined were metal-working, welding, forging, heat treat, engine testing, and diverse-skilled trades work. Considerable variability in claim-derived incidence rates across plants was not explained by age or known exposure differences. Asthma incidence increased in tool grinding (at mean cumulative duration: odds ratio [OR], 3.0; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.90 to 10.0), as did non-ischemic heart disease (cardiomyopathy, cor pulmonale, rheumatic heart disease, or hypertension; OR, 3.1; 95% CI, 1.26 to 7.6). These trends appeared in models with deficits (OR < 1.0) for those ever exposed to tool grinding because of exposure-response miss-specification, demographic confounding, or removal of high-risk workers from the exposed group. The apparent cancer rates identified from claims greatly exceeded the expected rates from a cancer registry, suggesting that diagnostic, "rule-out," and surveillance functions were contributing. This study supports the epidemiologic use of medical insurance records in surveillance and, possibly, etiologic investigation and identifies issues requiring special attention or resolution. PMID:11322094

  13. Medical insurance claims and surveillance for occupational disease: analysis of respiratory, cardiac, and cancer outcomes in auto industry tool grinding operations.

    PubMed

    Park, R M

    2001-04-01

    To evaluate medical insurance claims for chronic disease investigation, claims from eight automotive machining plants (1984 to 1993) were linked with work histories (1967 to 1993), and associations with respiratory, cardiac, and cancer conditions were investigated, in a case-control design analyzed with logistic regression. The primary focus was tool grinding, but other important processes examined were metal-working, welding, forging, heat treat, engine testing, and diverse-skilled trades work. Considerable variability in claim-derived incidence rates across plants was not explained by age or known exposure differences. Asthma incidence increased in tool grinding (at mean cumulative duration: odds ratio [OR], 3.0; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.90 to 10.0), as did non-ischemic heart disease (cardiomyopathy, cor pulmonale, rheumatic heart disease, or hypertension; OR, 3.1; 95% CI, 1.26 to 7.6). These trends appeared in models with deficits (OR < 1.0) for those ever exposed to tool grinding because of exposure-response miss-specification, demographic confounding, or removal of high-risk workers from the exposed group. The apparent cancer rates identified from claims greatly exceeded the expected rates from a cancer registry, suggesting that diagnostic, "rule-out," and surveillance functions were contributing. This study supports the epidemiologic use of medical insurance records in surveillance and, possibly, etiologic investigation and identifies issues requiring special attention or resolution.

  14. The implementation of HPGR mills in existing grinding circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Patzelt, N.; Knecht, J.; Longhurst, D.

    1996-12-31

    High pressure grinding mills have been successfully introduced in the industry. They offer the possibilities for capacity increase of existing plants and reduction of operating costs. The plants in operation are running in different applications and modes of operation. They can be installed in a combination with SAG and ball mills or in a stand-alone mode. In combination with other grinding mills, it has to be investigated how the HPGR can be installed to reach the full efficiency. This paper describes the possibilities of implementing high pressure grinding rolls and shows by case studies the potential of savings which could be reached.

  15. The influence of grinding oil viscosity on grinding heat and burn damage in creep-feed grinding{copyright}

    SciTech Connect

    Zhen-Change Liu; Abe, Satoshi; Noda, Masahiro

    1995-08-01

    Grinding oils are widely used in precision grinding, such as tool grinding, thread grinding and gear grinding, during which processes grinding burn is the most prevalent damage affecting the integrity of ground surface. This paper discusses the influence of oil viscosity on grinding heat and burn damage in creep-feed-grinding. Experimental results indicated that, under lighter grinding conditions, the effects of oil viscosity was not observed, but under heavy grinding conditions grinding burn occurred when using low viscosity oil. When the viscosity of the oil was increased, grinding heat and burn damage tended to be reduced. As the viscosity was increased to a certain level, grinding burn reduction, by further increasing the viscosity, became less while other problems such as much higher oil pump noise and reduced oil flow occurred. It is clear that a viscosity limit exists for given grinding conditions. 5 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. High-speed, low-damage grinding of advanced ceramics Phase 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kovach, J.A.; Malkin, S.

    1995-03-01

    In manufacture of structural ceramic components, grinding costs can comprise up to 80% of the entire manufacturing cost. Most of these costs arise from the conventional multi-step grinding process with numerous grinding wheels and additional capital equipment, perishable dressing tools, and labor. In an attempt to reduce structural ceramic grinding costs, a feasibility investigation was undertaken to develop a single step, roughing-finishing process suitable for producing high-quality silicon nitride ceramic parts at high material removal rates at lower cost than traditional, multi-stage grinding. This feasibility study employed combined use of laboratory grinding tests, mathematical grinding models, and characterization of resultant material surface condition. More specifically, this Phase 1 final report provides a technical overview of High-Speed, Low-Damage (HSLD) ceramic grinding and the conditions necessary to achieve the small grain depths of cut necessary for low damage grinding while operating at relatively high material removal rates. Particular issues addressed include determining effects of wheel speed and material removal rate on resulting mode of material removal (ductile or brittle fracture), limiting grinding forces, calculation of approximate grinding zone temperatures developed during HSLD grinding, and developing the experimental systems necessary for determining HSLD grinding energy partition relationships. In addition, practical considerations for production utilization of the HSLD process are also discussed.

  17. 2. DETAIL VIEW OF JOURNAL LATHE, AXLE FINISHING AREA. Grinding ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. DETAIL VIEW OF JOURNAL LATHE, AXLE FINISHING AREA. Grinding bearing diameters on locomotive axle. Norton grinder, 1942 (dated). Melvin Grassmeyer, operator. - Juniata Shops, Machine Shop No. 1, East of Fourth Avenue at Third Street, Altoona, Blair County, PA

  18. 3. DETAIL VIEW OF JOURNAL LATHE, AXLE FINISHING AREA. Grinding ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. DETAIL VIEW OF JOURNAL LATHE, AXLE FINISHING AREA. Grinding bearing diameters on locomotive axle. Norton grinder, 1942 (dated). Melvin Grassmeyer, operator. - Juniata Shops, Machine Shop No. 1, East of Fourth Avenue at Third Street, Altoona, Blair County, PA

  19. Cryogenic Grinding: a Physical Technique to Retain Volatile Content in Natural Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, Rohit; Soni, Aditi; Saxna, S. N.; Rathore, S. S.; Barnwal, P.

    Cryogenics is the study of the production of very low temperature (below -150°C, -238°F or 123K) and the behavior of materials at those temperatures. Similarly, cryogenic grinding is a term supported by the act of grinding a thing at very low temperature. This technique is generally used to grind the material, which contains heat labile constituents viz- volatile oils in seed spices. Due to high fat content in spices, heat is generated, while energy is used to fracture a particle into a smaller size in conventional grinding process. During the normal grinding process, this generated heat causes temperature rise of grinder upto 950C. The increased temperature is responsible for a loss of volatile content in the tune of about 30% and also produces dark colour powder. Generally, continuous operation is not possible in normal grinding process due to melting of fat and sticking of powder on the grinding surface. The loss of volatile content can be significantly reduced by cryogenic grinding technique using liquid nitrogen or liquid carbon dioxide that provides the refrigeration needed to pre-cool the spices and maintain the desired low temperature by absorbing the heat generated during the grinding operation. The extremely low temperature during grinder condenses the volatile matter and retains their presence in spices. The application of cryogenic technology for grinding of spices has been scientifically proved to be a suitable technique with negligible loss of volatile content and improved colour of oil and grinding operation of seeds.

  20. Innovative grinding wheel design for cost-effective machining of advanced ceramics. Phase I, final report

    SciTech Connect

    Licht, R.H.; Ramanath, S.; Simpson, M.; Lilley, E.

    1996-02-01

    Norton Company successfully completed the 16-month Phase I technical effort to define requirements, design, develop, and evaluate a next-generation grinding wheel for cost-effective cylindrical grinding of advanced ceramics. This program was a cooperative effort involving three Norton groups representing a superabrasive grinding wheel manufacturer, a diamond film manufacturing division and a ceramic research center. The program was divided into two technical tasks, Task 1, Analysis of Required Grinding Wheel Characteristics, and Task 2, Design and Prototype Development. In Task 1 we performed a parallel path approach with Superabrasive metal-bond development and the higher technical risk, CVD diamond wheel development. For the Superabrasive approach, Task 1 included bond wear and strength tests to engineer bond-wear characteristics. This task culminated in a small-wheel screening test plunge grinding sialon disks. In Task 2, an improved Superabrasive metal-bond specification for low-cost machining of ceramics in external cylindrical grinding mode was identified. The experimental wheel successfully ground three types of advanced ceramics without the need for wheel dressing. The spindle power consumed by this wheel during test grinding of NC-520 sialon is as much as to 30% lower compared to a standard resin bonded wheel with 100 diamond concentration. The wheel wear with this improved metal bond was an order of magnitude lower than the resin-bonded wheel, which would significantly reduce ceramic grinding costs through fewer wheel changes for retruing and replacements. Evaluation of ceramic specimens from both Tasks 1 and 2 tests for all three ceramic materials did not show evidence of unusual grinding damage. The novel CVD-diamond-wheel approach was incorporated in this program as part of Task 1. The important factors affecting the grinding performance of diamond wheels made by CVD coating preforms were determined.

  1. McCarter superfinish grinding for silicon -- an update.

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony, F.; Khounsary, A.; McCarter, D.; Krasnicki, F.; Tangedahl, M.

    2000-11-03

    A grinding technique, referred to as the McCarter Superfinish, for grinding large size optical components is discussed and certain surface characterization information about flatness and the relative magnitude of the subsurface damage in silicon substrates is reported. The flatness measurements were obtained with a Zygo surface analyzer, and the substrate damage measurements were made by x-ray diffraction and acid etching. Results indicate excellent control of flatness and fine surface finish. X-ray measurements show that the diamond wheels with small particle sizes used in the final phases of the grinding operation renders surfaces with relatively small subsurface damage.

  2. Cylindrical wormholes

    SciTech Connect

    Bronnikov, K. A.; Lemos, Jose P. S.

    2009-05-15

    It is shown that the existence of static, cylindrically symmetric wormholes does not require violation of the weak or null energy conditions near the throat, and cylindrically symmetric wormhole geometries can appear with less exotic sources than wormholes whose throats have a spherical topology. Examples of exact wormhole solutions are given with scalar, spinor and electromagnetic fields as sources, and these fields are not necessarily phantom. In particular, there are wormhole solutions for a massless, minimally coupled scalar field in the presence of a negative cosmological constant, and for an azimuthal Maxwell electromagnetic field. All these solutions are not asymptotically flat. A no-go theorem is proved, according to which a flat (or string) asymptotic behavior on both sides of a cylindrical wormhole throat is impossible if the energy density of matter is everywhere nonnegative.

  3. CNC grinding of valve housing piston holes

    SciTech Connect

    Ashbaugh, F.A.

    1991-11-01

    Grinding has traditionally been used for machining operations requiring close dimensional tolerances and better surface finishes than can be obtained from other metal removal techniques. Using a grinding process for the last metal removal operation, the close tolerances and surface finishes can be easily held while eliminating the adverse conditions from the current metal removal processes. Pre-machined test parts were sent to a machine tool supplier to have the critical inside features of a typical piston bore finish machined using an internal CNC grinder equipped with high-frequency spindles. The piston bore and sealing angle were ground using a standard 120-grit silicon carbide wheel. The wafer step was machined using a solid carbide tool designed and built at Allied-Signal Inc., Kansas City Division (KCD). Six consecutive parts were machined for evaluation. The repeatability on all six parts was within print requirements. The inside corner radii was less than 0.002 in. and the surface finish was 8.2 arithmetical average or better as defined by ANSI B46.1, Surface Texture. Machining parts by this grinding process would eliminate bellmouth, chatter, waviness, and traveler polishing operations. It would produce a superior surface finish, small inside radii, and small easily removable burrs. It would also hold tolerances closer and significantly reduce scrap, rework, rejects, and deviations. 1 fig.

  4. Machining Thin-Walled Cylindrical Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cimbak, Joe; Spagnolo, Jim; Kraus, Dan

    1988-01-01

    Cylindrical walls only few thousandths of inch thick machined accurately and without tears or punctures with aid of beryllium copper mandrel. Chilled so it contracts, then inserted in cylinder. As comes to room temperature, mandrel expands and fits snugly inside cylinder. Will not allow part to slide and provides solid backup to prevent deflection when part machined by grinding wheel. When machining finished, cylinder-and-mandrel assembly inserted in dry ice, mandrel contracts and removed from part.

  5. Grinding process monitoring based on electromechanical impedance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchi, Marcelo; Guimarães Baptista, Fabricio; de Aguiar, Paulo Roberto; Bianchi, Eduardo Carlos

    2015-04-01

    Grinding is considered one of the last processes in precision parts manufacturing, which makes it indispensable to have a reliable monitoring system to evaluate workpiece surface integrity. This paper proposes the use of the electromechanical impedance (EMI) method to monitor the surface grinding operation in real time, particularly the surface integrity of the ground workpiece. The EMI method stands out for its simplicity and for using low-cost components such as PZT (lead zirconate titanate) piezoelectric transducers. In order to assess the feasibility of applying the EMI method to the grinding process, experimental tests were performed on a surface grinder using a CBN grinding wheel and a SAE 1020 steel workpiece, with PZT transducers mounted on the workpiece and its holder. During the grinding process, the electrical impedance of the transducers was measured and damage indices conventionally used in the EMI method were calculated and compared with workpiece wear, indicating the surface condition of the workpiece. The experimental results indicate that the EMI method can be an efficient and cost-effective alternative for monitoring precision workpieces during the surface grinding process.

  6. TECHNICAL NOTE: High-speed grinding using thin abrasive disks for microcomponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, S. H.; Balon, S. A. P.

    2002-01-01

    This paper introduces the development of a high-speed grinding device for cylindrical grinding of microcomponents made of hard and brittle materials. The study made use of an ultraprecision diamond turning machine tool as a basic platform. The novelty of the device is based on the high-speed air bearing spindle with a thin grinding wheel, similar to the dicing technology for silicon wafer fabrication. The spindle attachment is inclined at an angle to the main spindle which holds the precision fixture mechanism via the vacuum chuck. Experiments have been conducted to verify the design and implementation of the grinding methodology. A feature size as small as 31 μm in diameter and average surface roughness of 98 nm were obtained in the experimental work. It is found that the work done is capable of manufacturing miniature components, such as microcylindrical stepped shafts.

  7. Compliant meso-scale grinding of silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Bo

    In this research, the need to create complex three-dimensional free-form shapes in silicon wafers for MEMS applications has been identified. Meso-scale grinding was chosen to perform the three-dimensional machining of silicon, among several other machining methods. Traditionally, ultra-rigid ultra-precision machines are used to machine silicon wafers in order to achieve ductile material removal mode to minimize grinding induced surface and subsurface defects. In this research, however, a compliant grinding methodology has been proposed to realize ductile regime material removal and to reduce grinding induced subsurface defects. A compliant meso-scale grinding apparatus, equipped with computer-controlled 3-axis movement, backlash-free flexure feeding and force monitoring, was developed to perform compliant silicon grinding experiments. Contour grinding, traverse grinding and plunge grinding experiments were carried out on the compliant grinding apparatus. These grinding experiments demonstrate that compliant grinding is capable of achieving good form accuracy and mirror surface finish. Further studies on grinding ductility, grinding induced subsurface defects indicate that compliant grinding can increase silicon ductility by 240.7%, reduce subsurface defects by 55.7% when compared with rigid grinding experiments. Based on off-line force analysis both in time domain and frequency domain, a first-cut detection algorithm was developed to detect wheel/workpiece contact in real-time. The algorithm is capable of adjusting to different motor vibrations and environmental noise levels by self-learning. The first-cut detection algorithm was tested successfully in real-time. To further improve form accuracy obtained on the compliant grinding apparatus, a normal grinding force model and a depth of cut model were developed to account for the large compliance in the grinding system. Numerical simulation was performed to predict actual depths of cut and the results were within 6

  8. Microfabricated cylindrical ion trap

    DOEpatents

    Blain, Matthew G.

    2005-03-22

    A microscale cylindrical ion trap, having an inner radius of order one micron, can be fabricated using surface micromachining techniques and materials known to the integrated circuits manufacturing and microelectromechanical systems industries. Micromachining methods enable batch fabrication, reduced manufacturing costs, dimensional and positional precision, and monolithic integration of massive arrays of ion traps with microscale ion generation and detection devices. Massive arraying enables the microscale cylindrical ion trap to retain the resolution, sensitivity, and mass range advantages necessary for high chemical selectivity. The microscale CIT has a reduced ion mean free path, allowing operation at higher pressures with less expensive and less bulky vacuum pumping system, and with lower battery power than conventional- and miniature-sized ion traps. The reduced electrode voltage enables integration of the microscale cylindrical ion trap with on-chip integrated circuit-based rf operation and detection electronics (i.e., cell phone electronics). Therefore, the full performance advantages of microscale cylindrical ion traps can be realized in truly field portable, handheld microanalysis systems.

  9. Optimization of Cylindrical Hall Thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Yevgeny Raitses, Artem Smirnov, Erik Granstedt, and Nathaniel J. Fi

    2007-07-24

    The cylindrical Hall thruster features high ionization efficiency, quiet operation, and ion acceleration in a large volume-to-surface ratio channel with performance comparable with the state-of-the-art annular Hall thrusters. These characteristics were demonstrated in low and medium power ranges. Optimization of miniaturized cylindrical thrusters led to performance improvements in the 50-200W input power range, including plume narrowing, increased thruster efficiency, reliable discharge initiation, and stable operation. __________________________________________________

  10. Optimization of Cylindrical Hall Thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Yevgeny Raitses, Artem Smirnov, Erik Granstedt, and Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2007-11-27

    The cylindrical Hall thruster features high ionization efficiency, quiet operation, and ion acceleration in a large volume-to-surface ratio channel with performance comparable with the state-of-the-art annular Hall thrusters. These characteristics were demonstrated in low and medium power ranges. Optimization of miniaturized cylindrical thrusters led to performance improvements in the 50-200W input power range, including plume narrowing, increased thruster efficiency, reliable discharge initiation, and stable operation.

  11. Cylindrical Brushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt

    1998-03-01

    Homopolymerization of macromonomers, i.e. polymerizable oligomers, yields macromolecules of cylindrical shape, because the main chain is considerably stretched due to the steric overcrowding of the side chains.(M. Wintermantel et al., Macromolecules 1996, 29,978.) Irrespective of the chemical nature of the macromonomer (styrene, methylmethacrylate, vinylpyridine, propylene) the chain stiffness in terms of the Kuhn statistical segment length lk lies in the range of 50 nm < lk < 200 nm. In accordance to the high degree of stiffness polymacromonomers form lyotropic liquid crystalline phases in solution and in the bulk.(M. Wintermantel et. al, Angew. Chemie 1995, 107, 1606.) Upon drying a dilute solution on mica or silicon wafer ordered monolayers are formed.(S.S. Sheiko et al., Langmuir 1997, 13, 5368.)^, (P. Dziezok et al., Angew. Chemie 1997, 00, 000.) Recently, stable monolayers of polyvinylpyridine macromonomers were successfully prepared on a Langmuir-Blodgett trough. Up to 15 monolayers were transferred onto a planar silicon wafer and characterized by x-ray reflection. The individual brush molecules within the monolayer could be visualized by atomic force microscopy. Frequently occurring hairpin formations by one molecule could not yet be explained. AFM on isolated, single molecules, however, have confirmed the cylindrical structure of polymacromonomers.

  12. Comparison of High-Speed Operating Characteristics of Size 215 Cylindrical-Roller Bearings as Determined in Turbojet Engine and in Laboratory Test Rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macks, E Fred; Nemeth, Zolton N

    1952-01-01

    A comparison of the operating characteristics of 75-millimeter-bore (size 215) cylindrical-roller one-piece inner-race-riding cage-type bearings was made by means of a laboratory test rig and a turbojet engine. Cooling correlation parameters were determined by means of dimensional analysis, and the generalized results for both the inner- and the outer-race bearing operating temperatures are computed for the laboratory test rig and the turbojet engine. A method is given that enables the designer to predict the inner- and outer-race turbine roller-bearing temperatures from single curves, regardless of variations in speed, load, oil flow, oil inlet temperature, oil inlet viscosity, oil-jet diameter, or any combination of these parameters.

  13. Correlation between mass transfer coefficient kLa and relevant operating parameters in cylindrical disposable shaken bioreactors on a bench-to-pilot scale

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Among disposable bioreactor systems, cylindrical orbitally shaken bioreactors show important advantages. They provide a well-defined hydrodynamic flow combined with excellent mixing and oxygen transfer for mammalian and plant cell cultivations. Since there is no known universal correlation between the volumetric mass transfer coefficient for oxygen kLa and relevant operating parameters in such bioreactor systems, the aim of this current study is to experimentally determine a universal kLa correlation. Results A Respiration Activity Monitoring System (RAMOS) was used to measure kLa values in cylindrical disposable shaken bioreactors and Buckingham’s π-Theorem was applied to define a dimensionless equation for kLa. In this way, a scale- and volume-independent kLa correlation was developed and validated in bioreactors with volumes from 2 L to 200 L. The final correlation was used to calculate cultivation parameters at different scales to allow a sufficient oxygen supply of tobacco BY-2 cell suspension cultures. Conclusion The resulting equation can be universally applied to calculate the mass transfer coefficient for any of seven relevant cultivation parameters such as the reactor diameter, the shaking frequency, the filling volume, the viscosity, the oxygen diffusion coefficient, the gravitational acceleration or the shaking diameter within an accuracy range of +/− 30%. To our knowledge, this is the first kLa correlation that has been defined and validated for the cited bioreactor system on a bench-to-pilot scale. PMID:24289110

  14. Operation of a cylindrical bioelectrochemical reactor containing carbon fiber fabric for efficient methane fermentation from thickened sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Daisuke; Sasaki, Kengo; Watanabe, Atsushi; Morita, Masahiko; Matsumoto, Norio; Igarashi, Yasuo; Ohmura, Naoya

    2013-02-01

    A bioelectrochemical reactor (BER) containing carbon fiber fabric (CFF) (BER+CFF) enabled efficient methane fermentation from thickened sewage sludge. A cylindrical BER+CFF was proposed and scaled-up to a volume of 4.0-L. Thickened sewage sludge was treated using three types of methanogenic reactors. The working electrode potential in the BER+CFF was regulated at -0.8 V (vs. Ag/AgCl). BER+CFF showed gas production of 3.57 L L(-1) day(-1) at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 4.0 days; however, non-BER+CFF showed a lower gas production rate (0.83 L L(-1) day(-1)) at this HRT, suggesting positive effects of electrochemical regulation. A stirred tank reactor (without CFF) deteriorated at an HRT of 10 days, suggesting positive effects of CFF. 16S rRNA gene analysis showed that the BER+CFF included 3 kinds of hydrogenotrophic methanogens and 1 aceticlastic methanogen. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of the BER+CFF for scale-up and flexibility of this technology. PMID:23262013

  15. Developments in precision optical grinding technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fess, Edward; Bechtold, Mike; Wolfs, Frank; Bechtold, Rob

    2013-09-01

    Optical systems that utilize complex optical geometries such as aspheres and freeform optics require precise control through the manufacturing process. As the preparatory stage for polishing, this is especially true for grinding. The quality of the grinding process can greatly influence the polishing process and the resultant finished product. OptiPro has performed extensive development work in evaluating components of a precision grinding machine to determine how they influence the overall manufacturing process. For example, spindle technology has a strong effect on how a grinding machine will perform. Through metrology techniques that measure the vibration characteristics of a machine and measurements of grinding forces with a dynamometer, OptiPro has also developed a detailed knowledge of how the machine can influence the grinding process. One of the outcomes of this work has led OptiPro to develop an ultrasonic head for their grinding platform to aid in reducing grinding forces. Initial results show a reduction in force by ~50%.

  16. Latest experiences and developments of coal grinding plants with roller grinding mills

    SciTech Connect

    Salewski, G.

    1996-12-31

    LOESCHE GmbH has for decades been involved in the research and development of coal processing plants with roller grinding mills. By intensive research work the engineers and technicians at LOESCHE GmbH, Duesseldorf, have successfully provided new coal processing technologies for the varied needs of industry. One of the first PCI Plants in Europe was equipped in 1985 by LOESCHE with two central coal grinding plants for the ironmaking plant at Dillingen, Germany. These two plants use hot stove waste gas in conjunction with blast furnace gas fired in a hot gas generator, as a heat source for coal drying. Further plant configurations have been developed and put into operation. Experience with self-inerted grinding plants (i.e., plants that do not make use of hot and dry waste gases) has been gained for various applications, such as coal gasification, liquefaction and pulverized coal injection into blast furnaces. In this paper experience and development of self-inerted, foreign-inerted and air-operated plants will be discussed.

  17. Ceramic-bonded abrasive grinding tools

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, C.E. Jr.; Gorin, A.H.; Seals, R.D.

    1994-11-22

    Abrasive grains such as boron carbide, silicon carbide, alumina, diamond, cubic boron nitride, and mullite are combined with a cement primarily comprised of zinc oxide and a reactive liquid setting agent and solidified into abrasive grinding tools. Such grinding tools are particularly suitable for grinding and polishing stone, such as marble and granite.

  18. Ceramic-bonded abrasive grinding tools

    SciTech Connect

    Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E.; Gorin, Andrew H.; Seals, Roland D.

    1994-01-01

    Abrasive grains such as boron carbide, silicon carbide, alumina, diamond, cubic boron nitride, and mullite are combined with a cement primarily comprised of zinc oxide and a reactive liquid setting agent and solidified into abrasive grinding tools. Such grinding tools are particularly suitable for grinding and polishing stone, such as marble and granite.

  19. "Grinding" cavities in polyurethane foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brower, J. R.; Davey, R. E.; Dixon, W. F.; Robb, P. H.; Zebus, P. P.

    1980-01-01

    Grinding tool installed on conventional milling machine cuts precise cavities in foam blocks. Method is well suited for prototype or midsize production runs and can be adapted to computer control for mass production. Method saves time and materials compared to bonding or hot wire techniques.

  20. Ultrasonic precision optical grinding technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, Michael J.; Bechtold, Michael J.; Fess, Edward; Wolfs, Frank L.; Bechtold, Rob

    2015-10-01

    As optical geometries become more precise and complex and a wider range of materials are used, the processes used for manufacturing become more critical. As the preparatory stage for polishing, this is especially true for grinding. Slow processing speeds, accelerated tool wear, and poor surface quality are often detriments in manufacturing glass and hard ceramics. The quality of the ground surface greatly influences the polishing process and the resulting finished product. Through extensive research and development, OptiPro Systems has introduced an ultrasonic assisted grinding technology, OptiSonic, which has numerous advantages over traditional grinding processes. OptiSonic utilizes a custom tool holder designed to produce oscillations in line with the rotating spindle. A newly developed software package called IntelliSonic is integral to this platform. IntelliSonic automatically characterizes the tool and continuously optimizes the output frequency for optimal cutting while in contact with the part. This helps maintain a highly consistent process under changing load conditions for a more accurate surface. Utilizing a wide variety of instruments, test have proven to show a reduction in tool wear and increase in surface quality while allowing processing speeds to be increased. OptiSonic has proven to be an enabling technology to overcome the difficulties seen in grinding of glass and hard optical ceramics. OptiSonic has demonstrated numerous advantages over the standard CNC grinding process. Advantages are evident in reduced tool wear, better surface quality, and reduced cycle times due to increased feed rates. These benefits can be seen over numerous applications within the precision optics industry.

  1. Characterization of grinding wheels: An annotated Bibliography. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McClung, R.W.

    1995-12-01

    The characteristics of grinding wheels, after both fabrication and periods of operation, have a significant effect on the processed surface and the mechanical properties of advanced ceramics. An extensive literature survey and review has been conducted to determine and catalogue the various characterization methods that have been investigated and reported. Although many of the references have addressed the grinding of metals, the historical and technical merit justify their inclusion in this bibliography. For convenience, the references have been subdivided into nine subheadings: Nondestructive examination; elasticity and stiffness; wheel hardness; topography and profilometry; observation of texture of wheel surfaces wheel wear; in process monitoring of grinding, acoustic emission, other; characteristics of ground surfaces; and miscellaneous.

  2. Fused silica fine grinding with low roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Lei; Gu, Yongqiang; Wu, Di

    2014-08-01

    Lithography-optics is one of the most complex optical systems. The fine grinding process is the most important step before polishing. Roughness and sub-surface damage (SSD) are essential outputs of fine grinding. We demonstrate the method that use fix abrasive cup tool with CNC grinding machine to complete the fine grinding process, even instead of lapping process. And experiment sample roughness can reach 23.40nm rms and Ra 18.554nm. The SSD estimate is about 2 μm which is also smaller than commercial lapping process. The fine grinding output can satisfy the lithography optic fabrication demands and efficiently reduce the polishing time.

  3. Ultraprecision, high stiffness CNC grinding machines for ductile mode grinding of brittle materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeown, Patrick A.; Carlisle, Keith; Shore, Paul; Read, R. F.

    1990-10-01

    Under certain controlled conditions it is now possible to machine brittle materials such as glasses and ceramics using single or multi-point diamond tools (grinding), so that material is removed by plastic flow, leaving crack-free surfaces. This process is called 'shear' or 'ductile' mode grinding. It represents a major breakthrough in modern manufacturing engineering since it promises to enable: - complex optical components, both transmission and reflecting to be generated by advanced CNC machines with very little (or even zero) subsequent polishing. - complex shaped components such as turbine blades, nozzle guide vanes, etc. to be finish machined after near net shape forming, to high precision in advanced ceramics such as silicon nitride, without inducing micro-cracking and thus lowering ultimate rupture strength and fatigue life. Ductile mode "damage free" grinding occurs when the volume of materials stressed by each grit of the grinding wheel is small enough to yield rather than exhibit brittle fracture, i.e. cracking. In practice, this means maintaining the undeformed chip thickness to below the ductile-brittle transition value; this varies from material to material but is generally in the order of 0.1 pm or 100 nm, (hence the term "nanogrinding" is sometimes used) . Thus the critical factors for operating successfully in the ductile regime are machine system accuracy and dynamic stiffness between each grit and the workpiece. In detail this means: (i) High precision 'truing' of the diamond grits, together with dressing of the wheel bond to ensure adequate ' openness'; (ii) Design and build of the grinding wheel spindle with very high dynamic stiffness; error motions, radial and axial, must be considerably less than 100 nfl. (iii) Design and build of the workpiece carriage motion system with very high dynamic stiffness; error motions, linear or rotary, must be well within 100 nm. (iv) Smooth, rumble-free, high-stiffness servo-drives controlling the motions

  4. Internal grinding of high-speed steels: Shorter processing times with boron nitride grinding tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borse, D.

    Boron nitride grinding tools can be used to advantage for the grinding of high speed steel (HSS) with a high vanadium content. the abrasives available to date are of limited value because the HSS materials contain very hard carbides, grinding of which, and of vanadium carbide in particular, results in very rapid wear in silicon carbide or corundum grinding wheels. The hardness of these steels is usually 62 RC to 70 RC. Boron nitride grinding tools are advantageous for internal grinding of workpieces made of high speed steel for example, sockets, milling tool bores, cutting wheels and crushing rollers. To date, boron nitride grinding wheels or pencil grinders were bonded with synthetic resin. Consequently internal grinding is usually carried out as wet grinding. In the meantime grinding tools bonded with electrodeposited metal bonds (GSS) were developed and proved to be successful for internal grinding. The abrasive grains which are arranged in a single layer protrude freely from the electrobond. During grinding very little heat is generated, so that dry grinding is possible.

  5. Grinding tool optimization in computer controlled grinding of SiC aspheric mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ci; Lu, Yi; Peng, Yanglin

    2014-11-01

    The shape, size and material of grinding tool not only affect the machining accuracy, but also the machining efficiency in the process of Computer Controlled Grinding. The hardness of the SiC aspheric mirror, the misfit of grinding tool and the work-piece also emphasize the importance of grinding tool optimization. By means of analyzing the misfit property of grinding tool and aspheric optic theoretically, as well as the wear character and the process of the grinding tool experimentally, this manuscript establishes the rule of grinding tool optimization satisfying different machining objective. Based on this, the adopted grinding tool was optimized in the grinding process of SiC off-axis aspheric (634mm×560mm). The simulation provide reasonable grinding tool for the off-axis aspheric grinding, and good results (large amount material removal and edge error figuring) are obtained when the optimized grinding tool are applied. Both of the simulations and experiments demonstrate the feasibility and correctness of the grinding tool optimization method.

  6. Grinding arrangement for ball nose milling cutters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burch, C. F. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A grinding arrangement for spiral fluted ball nose end mills and like tools includes a tool holder for positioning the tool relative to a grinding wheel. The tool is mounted in a spindle within the tool holder for rotation about its centerline and the tool holder is pivotably mounted for angular movement about an axis which intersects that centerline. A follower arm of a cam follower secured to the spindle cooperates with a specially shaped cam to provide rotation of the tool during the angular movement of the tool holder during the grinding cycle, by an amount determined by the cam profile. In this way the surface of the cutting edge in contact with the grinding wheel is maintained at the same height on the grinding wheel throughout the angular movement of the tool holder during the grinding cycle.

  7. Optical wear assessment system for grinding tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heger, Thomas; Pandit, Madhukar C.

    2003-04-01

    The inspection and monitoring of the wear of grinding tools is essential in order to ensure the quality of the grinding tool and the finished product. Present methods rely on dismounting the grinding tool for examination of the grinding tool surface. Often, the state of the grinding tool surface is checked indirectly by evaluating the quality of the workpiece. The application of image processing which offers an effective means for in situ inspection and monitoring is described in the paper. By using multi-directional illumination and image fusion, an image with a high degree of relevant information is generated that is then segmented using the wavelet transform (MSA) and classified to distinguish grains and cavities. Results of the application of the algorithms for a high performance grinding wheel with CBN grains embedded in a resin base are presented.

  8. Changeing of fly ash leachability after grinding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakatos, J.; Szabo, R.; Racz, A.; Banhidi, O.; Mucsi, G.

    2016-04-01

    Effect of grinding on the reactivity of fly ash used for geopolymer production was tested. Extraction technique using different alkaline and acidic solutions were used for detect the change of the solubility of elements due to the physical and mechano-chemical transformation of minerals in function of grinding time. Both the extraction with alkaline and acidic solution have detected improvement in solubility in function of grinding time. The enhancement in alkaline solution was approx. 100% in case of Si and Al. The acidic medium able to dissolve the fly ash higher manner than the alkaline, therefore the effect of grinding was found less pronounced.

  9. Surface topography of cylindrical gear wheels after smoothing in abrasive mass, honing and shot peening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalski, J.; Pawlus, P.; Żelasko, W.

    2011-08-01

    The present paper presents the analysis of surface topography of gear teeth as the result of final machining processes. Teeth of multiple cylindrical gears shaped by grinding were smoothed in abrasive mass, honed or shot peened. The measurement of gears were made using coordinate measuring machine and 3D surface topography stylus instrument. The following deviations were studied; pitch deviation, total pitches deviations, variation of teeth thickness and deviation of gear radial run-out. Changes in teeth surface topography during machining process were determined. 3D surface topography parameters, surface directionality as well as areal autocorrelation and power spectral density functions were taken into consideration. As the results of the analysis, the best surface topography with regard to gear operational properties was recommended.

  10. APPARATUS FOR GRINDING SPHERICAL BODIES

    DOEpatents

    Burch, R.F. Jr.

    1963-09-24

    A relatively inexpensive device is described for grinding rough ceramic bodies into accurate spherical shapes using a conventional drill press and a belt sander. A horizontal disk with an abrasive-surfaced recess in its lower face is mounted eccentrically on a vertical shaft which is forced downward against a stop by a spring. Bodies to be ground are placed in the recess and are subjected to the abrasive action of the belt sander as the disk is rotated by the drill press. (AEC)

  11. High Pressure Mass Spectrometry: The Generation of Mass Spectra at Operating Pressures Exceeding 1 Torr in a Microscale Cylindrical Ion Trap.

    PubMed

    Blakeman, Kenion H; Wolfe, Derek W; Cavanaugh, Craig A; Ramsey, J Michael

    2016-05-17

    We present the first demonstration of high pressure mass spectrometry (HPMS), which we define as mass spectrometry performed at pressures greater than 100 mTorr. Mass analysis is shown at operational pressures exceeding 1 Torr of helium buffer gas. A differentially pumped MS system was constructed for HPMS development consisting of two chambers. The first chamber (mass analysis chamber) was operated at pressures up to 1.2 Torr and contained the ionization source and a microscale cylindrical ion trap (CIT) mass analyzer. The CIT had critical dimensions of r0 = 500 μm and z0 = 650 μm. The second chamber was held at a lower pressure (≤10 mTorr) and contained an electron multiplier for detection. Mass spectra for xenon, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES), and octane were acquired with helium buffer gas pressures ranging from 0.04 to 1.2 Torr in the mass analysis chamber. Full-width at half-maximum of mass spectral peaks was found to increase 143% for xenon, 40% for CEES, and 77% for octane over this pressure range, with maximum peak widths of 1.19, 1.26, and 0.82 Da, respectively. Data were fitted with an algebraic model that factors in ion-neutral collision peak broadening effects at high pressures. Experimental and theoretical peak broadening slopes showed good agreement at buffer gas pressures greater than 0.2 Torr. Experiments presented here demonstrate mass spectrometry at pressures orders of magnitude higher than conventionally practiced with any type of mass analyzer. The use of HPMS provides a way to eliminate turbo pumping requirements, leading to significant reduction in MS system size, weight, and power and facilitating a path toward compact/hand-held mass spectrometers with numerous potential applications.

  12. High Pressure Mass Spectrometry: The Generation of Mass Spectra at Operating Pressures Exceeding 1 Torr in a Microscale Cylindrical Ion Trap.

    PubMed

    Blakeman, Kenion H; Wolfe, Derek W; Cavanaugh, Craig A; Ramsey, J Michael

    2016-05-17

    We present the first demonstration of high pressure mass spectrometry (HPMS), which we define as mass spectrometry performed at pressures greater than 100 mTorr. Mass analysis is shown at operational pressures exceeding 1 Torr of helium buffer gas. A differentially pumped MS system was constructed for HPMS development consisting of two chambers. The first chamber (mass analysis chamber) was operated at pressures up to 1.2 Torr and contained the ionization source and a microscale cylindrical ion trap (CIT) mass analyzer. The CIT had critical dimensions of r0 = 500 μm and z0 = 650 μm. The second chamber was held at a lower pressure (≤10 mTorr) and contained an electron multiplier for detection. Mass spectra for xenon, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES), and octane were acquired with helium buffer gas pressures ranging from 0.04 to 1.2 Torr in the mass analysis chamber. Full-width at half-maximum of mass spectral peaks was found to increase 143% for xenon, 40% for CEES, and 77% for octane over this pressure range, with maximum peak widths of 1.19, 1.26, and 0.82 Da, respectively. Data were fitted with an algebraic model that factors in ion-neutral collision peak broadening effects at high pressures. Experimental and theoretical peak broadening slopes showed good agreement at buffer gas pressures greater than 0.2 Torr. Experiments presented here demonstrate mass spectrometry at pressures orders of magnitude higher than conventionally practiced with any type of mass analyzer. The use of HPMS provides a way to eliminate turbo pumping requirements, leading to significant reduction in MS system size, weight, and power and facilitating a path toward compact/hand-held mass spectrometers with numerous potential applications. PMID:27109864

  13. Cylindrical geometry hall thruster

    DOEpatents

    Raitses, Yevgeny; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method for thrusting plasma, utilizing a Hall thruster with a cylindrical geometry, wherein ions are accelerated in substantially the axial direction. The apparatus is suitable for operation at low power. It employs small size thruster components, including a ceramic channel, with the center pole piece of the conventional annular design thruster eliminated or greatly reduced. Efficient operation is accomplished through magnetic fields with a substantial radial component. The propellant gas is ionized at an optimal location in the thruster. A further improvement is accomplished by segmented electrodes, which produce localized voltage drops within the thruster at optimally prescribed locations. The apparatus differs from a conventional Hall thruster, which has an annular geometry, not well suited to scaling to small size, because the small size for an annular design has a great deal of surface area relative to the volume.

  14. 'Diamond Jenness': A Tough Grind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This microscopic imager mosaic of the target area called 'Diamond Jenness' was taken after NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity ground into the surface with its rock abrasion tool for a second time.

    Opportunity has bored nearly a dozen holes into the inner walls of 'Endurance Crater.' On sols 177 and 178 (July 23 and July 24, 2004), the rover worked double-duty on Diamond Jenness. Surface debris and the bumpy shape of the rock resulted in a shallow and irregular hole, only about 2 millimeters (0.08 inch) deep. The final depth was not enough to remove all the bumps and leave a neat hole with a smooth floor. This extremely shallow depression was then examined by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

    On Sol 178, Opportunity's 'robotic rodent' dined on Diamond Jenness once again, grinding almost an additional 5 millimeters (about 0.2 inch). The rover then applied its Moessbauer spectrometer to the deepened hole. This double dose of Diamond Jenness enabled the science team to examine the rock at varying layers. Results from those grindings are currently being analyzed.

    The image mosaic is about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across.

  15. 'Diamond Jenness': Before the Grind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This microscopic imager mosaic of the rock called 'Diamond Jenness' was snapped on sol 177 before NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity ground into the surface with its rock abrasion tool, or 'Rat.'

    Opportunity has bored nearly a dozen holes into the inner walls of 'Endurance Crater.' On sols 177 and 178 (July 23 and July 24, 2004), the rover worked double-duty on Diamond Jenness. Surface debris and the bumpy shape of the rock resulted in a shallow and irregular hole, only about 2 millimeters (0.08 inch) deep. The final depth was not enough to remove all the bumps and leave a neat hole with a smooth floor. This extremely shallow depression was then examined by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer. On Sol 178, Opportunity's 'robotic rodent' dined on Diamond Jenness once again, grinding almost an additional 5 millimeters (about 0.2 inch). The rover then applied its Moessbauer spectrometer to the deepened hole. This double dose of Diamond Jenness enabled the science team to examine the rock at varying layers. Results from those grindings are currently being analyzed.

    The image mosaic is about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across.

  16. 'Diamond Jenness': After the Grind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This microscopic imager mosaic taken by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the rock dubbed 'Diamond Jenness.' It was taken on sol 177 (July 23, 2004) after the rover first ground into the rock with its rock abrasion tool, or 'Rat.' The rover later ground into the rock a second time. A sliced spherule, or 'blueberry,' is visible in the upper left corner of the hole.

    Opportunity has bored nearly a dozen holes into the inner walls of 'Endurance Crater.' On sols 177 and 178 (July 23 and July 24, 2004), the rover worked double-duty on Diamond Jenness. Surface debris and the bumpy shape of the rock resulted in a shallow and irregular hole, only about 2 millimeters (0.08 inch) deep. The final depth was not enough to remove all the bumps and leave a neat hole with a smooth floor. This extremely shallow depression was then examined by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

    On Sol 178, Opportunity's 'robotic rodent' dined on Diamond Jenness once again, grinding almost an additional 5 millimeters (about 0.2 inch). The rover then applied its Moessbauer spectrometer to the deepened hole. This double dose of Diamond Jenness enabled the science team to examine the rock at varying layers. Results from those grindings are currently being analyzed.

    The image mosaic is about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across.

  17. Lathe converted for grinding aspheric surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larmer, J. W.; Levinsohn, M.; Mc Craw, D.; Pessagno, E. H.; Taub, F. J.

    1964-01-01

    A standard overarm tracing lathe converted by the addition of an independently driven diamond grinding wheel is used for grinding aspheric surfaces. The motion of the wheel is controlled by the lathe air tracer following the template which produces the desired aspheric profile.

  18. Precision grinding process development for brittle materials

    SciTech Connect

    Blaedel, K L; Davis, P J; Piscotty, M A

    1999-04-01

    High performance, brittle materials are the materials of choice for many of today's engineering applications. This paper describes three separate precision grinding processes developed at Lawrence Liver-more National Laboratory to machine precision ceramic components. Included in the discussion of the precision processes is a variety of grinding wheel dressing, truing and profiling techniques.

  19. Evaluation of Recycle Grinding Performance in Flour Milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazlina Mustapa Kamal, Siti; Webb, Colin

    A typical flour milling process is a very linear operation that is almost entirely void of recycled streams where separate fractions from each operation go ahead as new streams to the next operation. In some cases, there are opportunities for combining some streams, for recycling particles that have been insufficiently broken to go back to the same roller mill. This study introduces this recycle concept in flour milling process at second break system. The recycle grinding assessment was made using a Satake STR-100 test roller mill. The recycle process was started after the second break system and the number of recycle grinding was up to 7 regrinds. The particle size distribution and ash analysis were produced to describe the behaviour of the recycle grinding performance. The material release was sifted on a range of sieves and the ash content was analysed using a laboratory furnace. The performance for each recycle stage was investigated. It was determined that it is possible for some coarse particles that contain only bran to keep being recycled in the recycle circuit. A purging operation was recommended to be included in the recycle system, to separate the unwanted particles.

  20. Precision diamond grinding of ceramics and glass

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.; Paul, H.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    A new research initiative will be undertaken to investigate the effect of machine parameters and material properties on precision diamond grinding of ceramics and glass. The critical grinding depth to initiate the plastic flow-to-brittle fracture regime will be directly measured using plunge-grind tests. This information will be correlated with machine parameters such as wheel bonding and diamond grain size. Multiaxis grinding tests will then be made to provide data more closely coupled with production technology. One important aspect of the material property studies involves measuring fracture toughness at the very short crack sizes commensurate with grinding damage. Short crack toughness value`s can be much less than the long-crack toughness values measured in conventional fracture tests.

  1. Machining and grinding: High rate deformation in practice

    SciTech Connect

    Follansbee, P.S.

    1993-04-01

    Machining and grinding are well-established material-working operations involving highly non-uniform deformation and failure processes. A typical machining operation is characterized by uncertain boundary conditions (e.g.,surface interactions), three-dimensional stress states, large strains, high strain rates, non-uniform temperatures, highly localized deformations, and failure by both nominally ductile and brittle mechanisms. While machining and grinding are thought to be dominated by empiricism, even a cursory inspection leads one to the conclusion that this results more from necessity arising out of the complicated and highly interdisciplinary nature of the processes than from the lack thereof. With these conditions in mind, the purpose of this paper is to outline the current understanding of strain rate effects in metals.

  2. Machining and grinding: High rate deformation in practice

    SciTech Connect

    Follansbee, P.S.

    1993-01-01

    Machining and grinding are well-established material-working operations involving highly non-uniform deformation and failure processes. A typical machining operation is characterized by uncertain boundary conditions (e.g.,surface interactions), three-dimensional stress states, large strains, high strain rates, non-uniform temperatures, highly localized deformations, and failure by both nominally ductile and brittle mechanisms. While machining and grinding are thought to be dominated by empiricism, even a cursory inspection leads one to the conclusion that this results more from necessity arising out of the complicated and highly interdisciplinary nature of the processes than from the lack thereof. With these conditions in mind, the purpose of this paper is to outline the current understanding of strain rate effects in metals.

  3. Comparison of High-Speed Operating Characteristics of Size 215 Cylindrical-Roller Bearings as Determined in Turbojet Engine and in Laboratory Test Rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macks, E Fred; Nemeth, Zolton N

    1951-01-01

    A comparison of the operating characteristics of 75-millimeter-bore (size 215) cylindrical-roller one-piece inner-race-riding cage-type bearings was made using a laboratory test rig and a turbojet engine. Cooling correlation parameters were determined by means of dimensional analysis, and the generalized results for both the inner- and outer-race bearing operating temperatures are compared for the laboratory test rig and the turbojet engine. Inner- and outer-race cooling-correlation curves were obtained for the turbojet-engine turbine-roller bearing with the same inner- and outer-race correlation parameters and exponents as those determined for the laboratory test-rig bearing. The inner- and outer-race turbine roller-bearing temperatures may be predicted from a single curve, regardless of variations in speed, load, oil flow, oil inlet temperature, oil inlet viscosity, oil-jet diameter or any combination of these parameters. The turbojet-engine turbine-roller-bearing inner-race temperatures were 30 to 60 F greater than the outer-race-maximum temperatures, the exact values depending on the operating condition and oil viscosity; these results are in contrast to the laboratory test-rig results where the inner-race temperatures were less than the outer-race-maximum temperatures. The turbojet-engine turbine-roller bearing, maximum outer-race circumferential temperature variation was approximately 30 F for each of the oils used. The effect of oil viscosity on inner- and outer-race turbojet-engine turbine-roller-bearing temperatures was found to be significant. With the lower viscosity oil (6x10(exp -7) reyns (4.9 centistokes) at 100 F; viscosity index, 83), the inner-race temperature was approximately 30 to 35 F less than with the higher viscosity oil (53x10(exp -7) reyns (42.8 centistokes) at 100 F; viscosity index, 150); whereas the outer-race-maximum temperatures were 12 to 28 F lower with the lower viscosity oil over the DN range investigated.

  4. Measurement and analysis of forces in grinding of silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Jahanmir, S.; Hwang, T.; Whitenton, E.P.; Job, L.S.; Evans, C.J.

    1995-12-31

    Using an instrumented surface grinder, the two components of grinding forces (normal and tangential) were measured for different types of silicon nitride ceramics. The influences of grinding parameters, such as down feed and table speed, and grinding fluids on forces were determined. In addition to these measurements, the specific grinding energy defined as the energy per unit volume of removed material was calculated. This parameter and the measured forces were then analyzed to determine possible correlations with mechanical properties of the silicon nitrides. It was found that, in general, the grinding forces and the specific grinding energy increase with the hardness. Both the grinding forces and the specific grinding energy were influenced by the grinding fluid and the grinding parameters. The implication of these results on the mechanisms of material removal in grinding of silicon nitride and the possible tribological effects are discussed.

  5. Thermal aspects of grinding for surface integrity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Yongqing

    Thermal aspects of grinding are analyzed in detail since it is argued that temperature controls the effect of grinding on workpiece surface integrity. Transient and steady state heat partition in sliding contact is discussed in detail. This leads to a complete thermal model for heat partition and temperatures in surface grinding. Numerical predictions of the model are shown to agree with experimental results available in the literature. Effects of grinding conditions including real contact area ratio, thermal properties, feeds and speeds, and type of cut (down or up grinding) on heat partition and workpiece temperature are studied systematically. It is shown that the presence of the fluid inside the grinding zone can reduce the heat flux into the workpiece and workpiece temperature significantly. It is also found that some ratios of workpiece velocity to wheel velocity result in high temperatures and therefore should be avoided. This result provides a basis for the difference between conventional and creep-feed grinding regions. After obtaining temperature, an efficient and robust FFT approach is developed to obtain the thermal stress field induced by moving heat sources. Study of the 'hot spot' problem shows that the effect of hot spots on surface displacement and stress is small suggesting that grinding thermal stress is induced by the global temperature while local temperature controls metallurgical phase transformations. It is also shown that thermal stress is dominant on the global scale while the global scale mechanical stress is insignificant. Thus, the superior thermal properties of CBN compared to Alsb2Osb3 leads to low temperature and less deleterious residual stresses. Finally, spectral analysis is performed to evaluate contact behavior of the finished surface. This analysis shows that a good grinding process improves not only the magnitude of the surface roughness but the frequency content as well.

  6. Mass exchange during simultaneous grinding and dissolution

    SciTech Connect

    Aksel'rud, G.A.; Semenishin, E.M.; Kopyt, S.Ya.; Trotskii, V.I.

    1988-03-20

    Extraction of ore components of interest has a number of disadvantages, one of which being low efficiency. Combining the grinding and dissolution steps in one apparatus makes the process more efficient. Adoption of this technology, however, requires theoretical and mathematical studies. This paper reports the kinetics of simultaneous grinding and dissolution of copper-containing minerals. Simultaneous grinding and dissolution accelerated several fold the mass transfer of components of interest in the interaction of malachite and azurite with sulfuric acid solutions. The complete dissolution time was determined by adding the experimental rates of dissolution and abrasion.

  7. High speed low damage grinding of advanced ceramics - Phase II Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kovach, J.A.; Malkin, S.

    2000-02-01

    In the manufacture of structural ceramic components, grinding costs can comprise up to 80% of the entire manufacturing cost. As a result, one of the most challenging tasks faced by manufacturing process engineers is the development of a ceramic finishing process to maximize part throughput while minimizing costs and associated scrap levels. The efforts summarized in this report represent the second phase of a program whose overall objective was to develop a single-step, roughing-finishing process suitable for producing high-quality silicon nitride parts at high material removal rates and at substantially lower cost than traditional, multi-stage grinding processes. More specifically, this report provides a technical overview of High-Speed, Low-Damage (HSLD) ceramic grinding which employs elevated wheel speeds to achieve the small grain depths of cut necessary for low-damage grinding while operating at relatively high material removal rates. The study employed the combined use of laboratory grinding tests, mathematical grinding models, and characterization of the resultant surface condition. A single-step, roughing-finishing process operating at high removal rates was developed and demonstrated.

  8. Evaluation of Grinding Wheel Surface by Means of Grinding Sound Discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosokawa, Akira; Mashimo, Kazufumi; Yamada, Keiji; Ueda, Takashi

    In this study, a new technique of in-process evaluation of a grinding wheel surface is proposed. Some specific wheel surfaces are prepared as references by the appropriate truing and/or dressing procedure, and grinding sounds generated by these wheels are discriminated by analyzing the dynamic frequency spectrum by a neural network technique. In the case of a conventional vitrified-bonded alumina wheel, the grinding sound can be identified in the optimum network configuration. Therefore, this system can instantaneously recognize differences in the wheel surface with a good degree of accuracy insofar as the wheel conditions are relatively widely changed. In addition, the network can perceive wheel wear because the grain tips are flattened as grinding proceeds and the grinding sound becomes similar to that of a wheel generated with lower dressing feed. The resinoid-bonded cubic boron nitride (CBN) wheel is also discriminable when a grinding sound in a higher frequency range is analyzed.

  9. Shear-mode grinding force criteria of Zerodur and Pyrex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Hiroshi; Imai, Kenichiro

    1995-08-01

    Experimental grinding of Zerodur and Pyrex demonstrated shear-mode grinding criteria (SM' GFC), which is a repeatable deterministic function of grinding conditions including materials and grinding wheels. Both criteria as with BK7 glass previously reported, are found to be the logarithmic function of removal rate.

  10. Automatic grinding apparatus to control uniform specimen thicknesses

    DOEpatents

    Bryner, J.S.

    1981-01-07

    This invention is directed to a new and improved grinding apparatus comprisng: (1) a movable grinding surface; (2) a specimen holder; (3) a dislacing means for moving the holder and/or grinding surface toward one another; and (4) at least three means for limiting displacement of the holder to the grinding surface.

  11. Automatic grinding apparatus to control uniform specimen thicknesses

    DOEpatents

    Bryner, Joseph S.

    1982-01-01

    This invention is directed to a new and improved grinding apparatus comprising (1) a movable grinding surface, (2) a specimen holder, (3) a displacing device for moving the holder and/or grinding surface toward one another, and (4) at least three devices for limiting displacement of the holder to the grinding surface.

  12. Effect of grinding conditions on the fatigue life of titanium 5Al-2.5Sn alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rangaswamy, P.; Terutung, H.; Jeelani, S.

    1991-01-01

    An investigation into the effect of grinding conditions on the fatigue life of titanium 5Al-2.5Sn is presented. Damage to surface integrity and changes in the residual stresses distribution are studied to assess changes in fatigue life. A surface grinding machine, operating at speeds ranging from 2000 to 6000 fpm and using SiC wheels of grit sizes 60 and 120, was used to grind flat subsize specimens of 0.1-in. thickness. After grinding, the specimens were fatigued at a chosen stress and compared with the unadulterated material. A standard profilometer, a microhardness tester, and a scanning electron microscope were utilized to examine surface characteristics and measure roughness and hardness. Increased grinding speed in both wet and dry applications tended to decrease the fatigue life of the specimens. Fatigue life increased markedly at 2000 fpm under wet conditions, but then decreased at higher speeds. Grit size had no effect on the fatigue life.

  13. Virtual sensors for on-line wheel wear and part roughness measurement in the grinding process.

    PubMed

    Arriandiaga, Ander; Portillo, Eva; Sánchez, Jose A; Cabanes, Itziar; Pombo, Iñigo

    2014-01-01

    Grinding is an advanced machining process for the manufacturing of valuable complex and accurate parts for high added value sectors such as aerospace, wind generation, etc. Due to the extremely severe conditions inside grinding machines, critical process variables such as part surface finish or grinding wheel wear cannot be easily and cheaply measured on-line. In this paper a virtual sensor for on-line monitoring of those variables is presented. The sensor is based on the modelling ability of Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) for stochastic and non-linear processes such as grinding; the selected architecture is the Layer-Recurrent neural network. The sensor makes use of the relation between the variables to be measured and power consumption in the wheel spindle, which can be easily measured. A sensor calibration methodology is presented, and the levels of error that can be expected are discussed. Validation of the new sensor is carried out by comparing the sensor's results with actual measurements carried out in an industrial grinding machine. Results show excellent estimation performance for both wheel wear and surface roughness. In the case of wheel wear, the absolute error is within the range of microns (average value 32 μm). In the case of surface finish, the absolute error is well below Ra 1 μm (average value 0.32 μm). The present approach can be easily generalized to other grinding operations.

  14. Temperature prediction in high speed bone grinding using motor PWM signal.

    PubMed

    Tai, Bruce L; Zhang, Lihui; Wang, Anthony C; Sullivan, Stephen; Wang, Guangjun; Shih, Albert J

    2013-10-01

    This research explores the feasibility of using motor electrical feedback to estimate temperature rise during a surgical bone grinding procedure. High-speed bone grinding is often used during skull base neurosurgery to remove cranial bone and approach skull base tumors through the nasal corridor. Grinding-induced heat could propagate and potentially injure surrounding nerves and arteries, and therefore, predicting the temperature in the grinding region would benefit neurosurgeons during the operation. High-speed electric motors are controlled by pulse-width-modulation (PWM) to alter the current input and thus maintain the rotational speed. Assuming full mechanical to thermal power conversion in the grinding process, PWM can be used as feedback for heat generation and temperature prediction. In this study, the conversion model was established from experiments under a variety of grinding conditions and an inverse heat transfer method to determine heat flux. Given a constant rotational speed, the heat conversion was represented by a linear function, and could predict temperature from the experimental data with less than 20% errors. Such results support the advance of this technology for practical application.

  15. Virtual Sensors for On-line Wheel Wear and Part Roughness Measurement in the Grinding Process

    PubMed Central

    Arriandiaga, Ander; Portillo, Eva; Sánchez, Jose A.; Cabanes, Itziar; Pombo, Iñigo

    2014-01-01

    Grinding is an advanced machining process for the manufacturing of valuable complex and accurate parts for high added value sectors such as aerospace, wind generation, etc. Due to the extremely severe conditions inside grinding machines, critical process variables such as part surface finish or grinding wheel wear cannot be easily and cheaply measured on-line. In this paper a virtual sensor for on-line monitoring of those variables is presented. The sensor is based on the modelling ability of Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) for stochastic and non-linear processes such as grinding; the selected architecture is the Layer-Recurrent neural network. The sensor makes use of the relation between the variables to be measured and power consumption in the wheel spindle, which can be easily measured. A sensor calibration methodology is presented, and the levels of error that can be expected are discussed. Validation of the new sensor is carried out by comparing the sensor's results with actual measurements carried out in an industrial grinding machine. Results show excellent estimation performance for both wheel wear and surface roughness. In the case of wheel wear, the absolute error is within the range of microns (average value 32 μm). In the case of surface finish, the absolute error is well below Ra 1 μm (average value 0.32 μm). The present approach can be easily generalized to other grinding operations. PMID:24854055

  16. Virtual sensors for on-line wheel wear and part roughness measurement in the grinding process.

    PubMed

    Arriandiaga, Ander; Portillo, Eva; Sánchez, Jose A; Cabanes, Itziar; Pombo, Iñigo

    2014-01-01

    Grinding is an advanced machining process for the manufacturing of valuable complex and accurate parts for high added value sectors such as aerospace, wind generation, etc. Due to the extremely severe conditions inside grinding machines, critical process variables such as part surface finish or grinding wheel wear cannot be easily and cheaply measured on-line. In this paper a virtual sensor for on-line monitoring of those variables is presented. The sensor is based on the modelling ability of Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) for stochastic and non-linear processes such as grinding; the selected architecture is the Layer-Recurrent neural network. The sensor makes use of the relation between the variables to be measured and power consumption in the wheel spindle, which can be easily measured. A sensor calibration methodology is presented, and the levels of error that can be expected are discussed. Validation of the new sensor is carried out by comparing the sensor's results with actual measurements carried out in an industrial grinding machine. Results show excellent estimation performance for both wheel wear and surface roughness. In the case of wheel wear, the absolute error is within the range of microns (average value 32 μm). In the case of surface finish, the absolute error is well below Ra 1 μm (average value 0.32 μm). The present approach can be easily generalized to other grinding operations. PMID:24854055

  17. Production of Near-Mirror Surface Quality by Precision Grinding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimofte, Florin; Krantz, Timothy

    2003-01-01

    Mechanical components such as gears and bearings operate with the working surfaces in intimate contact with a mating part. The performance of such components will be influenced by the quality of the working surface. In general, a smoother surface will perform better than a rougher surface since the lubrication conditions are improved. For example, surfaces with a special near-mirror quality finish of low roughness performed better than ground surfaces when tested using a block-on-ring arrangement. Bearings with near-mirror quality have been tested and analyzed; lower running torques were measured and improved fatigue life was anticipated. Experiments have been done to evaluate the performance of gears with improved, low roughness surface finishing. The measured performance improvements include an increased scuffing (scoring) load capacity by a factor of 1.6, a 30-percent reduction of gear tooth running friction, and longer fatigue lives by a factor of about four. One can also anticipate that near-mirror quality surface finishing could improve the performance of other mechanical components such as mechanical seals and heavily loaded journal bearings. Given these demonstrated benefits, capable and economical methods for the production of mechanical components with near-mirror quality surfaces are desired. One could propose the production of near-mirror quality surfaces by several methods such as abrasive polishing, chemical assisted polishing, or grinding. Production of the surfaces by grinding offers the possibility to control the macro-geometry (form), waviness, and surface texture with one process. The present study was carried out to investigate the possibility of producing near-mirror quality surfaces by grinding. The present study makes use of a specially designed grinding machine spindle to improve the surface quality relative to the quality produced when using a spindle of conventional design.

  18. Design and fundamental understanding of Minimum Quantity Lubrication (MQL) assisted grinding using advanced nanolubricants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalita, Parash

    Abrasive grinding is widely used across manufacturing industry for finishing parts and components requiring smooth superficial textures and precise dimensional tolerances and accuracy. Unlike any other machining operations, the complex thermo-mechanical processes during grinding produce excessive friction-induced energy consumption, heat, and intense contact seizures. Lubrication and cooling from grinding fluids is crucial in minimizing the deleterious effects of friction and heat to maximize the output part quality and process efficiency. The conventional flood grinding approach of an uneconomical application of large quantities of chemically active fluids has been found ineffective to provide sufficient lubrication and produces waste streams and pollutants that are hazardous to human health and environment. Application of Minimum Quantity Lubrication (MQL) that cuts the volumetric fluid consumption by 3-4 orders of magnitude have been extensively researched in grinding as a high-productivity and environmentally-sustainable alternative to the conventional flood method. However, the lubrication performance and productivity of MQL technique with current fluids has been critically challenged by the extreme thermo-mechanical conditions of abrasive grinding. In this research, an MQL system based on advanced nanolubricants has been proposed to address the current thermo-mechanical challenges of MQL grinding and improve its productivity. The nanolubricants were composed of inorganic Molybdenum Disulphide nanoparticles (≈ 200 nm) intercalated with organic macromolecules of EP/AW property, dispersed in straight (base) oils---mineral-based paraffin and vegetable-based soybean oil. After feasibility investigations into the grindability of cast iron using MQL with nanolubricants, this research focused on the fundamental understanding of tribological behavior and lubricating mechanisms of nanolubricants as a method to improve the productivity of MQL-assisted surface grinding

  19. Research on the processing speed of cam grinding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Baoying; Han, Qiushi

    2010-12-01

    Cam Grinding is a special kind of non-circular machining. The processing speed of cam grinding has a major influence on cam machining precision. In this paper, decomposed the X-axis feed speed and C-axis velocity by the tangential speed and normal speed in accordance with the curvature circle at the point of cam profile grinding. Proposed the cam grinding processing speed model and linear velocity calculation formula, the processing experiment on the CNC camshaft grinding machine results show that the cam grinding speed model is correct. Constant angular speed grinding and constant linear speed grinding are analyzed respectively, which provides a theoretical basis for cam grinding processing speed optimization.

  20. Research on the processing speed of cam grinding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Baoying; Han, Qiushi

    2011-05-01

    Cam Grinding is a special kind of non-circular machining. The processing speed of cam grinding has a major influence on cam machining precision. In this paper, decomposed the X-axis feed speed and C-axis velocity by the tangential speed and normal speed in accordance with the curvature circle at the point of cam profile grinding. Proposed the cam grinding processing speed model and linear velocity calculation formula, the processing experiment on the CNC camshaft grinding machine results show that the cam grinding speed model is correct. Constant angular speed grinding and constant linear speed grinding are analyzed respectively, which provides a theoretical basis for cam grinding processing speed optimization.

  1. Utilisation of chip thickness models in grinding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singleton, Roger

    Grinding is now a well established process utilised for both stock removal and finish applications. Although significant research is performed in this field, grinding still experiences problems with burn and high forces which can lead to poor quality components and damage to equipment. This generally occurs in grinding when the process deviates from its safe working conditions. In milling, chip thickness parameters are utilised to predict and maintain process outputs leading to improved control of the process. This thesis looks to further the knowledge of the relationship between chip thickness and the grinding process outputs to provide an increased predictive and maintenance modelling capability. Machining trials were undertaken using different chip thickness parameters to understand how these affect the process outputs. The chip thickness parameters were maintained at different grinding wheel diameters for a constant productivity process to determine the impact of chip thickness at a constant material removal rate.. Additional testing using a modified pin on disc test rig was performed to provide further information on process variables. The different chip thickness parameters provide control of different process outputs in the grinding process. These relationships can be described using contact layer theory and heat flux partitioning. The contact layer is defined as the immediate layer beneath the contact arc at the wheel workpiece interface. The size of the layer governs the force experienced during the process. The rate of contact layer removal directly impacts the net power required from the system. It was also found that the specific grinding energy of a process is more dependent on the productivity of a grinding process

  2. Study of the potential of three different MgB2 tapes for application in cylindrical coils operating at 20 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitel, J.; Kováč, P.; Tropeano, M.; Grasso, G.

    2015-05-01

    The goal of this theoretical study is to illustrate the potential of three different MgB2 tapes, developed by Columbus Superconductors, for application in cylindrical coils. First, the distribution of critical currents and electric fields of individual turns is compared when the winding of the model coil is made with tapes having different Ic(B) and anisotropy values. Second, the influence of the winding geometry on basic parameters of cylindrical coils which consist of a set of pancake coils, such as critical current Icmin, central magnetic field B0 and stored energy E, is analysed. The winding geometry of the coils, i.e. the outer winding radius and the coil length, with the same inner winding radius, was changed from a disc shape to a long thin solenoid in such a way that the overall tape length was held constant, and considered as a parameter. Finally, the winding cross-section of the coil is optimized with respect to the constant tape length in order to reach the maximum central field. The results of calculations show that for a given overall tape length and inner winding radius there exists only one winding geometry which generates the maximum central field. The overall tape length, as a parameter, is changed in a broad range from 500 m to 10 km. All calculations were performed using the experimental data measured at 20 K while the effect of the anisotropy in the Ic(B) characteristic of the short samples is taken into account.

  3. Surface integrity on grinding of gamma titanium aluminide intermetallic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murtagian, Gregorio Roberto

    Gamma-TiAl is an ordered intermetallic compound characterized by high strength to density ratio, good oxidation resistance, and good creep properties at elevated temperatures. However, it is intrinsically brittle at room temperature. This thesis investigates the potential for the use of grinding to process TiAl into useful shapes. Grinding is far from completely understood, and many aspects of the individual mechanical interactions of the abrasive grit with the material and their effect on surface integrity are unknown. The development of new synthetic diamond superabrasives in which shape and size can be controlled raises the question of the influence of those variables on the surface integrity. The goal of this work is to better understand the fundamentals of the abrasive grit/material interaction in grinding operations. Experimental, analytical, and numerical work was done to characterize and predict the resultant deformation and surface integrity on ground lamellar gamma-TiAl. Grinding tests were carried out, by analyzing the effects of grit size and shape, workpiece speed, wheel depth of cut, and wear on the subsurface plastic deformation depth (PDD). A practical method to assess the PDD is introduced based on the measurement of the lateral material flow by 3D non-contact surface profilometry. This method combines the quantitative capabilities of the microhardness measurement with the sensitivity of Nomarski microscopy. The scope and limitations of this technique are analyzed. Mechanical properties were obtained by quasi-static and split Hopkinson bar compression tests. Residual stress plots were obtained by x-ray, and surface roughness and cracking were evaluated. The abrasive grit/material interaction was accounted by modeling the force per abrasive grit for different grinding conditions, and studying its correlation to the PDD. Numerical models of this interaction were used to analyze boundary conditions, and abrasive size effects on the PDD. An explicit 2D

  4. Cylindrical neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2008-04-22

    A cylindrical neutron generator is formed with a coaxial RF-driven plasma ion source and target. A deuterium (or deuterium and tritium) plasma is produced by RF excitation in a cylindrical plasma ion generator using an RF antenna. A cylindrical neutron generating target is coaxial with the ion generator, separated by plasma and extraction electrodes which contain many slots. The plasma generator emanates ions radially over 360.degree. and the cylindrical target is thus irradiated by ions over its entire circumference. The plasma generator and target may be as long as desired. The plasma generator may be in the center and the neutron target on the outside, or the plasma generator may be on the outside and the target on the inside. In a nested configuration, several concentric targets and plasma generating regions are nested to increase the neutron flux.

  5. Cylindrical neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2005-06-14

    A cylindrical neutron generator is formed with a coaxial RF-driven plasma ion source and target. A deuterium (or deuterium and tritium) plasma is produced by RF excitation in a cylindrical plasma ion generator using an RF antenna. A cylindrical neutron generating target is coaxial with the ion generator, separated by plasma and extraction electrodes which contain many slots. The plasma generator emanates ions radially over 360.degree. and the cylindrical target is thus irradiated by ions over its entire circumference. The plasma generator and target may be as long as desired. The plasma generator may be in the center and the neutron target on the outside, or the plasma generator may be on the outside and the target on the inside. In a nested configuration, several concentric targets and plasma generating regions are nested to increase the neutron flux.

  6. Cylindrical neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2009-12-29

    A cylindrical neutron generator is formed with a coaxial RF-driven plasma ion source and target. A deuterium (or deuterium and tritium) plasma is produced by RF excitation in a cylindrical plasma ion generator using an RF antenna. A cylindrical neutron generating target is coaxial with the ion generator, separated by plasma and extraction electrodes which contain many slots. The plasma generator emanates ions radially over 360.degree. and the cylindrical target is thus irradiated by ions over its entire circumference. The plasma generator and target may be as long as desired. The plasma generator may be in the center and the neutron target on the outside, or the plasma generator may be on the outside and the target on the inside. In a nested configuration, several concentric targets and plasma generating regions are nested to increase the neutron flux.

  7. Cylindrically symmetric wormholes

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhfittig, Peter K.F.

    2005-05-15

    This paper discusses traversable wormholes that differ slightly but significantly from those of the Morris-Thorne type under the assumption of cylindrical symmetry. The throat is a piecewise smooth cylindrical surface resulting in a shape function that is not differentiable at some value. It is proposed that the regular derivative be replaced by a one-sided derivative at this value. The resulting wormhole geometry satisfies the weak energy condition.

  8. Analysis on the grinding quality of palm oil fibers by using combined grinding equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, H. L.; Gan, L. M.; Law, H. C.

    2015-12-01

    As known, Malaysia is the second largest palm oil producer worldwide after Indonesia, therefore indicating the abundance of its wastes within the country. The plantation would be seen to increase to at least 5.2 million ha by 2020, and the waste generation would be 50-70 times the plantation. However, the efficiency of bulk density is reduced. This is one of the main reasons of the initiation of this size reduction/ grinding research. With appropriate parameters, grinding will be seen to be helping in enhancing the inter-particle bindings, subsequently increasing the quality of final products. This paper focuses on the grinding quality involving palm oil wastes by using the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The samples would first be ground to powder at varying grinding speed and finally got the randomly chosen particles measured to obtain the size range. The grinding speed was manipulated from 15 Hz to 40 Hz. From the data obtained, it was found the particles fineness increased with increasing grinding speed. In general, the size ranged from 45 μm to about 600 μm, where the finest was recorded at the speed of 40 Hz. It was also found that the binding was not so encouraging at very low speeds. Therefore, the optimum grinding speed for oil palm residues lied in the range of 25 Hz to 30 Hz. However, there were still limitations to be overcome if the accuracy of the image clarity is to be enhanced.

  9. The effect of geometry and operation conditions on the performance of a gas-liquid cylindrical cyclone separator with new structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Qing; Zhang, Chi; Xu, Bo; Chen, Jiangping

    2013-07-01

    The hydrodynamic flow behavior, effects of geometry and working conditions of a gas-liquid cylindrical cyclone separator with a new structure are investigated by computational fluid dynamic and experiment. Gas liquid cylindrical cyclone separator is widely used in oil industry, refrigeration system because of its simple structure, high separating efficiency, little maintenance and no moving parts nor internal devices. In this work, a gas liquid cylindrical cyclone separator with new structure used before evaporator in refrigeration system can remove the vapor from the mixture and make evaporator compact by improving its heat exchange efficiency with the lower inlet quality. It also decreases evaporator pressure drop and reduces compressor work. The two pipes are placed symmetrically which makes each of them can be treated as inlet. It means when the fluids flow reverse, the separator performance will not be influence. Four samples with different geometry parameters are tested by experiment with different inlet quality (0.18-0.33), inlet mass flow rate (65-100kg/h). Compared with the experimental data, CFD simulation results show a good agreement. Eulerian multiphase model and Reynolds Stress Turbulence model are applied in the CFD simulation and obtained the inner flow field such as phase path lines, tangential velocity profiles and pressure and volume of fraction distribution contours. The separator body diameter (24, 36, 48mm) and inlet diameter (3.84, 4.8, 5.76mm) decide the maximum tangential velocity which results in the centrifugal force. The tangential velocity profiles are simulated and compared among different models. The higher tangential velocity makes higher quality of gas outlet but high pressure drop at the same time. Decreasing the inlet diameter increases quality of gas outlet pipe and pressure drop. High gas outlet quality is cost at high pressure drop. Increasing of separator diameter makes gas outlet quality increase first and then decrease but

  10. Grinding precision forecasting in optical aspheric grinding using artificial neural network and genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chen; Guo, Yinbiao; Yang, Qingqing; Han, Chunguang

    2010-10-01

    A new approach based on an artificial neural network (ANN) was presented for the prediction of machining precision of optical aspheric grinding. The ANN model is based on Globally Convergent Adaptive Quick Back Propagation algorithm (GCAOBP). A genetic algorithm (GA) was then applied to the trained ANN model to predict the gridding precision. The integrated GCAOBP-GA algorithm was successful in predicting the Root Mean Square of profile error (RMS) of optical aspheric workpiece in parallel grinding method using machining parameters. The results of experiments have shown that RMS of machined workpiece in parallel grinding can be predicted effectively through this approach.

  11. Working with the superabrasives industry to optimize tooling for grinding brittle materials

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.S.; Piscotty, M.A.; Blaedel, K.L.; Gray, F.A.

    1996-05-01

    The optics manufacturing industry is undertaking a significant modernization, as computer-numeric-controlled (CNC) equipment is joining or replacing open-loop equipment and hand lapping/polishing on the shop floor. Several prototype CNC lens grinding platforms employing ring tools are undergoing development and demonstration at the Center for Optics Manufacturing in Rochester, NY, and several machine tool companies have CNC product lines aimed at the optics industry. Benefits to using CNC ring tool grinding equipment include: essentially unlimited flexibility in selecting radii of curvature without special radiused tooling, the potential for CIM linkages to CAD workstations, and the cultural shift from craftsmen with undocumented procedures to CNC machine operators employing computerized routines for process control. In recent years, these developments, have inspired a number of US optics companies to invest in CNC equipment and participate in process development activities involving bound diamond tooling. This modernization process,extends beyond large optics companies that have historically embraced advanced equipment, to also include smaller optical shops where a shift to CNC equipment requires a significant company commitment. This paper addresses our efforts to optimize fine grinding wheels to support the new generation of CNC equipment. We begin with a discussion of how fine grinding fits into the optical production process, and then describe an initiative for improving the linkage between optics industry and the grinding wheel industry. For the purposes of this paper, we define fine wheels to have diamond sizes below 20 micrometers, which includes wheels used for what is sometimes called medium grinding (e.g. 10-20 micrometers diamond) and for fine grinding (e.g. 2-4 micrometers diamond).

  12. Application of cryogenic grinding to achieve homogenization of transuranic wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Atkins, W.H.; Hill, D.D.; Lucero, M.E.; Jaramillo, L.; Martinez, H.E.

    1996-08-01

    This paper describes work done at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in collaboration with the Department of Energy Rocky Flats Field Office (DOE/RFFO) and with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Boulder, Colorado. Researchers on this project have developed a method for cryogenic grinding of mixed wastes to homogenize and, thereby, to acquire a representative sample of the materials. There are approximately 220,000 waste drums owned by the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS)-50,000 at RFETS and 170,000 at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The cost of sampling the heterogeneous distribution of waste in each drum is prohibitive. In an attempt to produce a homogeneous mixture of waste that would reduce greatly the cost of sampling, researchers at NIST and RFETS are developing a cryogenic grinder. The Los Alamos work herein described addresses the implementation issues of the task. The first issue was to ascertain whether samples of the {open_quotes}small particle{close_quotes} mixtures of materials present in the waste drums at RFETS were representative of actual drum contents. Second, it was necessary to determine at what temperature the grinding operation must be performed in order to minimize or to eliminate the release of volatile organic compounds present in the waste. Last, it was essential to evaluate any effect the liquid cryogen might have on the structural integrity and ventilation capacity of the glovebox system. Results of this study showed that representative samples could be and had been obtained, that some release of organics occurred below freezing because of sublimation, and that operation of the cryogenic grinding equipment inside the glovebox was feasible.

  13. Precision grinding for rapid fabrication of segments for extremely large telescopes using the Cranfield BoX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonnellier, Xavier; Morantz, Paul; Shore, Paul; Comley, Paul

    2010-07-01

    An ultra precision large optics grinding machine, BoX®, was developed and produced at Cranfield University. BoX® offers a rapid and economic solution for grinding large off-axis aspherical and free-form optical components. Grinding high accuracy surfaces with low subsurface damage reduces subsequent polishing time. This efficient grinding process provides the capacity to grind 1.5 m parts. This paper presents an analysis of Astrositall® optical ground parts: a hexagonal 84 m radius of curvature mirror of 1 m across corners and an off-axis 350 mm diameter mirror. The 1 m hexagonal part is representative of segments under study for making extremely large telescope (ELT) segmented mirrors. The second part was machined off-axis to demonstrate free-form fabrication capability. These operations demonstrate the scalability of the rapid grinding process developed for large free-form optics. The use of an error compensation procedure improved an initial ground form accuracy to +/- 1 μm p-v over 1 metre surface. The results highlighted the effect of grinding parameters and machine dynamics on form accuracy and fabrication time.

  14. Proceedings of the precision grinding of brittle materials

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    Papers were selected for the database on topics related to grinding of ceramics. Subtopics include applications and economics, workpiece material properties, material removal mechanisms, and grinding wheels. Of the eight papers selected, five pertained to basic research in ceramics grinding processes. Two of the papers addressed specific, energy-related applications of ceramics grinding. Papers not selected for the database pertained to applications specific to non-energy industries.

  15. 30 CFR 56.14115 - Stationary grinding machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Stationary grinding machines. 56.14115 Section... Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 56.14115 Stationary grinding machines. Stationary grinding machines, other than special bit grinders, shall be equipped with— (a) Peripheral hoods capable...

  16. 30 CFR 56.14115 - Stationary grinding machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Stationary grinding machines. 56.14115 Section... Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 56.14115 Stationary grinding machines. Stationary grinding machines, other than special bit grinders, shall be equipped with— (a) Peripheral hoods capable...

  17. 30 CFR 57.14115 - Stationary grinding machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Stationary grinding machines. 57.14115 Section... and Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 57.14115 Stationary grinding machines. Stationary grinding machines, other than special bit grinders, shall be equipped with— (a) Peripheral...

  18. 30 CFR 75.1723 - Stationary grinding machines; protective devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Stationary grinding machines; protective devices. 75.1723 Section 75.1723 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF....1723 Stationary grinding machines; protective devices. (a) Stationary grinding machines other...

  19. 30 CFR 56.14115 - Stationary grinding machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Stationary grinding machines. 56.14115 Section... Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 56.14115 Stationary grinding machines. Stationary grinding machines, other than special bit grinders, shall be equipped with— (a) Peripheral hoods capable...

  20. 30 CFR 57.14115 - Stationary grinding machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Stationary grinding machines. 57.14115 Section... and Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 57.14115 Stationary grinding machines. Stationary grinding machines, other than special bit grinders, shall be equipped with— (a) Peripheral...

  1. 30 CFR 56.14115 - Stationary grinding machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Stationary grinding machines. 56.14115 Section... Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 56.14115 Stationary grinding machines. Stationary grinding machines, other than special bit grinders, shall be equipped with— (a) Peripheral hoods capable...

  2. 30 CFR 75.1723 - Stationary grinding machines; protective devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Stationary grinding machines; protective devices. 75.1723 Section 75.1723 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF....1723 Stationary grinding machines; protective devices. (a) Stationary grinding machines other...

  3. 30 CFR 56.14115 - Stationary grinding machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Stationary grinding machines. 56.14115 Section... Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 56.14115 Stationary grinding machines. Stationary grinding machines, other than special bit grinders, shall be equipped with— (a) Peripheral hoods capable...

  4. 30 CFR 77.401 - Stationary grinding machines; protective devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Stationary grinding machines; protective... OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Safeguards for Mechanical Equipment § 77.401 Stationary grinding machines; protective devices. (a) Stationary grinding machines other than special bit grinders shall be equipped...

  5. 30 CFR 75.1723 - Stationary grinding machines; protective devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Stationary grinding machines; protective devices. 75.1723 Section 75.1723 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF....1723 Stationary grinding machines; protective devices. (a) Stationary grinding machines other...

  6. 30 CFR 57.14115 - Stationary grinding machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Stationary grinding machines. 57.14115 Section... and Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 57.14115 Stationary grinding machines. Stationary grinding machines, other than special bit grinders, shall be equipped with— (a) Peripheral...

  7. 30 CFR 77.401 - Stationary grinding machines; protective devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Stationary grinding machines; protective... OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Safeguards for Mechanical Equipment § 77.401 Stationary grinding machines; protective devices. (a) Stationary grinding machines other than special bit grinders shall be equipped...

  8. 30 CFR 77.401 - Stationary grinding machines; protective devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Stationary grinding machines; protective... OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Safeguards for Mechanical Equipment § 77.401 Stationary grinding machines; protective devices. (a) Stationary grinding machines other than special bit grinders shall be equipped...

  9. 30 CFR 57.14115 - Stationary grinding machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Stationary grinding machines. 57.14115 Section... and Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 57.14115 Stationary grinding machines. Stationary grinding machines, other than special bit grinders, shall be equipped with— (a) Peripheral...

  10. 30 CFR 75.1723 - Stationary grinding machines; protective devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Stationary grinding machines; protective devices. 75.1723 Section 75.1723 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF....1723 Stationary grinding machines; protective devices. (a) Stationary grinding machines other...

  11. 30 CFR 77.401 - Stationary grinding machines; protective devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Stationary grinding machines; protective... OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Safeguards for Mechanical Equipment § 77.401 Stationary grinding machines; protective devices. (a) Stationary grinding machines other than special bit grinders shall be equipped...

  12. 30 CFR 57.14115 - Stationary grinding machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Stationary grinding machines. 57.14115 Section... and Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 57.14115 Stationary grinding machines. Stationary grinding machines, other than special bit grinders, shall be equipped with— (a) Peripheral...

  13. GRINDING ROOM AT SOUTHERN DUCTILE CASTING COMPANY, BESSEMER FOUNDRY SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GRINDING ROOM AT SOUTHERN DUCTILE CASTING COMPANY, BESSEMER FOUNDRY SHOWING WHEELABORATOR THAT IMPALE SHOT AT TUMBLING CASTINGS TO REMOVE EXCESS SURFACE METALS AND SAND; ANNEALING OVENS TO HEAT CERTAIN CASTINGS TO ACHIEVE A DESIRED CHARACTERISTIC; AND GRINDING WHEELS USED TO REMOVE GATES. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Grinding & Shipping, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  14. Full-field IR measurement of subsurface grinding temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakagami, Takahide; Madhavan, Viswanathan; Harish, G.; Krishnamurthy, K.; Ju, Yongqing; Farris, Thomas N.; Chandrasekar, Srinivasan

    1998-03-01

    A multiple-element, forward looking IR system is used to measure the subsurface temperature field produced by dry grinding of steel with both aluminum oxide and cubic boron nitride (CBN) grinding wheels. The technique is base don imaging the IR radiation obtained from the side of the specimen. A recent theoretical analysis of heat partition and surface temperatures in grinding is reviewed. The analysis partitions heat on the two length scales pertinent to grinding between the workpiece, wheel, coolant and chips. Spectral analysis is combined with FFT techniques to calculate subsurface temperature contours from the predicted heat partition. The numerical predictions of the model are shown to agree wit the experimental results taken for a range of grinding conditions. It is found that heat partition varies over a wide range depending on grinding conditions. Also, heat partition is a strong function of position inside the grinding zone. The presence of the fluid inside the grinding zone can reduce the heat flux into the workpiece and the workpiece temperature significantly. For typical grinding of steel with CBN, or creep feed grinding of steel with aluminum oxide or CBN, it is possible to keep the fluid active and therefore to reduce thermal damage. However, the analysis suggests that the fluid may not be effective inside the grinding zone, in the conventional grinding of steel with aluminum oxide, due to boiling. It is also found that a moderate ratio of the workpiece velocity to wheel velocity gives high temperatures and therefore should be avoided.

  15. Automated Inspection And Precise Grinding Of Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frint, Harold; Glasow, Warren

    1995-01-01

    Method of precise grinding of spiral bevel gears involves automated inspection of gear-tooth surfaces followed by adjustments of machine-tool settings to minimize differences between actual and nominal surfaces. Similar to method described in "Computerized Inspection of Gear-Tooth Surfaces" (LEW-15736). Yields gears of higher quality, with significant reduction in manufacturing and inspection time.

  16. Grinding Glass Disks On A Belt Sander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, James J., III

    1995-01-01

    Small machine attached to table-top belt sander makes possible to use belt sander to grind glass disk quickly to specified diameter within tolerance of about plus or minus 0.002 in. Intended to be used in place of production-shop glass grinder. Held on driveshaft by vacuum, glass disk rotated while periphery ground by continuous sanding belt.

  17. Precision replenishable grinding tool and manufacturing process

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, D.M.; Kerns, J.A.; Blaedel, K.L.; Colella, N.J.; Davis, P.J.; Juntz, R.S.

    1998-06-09

    A reusable grinding tool consisting of a replaceable single layer of abrasive particles intimately bonded to a precisely configured tool substrate, and a process for manufacturing the grinding tool are disclosed. The tool substrate may be ceramic or metal and the abrasive particles are preferably diamond, but may be cubic boron nitride. The manufacturing process involves: coating a configured tool substrate with layers of metals, such as titanium, copper and titanium, by physical vapor deposition (PVD); applying the abrasive particles to the coated surface by a slurry technique; and brazing the abrasive particles to the tool substrate by alloying the metal layers. The precision control of the composition and thickness of the metal layers enables the bonding of a single layer or several layers of micron size abrasive particles to the tool surface. By the incorporation of an easily dissolved metal layer in the composition such allows the removal and replacement of the abrasive particles, thereby providing a process for replenishing a precisely machined grinding tool with fine abrasive particles, thus greatly reducing costs as compared to replacing expensive grinding tools. 11 figs.

  18. Precision replenishable grinding tool and manufacturing process

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; Kerns, John A.; Blaedel, Kenneth L.; Colella, Nicholas J.; Davis, Pete J.; Juntz, Robert S.

    1998-01-01

    A reusable grinding tool consisting of a replaceable single layer of abrasive particles intimately bonded to a precisely configured tool substrate, and a process for manufacturing the grinding tool. The tool substrate may be ceramic or metal and the abrasive particles are preferably diamond, but may be cubic boron nitride. The manufacturing process involves: coating a configured tool substrate with layers of metals, such as titanium, copper and titanium, by physical vapor deposition (PVD); applying the abrasive particles to the coated surface by a slurry technique; and brazing the abrasive particles to the tool substrate by alloying the metal layers. The precision control of the composition and thickness of the metal layers enables the bonding of a single layer or several layers of micron size abrasive particles to the tool surface. By the incorporation of an easily dissolved metal layer in the composition such allows the removal and replacement of the abrasive particles, thereby providing a process for replenishing a precisely machined grinding tool with fine abrasive particles, thus greatly reducing costs as compared to replacing expensive grinding tools.

  19. Carving up Word Meaning: Portioning and Grinding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frisson, S.; Frazier, L.

    2005-01-01

    Two eye-tracking experiments investigated the processing of mass nouns used as count nouns and count nouns used as mass nouns. Following Copestake and Briscoe (1995), the basic or underived sense of a word was treated as the input to a derivational rule (''grinding'' or ''portioning'') which produced the derived sense as output. It was…

  20. Grinding of cast iron with wheels made of superhard materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korz, N. J.

    Optimum grinding conditions for cast iron with wheels made of superhard materials were determined. Type PP 250 x 10 wheels made of metallized and non metallized diamond and various brands of CBN with 125/100 grains at 100 % concentration on metellic M0 16 and organic B1 type bonds were used. Type KZ 25 CMIK 5 wheels of the same size were investigated for purposes of comparison. The experimental samples, 80 and 230 mm in diameter made from grey cast iron (HB 178), alloy cast iron (HB 200), high strength cast iron (HB 207), chilled cast iron (HB 460) and hardened cast iron (HCR 52-55), were ground on a 3 B 12 cylindrical grinder at cutting speeds of 35 m/sec, a workpiece velocity of 54 m/min and a longitudinal feed of 0,5 - 2,0 m/min. The crossfeed ranges rom 0,005 to 0,4 mm/sec. The cutting fluid was an aqueous solution of calcium carbonate supplied at 3 to 5 l/min.

  1. Self-adaptive grain recognition of diamond grinding wheel and its grains assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Changcai; Zhou, Lijun; Yu, Qing; Huang, Hui; Ye, Ruifang

    2013-10-01

    An improved Canny operator based on the method of Maximum Classes Square Error is adopted to get a self-adaptive threshold for grain recognition. First, a grinding wheel surface was measured by using a vertical scanning white light interferometric (WLI) system and reconstructed with an improved centroid algorithm; then the grains were extracted using the proposed method based on the fact that the peak intensity difference (ΔI) between maximum and minimum intensities on interferometric curve from diamond is larger than that from bond due to different reflective characteristics of different materials; third the grain protrusion parameters are investigated for grinding performance analysis. The experiments proved that the proposed grain recognition method is effective and assessment parameters are useful for understanding grinding performance.

  2. Smooth brome (Bromus inermis Leyss) response to concrete grinding residue application

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Concrete grinding residue (CGR) is a slurry byproduct created by concrete pavement maintenance operations. The application of CGR to roadside soils is not consistently regulated by state agencies across the United States. Much of this variability in regulation may be due to the lack of science-base...

  3. Examining Cylindrical Dice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Dustin L.

    2009-01-01

    The author describes an activity where prospective mathematics teachers made hypotheses about the dimensions of a fair cylindrical die and conducted experiments with different cylinders. He also provides a model that estimates the probability that a cylinder would land on the lateral surface, depending on the height and diameter of the cylinder.…

  4. Static cylindrical matter shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arık, Metin; Delice, Özgür

    2005-08-01

    Static cylindrical shells composed of massive particles arising from matching of two different Levi-Civita space-times are studied for the shell satisfying either an isotropic or an anisotropic equation of state. We find that these solutions satisfy the energy conditions for certain ranges of the parameters.

  5. Material and process issues in electrolytic in-process dressing (ELID)-grinding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hong

    This research covers research and development of the electrolytic in-process dressing (ELID) grinding technology, where material and process issues are systematically investigated. Experiments on anodic oxidation of cast iron and bronze were performed to determine the growth behavior of the oxides on the metals, their structures and mechanical properties. With SEM and optical microscope, a special technique to measure the oxide thickness was also developed. A series of theoretical calculations was carried out to highlight the fact that the localized dissolution of the metals around diamond particle results in exposing the cutting edge for efficient grinding and/or cutting. A model was proposed on the basis of experimental observations and theoretical calculations. It was the first quantitative model that explores the ELID mechanism and could serve guidance to optimize ELID-grinding operations for many applications. This model recognized the key feature of the oxide layer in the process, formulated the dynamic balance between its growth and wear, and emphasized the important role of its nonlinear growth. It not only brought a link between performance and process parameters, but also explained the experimental results and helped ELID-grinding practice. Grinding experiments performed on OPTICAM PM showed that with a proper selection of operation parameters from the proposed model, (1) ELID-grinding improved surface roughness (RMS) a factor of five for Zerodur; (2) Ductile grinding modes were achieved for Zerodur, BK-7 and SF-6; (3) Mirror finish (RMS < 500 A) and low subsurface damage (depth < 1.5 μm) for 4-inch silicon wafers were produced within 5 minutes; and (4) the three requirements of high precision optical grinding were achieved simultaneously on BK-7: high surface accuracy (flatness < 0.15/ /mum), low subsurface damage (depth < 2/ /mum) and good surface finish (RMS < 500 A). An ELID-cutting system was designed and developed. It consists of a modified cut

  6. A theoretical and experimental study on the pulsed laser dressing of bronze-bonded diamond grinding wheels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, H.; Chen, G. Y.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, X. C.; He, J.; Zhang, Y.

    2014-09-01

    A series of theoretical analyses and experimental investigations were performed to examine a pulsed fiber-laser tangential profiling and radial sharpening technique for bronze-bonded diamond grinding wheels. The mechanisms for the pulsed laser tangential profiling and radial sharpening of grinding wheels were theoretically analyzed, and the four key processing parameters that determine the quality, accuracy, and efficiency of pulsed laser dressing, namely, the laser power density, laser spot overlap ratio, laser scanning track line overlap ratio, and number of laser scanning cycles, were proposed. Further, by utilizing cylindrical bronze wheels (without diamond grains) and bronze-bonded diamond grinding wheels as the experimental subjects, the effects of these four processing parameters on the removal efficiency and the surface smoothness of the bond material after pulsed laser ablation, as well as the effects on the contour accuracy of the grinding wheels, the protrusion height of the diamond grains, the sharpness of the grain cutting edges, and the graphitization degree of the diamond grains after pulsed laser dressing, were explored. The optimal values of the four key processing parameters were identified.

  7. First Grinding of a Rock on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The round, shallow depression in this image resulted from history's first grinding of a rock on Mars. The rock abrasion tool on NASA's Spirit rover ground off the surface of a patch 45.5 millimeters (1.8 inches) in diameter on a rock called Adirondack during Spirit's 34th sol on Mars, Feb. 6, 2004. The hole is 2.65 millimeters (0.1 inch) deep, exposing fresh interior material of the rock for close inspection with the rover's microscopic imager and two spectrometers on the robotic arm. This image was taken by Spirit's panoramic camera, providing a quick visual check of the success of the grinding. The rock abrasion tools on both Mars Exploration Rovers were supplied by Honeybee Robotics, New York, N.Y.

  8. Further application and amelioration of a novel CNC aspheric grinding machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jianjun; Pan, Junhua

    2006-02-01

    Aspheric surface can be thought as being enveloped by a series of spherical surfaces with their centre on the same axis but having different positions. These spherical surfaces are tangent with the aspheric surface. A Φ600 CNC aspheric grinding machine with this novel operating principleis manufactured. The machine was reported in August 2005. We choose δ p, ɛ and α p as the key parameters of our grinding machine. δ p is the distance between the cup shaped tool's bottom and the vertex of the aspheric surface. α p is the rotational angle of the cup shaped tool. ɛ is the space angle of the cup shaped tool during the fabrication process of convex aspheric surface. This grinding machine can be used to fabricate a conic concave aspheric surface continuously about three hours. But we need change the cup shaped tool one time when we fabricate a conic convex aspheric surface in also about three hours. The grinding machine can also be used to fabricate high-order aspheric surface. In the last report we intoroduced that we used this machined fabricating a RC telescope system's primary and the secondary mirror. The PV-value is less than 5μm for the primary Φ350 concave hyperbolic aspheric surface which departure is about 55μm. The residual errors can be removed easily. This machine have been improved both the cup shaped tool and filter system. Using this grinding machine we have fabricated another Φ460 concave aspheric surface during the last month. The PV-values of these two mirrors are both less than 7μm. The aspheric grinding machine can be fitted for fabricating concave conicoids.

  9. Dressing of diamond grinding wheels by abrasive water jet for freeform optical surface grinding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Yao, Peng; Li, Chengwu; Huang, Chuanzhen; Wang, Jun; Zhu, Hongtao; Liu, Zengwen

    2014-08-01

    During the ultra-precision grinding of a large aperture mirror made of RB-SiC, the grinding wheel becomes dull rapidly, which will lead to an increase of grinding force and a decrease of grinding ratio. In this paper, diamond grinding sticks were dressed with micro SiC abrasive water jet and water jet. Through single factorial experiments, the influence of jet pressure on the dressing performance was investigated. To analyze and evaluate the effect of dressing quantitatively, the 3D roughness and the wheel topography were measured and compared with laser scanning confocal microscope before and after dressing. The experimental results show that the abrasive grains are well protruded from binder and the distribution of the abrasive grains becomes uniform after dressing by abrasive water jet when the dressing parameters are properly selected. The dressing performance of abrasive water jet is much better than water jet. For dressing ultra-fine grit size wheels, the abrasive size of the jet should be smaller than the wheel grit size to achieve a better result. The jet pressure is an obvious influence factor of the surface topography.

  10. Freeform grinding and polishing with PROSurf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfs, Franciscus; Fess, Edward; DeFisher, Scott; Torres, Josh; Ross, James

    2015-10-01

    Recently, the desire to use freeform optics has been increasing, including shapes such as torics and anamorphic aspheres. Freeform optics can be used to expand capabilities of optical systems. They can compensate for limitations in rotationally symmetric optics. These same traits that give freeform optics the ability to improve optical systems also makes them more challenging to manufacture. This holds true for grinding, polishing, and metrology. As freeform optics become more prevalent in the industry, tolerances will become more stringent, requiring deterministic manufacturing processes. To generate freeforms, it is crucial to have control over all aspects of the process. Controlling the surface definition is important for achieving a better surface finish during processing. Metrology will be required to adjust tool paths at various stages in manufacturing. During grinding, metrology will be used to adjust tool positions relative to the nominal tool path to compensate for repeatable machine and tooling error. For polishing, metrology will be used to deterministically adjust dwell relative to the amount of the error in different surface locations, allowing for convergence towards the desired surface at a uniform rate. OptiPro has developed PROSurf, a CAM software package for creating freeform tool paths and applying metrology-based corrections. The software can be used for both grinding and polishing freeform optics. The software has flexibility to allow for different methods of modelling the surface: mathematical equations, solid models, and point clouds. The software is designed to make it easier to manufacture and polish complex freeform optics.

  11. Influence of grain size on the grinding response of alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, H.H.K.; Wei, L.; Jahanmir, S.

    1996-05-01

    The effect of grain size on the grinding response, i.e., grinding forces, surface roughness, and grinding-induced subsurface damage, is investigated in a series of alumina ceramics with the average grain size ranging from 3 to 35 {micro}m. The grinding forces are measured as a function of depth of cut in surface grinding. It is found that the grinding forces decrease as the grain size is increased from 3 to 9 {micro}m. But at larger grain sizes, the grinding forces are independent of the grain size. Subsurface damage in grinding is observed using a bonded-interface sectioning technique. The subsurface damage is found to consist of intragrain twin/slip bands and intergranular microcracks. The density of grinding-induced subsurface microcracks increases with the grain size. In addition to using optical microscopy on the sections of the ground specimens, a nondestructive thermal wave measurement technique is used directly on the ground surfaces for the detection of grinding-induced subsurface microcracks. The grain size dependence of the microcrack density estimated from the thermal images is found to agree with the results obtained using the bonded-interface technique.

  12. Aroma recovery from roasted coffee by wet grinding.

    PubMed

    Baggenstoss, J; Thomann, D; Perren, R; Escher, F

    2010-01-01

    Aroma recovery as determined by solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPME-GC-MS) was compared in coffees resulting from conventional grinding processes, and from wet grinding with cold and hot water. Freshly roasted coffee as well as old, completely degassed coffee was ground in order to estimate the relationship of internal carbon dioxide pressure in freshly roasted coffee with the aroma loss during grinding. The release of volatile aroma substances during grinding was found to be related to the internal carbon dioxide pressure, and wet grinding with cold water was shown to minimize losses of aroma compounds by trapping them in water. Due to the high solubility of roasted coffee in water, the use of wet-grinding equipment is limited to processes where grinding is followed by an extraction step. Combining grinding and extraction by the use of hot water for wet grinding resulted in considerable losses of aroma compounds because of the prolonged heat impact. Therefore, a more promising two-step process involving cold wet grinding and subsequent hot extraction in a closed system was introduced. The yield of aroma compounds in the resulting coffee was substantially higher compared to conventionally ground coffee. PMID:21535580

  13. Static cylindrically symmetric spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fjällborg, Mikael

    2007-05-01

    We prove the existence of static solutions to the cylindrically symmetric Einstein Vlasov system, and we show that the matter cylinder has finite extension in two of the three spatial dimensions. The same results are also proved for a quite general class of equations of state for perfect fluids coupled to the Einstein equations, extending the class of equations of state considered by Bicak et al (2004 Class. Quantum Grav.21 1583). We also obtain this result for the Vlasov Poisson system.

  14. Characterization of Wheel Surface Topography in cBN Grinding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Masakazu; Ichida, Yoshio; Sato, Ryunosuke; Morimoto, Yoshitaka

    The wheel surface topography in the grinding process with vitrified cBN wheels has been investigated on the basis of 3-dimensional analysis using a multi-probe SEM, and the relationships between these results and the grinding characteristic parameters have been discussed. Moreover, the change of the wheel surface profile in the grinding process has been evaluated using fractal analysis. There are two regions: an initial wear region and a steady-state wear region, in the grinding process. In the initial wear region, a rapid decrease of grinding force and a rapid increase of wheel wear occur with increasing stock removal. In the steady-state wear region, the micro self-sharpening phenomenon owing to the micro fracture as well as the attritious wear of cutting edge occurs. The change in fractal dimension of the wheel surface is closely related to the change of grinding force dominated by the wear behavior of grain cutting edges.

  15. A Wavelet-Based Methodology for Grinding Wheel Condition Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, T. W.; Ting, C.F.; Qu, Jun; Blau, Peter Julian

    2007-01-01

    Grinding wheel surface condition changes as more material is removed. This paper presents a wavelet-based methodology for grinding wheel condition monitoring based on acoustic emission (AE) signals. Grinding experiments in creep feed mode were conducted to grind alumina specimens with a resinoid-bonded diamond wheel using two different conditions. During the experiments, AE signals were collected when the wheel was 'sharp' and when the wheel was 'dull'. Discriminant features were then extracted from each raw AE signal segment using the discrete wavelet decomposition procedure. An adaptive genetic clustering algorithm was finally applied to the extracted features in order to distinguish different states of grinding wheel condition. The test results indicate that the proposed methodology can achieve 97% clustering accuracy for the high material removal rate condition, 86.7% for the low material removal rate condition, and 76.7% for the combined grinding conditions if the base wavelet, the decomposition level, and the GA parameters are properly selected.

  16. Conformal approach to cylindrical DLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taloni, A.; Caglioti, E.; Loreto, V.; Pietronero, L.

    2006-09-01

    We extend the conformal mapping approach elaborated for the radial diffusion limited aggregation model (DLA) to cylindrical geometry. We introduce in particular a complex function which allows a cylindrical cluster to be grown using as an intermediate step a radial aggregate. The aggregate grown exhibits the same self-affine features as the original cylindrical DLA. The specific choice of the transformation allows us to study the relationship between the radial and the cylindrical geometry. In particular the cylindrical aggregate can be seen as a radial aggregate with particles of size increasing with the radius. On the other hand, the radial aggregate can be seen as a cylindrical aggregate with particles of size decreasing with the height. This framework, which shifts the point of view from the geometry to the size of the particles, can open the way to more quantitative studies on the relationship between radial and cylindrical DLA.

  17. Grinding tool for making hemispherical bores in hard materials

    DOEpatents

    Duran, E.L.

    1985-04-03

    A grinding tool for forming hemispherical bores in hard materials such as boron carbide. The tool comprises a hemicircular grinding bit, formed of a metal bond diamond matrix, which is mounted transversely on one end of a tubular tool shaft. The bit includes a spherically curved outer edge surface which is the active grinding surface of the tool. Two coolant fluid ports on opposite sides of the bit enable introduction of coolant fluid through the bore of the tool shaft so as to be emitted adjacent the opposite sides of the grinding bit, thereby providing optimum cooling of both the workpiece and the bit.

  18. Observations on the grinding of alumina with variations in belt speed, load, sample rotation, and grinding fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, C.J.; Bahadur, S.

    1998-07-01

    The volume of material removed in the grinding of alumina on a diamond-impregnated grinding belt was studied. Four grinding process parameters were tested: belt speed, normal load at the pin's contact surface, sample rotation during grinding, and grinding fluid. The results showed that at low loads the belts speed did not have a significant effect on material removal rates; however, the material removal rate decreased at higher loads combined with higher speeds. It decreased, in particular, when the sample was also rotated. Of the fluids used, the 50% ethylene glycol--50% water mixture produced the highest material removal rates while the lowest were produced by biodegradable soybean oil. The test conditions that produced high temperatures at the contact surface contributed to plowing as opposed to cutting and resulted in reduced material removal rates. The reasons for these variations were investigated by scanning electron microscopy of the surfaces, which revealed evidence of plastic deformation and temperature rise during grinding.

  19. Application of copper nanoparticles as additions to a grinding fluid to increase the quality of grinding of magnetic ceramic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krevchik, V. D.; Skryabin, V. A.; Sokolov, A. V.; Men'shova, S. B.; Artemov, I. I.; Prokof'ev, M. V.; Karasev, N. Ya.

    2015-12-01

    The influence of copper nanoparticles in a grinding fluid (GF) used for grinding on the characteristics of the surface layer of ferrite parts and their service properties is studied. Profilograms of the ground surfaces and their roughness are measured. The electromagnetic losses of 10000NN ferrite parts ground in an GF medium with copper nanoparticles are estimated. The use of metal nanoparticles as additions to a grinding fluid is shown to be useful for processing of brittle nonmetallic materials.

  20. Learning Activity Packets for Grinding Machines. Unit II--Surface Grinding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This learning activity packet (LAP) is one of three that accompany the curriculum guide on grinding machines. It outlines the study activities and performance tasks for the second unit of this curriculum guide. Its purpose is to aid the student in attaining a working knowledge of this area of training and in achieving a skilled or moderately…

  1. Learning Activity Packets for Grinding Machines. Unit I--Grinding Machines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This learning activity packet (LAP) is one of three that accompany the curriculum guide on grinding machines. It outlines the study activities and performance tasks for the first unit of this curriculum guide. Its purpose is to aid the student in attaining a working knowledge of this area of training and in achieving a skilled or moderately…

  2. Photothermal characterization of grind-hardened steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prekel, H.; Ament, Ch.; Goch, G.

    2003-01-01

    Grind hardening is a promising production process which combines grinding and hardening within one step. Due to the fact that many material and process parameters partially influence the properties of the workpieces in a nonlinear way, it is difficult to predict for instance the surface hardness and hardness penetration depth. In this study, photothermal radiometry is used as an approach to determine the hardness penetration depth. Photothermal phase signals have been measured as a function of frequency. First measurements showed a strong influence of surface roughness, causing phase signal maxima at unexpected high frequencies (f>60 Hz). After finishing of the surfaces, the maxima of phase signals shifted toward lower frequencies (f<10 Hz). In an attempt to extract a preliminary calibration curve, the measured phase values of each sample were added and correlated to the hardness penetration depth. The resulting curve reveals a good correlation between phase sum and the hardness penetration depth. Further research is necessary to collect more experimental data and to support the current results by theoretical models.

  3. New profilable bond system for diamond and CBN grinding wheels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macina, R.

    Attempts to use diamond or CBN grinding wheels for full cut or deep cutting processes in the machining of hard materials, were initially limited to grinding wheels coated by electrodeposition. The tool body was provided with the required profile and the diamond or CBN coating was electrodeposited in accordance with known methods. Success could be achieved with these grinding wheels in certain cases. The greater projection of abrasive grit obtained with electrodeposited coatings as opposed to impregnated coatings was removed by subsequent profiling with diamond profile grinding wheels, so that accurate tolerances for workpieces could be achieved up to a certain limit. The grain wear of the engaged tools is uneven and commences in those areas that are subjected to the greatest load such as at the edges or the projected radii so that recoating usually becomes necessary when the coating has worn away at only one point. For all practical purposes this amounts to a new coating. Efforts were therefore directed towards adapting the conventional grinding technique, involving the crushing of a profile onto the wheel periphery with the aid of a crushing device mounted on a grinding machine, to diamond and CBN grinding wheels. A prerequisite for this was to develop a bonding material which could be profiled by crushing. This method opened up new possibilities, particularly for deep and full cut grinding.

  4. 30 CFR 75.1723 - Stationary grinding machines; protective devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... devices. 75.1723 Section 75.1723 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF....1723 Stationary grinding machines; protective devices. (a) Stationary grinding machines other than special bit grinders shall be equipped with: (1) Peripheral hoods (less than 90° throat openings)...

  5. Three-dimensional measurement and characterization of grinding tool topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Changcai; Blunt, Liam; Jiang, Xiangqian; Xu, Xipeng; Huang, Hui; Ye, Ruifang

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive 3-dimensional measurement and characterization method for grinding tool topography was developed. A stylus instrument (SOMICRONIC, France) was used to measure the surface of a metal-bonded diamond grinding tool. The sampled data was input the software SurfStand developed by Centre for Precision Technology (CPT) for reconstruction and further characterization of the surface. Roughness parameters pertaining to the general surface and specific feature parameters relating to the grinding grits, such as height and angle peak curvature have been calculated. The methodology of measurement has been compared with that using an optical microscope. The comparison shows that the three-dimensional characterization has distinct advantages for grinding tool topography assessment. It is precise, convenient and comprehensive so it is suitable for precision measurement and analysis where an understanding of the grinding tool and its cutting ability are required.

  6. [Automatic grinding of undecalcified bone sections with exact adjustment of thickness].

    PubMed

    Stürmer, K M

    1979-01-01

    A new grinding machine for preparing thin undecalcified bone sections after methylmethacrylate embedding is described. About 20 rather small bone sections can be ground at the same time; bigger specimens, up to 8 cm of length, are allowed. Bone sections are mounted on a cylindrical specimen holder by an adhesive film. Then the final thickness of the sections is exactly adjusted by screwing three rubies out of the holder's bottom. Now the prepared holder is set in a guide ring on a turntable carrying a rough ended glass plate. The desired thickness of the sections is reached as soon as the three rubies touch the glass surface. The variation in the thickness of the sections is less than +/- 3 micron. The machine is simply constructed, easily to handle and rapidly to clean.

  7. [Automatic grinding of undecalcified bone sections with exact adjustment of thickness].

    PubMed

    Stürmer, K M

    1979-01-01

    A new grinding machine for preparing thin undecalcified bone sections after methylmethacrylate embedding is described. About 20 rather small bone sections can be ground at the same time; bigger specimens, up to 8 cm of length, are allowed. Bone sections are mounted on a cylindrical specimen holder by an adhesive film. Then the final thickness of the sections is exactly adjusted by screwing three rubies out of the holder's bottom. Now the prepared holder is set in a guide ring on a turntable carrying a rough ended glass plate. The desired thickness of the sections is reached as soon as the three rubies touch the glass surface. The variation in the thickness of the sections is less than +/- 3 micron. The machine is simply constructed, easily to handle and rapidly to clean. PMID:371325

  8. Thermal modeling of grinding for process optimization and durability improvements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, Ihab M.

    Both thermal and mechanical aspects of the grinding process are investigated in detail in an effort to predict grinding induced residual stresses. An existing thermal model is used as a foundation for computing heat partitions and temperatures in surface grinding. By numerically processing data from IR temperature measurements of the grinding zone; characterizations are made of the grinding zone heat flux. It is concluded that the typical heat flux profile in the grinding zone is triangular in shape, supporting this often used assumption found in the literature. Further analyses of the computed heat flux profiles has revealed that actual grinding zone contact lengths exceed geometric contact lengths by an average of 57% for the cases considered. By integrating the resulting heat flux profiles; workpiece energy partitions are computed for several cases of dry conventional grinding of hardened steel. The average workpiece energy partition for the cases considered was 37%. In an effort to more accurately predict grinding zone temperatures and heat fluxes, refinements are made to the existing thermal model. These include consideration of contact length extensions due to local elastic deformations, variations of the assumed contact area ratio as a function of grinding process parameters, consideration of coolant latent heat of vaporization and its effect on heat transfer beyond the coolant boiling point, and incorporation of coolant-workpiece convective heat flux effects outside the grinding zone. The result of the model refinements accounting for contact length extensions and process-dependant contact area ratios is excellent agreement with IR temperature measurements over a wide range of grinding conditions. By accounting for latent heat of vaporization effects, grinding zone temperature profiles are shown to be capable of reproducing measured profiles found in the literature for cases on the verge of thermal surge conditions. Computed peak grinding zone temperatures

  9. Technological Aspects of Forming the Surface Microrelief of Low-Wear Coatings after Electro-Diamond Grinding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burov, V. G.; Yanpolskiy, V. V.; Rakhimyanov, K. Kh

    2016-04-01

    The results of electro-diamond grinding of coatings based on the WC25 powder material are presented in the paper. It is shown that after electro-diamond grinding of the WC25 coating, an obtained magnitude (Ra=2.02µm) of surface roughness doesn’t meet the qualifying standards to parts surface working in wear-out conditions. The forming of the obtained microrelief is probably connected to the features of electrochemical dissolution of the WC25 coating material in the electrolyte being used. Based on the polarization studies, it is revealed that the electrochemical dissolution character of the indicated coating in the water solution of 10%NaNO3 is determined by the dissolution character of cobalt (Co) component. The intensive cobalt (Co) dissolution during the electro-diamond grinding of the WC25 coating leads to the tungsten carbide chipping by the grinding disk particles that increases the roughness. One of the way to improve the surface quality of low-wear coatings after electro-diamond grinding is an introduction of an additional step in a technological process, carrying out with the switched off source of technological current. For realization of the process according to this scheme a technological dimension chain is made which takes into consideration the dissolution value of the most active coating composition element while the calculating of the operating dimensions of a detail.

  10. Chirality Change by Grinding Crystals in Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viedma, Cristobal

    2010-07-01

    One of the greatest unsolved problems in chemistry is the origin of homochirality in the biosphere, that is, the fact that l-amino acids and d-sugars dominate in biology, while laboratory experiments with stereoselective reactions only produce racemic mixtures. Several models have been proposed to address the question of how enantiomerically pure solutions or crystalline phases could have emerged from a presumably racemic prebiotic world. Here we show that two populations of amino acid crystals of "left" and "right" hand cannot coexist in solution: one of the chiral populations disappears in an irreversible autocatalytic process that nurtures the other one. Final and complete chiral purity seems to be an inexorable fate in our systems, under grinding, in the course of the common process of growth-dissolution. This unexpected chiral symmetry breaking has become firmly established but the underlying mechanism is being debated and we have no definitive answer.

  11. Chirality Change by Grinding Crystals in Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Viedma, Cristobal

    2010-07-22

    One of the greatest unsolved problems in chemistry is the origin of homochirality in the biosphere, that is, the fact that l-amino acids and d-sugars dominate in biology, while laboratory experiments with stereoselective reactions only produce racemic mixtures. Several models have been proposed to address the question of how enantiomerically pure solutions or crystalline phases could have emerged from a presumably racemic prebiotic world. Here we show that two populations of amino acid crystals of 'left' and 'right' hand cannot coexist in solution: one of the chiral populations disappears in an irreversible autocatalytic process that nurtures the other one. Final and complete chiral purity seems to be an inexorable fate in our systems, under grinding, in the course of the common process of growth-dissolution. This unexpected chiral symmetry breaking has become firmly established but the underlying mechanism is being debated and we have no definitive answer.

  12. Influence of grinding direction on fracture strength of silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Strakna, T.J.; Jahanmir, S.; Allor, R.L.; Kumar, K.V.

    1995-12-31

    It is generally found that grinding transverse to the tensile stress direction in flexure bars subjected to four-point bending results in a lower strength compared to grinding in the longitudinal direction. In the present study, standard flexure specimens made from a reaction-bonded and a sintered reaction-bonded silicon nitride (RBSN and SRBSN) were surface ground under three different conditions in both longitudinal and transverse directions to assess the effect of grinding direction on strength. Four-point flexure tests were performed on the specimens and Weibull parameters were calculated. The results showed that while the strength was not affected by the grinding condition when grinding was performed in the longitudinal direction, the strength of the samples ground in the transverse direction was reduced as the material removal rate was increased by a factor of 30. This result was confirmed by fractography, which showed that almost all the fracture initiation sites in the longitudinally ground samples were associated with near-surface microstructural features, whereas in the transverse ground samples fracture initiated from damage introduced by grinding. The strength reduction by grinding in the transverse direction was found to be material dependent, and was larger for SRBSN than for RBSN.

  13. Stage Cylindrical Immersive Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abramyan, Lucy; Norris, Jeffrey S.; Powell, Mark W.; Mittman, David S.; Shams, Khawaja S.

    2011-01-01

    Panoramic images with a wide field of view intend to provide a better understanding of an environment by placing objects of the environment on one seamless image. However, understanding the sizes and relative positions of the objects in a panorama is not intuitive and prone to errors because the field of view is unnatural to human perception. Scientists are often faced with the difficult task of interpreting the sizes and relative positions of objects in an environment when viewing an image of the environment on computer monitors or prints. A panorama can display an object that appears to be to the right of the viewer when it is, in fact, behind the viewer. This misinterpretation can be very costly, especially when the environment is remote and/or only accessible by unmanned vehicles. A 270 cylindrical display has been developed that surrounds the viewer with carefully calibrated panoramic imagery that correctly engages their natural kinesthetic senses and provides a more accurate awareness of the environment. The cylindrical immersive display offers a more natural window to the environment than a standard cubic CAVE (Cave Automatic Virtual Environment), and the geometry allows multiple collocated users to simultaneously view data and share important decision-making tasks. A CAVE is an immersive virtual reality environment that allows one or more users to absorb themselves in a virtual environment. A common CAVE setup is a room-sized cube where the cube sides act as projection planes. By nature, all cubic CAVEs face a problem with edge matching at edges and corners of the display. Modern immersive displays have found ways to minimize seams by creating very tight edges, and rely on the user to ignore the seam. One significant deficiency of flat-walled CAVEs is that the sense of orientation and perspective within the scene is broken across adjacent walls. On any single wall, parallel lines properly converge at their vanishing point as they should, and the sense of

  14. Changes in the aromatic profile of espresso coffee as a function of the grinding grade and extraction time: a study by the electronic nose system.

    PubMed

    Severini, C; Ricci, I; Marone, M; Derossi, A; De Pilli, T

    2015-03-01

    The changes in chemical attributes and aromatic profile of espresso coffee (EC) were studied taking into account the extraction time and grinding level as independent variables. Particularly, using an electronic nose system, the changes of the global aromatic profile of EC were highlighted. The results shown as the major amounts of organic acids, solids, and caffeine were extracted in the first 8 s of percolation. The grinding grade significantly affected the quality of EC probably as an effect of the particle size distribution and the percolation pathways of water through the coffee cake. The use of an electronic nose system allowed us to discriminate the fractions of the brew as a function of the percolation time and also the regular coffee obtained from different grinding grades. Particularly, the aromatic profile of a regular coffee (25 mL) was significantly affected by the grinding level of the coffee grounds and percolation time, which are two variables under the control of the bar operator.

  15. Effect of wet grinding on structural properties of ball clay

    SciTech Connect

    Purohit, A. Chander, S.; Dhaka, M. S.; Hameed, A.; Singh, P.; Nehra, S. P.

    2015-05-15

    In this paper, the effect of wet grinding on structural properties of ball clay is undertaken. The wet grinding treatment was performed employing ball and vibro mills for different time spells of 2, 4, 8 and 16 hours. The structural properties were carried out using X-ray diffraction (XRD). The structure of ground samples is found to be simple cubic. The crystallographic parameters are calculated and slight change in lattice constant, inter planner spacing and particle size is observed with grinding treatment. The results are in agreement with the available literature.

  16. Grinding Wheel Condition Monitoring with Hidden Markov Model-Based Clustering Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, T. W.; Hua, G; Qu, Jun; Blau, Peter Julian

    2006-01-01

    Hidden Markov model (HMM) is well known for sequence modeling and has been used for condition monitoring. However, HMM-based clustering methods are developed only recently. This article proposes a HMM-based clustering method for monitoring the condition of grinding wheel used in grinding operations. The proposed method first extract features from signals based on discrete wavelet decomposition using a moving window approach. It then generates a distance (dissimilarity) matrix using HMM. Based on this distance matrix several hierarchical and partitioning-based clustering algorithms are applied to obtain clustering results. The proposed methodology was tested with feature sequences extracted from acoustic emission signals. The results show that clustering accuracy is dependent upon cutting condition. Higher material removal rate seems to produce more discriminatory signals/features than lower material removal rate. The effect of window size, wavelet decomposition level, wavelet basis, clustering algorithm, and data normalization were also studied.

  17. Shearfree cylindrical gravitational collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Di Prisco, A.; Herrera, L.; MacCallum, M. A. H.; Santos, N. O.

    2009-09-15

    We consider diagonal cylindrically symmetric metrics, with an interior representing a general nonrotating fluid with anisotropic pressures. An exterior vacuum Einstein-Rosen spacetime is matched to this using Darmois matching conditions. We show that the matching conditions can be explicitly solved for the boundary values of metric components and their derivatives, either for the interior or exterior. Specializing to shearfree interiors, a static exterior can only be matched to a static interior, and the evolution in the nonstatic case is found to be given in general by an elliptic function of time. For a collapsing shearfree isotropic fluid, only a Robertson-Walker dust interior is possible, and we show that all such cases were included in Cocke's discussion. For these metrics, Nolan and Nolan have shown that the matching breaks down before collapse is complete, and Tod and Mena have shown that the spacetime is not asymptotically flat in the sense of Berger, Chrusciel, and Moncrief. The issues about energy that then arise are revisited, and it is shown that the exterior is not in an intrinsic gravitational or superenergy radiative state at the boundary.

  18. Surface tension and long range corrections of cylindrical interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Bourasseau, E.; Ghoufi, A.

    2015-12-21

    The calculation of the surface tension of curved interfaces has been deeply investigated from molecular simulation during this last past decade. Recently, the thermodynamic Test-Area (TA) approach has been extended to the calculation of surface tension of curved interfaces. In the case of the cylindrical vapour-liquid interfaces of water and Lennard-Jones fluids, it was shown that the surface tension was independent of the curvature of the interface. In addition, the surface tension of the cylindrical interface is higher than that of the planar interface. Molecular simulations of cylindrical interfaces have been so far performed (i) by using a shifted potential, (ii) by means of large cutoff without periodic boundary conditions, or (iii) by ignoring the long range corrections to the surface tension due to the difficulty to estimate them. Indeed, unlike the planar interfaces there are no available operational expressions to consider the tail corrections to the surface tension of cylindrical interfaces. We propose here to develop the long range corrections of the surface tension for cylindrical interfaces by using the non-exponential TA (TA2) method. We also extend the formulation of the Mecke-Winkelmann corrections initially developed for planar surfaces to cylindrical interfaces. We complete this study by the calculation of the surface tension of cylindrical surfaces of liquid tin and copper using the embedded atom model potentials.

  19. Surface tension and long range corrections of cylindrical interfaces.

    PubMed

    Bourasseau, E; Malfreyt, P; Ghoufi, A

    2015-12-21

    The calculation of the surface tension of curved interfaces has been deeply investigated from molecular simulation during this last past decade. Recently, the thermodynamic Test-Area (TA) approach has been extended to the calculation of surface tension of curved interfaces. In the case of the cylindrical vapour-liquid interfaces of water and Lennard-Jones fluids, it was shown that the surface tension was independent of the curvature of the interface. In addition, the surface tension of the cylindrical interface is higher than that of the planar interface. Molecular simulations of cylindrical interfaces have been so far performed (i) by using a shifted potential, (ii) by means of large cutoff without periodic boundary conditions, or (iii) by ignoring the long range corrections to the surface tension due to the difficulty to estimate them. Indeed, unlike the planar interfaces there are no available operational expressions to consider the tail corrections to the surface tension of cylindrical interfaces. We propose here to develop the long range corrections of the surface tension for cylindrical interfaces by using the non-exponential TA (TA2) method. We also extend the formulation of the Mecke-Winkelmann corrections initially developed for planar surfaces to cylindrical interfaces. We complete this study by the calculation of the surface tension of cylindrical surfaces of liquid tin and copper using the embedded atom model potentials.

  20. Angular analysis of the cyclic impacting oscillations in a robotic grinding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafieian, Farzad; Girardin, François; Liu, Zhaoheng; Thomas, Marc; Hazel, Bruce

    2014-02-01

    In a robotic machining process, a light-weight cutter or grinder is usually held by an articulated robot arm. Material removal is achieved by the rotating cutting tool while the robot end effector ensures that the tool follows a programmed trajectory in order to work on complex curved surfaces or to access hard-to-reach areas. One typical application of such process is maintenance and repair work on hydropower equipment. This paper presents an experimental study of the dynamic characteristics of material removal in robotic grinding, which is unlike conventional grinding due to the lower structural stiffness of the tool-holder robot. The objective of the study is to explore the cyclic nature of this mechanical operation to provide the basis for future development of better process control strategies. Grinding tasks that minimize the number of iterations to converge to the target surface can be better planned based on a good understanding and modeling of the cyclic material removal mechanism. A single degree of freedom dynamic analysis of the process suggests that material removal is performed through high-frequency impacts that mainly last for only a small fraction of the grinding disk rotation period. To detect these discrete cutting events in practice, a grinder is equipped with a rotary encoder. The encoder's signal is acquired through the angular sampling technique. A running cyclic synchronous average is applied to the speed signal to remove its non-cyclic events. The measured instantaneous rotational frequency clearly indicates the impacting nature of the process and captures the transient response excited by these cyclic impacts. The technique also locates the angular positions of cutting impacts in revolution cycles. It is thus possible to draw conclusions about the cyclic nature of dynamic changes in impact-cutting behavior when grinding with a flexible robot. The dynamics of the impacting regime and transient responses to impact-cutting excitations

  1. SLEEP PATTERN OF TOOTH-GRINDING: ITS RELATIONSHIP TO DREAMING.

    PubMed

    REDING, G R; RUBRIGHT, W C; RECHTSCHAFFEN, A; DANIELS, R S

    1964-08-14

    Simultaneous recordings of brain waves, eye movements, and masticatory muscle potentials throughout the night demonstrate a temporal relationship between episodes of bruxism (nocturnal grinding of the teeth) and periods of rapid eye movements indicative of dreaming.

  2. Estimating Rock Strength Parameters from Rock Abrasion Tool (RAT) Grinds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, B. J.; Bridges, N. T.; Cohen, J.; Hurowitz, J.; Lennon, A.

    2011-03-01

    We have developed an empirical correlation between rock abrasion tool (RAT) grind energy and compressive strength. This correlation can be used to infer the physical properties of rocks ground by the MER rovers on Mars.

  3. Grinding methods to enhance the reactivity of olivine

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, Cathy A.; Dahlin, David C.; Rush, Gilbert E.; O'Connor, William K.; Gerdemann, Stephen J.

    2005-08-01

    The Albany Research Center (ARC) conducted studies of mechanical activation by conventional and ultrafine grinding techniques to enhance olivine reactivity in mineral carbonation reactions. Activated olivine is one of several solid feed materials used at ARC in reactions with carbon dioxide to form carbonate minerals. This paper compares grinding techniques via energy demand data and product characteristics, including particle size distributions, surface areas, full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) XRD analyses, and particle morphology by SEM analyses. Reactivity was calculated by percent conversion to carbonate in subsequent carbonation tests. Particle size reduction has the greatest impact on reactivity, and wet grinding is more energy efficient than dry grinding. Large additional inputs of energy to increase surface area or reduce crystallinity do not result in proportional improvements in reactivity.

  4. 15. STONE BURR MILL PROBABLY USED FOR GRINDING FEED. ONLY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. STONE BURR MILL PROBABLY USED FOR GRINDING FEED. ONLY REMAINING MILL MACHINERY William E. Barrett, photographer, 1973 - Thomas Shepherd's Grist Mill, High Street Vicinity, Shepherdstown, Jefferson County, WV

  5. DETAIL OF SPARE CONICAL CRUSHER AND GRINDING BURR WHEELS REMOVED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF SPARE CONICAL CRUSHER AND GRINDING BURR WHEELS REMOVED FROM THE MILLING MACHINE. - F. & H. Benning Company Oyster Mill, 14430 Solomons Island Road (moved from 1014 Benning Road, Galesville, Anne Arundel County, Maryland), Solomons, Calvert County, MD

  6. 65. BUILDING NO. 554, REWORK POWDER GRINDING HOUSE, PULVERIZING, WATER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    65. BUILDING NO. 554, REWORK POWDER GRINDING HOUSE, PULVERIZING, WATER DRY HOUSE, LOOKING SOUTH AT NORTH SIDE (DEMOLITION IN PROGRESS) OF BUILDING ONCE USED FOR REWORK POWDER GRINDING AND PULVERIZING (SEE NJ-36-C-33 FOR DIAGRAM OF THIS RECLAMATION PROCESS). THIS BUILDING ALSO SERVED AS A WATER DRY HOUSE. - Picatinny Arsenal, 500 Area, Powder Factory & Power House, State Route 15 near I-80, Dover, Morris County, NJ

  7. Genera use of CBN in tool grinding: Technology and economics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, H. R.; Wiemann, H. J.

    A long term test program in which all the grinding processes technically capable of being converted from conventional abrasives to crystalline boron nitrides (CBN) was carried out in close cooperation with an abrasives manufacturer and a tool manufacturer whose production included all types of cutters; notably, hobs, profile cutters, side melting cutters, and face milling cutters, as well as crushing rolls for profiling grinding wheels. The material mainly used was EM05C05 confirming to S 6-5-2-5.

  8. Grinding aspheric and freeform micro-optical molds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohme, Yazid E.

    2007-02-01

    Fueled by the need for better performing optics, glass optics are now replacing plastic optics in many industrial and consumer electronic devices. One of these devices is the mobile phone camera. The optical sub-assembly in a mobile phone includes several micro lenses that are spherical and/or aspherical in shape and require form tolerances in the submicron range. These micro glass lenses are mass produced by a replication process known as glass press molding. The process entails the compression of a glass gob between two precise optical quality molds at an elevated temperature, usually near the transition temperature of the glass material. The elevated forces and temperatures required in the glass molding process limits the materials of the molds to very tough materials such as tungsten carbide or silicon carbide. These materials can withstand large pressing forces at high temperatures without any significant deformation. These materials offer great mechanical properties for glass press molding but they are also a challenge to machine to submicron accuracy. The work in this paper discusses a deterministic micro grinding manufacturing process referred to as wheel normal grinding, which is utilized to produce these optical quality molds. Wheel normal grinding is more accurate and more deterministic than most other grinding techniques and can produce molds to the form and finish tolerances required for optical molding. This method relies on the ability to recognize and compensate for grinding wheel wear and machine repeatable errors. Results will be presented to illustrate the accuracy of this micro grinding technique.

  9. [Study on grinding of base metal alloys. 4. Constant pressure grinding of a Ni-Cr alloy with vitrified wheels].

    PubMed

    Miyakawa, O; Watanabe, K; Okawa, S; Nakano, S; Shiokawa, N; Kobayashi, M; Tamura, H

    1989-09-01

    The grinding techniques and the constituent element of vitrified wheels suitable for a 13% Cr-Ni dental casting alloy were determined. The lever-type grinding test machine used in the previous study was modified so that a work might be ground under a constant pressure as it moved reciprocally within a short stroke along the tangential direction of a rotating wheel. The grinding performance of two marketed wheels and eleven experimental wheels with different constituent elements was tested. Abrasive grains on the working surface of alumina wheel wore extremely due to abrasive attrition. Carborundum wheels proved to be more suitable for grinding of the comparatively soft Ni-Cr alloy. Not only depressing a wheel against a work but also moving the wheel over it with heavier pressure should be desired for the maximal grinding efficiency. The experimental carborundum wheels exhibited much the same performance as the marketed carborundum wheel under a less grinding pressure that 100 gf. Only the wheel of grain size #150 bonded with 19% binder wore obviously under the pressure of 150 or 200 gf and provided about two times the performance of the marketed wheel.

  10. Fatigue limit of polycrystalline zirconium oxide ceramics: Effect of grinding and low-temperature aging.

    PubMed

    Pereira, G K R; Silvestri, T; Amaral, M; Rippe, M P; Kleverlaan, C J; Valandro, L F

    2016-08-01

    The following study aimed to evaluate the effect of grinding and low-temperature aging on the fatigue limit of Y-TZP ceramics for frameworks and monolithic restorations. Disc specimens from each ceramic material, Lava Frame (3M ESPE) and Zirlux FC (Ivoclar Vivadent) were manufactured according to ISO:6872-2008 and assigned in accordance with two factors: (1) "surface treatment"-without treatment (as-sintered, Ctrl), grinding with coarse diamond bur (181µm; Grinding); and (2) "low-temperature aging (LTD)" - presence and absence. Grinding was performed using a contra-angle handpiece under constant water-cooling. LTD was simulated in an autoclave at 134°C under 2-bar pressure for 20h. Mean flexural fatigue limits (20,000 cycles) were determined under sinusoidal loading using stair case approach. For Lava ceramic, it was observed a statistical increase after grinding procedure and different behavior after LTD stimuli (Ctrl<Grinding; CtrlGrinding=Grinding Ltd); while for Zirlux, grinding and low-temperature aging promoted a statistical increase in the fatigue limit (Ctrl<Grinding; CtrlGrinding Ltd). An important increase was observed in m-phase content after both stimuli (grinding and LTD), although with different intensities. Additionally, fatigue test did not promote increase of m-phase content. Thus, tested grinding and low temperature aging did not damage the fatigue limit values significantly for both materials evaluated, even though those conditions promoted increase in m-phase.

  11. Single-mode cylindrical graphene plasmon waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jianfeng; Yang, Jingjing; Huang, Ming

    2016-08-01

    A cylindrical graphene plasmon waveguide (CGPW) which consists of two rolled graphene ribbons, a dielectric core and a dielectric interlayer is proposed. An analytical model for the single-mode condition and cutoff frequency of high-order graphene surface plasmon (GSP) modes is presented and verified by finite element method (FEM) simulations. Single-mode operation region of CGPW is identified in the frequency-radius space. By varying the separation between two graphene sheets and the Fermi level of graphene, a large tunability of the mode behavior is also demonstrated. The proposed structure may provide a new freedom to manipulate GSPs, and would lead to novel applications in optics.

  12. Cylindrical acoustic levitator/concentrator

    DOEpatents

    Kaduchak, Gregory; Sinha, Dipen N.

    2002-01-01

    A low-power, inexpensive acoustic apparatus for levitation and/or concentration of aerosols and small liquid/solid samples having particulates up to several millimeters in diameter in air or other fluids is described. It is constructed from a commercially available, hollow cylindrical piezoelectric crystal which has been modified to tune the resonance frequency of the breathing mode resonance of the crystal to that of the interior cavity of the cylinder. When the resonance frequency of the interior cylindrical cavity is matched to the breathing mode resonance of the cylindrical piezoelectric transducer, the acoustic efficiency for establishing a standing wave pattern in the cavity is high. The cylinder does not require accurate alignment of a resonant cavity. Water droplets having diameters greater than 1 mm have been levitated against the force of gravity using; less than 1 W of input electrical power. Concentration of aerosol particles in air is also demonstrated.

  13. Low-Rank Coal Grinding Performance Versus Power Plant Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Rajive Ganguli; Sukumar Bandopadhyay

    2008-12-31

    The intent of this project was to demonstrate that Alaskan low-rank coal, which is high in volatile content, need not be ground as fine as bituminous coal (typically low in volatile content) for optimum combustion in power plants. The grind or particle size distribution (PSD), which is quantified by percentage of pulverized coal passing 74 microns (200 mesh), affects the pulverizer throughput in power plants. The finer the grind, the lower the throughput. For a power plant to maintain combustion levels, throughput needs to be high. The problem of particle size is compounded for Alaskan coal since it has a low Hardgrove grindability index (HGI); that is, it is difficult to grind. If the thesis of this project is demonstrated, then Alaskan coal need not be ground to the industry standard, thereby alleviating somewhat the low HGI issue (and, hopefully, furthering the salability of Alaskan coal). This project studied the relationship between PSD and power plant efficiency, emissions, and mill power consumption for low-rank high-volatile-content Alaskan coal. The emissions studied were CO, CO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, and Hg (only two tests). The tested PSD range was 42 to 81 percent passing 76 microns. Within the tested range, there was very little correlation between PSD and power plant efficiency, CO, NO{sub x}, and SO{sub 2}. Hg emissions were very low and, therefore, did not allow comparison between grind sizes. Mill power consumption was lower for coarser grinds.

  14. Wear Characteristics of Vitrified cBN Grinding Wheels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Masakazu; Ichida, Yoshio; Sato, Ryunosuke

    To clarify the wheel wear characteristics in grinding process using vitrified cBN wheels, we have investigated the change in wheel wear behavior when the load on the grain cutting edge is increased by increasing work speed. Wheel wear behavior in the grinding process may be classified into two main types, a) wheel wear process-type 1, that is consists of initial and steady-state wheel wear regions, and b) wheel wear process-type 2, that is consists of initial, steady-state and abnormal wheel wear regions. In the steady-state wear region of wheel wear process-type 1, lower wheel wear rate, lower stable grinding forces and good finished surface roughness are obtained, because self-sharpening due to micro fractures of the cutting edges takes place. In grinding with wheel wear process-type 2, it is very hard to obtain good finished surface and high grinding ratio, because of occurrences of fracture or releasing of cBN grains.

  15. Fractal Analysis of Grain Cutting Edge Wear in Superabrasive Grinding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichida, Yoshio; Sato, Ryunosuke; Fujimoto, Masakazu; Tanaka, Hiromichi

    This paper deals with a fractal analysis of the wear behavior of the grain cutting edges in superabrasive grinding. Fundamental overcut fly grinding experiments for producing individual straight grooves using a grinding tool with multiple grits are carried out to clarify the wear characteristics of the grain cutting edges in the grinding process and then the change in three-dimensional profile of the cutting edge measured with a multiprobe SEM is evaluated on the basis of fractal analysis. The main results are summarized as follows: (1) Fractal dimension for the contour line of the fine cutting edge formed by micro fracture shows a higher value than that of cutting edge formed by attritious wear or large fracture. (2) Fractal dimension for cBN grain cutting edge mainly formed by micro fracture tends to take a higher value than that for diamond grain cutting edge mainly formed by attritious wear. (3) The complex change in shape of the cutting edge with the progress of grinding process can be quantitatively evaluated by means of fractal analysis.

  16. Single Grit Grinding Simulation by Using Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öpöz, Tahsin Tecelli; Chen, Xun

    2011-01-01

    In this research, basic material removal characteristics in a single grit grinding have been investigated by using Finite Element Analysis (FEA). ABAQUS/Standard is used as a computational environment. The influences of both friction and undeformed chip thickness are considered in the analyses of the grit ploughing, stress distribution and total force variation. Remeshing strategy is performed in the simulation to produce very fine meshes in the contact area to mitigate the material distortion due to large plastic deformation. The results show that the increase of undeformed chip thickness and frictional coefficient would increase ploughing action and grinding stress magnitude. Moreover, friction would cause the stress distribution circle on grit inclined backwards. Finally, FEM analysis can be considered as a strong tool for the single grit simulation of grinding process.

  17. Telescoping cylindrical piezoelectric fiber composite actuator assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Sidney G. (Inventor); Shams, Qamar A. (Inventor); Fox, Robert L. (Inventor); Fox, legal representative, Christopher L. (Inventor); Fox Chattin, legal representative, Melanie L. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A telescoping actuator assembly includes a plurality of cylindrical actuators in a concentric arrangement. Each cylindrical actuator is at least one piezoelectric fiber composite actuator having a plurality of piezoelectric fibers extending parallel to one another and to the concentric arrangement's longitudinal axis. Each cylindrical actuator is coupled to concentrically-adjacent ones of the cylindrical actuators such that the plurality of cylindrical actuators can experience telescopic movement. An electrical energy source coupled to the cylindrical actuators applies actuation energy thereto to generate the telescopic movement.

  18. Energy efficiency of cement finish grinding in a dry batch ball mill

    SciTech Connect

    Touil, D.; Belaadi, S.; Frances, C. . E-mail: Christine.Frances@ensiacet.fr

    2006-03-15

    Dry grinding experiments on cement clinker were carried out using a laboratory batch ball mill equipped with torque measurement. The specific energy was found to be dependent on operating parameters and clinker environment. Additional compounds such as gypsum and pozzolanic tuff improve energy efficiency. The optimal parameters allowing maximising the energy efficiency factor were determined. Energy efficiency factors were obtained both on the crude material (size minus 2.8 mm) and on a sieved fraction (1-0.71 mm). They demonstrate that a low initial rate of breakage implies higher energy efficiency. On the contrary, conditions ensuring an initial maximal rate of breakage lead to an increase of the energy consumption.

  19. Optics Demonstrations Using Cylindrical Lenses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivanov, Dragia; Nikolov, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we consider the main properties of cylindrical lenses and propose several demonstrational experiments that can be performed with them. Specifically we use simple glasses full of water to demonstrate some basic geometrical optics principles and phenomena. We also present some less standard experiments that can be performed with such…

  20. Notes on static cylindrical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bicák, J.; Zofka, M.

    2002-07-01

    Static cylindrical shells made of various types of matter are studied as sources of the vacuum Levi-Civita metrics. Their internal physical properties are related to the two essential parameters of the metrics outside. The total mass per unit length of the cylinders is always less than ¼. The results are illustrated by a number of figures.

  1. Grinding methods to enhance the reactivity of olivine

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, Cathy A.; Dahlin, David C.; Rush, Gilbert E.; O'Connor, William K.; Gerdemann, Stephen J.

    2004-01-01

    The Albany Research Center (ARC) conducted studies of mechanical activation by conventional and ultra-fine grinding techniques to enhance olivine reactivity in mineral carbonation reactions. Activated olivine is one of several solid feed materials used at ARC in reactions with carbon dioxide to form carbonate minerals. This paper compares grinding techniques via energy demand data and product characteristics, including particle size distributions, surface areas, full width at half maximum (FWHM) XRD analyses, and particle morphology by SEM analyses. Reactivity was gauged by percent conversion to carbonate in subsequent carbonation tests.

  2. Pulsed Laser Profiling of Grinding Wheels at Normal and Quasi-Tangential Incidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutey, Adrian H. A.; Fortunato, Alessandro; Zanini, Filippo; Carmignato, Simone

    2016-09-01

    A new methodology for normal and quasi-tangential pulsed laser profiling of grinding wheels is proposed, with laser path planning calculated according to a pre-specified angle of incidence and radial laser progression or predicted single-pass incision depth. Though tangential laser profiling has previously been investigated, few works have addressed the issue of negligible laser absorption under these conditions other than to apply a focal offset that effectively reduces the angle of incidence below 90∘. In the present work, the angle of incidence is specified explicitly, with normal and quasi-tangential profiling experiments performed on rotating bronze-bonded diamond and porous aluminum oxide grinding wheels with a 1064 nm nanosecond pulsed fiber laser source with 20 W average power. Triangular incisions are cut into each sample, following which analyses are performed with an optical profiler operating in confocal mode and x-ray computed tomography to determine the material removal rate and profile accuracy under all tested conditions. The angle of laser incidence is found to be of particular relevance to profiling operations, with more than one order of magnitude difference in material removal rates observed between 70∘ and 80∘ incidence, with improved profile accuracy in the latter case. Specifically, material removal rates of 0.12-0.14 mm 3/ s, 0.075-0.1 mm 3/ s and 0.002 mm 3/ s are achieved at normal, 70∘ and 80∘ laser incidence, respectively, for bronze-bonded diamond, and 0.1 mm 3/ s is achieved at 70∘ incidence for porous aluminum oxide. For both materials, profile accuracy of 50-70 μm is achieved under optimum conditions. The presented results highlight the necessity for precise specification and control of the angle of incidence during laser profiling operations. They furthermore confirm that laser profiling of grinding wheels is a viable alternative to electrical discharge machining for bronze-bonded diamond grinding wheels and a potential

  3. High Speed Cylindrical Roller Bearing Analysis, SKF Computer Program CYBEAN. Volume 1: Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleckner, R. J.; Pirvics, J.

    1978-01-01

    The CYBEAN (CYlindrical BEaring ANalysis) program was created to detail radially loaded, aligned and misaligned Cylindrical roller bearing performance under a variety of operating conditions. The models and associated mathematics used within CYBEAN are described. The user is referred to the material for formulation assumptions and algorithm detail.

  4. A study of cylindrical Hall thruster for low power space applications

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Raitses; N.J. Fisch; K.M. Ertmer; C.A. Burlingame

    2000-07-27

    A 9 cm cylindrical thruster with a ceramic channel exhibited performance comparable to the state-of-the-art Hall thrusters at low and moderate power levels. Significantly, its operation is not accompanied by large amplitude discharge low frequency oscillations. Preliminary experiments on a 2 cm cylindrical thruster suggest the possibility of a high performance micro Hall thruster.

  5. Calibrated cylindrical Mach probe in a plasma wind tunnel

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.; Dandurand, D.; Gray, T.; Brown, M. R.; Lukin, V. S.

    2011-03-15

    A simple cylindrical Mach probe is described along with an independent calibration procedure in a magnetized plasma wind tunnel. A particle orbit calculation corroborates our model. The probe operates in the weakly magnetized regime in which probe dimension and ion orbit are of the same scale. Analytical and simulation models are favorably compared with experimental calibration.

  6. New Geometry of Worm Face Gear Drives with Conical and Cylindrical Worms: Generation, Simulation of Meshing, and Stress Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, Faydor L.; Nava, Alessandro; Fan, Qi; Fuentes, Alfonso

    2002-01-01

    New geometry of face worm gear drives with conical and cylindrical worms is proposed. The generation of the face worm-gear is based on application of a tilted head-cutter (grinding tool) instead of application of a hob applied at present. The generation of a conjugated worm is based on application of a tilted head-cutter (grinding tool) as well. The bearing contact of the gear drive is localized and is oriented longitudinally. A predesigned parabolic function of transmission errors for reduction of noise and vibration is provided. The stress analysis of the gear drive is performed using a three-dimensional finite element analysis. The contacting model is automatically generated. The developed theory is illustrated with numerical examples.

  7. Grinding Kinetics of Vanadium-Titanium Magnetite Concentrate in a Damp Mill and Its Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Hongming; Chun, Tiejun; Wang, Ping; Meng, Qingmin; Di, Zhanxia; Li, Jiaxin

    2016-06-01

    The grinding behavior of the as-received (5 pct moisture) vanadium-titanium magnetite concentrates in a damp mill was investigated in this paper. A grinding kinetics equation was established based on a population balance model using size distribution data obtained from a laser diffraction technique. X-ray diffraction results show that a loss in crystallinity occurs when the grinding time is increased. The crystallite size of the materials decreased, whereas their structural microstrain increased with increasing grinding time. The wettability increased because the surface roughness increases with increasing grinding time. The moisture capacity of the solids increased during the first 3 minutes of grinding and then remained roughly constant with further increases in grinding time. The water transfer coefficient of the particles increased at grinding times of 3 and 6 minutes and then decreased at grinding times of 9 and 12 minutes. The compressive strength of oxidized pellets increased with increasing grinding time; longer grinding times can compensate for the effects of lower roasting temperature or shorter roasting time on the strength of the pellets. Lowering the roasting temperature and shortening the roasting time by grinding appeared to be possible.

  8. Recovery of titanium values from titanium grinding swarf by electric furnace smelting

    DOEpatents

    Gerdemann, Stephen J.; White, Jack C.

    1999-01-01

    A method for the recovery of valuable materials from titanium grinding swarf is provided comprising the steps of sieving the accumulated titanium grinding swarf to remove unwanted coarse trash and grinding wheel fragments, pelletizing, and smelting in an electric arc furnace to produce ferrotitanium and/or high titanium slag.

  9. Recovery of titanium values from titanium grinding swarf by electric furnace smelting

    DOEpatents

    Gerdemann, Stephen J.; White, Jack C.

    1998-01-01

    A method for the recovery of valuable materials from titanium grinding swarf is provided comprising the steps of sieving the accumulated titanium grinding swarf to remove unwanted coarse trash and grinding wheel fragments, pelletizing, and smelting in an electric arc furnace to produce ferrotitanium and/or high titanium slag.

  10. Recovery of titanium values from titanium grinding swarf by electric furnace smelting

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdemann, S.J.; White, J.C.

    1999-10-19

    A method for the recovery of valuable materials from titanium grinding swarf is provided comprising the steps of sieving the accumulated titanium grinding swarf to remove unwanted coarse trash and grinding wheel fragments, pelletizing, and smelting in an electric arc furnace to produce ferrotitanium and/or high titanium slag.

  11. Recovery of titanium values from titanium grinding swarf by electric furnace smelting

    DOEpatents

    Gerdemann, S.J.; White, J.C.

    1998-08-04

    A method for the recovery of valuable materials from titanium grinding swarf is provided comprising the steps of sieving the accumulated titanium grinding swarf to remove unwanted coarse trash and grinding wheel fragments, pelletizing, and smelting in an electric arc furnace to produce ferrotitanium and/or high titanium slag. 1 fig.

  12. Parametric Investigations of Miniaturized Cylindrical and Annular Hall Thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    A. Smirnov; Y. Raitses; N.J. Fisch

    2001-10-16

    A cylindrical geometry Hall thruster may overcome certain physical and technological limitations in scaling down of Hall thrusters to miniature sizes. The absence of the inner wall and use of the cusp magnetic field can potentially reduce heating of the thruster parts and erosion of the channel. A 2.6 cm miniaturized Hall thruster of a flexible design was built and successfully operated in the power range of 50-300 W. Comparison of preliminary results obtained for cylindrical and annular thruster configurations is presented.

  13. GRINDING ROOM, LOOKING EAST. NOTE OVERHEAD BRIDGE CRANE RIDING ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GRINDING ROOM, LOOKING EAST. NOTE OVERHEAD BRIDGE CRANE RIDING ON STEEL RAILS SUPPORTED BY WOODEN BEAMS AND CYCLONE CLASSIFIER IN CENTER. AT RIGHT IS TOP PORTION OF FLASH FLOTATION CELL. - Shenandoah-Dives Mill, 135 County Road 2, Silverton, San Juan County, CO

  14. INTERIOR VIEW WITH GRINDING MILL AND CONVEYOR EXTENDING UP TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW WITH GRINDING MILL AND CONVEYOR EXTENDING UP TO SORTING DRUM. DRIVE ENGINE AT LOWER LEFT. RADIATOR FOR ENGINE AT RIGHT. - F. & H. Benning Company Oyster Mill, 14430 Solomons Island Road (moved from 1014 Benning Road, Galesville, Anne Arundel County, Maryland), Solomons, Calvert County, MD

  15. Computer numerical control grinding of spiral bevel gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, H. Wayne

    1991-01-01

    The development of Computer Numerical Control (CNC) spiral bevel gear grinding has paved the way for major improvement in the production of precision spiral bevel gears. The object of the program was to decrease the setup, maintenance of setup, and pattern development time by 50 percent of the time required on conventional spiral bevel gear grinders. Details of the process are explained.

  16. Dressing methods for grinding wheels made of superhard abrasive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spur, G.

    As a result of the increase in the use of difficult-to-machine materials more and more machining tasks are falling within the sphere of grinding. Since the requirements that must be met by the working accuracy under conditions of high productivity of the working cycle are becoming ever more stringent, high-capacity grinding tools are essential. The development of new, superhard abrasives has provided the necessary conditions for achieving technological and economic advantages in the machining of high-alloy materials. In this context cubic crystalline boron nitride (CBN) is used as an abrasive in a number of new fields. After diamond, CBN is the hardest abrasive. While the machining of hard metals is still the field in which diamond grinding wheels are used, the use of CBN grinding wheels in the machining of high alloy, heated treated high-speed steel offers technological and economic advantages. The principal reasons for this are to be found in the fact that CBN does not have a chemical affinity to the alloying elements of the steel, but has a greater thermal stability than diamond.

  17. Cobalt exposure in a carbide tip grinding process.

    PubMed

    Stebbins, A I; Horstman, S W; Daniell, W E; Atallah, R

    1992-03-01

    Reports relating hard metal disease or nonspecific respiratory symptoms to tungsten or cobalt exposure have been published in the past 20 yr. This report discusses a work site investigation of a small company, employing approximately 50 workers, producing carbide tip saw blades for the woodworking industry. Cobalt exposure was characterized by ambient air monitoring (area and personnel), particle size determination, and biological monitoring. Area sampling for cadmium, cobalt, and tungsten indicated low ambient air levels in all manufacturing areas except the grinding department, which had cobalt air levels approaching the threshold limit value of 0.05 mg/m3. Area airborne cobalt exposure levels measured over six shifts in the grinding department ranged from 0.017 to 0.12 mg/m3 for the total collection method and 0.002 to 0.028 mg/m3 for the method collecting respirable particles. Cobalt content in the total and respirable fractions was similar. Urine monitoring indicated production workers have elevated cobalt levels, and the grinders' levels were higher than other production workers. The grinding coolant was found to have elevated cobalt concentrations. A survey of coolants from nine carbide grinding shops indicated the elevated cobalt concentrations may be common.

  18. 30 CFR 77.401 - Stationary grinding machines; protective devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... devices. 77.401 Section 77.401 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...; protective devices. (a) Stationary grinding machines other than special bit grinders shall be equipped with: (1) Peripheral hoods (less than 90° throat openings) capable of withstanding the force of a...

  19. Cylindrical magnets and ideal solenoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derby, Norman; Olbert, Stanislaw

    2010-03-01

    Both wire-wound solenoids and cylindrical magnets can be approximated as ideal azimuthally symmetric solenoids. We present an exact solution for the magnetic field of an ideal solenoid in an easy to use form. The field is expressed in terms of a single function that can be rapidly computed by means of a compact efficient algorithm, which can be coded as an add-in function to a spreadsheet, making field calculations accessible to introductory students. These expressions are not only accurate but are also as fast as most approximate expressions. We demonstrate their utility by simulating the dropping of a cylindrical magnet through a nonmagnetic conducting tube and comparing the calculation with data obtained from experiments suitable for an undergraduate laboratory.

  20. Design parameters for rotating cylindrical filtration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwille, John A.; Mitra, Deepanjan; Lueptow, Richard M.

    2002-01-01

    Rotating cylindrical filtration displays significantly reduced plugging of filter pores and build-up of a cake layer, but the number and range of parameters that can be adjusted complicates the design of these devices. Twelve individual parameters were investigated experimentally by measuring the build-up of particles on the rotating cylindrical filter after a fixed time of operation. The build-up of particles on the filter depends on the rotational speed, the radial filtrate flow, the particle size and the gap width. Other parameters, such as suspension concentration and total flow rate are less important. Of the four mechanisms present in rotating filters to reduce pore plugging and cake build-up, axial shear, rotational shear, centrifugal sedimentation and vortical motion, the evidence suggests rotational shear is the dominant mechanism, although the other mechanisms still play minor roles. The ratio of the shear force acting parallel to the filter surface on a particle to the Stokes drag acting normal to the filter surface on the particle due to the difference between particle motion and filtrate flow can be used as a non-dimensional parameter that predicts the degree of particle build-up on the filter surface for a wide variety of filtration conditions. c2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Design parameters for rotating cylindrical filtration.

    PubMed

    Schwille, John A; Mitra, Deepanjan; Lueptow, Richard M

    2002-07-15

    Rotating cylindrical filtration displays significantly reduced plugging of filter pores and build-up of a cake layer, but the number and range of parameters that can be adjusted complicates the design of these devices. Twelve individual parameters were investigated experimentally by measuring the build-up of particles on the rotating cylindrical filter after a fixed time of operation. The build-up of particles on the filter depends on the rotational speed, the radial filtrate flow, the particle size and the gap width. Other parameters, such as suspension concentration and total flow rate are less important. Of the four mechanisms present in rotating filters to reduce pore plugging and cake build-up, axial shear, rotational shear, centrifugal sedimentation and vortical motion, the evidence suggests rotational shear is the dominant mechanism, although the other mechanisms still play minor roles. The ratio of the shear force acting parallel to the filter surface on a particle to the Stokes drag acting normal to the filter surface on the particle due to the difference between particle motion and filtrate flow can be used as a non-dimensional parameter that predicts the degree of particle build-up on the filter surface for a wide variety of filtration conditions. PMID:12238523

  2. Thermal stress in high temperature cylindrical fasteners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blosser, Max L.

    1988-01-01

    Uninsulated structures fabricated from carbon or silicon-based materials, which are allowed to become hot during flight, are attractive for the design of some components of hypersonic vehicles. They have the potential to reduce weight and increase vehicle efficiency. Because of manufacturing contraints, these structures will consist of parts which must be fastened together. The thermal expansion mismatch between conventional metal fasteners and carbon or silicon-based structural materials may make it difficult to design a structural joint which is tight over the operational temperature range without exceeding allowable stress limits. In this study, algebraic, closed-form solutions for calculating the thermal stresses resulting from radial thermal expansion mismatch around a cylindrical fastener are developed. These solutions permit a designer to quickly evaluate many combinations of materials for the fastener and the structure. Using the algebraic equations developed, material properties and joint geometry were varied to determine their effect on thermal stresses. Finite element analyses were used to verify that the closed-form solutions derived give the correct thermal stress distribution around a cylindrical fastener and to investigate the effect of some of the simplifying assumptions made in developing the closed-form solutions for thermal stresses.

  3. Design parameters for rotating cylindrical filtration.

    PubMed

    Schwille, John A; Mitra, Deepanjan; Lueptow, Richard M

    2002-07-15

    Rotating cylindrical filtration displays significantly reduced plugging of filter pores and build-up of a cake layer, but the number and range of parameters that can be adjusted complicates the design of these devices. Twelve individual parameters were investigated experimentally by measuring the build-up of particles on the rotating cylindrical filter after a fixed time of operation. The build-up of particles on the filter depends on the rotational speed, the radial filtrate flow, the particle size and the gap width. Other parameters, such as suspension concentration and total flow rate are less important. Of the four mechanisms present in rotating filters to reduce pore plugging and cake build-up, axial shear, rotational shear, centrifugal sedimentation and vortical motion, the evidence suggests rotational shear is the dominant mechanism, although the other mechanisms still play minor roles. The ratio of the shear force acting parallel to the filter surface on a particle to the Stokes drag acting normal to the filter surface on the particle due to the difference between particle motion and filtrate flow can be used as a non-dimensional parameter that predicts the degree of particle build-up on the filter surface for a wide variety of filtration conditions.

  4. Dynamics of tilted cylindrical geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif, M.; Sadiq, Sobia

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we study the dynamics of tilted cylindrical model with imperfect matter distribution. We formulate the field equations and develop relations between tilted and non-tilted variables. We evaluate kinematical as well as dynamical quantities and discuss the inhomogeneity factor. We also obtain the Raychaudhuri equation to study evolution of expansion scalar. The solutions of field equations are also investigated for static cylinder under isotropy and conformally flat condition. Finally, we analyze some thermoinertial aspects of the system.

  5. Cylindrical Piezoelectric Fiber Composite Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Sidney G.; Shams, Qamar A.; Fox, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    The use of piezoelectric devices has become widespread since Pierre and Jacques Curie discovered the piezoelectric effect in 1880. Examples of current applications of piezoelectric devices include ultrasonic transducers, micro-positioning devices, buzzers, strain sensors, and clocks. The invention of such lightweight, relatively inexpensive piezoceramic-fiber-composite actuators as macro fiber composite (MFC) actuators has made it possible to obtain strains and displacements greater than those that could be generated by prior actuators based on monolithic piezoceramic sheet materials. MFC actuators are flat, flexible actuators designed for bonding to structures to apply or detect strains. Bonding multiple layers of MFC actuators together could increase force capability, but not strain or displacement capability. Cylindrical piezoelectric fiber composite (CPFC) actuators have been invented as alternatives to MFC actuators for applications in which greater forces and/or strains or displacements may be required. In essence, a CPFC actuator is an MFC or other piezoceramic fiber composite actuator fabricated in a cylindrical instead of its conventional flat shape. Cylindrical is used here in the general sense, encompassing shapes that can have circular, elliptical, rectangular or other cross-sectional shapes in the planes perpendicular to their longitudinal axes.

  6. Subsurface mechanical damage during bound abrasive grinding of fused silica glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaineau, P.; André, D.; Laheurte, R.; Darnis, P.; Darbois, N.; Cahuc, O.; Neauport, J.

    2015-10-01

    The subsurface damage (SSD) introduced during bound abrasive grinding of fused silica glass was measured using a wet etch technique. Various process parameters and grinding configurations were studied. The relation between the SSD depth, the process parameters and forces applied by the grinding wheel on the sample was investigated and compared to a simulation using a discrete element method to model the grinding interface. The results reveal a relation between the SSD depth and the grinding forces normalized by the abrasive concentration. Regarding the creation of the SSD, numerical simulations indicate that only a small fraction of the largest particles in the diamond wheel are responsible for the depth of the damaged layer.

  7. Development of an intelligent grinding wheel for in-process monitoring of ceramic grinding. Semi-annual report {number_sign}3

    SciTech Connect

    Malkin, S.; Gao, R.; Guo, C.; Varghese, B.; Pathare, S.

    1998-03-26

    This is the third semi-annual report for the project. The overall objective of this project is to develop sensor-integrated intelligent diamond wheels for grinding of ceramics. Such wheels will be smart enough to monitor and supervise both the wheel preparation and grinding processes without the need to instrument the machine tool. Intelligent wheels will utilize re-useable cores integrated with sensors: to measure the acoustic emission (AE) and grinding force. Signals from the sensors will be transmitted from a rotating wheel to a receiver by telemetry. Wheels will be trained to recognize distinct characteristics associated with truing, dressing and grinding. The technical progress is summarized in this report.

  8. Grinding force and microcrack density in abrasive machining of silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, H.H.K.; Wei, L.; Jahanmir, S.

    1995-12-01

    The relationship between grinding forces and the material`s resistance to microfracture is investigated in abrasive machining of silicon nitride ceramics. Surface grinding is performed on two forms of silicon nitride with different microstructures, and the grinding forces are measured. In addition, single-point scratching is performed on polished surfaces to amplify the damage associated with the action of an individual abrasive particle in grinding. A thermal wave measurement technique in then used on the cross sections to characterize the density of subsurface microcracks associated with scratching. Compared to a fine-grain silicon nitride, the density of microcracks in a coarse-grain silicon nitride is significantly larger, while the grinding force is smaller. The smaller grinding force for the coarse-grain silicon nitride is attributed to the ease of local intergranular microfracture and grain dislodgement during grinding. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital Materials} {ital Research} {ital Society}.

  9. Development of a grinding-specific performance test set-up.

    PubMed

    Olesen, C G; Larsen, B H; Andresen, E L; de Zee, M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a performance test set-up for America's Cup grinders. The test set-up had to mimic the on-boat grinding activity and be capable of collecting data for analysis and evaluation of grinding performance. This study included a literature-based analysis of grinding demands and a test protocol developed to accommodate the necessary physiological loads. This study resulted in a test protocol consisting of 10 intervals of 20 revolutions each interspersed with active resting periods of 50 s. The 20 revolutions are a combination of both forward and backward grinding and an exponentially rising resistance. A custom-made grinding ergometer was developed with computer-controlled resistance and capable of collecting data during the test. The data collected can be used to find measures of grinding performance such as peak power, time to complete and the decline in repeated grinding performance. PMID:25367077

  10. Cathode Effects in Cylindrical Hall Thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Granstedt, E.M.; Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N. J.

    2008-09-12

    Stable operation of a cylindrical Hall thruster (CHT) has been achieved using a hot wire cathode, which functions as a controllable electron emission source. It is shown that as the electron emission from the cathode increases with wire heating, the discharge current increases, the plasma plume angle reduces, and the ion energy distribution function shifts toward higher energies. The observed effect of cathode electron emission on thruster parameters extends and clarifies performance improvements previously obtained for the overrun discharge current regime of the same type of thruster, but using a hollow cathode-neutralizer. Once thruster discharge current saturates with wire heating, further filament heating does not affect other discharge parameters. The saturated values of thruster discharge parameters can be further enhanced by optimal placement of the cathode wire with respect to the magnetic field.

  11. Fatigue limit of polycrystalline zirconium oxide ceramics: Effect of grinding and low-temperature aging.

    PubMed

    Pereira, G K R; Silvestri, T; Amaral, M; Rippe, M P; Kleverlaan, C J; Valandro, L F

    2016-08-01

    The following study aimed to evaluate the effect of grinding and low-temperature aging on the fatigue limit of Y-TZP ceramics for frameworks and monolithic restorations. Disc specimens from each ceramic material, Lava Frame (3M ESPE) and Zirlux FC (Ivoclar Vivadent) were manufactured according to ISO:6872-2008 and assigned in accordance with two factors: (1) "surface treatment"-without treatment (as-sintered, Ctrl), grinding with coarse diamond bur (181µm; Grinding); and (2) "low-temperature aging (LTD)" - presence and absence. Grinding was performed using a contra-angle handpiece under constant water-cooling. LTD was simulated in an autoclave at 134°C under 2-bar pressure for 20h. Mean flexural fatigue limits (20,000 cycles) were determined under sinusoidal loading using stair case approach. For Lava ceramic, it was observed a statistical increase after grinding procedure and different behavior after LTD stimuli (Ctrl<Grinding; CtrlGrinding=Grinding Ltd); while for Zirlux, grinding and low-temperature aging promoted a statistical increase in the fatigue limit (Ctrl<Grinding; CtrlGrinding Ltd). An important increase was observed in m-phase content after both stimuli (grinding and LTD), although with different intensities. Additionally, fatigue test did not promote increase of m-phase content. Thus, tested grinding and low temperature aging did not damage the fatigue limit values significantly for both materials evaluated, even though those conditions promoted increase in m-phase. PMID:26828768

  12. Supercooling Water in Cylindrical Capsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman, J. J. Milón; Braga, S. L.

    2005-11-01

    An experimental apparatus was developed to investigate the supercooling phenomenon of water inside cylindrical capsules used for a cold storage process. The coolant is a water-alcohol mixture controlled by a constant temperature bath (CTB). Temperatures varying with time are measured inside and outside the capsule. Cylinders with an internal diameter and thickness of 45 and 1.5 mm, respectively, were made from four different materials: acrylic, PVC, brass, and aluminum. The supercooling period of the water and the nucleation temperature were investigated for different coolant temperatures. The supercooling and nucleation probabilities are shown as a function of the coolant temperature for the four different materials.

  13. Multi-stable cylindrical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirrera, Alberto; Lachenal, Xavier; Daynes, Stephen; Weaver, Paul M.; Chenchiah, Isaac V.

    2013-11-01

    We present a cylindrical lattice structure that mimics the behaviour of the virus bacteriophage T4 in having two (or more) stable states which differ in their radii and length. While the virus achieves bistability through molecular mechanisms we use composite materials to exploit the interplay between pre-stress, material properties and structural geometry. We demonstrate (computationally) that multi-stability is a robust phenomenon. We also show (analytically) that it is possible to choose the design variables so that the energy is independent of the radius, thus resulting in every state of the structure being stable.

  14. Formation Mechanism of Finished Surface in Ultrahigh-Speed Grinding with cubic Boron Nitride (cBN) Wheels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichida, Yoshio; Sato, Ryunosuke; Morimoto, Yoshitaka; Ohsawa, Yoshiteru; Fredj, Nabil Ben

    In this paper, we describe the formation mechanism of a finished surface in ultrahigh-speed grinding under a peripheral wheel speed higher than 200m/s. Grinding experiments using a grinding machine tool equipped with an active magnetic bearing spindle have been conducted over a range of grinding speeds from 60 to 300m/s. Moreover, grinding tests for producing some individual grooves using a grinding tool with multiple cBN grit have been carried out to clarify the effects of grinding speed on the side swelling formed along both sides of the grinding grooves. From the results of these experiments, we have confirmed that the roughness of the ground surface decreases with an increase in grinding speed, and this decrease is mainly due to the reduction of the swelling ratio with increasing grinding speed.

  15. Environmental contamination by cobalt in the vicinity of a cemented tungsten carbide tool grinding plant.

    PubMed

    Abraham, J L; Hunt, A

    1995-04-01

    Surface soil and dust samples have been collected from the vicinity of a hard metal (cemented tungsten carbide) tool grinding factory. As a result of poor waste management practices, dusts generated by the grinding operation were, for the most part, swept from the interior of the building onto open ground at the rear of the plant. The potential for contamination of the local environment with cobalt, tungsten, and other metals as a result of dust being either resuspended from the resulting uncontrolled mound of debris or emitted from the factory vents was considerable. Levels of cobalt in local soils were found to be as high as 12,700 mg kg-1; almost 2000 times higher than the average value for in the United States. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray micro-analysis examination of the waste dust particles revealed that the individual particles were, in general, composites containing variable quantities of tungsten, cobalt, calcium, titanium, and iron. Individual particles in soil samples collected at some distance from the plant were less heterogeneous, and fewer particles contained detectable quantities of cobalt. This would suggest that a degree of disassociation had occurred in the soil environment resulting in a mobilization of the cobalt.

  16. Spirit's First Grinding of a Rock on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The round, shallow depression in this image resulted from history's first grinding of a rock on Mars. The rock abrasion tool on NASA's Spirit rover ground off the surface of a patch 45.5 millimeters (1.8 inches) in diameter on a rock called Adirondack. The hole is 2.65 millimeters (0.1 inch) deep, exposing fresh interior material of the rock for close inspection with the rover's microscopic imager and two spectrometers on the robotic arm. This image was taken by Spirit's panoramic camera, providing a quick visual check of the success of the grinding. The rock abrasion tools on both Mars Exploration Rovers were supplied by Honeybee Robotics, New York, N.Y.

  17. Evolution of topography and material removal during nanoscale grinding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eder, S. J.; Cihak-Bayr, U.; Vernes, A.; Betz, G.

    2015-11-01

    In this work we perform molecular dynamics simulations to quantify and parametrize the evolution of a bcc Fe work piece topography during nanometric grinding with multiple hard abrasive particles. The final surface quality depends on both the normal pressure and the abrasive geometry. We fit the time development of the substrate’s root mean squared roughness to an exponential function, allowing the definition of a run-in regime, during which the surface ‘forgets’ about its initial state, and a steady-state regime where the roughness no longer changes. The time constants associated with smoothing and material removal are almost inversely proportional to each other, highlighting the distinctiveness of these two simultaneously occurring processes. We also describe an attempt to reduce the time required to achieve the smoothest possible surface finish by periodically re-adjusting the normal pressure during the grinding process.

  18. Progress toward a performance based specification for diamond grinding wheels

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.S.; Piscotty, M.S.; Blaedel, K.L.

    1996-11-12

    This work sought to improve the communication between users and makers of fine diamond grinding wheels. A promising avenue for this is to formulate a voluntary product standard that comprises performance indicators that bridge the gap between specific user requirements and the details of wheel formulations. We propose a set of performance specifiers of figures-of-merit, that might be assessed by straightforward and traceable testing methods, but do not compromise proprietary information of the wheel user of wheel maker. One such performance indicator might be wheel hardness. In addition we consider technologies that might be required to realize the benefits of optimized grinding wheels. A non-contact wheel-to- workpiece proximity sensor may provide a means of monitoring wheel wear and thus wheel position, for wheels that exhibit high wear rates in exchange for improved surface finish.

  19. 12. INTERIOR VIEW, FIRST FLOOR SHOWING GRINDING STONES COVERED WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. INTERIOR VIEW, FIRST FLOOR SHOWING GRINDING STONES COVERED WITH VATS (RIGHT STONE RUN BY 35' LEFFAL VERTICAL TURBINE; LEFT BY 23' 1EFFAL VERTICAL TURBINE). THE HOPPER ON THE VAT TO THE LEFT FUNNELS THE GRAIN IN. THE CHUTE AT THE BOTTOM OF THE CENTER VAT SENDS GROUND GRAIN TO THE CONVEYOR BELOW. - Schech's Mill, Beaver Creek State Park, La Crescent, Houston County, MN

  20. Measurement and modeling of strength distributions associated with grinding damage

    SciTech Connect

    Salem, J.A.; Nemeth, N.N.; Powers, L.M.

    1995-08-01

    The strength of ceramic material is typically measured in accordance with ASTM C1161 which specifies the machined specimens be ground uniaxially in the longitudinal direction and tested so that the maximum principal stress is longitudinal. Such a grinding process typically induces minimal damage in the transverse direction, but significant damage in the longitudinal direction, resulting in an anisotropic flaw distribution on the surface of the specimen. Additionally, investigations of the strength anisotropy due to grinding may provide a means to measure a materials strength response under mixed mode (I & II) conditions, thereby providing information that can be applied to isotropic cases (e.g. polished or as-processed material). The objective of this work was to measure and model the effects of a typical, uniaxial grinding process on the strength distribution of a ceramic material under various lading conditions. The fast-fracture strength of a sintered alpha silicon carbide was measured in four-point flexure with the principal stress oriented at angles between 0 and 90{degrees} relative to the grinding direction. Also, uniaxially ground plate specimens were loaded biaxial flexure. Finally, flexure specimens were tested in an annealed condition to determine if the machining damage could be healed. Modeling of the strength distributions was done with two and three parameter Weibull models and shear sensitive and insensitive models. Alpha silicon carbide was chosen because it exhibits a very low fracture toughness, no crack growth resistance, high elastic modulus and a very low susceptibility to slow crack growth (static fatigue). Such properties should make this an ideal ceramic for the verification of fast fracture reliability models and codes.

  1. Process for selective grinding of coal

    DOEpatents

    Venkatachari, Mukund K.; Benz, August D.; Huettenhain, Horst

    1991-01-01

    A process for preparing coal for use as a fuel. Forming a coal-water slurry having solid coal particles with a particle size not exceeding about 80 microns, transferring the coal-water slurry to a solid bowl centrifuge, and operating same to classify the ground coal-water slurry to provide a centrate containing solid particles with a particle size distribution of from about 5 microns to about 20 microns and a centrifuge cake of solids having a particle size distribution of from about 10 microns to about 80 microns. The classifer cake is reground and mixed with fresh feed to the solid bowl centrifuge for additional classification.

  2. Loads for pulsed power cylindrical implosion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, W.E.; Armijo, E.V.; Barthell, B.L.; Bartos, J.J.; Bush, H.; Foreman, L.R.; Garcia, F.P.; Gobby, P.L.; Gomez, V.M.; Gurule, V.A.

    1994-07-01

    Pulse power can be used to generate high energy density conditions in convergent hollow cylindrical geometry through the use of appropriate electrode configuration and cylindrical loads. Cylindrically symmetric experiments are conducted with the Pegasus-H inductive store, capacitor energized pulse power facility at Los Alamos using both precision machined cylindrical liner loads and low mass vapor deposited cylindrical foil loads. The liner experiments investigate solid density hydrodynamic topics. Foil loads vaporize from Joule heating to generate an imploding cylindrical plasma which can be used to simulate some fluxes associated with fusion energy processes. Similar experiments are conducted with {open_quotes}Procyon{close_quotes} inductive store pulse power assemblies energized by explosively driven magnetic flux compression.

  3. Rotary ultrasonic machining of CFRP: A comparison with grinding.

    PubMed

    Ning, F D; Cong, W L; Pei, Z J; Treadwell, C

    2016-03-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) composites have been intensively used in various industries due to their superior properties. In aircraft and aerospace industry, a large number of holes are required to be drilled into CFRP components at final stage for aircraft assembling. There are two major types of methods for hole making of CFRP composites in industry, twist drilling and its derived multi-points machining methods, and grinding and its related methods. The first type of methods are commonly used in hole making of CFRP composites. However, in recent years, rotary ultrasonic machining (RUM), a hybrid machining process combining ultrasonic machining and grinding, has also been successfully used in drilling of CFRP composites. It has been shown that RUM is superior to twist drilling in many aspects. However, there are no reported investigations on comparisons between RUM and grinding in drilling of CFRP. In this paper, these two drilling methods are compared in five aspects, including cutting force, torque, surface roughness, hole diameter, and material removal rate.

  4. Grinding Induced Changes in Residual Stresses of Carburized Gears

    SciTech Connect

    Lemaster, Robert A; Boggs, Bryan L; Bunn, Jeffrey R; Hubbard, Camden R; Watkins, Thomas R

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study performed to measure the change in residual stress that results from the finish grinding of carburized gears. Residual stresses were measured in five gears using the x-ray diffraction equipment in the Large Specimen Residual Stress Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Two of the gears were hobbed, carburized, quenched and tempered, but not finished. The remaining three gears were processed similarly, but were finish ground. The residual stresses were measured at 64 different locations on a tooth from each gear. Residual stresses were also measured at fewer points on other teeth to determine the tooth-to-tooth variation. Tooth profile measurements were made of the finished and unfinished gear samples. The results show a fairly uniform and constant compressive residual field in the nonfinished gears. There was a significant reduction in the average residual stress measured in the finished gears. Additionally, there was a significant increase in the variability of the residual stress that was introduced by the grinding process. Analysis of the data suggests a linear relationship between the change in average residual stress and the amount of material removed by the grinding process.

  5. Rotary ultrasonic machining of CFRP: A comparison with grinding.

    PubMed

    Ning, F D; Cong, W L; Pei, Z J; Treadwell, C

    2016-03-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) composites have been intensively used in various industries due to their superior properties. In aircraft and aerospace industry, a large number of holes are required to be drilled into CFRP components at final stage for aircraft assembling. There are two major types of methods for hole making of CFRP composites in industry, twist drilling and its derived multi-points machining methods, and grinding and its related methods. The first type of methods are commonly used in hole making of CFRP composites. However, in recent years, rotary ultrasonic machining (RUM), a hybrid machining process combining ultrasonic machining and grinding, has also been successfully used in drilling of CFRP composites. It has been shown that RUM is superior to twist drilling in many aspects. However, there are no reported investigations on comparisons between RUM and grinding in drilling of CFRP. In this paper, these two drilling methods are compared in five aspects, including cutting force, torque, surface roughness, hole diameter, and material removal rate. PMID:26614168

  6. Models of cylindrical bubble pulsation

    PubMed Central

    Ilinskii, Yurii A.; Zabolotskaya, Evgenia A.; Hay, Todd A.; Hamilton, Mark F.

    2012-01-01

    Three models are considered for describing the dynamics of a pulsating cylindrical bubble. A linear solution is derived for a cylindrical bubble in an infinite compressible liquid. The solution accounts for losses due to viscosity, heat conduction, and acoustic radiation. It reveals that radiation is the dominant loss mechanism, and that it is 22 times greater than for a spherical bubble of the same radius. The predicted resonance frequency provides a basis of comparison for limiting forms of other models. The second model considered is a commonly used equation in Rayleigh-Plesset form that requires an incompressible liquid to be finite in extent in order for bubble pulsation to occur. The radial extent of the liquid becomes a fitting parameter, and it is found that considerably different values of the parameter are required for modeling inertial motion versus acoustical oscillations. The third model was developed by V. K. Kedrinskii [Hydrodynamics of Explosion (Springer, New York, 2005), pp. 23–26] in the form of the Gilmore equation for compressible liquids of infinite extent. While the correct resonance frequency and loss factor are not recovered from this model in the linear approximation, it provides reasonable agreement with observations of inertial motion. PMID:22978863

  7. Effects of Compressive Force, Particle Size and Moisture Content on Mechanical Properties of Biomass Grinds

    SciTech Connect

    Mani, Sudhagar; Tabil, Lope Jr.; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine

    2006-03-01

    Chemical composition, moisture content, bulk and particle densities, and geometric mean particle size were determined to characterize grinds from wheat and barley straws, corn stover and switchgrass. The biomass grinds were compressed for five levels of compressive forces (1000, 2000, 3000, 4000, 4400 N) and three levels of particle sizes (3.2, 1.6 and 0.8 mm) at two levels of moisture contents (12% and 15% (wb) to establish the compression and relaxation data. Corn stover grind produced the highest compact density at low pressure during compression. Compressive force, particle size and moisture content of grinds significantly affected the compact density of barley straw, corn stover and switchgrass grinds. However, different particle sizes of wheat straw grind did not produce any significant difference on compact density. Barley straw grind had the highest asymptotic modulus among all other biomass grinds indicating that compact from barley straw grind were more rigid than those of other compacts. Asymptotic modulus increased with an increase in maximum compressive pressure. The trend of increase in asymptotic modulus (EA) with the maximum compressive pressure ( 0) was fitted to a second order polynomial equation. Keywords: Biomass grinds, chemical composition, compact density and asymptotic modulus

  8. Grinding model and material removal mechanism of medical nanometer zirconia ceramics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dongkun; Li, Changhe; Jia, Dongzhou; Wang, Sheng; Li, Runze; Qi, Xiaoxiao

    2014-01-01

    Many patents have been devoted to developing medical nanometer zirconia ceramic grinding techniques that can significantly improve both workpiece surface integrity and grinding quality. Among these patents is a process for preparing ceramic dental implants with a surface for improving osseo-integration by sand abrasive finishing under a jet pressure of 1.5 bar to 8.0 bar and with a grain size of 30 µm to 250 µm. Compared with other materials, nano-zirconia ceramics exhibit unmatched biomedical performance and excellent mechanical properties as medical bone tissue and dentures. The removal mechanism of nano-zirconia materials includes brittle fracture and plastic removal. Brittle fracture involves crack formation, extension, peeling, and chipping to completely remove debris. Plastic removal is similar to chip formation in metal grinding, including rubbing, ploughing, and the formation of grinding debris. The materials are removed in shearing and chipping. During brittle fracture, the grinding-led transverse and radial extension of cracks further generate local peeling of blocks of the material. In material peeling and removal, the mechanical strength and surface quality of the workpiece are also greatly reduced because of crack extension. When grinding occurs in the plastic region, plastic removal is performed, and surface grinding does not generate grinding fissures and surface fracture, producing clinically satisfactory grinding quality. With certain grinding conditions, medical nanometer zirconia ceramics can be removed through plastic flow in ductile regime. In this study, we analyzed the critical conditions for the transfer of brittle and plastic removal in nano-zirconia ceramic grinding as well as the high-quality surface grinding of medical nanometer zirconia ceramics by ELID grinding.

  9. A Novel Vibration Mode Testing Method for Cylindrical Resonators Based on Microphones

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yongmeng; Wu, Yulie; Wu, Xuezhong; Xi, Xiang; Wang, Jianqiu

    2015-01-01

    Non-contact testing is an important method for the study of the vibrating characteristic of cylindrical resonators. For the vibratory cylinder gyroscope excited by piezo-electric electrodes, mode testing of the cylindrical resonator is difficult. In this paper, a novel vibration testing method for cylindrical resonators is proposed. This method uses a MEMS microphone, which has the characteristics of small size and accurate directivity, to measure the vibration of the cylindrical resonator. A testing system was established, then the system was used to measure the vibration mode of the resonator. The experimental results show that the orientation resolution of the node of the vibration mode is better than 0.1°. This method also has the advantages of low cost and easy operation. It can be used in vibration testing and provide accurate results, which is important for the study of the vibration mode and thermal stability of vibratory cylindrical gyroscopes. PMID:25602269

  10. Propagation Mechanism of Cylindrical Cellular Detonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wen-Hu; Wang, Cheng; Ning, Jian-Guo

    2012-10-01

    We investigate the evolution of cylindrical cellular detonation with different instabilities. The numerical results show that with decreasing initial temperature, detonation becomes more unstable and the cells of the cylindrical detonation tend to be irregular. For stable detonation, a divergence of cylindrical detonation cells is formed eventually due to detonation instability resulting from a curved detonation front. For mildly unstable detonation, local overdriven detonation occurs. The detonation cell diverges and its size decreases. For highly unstable detonation, locally driven detonation is more obvious and the front is highly wrinkled. As a result, the diverging cylindrical detonation cell becomes highly irregular.

  11. Turbulence in the cylindrical slab

    SciTech Connect

    Gentle, K. W.; Rowan, W. L.; Williams, C. B.; Brookman, M. W.

    2014-09-15

    The cylindrical slab was the first and simplest model of intrinsically unstable microturbulence. The Helimak is an experimental realization of this model. Although finite, it is sufficiently large to escape boundary effects, with dimensionless parameters similar to those of a tokamak edge or scrape off layer. The essential drive is interchange-like, a pressure gradient with unfavorable magnetic curvature, leading to a non-linearly saturated state of large-amplitude turbulence, Δn{sub rms}/n ∼ 0.5. The nonlinear processes governing this saturation are unique, unlike any of those posited for the much weaker turbulence typical of confined plasma, e.g., in a tokamak. Neither linear stability theory, quasi-linear theory, zonal flows, nor flow shear stabilization is consistent with the observations. The mechanisms determining the non-linearly saturated state constitute an important challenge to our understanding of strongly nonlinear systems.

  12. Influence of cryogenic cooling on surface grinding of stainless steel 316

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manimaran, G.; Pradeep kumar, M.; Venkatasamy, R.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present investigation is to evaluate the improvements in the grinding force and surface roughness by the application of LN2 (liquid nitrogen) as a coolant in the cryogenic grinding process. Cryogenic machining is an environment concerned green manufacturing process. The grinding experiments were conducted on stainless steel 316 in three environments, namely, dry, wet and cryogenic cooling. The experimental results show that a reduction in the grinding zone temperature leads to excellent benefits in the machining performance. The cryogenic coolant offers 37% and 13% reduction in the grinding forces compared to dry and wet cooling. The surface roughness under cryogenic cooling is found to produce 59% and 32% lesser values and fewer defects, compared to surfaces ground with dry and wet cooling. The enhancements realized by the delivery pressure of the cryogen, with respect to the grinding forces, and surface roughness were also studied.

  13. High power impulse magnetron sputtering using a rotating cylindrical magnetron

    SciTech Connect

    Leroy, W. P.; Mahieu, S.; Depla, D.; Ehiasarian, A. P.

    2010-01-15

    Both the industrially favorable deposition technique, high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS), and the industrially popular rotating cylindrical magnetron have been successfully combined. A stable operation without arcing, leaks, or other complications for the rotatable magnetron was attained, with current densities around 11 A cm{sup -2}. For Ti and Al, a much higher degree in ionization in the plasma region was observed for the HIPIMS mode compared to the direct current mode.

  14. Strength and power determinants of grinding performance in America's Cup sailors.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Simon N; Hume, Patria A; Cronin, John B; Slyfield, David

    2009-09-01

    The purpose grinding is a physically demanding component of America's Cup sailing that is important to overall team performance, but little research is available on the determinants of grinding performance. We examined the relationship between various measures of muscular performance and the performance of upper-body grinding. Eleven elite male America's Cup sailors (33.9 +/- 5.5 yr, 97.8 +/- 12.5 kg, 186.0 +/- 7.1 cm) who performed grinding as part of their on-board role with extensive strength training experience participated in this study. Muscular performance testing examined the force, velocity, and power capabilities of the upper-body musculature, with upper-body push (bench press) and pull (bench pull) movements performed across loads of 10-100% of 1 repetition maximum (1RM). Functional grinding performance was examined for both forward and backward grinding and at 2 different resistances (moderate = 48 N x m, heavy = 68 N x m) using a land-based ergometer. Bench press 1RM and maximum force capability were the measures demonstrating the strongest correlation with forward grinding performance (r = 0.88-0.99 and 0.87-0.99, respectively), with the relationship increasing with grinding load. For backward grinding, there was a very strong relationship with bench pull maximum power (r = 0.85-0.98) in addition to 1RM (r = 0.90-0.95) and maximum force (r = 0.87-0.95). It appears that although maximal strength is a crucial muscular performance characteristic for grinding performance in all conditions, for backward grinding, there is the additional need to focus on the development of speed strength/power to maximize performance gains. This information was used by the Emirates Team New Zealand physical conditioner to develop a conditioning intervention to help improve grinding performance. PMID:19675468

  15. Performance Potential of Grinding Tools on Flexible Backing Produced of Grains with the Controlled Form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shatko, D. B.; Lyukshin, V. S.; Bakumenko, V. N.

    2016-08-01

    The paper provides consideration to the approaches to designing new grinding tools on flexible backing - flap grinding wheels and grinding belts having abrasive grains with certain form and orientation in their structure. Methods to estimate the shape of abrasive grains have been analyzed. Experimental data has been presented how the form of a grain affects characteristics of tools on flexible backing. Recommendations on practical application of new tools have been given

  16. Effects of cryogenic cooling by liquid nitrogen jet on forces, temperature and surface residual stresses in grinding steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, S.; Chattopadhyay, A. B.

    Grinding is a widely employed finishing process for different materials such as metals, ceramics, glass, carbides, rocks, etc. to achieve good geometrical (form) and dimensional accuracy with acceptable surface finish and surface integrity. However, it is inherently characterized by high specific energy requirements, unlike other conventional machining processes such as turning, milling, etc., which lead to a high grinding zone temperature and poor surface integrity. Many methods have been investigated to control this high grinding zone temperature, but all have their shortfalls, both technological and environmental, in exchange for controlling the grinding zone temperature. This paper briefly discusses the results obtained with regard to grinding forces, specific energy, grinding zone temperature and surface residual stress when using cryogenic cooling and compares them to the results from dry grinding and grinding with soluble oil. Cryogenic cooling seems to have the edge over other coolants in terms of controlling the temperature, residual stresses and grinding forces, and it is also environment friendly.

  17. Experimental results for absolute cylindrical wavefront testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reardon, Patrick J.; Alatawi, Ayshah

    2014-09-01

    Applications for Cylindrical and near-cylindrical surfaces are ever-increasing. However, fabrication of high quality cylindrical surfaces is limited by the difficulty of accurate and affordable metrology. Absolute testing of such surfaces represents a challenge to the optical testing community as cylindrical reference wavefronts are difficult to produce. In this paper, preliminary results for a new method of absolute testing of cylindrical wavefronts are presented. The method is based on the merging of the random ball test method with the fiber optic reference test. The random ball test assumes a large number of interferograms of a good quality sphere with errors that are statistically distributed such that the average of the errors goes to zero. The fiber optic reference test utilizes a specially processed optical fiber to provide a clean high quality reference wave from an incident line focus from the cylindrical wave under test. By taking measurements at different rotation and translations of the fiber, an analogous procedure can be employed to determine the quality of the converging cylindrical wavefront with high accuracy. This paper presents and discusses the results of recent tests of this method using a null optic formed by a COTS cylindrical lens and a free-form polished corrector element.

  18. Cylindrical millimeter-wave imaging technique for concealed weapon detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, David M.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Hall, Thomas E.

    1998-03-01

    A novel cylindrical millimeter-wave imaging technique has been developed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the detection of metallic and non-metallic concealed weapons. This technique uses a vertical array of millimeter- wave antennas which is mechanically swept around a person in a cylindrical fashion. The wideband millimeter-wave data is mathematically reconstructed into a series of high- resolution images of the person being screened. Clothing is relatively transparent to millimeter-wave illumination,whereas the human body and concealed items are reflective at millimeter wavelengths. Differences in shape and reflectivity are revealed in the images and allow a human operator to detect and identify concealed weapons. A full 360 degree scan is necessary to fully inspect a person for concealed items. The millimeter-wave images can be formed into a video animation sequence in which the person appears to rotate in front of a fixed illumination source.This is s convenient method for presenting the 3D image data for analysis. This work has been fully sponsored by the FAA. An engineering prototype based on the cylindrical imaging technique is presently under development. The FAA is currently opposed to presenting the image data directly to the operator due to personal privacy concerns. A computer automated system is desired to address this problem by eliminating operator viewing of the imagery.

  19. Cylindrical Hall Thrusters with Permanent Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Raitses, Yevgeny; Merino, Enrique; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2010-10-18

    The use of permanent magnets instead of electromagnet coils for low power Hall thrusters can offer a significant reduction of both the total electric power consumption and the thruster mass. Two permanent magnet versions of the miniaturized cylindrical Hall thruster (CHT) of different overall dimensions were operated in the power range of 50W-300 W. The discharge and plasma plume measurements revealed that the CHT thrusters with permanent magnets and electromagnet coils operate rather differently. In particular, the angular ion current density distribution from the permanent magnet thrusters has an unusual halo shape, with a majority of high energy ions flowing at large angles with respect to the thruster centerline. Differences in the magnetic field topology outside the thruster channel and in the vicinity of the channel exit are likely responsible for the differences in the plume characteristics measured for the CHTs with electromagnets and permanent magnets. It is shown that the presence of the reversing-direction or cusp-type magnetic field configuration inside the thruster channel without a strong axial magnetic field outside the thruster channel does not lead to the halo plasma plume from the CHT. __________________________________________________

  20. Evaluation of minimum quantity lubrication grinding with nano-particles and recent related patents.

    PubMed

    Li, Changhe; Wang, Sheng; Zhang, Qiang; Jia, Dongzhou

    2013-06-01

    In recent years, a large number of patents have been devoted to developing minimum quantity lubrication (MQL) grinding techniques that can significantly improve both environmentally conscious and energy saving and costeffective sustainable grinding fluid alternatives. Among them, one patent is about a supply system for the grinding fluid in nano-particle jet MQL, which produced MQL lubricant by adding solid nano-particles in degradable grinding fluid. The MQL supply device turns the lubricant to the pulse drops with fixed pressure, unchanged pulse frequency and the same drop diameter. The drops will be produced and injected in the grinding zone in the form of jet flow under high pressure gas and air seal. As people become increasingly demanding on our environment, minimum quantity lubrication has been widely used in the grinding and processing. Yet, it presents the defect of insufficient cooling performance, which confines its development. To improve the heat transfer efficiency of MQL, nano-particles of a certain mass fraction can be added in the minimum quantity of lubricant oil, which concomitantly will improve the lubrication effects in the processing. In this study, the grinding experiment corroborated the effect of nano-particles in surface grinding. In addition, compared with other forms of lubrication, the results presented that the grinding force, the friction coefficient and specific grinding energy of MQL grinding have been significantly weakened, while G ratio greatly rose. These are attributed to the friction oil-film with excellent anti-friction and anti-wear performance, which is generated nano-particles at the wheel/workpiece interface. In this research, the cooling performance of nano-particle jet MQL was analyzed. Based on tests and experiments, the surface temperature was assayed from different methods, including flood lubricating oil, dry grinding, MQL grinding and nano-particle jet MQL grinding. Because of the outstanding heat transfer

  1. Evaluation of minimum quantity lubrication grinding with nano-particles and recent related patents.

    PubMed

    Li, Changhe; Wang, Sheng; Zhang, Qiang; Jia, Dongzhou

    2013-06-01

    In recent years, a large number of patents have been devoted to developing minimum quantity lubrication (MQL) grinding techniques that can significantly improve both environmentally conscious and energy saving and costeffective sustainable grinding fluid alternatives. Among them, one patent is about a supply system for the grinding fluid in nano-particle jet MQL, which produced MQL lubricant by adding solid nano-particles in degradable grinding fluid. The MQL supply device turns the lubricant to the pulse drops with fixed pressure, unchanged pulse frequency and the same drop diameter. The drops will be produced and injected in the grinding zone in the form of jet flow under high pressure gas and air seal. As people become increasingly demanding on our environment, minimum quantity lubrication has been widely used in the grinding and processing. Yet, it presents the defect of insufficient cooling performance, which confines its development. To improve the heat transfer efficiency of MQL, nano-particles of a certain mass fraction can be added in the minimum quantity of lubricant oil, which concomitantly will improve the lubrication effects in the processing. In this study, the grinding experiment corroborated the effect of nano-particles in surface grinding. In addition, compared with other forms of lubrication, the results presented that the grinding force, the friction coefficient and specific grinding energy of MQL grinding have been significantly weakened, while G ratio greatly rose. These are attributed to the friction oil-film with excellent anti-friction and anti-wear performance, which is generated nano-particles at the wheel/workpiece interface. In this research, the cooling performance of nano-particle jet MQL was analyzed. Based on tests and experiments, the surface temperature was assayed from different methods, including flood lubricating oil, dry grinding, MQL grinding and nano-particle jet MQL grinding. Because of the outstanding heat transfer

  2. An experimental assessment on the performance of different lubrication techniques in grinding of Inconel 751.

    PubMed

    Balan, A S S; Vijayaraghavan, L; Krishnamurthy, R; Kuppan, P; Oyyaravelu, R

    2016-09-01

    The application of emulsion for combined heat extraction and lubrication requires continuous monitoring of the quality of emulsion to sustain a desired grinding environment; this is applicable to other grinding fluids as well. Thus to sustain a controlled grinding environment, it is necessary to adopt an effectively lubricated wheel-work interface. The current study was undertaken to assess experimentally the ​ effects of different grinding environments such as dry, minimum quantity lubrication (MQL) and Cryo-MQL on performance, such as grinding force, temperature, surface roughness and chip morphology on Inconel 751, a higher heat resistance material posing thermal problems and wheel loading. The results show that grinding with the combination of both liquid nitrogen (LN2) and MQL lowers temperature, cutting forces, and surface roughness as compared with MQL and dry grinding. Specific cutting energy is widely used as an inverse measure of process efficiency in machining. It is found from the results that specific cutting energy of Cryo-MQL assisted grinding is 50-65% lower than conventional dry grinding. The grindability of Inconel 751 superalloy can be enhanced with Cryo-MQL condition. PMID:27621941

  3. Profile Grinding of Superalloys with Ultrafine-Crystalline cBN Wheels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichida, Yoshio; Sato, Ryunosuke; Morimoto, Yoshitaka; Inoue, Yoshihiro

    This paper deals with the grinding characteristics of newly developed polycrystalline cBN (cBN-U) abrasives in creep feed profile grinding of nickel-based superalloys. Experiments for producing a V-shaped groove on a flat surface in one pass by creep feed grinding have been carried out using the new polycrystalline cBN-U and representative conventional cBN (cBN-B) grits. When grinding with cBN-U abrasives, both radial wear and profile wear are less, and hence the grinding ratio is around 10 times higher than that with the conventional cBN-B abrasives. Grinding forces in grinding with cBN-U abrasives are reduced by 20-30% compared with those in Grinding with cBN-B abrasives. The cBN-U abrasive is suitable for the applications with a high dimensional accuracy in creep feed profile grinding for nickel-based superalloys, because it gives less profile wear, and hence better form retention, than conventional cBN abrasive.

  4. Profile Grinding of High-Speed Steel using Ultrafine-Crystalline cBN Wheels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichida, Yoshio

    This paper deals with the grinding characteristics of newly developed ultrafine-crystalline cBN (cBN-U) abrasive grains in creep feed profile grinding of high-speed steels. Experiments for producing a V-shaped groove on a flat surface in one pass by creep feed grinding have been carried out using new polycrystalline cBN-U and representative conventional cBN (cBN-B) abrasive grains. When grinding with the cBN-U wheel, both radial wear and profile wear are less, and hence the grinding ratio is around 4 times higher than that with conventional cBN-B wheel. Grinding force in grinding with the cBN-U wheel is reduced by 5˜15 % compared with that in grinding with the cBN-B wheel. The cBN-U abrasive grain is suitable for application with a high dimensional accuracy in creep feed profile grinding for high-speed steel, because it gives less profile wear, and hence better form retention of the wheel, than conventional cBN abrasive grain.

  5. Effect of fiber orientations on surface grinding process of unidirectional C/SiC composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lifeng; Ren, Chengzu; Ji, Chunhui; Wang, Zhiqiang; Chen, Guang

    2016-03-01

    The machining mechanism of woven ceramic matrix composites is one of the most challenging problems in composite application. To elucidate the grinding mechanism of the woven ceramic matrix composites, a new model material consisting of unidirectional CVI-C/SiC was prepared and ground. The composite was ground in three typical directions and the experimental investigation of the surface grinding process for this composite is described. In addition, the micro structural characteristics and grinding mechanism of the composite were analyzed. The result shows that brittle fracture is the dominant removal mechanism for grinding of the C/SiC composites, and the destroy form of the composites is mainly the syntheses of the matrix cracking, fiber fracture, and interfacial debonding. The grinding force follows the order: Normal > Longitudinal > Transverse, and the surface roughness follows: Longitudinal > Normal > Transverse. The grinding parameters (feed speed, cut depth, grinding speed) have great influence on the grinding force and surface roughness. Based on the findings, the grinding force and surface integrity of the woven ceramic matrix composites can be predicted. Furthermore, it is expected to provide a useful guideline for the design, evaluation and optimal application of the C/SiC composites.

  6. Finishing of additively manufactured titanium alloy by shape adaptive grinding (SAG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaucamp, Anthony T.; Namba, Yoshiharu; Charlton, Phillip; Jain, Samyak; Graziano, Arthur A.

    2015-06-01

    In recent years, rapid prototyping of titanium alloy components for medical and aeronautics application has become viable thanks to advances in technologies such as electron beam melting (EBM) and selective laser sintering (SLS). However, for many applications the high surface roughness generated by additive manufacturing techniques demands a post-finishing operation to improve the surface quality prior to usage. In this paper, the novel shape adaptive grinding process has been applied to finishing titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) additively manufactured by EBM and SLS. It is shown that the micro-structured surface layer resulting from the melting process can be removed, and the surface can then be smoothed down to less than 10 nm Ra (starting from 4-5 μm Ra) using only three different diamond grit sizes. This paper also demonstrates application of the technology to freeform shapes, and documents the dimensional accuracy of finished artifacts.

  7. Fast calculation method for computer-generated cylindrical hologram based on wave propagation in spectral domain.

    PubMed

    Jackin, Boaz Jessie; Yatagai, Toyohiko

    2010-12-01

    A fast calculation method for computer generation of cylindrical holograms is proposed. The calculation method is based on wave propagation in spectral domain and in cylindrical co-ordinates, which is otherwise similar to the angular spectrum of plane waves in cartesian co-ordinates. The calculation requires only two FFT operations and hence is much faster. The theoretical background of the calculation method, sampling conditions and simulation results are presented. The generated cylindrical hologram has been tested for reconstruction in different view angles and also in plane surfaces.

  8. Changes in the aromatic profile of espresso coffee as a function of the grinding grade and extraction time: a study by the electronic nose system.

    PubMed

    Severini, C; Ricci, I; Marone, M; Derossi, A; De Pilli, T

    2015-03-01

    The changes in chemical attributes and aromatic profile of espresso coffee (EC) were studied taking into account the extraction time and grinding level as independent variables. Particularly, using an electronic nose system, the changes of the global aromatic profile of EC were highlighted. The results shown as the major amounts of organic acids, solids, and caffeine were extracted in the first 8 s of percolation. The grinding grade significantly affected the quality of EC probably as an effect of the particle size distribution and the percolation pathways of water through the coffee cake. The use of an electronic nose system allowed us to discriminate the fractions of the brew as a function of the percolation time and also the regular coffee obtained from different grinding grades. Particularly, the aromatic profile of a regular coffee (25 mL) was significantly affected by the grinding level of the coffee grounds and percolation time, which are two variables under the control of the bar operator. PMID:25665600

  9. Development of an ``intelligent grinding wheel`` for in-process monitoring of ceramic grinding. Semi-annual report {number_sign}1

    SciTech Connect

    Malkin, S.; Gao, R.; Guo, C.; Varghese, B.; Pathare, S.

    1997-03-27

    The overall objective of this project is to develop sensor-integrated ``intelligent`` diamond wheels for grinding of ceramics. Such wheels will be ``smart`` enough to monitor and supervise both the wheel preparation and grinding processes without the need to instrument the machine tool. Intelligent wheels will utilize reusable cores integrated with two types of sensors: acoustic emission (AE) and dynamic force transducers. Signals from the sensors will be transmitted from a rotating wheel to a receiver by telemetry. Wheels will be ``trained`` to recognize distinct characteristics associated with truing, dressing and grinding.

  10. In-process EDM truing to generate complex contours on metal-bond, superabrasive grinding wheels for precision grinding structural ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Piscotty, M.A.; Davis, P.J.; Saito, T.T.; Blaedel, K.L.; Griffith, L.

    1997-08-01

    The demand and use of precision grinding of structural ceramics continue to increase as the worldwide advanced ceramic industry surpasses $20 billion is sales. Included in this industry are engineering structural ceramics, electronic ceramics, bioceramics and others. These materials are used in applications such as engine components, casting and extrusion dies, bearings, medical implants, nozzles, thermal insulators, and more. Along with the variety of ceramic applications comes a broad range of precision requirements, which in turn leads to various required processes to accommodate a spectrum of specifications. A process for grinding ceramic components to micrometer tolerances was employed and further developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for two separate grinding projects.

  11. Analysis on Node Position of Imperfect Resonators for Cylindrical Shell Gyroscopes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zidan; Wu, Yulie; Xi, Xiang; Zhang, Yongmeng; Wu, Xuezhong

    2016-01-01

    For cylindrical shell gyroscopes, node position of their operating eigenmodes has an important influence on the gyroscopes' performance. It is considered that the nodes are equally separated from each other by 90° when the resonator vibrates in the standing wave eigenmode. However, we found that, due to manufacturing errors and trimming, the nodes may not be equally distributed. This paper mainly analyzes the influences of unbalanced masses on the cylindrical resonators' node position, by using FEM simulation and experimental measurement. PMID:27483284

  12. Analysis on Node Position of Imperfect Resonators for Cylindrical Shell Gyroscopes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zidan; Wu, Yulie; Xi, Xiang; Zhang, Yongmeng; Wu, Xuezhong

    2016-01-01

    For cylindrical shell gyroscopes, node position of their operating eigenmodes has an important influence on the gyroscopes’ performance. It is considered that the nodes are equally separated from each other by 90° when the resonator vibrates in the standing wave eigenmode. However, we found that, due to manufacturing errors and trimming, the nodes may not be equally distributed. This paper mainly analyzes the influences of unbalanced masses on the cylindrical resonators’ node position, by using FEM simulation and experimental measurement. PMID:27483284

  13. Growing yeast into cylindrical colonies.

    PubMed

    Vulin, Clément; Di Meglio, Jean-Marc; Lindner, Ariel B; Daerr, Adrian; Murray, Andrew; Hersen, Pascal

    2014-05-20

    Microorganisms often form complex multicellular assemblies such as biofilms and colonies. Understanding the interplay between assembly expansion, metabolic yield, and nutrient diffusion within a freely growing colony remains a challenge. Most available data on microorganisms are from planktonic cultures, due to the lack of experimental tools to control the growth of multicellular assemblies. Here, we propose a method to constrain the growth of yeast colonies into simple geometric shapes such as cylinders. To this end, we designed a simple, versatile culture system to control the location of nutrient delivery below a growing colony. Under such culture conditions, yeast colonies grow vertically and only at the locations where nutrients are delivered. Colonies increase in height at a steady growth rate that is inversely proportional to the cylinder radius. We show that the vertical growth rate of cylindrical colonies is not defined by the single-cell division rate, but rather by the colony metabolic yield. This contrasts with cells in liquid culture, in which the single-cell division rate is the only parameter that defines the population growth rate. This method also provides a direct, simple method to estimate the metabolic yield of a colony. Our study further demonstrates the importance of the shape of colonies on setting their expansion. We anticipate that our approach will be a starting point for elaborate studies of the population dynamics, evolution, and ecology of microbial colonies in complex landscapes. PMID:24853750

  14. Application of electrolytic in-process dressing for high-efficiency grinding of ceramic parts. Research activities 1995--96

    SciTech Connect

    Bandyopadhyay, B.P.

    1997-02-01

    The application of Electrolytic In-Process Dressing (ELID) for highly efficient and stable grinding of ceramic parts is discussed. This research was performed at the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), Tokyo, Japan, June 1995 through August 1995. Experiments were conducted using a vertical machining center. The silicon nitride work material, of Japanese manufacture and supplied in the form of a rectangular block, was clamped to a vice which was firmly fixed on the base of a strain gage dynamometer. The dynamometer was clamped on the machining center table. Reciprocating grinding was performed with a flat-faced diamond grinding wheel. The output from the dynamometer was recorded with a data acquisition system and the normal component of the force was monitored. Experiments were carried out under various cutting conditions, different ELID conditions, and various grinding wheel bonds types. Rough grinding wheels of grit sizes {number_sign}170 and {number_sign}140 were used in the experiments. Compared to conventional grinding, there was a significant reduction in grinding force with ELID grinding. Therefore, ELID grinding can be recommended for high material removal rate grinding, low rigidity machines, and low rigidity workpieces. Compared to normal grinding, a reduction in grinding ratio was observed when ELID grinding was performed. A negative aspect of the process, this reduced G-ratio derives from bond erosion and can be improved somewhat by adjustments in the ELID current. The results of this investigation are discussed in detail in this report.

  15. Effects of imbalance and geometric error on precision grinding machines

    SciTech Connect

    Bibler, J.E.

    1997-06-01

    To study balancing in grinding, a simple mechanical system was examined. It was essential to study such a well-defined system, as opposed to a large, complex system such as a machining center. The use of a compact, well-defined system enabled easy quantification of the imbalance force input, its phase angle to any geometric decentering, and good understanding of the machine mode shapes. It is important to understand a simple system such as the one I examined given that imbalance is so intimately coupled to machine dynamics. It is possible to extend the results presented here to industrial machines, although that is not part of this work. In addition to the empirical testing, a simple mechanical system to look at how mode shapes, balance, and geometric error interplay to yield spindle error motion was modelled. The results of this model will be presented along with the results from a more global grinding model. The global model, presented at ASPE in November 1996, allows one to examine the effects of changing global machine parameters like stiffness and damping. This geometrically abstract, one-dimensional model will be presented to demonstrate the usefulness of an abstract approach for first-order understanding but it will not be the main focus of this thesis. 19 refs., 36 figs., 10 tables.

  16. Jet mixing in a reacting cylindrical crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leong, M. Y.; Samuelsen, G. S.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1995-01-01

    This paper addresses the mixing of air jets into the hot, fuel-rich products of a gas turbine primary zone. The mixing, as a result, occurs in a reacting environment with chemical conversion and substantial heat release. The geometry is a crossflow confined in a cylindrical duct with side-wall injection of jets issuing from round orifices. A specially designed reactor, operating on propane, presents a uniform mixture without swirl to mixing modules consisting of 8, 9, 10, and 12 holes at a momentum-flux ratio of 57 and a jet-to-mainstream mass-flow ratio of 2.5. Concentrations of O2, CO2, CO, and HC are obtained upstream, downstream, and within the orifice plane. O2 profiles indicate jet penetration while CO2, CO, and HC profiles depict the extent of reaction. Jet penetration is observed to be a function of the number of orifices and is found to affect the mixing in the reacting system. The results demonstrate that one module (the 12-hole) produces near-optimal penetration defined here as a jet penetration closest to the module half-radius, and hence the best uniform mixture at a plane one duct radius from the orifice leading edge.

  17. Electron emitter pulsed-type cylindrical IEC

    SciTech Connect

    Miley, G.H.; Gu, Y.; Stubbers, R.; Zich, R.; Sved, J.; Anderl, R.; Hartwell, J.

    1997-12-31

    A cylindrical version of the single grid Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) device (termed the C-device) has been developed for use as a 2.5-MeV D-D fusion neutron source for neutron activation analysis. The C-device employs a hollow-tube type cathode with similar anodes backed up by ``reflector`` dishes. The resulting discharge differs from a conventional hollow cathode discharge, by creating an explicit ion beam which is ``pinched`` in the cathode region. Resulting fusion reactions generate {approximately}10{sup 6} neutron/s. A pulsed version is under development for applications requiring higher fluxes. Several pulsing techniques are under study, including an electron emitter (e-emitter) assisted discharge in a thorated tungsten wire emitter located behind a slotted area in the reflector dishes. Pulsing is initiated after establishing a low power steady-state discharge by pulsing the e-emitter current using a capacitor switch type circuit. The resulting electron jet, coupled with the discharge by the biased slot array, creates a strong pulse in the pinched ion beam. The pulse length/repetition rate are controlled by the e-emitter pulse circuit. Typical parameters in present studies are {approximately}30{micro}s, 10Hz and 1-amp ion current. Corresponding neutron measurements are an In-foil type activation counter for time averaged rates. Results for a wide variety of operating conditions are presented.

  18. Thermal Model to Investigate the Temperature in Bone Grinding for Skull Base Neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lihui; Tai, Bruce L.; Wang, Guangjun; Zhang, Kuibang; Sullivan, Stephen; Shih, Albert J.

    2013-01-01

    This study develops a thermal model utilizing the inverse heat transfer method (IHTM) to investigate the bone grinding temperature created by a spherical diamond tool used for skull base neurosurgery. Bone grinding is a critical procedure in the expanded endonasal approach to remove the cranial bone and access to the skull base tumor via nasal corridor. The heat is generated during grinding and could damage the nerve or coagulate the blood in the carotid artery adjacent to the bone. The finite element analysis is adopted to investigate the grinding-induced bone temperature rise. The heat source distribution is defined by the thermal model, and the temperature distribution is solved using the IHTM with experimental inputs. Grinding experiments were conducted on a bovine cortical bone with embedded thermocouples. Results show significant temperature rise in bone grinding. Using 50°C as the threshold, the thermal injury can propagate about 3 mm in the traverse direction, and 3 mm below the ground surface under the dry grinding condition. The presented methodology demonstrated the capability of being a thermal analysis tool for bone grinding study. PMID:23683875

  19. Capturing action of cooling lubricants in grinding and evaluation of its effectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyukhta, A. V.; Khandozhko, A. V.; Vasilenko, Yu V.

    2016-04-01

    Methods of coolant supply are considered to be aiming at capturing and neutralization of the flare of grinding waste and noxious coolant fumes during flat grinding with a wheel periphery. Study and evaluation of the new coolant functional property - capturing - are presented.

  20. Maize proximate composition and physical properties correlations to dry-grind ethanol concentrations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dry grind ethanol plants incur economic losses due to seasonal variations in ethanol yields. One possible cause associated with ethanol yield variability is incoming grain quality. There is little published information on factors causing variation in dry grind ethanol concentrations. The objective o...

  1. Evaporator fouling tendencies of thin stillage and concentrates from the dry grind process

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the US, more than 200 maize processing plants use multiple effect evaporators to remove water from thin stillage and steepwater during dry grind and wet milling processes, respectively. During the dry grind process, unfermentables are centrifuged and the liquid fraction, thin stillage, is concen...

  2. Research on machining error compensation in high-precision surface grinding machine for optical aspheric elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Xiaolong; Guo, Yinbiao; Zhang, Shihan; Huang, Hao

    2010-10-01

    Using aspheric component in optical system can correct optical aberration, acquire high imaging quality, improve the optical characteristic, simplify system structure, and reduce system volume. Nowadays, high-precision surface grinding machine is an important approach to processing optical aspheric elements. However, because of the characteristics of optical aspheric elements, the processing method makes a higher demand to whole performance of surface grinding machine, and hardly to achieve ideal machining effect. Taking high generality and efficiency into account, this paper presents a compensation method for machining errors of high-precision surface grinding machine, which bases on optical aspheric elements, to achieve high-precision machining for all kinds of optical aspheric elements. After compensation, the machining accuracy of grinding machine could reach 2um/200×200mm. The research bases on NC surface grinding machine which is self developed. First of all, this paper introduces machining principle for optical aspheric elements on the grinding machine. And then error sources which producing errors are analyzed. By contacting and non-contacting measurement sensors, measurement software which is self designed realizes on-position measure for grinded workpiece, then fits surface precision and machining errors. Through compensation software for machining error which is self designed, compensation algorithm is designed and translated compensation data into G-code for the high-precision grinding machine to achieve compensation machining. Finally, by comparison between machining error compensation before and after processing, the experiments for this purpose are done to validate the compensation machining accuracy.

  3. [Study on grinding of base metal alloys. 5. Constant pressure grinding of a Ni-Cr alloy with electro-deposited wheels].

    PubMed

    Miyakawa, O; Watanabe, K; Okawa, S; Nakano, S; Shiokawa, N; Kobayashi, M; Tamura, H

    1989-09-01

    The grinding techniques and electro-deposited wheels suitable for a 13% Cr-Ni dental casting alloy were determined. The lever-type grinding test machine modified in the previous study was used to investigate the grinding performance of experimental wheels of CBN- and diamond-particles. Depression of the diamond wheel against the work yielded unfavorable grinding results. Not only depression of the wheel against it but also moving the wheel over it with a heavier pressure is desired for higher grinding efficiency and its durability. Probably, the undurability of this wheel is associated with abrasive attrition due to oxidation or some chemical reaction with the work. The CBN wheel had not been suitable for the Co-Cr alloy tested in the third paper, but it exhibited very excellent performance for grinding of the Ni-Cr alloy, even without being moved over the work. Although being high in cost, the CBN wheel may pay for the very high performance and its durability.

  4. Comparison of Materials for Use in the Precision Grinding of Optical Components

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Boyd M. III; Miller, Arthur C. Jr.; Egert, Charles M.

    1997-12-31

    Precision grinding of optical components is becoming an accepted practice for rapidly and deterministically fabrication optical surfaces to final or near-final surface finish and figure. In this paper, a comparison of grinding techniques and materials is performed. Flat and spherical surfaces were ground in three different substrate materials: BK7 glass, chemical vapor deposited (CVD) silicon carbide ceramic, and sapphire. Spherical surfaces were used to determine the contouring capacity of the process, and flat surfaces were used for surface finish measurements. The recently developed Precitech Optimum 2800 diamond turning and grinding platform was used to grind surfaces in 40mm diameter substrates sapphire and silicon carbide substrates and 200 mm BK7 glass substrates using diamond grinding wheels. The results of this study compare the surface finish and figure for the three materials.

  5. Crack problems in cylindrical and spherical shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.

    1976-01-01

    Standard plate or shell theories were used as a starting point to study the fracture problems in thin-walled cylindrical and spherical shells, assuming that the plane of the crack is perpendicular to the surface of the sheet. Since recent studies have shown that local shell curvatures may have a rather considerable effect on the stress intensity factor, the crack problem was considered in conjunction with a shell rather than a plate theory. The material was assumed to be isotropic and homogeneous, so that approximate solutions may be obtained by approximating the local shell crack geometry with an ideal shell which has a solution, namely a spherical shell with a meridional crack, a cylindrical shell with a circumferential crack, or a cylindrical shell with an axial crack. A method of solution for the specially orthotropic shells containing a crack was described; symmetric and skew-symmetric problems are considered in cylindrical shells with an axial crack.

  6. Stability analysis of cylindrical Vlasov equilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Short, R W

    1980-02-01

    A method is presented for the fully kinetic, nonlocal stability analysis of cylindrically symmetric equilibria. Applications to the lower hybrid drift instability and the modes associated with a finite-width relativistic E-layer are discussed.

  7. View factors of cylindrical spiral surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, Vladimir A.; Solovjov, Vladimir P.

    2016-03-01

    Analytical expressions are presented for the view factors (radiative configuration factors) associated with the flat right cylindrical spiral surface. Such cylindrical spiral systems are widely applied as electrical resistance heating elements for lighting devices, electronic radio tubes, high-speed gas flow heaters, and other appliances used for scientific, industrial and domestic purposes. Derivation of the view factors is based on the invariant principles and the results presented in Lebedev (2000, 2003,1988) [1-3].

  8. Damage experiments in cylindrical geometry update

    SciTech Connect

    Kaul, Anne; Holtkamp, David; Rodriguez, George

    2009-01-01

    Using a cylindrical configuration to study spallation damage allows for a natural recollection of the damaged material under proper driving conditions. Previous experiments provided data about failure initiation in aluminum in a cylindrical geometry and the behavior of material recollected after damage from pressures in the damage initiation regime. The current series of experiments studied the behavior of material recollected after complete failure. Results from the current experiments will be presented.

  9. A Solid Core Heatpipe Reactor with Cylindrical Thermoelectric Converter Modules

    SciTech Connect

    Sayre, Edwin D.; Vaidyanathan, Sam

    2006-01-20

    A nuclear space power system that consists of a solid metal nuclear reactor core with heat pipes carrying energy to a cylindrical thermoelectric converter surrounding each of the heat pipes with a heat pipe radiator surrounding the thermoelectric converter is the most simple and reliable space power system. This means no single point of failure since each heat pipe and cylindrical converter is a separate power system and if one fails it will not affect the others. The heat pipe array in the solid core is designed so that if an isolated heat pipe or even two adjacent heat pipes fail, the remaining heat pipes will still transport the core heat without undue overheating of the uranium nitride fuel. The primary emphasis in this paper is on simplicity, reliability and fabricability of such a space nuclear power source. The core and heat pipes are made of Niobium 1% Zirconium alloy (Nb1Zr), with rhenium lined fuel tubes, bonded together by hot isostatic pressure (HIPing) and with sodium as the heat pipe working fluid, can be operated up to 1250K. The cylindrical thermoelectric converter is made by depositing the constituents of the converter around a Nb1%Zr tube and encasing it in a Nb 1% Zr alloy tube and HIPing the structure to get final bonding and to produce residual compressive stresses in all brittle materials in the converter. A radiator heat pipe filled with potassium that operates at 850K is bonded to the outside of the cylindrical converter for cooling. The solid core heat pipe and cylindrical converter are mated by welding during the final assembly. A solid core reactor with 150 heat pipes with a 0.650-inch (1.65 cm) ID and a 30-inch (76.2 cm) length with an output of 8 Watts per square inch as demonstrated by the SP100 PD2 cell tests will produce about 80 KW of electrical power. An advanced solid core reactor made with molybdenum 47% rhenium alloy, with lithium heat pipes and the PD2 theoretical output of 11 watts per square inch or advanced higher

  10. A Solid Core Heatpipe Reactor with Cylindrical Thermoelectric Converter Modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayre, Edwin D.; Vaidyanathan, Sam

    2006-01-01

    A nuclear space power system that consists of a solid metal nuclear reactor core with heat pipes carrying energy to a cylindrical thermoelectric converter surrounding each of the heat pipes with a heat pipe radiator surrounding the thermoelectric converter is the most simple and reliable space power system. This means no single point of failure since each heat pipe and cylindrical converter is a separate power system and if one fails it will not affect the others. The heat pipe array in the solid core is designed so that if an isolated heat pipe or even two adjacent heat pipes fail, the remaining heat pipes will still transport the core heat without undue overheating of the uranium nitride fuel. The primary emphasis in this paper is on simplicity, reliability and fabricability of such a space nuclear power source. The core and heat pipes are made of Niobium 1% Zirconium alloy (Nb1Zr), with rhenium lined fuel tubes, bonded together by hot isostatic pressure, (HIPing) and with sodium as the heat pipe working fluid, can be operated up to 1250K. The cylindrical thermoelectric converter is made by depositing the constituents of the converter around a Nb1%Zr tube and encasing it in a Nb 1% Zr alloy tube and HIPing the structure to get final bonding and to produce residual compressive stresses in all brittle materials in the converter. A radiator heat pipe filled with potassium that operates at 850K is bonded to the outside of the cylindrical converter for cooling. The solid core heat pipe and cylindrical converter are mated by welding during the final assembly. A solid core reactor with 150 heat pipes with a 0.650-inch (1.65 cm) ID and a 30-inch (76.2 cm) length with an output of 8 Watts per square inch as demonstrated by the SP100 PD2 cell tests will produce about 80 KW of electrical power. An advanced solid core reactor made with molybdenum 47% rhenium alloy, with lithium heat pipes and the PD2 theoretical output of 11 watts per square inch or advanced higher

  11. Simulating flow and segregation of cylindrical particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yongzhi; Umbanhowar, Paul B.; Lueptow, Richard M.

    2015-11-01

    Efficient and accurate simulation of cylindrical particles using discrete element method (DEM) is a challenge. Typical approaches to simulating cylindrical particle systems are based on the glued spheres method, which has low accuracy, or real shape models, which have high computational cost. In this work we utilize super-ellipsoids, which belong to super-quadrics, to model cylindrical particles in DEM simulations. Simulations of a single cylinder impacting a flat wall indicate that super-ellipsoids provide the same accuracy as real shape models and much better accuracy than the glued sphere method. Simulations of super-ellipsoid cylindrical particles in rotating tumblers result in nearly the same angle of repose as experiments and real shape simulations, demonstrating the accuracy of super-ellipsoid DEM simulations for multi-particle systems. The segregation of bidisperse cylindrical particles differing in length in a bounded heap was simulated by super-ellipsoid DEM, and the results are similar to the experiment. In spite of these advantages of using super-ellipsoid cylindrical particles, simulations of filling a box with particles indicate that the simulation times for super-ellipsoid cylinders is about an order of magnitude longer than that for the same number of spherical particles.

  12. Comparison of tungsten carbide and stainless steel ball bearings for grinding single maize kernels in a reciprocating grinder

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reciprocating grinders can grind single maize kernels by shaking the kernel in a vial with a ball bearing. This process results in a grind quality that is not satisfactory for many experiments. Tungesten carbide ball bearings are nearly twice as dense as steel, so we compared their grinding performa...

  13. Tunnel Point Cloud Filtering Method Based on Elliptic Cylindrical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhua, Ningning; Jiaa, Yonghong; Luo, Lun

    2016-06-01

    The large number of bolts and screws that attached to the subway shield ring plates, along with the great amount of accessories of metal stents and electrical equipments mounted on the tunnel walls, make the laser point cloud data include lots of non-tunnel section points (hereinafter referred to as non-points), therefore affecting the accuracy for modeling and deformation monitoring. This paper proposed a filtering method for the point cloud based on the elliptic cylindrical model. The original laser point cloud data was firstly projected onto a horizontal plane, and a searching algorithm was given to extract the edging points of both sides, which were used further to fit the tunnel central axis. Along the axis the point cloud was segmented regionally, and then fitted as smooth elliptic cylindrical surface by means of iteration. This processing enabled the automatic filtering of those inner wall non-points. Experiments of two groups showed coincident results, that the elliptic cylindrical model based method could effectively filter out the non-points, and meet the accuracy requirements for subway deformation monitoring. The method provides a new mode for the periodic monitoring of tunnel sections all-around deformation in subways routine operation and maintenance.

  14. A study of energy-size relationship and wear rate in a lab-scale high pressure grinding rolls unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashidi Dashtbayaz, Samira

    This study is focused on two independent topics of energy-size relationship and wear-rate measurements on a lab-scale high pressure grinding rolls (HPGR). The first part of this study has been aimed to investigate the influence of the operating parameters and the feed characteristics on the particle-bed breakage using four different ore samples in a 200 mm x 100 mm lab-scale HPGR. Additionally, multistage grinding, scale-up from a lab-scale HPGR, and prediction of the particle size distributions have been studied in detail. The results obtained from energy-size relationship studies help with better understanding of the factors contributing to more energy-efficient grinding. It will be shown that the energy efficiency of the two configurations of locked-cycle and open multipass is completely dependent on the ore properties. A test procedure to produce the scale-up data is presented. The comparison of the scale-up factors between the data obtained on the University of Utah lab-scale HPGR and the industrial machine at the Newmont Boddington plant confirmed the applicability of lab-scale machines for trade-off studies. The population balance model for the simulation of product size distributions has shown to work well with the breakage function estimated through tests performed on the HPGR at high rotational speed. Selection function has been estimated by back calculation of population balance model with the help of the experimental data. This is considered to be a major step towards advancing current research on the simulation of particle size distribution by using the HPGR machine for determining the breakage function. Developing a technique/setup to measure the wear rate of the HPGR rolls' surface is the objective of the second topic of this dissertation. A mockup was initially designed to assess the application of the linear displacement sensors for measuring the rolls' weight loss. Upon the analysis of that technique and considering the corresponding sources of

  15. Pyrolysis of a waste from the grinding of scrap tyres.

    PubMed

    Fernández, A M; Barriocanal, C; Alvarez, R

    2012-02-15

    The fibres that are used to reinforce tyres can be recovered as a waste in the process of grinding of scrap tyres. In this paper beneficiation through pyrolysis is studied since the fibres are made up of polymers with a small amount of rubber because the latter is difficult to separate. The experiments were performed at three temperatures (400, 550 and 900°C) in a horizontal oven. The three products - gas, oil and char - obtained from the pyrolysis were investigated. The composition of the gas was analyzed by means of gas chromatography. The oil was studied by gas chromatography and infrared spectroscopy. The char porous structure was determined by N(2) adsorption. In addition, the topography of the chars was studied by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The products resulting from the pyrolysis of the fibres were compared with those obtained from scrap rubber.

  16. Automated inspection and precision grinding of spiral bevel gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frint, Harold

    1987-01-01

    The results are presented of a four phase MM&T program to define, develop, and evaluate an improved inspection system for spiral bevel gears. The improved method utilizes a multi-axis coordinate measuring machine which maps the working flank of the tooth and compares it to nominal reference values stored in the machine's computer. A unique feature of the system is that corrective grinding machine settings can be automatically calculated and printed out when necessary to correct an errant tooth profile. This new method eliminates most of the subjective decision making involved in the present method, which compares contact patterns obtained when the gear set is run under light load in a rolling test machine. It produces a higher quality gear with significant inspection time and cost savings.

  17. Intra-pulp temperature increase of equine cheek teeth during treatment with motorized grinding systems: influence of grinding head position and rotational speed

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In equine practice, teeth corrections by means of motorized grinding systems are standard procedure. The heat resulting from that treatment may cause irreparable damage to the dental pulp. It has been shown that a 5.5°C temperature rise may cause severe destruction in pulp cells. Hence, the capability to continuously form secondary dentine is lost, and may lead, due to equine-typical occlusal tooth abrasion, to an opening of the pulp cavity. To obtain reliable data on the intra-pulp increase in temperature during corrective treatments, equine cheek teeth (CT) were modified in a way (occlusal surface smoothed, apical parts detached, pulp horns standardized) that had been qualified in own former published studies. All parameters influencing the grinding process were standardized (force applied, initial temperatures, dimensions of pulp horns, positioning of grinding disk, rotational speed). During grinding experiments, imitating real dental treatments, the time span for an intra-pulp temperature increase of 5.5°C was determined. Results The minimum time recorded for an intra-pulp temperature increase of 5.5°C was 38 s in mandibular CT (buccal grinding, 12,000 rpm) and 70 s in maxillary CT (flat occlusal grinding, 12,000 rpm). The data obtained showed that doubling the rotational speed of the disk results in halving the time span after which the critical intra-pulp temperature increase in maxillary CT is reached. For mandibular CT, the time span even drops by two thirds. Conclusion The use of standardized hypsodont CT enabled comparative studies of intra-pulp heating during the grinding of occlusal tooth surfaces using different tools and techniques. The anatomical structure of the natural vital hypsodont tooth must be kept in mind, so that the findings of this study do not create a deceptive sense of security with regard to the time-dependent heating of the native pulp. PMID:24559121

  18. Multipole analysis of circular cylindrical magnetic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvaggi, Jerry P.

    This thesis deals with an alternate method for computing the external magnetic field from a circular cylindrical magnetic source. The primary objective is to characterize the magnetic source in terms of its equivalent multipole distribution. This multipole distribution must be valid at points close to the cylindrical source and a spherical multipole expansion is ill-equipped to handle this problem; therefore a new method must be introduced. This method, based upon the free-space Green's function in cylindrical coordinates, is developed as an alternative to the more familiar spherical harmonic expansion. A family of special functions, called the toroidal functions or Q-functions, are found to exhibit the necessary properties for analyzing circular cylindrical geometries. In particular, the toroidal function of zeroth order, which comes from the integral formulation of the free-space Green's function in cylindrical coordinates, is employed to handle magnetic sources which exhibit circular cylindrical symmetry. The toroidal functions, also called Q-functions, are the weighting coefficients in a "Fourier series-like" expansion which represents the free-space Green's function. It is also called a toroidal expansion. This expansion can be directly employed in electrostatic, magnetostatic, and electrodynamic problems which exhibit cylindrical symmetry. Also, it is shown that they can be used as an alternative to the Elliptic integral formulation. In fact, anywhere that an Elliptic integral appears, one can replace it with its corresponding Q-function representation. A number of problems, using the toroidal expansion formulation, are analyzed and compared to existing known methods in order to validate the results. Also, the equivalent multipole distribution is found for most of the solved problems along with its corresponding physical interpretation. The main application is to characterize the external magnetic field due to a six-pole permanent magnet motor in terms of its

  19. Performance of a Low-Power Cylindrical Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Markusic, Thomas E.; Stanojev, Boris J.; Dehoyos, Amado; Raitses, Yevgeny; Smirnov, Artem; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2007-01-01

    Recent mission studies have shown that a Hall thruster which operates at relatively constant thrust efficiency (45-55%) over a broad power range (300W - 3kW) is enabling for deep space science missions when compared with slate-of-the-art ion thrusters. While conventional (annular) Hall thrusters can operate at high thrust efficiency at kW power levels, it is difficult to construct one that operates over a broad power envelope down to 0 (100 W) while maintaining relatively high efficiency. In this note we report the measured performance (I(sub sp), thrust and efficiency) of a cylindrical Hall thruster operating at 0 (100 W) input power.

  20. Novel grinding stone used for polishing 3D plastic replica with rapid prototyping technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Wang; Niikura, Yoshihiro; Sato, Toshio; Kawashima, Norimichi

    2006-01-01

    Rapid prototyping (RP) apparatus accepts a specific format translated from CAD data (patient's CT) and "slices" it into two-dimensional cross sections for laser photo curing. Surgeon can conduct safer surgery by reappearing on an actual model using 3D plastic replica in the preoperative. Polishing has to be used to eliminate the marks after removal of supports and the build layer pitches. Complicated and narrow areas of the 3D replica are difficult to be polished with the conventional grinding stone. This study proposes a novel grinding stone and introduces its producing process and characteristics. The novel grinding stone has many advantages as follows; (1) Preparation is possible of grinding stone that follows the complicated shape. (2) Grinding stone with uniformly dispersed abrasive grains can be prepared using magnetic particles and magnetic field. (3) Reshaping of grinding stone by heating is possible since the binder is made of a thermoplastic resin. (4) Every process can easily be carried out. We could polish to eliminate the marks after removal of supports and the build layer pitches on 3D plastic replica surface with the grinding stone.

  1. Analysis of grinding of superalloys and ceramics for off-line process optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathyanarayanan, G.

    The present study has compared the performances of resinoid, vitrified, and electroplated CBN wheels in creep feed grinding of M42 and D2 tool steels. Responses such as a specific energy, normal and tangential forces, and surface roughness were used as measures of performance. It was found that creep feed grinding with resinoid, vitrified, and electroplated CBN wheels has its own advantages, but no single wheel could provide good finish, lower specific energy, and high material removal rates simultaneously. To optimize the CBN grinding with different bonded wheels, a Multiple Criteria Decision Making (MCDM) methodology was used. Creep feed grinding of superalloys, Ti-6Al-4V and Inconel 718, has been modeled by utilizing neural networks to optimize the grinding process. A parallel effort was directed at creep feed grinding of alumina ceramics with diamond wheels to investigate the influence of process variables on responses based on experimental results and statistical analysis. The conflicting influence of variables was observed. This led to the formulation of ceramic grinding process as a multi-objective nonlinear mixed integer problem.

  2. Grinding efficiency of abutment tooth with both dentin and core composite resin on axial plane.

    PubMed

    Miho, Otoaki; Sato, Toru; Matsukubo, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate grinding efficiency in abutment teeth comprising both dentin and core composite resin in the axial plane. Grinding was performed over 5 runs at two loads (0.5 or 0.25 N) and two feed rates (1 or 2 mm/sec). The grinding surface was observed with a 3-D laser microscope. Tomographic images of the grinding surfaces captured perpendicular to the feed direction were also analyzed. Using a non-ground surface as a reference, areas comprising only dentin, both dentin and core composite resin, or only core composite resin were analyzed to determine the angle of the grinding surface. Composite resins were subjected to the Vickers hardness test and scanning electron microscopy. Data were statistically analyzed using a one-way analysis of variance and multiple comparison tests. Multiple regression analysis was performed for load, feed rate, and Vickers hardness of the build-up material depending on number of runs. When grinding was performed at a constant load and feed rate, a greater grinding angle was observed in areas comprising both dentin and composite resin or only composite resin than in areas consisting of dentin alone. A correlation was found between machinability and load or feed rate in areas comprising both dentin and composite resin or composite resin alone, with a particularly high correlation being observed between machinability and load. These results suggest that great caution should be exercised in a clinical setting when the boundary between the dentin and composite resin is to be ground, as the angle of the grinding surface changes when the rotating diamond point begins grinding the composite resin. PMID:25765571

  3. The Dizzying Depths of the Cylindrical Mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeWeerd, Alan J.; Hill, S. Eric

    2005-02-01

    A typical introduction to geometrical optics treats plane and spherical mirrors. At first glance, it may be surprising that texts seldom mention the cylindrical mirror, except for the occasional reference to use in fun houses and to viewing anamorphic art.1,2 However, even a cursory treatment reveals its complexity. Holzberlein used an extended object to qualitatively illustrate that images are produced both before and behind a concave cylindrical mirror.3 He also speculated on how this extreme astigmatism results in an observer's dizziness. By considering a simple point object, we make a more detailed analysis of the cylindrical mirror and the dizziness it induces. First, we illustrate how rays from a point object reflect to form not one point image but two line images. Next, we describe how an observer perceives a likeness of the object. Finally, we suggest how confusing depth cues induce dizziness. Although we focus on the concave cylindrical mirror, the discussion is easy to generalize to the convex cylindrical mirror.

  4. Scattering cancellation by metamaterial cylindrical multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tricarico, S.; Bilotti, F.; Vegni, L.

    2009-05-01

    In this paper, we present the theoretical analysis and the design of cylindrical multilayered electromagnetic cloaks based on the scattering cancellation technique. We propose at first the analysis and the design of bi-layered cylindrical shells, made of homogenous and isotropic metamaterials, in order to effectively reduce the scattered field from a dielectric cylindrical object. The single shell and the bi-layered shell cases are compared in terms of scattering reduction and loss effects. The comparison shows that the bi-layered configuration exhibits superior performances. The scattering cancellation approach, is, then, extended to the case of generic multilayered cylindrical shells, considering again homogeneous and isotropic metamaterials. The employment of the proposed technique to the case of cloaking devices working at multiple frequencies is also envisaged and discussed. Finally, some practical layouts of cylindrical electromagnetic cloaks working at optical frequencies are also proposed. In these configurations, the homogenous and isotropic metamaterials are replaced by their actual counterparts, obtained using alternating stacked plasmonic and non-plasmonic layers. The theoretical formulation and the design approaches presented throughout the paper are validated through proper full-wave numerical simulations.

  5. Antimicrobial Peptides in Toroidal and Cylindrical Pores

    PubMed Central

    Mihajlovic, Maja

    2010-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are small, usually cationic peptides, which permeabilize biological membranes. Their mechanism of action is still not well understood. Here we investigate the preference of alamethicin and melittin for pores of different shapes, using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the peptides in pre-formed toroidal and cylindrical pores. When an alamethicin hexamer is initially embedded in a cylindrical pore, at the end of the simulation the pore remains cylindrical or closes if glutamines in the N-termini are not located within the pore. On the other hand, when a melittin tetramer is embedded in toroidal pore or in a cylindrical pore, at the end of the simulation the pore is lined both with peptides and lipid headgroups, and, thus, can be classified as a toroidal pore. These observations agree with the prevailing views that alamethicin forms barrel-stave pores whereas melittin forms toroidal pores. Both alamethicin and melittin form amphiphilic helices in the presence of membranes, but their net charge differs; at pH ~7, the net charge of alamethicin is −1 whereas that of melittin is +5. This gives rise to stronger electrostatic interactions of melittin with membranes than those of alamethicin. The melittin tetramer interacts more strongly with lipids in the toroidal pore than in the cylindrical one, due to more favorable electrostatic interactions. PMID:20403332

  6. Process diagnostics for precision grinding brittle materials in a production environment

    SciTech Connect

    Blaedel, K L; Davis, P J; Piscotty, M A

    1999-04-01

    Precision grinding processes are steadily migrating from research laboratory environments into manufacturing production lines as precision machines and processes become increasingly more commonplace throughout industry. Low-roughness, low-damage precision grinding is gaining widespread commercial acceptance for a host of brittle materials including advanced structural ceramics. The development of these processes is often problematic and requires diagnostic information and analysis to harden the processes for manufacturing. This paper presents a series of practical precision grinding tests developed and practiced at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory that yield important information to help move a new process idea into production.

  7. Simulation and analysis of grinding wheel based on Gaussian mixture model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Yulun; Li, Haolin

    2012-12-01

    This article presents an application of numerical simulation technique for the generation and analysis of the grinding wheel surface topographies. The ZETA 20 imaging and metrology microscope is employed to measure the surface topographies. The Gaussian mixture model (GMM) is used to transform the measured non-Gaussian field to Gaussian fields, and the simulated topographies are generated. Some numerical examples are used to illustrate the viability of the method. It shows that the simulated grinding wheel topographies are similar with the measured and can be effective used to study the abrasive grains and grinding mechanism.

  8. A new cylindrical drift chamber for the MEG II experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldini, A. M.; Baracchini, E.; Berretta, L.; Bianucci, S.; Cavoto, G.; Chiarello, G.; Chiri, C.; Cei, F.; Corvaglia, A.; Dussoni, S.; Fahrni, D.; Galli, L.; Grancagnolo, F.; Grassi, M.; Hofer, A.; Hildebrandt, M.; Ignatov, F.; Miccoli, A.; Nicolò, D.; Orsini, A.; Panareo, M.; Pepino, A.; Pinto, C.; Piredda, G.; Signorelli, G.; Raffaelli, F.; Recchia, L.; Renga, F.; Ripiccini, E.; Tassielli, G.; Tazzioli, A.; Tenchini, F.; Venturini, M.; Voena, C.; Zullo, A.

    2016-07-01

    A new cylindrical drift chamber is currently under construction for the MEG II experiment. The chamber is meant to track low momentum positrons from μ+ decays to search for μ+ →e+ γ events. The detector is segmented in very small drift cells, placed in stereo configuration and operated in a helium-isobutane gas mixture. The use of thin aluminium wires and light gas mixture set the total radiation length of the chamber to only 1.6 ×10-3X0 per track turn allowing for a momentum resolution of ~120 keV/c.

  9. The grinding behavior of ground copper powder for Cu/CNT nanocomposite fabrication by using the dry grinding process with a high-speed planetary ball mill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Heekyu; Bor, Amgalan; Sakuragi, Shiori; Lee, Jehyun; Lim, Hyung-Tae

    2016-01-01

    The behavior of ground copper powder for copper-carbon nanotube (copper-CNT) nanocomposite fabrication during high-speed planetary ball milling was investigated because the study of the behavior characteristics of copper powder has recently gained scientific interest. Also, studies of Cu/CNT composites have widely been done due to their useful applications to enhanced, advanced nano materials and components, which would significantly improve the properties of new mechatronics-integrated materials and components. This study varied experimental conditions such as the rotation speed and the grinding time with and without CNTs, and the particle size distribution, median diameter, crystal structure and size, and particle morphology were monitored for a given grinding time. We observed that pure copper powders agglomerated and that the morphology changed with changing rotation speed. The particle agglomerations were observed with maximum experiment conditions (700 rpm, 60 min) in this study of the grinding process for mechanical alloys in the case of pure copper powders because the grinding behavior of Cu/CNT agglomerations was affected by the addition of CNTs. Indeed, the powder morphology and the crystal size of the composite powder could be changed by increasing the grinding time and the rotation speed.

  10. Development of an ``intelligent grinding wheel`` for in-process monitoring of ceramic grinding. Semi-annual report {number_sign}4

    SciTech Connect

    Malkin, S.; Gao, R.; Guo, C.; Varghese, B.; Pathare, S.

    1998-09-30

    The overall objective of this project is to develop sensor-integrated ``intelligent`` diamond wheels for grinding of ceramics. Such wheels will be ``smart`` enough to monitor and supervise both the wheel preparation and grinding processes without the need to instrument the machine tool. Intelligent wheels will utilize re-useable cores integrated with sensors: to measure the acoustic emission (AE) and grinding force. Signals from the sensors will be transmitted from a rotating wheel to a receiver by telemetry. Wheels will be ``trained`` to recognize distinct characteristics associated with truing, dressing and grinding. This overall project is divided into six tasks as follows: (1) development of miniaturized sensors and data transmission system; (2) wheel design and sensor configuration; (3) calibration of the sensor integrated wheel; (4) training of the intelligent wheel; (5) grinding tests; and (6) prototype demonstration. The technical progress is summarized in this report according to the tasks. All activity during this period has been concerned with the first two interrelated tasks, which need to be completed before undertaking the remaining tasks.

  11. Cylindrical electrochemical cells with a diaphragm seal

    SciTech Connect

    Georgopoulos, P.

    1993-07-13

    A cylindrical electrochemical cell is described comprising an anode, a cathode and electrolyte contained in a cylindrical container, the container having an open end and a closed end; wherein the open end of the container is sealed with a seal assembly comprising: (a) a disc-shaped seal member, made from an electrically insulative material, having an outer edge wall connected via a base to a centrally located cylindrical hub that defines an orifice; which base has a ventable diaphragm portion and a nonventable diaphragm portion that is thicker than the ventable diaphragm portion; and wherein the ventable diaphragm portion joins the hub at an interface and becomes gradually thicker in the direction away from the interface toward the outer edge wall so that the ventable diaphragm portion is thinnest at the interface; and (b) a current collector extending through the orifice defined by the hub into the cell's interior to contact one of the cell's electrodes.

  12. Laser diode assembly including a cylindrical lens

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, J.J.; Reichert, P.

    1992-01-14

    The present invention provides a diffraction limited, high numerical aperture (fast) cylindrical microlens. The method for making the microlens is adaptable to produce a cylindrical lens that has almost any shape on its optical surfaces. The cylindrical lens may have a shape, such as elliptical or hyperbolic, designed to transform some particular given input light distribution into some desired output light distribution. In the method, the desired shape is first formed in a glass preform. Then, the preform is heated to the minimum drawing temperature and a fiber is drawn from it. The cross-sectional shape of the fiber bears a direct relation to the shape of the preform from which it was drawn. During the drawing process, the surfaces become optically smooth due to fire polishing. 11 figs.

  13. Laser diode assembly including a cylindrical lens

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, James J.; Reichert, Patrick

    1992-01-01

    The present invention provides a diffraction limited, high numerical aperture (fast) cylindrical microlens. The method for making the microlens is adaptable to produce a cylindrical lens that has almost any shape on its optical surfaces. The cylindrical lens may have a shape, such as elliptical or hyperbolic, designed to transform some particular given input light distribution into some desired output light distribution. In the method, the desired shape is first formed in a glass preform. Then, the preform is heated to the minimum drawing temperature and a fiber is drawn from it. The cross-sectional shape of the fiber bears a direct relation to the shape of the preform from which it was drawn. During the drawing process, the surfaces become optically smooth due to fire polishing.

  14. Current pulse effects on cylindrical damage experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kaul, Ann M; Rousculp, Christopher L

    2009-01-01

    A series of joint experiments between LANL and VNIIEF use a VNIIEF-designed helical generator to provide currents for driving a LANL-designed cylindrical spallation experimental load. Under proper driving conditions, a cylindrical configuration allows for a natural recollection of the damaged material. In addition, the damaged material is able to come to a complete stop due to its strength, avoiding application of further forces. Thus far, experiments have provided data about failure initiation of a well-characterized material (aluminum) in a cylindrical geometry, behavior of material recollected after damage from pressures in the damage initiation regime, and behavior of material recollected after complete failure. In addition to post-shot collection of the damaged target material for subsequent metallographic analysis, dynamic in-situ experimental diagnostics include velocimetry and transverse radial radiography. This paper will focus on the effects of tailoring the driving current pulse to obtain the desired data.

  15. Self-referenced interferometer for cylindrical surfaces.

    PubMed

    Šarbort, Martin; Řeřucha, Šimon; Holá, Miroslava; Buchta, Zdeněk; Lazar, Josef

    2015-11-20

    We present a new interferometric method for shape measurement of hollow cylindrical tubes. We propose a simple and robust self-referenced interferometer where the reference and object waves are represented by the central and peripheral parts, respectively, of the conical wave generated by a single axicon lens. The interferogram detected by a digital camera is characterized by a closed-fringe pattern with a circular carrier. The interference phase is demodulated using spatial synchronous detection. The capabilities of the interferometer are experimentally tested for various hollow cylindrical tubes with lengths up to 600 mm.

  16. The effect of spindle perturbations on the quality of precision grinding

    SciTech Connect

    Blaedel, K.L.; Bibler, J.E.; Taylor, J.S.

    1996-12-31

    In grinding, there are many perturbations to the spindle that degrade the quality of the workpiece surface being ground. Imbalance of the grinding wheel and runout of the wheel are two examples of such perturbations. These disturbances manifest themselves as varying system forces or varying system displacements. The dynamics describing the combination of machinery and material removal process then determine how these perturbations affect the process, for example, the grinding force or grinding depth of cut. The system output is given in terms of the degradation in quality of the workpiece surface. It is only in the context of the whole system that the effect of poor wheel balance and poor wheel truing on workpiece quality can be assessed.

  17. On the limit of surface integrity of alumina by ductile-mode grinding

    SciTech Connect

    Zarudi, I.; Zhang, L.C.

    2000-01-01

    This paper investigates both experimentally and theoretically the subsurface damage in alumina by ductile-mode grinding. It was found that the distribution of the fractured area on a ground mirror surface, with the Rms roughness in the range from 30 nm to 90 nm, depends on not only the grinding conditions but also the pores in the bulk material. Surface pit formation is the result of interaction of abrasive grains of the grinding wheel with pores. Thus the surface quality achievable by ductile-mode grinding is limited by the initial microstructure of a material. The investigation shows that median and radial cracks do not appear and hence are not the cause of fracture as usually thought.

  18. Quality Estimation of Dry Grinding of Skiving Cutters With Organic Bonding Diamond Wheels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, A. V.; Shamarin, N. N.; Podgornykh, O. A.; Rubtsov, V. E.

    2016-08-01

    Engineering process preparation requires proper preparation of cutting tools. It influences not only the performance of the tools but also the quality of workpiece surface machining. One of the promising environmentally friendly trends of mechanical treatment is grinding without using lubricating cooling liquid. This method can considerably influence the quality of cutting tools grinding. Smoothing skiving turning is an effective treatment method providing high efficiency and workpiece quality. Proper preparation of cutting edges is especially important in this process. For that purpose we have carried out a research in grinding changeable carbide inserts for skiving turning by means of grinding wheels with different grain size. The influence of different combinations of wheels on roughness of the inserts front and rear surfaces and quality of cutting edge was studied with the help of laser confocal microscopy.

  19. 3. VIEW TO NORTHEAST, MECHANIC SHED, DRYERS, GRINDING/ROD MILL, AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW TO NORTHEAST, MECHANIC SHED, DRYERS, GRINDING/ROD MILL, AND SKINNER SALT ROASTERS. - Vanadium Corporation of America (VCA) Naturita Mill, 3 miles Northwest of Naturita, between Highway 141 & San Miguel River, Naturita, Montrose County, CO

  20. 8. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST, DRYERS, GRINDING/ROD MILL, MECHANIC SHED, AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST, DRYERS, GRINDING/ROD MILL, MECHANIC SHED, AND SKINNER SALT ROASTERS. - Vanadium Corporation of America (VCA) Naturita Mill, 3 miles Northwest of Naturita, between Highway 141 & San Miguel River, Naturita, Montrose County, CO

  1. 7. VIEW TO EAST, MILL WAREHOUSE, DRYERS, GRINDING/ROD MILL, AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW TO EAST, MILL WAREHOUSE, DRYERS, GRINDING/ROD MILL, AND MECHANIC SHED. - Vanadium Corporation of America (VCA) Naturita Mill, 3 miles Northwest of Naturita, between Highway 141 & San Miguel River, Naturita, Montrose County, CO

  2. An Efficient, Robust, and Inexpensive Grinding Device for Herbal Samples like Cinchona Bark

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Steen Honoré; Holmfred, Else; Cornett, Claus; Maldonado, Carla; Rønsted, Nina

    2015-01-01

    An effective, robust, and inexpensive grinding device for the grinding of herb samples like bark and roots was developed by rebuilding a commercially available coffee grinder. The grinder was constructed to be able to provide various particle sizes, to be easy to clean, and to have a minimum of dead volume. The recovery of the sample when grinding as little as 50 mg of crude Cinchona bark was about 60%. Grinding is performed in seconds with no rise in temperature, and the grinder is easily disassembled to be cleaned. The influence of the particle size of the obtained powders on the recovery of analytes in extracts of Cinchona bark was investigated using HPLC. PMID:26839823

  3. Categorical data model for cylindricity consistent with geometrical product specifications standard system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wenlong; Liu, Xiaojun; Jiang, Xiangqian; Qi, Qunfen; Scott, Paul

    2010-08-01

    Geometrical Product Specifications is an international standard system regarding standardization of dimensional, tolerancing, surface texture and related metrological principles and practices in the charge of ISO/TC213. Integrated information system is necessary to encapsulate the knowledge in GPS to extend its application in digital manufacturing. Establishing a suitable data structure for GPS data is one of the main works in building the integrated information system. This paper is focused on cylindricity and the main points are as follows: proposes the complete verification operator and the complete drawing indication for cylindricity consistent with GPS standard system; models the inter/intra relationships between the elements of operations involved in cylindricity and integrates them by category theory; solves the storage format and closure of query for the categorical data model by the pull-back structure and functor transform in category theory respectively.

  4. Effect of cryogenic grinding on volatile and fatty oil constituents of cumin (Cuminum cyminum L.) genotypes.

    PubMed

    Sharma, L K; Agarwal, D; Rathore, S S; Malhotra, S K; Saxena, S N

    2016-06-01

    Effect of cryogenic grinding on recovery of volatile oil, fatty oil percentage and their constituents in two cumin (Cuminum cyminum L.) genotypes have been analyzed. Cryogenic grinding not only retains the volatiles but enhanced the recovery by 33.9 % in GC 4 and 43.5 % in RZ 209. A significant increase (29.9 %) over normal grinding in oil percentage was also observed in genotype RZ 209. This increase was, however, less (15.4 %) in genotype GC 4. Nineteen major compounds were identified in the essential oil of both genotypes. The two grinding techniques had significant effects on dependent variables, viz., volatile oil and monoterpenes. Cuminaldehyde was the main constituent in both genotypes, content of which increased from 48.2 to 56.1 % in GC 4 on cryo grinding. Content of terpines were found to decrease in cryo ground samples of GC 4 and either decrease or no change was found in RZ 209. Organoleptic test showed more pleasant aroma in cryo ground seeds of both the genotypes. Significant increase was also reported in fatty oil yield due to cryogenic grinding. Fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) analysis showed oleic acid as major FAME content of which increased from 88.1 to 94.9 % in RZ 209 and from 88.2 to 90.1 % in GC 4 on cryogenic grinding. Other prominent FAME were palmitic, palmitoleic and stearic acid. Results indicated commercial potential of cryogenic grinding technology for cumin in general and spices in particular for better retention of flavour and quality in spices.

  5. Surface roughness of zirconia for full-contour crowns after clinically simulated grinding and polishing.

    PubMed

    Hmaidouch, Rim; Müller, Wolf-Dieter; Lauer, Hans-Christoph; Weigl, Paul

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of controlled intraoral grinding and polishing on the roughness of full-contour zirconia compared to classical veneered zirconia. Thirty bar-shaped zirconia specimens were fabricated and divided into two groups (n=15). Fifteen specimens (group 1) were glazed and 15 specimens (group 2) were veneered with feldspathic ceramic and then glazed. Prior to grinding, maximum roughness depth (Rmax) values were measured using a profilometer, 5 times per specimen. Simulated clinical grinding and polishing were performed on the specimens under water coolant for 15 s and 2 N pressure. For grinding, NTI diamonds burs with grain sizes of 20 µm, 10 µm, and 7.5 µm were used sequentially. The ground surfaces were polished using NTI kits with coarse, medium and fine polishers. After each step, Rmax values were determined. Differences between groups were examined using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). The roughness of group 1 was significantly lower than that of group 2. The roughness increased significantly after coarse grinding in both groups. The results after glazing were similar to those obtained after fine grinding for non-veneered zirconia. However, fine-ground veneered zirconia had significantly higher roughness than venerred, glazed zirconia. No significant difference was found between fine-polished and glazed zirconia, but after the fine polishing of veneered zirconia, the roughness was significantly higher than after glazing. It can be concluded that for full-contour zirconia, fewer defects and lower roughness values resulted after grinding and polishing compared to veneered zirconia. After polishing zirconia, lower roughness values were achieved compared to glazing; more interesting was that the grinding of glazed zirconia using the NTI three-step system could deliver smooth surfaces comparable to untreated glazed zirconia surfaces.

  6. Petrographical characteristics of calcium based absorbent and its effect on grinding and calcination/desulfurization property

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Y.; Sun, X.

    1998-07-01

    This paper discussed the relationship between the petrographical characteristics and grinding, calcination/desulfurization properties of calcium based absorbent. Optical microscopy, XRD analysis, TGS-DTGA-DTA and thermal microscopy analyses were carried out on carbonate rocks. It was found that petrographical characteristics, such as grain size and cleavages developing degree have great effect on grinding, calcination/desulfurization properties. The choice of calcium based adsorbent should be based on the petrographical characteristics.

  7. Effect of different grinding burs on the physical properties of zirconia

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE Grinding with less stress on 3Y-TZP through proper selection of methods and instruments can lead to a long-term success of prosthesis. The purpose of this study was to compare the phase transformation and physical properties after zirconia surface grinding with 3 different grinding burs. MATERIALS AND METHODS Forty disc-shaped zirconia specimens were fabricated. Each Ten specimens were ground with AllCeramic SuperMax (NTI, Kahla, Germany), Dura-Green DIA (Shofu Inc., Kyoto, Japan), and Dura-Green (Shofu Inc., Kyoto, Japan). Ten specimens were not ground and used as a control group. After the specimen grinding, XRD analysis, surface roughness test, FE-SEM imaging, and biaxial flexural strength test were performed. RESULTS After surface grinding, small amount of monoclinic phase in all experimental groups was observed. The phase change was higher in specimens, which were ground with Dura-Green DIA and AllCeramic SuperMax burs. The roughness of surfaces increased in specimens, which were ground with Dura-Green DIA and AllCeramic SuperMax burs than control groups and ground with Dura-Green. All experimental groups showed lower flexural strength than control group, but there was no statistically significant difference between control group and ground with Dura-Green DIA and AllCeramic SuperMax burs. The specimens, which were ground with Dura- Green showed the lowest strength. CONCLUSION The use of dedicated zirconia-specific grinding burs such as Dura-Green DIA and AllCeramic SuperMax burs decreases the grinding time and did not significantly affect the flexural strength of zirconia, and therefore, they may be recommended. However, a fine polishing process should be accompanied to reduce the surface roughness after grinding. PMID:27141258

  8. Effects of surface grinding conditions on the reciprocating friction and wear behavior of silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, P.J.; Martin, R.L.; Zanoria, E.S.

    1997-12-31

    The relationship between two significantly different surface grinding conditions and the reciprocating ball-on-flat friction and wear behavior of a high-quality, structural silicon nitride material (GS-44) was investigated. The slider materials were silicon nitride NBD 200 and 440C stainless steel. Two machining conditions were selected based on extensive machining and flexural strength test data obtained under the auspices of an international, interlaboratory grinding study. The condition categorized as {open_quotes}low strength{close_quote} grinding used a coarse 80 grit wheel and produced low flexure strength due to machining-induced flaws in the surface. The other condition, regarded as {open_quotes}high strength grinding,{close_quotes} utilized a 320 grit wheel and produced a flexural strength nearly 70% greater. Grinding wheel surface speeds were 35 and 47 m/s. Reciprocating sliding tests were conducted following the procedure described in a newly-published ASTM standard (G- 133) for linearly-reciprocating wear. Tests were performed in directions both parallel and perpendicular to the grinding marks (lay) using a 25 N load, 5 Hz reciprocating frequency, 10 mm stroke length, and 100 m of sliding at room temperature. The effects of sliding direction relative to the lay were more pronounced for stainless steel than for silicon nitride sliders. The wear of stainless steel was less than the wear of the silicon nitride slider materials because of the formation of transfer particles which covered the sharp edges of the silicon nitride grinding grooves and reduced abrasive contact. The wear of the GS-44 material was much greater for the silicon nitride sliders than for the stainless steel sliders. The causes for the effects of surface-grinding severity and sliding direction on friction and wear of GS-44 and its counterface materials are explained.

  9. Next generation grinding spindle for cost-effective manufacture of advanced ceramic components

    SciTech Connect

    Kovach, J.A.; Laurich, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    Finish grinding of advanced structural ceramics has generally been considered an extremely slow and costly process. Recently, however, results from the High-Speed, Low-Damage (HSLD) program have clearly demonstrated that numerous finish-process performance benefits can be realized by grinding silicon nitride at high wheel speeds. A new, single-step, roughing-process capable of producing high-quality silicon nitride parts at high material removal rates while dramatically reducing finishing costs has been developed.

  10. Effects of metal surface grinding at the porcelain try-in stage of fixed dental prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Kesim, Bülent; Gümüş, Hasan Önder; Dinçel, Mehmet; Erkaya, Selçuk

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE This study was to evaluate the effect of grinding of the inner metal surface during the porcelain try-in stage on metal-porcelain bonding considering the maximum temperature and the vibration of samples. MATERIALS AND METHODS Ninety-one square prism-shaped (1 × 1 × 1.5 mm) nickel-chrome cast frameworks 0.3 mm thick were prepared. Porcelain was applied on two opposite outer axial surfaces of the frameworks. The grinding was performed from the opposite axial sides of the inner metal surfaces with a low-speed handpiece with two types of burs (diamond, tungsten-carbide) under three grinding forces (3.5 N, 7 N, 14 N) and at two durations (5 seconds, 10 seconds). The shear bond strength (SBS) test was performed with universal testing machine. Statistical analyzes were performed at 5% significance level. RESULTS The samples subjected to grinding under 3.5 N showed higher SBS values than those exposed to grinding under 7 N and 14 N (P<.05). SBS values of none of the groups differed from those of the control group (P>.05). The types of bur (P=.965) and the duration (P=.679) did not affect the SBS values. On the other hand, type of bur, force applied, and duration of the grinding affected the maximum temperatures of the samples, whereas the maximum vibration was affected only by the type of bur (P<.05). CONCLUSION Grinding the inner metal surface did not affect the metal-porcelain bond strength. Although the grinding affected the maximum temperature and the vibration values of the samples, these did not influence the bonding strength. PMID:25177476

  11. Economic use of CBN grinding tools in the production of jet turbine components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisler, R.; Hallen, D.

    The use of cubical boron nitride (CBN) grinding wheels in the production of jet turbine components of superalloys such as Inconel 100, Nimonic 90 or Rene 120 with the aid of an example of guide vane machining for low pressure turbines is described. Cost savings achieved by the use of CBN wheels as compared with conventional grinding wheels and spark erosion are presented in tabular form.

  12. Surface roughness of zirconia for full-contour crowns after clinically simulated grinding and polishing.

    PubMed

    Hmaidouch, Rim; Müller, Wolf-Dieter; Lauer, Hans-Christoph; Weigl, Paul

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of controlled intraoral grinding and polishing on the roughness of full-contour zirconia compared to classical veneered zirconia. Thirty bar-shaped zirconia specimens were fabricated and divided into two groups (n=15). Fifteen specimens (group 1) were glazed and 15 specimens (group 2) were veneered with feldspathic ceramic and then glazed. Prior to grinding, maximum roughness depth (Rmax) values were measured using a profilometer, 5 times per specimen. Simulated clinical grinding and polishing were performed on the specimens under water coolant for 15 s and 2 N pressure. For grinding, NTI diamonds burs with grain sizes of 20 µm, 10 µm, and 7.5 µm were used sequentially. The ground surfaces were polished using NTI kits with coarse, medium and fine polishers. After each step, Rmax values were determined. Differences between groups were examined using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). The roughness of group 1 was significantly lower than that of group 2. The roughness increased significantly after coarse grinding in both groups. The results after glazing were similar to those obtained after fine grinding for non-veneered zirconia. However, fine-ground veneered zirconia had significantly higher roughness than venerred, glazed zirconia. No significant difference was found between fine-polished and glazed zirconia, but after the fine polishing of veneered zirconia, the roughness was significantly higher than after glazing. It can be concluded that for full-contour zirconia, fewer defects and lower roughness values resulted after grinding and polishing compared to veneered zirconia. After polishing zirconia, lower roughness values were achieved compared to glazing; more interesting was that the grinding of glazed zirconia using the NTI three-step system could deliver smooth surfaces comparable to untreated glazed zirconia surfaces. PMID:25059249

  13. Effect of cryogenic grinding on volatile and fatty oil constituents of cumin (Cuminum cyminum L.) genotypes.

    PubMed

    Sharma, L K; Agarwal, D; Rathore, S S; Malhotra, S K; Saxena, S N

    2016-06-01

    Effect of cryogenic grinding on recovery of volatile oil, fatty oil percentage and their constituents in two cumin (Cuminum cyminum L.) genotypes have been analyzed. Cryogenic grinding not only retains the volatiles but enhanced the recovery by 33.9 % in GC 4 and 43.5 % in RZ 209. A significant increase (29.9 %) over normal grinding in oil percentage was also observed in genotype RZ 209. This increase was, however, less (15.4 %) in genotype GC 4. Nineteen major compounds were identified in the essential oil of both genotypes. The two grinding techniques had significant effects on dependent variables, viz., volatile oil and monoterpenes. Cuminaldehyde was the main constituent in both genotypes, content of which increased from 48.2 to 56.1 % in GC 4 on cryo grinding. Content of terpines were found to decrease in cryo ground samples of GC 4 and either decrease or no change was found in RZ 209. Organoleptic test showed more pleasant aroma in cryo ground seeds of both the genotypes. Significant increase was also reported in fatty oil yield due to cryogenic grinding. Fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) analysis showed oleic acid as major FAME content of which increased from 88.1 to 94.9 % in RZ 209 and from 88.2 to 90.1 % in GC 4 on cryogenic grinding. Other prominent FAME were palmitic, palmitoleic and stearic acid. Results indicated commercial potential of cryogenic grinding technology for cumin in general and spices in particular for better retention of flavour and quality in spices. PMID:27478239

  14. Distributed neural signals on parabolic cylindrical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, S. D.; Li, H.; Tzou, H. S.

    2013-06-01

    Parabolic cylindrical shells are commonly used as key components in communication antennas, space telescopes, solar collectors, etc. This study focuses on distributed modal neural sensing signals on a flexible simply-supported parabolic cylindrical shell panel. The parabolic cylindrical shell is fully laminated with a piezoelectric layer on its outer surface and the piezoelectric layer is segmented into infinitesimal elements (neurons) to investigate the microscopic distributed neural sensing signals. Since the dominant vibration component of the shell is usually the transverse oscillation, a new transverse mode shape function is defined. Two shell cases, i.e., the ratio of the meridian height to the half span distance of a parabola at 1:4 (shallow) and 1:1 (deep), are studied to reveal the curvature effect to the neural sensing signals. Studies suggest that the membrane signal component dominates for lower natural modes and the bending signal component dominates for higher natural modes. The meridional membrane and bending signal components are mostly concentrated on the high-curvature areas, while the longitudinal bending component is mostly concentrated on the relatively flat areas. The concentration behavior becomes more prominent as the parabolic cylindrical shell deepens, primarily resulting from the enhanced membrane effect due to the increased curvature.

  15. Matching a static cylindrically symmetric elastic spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brito, I.; Carot, J.; Mena, F. C.; Vaz, E. G. L. R.

    2012-07-01

    We consider a static cylindrically symmetric spacetime with elastic matter and study the matching problem of this spacetime with a suitable exterior. For the exterior, we take the Levi-Civita spacetime and its generalization including a cosmological constant, the Linet-Tian spacetime. We show that the matching is only possible with the Linet-Tian solution.

  16. Ultrasound cylindrical phased array for transoesophageal thermal therapy: initial studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melodelima, David; Lafon, Cyril; Prat, Frederic; Birer, Alain; Cathignol, Dominique

    2002-12-01

    This work was undertaken to investigate the feasibility of constructing a cylindrical phased array composed of 64 elements spread around the periphery (OD 10.6 mm) for transoesophageal ultrasound thermotherapy. The underlying operating principle of this applicator is to rotate a plane ultrasound beam electronically. For this purpose, eight adjacent transducers were successively excited with appropriate delay times so as to generate a plane wave. The exposure direction was changed by exciting a different set of eight elements. For these feasibility studies, we used a cylindrical prototype (OD 10.6 mm) composed of 16 elementary transducers distributed over a quarter of the cylinder, all operating at 4.55 MHz. The active part was mechanically reinforced by a rigid damper structure behind the transducers. It was shown that an ultrasound field similar to that emitted by a plane transducer could be generated. Ex vivo experiments on pig's liver demonstrated that the ultrasound beam could be accurately rotated to generate sector-based lesions to a suitable depth (up to 19 mm). Throughout these experiments, exposures lasting 20 s were delivered at an acoustic intensity of 17 W cm-2. By varying the power from exposure to exposure, the depth of the lesion at different angles could be controlled.

  17. Transient three-dimensional modeling of riverbank filtration at Grind well field, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankar, Vijay; Eckert, Paul; Ojha, Chandra; König, Christoph M.

    2009-03-01

    Riverbank filtration (RBF) is a proven treatment step in a multi-barrier method of drinking-water supply at many sites. RBF wells induce a large amount of river water to infiltrate the river base and travel towards the wells, giving the opportunity for mixing of infiltrated surface water and groundwater. Assessment of raw water quality plays an important role in planning and operating a RBF well field. In this context, the determination of the catchment area (and land uses within the catchment) and the ratio of bank filtrate (BF) to raw groundwater (GW) are two prior steps. Transient model simulations were performed in order to study the hydraulic conditions at the RBF well field at Grind near Düsseldorf, Germany. The BF/GW ratio was determined to be 75/25. The flood events in winter, in particular, showed the BF/GW ratio to have high variation. Transient path lines in the well field were used for delineation of the catchment area.

  18. Viscoplastic analysis of an experimental cylindrical thrust chamber liner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arya, Vinod K.; Arnold, Steven M.

    1992-01-01

    A viscoplastic stress-strain analysis of an experimental cylindrical thrust chamber is presented. A viscoelastic constitutive model incorporating a single internal state variable that represents kinematic hardening was employed to investigate whether such a viscoplastic model could predict the experimentally observed behavior of the thrust chamber. Two types of loading cycles were considered: a short cycle of 3.5-s duration that corresponded to the experiments, and an extended loading cycle of 485.1 s duration that is typical of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) operating cycle. The analysis qualitatively replicated the deformation behavior of the component as observed in experiments designed to simulate SSME operating conditions. The analysis also showed that the mode and location of failure in the component may depend on the loading cycle. The results indicate that using viscoplastic models for structural analysis can lead to a more realistic life assessment of thrust chambers.

  19. Viscoplastic analysis of an experimental cylindrical thrust chamber liner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arya, Vinod K.; Arnold, Steven M.

    1991-01-01

    A viscoplastic stress-strain analysis of an experimental cylindrical thrust chamber is presented. A viscoelastic constitutive model incorporating a single internal state variable that represents kinematic hardening was employed to investigate whether such a viscoplastic model could predict the experimentally observed behavior of the thrust chamber. Two types of loading cycles were considered: a short cycle of 3.5 sec. duration that corresponded to the experiments, and an extended loading cycle of 485.1 sec. duration that is typical of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) operating cycle. The analysis qualitatively replicated the deformation behavior of the component as observed in experiments designed to simulate SSME operating conditions. The analysis also showed that the mode and location in the component may depend on the loading cycle. The results indicate that using viscoplastic models for structural analysis can lead to a more realistic life assessment of thrust chambers.

  20. Using modified theories to study the vibrations of thin-walled composite cylindrical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubala, Martin

    1992-06-01

    First-order modified theories are applied to the vibration analysis of thin-walled layered cylindrical shells in the case where one of the layers is an orthotropic composite material. Equilibrium equations are obtained by using the adjoint transformation of the strain-displacement operator in Hilbert space L2. The variability of the results is found to increase with the material heterogeneity.

  1. The sound field in a finite cylindrical shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Junger, M. C.

    1985-01-01

    The sound field excited by vibrating boundaries in a finite cylindrical space, e.g., in a cylindrical shell, differs from the pressure distribution in an infinite cylindrical shell of comparable structural wavelength by the pressure diffracted by the end caps. The latter pressure component is comparable in magnitude to the pressure generated by the vibrating cylindrical boundary, but does not introduce additional resonances or antiresonances. Finally, a third pressure component associated with end cap vibrations is formulated.

  2. Estimating rock compressive strength from Rock Abrasion Tool (RAT) grinds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, B. J.; Bridges, N. T.; Cohen, J.; Hurowitz, J. A.; Lennon, A.; Paulsen, G.; Zacny, K.

    2013-06-01

    Each Mars Exploration Rover carries a Rock Abrasion Tool (RAT) whose intended use was to abrade the outer surfaces of rocks to expose more pristine material. Motor currents drawn by the RAT motors are related to the strength and hardness of rock surfaces undergoing abrasion, and these data can be used to infer more about a target rock's physical properties. However, no calibration of the RAT exists. Here, we attempt to derive an empirical correlation using an assemblage of terrestrial rocks and apply this correlation to data returned by the rover Spirit. The results demonstrate a positive correlation between rock strength and RAT grind energy for rocks with compressive strengths less than about 150 MPa, a category that includes all but the strongest intact rocks. Applying this correlation to rocks abraded by Spirit's RAT, the results indicate a large divide in strength between more competent basaltic rocks encountered in the plains of Gusev crater (Adirondack-class rocks) and the weaker variety of rock types measured in the Columbia Hills. Adirondack-class rocks have estimated compressive strengths in the range of 70-130 MPa and are significantly less strong than fresh terrestrial basalts; this may be indicative of a degree of weathering-induced weakening. Rock types in the Columbia Hills (Wishstone, Watchtower, Clovis, and Peace class) all have compressive strengths <50 MPa and are consistent with impactites or volcanoclastic materials. In general, when considered alongside chemical, spectral, and rock textural data, these inferred compressive strength results help inform our understanding of rock origins and modification history.

  3. High speed cylindrical roller bearing analysis, SKF computer program CYBEAN. Volume 2: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleckner, R. J.; Pirvics, J.

    1978-01-01

    The CYBEAN (Cylindrical Bearing Analysis) was created to detail radially loaded, aligned and misaligned cylindrical roller bearing performance under a variety of operating conditions. Emphasis was placed on detailing the effects of high speed, preload and system thermal coupling. Roller tilt, skew, radial, circumferential and axial displacement as well as flange contact were considered. Variable housing and flexible out-of-round outer ring geometries, and both steady state and time transient temperature calculations were enabled. The complete range of elastohydrodynamic contact considerations, employing full and partial film conditions were treated in the computation of raceway and flange contacts. Input and output architectures containing guidelines for use and a sample execution are detailed.

  4. Surface superconductivity in thin cylindrical Bi nanowire.

    PubMed

    Tian, Mingliang; Wang, Jian; Ning, Wei; Mallouk, Thomas E; Chan, Moses H W

    2015-03-11

    The physical origin and the nature of superconductivity in nanostructured Bi remains puzzling. Here, we report transport measurements of individual cylindrical single-crystal Bi nanowires, 20 and 32 nm in diameter. In contrast to nonsuperconducting Bi nanoribbons with two flat surfaces, cylindrical Bi nanowires show superconductivity below 1.3 K. However, their superconducting critical magnetic fields decrease with their diameter, which is the opposite of the expected behavior for thin superconducting wires. Quasiperiodic oscillations of magnetoresistance were observed in perpendicular fields but were not seen in the parallel orientation. These results can be understood by a model of surface superconductivity with an enhanced surface-to-bulk volume in small diameter wires, where the superconductivity originates from the strained surface states of the nanowires due to the surface curvature-induced stress.

  5. Buckling optimisation of sandwich cylindrical panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abouhamzeh, M.; Sadighi, M.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the buckling load optimisation is performed on sandwich cylindrical panels. A finite element program is developed in MATLAB to solve the governing differential equations of the global buckling of the structure. In order to find the optimal solution, the genetic algorithm Toolbox in MATLAB is implemented. Verifications are made for both the buckling finite element code and also the results from the genetic algorithm by comparisons to the results available in literature. Sandwich cylindrical panels are optimised for the buckling strength with isotropic or orthotropic cores with different boundary conditions. Results are presented in terms of stacking sequence of fibers in the face sheets and core to face sheet thickness ratio.

  6. Gravitational radiation from a cylindrical naked singularity

    SciTech Connect

    Nakao, Ken-ichi; Morisawa, Yoshiyuki

    2005-06-15

    We construct an approximate solution which describes the gravitational emission from a naked singularity formed by the gravitational collapse of a cylindrical thick shell composed of dust. The assumed situation is that the collapsing speed of the dust is very large. In this situation, the metric variables are obtained approximately by a kind of linear perturbation analysis in the background Morgan solution which describes the motion of cylindrical null dust. The most important problem in this study is what boundary conditions for metric and matter variables should be imposed at the naked singularity. We find a boundary condition that all the metric and matter variables are everywhere finite at least up to the first order approximation. This implies that the spacetime singularity formed by this high-speed dust collapse is very similar to that formed by the null dust and the final singularity will be a conical one. Weyl curvature is completely released from the collapsed dust.

  7. Cylindrically converging blast waves in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, H.; Nakamura, Y.

    1981-07-01

    Cylindrically converging shock waves are produced by utilizing the detonation of cylindrical explosive shells. The production and the propagation of shock waves are observed by framing and streak camera photographs, and the trajectory of shock propagations is determined by using an electrical ionization probing system. The effect of the quantity of explosives on the stability, or the axial symmetry, of shock fronts and on the strength of shocks produced is investigated. It has been shown that, for practical purposes, the approximation of shock trajectories by Guderley's formulas would be sufficiently acceptable in an unexpectedly wide region near the implosion center, and that the axial symmetry of the shock front is improved by increasing the quantity of explosives, and thus, strong shocks are produced by merely increasing the quantity of explosives. The reflected diverging shock seems to be very stable. Piezoelectric elements have also been used to detect reflected diverging waves.

  8. Damage experiments in a cylindrical geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kaul, Ann M

    2010-09-21

    Studying spallation damage with a cylindrical configuration allows for a natural recollection of the damaged material under proper driving conditions. Additionally, the damaged material can come to a complete rest without the application of further stopping forces. Specific areas of research include the damage initiation regime in convergent geometry, behavior of material recollected after damage, and effects of convergent geometry on the material response. Such experiments produce unique strain and shear stress states, motivating improvements in existing computational material models and increasing the predictive capabilities of codes. A LANL/VNIIEF joint experimental series has produced cylindrical aluminum failure initiation data and studied the behavior of material recollected after damage initiation and after complete failure. In addition to post-shot collection of the damaged target material for subsequent metallographic analysis, dynamic in-situ experimental diagnostics include velocimetry and transverse radial radiography. This paper will discuss the current experimental status.

  9. Design of magnets inside cylindrical superconducting shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigby, K. W.

    1988-01-01

    The design of magnets inside closed, cylindrical, superconducting shields is discussed. The Green function is given for the magnetic vector potential for cylindrically symmetric currents inside such a shield. The magnetic field everywhere inside the shield can be obtained from this function, which includes the effects of the induced shield currents exactly. The field is given for a thin solenoid as an example and the convergence of the series solution for this case is discussed. The shield can significantly reduce the strength and improve the homogeneity of a magnet. The improvement in homogeneity is of particular importance in the design of correction coils. These effects, and the maximum field on the shield, are examined for a typical solenoid. The results given are also useful, although not exact, for long shields with one or two open ends.

  10. Surface superconductivity in thin cylindrical Bi nanowire.

    PubMed

    Tian, Mingliang; Wang, Jian; Ning, Wei; Mallouk, Thomas E; Chan, Moses H W

    2015-03-11

    The physical origin and the nature of superconductivity in nanostructured Bi remains puzzling. Here, we report transport measurements of individual cylindrical single-crystal Bi nanowires, 20 and 32 nm in diameter. In contrast to nonsuperconducting Bi nanoribbons with two flat surfaces, cylindrical Bi nanowires show superconductivity below 1.3 K. However, their superconducting critical magnetic fields decrease with their diameter, which is the opposite of the expected behavior for thin superconducting wires. Quasiperiodic oscillations of magnetoresistance were observed in perpendicular fields but were not seen in the parallel orientation. These results can be understood by a model of surface superconductivity with an enhanced surface-to-bulk volume in small diameter wires, where the superconductivity originates from the strained surface states of the nanowires due to the surface curvature-induced stress. PMID:25658139

  11. Multiple Bifurcations of a Cylindrical Dynamical System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Ning; Cao, Qingjie

    2016-03-01

    This paper focuses on multiple bifurcations of a cylindrical dynamical system, which is evolved from a rotating pendulum with SD oscillator. The rotating pendulum system exhibits the coupling dynamics property of the bistable state and conventional pendulum with the ho- moclinic orbits of the first and second type. A double Andronov-Hopf bifurcation, two saddle-node bifurcations of periodic orbits and a pair of homoclinic bifurcations are detected by using analytical analysis and nu- merical calculation. It is found that the homoclinic orbits of the second type can bifurcate into a pair of rotational limit cycles, coexisting with the oscillating limit cycle. Additionally, the results obtained herein, are helpful to explore different types of limit cycles and the complex dynamic bifurcation of cylindrical dynamical system.

  12. Nanolaminate Membranes as Cylindrical Telescope Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dooley, Jennifer; Dragovan, Mark; Hickey, Gregory; Lih, Shyh-Shiu Lih

    2010-01-01

    A document discusses a proposal to use axially stretched metal nanolaminate membranes as lightweight parabolic cylindrical reflectors in the Dual Anamorphic Reflector Telescope (DART) - a planned spaceborne telescope in which the cylindrical reflectors would be arranged to obtain a point focus. The discussion brings together a combination of concepts reported separately in several prior NASA Tech Briefs articles, the most relevant being "Nanolaminate Mirrors With Integral Figure-Control Actuators" NPO -30221, Vol. 26, No. 5 (May 2002), page 90; and "Reflectors Made From Membranes Stretched Between Beams" NPO -30571, Vol. 33, No. 10 (October 2009), page 11a. The engineering issues receiving the greatest emphasis in the instant document are (1) the change in curvature associated with the Poisson contraction of a stretched nanolaminate reflector membrane and (2) the feasibility of using patches of poly(vinylidene fluoride) on the rear membrane surface as piezoelectric actuators to correct the surface figure for the effect of Poisson contraction and other shape errors.

  13. Omnidirectional, circularly polarized, cylindrical microstrip antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanton, Philip H. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A microstrip cylindrical antenna comprised of two concentric subelements on a ground cylinder, a vertically polarized (E-field parallel to the axis of the antenna cylinder) subelement on the inside and a horizontally polarized (E-field perpendicular to the axis) subelement on the outside. The vertical subelement is a wraparound microstrip radiator. A Y-shaped microstrip patch configuration is used for the horizontally polarized radiator that is wrapped 1.5 times to provide radiating edges on opposite sides of the cylindrical antenna for improved azimuthal pattern uniformity. When these subelements are so fed that their far fields are equal in amplitude and phased 90.degree. from each other, a circularly polarized EM wave results. By stacking a plurality of like antenna elements on the ground cylinder, a linear phased array antenna is provided that can be beam steered to the desired elevation angle.

  14. Jamming of Cylindrical Grains in Vertical Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, G. William; Spier, Gregory; Barr, Nicholas; Steel, Fiona

    2012-02-01

    We study jamming of low aspect-ratio cylindrical Delrin grains in a vertical channel. These cylindrical grains resemble antacid tablets, poker chips, or coins since their height is less than their diameter. Grains are allowed to fall through a vertical channel with a square cross section where the channel width is greater than the diameter of a grain and constant throughout the length of the channel with no obstructions or constrictions. Within this channel, grains are sometimes observed to form jams, stable structures supported by the channel walls with no support beneath them. The probability of jam occurrence and the strength or robustness of a jam is effected by the grain dimensions and channel size. We will present experimental measurements of the jamming probability and jam strength in this system and discuss the relationship of these results to other experiments and theories.

  15. Combined Illumination Cylindrical Millimeter-Wave Imaging Technique for Concealed Weapon Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Sheen, David M.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Hall, Thomas E.

    2000-04-01

    A novel millimeter-wave imaging technique has been developed for personnel surveillance applications, including the detection of concealed weapons, explosives, drugs, and other contraband material. Millimeter-waves are high-frequency radio waves in the frequency band of 30-300 GHz, and pose no health threat to humans at moderate power levels. These waves readily penetrate common clothing materials, and are reflected by the human body and by concealed items. The combined illumination cylindrical imaging concept consists of a vertical, high-resolution, millimeter-wave array of antennas which is scanned in a cylindrical manner about the person under surveillance. Using a computer, the data from this scan is mathematically reconstructed into a series of focused 3-D images of the person. After reconstruction, the images are combined into a single high-resolution three-dimensional image of the person under surveillance. This combined image is then rendered using 3-D computer graphics techniques. The combined cylindrical illumination is critical as it allows the display of information from all angles. This is necessary because millimeter-waves do not penetrate the body. Ultimately, the images displayed to the operator will be icon-based to protect the privacy of the person being screened. Novel aspects of this technique include the cylindrical scanning concept and the image reconstruction algorithm, which was developed specifically for this imaging system. An engineering prototype based on this cylindrical imaging technique has been fabricated and tested. This work has been sponsored by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).

  16. Combined illumination cylindrical millimeter-wave imaging technique for concealed weapon detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, David M.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Hall, Thomas E.

    2000-07-01

    A novel millimeter-wave imaging technique has been developed for personnel surveillance applications, including the detection of concealed weapons, explosives, drugs, and other contraband material. Millimeter-waves are high-frequency radio waves in the frequency band of 30 - 300 GHz, and pose no health threat to humans at moderate power levels. These waves readily penetrate common clothing materials, and are reflected by the human body and by concealed items. The combined illumination cylindrical imaging concept consists of a vertical, high-resolution, millimeter-wave array of antennas which is scanned in a cylindrical manner about the person under surveillance. Using a computer, the data from this scan is mathematically reconstructed into a series of focused 3D images of the person. After reconstruction, the images are combined into a single high-resolution 3D image of the person under surveillance. This combined image is then rendered using 3D computer graphics techniques. The combined cylindrical illumination is critical as it allows the display of information from all angles. This is necessary because millimeter-waves do not penetrate the body. Ultimately, the images displayed to the operate will be icon-based to protect the privacy of the person being screened. Novel aspects of this technique include the cylindrical scanning concept and the image reconstruction algorithm, which was developed specifically for this imaging system. An engineering prototype based on this cylindrical imaging technique has been fabricated and tested. This work has been sponsored by the Federal Aviation Administration.

  17. Array gain for a cylindrical array with baffle scatter effects.

    PubMed

    Bertilone, Derek C; Killeen, Damien S; Bao, Chaoying

    2007-11-01

    Cylindrical arrays used in sonar for passive underwater surveillance often have sensors surrounding a cylindrical metal baffle. In some operational sonars, the phones in each stave (i.e., each line of phones aligned with the cylinder axis) are hardwired together so that the array is equivalent to a baffled circular array of directional elements, where each element corresponds to a line array of omnidirectional phones steered to broadside. In this paper a model is introduced for computing the array gain of such an array at high frequencies, which incorporates baffle scatter using infinite, rigid cylinder scattering theory, and with ambient noise described by an angular spectral density function. In practice the phones are often offset from the baffle surface, and the acoustic field sampled by the staves is distorted at high frequencies due to interference between the incident and scattered fields. Examples are given to illustrate the resulting array gain degradation, using three noise distributions that are frequently used in sonar performance modeling: three-dimensional isotropic, two-dimensional isotropic, and surface dipole noise.

  18. Economic analysis of fuel ethanol production from winter hulled barley by the EDGE (Enhanced Dry Grind Enzymatic) process.

    PubMed

    Nghiem, Nhuan P; Ramírez, Edna C; McAloon, Andrew J; Yee, Winnie; Johnston, David B; Hicks, Kevin B

    2011-06-01

    A process and cost model was developed for fuel ethanol production from winter barley based on the EDGE (Enhanced Dry Grind Enzymatic) process. In this process, in addition to β-glucanases, which are added to reduce the viscosity of the mash, β-glucosidase is also added to completely hydrolyze the oligomers obtained during the hydrolysis of β-glucans to glucose. The model allows determination of capital costs, operating costs, and ethanol production cost for a plant producing 40 million gallons of denatured fuel ethanol annually. A sensitivity study was also performed to examine the effects of β-glucosidase and barley costs on the final ethanol production cost. The results of this study clearly demonstrate the economic benefit of adding β-glucosidase. Lower ethanol production cost was obtained compared to that obtained without β-glucosidase addition in all cases except one where highest β-glucosidase cost allowance and lowest barley cost were used.

  19. Shock initiated instabilities in underwater cylindrical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Sachin; Matos, Helio; LeBlanc, James M.; Shukla, Arun

    2016-10-01

    An experimental investigation to understand the mechanisms of dynamic buckling instability in cylindrical structures due to underwater explosive loadings is conducted. In particular, the effects of initial hydrostatic pressure coupled with a dynamic pressure pulse on the stability of metallic cylindrical shells are evaluated. The experiments are conducted at varying initial hydrostatic pressures, below the critical buckling pressure, to estimate the threshold after which dynamic buckling will initiate. The transient underwater full-field deformations of the structures during shock wave loading are captured using high-speed stereo photography coupled with modified 3-D Digital Image Correlation (DIC) technique. Experimental results show that increasing initial hydrostatic pressure decreases the natural vibration frequency of the structure indicating loss in structural stiffness. DIC measurements reveal that the initial structural excitations primarily consist of axisymmetric vibrations due to symmetrical shock wave loading in the experiments. Following their decay after a few longitudinal reverberations, the primary mode of vibration evolves which continues throughout later in time. At the initial hydrostatic pressures below the threshold value, these vibrations are stable in nature. The analytical solutions for the vibration frequency and the transient response of cylindrical shell are discussed in the article by accounting for both (1) the added mass effect of the surrounding water and (2) the effect of initial stress on the shell imposed by the hydrostatic pressure. The analytical solutions match reasonably well with the experimental vibration frequencies. Later, the transient response of a cylindrical shell subjected to a general underwater pressure wave loading is derived which leads to the analytical prediction of dynamic stability.

  20. Electronic quantum confinement in cylindrical potential well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltenkov, Arkadiy S.; Msezane, Alfred Z.

    2016-04-01

    The effects of quantum confinement on the momentum distribution of electrons confined within a cylindrical potential well have been analyzed. The motivation is to understand specific features of the momentum distribution of electrons when the electron behavior is completely controlled by the parameters of a non-isotropic potential cavity. It is shown that studying the solutions of the wave equation for an electron confined in a cylindrical potential well offers the possibility to analyze the confinement behavior of an electron executing one- or two-dimensional motion in the three-dimensional space within the framework of the same mathematical model. Some low-lying electronic states with different symmetries have been considered and the corresponding wave functions have been calculated; the behavior of their nodes and their peak positions with respect to the parameters of the cylindrical well has been analyzed. Additionally, the momentum distributions of electrons in these states have been calculated. The limiting cases of the ratio of the cylinder length H and its radius R0 have been considered; when the cylinder length H significantly exceeds its radius R0 and when the cylinder radius is much greater than its length. The cylindrical quantum confinement effects on the momentum distribution of electrons in these potential wells have been analyzed. The possible application of the results obtained here for the description of the general features in the behavior of electrons in nanowires with metallic type of conductivity (or nanotubes) and ultrathin epitaxial films (or graphene sheets) are discussed. Possible experiments are suggested where the quantum confinement can be manifested. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Atomic Cluster Collisions (7th International Symposium)", edited by Gerardo Delgado Barrio, Andrey Solov'Yov, Pablo Villarreal, Rita Prosmiti.

  1. Aberrations of sphero-cylindrical ophthalmic lenses.

    PubMed

    Malacara, Z; Malacara, D

    1990-04-01

    The authors have presented in two previous articles the graphic solutions resembling Tscherning ellipses, for spherical as well as for aspherical ophthalmic lenses free of astigmatism or power error. These solutions were exact, inasmuch as they were based on exact ray tracing, and not third-order theory as frequently done. In this paper sphero-cylindrical lenses are now analyzed, also using exact ray tracing. The functional dependence of the astigmatism and the power error for these lenses is described extensively.

  2. A novel method of freeform surface grinding with a soft wheel based on industrial robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sha, Sheng-chun; Guo, Xiao-ling

    2011-08-01

    In order to meet the growing demand for high-quality images, optical elements of freeform surface are more and more applied to imaging system. However the fabrication of freeform surface optical elements is much more difficult than that of traditional spherical ones. Recent research on freeform surface manufacture often deals with precision machine tools which have limitations on dimensions and are always expensive. Little has been researched on industrial robots. In this paper, a new method of freeform surface grinding based on industrial robots was found. This method could be applied to both whole surface grinding as well as partial surface grinding. The diameter of lenses to be ground would not be restricted to the machine tool's size. In this method a high-speed-rotating soft wheel was used. The relation between removing amount and grinding time which could be called removing function was established and measured. The machining precision was achieved by means of controlling the grinding time instead of the machine tool or industrial robot itself. There are two main factors affecting the removing function: i).rotating speed of the soft wheel; ii).pressure between the wheel and the work piece. In this paper, two groups of experiments have been conducted. One is the removing function tested at constant rotating speed while under different pressure. The other is that tested under a certain pressure with variable speed. Tables and curves which can show the effect of speed and pressure on the removing efficiency have been obtained. Cause for inaccuracy between experiment data and calculated result according to the theory and the non-linearity in the curves was analyzed. Through these analyses the removing function could be concluded under certain condition including rotating speed and pressure. Finally several experiments were performed to verify the appropriateness of the removing function. It could also be concluded that this method was more efficient in comparison

  3. Westinghouse Modular Grinding Process - Enhancement of Volume Reduction for Hot Resin Supercompaction - 13491

    SciTech Connect

    Fehrmann, Henning; Aign, Joerg

    2013-07-01

    In nuclear power plants (NPP) ion exchange (IX) resins are used in several systems for water treatment. Spent resins can contain a significant amount of contaminates which makes treatment for disposal of spent resins mandatory. Several treatment processes are available such as direct immobilization with technologies like cementation, bitumisation, polymer solidification or usage of a high integrity container (HIC). These technologies usually come with a significant increase in final waste volume. The Hot Resin Supercompaction (HRSC) is a thermal treatment process which reduces the resin waste volume significantly. For a mixture of powdered and bead resins the HRSC process has demonstrated a volume reduction of up to 75 % [1]. For bead resins only the HRSC process is challenging because the bead resins compaction properties are unfavorable. The bead resin material does not form a solid block after compaction and shows a high spring back effect. The volume reduction of bead resins is not as good as for the mixture described in [1]. The compaction properties of bead resin waste can be significantly improved by grinding the beads to powder. The grinding also eliminates the need for a powder additive.Westinghouse has developed a modular grinding process to grind the bead resin to powder. The developed process requires no circulation of resins and enables a selective adjustment of particle size and distribution to achieve optimal results in the HRSC or in any other following process. A special grinding tool setup is use to minimize maintenance and radiation exposure to personnel. (authors)

  4. Rolling Resistance and Mechanical Properties of Grinded Copper Surfaces Using Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shih-Wei; Wang, Chih-Hao; Fang, Te-Hua

    2016-12-01

    Mechanical properties of copper (Cu) film under grinding process were accomplished by molecular dynamics simulation. A numerical calculation was carried out to understand the distributions of atomic and slip vector inside the Cu films. In this study, the roller rotation velocity, temperature, and roller rotation direction change are investigated to clarify their effect on the deformation mechanism. The simulation results showed that the destruction of materials was increased proportionally to the roller rotation velocity. The machining process at higher temperature results in larger kinetic energy of atoms than lower temperature during the grinding process of the Cu films. The result also shows that the roller rotation in the counterclockwise direction had the better stability than the roller rotation in the clockwise direction due to significantly increased backfill atoms in the groove of the Cu film surface. Additionally, the effects of the rolling resistances on the Cu film surfaces during the grinding process are studied by the molecular dynamics simulation method. PMID:27637893

  5. The effect of moisture content on grinding process of wheat and maize single kernel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupu, M. I.; Pădureanu, V.; Canja, C. M.; Măzărel, A.

    2016-08-01

    The mechanical properties and the resistance of grains are key characteristics that enhance grinding behaviour of wheat and maize and are dependent on the moisture content of the grains. These properties were defined in the single-kernel compression test, and it seems that the qualities expressing the relations resulting during mechanical loads like mechanical and rheological properties are significant. The aim of the study reported here is to show the influence of moisture content on grinding process of wheat and maize single kernel. To show this influence it is necessary to study the physical and mechanical properties of wheat and maize single kernel at different moisture content 10%, 12%, 14%, 16%, 18% and 20%. The measurement results showed significant relationship between the cereal type, its resistance characteristics and the moisture content in the grinding process.

  6. Rolling Resistance and Mechanical Properties of Grinded Copper Surfaces Using Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shih-Wei; Wang, Chih-Hao; Fang, Te-Hua

    2016-12-01

    Mechanical properties of copper (Cu) film under grinding process were accomplished by molecular dynamics simulation. A numerical calculation was carried out to understand the distributions of atomic and slip vector inside the Cu films. In this study, the roller rotation velocity, temperature, and roller rotation direction change are investigated to clarify their effect on the deformation mechanism. The simulation results showed that the destruction of materials was increased proportionally to the roller rotation velocity. The machining process at higher temperature results in larger kinetic energy of atoms than lower temperature during the grinding process of the Cu films. The result also shows that the roller rotation in the counterclockwise direction had the better stability than the roller rotation in the clockwise direction due to significantly increased backfill atoms in the groove of the Cu film surface. Additionally, the effects of the rolling resistances on the Cu film surfaces during the grinding process are studied by the molecular dynamics simulation method.

  7. Rolling Resistance and Mechanical Properties of Grinded Copper Surfaces Using Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Shih-Wei; Wang, Chih-Hao; Fang, Te-Hua

    2016-09-01

    Mechanical properties of copper (Cu) film under grinding process were accomplished by molecular dynamics simulation. A numerical calculation was carried out to understand the distributions of atomic and slip vector inside the Cu films. In this study, the roller rotation velocity, temperature, and roller rotation direction change are investigated to clarify their effect on the deformation mechanism. The simulation results showed that the destruction of materials was increased proportionally to the roller rotation velocity. The machining process at higher temperature results in larger kinetic energy of atoms than lower temperature during the grinding process of the Cu films. The result also shows that the roller rotation in the counterclockwise direction had the better stability than the roller rotation in the clockwise direction due to significantly increased backfill atoms in the groove of the Cu film surface. Additionally, the effects of the rolling resistances on the Cu film surfaces during the grinding process are studied by the molecular dynamics simulation method.

  8. Statistical model and control of a ring-and-roller type grinding mill

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, S.

    1992-01-01

    This project explores the use of a ring-and-roller grinding mill for fine grinding or pulverizing. Since the efficiency of this system is low, small improvements in product throughput or energy consumption can result in substantial economic improvements. To better understand this system, experiments were conducted for limestone and cement clinker. From these experiments models were formulated for product throughput, energy consumption and product size distribution. A control loop was implemented to reduce the effect of non-uniform feeding. Steady-state interactions were analyzed using the Relative Gain Array (RGA) method. Next, a multi-input and multi-output (MIMO) control system was designed using the Inverse Nyquist Array (INA) method to remove variable interactions. The robustness of this controller was explored. Finally, a self-tuning PI controller was designed using the pole placement method to improve system performance. The results of this study provide models for implementation on ring-and-roller grinding mills.

  9. Surface Integrity in Grinding Medium Carbon Steel with Miniature Electroplated Monolayer cBN Wheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vashista, Meghanshu; Kumar, Shobhit; Ghosh, Amitava; Paul, Soumitra

    2010-12-01

    An experimental study was undertaken to investigate the role of process parameters on grindability of medium carbon steel with particular emphasis on surface integrity. Grinding with miniature monolayer electroplated cBN wheels provided compressive residual stress throughout the experimental domain unlike conventional grinding. This can be attributed to desirable temperature control as the wheel takes away substantial part of grinding heat flux owing to its better thermal conductivity. Micromagnetic or Barkhausen Noise (BN) parameters correlated linearly with the residual stress indicating its applicability in assessing surface integrity of cBN ground products. Increase in maximum grit depth of cut ( h m) provided more grain elongation and surface hardness due to more chip load during chip formation.

  10. Surface characterization of diamond film tool grinding on the monocrystal sapphire under different liquid environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Wei; Lu, Wenzhuang; Zhou, Hai; Yang, Bin; Zuo, Dunwen

    2016-11-01

    Surface characterization of diamond film tool on the monocrystal sapphire under H2O, 3% ethylene glycol and 3% ethylenediamine was investigated. The typical components and chemical changes of the surface of diamond thick film were studied by means of Raman and XPS. Results showed that tribological properties of diamond film tool were associated with the liquid environment located the grinding. Diamond film tool under 3% ethylenediamine solution exhibited the minimum value of friction coefficient, while that under H2O exhibited maximum value of friction coefficient. As the ethylenediamine and ethylene glycol were added during the grinding process, the reaction between diamond film and the sapphire pieces occurred, and the chemical composition change of the surface was also studied. Under the same process parameters, a better surface quality of sapphire under the grinding fluid of ethylenediamine can be obtained.

  11. Wheel wear and surface/subsurface qualities when precision grinding optical materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonnellier, X.; Shore, P.; Luo, X.; Morantz, P.; Baldwin, A.; Evans, R.; Walker, D.

    2006-06-01

    An ultra precision large optics grinder, which will provide a rapid and economic solution for grinding large off-axis aspherical and free-form optical components, has been developed at Cranfield University. This paper presents representative grinding experiments performed on another machine - a 5 axes Edgetek - in order to verify the proposed BoX(r) grinding cycle. The optical materials assessed included; Zerodur(r), SIC and ULE(r), all three being materials are candidates for extreme large telescope (ELT) mirror segments. Investigated removal rates ranged from 2mm 3/s to 200mm 3/s. The higher removal rate ensures that a 1 metre size optic could be ground in less than 10 hours. These experiments point out the effect of diamond grit size on the surface quality and wheel wear. The power and forces for each material type at differing removal rates are presented, together with subsurface damage.

  12. Online monitoring of a belt grinding process by using a light scattering method

    SciTech Connect

    Boehm, Johannes; Vernes, Andras; Vorlaufer, Georg; Vellekoop, Michael

    2010-10-20

    Industrially ground surfaces often have a characteristic surface topography known as chatter marks. The surface finishing is mainly monitored by optical measurement techniques. In this work, the monitoring of an industrial belt grinding process with a light scattering sensor is presented. Although this technique is primarily applied for parametric surface roughness analysis, here it is shown that it enables also the measurement of the surface topography, i.e., the chatter marks occurring during the belt grinding process. In particular, it is proven that the light scattering method is appropriate to measure online the topography of chatter marks. Furthermore, the frequency analysis of the data reveals that the wavelength of chatter marks strongly depends on process parameters, such as the grinding speed.

  13. High-speed velocimetry inside imploding cylindrical liners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolan, Daniel; Lemke, Ray; Dalton, Devon; Harding, Eric; McBride, Ryan; Martin, Matthew; Blue, Brent; Walker, Scott

    2014-03-01

    Dynamic planar compression is conceptually simple but difficult to maintain at extreme pressure (>5 Mbar). Higher pressures are attainable with imploding cylindrical liners, using Photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV) to track the liner interior. PDV measures Doppler shift directly--1 GHz of beat frequency for every 1 km/s of velocity--requiring a special ``leapfrog'' approach for liners traveling in excess of 20 km/s. Single-point and multi-point PDV measurements have been performed in aluminum, beryllium, and tantalum liners under ramp compression, and the technique can readily applied to other implosion experiments. Combined with electrical current diagnostics, these measurements test thermodynamic equations of state at pressures up to 10 MBar and beyond. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85.

  14. Chemical composition and morphology of welding fume particles and grinding dusts

    SciTech Connect

    Karlsen, J.T.; Farrants, G.; Torgrimsen, T.; Reith, A. )

    1992-05-01

    Elemental composition and morphology of pure manual metal arc (MMA) welding fumes, pure grinding dust, and combined fume/dust air samples were collected and determined separately under semilaboratory conditions. The base material was stainless steel. The purpose of the present study was to create a synthetic' work situation under semilaboratory conditions by combining one grinding period and two MMA welding periods and comparing these results with results during welding in a workshop. The duty cycles of pure welding and of pure grinding were also observed. A comparison was also made between metal inert gas (MIG) and MMA welding on stainless steel as well as a nickel-rich alloy under regular conditions. The amount of collected material was determined by weighing the membrane filters before and after exposure, and the element contents were determined by atomic spectroscopy. Other transmission electron microscopy (TEM) filters were used for TEM and computer-image analysis, in which the amount of collected material and its morphological characteristics were observed. The arcing time and the consumption of filler material were estimated for different kinds of electrodes. Chemical analysis showed that the contents of manganese and total chromium were lower in grinding dust than in welding fumes. The contents of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), in grinding dust were undetectable. Samples collected in welding shops where concomitant grinding was performed contained about 30% less Cr(VI) than those collected under laboratory conditions during welding only. The sizes and shapes of the particles depend on the welding process and distance of collection from the plume of the fume. To compare laboratory experiments with regular welding situations, the experiment must resemble industrial welding.

  15. Chemical composition and morphology of welding fume particles and grinding dusts.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, J T; Farrants, G; Torgrimsen, T; Reith, A

    1992-05-01

    Elemental composition and morphology of pure manual metal arc (MMA) welding fumes, pure grinding dust, and combined fume/dust air samples were collected and determined separately under semilaboratory conditions. The base material was stainless steel. The purpose of the present study was to create a "synthetic" work situation under semilaboratory conditions by combining one grinding period and two MMA welding periods and comparing these results with results during welding in a workshop. The duty cycles of pure welding and of pure grinding were also observed. A comparison was also made between metal inert gas (MIG) and MMA welding on stainless steel as well as a nickel-rich alloy under regular conditions. The amount of collected material was determined by weighing the membrane filters before and after exposure, and the element contents were determined by atomic spectroscopy. Other transmission electron microscopy (TEM) filters were used for TEM and computer-image analysis, in which the amount of collected material and its morphological characteristics were observed. The arcing time and the consumption of filler material were estimated for different kinds of electrodes. Chemical analysis showed that the contents of manganese and total chromium were lower in grinding dust than in welding fumes. The contents of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), in grinding dust were undetectable. Samples collected in welding shops where concomitant grinding was performed contained about 30% less Cr(VI) than those collected under laboratory conditions during welding only. The sizes and shapes of the particles depend on the welding process and distance of collection from the plume of the fume. To compare laboratory experiments with regular welding situations, the experiment must resemble industrial welding.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Cylindrical nonlinear Schroedinger equation versus cylindrical Korteweg-de Vries equation

    SciTech Connect

    Fedele, Renato; De Nicola, Sergio; Grecu, Dan; Visinescu, Anca; Shukla, Padma K.

    2008-10-15

    A correspondence between the family of cylindrical nonlinear Schroedinger (cNLS) equations and the one of cylindrical Korteweg-de Vries (cKdV) equations is constructed. It associates non stationary solutions of the first family with the ones of the second family. This is done by using a correspondence, recently found, between the families of generalized NLS equation and generalized KdV equation, and their solutions in the form of travelling waves, respectively. In particular, non-stationary soliton-like solutions of the cNLS equation can be associated with non-stationary soliton-like solutions of cKdV equation.

  17. In Situ Investigation of a Self-Accelerated Cocrystal Formation by Grinding Pyrazinamide with Oxalic Acid.

    PubMed

    Kulla, Hannes; Greiser, Sebastian; Benemann, Sigrid; Rademann, Klaus; Emmerling, Franziska

    2016-01-01

    A new cocrystal of pyrazinamide with oxalic acid was prepared mechanochemically and characterized by PXRD, Raman spectroscopy, solid-state NMR spectroscopy, DTA-TG, and SEM. Based on powder X-ray diffraction data the structure was solved. The formation pathway of the reaction was studied in situ using combined synchrotron PXRD and Raman spectroscopy. Using oxalic acid dihydrate the initially neat grinding turned into a rapid self-accelerated liquid-assisted grinding process by the release of crystallization water. Under these conditions, the cocrystal was formed directly within two minutes. PMID:27428942

  18. New mirror-finish surface-grinding technology for the fabrication of optical device endfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanda, Torahiko; Mitsuhashi, Masashige; Ueda, Tetsuji; Toyohara, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Koji

    1995-08-01

    This paper describes a mirror-finish slicing technology, and a spherical mirror-finish surface grinding technology. The former technology uses a thin metal bond micro-grain blade to which an electrolytic dressing is applied, for use with optical waveguide device endfaces. The latter technology uses a concave surface of metal bond micro-grain grinding wheel with electrolytic dressing, which produces convex spherical ferrule endfaces for Physical Control optical fiber connectors. They successfully produce mirror-finish endfaces of 0.06 micrometers Rmax directly, without the need for lapping. Endfaces produced with these technologies have sufficiently high optical light transmission characteristics.

  19. Research on Bamboo Charcoal Bonded Grinding Wheel and Its Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Xu, Minjie; Zhan, Fangyong; Jin, Mingsheng

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, a new type of grinding wheel and its manufacturing production process are introduced. The new BCB (Bamboo Charcoal Bond) grinding wheel was made of bamboo charcoal, phenolic resin and abrasive powder with higher press and temperature. To investigate its mechanical features, such as Rockwell hardness, resistance to abrasion, and resistance to pressure, some experiments on three BCB samples with different Resin weight ratios 20%, 25%, 30%, were carried out. The results showed that the BCB sample with proper moulding process and Resin weight ratio had better performance.

  20. Motion parallax in immersive cylindrical display systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filliard, N.; Reymond, G.; Kemeny, A.; Berthoz, A.

    2012-03-01

    Motion parallax is a crucial visual cue produced by translations of the observer for the perception of depth and selfmotion. Therefore, tracking the observer viewpoint has become inevitable in immersive virtual (VR) reality systems (cylindrical screens, CAVE, head mounted displays) used e.g. in automotive industry (style reviews, architecture design, ergonomics studies) or in scientific studies of visual perception. The perception of a stable and rigid world requires that this visual cue be coherent with other extra-retinal (e.g. vestibular, kinesthetic) cues signaling ego-motion. Although world stability is never questioned in real world, rendering head coupled viewpoint in VR can lead to the perception of an illusory perception of unstable environments, unless a non-unity scale factor is applied on recorded head movements. Besides, cylindrical screens are usually used with static observers due to image distortions when rendering image for viewpoints different from a sweet spot. We developed a technique to compensate in real-time these non-linear visual distortions, in an industrial VR setup, based on a cylindrical screen projection system. Additionally, to evaluate the amount of discrepancies tolerated without perceptual distortions between visual and extraretinal cues, a "motion parallax gain" between the velocity of the observer's head and that of the virtual camera was introduced in this system. The influence of this artificial gain was measured on the gait stability of free-standing participants. Results indicate that, below unity, gains significantly alter postural control. Conversely, the influence of higher gains remains limited, suggesting a certain tolerance of observers to these conditions. Parallax gain amplification is therefore proposed as a possible solution to provide a wider exploration of space to users of immersive virtual reality systems.

  1. Off-flavor related volatiles in soymilk as affected by soybean variety, grinding, and heat-processing methods.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Guo, Shuntang; Liu, Zhisheng; Chang, Sam K C

    2012-08-01

    Off-flavor of soymilk is a barrier to the acceptance of consumers. The objectionable soy odor can be reduced through inhibition of their formation or through removal after being formed. In this study, soymilk was prepared by three grinding methods (ambient, cold, and hot grinding) from two varieties (yellow Prosoy and a black soybean) before undergoing three heating processes: stove cooking, one-phase UHT (ultrahigh temperature), and two-phase UHT process using a Microthermics direct injection processor, which was equipped with a vacuuming step to remove injected water and volatiles. Eight typical soy odor compounds, generated from lipid oxidation, were extracted by a solid-phase microextraction method and analyzed by gas chromatography. The results showed that hot grinding and cold grinding significantly reduced off-flavor as compared with ambient grinding, and hot grinding achieved the best result. The UHT methods, especially the two-phase UHT method, were effective to reduce soy odor. Different odor compounds showed distinct concentration patterns because of different formation mechanisms. The two varieties behaved differently in odor formation during the soymilk-making process. Most odor compounds could be reduced to below the detection limit through a combination of hot grinding and two-phase UHT processing. However, hot grinding gave lower solid and protein recoveries in soymilk.

  2. Development of size reduction equations for calculating power input for grinding pine wood chips using hammer mill

    DOE PAGES

    Naimi, Ladan J.; Collard, Flavien; Bi, Xiaotao; Lim, C. Jim; Sokhansanj, Shahab

    2016-01-05

    Size reduction is an unavoidable operation for preparing biomass for biofuels and bioproduct conversion. Yet, there is considerable uncertainty in power input requirement and the uniformity of ground biomass. Considerable gains are possible if the required power input for a size reduction ratio is estimated accurately. In this research three well-known mechanistic equations attributed to Rittinger, Kick, and Bond available for predicting energy input for grinding pine wood chips were tested against experimental grinding data. Prior to testing, samples of pine wood chips were conditioned to 11.7% wb, moisture content. The wood chips were successively ground in a hammer millmore » using screen sizes of 25.4 mm, 10 mm, 6.4 mm, and 3.2 mm. The input power and the flow of material into the grinder were recorded continuously. The recorded power input vs. mean particle size showed that the Rittinger equation had the best fit to the experimental data. The ground particle sizes were 4 to 7 times smaller than the size of installed screen. Geometric mean size of particles were calculated using two methods (1) Tyler sieves and using particle size analysis and (2) Sauter mean diameter calculated from the ratio of volume to surface that were estimated from measured length and width. The two mean diameters agreed well, pointing to the fact that either mechanical sieving or particle imaging can be used to characterize particle size. In conclusion, specific energy input to the hammer mill increased from 1.4 kWh t–1 (5.2 J g–1) for large 25.1-mm screen to 25 kWh t–1 (90.4 J g–1) for small 3.2-mm screen.« less

  3. Cullet Manufacture Using the Cylindrical Induction Melter

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D. H.

    2000-01-20

    The base process for vitrification of the Am/Cm solution stored in F-canyon uses 25SrABS cullet as the glass former. A small portion of the cullet used in the SRTC development work was purchased from Corning while the majority was made in the 5 inch Cylindrical Induction Melter (CIM5). Task 1.01 of TTR-NMSS/SE-006, Additional Am-Cm Process Development Studies, requested that a process for the glass former (cullet) fabrication be specified. This report provides the process details for 25SrAB cullet production thereby satisfying Task 1.01.

  4. Periodic Arrays of Interfacial Cylindrical reverse Micelles

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson,M.; Cain, N.; Ocko, B.; Gin, D.; Hammond, S.; Schwartz, D.

    2005-01-01

    We report an approach for the fabrication of periodic molecular nanostructures on surfaces. The approach involves biomimetic self-organization of synthetic wedge-shaped amphiphilic molecules into multilayer arrays of cylindrical reverse micelles. The films were characterized by atomic force microscopy and X-ray reflectivity. These nanostructured films self-assemble in solution but remain stable upon removal and exposure to ambient conditions, making them potentially suitable for a variety of dry pattern transfer methods. We illustrate the generality of this approach by using two distinct molecular systems that vary in size by a factor of 2.

  5. Liquid crystal alignment in cylindrical microcapillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chychłowski, M.; Yaroshchuk, O.; Kravchuk, R.; Woliński, T.

    2011-09-01

    A variety of alignment configurations of liquid crystals (LCs) inside the glassy cylindrical capillaries is realized by using alignment materials providing different anchoring. The radial configuration with central disclination line is obtained for homeotropic boundary conditions. In turn, the axial, transversal and tilted alignment structures are realized by using materials for planar anchoring. The uniformity and controlling of the latter structures were provided by photoalignment method. This approach can be further used to control LC alignment in the photonic crystal fibers recognized as advanced elements for different optical devices.

  6. Liquid crystal alignment in cylindrical microcapillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chychłowski, M.; Yaroshchuk, O.; Kravchuk, R.; Woliński, T.

    2012-03-01

    A variety of alignment configurations of liquid crystals (LCs) inside the glassy cylindrical capillaries is realized by using alignment materials providing different anchoring. The radial configuration with central disclination line is obtained for homeotropic boundary conditions. In turn, the axial, transversal and tilted alignment structures are realized by using materials for planar anchoring. The uniformity and controlling of the latter structures were provided by photoalignment method. This approach can be further used to control LC alignment in the photonic crystal fibers recognized as advanced elements for different optical devices.

  7. High convergence implosion symmetry in cylindrical hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Amendt, P A; Bradley, D K; Hammel, B A; Landen, O L; Suter, L J; Turner, R E; Wallace, R J

    1999-09-01

    High convergence, hohlraum-driven implosions will require control of time-integrated drive asymmetries to 1% levels for ignition to succeed on the NIF. We review how core imaging provides such asymmetry measurement accuracy for the lowest order asymmetry modes, and describe recent improvements in imaging techniques that should allow detection of higher order asymmetry modes. We also present a simple analytic model explaining how the sensitivity of symmetry control to beam pointing scales as we progress from single ring per side Nova cylindrical hohlraum illumination geometries to NIF-like multiple rings per side Omega hohlraum illumination geometries and ultimately to NIF-scale hohlraums.

  8. Radiation of sound from unflanged cylindrical ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartharan, S. L.; Bayliss, A.

    1983-01-01

    Calculations of sound radiated from unflanged cylindrical ducts are presented. The numerical simulation models the problem of an aero-engine inlet. The time dependent linearized Euler equations are solved from a state of rest until a harmonic solution is attained. A fourth order accurate finite difference scheme is used and solutions are obtained from a fully vectorized Cyber-203 computer program. Cases of both plane waves and spin modes are treated. Spin modes model the sound generated by a turbofan engine. Boundary conditions for both plane waves and spin modes are treated. Solutions obtained are compared with experiments conducted at NASA Langley Research Center.

  9. Current to a moving cylindrical electrostatic probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoegy, W. R.; Wharton, L. E.

    1972-01-01

    The current collection characteristics of a moving cylindrical Langmuir probe are evaluated for a range of probe speeds and potentials which are applicable to earth and planetary measurements. The current expressions derived include the cases of the general accelerated current, sheath area limited current, orbital motion limited current, and retarded current. For the orbital motion limited current, a simple algebraic expression is obtained which includes and generalizes the Mott-Smith and Langmuir expressions for both a stationary probe and a rapidly moving probe. For a rapidly moving probe a single formula adequately represents both the accelerated and the retarded current.

  10. Cylindrical Wire Electrical Discharge Machining of Metal Bond Diamond Wheels- Part II: Wheel Wear Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    McSpadden, SB

    2002-01-22

    The use of stereo scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) to investigate the wear mechanism of the wire EDM true metal bond diamond wheel for ceramic grinding is presented. On the grinding wheel, a wedge-shape removal part was machined to enable the examination and measurement of the worn wheel surfaces using the stereo SEM. The stereo SEM was calibrated by comparing results of depth profile of a wear groove with the profilometer measurements. On the surface of the grinding wheel after wire EDM truing and before grinding, the diamond protruding heights were measured in the level of 35 {micro}m, comparing to the 54 {micro}m average size of the diamond in the grinding wheel. The gap between the EDM wire and rotating grinding wheel is estimated to be about 35 to 40 {micro}m. This observation indicates that, during the wire EDM, electrical sparks occur between the metal bond and EDM wire, which leaves the diamond protruding in the gap between the wire and wheel. The protruding diamond is immediately fractured at the start of the grinding process, even under a light grinding condition. After heavy grinding, the grinding wheel surface and the diamond protrusion heights are also investigated using the stereo SEM. The height of diamond protrusion was estimated in the 5 to 15 {micro}m range. This study has demonstrated the use of stereo SEM as a metrology tool to study the grinding wheel surface.

  11. Development of a High Performance Vitrified Grinding Wheel using Ultrafine-Crystalline cBN Abrasive Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichida, Yoshio; Fujimoto, Masakazu; Inoue, Yuichiro; Matsui, Keisuke

    This paper describes the development of a high-performance vitrified bonded cBN grinding wheel using a new type of ultrafine-crystalline cBN (cBN-U) abrasive grain. Surface plunge grinding experiments using a vitrified wheel made of the cBN-U grains with a mesh size of #80/100 were carried out, and the wheel’s grinding performance was compared with those of cBN vitrified wheels made of representative conventional monocrystalline and polycrystalline cBN abrasive grains. This new cBN-U abrasive grain was found to possess a higher fracture strength than these conventional cBN grains. Therefore, the cBN-U wheel exhibits a higher grinding ratio and longer grinding wheel life than conventional cBN wheels.

  12. Thermal Convection in a cylindrical enclosure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, K.

    The microgravity experiment in the Apollo space mission during 1973 has established the importance of the surface tension as a propulsive force on the onset of convection because surface tension varies with temperature. Any temperature gradient established across the surface of the fluid is accompanied by a gradient in surface tension. However, the surface tension driven convection experiment flown in the shuttle flight has not shown any evidence of oscillatory flow even for Marangoni number as high as 105. The paper discusses thermal convection in a cylindrical enclosure with free boundary in a microgravity environment. The surface deformation caused by g-jitter and its relation to the oscillatory flow is studied. The system to be investigated in cylindrical layers of fluid heated from beneath with upper boundary free, initially in mechanical equilibrium, but subjected to the gradient of heat. At any instant of time, in a microgravity environment, the oscillatory part of g-jitter can be as high as 10 -3 g, where g is the gravitational acceleration on the surface of the earth [1]. The instability of a Boussinesq fluid [2] is analyzed in terms of the dimensionless parameters Raleigh number, Ra, Prandtl number, Pr, Marangoni number, M and the aspect ratio, A and relative importance of these parameters is established. References [1] Bannister, T C., etal, NASA, TMX-64772, 1973 [2] Shukla, K N, Applied Mechanics Review, Vol. 54, (5), PP 391-404, 2001

  13. Scattering and radiation from cylindrically conformal antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempel, Leo Charles

    Microstrip patch antennas offer considerable advantages in terms of weight, aerodynamic drag, cost, flexibility, and observability over more conventional protruding antennas. Two hybrid finite element methods are presented and are used to examine the scattering and radiation behavior of cylindrically conformal patches. In conjunction with a new divergence-free cylindrical shell element, the finite element-boundary integral method is shown to have low computational and memory requirements when compared with competing approaches. This method uses an efficient creeping wave series for the computation of the dyadic Green's function and a uniform surface mesh so that a fast Fourier transform may be used to reduce the computational and memory burden of the method. An alternative finite element-absorbing boundary condition approach incorporates a new conformal vector condition which minimizes the computational domain. The latter method is more flexible than the former because it can incorporate surface coatings and protruding antennas. Guidelines are established for minimal ABC displacement from the aperture. These two hybrid finite element methods are used to study the scattering, radiation, and input impedance of typical conformal antenna arrays. In particular, the effect of curvature and cavity size is examined for both discrete and wraparound antenna arrays.

  14. Motion of a Cylindrical Dielectric Boundary.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Li-Tien; Li, Bo; White, Michael; Zhou, Shenggao

    2013-01-01

    The interplay between geometry and electrostatics contributes significantly to hydrophobic interactions of biomolecules in an aqueous solution. With an implicit solvent, such a system can be described macroscopically by the dielectric boundary that separates the high-dielectric solvent from low-dielectric solutes. This work concerns the motion of a model cylindrical dielectric boundary as the steepest descent of a free-energy functional that consists of both the surface and electrostatic energies. The effective dielectric boundary force is defined and an explicit formula of the force is obtained. It is found that such a force always points from the solvent region to solute region. In the case that the interior of a cylinder is of a lower dielectric, the motion of the dielectric boundary is initially driven dominantly by the surface force but is then driven inward quickly to the cylindrical axis by both the surface and electrostatic forces. In the case that the interior of a cylinder is of a higher dielectric, the competition between the geometrical and electrostatic contributions leads to the existence of equilibrium boundaries that are circular cylinders. Linear stability analysis is presented to show that such an equilibrium is only stable for a perturbation with a wavenumber larger than a critical value. Numerical simulations are reported for both of the cases, confirming the analysis on the role of each component of the driving force. Implications of the mathematical findings to the understanding of charged molecular systems are discussed.

  15. Optical inspection system for cylindrical objects

    DOEpatents

    Brenden, Byron B.; Peters, Timothy J.

    1989-01-01

    In the inspection of cylindrical objects, particularly O-rings, the object is translated through a field of view and a linear light trace is projected on its surface. An image of the light trace is projected on a mask, which has a size and shape corresponding to the size and shape which the image would have if the surface of the object were perfect. If there is a defect, light will pass the mask and be sensed by a detector positioned behind the mask. Preferably, two masks and associated detectors are used, one mask being convex to pass light when the light trace falls on a projection from the surface and the other concave, to pass light when the light trace falls on a depression in the surface. The light trace may be either dynamic, formed by a scanned laser beam, or static, formed by such a beam focussed by a cylindrical lens. Means are provided to automatically keep the illuminating receiving systems properly aligned.

  16. Propagation properties of cylindrical sinc Gaussian beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyyuboğlu, Halil T.; Bayraktar, Mert

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the propagation properties of cylindrical sinc Gaussian beam in turbulent atmosphere. Since an analytic solution is hardly derivable, the study is carried out with the aid of random phase screens. Evolutions of the beam intensity profile, beam size and kurtosis parameter are analysed. It is found that on the source plane, cylindrical sinc Gaussian beam has a dark hollow appearance, where the side lobes also start to emerge with increase in width parameter and Gaussian source size. During propagation, beams with small width and Gaussian source size exhibit off-axis behaviour, losing the dark hollow shape, accumulating the intensity asymmetrically on one side, whereas those with large width and Gaussian source size retain dark hollow appearance even at long propagation distances. It is seen that the beams with large widths expand more in beam size than the ones with small widths. The structure constant values chosen do not seem to alter this situation. The kurtosis parameters of the beams having small widths are seen to be larger than the ones with the small widths. Again the choice of the structure constant does not change this trend.

  17. Electron Confinement in Cylindrical Potential Well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltenkov, A. S.; Msezane, A. Z.

    2016-05-01

    We show that studying the solutions of the wave equation for an electron confined in a cylindrical potential well offers the possibility to analyze the confinement behavior of an electron executing one- or two-dimensional motion in the remaining three-dimensional space within the framework of the same mathematical model of the potential well. Some low-lying electronic states with different symmetries are considered and the corresponding wave functions are calculated. The behavior of their nodes and their peak positions with respect to the parameters of the cylindrical well is analyzed. Additionally, the momentum distributions of electrons in these states are calculated. The limiting cases of the ratio of the cylinder length H to its radius R0 are considered; when H significantly exceeds R0 and when R0 is much greater than H. The possible application of the results obtained here for the description of the general features in the behavior of electrons in nanowires with metallic type of conductivity (or nanotubes) and ultrathin epitaxial films (or graphene sheets) are discussed. Possible experiments are suggested as well where the quantum confinement can be manifested. Work supported by the Uzbek Foundation (ASB) and by the U.S. DOE, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Energy Research (AZM).

  18. Note: Electrochemical etching of cylindrical nanoprobes using a vibrating electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yufeng; Zeng, Yongbin Qu, Ningsong; Zhu, Di

    2015-07-15

    An electrochemical etching process using a vibrating electrolyte of potassium hydroxide to prepare tungsten cylindrical nanotips is developed. The vibrating electrolyte eases the effects of a diffusion layer and extends the etching area, which aid in the production of cylindrical nanotips. Larger amplitudes and a vibration frequency of 35 Hz are recommended for producing cylindrical nanotips. Nanotips with a tip radius of approximately 43 nm and a conical angle of arctan 0.0216 are obtained.

  19. [Research on ultrafine grinding technology of improving dissolution rates of effective components in Sanjie Zhentong capsule].

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhong-kun; Gao, Jin; Qin, Jian-ping; Chen, Guang-bo; Wang, Zhen-zhong; Xiao, Wei

    2015-05-01

    The effects of ultrafine grinding on the dissolution rates of the effective components in Sanjie Zhentong capsule (SZC) were studied in this experiment. Fine and ultrafine powder of SZC intermediates were made by ordinary grinding and ultrafine grinding technology, and then granulated by wet granulation. SZC were prepared by fine powder, ultrafine powder and ultrafine granules, respectively. With resveratrol and loureirin B as investigated indexes, dissolution rates of the four intermediates in SZC were determined by cup method and HPLC. The dissolution rates of resveratrol in SZC prepared by fine powder, ultrafine powder and ultrafine granules were 26.11%, 63.27%, 67.49%, respectively; and the dissolution rates of loureirin B were 7.160%, 20.29%, 23.05%, respectively. The dissolution rate of resveratrol and loureirin B in SZC prepared by ultrafine granules was the best. D90 size of ultrafine grinding was 13.221 μm and could improve the dissolution rates of resveratrol and loureirin B in SZC. PMID:26390653

  20. High speed low damage grinding of advanced ceramics, Phase II final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kovach, J.A.; Malkin, S.

    2000-05-01

    In the manufacture of structural ceramic components, grinding costs can comprise up to 80% of the entire manufacturing cost. As a result, one of the most challenging tasks faced by manufacturing process engineers is the development of a ceramic finishing process to maximize part throughput while minimizing costs associated scrap levels.

  1. Eco-Friendly ELID Grinding Using Metal-Free Electro-Conductive Resinoid Bonded Wheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Nobuhide; Nemoto, Akihiko; Katoh, Teruko; Ohmori, Hitoshi

    In this study, a metal-free electro-conductive resinoid bonded wheel made of carbon as the conductive material was experimentally built to reduce metal ions in the grinding fluid and metal contamination of the workpiece in the aim to develop environmentally-friendly ELID (Electrolytic In-Process Dressing) grinding techniques. At the same time, characteristics of initial electrolytic-dressing and grinding were also investigated. The results showed that the prototyped metal-free electro-conductive resinoid bonded wheel consisted of a layer of oxides with high oxygen level formed on the wheel surface by electrolytic dressing. The layer generated by electrolytic dressing was found to wear more easily than the matrix composition and in addition have a high frictional coefficient. This wheel was also found to have good surface roughness compared to the cast iron bonded wheel generally used for ELID grinding. The obtained surface roughness was about 30nmPV using a #8000 metal-free electro-conductive resinoid bonded diamond wheel.

  2. In-situ roundness measurement and correction for pin journals in oscillating grinding machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hongxiang; Xu, Mengchen; Zhao, Jie

    2015-01-01

    In the mass production of vehicle-engine crankshafts, pin chasing grinding using oscillating grinding machines is a widely accepted method to achieve flexible and efficient performance. However, the eccentric movement of pin journals makes it difficult to develop an in-process roundness measurement scheme for the improvement of contour precision. Here, a new in-situ roundness measurement strategy is proposed with high scanning speed. The measuring mechanism is composed of a V-block and an adaptive telescopic support. The swing pattern of the telescopic support and the V-block is analysed for an equal angle-interval signal sampling. Hence roundness error signal is extracted in frequency domain using a small-signal model of the V-block roundness measurement method and the Fast Fourier Transformation. To implement the roundness data in the CNC coordinate system of an oscillating grinding machine, a transformation function is derived according to the motion model of pin chasing grinding methodology. Computer simulation reveals the relationship between the rotational position of the crankshaft component and the scanning angle of the displacement probe on the V-block, as well as the influence introduced by the rotation centre drift. Prototype investigation indicates the validity of the theoretical analysis and the feasibility of the new strategy.

  3. Effects of Kernel Composition and Starch Structure on Ethanol Yield Produced from Dry-Grind Corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objectives of this study were to understand how the composition of kernels (i.e., starch, protein, and lipid contents) and the starch structure of dry-grind corn affected the enzyme hydrolysis of starch and the ethanol yield during yeast fermentation. Four lines of corn, designated, 05GEM06031, 06G...

  4. Manual of industrial diamonds plus dressing and grinding criteria for machining superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, W. L.

    1968-01-01

    Manual combines the important and controlling factors for the proper selection and use of diamond stones for cutting and dressing grinding wheels. This manual is a compilation of empirical data and incorporates an original companion treatise on the physical descriptions of the diamond stones, their grading, and their applications.

  5. Cryogenics and its application with reference to spice grinding: a review.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, S; Gupta, Manoj Kumar; Singh, K K

    2012-01-01

    Cryogenics is the study of very low temperature and its application on different materials including biological products. Cryogenics has numerous applications in space science, electronics, automobiles, the manufacturing industry, sports and musical instruments, biological science and agriculture, etc. Cryogenic freezing finds pivotal application in food, that is, spices and condiments. Although there is a wide range of cryogens to produce the desired low temperature, generally liquid nitrogen (LN₂) is used in food grinding. The application of low temperature shows a promising pathway to produce higher quality end product with higher flavor and volatile oil retention. Cryogenic grinders generally consist of precoolers and grinder with the cryogen distribution system. In such grinding systems, cryogens subject the raw material up to or lower than glass transition temperature before it is ground, thus eliminating much of the material and quality hassles of traditional grinding. At present, the capital investment including cryogen and handling costs escalate the final cost of the product. Thus, for large-scale production, a proper design to optimize and make it feasible is the need of the hour and understanding the behavior of different food materials at these low temperature conditions. This article reviews the scenario and application of cryogenics in different sectors, especially to spice grinding.

  6. Effect of ultrafine grinding on physicochemical and antioxidant properties of dietary fiber from wine grape pomace.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Feng-Mei; Du, Bin; Li, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Wine grape pomace dietary fiber powders were prepared by superfine grinding, whose effects were investigated on the composition, functional and antioxidant properties of the wine grape pomace dietary fiber products. The results showed that superfine grinding could effectively pulverize the fiber particles to submicron scale. As particle size decrease, the functional properties (water-holding capacity, water-retention capacity, swelling capacity, oil-binding capacity, and nitrite ion absorption capacity) of wine grape pomace dietary fiber were significantly (p < 0.05) decreased and a redistribution of fiber components from insoluble to soluble fractions was observed. The antioxidant activities of wine grape pomace and dietary fiber before and after grinding were in terms of DPPH radical scavenging activity, ABTS diammonium salt radical scavenging activity, ferric reducing antioxidant power, and total phenolic content. Compared with dietary fiber before and after grinding, micronized insoluble dietary fiber showed increased ABTS radical scavenging activity, ferric reducing antioxidant power, and total phenolic content yet decreased DPPH radical scavenging activity. Positive correlations were detected between ABTS radical scavenging activity, ferric reducing antioxidant power, and total phenolic content.

  7. Ductile grinding of silicon carbide as a production method for reflective optics

    SciTech Connect

    Kahl, W.K.

    1993-11-01

    Ductile regime grinding or shear-mode grinding is an enabling technology that is finding application in the optics manufacturing industry. By definition, ductile removal occurs when the scale of machining is conducted below a material-dependent critical dimension or chip size. Much of the interest in ductile grinding resides in manufacturing glass optics, which experience brittle-ductile transition at {approximately}10 nm. Silicon carbide has a critical dimension that is on the order of 100--200 nm, making it a more attractive candidate for the technology. Preliminary results from an on-axis chemical vapor deposited (CVD) SiC sphere (f/14) indicate 317 {Angstrom} surface roughness and 0.96 wave P-V figure were achieved with this manufacturing method. Surface finish, interferometric measured figure and BRDF scatter results are presented from ductile regime grinding of 40 and 75 mm flats of CVD silicon carbide, bare reaction bonded SiC (RBSiC) and uniaxial hot-pressed SiC (HPSiC).

  8. Synthesis of bimetallic gold-silver alloy nanoclusters by simple mortar grinding.

    PubMed

    Murugadoss, Arumugam; Kai, Noriko; Sakurai, Hidehiro

    2012-02-21

    A macroscale quantity of bimetallic Au-Ag alloy nanoclusters was achieved through sequential reduction by simple mortar grinding. The chitosan biopolymer was used as both a stabilizing and reducing agent. These nanoclusters exhibit excellent catalytic activity toward the reduction of 4-nitrophenol.

  9. Changes in mineral concentrations and phosphorus profile during dry-grind process of corn into ethanol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For determining variation in mineral composition and phosphorus (P) profile among streams of dry-grind ethanol production, samples of ground corn, intermediate streams, and distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) were obtained from 3 commercial plants. Most attributes (dry matter concentration...

  10. Fatigue Behavior of Friction Stir-Welded Joints Repaired by Grinding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, C.; Infante, V.

    2014-04-01

    Fatigue is undoubtedly the most important design criterion in aeronautic structures. Although friction stir-welded joints are characterized by a high mechanical performance, they can enclose some defects, especially in their root. These defects along with the relatively low residual stresses of the friction stir-welding thermomechanical cycle can turn into primary sources of crack initiation. In this context, this article deals with the fatigue behavior of friction stir-welded joints subjected to surface smoothing by grinding improvement technique. The 4-mm-thick aluminum alloy 2024-T351 was used in this study. The fatigue strength of the base material, joints in the as-welded condition, and the sound and defective friction stir-welded joints improved by grinding were investigated in detail. The tests were carried out with a constant amplitude loading and with a stress ratio of R = 0. The fatigue results show that an improvement in fatigue behavior was obtained in the joints repaired by superficial grinding technique. The weld grinding technique is better especially for lower loads and increases the high cycle fatigue strength. The fatigue strength of the improved welded joints was higher than that of the base material.

  11. 9. VIEW TO SOUTHSOUTHWEST, MINE WAREHOUSE, LABORATORY AND GRINDING/ROD MILL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. VIEW TO SOUTH-SOUTHWEST, MINE WAREHOUSE, LABORATORY AND GRINDING/ROD MILL (FOREGROUND), AND SAMPLING BUILDING AND WATER TOWER (BACKGROUND). - Vanadium Corporation of America (VCA) Naturita Mill, 3 miles Northwest of Naturita, between Highway 141 & San Miguel River, Naturita, Montrose County, CO

  12. Why Do Marbles Become Paler on Grinding? Reflectance, Spectroscopy, Color, and Particle Size

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lagorio, Maria Gabriela

    2004-01-01

    A qualitative description of the color-change problem, which will assist in rationalizing the change in color of marbles after grinding them using a simple physical picture and the qualitative dependence of diffuse reflectance on particle size is presented. Different approaches are discussed but it is seen that the interpretation of nanoparticles…

  13. Rapid and effective DNA extraction method with bead grinding for a large amount of fungal DNA.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, M; Lee, K; Goto, K; Kumagai, S; Sugita-Konishi, Y; Hara-Kudo, Y

    2010-06-01

    To identify a rapid method for extracting a large amount of DNA from fungi associated with food hygiene, extraction methods were compared using fungal pellets formed rapidly in liquid media. Combinations of physical and chemical methods or commercial kits were evaluated with 3 species of yeast, 10 species of ascomycetous molds, and 4 species of zygomycetous molds. Bead grinding was the physical method, followed by chemical methods involving sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB), and benzyl chloride and two commercial kits. Quantity was calculated by UV absorbance at 260 nm, quality was determined by the ratio of UV absorbance at 260 and 280 nm, and gene amplifications and electrophoresis profiles of whole genomes were analyzed. Bead grinding with the SDS method was the most effective for DNA extraction for yeasts and ascomycetous molds, and bead grinding with the CTAB method was most effective with zygomycetous molds. For both groups of molds, bead grinding with the CTAB method was the best approach for DNA extraction. Because this combination also is relatively effective for yeasts, it can be used to extract a large amount of DNA from a wide range of fungi. The DNA extraction methods are useful for developing gene indexes to identify fungi with molecular techniques, such as DNA fingerprinting.

  14. Static, cylindrically symmetric strings in general relativity with cosmological constant

    SciTech Connect

    Linet, B.

    1986-07-01

    The static, cylindrically symmetric solutions to Einstein's equations with a cosmological term describing cosmic strings are determined. The discussion depends on the sign of the cosmological constant.

  15. Cylindrical Asymmetrical Capacitors for Use in Outer Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Jonathan W.

    2007-01-01

    A report proposes that cylindrical asymmetrical capacitors (CACs) be used to generate small thrusts for precise maneuvering of spacecraft on long missions. The report notes that it has been known for decades that when high voltages are applied to CACs in air, thrusts are generated - most likely as a result of ionization of air molecules and acceleration of the ions by the high electric fields. The report goes on to discuss how to optimize the designs of CACs for operation as thrusters in outer space. Components that could be used to enable outerspace operation include a supply of gas and a shroud, partly surrounding a CAC, into which the gas would flow. Other elements of operation and design discussed in the report include variation of applied voltage and/or of gas flow to vary thrust, effects of CAC and shroud dimensions on thrust and weight, some representative electrode configurations, and several alternative designs, including one in which the basic CAC configuration would be modified into something shaped like a conventional rocket engine with converging/diverging nozzle and an anode with gas feed in the space that, in a conventional rocket engine, would be the combustion chamber.

  16. Influence of pin and hammer mill on grinding characteristics, thermal and antioxidant properties of coriander powder.

    PubMed

    Barnwal, P; Singh, K K; Sharma, Alka; Choudhary, A K; Saxena, S N

    2015-12-01

    In present study, influence of grinding (hammer and pin mills) and moisture content (range: 6.4-13.6 % dry basis) on the quality traits of coriander powder were investigated. These include grinding parameters, colour parameters, specific heat, thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, glass transition temperature, essential oil, total phenolic content, total flavonoid content and DPPH scavenging (%) of coriander powder. For coriander seed, the geometric properties such as major, medium, minor dimensions, geometric mean diameter, arithmetic mean diameter, sphericity, surface area and volume of coriander seeds increased significantly with increasing moisture (6.4-13.6 % db). For coriander powder, the grinding parameters such as average particle size, volume surface mean diameter and volume mean diameter increased significantly with increasing moisture (6.4-13.6 % db). With the grinding method, the colour attributes of coriander powder such as L-value, a-value, b-value, hue angle and browning index varied significantly. It was observed that the specific heat followed second order polynomial relationship with temperature and moisture whereas thermal conductivity varied linearly with temperature and moisture content. The variation of glass transition temperature with moisture can be best represented in quadratic manner. Total flavonoid content (mg QE/g crude seed extract) and DPPH scavenging % activity of coriander powder is significantly affected by grinding methods. A lower value of specific heat was observed for hammer ground coriander powder as compared to pin mill ground coriander powder. The thermal conductivity of hammer mill ground coriander powder was higher as compared to pin mill ground coriander. It was observed that hammer mill yields more fine coriander powder in comparison to pin mill. The browning index was more in hammer mill ground coriander powder. PMID:26604351

  17. Surface quality of a 1m Zerodur part using an effective grinding mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonnellier, X.; Shore, P.; Morantz, P.; Orton, D.

    2008-09-01

    A new ultra precision large optics grinding machine, BoX (R) , has been developed at Cranfield University. This machine is located at the UK's Ultra Precision Surfaces laboratory at the OpTIC Technium, North Wales. This machine offers a rapid and economic solution for grinding large off-axis aspherical and free-form optical components. This paper presents an analysis of surface and subsurface damage assessments of Zerodur(R) ground using diamond resin bonded grinding wheels. Zerodur(R) was tested as it is one of the materials currently under study for making extremely large telescope (ELT) segmented mirrors such as in the E-ELT project. The grinding experiments have been conducted on the BoX(R) grinding machine using wheels with grit sizes of 76 μm, 46 µm and 25 μm. The highest material removal rate (187.5 mm3/s) used ensures that a 1 metre diameter optic can be ground in less than 10 hours. The surface roughness and surface profile were measured using a Form Talysurf. The subsurface damage was revealed using a sub aperture polishing process in combination with an etching technique on small parts. These results are compared with the targeted form accuracy of 1 μm p-v over a 1 metre part, surface roughness of 50-150 nm RMS and subsurface damage in the range of 2-5 μm. This process stage was validated on a 1 metre hexagonal Zerodur(R) part.

  18. Dissolution Behaviour of Hazardous Materials from Steel Slag with Wet Grinding Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hisyamudin Muhd Nor, Nik; Norhana Selamat, Siti; Hanif Abd Rashid, Muhammad; Fauzi Ahmad, Mohd; Jamian, Saifulnizan; Chee Kiong, Sia; Fahrul Hassan, Mohd; Mohamad, Fariza; Yokoyama, Seiji

    2016-06-01

    Steel slag is a by-product from steel industry and it contains variety of hazardous materials. In this study, the dissolution behaviour and removal potential of hazardous materials from steel slag with the wet grinding method was investigated. The slag was wet ground in the CO2 atmosphere and the slurry produced was filtered using centrifugal separator to separate the liquid and solid sediments. Then, the concentrations of dissolved metal elements in the liquid sediment were analyzed by ICP-MS. The changes of pH during the grinding were also investigated. It was found that the pHs were decreased immediately after the CO2 gas introduced into the vessel. The pHs were ranging from 6.8 to 7.6 at the end of grinding. The dissolved concentration of Zn and Cr were ranging from 5~45 [mg/dm3] and 0.2~2.5 [mg/dm3] respectively. The ratios of Zn removal for stainless steel oxidizing and reducing slag were very high, but those from normal steel oxidizing and reducing slag were very low. It is assumed that the Zn dissolved as ZnOH+ from Zn(OH)2 that formed due to the reaction between ZnO and water. Dissolution of Cr also occurred but in very low quantity compared to the dissolution of Zn. The dissolution of Cr occurred due to the grinding process and small amount of Cr(OH)3 was formed during the grinding. This small formation of Cr(OH)3 resulted to the low dissolved concentration of Cr in the form of Cr(OH)2+. According to the XRD analysis, the Cr mostly existed in the slags as Cr(IIl) in the form of MgCr2O4 and FeCr2O4.

  19. Influence of pin and hammer mill on grinding characteristics, thermal and antioxidant properties of coriander powder.

    PubMed

    Barnwal, P; Singh, K K; Sharma, Alka; Choudhary, A K; Saxena, S N

    2015-12-01

    In present study, influence of grinding (hammer and pin mills) and moisture content (range: 6.4-13.6 % dry basis) on the quality traits of coriander powder were investigated. These include grinding parameters, colour parameters, specific heat, thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, glass transition temperature, essential oil, total phenolic content, total flavonoid content and DPPH scavenging (%) of coriander powder. For coriander seed, the geometric properties such as major, medium, minor dimensions, geometric mean diameter, arithmetic mean diameter, sphericity, surface area and volume of coriander seeds increased significantly with increasing moisture (6.4-13.6 % db). For coriander powder, the grinding parameters such as average particle size, volume surface mean diameter and volume mean diameter increased significantly with increasing moisture (6.4-13.6 % db). With the grinding method, the colour attributes of coriander powder such as L-value, a-value, b-value, hue angle and browning index varied significantly. It was observed that the specific heat followed second order polynomial relationship with temperature and moisture whereas thermal conductivity varied linearly with temperature and moisture content. The variation of glass transition temperature with moisture can be best represented in quadratic manner. Total flavonoid content (mg QE/g crude seed extract) and DPPH scavenging % activity of coriander powder is significantly affected by grinding methods. A lower value of specific heat was observed for hammer ground coriander powder as compared to pin mill ground coriander powder. The thermal conductivity of hammer mill ground coriander powder was higher as compared to pin mill ground coriander. It was observed that hammer mill yields more fine coriander powder in comparison to pin mill. The browning index was more in hammer mill ground coriander powder.

  20. Electron Cross-field Transport in a Miniaturized Cylindrical Hall Thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov Artem, Raitses Yevgeny, Fisch Nathaniel J

    2005-10-14

    Conventional annular Hall thrusters become inefficient when scaled to low power. Cylindrical Hall thrusters, which have lower surface-to-volume ratio, are more promising for scaling down. They presently exhibit performance comparable with conventional annular Hall thrusters. The present paper gives a review of the experimental and numerical investigations of electron crossfield transport in the 2.6 cm miniaturized cylindrical Hall thruster (100 W power level). We show that, in order to explain the discharge current observed for the typical operating conditions, the electron anomalous collision frequency {nu}{sub b} has to be on the order of the Bohm value, {nu}{sub B} {approx} {omega}{sub c}/16. The contribution of electron-wall collisions to cross-field transport is found to be insignificant. The optimal regimes of thruster operation at low background pressure (below 10{sup -5} Torr) in the vacuum tank appear to be different from those at higher pressure ({approx} 10{sup -4} Torr).

  1. Method for making generally cylindrical underground openings

    DOEpatents

    Routh, J.W.

    1983-05-26

    A rapid, economical and safe method for making a generally cylindrical underground opening such as a shaft or a tunnel is described. A borehole is formed along the approximate center line of where it is desired to make the underground opening. The borehole is loaded with an explodable material and the explodable material is detonated. An enlarged cavity is formed by the explosive action of the detonated explodable material forcing outward and compacting the original walls of the borehole. The enlarged cavity may be increased in size by loading it with a second explodable material, and detonating the second explodable material. The process may be repeated as required until the desired underground opening is made. The explodable material used in the method may be free-flowing, and it may be contained in a pipe.

  2. Naked singularity resolution in cylindrical collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Kurita, Yasunari; Nakao, Ken-ichi

    2006-03-15

    In this paper, we study the gravitational collapse of null dust in cylindrically symmetric spacetime. The naked singularity necessarily forms at the symmetry axis. We consider the situation in which null dust is emitted again from the naked singularity formed by the collapsed null dust and investigate the backreaction by this emission for the naked singularity. We show a very peculiar but physically important case in which the same amount of null dust as that of the collapsed one is emitted from the naked singularity as soon as the ingoing null dust hits the symmetry axis and forms the naked singularity. In this case, although this naked singularity satisfies the strong curvature condition by Krolak (limiting focusing condition), geodesics which hit the singularity can be extended uniquely across the singularity. Therefore, we may say that the collapsing null dust passes through the singularity formed by itself and then leaves for infinity. Finally, the singularity completely disappears and the flat spacetime remains.

  3. Electrochemical cell having cylindrical electrode elements

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Paul A.; Shimotake, Hiroshi

    1982-01-01

    A secondary, high temperature electrochemical cell especially adapted for lithium alloy negative electrodes, transition metal chalcogenide positive electrodes and alkali metal halide or alkaline earth metal halide electrolyte is disclosed. The cell is held within an elongated cylindrical container in which one of the active materials is filled around the outside surfaces of a plurality of perforate tubular current collectors along the length of the container. Each of the current collector tubes contain a concentric tubular layer of electrically insulative ceramic as an interelectrode separator. The active material of opposite polarity in elongated pin shape is positioned longitudinally within the separator layer. A second electrically conductive tube with perforate walls can be swagged or otherwise bonded to the outer surface of the pin as a current collector and the electrically insulative ceramic layer can be coated or otherwise layered onto the outer surface of this second current collector. Alternatively, the central pin electrode can include an axial core as a current collector.

  4. Scattering by buried dielectric cylindrical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Vico, M.; Frezza, F.; Pajewski, L.; Schettini, G.

    2005-12-01

    An analytical-numerical technique for the solution of the two-dimensional electromagnetic plane wave scattering by a finite set of dielectric circular cylinders buried in a dielectric half-space is presented. The problem is solved for both the near- and far-field regions, for transverse magnetic and transverse electric polarizations. The scattered field is represented in terms of a superposition of cylindrical waves, and use is made of the plane wave spectrum to take into account the reflection and transmission of such waves by the interface. The validity of the approach is confirmed by comparisons with results available in the literature, with very good agreement, and by self-consistency tests. Applications of the method to objects of arbitrary cross section simulated by suitable configurations of circular cylinders are shown.

  5. Polymer translocation through a cylindrical channel

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Chiu TaiAndrew; Muthukumar, M.

    2008-01-01

    A formalism of polymer translocation through a cylindrical channel of finite diameter and length between two spherical compartments is developed. Unlike previous simplified systems, the finite diameter of the channel allows the number of polymer segments inside the channel to be adjusted during translocation according to the free energy of possible conformations. The translocation process of a Gaussian chain without excluded volume and hydrodynamic interactions is studied using exact formulas of confinement free energy under this formalism. The free energy landscape for the translocation process, the distribution of the translocation time, and the average translocation time are presented. The complex dependencies of the average translocation time on the length and diameter of the channel, the sizes of the donor and receptor compartments, and the chain length are illustrated. PMID:18433273

  6. Stresses in rotating composite cylindrical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, James T.-S.; Lin, Chien-Chang

    Stresses in composite cylindrical shells rotating with a constant speed about their longitudinal axis are analyzed. Each ply or ply group is treated as a separate thin layer of homogeneous and orthotropic material under the interfacial stresses as surface loading. There is no limitation on the total thickness of the shell. The circumferential stress, motivated by the conventional thin shell theory, is assumed to vary linearly through the thickness of the layer. The radial stress is determined in terms of the circumferential stress through the equilibrium condition, and an average compatibility condition through the thickness of the thin layer is used. Numerical results using the present analysis show nearly perfect agreement with the exact solution for homogeneous and isotropic cylinders. Some results for cylinders having orthotropic layers are presented for illustrative purposes.

  7. Magnetosheath effects on cylindrical Langmuir probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szuszczewicz, E. P.; Takacs, P. Z.

    1979-01-01

    A study of the response of cylindrical Langmuir probes in magnetoplasmas focusing on the relative magnitudes of Larmor radius and sheath size is presented. The approach results in a classification of magnetic field effects which involves the magnetic field strength and plasma parameters of density, temperature, and the applied probe potential. It is shown that a 0.25 G field can have similar effects on the current collection properties of the probe in ionospheric plasma as a 30 kG field would have in a hot, dense laboratory plasma. The data also show: (1) the effects of probe orientation on electron current collection from magnetoplasmas; (2) that these effects can be important even when the electron Larmor radius is larger than the radius of the probe; and (3) that substantial magnetic field effects occur when the probe sheath is comparable to or greater than the Larmor radius.

  8. Indentation of Ellipsoidal and Cylindrical Elastic Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vella, Dominic; Ajdari, Amin; Vaziri, Ashkan; Boudaoud, Arezki

    2012-10-01

    Thin shells are found in nature at scales ranging from viruses to hens’ eggs; the stiffness of such shells is essential for their function. We present the results of numerical simulations and theoretical analyses for the indentation of ellipsoidal and cylindrical elastic shells, considering both pressurized and unpressurized shells. We provide a theoretical foundation for the experimental findings of Lazarus et al. [following paper, Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 144301 (2012)PRLTAO0031-9007] and for previous work inferring the turgor pressure of bacteria from measurements of their indentation stiffness; we also identify a new regime at large indentation. We show that the indentation stiffness of convex shells is dominated by either the mean or Gaussian curvature of the shell depending on the pressurization and indentation depth. Our results reveal how geometry rules the rigidity of shells.

  9. Premixed flames in closed cylindrical tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzener, Philippe; Matalon, Moshe

    2001-09-01

    We consider the propagation of a premixed flame, as a two-dimensional sheet separating unburned gas from burned products, in a closed cylindrical tube. A nonlinear evolution equation, that describes the motion of the flame front as a function of its mean position, is derived. The equation contains a destabilizing term that results from the gas motion induced by thermal expansion and has a memory term associated with vorticity generation. Numerical solutions of this equation indicate that, when diffusion is stabilizing, the flame evolves into a non-planar form whose shape, and its associated symmetry properties, are determined by the Markstein parameter, and by the initial data. In particular, we observe the development of convex axisymmetric or non-axisymmetric flames, tulip flames and cellular flames.

  10. Cylindrical spreading due to downwind refraction.

    PubMed

    Makarewicz, Rufin

    2016-04-01

    Downwind propagation is analyzed for a low level jet (LLJ). The LLJ is characterized by a wind speed maximum (at least 10-20 m/s with peak speeds up to 30 m/s) a few hundred meters above the ground. Close to an elevated point source, such as a wind turbine or an aircraft, spherical spreading results in a 6 dB decrease in sound level per doubling of the distance. Wind turbine noise measurements show that at a transition distance, the downwind propagation changes the spherical spreading into a cylindrical spreading with a 3 dB decrease. It is shown how the transition distance and sound intensity depend on the LLJ parameters. The pivotal phenomenon is the non-coherent superposition of ground reflected rays in the turbulent atmosphere. PMID:27106309

  11. Ion orbits in a cylindrical Langmuir probe

    SciTech Connect

    Taccogna, Francesco; Longo, Savino; Capitelli, Mario

    2006-04-15

    It has been suggested that in weakly collisional sheaths, potential wells and barriers could appear due to ion-neutral momentum and charge transfer collisions. These can cause the presence of repulsed and trapped ions in the region surrounding a negatively biased Langmuir probe, invalidating the commonly used orbital-motion-limited theory of ion current. This is still an open question concerning also the charging and shielding of dust grains, and at present, no fully self-consistent treatment exists. For this reason, a particle-in-cell/test-particle Monte Carlo simulation of the dynamics of an argon plasma in the region surrounding an attracting cylindrical probe at medium gas pressure has been developed. The results of the present simulation for different probe potentials and discharge pressures demonstrate the complex structure of electric potential around the probe and the failure of collisionless theories.

  12. On-machine measurement of the grinding wheels' 3D surface topography using a laser displacement sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yongcheng; Zhao, Qingliang; Guo, Bing

    2014-08-01

    A method of non-contact, on-machine measurement of three dimensional surface topography of grinding wheels' whole surface was developed in this paper, focusing on an electroplated coarse-grained diamond grinding wheel. The measuring system consists of a Keyence laser displacement sensor, a Keyence controller and a NI PCI-6132 data acquisition card. A resolution of 0.1μm in vertical direction and 8μm in horizontal direction could be achieved. After processing the data by LabVIEW and MATLAB, the 3D topography of the grinding wheel's whole surface could be reconstructed. When comparing the reconstructed 3D topography of the grinding wheel's marked area to its real topography captured by a high-depth-field optical digital microscope (HDF-ODM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM), they were very similar to each other, proving that this method is accurate and effective. By a subsequent data processing, the topography of every grain could be extracted and then the active grain number, the active grain volume and the active grain's bearing ration could be calculated. These three parameters could serve as the criterion to evaluate the grinding performance of coarse-grained diamond grinding wheels. Then the performance of the grinding wheel could be evaluated on-machine accurately and quantitatively.

  13. The grinding tip of the sea urchin tooth exhibits exquisite control over calcite crystal orientation and Mg distribution

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yurong; Aichmayer, Barbara; Paris, Oskar; Fratzl, Peter; Meibom, Anders; Metzler, Rebecca A.; Politi, Yael; Addadi, Lia; Gilbert, P. U. P. A.; Weiner, Steve

    2009-01-01

    The sea urchin tooth is a remarkable grinding tool. Even though the tooth is composed almost entirely of calcite, it is used to grind holes into a rocky substrate itself often composed of calcite. Here, we use 3 complementary high-resolution tools to probe aspects of the structure of the grinding tip: X-ray photoelectron emission spectromicroscopy (X-PEEM), X-ray microdiffraction, and NanoSIMS. We confirm that the needles and plates are aligned and show here that even the high Mg polycrystalline matrix constituents are aligned with the other 2 structural elements when imaged at 20-nm resolution. Furthermore, we show that the entire tooth is composed of 2 cooriented polycrystalline blocks that differ in their orientations by only a few degrees. A unique feature of the grinding tip is that the structural elements from each coaligned block interdigitate. This interdigitation may influence the fracture process by creating a corrugated grinding surface. We also show that the overall Mg content of the tooth structural elements increases toward the grinding tip. This probably contributes to the increasing hardness of the tooth from the periphery to the tip. Clearly the formation of the tooth, and the tooth tip in particular, is amazingly well controlled. The improved understanding of these structural features could lead to the design of better mechanical grinding and cutting tools. PMID:19332795

  14. Concentration profiles in drying cylindrical filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czaputa, Klaus; Brenn, Günter; Meile, Walter

    2008-12-01

    We analyze theoretically the drying of cylindrical filaments. For modelling the mass transfer on the gas side of the liquid-gas interface of the shrinking circular cylindrical filament, we apply the model of Abramzon and Sirignano, which was originally developed for spherical geometry. As a consequence of mass transfer at constant Sherwood number, we obtain a d2-law for the shrinkage of the cylinder as in the case of the spherical geometry, which expresses that the cross-sectional area of the cylinder shrinks at a constant rate with time. For this situation, the diffusion equation for the liquid phase mixture components becomes separable upon transformation into similarity coordinates and is solved analytically to obtain the concentration profiles inside the filament as functions of time. The dependency of the profiles on the radial coordinate is determined by a series of Kummer’s functions. Applying this result, we study the evolution of the concentration profiles in the liquid phase with time as dependent on a parameter given as the ratio of rate of shrinkage of the cross-sectional area of the cylinder to liquid-phase diffusion coefficient, which was identified as relevant for the shape of the concentration profiles formed in the liquid during the drying process. As an example, we present computed results for the constant evaporation rate regime in the dry-spinning process of a polyvinyl-alcohol (PVA)-water system. Comparison of our analytical results with full numerical solutions of the diffusion equation from the literature, achieved with concentration-dependent diffusion coefficient, reveals very good agreement.

  15. Low-mass, high-rate cylindrical MWPC's for the MEGA experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Mischke, R.E.; Armijo, V.; Black, J.K.; Bolton, R.D.; Carius, S.; Cooper, M.D.; Espinoza, C.; Hart, G.W.; Hogan, G.E.; Piilonen, L.E.; Sandoval, J.; Schilling, S.; Sena, J.; Stanislaus, S.; Suazo, G.; Szymanski, J.J.; Whitehouse, D.A.; Wilkinson, C.A. ); Fisk, R.; Koetke, D.D.; Manweiler, R.W. ); Jui, C. )

    1990-01-01

    The construction of MWPCs for the MEGA experiment at LAMPF are described. The chambers are cylindrical, low mass (3 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} radiation lengths), and are designed to operate at high rates (3 {times} 10{sup 4} /mm{sup 2}/s). Several novel construction techniques have been developed and custom electronics have been designed to help achieve the required performance, which corresponds to that needed at high luminosity colliders. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  16. An automated program for reinforcement requirements for openings in cylindrical pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. F.; Taylor, J. T.

    1975-01-01

    An automated interactive program for calculating the reinforcement requirements for openings in cylindrical pressure vessels subjected to internal pressure is described. The program is written for an electronic desk top calculator. The program calculates the required area of reinforcement for a given opening and compares this value with the area of reinforcement provided by a proposed design. All program steps, operating instructions, and example problems with input and sample output are documented.

  17. Grinding energy and physical properties of chopped and hammer-milled barley, wheat, oat, and canola straws

    SciTech Connect

    J.S. Tumuluru; L.G. Tabil; Y. Song; K.L. Iroba; V. Meda

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, specific energy for grinding and physical properties of wheat, canola, oat and barley straw grinds were investigated. The initial moisture content of the straw was about 0.13–0.15 (fraction total mass basis). Particle size reduction experiments were conducted in two stages: (1) a chopper without a screen, and (2) a hammer mill using three screen sizes (19.05, 25.4, and 31.75 mm). The lowest grinding energy (1.96 and 2.91 kWh t-1) was recorded for canola straw using a chopper and hammer mill with 19.05-mm screen size, whereas the highest (3.15 and 8.05 kWh t-1) was recorded for barley and oat straws. The physical properties (geometric mean particle diameter, bulk, tapped and particle density, and porosity) of the chopped and hammer-milled wheat, barley, canola, and oat straw grinds measured were in the range of 0.98–4.22 mm, 36–80 kg m-3, 49–119 kg m-3, 600–1220 kg m-3, and 0.9–0.96, respectively. The average mean particle diameter was highest for the chopped wheat straw (4.22-mm) and lowest for the canola grind (0.98-mm). The canola grinds produced using the hammer mill (19.05-mm screen size) had the highest bulk and tapped density of about 80 and 119 kg m-3; whereas, the wheat and oat grinds had the lowest of about 58 and 88–90 kg m-3. The results indicate that the bulk and tapped densities are inversely proportional to the particle size of the grinds. The flow properties of the grinds calculated are better for chopped straws compared to hammer milled using smaller screen size (19.05 mm).

  18. Development of the Cylindrical Wire Electrical Discharge Machining Process.

    SciTech Connect

    McSpadden, SB

    2002-01-22

    Results of applying the wire Electrical Discharge Machining (EDM) process to generate precise cylindrical forms on hard, difficult-to-machine materials are presented. A precise, flexible, and corrosion-resistant underwater rotary spindle was designed and added to a conventional two-axis wire EDM machine to enable the generation of free-form cylindrical geometries. A detailed spindle error analysis identifies the major source of error at different frequency. The mathematical model for the material removal of cylindrical wire EDM process is derived. Experiments were conducted to explore the maximum material removal rate for cylindrical and 2D wire EDM of carbide and brass work-materials. Compared to the 2D wire EDM, higher maximum material removal rates may be achieved in the cylindrical wire EDM. This study also investigates the surface integrity and roundness of parts created by the cylindrical wire EDM process. For carbide parts, an arithmetic average surface roughness and roundness as low as 0.68 and 1.7 {micro}m, respectively, can be achieved. Surfaces of the cylindrical EDM parts were examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) to identify the craters, sub-surface recast layers and heat-affected zones under various process parameters. This study has demonstrated that the cylindrical wire EDM process parameters can be adjusted to achieve either high material removal rate or good surface integrity.

  19. Cylindrical thin-shell wormholes supported by phantom energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eid, A.

    2016-09-01

    In the framework of Darmois-Israel formalism, the general equations describing the motion of cylindrical thin-shell wormholes supported by equation of state of phantom energy are derived. The linear perturbation approach is used to investigate the stability of a cylindrical thin-shell wormhole of a static solution.

  20. Modeling and research of temperature distribution in surface layer of titanium alloy workpiece during AEDG and conventional grinding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gołąbczak, M.; Gołąbczak, A.; Konstantynowicz, A.; Święcik, R.

    2016-11-01

    Titanium and its alloys are widely recognized as the hardly machinable materials, especially due to their relatively high hardness, low thermal conductivity and possible subcritical superplasticity. Then, a thorough control of the machining process parameters shall be maintained. In this paper, we have concentrated on the grinding of the Ti6Al4V titanium alloy using cBN (boron nitride) grinding wheel combined with the AEDG (abrasive electrodischarge grinding) process. The mathematical model we have dealt with has been based mainly on Jaeger model of the heat taking over between sliding bodies with substantial upgrades related to:estimation of the frictional heat generating based on friction forces distribution,

  1. Effectiveness of dust control methods for crystalline silica and respirable suspended particulate matter exposure during manual concrete surface grinding.

    PubMed

    Akbar-Khanzadeh, Farhang; Milz, Sheryl A; Wagner, Cynthia D; Bisesi, Michael S; Ames, April L; Khuder, Sadik; Susi, Pam; Akbar-Khanzadeh, Mahboubeh

    2010-12-01

    Concrete grinding exposes workers to unacceptable levels of crystalline silica dust, known to cause diseases such as silicosis and possibly lung cancer. This study examined the influence of major factors of exposure and effectiveness of existing dust control methods by simulating field concrete grinding in an enclosed workplace laboratory. Air was monitored during 201 concrete grinding sessions while using a variety of grinders, accessories, and existing dust control methods, including general ventilation (GV), local exhaust ventilation (LEV), and wet grinding. Task-specific geometric mean (GM) of respirable crystalline silica dust concentrations (mg/m³ for LEV:HEPA-, LEV:Shop-vac-, wet-, and uncontrolled-grinding, while GV was off/on, were 0.17/0.09, 0.57/0.13, 1.11/0.44, and 23.1/6.80, respectively. Silica dust concentrations (mg/m³ using 100-125 mm (4-5 inch) and 180 mm (7 inch) grinding cups were 0.53/0.22 and 2.43/0.56, respectively. GM concentrations of silica dust were significantly lower for (1) GV on (66.0%) vs. off, and (2) LEV:HEPA- (99.0%), LEV:Shop-vac- (98.1%) or wet- (94.4%) vs. uncontrolled-grinding. Task-specific GM of respirable suspended particulate matter (RSP) concentrations (mg/m³ for LEV:HEPA-, LEV:Shop-vac-, wet-, and uncontrolled grinding, while GV was off/on, were 1.58/0.63, 7.20/1.15, 9.52/4.13, and 152/47.8, respectively. GM concentrations of RSP using 100-125 mm and 180 mm grinding cups were 4.78/1.62 and 22.2/5.06, respectively. GM concentrations of RSP were significantly lower for (1) GV on (70.2%) vs. off, and (2) LEV:HEPA- (98.9%), LEV:Shop-vac- (96.9%) or wet- (92.6%) vs. uncontrolled grinding. Silica dust and RSP were not significantly affected by (1) orientation of grinding surfaces (vertical vs. inclined); (2) water flow rates for wet grinding; (3) length of task-specific sampling time; or, (4) among cup sizes of 100, 115 or 125 mm. No combination of factors or control methods reduced an 8-hr exposure level to below the

  2. Focal field interactions from cylindrical vector beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biss, David Paul

    In optical imaging there is always a push to improve image quality or find methods to gain new imaging information. This is apparent in the optical lithography and semiconductor inspection industries, where optical metrology and imaging systems are using larger numerical aperture systems and finding new imaging methods, such as immersion imaging, to shrink focal fields. At high numerical apertures, scalar diffraction theories break down and polarization effects play a large role in focal field interactions. With this interest in polarization, new models for local polarization effects are needed. Along with new models, cylindrically-symmetric polarized beams known as cylindrical vector (CV) beams, can provide new methods of imaging in this high NA regime. In this thesis, we examine the modeling of radially and azimuthally polarized beams focused at high numerical aperture in the presence of a planar interface. These focal fields are also modeled with primary spherical, coma, and astigmatism wavefront aberrations in the entrance pupil of the focusing system. Particular attention is given to the longitudinal field component generated by the focused radial beam, and the correlation between the magnetic and electric fields of radial and azimuthal beams. A scanning edge test using linearly polarized beams is modeled using a rigorous coupled wave (RCW) method and is compared to experimental data. The ability of the scanning edge test to predict spot asymmetry is investigated though the comparison of the RCW scanning edge model with free space vector diffraction theories. This RCW model is extended to include CV beam illumination and mode filtering of the system's exit pupil fields. This extension provides a model to accurately predict the performance of a dark-field imaging modality using radially and azimuthally polarized beams. Predictions from this model are compared to experimental results with attention given to defocus effects and the ability to accurately measure

  3. Cylindrical Implosion Experiments using Laser Direct Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tubbs, David

    1998-11-01

    Development of high-gain targets for the National Ignition Facility relies considerably on computational modeling, and it is important that our codes are validated against relevant experimental data in convergent geometry.(W. J. Krauser et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 2084 (1996); D. C. Wilson et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 1953 (1998)) In collaboration with the University of Rochester, we have begun a campaign of hydrodynamic instability experiments in cylindrical geometry using direct drive,(D. L. Tubbs et al., submitted to Laser and Particle Beams (1998); C. W. Barnes et al., submitted to Rev. Sci. Instrm. (1998)) building on our success in indirect drive.( W. W. Hsing et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 1832 (1997); W. W. Hsing and N. M. Hoffman, Phys. Rev. Lett., 3876 (1997)) Cylindrical targets facilitate direct diagnostic access to the convergent, hydrodynamic flow. The energy advantage of direct drive and its excellent target-illumination symmetry (achieved at OMEGA through use of Distributed Phase Plates and SSD) permit more energetic implosions, larger target scale (hence greater diagnostic resolution), longer acceleration timescales, and higher convergence than were possible using indirect drive. We estimate that specific laser energy delivered to the target for direct drive at OMEGA is roughly 4 times that achieved for indirect drive at Nova. Our first experiments (January 1998) yield excellent data for the first highly symmetrical direct-drive implosions, with which we benchmark zeroth-order hydrodynamic simulations. Two-dimensional (2-D) LASNEX calculations, using as-shot laser power histories and no further physics adjustments, match measured target-implosion data within theoretical and experimental errors. In addition, 2-D LASNEX simulations of single-mode (m=28, azimuthally symmetric) perturbation growth agree well with data obtained during our first week of experiments. For 1.5-micron initial perturbation amplitude, we observe Rayleigh-Taylor growth factors of order 10

  4. Converging cylindrical shocks in ideal magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Pullin, D. I.; Mostert, W.; Wheatley, V.; Samtaney, R.

    2014-09-15

    We consider a cylindrically symmetrical shock converging onto an axis within the framework of ideal, compressible-gas non-dissipative magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). In cylindrical polar co-ordinates we restrict attention to either constant axial magnetic field or to the azimuthal but singular magnetic field produced by a line current on the axis. Under the constraint of zero normal magnetic field and zero tangential fluid speed at the shock, a set of restricted shock-jump conditions are obtained as functions of the shock Mach number, defined as the ratio of the local shock speed to the unique magnetohydrodynamic wave speed ahead of the shock, and also of a parameter measuring the local strength of the magnetic field. For the line current case, two approaches are explored and the results compared in detail. The first is geometrical shock-dynamics where the restricted shock-jump conditions are applied directly to the equation on the characteristic entering the shock from behind. This gives an ordinary-differential equation for the shock Mach number as a function of radius which is integrated numerically to provide profiles of the shock implosion. Also, analytic, asymptotic results are obtained for the shock trajectory at small radius. The second approach is direct numerical solution of the radially symmetric MHD equations using a shock-capturing method. For the axial magnetic field case the shock implosion is of the Guderley power-law type with exponent that is not affected by the presence of a finite magnetic field. For the axial current case, however, the presence of a tangential magnetic field ahead of the shock with strength inversely proportional to radius introduces a length scale R=√(μ{sub 0}/p{sub 0}) I/(2 π) where I is the current, μ{sub 0} is the permeability, and p{sub 0} is the pressure ahead of the shock. For shocks initiated at r ≫ R, shock convergence is first accompanied by shock strengthening as for the strictly gas-dynamic implosion. The

  5. Converging cylindrical shocks in ideal magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullin, D. I.; Mostert, W.; Wheatley, V.; Samtaney, R.

    2014-09-01

    We consider a cylindrically symmetrical shock converging onto an axis within the framework of ideal, compressible-gas non-dissipative magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). In cylindrical polar co-ordinates we restrict attention to either constant axial magnetic field or to the azimuthal but singular magnetic field produced by a line current on the axis. Under the constraint of zero normal magnetic field and zero tangential fluid speed at the shock, a set of restricted shock-jump conditions are obtained as functions of the shock Mach number, defined as the ratio of the local shock speed to the unique magnetohydrodynamic wave speed ahead of the shock, and also of a parameter measuring the local strength of the magnetic field. For the line current case, two approaches are explored and the results compared in detail. The first is geometrical shock-dynamics where the restricted shock-jump conditions are applied directly to the equation on the characteristic entering the shock from behind. This gives an ordinary-differential equation for the shock Mach number as a function of radius which is integrated numerically to provide profiles of the shock implosion. Also, analytic, asymptotic results are obtained for the shock trajectory at small radius. The second approach is direct numerical solution of the radially symmetric MHD equations using a shock-capturing method. For the axial magnetic field case the shock implosion is of the Guderley power-law type with exponent that is not affected by the presence of a finite magnetic field. For the axial current case, however, the presence of a tangential magnetic field ahead of the shock with strength inversely proportional to radius introduces a length scale R=sqrt{μ _0/p_0} I/(2 π ) where I is the current, μ0 is the permeability, and p0 is the pressure ahead of the shock. For shocks initiated at r ≫ R, shock convergence is first accompanied by shock strengthening as for the strictly gas-dynamic implosion. The diverging magnetic field

  6. A study on the grinding accuracy of a copy milling machine for dental use.

    PubMed

    Seido, T; Hasegawa, K; Kawada, E; Oda, Y

    1997-08-01

    In order to assess the relationship between the profiling pressure of a copy milling machine for dental use and the accuracy of the dimensions of the objects produced, a Celay System was used to profile a metal-cylinder model, and its dimensions were compared with the workpieces. The results showed that, when a cylindrical model with a diameter of 6 mm was subjected to freehand profiling, the mean processing error of the object produced was -0.026 mm, and the profiling pressure was 4.6 gf to 131.7 gf (mean: 76.6 gf). However, the fluctuations in profiling pressure decreased by 1/5 during profiling operations when accessories that fixed the profiling pressure and the profiling loci were used. Moreover, while the processing error when the model was profiled at a profiling pressure of 76 gf or less was a mere 0.005 mm, at 110 gf it rose to 0.022 mm. Based on the above, the processing error that occurred as a result of profiling pressure appeared to affect processing accuracy. On the basis of these findings, profiling as light weight must be performed with as possible in order to obtain accurate products using the copy milling machine for dental use, and the results suggested the necessity of attaching control devices to the copy milling machine to make accurate restorations.

  7. The effect of cryogenic grinding and hammer milling on the flavour quality of ground pepper (Piper nigrum L.).

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong; Zeng, Fankui; Wang, Qinghuang; Ou, Shiyi; Tan, Lehe; Gu, Fenglin

    2013-12-15

    In this study, we compared the effects of cryogenic grinding and hammer milling on the flavour attributes of black, white, and green pepper. The flavour attributes were analysed using headspace solid-phase micro-extraction (HS-SPME) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS), sensory evaluation and electronic nose (e-nose) analysis. Cryogenic grinding resulted in minimal damage to the colour, flavour, and sensory attributes of the spices. Cryogenic grinding was also better than hammer milling at preserving the main potent aroma constituents, but the concentrations of the main aroma constituents were dramatically reduced after storing the samples at 4 °C for 6 months. Pattern matching performed by the e-nose further supported our sensory and instrumental findings. Overall, cryogenic grinding was superior to hammer milling for preserving the sensory properties and flavour attributes of pepper without significantly affecting its quality. However, we found that the flavour quality of ground pepper was reduced during storage.

  8. Grinding and polishing instead of sectioning for the tissue samples with a graft: Implications for light and electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mukhamadiyarov, Rinat A; Sevostyanova, Victoria V; Shishkova, Daria K; Nokhrin, Andrey V; Sidorova, Olga D; Kutikhin, Anton G

    2016-06-01

    A broad use of the graft replacement requires a detailed investigation of the host-graft interaction, including both histological examination and electron microscopy. A high quality sectioning of the host tissue with a graft seems to be complicated; in addition, it is difficult to examine the same tissue area by both of the mentioned microscopy techniques. To solve these problems, we developed a new technique of epoxy resin embedding with the further grinding, polishing, and staining. Graft-containing tissues prepared by grinding and polishing preserved their structure; however, sectioning frequently required the explantation of the graft and led to tissue disintegration. Moreover, stained samples prepared by grinding and polishing may then be assessed by both light microscopy and backscattered scanning electron microscopy. Therefore, grinding and polishing outperform sectioning when applied to the tissues with a graft. PMID:27023831

  9. The effect of bean origin and temperature on grinding roasted coffee.

    PubMed

    Uman, Erol; Colonna-Dashwood, Maxwell; Colonna-Dashwood, Lesley; Perger, Matthew; Klatt, Christian; Leighton, Stephen; Miller, Brian; Butler, Keith T; Melot, Brent C; Speirs, Rory W; Hendon, Christopher H

    2016-01-01

    Coffee is prepared by the extraction of a complex array of organic molecules from the roasted bean, which has been ground into fine particulates. The extraction depends on temperature, water chemistry and also the accessible surface area of the coffee. Here we investigate whether variations in the production processes of single origin coffee beans affects the particle size distribution upon grinding. We find that the particle size distribution is independent of the bean origin and processing method. Furthermore, we elucidate the influence of bean temperature on particle size distribution, concluding that grinding cold results in a narrower particle size distribution, and reduced mean particle size. We anticipate these results will influence the production of coffee industrially, as well as contribute to how we store and use coffee daily. PMID:27086837

  10. The effect of bean origin and temperature on grinding roasted coffee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uman, Erol; Colonna-Dashwood, Maxwell; Colonna-Dashwood, Lesley; Perger, Matthew; Klatt, Christian; Leighton, Stephen; Miller, Brian; Butler, Keith T.; Melot, Brent C.; Speirs, Rory W.; Hendon, Christopher H.

    2016-04-01

    Coffee is prepared by the extraction of a complex array of organic molecules from the roasted bean, which has been ground into fine particulates. The extraction depends on temperature, water chemistry and also the accessible surface area of the coffee. Here we investigate whether variations in the production processes of single origin coffee beans affects the particle size distribution upon grinding. We find that the particle size distribution is independent of the bean origin and processing method. Furthermore, we elucidate the influence of bean temperature on particle size distribution, concluding that grinding cold results in a narrower particle size distribution, and reduced mean particle size. We anticipate these results will influence the production of coffee industrially, as well as contribute to how we store and use coffee daily.

  11. Stitching for a large area of surface topography analysis of diamond grinding wheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuang; Cui, Changcai; Huang, Chunqi; Huang, Hui; Ye, Ruifang; Fu, Shiwei

    2013-01-01

    It is necessary to stitch small area of images together for large surface analysis while the measurement instrument used with a limited measurement area, e.g. White-light Interferometry (WLI)-based system. A new stitching method is proposed in this paper for diamond grinding wheel surface analysis. The images are captured by a WLI-based system and the 3D images' stitching requires an overlapping region of 30%~50%. First, two-step intensity correlation matching method is used to obtain several pairs of matched points fast and the RANSAC (Random Sample Consensus) algorithm is adopted to screen them to get exact pairs of matched points. Then the measurement errors are adjusted and a stitched topography is got after data fusion. Experiments show that this method can effectively stitch 3D images of diamond grinding wheel together in less than 4 minutes with a correlation coefficient above 0.9 for two horizontal overlapping regions after adjustment.

  12. The effect of bean origin and temperature on grinding roasted coffee

    PubMed Central

    Uman, Erol; Colonna-Dashwood, Maxwell; Colonna-Dashwood, Lesley; Perger, Matthew; Klatt, Christian; Leighton, Stephen; Miller, Brian; Butler, Keith T.; Melot, Brent C.; Speirs, Rory W.; Hendon, Christopher H.

    2016-01-01

    Coffee is prepared by the extraction of a complex array of organic molecules from the roasted bean, which has been ground into fine particulates. The extraction depends on temperature, water chemistry and also the accessible surface area of the coffee. Here we investigate whether variations in the production processes of single origin coffee beans affects the particle size distribution upon grinding. We find that the particle size distribution is independent of the bean origin and processing method. Furthermore, we elucidate the influence of bean temperature on particle size distribution, concluding that grinding cold results in a narrower particle size distribution, and reduced mean particle size. We anticipate these results will influence the production of coffee industrially, as well as contribute to how we store and use coffee daily. PMID:27086837

  13. Theoretical study of interactions between striated cylindrical particles and membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing-Jing; Jia-Wei, Feng; Ren, Chun-Lai

    2015-08-01

    The interaction of nanoparticles with cell membranes is of great importance because of their potential biomedical applications. In this paper, we investigate the adhesion of stripe-patterned cylinders to a fluid membrane with a full consideration of the Helfrich free energy. Three situations are considered: one striated cylindrical particle, two pure cylindrical particles, and two Janus cylindrical particles. It is found that, with the adhesion of a single sparse striated cylinder, there are a variety of steady-states with energy barriers and the stable state is determined by the pattern of the cylinder. However, when the particle is densely striped, it has no effect on the stable state. By comparing the wrapping degree of two cylindrical particles with that of a single cylindrical particle, we find that two pure cylindrical particles can promote or suppress their interaction with the membrane under different situations. However, two Janus cylindrical particles can only inhibit their interaction with the membrane. Besides, this interaction is related to a first-order transition which is a shallow-to-deep wrapping transition for two pure cylinders while it is a shallow-to-half wrapping transition for two Janus cylinders. Furthermore, the position where the transition happens as a function of adhesion energy is given for fixed membrane tension and the precondition of the transition is presented. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 91027040 and 21274062).

  14. Quantification of loosely associated and tightly associated bacteria on broiler carcass skin using swabbing, stomaching, and grinding methods.

    PubMed

    Singh, P; Lee, H C; Chin, K B; Ha, S D; Kang, I

    2015-12-01

    This research was conducted to quantify bacterial populations after swabbing or stomaching, followed by grinding the swabbed or stomached broiler skins. For each of 3 replications, 3 eviscerated broilers were randomly taken from a processing line in a local broiler processing plant. Ten swabs and 10 stomachs per bird were conducted on the left- and the right-side skins (10×7 cm), respectively, which were then finally ground. Results indicated that mesophilic aerobic bacteria (MAB) in the first swabbed sample were significantly lower than those in the first stomached sample (P<0.05), with no difference seen for the remaining sampling times (P>0.05). During 10 swabbings followed by final grinding, 8, 9, and 83% of MAB were detected after the first swabbing, after the second through 10th swabbings, and after final grinding of the skin, respectively. During 10 stomachings followed by the final grinding, 17, 18, and 65% of MAB were detected after the first stomaching, after the second through 10th stomachings, and after final grinding of the skin, respectively. Escherichia coli (E. coli) and coliforms were significantly higher in the first stomaching than those in the first swabbing (P<0.05), with no difference seen between the 2 sampling methods for the rest sampling times (P>0.05). Populations of E. coli and coliforms decreased step-wisely from the highest after grinding to the intermediate after first and second sampling, and to the least after 10th sampling (P<0.05), regardless of swabbing or grinding. In this study, less than 35% of MAB seemed loosely associated in the skin of eviscerated broiler, whereas more than 65% of MAB looked tightly associated, which were not recovered by stomaching or swabbing even 10 times but were recovered by grinding the skin. PMID:26467007

  15. Force Balances in Systems of Cylindrical Polyelectrolytes

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, Stephen L.; McQuarrie, Donald A.

    1973-01-01

    A detailed analysis is made of the model system of two parallel cylindrical polyelectrolytes which contain ionizable groups on their surfaces and are immersed in an ionic bathing medium. The interaction between the cylinders is examined by considering the interplay between repulsive electrostatic forces and attractive forces of electrodynamic origin. The repulsive force arises from the screened coulomb interaction between the surface charge distributions on the cylinders and has been treated by developing a solution to the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation. The boundary condition at the cylinder surfaces is determined as a self-consistent functional of the potential, with the input consisting of the density of ionizable groups and their dissociation constants. It is suggested that a reasonably accurate representation for the form of the attractive force can be obtained by performing a pairwise summation of the individual interatomic forces. A quantitative estimate is obtained using a Hamaker constant chosen on the basis of rigorous calculations on simpler systems. It is found that a balance exists between these repulsive and attractive forces at separations in good agreement with those observed in arrays of tobacco mosaic virus and in the A band myosin lattice in striated muscle. The behavior of the balance point as a function of the pH and ionic strength of the bathing medium closely parallels that seen experimentally. PMID:4696760

  16. Cylindrical converging shock initiation of reactive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Charles M.; Horie, Yasuyuki; Lindsay, Christopher Michael; Butler, George C.; Lambert, David; Welle, Eric

    2012-03-01

    Recent research has been conducted that builds on the Forbes et al. (1997) study of inducing a rapid solid state reaction in a highly porous core using a converging cylindrical shock driven by a high explosive. The high explosive annular charge used in this research to compress the center reactive core was comparable to PBXN-110. Some modifications were made on the physical configuration of the test item for scale-up and ease of production. The reactive materials (I2O5/Al and I2O5/Al/Teflon) were hand mixed and packed to a tap density of about 32 percent. Data provided by a Cordon 114 high speed framing camera and a Photon Doppler Velocimetry instrument provided exit gas expansion, core particle and cylinder wall velocities. Analysis indicates that the case expansion velocity differs according to the core formulation and behaved similar to the baseline high explosive core with the exit gas of the reactive materials producing comparable velocities. Results from CTH hydrocode used to model the test item compares favorably to the experimental results.

  17. Technology Selections for Cylindrical Compact Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey A. Phillips

    2010-10-01

    A variety of process approaches are available and have been used historically for manufacture of cylindrical fuel compacts. The jet milling, fluid bed overcoating, and hot press compacting approach being adopted in the U.S. AGR Fuel Development Program for scale-up of the compacting process involves significant paradigm shifts from historical approaches. New methods are being pursued because of distinct advantages in simplicity, yield, and elimination of process mixed waste. Recent advances in jet milling technology allow simplified dry matrix powder preparation. The matrix preparation method is well matched with patented fluid bed powder overcoating technology recently developed for the pharmaceutical industry and directly usable for high density fuel particle matrix overcoating. High density overcoating places fuel particles as close as possible to their final position in the compact and is matched with hot press compacting which fully fluidizes matrix resin to achieve die fill at low compacting pressures and without matrix end caps. Overall the revised methodology provides a simpler process that should provide very high yields, improve homogeneity, further reduce defect fractions, eliminate intermediate grading and QC steps, and allow further increases in fuel packing fractions.

  18. Rotating cylindrical wormholes and energy conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronnikov, K. A.; Krechet, V. G.

    2016-01-01

    We seek wormholes among rotating cylindrically symmetric configurations in general relativity. Exact wormhole solutions are presented with such sources of gravity as a massless scalar field, a cosmological constant, and a scalar field with an exponential potential. However, none of these solutions are asymptotically flat, which excludes the existence of wormhole entrances as local objects in our Universe. To overcome this difficulty, we try to build configurations with flat asymptotic regions using the cut-and-paste procedure: on both sides of the throat, a wormhole solution is matched to a properly chosen region of flat space-time at some surfaces Σ- and Σ+. It is shown, however, that if the source of gravity in the throat region is a scalar field with an arbitrary potential, then one or both thin shells appearing on Σ- and Σ+ inevitably violate the null energy condition. Thus, although rotating wormhole solutions are easily found without exotic matter, such matter is still necessary for obtaining asymptotic flatness.

  19. Cylindrical isentropic compression by ultrahigh magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Zhuowei; Luo, Hao; Zhang, Hengdi; Zhao, Shichao; Tang, Xiaosong; Tong, Yanjin; Song, Zhenfei; Tan, Fuli; Zhao, Jianheng; Sun, Chengwei

    2014-05-01

    The cylindrical isentropic compression by ultrahigh magnetic field (MC-1) is a kind of unique high energy density technique. It has characters like ultrahigh pressure and low temperature rising, and would have widely used in areas like high pressure physics, new material synthesis and ultrahigh magnetic field physics. The Institute of Fluid Physics, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics (IFP, CAEP) has begun the experiment since 2011 and a primary experimental device had been set-up. In the experiments, a seed magnetic field of 5 Tesla were set-up first and compressed by a stainless steel liner which is driven by high explosive initiated synchronously. The internal diameter of the liner is 97 mm, and its thickness is 1.5 mm. The movement of liner was recorded optically and a typical turnaround phenomenon was observed. From the photography results the liner was compressed smoothly and evenly and its average velocity was about 5-6 km/s. In the experiment a axial magnetic field of over 1400 Tesla has been recorded. The MC-1 process was numerical simulated by 1D MHD code MC11D and the simulations are in accord with the experiments.

  20. Cylindrical gate valve apparatus and method

    SciTech Connect

    Hynes, J. H.; Morrill, C. D.

    1985-04-30

    A safety valve is disclosed which may be installed on an offshore wellhead above the tubing head and below the Christmas tree. The valve has a housing with upper and lower vertical passages and a lateral housing passage. A cylindrical gate is disposed within the lateral passage and includes a ''T'' shaped passage therein. The gate may be moved laterally and angularly within the lateral passage. During completion or workover of the well, the gate is moved laterally until the upper and lower vertical passages are in full open communication to run drills, hangers or other large diameter devices into the well via a BOP which may be attached to the top of the housing. During normal production, the gate may be laterally moved into the intersection of the vertical and lateral passages and the small through head part of the ''T'' passage serves to provide a vertical flow path through the production bore which is sealed off from the larger upper and lower vertical passages. Flow through side outlets in the housing is possible through the base of the ''T'' passage. The gate may be angularly moved to have production to the lateral outlets via the head part of the ''T'' when the base part of the ''T'' is aligned with production tubing. Should the need arise, the valve may be angularly rotated to a position where the fluid flow path of the production tubing is completely shut in.

  1. Why Do Marbles Become Paler on Grinding? Reflectance, Spectroscopy, Color, and Particle Size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagorio, María Gabriela

    2004-11-01

    Theoretical aspects of light interaction with solid particles are discussed. The dependence of the remission function (from Kubelka Munk theory) and consequently the modification of the color of a solid with particle size are analyzed in detail. A physical interpretation of the phenomenon is given. Comparison of results from grinding glass marbles, copper sulfate, and potassium permanganate are discussed. Color changes in nanoparticles are also presented.

  2. Analysis of surface integrity of grinded gears using Barkhausen noise analysis and x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Vrkoslavová, Lucie; Louda, Petr; Malec, Jiři

    2014-02-18

    The contribution is focused to present results of study grinded gears made of 18CrNiMo7-6 steel used in the wind power plant for support (service) purposes. These gears were case-hardened due to standard hard case and soft core formation. This heat treatment increases wear resistance and fatigue strength of machine parts. During serial production some troubles with surface integrity have occurred. When solving complex problems lots of samples were prepared. For grinding of gears were used different parameters of cutting speed, number of material removal and lots from different subsuppliers. Material characterization was carried out using Barkhausen noise analysis (BNA) device; X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurement of surface residual stresses was done as well. Depth profile of measured characteristics, e.g. magnetoelastic parameter and residual stress was obtained by step by step layers' removing using electrolytic etching. BNA software Viewscan was used to measure magnetizing frequency sweep (MFS) and magnetizing voltage sweep (MVS). Scanning of Magnetoelastic parameter (MP) endwise individual teeth were also carried out with Viewscan. These measurements were done to find problematic surface areas after grinding such as thermal damaged locations. Plots of the hardness and thickness of case-hardened layer on cross sections were measurered as well. Evaluation of structure of subsurface case-hardened layer and core was made on etched metallographic patterns. The aim of performed measurements was to find correlation between conditions of grinding, residual stresses and structural and magnetoelastic parameters. Based on correlation of measured values and technological parameters optimizing the production of gears will be done.

  3. Analysis of surface integrity of grinded gears using Barkhausen noise analysis and x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrkoslavová, Lucie; Louda, Petr; Malec, Jiři

    2014-02-01

    The contribution is focused to present results of study grinded gears made of 18CrNiMo7-6 steel used in the wind power plant for support (service) purposes. These gears were case-hardened due to standard hard case and soft core formation. This heat treatment increases wear resistance and fatigue strength of machine parts. During serial production some troubles with surface integrity have occurred. When solving complex problems lots of samples were prepared. For grinding of gears were used different parameters of cutting speed, number of material removal and lots from different subsuppliers. Material characterization was carried out using Barkhausen noise analysis (BNA) device; X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurement of surface residual stresses was done as well. Depth profile of measured characteristics, e.g. magnetoelastic parameter and residual stress was obtained by step by step layers' removing using electrolytic etching. BNA software Viewscan was used to measure magnetizing frequency sweep (MFS) and magnetizing voltage sweep (MVS). Scanning of Magnetoelastic parameter (MP) endwise individual teeth were also carried out with Viewscan. These measurements were done to find problematic surface areas after grinding such as thermal damaged locations. Plots of the hardness and thickness of case-hardened layer on cross sections were measurered as well. Evaluation of structure of subsurface case-hardened layer and core was made on etched metallographic patterns. The aim of performed measurements was to find correlation between conditions of grinding, residual stresses and structural and magnetoelastic parameters. Based on correlation of measured values and technological parameters optimizing the production of gears will be done.

  4. OBSERVED BINARY FRACTION SETS LIMITS ON THE EXTENT OF COLLISIONAL GRINDING IN THE KUIPER BELT

    SciTech Connect

    Nesvorny, David; Vokrouhlicky, David; Bottke, William F.; Levison, Harold F.; Noll, Keith

    2011-05-15

    The size distribution in the cold classical Kuiper Belt (KB) can be approximated by two idealized power laws: one with steep slope for radii R > R* and one with shallow slope for R < R*, where R* {approx} 25-50 km. Previous works suggested that the size frequency distribution (SFD) rollover at R* can be the result of extensive collisional grinding in the KB that led to the catastrophic disruption of most bodies with R < R*. Here, we use a new code to test the effect of collisions in the KB. We find that the observed rollover could indeed be explained by collisional grinding provided that the initial mass in large bodies was much larger than the one in the present KB and was dynamically depleted. In addition to the size distribution changes, our code also tracks the effects of collisions on binary systems. We find that it is generally easier to dissolve wide binary systems, such as the ones existing in the cold KB today, than to catastrophically disrupt objects with R {approx} R*. Thus, the binary survival sets important limits on the extent of collisional grinding in the KB. We find that the extensive collisional grinding required to produce the SFD rollover at R* would imply a strong gradient of the binary fraction with R and separation, because it is generally easier to dissolve binaries with small components and/or those with wide orbits. The expected binary fraction for R {approx}< R* is {approx}<0.1. The present observational data do not show such a gradient. Instead, they suggest a large binary fraction of {approx}0.4 for R = 30-40 km. This may indicate that the rollover was not produced by disruptive collisions, but is instead a fossil remnant of the KB object formation process.

  5. The Tucker technique: the proximal hollow grind to address a root concavity.

    PubMed

    Hess, T A

    2014-01-01

    Cast gold inlays have long been used to conservatively restore compromised tooth structure. When the mesial or distal proximal surfaces are indicated for restoration and a cast gold restoration is desired, traditionally a box is prepared with an external bevel. Often a root concavity does not allow for a standard box form or the external and/or internal bevels. A proximal hollow grind can be utilized to address limits of standard inlay or onlay preparation design.

  6. Leaf wetness duration measurement: comparison of cylindrical and flat plate sensors under different field conditons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sentelhas, Paulo C.; Gillespie, Terry J.; Santos, Eduardo A.

    2007-03-01

    In general, leaf wetness duration (LWD) is a key parameter influencing plant disease epidemiology, since it provides the free water required by pathogens to infect foliar tissue. LWD is used as an input in many disease warning systems, which help growers to decide the best time to spray their crops against diseases. Since there is no observation standard either for sensor or exposure, LWD measurement is often problematic. To assess the performance of electronic sensors, LWD measurements obtained with painted cylindrical and flat plate sensors were compared under different field conditions in Elora, Ontario, Canada, and in Piracicaba, São Paulo, Brazil. The sensors were tested in four different crop environments—mowed turfgrass, maize, soybean, and tomatoes—during the summer of 2003 and 2004 in Elora and during the winter of 2005 in Piracicaba. Flat plate sensors were deployed facing north and at 45° to horizontal, and cylindrical sensors were deployed horizontally. At the turfgrass site, both sensors were installed 30 cm above the ground, while at the crop fields, the sensors were installed at the top and inside the canopy (except for maize, with a sensor only at the top). Considering the flat plate sensor as a reference (Sentelhas et al. Operational exposure of leaf wetness sensors. Agric For Meteorol 126:59-72, 2004a), the results in the more humid climate at Elora showed that the cylindrical sensor overestimated LWD by 1.1-4.2 h, depending on the crop and canopy position. The main cause of the overestimation was the accumulation of big water drops along the bottom of the cylindrical sensors, which required much more energy and, consequently, time to evaporate. The overall difference between sensors when evaporating wetness formed during the night was around 1.6 h. Cylindrical sensors also detected wetness earlier than did flat plates—around 0.6 h. Agreement between plate and cylinder sensors was much better in the drier climate at Piracicaba. These

  7. Ultraprecision grinding of chemical vapor deposited silicon carbide mirrors for synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namba, Yoshiharu

    1996-11-01

    Chemically vapor deposited silicon carbide (CVD-SiC) is the most important material of mirrors for high-brightness synchrotron radiation beamlines, though the material is too difficult to be machined. It takes quite a long time to polish SiC substrate to make mirrors. This paper intends to reduce the machining time to make CVD-SiC mirrors by using ultra-precision grinding technology. The CVD-SiC sample has been ground into 0.4 nm rms in surface roughness by a resinoid-bonded diamond wheel and an ultra-precision surface grinder having a glass-ceramic spindle of extremely-low thermal expansion. The surface roughness of ground samples were measured with TOPO-3D and AFM. 88.7% reflectivity has been obtained on the ground CVD-SiC flat surface, measured with X-ray of 0.834 nm in wavelength at the grazing incidence angle of 0.7 - 0.95 degree. The reflectivity depends upon the angle between the direction of incident beam and grinding marks on the sample. The relationship between the surface roughness and grinding conditions was also discussed.

  8. Microstructural and crystallographic surface changes after grinding zirconia-based dental ceramics.

    PubMed

    Denry, I L; Holloway, J A

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate microstructural and crystallographic phase changes after grinding 3Y-TZP dental ceramics. Ceramic blanks were sintered according to manufacturer's recommendations and divided into four groups: (A) as-sintered control, (B) diamond-ground manually under water, (C) ground and polished, and (D) ground and annealed at 1000 degrees C for 1 h. Bulk specimens were analyzed by X-ray diffraction to characterize the crystalline phases. The microstructure was investigated by SEM. XRD analyses showed that the control group and the group that was ground and annealed contained only tetragonal zirconia. However, after grinding or after grinding followed by polishing, rhombohedral zirconia and strained tetragonal zirconia were present, without any detectable amount of monoclinic zirconia. Annealing led to the disappearance of both residual lattice strain and the rhombohedral phase. The microstructure of the ground and polished specimens was characterized by significant residual surface damage associated with grain pullout to a depth of about 20 microm. This type of damage could have an impact on the long-term fatigue behavior of 3Y-TZP.

  9. Influence of ageing, grinding and preheating on the thermal behaviour of alpha-lactose monohydrate.

    PubMed

    Garnier, S; Petit, S; Mallet, F; Petit, M-N; Lemarchand, D; Coste, S; Lefebvre, J; Coquerel, G

    2008-09-01

    It is shown that the onset temperature and the magnitude of thermal events observed during DSC analyses of alpha-lactose monohydrate can be strongly affected by various treatments such as ageing, manual grinding and preheating (cycle of preliminary dehydration and rehydration). In the case of grinding and preheating, the change of dehydration pathways was further investigated by using a suitable combination of characterization techniques, including X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) performed with a synchrotron source (allowing an accurate Rietveld analysis), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), laser particle size measurements, FTIR spectroscopy and (1)H NMR for the determination of beta-lactose contents in samples. It appeared that the dehydration mechanism is affected not only by a smaller particle size distribution, but also by residual anisotropic lattice distortions and by the formation of surface defects or high energy surfaces. The fusion-recrystallization process occurring between anhydrous forms of alpha-lactose at ca. 170 degrees C is not significantly affected by grinding, whereas a preheating treatment induces an unexpected large increase of the enthalpy associated with this transition. Our observations and interpretations confirm the important role of water molecules in the crystal cohesion of the title compound and illustrate the necessity to consider the history of each sample for a satisfactory understanding of the physical properties and the behaviour of this important pharmaceutical excipient. PMID:18617338

  10. Precision grinding of tungsten carbide mold insert for molding of sub-millimeter glass aspheric lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Choung-Lii; Chang, Chia-Jung; Chen, Chun-Chieh; Chou, Wen-Chen; Ma, Kung-Jeng

    2013-06-01

    As the demand for precision optical components with sub-millimeter feature size steadily increasing, numerous efforts have been made in developing new techniques and in improving the existing approaches to efficiently and economically produce those components. Glass molding process (GMP) is one of these methods to enable mass production of precision glass optical components in recent years. One of the key issues in GMP is precision mold insert fabrication. Since the mould are normally made of hard and brittle materials such as tungsten carbide (WC) and silicon carbide (SiC), precision diamond grinding is by far the principal choice used to machine the GMP mould. As the feature size of optical component gets smaller, the size of mould and grinding wheel used to fabricate the mould gets smaller too. This makes the grinding process a very time consuming and expensive task. This research aimed to improve the small mold fabrication processes by developing an effective way of producing small diamond wheels and in-process monitoring wheel profile. Diamond wheels of around 0.2mm to 0.5mm in diameter after truing and WC aspheric mold insert of form accuracy around 0.47μm were successfully produced in this research.

  11. Experimental Simulation of Boiling Phenomena with a Cylindrical Annulus Moderator Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.H.; Lee, D.J.; Chan, Y.K.; Chang, C.J.

    2002-07-01

    The improvement and utilization promotion project of the Taiwan Research Reactor (TRR-II) has been carried out at the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER). The Cold Neutron Source (CNS) with a two-phase thermosyphon will be installed in the heavy water reactor. The hydrogen cold loop consists of a cylindrical moderator cell, a single transfer tube, and a condenser. A cylindrical annulus moderator cell consists of the outer shell and the inner shell of which bottom part is open. A series of mockup tests were performed by using the full-scale mock-up test facility and Freon-11 as a working fluid. The test results show that the inner shell contains only vapor and the outer shell contains boiling liquid for simulating the TRR-II CNS in the full power operations. The liquid level in the outer shell is stable without producing a sudden bubbling against the increase of 30% power. (authors)

  12. Self-formed cavity quantum electrodynamics in coupled dipole cylindrical-waveguide systems.

    PubMed

    Afshar V, S; Henderson, M R; Greentree, A D; Gibson, B C; Monro, T M

    2014-05-01

    An ideal optical cavity operates by confining light in all three dimensions. We show that a cylindrical waveguide can provide the longitudinal confinement required to form a two dimensional cavity, described here as a self-formed cavity, by locating a dipole, directed along the waveguide, on the interface of the waveguide. The cavity resonance modes lead to peaks in the radiation of the dipole-waveguide system that have no contribution due to the skew rays that exist in longitudinally invariant waveguides and reduce their Q-factor. Using a theoretical model, we evaluate the Q-factor and modal volume of the cavity formed by a dipole-cylindrical-waveguide system and show that such a cavity allows access to both the strong and weak coupling regimes of cavity quantum electrodynamics.

  13. Electrolytic In-process Dressing (ELID) for high-efficiency, precision grinding of ceramic parts: An experiment study

    SciTech Connect

    Bandyopadhyay, B.P.

    1995-08-01

    This report describes Electrolytic In-process Dressing (ELID) as applied to the efficient, high-precision grinding of structural ceramics, and describes work performed jointly by Dr. B.P. Bandyopadhyay, University of North Dakota, and Dr. R. Ohmori, of the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RINEN), Tokyo, Japan, from June through August, 1994. Dr. Ohmori pioneered the novel ELID grinding technology which incorporates electrolytically enhanced, in-process dressing of metal bonded superabrasive wheels. The principle of ELID grinding technology is discussed in the report as will its application for rough grinding and precision grinding. Two types of silicon nitride based ceramics (Kyocerals Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, and Eaton`s SRBSN) were ground under various conditions with ELID methods. Mirror surface finishes were obtained with {number_sign} 4000 mesh size wheel (average grain size = 4 {mu}m). Results of these investigations are presented in this report. These include the effects of wheel bond type, type of power supply, abrasive grit friability, and cooling fluid composition. The effects of various parameters are discussed in terms of the mechanisms of ELID grinding, and in particular, the manner of boundary layer formation on the wheels and abrasive grit protrusion.

  14. Plasmonic Bloch oscillations in cylindrical metal-dielectric waveguide arrays.

    PubMed

    Shiu, Ruei-Cheng; Lan, Yung-Chiang; Chen, Chin-Min

    2010-12-01

    This study investigates plasmonic Bloch oscillations (PBOs) in cylindrical metal-dielectric waveguide arrays (MDWAs) by performing numerical simulations and theoretical analyses. Optical conformal mapping is used to transform cylindrical MDWAs into equivalent chirped structures with permittivity and permeability gradients across the waveguide arrays, which is caused by the curvature of the cylindrical waveguide. The PBOs are attributed to the transformed structure. The period of oscillation increases with the wavelength of the incident Gaussian beam. However, the amplitude of oscillation is almost independent of wavelength.

  15. Limit of concentration for cylindrical concentrators under extended light sources.

    PubMed

    Miñano, J C; Luque, A

    1983-08-15

    Cylindrical concentrators illuminated by an extended source with an arbitrary distribution of radiance are analyzed taking into account basic properties derived from the Fermat principle and not from the specific concentrator shape. The upper limit of concentration achievable with this type of concentrator is obtained and it is found to be lower than that of general (3-D) concentrators. Cylindrical compound parabolic concentrators are analyzed in the light of this theory, and it is shown that they achieve the highest optical concentration possible for a cylindrical concentrator. PMID:18196152

  16. Cylindrical array luminescent solar concentrators: performance boosts by geometric effects.

    PubMed

    Videira, Jose J H; Bilotti, Emiliano; Chatten, Amanda J

    2016-07-11

    This paper presents an investigation of the geometric effects within a cylindrical array luminescent solar concentrator (LSC). Photon concentration of a cylindrical LSC increases linearly with cylinder length up to 2 metres. Raytrace modelling on the shading effects of circles on their neighbours demonstrates effective incident light trapping in a cylindrical LSC array at angles of incidence between 60-70 degrees. Raytrace modelling with real-world lighting conditions shows optical efficiency boosts when the suns angle of incidence is within this angle range. On certain days, 2 separate times of peak optical efficiency can be attained over the course of sunrise-solar noon. PMID:27410904

  17. Computation of dispersion relations for axially symmetric guided waves in cylindrical structures by means of a spectral decomposition method.

    PubMed

    Höhne, Christian; Prager, Jens; Gravenkamp, Hauke

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, a method to determine the complex dispersion relations of axially symmetric guided waves in cylindrical structures is presented as an alternative to the currently established numerical procedures. The method is based on a spectral decomposition into eigenfunctions of the Laplace operator on the cross-section of the waveguide. This translates the calculation of real or complex wave numbers at a given frequency into solving an eigenvalue problem. Cylindrical rods and plates are treated as the asymptotic cases of cylindrical structures and used to generalize the method to the case of hollow cylinders. The presented method is superior to direct root-finding algorithms in the sense that no initial guess values are needed to determine the complex wave numbers and that neither starting at low frequencies nor subsequent mode tracking is required. The results obtained with this method are shown to be reasonably close to those calculated by other means and an estimate for the achievable accuracy is given.

  18. Fabrication Studies for a Cylindrical DDS Structure at 90 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Bowden, G.B.; Chou, P.J.; Kirby, R.E.; Menegat, A.; Siemann, R.H.; Spencer, J.E.; Wang, J.W.; /SLAC

    2011-08-26

    A natural extension of work on the next generation of high power RF sources and accelerating cavities for Linear Colliders implies cylindrical, damped, detuned structures for millimeter wavelengths. Commercial availability of WR-10 waveguides and other components in the 75-110 GHz range provides a practical goal. Fabrication methods are surveyed, compared and, in some cases, tested to determine whether they can provide the imposed tolerances. Different techniques and tolerances are compared to previous methods at longer wavelengths. The higher gradients and corresponding surface fields indicate that a better understanding of the surface physics is required as well as how the different fabrication steps influence those surface characteristics that impact the final operation. We consider existing systems at SLAC and elsewhere as a function of frequency to determine what is desirable to measure and control for all phases of the fabrication, testing, conditioning and use of these systems. For example, the importance of crystal structure to the different steps is discussed. The preferred method allows a variety of design alternatives to be pursued simultaneously and extends to shorter wavelengths as well as provides possibilities for embedded test and control elements.

  19. Cylindrically symmetric Einstein-Yang-Mills-Higgs gauge configurations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondaini, R. P.

    1985-02-01

    Two solutions are obtained for coupled Einstein-Yang-Mills-Higgs fields with cylindrical symmetry and rigid rotation. The Higgs fields are responsible for the creation of singularities and infinite energy densities at the cylinder's axis.

  20. Numerical analysis of cocurrent conical and cylindrical axial cyclone separators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nor, M. A. M.; Al-Kayiem, H. H.; Lemma, T. A.

    2015-12-01

    Axial concurrent liquid-liquid separator is seen as an alternative unit to the traditional tangential counter current cyclone due to lower droplet break ups, turbulence and pressure drop. This paper presents the numerical analysis of a new conical axial cocurrent design along with a comparison to the cylindrical axial cocurrent type. The simulation was carried out using CFD technique in ANSYS-FLUENT software. The simulation results were validated by comparison with experimental data from literature, and mesh independency and quality were performed. The analysis indicates that the conical version achieves better separation performance compared to the cylindrical type. Simulation results indicate tangential velocity with 8% higher and axial velocity with 80% lower recirculation compared to the cylindrical type. Also, the flow visualization counters shows smaller recirculation region relative to the cylindrical unit. The proposed conical design seems more efficient and suits the crude/water separation in O&G industry.