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Sample records for cylindrical multiwire proportional

  1. Multiwire proportional chamber development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doolittle, R. F.; Pollvogt, U.; Eskovitz, A. J.

    1973-01-01

    The development of large area multiwire proportional chambers, to be used as high resolution spatial detectors in cosmic ray experiments is described. A readout system was developed which uses a directly coupled, lumped element delay-line whose characteristics are independent of the MWPC design. A complete analysis of the delay-line and the readout electronic system shows that a spatial resolution of about 0.1 mm can be reached with the MWPC operating in the strictly proportional region. This was confirmed by measurements with a small MWPC and Fe-55 X-rays. A simplified analysis was carried out to estimate the theoretical limit of spatial resolution due to delta-rays, spread of the discharge along the anode wire, and inclined trajectories. To calculate the gas gain of MWPC's of different geometrical configurations a method was developed which is based on the knowledge of the first Townsend coefficient of the chamber gas.

  2. GSFC's Multi-Wire Gas Proportional Counter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serlemitsos, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    The Goddard X-ray group made its appearance in 1964 as a one person (Elihu Boldt) appendage to the well established cosmic ray group, then headed by Frank MacDonald. This discipline proximity was crucial because it meant superb technical support from the start, which allowed the fledging group to quickly advance toward directions of choice. When I became the 2nd member of the group in 1966, the new discipline still relied on bulky gas counters, stacked to make up a usable detection area. Slim opportunities existed for timing or spectral inferences. Elihu's strong interest in pursuing the reported diffuse cosmic radiation had to be set aside, as improving this situation appeared to be years away. Cosmic ray researchers had long used charged particle timing techniques for cleaning up their data, but those appeared irrelevant for our purposes because of the large, background generating, mass of the gas containment vessels and the slow drift in the counter gas of the charge from photon interaction sites to the counter anode. We had to deal with these realities in whatever choices we made for our future instruments. The multi-wire gas proportional counter emerged from our still small group in the late1960s, demonstrating on several rocket and balloon flights a greatly reduced detector background, improved event timing and adequate resolution for addressing key spectral features. Three of these detectors, flown in 1975 on NASA's 8th orbiting solar observatory, were successfully used for some 3 years to conduct non dispersive, 1-10 keV spectroscopy on many galactic and extragalactic sources, including several clusters of galaxies. In 1977 we flew a set of larger detectors on the first of NASA's High Energy Astrophysical Observatories (HEAO). These were specifically designed for the study of the X-ray background. Finally, the largest instruments of this family were flown in 1995 by our group on NASA's Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer, RXTE, which observed over a remarkable 16

  3. Measurements of the performance of multiwire proportional chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Austin, R. W.; Eglitis, A.; Gregory, J. C.; Metzger, S. A.; Parnell, T. A.; Rutledge, H. F.; Selig, W.; Cumings, N. P.

    1973-01-01

    Data are presented that may be useful in formulating engineering specifications and test procedures for the proportional counter hodoscope to be flown as part of the High Energy Cosmic Ray Experiment on the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO), Mission A. A collection of preliminary data taken in laboratory tests of multiwire counters with an anode wire spacing of 5 mm and cathode gap spacing of 1 cm is presented. The data are from laboratory development models or counters for balloon flights and were selected to illustrate several aspects of proper and improper counter performance. Most of the data were taken from a large proportional counter hodoscope which has an active area of 0.5 by 0.5 m and 104 wires per plane.

  4. A multiwire proportional counter system for high energy astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacy, J. L.; Badhwar, G. D.; Deney, C. L.; Golden, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Resolution tests of multiwire proportional counter delay line readout systems are reported. The system is being developed at NASA/JSC for use in a large balloon borne magnet spectrometer. The system is ultimately intended for use in Space Shuttle missions. Tests of two different types of delay line and associated electronics carried out in minimum ionizing particle beams (accelerator and sea level cosmic ray) are reported. Resolution performance is shown to be strongly dependent on type of gas mixture and in the case of inclined events upon the propagation velocity of the delay line. The resolution performance achieved for magic gas chamber filling (100 um at normal incidence) is far superior to any other state of the art technique capable of being applied to large geometry factor systems.

  5. Secondary electron background produced by heavy nuclei in a multiwire proportional counter hodoscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, S. H., Jr.; Watts, J. W., Jr.; Schwille, H.; Pollvogt, U.

    1974-01-01

    The secondary electron background produced by heavy nuclei in a multiwire proportional counter hodoscope is calculated using both a simplified and a more complete Monte Carlo model. These results are compared with experimental data from a small multiwire proportional counter hodoscope operated in a 530 MeV/nucleon accelerator beam of nitrogen nuclei. Estimates of the secondary electron background produced by heavy relativistic nuclei are presented along with the detailed results from calculations of energy deposition in the hodoscope counter cells.

  6. Compact multiwire proportional counters for the detection of fission fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jhingan, Akhil; Sugathan, P.; Golda, K. S.; Singh, R. P.; Varughese, T.; Singh, Hardev; Behera, B. R.; Mandal, S. K.

    2009-12-01

    Two large area multistep position sensitive (two dimensional) multiwire proportional counters have been developed for experiments involving study of fission dynamics using general purpose scattering chamber facility at IUAC. Both detectors have an active area of 20×10 cm2 and provide position signals in horizontal (X) and vertical (Y) planes, timing signal for time of flight measurements and energy signal giving the differential energy loss in the active volume. The design features are optimized for the detection of low energy heavy ions at very low gas pressures. Special care was taken in setting up the readout electronics, constant fraction discriminators for position signals in particular, to get optimum position and timing resolutions along with high count rate handling capability of low energy heavy ions. A custom made charge sensitive preamplifier, having lower gain and shorter decay time, has been developed for extracting the differential energy loss signal. The position and time resolutions of the detectors were determined to be 1.1 mm full width at half maximum (FWHM) and 1.7 ns FWHM, respectively. The detector could handle heavy ion count rates exceeding 20 kHz without any breakdown. Time of flight signal in combination with differential energy loss signal gives a clean separation of fission fragments from projectile and target like particles. The timing and position signals of the detectors are used for fission coincidence measurements and subsequent extraction of their mass, angular, and total kinetic energy distributions. This article describes systematic study of these fission counters in terms of efficiency, time resolution, count rate handling capability, position resolution, and the readout electronics. The detector has been operated with both five electrode geometry and four electrode geometry, and a comparison has been made in their performances.

  7. Compact multiwire proportional counters for the detection of fission fragments.

    PubMed

    Jhingan, Akhil; Sugathan, P; Golda, K S; Singh, R P; Varughese, T; Singh, Hardev; Behera, B R; Mandal, S K

    2009-12-01

    Two large area multistep position sensitive (two dimensional) multiwire proportional counters have been developed for experiments involving study of fission dynamics using general purpose scattering chamber facility at IUAC. Both detectors have an active area of 20x10 cm(2) and provide position signals in horizontal (X) and vertical (Y) planes, timing signal for time of flight measurements and energy signal giving the differential energy loss in the active volume. The design features are optimized for the detection of low energy heavy ions at very low gas pressures. Special care was taken in setting up the readout electronics, constant fraction discriminators for position signals in particular, to get optimum position and timing resolutions along with high count rate handling capability of low energy heavy ions. A custom made charge sensitive preamplifier, having lower gain and shorter decay time, has been developed for extracting the differential energy loss signal. The position and time resolutions of the detectors were determined to be 1.1 mm full width at half maximum (FWHM) and 1.7 ns FWHM, respectively. The detector could handle heavy ion count rates exceeding 20 kHz without any breakdown. Time of flight signal in combination with differential energy loss signal gives a clean separation of fission fragments from projectile and target like particles. The timing and position signals of the detectors are used for fission coincidence measurements and subsequent extraction of their mass, angular, and total kinetic energy distributions. This article describes systematic study of these fission counters in terms of efficiency, time resolution, count rate handling capability, position resolution, and the readout electronics. The detector has been operated with both five electrode geometry and four electrode geometry, and a comparison has been made in their performances.

  8. Imaging with a multiplane multiwire proportional chamber using heavy ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, W.T.; Alonso, J.R.; Tobias, C.A.

    1982-01-01

    A 16-plane multiwire proportional chamber has been developed to accurately map intensity profiles of heavy ion beams at the Bevalac. The imaging capability of the system has been tested for reconstruction of 3-dimensional representation of a canine thorax region using heavy ion beams.

  9. Imaging With A Multiplane Multiwire Proportional Chamber Using Heavy Ion Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, W. T.; Alonso, J. R.; Tobias, C. A...

    1982-11-01

    A 16-plane multiwire proportional chamber has been developed to accurately map intensity pro files of heavy ion beams at the Bevalac. The imaging capability of the system has been tested for reconstruction of 3-dimensional representation of a canine thorax region using heavy ion beams.

  10. Imaging with a multiplane multiwire proportional chamber using heavy-ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, W. T.; Alonso, J. R.; Tobias, C. A.

    A 16 plane multiwire proportional chamber was developed to accurately map intensity profiles of heavy ion beams at the Bevalac. The imaging capability of the system was tested for reconstruction of 3 dimensional representation of a canine thorax region using heavy ion beams.

  11. Heavy ion beam studies and imaging with a multiplane multiwire proportional chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, W. T.; Alonso, J. R.; Tobias, C.

    1981-03-01

    A 16-plane multiwire proportional chamber was used to accurately measure intensity profiles of heavy ion beams at the Bevalac. An imaging capability was developed for the system, allowing for reconstruction of three dimensional representation of radiological objects using heavy ion beams.

  12. Some simple approaches used in the construction of multiwire proportional chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staricˇ, M.; Zavrtanik, D.; Kernel, G.

    1983-10-01

    A simple method of manufacturing multiwire proportional chambers is described on an example of a 160 mm × 160 mm chamber. Using a microscope the wires of anode planes are positioned to an accuracy of about 10 μm. Wire tensions are checked by comparing their natural frequencies to the notes of a musical instrument. A description of a drum-like device for foil stretching is also given.

  13. The detection of tritium-labeled ligands and their carrier proteins using a multiwire proportional counter

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, B.J.; Bateman, J.E.; Bradwell, A.R.

    1982-06-01

    Two-dimensional immunoelectrophoresis combined with autoradiography is a powerful technique for studying the binding of radiolabeled ligands to their carrier proteins. Tritium-labeled compounds are difficult to detect by autoradiography, yet this isotope is often the radiolabel of choice, because it is possible to achieve high specific activity with no loss of biological function. Therefore an electronic detection system called a multiwire proportional counter has been investigated. This has resulted in an increase in detection speed for tritium of several thousand fold over conventional autoradiography and furthermore the results are potentially quantitative.

  14. Alpha-beta monitoring system based on pair of simultaneous Multi-Wire Proportional Counters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wengrowicz, U.; Amidan, D.; Orion, I.

    2016-08-01

    A new approach for a simultaneous alpha-beta Multi-wire Proportional Counter (MWPC) is presented. The popular approach for alpha-beta monitoring systems consists of a large area MWPC using noble gas flow such as Argon Methane. This method of measurement is effective but requires large-scale and expensive maintenance due to the needs of gas flow control and periodic replacements. In this work, a pair of simultaneous MWPCs for alpha-beta measuring is presented. The developed detector consists of a sealed gas MWPC sensor for beta particles, behind a free air alpha sensor. This approach allows effective simultaneous detection and discrimination of both alpha and beta radiation without the maintenance cost noble gas flow required for unsealed detectors.

  15. Gas gain uniformity tests performed on multiwire proportional chambers for the LHCb muon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, A.; de Andrade Filho, L. M.; Barbosa, A. F.; Graulich, J. S.; Guerrer, G.; Lima, H. P.; Mair, K.; Polycarpo, E.; Reis, A.; Rodrigues, F.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, T.; Schoch Vianna, C.

    2008-06-01

    We present the experimental setup and the results of the gas gain uniformity tests performed as part of the quality control of the multiwire proportional chambers produced at CERN for the LHCb muon system. The test provides a relative gas gain measurement over the whole chamber sensitive area. It is based on the analysis of the pulse height spectrum obtained when the chamber is exposed to a 241Am radioactive source. Since the measurement is normalized to the peak of a precise pulse generator, the gain uniformity can also be evaluated among different gas gaps and different chambers. In order to cope with the specific requirements related to the relatively high number of chambers and to their varying geometry, a standalone and compact data acquisition system has been developed which is programmable at the hardware level and may be applied to many other applications requiring precise time-to-digital and analog-to-digital conversion, in correlated or non-correlated mode.

  16. Multiwire proportional chambers in M1 and M3 spectrometers of charmed baryon experiment (E781) at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Kaya, Mithat; /Iowa U.

    1997-08-01

    The status of the multiwire proportional chambers in the FERMILAB E781 experiment and a general description of the readout system are given. This essay will describe the system of multiwire proportional chambers (MWPC) that are part of the Fermilab experiment E781 setup. Multiwire proportional chambers are often used in particle physics experiments because they can determine the position of charged particles very accurately (less than a millimeter). The E781 experiment which is also called SELEX (SEgmented LargE-X) is a spectrometer designed to study the production and decay of charmed baryons. MWPCs are part of the 3-stage charged particle spectrometer (Figure 1). Each spectrometer stage includes a bending magnet and chambers. More information about E781 experiment is given in the Appendix. In the following, some basic concepts of MWPCs will be given briefly. After that the multiwire proportional chambers (M1PWC and M3PWC) that are used in the E781 fixed target experiment will be described. Then a general description of the readout system for both M1PWC and M3PWC setups will follow. Finally the tests done on both sets of chambers will be explained in detail.

  17. High-resolution multiwire proportional soft x-ray diagnostic measurements on TCV

    SciTech Connect

    Sushkov, A.; Andreev, V.; Camenen, Y.; Pochelon, A.; Klimanov, I.; Scarabosio, A.; Weisen, H.

    2008-02-15

    A multiwire proportional x-ray (MPX) detector is used on the TCV tokamak (Tokamak a configuration variable) as a high spatial and temporal resolution soft x-ray emissivity imaging diagnostic. The MPX system consists of 64 vertically viewing channels and has been designed to complement the existing TCV soft x-ray tomography system by enhancing the spatial resolution. The MPX detector is suitable for the measurement of fast and localized phenomena and can be used, for instance, for the observation of magnetohydrodynamic activity, for the characterization of transport barriers or for an improved determination of the electron cyclotron heating power deposition profile. The MPX detector operates in continuous-current mode and measures the plasma soft x-ray emission in the 3-30 keV range with a radial resolution of about 5 mm - 1% of plasma diameter - and a frequency bandwidth of 50 kHz. A detailed description of the MPX detector construction and the principle of its operation are given. The properties of the detector in photon-counting and continuous-current operation modes are studied. The implementation of the system on TCV and experimental results illustrating the potential of the diagnostic are also presented.

  18. Numerical studies of transient gain reduction process in a multi-wire proportional chamber.

    PubMed

    Katagiri, Ken; Furukawa, Takuji; Noda, Koji

    2011-05-01

    A gain reduction process caused by successive beam irradiation in a multi-wire proportional chamber was numerically investigated to clarify the relations between the gas gain variation and the ion density distribution. A numerical code was developed based on a two-dimensional drift-diffusion model in order to evaluate the ion and electron density distributions and the electric field variation caused by the space charge effect. In order to consider the gain reduction process which occurs under the high rate and successive irradiation, the simulations were performed for the time period of ∼10-100 μs, which is much longer than the time required for ions to travel from an anode to a cathode. The numerical simulation results showed that for the low gas gain regime of ∼10, quasi-stationary density distribution of the ions was formed by the high-rate beams of ∼10(8)-10(10) particles per second, and that the transient variation of the gas gain became constant after establishment of the quasi-stationary ion density distributions.

  19. Numerical studies of transient gain reduction process in a multi-wire proportional chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Katagiri, Ken; Furukawa, Takuji; Noda, Koji

    2011-05-15

    A gain reduction process caused by successive beam irradiation in a multi-wire proportional chamber was numerically investigated to clarify the relations between the gas gain variation and the ion density distribution. A numerical code was developed based on a two-dimensional drift-diffusion model in order to evaluate the ion and electron density distributions and the electric field variation caused by the space charge effect. In order to consider the gain reduction process which occurs under the high rate and successive irradiation, the simulations were performed for the time period of {approx}10-100 {mu}s, which is much longer than the time required for ions to travel from an anode to a cathode. The numerical simulation results showed that for the low gas gain regime of {approx}10, quasi-stationary density distribution of the ions was formed by the high-rate beams of {approx}10{sup 8}- 10{sup 10} particles per second, and that the transient variation of the gas gain became constant after establishment of the quasi-stationary ion density distributions.

  20. Experimental results from an X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer utilizing multi-wire proportional counter for KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. G.; Yoo, J. W.; Kim, Y. S.; Nam, U. W.; Moon, M. K.

    2016-11-01

    The inconsistency of the first experimental results from the X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer for the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research device utilizing a multi-wire proportional counter (MWPC) is clarified after improving the photon-count rate of the data acquisition system for the MWPC and ground loop isolator for the whole spectrometer system. The improved MWPC is successfully applied to pure Ohmic plasmas as well as plasmas with high confinement modes.

  1. Isomer Tagging with a Dual Multi-Wire Proportional Counter and a Differential Plunger

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D. M.; Mason, P. J. R.; Khan, S.; Kishada, A. M.; Varley, B. J.; Rigby, S. V.; Scholey, C.; Greenlees, P.; Rahkila, P.; Jones, P. M.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Leino, M.; Leppaenen, A. P.; Nyman, M.; Uusitalo, J.; Grahn, T.; Pakarinen, J.; Nieminen, P.

    2008-05-12

    This report details the status of an experimental research programme which has studied isomeric states in the mass 130-160 region of the nuclear chart. Several new isomers have been established and characterised near the proton drip line using a recoil isomer tagging technique at the University of Jyvaeskylae, Finland. The latest experiments have been performed with a modified setup where the standard GREAT focal-plane double-sided silicon-strip detector was changed to a dual multi-wire proportional-counter arrangement. This new setup has improved capability for short-lived isomer studies where large focal-plane rates can be tolerated. The results of key recent experiments for nuclei situated above ({sup 153}Yb, {sup 152}Tm) and below ({sup 144}Ho, {sup 142}Tb) the N = 82 shell gap were presented. These studies have charted the evolution of isomeric states across the neutron shell from K-Isomers at N = 74, to shape isomers at N = 77 and shell-model isomers at N = 82, 83. The excitation energies for some of the lowest-lying excited states in these isomeric nuclei show behaviour which is characteristic of an X(5) symmetry falling midway between the limits expected for pure vibrational and rotational behaviour. The future prospects for studies of these nuclei were discussed using an isomer-tagged differential-plunger setup. This technique will be capable of establishing the deformation of the states above the isomers and will aid in determining whether their behaviour is indeed well described by the X(5) symmetry limit.

  2. A modular large-area lithium foil multi-wire proportional counter neutron detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Kyle A.; Edwards, Nathaniel S.; Kusner, Michael R.; Mayhugh, Michael R.; Montag, Benjamin W.; Schmidt, Aaron J.; Wayant, Clayton D.; McGregor, Douglas S.

    2015-11-01

    Several Li foil multi-wire proportional counters were constructed with five layers of 75 μm thick 6Li foils spaced 1.63 cm apart. Each detector had 1250 cm2 of active area and was backfilled with 1.0 atm of P-10 gas. Two of these detectors were positioned back-to-front with 5.0 cm of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) positioned between the two detectors and on the front and back. Additional 2.54 cm thick HDPE sheets were added to the remaining sides. The detectors were operated with a single electronics unit and were delivered to a test facility where multiple neutron and gamma-ray sensitivity experiments were completed. First, a 252Cf neutron source was positioned at various distances from the front of the detector and the absolute detection efficiency (cps ng-1) was recorded at each distance. Second, a transient test was completed by moving the neutron source in front of the detector at a constant rate while recording the change in count rate (cps). Third, the lateral sensitivity and symmetry of the detection system was investigated by positioning a 252Cf source up to 5.0 m away from the centerline of the arrayed detectors in 1.0 m increments in both outward directions. The angular response was investigated by positioning the 252Cf source 2.0 m from the center of the device and recording the count rate at each stationary position in 15° increments from 0° to 360°. The count rate varied 15% from minimum to maximum during the angular response test. Additionally, the arrayed system was modeled in MCNP6 and had an intrinsic neutron detection efficiency of 12.6% for a bare 252Cf source, less than the experimentally determined efficiency of 13.9±0.03%, as expected. The gamma-ray sensitivity of the detection system was also investigated and pulse-height spectra were collected and plotted against a neutron response spectrum for comparison.

  3. Quantitative autoradiography using a radioimager based on a multiwire proportional chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petegnief, Yolande; Petiet, Anne; Peker, Muammer Can; Bonnin, François; Meulemans, Alain; LeGuludec, Dominique

    1998-12-01

    Determination of the biodistribution of radiopharmaceuticals is an important issue for the evaluation of their performance in diagnosis and therapy. In this study, we evaluated a digital radioimager (RI) based on a multiwire proportional chamber for quantitative autoradiography (AR). The RI allows direct detection of electronic emissions of gamma emitters. Its qualitative and quantitative performances were tested on Tc and In labelled sections and compared with conventional film AR. Linearity of count rate versus activity was verified over a range of activity. As compared with film AR, a substantial improvement of the detection limit was obtained even for acquisition periods up to 20 times less than film exposure times. We provided the basis for quantitative analysis with tissue equivalent paste standards: the Tc and In RI counting efficiencies were respectively 1.19% and 2.35%. We illustrated the respective values of RI and film AR in two rat studies: Tc-DMSA in kidney and dual-isotope Tc-MIBI and In-antimyosin in heart. Calculated activity concentrations on sections of rat organs confirmed good correlation to gamma counting (deviation less than 12%). We suggest RI as a convenient technique for fast localization of single or dual-isotope tracers and determination of activity distribution.

  4. Two-dimensional multiwire gas proportional detector for X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy of condensed matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Tae Joo; Dierker, Steven B.; Smith, Graham C.

    2008-03-01

    Details of a two-dimensional (2-D) multiwire gas proportional detector for X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) of condensed matter are described. The characteristics of the gas proportional detector at 8 keV, 0.3 pC anode charge, and 3 bar (absolute) of Xe/10%CO 2 are as follows: 8.5×10 -7 counts/s (100×100 μm 2) dark count rate, ˜μs time resolution, ˜48 and 73 μm position resolution (FWHM) along and across the anode wire direction, respectively, and ˜80% quantum efficiency. The effects of incident photon energy, anode charge (i.e., gain), gas drift depth, and gas pressure on position resolution are discussed. Static and dynamic speckle patterns, measured from disordered aerogel and polystyrene/polybutadiene blends by a partially coherent synchrotron X-ray source, demonstrate that a 2-D multiwire gas proportional detector is very suitable for the dynamic study of condensed matter with relaxation times in the order of μs to 10 3 s and atomic length scale.

  5. Right/left assignment in drift chambers and proportional multiwire chambers (PWC's) using induced signals

    DOEpatents

    Walenta, Albert H.

    1979-01-01

    Improved multiwire chamber having means for resolving the left/right ambiguity in the location of an ionizing event. The chamber includes a plurality of spaced parallel anode wires positioned between spaced planar cathodes. Associated with each of the anode wires are a pair of localizing wires, one positioned on either side of the anode wire. The localizing wires are connected to a differential amplifier whose output polarity is determined by whether the ionizing event occurs to the right or left of the anode wire.

  6. Multianode cylindrical proportional counter for high count rates

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, J.A.; Kopp, M.K.

    1980-05-23

    A cylindrical, multiple-anode proportional counter is provided for counting of low-energy photons (< 60 keV) at count rates of greater than 10/sup 5/ counts/sec. A gas-filled proportional counter cylinder forming an outer cathode is provided with a central coaxially disposed inner cathode and a plurality of anode wires disposed in a cylindrical array in coaxial alignment with and between the inner and outer cathodes to form a virtual cylindrical anode coaxial with the inner and outer cathodes. The virtual cylindrical anode configuration improves the electron drift velocity by providing a more uniform field strength throughout the counter gas volume, thus decreasing the electron collection time following the detection of an ionizing event. This avoids pulse pile-up and coincidence losses at these high count rates. Conventional RC position encoding detection circuitry may be employed to extract the spatial information from the counter anodes.

  7. Multianode cylindrical proportional counter for high count rates

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, James A.; Kopp, Manfred K.

    1981-01-01

    A cylindrical, multiple-anode proportional counter is provided for counting of low-energy photons (<60 keV) at count rates of greater than 10.sup.5 counts/sec. A gas-filled proportional counter cylinder forming an outer cathode is provided with a central coaxially disposed inner cathode and a plurality of anode wires disposed in a cylindrical array in coaxial alignment with and between the inner and outer cathodes to form a virtual cylindrical anode coaxial with the inner and outer cathodes. The virtual cylindrical anode configuration improves the electron drift velocity by providing a more uniform field strength throughout the counter gas volume, thus decreasing the electron collection time following the detection of an ionizing event. This avoids pulse pile-up and coincidence losses at these high count rates. Conventional RC position encoding detection circuitry may be employed to extract the spatial information from the counter anodes.

  8. Measurements of cosmic ray muons with multi-wire proportional chambers with a prototype setup for KASCADE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathes, Hermann-Josef

    1993-03-01

    The cosmic ray experiment KASCADE (German acronym for Karlsruhe Shower Core and Array Detector) designed for measuring simultaneously the electromagnetic, muonic, and hadronic components of extensive air showers to determine the primary cosmic ray mass composition in the energy range 300 Tev to 100 Btu is described. Beneath the central hadron calorimeter of this experiment, measurements of muons with an energy threshold of 2 GeV are planned. Four large position sensitive multi-wire proportional chambers were brought into operation after the required supply units were installed. This test setup was extended with a trigger system for cosmic ray muons. The trigger allows muon detection efficiencies and the spatial resolution of the chambers to be measured. To enhance the content of multiple track events in the data a trigger system for air showers was required. A small detector array was installed with the possibility to determine roughly the arrival direction of the shower. For that configuration of chambers an algorithm for track reconstruction was developed. It led to satisfying results for single and double track events. It is demonstrated that the determination of hits with only one chamber is influenced by the ambiguities resulting from the chamber layout. In addition this effect is shown to be enhanced by electronic noise and electromagnetic background. An extension with a time measuring system of an accuracy better than 2 ns allowed the arrival times of the muons to be measured for some events. The resulting arrival time distribution could be qualitatively understood.

  9. Rapid orthograde transport of 32P-labelled material in amphibian sensory axons: a multiwire proportional chamber study.

    PubMed

    Snyder, R E; Nichols, T R; Smith, R S

    1980-05-01

    A multiwire proportional chamber was used to follow the axonal transport of material labelled with [32P]orthophosphate in dorsal root ganglion (DRG)--sciatic nerve preparations of Xenopus laevis and Rana catesbiana. The DRG were exposed to label for a period of 4 h following which there was a period of continued delivery of labelled material to the nerve for up to 18 h. The front of the labelled material in the nerve moved at a velocity of 160--170 mm/24 h at room temperature (22.5--23.5 degrees C). Sectioning the nerve at a proximal position showed that labelled material behind the front moved at a similar rapid velocity. Experiments in which the nerve was sectioned showed that some of the rapidly transported label appeared to be deposited into a relatively stationary phase. Extrapolation of the results indicated that the delay between the presentation of the label to the DRG and the onset of the transport of labelled material in the nerve was 4--6 h. The rapid transport of the label was inhibited by vinblastine sulphate at concentrations of 130--950 microM. Most of the rapidly transported material was found to be in a chloroform-methanol extractable form. In conclusion, 32P labels materials whose transport dynamics are very similar to those observed when [35S]methionine is used as the precursor. PMID:6158368

  10. High Accuracy, Two-Dimensional Read-Out in Multiwire Proportional Chambers

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Charpak, G.; Sauli, F.

    1973-02-14

    In most applications of proportional chambers, especially in high-energy physics, separate chambers are used for measuring different coordinates. In general one coordinate is obtained by recording the pulses from the anode wires around which avalanches have grown. Several methods have been imagined for obtaining the position of an avalanche along a wire. In this article a method is proposed which leads to the same range of accuracies and may be preferred in some cases. The problem of accurate measurements for large-size chamber is also discussed.

  11. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS: Study of a multi-wire proportional chamber with a cathode strip and delay-line readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Li-Ying; Li, Qi-Te; Faisal, Q.; Ge, Yu-Cheng; Liu, Hong-Tao; Ye, Yan-Lin

    2009-05-01

    The design principle for a multi-wire proportional chamber with a cathode strip and delay-line readout is described. A prototype chamber of a size of 10 cm ×10 cm was made together with the readout electronics circuit. A very clean signal with very low background noise was obtained by applying a transformer between the delay-line and the pre-amplifier in order to match the resistance. Along the anode wire direction a position resolution of less than 0.5 mm was achieved with a 55Fe-5.9 keV X ray source. The simple structure, large effective area and high position resolution allow the application of a gas chamber of this kind to many purposes.

  12. Study and full simulation of ten different gases on sealed Multi-Wire Proportional Counter (MWPC) by using Garfield and Maxwell codes.

    PubMed

    Shohani, M Ebrahimi; Golgoun, S M; Aminipour, M; Shabani, A; Mazoochi, A R; Akbari, R Maghsoudi; Mohammadzadeh, M; Davarpanah, M R; Sardari, D; Sadeghi, M; Mofrad, F Babapour; Jafari, A

    2016-09-01

    In this research gas sealed Multi-Wire Proportional Counter (MWPC) including blades between anode wires and beta particles of (90)Sr with 196keV mean energy were considered. Ten different gases such as Noble gases mixtures with methane and several other pure gases were studied. In this type of detector, by using Garfield and Maxwell codes and for each of the gases, variation of different parameters such as first Townsend, electron attachment coefficients with variable electric field and their effects on pulse height or collected charge and in turn on Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) were studied. Also the effect of anode voltage and its diameter and the pressure of gas on the pulse height were studied. Results show that Garfield and Maxwell codes can be used to study and improve the design of other gaseous detectors. PMID:27451113

  13. High speed multiwire photon camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacy, Jeffrey L. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An improved multiwire proportional counter camera having particular utility in the field of clinical nuclear medicine imaging. The detector utilizes direct coupled, low impedance, high speed delay lines, the segments of which are capacitor-inductor networks. A pile-up rejection test is provided to reject confused events otherwise caused by multiple ionization events occurring during the readout window.

  14. High speed multiwire photon camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacy, Jeffrey L. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An improved multiwire proportional counter camera having particular utility in the field of clinical nuclear medicine imaging. The detector utilizes direct coupled, low impedance, high speed delay lines, the segments of which are capacitor-inductor networks. A pile-up rejection test is provided to reject confused events otherwise caused by multiple ionization events occuring during the readout window.

  15. Monte Carlo calculations and experimental results of Bonner spheres systems with a new cylindrical Helium-3 proportional counter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, H.; Fernández, F.; Van Ryckeghem, L.; Alexandre, P.; Bouassoule, T.; Pochat, J.-L.; Tomas, M.

    2002-01-01

    The experimental results on neutron energy spectra, integral fluences and equivalent dose measurements performed by means of a Bonner sphere system placed inside the containment building of the Vandellòs II Nuclear Power Plant (Tarragona, Spain) are presented. The equivalent dose results obtained with this system are compared to those measured with different neutron area detectors (Berthold, Dineutron, Harwell). A realistic geometry model of the Bonner sphere system with a new cylindrical counter type "F" (0,5NH1/1KI—Eurisys Mesures) and with a set of eight polyethylene moderating spheres is described in detail. The response function in fluence of this new device, to mono-energetic neutrons from thermal energy to 20 MeV, is calculated by the MCNP-4B code for each moderator sphere. The system has been calibrated at IPSN Cadarache facility for ISO Am-Be calibrated source and thermal neutron field, then the response functions were confirmed by measurements at PTB (Germany) for ISO recommended energies of mono-energetic neutrons and with the CANEL IPSN facility which simulates realistic fields.

  16. Multiwire Gamma Camera for Radionuclide and Radiographic Imaging in the Space environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacy, Jeffrey L.

    1985-01-01

    Unique multiwire proportional counter technology has been developed at the Johnson Space Center over the past several years. The technology will be described and how it may apply both in near- and long-term NASA efforts. In the near-term, I feel that the technology will provide a significant tool for the cardiovascular research area. In particular, low-dose nuclear medicine and tissue densitometry techniques of expanded scope will be supplied. In the longer term, the multiwire technique can provide a general purpose radiology and nuclear medicine facility for use in the space station which would be difficult and costly to provide by other means.

  17. A multi-wire beam profile monitor in the AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H.; Buxton, W.; Castillo, V.; Glenn, J.W.

    1997-07-01

    A multi-wire beam profile monitor which can be used to directly monitor and control the optical matching between the Booster and AGS rings has been installed and tested in the AGS. Placement of a multi-wire monitor directly in the AGS provides profile measurements taken upon injection and the first two or more revolutions of the beam. The data from such measurements can be used to determine the optical properties of the beam transport line leading into the AGS.

  18. Beta Cage: A New, Large-Area Multi-Wire Screening Detector For Surface Beta Contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Shutt, T.; Schnee, R.W.; Dahl, C.E.; Viveiros, L. de; Gaitskell, R.J.

    2005-09-08

    We report on a design study for a new, dedicated, low-radioactive-background screening detector for low-energy beta-emitting contamination on surfaces. The detector, a large-area gaseous detector with multi-wire proportional readout, has sufficient sensitivity to screen materials at the level needed for the proposed SuperCDMS 1 ton dark matter experiment. Such capability does not currently exist. This detector would have additional applications in low-radioactive-background physics experiments, and radioactive trace analysis, such as 14C dating.

  19. Proportional counter radiation camera

    DOEpatents

    Borkowski, C.J.; Kopp, M.K.

    1974-01-15

    A gas-filled proportional counter camera that images photon emitting sources is described. A two-dimensional, positionsensitive proportional multiwire counter is provided as the detector. The counter consists of a high- voltage anode screen sandwiched between orthogonally disposed planar arrays of multiple parallel strung, resistively coupled cathode wires. Two terminals from each of the cathode arrays are connected to separate timing circuitry to obtain separate X and Y coordinate signal values from pulse shape measurements to define the position of an event within the counter arrays which may be recorded by various means for data display. The counter is further provided with a linear drift field which effectively enlarges the active gas volume of the counter and constrains the recoil electrons produced from ionizing radiation entering the counter to drift perpendicularly toward the planar detection arrays. A collimator is interposed between a subject to be imaged and the counter to transmit only the radiation from the subject which has a perpendicular trajectory with respect to the planar cathode arrays of the detector. (Official Gazette)

  20. Radiology utilizing a gas multiwire detector with resolution enhancement

    DOEpatents

    Majewski, Stanislaw; Majewski, Lucasz A.

    1999-09-28

    This invention relates to a process and apparatus for obtaining filmless, radiological, digital images utilizing a gas multiwire detector. Resolution is enhanced through projection geometry. This invention further relates to imaging systems for X-ray examination of patients or objects, and is particularly suited for mammography.

  1. Performance test of the low-pressure thin window multi-wire chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun-Wei; Lu, Chen-Gui; Duan, Li-Min; Ma, Long; Hu, Rong-Jiang; Yang, He-Run; Ma, Peng; Gan, Zai-Guo

    2014-02-01

    A flow gas low-pressure multi-wire proportional chamber (LPMWPC) with an active area of 180 mm × 80 mm has been developed for the flying time test of the recoil nuclei on super heavy nuclear experiments. The LPMWPC detector can be operated in single as well as double step operational modes. In the case of double step operational mode with a high gas amplification factor, signals from α-particles reside well above the electronic noise. The gas leakage rate and time resolution obtained from the α 239Pu source are shown and discussed at the condition of 3 mbar Isobutane gas. It was shown that the time resolution was better than 2.9 ns at the best work condition, and the detecting efficiency was larger than 98% at the low energy α particles. So the LPMWPC is fit to measure the flying time in the super heavy nuclear fragments experiment.

  2. Cylindrical wormholes

    SciTech Connect

    Bronnikov, K. A.; Lemos, Jose P. S.

    2009-05-15

    It is shown that the existence of static, cylindrically symmetric wormholes does not require violation of the weak or null energy conditions near the throat, and cylindrically symmetric wormhole geometries can appear with less exotic sources than wormholes whose throats have a spherical topology. Examples of exact wormhole solutions are given with scalar, spinor and electromagnetic fields as sources, and these fields are not necessarily phantom. In particular, there are wormhole solutions for a massless, minimally coupled scalar field in the presence of a negative cosmological constant, and for an azimuthal Maxwell electromagnetic field. All these solutions are not asymptotically flat. A no-go theorem is proved, according to which a flat (or string) asymptotic behavior on both sides of a cylindrical wormhole throat is impossible if the energy density of matter is everywhere nonnegative.

  3. Cylindrical Brushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt

    1998-03-01

    Homopolymerization of macromonomers, i.e. polymerizable oligomers, yields macromolecules of cylindrical shape, because the main chain is considerably stretched due to the steric overcrowding of the side chains.(M. Wintermantel et al., Macromolecules 1996, 29,978.) Irrespective of the chemical nature of the macromonomer (styrene, methylmethacrylate, vinylpyridine, propylene) the chain stiffness in terms of the Kuhn statistical segment length lk lies in the range of 50 nm < lk < 200 nm. In accordance to the high degree of stiffness polymacromonomers form lyotropic liquid crystalline phases in solution and in the bulk.(M. Wintermantel et. al, Angew. Chemie 1995, 107, 1606.) Upon drying a dilute solution on mica or silicon wafer ordered monolayers are formed.(S.S. Sheiko et al., Langmuir 1997, 13, 5368.)^, (P. Dziezok et al., Angew. Chemie 1997, 00, 000.) Recently, stable monolayers of polyvinylpyridine macromonomers were successfully prepared on a Langmuir-Blodgett trough. Up to 15 monolayers were transferred onto a planar silicon wafer and characterized by x-ray reflection. The individual brush molecules within the monolayer could be visualized by atomic force microscopy. Frequently occurring hairpin formations by one molecule could not yet be explained. AFM on isolated, single molecules, however, have confirmed the cylindrical structure of polymacromonomers.

  4. Cylindrical Scanner

    1999-04-29

    The CS system is designed to provide a very fast imaging system in order to search for weapons on persons in an airport environment. The Cylindrical Scanner moves a vertical transceiver array rapidly around a person standing stationary. The software can be segmented in to three specific tasks. The first task is data acquisition and scanner control. At the operator's request, this task commands the scanner to move and the radar transceiver array to sendmore » data to the computer system in a known and well-ordered manner. The array is moved over the complete aperture in 10 to 12 seconds. At the completion of the array movement the second software task automatically reconstructs the high-resolution image from the radar data utilizing the integrated DSP boards. The third task displays the resulting images, as they become available, to the computer screen for user review and analysis.« less

  5. Booster-to-AGS Multiwires and an Evolution of the Application Profile Display

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrens,L.

    2008-07-01

    Follow up on BtA multiwire beam measurements taken during the 2008 polarized proton run has led to a number of better understandings (for the author) associated with the beam instrumentation involved. This history will be reviewed--some 'beam-based' results noted--and the present state of the application for these monitors described. The BtA multiwire system seems to be fundamentally an excellent diagnostic for allowing us to get the BtA line well under control in a defendable way. When beam is available in BtA, carrying out some systematic measurements with the system can get us there.

  6. Detection of damage in multiwire cables based on wavelet entropy evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibáñez, Flor; Baltazar, Arturo; Mijarez, Rito

    2015-08-01

    Multiwire cables are widely used in important engineering structures. Since they are exposed to several dynamic and static loads as well as detrimental environmental conditions, their structural health can be compromised. Due to the critical role played by multiwire cables, it is necessary to develop a non-destructive health monitoring method to maintain their structure and proper performance. Ultrasonic inspection using guided waves is a promising non-destructive damage monitoring technique for rods, single and multiwire cables. However, the propagated guided waves are composed of an infinite number of dispersive vibrational modes making their analysis difficult. In this work, an entropy-based method to identify small changes in non-stationary signals is proposed. An experimental system to capture and post-process acoustic signals is implemented. The discrete wavelet transform is computed in order to obtain the reconstructed wavelet coefficients of the signals and to analyze the energy at different scales. The use of the concept of entropy evolution of non-stationary signals to detect damage in multiwire cables is evaluated. The results show that there is a correlation between the entropy value and level of damage of the cable including breaking of single wires and change in the mechanical contact conditions among the wires. It is found that the studied method has low sensitivity to signal noise and can reduce the computational complexity encountered in a typical time-frequency analysis.

  7. Detection of structural damage in multiwire cables by monitoring the entropy evolution of wavelet coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibáñez, Flor; Baltazar, Arturo; Mijarez, Rito; Aranda, Jorge

    2015-03-01

    Multiwire cables are widely used in important civil structures. Since they are exposed to several dynamic and static loads, their structural health can be compromised. The cables can also be submitted to mechanical contact, tension and energy propagation in addition to changes in size and material within their wires. Due to the critical role played by multiwire cables, it is necessary to develop a non-destructive health monitoring method to maintain their structure and proper performance. Ultrasonic inspection using guided waves is a promising non-destructive damage monitoring technique for rods, single wires and multiwire cables. The propagated guided waves are composed by an infinite number of vibrational modes making their analysis difficult. In this work, an entropy-based method to identify small changes in non-stationary signals is proposed. A system to capture and post-process acoustic signals is implemented. The Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT) is computed in order to obtain the reconstructed wavelet coefficients of the signals and to analyze the energy at different scales. The feasibility of using the concept of entropy evolution of non-stationary signals to detect damage in multiwire cables is evaluated. The results show that there is a high correlation between the entropy value and damage level of the cable. The proposed method has low sensitivity to noise and reduces the computational complexity found in a typical time-frequency analysis.

  8. CABPRO: An expert system for process planning multiwire cables. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, R.M.

    1994-04-01

    CABPRO (CABle PROcessor) is a set of computer programs using Artificial Intelligence programming to automatically generate process plans and work instructions in support of the manufacture of multiwire cables. Development of these programs required selecting appropriate hardware and software tools, defining engineering process planning activities, acquiring and representing process planning knowledge, and creating a prototype system. A successful prototype was developed and demonstrated.

  9. Near-field transport by a bent multi-wire endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latioui, Hafssaa; Silveirinha, Mário G.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we investigate the impact of bending a multi-wire endoscope in the context of subwavelength imaging and near-field transport. To this end, we study the reflection and transmission by a "bent" wire medium in different configurations and demonstrate that the structure can be quite robust to the effect of bending provided the total length of the bent wires satisfies the Fabry-Pérot condition. The study is carried out relying on an analytical homogenization theory and using two additional boundary conditions obtained with physical arguments. It is proven that a structure formed by two connected sets of tilted metallic wires can allow for the near field transport with a deeply subwavelength resolution. To illustrate the applications and potentials of the results, the performance of bent multi-wire endoscopes is characterized using full wave numerical simulations.

  10. Transfer molding using soft-flow epoxy in multiwire cable EMR hardware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friebe, M. C.; Wetherill, W. R.

    1981-12-01

    A technique using a soft-flow molding epoxy and a transfer press to fill EMR hardware was found to reduce manufacturing time and scrap yield for shielded multiwire cables. Samples representative of production cables were subjected to mechanical and temperature shock, humidity, and vibration. The results indicated that this epoxy could prevent or reduce EMR hardware collapse from molding pressures during fabrication, thereby reducing scrap and increasing cable production yield.

  11. Investigation of elastic modes propagating in multi-wire helical waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treyssède, Fabien; Laguerre, Laurent

    2010-05-01

    Elastic guided waves have some potential for non-destructive inspection of civil engineering multi-wire steel cables. However, wave propagation inside such structures is not yet fully understood. This paper investigates multi-wire helical waveguides with special attention to the common seven-wire strand configuration (one straight core surrounded by one layer of six helical wires). A helical coordinate system is first proposed. Though non-orthogonal, this system preserves translational invariance along the helix centreline to explicitly perform a spatial Fourier transform. Then, it is shown that for the analysis of multi-wire helical strands a twisting system—which is a special case of helical systems—is translationally invariant. A semi-analytical finite element method is developed reducing the problem on the cross-section only. A straightforward computation of energy velocity is proposed. Dispersion curves for a single straight wire and a helical wire are first computed to verify the adequacy of the twisting system. Finally the seven-wire strand is analysed using simplified contact conditions. Theoretical dispersion curves are compared to low-frequency magnetostrictive measurements. Good agreement is found for the first compressional-like mode and its associated veering central frequency ('notch frequency').

  12. High-Accuracy Measurements of the Centre of Gravity of Avalanches in Proportional Chambers

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Charpak, G.; Jeavons, A.; Sauli, F.; Stubbs, R.

    1973-09-24

    In a multiwire proportional chamber the avalanches occur close to the anode wires. The motion of the positive ions in the large electric fields at the vicinity of the wires induces fast-rising positive pulses on the surrounding electrodes. Different methods have been developed in order to determine the position of the centre of the avalanches. In the method we describe, the centre of gravity of the pulse distribution is measured directly. It seems to lead to an accuracy which is limited only by the stability of the spatial distribution of the avalanches generated by the process being measured.

  13. Strip Diagrams: Illuminating Proportions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Jessica S.

    2013-01-01

    Proportional reasoning is both complex and layered, making it challenging to define. Lamon (1999) identified characteristics of proportional thinkers, such as being able to understand covariance of quantities; distinguish between proportional and nonproportional relationships; use a variety of strategies flexibly, most of which are nonalgorithmic,…

  14. Multiwire conductor having increased interwire resistance and good mechanical stability and method for making same

    DOEpatents

    Luhman, Thomas; Klamut, Carl

    1984-02-14

    An improved multiwire conductor of the type which is mechanically stabilized by a solder filler. A solder filled conductor is heated to a temperature sufficient to make the solder brittle, but below the melting point of the solder. While still hot, the conductor is flexed, causing the solder to separate from the wires comprising the conductor, thereby increasing the interwire resistance. In one embodiment the conductor may be heated to a temperature above the eutectic temperature of the solder so that a controlled amount of solder is removed. The subject invention is particularly suited for use with braided, ribbon-type, solder filled superconductors.

  15. Multiwire conductor having increased interwire resistance and good mechanical stability and method for making same

    DOEpatents

    Luhman, T.; Klamut, C.

    1982-03-15

    An improved multiwire conductor of the type which is mechanically stabilized by a solder filler. A solder filled conductor is heated to a temperature sufficient to make the solder brittle, but below the melting point of the solder. While still hot, the conductor is flexed, causing the solder to separate from the wires comprising the conductor, thereby increasing the interwire resistance. In one embodiment the conductor may be heated to a temperature above the eutectic temperature of the solder so that a controlled amount of solder is removed. The subject invention is particularly suited for use with braided, ribbon-type, solder filled superconductors.

  16. Multiwire conductor having greatly increased interwire resistance and method for making same

    DOEpatents

    Luhman, T.; Suenaga, M.

    1982-03-15

    An improved multiwire conductor of the type which is mechanically stabilized by a tin based solder filler is described. A solder filled conductor is heated to a temperature above its melting point for a period long enough to allow a substantial amount of copper to be dissolved from the wires comprising the conductor. The copper forms the brittle intermetallic compound Cu/sub 5/Sn/sub 6/ with tin in the solder. After cooling the conductor is flexed causing a random cracking of the solder, and thereby increasing the interwire resistance of the conductor. The subject invention is particularly adapted for use with braided, ribbon-type solder filled superconductors.

  17. Multiwire conductor having greatly increased interwire resistance and method for making same

    DOEpatents

    Luhman, Thomas; Suenaga, Masaki

    1984-01-17

    An improved multiwire conductor of the type which is mechanically stabilized by a tin based solder filler. A solder filled conductor is heated to a temperature above its melting point for a period long enough to allow a substantial amount of copper to be dissolved from the wires comprising the conductor. The copper forms the brittle intermetallic compound Cu.sub.5 Sn.sub.6 with tin in the solder. After cooling the conductor is flexed causing a random cracking of the solder, and thereby increasing the interwire resistance of the conductor. The subject invention is particularly adapted for use with braided, ribbon-type solder filled superconductors.

  18. Cylindrical neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2008-04-22

    A cylindrical neutron generator is formed with a coaxial RF-driven plasma ion source and target. A deuterium (or deuterium and tritium) plasma is produced by RF excitation in a cylindrical plasma ion generator using an RF antenna. A cylindrical neutron generating target is coaxial with the ion generator, separated by plasma and extraction electrodes which contain many slots. The plasma generator emanates ions radially over 360.degree. and the cylindrical target is thus irradiated by ions over its entire circumference. The plasma generator and target may be as long as desired. The plasma generator may be in the center and the neutron target on the outside, or the plasma generator may be on the outside and the target on the inside. In a nested configuration, several concentric targets and plasma generating regions are nested to increase the neutron flux.

  19. Cylindrical neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2005-06-14

    A cylindrical neutron generator is formed with a coaxial RF-driven plasma ion source and target. A deuterium (or deuterium and tritium) plasma is produced by RF excitation in a cylindrical plasma ion generator using an RF antenna. A cylindrical neutron generating target is coaxial with the ion generator, separated by plasma and extraction electrodes which contain many slots. The plasma generator emanates ions radially over 360.degree. and the cylindrical target is thus irradiated by ions over its entire circumference. The plasma generator and target may be as long as desired. The plasma generator may be in the center and the neutron target on the outside, or the plasma generator may be on the outside and the target on the inside. In a nested configuration, several concentric targets and plasma generating regions are nested to increase the neutron flux.

  20. Cylindrical neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2009-12-29

    A cylindrical neutron generator is formed with a coaxial RF-driven plasma ion source and target. A deuterium (or deuterium and tritium) plasma is produced by RF excitation in a cylindrical plasma ion generator using an RF antenna. A cylindrical neutron generating target is coaxial with the ion generator, separated by plasma and extraction electrodes which contain many slots. The plasma generator emanates ions radially over 360.degree. and the cylindrical target is thus irradiated by ions over its entire circumference. The plasma generator and target may be as long as desired. The plasma generator may be in the center and the neutron target on the outside, or the plasma generator may be on the outside and the target on the inside. In a nested configuration, several concentric targets and plasma generating regions are nested to increase the neutron flux.

  1. Cylindrically symmetric wormholes

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhfittig, Peter K.F.

    2005-05-15

    This paper discusses traversable wormholes that differ slightly but significantly from those of the Morris-Thorne type under the assumption of cylindrical symmetry. The throat is a piecewise smooth cylindrical surface resulting in a shape function that is not differentiable at some value. It is proposed that the regular derivative be replaced by a one-sided derivative at this value. The resulting wormhole geometry satisfies the weak energy condition.

  2. Study of the Multiwire X-Pinch as a Load for Mega-Ampere-Range Pulsed Power Generators

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinin, Yu.; Anan'ev, S.; Bakshaev, Yu.; Blinov, P.; Bryzgunov, V.; Chernenko, A.; Danko, S.; Kazakov, E.; Kingsep, A.; Korolev, V.; Mizhiritsky, V.; Smirnov, V.; Zelenin, A.; Pikuz, S.; Shelkovenko, T.; Tkachenko, S.

    2009-01-21

    We present the results of experimental study of the dynamics of plasma formations originated from the high-current multiwire X-pinch (the current value up to 2.3 MA) based on the wires of different thicknesses made of different materials.

  3. Coincidence Proportional Counter

    DOEpatents

    Manley, J H

    1950-11-21

    A coincidence proportional counter having a plurality of collecting electrodes so disposed as to measure the range or energy spectrum of an ionizing particle-emitting source such as an alpha source, is disclosed.

  4. Adaptation through proportion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Liyang; Shi, Wenjia; Tang, Chao

    2016-08-01

    Adaptation is a ubiquitous feature in biological sensory and signaling networks. It has been suggested that adaptive systems may follow certain simple design principles across diverse organisms, cells and pathways. One class of networks that can achieve adaptation utilizes an incoherent feedforward control, in which two parallel signaling branches exert opposite but proportional effects on the output at steady state. In this paper, we generalize this adaptation mechanism by establishing a steady-state proportionality relationship among a subset of nodes in a network. Adaptation can be achieved by using any two nodes in the sub-network to respectively regulate the output node positively and negatively. We focus on enzyme networks and first identify basic regulation motifs consisting of two and three nodes that can be used to build small networks with proportional relationships. Larger proportional networks can then be constructed modularly similar to LEGOs. Our method provides a general framework to construct and analyze a class of proportional and/or adaptation networks with arbitrary size, flexibility and versatile functional features.

  5. Keep It in Proportion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snider, Richard G.

    1985-01-01

    The ratio factors approach involves recognizing a given fraction, then multiplying so that units cancel. This approach, which is grounded in concrete operational thinking patterns, provides a standard for science ratio and proportion problems. Examples are included for unit conversions, mole problems, molarity, speed/density problems, and…

  6. Microfabricated cylindrical ion trap

    DOEpatents

    Blain, Matthew G.

    2005-03-22

    A microscale cylindrical ion trap, having an inner radius of order one micron, can be fabricated using surface micromachining techniques and materials known to the integrated circuits manufacturing and microelectromechanical systems industries. Micromachining methods enable batch fabrication, reduced manufacturing costs, dimensional and positional precision, and monolithic integration of massive arrays of ion traps with microscale ion generation and detection devices. Massive arraying enables the microscale cylindrical ion trap to retain the resolution, sensitivity, and mass range advantages necessary for high chemical selectivity. The microscale CIT has a reduced ion mean free path, allowing operation at higher pressures with less expensive and less bulky vacuum pumping system, and with lower battery power than conventional- and miniature-sized ion traps. The reduced electrode voltage enables integration of the microscale cylindrical ion trap with on-chip integrated circuit-based rf operation and detection electronics (i.e., cell phone electronics). Therefore, the full performance advantages of microscale cylindrical ion traps can be realized in truly field portable, handheld microanalysis systems.

  7. Examining Cylindrical Dice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Dustin L.

    2009-01-01

    The author describes an activity where prospective mathematics teachers made hypotheses about the dimensions of a fair cylindrical die and conducted experiments with different cylinders. He also provides a model that estimates the probability that a cylinder would land on the lateral surface, depending on the height and diameter of the cylinder.…

  8. Static cylindrical matter shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arık, Metin; Delice, Özgür

    2005-08-01

    Static cylindrical shells composed of massive particles arising from matching of two different Levi-Civita space-times are studied for the shell satisfying either an isotropic or an anisotropic equation of state. We find that these solutions satisfy the energy conditions for certain ranges of the parameters.

  9. Monitor proportional counter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, M. C.

    1979-01-01

    An Uhuru class Ar-CO2 gas filled proportional counter sealed with a 1.5 mil beryllium window and sensitive to X-rays in the energy bandwidth from 1.5 to 22 keV is presented. This device is coaligned with the X-ray telescope aboard the Einstein Observatory and takes data as a normal part of the Observatory operations.

  10. Development of low-pressure multi-wire drift chambers for high-resolution spectroscopy with radioactive isotope beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miya, H.; Ota, S.; Fujii, T.; Kawase, S.; Kubota, Y.; Lee, C. S.; Matsubara, H.; Miki, K.; Saito, A.; Michimasa, S.; Uesaka, T.; Sakai, H.; Shimoura, S.

    2013-12-01

    Low-pressure multi-wire drift chambers have been developed to track high-intensity radioactive isotope beams at the energies of around 200 MeV/nucleon. In order to minimize the effect of multiple scattering by radioactive isotope beam, the thickness of the detectors were minimized by using isobutane gas at low pressure (10 kPa). The performance of the position resolution, the tracking efficiency, and the beam intensity capability were evaluated as a function of atomic number and applied voltage. As a result, an overall position resolution of 300 μm was achieved for radioactive isotope beams with an intensity of 1 MHz. The details of the design specifications and performances of the low-pressure multi-wire drift chambers are described.

  11. Static cylindrically symmetric spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fjällborg, Mikael

    2007-05-01

    We prove the existence of static solutions to the cylindrically symmetric Einstein Vlasov system, and we show that the matter cylinder has finite extension in two of the three spatial dimensions. The same results are also proved for a quite general class of equations of state for perfect fluids coupled to the Einstein equations, extending the class of equations of state considered by Bicak et al (2004 Class. Quantum Grav.21 1583). We also obtain this result for the Vlasov Poisson system.

  12. Masked Proportional Routing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolpert, David

    2004-01-01

    Masked proportional routing is an improved procedure for choosing links between adjacent nodes of a network for the purpose of transporting an entity from a source node ("A") to a destination node ("B"). The entity could be, for example, a physical object to be shipped, in which case the nodes would represent waypoints and the links would represent roads or other paths between waypoints. For another example, the entity could be a message or packet of data to be transmitted from A to B, in which case the nodes could be computer-controlled switching stations and the links could be communication channels between the stations. In yet another example, an entity could represent a workpiece while links and nodes could represent, respectively, manufacturing processes and stages in the progress of the workpiece towards a finished product. More generally, the nodes could represent states of an entity and the links could represent allowed transitions of the entity. The purpose of masked proportional routing and of related prior routing procedures is to schedule transitions of entities from their initial states ("A") to their final states ("B") in such a manner as to minimize a cost or to attain some other measure of optimality or efficiency. Masked proportional routing follows a distributed (in the sense of decentralized) approach to probabilistically or deterministically choosing the links. It was developed to satisfy a need for a routing procedure that 1. Does not always choose the same link(s), even for two instances characterized by identical estimated values of associated cost functions; 2. Enables a graceful transition from one set of links to another set of links as the circumstances of operation of the network change over time; 3. Is preferably amenable to separate optimization of different portions of the network; 4. Is preferably usable in a network in which some of the routing decisions are made by one or more other procedure(s); 5. Preferably does not cause an

  13. Gated strip proportional detector

    DOEpatents

    Morris, Christopher L.; Idzorek, George C.; Atencio, Leroy G.

    1987-01-01

    A gated strip proportional detector includes a gas tight chamber which encloses a solid ground plane, a wire anode plane, a wire gating plane, and a multiconductor cathode plane. The anode plane amplifies the amount of charge deposited in the chamber by a factor of up to 10.sup.6. The gating plane allows only charge within a narrow strip to reach the cathode. The cathode plane collects the charge allowed to pass through the gating plane on a set of conductors perpendicular to the open-gated region. By scanning the open-gated region across the chamber and reading out the charge collected on the cathode conductors after a suitable integration time for each location of the gate, a two-dimensional image of the intensity of the ionizing radiation incident on the detector can be made.

  14. Gated strip proportional detector

    DOEpatents

    Morris, C.L.; Idzorek, G.C.; Atencio, L.G.

    1985-02-19

    A gated strip proportional detector includes a gas tight chamber which encloses a solid ground plane, a wire anode plane, a wire gating plane, and a multiconductor cathode plane. The anode plane amplifies the amount of charge deposited in the chamber by a factor of up to 10/sup 6/. The gating plane allows only charge within a narrow strip to reach the cathode. The cathode plane collects the charge allowed to pass through the gating plane on a set of conductors perpendicular to the open-gated region. By scanning the open-gated region across the chamber and reading out the charge collected on the cathode conductors after a suitable integration time for each location of the gate, a two-dimensional image of the intensity of the ionizing radiation incident on the detector can be made.

  15. Conformal approach to cylindrical DLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taloni, A.; Caglioti, E.; Loreto, V.; Pietronero, L.

    2006-09-01

    We extend the conformal mapping approach elaborated for the radial diffusion limited aggregation model (DLA) to cylindrical geometry. We introduce in particular a complex function which allows a cylindrical cluster to be grown using as an intermediate step a radial aggregate. The aggregate grown exhibits the same self-affine features as the original cylindrical DLA. The specific choice of the transformation allows us to study the relationship between the radial and the cylindrical geometry. In particular the cylindrical aggregate can be seen as a radial aggregate with particles of size increasing with the radius. On the other hand, the radial aggregate can be seen as a cylindrical aggregate with particles of size decreasing with the height. This framework, which shifts the point of view from the geometry to the size of the particles, can open the way to more quantitative studies on the relationship between radial and cylindrical DLA.

  16. Growing yeast into cylindrical colonies.

    PubMed

    Vulin, Clément; Di Meglio, Jean-Marc; Lindner, Ariel B; Daerr, Adrian; Murray, Andrew; Hersen, Pascal

    2014-05-20

    Microorganisms often form complex multicellular assemblies such as biofilms and colonies. Understanding the interplay between assembly expansion, metabolic yield, and nutrient diffusion within a freely growing colony remains a challenge. Most available data on microorganisms are from planktonic cultures, due to the lack of experimental tools to control the growth of multicellular assemblies. Here, we propose a method to constrain the growth of yeast colonies into simple geometric shapes such as cylinders. To this end, we designed a simple, versatile culture system to control the location of nutrient delivery below a growing colony. Under such culture conditions, yeast colonies grow vertically and only at the locations where nutrients are delivered. Colonies increase in height at a steady growth rate that is inversely proportional to the cylinder radius. We show that the vertical growth rate of cylindrical colonies is not defined by the single-cell division rate, but rather by the colony metabolic yield. This contrasts with cells in liquid culture, in which the single-cell division rate is the only parameter that defines the population growth rate. This method also provides a direct, simple method to estimate the metabolic yield of a colony. Our study further demonstrates the importance of the shape of colonies on setting their expansion. We anticipate that our approach will be a starting point for elaborate studies of the population dynamics, evolution, and ecology of microbial colonies in complex landscapes. PMID:24853750

  17. Recovery of copper from PVC multiwire cable waste by steam gasification.

    PubMed

    Zabłocka-Malicka, Monika; Rutkowski, Piotr; Szczepaniak, Włodzimierz

    2015-12-01

    Screened multiwire, PVC insulated tinned copper cable was gasified with steam at high temperature (HTSG) under atmospheric pressure for recovery of cooper. Gases from the process were additionally equilibrated at 850°C on the bed of calcined clay granules and more than 98% of C+H content in the cable was transformed to non-condensing species. Granules prepared from local clay were generally resistant for chlorination, there was also almost no deposition of metals, Cu and Sn, on the catalytic bed. It was found that 28% of chlorine reacted to form CaCl2, 71% was retained in aqueous condensate and only 0.6% was absorbed in alkaline scrubber. More than 99% of calcium existed in the process solid residue as a mixture of calcium chloride and calcium oxide/hydroxide. PVC and other hydrocarbon constituents were completely removed from the cable sample. Copper was preserved in original form and volatilization of copper species appeared insignificant. Tin was alloying with copper and its volatilization was less than 1%. Fractionation and speciation of metals, chlorine and calcium were discussed on the basis of equilibrium model calculated with HSC Chemistry software. High temperature steam gasification prevents direct use of the air and steam/water is in the process simultaneously gaseous carrier and reagent, which may be recycled together with hydrocarbon condensates.

  18. Recovery of copper from PVC multiwire cable waste by steam gasification.

    PubMed

    Zabłocka-Malicka, Monika; Rutkowski, Piotr; Szczepaniak, Włodzimierz

    2015-12-01

    Screened multiwire, PVC insulated tinned copper cable was gasified with steam at high temperature (HTSG) under atmospheric pressure for recovery of cooper. Gases from the process were additionally equilibrated at 850°C on the bed of calcined clay granules and more than 98% of C+H content in the cable was transformed to non-condensing species. Granules prepared from local clay were generally resistant for chlorination, there was also almost no deposition of metals, Cu and Sn, on the catalytic bed. It was found that 28% of chlorine reacted to form CaCl2, 71% was retained in aqueous condensate and only 0.6% was absorbed in alkaline scrubber. More than 99% of calcium existed in the process solid residue as a mixture of calcium chloride and calcium oxide/hydroxide. PVC and other hydrocarbon constituents were completely removed from the cable sample. Copper was preserved in original form and volatilization of copper species appeared insignificant. Tin was alloying with copper and its volatilization was less than 1%. Fractionation and speciation of metals, chlorine and calcium were discussed on the basis of equilibrium model calculated with HSC Chemistry software. High temperature steam gasification prevents direct use of the air and steam/water is in the process simultaneously gaseous carrier and reagent, which may be recycled together with hydrocarbon condensates. PMID:26282888

  19. The use of polycarbonate in proportional counters

    SciTech Connect

    Trow, M.; Smith, A. )

    1992-01-01

    Proportional counters are relatively sensitive to contamination through outgassing and the range of electrical insulators suitable for use in their manufacture is quite limited. Although small amounts of plastics such as polychlorotrifluoroethylene have been used as feedthroughs, ceramics are most commonly used when sealed counters with long lives are required. Ceramics have poor and widely scattered mechanical properties and the use of a more robust material is often highly desirable. Of particular interest is the use of polymers and this work examines polycarbonate in particular. To investigate its suitability in terms of outgassing a simple cylindrical, single anode proportional counter containing a large sample of polycarbonate was baked at {similar to}100 {degree}C and filled with a CO{sub 2}/Ar/Xe mixture (5:47.5:47.5 by pressure, respectively). Subsequent measurements of the counter indicated an increase in gain, which, after a second similar filling, was identified to be associated with a preferential loss of CO{sub 2} to the polycarbonate. The consequences of this result and the circumstances under which polycarbonate could be used on a large scale in the construction of proportional counters are discussed.

  20. Cylindrical geometry hall thruster

    DOEpatents

    Raitses, Yevgeny; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method for thrusting plasma, utilizing a Hall thruster with a cylindrical geometry, wherein ions are accelerated in substantially the axial direction. The apparatus is suitable for operation at low power. It employs small size thruster components, including a ceramic channel, with the center pole piece of the conventional annular design thruster eliminated or greatly reduced. Efficient operation is accomplished through magnetic fields with a substantial radial component. The propellant gas is ionized at an optimal location in the thruster. A further improvement is accomplished by segmented electrodes, which produce localized voltage drops within the thruster at optimally prescribed locations. The apparatus differs from a conventional Hall thruster, which has an annular geometry, not well suited to scaling to small size, because the small size for an annular design has a great deal of surface area relative to the volume.

  1. Visual Manipulatives for Proportional Reasoning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Joyce L.; Schwartz, Daniel L.

    The use of a visual representation in learning about proportional relations was studied, examining students' understandings of the invariance of a multiplicative relation on both sides of a proportion equation and the invariance of the structural relations that exist in different semantic types of proportion problems. Subjects were 49 high-ability…

  2. Wide-range neutron spectrometer on gas proportional counters

    SciTech Connect

    Shvetsov, A.M.; Fomushkin, E.F.

    1994-12-31

    A neutron spectrometer with four cylindrical gas proportional counters was developed, produced and tested in VNIIEF. Active lengths of the counters are concentrated in the range of {approximately}10-100 cm, while the diameters - in the range of {approximately}2-8 cm. Hydrogen, methane, argon, krypton and {sup 3}He were used as working gases. Energy range of the spectrometer constitutes {approximately}0.01

  3. Quench gases for xenon- (and krypton-) filled proportional counters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, B. D.; Agrawal, P. C.

    1988-01-01

    Xenon-filled proportional counters are used extensively in astronomy, particularly in the hard X-ray region. The choice of quench gas can have a significant effect on the operating characteristics of the instrument although the data necessary to make the choice are not easily obtainable. Results which detail the performance obtained from both cylindrical and parallel field geometries for a wide variety of readily available, ultrahigh or research grade purity, quench gases are presented.

  4. Stage Cylindrical Immersive Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abramyan, Lucy; Norris, Jeffrey S.; Powell, Mark W.; Mittman, David S.; Shams, Khawaja S.

    2011-01-01

    Panoramic images with a wide field of view intend to provide a better understanding of an environment by placing objects of the environment on one seamless image. However, understanding the sizes and relative positions of the objects in a panorama is not intuitive and prone to errors because the field of view is unnatural to human perception. Scientists are often faced with the difficult task of interpreting the sizes and relative positions of objects in an environment when viewing an image of the environment on computer monitors or prints. A panorama can display an object that appears to be to the right of the viewer when it is, in fact, behind the viewer. This misinterpretation can be very costly, especially when the environment is remote and/or only accessible by unmanned vehicles. A 270 cylindrical display has been developed that surrounds the viewer with carefully calibrated panoramic imagery that correctly engages their natural kinesthetic senses and provides a more accurate awareness of the environment. The cylindrical immersive display offers a more natural window to the environment than a standard cubic CAVE (Cave Automatic Virtual Environment), and the geometry allows multiple collocated users to simultaneously view data and share important decision-making tasks. A CAVE is an immersive virtual reality environment that allows one or more users to absorb themselves in a virtual environment. A common CAVE setup is a room-sized cube where the cube sides act as projection planes. By nature, all cubic CAVEs face a problem with edge matching at edges and corners of the display. Modern immersive displays have found ways to minimize seams by creating very tight edges, and rely on the user to ignore the seam. One significant deficiency of flat-walled CAVEs is that the sense of orientation and perspective within the scene is broken across adjacent walls. On any single wall, parallel lines properly converge at their vanishing point as they should, and the sense of

  5. Shearfree cylindrical gravitational collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Di Prisco, A.; Herrera, L.; MacCallum, M. A. H.; Santos, N. O.

    2009-09-15

    We consider diagonal cylindrically symmetric metrics, with an interior representing a general nonrotating fluid with anisotropic pressures. An exterior vacuum Einstein-Rosen spacetime is matched to this using Darmois matching conditions. We show that the matching conditions can be explicitly solved for the boundary values of metric components and their derivatives, either for the interior or exterior. Specializing to shearfree interiors, a static exterior can only be matched to a static interior, and the evolution in the nonstatic case is found to be given in general by an elliptic function of time. For a collapsing shearfree isotropic fluid, only a Robertson-Walker dust interior is possible, and we show that all such cases were included in Cocke's discussion. For these metrics, Nolan and Nolan have shown that the matching breaks down before collapse is complete, and Tod and Mena have shown that the spacetime is not asymptotically flat in the sense of Berger, Chrusciel, and Moncrief. The issues about energy that then arise are revisited, and it is shown that the exterior is not in an intrinsic gravitational or superenergy radiative state at the boundary.

  6. Optimization of Cylindrical Hall Thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Yevgeny Raitses, Artem Smirnov, Erik Granstedt, and Nathaniel J. Fi

    2007-07-24

    The cylindrical Hall thruster features high ionization efficiency, quiet operation, and ion acceleration in a large volume-to-surface ratio channel with performance comparable with the state-of-the-art annular Hall thrusters. These characteristics were demonstrated in low and medium power ranges. Optimization of miniaturized cylindrical thrusters led to performance improvements in the 50-200W input power range, including plume narrowing, increased thruster efficiency, reliable discharge initiation, and stable operation. __________________________________________________

  7. Optimization of Cylindrical Hall Thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Yevgeny Raitses, Artem Smirnov, Erik Granstedt, and Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2007-11-27

    The cylindrical Hall thruster features high ionization efficiency, quiet operation, and ion acceleration in a large volume-to-surface ratio channel with performance comparable with the state-of-the-art annular Hall thrusters. These characteristics were demonstrated in low and medium power ranges. Optimization of miniaturized cylindrical thrusters led to performance improvements in the 50-200W input power range, including plume narrowing, increased thruster efficiency, reliable discharge initiation, and stable operation.

  8. Multiple Ways to Solve Proportions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ercole, Leslie K.; Frantz, Marny; Ashline, George

    2011-01-01

    When solving problems involving proportions, students may intuitively draw on strategies that connect to their understanding of fractions, decimals, and percents. These two statements--"Instruction in solving proportions should include methods that have a strong intuitive basis" and "Teachers should begin instruction with more intuitive…

  9. Adhesive contact of cylindrical lens and a flat sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhury, Manoj K.; Weaver, Timothy; Hui, C. Y.; Kramer, E. J.

    1996-07-01

    Methods are developed to estimate the adhesion and surface free energies of compliant materials from the contact deformations of cylindrical lenses with flat sheets. Some important differences are found between the cylindrical contact studied here and the widely studied geometry of spherical contact. For example, while the pull-off force is completely independent of the elastic constants (K) of the materials for spherical contacts, the pull-off force for cylindrical contact is proportional to K1/3. Furthermore, for cylindrical contacts the contact width at separation reaches to a value of 39% of the width (a0) at zero load, whereas the corresponding value is 0.63a0 for spherical contact. The feasibility of using cylindrical contacts to estimate the surface and adhesive energies of polymers was investigated using elastomeric polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) as a model system. PDMS was used in two ways: (1) unmodified and (2) with its surface hydrolyzed with dilute hydrochloric acid. Significant hysteresis of adhesion was observed with the hydrolyzed PDMS surfaces due to H-bonding interactions, which appeared to depend on normal stress.

  10. Front-end electronics and data acquisition system for a multi-wire 3D gas tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łojek, K.; Rozpȩdzik, D.; Bodek, K.; Perkowski, M.; Severijns, N.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the design and implementation of the front-end electronics and the data acquisition (DAQ) system for readout of multi-wire drift chambers (MWDC). Apart of the conventional drift time measurement the system delivers the hit position along the wire utilizing the charge division technique. The system consists of preamplifiers, and analog and digital boards sending data to a back-end computer via an Ethernet interface. The data logging software formats the received data and enables an easy access to the data analysis software. The use of specially designed preamplifiers and peak detectors allows the charge-division readout of the low resistance signal wire. The implication of the charge-division circuitry onto the drift time measurement was studied and the overall performance of the electronic system was evaluated in dedicated off-line tests.

  11. Proportional smile design using the recurring esthetic dental (red) proportion.

    PubMed

    Ward, D H

    2001-01-01

    Dentists have needed an objective way in which to evaluate a smile. A method for determining the ideal size and position of the anterior teeth has been presented here. Use of the FIVE to evaluate the RED proportion and the width-to-height ratio, tempered with sound clinical judgment, gives pleasing and consistent results. With the diversity that exists in nature, rarely does the final result follow all the mathematical rules of proportional smile design. This approach may serve as a foundation on which to base initial smile design, however. When one begins to understand the relationship between beauty, mathematics, and the surrounding world, one begins to appreciate their interdependence.

  12. Cylindrical acoustic levitator/concentrator

    DOEpatents

    Kaduchak, Gregory; Sinha, Dipen N.

    2002-01-01

    A low-power, inexpensive acoustic apparatus for levitation and/or concentration of aerosols and small liquid/solid samples having particulates up to several millimeters in diameter in air or other fluids is described. It is constructed from a commercially available, hollow cylindrical piezoelectric crystal which has been modified to tune the resonance frequency of the breathing mode resonance of the crystal to that of the interior cavity of the cylinder. When the resonance frequency of the interior cylindrical cavity is matched to the breathing mode resonance of the cylindrical piezoelectric transducer, the acoustic efficiency for establishing a standing wave pattern in the cavity is high. The cylinder does not require accurate alignment of a resonant cavity. Water droplets having diameters greater than 1 mm have been levitated against the force of gravity using; less than 1 W of input electrical power. Concentration of aerosol particles in air is also demonstrated.

  13. Bayesian inference on proportional elections.

    PubMed

    Brunello, Gabriel Hideki Vatanabe; Nakano, Eduardo Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Polls for majoritarian voting systems usually show estimates of the percentage of votes for each candidate. However, proportional vote systems do not necessarily guarantee the candidate with the most percentage of votes will be elected. Thus, traditional methods used in majoritarian elections cannot be applied on proportional elections. In this context, the purpose of this paper was to perform a Bayesian inference on proportional elections considering the Brazilian system of seats distribution. More specifically, a methodology to answer the probability that a given party will have representation on the chamber of deputies was developed. Inferences were made on a Bayesian scenario using the Monte Carlo simulation technique, and the developed methodology was applied on data from the Brazilian elections for Members of the Legislative Assembly and Federal Chamber of Deputies in 2010. A performance rate was also presented to evaluate the efficiency of the methodology. Calculations and simulations were carried out using the free R statistical software.

  14. Bayesian Inference on Proportional Elections

    PubMed Central

    Brunello, Gabriel Hideki Vatanabe; Nakano, Eduardo Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Polls for majoritarian voting systems usually show estimates of the percentage of votes for each candidate. However, proportional vote systems do not necessarily guarantee the candidate with the most percentage of votes will be elected. Thus, traditional methods used in majoritarian elections cannot be applied on proportional elections. In this context, the purpose of this paper was to perform a Bayesian inference on proportional elections considering the Brazilian system of seats distribution. More specifically, a methodology to answer the probability that a given party will have representation on the chamber of deputies was developed. Inferences were made on a Bayesian scenario using the Monte Carlo simulation technique, and the developed methodology was applied on data from the Brazilian elections for Members of the Legislative Assembly and Federal Chamber of Deputies in 2010. A performance rate was also presented to evaluate the efficiency of the methodology. Calculations and simulations were carried out using the free R statistical software. PMID:25786259

  15. Telescoping cylindrical piezoelectric fiber composite actuator assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Sidney G. (Inventor); Shams, Qamar A. (Inventor); Fox, Robert L. (Inventor); Fox, legal representative, Christopher L. (Inventor); Fox Chattin, legal representative, Melanie L. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A telescoping actuator assembly includes a plurality of cylindrical actuators in a concentric arrangement. Each cylindrical actuator is at least one piezoelectric fiber composite actuator having a plurality of piezoelectric fibers extending parallel to one another and to the concentric arrangement's longitudinal axis. Each cylindrical actuator is coupled to concentrically-adjacent ones of the cylindrical actuators such that the plurality of cylindrical actuators can experience telescopic movement. An electrical energy source coupled to the cylindrical actuators applies actuation energy thereto to generate the telescopic movement.

  16. Optics Demonstrations Using Cylindrical Lenses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivanov, Dragia; Nikolov, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we consider the main properties of cylindrical lenses and propose several demonstrational experiments that can be performed with them. Specifically we use simple glasses full of water to demonstrate some basic geometrical optics principles and phenomena. We also present some less standard experiments that can be performed with such…

  17. Notes on static cylindrical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bicák, J.; Zofka, M.

    2002-07-01

    Static cylindrical shells made of various types of matter are studied as sources of the vacuum Levi-Civita metrics. Their internal physical properties are related to the two essential parameters of the metrics outside. The total mass per unit length of the cylinders is always less than ¼. The results are illustrated by a number of figures.

  18. Proportional Reasoning with a Pyramid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mamolo, Ami; Sinclair, Margaret; Whiteley, Walter J.

    2011-01-01

    Proportional reasoning pops up in math class in a variety of places, such as while making scaled drawings; finding equivalent fractions; converting units of measurement; comparing speeds, prices, and rates; and comparing lengths, areas, and volume. Students need to be exposed to a variety of representations to develop a sound understanding of this…

  19. Proportional Hazards Models of Graduation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chimka, Justin R.; Reed-Rhoads, Teri; Barker, Kash

    2008-01-01

    Survival analysis is a statistical tool used to describe the duration between events. Many processes in medical research, engineering, and economics can be described using survival analysis techniques. This research involves studying engineering college student graduation using Cox proportional hazards models. Among male students with American…

  20. Social Justice and Proportional Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simic-Muller, Ksenija

    2015-01-01

    Ratio and proportional reasoning tasks abound that have connections to real-world situations. Examples in this article demonstrate how textbook tasks can easily be transformed into authentic real-world problems that shed light on issues of equity and fairness, such as population growth and crime rates. A few ideas are presented on how teachers can…

  1. Saving Money Using Proportional Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de la Cruz, Jessica A.; Garney, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    It is beneficial for students to discover intuitive strategies, as opposed to the teacher presenting strategies to them. Certain proportional reasoning tasks are more likely to elicit intuitive strategies than other tasks. The strategies that students are apt to use when approaching a task, as well as the likelihood of a student's success or…

  2. What is proportional reasoning, anyway?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subero, Keron; Kanim, Stephen

    2007-10-01

    There appears to be a correlation between some measures of scientific reasoning skills and gain on conceptual measures of student understanding of introductory physics such as the Force Concept Inventory. At NMSU, we have established a correlation between pretest scores on proportional reasoning tasks and student performance on conceptual post-tests in the introductory lab. Proponents of a Piagetian model of cognitive development would call these scientific reasoning skills `operational capacities'' that signal the last transition in human intellectual growth from ``Concrete Operational'' to ``Formal'' reasoning. Seen in this light, the correlations described above suggest a cognitive ``deficit'' associated with development. We are exploring the possibility that proportional reasoning may in fact be a blanket term to describe many smaller elements of skills which students often seem to lack. In this talk, I will present some initial results from our investigation.

  3. Some advances towards a better understanding of wave propagation in civil engineering multiwires trands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laguerre, L.; Treyssede, F.

    Steel members of civil engineering structures undergo degradations mainly due to corrosion and mechanical fatigue. In this context, non-destructive inspection techniques using mechanical guided waves have potential to monitor these structures. Even if wave propagation is not yet fully understood in these structures, useful results can be derived for inspection methodology by using wave modeling in cylindrical waveguide, embedded or not. However, further improvement can be expected from the development of wave propagation simulation tools for real-life structures. Indeed, several difficulties arise in the understanding of guided ultrasonic waves in such structures, partly due to the helical geometry and the inter-wire coupling effects. Moreover, these structures are pre-stressed and can be free or embedded in solid material. This paper shows some recent research results at LCPC. A first part deals with experimental results on the guided wave propagation in a commonly used steel member, the seven wire strand (i.e one straight single cylindrical wire surrounded by six helical wires). The second part aims at numerically investigating the propagation of elastic waves in free helical waveguides. A numerical method is chosen based on a semi-analytical finite element technique that relies on a specific non-orthogonal curvilinear coordinate system. This system is shown to be translationally invariant along the helix centerline so that a spatial Fourier transform can be explicitly performed along the axis to reduce the problem to two dimensions. The method can thus readily be used for the analysis of helical structures by considering the special case of no curvature. Results for single straight and helical wires are first computed. A dispersion analysis for a seven wire strand with simplified contact conditions is then performed.

  4. Some advances towards a better understanding of wave propagation in civil engineering multi-wire strands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laguerre, L.; Treyssede, F.

    Steel members of civil engineering structures undergo degradations mainly due to corrosion and mechanical fatigue. In this context, non-destructive inspection techniques using mechanical guided waves have potential to monitor these structures. Even if wave propagation is not yet fully understood in these structures, useful results can be derived for inspection methodology by using wave modeling in cylindrical waveguide, embedded or not. However, further improvement can be expected from the development of wave propagation simulation tools for real-life structures. Indeed, several difficulties arise in the understanding of guided ultrasonic waves in such structures, partly due to the helical geometry and the inter-wire coupling effects. Moreover, these structures are pre-stressed and can be free or embedded in solid material. This paper shows some recent research results at LCPC. A first part deals with experimental results on the guided wave propagation in a commonly used steel member, the seven wire strand (i.e one straight single cylindrical wire surrounded by six helical wires). The second part aims at numerically investigating the propagation of elastic waves in free helical waveguides. A numerical method is chosen based on a semi-analytical finite element technique that relies on a specific non-orthogonal curvilinear coordinate system. This system is shown to be translationally invariant along the helix centerline so that a spatial Fourier transform can be explicitly performed along the axis to reduce the problem to two dimensions. The method can thus readily be used for the analysis of helical structures by considering the special case of no curvature. Results for single straight and helical wires are first computed. A dispersion analysis for a seven wire strand with simplified contact conditions is then performed.

  5. Cylindrical magnets and ideal solenoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derby, Norman; Olbert, Stanislaw

    2010-03-01

    Both wire-wound solenoids and cylindrical magnets can be approximated as ideal azimuthally symmetric solenoids. We present an exact solution for the magnetic field of an ideal solenoid in an easy to use form. The field is expressed in terms of a single function that can be rapidly computed by means of a compact efficient algorithm, which can be coded as an add-in function to a spreadsheet, making field calculations accessible to introductory students. These expressions are not only accurate but are also as fast as most approximate expressions. We demonstrate their utility by simulating the dropping of a cylindrical magnet through a nonmagnetic conducting tube and comparing the calculation with data obtained from experiments suitable for an undergraduate laboratory.

  6. Dynamics of tilted cylindrical geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif, M.; Sadiq, Sobia

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we study the dynamics of tilted cylindrical model with imperfect matter distribution. We formulate the field equations and develop relations between tilted and non-tilted variables. We evaluate kinematical as well as dynamical quantities and discuss the inhomogeneity factor. We also obtain the Raychaudhuri equation to study evolution of expansion scalar. The solutions of field equations are also investigated for static cylinder under isotropy and conformally flat condition. Finally, we analyze some thermoinertial aspects of the system.

  7. Cylindrical Piezoelectric Fiber Composite Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Sidney G.; Shams, Qamar A.; Fox, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    The use of piezoelectric devices has become widespread since Pierre and Jacques Curie discovered the piezoelectric effect in 1880. Examples of current applications of piezoelectric devices include ultrasonic transducers, micro-positioning devices, buzzers, strain sensors, and clocks. The invention of such lightweight, relatively inexpensive piezoceramic-fiber-composite actuators as macro fiber composite (MFC) actuators has made it possible to obtain strains and displacements greater than those that could be generated by prior actuators based on monolithic piezoceramic sheet materials. MFC actuators are flat, flexible actuators designed for bonding to structures to apply or detect strains. Bonding multiple layers of MFC actuators together could increase force capability, but not strain or displacement capability. Cylindrical piezoelectric fiber composite (CPFC) actuators have been invented as alternatives to MFC actuators for applications in which greater forces and/or strains or displacements may be required. In essence, a CPFC actuator is an MFC or other piezoceramic fiber composite actuator fabricated in a cylindrical instead of its conventional flat shape. Cylindrical is used here in the general sense, encompassing shapes that can have circular, elliptical, rectangular or other cross-sectional shapes in the planes perpendicular to their longitudinal axes.

  8. Photodetectors for Scintillator Proportionality Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, William W.; Choong, Woon-Seng; Hull, Giulia; Payne, Steve; Cherepy, Nerine; Valentine, J.D.

    2010-10-18

    We evaluate photodetectors for use in a Compton Coincidence apparatus designed for measuring scintillator proportionality. There are many requirements placed on the photodetector in these systems, including active area, linearity, and the ability to accurately measure low light levels (which implies high quantum efficiency and high signal-to-noise ratio). Through a combination of measurement and Monte Carlo simulation, we evaluate a number of potential photodetectors, especially photomultiplier tubes and hybrid photodetectors. Of these, we find that the most promising devices available are photomultiplier tubes with high ({approx}50%) quantum efficiency, although hybrid photodetectors with high quantum efficiency would be preferable.

  9. Incisors’ proportions in smile esthetics

    PubMed Central

    Alsulaimani, Fahad F; Batwa, Waeil

    2013-01-01

    Aims: To determine whether alteration of the maxillary central and lateral incisors’ length and width, respectively, would affect perceived smile esthetics and to validate the most esthetic length and width, respectively, for the central and lateral incisors. Materials and Methods: Photographic manipulation was undertaken to produce two sets of photographs, each set of four photographs showing the altered width of the lateral incisor and length of the central length. The eight produced photographs were assessed by laypeople, dentists and orthodontists. Results: Alteration in the incisors’ proportion affected the relative smile attractiveness for laypeople (n=124), dentists (n=115) and orthodontists (n=68); dentists and orthodontists did not accept lateral width reduction of more than 0.5 mm (P<0.01), which suggests that the lateral to central incisor width ratio ranges from 54% to 62%. However, laypeople did not accept lateral width reduction of more than 1 mm (P<0.01), widening the range to be from 48% to 62%. All groups had zero tolerance for changes in central crown length (P<0.01). Conclusion: All participants recognized that the central incisors’ length changes. For lateral incisors, laypeople were more tolerant than dentists and orthodontists. This suggests that changing incisors’ proportions affects the relative smile attractiveness. PMID:24987650

  10. Supercooling Water in Cylindrical Capsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman, J. J. Milón; Braga, S. L.

    2005-11-01

    An experimental apparatus was developed to investigate the supercooling phenomenon of water inside cylindrical capsules used for a cold storage process. The coolant is a water-alcohol mixture controlled by a constant temperature bath (CTB). Temperatures varying with time are measured inside and outside the capsule. Cylinders with an internal diameter and thickness of 45 and 1.5 mm, respectively, were made from four different materials: acrylic, PVC, brass, and aluminum. The supercooling period of the water and the nucleation temperature were investigated for different coolant temperatures. The supercooling and nucleation probabilities are shown as a function of the coolant temperature for the four different materials.

  11. Multi-stable cylindrical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirrera, Alberto; Lachenal, Xavier; Daynes, Stephen; Weaver, Paul M.; Chenchiah, Isaac V.

    2013-11-01

    We present a cylindrical lattice structure that mimics the behaviour of the virus bacteriophage T4 in having two (or more) stable states which differ in their radii and length. While the virus achieves bistability through molecular mechanisms we use composite materials to exploit the interplay between pre-stress, material properties and structural geometry. We demonstrate (computationally) that multi-stability is a robust phenomenon. We also show (analytically) that it is possible to choose the design variables so that the energy is independent of the radius, thus resulting in every state of the structure being stable.

  12. Loads for pulsed power cylindrical implosion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, W.E.; Armijo, E.V.; Barthell, B.L.; Bartos, J.J.; Bush, H.; Foreman, L.R.; Garcia, F.P.; Gobby, P.L.; Gomez, V.M.; Gurule, V.A.

    1994-07-01

    Pulse power can be used to generate high energy density conditions in convergent hollow cylindrical geometry through the use of appropriate electrode configuration and cylindrical loads. Cylindrically symmetric experiments are conducted with the Pegasus-H inductive store, capacitor energized pulse power facility at Los Alamos using both precision machined cylindrical liner loads and low mass vapor deposited cylindrical foil loads. The liner experiments investigate solid density hydrodynamic topics. Foil loads vaporize from Joule heating to generate an imploding cylindrical plasma which can be used to simulate some fluxes associated with fusion energy processes. Similar experiments are conducted with {open_quotes}Procyon{close_quotes} inductive store pulse power assemblies energized by explosively driven magnetic flux compression.

  13. Models of cylindrical bubble pulsation

    PubMed Central

    Ilinskii, Yurii A.; Zabolotskaya, Evgenia A.; Hay, Todd A.; Hamilton, Mark F.

    2012-01-01

    Three models are considered for describing the dynamics of a pulsating cylindrical bubble. A linear solution is derived for a cylindrical bubble in an infinite compressible liquid. The solution accounts for losses due to viscosity, heat conduction, and acoustic radiation. It reveals that radiation is the dominant loss mechanism, and that it is 22 times greater than for a spherical bubble of the same radius. The predicted resonance frequency provides a basis of comparison for limiting forms of other models. The second model considered is a commonly used equation in Rayleigh-Plesset form that requires an incompressible liquid to be finite in extent in order for bubble pulsation to occur. The radial extent of the liquid becomes a fitting parameter, and it is found that considerably different values of the parameter are required for modeling inertial motion versus acoustical oscillations. The third model was developed by V. K. Kedrinskii [Hydrodynamics of Explosion (Springer, New York, 2005), pp. 23–26] in the form of the Gilmore equation for compressible liquids of infinite extent. While the correct resonance frequency and loss factor are not recovered from this model in the linear approximation, it provides reasonable agreement with observations of inertial motion. PMID:22978863

  14. Challenging the principle of proportionality.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Anna-Karin Margareta

    2016-04-01

    The first objective of this article is to examine one aspect of the principle of proportionality (PP) as advanced by Alan Gewirth in his 1978 bookReason and Morality Gewirth claims that being capable of exercising agency to some minimal degree is a property that justifies having at least prima facie rights not to get killed. However, according to the PP, before the being possesses the capacity for exercising agency to that minimal degree, the extent of her rights depends on to what extent she approaches possession of agential capacities. One interpretation of PP holds that variations in degree of possession of the physical constitution necessary to exercise agency are morally relevant. The other interpretation holds that only variations in degree of actual mental capacity are morally relevant. The first of these interpretations is vastly more problematic than the other. The second objective is to argue that according to the most plausible interpretation of the PP, the fetus' level of development before at least the 20th week of pregnancy does not affect the fetus' moral rights status. I then suggest that my argument is not restricted to such fetuses, although extending my argument to more developed fetuses requires caution. PMID:26839114

  15. Propagation Mechanism of Cylindrical Cellular Detonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wen-Hu; Wang, Cheng; Ning, Jian-Guo

    2012-10-01

    We investigate the evolution of cylindrical cellular detonation with different instabilities. The numerical results show that with decreasing initial temperature, detonation becomes more unstable and the cells of the cylindrical detonation tend to be irregular. For stable detonation, a divergence of cylindrical detonation cells is formed eventually due to detonation instability resulting from a curved detonation front. For mildly unstable detonation, local overdriven detonation occurs. The detonation cell diverges and its size decreases. For highly unstable detonation, locally driven detonation is more obvious and the front is highly wrinkled. As a result, the diverging cylindrical detonation cell becomes highly irregular.

  16. Converging cylindrical shocks in ideal magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Pullin, D. I.; Mostert, W.; Wheatley, V.; Samtaney, R.

    2014-09-15

    We consider a cylindrically symmetrical shock converging onto an axis within the framework of ideal, compressible-gas non-dissipative magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). In cylindrical polar co-ordinates we restrict attention to either constant axial magnetic field or to the azimuthal but singular magnetic field produced by a line current on the axis. Under the constraint of zero normal magnetic field and zero tangential fluid speed at the shock, a set of restricted shock-jump conditions are obtained as functions of the shock Mach number, defined as the ratio of the local shock speed to the unique magnetohydrodynamic wave speed ahead of the shock, and also of a parameter measuring the local strength of the magnetic field. For the line current case, two approaches are explored and the results compared in detail. The first is geometrical shock-dynamics where the restricted shock-jump conditions are applied directly to the equation on the characteristic entering the shock from behind. This gives an ordinary-differential equation for the shock Mach number as a function of radius which is integrated numerically to provide profiles of the shock implosion. Also, analytic, asymptotic results are obtained for the shock trajectory at small radius. The second approach is direct numerical solution of the radially symmetric MHD equations using a shock-capturing method. For the axial magnetic field case the shock implosion is of the Guderley power-law type with exponent that is not affected by the presence of a finite magnetic field. For the axial current case, however, the presence of a tangential magnetic field ahead of the shock with strength inversely proportional to radius introduces a length scale R=√(μ{sub 0}/p{sub 0}) I/(2 π) where I is the current, μ{sub 0} is the permeability, and p{sub 0} is the pressure ahead of the shock. For shocks initiated at r ≫ R, shock convergence is first accompanied by shock strengthening as for the strictly gas-dynamic implosion. The

  17. Converging cylindrical shocks in ideal magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullin, D. I.; Mostert, W.; Wheatley, V.; Samtaney, R.

    2014-09-01

    We consider a cylindrically symmetrical shock converging onto an axis within the framework of ideal, compressible-gas non-dissipative magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). In cylindrical polar co-ordinates we restrict attention to either constant axial magnetic field or to the azimuthal but singular magnetic field produced by a line current on the axis. Under the constraint of zero normal magnetic field and zero tangential fluid speed at the shock, a set of restricted shock-jump conditions are obtained as functions of the shock Mach number, defined as the ratio of the local shock speed to the unique magnetohydrodynamic wave speed ahead of the shock, and also of a parameter measuring the local strength of the magnetic field. For the line current case, two approaches are explored and the results compared in detail. The first is geometrical shock-dynamics where the restricted shock-jump conditions are applied directly to the equation on the characteristic entering the shock from behind. This gives an ordinary-differential equation for the shock Mach number as a function of radius which is integrated numerically to provide profiles of the shock implosion. Also, analytic, asymptotic results are obtained for the shock trajectory at small radius. The second approach is direct numerical solution of the radially symmetric MHD equations using a shock-capturing method. For the axial magnetic field case the shock implosion is of the Guderley power-law type with exponent that is not affected by the presence of a finite magnetic field. For the axial current case, however, the presence of a tangential magnetic field ahead of the shock with strength inversely proportional to radius introduces a length scale R=sqrt{μ _0/p_0} I/(2 π ) where I is the current, μ0 is the permeability, and p0 is the pressure ahead of the shock. For shocks initiated at r ≫ R, shock convergence is first accompanied by shock strengthening as for the strictly gas-dynamic implosion. The diverging magnetic field

  18. Turbulence in the cylindrical slab

    SciTech Connect

    Gentle, K. W.; Rowan, W. L.; Williams, C. B.; Brookman, M. W.

    2014-09-15

    The cylindrical slab was the first and simplest model of intrinsically unstable microturbulence. The Helimak is an experimental realization of this model. Although finite, it is sufficiently large to escape boundary effects, with dimensionless parameters similar to those of a tokamak edge or scrape off layer. The essential drive is interchange-like, a pressure gradient with unfavorable magnetic curvature, leading to a non-linearly saturated state of large-amplitude turbulence, Δn{sub rms}/n ∼ 0.5. The nonlinear processes governing this saturation are unique, unlike any of those posited for the much weaker turbulence typical of confined plasma, e.g., in a tokamak. Neither linear stability theory, quasi-linear theory, zonal flows, nor flow shear stabilization is consistent with the observations. The mechanisms determining the non-linearly saturated state constitute an important challenge to our understanding of strongly nonlinear systems.

  19. Experimental results for absolute cylindrical wavefront testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reardon, Patrick J.; Alatawi, Ayshah

    2014-09-01

    Applications for Cylindrical and near-cylindrical surfaces are ever-increasing. However, fabrication of high quality cylindrical surfaces is limited by the difficulty of accurate and affordable metrology. Absolute testing of such surfaces represents a challenge to the optical testing community as cylindrical reference wavefronts are difficult to produce. In this paper, preliminary results for a new method of absolute testing of cylindrical wavefronts are presented. The method is based on the merging of the random ball test method with the fiber optic reference test. The random ball test assumes a large number of interferograms of a good quality sphere with errors that are statistically distributed such that the average of the errors goes to zero. The fiber optic reference test utilizes a specially processed optical fiber to provide a clean high quality reference wave from an incident line focus from the cylindrical wave under test. By taking measurements at different rotation and translations of the fiber, an analogous procedure can be employed to determine the quality of the converging cylindrical wavefront with high accuracy. This paper presents and discusses the results of recent tests of this method using a null optic formed by a COTS cylindrical lens and a free-form polished corrector element.

  20. Vibration and damping characteristics of cylindrical shells with active constrained layer damping treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Ling; Zhang, Dongdong; Wang, Yi

    2011-02-01

    In this paper, the application of active constrained layer damping (ACLD) treatments is extended to the vibration control of cylindrical shells. The governing equation of motion of cylindrical shells partially treated with ACLD treatments is derived on the basis of the constitutive equations of elastic, piezoelectric and visco-elastic materials and an energy approach. The damping of a visco-elastic layer is modeled by the complex modulus formula. A finite element model is developed to describe and predict the vibration characteristics of cylindrical shells partially treated with ACLD treatments. A closed-loop control system based on proportional and derivative feedback of the sensor voltage generated by the piezo-sensor of the ACLD patches is established. The dynamic behaviors of cylindrical shells with ACLD treatments such as natural frequencies, loss factors and responses in the frequency domain are further investigated. The effects of several key parameters such as control gains, location and coverage of ACLD treatments on vibration suppression of cylindrical shells are also discussed. The numerical results indicate the validity of the finite element model and the control strategy approach. The potential of ACLD treatments in controlling vibration and sound radiation of cylindrical shells used as major critical structures such as cabins of aircraft, hulls of submarines and bodies of rockets and missiles is thus demonstrated.

  1. Design and performance of the new cathode readout proportional chambers in LASS

    SciTech Connect

    Aiken, G.; Aston, D.; Dunwoodie, W.

    1980-10-01

    The design and construction of a new proportional chamber system for the LASS spectrometer are discussed. This system consists of planar and cylindrical chambers employing anode wire and cathode strip readout techniques. The good timing characteristics of anode readout combine with the excellent spatial resolution of cathode readout to provide powerful and compact detectors. Preliminary resolution data are presented along with operating characteristics of the various devices.

  2. GAMMA PROPORTIONAL COUNTER CONTAINING HIGH Z GAS AND LOW Z MODERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Fox, R.

    1963-07-23

    A gamma radiation counter employing a gas proportional counter is described. The radiation counter comprises a cylindrical gas proportional counter which contains a high atomic number gas and is surrounded by a low atomic number gamma radiation moderator material. At least one slit is provided in the moderator to allow accident gamma radiation to enter the moderator in the most favorable manner for moderation, and also to allow low energy gamma radiation to enter the counter without the necessity of passing through the moderator. This radiation counter is capable of detecting and measuring gamma radiation in the energy range of 0.5-5 Mev. (AEC)

  3. Crack problems in cylindrical and spherical shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.

    1976-01-01

    Standard plate or shell theories were used as a starting point to study the fracture problems in thin-walled cylindrical and spherical shells, assuming that the plane of the crack is perpendicular to the surface of the sheet. Since recent studies have shown that local shell curvatures may have a rather considerable effect on the stress intensity factor, the crack problem was considered in conjunction with a shell rather than a plate theory. The material was assumed to be isotropic and homogeneous, so that approximate solutions may be obtained by approximating the local shell crack geometry with an ideal shell which has a solution, namely a spherical shell with a meridional crack, a cylindrical shell with a circumferential crack, or a cylindrical shell with an axial crack. A method of solution for the specially orthotropic shells containing a crack was described; symmetric and skew-symmetric problems are considered in cylindrical shells with an axial crack.

  4. Stability analysis of cylindrical Vlasov equilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Short, R W

    1980-02-01

    A method is presented for the fully kinetic, nonlocal stability analysis of cylindrically symmetric equilibria. Applications to the lower hybrid drift instability and the modes associated with a finite-width relativistic E-layer are discussed.

  5. View factors of cylindrical spiral surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, Vladimir A.; Solovjov, Vladimir P.

    2016-03-01

    Analytical expressions are presented for the view factors (radiative configuration factors) associated with the flat right cylindrical spiral surface. Such cylindrical spiral systems are widely applied as electrical resistance heating elements for lighting devices, electronic radio tubes, high-speed gas flow heaters, and other appliances used for scientific, industrial and domestic purposes. Derivation of the view factors is based on the invariant principles and the results presented in Lebedev (2000, 2003,1988) [1-3].

  6. Damage experiments in cylindrical geometry update

    SciTech Connect

    Kaul, Anne; Holtkamp, David; Rodriguez, George

    2009-01-01

    Using a cylindrical configuration to study spallation damage allows for a natural recollection of the damaged material under proper driving conditions. Previous experiments provided data about failure initiation in aluminum in a cylindrical geometry and the behavior of material recollected after damage from pressures in the damage initiation regime. The current series of experiments studied the behavior of material recollected after complete failure. Results from the current experiments will be presented.

  7. Simulating flow and segregation of cylindrical particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yongzhi; Umbanhowar, Paul B.; Lueptow, Richard M.

    2015-11-01

    Efficient and accurate simulation of cylindrical particles using discrete element method (DEM) is a challenge. Typical approaches to simulating cylindrical particle systems are based on the glued spheres method, which has low accuracy, or real shape models, which have high computational cost. In this work we utilize super-ellipsoids, which belong to super-quadrics, to model cylindrical particles in DEM simulations. Simulations of a single cylinder impacting a flat wall indicate that super-ellipsoids provide the same accuracy as real shape models and much better accuracy than the glued sphere method. Simulations of super-ellipsoid cylindrical particles in rotating tumblers result in nearly the same angle of repose as experiments and real shape simulations, demonstrating the accuracy of super-ellipsoid DEM simulations for multi-particle systems. The segregation of bidisperse cylindrical particles differing in length in a bounded heap was simulated by super-ellipsoid DEM, and the results are similar to the experiment. In spite of these advantages of using super-ellipsoid cylindrical particles, simulations of filling a box with particles indicate that the simulation times for super-ellipsoid cylinders is about an order of magnitude longer than that for the same number of spherical particles.

  8. Asymmetric Bulkheads for Cylindrical Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, Donald B.

    2007-01-01

    Asymmetric bulkheads are proposed for the ends of vertically oriented cylindrical pressure vessels. These bulkheads, which would feature both convex and concave contours, would offer advantages over purely convex, purely concave, and flat bulkheads (see figure). Intended originally to be applied to large tanks that hold propellant liquids for launching spacecraft, the asymmetric-bulkhead concept may also be attractive for terrestrial pressure vessels for which there are requirements to maximize volumetric and mass efficiencies. A description of the relative advantages and disadvantages of prior symmetric bulkhead configurations is prerequisite to understanding the advantages of the proposed asymmetric configuration: In order to obtain adequate strength, flat bulkheads must be made thicker, relative to concave and convex bulkheads; the difference in thickness is such that, other things being equal, pressure vessels with flat bulkheads must be made heavier than ones with concave or convex bulkheads. Convex bulkhead designs increase overall tank lengths, thereby necessitating additional supporting structure for keeping tanks vertical. Concave bulkhead configurations increase tank lengths and detract from volumetric efficiency, even though they do not necessitate additional supporting structure. The shape of a bulkhead affects the proportion of residual fluid in a tank that is, the portion of fluid that unavoidably remains in the tank during outflow and hence cannot be used. In this regard, a flat bulkhead is disadvantageous in two respects: (1) It lacks a single low point for optimum placement of an outlet and (2) a vortex that forms at the outlet during outflow prevents a relatively large amount of fluid from leaving the tank. A concave bulkhead also lacks a single low point for optimum placement of an outlet. Like purely concave and purely convex bulkhead configurations, the proposed asymmetric bulkhead configurations would be more mass-efficient than is the flat

  9. Proportional Reasoning and the Visually Impaired

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilton, Geoff; Hilton, Annette; Dole, Shelley L.; Goos, Merrilyn; O'Brien, Mia

    2012-01-01

    Proportional reasoning is an important aspect of formal thinking that is acquired during the developmental years that approximate the middle years of schooling. Students who fail to acquire sound proportional reasoning often experience difficulties in subjects that require quantitative thinking, such as science, technology, engineering, and…

  10. CCSSM Challenge: Graphing Ratio and Proportion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastberg, Signe E.; D'Ambrosio, Beatriz S.; Lynch-Davis, Kathleen; Mintos, Alexia; Krawczyk, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    A renewed emphasis was placed on ratio and proportional reasoning in the middle grades in the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM). The expectation for students includes the ability to not only compute and then compare and interpret the results of computations in context but also interpret ratios and proportions as they are…

  11. Working Memory Mechanism in Proportional Quantifier Verification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zajenkowski, Marcin; Szymanik, Jakub; Garraffa, Maria

    2014-01-01

    The paper explores the cognitive mechanisms involved in the verification of sentences with proportional quantifiers (e.g. "More than half of the dots are blue"). The first study shows that the verification of proportional sentences is more demanding than the verification of sentences such as: "There are seven blue and eight yellow…

  12. Multipole analysis of circular cylindrical magnetic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvaggi, Jerry P.

    This thesis deals with an alternate method for computing the external magnetic field from a circular cylindrical magnetic source. The primary objective is to characterize the magnetic source in terms of its equivalent multipole distribution. This multipole distribution must be valid at points close to the cylindrical source and a spherical multipole expansion is ill-equipped to handle this problem; therefore a new method must be introduced. This method, based upon the free-space Green's function in cylindrical coordinates, is developed as an alternative to the more familiar spherical harmonic expansion. A family of special functions, called the toroidal functions or Q-functions, are found to exhibit the necessary properties for analyzing circular cylindrical geometries. In particular, the toroidal function of zeroth order, which comes from the integral formulation of the free-space Green's function in cylindrical coordinates, is employed to handle magnetic sources which exhibit circular cylindrical symmetry. The toroidal functions, also called Q-functions, are the weighting coefficients in a "Fourier series-like" expansion which represents the free-space Green's function. It is also called a toroidal expansion. This expansion can be directly employed in electrostatic, magnetostatic, and electrodynamic problems which exhibit cylindrical symmetry. Also, it is shown that they can be used as an alternative to the Elliptic integral formulation. In fact, anywhere that an Elliptic integral appears, one can replace it with its corresponding Q-function representation. A number of problems, using the toroidal expansion formulation, are analyzed and compared to existing known methods in order to validate the results. Also, the equivalent multipole distribution is found for most of the solved problems along with its corresponding physical interpretation. The main application is to characterize the external magnetic field due to a six-pole permanent magnet motor in terms of its

  13. The Dizzying Depths of the Cylindrical Mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeWeerd, Alan J.; Hill, S. Eric

    2005-02-01

    A typical introduction to geometrical optics treats plane and spherical mirrors. At first glance, it may be surprising that texts seldom mention the cylindrical mirror, except for the occasional reference to use in fun houses and to viewing anamorphic art.1,2 However, even a cursory treatment reveals its complexity. Holzberlein used an extended object to qualitatively illustrate that images are produced both before and behind a concave cylindrical mirror.3 He also speculated on how this extreme astigmatism results in an observer's dizziness. By considering a simple point object, we make a more detailed analysis of the cylindrical mirror and the dizziness it induces. First, we illustrate how rays from a point object reflect to form not one point image but two line images. Next, we describe how an observer perceives a likeness of the object. Finally, we suggest how confusing depth cues induce dizziness. Although we focus on the concave cylindrical mirror, the discussion is easy to generalize to the convex cylindrical mirror.

  14. Scattering cancellation by metamaterial cylindrical multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tricarico, S.; Bilotti, F.; Vegni, L.

    2009-05-01

    In this paper, we present the theoretical analysis and the design of cylindrical multilayered electromagnetic cloaks based on the scattering cancellation technique. We propose at first the analysis and the design of bi-layered cylindrical shells, made of homogenous and isotropic metamaterials, in order to effectively reduce the scattered field from a dielectric cylindrical object. The single shell and the bi-layered shell cases are compared in terms of scattering reduction and loss effects. The comparison shows that the bi-layered configuration exhibits superior performances. The scattering cancellation approach, is, then, extended to the case of generic multilayered cylindrical shells, considering again homogeneous and isotropic metamaterials. The employment of the proposed technique to the case of cloaking devices working at multiple frequencies is also envisaged and discussed. Finally, some practical layouts of cylindrical electromagnetic cloaks working at optical frequencies are also proposed. In these configurations, the homogenous and isotropic metamaterials are replaced by their actual counterparts, obtained using alternating stacked plasmonic and non-plasmonic layers. The theoretical formulation and the design approaches presented throughout the paper are validated through proper full-wave numerical simulations.

  15. Antimicrobial Peptides in Toroidal and Cylindrical Pores

    PubMed Central

    Mihajlovic, Maja

    2010-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are small, usually cationic peptides, which permeabilize biological membranes. Their mechanism of action is still not well understood. Here we investigate the preference of alamethicin and melittin for pores of different shapes, using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the peptides in pre-formed toroidal and cylindrical pores. When an alamethicin hexamer is initially embedded in a cylindrical pore, at the end of the simulation the pore remains cylindrical or closes if glutamines in the N-termini are not located within the pore. On the other hand, when a melittin tetramer is embedded in toroidal pore or in a cylindrical pore, at the end of the simulation the pore is lined both with peptides and lipid headgroups, and, thus, can be classified as a toroidal pore. These observations agree with the prevailing views that alamethicin forms barrel-stave pores whereas melittin forms toroidal pores. Both alamethicin and melittin form amphiphilic helices in the presence of membranes, but their net charge differs; at pH ~7, the net charge of alamethicin is −1 whereas that of melittin is +5. This gives rise to stronger electrostatic interactions of melittin with membranes than those of alamethicin. The melittin tetramer interacts more strongly with lipids in the toroidal pore than in the cylindrical one, due to more favorable electrostatic interactions. PMID:20403332

  16. Effects of Stiffening and Mechanical Load on Thermal Buckling of Stiffened Cylindrical Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Theodore F.; Card, Michael F.

    1995-01-01

    A study of thermal buckling of stiffened cylindrical shells with the proportions of a preliminary supersonic transport fuselage design (1970) is presented. The buckling analysis is performed using an axisymmetric shell-of-revolution code, BOSOR4. The effects of combined mechanical (axial loading) and thermal loading (heated skins) are investigated. Results indicate that the location of longitudinal eccentric stiffening has a very large effect on the thermal buckling strength of longitudinally stiffened shells, and on longitudinally stiffened shells with rings.

  17. Proportion of recovered waterfowl bands reported

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geis, A.D.; Atwood, E.L.

    1961-01-01

    Data from the annual mail survey of waterfowl hunters in the United States were used to estimate the total numbers of banded waterfowl that were shot. These estimates were compared with Banding Office records to estimate the proportion of recovered bands that was reported. On the average, about two banded birds were recovered for each one reported. The proportion reported was higher for some areas and for some species than for others. The proportion reported was higher when more of the reports came through employees of conservation agencies.

  18. Characteristics of a high pressure gas proportional counter filled with xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, H.; Ramsey, B. D.

    1991-01-01

    The characteristics of a conventional cylindrical geometry proportional counter filled with high pressure xenon gas up to 10 atm. were fundamentally investigated for use as a detector in hard X-ray astronomy. With a 2 percent methane gas mixture the energy resolutions at 10 atm. were 9.8 percent and 7.3 percent for 22 keV and 60 keV X-rays, respectively. From calculations of the Townsend ionization coefficient, it is shown that proportional counters at high pressure operate at weaker reduced electric field than low pressure counters. The characteristics of a parallel grid proportional counter at low pressure showed similar pressure dependence. It is suggested that this is the fundamental reason for the degradation of resolution observed with increasing pressure.

  19. Cylindrical electrochemical cells with a diaphragm seal

    SciTech Connect

    Georgopoulos, P.

    1993-07-13

    A cylindrical electrochemical cell is described comprising an anode, a cathode and electrolyte contained in a cylindrical container, the container having an open end and a closed end; wherein the open end of the container is sealed with a seal assembly comprising: (a) a disc-shaped seal member, made from an electrically insulative material, having an outer edge wall connected via a base to a centrally located cylindrical hub that defines an orifice; which base has a ventable diaphragm portion and a nonventable diaphragm portion that is thicker than the ventable diaphragm portion; and wherein the ventable diaphragm portion joins the hub at an interface and becomes gradually thicker in the direction away from the interface toward the outer edge wall so that the ventable diaphragm portion is thinnest at the interface; and (b) a current collector extending through the orifice defined by the hub into the cell's interior to contact one of the cell's electrodes.

  20. Laser diode assembly including a cylindrical lens

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, J.J.; Reichert, P.

    1992-01-14

    The present invention provides a diffraction limited, high numerical aperture (fast) cylindrical microlens. The method for making the microlens is adaptable to produce a cylindrical lens that has almost any shape on its optical surfaces. The cylindrical lens may have a shape, such as elliptical or hyperbolic, designed to transform some particular given input light distribution into some desired output light distribution. In the method, the desired shape is first formed in a glass preform. Then, the preform is heated to the minimum drawing temperature and a fiber is drawn from it. The cross-sectional shape of the fiber bears a direct relation to the shape of the preform from which it was drawn. During the drawing process, the surfaces become optically smooth due to fire polishing. 11 figs.

  1. Laser diode assembly including a cylindrical lens

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, James J.; Reichert, Patrick

    1992-01-01

    The present invention provides a diffraction limited, high numerical aperture (fast) cylindrical microlens. The method for making the microlens is adaptable to produce a cylindrical lens that has almost any shape on its optical surfaces. The cylindrical lens may have a shape, such as elliptical or hyperbolic, designed to transform some particular given input light distribution into some desired output light distribution. In the method, the desired shape is first formed in a glass preform. Then, the preform is heated to the minimum drawing temperature and a fiber is drawn from it. The cross-sectional shape of the fiber bears a direct relation to the shape of the preform from which it was drawn. During the drawing process, the surfaces become optically smooth due to fire polishing.

  2. Current pulse effects on cylindrical damage experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kaul, Ann M; Rousculp, Christopher L

    2009-01-01

    A series of joint experiments between LANL and VNIIEF use a VNIIEF-designed helical generator to provide currents for driving a LANL-designed cylindrical spallation experimental load. Under proper driving conditions, a cylindrical configuration allows for a natural recollection of the damaged material. In addition, the damaged material is able to come to a complete stop due to its strength, avoiding application of further forces. Thus far, experiments have provided data about failure initiation of a well-characterized material (aluminum) in a cylindrical geometry, behavior of material recollected after damage from pressures in the damage initiation regime, and behavior of material recollected after complete failure. In addition to post-shot collection of the damaged target material for subsequent metallographic analysis, dynamic in-situ experimental diagnostics include velocimetry and transverse radial radiography. This paper will focus on the effects of tailoring the driving current pulse to obtain the desired data.

  3. Lineal energy calibration of mini tissue-equivalent gas-proportional counters (TEPC)

    SciTech Connect

    Conte, V.; Moro, D.; Colautti, P.; Grosswendt, B.

    2013-07-18

    Mini TEPCs are cylindrical gas proportional counters of 1 mm or less of sensitive volume diameter. The lineal energy calibration of these tiny counters can be performed with an external gamma-ray source. However, to do that, first a method to get a simple and precise spectral mark has to be found and then the keV/{mu}m value of this mark. A precise method (less than 1% of uncertainty) to identify this markis described here, and the lineal energy value of this mark has been measured for different simulated site sizes by using a {sup 137}Cs gamma source and a cylindrical TEPC equipped with a precision internal {sup 244}Cm alpha-particle source, and filled with propane-based tissue-equivalent gas mixture. Mini TEPCs can be calibrated in terms of lineal energy, by exposing them to {sup 137}Cesium sources, with an overall uncertainty of about 5%.

  4. Working memory mechanism in proportional quantifier verification.

    PubMed

    Zajenkowski, Marcin; Szymanik, Jakub; Garraffa, Maria

    2014-12-01

    The paper explores the cognitive mechanisms involved in the verification of sentences with proportional quantifiers (e.g., "More than half of the dots are blue"). The first study shows that the verification of proportional sentences is more demanding than the verification of sentences such as: "There are seven blue and eight yellow dots". The second study reveals that both types of sentences are correlated with memory storage, however, only proportional sentences are associated with the cognitive control. This result suggests that the cognitive mechanism underlying the verification of proportional quantifiers is crucially related to the integration process, in which an individual has to compare in memory the cardinalities of two sets. In the third study we find that the numerical distance between two cardinalities that must be compared significantly influences the verification time and accuracy. The results of our studies are discussed in the broader context of processing complex sentences. PMID:24374596

  5. Proportionality, just war theory and weapons innovation.

    PubMed

    Forge, John

    2009-03-01

    Just wars are supposed to be proportional responses to aggression: the costs of war must not greatly exceed the benefits. This proportionality principle raises a corresponding 'interpretation problem': what are the costs and benefits of war, how are they to be determined, and a 'measurement problem': how are costs and benefits to be balanced? And it raises a problem about scope: how far into the future do the states of affairs to be measured stretch? It is argued here that weapons innovation always introduces costs, and that these costs cannot be determined in advance of going to war. Three examples, the atomic bomb, the AK-47 and the ancient Greek catapult, are given as examples. It is therefore argued that the proportionality principle is inapplicable prospectively. Some replies to the argument are discussed and rejected. Some more general defences of the proportionality principle are considered and also rejected. Finally, the significance of the argument for Just War Theory as a whole is discussed.

  6. Using Resampling to Compare Two Proportions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephenson, W. Robert; Froelich, Amy G.; Duckworth, William M.

    2010-01-01

    This article shows that when applying resampling methods to the problem of comparing two proportions, students can discover that whether you resample with or without replacement can make a big difference.

  7. Self-referenced interferometer for cylindrical surfaces.

    PubMed

    Šarbort, Martin; Řeřucha, Šimon; Holá, Miroslava; Buchta, Zdeněk; Lazar, Josef

    2015-11-20

    We present a new interferometric method for shape measurement of hollow cylindrical tubes. We propose a simple and robust self-referenced interferometer where the reference and object waves are represented by the central and peripheral parts, respectively, of the conical wave generated by a single axicon lens. The interferogram detected by a digital camera is characterized by a closed-fringe pattern with a circular carrier. The interference phase is demodulated using spatial synchronous detection. The capabilities of the interferometer are experimentally tested for various hollow cylindrical tubes with lengths up to 600 mm.

  8. Human body proportions explained on the basis of biomechanical principles.

    PubMed

    Witte, H; Preuschoft, H; Recknagel, S

    1991-01-01

    On the basis of theoretical biomechanics and of experiments, we investigated the mechanical requirements to which the body of a bipedally walking primate is subject, and the possibilities to meet these requirements with a minimum amount of energy. The least energy-consuming adaptation is clearly a body shape favourable for the preferred locomotion. Some characteristics of human body shape, in particular its proportions, could be identified as advantageous for fulfilling obvious biological roles or mechanical necessities. The characteristic length and the extended position of human hindlimbs make walking faster without additional input of energy. Mass distribution on the hindlimbs reduces the energy necessary for accelerating the swing limb after liftoff and for decelerating the swing limb before the heelstrike. Length and mass distribution in the forelimb gives it a pendulum length comparable to that of the hindlimb, so that both extremities swing at the same frequency. This swinging of the forelimbs counters in part the movements exerted by the moved hindlimbs on the trunk. The elongate and slim shape of the trunk provides great mass moments of inertia and that means stability against being flexed ventrally and dorsally by the forward and rearward movements of the heavy and long hindlimbs. Shoulder breadth in combination with the shallow shape of the thorax yield higher mass moments of inertia against the rotation of the trunk about a vertical axis than a cylindrical trunk shape. Further elongation of the hindlimbs is limited by the energy necessary for acceleration and deceleration, as well as for lifting them during the swing phase. In addition, the reaction forces exerted by the hindlimbs would expose the trunk to undue excursions if the proportions trunk length/limb length or trunk mass/limb mass would decrease. The above-noted kinetic requirements are partly in line, partly in conflict with the requirements of statics.

  9. Distributed neural signals on parabolic cylindrical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, S. D.; Li, H.; Tzou, H. S.

    2013-06-01

    Parabolic cylindrical shells are commonly used as key components in communication antennas, space telescopes, solar collectors, etc. This study focuses on distributed modal neural sensing signals on a flexible simply-supported parabolic cylindrical shell panel. The parabolic cylindrical shell is fully laminated with a piezoelectric layer on its outer surface and the piezoelectric layer is segmented into infinitesimal elements (neurons) to investigate the microscopic distributed neural sensing signals. Since the dominant vibration component of the shell is usually the transverse oscillation, a new transverse mode shape function is defined. Two shell cases, i.e., the ratio of the meridian height to the half span distance of a parabola at 1:4 (shallow) and 1:1 (deep), are studied to reveal the curvature effect to the neural sensing signals. Studies suggest that the membrane signal component dominates for lower natural modes and the bending signal component dominates for higher natural modes. The meridional membrane and bending signal components are mostly concentrated on the high-curvature areas, while the longitudinal bending component is mostly concentrated on the relatively flat areas. The concentration behavior becomes more prominent as the parabolic cylindrical shell deepens, primarily resulting from the enhanced membrane effect due to the increased curvature.

  10. Matching a static cylindrically symmetric elastic spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brito, I.; Carot, J.; Mena, F. C.; Vaz, E. G. L. R.

    2012-07-01

    We consider a static cylindrically symmetric spacetime with elastic matter and study the matching problem of this spacetime with a suitable exterior. For the exterior, we take the Levi-Civita spacetime and its generalization including a cosmological constant, the Linet-Tian spacetime. We show that the matching is only possible with the Linet-Tian solution.

  11. Progress in studying scintillator proportionality: Phenomenological model

    SciTech Connect

    Bizarri, Gregory; Cherepy, Nerine; Choong, Woon-Seng; Hull, Giulia; Moses, William; Payne, Sephen; Singh, Jai; Valentine, John; Vasilev, Andrey; Williams, Richard

    2009-04-30

    We present a model to describe the origin of non-proportional dependence of scintillator light yield on the energy of an ionizing particle. The non-proportionality is discussed in terms of energy relaxation channels and their linear and non-linear dependences on the deposited energy. In this approach, the scintillation response is described as a function of the deposited energy deposition and the kinetic rates of each relaxation channel. This mathematical framework allows both a qualitative interpretation and a quantitative fitting representation of scintillation non-proportionality response as function of kinetic rates. This method was successfully applied to thallium doped sodium iodide measured with SLYNCI, a new facility using the Compton coincidence technique. Finally, attention is given to the physical meaning of the dominant relaxation channels, and to the potential causes responsible for the scintillation non-proportionality. We find that thallium doped sodium iodide behaves as if non-proportionality is due to competition between radiative recombinations and non-radiative Auger processes.

  12. Boron-10 Lined Proportional Counter Wall Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Siciliano, Edward R.; Kouzes, Richard T.

    2012-05-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safeguards (NA-241) is supporting the project 'Coincidence Counting With Boron-Based Alternative Neutron Detection Technology' at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for development of an alternative neutron coincidence counter. The goal of this project is to design, build and demonstrate a boron-lined proportional tube based system in the configuration of a coincidence counter. This report provides information about how variations in proportional counter radius and gas pressure in a typical coincident counter design might affect the observed signal from boron-lined tubes. A discussion comparing tubes to parallel plate counters is also included.

  13. Proportional hazards models with discrete frailty.

    PubMed

    Caroni, Chrys; Crowder, Martin; Kimber, Alan

    2010-07-01

    We extend proportional hazards frailty models for lifetime data to allow a negative binomial, Poisson, Geometric or other discrete distribution of the frailty variable. This might represent, for example, the unknown number of flaws in an item under test. Zero frailty corresponds to a limited failure model containing a proportion of units that never fail (long-term survivors). Ways of modifying the model to avoid this are discussed. The models are illustrated on a previously published set of data on failures of printed circuit boards and on new data on breaking strengths of samples of cord.

  14. Ratio, Proportion and Scaling. Mathematics Resource Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffer, Shirley Ann, Ed.

    The Mathematics Resource Project has as its goal the production of topical resources for teachers, drawn from the vast amounts of available material. This experimental edition on Ratio, Proportion, and Scaling, contains a teaching emphasis section, a classroom materials section, and teacher commentaries. The teaching emphasis section stresses…

  15. Augmented mixed models for clustered proportion data

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Dipankar; Galvis, Diana M; Lachos, Victor H

    2015-01-01

    Often in biomedical research, we deal with continuous (clustered) proportion responses ranging between zero and one quantifying the disease status of the cluster units. Interestingly, the study population might also consist of relatively disease-free as well as highly diseased subjects, contributing to proportion values in the interval [0, 1]. Regression on a variety of parametric densities with support lying in (0, 1), such as beta regression, can assess important covariate effects. However, they are deemed inappropriate due to the presence of zeros and/or ones. To evade this, we introduce a class of general proportion density, and further augment the probabilities of zero and one to this general proportion density, controlling for the clustering. Our approach is Bayesian and presents a computationally convenient framework amenable to available freeware. Bayesian case-deletion influence diagnostics based on q-divergence measures are automatic from the Markov chain Monte Carlo output. The methodology is illustrated using both simulation studies and application to a real dataset from a clinical periodontology study. PMID:25491718

  16. Golden Proportions for the Generalized Tribonacci Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Devbhadra V.; Mehta, Darshana A.

    2009-01-01

    It is known that the ratios of consecutive terms of Fibonacci and Tribonacci sequences converge to the fixed ratio. In this article, we consider the generalized form of Tribonacci numbers and derive the "golden proportion" for the whole family of this generalized sequence. (Contains 2 tables.)

  17. Indices of body proportionality in neonates.

    PubMed

    Tsou Yau, K I; Chang, M H

    1993-01-01

    The inadequacy of using body weight alone to evaluate fetal skeletal and soft-tissue growth has long been recognized. Body proportionality indices could identify symptomatic newborn infants better than size-for-date classification. Lack of normative data precludes its being used, practically, in Chinese newborns. Thus body weight, body length, head circumference and mid-arm circumference were measured in 240 neonates appropriate for gestational age, 27-42 weeks, 960-3918 g, to construct reference indices of body proportionality: ponderal index (PI), body mass index (BMI), weight/length ratio (W/L), head circumference/body length ratio (HC/L) and mid-arm circumference/head circumference ratio (MAC/HC). All the five indices of body proportionality but HC/L were statistically correlated with gestational age (GA). For full-term newborns, PI did not correlate with GA. Furthers, the MAC/HC ratio decreased after 40 weeks' gestation. Therefore, when these indices of body proportionality are used to evaluate intrauterine nutritional status of a newborn, the appropriate standard for GA should be considered. PMID:8372678

  18. Canine Conjectures: Using Data for Proportional Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westenskow, Arla; Moyer-Packenham, Patricia S.

    2011-01-01

    No person, place, or thing can capture the attention of a class of sixth graders like "man's best friend." To prompt students' interest in a series of lessons on proportional relationships, the authors brought in a unique teaching aid--a dog. A family dog was used to supply the measurements for scatter plots and variables so that students could…

  19. Kitchen Gardens: Contexts for Developing Proportional Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilton, Annette; Hilton, Geoff; Dole, Shelley; Goos, Merrilyn; O'Brien, Mia

    2013-01-01

    It is great to see how the sharing of ideas sparks new ideas. In 2011 Lyon and Bragg wrote an "Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom" (APMC) article on the mathematics of kitchen gardens. In this article the authors show how the kitchen garden may be used as a starting point for proportional reasoning. The authors highlight different…

  20. The sound field in a finite cylindrical shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Junger, M. C.

    1985-01-01

    The sound field excited by vibrating boundaries in a finite cylindrical space, e.g., in a cylindrical shell, differs from the pressure distribution in an infinite cylindrical shell of comparable structural wavelength by the pressure diffracted by the end caps. The latter pressure component is comparable in magnitude to the pressure generated by the vibrating cylindrical boundary, but does not introduce additional resonances or antiresonances. Finally, a third pressure component associated with end cap vibrations is formulated.

  1. Intermediate Moral Respect and Proportionality Reasoning.

    PubMed

    Finegan, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    In a recent article in this journal Jonathan Pugh critiques the idea of intermediate 'moral respect' which some say is owed to embryos. This concept is inherent within the 'principle of proportionality', the principle that destructive research on embryos is permissable only if the research serves an important purpose. Pugh poses two specific questions to proponents of the idea of intermediate moral respect. This article argues that while the questions posed by Pugh are certainly pertinent to the debate, the hypothetical responses he suggests to these questions do not quite get to the core of what is troublesome about the concept. The article suggests alternative responses to Pugh's questions in order to focus attention on more fundamental problems facing the idea of intermediate moral respect, while also pointing to how the intermediate moral respect proponent might best develop these responses. It goes on to argue that these hypothetical responses fail to answer convincingly the questions posed. More specifically, this article challenges two possible justifications for the distinct idea of intermediate moral respect, namely the argument from potentiality (the argument raised by Pugh) and an argument from the proportionality of fundamental moral status (not considered by Pugh). The article also raises a dilemma inherent in the application of the principle of proportionality to cases involving beings to which intermediate moral respect is owed even where it is allowed, ex hypothesi, that both the category of intermediate moral respect and the general proportionality reasoning underpinning the principle of proportionality are basically cogent. This article thus develops and adds to the challenge laid down by Pugh to proponents of the idea of intermediate moral respect. PMID:27212688

  2. Intermediate Moral Respect and Proportionality Reasoning.

    PubMed

    Finegan, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    In a recent article in this journal Jonathan Pugh critiques the idea of intermediate 'moral respect' which some say is owed to embryos. This concept is inherent within the 'principle of proportionality', the principle that destructive research on embryos is permissable only if the research serves an important purpose. Pugh poses two specific questions to proponents of the idea of intermediate moral respect. This article argues that while the questions posed by Pugh are certainly pertinent to the debate, the hypothetical responses he suggests to these questions do not quite get to the core of what is troublesome about the concept. The article suggests alternative responses to Pugh's questions in order to focus attention on more fundamental problems facing the idea of intermediate moral respect, while also pointing to how the intermediate moral respect proponent might best develop these responses. It goes on to argue that these hypothetical responses fail to answer convincingly the questions posed. More specifically, this article challenges two possible justifications for the distinct idea of intermediate moral respect, namely the argument from potentiality (the argument raised by Pugh) and an argument from the proportionality of fundamental moral status (not considered by Pugh). The article also raises a dilemma inherent in the application of the principle of proportionality to cases involving beings to which intermediate moral respect is owed even where it is allowed, ex hypothesi, that both the category of intermediate moral respect and the general proportionality reasoning underpinning the principle of proportionality are basically cogent. This article thus develops and adds to the challenge laid down by Pugh to proponents of the idea of intermediate moral respect.

  3. Multi-anode wire two dimensional proportional counter for detecting Iron-55 X-Ray Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weston, Michael William James

    Radiation detectors in many applications use small sensor areas or large tubes which only collect one-dimensional information. There are some applications that require analyzing a large area and locating specific elements such as contamination on the heat tiles of a space shuttle or features on historical artifacts. The process can be time consuming and scanning a large area in a single pass is beneficial. The use of a two dimensional multi-wire proportional counter provides a large detection window presenting positional information in a single pass. This thesis described the design and implementation of an experimental detector to evaluate a specific design intended for use as a handheld instrument. The main effort of this research was to custom build a detector for testing purposes. The aluminum chamber and all circuit boards were custom designed and built specifically for this application. Various software and programmable logic algorithms were designed to analyze the raw data in real time and attempted to determine what data was useful and what could be discarded. The research presented here provides results useful for designing an improved second generation detector in the future. With the anode wire spacing chosen and the minimal collimation of the radiation source, detected events occurred all over the detection grid at any time. The raw event data did not make determining the source position easy and further data correlation was required. An abundance of samples had multiple wire hits which were not useful because it falsely reported the source to be all over the place and at different energy levels. By narrowing down the results to only use the largest signal pairs on different axes in each event, a much more accurate analysis of where the source existed above the grid was determined. The basic principle and construction method was shown to work, however the gas selection, geometry and anode wire constructs proved to be poor. To provide a system optimized

  4. Surface superconductivity in thin cylindrical Bi nanowire.

    PubMed

    Tian, Mingliang; Wang, Jian; Ning, Wei; Mallouk, Thomas E; Chan, Moses H W

    2015-03-11

    The physical origin and the nature of superconductivity in nanostructured Bi remains puzzling. Here, we report transport measurements of individual cylindrical single-crystal Bi nanowires, 20 and 32 nm in diameter. In contrast to nonsuperconducting Bi nanoribbons with two flat surfaces, cylindrical Bi nanowires show superconductivity below 1.3 K. However, their superconducting critical magnetic fields decrease with their diameter, which is the opposite of the expected behavior for thin superconducting wires. Quasiperiodic oscillations of magnetoresistance were observed in perpendicular fields but were not seen in the parallel orientation. These results can be understood by a model of surface superconductivity with an enhanced surface-to-bulk volume in small diameter wires, where the superconductivity originates from the strained surface states of the nanowires due to the surface curvature-induced stress.

  5. Buckling optimisation of sandwich cylindrical panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abouhamzeh, M.; Sadighi, M.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the buckling load optimisation is performed on sandwich cylindrical panels. A finite element program is developed in MATLAB to solve the governing differential equations of the global buckling of the structure. In order to find the optimal solution, the genetic algorithm Toolbox in MATLAB is implemented. Verifications are made for both the buckling finite element code and also the results from the genetic algorithm by comparisons to the results available in literature. Sandwich cylindrical panels are optimised for the buckling strength with isotropic or orthotropic cores with different boundary conditions. Results are presented in terms of stacking sequence of fibers in the face sheets and core to face sheet thickness ratio.

  6. Gravitational radiation from a cylindrical naked singularity

    SciTech Connect

    Nakao, Ken-ichi; Morisawa, Yoshiyuki

    2005-06-15

    We construct an approximate solution which describes the gravitational emission from a naked singularity formed by the gravitational collapse of a cylindrical thick shell composed of dust. The assumed situation is that the collapsing speed of the dust is very large. In this situation, the metric variables are obtained approximately by a kind of linear perturbation analysis in the background Morgan solution which describes the motion of cylindrical null dust. The most important problem in this study is what boundary conditions for metric and matter variables should be imposed at the naked singularity. We find a boundary condition that all the metric and matter variables are everywhere finite at least up to the first order approximation. This implies that the spacetime singularity formed by this high-speed dust collapse is very similar to that formed by the null dust and the final singularity will be a conical one. Weyl curvature is completely released from the collapsed dust.

  7. Cylindrically converging blast waves in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, H.; Nakamura, Y.

    1981-07-01

    Cylindrically converging shock waves are produced by utilizing the detonation of cylindrical explosive shells. The production and the propagation of shock waves are observed by framing and streak camera photographs, and the trajectory of shock propagations is determined by using an electrical ionization probing system. The effect of the quantity of explosives on the stability, or the axial symmetry, of shock fronts and on the strength of shocks produced is investigated. It has been shown that, for practical purposes, the approximation of shock trajectories by Guderley's formulas would be sufficiently acceptable in an unexpectedly wide region near the implosion center, and that the axial symmetry of the shock front is improved by increasing the quantity of explosives, and thus, strong shocks are produced by merely increasing the quantity of explosives. The reflected diverging shock seems to be very stable. Piezoelectric elements have also been used to detect reflected diverging waves.

  8. Damage experiments in a cylindrical geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kaul, Ann M

    2010-09-21

    Studying spallation damage with a cylindrical configuration allows for a natural recollection of the damaged material under proper driving conditions. Additionally, the damaged material can come to a complete rest without the application of further stopping forces. Specific areas of research include the damage initiation regime in convergent geometry, behavior of material recollected after damage, and effects of convergent geometry on the material response. Such experiments produce unique strain and shear stress states, motivating improvements in existing computational material models and increasing the predictive capabilities of codes. A LANL/VNIIEF joint experimental series has produced cylindrical aluminum failure initiation data and studied the behavior of material recollected after damage initiation and after complete failure. In addition to post-shot collection of the damaged target material for subsequent metallographic analysis, dynamic in-situ experimental diagnostics include velocimetry and transverse radial radiography. This paper will discuss the current experimental status.

  9. Design of magnets inside cylindrical superconducting shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigby, K. W.

    1988-01-01

    The design of magnets inside closed, cylindrical, superconducting shields is discussed. The Green function is given for the magnetic vector potential for cylindrically symmetric currents inside such a shield. The magnetic field everywhere inside the shield can be obtained from this function, which includes the effects of the induced shield currents exactly. The field is given for a thin solenoid as an example and the convergence of the series solution for this case is discussed. The shield can significantly reduce the strength and improve the homogeneity of a magnet. The improvement in homogeneity is of particular importance in the design of correction coils. These effects, and the maximum field on the shield, are examined for a typical solenoid. The results given are also useful, although not exact, for long shields with one or two open ends.

  10. Surface superconductivity in thin cylindrical Bi nanowire.

    PubMed

    Tian, Mingliang; Wang, Jian; Ning, Wei; Mallouk, Thomas E; Chan, Moses H W

    2015-03-11

    The physical origin and the nature of superconductivity in nanostructured Bi remains puzzling. Here, we report transport measurements of individual cylindrical single-crystal Bi nanowires, 20 and 32 nm in diameter. In contrast to nonsuperconducting Bi nanoribbons with two flat surfaces, cylindrical Bi nanowires show superconductivity below 1.3 K. However, their superconducting critical magnetic fields decrease with their diameter, which is the opposite of the expected behavior for thin superconducting wires. Quasiperiodic oscillations of magnetoresistance were observed in perpendicular fields but were not seen in the parallel orientation. These results can be understood by a model of surface superconductivity with an enhanced surface-to-bulk volume in small diameter wires, where the superconductivity originates from the strained surface states of the nanowires due to the surface curvature-induced stress. PMID:25658139

  11. Multiple Bifurcations of a Cylindrical Dynamical System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Ning; Cao, Qingjie

    2016-03-01

    This paper focuses on multiple bifurcations of a cylindrical dynamical system, which is evolved from a rotating pendulum with SD oscillator. The rotating pendulum system exhibits the coupling dynamics property of the bistable state and conventional pendulum with the ho- moclinic orbits of the first and second type. A double Andronov-Hopf bifurcation, two saddle-node bifurcations of periodic orbits and a pair of homoclinic bifurcations are detected by using analytical analysis and nu- merical calculation. It is found that the homoclinic orbits of the second type can bifurcate into a pair of rotational limit cycles, coexisting with the oscillating limit cycle. Additionally, the results obtained herein, are helpful to explore different types of limit cycles and the complex dynamic bifurcation of cylindrical dynamical system.

  12. Nanolaminate Membranes as Cylindrical Telescope Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dooley, Jennifer; Dragovan, Mark; Hickey, Gregory; Lih, Shyh-Shiu Lih

    2010-01-01

    A document discusses a proposal to use axially stretched metal nanolaminate membranes as lightweight parabolic cylindrical reflectors in the Dual Anamorphic Reflector Telescope (DART) - a planned spaceborne telescope in which the cylindrical reflectors would be arranged to obtain a point focus. The discussion brings together a combination of concepts reported separately in several prior NASA Tech Briefs articles, the most relevant being "Nanolaminate Mirrors With Integral Figure-Control Actuators" NPO -30221, Vol. 26, No. 5 (May 2002), page 90; and "Reflectors Made From Membranes Stretched Between Beams" NPO -30571, Vol. 33, No. 10 (October 2009), page 11a. The engineering issues receiving the greatest emphasis in the instant document are (1) the change in curvature associated with the Poisson contraction of a stretched nanolaminate reflector membrane and (2) the feasibility of using patches of poly(vinylidene fluoride) on the rear membrane surface as piezoelectric actuators to correct the surface figure for the effect of Poisson contraction and other shape errors.

  13. Omnidirectional, circularly polarized, cylindrical microstrip antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanton, Philip H. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A microstrip cylindrical antenna comprised of two concentric subelements on a ground cylinder, a vertically polarized (E-field parallel to the axis of the antenna cylinder) subelement on the inside and a horizontally polarized (E-field perpendicular to the axis) subelement on the outside. The vertical subelement is a wraparound microstrip radiator. A Y-shaped microstrip patch configuration is used for the horizontally polarized radiator that is wrapped 1.5 times to provide radiating edges on opposite sides of the cylindrical antenna for improved azimuthal pattern uniformity. When these subelements are so fed that their far fields are equal in amplitude and phased 90.degree. from each other, a circularly polarized EM wave results. By stacking a plurality of like antenna elements on the ground cylinder, a linear phased array antenna is provided that can be beam steered to the desired elevation angle.

  14. Jamming of Cylindrical Grains in Vertical Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, G. William; Spier, Gregory; Barr, Nicholas; Steel, Fiona

    2012-02-01

    We study jamming of low aspect-ratio cylindrical Delrin grains in a vertical channel. These cylindrical grains resemble antacid tablets, poker chips, or coins since their height is less than their diameter. Grains are allowed to fall through a vertical channel with a square cross section where the channel width is greater than the diameter of a grain and constant throughout the length of the channel with no obstructions or constrictions. Within this channel, grains are sometimes observed to form jams, stable structures supported by the channel walls with no support beneath them. The probability of jam occurrence and the strength or robustness of a jam is effected by the grain dimensions and channel size. We will present experimental measurements of the jamming probability and jam strength in this system and discuss the relationship of these results to other experiments and theories.

  15. Machining Thin-Walled Cylindrical Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cimbak, Joe; Spagnolo, Jim; Kraus, Dan

    1988-01-01

    Cylindrical walls only few thousandths of inch thick machined accurately and without tears or punctures with aid of beryllium copper mandrel. Chilled so it contracts, then inserted in cylinder. As comes to room temperature, mandrel expands and fits snugly inside cylinder. Will not allow part to slide and provides solid backup to prevent deflection when part machined by grinding wheel. When machining finished, cylinder-and-mandrel assembly inserted in dry ice, mandrel contracts and removed from part.

  16. Shock initiated instabilities in underwater cylindrical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Sachin; Matos, Helio; LeBlanc, James M.; Shukla, Arun

    2016-10-01

    An experimental investigation to understand the mechanisms of dynamic buckling instability in cylindrical structures due to underwater explosive loadings is conducted. In particular, the effects of initial hydrostatic pressure coupled with a dynamic pressure pulse on the stability of metallic cylindrical shells are evaluated. The experiments are conducted at varying initial hydrostatic pressures, below the critical buckling pressure, to estimate the threshold after which dynamic buckling will initiate. The transient underwater full-field deformations of the structures during shock wave loading are captured using high-speed stereo photography coupled with modified 3-D Digital Image Correlation (DIC) technique. Experimental results show that increasing initial hydrostatic pressure decreases the natural vibration frequency of the structure indicating loss in structural stiffness. DIC measurements reveal that the initial structural excitations primarily consist of axisymmetric vibrations due to symmetrical shock wave loading in the experiments. Following their decay after a few longitudinal reverberations, the primary mode of vibration evolves which continues throughout later in time. At the initial hydrostatic pressures below the threshold value, these vibrations are stable in nature. The analytical solutions for the vibration frequency and the transient response of cylindrical shell are discussed in the article by accounting for both (1) the added mass effect of the surrounding water and (2) the effect of initial stress on the shell imposed by the hydrostatic pressure. The analytical solutions match reasonably well with the experimental vibration frequencies. Later, the transient response of a cylindrical shell subjected to a general underwater pressure wave loading is derived which leads to the analytical prediction of dynamic stability.

  17. Electronic quantum confinement in cylindrical potential well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltenkov, Arkadiy S.; Msezane, Alfred Z.

    2016-04-01

    The effects of quantum confinement on the momentum distribution of electrons confined within a cylindrical potential well have been analyzed. The motivation is to understand specific features of the momentum distribution of electrons when the electron behavior is completely controlled by the parameters of a non-isotropic potential cavity. It is shown that studying the solutions of the wave equation for an electron confined in a cylindrical potential well offers the possibility to analyze the confinement behavior of an electron executing one- or two-dimensional motion in the three-dimensional space within the framework of the same mathematical model. Some low-lying electronic states with different symmetries have been considered and the corresponding wave functions have been calculated; the behavior of their nodes and their peak positions with respect to the parameters of the cylindrical well has been analyzed. Additionally, the momentum distributions of electrons in these states have been calculated. The limiting cases of the ratio of the cylinder length H and its radius R0 have been considered; when the cylinder length H significantly exceeds its radius R0 and when the cylinder radius is much greater than its length. The cylindrical quantum confinement effects on the momentum distribution of electrons in these potential wells have been analyzed. The possible application of the results obtained here for the description of the general features in the behavior of electrons in nanowires with metallic type of conductivity (or nanotubes) and ultrathin epitaxial films (or graphene sheets) are discussed. Possible experiments are suggested where the quantum confinement can be manifested. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Atomic Cluster Collisions (7th International Symposium)", edited by Gerardo Delgado Barrio, Andrey Solov'Yov, Pablo Villarreal, Rita Prosmiti.

  18. Aberrations of sphero-cylindrical ophthalmic lenses.

    PubMed

    Malacara, Z; Malacara, D

    1990-04-01

    The authors have presented in two previous articles the graphic solutions resembling Tscherning ellipses, for spherical as well as for aspherical ophthalmic lenses free of astigmatism or power error. These solutions were exact, inasmuch as they were based on exact ray tracing, and not third-order theory as frequently done. In this paper sphero-cylindrical lenses are now analyzed, also using exact ray tracing. The functional dependence of the astigmatism and the power error for these lenses is described extensively.

  19. Proportional Reasoning of Preservice Elementary Education Majors: An Epistemic Model of the Proportional Reasoning Construct.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleener, M. Jayne

    Current research and learning theory suggest that a hierarchy of proportional reasoning exists that can be tested. Using G. Vergnaud's four complexity variables (structure, content, numerical characteristics, and presentation) and T. E. Kieren's model of rational number knowledge building, an epistemic model of proportional reasoning was…

  20. A gaseous proportional counter built from a conventional aluminum beverage can

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Alexander; Karadzhinova, Aneliya; Hildén, Timo; Garcia, Francisco; Fedi, Giacomo; Devoto, Francesco; Brücken, Erik J.

    2015-08-01

    The gaseous proportional counter is a device that can be used to detect ionizing radiation. These devices can be as simple as a cylindrical cathode and a very thin anode wire centered along its axis. By applying a high voltage, a strong electric field is generated close to the anode wire. Ion-pairs, generated by passing ionizing radiation, create avalanches once they drift into the strong electric field region near the anode. The electrical charges created by the avalanche generate an observable signal which is proportional to the energy loss of the incoming radiation. We discuss the construction of such a device. Our detector was built from an ordinary aluminum beverage can and uses a common electric wire strand as the anode. The construction of this detector offers students at universities or technically oriented high schools a detailed understanding of the design and operation of gaseous radiation detectors. The equipment required to complete the project should be available at most institutions.

  1. Processing of Numerical and Proportional Quantifiers.

    PubMed

    Shikhare, Sailee; Heim, Stefan; Klein, Elise; Huber, Stefan; Willmes, Klaus

    2015-09-01

    Quantifier expressions like "many" and "at least" are part of a rich repository of words in language representing magnitude information. The role of numerical processing in comprehending quantifiers was studied in a semantic truth value judgment task, asking adults to quickly verify sentences about visual displays using numerical (at least seven, at least thirteen, at most seven, at most thirteen) or proportional (many, few) quantifiers. The visual displays were composed of systematically varied proportions of yellow and blue circles. The results demonstrated that numerical estimation and numerical reference information are fundamental in encoding the meaning of quantifiers in terms of response times and acceptability judgments. However, a difference emerges in the comparison strategies when a fixed external reference numerosity (seven or thirteen) is used for numerical quantifiers, whereas an internal numerical criterion is invoked for proportional quantifiers. Moreover, for both quantifier types, quantifier semantics and its polarity (positive vs. negative) biased the response direction (accept/reject). Overall, our results indicate that quantifier comprehension involves core numerical and lexical semantic properties, demonstrating integrated processing of language and numbers. PMID:25631283

  2. NASA CONNECT: Proportionality: Modeling the Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    'Proportionality: Modeling the Future' is the sixth of seven programs in the 1999-2000 NASA CONNECT series. Produced by NASA Langley Research Center's Office of Education, NASA CONNECT is an award-winning series of instructional programs designed to enhance the teaching of math, science and technology concepts in grades 5-8. NASA CONNECT establishes the 'connection' between the mathematics, science, and technology concepts taught in the classroom and NASA research. Each program in the series supports the national mathematics, science, and technology standards; includes a resource-rich teacher guide; and uses a classroom experiment and web-based activity to complement and enhance the math, science, and technology concepts presented in the program. NASA CONNECT is FREE and the programs in the series are in the public domain. Visit our web site and register. http://connect.larc.nasa.gov 'Proportionality: Modeling the Future', students will examine how patterns, measurement, ratios, and proportions are used in the research, development, and production of airplanes.

  3. Evaluation of Facial Beauty Using Anthropometric Proportions

    PubMed Central

    Milutinovic, Jovana

    2014-01-01

    The improvement of a patient's facial appearance is one of the main goals of contemporary orthodontic treatment. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the difference in facial proportions between attractive and anonymous females in order to establish objective facial features which are widely considered as beautiful. The study included two groups: first group consisted of 83 Caucasian female subjects between 22 and 28 years of age who were selected from the population of students at the University of Belgrade, and the second group included 24 attractive celebrity Caucasian females. The en face facial photographs were taken in natural head position (NHP). Numerous parameters were recorded on these photographs, in order to establish facial symmetry and correlation with the ideal set of proportions. This study showed significant difference between anonymous and attractive females. Attractive females showed smaller face in general and uniformity of the facial thirds and fifths, and most of the facial parameters meet the criteria of the ideal proportions. PMID:24701166

  4. The PEP Quark Search Proportional Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, S. I.; Harris, F.; Karliner, I.; Yount, D.; Ely, R.; Hamilton, R.; Pun, T.; Guryn, W.; Miller, D.; Fries, R.

    1981-04-01

    Proportional chambers are used in the PEP Free Quark Search to identify and remove possible background sources such as particles traversing the edges of counters, to permit geometric corrections to the dE/dx and TOF information from the scintillator and Cerenkov counters, and to look for possible high cross section quarks. The present beam pipe has a thickness of 0.007 interaction lengths (λi) and is followed in both arms (each with 45° <= θ <= 135°. Δphi = 90°) by 5 proportional chambers, each 0.0008 λi thick with 32 channels of pulse height readout, and by 3 thin scintillator planes, each 0.003 λi thick. Following this thin front end, each arm of the detector has 8 layers of scintillator (one with scintillating light pipes) interspersed with 4 proportional chambers and a layer of lucite Cerenkov counters. Both the calculated ion statistics and measurements using He-CH4 gas in a test chamber indicate that the chamber efficiencies should be > 98% for q = 1/3. The Landau spread measured in the test was equal to that observed for normal q = 1 traversals. One scintillator plane and thin chamber in each arm will have an extra set of ADC's with a wide gate bracketing the normal one so timing errors and tails of earlier pulses should not produce fake quarks.

  5. Tissue equivalent proportional counter neutron monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.C.; Strode, J.N.

    1980-06-01

    The Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter (TEPC) is a sensitive area monitoring instrument that can be used either in place at fixed locations or as a portable neutron exposure measuring device. The system monitors low levels of neutron radiation exposure and has the capability of accurately measuring neutron exposure rates as low as 0.1 mrem/hr. The computerized analysis system calculates the quality factor which is important for situations where the neutron to gamma ratio may vary significantly and irregularly such as in fuel fabrication or handling facilities.

  6. Neutron spectrometry with He-3 proportional counters

    SciTech Connect

    Manolopoulou, M.; Fragopoulou, M.; Stoulos, S.; Vagena, E.; Westmeier, W.; Zamani, M.

    2011-07-01

    Helium filled proportional counters are widely used in the field of neutron detection and spectrometry. In this work the response of a commercially available He-3 counter is studied experimentally and calculated with Monte Carlo for the neutron energy range from 230 keV up to about 7 MeV. The calculated response of the system is used to determine neutron yield energy distribution emitted from an extended {sup nat}U/Pb assembly irradiated with 1.6 GeV deuterons. The results are in acceptable agreement with the calculated neutron distribution with DCM-DEM code. (authors)

  7. Cylindrical nonlinear Schroedinger equation versus cylindrical Korteweg-de Vries equation

    SciTech Connect

    Fedele, Renato; De Nicola, Sergio; Grecu, Dan; Visinescu, Anca; Shukla, Padma K.

    2008-10-15

    A correspondence between the family of cylindrical nonlinear Schroedinger (cNLS) equations and the one of cylindrical Korteweg-de Vries (cKdV) equations is constructed. It associates non stationary solutions of the first family with the ones of the second family. This is done by using a correspondence, recently found, between the families of generalized NLS equation and generalized KdV equation, and their solutions in the form of travelling waves, respectively. In particular, non-stationary soliton-like solutions of the cNLS equation can be associated with non-stationary soliton-like solutions of cKdV equation.

  8. Energy Proportionality for Disk Storage Using Replication

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jinoh; Rotem, Doron

    2010-09-09

    Energy saving has become a crucial concern in datacenters as several reports predict that the anticipated energy costs over a three year period will exceed hardware acquisition. In particular, saving energy for storage is of major importance as storage devices (and cooling them off) may contribute over 25 percent of the total energy consumed in a datacenter. Recent work introduced the concept of energy proportionality and argued that it is a more relevant metric than just energy saving as it takes into account the tradeoff between energy consumption and performance. In this paper, we present a novel approach, called FREP (Fractional Replication for Energy Proportionality), for energy management in large datacenters. FREP includes areplication strategy and basic functions to enable flexible energy management. Specifically, our method provides performance guarantees by adaptively controlling the power states of a group of disks based on observed and predicted workloads. Our experiments, using a set of real and synthetic traces, show that FREP dramatically reduces energy requirements with a minimal response time penalty.

  9. ProPortal: A Database for Prochlorococcus

    DOE Data Explorer

    Huang, Katherine [Chisholm lab, MIT

    Prochlorococcus is a marine cyanobacterium that numerically dominates the mid-latitude oceans, and is the smallest known oxygenic phototroph. All isolates described thus far can be assigned to either a tightly clustered high-light (HL) adapted clade, or a more divergent low-light (LL) adapted group. They are closely related to, but distinct from, marine Synechococcus. The genomes of 12 strains have been sequenced and they range in size from 1.6 to 2.6 Mbp. They represent diverse lineages, spanning the rRNA diversity (97 to 99.93% similarity) of cultured representatives of this group. Our analyses of these genomes inform our understanding of how adaptation occurs in the oceans along gradients of light, nutrients, and other environmental factors, providing essential context for interpreting rapidly expanding metagenomic datasets. [Copied from http://proportal.mit.edu/project/prochlorococcus/] ProPortal allows users to browse and search genome date for not only Prochlorococcus, but Cyanophage and Synechococcus. Microarray data, environmental cell concentration data, and metagenome information are also available.

  10. Kalman-predictive-proportional-integral-derivative (KPPID)

    SciTech Connect

    Fluerasu, A.; Sutton, M.

    2004-12-17

    With third generation synchrotron X-ray sources, it is possible to acquire detailed structural information about the system under study with time resolution orders of magnitude faster than was possible a few years ago. These advances have generated many new challenges for changing and controlling the state of the system on very short time scales, in a uniform and controlled manner. For our particular X-ray experiments on crystallization or order-disorder phase transitions in metallic alloys, we need to change the sample temperature by hundreds of degrees as fast as possible while avoiding over or under shooting. To achieve this, we designed and implemented a computer-controlled temperature tracking system which combines standard Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID) feedback, thermal modeling and finite difference thermal calculations (feedforward), and Kalman filtering of the temperature readings in order to reduce the noise. The resulting Kalman-Predictive-Proportional-Integral-Derivative (KPPID) algorithm allows us to obtain accurate control, to minimize the response time and to avoid over/under shooting, even in systems with inherently noisy temperature readings and time delays. The KPPID temperature controller was successfully implemented at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratories and was used to perform coherent and time-resolved X-ray diffraction experiments.

  11. Motion parallax in immersive cylindrical display systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filliard, N.; Reymond, G.; Kemeny, A.; Berthoz, A.

    2012-03-01

    Motion parallax is a crucial visual cue produced by translations of the observer for the perception of depth and selfmotion. Therefore, tracking the observer viewpoint has become inevitable in immersive virtual (VR) reality systems (cylindrical screens, CAVE, head mounted displays) used e.g. in automotive industry (style reviews, architecture design, ergonomics studies) or in scientific studies of visual perception. The perception of a stable and rigid world requires that this visual cue be coherent with other extra-retinal (e.g. vestibular, kinesthetic) cues signaling ego-motion. Although world stability is never questioned in real world, rendering head coupled viewpoint in VR can lead to the perception of an illusory perception of unstable environments, unless a non-unity scale factor is applied on recorded head movements. Besides, cylindrical screens are usually used with static observers due to image distortions when rendering image for viewpoints different from a sweet spot. We developed a technique to compensate in real-time these non-linear visual distortions, in an industrial VR setup, based on a cylindrical screen projection system. Additionally, to evaluate the amount of discrepancies tolerated without perceptual distortions between visual and extraretinal cues, a "motion parallax gain" between the velocity of the observer's head and that of the virtual camera was introduced in this system. The influence of this artificial gain was measured on the gait stability of free-standing participants. Results indicate that, below unity, gains significantly alter postural control. Conversely, the influence of higher gains remains limited, suggesting a certain tolerance of observers to these conditions. Parallax gain amplification is therefore proposed as a possible solution to provide a wider exploration of space to users of immersive virtual reality systems.

  12. Single-mode cylindrical graphene plasmon waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jianfeng; Yang, Jingjing; Huang, Ming

    2016-08-01

    A cylindrical graphene plasmon waveguide (CGPW) which consists of two rolled graphene ribbons, a dielectric core and a dielectric interlayer is proposed. An analytical model for the single-mode condition and cutoff frequency of high-order graphene surface plasmon (GSP) modes is presented and verified by finite element method (FEM) simulations. Single-mode operation region of CGPW is identified in the frequency-radius space. By varying the separation between two graphene sheets and the Fermi level of graphene, a large tunability of the mode behavior is also demonstrated. The proposed structure may provide a new freedom to manipulate GSPs, and would lead to novel applications in optics.

  13. Cullet Manufacture Using the Cylindrical Induction Melter

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D. H.

    2000-01-20

    The base process for vitrification of the Am/Cm solution stored in F-canyon uses 25SrABS cullet as the glass former. A small portion of the cullet used in the SRTC development work was purchased from Corning while the majority was made in the 5 inch Cylindrical Induction Melter (CIM5). Task 1.01 of TTR-NMSS/SE-006, Additional Am-Cm Process Development Studies, requested that a process for the glass former (cullet) fabrication be specified. This report provides the process details for 25SrAB cullet production thereby satisfying Task 1.01.

  14. Periodic Arrays of Interfacial Cylindrical reverse Micelles

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson,M.; Cain, N.; Ocko, B.; Gin, D.; Hammond, S.; Schwartz, D.

    2005-01-01

    We report an approach for the fabrication of periodic molecular nanostructures on surfaces. The approach involves biomimetic self-organization of synthetic wedge-shaped amphiphilic molecules into multilayer arrays of cylindrical reverse micelles. The films were characterized by atomic force microscopy and X-ray reflectivity. These nanostructured films self-assemble in solution but remain stable upon removal and exposure to ambient conditions, making them potentially suitable for a variety of dry pattern transfer methods. We illustrate the generality of this approach by using two distinct molecular systems that vary in size by a factor of 2.

  15. Liquid crystal alignment in cylindrical microcapillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chychłowski, M.; Yaroshchuk, O.; Kravchuk, R.; Woliński, T.

    2011-09-01

    A variety of alignment configurations of liquid crystals (LCs) inside the glassy cylindrical capillaries is realized by using alignment materials providing different anchoring. The radial configuration with central disclination line is obtained for homeotropic boundary conditions. In turn, the axial, transversal and tilted alignment structures are realized by using materials for planar anchoring. The uniformity and controlling of the latter structures were provided by photoalignment method. This approach can be further used to control LC alignment in the photonic crystal fibers recognized as advanced elements for different optical devices.

  16. Liquid crystal alignment in cylindrical microcapillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chychłowski, M.; Yaroshchuk, O.; Kravchuk, R.; Woliński, T.

    2012-03-01

    A variety of alignment configurations of liquid crystals (LCs) inside the glassy cylindrical capillaries is realized by using alignment materials providing different anchoring. The radial configuration with central disclination line is obtained for homeotropic boundary conditions. In turn, the axial, transversal and tilted alignment structures are realized by using materials for planar anchoring. The uniformity and controlling of the latter structures were provided by photoalignment method. This approach can be further used to control LC alignment in the photonic crystal fibers recognized as advanced elements for different optical devices.

  17. High convergence implosion symmetry in cylindrical hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Amendt, P A; Bradley, D K; Hammel, B A; Landen, O L; Suter, L J; Turner, R E; Wallace, R J

    1999-09-01

    High convergence, hohlraum-driven implosions will require control of time-integrated drive asymmetries to 1% levels for ignition to succeed on the NIF. We review how core imaging provides such asymmetry measurement accuracy for the lowest order asymmetry modes, and describe recent improvements in imaging techniques that should allow detection of higher order asymmetry modes. We also present a simple analytic model explaining how the sensitivity of symmetry control to beam pointing scales as we progress from single ring per side Nova cylindrical hohlraum illumination geometries to NIF-like multiple rings per side Omega hohlraum illumination geometries and ultimately to NIF-scale hohlraums.

  18. Radiation of sound from unflanged cylindrical ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartharan, S. L.; Bayliss, A.

    1983-01-01

    Calculations of sound radiated from unflanged cylindrical ducts are presented. The numerical simulation models the problem of an aero-engine inlet. The time dependent linearized Euler equations are solved from a state of rest until a harmonic solution is attained. A fourth order accurate finite difference scheme is used and solutions are obtained from a fully vectorized Cyber-203 computer program. Cases of both plane waves and spin modes are treated. Spin modes model the sound generated by a turbofan engine. Boundary conditions for both plane waves and spin modes are treated. Solutions obtained are compared with experiments conducted at NASA Langley Research Center.

  19. Current to a moving cylindrical electrostatic probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoegy, W. R.; Wharton, L. E.

    1972-01-01

    The current collection characteristics of a moving cylindrical Langmuir probe are evaluated for a range of probe speeds and potentials which are applicable to earth and planetary measurements. The current expressions derived include the cases of the general accelerated current, sheath area limited current, orbital motion limited current, and retarded current. For the orbital motion limited current, a simple algebraic expression is obtained which includes and generalizes the Mott-Smith and Langmuir expressions for both a stationary probe and a rapidly moving probe. For a rapidly moving probe a single formula adequately represents both the accelerated and the retarded current.

  20. Relativistic current collection by a cylindrical Langmuir probe

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Arriaga, G.; Sanmartin, J. R.

    2012-06-15

    The current I to a cylindrical Langmuir probe with a bias {Phi}{sub p} satisfying {beta}{identical_to}e{Phi}{sub p}/m{sub e}c{sup 2}{approx}O(1) is discussed. The probe is considered at rest in an unmagnetized plasma composed of electrons and ions with temperatures kT{sub e}{approx}kT{sub i} Much-Less-Than m{sub e}c{sup 2}. For small enough radius, the probe collects the relativistic orbital-motion-limited (OML) current I{sub OML}, which is shown to be larger than the non-relativistic result; the OML current is proportional to {beta}{sup 1/2} and {beta}{sup 3/2} in the limits {beta} Much-Less-Than 1 and {beta} Much-Greater-Than 1, respectively. Unlike the non-relativistic case, the electron density can exceed the unperturbed density value. An asymptotic theory allowed to compute the maximum radius of the probe to collect OML current, the sheath radius for probe radius well below maximum and how the ratio I/I{sub OML} drops below unity when the maximum radius is exceeded. A numerical algorithm that solves the Vlasov-Poisson system was implemented and density and potential profiles presented. The results and their implications in a possible mission to Jupiter with electrodynamic bare tethers are discussed.

  1. How do college students solve proportion problems?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, Melvin C.; Fuller, Robert G.

    Problems which could be solved using proportional reasoning were administered nationwide by college faculty to their own science classes during a three year period. The reasoning of more than 8000 students covering three sections of the country was classified as concrete, transitional, or formal using Piagetian categories. Data from the West closely replicated that from the Midwest on similar metric conversion tasks. Student performance changed noticeably with a different problem format. The percentages of students using a ratio formula, ratio attempt, or intuitive methods of solution held approximately constant over time, task, and section of the country. The data shows the use of additive and conversion methods of solution depends upon the problem presentation.

  2. A proportional temperature controller with automatic shutoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucich, G. M.; Holland, P. W.

    1980-08-01

    A sensitive, proportional temperature controller useful in the temperature range from 40 to 400 C with an accuracy of plus or minus 0.1 C is described. It is potentially useful for regulating temperatures in air chambers, liquid baths, furnaces and reaction vessels and for other applications. This instrument was developed to control the duration and temperature of the heating cycle of a charcoal filled adsorber that is part of a special helium analyzer. The controller was made from commercially available parts and can be easily modified to provide continuous temperature control. The circuit is solid state and employs no electromechanical devices. Over a 2 year period of use as a component of the special helium analyzer, this temperature controller performed successfully and required no maintenance.

  3. Boron-10 Lined Proportional Counter Model Validation

    SciTech Connect

    Lintereur, Azaree T.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Kouzes, Richard T.

    2012-06-30

    The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safeguards (NA-241) is supporting the project “Coincidence Counting With Boron-Based Alternative Neutron Detection Technology” at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the development of an alternative neutron coincidence counter. The goal of this project is to design, build and demonstrate a boron-lined proportional tube-based alternative system in the configuration of a coincidence counter. This report discusses the validation studies performed to establish the degree of accuracy of the computer modeling methods current used to simulate the response of boron-lined tubes. This is the precursor to developing models for the uranium neutron coincidence collar under Task 2 of this project.

  4. TRIAC/SCR proportional control circuit

    DOEpatents

    Hughes, W.J.

    1999-04-06

    A power controller device is disclosed which uses a voltage-to-frequency converter in conjunction with a zero crossing detector to linearly and proportionally control AC power being supplied to a load. The output of the voltage-to frequency converter controls the ``reset`` input of a R-S flip flop, while an ``0`` crossing detector controls the ``set`` input. The output of the flip flop triggers a monostable multivibrator controlling the SCR or TRIAC firing circuit connected to the load. Logic gates prevent the direct triggering of the multivibrator in the rare instance where the ``reset`` and ``set`` inputs of the flip flop are in coincidence. The control circuit can be supplemented with a control loop, providing compensation for line voltage variations. 9 figs.

  5. TRIAC/SCR proportional control circuit

    DOEpatents

    Hughes, Wallace J.

    1999-01-01

    A power controller device which uses a voltage-to-frequency converter in conjunction with a zero crossing detector to linearly and proportionally control AC power being supplied to a load. The output of the voltage-to frequency converter controls the "reset" input of a R-S flip flop, while an "0" crossing detector controls the "set" input. The output of the flip flop triggers a monostable multivibrator controlling the SCR or TRIAC firing circuit connected to the load. Logic gates prevent the direct triggering of the multivibrator in the rare instance where the "reset" and "set" inputs of the flip flop are in coincidence. The control circuit can be supplemented with a control loop, providing compensation for line voltage variations.

  6. Gaseous fuel and air proportioning device

    SciTech Connect

    Lassanske, G. G.; Poshlman, A. G.

    1984-01-10

    The device for proportioning a gaseous fuel and air for combustion in an internal combustion engine includes a plate-like first member having a peripheral edge portion and a second member cooperating with the first member having a peripheral edge portion and a second member cooperating with the first member to define a mixing chamber having an outlet adapted to be connected in communication with the air intake of the engine carburetor. The second member also includes an annular portion having an arcuate first wall which is convex to and spaced from the peripheral edge portion of the first member to define an annular venturi having an inlet in communication with the atmosphere and an annular outlet in communication with the mixing chamber. A base member or second wall cooperates with the arcuate wall to form a substantially closed, annular plenum chamber into which a gaseous fuel, such as natural gas, is admitted when the engine is to be operated on the gaseous fuel. The gaseous fuel is admitted into the mixing chamber from the plenum chamber through one or more ports in the arcuate wall at or in the vicinity of the throat of the annular venturi. A pair of circumferentially spaced radially extending partitions located on the opposite sides of each port define a radially extending venturi which has a throat located at or in the vicinity of the port and serves to induce flow of the gaseous fuel through the corresponding port. The proportioning device preferably is arranged to fit inside the housing of an existing air cleaner.

  7. Design parameters for rotating cylindrical filtration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwille, John A.; Mitra, Deepanjan; Lueptow, Richard M.

    2002-01-01

    Rotating cylindrical filtration displays significantly reduced plugging of filter pores and build-up of a cake layer, but the number and range of parameters that can be adjusted complicates the design of these devices. Twelve individual parameters were investigated experimentally by measuring the build-up of particles on the rotating cylindrical filter after a fixed time of operation. The build-up of particles on the filter depends on the rotational speed, the radial filtrate flow, the particle size and the gap width. Other parameters, such as suspension concentration and total flow rate are less important. Of the four mechanisms present in rotating filters to reduce pore plugging and cake build-up, axial shear, rotational shear, centrifugal sedimentation and vortical motion, the evidence suggests rotational shear is the dominant mechanism, although the other mechanisms still play minor roles. The ratio of the shear force acting parallel to the filter surface on a particle to the Stokes drag acting normal to the filter surface on the particle due to the difference between particle motion and filtrate flow can be used as a non-dimensional parameter that predicts the degree of particle build-up on the filter surface for a wide variety of filtration conditions. c2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Design parameters for rotating cylindrical filtration.

    PubMed

    Schwille, John A; Mitra, Deepanjan; Lueptow, Richard M

    2002-07-15

    Rotating cylindrical filtration displays significantly reduced plugging of filter pores and build-up of a cake layer, but the number and range of parameters that can be adjusted complicates the design of these devices. Twelve individual parameters were investigated experimentally by measuring the build-up of particles on the rotating cylindrical filter after a fixed time of operation. The build-up of particles on the filter depends on the rotational speed, the radial filtrate flow, the particle size and the gap width. Other parameters, such as suspension concentration and total flow rate are less important. Of the four mechanisms present in rotating filters to reduce pore plugging and cake build-up, axial shear, rotational shear, centrifugal sedimentation and vortical motion, the evidence suggests rotational shear is the dominant mechanism, although the other mechanisms still play minor roles. The ratio of the shear force acting parallel to the filter surface on a particle to the Stokes drag acting normal to the filter surface on the particle due to the difference between particle motion and filtrate flow can be used as a non-dimensional parameter that predicts the degree of particle build-up on the filter surface for a wide variety of filtration conditions. PMID:12238523

  9. Thermal Convection in a cylindrical enclosure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, K.

    The microgravity experiment in the Apollo space mission during 1973 has established the importance of the surface tension as a propulsive force on the onset of convection because surface tension varies with temperature. Any temperature gradient established across the surface of the fluid is accompanied by a gradient in surface tension. However, the surface tension driven convection experiment flown in the shuttle flight has not shown any evidence of oscillatory flow even for Marangoni number as high as 105. The paper discusses thermal convection in a cylindrical enclosure with free boundary in a microgravity environment. The surface deformation caused by g-jitter and its relation to the oscillatory flow is studied. The system to be investigated in cylindrical layers of fluid heated from beneath with upper boundary free, initially in mechanical equilibrium, but subjected to the gradient of heat. At any instant of time, in a microgravity environment, the oscillatory part of g-jitter can be as high as 10 -3 g, where g is the gravitational acceleration on the surface of the earth [1]. The instability of a Boussinesq fluid [2] is analyzed in terms of the dimensionless parameters Raleigh number, Ra, Prandtl number, Pr, Marangoni number, M and the aspect ratio, A and relative importance of these parameters is established. References [1] Bannister, T C., etal, NASA, TMX-64772, 1973 [2] Shukla, K N, Applied Mechanics Review, Vol. 54, (5), PP 391-404, 2001

  10. Scattering and radiation from cylindrically conformal antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempel, Leo Charles

    Microstrip patch antennas offer considerable advantages in terms of weight, aerodynamic drag, cost, flexibility, and observability over more conventional protruding antennas. Two hybrid finite element methods are presented and are used to examine the scattering and radiation behavior of cylindrically conformal patches. In conjunction with a new divergence-free cylindrical shell element, the finite element-boundary integral method is shown to have low computational and memory requirements when compared with competing approaches. This method uses an efficient creeping wave series for the computation of the dyadic Green's function and a uniform surface mesh so that a fast Fourier transform may be used to reduce the computational and memory burden of the method. An alternative finite element-absorbing boundary condition approach incorporates a new conformal vector condition which minimizes the computational domain. The latter method is more flexible than the former because it can incorporate surface coatings and protruding antennas. Guidelines are established for minimal ABC displacement from the aperture. These two hybrid finite element methods are used to study the scattering, radiation, and input impedance of typical conformal antenna arrays. In particular, the effect of curvature and cavity size is examined for both discrete and wraparound antenna arrays.

  11. Thermal stress in high temperature cylindrical fasteners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blosser, Max L.

    1988-01-01

    Uninsulated structures fabricated from carbon or silicon-based materials, which are allowed to become hot during flight, are attractive for the design of some components of hypersonic vehicles. They have the potential to reduce weight and increase vehicle efficiency. Because of manufacturing contraints, these structures will consist of parts which must be fastened together. The thermal expansion mismatch between conventional metal fasteners and carbon or silicon-based structural materials may make it difficult to design a structural joint which is tight over the operational temperature range without exceeding allowable stress limits. In this study, algebraic, closed-form solutions for calculating the thermal stresses resulting from radial thermal expansion mismatch around a cylindrical fastener are developed. These solutions permit a designer to quickly evaluate many combinations of materials for the fastener and the structure. Using the algebraic equations developed, material properties and joint geometry were varied to determine their effect on thermal stresses. Finite element analyses were used to verify that the closed-form solutions derived give the correct thermal stress distribution around a cylindrical fastener and to investigate the effect of some of the simplifying assumptions made in developing the closed-form solutions for thermal stresses.

  12. Motion of a Cylindrical Dielectric Boundary.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Li-Tien; Li, Bo; White, Michael; Zhou, Shenggao

    2013-01-01

    The interplay between geometry and electrostatics contributes significantly to hydrophobic interactions of biomolecules in an aqueous solution. With an implicit solvent, such a system can be described macroscopically by the dielectric boundary that separates the high-dielectric solvent from low-dielectric solutes. This work concerns the motion of a model cylindrical dielectric boundary as the steepest descent of a free-energy functional that consists of both the surface and electrostatic energies. The effective dielectric boundary force is defined and an explicit formula of the force is obtained. It is found that such a force always points from the solvent region to solute region. In the case that the interior of a cylinder is of a lower dielectric, the motion of the dielectric boundary is initially driven dominantly by the surface force but is then driven inward quickly to the cylindrical axis by both the surface and electrostatic forces. In the case that the interior of a cylinder is of a higher dielectric, the competition between the geometrical and electrostatic contributions leads to the existence of equilibrium boundaries that are circular cylinders. Linear stability analysis is presented to show that such an equilibrium is only stable for a perturbation with a wavenumber larger than a critical value. Numerical simulations are reported for both of the cases, confirming the analysis on the role of each component of the driving force. Implications of the mathematical findings to the understanding of charged molecular systems are discussed.

  13. Optical inspection system for cylindrical objects

    DOEpatents

    Brenden, Byron B.; Peters, Timothy J.

    1989-01-01

    In the inspection of cylindrical objects, particularly O-rings, the object is translated through a field of view and a linear light trace is projected on its surface. An image of the light trace is projected on a mask, which has a size and shape corresponding to the size and shape which the image would have if the surface of the object were perfect. If there is a defect, light will pass the mask and be sensed by a detector positioned behind the mask. Preferably, two masks and associated detectors are used, one mask being convex to pass light when the light trace falls on a projection from the surface and the other concave, to pass light when the light trace falls on a depression in the surface. The light trace may be either dynamic, formed by a scanned laser beam, or static, formed by such a beam focussed by a cylindrical lens. Means are provided to automatically keep the illuminating receiving systems properly aligned.

  14. Propagation properties of cylindrical sinc Gaussian beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyyuboğlu, Halil T.; Bayraktar, Mert

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the propagation properties of cylindrical sinc Gaussian beam in turbulent atmosphere. Since an analytic solution is hardly derivable, the study is carried out with the aid of random phase screens. Evolutions of the beam intensity profile, beam size and kurtosis parameter are analysed. It is found that on the source plane, cylindrical sinc Gaussian beam has a dark hollow appearance, where the side lobes also start to emerge with increase in width parameter and Gaussian source size. During propagation, beams with small width and Gaussian source size exhibit off-axis behaviour, losing the dark hollow shape, accumulating the intensity asymmetrically on one side, whereas those with large width and Gaussian source size retain dark hollow appearance even at long propagation distances. It is seen that the beams with large widths expand more in beam size than the ones with small widths. The structure constant values chosen do not seem to alter this situation. The kurtosis parameters of the beams having small widths are seen to be larger than the ones with the small widths. Again the choice of the structure constant does not change this trend.

  15. Design parameters for rotating cylindrical filtration.

    PubMed

    Schwille, John A; Mitra, Deepanjan; Lueptow, Richard M

    2002-07-15

    Rotating cylindrical filtration displays significantly reduced plugging of filter pores and build-up of a cake layer, but the number and range of parameters that can be adjusted complicates the design of these devices. Twelve individual parameters were investigated experimentally by measuring the build-up of particles on the rotating cylindrical filter after a fixed time of operation. The build-up of particles on the filter depends on the rotational speed, the radial filtrate flow, the particle size and the gap width. Other parameters, such as suspension concentration and total flow rate are less important. Of the four mechanisms present in rotating filters to reduce pore plugging and cake build-up, axial shear, rotational shear, centrifugal sedimentation and vortical motion, the evidence suggests rotational shear is the dominant mechanism, although the other mechanisms still play minor roles. The ratio of the shear force acting parallel to the filter surface on a particle to the Stokes drag acting normal to the filter surface on the particle due to the difference between particle motion and filtrate flow can be used as a non-dimensional parameter that predicts the degree of particle build-up on the filter surface for a wide variety of filtration conditions.

  16. Electron Confinement in Cylindrical Potential Well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltenkov, A. S.; Msezane, A. Z.

    2016-05-01

    We show that studying the solutions of the wave equation for an electron confined in a cylindrical potential well offers the possibility to analyze the confinement behavior of an electron executing one- or two-dimensional motion in the remaining three-dimensional space within the framework of the same mathematical model of the potential well. Some low-lying electronic states with different symmetries are considered and the corresponding wave functions are calculated. The behavior of their nodes and their peak positions with respect to the parameters of the cylindrical well is analyzed. Additionally, the momentum distributions of electrons in these states are calculated. The limiting cases of the ratio of the cylinder length H to its radius R0 are considered; when H significantly exceeds R0 and when R0 is much greater than H. The possible application of the results obtained here for the description of the general features in the behavior of electrons in nanowires with metallic type of conductivity (or nanotubes) and ultrathin epitaxial films (or graphene sheets) are discussed. Possible experiments are suggested as well where the quantum confinement can be manifested. Work supported by the Uzbek Foundation (ASB) and by the U.S. DOE, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Energy Research (AZM).

  17. Note: Electrochemical etching of cylindrical nanoprobes using a vibrating electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yufeng; Zeng, Yongbin Qu, Ningsong; Zhu, Di

    2015-07-15

    An electrochemical etching process using a vibrating electrolyte of potassium hydroxide to prepare tungsten cylindrical nanotips is developed. The vibrating electrolyte eases the effects of a diffusion layer and extends the etching area, which aid in the production of cylindrical nanotips. Larger amplitudes and a vibration frequency of 35 Hz are recommended for producing cylindrical nanotips. Nanotips with a tip radius of approximately 43 nm and a conical angle of arctan 0.0216 are obtained.

  18. Static, cylindrically symmetric strings in general relativity with cosmological constant

    SciTech Connect

    Linet, B.

    1986-07-01

    The static, cylindrically symmetric solutions to Einstein's equations with a cosmological term describing cosmic strings are determined. The discussion depends on the sign of the cosmological constant.

  19. Altered proportions of RCS-rat eyes.

    PubMed

    Schreckenberger, M; Eichhorn, M; Gottanka, J; Döbig, C; Lütjen-Drecoll, E

    1994-10-01

    The growth pattern of RCS-rat eyes with hereditary retinal degeneration was analysed morphometrically, evaluating midsagittal sections of the entire globe and sections of the chamber angle region. No changes of the axial diameter of RCS-rat eyes were found if compared with eyes of age-matched controls. There were, however, characteristic proportional changes in the anterior eye segment of RCS rats. The distance between the peripheral end of Descemet's membrane (DM) and both the posterior end of Schlemm's canal and the ora serrata were significantly elongated indicating that this region might be most susceptible to growth factors. The length of the posterior globe up to the level of the ora serrata was shorter in RCS rats than in control rats. In addition, in RCS-rat eyes the pars plana was significantly elongated and the pars plicata shortened. Ultrastructural changes of ciliary epithelium were not seen before 7 months of age in RCS rats. They were only present in those parts of the circumference in which the stromal capillaries also revealed structural changes. The ciliary epithelial alterations were therefore considered secondary to narrowing or rarefication in the adjacent blood vessels.

  20. Method for making generally cylindrical underground openings

    DOEpatents

    Routh, J.W.

    1983-05-26

    A rapid, economical and safe method for making a generally cylindrical underground opening such as a shaft or a tunnel is described. A borehole is formed along the approximate center line of where it is desired to make the underground opening. The borehole is loaded with an explodable material and the explodable material is detonated. An enlarged cavity is formed by the explosive action of the detonated explodable material forcing outward and compacting the original walls of the borehole. The enlarged cavity may be increased in size by loading it with a second explodable material, and detonating the second explodable material. The process may be repeated as required until the desired underground opening is made. The explodable material used in the method may be free-flowing, and it may be contained in a pipe.

  1. Naked singularity resolution in cylindrical collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Kurita, Yasunari; Nakao, Ken-ichi

    2006-03-15

    In this paper, we study the gravitational collapse of null dust in cylindrically symmetric spacetime. The naked singularity necessarily forms at the symmetry axis. We consider the situation in which null dust is emitted again from the naked singularity formed by the collapsed null dust and investigate the backreaction by this emission for the naked singularity. We show a very peculiar but physically important case in which the same amount of null dust as that of the collapsed one is emitted from the naked singularity as soon as the ingoing null dust hits the symmetry axis and forms the naked singularity. In this case, although this naked singularity satisfies the strong curvature condition by Krolak (limiting focusing condition), geodesics which hit the singularity can be extended uniquely across the singularity. Therefore, we may say that the collapsing null dust passes through the singularity formed by itself and then leaves for infinity. Finally, the singularity completely disappears and the flat spacetime remains.

  2. Electrochemical cell having cylindrical electrode elements

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Paul A.; Shimotake, Hiroshi

    1982-01-01

    A secondary, high temperature electrochemical cell especially adapted for lithium alloy negative electrodes, transition metal chalcogenide positive electrodes and alkali metal halide or alkaline earth metal halide electrolyte is disclosed. The cell is held within an elongated cylindrical container in which one of the active materials is filled around the outside surfaces of a plurality of perforate tubular current collectors along the length of the container. Each of the current collector tubes contain a concentric tubular layer of electrically insulative ceramic as an interelectrode separator. The active material of opposite polarity in elongated pin shape is positioned longitudinally within the separator layer. A second electrically conductive tube with perforate walls can be swagged or otherwise bonded to the outer surface of the pin as a current collector and the electrically insulative ceramic layer can be coated or otherwise layered onto the outer surface of this second current collector. Alternatively, the central pin electrode can include an axial core as a current collector.

  3. Scattering by buried dielectric cylindrical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Vico, M.; Frezza, F.; Pajewski, L.; Schettini, G.

    2005-12-01

    An analytical-numerical technique for the solution of the two-dimensional electromagnetic plane wave scattering by a finite set of dielectric circular cylinders buried in a dielectric half-space is presented. The problem is solved for both the near- and far-field regions, for transverse magnetic and transverse electric polarizations. The scattered field is represented in terms of a superposition of cylindrical waves, and use is made of the plane wave spectrum to take into account the reflection and transmission of such waves by the interface. The validity of the approach is confirmed by comparisons with results available in the literature, with very good agreement, and by self-consistency tests. Applications of the method to objects of arbitrary cross section simulated by suitable configurations of circular cylinders are shown.

  4. Polymer translocation through a cylindrical channel

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Chiu TaiAndrew; Muthukumar, M.

    2008-01-01

    A formalism of polymer translocation through a cylindrical channel of finite diameter and length between two spherical compartments is developed. Unlike previous simplified systems, the finite diameter of the channel allows the number of polymer segments inside the channel to be adjusted during translocation according to the free energy of possible conformations. The translocation process of a Gaussian chain without excluded volume and hydrodynamic interactions is studied using exact formulas of confinement free energy under this formalism. The free energy landscape for the translocation process, the distribution of the translocation time, and the average translocation time are presented. The complex dependencies of the average translocation time on the length and diameter of the channel, the sizes of the donor and receptor compartments, and the chain length are illustrated. PMID:18433273

  5. Stresses in rotating composite cylindrical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, James T.-S.; Lin, Chien-Chang

    Stresses in composite cylindrical shells rotating with a constant speed about their longitudinal axis are analyzed. Each ply or ply group is treated as a separate thin layer of homogeneous and orthotropic material under the interfacial stresses as surface loading. There is no limitation on the total thickness of the shell. The circumferential stress, motivated by the conventional thin shell theory, is assumed to vary linearly through the thickness of the layer. The radial stress is determined in terms of the circumferential stress through the equilibrium condition, and an average compatibility condition through the thickness of the thin layer is used. Numerical results using the present analysis show nearly perfect agreement with the exact solution for homogeneous and isotropic cylinders. Some results for cylinders having orthotropic layers are presented for illustrative purposes.

  6. Magnetosheath effects on cylindrical Langmuir probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szuszczewicz, E. P.; Takacs, P. Z.

    1979-01-01

    A study of the response of cylindrical Langmuir probes in magnetoplasmas focusing on the relative magnitudes of Larmor radius and sheath size is presented. The approach results in a classification of magnetic field effects which involves the magnetic field strength and plasma parameters of density, temperature, and the applied probe potential. It is shown that a 0.25 G field can have similar effects on the current collection properties of the probe in ionospheric plasma as a 30 kG field would have in a hot, dense laboratory plasma. The data also show: (1) the effects of probe orientation on electron current collection from magnetoplasmas; (2) that these effects can be important even when the electron Larmor radius is larger than the radius of the probe; and (3) that substantial magnetic field effects occur when the probe sheath is comparable to or greater than the Larmor radius.

  7. Cathode Effects in Cylindrical Hall Thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Granstedt, E.M.; Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N. J.

    2008-09-12

    Stable operation of a cylindrical Hall thruster (CHT) has been achieved using a hot wire cathode, which functions as a controllable electron emission source. It is shown that as the electron emission from the cathode increases with wire heating, the discharge current increases, the plasma plume angle reduces, and the ion energy distribution function shifts toward higher energies. The observed effect of cathode electron emission on thruster parameters extends and clarifies performance improvements previously obtained for the overrun discharge current regime of the same type of thruster, but using a hollow cathode-neutralizer. Once thruster discharge current saturates with wire heating, further filament heating does not affect other discharge parameters. The saturated values of thruster discharge parameters can be further enhanced by optimal placement of the cathode wire with respect to the magnetic field.

  8. Indentation of Ellipsoidal and Cylindrical Elastic Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vella, Dominic; Ajdari, Amin; Vaziri, Ashkan; Boudaoud, Arezki

    2012-10-01

    Thin shells are found in nature at scales ranging from viruses to hens’ eggs; the stiffness of such shells is essential for their function. We present the results of numerical simulations and theoretical analyses for the indentation of ellipsoidal and cylindrical elastic shells, considering both pressurized and unpressurized shells. We provide a theoretical foundation for the experimental findings of Lazarus et al. [following paper, Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 144301 (2012)PRLTAO0031-9007] and for previous work inferring the turgor pressure of bacteria from measurements of their indentation stiffness; we also identify a new regime at large indentation. We show that the indentation stiffness of convex shells is dominated by either the mean or Gaussian curvature of the shell depending on the pressurization and indentation depth. Our results reveal how geometry rules the rigidity of shells.

  9. Premixed flames in closed cylindrical tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzener, Philippe; Matalon, Moshe

    2001-09-01

    We consider the propagation of a premixed flame, as a two-dimensional sheet separating unburned gas from burned products, in a closed cylindrical tube. A nonlinear evolution equation, that describes the motion of the flame front as a function of its mean position, is derived. The equation contains a destabilizing term that results from the gas motion induced by thermal expansion and has a memory term associated with vorticity generation. Numerical solutions of this equation indicate that, when diffusion is stabilizing, the flame evolves into a non-planar form whose shape, and its associated symmetry properties, are determined by the Markstein parameter, and by the initial data. In particular, we observe the development of convex axisymmetric or non-axisymmetric flames, tulip flames and cellular flames.

  10. Cylindrical spreading due to downwind refraction.

    PubMed

    Makarewicz, Rufin

    2016-04-01

    Downwind propagation is analyzed for a low level jet (LLJ). The LLJ is characterized by a wind speed maximum (at least 10-20 m/s with peak speeds up to 30 m/s) a few hundred meters above the ground. Close to an elevated point source, such as a wind turbine or an aircraft, spherical spreading results in a 6 dB decrease in sound level per doubling of the distance. Wind turbine noise measurements show that at a transition distance, the downwind propagation changes the spherical spreading into a cylindrical spreading with a 3 dB decrease. It is shown how the transition distance and sound intensity depend on the LLJ parameters. The pivotal phenomenon is the non-coherent superposition of ground reflected rays in the turbulent atmosphere. PMID:27106309

  11. Ion orbits in a cylindrical Langmuir probe

    SciTech Connect

    Taccogna, Francesco; Longo, Savino; Capitelli, Mario

    2006-04-15

    It has been suggested that in weakly collisional sheaths, potential wells and barriers could appear due to ion-neutral momentum and charge transfer collisions. These can cause the presence of repulsed and trapped ions in the region surrounding a negatively biased Langmuir probe, invalidating the commonly used orbital-motion-limited theory of ion current. This is still an open question concerning also the charging and shielding of dust grains, and at present, no fully self-consistent treatment exists. For this reason, a particle-in-cell/test-particle Monte Carlo simulation of the dynamics of an argon plasma in the region surrounding an attracting cylindrical probe at medium gas pressure has been developed. The results of the present simulation for different probe potentials and discharge pressures demonstrate the complex structure of electric potential around the probe and the failure of collisionless theories.

  12. Concentration profiles in drying cylindrical filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czaputa, Klaus; Brenn, Günter; Meile, Walter

    2008-12-01

    We analyze theoretically the drying of cylindrical filaments. For modelling the mass transfer on the gas side of the liquid-gas interface of the shrinking circular cylindrical filament, we apply the model of Abramzon and Sirignano, which was originally developed for spherical geometry. As a consequence of mass transfer at constant Sherwood number, we obtain a d2-law for the shrinkage of the cylinder as in the case of the spherical geometry, which expresses that the cross-sectional area of the cylinder shrinks at a constant rate with time. For this situation, the diffusion equation for the liquid phase mixture components becomes separable upon transformation into similarity coordinates and is solved analytically to obtain the concentration profiles inside the filament as functions of time. The dependency of the profiles on the radial coordinate is determined by a series of Kummer’s functions. Applying this result, we study the evolution of the concentration profiles in the liquid phase with time as dependent on a parameter given as the ratio of rate of shrinkage of the cross-sectional area of the cylinder to liquid-phase diffusion coefficient, which was identified as relevant for the shape of the concentration profiles formed in the liquid during the drying process. As an example, we present computed results for the constant evaporation rate regime in the dry-spinning process of a polyvinyl-alcohol (PVA)-water system. Comparison of our analytical results with full numerical solutions of the diffusion equation from the literature, achieved with concentration-dependent diffusion coefficient, reveals very good agreement.

  13. Development of the Cylindrical Wire Electrical Discharge Machining Process.

    SciTech Connect

    McSpadden, SB

    2002-01-22

    Results of applying the wire Electrical Discharge Machining (EDM) process to generate precise cylindrical forms on hard, difficult-to-machine materials are presented. A precise, flexible, and corrosion-resistant underwater rotary spindle was designed and added to a conventional two-axis wire EDM machine to enable the generation of free-form cylindrical geometries. A detailed spindle error analysis identifies the major source of error at different frequency. The mathematical model for the material removal of cylindrical wire EDM process is derived. Experiments were conducted to explore the maximum material removal rate for cylindrical and 2D wire EDM of carbide and brass work-materials. Compared to the 2D wire EDM, higher maximum material removal rates may be achieved in the cylindrical wire EDM. This study also investigates the surface integrity and roundness of parts created by the cylindrical wire EDM process. For carbide parts, an arithmetic average surface roughness and roundness as low as 0.68 and 1.7 {micro}m, respectively, can be achieved. Surfaces of the cylindrical EDM parts were examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) to identify the craters, sub-surface recast layers and heat-affected zones under various process parameters. This study has demonstrated that the cylindrical wire EDM process parameters can be adjusted to achieve either high material removal rate or good surface integrity.

  14. Cylindrical thin-shell wormholes supported by phantom energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eid, A.

    2016-09-01

    In the framework of Darmois-Israel formalism, the general equations describing the motion of cylindrical thin-shell wormholes supported by equation of state of phantom energy are derived. The linear perturbation approach is used to investigate the stability of a cylindrical thin-shell wormhole of a static solution.

  15. STABILITY OF A CYLINDRICAL SOLUTE-SOLVENT INTERFACE: EFFECT OF GEOMETRY, ELECTROSTATICS, AND HYDRODYNAMICS*

    PubMed Central

    LI, BO; SUN, HUI; ZHOU, SHENGGAO

    2015-01-01

    The solute-solvent interface that separates biological molecules from their surrounding aqueous solvent characterizes the conformation and dynamics of such molecules. In this work, we construct a solvent fluid dielectric boundary model for the solvation of charged molecules and apply it to study the stability of a model cylindrical solute-solvent interface. The motion of the solute-solvent interface is defined to be the same as that of solvent fluid at the interface. The solvent fluid is assumed to be incompressible and is described by the Stokes equation. The solute is modeled simply by the ideal-gas law. All the viscous force, hydrostatic pressure, solute-solvent van der Waals interaction, surface tension, and electrostatic force are balanced at the solute-solvent interface. We model the electrostatics by Poisson’s equation in which the solute-solvent interface is treated as a dielectric boundary that separates the low-dielectric solute from the high-dielectric solvent. For a cylindrical geometry, we find multiple cylindrically shaped equilibrium interfaces that describe polymodal (e.g., dry and wet) states of hydration of an underlying molecular system. These steady-state solutions exhibit bifurcation behavior with respect to the charge density. For their linearized systems, we use the projection method to solve the fluid equation and find the dispersion relation. Our asymptotic analysis shows that, for large wavenumbers, the decay rate is proportional to wavenumber with the proportionality half of the ratio of surface tension to solvent viscosity, indicating that the solvent viscosity does affect the stability of a solute-solvent interface. Consequences of our analysis in the context of biomolecular interactions are discussed. PMID:26877555

  16. Estimates of neutron reaction rates in three portable He-3 proportional counters

    SciTech Connect

    Descalle, M; Labov, S

    2007-03-01

    The goal of this study is to obtain Monte Carlo estimates of neutron reaction rates for the {sup 3}He(n,p){sup 3}H reaction in two portable He-3 proportional counters in several configurations to quantify contributions from the environment, and optimize the tube characteristics. The smallest tube (0.5-inch diameter, 2-inch long, P = 10 atm) will not meet requirements. The largest tube (1-inch diameter, 4-inch long, P = 6 or 10 atm) will meet requirements and the tube length could be decreased to 2-inch at 6 atm and 1-inch at 10 atm. The 'medium' tube (3/4-inch diameter, 2-inch long, P = 10 atm) will meet requirements for the parallelepiped body, but will not for the cylindrical body.

  17. Changes in left ventricular function as determined by the multi-wire gamma camera at near presyncopal levels of lower body negative pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pintner, R.; Fortney, S.; Mulvagh, S.; Lacy, J.

    1992-01-01

    At presyncopal levels of lower body negative pressure (LBNP), we have frequently observed electrocardiographic responses that may be due to changes in cardiac position and/or shape, but could be indicative of altered myocardial function. To further investigate this, we evaluated cardiac function using a nuclear imaging technique in 21 healthy subjects (17 men and 4 women) after 30 minutes of supine rest and near the end of a presyncopal-limited LBNP exposure (LBNP averaged 65 plus or minus 3 mmHg at injection). Cardiac first pass images were obtained with a Multi-Wire Gamma Camera following an intravenous bolus injection of 30-50 millicurries of Tantalum-178. Manual blood pressures and electrocardiograms were obtained throughout the 3 minute graded LBNP protocol. Between rest and injection during LBNP, heart rate increased (P less than 0.01) from 67 plus or minus 3 beats per minute to 99 plus or minus beats per minute, systolic blood pressure decreased (P less than 0.01) from 110 plus or minus 3 mmHg to 107 plus or minus 3 mmHg and left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) decreased (P less than 0.01) from 0.57 plus or minus 0.02 to 0.48 plus or minus 0.02. During LBNP, ST segment depression of at least 0.5 mm occurred in 7 subjects. Subjects with ST depression had greater reductions (P = 0.05) in EF than subjects without ST depression (0.15 plus or minus 0.07 versus 0.005 plus or minus 0.03), but also tolerated greater levels (P less than 0.05) of negative pressure (88 plus or minus mmHg versus 69 plus or minus 5 mmHg). There was a significant relationship between presyncopal LBNP level and EF (R(exp 2) = 0.50, P less than 0.05). Our findings suggest there may be a decrease in systolic myocardial function at high levels of LBNP.

  18. Focal field interactions from cylindrical vector beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biss, David Paul

    In optical imaging there is always a push to improve image quality or find methods to gain new imaging information. This is apparent in the optical lithography and semiconductor inspection industries, where optical metrology and imaging systems are using larger numerical aperture systems and finding new imaging methods, such as immersion imaging, to shrink focal fields. At high numerical apertures, scalar diffraction theories break down and polarization effects play a large role in focal field interactions. With this interest in polarization, new models for local polarization effects are needed. Along with new models, cylindrically-symmetric polarized beams known as cylindrical vector (CV) beams, can provide new methods of imaging in this high NA regime. In this thesis, we examine the modeling of radially and azimuthally polarized beams focused at high numerical aperture in the presence of a planar interface. These focal fields are also modeled with primary spherical, coma, and astigmatism wavefront aberrations in the entrance pupil of the focusing system. Particular attention is given to the longitudinal field component generated by the focused radial beam, and the correlation between the magnetic and electric fields of radial and azimuthal beams. A scanning edge test using linearly polarized beams is modeled using a rigorous coupled wave (RCW) method and is compared to experimental data. The ability of the scanning edge test to predict spot asymmetry is investigated though the comparison of the RCW scanning edge model with free space vector diffraction theories. This RCW model is extended to include CV beam illumination and mode filtering of the system's exit pupil fields. This extension provides a model to accurately predict the performance of a dark-field imaging modality using radially and azimuthally polarized beams. Predictions from this model are compared to experimental results with attention given to defocus effects and the ability to accurately measure

  19. Cylindrical Implosion Experiments using Laser Direct Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tubbs, David

    1998-11-01

    Development of high-gain targets for the National Ignition Facility relies considerably on computational modeling, and it is important that our codes are validated against relevant experimental data in convergent geometry.(W. J. Krauser et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 2084 (1996); D. C. Wilson et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 1953 (1998)) In collaboration with the University of Rochester, we have begun a campaign of hydrodynamic instability experiments in cylindrical geometry using direct drive,(D. L. Tubbs et al., submitted to Laser and Particle Beams (1998); C. W. Barnes et al., submitted to Rev. Sci. Instrm. (1998)) building on our success in indirect drive.( W. W. Hsing et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 1832 (1997); W. W. Hsing and N. M. Hoffman, Phys. Rev. Lett., 3876 (1997)) Cylindrical targets facilitate direct diagnostic access to the convergent, hydrodynamic flow. The energy advantage of direct drive and its excellent target-illumination symmetry (achieved at OMEGA through use of Distributed Phase Plates and SSD) permit more energetic implosions, larger target scale (hence greater diagnostic resolution), longer acceleration timescales, and higher convergence than were possible using indirect drive. We estimate that specific laser energy delivered to the target for direct drive at OMEGA is roughly 4 times that achieved for indirect drive at Nova. Our first experiments (January 1998) yield excellent data for the first highly symmetrical direct-drive implosions, with which we benchmark zeroth-order hydrodynamic simulations. Two-dimensional (2-D) LASNEX calculations, using as-shot laser power histories and no further physics adjustments, match measured target-implosion data within theoretical and experimental errors. In addition, 2-D LASNEX simulations of single-mode (m=28, azimuthally symmetric) perturbation growth agree well with data obtained during our first week of experiments. For 1.5-micron initial perturbation amplitude, we observe Rayleigh-Taylor growth factors of order 10

  20. Surface tension and long range corrections of cylindrical interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Bourasseau, E.; Ghoufi, A.

    2015-12-21

    The calculation of the surface tension of curved interfaces has been deeply investigated from molecular simulation during this last past decade. Recently, the thermodynamic Test-Area (TA) approach has been extended to the calculation of surface tension of curved interfaces. In the case of the cylindrical vapour-liquid interfaces of water and Lennard-Jones fluids, it was shown that the surface tension was independent of the curvature of the interface. In addition, the surface tension of the cylindrical interface is higher than that of the planar interface. Molecular simulations of cylindrical interfaces have been so far performed (i) by using a shifted potential, (ii) by means of large cutoff without periodic boundary conditions, or (iii) by ignoring the long range corrections to the surface tension due to the difficulty to estimate them. Indeed, unlike the planar interfaces there are no available operational expressions to consider the tail corrections to the surface tension of cylindrical interfaces. We propose here to develop the long range corrections of the surface tension for cylindrical interfaces by using the non-exponential TA (TA2) method. We also extend the formulation of the Mecke-Winkelmann corrections initially developed for planar surfaces to cylindrical interfaces. We complete this study by the calculation of the surface tension of cylindrical surfaces of liquid tin and copper using the embedded atom model potentials.

  1. Theoretical study of interactions between striated cylindrical particles and membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing-Jing; Jia-Wei, Feng; Ren, Chun-Lai

    2015-08-01

    The interaction of nanoparticles with cell membranes is of great importance because of their potential biomedical applications. In this paper, we investigate the adhesion of stripe-patterned cylinders to a fluid membrane with a full consideration of the Helfrich free energy. Three situations are considered: one striated cylindrical particle, two pure cylindrical particles, and two Janus cylindrical particles. It is found that, with the adhesion of a single sparse striated cylinder, there are a variety of steady-states with energy barriers and the stable state is determined by the pattern of the cylinder. However, when the particle is densely striped, it has no effect on the stable state. By comparing the wrapping degree of two cylindrical particles with that of a single cylindrical particle, we find that two pure cylindrical particles can promote or suppress their interaction with the membrane under different situations. However, two Janus cylindrical particles can only inhibit their interaction with the membrane. Besides, this interaction is related to a first-order transition which is a shallow-to-deep wrapping transition for two pure cylinders while it is a shallow-to-half wrapping transition for two Janus cylinders. Furthermore, the position where the transition happens as a function of adhesion energy is given for fixed membrane tension and the precondition of the transition is presented. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 91027040 and 21274062).

  2. Surface tension and long range corrections of cylindrical interfaces.

    PubMed

    Bourasseau, E; Malfreyt, P; Ghoufi, A

    2015-12-21

    The calculation of the surface tension of curved interfaces has been deeply investigated from molecular simulation during this last past decade. Recently, the thermodynamic Test-Area (TA) approach has been extended to the calculation of surface tension of curved interfaces. In the case of the cylindrical vapour-liquid interfaces of water and Lennard-Jones fluids, it was shown that the surface tension was independent of the curvature of the interface. In addition, the surface tension of the cylindrical interface is higher than that of the planar interface. Molecular simulations of cylindrical interfaces have been so far performed (i) by using a shifted potential, (ii) by means of large cutoff without periodic boundary conditions, or (iii) by ignoring the long range corrections to the surface tension due to the difficulty to estimate them. Indeed, unlike the planar interfaces there are no available operational expressions to consider the tail corrections to the surface tension of cylindrical interfaces. We propose here to develop the long range corrections of the surface tension for cylindrical interfaces by using the non-exponential TA (TA2) method. We also extend the formulation of the Mecke-Winkelmann corrections initially developed for planar surfaces to cylindrical interfaces. We complete this study by the calculation of the surface tension of cylindrical surfaces of liquid tin and copper using the embedded atom model potentials.

  3. Cylindrical Hall Thrusters with Permanent Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Raitses, Yevgeny; Merino, Enrique; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2010-10-18

    The use of permanent magnets instead of electromagnet coils for low power Hall thrusters can offer a significant reduction of both the total electric power consumption and the thruster mass. Two permanent magnet versions of the miniaturized cylindrical Hall thruster (CHT) of different overall dimensions were operated in the power range of 50W-300 W. The discharge and plasma plume measurements revealed that the CHT thrusters with permanent magnets and electromagnet coils operate rather differently. In particular, the angular ion current density distribution from the permanent magnet thrusters has an unusual halo shape, with a majority of high energy ions flowing at large angles with respect to the thruster centerline. Differences in the magnetic field topology outside the thruster channel and in the vicinity of the channel exit are likely responsible for the differences in the plume characteristics measured for the CHTs with electromagnets and permanent magnets. It is shown that the presence of the reversing-direction or cusp-type magnetic field configuration inside the thruster channel without a strong axial magnetic field outside the thruster channel does not lead to the halo plasma plume from the CHT. __________________________________________________

  4. Force Balances in Systems of Cylindrical Polyelectrolytes

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, Stephen L.; McQuarrie, Donald A.

    1973-01-01

    A detailed analysis is made of the model system of two parallel cylindrical polyelectrolytes which contain ionizable groups on their surfaces and are immersed in an ionic bathing medium. The interaction between the cylinders is examined by considering the interplay between repulsive electrostatic forces and attractive forces of electrodynamic origin. The repulsive force arises from the screened coulomb interaction between the surface charge distributions on the cylinders and has been treated by developing a solution to the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation. The boundary condition at the cylinder surfaces is determined as a self-consistent functional of the potential, with the input consisting of the density of ionizable groups and their dissociation constants. It is suggested that a reasonably accurate representation for the form of the attractive force can be obtained by performing a pairwise summation of the individual interatomic forces. A quantitative estimate is obtained using a Hamaker constant chosen on the basis of rigorous calculations on simpler systems. It is found that a balance exists between these repulsive and attractive forces at separations in good agreement with those observed in arrays of tobacco mosaic virus and in the A band myosin lattice in striated muscle. The behavior of the balance point as a function of the pH and ionic strength of the bathing medium closely parallels that seen experimentally. PMID:4696760

  5. Cylindrical converging shock initiation of reactive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Charles M.; Horie, Yasuyuki; Lindsay, Christopher Michael; Butler, George C.; Lambert, David; Welle, Eric

    2012-03-01

    Recent research has been conducted that builds on the Forbes et al. (1997) study of inducing a rapid solid state reaction in a highly porous core using a converging cylindrical shock driven by a high explosive. The high explosive annular charge used in this research to compress the center reactive core was comparable to PBXN-110. Some modifications were made on the physical configuration of the test item for scale-up and ease of production. The reactive materials (I2O5/Al and I2O5/Al/Teflon) were hand mixed and packed to a tap density of about 32 percent. Data provided by a Cordon 114 high speed framing camera and a Photon Doppler Velocimetry instrument provided exit gas expansion, core particle and cylinder wall velocities. Analysis indicates that the case expansion velocity differs according to the core formulation and behaved similar to the baseline high explosive core with the exit gas of the reactive materials producing comparable velocities. Results from CTH hydrocode used to model the test item compares favorably to the experimental results.

  6. Technology Selections for Cylindrical Compact Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey A. Phillips

    2010-10-01

    A variety of process approaches are available and have been used historically for manufacture of cylindrical fuel compacts. The jet milling, fluid bed overcoating, and hot press compacting approach being adopted in the U.S. AGR Fuel Development Program for scale-up of the compacting process involves significant paradigm shifts from historical approaches. New methods are being pursued because of distinct advantages in simplicity, yield, and elimination of process mixed waste. Recent advances in jet milling technology allow simplified dry matrix powder preparation. The matrix preparation method is well matched with patented fluid bed powder overcoating technology recently developed for the pharmaceutical industry and directly usable for high density fuel particle matrix overcoating. High density overcoating places fuel particles as close as possible to their final position in the compact and is matched with hot press compacting which fully fluidizes matrix resin to achieve die fill at low compacting pressures and without matrix end caps. Overall the revised methodology provides a simpler process that should provide very high yields, improve homogeneity, further reduce defect fractions, eliminate intermediate grading and QC steps, and allow further increases in fuel packing fractions.

  7. Jet mixing in a reacting cylindrical crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leong, M. Y.; Samuelsen, G. S.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1995-01-01

    This paper addresses the mixing of air jets into the hot, fuel-rich products of a gas turbine primary zone. The mixing, as a result, occurs in a reacting environment with chemical conversion and substantial heat release. The geometry is a crossflow confined in a cylindrical duct with side-wall injection of jets issuing from round orifices. A specially designed reactor, operating on propane, presents a uniform mixture without swirl to mixing modules consisting of 8, 9, 10, and 12 holes at a momentum-flux ratio of 57 and a jet-to-mainstream mass-flow ratio of 2.5. Concentrations of O2, CO2, CO, and HC are obtained upstream, downstream, and within the orifice plane. O2 profiles indicate jet penetration while CO2, CO, and HC profiles depict the extent of reaction. Jet penetration is observed to be a function of the number of orifices and is found to affect the mixing in the reacting system. The results demonstrate that one module (the 12-hole) produces near-optimal penetration defined here as a jet penetration closest to the module half-radius, and hence the best uniform mixture at a plane one duct radius from the orifice leading edge.

  8. Rotating cylindrical wormholes and energy conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronnikov, K. A.; Krechet, V. G.

    2016-01-01

    We seek wormholes among rotating cylindrically symmetric configurations in general relativity. Exact wormhole solutions are presented with such sources of gravity as a massless scalar field, a cosmological constant, and a scalar field with an exponential potential. However, none of these solutions are asymptotically flat, which excludes the existence of wormhole entrances as local objects in our Universe. To overcome this difficulty, we try to build configurations with flat asymptotic regions using the cut-and-paste procedure: on both sides of the throat, a wormhole solution is matched to a properly chosen region of flat space-time at some surfaces Σ- and Σ+. It is shown, however, that if the source of gravity in the throat region is a scalar field with an arbitrary potential, then one or both thin shells appearing on Σ- and Σ+ inevitably violate the null energy condition. Thus, although rotating wormhole solutions are easily found without exotic matter, such matter is still necessary for obtaining asymptotic flatness.

  9. Cylindrical isentropic compression by ultrahigh magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Zhuowei; Luo, Hao; Zhang, Hengdi; Zhao, Shichao; Tang, Xiaosong; Tong, Yanjin; Song, Zhenfei; Tan, Fuli; Zhao, Jianheng; Sun, Chengwei

    2014-05-01

    The cylindrical isentropic compression by ultrahigh magnetic field (MC-1) is a kind of unique high energy density technique. It has characters like ultrahigh pressure and low temperature rising, and would have widely used in areas like high pressure physics, new material synthesis and ultrahigh magnetic field physics. The Institute of Fluid Physics, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics (IFP, CAEP) has begun the experiment since 2011 and a primary experimental device had been set-up. In the experiments, a seed magnetic field of 5 Tesla were set-up first and compressed by a stainless steel liner which is driven by high explosive initiated synchronously. The internal diameter of the liner is 97 mm, and its thickness is 1.5 mm. The movement of liner was recorded optically and a typical turnaround phenomenon was observed. From the photography results the liner was compressed smoothly and evenly and its average velocity was about 5-6 km/s. In the experiment a axial magnetic field of over 1400 Tesla has been recorded. The MC-1 process was numerical simulated by 1D MHD code MC11D and the simulations are in accord with the experiments.

  10. Cylindrical gate valve apparatus and method

    SciTech Connect

    Hynes, J. H.; Morrill, C. D.

    1985-04-30

    A safety valve is disclosed which may be installed on an offshore wellhead above the tubing head and below the Christmas tree. The valve has a housing with upper and lower vertical passages and a lateral housing passage. A cylindrical gate is disposed within the lateral passage and includes a ''T'' shaped passage therein. The gate may be moved laterally and angularly within the lateral passage. During completion or workover of the well, the gate is moved laterally until the upper and lower vertical passages are in full open communication to run drills, hangers or other large diameter devices into the well via a BOP which may be attached to the top of the housing. During normal production, the gate may be laterally moved into the intersection of the vertical and lateral passages and the small through head part of the ''T'' passage serves to provide a vertical flow path through the production bore which is sealed off from the larger upper and lower vertical passages. Flow through side outlets in the housing is possible through the base of the ''T'' passage. The gate may be angularly moved to have production to the lateral outlets via the head part of the ''T'' when the base part of the ''T'' is aligned with production tubing. Should the need arise, the valve may be angularly rotated to a position where the fluid flow path of the production tubing is completely shut in.

  11. Electron emitter pulsed-type cylindrical IEC

    SciTech Connect

    Miley, G.H.; Gu, Y.; Stubbers, R.; Zich, R.; Sved, J.; Anderl, R.; Hartwell, J.

    1997-12-31

    A cylindrical version of the single grid Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) device (termed the C-device) has been developed for use as a 2.5-MeV D-D fusion neutron source for neutron activation analysis. The C-device employs a hollow-tube type cathode with similar anodes backed up by ``reflector`` dishes. The resulting discharge differs from a conventional hollow cathode discharge, by creating an explicit ion beam which is ``pinched`` in the cathode region. Resulting fusion reactions generate {approximately}10{sup 6} neutron/s. A pulsed version is under development for applications requiring higher fluxes. Several pulsing techniques are under study, including an electron emitter (e-emitter) assisted discharge in a thorated tungsten wire emitter located behind a slotted area in the reflector dishes. Pulsing is initiated after establishing a low power steady-state discharge by pulsing the e-emitter current using a capacitor switch type circuit. The resulting electron jet, coupled with the discharge by the biased slot array, creates a strong pulse in the pinched ion beam. The pulse length/repetition rate are controlled by the e-emitter pulse circuit. Typical parameters in present studies are {approximately}30{micro}s, 10Hz and 1-amp ion current. Corresponding neutron measurements are an In-foil type activation counter for time averaged rates. Results for a wide variety of operating conditions are presented.

  12. Mathematically modelling proportions of Japanese populations by industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Yoshito

    2016-10-01

    I propose a mathematical model for temporal changes of proportions for industrial sectors. I prove that the model keeps the proportions for the primary, the secondary, and the tertiary sectors between 0 and 100% and preserves their total as 100%. The model fits the Japanese historical data between 1950 and 2005 for the population proportions by industry very well. The model also predicts that the proportion for the secondary industry becomes negligible and becomes less than 1% at least around 2080.

  13. Plasmonic Bloch oscillations in cylindrical metal-dielectric waveguide arrays.

    PubMed

    Shiu, Ruei-Cheng; Lan, Yung-Chiang; Chen, Chin-Min

    2010-12-01

    This study investigates plasmonic Bloch oscillations (PBOs) in cylindrical metal-dielectric waveguide arrays (MDWAs) by performing numerical simulations and theoretical analyses. Optical conformal mapping is used to transform cylindrical MDWAs into equivalent chirped structures with permittivity and permeability gradients across the waveguide arrays, which is caused by the curvature of the cylindrical waveguide. The PBOs are attributed to the transformed structure. The period of oscillation increases with the wavelength of the incident Gaussian beam. However, the amplitude of oscillation is almost independent of wavelength.

  14. Limit of concentration for cylindrical concentrators under extended light sources.

    PubMed

    Miñano, J C; Luque, A

    1983-08-15

    Cylindrical concentrators illuminated by an extended source with an arbitrary distribution of radiance are analyzed taking into account basic properties derived from the Fermat principle and not from the specific concentrator shape. The upper limit of concentration achievable with this type of concentrator is obtained and it is found to be lower than that of general (3-D) concentrators. Cylindrical compound parabolic concentrators are analyzed in the light of this theory, and it is shown that they achieve the highest optical concentration possible for a cylindrical concentrator. PMID:18196152

  15. Cylindrical array luminescent solar concentrators: performance boosts by geometric effects.

    PubMed

    Videira, Jose J H; Bilotti, Emiliano; Chatten, Amanda J

    2016-07-11

    This paper presents an investigation of the geometric effects within a cylindrical array luminescent solar concentrator (LSC). Photon concentration of a cylindrical LSC increases linearly with cylinder length up to 2 metres. Raytrace modelling on the shading effects of circles on their neighbours demonstrates effective incident light trapping in a cylindrical LSC array at angles of incidence between 60-70 degrees. Raytrace modelling with real-world lighting conditions shows optical efficiency boosts when the suns angle of incidence is within this angle range. On certain days, 2 separate times of peak optical efficiency can be attained over the course of sunrise-solar noon. PMID:27410904

  16. Evaluation of facial divine proportion in North Indian Population

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Naseem Ahmad; Nagar, Amit; Tandon, Pradeep; Singh, Gulshan Kumar; Singh, Alka

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the facial divine proportion and its relationship with facial attractiveness in North Indian population. Materials and Methods: For evaluation of various facial proportions, standardized frontal facial photographs of total 300 subjects between 18 and 30 years of age were obtained. Black and white copies of these photographs were presented in front of an evaluation jury for assigning scores of facial attractiveness and finally 130 attractive subjects were selected. These subjects were divided into two groups, Group I (attractive females n = 65) and Group II (attractive males n = 65) and they were further analyzed for various parameters of facial proportions. Unpaired Student's t-test was used to compare both groups. Results: Group I showed that five of seven vertical facial proportions were close to divine proportion (1.618) whereas only two vertical proportions in Group II were close to it. Transverse facial proportions in both groups deviated more from divine proportion (1.618) and were closer to silver proportion (1.414). Conclusions: Most of the facial proportions of attractive females in the North-Indian population were close to the divine proportion. Thus, facial divine proportion could be an important factor in the perception of facial attractiveness of North-Indian attractive females.

  17. Spatial Proportional Reasoning Is Associated with Formal Knowledge about Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Möhring, Wenke; Newcombe, Nora S.; Levine, Susan C.; Frick, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Proportional reasoning involves thinking about parts and wholes (i.e., about fractional quantities). Yet, research on proportional reasoning and fraction learning has proceeded separately. This study assessed proportional reasoning and formal fraction knowledge in 8- to 10-year-olds. Participants (N = 52) saw combinations of cherry juice and water…

  18. Evaluation of facial divine proportion in North Indian Population

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Naseem Ahmad; Nagar, Amit; Tandon, Pradeep; Singh, Gulshan Kumar; Singh, Alka

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the facial divine proportion and its relationship with facial attractiveness in North Indian population. Materials and Methods: For evaluation of various facial proportions, standardized frontal facial photographs of total 300 subjects between 18 and 30 years of age were obtained. Black and white copies of these photographs were presented in front of an evaluation jury for assigning scores of facial attractiveness and finally 130 attractive subjects were selected. These subjects were divided into two groups, Group I (attractive females n = 65) and Group II (attractive males n = 65) and they were further analyzed for various parameters of facial proportions. Unpaired Student's t-test was used to compare both groups. Results: Group I showed that five of seven vertical facial proportions were close to divine proportion (1.618) whereas only two vertical proportions in Group II were close to it. Transverse facial proportions in both groups deviated more from divine proportion (1.618) and were closer to silver proportion (1.414). Conclusions: Most of the facial proportions of attractive females in the North-Indian population were close to the divine proportion. Thus, facial divine proportion could be an important factor in the perception of facial attractiveness of North-Indian attractive females. PMID:27630502

  19. As-built design specification for proportion estimate software subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, S. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    The Proportion Estimate Processor evaluates four estimation techniques in order to get an improved estimate of the proportion of a scene that is planted in a selected crop. The four techniques to be evaluated were provided by the techniques development section and are: (1) random sampling; (2) proportional allocation, relative count estimate; (3) proportional allocation, Bayesian estimate; and (4) sequential Bayesian allocation. The user is given two options for computation of the estimated mean square error. These are referred to as the cluster calculation option and the segment calculation option. The software for the Proportion Estimate Processor is operational on the IBM 3031 computer.

  20. Cylindrically symmetric Einstein-Yang-Mills-Higgs gauge configurations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondaini, R. P.

    1985-02-01

    Two solutions are obtained for coupled Einstein-Yang-Mills-Higgs fields with cylindrical symmetry and rigid rotation. The Higgs fields are responsible for the creation of singularities and infinite energy densities at the cylinder's axis.

  1. Numerical analysis of cocurrent conical and cylindrical axial cyclone separators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nor, M. A. M.; Al-Kayiem, H. H.; Lemma, T. A.

    2015-12-01

    Axial concurrent liquid-liquid separator is seen as an alternative unit to the traditional tangential counter current cyclone due to lower droplet break ups, turbulence and pressure drop. This paper presents the numerical analysis of a new conical axial cocurrent design along with a comparison to the cylindrical axial cocurrent type. The simulation was carried out using CFD technique in ANSYS-FLUENT software. The simulation results were validated by comparison with experimental data from literature, and mesh independency and quality were performed. The analysis indicates that the conical version achieves better separation performance compared to the cylindrical type. Simulation results indicate tangential velocity with 8% higher and axial velocity with 80% lower recirculation compared to the cylindrical type. Also, the flow visualization counters shows smaller recirculation region relative to the cylindrical unit. The proposed conical design seems more efficient and suits the crude/water separation in O&G industry.

  2. Cylindrical deformity of the nail plate secondary to subungual myxoma.

    PubMed

    Gourdin, F W; Lang, P G

    1996-11-01

    Digital myxomas are rare neoplasms. We describe a subungual myxoma arising in a previously unreported location, the nail matrix. This produced an interesting cylindrical deformity of the nail. Complete surgical excision is usually curative. PMID:8912602

  3. 16. DETAIL OF SOUTH ABUTMENT, SHOWING GIRDER, CYLINDRICAL FIXED BEARING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. DETAIL OF SOUTH ABUTMENT, SHOWING GIRDER, CYLINDRICAL FIXED BEARING SHOE AND LATERAL BRACING. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Rio Puerco Bridge, Mainline Road, spanning Rio Puerco, Holbrook, Navajo County, AZ

  4. dc electrokinetic transport of cylindrical cells in straight microchannels

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Ye; Beskok, Ali; Gauthier, David T.; Joo, Sang W.; Qian, Shizhi

    2009-01-01

    Electrokinetic transport of cylindrical cells under dc electric fields in a straight microfluidic channel is experimentally and numerically investigated with emphasis on the dielectrophoretic (DEP) effect on their orientation variations. A two-dimensional multiphysics model, composed of the Navier–Stokes equations for the fluid flow and the Laplace equation for the electric potential defined in an arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian framework, is employed to capture the transient electrokinetic motion of cylindrical cells. The numerical predictions of the particle transport are in quantitative agreement with the obtained experimental results, suggesting that the DEP effect should be taken into account to study the electrokinetic transport of cylindrical particles even in a straight microchannel with uniform cross-sectional area. A comprehensive parametric study indicates that cylindrical particles would experience an oscillatory motion under low electric fields. However, they are aligned with their longest axis parallel to the imposed electric field under high electric fields due to the induced DEP effect. PMID:20216972

  5. 108. Cylindrical chamber where gas exits stove to below ground ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    108. Cylindrical chamber where gas exits stove to below ground flue that leads to stack. - Sloss-Sheffield Steel & Iron, First Avenue North Viaduct at Thirty-second Street, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  6. Laser differential confocal radius measurement method for the cylindrical surfaces.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Lirong; Xiao, Yang; Zhao, Weiqian

    2016-05-30

    This paper proposes a laser differential confocal cylindrical radius of curvature measurement (DCCRM) method for high accuracy measurement of the radius of curvature of the cylindrical lens. Based on the property that the null point of an axial intensity curve precisely corresponds to the focus of the objective in a differential confocal system (DCS), the DCCRM uses the null point of the DCS axial intensity curve to precisely identify the cat's eye position and confocal position of the test cylindrical lens. The distance between the two positions is measured accurately using a laser distance instrument, thus achieving high precision radius measurement. In comparison with existing measurement methods, the proposed DCCRM has high measurement precision and strong environmental anti-interference capability. Theoretical analyses and preliminary experimental results indicate that the DCCRM has a relative measurement uncertainty of better than 0.03% and provides a new approach for a high precision radius measurement of the cylindrical lens.

  7. Drag coefficient and settling velocity for particles of cylindrical shape

    SciTech Connect

    Gabitto, Jorge; Tsouris, Costas

    2008-01-01

    Solid particles of cylindrical shape play a significant role in many separations processes. Explicit equations for the drag coefficient and the terminal velocity of free-falling cylindrical particles have been developed in this work. The developed equations are based on available experimental data for falling cylindrical particles in all flow regimes. The aspect ratio (i.e., length-over-diameter ratio) has been used to account for the particle shape. Comparisons with correlations proposed by other researchers using different parameters to account for the geometry are presented. Good agreement is found for small aspect ratios, and increasing differences appear when the aspect ratio increases. The aspect ratio of cylindrical particles satisfactorily accounts for the geometrical influence on fluid flow of settling particles.

  8. Theory and modeling of cylindrical thermo-acoustic transduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Lihong; Lim, C. W.; Zhao, Xiushao; Geng, Daxing

    2016-06-01

    Models both for solid and thinfilm-solid cylindrical thermo-acoustic transductions are proposed and the corresponding acoustic pressure solutions are obtained. The acoustic pressure for an individual carbon nanotube (CNT) as a function of input power is investigated analytically and it is verified by comparing with the published experimental data. Further numerical analysis on the acoustic pressure response and characteristics for varying input frequency and distance are also examined both for solid and thinfilm-solid cylindrical thermo-acoustic transductions. Through detailed theoretical and numerical studies on the acoustic pressure solution for thinfilm-solid cylindrical transduction, it is concluded that a solid with smaller thermal conductivity favors to improve the acoustic performance. In general, the proposed models are applicable to a variety of cylindrical thermo-acoustic devices performing in different gaseous media.

  9. 109. Detail view of structural frame supporting torch arm; cylindrical ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    109. Detail view of structural frame supporting torch arm; cylindrical object in foreground is part of ventilating system. February 1984. - Statue of Liberty, Liberty Island, Manhattan, New York County, NY

  10. Students' Understanding of Proportional, Inverse Proportional, and Affine Functions: Two Studies on the Role of External Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Bock, Dirk; Van Dooren, Wim; Verschaffel, Lieven

    2015-01-01

    We investigated students' understanding of proportional, inverse proportional, and affine functions and the way this understanding is affected by various external representations. In a first study, we focus on students' ability to model textual descriptions of situations with different kinds of representations of proportional, inverse…

  11. The Identification and Validation Process of Proportional Reasoning Attributes: An Application of a Proportional Reasoning Modeling Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tjoe, Hartono; de la Torre, Jimmy

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the process of identifying and validating students' abilities to think proportionally. More specifically, we describe the methodology we used to identify these proportional reasoning attributes, beginning with the selection and review of relevant literature on proportional reasoning. We then continue with the…

  12. Estimating sighting proportions of American alligator nests during helicopter survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rice, Kenneth G.; Percival, H. Franklin; Woodward, Allan R.

    2000-01-01

    Proportions of American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) nests sighted during aerial survey in Florida were estimated based upon multiple surveys by different observers. We compared sighting proportions across habitats, nesting seasons, and observer experience levels. The mean sighting proportion across all habitats and years was 0.736 (SE=0.024). Survey counts corrected by the mean sighting proportion reliably predicted total nest counts (7?2=0.933). Sighting proportions did not differ by habitat type (P=0.668) or year P=0.328). Experienced observers detected a greater proportion of nests (P<0.0001) than did either less experienced or inexperienced observers. Reliable estimates of nest abundance can be derived from aerial counts of alligator nests when corrected by the appropriate sighting proportion.

  13. Interfacial slip friction at a fluid-solid cylindrical boundary.

    PubMed

    Kannam, Sridhar Kumar; Todd, B D; Hansen, J S; Daivis, Peter J

    2012-06-28

    Recently we proposed a method to calculate the interfacial friction coefficient between fluid and solid at a planar interface. In this work we extend the method to cylindrical systems where the friction coefficient is curvature dependent. We apply the method to methane flow in carbon nanotubes, and find good agreement with non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The proposed method is robust, general, and can be used to predict the slip for cylindrical nanofluidic systems.

  14. On cylindrically converging shock waves shaped by obstacles

    SciTech Connect

    Eliasson, V; Henshaw, W D; Appelo, D

    2007-07-16

    Motivated by recent experiments, numerical simulations were performed of cylindrically converging shock waves. The converging shocks impinged upon a set of zero to sixteen regularly space obstacles. For more than two obstacles the resulting diffracted shock fronts formed polygonal shaped patterns near the point of focus. The maximum pressure and temperature as a function of number of obstacles were studied. The self-similar behavior of cylindrical, triangular and square-shaped shocks were also investigated.

  15. Cylindrical bubbles and blobs from a Class II Hydrophobin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Paul; Pham, Michael; Blalock, Brad

    2012-02-01

    Cerato ulmin is a class II hydrophobin. In aqueous suspensions, it easily forms cylindrical air bubbles and cylindrical oil blobs. The conditions for formation of these unusual structures will be discussed, along with scattering and microscopic investigations of their remarkable stability. Possible applications in diverse fields including polymer synthesis and oil spill remediation will be considered. Acknowledgment is made to Dr. Wayne C. Richards of the Canadian Forest Service for the gift of Cerato ulmin.

  16. Extrusion printing for fabrication of spherical and cylindrical microlens arrays.

    PubMed

    Xing, Jiyao; Rong, Weibin; Sun, Ding; Wang, Lefeng; Sun, Lining

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we present an extrusion printing technique for producing spherical and cylindrical plano-convex microlens arrays with controllable feature dimensions. This technique employs a robotic adhesive dispenser for robotically controlled microextrusion of ultraviolet (UV) curable polymer onto a glass substrate surface to directly deposit the microlens arrays. It provides a simple and flexible alternative to fabricate both spherical and cylindrical microlens arrays. PMID:27607269

  17. Effect of cylindrical confinement on the determination of laminar flame speeds using outwardly propagating flames

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, Michael P.; Chen, Zheng; Ju, Yiguang; Dryer, Frederick L.

    2009-04-15

    The effect of nonspherical (i.e. cylindrical) bomb geometry on the evolution of outwardly propagating flames and the determination of laminar flame speeds using the conventional constant-pressure technique is investigated experimentally and theoretically. The cylindrical chamber boundary modifies the propagation rate through the interaction of the wall with the flow induced by thermal expansion across the flame (even with constant pressure), which leads to significant distortion of the flame surface for large flame radii. These departures from the unconfined case, especially the resulting nonzero burned gas velocities, can lead to significant errors in flame speeds calculated using the conventional assumptions, especially for large flame radii. For example, at a flame radius of 0.5 times the wall radius, the flame speed calculated neglecting confinement effects can be low by {proportional_to}15% (even with constant pressure). A methodology to estimate the effect of nonzero burned gas velocities on the measured flame speed in cylindrical chambers is presented. Modeling and experiments indicate that the effect of confinement can be neglected for flame radii less than 0.3 times the wall radius while still achieving acceptable accuracy (within 3%). The methodology is applied to correct the flame speed for nonzero burned gas speeds, in order to extend the range of flame radii useful for flame speed measurements. Under the proposed scaling, the burned gas speed can be well approximated as a function of only flame radius for a given chamber geometry - i.e. the correction function need only be determined once for an apparatus and then it can be used for any mixture. Results indicate that the flow correction can be used to extract flame speeds for flame radii up to 0.5 times the wall radius with somewhat larger, yet still acceptable uncertainties for the cases studied. Flow-corrected burning velocities are measured for hydrogen and syngas mixtures at atmospheric and

  18. A small-sized MWPC with 1 mm wire spacing as a beam/target chamber for nuclear experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ninomiya, M.; Arai, I.; Manabe, A.; Nunokawa, H.; Tanaka, M.; Tomizawa, K.; Yagi, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Chiba, J.; Nakai, K.; Sano, H.; Sasaki, S.; Nagae, T.; Tokushuku, K.; Sekimoto, M.

    1988-11-01

    We developed a small-sized multiwire proportional chamber with 1 mm wire spacing for a study of backward Λ production in high energy hadron-nucleus reactions. Two chambers were installed in a cylindrical drift chamber of the large aperture spectrometer FANCY in order to determine beam trajectories precisely. A position resolution of about 0.6 mm was obtained with a counting efficiency of 97%.

  19. Skin-implant multiwire connector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, L. J.

    1977-01-01

    Construction of device utilizing high-purity carbon is biocompatible as well as hygienic, Design allows for easy connections and disconnections in dark, cleaning and maintenance and less snagging of clothing and other articles by device. Guides and magnetic coupling preclude need for locks, screwing, or latching.

  20. The Speed of Axial Propagation of a Cylindrical Bubble Through a Cylindrical Vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shariff, Karim; Mansour, Nagi N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Inspired by the rapid elongation of air columns injected into vortices by dolphins, we present an exact inviscid solution for the axial speed (assumed steady) of propagation of the tip of a semi-infinite cylindrical bubble along the axis of a cylindrical vortex. The bubble is assumed to be held at constant pressure by being connected to a reservoir, the lungs of the dolphin, say. For a given bubble pressure, there is a modest critical rotation rate above which steadily propagating bubbles exist. For a bubble at ambient pressure, the propagation speed of the bubble (relative to axial velocity within the vortex) varies between 0.5 and 0.6 of the maximum rotational speed of the vortex. Surprisingly, the bubble tip can propagate (almost as rapidly) even when the pressure minimum in the vortex core is greater than the bubble pressure; in this case, solutions exhibit a dimple on the nose of the bubble. A situation important for incipient vortex cavitation, and one which dolphins also demonstrate, is elongation of a free bubble, i.e., one whose internal pressure may vary. Under the assumption that the acceleration term is small (checked a posteriori), the steady solution is applied at each instant during the elongation. Three types of behavior are then possible depending on physical parameters and initial conditions: (A) Unabated elongation with slowly increasing bubble pressure, and nearly constant volume. Volume begins to decrease in the late stages. (B1) Elongation with decreasing bubble pressure. A limit point of the steady solution is encountered at a finite bubble length. (B2) Unabated elongation with decreasing bubble pressure and indefinite creation of volume. This is made possible by the existence of propagating solutions at bubble pressures below the minimum vortex pressure. As the bubble stretches, its radius initially decreases but then becomes constant; this is also observed in experiments on incipient vortex cavitation.

  1. Evaluation of natural smile: Golden proportion, RED or Golden percentage

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, B. V. Sreenivasan; Ramani, Niketa

    2008-01-01

    Creating geometric or mathematical proportion to relate the successive width of maxillary anterior teeth is a critical aspect in Esthetic dentistry. Golden proportion, recurring esthetic dental (RED) proportion and golden percentage are new theories in this field. Aim: To investigate the existence and suitability of Golden proportion, Recurring Esthetic Dental, and Golden percentage between the widths of maxillary anterior teeth in individuals with natural dentition, with the aid of digital photographs and computer analysis. Material and Methods: Standardized frontal images of 56 dental students, 20 male and 36 female, were captured. Each maxillary anterior tooth was digitally measured. Once the measurements were recorded, the three theories were applied and the data was analyzed statistically. Results: The golden proportion was found to exist only in 14-25% of the subjects, between perceived maxillary anterior teeth in natural dentition. The value of RED proportion was not constant, and as one moved distally, this proportion gradually increased. Furthermore, the results revealed that golden percentage was rather constant in terms of relative tooth width. Central incisor represented 22%, lateral incisor 15% and canine 13% of the width of six maxillary anterior teeth, as viewed from the front. Conclusion: Both golden proportion and RED proportion are unsuitable methods to relate the successive width of the maxillary anterior teeth in natural dentition. However, the golden percentage theory can be applied if percentages are adjusted, taking into consideration the ethnicity of the population. PMID:20142879

  2. Replacement tissue-equivalent proportional counter for the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Perez-Nunez, D; Braby, L A

    2011-02-01

    The tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC)-based dosemeters used on the International Space Station have exceeded their planned useful lives, and are scheduled to be replaced with the new units taking advantage of improved technology. The original TEPC detectors used cylindrical geometry with field tubes to achieve good energy resolution and minimum sensitivity to noise created by vibration. The inside diameter of these detectors is 5.1 cm. The new detectors developed for this application produce the resolution and vibration resistance of the cylindrical detector with the isotropic response and compact size of a spherical detector. The cathode structure consists of conductive tissue-equivalent plastic A-150 layers separated by thin polyethylene layers perpendicular to the anode. Each conductive layer is held at the electrical potential needed to produce uniform electric field strength along the anode wire, and thus the same gas gain for electrons produced in different portions of the spherical volume. The new design contains the whole preamplifier inside the vacuum chamber to reduce electronic noise. Also the vacuum chamber has a novel design with a 0.020-inch-thick aluminium wall to allow a total wall thickness of 0.5 g cm(-2), which is typical of the shielding provided by a space suit. This feature will allow measuring the dose on the astronauts' skin due to low-energy electrons and protons produced during solar events. The vacuum chamber has a new bayonet clamping system that reduces the total detector weight to less than half that of the old TEPC. PMID:21115447

  3. A curve fitting method for extrinsic camera calibration from a single image of a cylindrical object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, A. W.; Zagar, B. G.

    2013-08-01

    An important step in the process of optical steel coil quality assurance is to measure the proportions of width and radius of steel coils as well as the relative position and orientation of the camera. This work attempts to estimate these extrinsic parameters from single images by using the cylindrical coil itself as the calibration target. Therefore, an adaptive least-squares algorithm is applied to fit parametrized curves to the detected true coil outline in the acquisition. The employed model allows for strictly separating the intrinsic and the extrinsic parameters. Thus, the intrinsic camera parameters can be calibrated beforehand using available calibration software. Furthermore, a way to segment the true coil outline in the acquired images is motivated. The proposed optimization method yields highly accurate results and can be generalized even to measure other solids which cannot be characterized by the identification of simple geometric primitives.

  4. Characteristics of the simulated workplace neutron fields using a 252Cf source surrounded with cylindrical moderators.

    PubMed

    Tsujimura, N; Yoshida, T

    2004-01-01

    The authors established the simulated workplace neutron fields using a 252Cf source surrounded with cylindrical moderators at the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC), Tokai Works. The moderators are annular cylinders made of polymethyl methacrylate and steel. The neutron energy spectrum at the reference calibration point was evaluated from the calculations by MCNP-4B and the measurements by the Bonner multisphere spectrometer and the hydrogen-filled proportional counters. The calculated neutron spectra were in good agreements with the measured ones. These fields can provide the realistic neutron spectra similar to those encountered around the glove-boxes of the fabrication process of MOX (PuO2-UO2 mixed oxide) fuel.

  5. First birth cesarean proportion: A missed indicator in controlling policies

    PubMed Central

    Safari-Faramani, Roya; Haghdoost, Ali Akbar; Nakhaei, Nouzar; Foroudnia, Shohreh; Mahmoodabadi, Zahra; Safizadeh, Mansooreh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Around one out of two mothers give births by cesarean section (CS) surgery in Iran and about half of this number is due to previous CS. Recently Health Sector Evolution (HSEP) program (started in April 2014) targets the high rate of CS in Iran. To assess the impact of the interventions, we emphasized that the First Birth Cesarean (FBC) proportion is one of the main indicators to assess the controlling programs. Methods: Data on the mode of delivery were collected in Kerman province between 21 March and 20 March 2015 classified by hospital ownership. FBC proportion is defined as the number of CS in the first pregnancies divided by the total number of first births. Chi-square test for trend was used to assess the trends. Results: Total number of births was around 34000. There were 8.9 and 13.1 percent reduction in CS and FBC proportion respectively. CS proportion was 54.5 at the end of the first quarter of the studied period and reached to 49.6 at the end of the period (p<0.0001). Also, FBC proportion was 54.1 percent at first and reached to 47 percent at the end of the study period. The main reason for CS was due to previous CS. At the hospital level, the highest reduction in CS and FBC proportion were in public hospitals. Conclusion: Results suggested more reduction in FBC proportion than the CS proportion, so this is a very good sign since more potential CS cases will be prevented. As repeated CS is one of the main indications for the operation, in the short term, even effective policies may change the overall proportion slightly, while the FBC proportion is more sensitive to reflect the impacts. Therefore, it is necessary to target the main fuel to reduce CS proportion effectively. PMID:27579285

  6. Monolithic Cylindrical Fused Silica Resonators with High Q Factors.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yao; Wang, Dongya; Wang, Yanyan; Liu, Jianping; Wu, Suyong; Qu, Tianliang; Yang, Kaiyong; Luo, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The cylindrical resonator gyroscope (CRG) is a typical Coriolis vibratory gyroscope whose performance is determined by the Q factor and frequency mismatch of the cylindrical resonator. Enhancing the Q factor is crucial for improving the rate sensitivity and noise performance of the CRG. In this paper, for the first time, a monolithic cylindrical fused silica resonator with a Q factor approaching 8 × 10⁵ (ring-down time over 1 min) is reported. The resonator is made of fused silica with low internal friction and high isotropy, with a diameter of 25 mm and a center frequency of 3974.35 Hz. The structure of the resonator is first briefly introduced, and then the experimental non-contact characterization method is presented. In addition, the post-fabrication experimental procedure of Q factor improvement, including chemical and thermal treatment, is demonstrated. The Q factor improvement by both treatments is compared and the primary loss mechanism is analyzed. To the best of our knowledge, the work presented in this paper represents the highest reported Q factor for a cylindrical resonator. The proposed monolithic cylindrical fused silica resonator may enable high performance inertial sensing with standard manufacturing process and simple post-fabrication treatment. PMID:27483263

  7. Elliptic cylindrical silicon nanowire hybrid surface plasmon polariton waveguide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Xiong, Qiulin; Li, Xiaopeng; Ma, Junxian

    2015-08-10

    We researched an elliptic cylindrical silicon nanowire hybrid surface plasmon polariton waveguide and evaluated its mode characteristics using the finite element method software COMSOL. The waveguide consists of three parts: an elliptic cylindrical silicon nanowire, a silver film layer, and a silica covering layer between them. All of the components are surrounded by air. After optimizing the geometrical parameters of the waveguide, we can achieve the waveguide's strong field confinement (ranging from λ2/270 to λ2/27) and long propagation distances (119-485 μm). In order to further understand the impact of the waveguide's architecture on its performance, we also studied the ridge hybrid waveguide. The results show that the ridge waveguide has moderate local field confinement ranging from λ2/190 to λ2/20 and its maximum propagation distance is about 340 μm. We compared the elliptic cylindrical and ridge nanowire hybrid waveguides with the cylindrical hybrid waveguide that we studied before. The elliptic cylindrical waveguide achieves a better trade-off between reasonable mode confinement and maximum propagation length in the three waveguides. The researched hybrid surface plasmon polaritons waveguides are useful to construct devices such as a directional coupler and may find potential applications in photonic integrated circuits or other novel SPP devices.

  8. Elliptic cylindrical silicon nanowire hybrid surface plasmon polariton waveguide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Xiong, Qiulin; Li, Xiaopeng; Ma, Junxian

    2015-08-10

    We researched an elliptic cylindrical silicon nanowire hybrid surface plasmon polariton waveguide and evaluated its mode characteristics using the finite element method software COMSOL. The waveguide consists of three parts: an elliptic cylindrical silicon nanowire, a silver film layer, and a silica covering layer between them. All of the components are surrounded by air. After optimizing the geometrical parameters of the waveguide, we can achieve the waveguide's strong field confinement (ranging from λ2/270 to λ2/27) and long propagation distances (119-485 μm). In order to further understand the impact of the waveguide's architecture on its performance, we also studied the ridge hybrid waveguide. The results show that the ridge waveguide has moderate local field confinement ranging from λ2/190 to λ2/20 and its maximum propagation distance is about 340 μm. We compared the elliptic cylindrical and ridge nanowire hybrid waveguides with the cylindrical hybrid waveguide that we studied before. The elliptic cylindrical waveguide achieves a better trade-off between reasonable mode confinement and maximum propagation length in the three waveguides. The researched hybrid surface plasmon polaritons waveguides are useful to construct devices such as a directional coupler and may find potential applications in photonic integrated circuits or other novel SPP devices. PMID:26368373

  9. Monolithic Cylindrical Fused Silica Resonators with High Q Factors

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yao; Wang, Dongya; Wang, Yanyan; Liu, Jianping; Wu, Suyong; Qu, Tianliang; Yang, Kaiyong; Luo, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The cylindrical resonator gyroscope (CRG) is a typical Coriolis vibratory gyroscope whose performance is determined by the Q factor and frequency mismatch of the cylindrical resonator. Enhancing the Q factor is crucial for improving the rate sensitivity and noise performance of the CRG. In this paper, for the first time, a monolithic cylindrical fused silica resonator with a Q factor approaching 8 × 105 (ring-down time over 1 min) is reported. The resonator is made of fused silica with low internal friction and high isotropy, with a diameter of 25 mm and a center frequency of 3974.35 Hz. The structure of the resonator is first briefly introduced, and then the experimental non-contact characterization method is presented. In addition, the post-fabrication experimental procedure of Q factor improvement, including chemical and thermal treatment, is demonstrated. The Q factor improvement by both treatments is compared and the primary loss mechanism is analyzed. To the best of our knowledge, the work presented in this paper represents the highest reported Q factor for a cylindrical resonator. The proposed monolithic cylindrical fused silica resonator may enable high performance inertial sensing with standard manufacturing process and simple post-fabrication treatment. PMID:27483263

  10. Attention Modulation by Proportion Congruency: The Asymmetrical List Shifting Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrahamse, Elger L.; Duthoo, Wout; Notebaert, Wim; Risko, Evan F.

    2013-01-01

    Proportion congruency effects represent hallmark phenomena in current theorizing about cognitive control. This is based on the notion that proportion congruency determines the relative levels of attention to relevant and irrelevant information in conflict tasks. However, little empirical evidence exists that uniquely supports such an attention…

  11. Longitudinal Enrollment Dynamics and Changes in Ethnic Proportionality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greaves, Fred

    The Federal Racial/Ethnic Surveys of the Salinas Union High School District were examined to identify changes in ethnic proportions within a particular class from its entry in the 9th grade until the 12th grade. The 9th, 10th, 11th, and 12th grade proportional distributions are reported by school (Alisal High School, North Salinas High School, and…

  12. Development of Proportional Reasoning: Where Young Children Go Wrong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Ty W.; Levine, Susan C.; Huttenlocher, Janellen

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies have found that children have difficulty solving proportional reasoning problems involving discrete units until 10 to 12 years of age, but can solve parallel problems involving continuous quantities by 6 years of age. The present studies examine where children go wrong in processing proportions that involve discrete quantities. A…

  13. The Failings of the Law of Definite Proportions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suchow, Lawrence

    1975-01-01

    Indicates that the concept of definite proportions or constant composition should be introduced with qualification. Presents arguments against the Law of Definite Proportions and cites examples in the areas of solid solutions, compounds of the transition and inner transition elements, and in some compounds of the representative elements. (GS)

  14. 16 CFR 240.9 - Proportionally equal terms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Proportionally equal terms. 240.9 Section 240.9 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION GUIDES AND TRADE PRACTICE RULES GUIDES FOR ADVERTISING ALLOWANCES AND OTHER MERCHANDISING PAYMENTS AND SERVICES § 240.9 Proportionally equal terms....

  15. Understanding Proportional Reasoning in Pre-Service Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Kim H.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the proportional reasoning of pre-service teachers at the beginning of their teacher preparation program using the developmental shifts described by Lobato and Ellis (2010). They cast changes in proportional reasoning as transitions or "shifts" in students' thinking and these shifts can serve as…

  16. The influence of lower face vertical proportion on facial attractiveness.

    PubMed

    Johnston, D J; Hunt, O; Johnston, C D; Burden, D J; Stevenson, M; Hepper, P

    2005-08-01

    This study investigated the influence of changing lower face vertical proportion on the attractiveness ratings scored by lay people.Ninety-two social science students rated the attractiveness of a series of silhouettes with normal, reduced or increased lower face proportions. The random sequences of 10 images included an image with the Eastman normal lower face height relative to total face height [lower anterior face height/total anterior face height (LAFH/TAFH) of 55 per cent], and images with LAFH/TAFH increased or decreased by up to four standard deviations (SD) from the Eastman norm. All the images had a skeletal Class I antero-posterior (AP) relationship. A duplicate image in each sequence assessed repeatability. The participants scored each image using a 10 point numerical scale and also indicated whether they would seek treatment if the image was their own profile. The profile image with normal vertical facial proportions was rated by the lay people as the most attractive. Attractiveness scores reduced as the vertical facial proportions diverged from the normal value. Images with a reduced lower face proportion were rated as significantly more attractive than the corresponding images with an increased lower face proportion. Images with a reduced lower face proportion were also significantly less likely to be judged as needing treatment than the corresponding images with an increased lower face proportion. PMID:15961569

  17. ESTIMATING PROPORTION OF AREA OCCUPIED UNDER COMPLEX SURVEY DESIGNS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estimating proportion of sites occupied, or proportion of area occupied (PAO) is a common problem in environmental studies. Typically, field surveys do not ensure that occupancy of a site is made with perfect detection. Maximum likelihood estimation of site occupancy rates when...

  18. Resonance in cylindrical-rectangular and wraparound microstrip structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ali, Sami M.; Kong, Jin AU; Habashy, Tarek M.; Kiang, Jean-Fu

    1989-01-01

    A rigorous analysis of the resonance frequency problem of both the cylindrical-rectangular and the wraparound microstrip structure is presented. The problem is formulated in terms of a set of vector integral equations. Using Galerkin's method to solve the integral equations, the complex resonance frequencies are studied with sinusoidal basis functions which incorporate the edge singularity. The complex resonance frequencies are computed using a perturbation approach. Modes suitable for resonator or antenna applications are investigated. The edge singularity of the patch current is shown to have no significant effect on the accuracy of the results. It is shown that the HE10 modes of the cylindrical-rectangular and wraparound patches are more appropriate for resonator applications. The HE01 and TE01 modes of the cylindrical-rectangular and wraparound patches, respectively, are efficient radiating modes.

  19. Sound generation by flow over relatively deep cylindrical cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parthasarathy, S. P.; Cho, Y. I.; Back, L. H.

    1985-01-01

    To develop a system for acoustic coding of moving objects containing drilled cylindrical cavities, the production of high-intensity tones by deep cylindrical cavities in a flat surface at low (0.12-0.24) Mach numbers was investigated. The sound intensity and frequency have been determined as functions of flow velocity, diameter, and depth of the cavities. It is shown that whistles can be designed for a given frequency (in the range of 5-17 kHz) and flow, and the sound pressure levels can be calculated by the equations given. Using these equations a whistle producing 106 dB at a 30.5-cm distance from a cylindrical cavity of 0.508 cm in diameter and 1.32 cm in depth with an airflow of 57.7 m/s past the cavity was designed.

  20. Rotating cylindrical magnetron sputtering: Simulation of the reactive process

    SciTech Connect

    Depla, D.; Mahieu, S.; Van Aeken, K.; Leroy, W. P.; Haemers, J.; De Gryse, R.; Li, X. Y.; Bogaerts, A.

    2010-06-15

    A rotating cylindrical magnetron consists of a cylindrical tube, functioning as the cathode, which rotates around a stationary magnet assembly. In stationary mode, the cylindrical magnetron behaves similar to a planar magnetron with respect to the influence of reactive gas addition to the plasma. However, the transition from metallic mode to poisoned mode and vice versa depends on the rotation speed. An existing model has been modified to simulate the influence of target rotation on the well known hysteresis behavior during reactive magnetron sputtering. The model shows that the existing poisoning mechanisms, i.e., chemisorption, direct reactive ion implantation and knock on implantation, are insufficient to describe the poisoning behavior of the rotating target. A better description of the process is only possible by including the deposition of sputtered material on the target.

  1. Experiments of cylindrical isentropic compression by ultrahigh magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Zhuowei; Zhou, Zhongyu; Zhang, Chunbo; Tang, Xiaosong; Tong, Yanjin; Zhao, Jianheng; Sun, Chengwei

    2015-09-01

    The high Explosive Magnetic Flux Implosion Compression Generator (EMFICG) is a kind of unique high energy density dynamic technique with characters like ultrahigh pressure and low temperature rising and could be suitable as a tool of cylindrical isentropic compression. The Institute of Fluid Physics, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics (IFP, CAEP) have developed EMFICG technique and realized cylindrical isentropic compression. In the experiments, a seed magnetic field of 5-6 Tesla were built first and compressed by a stainless steel liner which is driven by high explosive. The inner free surface velocity of sample was measured by PDV. The isentropic compression of a copper sample was verified and the isentropic pressure is over 100 GPa. The cylindrical isentropic compression process has been numerical simulated by 1D MHD code and the simulation results were compared with the experiments. Compared with the transitional X-ray flash radiograph measurement, this method will probably promote the data accuracy.

  2. Radiation and scattering from printed antennas on cylindrically conformal platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempel, Leo C.; Volakis, John L.; Bindiganavale, Sunil

    1994-01-01

    The goal was to develop suitable methods and software for the analysis of antennas on cylindrical coated and uncoated platforms. Specifically, the finite element boundary integral and finite element ABC methods were employed successfully and associated software were developed for the analysis and design of wraparound and discrete cavity-backed arrays situated on cylindrical platforms. This work led to the successful implementation of analysis software for such antennas. Developments which played a role in this respect are the efficient implementation of the 3D Green's function for a metallic cylinder, the incorporation of the fast Fourier transform in computing the matrix-vector products executed in the solver of the finite element-boundary integral system, and the development of a new absorbing boundary condition for terminating the finite element mesh on cylindrical surfaces.

  3. Determination of thermal diffusivities of cylindrical bodies being cooled

    SciTech Connect

    Dincer, I.

    1996-09-01

    This paper deals with the development of an analytical model for determining the thermal diffusivities of the individual solid cylindrical bodies subjected to cooling is presented. Applications of this model were made using the experimental center temperature data obtained from the cylindrical products (e.g., cucumber and grape) during air cooling at the flow velocity of 2 m/s. As an experimental result, the thermal diffusivities of products were found to be 1.45{times}10{sup {minus}7} m{sup 2}/s for cucumber and 1.68{times}10{sup {minus}7} m{sup 2}/s for grape. It can be concluded that the present model is capable of determining the thermal diffusivities of cylindrical bodies during cooling in a simple and effective form.

  4. Gamma-ray bursts: afterglows from cylindrical jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, K. S.; Huang, Y. F.; Lu, T.

    2001-08-01

    Nearly all previous discussions on beaming effects in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have assumed a conical geometry. However, more and more observations on relativistic jets in radio galaxies, active galactic nuclei, and `microquasars' in the Galaxy have shown that many of these outflows are not conical, but cylindrical, i.e. they maintain constant cross-sections at large scales. Thus it is necessary to discuss the possibility of gamma-ray bursts being due to highly collimated cylindrical jets, not conical ones. Here we study the dynamical evolution of cylindrical jets and discuss their afterglows. Both analytical and numerical results are presented. It is shown that when the lateral expansion is not taken into account, a cylindrical jet typically remains highly relativistic for ~108-109s. During this relativistic phase, the optical afterglow at first decays as Sν~t-p/2, where p is the index characterizing the power-law energy distribution of electrons. Then the light curve steepens to Sν~t-(p+1)/2 due to cooling of electrons. After entering the non-relativistic phase (i.e. t>=1011s), the afterglow is Sν~t-(5p-4)/6. However, if the cylindrical jet expands laterally at the comoving sound speed, then the decay becomes Sν~t-p and Sν~t-(15p-21)/10-t-(15p-20)/10 in the ultrarelativistic and in the non-relativistic phase respectively. Note that in both cases the light curve turns flatter after the relativistic-Newtonian transition point, which differs markedly from the behaviour of a conical jet. It is suggested that some GRBs with afterglows decaying as t-1.1-t-1.3 may be due to cylindrical jets, not necessarily isotropic fireballs.

  5. Parametric Investigations of Miniaturized Cylindrical and Annular Hall Thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    A. Smirnov; Y. Raitses; N.J. Fisch

    2001-10-16

    A cylindrical geometry Hall thruster may overcome certain physical and technological limitations in scaling down of Hall thrusters to miniature sizes. The absence of the inner wall and use of the cusp magnetic field can potentially reduce heating of the thruster parts and erosion of the channel. A 2.6 cm miniaturized Hall thruster of a flexible design was built and successfully operated in the power range of 50-300 W. Comparison of preliminary results obtained for cylindrical and annular thruster configurations is presented.

  6. Experiments on cylindrically converging blast waves in atmospheric air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, Hideo; Nakamura, Yuichi

    1980-06-01

    Cylindrically converging blast waves have been produced in normal atmospheric conditions by the detonation of the explosives, pentaerythritoltetranitrate, (PETN), over cylindrical surfaces. The shocks generated in this way are so strong that the fronts propagating through the air become luminous of themselves. The production and the propagation of the shocks have been monitored with a framing camera and a streak camera, and the time-space relations of the shock propagations have been determined using an electrical ionization probing system. The results have shown that the trajectory of the shock fronts near the axis of the cylinder can be approximately represented by the Guderley's formula.

  7. Trapping of Microparticles in Cylindrical Standing Wave Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jeongwon; Hwang, Haerang; Bae, Young Min; Kim, Moojoon; Ha, Kanglyeol

    2013-07-01

    In this study, in order to determine the positions where microparticles are trapped in a cylindrical standing wave field, we derived equations giving the radiation force and potential energy distribution. Then, the trapped pattern and its variation with time in a hollow cylindrical transducer were simulated. The simulation results showed that polystyrene particles moved to and aggregated near positions corresponding to pressure nodes, which were estimated from the derived equations. These were confirmed by measurement. In addition, it was demonstrated that biological particles of the green algae chlorella show similar trapping phenomena to polystyrene particles.

  8. The magnetic properties of the hollow cylindrical ideal remanence magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjørk, R.

    2016-10-01

    We consider the magnetic properties of the hollow cylindrical ideal remanence magnet. This magnet is the cylindrical permanent magnet that generates a uniform field in the cylinder bore, using the least amount of magnetic energy to do so. The remanence distribution of this magnet is derived and the generated field is compared to that of a Halbach cylinder of equal dimensions. The ideal remanence magnet is shown in most cases to generate a significantly lower field than the equivalent Halbach cylinder, although the field is generated with higher efficiency. The most efficient Halbach cylinder is shown to generate a field exactly twice as large as the equivalent ideal remanence magnet.

  9. Aerodynamic sound generation induced by flow over small, cylindrical cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parthasarathy, S. P.; Cho, Y. I.; Back, L. H.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been conducted on the production of high intensity tones by small cylindrical cavities in a flat surface. The application of such a mechanism is to the acoustic coding of moving objects containing drilled holes. The sound intensity and frequency have been determined as functions of flow velocity, diameter and depth of the cavities. As a practical matter, it is possible to produce a whistle producing 106 dB at 30.5 cm distance from a cylindrical hole of 0.5 cm diameter and 1.2 cm deep with an airflow of 60 m/s past the hole.

  10. Microwave guiding in air by a cylindrical filament array waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Chateauneuf, M.; Dubois, J.; Payeur, S.; Kieffer, J.-C.

    2008-03-03

    Microwave guiding was demonstrated over 16 cm in air using a large diameter hollow plasma waveguide. The waveguide was generated with the 100 TW femtosecond laser system at the Advanced Laser Light Source facility. A deformable mirror was used to spatially shape the intense laser pulses in order to generate hundreds of filaments judiciously distributed in a cylindrical shape, creating a cylindrical plasma wall that acts as a microwave waveguide. The microwaves were confined for about 10 ns, which corresponds to the free electron plasma wall recombination time. The characteristics of the plasma waveguide and the results of microwave guiding are presented.

  11. Analytic descriptions of cylindrical electromagnetic waves in a nonlinear medium.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Hao; Si, Liu-Gang; Yang, Xiaoxue; Wu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    A simple but highly efficient approach for dealing with the problem of cylindrical electromagnetic waves propagation in a nonlinear medium is proposed based on an exact solution proposed recently. We derive an analytical explicit formula, which exhibiting rich interesting nonlinear effects, to describe the propagation of any amount of cylindrical electromagnetic waves in a nonlinear medium. The results obtained by using the present method are accurately concordant with the results of using traditional coupled-wave equations. As an example of application, we discuss how a third wave affects the sum- and difference-frequency generation of two waves propagation in the nonlinear medium.

  12. Analytic descriptions of cylindrical electromagnetic waves in a nonlinear medium

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Hao; Si, Liu-Gang; Yang, Xiaoxue; Wu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    A simple but highly efficient approach for dealing with the problem of cylindrical electromagnetic waves propagation in a nonlinear medium is proposed based on an exact solution proposed recently. We derive an analytical explicit formula, which exhibiting rich interesting nonlinear effects, to describe the propagation of any amount of cylindrical electromagnetic waves in a nonlinear medium. The results obtained by using the present method are accurately concordant with the results of using traditional coupled-wave equations. As an example of application, we discuss how a third wave affects the sum- and difference-frequency generation of two waves propagation in the nonlinear medium. PMID:26073066

  13. Cylindrical diffuser axial detection profile is dependent on fiber design

    PubMed Central

    Baran, Timothy M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. The axial emission and detection profiles of 1- and 2-cm cylindrical diffusing fibers based on concentration gradients of scatterers were measured. Based on these measurements, we describe a method for determination of the scatterer concentration gradient within the diffusers. Using a Monte Carlo model incorporating these concentrations, detection was simulated and found to agree with measurements. The measured and simulated detection profiles for these diffusers were found to be drastically different from those previously measured in an alternative diffuser design incorporating an end reflector. When using cylindrical diffusers as detection fibers, it is, therefore, important to understand the design of the fiber and characterize the detection behavior. PMID:25839428

  14. The evanescent wavefield part of a cylindrical vector beam

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rui-Pin; Li, Guoqiang

    2013-01-01

    The evanescent wave of the cylindrical vector field is analyzed using the vector angular spectrum of the electromagnetic beam. Comparison between the contributions of the TE and TM terms of both the propagating and the evanescent waves associated with the cylindrical vector field in free space is demonstrated. The physical pictures of the evanescent wave and the propagating wave are well illustrated from the vectorial structure, which provides a new approach to manipulating laser beams by choosing the states of polarization in the cross-section of the field. PMID:24104116

  15. Cylindrically symmetric distributions of matter taking into account pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Dandash, N.F.

    1986-06-01

    This paper considers a non-steady-state cosmological field for describing the distribution of matter with nonzero pressure; the assumption of cylindrical symmetry is taken into consideration. A new class of non-steady-state solutions to the Einstein equations is found. A homogeneous, anisotropic universe and an analog of the Schwarzschild solution are considered as particular cases. The obtained results can be used for describing cylindrical regions in the universe, especially in the vicinity of linear mass ejection from galaxies and quasars and linear super-large-scale structures.

  16. On the integrable elliptic cylindrical Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation.

    PubMed

    Khusnutdinova, K R; Klein, C; Matveev, V B; Smirnov, A O

    2013-03-01

    There exist two versions of the Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) equation, related to the Cartesian and cylindrical geometries of the waves. In this paper, we derive and study a new version, related to the elliptic cylindrical geometry. The derivation is given in the context of surface waves, but the derived equation is a universal integrable model applicable to generic weakly nonlinear weakly dispersive waves. We also show that there exist nontrivial transformations between all three versions of the KP equation associated with the physical problem formulation, and use them to obtain new classes of approximate solutions for water waves.

  17. Real-time wideband cylindrical holographic surveillance system

    DOEpatents

    Sheen, David M.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Hall, Thomas E.; Severtsen, Ronald H.

    1999-01-01

    A wideband holographic cylindrical surveillance system including a transceiver for generating a plurality of electromagnetic waves; antenna for transmitting the electromagnetic waves toward a target at a plurality of predetermined positions in space; the transceiver also receiving and converting electromagnetic waves reflected from the target to electrical signals at a plurality of predetermined positions in space; a computer for processing the electrical signals to obtain signals corresponding to a holographic reconstruction of the target; and a display for displaying the processed information to determine nature of the target. The computer has instructions to apply Fast Fourier Transforms and obtain a three dimensional cylindrical image.

  18. Real-time wideband cylindrical holographic surveillance system

    DOEpatents

    Sheen, D.M.; McMakin, D.L.; Hall, T.E.; Severtsen, R.H.

    1999-01-12

    A wideband holographic cylindrical surveillance system is disclosed including a transceiver for generating a plurality of electromagnetic waves; antenna for transmitting the electromagnetic waves toward a target at a plurality of predetermined positions in space; the transceiver also receiving and converting electromagnetic waves reflected from the target to electrical signals at a plurality of predetermined positions in space; a computer for processing the electrical signals to obtain signals corresponding to a holographic reconstruction of the target; and a display for displaying the processed information to determine nature of the target. The computer has instructions to apply Fast Fourier Transforms and obtain a three dimensional cylindrical image. 13 figs.

  19. Estimation of lithofacies proportions using well and well test data

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, L.Y.; Blanc, G.; Noetinger, B.

    1996-12-31

    A crucial step of the commonly used geostatistical methods for modeling heterogeneous reservoirs (e.g. the sequential indicator simulation and the truncated Gaussian functions) is the estimation of the lithofacies local proportion (or probability density) functions. Well-test derived permeabilities show good correlation with lithofacies proportions around wells. Integrating well and well-test data in estimating lithofacies proportions could permit the building of more realistic models of reservoir heterogeneity. However this integration is difficult because of the different natures and measurement scales of these two types of data. This paper presents a two step approach to integrating well and well-test data into heterogeneous reservoir modeling. First lithofacies proportions in well-test investigation areas are estimated using a new kriging algorithm called KISCA. KISCA consists in kriging jointly the proportions of all lithofacies in a well-test investigation area so that the corresponding well-test derived permeability is respected through a weighted power averaging of lithofacies permeabilities. For multiple well-tests, an iterative process is used in KISCA to account for their interaction. After this, the estimated proportions are combined with lithofacies indicators at wells for estimating proportion (or probability density) functions over the entire reservoir field using a classical kriging method. Some numerical examples were considered to test the proposed method for estimating lithofacies proportions. In addition, a synthetic lithofacies reservoir model was generated and a well-test simulation was performed. The comparison between the experimental and estimated proportions in the well-test investigation area demonstrates the validity of the proposed method.

  20. System training and assessment in simultaneous proportional myoelectric prosthesis control

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pattern recognition control of prosthetic hands take inputs from one or more myoelectric sensors and controls one or more degrees of freedom. However, most systems created allow only sequential control of one motion class at a time. Additionally, only recently have researchers demonstrated proportional myoelectric control in such systems, an option that is believed to make fine control easier for the user. Recent developments suggest improved reliability if the user follows a so-called prosthesis guided training (PGT) scheme. Methods In this study, a system for simultaneous proportional myoelectric control has been developed for a hand prosthesis with two motor functions (hand open/close, and wrist pro-/supination). The prosthesis has been used with a prosthesis socket equivalent designed for normally-limbed subjects. An extended version of PGT was developed for use with proportional control. The control system’s performance was tested for two subjects in the Clothespin Relocation Task and the Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure (SHAP). Simultaneous proportional control was compared with three other control strategies implemented on the same prosthesis: mutex proportional control (the same system but with simultaneous control disabled), mutex on-off control, and a more traditional, sequential proportional control system with co-contractions for state switching. Results The practical tests indicate that the simultaneous proportional control strategy and the two mutex-based pattern recognition strategies performed equally well, and superiorly to the more traditional sequential strategy according to the chosen outcome measures. Conclusions This is the first simultaneous proportional myoelectric control system demonstrated on a prosthesis affixed to the forearm of a subject. The study illustrates that PGT is a promising system training method for proportional control. Due to the limited number of subjects in this study, no definite conclusions can be

  1. Goodness-of-fit test for proportional subdistribution hazards model.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bingqing; Fine, Jason; Laird, Glen

    2013-09-30

    This paper concerns using modified weighted Schoenfeld residuals to test the proportionality of subdistribution hazards for the Fine-Gray model, similar to the tests proposed by Grambsch and Therneau for independently censored data. We develop a score test for the time-varying coefficients based on the modified Schoenfeld residuals derived assuming a certain form of non-proportionality. The methods perform well in simulations and a real data analysis of breast cancer data, where the treatment effect exhibits non-proportional hazards.

  2. Minimum weight design of ring and stringer stiffeners for axially compressed cylindrical shells with and without internal pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Block, D. L.

    1972-01-01

    Results of analytical study to determine desirable ring and stringer stiffener parameters and proportions for axially compressed stiffened isotropic cylinders with and without internal pressure are presented. This investigation examines the panel and general instability buckling modes of a stiffened cylindrical shell and from this determines desirable stiffener parameters and proportions. Classical buckling equations are used which retain the important effects of the stiffeners. The results determined by using the simpler classical buckling equations are then spot checked and verified using buckling equations which considered discrete ring stiffeners and nonlinear prebuckling deformations. For both rings and stringers, T-shaped stiffeners are preferable and the effects to stiffener shape are much more pronounced at low or zero values of the internal pressure parameter. Simple analytical expressions are developed and presented which express the stiffener area parameter, the ratio of stiffener area and elastics to shell wall area and elastic modulus, in terms of the cylinder geometry and internal pressure parameter.

  3. Proportional proximity sensing for telerobots using Coherent Laser Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vazquez, Sixto L.; Goode, Plesent W.; Slotwinski, Anthony R.

    1992-01-01

    The ability of a telerobotic manipulator to operate in confined spaces while avoiding unwanted collisions is enhanced by the accurate sensing of its proximate environment. To achieve the fidelity required for precise manipulator control, a proportional proximity sensor system with a sufficiently large measurement envelope is required. Current proximity sensors provide a binary indication of the presence of obstacles within a small envelope with coarse or no proportional measurement of their location. A proportional proximity sensor system configured as a Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave (FMCW) Coherent Laser Radar (CLR) using a semiconductor laser as the energy source is described and analyzed. The source and reflected energies mix coherently to generate a radio frequency (RF) signal whose frequency is proportional to the range. The system is tested for accuracy, range, depth of range, speed, and sensitivity and the results are presented. Techniques to derive orientation information and an application to telerobotic control are also described.

  4. Proportionality: a valid alternative to correlation for relative data.

    PubMed

    Lovell, David; Pawlowsky-Glahn, Vera; Egozcue, Juan José; Marguerat, Samuel; Bähler, Jürg

    2015-03-01

    In the life sciences, many measurement methods yield only the relative abundances of different components in a sample. With such relative-or compositional-data, differential expression needs careful interpretation, and correlation-a statistical workhorse for analyzing pairwise relationships-is an inappropriate measure of association. Using yeast gene expression data we show how correlation can be misleading and present proportionality as a valid alternative for relative data. We show how the strength of proportionality between two variables can be meaningfully and interpretably described by a new statistic ϕ which can be used instead of correlation as the basis of familiar analyses and visualisation methods, including co-expression networks and clustered heatmaps. While the main aim of this study is to present proportionality as a means to analyse relative data, it also raises intriguing questions about the molecular mechanisms underlying the proportional regulation of a range of yeast genes.

  5. DC motor proportional control system for orthotic devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaise, H. T.; Allen, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    Multi-channel proportional control system for operation of dc motors for use with externally-powered orthotic arm braces is described. Components of circuitry and principles of operation are described. Schematic diagram of control circuit is provided.

  6. Description of an ionization calorimeter complemented with proportional counters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babayan, K. P.; Boyadzhyan, N. G.; Vasiltsov, V. V.; Grigorov, N. L.; Sobinyakov, V. A.; Shestoperov, V. Y.

    1975-01-01

    An ionization calorimeter is described with a system of proportional counters which are used to determine the charge of the particles incident to the calorimeter and to estimate the number of the secondary charged particles.

  7. Improvements in estimating proportions of objects from multispectral data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horwitz, H. M.; Hyde, P. D.; Richardson, W.

    1974-01-01

    Methods for estimating proportions of objects and materials imaged within the instantaneous field of view of a multispectral sensor were developed further. Improvements in the basic proportion estimation algorithm were devised as well as improved alien object detection procedures. Also, a simplified signature set analysis scheme was introduced for determining the adequacy of signature set geometry for satisfactory proportion estimation. Averaging procedures used in conjunction with the mixtures algorithm were examined theoretically and applied to artificially generated multispectral data. A computationally simpler estimator was considered and found unsatisfactory. Experiments conducted to find a suitable procedure for setting the alien object threshold yielded little definitive result. Mixtures procedures were used on a limited amount of ERTS data to estimate wheat proportion in selected areas. Results were unsatisfactory, partly because of the ill-conditioned nature of the pure signature set.

  8. Proportional reasoning in the learning of chemistry: levels of complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramful, Ajay; Narod, Fawzia Bibi

    2014-03-01

    This interdisciplinary study sketches the ways in which proportional reasoning is involved in the solution of chemistry problems, more specifically, problems involving quantities in chemical reactions (commonly referred to as stoichiometry problems). By building on the expertise of both mathematics and chemistry education research, the present paper shows how the theoretical constructs in proportional reasoning in mathematics education offer rich explanatory accounts of the complexities involved in solving stoichiometry problems. Using Vergnaud's concept of measure spaces, the theoretical analysis shows that proportionality situations are relatively more intricate, involving various layers of complexity in chemistry as compared to those in the mathematics curriculum. Knowledge of proportionality and chemistry are simultaneously required to provide solutions to chemical reactions. Our analysis of a range of stoichiometry situations led us to propose a problem analysis framework involving five levels of difficulty. Further, the specificity of proportionality in stoichiometry is that it can only be established when quantities are interpreted in the unit "mole," a unit which does not have any physical embodiment in terms of a measure of quantity unlike mass and volume. Our analysis of student-teachers' solution to the stoichiometry problems, shows that they tend to incorrectly (probably intuitively) set proportional relationships when two quantities in a reaction are expressed in non-molar quantities such as mass. The data also bring to the fore the primarily formulaic approach that student-teachers use in setting inherent proportionality relationships. An important finding is the interpretation of a chemical equation as a mathematical equation, rather than a statement of proportionality.

  9. Analysis of cylindrical Langmuir probe using experiment and different theories

    SciTech Connect

    Hassouba, M. A.; Galaly, A. R.; Rashed, U. M.

    2013-03-15

    Cylindrical probe data have been analyzed using different theories in order to determine some plasma parameters (electron temperature and electron and ion densities). Langmuir probe data are obtained in a cylindrical DC glow discharge in the positive column plasma at argon gas pressures varied from 0.5 to 6 Torr and at constant discharge current equal to 10 mA. The electron density has calculated from the electron current at the space potential and from Orbital Motion Limited (OML) collisionless theory. Ion density has obtained from the OML analysis of the ion saturation currents. In addition, the electron temperature has measured by three different methods using probe and electrons currents. The electron temperature T{sub e}, plasma density n{sub e}, and space potential V{sub s}, have been obtained from the measured single cylindrical probe I-V characteristic curves. The radial distribution of the electron temperature and plasma density along the glow discharge are measured and discussed. Using the collisionless theories by Langmuir cylindrical probe and up to several Torr argon gas pressures the differences between the values of electron temperature and electron and ion densities stay within reasonable error limits.

  10. Calibrated cylindrical Mach probe in a plasma wind tunnel

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.; Dandurand, D.; Gray, T.; Brown, M. R.; Lukin, V. S.

    2011-03-15

    A simple cylindrical Mach probe is described along with an independent calibration procedure in a magnetized plasma wind tunnel. A particle orbit calculation corroborates our model. The probe operates in the weakly magnetized regime in which probe dimension and ion orbit are of the same scale. Analytical and simulation models are favorably compared with experimental calibration.

  11. QUASI-PML FOR WAVES IN CYLINDRICAL COORDINATES. (R825225)

    EPA Science Inventory

    We prove that the straightforward extension of Berenger's original perfectly matched layer (PML) is not reflectionless at a cylindrical interface in the continuum limit. A quasi-PLM is developed as an absorbing boundary condition (ABC) for the finite-difference time-domain method...

  12. Hypersonic Magneto-Fluid-Dynamic Compression in Cylindrical Inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shang, Joseph S.; Chang, Chau-Lyan

    2007-01-01

    Hypersonic magneto-fluid-dynamic interaction has been successfully performed as a virtual leading-edge strake and a virtual cowl of a cylindrical inlet. In a side-by-side experimental and computational study, the magnitude of the induced compression was found to be depended on configuration and electrode placement. To better understand the interacting phenomenon the present investigation is focused on a direct current discharge at the leading edge of a cylindrical inlet for which validating experimental data is available. The present computational result is obtained by solving the magneto-fluid-dynamics equations at the low magnetic Reynolds number limit and using a nonequilibrium weakly ionized gas model based on the drift-diffusion theory. The numerical simulation provides a detailed description of the intriguing physics. After validation with experimental measurements, the computed results further quantify the effectiveness of a magnet-fluid-dynamic compression for a hypersonic cylindrical inlet. At a minuscule power input to a direct current surface discharge of 8.14 watts per square centimeter of electrode area produces an additional compression of 6.7 percent for a constant cross-section cylindrical inlet.

  13. Static Solutions of Einstein's Equations with Cylindrical Symmetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trendafilova, C. S.; Fulling, S. A.

    2011-01-01

    In analogy with the standard derivation of the Schwarzschild solution, we find all static, cylindrically symmetric solutions of the Einstein field equations for vacuum. These include not only the well-known cone solution, which is locally flat, but others in which the metric coefficients are powers of the radial coordinate and the spacetime is…

  14. 15. CYLINDRICAL FISH SCALER Remnants of the wire screen remain, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. CYLINDRICAL FISH SCALER Remnants of the wire screen remain, through which the fish tumbled as the cylinder revolved. Note geared ring around cylinder, and the small drive shaft by which it was driven. - Hovden Cannery, 886 Cannery Row, Monterey, Monterey County, CA

  15. Double focusing ion mass spectrometer of cylindrical symmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coplan, M. A.; Moore, J. H.; Hoffman, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    A mass spectrometer consisting of an electric sector followed by a magnetic sector is described. The geometry is a cylindrically symmetric generalization of the Mattauch-Herzog spectrometer (1934). With its large annular entrance aperture and a position-sensitive detector, the instrument provides a large geometric factor and 100-percent duty factor, making it appropriate for spacecraft experiments.

  16. Efficient Generation of Truncated Bessel Beams using Cylindrical Waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilchenko, Vladimir S.; Mohageg, Makan; Savchenkov, Anatoliy A.; Matsko, Andrey B.; Maleki, Lute

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we address efficient conversion between a Gaussian beam (a truncated plane wave) and a truncated Bessel beam of agiven order, using cylindrical optical waveguides and whispering gallery mode resonators. Utilizing a generator based on waveguides combined with whispering gallery mode resonators, we have realized Bessel beams of the order of 200 with a conversion efficiency exceeding 10 %.

  17. Screen of cylindrical lenses produces stereoscopic television pictures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nork, C. L.

    1966-01-01

    Stereoscopic television pictures are produced by placing a colorless, transparent screen of adjacent parallel cylindrical lenses before a raster from two synchronized TV cameras. Alternate frames from alternate cameras are displayed. The viewers sensory perception fuses the two images into one three-dimensional picture.

  18. Dynamics of a Liquid Dielectric Attracted by a Cylindrical Capacitor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nardi, Rafael; Lemos, Nivaldo A.

    2007-01-01

    The dynamics of a liquid dielectric attracted by a vertical cylindrical capacitor are studied. Contrary to what might be expected from the standard calculation of the force exerted by the capacitor, the motion of the dielectric is different depending on whether the charge or the voltage of the capacitor is held constant. The problem turns out to…

  19. Electron beam current in high power cylindrical diode

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Amitava; Menon, R.; Mitra, S.; Sharma, Vishnu; Singh, S. K.; Nagesh, K. V.; Chakravarthy, D. P.

    2010-01-15

    Intense electron beam generation studies were carried out in high power cylindrical diode to investigate the effect of the accelerating gap and diode voltage on the electron beam current. The diode voltage has been varied from 130 to 356 kV, whereas the current density has been varied from 87 to 391 A/cm{sup 2} with 100 ns pulse duration. The experimentally obtained electron beam current in the cylindrical diode has been compared with the Langmuir-Blodgett law. It was found that the diode current can be explained by a model of anode and cathode plasma expanding toward each other. However, the diode voltage and current do not follow the bipolar space-charge limited flow model. It was also found that initially only a part of the cathode take part in the emission process. The plasma expands at 4.2 cm/mus for 1.7 cm anode-cathode gap and the plasma velocity decreases for smaller gaps. The electrode plasma expansion velocity of the cylindrical diode is much smaller as compared with the planar diode for the same accelerating gap and diode voltage. Therefore, much higher voltage can be obtained for the cylindrical diodes as compared with the planar diodes for the same accelerating gap.

  20. PCM thermal energy storage in cylindrical containers of various configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Mujumdar, A.S.; Ali Ashraf, F.; Menon, A.S.; Weber, M.E.

    1981-01-01

    Experimental measurements are reported for the time variation of surface-averaged rate of heat storage during melting in single, thin-walled cylindrical containers of copper filled with a commercially available paraffin wax. For the wax used the enthalpy-temperature curve was obtained using a differential scanning calorimeter according to the ASTM method. 12 refs.

  1. Applications of bent cylindrical mirrors to x-ray beamlines

    SciTech Connect

    Heald, S.M.

    1981-07-01

    Bent cylindrical mirrors are considered as substitutes for paraboloidal and ellipsoidal mirrors in x-ray beamlines. Analytic and raytracing studies are used to compare their optical performance with the corresponding ideal elements. Particular emphasis is placed on obtaining the practical limitations in the application of bent cylinders to typical beamline configurations.

  2. On Ideal Stability of Cylindrical Localized Interchange Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Umansky, M V

    2007-05-15

    Stability of cylindrical localized ideal pressure-driven interchange plasma modes is revisited. Converting the underlying eigenvalue problem into the form of the Schroedinger equation gives a new simple way of deriving the Suydam stability criterion and calculating the growth rates of unstable modes. Near the marginal stability limit the growth rate is exponentially small and the mode has a double-peak structure.

  3. Microfabrication of cylindrical microfluidic channel networks for microvascular research.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhouchun; Li, Xiang; Martins-Green, Manuela; Liu, Yuxin

    2012-10-01

    Current methods for formation of microvascular channel scaffolds are limited with non-circular channel cross-sections, complicated fabrication, and less flexibility in microchannel network design. To address current limitations in the creation of engineered microvascular channels with complex three-dimensional (3-D) geometries in the shape of microvessels, we have developed a reproducible, cost-effective, and flexible micromanufacturing process combined with photolithographic reflowable photoresist and soft lithography techniques to fabricate cylindrical microchannel and networks. A positive reflowable photoresist AZ P4620 was used to fabricate a master microchannel mold with semi-circular cross-sections. By the alignment and bonding of two polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannels replicated from the master mold together, a cylindrical microchannel or microchannel network was created. Further examination of the channel dimensions and surface profiles at different branching levels showed that the shape of the microfluidic channel was well approximated by a semi-circular surface, and a multi-level, multi-depth channel network was created. In addition, a computational fluidic dynamics (CFD) model was used to simulate shear flows and corresponding pressure distributions inside of the microchannel and channel network based on the dimensions of the fabricated channels. The fabricated multi-depth cylindrical microchannel network can provide platforms for the investigation of microvascular cells growing inside of cylindrical channels under shear flows and lumen pressures, and work as scaffolds for the investigation of morphogenesis and tubulogenesis. PMID:22729782

  4. Cylindrical surface profile and diameter measuring tool and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Currie, James R. (Inventor); Kissel, Ralph R. (Inventor); Smith, Earnest C. (Inventor); Oliver, Charles E. (Inventor); Redmon, John W., Sr. (Inventor); Wallace, Charles C. (Inventor); Swanson, Charles P. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A tool is shown having a cross beam assembly made of beams joined by a center box structure. The assembly is adapted to be mounted by brackets to the outer end of a cylindrical case. The center box structure has a vertical shaft rotatably mounted therein and extending beneath the assembly. Secured to the vertical shaft is a radius arm which is adapted to rotate with the shaft. On the longer end of the radius arm is a measuring tip which contacts the cylindrical surface to be measured and which provides an electric signal representing the radius of the cylindrical surface from the center of rotation of the radius arm. An electric servomotor rotates the vertical shaft and an electronic resolver provides an electric signal representing the angle of rotation of the shaft. The electric signals are provided to a computer station which has software for its computer to calculate and print out the continuous circumference profile of the cylindrical surface, and give its true diameter and the deviations from the ideal circle.

  5. Cylindrical surface profile and diameter measuring tool and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Currie, James R. (Inventor); Kissel, Ralph R. (Inventor); Oliver, Charles E. (Inventor); Smith, Earnest C. (Inventor); Redmon, John W. (Inventor); Wallace, Charles C. (Inventor); Swanson, Charles P. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A tool is shown having a cross beam assembly (15) made of beams (18, 19, 20, 21) joined by a center box structure (23). The assembly (15) is adapted to be mounted by brackets (16) to the outer end of a cylindrical case (11). The center box structure (23) has a vertical shaft (25) rotatably mounted therein and extending beneath the assembly (15). Secured to the vertical shaft (25) is a radius arm (28) which is adapted to rotate with shaft (25). On the longer end of the radius arm (28) is a measuring tip (30) which contacts the cylindrical surface to be measured and which provides an electric signal representing the radius of the cylindrical surface from the center of rotation of the radius arm (28). An electric servomotor (49) rotates the vertical shaft (25) and an electronic resolver (61) provides an electric signal representing the angle of rotation of the shaft (25). The electric signals are provided to a computer station (73) which has software for its computer to calculate and print out the continuous circumference profile of the cylindrical surface, and give its true diameter and the deviations from the ideal circle.

  6. Optical scanning apparatus for indicia imprinted about a cylindrical axis

    DOEpatents

    Villarreal, Richard A.

    1987-01-01

    An optical scanner employed in a radioactive environment for reading indicia imprinted about a cylindrical surface of an article by means of an optical system including metallic reflective and mirror surfaces resistant to degradation and discoloration otherwise imparted to glass surfaces exposed to radiation.

  7. Microfabrication of cylindrical microfluidic channel networks for microvascular research.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhouchun; Li, Xiang; Martins-Green, Manuela; Liu, Yuxin

    2012-10-01

    Current methods for formation of microvascular channel scaffolds are limited with non-circular channel cross-sections, complicated fabrication, and less flexibility in microchannel network design. To address current limitations in the creation of engineered microvascular channels with complex three-dimensional (3-D) geometries in the shape of microvessels, we have developed a reproducible, cost-effective, and flexible micromanufacturing process combined with photolithographic reflowable photoresist and soft lithography techniques to fabricate cylindrical microchannel and networks. A positive reflowable photoresist AZ P4620 was used to fabricate a master microchannel mold with semi-circular cross-sections. By the alignment and bonding of two polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannels replicated from the master mold together, a cylindrical microchannel or microchannel network was created. Further examination of the channel dimensions and surface profiles at different branching levels showed that the shape of the microfluidic channel was well approximated by a semi-circular surface, and a multi-level, multi-depth channel network was created. In addition, a computational fluidic dynamics (CFD) model was used to simulate shear flows and corresponding pressure distributions inside of the microchannel and channel network based on the dimensions of the fabricated channels. The fabricated multi-depth cylindrical microchannel network can provide platforms for the investigation of microvascular cells growing inside of cylindrical channels under shear flows and lumen pressures, and work as scaffolds for the investigation of morphogenesis and tubulogenesis.

  8. Lithium glass scintillator neutron detector as an improved alternative to the standard 3 he proportional counter

    SciTech Connect

    Vladimir Popov, Pavel Degtiarenko

    2011-06-01

    Lithium glass scintillator made from 6Li-enriched substrate is a well known for its neutron detection capability. In spite of neutron interaction, cross section of 6Li happens to be lower than that of 3He. However, the neutron detection efficiency could be higher due to higher volume content of 6Li nuclear in the solid scintillator vs. gas filled proportional counter. At the same time, as lithium glass is sensitive to gamma and charge particle radiation, non-neutron radiation discrimination is required. Our detector is composed of two equal-size cylindrical Li(Ce) glass scintillators. The first one is high-sensitive to thermal neutrons GS-20 (6Li doped), the second one is GS-30 (7Li doped) type Scint-Gobain made lithium glass scintillator. Each of scintillators is coupled with R7400U Hamamatsu subminiature photomultiplier tube, and all assembly is fitted into NP100H 3He tube size. 6Li absorbs thermal neutrons releasing alpha particles and triton with 4.8 MeV total energy deposit inside the scintillator (equivalent to about ~1.3 MeV gamma energy depositions). Because 7Li isotope does not absorb thermal neutrons, and the physical properties of the two scintillators are virtually identical, the difference between these two scintillators could be used to provide neutron dose rate information. Results of study of neutron detector assembled of two Li(Ce) scintillators and NP100H moderator are presented

  9. ["Golden proportion" and its application to calculate dentition].

    PubMed

    Vadachkoriia, N R; Gumberidze, N Sh; Mandzhavidze, N A

    2007-01-01

    Within an evolutionary process, the nature has created the standard of aesthetics - a "gold proportion" on the basis of which, the parts of human body, to be more exact, teeth and denture correspond to each other and to own parts by the size, which is the ideal precondition for ideal appearance. The charming smile serves as the proof, that teeth in denture are located by a principle of "gold proportion". A "gold proportion" is the corner stone of beauty and it can be applied with success in stomatology. Proportion is the certain ratio between parts, and proportional means a proper correlation of parts among themselves. It is reputed, that knowledge about "gold proportion" Pythagor has got from products of the Egyptian and Babylon scientists. And this is true, proportions of cult constructions, bas-relieves, pyramids in Giza, home appliances and ornaments from Tutanhamon tomb testify, that under their creation the Egyptian masters were guided by a principle of "gold proportion". The facade of ancient Greek temple Parthenon is built by a principle of "gold proportion". During archeological digs of this temple the compasses which sculptors and architects of an ancient world used has been found. The "gold proportion" is mentioned in the work which has reached us "Beginning" the author is the scientist of antique epoch Euclid. In 1509, in Venice the book of Luka Pacholi the "Divine proportion" has been published, its illustration is attributed to Leonardo de Vinci. This work has been recognized as a "Hymn of a gold proportion". In 1885 the German researcher professor Zeising published his work - "Aesthetic researches". When Zeising has received numerical values of piece length, he saw that they coincided with figures of some numerical sequence, which was offered by the great Italian mathematician of Middle Ages Fibonacci (or Leonardo Pisano). In his composition the "Abacus Book" Leonardo Fibonacci showed aforesaid sequence of numbers, by means of which he has explained

  10. ["Golden proportion" and its application to calculate dentition].

    PubMed

    Vadachkoriia, N R; Gumberidze, N Sh; Mandzhavidze, N A

    2007-01-01

    Within an evolutionary process, the nature has created the standard of aesthetics - a "gold proportion" on the basis of which, the parts of human body, to be more exact, teeth and denture correspond to each other and to own parts by the size, which is the ideal precondition for ideal appearance. The charming smile serves as the proof, that teeth in denture are located by a principle of "gold proportion". A "gold proportion" is the corner stone of beauty and it can be applied with success in stomatology. Proportion is the certain ratio between parts, and proportional means a proper correlation of parts among themselves. It is reputed, that knowledge about "gold proportion" Pythagor has got from products of the Egyptian and Babylon scientists. And this is true, proportions of cult constructions, bas-relieves, pyramids in Giza, home appliances and ornaments from Tutanhamon tomb testify, that under their creation the Egyptian masters were guided by a principle of "gold proportion". The facade of ancient Greek temple Parthenon is built by a principle of "gold proportion". During archeological digs of this temple the compasses which sculptors and architects of an ancient world used has been found. The "gold proportion" is mentioned in the work which has reached us "Beginning" the author is the scientist of antique epoch Euclid. In 1509, in Venice the book of Luka Pacholi the "Divine proportion" has been published, its illustration is attributed to Leonardo de Vinci. This work has been recognized as a "Hymn of a gold proportion". In 1885 the German researcher professor Zeising published his work - "Aesthetic researches". When Zeising has received numerical values of piece length, he saw that they coincided with figures of some numerical sequence, which was offered by the great Italian mathematician of Middle Ages Fibonacci (or Leonardo Pisano). In his composition the "Abacus Book" Leonardo Fibonacci showed aforesaid sequence of numbers, by means of which he has explained

  11. Proportional counter for X-ray analysis of lunar and planetary surfaces. [a position sensitive scintillating imaging proportional counter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A position sensitive proportional scintillation detector was developed and evaluated for use in applications involving X-ray imaging as well as spectroscopy. Topics covered include limitations of the proportional scintillation counter for use in space; purification of the xenon gas in the detector, and the operation of the detector system. Results show that the light signal in a proportional scintillation detector remains well localized. With modest electric fields in xenon, the primary electrons from a photoelectric absorption of an X-ray can be brought a distance of a few millimeters to a higher field region without spreading more than a millimeter or so. Therefore, it is possible to make a proportional scintillation detector with good position sensitivity that could be used to calibrate out the difference in light collection over its sensitive volume.

  12. Shaping of parabolic cylindrical membrane reflectors for the DART precision test bed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, C.; Salama, M.; Dragovan, M.; Schroeder, J.; Barber, D.; Dooley, J.

    2003-01-01

    The DART is a new telescope architecture consisting of two cylindrical parabolic reflectors. The system is ideally suited to using tensioned membranes for the reflective surfaces, owing to the zero Gaussian curvature of a cylindrical parabola.

  13. An Interactive Point Kernel Program For Photon Dose Rate Prediction of Cylindrical Source/Shield Arrangements.

    1990-10-26

    Version 00 The program ZYLIND is an interactive point kernel program for photon dose rate prediction of a homogeneous cylindrical source shielded by cylindrical (radial) or plane (axial) layered shields.

  14. Wing spar stress charts and wing truss proportions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, Edward P

    1926-01-01

    In order to simplify the calculation of beams continuous over three supports, a series of charts have been calculated giving the bending moments at all the critical points and the reactions at all supports for such members. Using these charts as a basis, calculations of equivalent bending moments, representing the total stresses acting in two bay-wing trusses of proportions varying over a wide range, have been determined, both with and without allowance for column effect. This leads finally to the determination of the best proportions for any particular truss or the best strut locations in any particular airplane. The ideal proportions are found to vary with the thickness of the wing section used, the aspect ratio, and the ratio of gap to chord.

  15. Mixing of Multiple Jets with a Confined Subsonic Crossflow in a Cylindrical Duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, James D.; Liscinsky, David S.; Samuelsen, G. Scott; Smith, Clifford E.; Oechsle, Victor L.

    1996-01-01

    This paper summarizes NASA-supported experimental and computational results on the mixing of a row of jets with a confined subsonic crossflow in a cylindrical duct. The studies from which these results were derived investigated flow and geometric variations typical of the complex 3-D flowfield in the combustion chambers in gas turbine engines. The principal observations were that the momentum-flux ratio and the number of orifices were significant variables. Jet penetration was critical, and jet penetration decreased as either the number of orifices increased or the momentum-flux ratio decreased. It also appeared that jet penetration remained similar with variations in orifice size, shape, spacing, and momentum-flux ratio when the number of orifices was proportional to the square-root of the momentum-flux ratio. In the cylindrical geometry, planar variances are very sensitive to events in the near wall region, so planar averages must be considered in context with the distributions. The mass-flow ratios and orifices investigated were often very large (mass-flow ratio greater than 1 and ratio of orifice area-to-mainstream cross-sectional area up to 0.5), and the axial planes of interest were sometimes near the orifice trailing edge. Three-dimensional flow was a key part of efficient mixing and was observed for all configurations. The results shown also seem to indicate that non-reacting dimensionless scalar profiles can emulate the reacting flow equivalence ratio distribution reasonably well. The results cited suggest that further study may not necessarily lead to a universal 'rule of thumb' for mixer design for lowest emissions, because optimization will likely require an assessment for a specific application.

  16. Student reasoning about ratio and proportion in introductory physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudreaux, Andrew

    2012-02-01

    To many students, introductory physics must seem a fast-moving parade of abstract and somewhat mysterious quantities. Most such quantities are rooted in proportional reasoning. Using ratio, physicists construct the force experienced by a unit charge, and attach the name electric field, or characterize a motion with the velocity change that occurs in a unit time. While physicists reason about these ratios without conscious effort, students tend to resort to memorized algorithms, and at times struggle to match the appropriate algorithm to the situation encountered. Although the term ``proportional reasoning'' is prevalent, skill in reasoning with these ratio quantities is neither acquired nor applied as a single cognitive entity. Expert ability seems to be characterized by the intentional use of a variety of components, or elements of proportional reasoning, by a fluency in shifting from one component to another, and by a skill in selecting from among these components. Based on this perspective, it is natural to expect students to develop proportional reasoning ability in fits and starts as various facets are acquired and integrated into existing understandings. In an ongoing collaboration between Western Washington University, New Mexico State University, and Rutgers, we are attempting to map the rich cognitive terrain of proportional reasoning, and to use our findings to guide the design of instruction that develops fluency. This talk will present a provisional set of proportional reasoning components, along with research tasks that have been developed to measure student ability along these components. Student responses will be presented as evidence of specific modes of thinking. The talk will conclude with a brief outline of our approach to improving student understanding.

  17. Proportion of hospital readmissions deemed avoidable: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    van Walraven, Carl; Bennett, Carol; Jennings, Alison; Austin, Peter C.; Forster, Alan J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Readmissions to hospital are increasingly being used as an indicator of quality of care. However, this approach is valid only when we know what proportion of readmissions are avoidable. We conducted a systematic review of studies that measured the proportion of readmissions deemed avoidable. We examined how such readmissions were measured and estimated their prevalence. Methods We searched the MEDLINE and EMBASE databases to identify all studies published from 1966 to July 2010 that reviewed hospital readmissions and that specified how many were classified as avoidable. Results Our search strategy identified 34 studies. Three of the studies used combinations of administrative diagnostic codes to determine whether readmissions were avoidable. Criteria used in the remaining studies were subjective. Most of the studies were conducted at single teaching hospitals, did not consider information from the community or treating physicians, and used only one reviewer to decide whether readmissions were avoidable. The median proportion of readmissions deemed avoidable was 27.1% but varied from 5% to 79%. Three study-level factors (teaching status of hospital, whether all diagnoses or only some were considered, and length of follow-up) were significantly associated with the proportion of admissions deemed to be avoidable and explained some, but not all, of the heterogeneity between the studies. Interpretation All but three of the studies used subjective criteria to determine whether readmissions were avoidable. Study methods had notable deficits and varied extensively, as did the proportion of readmissions deemed avoidable. The true proportion of hospital readmissions that are potentially avoidable remains unclear. PMID:21444623

  18. A Method to Calculate the Surface Tension of a Cylindrical Droplet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Xiaosong; Zhu, Ruzeng

    2010-01-01

    The history of Laplace's equations for spherical and cylindrical droplets and the concept of dividing surface in Gibbs' thermodynamic theory of capillary phenomena are briefly reviewed. The existing theories of surface tensions of cylindrical droplets are briefly reviewed too. For cylindrical droplets, a new method to calculate the radius and the…

  19. Development of proportional counters using photosensitive gases and liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.F.

    1985-02-01

    An introduction to the history and to the principle of operation of wire chambers using photosensitive gases and liquids is presented. Their use as light sensors coupled to Gas Scintillation Proportional Counters and BaF/sub 2/, as well as their use in Cherenkov Ring Imaging, is discussed in some detail. The development of wire chambers using photosensitive gases, and later photosensitive liquids, has gone in three major directions. The first is as a replacement for photomultiplier tubes for gas scintillation proportional counters. The second is for Ring Imaging Cherenkov detectors. The third is as the photon sensor for the scintillator BaF/sub 2/. We discuss all three fields here.

  20. Proportional assist ventilation and neurally adjusted ventilatory assist.

    PubMed

    Kacmarek, Robert M

    2011-02-01

    Patient-ventilator synchrony is a common problem with all patients actively triggering the mechanical ventilator. In many cases synchrony can be improved by vigilant adjustments by the managing clinician. However, in most institutions clinicians are not able to spend the time necessary to ensure synchrony in all patients. Proportional assist ventilation (PAV) and neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NAVA) were both developed to improve patient-ventilator synchrony by proportionally unloading ventilatory effort and turning control of the ventilatory pattern over to the patient. This paper discusses PAV's and NAVA's theory of operation, general process of application, and the supporting literature.

  1. Selective decay in a long cylindrical geometry in SSX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, T.; Brown, M.; Dandurand, D.; Zhang, X.

    2010-11-01

    A helical, minimum-energy relaxed plasma state has been observed in a long cylindrical volume. The cylinder is long enough (L/R = 13) so that the predicted minimum energy state is a close approximation to the infinite cylinder solution. The plasma is injected at v >=50 km/s by a coaxial magnetized plasma gun located at one end of the cylindrical volume. The relaxed state is rapidly attained in 1--2 axial Alfvén times after initiation of the plasma. Magnetic data is favorably compared with an analytical model. Magnetic data exhibits broadband fluctuations of the measured axial modes during the formation period. The broadband activity rapidly decays as the energy condenses into the lowest energy mode, which is in agreement to the minimum energy eigenstate of ∇xB = λB. Merging experiments are planned and additional data will be presented if available.

  2. Field emission of electrons from cylindrical metallic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sodha, Mahendra Singh; Dixit, Amrit

    2008-10-01

    In this communication the authors have derived an almost exact expression for the tunneling probability of an electron through the surface potential barrier on account of a negative charge on a cylindrical metallic dust particle and have used it to obtain the field emission current density from the surface of the particle. Based on these results, a parametric analysis of the phenomenon and comparison to the results of JWKB approximation (similar to Fowler-Nordheim theory) has been presented. These results are also applicable to a number of applications based on electric field emission from a thin metallic wire surrounded by a coaxial cylindrical surface at a high electric potential with respect to the wire. The investigation is of relevance to dusty plasmas in space and laboratory and carbon nanotubes.

  3. Sound Transmission through a Cylindrical Sandwich Shell with Honeycomb Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Yvette Y.; Robinson, Jay H.; Silcox, Richard J.

    1996-01-01

    Sound transmission through an infinite cylindrical sandwich shell is studied in the context of the transmission of airborne sound into aircraft interiors. The cylindrical shell is immersed in fluid media and excited by an oblique incident plane sound wave. The internal and external fluids are different and there is uniform airflow in the external fluid medium. An explicit expression of transmission loss is derived in terms of modal impedance of the fluids and the shell. The results show the effects of (a) the incident angles of the plane wave; (b) the flight conditions of Mach number and altitude of the aircraft; (c) the ratios between the core thickness and the total thickness of the shell; and (d) the structural loss factors on the transmission loss. Comparisons of the transmission loss are made among different shell constructions and different shell theories.

  4. Plasmon modes of circular cylindrical double-layer graphene.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tao; Hu, Min; Zhong, Renbin; Chen, Xiaoxing; Zhang, Ping; Gong, Sen; Zhang, Chao; Liu, Shenggang

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a theoretical investigation on plasmon modes in a circular cylindrical double-layer graphene structure is presented. Due to the interlayer electromagnetic interaction, there exist two branches of plasmon modes, the optical plasmon mode and the acoustic plasmon mode. The characteristics of these two modes, such as mode pattern, effective mode index and propagation loss, are analyzed. The modal behaviors can be effectively tuned by changing the distance between two graphene layers, the chemical potential of graphene and the permittivity of interlayer dielectric. Importantly, the breakup of tradeoff between mode confinement and propagation loss is discovered in the distance-dependent modal behavior, which originates from the unique dispersion properties of a double-layer graphene system. As a consequence, both strong mode confinement and longer propagation length can be achieved. Our results may provide good opportunities for developing applications based on graphene plasmonics in circular cylindrical structure. PMID:27607651

  5. Reflection of solar radiation by a cylindrical cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. L.

    1989-01-01

    Potential applications of an analytic method for computing the solar radiation reflected by a cylindrical cloud are discussed, including studies of radiative transfer within finite clouds and evaluations of these effects on other clouds and on remote sensing problems involving finite clouds. The pattern of reflected sunlight from a cylindrical cloud as seen at a large distance has been considered and described by the bidirectional function method for finite cloud analysis, as previously studied theoretically for plane-parallel atmospheres by McKee and Cox (1974); Schmetz and Raschke (1981); and Stuhlmann et al. (1985). However, the lack of three-dimensional radiative transfer solutions for anisotropic scattering media have hampered theoretical investigations of bidirectional functions for finite clouds. The present approach permits expression of the directional variation of the radiation field as a spherical harmonic series to any desired degree and order.

  6. Plasmon modes of circular cylindrical double-layer graphene.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tao; Hu, Min; Zhong, Renbin; Chen, Xiaoxing; Zhang, Ping; Gong, Sen; Zhang, Chao; Liu, Shenggang

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a theoretical investigation on plasmon modes in a circular cylindrical double-layer graphene structure is presented. Due to the interlayer electromagnetic interaction, there exist two branches of plasmon modes, the optical plasmon mode and the acoustic plasmon mode. The characteristics of these two modes, such as mode pattern, effective mode index and propagation loss, are analyzed. The modal behaviors can be effectively tuned by changing the distance between two graphene layers, the chemical potential of graphene and the permittivity of interlayer dielectric. Importantly, the breakup of tradeoff between mode confinement and propagation loss is discovered in the distance-dependent modal behavior, which originates from the unique dispersion properties of a double-layer graphene system. As a consequence, both strong mode confinement and longer propagation length can be achieved. Our results may provide good opportunities for developing applications based on graphene plasmonics in circular cylindrical structure.

  7. Coupled domain wall oscillations in magnetic cylindrical nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Murapaka, Chandrasekhar; Goolaup, S.; Purnama, I.; Lew, W. S.

    2015-02-07

    We report on transverse domain wall (DW) dynamics in two closely spaced cylindrical nanowires. The magnetostatically coupled DWs are shown to undergo an intrinsic oscillatory motion along the nanowire length in addition to their default rotational motion. In the absence of external forces, the amplitude of the DW oscillation is governed by the change in the frequency of the DW rotation. It is possible to sustain the DW oscillations by applying spin-polarized current to the nanowires to balance the repulsive magnetostatic coupling. The current density required to sustain the DW oscillation is found to be in the order of 10{sup 5 }A/cm{sup 2}. Morover, our analysis of the oscillation reveals that the DWs in cylindrical nanowires possess a finite mass.

  8. Nonlinear dynamo action in a cylindrical container driven by precession

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nore, C.; Léorat, J.; Guermond, J.-L.; Luddens, F.

    2011-12-01

    Precession, which results simply from the composition of two rotations with distinct axes, is an efficient way to drive a 3D flow in a closed rigid container. Are such flows relevant to dynamo action in some astrophysical bodies? Positive answers are available for a spherical and a spheroidal containers, using parameters which are, however, not realistic. An experimental approach could be relevant to natural dynamos and seems within reach using a cylindrical container (cf. the experiment now planned at the DREsden Sodium facility for DYNamo and thermohydraulic studies in Germany (DRESDYN), F. Stefani, personal communication, 2011). Using a nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code (SFEMaNS), we numerically demonstrate that precession is able to drive a cylindrical dynamo.

  9. Single-file diffusion of protein drugs through cylindrical nanochannels.

    PubMed

    Yang, Seung Yun; Yang, Jeong-A; Kim, Eung-Sam; Jeon, Gumhye; Oh, Eun Ju; Choi, Kwan Yong; Hahn, Sei Kwang; Kim, Jin Kon

    2010-07-27

    A new drug delivery device using cylindrical block copolymer nanochannels was successfully developed for controlled protein drug delivery applications. Depending on the hydrodynamic diameter of the protein drugs, the pore size in cylindrical nanochannels could be controlled precisely down to 6 nm by Au deposition. Zero-order release of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and human growth hormone (hGH) by single-file diffusion, which has been observed for gas diffusion through zeolite pores, was realized up to 2 months without protein denaturation. Furthermore, a nearly constant in vivo release of hGH from the drug delivery nanodevice implanted to Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats was continued up to 3 weeks, demonstrating the feasibility for long-term controlled delivery of therapeutic protein drugs.

  10. Precession of cylindrical dust particles in the plasma sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Banu, N.; Ticoş, C. M.

    2015-10-15

    The vertical precession of cylindrical dust particles levitated in the sheath of an rf plasma is experimentally investigated. Typically, the dust particles have two equilibrium positions depending on the orientation of their longitudinal axis: horizontal and vertical. A transition between these two states is induced by rapidly increasing the neutral gas pressure in the plasma chamber. During this transition, the cylindrical dust particles make an angle with the horizontal and rotate about their center of mass. The rotation speed increases as the dust rods aligned with the vertical axis. All dust particles will eventually end up in the vertical state while spinning fast about their longitudinal axis. Dust-dust interaction and the attracting ion wakes are possible mechanisms for inducing the observed dust precession.

  11. Novel design of a compact 'cylindrical mirror analyzer' array

    SciTech Connect

    Herting, C.; Juettemann, F.; Petuker, Z.; Schmitter, S.; Hanne, G. F.

    2008-02-15

    The design of a compact multiangle electron analyzer array for simultaneous detection of scattered and ejected electrons at nine different angles is described. It consists of eight slim 'simulated' cylindrical mirror analyzers (CMAs) providing electron detection for scattering/ejected angles of 14 deg. apart from each other. A ninth analyzer is arranged to a scattering angle on the opposite side. A single analyzer has cylindrical symmetry equipotential lines in the region of the beam trajectories, whereas its electrodes are noncylindrical, except for the inner cylinder. The new spectrometer is easy to build because only a few electrodes of simple shape are needed for each of the analyzers. The electron optical properties of the new device are very close to those of a true CMA. Its geometric width, however, is only less than one-fifth of that of a conventional CMA, which allows one to arrange several analyzers close to each other. Example results with the new device are presented.

  12. Cylindrical PVDF film transmitters and receivers for air ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Toda, Minoru

    2002-05-01

    Cylindrical polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) film transducers for transmission and reception of 40-kHz ultrasonic waves in air have been investigated. A key feature of such transducers is their omni-directional polar response. An optimized structure comprises a cylindrical PVDF film element resting on a spool without a mechanical bond to it. Various key design equations to obtain the required ultrasonic performance both as transmitter and receiver are shown, which include resonance frequency, acoustic pressure, angle performance, back air cavity effect, and receiver sensitivity. Measurements of actual frequency response of transmitter output and receiver sensitivity, angular performance, back air space effect, and temperature effect are presented. The results agree well with the theoretical predictions. It has been shown that this device is well-suited for practical application as an ultrasonic ranging device. PMID:12046938

  13. Laser holographic interferometry for investigations of cylindrical transparent tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralea, Mihai F.; Rosu, Nicu; Iova, Iancu

    1996-05-01

    A new double differential refractometer for student laboratories, based on holographic interferometry in real time with reference hologram and reference fringes, is presented. By studying the interferograms one gets a graphical record of the radial, axial, and temporal distribution of the refraction index in cylindrical tubes. This method permits the determination of the experimental parameters for cases when the relationship between these parameters and the refraction index is known. The paper presents experimental results for gas-discharge parameters.

  14. The geometric factor of a cylindrical plate electrostatic analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnstone, A. D.

    1971-01-01

    A method for calculating the geometric factor of cylindrical plate electrostatic energy analyzers with various detector geometries is described. The effects of the fringe-field are estimated. For a special simple case an exact geometric factor is calculated enabling an estimate of the inaccuracies of the approximations used in other cases. The results of some calculations are presented and a simple approximate expression for the geometric factor is deduced.

  15. Charged cylindrical polytropes with generalized polytropic equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azam, M.; Mardan, S. A.; Noureen, I.; Rehman, M. A.

    2016-09-01

    We study the general formalism of polytropes in the relativistic regime with generalized polytropic equations of state in the vicinity of cylindrical symmetry. We take a charged anisotropic fluid distribution of matter with a conformally flat condition for the development of a general framework of the polytropes. We discuss the stability of the model by the Whittaker formula and conclude that one of the models developed is physically viable.

  16. Four-Sector Cylindrical Radio-Frequency Ion Trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melbourne, Ruthann K.; Prestage, John D.; Maleki, Lutfollah

    1992-01-01

    Proposed linear radio-frequency ion trap consists of closed metal cylinder partitioned into four equal cylindrical-sector electrodes and two circular end electrodes. Features include relatively large ion-storage capacity and shielding against external fields. Used in frequency-standard laboratories to confine 199Hg+ ions electrodynamically in isolation from external environment. Similar to device described in "Linear Ion Trap for Atomic Clock" (NPO-17758).

  17. Ideal internal kink modes in a differentially rotating cylindrical plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailovskii, A. B.; Lominadze, J. G.; Galvao, R. M. O.; Churikov, A. P.; Erokhin, N. N.; Pustovitov, V. D.; Konovalov, S. V.; Smolyakov, A. I.; Tsypin, V. S.

    2008-07-15

    The Velikhov effect leading to magnetorotational instability (MRI) is incorporated into the theory of ideal internal kink modes in a differentially rotating cylindrical plasma column. It is shown that this effect can play a stabilizing role for suitably organized plasma rotation profiles, leading to suppression of MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) instabilities in magnetic confinement systems. The role of this effect in the problem of the Suydam and the m = 1 internal kink modes is elucidated, where m is the poloidal mode number.

  18. Theory of semicollisional drift-interchange modes in cylindrical plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hahm, T.S.; Chen, L.

    1985-01-01

    Resistive interchange instabilities in cylindrical plasmas are studied, including the effects of electron diamagnetic drift, perpendicular resistivity, and plasma compression. The analyses are pertinent to the semicollisional regime where the effective ion gyro-radius is larger than the resistive layer width. Both analytical and numerical results show that the modes can be completely stabilized by the perpendicular plasma transport. Ion sound effects, meanwhile, are found to be negligible in the semicollisional regime.

  19. High power impulse magnetron sputtering using a rotating cylindrical magnetron

    SciTech Connect

    Leroy, W. P.; Mahieu, S.; Depla, D.; Ehiasarian, A. P.

    2010-01-15

    Both the industrially favorable deposition technique, high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS), and the industrially popular rotating cylindrical magnetron have been successfully combined. A stable operation without arcing, leaks, or other complications for the rotatable magnetron was attained, with current densities around 11 A cm{sup -2}. For Ti and Al, a much higher degree in ionization in the plasma region was observed for the HIPIMS mode compared to the direct current mode.

  20. Plane-wave expansion of elliptic cylindrical functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santini, Carlo; Frezza, Fabrizio; Tedeschi, Nicola

    2015-08-01

    Elliptic Cylindrical Waves (ECW), defined as the product of an angular Mathieu function by its corresponding radial Mathieu function, occur in the solution of scattering problems involving two-dimensional structures with elliptic cross sections. In this paper, we explicitly derive the expansion of ECW, along a plane surface, in terms of homogeneous and evanescent plane waves, showing the accuracy of the numerical implementation of the formulas and discussing possible applications of the result.

  1. Evolution of bulk strain solitons in cylindrical inhomogeneous shells

    SciTech Connect

    Shvartz, A. Samsonov, A.; Dreiden, G.; Semenova, I.

    2015-10-28

    Bulk strain solitary waves in nonlinearly elastic thin-walled cylindrical shells with variable geometrical and physical parameters are studied, and equation for the longitudinal strain component with the variable coefficients is derived. A conservative finite difference scheme is proposed, and the results of numerical simulation of the strain soliton evolution in a shell with the abrupt variations of cross section and physical properties of the material are presented.

  2. Transition in Electron Transport in a Cylindrical Hall Thruster

    SciTech Connect

    J.B. Parker, Y. Raitses, and N.J. Fisch

    2010-06-02

    Through the use of high-speed camera and Langmuir probe measurements in a cylindrical Hall thruster, we report the discovery of a rotating spoke of increased plasma density and light emission which correlates with increased electron transport across the magnetic field. As cathode electron emission is increased, a sharp transition occurs where the spoke disappears and electron transport decreases. This suggests that a significant fraction of the electron current might be directed through the spoke.

  3. Transition in electron transport in a cylindrical Hall thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, J. B.; Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N. J.

    2010-08-30

    Through the use of high-speed camera and Langmuir probe measurements in a cylindrical Hall thruster, we report the discovery of a rotating spoke of increased plasma density and light emission which correlates with increased electron transport across the magnetic field. As cathode electron emission is increased, a sharp transition occurs where the spoke disappears and electron transport decreases. This suggests that a significant fraction of the electron current might be directed through the spoke.

  4. Evaluation of direct-exchange areas for a cylindrical enclosure

    SciTech Connect

    Sika, J. )

    1991-11-01

    This paper reports on a method for calculating the radiative heat transfer direct-exchange areas for surface-to-surface, volume-to-surface, and volume-to-volume pairs of zones in axisymmetric cylindrical geometries. With this method the calculation of the direct-exchange areas can be transformed from the original four-, five-, and sixfold integrals in the defining relations to just single and/or double integrals. Gray gas with absorption coefficient K is assumed.

  5. A tool for installation and removal of cylindrical baffles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pessin, R.

    1980-01-01

    Simple tool based on principle of automobile oil wrench slips over cylindrical thread-on baffle to install or remove it from baffle assembly. Tool consists of curled metal sheet brazed onto handgrip. Handgrip is adapted to be driven by wrench, ratchet, extension, torque wrench, or some other convenient tool. Clockwise twist of handgrip, tightens metal sheet around baffle to advance it into threaded joint. Counterclockwise twist loosens sheet for repositioning or tool removal.

  6. Sensitive cylindrical SERS substrate array for rapid microanalysis of nucleobases.

    PubMed

    Rajapandiyan, Panneerselvam; Yang, Jyisy

    2012-12-01

    In this work, a cylindrical-substrate array for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) measurements was developed to enable analysis of nucleobases in a few microliters of liquid. To eliminate uncertainties associated with SERS detection of aqueous samples, a new type of cylindrical SERS substrate was designed to confine the aqueous sample at the tip of the SERS probe. Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) optical fibers in a series of different diameters were used as the basic substrate. A solution of poly(vinylidene fluoride)/dimethylformamide (PVDF/DMF) was used to coat the tip of each fiber to increase the surface roughness and facilitate adsorption of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) for enhancing Raman signals. A chemical reduction method was used to form AgNPs in and on the PVDF coating layer. The reagents and reaction conditions were systematically examined with the aim of estimating the optimum parameters. Unlike the spreading of aqueous sample on most SERS substrates, particularly flat ones, the new SERS substrates showed enough hydrophobicity to restrict aqueous sample to the tip area, thus enabling quantitative analysis. The required volume of sample could be as low as 1 μL with no need for a drying step in the procedure. By aligning the cylindrical SERS substrates into a solid holder, an array of cylindrical substrates was produced for mass analysis of aqueous samples. This new substrate improves both reproducibility and sensitivity for detection in aqueous samples. The enhancement factor approaches 7 orders in magnitude with a relative standard error close to 8%. Using the optimized conditions, nucleobases of adenine, cytosine, thymine, and uracil could be detected with limits approaching a few hundreds nanomolar in only a few microliters of solution. PMID:23140099

  7. Improving Students' Proportional Thinking Using Schema-Based Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jitendra, Asha K.; Star, Jon R.; Rodriguez, Michael; Lindell, Mary; Someki, Fumio

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of an instructional program (schema-based instruction, SBI) designed to teach 7th graders how to comprehend and solve proportion problems involving ratios/rates, scale drawings, and percents. The SBI program emphasized the underlying mathematical structure of problems via schematic diagrams, focused on a…

  8. High condylectomy versus proportional condylectomy: is secondary orthognathic surgery necessary?

    PubMed

    Fariña, R; Olate, S; Raposo, A; Araya, I; Alister, J P; Uribe, F

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the need for secondary orthognathic surgery in patients undergoing two different condylectomy protocols for active unilateral condylar hyperplasia (UCH). A retrospective cohort study evaluated UCH patients treated by condylectomy. Two groups were established: group 1 comprised those who had undergone a high condylectomy (5 mm removed) and group 2 comprised those who had undergone a proportional condylectomy (removing the difference observed between the measurements of the hyperplastic and the healthy side). Data analysis was done with the Levene test and t-test; a P-value of <0.05 indicated a statistically significant relationship. Forty-nine patients, with an average age of 19.83 years, were analyzed; 11 were included in group 1 and 38 in group 2. There was no statistical difference between the two groups with regard to age or sex (P=0.781). An average of 5.81 mm was removed in the high condylectomy group, while an average of 9.28 mm was removed in the proportional condylectomy group; this difference was statistically significant (P=0.042). Comparing the two groups, proportional condylectomy reduced the need for secondary orthognathic surgery (P<0.001). The proportional condylectomy can be used as the sole surgical treatment in cases of UCH, thus avoiding the need for secondary orthognathic surgery. PMID:26275962

  9. Making Sense of Fractions, Ratios, and Proportions. 2002 Yearbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litwiller, Bonnie, Ed.; Bright, George, Ed.

    This yearbook contains articles that give insight into students' thinking about factions, ratios, and proportions. Suggestions are offered on how to develop the concepts and skills associated with these topics. The book is divided into elementary, middle school, and professional development sections. Chapters include: (1) "The Development of…

  10. Prospective Elementary Teachers' Misunderstandings in Solving Ratio and Proportion Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monteiro, Cecilia

    2003-01-01

    This study explores difficulties that prospective elementary mathematics teachers have with the concepts of ratio and proportion, mainly when they are engaged in solving problems using algorithm procedures. These difficulties can be traced back to earlier experiences when they were students of junior and high school. The reflection on these…

  11. Development of proportional counters using photosensitive gases and liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.F.

    1984-10-01

    An introduction to the history and to the principle of operation of wire chambers using photosensitive gases and liquids is presented. Their use as light sensors coupled to Gas Scintillation Proportional Counters and BaF/sub 2/, as well as their use in Cherenkov Ring imaging, is discussed in some detail. 42 references, 21 figures.

  12. Proportional Reasoning Tasks as a Measure of Formal Reasoning Ability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shemesh, Michal

    A nonequivalent control group design study, with a math unit on ratio and proportion as the treatment, was conducted to examine the validity of some written tasks as a measure of formal reasoning. Subjects in the study were 68 fifth grade students who enrolled in two classes in a small urban school. The experimental group learned a 12-lesson math…

  13. Augmented mixed beta regression models for periodontal proportion data

    PubMed Central

    Galvis, Diana M.; Bandyopadhyay, Dipankar; Lachos, Victor H.

    2014-01-01

    Continuous (clustered) proportion data often arise in various domains of medicine and public health where the response variable of interest is a proportion (or percentage) quantifying disease status for the cluster units, ranging between zero and one. However, because of the presence of relatively disease-free as well as heavily diseased subjects in any study, the proportion values can lie in the interval [0, 1]. While beta regression can be adapted to assess covariate effects in these situations, its versatility is often challenged because of the presence/excess of zeros and ones because the beta support lies in the interval (0, 1). To circumvent this, we augment the probabilities of zero and one with the beta density, controlling for the clustering effect. Our approach is Bayesian with the ability to borrow information across various stages of the complex model hierarchy and produces a computationally convenient framework amenable to available freeware. The marginal likelihood is tractable and can be used to develop Bayesian case-deletion influence diagnostics based on q-divergence measures. Both simulation studies and application to a real dataset from a clinical periodontology study quantify the gain in model fit and parameter estimation over other ad hoc alternatives and provide quantitative insight into assessing the true covariate effects on the proportion responses. PMID:24764045

  14. Collaboration Promotes Proportional Reasoning about Resource Distribution in Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Rowena; Heyman, Gail D.; Barner, David

    2011-01-01

    The authors investigated how children and adults evaluate the "niceness" of individuals who engage in resource distribution, with a focus on their sensitivity to the proportion of resources given. Across 3 experiments, subjects evaluated the niceness of a child who gave a quantity of pennies to another child. In Study 1 (N = 30), adults showed…

  15. Attentional Control and the Relatedness Proportion Effect in Semantic Priming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchison, Keith A.

    2007-01-01

    In 2 experiments, participants completed both an attentional control battery (OSPAN, antisaccade, and Stroop tasks) and a modified semantic priming task. The priming task measured relatedness proportion (RP) effects within subjects, with the color of the prime indicating the probability that the to-be-named target would be related. In Experiment…

  16. Modelling boron-lined proportional counter response to neutrons.

    PubMed

    Shahri, A; Ghal-Eh, N; Etaati, G R

    2013-09-01

    The detailed Monte Carlo simulation of a boron-lined proportional counter response to a neutron source has been presented. The MCNP4C and experimental data on different source-moderator geometries have been given for comparison. The influence of different irradiation geometries and boron-lining thicknesses on the detector response has been studied.

  17. System proportions fluid-flow in response to demand signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Control system provides proportioned fluid flow rates in response to demand signals. It compares a digital signal, representing a flow demand, with a reference signal to yield a control voltage to one or more solenoid valves connected to orifices of a predetermined size.

  18. Population-Sample Regression in the Estimation of Population Proportions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weitzman, R. A.

    2006-01-01

    Focusing on a single sample obtained randomly with replacement from a single population, this article examines the regression of population on sample proportions and develops an unbiased estimator of the square of the correlation between them. This estimator turns out to be the regression coefficient. Use of the squared-correlation estimator as a…

  19. Proportional Reasoning in the Learning of Chemistry: Levels of Complexity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramful, Ajay; Narod, Fawzia Bibi

    2014-01-01

    This interdisciplinary study sketches the ways in which proportional reasoning is involved in the solution of chemistry problems, more specifically, problems involving quantities in chemical reactions (commonly referred to as stoichiometry problems). By building on the expertise of both mathematics and chemistry education research, the present…

  20. Simulation of dynamics of hydraulic system with proportional control valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bureček, Adam; Hružík, Lumír; Vašina, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Dynamics of a hydraulic system is influenced by several parameters, in this case mainly by proportional control valve, oil bulk modulus, oil viscosity, mass load etc. This paper will be focused on experimental measurement and mathematical simulation of dynamics of a hydraulic system with proportional control valve, linear hydraulic cylinder and mass load. The measurement is performed on experimental equipment that enables realization of dynamic processes of the hydraulic system. Linear hydraulic cylinder with mass load is equipped with position sensor of piston. The movement control of piston rod is ensured by the proportional control valve. The equipment enables to test an influence of parameter settings of regulator of the proportional control valve on position and pressure system responses. The piston position is recorded by magnetostrictive sensor that is located in drilled piston rod side of the linear hydraulic cylinder. Pressures are measured by piezoresistive sensors on the piston side and the piston rod side of the hydraulic cylinder. The measurement is performed during movement of the piston rod with mass load to the required position. There is realized and verified a mathematical model using Matlab SimHydraulics software for this hydraulic system.

  1. A Refined Item Digraph Analysis of a Proportional Reasoning Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bart, William M.; Williams-Morris, Ruth

    1990-01-01

    Refined item digraph analysis (RIDA) is a way of studying diagnostic and prescriptive testing. It permits assessment of a test item's diagnostic value by examining the extent to which the item has properties of ideal items. RIDA is illustrated with the Orange Juice Test, which assesses the proportionality concept. (TJH)

  2. High condylectomy versus proportional condylectomy: is secondary orthognathic surgery necessary?

    PubMed

    Fariña, R; Olate, S; Raposo, A; Araya, I; Alister, J P; Uribe, F

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the need for secondary orthognathic surgery in patients undergoing two different condylectomy protocols for active unilateral condylar hyperplasia (UCH). A retrospective cohort study evaluated UCH patients treated by condylectomy. Two groups were established: group 1 comprised those who had undergone a high condylectomy (5 mm removed) and group 2 comprised those who had undergone a proportional condylectomy (removing the difference observed between the measurements of the hyperplastic and the healthy side). Data analysis was done with the Levene test and t-test; a P-value of <0.05 indicated a statistically significant relationship. Forty-nine patients, with an average age of 19.83 years, were analyzed; 11 were included in group 1 and 38 in group 2. There was no statistical difference between the two groups with regard to age or sex (P=0.781). An average of 5.81 mm was removed in the high condylectomy group, while an average of 9.28 mm was removed in the proportional condylectomy group; this difference was statistically significant (P=0.042). Comparing the two groups, proportional condylectomy reduced the need for secondary orthognathic surgery (P<0.001). The proportional condylectomy can be used as the sole surgical treatment in cases of UCH, thus avoiding the need for secondary orthognathic surgery.

  3. Are Explicit Apologies Proportional to the Offenses They Address?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heritage, John; Raymond, Chase Wesley

    2016-01-01

    We consider here Goffman's proposal of proportionality between virtual offenses and remedial actions, based on the examination of 102 cases of explicit apologies. To this end, we offer a typology of the primary apology formats within the dataset, together with a broad categorization of the types of virtual offenses to which these apologies are…

  4. A FORTRAN program for testing trend and homogeneity in proportions.

    PubMed

    Thakur, A K; Berry, K J; Mielke, P W

    1985-01-01

    A FORTRAN program is provided for testing linear trend and homogeneity in proportions. Trend is evaluated by the Cochran-Armitage method and homogeneity is tested by an overall X2 test as well by multiple pairwise comparisons by the Fisher-Irwin exact method. The program should be easy to implement on any size of computer with a FORTRAN compiler.

  5. Sci-Math: Applications in Proportional Problem Solving. Module One.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodstein, Madeline P.

    Sci-Math is an interdisciplinary curriculum intended to help students develop the math skills needed for science, especially dimensional analysis, ratio, and the concept of proportion. Sci-Math is divided into two modules with each module having a student and teacher's guide. This module is a pre-algebra module dealing with the arithmetic and…

  6. Applying the Mean Proportional Principle to Graphical Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barton, Lyndon O.

    1991-01-01

    A graphical illustration is presented indicating how the mean proportional (geometric mean), once established for one set of conditions of a geometric identity, can be used to generate other sets of conditions for the same identity. Exemplified is the application of this principle in developing graphical solutions to engineering problems. (JJK)

  7. Map Scale, Proportion, and Google[TM] Earth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberge, Martin C.; Cooper, Linda L.

    2010-01-01

    Aerial imagery has a great capacity to engage and maintain student interest while providing a contextual setting to strengthen their ability to reason proportionally. Free, on-demand, high-resolution, large-scale aerial photography provides both a bird's eye view of the world and a new perspective on one's own community. This article presents an…

  8. Method for fabrication of cylindrical microlenses of selected shape

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, James J.; Baer, Thomas M.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention provides a diffraction limited, high numerical aperture (fast) cylindrical microlens. The method for making the microlens is adaptable to produce a cylindrical lens that has almost any shape on its optical surfaces. The cylindrical lens may have a shape, such as elliptical or hyperbolic, designed to transform some particular given input light distribution into some desired output light distribution. In the method, the desired shape is first formed in a glass preform. Then, the preform is heated to the minimum drawing temperature and a fiber is drawn from it. The cross-sectional shape of the fiber bears a direct relation to the shape of the preform from which it was drawn. During the drawing process, the surfaces become optically smooth due to fire polishing. The present invention has many applications, such as integrated optics, optical detectors and laser diodes. The lens, when connected to a laser diode bar, can provide a high intensity source of laser radiation for pumping a high average power solid state laser. In integrated optics, a lens can be used to couple light into and out of apertures such as waveguides. The lens can also be used to collect light, and focus it on a detector.

  9. Electromagnetic field and cylindrical compact objects in modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousaf, Z.; Bhatti, M. Zaeem ul Haq

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the role of different fluid parameters particularly electromagnetic field and f(R) corrections on the evolution of cylindrical compact object. We have explored the modified field equations, kinematical quantities and dynamical equations. An expression for the mass function has been found in comparison with the Misner-Sharp formalism in modified gravity, after which different mass-radius diagrams are drawn. The coupled dynamical transport equation have been formulated to discuss the role of thermoinertial effects on the inertial mass density of the cylindrical relativistic interior. Finally, we have presented a framework, according to which all possible solutions of the metric f(R)-Maxwell field equations coupled with static fluid can be written through set of scalar functions. It is found that modified gravity induced by Lagrangians f(R) = αR2, f(R) = αR2 - βR and f(R)=α R^2-β R/1+γ R are likely to host more massive cylindrical compact objects with smaller radii as compared to general relativity.

  10. Hierarchical structure formation of cylindrical brush polymer-surfactant complexes.

    PubMed

    Cong, Yang; Gunari, Nikhil; Zhang, Bin; Janshoff, Andreas; Schmidt, Manfred

    2009-06-01

    The complex formation of cylindrical brush polymers with poly(l-lysine) side chains (PLL) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) can induce a helical conformation of the cylindrical brush polymer in aqueous solution (Gunari, N.; Cong, Y.; Zhang, B.; Fischer, K.; Janshoff, A.; Schmidt, M. Macromol. Rapid Commun. 2008, 29, 821-825). Herein, we have systematically investigated the influence of surfactant, salt, and pH on the supramolecular structure formation. The cylindrical brush polymers and their complexes with surfactants were directly visualized by atomic force microscopy in air and in aqueous solution. The alkyl chain length (measured by the carbon number, n) of the surfactant plays a key role. While helical structures were formed with n=10, 11, and 12, no helices were observed with n<10 and n>13. Addition of salt destroys the helical structures as do pH conditions below 4 and above 6, most probably because the polymer-surfactant complexes start to disintegrate. Circular dichroism was utilized to monitor the PLL side chain conformation and clearly revealed that beta-sheet formation of the side chains induces the helical conformation of the atactic main chain. PMID:19326944

  11. Method for fabrication of cylindrical microlenses of selected shape

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, J.J.; Baer, T.M.

    1992-01-14

    The present invention provides a diffraction limited, high numerical aperture (fast) cylindrical microlens. The method for making the microlens is adaptable to produce a cylindrical lens that has almost any shape on its optical surfaces. The cylindrical lens may have a shape, such as elliptical or hyperbolic, designed to transform some particular given input light distribution into some desired output light distribution. In the method, the desired shape is first formed in a glass preform. Then, the preform is heated to the minimum drawing temperature and a fiber is drawn from it. The cross-sectional shape of the fiber bears a direct relation to the shape of the preform from which it was drawn. During the drawing process, the surfaces become optically smooth due to fire polishing. The present invention has many applications, such as integrated optics, optical detectors and laser diodes. The lens, when connected to a laser diode bar, can provide a high intensity source of laser radiation for pumping a high average power solid state laser. In integrated optics, a lens can be used to couple light into and out of apertures such as waveguides. The lens can also be used to collect light, and focus it on a detector. 11 figs.

  12. Chain-Based Communication in Cylindrical Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Javaid, Nadeem; Jafri, Mohsin Raza; Khan, Zahoor Ali; Alrajeh, Nabil; Imran, Muhammad; Vasilakos, Athanasios

    2015-01-01

    Appropriate network design is very significant for Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks (UWSNs). Application-oriented UWSNs are planned to achieve certain objectives. Therefore, there is always a demand for efficient data routing schemes, which can fulfill certain requirements of application-oriented UWSNs. These networks can be of any shape, i.e., rectangular, cylindrical or square. In this paper, we propose chain-based routing schemes for application-oriented cylindrical networks and also formulate mathematical models to find a global optimum path for data transmission. In the first scheme, we devise four interconnected chains of sensor nodes to perform data communication. In the second scheme, we propose routing scheme in which two chains of sensor nodes are interconnected, whereas in third scheme single-chain based routing is done in cylindrical networks. After finding local optimum paths in separate chains, we find global optimum paths through their interconnection. Moreover, we develop a computational model for the analysis of end-to-end delay. We compare the performance of the above three proposed schemes with that of Power Efficient Gathering System in Sensor Information Systems (PEGASIS) and Congestion adjusted PEGASIS (C-PEGASIS). Simulation results show that our proposed 4-chain based scheme performs better than the other selected schemes in terms of network lifetime, end-to-end delay, path loss, transmission loss, and packet sending rate. PMID:25658394

  13. The Athena Astrophysical MHD Code in Cylindrical Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, M. A.; Ostriker, E. C.

    2011-10-01

    We have developed a method for implementing cylindrical coordinates in the Athena MHD code (Skinner & Ostriker 2010). The extension has been designed to alter the existing Cartesian-coordinates code (Stone et al. 2008) as minimally and transparently as possible. The numerical equations in cylindrical coordinates are formulated to maintain consistency with constrained transport, a central feature of the Athena algorithm, while making use of previously implemented code modules such as the eigensystems and Riemann solvers. Angular-momentum transport, which is critical in astrophysical disk systems dominated by rotation, is treated carefully. We describe modifications for cylindrical coordinates of the higher-order spatial reconstruction and characteristic evolution steps as well as the finite-volume and constrained transport updates. Finally, we have developed a test suite of standard and novel problems in one-, two-, and three-dimensions designed to validate our algorithms and implementation and to be of use to other code developers. The code is suitable for use in a wide variety of astrophysical applications and is freely available for download on the web.

  14. Rayleigh-Taylor instability experiments in a cylindrically convergent geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, B.; Weir, S.

    1995-08-25

    Due to the sensitivity of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities to initial conditions and due to the difficulty of forming well controlled cylindrical or spherical fluid interfaces, Rayleigh-Taylor experiments are often performed with simple, planar interfaces. Rayleigh-Taylor instability phenomena of practical interest, however, (e.g., underwater explosions, supernova core collapses, and inertial confinement fusion capsule implosions) are typically associated with cylindrical or spherical interfaces in which convergent flow effects have an important influence on the dynamics of instability growth. Recently, Meshkov et.al. have developed a novel technique for studying Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth in a cylindrically convergent geometry. Their experiments utilized low-strength gelatin rings which are imploded by a detonating gas mixture of oxygen and acetylene. Since the gelatin itself has sufficient strength to resist significant deformation by gravity, no membranes are needed to define the ring shape. This experimental technique is attractive because it offers a high degree of control over the interfacial geometry and over the material`s strength and rigidity, which can be varied by adjusting the gelatin concentration. Finally, since both the gelatin and the explosive product gases are transparent, optical diagnostics can be used.

  15. Tunnel Point Cloud Filtering Method Based on Elliptic Cylindrical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhua, Ningning; Jiaa, Yonghong; Luo, Lun

    2016-06-01

    The large number of bolts and screws that attached to the subway shield ring plates, along with the great amount of accessories of metal stents and electrical equipments mounted on the tunnel walls, make the laser point cloud data include lots of non-tunnel section points (hereinafter referred to as non-points), therefore affecting the accuracy for modeling and deformation monitoring. This paper proposed a filtering method for the point cloud based on the elliptic cylindrical model. The original laser point cloud data was firstly projected onto a horizontal plane, and a searching algorithm was given to extract the edging points of both sides, which were used further to fit the tunnel central axis. Along the axis the point cloud was segmented regionally, and then fitted as smooth elliptic cylindrical surface by means of iteration. This processing enabled the automatic filtering of those inner wall non-points. Experiments of two groups showed coincident results, that the elliptic cylindrical model based method could effectively filter out the non-points, and meet the accuracy requirements for subway deformation monitoring. The method provides a new mode for the periodic monitoring of tunnel sections all-around deformation in subways routine operation and maintenance.

  16. Chain-based communication in cylindrical underwater wireless sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Javaid, Nadeem; Jafri, Mohsin Raza; Khan, Zahoor Ali; Alrajeh, Nabil; Imran, Muhammad; Vasilakos, Athanasios

    2015-01-01

    Appropriate network design is very significant for Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks (UWSNs). Application-oriented UWSNs are planned to achieve certain objectives. Therefore, there is always a demand for efficient data routing schemes, which can fulfill certain requirements of application-oriented UWSNs. These networks can be of any shape, i.e., rectangular, cylindrical or square. In this paper, we propose chain-based routing schemes for application-oriented cylindrical networks and also formulate mathematical models to find a global optimum path for data transmission. In the first scheme, we devise four interconnected chains of sensor nodes to perform data communication. In the second scheme, we propose routing scheme in which two chains of sensor nodes are interconnected, whereas in third scheme single-chain based routing is done in cylindrical networks. After finding local optimum paths in separate chains, we find global optimum paths through their interconnection. Moreover, we develop a computational model for the analysis of end-to-end delay. We compare the performance of the above three proposed schemes with that of Power Efficient Gathering System in Sensor Information Systems (PEGASIS) and Congestion adjusted PEGASIS (C-PEGASIS). Simulation results show that our proposed 4-chain based scheme performs better than the other selected schemes in terms of network lifetime, end-to-end delay, path loss, transmission loss, and packet sending rate.

  17. Determining the axis orientation of cylindrical magnetic flux rope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Zhaojin; Wan, Weixing; Shen, Chao; Zhang, Tielong; Lui, Anthony; Wang, Yuming; Dunlop, malcolm; Zhang, Yongcun; Zong, Qiugang

    2013-04-01

    We develop a new simple method for inferring the orientation of a magnetic flux rope, which is assumed to be a time-independent cylindrically symmetric structure via the direct single-point analysis of magnetic field structure. The model tests demonstrate that, for the cylindrical flux rope regardless of whether it is force-free or not, the method can consistently yield the axis orientation of the flux rope with higher accuracy and stability than the minimum variance analysis of the magnetic field and the Grad-Shafranov reconstruction technique. Moreover, the radial distance to the axis center and the current density can also be estimated consistently. Application to two actual flux transfer events observed by the four satellites of the Cluster mission demonstrates that the method is more appropriate to be used for the inner part of flux rope, which might be closer to the cylindrical structure, showing good agreement with the results obtained from the optimal Grad-Shafranov reconstruction and the least squares technique of Faraday's law, but fails to produce such agreement for the outer satellite that grazes the flux rope. Therefore, the method must be used with caution.

  18. Chiral structures from achiral liquid crystals in cylindrical capillaries.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Joonwoo; Kang, Louis; Davidson, Zoey S; Collings, Peter J; Lubensky, Tom C; Yodh, A G

    2015-04-14

    We study chiral symmetry-broken configurations of nematic liquid crystals (LCs) confined to cylindrical capillaries with homeotropic anchoring on the cylinder walls (i.e., perpendicular surface alignment). Interestingly, achiral nematic LCs with comparatively small twist elastic moduli relieve bend and splay deformations by introducing twist deformations. In the resulting twisted and escaped radial (TER) configuration, LC directors are parallel to the cylindrical axis near the center, but to attain radial orientation near the capillary wall, they escape along the radius through bend and twist distortions. Chiral symmetry-breaking experiments in polymer-coated capillaries are carried out using Sunset Yellow FCF, a lyotropic chromonic LC with a small twist elastic constant. Its director configurations are investigated by polarized optical microscopy and explained theoretically with numerical calculations. A rich phenomenology of defects also arises from the degenerate bend/twist deformations of the TER configuration, including a nonsingular domain wall separating domains of opposite twist handedness but the same escape direction and singular point defects (hedgehogs) separating domains of opposite escape direction. We show the energetic preference for singular defects separating domains of opposite twist handedness compared with those of the same handedness, and we report remarkable chiral configurations with a double helix of disclination lines along the cylindrical axis. These findings show archetypally how simple boundary conditions and elastic anisotropy of confined materials lead to multiple symmetry breaking and how these broken symmetries combine to create a variety of defects. PMID:25825733

  19. Cylindrical millimeter-wave imaging technique for concealed weapon detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, David M.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Hall, Thomas E.

    1998-03-01

    A novel cylindrical millimeter-wave imaging technique has been developed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the detection of metallic and non-metallic concealed weapons. This technique uses a vertical array of millimeter- wave antennas which is mechanically swept around a person in a cylindrical fashion. The wideband millimeter-wave data is mathematically reconstructed into a series of high- resolution images of the person being screened. Clothing is relatively transparent to millimeter-wave illumination,whereas the human body and concealed items are reflective at millimeter wavelengths. Differences in shape and reflectivity are revealed in the images and allow a human operator to detect and identify concealed weapons. A full 360 degree scan is necessary to fully inspect a person for concealed items. The millimeter-wave images can be formed into a video animation sequence in which the person appears to rotate in front of a fixed illumination source.This is s convenient method for presenting the 3D image data for analysis. This work has been fully sponsored by the FAA. An engineering prototype based on the cylindrical imaging technique is presently under development. The FAA is currently opposed to presenting the image data directly to the operator due to personal privacy concerns. A computer automated system is desired to address this problem by eliminating operator viewing of the imagery.

  20. Chiral structures from achiral liquid crystals in cylindrical capillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Joonwoo; Kang, Louis; Davidson, Zoey S.; Collings, Peter J.; Lubensky, Tom C.; Yodh, A. G.

    2015-04-01

    We study chiral symmetry-broken configurations of nematic liquid crystals (LCs) confined to cylindrical capillaries with homeotropic anchoring on the cylinder walls (i.e., perpendicular surface alignment). Interestingly, achiral nematic LCs with comparatively small twist elastic moduli relieve bend and splay deformations by introducing twist deformations. In the resulting twisted and escaped radial (TER) configuration, LC directors are parallel to the cylindrical axis near the center, but to attain radial orientation near the capillary wall, they escape along the radius through bend and twist distortions. Chiral symmetry-breaking experiments in polymer-coated capillaries are carried out using Sunset Yellow FCF, a lyotropic chromonic LC with a small twist elastic constant. Its director configurations are investigated by polarized optical microscopy and explained theoretically with numerical calculations. A rich phenomenology of defects also arises from the degenerate bend/twist deformations of the TER configuration, including a nonsingular domain wall separating domains of opposite twist handedness but the same escape direction and singular point defects (hedgehogs) separating domains of opposite escape direction. We show the energetic preference for singular defects separating domains of opposite twist handedness compared with those of the same handedness, and we report remarkable chiral configurations with a double helix of disclination lines along the cylindrical axis. These findings show archetypally how simple boundary conditions and elastic anisotropy of confined materials lead to multiple symmetry breaking and how these broken symmetries combine to create a variety of defects.

  1. Chiral structures from achiral liquid crystals in cylindrical capillaries

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Joonwoo; Kang, Louis; Davidson, Zoey S.; Collings, Peter J.; Lubensky, Tom C.; Yodh, A. G.

    2015-01-01

    We study chiral symmetry-broken configurations of nematic liquid crystals (LCs) confined to cylindrical capillaries with homeotropic anchoring on the cylinder walls (i.e., perpendicular surface alignment). Interestingly, achiral nematic LCs with comparatively small twist elastic moduli relieve bend and splay deformations by introducing twist deformations. In the resulting twisted and escaped radial (TER) configuration, LC directors are parallel to the cylindrical axis near the center, but to attain radial orientation near the capillary wall, they escape along the radius through bend and twist distortions. Chiral symmetry-breaking experiments in polymer-coated capillaries are carried out using Sunset Yellow FCF, a lyotropic chromonic LC with a small twist elastic constant. Its director configurations are investigated by polarized optical microscopy and explained theoretically with numerical calculations. A rich phenomenology of defects also arises from the degenerate bend/twist deformations of the TER configuration, including a nonsingular domain wall separating domains of opposite twist handedness but the same escape direction and singular point defects (hedgehogs) separating domains of opposite escape direction. We show the energetic preference for singular defects separating domains of opposite twist handedness compared with those of the same handedness, and we report remarkable chiral configurations with a double helix of disclination lines along the cylindrical axis. These findings show archetypally how simple boundary conditions and elastic anisotropy of confined materials lead to multiple symmetry breaking and how these broken symmetries combine to create a variety of defects. PMID:25825733

  2. A Novel Automated Method for Analyzing Cylindrical Computed Tomography Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, D. J.; Burke, E. R.; Rauser, R. W.; Martin, R. E.

    2011-01-01

    A novel software method is presented that is applicable for analyzing cylindrical and partially cylindrical objects inspected using computed tomography. This method involves unwrapping and re-slicing data so that the CT data from the cylindrical object can be viewed as a series of 2-D sheets in the vertical direction in addition to volume rendering and normal plane views provided by traditional CT software. The method is based on interior and exterior surface edge detection and under proper conditions, is FULLY AUTOMATED and requires no input from the user except the correct voxel dimension from the CT scan. The software is available from NASA in 32- and 64-bit versions that can be applied to gigabyte-sized data sets, processing data either in random access memory or primarily on the computer hard drive. Please inquire with the presenting author if further interested. This software differentiates itself in total from other possible re-slicing software solutions due to complete automation and advanced processing and analysis capabilities.

  3. Some implications of satellite spin effects in cylindrical probe measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, N. J.

    1971-01-01

    In-situ measurements of ambient electron densities with satellite-borne cylindrical probes exhibit periodic variations synchronous with the satellite's spin cycle. Representing these fluctuations as a superposition of effects attributable to both the presence of the satellite wake and the geomagnetic field leads to a model of the modulations of accelerated electron current to cylindrical probes in which one modulation component displays current variations dependent upon the probe-velocity angle (psi) and the other displays variations dependent upon the angle between the probe axis and the geomagnetic field lines (beta). The modulations produce an electron current decrease whenever the probe axis rotates into the satellite wake or whenever the probe axis rotates toward alignment with the geomagnetic field lines. With increasing altitude, the modulation dependent upon psi decreases whereas the modulation dependent upon beta increases. The analysis results imply that the most accurate of atmospheric electron densities by satellite-borne cylindrical probes come from measurements taken out of the satellite's wake and when the probe axis is within 20 degrees of being perpendicular to the geomagnetic field lines.

  4. A Solid Core Heatpipe Reactor with Cylindrical Thermoelectric Converter Modules

    SciTech Connect

    Sayre, Edwin D.; Vaidyanathan, Sam

    2006-01-20

    A nuclear space power system that consists of a solid metal nuclear reactor core with heat pipes carrying energy to a cylindrical thermoelectric converter surrounding each of the heat pipes with a heat pipe radiator surrounding the thermoelectric converter is the most simple and reliable space power system. This means no single point of failure since each heat pipe and cylindrical converter is a separate power system and if one fails it will not affect the others. The heat pipe array in the solid core is designed so that if an isolated heat pipe or even two adjacent heat pipes fail, the remaining heat pipes will still transport the core heat without undue overheating of the uranium nitride fuel. The primary emphasis in this paper is on simplicity, reliability and fabricability of such a space nuclear power source. The core and heat pipes are made of Niobium 1% Zirconium alloy (Nb1Zr), with rhenium lined fuel tubes, bonded together by hot isostatic pressure (HIPing) and with sodium as the heat pipe working fluid, can be operated up to 1250K. The cylindrical thermoelectric converter is made by depositing the constituents of the converter around a Nb1%Zr tube and encasing it in a Nb 1% Zr alloy tube and HIPing the structure to get final bonding and to produce residual compressive stresses in all brittle materials in the converter. A radiator heat pipe filled with potassium that operates at 850K is bonded to the outside of the cylindrical converter for cooling. The solid core heat pipe and cylindrical converter are mated by welding during the final assembly. A solid core reactor with 150 heat pipes with a 0.650-inch (1.65 cm) ID and a 30-inch (76.2 cm) length with an output of 8 Watts per square inch as demonstrated by the SP100 PD2 cell tests will produce about 80 KW of electrical power. An advanced solid core reactor made with molybdenum 47% rhenium alloy, with lithium heat pipes and the PD2 theoretical output of 11 watts per square inch or advanced higher

  5. A Solid Core Heatpipe Reactor with Cylindrical Thermoelectric Converter Modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayre, Edwin D.; Vaidyanathan, Sam

    2006-01-01

    A nuclear space power system that consists of a solid metal nuclear reactor core with heat pipes carrying energy to a cylindrical thermoelectric converter surrounding each of the heat pipes with a heat pipe radiator surrounding the thermoelectric converter is the most simple and reliable space power system. This means no single point of failure since each heat pipe and cylindrical converter is a separate power system and if one fails it will not affect the others. The heat pipe array in the solid core is designed so that if an isolated heat pipe or even two adjacent heat pipes fail, the remaining heat pipes will still transport the core heat without undue overheating of the uranium nitride fuel. The primary emphasis in this paper is on simplicity, reliability and fabricability of such a space nuclear power source. The core and heat pipes are made of Niobium 1% Zirconium alloy (Nb1Zr), with rhenium lined fuel tubes, bonded together by hot isostatic pressure, (HIPing) and with sodium as the heat pipe working fluid, can be operated up to 1250K. The cylindrical thermoelectric converter is made by depositing the constituents of the converter around a Nb1%Zr tube and encasing it in a Nb 1% Zr alloy tube and HIPing the structure to get final bonding and to produce residual compressive stresses in all brittle materials in the converter. A radiator heat pipe filled with potassium that operates at 850K is bonded to the outside of the cylindrical converter for cooling. The solid core heat pipe and cylindrical converter are mated by welding during the final assembly. A solid core reactor with 150 heat pipes with a 0.650-inch (1.65 cm) ID and a 30-inch (76.2 cm) length with an output of 8 Watts per square inch as demonstrated by the SP100 PD2 cell tests will produce about 80 KW of electrical power. An advanced solid core reactor made with molybdenum 47% rhenium alloy, with lithium heat pipes and the PD2 theoretical output of 11 watts per square inch or advanced higher

  6. Electromagnetic response of buried cylindrical structures for line current excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pajewski, Lara; Ponti, Cristina

    2013-04-01

    The Cylindrical-Wave Approach (CWA) rigorously solves, in the spectral domain, the electromagnetic forward scattering by a finite set of buried two-dimensional perfectly-conducting or dielectric objects [1]-[2]. In this technique, the field scattered by underground objects is represented in terms of a superposition of cylindrical waves. Use is made of the plane-wave spectrum [1] to take into account the interaction of such waves with the planar interface between air and soil, and between different layers eventually present in the ground [3]. Obstacles of general shape can be simulated through the CWA with good results, by using a suitable set of small circular-section cylinders [4]. Recently, we improved the CWA by facing the fundamental problem of losses in the ground [5]: this is of significant importance in remote-sensing applications, since real soils often have complex permittivity and conductivity, and sometimes also a complex permeability. While in previous works concerning the CWA a monochromatic or pulsed plane-wave incident field was considered, in the present work a different source of scattering is present: a cylindrical wave radiated by a line source. Such a source is more suitable to model the practical illumination field used in GPR surveys. The electric field radiated by the line current is expressed by means of a first-kind Hankel function of 0-th order. The theoretical solution to the scattering problem is developed for both dielectric and perfectly-conducting cylinders buried in a dielectric half-space. The approach is implemented in a Fortran code; an accurate numerical evaluation of the involved spectral integrals is performed, the highly-oscillating behavior of the homogeneous waves is correctly followed and evanescent contributions are taken into account. The electromagnetic field scattered in both air and ground can be obtained, in near- and far-field regions, for arbitrary radii and permittivity of the buried cylinders, as well as for

  7. Masked repetition priming and proportion effects under cognitive load.

    PubMed

    Bodner, Glen E; Stalinski, Stephanie M

    2008-06-01

    The authors used a cognitive load manipulation (rehearsing a string of digits during the trial) to test the automaticity of (a) masked repetition priming and (b) the masked repetition proportion (RP) effect (i.e., greater priming when the proportion of repetition-prime trials is higher) in the lexical decision task. The RP (.2 vs. .8) was varied across blocks. Masked priming was not reduced under load compared with a no-load group. Surprisingly, only the load group showed an RP effect in response latencies, although the no-load group showed an RP effect in the error rates. Our results show that masked priming is automatic, yet the influence of masked primes can nonetheless be adjusted at an unconscious level. Implications for accounts of masked priming are discussed. PMID:18572990

  8. Robotic Lower Limb Exoskeletons Using Proportional Myoelectric Control

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, Daniel P.; Lewis, Cara L.

    2010-01-01

    Robotic lower limb exoskeletons have been built for augmenting human performance, assisting with disabilities, studying human physiology, and re-training motor deficiencies. At the University of Michigan Human Neuromechanics Laboratory, we have built pneumatically-powered lower limb exoskeletons for the last two purposes. Most of our prior research has focused on ankle joint exoskeletons because of the large contribution from plantar flexors to the mechanical work performed during gait. One way we control the exoskeletons is with proportional myoelectric control, effectively increasing the strength of the wearer with a physiological mode of control. Healthy human subjects quickly adapt to walking with the robotic ankle exoskeletons, reducing their overall energy expenditure. Individuals with incomplete spinal cord injury have demonstrated rapid modification of muscle recruitment patterns with practice walking with the ankle exoskeletons. Evidence suggests that proportional myoelectric control may have distinct advantages over other types of control for robotic exoskeletons in basic science and rehabilitation. PMID:19964579

  9. Proportion cured models applied to 23 cancer sites in Norway.

    PubMed

    Cvancarova, Milada; Aagnes, Bjarte; Fosså, Sophie D; Lambert, Paul C; Møller, Bjørn; Bray, Freddie

    2013-04-01

    Statistical cure is reached when a group of patients has the same mortality as cancer-free individuals. Cure models predict the cured proportion and the median survival of fatal cases. Cure models have seldom been applied and tested systematically across all major cancer sites. Incidence and follow-up data on 23 cancer sites recorded at the Cancer Registry of Norway 1963-2007 were obtained. Mixture cure models were fitted to obtain trends and up-to-date estimates (based on period approach) assuming cured and uncured groups exist. The model converged for cancers of the mouth and pharynx, oesophagus, stomach, colon, rectum, liver, gallbladder, pancreas, lung and trachea, ovary, kidney, bladder, CNS, non-Hodgkin lymphoma (only for males) and leukemia. The proportion of cured patients increased 1963-2002 for both sexes, with the largest changes (in percent) seen for leukemia (46.4 and 46.7) and CNS (35.9, 42.0), males given first. Median survival time for the uncured cases increased for colon and rectal cancer, and there was a three- fold increase in median survival time for patients with fatal ovarian cancers. Cancers of bladder and CNS had the highest up-to-date proportion cured (in percent), 67.4 and 64.0, respectively, pancreas and liver were amongst the lowest (5.7 and 9.9, respectively). Cure models are useful when monitoring progress in cancer care, but must be applied and interpreted with caution. The absolute estimates of the cure proportion are speculative and should not be calculated where cure is not medically anticipated.

  10. Proportional drift tubes for large area muon detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, C.; Higashi, S.; Hiraoka, N.; Maruyama, A.; Okusawa, T.; Sato, T.; Suwada, T.; Takahashi, T.; Umeda, H.

    1985-01-01

    A proportional drift chamber which consists of eight rectangular drift tubes with cross section of 10 cm x 5 cm, a sense wire of 100 micron phi gold-plated tungsten wire and the length of 6 m, was tested using cosmic ray muons. Spatial resolution (rms) is between 0.5 and 1 mm over drift space of 50 mm, depending on incident angle and distance from sense wire.

  11. A complete database for the Einstein imaging proportional counter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfand, David J.

    1991-01-01

    A complete database for the Einstein Imaging Proportional Counter (IPC) was completed. The original data that makes up the archive is described as well as the structure of the database, the Op-Ed analysis system, the technical advances achieved relative to the analysis of (IPC) data, the data products produced, and some uses to which the database has been put by scientists outside Columbia University over the past year.

  12. Proportion cured models applied to 23 cancer sites in Norway.

    PubMed

    Cvancarova, Milada; Aagnes, Bjarte; Fosså, Sophie D; Lambert, Paul C; Møller, Bjørn; Bray, Freddie

    2013-04-01

    Statistical cure is reached when a group of patients has the same mortality as cancer-free individuals. Cure models predict the cured proportion and the median survival of fatal cases. Cure models have seldom been applied and tested systematically across all major cancer sites. Incidence and follow-up data on 23 cancer sites recorded at the Cancer Registry of Norway 1963-2007 were obtained. Mixture cure models were fitted to obtain trends and up-to-date estimates (based on period approach) assuming cured and uncured groups exist. The model converged for cancers of the mouth and pharynx, oesophagus, stomach, colon, rectum, liver, gallbladder, pancreas, lung and trachea, ovary, kidney, bladder, CNS, non-Hodgkin lymphoma (only for males) and leukemia. The proportion of cured patients increased 1963-2002 for both sexes, with the largest changes (in percent) seen for leukemia (46.4 and 46.7) and CNS (35.9, 42.0), males given first. Median survival time for the uncured cases increased for colon and rectal cancer, and there was a three- fold increase in median survival time for patients with fatal ovarian cancers. Cancers of bladder and CNS had the highest up-to-date proportion cured (in percent), 67.4 and 64.0, respectively, pancreas and liver were amongst the lowest (5.7 and 9.9, respectively). Cure models are useful when monitoring progress in cancer care, but must be applied and interpreted with caution. The absolute estimates of the cure proportion are speculative and should not be calculated where cure is not medically anticipated. PMID:22927104

  13. Maximum-likelihood estimation of admixture proportions from genetic data.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinliang

    2003-01-01

    For an admixed population, an important question is how much genetic contribution comes from each parental population. Several methods have been developed to estimate such admixture proportions, using data on genetic markers sampled from parental and admixed populations. In this study, I propose a likelihood method to estimate jointly the admixture proportions, the genetic drift that occurred to the admixed population and each parental population during the period between the hybridization and sampling events, and the genetic drift in each ancestral population within the interval between their split and hybridization. The results from extensive simulations using various combinations of relevant parameter values show that in general much more accurate and precise estimates of admixture proportions are obtained from the likelihood method than from previous methods. The likelihood method also yields reasonable estimates of genetic drift that occurred to each population, which translate into relative effective sizes (N(e)) or absolute average N(e)'s if the times when the relevant events (such as population split, admixture, and sampling) occurred are known. The proposed likelihood method also has features such as relatively low computational requirement compared with previous ones, flexibility for admixture models, and marker types. In particular, it allows for missing data from a contributing parental population. The method is applied to a human data set and a wolflike canids data set, and the results obtained are discussed in comparison with those from other estimators and from previous studies. PMID:12807794

  14. Energy Proportionality and Performance in Data Parallel Computing Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jinoh; Chou, Jerry; Rotem, Doron

    2011-02-14

    Energy consumption in datacenters has recently become a major concern due to the rising operational costs andscalability issues. Recent solutions to this problem propose the principle of energy proportionality, i.e., the amount of energy consumedby the server nodes must be proportional to the amount of work performed. For data parallelism and fault tolerancepurposes, most common file systems used in MapReduce-type clusters maintain a set of replicas for each data block. A coveringset is a group of nodes that together contain at least one replica of the data blocks needed for performing computing tasks. In thiswork, we develop and analyze algorithms to maintain energy proportionality by discovering a covering set that minimizesenergy consumption while placing the remaining nodes in lowpower standby mode. Our algorithms can also discover coveringsets in heterogeneous computing environments. In order to allow more data parallelism, we generalize our algorithms so that itcan discover k-covering sets, i.e., a set of nodes that contain at least k replicas of the data blocks. Our experimental results showthat we can achieve substantial energy saving without significant performance loss in diverse cluster configurations and workingenvironments.

  15. L and M cone proportions in polymorphic New World monkeys.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Gerald H; Williams, Gary A

    2006-01-01

    Platyrrhine monkeys typically have only a single X-chromosome opsin gene. Alleles of this gene code for multiple versions of middle- to long-wavelength cone photopigments. X-chromosome inactivation provides heterozygous females with a retinal mosaic of cones containing either of two types of M and L pigment, thus establishing the photopigment basis for trichromatic color vision. This study examined the proportions of L and M cones created by this process. For that purpose, electroretinogram flicker photometry was used to obtain complete spectral sensitivity functions from 60 heterozygous female monkeys drawn from seven genera of platyrrhine monkeys. To obtain estimates of cone proportions, these functions were subsequently fit with linear combinations of L and M cone fundamentals that were derived from similar recordings made on conspecific animals having only one type of M/L pigment. Consistent with a random X-chromosome inactivation process, the average L:M cone weighting across the sample was close to unity. At the same time, there were significant individual variations in L:M cone proportions. The genesis of this variation and its implications for seeing are discussed. PMID:16961968

  16. Proportional mortality patterns among chemical plant workers exposed to formaldehyde.

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, G M

    1982-01-01

    To examine the possible health risks associated with occupational exposure to formaldehyde a proportional mortality analysis was conducted on deaths occurring between 1950 and 1976 among 136 men who had been employed a month or more in one of five formaldehyde-related areas of a large chemical producing plant located in Springfield, Massachusetts, USA. Overall, no statistically significant excesses or deficits in proportional mortality were observed among the formaldehyde-exposed group based on comparisons with both United States men and men from the local county area. In addition, no important differences in mortality were observed among this group when comparisons were made with 456 male decedents from the same plant who had not had a month or more of formaldehyde exposure. Within the calendar period examined, no deaths from sinonasal cancer were observed among the chemical workers studied nor was mention made on any death certificate of sinonasal cancer as a contributory cause of death. No important excesses, trends, or patterns in cancer mortality were observed among white male formadelhyde-exposed workers when consideration was given to age and time period of death, type and duration of formaldehyde exposure, and the lapse period from the onset of the first formaldehyde-related job assignment. Although certain limitations of this study do not allow definite conclusions to be drawn, the results indicate no trends or patterns in proportional mortality that could be directly linked to exposures to formaldehyde. PMID:7138792

  17. NASA CONNECT: Proportionality: The X-Plane Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    'Proportionality: The X-Plane Generation' is the fifth of seven programs in the 1999-2000 NASA CONNECT series. Produced by NASA Langley Research Center's Office of Education, NASA CONNECT is an award-winning series of instructional programs designed to enhance the teaching of math, science and technology concepts in grades 5-8. NASA CONNECT establishes the 'connection' between the mathematics, science, and technology concepts taught in the classroom and NASA research. Each program in the series supports the national mathematics, science, and technology standards; includes a resource-rich teacher guide; and uses a classroom experiment and web-based activity to complement and enhance the math, science, and technology concepts presented in the program. NASA CONNECT is FREE and the programs in the series are in the public domain. Visit our web site and register. http://connect.larc.nasa.gov In 'Proportionality: The X-Plane Generation', students will learn why scaling and proportion are important factors in spacecraft design.

  18. Is proportion burned severely related to daily area burned?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birch, Donovan S.; Morgan, Penelope; Kolden, Crystal A.; Hudak, Andrew T.; Smith, Alistair M. S.

    2014-05-01

    The ecological effects of forest fires burning with high severity are long-lived and have the greatest impact on vegetation successional trajectories, as compared to low-to-moderate severity fires. The primary drivers of high severity fire are unclear, but it has been hypothesized that wind-driven, large fire-growth days play a significant role, particularly on large fires in forested ecosystems. Here, we examined the relative proportion of classified burn severity for individual daily areas burned that occurred during 42 large forest fires in central Idaho and western Montana from 2005 to 2007 and 2011. Using infrared perimeter data for wildfires with five or more consecutive days of mapped perimeters, we delineated 2697 individual daily areas burned from which we calculated the proportions of each of three burn severity classes (high, moderate, and low) using the differenced normalized burn ratio as mapped for large fires by the Monitoring Trends in Burn Severity project. We found that the proportion of high burn severity was weakly correlated (Kendall τ = 0.299) with size of daily area burned (DAB). Burn severity was highly variable, even for the largest (95th percentile) in DAB, suggesting that other variables than fire extent influence the ecological effects of fires. We suggest that these results do not support the prioritization of large runs during fire rehabilitation efforts, since the underlying assumption in this prioritization is a positive relationship between severity and area burned in a day.

  19. Proportional inhibition in the cricket medial giant interneuron.

    PubMed

    Baba, Y; Masuda, H; Shimozawa, T

    2001-02-01

    Inhibitory effects on the number of wind-evoked impulses were studied in the medial giant interneuron of the cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus. The interneuron receives an inhibitory input from wind receptors on cercus ipsilateral to its soma. Using a dual channel wind stimulator, the intensity of inhibitory input was changed over 1,000-fold and effects on the number of spikes were observed. The ipsilateral inhibition reduced the number of outgoing spikes from a level elicited by excitation alone and it did so in proportion to the level of wind responsiveness displayed by each cell. A proportional coefficient of inhibition was derived and its value depended on the level of total excitation of the medial giant interneuron. The medial giant interneurons with high excitation showed a smaller value of the coefficient than those with low excitation. The proportional inhibition of the medial giant interneuron by the ipsilateral cercus suppresses the number of its spikes to a reasonable level for a wide range of stimulus intensities under natural conditions.

  20. LDPC Codes with Minimum Distance Proportional to Block Size

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Jones, Christopher; Dolinar, Samuel; Thorpe, Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    Low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes characterized by minimum Hamming distances proportional to block sizes have been demonstrated. Like the codes mentioned in the immediately preceding article, the present codes are error-correcting codes suitable for use in a variety of wireless data-communication systems that include noisy channels. The previously mentioned codes have low decoding thresholds and reasonably low error floors. However, the minimum Hamming distances of those codes do not grow linearly with code-block sizes. Codes that have this minimum-distance property exhibit very low error floors. Examples of such codes include regular LDPC codes with variable degrees of at least 3. Unfortunately, the decoding thresholds of regular LDPC codes are high. Hence, there is a need for LDPC codes characterized by both low decoding thresholds and, in order to obtain acceptably low error floors, minimum Hamming distances that are proportional to code-block sizes. The present codes were developed to satisfy this need. The minimum Hamming distances of the present codes have been shown, through consideration of ensemble-average weight enumerators, to be proportional to code block sizes. As in the cases of irregular ensembles, the properties of these codes are sensitive to the proportion of degree-2 variable nodes. A code having too few such nodes tends to have an iterative decoding threshold that is far from the capacity threshold. A code having too many such nodes tends not to exhibit a minimum distance that is proportional to block size. Results of computational simulations have shown that the decoding thresholds of codes of the present type are lower than those of regular LDPC codes. Included in the simulations were a few examples from a family of codes characterized by rates ranging from low to high and by thresholds that adhere closely to their respective channel capacity thresholds; the simulation results from these examples showed that the codes in question have low

  1. Use of a tantalum-178 generator and a multiwire gamma camera to study the effect of the Mueller maneuver on left ventricular performance: comparison to hemodynamics and single photon emission computed tomography perfusion patterns.

    PubMed

    Gioia, G; Lin, B; Katz, R; DiMarino, A J; Ogilby, J D; Cassel, D; DePace, N L; Heo, J; Iskandrian, A S

    1995-11-01

    During the Mueller maneuver, there is a decrease in intrathoracic pressure and an increase in transmural left ventricular pressure. The changes in loading conditions cause transient left ventricular dysfunction. This study examined the effects of the Mueller maneuver on left ventricular performance using tantalum (Ta)-178 (half-life 9.3 min) and a multiwire gamma camera. First-pass radionuclide angiograms were obtained at baseline and during Mueller maneuver in 41 patients aged 58 +/- 10 years. In 34 patients, stress single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging with thallium-201 or sestamibi was also performed. Hemodynamic measurements during the Mueller maneuver (n = 10) showed a decrease in systemic pressure (139 +/- 25 mm Hg vs 123 +/- 24 mm Hg, p < 0.001) and pulmonary artery pressure (24 +/- 6 mm Hg vs 14 +/- 12 mm Hg, p = 0.01) and an increase in heart rate (67 +/- 10 bpm vs 75 +/- 14 beats/min, p = 0.001). Among the 34 patients who had perfusion imaging, the left ventricular ejection fraction remained unchanged or increased in 17 patients (group 1) (48% +/- 19% vs 49% +/- 21%, p not significant) and decreased (> or = 5%) in 17 patients (group 2) (55% +/- 13% vs 40% +/- 16%, p = 0.001). The stress SPECT images showed no or only fixed defects in 11 (65%) patients in group 1 and 3 (18%) patients in group 2 (p = 0.02), and reversible defects in 6 (35%) patients in group 1 and 14 (82%) patients in group 2 (p = 0.04).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Cylindrical Taylor states conserving total absolute magnetic helicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Low, B. C.; Fang, F.

    2014-09-01

    The Taylor state of a three-dimensional (3D) magnetic field in an upright cylindrical domain V is derived from first principles as an extremum of the total magnetic energy subject to a conserved, total absolute helicity Habs. This new helicity [Low, Phys. Plasmas 18, 052901 (2011)] is distinct from the well known classical total helicity and relative total helicity in common use to describe wholly-contained and anchored fields, respectively. A given field B, tangential along the cylindrical side of V, may be represented as a unique linear superposition of two flux systems, an axially extended system along V and a strictly transverse system carrying information on field-circulation. This specialized Chandrasekhar-Kendall representation defines Habs and permits a neat formulation of the boundary-value problem (BVP) for the Taylor state as a constant-α force-free field, treating 3D wholly-contained and anchored fields on the same conceptual basis. In this formulation, the governing equation is a scalar integro-partial differential equation (PDE). A family of series solutions for an anchored field is presented as an illustration of this class of BVPs. Past treatments of the constant-α field in 3D cylindrical geometry are based on a scalar Helmholtz PDE as the governing equation, with issues of inconsistency in the published field solutions discussed over time in the journal literature. The constant-α force-free equation reduces to a scalar Helmholtz PDE only as special cases of the 3D integro-PDE derived here. In contrast, the constant-α force-free equation and the scalar Helmholtz PDE are absolutely equivalent in the spherical domain as discussed in Appendix. This theoretical study is motivated by the investigation of the Sun's corona but the results are also relevant to laboratory plasmas.

  3. WSRC Am/Cm Stabilization Program - Cylindrical Induction Melter Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, W.A.

    1999-02-17

    1.1.1 Kilogram quantities of Americium and Curium isotopes (Am/Cm) have been produced at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, South Carolina. These highly radioactive isotopes have both government and commercial value and are currently stored as a nitric acid solution at the Savannah River Site. The material represents the largest source term in the F canyon at SRS. It is proposed that the Am/Cm material be vitrified to stabilize the material for long term, recoverable storage. This paper reviews the progress made during the process development phase of this program using the Cylindrical Induction Melter.

  4. Axial jet mixing of ethanol in cylindrical containers during weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aydelott, J. C.

    1979-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to examine the liquid flow patterns that result from the axial jet mixing of ethanol in 10-centimeter-diameter cylindrical tanks in weightlessness. A convex hemispherically ended tank and two Centaur liquid-hydrogen-tank models were used for the study. Four distinct liquid flow patterns were observed to be a function of the tank geometry, the liquid-jet velocity, the volume of liquid in the tank, and the location of the tube from which the liquid jet exited.

  5. Preliminary analysis techniques for ring and stringer stiffened cylindrical shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, J.

    1993-01-01

    This report outlines methods of analysis for the buckling of thin-walled circumferentially and longitudinally stiffened cylindrical shells. Methods of analysis for the various failure modes are presented in one cohesive package. Where applicable, more than one method of analysis for a failure mode is presented along with standard practices. The results of this report are primarily intended for use in launch vehicle design in the elastic range. A Microsoft Excel worksheet with accompanying macros has been developed to automate the analysis procedures.

  6. Rotating cylindrical wormholes: a no-go theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronnikov, K. A.

    2016-02-01

    The existing solutions to the Einstein equations describing rotating cylindrical wormholes are not asymptotically flat and therefore cannot describe wormhole entrances as local objects in our Universe. To overcome this difficulty, flat asymptotic regions are added to wormhole solutions by matching them at some surfaces ∑- and ∑+. It is shown, however, that if the wormhole solution is obtained for scalar fields with arbitrary potentials, possibly interacting with an azimuthal electric or magnetic field, then the matter content of one or both thin shells appearing on ∑- and ∑+ violate the Null Energy Condition. Thus exotic matter is still necessary for obtaining a twice asymptotically flat wormhole.

  7. Polar POLICRYPS diffractive structures generate cylindrical vector beams

    SciTech Connect

    Alj, Domenico; Caputo, Roberto Umeton, Cesare; Paladugu, Sathyanarayana; Volpe, Giovanni

    2015-11-16

    Local shaping of the polarization state of a light beam is appealing for a number of applications. This can be achieved by employing devices containing birefringent materials. In this article, we present one such enables converting a uniformly circularly polarized beam into a cylindrical vector beam (CVB). This device has been fabricated by exploiting the POLICRYPS (POlymer-LIquid CRYstals-Polymer-Slices) photocuring technique. It is a liquid-crystal-based optical diffraction grating featuring polar symmetry of the director alignment. We have characterized the resulting CVB profile and polarization for the cases of left and right circularly polarized incoming beams.

  8. Entropic selectivity of binary mixtures in cylindrical pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, A.; White, J. A.; Román, F. L.; Velasco, S.

    2011-10-01

    We show that a simple model consisting of a binary hard-sphere mixture in a narrow cylindrical pore can lead to strong size selectivity by considering a situation where each species of the mixture sees a different radius of the cylinder. Two mechanisms are proposed to explain the observed results depending on the radius of the cylinder: for large radii the selectivity is driven by an enhancement of the depletion forces at the cylinder walls whereas for the narrowest cylinders excluded-volume effects lead to a shift of the effective chemical potential of the particles in the pore.

  9. Testing of a single cell cylindrical inverted converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desplat, Jean-Louis

    2002-01-01

    A Cylindrical Inverted Converter (CIC), made by Lutch, with the emitter on the outside was tested in a vacuum furnace supplying radiant heat to the emitter outer surface. The collector, coaxial with the emitter, has an integral heat pipe with sodium as the working fluid, which carries the heat dissipated in the collector to a radiating area with a coating of alumina and sub-stoichiometric TiO2. The CIC is a proof-of-principle device which will lead to the development of multi-cell inverted converter assemblies for space solar power systems. The thermionic performance at emitter temperatures of 1800 and 1900 K is presented. .

  10. A new cylindrical drift chamber for the MEG II experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldini, A. M.; Baracchini, E.; Berretta, L.; Bianucci, S.; Cavoto, G.; Chiarello, G.; Chiri, C.; Cei, F.; Corvaglia, A.; Dussoni, S.; Fahrni, D.; Galli, L.; Grancagnolo, F.; Grassi, M.; Hofer, A.; Hildebrandt, M.; Ignatov, F.; Miccoli, A.; Nicolò, D.; Orsini, A.; Panareo, M.; Pepino, A.; Pinto, C.; Piredda, G.; Signorelli, G.; Raffaelli, F.; Recchia, L.; Renga, F.; Ripiccini, E.; Tassielli, G.; Tazzioli, A.; Tenchini, F.; Venturini, M.; Voena, C.; Zullo, A.

    2016-07-01

    A new cylindrical drift chamber is currently under construction for the MEG II experiment. The chamber is meant to track low momentum positrons from μ+ decays to search for μ+ →e+ γ events. The detector is segmented in very small drift cells, placed in stereo configuration and operated in a helium-isobutane gas mixture. The use of thin aluminium wires and light gas mixture set the total radiation length of the chamber to only 1.6 ×10-3X0 per track turn allowing for a momentum resolution of ~120 keV/c.

  11. Apparatus for scanning the surface of a cylindrical body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakich, R. B.; Woodbury, R. C. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A laser scanning system for providing a two-dimensional display of a cylindrical surface, such as to display striae of a fired bullet is described. The cylinder is scanned along its axis by vibrating one mirror in the laser beam path, and is scanned in a direction normal to its axis by vibrating a second mirror in a direction normal to the first or by rotating the bullet. Scan control signals are adjusted in phase to produce a synchronized display of a video signal obtained from detection of scattered light from the surface thus scanned by a laser beam.

  12. Formation of prominences by condensation modes in magnetized cylindrical plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    An, C.-H.

    1985-01-01

    Condensation modes in a magnetized cylindrical plasma are studied to shed light on the formation and stability of solar prominences. A rigorous mathematical derivation of the perturbation equation is developed, and the effect of field twist on the stability is studied for an equilibrium with uniform field twist, in which temperature increases, but density does not, as pressure increases. The results imply that prominences may form in globally magnetohydrodynamic-stable magnetic loops with very low field twist. Also, prominences are more likely to form in a region of weaker area-averaged magnetic field.

  13. Cylindrical plasmas generated by an annular beam of ultraviolet light

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, D. M.; Allen, J. E.

    2015-07-15

    We investigate a cylindrical plasma system with ionization, by an annular beam of ultraviolet light, taking place only in the cylinder's outer region. In the steady state, both the outer and inner regions contain a plasma, with that in the inner region being uniform and field-free. At the interface between the two regions, there is an infinitesimal jump in ion density, the magnitude approaching zero in the quasi-neutral (λ{sub D} → 0) limit. The system offers the possibility of producing a uniform stationary plasma in the laboratory, hitherto obtained only with thermally produced alkali plasmas.

  14. Finite-amplitude waves in cylindrical lined ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayfeh, A. H.; Tsai, M.-S.

    1974-01-01

    A second-order uniformly valid expansion is obtained for nonlinear waves propagating in a cylindrical duct lined with a point-reacting acoustic material that consists of a porous sheet followed by honey-comb cavities and backed by the impervious walls of the duct. The effect of the liner is taken into account by coupling the waves in the duct with those in the liner. As in the two-dimensional case, the nonlinearity increases the attenuation rate at all frequencies except in narrow bandwidths around the resonant frequencies, irrespective of the geometrical dimensions of the liner or the acoustic properties of the porous sheet.

  15. Application of cylindrical Langmuir probes to streaming plasma diagnostics.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segall, S. B.; Koopman, D. W.

    1973-01-01

    The current-voltage characteristics of cylindrical probes in a high velocity collisionless plasma flow have been investigated experimentally and theoretically. The plasma was generated by a focused laser pulse incident on a metallic target in vacuum. An analysis, developed from a stationary plasma analog to the flowing case, demonstrated a failure of plasma shielding of probe potential in the electron attracting region. Modifications of relatively simple previous treatments were found to be valid for computing electron current to a probe. The electron characteristics derived from the present analysis agree well with experimental results. The ion and electron portions of the characteristics are consistent with each other and with independent diagnostic measurements.

  16. Measuring cylindrically symmetric refractive-index profiles: a method.

    PubMed

    Gregoris, D; Iizuka, K

    1983-02-01

    This paper describes a new nondestructive method to measure cylindrically symmetric refractive-index profiles of transparent cylinders. The technique is based on the measurement of the axial displacement of rays that are refracted within the cylinder. Three different types of index profile were experimentally determined. Profile errors of better than one part in 10(3) were achieved using very modest equipment. The effects of certain experimental parameters on the profile accuracy are noted. The technique may be applied to the characterization of optical fiber preforms and graded-index rod lenses. PMID:18195804

  17. An experimental investigation of flame behavior during cylindrical vessel explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Starke, R.; Roth, P.

    1986-12-01

    The propagation of premixed flames centrally ignited at one of the end flanges of a closed cylindrical vessel and the flame-induced fluid flow have been investigated in the present study. Photographic records show that under specific geometrical conditions the flame exhibits a cone form with a backward directed top, called ''tulip'' -shaped. This appears after the flame has lost a main part of its area by side wall quenching. With a laser-Doppler anemometer the instantaneous flow velocity during the short explosion process was measured together with pressure records.

  18. An experimental investigation of flame behavior during cylindrical vessel explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starke, R.; Roth, P.

    1986-12-01

    The propagation of premixed flames centrally ignited at one of the end flanges of a closed cylindrical vessel and the flame-induced flow have been investigated. Photographic records show that under specific geometrical conditions the flame exhibits a cone form with a backward directed top, called tulip-shaped. This appears after the flame has lost a main part of its area by side wall quenching. The instantaneous flow velocity during the short explosion process was measured, together with pressure records, with an LDV. An analogy to the experiments of Markstein (1964), is shown, and the explanations of several authors for the 'tulip' formation are given.

  19. Optimization of multilayer cylindrical cloaks using genetic algorithms and NEWUOA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakr, Ahmed A.; Abdelmageed, Alaa K.

    2016-06-01

    The problem of minimizing the scattering from a multilayer cylindrical cloak is studied. Both TM and TE polarizations are considered. A two-stage optimization procedure using genetic algorithms and NEWUOA (new unconstrained optimization algorithm) is adopted for realizing the cloak using homogeneous isotropic layers. The layers are arranged such that they follow a repeated pattern of alternating DPS and DNG materials. The results show that a good level of invisibility can be realized using a reasonable number of layers. Maintaining the cloak performance over a finite range of frequencies without sacrificing the level of invisibility is achieved.

  20. Wrinkling pattern evolution of cylindrical biological tissues with differential growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Fei; Li, Bo; Cao, Yan-Ping; Xie, Wei-Hua; Feng, Xi-Qiao

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional surface wrinkling of soft cylindrical tissues induced by differential growth is explored. Differential volumetric growth can cause their morphological stability, leading to the formation of hexagonal and labyrinth wrinkles. During postbuckling, multiple bifurcations and morphological transitions may occur as a consequence of continuous growth in the surface layer. The physical mechanisms underpinning the morphological evolution are examined from the viewpoint of energy. Surface curvature is found to play a regulatory role in the pattern evolution. This study may not only help understand the morphogenesis of soft biological tissues, but also inspire novel routes for creating desired surface patterns of soft materials.

  1. Self shielding in cylindrical fissile sources in the APNea system

    SciTech Connect

    Hensley, D.

    1997-02-01

    In order for a source of fissile material to be useful as a calibration instrument, it is necessary to know not only how much fissile material is in the source but also what the effective fissile content is. Because uranium and plutonium absorb thermal neutrons so Efficiently, material in the center of a sample is shielded from the external thermal flux by the surface layers of the material. Differential dieaway measurements in the APNea System of five different sets of cylindrical fissile sources show the various self shielding effects that are routinely encountered. A method for calculating the self shielding effect is presented and its predictions are compared with the experimental results.

  2. Polar POLICRYPS diffractive structures generate cylindrical vector beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alj, Domenico; Paladugu, Sathyanarayana; Volpe, Giovanni; Caputo, Roberto; Umeton, Cesare

    2015-11-01

    Local shaping of the polarization state of a light beam is appealing for a number of applications. This can be achieved by employing devices containing birefringent materials. In this article, we present one such enables converting a uniformly circularly polarized beam into a cylindrical vector beam (CVB). This device has been fabricated by exploiting the POLICRYPS (POlymer-LIquid CRYstals-Polymer-Slices) photocuring technique. It is a liquid-crystal-based optical diffraction grating featuring polar symmetry of the director alignment. We have characterized the resulting CVB profile and polarization for the cases of left and right circularly polarized incoming beams.

  3. Infinitesimal structure of inverse pinch effect cylindrical MHD shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Baty, Roy S; Stanescu, Dan; Tucker, Don H

    2008-01-01

    Nonstandard analysis is used to derive the relationships between the jump functions for density, pressure, velocity and magnetic field within a diverging cylindrical magnetohydrodynamic shock caused by the inverse pinch effect. The shock is assumed to have infinitesimal thickness. The obtained relationships allow explicit numerical constructions of the shock structure once the variation in one variable, here chosen to be the density, is specified. The shapes thus constructed offer additional insight into the physics of such shock waves from a perspective which would be extremely difficult to investigate experimentally.

  4. Modelling of single walled carbon nanotube cylindrical structures with finite element method simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günay, E.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the modulus of elasticity and shear modulus values of single-walled carbon nanotubes SWCNTs were modelled by using both finite element method and the Matlab code. Initially, cylindrical armchair and zigzag single walled 3D space frames were demonstrated as carbon nanostructures. Thereafter, macro programs were written by the Matlab code producing the space truss for zigzag and armchair models. 3D space frames were introduced to the ANSYS software and then tension, compression and additionally torsion tests were performed on zigzag and armchair carbon nanotubes with BEAM4 element in obtaining the exact values of elastic and shear modulus values. In this study, two different boundary conditions were tested and especially used in torsion loading. The equivalent shear modulus data was found by averaging the corresponding values obtained from ten different nodal points on the nanotube path. Finally, in this study it was determined that the elastic constant values showed proportional changes by increasing the carbon nanotube diameters up to a certain level but beyond this level these values remained stable.

  5. High proportion of male faeces in jaguar populations.

    PubMed

    Palomares, Francisco; Roques, Séverine; Chávez, Cuauhtémoc; Silveira, Leandro; Keller, Claudia; Sollmann, Rahel; do Prado, Denise Mello; Torres, Patricia Carignano; Adrados, Begoña; Godoy, José Antonio; de Almeida Jácomo, Anah Tereza; Tôrres, Natália Mundim; Furtado, Mariana Malzoni; López-Bao, José Vicente

    2012-01-01

    Faeces provide relevant biological information which includes, with the application of genetic techniques, the sex and identity of individuals that defecated, thus providing potentially useful data on the behaviour and ecology of individuals, as well as the dynamics and structure of populations. This paper presents estimates of the sex ratio of different felid species (jaguar, Panthera onca; puma, Puma concolor; and ocelot/margay, Leopardus pardalis/Leopardus wiedi) as observed in field collected faeces, and proposes several hypotheses that could explain the strikingly high proportion of faeces from male jaguars. The proportion of male and female faeces was estimated using a non-invasive faecal sampling method in 14 study areas in Mexico and Brazil. Faecal samples were genetically analysed to identify the species, the sex and the individual (the latter only for samples identified as belonging to jaguars). Considering the three species, 72.6% of faeces (n = 493) were from males; however, there were significant differences among them, with the proportion from males being higher for jaguars than for pumas and ocelots/margays. A male-bias was consistently observed in all study areas for jaguar faeces, but not for the other species. For jaguars the trend was the same when considering the number of individuals identified (n = 68), with an average of 4.2±0.56 faeces per male and 2.0±0.36 per female. The observed faecal marking patterns might be related to the behaviour of female jaguars directed toward protecting litters from males, and in both male and female pumas, to prevent interspecific aggressions from male jaguars. The hypothesis that there are effectively more males than females in jaguar populations cannot be discarded, which could be due to the fact that females are territorial and males are not, or a tendency for males to disperse into suboptimal areas for the species.

  6. High proportion of male faeces in jaguar populations.

    PubMed

    Palomares, Francisco; Roques, Séverine; Chávez, Cuauhtémoc; Silveira, Leandro; Keller, Claudia; Sollmann, Rahel; do Prado, Denise Mello; Torres, Patricia Carignano; Adrados, Begoña; Godoy, José Antonio; de Almeida Jácomo, Anah Tereza; Tôrres, Natália Mundim; Furtado, Mariana Malzoni; López-Bao, José Vicente

    2012-01-01

    Faeces provide relevant biological information which includes, with the application of genetic techniques, the sex and identity of individuals that defecated, thus providing potentially useful data on the behaviour and ecology of individuals, as well as the dynamics and structure of populations. This paper presents estimates of the sex ratio of different felid species (jaguar, Panthera onca; puma, Puma concolor; and ocelot/margay, Leopardus pardalis/Leopardus wiedi) as observed in field collected faeces, and proposes several hypotheses that could explain the strikingly high proportion of faeces from male jaguars. The proportion of male and female faeces was estimated using a non-invasive faecal sampling method in 14 study areas in Mexico and Brazil. Faecal samples were genetically analysed to identify the species, the sex and the individual (the latter only for samples identified as belonging to jaguars). Considering the three species, 72.6% of faeces (n = 493) were from males; however, there were significant differences among them, with the proportion from males being higher for jaguars than for pumas and ocelots/margays. A male-bias was consistently observed in all study areas for jaguar faeces, but not for the other species. For jaguars the trend was the same when considering the number of individuals identified (n = 68), with an average of 4.2±0.56 faeces per male and 2.0±0.36 per female. The observed faecal marking patterns might be related to the behaviour of female jaguars directed toward protecting litters from males, and in both male and female pumas, to prevent interspecific aggressions from male jaguars. The hypothesis that there are effectively more males than females in jaguar populations cannot be discarded, which could be due to the fact that females are territorial and males are not, or a tendency for males to disperse into suboptimal areas for the species. PMID:23285226

  7. The elite athlete - assessing body shape, size, proportion and composition.

    PubMed

    Kerr, D A; Ackland, T R; Schreiner, A B

    1995-03-01

    In the quest to optimize performance of the elite athlete the sport scientist has sought to determine the ideal physique for a given sport or event. For some sports, specific structural characteristics offer definite performance advantages; for example in rowing, in addition to height, a large arm span has been identified as important. In other sports. such as long distance running, low levels of adiposity or 'fatness' appear to be linked with faster running times. There are four areas where appraisal of the athlete's physique can provide useful information: (1) identification of talented athletes; (2) to assess and monitor the growing athlete; (3) to monitor training and performance; and (4) to determine 'race weight' in weight-category sports. As a research tool a particular method must be reliable and valid. Other considerations include how expensive the method is, if it is suitable for a field situation and if large amounts of data on a number of subjects can be collected quickly. The method should be safe for both the athlete and the tester and provide useful feedback for the athlete or coach. Anthropometry, with training is able to fulfil most of these criteria and is the most widely used method of physique assessment in sports science. Large anthropometric data bases have been collected on elite athletes at Olympic games and world championships according to a standard protocol. Kinanthropometry, which has developed from anthropometry, is concerned with measurement and evaluation of different aspects of human movement and individual variation in body shape, size, proportion and composition. For the assessment of adiposity a sum of skinfolds, usually over six sites, is most commonly used rather than percentage body fat formulae. Muscle mass can be assessed indirectly through girth and corrected girth measurements. Limb lengths and breadths are used to assess skeletal structure and proportional differences in limb size. The anthropometric methods most commonly

  8. High Proportion of Male Faeces in Jaguar Populations

    PubMed Central

    Palomares, Francisco; Roques, Séverine; Chávez, Cuauhtémoc; Silveira, Leandro; Keller, Claudia; Sollmann, Rahel; do Prado, Denise Mello; Torres, Patricia Carignano; Adrados, Begoña; Godoy, José Antonio; de Almeida Jácomo, Anah Tereza; Tôrres, Natália Mundim; Furtado, Mariana Malzoni; López-Bao, José Vicente

    2012-01-01

    Faeces provide relevant biological information which includes, with the application of genetic techniques, the sex and identity of individuals that defecated, thus providing potentially useful data on the behaviour and ecology of individuals, as well as the dynamics and structure of populations. This paper presents estimates of the sex ratio of different felid species (jaguar, Panthera onca; puma, Puma concolor; and ocelot/margay, Leopardus pardalis/Leopardus wiedi) as observed in field collected faeces, and proposes several hypotheses that could explain the strikingly high proportion of faeces from male jaguars. The proportion of male and female faeces was estimated using a non-invasive faecal sampling method in 14 study areas in Mexico and Brazil. Faecal samples were genetically analysed to identify the species, the sex and the individual (the latter only for samples identified as belonging to jaguars). Considering the three species, 72.6% of faeces (n = 493) were from males; however, there were significant differences among them, with the proportion from males being higher for jaguars than for pumas and ocelots/margays. A male-bias was consistently observed in all study areas for jaguar faeces, but not for the other species. For jaguars the trend was the same when considering the number of individuals identified (n = 68), with an average of 4.2±0.56 faeces per male and 2.0±0.36 per female. The observed faecal marking patterns might be related to the behaviour of female jaguars directed toward protecting litters from males, and in both male and female pumas, to prevent interspecific aggressions from male jaguars. The hypothesis that there are effectively more males than females in jaguar populations cannot be discarded, which could be due to the fact that females are territorial and males are not, or a tendency for males to disperse into suboptimal areas for the species. PMID:23285226

  9. Calculation of the drag and heat transfer from a sphere in the gas flow in a cylindrical channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simakov, N. N.

    2016-09-01

    A numerical experiment on the simulation of heat transfer from a sphere to a gas flow in a cylindrical channel in the Stokes and transient flow regimes has been described. Radial and axial profiles of the gas temperature and the dependences of drag coefficient C d of the body and Nusselt number Nu on Reynolds number Re have been calculated and analyzed. The problem of the influence of the early drag crisis for a sphere on its heat transfer to the gas flow has been considered. The estimation of this phenomenon has shown that the early drag crisis of the sphere in a strongly turbulent flow causes a reduction in heat transfer from the sphere to the gas by three to six times (in approximately the same proportion as for its drag coefficient).

  10. Proportional counting techniques for routine tritium analyses at environmental levels

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, W W; Hughes, M B

    1981-01-01

    Techniques and procedures were developed to routinely analyze samples for tritium as part of research and monitoring programs on the transport of radionuclides released from the Savannah River Plant site. Because tritium concentrations in the environment are low, trace analysis methods were developed. The primary analysis technique involves converting aqueous samples to hydrogen gas which is mixed with propane and assayed in proportional counters. Counter background is reduced by massive shielding, anticoincidence gating with plastic scintillators, and pulse shape discrimination. The overall sensitivity for tritium is 0.02 pCi/g of water with a demonstrated precision of 6.3% at 1 pCi/g of water.

  11. Asbestos disease in sheet metal workers: proportional mortality update.

    PubMed

    Michaels, D; Zoloth, S

    1988-01-01

    This paper, updating the findings of an earlier study, provides additional evidence that sheet metal workers in the construction trades are at increased risk for asbestos-related disease. A proportional analysis of cause of death among 331 New York sheet metal workers found a significantly elevated PMR for lung cancer (PMR = 186). In addition, there were six deaths attributable to mesothelioma (three classified as lung cancer deaths) and three death certificates mentioned asbestosis or pulmonary fibrosis, although none of these three deaths were attributed to these diseases.

  12. Proportional EMG control for upper-limb powered exoskeletons.

    PubMed

    Lenzi, T; De Rossi, S M M; Vitiello, N; Carrozza, M C

    2011-01-01

    Electromyography (EMG) has been frequently proposed as the driving signal for controlling powered exoskeletons. Lot of effort has been spent to design accurate algorithms for muscular torque estimation, while very few studies attempted to understand to what extent an accurate torque estimate is indeed necessary to provide effective movement assistance through powered exoskeletons. In this study, we focus on the latter aspect by using a simple and "low-accuracy" torque estimate, an EMG-proportional control, to provide assistance through an elbow exoskeleton. Preliminary results show that subjects adapt almost instantaneously to the assistance provided by the exoskeleton and can reduce their effort while keeping full control of the movement. PMID:22254387

  13. [Body build and body proportions in children with bronchial asthma].

    PubMed

    Umławska, Wioleta

    2011-01-01

    This paper is a literature review of somatic development in children with chronic bronchial asthma. Asthma is the most common chronic inflammatory disease of the respiratory system in children and youth that is increasing in prevalence. In spite of significant progress in treatment, growth problems are often observed in children with asthma. Growth delay in asthmatic children, increased incidence of short stature, distorted body proportions and nutritional status impairment are reported frequently, in spite of inhaled corticosteroid drugs treatment. The severity of the asthma influences growth outcomes. The issue of growth in children with chronic asthma requires further detailed studies in its clinical and auxological aspects.

  14. Wealth distribution under Yard-Sale exchange with proportional taxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bustos-Guajardo, R.; Moukarzel, Cristian F.

    2016-03-01

    Recent analysis of a Yard-Sale (YS) exchange model supplemented with redistributive proportional taxation suggested an asymptotic behavior P(w)˜1/wμ for the wealth distribution, with a parameter-dependent exponent μ. Revisiting this problem, it is here shown analytically, and confirmed by extensive numerical simulation, that the asymptotic behavior of P(w) is not power-law but rather a Gaussian. When taxation is weak, we furthermore show that a restricted-range power-law behavior appears for wealths around the mean value. The corresponding power-law exponent equals 3/2 when the return distribution has zero mean.

  15. Proportion of recovered goose and brant bands that are reported

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martinson, R.K.; McCann, J.A.

    1966-01-01

    A few more than one-third of the goose and brant bands recovered by hunters were reported to the Bird Banding Laboratory (a rate of 0.361) during the 1962-64 hunting seasons. We calculated this band-reporting rate by comparing the estimated number of goose and brant bands recovered by hunters, based on a mail questionnaire survey, with the number of bands actually reported to the Bird Banding Laboratory. This band-reporting rate is probably representative only of the 1962-65 period. It is likely that, in earlier years, a greater proportion (perhaps about 0.60) of recovered goose and brant bands were reported.

  16. Cylindrical acoustical holography applied to full-scale jet noise.

    PubMed

    Wall, Alan T; Gee, Kent L; Neilsen, Tracianne B; Krueger, David W; James, Michael M

    2014-09-01

    Near-field acoustical holography methods are used to predict sound radiation from an engine installed on a high-performance military fighter aircraft. Cylindrical holography techniques are an efficient approach to measure the large and complex sound fields produced by full-scale jets. It is shown that a ground-based, one-dimensional array of microphones can be used in conjunction with a cylindrical wave function field representation to provide a holographic reconstruction of the radiated sound field at low frequencies. In the current work, partial field decomposition methods and numerical extrapolation of data beyond the boundaries of the hologram aperture are required prior to holographic projection. Predicted jet noise source distributions and directionality are shown for four frequencies between 63 and 250 Hz. It is shown that the source distribution narrows and moves upstream, and that radiation directionality shifts toward the forward direction, with increasing frequency. A double-lobe feature of full-scale jet radiation is also demonstrated. PMID:25190387

  17. Rotational statistics in dense granular flows of smooth cylindrical particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olafsen, Jeffrey; Jantzi, Jacob

    2011-03-01

    We report the results of an experiment to investigate the dissipation in the rotational degree of freedom for smooth cylindrical particles in a dense, driven granular flow. The flow is studied in a rotating drum of radius R = 30 cm for particles of radius r = 0.635 cm while the cell is rotated at speeds between 0.25 and 0.75 Hz. The 2D geometry of the experimental design allows for the measurement of two translational degrees of freedom as well as the rotation of the disks within the driven flow. The rotational velocity statistics demonstrate non-Gaussian behavior as well as a significant amount of energy being dissipated within the flow via the tangential friction between the particles. The results of this experiment are significant in that many driven granular experiments use smooth cylindrical or spherical particles to investigate granular dynamics, but the contribution from the rotational degrees of freedom are often unmeasured. A novel imaging technique is used to extract both the translational and rotational velocity statistics to a high degree of precision in the entire cell during the experiment.

  18. Cylindrical diffractive lenses recorded on PVA/AA photopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, R.; Gallego, S.; Márquez, A.; Navarro-Fuster, V.; Francés, J.; Neipp, C.; Beléndez, A.; Pascual, I.

    2016-04-01

    Photopolymers are optical recording materials appealing for many different applications such as holography, data storage, interconnectors, solar concentrations, or wave-guides fabrication. Recently the capacity of photopolymers to record diffractive optical elements (DOE's) has been investigated. Different authors have reported proposes to record DOE like fork gratings, photonics structures, lenses, sinusoidal, blazed or fork gratings. In these experiments there are different experimental set-ups and different photopolymers. In this work due to the improvement in the spatial light modulation technology together with the photopolymer science we propose a recording experimental system of DOE using a Liquid Cristal based on Silicon (LCoS) display as a master to store complex DOE like cylindrical lenses. This technology permits us an accurate control of the phase and the amplitude of the recording beam, with a very small pixel size. The main advantage of this display is that permit us to modify the DOE automatically, we use the software of the LCoS to send the voltage to each pixel In this work we use a photopolymer composed by acrylamide (AA) as polymerizable monomer and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). We use a coverplated and index matched photopolymer to avoid the influence of the thickness variation on the transmitted light. In order to reproduce the material behaviour during polymerization, we have designed our model to simulate cylindrical lenses and used Fresnel propagation to simulate the light propagation through the DOE and analyze the focal plane and the properties of the recorded lenses.

  19. An evaluation of active noise control in a cylindrical shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silcox, R. J.; Lester, H. C.; Abler, S. B.

    1987-01-01

    The physical mechanisms governing the use of active noise control in an extended volume of a cylindrical shell are discussed. Measured data was compared with computer results from a previously derived analytical model based on an infinite shell theory. For both the analytical model and experiment, the radiation of the external monopoles is coupled to the internal acoustic field through the radial displacement of the thin, elastic cylindrical shell. An active noise control system was implemented in the cylinder using a fixed array of discrete monopole sources, all of which lie in the plane of the exterior noise sources. Good agreement between measurement and prediction was obtained for both internal pressure response and overall noise reduction. Attenuations in the source plane greater than 15 dB were recorded along with a uniformly quieted noise environment over the entire length of the experimental model. Results indicate that for extended axial forcing distributions or very low shell damping, axial arrays of control sources may be required. Finally, the Nyquist criteria for the number of azimuthal control sources is shown to provide for effective control over the full cylinder cross section.

  20. An evaluation of active noise control in a cylindrical shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silcox, R. J.; Lester, H. C.; Abler, S. B.

    1989-01-01

    The physical mechanisms governing the use of active noise control in an extended volume of a cylindrical shell are discussed. Measured data was compared with computer results from a previously derived analytical model based on an infinite shell theory. For both the analytical model and experiment, the radiation of the external monopoles is coupled to the internal acoustic field through the radial displacement of the thin, elastic cylindrical shell. An active noise control system was implemented in the cylinder using a fixed array of discrete monopole sources, all of which lie in the plane of the exterior noise sources. Good agreement between measurement and prediction was obtained for both internal pressure response and overall noise reduction. Attenuations in the source plane greater than 15 dB were recorded along with a uniformly quieted noise environment over the entire length of the experimental model. Results indicate that for extended axial forcing distributions or very low shell damping, axial arrays of control sources may be required. Finally, the Nyquist criteria for the number of azimuthal control sources is shown to provide for effective control over the full cylinder cross section.

  1. Experimental fatigue life investigation of cylindrical thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quentmeyer, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    Twenty-two cylindrical test sections of a cylindrical rocket thrust chamber were fabricated and 21 of them were cycled to failure to explore the failure mechanisms, determine the effects of wall temperature on cyclic life, and to rank the material life characteristics for comparison with results from isothermal tests of 12 alloys at 538 C. Cylinder liners were fabricated from OFHC copper, Amzirc, and NAR1loy-Z. Tests were conducted at a chamber pressure of 4.14 MW/sq m using hydrogen-oxygen propellants at an oxidant-fuel ratio of 6.0, which resulted in an average throat heat flux of 54 MW/sq m. The cylinders were cooled with liquid hydrogen at an average rate of 0.91 Kg/sec. All failures were characterized by a thinning of the cooling channel wall at the centerline and eventual failure by tensile rupture. Cyclic life rankings of the materials based on temperature do not agree with published rankings based on uniaxial, isothermal strain tests.

  2. On the optimal pretensioning of cylindrical and spherical pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Kalamkarov, A.L.; Drozdov, A.D.

    1995-11-01

    Filament winding of pressure vessels and pipes is always realized with some pretensioning, and some external loads may be applied. It is important to determine such an optimal preload regime that ensures the maximum load-carrying capacity of the vessel subject to internal pressure. In the present study, the optimal preload distribution is analyzed in the filament winding fabrication of the cylindrical or spherical pressure vessels that are treated as growing elastic solids subjected to aging. In the case of cylindrical vessels, the dependence of the optimal preload intensity versus the polar radius is obtained for both nonaging and aging material of the fibers. In the case of spherical pressure vessels, the optimal regime of internal pressure applied during the winding process is obtained. The optimal loading of a spherical vessel at both infinitesimal and finite strains is analyzed. The new solutions obtained and the recommendations formulated are of a special practical importance for the optimal design and fabrication of the composite pressure vessels and pipes.

  3. Finite-amplitude dynamics of coupled cylindrical menisci.

    PubMed

    Cox, B L; Steen, P H

    2011-10-01

    The cylindrical meniscus is a liquid/gas interface of circular-cap cross-section constrained along its axis and bounded by end-planes. The inviscid motions of coupled cylindrical menisci are studied here. Motions result from the competition between inertia and surface tension forces. Restriction to shapes that are of circular-cap cross-section leads to an ordinary differential equation (ode) model, with the advantage that finite-amplitude stability can be examined. The second-order nonlinear ode model has a Hamiltonian structure, showing dynamical behavior like the Duffing-oscillator. The energy landscape has either a single- or double-welled potential depending on the extent of volume overfill. Total liquid volume is a bifurcation parameter, as in the corresponding problem for coupled spherical-cap droplets. Unlike the spherical-cap problem, however, axial disturbances can also destabilize, depending on overfill. For large volumes, previously known axial stability results are applied to find the limit at which axial symmetry is lost and comparison is made to the Plateau-Rayleigh limit. PMID:21723560

  4. A cylindrical specimen holder for electron cryo-tomography.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Colin M; Löwe, Jan

    2014-02-01

    The use of slab-like flat specimens for electron cryo-tomography restricts the range of viewing angles that can be used. This leads to the "missing wedge" problem, which causes artefacts and anisotropic resolution in reconstructed tomograms. Cylindrical specimens provide a way to eliminate the problem, since they allow imaging from a full range of viewing angles around the tilt axis. Such specimens have been used before for tomography of radiation-insensitive samples at room temperature, but never for frozen-hydrated specimens. Here, we demonstrate the use of thin-walled carbon tubes as specimen holders, allowing the preparation of cylindrical frozen-hydrated samples of ribosomes, liposomes and whole bacterial cells. Images acquired from these cylinders have equal quality at all viewing angles, and the accessible tilt range is restricted only by the physical limits of the microscope. Tomographic reconstructions of these specimens demonstrate that the effects of the missing wedge are substantially reduced, and could be completely eliminated if a full tilt range was used. The overall quality of these tomograms is still lower than that obtained by existing methods, but improvements are likely in future. PMID:24275523

  5. Cylindrical boiloff calorimeters for testing of thermal insulation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fesmire, J. E.; Johnson, W. L.; Meneghelli, B. J.; Coffman, B. E.

    2015-12-01

    Cryostats have been developed and standardized for laboratory testing of thermal insulation systems in a cylindrical configuration. Boiloff calorimetry is the measurement principle for determining the effective thermal conductivity (ke) and heat flux (q) of a test specimen at a fixed environmental condition (boundary temperatures, cold vacuum pressure, and residual gas composition). Through its heat of vaporization, liquid nitrogen serves as the energy meter, but the design is adaptable for various cryogens. The main instrument, Cryostat-100, is thermally guarded and directly measures absolute thermal performance. A cold mass assembly and all fluid and instrumentation feedthroughs are suspended from a lid of the vacuum canister; and a custom lifting mechanism allows the assembly and specimen to be manipulated easily. Each of three chambers is filled and vented through a single feedthrough for minimum overall heat leakage. The cold mass design precludes direct, solid-conduction heat transfer (other than through the vessel's outer wall itself) from one liquid volume to another, which is critical for achieving very low heat measurements. The cryostat system design details and test methods are discussed, as well as results for select thermal insulation materials. Additional cylindrical boiloff calorimeters and progress toward a liquid hydrogen apparatus are also discussed.

  6. Residual Stress Measurements of Explosively Clad Cylindrical Pressure Vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Douglas J; Watkins, Thomas R; Hubbard, Camden R; Hill, M. R.; Meith, W. A.

    2012-01-01

    Tantalum refractory liners were explosively clad into cylindrical pressure vessels, some of which had been previously autofrettaged. Using explosive cladding, the refractory liner formed a metallurgical bond with the steel of the pressure vessel at a cost of induced strain. Two techniques were employed to determine the residual stress state of the clad steel cylinders: neutron diffraction and mechanical slitting. Neutron diffraction is typically nondestructive; however, due to attenuation along the beam path, the cylinders had to be sectioned into rings that were nominally 25 mm thick. Slitting is a destructive method, requiring the sectioning of the cylindrical samples. Both techniques provided triaxial stress data and useful information on the effects of explosive cladding. The stress profiles in the hoop and radial directions were similar for an autofrettaged, nonclad vessel and a clad, nonautofrettaged vessel. The stress profiles in the axial direction appeared to be different. Further, the data suggested that residual stresses from the autofrettage and explosive cladding processes were not additive, in part due to evidence of reverse yielding. The residual stress data are presented, compared and discussed.

  7. Optimisation of a Horizontal Capsule Transporting Pipeline carrying Cylindrical Capsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asim, Taimoor; Mishra, Rakesh; Kollar, Laszlo; Ubbi, Kuldip

    2012-05-01

    Pipelines carrying fluids and slurries are quite common. The third-generation pipelines carrying spherical or cylindrical capsules (hollow containers) filled with minerals or other materials including hazardous liquids are rather a new concept. These pipelines need to be designed optimally for commercial viability. An optimal design of such a pipeline results in minimum pressure drop in the pipeline. This corresponds to minimum head loss and hence minimum pumping power required to drive the capsules and the transporting fluid. This study uses a rigorous approach to predict pumping cost based on Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and hence optimize the design of the capsule transporting pipelines. Pressure drop relationship developed has been incorporated to calculate the pumping requirements for the system. Based on the least-cost principle, a methodology has been developed for the determination of the optimal diameter of cylindrical capsule carrying hydraulic pipeline. This procedure can be applied to obtain the optimal size of the capsule pipeline for minimum pumping and capital costs.

  8. Transurethral canine prostatectomy with a cylindrically diffusing fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cromeens, Douglas M.; Johnson, Douglas E.; Price, Roger E.

    1994-09-01

    In this study, visual laser ablation of the prostate (VLAP) was performed on eight mongrel dogs utilizing a cylindrically diffusing fiber attached to a 1.06 neodymium:YAG (Nd:YAG) laser. All dogs received one continuous dose totaling 15,000 J (25 W for 10 min) applied from the vesical neck to the colliculus seminalis. There was no visible hemorrhage from the lasing intraoperatively in any dog. Postoperative recovery was uneventful with no dog experiencing urinary incontinence and only one incident of dysuria with urinary retention during their observation period. Gross and histopathologic examinations of serial sections of the prostate were performed from 2 hours to 7 weeks postoperatively and demonstrated a consistent spherical zone of destruction 2.9 cm (average) in diameter. We believe the simplified fiber placement and complete lack of postoperative complications in this small group of dogs suggest that the cylindrically diffusing fiber offers significant advantage over laterally deflecting fibers for transurethral prostatectomies in the dog.

  9. Investigation of a scanned cylindrical ultrasound system for breast hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Ju, Kuen-Cheng; Tseng, Li-Te; Chen, Yung-Yaw; Lin, Win-Li

    2006-02-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of a scanned cylindrical ultrasound system for producing uniform heating from the central to the superficial portions of the breast or localized heating within the breast at a specific location. The proposed system consists of plane ultrasound transducer(s) mounted on a scanned cylindrical support. The breast was immersed in water and surrounded by this system during the treatment. The control parameters considered are the size of the transducer, the ultrasound frequency, the scan angle and the shifting distance between the axes of the breast and the system. Three-dimensional acoustical and thermal models were used to calculate the temperature distribution. Non-perfused phantom experiments were performed to verify the simulation results. Simulation results indicate that high frequency ultrasound could be used for the superficial heating, and the scan angle of the transducer could be varied to obtain an appropriate high temperature region to cover the desired treatment region. Low frequency ultrasound could be used for deep heating and the high temperature region could be moved by shifting the system. In addition, a combination of low and high frequency ultrasound could result in a portion treatment from the central to the superficial breast or an entire breast treatment. Good agreement was obtained between non-perfused experiments and simulation results. The findings of this study can be used to determine the effects of the control parameters of this system, as well as to select the optimal parameters for a specific treatment.

  10. A cylindrical specimen holder for electron cryo-tomography

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Colin M.; Löwe, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The use of slab-like flat specimens for electron cryo-tomography restricts the range of viewing angles that can be used. This leads to the “missing wedge” problem, which causes artefacts and anisotropic resolution in reconstructed tomograms. Cylindrical specimens provide a way to eliminate the problem, since they allow imaging from a full range of viewing angles around the tilt axis. Such specimens have been used before for tomography of radiation-insensitive samples at room temperature, but never for frozen-hydrated specimens. Here, we demonstrate the use of thin-walled carbon tubes as specimen holders, allowing the preparation of cylindrical frozen-hydrated samples of ribosomes, liposomes and whole bacterial cells. Images acquired from these cylinders have equal quality at all viewing angles, and the accessible tilt range is restricted only by the physical limits of the microscope. Tomographic reconstructions of these specimens demonstrate that the effects of the missing wedge are substantially reduced, and could be completely eliminated if a full tilt range was used. The overall quality of these tomograms is still lower than that obtained by existing methods, but improvements are likely in future. PMID:24275523

  11. RBF network with cylindrical coordinate features for multispectral MRI segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanez-Suarez, Oscar; Valdes-Cristerna, Raquel; Medina, Veronica; Barrios, Fernando A.

    2001-07-01

    Spatial quantification of relevant brain structures, is usually carried out through the analysis of a stack of magnetic resonance (MR) images by means of some image segmentation approach. In this paper, multispectral MR imaging segmentation based on a modified radial-basis function network is presented. Multispectral MR image sets are constructed by collecting data for the same anatomical structures under T1, T2 and FLAIR excitation sequences. Classification features for the network are extended beyond the normalized intensities in each band to also include the cylindrical coordinates of the image pixels. Such coordinates are determined within a reference image space upon which all targets are registered to. The network classifier was designed to differentiate three structures: gray matter, white matter and image background. The classification layer was also modified to accommodate the pixel cylindrical coordinates as inputs. With the designed network, background pixels are correctly classified for all cases, while gray and white matter pixels are misclassified for about 10% of the cases in the validation set. The source of these errors can be traced to smooth transitions in the output nodes for these two classes. Thresholding the outputs of these nodes to include a reject class reduces the misclassification error. The small and simple architecture of the network shows good generalization, and thus good segmentation over unseen stacks.

  12. Acoustic Microscope Inspection of Cylindrical Butt Laser Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maev, R. Gr.; Severin, F.

    Presented work was made in order to develop the ultrasound technique for quality control of critical butt laser welds in automotive production. The set of powertrain assemblies was tested by high resolution acoustic microscopy method. The pulse-echo Tessonics AM 1102 scanning acoustic microscope was modified to accommodate cylindrical configuration of the parts. The spherically focused transducers with frequencies 15, 25 and 50 MHz were used; ultrasonic beam was focused on the joint area. Three-dimensional acoustic images were obtained and analyzed. The clear distinction between weld seam and remaining gap was demonstrated on the B- and C-scans representation. Seam depth varying from 0 up to 3.2 mm was measured along the weld. Different types of defects (porosity, cracks, lack of fusion) were detected and classified. The optimized analytical procedures for signal processing and advanced seam visualization were determined. The results were used as a basis for development of specialized instrumentation for inspection of this kind of parts in industrial environment. The technical requirements were established and the general design of new cylindrical acoustical scanner was made.

  13. Microwave Plasma Excitation Using Cylindrical Cavity with Dual Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Yuichi; Nakamura, Keiji; Park, Soonam; Kobayashi, Satoru; Sugai, Hideo; Chubu University Team; Applied Materials Team; Nagoya Industrial Science Research Institute Team

    2015-09-01

    Large high-density plasmas have been generated by injecting magnetron-based microwaves radiated from slots cut on a wall of a rectangular or coaxial waveguide. However, a standing structural microwave in the waveguide often causes non-uniformity of plasma density. To minimize such inhomogeneity excited by the conventional waveguide, we adopt a resonant cylindrical cavity combined with a solid-state microwave amplifier. Microwave is injected into the cavity from two ports azimuthally apart by 90 degrees to each other (dual injection). FDTD simulations are performed for a TE111 mode resonant cavity excited by single or dual microwave injection. In the case of the dual injection with a phase difference of π/2, the wave field azimuthally rotates in the cavity, and hence the slots cut on a cavity bottom wall launch travelling waves, thus minimizing the azimuthal inhomogeneity of the resultant plasma. 40-cm-diameter plasmas are experimentally generated in argon at 0.1 ~ 5 Torr with microwaves of 2.4-2.5GHz and 400W. Threshold powers for plasma ignition are much less in dual injection than those in single injection. Optical emission images of the cylindrical plasmas show that the plasma uniformity is considerably improved in dual injection, particularly at high-pressure and low-power.

  14. The magnetic field of a permanent hollow cylindrical magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reich, Felix A.; Stahn, Oliver; Müller, Wolfgang H.

    2016-09-01

    Based on the rational version of M AXWELL's equations according to T RUESDELL and T OUPIN or KOVETZ, cf. (Kovetz in Electromagnetic theory, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2000; Truesdell and Toupin in Handbuch der Physik, Bd. III/1, Springer, Berlin, pp 226-793; appendix, pp 794-858, 2000), we present, for stationary processes, a closed-form solution for the magnetic flux density of a hollow cylindrical magnet. Its magnetization is constant in axial direction. We consider M AXWELL's equations in regular and singular points that are obtained by rational electrodynamics, adapted to stationary processes. The magnetic flux density is calculated analytically by means of a vector potential. We obtain a solution in terms of complete elliptic integrals. Therefore, numerical evaluation can be performed in a computationally efficient manner. The solution is written in dimensionless form and can easily be applied to cylinders of arbitrary shape. The relation between the magnetic flux density and the magnetic field is linear, and an explicit relation for the field is presented. With a slight modification the result can be used to obtain the field of a solid cylindrical magnet. The mathematical structure of the solution and, in particular, singularities are discussed.

  15. Nonlinear RF spurious in a cylindrical cavity with superconducting endplates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateu, Jordi; Collado, Carlos; Shaw, Timothy J.; O'Callaghan, Juan M.

    2002-08-01

    We have developed a method to calculate the distribution of fundamental and spurious fields in a metallic cylindrical cavity with superconducting endplates in which signals at two different frequencies are injected. The nonlinearity in the superconductor produces the typical intermodulation effects if the frequencies of the injected signals are sufficiently close to each other and near a resonant mode. Our method uses harmonic balance to match the fields in the cavity with the currents on the endplates. The method can be used for a variety of nonlinear models of the superconducting endplate, and could be the base for a nondestructive procedure to extract the nonlinear parameters of an HTS sample from RF measurements. Our analysis is restricted to the TE0 1 1 mode, but the method can be applied to any propagating mode in the cylindrical cavity. Closed-form equations for the case of square-law nonlinearities in the superconductor are derived and used to check the validity of the harmonic balance calculation.

  16. Finite-amplitude dynamics of coupled cylindrical menisci.

    PubMed

    Cox, B L; Steen, P H

    2011-10-01

    The cylindrical meniscus is a liquid/gas interface of circular-cap cross-section constrained along its axis and bounded by end-planes. The inviscid motions of coupled cylindrical menisci are studied here. Motions result from the competition between inertia and surface tension forces. Restriction to shapes that are of circular-cap cross-section leads to an ordinary differential equation (ode) model, with the advantage that finite-amplitude stability can be examined. The second-order nonlinear ode model has a Hamiltonian structure, showing dynamical behavior like the Duffing-oscillator. The energy landscape has either a single- or double-welled potential depending on the extent of volume overfill. Total liquid volume is a bifurcation parameter, as in the corresponding problem for coupled spherical-cap droplets. Unlike the spherical-cap problem, however, axial disturbances can also destabilize, depending on overfill. For large volumes, previously known axial stability results are applied to find the limit at which axial symmetry is lost and comparison is made to the Plateau-Rayleigh limit.

  17. Ultrasound cylindrical phased array for transoesophageal thermal therapy: initial studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melodelima, David; Lafon, Cyril; Prat, Frederic; Birer, Alain; Cathignol, Dominique

    2002-12-01

    This work was undertaken to investigate the feasibility of constructing a cylindrical phased array composed of 64 elements spread around the periphery (OD 10.6 mm) for transoesophageal ultrasound thermotherapy. The underlying operating principle of this applicator is to rotate a plane ultrasound beam electronically. For this purpose, eight adjacent transducers were successively excited with appropriate delay times so as to generate a plane wave. The exposure direction was changed by exciting a different set of eight elements. For these feasibility studies, we used a cylindrical prototype (OD 10.6 mm) composed of 16 elementary transducers distributed over a quarter of the cylinder, all operating at 4.55 MHz. The active part was mechanically reinforced by a rigid damper structure behind the transducers. It was shown that an ultrasound field similar to that emitted by a plane transducer could be generated. Ex vivo experiments on pig's liver demonstrated that the ultrasound beam could be accurately rotated to generate sector-based lesions to a suitable depth (up to 19 mm). Throughout these experiments, exposures lasting 20 s were delivered at an acoustic intensity of 17 W cm-2. By varying the power from exposure to exposure, the depth of the lesion at different angles could be controlled.

  18. Reflection of cylindrical converging shock wave over a plane wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fu; Si, Ting; Zhai, Zhigang; Luo, Xisheng; Yang, Jiming; Lu, Xiyun

    2016-08-01

    The cylindrical converging shock reflection over a plane wedge is investigated experimentally and numerically in a specially designed shock tube which converts a planar shock into a cylindrical one. When the converging shock is moving along the wedge, both the shock strength and the incident angle are changing, which provides the possibility for the wave transition. The results show that both regular reflection (RR) and Mach reflection (MR) are found on the wedge with different initial incident angles. The wave transitions from direct Mach reflection (DiMR) to inverse Mach reflection (InMR) and further to transitioned regular reflection (TRR) are observed with appropriate initial incident angles. The instability development in the shear layer and strong vortices formation near the wall are evident, which are ascribed not only to the interaction of two shear layers but also to the shock impact and the shock converging effect. Because of the flow unsteadiness after the converging shock, the detachment criterion provides a good estimation for the RR → MR transition, but fails to predict the DiMR → InMR transition, and MR is found to persist slightly below the mechanical equilibrium condition. A hysteresis process is found in the MR → TRR transition and becomes more apparent as the increase of the initial incident angle due to the shock converging effect.

  19. Cylindrical 3D video display observable from all directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Tomohiro; Kajiki, Yoshihiro; Honda, Toshio; Sato, Makoto

    2000-05-01

    We propose a 3D video displaying technique that multiple viewers can observe 3D images from 360 degrees of arc horizontally without 3D glasses. This technique uses a cylindrical parallax barrier and 1D light source array. We have developed an experimental display using this technique and have demonstrated 3D images observable form 360 degrees of arc horizontally without 3D glasses. Since this technique is based on the parallax panoramagram, the parallax number and resolution are limited by the diffraction at the parallax barrier. To avoid these limits, we improved the technique by revolving the parallax barrier. We have been developing a new experimental display using this improved technique. The display is capable of displaying cylindrical 3D video images within the diameter of 100 mm and the height of 128 mm. Images are described with the resolution of 1254 pixels circularly and 128 pixels vertically, and refreshed at 30Hz. Each pixel has the viewing angle of 60 degrees and that is divided into 70 views, therefore the angular parallax interval of each pixel is less than 1 degree. In such a case, observers may barely perceive parallax discretely. The pixels are arranged on a cylinder surface, therefore produced 3D images can be observed from all directions.

  20. Array gain for a cylindrical array with baffle scatter effects.

    PubMed

    Bertilone, Derek C; Killeen, Damien S; Bao, Chaoying

    2007-11-01

    Cylindrical arrays used in sonar for passive underwater surveillance often have sensors surrounding a cylindrical metal baffle. In some operational sonars, the phones in each stave (i.e., each line of phones aligned with the cylinder axis) are hardwired together so that the array is equivalent to a baffled circular array of directional elements, where each element corresponds to a line array of omnidirectional phones steered to broadside. In this paper a model is introduced for computing the array gain of such an array at high frequencies, which incorporates baffle scatter using infinite, rigid cylinder scattering theory, and with ambient noise described by an angular spectral density function. In practice the phones are often offset from the baffle surface, and the acoustic field sampled by the staves is distorted at high frequencies due to interference between the incident and scattered fields. Examples are given to illustrate the resulting array gain degradation, using three noise distributions that are frequently used in sonar performance modeling: three-dimensional isotropic, two-dimensional isotropic, and surface dipole noise.