Science.gov

Sample records for cylindrical hall-effect thruster

  1. Performance of a Permanent-Magnet Cylindrical Hall-Effect Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, K. A.; Sooby, E. S.; Kimberlin, A. C.; Raites, Y.; Merino, E.; Fisch, N. J.

    2009-01-01

    The performance of a low-power cylindrical Hall thruster, which more readily lends itself to miniaturization and low-power operation than a conventional (annular) Hall thruster, was measured using a planar plasma probe and a thrust stand. The field in the cylindrical thruster was produced using permanent magnets, promising a power reduction over previous cylindrical thruster iterations that employed electromagnets to generate the required magnetic field topology. Two sets of ring-shaped permanent magnets are used, and two different field configurations can be produced by reorienting the poles of one magnet relative to the other. A plasma probe measuring ion flux in the plume is used to estimate the current utilization for the two magnetic topologies. The measurements indicate that electron transport is impeded much more effectively in one configuration, implying higher thrust efficiency. Thruster performance measurements on this configuration were obtained over a power range of 70-350 W and with the cathode orifice located at three different axial positions relative to the thruster exit plane. The thrust levels over this power range were 1.25-6.5 mN, with anode efficiencies and specific impulses spanning 4-21% and 400-1950 s, respectively. The anode efficiency of the permanent-magnet thruster compares favorable with the efficiency of the electromagnet thruster when the power consumed by the electromagnets is taken into account.

  2. Comparisons in Performance of Electromagnet and Permanent-Magnet Cylindrical Hall-Effect Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, K. A.; Raitses, Y.; Gayoso, J. C.; Fisch, N. J.

    2010-01-01

    Three different low-power cylindrical Hall thrusters, which more readily lend themselves to miniaturization and low-power operation than a conventional (annular) Hall thruster, are compared to evaluate the propulsive performance of each. One thruster uses electromagnet coils to produce the magnetic field within the discharge channel while the others use permanent magnets, promising power reduction relative to the electromagnet thruster. A magnetic screen is added to the permanent magnet thruster to improve performance by keeping the magnetic field from expanding into space beyond the exit of the thruster. The combined dataset spans a power range from 50-350 W. The thrust levels over this range were 1.3-7.3 mN, with thruster efficiencies and specific impulses spanning 3.5-28.7% and 400-1940 s, respectively. The efficiency is generally higher for the permanent magnet thruster with the magnetic screen, while That thruster s specific impulse as a function of discharge voltage is comparable to the electromagnet thruster.

  3. Performance of a Cylindrical Hall-Effect Thruster with Magnetic Field Generated by Permanent Magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Raitses, Yevgeny; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2008-01-01

    While Hall thrusters can operate at high efficiency at kW power levels, it is difficult to construct one that operates over a broad envelope down to 100W while maintaining an efficiency of 45- 55%. Scaling to low power while holding the main dimensionless parameters constant requires a decrease in the thruster channel size and an increase in the magnetic field strength. Increasing the magnetic field becomes technically challenging since the field can saturate the miniaturized inner components of the magnetic circuit and scaling down the magnetic circuit leaves very little room for magnetic pole pieces and heat shields. An alternative approach is to employ a cylindrical Hall thruster (CHT) geometry. Laboratory model CHTs have operated at power levels ranging from the order of 50 Watts up to 1 kW. These thrusters exhibit performance characteristics which are comparable to conventional, annular Hall thrusters of similar size. Compared to the annular Hall thruster, the CHT has a lower insulator surface area to discharge chamber volume ratio. Consequently, there is the potential for reduced wall losses in the channel of a CHT, and any reduction in wall losses should translate into lower channel heating rates and reduced erosion. This makes the CHT geometry promising for low-power applications. Recently, a CHT that uses permanent magnets to produce the magnetic field topology was tested. This thruster has the promise of reduced power consumption over previous CHT iterations that employed electromagnets. Data are presented for two purposes: to expose the effect different controllable parameters have on the discharge and to summarize performance measurements (thrust, Isp, efficiency) obtained using a thrust stand. These data are used to gain insight into the thruster's operation and to allow for quantitative comparisons between the permanent magnet CHT and the electromagnet CHT.

  4. Performance of a Cylindrical Hall-Effect Thruster Using Permanent Magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Raitses, Y.; Merino, E.; Fisch, N. J.

    2009-01-01

    While annular Hall thrusters can operate at high efficiency at kW power levels, it is difficult to construct one that operates over a broad envelope from 1 kW down to 100 W while maintaining an efficiency of 45-55%. Scaling to low power while holding the main dimensionless parameters constant requires a decrease in the thruster channel size and an increase in the magnetic field strength. Increasing the magnetic field becomes technically challenging since the field can saturate the miniaturized inner components of the magnetic circuit and scaling down the magnetic circuit leaves very little room for magnetic pole pieces and heat shields. In addition, the central magnetic pole piece defining the interior wall of the annular channel can experience excessive heat loads in a miniaturized Hall thruster, with the temperature eventually exceeding the Curie temperature of the material and in extreme circumstances leading to accelerated erosion of the channel wall. An alternative approach is to employ a cylindrical Hall thruster (CHT) geometry. Laboratory model CHTs have operated at power levels ranging from 50 W up to 1 kW. These thrusters exhibit performance characteristics that are comparable to conventional, annular Hall thrusters of similar size. Compared to the annular Hall thruster, the CHTs insulator surface area to discharge chamber volume ratio is lower. Consequently, there is the potential for reduced wall losses in the channel of a CHT, and any reduction in wall losses should translate into lower channel heating rates and reduced erosion, making the CHT geometry promising for low-power applications. This potential for high performance in the low-power regime has served as the impetus for research and development efforts aimed at understanding and improving CHT performance. Recently, a 2.6 cm channel diameter permanent magnet CHT (shown in Fig. 1) was tested. This thruster has the promise of reduced power consumption over previous CHT iterations that employed

  5. Discharge Oscillations in a Permanent Magnet Cylindrical Hall-Effect Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, K. A.; Sooby, E. S.; Raitses, Y.; Merino, E.; Fisch, N. J.

    2009-01-01

    Measurements of the discharge current in a cylindrical Hall thruster are presented to quantify plasma oscillations and instabilities without introducing an intrusive probe into the plasma. The time-varying component of the discharge current is measured using a current monitor that possesses a wide frequency bandwidth and the signal is Fourier transformed to yield the frequency spectra present, allowing for the identification of plasma oscillations. The data show that the discharge current oscillations become generally greater in amplitude and complexity as the voltage is increased, and are reduced in severity with increasing flow rate. The breathing mode ionization instability is identified, with frequency as a function of discharge voltage not increasing with discharge voltage as has been observed in some traditional Hall thruster geometries, but instead following a scaling similar to a large-amplitude, nonlinear oscillation mode recently predicted in for annular Hall thrusters. A transition from lower amplitude oscillations to large relative fluctuations in the oscillating discharge current is observed at low flow rates and is suppressed as the mass flow rate is increased. A second set of peaks in the frequency spectra are observed at the highest propellant flow rate tested. Possible mechanisms that might give rise to these peaks include ionization instabilities and interactions between various oscillatory modes.

  6. Mode Transitions in Hall Effect Thrusters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    Astronautics Mode Transitions in Hall Effect Thrusters Michael J. Sekerak 1 , Benjamin W. Longmier 2 and Alec D. Gallimore 3 University of Michigan...nude Faraday probe, retarding potential analyzer and cylindrical Langmuir prove, Brown showed the transition from “low-current” to “high-current...thank two former PEPL students: Dr. Robert Lobbia for development of the HDLP; and Dr. Michael McDonald for development of the FastCam Analysis

  7. Preliminary Results of Performance Measurements on a Cylindrical Hall-Effect Thruster with Magnetic Field Generated by Permanent Magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, K. A.; Raitses, Y.; Merino, E.; Fisch, N. J.

    2008-01-01

    The performance of a low-power cylindrical Hall thruster, which more readily lends itself to miniaturization and low-power operation than a conventional (annular) Hall thruster, was measured using a planar plasma probe and a thrust stand. The field in the cylindrical thruster was produced using permanent magnets, promising a power reduction over previous cylindrical thruster iterations that employed electromagnets to generate the required magnetic field topology. Two sets of ring-shaped permanent magnets are used, and two different field configurations can be produced by reorienting the poles of one magnet relative to the other. A plasma probe measuring ion flux in the plume is used to estimate the current utilization for the two magnetic configurations. The measurements indicate that electron transport is impeded much more effectively in one configuration, implying a higher thrust efficiency. Preliminary thruster performance measurements on this configuration were obtained over a power range of 100-250 W. The thrust levels over this power range were 3.5-6.5 mN, with anode efficiencies and specific impulses spanning 14-19% and 875- 1425 s, respectively. The magnetic field in the thruster was lower for the thrust measurements than the plasma probe measurements due to heating and weakening of the permanent magnets, reducing the maximum field strength from 2 kG to roughly 750-800 G. The discharge current levels observed during thrust stand testing were anomalously high compared to those levels measured in previous experiments with this thruster.

  8. Azimuthal Spoke Propagation in Hall Effect Thrusters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. IEPC-2013- Background Pressure Effects on Krypton Hall Effect Thruster Internal Acceleration...Why are we doing this work? – Continued examination of alternative Hall effect thruster propellants: Krypton – Interest in effects of test...Distribution unlimited 2 Photograph of BHT-600 operating on krypton Long exposure photograph of BHT-600 operating on krypton showing extended plume

  9. A Small Modular Laboratory Hall Effect Thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ty Davis

    Electric propulsion technologies promise to revolutionize access to space, opening the door for mission concepts unfeasible by traditional propulsion methods alone. The Hall effect thruster is a relatively high thrust, moderate specific impulse electric propulsion device that belongs to the class of electrostatic thrusters. Hall effect thrusters benefit from an extensive flight history, and offer significant performance and cost advantages when compared to other forms of electric propulsion. Ongoing research on these devices includes the investigation of mechanisms that tend to decrease overall thruster efficiency, as well as the development of new techniques to extend operational lifetimes. This thesis is primarily concerned with the design and construction of a Small Modular Laboratory Hall Effect Thruster (SMLHET), and its operation on argon propellant gas. Particular attention was addressed at low-cost, modular design principles, that would facilitate simple replacement and modification of key thruster parts such as the magnetic circuit and discharge channel. This capability is intended to facilitate future studies of device physics such as anomalous electron transport and magnetic shielding of the channel walls, that have an impact on thruster performance and life. Preliminary results demonstrate SMLHET running on argon in a manner characteristic of Hall effect thrusters, additionally a power balance method was utilized to estimate thruster performance. It is expected that future thruster studies utilizing heavier though more expensive gases like xenon or krypton, will observe increased efficiency and stability.

  10. Thermal Characterization of a Hall Effect Thruster

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    Material Curie Temperature Iron 770 °C Nickel 358 °C Cobalt 1130 °C Gadolinium 20 °C Terfenol 380-430 °C Alnico 850 °C Hard Ferrites 400-700...C Barium Ferrite 450 °C Hall Effect thrusters generally use iron magnets with a Curie temperature of 770 °C. Decreasing the magnetic strength

  11. Mode Transitions in Hall Effect Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekerak, Michael J.; Longmier, Benjamin W.; Gallimore, Alec D.; Brown, Daniel L.; Hofer, Richard R.; Polk, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Mode transitions have been commonly observed in Hall Effect Thruster (HET) operation where a small change in a thruster operating parameter such as discharge voltage, magnetic field or mass flow rate causes the thruster discharge current mean value and oscillation amplitude to increase significantly. Mode transitions in a 6-kW-class HET called the H6 are induced by varying the magnetic field intensity while holding all other operating parameters constant and measurements are acquired with ion saturation probes and ultra-fast imaging. Global and local oscillation modes are identified. In the global mode, the entire discharge channel oscillates in unison and azimuthal perturbations (spokes) are either absent or negligible. Downstream azimuthally spaced probes show no signal delay between each other and are very well correlated to the discharge current signal. In the local mode, signals from the azimuthally spaced probes exhibit a clear delay indicating the passage of "spokes" and are not well correlated to the discharge current. These spokes are localized oscillations propagating in the ExB direction that are typically 10-20% of the mean value. In contrast, the oscillations in the global mode can be 100% of the mean value. The transition between global and local modes occurs at higher relative magnetic field strengths for higher mass flow rates or higher discharge voltages. The thrust is constant through mode transition but the thrust-to-power decreased by 25% due to increasing discharge current. The plume shows significant differences between modes with the global mode significantly brighter in the channel and the near-field plasma plume as well as exhibiting a luminous spike on thruster centerline. Mode transitions provide valuable insight to thruster operation and suggest improved methods for thruster performance characterization.

  12. Hall-Effect Thruster Utilizing Bismuth as Propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szabo, James; Gasdaska, Charles; Hruby, Vlad; Robin, Mike

    2008-01-01

    A laboratory-model Hall-effect spacecraft thruster was developed that utilizes bismuth as the propellant. Xenon was used in most prior Hall-effect thrusters. Bismuth is an attractive alternative because it has a larger atomic mass, a larger electron-impact-ionization cross-section, and is cheaper and more plentiful.

  13. Azimuthal Spoke Propagation in Hall Effect Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekerak, Michael J.; Longmier, Benjamin W.; Gallimore, Alec D.; Brown, Daniel L.; Hofer, Richard R.; Polk, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Spokes are azimuthally propagating perturbations in the plasma discharge of Hall Effect Thrusters (HETs) that travel in the E x B direction and have been observed in many different systems. The propagation of azimuthal spokes are investigated in a 6 kW HET known as the H6 using ultra-fast imaging and azimuthally spaced probes. A spoke surface is a 2-D plot of azimuthal light intensity evolution over time calculated from 87,500 frames/s videos. The spoke velocity has been determined using three methods with similar results: manual fitting of diagonal lines on the spoke surface, linear cross-correlation between azimuthal locations and an approximated dispersion relation. The spoke velocity for three discharge voltages (300, 400 and 450 V) and three anode mass flow rates (14.7, 19.5 and 25.2 mg/s) yielded spoke velocities between 1500 and 2200 m/s across a range of normalized magnetic field settings. The spoke velocity was inversely dependent on magnetic field strength for low B-field settings and asymptoted at B-field higher values. The velocities and frequencies are compared to standard drifts and plasma waves such as E x B drift, electrostatic ion cyclotron, magnetosonic and various drift waves. The empirically approximated dispersion relation yielded a characteristic velocity that matched the ion acoustic speed for 5 eV electrons that exist in the near-anode and near-field plume regions of the discharge channel based on internal measurements. Thruster performance has been linked to operating mode where thrust-to-power is maximized when azimuthal spokes are present so investigating the underlying mechanism of spokes will benefit thruster operation.

  14. Cylindrical geometry hall thruster

    DOEpatents

    Raitses, Yevgeny; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method for thrusting plasma, utilizing a Hall thruster with a cylindrical geometry, wherein ions are accelerated in substantially the axial direction. The apparatus is suitable for operation at low power. It employs small size thruster components, including a ceramic channel, with the center pole piece of the conventional annular design thruster eliminated or greatly reduced. Efficient operation is accomplished through magnetic fields with a substantial radial component. The propellant gas is ionized at an optimal location in the thruster. A further improvement is accomplished by segmented electrodes, which produce localized voltage drops within the thruster at optimally prescribed locations. The apparatus differs from a conventional Hall thruster, which has an annular geometry, not well suited to scaling to small size, because the small size for an annular design has a great deal of surface area relative to the volume.

  15. High Throughput 600 Watt Hall Effect Thruster for Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szabo, James; Pote, Bruce; Tedrake, Rachel; Paintal, Surjeet; Byrne, Lawrence; Hruby, Vlad; Kamhawi, Hani; Smith, Tim

    2016-01-01

    A nominal 600-Watt Hall Effect Thruster was developed to propel unmanned space vehicles. Both xenon and iodine compatible versions were demonstrated. With xenon, peak measured thruster efficiency is 46-48% at 600-W, with specific impulse from 1400 s to 1700 s. Evolution of the thruster channel due to ion erosion was predicted through numerical models and calibrated with experimental measurements. Estimated xenon throughput is greater than 100 kg. The thruster is well sized for satellite station keeping and orbit maneuvering, either by itself or within a cluster.

  16. Hall Effect Thruster Ground Testing Challenges

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-18

    high purity propellent to eliminate the risk of oxidation poisoning the thermionically emitting electron/neutralizer source drive the entire Hall effect...Mason, L., Jankovsky, R., Snyder, J. S., Malone , S., Haas, J., and Gallimore, A. D., “Spacecraft Interaction Test Results for the High Performance

  17. Optimization of Cylindrical Hall Thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Yevgeny Raitses, Artem Smirnov, Erik Granstedt, and Nathaniel J. Fi

    2007-07-24

    The cylindrical Hall thruster features high ionization efficiency, quiet operation, and ion acceleration in a large volume-to-surface ratio channel with performance comparable with the state-of-the-art annular Hall thrusters. These characteristics were demonstrated in low and medium power ranges. Optimization of miniaturized cylindrical thrusters led to performance improvements in the 50-200W input power range, including plume narrowing, increased thruster efficiency, reliable discharge initiation, and stable operation. __________________________________________________

  18. Optimization of Cylindrical Hall Thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Yevgeny Raitses, Artem Smirnov, Erik Granstedt, and Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2007-11-27

    The cylindrical Hall thruster features high ionization efficiency, quiet operation, and ion acceleration in a large volume-to-surface ratio channel with performance comparable with the state-of-the-art annular Hall thrusters. These characteristics were demonstrated in low and medium power ranges. Optimization of miniaturized cylindrical thrusters led to performance improvements in the 50-200W input power range, including plume narrowing, increased thruster efficiency, reliable discharge initiation, and stable operation.

  19. Krypton charge exchange cross sections for Hall effect thruster models

    SciTech Connect

    Hause, Michael L.; Prince, Benjamin D.; Bemish, Raymond J.

    2013-04-28

    Following discharge from a Hall effect thruster, charge exchange occurs between ions and un-ionized propellant atoms. The low-energy cations produced can disturb operation of onboard instrumentation or the thruster itself. Charge-exchange cross sections for both singly and doubly charged propellant atoms are required to model these interactions. While xenon is the most common propellant currently used in Hall effect thrusters, other propellants are being considered, in particular, krypton. We present here guided-ion beam measurements and comparisons to semiclassical calculations for Kr{sup +} + Kr and Kr{sup 2+} + Kr cross sections. The measurements of symmetric Kr{sup +} + Kr charge exchange are in good agreement with both the calculations including spin-orbit effects and previous measurements. For the symmetric Kr{sup 2+} + Kr reaction, we present cross section measurements for center-of-mass energies between 1 eV and 300 eV, which spans energies not previously examined experimentally. These cross section measurements compare well with a simple one-electron transfer model. Finally, cross sections for the asymmetric Kr{sup 2+} + Kr {yields} Kr{sup +} + Kr{sup +} reaction show an onset near 12 eV, reaching cross sections near constant value of 1.6 A{sup 2} with an exception near 70-80 eV.

  20. Hall Effect Thruster Plume Contamination and Erosion Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of the Hall effect thruster plume contamination and erosion study was to evaluate the impact of a xenon ion plume on various samples placed in the vicinity of a Hall effect thruster for a continuous 100 hour exposure. NASA Glenn Research Center was responsible for the pre- and post-test evaluation of three sample types placed around the thruster: solar cell cover glass, RTV silicone, and Kapton(R). Mass and profilometer), were used to identify the degree of deposition and/or erosion on the solar cell cover glass, RTV silicone, and Kapton@ samples. Transmittance, reflectance, solar absorptance, and room temperature emittance were used to identify the degree of performance degradation of the solar cell cover glass samples alone. Auger spectroscopy was used to identify the chemical constituents found on the surface of the exposed solar cell cover glass samples. Chemical analysis indicated some boron nitride contamination on the samples, from boron nitride insulators used in the body of the thruster. However, erosion outweighted contamination. All samples exhibited some degree of erosion. with the most erosion occurring near the centerline of the plume and the least occurring at the +/- 90 deg positions. For the solar cell cover glass samples, erosion progressed through the antireflective coating and into the microsheet glass itself. Erosion occurred in the solar cell cover glass, RTV silicone and Kapton(R) at different rates. All optical properties changed with the degree of erosion, with solar absorptance and room temperature emittance increasing with erosion. The transmittance of some samples decreased while the reflectance of some samples increased and others decreased. All results are consistent with an energetic plume of xenon ions serving as a source for erosion.

  1. Perturbation analysis of ionization oscillations in Hall effect thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, Kentaro Sekerak, Michael J.; Boyd, Iain D.; Gallimore, Alec D.

    2014-12-15

    A perturbation analysis of ionization oscillations, which cause low frequency oscillations of the discharge plasma, in Hall effect thrusters is presented including the electron energy equation in addition to heavy-species transport. Excitation and stabilization of such oscillations, often called the breathing mode, are discussed in terms of the growth rate obtained from the linear perturbation equations of the discharge plasma. The instability induced from the ionization occurs only when the perturbation in the electron energy is included while the neutral atom flow contributes to the damping of the oscillation. Effects of the electron energy loss mechanisms such as wall heat loss, inelastic collisions, and convective heat flux are discussed. It is shown that the ionization oscillations can be damped when the electron transport is reduced and the electron temperature increases so that the energy loss to the wall stabilizes the ionization instability.

  2. Effects of wall electrodes on Hall effect thruster plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Langendorf, S. Walker, M.; Xu, K.

    2015-02-15

    This paper investigates the physical mechanisms that cause beneficial and detrimental performance effect observed to date in Hall effect thrusters with wall electrodes. It is determined that the wall electrode sheath can reduce ion losses to the wall if positioned near the anode (outside the dense region of the plasma) such that an ion-repelling sheath is able to form. The ability of the wall electrode to form an ion-repelling sheath is inversely proportional to the current drawn—if the wall electrode becomes the dominant sink for the thruster discharge current, increases in wall electrode bias result in increased local plasma potential rather than an ion-repelling sheath. A single-fluid electron flow model gives results that mimic the observed potential structures and the current-sharing fractions between the anode and wall electrodes, showing that potential gradients in the presheath and bulk plasma come at the expense of current draw to the wall electrodes. Secondary electron emission from the wall electrodes (or lack thereof) is inferred to have a larger effect if the electrodes are positioned near the exit plane than if positioned near the anode, due to the difference in energy deposition from the plasma.

  3. Numerical study of influence of hydrogen backflow on krypton Hall effect thruster plasma focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Shilin; Ding, Yongjie; Wei, Liqiu; Hu, Yanlin; Li, Jie; Ning, Zhongxi; Yu, Daren

    2017-03-01

    The influence of backflow hydrogen on plasma plume focusing of a krypton Hall effect thruster is studied via a numerical simulation method. Theoretical analysis indicates that hydrogen participates in the plasma discharge process, changes the potential and ionization distribution in the thruster discharge cavity, and finally affects the plume focusing within a vacuum vessel.

  4. Characterization of Hall effect thruster propellant distributors with flame visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langendorf, S.; Walker, M. L. R.

    2013-01-01

    A novel method for the characterization and qualification of Hall effect thruster propellant distributors is presented. A quantitative measurement of the azimuthal number density uniformity, a metric which impacts propellant utilization, is obtained from photographs of a premixed flame anchored on the exit plane of the propellant distributor. The technique is demonstrated for three propellant distributors using a propane-air mixture at reservoir pressure of 40 psi (gauge) (377 kPa) exhausting to atmosphere, with volumetric flow rates ranging from 15-145 cfh (7.2-68 l/min) with equivalence ratios from 1.2 to 2.1. The visualization is compared with in-vacuum pressure measurements 1 mm downstream of the distributor exit plane (chamber pressure held below 2.7 × 10-5 Torr-Xe at all flow rates). Both methods indicate a non-uniformity in line with the propellant inlet, supporting the validity of the technique of flow visualization with flame luminosity for propellant distributor characterization. The technique is applied to a propellant distributor with a manufacturing defect in a known location and is able to identify the defect and characterize its impact. The technique is also applied to a distributor with numerous small orifices at the exit plane and is able to resolve the resulting non-uniformity. Luminosity data are collected with a spatial resolution of 48.2-76.1 μm (pixel width). The azimuthal uniformity is characterized in the form of standard deviation of azimuthal luminosities, normalized by the mean azimuthal luminosity. The distributors investigated achieve standard deviations of 0.346 ± 0.0212, 0.108 ± 0.0178, and 0.708 ± 0.0230 mean-normalized luminosity units respectively, where a value of 0 corresponds to perfect uniformity and a value of 1 represents a standard deviation equivalent to the mean.

  5. Power Reduction of the Air-Breathing Hall-Effect Thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sungrae

    Electric propulsion system is spotlighted as the next generation space propulsion system due to its benefits; one of them is specific impulse. While there are a lot of types in electric propulsion system, Hall-Effect Thruster, one of electric propulsion system, has higher thrust-to-power ratio and requires fewer power supplies for operation in comparison to other electric propulsion systems, which means it is optimal for long space voyage. The usual propellant for Hall-Effect Thruster is Xenon and it is used to be stored in the tank, which may increase the weight of the thruster. Therefore, one theory that uses the ambient air as a propellant has been proposed and it is introduced as Air-Breathing Hall-Effect Thruster. Referring to the analysis on Air-Breathing Hall-Effect Thruster, the goal of this paper is to reduce the power of the thruster so that it can be applied to real mission such as satellite orbit adjustment. To reduce the power of the thruster, two assumptions are considered. First one is changing the altitude for the operation, while another one is assuming the alpha value that is electron density to ambient air density. With assumptions above, the analysis was done and the results are represented. The power could be decreased to 10s˜1000s with the assumptions. However, some parameters that do not satisfy the expectation, which would be the question for future work, and it will be introduced at the end of the thesis.

  6. Background Pressure Effects on Krypton Hall Effect Thruster Internal Acceleration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    Technical Paper 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) August 2013- September 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Background Pressure Effects on Krypton Hall Effect...Conference 2013, Washington, D.C., 6-10 October 2013. 14. ABSTRACT This study uses krypton propellant in a medium power Hall effect to amplify the...effect of background pressure due to the greater mobility of neutral krypton compared to neutral xenon. The use of krypton amplifies the effect of

  7. Enhanced Performance of Cylindrical Hall Thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Raitses, A. Smirnov, and N.J. Fisch

    2007-05-14

    The cylindrical thruster differs significantly in its underlying physical mechanisms from the conventional annular Hall thruster. It features high ionization efficiency, quiet operation, ion acceleration in a large volume-to-surface ratio channel, and performance comparable with the state-of-the-art conventional Hall thrusters. Very significant plume narrowing, accompanied by the increase of the energetic ion fraction and improvement of ion focusing, led to 50%–60% increase of the thruster anode efficiency. These improvements were achieved by overrunning the discharge current in the magnetized thruster plasma.

  8. High Performance Power Module for Hall Effect Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinero, Luis R.; Peterson, Peter Y.; Bowers, Glen E.

    2002-01-01

    Previous efforts to develop power electronics for Hall thruster systems have targeted the 1 to 5 kW power range and an output voltage of approximately 300 V. New Hall thrusters are being developed for higher power, higher specific impulse, and multi-mode operation. These thrusters require up to 50 kW of power and a discharge voltage in excess of 600 V. Modular power supplies can process more power with higher efficiency at the expense of complexity. A 1 kW discharge power module was designed, built and integrated with a Hall thruster. The breadboard module has a power conversion efficiency in excess of 96 percent and weighs only 0.765 kg. This module will be used to develop a kW, multi-kW, and high voltage power processors.

  9. Empirical electron cross-field mobility in a Hall effect thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Garrigues, L.; Perez-Luna, J.; Lo, J.; Hagelaar, G. J. M.; Boeuf, J. P.; Mazouffre, S.

    2009-10-05

    Electron transport across the magnetic field in Hall effect thrusters is still an open question. Models have so far assumed 1/B{sup 2} or 1/B scaling laws for the 'anomalous' electron mobility, adjusted to reproduce the integrated performance parameters of the thruster. We show that models based on such mobility laws predict very different ion velocity distribution functions (IVDF) than measured by laser induced fluorescence (LIF). A fixed spatial mobility profile, obtained by analysis of improved LIF measurements, leads to much better model predictions of thruster performance and IVDF than 1/B{sup 2} or 1/B mobility laws for discharge voltages in the 500-700 V range.

  10. Mode Transitions in Magnetically Shielded Hall Effect Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekerak, Michael J.; Longmier, Benjamin W.; Gallimore, Alec D.; Huang, Wensheng; Kamhawi, Hani; Hofer, Richard R.; Jorns, Benjamin A.; Polk, James E.

    2014-01-01

    A mode transition study is conducted in magnetically shielded thrusters where the magnetic field magnitude is varied to induce mode transitions. Three different oscillatory modes are identified with the 20-kW NASA-300MS-2 and the 6-kW H6MS: Mode 1) global mode similar to unshielded thrusters at low magnetic fields, Mode 2) cathode oscillations at nominal magnetic fields, and Mode 3) combined spoke, cathode and breathing mode oscillations at high magnetic fields. Mode 1 exhibits large amplitude, low frequency (1-10 kHz), breathing mode type oscillations where discharge current mean value and oscillation amplitude peak. The mean discharge current is minimized while thrust-to-power and anode efficiency are maximized in Mode 2, where higher frequency (50-90 kHz), low amplitude, cathode oscillations dominate. Thrust is maximized in Mode 3 and decreases by 5-6% with decreasing magnetic field strength. The presence or absence of spokes and strong cathode oscillations do not affect each other or discharge current. Similar to unshielded thrusters, mode transitions and plasma oscillations affect magnetically shielded thruster performance and should be characterized during system development.

  11. Hall-effect Thruster Channel Surface Properties Investigation (PREPRINT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-03

    this study show differences in boron nitride channel surface properties from beginning-of-life and after 100’s of hours of operation. Two worn thruster...operation. Results from this study show differences in boron nitride channel surface properties from beginning-of-life and after 100’s of hours of...H 3 Properties of the HET channel wall affect SEE, anomalous electron transport, and near-wall conductivity, thereby altering HET performance

  12. Performance Characterization of a Three-Axis Hall Effect Thruster

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    especially solar arrays. The ob- vious solution is to orient the thruster plume away from sensitive areas and to avoid the spacecraft entirely if...ion current at a point in the plasma. When ions strike the probe electrons move to the collector plate which is measured by the probe as the ion...and strike the collector plate. The current value is determined by measuring the voltage drop across a resistor which separates the collector plate

  13. Cylindrical Hall Thrusters with Permanent Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Raitses, Yevgeny; Merino, Enrique; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2010-10-18

    The use of permanent magnets instead of electromagnet coils for low power Hall thrusters can offer a significant reduction of both the total electric power consumption and the thruster mass. Two permanent magnet versions of the miniaturized cylindrical Hall thruster (CHT) of different overall dimensions were operated in the power range of 50W-300 W. The discharge and plasma plume measurements revealed that the CHT thrusters with permanent magnets and electromagnet coils operate rather differently. In particular, the angular ion current density distribution from the permanent magnet thrusters has an unusual halo shape, with a majority of high energy ions flowing at large angles with respect to the thruster centerline. Differences in the magnetic field topology outside the thruster channel and in the vicinity of the channel exit are likely responsible for the differences in the plume characteristics measured for the CHTs with electromagnets and permanent magnets. It is shown that the presence of the reversing-direction or cusp-type magnetic field configuration inside the thruster channel without a strong axial magnetic field outside the thruster channel does not lead to the halo plasma plume from the CHT. __________________________________________________

  14. Cylindrical Hall thrusters with permanent magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raitses, Yevgeny; Merino, Enrique; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2010-11-01

    The use of permanent magnets instead of electromagnet coils for low power Hall thrusters can offer a significant reduction in both the total electric power consumption and the thruster mass. Two permanent magnet versions of the miniaturized cylindrical Hall thruster (CHT) of different overall dimensions were operated in the power range of 50-300 W. The discharge and plasma plume measurements revealed that the CHT thrusters with permanent magnets and electromagnet coils operate rather differently. In particular, the angular ion current density distribution from the permanent magnet thrusters has an unusual halo shape, with a majority of high energy ions flowing at large angles with respect to the thruster centerline. Differences in the magnetic field topology outside the thruster channel and in the vicinity of the channel exit are likely responsible for the differences in the plume characteristics measured for the CHTs with electromagnets and permanent magnets. It is shown that the presence of the reversing-direction or cusp-type magnetic field configuration inside the thruster channel without a strong axial magnetic field outside the thruster channel does not lead to the halo plasma plume from the CHT.

  15. Analysis of Air Breathing Hall-Effect Thruster (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    for public release; dlistribution is unlimited 1 n; = ion number density npl = number density of plasma p electric power put. imo the discharge...thruster chamber. Since the third assumption of the model is that the plasma is quasineutral, in Eq. (18) in the expression for je we have used npl ...lo:ts lass 7t · Cro - ~’u ) · e · npl · V ,?,drift + e · ngus · Vo · ffJ = Ewall + Ejer + Ea,od~ , (22) where the left-hand side of Eq. (22) is the

  16. Cathode Effects in Cylindrical Hall Thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Granstedt, E.M.; Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N. J.

    2008-09-12

    Stable operation of a cylindrical Hall thruster (CHT) has been achieved using a hot wire cathode, which functions as a controllable electron emission source. It is shown that as the electron emission from the cathode increases with wire heating, the discharge current increases, the plasma plume angle reduces, and the ion energy distribution function shifts toward higher energies. The observed effect of cathode electron emission on thruster parameters extends and clarifies performance improvements previously obtained for the overrun discharge current regime of the same type of thruster, but using a hollow cathode-neutralizer. Once thruster discharge current saturates with wire heating, further filament heating does not affect other discharge parameters. The saturated values of thruster discharge parameters can be further enhanced by optimal placement of the cathode wire with respect to the magnetic field.

  17. Demonstration of Laser-Induced Fluorescence on Krypton Hall Effect Thruster

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-10

    Conference Paper 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Demonstration of Laser-Induced Fluorescence on Krypton Hall Effect...Sep 2011. 14. ABSTRACT There is growing interest within the electrostatic propulsion community for the use of krypton as a propellant. It is a...probe thruster krypton propellant acceleration with the minimum disturbance to the overall propellant stream similar to those already developed for

  18. Far-Field Plume Measurements of a Nested-Channel Hall-Effect Thruster (PREPRINT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-13

    nude Faraday probe, retarding potential analyzer, and ExB probe. Data from these probes were used to calculate utilization efficiencies from existing...USA Far-field plume measurements were performed on the X2 nested-channel Hall-effect thruster using an ar- ray of diagnostics, including a nude Faraday...mode to nested-channel mode by utilizing a traditional array of far-field diagnostics, which include a nude Faraday probe, retarding potential analyzer

  19. Influence of oblique magnetic field on electron cross-field transport in a Hall effect thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Miedzik, Jan; Daniłko, Dariusz; Barral, Serge

    2015-04-15

    The effects of the inclination of the magnetic field with respect to the channel walls in a Hall effect thruster are numerically studied with the use of a one-dimensional quasi-neutral Particle-In-Cell model with guiding center approximation of electron motion along magnetic lines. Parametric studies suggest that the incidence angle strongly influences electron transport across the magnetic field. In ion-focusing magnetic topologies, electrons collide predominantly on the side of the magnetic flux tube closer to the anode, thus increasing the electron cross-field drift. The opposite effect is observed in ion-defocussing topology.

  20. Silicon Carbide (SiC) Power Processing Unit (PPU) for Hall Effect Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reese, Bradley

    2015-01-01

    Arkansas Power Electronics International (APEI), Inc., is developing a high-efficiency, radiation-hardened 3.8-kW SiC power supply for the PPU of Hall effect thrusters. This project specifically targets the design of a PPU for the high-voltage Hall accelerator (HiVHAC) thruster, with target specifications of 80- to 160-V input, 200- to 700-V/5A output, efficiency greater than 96 percent, and peak power density in excess of 2.5 kW/kg. The PPU under development uses SiC junction field-effect transistor power switches, components that APEI, Inc., has irradiated under total ionizing dose conditions to greater than 3 MRad with little to no change in device performance.

  1. Characteristics and transport effects of the electron drift instability in Hall-effect thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafleur, T.; Baalrud, S. D.; Chabert, P.

    2017-02-01

    The large electron {E}× {B} drift (relative to the ions) in the azimuthal direction of Hall-effect thrusters is well known to excite a strong instability. In a recent paper (Lafleur et al 2016 Phys. Plasmas 23 053503) we demonstrated that this instability leads to an enhanced electron–ion friction force that increases the electron cross-field mobility to levels similar to those seen experimentally. Here we extend this work by considering in detail the onset criteria for the formation of this instability (both in xenon, and other propellants of interest), and identify a number of important characteristics that it displays within Hall-effect thrusters (HETs): including the appearance of an additional non-dimensionalized scaling parameter (the instability growth-to-convection ratio), which controls the instability evolution and amplitude. We also investigate the effect that the instability has on electron and ion heating in HETs, and show that it leads to an ion rotation in the azimuthal direction that is in agreement with that seen experimentally.

  2. Compact High Current Rare-Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode for Hall Effect Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofer, Richard R. (Inventor); Goebel, Dan M. (Inventor); Watkins, Ronnie M. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An apparatus and method for achieving an efficient central cathode in a Hall effect thruster is disclosed. A hollow insert disposed inside the end of a hollow conductive cathode comprises a rare-earth element and energized to emit electrons from an inner surface. The cathode employs an end opening having an area at least as large as the internal cross sectional area of the rare earth insert to enhance throughput from the cathode end. In addition, the cathode employs a high aspect ratio geometry based on the cathode length to width which mitigates heat transfer from the end. A gas flow through the cathode and insert may be impinged by the emitted electrons to yield a plasma. One or more optional auxiliary gas feeds may also be employed between the cathode and keeper wall and external to the keeper near the outlet.

  3. High Voltage Solar Array ARC Testing for a Direct Drive Hall Effect Thruster System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, T.; Vaughn, J.; Carruth, M. R.; Mikellides, I. G.; Jongeward, G. A.; Peterson, T.; Kerslake, T. W.; Snyder, D.; Ferguson, D.; Hoskins, A.

    2003-01-01

    The deleterious effects of spacecraft charging are well known, particularly when the charging leads to arc events. The damage that results from arcing can severely reduce system lifetime and even cause critical system failures. On a primary spacecraft system such as a solar array, there is very little tolerance for arcing. Motivated by these concerns, an experimental investigation was undertaken to determine arc thresholds for a high voltage (200-500 V) solar array in a plasma environment. The investigation was in support of a NASA program to develop a Direct Drive Hall-Effect Thruster (112HET) system. By directly coupling the solar array to a Hall-effect thruster, the D2HET program seeks to reduce mass, cost and complexity commonly associated with the power processing in conventional power systems. In the investigation, multiple solar array technologies and configurations were tested. The cell samples were biased to a negative voltage, with an applied potential difference between them, to imitate possible scenarios in solar array strings that could lead to damaging arcs. The samples were tested in an environment that emulated a low-energy, HET-induced plasma. Short duration "trigger" arcs as well as long duration "sustained" arcs were generated. Typical current and voltage waveforms associated with the arc events are presented. Arc thresholds are also defined in terms of vo!tage, (current and power. The data will be used to propose a new, high-voltage (>300 V) solar array design for which the likelihood of damage from arcing is minimal.

  4. High Voltage Solar Array Arc Testing for a Direct Drive Hall Effect Thruster System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Todd; Carruth, M. R., Jr.; Vaughn, J. A.; Jongeward, G. A.; Mikellides, I. G.; Ferguson, D.; Kerslake, T. W.; Peterson, T.; Snyder, D.; Hoskins, A.

    2004-01-01

    The deleterious effects of spacecraft charging are well known, particularly when the charging leads to arc events. The damage that results from arcing can severely reduce system lifetime and even cause critical system failures. On a primary spacecraft system such as a solar array, there is very little tolerance for arcing. Motivated by these concerns, an experimental investigation was undertaken to determine arc thresholds for a high voltage (200-500 V) solar array in a plasma environment. The investigation was in support of a NASA program to develop a Direct Drive Hall-Effect Thruster (D2HET) system. By directly coupling the solar array to a Hall-effect thruster, the D2HET program seeks to reduce mass, cost and complexity commonly associated with the power processing in conventional power systems. In the investigation, multiple solar array technologies and configurations were tested. The cell samples were biased to a negative voltage, with an applied potential difference between them, to imitate possible scenarios in solar array strings that could lead to damaging arcs. The samples were tested in an environment that emulated a low-energy, HET-induced plasma. Short duration trigger arcs as well as long duration sustained arcs were generated. Typical current and voltage waveforms associated with the arc events are presented. Arc thresholds are also defined in terms of voltage, current and power. The data will be used to propose a new, high-voltage (greater than 300 V) solar array design for which the likelihood of damage from arcing is minimal.

  5. Satellite propulsion spectral signature detection and analysis through Hall effect thruster plume and atmospheric modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Pamela; Cobb, Richard; Hartsfield, Carl; Prince, Benjamin

    2016-09-01

    Space Situational Awareness (SSA) is of utmost importance in today's congested and contested space environment. Satellites must perform orbital corrections for station keeping, devices like high efficiency electric propulsion systems such as a Hall effect thrusters (HETs) to accomplish this are on the rise. The health of this system is extremely important to ensure the satellite can maintain proper position and perform its intended mission. Electron temperature is a commonly used diagnostic to determine the efficiency of a hall thruster. Recent papers have coordinated near infrared (NIR) spectral measurements of emission lines in xenon and krypton to electron temperature measurements. Ground based observations of these spectral lines could allow the health of the thruster to be determined while the satellite is in operation. Another issue worth considering is the availability of SSA assets for ground-based observations. The current SSA architecture is limited and task saturated. If smaller telescopes, like those at universities, could successfully detect these signatures they could augment data collection for the SSA network. To facilitate this, precise atmospheric modeling must be used to pull out the signature. Within the atmosphere, the NIR has a higher transmission ratio and typical HET propellants are approximately 3x the intensity in the NIR versus the visible spectrum making it ideal for ground based observations. The proposed research will focus on developing a model to determine xenon and krypton signatures through the atmosphere and estimate the efficacy through ground-based observations. The model will take power modes, orbit geometries, and satellite altitudes into consideration and be correlated with lab and field observations.

  6. A non-invasive Hall current distribution measurement system for Hall Effect thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullins, Carl Raymond

    A direct, accurate method to measure thrust produced by a Hall Effect thruster on orbit does not currently exist. The ability to calculate produced thrust will enable timely and precise maneuvering of spacecraft---a capability particularly important to satellite formation flying. The means to determine thrust directly is achievable by remotely measuring the magnetic field of the thruster and solving the inverse magnetostatic problem for the Hall current density distribution. For this thesis, the magnetic field was measured by employing an array of eight tunneling magnetoresistive (TMR) sensors capable of milligauss sensitivity when placed in a high background field. The array was positioned outside the channel of a 1.5 kW Colorado State University Hall thruster equipped with a center-mounted electride cathode. In this location, the static magnetic field is approximately 30 Gauss, which is within the linear operating range of the TMR sensors. Furthermore, the induced field at this distance is greater than tens of milligauss, which is within the sensitivity range of the TMR sensors. Due to the nature of the inverse problem, the induced-field measurements do not provide the Hall current density by a simple inversion; however, a Tikhonov regularization of the induced field along with a non-negativity constraint and a zero boundary condition provides current density distributions. Our system measures the sensor outputs at 2 MHz allowing the determination of the Hall current density distribution as a function of time. These data are shown in contour plots in sequential frames. The measured ratios between the average Hall current and the discharge current ranged from 0.1 to 10 over a range of operating conditions from 1.3 kW to 2.2 kW. The temporal inverse solution at 2.0 kW exhibited a breathing mode of 37 kHz, which was in agreement with temporal measurements of the discharge current.

  7. Performance, Facility Pressure Effects, and Stability Characterization Tests of NASA's Hall Effect Rocket with Magnetic Shielding Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Huang, Wensheng; Haag, Thomas; Yim, John; Herman, Daniel; Peterson, Peter Y.; Williams, George J.; Gilland, James; Hofer, Richard; Mikellides, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Hall Effect Rocket with Magnetic Shielding (HERMeS) 12.5 kW Technology Demonstration Unit-1 (TDU-1) has been the subject of extensive technology maturation in preparation for flight system development. Part of the technology maturation effort included experimental evaluation of the TDU-1 thruster with conducting and dielectric front pole cover materials in two different electrical configurations. A graphite front magnetic pole cover thruster configuration with the thruster body electrically tied to cathode, and an alumina front pole cover thruster configuration with the thruster body floating were evaluated. Both configurations were also evaluated at different facility background pressure conditions to evaluate background pressure effects on thruster operation. Performance characterization tests found that higher thruster performance was attained with the graphite front pole cover configuration with the thruster electrically tied to cathode. A total thrust efficiency of 68% and a total specific impulse of 2,820 s was demonstrated at a discharge voltage of 600 V and a discharge power of 12.5 kW. Thruster stability regimes were characterized with respect to the thruster discharge current oscillations and with maps of the discharge current-voltage-magnetic field (IVB). Analysis of TDU-1 discharge current waveforms found that lower normalized discharge current peak-to-peak and root mean square magnitudes were attained when the thruster was electrically floated with alumina front pole covers. Background pressure effects characterization tests indicated that the thruster performance and stability were mostly invariant to changes in the facility background pressure for vacuum chamber pressure below 1×10-5 Torr-Xe (for thruster flow rates of 20.5 mg/s). Power spectral density analysis of the discharge current waveforms showed that increasing the vacuum chamber background pressure resulted in a higher discharge current dominant breathing mode frequency. Finally, IVB

  8. Manual modification and plasma exposure of boron nitride ceramic to study Hall effect thruster plasma channel material erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satonik, Alexander J.

    Worn Hall effect thrusters (HET) show a variety of unique microstructures and elemental compositions in the boron nitride thruster channel walls. Worn thruster channels are typically created by running test thrusters in vacuum chambers for hundreds of hours. Studies were undertaken to manually modify samples of boron nitride without the use of a hall effect thruster. Samples were manually abraded with an abrasive blaster and sandpaper, in addition to a vacuum heater. Some of these samples were further exposed to a xenon plasma in a magnetron sputter device. Sandpaper and abrasive blaster tests were used to modify surface roughness values of the samples from 10,000 A to 150,000 A, matching worn thruster values. Vacuum heat treatments were performed on samples. These treatments showed the ability to modify chemical compositions of boron nitride samples, but not in a manner matching changes seen in worn thruster channels. Plasma erosion rate was shown to depend on the grade of the BN ceramic and the preparation of the surface prior to plasma exposure. Abraded samples were shown to erode 43% more than their pristine counterparts. Unique surface features and elemental compositions on the worn thruster channel samples were overwritten by new surface features on the ceramic grains. The microscope images of the ceramic surface show that the magnetron plasma source rounded the edges of the ceramic grains to closely match the worn HET surface. This effect was not as pronounced in studies of ion beam bombardment of the surface and appears to be a result of the quasi-neutral plasma environment.

  9. Studies of anode sheath phenomena in a Hall-effect thruster discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorf, Leonid

    2005-10-01

    Crossed electric and magnetic fields devices (plasma thrusters, magnetrons, coaxial plasma guns, plasma opening switches, etc.) are routinely used for plasma production and in other applications. Despite these numerous applications, the fundamental anode sheath phenomena in many of these devices have received surprisingly little experimental scrutiny. We chose a Hall-effect thruster (HT) discharge for our study of the anode sheath. It has been typically assumed in most fluid models of an HT that its steady-state operation requires the presence of a negative anode fall (electron-repelling anode sheath). Such anode fall behavior, opposite to that in typical glow discharges or hollow-anode plasma sources, is the result of a relatively high degree of ionization in HTs, achieved by applying a radial magnetic field transverse to the direction of the discharge current. Our data from non-perturbing probe measurements showed for the first time that the anode fall in HTs can be either negative or positive (electron-attracting anode sheath), depending on conditions at the anode surface. The path for current closure to the anode turns out to be quite subtle in HTs. This path determines the mechanism of the anode fall formation. In varying the magnetic field topology in the channel from a more uniform to a cusp-like one, we uncover intriguing results. For cusp configurations, in which the radial magnetic field changes polarity somewhere along the channel, the anode fall is positive, whereas it is negative for a more uniform field. This polarity difference could be attributed to the decreased electron mobility across the magnetic field in the cusp-like configuration. Our theoretical modeling of the anode sheath correlates well with the experimental results in describing how the magnitude of the sheath varies with the discharge voltage and mass flow rate.

  10. Spectral analysis of Hall-effect thruster plasma oscillations based on the empirical mode decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Kurzyna, J.; Mazouffre, S.; Lazurenko, A.; Albarede, L.; Bonhomme, G.; Makowski, K.; Dudeck, M.; Peradzynski, Z.

    2005-12-15

    Hall-effect thruster plasma oscillations recorded by means of probes located at the channel exit are analyzed using the empirical mode decomposition (EMD) method. This self-adaptive technique permits to decompose a nonstationary signal into a set of intrinsic modes, and acts as a very efficient filter allowing to separate contributions of different underlying physical mechanisms. Applying the Hilbert transform to the whole set of modes allows to identify peculiar events and to assign them a range of instantaneous frequency and power. In addition to 25 kHz breathing-type oscillations which are unambiguously identified, the EMD approach confirms the existence of oscillations with instantaneous frequencies in the range of 100-500 kHz typical for ion transit-time oscillations. Modeling of high-frequency modes ({nu}{approx}10 MHz) resulting from EMD of measured wave forms supports the idea that high-frequency plasma oscillations originate from electron-density perturbations propagating azimuthally with the electron drift velocity.

  11. Computed versus measured ion velocity distribution functions in a Hall effect thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Garrigues, L.; Mazouffre, S.; Bourgeois, G.

    2012-06-01

    We compare time-averaged and time-varying measured and computed ion velocity distribution functions in a Hall effect thruster for typical operating conditions. The ion properties are measured by means of laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Simulations of the plasma properties are performed with a two-dimensional hybrid model. In the electron fluid description of the hybrid model, the anomalous transport responsible for the electron diffusion across the magnetic field barrier is deduced from the experimental profile of the time-averaged electric field. The use of a steady state anomalous mobility profile allows the hybrid model to capture some properties like the time-averaged ion mean velocity. Yet, the model fails at reproducing the time evolution of the ion velocity. This fact reveals a complex underlying physics that necessitates to account for the electron dynamics over a short time-scale. This study also shows the necessity for electron temperature measurements. Moreover, the strength of the self-magnetic field due to the rotating Hall current is found negligible.

  12. Numerical simulation of geometric scale effects in cylindrical self-field MPD thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lapointe, M.

    1992-01-01

    A 2-D, two-temperature, single fluid magnetohydrodynamic code which incorporates classical plasma transport coefficients and Hall effects was developed to predict steady-state, self-field magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster performance. The governing equations and numerical methods of solution are outlined and discussed. Experimental comparisons are used to validate model predictions. The model accurately predicts thrust and reproduces trends in the discharge voltage for discharge currents below experimentally measured onset values. However, because the model does not include electrode effects, the calculated voltage drops are significantly lower than experimentally measured values. Predictions of thrust and flow efficiency are made for a matrix of fifteen cylindrical thruster geometries, assuming a fully ionized argon propellant. A maximum predicted specific impulse of 1680 s is obtained for a thruster with an anode radius of 2.5 cm, a cathode radius of 0.5 cm, and equal electrode lengths of 2.5 cm. A scaling relation is developed to predict, within limits, the onset of cylindrical, self-field thruster instability as a function of geometry and operating condition.

  13. Search for the Frequency Content of Hall Effect Thruster HF Electrostatic Wave with the Hilbert-Huang Method

    SciTech Connect

    Kurzyna, J.; Makowski, K.; Lazurenko, A.; Mazouffre, S.; Dudeck, M.; Bonhomme, G.; Peradzynski, Z.

    2006-01-15

    Hall Effect Thruster (HET) plasma oscillations are studied. A set of antennas and an electric probe is used to pick-up the signals. All the detectors are located in the thruster channel exit plane, at its outer circumference, close to the zone of maximum magnetic barrier of SPT100-ML device. Each non-stationary signal is expanded into a finite set of intrinsic modes with the use of Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) method. Characteristic bands of instantaneous frequency and power are filtered out by means of Hilbert transform. The analysis is applied to signals recorded in different operating conditions of the HET. The HF oscillations in the frequency range of {approx} 1 divide 20 MHz are identified as an electrostatic drift wave propagating along the thruster azimuth. In this band the decrease of discharge voltage results in less defined and broadened frequency spectrum when compared to nominal operating conditions.

  14. Plasma Interactions with High Voltage Solar Arrays for a Direct Drive Hall Effect Thruster System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, T.; Horvater, M. A.; Vaughn, J.; Carruth, M. R.; Jongeward, G. A.; Mikellides, I. G.

    2003-01-01

    The Environmental Effects Group of NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is conducting research into the effects of plasma interaction with high voltage solar arrays. These high voltage solar arrays are being developed for a direct drive Hall Effect Thruster propulsion system. A direct drive system configuration will reduce power system mass by eliminating a conventional power-processing unit. The Environmental Effects Group has configured two large vacuum chambers to test different high-voltage array concepts in a plasma environment. Three types of solar arrays have so far been tested, an International Space Station (ISS) planar array, a Tecstar planar array, and a Tecstar solar concentrator array. The plasma environment was generated using a hollow cathode plasma source, which yielded densities between 10(exp 6) - 10(exp 7) per cubic centimeter and electron temperatures of 0.5-1 eV. Each array was positioned in this plasma and biased in the -500 to + 500 volt range. The current collection was monitored continuously. In addition, the characteristics of arcing, snap over, and other features, were recorded. Analysis of the array performance indicates a time dependence associated with the current collection as well as a tendency for "conditioning" over a large number of runs. Mitigation strategies, to reduce parasitic current collection, as well as arcing, include changing cover-glass geometry and layout as well as shielding the solar cell edges. High voltage performance data for each of the solar array types tested will be presented. In addition, data will be provided to indicate the effectiveness of the mitigation techniques.

  15. A study of cylindrical Hall thruster for low power space applications

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Raitses; N.J. Fisch; K.M. Ertmer; C.A. Burlingame

    2000-07-27

    A 9 cm cylindrical thruster with a ceramic channel exhibited performance comparable to the state-of-the-art Hall thrusters at low and moderate power levels. Significantly, its operation is not accompanied by large amplitude discharge low frequency oscillations. Preliminary experiments on a 2 cm cylindrical thruster suggest the possibility of a high performance micro Hall thruster.

  16. Controlling the Plasma Flow in the Miniaturized Cylindrical Hall Thruster

    SciTech Connect

    A. Smirnov, Y. Raitses and N.J. Fisch

    2008-03-04

    A substantial narrowmg of the plume of the cylindrical RaIl thruster (CRT) was observed upon the enhancement of the electron emission from the hollow cathode discharge, which implies the possibility for the thruster efficiency increase due to the ion beam focusing. It is demonstrated that the miniaturized CRT can be operated in the non-self-sustained regime, with the discharge current limited by the cathode electron emission. The thruster operation in this mode greatly expands the range of the plasma and discharge parameters normally accessible for the CRT.

  17. Assessment of High-Voltage Photovoltaic Technologies for the Design of a Direct Drive Hall Effect Thruster Solar Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, I. G.; Jongeward, G. A.; Schneider, T.; Carruth, M. R.; Peterson, T.; Kerslake, T. W.; Snyder, D.; Ferguson, D.; Hoskins, A.

    2004-01-01

    A three-year program to develop a Direct Drive Hall-Effect Thruster system (D2HET) begun in 2001 as part of the NASA Advanced Cross-Enterprise Technology Development initiative. The system, which is expected to reduce significantly the power processing, complexity, weight, and cost over conventional low-voltage systems, will employ solar arrays that operate at voltages higher than (or equal to) 300 V. The lessons learned from the development of the technology also promise to become a stepping-stone for the production of the next generation of power systems employing high voltage solar arrays. This paper summarizes the results from experiments conducted mainly at the NASA Marshal Space Flight Center with two main solar array technologies. The experiments focused on electron collection and arcing studies, when the solar cells operated at high voltages. The tests utilized small coupons representative of each solar array technology. A hollow cathode was used to emulate parts of the induced environment on the solar arrays, mostly the low-energy charge-exchange plasma (1012-1013 m-3 and 0.5-1 eV). Results and conclusions from modeling of electron collection are also summarized. The observations from the total effort are used to propose a preliminary, new solar array design for 2 kW and 30-40 kW class, deep space missions that may employ a single or a cluster of Hall- Effect thrusters.

  18. Performance of a Low-Power Cylindrical Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Markusic, Thomas E.; Stanojev, Boris J.; Dehoyos, Amado; Raitses, Yevgeny; Smirnov, Artem; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2007-01-01

    Recent mission studies have shown that a Hall thruster which operates at relatively constant thrust efficiency (45-55%) over a broad power range (300W - 3kW) is enabling for deep space science missions when compared with slate-of-the-art ion thrusters. While conventional (annular) Hall thrusters can operate at high thrust efficiency at kW power levels, it is difficult to construct one that operates over a broad power envelope down to 0 (100 W) while maintaining relatively high efficiency. In this note we report the measured performance (I(sub sp), thrust and efficiency) of a cylindrical Hall thruster operating at 0 (100 W) input power.

  19. Performance and Thermal Characterization of the NASA-300MS 20 kW Hall Effect Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Huang, Wensheng; Haag, Thomas; Shastry, Rohit; Soulas, George; Smith, Timothy; Mikellides, Ioannis; Hofer, Richard

    2013-01-01

    NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate is sponsoring the development of a high fidelity 15 kW-class long-life high performance Hall thruster for candidate NASA technology demonstration missions. An essential element of the development process is demonstration that incorporation of magnetic shielding on a 20 kW-class Hall thruster will yield significant improvements in the throughput capability of the thruster without any significant reduction in thruster performance. As such, NASA Glenn Research Center and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory collaborated on modifying the NASA-300M 20 kW Hall thruster to improve its propellant throughput capability. JPL and NASA Glenn researchers performed plasma numerical simulations with JPL's Hall2De and a commercially available magnetic modeling code that indicated significant enhancement in the throughput capability of the NASA-300M can be attained by modifying the thruster's magnetic circuit. This led to modifying the NASA-300M magnetic topology to a magnetically shielded topology. This paper presents performance evaluation results of the two NASA-300M magnetically shielded thruster configurations, designated 300MS and 300MS-2. The 300MS and 300MS-2 were operated at power levels between 2.5 and 20 kW at discharge voltages between 200 and 700 V. Discharge channel deposition from back-sputtered facility wall flux, and plasma potential and electron temperature measurements made on the inner and outer discharge channel surfaces confirmed that magnetic shielding was achieved. Peak total thrust efficiency of 64% and total specific impulse of 3,050 sec were demonstrated with the 300MS-2 at 20 kW. Thermal characterization results indicate that the boron nitride discharge chamber walls temperatures are approximately 100 C lower for the 300MS when compared to the NASA- 300M at the same thruster operating discharge power.

  20. Hall-Effect Thruster Simulations with 2-D Electron Transport and Hydrodynamic Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Hofer, Richard H.; Goebel, Dan M.

    2009-01-01

    A computational approach that has been used extensively in the last two decades for Hall thruster simulations is to solve a diffusion equation and energy conservation law for the electrons in a direction that is perpendicular to the magnetic field, and use discrete-particle methods for the heavy species. This "hybrid" approach has allowed for the capture of bulk plasma phenomena inside these thrusters within reasonable computational times. Regions of the thruster with complex magnetic field arrangements (such as those near eroded walls and magnets) and/or reduced Hall parameter (such as those near the anode and the cathode plume) challenge the validity of the quasi-one-dimensional assumption for the electrons. This paper reports on the development of a computer code that solves numerically the 2-D axisymmetric vector form of Ohm's law, with no assumptions regarding the rate of electron transport in the parallel and perpendicular directions. The numerical challenges related to the large disparity of the transport coefficients in the two directions are met by solving the equations in a computational mesh that is aligned with the magnetic field. The fully-2D approach allows for a large physical domain that extends more than five times the thruster channel length in the axial direction, and encompasses the cathode boundary. Ions are treated as an isothermal, cold (relative to the electrons) fluid, accounting for charge-exchange and multiple-ionization collisions in the momentum equations. A first series of simulations of two Hall thrusters, namely the BPT-4000 and a 6-kW laboratory thruster, quantifies the significance of ion diffusion in the anode region and the importance of the extended physical domain on studies related to the impact of the transport coefficients on the electron flow field.

  1. Transition in Electron Transport in a Cylindrical Hall Thruster

    SciTech Connect

    J.B. Parker, Y. Raitses, and N.J. Fisch

    2010-06-02

    Through the use of high-speed camera and Langmuir probe measurements in a cylindrical Hall thruster, we report the discovery of a rotating spoke of increased plasma density and light emission which correlates with increased electron transport across the magnetic field. As cathode electron emission is increased, a sharp transition occurs where the spoke disappears and electron transport decreases. This suggests that a significant fraction of the electron current might be directed through the spoke.

  2. Performance and Facility Background Pressure Characterization Tests of NASAs 12.5-kW Hall Effect Rocket with Magnetic Shielding Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Huang, Wensheng; Haag, Thomas; Shastry, Rohit; Thomas, Robert; Yim, John; Herman, Daniel; Williams, George; Myers, James; Hofer, Richard; Mikellides, Ioannis; Sekerak, Michael; Polk, James

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) Solar Electric Propulsion Technology Demonstration Mission (SEP/TDM) project is funding the development of a 12.5-kW Hall thruster system to support future NASA missions. The thruster designated Hall Effect Rocket with Magnetic Shielding (HERMeS) is a 12.5-kW Hall thruster with magnetic shielding incorporating a centrally mounted cathode. HERMeS was designed and modeled by a NASA GRC and JPL team and was fabricated and tested in vacuum facility 5 (VF5) at NASA GRC. Tests at NASA GRC were performed with the Technology Development Unit 1 (TDU1) thruster. TDU1's magnetic shielding topology was confirmed by measurement of anode potential and low electron temperature along the discharge chamber walls. Thermal characterization tests indicated that during full power thruster operation at peak magnetic field strength, the various thruster component temperatures were below prescribed maximum allowable limits. Performance characterization tests demonstrated the thruster's wide throttling range and found that the thruster can achieve a peak thruster efficiency of 63% at 12.5 kW 500 V and can attain a specific impulse of 3,000 s at 12.5 kW and a discharge voltage of 800 V. Facility background pressure variation tests revealed that the performance, operational characteristics, and magnetic shielding effectiveness of the TDU1 design were mostly insensitive to increases in background pressure.

  3. Non-invasive Hall current distribution measurement in a Hall effect thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullins, Carl R.; Farnell, Casey C.; Farnell, Cody C.; Martinez, Rafael A.; Liu, David; Branam, Richard D.; Williams, John D.

    2017-01-01

    A means is presented to determine the Hall current density distribution in a closed drift thruster by remotely measuring the magnetic field and solving the inverse problem for the current density. The magnetic field was measured by employing an array of eight tunneling magnetoresistive (TMR) sensors capable of milligauss sensitivity when placed in a high background field. The array was positioned just outside the thruster channel on a 1.5 kW Hall thruster equipped with a center-mounted hollow cathode. In the sensor array location, the static magnetic field is approximately 30 G, which is within the linear operating range of the TMR sensors. Furthermore, the induced field at this distance is approximately tens of milligauss, which is within the sensitivity range of the TMR sensors. Because of the nature of the inverse problem, the induced-field measurements do not provide the Hall current density by a simple inversion; however, a Tikhonov regularization of the induced field does provide the current density distributions. These distributions are shown as a function of time in contour plots. The measured ratios between the average Hall current and the average discharge current ranged from 6.1 to 7.3 over a range of operating conditions from 1.3 kW to 2.2 kW. The temporal inverse solution at 1.5 kW exhibited a breathing mode frequency of 24 kHz, which was in agreement with temporal measurements of the discharge current.

  4. Non-invasive Hall current distribution measurement in a Hall effect thruster.

    PubMed

    Mullins, Carl R; Farnell, Casey C; Farnell, Cody C; Martinez, Rafael A; Liu, David; Branam, Richard D; Williams, John D

    2017-01-01

    A means is presented to determine the Hall current density distribution in a closed drift thruster by remotely measuring the magnetic field and solving the inverse problem for the current density. The magnetic field was measured by employing an array of eight tunneling magnetoresistive (TMR) sensors capable of milligauss sensitivity when placed in a high background field. The array was positioned just outside the thruster channel on a 1.5 kW Hall thruster equipped with a center-mounted hollow cathode. In the sensor array location, the static magnetic field is approximately 30 G, which is within the linear operating range of the TMR sensors. Furthermore, the induced field at this distance is approximately tens of milligauss, which is within the sensitivity range of the TMR sensors. Because of the nature of the inverse problem, the induced-field measurements do not provide the Hall current density by a simple inversion; however, a Tikhonov regularization of the induced field does provide the current density distributions. These distributions are shown as a function of time in contour plots. The measured ratios between the average Hall current and the average discharge current ranged from 6.1 to 7.3 over a range of operating conditions from 1.3 kW to 2.2 kW. The temporal inverse solution at 1.5 kW exhibited a breathing mode frequency of 24 kHz, which was in agreement with temporal measurements of the discharge current.

  5. Ion Velocity and Plasma Potential Measurements of a Cylindrical Cusped Field Thruster

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-19

    Thrusters. Journal of Propulsion and Power. 1998;14(5):736–743. [4] Raitses Y, Fisch NJ. Parametric investigations of a nonconventional Hall thruster...Astronautics; 2009. . [7] Raitses Y, Granstedt E, Smirnov A, Merino E, Fisch NJ. Effects of Cathode Electron Emission on Hall Thruster Discharge. In...Proceedings of the 44th AIAA/ASME/SAE/ASEE Joint Propulsion Conference & Exhibit; 2008. . [8] Raitses Y, Smirnov A, Fisch NJ. Cylindrical Hall Thrusters. In

  6. Magnetic field configurations on thruster performance in accordance with ion beam characteristics in cylindrical Hall thruster plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Holak; Choe, Wonho; Lim, Youbong; Lee, Seunghun; Park, Sanghoo

    2017-03-01

    Magnetic field configuration is critical in Hall thrusters for achieving high performance, particularly in thrust, specific impulse, efficiency, etc. Ion beam features are also significantly influenced by magnetic field configurations. In two typical magnetic field configurations (i.e., co-current and counter-current configurations) of a cylindrical Hall thruster, ion beam characteristics are compared in relation to multiply charged ions. Our study shows that the co-current configuration brings about high ion current (or low electron current), high ionization rate, and small plume angle that lead to high thruster performance.

  7. Ion Velocity Distribution in a Low-Power Cylindrical Hall Thruster

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    S. A. and Fisch , N. J., “Cylindrical Hall Thrusters,” Proceedings of the 37th AIAA Plasmadynamics and Lasers Conference, No. AIAA-2006-3245, American...Channel of Low-Power Hall Thruster,” IEEE Transactions on Plasma Science, Vol. 36, No. 5, October 2008, pp. 1989–1997. 4Raitses, Y., S. A. and Fisch , N. J... Fisch , N. J., “Enhanced Ionization in the Cylindrical Hall Thruster,” Journal of Applied Physics, Vol. 94, No. 2, 2003. 16Gildea, S. R., B. O. and

  8. Electron Cross-field Transport in a Low Power Cylindrical Hall Thruster

    SciTech Connect

    A. Smirnov; Y. Raitses; N.J. Fisch

    2004-06-24

    Conventional annular Hall thrusters become inefficient when scaled to low power. Cylindrical Hall thrusters, which have lower surface-to-volume ratio, are therefore more promising for scaling down. They presently exhibit performance comparable with conventional annular Hall thrusters. Electron cross-field transport in a 2.6 cm miniaturized cylindrical Hall thruster (100 W power level) has been studied through the analysis of experimental data and Monte Carlo simulations of electron dynamics in the thruster channel. The numerical model takes into account elastic and inelastic electron collisions with atoms, electron-wall collisions, including secondary electron emission, and Bohm diffusion. We show that in order to explain the observed discharge current, the electron anomalous collision frequency {nu}{sub B} has to be on the order of the Bohm value, {nu}{sub B} {approx} {omega}{sub c}/16. The contribution of electron-wall collisions to cross-field transport is found to be insignificant.

  9. Electron Cross-field Transport in a Miniaturized Cylindrical Hall Thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov Artem, Raitses Yevgeny, Fisch Nathaniel J

    2005-10-14

    Conventional annular Hall thrusters become inefficient when scaled to low power. Cylindrical Hall thrusters, which have lower surface-to-volume ratio, are more promising for scaling down. They presently exhibit performance comparable with conventional annular Hall thrusters. The present paper gives a review of the experimental and numerical investigations of electron crossfield transport in the 2.6 cm miniaturized cylindrical Hall thruster (100 W power level). We show that, in order to explain the discharge current observed for the typical operating conditions, the electron anomalous collision frequency {nu}{sub b} has to be on the order of the Bohm value, {nu}{sub B} {approx} {omega}{sub c}/16. The contribution of electron-wall collisions to cross-field transport is found to be insignificant. The optimal regimes of thruster operation at low background pressure (below 10{sup -5} Torr) in the vacuum tank appear to be different from those at higher pressure ({approx} 10{sup -4} Torr).

  10. Cylindrical Langmuir probe measurements in an ion thruster plume

    SciTech Connect

    Semak, V.V.; Keefer, D.

    1995-12-31

    Cylindrical Langmuir probe measurements have been made in the exhaust plume of a 15 cm diameter three-grid ion thruster. Xenon gas was used as a propellant. The experiments were performed in a large vacuum chamber with background pressure values of 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} Torr and 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} Torr. A 250 {micro}m diameter tungsten probe 2.78 mm long was used in the experiments. The data collected for radial and axial scans were analyzed to provide measurements of electron temperature, plasma potential and electron density. It was found that, unlike the case of a stationary plasma, the electron saturation current is only several times higher than ion current. Small errors in the determination of the ion current component of the characteristic curve can result in significant overestimation of electron temperature. A method of data analysis was developed which includes an estimation of the collected ion current. This method is compared with a numerical particle simulation model for calculation of the ion current component.

  11. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Velocity Measurements of a Low Power Cylindrical Hall Thruster

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-25

    Y., S. A. and Fisch , N. J., “Enhanced perfor- mance of cylindrical Hall thrusters,” Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 90, No. 221502, 2007. 3Hargus Jr., W...12Raitses, Y., S. A. and Fisch , N. J., “Cylindrical Hall Thrusters,” Proceedings of the 37th AIAA Plasmadynamics and Lasers Conference, No. AIAA-2006-3245...American Insti- tute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, June 2006. 13Smirnov, A., R. Y. and Fisch , N. J., “Enhanced Ion- ization in the Cylindrical Hall

  12. Electron Transport and Ion Acceleration in a Low-power Cylindrical Hall Thruster

    SciTech Connect

    A. Smirnov; Y. Raitses; N.J. Fisch

    2004-06-24

    Conventional annular Hall thrusters become inefficient when scaled to low power. Cylindrical Hall thrusters, which have lower surface-to-volume ratio, are therefore more promising for scaling down. They presently exhibit performance comparable with conventional annular Hall thrusters. Electron cross-field transport in a 2.6 cm miniaturized cylindrical Hall thruster (100 W power level) has been studied through the analysis of experimental data and Monte Carlo simulations of electron dynamics in the thruster channel. The numerical model takes into account elastic and inelastic electron collisions with atoms, electron-wall collisions, including secondary electron emission, and Bohm diffusion. We show that in order to explain the observed discharge current, the electron anomalous collision frequency {nu}{sub B} has to be on the order of the Bohm value, {nu}{sub B} {approx} {omega}{sub c}/16. The contribution of electron-wall collisions to cross-field transport is found to be insignificant. The plasma density peak observed at the axis of the 2.6 cm cylindrical Hall thruster is likely to be due to the convergent flux of ions, which are born in the annular part of the channel and accelerated towards the thruster axis.

  13. 2D particle-in-cell simulations of the electron drift instability and associated anomalous electron transport in Hall-effect thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croes, Vivien; Lafleur, Trevor; Bonaventura, Zdeněk; Bourdon, Anne; Chabert, Pascal

    2017-03-01

    In this work we study the electron drift instability in Hall-effect thrusters (HETs) using a 2D electrostatic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. The simulation is configured with a Cartesian coordinate system modeling the radial-azimuthal (r{--}θ ) plane for large radius thrusters. A magnetic field, {{B}}0, is aligned along the Oy axis (r direction), a constant applied electric field, {{E}}0, along the Oz axis (perpendicular to the simulation plane), and the {{E}}0× {{B}}0 direction is along the Ox axis (θ direction). Although electron transport can be well described by electron–neutral collisions for low plasma densities, at high densities (similar to those in typical HETs), a strong instability is observed that enhances the electron cross-field mobility; even in the absence of electron–neutral collisions. The instability generates high frequency (of the order of MHz) and short wavelength (of the order of mm) fluctuations in both the azimuthal electric field and charged particle densities, and propagates in the {{E}}0× {{B}}0 direction with a velocity close to the ion sound speed. The correlation between the electric field and density fluctuations (which leads to an enhanced electron–ion friction force) is investigated and shown to be directly responsible for the increased electron transport. Results are compared with a recent kinetic theory, showing good agreement with the instability properties and electron transport.

  14. Numerical simulation of cylindrical, self-field MPD thrusters with multiple propellants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapointe, Michael R.

    1994-03-01

    A two-dimensional, two-temperature, single fluid MHD code was used to predict the performance of cylindrical, self-field magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters operated with argon, lithium, and hydrogen propellants. A thruster stability equation was determined relating maximum stable J(sup 2)/m values to cylindrical thruster geometry and propellant species. The maximum value of J(sup 2)/m was found to scale as the inverse of the propellant molecular weight to the 0.57 power, in rough agreement with limited experimental data which scales as the inverse square root of the propellant molecular weight. A general equation which relates total thrust to electromagnetic thrust, propellant molecular weight, and J(sup 2)/m was determined using reported thrust values for argon and hydrogen and calculated thrust values for lithium. In addition to argon, lithium, and hydrogen, the equation accurately predicted thrust for ammonia at sufficiently high J(sup 2)/m values. A simple algorithm is suggested to aid in the preliminary design of cylindrical, self-field MPD thrusters. A brief example is presented to illustrate the use of the algorithm in the design of a low power MPD thruster.

  15. Ion velocity and plasma potential measurements of a cylindrical cusped field thruster

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, N. A.; Young, C. V.; Cappelli, M. A.; Hargus, W. A. Jr.

    2012-05-01

    Measurements of the most probable time-averaged axial ion velocities and plasma potential within the acceleration channel and in the plume of a straight-channeled cylindrical cusped field thruster operating on xenon are presented. Ion velocities for the thruster are derived from laser-induced fluorescence measurements of the 5d[4]{sub 7/2}-6p[3]{sub 5/2} xenon ion excited state transition centered at {lambda}=834.72nm. Plasma potential measurements are made using a floating emissive probe with a thoriated-tungsten filament. The thruster is operated in a power matched condition with 300 V applied anode potential for comparison to previous krypton plasma potential measurements, and a low power condition with 150 V applied anode potential. Correlations are seen between the plasma potential drop outside of the thruster and kinetic energy contours of the accelerating ions.

  16. Hall Effect Thruster Interactions Data From the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sitnikova, N.; Volkov, D.; Maximov, I.; Petrusevich, V.; Allen, D.

    2003-01-01

    This 12-part report documents the data obtained from various sensor measurements taken aboard the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 spacecraft in Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO). These GEO communications satellites, which were designed and built by NPO Prikladnoy Mekhaniki (NPO PM) of Zheleznogorsk, Russia, utilize Hall thruster propulsion systems for north-south and east-west stationkeeping and as of June 2002, were still operating at 80 E. and 11 W., respectively. Express-A2 was launched on March 12, 2000, while Express-A3 was launched on June 24, 2000. The diagnostic equipment from which these data were taken includes electric field strength sensors, ion current and energy sensors, and pressure sensors. The diagnostics and the Hall thruster propulsion systems are described in detail along with lists of tabular data from those diagnostics and propulsion system and other satellite systems. Space Power, Inc., now part of Pratt & Whitney's Chemical Systems Division, under contract NAS3 99151 to the NASA Glenn Research Center, obtained these data over several periods from March 12, 2000, through September 30, 2001. Each of the 12 individual reports describe, in detail, the propulsion systems as well as the diagnostic sensors utilized. Finally, parts 11 and 12 include the requirements to which NPO PM prepared and delivered these data.

  17. Performance characteristics according to the channel length and magnetic fields of cylindrical Hall thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jongsub; Seo, Mihui; Seon, Jongho; June Lee, Hae; Choe, Wonho

    2011-09-01

    Performance characteristics of low power cylindrical Hall thrusters are investigated in terms of the length of the discharge channel. Thrust, efficiency, discharge current, and propellant utilization are evaluated for different channel lengths of 19, 22, and 25 mm. It is found that the propellant utilization and ion energy distribution function are strongly associated with the channel length. Increase of thrust and efficiency are also found with increasing channel lengths. These characteristics of the thruster are interpreted with possible generation of multi-charged ions due to increased residing time within the extended space inside the channel.

  18. 2D Particle-In-Cell simulations of the electron-cyclotron instability and associated anomalous transport in Hall-Effect Thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croes, Vivien; Lafleur, Trevor; Bonaventura, Zdenek; Péchereau, François; Bourdon, Anne; Chabert, Pascal

    2016-09-01

    This work studies the electron-cyclotron instability in Hall-Effect Thrusters (HETs) using a 2D Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulation. The simulation is configured with a Cartesian coordinate system where a magnetic field, B0, is aligned along the X-axis (radial direction, including absorbing walls), a constant electric field, E0, along the Z-axis (axial direction, perpendicular to simulation plane), and the E0xB0 direction along the Y-axis (O direction, with periodic boundaries). Although for low plasma densities classical electron-neutral collisions theory describes well electron transport, at sufficiently high densities (as measured in HETs) a strong instability can be observed that enhances the electron mobility, even in the absence of collisions. The instability generates high frequency ( MHz) and short wavelength ( mm) fluctuations in both the electric field and charged particle densities. We investigate the correlation between these fluctuations and their role with anomalous electron transport; complementing previous 1D simulations. Plasma is self-consistently heated by the instability, but since the latter does not reach saturation in an infinitely long 2D system, saturation is achieved through implementation of a finite axial length that models convection in E0 direction. With support of Safran Aircraft Engines.

  19. Systems and methods for cylindrical hall thrusters with independently controllable ionization and acceleration stages

    DOEpatents

    Diamant, Kevin David; Raitses, Yevgeny; Fisch, Nathaniel Joseph

    2014-05-13

    Systems and methods may be provided for cylindrical Hall thrusters with independently controllable ionization and acceleration stages. The systems and methods may include a cylindrical channel having a center axial direction, a gas inlet for directing ionizable gas to an ionization section of the cylindrical channel, an ionization device that ionizes at least a portion of the ionizable gas within the ionization section to generate ionized gas, and an acceleration device distinct from the ionization device. The acceleration device may provide an axial electric field for an acceleration section of the cylindrical channel to accelerate the ionized gas through the acceleration section, where the axial electric field has an axial direction in relation to the center axial direction. The ionization section and the acceleration section of the cylindrical channel may be substantially non-overlapping.

  20. Cross-field electron transport induced by a rotating spoke in a cylindrical Hall thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, C. L.; Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N. J.

    2012-01-01

    Rotating spoke phenomena have been observed in a variety of Hall thruster and other E × B devices. It has been suggested that the spoke may be associated with the enhancement of the electron cross-field transport. In this paper, the current conducted across the magnetic field via a rotating spoke has been directly measured for the first time in the E × B discharge of a cylindrical Hall thruster. The spoke current was measured using a segmented anode. Synchronized measurements with a high speed camera and a four-segment anode allow observation of the current as a function of time and azimuthal position. Upwards of 50% of the total current is conducted through the spoke, which occupies a quarter of the Hall thruster channel area. To determine the transport mechanism, emissive and Langmuir probes were installed to measure fluctuating plasma potential, electron density, and temperature. A perturbed, azimuthal electric field and density are observed to oscillate in-phase with the rotating spoke. The resulting drift current is found to enhance electron transport with a magnitude equal to the spoke current to within margins of error.

  1. Confinement effect of cylindrical-separatrix-type magnetic field on the plume of magnetic focusing type Hall thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Daren; Meng, Tianhang; Ning, Zhongxi; Liu, Hui

    2017-04-01

    A magnetic focusing type Hall thruster was designed with a cylindrical magnetic seperatrix. During the process of a hollow cathode crossing the separatrix, the variance of plume parameter distribution was monitored. Results show that the ion flux on the large spatial angle is significantly lower when the hollow cathode is located in the inner magnetic field. This convergence effect is preserved even in a distant area. A mechanism was proposed for plume divergence from the perspective of cathode-to-plume potential difference, through which the confinement effect of cylindrical-separatrix-type magnetic field on thruster plume was confirmed and proposed as a means of plume protection for plasma propulsion devices.

  2. Integration Tests of the 4 kW-Class High Voltage Hall Accelerator Power Processing Unit with the HiVHAc and the SPT-140 Hall Effect Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Pinero, Luis; Haag, Thomas; Huang, Wensheng; Ahern, Drew; Liang, Ray; Shilo, Vlad

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Science Mission Directorate is sponsoring the development of a 4 kW-class Hall propulsion system for implementation in NASA science and exploration missions. The main components of the system include the High Voltage Hall Accelerator (HiVHAc), an engineering model power processing unit (PPU) developed by Colorado Power Electronics, and a xenon flow control module (XFCM) developed by VACCO Industries. NASA Glenn Research Center is performing integrated tests of the Hall thruster propulsion system. This paper presents results from integrated tests of the PPU and XFCM with the HiVHAc engineering development thruster and a SPT-140 thruster provided by Space System Loral. The results presented in this paper demonstrate thruster discharge initiation along with open-loop and closed-loop control of the discharge current with anode flow for both the HiVHAc and the SPT-140 thrusters. Integrated tests with the SPT-140 thruster indicated that the PPU was able to repeatedly initiate the thruster's discharge, achieve steady state operation, and successfully throttle the thruster between 1.5 and 4.5 kW. The measured SPT-140 performance was identical to levels reported by Space Systems Loral.

  3. A type of cylindrical Hall thruster with a magnetically insulated anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yongjie, Ding; Yu, Xu; Wuji, Peng; Liqiu, Wei; Hongbo, Su; Hezhi, Sun; Peng, Li; Hong, Li; Daren, Yu

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, a type of magnetically insulated anode structure is proposed for the design of a low-power cylindrical Hall thruster. The magnetic field distribution in the channel is guided by the magnetically insulated anode, altering the intersection status of the magnetic field line passing through the anode and wall. Experimental and simulation results show that a high potential is formed near the wall by the magnetically insulated anode. As the ionization moves towards the outlet, the energy and flux of the ions bombarding the channel wall can be reduced effectively. Due to the reduction in the bombardment of the wall from high-energy ions, the thrust and specific impulse greatly increase compared with those of the non-magnetically insulated anode. For anode mass flow rates of 0.3 and 0.35 mg s‑1 and discharge voltages in the 100–200 V range, the thrust can be increased by more than 33% and the anode efficiency can be improved by more than 7%. Meanwhile, the length of the sputtering area is clearly reduced. The starting position of the sputtering area is in front of the magnetic pole, which can effectively prolong the service life of the thruster.

  4. Diagnostics Systems for Permanent Hall Thrusters Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Jose Leonardo; Soares Ferreira, Ivan; Santos, Jean; Miranda, Rodrigo; Possa, M. Gabriela

    Thruster (PMHET), developed at the Plasma Physics Laboratory of UnB. The idea of using an array of permanent magnets, instead of an electromagnet, to produce a radial magnetic field inside the cylindrical plasma drift channel of the thruster is very attractive, especially because of the possibility of developing a HET with power consumption low enough to be used in small satellites or medium-size satellites with low on board power. Hall-Effect Thrusters are now a very good option for spacecraft primary propulsion and also for station-keeping of medium and large satellites. This is because of their high specific impulse, efficient use of propellant mass and combined low and precise thrust capabilities, which are related to an economy in terms of propellant mass utilization , longer satellite lifetime and easier spacecraft maneuvering in microgravity environment. The first HETs were developed in the mid 1950’s, and they were first called Closed Drift Thrusters. Today, the successful use of electric thrusters for attitude control and orbit modification on hundreds of satellites shows the advanced stage of development of this technology. In addition to this, after the success of space missions such as Deep Space One and Dawn (NASA), Hayabusa (JAXA) and Smart-1 (ESA), the employment of electric thrusters is also consolidated for the primary propulsion of spacecraft. This success is mainly due to three factors: reliability of this technology; efficiency of propellant utilization, and therefore reduction of the initial mass of the ship; possibility of operation over long time intervals, with practically unlimited cycling and restarts. This thrusting system is designed to be used in satellite attitude control and long term space missions. One of the greatest advantage of this kind of thruster is the production of a steady state magnetic field by permanent magnets providing electron trapping and Hall current generation within a significant decrease on the electric energy supply

  5. HALL EFFECT INVESTIGATIONS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    INTERMETALLIC COMPOUNDS, *SEMICONDUCTING FILMS, *THIN FILM STORAGE DEVICES, ANTIMONY ALLOYS, CRYSTALLIZATION, ELECTRODES, ELECTROMAGNETIC PROPERTIES, EVAPORATION, HALL EFFECT , HEAT TREATMENT, INDIUM ALLOYS, ELECTRICAL RESISTANCE.

  6. Observation of a high-energy tail in ion energy distribution in the cylindrical Hall thruster plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Youbong; Kim, Holak; Choe, Wonho Lee, Seung Hun; Seon, Jongho; Lee, Hae June

    2014-10-15

    A novel method is presented to determine populations and ion energy distribution functions (IEDFs) of individual ion species having different charge states in an ion beam from the measured spectrum of an E × B probe. The inversion of the problem is performed by adopting the iterative Tikhonov regularization method with the characteristic matrices obtained from the calculated ion trajectories. In a cylindrical Hall thruster plasma, an excellent agreement is observed between the IEDFs by an E × B probe and those by a retarding potential analyzer. The existence of a high-energy tail in the IEDF is found to be mainly due to singly charged Xe ions, and is interpreted in terms of non-linear ion acceleration.

  7. Mode Transitions in Hall Effect Thrusters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    Al2O3), silicon carbide ( SiC ) and graphite (C). The significant differences being ion bombardment sputter yield and secondary electron emission...channel cross-section is radially symmetric about ( mirrored above and below) discharge channel centerline from the anode to the exit plane, whereas

  8. Azimuthal Spoke Propagation in Hall Effect Thrusters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    group velocity, m s−1 vph = phase velocity, m s−1 vs = ion acoustic velocity, m s−1 vsp = spoke velocity, m s−1 vspj,k = spoke velocity from bin n to m...phase velocity, vph , and group velocity, vgr, from the dispersion relation in Eq. (7) are vph = ω kθ = [ vαch − ( ωch kθ )α]1/α (9) vgr = ∂ω ∂kθ = vph ...vch vph )α (10) Eq. (9) shows that the phase velocity will always be less than the characteristic velocity and Eq. (10) shows the group velocity will

  9. Hall Effect Spintronics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    spin-transfer torque gives rise to magnetization reversal and excitation of spin-waves in ferromagnet /normal- metal / ferromagnet trilayers (F/N/F...applications based on the extraordinary Hall effect (EHE). The work was focused on three major tasks: 1. Preparation and study of CoPd multilayers ...D. Rosenblatt, M. Karpovski and A. Gerber, Reversal of the Extraordinary Hall Effect polarity in thin Co-Pd multilayers ., Appl. Phys. Lett., 96

  10. Magnetic circuit for hall effect plasma accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manzella, David H. (Inventor); Jacobson, David T. (Inventor); Jankovsky, Robert S. (Inventor); Hofer, Richard (Inventor); Peterson, Peter (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A Hall effect plasma accelerator includes inner and outer electromagnets, circumferentially surrounding the inner electromagnet along a thruster centerline axis and separated therefrom, inner and outer magnetic conductors, in physical connection with their respective inner and outer electromagnets, with the inner magnetic conductor having a mostly circular shape and the outer magnetic conductor having a mostly annular shape, a discharge chamber, located between the inner and outer magnetic conductors, a magnetically conducting back plate, in magnetic contact with the inner and outer magnetic conductors, and a combined anode electrode/gaseous propellant distributor, located at a bottom portion of the discharge chamber. The inner and outer electromagnets, the inner and outer magnetic conductors and the magnetically conducting back plate form a magnetic circuit that produces a magnetic field that is largely axial and radially symmetric with respect to the thruster centerline.

  11. Hall Effect in a Plasma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunkel, W. B.

    1981-01-01

    Describes an apparatus and procedure for conducting an undergraduate laboratory experiment to quantitatively study the Hall effect in a plasma. Includes background information on the Hall effect and rationale for conducting the experiment. (JN)

  12. Nonlocal Anomalous Hall Effect.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Steven S-L; Vignale, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    The anomalous Hall (AH) effect is deemed to be a unique transport property of ferromagnetic metals, caused by the concerted action of spin polarization and spin-orbit coupling. Nevertheless, recent experiments have shown that the effect also occurs in a nonmagnetic metal (Pt) in contact with a magnetic insulator [yttrium iron garnet (YIG)], even when precautions are taken to ensure that there is no induced magnetization in the metal. We propose a theory of this effect based on the combined action of spin-dependent scattering from the magnetic interface and the spin-Hall effect in the bulk of the metal. At variance with previous theories, we predict the effect to be of first order in the spin-orbit coupling, just as the conventional anomalous Hall effect-the only difference being the spatial separation of the spin-orbit interaction and the magnetization. For this reason we name this effect the nonlocal anomalous Hall effect and predict that its sign will be determined by the sign of the spin-Hall angle in the metal. The AH conductivity that we calculate from our theory is in order of magnitude agreement with the measured values in Pt/YIG structures.

  13. Spin Hall effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinova, Jairo; Valenzuela, Sergio O.; Wunderlich, J.; Back, C. H.; Jungwirth, T.

    2015-10-01

    Spin Hall effects are a collection of relativistic spin-orbit coupling phenomena in which electrical currents can generate transverse spin currents and vice versa. Despite being observed only a decade ago, these effects are already ubiquitous within spintronics, as standard spin-current generators and detectors. Here the theoretical and experimental results that have established this subfield of spintronics are reviewed. The focus is on the results that have converged to give us the current understanding of the phenomena, which has evolved from a qualitative to a more quantitative measurement of spin currents and their associated spin accumulation. Within the experimental framework, optical-, transport-, and magnetization-dynamics-based measurements are reviewed and linked to both phenomenological and microscopic theories of the effect. Within the theoretical framework, the basic mechanisms in both the extrinsic and intrinsic regimes are reviewed, which are linked to the mechanisms present in their closely related phenomenon in ferromagnets, the anomalous Hall effect. Also reviewed is the connection to the phenomenological treatment based on spin-diffusion equations applicable to certain regimes, as well as the spin-pumping theory of spin generation used in many measurements of the spin Hall angle. A further connection to the spin-current-generating spin Hall effect to the inverse spin galvanic effect is given, in which an electrical current induces a nonequilibrium spin polarization. This effect often accompanies the spin Hall effect since they share common microscopic origins. Both can exhibit the same symmetries when present in structures comprising ferromagnetic and nonmagnetic layers through their induced current-driven spin torques or induced voltages. Although a short chronological overview of the evolution of the spin Hall effect field and the resolution of some early controversies is given, the main body of this review is structured from a pedagogical

  14. Nonlocal Anomalous Hall Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Steven S.-L.; Vignale, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    The anomalous Hall (AH) effect is deemed to be a unique transport property of ferromagnetic metals, caused by the concerted action of spin polarization and spin-orbit coupling. Nevertheless, recent experiments have shown that the effect also occurs in a nonmagnetic metal (Pt) in contact with a magnetic insulator [yttrium iron garnet (YIG)], even when precautions are taken to ensure that there is no induced magnetization in the metal. We propose a theory of this effect based on the combined action of spin-dependent scattering from the magnetic interface and the spin-Hall effect in the bulk of the metal. At variance with previous theories, we predict the effect to be of first order in the spin-orbit coupling, just as the conventional anomalous Hall effect—the only difference being the spatial separation of the spin-orbit interaction and the magnetization. For this reason we name this effect the nonlocal anomalous Hall effect and predict that its sign will be determined by the sign of the spin-Hall angle in the metal. The AH conductivity that we calculate from our theory is in order of magnitude agreement with the measured values in Pt /YIG structures.

  15. Nonlocal anomalous Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shulei; Vignale, Giovanni

    Anomalous Hall effect (AHE) is a distinctive transport property of ferromagnetic metals arising from spin orbit coupling (SOC) in concert with spontaneous spin polarization. Nonetheless, recent experiments have shown that the effect also appears in a nonmagnetic metal in contact with a magnetic insulator. The main puzzle lies in the apparent absence of spin polarized electrons in the non-magnetic metal. Here, we theoretically demonstrate that the scattering of electrons from a rough metal-insulator interface is generally spin-dependent, which results in mutual conversion between spin and charge currents flowing in the plane of the layer. It is the current-carrying spin polarized electrons and the spin Hall effect in the bulk of the metal layer that conspire to generate the AH current. This novel AHE differs from the conventional one only in the spatial separation of the SOC and the magnetization, so we name it as nonlocal AHE. In contrast to other previously proposed mechanisms (e.g., spin Hall AHE and magnetic proximity effect (MPE)), the nonlocal AHE appears on the first order of spin Hall angle and does not rely on the induced moments in the metal layer, which make it experimentally detectable by contrasting the AH current directions of two layered structures such as Pt/Cu/YIG and β -Ta/Cu/YIG (with a thin inserted Cu layer to eliminate the MPE). We predict that the directions of the AH currents in these two trilayers would be opposite since the spin Hall angles of Pt and β -Ta are of opposite signs. Work supported by NSF Grants DMR-1406568.

  16. Hall Effect Thruster Interactions Data from the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 Satellites. Part 5; Acquire Express-A3 SPT?100 Based Propulsion Subsystem and Other Subsystem Flight Operation TM-Data, Task 31

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sitnikova, N.; Volkov, D.; Maximov, I.; Petrusevich, V.; Allen, D.

    2003-01-01

    This 12-part report documents the data obtained from various sensor measurements taken aboard the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 spacecraft in Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO). These GEO communications satellites, which were designed and built by NPO Prikladnoy Mekhaniki (NPO PM) of Zheleznogorsk, Russia, utilize Hall thruster propulsion systems for north-south and east-west stationkeeping and as of June 2002, were still operating at 80deg E. and 11deg W., respectively. Express-A2 was launched on March 12, 2000, while Express-A3 was launched on June 24, 2000. The diagnostic equipment from which these data were taken includes electric field strength sensors, ion current and energy sensors, and pressure sensors. The diagnostics and the Hall thruster propulsion systems are described in detail along with lists of tabular data from those diagnostics and propulsion system and other satellite systems. Space Power, Inc., now part of Pratt & Whitney's Chemical Systems Division, under contract NAS3-99151 to the NASA Glenn Research Center, obtained these data over several periods from March 12, 2000, through September 30, 2001. Each of the 12 individual reports describe, in detail, the propulsion systems as well as the diagnostic sensors utilized. Finally, parts 11 and 12 include the requirements to which NPO PM prepared and delivered these data.

  17. Hall Effect Thruster Interactions Data From the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 Satellites. Part 11; Express/T-160E Project Express A2 and A3 Data Agreement Document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sitnikova, N.; Volkov, D.; Maximov, I.; Petrusevich, V.; Allen, D.; Dunning, John (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    This 12-part report documents the data obtained from various sensor measurements taken aboard the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 spacecraft in Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO). These GEO communications satellites, which were designed and built by NPO Prikladnoy Mekhaniki (NPO PM) of Zheleznogorsk, Russia, utilize Hall thruster propulsion systems for north-south and east-west stationkeeping and as of June 2002, were still operating at 80deg E. and 11deg W., respectively. Express-A2 was launched on March 12, 2000, while Express-A3 was launched on June 24, 2000. The diagnostic equipment from which these data were taken includes electric field strength sensors, ion current and energy sensors, and pressure sensors. The diagnostics and the Hall thruster propulsion systems are described in detail along with lists of tabular data from those diagnostics and propulsion system and other satellite systems. Space Power, Inc., now part of Pratt & Whitney's Chemical Systems Division, under contract NAS3-99151 to the NASA Glenn Research Center, obtained these data over several periods from March 12, 2000, through September 30, 2001. Each of the 12 individual reports describe, in detail, the propulsion systems as well as the diagnostic sensors utilized. Finally, parts 11 and 12 include the requirements to which NPO PM prepared and delivered these data.

  18. Hall Effect Thruster Interactions Data From the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 Satellites. Acquire Express-A3 SPT 100 Based Propulsion Subsystem and Other Subsystem Flight Operation TM-Data, Task 33

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sitnikova, N.; Volkov, D.; Maximov, I.; Petrusevich, V.; Allen, D.

    2003-01-01

    This 12-part report documents the data obtained from various sensor measurements taken aboard the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 spacecraft in Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO). These GEO communications satellites, which were designed and built by NPO Prikladnoy Mekhaniki (NPO PM) of Zheleznogorsk, Russia, utilize Hall thruster propulsion systems for north-south and east-west stationkeeping and as of June 2002, were still operating at 80 deg E and 11 deg W, respectively. Express-A2 was launched on March 12, 2000, while Express-A3 was launched on June 24, 2000. The diagnostic equipment from which these data were taken includes electric field strength sensors, ion current and energy sensors, and pressure sensors. The diagnostics and the Hall thruster propulsion systems are described in detail along with lists of tabular data from those diagnostics and propulsion system and other satellite systems. Space Power, Inc., now part of Pratt & Whitney's Chemical Systems Division, under contract NAS3-99151 to the NASA Glenn Research Center, obtained these data over several periods from March 12, 2000, through September 30, 2001. Each of the 12 individual reports describe, in detail, the propulsion systems as well as the diagnostic sensors utilized. Finally, parts 11 and 12 include the requirements to which NPO PM prepared and delivered these data.

  19. Hall Effect Thruster Interactions Data From the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 Satellites. Part 7; Acquire Express-A3 SPT-100 Based Propulsion Subsystem and Other Subsystem Flight Operation TM-Data, Task 32

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sitnikova, N.; Volkov, D.; Maximov, I.; Petrusevich, V.; Allen, D.

    2003-01-01

    This 12-part report documents the data obtained from various sensor measurements taken aboard the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 spacecraft in Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO). These GEO communications satellites, which were designed and built by NPO Prikladnoy Mekhaniki (NPO PM) of Zheleznogorsk, Russia, utilize Hall thruster propulsion systems for north-south and east-west stationkeeping and as of June 2002, were still operating at 80 E. and 11 W., respectively. Express-A2 was launched on March 12, 2000, while Express-A3 was launched on June 24, 2000. The diagnostic equipment from which these data were taken includes electric field strength sensors, ion current and energy sensors, and pressure sensors. The diagnostics and the Hall thruster propulsion systems are described in detail along with lists of tabular data from those diagnostics and propulsion system and other satellite systems. Space Power, Inc., now part of Pratt & Whitney's Chemical Systems Division, to the NASA Glenn Research Center, obtained these data over several periods from March 12, 2000, through September 30, 2001. Each of the 12 individual reports describe, in detail, the propulsion systems as well as the diagnostic sensors utilized. Finally, parts 11 and 12 include the requirements to which NPO PM prepared and delivered these data.

  20. Hall Effect Thruster Interactions Data From the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 Satellites. Part 12; Express/T-160 Project Express A2 and A3 Sensors Operations Procedures Document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunning, John (Technical Monitor); Sitnikova, N.; Volkov, D.; Maximov, I.; Petrusevich, V.; Allen, D.

    2003-01-01

    This 12-part report documents the data obtained from various sensor measurements taken aboard the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 spacecraft in Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO). These GEO communications satellites, which were designed and built by NPO Prikladnoy Mekhaniki (NPO PM) of Zheleznogorsk, Russia, utilize Hall thruster propulsion systems for north-south and east-west stationkeeping and as of June 2002, were still operating at 80 deg. E. and 11 deg. W respectively. Express-A2 was launched on March 12, 2000, while Express-A3 was launched on June 24, 2000. The diagnostic equipment from which these data were taken includes electric field strength sensors, ion current and energy sensors, and pressure sensors. The diagnostics and the Hall thruster propulsion systems are described in detail along with lists of tabular data from those diagnostics and propulsion system and other satellite systems. Space Power, Inc., now part of Pratt & Whitney's Chemical Systems Division, under contract NAS3 99151 to the NASA Glenn Research Center, obtained these data over several periods from March 12, 2000, through September 30, 2001. Each of the 12 individual reports describe, in detail, the propulsion systems as well as the diagnostic sensors utilized. Finally, parts 11 and 12 include the requirements to which NPO PM prepared and delivered these data.

  1. Ion beam thruster shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Power, J. L. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An ion thruster beam shield is provided that comprises a cylindrical housing that extends downstream from the ion thruster and a plurality of annular vanes which are spaced along the length of the housing, and extend inwardly from the interior wall of the housing. The shield intercepts and stops all charge exchange and beam ions, neutral propellant, and sputter products formed due to the interaction of beam and shield emanating from the ion thruster outside of a fixed conical angle from the thruster axis. Further, the shield prevents the sputter products formed during the operation of the engine from escaping the interior volume of the shield.

  2. Thermal Hall Effect of Magnons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Shuichi; Okamoto, Akihiro

    2017-01-01

    We review recent developments in theories and experiments on the magnon Hall effect. We derive the thermal Hall conductivity of magnons in terms of the Berry curvature of magnonic bands. In addition to the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, we show that the dipolar interaction can make the Berry curvature nonzero. We mainly discuss theoretical aspects of the magnon Hall effect and related theoretical works. Experimental progress in this field is also mentioned.

  3. Hall effect in hopping regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avdonin, A.; Skupiński, P.; Grasza, K.

    2016-02-01

    A simple description of the Hall effect in the hopping regime of conductivity in semiconductors is presented. Expressions for the Hall coefficient and Hall mobility are derived by considering averaged equilibrium electron transport in a single triangle of localization sites in a magnetic field. Dependence of the Hall coefficient is analyzed in a wide range of temperature and magnetic field values. Our theoretical result is applied to our experimental data on temperature dependence of Hall effect and Hall mobility in ZnO.

  4. Magnesium Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szabo, James J.

    2015-01-01

    This Phase II project is developing a magnesium (Mg) Hall effect thruster system that would open the door for in situ resource utilization (ISRU)-based solar system exploration. Magnesium is light and easy to ionize. For a Mars- Earth transfer, the propellant mass savings with respect to a xenon Hall effect thruster (HET) system are enormous. Magnesium also can be combusted in a rocket with carbon dioxide (CO2) or water (H2O), enabling a multimode propulsion system with propellant sharing and ISRU. In the near term, CO2 and H2O would be collected in situ on Mars or the moon. In the far term, Mg itself would be collected from Martian and lunar regolith. In Phase I, an integrated, medium-power (1- to 3-kW) Mg HET system was developed and tested. Controlled, steady operation at constant voltage and power was demonstrated. Preliminary measurements indicate a specific impulse (Isp) greater than 4,000 s was achieved at a discharge potential of 400 V. The feasibility of delivering fluidized Mg powder to a medium- or high-power thruster also was demonstrated. Phase II of the project evaluated the performance of an integrated, highpower Mg Hall thruster system in a relevant space environment. Researchers improved the medium power thruster system and characterized it in detail. Researchers also designed and built a high-power (8- to 20-kW) Mg HET. A fluidized powder feed system supporting the high-power thruster was built and delivered to Busek Company, Inc.

  5. Optical Hall effect-model description: tutorial.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Mathias; Kühne, Philipp; Darakchieva, Vanya; Hofmann, Tino

    2016-08-01

    The optical Hall effect is a physical phenomenon that describes the occurrence of magnetic-field-induced dielectric displacement at optical wavelengths, transverse and longitudinal to the incident electric field, and analogous to the static electrical Hall effect. The electrical Hall effect and certain cases of the optical Hall effect observations can be explained by extensions of the classic Drude model for the transport of electrons in metals. The optical Hall effect is most useful for characterization of electrical properties in semiconductors. Among many advantages, while the optical Hall effect dispenses with the need of electrical contacts, electrical material properties such as effective mass and mobility parameters, including their anisotropy as well as carrier type and density, can be determined from the optical Hall effect. Measurement of the optical Hall effect can be performed within the concept of generalized ellipsometry at an oblique angle of incidence. In this paper, we review and discuss physical model equations, which can be used to calculate the optical Hall effect in single- and multiple-layered structures of semiconductor materials. We define the optical Hall effect dielectric function tensor, demonstrate diagonalization approaches, and show requirements for the optical Hall effect tensor from energy conservation. We discuss both continuum and quantum approaches, and we provide a brief description of the generalized ellipsometry concept, the Mueller matrix calculus, and a 4×4 matrix algebra to calculate data accessible by experiment. In a follow-up paper, we will discuss strategies and approaches for experimental data acquisition and analysis.

  6. Pseudospectral Model for Hybrid PIC Hall-effect Thruster Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    significant effort, including the use of both numerical limiters and a smooth fluid neutral description, stable discharges have been demonstrated and... neutral description, stable discharges have been demonstrated and interim results are presented. Nomenclature E = magnitude of electric field B...magnitude of magnetic field ~E = electric field ~B = magnetic field Te = electron temperature p = electron pressure Tn = neutral temperature mn = neutral

  7. Characterization of a Hall Effect Thruster Using Thermal Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    Stainless Inconel X Polished 0.19 to 0.20 -183 to 486 Stainless Inconel X Polished 0.19 to 0.22 -183 to 486 Stainless 301 Polished 0.16 26...0.51 718 11 0.53 707 NA 70 Table 15: Alumina Plasma Spray Temperature Error Due to Emissivity Alumina Plasma Spray Spot Location in

  8. Iodine Plasma Species Measurements in a Hall Effect Thruster Plume

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    e.g. 80 - 100 degrees C. Xenon must be stored in h high pressure tanks or at cryogenic conditions. The only significant disadvantage to iodine is...l/s on air. The facility is also equipped with cryogenic pumps with an estimated pumping speed of 90,000 l/s on Xe. Facility background pressure ...all angles. The indicated tank pressure was 6.6x10-6 torr, and the actual pressure was lower by a factor of 0.52 or greater. By current, the

  9. Iodine Plasma Species Measurements in a Hall Effect Thruster Plume

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    divergence than Xe • High density – Stores at 2-3 times density of Xe – Modest heating to generate gas (sublimation) • Low feed system pressure – Tank ...point for Xe – 30 degrees encloses 86% of Xenon plume, 90% of Iodine plume • Tank pressure always lower with iodine Iodine 500 V, 2 A -90 -60 -30 0 30... pressure is 1000 times lower than Xe • Passive long term storage – I2 stores in the solid phase – No temperature control for inactive system • Low cost

  10. Hall-effect arc protector

    DOEpatents

    Rankin, Richard A.; Kotter, Dale K.

    1997-01-01

    The Hall-Effect Arc Protector is used to protect sensitive electronics from high energy arcs. The apparatus detects arcs by monitoring an electrical conductor, of the instrument, for changes in the electromagnetic field surrounding the conductor which would be indicative of a possible arcing condition. When the magnitude of the monitored electromagnetic field exceeds a predetermined threshold, the potential for an instrument damaging are exists and the control system logic activates a high speed circuit breaker. The activation of the breaker shunts the energy imparted to the input signal through a dummy load to the ground. After the arc condition is terminated, the normal signal path is restored.

  11. Hall-effect arc protector

    DOEpatents

    Rankin, R.A.; Kotter, D.K.

    1997-05-13

    The Hall-Effect Arc Protector is used to protect sensitive electronics from high energy arcs. The apparatus detects arcs by monitoring an electrical conductor, of the instrument, for changes in the electromagnetic field surrounding the conductor which would be indicative of a possible arcing condition. When the magnitude of the monitored electromagnetic field exceeds a predetermined threshold, the potential for an instrument damaging are exists and the control system logic activates a high speed circuit breaker. The activation of the breaker shunts the energy imparted to the input signal through a dummy load to the ground. After the arc condition is terminated, the normal signal path is restored. 2 figs.

  12. Temperature Stable Hall Effect Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partin, D. L.; Heremans, J. P.; Schroeder, T.; Thrush, C. M.; Flores, L. A.

    2004-03-01

    Magnetic field sensors are needed for high accuracy position, angle, force, strain, torque, and current flow measurements. Molecular beam epitaxy was used to grow tellurium-doped indium gallium antimonide thin films. Hall effect sensors made from these films have been studied for their magnetic sensitivity and thermal stability. For a range of alloy composition and n-type doping levels, high magnetic sensitivity from -40°C to +200°C was found with a resolution of better than +/- 0.5 percent over the entire temperature range.

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF IMPROVED HALL EFFECT SENSORS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    HALL EFFECT , MAGNETOMETERS, GAIN, SENSITIVITY, MAGNETIC FIELDS, DETECTION, ELECTROMAGNETIC PROBES, WEIGHT, VOLUME, BATTERY COMPONENTS, INDIUM ALLOYS, ANTIMONY ALLOYS, FERRITES, MANPORTABLE EQUIPMENT.

  14. AN A. C. HALL EFFECT GAUSSMETER,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    MEASURING INSTRUMENTS, MEASURING INSTRUMENTS, HALL EFFECT , MAGNETOMETERS, MEASUREMENT, GENERATORS, CIRCUITS, ALTERNATING CURRENT, GERMANIUM, SEMICONDUCTOR DIODES, GALVANOMETERS, VOLTAGE, DIRECT CURRENT, MAGNETIC FIELDS.

  15. Planar Hall effect bridge magnetic field sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Henriksen, A. D.; Dalslet, B. T.; Skieller, D. H.; Lee, K. H.; Okkels, F.; Hansen, M. F.

    2010-07-05

    Until now, the planar Hall effect has been studied in samples with cross-shaped Hall geometry. We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that the planar Hall effect can be observed for an exchange-biased ferromagnetic material in a Wheatstone bridge topology and that the sensor signal can be significantly enhanced by a geometric factor. For the samples in the present study, we demonstrate an enhancement of the sensor output by a factor of about 100 compared to cross-shaped sensors. The presented construction opens a new design and application area of the planar Hall effect, which we term planar Hall effect bridge sensors.

  16. The quantum Hall effect helicity

    SciTech Connect

    Shrivastava, Keshav N.

    2015-04-16

    The quantum Hall effect in semiconductor heterostructures is explained by two signs in the angular momentum j=l±s and g=(2j+1)/(2l+1) along with the Landau factor (n+1/2). These modifications in the existing theories explain all of the fractional charges. The helicity which is the sign of the product of the linear momentum with the spin p.s plays an important role for the understanding of the data at high magnetic fields. In particular it is found that particles with positive sign in the spin move in one direction and those with negative sign move in another direction which explains the up and down stream motion of the particles.

  17. Berry curvature and various thermal Hall effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lifa

    2016-10-01

    Applying the approach of semiclassical wave packet dynamics, we study various thermal Hall effects where carriers can be electron, phonon, magnon, etc. A general formula of thermal Hall conductivity is obtained to provide an essential physics for various thermal Hall effects, where the Berry phase effect manifests naturally. All the formulas of electron thermal Hall effect, phonon Hall effect, and magnon Hall effect can be directly reproduced from the general formula. It is also found that the Strěda formula can not be directly applied to the thermal Hall effects, where only the edge magnetization contributes to the Hall effects. Furthermore, we obtain a combined formula for anomalous Hall conductivity, thermal Hall electronic conductivity and thermal Hall conductivity for electron systems, where the Berry curvature is weighted by a different function. Finally, we discuss particle magnetization and its relation to angular momentum of the carrier, change of which could induce a mechanical rotation; and possible experiments for thermal Hall effect associated with a mechanical rotation are also proposed.

  18. Optical Emission Characterization of High-Power Hall Thruster Wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    WIlliams, George J.; Kamhawi, Hani

    2013-01-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy is employed to correlate BN insulator erosion with high-power operation of the NASA 300M Hall-effect thruster. Actinometry leveraging excited xenon states is used to normalize the emission spectra of ground state boron as a function of thruster operating condition. Trends in the strength of the boron signal are correlated with thruster power, discharge voltage, discharge current and magnetic field strength. The boron signals are shown to trend with discharge current and show weak dependence on discharge voltage. The trends are consistent with data previously collected on the NASA 300M and NASA 457M thrusters but are different from conventional wisdom.

  19. Fractional quantum Hall effect revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacak, J.; Łydżba, P.; Jacak, L.

    2015-10-01

    The topology-based explanation of the fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE) is summarized. The cyclotron braid subgroups crucial for this approach are introduced in order to identify the origin of the Laughlin correlations in 2D (two-dimensional) Hall systems. Flux-tubes and vortices for composite fermions in their standard constructions are explained in terms of cyclotron braids. The derivation of the hierarchy of the FQHE is proposed by mapping onto the integer effect within the topology-based approach. The experimental observations of the FQHE supporting the cyclotron braid picture are reviewed with a special attention paid to recent experiments with a suspended graphene. The triggering role of a carrier mobility for organization of the fractional state in Hall configuration is emphasized. The prerequisites for the FQHE are indicated including topological conditions substantially increasing the previously accepted set of physical necessities. The explanation of numerical studies by exact diagonalizations of the fractional Chern insulator states is formulated in terms of the topology condition applied to the Berry field flux quantization. Some new ideas withz regard to the synthetic fractional states in the optical lattices are also formulated.

  20. The quantum Hall effects: Philosophical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lederer, P.

    2015-05-01

    The Quantum Hall Effects offer a rich variety of theoretical and experimental advances. They provide interesting insights on such topics as gauge invariance, strong interactions in Condensed Matter physics, emergence of new paradigms. This paper focuses on some related philosophical questions. Various brands of positivism or agnosticism are confronted with the physics of the Quantum Hall Effects. Hacking's views on Scientific Realism, Chalmers' on Non-Figurative Realism are discussed. It is argued that the difficulties with those versions of realism may be resolved within a dialectical materialist approach. The latter is argued to provide a rational approach to the phenomena, theory and ontology of the Quantum Hall Effects.

  1. Parametric Investigations of Non-Conventional Hall Thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N.J.

    2001-01-12

    Hall thrusters might better scale to low power with non-conventional geometry. A 9 cm cylindrical, ceramic-channel, Hall thruster with a cusp-type magnetic field distribution has been investigated. It exhibits discharge characteristics similar to conventional coaxial Hall thrusters, but does not expose as much channel surface. Significantly, its operation is not accompanied by large amplitude discharge low frequency oscillations.

  2. Observation of the magnon Hall effect.

    PubMed

    Onose, Y; Ideue, T; Katsura, H; Shiomi, Y; Nagaosa, N; Tokura, Y

    2010-07-16

    The Hall effect usually occurs in conductors when the Lorentz force acts on a charge current in the presence of a perpendicular magnetic field. Neutral quasi-particles such as phonons and spins can, however, carry heat current and potentially exhibit the thermal Hall effect without resorting to the Lorentz force. We report experimental evidence for the anomalous thermal Hall effect caused by spin excitations (magnons) in an insulating ferromagnet with a pyrochlore lattice structure. Our theoretical analysis indicates that the propagation of the spin waves is influenced by the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya spin-orbit interaction, which plays the role of the vector potential, much as in the intrinsic anomalous Hall effect in metallic ferromagnets.

  3. Quantum Hall effect in momentum space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Tomoki; Price, Hannah M.; Carusotto, Iacopo

    2016-05-01

    We theoretically discuss a momentum-space analog of the quantum Hall effect, which could be observed in topologically nontrivial lattice models subject to an external harmonic trapping potential. In our proposal, the Niu-Thouless-Wu formulation of the quantum Hall effect on a torus is realized in the toroidally shaped Brillouin zone. In this analogy, the position of the trap center in real space controls the magnetic fluxes that are inserted through the holes of the torus in momentum space. We illustrate the momentum-space quantum Hall effect with the noninteracting trapped Harper-Hofstadter model, for which we numerically demonstrate how this effect manifests itself in experimental observables. Extension to the interacting trapped Harper-Hofstadter model is also briefly considered. We finally discuss possible experimental platforms where our proposal for the momentum-space quantum Hall effect could be realized.

  4. Multilayer thin film Hall effect device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Palmer N. (Inventor); Sisk, R. Charles (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A Hall effect device and a method of obtaining a magnetic field map of a magnetic body with the Hall effect device are presented. The device comprises: (1) a substrate, (2) a first layer having a first Hall coefficient deposited over the substrate, and (3) a second layer having a second Hall coefficient deposited over the first layer, the first and second layers cooperating to create, in the Hall effect device, a third Hall coefficient different from the first and second Hall coefficients. Creation of the third Hall coefficient by cooperation of the first and second layers allows use of materials for the first and second layers that were previously unavailable for Hall effect devices due to their relatively weak Hall coefficient.

  5. A Comparison of Ion Acceleration Characteristics for Krypton and Xenon Propellants within a 600 Watt Hall Thruster

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-20

    fluctuation.8,9 However, care must be taken to ensure that the relative effects of these phenomena are separable. In addition, magnetic ( Zeeman effect ...capability. This work compares the internal propellant acceleration of krypton within a laboratory medium power Hall effect thruster to historical xenon...Watt Hall Effect Thruster William A. Hargus, Jr.∗ Gregory M. Azarnia† Michael R. Nakles‡ Air Force Research Laboratory, Edwards Air Force Base, CA

  6. Low-Cost, High-Performance Hall Thruster Support System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesterman, Bryce

    2015-01-01

    Colorado Power Electronics (CPE) has built an innovative modular PPU for Hall thrusters, including discharge, magnet, heater and keeper supplies, and an interface module. This high-performance PPU offers resonant circuit topologies, magnetics design, modularity, and a stable and sustained operation during severe Hall effect thruster current oscillations. Laboratory testing has demonstrated discharge module efficiency of 96 percent, which is considerably higher than current state of the art.

  7. Hall effect degradation of rail gun performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witalis, E. A.; Gunnarsson, Patrik

    1993-01-01

    The paper discusses the Hall effect and shows it to be significant in the low-density and high-field trailing part of a plasma armature. Without the Hall effect a simple armature model is derived. It exhibits properties expected from classical MHD theory and shows that the purely relativistic electric charge buildup on the rails is a fundamental gun property, leading to V(breech) = 1.5 V(muzzle). The mathematics involved in accounting for Hall effect phenomena is described. These are of two types: the Hall-skewing of the armature current and the superimposed plasma flow rotation. For decreasing gun current the two effects efficiently combine to eject armature plasma rearwards, thus creating conditions for arc separation and parasitic arcs.

  8. Generalized Hall effect as a modification of ideal magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, M.L.

    1986-01-01

    The generalized Hall effect (GHE) in the generalized Hall model (GHM) is studied as a correction to ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) in the context of how it affects the linear stability of cylindrically symmetric equilibria and how it changes helically symmetric equilibria. The GHM differs from what is usually called the Hall model by including the electron pressure in the electron-momentum equations. This gives the GHM some aspects of a two-fluid model, whereas the Hall model is a one-fluid model. In both cases of cylindrical and helical symmetry, the presence of the electron pressure gradient as part of the GHE gives rise to an electric field tangent to the boundary of the plasma. This introduces an additional boundary condition in the case of a perfectly conducting plasma boundary. In the case of helical symmetry, the equilibrium equations are a generalization of the Grad-Shafranov equation to equilibria with flow and GHE. In the case of cylindrical symmetry, a class of Alfven-wave solutions that do not exist in ideal MHD is obtained and the accumulation point, with respect to large radial wavenumber, of the slow magnetoacoustic wave is shown to be changed from a finite nonzero value in ideal MHD to infinity by the GHE>

  9. Fractional Quantization of the Hall Effect

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Laughlin, R. B.

    1984-02-27

    The Fractional Quantum Hall Effect is caused by the condensation of a two-dimensional electron gas in a strong magnetic field into a new type of macroscopic ground state, the elementary excitations of which are fermions of charge 1/m, where m is an odd integer. A mathematical description is presented.

  10. Quantum Hall effect in quantum electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Penin, Alexander A.

    2009-03-15

    We consider the quantum Hall effect in quantum electrodynamics and find a deviation from the quantum-mechanical prediction for the Hall conductivity due to radiative antiscreening of electric charge in an external magnetic field. A weak dependence of the universal von Klitzing constant on the magnetic field strength, which can possibly be observed in a dedicated experiment, is predicted.

  11. The Other Hall Effect: College Board Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheppard, Keith; Gunning, Amanda M.

    2013-01-01

    Edwin Herbert Hall (1855-1938), discoverer of the Hall effect, was one of the first winners of the AAPT Oersted Medal for his contributions to the teaching of physics. While Hall's role in establishing laboratory work in high schools is widely acknowledged, his position as chair of the physics section of the Committee on College Entrance…

  12. Sheath oscillation characteristics and effect on near-wall conduction in a krypton Hall thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Fengkui Kong, Lingyi; Li, Chenliang; Yang, Haiwei; Li, Wei

    2014-11-15

    Despite its affordability, the krypton Hall-effect thruster in applications always had problems in regard to performance. The reason for this degradation is studied from the perspective of the near-wall conductivity of electrons. Using the particle-in-cell method, the sheath oscillation characteristics and its effect on near-wall conduction are compared in the krypton and xenon Hall-effect thrusters both with wall material composed of BNSiO{sub 2}. Comparing these two thrusters, the sheath in the krypton-plasma thruster will oscillate at low electron temperatures. The near-wall conduction current is only produced by collisions between electrons and wall, thereby causing a deficiency in the channel current. The sheath displays spatial oscillations only at high electron temperature; electrons are then reflected to produce the non-oscillation conduction current needed for the krypton-plasma thruster. However, it is accompanied with intensified oscillations.

  13. Towards a Better Understanding of the Anomalous Hall Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Di; Jin, Xiaofeng

    2017-01-01

    Recent experimental efforts to identify the intrinsic and extrinsic contributions in the anomalous Hall effect are reviewed. Benefited from the experimental control of artificial impurity density in single crystalline magnetic thin films, a comprehensive physical picture of the anomalous Hall effect involving multiple competing scattering processes has been established. Some new insights into the microscopic mechanisms of the anomalous Hall effect are discussed.

  14. Improved Hall-Effect Sensors For Magnetic Memories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Jiin-Chuan; Stadler, Henry L.; Katti, Romney R.; Chen, Y. C.; Bhattacharya, Pallab K.

    1993-01-01

    High-electron-mobility sensor films deposited on superlattice buffer (strain) layers. Improved Hall-effect sensors offer combination of adequate response and high speed needed for use in micromagnet/Hall-effect random-access memories. Hall-effect material chosen for use in sensors is InAs.

  15. Current Distributions in Quantum Hall Effect Devices

    PubMed Central

    Cage, M. E.

    1997-01-01

    This paper addresses the question of how current is distributed within quantum Hall effect devices. Three types of flow patterns most often mentioned in the literature are considered. They are: (1) skipping orbits along the device periphery (which arise from elastic collisions off hard-walled potentials); (2) narrow conducting channels along the device sides (which are presumed to be generated from confining potentials); and (3) currents distributed throughout the device (which are assumed to arise from a combination of confining and charge-redistribution potentials). The major conclusions are that skipping orbits do not occur in quantum Hall effect devices, and that nearly all of the externally applied current is located within the device interior rather than along the device edges. PMID:27805115

  16. High temperature Hall-effect apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, C.; Lockwood, A.; Chmielewski, A.; Parker, J.; Zoltan, A.

    1984-01-01

    A high-temperature Hall-effect apparatus is described which allows measurements up to temperatures greater than 1200 K using the van der Pauw method. The apparatus was designed for measurements on refractory materials having high charge carrier concentrations and generally low mobilities. Pressure contacts are applied to the samples. Consequently, special contacting methods, peculiar to a specific sample material, are not required. The apparatus has been semiautomated to facilitate measurements. Results are presented on n- and p-type silicon.

  17. Observation of a superfluid Hall effect

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-García, Karina; Williams, Ross A.; Beeler, Matthew C.; Perry, Abigail R.; Phillips, William D.; Spielman, Ian B.

    2012-01-01

    Measurement techniques based upon the Hall effect are invaluable tools in condensed-matter physics. When an electric current flows perpendicular to a magnetic field, a Hall voltage develops in the direction transverse to both the current and the field. In semiconductors, this behavior is routinely used to measure the density and charge of the current carriers (electrons in conduction bands or holes in valence bands)—internal properties of the system that are not accessible from measurements of the conventional resistance. For strongly interacting electron systems, whose behavior can be very different from the free electron gas, the Hall effect’s sensitivity to internal properties makes it a powerful tool; indeed, the quantum Hall effects are named after the tool by which they are most distinctly measured instead of the physics from which the phenomena originate. Here we report the first observation of a Hall effect in an ultracold gas of neutral atoms, revealed by measuring a Bose–Einstein condensate’s transport properties perpendicular to a synthetic magnetic field. Our observations in this vortex-free superfluid are in good agreement with hydrodynamic predictions, demonstrating that the system’s global irrotationality influences this superfluid Hall signal. PMID:22699494

  18. Hall Thruster Thermal Modeling and Test Data Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, James; Kamhawi, Hani; Yim, John; Clayman, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    The life of Hall Effect thrusters are primarily limited by plasma erosion and thermal related failures. NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in cooperation with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) have recently completed development of a Hall thruster with specific emphasis to mitigate these limitations. Extending the operational life of Hall thursters makes them more suitable for some of NASA's longer duration interplanetary missions. This paper documents the thermal model development, refinement and correlation of results with thruster test data. Correlation was achieved by minimizing uncertainties in model input and recognizing the relevant parameters for effective model tuning. Throughout the thruster design phase the model was used to evaluate design options and systematically reduce component temperatures. Hall thrusters are inherently complex assemblies of high temperature components relying on internal conduction and external radiation for heat dispersion and rejection. System solutions are necessary in most cases to fully assess the benefits and/or consequences of any potential design change. Thermal model correlation is critical since thruster operational parameters can push some components/materials beyond their temperature limits. This thruster incorporates a state-of-the-art magnetic shielding system to reduce plasma erosion and to a lesser extend power/heat deposition. Additionally a comprehensive thermal design strategy was employed to reduce temperatures of critical thruster components (primarily the magnet coils and the discharge channel). Long term wear testing is currently underway to assess the effectiveness of these systems and consequently thruster longevity.

  19. NASA HERMeS Hall Thruster Electrical Configuration Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Peter Y.; Kamhawi, Hani; Huang, Wensheng; Yim, John; Herman, Daniel; Williams, George; Gilland, James; Hofer, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Hall Effect Rocket with Magnetic Shielding (HERMeS) 12.5 kW Technology Demonstration Unit-1 (TDU-1) Hall thruster has been the subject of extensive technology maturation in preparation for development into a flight ready propulsion system. Part of the technology maturation was to test the TDU-1 thruster in several ground based electrical configurations to assess the thruster robustness and suitability to successful in-space operation. The ground based electrical configuration testing has recently been demonstrated as an important step in understanding and assessing how a Hall thruster may operate differently in-space compared to ground based testing, and to determine the best configuration to conduct development and qualification testing. This paper describes the electrical configuration testing of the HERMeS TDU-1 Hall thruster in NASA Glenn Research Center's Vacuum Facility 5. The three electrical configurations examined were 1) thruster body tied to facility ground, 2) thruster floating, and 3) thruster body electrically tied to cathode common. The HERMeS TDU-1 Hall thruster was also configured with two different exit plane boundary conditions, dielectric and conducting, to examine the influence on the electrical configuration characterization.

  20. Hall Effect Thruster Interactions Data From the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 Satellites. Part 2; Acquire TM Date for Type B Sensors for "Express-A" Number 2 Satellite for the Period of March 12, 2000 to and Including June 15, 2000, Task 25

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunning, John (Technical Monitor); Sitnikova, N.; Volkov, D.; Maximov, I.; Petrusevich, V.; Allen, D.

    2003-01-01

    This 12-part report documents the data obtained from various sensor measurements taken aboard the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 spacecraft in Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO). These GEO communications satellites, which were designed and built by NPO Prikladnoy Mekhaniki (NPO PM) of Zheleznogorsk, Russia, utilize Hall thruster propulsion systems for north-south and east-west stationkeeping and as of June 2002, were still operating at 80 E. and 11 W., respectively. Express-A2 was launched on March 12, 2000, while Express-A3 was launched on June 24, 2000. The diagnostic equipment from which these data were taken includes electric field strength sensors, ion current and energy sensors, and pressure sensors. The diagnostics and the Hall thruster propulsion systems are described in detail along with lists of tabular data from those diagnostics and propulsion system and other satellite systems. Space Power, Inc., now part of Pratt & Whitney's Chemical Systems Division, under contract NAS3 99151 to the NASA Glenn Research Center, obtained these data over several periods from March 12, 2000, through September 30, 2001. Each of the 12 individual reports describe, in detail, the propulsion systems as well as the diagnostic sensors utilized. Finally, parts 11 and 12 include the requirements to which NPO PM prepared and delivered these data.

  1. Hall Effect Thruster Interactions Data from the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 Satellites. Part 4; Acquire TM-Data for Type A and Type B Sensors for "Express-A" Number 3 Satellite, Task 27A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sitnikova, N.; Volkov, D.; Maximov, I.; Petrusevich, V.; Allen, D.

    2003-01-01

    This 12-part report documents the data obtained from various sensor measurements taken aboard the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 spacecraft in Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO). These GEO communications satellites, which were designed and built by NPO Prikladnoy Mekhaniki (NPO PM) of Zheleznogorsk, Russia, utilize Hall thruster propulsion systems for north-south and east-west stationkeeping and as of June 2002, were still operating at 80deg E., and 11deg W., respectively. Express-A2 was launched on March 12, 2000, while Express-A3 was launched on June 24, 2000. The diagnostic equipment from which these data were taken includes electric field strength sensors, ion current and energy sensors, and pressure sensors. The diagnostics and the Hall thruster propulsion systems are described in detail along with lists of tabular data from those diagnostics and propulsion system and other satellite systems. Space Power, Inc., now part of Pratt & Whitney's Chemical Systems Division, under contract NAS3-99151 to the NASA Glenn Research Center, obtained these data over several periods from March 12, 2000, through September 30, 2001. Each of the 12 individual reports describe, in detail, the propulsion systems as well as the diagnostic sensors utilized. Finally, parts 11 and 12 include the requirements to which NPO PM prepared and delivered these data.

  2. Hall Effect Thruster Interactions Data from the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 Satellites. Part 8; Acquire TM-Data for Type A and Type B Sensors for "Express A" Number 3 Satellite for the Period of January 1, 2001 to and Including March 31, 2001, Task 27C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunning, John (Technical Monitor); Sitnikova, N.; Volkov, D.; Maximov, I.; Petrusevich, V.; Allen, D.

    2003-01-01

    This 12-part report documents the data obtained from various sensor measurements taken aboard the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 spacecraft in Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO). These GEO communications satellites, which were designed and built by NPO Prikladnoy Mekhaniki (NPO PM) of Zheleznogorsk, Russia, utilize Hall thruster propulsion systems for north-south and east-west stationkeeping and as of June 2002, were still operating at 80deg E. and 11deg W., respectively. Express-A2 was launched on March 12, 2000, while Express-A3 was launched on June 24, 2000. The diagnostic equipment from which these data were taken includes electric field strength sensors, ion current and energy sensors, and pressure sensors. The diagnostics and the Hall thruster propulsion systems are described in detail along with lists of tabular data from those diagnostics and propulsion system and other satellite systems. Space Power, Inc., now part of Pratt & Whitney's Chemical Systems Division, under contract NAS3 99151 to the NASA Glenn Research Center, obtained these data over several periods from March 12, 2000, through September 30, 2001. Each of the 12 individual reports describe, in detail, the propulsion systems as well as the diagnostic sensors utilized. Finally, parts 11 and 12 include the requirements to which NPO PM prepared and delivered these data.

  3. Hall Effect Thruster Interactions Data From the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 Satellites. Part 10; Acquire TM-Data for Type A and Type B Sensors for "Express-A" Number 3 Satellite for the Period of July 1, 2001 to and Including September 30, 2001, Task 27D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunning, John (Technical Monitor); Sitnikova, N.; Volkov, D.; Maximov, I.; Petrusevich, V.; Allen, D.

    2003-01-01

    This 12-part report documents the data obtained from various sensor measurements taken aboard the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 spacecraft in Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO). These GEO communications satellites, which were designed and built by NPO Prikladnoy Mekhaniki (NPO PM) of Zheleznogorsk, Russia, utilize Hall thruster propulsion systems for north-south and east-west stationkeeping and as of June 2002, were still operating at 80 E. and 11 W., respectively. Express-A2 was launched on March 12, 2000, while Express-A3 was launched on June 24, 2000. The diagnostic equipment from which these data were taken includes electric field strength sensors, ion current and energy sensors, and pressure sensors. The diagnostics and the Hall thruster propulsion systems are described in detail along with lists of tabular data from those diagnostics and propulsion system and other satellite systems. Space Power, Inc., now part of Pratt & Whitney's Chemical Systems Division, under contract NAS3 99151 to the NASA Glenn Research Center, obtained these data over several periods from March 12, 2000, through September 30, 2001. Each of the 12 individual reports describe, in detail, the propulsion systems as well as the diagnostic sensors utilized. Finally, parts 11 and 12 include the requirements to which NPO PM prepared and delivered these data.

  4. Hall Effect Thruster Interactions Data From the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 Satellites. Part 3; Acquire Express-A3 SPT-100 Based Propulsion Subsystem and Other Subsystem Flight Operation TM-Data for the Period of June 24, 2000 to and Including September 30, 2000, Task 30

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sitnikova, N.; Volkov, D.; Maximov, I.; Petrusevich, V.; Allen, D.

    2003-01-01

    This 12-part report documents the data obtained from various sensor measurements taken aboard the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 spacecraft in Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO). These GEO communications satellites, which were designed and built by NPO Prikladnoy Mekhaniki (NPO PM) of Zheleznogorsk, Russia, utilize Hall thruster propulsion systems for north-south and east-west stationkeeping and as of June 2002, were still operating at 80 E. and 11 W., respectively. Express-A2 was launched on March 12, 2000, while Express-A3 was launched on June 24, 2000. The diagnostic equipment from which these data were taken includes electric field strength sensors, ion current and energy sensors, and pressure sensors. The diagnostics and the Hall thruster propulsion systems are described in detail along with lists of tabular data from those diagnostics and propulsion system and other satellite systems. Space Power, Inc., now part of Pratt & Whitney's Chemical Systems Division, under contract NAS3 99151 to the NASA Glenn Research Center, obtained these data over several periods from March 12, 2000, through September 30, 2001. Each of the 12 individual reports describe, in detail, the propulsion systems as well as the diagnostic sensors utilized. Finally, parts 11 and 12 include the requirements to which NPO PM prepared and delivered these data.

  5. Hall Effect Thruster Interactions Data From the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 Satellites. Acquire Express-A2 SPT-100 Based Propulsion Subsystem and Other Subsystem Flight Operation TM-Data for the Period of March 12, 2000 to and Including June 15, 2000, Task 29

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sitnikova, N.; Volkov, D.; Maximov, I.; Petrusevich, V.; Allen, D.

    2003-01-01

    This 12-part report documents the data obtained from various sensor measurements taken aboard the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 spacecraft in Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO). These GEO communications satellites, which were designed and built by NPO Prikladnoy Mekhaniki (NPO PM) of Zheleznogorsk, Russia, utilize Hall thruster propulsion systems for north-south and east-west stationkeeping and as of June 2002, were still operating at 80 E. and 11 W., respectively. Express-A2 was launched on March 12, 2000, while Express-A3 was launched on June 24, 2000. The diagnostic equipment from which these data were taken includes electric field strength sensors, ion current and energy sensors, and pressure sensors. The diagnostics and the Hall thruster propulsion systems are described in detail along with lists of tabular data from those diagnostics and propulsion system and other satellite systems. Space Power, Inc., now part of Pratt & Whitney s Chemical Systems Division, under contract NAS3 99151 to the NASA Glenn Research Center, obtained these data over several periods from March 12, 2000, through September 30, 2001. Each of the 12 individual reports describe, in detail, the propulsion systems as well as the diagnostic sensors utilized. Finally, parts 11 and 12 include the requirements to which NPO PM prepared and delivered these data.

  6. Pulsed Plasma Thruster Contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Roger M.; Arrington, Lynn A.; Pencil, Eric J.; Carter, Justin; Heminger, Jason; Gatsonis, Nicolas

    1996-01-01

    Pulsed Plasma Thrusters (PPT's) are currently baselined for the Air Force Mightysat II.1 flight in 1999 and are under consideration for a number of other missions for primary propulsion, precision positioning, and attitude control functions. In this work, PPT plumes were characterized to assess their contamination characteristics. Diagnostics included planar and cylindrical Langmuir probes and a large number of collimated quartz contamination sensors. Measurements were made using a LES 8/9 flight PPT at 0.24, 0.39, 0.55, and 1.2 m from the thruster, as well as in the backflow region behind the thruster. Plasma measurements revealed a peak centerline ion density and velocity of approx. 6 x 10(exp 12) cm(exp -3) and 42,000 m/s, respectively. Optical transmittance measurements of the quartz sensors after 2 x 10(exp 5) pulses showed a rapid decrease in plume contamination with increasing angle from the plume axis, with a barely measurable transmittance decrease in the ultraviolet at 90 deg. No change in optical properties was detected for sensors in the backflow region.

  7. Realization of tunable spin-dependent splitting in intrinsic photonic spin Hall effect

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, Xiaohui; Yi, Xunong; Zhou, Xinxing; Liu, Yachao; Shu, Weixing; Wen, Shuangchun; Luo, Hailu

    2014-10-13

    We report the realization of tunable spin-dependent splitting in intrinsic photonic spin Hall effect. By breaking the rotational symmetry of a cylindrical vector beam, the intrinsic vortex phases that the two spin components of the vector beam carries, which is similar to the geometric Pancharatnam-Berry phase, are no longer continuous in the azimuthal direction, and leads to observation of spin accumulation at the opposite edge of the beam. Due to the inherent nature of the phase and independency of light-matter interaction, the observed photonic spin Hall effect is intrinsic. Modulating the topological charge of the vector beam, the spin-dependent splitting can be enhanced and the direction of spin accumulation is switchable. Our findings may provide a possible route for generation and manipulation of spin-polarized photons, and enables spin-based photonics applications.

  8. Hall effect in two-dimensional composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansson, H.

    1997-07-01

    Conduction in a two-component composite film, subject to a magnetic field, is treated numerically with an interface integral equation method. The composite is chosen to be a square array of starfish-shaped inclusions in an anisotropic matrix. Highly accurate calculations are performed and used to investigate microstructure-independent relations between the effective conductivity tensor elements. Asymptotic studies of closely spaced superconducting and insulating disks in an anisotropic matrix verify theoretical results. All the results in this paper are valid for the analog to the Hall effect in heat conduction, the Righi-Leduc effect.

  9. Integer quantum Hall effect in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jellal, Ahmed

    2016-04-01

    We study the quantum Hall effect in a monolayer graphene by using an approach based on thermodynamical properties. This can be done by considering a system of Dirac particles in an electromagnetic field and taking into account of the edges effect as a pseudo-potential varying continuously along the x direction. At low temperature and in the weak electric field limit, we explicitly determine the thermodynamical potential. With this, we derive the particle numbers in terms of the quantized flux and therefore the Hall conductivity immediately follows.

  10. Inverse spin Hall effect by spin injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S. Y.; Horing, Norman J. M.; Lei, X. L.

    2007-09-01

    Motivated by a recent experiment [S. O. Valenzuela and M. Tinkham, Nature (London) 442, 176 (2006)], the authors present a quantitative microscopic theory to investigate the inverse spin-Hall effect with spin injection into aluminum considering both intrinsic and extrinsic spin-orbit couplings using the orthogonalized-plane-wave method. Their theoretical results are in good agreement with the experimental data. It is also clear that the magnitude of the anomalous Hall resistivity is mainly due to contributions from extrinsic skew scattering.

  11. Piezo Voltage Controlled Planar Hall Effect Devices.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bao; Meng, Kang-Kang; Yang, Mei-Yin; Edmonds, K W; Zhang, Hao; Cai, Kai-Ming; Sheng, Yu; Zhang, Nan; Ji, Yang; Zhao, Jian-Hua; Zheng, Hou-Zhi; Wang, Kai-You

    2016-06-22

    The electrical control of the magnetization switching in ferromagnets is highly desired for future spintronic applications. Here we report on hybrid piezoelectric (PZT)/ferromagnetic (Co2FeAl) devices in which the planar Hall voltage in the ferromagnetic layer is tuned solely by piezo voltages. The change of planar Hall voltage is associated with magnetization switching through 90° in the plane under piezo voltages. Room temperature magnetic NOT and NOR gates are demonstrated based on the piezo voltage controlled Co2FeAl planar Hall effect devices without the external magnetic field. Our demonstration may lead to the realization of both information storage and processing using ferromagnetic materials.

  12. Piezo Voltage Controlled Planar Hall Effect Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bao; Meng, Kang-Kang; Yang, Mei-Yin; Edmonds, K. W.; Zhang, Hao; Cai, Kai-Ming; Sheng, Yu; Zhang, Nan; Ji, Yang; Zhao, Jian-Hua; Zheng, Hou-Zhi; Wang, Kai-You

    2016-06-01

    The electrical control of the magnetization switching in ferromagnets is highly desired for future spintronic applications. Here we report on hybrid piezoelectric (PZT)/ferromagnetic (Co2FeAl) devices in which the planar Hall voltage in the ferromagnetic layer is tuned solely by piezo voltages. The change of planar Hall voltage is associated with magnetization switching through 90° in the plane under piezo voltages. Room temperature magnetic NOT and NOR gates are demonstrated based on the piezo voltage controlled Co2FeAl planar Hall effect devices without the external magnetic field. Our demonstration may lead to the realization of both information storage and processing using ferromagnetic materials.

  13. Excitons in the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Laughlin, R. B.

    1984-09-01

    Quasiparticles of charge 1/m in the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect form excitons, which are collective excitations physically similar to the transverse magnetoplasma oscillations of a Wigner crystal. A variational exciton wavefunction which shows explicitly that the magnetic length is effectively longer for quasiparticles than for electrons is proposed. This wavefunction is used to estimate the dispersion relation of these excitons and the matrix elements to generate them optically out of the ground state. These quantities are then used to describe a type of nonlinear conductivity which may occur in these systems when they are relatively clean.

  14. Integer Quantum Hall Effect in Trilayer Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, A.; Escoffier, W.; Poumirol, J. M.; Faugeras, C.; Arovas, D. P.; Fogler, M. M.; Guinea, F.; Roche, S.; Goiran, M.; Raquet, B.

    2011-09-01

    By using high-magnetic fields (up to 60 T), we observe compelling evidence of the integer quantum Hall effect in trilayer graphene. The magnetotransport fingerprints are similar to those of the graphene monolayer, except for the absence of a plateau at a filling factor of ν=2. At a very low filling factor, the Hall resistance vanishes due to the presence of mixed electron and hole carriers induced by disorder. The measured Hall resistivity plateaus are well reproduced theoretically, using a self-consistent Hartree calculations of the Landau levels and assuming an ABC stacking order of the three layers.

  15. NASA HERMeS Hall Thruster Electrical Configuration Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Peter; Kamhawi, Hani; Huang, Wensheng; Yim, John; Herman, Daniel; Williams, George; Gilland, James; Hofer, Richard

    2016-01-01

    NASAs Hall Effect Rocket with Magnetic Shielding (HERMeS) 12.5 kW Technology Demonstration Unit-1 (TDU-1) Hall thruster has been the subject of extensive technology maturation in preparation for development into a flight ready propulsion system. Part of the technology maturation was to test the TDU-1 thruster in several ground based electrical configurations to assess the thruster robustness and suitability to successful in-space operation. The ground based electrical configuration testing has recently been demonstrated as an important step in understanding and assessing how a Hall thruster may operate differently in space compared to ground based testing, and to determine the best configuration to conduct development and qualification testing. This presentation will cover the electrical configuration testing of the TDU-1 HERMeS Hall thruster in NASA Glenn Research Centers Vacuum Facility 5. The three electrical configurations examined are the thruster body tied to facility ground, thruster floating, and finally the thruster body electrically tied to cathode common. The TDU-1 HERMeS was configured with two different exit plane boundary conditions, dielectric and conducting, to examine the influence on the electrical configuration characterization.

  16. Generic superweak chaos induced by Hall effect.

    PubMed

    Ben-Harush, Moti; Dana, Itzhack

    2016-05-01

    We introduce and study the "kicked Hall system" (KHS), i.e., charged particles periodically kicked in the presence of uniform magnetic (B) and electric (E) fields that are perpendicular to each other and to the kicking direction. We show that for resonant values of B and E and in the weak-chaos regime of sufficiently small nonintegrability parameter κ (the kicking strength), there exists a generic family of periodic kicking potentials for which the Hall effect from B and E significantly suppresses the weak chaos, replacing it by "superweak" chaos (SWC). This means that the system behaves as if the kicking strength were κ^{2} rather than κ. For E=0, SWC is known to be a classical fingerprint of quantum antiresonance, but it occurs under much less generic conditions, in particular only for very special kicking potentials. Manifestations of SWC are a decrease in the instability of periodic orbits and a narrowing of the chaotic layers, relative to the ordinary weak-chaos case. Also, for global SWC, taking place on an infinite "stochastic web" in phase space, the chaotic diffusion on the web is much slower than the weak-chaos one. Thus, the Hall effect can be relatively stabilizing for small κ. In some special cases, the effect is shown to cause ballistic motion for almost all parameter values. The generic global SWC on stochastic webs in the KHS appears to be the two-dimensional closest analog to the Arnol'd web in higher dimensional systems.

  17. Star Formation and the Hall Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braiding, Catherine

    2011-10-01

    Magnetic fields play an important role in star formation by regulating the removal of angular momentum from collapsing molecular cloud cores. Hall diffusion is known to be important to the magnetic field behaviour at many of the intermediate densities and field strengths encountered during the gravitational collapse of molecular cloud cores into protostars, and yet its role in the star formation process is not well-studied. This thesis describes a semianalytic self-similar model of the collapse of rotating isothermal molecular cloud cores with both Hall and ambipolar diffusion, presenting similarity solutions that demonstrate that the Hall effect has a profound influence on the dynamics of collapse. ... Hall diffusion also determines the strength of the magnetic diffusion and centrifugal shocks that bound the pseudo and rotationally-supported discs, and can introduce subshocks that further slow accretion onto the protostar. In cores that are not initially rotating Hall diffusion can even induce rotation, which could give rise to disc formation and resolve the magnetic braking catastrophe. The Hall effect clearly influences the dynamics of gravitational collapse and its role in controlling the magnetic braking and radial diffusion of the field would be worth exploring in future numerical simulations of star formation.

  18. Charge carrier coherence and Hall effect in organic semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Yi, H T; Gartstein, Y N; Podzorov, V

    2016-03-30

    Hall effect measurements are important for elucidating the fundamental charge transport mechanisms and intrinsic mobility in organic semiconductors. However, Hall effect studies frequently reveal an unconventional behavior that cannot be readily explained with the simple band-semiconductor Hall effect model. Here, we develop an analytical model of Hall effect in organic field-effect transistors in a regime of coexisting band and hopping carriers. The model, which is supported by the experiments, is based on a partial Hall voltage compensation effect, occurring because hopping carriers respond to the transverse Hall electric field and drift in the direction opposite to the Lorentz force acting on band carriers. We show that this can lead in particular to an underdeveloped Hall effect observed in organic semiconductors with substantial off-diagonal thermal disorder. Our model captures the main features of Hall effect in a variety of organic semiconductors and provides an analytical description of Hall mobility, carrier density and carrier coherence factor.

  19. Charge carrier coherence and Hall effect in organic semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, H. T.; Gartstein, Y. N.; Podzorov, V.

    2016-03-30

    Hall effect measurements are important for elucidating the fundamental charge transport mechanisms and intrinsic mobility in organic semiconductors. However, Hall effect studies frequently reveal an unconventional behavior that cannot be readily explained with the simple band-semiconductor Hall effect model. Here, we develop an analytical model of Hall effect in organic field-effect transistors in a regime of coexisting band and hopping carriers. The model, which is supported by the experiments, is based on a partial Hall voltage compensation effect, occurring because hopping carriers respond to the transverse Hall electric field and drift in the direction opposite to the Lorentz force acting on band carriers. We show that this can lead in particular to an underdeveloped Hall effect observed in organic semiconductors with substantial off-diagonal thermal disorder. Lastly, our model captures the main features of Hall effect in a variety of organic semiconductors and provides an analytical description of Hall mobility, carrier density and carrier coherence factor.

  20. Charge carrier coherence and Hall effect in organic semiconductors

    PubMed Central

    Yi, H. T.; Gartstein, Y. N.; Podzorov, V.

    2016-01-01

    Hall effect measurements are important for elucidating the fundamental charge transport mechanisms and intrinsic mobility in organic semiconductors. However, Hall effect studies frequently reveal an unconventional behavior that cannot be readily explained with the simple band-semiconductor Hall effect model. Here, we develop an analytical model of Hall effect in organic field-effect transistors in a regime of coexisting band and hopping carriers. The model, which is supported by the experiments, is based on a partial Hall voltage compensation effect, occurring because hopping carriers respond to the transverse Hall electric field and drift in the direction opposite to the Lorentz force acting on band carriers. We show that this can lead in particular to an underdeveloped Hall effect observed in organic semiconductors with substantial off-diagonal thermal disorder. Our model captures the main features of Hall effect in a variety of organic semiconductors and provides an analytical description of Hall mobility, carrier density and carrier coherence factor. PMID:27025354

  1. Faster Hall-Effect Current-Measuring Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullender, Craig C.; Johnson, Daniel D.; Walker, Daniel D.

    1993-01-01

    Current-measuring circuit operates on Hall-effect-sensing and magnetic-field-nulling principles similar to those described in article, "Nulling Hall-Effect Current-Measuring Circuit" (LEW-15023), but simpler and responds faster. Designed without feedback loop, and analog pulse-width-modulated output indicates measured current. Circuit measures current at frequency higher than bandwidth of its Hall-effect sensor.

  2. MAGNETORESISTANCE AND HALL EFFECT IN SINGLE CRYSTALS OF ALUMINUM

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ALUMINUM, *SINGLE CRYSTALS, CRYSTALS, HALL EFFECT , IMPURITIES, LOW PRESSURE, MAGNETIC FIELDS, MAGNETIC PROPERTIES, PARTICLE TRAJECTORIES, ELECTRICAL RESISTANCE, SOLID STATE PHYSICS, SURFACE PROPERTIES.

  3. Volumetric Hall effect tomography--a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Wen, H

    1999-07-01

    Hall effect imaging is an ultrasound-based method of mapping spatial variations in the dielectric constants of an acoustically-uniform sample. This paper presents three-dimensional Hall effect images of phantoms obtained by scanning a single transducer across a two-dimensional grid, effectively simulating two-dimensional phased-array signal reception. The experiments demonstrate the feasibility of volumetric Hall effect tomography and show the advantage of volumetric scans over planar scans. The images reflect several limitations of the current scanning method and point to directions for further hardware development. The inherent limitations of Hall effect imaging are also discussed in light of these results.

  4. Volumetric Hall Effect Tomography – A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Han

    2010-01-01

    Hall effect imaging is an ultrasound-based method of mapping spatial variations in the dielectric constants of an acoustically-uniform sample. This paper presents three-dimensional Hall effect images of phantoms obtained by scanning a single transducer across a two-dimensional grid, effectively simulating two-dimensional phased-array signal reception. The experiments demonstrate the feasibility of volumetric Hall effect tomography and show the advantage of volumetric scans over planar scans. The images reflect several limitations of the current scanning method and point to directions for further hardware development. The inherent limitations of Hall effect imaging are also discussed in light of these results. PMID:10604800

  5. Gauge Physics of Spin Hall Effect

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Seng Ghee; Jalil, Mansoor B. A.; Ho, Cong Son; Siu, Zhuobin; Murakami, Shuichi

    2015-01-01

    Spin Hall effect (SHE) has been discussed in the context of Kubo formulation, geometric physics, spin orbit force, and numerous semi-classical treatments. It can be confusing if the different pictures have partial or overlapping claims of contribution to the SHE. In this article, we present a gauge-theoretic, time-momentum elucidation, which provides a general SHE equation of motion, that unifies under one theoretical framework, all contributions of SHE conductivity due to the kinetic, the spin orbit force (Yang-Mills), and the geometric (Murakami-Fujita) effects. Our work puts right an ambiguity surrounding previously partial treatments involving the Kubo, semiclassical, Berry curvatures, or the spin orbit force. Our full treatment shows the Rashba 2DEG SHE conductivity to be instead of −, and Rashba heavy hole instead of −. This renewed treatment suggests a need to re-derive and re-calculate previously studied SHE conductivity. PMID:26689260

  6. Precise Quantization of Anomalous Hall Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bestwick, Andrew

    In the quantum anomalous Hall effect, electron transport in a magnetically-doped topological insulator takes place through chiral, dissipationless edge channels. In this talk, we discuss the behavior of a nearly ideal implementations of the effect in which the Hall resistance is within a part per 10,000 of its quantized value and the longitudinal resistivity can reach below 1 Ω per square. Nearly all Cr-doped topological insulator samples demonstrate extreme temperature dependence that is well-modeled by a small effective gap, allowing control over quantization with an unexpected magnetocaloric effect. We also discuss measurements of new device geometries and non-local resistances that identify the sources of dissipation that limit the effect. (Now at Rigetti Computing).

  7. Photonic versus electronic quantum anomalous Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleu, O.; Solnyshkov, D. D.; Malpuech, G.

    2017-03-01

    We derive the diagram of the topological phases accessible within a generic Hamiltonian describing quantum anomalous Hall effect for photons and electrons in honeycomb lattices in the presence of a Zeeman field and spin-orbit coupling (SOC). The two cases differ crucially by the winding number of their SOC, which is 1 for the Rashba SOC of electrons, and 2 for the photon SOC induced by the energy splitting between the TE and TM modes. As a consequence, the two models exhibit opposite Chern numbers ±2 at low field. Moreover, the photonic system shows a topological transition absent in the electronic case. If the photonic states are mixed with excitonic resonances to form interacting exciton-polaritons, the effective Zeeman field can be induced and controlled by a circularly polarized pump. This new feature allows an all-optical control of the topological phase transitions.

  8. Piezo Voltage Controlled Planar Hall Effect Devices

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bao; Meng, Kang-Kang; Yang, Mei-Yin; Edmonds, K. W.; Zhang, Hao; Cai, Kai-Ming; Sheng, Yu; Zhang, Nan; Ji, Yang; Zhao, Jian-Hua; Zheng, Hou-Zhi; Wang, Kai-You

    2016-01-01

    The electrical control of the magnetization switching in ferromagnets is highly desired for future spintronic applications. Here we report on hybrid piezoelectric (PZT)/ferromagnetic (Co2FeAl) devices in which the planar Hall voltage in the ferromagnetic layer is tuned solely by piezo voltages. The change of planar Hall voltage is associated with magnetization switching through 90° in the plane under piezo voltages. Room temperature magnetic NOT and NOR gates are demonstrated based on the piezo voltage controlled Co2FeAl planar Hall effect devices without the external magnetic field. Our demonstration may lead to the realization of both information storage and processing using ferromagnetic materials. PMID:27329068

  9. Quantized photonic spin Hall effect in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Liang; Liu, Mengxia; Chen, Shizhen; Liu, Yachao; Shu, Weixing; Luo, Hailu; Wen, Shuangchun

    2017-01-01

    We examine the photonic spin Hall effect (SHE) in a graphene-substrate system with the presence of an external magnetic field. In the quantum Hall regime, we demonstrate that the in-plane and transverse spin-dependent splittings in the photonic SHE exhibit different quantized behaviors. The quantized SHE can be described as a consequence of a quantized geometric phase (Berry phase), which corresponds to the quantized spin-orbit interaction. Furthermore, an experimental scheme based on quantum weak value amplification is proposed to detect the quantized SHE in the terahertz frequency regime. By incorporating the quantum weak measurement techniques, the quantized photonic SHE holds great promise for detecting quantized Hall conductivity and the Berry phase. These results may bridge the gap between the electronic SHE and photonic SHE in graphene.

  10. Gauge Physics of Spin Hall Effect.

    PubMed

    Tan, Seng Ghee; Jalil, Mansoor B A; Ho, Cong Son; Siu, Zhuobin; Murakami, Shuichi

    2015-12-22

    Spin Hall effect (SHE) has been discussed in the context of Kubo formulation, geometric physics, spin orbit force, and numerous semi-classical treatments. It can be confusing if the different pictures have partial or overlapping claims of contribution to the SHE. In this article, we present a gauge-theoretic, time-momentum elucidation, which provides a general SHE equation of motion, that unifies under one theoretical framework, all contributions of SHE conductivity due to the kinetic, the spin orbit force (Yang-Mills), and the geometric (Murakami-Fujita) effects. Our work puts right an ambiguity surrounding previously partial treatments involving the Kubo, semiclassical, Berry curvatures, or the spin orbit force. Our full treatment shows the Rashba 2DEG SHE conductivity to be [formula in text] instead of [formula in text], and Rashba heavy hole [formula in text] instead of [formula in text]. This renewed treatment suggests a need to re-derive and re-calculate previously studied SHE conductivity.

  11. Gauge Physics of Spin Hall Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Seng Ghee; Jalil, Mansoor B. A.; Ho, Cong Son; Siu, Zhuobin; Murakami, Shuichi

    2015-12-01

    Spin Hall effect (SHE) has been discussed in the context of Kubo formulation, geometric physics, spin orbit force, and numerous semi-classical treatments. It can be confusing if the different pictures have partial or overlapping claims of contribution to the SHE. In this article, we present a gauge-theoretic, time-momentum elucidation, which provides a general SHE equation of motion, that unifies under one theoretical framework, all contributions of SHE conductivity due to the kinetic, the spin orbit force (Yang-Mills), and the geometric (Murakami-Fujita) effects. Our work puts right an ambiguity surrounding previously partial treatments involving the Kubo, semiclassical, Berry curvatures, or the spin orbit force. Our full treatment shows the Rashba 2DEG SHE conductivity to be instead of -, and Rashba heavy hole instead of -. This renewed treatment suggests a need to re-derive and re-calculate previously studied SHE conductivity.

  12. Universal scaling of the anomalous Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoqian; Wang, Wei; Wang, Kejie; Niu, Wei; Lai, Bolin; Maltby, Nick; Yang, Mao; Gao, Ming; Liu, Wenqing; He, Liang; Zhang, Rong; Xu, Yongbing

    2017-04-01

    We have undertaken a detailed study of the magneto-transport properties of ultra-thin Fe films epitaxially grown on GaAs (1 0 0). A metal–semiconductor transition has been observed with a critical thickness of 1.25 nm, which was thought to be related to the thermally activated tunneling between metallic clusters. By fitting {ρ\\text{AH}} versus ρ xx2 with the TYJ equation (Tian et al 2009 Phys. Rev. Lett. 103 087206), we found that the magnetization is negligible for the scaling of the anomalous Hall effect in ultra-thin Fe films. Furthermore, the intrinsic term, which is acquired by the linear fitting of {ρ\\text{AH}} versus ρ xx2 , shows an obvious decrease when the film thickness drops below 1.25 nm, which was thought to be related to the fading of the Berry curvature in the ultra-thin film limit.

  13. Hall Effect in Neutron Star Crusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourgouliatos, K. N.; Cumming, A.

    2014-08-01

    The crust of Neutron Stars can be approximated by a highly conducting solid crystal lattice. The evolution of the magnetic field in the crust is mediated through Hall effect, namely the electric current is carried by the free electrons of the lattice and the magnetic field lines are advected by the electron fluid. Here, we present the results of a time-dependent evolution code which shows the effect Hall drift has in the large-scale evolution of the magnetic field. In particular we link analytical predictions with simulation results. We find that there are two basic evolutionary paths, depending on the initial conditions compared to Hall equilibrium. We also show the effect axial symmetry combined with density gradient have on suppressing turbulent cascade.

  14. Developments in the quantum Hall effect.

    PubMed

    von Klitzing, Klaus

    2005-09-15

    The most important applications of the quantum Hall effect (QHE) are in the field of metrology. The observed quantization of the resistance is primarily used for the reproduction of the SI unit ohm, but is also important for high precision measurements of both the fine structure constant and the Planck constant. Some current QHE research areas include the analysis of new electron-electron correlation phenomena and the development of a more complete microscopic picture of this quantum effect. Recently, scanning force microscopy (SFM) of the potential distribution in QHE devices has been used to enhance the microscopic understanding of current flow in quantum Hall systems. This confirms the importance of the theoretically predicted stripes of compressible and incompressible electronic states close to the boundary of the QHE devices.

  15. Anisotropic Spin Hall Effect from First Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freimuth, Frank; Blügel, Stefan; Mokrousov, Yuriy

    2011-03-01

    We present first principles calculations of the intrinsic non-dissipative spin Hall conductivity (SHC) for 3 d , 4 d and 5 d transition metals focusing in particular on the anisotropy of the SHC in nonmagnetic hcp metals and in antiferromagnetic Cr. For the metals of this study we generally find large anisotropies. We derive the general relation between the SHC vector and the direction of spin-polarization and discuss its consequences for hcp metals. Especially, it is predicted that for systems where the SHC changes sign due to the anisotropy the spin Hall effect may be tuned such that the spin polarization is parallel either to the electric field or to the spin current. Additionally, we describe our computational method [2,3] emphasizing the Wannier interpolation technique and the definition of the conserved spin current. This work is supported by the DFG Project MO 1731/3-1 and HGF-YIG grant VH-NG-513.

  16. The Hall effect in star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braiding, C. R.; Wardle, M.

    2012-05-01

    Magnetic fields play an important role in star formation by regulating the removal of angular momentum from collapsing molecular cloud cores. Hall diffusion is known to be important to the magnetic field behaviour at many of the intermediate densities and field strengths encountered during the gravitational collapse of molecular cloud cores into protostars, and yet its role in the star formation process is not well studied. We present a semianalytic self-similar model of the collapse of rotating isothermal molecular cloud cores with both Hall and ambipolar diffusion, and similarity solutions that demonstrate the profound influence of the Hall effect on the dynamics of collapse. The solutions show that the size and sign of the Hall parameter can change the size of the protostellar disc by up to an order of magnitude and the protostellar accretion rate by 50 per cent when the ratio of the Hall to ambipolar diffusivities is varied between -0.5 ≤ηH/ηA≤ 0.2. These changes depend upon the orientation of the magnetic field with respect to the axis of rotation and create a preferred handedness to the solutions that could be observed in protostellar cores using next-generation instruments such as ALMA. Hall diffusion also determines the strength and position of the shocks that bound the pseudo and rotationally supported discs, and can introduce subshocks that further slow accretion on to the protostar. In cores that are not initially rotating (not examined here), Hall diffusion can even induce rotation, which could give rise to disc formation and resolve the magnetic braking catastrophe. The Hall effect clearly influences the dynamics of gravitational collapse and its role in controlling the magnetic braking and radial diffusion of the field merits further exploration in numerical simulations of star formation.

  17. A collisionless plasma thruster plume expansion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merino, Mario; Cichocki, Filippo; Ahedo, Eduardo

    2015-06-01

    A two-fluid model of the unmagnetized, collisionless far region expansion of the plasma plume for gridded ion thrusters and Hall effect thrusters is presented. The model is integrated into two semi-analytical solutions valid in the hypersonic case. These solutions are discussed and compared against the results from the (exact) method of characteristics; the relative errors in density and velocity increase slowly axially and radially and are of the order of 10-2-10-3 in the cases studied. The plasma density, ion flux and ambipolar electric field are investigated. A sensitivity analysis of the problem parameters and initial conditions is carried out in order to characterize the far plume divergence angle in the range of interest for space electric propulsion. A qualitative discussion of the physics of the secondary plasma plume is also provided.

  18. Destruction of the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect by Disorder

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Laughlin, R. B.

    1985-07-01

    It is suggested that Hall steps in the fractional quantum Hall effect are physically similar to those in the ordinary quantum Hall effect. This proposition leads to a simple scaling diagram containing a new type of fixed point, which is identified with the destruction of the fractional states by disorder. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Useful Pedagogical Applications of the Classical Hall Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houari, Ahmed

    2007-01-01

    One of the most known phenomena in physics is the Hall effect. This is mainly due to its simplicity and to the wide range of its theoretical and practical applications. To complete the pedagogical utility of the Hall effect in physics teaching, I will apply it here to determine the Faraday constant as a fundamental physical number and the number…

  20. NEXT Ion Thruster Thermal Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanNoord, Jonathan L.

    2010-01-01

    As the NEXT ion thruster progresses towards higher technology readiness, it is necessary to develop the tools that will support its implementation into flight programs. An ion thruster thermal model has been developed for the latest prototype model design to aid in predicting thruster temperatures for various missions. This model is comprised of two parts. The first part predicts the heating from the discharge plasma for various throttling points based on a discharge chamber plasma model. This model shows, as expected, that the internal heating is strongly correlated with the discharge power. Typically, the internal plasma heating increases with beam current and decreases slightly with beam voltage. The second is a model based on a finite difference thermal code used to predict the thruster temperatures. Both parts of the model will be described in this paper. This model has been correlated with a thermal development test on the NEXT Prototype Model 1 thruster with most predicted component temperatures within 5 to 10 C of test temperatures. The model indicates that heating, and hence current collection, is not based purely on the footprint of the magnet rings, but follows a 0.1:1:2:1 ratio for the cathode-to-conical-to-cylindrical-to-front magnet rings. This thermal model has also been used to predict the temperatures during the worst case mission profile that is anticipated for the thruster. The model predicts ample thermal margin for all of its components except the external cable harness under the hottest anticipated mission scenario. The external cable harness will be re-rated or replaced to meet the predicted environment.

  1. In-plane magnetization-induced quantum anomalous Hall effect.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Hsu, Hsiu-Chuan; Liu, Chao-Xing

    2013-08-23

    The quantum Hall effect can only be induced by an out-of-plane magnetic field for two-dimensional electron gases, and similarly, the quantum anomalous Hall effect has also usually been considered for systems with only out-of-plane magnetization. In the present work, we predict that the quantum anomalous Hall effect can be induced by in-plane magnetization that is not accompanied by any out-of-plane magnetic field. Two realistic two-dimensional systems, Bi2Te3 thin film with magnetic doping and HgMnTe quantum wells with shear strains, are presented and the general condition for the in-plane magnetization-induced quantum anomalous Hall effect is discussed based on the symmetry analysis. Nonetheless, an experimental setup is proposed to confirm this effect, the observation of which will pave the way to search for the quantum anomalous Hall effect in a wider range of materials.

  2. Geometric spin Hall effect of light with inhomogeneous polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Xiaohui; Zhou, Xinxing; Yi, Xunong

    2017-01-01

    The spin Hall effect of light originates from spin-orbit interaction of light, which manifests two types of geometric phases. In this paper, we report the observation of a geometric spin Hall effect by generating a light beam with inhomogeneous polarization distribution. Unlike the previously reported geometric spin Hall effect observed in a tilted beam-detector system, which is believed to result from an effective spin-redirection Berry geometric phase, the geometric spin Hall effect demonstrated here is attributed to an effective, spatially varying Pancharatnam-Berry geometric phase generated by the inhomogeneous polarization geometry. Our further experiments show that the geometric spin Hall effect can be tuned by tailoring the polarization geometry of light, demonstrating the spin states of photons can be steered with a great flexibility.

  3. Global model of an iodine gridded plasma thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grondein, P.; Lafleur, T.; Chabert, P.; Aanesland, A.

    2016-03-01

    Most state-of-the-art electric space propulsion systems such as gridded and Hall effect thrusters use xenon as the propellant gas. However, xenon is very rare, expensive to produce, and used in a number of competing industrial applications. Alternatives to xenon are currently being investigated, and iodine has emerged as a potential candidate. Its lower cost and larger availability, its solid state at standard temperature and pressure, its low vapour pressure and its low ionization potential make it an attractive option. In this work, we compare the performances of a gridded ion thruster operating separately with iodine and xenon, under otherwise identical conditions using a global model. The thruster discharge properties such as neutral, ion, and electron densities and electron temperature are calculated, as well as the thruster performance parameters such as thrust, specific impulse, and system efficiencies. For similar operating conditions, representative of realistic thrusters, the model predicts similar thrust levels and performances for both iodine and xenon. The thruster efficiency is however slightly higher for iodine compared with xenon, due to its lower ionization potential. This demonstrates that iodine could be a viable alternative propellant for gridded plasma thrusters.

  4. Wear Testing of the HERMeS Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, George J., Jr.; Gilland, James H.; Peterson, Peter Y.; Kamhawi, Hani; Huang, Wensheng; Ahern, Drew M.; Yim, John; Herman, Daniel A.; Hofer, Richard R.; Sekerak, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The Hall-Effect Rocket with Magnetic Shielding (HERMeS) thruster is being developed and tested at NASA GRC and NASA JPL through support of the Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) as primary propulsion for the Asteroid Redirect Robotic Mission (ARRM). This thruster is advancing the state-of-the-art of Hall-effect thrusters and is intended to serve as a precursor to higher power systems for human interplanetary exploration. A 2000-hour wear test has been initiated at NASA GRC with the HERMeS Technology Demonstration Unit One and three of four test segments have been completed totaling 728 h of operation. This is the first test of a NASA-designed magnetically shielded thruster to extend beyond 300 hr of continuous operation. Trends in performance, component wear, thermal design, plume properties, and back-sputtered deposition are discussed for two wear-test segments of 246 h and 360 h. The first incorporated graphite pole covers in an electrical configuration where cathode was electrically connected to thruster body. The second utilized traditional alumina pole covers with the thruster body floating. It was shown that the magnetic shielding in both configurations completely eliminated erosion of the boron nitride discharge channel but resulted in erosion of the inner pole cover. The volumetric erosion rate of the graphite pole covers was roughly 2/3 that of the alumina pole covers and the thruster exhibited slightly better performance. Buildup of back-sputtered carbon on the BN channel at a rate of roughly 1.5 µm/kh is shown to have negligible impact on the performance.

  5. Carbon Back Sputter Modeling for Hall Thruster Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilland, James H.; Williams, George J.; Burt, Jonathan M.; Yim, John Tamin

    2016-01-01

    Lifetime requirements for electric propulsion devices, including Hall Effect thrusters, are continually increasing, driven in part by NASA's inclusion of this technology in it's exploration architecture. NASA will demonstrate high-power electric propulsion system on the Solar Electric Propulsion Technology Demonstration Mission (SEP TDM). The Asteroid Redirect Robotic mission is one candidate SEP TDM, which is projected to require tens of thousands of thruster life. As thruster life is increased, for example through the use of improved magnetic field designs, the relative influence of facility effects increases. One such effect is the sputtering and redeposition, or back sputter, of facility materials by the high energy thruster plumes. In support of wear testing for the Hall Effect Rocket with Magnetic Shielding (HERMeS) project, the back sputter from a Hall effect thruster plume has been modeled for the NASA Glenn Research Center's Vacuum Facility 5. The predicted wear at a near-worst case condition of 600 V, 12.5 kW was found to be on the order of 1 micron/kh in a fully carbon-lined chamber. A more detailed numerical Monte Carlo code was also modified to estimate back sputter for a detailed facility and pumping configuration. This code demonstrated similar back sputter rate distributions, but is not yet accurately modeling the magnitudes. The modeling has been benchmarked to recent HERMeS wear testing, using multiple microbalance measurements. These recent measurements have yielded values on the order of 1.5 - 2 micron/kh at 600 V and 12.5 kW.

  6. Hall Effect in a Moving Liquid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Di Lieto, Alberto; Giuliano, Alessia; Maccarrone, Francesco; Paffuti, Giampiero

    2012-01-01

    A simple experiment, suitable for performing in an undergraduate physics laboratory, illustrates electromagnetic induction through the water entering into a cylindrical rubber tube by detecting the voltage developed across the tube in the direction transverse both to the flow velocity and to the magnetic field. The apparatus is a very simple…

  7. Hall Effect and Magneto Optical MFL Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jallouli, Wissem

    The need for a reliable sensing tool has stimulated countless researchers to develop techniques trying to extract maximum information. In the field of nondestructive testing (NDT), various sensors have been established to fulfill that function. Examples include the ultrasonic, eddy current, and magnetic flux leakage (MFL) based techniques. Because they are extremely reliable, MFL based techniques represent one of the best inspection technologies. These technologies have numerous applications in diverse domains, including petroleum pipeline and tank inspections, airplane inspections, and production quality control. In this work, we will present two technologies based on MFL technique. The first is the Hall Effect sensor. This device has been extensively developed during the last century, especially after the use of integrated circuit technology. Its reliable results even under extreme conditions made it an extremely useful tool. The second technology is Magneto Optical Imaging. This technique rose very recently, and scientists hold high expectations about its performance once proper techniques are developed. The study of these two sensing devices gives a better understanding of the MFL technique by allowing us to investigate the potential of each technology, experience each in studied conditions to derive its characteristics, and discuss its performance.

  8. Universality in the Fractional Quantum Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fradkin, Eduardo; Lopez, Ana

    1993-11-01

    In this lectures we review the fermion field theoretic approach to the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect and use it to discuss the origin of its remarkable universality. We discuss the semiclassical expansion around the average field approximation (AFA). We reexamine the AFA and the role of fluctuations. We argue that, order-by-order in the semiclassical expansion, the response functions obey the correct symmetry properties required by Galilean and Gauge Invariance and by the incompressibility of the fluid. In particular, we find that the low-momentum limit of the semiclassical approximation to the response functions is exact and that it saturates the f-sum rule. We discuss the nature of the spectrum of collective excitations of FQHE systems in the low-momentum limit. We applied these results to the problem of the screening of external charges and fluxes by the electron fluid, and obtained asymptotic expressions of the charge and current density profiles, for different types of interactions. The universality of the FQHE is demonstrated by deriving the form of the wave function of the ground state at long distances. We show that the wave functions of the fluid ground states of Fractional Quantum Hall systems, in the thermodynamic limit, are universal at long distances and that they have a generalized Laughlin form. This universality is a consequence of the analytic properties of the equal-time density correlation functions at long distances.

  9. Hall Effect Measured Using a Waveguide Tee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppock, Joyce; Anderson, James; Johnson, William

    2014-03-01

    We describe a simple microwave apparatus to measure the Hall effect in semiconductor wafers. The advantage of this technique is that it does not require contacts on the sample or the use of a resonant cavity. Our method consists of placing the semiconductor wafer into a slot cut in an X-band waveguide tee, which lies in the center of an electromagnet, injecting power into the two opposing arms of the tee, and measuring the output at the third arm. Application of a magnetic field gives a Hall signal that is linear in the magnetic field and which reverses phase when the magnetic field is reversed. This method yields the semiconductor mobility, which we can compare for calibration purposes with mobility data from direct-current (Van der Pauw1) measurements. We are in the process of modeling the system using a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation to better understand the behavior of the electric fields inside the sample. Resistivity data is obtained by measuring the microwave reflection coefficient of the sample. This talk presents data for silicon and germanium samples doped with boron or phosphorus. Measured mobilities ranged from 270-3000 cm2/V.s . 1L. J. van der Pauw, PhilipsResearchReports 13, 1 (1958)

  10. Hall Effect Measured Using a Waveguide Tee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppock, Joyce; Anderson, James; Johnson, William

    2013-03-01

    We describe a simple microwave apparatus to measure the Hall effect in semiconductor wafers. The advantage of this technique is that it does not require contacts on the sample, unlike the Van der Pauw method.[1] Our method consists of placing the semiconductor wafer into a slot cut in an X-band waveguide tee and placing the tee in the center of an electromagnet. The next step is to inject power into two arms of the tee and to balance the output so that no power comes out of the third arm of the tee at zero magnetic field. Application of a nonzero magnetic field gives a Hall signal that is linear in the magnetic field and which reverses phase when the magnetic field is reversed. We use a network analyzer to measure the ratio of the Hall signal to the input power. This method yields the semiconductor mobility in the wafer, which we can compare for calibration purposes with mobility data from our Van der Pauw measurements. This talk presents data for silicon and germanium samples doped with boron or phosphorus. Preliminary measurements on doped III-V semiconductor samples will also be presented.

  11. Intrinsic valley Hall effect in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Mou; Zhang, Wen-Lian; Liu, Hai; Bai, Yan-Kui

    2017-04-01

    If electrons are incident from an armchair graphene ribbon into the bulk graphene region, the electronic diffraction occurs. Because of the different triangular wrapping of the energy dispersion between valleys K and K ‧ , the electrons of valley K tend to be diffracted to one side and those of valley K ‧ to the other side. When the current is injected from the armchair ribbon of a four-terminal graphene device, the major portion of the incident current of valley K flows through one side arm and the minor portion through the other side arm. The ratio between them is derived to be 1 + 4 E / 3 in the low energy limit, where E is the energy in units of hopping parameter. The major arm for valley K is the minor arm for valley K ‧ . This results in the rise of the valley Hall effect, which is an intrinsic property of graphene stemming from the different electronic structure of the two valleys. The valley Hall conductance is calculated to be (2 E / 3)G0 with G0 being the conductance supported by the injection ribbon.

  12. Quantum Hall Effect and Quillen Metric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klevtsov, Semyon; Ma, Xiaonan; Marinescu, George; Wiegmann, Paul

    2017-02-01

    We study the generating functional, the adiabatic curvature and the adiabatic phase for the integer quantum Hall effect (QHE) on a compact Riemann surface. For the generating functional we derive its asymptotic expansion for the large flux of the magnetic field, i.e., for the large degree k of the positive Hermitian line bundle L k . The expansion consists of the anomalous and exact terms. The anomalous terms are the leading terms of the expansion. This part is responsible for the quantization of the adiabatic transport coefficients in QHE. We then identify the non-local (anomalous) part of the expansion with the Quillen metric on the determinant line bundle, and the subleading exact part with the asymptotics of the regularized spectral determinant of the Laplacian for the line bundle L k , at large k. Finally, we show how the generating functional of the integer QHE is related to the gauge and gravitational (2+1)d Chern-Simons functionals. We observe the relation between the Bismut-Gillet-Soulé curvature formula for the Quillen metric and the adiabatic curvature for the electromagnetic and geometric adiabatic transport of the integer Quantum Hall state. We then obtain the geometric part of the adiabatic phase in QHE, given by the Chern-Simons functional.

  13. Magnet/Hall-Effect Random-Access Memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Jiin-Chuan; Stadler, Henry L.; Katti, Romney R.

    1991-01-01

    In proposed magnet/Hall-effect random-access memory (MHRAM), bits of data stored magnetically in Perm-alloy (or equivalent)-film memory elements and read out by using Hall-effect sensors to detect magnetization. Value of each bit represented by polarity of magnetization. Retains data for indefinite time or until data rewritten. Speed of Hall-effect sensors in MHRAM results in readout times of about 100 nanoseconds. Other characteristics include high immunity to ionizing radiation and storage densities of order 10(Sup6)bits/cm(Sup 2) or more.

  14. Stacking order dependence of inverse spin Hall effect and anomalous Hall effect in spin pumping experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sang-Il; Seo, Min-Su; Park, Seung-Young; Kim, Dong-Jun; Park, Byong-Guk

    2015-05-07

    The dependence of the measured DC voltage on the non-magnetic material (NM) in NM/CoFeB and CoFeB/NM bilayers is studied under ferromagnetic resonance conditions in a TE{sub 011} resonant cavity. The directional change of the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE) voltage V{sub ISHE} for the stacking order of the bilayer can separate the pure V{sub ISHE} and the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) voltage V{sub AHE} utilizing the method of addition and subtraction. The Ta and Ti NMs show a broad deviation of the spin Hall angle θ{sub ISH}, which originates from the AHE in accordance with the high resistivity of NMs. However, the Pt and Pd NMs show that the kinds of NMs with low resistivity are consistent with the previously reported θ{sub ISH} values. Therefore, the characteristics that NM should simultaneously satisfy to obtain a reasonable V{sub ISHE} value in bilayer systems are large θ{sub ISH} and low resistivity.

  15. Fractional quantum Hall effect in the absence of Landau levels.

    PubMed

    Sheng, D N; Gu, Zheng-Cheng; Sun, Kai; Sheng, L

    2011-07-12

    It is well known that the topological phenomena with fractional excitations, the fractional quantum Hall effect, will emerge when electrons move in Landau levels. Here we show the theoretical discovery of the fractional quantum Hall effect in the absence of Landau levels in an interacting fermion model. The non-interacting part of our Hamiltonian is the recently proposed topologically non-trivial flat-band model on a checkerboard lattice. In the presence of nearest-neighbouring repulsion, we find that at 1/3 filling, the Fermi-liquid state is unstable towards the fractional quantum Hall effect. At 1/5 filling, however, a next-nearest-neighbouring repulsion is needed for the occurrence of the 1/5 fractional quantum Hall effect when nearest-neighbouring repulsion is not too strong. We demonstrate the characteristic features of these novel states and determine the corresponding phase diagram.

  16. Improved Readout For Micromagnet/Hall-Effect Memories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Jiin-Chuan; Stadler, Henry L.; Katti, Romney R.

    1993-01-01

    Two improved readout circuits for micromagnet/Hall-effect random-access memories designed to eliminate current shunts introducing errors into outputs of older readout circuits. Incorporate additional switching transistors to isolate Hall sensors as needed.

  17. Anomalous Hall effect in YIG|Pt bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Sibylle Schlitz, Richard; Geprägs, Stephan; Opel, Matthias; Huebl, Hans; Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B.; Gross, Rudolf

    2015-03-30

    We measure the ordinary and the anomalous Hall effect in a set of yttrium iron garnet|platinum (YIG|Pt) bilayers via magnetization orientation dependent magnetoresistance experiments. Our data show that the presence of the ferrimagnetic insulator YIG leads to an anomalous Hall effect like voltage in Pt, which is sensitive to both Pt thickness and temperature. Interpretation of the experimental findings in terms of the spin Hall anomalous Hall effect indicates that the imaginary part of the spin mixing conductance G{sub i} plays a crucial role in YIG|Pt bilayers. In particular, our data suggest a sign change in G{sub i} between 10 K and 300 K. Additionally, we report a higher order Hall effect contribution, which appears in thin Pt films on YIG at low temperatures.

  18. Anomalous Josephson Hall effect in magnet/triplet superconductor junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Takehito

    2015-11-01

    We investigate anomalous Hall effect in a magnet coupled to a triplet superconductor under phase gradient. It is found that the anomalous Hall supercurrent arises from the nontrivial structure of the magnetization. The magnetic structure manifested in the Hall supercurrent is characterized by even order terms of the exchange coupling, essentially different from that discussed in the context of anomalous Hall effect, reflecting the dissipationless nature of the supercurrent. We also discuss a possible candidate for magnetic structure to verify our prediction.

  19. Intrinsic spin and orbital angular momentum Hall effect.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S; Yang, Z

    2005-02-18

    A generalized definition of intrinsic and extrinsic transport coefficients is introduced. We show that transport coefficients from the intrinsic origin are solely determined by local electronic structure, and thus the intrinsic spin Hall effect is not a transport phenomenon. The intrinsic spin Hall current is always accompanied by an equal but opposite intrinsic orbital angular momentum Hall current. We prove that the intrinsic spin Hall effect does not induce a spin accumulation at the edge of the sample or near the interface.

  20. Hall-Effect Current Sensors For Integrated Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rippel, Wally E.

    1989-01-01

    Built-in devices measure direct or alternating currents. Hall-effect sensors placed near constriction in conductor strip. Differential configuration reduces effects of stray magnetic fields, nonlinearities, and changes in temperature. Preliminary design studies and experiments with macroscopic commercial Hall-effect sensors conducted to assess feasibility, limitations, and need for further research and development of this concept. Potential applications include programmable power supplies and protective circuitry.

  1. Nulling Hall-Effect Current-Measuring Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullender, Craig C.; Vazquez, Juan M.; Berru, Robert I.

    1993-01-01

    Circuit measures electrical current via combination of Hall-effect-sensing and magnetic-field-nulling techniques. Known current generated by feedback circuit adjusted until it causes cancellation or near cancellation of magnetic field produced in toroidal ferrite core by current measured. Remaining magnetic field measured by Hall-effect sensor. Circuit puts out analog signal and digital signal proportional to current measured. Accuracy of measurement does not depend on linearity of sensing components.

  2. The spin Hall effect in a quantum gas.

    PubMed

    Beeler, M C; Williams, R A; Jiménez-García, K; LeBlanc, L J; Perry, A R; Spielman, I B

    2013-06-13

    Electronic properties such as current flow are generally independent of the electron's spin angular momentum, an internal degree of freedom possessed by quantum particles. The spin Hall effect, first proposed 40 years ago, is an unusual class of phenomena in which flowing particles experience orthogonally directed, spin-dependent forces--analogous to the conventional Lorentz force that gives the Hall effect, but opposite in sign for two spin states. Spin Hall effects have been observed for electrons flowing in spin-orbit-coupled materials such as GaAs and InGaAs (refs 2, 3) and for laser light traversing dielectric junctions. Here we observe the spin Hall effect in a quantum-degenerate Bose gas, and use the resulting spin-dependent Lorentz forces to realize a cold-atom spin transistor. By engineering a spatially inhomogeneous spin-orbit coupling field for our quantum gas, we explicitly introduce and measure the requisite spin-dependent Lorentz forces, finding them to be in excellent agreement with our calculations. This 'atomtronic' transistor behaves as a type of velocity-insensitive adiabatic spin selector, with potential application in devices such as magnetic or inertial sensors. In addition, such techniques for creating and measuring the spin Hall effect are clear prerequisites for engineering topological insulators and detecting their associated quantized spin Hall effects in quantum gases. As implemented, our system realizes a laser-actuated analogue to the archetypal semiconductor spintronic device, the Datta-Das spin transistor.

  3. Charge carrier coherence and Hall effect in organic semiconductors

    DOE PAGES

    Yi, H. T.; Gartstein, Y. N.; Podzorov, V.

    2016-03-30

    Hall effect measurements are important for elucidating the fundamental charge transport mechanisms and intrinsic mobility in organic semiconductors. However, Hall effect studies frequently reveal an unconventional behavior that cannot be readily explained with the simple band-semiconductor Hall effect model. Here, we develop an analytical model of Hall effect in organic field-effect transistors in a regime of coexisting band and hopping carriers. The model, which is supported by the experiments, is based on a partial Hall voltage compensation effect, occurring because hopping carriers respond to the transverse Hall electric field and drift in the direction opposite to the Lorentz force actingmore » on band carriers. We show that this can lead in particular to an underdeveloped Hall effect observed in organic semiconductors with substantial off-diagonal thermal disorder. Lastly, our model captures the main features of Hall effect in a variety of organic semiconductors and provides an analytical description of Hall mobility, carrier density and carrier coherence factor.« less

  4. Cusped magnetic field mercury ion thruster. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beattie, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    The importance of a uniform current density profile in the exhaust beam of an electrostatic ion thruster is discussed in terms of thrust level and accelerator system lifetime. A residence time approach is used to explain the nonuniform beam current density profile of the divergent magnetic field thruster. Mathematical expressions are derived which relate the thruster discharge power loss, propellant utilization, and double to single ion density ratio to the geometry and plasma properties of the discharge chamber. These relationships are applied to a cylindrical discharge chamber model of the thruster. Experimental results are presented for a wide range of the discharge chamber length. The thruster designed for this investigation was operated with a cusped magnetic field as well as a divergent field geometry, and the cusped field geometry is shown to be superior from the standpoint of beam profile uniformity, performance, and double ion population.

  5. Mesoscopic spin Hall effect in semiconductor nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarbo, Liviu

    The spin Hall effect (SHE) is a name given to a collection of diverse phenomena which share two principal features: (i) longitudinal electric current flowing through a paramagnetic semiconductor or metallic sample leads to transverse spin current and spin accumulation of opposite sign at opposing lateral edges; (ii) SHE does not require externally applied magnetic field or magnetic ordering in the equilibrium state of the sample, instead it relies on the presence of spin-orbit (SO) couplings within the sample. This thesis elaborates on a new type of phenomenon within the SHE family, predicted in our recent studies [Phys. Rev. B 72, 075361 (2005); Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 046601 (2005); Phys. Rev. B 72, 075335 (2005); Phys. Rev. B 73 , 075303 (2006); and Europhys. Lett. 77, 47004 (2007)], where pure spin current flows through the transverse electrodes attached to a clean finitesize two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) due to unpolarized charge current injected through its longitudinal leads. If transverse leads are removed, the effect manifests as nonequilibrium spin Hall accumulation at the lateral edges of 2DEG wires. The SO coupling driving this SHE effect is of the Rashba type, which arises due to structural inversion asymmetry of semiconductor heterostructure hosting the 2DEG. We term the effect "mesoscopic" because the spin Hall currents and accumulations reach optimal value in samples of the size of the spin precession length---the distance over which the spin of an electron precesses by an angle pi. In strongly SO-coupled structures this scale is of the order of ˜100 nm, and, therefore, mesoscopic in the sense of being much larger than the characteristic microscopic scales (such as the Fermi wavelength, screening length, or the mean free path in disordered systems), but still much smaller than the macroscopic ones. Although the first theoretical proposal for SHE, driven by asymmetry in SO-dependent scattering of spin-up and spin-down electrons off impurities

  6. Laser Thomson scattering measurements of electron temperature and density in a hall-effect plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washeleski, Robert L.

    Hall-effect thrusters (HETs) are compact electric propulsion devices with high specific impulse used for a variety of space propulsion applications. HET technology is well developed but the electron properties in the discharge are not completely understood, mainly due to the difficulty involved in performing accurate measurements in the discharge. Measurements of electron temperature and density have been performed using electrostatic probes, but presence of the probes can significantly disrupt thruster operation, and thus alter the electron temperature and density. While fast-probe studies have expanded understanding of HET discharges, a non-invasive method of measuring the electron temperature and density in the plasma is highly desirable. An alternative to electrostatic probes is a non-perturbing laser diagnostic technique that measures Thomson scattering from the plasma. Thomson scattering is the process by which photons are elastically scattered from the free electrons in a plasma. Since the electrons have thermal energy their motion causes a Doppler shift in the scattered photons that is proportional to their velocity. Like electrostatic probes, laser Thomson scattering (LTS) can be used to determine the temperature and density of free electrons in the plasma. Since Thomson scattering measures the electron velocity distribution function directly no assumptions of the plasma conditions are required, allowing accurate measurements in anisotropic and non-Maxwellian plasmas. LTS requires a complicated measurement apparatus, but has the potential to provide accurate, non-perturbing measurements of electron temperature and density in HET discharges. In order to assess the feasibility of LTS diagnostics on HETs non-invasive measurements of electron temperature and density in the near-field plume of a Hall thruster were performed using a custom built laser Thomson scattering diagnostic. Laser measurements were processed using a maximum likelihood estimation method

  7. Anisotropic intrinsic spin Hall effect in quantum wires.

    PubMed

    Cummings, A W; Akis, R; Ferry, D K

    2011-11-23

    We use numerical simulations to investigate the spin Hall effect in quantum wires in the presence of both Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling. We find that the intrinsic spin Hall effect is highly anisotropic with respect to the orientation of the wire, and that the nature of this anisotropy depends strongly on the electron density and the relative strengths of the Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit couplings. In particular, at low densities, when only one subband of the quantum wire is occupied, the spin Hall effect is strongest for electron momentum along the [N110] axis, which is the opposite of what is expected for the purely 2D case. In addition, when more than one subband is occupied, the strength and anisotropy of the spin Hall effect can vary greatly over relatively small changes in electron density, which makes it difficult to predict which wire orientation will maximize the strength of the spin Hall effect. These results help to illuminate the role of quantum confinement in spin-orbit-coupled systems, and can serve as a guide for future experimental work on the use of quantum wires for spin-Hall-based spintronic applications.

  8. Second Magnetoplasmadynamic Thruster Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The meeting focused on progress made in establishing performance and lifetime expectations of magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters as functions of power, propellant, and design; models for the plasma flow and electrode components; viability and transportability of quasi-steady thruster testing; engineering requirements for high power, long life thrusters; and facilities and their requirements for performance and life testing.

  9. Two-Dimensional, Time-Dependent Plasma Structures of a Hall Effect Thruster

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    The magnet current and mass flow rate were held constant at 1.0 A and 0.94 mg/s of xenon. . 95 4.28 Measured intensity ratio I823/I828 for the BHT...mass flow rate were held constant at 1.0 A and 0.94 mg/s of xenon. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 4.30 Measured electron temperature of the BHT...provides the test matrix of the measured emission data. The mass flow rate and magnet current at the various discharge potentials was held constant at

  10. Revolutionizing Space Propulsion Through the Characterization of Iodine as Fuel for Hall-Effect Thrusters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    is 25,000 times more abundant in the Earth’s crust [4]. Iodine is a good alternative, but using it has its own technical barriers. One major barrier...required to heat a propellant to its melting point. Latent heat of fusion will need to be overcome when melting the propellant because simply raising

  11. Global Linear Stability Analysis of the Spoke Oscillation in Hall Effect Thrusters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-15

    voltage: Vd = 300V 6. magnetic field : Bmax = 230G 7. discharge current: Id = 4.5A 8 . power: Pd = 1.35kW 9. efficiency: η = 0.48 10. specific impulse: Isp...sheaths and hit the wall. The rest of them are trapped in a periodic motion along the magnetic field line from one wall the other. The characteristic...nn0 = 10 19 m− 3 ; electron temperature, Te0 = 6 eV; ionization frequency, νi0 = nn0ξion0 = 10 5 Hz; and magnetic field , B0 = 140 G. Additionally, the

  12. Dynamic Particle Weight Remapping in Hybrid PIC Hall-effect Thruster Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    there is little need for dynamic particle remapping in this problem. The ionization model used in this work samples new ions from a thermal population and...pseudo-spectral HET simulation. The technique also avoids thermalization by remaining faithful to the original velocity distribution function through the...merging techniques to adapt macropar- ticle weights within a simple pseudo-spectral HET simulation. The technique also avoids thermalization by

  13. Comparison of Medium Power Hall Effect Thruster Ion Acceleration for Krypton and Xenon Propellants

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-14

    electric transfer vehicles that would strain world-wide xenon production. This work compares the internal propellant acceleration of krypton ions...acceleration rate is lower and produces a lower effective electric field. As a result, energy conversion is lower than xenon for this flow matched case. In...lower cost replacement for xenon, may optimize to similar or potentially higher performance, and is enabling for very large solar electric transfer

  14. Valleytronics. The valley Hall effect in MoS₂ transistors.

    PubMed

    Mak, K F; McGill, K L; Park, J; McEuen, P L

    2014-06-27

    Electrons in two-dimensional crystals with a honeycomb lattice structure possess a valley degree of freedom (DOF) in addition to charge and spin. These systems are predicted to exhibit an anomalous Hall effect whose sign depends on the valley index. Here, we report the observation of this so-called valley Hall effect (VHE). Monolayer MoS2 transistors are illuminated with circularly polarized light, which preferentially excites electrons into a specific valley, causing a finite anomalous Hall voltage whose sign is controlled by the helicity of the light. No anomalous Hall effect is observed in bilayer devices, which have crystal inversion symmetry. Our observation of the VHE opens up new possibilities for using the valley DOF as an information carrier in next-generation electronics and optoelectronics.

  15. Composed planar Hall effect sensors with dual-mode operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mor, Vladislav; Roy, Debangsu; Schultz, Moty; Klein, Lior

    2016-02-01

    We present a composed planar Hall effect sensor with two modes of operation: (a) an ON mode where the composed sensor responds to magnetic field excitations similarly to the response of a regular planar Hall effect sensor, and (b) an OFF mode where the response is negligible. The composed planar Hall effect sensor switches from the OFF mode to the ON mode when it is exposed to a magnetic field which exceeds a certain threshold determined by the sensor design. The features of this sensor make it useful as a switch triggered by magnetic field and as a sensing device with memory, as its mode of operation indicates exposure to a magnetic field larger than a certain threshold without the need to be activated during the exposure itself.

  16. The spin Hall effect of light in moving medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hehe; Li, Xinzhong; Wang, Jingge

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the spin Hall effect of light in moving inhomogeneous medium using the Gordon metric and the Maxwell’s equations in the gravitational field. Light experiences a moving medium as a gravitational field by means of the Gordon metric. It is shown that the spin Hall effect of light is modified by the motion of medium, and the deflection of the ray trajectory is dependent on the polarization and the motion of the medium. It is interesting that there is no coupling of the spin angular momentum of light and the effective gravitational field when the medium is moving along the direction of the gradient ∇n(r). The results provide a potential method for controlling the spin Hall effect of light in medium.

  17. Intrinsic Spin Hall Effect in the Two Dimensional Hole Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Bernevig, B.Andrei; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-01-15

    We show that two types of spin-orbit coupling in the 2 dimensional hole gas (2DHG), with and without inversion symmetry breaking, contribute to the intrinsic spin Hall effect. Furthermore, the vertex correction due to impurity scattering vanishes in both cases, in sharp contrast to the case of usual Rashba coupling in the electron band. Recently, the spin Hall effect in a hole doped GaAs semiconductor has been observed experimentally by Wunderlich et al. From the fact that the life time broadening is smaller than the spin splitting, and the fact impurity vertex corrections vanish in this system, we argue that the observed spin Hall effect should be in the intrinsic regime.

  18. 15 cm multipole gas ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isaacson, G. C.; Kaufman, H. R.

    1976-01-01

    A 15-cm multipole thruster was operated on argon and xenon. The multipole approach used has been shown capable of low discharge losses and flat ion beam profiles with a minimum of redesign. This approach employs low magnetic field strengths and flat or cylindrical sheet-metal parts, hence is suited to rapid optimization and scaling. Only refractory metal cathodes were used in this investigation.

  19. Magnetic Field Tailored Annular Hall Thruster with Anode Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seunghun; Kim, Holak; Kim, Junbum; Lim, Youbong; Choe, Wonho; Korea Adv Inst of Sci; Tech Team; Korea Institute of Materials Science Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    Plasma propulsion system is one of the key components for advanced missions of satellites as well as deep space exploration. A typical plasma propulsion system is Hall effect thruster that uses crossed electric and magnetic fields to ionize a propellant gas and to accelerate the ionized gas to generate momentum. In Hall thruster plasmas, magnetic field configuration is important due to the fact that electron confinement in the electromagnetic fields affects both plasma and ion beam characteristics as well as thruster performance parameters including thrust, specific impulse, power efficiency, and life time. In this work, development of an anode layer Hall thruster (TAL) with magnetic field tailoring has been attempted. The TAL is possible to keep discharge in 1 to 2 kilovolts of anode voltage, which is useful to obtain high specific impulse. The magnetic field tailoring is used to minimize undesirable heat dissipation and secondary electron emission from the wall surrounding the plasma. We will report 3 W and 200 W thrusters performances measured by a pendulum thrust stand according to the magnetic field configuration. Also, the measured result will be compared with the plasma diagnostics conducted by an angular Faraday probe, a retarding potential analyzer, and a ExB probe.

  20. Controlling the optical spin Hall effect with light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafont, O.; Luk, S. M. H.; Lewandowski, P.; Kwong, N. H.; Leung, P. T.; Galopin, E.; Lemaitre, A.; Tignon, J.; Schumacher, S.; Baudin, E.; Binder, R.

    2017-02-01

    The optical spin Hall effect is a transport phenomenon of exciton polaritons in semiconductor microcavities, caused by the polaritonic spin-orbit interaction, which leads to the formation of spin textures. The control of the optical spin Hall effect via light injection in a double microcavity is demonstrated. Angular rotations of the polarization pattern up to 22° are observed and compared to a simple theoretical model. The device geometry is responsible for the existence of two polariton branches which allows a robust independent control of the polariton spin and hence the polarization state of the emitted light field, a solution technologically relevant for future spin-optronic devices.

  1. Anomalous Hall Effect in a Feromagnetic Rare-Earth Cobalite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoilov, A. V.; Yeh, N. C.; Vasquez, R. P.

    1996-01-01

    Rare-Earth manganites and cobalites with the perovskite structure have been a subject of great recent interest because their electrical resistance changes significantly when a magnetic field is applied...we have studied the Hall effect in thin film La(sub 0.5)Ca(sub 0.5)CoO(sub 3) material and have obtained convincing evidence fo the so called anomalous Hall effect, typical for magnetic metals...Our results suggest that near the ferromagnetic ordering temperature, the dominant electron scattering mechanism is the spin fluctuation.

  2. Carbon Back Sputter Modeling for Hall Thruster Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilland, James H.; Williams, George J.; Burt, Jonathan M.; Yim, John T.

    2016-01-01

    In support of wear testing for the Hall Effect Rocket with Magnetic Shielding (HERMeS) program, the back sputter from a Hall effect thruster plume has been modeled for the NASA Glenn Research Centers Vacuum Facility 5. The predicted wear at a near-worst case condition of 600 V, 12.5 kW was found to be on the order of 3 4 mkhour in a fully carbon-lined chamber. A more detailed numerical monte carlo code was also modified to estimate back sputter for a detailed facility and pumping configuration. This code demonstrated similar back sputter rate distributions, but is not yet accurately modeling the magnitudes. The modeling has been benchmarked to recent HERMeS wear testing, using multiple microbalance measurements. These recent measurements have yielded values, on the order of 1.5- 2 microns/khour.

  3. Dynamics of antiferromagnetic skyrmion driven by the spin Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Chendong; Song, Chengkun; Wang, Jianbo; Liu, Qingfang

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic skyrmion moved by the spin-Hall effect is promising for the application of the generation racetrack memories. However, the Magnus force causes a deflected motion of skyrmion, which limits its application. Here, we create an antiferromagnetic skyrmion by injecting a spin-polarized pulse in the nanostripe and investigate the spin Hall effect-induced motion of antiferromagnetic skyrmion by micromagnetic simulations. In contrast to ferromagnetic skyrmion, we find that the antiferromagnetic skyrmion has three evident advantages: (i) the minimum driving current density of antiferromagnetic skyrmion is about two orders smaller than the ferromagnetic skyrmion; (ii) the velocity of the antiferromagnetic skyrmion is about 57 times larger than the ferromagnetic skyrmion driven by the same value of current density; (iii) antiferromagnetic skyrmion can be driven by the spin Hall effect without the influence of Magnus force. In addition, antiferromagnetic skyrmion can move around the pinning sites due to its property of topological protection. Our results present the understanding of antiferromagnetic skyrmion motion driven by the spin Hall effect and may also contribute to the development of antiferromagnetic skyrmion-based racetrack memories.

  4. Topological Hall Effect in Skyrmions: A Nonequilibrium Coherent Transport Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Gen; Zang, Jiadong; Lake, Roger

    2014-03-01

    Skyrmion is a topological spin texture recently observed in many materials with broken inversion symmetry. In experiments, one effective method to detect the skyrmion crystal phase is the topological Hall measurement. At adiabatic approximation, previous theoretical studies show that the Hall signal is provided by an emergent magnetic field, which explains the topological Hall effect in the classical level. Motivated by the potential device application of skyrmions as digital bits, it is important to understand the topological Hall effect in the mesoscopic level, where the electron coherence should be considered. In this talk, we will discuss the quantum aspects of the topological Hall effect on a tight binding setup solved by nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF). The charge distribution, Hall potential distribution, thermal broadening effect and the Hall resistivity are investigated in detail. The relation between the Hall resistance and the DM interaction is investigated. Driven by the spin transferred torque (SST), Skyrmion dynamics is previously studied within the adiabatic approximation. At the quantum transport level, this talk will also discuss the non-adiabatic effect in the skyrmion motion with the presence of the topological Hall effect. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Nos. NSF 1128304 and NSF 1124733. It was also supported in part by FAME, one of six centers of STARnet, an SRC program sponsored by MARCO and DARPA.

  5. The Feasibility of a Stretched Lens Concentrating Solar Array Direct-Driving an Electric Thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandhorst, Henry W.; Best, Steve R.; Rodiek, Julie A.

    2010-01-01

    As space exploration continues to be a primary focus of NASA, solar electric propulsion (SEP) becomes a forerunner in the mode of transportation to reach the moon and other planets in our solar system. The Stretched Lens Array (SLA) is a unique ultra-high-performance, ultra-light, cost-effective photovoltaic concentrator array using refractive concentrator technology. The SLA is capable of high voltage operation and sustainability in a high radiation environment and can be specifically optimized for SEP by the ability to direct-drive Hall-effect thrusters. Auburn University has performed a ``direct drive'' experiment using a high-voltage (600 Voc) ENTECH SunLine concentrator array powered with multijunction solar cells coupled to a Russian T-100 Hall Effect Thruster (HET). This appears to be the first time a Hall thruster has been run directly from III-V-based multi-junction solar cells and at this high voltage. This paper discusses the set-up and testing results. Testing includes the inclusion of ENTECH's Stretched Lens Array hardware in a vacuum chamber to measure plume impingement effects at various positions relative to the exhaust axis of the thruster. The goal is to define meaningful high voltage SLA concentrator array and Hall thruster demonstration tests relevant to SEP and to test SLA reliability.

  6. Iodine Hall Thruster Propellant Feed System for a CubeSat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Peeples, Steven

    2014-01-01

    The components required for an in-space iodine vapor-fed Hall effect thruster propellant management system are described. A laboratory apparatus was assembled and used to produce iodine vapor and control the flow through the application of heating to the propellant reservoir and through the adjustment of the opening in a proportional flow control valve. Changing of the reservoir temperature altered the flowrate on the timescale of minutes while adjustment of the proportional flow control valve changed the flowrate immediately without an overshoot or undershoot in flowrate with the requisite recovery time associated with thermal control systems. The flowrates tested spanned a range from 0-1.5 mg/s of iodine, which is sufficient to feed a 200-W Hall effect thruster.

  7. VHITAL-160 Thruster Development Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sengupta, Anita; Marrese-Reading, Colleen; Hofer, Rich; Owens, Al; Swindlehurst, Ray; Fitzgerald, Dennis

    2006-01-01

    A general overview on the status of the Very High Isp Thruster with Anode Layer (VHITAL)-160 program is presented. The topics include: 1) Bi TAL Overview; 2) VHITAL Program Overview; 3) Thruster Fabrication; and 4) Thruster Testing.

  8. Vacuum arc plasma thrusters with inductive energy storage driver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnan, Mahadevan (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A plasma thruster with a cylindrical inner and cylindrical outer electrode generates plasma particles from the application of energy stored in an inductor to a surface suitable for the formation of a plasma and expansion of plasma particles. The plasma production results in the generation of charged particles suitable for generating a reaction force, and the charged particles are guided by a magnetic field produced by the same inductor used to store the energy used to form the plasma.

  9. High Power Hall Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jankovsky, Robert; Tverdokhlebov, Sergery; Manzella, David

    1999-01-01

    The development of Hall thrusters with powers ranging from tens of kilowatts to in excess of one hundred kilowatts is considered based on renewed interest in high power. high thrust electric propulsion applications. An approach to develop such thrusters based on previous experience is discussed. It is shown that the previous experimental data taken with thrusters of 10 kW input power and less can be used. Potential mass savings due to the design of high power Hall thrusters are discussed. Both xenon and alternate thruster propellant are considered, as are technological issues that will challenge the design of high power Hall thrusters. Finally, the implications of such a development effort with regard to ground testing and spacecraft intecrati'on issues are discussed.

  10. Pulsed hall thruster system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hruby, Vladimir J. (Inventor); Pote, Bruce M. (Inventor); Gamero-Castano, Manuel (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A pulsed Hall thruster system includes a Hall thruster having an electron source, a magnetic circuit, and a discharge chamber; a power processing unit for firing the Hall thruster to generate a discharge; a propellant storage and delivery system for providing propellant to the discharge chamber and a control unit for defining a pulse duration .tau.<0.1d.sup.3.rho./m, where d is the characteristic size of the thruster, .rho. is the propellant density at standard conditions, and m is the propellant mass flow rate for operating either the power processing unit to provide to the Hall thruster a power pulse of a pre-selected duration, .tau., or operating the propellant storage and delivery system to provide a propellant flow pulse of duration, .tau., or providing both as pulses, synchronized to arrive coincidentally at the discharge chamber to enable the Hall thruster to produce a discreet output impulse.

  11. The BMDO Thruster-on-a-Pallet Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caveny, Leonard H.; Curran, Francis M.; Sankovic, John M.; Allen, Douglas M.; Brophy, John R.; Garner, Charles

    1995-01-01

    The Ballistic Missile Defense Organization sponsors an aggressive program to develop and demonstrate electric propulsion and space power technologies for future missions. This program supports a focused effort to design, fabricate, and space qualify a Russian Hall thruster system-on-a-pallet ready to take advantage of a near-term flight opportunity. The Russian Hall Effect Thruster Technology (RHETT) program will demonstrate an integrated pallet design in late FY95. The program also includes a parallel effort to develop advanced Solar Concentrator Arrays with Refractive Linear Element Technology (SCARLET). This synergistic technology will be demonstrated in a flight experiment this summer on the Comet satellite. This paper provides an overview of the RHETT and SCARLET programs with an emphasis on electric propulsion, recent progress, and near-term program plans.

  12. MPD thruster technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Roger M.

    1991-01-01

    Inhouse magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster technology is discussed. The study focussed on steady state thrusters at powers of less than 1 MW. Performance measurement and diagnostics technologies were developed for high power thrusters. Also developed was a MPD computer code. The stated goals of the program are to establish: performance and life limitation; influence of applied fields; propellant effects; and scaling laws. The presentation is mostly through graphs and charts.

  13. Conducting Wall Hall Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, Dan M.; Hofer, Richard R.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Polk, James E.; Dotson, Brandon

    2013-01-01

    A unique configuration of the magnetic field near the wall of Hall thrusters, called Magnetic Shielding, has recently demonstrated the ability to significantly reduce the erosion of the boron nitride (BN) walls and extend the life of Hall thrusters by orders of magnitude. The ability of magnetic shielding to minimize interactions between the plasma and the discharge chamber walls has for the first time enabled the replacement of insulating walls with conducting materials without loss in thruster performance. The boron nitride rings in the 6 kW H6 Hall thruster were replaced with graphite that self-biased to near the anode potential. The thruster efficiency remained over 60% (within two percent of the baseline BN configuration) with a small decrease in thrust and increase in Isp typical of magnetically shielded Hall thrusters. The graphite wall temperatures decreased significantly compared to both shielded and unshielded BN configurations, leading to the potential for higher power operation. Eliminating ceramic walls makes it simpler and less expensive to fabricate a thruster to survive launch loads, and the graphite discharge chamber radiates more efficiently which increases the power capability of the thruster compared to conventional Hall thruster designs.

  14. Oxygen-Methane Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickens, Tim

    2012-01-01

    An oxygen-methane thruster was conceived with integrated igniter/injector capable of nominal operation on either gaseous or liquid propellants. The thruster was designed to develop 100 lbf (approximately 445 N) thrust at vacuum conditions and use oxygen and methane as propellants. This continued development included refining the design of the thruster to minimize part count and manufacturing difficulties/cost, refining the modeling tools and capabilities that support system design and analysis, demonstrating the performance of the igniter and full thruster assembly with both gaseous and liquid propellants, and acquiring data from this testing in order to verify the design and operational parameters of the thruster. Thruster testing was conducted with gaseous propellants used for the igniter and thruster. The thruster was demonstrated to work with all types of propellant conditions, and provided the desired performance. Both the thruster and igniter were tested, as well as gaseous propellants, and found to provide the desired performance using the various propellant conditions. The engine also served as an injector testbed for MSFC-designed refractory combustion chambers made of rhenium.

  15. O the Generalized Hall Effect as a Modification of Ideal Magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, Michael Lee

    The generalized Hall effect (GHE) in the generalized Hall model (GHM) is studied as a correction to ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) in the context of how it affects the linear stability of cylindrically symmetric equilibria and how it changes helically symmetric equilibria. The GHM differs from what is usually called the Hall model by including the electron pressure in the electron momentum equation. This gives the GHM some aspects of a two fluid model whereas the Hall model is a one fluid model. In both cases of cyclindrical and helical symmetry the presence of the electron pressure gradient as part of the GHE gives rise to an electric field tangent to the boundary of the plasma. This introduces an additional boundary condition in the case of a perfectly conducting plasma boundary. In the case of helical symmetry the equilibrium equations are a generalization of the Grad-Schafranov equation to equilibria with flow and GHE. The classification of these partial differential equations is independent of the component of the ion fluid velocity parallel to the helical direction which may allow for transonic or supersonic flows which are governed by elliptic equations. In the case of cylindrical symmetry a class of Alfven wave solutions that do not exist in ideal MHD is obtained and the accumulation point, with respect to large radial wavenumber, of the slow magnetoacoustic wave is shown to be changed from a finite nonzero value in ideal MHD to infinity by the GHE.

  16. Observation of the geometric spin Hall effect of light.

    PubMed

    Korger, Jan; Aiello, Andrea; Chille, Vanessa; Banzer, Peter; Wittmann, Christoffer; Lindlein, Norbert; Marquardt, Christoph; Leuchs, Gerd

    2014-03-21

    The spin Hall effect of light (SHEL) is the photonic analogue of the spin Hall effect occurring for charge carriers in solid-state systems. This intriguing phenomenon manifests itself when a light beam refracts at an air-glass interface (conventional SHEL) or when it is projected onto an oblique plane, the latter effect being known as the geometric SHEL. It amounts to a polarization-dependent displacement perpendicular to the plane of incidence. In this work, we experimentally investigate the geometric SHEL for a light beam transmitted across an oblique polarizer. We find that the spatial intensity distribution of the transmitted beam depends on the incident state of polarization and its centroid undergoes a positional displacement exceeding one wavelength. This novel phenomenon is virtually independent from the material properties of the polarizer and, thus, reveals universal features of spin-orbit coupling.

  17. Linear Magnetization Dependence of the Intrinsic Anomalous Hall Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, C.; Yao, Y.; Niu, Q.; Weitering, Harm H

    2006-01-01

    The anomalous Hall effect is investigated experimentally and theoretically for ferromagnetic thin films of Mn{sub 5}Ge{sub 3}. We have separated the intrinsic and extrinsic contributions to the experimental anomalous Hall effect and calculated the intrinsic anomalous Hall conductivity from the Berry curvature of the Bloch states using first-principles methods. The intrinsic anomalous Hall conductivity depends linearly on the magnetization, which can be understood from the long-wavelength fluctuations of the spin orientation at finite temperatures. The quantitative agreement between theory and experiment is remarkably good, not only near 0 K but also at finite temperatures, up to about -240 K (0.8T{sub c}).

  18. Thermal Hall Effect of Spin Excitations in a Kagome Magnet.

    PubMed

    Hirschberger, Max; Chisnell, Robin; Lee, Young S; Ong, N P

    2015-09-04

    At low temperatures, the thermal conductivity of spin excitations in a magnetic insulator can exceed that of phonons. However, because they are charge neutral, the spin waves are not expected to display a thermal Hall effect. However, in the kagome lattice, theory predicts that the Berry curvature leads to a thermal Hall conductivity κ(xy). Here we report observation of a large κ(xy) in the kagome magnet Cu(1-3, bdc) which orders magnetically at 1.8 K. The observed κ(xy) undergoes a remarkable sign reversal with changes in temperature or magnetic field, associated with sign alternation of the Chern flux between magnon bands. The close correlation between κ(xy) and κ(xx) firmly precludes a phonon origin for the thermal Hall effect.

  19. Higher-Dimensional Quantum Hall Effect in String Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Fabinger, Michal

    2002-08-08

    We construct a string theory realization of the 4+1d quantum Hall effect recently discovered by Zhang and Hu. The string theory picture contains coincident D4-branes forming an S{sup 4} and having D0-branes (i.e. instantons) in their world-volume. The charged particles are modeled as string ends. Their configuration space approaches in the large n limit a CP{sup 3}, which is an S{sup 2} fibration over S{sup 4}, the extra S{sup 2} being made out of the Chan-Paton degrees of freedom. An alternative matrix theory description involves the fuzzy S{sup 4}. We also find that there is a hierarchy of quantum Hall effects in odd-dimensional spacetimes, generalizing the known cases in 2 + 1d and 4 + 1d.

  20. Quantum Hall effect in graphene decorated with disordered multilayer patches

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Youngwoo; Sun, Jie Lindvall, Niclas; Kireev, Dmitry; Yurgens, August; Jae Yang, Seung; Rae Park, Chong; Woo Park, Yung

    2013-12-02

    Quantum Hall effect (QHE) is observed in graphene grown by chemical vapour deposition using platinum catalyst. The QHE is even seen in samples which are irregularly decorated with disordered multilayer graphene patches and have very low mobility (<500 cm{sup 2}V{sup −1}s{sup −1}). The effect does not seem to depend on electronic mobility and uniformity of the resulting material, which indicates the robustness of QHE in graphene.

  1. Hall effect measurements on InAs nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Bloemers, Ch.; Grap, T.; Lepsa, M. I.; Moers, J.; Gruetzmacher, D.; Lueth, H.; Trellenkamp, St.; Schaepers, Th.

    2012-10-08

    We have processed Hall contacts on InAs nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy using an electron beam lithography process with an extremely high alignment accuracy. The carrier concentrations determined from the Hall effect measurements on these nanowires are lower by a factor of about 4 in comparison with those measured by the common field-effect technique. The results are used to evaluate quantitatively the charging effect of the interface and surface states.

  2. Extraordinary Hall-effect in colloidal magnetic nanoparticle films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Gur, Leah; Tirosh, Einat; Segal, Amir; Markovich, Gil; Gerber, Alexander

    2017-03-01

    Colloidal nickel nanoparticles (NPs) coated with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) were synthesized. The nanoparticle dispersions were deposited on substrates and dried under mild heating to form conductive films. The films exhibited very small coercivity, nearly metallic conductivity, and a significant extraordinary Hall effect signal. This method could be useful for preparing simple, printed magnetic field sensors with the advantage of relatively high sensitivity around zero magnetic field, in contrast to magnetoresistive sensors, which have maximal field sensitivity away from zero magnetic field.

  3. Another Nulling Hall-Effect Current-Measuring Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thibodeau, Phillip E.; Sullender, Craig C.

    1993-01-01

    Lightweight, low-power circuit provides noncontact measurement of alternating or direct current of many ampheres in main conductor. Advantages of circuit over other nulling Hall-effect current-measuring circuits is stability and accuracy increased by putting both analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog converters in nulling feedback loop. Converters and rest of circuit designed for operation at sampling rate of 100 kHz, but rate changed to alter time or frequency response of circuit.

  4. Hall effect measurements on InAs nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blömers, Ch.; Grap, T.; Lepsa, M. I.; Moers, J.; Trellenkamp, St.; Grützmacher, D.; Lüth, H.; Schäpers, Th.

    2012-10-01

    We have processed Hall contacts on InAs nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy using an electron beam lithography process with an extremely high alignment accuracy. The carrier concentrations determined from the Hall effect measurements on these nanowires are lower by a factor of about 4 in comparison with those measured by the common field-effect technique. The results are used to evaluate quantitatively the charging effect of the interface and surface states.

  5. Dynamical quantum Hall effect in the parameter space.

    PubMed

    Gritsev, V; Polkovnikov, A

    2012-04-24

    Geometric phases in quantum mechanics play an extraordinary role in broadening our understanding of fundamental significance of geometry in nature. One of the best known examples is the Berry phase [M.V. Berry (1984), Proc. Royal. Soc. London A, 392:45], which naturally emerges in quantum adiabatic evolution. So far the applicability and measurements of the Berry phase were mostly limited to systems of weakly interacting quasi-particles, where interference experiments are feasible. Here we show how one can go beyond this limitation and observe the Berry curvature, and hence the Berry phase, in generic systems as a nonadiabatic response of physical observables to the rate of change of an external parameter. These results can be interpreted as a dynamical quantum Hall effect in a parameter space. The conventional quantum Hall effect is a particular example of the general relation if one views the electric field as a rate of change of the vector potential. We illustrate our findings by analyzing the response of interacting spin chains to a rotating magnetic field. We observe the quantization of this response, which we term the rotational quantum Hall effect.

  6. Optical detection of spin Hall effect in metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van T Erve, Olaf; Hanbicki, Aubrey; Li, Connie; Jonker, Berend

    Spin Hall effects in metals have been successfully measured using electrical methods such as nonlocal spin valve transport, ferromagnetic resonance or spin torque transfer experiments. These methods require complex processing techniques and measuring setups. Here we present room temperature measurements of the spin Hall effect in non-magnetic metals such as Pt and β-W using a standard bench top magneto-optic Kerr effect (MOKE) system. With this system, one can readily determine the angular dependence of the induced polarization on the bias current direction. When a bias current is applied, the spin Hall effect causes electrons of opposite spin to be scattered in opposite directions, resulting in a spin accumulation at the surface of the film. The MOKE signal tracks the applied square wave bias current with an amplitude and phase directly related to the spin Hall angle. Using this technique, we show that the spin-Hall angle of β-W is opposite in sign and significantly larger than that of Pt. In addition, we use this technique to detect spin diffusion from β-W into Al thin films, as well as spin diffusion from the topological surface states of Bi2Se3 into Al. We will also show direct modulation of the reflected light up to 100 kHz, using Bi doped Cu samples. This work was supported by internal programs at NRL.

  7. Nontrivial anomalous Hall effect in ultrathin Pt/permalloy bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanqing; Shan, Rong

    2015-03-01

    Anomalous Hall effect of Pt (2.5 nm)/permalloy bilayers with the thickness tPy = 0.6 ~10 nm; Pt/permalloy (2.2 nm) bilayers with the thickness tPt = 1.5 ~10 nm and Pt (2.5 nm)/permalloy (2.2 nm) bilayers with the post-annealing temperature 100 ~500° grown on MgO (001) substrates are investigated. The Pt/permalloy bilayer shows distinguished performance from the single permalloy layer due to the interfacial influence. Effective magnetic anisotropy of the bilayer with tPy <2.2 nm turns to be perpendicular to the film plane and it increases with decreasing measured temperature. More interestingly, the anomalous Hall effect is also greatly enhanced in these Pt/permalloy bilayers, comparing with that in bulk permalloy. The parameters presenting skew scattering, side jump and intrinsic contribution become extremely large, indicating a strong influence of spin orbit coupling coming from Pt/permalloy interface on the anomalous Hall effect.

  8. Observation of the fractional quantum Hall effect in an oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukazaki, A.; Akasaka, S.; Nakahara, K.; Ohno, Y.; Ohno, H.; Maryenko, D.; Ohtomo, A.; Kawasaki, M.

    2010-11-01

    The quantum Hall effect arises from the cyclotron motion of charge carriers in two-dimensional systems. However, the ground states related to the integer and fractional quantum Hall effect, respectively, are of entirely different origin. The former can be explained within a single-particle picture; the latter arises from electron correlation effects governed by Coulomb interaction. The prerequisite for the observation of these effects is extremely smooth interfaces of the thin film layers to which the charge carriers are confined. So far, experimental observations of such quantum transport phenomena have been limited to a few material systems based on silicon, III-V compounds and graphene. In ionic materials, the correlation between electrons is expected to be more pronounced than in the conventional heterostructures, owing to a large effective mass of charge carriers. Here we report the observation of the fractional quantum Hall effect in MgZnO/ZnO heterostructures grown by molecular-beam epitaxy, in which the electron mobility exceeds 180,000cm2V-1s-1. Fractional states such as ν=4/3, 5/3 and 8/3 clearly emerge, and the appearance of the ν=2/5 state is indicated. The present study represents a technological advance in oxide electronics that provides opportunities to explore strongly correlated phenomena in quantum transport of dilute carriers.

  9. Topological thermal Hall effect in frustrated kagome antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owerre, S. A.

    2017-01-01

    In frustrated magnets the Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction (DMI) arising from spin-orbit coupling can induce a magnetic long-range order. Here, we report a theoretical prediction of the thermal Hall effect in frustrated kagome magnets such as KCr3(OH) 6(SO4) 2 and KFe3(OH) 6(SO4)2 . The thermal Hall effects in these materials are induced by scalar spin chirality as opposed to DMI in previous studies. The scalar spin chirality originates from the magnetic-field-induced chiral spin configuration due to noncoplanar spin textures, but in general it can be spontaneously developed as a macroscopic order parameter in chiral quantum spin liquids. Therefore, we infer that there is a possibility of the thermal Hall effect in frustrated kagome magnets such as herbertsmithite ZnCu3(OH) 6Cl2 and the chromium compound Ca10Cr7O28 , although they also show evidence of magnetic long-range order in the presence of applied magnetic field or pressure.

  10. Optical detection of spin Hall effect in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Erve, O. M. J. van ‘t Hanbicki, A. T.; McCreary, K. M.; Li, C. H.; Jonker, B. T.

    2014-04-28

    Optical techniques have been widely used to probe the spin Hall effect in semiconductors. In metals, however, only electrical methods such as nonlocal spin valve transport, ferromagnetic resonance, or spin torque transfer experiments have been successful. These methods require complex processing techniques and measuring setups. We show here that the spin Hall effect can be observed in non-magnetic metals such as Pt and β-W, using a standard bench top magneto-optical Kerr system with very little sample preparation. Applying a square wave current and using Fourier analysis significantly improve our detection level. One can readily determine the angular dependence of the induced polarization on the bias current direction (very difficult to do with voltage detection), the orientation of the spin Hall induced polarization, and the sign of the spin Hall angle. This optical approach is free from the complications of various resistive effects, which can compromise voltage measurements. This opens up the study of spin Hall effect in metals to a variety of spin dynamic and spatial imaging experiments.

  11. The plasmoid instability and Hall effect during chromospheric magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Nicholas Arnold; Lukin, Vyacheslav

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a ubiquitous process in the partially ionized solar chromosphere. Recent two-dimensional simulations have shown that the plasmoid instability onsets during partially ionized reconnection [1-4]. We use the plasma-neutral module of the HiFi framework to simulate the nonlinear evolution of the plasmoid instability during symmetric and asymmetric reconnection. These simulations model the plasma and neutrals as separate fluids and include ionization, recombination, charge exchange, thermal conduction, and the Hall effect. The Hall effect leads to the development of significant out-of-plane magnetic fields in the current sheet region in the laminar phase, but we do not observe shortening of the current sheet or significant acceleration of the reconnection rate as a result. After the onset of the plasmoid instability, structure develops on scales comparable to the ion inertial length. We compare simulations of the plasmoid instability with and without the Hall effect to determine its impact on the reconnection process. Finally, we discuss ongoing efforts to connect these simulations with solar observations and laboratory experiments.[1] Leake et al. 2012, ApJ, 760, 109 [2] Leake et al. 2013, PhPl, 20, 062102 [3] Ni et al. 2015, ApJ, 799, 79 [4] Murphy & Lukin 2015, ApJ, 805, 134

  12. NASA's Hall Thruster Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jankovsky, Robert S.; Jacobson, David T.; Rawlin, Vincent K.; Mason, Lee S.; Mantenieks, Maris A.; Manzella, David H.; Hofer, Richard R.; Peterson, Peter Y.

    2001-01-01

    NASA's Hall thruster program has base research and focused development efforts in support of the Advanced Space Transportation Program, Space-Based Program, and various other programs. The objective of the base research is to gain an improved understanding of the physical processes and engineering constraints of Hall thrusters to enable development of advanced Hall thruster designs. Specific technical questions that are current priorities of the base effort are: (1) How does thruster life vary with operating point? (2) How can thruster lifetime and wear rate be most efficiently evaluated? (3) What are the practical limitations for discharge voltage as it pertains to high specific impulse operation (high discharge voltage) and high thrust operation (low discharge voltage)? (4) What are the practical limits for extending Hall thrusters to very high input powers? and (5) What can be done during thruster design to reduce cost and integration concerns? The objective of the focused development effort is to develop a 50 kW-class Hall propulsion system, with a milestone of a 50 kW engineering model thruster/system by the end of program year 2006. Specific program wear 2001 efforts, along with the corporate and academic participation, are described.

  13. Anomalous Hall effect in MnAl/W bilayers: Modification from strong spin Hall effect of W

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, K. K.; Miao, J.; Xu, X. G.; Wu, Y.; Zhao, J. H.; Jiang, Y.

    2017-04-01

    We report systematic measurements of anomalous Hall effect (AHE) in MnAl/W bilayers modified by strong spin Hall effect (SHE) of the heavy metals, in which a single L10-MnAl epitaxial layer reveals obvious orbital two-channel Kondo (2CK) effect. The results are compared with the AHE in MnAl/Cu with weak spin orbit coupling. As increasing the thickness of W, the strong SHE has gradually suppressed the orbital 2CK effect and modified the AHE of MnAl. A scaling involving multiple competing scattering mechanisms has been used to distinguish different contributions to the modified AHE. The direct observation of spin-orbit torque induced magnetization switching confirms that the result is a combination of the AHE of MnAl and SHE of W.

  14. Multi-Thruster Propulsion Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Michael J. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An electric propulsion machine includes an ion thruster having a discharge chamber housing a large surface area anode. The ion thruster includes flat annular ion optics with a small span to gap ratio. Optionally, at least a second thruster may be disposed radially offset from the ion thruster.

  15. Mercury ion thruster technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beattie, J. R.; Matossian, J. N.

    1989-01-01

    The Mercury Ion Thruster Technology program was an investigation for improving the understanding of state-of-the-art mercury ion thrusters. Emphasis was placed on optimizing the performance and simplifying the design of the 30 cm diameter ring-cusp discharge chamber. Thruster performance was improved considerably; the baseline beam-ion production cost of the optimized configuration was reduced to Epsilon (sub i) perspective to 130 eV/ion. At a discharge propellant-utilization efficiency of 95 percent, the beam-ion production cost was reduced to about 155 eV/ion, representing a reduction of about 40 eV/ion over the corresponding value for the 30 cm diameter J-series thruster. Comprehensive Langmuir-probe surveys were obtained and compared with similar measurements for a J-series thruster. A successful volume-averaging scheme was developed to correlate thruster performance with the dominant plasma processes that prevail in the two thruster designs. The average Maxwellian electron temperature in the optimized ring-cusp design is as much as 1 eV higher than it is in the J-series thruster. Advances in ion-extraction electrode fabrication technology were made by improving materials selection criteria, hydroforming and stress-relieving tooling, and fabrications procedures. An ion-extraction performance study was conducted to assess the effect of screen aperture size on ion-optics performance and to verify the effectiveness of a beam-vectoring model for three-grid ion optics. An assessment of the technology readiness of the J-series thruster was completed, and operation of an 8 cm IAPS thruster using a simplified power processor was demonstrated.

  16. Integrated Stirling Convertor and Hall Thruster Test Conducted

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Lee S.

    2002-01-01

    An important aspect of implementing Stirling Radioisotope Generators on future NASA missions is the integration of the generator and controller with potential spacecraft loads. Some recent studies have indicated that the combination of Stirling Radioisotope Generators and electric propulsion devices offer significant trip time and payload fraction benefits for deep space missions. A test was devised to begin to understand the interactions between Stirling generators and electric thrusters. An electrically heated RG- 350 (350-W output) Stirling convertor, designed and built by Stirling Technology Company of Kennewick, Washington, under a NASA Small Business Innovation Research agreement, was coupled to a 300-W SPT-50 Hall-effect thruster built for NASA by the Moscow Aviation Institute (RIAME). The RG-350 and the SPT-50 shown, were installed in adjacent vacuum chamber ports at NASA Glenn Research Center's Electric Propulsion Laboratory, Vacuum Facility 8. The Stirling electrical controller interfaced directly with the Hall thruster power-processing unit, both of which were located outside of the vacuum chamber. The power-processing unit accepted the 48 Vdc output from the Stirling controller and distributed the power to all the loads of the SPT-50, including the magnets, keeper, heater, and discharge. On February 28, 2001, the Glenn test team successfully operated the Hall-effect thruster with the Stirling convertor. This is the world's first known test of a dynamic power source with electric propulsion. The RG-350 successfully managed the transition from the purely resistive load bank within the Stirling controller to the highly capacitive power-processing unit load. At the time of the demonstration, the Stirling convertor was operating at a hot temperature of 530 C and a cold temperature of -6 C. The linear alternator was producing approximately 250 W at 109 Vac, while the power-processing unit was drawing 175 W at 48 Vdc. The majority of power was delivered to the

  17. Miniature cold gas thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bzibziak, R. J., Sr.

    1992-07-01

    Cold gas thrusters provide a safe, inexpensive, lightweight and reliable means of propulsive control for small satellites, projectiles and maneuvering control systems. Moog Inc. has designed and developed a family of miniature cold gas thrusters for use on Strategic Defense Iniative flight simulation experiments, sounding rockets, small satellite applications, astronaut control systems, and close proximity maneuvering systems for Space System. Construction features such as coil assembly, core assembly, armature assembly, external housing and valve body are discussed. The design approach, performance characteristics and functional description of cold gas thrusters designed for various applications are presented.

  18. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in topological insulator memory

    SciTech Connect

    Jalil, Mansoor B. A.; Tan, S. G.; Siu, Z. B.

    2015-05-07

    We theoretically investigate the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) in a magnetically coupled three-dimensional-topological insulator (3D-TI) system. We apply the generalized spin-orbit coupling Hamiltonian to obtain the Hall conductivity σ{sup xy} of the system. The underlying topology of the QAHE phenomenon is then analyzed to show the quantization of σ{sup xy} and its relation to the Berry phase of the system. Finally, we analyze the feasibility of utilizing σ{sup xy} as a memory read-out in a 3D-TI based memory at finite temperatures, with comparison to known magnetically doped 3D-TIs.

  19. The width of the plateaus of the quantum Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groshev, Atanas; Scho¨n, Gerd

    1994-02-01

    We suggest that in high quality samples in the quantum Hall regime the interaction between localized states dominates over disorder effects. It leads to the formation of a Wigner crystal, which melts at a critical value ν c≈0.2 of the filling factor of the localized states. This leads to a finite width of the plateaus of the integer quantum Hall effect Δν=2ν c. This result describes well recent experimental data on single AlGaAs/GaAs heterojunctions (electron and hole gases) and double 2DEG systems.

  20. Redundant speed control for brushless Hall effect motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nola, F. J. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A speed control system for a brushless Hall effect device equipped direct current (D.C.) motor is described. Separate windings of the motor are powered by separate speed responsive power sources. A change in speed, upward or downward, because of the failure of a component of one of the power sources results in a corrective signal being generated in the other power source to supply an appropriate power level and polarity to one winding to cause the motor to be corrected in speed.

  1. 25 Years quantum Hall effect: how it all came about

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landwehr, G.

    2003-12-01

    The quantum Hall effect (QHE) was discovered by Klaus von Klitzing in the spring of 1980. However, the plateaus in the Hall resistance of silicon metal oxide semiconductor devices which can be observed in high magnetic fields at low temperatures showed up several years earlier. The world wide research, which eventually culminated in the discovery, is briefly reviewed. The QHE was not predicted by theory, there were only approximate indications of quantization of the Hall resistance in whole fractions of h/ e2. The exceptional precision of the resistance values of the Hall plateau led very soon to a new resistance standard.

  2. Few-body, hyperspherical treatment of the quantum Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooten, R. E.; Daily, K. M.; Greene, Chris H.

    2016-03-01

    The quantum Hall effect arises from the quantum behavior of two-dimensional, strongly-interacting electrons exposed to a strong, perpendicular magnetic field [1, 2]. Conventionally treated from a many-body perspective, we instead treat the system from the few-body perspective using collective coordinates and the hyperspherical adiabatic technique developed originally for atomic systems [3]. The grand angular momentum K from K-harmonic few-body theory, is shown to be an approximate good collective quantum number in this system, and is shown to correlate with known fractional quantum Hall (FQH) states at experimentally observed filling factors.

  3. Complex scattering dynamics and the quantum Hall effects

    SciTech Connect

    Trugman, S.A.

    1994-12-16

    We review both classical and quantum potential scattering in two dimensions in a magnetic field, with applications to the quantum Hall effect. Classical scattering is complex, due to the approach of scattering states to an infinite number of dynamically bound states. Quantum scattering follows the classical behavior rather closely, exhibiting sharp resonances in place of the classical bound states. Extended scatterers provide a quantitative explanation for the breakdown of the QHE at a comparatively small Hall voltage as seen by Kawaji et al., and possibly for noise effects.

  4. Unconventional fractional quantum Hall effect in monolayer and bilayer graphene

    PubMed Central

    Jacak, Janusz; Jacak, Lucjan

    2016-01-01

    The commensurability condition is applied to determine the hierarchy of fractional fillings of Landau levels in monolayer and in bilayer graphene. The filling rates for fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE) in graphene are found in the first three Landau levels in one-to-one agreement with the experimental data. The presence of even denominator filling fractions in the hierarchy for FQHE in bilayer graphene is explained. Experimentally observed hierarchy of FQHE in the first and second Landau levels in monolayer graphene and in the zeroth Landau level in bilayer graphene is beyond the conventional composite fermion interpretation but fits to the presented nonlocal topology commensurability condition. PMID:27877866

  5. Geometric phase gradient and spin Hall effect of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Xiaohui; Zhou, Xinxing; Qiu, Cheng-Wei

    2016-10-01

    The spin Hall effect (SHE) of light originates from the spin-orbit interaction, which can be explained in terms of two geometric phases: the Rytov-Vladimirskii-Berry phase and the Pancharatnam-Berry phase. Here we present a unified theoretical description of the SHE based on the two types of geometric phase gradients, and observe experimentally the SHE in structured dielectric metasurfaces induced by the PB phase. Unlike the weak real-space spin-Hall shift induced by the SRB phase occurring at interfacial reflection/refraction, the observed SHE occurs in momentum space is large enough to be measured directly.

  6. Measurement of spin Hall effect of reflected light.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yi; Li, Yan; He, Huanyu; Gong, Qihuang

    2009-09-01

    We have measured the spin-dependent nanometer-sized displacements of the spin Hall effect of the reflected light from a planar air-glass interface. In the case of the vertical polarization, the displacement is found to increase with the incident angle and subsequently decrease after approximately 48 deg, while in the case of the horizontal polarization, it changes rapidly near the Brewster angle. For a fixed incident angle of 30 deg, the displacement decreases to zero as the polarization angle approaches approximately 39 deg from 0 deg (the horizontal polarization) and then increases in the opposite direction until 90 deg (the vertical polarization).

  7. Inverse spin Hall effect in Pt/(Ga,Mn)As

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, H.; Chen, L.; Chang, H. W.; Ohno, H.; Matsukura, F.

    2015-06-01

    We investigate dc voltages under ferromagnetic resonance in a Pt/(Ga,Mn)As bilayer structure. A part of the observed dc voltage is shown to originate from the inverse spin Hall effect. The sign of the inverse spin Hall voltage is the same as that in Py/Pt bilayer structure, even though the stacking order of ferromagnetic and nonmagnetic layers is opposite to each other. The spin mixing conductance at the Pt/(Ga,Mn)As interface is determined to be of the order of 10{sup 19 }m{sup −2}, which is about ten times greater than that of (Ga,Mn)As/p-GaAs.

  8. Spin Hall effect induced by a gravitational field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dartora, C. A.; Cabrera, G. G.

    2010-06-01

    The experiment by Collela et al. (1975) [1] evidenced in a striking manner how the gravitational field appears in quantum mechanics. Within the modern framework of gauge theories, one can ascribe such effect as due to gauge fields originated from fundamental symmetries of spacetime: local transformations of the Lorentz-Poincaré group. When this gauge principle is applied to the Dirac equation, we obtain kinematical correlations between the gravitational field and the spin of the particles. The phenomenon is similar to the spin Hall effect found in condensed matter systems, although much smaller in magnitude. Actual measurements may require highly precision interferometric techniques with spin-polarized neutrons.

  9. Sign change of the flux flow hall effect in HTSC

    SciTech Connect

    Feigel`man, M.V.; Geshkenbein, V.B.; Larkin, A.I. ||; Vinokur, V.M.

    1994-05-01

    A novel mechanism for the sign change of the Hall effect in flux flow region is proposed. The difference {delta}n between the electron density at the center of the vortex core and that far outside the vortex causes the additional contribution to the Hall conductivity {delta}{sigma}{sub xy} = {delta}nec/B. This contribution can be bigger than the conventional one inn the dirty case {Delta}(T){tau} < 1. If the electron density inside the core exceeds the electron density outside the core the double sign change may occur as a function of temperature and magnetic field.

  10. Note: An advanced in situ diagnostic system for characterization of electric propulsion thrusters and ion beam sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bundesmann, C.; Tartz, M.; Scholze, F.; Leiter, H. J.; Scortecci, F.; Gnizdor, R. Y.; Neumann, H.

    2010-04-01

    We present an advanced diagnostic system for in situ characterization of electric propulsion thrusters and ion beam sources. The system uses a high-precision five-axis positioning system with a modular setup and the following diagnostic tools: a telemicroscopy head for optical imaging, a triangular laser head for surface profile scanning, a pyrometer for temperature scanning, a Faraday probe for current density mapping, and an energy-selective mass spectrometer for beam characterization (energy and mass distribution, composition). The capabilities of our diagnostic system are demonstrated with a Hall effect thruster SPT-100D EM1.

  11. Numerical simulations of Hall-effect plasma accelerators on a magnetic-field-aligned mesh.

    PubMed

    Mikellides, Ioannis G; Katz, Ira

    2012-10-01

    The ionized gas in Hall-effect plasma accelerators spans a wide range of spatial and temporal scales, and exhibits diverse physics some of which remain elusive even after decades of research. Inside the acceleration channel a quasiradial applied magnetic field impedes the current of electrons perpendicular to it in favor of a significant component in the E×B direction. Ions are unmagnetized and, arguably, of wide collisional mean free paths. Collisions between the atomic species are rare. This paper reports on a computational approach that solves numerically the 2D axisymmetric vector form of Ohm's law with no assumptions regarding the resistance to classical electron transport in the parallel relative to the perpendicular direction. The numerical challenges related to the large disparity of the transport coefficients in the two directions are met by solving the equations on a computational mesh that is aligned with the applied magnetic field. This approach allows for a large physical domain that extends more than five times the thruster channel length in the axial direction and encompasses the cathode boundary where the lines of force can become nonisothermal. It also allows for the self-consistent solution of the plasma conservation laws near the anode boundary, and for simulations in accelerators with complex magnetic field topologies. Ions are treated as an isothermal, cold (relative to the electrons) fluid, accounting for the ion drag in the momentum equation due to ion-neutral (charge-exchange) and ion-ion collisions. The density of the atomic species is determined using an algorithm that eliminates the statistical noise associated with discrete-particle methods. Numerical simulations are presented that illustrate the impact of the above-mentioned features on our understanding of the plasma in these accelerators.

  12. Development of a direct evaporation bismuth Hall thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, Dean Richard

    Hall thrusters have been under active development around the world since the 1960's. Thrusters using traditional propellants such as xenon have been flown on a variety of satellite orbit raising and maintenance missions with an excellent record. To expand the mission envelope, it is necessary to lower the specific impulse of the thrusters but xenon and krypton are poor performers at specific impulses below 1,200 seconds. To enhance low specific impulse performance, this dissertation examines the development of a Hall-effect thruster which uses bismuth as a propellant. Bismuth, the heaviest non-radioactive element, holds many advantages over noble gas propellants from an energetics as well as a practical economic standpoint. Low ionization energy, large electron-impact cross-section and high atomic mass make bismuth ideal for low-specific impulse applications. The primary disadvantage lies in the high temperatures which are required to generate the bismuth vapors. Previous efforts carried out in the Soviet Union relied upon the complete bismuth vaporization and gas phase delivery to the anode. While this proved successful, the power required to vaporize and maintain gas phase throughout the mass flow system quickly removed many of the efficiency gains expected from using bismuth. To solve these problems, a unique method of delivering liquid bismuth to the anode has been developed. Bismuth is contained within a hollow anode reservoir that is capped by a porous metallic disc. By utilizing the inherent waste heat generated in a Hall thruster, liquid bismuth is evaporated and the vapors pass through the porous disc into the discharge chamber. Due to the high temperatures and material compatibility requirements, the anode was fabricated out of pure molybdenum. The porous vaporizer was not available commercially so a method of creating a refractory porous plate with 40-50% open porosity was developed. Molybdenum also does not respond well to most forms of welding so a

  13. Integrated thruster assembly program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The program is reported which has provided technology for a long life, high performing, integrated ACPS thruster assembly suitable for use in 100 typical flights of a space shuttle vehicle over a ten year period. The four integrated thruster assemblies (ITA) fabricated consisted of: propellant injector; a capacitive discharge, air gap torch type igniter assembly; fast response igniter and main propellant valves; and a combined regen-dump film cooled chamber. These flightweight 6672 N (1500 lb) thruster assemblies employed GH2/GO2 as propellants at a chamber pressure of 207 N/sq cm (300 psia). Test data were obtained on thrusted performance, thermal and hydraulic characteristics, dynamic response in pulsing, and cycle life. One thruster was fired in excess of 42,000 times.

  14. MPD thruster technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Roger M.; Mantenieks, Maris A.; Lapointe, Michael R.

    1991-01-01

    MPD (MagnetoPlasmaDynamic) thrusters demonstrated between 2000 and 7000 seconds specific impulse at efficiencies approaching 40 percent, and were operated continuously at power levels over 500 kW. These demonstrated capabilities, combined with the simplicity and robustness of the thruster, make them attractive candidates for application to both unmanned and manned orbit raising, lunar, and planetary missions. To date, however, only a limited number of thruster configurations, propellants, and operating conditions were studied. The present status of MPD research is reviewed, including developments in the measured performance levels and electrode erosion rates. Theoretical studies of the thruster dynamics are also described. Significant progress was made in establishing empirical scaling laws, performance and lifetime limitations and in the development of numerical codes to simulate the flow field and electrode processes.

  15. MPD thruster technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Roger M.; Lapointe, Michael R.; Mantenieks, Maris A.

    1991-01-01

    MPD thrusters have demonstrated between 2000 and 7000 sec specific impulse at efficiencies approaching 40 percent, and have been operated continuously at power levels over 500 kW. These demonstrated capabilities, combined with the simplicity and robustness of the thruster, make them attractive candidates for application to both unmanned and manned orbit raising, lunar, and planetary missions. This work reviews the present status of MPD thruster research, including developments in the measured performance levels and electrode erosion rates, and theoretical studies of the thruster dynamics. Significant progress has been made in establishing empirical scaling laws, performance and lifetime limitations, and in the development of numerical codes to simulate the flowfield and the electrode processes.

  16. Metallic Wall Hall Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, Dan Michael (Inventor); Hofer, Richard Robert (Inventor); Mikellides, Ioannis G. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A Hall thruster apparatus having walls constructed from a conductive material, such as graphite, and having magnetic shielding of the walls from the ionized plasma has been demonstrated to operate with nearly the same efficiency as a conventional non-magnetically shielded design using insulators as wall components. The new design is believed to provide the potential of higher power and uniform operation over the operating life of a thruster device.

  17. Nonlinear dynamics induced anomalous Hall effect in topological insulators.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guanglei; Xu, Hongya; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2016-01-28

    We uncover an alternative mechanism for anomalous Hall effect. In particular, we investigate the magnetisation dynamics of an insulating ferromagnet (FM) deposited on the surface of a three-dimensional topological insulator (TI), subject to an external voltage. The spin-polarised current on the TI surface induces a spin-transfer torque on the magnetisation of the top FM while its dynamics can change the transmission probability of the surface electrons through the exchange coupling and hence the current. We find a host of nonlinear dynamical behaviors including multistability, chaos, and phase synchronisation. Strikingly, a dynamics mediated Hall-like current can arise, which exhibits a nontrivial dependence on the channel conductance. We develop a physical understanding of the mechanism that leads to the anomalous Hall effect. The nonlinear dynamical origin of the effect stipulates that a rich variety of final states exist, implying that the associated Hall current can be controlled to yield desirable behaviors. The phenomenon can find applications in Dirac-material based spintronics.

  18. The local nature of incompressibility of quantum Hall effect.

    PubMed

    Kendirlik, E M; Sirt, S; Kalkan, S B; Ofek, N; Umansky, V; Siddiki, A

    2017-01-10

    Since the experimental realization of the integer quantum Hall effect in a two-dimensional electron system, the interrelation between the conductance quantization and the topological properties of the system has been investigated. Assuming that the two-dimensional electron system is described by a Bloch Hamiltonian, system is insulating in the bulk of sample throughout the quantum Hall plateau due to a magnetic field induced energy gap. Meanwhile, the system is conducting at the edges resembling a 2+1 dimensional topological insulator without time-reversal symmetry. Here, by our magneto-transport measurements performed on GaAs/AlGaAs high purity Hall bars with two inner contacts we show that incompressible strips formed at the edges result in Hall quantization, even if the bulk is compressible. Consequently, the relationship between the quantum Hall effect and topological bulk insulator breaks for specific field intervals within the plateaus. The measurement of conducting bulk, strongly challenges all existing single-particle theories.

  19. Optical detection of spin Hall effect in metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van T Erve, Olaf; Hanbicki, Aubrey; McCreary, Kathy; Li, Connie; Jonker, Berry

    2015-03-01

    Here we present room temperature measurements of the spin Hall effect in non-magnetic metals such as Pt and β-W using a standard bench top magneto-optic Kerr effect (MOKE) system. With this system, one can readily determine the angular dependence of the induced polarization on the bias current direction, the orientation of the spin Hall induced polarization, and the sign of the spin Hall angle. When a bias current is applied, the spin Hall effect causes electrons of opposite spin to be scattered in orthogonal directions, resulting in a spin accumulation at the surface of the film. The MOKE signal tracks the applied square wave bias current with an amplitude and phase directly related to the spin Hall angle. Using this technique, we show that the spin-Hall angle of β-W is opposite in sign and significantly larger than that of Pt, and follow the structural phase transition from β-W to α-W as the film is annealed through the dependence of the spin Hall angle on crystal structure. We also use this technique to detect spin diffusion from β-W into Al thin films. This work was supported by internal programs at NRL and the NRL Nanoscience Institute

  20. Spin Hall effect and spin swapping in diffusive superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espedal, Camilla; Lange, Peter; Sadjina, Severin; Mal'shukov, A. G.; Brataas, Arne

    2017-02-01

    We consider the spin-orbit-induced spin Hall effect and spin swapping in diffusive superconductors. By employing the nonequilibrium Keldysh Green's function technique in the quasiclassical approximation, we derive coupled transport equations for the spectral spin and particle distributions and for the energy density in the elastic scattering regime. We compute four contributions to the spin Hall conductivity, namely, skew scattering, side jump, anomalous velocity, and the Yafet contribution. The reduced density of states in the superconductor causes a renormalization of the spin Hall angle. We demonstrate that all four of these contributions to the spin Hall conductivity are renormalized in the same way in the superconducting state. In its simplest manifestation, spin swapping transforms a primary spin current into a secondary spin current with swapped current and polarization directions. We find that the spin-swapping coefficient is not explicitly but only implicitly affected by the superconducting gap through the renormalized diffusion coefficients. We discuss experimental consequences for measurements of the (inverse) spin Hall effect and spin swapping in four-terminal geometries. In our geometry, below the superconducting transition temperature, the spin-swapping signal is increased an order of magnitude while changes in the (inverse) spin Hall signal are moderate.

  1. Nonlinear dynamics induced anomalous Hall effect in topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guanglei; Xu, Hongya; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    We uncover an alternative mechanism for anomalous Hall effect. In particular, we investigate the magnetisation dynamics of an insulating ferromagnet (FM) deposited on the surface of a three-dimensional topological insulator (TI), subject to an external voltage. The spin-polarised current on the TI surface induces a spin-transfer torque on the magnetisation of the top FM while its dynamics can change the transmission probability of the surface electrons through the exchange coupling and hence the current. We find a host of nonlinear dynamical behaviors including multistability, chaos, and phase synchronisation. Strikingly, a dynamics mediated Hall-like current can arise, which exhibits a nontrivial dependence on the channel conductance. We develop a physical understanding of the mechanism that leads to the anomalous Hall effect. The nonlinear dynamical origin of the effect stipulates that a rich variety of final states exist, implying that the associated Hall current can be controlled to yield desirable behaviors. The phenomenon can find applications in Dirac-material based spintronics.

  2. Strong Spin Hall effect in PtMn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Yongxi; Shi, Shengjie; Ralph, Daniel; Buhrman, Robert

    Recent reports indicate that certain metallic antiferromagnets (AFM) can exhibit a significant spin Hall effect. Here we report a large damping-like spin torque efficiency (ξDL) in PtMn/ferromagnet(FM) bilayer structures, determined from both FM-thickness-dependent spin-torque ferromagnetic resonance (ST-FMR), and harmonic response (HR) measurements of layers with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA). We find that ξDL can vary from <0.1 to >0.15, depending on the thickness of PtMn, the stacking order of the samples, and the choice of the FM material. The field-like spin torque efficiency (ξFL) is also quite variable, 0<|ξFL|<0.5. The large broadening of the ST-FMR linewidth suggests extra spin attenuation at the AFM/FM interface that is possibly due to intermixing. The PtMn/FeCoB/MgO structures that exhibit PMA have a comparatively low switching current density and an unusual asymmetric switching phase diagram. These results indicate that AFM PtMn has significant potential both for advancing the understanding the physics of the spin Hall effect in Pt alloys, and for enabling new spintronics functionality.

  3. The local nature of incompressibility of quantum Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendirlik, E. M.; Sirt, S.; Kalkan, S. B.; Ofek, N.; Umansky, V.; Siddiki, A.

    2017-01-01

    Since the experimental realization of the integer quantum Hall effect in a two-dimensional electron system, the interrelation between the conductance quantization and the topological properties of the system has been investigated. Assuming that the two-dimensional electron system is described by a Bloch Hamiltonian, system is insulating in the bulk of sample throughout the quantum Hall plateau due to a magnetic field induced energy gap. Meanwhile, the system is conducting at the edges resembling a 2+1 dimensional topological insulator without time-reversal symmetry. Here, by our magneto-transport measurements performed on GaAs/AlGaAs high purity Hall bars with two inner contacts we show that incompressible strips formed at the edges result in Hall quantization, even if the bulk is compressible. Consequently, the relationship between the quantum Hall effect and topological bulk insulator breaks for specific field intervals within the plateaus. The measurement of conducting bulk, strongly challenges all existing single-particle theories.

  4. The local nature of incompressibility of quantum Hall effect

    PubMed Central

    Kendirlik, E. M.; Sirt, S.; Kalkan, S. B.; Ofek, N.; Umansky, V.; Siddiki, A.

    2017-01-01

    Since the experimental realization of the integer quantum Hall effect in a two-dimensional electron system, the interrelation between the conductance quantization and the topological properties of the system has been investigated. Assuming that the two-dimensional electron system is described by a Bloch Hamiltonian, system is insulating in the bulk of sample throughout the quantum Hall plateau due to a magnetic field induced energy gap. Meanwhile, the system is conducting at the edges resembling a 2+1 dimensional topological insulator without time-reversal symmetry. Here, by our magneto-transport measurements performed on GaAs/AlGaAs high purity Hall bars with two inner contacts we show that incompressible strips formed at the edges result in Hall quantization, even if the bulk is compressible. Consequently, the relationship between the quantum Hall effect and topological bulk insulator breaks for specific field intervals within the plateaus. The measurement of conducting bulk, strongly challenges all existing single-particle theories. PMID:28071652

  5. The spin Hall effect as a probe of nonlinear spin fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Wei, D H; Niimi, Y; Gu, B; Ziman, T; Maekawa, S; Otani, Y

    2012-01-01

    The spin Hall effect and its inverse have key roles in spintronic devices as they allow conversion of charge currents to and from spin currents. The conversion efficiency strongly depends on material details, such as the electronic band structure and the nature of impurities. Here we show an anomaly in the inverse spin Hall effect in weak ferromagnetic NiPd alloys near their Curie temperatures with a shape independent of material details, such as Ni concentrations. By extending Kondo's model for the anomalous Hall effect, we explain the observed anomaly as originating from the second-order nonlinear spin fluctuation of Ni moments. This brings to light an essential symmetry difference between the spin Hall effect and the anomalous Hall effect, which reflects the first-order nonlinear fluctuations of local moments. Our finding opens up a new application of the spin Hall effect, by which a minuscule magnetic moment can be detected.

  6. Ion thruster performance model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    A model of ion thruster performance is developed for high flux density, cusped magnetic field thruster designs. This model is formulated in terms of the average energy required to produce an ion in the discharge chamber plasma and the fraction of these ions that are extracted to form the beam. The direct loss of high energy (primary) electrons from the plasma to the anode is shown to have a major effect on thruster performance. The model provides simple algebraic equations enabling one to calculate the beam ion energy cost, the average discharge chamber plasma ion energy cost, the primary electron density, the primary-to-Maxwellian electron density ratio and the Maxwellian electron temperature. Experiments indicate that the model correctly predicts the variation in plasma ion energy cost for changes in propellant gas (Ar, Kr and Xe), grid transparency to neutral atoms, beam extraction area, discharge voltage, and discharge chamber wall temperature. The model and experiments indicate that thruster performance may be described in terms of only four thruster configuration dependent parameters and two operating parameters. The model also suggests that improved performance should be exhibited by thruster designs which extract a large fraction of the ions produced in the discharge chamber, which have good primary electron and neutral atom containment and which operate at high propellant flow rates.

  7. High temperature hall effect measurement system design, measurement and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkun, Isil

    A reliable knowledge of the transport properties of semiconductor materials is essential for the development and understanding of a number of electronic devices. In this thesis, the work on developing a Hall Effect measurement system with software based data acqui- sition and control for a temperature range of 300K-700K will be described. A system was developed for high temperature measurements of materials including single crystal diamond, poly-crystalline diamond, and thermoelectric compounds. An added capability for monitor- ing the current versus voltage behavior of the contacts was used for studying the influence of ohmic and non-ohmic contacts on Hall Effect measurements. The system has been primar- ily used for testing the transport properties of boron-doped single crystal diamond (SCD) deposited in a microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) reactor [1]. Diamond has several outstanding properties that are of high interest for its development as an electronic material. These include a relatively wide band gap of 5.5 (eV), high thermal conductivity, high mobility, high saturation velocity, and a high breakdown voltage. For a temperature range of 300K-700K, IV curves, Hall mobilities and carrier concentrations are shown. Temperature dependent Hall effect measurements have shown carrier concentrations from below 1017cm --3 to approximately 1021 cm--3 with mobilities ranging from 763( cm2/V s) to 0.15(cm 2/V s) respectively. Simulation results have shown the effects of single and mixed carrier models, activation energies, effective mass and doping concentrations. These studies have been helpful in the development of single crystal diamond for diode applications. Reference materials of Ge and GaAs were used to test the Hall Effect system. The system was also used to characterize polycrystalline diamond deposited on glass for electrochemical applications, and Mg2(Si,Sn) compounds which are promising candidates of low-cost, light weight and non

  8. 43. Bow thruster room. Bow thruster engine not used for ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. Bow thruster room. Bow thruster engine not used for powering hydraulics to boom as in some other tenders in same class. - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter BRAMBLE, Waterfront at Lincoln Avenue, Port Huron, St. Clair County, MI

  9. HIGH-FIELD STUDY OF A HALL-EFFECT MICROWAVE CONVERTER

    DTIC Science & Technology

    FREQUENCY CONVERTERS, CAVITY RESONATORS, COUPLING CIRCUITS, DIELECTRICS, DIOXIDES, ELECTRIC FIELDS, HALL EFFECT , MAGNETIC FIELDS, MICROWAVE NETWORKS, MICROWAVES, MODEL TESTS, MODULATION, RADIOFREQUENCY POWER, SENSITIVITY, TITANIUM

  10. Orbitronics: the Intrinsic Orbital Hall Effect in p-Doped Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Bernevig, B.Andrei; Hughes, Taylor L.; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-01-15

    The spin Hall effect depends crucially on the intrinsic spin-orbit coupling of the energy band. Because of the smaller spin-orbit coupling in silicon, the spin Hall effect is expected to be much reduced. We show that the electric field in p-doped silicon can induce a dissipationless orbital current in a fashion reminiscent of the spin Hall effect. The vertex correction due to impurity scattering vanishes and the effect is therefore robust against disorder. The orbital Hall effect can lead to the accumulation of local orbital momentum at the edge of the sample, and can be detected by the Kerr effect.

  11. Quantized spin waves in single Co/Pt dots detected by anomalous Hall effect based ferromagnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuchi, N. Furuta, M.; Okamoto, S.; Kitakami, O.; Shimatsu, T.

    2014-12-15

    Anomalous Hall effect (AHE) based ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) measurements were carried out on perpendicularly magnetized Co/Pt multilayer single dots of 0.4–3 μm in diameter. The resonance behavior was measured by detecting the decrease of perpendicular magnetization component due to magnetization precession. Resonance behavior was observed as a clear decrease of Hall voltages, and the obtained resonance fields were consistent with the results of vector-network-analyzer FMR. Spin-waves with cylindrical symmetry became significant by decreasing the dot diameter, and quantized multiple resonances were observed in the dot of 0.4 μm in diameter. The AHE based FMR proposed here is a powerful method to approach magnetization dynamics including spin waves and non-linear behavior excited in a finite nanostructure.

  12. Quantized spin waves in single Co/Pt dots detected by anomalous Hall effect based ferromagnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, N.; Furuta, M.; Okamoto, S.; Kitakami, O.; Shimatsu, T.

    2014-12-01

    Anomalous Hall effect (AHE) based ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) measurements were carried out on perpendicularly magnetized Co/Pt multilayer single dots of 0.4-3 μm in diameter. The resonance behavior was measured by detecting the decrease of perpendicular magnetization component due to magnetization precession. Resonance behavior was observed as a clear decrease of Hall voltages, and the obtained resonance fields were consistent with the results of vector-network-analyzer FMR. Spin-waves with cylindrical symmetry became significant by decreasing the dot diameter, and quantized multiple resonances were observed in the dot of 0.4 μm in diameter. The AHE based FMR proposed here is a powerful method to approach magnetization dynamics including spin waves and non-linear behavior excited in a finite nanostructure.

  13. NASA's Hall Thruster Program 2002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jankovsky, Robert S.; Jacobson, David T.; Pinero, Luis R.; Manzella, David H.; Hofer, Richard R.; Peterson, Peter Y.

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Hall thruster program currently supports a number of tasks related to high power thruster development for a number of customers including the Energetics Program (formerly called the Space-based Program), the Space Solar Power Program, and the In-space Propulsion Program. In program year 2002, two tasks were central to the NASA Hall thruster program: 1) the development of a laboratory Hall thruster capable of providing high thrust at high power-, and 2) investigations into operation of Hall thrusters at high specific impulse. In addition to these two primary thruster development activities, there are a number of other on-going activities supported by the NASA Hall thruster program. These additional activities are related to issues such as high-power power processor architecture, thruster lifetime, and spacecraft integration.

  14. Quantum spin Hall effect in nanostructures based on cadmium fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Bagraev, N. T.; Guimbitskaya, O. N.; Klyachkin, L. E.; Koudryavtsev, A. A.; Malyarenko, A. M.; Romanov, V. V.; Ryskin, A. I.; Shcheulin, A. S.

    2010-10-15

    Tunneling current-voltage (I-V) characteristics and temperature dependences of static magnetic susceptibility and specific heat of the CdB{sub x}F{sub 2-x}/p-CdF{sub 2}-QW/CdB{sub x}F{sub 2-x} planar sandwich structures formed on the surface of an n-CdF{sub 2} crystal have been studied in order to identify superconducting properties of the CdB{sub x}F{sub 2-x} {delta} barriers confining the p-type CdF{sub 2} ultranarrow quantum well. Comparative analysis of current-voltage (I-V) characteristics and conductance-voltage dependences (measured at the temperatures, respectively, below and above the critical temperature of superconducting transition) indicates that there is an interrelation between quantization of supercurrent and dimensional quantization of holes in the p-CdF{sub 2} ultranarrow quantum well. It is noteworthy that detection of the Josephson peak of current in each hole subband is accompanied by the appearance of the spectrum of the multiple Andreev reflection (MAR). A high degree of spin polarization of holes in the edge channels along the perimeter of the p-CdF{sub 2} ultranarrow quantum well appears as a result of MAR and makes it possible to identify the quantum spin Hall effect I-V characteristics; this effect becomes pronounced in the case of detection of nonzero conductance at the zero voltage applied to the vertical gate in the Hall geometry of the experiment. Within the energy range of superconducting gap, the I-V characteristics of the spin transistor and quantum spin Hall effect are controlled by the MAR spectrum appearing as the voltage applied to the vertical gate is varied. Beyond the range of the superconducting gap, the observed I-V characteristic of the quantum spin Hall effect is represented by a quantum conductance staircase with a height of the steps equal to e{sub 2}/h; this height is interrelated with the Aharonov-Casher oscillations of longitudinal and depends on the voltage applied to the vertical gate.

  15. Iodine Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szabo, James

    2015-01-01

    Iodine enables dramatic mass and cost savings for lunar and Mars cargo missions, including Earth escape and near-Earth space maneuvers. The demonstrated throttling ability of iodine is important for a singular thruster that might be called upon to propel a spacecraft from Earth to Mars or Venus. The ability to throttle efficiently is even more important for missions beyond Mars. In the Phase I project, Busek Company, Inc., tested an existing Hall thruster, the BHT-8000, on iodine propellant. The thruster was fed by a high-flow iodine feed system and supported by an existing Busek hollow cathode flowing xenon gas. The Phase I propellant feed system was evolved from a previously demonstrated laboratory feed system. Throttling of the thruster between 2 and 11 kW at 200 to 600 V was demonstrated. Testing showed that the efficiency of iodine fueled BHT-8000 is the same as with xenon, with iodine delivering a slightly higher thrust-to-power (T/P) ratio. In Phase II, a complete iodine-fueled system was developed, including the thruster, hollow cathode, and iodine propellant feed system. The nominal power of the Phase II system is 8 kW; however, it can be deeply throttled as well as clustered to much higher power levels. The technology also can be scaled to greater than 100 kW per thruster to support megawatt-class missions. The target thruster efficiency for the full-scale system is 65 percent at high specific impulse (Isp) (approximately 3,000 s) and 60 percent at high thrust (Isp approximately 2,000 s).

  16. Hall effect in quantum critical charge-cluster glass.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jie; Bollinger, Anthony T; Sun, Yujie; Božović, Ivan

    2016-04-19

    Upon doping, cuprates undergo a quantum phase transition from an insulator to a d-wave superconductor. The nature of this transition and of the insulating state is vividly debated. Here, we study the Hall effect in La2-xSrxCuO4(LSCO) samples doped near the quantum critical point atx∼ 0.06. Dramatic fluctuations in the Hall resistance appear belowTCG∼ 1.5 K and increase as the sample is cooled down further, signaling quantum critical behavior. We explore the doping dependence of this effect in detail, by studying a combinatorial LSCO library in which the Sr content is varied in extremely fine steps,Δx∼ 0.00008. We observe that quantum charge fluctuations wash out when superconductivity emerges but can be restored when the latter is suppressed by applying a magnetic field, showing that the two instabilities compete for the ground state.

  17. Precise quantization of anomalous Hall effect near zero magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bestwick, Andrew; Fox, Eli; Kou, Xufeng; Pan, Lei; Wang, Kang; Goldhaber-Gordon, David

    2015-03-01

    The quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) has recently been of great interest due to its recent experimental realization in thin films of Cr-doped (Bi, Sb)2Te3, a ferromagnetic 3D topological insulator. The presence of ferromagnetic exchange breaks time-reversal symmetry, opening a gap in the surface states, but gives rise to dissipationless chiral conduction at the edge of a magnetized film. Ideally, this leads to vanishing longitudinal resistance and Hall resistance quantized to h /e2 , where h is Planck's constant and e is the electron charge, but perfect quantization has so far proved elusive. Here, we study the QAHE in the limit of zero applied magnetic field, and measure Hall resistance quantized to within one part per 10,000. Deviation from quantization is due primarily to thermally activated carriers, which can be nearly eliminated through adiabatic demagnetization cooling. This result demonstrates an important step toward dissipationless electron transport in technologically relevant conditions.

  18. Quantum Hall effect in epitaxial graphene with permanent magnets

    PubMed Central

    Parmentier, F. D.; Cazimajou, T.; Sekine, Y.; Hibino, H.; Irie, H.; Glattli, D. C.; Kumada, N.; Roulleau, P.

    2016-01-01

    We have observed the well-kown quantum Hall effect (QHE) in epitaxial graphene grown on silicon carbide (SiC) by using, for the first time, only commercial NdFeB permanent magnets at low temperature. The relatively large and homogeneous magnetic field generated by the magnets, together with the high quality of the epitaxial graphene films, enables the formation of well-developed quantum Hall states at Landau level filling factors v = ±2, commonly observed with superconducting electro-magnets. Furthermore, the chirality of the QHE edge channels can be changed by a top gate. These results demonstrate that basic QHE physics are experimentally accessible in graphene for a fraction of the price of conventional setups using superconducting magnets, which greatly increases the potential of the QHE in graphene for research and applications. PMID:27922114

  19. Quantum Hall effect in epitaxial graphene with permanent magnets.

    PubMed

    Parmentier, F D; Cazimajou, T; Sekine, Y; Hibino, H; Irie, H; Glattli, D C; Kumada, N; Roulleau, P

    2016-12-06

    We have observed the well-kown quantum Hall effect (QHE) in epitaxial graphene grown on silicon carbide (SiC) by using, for the first time, only commercial NdFeB permanent magnets at low temperature. The relatively large and homogeneous magnetic field generated by the magnets, together with the high quality of the epitaxial graphene films, enables the formation of well-developed quantum Hall states at Landau level filling factors v = ±2, commonly observed with superconducting electro-magnets. Furthermore, the chirality of the QHE edge channels can be changed by a top gate. These results demonstrate that basic QHE physics are experimentally accessible in graphene for a fraction of the price of conventional setups using superconducting magnets, which greatly increases the potential of the QHE in graphene for research and applications.

  20. Magnetic bilayer-skyrmions without skyrmion Hall effect.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xichao; Zhou, Yan; Ezawa, Motohiko

    2016-01-19

    Magnetic skyrmions might be used as information carriers in future advanced memories, logic gates and computing devices. However, there exists an obstacle known as the skyrmion Hall effect (SkHE), that is, the skyrmion trajectories bend away from the driving current direction due to the Magnus force. Consequently, the skyrmions in constricted geometries may be destroyed by touching the sample edges. Here we theoretically propose that the SkHE can be suppressed in the antiferromagnetically exchange-coupled bilayer system, since the Magnus forces in the top and bottom layers are exactly cancelled. We show that such a pair of SkHE-free magnetic skyrmions can be nucleated and be driven by the current-induced torque. Our proposal provides a promising means to move magnetic skyrmions in a perfectly straight trajectory in ultra-dense devices with ultra-fast processing speed.

  1. Magnonic quantum Hall effect and Wiedemann-Franz law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, Kouki; Klinovaja, Jelena; Loss, Daniel

    2017-03-01

    We present a quantum Hall effect of magnons in two-dimensional clean insulating magnets at finite temperature. Through the Aharonov-Casher effect, a magnon moving in an electric field acquires a geometric phase and forms Landau levels in an electric field gradient of sawtooth form. At low temperatures, the lowest energy band being almost flat carries a Chern number associated with a Berry curvature. Appropriately defining the thermal conductance for bosons, we find that the magnon Hall conductances get quantized and show a universal thermomagnetic behavior, i.e., are independent of materials, and obey a Wiedemann-Franz law for magnon transport. We consider magnons with quadratic and linear (Dirac-like) dispersions. Finally, we show that our predictions are within experimental reach for ferromagnets and skyrmion lattices with current device and measurement techniques.

  2. Recent advances in the spin Hall effect of light.

    PubMed

    Ling, Xiaohui; Zhou, Xinxing; Huang, Kun; Liu, Yachao; Qiu, Cheng-Wei; Luo, Hailu; Wen, Shuangchun

    2017-03-30

    The spin Hall effect (SHE) of light, as an analogue of the SHE in electronic systems, is a promising candidate for investigating the SHE in semiconductor spintronics/valleytronics, high-energy physics and condensed matter physics, owing to their similar topological nature in the spin-orbit interaction. The SHE of light exhibits unique potential for exploring the physical properties of nanostructures, such as determining the optical thickness, and the material properties of metallic and magnetic thin films and even atomically thin two-dimensional materials. More importantly, it opens a possible pathway for controlling the spin states of photons and developing next-generation photonic spin Hall devices as a fundamental constituent of the emerging spinoptics. In this review, based on the viewpoint of the geometric phase gradient, we give a detailed presentation of the recent advances in the SHE of light and its applications in precision metrology and future spin-based photonics.

  3. Spin Hall effect of light in photon tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Luo Hailu; Wen Shuangchun; Shu Weixing; Fan Dianyuan

    2010-10-15

    We resolve the breakdown of angular momentum conservation on two-dimensional photon tunneling by considering the spin Hall effect (SHE) of light. This effect manifests itself as polarization-dependent transverse shifts of the field centroid when a classic wave packet tunnels through a prism-air-prism barrier. For the left or the right circularly polarized component, the transverse shift can be modulated by altering the refractive index gradient associated with the two prisms. We find that the SHE in conventional beam refraction can be evidently enhanced via photon tunneling mechanism. The transverse spatial shift is governed by the total angular momentum conservation law, while the transverse angular shift is governed by the total linear momentum conservation law. These findings open the possibility for developing new nanophotonic devices and can be extrapolated to other physical systems.

  4. Modulation of effective damping constant using spin Hall effect

    SciTech Connect

    Kasai, Shinya Kondou, Kouta; Sukegawa, Hiroaki; Mitani, Seiji; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito; Otani, Yoshichika

    2014-03-03

    We have investigated modulation of the effective damping constant α{sub eff} via spin currents through the spin Hall effect for Permalloy/Pt bilayer films with various thicknesses. The observed linear and sinusoidal dependences of current density and field direction on α{sub eff} are in agreement with the analytical model. By comparing the thickness dependence of spin Hall angle obtained from the damping modulation with that previously obtained by spin-torque-induced ferromagnetic resonance, we show that there is no clear extrinsic contribution in the present method. We also show the large modulation of the effective damping constant (down to ∼20%) in the high-current-density region.

  5. Hall effect in quantum critical charge-cluster glass

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jie; Bollinger, Anthony T.; Sun, Yujie; Božović, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Upon doping, cuprates undergo a quantum phase transition from an insulator to a d-wave superconductor. The nature of this transition and of the insulating state is vividly debated. Here, we study the Hall effect in La2-xSrxCuO4 (LSCO) samples doped near the quantum critical point at x ∼ 0.06. Dramatic fluctuations in the Hall resistance appear below TCG ∼ 1.5 K and increase as the sample is cooled down further, signaling quantum critical behavior. We explore the doping dependence of this effect in detail, by studying a combinatorial LSCO library in which the Sr content is varied in extremely fine steps, Δx ∼ 0.00008. We observe that quantum charge fluctuations wash out when superconductivity emerges but can be restored when the latter is suppressed by applying a magnetic field, showing that the two instabilities compete for the ground state. PMID:27044081

  6. Fractional quantum Hall effect in HgTe quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianhui

    2016-02-01

    We study the possibility of fractional quantum Hall effects in HgTe quantum wells using exact diagonalization. Our results show that Laughlin states, the Moore-Read state, and the Read-Rezayi Z3 state can all be supported. However, near the level crossing point (of the single-particle spectrum) the gap can be destroyed by Landau level mixing, and the Moore-Read state and the Read-Rezayi state dominate over their respective competing states only for wide wells. For smaller well widths the Moore-Read state crosses over to the composite fermion Fermi sea, while the Read-Rezayi state loses its dominance over the hierarchy state.

  7. Microbeads detection using spin-valve planar Hall effect sensors.

    PubMed

    Volmer, M; Avram, M

    2012-09-01

    In this paper we present a micromagnetic approach to describe the detection of magnetic nanobeads using planar Hall effect sensors. The magnetic beads polarized by a dc magnetic field generate a field, which can affect the magnetization state of spin-valve sensor, leading in principle, to a detectable signal. For magnetic nanobeads we assumed a superparamagnetic behaviour. Three detection geometries are discussed and some specific behaviours were highlighted by micromagnetic simulations. We found that when the polarising field is applied parallel with the sensor surface a very weak signal can be obtained. This is because at working fields, for which the magnetic nanobeads are magnetised, the sensor saturates. We identified other setups that can overcome this shortcoming and deliver a net signal.

  8. Heterodyne Hall effect in a two-dimensional electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Takashi; Bucciantini, Leda

    2016-10-01

    We study the hitherto unaddressed phenomenon of the quantum Hall effect with a magnetic and electric field oscillating in time with resonant frequencies. This phenomenon highlights an example of a heterodyne device with the magnetic field acting as a driving force, and it is analyzed in detail in its classical and quantum versions using Floquet theory. A bulk current flowing perpendicularly to the applied electric field is found, with a frequency shifted by integer multiples of the driving frequency. When the ratio of the cyclotron and driving frequency takes special values, the electron's classical trajectory forms a loop and the effective mass diverges, while in the quantum case we find an analog of the Landau quantization. A possible realization using metamaterial plasmonics is discussed.

  9. Pseudo Magnetic Faraday and Quantum Hall Effect In Oscillating Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhagat, Anita; Mullen, Kieran

    When a graphene layer is stressed, the strain changes the phase between sites in a tight binding model of the system. This phase can be viewed as a pseudo-magnetic vector potential. The corresponding pseudo-magnetic field has been experimentally verified in static cases. We examine the case of oscillating graphene ribbons and explore two new effects. The first is to investigate an oscillating pseudo-magnetic field that produces a quantum Hall effect: we calculate the I-V characteristic of an oscillating graphene nanoribbon as a function of frequency, and amplitude in both the oscillations and the applied driving voltage. Second, the time dependent pseudo-magnetic field should produce a pseudo-Faraday effect driving electrons in different valleys in opposite directions. In both cases, we make explicit calculations for experiment. This project was supported in part by the US National Science Foundation under Grant DMR-1310407.

  10. Investigating dissipation in the quantum anomalous Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Eli; Bestwick, Andrew; Goldhaber-Gordon, David; Feng, Yang; Ou, Yunbo; He, Ke; Wang, Yayu; Xue, Qi-Kun; Kou, Xufeng; Pan, Lei; Wang, Kang

    In the quantum anomalous Hall effect, a magnetic exchange gap in a 3D topological insulator gives rise to dissipationless chiral edge states. Though the effect has recently been realized in a family of ferromagnetically-doped (Bi,Sb)2Te3 topological insulator thin films, experiments to date have found non-vanishing longitudinal resistance, contrary to initial theoretical expectations. Proposed sources of this dissipation include extra gapless or activated quasi-helical edge states, thermally activated 2D conduction, and variable-range hopping. Here, we discuss transport measurements of Corbino disk and non-local geometries to identify the mechanism of non-ideal behavior. This work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, under Award No. 19-7503.

  11. Quantum Hall effect in epitaxial graphene with permanent magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmentier, F. D.; Cazimajou, T.; Sekine, Y.; Hibino, H.; Irie, H.; Glattli, D. C.; Kumada, N.; Roulleau, P.

    2016-12-01

    We have observed the well-kown quantum Hall effect (QHE) in epitaxial graphene grown on silicon carbide (SiC) by using, for the first time, only commercial NdFeB permanent magnets at low temperature. The relatively large and homogeneous magnetic field generated by the magnets, together with the high quality of the epitaxial graphene films, enables the formation of well-developed quantum Hall states at Landau level filling factors v = ±2, commonly observed with superconducting electro-magnets. Furthermore, the chirality of the QHE edge channels can be changed by a top gate. These results demonstrate that basic QHE physics are experimentally accessible in graphene for a fraction of the price of conventional setups using superconducting magnets, which greatly increases the potential of the QHE in graphene for research and applications.

  12. Topological insulator in junction with ferromagnets: Quantum Hall effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudnovskiy, A. L.; Kagalovsky, V.

    2015-06-01

    The ferromagnet-topological insulator-ferromagnet (FM-TI-FM) junction exhibits thermal and electrical quantum Hall effects. The generated Hall voltage and transverse temperature gradient can be controlled by the directions of magnetizations in the FM leads, which inspires the use of FM-TI-FM junctions as electrical and as heat switches in spintronic devices. Thermal and electrical Hall coefficients are calculated as functions of the magnetization directions in ferromagnets and the spin-relaxation time in TI. Both the Hall voltage and the transverse temperature gradient decrease but are not completely suppressed even at very short spin-relaxation times. The Hall coefficients turn out to be independent of the spin-relaxation time for symmetric configuration of FM leads.

  13. Influence of disorder on anomalous Hall effect for Heusler compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilanova Vidal, E.; Schneider, H.; Jakob, G.

    2011-05-01

    The anomalous Hall effect (AHE) is a long known but still not fully understood transport effect. Most theory papers focus on the influence of one particular contribution to the AHE. Actual measured experimental data, however, often are not in accord with idealized assumptions. In this work we discuss the data analysis for materials with low residual resistivity ratios. As prototypical materials we study half metallic Heusler compounds. Here the influence of defects and disorder is apparent in a material with a complex topology of the Fermi surface. Using films of different degree of disorder, we show how different scattering mechanisms can be separated. For Co2FeSi0.6Al0.4 and Co2FeGa0.5Ge0.5 the AHE induced by B2-type disorder and temperature-dependent scattering is positive, while DO3-type disorder and possible intrinsic contributions possess a negative sign.

  14. Deformed Calogero-Sutherland model and fractional quantum Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atai, Farrokh; Langmann, Edwin

    2017-01-01

    The deformed Calogero-Sutherland (CS) model is a quantum integrable system with arbitrary numbers of two types of particles and reducing to the standard CS model in special cases. We show that a known collective field description of the CS model, which is based on conformal field theory (CFT), is actually a collective field description of the deformed CS model. This provides a natural application of the deformed CS model in Wen's effective field theory of the fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE), with the two kinds of particles corresponding to electrons and quasi-hole excitations. In particular, we use known mathematical results about super-Jack polynomials to obtain simple explicit formulas for the orthonormal CFT basis proposed by van Elburg and Schoutens in the context of the FQHE.

  15. Rotational spin Hall effect in a uniaxial crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadeyeva, Tatyana A.; Alexeyev, Constantine N.; Rubass, Alexander F.; Ivanov, Maksym O.; Zinov'ev, Alexey O.; Konovalenko, Victor L.; Volyar, Alexander V.

    2012-04-01

    We have considered the propagation process of the phase-matched array of singular beams through a uniaxial crystal. We have revealed that local beams in the array are rotated when propagating. However the right and left rotations are unequal. There are at least two processes responsible for the array rotation: the interference of local beams and the spatial depolarization. The interference takes place in the vortex birth and annihilation events forming the symmetrical part of the rotation. The depolarization process contributes to the asymmetry of the rotation that is called the rotational spin Hall effect. It can be brought to light due to the difference between the envelopes of the dependences of the angular displacement on the inclination angle of the local beams or the crystal length reaching the value some angular degree. The direction of the additional array rotation is exclusively defined by the handedness of the circular polarization in the initial beam array.

  16. Rotational spin Hall effect in a uniaxial crystal.

    PubMed

    Fadeyeva, Tatyana A; Alexeyev, Constantine N; Rubass, Alexander F; Ivanov, Maksym O; Zinov'ev, Alexey O; Konovalenko, Victor L; Volyar, Alexander V

    2012-04-01

    We have considered the propagation process of the phase-matched array of singular beams through a uniaxial crystal. We have revealed that local beams in the array are rotated when propagating. However the right and left rotations are unequal. There are at least two processes responsible for the array rotation: the interference of local beams and the spatial depolarization. The interference takes place in the vortex birth and annihilation events forming the symmetrical part of the rotation. The depolarization process contributes to the asymmetry of the rotation that is called the rotational spin Hall effect. It can be brought to light due to the difference between the envelopes of the dependences of the angular displacement on the inclination angle of the local beams or the crystal length reaching the value of some angular degree. The direction of the additional array rotation is exclusively defined by the handedness of the circular polarization in the initial beam array.

  17. Magnetic bilayer-skyrmions without skyrmion Hall effect

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xichao; Zhou, Yan; Ezawa, Motohiko

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic skyrmions might be used as information carriers in future advanced memories, logic gates and computing devices. However, there exists an obstacle known as the skyrmion Hall effect (SkHE), that is, the skyrmion trajectories bend away from the driving current direction due to the Magnus force. Consequently, the skyrmions in constricted geometries may be destroyed by touching the sample edges. Here we theoretically propose that the SkHE can be suppressed in the antiferromagnetically exchange-coupled bilayer system, since the Magnus forces in the top and bottom layers are exactly cancelled. We show that such a pair of SkHE-free magnetic skyrmions can be nucleated and be driven by the current-induced torque. Our proposal provides a promising means to move magnetic skyrmions in a perfectly straight trajectory in ultra-dense devices with ultra-fast processing speed. PMID:26782905

  18. A Hall effect angle detector for solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Mamone, Salvatore; Dorsch, André; Johannessen, Ole G; Naik, Manoj V; Madhu, P K; Levitt, Malcolm H

    2008-01-01

    We describe a new method for independent monitoring of the angle between the spinning axis and the magnetic field in solid-state NMR. A Hall effect magnetic flux sensor is fixed to the spinning housing, so that a change in the stator orientation leads to a change in the angle between the Hall plane and the static magnetic field. This leads to a change in the Hall voltage generated by the sensor when an electric current is passed through it. The Hall voltage may be measured externally by a precision voltmeter, allowing the spinning angle to be measured non-mechanically and independent of the NMR experiment. If the Hall sensor is mounted so that the magnetic field is approximately parallel to the Hall plane, the Hall voltage becomes highly sensitive to the stator orientation. The current angular accuracy is around 10 millidegrees. The precautions needed to achieve higher angular accuracy are described.

  19. Unconventional quantum Hall effect in Floquet topological insulators.

    PubMed

    Tahir, M; Vasilopoulos, P; Schwingenschlögl, U

    2016-09-28

    We study an unconventional quantum Hall effect for the surface states of ultrathin Floquet topological insulators in a perpendicular magnetic field. The resulting band structure is modified by photon dressing and the topological property is governed by the low-energy dynamics of a single surface. An exchange of symmetric and antisymmetric surface states occurs by reversing the light's polarization. We find a novel quantum Hall state in which the zeroth Landau level undergoes a phase transition from a trivial insulator state, with Hall conductivity [Formula: see text] at zero Fermi energy, to a Hall insulator state with [Formula: see text]. These findings open new possibilities for experimentally realizing nontrivial quantum states and unusual quantum Hall plateaus at [Formula: see text].

  20. Integer quantum Hall effect of interacting electrons in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xin-Zhong; Ting, C. S.

    2017-02-01

    By taking into account the charge and spin orderings and the exchange interactions between all the Landau levels, we investigate the integer quantum Hall effect of electrons in graphene using the mean-field theory. We find that the fourfold degeneracy of the Landau levels cannot be completely lifted by the Coulomb interactions. In particular, at fillings ν =4 n +2 with n =0 ,1 ,... , there is no splitting between the fourfold degenerated Landau levels. We show that with doping the degenerated lowest empty level can be sequentially filled one by one; the filled level is lower than the empty ones because of the Coulomb-exchange interactions. This result explains the step Δ ν =1 in the quantized Hall conductivity. We present a highly efficient method for dealing with a huge number of the Coulomb couplings between all the Landau levels of the Dirac fermions.

  1. Quasiparticle Aggregation in the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Laughlin, R. B.

    1984-10-10

    Quasiparticles in the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect behave qualitatively like electrons confined to the lowest landau level, and can do everything electrons can do, including condense into second generation Fractional Quantum Hall ground states. I review in this paper the reasoning leading to variational wavefunctions for ground state and quasiparticles in the 1/3 effect. I then show how two-quasiparticle eigenstates are uniquely determined from symmetry, and how this leads in a natural way to variational wavefunctions for composite states which have the correct densities (2/5, 2/7, ...). I show in the process that the boson, anyon and fermion representations for the quasiparticles used by Haldane, Halperin, and me are all equivalent. I demonstrate a simple way to derive Halperin`s multiple-valued quasiparticle wavefunction from the correct single-valued electron wavefunction. (auth)

  2. Fractionally charged skyrmions in fractional quantum Hall effect.

    PubMed

    Balram, Ajit C; Wurstbauer, U; Wójs, A; Pinczuk, A; Jain, J K

    2015-11-26

    The fractional quantum Hall effect has inspired searches for exotic emergent topological particles, such as fractionally charged excitations, composite fermions, abelian and nonabelian anyons and Majorana fermions. Fractionally charged skyrmions, which support both topological charge and topological vortex-like spin structure, have also been predicted to occur in the vicinity of 1/3 filling of the lowest Landau level. The fractional skyrmions, however, are anticipated to be exceedingly fragile, suppressed by very small Zeeman energies. Here we show that, slightly away from 1/3 filling, the smallest manifestations of the fractional skyrmion exist in the excitation spectrum for a broad range of Zeeman energies, and appear in resonant inelastic light scattering experiments as well-defined resonances slightly below the long wavelength spin wave mode. The spectroscopy of these exotic bound states serves as a sensitive tool for investigating the residual interaction between composite fermions, responsible for delicate new fractional quantum Hall states in this filling factor region.

  3. Inverse spin Hall effect in a complex ferromagnetic oxide heterostructure

    PubMed Central

    Wahler, Martin; Homonnay, Nico; Richter, Tim; Müller, Alexander; Eisenschmidt, Christian; Fuhrmann, Bodo; Schmidt, Georg

    2016-01-01

    We present spin pumping and inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE) in an epitaxial complex oxide heterostructure. Ferromagnetic La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSMO) is used as a source of spin pumping while the spin sink exhibiting the ISHE consists of SrRuO3 (SRO). SRO is a ferromagnetic oxide with metallic conductivity, however, with a Curie temperature (TC) of 155 K, thus well below room temperature. This choice allows to perform the experiment above and below TC of the SRO and to demonstrate that SRO not only shows an ISHE of a magnitude comparable to Pt (though with opposite sign) in its non magnetic state but also exhibits a finite ISHE even 50 K below TC. PMID:27346793

  4. Precise quantization of anomalous Hall effect near zero magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Bestwick, A. J.; Fox, E. J.; Kou, Xufeng; Pan, Lei; Wang, Kang L.; Goldhaber-Gordon, D.

    2015-05-04

    In this study, we report a nearly ideal quantum anomalous Hall effect in a three-dimensional topological insulator thin film with ferromagnetic doping. Near zero applied magnetic field we measure exact quantization in the Hall resistance to within a part per 10,000 and a longitudinal resistivity under 1 Ω per square, with chiral edge transport explicitly confirmed by nonlocal measurements. Deviations from this behavior are found to be caused by thermally activated carriers, as indicated by an Arrhenius law temperature dependence. Using the deviations as a thermometer, we demonstrate an unexpected magnetocaloric effect and use it to reach near-perfect quantization by cooling the sample below the dilution refrigerator base temperature in a process approximating adiabatic demagnetization refrigeration.

  5. Magnetic bilayer-skyrmions without skyrmion Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xichao; Zhou, Yan; Ezawa, Motohiko

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic skyrmions might be used as information carriers in future advanced memories, logic gates and computing devices. However, there exists an obstacle known as the skyrmion Hall effect (SkHE), that is, the skyrmion trajectories bend away from the driving current direction due to the Magnus force. Consequently, the skyrmions in constricted geometries may be destroyed by touching the sample edges. Here we theoretically propose that the SkHE can be suppressed in the antiferromagnetically exchange-coupled bilayer system, since the Magnus forces in the top and bottom layers are exactly cancelled. We show that such a pair of SkHE-free magnetic skyrmions can be nucleated and be driven by the current-induced torque. Our proposal provides a promising means to move magnetic skyrmions in a perfectly straight trajectory in ultra-dense devices with ultra-fast processing speed.

  6. Vortices in superconducting films: Statistics and fractional quantum Hall effect

    SciTech Connect

    Dziarmaga, J.

    1996-03-01

    We present a derivation of the Berry phase picked up during exchange of parallel vortices. This derivation is based on the Bogolubov{endash}de Gennes formalism. The origin of the Magnus force is also critically reanalyzed. The Magnus force can be interpreted as an interaction with the effective magnetic field. The effective magnetic field may be even of the order 10{sup 6}{ital T}/A. We discuss a possibility of the fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE) in vortex systems. As the real magnetic field is varied to drive changes in vortex density, the vortex density will prefer to stay at some quantized values. The mere existence of the FQHE does not depend on vortex quantum statistics, although the pattern of the plateaux does. We also discuss how the density of anyonic vortices can lower the effective strengh of the Magnus force, what might be observable in measurements of Hall resistivity. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  7. Fractionally charged skyrmions in fractional quantum Hall effect

    SciTech Connect

    Balram, Ajit C.; Wurstbauer, U.; Wójs, A.; Pinczuk, A.; Jain, J. K.

    2015-11-26

    The fractional quantum Hall effect has inspired searches for exotic emergent topological particles, such as fractionally charged excitations, composite fermions, abelian and nonabelian anyons and Majorana fermions. Fractionally charged skyrmions, which support both topological charge and topological vortex-like spin structure, have also been predicted to occur in the vicinity of 1/3 filling of the lowest Landau level. The fractional skyrmions, however, are anticipated to be exceedingly fragile, suppressed by very small Zeeman energies. Here we show that, slightly away from 1/3 filling, the smallest manifestations of the fractional skyrmion exist in the excitation spectrum for a broad range of Zeeman energies, and appear in resonant inelastic light scattering experiments as well-defined resonances slightly below the long wavelength spin wave mode. The spectroscopy of these exotic bound states serves as a sensitive tool for investigating the residual interaction between composite fermions, responsible for delicate new fractional quantum Hall states in this filling factor region.

  8. Electric thruster research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.; Robinson, R. S.

    1982-01-01

    It has been customary to assume that ions flow nearly equally in all directions from the ion production region within an electron-bombardment discharge chamber. In general, the electron current through a magnetic field can alter the electron density, and hence the ion density, in such a way that ions tend to be directed away from the region bounded by the magnetic field. When this mechanism is understood, it becomes evident that many past discharge chamber designs have operated with a preferentially directed flow of ions. Thermal losses were calculated for an oxide-free hollow cathode. At low electron emissions, the total of the radiation and conduction losses agreed with the total discharge power. At higher emissions, though, the plasma collisions external to the cathode constituted an increasingly greater fraction of the discharge power. Experimental performance of a Hall-current thruster was adversely affected by nonuniformities in the magnetic field, produced by the cathode heating current. The technology of closed-drift thrusters was reviewed. The experimental electron diffusion in the acceleration channel was found to be within about a factor of 3 of the Bohm value for the better thruster designs at most operating conditions. Thruster efficiencies of about 0.5 appear practical for the 1000 to 2000 s range of specific impulse. Lifetime information is limited, but values of several thousands of hours should be possible with anode layer thrusters operated or = to 2000 s.

  9. A multiple thruster array for 30-cm thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawlin, V. K.; Mantenieks, M. A.

    1975-01-01

    The 3.0-m diameter chamber of the 7.6-m diameter by 21.4-m long vacuum tank at NASA LeRC was modified to permit testing of an array of up to six 30-cm thrusters with a variety of laboratory and thermal vacuum bread-board power systems. A primary objective of the Multiple Thruster Array (MTA) program is to assess the impact of multiple thruster operation on individual thruster and power processor requirements. The areas of thruster startup, steady-state operation, throttling, high voltage recycle, thrust vectoring, and shutdown are of special concern. The results of initial tests are reported.

  10. Development And Testing Of The Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Diffusion Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becnel, Mark D.; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2013-01-01

    The Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) diffusion thruster is an experiment in active development that takes advantage of physical phenomenon that occurs during operation of an IEC device. The IEC device has been proposed as a fusion reactor design that relies on traditional electrostatic ion acceleration and is typically arranged in a spherical geometry. The design incorporates two radially-symmetric spherical electrodes. Often the inner electrode utilizes a grid of wire shaped in a sphere with a radius 15 to 50 percent of the radius of the outer electrode. The inner electrode traditionally has 90 percent or more transparency to allow particles (ions) to pass to the center of the spheres and collide/recombine in the dense plasma core at r=0. When operating the IEC, an unsteady plasma leak is typically observed passing out one of the gaps in the lattice grid of the inner electrode. The IED diffusion thruster is based upon the idea that this plasma leak can be used for propulsive purposes. The IEC diffusion thruster utilizes the radial symmetry found in the IEC device. A cylindrical configuration is employed here as it will produce a dense core of plasma the length of the cylindrical grid while promoting the plasma leak to exhaust through an electromagnetic nozzle at one end of the apparatus. A proof-of-concept IEC diffusion thruster is operational and under testing using argon as propellant (Figure 1).

  11. Strong anisotropic anomalous Hall effect and spin Hall effect in the chiral antiferromagnetic compounds Mn3X (X =Ge , Sn, Ga, Ir, Rh, and Pt)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Sun, Yan; Yang, Hao; Železný, Jakub; Parkin, Stuart P. P.; Felser, Claudia; Yan, Binghai

    2017-02-01

    We have carried out a comprehensive study of the intrinsic anomalous Hall effect and spin Hall effect of several chiral antiferromagnetic compounds Mn3X (X = Ge, Sn, Ga, Ir, Rh and Pt) by ab initio band structure and Berry phase calculations. These studies reveal large and anisotropic values of both the intrinsic anomalous Hall effect and spin Hall effect. The Mn3X materials exhibit a noncollinear antiferromagnetic order which, to avoid geometrical frustration, forms planes of Mn moments that are arranged in a Kagome-type lattice. With respect to these Kagome planes, we find that both the anomalous Hall conductivity (AHC) and the spin Hall conductivity (SHC) are quite anisotropic for any of these materials. Based on our calculations, we propose how to maximize AHC and SHC for different materials. The band structures and corresponding electron filling, that we show are essential to determine the AHC and SHC, are compared for these different compounds. We point out that Mn3Ga shows a large SHC of about 600 (ℏ /e ) (Ωcm) -1 . Our work provides insights into the realization of strong anomalous Hall effects and spin Hall effects in chiral antiferromagnetic materials.

  12. Cylindrical wormholes

    SciTech Connect

    Bronnikov, K. A.; Lemos, Jose P. S.

    2009-05-15

    It is shown that the existence of static, cylindrically symmetric wormholes does not require violation of the weak or null energy conditions near the throat, and cylindrically symmetric wormhole geometries can appear with less exotic sources than wormholes whose throats have a spherical topology. Examples of exact wormhole solutions are given with scalar, spinor and electromagnetic fields as sources, and these fields are not necessarily phantom. In particular, there are wormhole solutions for a massless, minimally coupled scalar field in the presence of a negative cosmological constant, and for an azimuthal Maxwell electromagnetic field. All these solutions are not asymptotically flat. A no-go theorem is proved, according to which a flat (or string) asymptotic behavior on both sides of a cylindrical wormhole throat is impossible if the energy density of matter is everywhere nonnegative.

  13. Sign change of the vortex Hall effect in superconducting YBCO thin films with a square pattern of ion-irradiated defect columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zechner, G.; Haag, L. T.; Lang, W.; Dosmailov, M.; Bodea, M. A.; Pedarnig, J. D.

    2017-02-01

    The Hall effect in the mixed state of thin films of the high-temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO) that were patterned with a square array of regions with suppressed superconducting order parameter is investigated. Cylindrical defect columns penetrating the entire thin YBCO film along its crystallographic c - axis have been created by irradiation with He+ ions through a silicon stencil mask. Distinct peaks of the critical current at commensurate arrangements of magnetic flux quanta with the artificial defect lattice confirm enhanced vortex pinning. Vortex motion not only leads to a dissipative voltage along the current direction but also to a transverse voltage, termed vortex Hall effect. We report on the observation of a novel commensurability effect in the transverse Hall signal. A sign change and a positive peak of the Hall coefficient appear in a narrow magnetic field range around the matching field. The feature appears in the temperature range below the critical temperature, where the Hall effect usually is negative in underdoped and optimally-doped cuprate superconductors. The results indicate that the Hall matching effect originates from enhanced pinning of the vortices along the regular defect columns.

  14. Inert gas thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.; Robinson, R. S.

    1980-01-01

    Some advances in component technology for inert gas thrusters are described. The maximum electron emission of a hollow cathode with Ar was increased 60-70% by the use of an enclosed keeper configuration. Operation with Ar, but without emissive oxide, was also obtained. A 30 cm thruster operated with Ar at moderate discharge voltages give double-ion measurements consistent with a double ion correlation developed previously using 15 cm thruster data. An attempt was made to reduce discharge losses by biasing anodes positive of the discharge plasma. The reason this attempt was unsuccessful is not yet clear. The performance of a single-grid ion-optics configuration was evaluated. The ion impingement on the single grid accelerator was found to approach the value expected from the projected blockage when the sheath thickness next to the accelerator was 2-3 times the aperture diameter.

  15. Krypton ion thruster performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Michael J.; Williams, George J., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary data were obtained from a 30 cm ion thruster operating on krypton propellant over the input power range of 0.4-5.5 kW. The data are presented, and compared and contrasted to those obtained with xenon propellant over the same input power envelope. Typical krypton thruster efficiency was 70 percent at a specific impulse of approximately 5000 s, with a maximum demonstrated thrust-to-power ratio of approximately 42 mN/kW at 2090 s specific impulse and 1580 watts input power. Critical thruster performance and component lifetime issues were evaluated. Order-of-magnitude power throttling was demonstrated using a simplified power-throttling strategy.

  16. Krypton Ion Thruster Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Michael J.; Williams, George J.

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary data were obtained from a 30 cm ion thruster operating on krypton propellant over the input power range of 0.4 to 5.5 kW. The data presented are compared and contrasted to the data obtained with xenon propellant over the same input power envelope. Typical krypton thruster efficiency was 70 percent at a specific impulse of approximately 5000 s, with a maximum demonstrated thrust to power ratio of approximately 42 mN/kW at 2090 s specific impulse and 1580 watts input power. Critical thruster performance and component lifetime issues were evaluated. Order of magnitude power throttling was demonstrated using a simplified power-throttling strategy.

  17. Inert gas ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, W. D.

    1980-01-01

    Inert gas performance with three types of 12 cm diameter magnetoelectrostatic containment (MESC) ion thrusters was tested. The types tested included: (1) a hemispherical shaped discharge chamber with platinum cobalt magnets; (2) three different lengths of the hemispherical chambers with samarium cobalt magnets; and (3) three lengths of the conical shaped chambers with aluminum nickel cobalt magnets. The best argon performance was produced by a 8.0 cm long conical chamber with alnico magnets. The best xenon high mass utilization performance was obtained with the same 8.0 cm long conical thruster. The hemispherical thruster obtained 75 to 87% mass utilization at 185 to 205 eV/ion of singly charged ion equivalent beam.

  18. Observation of anomalous Hall effect in a non-magnetic two-dimensional electron system

    PubMed Central

    Maryenko, D.; Mishchenko, A. S.; Bahramy, M. S.; Ernst, A.; Falson, J.; Kozuka, Y.; Tsukazaki, A.; Nagaosa, N.; Kawasaki, M.

    2017-01-01

    Anomalous Hall effect, a manifestation of Hall effect occurring in systems without time-reversal symmetry, has been mostly observed in ferromagnetically ordered materials. However, its realization in high-mobility two-dimensional electron system remains elusive, as the incorporation of magnetic moments deteriorates the device performance compared to non-doped structure. Here we observe systematic emergence of anomalous Hall effect in various MgZnO/ZnO heterostructures that exhibit quantum Hall effect. At low temperatures, our nominally non-magnetic heterostructures display an anomalous Hall effect response similar to that of a clean ferromagnetic metal, while keeping a large anomalous Hall effect angle θAHE≈20°. Such a behaviour is consistent with Giovannini–Kondo model in which the anomalous Hall effect arises from the skew scattering of electrons by localized paramagnetic centres. Our study unveils a new aspect of many-body interactions in two-dimensional electron systems and shows how the anomalous Hall effect can emerge in a non-magnetic system. PMID:28300133

  19. Observation of anomalous Hall effect in a non-magnetic two-dimensional electron system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maryenko, D.; Mishchenko, A. S.; Bahramy, M. S.; Ernst, A.; Falson, J.; Kozuka, Y.; Tsukazaki, A.; Nagaosa, N.; Kawasaki, M.

    2017-03-01

    Anomalous Hall effect, a manifestation of Hall effect occurring in systems without time-reversal symmetry, has been mostly observed in ferromagnetically ordered materials. However, its realization in high-mobility two-dimensional electron system remains elusive, as the incorporation of magnetic moments deteriorates the device performance compared to non-doped structure. Here we observe systematic emergence of anomalous Hall effect in various MgZnO/ZnO heterostructures that exhibit quantum Hall effect. At low temperatures, our nominally non-magnetic heterostructures display an anomalous Hall effect response similar to that of a clean ferromagnetic metal, while keeping a large anomalous Hall effect angle θAHE~20°. Such a behaviour is consistent with Giovannini-Kondo model in which the anomalous Hall effect arises from the skew scattering of electrons by localized paramagnetic centres. Our study unveils a new aspect of many-body interactions in two-dimensional electron systems and shows how the anomalous Hall effect can emerge in a non-magnetic system.

  20. Particle-in-cell simulations of Hall plasma thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, Rodrigo; Ferreira, Jose Leonardo; Martins, Alexandre

    2016-07-01

    Hall plasma thrusters can be modelled using particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. In these simulations, the plasma is described by a set of equations which represent a coupled system of charged particles and electromagnetic fields. The fields are computed using a spatial grid (i.e., a discretization in space), whereas the particles can move continuously in space. Briefly, the particle and fields dynamics are computed as follows. First, forces due to electric and magnetic fields are employed to calculate the velocities and positions of particles. Next, the velocities and positions of particles are used to compute the charge and current densities at discrete positions in space. Finally, these densities are used to solve the electromagnetic field equations in the grid, which are interpolated at the position of the particles to obtain the acting forces, and restart this cycle. We will present numerical simulations using software for PIC simulations to study turbulence, wave and instabilities that arise in Hall plasma thrusters. We have sucessfully reproduced a numerical simulation of a SPT-100 Hall thruster using a two-dimensional (2D) model. In addition, we are developing a 2D model of a cylindrical Hall thruster. The results of these simulations will contribute to improve the performance of plasma thrusters to be used in Cubesats satellites currenty in development at the Plasma Laboratory at University of Brasília.

  1. NASA's 2004 Hall Thruster Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, David T.; Manzella, David H.; Hofer, Richard R.; Peterson, Peter Y.

    2004-01-01

    An overview of NASA's Hall thruster research and development tasks conducted during fiscal year 2004 is presented. These tasks focus on: raising the technology readiness level of high power Hall thrusters, developing a moderate-power/ moderate specific impulse Hall thruster, demonstrating high-power/high specific impulse Hall thruster operation, and addressing the fundamental technical challenges of emerging Hall thruster concepts. Programmatic background information, technical accomplishments and out year plans for each program element performed under the sponsorship of the In-Space Transportation Program, Project Prometheus, and the Energetics Project are provided.

  2. Magnetoplasmadynamic Thruster Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    On May 16, 1991, the NASA Headquarters Propulsion, Power, and Energy Division and the NASA Lewis Research Center Low Thrust Propulsion Branch hosted a workshop attended by key experts in magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters and associated sciences. The scope was limited to high power MPD thrusters suitable for major NASA space exploration missions, and its purpose was to initiate the process of increasing the expectations and prospects for MPD research, primarily by increasing the level of cooperation, interaction, and communication between parties within the MPD community.

  3. Evaluation of the Hall-effect sensor for determination of eyelid closure in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hamiel, S R; Bleicher, J N; Tubach, M R; Cronan, J C

    1995-07-01

    A small device to detect eyelid closure was designed on the basis of a Hall-effect sensor. Accurate sensing of normal eyelid closure is required to develop a prosthetic eyelid closure device for patients with paralyzed orbicularis oculi muscles. In this study, six rabbits had the sensors surgically implanted. A Hall-effect sensor, a small device that measures magnetic fields, was implanted in the inferior eyelid near the ciliary margin. An opposing magnet was implanted in the upper eyelid. Thus, as the eyelid closes, the output of the Hall-effect sensor will increase. This output voltage was monitored weekly. During the first 5 weeks the output of the Hall-effect sensor decreased slightly but then reached a steady state for the duration of the experiment. This study suggests that the Hall-effect sensor could be used to detect normal eyelid closure in an implantable facial reanimation device.

  4. Inert gas ion thruster development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, W. D.

    1980-01-01

    Two 12 cm magneto-electrostatic containment (MESC) ion thrusters were performance mapped with argon and xenon. The first, hexagonal, thruster produced optimized performance of 48.5to 79 percent argon mass utilization efficiencies at discharge energies of 240 to 425 eV/ion, respectively, Xenon mass utilization efficiencies of 78 to 95 percent were observed at discharge energies of 220 to 290 eV/ion with the same optimized hexagonal thruster. Changes to the cathode baffle reduced the discharge anode potential during xenon operation from approximately 40 volts to about 30 volts. Preliminary tests conducted with the second, hemispherical, MESC thruster showed a nonuniform anode magnetic field adversely affected thruster performance. This performance degradation was partially overcome by changes in the boundary anode placement. Conclusions drawn the hemispherical thruster tests gave insights into the plasma processes in the MESC discharge that will aid in the design of future thrusters.

  5. MPD Thruster Performance Analytic Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilland, James; Johnston, Geoffrey

    2007-01-01

    Magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters are capable of accelerating quasi-neutral plasmas to high exhaust velocities using Megawatts (MW) of electric power. These characteristics make such devices worthy of consideration for demanding, far-term missions such as the human exploration of Mars or beyond. Assessment of MPD thrusters at the system and mission level is often difficult due to their status as ongoing experimental research topics rather than developed thrusters. However, in order to assess MPD thrusters utility in later missions, some adequate characterization of performance, or more exactly, projected performance, and system level definition are required for use in analyses. The most recent physical models of self-field MPD thrusters have been examined, assessed, and reconfigured for use by systems and mission analysts. The physical models allow for rational projections of thruster performance based on physical parameters that can be measured in the laboratory. The models and their implications for the design of future MPD thrusters are presented.

  6. MPD Thruster Performance Analytic Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilland, James; Johnston, Geoffrey

    2003-01-01

    Magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters are capable of accelerating quasi-neutral plasmas to high exhaust velocities using Megawatts (MW) of electric power. These characteristics make such devices worthy of consideration for demanding, far-term missions such as the human exploration of Mars or beyond. Assessment of MPD thrusters at the system and mission level is often difficult due to their status as ongoing experimental research topics rather than developed thrusters. However, in order to assess MPD thrusters utility in later missions, some adequate characterization of performance, or more exactly, projected performance, and system level definition are required for use in analyses. The most recent physical models of self-field MPD thrusters have been examined, assessed, and reconfigured for use by systems and mission analysts. The physical models allow for rational projections of thruster performance based on physical parameters that can be measured in the laboratory. The models and their implications for the design of future MPD thrusters are presented.

  7. Hall effect in gallium manganese arsenide-diluted magnetic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzmetov, Dmitry A.

    A series of GaMnAs samples with various Mn concentrations and thicknesses is extensively studied in this thesis. The influence of annealing on the magnetic, lattice, and electron transport properties of GaMnAs is investigated. X-ray analysis allowed the lattice constants and the strains due to the lattice mismatch between the GaMnAs film and a GaAs substrate for each sample to be determined. Magnetometric measurements confirm the expected anisotropic ferromagnetic characteristics of these semiconductors, and the measured magnetization in hard and easy axis directions indicates that only around 40% of Mn ions contribute to the ferromagnetism. As a result of the study of the electron transport in GaMnAs at high temperatures, we found that the anomalous contribution to the Hall resistivity dominates over the ordinary contribution up to 380 K in our samples. The measured Hall coefficient of metallic samples with low Mn content above the Curie temperature (TC) can be fit with a model that takes into account the ordinary and anomalous contributions to the Hall resistivity. According to our model, the spontaneous Hall coefficient (RS) in our samples is proportional to the square of the longitudinal resistivity above TC, which corresponds to a temperature-independent Hall conductivity, and we checked for one sample that this form of RS holds also at the liquid He temperature. This indicates that the physical mechanism responsible for the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) remains unchanged in the transition from ferromagnetic to paramagnetic phases of the semiconductor. It is found that the temperature dependence of the AHE above TC can be described except for RS(T) with the Curie-Weiss law for the paramagnetic susceptibility with the inclusion of a small, negative, temperature and Mn content independent correction to the susceptibility, which may originate from the diamagnetism of the GaAs matrix. The good agreement between the measured and fitting Hall data suggests that the

  8. Inert gas thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.; Robinson, R. S.

    1979-01-01

    Inert gas thrusters considered for space propulsion systems were investigated. Electron diffusion across a magnetic field was examined utilizing a basic model. The production of doubly charged ions was correlated using only overall performance parameters. The use of this correlation is therefore possible in the design stage of large gas thrusters, where detailed plasma properties are not available. Argon hollow cathode performance was investigated over a range of emission currents, with the positions of the inert, keeper, and anode varied. A general trend observed was that the maximum ratio of emission to flow rate increased at higher propellant flow rates. It was also found that an enclosed keeper enhances maximum cathode emission at high flow rates. The maximum cathode emission at a given flow rate was associated with a noisy high voltage mode. Although this mode has some similarities to the plume mode found at low flows and emissions, it is encountered by being initially in the spot mode and increasing emission. A detailed analysis of large, inert-gas thruster performance was carried out. For maximum thruster efficiency, the optimum beam diameter increases from less than a meter at under 2000 sec specific impulse to several meters at 10,000 sec. The corresponding range in input power ranges from several kilowatts to megawatts.

  9. Photonic spin Hall effect in metasurfaces: a brief review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yachao; Ke, Yougang; Luo, Hailu; Wen, Shuangchun

    2017-01-01

    The photonic spin Hall effect (SHE) originates from the interplay between the photon-spin (polarization) and the trajectory (extrinsic orbital angular momentum) of light, i.e. the spin-orbit interaction. Metasurfaces, metamaterials with a reduced dimensionality, exhibit exceptional abilities for controlling the spin-orbit interaction and thereby manipulating the photonic SHE. Spin-redirection phase and Pancharatnam-Berry phase are the manifestations of spin-orbit interaction. The former is related to the evolution of the propagation direction and the latter to the manipulation with polarization state. Two distinct forms of splitting based on these two types of geometric phases can be induced by the photonic SHE in metasurfaces: the spin-dependent splitting in position space and in momentum space. The introduction of Pacharatnam-Berry phases, through space-variant polarization manipulations with metasurfaces, enables new approaches for fabricating the spin-Hall devices. Here, we present a short review of photonic SHE in metasurfaces and outline the opportunities in spin photonics.

  10. Concepts of ferrovalley material and anomalous valley Hall effect.

    PubMed

    Tong, Wen-Yi; Gong, Shi-Jing; Wan, Xiangang; Duan, Chun-Gang

    2016-12-16

    Valleytronics rooted in the valley degree of freedom is of both theoretical and technological importance as it offers additional opportunities for information storage, as well as electronic, magnetic and optical switches. In analogy to ferroelectric materials with spontaneous charge polarization, or ferromagnetic materials with spontaneous spin polarization, here we introduce a new member of ferroic family, that is, a ferrovalley material with spontaneous valley polarization. Combining a two-band k·p model with first-principles calculations, we show that 2H-VSe2 monolayer, where the spin-orbit coupling coexists with the intrinsic exchange interaction of transition-metal d electrons, is such a room-temperature ferrovalley material. We further predict that such system could demonstrate many distinctive properties, for example, chirality-dependent optical band gap and, more interestingly, anomalous valley Hall effect. On account of the latter, functional devices based on ferrovalley materials, such as valley-based nonvolatile random access memory and valley filter, are contemplated for valleytronic applications.

  11. Hall effect in charged conducting ferroelectric domain walls.

    PubMed

    Campbell, M P; McConville, J P V; McQuaid, R G P; Prabhakaran, D; Kumar, A; Gregg, J M

    2016-12-12

    Enhanced conductivity at specific domain walls in ferroelectrics is now an established phenomenon. Surprisingly, however, little is known about the most fundamental aspects of conduction. Carrier types, densities and mobilities have not been determined and transport mechanisms are still a matter of guesswork. Here we demonstrate that intermittent-contact atomic force microscopy (AFM) can detect the Hall effect in conducting domain walls. Studying YbMnO3 single crystals, we have confirmed that p-type conduction occurs in tail-to-tail charged domain walls. By calibration of the AFM signal, an upper estimate of ∼1 × 10(16) cm(-3) is calculated for the mobile carrier density in the wall, around four orders of magnitude below that required for complete screening of the polar discontinuity. A carrier mobility of∼50 cm(2)V(-1)s(-1) is calculated, about an order of magnitude below equivalent carrier mobilities in p-type silicon, but sufficiently high to preclude carrier-lattice coupling associated with small polarons.

  12. Magnon Hall effect without Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction.

    PubMed

    Owerre, S A

    2017-01-25

    Topological magnon bands and magnon Hall effect in insulating collinear ferromagnets are induced by the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) even at zero magnetic field. In the geometrically frustrated star lattice, a coplanar/noncollinear [Formula: see text] magnetic ordering may be present due to spin frustration. This magnetic structure, however, does not exhibit topological magnon effects even with DMI in contrast to collinear ferromagnets. We show that a magnetic field applied perpendicular to the star plane induces a non-coplanar spin configuration with nonzero spin scalar chirality, which provides topological effects without the need of DMI. The non-coplanar spin texture originates from the topology of the spin configurations and does not need the presence of DMI or magnetic ordering, which suggests that this phenomenon may be present in the chiral spin liquid phases of frustrated magnetic systems. We propose that these anomalous topological magnon effects can be accessible in polymeric iron (III) acetate-a star-lattice antiferromagnet with both spin frustration and long-range magnetic ordering.

  13. The transport mechanism of the integer quantum Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Tan; LiMing, W.; Liang, Shi-Dong

    2016-11-01

    The integer quantum Hall effect (IQHE) is analysed using a mechanism of the electron transport in the form of semi-classic wave packages in this paper. Due to the confinement of the edges of a slab the Landau levels of electrons in a strong magnetic field go up at large wave-vectors to form energy bands. The slopes of the energy bands give the group velocities of electron wave packages and thus contribute to the current. Certain magnetic fields separate the electron transport in the slab into two branches with opposite and large wave vectors, which are localized at the two edges of the slab, respectively. In this case back scattering of electrons is prohibited due to the localization of these two branches. Thus the slab exhibits zero longitudinal resistance and plateaus of Hall resistance. When the Fermi level is sweeping over a Landau level at some magnetic fields, however, the electron waves locate around the central axis of the slab and overlap each other thus back scattering of electrons takes place frequently. Then longitudinal resistance appears and the Hall resistance goes up from one plateau to a new one. This transport mechanism is much clearer and more intuitive than the conventional explanations to the IQHE.

  14. Far-infrared Hall Effect in YBCO films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grayson, M.; Rigal, L.; Cerne, J.; Schmadel, D. C.; Drew, H. D.; Kung, P.-J.

    2001-03-01

    In order to gain insight into the so-called "anomalous Hall effect" in Hi Tc superconductors(T.R. Chien, D.A. Brawner, Z.Z. Wang, and N.P. Ong, PRB 43, 6242(1991).) we explore Hall measurements at far-infrared (FIR) frequencies and study the temperature dependence. We separately measure the real and imaginary parts of the magneto-optical response of YBCO thin films to polarized FIR light (15-250 cm-1). The induced rotation of linearly polarized light tells us the real part of the Faraday angle, Re[θ_F(ω)], and the induced dichroism of circularly polarized light tells us Im[θ_F(ω)]. We can then deduce the complex Hall angle without resorting to Kramers-Kronig (K-K) analysis. Since both the Hall angle and the Faraday angle obey sum rules, we can compare to higher frequencies(Cerne, et al., invited talk) and determine additional information about the spectral response at intermediate frequencies. The consistency of these results is verified with K-K analysis.

  15. Quasiparticle-mediated spin Hall effect in a superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakamura, Taro

    Superconductivity often brings novel phenomena to spintronics. According to theoretical predictions, superconductivity may enhance the spin Hall effect (SHE) due to the increase in the resistance of superconducting quasiparticles which mediate spin transport in superconductors. In this work, we show a first experimental observation of quasiparticle-mediated SHE in a superconducting NbN, which exhibits an enormous enhancement below the superconducting critical temperature (TC = 10 K). We fabricated a lateral device structure composed of Py (NiFe) and NbN wires bridged by a nonmagnetic Cu wire. A pure spin current is generated in the Cu bridge by a spin injection current (I) between the Py and the Cu, and absorbed into the NbN wire. The absorbed spin currents are converted into charge currents via the inverse SHE, thereby generating the inverse SH voltage (VISHE) . When NbN is in the normal state at 20 K (>TC) , inverse SH signals ΔRISHE (RISHE ≡VISHE / I) are independent of I. However, at 3 K (

  16. Cluster multipole theory for anomalous Hall effect in antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, M.-T.; Koretsune, T.; Ochi, M.; Arita, R.

    2017-03-01

    We introduce a cluster extension of multipole moments to discuss the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) in both ferromagnetic (FM) and antiferromagnetic (AFM) states in a unified framework. We first derive general symmetry requirements for the AHE in the presence or absence of the spin-orbit coupling by considering the symmetry of the Berry curvature in k space. The cluster multipole (CMP) moments are then defined to quantify the macroscopic magnetization in noncollinear AFM states as a natural generalization of the magnetization in FM states. We identify the macroscopic CMP order which induces the AHE. The theoretical framework is applied to the noncollinear AFM states of Mn3Ir , for which an AHE was predicted in a first-principles calculation, and Mn3Z (Z =Sn ,Ge ), for which a large AHE was recently discovered experimentally. We further compare the AHE in Mn3Z and bcc Fe in terms of the CMP. We show that the AHE in Mn3Z is characterized by the magnetization of a cluster octupole moment in the same manner as that in bcc Fe characterized by the magnetization of the dipole moment.

  17. Magnon Hall effect without Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owerre, S. A.

    2017-01-01

    Topological magnon bands and magnon Hall effect in insulating collinear ferromagnets are induced by the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) even at zero magnetic field. In the geometrically frustrated star lattice, a coplanar/noncollinear \\mathbf{q}=0 magnetic ordering may be present due to spin frustration. This magnetic structure, however, does not exhibit topological magnon effects even with DMI in contrast to collinear ferromagnets. We show that a magnetic field applied perpendicular to the star plane induces a non-coplanar spin configuration with nonzero spin scalar chirality, which provides topological effects without the need of DMI. The non-coplanar spin texture originates from the topology of the spin configurations and does not need the presence of DMI or magnetic ordering, which suggests that this phenomenon may be present in the chiral spin liquid phases of frustrated magnetic systems. We propose that these anomalous topological magnon effects can be accessible in polymeric iron (III) acetate—a star-lattice antiferromagnet with both spin frustration and long-range magnetic ordering.

  18. The Microwave Hall Effect Measured Using a Waveguide Tee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, William; Coppock, Joyce; Anderson, J. Robert

    We describe a simple microwave apparatus to measure the Hall effect in semiconductor wafers. This technique does not require contacts on the sample or the use of a resonant cavity. Our method consists of placing a semiconductor wafer into a slot in an X-band (8 - 12 GHz) waveguide series tee, injecting microwave power into the two opposite arms of the tee, and measuring the microwave output at the third arm. A magnetic field is applied perpendicular to the wafer and produces a microwave Hall signal that is linear in the magnetic field and which reverses phase when the magnetic field is reversed. The microwave Hall signal is proportional to the semiconductor mobility, which we compare for calibration purposes with d. c. mobility measurements obtained using the van der Pauw method. We obtain the resistivity by measuring the microwave reflection coefficient of the sample. We determine a calibration constant as a function of the ratio of thickness to skin depth for two and three inch silicon and germanium samples doped with boron or phosphorus. The measured mobilities ranged from 270 to 3000 cm2 / (Vsec)

  19. The microwave Hall effect measured using a waveguide tee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppock, J. E.; Anderson, J. R.; Johnson, W. B.

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes a simple microwave apparatus to measure the Hall effect in semiconductor wafers. The advantage of this technique is that it does not require contacts on the sample or the use of a resonant cavity. Our method consists of placing the semiconductor wafer into a slot cut in an X-band (8-12 GHz) waveguide series tee, injecting microwave power into the two opposite arms of the tee, and measuring the microwave output at the third arm. A magnetic field applied perpendicular to the wafer gives a microwave Hall signal that is linear in the magnetic field and which reverses phase when the magnetic field is reversed. The microwave Hall signal is proportional to the semiconductor mobility, which we compare for calibration purposes with d.c. mobility measurements obtained using the van der Pauw method. We obtain the resistivity by measuring the microwave reflection coefficient of the sample. This paper presents data for silicon and germanium samples doped with boron or phosphorus. The measured mobilities ranged from 270 to 3000 cm2/(V s).

  20. Emergence and mechanism in the fractional quantum Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bain, Jonathan

    2016-11-01

    For some authors, an adequate notion of emergence must include an account of a mechanism by means of which emergent behavior is realized. This appeal to mechanism is problematic in the case of the fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE). There is a consensus among physicists that the FQHE exhibits emergent phenomena, but there are at least four alternative explanations of the latter that, arguably, appeal to ontologically distinct mechanisms, both at the microphysics level and at the level of general organizing principles. In light of this underdetermination of mechanism, one is faced with the following options: (I) deny that emergence is present in the FQHE; (II) argue for the priority of one mechanistic explanation over the others; or (III) temper the desire for a mechanism-centric account of emergence. I will argue that there are good reasons to reject (I) and (II) and accept (III). In particular, I will suggest that a law-centric account of emergence does just fine in explaining the emergent phenomena associated with the FQHE.

  1. Pulsed field UCu5 Hall effect and magnetization (I)

    SciTech Connect

    Mcdonald, Ross D; Ayala - Valenzuela, Oscar E; Ben, Ueland G; Corneliu, Miclea; Movshovich, R; Tompson, J. D.; Bauer, E; Batista, C. D.; Martin, I

    2011-01-14

    Prior studies of UCu{sub 5} identified the material as undergoing antiferromagnetic ordering at a temperature of 15 K with a subsequent reduction of the electronic density of states, evident as sharp upturn in resistance, at 1.4 K. High field magnetization measurements indicate a complex temperature-field phase diagram comprising of numerous phases below 15 K up and up to 60 T, with NMR and neutron measurements identifying both simple anitferromagnetic and 4Q-magnetic structures at low fields. The purpose of our investigations is to identify the possibly strong coupling between the itinerant electrons and the local spin structures, such as quantum amplification of the Hall effect due to (field induced) non-colinear spin textures. Comparison with prior literature indicates the sensitivity of the phase stability of the different spin textures to composition and sample preparation. However, the 'simplified' phase diagram of this composition offers the possibility of exploring, anomalous Hall properties arising from a field induced non-colinear spin texture over a wide range of temperatures and magnetic fields.

  2. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in magnetic topological insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jing; Lian, Biao; Zhang, Shou -Cheng

    2015-08-25

    The search for topologically non-trivial states of matter has become an important goal for condensed matter physics. Here, we give a theoretical introduction to the quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect based on magnetic topological insulators in two-dimensions (2D) and three-dimensions (3D). In 2D topological insulators, magnetic order breaks the symmetry between the counter-propagating helical edge states, and as a result, the quantum spin Hall effect can evolve into the QAH effect. In 3D, magnetic order opens up a gap for the topological surface states, and chiral edge state has been predicted to exist on the magnetic domain walls. We present the phase diagram in thin films of a magnetic topological insulator and review the basic mechanism of ferromagnetic order in magnetically doped topological insulators. We also review the recent experimental observation of the QAH effect. Furthermore, we discuss more recent theoretical work on the coexistence of the helical and chiral edge states, multi-channel chiral edge states, the theory of the plateau transition, and the thickness dependence in the QAH effect.

  3. Concepts of ferrovalley material and anomalous valley Hall effect

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Wen-Yi; Gong, Shi-Jing; Wan, Xiangang; Duan, Chun-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Valleytronics rooted in the valley degree of freedom is of both theoretical and technological importance as it offers additional opportunities for information storage, as well as electronic, magnetic and optical switches. In analogy to ferroelectric materials with spontaneous charge polarization, or ferromagnetic materials with spontaneous spin polarization, here we introduce a new member of ferroic family, that is, a ferrovalley material with spontaneous valley polarization. Combining a two-band k·p model with first-principles calculations, we show that 2H-VSe2 monolayer, where the spin–orbit coupling coexists with the intrinsic exchange interaction of transition-metal d electrons, is such a room-temperature ferrovalley material. We further predict that such system could demonstrate many distinctive properties, for example, chirality-dependent optical band gap and, more interestingly, anomalous valley Hall effect. On account of the latter, functional devices based on ferrovalley materials, such as valley-based nonvolatile random access memory and valley filter, are contemplated for valleytronic applications. PMID:27982088

  4. Large anomalous Hall effect in a half-Heusler antiferromagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, T.; Chisnell, R.; Devarakonda, A.; Liu, Y.-T.; Feng, W.; Xiao, D.; Lynn, J. W.; Checkelsky, J. G.

    2016-12-01

    The quantum mechanical (Berry) phase of the electronic wavefunction plays a critical role in the anomalous and spin Hall effects, including their quantized limits. While progress has been made in understanding these effects in ferromagnets, less is known in antiferromagnetic systems. Here we present a study of antiferromagnet GdPtBi, whose electronic structure is similar to that of the topologically non-trivial HgTe (refs ,,), and where the Gd ions offer the possibility to tune the Berry phase via control of the spin texture. We show that this system supports an anomalous Hall angle ΘAH > 0.1, comparable to the largest observed in bulk ferromagnets and significantly larger than in other antiferromagnets. Neutron scattering measurements and electronic structure calculations suggest that this effect originates from avoided crossing or Weyl points that develop near the Fermi level due to a breaking of combined time-reversal and lattice symmetries. Berry phase effects associated with such symmetry breaking have recently been explored in kagome networks; our results extend this to half-Heusler systems with non-trivial band topology. The magnetic textures indicated here may also provide pathways towards realizing the topological insulating and semimetallic states predicted in this material class.

  5. Hall effect of triplons in a dimerized quantum magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romhányi, Judit; Penc, Karlo; Ganesh, R.

    2015-04-01

    SrCu2(BO3)2 is the archetypal quantum magnet with a gapped dimer-singlet ground state and triplon excitations. It serves as an excellent realization of the Shastry-Sutherland model, up to small anisotropies arising from Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions. Here we demonstrate that these anisotropies, in fact, give rise to topological character in the triplon band structure. The triplons form a new kind of Dirac cone with three bands touching at a single point, a spin-1 generalization of graphene. An applied magnetic field opens band gaps resulting in topological bands with Chern numbers +/-2. SrCu2(BO3)2 thus provides a magnetic analogue of the integer quantum Hall effect and supports topologically protected edge modes. At a threshold value of the magnetic field set by the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions, the three triplon bands touch once again in a spin-1 Dirac cone, and lose their topological character. We predict a strong thermal Hall signature in the topological regime.

  6. Hall effect of triplons in a dimerized quantum magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romhanyi, Judit; Penc, Karlo; Ganesh, Ramachandran

    2015-03-01

    SrCu2(BO3)2 is the archetypal quantum magnet with a gapped dimer-singlet ground state and triplon excitations. It serves as a realization of the Shastry Sutherland model, up to small anisotropies arising from Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) interactions. We demonstrate that the DM couplings give rise to topological character in the triplon band structure. The triplons form a new kind of a Dirac cone with three bands touching at a single point, a spin-1 generalization of graphene. An applied magnetic field opens band gaps and as a result topological bands with Chern numbers +/- 2 develop. Thus SrCu2(BO3)2 is a magnetic analogue of the integer quantum Hall effect and supports topologically protected edge modes. At a critical value of the magnetic field set by the strength of DM interactions, the three triplon bands touch again in a spin-1 Dirac cone, and lose their topological character. We predict thermal Hall signature in the topological regime.

  7. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in magnetic topological insulators

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Jing; Lian, Biao; Zhang, Shou -Cheng

    2015-08-25

    The search for topologically non-trivial states of matter has become an important goal for condensed matter physics. Here, we give a theoretical introduction to the quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect based on magnetic topological insulators in two-dimensions (2D) and three-dimensions (3D). In 2D topological insulators, magnetic order breaks the symmetry between the counter-propagating helical edge states, and as a result, the quantum spin Hall effect can evolve into the QAH effect. In 3D, magnetic order opens up a gap for the topological surface states, and chiral edge state has been predicted to exist on the magnetic domain walls. We presentmore » the phase diagram in thin films of a magnetic topological insulator and review the basic mechanism of ferromagnetic order in magnetically doped topological insulators. We also review the recent experimental observation of the QAH effect. Furthermore, we discuss more recent theoretical work on the coexistence of the helical and chiral edge states, multi-channel chiral edge states, the theory of the plateau transition, and the thickness dependence in the QAH effect.« less

  8. Hall effect in charged conducting ferroelectric domain walls

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, M. P.; McConville, J.P.V.; McQuaid, R.G.P.; Prabhakaran, D.; Kumar, A.; Gregg, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced conductivity at specific domain walls in ferroelectrics is now an established phenomenon. Surprisingly, however, little is known about the most fundamental aspects of conduction. Carrier types, densities and mobilities have not been determined and transport mechanisms are still a matter of guesswork. Here we demonstrate that intermittent-contact atomic force microscopy (AFM) can detect the Hall effect in conducting domain walls. Studying YbMnO3 single crystals, we have confirmed that p-type conduction occurs in tail-to-tail charged domain walls. By calibration of the AFM signal, an upper estimate of ∼1 × 1016 cm−3 is calculated for the mobile carrier density in the wall, around four orders of magnitude below that required for complete screening of the polar discontinuity. A carrier mobility of∼50 cm2V−1s−1 is calculated, about an order of magnitude below equivalent carrier mobilities in p-type silicon, but sufficiently high to preclude carrier-lattice coupling associated with small polarons. PMID:27941794

  9. Does the Hall Effect Solve the Flux Pileup Saturation Problem?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorelli, John C.

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that magnetic flux pileup can significantly speed up the rate of magnetic reconnection in high Lundquist number resistive MHD,allowing reconnection to proceed at a rate which is insensitive to the plasma resistivity over a wide range of Lundquist number. Hence, pileup is a possible solution to the Sweet-Parker time scale problem. Unfortunately, pileup tends to saturate above a critical value of the Lundquist number, S_c, where the value ofS_c depends on initial and boundary conditions, with Sweet-Parker scaling returning above S_c. It has been argued (see Dorelli and Bim [2003] and Dorelli [2003]) that the Hall effect can allow flux pileup to saturate (when the scale of the current sheet approaches ion inertial scale, di) before the reconnection rate begins to stall. However, the resulting saturated reconnection rate, while insensitive to the plasma resistivity, was found to depend strongly on the di. In this presentation, we revisit the problem of magnetic island coalescence (which is a well known example of flux pileup reconnection), addressing the dependence of the maximum coalescence rate on the ratio of di in the "large island" limit in which the following inequality is always satisfied: l_eta di lambda, where I_eta is the resistive diffusion length and lambda is the island wavelength.

  10. Self-Impedance-Matched Hall-Effect Gyrators and Circulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosco, S.; Haupt, F.; DiVincenzo, D. P.

    2017-02-01

    We present a model study of an alternative implementation of a two-port Hall-effect microwave gyrator. Our setup involves three electrodes, one of which acts as a common ground for the others. Based on the capacitive-coupling model of Viola and DiVincenzo, we analyze the performance of the device and we predict that ideal gyration can be achieved at specific frequencies. Interestingly, the impedance of the three-terminal gyrator can be made arbitrarily small for certain coupling strengths, so that no auxiliary impedance matching is required. Although the bandwidth of the device shrinks as the impedance decreases, it can be improved by reducing the magnetic field; it can be realistically increased up to 150 MHz at 50 Ω by working at the filling factor ν =10 . We also examine the effects of the parasitic capacitive coupling between electrodes and we find that, although, in general, they strongly influence the response of device, their effect is negligible at low impedance. Finally, we analyze an interferometric implementation of a circulator, which incorporates the gyrator in a Mach-Zender-like construction. Perfect circulation in both directions can be achieved, depending on frequency and on the details of the interferometer.

  11. Concepts of ferrovalley material and anomalous valley Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Wen-Yi; Gong, Shi-Jing; Wan, Xiangang; Duan, Chun-Gang

    2016-12-01

    Valleytronics rooted in the valley degree of freedom is of both theoretical and technological importance as it offers additional opportunities for information storage, as well as electronic, magnetic and optical switches. In analogy to ferroelectric materials with spontaneous charge polarization, or ferromagnetic materials with spontaneous spin polarization, here we introduce a new member of ferroic family, that is, a ferrovalley material with spontaneous valley polarization. Combining a two-band k.p model with first-principles calculations, we show that 2H-VSe2 monolayer, where the spin-orbit coupling coexists with the intrinsic exchange interaction of transition-metal d electrons, is such a room-temperature ferrovalley material. We further predict that such system could demonstrate many distinctive properties, for example, chirality-dependent optical band gap and, more interestingly, anomalous valley Hall effect. On account of the latter, functional devices based on ferrovalley materials, such as valley-based nonvolatile random access memory and valley filter, are contemplated for valleytronic applications.

  12. Fractionally charged skyrmions in fractional quantum Hall effect

    DOE PAGES

    Balram, Ajit C.; Wurstbauer, U.; Wójs, A.; ...

    2015-11-26

    The fractional quantum Hall effect has inspired searches for exotic emergent topological particles, such as fractionally charged excitations, composite fermions, abelian and nonabelian anyons and Majorana fermions. Fractionally charged skyrmions, which support both topological charge and topological vortex-like spin structure, have also been predicted to occur in the vicinity of 1/3 filling of the lowest Landau level. The fractional skyrmions, however, are anticipated to be exceedingly fragile, suppressed by very small Zeeman energies. Here we show that, slightly away from 1/3 filling, the smallest manifestations of the fractional skyrmion exist in the excitation spectrum for a broad range of Zeemanmore » energies, and appear in resonant inelastic light scattering experiments as well-defined resonances slightly below the long wavelength spin wave mode. The spectroscopy of these exotic bound states serves as a sensitive tool for investigating the residual interaction between composite fermions, responsible for delicate new fractional quantum Hall states in this filling factor region.« less

  13. A bibliography of electrothermal thruster technology, 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, J. S.; Hardy, T. L.; Englehart, M.

    1986-01-01

    Electrothermal propulsion concepts are briefly discussed as an introduction to a bibliography and author index. Nearly 700 citations are given for resistojets, thermal arcjets, pulsed electrothermal thrusters, microwave heated devices, solar thermal thrusters, and laser thermal thrusters.

  14. Extrinsic spin Hall effect induced by resonant skew scattering in graphene.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Aires; Rappoport, Tatiana G; Cazalilla, Miguel A; Castro Neto, A H

    2014-02-14

    We show that the extrinsic spin Hall effect can be engineered in monolayer graphene by decoration with small doses of adatoms, molecules, or nanoparticles originating local spin-orbit perturbations. The analysis of the single impurity scattering problem shows that intrinsic and Rashba spin-orbit local couplings enhance the spin Hall effect via skew scattering of charge carriers in the resonant regime. The solution of the transport equations for a random ensemble of spin-orbit impurities reveals that giant spin Hall currents are within the reach of the current state of the art in device fabrication. The spin Hall effect is robust with respect to thermal fluctuations and disorder averaging.

  15. All electrical manipulation of magnetization dynamics in a ferromagnet by antiferromagnets with anisotropic spin Hall effects.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei; Jungfleisch, Matthias B.; Freimuth, Frank; Jiang, Wanjun; Sklenar, Joseph; Pearson, John E.; Ketterson, John B.; Mokrousov, Yuri; Hoffmann, Axel

    2015-10-06

    We investigate spin-orbit torques of metallic CuAu-I-type antiferromagnets using spin-torque ferromagnetic resonance tuned by a dc-bias current. The observed spin torques predominantly arise from diffusive transport of spin current generated by the spin Hall effect. We find a growth-orientation dependence of the spin torques by studying epitaxial samples, which may be correlated to the anisotropy of the spin Hall effect. The observed anisotropy is consistent with first-principles calculations on the intrinsic spin Hall effect. Our work suggests large tunable spin-orbit effects in magnetically-ordered materials.

  16. HG ion thruster component testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantenieks, M. A.

    1979-01-01

    Cathodes, isolators, and vaporizers are critical components in determining the performance and lifetime of mercury ion thrusters. The results of life tests of several of these components are reported. A 30-cm thruster CIV test in a bell jar has successfully accumulated over 26,000 hours. The cathode has undergone 65 restarts during the life test without requiring any appreciable increases in starting power. Recently, all restarts have been achieved with only the 44 volt keeper supply with no change required in the starting power. Another ongoing 30-cm Hg thruster cathode test has successfully passed the 10,000 hour mark. A solid-insert, 8-cm thruster cathode has accumulated over 4,000 hours of thruster operation. All starts have been achieved without the use of a high voltage ignitor. The results of this test indicate that the solid impregnated insert is a viable neutralizer cathode for the 8-cm thruster.

  17. Hg ion thruster component testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantenieks, M. A.

    1979-01-01

    Electron bombardment thrusters, under development to provide both auxiliary and primary propulsion functions for a large variety of space missions are tested. Thruster design verification which requires life tests of durations of the order of the time anticipated in space applications, are discussed. The life time and reliability of an electron bombardment thruster is dependent upon the performance of several critical components including cathodes, vaporizers, and isolators. The performances of the cathode, vaporizer, and propellant isolaters during fatigue analyses are examined.

  18. The Plasmoid Thruster Experiment (PTX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eskridge, R.; Martin, Adam; Lee, Michael; Smith, James; Koelfgen, Syri

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the overall Plasma Thruster Experiment (PTX), it's purpose and design, compact toroid propulsion, advantages and requirements of a plasmoid thruster, the projected efficiency, theta-pinch formation, a simulation of the PTX Coil/Bank Circuit using SPICE, the test firing of the PTX Capacitor Bank, PTX diagnostics, the excluded flux array, thruster simulations using MOQUI, and future work on the PTX.

  19. Thruster sealing system and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svejkovsky, Paul A. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A thruster nozzle sealing system and apparatus is provided for protection of spacecraft thruster motors. The system includes a sealing plug, a sealing plug insertion tool, an outer cover, an outer cover attachment, and a ferry flight attachment. The sealing plug prevents moisture from entering the thruster engine so as to prevent valve failure. The attachments are interchangeably connectable with the sealing plug. The ferry flight attachment is used during air transportation of the spacecraft, and the outer cover attachment is used during storage and service of the spacecraft. The outer cover provides protection to the thruster nozzle from mechanical damage.

  20. Multimegawatt MPD thruster design considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Roger M.; Parkes, James E.; Mantenieks, Maris A.

    1992-01-01

    Performance and lifetime requirements for multimegawatt magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters were used to establish a baseline 2.5 MW thruster design. The chamber surface power deposition resulting from current conduction, plasma and surface radiation, and conduction from the hot plasma was then evaluated to establish the feasibility of thruster operation. It was determined that state of the art lithium heat pipes were adequate to cool the anode electrode, and that the liquid hydrogen propellant could be used to cool the applied field magnet, cathode, and backplate. Unresolved issues having an impact of thruster design are discussed to help focus future research.

  1. Green Liquid Monopropellant Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, Prakash B.

    2015-01-01

    Physical Sciences, Inc. (PSI), and Orbital Technologies Corporation (ORBITEC) are developing a unique chemical propulsion system for next-generation NASA science spacecraft and missions. The system is compact, lightweight, and can operate with high reliability over extended periods of time and under a wide range of thermal environments. The system uses a new storable, low-toxicity liquid monopropellant as its working fluid. In Phase I, the team demonstrated experimentally the critical ignition and combustion processes for the propellant and used the data to develop thruster design concepts. In Phase II, the team developed and demonstrated in the laboratory a proof-of-concept prototype thruster. A Phase III project is envisioned to develop a full-scale protoflight propulsion system applicable to a class of NASA missions.

  2. Helical plasma thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Beklemishev, A. D.

    2015-10-15

    A new scheme of plasma thruster is proposed. It is based on axial acceleration of rotating magnetized plasmas in magnetic field with helical corrugation. The idea is that the propellant ionization zone can be placed into the local magnetic well, so that initially the ions are trapped. The E × B rotation is provided by an applied radial electric field that makes the setup similar to a magnetron discharge. Then, from the rotating plasma viewpoint, the magnetic wells of the helically corrugated field look like axially moving mirror traps. Specific shaping of the corrugation can allow continuous acceleration of trapped plasma ions along the magnetic field by diamagnetic forces. The accelerated propellant is expelled through the expanding field of magnetic nozzle. By features of the acceleration principle, the helical plasma thruster may operate at high energy densities but requires a rather high axial magnetic field, which places it in the same class as the VASIMR{sup ®} rocket engine.

  3. Helical plasma thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beklemishev, A. D.

    2015-10-01

    A new scheme of plasma thruster is proposed. It is based on axial acceleration of rotating magnetized plasmas in magnetic field with helical corrugation. The idea is that the propellant ionization zone can be placed into the local magnetic well, so that initially the ions are trapped. The E × B rotation is provided by an applied radial electric field that makes the setup similar to a magnetron discharge. Then, from the rotating plasma viewpoint, the magnetic wells of the helically corrugated field look like axially moving mirror traps. Specific shaping of the corrugation can allow continuous acceleration of trapped plasma ions along the magnetic field by diamagnetic forces. The accelerated propellant is expelled through the expanding field of magnetic nozzle. By features of the acceleration principle, the helical plasma thruster may operate at high energy densities but requires a rather high axial magnetic field, which places it in the same class as the VASIMR® rocket engine.

  4. Large local Hall effect in pin-hole dominated multigraphene spin-valves.

    PubMed

    Muduli, P K; Barzola-Quiquia, J; Dusari, S; Ballestar, A; Bern, F; Böhlmann, W; Esquinazi, P

    2013-01-11

    We report local and non-local measurements in pin-hole dominated mesoscopic multigraphene spin-valves. Local spin-valve measurements show spurious switching behavior in resistance during magnetic field sweeping similar to the signal observed due to spin injection into multigraphene. The switching behavior has been explained in terms of a local Hall effect due to a thickness irregularity of the tunnel barrier. The local Hall effect appears due to a large local magnetostatic field produced near the roughness in the AlO(x) tunnel barrier. In our samples the resistance change due to the local Hall effect remains negligibly small above 75 K. A strong local Hall effect might hinder spin injection into multigraphene, resulting in no spin signal in non-local measurements.

  5. Large anomalous Hall effect in a non-collinear antiferromagnet at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Nakatsuji, Satoru; Kiyohara, Naoki; Higo, Tomoya

    2015-11-12

    In ferromagnetic conductors, an electric current may induce a transverse voltage drop in zero applied magnetic field: this anomalous Hall effect is observed to be proportional to magnetization, and thus is not usually seen in antiferromagnets in zero field. Recent developments in theory and experiment have provided a framework for understanding the anomalous Hall effect using Berry-phase concepts, and this perspective has led to predictions that, under certain conditions, a large anomalous Hall effect may appear in spin liquids and antiferromagnets without net spin magnetization. Although such a spontaneous Hall effect has now been observed in a spin liquid state, a zero-field anomalous Hall effect has hitherto not been reported for antiferromagnets. Here we report empirical evidence for a large anomalous Hall effect in an antiferromagnet that has vanishingly small magnetization. In particular, we find that Mn3Sn, an antiferromagnet that has a non-collinear 120-degree spin order, exhibits a large anomalous Hall conductivity of around 20 per ohm per centimetre at room temperature and more than 100 per ohm per centimetre at low temperatures, reaching the same order of magnitude as in ferromagnetic metals. Notably, the chiral antiferromagnetic state has a very weak and soft ferromagnetic moment of about 0.002 Bohr magnetons per Mn atom (refs 10, 12), allowing us to switch the sign of the Hall effect with a small magnetic field of around a few hundred oersted. This soft response of the large anomalous Hall effect could be useful for various applications including spintronics--for example, to develop a memory device that produces almost no perturbing stray fields.

  6. Hall effect sensors embedded within two-pole toothless stator assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denk, Joseph (Inventor); Grant, Richard J. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A two-pole toothless PM machine employs Hall effect sensors to indicate the position of the machine's rotor relative to power windings in the machine's stator. The Hall effect sensors are located in the main magnetic air gap underneath the power windings. The main magnetic air gap is defined by an outer magnetic surface of the rotor and an inner surface of the stator's flux collector ring.

  7. Design of an ICRF plasma thruster antenna by TOPICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vecchi, Giuseppe; Lancellotti, Vito; Maggiora, Riccardo

    2006-10-01

    A typical RF plasma thruster is comprised of an RF plasma source, an open-ended magnetic confinement device, an RF acceleration unit and a magnetic nozzle. The usual choice for the acceleration is to employ the Ion-Cyclotron resonance frequency (ICRF), a well established technology in fusion experiments for transferring large RF powers to magnetized plasmas. To help design RF thruster ICRF antennas, TOPICA (Torino Polytechnic Ion Cyclotron Antenna) code [1] has been recently extended to handle cylindrically symmetric plasmas. The latter entailed developing a wholly new module of TOPICA charged with the task of solving Maxwell's equations in cylindrical magnetized warm plasmas and yielding the Green's functionY (m,kz), i.e. the relationship at the air-plasma interface between the transverse magnetic and electric fields in the spectral (wavenumber) domain. The approach to the problem of determining the antenna input impedance relies on an integral-equation formulation for the self-consistent evaluation of the current distribution on the conductors. This work reports on TOPICA evolution and presents the design of an RF thruster ICRF antenna. *V. Lancellotti et al., Nucl. Fusion, 46 (2006) S476-S499

  8. Anode power deposition in applied-field MPD thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Roger M.; Soulas, George C.

    1992-01-01

    Anode power deposition is the principal performance limiter of magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters. Current thrusters lose between 50 and 70 percent of the input power to the anode. In this work, anode power deposition was studied for three cylindrical applied magnetic field thrusters for a range of argon propellant flow rates, discharge currents, and applied-field strengths. Between 60 and 95 percent of the anode power depositions resulted from electron current conduction into the anode, with cathode radiation depositing between 5 and 35 percent of the anode power, and convective heat transfer from the hot plasma accounting for less than 5 percent. While the fractional anode power loss decreased with increasing applied-field strength and anode size, the magnitude of the anode power increased. The rise in anode power resulted from a linear rise in the anode fall voltage with applied-field strength and anode radius. The anode fall voltage also rose with decreasing propellant flow rate. The trends indicate that the anode fall region is magnetized, and suggest techniques for reducing the anode power loss in MPD thrusters.

  9. Anode power deposition in applied-field MPD thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Roger M.; Soulas, George C.

    1992-01-01

    Anode power deposition is the principle performance limiter of magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters. Current thrusters lose between 50 and 70 percent of the input power to the anode. In this work, anode power deposition was studied for three cylindrical applied magnetic field thrusters for a range of argon propellant flow rates, discharge currents, and applied-field strengths. Between 60 and 95 percent of the anode power deposition resulted from electron current conduction into the anode, with cathode radiation depositing between 5 and 35 percent of the anode power, and convective heat transfer from the hot plasma accounting for less than 5 percent. While the fractional anode power loss decreased with increasing applied-field strength and anode size, the magnitude of the anode power increased. The rise in anode power resulted from a linear rise in the anode fall voltage with applied-field strength and anode radius. The anode fall voltage also rose with decreasing propellant flow rate. The trends indicate that the anode fall region is magnetized, and suggest techniques for reducing the anode power loss in MPD thrusters.

  10. Facility Effect Characterization Test of NASA's HERMeS Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Wensheng; Kamhawi, Hani; Haag, Thomas W.; Ortega, Alejandro Lopez; Mikellides, Ioannis G.

    2016-01-01

    A test to characterize the effect of varying background pressure on NASA's 12.5-kW Hall Effect Rocket with Magnetic Shielding had being completed. This thruster is the baseline propulsion system for the Solar Electric Propulsion Technology Demonstration Mission (SEP TDM). Potential differences in thruster performance and oscillation characteristics when in ground facilities versus on-orbit are considered a primary risk for the propulsion system of the Asteroid Redirect Robotic Mission, which is a candidate for SEP TDM. The first primary objective of this test was to demonstrate that the tools being developed to predict the zero-background-pressure behavior of the thruster can provide self-consistent results. The second primary objective of this test was to provide data for refining a physics-based model of the thruster plume that will be used in spacecraft interaction studies. Diagnostics deployed included a thrust stand, Faraday probe, Langmuir probe, retarding potential analyzer, Wien filter spectrometer, and high-speed camera. From the data, a physics-based plume model was refined. Comparisons of empirical data to modeling results are shown.

  11. Optical Characterization of Component Wear and Near-Field Plasma of the Hermes Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, George J., Jr.; Kamhawi, Hani

    2015-01-01

    Optical emission spectral (OES) data are presented which correlate trends in sputtered species and the near-field plasma with the Hall-Effect Rocket with Magnetic Shielding (HERMeS) thruster operating condition. The relative density of singly-ionized xenon (Xe II) is estimated using a collisional-radiative model. OES data were collected at three radial and several axial locations downstream of the thruster's exit plane. These data were deconvolved to show the structure for the near-field plasma as a function of thruster operating condition. The magnetic field is shown to have a much greater affect on plasma structure than the discharge voltage with the primary ionization/acceleration zone boundary being similar for all nominal operating voltages at constant power. OES measurement of sputtered boron shows that the HERMeS thruster is magnetically shielded across its operating envelope. Preliminary assessment of carbon sputtered from the keeper face suggest it increases significantly with operating voltage, but the uncertainty associated with these measurements is very high.

  12. Magnetic Topological Insulators and Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, Xufeng

    The engineering of topological surface states is a key to realize applicable devices based on topological insulators (TIs). Among various proposals, introducing magnetic impurities into TIs has been proven to be an effective way to open a surface gap and integrate additional ferromagnetism with the original topological order. In this Dissertation, we study both the intrinsic electrical and magnetic properties of the magnetic TI thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy. By doping transition element Cr into the host tetradymite-type V-VI semiconductors, we achieve robust ferromagnetic order with a strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. With additional top-gating capability, we realize the electric-field-controlled ferromagnetism in the magnetic TI systems, and demonstrate such magneto-electric effects can be effectively manipulated, depending on the interplays between the band topology, magnetic exchange coupling, and structural engineering. Most significantly, we report the observation of quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) in the Cr-doped (BiSb)2Te3 samples where dissipationless chiral edge conduction is realized in the macroscopic millimeter-size devices without the presence of any external magnetic field, and the stability of the quantized Hall conductance of e2/h is well-maintained as the film thickness varies across the 2D hybridization limit. With additional quantum confinement, we discover the metal-to-insulator switching between two opposite QAHE states, and reveal the universal QAHE phase diagram in the thin magnetic TI samples. In addition to the uniform magnetic TIs, we further investigate the TI/Cr-doped TI bilayer structures prepared by the modulation-doped growth method. By controlling the magnetic interaction profile, we observe the Dirac hole-mediated ferromagnetism and develop an effective way to manipulate its strength. Besides, the giant spin-orbit torque in such magnetic TI-based heterostructures enables us to demonstrate the current

  13. Universality and phase diagram in the quantum Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Lauren Wai-Wing

    We have designed and conducted detailed experiments to explore the following critical, unsolved issues in regarding to the global behavior of the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in the presence of disorder and many-body interaction in the quantum Hall effect (QHE) regime: (1) nature of the quantum Hall liquid-Hall insulator (QHL-HI) phase transition induced by disorder, (2) topological phase diagram and possible existence of a thermodynamically stable "metallic phase" around filling factor nu =1/2, and (3) whether the termination of spin-resolved Landau levels in general a phase transition. First, I present our studies of the disorder-tuned QHL-HI phase transition in both the integer and fractional QHE regimes. We found that the longitudinal resistivity near the critical points shows reflection symmetry and good scaling behavior over a wide range of densities and temperature with the same critical exponent. This supports the notion that quantum phase transitions in the QHE belong to same universality class. Furthermore, the critical conductivities are universal at the transitions. Our approach to investigate the second issue is to map out the phase boundaries corresponding to different QHLs around nu =1/2. We identified a line on which the value of the Hall conductivity equals to 1/2(esp2/h) in the phase diagram; and an another line on which the value of the Hall resistivity equals to 2(h/esp2). We interpreted the later is a result predicted by the composite-fermion theory. The phase boundaries between the HI and the principal QHLs at nu =1 and 1/3 show levitation of the delocalized states of the first Landau levels for electrons and Composite fermions. Our data suggest that there is no true metallic state around nu =1/2. Finally, I present our magnetotransport studies of the spin-resolved integer QHE by changing disorder. For a given Landau level, the difference in filling factors of a pair of spin-split resistivity peaks changes rapidly from one to zero near

  14. Electron Transport in Hall Thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Michael Sean

    Despite high technological maturity and a long flight heritage, computer models of Hall thrusters remain dependent on empirical inputs and a large part of thruster development to date has been heavily experimental in nature. This empirical approach will become increasingly unsustainable as new high-power thrusters tax existing ground test facilities and more exotic thruster designs stretch and strain the boundaries of existing design experience. The fundamental obstacle preventing predictive modeling of Hall thruster plasma properties and channel erosion is the lack of a first-principles description of electron transport across the strong magnetic fields between the cathode and anode. In spite of an abundance of proposed transport mechanisms, accurate assessments of the magnitude of electron current due to any one mechanism are scarce, and comparative studies of their relative influence on a single thruster platform simply do not exist. Lacking a clear idea of what mechanism(s) are primarily responsible for transport, it is understandably difficult for the electric propulsion scientist to focus his or her theoretical and computational tools on the right targets. This work presents a primarily experimental investigation of collisional and turbulent Hall thruster electron transport mechanisms. High-speed imaging of the thruster discharge channel at tens of thousands of frames per second reveals omnipresent rotating regions of elevated light emission, identified with a rotating spoke instability. This turbulent instability has been shown through construction of an azimuthally segmented anode to drive significant cross-field electron current in the discharge channel, and suggestive evidence points to its spatial extent into the thruster near-field plume as well. Electron trajectory simulations in experimentally measured thruster electromagnetic fields indicate that binary collisional transport mechanisms are not significant in the thruster plume, and experiments

  15. Cylindrical Scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Thomas E.

    1999-04-29

    The CS system is designed to provide a very fast imaging system in order to search for weapons on persons in an airport environment. The Cylindrical Scanner moves a vertical transceiver array rapidly around a person standing stationary. The software can be segmented in to three specific tasks. The first task is data acquisition and scanner control. At the operator's request, this task commands the scanner to move and the radar transceiver array to send data to the computer system in a known and well-ordered manner. The array is moved over the complete aperture in 10 to 12 seconds. At the completion of the array movement the second software task automatically reconstructs the high-resolution image from the radar data utilizing the integrated DSP boards. The third task displays the resulting images, as they become available, to the computer screen for user review and analysis.

  16. The MPD thruster program at JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnett, John; Goodfellow, Keith; Polk, James; Pivirotto, Thomas

    1991-01-01

    The main topics covered include: (1) the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) context; (2) critical issues of MPD Thruster design; and (3) the Magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) Thruster Program at JPL. Under the section on the SEI context the nuclear electric propulsion system and some electric thruster options are addressed. The critical issues of MPD Thruster development deal with the requirements, status, and approach taken. The following areas are covered with respect to the MPD Thruster Program at JPL: (1) the radiation-cooled MPD thruster; (2) the High-Current Cathode Test Facility; (3) thruster component thermal modeling; and (4) alkali metal propellant studies.

  17. Experimental investigation of steady state high power MPD thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegmann, Thomas; Auweter-Kurtz, Monika; Habiger, Harald A.; Kurtz, Helmut L.; Schrade, Herbert O.

    1992-07-01

    MPD thrusters with different geometries, nozzle type and cylindrical, were compared under various operating parameters. The effects of mass flow rate and power input on the operating conditions were explored, and plasma parameters were determined with both probe measurements and optical diagnostics. Besides water-cooled plasma accelerators, tests with a hot anode thruster having a radiation-cooled anode were performed. They showed the feasibility of large radiating tungsten anodes and a lower voltage level than water-cooled devices. A systematic study of the various instabilities of the arc and the plasma flow occurring at high power levels was begun. The cathode erosion and its mechanisms were examined with purified propellant gases.

  18. Segmented ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Apparatus and methods for large-area, high-power ion engines comprise dividing a single engine into a combination of smaller discharge chambers (or segments) configured to operate as a single large-area engine. This segmented ion thruster (SIT) approach enables the development of 100-kW class argon ion engines for operation at a specific impulse of 10,000 s. A combination of six 30-cm diameter ion chambers operating as a single engine can process over 100 kW. Such a segmented ion engine can be operated from a single power processor unit.

  19. Exotic emergent phenomena in the fractional quantum Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coimbatore Balram, Ajit

    When two-dimensional electron systems are subjected to a perpendicular magnetic field, they exhibit the marvelous phenomenon known as the fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE). This arises as a result of the formation of composite fermions (CFs), which are bound states of electrons and an even number of vortices. The FQHE of electrons is understood as arising from the integer QHE (IQHE) of CFs. Alongside superconductivity, Bose-Einstein condensation and spin-liquids, the CF quantum fluid provides a model system for understanding strongly correlated systems and their collective behavior. Although it has been more than three decades since the experimental discovery of FQHE, the field continues to produce profound insights and pose interesting problems some of which have been addressed in this thesis. A major unanswered question in the field of FQHE is the mechanism of FQHE for the 1/3 state in the second Landau level (7/3 state). Numerical studies of this state have brought out the following puzzle: exact diagonalization studies suggest that the ground state and excitations of 1/3 state in the second Landau level are different from its counterpart in the lowest Landau level (LLL), while entanglement spectra of the two states point to the fact that they fall in the same universality class. Using methods from CF theory we show that the excitations of the 7/3 FQHE lie in the same universality class as those of the 1/3 state but are strongly modified due to screening by CF excitons, thereby settling the above discrepancy. Armed with the exciton calculation, we illustrate that by imposing certain exclusion rules for CF excitons one can build the full spectrum of FQHE in the lowest Landau level. Equipped with the techniques to calculate the spectra of FQHE systems, we carry out an extensive study of FQHE of multi-component CFs (systems possessing degrees of freedom for eg: valley and spin degeneracy), which is applicable to FQHE in systems such as graphene, AlAs and Ga

  20. Electric thruster research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.; Robinson, R. S.

    1981-01-01

    The multipole discharge chamber of an electrostatic ion thruster is discussed. No reductions in discharge losses were obtained, despite repeated demonstration of anode potentials more positive than the bulk of the discharge plasma. The penalty associated with biased anode operation was reduced as the magnetic integral above the biased anodes was increased. The hollow cathode is discussed. The experimental configuration of the Hall current thruster had a uniform field throughout the ion generation and acceleration regions. To obtain reliable ion generation, it was necessary to reduce the magnetic field strength, to the point where excessive electron backflow was required to establish ion acceleration. The theoretical study of ion acceleration with closed electron drift paths resulted in two classes of solutions. One class has the continuous potential variation in the acceleration region that is normally associated with a Hall current accelerator. The other class has an almost discontinuous potential step near the anode end of the acceleration region. This step includes a significant fraction of the total acceleration potential difference.

  1. Inert gas thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.

    1978-01-01

    Inert gas thrusters have continued to be of interest for space propulsion applications. Xenon is of interest in that its physical characteristics are well suited to propulsion. High atomic weight and low tankage fraction were major factors in this choice. If a large amount of propellant was required, so that cryogenic storage was practical, argon is a more economical alternative. Argon was also the preferred propellant for ground applications of thruster technology, such as sputter etching and deposition. Additional magnetic field measurements are reported. These measurements should be of use in magnetic field design. The diffusion of electrons through the magnetic field above multipole anodes was studied in detail. The data were consistent with Bohm diffusion across a magnetic field. The theory based on Bohm diffusion was simple and easily used for diffusion calculations. Limited startup data were obtained for multipole discharge chambers. These data were obtained with refractory cathodes, but should be useful in predicting the upper limits for starting with hollow cathodes.

  2. Inert gas thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.

    1976-01-01

    Inert gases are of interest as possible alternatives to the usual electric thruster propellants of mercury and cesium. The multipole discharge chamber investigated was shown capable of low discharge chamber losses and flat ion beam profiles with a minimum of optimization. Minimum discharge losses were 200 to 250 eV/ion for xenon and 300 to 350 eV/ion for argon, while flatness parameters in the plane of the accelerator grid were 0.85 to 0.95. The design used employs low magnetic field strengths, which permits the use of sheet-metal parts. The corner problem of the discharge chamber was resolved with recessed corner anodes, which approximately equalized both the magnetic field above the anodes and the electron currents to these anodes. Argon hollow cathodes were investigated at currents up to about 5 amperes using internal thermionic emitters. Cathode chamber diameter optimized in the 1.0 to 2.5 cm range, while orifices diameter optimized in the 0.5 to 5 mm range. The use of a bias voltage for the internal emitter extended the operating range and facilitated starting. The masses of 15 and 30 cm flight type thrusters were estimated at about 4.2 and 10.8 kg.

  3. Large inert-gas thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.; Robinson, R. S.

    1981-01-01

    Using present technology as a starting point, performance predictions were made for large thrusters. The optimum beam diameter for maximum thruster efficiency was determined for a range of specific impulse. This optimum beam diameter varied greatly with specific impulse, from about 0.6 m at 3000 seconds (and below) to about 4 m at 10,000 seconds with argon, and from about 0.6 m at 2,000 seconds (and below) to about 12 m at 10,000 seconds with Xe. These beams sizes would require much larger thrusters than those presently available, but would offer substantial complexity and cost reductions for large electric propulsion systems.

  4. Temperature Gradient in Hall Thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    D. Staack; Y. Raitses; N.J. Fisch

    2003-11-24

    Plasma potentials and electron temperatures were deduced from emissive and cold floating probe measurements in a 2 kW Hall thruster, operated in the discharge voltage range of 200-400 V. An almost linear dependence of the electron temperature on the plasma potential was observed in the acceleration region of the thruster both inside and outside the thruster. This result calls into question whether secondary electron emission from the ceramic channel walls plays a significant role in electron energy balance. The proportionality factor between the axial electron temperature gradient and the electric field is significantly smaller than might be expected by models employing Ohmic heating of electrons.

  5. Scaling of 100 kW class applied-field MPD thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Roger M.

    1992-01-01

    Three cylindrical applied-field magnetoplasmadynamic thrusters were tested with argon propellant over a broad range of operating conditions to establish empirical scaling laws for thruster performance. Argon flow rates, discharge currents, and applied-field strengths were varied between 0.025 and 0.14 g/s, 750 to 2000 A, and 0.034 to 0.20T, respectively. The results showed that the thrust reached over five times the self-field value, and that thrust increased linearly with the product of discharge current and applied-field strength and quadratically with the anode radius. While increasing the propellant flow rate increased the thrust, it did not affect the rate of thrust increase with applied-field strength, and at low propellant flow rates the self-field thrust approached 30 percent of the measured thrust. The voltage increased linearly with applied-field strength but was insensitive to the discharge current. The rate of voltage increase with applied-field strength dependent on anode radius. Thruster efficiency increased monotonically with applied-field strength and propellant flow rate. Peak thruster efficiencies were insensitive to changes in anode radius. Electrode power loss and thruster efficiency measurements showed that while the electrode losses decreased with increasing anode radius the plasma losses increased. The opposite behaviors of electrode and plasma losses demonstrates the need to identify ways of independently controlling the thruster loss mechanisms.

  6. Anomalous Hall effect and spin-orbit torques in MnGa/IrMn films: Modification from strong spin Hall effect of the antiferromagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, K. K.; Miao, J.; Xu, X. G.; Wu, Y.; Zhao, X. P.; Zhao, J. H.; Jiang, Y.

    2016-12-01

    We report systematic measurements of anomalous Hall effect (AHE) and spin-orbit torques (SOTs) in MnGa/IrMn films, in which a single L 10-MnGa epitaxial layer reveals obvious orbital two-channel Kondo (2CK) effect. As increasing the thickness of the antiferromagnet IrMn, the strong spin Hall effect (SHE) has gradually suppressed the orbital 2CK effect and modified the AHE of MnGa. A scaling involving multiple competing scattering mechanisms has been used to distinguish different contributions to the modified AHE. Finally, the sizeable SOT in the MnGa/IrMn films induced by the strong SHE of IrMn have been investigated. The IrMn layer also supplies an in-plane exchange bias field and enables nearly field-free magnetization reversal.

  7. Observation of orbital resonance Hall effect in (TMTSF)2ClO4.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Kaya; Satsukawa, H; Yamada, J; Terashima, T; Uji, S

    2014-03-21

    We report the observation of a Hall effect driven by orbital resonance in the quasi-1-dimensional (q1D) organic conductor (TMTSF)2ClO4. Although a conventional Hall effect is not expected in this class of materials due to their reduced dimensionality, we observed a prominent Hall response at certain orientations of the magnetic field B corresponding to lattice vectors of the constituent molecular chains, known as the magic angles (MAs). We show that this Hall effect can be understood as the response of conducting planes generated by an effective locking of the orbital motion of the charge carriers to the MA driven by an electron-trajectory resonance. This phenomenon supports a class of theories describing the rich behavior of MA phenomena in q1D materials based on altered dimensionality. Furthermore, we observed that the effective carrier density of the conducting planes is exponentially suppressed in large B, which indicates possible density wave formation.

  8. Electrical detection of magnetic domain walls by inverse and direct spin Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, V. T.; Zahnd, G.; Marty, A.; Savero Torres, W.; Jamet, M.; Noël, P.; Vila, L.; Attané, J. P.

    2016-11-01

    Domain wall (DW) detection is a prerequisite to perform current-induced DW motion. In this letter, we demonstrate a detection method, based on the ability for a ferromagnetic nanowire, in which a DW is pinned, to inject or detect a pure spin current. The device consists of such a ferromagnetic nanowire in contact with an orthogonal spin Hall effect (SHE) nanowire. When a current flows along the ferromagnetic nanowire, and provided a DW is pinned, the pure spin current is transformed into a transverse voltage by inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE). In the reciprocal configuration, the pure spin current created by the direct SHE, generates a transverse voltage along the ferromagnetic wire. Finite element method (FEM) simulations allow estimating the Pt spin Hall angle (SHA) (7.5 ± 0.5%). This technique provides an electrical way to study the DW motion, a device akin to the ferromagnetic/spin Hall effect bilayers typically used for spin-orbit torques experiments.

  9. Split-quaternionic Hopf map, quantum Hall effect, and twistor theory

    SciTech Connect

    Hasebe, Kazuki

    2010-02-15

    Introducing a noncompact version of the Hopf map, we demonstrate remarkable close relations between quantum Hall effect and twistor theory. We first construct quantum Hall effect on a hyperboloid based on the noncompact 2nd Hopf map of split-quaternions. We analyze a hyperbolic one-particle mechanics, and explore many-body problem, where a many-body ground state wave function and membrane-like excitations are derived explicitly. In the lowest Landau level, the symmetry is enhanced from SO(3,2) to the SU(2,2) conformal symmetry. We point out that the quantum Hall effect naturally realizes the philosophy of twistor theory. In particular, emergence mechanism of fuzzy space-time is discussed somehow in detail.

  10. Crossover to the anomalous quantum regime in the extrinsic spin Hall effect of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milletarı, Mirco; Ferreira, Aires

    2016-11-01

    Recent reports of spin-orbit coupling enhancement in chemically modified graphene have opened doors to studies of the spin Hall effect with massless chiral fermions. Here, we theoretically investigate the interaction and impurity density dependence of the extrinsic spin Hall effect in spin-orbit coupled graphene. We present a nonperturbative quantum diagrammatic calculation of the spin Hall response function in the strong-coupling regime that incorporates skew scattering and anomalous impurity density-independent contributions on equal footing. The spin Hall conductivity dependence on Fermi energy and electron-impurity interaction strength reveals the existence of experimentally accessible regions where anomalous quantum processes dominate. Our findings suggest that spin-orbit-coupled graphene is an ideal model system for probing the competition between semiclassical and bona fide quantum scattering mechanisms underlying the spin Hall effect.

  11. Ferromagnetic/Nonmagnetic Nanostructures for the Electrical Measurement of the Spin Hall Effect.

    PubMed

    Pham, Van Tuong; Vila, Laurent; Zahnd, Gilles; Marty, Alain; Savero-Torres, Williams; Jamet, Matthieu; Attané, Jean-Philippe

    2016-11-09

    Spin-orbitronics is based on the ability of spin-orbit interactions to achieve the conversion between charge currents and pure spin currents. As the precise evaluation of the conversion efficiency becomes a crucial issue, the need for straightforward ways to observe this conversion has emerged as one of the main challenges in spintronics. Here, we propose a simple device, akin to the ferromagnetic/nonmagnetic bilayers used in most spin-orbit torques experiments, and consisting of a spin Hall effect wire connected to two transverse ferromagnetic electrodes. We show that this system allows probing electrically the direct and inverse conversion in a spin Hall effect system and measuring both the spin Hall angle and the spin diffusion length. By applying this method to several spin Hall effect materials (Pt, Pd, Au, Ta, W), we show that it represents a promising tool for the metrology of spin-orbit materials.

  12. Topological Hubbard model and its high-temperature quantum Hall effect.

    PubMed

    Neupert, Titus; Santos, Luiz; Ryu, Shinsei; Chamon, Claudio; Mudry, Christopher

    2012-01-27

    The quintessential two-dimensional lattice model that describes the competition between the kinetic energy of electrons and their short-range repulsive interactions is the repulsive Hubbard model. We study a time-reversal symmetric variant of the repulsive Hubbard model defined on a planar lattice: Whereas the interaction is unchanged, any fully occupied band supports a quantized spin Hall effect. We show that at 1/2 filling of this band, the ground state develops spontaneously and simultaneously Ising ferromagnetic long-range order and a quantized charge Hall effect when the interaction is sufficiently strong. We ponder on the possible practical applications, beyond metrology, that the quantized charge Hall effect might have if it could be realized at high temperatures and without external magnetic fields in strongly correlated materials.

  13. Tuning the spin Hall effect of Pt from the moderately dirty to the superclean regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagasta, Edurne; Omori, Yasutomo; Isasa, Miren; Gradhand, Martin; Hueso, Luis E.; Niimi, Yasuhiro; Otani, YoshiChika; Casanova, Fèlix

    2016-08-01

    We systematically measure and analyze the spin diffusion length and the spin Hall effect in Pt with a wide range of conductivities using the spin absorption method in lateral spin valve devices. We observe a linear relation between the spin diffusion length and the conductivity, evidencing that the spin relaxation in Pt is governed by the Elliott-Yafet mechanism. We find a single intrinsic spin Hall conductivity (σSHint=1600 ±150 Ω-1c m-1) for Pt in the full range studied which is in good agreement with theory. We have obtained the crossover between the moderately dirty and the superclean scaling regimes of the spin Hall effect by tuning the conductivity. This is equivalent to that obtained for the anomalous Hall effect. Our results explain the spread of the spin Hall angle values in the literature and find a route to maximize this important parameter.

  14. Quantum Hall effect in semiconductor systems with quantum dots and antidots

    SciTech Connect

    Beltukov, Ya. M.; Greshnov, A. A.

    2015-04-15

    The integer quantum Hall effect in systems of semiconductor quantum dots and antidots is studied theoretically as a factor of temperature. It is established that the conditions for carrier localization in quantum-dot systems favor the observation of the quantum Hall effect at higher temperatures than in quantum-well systems. The obtained numerical results show that the fundamental plateau corresponding to the transition between the ground and first excited Landau levels can be retained up to a temperature of T ∼ 50 K, which is an order of magnitude higher than in the case of quantum wells. Implementation of the quantum Hall effect at such temperatures requires quantum-dot systems with controllable characteristics, including the optimal size and concentration and moderate geometrical and composition fluctuations. In addition, ordered arrangement is desirable, hence quantum antidots are preferable.

  15. Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in Co2MnGa and its anomalous Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludbrook, B. M.; Ruck, B. J.; Granville, S.

    2017-02-01

    We report perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in the ferromagnetic Heusler alloy Co2MnGa in a MgO/Co2MnGa/Pd trilayer stack for Co2MnGa thicknesses up to 3.5 nm. There is a thickness- and temperature-dependent spin reorientation transition from perpendicular to in-plane magnetic anisotropy, which we study through the anomalous Hall effect. From the temperature dependence of the anomalous Hall effect, we observe the expected scaling of ρx y A H E with ρxx, suggesting that the intrinsic and side-jump mechanisms are largely responsible for the anomalous Hall effect in this material.

  16. A novel NO2 gas sensor based on Hall effect operating at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J. Y.; Xie, W. M.; He, X. L.; Wang, H. C.

    2016-09-01

    Tungsten trioxide nanoparticles were obtained by a simple thermal oxidation approach. The structural and morphological properties of these nanoparticles are investigated using XRD, SEM and TEM. A WO3 thick film was deposited on the four Au electrodes to be a WO3 Hall effect sensor. The sensor was tested between magnetic field in a plastic test chamber. Room-temperature nitrogen dioxide sensing characteristics of Hall effect sensor were studied for various concentration levels of nitrogen dioxide at dry air and humidity conditions. A typical room-temperature response of 3.27 was achieved at 40 ppm of NO2 with a response and recovery times of 36 and 45 s, respectively. NO2 gas sensing mechanism of Hall effect sensor was also studied. The room-temperature operation, with the low deposition cost of the sensor, suggests suitability for developing a low-power cost-effective nitrogen dioxide sensor.

  17. Edge states and integer quantum Hall effect in topological insulator thin films.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Song-Bo; Lu, Hai-Zhou; Shen, Shun-Qing

    2015-08-25

    The integer quantum Hall effect is a topological state of quantum matter in two dimensions, and has recently been observed in three-dimensional topological insulator thin films. Here we study the Landau levels and edge states of surface Dirac fermions in topological insulators under strong magnetic field. We examine the formation of the quantum plateaux of the Hall conductance and find two different patterns, in one pattern the filling number covers all integers while only odd integers in the other. We focus on the quantum plateau closest to zero energy and demonstrate the breakdown of the quantum spin Hall effect resulting from structure inversion asymmetry. The phase diagrams of the quantum Hall states are presented as functions of magnetic field, gate voltage and chemical potential. This work establishes an intuitive picture of the edge states to understand the integer quantum Hall effect for Dirac electrons in topological insulator thin films.

  18. Quantum anomalous Hall effect and tunable topological states in 3d transition metals doped silicene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Long; Liu, Lan-Feng; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2013-10-09

    Silicene is an intriguing 2D topological material which is closely analogous to graphene but with stronger spin orbit coupling effect and natural compatibility with current silicon-based electronics industry. Here we demonstrate that silicene decorated with certain 3d transition metals (Vanadium) can sustain a stable quantum anomalous Hall effect using both analytical model and first-principles Wannier interpolation. We also predict the quantum valley Hall effect and electrically tunable topological states could be realized in certain transition metal doped silicene where the energy band inversion occurs. Our findings provide new scheme for the realization of quantum anomalous Hall effect and platform for electrically controllable topological states which are highly desirable for future nanoelectronics and spintronics application.

  19. NEXT Ion Thruster Performance Dispersion Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soulas, George C.; Patterson, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    The NEXT ion thruster is a low specific mass, high performance thruster with a nominal throttling range of 0.5 to 7 kW. Numerous engineering model and one prototype model thrusters have been manufactured and tested. Of significant importance to propulsion system performance is thruster-to-thruster performance dispersions. This type of information can provide a bandwidth of expected performance variations both on a thruster and a component level. Knowledge of these dispersions can be used to more conservatively predict thruster service life capability and thruster performance for mission planning, facilitate future thruster performance comparisons, and verify power processor capabilities are compatible with the thruster design. This study compiles the test results of five engineering model thrusters and one flight-like thruster to determine unit-to-unit dispersions in thruster performance. Component level performance dispersion analyses will include discharge chamber voltages, currents, and losses; accelerator currents, electron backstreaming limits, and perveance limits; and neutralizer keeper and coupling voltages and the spot-to-plume mode transition flow rates. Thruster level performance dispersion analyses will include thrust efficiency.

  20. Ring-cusp ion thruster with shell anode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, J. S.; Rawlin, V. K.; Roman, R. F. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    An improved ion thruster for low specific impulse operation in the 1500 sec to 6000 sec range has a multicusp boundary field provided by high strength magnets on an iron anode shell which lengthens the paths of electrons from a hollow cathode assembly. A downstream anode pole piece in the form of an iron ring supports a ring of magnets to provide a more uniform beam profile. A cylindrical cathode magnet can be moved selectively in an axial direction along a feed tube to produce the desired magnetic field at the cathode tip.

  1. High-Resolution ac Measurements of the Hall Effect in Organic Field-Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Yi, H. T.; Podzorov, V.

    2016-03-01

    We describe a high resolving power technique for Hall-effect measurements, efficient in determining Hall mobility and carrier density in organic field-effect transistors and other low-mobility systems. We utilize a small low-frequency ac magnetic field (Brms<0.25 T ) and a phase-sensitive (lock-in) detection of Hall voltage, with the necessary corrections for Faraday induction. This method significantly enhances the signal-to-noise ratio and eliminates the necessity of using high magnetic fields in Hall-effect studies. With the help of this method, we are able to obtain the Hall mobility and carrier density in organic transistors with a mobility as low as μ ˜0.3 cm2 V-1 s-1 by using a compact desktop apparatus and low magnetic fields. We find a good agreement between Hall-effect and electric-field-effect measurements, indicating that, contrary to the common belief, certain organic semiconductors with mobilities below 1 cm2 V-1 s-1 can still exhibit a fully developed, band-semiconductor-like Hall effect, with the Hall mobility and carrier density matching those obtained in longitudinal transistor measurements. This suggests that, even when μ <1 cm2 V-1 s-1 , charges in organic semiconductors can still behave as delocalized coherent carriers. This technique paves the way to ubiquitous Hall-effect studies in a wide range of low-mobility materials and devices, where it is typically very difficult to resolve the Hall effect even in very high dc magnetic fields.

  2. Derated ion thruster design issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Michael J.; Rawlin, Vincent K.

    1991-01-01

    Preliminary activities to develop and refine a lightweight 30 cm engineering model ion thruster are discussed. The approach is to develop a 'derated' ion thruster capable of performing both auxiliary and primary propulsion roles over an input power range of at least 0.5 to 5.0 kilo-W. Design modifications to a baseline thruster to reduce mass and volume are discussed. Performance data over an order of magnitude input power range are presented, with emphasis on the performance impact of engine throttling. Thruster design modifications to optimize performance over specific power envelopes are discussed. Additionally, lifetime estimates based on wear test measurements are made for the operation envelope of the engine.

  3. Hall thruster with grooved walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hong; Ning, Zhongxi; Yu, Daren

    2013-02-01

    Axial-oriented and azimuthal-distributed grooves are formed on channel walls of a Hall thruster after the engine undergoes a long-term operation. Existing studies have demonstrated the relation between the grooves and the near-wall physics, such as sheath and electron near-wall transport. The idea to optimize the thruster performance with such grooves was also proposed. Therefore, this paper is devoted to explore the effects of wall grooves on the discharge characteristics of a Hall thruster. With experimental measurements, the variations on electron conductivity, ionization distribution, and integrated performance are obtained. The involved physical mechanisms are then analyzed and discussed. The findings help to not only better understand the working principle of Hall thruster discharge but also establish a physical fundamental for the subsequent optimization with artificial grooves.

  4. Comparing Hall Effect and Field Effect Measurements on the Same Single Nanowire.

    PubMed

    Hultin, Olof; Otnes, Gaute; Borgström, Magnus T; Björk, Mikael; Samuelson, Lars; Storm, Kristian

    2016-01-13

    We compare and discuss the two most commonly used electrical characterization techniques for nanowires (NWs). In a novel single-NW device, we combine Hall effect and back-gated and top-gated field effect measurements and quantify the carrier concentrations in a series of sulfur-doped InP NWs. The carrier concentrations from Hall effect and field effect measurements are found to correlate well when using the analysis methods described in this work. This shows that NWs can be accurately characterized with available electrical methods, an important result toward better understanding of semiconductor NW doping.

  5. Unusual spin Hall effect of a light beam in chiral metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Hailei; Zhang Xiangdong

    2011-05-15

    We present a solution to the problem of reflection and refraction of a polarized Gaussian beam at the interface between the transparent medium and the chiral metamaterials. Some unusual spin Hall effects of reflected and transmitted light have been found. It is shown that the spin-dependent displacements of the reflected beam centroid can not only reach several tens of wavelengths at certain incident angles; the reversed effect for the transmitted beams can also be realized by tuning the chiral parameters. These findings provide an alternative pathway for controlling the spin Hall effects of light and thereby open up the possibility for developing new nanophotonic devices.

  6. Topological edge states and fractional quantum Hall effect from umklapp scattering.

    PubMed

    Klinovaja, Jelena; Loss, Daniel

    2013-11-08

    We study anisotropic lattice strips in the presence of a magnetic field in the quantum Hall effect regime. At specific magnetic fields, causing resonant umklapp scattering, the system is gapped in the bulk and supports chiral edge states in close analogy to topological insulators. In electron gases with stripes, these gaps result in plateaus for the Hall conductivity exactly at the known fillings n/m (both positive integers and m odd) for the integer and fractional quantum Hall effect. For double strips, we find topological phase transitions with phases that support midgap edge states with flat dispersion. The topological effects predicted here could be tested directly in optical lattices.

  7. Simulation of Electric Propulsion Thrusters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    Electric Propulsion Thrusters RTO-EN-AVT-194 17 - 3 [3] is a well-developed, highly successful numerical technique for simulating rarefied gas flows ... Rarefied Flows (Modeles et methodes de calcul des coulements de gaz rarefies ). RTO-EN-AVT-194 14. ABSTRACT Electric propulsion thrusters are replacing...METHODS The focus of this article is on numerical methods used to model the flow of gas and plasma through electric propulsion devices. Discussion

  8. Hall Thruster Technology for NASA Science Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manzella, David; Oh, David; Aadland, Randall

    2005-01-01

    The performance of a prototype Hall thruster designed for Discovery-class NASA science mission applications was evaluated at input powers ranging from 0.2 to 2.9 kilowatts. These data were used to construct a throttle profile for a projected Hall thruster system based on this prototype thruster. The suitability of such a Hall thruster system to perform robotic exploration missions was evaluated through the analysis of a near Earth asteroid sample return mission. This analysis demonstrated that a propulsion system based on the prototype Hall thruster offers mission benefits compared to a propulsion system based on an existing ion thruster.

  9. High-Energy Two-Stage Pulsed Plasma Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markusic, Tom

    2003-01-01

    A high-energy (28 kJ per pulse) two-stage pulsed plasma thruster (MSFC PPT-1) has been constructed and tested. The motivation of this project is to develop a high power (approximately 500 kW), high specific impulse (approximately 10000 s), highly efficient (greater than 50%) thruster for use as primary propulsion in a high power nuclear electric propulsion system. PPT-1 was designed to overcome four negative characteristics which have detracted from the utility of pulsed plasma thrusters: poor electrical efficiency, poor propellant utilization efficiency, electrode erosion, and reliability issues associated with the use of high speed gas valves and high current switches. Traditional PPTs have been plagued with poor efficiency because they have not been operated in a plasma regime that fully exploits the potential benefits of pulsed plasma acceleration by electromagnetic forces. PPTs have generally been used to accelerate low-density plasmas with long current pulses. Operation of thrusters in this plasma regime allows for the development of certain undesirable particle-kinetic effects, such as Hall effect-induced current sheet canting. PPT-1 was designed to propel a highly collisional, dense plasma that has more fluid-like properties and, hence, is more effectively pushed by a magnetic field. The high-density plasma loading into the second stage of the accelerator is achieved through the use of a dense plasma injector (first stage). The injector produces a thermal plasma, derived from a molten lithium propellant feed system, which is subsequently accelerated by the second stage using mega-amp level currents, which eject the plasma at a speed on the order of 100 kilometers per second. Traditional PPTs also suffer from dynamic efficiency losses associated with snowplow loading of distributed neutral propellant. The twostage scheme used in PPT-I allows the propellant to be loaded in a manner which more closely approximates the optimal slug loading. Lithium propellant

  10. Superconducting electromagnetic thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, J.

    1993-02-11

    An electromagnetic thruster for marine vehicles using a jet of water driven by the interaction of a mutually perpendicular intensified magnetic field and an intensified electric field is disclosed. The intensified magnetic field is produced by superconducting coils cooled by a coolant such as liquid helium. An intensified electric field is produced by passing high amperage current across the seawater jet. These interacting fields produce a Lorentz force perpendicular to mutually perpendicular electric and magnetic field vectors which is used to drive the seawater jet. In some embodiments, the force may also be used to draw water into the jet from the boundary layer flow around the vehicle thereby reducing boundary layer turbulence and associated radiated noise.

  11. Laser-heated thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kemp, N. H.; Krech, R. H.

    1980-01-01

    The development of computer codes for the thrust chamber of a rocket of which the propellant gas is heated by a CW laser beam was investigated. The following results are presented: (1) simplified models of laser heated thrusters for approximate parametric studies and performance mapping; (3) computer programs for thrust chamber design; and (3) shock tube experiment to measure absorption coefficients. Two thrust chamber design programs are outlined: (1) for seeded hydrogen, with both low temperature and high temperature seeds, which absorbs the laser radiation continuously, starting at the inlet gas temperature; and (2) for hydrogen seeded with cesium, in which a laser supported combustion wave stands near the gas inlet, and heats the gas up to a temperature at which the gas can absorb the laser energy.

  12. Laser-heated thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kemp, N. H.; Lewis, P. F.

    1980-01-01

    The development of a computer program for the design of the thrust chamber for a CW laser heated thruster was examined. Hydrodgen was employed as the propellant gas and high temperature absorber. The laser absorption coefficient of the mixture/laser radiation combination is given in temperature and species densities. Radiative and absorptive properties are given to determine radiation from such gas mixtures. A computer code for calculating the axisymmetric channel flow of a gas mixture in chemical equilibrium, and laser energy absorption and convective and radiative heating is described. It is concluded that: (1) small amounts of cesium seed substantially increase the absorption coefficient of hydrogen; (2) cesium is a strong radiator and contributes greatly to radiation of cesium seeded hydrogen; (3) water vapor is a poor absorber; and (4) for 5.3mcm radiation, both H2O/CO and NO/CO seeded hydrogen mixtures are good absorbers.

  13. Ion Thruster Support and Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haag, Thomas W. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A system for supporting and selectively positioning an ion thruster relative to a surface of a spacecraft includes three angularly spaced thruster support assemblies. Each thruster support assembly includes a frame which has a rotary actuator mounted thereon. The rotary actuator is connected to an actuator member which is rotatably connected to a thruster attachment member connected to a body of the thruster. A stabilizer member is rotatably mounted to the frame and to the thruster attachment member. The thruster is selectively movable in the pitch and yaw directions responsive to movement of the actuator members by the actuators on the thruster support assemblies. A failure of any one actuator on a thruster support assembly will generally still enable limited thruster positioning capability in two directions. In a retracted position the thruster attachment members are held in nested relation in saddles supported on the frames of the thruster support assemblies. The thruster is securely held in the retracted position during periods of high loading such as during launch of the spacecraft.

  14. Study of Breathing Oscillations in a Hall Thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Scott; Raitses, Yevgeny; Diallo, Ahmed

    2014-10-01

    Breathing oscillations are the most powerful low frequency (10-30 kHz) oscillations that are typically observed in different types of Hall thrusters. We report on investigations of the effects of both natural and artificially driven breathing oscillations on the discharge and plasma properties of a cylindrical Hall thruster. In order to produce artificially coherent oscillations, a sinusoidal modulation up to 30 VAC of the anode potential in the range of 5-30 kHz is applied to the thruster. These driven modes are studied in operating regimes with and without naturally occurring oscillations. The imposed periodicity allows for measurement of the time-dependent ion velocity distribution through a novel heterodyne approach to laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) using phase-sensitive detection. Further comparison between natural and driven modes is performed through the analysis of the discharge and ion currents, as well as high-speed imaging data. Results serve both to validate the LIF technique and to improve understanding of breathing oscillations. In particular, we show oscillations of the ion velocity distribution function due to breathing oscillations and explain their correlation with oscillations of the discharge and ion currents. This work was supported by DOE Contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  15. Non-Contact Thermal Characterization of NASA's HERMeS Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Wensheng; Kamhawi, Hani; Myers, James L.; Yim, John T.; Neff, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    The thermal characterization test of NASA's 12.5-kW Hall Effect Rocket with Magnetic Shielding has been completed. This thruster was developed to support a number of potential Solar Electric Propulsion Technology Demonstration Mission concepts, including the Asteroid Redirect Robotic Mission concept. As a part of the preparation for this characterization test, an infrared-based, non-contact thermal imaging system was developed to measure the temperature of various thruster surfaces that are exposed to high voltage or plasma. An in-situ calibration array was incorporated into the setup to improve the accuracy of the temperature measurement. The key design parameters for the calibration array were determined in a separate pilot test. The raw data from the characterization test was analyzed though further work is needed to obtain accurate anode temperatures. Examination of the front pole and discharge channel temperatures showed that the thruster temperature was driven more by discharge voltage than by discharge power. Operation at lower discharge voltages also yielded more uniform temperature distributions than at higher discharge voltages. When operating at high discharge voltage, increasing the magnetic field strength appeared to have made the thermal loading azimuthally more uniform.

  16. Prediction and experimental measurement of the electromagnetic thrust generated by a microwave thruster system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Juan; Wang, Yu-Quan; Ma, Yan-Jie; Li, Peng-Fei; Yang, Le; Wang, Yang; He, Guo-Qiang

    2013-05-01

    A microwave thruster system that can convert microwave power directly to thrust without a gas propellant is developed. In the system, a cylindrical tapered resonance cavity and a magnetron microwave source are used respectively as the thruster cavity and the energy source to generate the electromagnetic wave. The wave is radiated into and then reflected from the cavity to form a pure standing wave with non-uniform electromagnetic pressure distribution. Consequently, a net electromagnetic thrust exerted on the axis of the thruster cavity appears, which is demonstrated through theoretical calculation based on the electromagnetic theory. The net electromagnetic thrust is also experimentally measured in the range from 70 mN to 720 mN when the microwave output power is from 80 W to 2500 W.

  17. A novel method of including Landau level mixing in numerical studies of the quantum Hall effect

    SciTech Connect

    Wooten, Rachel; Quinn, John; Macek, Joseph

    2013-12-04

    Landau level mixing should influence the quantum Hall effect for all except the strongest applied magnetic fields. We propose a simple method for examining the effects of Landau level mixing by incorporating multiple Landau levels into the Haldane pseudopotentials through exact numerical diagonalization. Some of the resulting pseudopotentials for the lowest and first excited Landau levels will be presented.

  18. Including Landau level mixing in numerical studies of the quantum Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooten, R. E.; Macek, J. H.; Quinn, J. J.

    2013-10-01

    Landau level mixing should influence the quantum Hall effect for all but the strongest applied magnetic fields. However, the effects of Landau level mixing have proven difficult to model theoretically. We propose a simple method for examining the effects of Landau level mixing on electron pairs for intermediate magnetic fields by incorporating multiple Landau levels into the pseudopotentials on the Haldane sphere.

  19. A novel method of including Landau level mixing in numerical studies of the quantum Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooten, Rachel; Quinn, John; Macek, Joseph

    2013-12-01

    Landau level mixing should influence the quantum Hall effect for all except the strongest applied magnetic fields. We propose a simple method for examining the effects of Landau level mixing by incorporating multiple Landau levels into the Haldane pseudopotentials through exact numerical diagonalization. Some of the resulting pseudopotentials for the lowest and first excited Landau levels will be presented.

  20. Edge states and integer quantum Hall effect in topological insulator thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Song-Bo; Lu, Hai-Zhou; Shen, Shun-Qing

    The integer quantum Hall effect is a topological state of quantum matter in two dimensions, and has recently been observed in three-dimensional topological insulator thin films. In this report, I will talk about the Landau levels and edge states of surface Dirac fermions in topological insulators under a strong magnetic field. We examine the formation of the quantum plateaux of the Hall conductance and find two different patterns, in one pattern the filling number covers all integers while only odd integers in the other. We focus on the quantum plateau closest to zero energy and demonstrate the breakdown of the quantum spin Hall effect as a result of the interplay of magnetic field and structure inversion asymmetry. We also reveal that the edge states exist only for the integer Hall conductance while no edge-state solution can be found for the ''half-integer'' Hall conductance. The addition of top and bottom surface Dirac fermions always form well-defined edge states, and gives an integer quantum Hall effect. This work establishes an intuitive picture of the edge states to understand the integer quantum Hall effect for Dirac electrons in topological insulator thin films.

  1. Non-commutative geometry in higher dimensional quantum hall effect as A-class topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasebe, K.

    2014-09-01

    We clarify relations between the higher dimensional quantum Hall effect and A-class topological insulator. In particular, we elucidate physical implications of the higher dimensional non-commutative geometry in the context of A-class topological insulator. This presentation is based on arXiv:1403.5066.

  2. Thickness Dependence of the Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in Magnetic Topological Insulator Films.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiao; Feng, Yang; Wang, Jing; Ou, Yunbo; Hao, Zhenqi; Liu, Chang; Zhang, Zuocheng; Zhang, Liguo; Lin, Chaojing; Liao, Jian; Li, Yongqing; Wang, Li-Li; Ji, Shuai-Hua; Chen, Xi; Ma, Xucun; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; Wang, Yayu; He, Ke; Xue, Qi-Kun

    2016-08-01

    The evolution of the quantum anomalous Hall effect with the thickness of Cr-doped (Bi,Sb)2 Te3 magnetic topological insulator films is studied, revealing how the effect is caused by the interplay of the surface states, band-bending, and ferromagnetic exchange energy. Homogeneity in ferromagnetism is found to be the key to high-temperature quantum anomalous Hall material.

  3. Fast Camera Imaging of Hall Thruster Ignition

    SciTech Connect

    C.L. Ellison, Y. Raitses and N.J. Fisch

    2011-02-24

    Hall thrusters provide efficient space propulsion by electrostatic acceleration of ions. Rotating electron clouds in the thruster overcome the space charge limitations of other methods. Images of the thruster startup, taken with a fast camera, reveal a bright ionization period which settles into steady state operation over 50 μs. The cathode introduces azimuthal asymmetry, which persists for about 30 μs into the ignition. Plasma thrusters are used on satellites for repositioning, orbit correction and drag compensation. The advantage of plasma thrusters over conventional chemical thrusters is that the exhaust energies are not limited by chemical energy to about an electron volt. For xenon Hall thrusters, the ion exhaust velocity can be 15-20 km/s, compared to 5 km/s for a typical chemical thruster

  4. Tunable Valley Polarization and Valley Orbital Magnetic Moment Hall Effect in Honeycomb Systems with Broken Inversion Symmetry.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhigang; Quhe, Ruge; Liu, Shunquan; Li, Yan; Feng, Ji; Yang, Yingchang; Lu, Jing; Yang, Jinbo

    2015-09-11

    In this Letter, a tunable valley polarization is investigated for honeycomb systems with broken inversion symmetry such as transition-metal dichalcogenide MX2 (M = Mo, W; X = S, Se) monolayers through elliptical pumping. Compared to circular pumping, elliptical pumping is a more universal and effective method to create coherent valley polarization. When two valleys of MX2 monolayers are doped or polarized, a novel anomalous Hall effect (called valley orbital magnetic moment Hall effect) is predicted. Valley orbital magnetic moment Hall effect can generate an orbital magnetic moment current without the accompaniment of a charge current, which opens a new avenue for exploration of valleytronics and orbitronics. Valley orbital magnetic moment Hall effect is expected to overshadow spin Hall effect and is tunable under elliptical pumping.

  5. Cavity-enhanced optical Hall effect in two-dimensional free charge carrier gases detected at terahertz frequencies.

    PubMed

    Knight, S; Schöche, S; Darakchieva, V; Kühne, P; Carlin, J-F; Grandjean, N; Herzinger, C M; Schubert, M; Hofmann, T

    2015-06-15

    The effect of a tunable, externally coupled Fabry-Perot cavity to resonantly enhance the optical Hall effect signatures at terahertz frequencies produced by a traditional Drude-like two-dimensional electron gas is shown and discussed in this Letter. As a result, the detection of optical Hall effect signatures at conveniently obtainable magnetic fields, for example, by neodymium permanent magnets, is demonstrated. An AlInN/GaN-based high-electron mobility transistor structure grown on a sapphire substrate is used for the experiment. The optical Hall effect signatures and their dispersions, which are governed by the frequency and the reflectance minima and maxima of the externally coupled Fabry-Perot cavity, are presented and discussed. Tuning the externally coupled Fabry-Perot cavity strongly modifies the optical Hall effect signatures, which provides a new degree of freedom for optical Hall effect experiments in addition to frequency, angle of incidence, and magnetic field direction and strength.

  6. Detection of a History Dependent Topological Hall Effect Due to Skyrmion Formation in FeGe Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, James; Page, Michael; Bhallamudi, Vidya; Brangham, Jack; Meng, Keng Yuan; Esser, Bryan; Wang, Hailong; McComb, Dave; Hammel, Chris; Yang, Fengyuan

    B20 phase crystal structures, such as FeGe and MnSi, have been of interest because they enable magnetic skyrmion phases, which can potentially lead to low energy cost spintronic device applications. We report the synthesis of pure phase FeGe epitaxial thin films grown on Si (111) substrates by ultra-high vacuum off-axis magnetron sputtering. The FeGe films were characterized by x-ray diffraction, scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and Hall effect measurements. The topological Hall effect (THE) signals were extracted by subtracting out the anomalous Hall effect and ordinary Hall effect, demonstrating the existence of the skyrmion phase in FeGe films between 5 and 275 K. Topological hall effect was observed at zero field at all temperatures below the Curie temperature, showing the possibility of metastable skymion particles at zero field and high temperatures. We will also discuss the study of dynamics of the ferromagnetic phases using ferromagnetic resonance.

  7. Tunable Valley Polarization and Valley Orbital Magnetic Moment Hall Effect in Honeycomb Systems with Broken Inversion Symmetry

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zhigang; Quhe, Ruge; Liu, Shunquan; Li, Yan; Feng, Ji; Yang, Yingchang; Lu, Jing; Yang, Jinbo

    2015-01-01

    In this Letter, a tunable valley polarization is investigated for honeycomb systems with broken inversion symmetry such as transition-metal dichalcogenide MX2 (M = Mo, W; X = S, Se) monolayers through elliptical pumping. Compared to circular pumping, elliptical pumping is a more universal and effective method to create coherent valley polarization. When two valleys of MX2 monolayers are doped or polarized, a novel anomalous Hall effect (called valley orbital magnetic moment Hall effect) is predicted. Valley orbital magnetic moment Hall effect can generate an orbital magnetic moment current without the accompaniment of a charge current, which opens a new avenue for exploration of valleytronics and orbitronics. Valley orbital magnetic moment Hall effect is expected to overshadow spin Hall effect and is tunable under elliptical pumping. PMID:26358835

  8. Understanding the physics of a possible non-Abelian fractional quantum hall effect state.

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Wei; Crawford, Matthew; Tallakulam, Madhu; Ross, Anthony Joseph, III

    2010-10-01

    We wish to present in this report experimental results from a one-year Senior Council Tier-1 LDRD project that focused on understanding the physics of a possible non-Abelian fractional quantum Hall effect state. We first give a general introduction to the quantum Hall effect, and then present the experimental results on the edge-state transport in a special fractional quantum Hall effect state at Landau level filling {nu} = 5/2 - a possible non-Abelian quantum Hall state. This state has been at the center of current basic research due to its potential applications in fault-resistant topological quantum computation. We will also describe the semiconductor 'Hall-bar' devices we used in this project. Electron physics in low dimensional systems has been one of the most exciting fields in condensed matter physics for many years. This is especially true of quantum Hall effect (QHE) physics, which has seen its intellectual wealth applied in and has influenced many seemingly unrelated fields, such as the black hole physics, where a fractional QHE-like phase has been identified. Two Nobel prizes have been awarded for discoveries of quantum Hall effects: in 1985 to von Klitzing for the discovery of integer QHE, and in 1998 to Tsui, Stormer, and Laughlin for the discovery of fractional QHE. Today, QH physics remains one of the most vibrant research fields, and many unexpected novel quantum states continue to be discovered and to surprise us, such as utilizing an exotic, non-Abelian FQHE state at {nu} = 5/2 for fault resistant topological computation. Below we give a briefly introduction of the quantum Hall physics.

  9. Near-Surface Plasma Characterization of the 12.5-kW NASA TDU1 Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shastry, Rohit; Huang, Wensheng; Kamhawi, Hani

    2015-01-01

    To advance the state-of-the-art in Hall thruster technology, NASA is developing a 12.5-kW, high-specific-impulse, high-throughput thruster for the Solar Electric Propulsion Technology Demonstration Mission. In order to meet the demanding lifetime requirements of potential missions such as the Asteroid Redirect Robotic Mission, magnetic shielding was incorporated into the thruster design. Two units of the resulting thruster, called the Hall Effect Rocket with Magnetic Shielding (HERMeS), were fabricated and are presently being characterized. The first of these units, designated the Technology Development Unit 1 (TDU1), has undergone extensive performance and thermal characterization at NASA Glenn Research Center. A preliminary lifetime assessment was conducted by characterizing the degree of magnetic shielding within the thruster. This characterization was accomplished by placing eight flush-mounted Langmuir probes within each discharge channel wall and measuring the local plasma potential and electron temperature at various axial locations. Measured properties indicate a high degree of magnetic shielding across the throttle table, with plasma potential variations along each channel wall being less than or equal to 5 eV and electron temperatures being maintained at less than or equal to 5 eV, even at 800 V discharge voltage near the thruster exit plane. These properties indicate that ion impact energies within the HERMeS will not exceed 26 eV, which is below the expected sputtering threshold energy for boron nitride. Parametric studies that varied the facility backpressure and magnetic field strength at 300 V, 9.4 kW, illustrate that the plasma potential and electron temperature are insensitive to these parameters, with shielding being maintained at facility pressures 3X higher and magnetic field strengths 2.5X higher than nominal conditions. Overall, the preliminary lifetime assessment indicates a high degree of shielding within the HERMeS TDU1, effectively

  10. Mercury ion thruster research, 1978

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbur, P. J.

    1978-01-01

    The effects of 8 cm thruster main and neutralizer cathode operating conditions on cathode orifice plate temperatures were studied. The effects of cathode operating conditions on insert temperature profiles and keeper voltages are presented for three different types of inserts. The bulk of the emission current is generally observed to come from the downstream end of the insert rather than from the cathode orifice plate. Results of a test in which the screen grid plasma sheath of a thruster was probed as the beam current was varied are shown. Grid performance obtained with a grid machined from glass ceramic is discussed. The effects of copper and nitrogen impurities on the sputtering rates of thruster materials are measured experimentally and a model describing the rate of nitrogen chemisorption on materials in either the beam or the discharge chamber is presented. The results of optimization of a radial field thruster design are presented. Performance of this device is shown to be comparable to that of a divergent field thruster and efficient operation with the screen grid biased to floating potential, where its susceptibility to sputter erosion damage is reduced, is demonstrated.

  11. Stationary Plasma Thruster Plume Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Roger M.; Manzella, David H.

    1994-01-01

    Stationary Plasma Thrusters (SPT's) are being investigated for application to a variety of near-term missions. This paper presents the results of a preliminary study of the thruster plume characteristics which are needed to assess spacecraft integration requirements. Langmuir probes, planar probes, Faraday cups, and a retarding potential analyzer were used to measure plume properties. For the design operating voltage of 300 V the centerline electron density was found to decrease from approximately 1.8 x 10 exp 17 cubic meters at a distance of 0.3 m to 1.8 X 10 exp 14 cubic meters at a distance of 4 m from the thruster. The electron temperature over the same region was between 1.7 and 3.5 eV. Ion current density measurements showed that the plume was sharply peaked, dropping by a factor of 2.6 within 22 degrees of centerline. The ion energy 4 m from the thruster and 15 degrees off-centerline was approximately 270 V. The thruster cathode flow rate and facility pressure were found to strongly affect the plume properties. In addition to the plume measurements, the data from the various probe types were used to assess the impact of probe design criteria

  12. Advanced ion thruster research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbur, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    A series of experiments conducted on a ring cusp magnetic field ion thruster; in which the anode, cathode and discharge chamber backplate were moved relative to the magnetic cusp; are described. Optimum locations for the anode, cathode and backplate which yield the lowest energy cost per plasma ion and highest extracted ion fraction are identified. The results are discussed in terms of simple physical models. The results of preliminary experiments into the operation of hollow cathodes on nitrogen and xenon over a large pressure range (0.1 to 100 Torr) are presented. They show that the cathode discharge transfers from the cathode insert to the exterior edge of the orifice plate as the interelectrode pressure is increased. Experimental evidence showing that a new ion extractor grid concept can be used to stabilize the plasma sheath at the screen grid is presented. This concept, identified by the term constrained sheath optics, is shown to hold ion beamlet divergence and impingement characteristics to stable values as the beamlet current and the net and total accelerating voltages are changed. The current status of a study of beamlet vectoring induced by displacing the accelerator and/or decelerator grids of a three grid ion extraction system relative to the screen grid is discussed.

  13. Inert gas thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.

    1977-01-01

    Inert gases, particularly argon and xenon, are of interest as possible alternatives to the usual electric thruster propellants of mercury and cesium. Hollow cathode data were obtained for a wide range of operating conditions. Some test conditions gave plasma coupling voltages at or below the sputtering threshold, hence should permit long operating lifetimes. All observations of hollow cathode operation were consistent with a single theory of operation, in which a significant amount of the total electron emission is from localized areas within the orifice. This mode of emission is also supported by scanning electron microscope photographs that indicate local temperatures at or near the melting temperature of the tungsten tip. Experimental hollow cathode performance was correlated for two orifice diameters, three inert gas propellants, and a range of flow rates for each propellant. The basic theory for the production of doubly ionized argon and xenon was completed. Experimental measurements of the doubly ionized fraction agree with theory within about plus or minus 20 percent. High voltage isolators were studied for the propellant feed line. The breakdown voltage per segment ranged from 300 to over 500 V with argon.

  14. Advanced ion thruster research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbur, P. J.

    1984-01-01

    A simple model describing the discharge chamber performance of high strength, cusped magnetic field ion thrusters is developed. The model is formulated in terms of the energy cost of producing ions in the discharge chamber and the fraction of ions produced in the discharge chamber that are extracted to form the ion beam. The accuracy of the model is verified experimentally in a series of tests wherein the discharge voltage, propellant, grid transparency to neutral atoms, beam diameter and discharge chamber wall temperature are varied. The model is exercised to demonstrate what variations in performance might be expected by varying discharge chamber parameters. The results of a study of xenon and argon orificed hollow cathodes are reported. These results suggest that a hollow cathode model developed from research conducted on mercury cathodes can also be applied to xenon and argon. Primary electron mean free paths observed in argon and xenon cathodes that are larger than those found in mercury cathodes are identified as a cause of performance differences between mercury and inert gas cathodes. Data required as inputs to the inert gas cathode model are presented so it can be used as an aid in cathode design.

  15. Electron dynamics in Hall thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marini, Samuel; Pakter, Renato

    2015-11-01

    Hall thrusters are plasma engines those use an electromagnetic fields combination to confine electrons, generate and accelerate ions. Widely used by aerospace industries those thrusters stand out for its simple geometry, high specific impulse and low demand for electric power. Propulsion generated by those systems is due to acceleration of ions produced in an acceleration channel. The ions are generated by collision of electrons with propellant gas atoms. In this context, we can realize how important is characterizing the electronic dynamics. Using Hamiltonian formalism, we derive the electron motion equation in a simplified electromagnetic fields configuration observed in hall thrusters. We found conditions those must be satisfied by electromagnetic fields to have electronic confinement in acceleration channel. We present configurations of electromagnetic fields those maximize propellant gas ionization and thus make propulsion more efficient. This work was supported by CNPq.

  16. Inert-gas thruster technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.; Robinson, R. S.; Trock, D. C.

    1981-01-01

    Attention is given to recent advances in component technology for inert-gas thrusters. It is noted that the maximum electron emission of a hollow cathode with Ar can be increased 60-70% by using an enclosed keeper configuration. Operation with Ar but without emissive oxide has also been attained. A 30-cm thruster operated with Ar at moderate discharge voltages is found to give double-ion measurements consistent with a double-ion correlation developed earlier on the basis of 15-cm thruster data. An attempt is made to reduce discharge losses by biasing anodes positive of the discharge plasma. The performance of a single-grid ion-optics configuration is assessed. The ion impingement on the single-grid accelerator is found to approach the value expected from the projected blockage when the sheath thickness next to the accelerator is 2-3 times the aperture diameter.

  17. NEXT Thruster Component Verification Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinero, Luis R.; Sovey, James S.

    2007-01-01

    Component testing is a critical part of thruster life validation activities under NASA s Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) project testing. The high voltage propellant isolators were selected for design verification testing. Even though they are based on a heritage design, design changes were made because the isolators will be operated under different environmental conditions including temperature, voltage, and pressure. The life test of two NEXT isolators was therefore initiated and has accumulated more than 10,000 hr of operation. Measurements to date indicate only a negligibly small increase in leakage current. The cathode heaters were also selected for verification testing. The technology to fabricate these heaters, developed for the International Space Station plasma contactor hollow cathode assembly, was transferred to Aerojet for the fabrication of the NEXT prototype model ion thrusters. Testing the contractor-fabricated heaters is necessary to validate fabrication processes for high reliability heaters. This paper documents the status of the propellant isolator and cathode heater tests.

  18. Helicon plasma thruster discharge model

    SciTech Connect

    Lafleur, T.

    2014-04-15

    By considering particle, momentum, and energy balance equations, we develop a semi-empirical quasi one-dimensional analytical discharge model of radio-frequency and helicon plasma thrusters. The model, which includes both the upstream plasma source region as well as the downstream diverging magnetic nozzle region, is compared with experimental measurements and confirms current performance levels. Analysis of the discharge model identifies plasma power losses on the radial and back wall of the thruster as the major performance reduction factors. These losses serve as sinks for the input power which do not contribute to the thrust, and which reduce the maximum plasma density and hence propellant utilization. With significant radial plasma losses eliminated, the discharge model (with argon) predicts specific impulses in excess of 3000 s, propellant utilizations above 90%, and thruster efficiencies of about 30%.

  19. Measurements of neutral and ion velocity distribution functions in a Hall thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svarnas, Panagiotis; Romadanov, Iavn; Diallo, Ahmed; Raitses, Yevgeny

    2015-11-01

    Hall thruster is a plasma device for space propulsion. It utilizes a cross-field discharge to generate a partially ionized weakly collisional plasma with magnetized electrons and non-magnetized ions. The ions are accelerated by the electric field to produce the thrust. There is a relatively large number of studies devoted to characterization of accelerated ions, including measurements of ion velocity distribution function using laser-induced fluorescence diagnostic. Interactions of these accelerated ions with neutral atoms in the thruster and the thruster plume is a subject of on-going studies, which require combined monitoring of ion and neutral velocity distributions. Herein, laser-induced fluorescence technique has been employed to study neutral and single-charged ion velocity distribution functions in a 200 W cylindrical Hall thruster operating with xenon propellant. An optical system is installed in the vacuum chamber enabling spatially resolved axial velocity measurements. The fluorescence signals are well separated from the plasma background emission by modulating the laser beam and using lock-in detectors. Measured velocity distribution functions of neutral atoms and ions at different operating parameters of the thruster are reported and analyzed. This work was supported by DOE contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  20. NASA GRC High Power Electromagnetic Thruster Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapointe, Michael R.; Pencil, Eric J.

    2004-02-01

    Interest in high power electromagnetic propulsion has been revived to support a variety of future space missions, such as platform maneuvering in low earth orbit, cost-effective cargo transport to lunar and Mars bases, asteroid and outer planet sample return, deep space robotic exploration, and piloted missions to Mars and the outer planets. Magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters have demonstrated, at the laboratory level, the capacity to process megawatts of electrical power while providing higher thrust densities than current electric propulsion systems. The ability to generate higher thrust densities permits a reduction in the number of thrusters required to perform a given mission and alleviates the system complexity associated with multiple thruster arrays. The specific impulse of an MPD thruster can be optimized to meet given mission requirements, from a few thousand seconds with heavier gas propellants up to 10,000 seconds with hydrogen propellant. In support of NASA space science and human exploration strategic initiatives, Glenn Research Center is developing and testing pulsed, MW-class MPD thrusters as a prelude to long-duration high power thruster tests. The research effort includes numerical modeling of self-field and applied-field MPD thrusters and experimental testing of quasi-steady MW-class MPD thrusters in a high power pulsed thruster facility. This paper provides an overview of the GRC high power electromagnetic thruster program and the pulsed thruster test facility.

  1. Large anomalous Hall effect driven by a nonvanishing Berry curvature in the noncolinear antiferromagnet Mn3Ge.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Ajaya K; Fischer, Julia Erika; Sun, Yan; Yan, Binghai; Karel, Julie; Komarek, Alexander C; Shekhar, Chandra; Kumar, Nitesh; Schnelle, Walter; Kübler, Jürgen; Felser, Claudia; Parkin, Stuart S P

    2016-04-01

    It is well established that the anomalous Hall effect displayed by a ferromagnet scales with its magnetization. Therefore, an antiferromagnet that has no net magnetization should exhibit no anomalous Hall effect. We show that the noncolinear triangular antiferromagnet Mn3Ge exhibits a large anomalous Hall effect comparable to that of ferromagnetic metals; the magnitude of the anomalous conductivity is ~500 (ohm·cm)(-1) at 2 K and ~50 (ohm·cm)(-1) at room temperature. The angular dependence of the anomalous Hall effect measurements confirms that the small residual in-plane magnetic moment has no role in the observed effect except to control the chirality of the spin triangular structure. Our theoretical calculations demonstrate that the large anomalous Hall effect in Mn3Ge originates from a nonvanishing Berry curvature that arises from the chiral spin structure, and that also results in a large spin Hall effect of 1100 (ħ/e) (ohm·cm)(-1), comparable to that of platinum. The present results pave the way toward the realization of room temperature antiferromagnetic spintronics and spin Hall effect-based data storage devices.

  2. Scale Model Thruster Acoustic Measurement Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, R. Jeremy; Vargas, Magda B.

    2013-01-01

    Subscale rocket acoustic data is used to predict acoustic environments for full scale rockets. Over the last several years acoustic data has been collected during horizontal tests of solid rocket motors. Space Launch System (SLS) Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) was designed to evaluate the acoustics of the SLS vehicle including the liquid engines and solid rocket boosters. SMAT is comprised of liquid thrusters scalable to the Space Shuttle Main engines (SSME) and Rocket Assisted Take Off (RATO) motors scalable to the 5-segment Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSTMV). Horizontal testing of the liquid thrusters provided an opportunity to collect acoustic data from liquid thrusters to characterize the acoustic environments. Acoustic data was collected during the horizontal firings of a single thruster and a 4-thruster (Quad) configuration. Presentation scope. Discuss the results of the single and 4-thruster acoustic measurements. Compare the measured acoustic levels of the liquid thrusters to the Solid Rocket Test Motor V - Nozzle 2 (SRTMV-N2).

  3. Extended Performance 8-cm Mercury Ion Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantenieks, M. A.

    1981-01-01

    A slightly modified 8-cm Hg ion thruster demonstrated significant increase in performance. Thrust was increased by almost a factor of five over that of the baseline thruster. Thruster operation with various three grid ion optics configurations; thruster performance as a function of accelerator grid open area, cathode baffle, and cathode orifice size; and a life test of 614 hours at a beam current of 250 mA (17.5 mN thrust) are discussed. Highest thruster efficiency was obtained with the smallest open area accelerator grid. The benefits in efficiency from the low neutral loss grids were mitigated, however, by the limitation such grids place on attainable ion beam current densities. The thruster components suffered negligible weight losses during a life test, which indicated that operation of the 8-cm thruster at extended levels of thrust and power is possible with no significant loss of lifetime.

  4. High-Pressure Lightweight Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Richard; McKechnie, Timothy; Shchetkovskiy, Anatoliy; Smirnov, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Returning samples of Martian soil and rock to Earth is of great interest to scientists. There were numerous studies to evaluate Mars Sample Return (MSR) mission architectures, technology needs, development plans, and requirements. The largest propulsion risk element of the MSR mission is the Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV). Along with the baseline solid-propellant vehicle, liquid propellants have been considered. Similar requirements apply to other lander ascent engines and reaction control systems. The performance of current state-ofthe- art liquid propellant engines can be significantly improved by increasing both combustion temperature and pressure. Pump-fed propulsion is suggested for a single-stage bipropellant MAV. Achieving a 90-percent stage propellant fraction is thought to be possible on a 100-kg scale, including sufficient thrust for lifting off Mars. To increase the performance of storable bipropellant rocket engines, a high-pressure, lightweight combustion chamber was designed. Iridium liner electrodeposition was investigated on complex-shaped thrust chamber mandrels. Dense, uniform iridium liners were produced on chamber and cylindrical mandrels. Carbon/carbon composite (C/C) structures were braided over iridium-lined mandrels and densified by chemical vapor infiltration. Niobium deposition was evaluated for forming a metallic attachment flange on the carbon/ carbon structure. The new thrust chamber was designed to exceed state-of-the-art performance, and was manufactured with an 83-percent weight savings. High-performance C/Cs possess a unique set of properties that make them desirable materials for high-temperature structures used in rocket propulsion components, hypersonic vehicles, and aircraft brakes. In particular, more attention is focused on 3D braided C/Cs due to their mesh-work structure. Research on the properties of C/Cs has shown that the strength of composites is strongly affected by the fiber-matrix interfacial bonding, and that weakening

  5. Synchronization of spin-transfer torque oscillators by spin pumping, inverse spin Hall, and spin Hall effects

    SciTech Connect

    Elyasi, Mehrdad; Bhatia, Charanjit S.; Yang, Hyunsoo

    2015-02-14

    We have proposed a method to synchronize multiple spin-transfer torque oscillators based on spin pumping, inverse spin Hall, and spin Hall effects. The proposed oscillator system consists of a series of nano-magnets in junction with a normal metal with high spin-orbit coupling, and an accumulative feedback loop. We conduct simulations to demonstrate the effect of modulated charge currents in the normal metal due to spin pumping from each nano-magnet. We show that the interplay between the spin Hall effect and inverse spin Hall effect results in synchronization of the nano-magnets.

  6. A Novel Method of Zero Offset Reduction in Hall Effect Sensors with Applications to Magnetic Field Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Cheng; Liu, Ji-Gou; Zhang, Quan

    2015-02-01

    The paper presents a novel method to reduce the zero offset in Hall-Effect based magnetic measurement with single power supply. This method consists of a coarse zero compensation and a fine zero adjustment afterwards. By using the proposed method the zero output offset of Hall Effect sensors under using single power supply can be controlled within 0.2%. This method can be applied to all Hall Effect sensors with analog output and other similar sensors, which are powered with a single voltage or current source.

  7. Spontaneous magnetization and anomalous Hall effect in an emergent Dice lattice.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Omjyoti; Przysiężna, Anna; Zakrzewski, Jakub

    2015-06-09

    Ultracold atoms in optical lattices serve as a tool to model different physical phenomena appearing originally in condensed matter. To study magnetic phenomena one needs to engineer synthetic fields as atoms are neutral. Appropriately shaped optical potentials force atoms to mimic charged particles moving in a given field. We present the realization of artificial gauge fields for the observation of anomalous Hall effect. Two species of attractively interacting ultracold fermions are considered to be trapped in a shaken two dimensional triangular lattice. A combination of interaction induced tunneling and shaking can result in an emergent Dice lattice. In such a lattice the staggered synthetic magnetic flux appears and it can be controlled with external parameters. The obtained synthetic fields are non-Abelian. Depending on the tuning of the staggered flux we can obtain either anomalous Hall effect or its quantized version. Our results are reminiscent of Anomalous Hall conductivity in spin-orbit coupled ferromagnets.

  8. Chiral Magnetic Effect and Anomalous Hall Effect in Antiferromagnetic Insulators with Spin-Orbit Coupling.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Akihiko; Nomura, Kentaro

    2016-03-04

    We search for dynamical magnetoelectric phenomena in three-dimensional correlated systems with spin-orbit coupling. We focus on the antiferromagnetic insulator phases where the dynamical axion field is realized by the fluctuation of the antiferromagnetic order parameter. It is shown that the dynamical chiral magnetic effect, an alternating current generation by magnetic fields, emerges due to such time dependences of the order parameter as antiferromagnetic resonance. It is also shown that the anomalous Hall effect arises due to such spatial variations of the order parameter as antiferromagnetic domain walls. Our study indicates that spin excitations in antiferromagnetic insulators with spin-orbit coupling can result in nontrivial charge responses. Moreover, observing the chiral magnetic effect and anomalous Hall effect in our system is equivalent to detecting the dynamical axion field in condensed matter.

  9. Quantum Hall effect in black phosphorus two-dimensional electron system.

    PubMed

    Li, Likai; Yang, Fangyuan; Ye, Guo Jun; Zhang, Zuocheng; Zhu, Zengwei; Lou, Wenkai; Zhou, Xiaoying; Li, Liang; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Chang, Kai; Wang, Yayu; Chen, Xian Hui; Zhang, Yuanbo

    2016-07-01

    The development of new, high-quality functional materials has been at the forefront of condensed-matter research. The recent advent of two-dimensional black phosphorus has greatly enriched the materials base of two-dimensional electron systems (2DESs). Here, we report the observation of the integer quantum Hall effect in a high-quality black phosphorus 2DES. The high quality is achieved by embedding the black phosphorus 2DES in a van der Waals heterostructure close to a graphite back gate; the graphite gate screens the impurity potential in the 2DES and brings the carrier Hall mobility up to 6,000 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). The exceptional mobility enabled us to observe the quantum Hall effect and to gain important information on the energetics of the spin-split Landau levels in black phosphorus. Our results set the stage for further study on quantum transport and device application in the ultrahigh mobility regime.

  10. Minimal Model of Spin-Transfer Torque and Spin Pumping Caused by the Spin Hall Effect.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Sigrist, Manfred; Sinova, Jairo; Manske, Dirk

    2015-11-20

    In the normal-metal-ferromagnetic-insulator bilayer (such as Pt/Y_{3}Fe_{5}O_{12}) and the normal-metal-ferromagnetic-metal-oxide trilayer (such as Pt/Co/AlO_{x}) where spin injection and ejection are achieved by the spin Hall effect in the normal metal, we propose a minimal model based on quantum tunneling of spins to explain the spin-transfer torque and spin pumping caused by the spin Hall effect. The ratio of their dampinglike to fieldlike component depends on the tunneling wave function that is strongly influenced by generic material properties such as interface s-d coupling, insulating gap, and layer thickness, yet the spin relaxation plays a minor role. The quantified result renders our minimal model an inexpensive tool for searching for appropriate materials.

  11. Fractional quantum Hall effect in strained graphene: Stability of Laughlin states in disordered pseudomagnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagrov, Andrey A.; Principi, Alessandro; Katsnelson, Mikhail I.

    2017-03-01

    We address the question of the stability of the fractional quantum Hall effect in the presence of pseudomagnetic disorder generated by mechanical deformations of a graphene sheet. Neglecting the potential disorder and taking into account only strain-induced random pseudomagnetic fields, it is possible to write down a Laughlin-like trial ground-state wave function explicitly. Exploiting the Laughlin plasma analogy, we demonstrate that in the case of fluctuating pseudomagnetic fluxes of a relatively small amplitude, the fractional quantum Hall effect is always stable upon the deformations. By contrast, in the case of bubble-induced pseudomagnetic fields in graphene on a substrate (a small number of large fluxes) the disorder can be strong enough to cause a glass transition in the corresponding classical Coulomb plasma, resulting in the destruction of the fractional quantum Hall regime and in a quantum phase transition to a nonergodic state of the lowest Landau level.

  12. Geometrical optics of beams with vortices: Berry phase and orbital angular momentum Hall effect.

    PubMed

    Bliokh, Konstantin Yu

    2006-07-28

    We consider propagation of a paraxial beam carrying the spin angular momentum (polarization) and intrinsic orbital angular momentum (IOAM) in a smoothly inhomogeneous isotropic medium. It is shown that the presence of IOAM can dramatically enhance and rearrange the topological phenomena that previously were considered solely in connection to the polarization of transverse waves. In particular, the appearance of a new type of Berry phase that describes the parallel transport of the beam structure along a curved ray is predicted. We derive the ray equations demonstrating the splitting of beams with different values of IOAM. This is the orbital angular momentum Hall effect, which resembles the Magnus effect for optical vortices. Unlike the spin Hall effect of photons, it can be much larger in magnitude and is inherent to waves of any nature. Experimental means to detect the phenomena are discussed.

  13. Hysteresis in the anomalous Hall effect of MnAs thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeckel, Felix T.; Stintz, Andreas; El-Emawy, Abdel-Rahman A.; Malloy, Kevin J.

    2008-03-01

    We report detailed measurements of the Hall effect in MBE-grown MnAs thin films on (001)-GaAs as a function of temperature. Hysteresis of the Hall resistivity is observed for temperatures between 300 and 355 K. Non-linear behavior of the Hall resistivity persists up to 390 K. The appearance of hysteresis at low temperatures can be explained by the emergence of stable, out-of-plane domains due to the shape anisotropy of the contracting α-phase. However, the persistence of the hysteresis and the anomalous Hall effect at temperatures significantly above 318 K is not consistent with the complete transformation of the α-phase and introduces new questions about the magnetic properties of the β-phase.

  14. Driving and detecting ferromagnetic resonance in insulators with the spin Hall effect.

    SciTech Connect

    Sklenar, Joseph; Zhang, Wei; Jungfleisch, Matthias B.; Jiang, Wanjun; Chang, Houchen; Pearson, John E.; Wu, Mingzhong; Ketterson, John B.; Hoffmann, Axel

    2015-11-06

    We demonstrate the generation and detection of spin-torque ferromagnetic resonance in Pt/Y3Fe5O12 (YIG) bilayers. A unique attribute of this system is that the spin Hall effect lies at the heart of both the generation and detection processes and no charge current is passing through the insulating magnetic layer. When the YIG undergoes resonance, a dc voltage is detected longitudinally along the Pt that can be described by two components. One is the mixing of the spin Hall magnetoresistance with the microwave current. The other results from spin pumping into the Pt being converted to a dc current through the inverse spin Hall effect. The voltage is measured with applied magnetic field directions that range in-plane to nearly perpendicular. We find that for magnetic fields that are mostly out-of-plane, an imaginary component of the spin mixing conductance is required to model our data.

  15. Interface engineering of quantum Hall effects in digital transition metal oxide heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Di; Zhu, Wenguang; Ran, Ying; Nagaosa, Naoto; Okamoto, Satoshi

    2011-12-20

    Topological insulators are characterized by a non-trivial band topology driven by the spin-orbit coupling. To fully explore the fundamental science and application of topological insulators, material realization is indispensable. Here we predict, based on tight-binding modelling and first-principles calculations, that bilayers of perovskite-type transition-metal oxides grown along the [111] crystallographic axis are potential candidates for two-dimensional topological insulators. The topological band structure of these materials can be fine-tuned by changing dopant ions, substrates and external gate voltages. We predict that LaAuO(3) bilayers have a topologically non-trivial energy gap of about 0.15 eV, which is sufficiently large to realize the quantum spin Hall effect at room temperature. Intriguing phenomena, such as fractional quantum Hall effect, associated with the nearly flat topologically non-trivial bands found in e(g) systems are also discussed.

  16. Prospect of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall effect in doped kagome lattice Mott insulators

    PubMed Central

    Guterding, Daniel; Jeschke, Harald O.; Valentí, Roser

    2016-01-01

    Electronic states with non-trivial topology host a number of novel phenomena with potential for revolutionizing information technology. The quantum anomalous Hall effect provides spin-polarized dissipation-free transport of electrons, while the quantum spin Hall effect in combination with superconductivity has been proposed as the basis for realizing decoherence-free quantum computing. We introduce a new strategy for realizing these effects, namely by hole and electron doping kagome lattice Mott insulators through, for instance, chemical substitution. As an example, we apply this new approach to the natural mineral herbertsmithite. We prove the feasibility of the proposed modifications by performing ab-initio density functional theory calculations and demonstrate the occurrence of the predicted effects using realistic models. Our results herald a new family of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall insulators at affordable energy/temperature scales based on kagome lattices of transition metal ions. PMID:27185665

  17. Interface engineering of quantum Hall effects in digital transition metal oxide heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Di; Zhu, Wenguang; Ran, Ying; Nagaosa, Naoto; Okamoto, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    Topological insulators (TIs) are characterized by a non-trivial band topology driven by the spin-orbit coupling. To fully explore the fundamental science and application of TIs, material realization is indispensable. Here we predict, based on tight-binding modeling and first-principles calculations, that bilayers of perovskite-type transition-metal oxides grown along the [111] crystallographic axis are potential candidates for two-dimensional TIs. The topological band structure of these materials can be fine-tuned by changing dopant ions, substrates and external gate voltages. We predict that LaAuO$_3$ bilayers have a topologically non-trivial energy gap of about 0.15~eV, which is sufficiently large to realize the quantum spin Hall effect at room temperature. Intriguing phenomena, such as fractional quantum Hall effect, associated with the nearly flat topologically non-trivial bands found in $e_g$ systems are also discussed.

  18. Prospect of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall effect in doped kagome lattice Mott insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guterding, Daniel; Jeschke, Harald O.; Valentí, Roser

    2016-05-01

    Electronic states with non-trivial topology host a number of novel phenomena with potential for revolutionizing information technology. The quantum anomalous Hall effect provides spin-polarized dissipation-free transport of electrons, while the quantum spin Hall effect in combination with superconductivity has been proposed as the basis for realizing decoherence-free quantum computing. We introduce a new strategy for realizing these effects, namely by hole and electron doping kagome lattice Mott insulators through, for instance, chemical substitution. As an example, we apply this new approach to the natural mineral herbertsmithite. We prove the feasibility of the proposed modifications by performing ab-initio density functional theory calculations and demonstrate the occurrence of the predicted effects using realistic models. Our results herald a new family of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall insulators at affordable energy/temperature scales based on kagome lattices of transition metal ions.

  19. Origin of the planar Hall effect in nanocrystalline Co60Fe20B20.

    PubMed

    Seemann, K M; Freimuth, F; Zhang, H; Blügel, S; Mokrousov, Y; Bürgler, D E; Schneider, C M

    2011-08-19

    An angle dependent analysis of the planar Hall effect (PHE) in nanocrystalline single-domain Co(60)Fe(20)B(20) thin films is reported. In a combined experimental and theoretical study we show that the transverse resistivity of the PHE is entirely driven by anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR). Our results for Co(60)Fe(20)B(20) obtained from first principles theory in conjunction with a Boltzmann transport model take into account the nanocrystallinity and the presence of 20 at. % boron. The ab initio AMR ratio of 0.12% agrees well with the experimental value of 0.22%. Furthermore, we experimentally demonstrate that the anomalous Hall effect contributes negligibly in the present case.

  20. Metallization and Hall-effect of Mg{sub 2}Ge under high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuqiang; Gao, Yang; Han, Yonghao Liu, Cailong; Peng, Gang; Ke, Feng; Gao, Chunxiao; Wang, Qinglin; Ma, Yanzhang

    2015-10-05

    The electrical transport properties of Mg{sub 2}Ge under high pressure were studied with the in situ temperature-dependent resistivity and Hall-effect measurements. The theoretically predicted metallization of Mg{sub 2}Ge was definitely found around 7.4 GPa by the temperature-dependent resistivity measurement. Other two pressure-induced structural phase transitions were also reflected by the measurements. Hall-effect measurement showed that the dominant charge carrier in the metallic Mg{sub 2}Ge was hole, indicating the “bad metal” nature of Mg{sub 2}Ge. The Hall mobility and charge carrier concentration results pointed out that the electrical transport behavior in the antifluorite phase was controlled by the increase quantity of drifting electrons under high pressure, but in both anticotunnite and Ni{sub 2}In-type phases it was governed by the Hall mobility.

  1. Spontaneous magnetization and anomalous Hall effect in an emergent Dice lattice

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Omjyoti; Przysiężna, Anna; Zakrzewski, Jakub

    2015-01-01

    Ultracold atoms in optical lattices serve as a tool to model different physical phenomena appearing originally in condensed matter. To study magnetic phenomena one needs to engineer synthetic fields as atoms are neutral. Appropriately shaped optical potentials force atoms to mimic charged particles moving in a given field. We present the realization of artificial gauge fields for the observation of anomalous Hall effect. Two species of attractively interacting ultracold fermions are considered to be trapped in a shaken two dimensional triangular lattice. A combination of interaction induced tunneling and shaking can result in an emergent Dice lattice. In such a lattice the staggered synthetic magnetic flux appears and it can be controlled with external parameters. The obtained synthetic fields are non-Abelian. Depending on the tuning of the staggered flux we can obtain either anomalous Hall effect or its quantized version. Our results are reminiscent of Anomalous Hall conductivity in spin-orbit coupled ferromagnets. PMID:26057635

  2. Determination of the Pt spin diffusion length by spin-pumping and spin Hall effect

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei; Pearson, John E.; Hoffmann, Axel; Vlaminck, Vincent; Divan, Ralu; Bader, Samuel D.

    2013-12-09

    The spin diffusion length of Pt at room temperature and at 8 K is experimentally determined via spin pumping and spin Hall effect in permalloy/Pt bilayers. Voltages generated during excitation of ferromagnetic resonance from the inverse spin Hall effect and anisotropic magnetoresistance effect were investigated with a broadband approach. Varying the Pt layer thickness gives rise to an evolution of the voltage line shape due to the superposition of the above two effects. By studying the ratio of the two voltage components with the Pt layer thickness, the spin diffusion length of Pt can be directly extracted. We obtain a spin diffusion length of ∼1.2 nm at room temperature and ∼1.6 nm at 8 K.

  3. Topological Hall Effect in the A Phase of MnSi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubauer, A.; Pfleiderer, C.; Binz, B.; Rosch, A.; Ritz, R.; Niklowitz, P. G.; Böni, P.

    2009-05-01

    Recent small angle neutron scattering suggests that the spin structure in the A phase of MnSi is a so-called triple-Q state, i.e., a superposition of three helices under 120 degrees. Model calculations indicate that this structure in fact is a lattice of so-called Skyrmions, i.e., a lattice of topologically stable knots in the spin structure. We report a distinct additional contribution to the Hall effect in the temperature and magnetic field range of the proposed Skyrmion lattice, where such a contribution is neither seen nor expected for a normal helical state. Our Hall effect measurements constitute a direct observation of a topologically quantized Berry phase that identifies the spin structure seen in neutron scattering as the proposed Skyrmion lattice.

  4. Geometrical Optics of Beams with Vortices: Berry Phase and Orbital Angular Momentum Hall Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Bliokh, Konstantin Yu.

    2006-07-28

    We consider propagation of a paraxial beam carrying the spin angular momentum (polarization) and intrinsic orbital angular momentum (IOAM) in a smoothly inhomogeneous isotropic medium. It is shown that the presence of IOAM can dramatically enhance and rearrange the topological phenomena that previously were considered solely in connection to the polarization of transverse waves. In particular, the appearance of a new type of Berry phase that describes the parallel transport of the beam structure along a curved ray is predicted. We derive the ray equations demonstrating the splitting of beams with different values of IOAM. This is the orbital angular momentum Hall effect, which resembles the Magnus effect for optical vortices. Unlike the spin Hall effect of photons, it can be much larger in magnitude and is inherent to waves of any nature. Experimental means to detect the phenomena are discussed.

  5. Prospect of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall effect in doped kagome lattice Mott insulators.

    PubMed

    Guterding, Daniel; Jeschke, Harald O; Valentí, Roser

    2016-05-17

    Electronic states with non-trivial topology host a number of novel phenomena with potential for revolutionizing information technology. The quantum anomalous Hall effect provides spin-polarized dissipation-free transport of electrons, while the quantum spin Hall effect in combination with superconductivity has been proposed as the basis for realizing decoherence-free quantum computing. We introduce a new strategy for realizing these effects, namely by hole and electron doping kagome lattice Mott insulators through, for instance, chemical substitution. As an example, we apply this new approach to the natural mineral herbertsmithite. We prove the feasibility of the proposed modifications by performing ab-initio density functional theory calculations and demonstrate the occurrence of the predicted effects using realistic models. Our results herald a new family of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall insulators at affordable energy/temperature scales based on kagome lattices of transition metal ions.

  6. Experimental Observation of the Inverse Spin Hall Effect at Room Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Baoli; Shi, Junren; Wang, Wenxin; Zhao, Hongming; Li, Dafang; Zhang, Shoucheng; Xue, Qikun; Chen, Dongmin; /Beijing, Inst. Phys.

    2010-03-16

    We observe the inverse spin Hall effect in a two-dimensional electron gas confined in Al-GaAs/InGaAs quantum wells. Specifically, they find that an inhomogeneous spin density induced by the optical injection gives rise to an electric current transverse to both the spin polarization and its gradient. The spin Hall conductivity can be inferred from such a measurement through the Einstein relation and the onsager relation, and is found to have the order of magnitude of 0.5(e{sup 2}/h). The observation is made at the room temperature and in samples with macroscopic sizes, suggesting that the inverse spin Hall effects is a robust macroscopic transport phenomenon.

  7. Spintronic Oscillator Based on Spin-Current Feedback Using the Spin Hall Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuktare, Swapnil; Singh, Hanuman; Bose, Arnab; Tulapurkar, Ashwin. A.

    2017-01-01

    We propose a radio-frequency nano-oscillator based on feedback of spin current into a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) with an in-plane magnetized pinned layer and an out-of-plane magnetized free layer. The MTJ is connected to a "feedback" strip of a material like tungsten with a giant spin Hall effect. On passing a dc current through the MTJ, the thermal fluctuations of its free layer produce an oscillatory voltage across itself owing to the magnetoresistance effect. This oscillatory voltage drives an oscillatory current into the tungsten strip which converts this charge current into spin current via the spin Hall effect and feeds it back to the MTJ. We show that this feedback can amplify the fluctuations further and drive the free layer into periodic precessional states. We also propose a way of implementing spin-current feedback by using a nanomagnet coupled to the free layer of the MTJ by dipolar magnetic field.

  8. Spin Hall effects for cold atoms in a light induced gauge potential

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Shi-Liang; Fu, Hao; Wu, C.-J.; Zhang, S.-C.; Duan, L.-M. /Michigan U., MCTP

    2010-03-16

    We propose an experimental scheme to observe spin Hall effects with cold atoms in a light induced gauge potential. Under an appropriate configuration, the cold atoms moving in a spatially varying laser field experience an effective spin-dependent gauge potential. Through numerical simulation, we demonstrate that such a gauge field leads to observable spin Hall currents under realistic conditions. We also discuss the quantum spin Hall state in an optical lattice.

  9. Hall effect control of magnetotail dawn-dusk asymmetry: A three-dimensional global hybrid simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, San; Lin, Y.; Angelopoulos, V.; Artemyev, A. V.; Pritchett, P. L.; Lu, Quanming; Wang, X. Y.

    2016-12-01

    Magnetotail reconnection and related phenomena (e.g., flux ropes, dipolarizing flux bundles, flow bursts, and particle injections) occur more frequently on the duskside than on the dawnside. Because this asymmetry can directly result in dawn-dusk asymmetric space weather effects, uncovering its physical origin is important for better understanding, modeling, and prediction of the space weather phenomena. However, the cause of this pervasive asymmetry is unclear. Using three-dimensional global hybrid simulations, we demonstrate that the Hall physics in the magnetotail current sheet is responsible for the asymmetry. The current sheet thins progressively under enhanced global convection; when its thickness reaches ion kinetic scales, some ions are decoupled from the magnetized electrons (the Hall effect). The resultant Hall electric field Ez is directed toward the neutral plane. The Hall effect is stronger (grows faster) on the duskside; i.e., more ions become unmagnetized there and do not comove with the magnetized dawnward Ez × Bx drifting electrons, thus creating a larger additional cross-tail current intensity jy (in addition to the diamagnetic current) on the duskside, compared to the dawnside. The stronger Hall effect strength on the duskside is controlled by the higher ion temperature, thinner current sheet, and smaller normal magnetic field Bz there. These asymmetric current sheet properties are in turn controlled by two competing processes that correspond to the Hall effect: (1) the dawnward E × B drift of the magnetic flux and magnetized ions and electrons and (2) the transient motion of the unmagnetized ions which do not execute E × B drift.

  10. Giant planar Hall effect in epitaxial (Ga,Mn)as devices.

    PubMed

    Tang, H X; Kawakami, R K; Awschalom, D D; Roukes, M L

    2003-03-14

    Large Hall resistance jumps are observed in microdevices patterned from epitaxial (Ga,Mn)As layers when subjected to a swept, in-plane magnetic field. This giant planar Hall effect is 4 orders of magnitude greater than previously observed in metallic ferromagnets. This enables extremely sensitive measurements of the angle-dependent magnetic properties of (Ga,Mn)As. The magnetic anisotropy fields deduced from these measurements are compared with theoretical predictions.

  11. Offset reduction in Hall effect measurements using a nonswitching van der Pauw technique.

    PubMed

    Riss, O; Shaked, E; Karpovsky, M; Gerber, A

    2008-07-01

    A nonswitching van der Pauw technique, which uses two electrically isolated alternating current sources operating at two different frequencies and two lock-in amplifiers, is suggested for Hall effect measurements. Parasitic offset voltage, typical for this type of measurements, is reduced by averaging two sets of data accumulated simultaneously. Application of the technique is particularly useful when the offset changes on a time scale comparable to the measurement cycle.

  12. Ordinary and anomalous Hall effects of ferromagnetic Mn5Ge3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Changgan

    2007-03-01

    It is well know that in ferromagnetic materials, the Hall effect includes two contributions: the ordinary Hall effect (OHE), which is proportional to the applied magnetic field, and the anomalous Hall effect (AHE), which originates from the magnetization of the material. Although both phenomena have been throughly studied, there are still questions about the origins of both OHE and AHE in ferromagnetic materials with complicated band structures. Using ferromagnetic Mn5Ge3 thin films as an example, we investigate the Hall effect experimentally and theoretically. We have separated the intrinsic and extrinsic contributions to the experimental AHE and calculated the intrinsic anomalous Hall conductivity from the Berry curvature of the Bloch states using first-principles methods. The intrinsic anomalous Hall conductivity depends linearly on the magnetization, which can be understood from the long-wavelength fluctuations of the spin orientation at finite temperatures. The quantitative agreement between theory and experiment is remarkably good, not only near 0 K but also at finite temperatures, up to about 240 K (0.8Tc) [1]. The measured ordinary Hall coefficient is found to change its sign as a function of temperature. From a detailed analysis, which includes magneto-resistance measurements, magnetic characterization, and first-principles calculations, we establish that the sign change of the OHE is mainly caused by the mixing of the AHE with the magneto-resistance and differential susceptibility. This work was done in collaboration with Y. Yao, Di Xiao, Q. Niu, and H.H. Weitering. [1] Changgan Zeng, Yugui Yao, Qian Niu, and Hanno, H. Weitering, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 037204 (2006).

  13. MHD Convective rotating flow past an oscillating porous plate with chemical reaction and Hall effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veera Krishna, M.; Gangadhar Reddy, M.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we have considered Hall effects on the unsteady MHD free convective rotating flow of visco-elastic fluid with heat and mass transfer near oscillating porous plate. The equations of the flow are solved by perturbation method for small elastic parameter. The analytical expressions for the velocity, temperature, concentration have been derived and also its behaviour is computationally discussed with the help of graphs. The skin friction, Nusselt number, and Sherwood number are also obtained analytically and their behaviour discussed.

  14. Effective-field-theory model for the fractional quantum Hall effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, S. C.; Hansson, T. H.; Kivelson, S.

    1989-01-01

    Starting directly from the microscopic Hamiltonian, a field-theory model is derived for the fractional quantum Hall effect. By considering an approximate coarse-grained version of the same model, a Landau-Ginzburg theory similar to that of Girvin (1986) is constructed. The partition function of the model exhibits cusps as a function of density. It is shown that the collective density fluctuations are massive.

  15. Temperature-dependent nonlinear Hall effect in macroscopic Si-MOS antidot array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuntsevich, A. Yu.; Shupletsov, A. V.; Nunuparov, M. S.

    2016-05-01

    By measuring magnetoresistance and the Hall effect in a classically moderate perpendicular magnetic field in a Si-MOSFET-type macroscopic antidot array, we found a nonlinear with field, temperature- and density-dependent Hall resistivity. We argue that this nonlinearity originates from low mobility shells of the antidots with a strong temperature dependence of the resistivity and suggest a qualitative explanation of the phenomenon.

  16. Spin cloud induced around an elastic scatterer by the intrinsic spin hall effect.

    PubMed

    Mal'shukov, A G; Chu, C S

    2006-08-18

    Similar to the Landauer electric dipole created around an impurity by the electric current, a spin polarized cloud of electrons can be induced by the intrinsic spin Hall effect near a spin independent elastic scatterer. It is shown that in the ballistic range around the impurity, such a cloud appears in the case of Rashba spin-orbit interaction, even though the bulk spin Hall current is absent.

  17. Coriolis effect and spin Hall effect of light in an inhomogeneous chiral medium.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongliang; Shi, Lina; Xie, Changqing

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically investigate the spin Hall effect of spinning light in an inhomogeneous chiral medium. The Hamiltonian equations of the photon are analytically obtained within eikonal approximation in the noninertial orthogonal frame. Besides the usual spin curvature coupling, the chiral parameter enters the Hamiltonian as a spin-torsion-like interaction. We reveal that both terms have parallel geometric origins as the Coriolis terms of Maxwell's equations in nontrivial frames.

  18. Plasma Oscillation Characterization of NASA's HERMeS Hall Thruster via High Speed Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Wensheng; Kamhawi, Hani; Haag, Thomas W.

    2016-01-01

    The performance and facility effect characterization tests of NASA's 12.5-kW Hall Effect Rocket with Magnetic Shielding had been completed. As a part of these tests, three plasma oscillation characterization studies were performed to help determine operation settings and quantify margins. The studies included the magnetic field strength variation study, background pressure effect study, and cathode flow fraction study. Separate high-speed videos of the thruster including the cathode and of only the cathode were recorded. Breathing mode at 10-15 kHz and cathode gradient-driven mode at 60-75 kHz were observed. An additional high frequency (40-70 kHz) global oscillation mode with sinusoidal probability distribution function was identified.

  19. Strong Intrinsic Spin Hall Effect in the TaAs Family of Weyl Semimetals.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yan; Zhang, Yang; Felser, Claudia; Yan, Binghai

    2016-09-30

    Since their discovery, topological insulators are expected to be ideal spintronic materials owing to the spin currents carried by surface states with spin-momentum locking. However, the bulk doping problem remains an obstacle that hinders such an application. In this work, we predict that a newly discovered family of topological materials, the Weyl semimetals, exhibits a large intrinsic spin Hall effect that can be utilized to generate and detect spin currents. Our ab initio calculations reveal a large spin Hall conductivity in the TaAs family of Weyl materials. Considering the low charge conductivity of semimetals, Weyl semimetals are believed to present a larger spin Hall angle (the ratio of the spin Hall conductivity over the charge conductivity) than that of conventional spin Hall systems such as the 4d and 5d transition metals. The spin Hall effect originates intrinsically from the bulk band structure of Weyl semimetals, which exhibit a large Berry curvature and spin-orbit coupling, so the bulk carrier problem in the topological insulators is naturally avoided. Our work not only paves the way for employing Weyl semimetals in spintronics, but also proposes a new guideline for searching for the spin Hall effect in various topological materials.

  20. Large topological Hall effect in the non-collinear phase of an antiferromagnet.

    PubMed

    Sürgers, Christoph; Fischer, Gerda; Winkel, Patrick; Löhneysen, Hilbert V

    2014-03-05

    Non-trivial spin arrangements in magnetic materials give rise to the topological Hall effect observed in compounds with a non-centrosymmetric cubic structure hosting a skyrmion lattice, in double-exchange ferromagnets and magnetically frustrated systems. The topological Hall effect has been proposed to appear also in presence of non-coplanar spin configurations and thus might occur in an antiferromagnetic material with a highly non-collinear and non-coplanar spin structure. Particularly interesting is a material where the non-collinearity develops not immediately at the onset of antiferromagnetic order but deep in the antiferromagnetic phase. This unusual situation arises in non-cubic antiferromagnetic Mn5Si3. Here we show that a large topological Hall effect develops well below the Néel temperature as soon as the spin arrangement changes from collinear to non-collinear with decreasing temperature. We further demonstrate that the effect is not observed when the material is turned ferromagnetic by carbon doping without changing its crystal structure.