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Sample records for cysteine-rich domain protein

  1. Cysteine-rich domains related to Frizzled receptors and Hedgehog-interacting proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Jimin; Grishin, Nick V

    2012-01-01

    Frizzled and Smoothened are homologous seven-transmembrane proteins functioning in the Wnt and Hedgehog signaling pathways, respectively. They harbor an extracellular cysteine-rich domain (FZ-CRD), a mobile evolutionary unit that has been found in a number of other metazoan proteins and Frizzled-like proteins in Dictyostelium. Domains distantly related to FZ-CRDs, in Hedgehog-interacting proteins (HHIPs), folate receptors and riboflavin-binding proteins (FRBPs), and Niemann-Pick Type C1 proteins (NPC1s), referred to as HFN-CRDs, exhibit similar structures and disulfide connectivity patterns compared with FZ-CRDs. We used computational analyses to expand the homologous set of FZ-CRDs and HFN-CRDs, providing a better understanding of their evolution and classification. First, FZ-CRD-containing proteins with various domain compositions were identified in several major eukaryotic lineages including plants and Chromalveolata, revealing a wider phylogenetic distribution of FZ-CRDs than previously recognized. Second, two new and distinct groups of highly divergent FZ-CRDs were found by sensitive similarity searches. One of them is present in the calcium channel component Mid1 in fungi and the uncharacterized FAM155 proteins in metazoans. Members of the other new FZ-CRD group occur in the metazoan-specific RECK (reversion-inducing-cysteine-rich protein with Kazal motifs) proteins that are putative tumor suppressors acting as inhibitors of matrix metalloproteases. Finally, sequence and three-dimensional structural comparisons helped us uncover a divergent HFN-CRD in glypicans, which are important morphogen-binding heparan sulfate proteoglycans. Such a finding reinforces the evolutionary ties between the Wnt and Hedgehog signaling pathways and underscores the importance of gene duplications in creating essential signaling components in metazoan evolution. PMID:22693159

  2. Structures of pseudechetoxin and pseudecin, two snake-venom cysteine-rich secretory proteins that target cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channels: implications for movement of the C-terminal cysteine-rich domain

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Yamazaki, Yasuo; Brown, R. Lane; Fujimoto, Zui; Morita, Takashi; Mizuno, Hiroshi

    2008-10-01

    The structures of pseudechetoxin and pseudecin suggest that both proteins bind to cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channels in a manner in which the concave surface occludes the pore entrance. Cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) ion channels play pivotal roles in sensory transduction by retinal photoreceptors and olfactory neurons. The elapid snake toxins pseudechetoxin (PsTx) and pseudecin (Pdc) are the only known protein blockers of CNG channels. These toxins belong to a cysteine-rich secretory protein (CRISP) family containing an N-terminal pathogenesis-related proteins of group 1 (PR-1) domain and a C-terminal cysteine-rich domain (CRD). PsTx and Pdc are highly homologous proteins, but their blocking affinities on CNG channels are different: PsTx blocks both the olfactory and retinal channels with ∼15–30-fold higher affinity than Pdc. To gain further insights into their structure and function, the crystal structures of PsTx, Pdc and Zn{sup 2+}-bound Pdc were determined. The structures revealed that most of the amino-acid-residue differences between PsTx and Pdc are located around the concave surface formed between the PR-1 domain and the CRD, suggesting that the concave surface is functionally important for CNG-channel binding and inhibition. A structural comparison in the presence and absence of Zn{sup 2+} ion demonstrated that the concave surface can open and close owing to movement of the CRD upon Zn{sup 2+} binding. The data suggest that PsTx and Pdc occlude the pore entrance and that the dynamic motion of the concave surface facilitates interaction with the CNG channels.

  3. Biochemical and molecular characterization of the chicken cysteine-rich protein, a developmentally regulated LIM-domain protein that is associated with the actin cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Crawford, A W; Pino, J D; Beckerle, M C

    1994-01-01

    LIM domains are present in a number of proteins including transcription factors, a proto-oncogene product, and the adhesion plaque protein zyxin. The LIM domain exhibits a characteristic arrangement of cysteine and histidine residues and represents a novel zinc binding sequence (Michelsen et al., 1993). Previously, we reported the identification of a 23-kD protein that interacts with zyxin in vitro (Sadler et al., 1992). In this report, we describe the purification and characterization of this 23-kD zyxin-binding protein from avian smooth muscle. Isolation of a cDNA encoding the 23-kD protein has revealed that it consists of 192 amino acids and exhibits two copies of the LIM motif. The 23-kD protein is 91% identical to the human cysteine-rich protein (hCRP); therefore we refer to it as the chicken cysteine-rich protein (cCRP). Examination of a number of chick embryonic tissues by Western immunoblot analysis reveals that cCRP exhibits tissue-specific expression. cCRP is most prominent in tissues that are enriched in smooth muscle cells, such as gizzard, stomach, and intestine. In primary cell cultures derived from embryonic gizzard, differentiated smooth muscle cells exhibit the most striking staining with anti-cCRP antibodies. We have performed quantitative Western immunoblot analysis of cCRP, zyxin, and alpha-actinin levels during embryogenesis. By this approach, we have demonstrated that the expression of cCRP is developmentally regulated.

  4. Biochemical and molecular characterization of the chicken cysteine-rich protein, a developmentally regulated LIM-domain protein that is associated with the actin cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    LIM domains are present in a number of proteins including transcription factors, a proto-oncogene product, and the adhesion plaque protein zyxin. The LIM domain exhibits a characteristic arrangement of cysteine and histidine residues and represents a novel zinc binding sequence (Michelsen et al., 1993). Previously, we reported the identification of a 23-kD protein that interacts with zyxin in vitro (Sadler et al., 1992). In this report, we describe the purification and characterization of this 23-kD zyxin-binding protein from avian smooth muscle. Isolation of a cDNA encoding the 23-kD protein has revealed that it consists of 192 amino acids and exhibits two copies of the LIM motif. The 23-kD protein is 91% identical to the human cysteine-rich protein (hCRP); therefore we refer to it as the chicken cysteine-rich protein (cCRP). Examination of a number of chick embryonic tissues by Western immunoblot analysis reveals that cCRP exhibits tissue-specific expression. cCRP is most prominent in tissues that are enriched in smooth muscle cells, such as gizzard, stomach, and intestine. In primary cell cultures derived from embryonic gizzard, differentiated smooth muscle cells exhibit the most striking staining with anti-cCRP antibodies. We have performed quantitative Western immunoblot analysis of cCRP, zyxin, and alpha-actinin levels during embryogenesis. By this approach, we have demonstrated that the expression of cCRP is developmentally regulated. PMID:8294495

  5. Cysteine rich secretory proteins in reproduction and venom.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Gerard M; O'Bryan, Moira K

    2007-01-01

    The cysteine rich secretory proteins (Crisp) are predominantly found in the mammalian male reproductive tract and in the venom of reptiles. Crisps are two domain proteins with a structurally similar yet evolutionarily diverse N-terminal domain and a characteristic cysteine rich C-terminal domain which we refer to as the Crisp domain. Since their identification 30 years ago Crisp research in mammals has focused on the characterisation of their expression localization to infer function. While no doubt important observations, these have not substantially led to an understanding of the biochemical activity of the Crisps and their role in sperm function or fertilisation. Recently, we demonstrated that the Crisp-2 Crisp domain has a structure similar to ion channel toxins ShK and BgK and was itself able to regulate Ca2+ flux through ryanodine receptors. These data build upon the previous characterizations of reptile venom Crisps as regulators of several types of ion channels and permits for the first time a dissection of the biochemical activity of mammalian Crisps.

  6. Molecular cloning, genomic structure, and tissue distribution of EW135, a novel chicken egg white protein with group B scavenger receptor cysteine-rich domains.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Whayoung; Nakamura, Tomohiro; Asanuma, Hideki; Matsushita, Misao

    2013-11-01

    Approximately 80 proteins are reported to be present in chicken egg white. The major function of egg white proteins isolated so far is to defend the egg yolk against infections. We recently isolated a novel protein termed EW135 from chicken egg white. In this paper, we have determined the complete amino acid sequence of EW135 based on cDNA cloning. EW135 consists of 970 amino acids with a putative signal peptide of 17 amino acids. It is composed exclusively of tandem repeats of nine group B scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) domains separated by eight seven-amino acid peptides. The features of consensus sequences found in the group B SRCR domain were well conserved in EW135. The EW135 gene consists of putative 11 exons, with each SRCR domain being encoded by a single exon. Reverse transcription PCR showed that EW135 is expressed in only the oviduct among the 11 types of tissues tested. EW135 is a second soluble protein belonging to the group B SRCR domain superfamily identified in chickens. One of the important functions of proteins belonging to the group B SRCR domain superfamily is to recognize pathogens in innate immunity. It is, therefore, conceivable that EW135 could be involved in host defense in egg white.

  7. Structure-based Discovery of Novel Small Molecule Wnt Signaling Inhibitors by Targeting the Cysteine-rich Domain of Frizzled*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ho-Jin; Bao, Ju; Miller, Ami; Zhang, Chi; Wu, Jibo; Baday, Yiressy C.; Guibao, Cristina; Li, Lin; Wu, Dianqing; Zheng, Jie J.

    2015-01-01

    Frizzled is the earliest discovered glycosylated Wnt protein receptor and is critical for the initiation of Wnt signaling. Antagonizing Frizzled is effective in inhibiting the growth of multiple tumor types. The extracellular N terminus of Frizzled contains a conserved cysteine-rich domain that directly interacts with Wnt ligands. Structure-based virtual screening and cell-based assays were used to identify five small molecules that can inhibit canonical Wnt signaling and have low IC50 values in the micromolar range. NMR experiments confirmed that these compounds specifically bind to the Wnt binding site on the Frizzled8 cysteine-rich domain with submicromolar dissociation constants. Our study confirms the feasibility of targeting the Frizzled cysteine-rich domain as an effective way of regulating canonical Wnt signaling. These small molecules can be further optimized into more potent therapeutic agents for regulating abnormal Wnt signaling by targeting Frizzled. PMID:26504084

  8. Cysteine-rich protein 61 (CCN1) domain-specific stimulation of matrix metalloproteinase-1 expression through αVβ3 integrin in human skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Qin, Zhaoping; Fisher, Gary J; Quan, Taihao

    2013-04-26

    Human skin largely comprises collagenous extracellular matrix. The hallmark of skin aging is fragmentation of collagen fibrils. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are largely responsible for collagen degradation. MMP-1, principally derived from dermal fibroblasts, is the major protease capable of initiating degradation of native fibrillar collagens. Presently, we report that CCN1, a secreted and extracellular matrix-associated protein, is elevated in aged human skin dermal fibroblasts in vivo and stimulates MMP-1 expression through functional interaction with αVβ3 integrin in human dermal fibroblasts. CCN1 contains four conserved structural domains. Our results indicate that the three N-terminal domains (IGFBP, VWC, and TSP1), but not the C-terminal CT domain, are required for CCN1 to stimulate MMP-1 expression. This stimulation is dependent on interaction between the active structural domains and αVβ3 integrin. The interaction of VWC domain with integrin αVβ3 is necessary and requires functional cooperation with adjacent IGFBP and TSP1 domains to stimulate MMP-1 expression. Finally, induction of MMP-1 expression in dermal fibroblasts by CCN1 N-terminal domains resulted in fragmentation of type I collagen fibrils in a three-dimensional collagen lattice model. These data suggest that domain-specific interactions of CCN1 with αVβ3 integrin contribute to human skin aging by stimulating MMP-1-mediated collagen fibril fragmentation.

  9. Structural divergence of cysteine-rich secretory proteins in snake venoms.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Yukiko; Yamazaki, Yasuo; Hyodo, Fumiko; Sugiyama, Yusuke; Nozaki, Masatoshi; Morita, Takashi

    2009-03-01

    Cysteine-rich secretory proteins (CRISPs) are expressed in spermatocytes and granules of neutrophils in mammals, and are associated with sperm maturation and host defense. Related proteins have recently been recovered in snake venoms, and some of the snake venom-derived CRISPs exhibit ion channel blocking activity. Here we isolated and identified two novel CRISPs (kaouthin-1 and kaouthin-2) from the venom of Naja kaouthia (Elapidae), and cloned the encoding cDNAs. Kaouthin-1 and kaouthin-2 were classified into two broad sister groups of Elapidae, the Asian species and the marine/Australian species, respectively. Sequence comparisons reveal that the high-frequency variable regions among snake venom CRISPs define a continuous line on the molecular surface of the N-terminal pathogenesis-related protein-1 (PR-1) domain and the C-terminal cysteine-rich domain (CRD). Snake venom proteins generally display efficient molecular diversity around functionally key regions, suggesting that the PR-1 domain of CRISPs is important for the recognition of target molecules.

  10. The role of cysteine-rich secretory proteins in male fertility.

    PubMed

    Koppers, Adam J; Reddy, Thulasimala; O'Bryan, Moira K

    2011-01-01

    The cysteine-rich secretory proteins (CRISPs) are a subgroup of the CRISP, antigen 5 and Pr-1 (CAP) protein superfamily, and are found only in vertebrates. They show a strong expression bias to the mammalian male reproductive tract and the venom of poisonous reptiles. Within the male reproductive tract CRISPs have been implicated in many aspects of male germ cell biology spanning haploid germ cell development, epididymal maturation, capacitation, motility and the actual processes of fertilization. At a structural level, CRISPs are composed of two domains, a CAP domain, which has been implicated in cell-cell adhesion, and a CRISP domain, which has been shown to regulate several classes of ion channels across multiple species. Herein, we will review the current literature on the role of CRISPs in male fertility, and by inference to related non-mammalian protein, infer potential biochemical functions.

  11. The role of cysteine-rich secretory proteins in male fertility

    PubMed Central

    Koppers, Adam J; Reddy, Thulasimala; O'Bryan, Moira K

    2011-01-01

    The cysteine-rich secretory proteins (CRISPs) are a subgroup of the CRISP, antigen 5 and Pr-1 (CAP) protein superfamily, and are found only in vertebrates. They show a strong expression bias to the mammalian male reproductive tract and the venom of poisonous reptiles. Within the male reproductive tract CRISPs have been implicated in many aspects of male germ cell biology spanning haploid germ cell development, epididymal maturation, capacitation, motility and the actual processes of fertilization. At a structural level, CRISPs are composed of two domains, a CAP domain, which has been implicated in cell–cell adhesion, and a CRISP domain, which has been shown to regulate several classes of ion channels across multiple species. Herein, we will review the current literature on the role of CRISPs in male fertility, and by inference to related non-mammalian protein, infer potential biochemical functions. PMID:20972450

  12. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of ginkbilobin-2 from Ginkgo biloba seeds: a novel antifungal protein with homology to the extracellular domain of plant cysteine-rich receptor-like kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Miyakawa, Takuya; Sawano, Yoriko; Miyazono, Ken-ichi; Hatano, Ken-ichi; Tanokura, Masaru

    2007-09-01

    Purification and crystallization of ginkbilobin-2 and its selenomethionine derivative allowed the collection of complete data to 2.38 Å resolution and multiwavelength anomalous diffraction data sets, respectively. The antifungal protein ginkbilobin-2 (Gnk2) from Ginkgo biloba seeds does not show homology to other pathogenesis-related proteins, but does show homology to the extracellular domain of plant cysteine-rich receptor-like kinases. Native Gnk2 purified from ginkgo nuts and the selenomethionine derivative of recombinant Gnk2 (SeMet-rGnk2) were crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method using different precipitants. X-ray diffraction data were collected from Gnk2 at 2.38 Å resolution and from SeMet-rGnk2 at 2.79 Å resolution using a synchrotron-radiation source. The crystals of both proteins belonged to the primitive cubic space group P2{sub 1}3, with unit-cell parameters a = b = c = 143.2 Å.

  13. The disulfide bond pattern of catrocollastatin C, a disintegrin-like/cysteine-rich protein isolated from Crotalus atrox venom.

    PubMed Central

    Calvete, J. J.; Moreno-Murciano, M. P.; Sanz, L.; Jürgens, M.; Schrader, M.; Raida, M.; Benjamin, D. C.; Fox, J. W.

    2000-01-01

    The disulfide bond pattern of catrocollastatin-C was determined by N-terminal sequencing and mass spectrometry. The N-terminal disintegrin-like domain is a compact structure including eight disulfide bonds, seven of them in the same pattern as the disintegrin bitistatin. The protein has two extra cysteine residues (XIII and XVI) that form an additional disulfide bond that is characteristically found in the disintegrin-like domains of cellular metalloproteinases (ADAMs) and PIII snake venom Zn-metalloproteinases (SVMPs). The C-terminal cysteine-rich domain of catrocollastatin-C contains five disulfide bonds between nearest-neighbor cysteines and a long range disulfide bridge between CysV and CysX. These results provide structural evidence for a redefinition of the disintegrin-like and cysteine-rich domain boundaries. An evolutionary pathway for ADAMs, PIII, and PII SVMPs based on disulfide bond engineering is also proposed. PMID:10933502

  14. Identification and characterization of a cell surface scavenger receptor cysteine-rich protein of Sciaenops ocellatus: bacterial interaction and its dependence on the conserved structural features of the SRCR domain.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Reng; Sun, Bo-Guang; Li, Jun; Liu, Xiao; Sun, Li

    2013-03-01

    The scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) proteins are secreted or membrane-bound receptors with one or multiple SRCR domains. Members of the SRCR superfamily are known to have diverse functions that include pathogen recognition and immunoregulation. In teleost, although protein sequences with SRCR structure have been identified in some species, very little functional investigation has been carried out. In this study, we identified and characterized a teleost SRCR protein from red drum Sciaenops ocellatus. The protein was named S. ocellatus SRCR1 (SoSRCRP1). SoSRCRP1 is 410-residue in length and was predicted to be a transmembrane protein, with the extracellular region containing a collagen triple helix repeat and a SRCR domain. The SRCR domain has six conserved cysteines, of which, C338 and C399, C351 and C409, and C379 and C389 were predicted to form three disulfide bonds. SoSRCRP1 expression was detected mainly in immune-relevant tissues and upregulated by bacterial and viral infection. In head kidney leukocytes, bacterial infection stimulated the expression of SoSRCRP1, and the expressed SoSRCRP1 was localized on cell surface. Recombinant SoSRCRP1 (rSoSRCRP1) corresponding to the SRCR domain was purified from Escherichia coli and found to be able to bind Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. To examine the structure-function relationship of SoSRCRP1, the mutant proteins SoSRCRP1M1, SoSRCRP1M2, SoSRCRP1M3, and SoSRCRP1M4 were created, which bear C351S and C409S, C338S, C379S, and R325A mutations respectively. Compared to rSoSRCRP1, all mutants were significantly reduced in the ability of bacterial interaction, with the highest reduction observed with SoSRCRP1M4. Taken together, these results indicate that SoSRCRP1 is a cell surface-localized SRCR protein that binds bacterial ligands in a manner that depends on the conserved structural features of the SRCR domain.

  15. NOA36/ZNF330 is a conserved cystein-rich protein with proapoptotic activity in human cells.

    PubMed

    de Melo, Ivan S; Iglesias, Concepción; Benítez-Rondán, Alicia; Medina, Francisco; Martínez-Barberá, Juan Pedro; Bolívar, Jorge

    2009-12-01

    Translocations of regulator proteins from or to the mitochondria are key events in apoptosis regulation. NOA36/ZNF330 is a highly evolutionary conserved protein with a characteristic cystein-rich domain. In this work we address its mitochondrial localization and we demonstrate that a blockage of endogenous NOA36/ZNF330 expression by small-interfering RNA (siRNA) reduced apoptotic response to etoposide (ETO), camptothecin (CPT) and staurosporine (STS) but not to CH11 anti-Fas antibody or tumour-necrosis-factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) in HeLa cells. In contrast, when ectopically expressed in the cytoplasm, NOA36/ZNF330 induces apoptotic cell death. We also found that the domain responsible for this proapoptotic activity is located its cystein-rich region. We propose that NOA36/ZNF330 is translocated from the mitochondria to the cytoplasm when apoptosis is induced and that it contributes to cytochrome c release.

  16. Minicollagen cysteine-rich domains encode distinct modes of polymerization to form stable nematocyst capsules

    PubMed Central

    Tursch, Anja; Mercadante, Davide; Tennigkeit, Jutta; Gräter, Frauke; Özbek, Suat

    2016-01-01

    The stinging capsules of cnidarians, nematocysts, function as harpoon-like organelles with unusual biomechanical properties. The nanosecond discharge of the nematocyst requires a dense protein network of the capsule structure withstanding an internal pressure of up to 150 bar. Main components of the capsule are short collagens, so-called minicollagens, that form extended polymers by disulfide reshuffling of their cysteine-rich domains (CRDs). Although CRDs have identical cysteine patterns, they exhibit different structures and disulfide connectivity at minicollagen N and C-termini. We show that the structurally divergent CRDs have different cross-linking potentials in vitro and in vivo. While the C-CRD can participate in several simultaneous intermolecular disulfides and functions as a cystine knot after minicollagen synthesis, the N-CRD is monovalent. Our combined experimental and computational analyses reveal the cysteines in the C-CRD fold to exhibit a higher structural propensity for disulfide bonding and a faster kinetics of polymerization. During nematocyst maturation, the highly reactive C-CRD is instrumental in efficient cross-linking of minicollagens to form pressure resistant capsules. The higher ratio of C-CRD folding types evidenced in the medusozoan lineage might have fostered the evolution of novel, predatory nematocyst types in cnidarians with a free-swimming medusa stage. PMID:27166560

  17. Amplified pathogenic actions of angiotensin II in cysteine-rich LIM-only protein 4-negative mouse hearts.

    PubMed

    Straubinger, Julia; Boldt, Karsten; Kuret, Anna; Deng, Lisa; Krattenmacher, Diana; Bork, Nadja; Desch, Matthias; Feil, Robert; Feil, Susanne; Nemer, Mona; Ueffing, Marius; Ruth, Peter; Just, Steffen; Lukowski, Robert

    2017-04-01

    LIM domain proteins have been identified as essential modulators of cardiac biology and pathology; however, it is unclear which role the cysteine-rich LIM-only protein (CRP)4 plays in these processes. In studying CRP4 mutant mice, we found that their hearts developed normally, but lack of CRP4 exaggerated multiple parameters of the cardiac stress response to the neurohormone angiotensin II (Ang II). Aiming to dissect the molecular details, we found a link between CRP4 and the cardioprotective cGMP pathway, as well as a multiprotein complex comprising well-known hypertrophy-associated factors. Significant enrichment of the cysteine-rich intestinal protein (CRIP)1 in murine hearts lacking CRP4, as well as severe cardiac defects and premature death of CRIP1 and CRP4 morphant zebrafish embryos, further support the notion that depleting CRP4 is incompatible with a proper cardiac development and function. Together, amplified Ang II signaling identified CRP4 as a novel antiremodeling factor regulated, at least to some extent, by cardiac cGMP.-Straubinger, J., Boldt, K., Kuret, A., Deng, L., Krattenmacher, D., Bork, N., Desch, M., Feil, R., Feil, S., Nemer, M., Ueffing, M., Ruth, P., Just, S., Lukowski, R. Amplified pathogenic actions of angiotensin II in cysteine-rich LIM-only protein 4 negative mouse hearts.

  18. Structure and function of snake venom cysteine-rich secretory proteins.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Yasuo; Morita, Takashi

    2004-09-01

    Cysteine-rich secretory proteins (CRISPs) are primarily found in the epididymis of mammals and are expressed in diverse organisms. However, the functions of most CRISPs remain unknown. Recent studies reveal that CRISPs are widely distributed in snake venoms and that they inhibit smooth muscle contraction and cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channels. In this review, we discuss recent findings on several snake venom-derived CRISPs.

  19. The Arabidopsis cysteine-rich protein GASA4 promotes GA responses and exhibits redox activity in bacteria and in planta.

    PubMed

    Rubinovich, Lior; Weiss, David

    2010-12-01

    Although the gibberellin (GA) signaling pathway has been elucidated, very little is known about the steps linking first transcriptional activation to physiological responses. Among the few identified GA-induced genes are the plant-specific GAST1-like genes, which encode small proteins with a conserved cysteine-rich domain. The role of these proteins in plant development and GA responses is not yet clear. The Arabidopsis GAST1-like gene family consists of 14 members, GASA1-14. Here we show that over-expression of the GA-induced GASA4 gene in Arabidopsis promoted GA responses such as flowering and seed germination. Suppression of several GASA genes using synthetic microRNA (miR(GASA) ) also promoted seed germination. This was probably caused by suppression of GASA5, which acts as a repressor of GA responses. Previously, we proposed that GAST1-like proteins are involved in redox reactions via their cysteine-rich domain. The results of this study support this hypothesis, as over-expression of GASA4 suppressed ROS accumulation and the transgenic seeds were partially resistant to the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP). Moreover, Escherichia coli expressing intact GASA4 or a truncated version containing only the cysteine-rich domain were resistant to SNP. Mutated GASA4, in which conserved cysteines were replaced by alanines, lost its redox activity and the ability to promote GA responses, suggesting that the two functions are linked. We propose that GA induces some GAST1-like genes and suppresses others to regulate its own responses. We also suggest that the encoded proteins regulate the redox status of specific components to promote or suppress these responses.

  20. The role of the ADAMTS13 cysteine-rich domain in VWF binding and proteolysis.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Rens; Lane, David A; Crawley, James T B

    2015-03-19

    ADAMTS13 proteolytically regulates the platelet-tethering function of von Willebrand factor (VWF). ADAMTS13 function is dependent upon multiple exosites that specifically bind the unraveled VWF A2 domain and enable proteolysis. We carried out a comprehensive functional analysis of the ADAMTS13 cysteine-rich (Cys-rich) domain using engineered glycans, sequence swaps, and single point mutations in this domain. Mutagenesis of Cys-rich domain-charged residues had no major effect on ADAMTS13 function, and 5 out of 6 engineered glycans on the Cys-rich domain also had no effect on ADAMTS13 function. However, a glycan attached at position 476 appreciably reduced both VWF binding and proteolysis. Substitution of Cys-rich sequences for the corresponding regions in ADAMTS1 identified a hydrophobic pocket involving residues Gly471-Val474 as being of critical importance for both VWF binding and proteolysis. Substitution of hydrophobic VWF A2 domain residues to serine in a region (residues 1642-1659) previously postulated to interact with the Cys-rich domain revealed the functional importance of VWF residues Ile1642, Trp1644, Ile1649, Leu1650, and Ile1651. Furthermore, the functional deficit of the ADAMTS13 Cys-rich Gly471-Val474 variant was dependent on these same hydrophobic VWF residues, suggesting that these regions form complementary binding sites that directly interact to enhance the efficiency of the proteolytic reaction.

  1. Sclerostin binds and regulates the activity of cysteine-rich protein 61

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, Theodore A.; Bhattacharya, Resham; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Kumar, Rajiv

    2010-01-29

    Sclerostin, a secreted glycoprotein, regulates osteoblast function. Using yeast two-hybrid and direct protein interaction analyses, we demonstrate that sclerostin binds the Wnt-modulating and Wnt-modulated, extracellular matrix protein, cysteine-rich protein 61 (Cyr61, CCN1), which regulates mesenchymal stem cell proliferation and differentiation, osteoblast and osteoclast function, and angiogenesis. Sclerostin was shown to inhibit Cyr61-mediated fibroblast attachment, and Cyr61 together with sclerostin increases vascular endothelial cell migration and increases osteoblast cell division. The data show that sclerostin binds to and influences the activity of Cyr61.

  2. Scavenger receptor cysteine-rich domains 9 and 11 of WC1 are receptors for the WC1 counter receptor.

    PubMed

    Ahn, J S; Konno, A; Gebe, J A; Aruffo, A; Hamilton, M J; Park, Y H; Davis, W C

    2002-08-01

    Workshop cluster 1 (WC1) is a member of the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) superfamily that includes CD5, CD6, CD163, and M160. Bovine WC1 consists of 11 SRCR domains, a unique domain 1, and two homologous 5 SRCR domain cassettes, WC1 domains 2-6 and 7-11. The porcine orthologue of WC1 contains five SRCR domains with a different domain arrangement. Although the function of WC1 is unknown, WC1 is proposed to be an accessory or homing molecule. Thus, identification of cells that express the counter receptor for WC1 (WC1-CR) is critical to understanding the function of WC1. For this reason, we constructed WC1-human immunoglobulin G1 fusion proteins to identify the binding domain of WC1 and cells that express the WC1-CR. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed WC1 domains 9 and 11 bind cells with macrophage and dendritic cell morphology and cells in ellipsoids in the spleen. These results and the finding of conserved signaling motifs in the cytoplasmic tail suggest WC1 may be an accessory molecule.

  3. A novel cysteine-rich sequence-specific DNA-binding protein interacts with the conserved X-box motif of the human major histocompatibility complex class II genes via a repeated Cys-His domain and functions as a transcriptional repressor

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    The class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules function in the presentation of processed peptides to helper T cells. As most mammalian cells can endocytose and process foreign antigen, the critical determinant of an antigen-presenting cell is its ability to express class II MHC molecules. Expression of these molecules is usually restricted to cells of the immune system and dysregulated expression is hypothesized to contribute to the pathogenesis of a severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome and certain autoimmune diseases. Human complementary DNA clones encoding a newly identified, cysteine-rich transcription factor, NF-X1, which binds to the conserved X-box motif of class II MHC genes, were obtained, and the primary amino acid sequence deduced. The major open reading frame encodes a polypeptide of 1,104 amino acids with a symmetrical organization. A central cysteine-rich portion encodes the DNA-binding domain, and is subdivided into seven repeated motifs. This motif is similar to but distinct from the LIM domain and the RING finger family, and is reminiscent of known metal-binding regions. The unique arrangement of cysteines indicates that the consensus sequence CX3CXL-XCGX1- 5HXCX3CHXGXC represents a novel cysteine-rich motif. Two lines of evidence indicate that the polypeptide encodes a potent and biologically relevant repressor of HLA-DRA transcription: (a) overexpression of NF-X1 from a retroviral construct strongly decreases transcription from the HLA-DRA promoter; and (b) the NF-X1 transcript is markedly induced late after induction with interferon gamma (IFN- gamma), coinciding with postinduction attenuation of HLA-DRA transcription. The NF-X1 protein may therefore play an important role in regulating the duration of an inflammatory response by limiting the period in which class II MHC molecules are induced by IFN-gamma. PMID:7964459

  4. Purification and cloning of cysteine-rich proteins from Trimeresurus jerdonii and Naja atra venoms.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yang; Lu, Qiumin; Zhou, Xingding; Zhu, Shaowen; Li, Rui; Wang, Wanyu; Xiong, Yuliang

    2003-10-01

    Three 26 kDa proteins, named as TJ-CRVP, NA-CRVP1 and NA-CRVP2, were isolated from the venoms of Trimeresurus jerdonii and Naja atra, respectively. The N-terminal sequences of TJ-CRVP and NA-CRVPs were determined. These components were devoid of the enzymatic activities tested, such as phospholipase A(2), arginine esterase, proteolysis, L-amino acid oxidase, 5'nucleotidase, acetylcholinesterase. Furthermore, these three components did not have the following biological activities: coagulant and anticoagulant activities, lethal activity, myotoxicity, hemorrhagic activity, platelet aggregation and platelet aggregation-inhibiting activities. These proteins are named as cysteine-rich venom protein (CRVP) because their sequences showed high level of similarity with mammalian cysteine-rich secretory protein (CRISP) family. Recently, some CRISP-like proteins were also isolated from several different snake venoms, including Agkistrodon blomhoffi, Trimeresurus flavoviridis, Lanticauda semifascita and king cobra. We presumed that CRVP might be a common component in snake venoms. Of particular interest, phylogenetic analysis and sequence alignment showed that NA-CRVP1 and ophanin, both from elapid snakes, share higher similarity with CRVPs from Viperidae snakes.

  5. Cysteine-rich secretory proteins are not exclusively expressed in the male reproductive tract.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Thulasimala; Gibbs, Gerard M; Merriner, D Jo; Kerr, Jeffrey B; O'Bryan, Moira K

    2008-11-01

    The Cysteine-RIch Secretory Proteins (CRISPs) are abundantly produced in the male reproductive tract of mammals and within the venom of reptiles and have been shown to regulate ion channel activity. CRISPs, along with the Antigen-5 proteins and the Pathogenesis related-1 (Pr-1) proteins, form the CAP superfamily of proteins. Analyses of EST expression databases are increasingly suggesting that mammalian CRISPs are expressed more widely than in the reproductive tract. We, therefore, conducted a reverse transcription PCR expression profile and immunohistochemical analyses of 16 mouse tissues to define the sites of production of each of the four murine CRISPs. These data showed that each of the CRISPs have distinct and sometimes overlapping expression profiles, typically associated with the male and female reproductive tract, the secretory epithelia of exocrine glands, and immune tissues including the spleen and thymus. These investigations raise the potential for a role for CRISPs in general mammalian physiology.

  6. Cobra venom contains a pool of cysteine-rich secretory proteins.

    PubMed

    Osipov, Alexey V; Levashov, Mikhail Yu; Tsetlin, Victor I; Utkin, Yuri N

    2005-03-04

    A large family of cysteine-rich secretory proteins (CRISPs) includes proteins of different origin, the function of the majority of CRISPs being unknown. For CRISPs isolated from snake venom, two types of activities were found: two proteins blocked cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channels, several others blocked potassium-stimulated smooth muscle contraction. Thus, snake CRISPs represent potentially valuable tools for studies of ion channels, which makes promising a search for new CRISPs. Here we report on the isolation of several novel CRISPs from the venoms of Asian cobra Naja kaouthia and African cobra Naja haje using a combination of different types of liquid chromatography. Four CRISP variants were identified in N. kaouthia venom and three proteins, one of them acidic, were found in N. haje venom. Acidic CRISP was found in a reptilian venom for the first time. Our data suggest that each cobra venom contains a pool of different CRISPs.

  7. Cysteine-Rich Atrial Secretory Protein from the Snail Achatina achatina: Purification and Structural Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Shabelnikov, Sergey; Kiselev, Artem

    2015-01-01

    Despite extensive studies of cardiac bioactive peptides and their functions in molluscs, soluble proteins expressed in the heart and secreted into the circulation have not yet been reported. In this study, we describe an 18.1-kDa, cysteine-rich atrial secretory protein (CRASP) isolated from the terrestrial snail Achatina achatina that has no detectable sequence similarity to any known protein or nucleotide sequence. CRASP is an acidic, 158-residue, N-glycosylated protein composed of eight alpha-helical segments stabilized with five disulphide bonds. A combination of fold recognition algorithms and ab initio folding predicted that CRASP adopts an all-alpha, right-handed superhelical fold. CRASP is most strongly expressed in the atrium in secretory atrial granular cells, and substantial amounts of CRASP are released from the heart upon nerve stimulation. CRASP is detected in the haemolymph of intact animals at nanomolar concentrations. CRASP is the first secretory protein expressed in molluscan atrium to be reported. We propose that CRASP is an example of a taxonomically restricted gene that might be responsible for adaptations specific for terrestrial pulmonates. PMID:26444993

  8. Purification and characterization of a cysteine-rich secretory protein from Philodryas patagoniensis snake venom.

    PubMed

    Peichoto, María E; Mackessy, Stephen P; Teibler, Pamela; Tavares, Flávio L; Burckhardt, Paula L; Breno, María C; Acosta, Ofelia; Santoro, Marcelo L

    2009-07-01

    Cysteine-rich secretory proteins (CRiSPs) are widespread in reptile venoms, but most have functions that remain unknown. In the present study we describe the purification and characterization of a CRiSP (patagonin) from the venom of the rear-fanged snake Philodryas patagoniensis, and demonstrate its biological activity. Patagonin is a single-chain protein, exhibiting a molecular mass of 24,858.6 Da, whose NH(2)-terminal and MS/MS-derived sequences are nearly identical to other snake venom CRiSPs. The purified protein hydrolyzed neither azocasein nor fibrinogen, and it could induce no edema, hemorrhage or inhibition of platelet adhesion and aggregation. In addition, patagonin did not inhibit contractions of rat aortic smooth muscle induced by high K(+). However, it caused muscular damage to murine gastrocnemius muscle, an action that has not been previously described for any snake venom CRiSPs. Thus, patagonin will be important for studies of the structure-function and evolutionary relationships of this family of proteins that are widely distributed among snake venoms.

  9. Expression of transcripts for cysteine-rich secretory proteins (CRISPs) in the murine lacrimal gland.

    PubMed

    Haendler, B; Toda, I; Sullivan, D A; Schleuning, W D

    1999-03-01

    Cysteine-rich secretory proteins (CRISPs) represent a family of evolutionarily conserved proteins which may play a role in the innate immune system and are transcriptionally regulated by androgens in several tissues. Transcripts for all three members of the CRISP family have now been identified in the murine lacrimal gland. RT-PCR using primers able to discriminate between the related CRISP forms allowed the amplification of fragments with the expected length. DNA sequencing revealed a complete identity with the hitherto characterized epididymal CRISP-1, testicular CRISP-2, and salivary gland CRISP-3. An analysis of several mouse strains indicated that all expressed the three CRISP forms, but in differing amounts. RT-PCR analysis of RNA isolated from acinar cells of lacrimal glands revealed that they expressed CRISP-1 and CRISP-2. Semiquantitative and quantitative analyses furthermore showed higher CRISP-1 and CRISP-3 mRNA levels in the lacrimal glands of male BALB/c and NOD mice when compared to females. Testosterone treatment of C3H/HeJ female mice was followed by an upregulation of the steady-state CRISP-1 but not CRISP-2 transcript levels. A comparable stimulation was observed for the mRNAs coding for parotid secretory protein (PSP), a factor previously shown to exhibit sexual dimorphism in the murine lacrimal gland. The expression of CRISP transcripts in the lacrimal gland is consistent with a function in the innate immune system.

  10. Redox modulation of the expression of bacterial genes encoding cysteine-rich proteins in plant protoplasts.

    PubMed Central

    Piñeiro, M; García-Olmedo, F; Diaz, I

    1994-01-01

    Activity of neomycin phosphotransferase II (NPTII; gene, neo; five cysteines) in tobacco protoplasts transfected with fusions of the octopine TR2' or cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter and the neo gene, with or without a signal peptide, increased up to 8-fold in response to externally added dithiothreitol at concentrations that did not affect protoplast viability (up to 2.5 mM). Activity of phosphinothricin acetyltransferase (PAT; gene, bar; one cysteine) expressed under control of the TR1' or 35S promoter was not similarly affected, thus excluding a redox modulation of transcription as the mechanism of NPTII activation by dithiothreitol. Western-blot analyses showed an increase in the amount of protein in response to dithiothreitol, whereas neither the steady-state level of NPTII mRNA nor the specific activity of the purified enzyme was affected. The same type of modulation was observed for transiently expressed beta-glucuronidase (nine cysteines) produced from a fusion with the 35S promoter, with or without a signal peptide. Limitation of cotranslational and/or early posttranslational steps by excessively oxidizing sulfhydryl/disulfide redox potentials is postulated to explain the low net accumulation of cysteine-rich proteins of bacterial origin (i.e., NPTII and beta-glucuronidase) when expressed in plant protoplasts, and the marked increase in such proteins in response to externally added dithiothreitol. Images PMID:8171004

  11. Dengue Virus Infection of Aedes aegypti Requires a Putative Cysteine Rich Venom Protein.

    PubMed

    Londono-Renteria, Berlin; Troupin, Andrea; Conway, Michael J; Vesely, Diana; Ledizet, Michael; Roundy, Christopher M; Cloherty, Erin; Jameson, Samuel; Vanlandingham, Dana; Higgs, Stephen; Fikrig, Erol; Colpitts, Tonya M

    2015-10-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that causes serious human disease and mortality worldwide. There is no specific antiviral therapy or vaccine for DENV infection. Alterations in gene expression during DENV infection of the mosquito and the impact of these changes on virus infection are important events to investigate in hopes of creating new treatments and vaccines. We previously identified 203 genes that were ≥5-fold differentially upregulated during flavivirus infection of the mosquito. Here, we examined the impact of silencing 100 of the most highly upregulated gene targets on DENV infection in its mosquito vector. We identified 20 genes that reduced DENV infection by at least 60% when silenced. We focused on one gene, a putative cysteine rich venom protein (SeqID AAEL000379; CRVP379), whose silencing significantly reduced DENV infection in Aedes aegypti cells. Here, we examine the requirement for CRVP379 during DENV infection of the mosquito and investigate the mechanisms surrounding this phenomenon. We also show that blocking CRVP379 protein with either RNAi or specific antisera inhibits DENV infection in Aedes aegypti. This work identifies a novel mosquito gene target for controlling DENV infection in mosquitoes that may also be used to develop broad preventative and therapeutic measures for multiple flaviviruses.

  12. Increased Susceptibility of  Thymocytes to Apoptosis in Mice Lacking AIM, a Novel Murine Macrophage-derived Soluble Factor Belonging to the Scavenger Receptor Cysteine-rich Domain Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Toru; Hirokami, Yumiko; Matsuhashi, Nobuyuki; Takatsuka, Hisakazu; Naito, Makoto

    1999-01-01

    Apoptosis of cells must be regulated both positively and negatively in response to a variety of stimuli in the body. Various environmental stresses are known to initiate apoptosis via differential signal transduction cascades. However, induction of signals that may inhibit apoptosis is poorly understood, although a number of intracellular molecules that mediate inhibition of apoptosis have been identified. Here we present a novel murine macrophage-specific 54-kD secreted protein which inhibits apoptosis (termed AIM, for apoptosis inhibitor expressed by macrophages). AIM belongs to the macrophage scavenger receptor cysteine-rich domain superfamily (SRCR-SF), members of which share a highly homologous conserved cysteine-rich domain. In AIM-deficient mice, the thymocyte numbers were diminished to half those in wild-type mice, and CD4/CD8 double-positive (DP) thymocytes were strikingly more susceptible to apoptosis induced by both dexamethasone and irradiation in vivo. Recombinant AIM protein significantly inhibited cell death of DP thymocytes in response to a variety of stimuli in vitro. These results indicate that in the thymus, AIM functions in trans to induce resistance to apoptosis within DP cells, and thus supports the viability of DP thymocytes before thymic selection. PMID:9892623

  13. Characterization of a family of cysteine rich proteins and development of a MaSp1 derived miniature fibroin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Tyler Casey

    Spider silk displays a unique balance of high tensile strength and extensibility, making it one of the toughest materials on the planet. Dragline silk, also known as the lifeline of the spider, represents one of the best studied fiber types and many labs are attempting to produce synthetic dragline silk fibers for commercial applications. In these studies, we develop a minifibroin for expression studies in bacteria. Using recombinant DNA methodology and protein expression studies, we develop a natural minifibroin that contains the highly conserved N- and C-terminal domains, along with several internal block repeats of MaSp1. We also characterize a family of small cysteine-rich proteins (CRPs) and demonstrate that these factors are present within the spinning dope of the major ampullate gland using MS analysis. Biochemical studies and characterization of one of the family members, CRP1, demonstrate that this factor can self-polymerize into higher molecular weight complexes under oxidizing conditions, but can be converted into a monomeric species under reducing conditions. Self-polymerization of CRP1 is also shown to be independent of pH and salt concentration, two important chemical cues that help fibroin aggregation. Overall, our data demonstrate that the polymerization state of CRP1 is dependent upon redox state, suggesting that the redox environment during fiber extrusion may help regulate the oligomerization of CRP molecules during dragline silk production.

  14. Blocking effect and crystal structure of natrin toxin, a cysteine-rich secretory protein from Naja atra venom that targets the BKCa channel.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Shen, Bing; Guo, Min; Lou, Xiaohua; Duan, Yuanyuan; Cheng, Xin Ping; Teng, Maikun; Niu, Liwen; Liu, Qun; Huang, Qingqiu; Hao, Quan

    2005-08-02

    Cysteine-rich secretory proteins (CRISPs) are widespread in snake venoms. Some members of these CRISPs recently have been found to block L-type Ca(2+) channels or cyclic nucleotide-gated ion (CNG) channels. Here, natrin purified from Naja atra venom, a member of the CRISP family, can induce a further contractile response in the endothelium-denuded thoracic aorta of mouse which has been contracted by a high-K(+) solution. Further experiments show it can block the high-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK(Ca)) channel in a concentration-dependent manner with an IC(50) of 34.4 nM and a Hill coefficient of 1.02, which suggests that only a single natrin molecule is required to bind an ion channel to block BK(Ca) current. The crystal structure of natrin displaying two domains in tandem shows its cysteine-rich domain (CRD) has relatively independent flexibility, especially for the C-terminal long loop (loop I) of CRD to participate in the interface of two domains. On the basis of previous studies of CNG channel and L-Ca(2+) channel blockers, and the sequence and structural comparison of natrin and stecrisp, the deviation of the vital loop I of CRD is suggested to contribute to different effects of some CRISPs in protein-protein interaction.

  15. Putative DHHC-Cysteine-Rich Domain S-Acyltransferase in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Meihong; Liu, Shiyang; Qi, Baoxiu; Li, Xinzheng

    2013-01-01

    Protein S-acyltransferases (PATs) containing Asp-His-His-Cys within a Cys-rich domain (DHHC-CRD) are polytopic transmembrane proteins that are found in eukaryotic cells and mediate the S-acylation of target proteins. S-acylation is an important secondary and reversible modification that regulates the membrane association, trafficking and function of target proteins. However, little is known about the characteristics of PATs in plants. Here, we identified 804 PATs from 31 species with complete genomes. The analysis of the phylogenetic relationships suggested that all of the PATs fell into 8 groups. In addition, we analysed the phylogeny, genomic organization, chromosome localisation and expression pattern of PATs in Arabidopsis, Oryza sative, Zea mays and Glycine max. The microarray data revealed that PATs genes were expressed in different tissues and during different life stages. The preferential expression of the ZmPATs in specific tissues and the response of Zea mays to treatments with phytohormones and abiotic stress demonstrated that the PATs play roles in plant growth and development as well as in stress responses. Our data provide a useful reference for the identification and functional analysis of the members of this protein family. PMID:24155879

  16. HmCRIP, a cysteine-rich intestinal protein, is expressed by an identified regenerating nerve cell.

    PubMed

    Emes, R D; Wang, W-Z; Lanary, K; Blackshaw, S E

    2003-01-02

    A Hirudo medicinalis cDNA isolated from regenerating CNS tissue at 24 h post-axotomy was identified as a leech homologue of the mammalian cysteine-rich intestinal proteins (CRIPs) and named HmCRIP. HmCRIP is up-regulated within 6 h of axotomy, peaking at 24 h. This is the first demonstration of a CRIP homologue in regenerating CNS and in a serotonergic neurone. In rodents CRIP is an important factor in the regulation of the inflammatory immune response through control of Th1/Th2 differentiation. The role of HmCRIP in the regeneration competent environment of the annelid central nervous system is discussed.

  17. S cysteine-rich (SCR) binding domain analysis of the Brassica self-incompatibility S-locus receptor kinase.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Benjamin P; Doughty, James

    2007-01-01

    Brassica self-incompatibility, a highly discriminating outbreeding mechanism, has become a paradigm for the study of plant cell-cell communications. When self-pollen lands on a stigma, the male ligand S cysteine-rich (SCR), which is present in the pollen coat, is transmitted to the female receptor, S-locus receptor kinase (SRK). SRK is a membrane-spanning serine/threonine receptor kinase present in the stigmatic papillar cell membrane. Haplotype-specific binding of SCR to SRK brings about pollen rejection. The extracellular receptor domain of SRK (eSRK) is responsible for binding SCR. Based on sequence homology, eSRK can be divided into three subdomains: B lectin-like, hypervariable, and PAN. Biochemical analysis of these subdomains showed that the hypervariable subdomain is responsible for most of the SCR binding capacity of eSRK, whereas the B lectin-like and PAN domains have little, if any, affinity for SCR. Fine mapping of the SCR binding region of SRK using a peptide array revealed a region of the hypervariable subdomain that plays a key role in binding the SCR molecule. We show that residues within the hypervariable subdomain define SRK binding and are likely to be involved in defining haplotype specificity.

  18. Genome-wide analysis of small secreted cysteine-rich proteins identifies candidate effector proteins potentially involved in Fusarium graminearum-wheat interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pathogen-derived, small secreted cysteine-rich proteins (SSCPs) are known to be a common source of fungal effectors that trigger resistance or susceptibility in specific host plants. This group of proteins has not been well studied in Fusarium graminearum, the primary cause of Fusarium head blight ...

  19. Comparative expression analysis of cysteine-rich intestinal protein family members crip1, 2 and 3 during Xenopus laevis embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hempel, Annemarie; Kühl, Susanne J

    2014-01-01

    Members of the cysteine-rich intestinal protein (Crip) family belong to the group 2 LIM proteins. Crip proteins are widely expressed in adult mammals but their expression profile and function during embryonic development are still mostly unknown. In this study, we have described for the first time the spatio-temporal expression pattern of the three family members crip1, crip2 and crip3 during Xenopus laevis embryogenesis by RT-PCR and whole mount in situ hybridization approaches. We observed that all three genes are expressed in the pronephros, branchial arches and the eye. Furthermore, crip1 transcripts could be visualized in the developing cranial ganglia and neural tube. In contrast, crip2 could be detected in the cardiovascular system, the brain and the neural tube while crip3 was expressed in the cranial ganglions and the heart. Based on these findings, we suggest that each crip family member may play an important role during embryonic development.

  20. Developmental expression, intracellular localization, and selenium content of the cysteine-rich protein associated with the mitochondrial capsules of mouse sperm.

    PubMed

    Cataldo, L; Baig, K; Oko, R; Mastrangelo, M A; Kleene, K C

    1996-11-01

    The outer membranes of mitochondria of mammalian sperm are encased in a keratinous structure known as the mitochondrial capsule. The experiments in the present study were designed to resolve a controversy surrounding the intracellular localization, developmental expression, and selenium-content of a cysteine-rich 17-20 kD protein that has been reported to constitute the major structural protein in the mitochondrial capsule of mammals. An antibody to a synthetic oligopeptide based on the predicted sequence of mouse cysteinerich protein recognizes a 24 kD protein in epididymal sperm tails of mice. The 24 kD protein does not appear to be a selenoprotein because: (1) it is not labeled with 75Se-selenite in seminiferous tubule culture; (2) cleavage with cyanogen bromide and translation of T7 RNA polymerase transcripts in vitro indicate that the translation start site is located downstream of potential UGA selenocysteine codons in the mouse cysteine-rich mRNA; (3) the reading frame encoding the cysteine-rich protein in rat lacks inphase UGA selenocysteine codons. Light and electron microscopy immunocytochemistry detects the cysteine-rich protein first during step 11 of spermiogenesis in the mouse demonstrating that the cysteine-rich protein mRNA is under temporal translational control. Electron microscope immunocytochemistry reveals that the cysteine-rich protein is evenly distributed in the cytoplasm in spermatids in steps 11 through early step 16 in mouse, and that it is associated with the outer mitochondrial membranes of spermatids in late step 16 and epididymal spermatozoa.

  1. A Secreted Protein with Plant-Specific Cysteine-Rich Motif Functions as a Mannose-Binding Lectin That Exhibits Antifungal Activity1[W

    PubMed Central

    Miyakawa, Takuya; Hatano, Ken-ichi; Miyauchi, Yumiko; Suwa, You-ichi; Sawano, Yoriko; Tanokura, Masaru

    2014-01-01

    Plants have a variety of mechanisms for defending against plant pathogens and tolerating environmental stresses such as drought and high salinity. Ginkbilobin2 (Gnk2) is a seed storage protein in gymnosperm that possesses antifungal activity and a plant-specific cysteine-rich motif (domain of unknown function26 [DUF26]). The Gnk2-homologous sequence is also observed in an extracellular region of cysteine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases that function in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Here, we report the lectin-like molecular function of Gnk2 and the structural basis of its monosaccharide recognition. Nuclear magnetic resonance experiments showed that mannan was the only yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) cell wall polysaccharide that interacted with Gnk2. Gnk2 also interacted with mannose, a building block of mannan, with a specificity that was similar to those of mannose-binding legume lectins, by strictly recognizing the configuration of the hydroxy group at the C4 position of the monosaccharide. The crystal structure of Gnk2 in complex with mannose revealed that three residues (asparagine-11, arginine-93, and glutamate-104) recognized mannose by hydrogen bonds, which defined the carbohydrate-binding specificity. These interactions were directly related to the ability of Gnk2 to inhibit the growth of fungi, including the plant pathogenic Fusarium spp., which were disrupted by mutation of arginine-93 or the presence of yeast mannan in the assay system. In addition, Gnk2 did not inhibit the growth of a yeast mutant strain lacking the α1,2-linked mannose moiety. These results provide insights into the molecular basis of the DUF26 protein family. PMID:25139159

  2. VCRPs, small cysteine-rich proteins, might be involved in extracellular signaling in the green alga Volvox.

    PubMed

    Hallmann, Armin

    2008-02-01

    The sex-inducer of the spherical green alga Volvox carteri is one of the most potent biological effector molecules known: it is released into the medium by sexual males and triggers the switch to the sexual cleavage program in the reproductive cells of vegetatively grown males and females even at concentrations as low as 10(-16) M. In an adult Volvox alga, all cells are embedded in an extensive extracellular matrix (ECM), which constitutes >99% of the volume of the spheroid. There exist no cytoplasmic connections between the cells in an adult alga, so any signal transduction between different cells or from the organism's environment to a reproductive cell must involve the ECM. Recently, a small cysteine-rich extracellular protein, VCRP, was identified in Volvox and shown to be quickly synthesized by somatic cells in response to the sex-inducer. Due to its characteristics, VCRP was speculated to be an extracellular second messenger from somatic cells to reproductive cells. Here a related protein, VCRP2, is presented, exhibiting a 56% amino acid sequence identity with VCRP. Two possible scenarios for signal transduction from the sex-inducer to the reproductive cell are discussed.

  3. Cysteine-rich secretory proteins in snake venoms form high affinity complexes with human and porcine beta-microseminoproteins.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Karin; Kjellberg, Margareta; Fernlund, Per

    2009-08-01

    BETA-microseminoprotein (MSP), a 10 kDa protein in human seminal plasma, binds human cysteine-rich secretory protein-3 (CRISP-3) with high affinity. CRISP-3 is a member of the family of CRISPs, which are widespread among animals. In this work we show that human as well as porcine MSP binds catrin, latisemin, pseudecin, and triflin, which are CRISPs present in the venoms of the snakes Crotalus atrox, Laticauda semifasciata, Pseudechis porphyriacus, and Trimeresurus flavoviridis, respectively. The CRISPs were purified from the venoms by affinity chromatography on a human MSP column and their identities were settled by gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Their interactions with human and porcine MSPs were studied with size exclusion chromatography and surface plasmon resonance measurements. The binding affinities at 25 degrees C were between 10(-10)M and 10(-7)M for most of the interactions, with higher affinities for the interactions with porcine MSP compared to human MSP and with Elapidae CRISPs compared to Viperidae CRISPs. The high affinities of the bindings in spite of the differences in amino acid sequence between the MSPs as well as between the CRISPs indicate that the binding is tolerant to amino acid sequence variation and raise the question how universal this cross-species reaction between MSPs and CRISPs is.

  4. The involvement of cysteine-rich intestinal protein in early development and innate immunity of Asiatic hard clam, Meretrix meretrix.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongjian; Yang, Xue; Tang, Ting; Li, Juan; Liu, Baozhong; Liu, Fengsong; Xie, Song

    2014-10-01

    Cysteine-rich intestinal protein (CRIP), a Zn(2+)-binding protein, contains a single copy of the highly conserved double-zinc-finger structure known as the LIM (lin-11-isl-1-mec-3) motif. In this paper, a cDNA encoding MmCRIP was isolated from the Asiatic hard clam Meretrix meretrix. The full-length cDNA of MmCRIP consists of a 237-bp open reading frame that encodes a polypeptide of 78 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight (MW) of 8635.8 Da and theoretical isoelectric point (pI) of 9.01. Bioinformatics analysis showed that it belonged to a new member of the CRIP subfamily. Relationship analysis revealed that MmCRIP has high-levels of sequence similarity to many CRIPs reported in other animals, particularly in invertebrates. Real-time PCR analysis showed that the highest level of MmCRIP expression was in hemocyte tissue and at pediveligers stage. To investigate immune function, mature clams were challenged with Aeromonas hydrophila. During A. hydrophila infection, up-regulation of MmCRIP transcript in clam's hemocyte, gill and hepatopancreas was detected. DsRNAi (double-strand RNA interference) approach was employed to study the function of MmCRIP and the data showed that inactivation of the MmCRIP gene blocked larvae development and caused mass mortalities. The probable roles of MmCRIP in clam early development and innate immunity are presented for the first time.

  5. A Small Cysteine-Rich Protein from the Asian Soybean Rust Fungus, Phakopsora pachyrhizi, Suppresses Plant Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Mingsheng; Link, Tobias I.; Müller, Manuel; Hirschburger, Daniela; Pudake, Ramesh N.; Pedley, Kerry F.; Braun, Edward; Voegele, Ralf T.; Baum, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    The Asian soybean rust fungus, Phakopsora pachyrhizi, is an obligate biotrophic pathogen causing severe soybean disease epidemics. Molecular mechanisms by which P. pachyrhizi and other rust fungi interact with their host plants are poorly understood. The genomes of all rust fungi encode many small, secreted cysteine-rich proteins (SSCRP). While these proteins are thought to function within the host, their roles are completely unknown. Here, we present the characterization of P. pachyrhizi effector candidate 23 (PpEC23), a SSCRP that we show to suppress plant immunity. Furthermore, we show that PpEC23 interacts with soybean transcription factor GmSPL12l and that soybean plants in which GmSPL12l is silenced have constitutively active immunity, thereby identifying GmSPL12l as a negative regulator of soybean defenses. Collectively, our data present evidence for a virulence function of a rust SSCRP and suggest that PpEC23 is able to suppress soybean immune responses and physically interact with soybean transcription factor GmSPL12l, a negative immune regulator. PMID:27676173

  6. Role of cysteine-rich 61 protein (CCN1) in macrophage-mediated oncolytic herpes simplex virus clearance.

    PubMed

    Thorne, Amy Haseley; Meisen, Walter H; Russell, Luke; Yoo, Ji Young; Bolyard, Chelsea M; Lathia, Justin D; Rich, Jeremy; Puduvalli, Vinay K; Mao, Hsiaoyin; Yu, Jianhua; Caligiuri, Michael A; Tridandapani, Susheela; Kaur, Balveen

    2014-09-01

    Glioblastoma is a devastating disease, and there is an urgent need to develop novel therapies, such as oncolytic HSV1 (OV) to effectively target tumor cells. OV therapy depends on tumor-specific replication leading to destruction of neoplastic tissues. Host responses that curtail virus replication limit its efficacy in vivo. We have previously shown that cysteine-rich 61 protein (CCN1) activates a type 1 IFN antiviral defense response in glioblastoma cells. Incorporating TCGA data, we found CCN1 expression to be a negative prognostic factor for glioblastoma patients. Based on this, we used neutralizing antibodies against CCN1 to investigate its effect on OV therapy. Use of an anti-CCN1 antibody in mice bearing glioblastomas treated with OV led to enhanced virus expression along with reduced immune cell infiltration. OV-induced CCN1 increases macrophage migration toward infected glioblastoma cells by directly binding macrophages and also by enhancing the proinflammatory activation of macrophages inducing MCP-1 expression in glioblastoma cells. Activation of macrophages by CCN1 also increases viral clearance. Neutralization of integrin αMβ2 reversed CCN1-induced macrophage activation and migration, and reduced MCP-1 expression by glioblastoma cells. Our findings reveal that CCN1 plays a novel role in pathogen clearance; increasing macrophage infiltration and activation resulting in increased virus clearance in tumors.

  7. Crovirin, a Snake Venom Cysteine-Rich Secretory Protein (CRISP) with Promising Activity against Trypanosomes and Leishmania

    PubMed Central

    Adade, Camila M.; Carvalho, Ana Lúcia O.; Tomaz, Marcelo A.; Costa, Tatiana F. R.; Godinho, Joseane L.; Melo, Paulo A.; Lima, Ana Paula C. A.; Rodrigues, Juliany C. F.; Zingali, Russolina B.; Souto-Padrón, Thaïs

    2014-01-01

    Background The neglected human diseases caused by trypanosomatids are currently treated with toxic therapy with limited efficacy. In search for novel anti-trypanosomatid agents, we showed previously that the Crotalus viridis viridis (Cvv) snake venom was active against infective forms of Trypanosoma cruzi. Here, we describe the purification of crovirin, a cysteine-rich secretory protein (CRISP) from Cvv venom with promising activity against trypanosomes and Leishmania. Methodology/Principal Findings Crude venom extract was loaded onto a reverse phase analytical (C8) column using a high performance liquid chromatographer. A linear gradient of water/acetonitrile with 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid was used. The peak containing the isolated protein (confirmed by SDS-PAGE and mass spectrometry) was collected and its protein content was measured. T. cruzi trypomastigotes and amastigotes, L. amazonensis promastigotes and amastigotes and T. brucei rhodesiense procyclic and bloodstream trypomastigotes were challenged with crovirin, whose toxicity was tested against LLC-MK2 cells, peritoneal macrophages and isolated murine extensor digitorum longus muscle. We purified a single protein from Cvv venom corresponding, according to Nano-LC MS/MS sequencing, to a CRISP of 24,893.64 Da, henceforth referred to as crovirin. Human infective trypanosomatid forms, including intracellular amastigotes, were sensitive to crovirin, with low IC50 or LD50 values (1.10–2.38 µg/ml). A considerably higher concentration (20 µg/ml) of crovirin was required to elicit only limited toxicity on mammalian cells. Conclusions This is the first report of CRISP anti-protozoal activity, and suggests that other members of this family might have potential as drugs or drug leads for the development of novel agents against trypanosomatid-borne neglected diseases. PMID:25330220

  8. New Cysteine-Rich Ice-Binding Protein Secreted from Antarctic Microalga, Chloromonas sp.

    PubMed

    Jung, Woongsic; Campbell, Robert L; Gwak, Yunho; Kim, Jong Im; Davies, Peter L; Jin, EonSeon

    2016-01-01

    Many microorganisms in Antarctica survive in the cold environment there by producing ice-binding proteins (IBPs) to control the growth of ice around them. An IBP from the Antarctic freshwater microalga, Chloromonas sp., was identified and characterized. The length of the Chloromonas sp. IBP (ChloroIBP) gene was 3.2 kb with 12 exons, and the molecular weight of the protein deduced from the ChloroIBP cDNA was 34.0 kDa. Expression of the ChloroIBP gene was up- and down-regulated by freezing and warming conditions, respectively. Western blot analysis revealed that native ChloroIBP was secreted into the culture medium. This protein has fifteen cysteines and is extensively disulfide bonded as shown by in-gel mobility shifts between oxidizing and reducing conditions. The open-reading frame of ChloroIBP was cloned and over-expressed in Escherichia coli to investigate the IBP's biochemical characteristics. Recombinant ChloroIBP produced as a fusion protein with thioredoxin was purified by affinity chromatography and formed single ice crystals of a dendritic shape with a thermal hysteresis activity of 0.4±0.02°C at a concentration of 5 mg/ml. In silico structural modeling indicated that the three-dimensional structure of ChloroIBP was that of a right-handed β-helix. Site-directed mutagenesis of ChloroIBP showed that a conserved region of six parallel T-X-T motifs on the β-2 face was the ice-binding region, as predicted from the model. In addition to disulfide bonding, hydrophobic interactions between inward-pointing residues on the β-1 and β-2 faces, in the region of ice-binding motifs, were crucial to maintaining the structural conformation of ice-binding site and the ice-binding activity of ChloroIBP.

  9. New Cysteine-Rich Ice-Binding Protein Secreted from Antarctic Microalga, Chloromonas sp.

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Woongsic; Gwak, Yunho; Kim, Jong Im; Davies, Peter L.; Jin, EonSeon

    2016-01-01

    Many microorganisms in Antarctica survive in the cold environment there by producing ice-binding proteins (IBPs) to control the growth of ice around them. An IBP from the Antarctic freshwater microalga, Chloromonas sp., was identified and characterized. The length of the Chloromonas sp. IBP (ChloroIBP) gene was 3.2 kb with 12 exons, and the molecular weight of the protein deduced from the ChloroIBP cDNA was 34.0 kDa. Expression of the ChloroIBP gene was up- and down-regulated by freezing and warming conditions, respectively. Western blot analysis revealed that native ChloroIBP was secreted into the culture medium. This protein has fifteen cysteines and is extensively disulfide bonded as shown by in-gel mobility shifts between oxidizing and reducing conditions. The open-reading frame of ChloroIBP was cloned and over-expressed in Escherichia coli to investigate the IBP’s biochemical characteristics. Recombinant ChloroIBP produced as a fusion protein with thioredoxin was purified by affinity chromatography and formed single ice crystals of a dendritic shape with a thermal hysteresis activity of 0.4±0.02°C at a concentration of 5 mg/ml. In silico structural modeling indicated that the three-dimensional structure of ChloroIBP was that of a right-handed β-helix. Site-directed mutagenesis of ChloroIBP showed that a conserved region of six parallel T-X-T motifs on the β-2 face was the ice-binding region, as predicted from the model. In addition to disulfide bonding, hydrophobic interactions between inward-pointing residues on the β-1 and β-2 faces, in the region of ice-binding motifs, were crucial to maintaining the structural conformation of ice-binding site and the ice-binding activity of ChloroIBP. PMID:27097164

  10. Cysteine-rich protein 61 (CCN1) mediates replicative senescence-associated aberrant collagen homeostasis in human skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Quan, Taihao; Qin, Zhaoping; Voorhees, John J; Fisher, Gary J

    2012-09-01

    Dermal fibroblasts produce a collagen-rich extracellular matrix, which confers mechanical strength and resiliency to human skin. During aging, collagen production is reduced and collagen fragmentation is increased, which is initiated by matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1). This aberrant collagen homeostasis results in net collagen deficiency, which impairs the structural integrity and function of skin. Cysteine-rich protein 61 (CCN1), a member of the CCN family, negatively regulates collagen homeostasis, in primary human skin dermal fibroblasts. As replicative senescence is a form of cellular aging, we have utilized replicative senescent dermal fibroblasts to further investigate the connection between elevated CCN1 and aberrant collagen homeostasis. CCN1 mRNA and protein levels were significantly elevated in replicative senescent dermal fibroblasts. Replicative senescent dermal fibroblasts also expressed significantly reduced levels of type I procollagen and increased levels of MMP-1. Knockdown of elevated CCN1 in senescent dermal fibroblasts partially normalized both type I procollagen and MMP-1 expression. These data further support a key role of CCN1 in regulation of collagen homeostasis. Elevated expression of CCN1 substantially increased collagen lattice contraction and fragmentation caused by replicative senescent dermal fibroblasts. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) further revealed collagen fibril fragmentation and disorganization were largely prevented by knockdown of CCN1 in replicative senescent dermal fibroblasts, suggesting CCN1 mediates MMP-1-induced alterations of collagen fibrils by replicative senescent dermal fibroblasts. Given the ability of CCN1 to regulate both production and degradation of type I collagen, it is likely that elevated-CCN1 functions as an important mediator of collagen loss, which is observed in aged human skin.

  11. Characterization of toxins from the broad-banded water snake Helicops angulatus (Linnaeus, 1758): isolation of a cysteine-rich secretory protein, Helicopsin.

    PubMed

    Estrella, Amalid; Sánchez, Elda E; Galán, Jacob A; Tao, W Andy; Guerrero, Belsy; Navarrete, Luis F; Rodríguez-Acosta, Alexis

    2011-04-01

    Helicops angulatus (broad-banded water snake) according to recent proposals is presently cited in the family Dipsadidae, subfamily Xenodontinae, forming the tribe Hydropsini along with the genera Hydrops and Pseudoeryx. The current work characterizes the proteolytic and neurotoxic activities of H. angulatus crude toxins from salivary excretion (SE) and describes the isolation and identification of a cysteine-rich secretory protein (CRISP) called helicopsin. The SE lethal dose (LD₅₀) was 5.3 mg/kg; however, the SE did not contain hemorrhagic activity. Helicopsin was purified using activity-guided, Superose 12 10/300 GL molecular exclusion, Mono Q10 ion exchange, and Protein Pak 60 molecular exclusion. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) showed a highly purified band of approximately 20 kDa. The minimal lethal dose for helicopsin was 0.4 mg/kg. Liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis identified 2 unique peptides MEWYPEAAANAER and YTQIVWYK, representing a protein sequence (deleted homology) belonging to cysteine-rich secretory proteins, which are conserved in snake venoms (CRISPs). CRISPs are a large family of cysteine-rich secretory proteins found in various organisms and participate in diverse biological processes. Helicopsin exhibited robust neurotoxic activity as evidenced by immediate death (~8 min) due to respiratory paralysis in NIH mice. These observations for helicopsin purified from H. angulatus provide further evidence of the extensive distribution of highly potent neurotoxins in the Colubroidea superfamily of snakes than previously described.

  12. Cysteine-rich secretory protein 4 is an inhibitor of transient receptor potential M8 with a role in establishing sperm function

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, Gerard M.; Orta, Gerardo; Reddy, Thulasimala; Koppers, Adam J.; Martínez-López, Pablo; Luis de la Vega-Beltràn, José; Lo, Jennifer C. Y.; Veldhuis, Nicholas; Jamsai, Duangporn; McIntyre, Peter; Darszon, Alberto; O'Bryan, Moira K.

    2011-01-01

    The cysteine-rich secretory proteins (CRISPs) are a group of four proteins in the mouse that are expressed abundantly in the male reproductive tract, and to a lesser extent in other tissues. Analysis of reptile CRISPs and mouse CRISP2 has shown that CRISPs can regulate cellular homeostasis via ion channels. With the exception of the ability of CRISP2 to regulate ryanodine receptors, the in vivo targets of mammalian CRISPs function are unknown. In this study, we have characterized the ion channel regulatory activity of epididymal CRISP4 using electrophysiology, cell assays, and mouse models. Through patch-clamping of testicular sperm, the CRISP4 CRISP domain was shown to inhibit the transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channel TRPM8. These data were confirmed using a stably transfected CHO cell line. TRPM8 is a major cold receptor in the body, but is found in other tissues, including the testis and on the tail and head of mouse and human sperm. Functional assays using sperm from wild-type mice showed that TRPM8 activation significantly reduced the number of sperm undergoing the progesterone-induced acrosome reaction following capacitation, and that this response was reversed by the coaddition of CRISP4. In accordance, sperm from Crisp4 null mice had a compromised ability to undergo to the progesterone-induced acrosome reaction. Collectively, these data identify CRISP4 as an endogenous regulator of TRPM8 with a role in normal sperm function. PMID:21482758

  13. Cysteine-rich secretory protein 4 is an inhibitor of transient receptor potential M8 with a role in establishing sperm function.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Gerard M; Orta, Gerardo; Reddy, Thulasimala; Koppers, Adam J; Martínez-López, Pablo; de la Vega-Beltràn, José Luis; Lo, Jennifer C Y; Veldhuis, Nicholas; Jamsai, Duangporn; McIntyre, Peter; Darszon, Alberto; O'Bryan, Moira K

    2011-04-26

    The cysteine-rich secretory proteins (CRISPs) are a group of four proteins in the mouse that are expressed abundantly in the male reproductive tract, and to a lesser extent in other tissues. Analysis of reptile CRISPs and mouse CRISP2 has shown that CRISPs can regulate cellular homeostasis via ion channels. With the exception of the ability of CRISP2 to regulate ryanodine receptors, the in vivo targets of mammalian CRISPs function are unknown. In this study, we have characterized the ion channel regulatory activity of epididymal CRISP4 using electrophysiology, cell assays, and mouse models. Through patch-clamping of testicular sperm, the CRISP4 CRISP domain was shown to inhibit the transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channel TRPM8. These data were confirmed using a stably transfected CHO cell line. TRPM8 is a major cold receptor in the body, but is found in other tissues, including the testis and on the tail and head of mouse and human sperm. Functional assays using sperm from wild-type mice showed that TRPM8 activation significantly reduced the number of sperm undergoing the progesterone-induced acrosome reaction following capacitation, and that this response was reversed by the coaddition of CRISP4. In accordance, sperm from Crisp4 null mice had a compromised ability to undergo to the progesterone-induced acrosome reaction. Collectively, these data identify CRISP4 as an endogenous regulator of TRPM8 with a role in normal sperm function.

  14. Overexpression of an Arabidopsis cysteine-rich receptor-like protein kinase, CRK5, enhances abscisic acid sensitivity and confers drought tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Kai; Liang, Shan; Wu, Zhen; Bi, Chao; Yu, Yong-Tao; Wang, Xiao-Fang; Zhang, Da-Peng

    2016-01-01

    Receptor-like kinases (RLKs) have been reported to regulate many developmental and defense process, but only a few members have been functionally characterized. In the present study, our observations suggest that one of the RLKs, a membrane-localized cysteine-rich receptor-like protein kinase, CRK5, is involved in abscisic acid (ABA) signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana. Overexpression of CRK5 increases ABA sensitivity in ABA-induced early seedling growth arrest and promotion of stomatal closure and inhibition of stomatal opening. Interestingly, and importantly, overexpression of CRK5 enhances plant drought tolerance without affecting plant growth at the mature stages and plant productivity. Transgenic lines overexpressing a mutated form of CRK5, CRK5 K372E with the change of the 372nd conserved amino acid residue from lysine to glutamic acid in its kinase domain, result in wild-type ABA and drought responses, supporting the role of CRK5 in ABA signaling. The loss-of-function mutation of the CRK5 gene does not affect the ABA response, while overexpression of two homologs of CRK5, CRK4 and CRK19, confers ABA responses, suggesting that these CRK members function redundantly. We further showed that WRKY18, WRKY40 and WRKY60 transcription factors repress the expression of CRK5, and that CRK5 likely functions upstream of ABI2 in ABA signaling. These findings help in understanding the complex ABA signaling network. PMID:27406784

  15. Convergent solid-phase and solution approaches in the synthesis of the cysteine-rich Mdm2 RING finger domain.

    PubMed

    Vasileiou, Zoe; Barlos, Kostas; Gatos, Dimitrios

    2009-12-01

    The RING finger domain of the Mdm2, located at the C-terminus of the protein, is necessary for regulation of p53, a tumor suppressor protein. The 48-residues long Mdm2 peptide is an important target for studying its interaction with small anticancer drug candidates. For the chemical synthesis of the Mdm2 RING finger domain, the fragment condensation on solid-phase and the fragment condensation in solution were studied. The latter method was performed using either protected or free peptides at the C-terminus as the amino component. Best results were achieved using solution condensation where the N-component was applied with the C-terminal carboxyl group left unprotected. The developed method is well suited for large-scale synthesis of Mdm2 RING finger domain, combining the advantages of both solid-phase and solution synthesis.

  16. Immunogold labeling shows that glycine-cysteine-rich beta-proteins are deposited in the Oberhäutchen layer of snake epidermis in preparation to shedding.

    PubMed

    Alibardi, Lorenzo

    2015-02-01

    Shedding in snakes is cyclical and derives from the differentiation of an intraepidermal shedding complex made of two different layers, termed clear and Oberhäutchen that determine the separation between the outer from the inner epidermal generation that produces a molt. The present comparative immunocytochemical study on the epidermis and molts of different species of snakes shows that a glycine-cysteine-rich corneous beta-protein in a snake is prevalently accumulated in cells of the Oberhäutchen layer and decreases in those of the beta-layer. The protein is variably distributed in the mature beta-layer of species representing some snake families when the beta-layer merges with the Oberhäutchen but disappears in alpha-layers. Therefore, this protein represents an early marker of the transition between the outer and the inner epidermal generations in the epidermis of snakes in general. It is hypothesized that specific gene activation for glycine-cysteine-rich corneous beta-proteins occurs during the passage from the clear layer of the outer epidermal generation to the Oberhäutchen layer of the replacing inner epidermal generation. It is suggested that in the epidermis of most species glycine-cysteine-rich corneous beta-proteins form part of the dense corneous material that rapidly accumulates in the differentiating Oberhäutchen cells but decreases in the following beta-layer of the inner epidermal generation destined to be separated from the previous outer generation in the process of shedding. The regulation of the synthesis of these and other proteins is, therefore, crucial in timing the different stages of the shedding cycle in lepidosaurian reptiles.

  17. Characterization of the human mucin gene MUC5AC: a consensus cysteine-rich domain for 11p15 mucin genes?

    PubMed Central

    Guyonnet Duperat, V; Audie, J P; Debailleul, V; Laine, A; Buisine, M P; Galiegue-Zouitina, S; Pigny, P; Degand, P; Aubert, J P; Porchet, N

    1995-01-01

    To date five human mucin cDNAs (MUC2, 5A, 5B, 5C and 6) mapped to 11p15.3-15.5, so it appears that this chromosome region might contain several distinct gene loci for mucins. Three of these cDNAs, MUC5A, B and C, were cloned in our laboratory and previously published. A common number, 5, was recommended by the Human Gene Mapping Nomenclature Committee to designate them because of their common provenance from human tracheobronchial mucosa. In order to define whether they are products of the same gene locus or distinct loci, we describe in this paper physical mapping of these cDNAs using the strategy of analysis of CpG islands by pulse-field gel electrophoresis. The data suggest that MUC5A and MUC5C are part of the same gene (called MUC5AC) which is distinct from MUC5B. In the second part of this work, complete sequences of the inserts corresponding to previously described (JER47, JER58) and novel (JER62, JUL32, MAR2, MAR10 and MAR11) cDNAs of the so-called MUC5AC gene are presented and analysed. The data show that in this mucin gene, the tandem repeat domain is interrupted several times with a subdomain encoding a 130 amino acid cysteine-rich peptide in which the TR3A and TR3B peptides previously isolated by Rose et al. [Rose, Kaufman and Martin (1989) J. Biol. Chem., 264, 8193-8199] from airway mucins are found. A consensus peptide sequence for these subdomains involving invariant positions of most of the cysteines is proposed. The consensus nucleotide sequence of this subdomain is also found in the MUC2 gene and in the MUC5B gene, two other mucin genes mapped to 11p15. The functional significance for secreted mucins of these cysteine-rich subdomains and the modular organization of mucin peptides are discussed. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 8 PMID:7826332

  18. Introgression of leginsulin, a cysteine-rich protein, and high-protein trait from an Asian soybean plant introduction genotype into a North American experimental soybean line.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Hari B; Kim, Won-Seok; Oehrle, Nathan W; Alaswad, Alaa A; Baxter, Ivan; Wiebold, William J; Nelson, Randall L

    2015-03-25

    Soybean is an important protein source for both humans and animals. However, soybean proteins are relatively poor in the sulfur-containing amino acids, cysteine and methionine. Improving the content of endogenous proteins rich in sulfur-containing amino acids could enhance the nutritive value of soybean meal. Leginsulin, a cysteine-rich peptide, predominantly accumulates in Asian soybean accessions but not in most North American cultivars. By screening diverse soybean accessions from the USDA Soybean Germplasm Collection, we were able to identify one plant introduction, PI 427138, as a high-protein line with relatively high amounts of both elemental sulfur and leginsulin. We introgressed these desirable traits from PI 427138 into an experimental line with the aim of improving the overall protein content and quality of seed proteins. Biochemical characterization of inbred progenies from the cross of LD00-3309 with PI 427138 grown at six locations revealed stable ingression of high protein, high elemental sulfur, and high leginsulin accumulation. Comparison of soybean seed proteins resolved by high-resolution 2-D gel electrophoresis in combination with Delta2D image analysis software revealed preferential accumulation of a few glycinin subunits contributed to the increased protein content in the introgressed lines. Amino acid analysis revealed that even though the leginsulin introgressed lines had higher protein, leginsulin, and elemental sulfur, the overall concentration of sulfur-containing amino acids was not significantly altered when compared with the parental lines. The experimental soybean lines developed during this study (Leg-3, Leg-7, and Leg-8) lack A5, A4, and B3 glycinin subunits and could be utilized in breeding programs to develop high-quality tofu cultivars.

  19. Involvement of cysteine-rich protein 61 in the epidermal growth factor-induced migration of human anaplastic thyroid cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chin, Li-Han; Hsu, Sung-Po; Zhong, Wen-Bin; Liang, Yu-Chih

    2016-05-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is among the most aggressive types of malignant cancer. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of ATC, and patients with thyroid carcinoma typically exhibit increased cysteine-rich protein 61 (Cyr61). In this study, we found that EGF treatment induced cell migration, stress fiber formation, Cyr61 mRNA and protein expressions, and Cyr61 protein secretion in ATC cells. The recombinant Cyr61 protein significantly induced cell migration; however, inhibition of Cyr61 activity by a Cyr61-specific antibody abrogated EGF-induced cell migration. EGF treatment also affected epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related marker protein expression, as evidenced by an increase in vimentin and a decrease in E-cadherin expression. Inhibition of Cyr61 expression by Cyr61 siRNA decreased cell migration and reversed the EMT-related marker protein expression. EGF treatment increased the phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), and finally activated Cyr61 promoter plasmid activity. Our results suggest that Cyr61 is induced by EGF through the ERK/CREB signal pathway and that it plays a crucial role in the migration and invasion of ATC cells; moreover, Cyr61 might be a therapeutic target for metastatic ATC.

  20. The matricellular protein cysteine-rich protein 61 (CCN1/Cyr61) enhances physiological adaptation of retinal vessels and reduces pathological neovascularization associated with ischemic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Adeel; Pokeza, Nataliya; Shaw, Lynn; Lee, Hyun-Seung; Lazzaro, Douglas; Chintala, Hemabindu; Rosenbaum, Daniel; Grant, Maria B; Chaqour, Brahim

    2011-03-18

    Retinal vascular damages are the cardinal hallmarks of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), a leading cause of vision impairment and blindness in childhood. Both angiogenesis and vasculogenesis are disrupted in the hyperoxia-induced vaso-obliteration phase, and recapitulated, although aberrantly, in the subsequent ischemia-induced neovessel formation phase of ROP. Yet, whereas the histopathological features of ROP are well characterized, many key modulators with a therapeutic potential remain unknown. The CCN1 protein also known as cysteine-rich protein 61 (Cyr61) is a dynamically expressed, matricellular protein required for proper angiogenesis and vasculogenesis during development. The expression of CCN1 becomes abnormally reduced during the hyperoxic and ischemic phases of ROP modeled in the mouse eye with oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR). Lentivirus-mediated re-expression of CCN1 enhanced physiological adaptation of the retinal vasculature to hyperoxia and reduced pathological angiogenesis following ischemia. Remarkably, injection into the vitreous of OIR mice of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) engineered to express CCN1 harnessed ischemia-induced neovessel outgrowth without adversely affecting the physiological adaptation of retinal vessels to hyperoxia. In vitro exposure of HSCs to recombinant CCN1 induced integrin-dependent cell adhesion, migration, and expression of specific endothelial cell markers as well as many components of the Wnt signaling pathway including Wnt ligands, their receptors, inhibitors, and downstream targets. CCN1-induced Wnt signaling mediated, at least in part, adhesion and endothelial differentiation of cultured HSCs, and inhibition of Wnt signaling interfered with normalization of the retinal vasculature induced by CCN1-primed HSCs in OIR mice. These newly identified functions of CCN1 suggest its possible therapeutic utility in ischemic retinopathy.

  1. A small cysteine-rich extracellular protein, VCRP, is inducible by the sex-inducer of Volvox carteri and by wounding.

    PubMed

    Hallmann, Armin

    2007-08-01

    The green alga Volvox carteri represents one of the simplest multicellular organisms: it is composed of only two cell types, somatic and reproductive. Volvox is capable of both vegetative and sexual reproduction. Sexual development of males and females is triggered by a sex-inducer at concentrations as low as 10(-16) M. By differential screenings of cDNA libraries, a novel gene was identified that is under the control of this sex-inducer and that encodes a small cysteine-rich extracellular protein, named VCRP. Analysis of the VCRP polypeptide sequence suggests ten disulfide bonds and a dimetal-binding capacity. VCRP mRNA is detectable in males and females approximately 1 h after the spheroids' first contact with the sex-inducer, but transcription is restricted to the somatic cell-type. mRNA and protein synthesis is triggered not only by the sex-inducer, but also by wounding. VCRP does not share significant sequence similarity with any known protein sequence, but a potential EGF-like calcium-binding motif and a potential plant metallothionein family-15 motif have been identified. The characteristics of VCRP suggest a function as a signal transducer molecule, an extracellular second messenger from somatic cells to reproductive cells, or a role within the stress response.

  2. Retinoids suppress cysteine-rich protein 61 (CCN1), a negative regulator of collagen homeostasis, in skin equivalent cultures and aged human skin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Quan, Taihao; Qin, Zhaoping; Shao, Yuan; Xu, Yiru; Voorhees, John J; Fisher, Gary J

    2011-07-01

    Alterations in connective tissue collagen are prominent features of both chronologically aged and photoaged (ageing because of sun exposure) human skin. These age-related abnormalities are mediated in part by cysteine-rich protein 61 (CCN1). CCN1 is elevated in the dermis of both chronologically aged and photoaged human skin in vivo and promotes aberrant collagen homeostasis by down-regulating type I collagen, the major structural protein in skin, and promoting collagen degradation. Vitamin A and its metabolites have been shown to improve chronologically aged and photoaged skin by promoting deposition of new collagen and preventing its degradation. Here, we investigated regulation of CCN1 expression by retinoids in skin equivalent cultures and chronologically aged and photoaged human skin in vivo. In skin equivalent cultures, all-trans retinoic acid (RA), the major bioactive form of vitamin A in skin, significantly increased type I procollagen and reduced collagenase (matrix metalloproteinases-1, MMP-1). Addition of recombinant human CCN1 to skin equivalent cultures significantly reduced type I procollagen and increased MMP-1. Importantly, RA significantly reduced CCN1 expression in skin equivalent cultures. Topical treatment with retinol (vitamin A, 0.4%) for 7days significantly reduced CCN1 mRNA and protein expression in both chronologically aged (80+years) and photoaged human skin in vivo, compared to vehicle-treated skin. These data indicate that the mechanism by which retinoids improve aged skin, through increased collagen production, involves down-regulation of CCN1.

  3. Investigating possible biological targets of Bj-CRP, the first cysteine-rich secretory protein (CRISP) isolated from Bothrops jararaca snake venom.

    PubMed

    Lodovicho, Marina E; Costa, Tássia R; Bernardes, Carolina P; Menaldo, Danilo L; Zoccal, Karina F; Carone, Sante E; Rosa, José C; Pucca, Manuela B; Cerni, Felipe A; Arantes, Eliane C; Tytgat, Jan; Faccioli, Lúcia H; Pereira-Crott, Luciana S; Sampaio, Suely V

    2017-01-04

    Cysteine-rich secretory proteins (CRISPs) are commonly described as part of the protein content of snake venoms, nevertheless, so far, little is known about their biological targets and functions. Our study describes the isolation and characterization of Bj-CRP, the first CRISP isolated from Bothrops jararaca snake venom, also aiming at the identification of possible targets for its actions. Bj-CRP was purified using three chromatographic steps (Sephacryl S-200, Source 15Q and C18) and showed to be an acidic protein of 24.6kDa with high sequence identity to other snake venom CRISPs. This CRISP was devoid of proteolytic, hemorrhagic or coagulant activities, and it did not affect the currents from 13 voltage-gated potassium channel isoforms. Conversely, Bj-CRP induced inflammatory responses characterized by increase of leukocytes, mainly neutrophils, after 1 and 4h of its injection in the peritoneal cavity of mice, also stimulating the production of IL-6. Bj-CRP also acted on the human complement system, modulating some of the activation pathways and acting directly on important components (C3 and C4), thus inducing the generation of anaphylatoxins (C3a, C4a and C5a). Therefore, our results for Bj-CRP open up prospects for better understanding this class of toxins and its biological actions.

  4. Characterization of Helicobacter pylori HP0231 (DsbK): role in disulfide bond formation, redox homeostasis and production of Helicobacter cystein-rich protein HcpE.

    PubMed

    Lester, Jeffrey; Kichler, Sari; Oickle, Brandon; Fairweather, Spencer; Oberc, Alexander; Chahal, Jaspreet; Ratnayake, Dinath; Creuzenet, Carole

    2015-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a human gastric pathogen that colonizes ∼ 50% of the world's population. It can cause gastritis, gastric or duodenal ulcers and also gastric cancer. The numerous side effects of available treatments and the emergence of antibiotic resistant strains are severe concerns that justify further research into H. pylori's pathogenic mechanisms. H. pylori produces secreted proteins that may play a role in virulence, including the Helicobacter cysteine-rich protein HcpE (aka HP0235). We demonstrate herein that HcpE is secreted in the culture supernatant both as a soluble protein and in association with outer membrane vesicles. We show that the structure of HcpE comprises an organized array of disulfide bonds. We identify DsbK (aka HP0231) as a folding factor necessary for HcpE production and secretion in H. pylori and show that recombinant DsbK can interact with and refold unprocessed, reduced HcpE in vitro. These experiments highlight the first biologically relevant substrate for DsbK. Furthermore, we show that DsbK has disulfide bond (Dsb) forming activity on reduced lysozyme and demonstrate a DsbA-type of activity for DsbK upon expression in E. coli, despite its similarity with DsbG. Finally, we show a role of DsbK in maintaining redox homeostasis in H. pylori.

  5. Oxidant exposure induces cysteine-rich protein 61 (CCN1) via c-Jun/AP-1 to reduce collagen expression in human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Qin, Zhaoping; Robichaud, Patrick; He, Tianyuan; Fisher, Gary J; Voorhees, John J; Quan, Taihao

    2014-01-01

    Human skin is a primary target of oxidative stress from reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated from both extrinsic and intrinsic sources. Oxidative stress inhibits the production of collagen, the most abundant protein in skin, and thus contributes to connective tissue aging. Here we report that cysteine-rich protein 61 (CCN1), a negative regulator of collagen production, is markedly induced by ROS and mediates loss of type I collagen in human dermal fibroblasts. Conversely, antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine significantly reduced CCN1 expression and prevented ROS-induced loss of type I collagen in both human dermal fibroblasts and human skin in vivo. ROS increased c-Jun, a critical member of transcription factor AP-1 complex, and increased c-Jun binding to the AP-1 site of the CCN1 promoter. Functional blocking of c-Jun significantly reduced CCN1 promoter and gene expression and thus prevented ROS-induced loss of type I collagen. Targeting the c-Jun/CCN1 axis may provide clinical benefit for connective tissue aging in human skin.

  6. Elevated cysteine-rich protein 61 (CCN1) promotes skin aging via upregulation of IL-1β in chronically sun-exposed human skin.

    PubMed

    Qin, Zhaoping; Okubo, Toru; Voorhees, John J; Fisher, Gary J; Quan, Taihao

    2014-02-01

    Chronic exposure of human skin to solar ultraviolet (UV) irradiation causes premature skin aging, which is characterized by reduced type I collagen production and increased fragmentation of the dermal collagenous extracellular matrix. This imbalance of collagen homeostasis is mediated, in part, by elevated expression of the matricellular protein cysteine-rich protein 61 (CCN1), in dermal fibroblasts, the primary collagen producing cell type in human skin. Here, we report that the actions of CCN1 are mediated by induction of interleukin 1β (IL-1β). CCN1 and IL-1β are strikingly induced by acute UV irradiation, and constitutively elevated in sun-exposed prematurely aged human skin. Elevated CCN1 rapidly induces IL-1β, inhibits type I collagen production, and upregulates matrix metalloproteinase-1, which degrades collagen fibrils. Blockade of IL-1β actions by IL-1 receptor antagonist largely prevents the deleterious effects of CCN1 on collagen homeostasis. Furthermore, knockdown of CCN1 significantly reduces induction of IL-1β by UV irradiation, and thereby partially prevents collagen loss. These data demonstrate that elevated CCN1promotes inflammaging and collagen loss via induction of IL-1β and thereby contributes to the pathophysiology of premature aging in chronically sun-exposed human skin.

  7. Oxidant Exposure Induces Cysteine-Rich Protein 61 (CCN1) via c-Jun/AP-1 to Reduce Collagen Expression in Human Dermal Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Zhaoping; Robichaud, Patrick; He, Tianyuan; Fisher, Gary J.; Voorhees, John J.; Quan, Taihao

    2014-01-01

    Human skin is a primary target of oxidative stress from reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated from both extrinsic and intrinsic sources. Oxidative stress inhibits the production of collagen, the most abundant protein in skin, and thus contributes to connective tissue aging. Here we report that cysteine-rich protein 61 (CCN1), a negative regulator of collagen production, is markedly induced by ROS and mediates loss of type I collagen in human dermal fibroblasts. Conversely, antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine significantly reduced CCN1 expression and prevented ROS-induced loss of type I collagen in both human dermal fibroblasts and human skin in vivo. ROS increased c-Jun, a critical member of transcription factor AP-1 complex, and increased c-Jun binding to the AP-1 site of the CCN1 promoter. Functional blocking of c-Jun significantly reduced CCN1 promoter and gene expression and thus prevented ROS-induced loss of type I collagen. Targeting the c-Jun/CCN1 axis may provide clinical benefit for connective tissue aging in human skin. PMID:25536346

  8. Molecular cloning, mapping to human chromosome 1 q21-q23, and cell binding characteristics of Spalpha, a new member of the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) family of proteins.

    PubMed

    Gebe, J A; Kiener, P A; Ring, H Z; Li, X; Francke, U; Aruffo, A

    1997-03-07

    CD5 and CD6, two type I cell surface antigens predominantly expressed by T cells and a subset of B cells, have been shown to function as accessory molecules capable of modulating T cell activation. Here we report the cloning of a cDNA encoding Spalpha, a secreted protein that is highly homologous to CD5 and CD6. Spalpha has the same domain organization as the extracellular region of CD5 and CD6 and is composed of three SRCR (scavenger receptor cysteine rich) domains. Chromosomal mapping by fluorescence in situ hybridization and radiation hybrid panel analysis indicated that the gene encoding Spalpha is located on the long arm of human chromosome 1 at q21-q23 within contig WC1.17. RNA transcripts encoding Spalpha were found in human bone marrow, spleen, lymph node, thymus, and fetal liver but not in non-lymphoid tissues. Cell binding studies with an Spalpha immunoglobulin (Spalpha-mIg) fusion protein indicated that Spalpha is capable of binding to peripheral monocytes but not to T or B cells. Spalpha-mIg was also found to bind to the monocyte precursor cell lines K-562 and weakly to THP-1 but not to U937. Spalpha-mIg also bound to the B cell line Raji and weakly to the T cell line HUT-78. These findings indicate that Spalpha, a novel secreted protein produced in lymphoid tissues, may regulate monocyte activation, function, and/or survival.

  9. DMSA-Coated Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Greatly Affect the Expression of Genes Coding Cysteine-Rich Proteins by Their DMSA Coating.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Wang, Xin; Zou, Jinglu; Liu, Yingxun; Wang, Jinke

    2015-10-19

    The dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) was widely used to coat iron oxide nanoparticles (FeNPs); however, its intracellular cytotoxicity remains to be adequately elucidated. This study analyzed the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in four mammalian cells treated by a DMSA-coated magnetite FeNP at various doses at different times. The results revealed that about one-fourth of DEGs coded cysteine-rich proteins (CRPs) in all cells under each treatment, indicating that the nanoparticles greatly affected the expressions of CRP-coding genes. Additionally, about 26% of CRP-coding DEGs were enzyme genes in all cells, indicating that the nanoparticles greatly affected the expression of enzyme genes. Further experiments with the nanoparticles and a polyethylenimine (PEI)-coated magnetite FeNP revealed that the effect mainly resulted from DMSA carried into cells by the nanoparticles. This study thus first reported the cytotoxicity of DMSA at the gene transcription level as coating molecules of FeNPs. This study provides new insight into the molecular mechanism by which the DMSA-coated nanoparticles resulted in the transcriptional changes of many CRP-coding genes in cells. This study draws attention toward the intracellular cytotoxicity of DMSA as a coating molecule of nanoparticles, which has very low toxicity as an orally administered antidote due to its extracellular distribution.

  10. Functional interaction of phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase with sperm mitochondrion-associated cysteine-rich protein discloses the adjacent cysteine motif as a new substrate of the selenoperoxidase.

    PubMed

    Maiorino, Matilde; Roveri, Antonella; Benazzi, Louise; Bosello, Valentina; Mauri, Pierluigi; Toppo, Stefano; Tosatto, Silvio C E; Ursini, Fulvio

    2005-11-18

    The mitochondrial capsule is a selenium- and disulfide-rich structure enchasing the outer mitochondrial membrane of mammalian spermatozoa. Among the proteins solubilized from the sperm mitochondrial capsule, we confirmed, by using a proteomic approach, the presence of phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase (PHGPx) as a major component, and we also identified the sperm mitochondrion-associated cysteine-rich protein (SMCP) and fragments/aggregates of specific keratins that previously escaped detection (Ursini, F., Heim, S., Kiess, M., Maiorino, M., Roveri, A., Wissing, J., and Flohé, L. (1999) Science 285, 1393-1396). The evidence for a functional association between PHGPx, SMCP, and keratins is further supported by the identification of a sequence motif of regularly spaced Cys-Cys doublets common to SMCP and high sulfur keratin-associated proteins, involved in bundling hair shaft keratin by disulfide cross-linking. Following the oxidative polymerization of mitochondrial capsule proteins, catalyzed by PHGPx, two-dimensional redox electrophoresis analysis showed homo- and heteropolymers of SMCP and PHGPx, together with other minor components. Adjacent cysteine residues in SMCP peptides are oxidized to cystine by PHGPx. This unusual disulfide is known to drive, by reshuffling oxidative protein folding. On this basis we propose that oxidative polymerization of the mitochondrial capsule is primed by the formation of cystine on SMCP, followed by reshuffling. Occurrence of reshuffling is further supported by the calculated thermodynamic gain of the process. This study suggests a new mechanism where selenium catalysis drives the cross-linking of structural elements of the cytoskeleton via the oxidation of a keratin-associated protein.

  11. Genetic characterization of cysteine-rich type-b avenin-like protein coding genes in common wheat

    PubMed Central

    Chen, X. Y.; Cao, X. Y.; Zhang, Y. J.; Islam, S.; Zhang, J. J.; Yang, R. C.; Liu, J. J.; Li, G. Y.; Appels, R.; Keeble-Gagnere, G.; Ji, W. Q.; He, Z. H.; Ma, W. J.

    2016-01-01

    The wheat avenin-like proteins (ALP) are considered atypical gluten constituents and have shown positive effects on dough properties revealed using a transgenic approach. However, to date the genetic architecture of ALP genes is unclear, making it impossible to be utilized in wheat breeding. In the current study, three genes of type-b ALPs were identified and mapped to chromosomes 7AS, 4AL and 7DS. The coding gene sequence of both TaALP-7A and TaALP-7D was 855 bp long, encoding two identical homologous 284 amino acid long proteins. TaALP-4A was 858 bp long, encoding a 285 amino acid protein variant. Three alleles were identified for TaALP-7A and four for TaALP-4A. TaALP-7A alleles were of two types: type-1, which includes TaALP-7A1 andTaALP-7A2, encodes mature proteins, while type-2, represented byTaALP-7A3, contains a stop codon in the coding region and thus does not encode a mature protein. Dough quality testing of 102 wheat cultivars established a highly significant association of the type-1 TaALP-7A allele with better wheat processing quality. This allelic effects were confirmed among a range of commercial wheat cultivars. Our research makes the ALP be the first of such genetic variation source that can be readily utilized in wheat breeding. PMID:27503660

  12. The expression of cysteine-rich secretory protein 2 (CRISP2) and its specific regulator miR-27b in the spermatozoa of patients with asthenozoospermia.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jun-Hao; Zhou, Qi-Zhao; Lyu, Xiao-Ming; Zhu, Ting; Chen, Zi-Jian; Chen, Ming-Kun; Xia, Hui; Wang, Chun-Yan; Qi, Tao; Li, Xin; Liu, Cun-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine-rich secretory protein 2 (CRISP2) is an important sperm protein and plays roles in spermatogenesis, modulation of flagellar motility, acrosome reaction, and gamete fusion. Clinical evidence shows a reduced CRISP2 expression in spermatozoa from asthenozoospermic patients, but the molecular mechanism underlying its reduction remains unknown. Herein, we carried out a study focusing on the CRISP2 reduction and its roles in asthenozoospermia. Initially, through analyzing CRISP2 expression and methylation on CRISP2 promoter activity in sperm, we observed a decreased expression of CRISP2 protein rather than its mRNA in the ejaculated spermatozoa from asthenozoospermic patients and no methylation in the CRISP2 promoter, suggesting CRISP2 expression may be regulated in the sperm at the posttranscriptional level. Subsequently, we found that microRNA 27b (miR-27b), predicted as a candidate regulator of CRISP2 using bioinformatics, was highly expressed in the ejaculated spermatozoa from asthenozoospermic patients. Luciferase reporter assay and transfection experiments disclosed that this microRNA could target CRISP2 by specifically binding its 3' untranslated region, suppressing CRISP2 expression. Extended clinical observation further confirmed a highly expressed miR-27b and its obviously negative correlation with CRISP2 protein expression in ejaculated spermatozoa samples from asthenozoospermic patients. Finally, we conducted a retrospective follow-up study to support that either high miR-27b expression or low CRISP2 protein expression was significantly associated with low sperm progressive motility, abnormal morphology, and infertility. Thus, this study provides the first preliminary insight into the mechanism leading to the reduced CRISP2 expression in asthenozoospermia, offering a potential therapeutic target for treating male infertility or for male contraception.

  13. D19S Mutation of the Cationic, Cysteine-Rich Protein PAF: Novel Insights into Its Structural Dynamics, Thermal Unfolding and Antifungal Function

    PubMed Central

    Burtscher, Laura; Hajdu, Dorottya; Muñoz, Alberto; Gáspári, Zoltán; Read, Nick D.; Batta, Gyula; Marx, Florentine

    2017-01-01

    The cysteine-rich, cationic, antifungal protein PAF is abundantly secreted into the culture supernatant of the filamentous Ascomycete Penicillium chrysogenum. The five β-strands of PAF form a compact β-barrel that is stabilized by three disulphide bonds. The folding of PAF allows the formation of four surface-exposed loops and distinct charged motifs on the protein surface that might regulate the interaction of PAF with the sensitive target fungus. The growth inhibitory activity of this highly stable protein against opportunistic fungal pathogens provides great potential in antifungal drug research. To understand its mode of action, we started to investigate the surface-exposed loops of PAF and replaced one aspartic acid at position 19 in loop 2 that is potentially involved in PAF active or binding site, with a serine (Asp19 to Ser19). We analysed the overall effects, such as unfolding, electrostatic changes, sporadic conformers and antifungal activity when substituting this specific amino acid to the fairly indifferent amino acid serine. Structural analyses revealed that the overall 3D solution structure is virtually identical with that of PAF. However, PAFD19S showed slightly increased dynamics and significant differences in the surface charge distribution. Thermal unfolding identified PAFD19S to be rather a two-state folder in contrast to the three-state folder PAF. Functional comparison of PAFD19S and PAF revealed that the exchange at residue 19 caused a dramatic loss of antifungal activity: the binding and internalization of PAFD19S by target cells was reduced and the protein failed to trigger an intracellular Ca2+ response, all of which are closely linked to the antifungal toxicity of PAF. We conclude that the negatively charged residue Asp19 in loop 2 is essential for full function of the cationic protein PAF. PMID:28072824

  14. Characterization of expression and stability of recombinant cystein-rich protein human MT1A from yeast.

    PubMed

    Jie, Li; Kaifeng, Shao; Dian, Yao; Lin, An; Binggen, Ru

    2005-08-01

    Metallothionein (MT) is the protein that has been shown to bind heavy metals, scavenge free radicals, protect DNA from radiation damage, and alleviate disease symptoms. However, only very limited success has been achieved in expression and production of active recombinant metallothionein. In this study, human metallothionein 1A (hMT1A) was transformed into yeast Pichia pastoris for expression with secretion of the protein into the medium. The expression system was optimized to obtain the targeted protein in active form at 335 mg per litre culture. hMT1A showed the character of extreme instability in the experiment. High concentration, aeration and heavy metal ions are the main factors affecting hMT1A stability.

  15. A Cysteine-Rich CCG Domain Contains a Novel [4Fe-4S] Cluster Binding Motif As Deduced From Studies With Subunit B of Heterodisulfide Reductase From Methanothermobacter Marburgensis

    SciTech Connect

    Hamann, N.; Mander, G.J.; Shokes, J.E.; Scott, R.A.; Bennati, M.; Hedderich, R.

    2009-06-01

    Heterodisulfide reductase (HDR) of methanogenic archaea with its active-site [4Fe-4S] cluster catalyzes the reversible reduction of the heterodisulfide (CoM-S-S-CoB) of the methanogenic coenzyme M (CoM-SH) and coenzyme B (CoB-SH). CoM-HDR, a mechanistic-based paramagnetic intermediate generated upon half-reaction of the oxidized enzyme with CoM-SH, is a novel type of [4Fe-4S]{sup 3+} cluster with CoM-SH as a ligand. Subunit HdrB of the Methanothermobacter marburgensis HdrABC holoenzyme contains two cysteine-rich sequence motifs (CX{sub 31-39}CCX{sub 35-36}CXXC), designated as CCG domain in the Pfam database and conserved in many proteins. Here we present experimental evidence that the C-terminal CCG domain of HdrB binds this unusual [4Fe-4S] cluster. HdrB was produced in Escherichia coli, and an iron-sulfur cluster was subsequently inserted by in vitro reconstitution. In the oxidized state the cluster without the substrate exhibited a rhombic EPR signal (g{sub zyx} = 2.015, 1.995, and 1.950) reminiscent of the CoM-HDR signal. {sup 57}Fe ENDOR spectroscopy revealed that this paramagnetic species is a [4Fe-4S] cluster with {sup 57}Fe hyperfine couplings very similar to that of CoM-HDR. CoM-{sup 33}SH resulted in a broadening of the EPR signal, and upon addition of CoM-SH the midpoint potential of the cluster was shifted to values observed for CoM-HDR, both indicating binding of CoM-SH to the cluster. Site-directed mutagenesis of all 12 cysteine residues in HdrB identified four cysteines of the C-terminal CCG domain as cluster ligands. Combined with the previous detection of CoM-HDR-like EPR signals in other CCG domain-containing proteins our data indicate a general role of the C-terminal CCG domain in coordination of this novel [4Fe-4S] cluster. In addition, Zn K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy identified an isolated Zn site with an S{sub 3}(O/N){sub 1} geometry in HdrB and the HDR holoenzyme. The N-terminal CCG domain is suggested to provide ligands to the Zn

  16. A Cysteine-Rich CCG Domain Contains a Novel [4Fe-4S] Cluster Binding Motif As Deduced from Studies with Subunit B of Heterodisulfide Reductase from Methanothermobacter marburgensis†

    PubMed Central

    Hamann, Nils; Mander, Gerd J.; Shokes, Jacob E.; Scott, Robert A.; Bennati, Marina; Hedderich, Reiner

    2013-01-01

    Heterodisulfide reductase (HDR) of methanogenic archaea with its active-site [4Fe-4S] cluster catalyzes the reversible reduction of the heterodisulfide (CoM-S-S-CoB) of the methanogenic coenzyme M (CoM-SH) and coenzyme B (CoB-SH). CoM-HDR, a mechanistic-based paramagnetic intermediate generated upon half-reaction of the oxidized enzyme with CoM-SH, is a novel type of [4Fe-4S]3+ cluster with CoM-SH as a ligand. Subunit HdrB of the Methanothermobacter marburgensis HdrABC holoenzyme contains two cysteine-rich sequence motifs (CX31–39CCX35–36CXXC), designated as CCG domain in the Pfam database and conserved in many proteins. Here we present experimental evidence that the C-terminal CCG domain of HdrB binds this unusual [4Fe-4S] cluster. HdrB was produced in Escherichia coli, and an iron–sulfur cluster was subsequently inserted by in vitro reconstitution. In the oxidized state the cluster without the substrate exhibited a rhombic EPR signal (gzyx= 2.015, 1.995, and 1.950) reminiscent of the CoM-HDR signal. 57Fe ENDOR spectroscopy revealed that this paramagnetic species is a [4Fe-4S] cluster with 57Fe hyperfine couplings very similar to that of CoM-HDR. CoM-33SH resulted in a broadening of the EPR signal, and upon addition of CoM-SH the midpoint potential of the cluster was shifted to values observed for CoM-HDR, both indicating binding of CoM-SH to the cluster. Site-directed mutagenesis of all 12 cysteine residues in HdrB identified four cysteines of the C-terminal CCG domain as cluster ligands. Combined with the previous detection of CoM-HDR-like EPR signals in other CCG domain-containing proteins our data indicate a general role of the C-terminal CCG domain in coordination of this novel [4Fe-4S] cluster. In addition, Zn K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy identified an isolated Zn site with an S3(O/N)1 geometry in HdrB and the HDR holoenzyme. The N-terminal CCG domain is suggested to provide ligands to the Zn site. PMID:17929940

  17. Endometrial cysteine-rich secretory protein 3 is inhibited by human chorionic gonadotrophin, and is increased in the decidua of tubal ectopic pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Horne, A.W.; Duncan, W.C.; King, A.E.; Burgess, S.; Lourenco, P.C.; Cornes, P.; Ghazal, P.; Williams, A.R.; Udby, L.; Critchley, H.O.D.

    2009-01-01

    Ectopic pregnancy (EP) remains a considerable cause of morbidity and occasional mortality. Currently, there is no reliable test to differentiate ectopic from intrauterine gestation. We have previously used array technology to demonstrate that differences in gene expression in decidualized endometrium from women with ectopic and intrauterine gestations could be used to identify candidate diagnostic biomarkers for EP. The aim of this study was to further investigate the decidual gene with the highest fold increase in EP, cysteine-rich secretory protein-3 (CRISP-3). Decidualized endometrium from gestation-matched women undergoing surgical termination of pregnancy (n = 8), evacuation of uterus for miscarriage (n = 6) and surgery for EP (n = 11) was subjected to quantitative RT–PCR, morphological assessment, immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. Sera were analysed for progesterone and human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) levels. Immortalized endometrial epithelial cells were cultured with physiological concentrations of hCG. CRISP-3 mRNA and protein expression were greater in endometrium from ectopic when compared with intrauterine pregnancies (P < 0.05). CRISP-3 protein was localized to epithelium and granulocytes of endometrium. CRISP-3 serum concentrations were not different in women with ectopic compared with intrauterine pregnancies. CRISP-3 expression in endometrium was not related to the degree of decidualization or to serum progesterone levels. Endometrial CRISP-3 expression was inversely proportional to serum hCG concentrations (P < 0.001). Stimulation of endometrial epithelial cells with hCG in vitro caused a reduction in CRISP-3 expression (P < 0.01). The measurement of CRISP-3 in endometrium could provide an additional tool in the diagnosis of failing early pregnancy of unknown location. The absence of a local reduction in expression of CRISP-3 in decidualized endometrium of women with EP may be due to reduced exposure to hCG due to the ectopic

  18. Endometrial cysteine-rich secretory protein 3 is inhibited by human chorionic gonadotrophin, and is increased in the decidua of tubal ectopic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Horne, A W; Duncan, W C; King, A E; Burgess, S; Lourenco, P C; Cornes, P; Ghazal, P; Williams, A R; Udby, L; Critchley, H O D

    2009-05-01

    Ectopic pregnancy (EP) remains a considerable cause of morbidity and occasional mortality. Currently, there is no reliable test to differentiate ectopic from intrauterine gestation. We have previously used array technology to demonstrate that differences in gene expression in decidualized endometrium from women with ectopic and intrauterine gestations could be used to identify candidate diagnostic biomarkers for EP. The aim of this study was to further investigate the decidual gene with the highest fold increase in EP, cysteine-rich secretory protein-3 (CRISP-3). Decidualized endometrium from gestation-matched women undergoing surgical termination of pregnancy (n = 8), evacuation of uterus for miscarriage (n = 6) and surgery for EP (n = 11) was subjected to quantitative RT-PCR, morphological assessment, immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. Sera were analysed for progesterone and human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) levels. Immortalized endometrial epithelial cells were cultured with physiological concentrations of hCG. CRISP-3 mRNA and protein expression were greater in endometrium from ectopic when compared with intrauterine pregnancies (P < 0.05). CRISP-3 protein was localized to epithelium and granulocytes of endometrium. CRISP-3 serum concentrations were not different in women with ectopic compared with intrauterine pregnancies. CRISP-3 expression in endometrium was not related to the degree of decidualization or to serum progesterone levels. Endometrial CRISP-3 expression was inversely proportional to serum hCG concentrations (P < 0.001). Stimulation of endometrial epithelial cells with hCG in vitro caused a reduction in CRISP-3 expression (P < 0.01). The measurement of CRISP-3 in endometrium could provide an additional tool in the diagnosis of failing early pregnancy of unknown location. The absence of a local reduction in expression of CRISP-3 in decidualized endometrium of women with EP may be due to reduced exposure to hCG due to the ectopic

  19. The Crystal Structure of the Fifth Scavenger Receptor Cysteine-Rich Domain of Porcine CD163 Reveals an Important Residue Involved in Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hongfang; Jiang, Longguang; Qiao, Songlin; Zhi, Yubao; Chen, Xin-Xin; Yang, Yanyan; Huang, Xiaojing; Huang, Mingdong; Li, Rui; Zhang, Gai-Ping

    2017-02-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) has become an economically critical factor in swine industry since its worldwide spread in the 1990s. Infection by its causative agent, PRRS virus (PRRSV), was proven to be mediated by an indispensable receptor, porcine CD163 (pCD163), and the fifth scavenger receptor cysteine-rich domain (SRCR5) is essential for virus infection. However, the structural details and specific residues of pCD163 SRCR5 involved in infection have not been defined yet. In this study, we prepared recombinant pCD163 SRCR5 in Drosophila melanogaster Schneider 2 (S2) cells and determined its crystal structure at a high resolution of 2.0 Å. This structure includes a markedly long loop region and shows a special electrostatic potential, and these are significantly different from those of other members of the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich superfamily (SRCR-SF). Subsequently, we carried out structure-based mutational studies to identify that the arginine residue at position 561 (Arg561) in the long loop region is important for PRRSV infection. Further, we showed Arg561 probably takes effect on the binding of pCD163 to PRRSV during virus invasion. Altogether the current work provides the first view of the CD163 SRCR domain, expands our knowledge of the invasion mechanism of PRRSV, and supports a molecular basis for prevention and control of the virus.

  20. AB035. The expression of cysteine-rich secretory protein 2 (CRISP2) and its specific regulator mir-27b in the spermatozoa of patients with asthenozoospermia

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jun-Hao; Zhou, Qi-Zhao; Lyu, Xiao-Ming; Zhu, Ting; Chen, Zi-Jian; Chen, Ming-Kun; Xia, Hui; Wang, Chun-Yan; Qi, Tao; Li, Xin; Liu, Cun-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Background Cysteine-rich secretory protein 2 (CRISP2) is an important sperm protein and plays roles in spermatogenesis, modulation of flagellar motility, acrosome reaction, and gamete fusion. Clinical evidence shows a reduced CRISP2 expression in spermatozoa from asthenozoospermic patients, but the molecular mechanism underlying its reduction remains unknown. Herein, we carried out a study focusing on the CRISP2 reduction and its roles in asthenozoospermia Methods Spermatozoa were isolated from 90 study subjects’ ejaculated semen samples. DNA methylation was evaluated using bisulfite-sequencing PCR and methylation-specific PCR. The CRISP2 mRNA and protein expression levels were examined in the ejaculated spermatozoa by qRT-PCR and Western blot respectively. miRNA expression was detected by qRT-PCR. The direct regulatory effect of miR-27b on CRISP2 was predicted computationally and validated via luciferase reporter assay and in vitro experiments in which miR-27b mimic or inhibitor was transfected into 293T cells. Respective correlations of miR-27b and CRISP2 protein expression with clinical features were analyzed using Spearman’s correlation coefficient. Results Initially, low expression of CRISP2 protein rather than its mRNA was observed in the ejaculated spermatozoa from asthenozoospermic patients relative to normozoospermic males. Meanwhile, methylation was not found in CRISP2 promoter. These data suggest a possible post-transcriptional regulation of CRISP2 in asthenozoospermia. Subsequently, bioinformatics prediction, luciferase reporter assay and miR-27b transfection experiments revealed that miR-27b could specifically target CRISP2 by binding its 3’-UTR, suppressing CRISP2 expression post-transcriptionally. Further evidence was provided by the clinical observation of a high miR-27b expression in the ejaculated spermatozoa from asthenozoospermic patients and a negative correlation between miR-27b and CRISP2 protein expression. Finally, a retrospective

  1. The cysteine-rich domain of the secreted proprotein convertases PC5A and PACE4 functions as a cell surface anchor and interacts with tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases.

    PubMed

    Nour, Nadia; Mayer, Gaétan; Mort, John S; Salvas, Alexandre; Mbikay, Majambu; Morrison, Charlotte J; Overall, Christopher M; Seidah, Nabil G

    2005-11-01

    The proprotein convertases PC5, PACE4 and furin contain a C-terminal cysteine-rich domain (CRD) of unknown function. We demonstrate that the CRD confers to PC5A and PACE4 properties to bind tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) and the cell surface. Confocal microscopy and biochemical analyses revealed that the CRD is essential for cell surface tethering of PC5A and PACE4 and that it colocalizes and coimmunoprecipitates with the full-length and C-terminal domain of TIMP-2. Surface-bound PC5A in TIMP-2 null fibroblasts was only observed upon coexpression with TIMP-2. In COS-1 cells, plasma membrane-associated PC5A can be displaced by heparin, suramin, or heparinases I and III and by competition with excess exogenous TIMP-2. Furthermore, PC5A and TIMP-2 are shown to be colocalized over the surface of enterocytes in the mouse duodenum and jejunum, as well as in liver sinusoids. In conclusion, the CRD of PC5A and PACE4 functions as a cell surface anchor favoring the processing of their cognate surface-anchored substrates, including endothelial lipase.

  2. Transcriptome Analysis Revealed Highly Expressed Genes Encoding Secondary Metabolite Pathways and Small Cysteine-Rich Proteins in the Sclerotium of Lignosus rhinocerotis

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Hui-Yeng Y.; Chooi, Yit-Heng; Fung, Shin-Yee; Ng, Szu-Ting; Tan, Chon-Seng; Tan, Nget-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Lignosus rhinocerotis (Cooke) Ryvarden (tiger milk mushroom) has long been known for its nutritional and medicinal benefits among the local communities in Southeast Asia. However, the molecular and genetic basis of its medicinal and nutraceutical properties at transcriptional level have not been investigated. In this study, the transcriptome of L. rhinocerotis sclerotium, the part with medicinal value, was analyzed using high-throughput Illumina HiSeqTM platform with good sequencing quality and alignment results. A total of 3,673, 117, and 59,649 events of alternative splicing, novel transcripts, and SNP variation were found to enrich its current genome database. A large number of transcripts were expressed and involved in the processing of gene information and carbohydrate metabolism. A few highly expressed genes encoding the cysteine-rich cerato-platanin, hydrophobins, and sugar-binding lectins were identified and their possible roles in L. rhinocerotis were discussed. Genes encoding enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of glucans, six gene clusters encoding four terpene synthases and one each of non-ribosomal peptide synthetase and polyketide synthase, and 109 transcribed cytochrome P450 sequences were also identified in the transcriptome. The data from this study forms a valuable foundation for future research in the exploitation of this mushroom in pharmacological and industrial applications. PMID:26606395

  3. Synthesis, screening, and sequencing of cysteine-rich one-bead one-compound peptide libraries.

    PubMed

    Juskowiak, Gary L; McGee, Christopher J; Greaves, John; Van Vranken, David L

    2008-01-01

    Cysteine-rich peptides are valued as tags for biarsenical fluorophores and as environmentally important reagents for binding toxic heavy metals. Due to the inherent difficulties created by cysteine, the power of one-bead one-compound (OBOC) libraries has never been applied to the discovery of short cysteine-rich peptides. We have developed the first method for the synthesis, screening, and sequencing of cysteine-rich OBOC peptide libraries. First, we synthesized a heavily biased cysteine-rich OBOC library, incorporating 50% cysteine at each position (Ac-X8-KM-TentaGel). Then, we developed conditions for cysteine alkylation, cyanogen bromide cleavage, and direct MS/MS sequencing of that library at the single bead level. The sequencing efficiency of this library was comparable to a traditional cysteine-free library. To validate screening of cysteine-rich OBOC libraries, we reacted a library with the biarsenical FlAsH and identified beads bearing the known biarsenical-binding motif (CCXXCC). These results enable OBOC libraries to be used in high-throughput discovery of cysteine-rich peptides for protein tagging, environmental remediation of metal contaminants, or cysteine-rich pharmaceuticals.

  4. Cysteine-Rich Peptide Family with Unusual Disulfide Connectivity from Jasminum sambac.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Geeta; Serra, Aida; Shin, Joon; Nguyen, Phuong Q T; Sze, Siu Kwan; Yoon, Ho Sup; Tam, James P

    2015-11-25

    Cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs) are natural products with privileged peptidyl structures that represent a potentially rich source of bioactive compounds. Here, the discovery and characterization of a novel plant CRP family, jasmintides from Jasminum sambac of the Oleaceae family, are described. Two 27-amino acid jasmintides (jS1 and jS2) were identified at the gene and protein levels. Disulfide bond mapping of jS1 by mass spectrometry and its confirmation by NMR spectroscopy revealed disulfide bond connectivity of C-1-C-5, C-2-C-4, and C-3-C-6, a cystine motif that has not been reported in plant CRPs. Structural determination showed that jS1 displays a well-defined structure framed by three short antiparallel β-sheets. Genomic analysis showed that jasmintides share a three-domain precursor arrangement with a C-terminal mature domain preceded by a long pro-domain of 46 residues and an intron cleavage site between the signal sequence and pro-domain. The compact cysteine-rich structure together with an N-terminal pyroglutamic acid residue confers jasmintides high resistance to heat and enzymatic degradation, including exopeptidase treatment. Collectively, these results reveal a new plant CRP structure with an unusual cystine connectivity, which could be useful as a scaffold for designing peptide drugs.

  5. Substitution of a conserved cysteine-996 in a cysteine-rich motif of the laminin {alpha}2-chain in congenital muscular dystrophy with partial deficiency of the protein

    SciTech Connect

    Nissinen, M.; Xu Zhang; Tryggvason, K.

    1996-06-01

    Congenital muscular dystrophies (CMDs) are autosomal recessive muscle disorders of early onset. Approximately half of CMD patients present laminin {alpha}2-chain (merosin) deficiency in muscle biopsies, and the disease locus has been mapped to the region of the LAMA2 gene (6q22-23) in several families. Recently, two nonsense mutations in the laminin {alpha}2-chain gene were identified in CMD patients exhibiting complete deficiency of the laminin {alpha}2-chain in muscle biopsies. However, a subset of CMD patients with linkage to LAMA2 show only partial absence of the laminin {alpha}2-chain around muscle fibers, by immunocytochemical analysis. In the present study we have identified a homozygous missense mutation in the {alpha}2-chain gene of a consanguineous Turkish family with partial laminin {alpha}2-chain deficiency. The T{r_arrow}C transition at position 3035 in the cDNA sequence results in a Cys996{r_arrow}Arg substitution. The mutation that affects one of the conserved cysteine-rich repeats in the short arm of the laminin {alpha}2-chain should result in normal synthesis of the chain and in formation and secretion of a heterotrimeric laminin molecule. Muscular dysfunction is possibly caused either by abnormal disulfide cross-links and folding of the laminin repeat, leading to the disturbance of an as yet unknown binding function of the laminin {alpha}2-chain and to shorter half-life of the muscle-specific laminin-2 and laminin-4 isoforms, or by increased proteolytic sensitivity, leading to truncation of the short arm. 42 refs., 7 figs.

  6. Introgression of leginsulin, a cysteine-rich protein, and high-protein trait from an Asian soybean plant introduction genotype into a North American experimental soybean line

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean is an important protein source for both humans and animals. However, soybean proteins are relatively poor in the sulfur-containing amino acids, cysteine and methionine. Improving the content of endogenous proteins rich in sulfur containing amino acids could enhance the nutritive value of soy...

  7. A Cysteine-Rich Protein Kinase Associates with a Membrane Immune Complex and the Cysteine Residues Are Required for Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Yadeta, Koste A; Elmore, James M; Creer, Athena Y; Feng, Baomin; Franco, Jessica Y; Rufian, Jose Sebastian; He, Ping; Phinney, Brett; Coaker, Gitta

    2017-01-01

    Membrane-localized proteins perceive and respond to biotic and abiotic stresses. We performed quantitative proteomics on plasma membrane-enriched samples from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) treated with bacterial flagellin. We identified multiple receptor-like protein kinases changing in abundance, including cysteine (Cys)-rich receptor-like kinases (CRKs) that are up-regulated upon the perception of flagellin. CRKs possess extracellular Cys-rich domains and constitute a gene family consisting of 46 members in Arabidopsis. The single transfer DNA insertion lines CRK28 and CRK29, two CRKs induced in response to flagellin perception, did not exhibit robust alterations in immune responses. In contrast, silencing of multiple bacterial flagellin-induced CRKs resulted in enhanced susceptibility to pathogenic Pseudomonas syringae, indicating functional redundancy in this large gene family. Enhanced expression of CRK28 in Arabidopsis increased disease resistance to P. syringae Expression of CRK28 in Nicotiana benthamiana induced cell death, which required intact extracellular Cys residues and a conserved kinase active site. CRK28-mediated cell death required the common receptor-like protein kinase coreceptor BAK1. CRK28 associated with BAK1 as well as the activated FLAGELLIN-SENSING2 (FLS2) immune receptor complex. CRK28 self-associated as well as associated with the closely related CRK29. These data support a model where Arabidopsis CRKs are synthesized upon pathogen perception, associate with the FLS2 complex, and coordinately act to enhance plant immune responses.

  8. A Cysteine-Rich Protein Kinase Associates with a Membrane Immune Complex and the Cysteine Residues Are Required for Cell Death1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Elmore, James M.; Creer, Athena Y.; Feng, Baomin; Franco, Jessica Y.; He, Ping; Phinney, Brett

    2017-01-01

    Membrane-localized proteins perceive and respond to biotic and abiotic stresses. We performed quantitative proteomics on plasma membrane-enriched samples from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) treated with bacterial flagellin. We identified multiple receptor-like protein kinases changing in abundance, including cysteine (Cys)-rich receptor-like kinases (CRKs) that are up-regulated upon the perception of flagellin. CRKs possess extracellular Cys-rich domains and constitute a gene family consisting of 46 members in Arabidopsis. The single transfer DNA insertion lines CRK28 and CRK29, two CRKs induced in response to flagellin perception, did not exhibit robust alterations in immune responses. In contrast, silencing of multiple bacterial flagellin-induced CRKs resulted in enhanced susceptibility to pathogenic Pseudomonas syringae, indicating functional redundancy in this large gene family. Enhanced expression of CRK28 in Arabidopsis increased disease resistance to P. syringae. Expression of CRK28 in Nicotiana benthamiana induced cell death, which required intact extracellular Cys residues and a conserved kinase active site. CRK28-mediated cell death required the common receptor-like protein kinase coreceptor BAK1. CRK28 associated with BAK1 as well as the activated FLAGELLIN-SENSING2 (FLS2) immune receptor complex. CRK28 self-associated as well as associated with the closely related CRK29. These data support a model where Arabidopsis CRKs are synthesized upon pathogen perception, associate with the FLS2 complex, and coordinately act to enhance plant immune responses. PMID:27852951

  9. The human analog of murine cystein rich protein 61 [correction of 16] is a 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 responsive immediate early gene in human fetal osteoblasts: regulation by cytokines, growth factors, and serum.

    PubMed

    Schütze, N; Lechner, A; Groll, C; Siggelkow, H; Hüfner, M; Köhrle, J; Jakob, F

    1998-04-01

    1Alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25-(OH)2D3) is a potent mediator of differentiation and maintenance of specific functions of osteoblasts. To detect novel targets for 1,25-(OH)2D3 action, we applied differential display PCR to human fetal osteoblast-like cells and identified the human analog of murine cystein rich protein 61 (hCYR61) as a 1,25-(OH)2D3-responsive immediate early gene in differentiated fetal osteoblast-like cells. The murine gene CYR61 is important for cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions, and it belongs to an emerging gene family of cysteine-rich proteins. hCYR61 messenger RNA (mRNA) steady-state levels were stimulated 11-fold by 10 nM 1,25-(OH)2D3 by 1 h and declined to control levels by 4 h. This transient stimulation of hCYR61 mRNA was not inhibited by cycloheximide but was prevented by actinomycin D, indicating that the 1,25-(OH)2D3 effect involves transcriptional events and does not require de novo protein synthesis. hCYR61 mRNA stability was not influenced by 1,25(OH)2D3, whereas cycloheximide treatment stabilized hCYR61 mRNA. FCS, as well as growth factors and cytokines such as basic fibroblast growth factor, epidermal growth factor, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and interleukin-1, strongly elevated hCYR61 mRNA steady-state levels within 1 h. hCYR61 mRNA was expressed also in primary human osteoblasts and osteosarcoma cell lines. Using a commercial tissue blot, hCYR61 mRNA was only observed in skeletal muscle. The fast and transient response of hCYR 61 to 1,25-(OH)2D3, serum, growth factors, and cytokines suggests an important role of hCYR61 for osteoblast function and differentiation.

  10. Autoantigen 1 of the guinea pig sperm acrosome is the homologue of mouse Tpx-1 and human TPX1 and is a member of the cysteine-rich secretory protein (CRISP) family.

    PubMed

    Foster, J A; Gerton, G L

    1996-06-01

    We have cloned and sequenced cDNAs encoding autoantigen 1 (AA1), a testis-specific protein and the major autoantigen of the guinea pig sperm acrosome. The cDNA predicts a precursor protein of 244 amino acids including a 21 amino acid hydrophobic, secretory signal sequence. The mature polypeptide is predicted to have a molecular mass of 24,891 Daltons which agrees with the experimentally determined molecular weight of 25,000. Consistent with previous studies demonstrating that AA1 is not a glycoprotein, the predicted amino acid sequence contained no canonical sites for N-linked glycosylation. Comparison with other sequences showed that AA1 is the guinea pig homologue of the testis-specific protein Tpx-1 in mice and TPX1 in humans. AA1 also showed significant amino acid sequence homology with other cysteine-rich secretory proteins (CRISP's): rat and mouse acidic epididymal glycoproteins (AEG; also known as proteins D/E in rats) and helothermine, a toxin from the Mexican beaded lizard. In addition, AA1 had a lesser degree of homology with antigen 5 (vespid wasp venom), PR-1 (a plant pathogenesis related protein), and GliPR (a protein identified in human gliomas). Northern analysis of RNA from purified guinea pig spermatogenic cells showed that a 1.5 kb message was first detected in pachytene spermatocytes, was strongest in round spermatids, and was detected at a low level in condensing spermatids. Immunoblot analysis and metabolic labeling data of AA1 in spermatogenic cells showed that the protein was synthesized as early as the pachytene spermatocyte stage of spermatogenesis. Thus, the patterns of AA1 mRNA and protein expression during spermatogenesis are similar to the expression of other acrosomal mRNAs and proteins that are first detected meiotically.

  11. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analyses of pseudechetoxin and pseudecin, two snake-venom cysteine-rich secretory proteins that target cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channels

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Yamazaki, Yasuo; Fujimoto, Zui; Morita, Takashi; Mizuno, Hiroshi

    2005-08-01

    Crystals of pseudechetoxin and pseudecin, potent peptidic inhibitors of cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channels, have been prepared and X-ray diffraction data have been collected to 2.25 and 1.90 Å resolution, respectively. Cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) ion channels play pivotal roles in sensory transduction of retinal and olfactory neurons. The elapid snake toxins pseudechetoxin (PsTx) and pseudecin (Pdc) are the only known protein blockers of CNG channels. These toxins are structurally classified as cysteine-rich secretory proteins and exhibit structural features that are quite distinct from those of other known small peptidic channel blockers. This article describes the crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analyses of these toxins. Crystals of PsTx belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 60.30, b = 61.59, c = 251.69 Å, and diffraction data were collected to 2.25 Å resolution. Crystals of Pdc also belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with similar unit-cell parameters a = 60.71, b = 61.67, c = 251.22 Å, and diffraction data were collected to 1.90 Å resolution.

  12. Identification of a Novel Small Cysteine-Rich Protein in the Fraction from the Biocontrol Fusarium oxysporum Strain CS-20 that Mitigates Fusarium Wilt Symptoms and Triggers Defense Responses in Tomato

    PubMed Central

    Shcherbakova, Larisa A.; Odintsova, Tatyana I.; Stakheev, Alexander A.; Fravel, Deborah R.; Zavriev, Sergey K.

    2016-01-01

    The biocontrol effect of the non-pathogenic Fusarium oxysporum strain CS-20 against the tomato wilt pathogen F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (FOL) has been previously reported to be primarily plant-mediated. This study shows that CS-20 produces proteins, which elicit defense responses in tomato plants. Three protein-containing fractions were isolated from CS-20 biomass using size exclusion chromatography. Exposure of seedling roots to one of these fractions prior to inoculation with pathogenic FOL strains significantly reduced wilt severity. This fraction initiated an ion exchange response in cultured tomato cells resulting in a reversible alteration of extracellular pH; increased tomato chitinase activity, and induced systemic resistance by enhancing PR-1 expression in tomato leaves. Two other protein fractions were inactive in seedling protection. The main polypeptide (designated CS20EP), which was specifically present in the defense-inducing fraction and was not detected in inactive protein fractions, was identified. The nucleotide sequence encoding this protein was determined, and its complete amino acid sequence was deduced from direct Edman degradation (25 N-terminal amino acid residues) and DNA sequencing. The CS20EP was found to be a small basic cysteine-rich protein with a pI of 9.87 and 23.43% of hydrophobic amino acid residues. BLAST search in the NCBI database showed that the protein is new; however, it displays 48% sequence similarity with a hypothetical protein FGSG_10784 from F. graminearum strain PH-1. The contribution of CS20EP to elicitation of tomato defense responses resulting in wilt mitigating is discussed. PMID:26779237

  13. Higher sequence coverage and improved confidence in the identification of cysteine-rich proteins from the wool cuticle using combined chemical and enzymatic digestion.

    PubMed

    Koehn, Henning; Clerens, Stefan; Deb-Choudhury, Santanu; Morton, James D; Dyer, Jolon M; Plowman, Jeffrey E

    2009-12-01

    Keratin-associated proteins (KAPs) are important constituents of the wool cuticle, comprised of the endo-, exocuticle and a-layers, which contribute significantly to the fibre's molecular and mechanical characteristics. Relatively little is known about the distribution of specific KAPs across these layers, and correct protein identification of individual KAPs is difficult due to extensive homology and identity among individual KAPs. We here present evidence that, by specifically exploiting the high-cysteine content of KAPs in the wool cuticle, using 2-nitro-5-thiocyanobenzoic acid (NTCB) cleavage in combination with tryptic digestion, a larger number of KAPs can be identified than with standard trypsin-only digests. A total of 27 KAPs were identified, six of which could only be identified using NTCB. Furthermore, NTCB-mediated cleavage of cuticle proteins generated unique peptides critical for unambiguous identification of two KAPs, as well as significantly increasing the overall sequence coverage of most identified KAPs. Interestingly, some of the peptides found to be unique to particular KAPs could only be found in either the exo- or endocuticle. We conclude that for the analysis of high sulphur proteomes, specific targeting of cysteine residues using chemical agents such as NTCB can provide critical information for unambiguous protein identification.

  14. Cysteine-rich protein 61 (CCN1) and connective tissue growth factor (CCN2) at the crosshairs of ocular neovascular and fibrovascular disease therapy.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lulu; Chaqour, Brahim

    2013-12-01

    The vasculature forms a highly branched network investing every organ of vertebrate organisms. The retinal circulation, in particular, is supported by a central retinal artery branching into superficial arteries, which dive into the retina to form a dense network of capillaries in the deeper retinal layers. The function of the retina is highly dependent on the integrity and proper functioning of its vascular network and numerous ocular diseases including diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration and retinopathy of prematurity are caused by vascular abnormalities culminating in total and sometimes irreversible loss of vision. CCN1 and CCN2 are inducible extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins which play a major role in normal and aberrant formation of blood vessels as their expression is associated with developmental and pathological angiogenesis. Both CCN1 and CCN2 achieve disparate cell-type and context-dependent activities through modulation of the angiogenic and synthetic phenotype of vascular and mesenchymal cells respectively. At the molecular level, CCN1 and CCN2 may control capillary growth and vascular cell differentiation by altering the composition or function of the constitutive ECM proteins, potentiating or interfering with the activity of various ligands and/or their receptors, physically interfering with the ECM-cell surface interconnections, and/or reprogramming gene expression driving cells toward new phenotypes. As such, these proteins emerged as important prognostic markers and potential therapeutic targets in neovascular and fibrovascular diseases of the eye. The purpose of this review is to highlight our current knowledge and understanding of the most recent data linking CCN1 and CCN2 signaling to ocular neovascularization bolstering the potential value of targeting these proteins in a therapeutic context.

  15. Changes in rubisco, cysteine-rich proteins and antioxidant system of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) due to sulphur deficiency, cadmium stress and their combination.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Rita; Ahmad, Javed; Bashir, Humayra; Iqbal, Muhammad; Qureshi, M Irfan

    2017-03-01

    Sulphur (S) deficiency, cadmium (Cd) toxicity and their combinations are of wide occurrence throughout agricultural lands. We assessed the impact of short-term (2 days) and long-term (4 days) applications of cadmium (40 μg/g soil) on spinach plants grown on sulphur-sufficient (300 μM SO4(2-)) and sulphur-deficient (30 μM SO4(2-)) soils. Compared with the control (+S and -Cd), oxidative stress was increased by S deficiency (-S and -Cd), cadmium (+S and +Cd) and their combination stress (-S and +Cd) in the order of (S deficiency) < (Cd stress) < (S deficiency and +Cd stress). SDS-PAGE profile of leaf proteins showed a high vulnerability of rubisco large subunit (RbcL) to S deficiency. Rubisco small subunit (RbcS) was particularly sensitive to Cd as well as dual stress (+Cd and -S) but increased with Cd in the presence of S. Cysteine content in low molecular weight proteins/peptide was also affected, showing a significant increase under cadmium treatment. Components of ascorbate-glutathione antioxidant system altered their levels, showing the maximum decline in ascorbate (ASA), dehydroascorbate (DHA), total ascorbate (ASA + DHA, hereafter TA), glutathione (GSH) and total glutathione (GSH + GSSG, hereafter TG) under S deficiency. However, total ascorbate and total glutathione increased, besides a marginal increase in their reduced and oxidized forms, when Cd was applied in the presence of sufficient S. Sulphur supply also helped in increasing the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), glutathione reductase (GR) and catalase (CAT) under Cd stress. However, their activity suffered by S deficiency and by Cd stress during S deficiency. Each stress declined the contents of soluble protein and photosynthetic pigments; the highest decline in contents of protein and pigments occurred under S deficiency and dual stress respectively. The fresh and dry weights, although affected adversely by every stress, declined most under dual stress. It

  16. microRNA-200b and microRNA-200c promote colorectal cancer cell proliferation via targeting the reversion-inducing cysteine-rich protein with Kazal motifs.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yi; Liang, Hongwei; Chen, Weixu; Zhang, Hongjie; Wang, Nan; Wang, Feng; Zhang, Suyang; Liu, Yanqing; Zhao, Chihao; Yan, Xin; Zhang, Junfeng; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Gu, Hongwei; Zen, Ke; Chen, Xi

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA-200b and microRNA-200c (miR-200b/c) are 2 of the most frequently upregulated oncomiRs in colorectal cancer cells. The role of miR-200b/c during colorectal tumorigenesis, however, remains unclear. In the present study, we report that miR-200b/c can promote colorectal cancer cell proliferation via targeting the reversion-inducing cysteine-rich protein with Kazal motifs (RECK). Firstly, bioinformatics analysis predicted RECK as a conserved target of miR-200b/c. By overexpressing or knocking down miR-200b/c in colorectal cancer cells, we experimentally validated that miR-200b/c are direct regulators of RECK. Secondly, an inverse correlation between the levels of miR-200b/c and RECK protein was found in human colorectal cancer tissues and cell lines. Thirdly, we demonstrated that repression of RECK by miR-200b/c consequently triggered SKP2 (S-phase kinase-associated protein 2) elevation and p27(Kip1) (also known as cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B) degradation in colorectal cancer cells, which eventually promotes cancer cell proliferation. Finally, promoting tumor cell growth by miR-200b/c-targeting RECK was also observed in the xenograft mouse model. Taken together, our results demonstrate that miR-200b/c play a critical role in promoting colorectal tumorigenesis through inhibiting RECK expression and subsequently triggering SKP2 elevation and p27(Kip1) degradation.

  17. A multifaceted study of stigma/style cysteine-rich adhesin (SCA)-like Arabidopsis lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) suggests diversified roles for these LTPs in plant growth and reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Keun; Gonong, Benedict J.; Kim, Seung-Chul; Kieslich, Chris A.; Morikis, Dimitrios; Balasubramanian, Shruthi; Lord, Elizabeth M.

    2010-01-01

    Lily stigma/style cysteine-rich adhesin (SCA), a plant lipid transfer protein (LTP) which is secreted into the extracellular matrix, functions in pollen tube guidance in fertilization. A gain-of-function mutant (ltp5-1) for Arabidopsis LTP5, an SCA-like molecule, was recently shown to display defects in sexual reproduction. In the current study, it is reported that ltp5-1 plants have dwarfed primary shoots, delayed hypocotyl elongation, various abnormal tissue fusions, and display multibranching. These mutant phenotypes in vegetative growth are recessive. No abnormality was found in ltp5-1/+ plants. In a phylogenetic analysis of plant LTPs, SCA-like Arabidopsis LTPs were classified with conventional plant LTPs. Homology modelling-based electrostatic similarity index (ESI) clustering was used to show diversity in spatial distributions of electrostatic potentials of SCA-like LTPs, suggestive of their various roles in interaction in the extracellular matrix space. β-Glucuronidase (GUS) analysis showed that SCA-like Arabidopsis LTP genes are diversely present in various tissues. LTP4 was found specifically in the guard cells and LTP6 in trichomes as well as in other tissues. LTP1 levels were specifically abundant in the stigma, and both LTP3 and LTP6 in the ovules. LTP2 and LTP4 gene levels were up-regulated in whole seedlings with 20% polyethylene glycol (PEG) and 300 mM NaCl treatments, respectively. LTP5 was up-regulated in the hypocotyl with 3 d dark growth conditions. LTP6 was specifically expressed in the tip of the cotyledon under drought stress conditions. The results suggest that SCA-like Arabidopsis LTPs are multifunctional, with diversified roles in plant growth and reproduction. PMID:20667964

  18. AB087. The expression of cysteine-rich secretory protein 2 (CRISP2) and its specific regulator miR-27b in the spermatozoa of patients with asthenozoospermia

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Junhao; Zhou, Qizhao; Lyu, Xiaoming; Zhu, Ting; Chen, Zijian; Chen, Mingkun; Xia, Hui; Wang, Chunyan; Qi, Tao; Li, Xin; Liu, Cundong

    2016-01-01

    Objective Cysteine-rich secretory protein 2 (CRISP2) is an important sperm protein and plays roles in spermatogenesis, modulation of flagellar motility, acrosome reaction, and gamete fusion. Clinical evidence shows a reduced CRISP2 expression in spermatozoa from asthenozoospermic patients, but the molecular mechanism underlying its reduction remains unknown. Herein, we carried out a study focusing on the CRISP2 reduction and its roles in asthenozoospermia. Methods Spermatozoa were isolated from 90 study subjects’ ejaculated semen samples. DNA methylation was evaluated using bisulfite-sequencing PCR and methylation-specific PCR. The CRISP2 mRNA and protein expression levels were examined in the ejaculated spermatozoa by qRT-PCR and Western blot respectively. MiRNA expression was detected by qRT-PCR. The direct regulatory effect of miR-27b on CRISP2 was predicted computationally and validated via luciferase reporter assay and in vitro experiments in which miR-27b mimic or inhibitor was transfected into 293T cells. Respective correlations of miR-27b and CRISP2 protein expression with clinical features were analyzed using Spearman’s correlation coefficient. Results Initially, low expression of CRISP2 protein rather than its mRNA was observed in the ejaculated spermatozoa from asthenozoospermic patients relative to normozoospermic males. Meanwhile, methylation was not found in CRISP2 promoter. These data suggest a possible post-transcriptional regulation of CRISP2 in asthenozoospermia. Subsequently, bioinformatics prediction, luciferase reporter assay and miR-27b transfection experiments revealed that miR-27b could specifically target CRISP2 by binding its 3’-UTR, suppressing CRISP2 expression post-transcriptionally. Further evidence was provided by the clinical observation of a high miR-27b expression in the ejaculated spermatozoa from asthenozoospermic patients and a negative correlation between miR-27b and CRISP2 protein expression. Finally, a retrospective

  19. Immunolocalization of keratin-associated beta-proteins (beta-keratins) in pad lamellae of geckos suggest that glycine-cysteine-rich proteins contribute to their flexibility and adhesiveness.

    PubMed

    Alibardi, Lorenzo

    2013-03-01

    The epidermis of digital pads in geckos comprises superficial microornamentation from the oberhautchen layer that form long setae allowing these lizards to climb vertical surfaces. The beta-layer is reduced in pad lamellae but persists up to the apical free margin. Setae are made of different proteins including keratin-associated beta-proteins, formerly indicated as beta-keratins. In order to identify specific setal proteins the present ultrastructural study on geckos pad lamellae analyzes the immunolocalization of three beta-proteins previously found in the epidermis and adhesive setae of the green anolis. A protein rich in glycine but poor in cysteine (HgG5-like) is absent or masked in gecko pad lamellae. Another protein rich in glycine and cysteine (HgGC3-like) is weakly present in setae, oberhautchen and beta-layer. A glycine and cysteine medium rich beta-protein (HgGC10-like) is present in the lower part of the beta-layer but is absent in the oberhautchen, setae, and mesos layer. The latter two proteins may form intermolecular bonds that contribute to the flexibility of the corneous material sustaining the setae. The pliable alpha-layer present beneath the thin beta-layer and in the hinge region of the pad lamellae also contains HgGC10-like proteins. Based on the possibility that some HgGC3-like or other cys-rich beta-proteins are charged in the setae it is suggested that their charges influence the mechanism of adhesion increasing the induction of dipoles on the substrate and enhancing attractive van der Waals forces.

  20. A Novel Trypsin Inhibitor-Like Cysteine-Rich Peptide from the Frog Lepidobatrachus laevis Containing Proteinase-Inhibiting Activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Wei; Tan, Ji-Min; Du, Can-Wei; Luan, Ning; Yan, Xiu-Wen; Lai, Ren; Lu, Qiu-Min

    2015-08-01

    Various bio-active substances in amphibian skins play important roles in survival of the amphibians. Many protease inhibitor peptides have been identified from amphibian skins, which are supposed to negatively modulate the activity of proteases to avoid premature degradation or release of skin peptides, or to inhibit extracellular proteases produced by invading bacteria. However, there is no information on the proteinase inhibitors from the frog Lepidobatrachus laevis which is unique in South America. In this work, a cDNA encoding a novel trypsin inhibitor-like (TIL) cysteine-rich peptide was identified from the skin cDNA library of L. laevis. The 240-bp coding region encodes an 80-amino acid residue precursor protein containing 10 half-cysteines. By sequence comparison and signal peptide prediction, the precursor was predicted to release a 55-amino acid mature peptide with amino acid sequence, IRCPKDKIYKFCGSPCPPSCKDLTPNCIAVCKKGCFCRDGTVDNNHGKCVKKENC. The mature peptide was named LL-TIL. LL-TIL shares significant domain similarity with the peptides from the TIL supper family. Antimicrobial and trypsin-inhibitory abilities of recombinant LL-TIL were tested. Recombinant LL-TIL showed no antimicrobial activity, while it had trypsin-inhibiting activity with a Ki of 16.5178 μM. These results suggested there was TIL peptide with proteinase-inhibiting activity in the skin of frog L. laevis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of TIL peptide from frog skin.

  1. The cysteine rich necrotrophic effector SnTox1 produced by Stagonospora nodorum triggers susceptibility of wheat lines harboring Snn1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The gene encoding SnTox1, a necrotrophic effector from Stagonospora nodorum that causes necrosis of wheat lines expressing Snn1, has been verified by heterologous expression in Pichia pastoris. SnTox1 encodes a 117 amino acid cysteine rich protein with the first 17 amino acids predicted as a signal ...

  2. Dipeptide frequency/bias analysis identifies conserved sites of nonrandomness shared by cysteine-rich motifs.

    PubMed

    Campion, S R; Ameen, A S; Lai, L; King, J M; Munzenmaier, T N

    2001-08-15

    This report describes the application of a simple computational tool, AAPAIR.TAB, for the systematic analysis of the cysteine-rich EGF, Sushi, and Laminin motif/sequence families at the two-amino acid level. Automated dipeptide frequency/bias analysis detects preferences in the distribution of amino acids in established protein families, by determining which "ordered dipeptides" occur most frequently in comprehensive motif-specific sequence data sets. Graphic display of the dipeptide frequency/bias data revealed family-specific preferences for certain dipeptides, but more importantly detected a shared preference for employment of the ordered dipeptides Gly-Tyr (GY) and Gly-Phe (GF) in all three protein families. The dipeptide Asn-Gly (NG) also exhibited high-frequency and bias in the EGF and Sushi motif families, whereas Asn-Thr (NT) was distinguished in the Laminin family. Evaluation of the distribution of dipeptides identified by frequency/bias analysis subsequently revealed the highly restricted localization of the G(F/Y) and N(G/T) sequence elements at two separate sites of extreme conservation in the consensus sequence of all three sequence families. The similar employment of the high-frequency/bias dipeptides in three distinct protein sequence families was further correlated with the concurrence of these shared molecular determinants at similar positions within the distinctive scaffolds of three structurally divergent, but similarly employed, motif modules.

  3. Modeling Protein Domain Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Jones, Carleton "Buck"; Hull, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    This simple but effective laboratory exercise helps students understand the concept of protein domain function. They use foam beads, Styrofoam craft balls, and pipe cleaners to explore how domains within protein active sites interact to form a functional protein. The activity allows students to gain content mastery and an understanding of the…

  4. Protection of Sinorhizobium against host cysteine-rich antimicrobial peptides is critical for symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Haag, Andreas F; Baloban, Mikhail; Sani, Monica; Kerscher, Bernhard; Pierre, Olivier; Farkas, Attila; Longhi, Renato; Boncompagni, Eric; Hérouart, Didier; Dall'angelo, Sergio; Kondorosi, Eva; Zanda, Matteo; Mergaert, Peter; Ferguson, Gail P

    2011-10-01

    Sinorhizobium meliloti differentiates into persisting, nitrogen-fixing bacteroids within root nodules of the legume Medicago truncatula. Nodule-specific cysteine-rich antimicrobial peptides (NCR AMPs) and the bacterial BacA protein are essential for bacteroid development. However, the bacterial factors central to the NCR AMP response and the in planta role of BacA are unknown. We investigated the hypothesis that BacA is critical for the bacterial response towards NCR AMPs. We found that BacA was not essential for NCR AMPs to induce features of S. meliloti bacteroids in vitro. Instead, BacA was critical to reduce the amount of NCR AMP-induced membrane permeabilization and bacterial killing in vitro. Within M. truncatula, both wild-type and BacA-deficient mutant bacteria were challenged with NCR AMPs, but this resulted in persistence of the wild-type bacteria and rapid cell death of the mutant bacteria. In contrast, BacA was dispensable for bacterial survival in an M. truncatula dnf1 mutant defective in NCR AMP transport to the bacterial compartment. Therefore, BacA is critical for the legume symbiosis by protecting S. meliloti against the bactericidal effects of NCR AMPs. Host AMPs are ubiquitous in nature and BacA proteins are essential for other chronic host infections by symbiotic and pathogenic bacteria. Hence, our findings suggest that BacA-mediated protection of bacteria against host AMPs is a critical stage in the establishment of different prolonged host infections.

  5. Sac phosphatase domain proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, W E; Cooke, F T; Parker, P J

    2000-01-01

    Advances in our understanding of the roles of phosphatidylinositol phosphates in controlling cellular functions such as endocytosis, exocytosis and the actin cytoskeleton have included new insights into the phosphatases that are responsible for the interconversion of these lipids. One of these is an entirely novel class of phosphatase domain found in a number of well characterized proteins. Proteins containing this Sac phosphatase domain include the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins Sac1p and Fig4p. The Sac phosphatase domain is also found within the mammalian phosphoinositide 5-phosphatase synaptojanin and the yeast synaptojanin homologues Inp51p, Inp52p and Inp53p. These proteins therefore contain both Sac phosphatase and 5-phosphatase domains. This review describes the Sac phosphatase domain-containing proteins and their actions, with particular reference to the genetic and biochemical insights provided by study of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:10947947

  6. Identification and Characterization of a Novel Family of Cysteine-Rich Peptides (MgCRP-I) from Mytilus galloprovincialis

    PubMed Central

    Gerdol, Marco; Puillandre, Nicolas; Moro, Gianluca De; Guarnaccia, Corrado; Lucafò, Marianna; Benincasa, Monica; Zlatev, Ventislav; Manfrin, Chiara; Torboli, Valentina; Giulianini, Piero Giulio; Sava, Gianni; Venier, Paola; Pallavicini, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    We report the identification of a novel gene family (named MgCRP-I) encoding short secreted cysteine-rich peptides in the Mediterranean mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. These peptides display a highly conserved pre-pro region and a hypervariable mature peptide comprising six invariant cysteine residues arranged in three intramolecular disulfide bridges. Although their cysteine pattern is similar to cysteines-rich neurotoxic peptides of distantly related protostomes such as cone snails and arachnids, the different organization of the disulfide bridges observed in synthetic peptides and phylogenetic analyses revealed MgCRP-I as a novel protein family. Genome- and transcriptome-wide searches for orthologous sequences in other bivalve species indicated the unique presence of this gene family in Mytilus spp. Like many antimicrobial peptides and neurotoxins, MgCRP-I peptides are produced as pre-propeptides, usually have a net positive charge and likely derive from similar evolutionary mechanisms, that is, gene duplication and positive selection within the mature peptide region; however, synthetic MgCRP-I peptides did not display significant toxicity in cultured mammalian cells, insecticidal, antimicrobial, or antifungal activities. The functional role of MgCRP-I peptides in mussel physiology still remains puzzling. PMID:26201648

  7. Identification and Characterization of a Novel Family of Cysteine-Rich Peptides (MgCRP-I) from Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    PubMed

    Gerdol, Marco; Puillandre, Nicolas; De Moro, Gianluca; Guarnaccia, Corrado; Lucafò, Marianna; Benincasa, Monica; Zlatev, Ventislav; Manfrin, Chiara; Torboli, Valentina; Giulianini, Piero Giulio; Sava, Gianni; Venier, Paola; Pallavicini, Alberto

    2015-07-21

    We report the identification of a novel gene family (named MgCRP-I) encoding short secreted cysteine-rich peptides in the Mediterranean mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. These peptides display a highly conserved pre-pro region and a hypervariable mature peptide comprising six invariant cysteine residues arranged in three intramolecular disulfide bridges. Although their cysteine pattern is similar to cysteines-rich neurotoxic peptides of distantly related protostomes such as cone snails and arachnids, the different organization of the disulfide bridges observed in synthetic peptides and phylogenetic analyses revealed MgCRP-I as a novel protein family. Genome- and transcriptome-wide searches for orthologous sequences in other bivalve species indicated the unique presence of this gene family in Mytilus spp. Like many antimicrobial peptides and neurotoxins, MgCRP-I peptides are produced as pre-propeptides, usually have a net positive charge and likely derive from similar evolutionary mechanisms, that is, gene duplication and positive selection within the mature peptide region; however, synthetic MgCRP-I peptides did not display significant toxicity in cultured mammalian cells, insecticidal, antimicrobial, or antifungal activities. The functional role of MgCRP-I peptides in mussel physiology still remains puzzling.

  8. Cysteine-rich receptor-like kinase CRK5 as a regulator of growth, development, and ultraviolet radiation responses in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Burdiak, Paweł; Rusaczonek, Anna; Witoń, Damian; Głów, Dawid; Karpiński, Stanisław

    2015-06-01

    In plants, receptor-like protein kinases play essential roles in signal transduction by recognizing extracellular stimuli and activating the downstream signalling pathways. Cysteine-rich receptor-like kinases (CRKs) constitute a large subfamily of receptor-like protein kinases, with 44 members in Arabidopsis thaliana. They are distinguished by the novel C-X8-C-X2-C motif (DUF26) in the extracellular domains. One of them, CRK5, is an important component of the biochemical machinery involved in the regulation of essential physiological processes. Functional characterization of crk5 mutant plants showed their clear phenotype, manifested by impaired stomatal conductance and accelerated senescence. This phenotype correlated with accumulation of reactive oxygen species, higher foliar levels of ethylene and salicylic acid, and increased transcript abundance for genes associated with signalling pathways corresponding to these hormones. Moreover, the crk5 plants displayed enhanced cell death and oxidative damage in response to ultraviolet radiation. Complementation of CRK5 mutation managed to recover the wild-type phenotype, indicating an essential role of this gene in the regulation of growth, development, and acclimatory responses.

  9. The Arabidopsis thaliana cysteine-rich receptor-like kinases CRK6 and CRK7 protect against apoplastic oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Idänheimo, Niina; Gauthier, Adrien; Salojärvi, Jarkko; Siligato, Riccardo; Brosché, Mikael; Kollist, Hannes; Mähönen, Ari Pekka; Kangasjärvi, Jaakko; Wrzaczek, Michael

    2014-03-07

    Receptor-like kinases are important regulators of many different processes in plants. Despite their large number only a few have been functionally characterized. One of the largest subgroups of receptor-like kinases in Arabidopsis is the cysteine-rich receptor like kinases (CRKs). High sequence similarity among the CRKs has been suggested as major cause for functional redundancy. The genomic localization of CRK genes in back-to-back repeats has made their characterization through mutant analysis unpractical. Expression profiling has linked the CRKs with reactive oxygen species, important signaling molecules in plants. Here we have investigated the role of two CRKs, CRK6 and CRK7, and analyzed their role in extracellular ROS signaling. CRK6 and CRK7 are active protein kinases with differential preference for divalent cations. Our results suggest that CRK7 is involved in mediating the responses to extracellular but not chloroplastic ROS production.

  10. Structure of a two-CAP-domain protein from the human hookworm parasite Necator americanus

    SciTech Connect

    Asojo, Oluwatoyin A.

    2011-05-01

    The first structure of a two-CAP-domain protein, Na-ASP-1, from the major human hookworm parasite N. americanus refined to a resolution limit of 2.2 Å is presented. Major proteins secreted by the infective larval stage hookworms upon host entry include Ancylostoma secreted proteins (ASPs), which are characterized by one or two CAP (cysteine-rich secretory protein/antigen 5/pathogenesis related-1) domains. The CAP domain has been reported in diverse phylogenetically unrelated proteins, but has no confirmed function. The first structure of a two-CAP-domain protein, Na-ASP-1, from the major human hookworm parasite Necator americanus was refined to a resolution limit of 2.2 Å. The structure was solved by molecular replacement (MR) using Na-ASP-2, a one-CAP-domain ASP, as the search model. The correct MR solution could only be obtained by truncating the polyalanine model of Na-ASP-2 and removing several loops. The structure reveals two CAP domains linked by an extended loop. Overall, the carboxyl-terminal CAP domain is more similar to Na-ASP-2 than to the amino-terminal CAP domain. A large central cavity extends from the amino-terminal CAP domain to the carboxyl-terminal CAP domain, encompassing the putative CAP-binding cavity. The putative CAP-binding cavity is a characteristic cavity in the carboxyl-terminal CAP domain that contains a His and Glu pair. These residues are conserved in all single-CAP-domain proteins, but are absent in the amino-terminal CAP domain. The conserved His residues are oriented such that they appear to be capable of directly coordinating a zinc ion as observed for CAP proteins from reptile venoms. This first structure of a two-CAP-domain ASP can serve as a template for homology modeling of other two-CAP-domain proteins.

  11. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc; Doi, Roy

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  12. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.; Doi, R.

    1998-11-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  13. A high-throughput peptidomic strategy to decipher the molecular diversity of cyclic cysteine-rich peptides

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Aida; Hemu, Xinya; Nguyen, Giang K. T.; Nguyen, Ngan T. K.; Sze, Siu Kwan; Tam, James P.

    2016-01-01

    Cyclotides are plant cyclic cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs). The cyclic nature is reported to be gene-determined with a precursor containing a cyclization-competent domain which contains an essential C-terminal Asn/Asp (Asx) processing signal recognized by a cyclase. Linear forms of cyclotides are rare and are likely uncyclizable because they lack this essential C-terminal Asx signal (uncyclotide). Here we show that in the cyclotide-producing plant Clitoria ternatea, both cyclic and acyclic products, collectively named cliotides, can be bioprocessed from the same cyclization-competent precursor. Using an improved peptidomic strategy coupled with the novel Asx-specific endopeptidase butelase 2 to linearize cliotides at a biosynthetic ligation site for transcriptomic analysis, we characterized 272 cliotides derived from 38 genes. Several types of post-translational modifications of the processed cyclotides were observed, including deamidation, oxidation, hydroxylation, dehydration, glycosylation, methylation, and truncation. Taken together, our results suggest that cyclotide biosynthesis involves ‘fuzzy’ processing of precursors into both cyclic and linear forms as well as post-translational modifications to achieve molecular diversity, which is a commonly found trait of natural product biosynthesis. PMID:26965458

  14. A high-throughput peptidomic strategy to decipher the molecular diversity of cyclic cysteine-rich peptides.

    PubMed

    Serra, Aida; Hemu, Xinya; Nguyen, Giang K T; Nguyen, Ngan T K; Sze, Siu Kwan; Tam, James P

    2016-03-11

    Cyclotides are plant cyclic cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs). The cyclic nature is reported to be gene-determined with a precursor containing a cyclization-competent domain which contains an essential C-terminal Asn/Asp (Asx) processing signal recognized by a cyclase. Linear forms of cyclotides are rare and are likely uncyclizable because they lack this essential C-terminal Asx signal (uncyclotide). Here we show that in the cyclotide-producing plant Clitoria ternatea, both cyclic and acyclic products, collectively named cliotides, can be bioprocessed from the same cyclization-competent precursor. Using an improved peptidomic strategy coupled with the novel Asx-specific endopeptidase butelase 2 to linearize cliotides at a biosynthetic ligation site for transcriptomic analysis, we characterized 272 cliotides derived from 38 genes. Several types of post-translational modifications of the processed cyclotides were observed, including deamidation, oxidation, hydroxylation, dehydration, glycosylation, methylation, and truncation. Taken together, our results suggest that cyclotide biosynthesis involves 'fuzzy' processing of precursors into both cyclic and linear forms as well as post-translational modifications to achieve molecular diversity, which is a commonly found trait of natural product biosynthesis.

  15. Glioma Specific Extracellular Missense Mutations in the First Cysteine Rich Region of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) Initiate Ligand Independent Activation.

    PubMed

    Ymer, Susie I; Greenall, Sameer A; Cvrljevic, Anna; Cao, Diana X; Donoghue, Jacqui F; Epa, V Chandana; Scott, Andrew M; Adams, Timothy E; Johns, Terrance G

    2011-04-18

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is overexpressed or mutated in glioma. Recently, a series of missense mutations in the extracellular domain (ECD) of EGFR were reported in glioma patients. Some of these mutations clustered within a cysteine-rich region of the EGFR targeted by the therapeutic antibody mAb806. This region is only exposed when EGFR activates and appears to locally misfold during activation. We expressed two of these mutations (R324L and E330K) in NR6 mouse fibroblasts, as they do not express any EGFR-related receptors. Both mutants were autophosphorylated in the absence of ligand and enhanced cell survival and anchorage-independent and xenograft growth. The ECD truncation that produces the de2-7EGFR (or EGFRvIII), the most common EGFR mutation in glioma, generates a free cysteine in this same region. Using a technique optimized for detecting disulfide-bonded dimers, we definitively demonstrated that the de2-7EGFR is robustly dimerized and that ablation of the free cysteine prevents dimerization and activation. Modeling of the R324L mutation suggests it may cause transient breaking of disulfide bonds, leading to similar disulfide-bonded dimers as seen for the de2-7EGFR. These ECD mutations confirm that the cysteine-rich region of EGFR around the mAb806 epitope has a significant role in receptor activation.

  16. Glioma Specific Extracellular Missense Mutations in the First Cysteine Rich Region of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) Initiate Ligand Independent Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ymer, Susie I.; Greenall, Sameer A.; Cvrljevic, Anna; Cao, Diana X.; Donoghue, Jacqui F.; Epa, V. Chandana; Scott, Andrew M.; Adams, Timothy E.; Johns, Terrance G.

    2011-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is overexpressed or mutated in glioma. Recently, a series of missense mutations in the extracellular domain (ECD) of EGFR were reported in glioma patients. Some of these mutations clustered within a cysteine-rich region of the EGFR targeted by the therapeutic antibody mAb806. This region is only exposed when EGFR activates and appears to locally misfold during activation. We expressed two of these mutations (R324L and E330K) in NR6 mouse fibroblasts, as they do not express any EGFR-related receptors. Both mutants were autophosphorylated in the absence of ligand and enhanced cell survival and anchorage-independent and xenograft growth. The ECD truncation that produces the de2-7EGFR (or EGFRvIII), the most common EGFR mutation in glioma, generates a free cysteine in this same region. Using a technique optimized for detecting disulfide-bonded dimers, we definitively demonstrated that the de2-7EGFR is robustly dimerized and that ablation of the free cysteine prevents dimerization and activation. Modeling of the R324L mutation suggests it may cause transient breaking of disulfide bonds, leading to similar disulfide-bonded dimers as seen for the de2-7EGFR. These ECD mutations confirm that the cysteine-rich region of EGFR around the mAb806 epitope has a significant role in receptor activation. PMID:24212795

  17. Protein domain connectivity and essentiality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da F. Costa, L.; Rodrigues, F. A.; Travieso, G.

    2006-10-01

    Protein-protein interactions can be properly modeled as scale-free complex networks, while the lethality of proteins has been correlated with the node degrees, therefore defining a lethality-centrality rule. In this work the authors revisit this relevant problem by focusing attention not on proteins as a whole, but on their functional domains, which are ultimately responsible for their binding potential. Four networks are considered: the original protein-protein interaction network, its randomized version, and two domain networks assuming different lethality hypotheses. By using formal statistical analysis, they show that the correlation between connectivity and essentiality is higher for domains than for proteins.

  18. cDNA sequence analysis of a 29-kDa cysteine-rich surface antigen of pathogenic Entamoeba histolytica

    SciTech Connect

    Torian, B.E.; Stroeher, V.L.; Stamm, W.E. ); Flores, B.M. ); Hagen, F.S. )

    1990-08-01

    A {lambda}gt11 cDNA library was constructed from poly(U)-Spharose-selected Entamoeba histolytica trophozoite RNA in order to clone and identify surface antigens. The library was screened with rabbit polyclonal anti-E. histolytica serum. A 700-base-pair cDNA insert was isolated and the nucleotide sequence was determined. The deduced amino acid sequence of the cDNA revealed a cysteine-rich protein. DNA hybridizations showed that the gene was specific to E. histolytica since the cDNA probe reacted with DNA from four axenic strains of E. histolytica but did not react with DNA from Entamoeba invadens, Acanthamoeba castellanii, or Trichomonas vaginalis. The insert was subcloned into the expression vector pGEX-1 and the protein was expressed as a fusion with the C terminus of glutathione S-transferase. Purified fusion protein was used to generate 22 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and a mouse polyclonal antiserum specific for the E. histolytica portion of the fusion protein. A 29-kDa protein was identified as a surface antigen when mAbs were used to immunoprecipitate the antigen from metabolically {sup 35}S-labeled live trophozoites. The surface location of the antigen was corroborated by mAb immunoprecipitation of a 29-kDa protein from surface-{sup 125}I-labeled whole trophozoites as well as by the reaction of mAbs with live trophozoites in an indirect immunofluorescence assay performed at 4{degree}C. Immunoblotting with mAbs demonstrated that the antigen was present on four axenic isolates tested. mAbs recognized epitopes on the 29-kDa native antigen on some but not all clinical isolates tested.

  19. Zyxin and cCRP: two interactive LIM domain proteins associated with the cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Interaction with extracellular matrix can trigger a variety of responses by cells including changes in specific gene expression and cell differentiation. The mechanism by which cell surface events are coupled to the transcriptional machinery is not understood, however, proteins localized at sites of cell-substratum contact are likely to function as signal transducers. We have recently purified and characterized a low abundance adhesion plaque protein called zyxin (Crawford, A. W., and M. C. Beckerle. 1991. J. Biol. Chem. 266:5847- 5853; Crawford, A. W., J. W. Michelsen, and M. C. Beckerle. 1992. J. Cell Biol. 116:1381-1393). We have now isolated and sequenced zyxin cDNA and we report here that zyxin exhibits an unusual proline-rich NH2- terminus followed by three tandemly arrayed LIM domains. LIM domains have previously been identified in proteins that play important roles in transcriptional regulation and cellular differentiation. LIM domains have been proposed to coordinate metal ions and we have demonstrated by atomic absorption spectroscopy that purified zyxin binds zinc, a result consistent with the idea that zyxin has zinc fingers. In addition, we have discovered that zyxin interacts in vitro with a 23-kD protein that also exhibits LIM domains. Microsequence analysis has revealed that the 23-kD protein (or cCRP) is the chicken homologue of the human cysteine- rich protein (hCRP). By double-label indirect immunofluorescence, we found that zyxin and cCRP are extensively colocalized in chicken embryo fibroblasts, consistent with the idea that they interact in vivo. We conclude that LIM domains are zinc-binding sequences that may be involved in protein-protein interactions. The demonstration that two cytoskeletal proteins, zyxin and cCRP, share a sequence motif with proteins important for transcriptional regulation raises the possibility that zyxin and cCRP are components of a signal transduction pathway that mediates adhesion-stimulated changes in gene

  20. A novel cysteine-rich antimicrobial peptide from the mucus of the snail of Achatina fulica.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jian; Wang, Wenhong; Yang, Xiaomei; Yan, Xiuwen; Liu, Rui

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are important components of the innate immunity. Many antimicrobial peptides have been found from marine mollusks. Little information about AMPs of mollusks living on land is available. A novel cysteine-rich antimicrobial peptide (mytimacin-AF) belonging to the peptide family of mytimacins was purified and characterized from the mucus of the snail of Achatina fulica. Its cDNA was also cloned from the cDNA library. Mytimacin-AF is composed of 80 amino acid residues including 10 cysteines. Mytimacin-AF showed potent antimicrobial activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria and the fungus Candida albicans. Among tested microorganisms, it exerted strongest antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus with a minimal peptide concentration (MIC) of 1.9 μg/ml. Mytimacin-AF had little hemolytic activity against human blood red cells. The current work confirmed the presence of mytimacin-like antimicrobial peptide in land-living mollusks.

  1. The inhibition of calcium carbonate crystal growth by the cysteine-rich Mdm2 peptide.

    PubMed

    Dalas, E; Chalias, A; Gatos, D; Barlos, K

    2006-08-15

    The crystal growth of calcite, the most stable calcium carbonate polymorph, in the presence of the cysteine-rich Mdm2 peptide (containing 48 amino acids in the ring finger configuration), has been investigated by the constant composition technique. Crystallization took place exclusively on well-characterized calcite crystals in solutions supersaturated only with respect to this calcium carbonate salt. The kinetic results indicated a surface diffusion spiral growth mechanism. The presence of the Mdm2 peptide inhibited the crystal growth of calcite by 22-58% in the concentration range tested, through adsorption onto the active growth sites of the calcite crystal surface. The kinetic results favored a Langmuir-type adsorption model, and the value of the calculated affinity constant was k(aff)=147x10(4) dm(3)mol(-1), a(ads)=0.29.

  2. CD6-ligand interactions: a paradigm for SRCR domain function?

    PubMed

    Aruffo, A; Bowen, M A; Patel, D D; Haynes, B F; Starling, G C; Gebe, J A; Bajorath, J

    1997-10-01

    The scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) superfamily, which includes proteins expressed by leukocytes, can be subdivided into groups A and B. Group B contains the lymphocyte cell-surface receptor CD6. This article reviews recent progress in understanding the interaction between CD6 and its ligand, activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM). Analysis of the CD6-ALCAM interaction may help to understand how other SRCR domains bind to their ligands.

  3. The LIM motif defines a specific zinc-binding protein domain.

    PubMed

    Michelsen, J W; Schmeichel, K L; Beckerle, M C; Winge, D R

    1993-05-15

    The cysteine-rich protein (CRP) contains two copies of the LIM sequence motif, CX2CX17HX2CX2CX2CX17-CX2C, that was first identified in the homeodomain proteins Lin-11, Is1-1, and Mec-3. The abundance and spacing of the cysteine residues in the LIM motif are reminiscent of a metal-binding domain. We examined the metal-binding properties of CRP isolated from chicken smooth muscle (cCRP) and from a bacterial expression system and observed that cCRP is a specific Zn-binding metalloprotein. Four Zn(II) ions are maximally bound to cCRP, consistent with the idea that each LIM domain coordinates two metal ions. From spectroscopic studies of Co(II)- and 113Cd(II)-substituted cCRP, we determined that each metal ion is tetrahedrally coordinated with cysteinyl sulfurs dominating the ligand types. One metal site within each LIM motif has tetrathiolate (S4) coordination, the second site may either be S4 or S3N1. The LIM motif represents another example of a specific Zn-binding protein sequence.

  4. Alternative splicing for members of human mosaic domain superfamilies. I. The CH and LIM domains containing group of proteins.

    PubMed

    Friedberg, Felix

    2009-05-01

    In this paper we examine (restricted to homo sapiens) the products resulting from gene duplication and the subsequent alternative splicing for the members of a multidomain group of proteins which possess the evolutionary conserved calponin homology CH domain, i.e. an "actin binding domain", as a singlet and which, in addition, contain the conserved cysteine rich double Zn finger possessing Lim domain, also as a singlet. Seven genes, resulting from gene duplications, were identified that code for seven group members for which pre-mRNAs appear to have undergone multiple alternative splicing: Mical 1, 2 and 3 are located on chromosomes 6q21, 11p15 and 22q11, respectively. The LMO7 gene is present on chromosome 13q22 and the LIMCH1 gene on chromosome 4p13. Micall1 is mapped to chromosome 22q13 and Micall2 to chromosome 7p22. Translated Gen/Bank ESTs suggest the existence of multiple products alternatively spliced from the pre-mRNAs encoded by these genes. Characteristic indicators of such splicing among the proteins derived from one gene must include containment of some common extensive 100% identical regions. In some instances only one exon might be partly or completely eliminated. Sometimes alternative splicing is also associated with an increased frequency of creation of an exon or part of an exon from an intron. Not only coding regions for the body of the protein but also for its N- or -C ends could be affected by the splicing. If created forms are merely beginning at different starting points but remain identical in sequence thereafter, their existence as products of alternate splicing must be questioned. In the splicings, described in this paper, multiple isoforms rather than a single isoform appear as products during the gene expression.

  5. Diversity in protein domain superfamilies

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sayoni; Dawson, Natalie L; Orengo, Christine A

    2015-01-01

    Whilst ∼93% of domain superfamilies appear to be relatively structurally and functionally conserved based on the available data from the CATH-Gene3D domain classification resource, the remainder are much more diverse. In this review, we consider how domains in some of the most ubiquitous and promiscuous superfamilies have evolved, in particular the plasticity in their functional sites and surfaces which expands the repertoire of molecules they interact with and actions performed on them. To what extent can we identify a core function for these superfamilies which would allow us to develop a ‘domain grammar of function’ whereby a protein's biological role can be proposed from its constituent domains? Clearly the first step is to understand the extent to which these components vary and how changes in their molecular make-up modifies function. PMID:26451979

  6. Cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs) mediate diverse aspects of cell-cell communication in plant reproduction and development.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Eleanor; Costa, Liliana M; Gutierrez-Marcos, Jose

    2011-03-01

    Cell-cell communication in plants is essential for the correct co-ordination of reproduction, growth, and development. Studies to dissect this mode of communication have previously focussed primarily on the action of plant hormones as mediators of intercellular signalling. In animals, peptide signalling is a well-documented intercellular communication system, however, relatively little is known about this system in plants. In recent years, numerous reports have emerged about small, secreted peptides controlling different aspects of plant reproduction. Interestingly, most of these peptides are cysteine-rich, and there is convincing evidence suggesting multiple roles for related cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs) as signalling factors in developmental patterning as well as during plant pathogen responses and symbiosis. In this review, we discuss how CRPs are emerging as key signalling factors in regulating multiple aspects of vegetative growth and reproductive development in plants.

  7. Structure of Protein Having Inhibitory Disintegrin and Leukotriene Scavenging Functions Contained in Single Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Xueqing; Francischetti, Ivo M.B.; Lai, Ren; Ribeiro, José M.C.; Andersen, John F.

    2012-08-10

    The antihemostatic/antiangiogenic protein tablysin-15 is a member of the CAP (cysteine-rich secretory, antigen 5, and pathogenesis-related 1 protein) superfamily and has been shown to bind the integrins {alpha}{sub IIb}{beta}{sub 3} and {alpha}{sub V}{beta}{sub 3} by means of an Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) tripeptide sequence. Here we describe the x-ray crystal structure of tablysin-15 and show that the RGD motif is located in a novel structural context. The motif itself is contained in a type II {beta}-turn structure that is similar in its conformation to the RGD sequence of the cyclic pentapeptide cilengitide when bound to integrin {alpha}V{beta}3. The CAP domain also contains a hydrophobic channel that appears to bind a fatty acid molecule in the crystal structure after purification from Escherichia coli. After delipidation of the protein, tablysin-15 was found to bind proinflammatory cysteinyl leukotrienes with submicromolar affinities. The structure of the leukotriene E{sub 4}-tablysin-15 complex shows that the ligand binds with the nonfunctionalized end of the fatty acid chain buried in the hydrophobic pocket, whereas the carboxylate end of the ligand binds forms hydrogen bond/salt bridge interactions with polar side chains at the channel entrance. Therefore, tablysin-15 functions as an inhibitor of integrin function and as an anti-inflammatory scavenger of eicosanoids.

  8. Structural studies of human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1.

    PubMed

    Asojo, Oluwatoyin A; Koski, Raymond A; Bonafé, Nathalie

    2011-10-01

    Human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1 (GLIPR1) is a membrane protein that is highly upregulated in brain cancers but is barely detectable in normal brain tissue. GLIPR1 is composed of a signal peptide that directs its secretion, a conserved cysteine-rich CAP (cysteine-rich secretory proteins, antigen 5 and pathogenesis-related 1 proteins) domain and a transmembrane domain. GLIPR1 is currently being investigated as a candidate for prostate cancer gene therapy and for glioblastoma targeted therapy. Crystal structures of a truncated soluble domain of the human GLIPR1 protein (sGLIPR1) solved by molecular replacement using a truncated polyalanine search model of the CAP domain of stecrisp, a snake-venom cysteine-rich secretory protein (CRISP), are presented. The correct molecular-replacement solution could only be obtained by removing all loops from the search model. The native structure was refined to 1.85 Å resolution and that of a Zn2+ complex was refined to 2.2 Å resolution. The latter structure revealed that the putative binding cavity coordinates Zn2+ similarly to snake-venom CRISPs, which are involved in Zn2+-dependent mechanisms of inflammatory modulation. Both sGLIPR1 structures have extensive flexible loop/turn regions and unique charge distributions that were not observed in any of the previously reported CAP protein structures. A model is also proposed for the structure of full-length membrane-bound GLIPR1.

  9. Robustness of Helicobacter pylori Infection Conferred by Context-Variable Redundancy among Cysteine-Rich Paralogs

    PubMed Central

    Putty, Kalyani; Marcus, Sarah A.; Mittl, Peer R. E.; Bogadi, Lindsey E.; Hunter, Allison M.; Arur, Swathi; Berg, Douglas E.; Sethu, Palaniappan; Kalia, Awdhesh

    2013-01-01

    Deletion of single genes from expanded gene families in bacterial genomes often does not elicit a phenotype thus implying redundancy or functional non-essentiality of paralogous genes. The molecular mechanisms that facilitate evolutionary maintenance of such paralogs despite selective pressures against redundancy remain mostly unexplored. Here, we investigate the evolutionary, genetic, and functional interaction between the Helicobacter pylori cysteine-rich paralogs hcpG and hcpC in the context of H. pylori infection of cultured mammalian cells. We find that in natural H. pylori populations both hcpG and hcpC are maintained by positive selection in a dual genetic relationship that switches from complete redundancy during early infection, whereby ΔhcpC or ΔhcpG mutants themselves show no growth defect but a significant growth defect is seen in the ΔhcpC,ΔhcpG double mutant, to quantitative redundancy during late infection wherein the growth defect of the ΔhcpC mutant is exacerbated in the ΔhcpC,ΔhcpG double mutant although the ΔhcpG mutant itself shows no defect. Moreover, during early infection both hcpG and hcpC are essential for optimal translocation of the H. pylori HspB/GroEL chaperone, but during middle-to-late infection hcpC alone is necessary and sufficient for HspB/GroEL translocation thereby revealing the lack of functional compensation among paralogs. We propose that evolution of context-dependent differences in the nature of genetic redundancy, and function, between hcpG and hcpC may facilitate their maintenance in H. pylori genomes, and confer robustness to H. pylori growth during infection of cultured mammalian cells. PMID:23555707

  10. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  11. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Yosef, K.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1998-02-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  12. Increased Understanding of the Biochemistry and Biosynthesis of MUC2 and Other Gel-Forming Mucins Through the Recombinant Expression of Their Protein Domains

    PubMed Central

    Ambort, Daniel; Thomsson, Elisabeth; Johansson, Malin E. V.; Hansson, Gunnar C.

    2016-01-01

    The gel-forming mucins are large and heavily O-glycosylated proteins which build up mucus gels. The recombinant production of full-length gel-forming mucins has not been possible to date. In order to study mucin biosynthesis and biochemistry, we and others have taken the alternative approach of constructing different recombinant proteins consisting of one or several domains of these large proteins and expressing them separately in different cell lines. Using this approach, we have determined that MUC2, the intestinal gel-forming mucin, dimerizes via its C-terminal cysteine-knot domain and also trimerizes via one of the N-terminal von Willebrand D domains. Both of these interactions are disulfide bond mediated. Via this assembly, a molecular network is built by which the mucus gel is formed. Here we discuss not only the functional understanding obtained from studies of the recombinant proteins, but also highlight the difficulties encountered when these proteins were produced recombinantly. We often found an accumulation of the proteins in the ER and consequently no secretion. This was especially apparent when the cysteine-rich domains of the N- and C-terminal parts of the mucins were expressed. Other proteins that we constructed were either not secreted or not expressed at all. Despite these problems, the knowledge of mucin biosynthesis and assembly has advanced considerably through the studies of these recombinant proteins. PMID:23359125

  13. Functional domains in tetraspanin proteins.

    PubMed

    Stipp, Christopher S; Kolesnikova, Tatiana V; Hemler, Martin E

    2003-02-01

    Exciting new findings have emerged about the structure, function and biochemistry of tetraspanin proteins. Five distinct tetraspanin regions have now been delineated linking structural features to specific functions. Within the large extracellular loop of tetraspanins, there is a variable region that mediates specific interactions with other proteins, as well as a more highly conserved region that has been suggested to mediate homodimerization. Within the transmembrane region, the four tetraspanin transmembrane domains are probable sites of both intra- and inter-molecular interactions that are crucial during biosynthesis and assembly of the network of tetraspanin-linked membrane proteins known as the 'tetraspanin web'. In the intracellular juxtamembrane region, palmitoylation of cysteine residues also contributes to tetraspanin web assembly, and the C-terminal cytoplasmic tail region could provide specific functional links to cytoskeletal or signaling proteins.

  14. Connective tissue growth factor: a cysteine-rich mitogen secreted by human vascular endothelial cells is related to the SRC-induced immediate early gene product CEF-10

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Human umbilical vein endothelial (HUVE) cells have been previously reported to express the genes for the A and B chains of PDGF and to secrete PDGF-related factors into culture media. Antihuman PDGF IgG affinity chromatography was used to purify PDGF-related activity from HUVE cell-conditioned media. Immunoblot analysis of the affinity- purified proteins with anti-PDGF IgG and antibodies specific for the A or B chain peptides of PDGF combined with chemotactic and mitogenic assays revealed that the major PDGF immunorelated molecule secreted by HUVE cells is a monomer of approximately 36-38 kD and that less than 10% of the purified biologically active molecules are PDGF A or B chain peptides. Screening of an HUVE cell cDNA library in the expression vector lambda gtl 1 with the anti-PDGF antibody resulted in the cloning and sequencing of a cDNA with an open reading frame encoding a 38-kD cysteine-rich secreted protein which we show to be the major PDGF- related mitogen secreted by human vascular endothelial cells. The protein has a 45% overall homology to the translation product of the v- src-induced CEF-10 mRNA from chick embryo fibroblasts. We have termed this new mitogen connective tissue growth factor. PMID:1654338

  15. Myticin, a novel cysteine-rich antimicrobial peptide isolated from haemocytes and plasma of the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    PubMed

    Mitta, G; Hubert, F; Noël, T; Roch, P

    1999-10-01

    We report here the isolation of two isoforms of a novel cysteine-rich peptide from haemocytes (isoform A of 4.438 Da and B of 4.562 Da) and plasma (isoform A) of the mussel, Mytilus galloprovincialis. The two molecules display antibacterial activity against gram-positive bacteria, whereas only isoform B is active against the fungus Fusarium oxysporum and a gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli D31. Complete peptide sequences were determined by a combination of Edman degradation, mass spectrometry and cDNA cloning using a haemocyte cDNA library. The mature molecules, named myticins, comprise 40 residues with four intramolecular disulfide bridges and a cysteine array in the primary structure different to that of the previously characterized cysteine-rich antimicrobial peptides. Sequence analysis of the cloned cDNAs revealed that myticin precursors consist of 96 amino acids with a putative signal peptide of 20 amino acids, the antimicrobial peptide sequence and a 36-residue C-terminal extension. This structure suggests that myticins are synthesized as preproproteins and then processed by various proteolytic events before storage of the active peptide in the haemocytes. Myticin precursors are expressed mainly in the haemocytes as revealed by Northern blot analysis.

  16. Inverse expression of cystein-rich 61 (Cyr61/CCN1) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) in borderline tumors and carcinomas of the ovary.

    PubMed

    Bartel, Frank; Balschun, Katharina; Gradhand, Elise; Strauss, Hans G; Dittmer, Jürgen; Hauptmann, Steffen

    2012-09-01

    Members of the CCN [cystein-rich 61 (Cyr61)/connective tissue growth factor (CTGF)/nephroblastoma (NOV)] protein family are involved in the regulation of cellular proliferation, apoptosis, and migration and are also assumed to play a role in carcinogenesis. Therefore, we performed a retrospective study to investigate the immunohistochemical expression of both Cyr61 and CTGF in 92 borderline tumors (BOTs) and 107 invasive carcinomas of the ovary (IOCs). To determine their diagnostic and prognostic value, we correlated protein expression with clinicopathologic factors including overall and disease-free survival. Cyr61 and CTGF were found to be inversely expressed in both BOTs and IOCs, with a stronger expression of Cyr61 in IOCs. Moreover, Cyr61 was found to be preferentially expressed in high-grade serous carcinomas, whereas CTGF was found more frequently in low-grade serous carcinomas. Weak Cyr61 levels correlated with both low estrogen receptor and p53 expression (P=0.038, P=0.04, respectively). However, no association was observed between CTGF, estrogen receptor, and p53 expression levels in IOCs. Regarding prognosis, Cyr61 was found to be of no value, but the loss of CTGF was found to be associated with a poor prognosis in multivariate analysis of overall (relative risk 2.8; P=0.050) and disease-free (relative risk 2.3; P=0.031) survival. Cyr61 and CTGF are inversely expressed in BOTs and IOCs, and loss of CTGF independently indicates poor prognosis in IOCs.

  17. Role of cysteine residues and disulfide bonds in the activity of a legume root nodule-specific, cysteine-rich peptide.

    PubMed

    Haag, Andreas F; Kerscher, Bernhard; Dall'Angelo, Sergio; Sani, Monica; Longhi, Renato; Baloban, Mikhail; Wilson, Heather M; Mergaert, Peter; Zanda, Matteo; Ferguson, Gail P

    2012-03-30

    The root nodules of certain legumes including Medicago truncatula produce >300 different nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) peptides. Medicago NCR antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) mediate the differentiation of the bacterium, Sinorhizobium meliloti into a nitrogen-fixing bacteroid within the legume root nodules. In vitro, NCR AMPs such as NCR247 induced bacteroid features and exhibited antimicrobial activity against S. meliloti. The bacterial BacA protein is critical to prevent S. meliloti from being hypersensitive toward NCR AMPs. NCR AMPs are cationic and have conserved cysteine residues, which form disulfide (S-S) bridges. However, the natural configuration of NCR AMP S-S bridges and the role of these in the activity of the peptide are unknown. In this study, we found that either cysteine replacements or S-S bond modifications influenced the activity of NCR247 against S. meliloti. Specifically, either substitution of cysteines for serines, changing the S-S bridges from cysteines 1-2, 3-4 to 1-3, 2-4 or oxidation of NCR247 lowered its activity against S. meliloti. We also determined that BacA specifically protected S. meliloti against oxidized NCR247. Due to the large number of different NCRs synthesized by legume root nodules and the importance of bacterial BacA proteins for prolonged host infections, these findings have important implications for analyzing the function of these novel peptides and the protective role of BacA in the bacterial response toward these peptides.

  18. Structural and functional characterization of the CAP domain of pathogen-related yeast 1 (Pry1) protein

    PubMed Central

    Darwiche, Rabih; Kelleher, Alan; Hudspeth, Elissa M.; Schneiter, Roger; Asojo, Oluwatoyin A.

    2016-01-01

    The production, crystal structure, and functional characterization of the C-terminal cysteine-rich secretory protein/antigen 5/pathogenesis related-1 (CAP) domain of pathogen-related yeast protein-1 (Pry1) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is presented. The CAP domain of Pry1 (Pry1CAP) is functional in vivo as its expression restores cholesterol export to yeast mutants lacking endogenous Pry1 and Pry2. Recombinant Pry1CAP forms dimers in solution, is sufficient for in vitro cholesterol binding, and has comparable binding properties as full-length Pry1. Two crystal structures of Pry1CAP are reported, one with Mg2+ coordinated to the conserved CAP tetrad (His208, Glu215, Glu233 and His250) in spacegroup I41 and the other without divalent cations in spacegroup P6122. The latter structure contains four 1,4-dioxane molecules from the crystallization solution, one of which sits in the cholesterol binding site. Both structures reveal that the divalent cation and cholesterol binding sites are connected upon dimerization, providing a structural basis for the observed Mg2+-dependent sterol binding by Pry1. PMID:27344972

  19. Structural and functional characterization of the CAP domain of pathogen-related yeast 1 (Pry1) protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darwiche, Rabih; Kelleher, Alan; Hudspeth, Elissa M.; Schneiter, Roger; Asojo, Oluwatoyin A.

    2016-06-01

    The production, crystal structure, and functional characterization of the C-terminal cysteine-rich secretory protein/antigen 5/pathogenesis related-1 (CAP) domain of pathogen-related yeast protein-1 (Pry1) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is presented. The CAP domain of Pry1 (Pry1CAP) is functional in vivo as its expression restores cholesterol export to yeast mutants lacking endogenous Pry1 and Pry2. Recombinant Pry1CAP forms dimers in solution, is sufficient for in vitro cholesterol binding, and has comparable binding properties as full-length Pry1. Two crystal structures of Pry1CAP are reported, one with Mg2+ coordinated to the conserved CAP tetrad (His208, Glu215, Glu233 and His250) in spacegroup I41 and the other without divalent cations in spacegroup P6122. The latter structure contains four 1,4-dioxane molecules from the crystallization solution, one of which sits in the cholesterol binding site. Both structures reveal that the divalent cation and cholesterol binding sites are connected upon dimerization, providing a structural basis for the observed Mg2+-dependent sterol binding by Pry1.

  20. Direct Association of Sprouty-related Protein with an EVH1 Domain (SPRED) 1 or SPRED2 with DYRK1A Modifies Substrate/Kinase Interactions*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dan; Jackson, Rebecca A.; Yusoff, Permeen; Guy, Graeme R.

    2010-01-01

    The mammalian SPRED (Sprouty-related protein with an EVH1 domain) proteins include a family of three members, SPRED1–3. Currently, little is known about their biochemistry. The best described, SPRED1, has been shown to inhibit the Ras/ERK pathway downstream of Ras. All three SPREDs have a cysteine-rich domain (CRD) that has high homology to the CRD of the Sprouty family of proteins, several of which are also Ras/ERK inhibitors. In the belief that binding partners would clarify SPRED function, we assayed for their associated proteins. Here, we describe the direct and endogenous interaction of SPRED1 and SPRED2 with the novel kinase, DYRK1A. DYRK1A has become the subject of recent research focus as it plays a central role in Caenorhabditis elegans oocyte maturation and egg activation, and there is strong evidence that it could be involved in Down syndrome in humans. Both SPRED1 and SPRED2 inhibit the ability of DYRK1A to phosphorylate its substrates, Tau and STAT3. This inhibition occurs via an interaction of the CRD of the SPREDs with the kinase domain of DYRK1A. DYRK1A substrates must bind to the kinase to enable phosphorylation, and SPRED proteins compete for the same binding site to modify this process. Our accumulated evidence indicates that the SPRED proteins are likely physiological modifiers of DYRK1A. PMID:20736167

  1. ADM-1, a protein with metalloprotease- and disintegrin-like domains, is expressed in syncytial organs, sperm, and sheath cells of sensory organs in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed Central

    Podbilewicz, B

    1996-01-01

    A search was carried out for homologues of possible fusogenic proteins to study their function in a genetically tractable animal. The isolation, molecular, and cellular characterization of the Caenorhabditis elegans adm-1 gene (a disintegrin and metalloprotease domain) are described. A glycoprotein analogous to viral fusion proteins has been identified on the surface of guinea pig sperm (PH-30/fertilin) and is implicated in sperm-egg fusion. adm-1 is the first reported invertebrate gene related to PH-30 and a family of proteins containing snake venom disintegrin- and metalloprotease-like domains. ADM-1 shows a domain organization identical to PH-30. It contains prepro, metalloprotease, disintegrin, cysteine rich with putative fusion peptide, epidermal growth factor-like repeat, transmembrane, and cytoplasmic domains. Antibodies which recognize ADM-1 protein in immunoblots were generated. Using immunofluorescence and in situ hybridization, the products of adm-1 have been detected in specific cells during different stages of development. The localization of ADM-1 to the plasma membrane of embryonic cells and to the sheath cells of sensory organs suggests a function in cell adhesion. ADM-1 expression in the hypodermis, pharynx, vulva, and mature sperm is consistent with a putative role in somatic and gamete cell fusions. Images PMID:8970152

  2. Solution structure of the focal adhesion adaptor PINCH LIM1 domain and characterization of its interaction with the integrin-linked kinase ankyrin repeat domain.

    PubMed

    Velyvis, A; Yang, Y; Wu, C; Qin, J

    2001-02-16

    PINCH is a recently identified adaptor protein that comprises an array of five LIM domains. PINCH functions through LIM-mediated protein-protein interactions that are involved in cell adhesion, growth, and differentiation. The LIM1 domain of PINCH interacts with integrin-linked kinase (ILK), thereby mediating focal adhesions via a specific integrin/ILK signaling pathway. We have solved the NMR structure of the PINCH LIM1 domain and characterized its binding to ILK. LIM1 contains two contiguous zinc fingers of the CCHC and CCCH types and adopts a global fold similar to that of functionally distinct LIM domains from cysteine-rich protein and cysteine-rich intestinal protein families with CCHC and CCCC zinc finger types. Gel-filtration and NMR experiments demonstrated a 1:1 complex between PINCH LIM1 and the ankyrin repeat domain of ILK. A chemical shift mapping experiment identified regions in PINCH LIM1 that are important for interaction with ILK. Comparison of surface features between PINCH LIM1 and other functionally different LIM domains indicated that the LIM motif might have a highly variable mode in recognizing various target proteins.

  3. Palmitoylation of the cysteine-rich endodomain of the SARS-coronavirus spike glycoprotein is important for spike-mediated cell fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Petit, Chad M.; Chouljenko, Vladimir N.; Iyer, Arun; Colgrove, Robin; Farzan, Michael; Knipe, David M.; Kousoulas, K.G. . E-mail: vtgusk@lsu.edu

    2007-04-10

    The SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV) is the etiological agent of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). The SARS-CoV spike (S) glycoprotein mediates membrane fusion events during virus entry and virus-induced cell-to-cell fusion. The cytoplasmic portion of the S glycoprotein contains four cysteine-rich amino acid clusters. Individual cysteine clusters were altered via cysteine-to-alanine amino acid replacement and the modified S glycoproteins were tested for their transport to cell-surfaces and ability to cause cell fusion in transient transfection assays. Mutagenesis of the cysteine cluster I, located immediately proximal to the predicted transmembrane, domain did not appreciably reduce cell-surface expression, although S-mediated cell fusion was reduced by more than 50% in comparison to the wild-type S. Similarly, mutagenesis of the cysteine cluster II located adjacent to cluster I reduced S-mediated cell fusion by more than 60% compared to the wild-type S, while cell-surface expression was reduced by less than 20%. Mutagenesis of cysteine clusters III and IV did not appreciably affect S cell-surface expression or S-mediated cell fusion. The wild-type S was palmitoylated as evidenced by the efficient incorporation of {sup 3}H-palmitic acid in wild-type S molecules. S glycoprotein palmitoylation was significantly reduced for mutant glycoproteins having cluster I and II cysteine changes, but was largely unaffected for cysteine cluster III and IV mutants. These results show that the S cytoplasmic domain is palmitoylated and that palmitoylation of the membrane proximal cysteine clusters I and II may be important for S-mediated cell fusion.

  4. Mapping the Protein Domain Structures of the Respiratory Mucins: a mucin proteome coverage study

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Rui; Wang, T. Tiffany; DeMaria, Genevieve; Sheehan, John K.; Kesimer, Mehmet

    2012-01-01

    Mucin genes encode a family of the largest expressed proteins in the human genome. The proteins are highly substituted with O-linked oligosaccharides which greatly restrict access to the peptide backbones. The genomic organization of the N-terminal, O-glycosylated, and C-terminal regions of most of the mucins has been established and is available in the sequence databases. However, much less is known about the fate of their exposed protein regions after translation and secretion, and, to date, detailed proteomic studies complementary to the genomic studies are rather limited. Using mucins isolated from cultured human airway epithelial cell secretions, trypsin digestion and mass spectrometry, we investigated the proteome coverage of the mucins responsible for the maintenance and protection of the airway epithelia. Excluding the heavily glycosylated mucin domains, up to 85% coverage of the N-terminal region of the gel forming mucins MUC5B and MUC5AC was achieved, and up to 60% of the C-terminal regions were covered, suggesting that more N- and sparsely O-glycosylated regions as well as possible other modifications are available at the C-terminus. All possible peptides from the cysteine-rich regions that interrupt the heavily glycosylated mucin domains were identified. Interestingly, 43 cleavage sites from ten different domains of MUC5B and MUC5AC were identified, which possessed a non-tryptic cleavage site on the N-terminal end of the peptide, indicating potential exposure to proteolytic and/or “spontaneous cleavages”. Some of these non-tryptic cleavages may be important for proper maturation of the molecule, before and/or after secretion. Most of the peptides identified from MUC16 were from the SEA region. Surprisingly, three peptides were clearly identified from its heavily glycosylated regions. Up to 25% coverage of MUC4 was achieved covering seven different domains of the molecule. All peptides from the MUC1 cytoplasmic domain were detected along with the

  5. Innate immunity. Isolation of several cysteine-rich antimicrobial peptides from the blood of a mollusc, Mytilus edulis.

    PubMed

    Charlet, M; Chernysh, S; Philippe, H; Hetru, C; Hoffmann, J A; Bulet, P

    1996-09-06

    We have isolated from the blood of immune-challenged and untreated mussels (Mytilus edulis) antibacterial and antifungal peptides. We have characterized two isoforms of a novel 34-residue, cysteine-rich, peptide with potent bactericidal activity and partially characterized a novel 6.2-kDa antifungal peptide containing 12 cysteines. We report the presence of two members of the insect defensin family of antibacterial peptides and provide a phylogenetic analysis that indicates that mollusc and arthropod defensins have a common ancestry. Our data argue that circulating antimicrobial peptides represent an ancient host defense mechanism that predated the separation between molluscs and arthropods at the root of the Cambrian, about 545 million years ago.

  6. J domain independent functions of J proteins.

    PubMed

    Ajit Tamadaddi, Chetana; Sahi, Chandan

    2016-07-01

    Heat shock proteins of 40 kDa (Hsp40s), also called J proteins, are obligate partners of Hsp70s. Via their highly conserved and functionally critical J domain, J proteins interact and modulate the activity of their Hsp70 partners. Mutations in the critical residues in the J domain often result in the null phenotype for the J protein in question. However, as more J proteins have been characterized, it is becoming increasingly clear that a significant number of J proteins do not "completely" rely on their J domains to carry out their cellular functions, as previously thought. In some cases, regions outside the highly conserved J domain have become more important making the J domain dispensable for some, if not for all functions of a J protein. This has profound effects on the evolution of such J proteins. Here we present selected examples of J proteins that perform J domain independent functions and discuss this in the context of evolution of J proteins with dispensable J domains and J-like proteins in eukaryotes.

  7. Structural studies of human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1

    SciTech Connect

    Asojo, Oluwatoyin A.; Koski, Raymond A.; Bonafé, Nathalie

    2011-10-01

    Structural analysis of a truncated soluble domain of human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1, a membrane protein implicated in the proliferation of aggressive brain cancer, is presented. Human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1 (GLIPR1) is a membrane protein that is highly upregulated in brain cancers but is barely detectable in normal brain tissue. GLIPR1 is composed of a signal peptide that directs its secretion, a conserved cysteine-rich CAP (cysteine-rich secretory proteins, antigen 5 and pathogenesis-related 1 proteins) domain and a transmembrane domain. GLIPR1 is currently being investigated as a candidate for prostate cancer gene therapy and for glioblastoma targeted therapy. Crystal structures of a truncated soluble domain of the human GLIPR1 protein (sGLIPR1) solved by molecular replacement using a truncated polyalanine search model of the CAP domain of stecrisp, a snake-venom cysteine-rich secretory protein (CRISP), are presented. The correct molecular-replacement solution could only be obtained by removing all loops from the search model. The native structure was refined to 1.85 Å resolution and that of a Zn{sup 2+} complex was refined to 2.2 Å resolution. The latter structure revealed that the putative binding cavity coordinates Zn{sup 2+} similarly to snake-venom CRISPs, which are involved in Zn{sup 2+}-dependent mechanisms of inflammatory modulation. Both sGLIPR1 structures have extensive flexible loop/turn regions and unique charge distributions that were not observed in any of the previously reported CAP protein structures. A model is also proposed for the structure of full-length membrane-bound GLIPR1.

  8. Molecular cloning and characterization of lustrin A, a matrix protein from shell and pearl nacre of Haliotis rufescens.

    PubMed

    Shen, X; Belcher, A M; Hansma, P K; Stucky, G D; Morse, D E

    1997-12-19

    A specialized extracellular matrix of proteins and polysaccharides controls the morphology and packing of calcium carbonate crystals and becomes occluded within the mineralized composite during formation of the molluscan shell and pearl. We have cloned and characterized the cDNA coding for Lustrin A, a newly described matrix protein from the nacreous layer of the shell and pearl produced by the abalone, Haliotis rufescens, a marine gastropod mollusc. The full-length cDNA is 4,439 base pairs (bp) long and contains an open reading frame coding for 1,428 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence reveals a highly modular structure with a high proportion of Ser (16%), Pro (14%), Gly (13%), and Cys (9%). The protein contains ten highly conserved cysteine-rich domains interspersed by eight proline-rich domains; a glycine- and serine-rich domain lies between the two cysteine-rich domains nearest the C terminus, and these are followed by a basic domain and a C-terminal domain that is highly similar to known protease inhibitors. The glycine- and serine-rich domain and at least one of the proline-rich domains show sequence similarity to proteins of two extracellular matrix superfamilies (one of which also is involved in the mineralized matrixes of bone, dentin, and avian eggshell). The arrangement of alternating cysteine-rich domains and proline-rich domains is strikingly similar to that found in frustulins, the proteins that are integral to the silicified cell wall of diatoms. Its modular structure suggests that Lustrin A is a multifunctional protein, whereas the occurrence of related sequences suggest it is a member of a multiprotein family.

  9. A novel cysteine-rich neurotrophic factor in Aplysia facilitates growth, MAPK activation, and long-term synaptic facilitation.

    PubMed

    Pu, Lu; Kopec, Ashley M; Boyle, Heather D; Carew, Thomas J

    2014-04-01

    Neurotrophins are critically involved in developmental processes such as neuronal cell survival, growth, and differentiation, as well as in adult synaptic plasticity contributing to learning and memory. Our previous studies examining neurotrophins and memory formation in Aplysia showed that a TrkB ligand is required for MAPK activation, long-term synaptic facilitation (LTF), and long-term memory (LTM) for sensitization. These studies indicate that neurotrophin-like molecules in Aplysia can act as key elements in a functionally conserved TrkB signaling pathway. Here we report that we have cloned and characterized a novel neurotrophic factor, Aplysia cysteine-rich neurotrophic factor (apCRNF), which shares classical structural and functional characteristics with mammalian neurotrophins. We show that apCRNF (1) is highly enriched in the CNS, (2) enhances neurite elongation and branching, (3) interacts with mammalian TrkB and p75(NTR), (4) is released from Aplysia CNS in an activity-dependent fashion, (5) facilitates MAPK activation in a tyrosine kinase dependent manner in response to sensitizing stimuli, and (6) facilitates the induction of LTF. These results show that apCRNF is a native neurotrophic factor in Aplysia that can engage the molecular and synaptic mechanisms underlying memory formation.

  10. The architecture of the protein domain universe.

    PubMed

    Dokholyan, Nikolay V

    2005-03-14

    Understanding the design of the universe of protein structures may provide insights into protein evolution. We study the architecture of the protein domain universe, which has been found to poses peculiar scale-free properties. We examine the origin of these scale-free properties of the graph of protein domain structures (PDUG) and determine that that the PDUG is not modular, i.e. it does not consist of modules with uniform properties. Instead, we find the PDUG to be self-similar at all scales. We further characterize the PDUG architecture by studying the properties of the hub nodes that are responsible for the scale-free connectivity of the PDUG. We introduce a measure of the betweenness centrality of protein domains in the PDUG and find a power-law distribution of the betweenness centrality values. The scale-free distribution of hubs in the protein universe suggests that a set of specific statistical mechanics models, such as the self-organized criticality model, can potentially identify the principal driving forces of protein evolution. We also find a gatekeeper protein domain, removal of which partitions the largest cluster into two large sub-clusters. We suggest that the loss of such gatekeeper protein domains in the course of evolution is responsible for the creation of new fold families.

  11. A novel cysteine-rich antifungal peptide ToAMP4 from Taraxacum officinale Wigg. flowers.

    PubMed

    Astafieva, A A; Rogozhin, Eugene A; Andreev, Yaroslav A; Odintsova, T I; Kozlov, S A; Grishin, Eugene V; Egorov, Tsezi A

    2013-09-01

    A novel peptide named ToAMP4 was isolated from Taraxacum officinale Wigg. flowers by a combination of acetic acid extraction and different types of chromatography: affinity, size-exclusion, and RP-HPLC. The amino acid sequence of ToAMP4 was determined by automated Edman degradation. The peptide is basic, consists of 41 amino acids, and incorporates three disulphide bonds. Due to the unusual cysteine spacing pattern, ToAMP4 does not belong to any known plant AMP family, but classifies together with two other antimicrobial peptides ToAMP1 and ToAMP2 previously isolated from the dandelion flowers. To study the biological activity of ToAMP4, it was successfully produced in a prokaryotic expression system as a fusion protein with thioredoxin. The recombinant peptide was shown to be identical to the native ToAMP4 by chromatographic behavior, molecular mass, and N-terminal amino acid sequence. The peptide displays broad-spectrum antifungal activity against important phytopathogens. Two ToAMP4-mediated inhibition strategies depending on the fungus were demonstrated. The results obtained add to our knowledge on the structural and functional diversity of AMPs in plants.

  12. Domain structure of Lassa virus L protein.

    PubMed

    Brunotte, Linda; Lelke, Michaela; Hass, Meike; Kleinsteuber, Katja; Becker-Ziaja, Beate; Günther, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    The 200-kDa L protein of arenaviruses plays a central role in viral genome replication and transcription. This study aimed at providing evidence for the domain structure of L protein by combining bioinformatics with a stepwise mutagenesis approach using the Lassa virus minireplicon system. Potential interdomain linkers were predicted using various algorithms. The prediction was challenged by insertion of flexible sequences into the predicted linkers. Insertion of 5 or 10 amino acid residues was tolerated at seven sites (S407, G446, G467, G774, G939, S1952, and V2074 in Lassa virus AV). At two of these sites, G467 and G939, L protein could be split into an N-terminal and a C-terminal part, which were able to trans-complement each other and reconstitute a functional complex upon coexpression. Coimmunoprecipitation studies revealed physical interaction between the N- and C-terminal domains, irrespective of whether L protein was split at G467 or G939. In confocal immunofluorescence microscopy, the N-terminal domains showed a dot-like, sometimes perinuclear, cytoplasmic distribution similar to that of full-length L protein, while the C-terminal domains were homogenously distributed in cytoplasm. The latter were redistributed into the dot-like structures upon coexpression with the corresponding N-terminal domain. In conclusion, this study demonstrates two interdomain linkers in Lassa virus L protein, at G467 and G939, suggesting that L protein is composed of at least three structural domains spanning residues 1 to 467, 467 to 939, and 939 to 2220. The first domain seems to mediate accumulation of L protein into cytoplasmic dot-like structures.

  13. Protein function prediction using domain families

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Here we assessed the use of domain families for predicting the functions of whole proteins. These 'functional families' (FunFams) were derived using a protocol that combines sequence clustering with supervised cluster evaluation, relying on available high-quality Gene Ontology (GO) annotation data in the latter step. In essence, the protocol groups domain sequences belonging to the same superfamily into families based on the GO annotations of their parent proteins. An initial test based on enzyme sequences confirmed that the FunFams resemble enzyme (domain) families much better than do families produced by sequence clustering alone. For the CAFA 2011 experiment, we further associated the FunFams with GO terms probabilistically. All target proteins were first submitted to domain superfamily assignment, followed by FunFam assignment and, eventually, function assignment. The latter included an integration step for multi-domain target proteins. The CAFA results put our domain-based approach among the top ten of 31 competing groups and 56 prediction methods, confirming that it outperforms simple pairwise whole-protein sequence comparisons. PMID:23514456

  14. Discovering interacting domains and motifs in protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Hugo, Willy; Sung, Wing-Kin; Ng, See-Kiong

    2013-01-01

    Many important biological processes, such as the signaling pathways, require protein-protein interactions (PPIs) that are designed for fast response to stimuli. These interactions are usually transient, easily formed, and disrupted, yet specific. Many of these transient interactions involve the binding of a protein domain to a short stretch (3-10) of amino acid residues, which can be characterized by a sequence pattern, i.e., a short linear motif (SLiM). We call these interacting domains and motifs domain-SLiM interactions. Existing methods have focused on discovering SLiMs in the interacting proteins' sequence data. With the recent increase in protein structures, we have a new opportunity to detect SLiMs directly from the proteins' 3D structures instead of their linear sequences. In this chapter, we describe a computational method called SLiMDIet to directly detect SLiMs on domain interfaces extracted from 3D structures of PPIs. SLiMDIet comprises two steps: (1) interaction interfaces belonging to the same domain are extracted and grouped together using structural clustering and (2) the extracted interaction interfaces in each cluster are structurally aligned to extract the corresponding SLiM. Using SLiMDIet, de novo SLiMs interacting with protein domains can be computationally detected from structurally clustered domain-SLiM interactions for PFAM domains which have available 3D structures in the PDB database.

  15. Proteins and cholesterol-rich domains.

    PubMed

    Epand, Richard M

    2008-01-01

    Biological membranes are composed of many molecular species of lipids and proteins. These molecules do not mix ideally. In the plane of the membrane components are segregated into domains that are enriched in certain lipids and proteins. Cholesterol is a membrane lipid that is not uniformly distributed in the membrane. Proteins play an important role in determining cholesterol distribution. Certain types of protein lipidation are known to cause the lipoprotein to sequester with cholesterol and to stabilize cholesterol-rich domains. However, proteins that are excluded from such domains also contribute to the redistribution of cholesterol. One of the motifs that favor interaction with cholesterol is the CRAC motif. The role of the CRAC motif of the gp41 fusogenic protein of HIV is discussed. The distribution of the multianionic lipid, phosphatidylinositol(4,5)bis-phosphate (PtnIns(4,5)P2), is also not uniform in cell membranes. This lipid has several functions in the cell, including a morphological role in determining the sites of attachment of the actin cytoskeleton to the plasma membrane. PtnIns(4,5)P2 is sequestered by proteins having clusters of cationic residues in their sequence. Certain proteins containing cationic clusters also contain moieties such as myristoylation or a CRAC segment that would also endow them with the ability to sequester to a cholesterol-rich domain. These proteins interact with PtnIns(4,5)P2 in a cholesterol-dependent manner forming domains that are enriched in both cholesterol and in PtnIns(4,5)P2 but can also be distinct from liquid-ordered raft-like domains.

  16. Molecular cloning and characterization of two novel genes from hexaploid wheat that encode double PR-1 domains coupled with a receptor-like protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shunwen; Faris, Justin D; Edwards, Michael C

    2017-04-01

    Hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) contains at least 23 TaPr-1 genes encoding the group 1 pathogenesis-related (PR-1) proteins as identified in our previous work. Here, we report the cloning and characterization of TaPr-1-rk1 and TaPr-1-rk2, two novel genes closely related to the wheat PR-1 family. The two TaPr-1-rk genes are located on homoeologous chromosomes 3D and 3A, respectively, and each contains a large open reading frame (7385 or 6060 bp) that is interrupted by seven introns and subjected to alternative splicing (AS) with five or six isoforms of mRNA transcripts. The deduced full-length TaPR-1-RK1 and TaPR-1-RK2 proteins (95% identity) contain two repeat PR-1 domains, the second of which is fused via a transmembrane helix to a serine/threonine kinase catalytic (STKc) domain characteristic of receptor-like protein kinases. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the two PR-1 domains of the TaPR-1-RK proteins form sister clades with their homologues identified in other monocot plants and are well separated from stand-alone PR-1 proteins, whereas the STKc domains may have originated from cysteine-rich receptor-like kinases (CRKs). Reverse-transcriptase-PCR analysis revealed that the TaPr-1-rk genes are predominantly expressed in wheat leaves and their expression levels are elevated in response to pathogen attack, such as infection by barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV), and also to stress conditions, most obviously, to soil salinity. This is the first report of PR-1-CRK hybrid proteins in wheat. The data may shed new insights into the function/evolutionary origin of the PR-1 family and the STKc-mediated defense/stress response pathways in plants.

  17. Inhibition of the proliferation and acceleration of migration of vascular endothelial cells by increased cysteine-rich motor neuron 1

    SciTech Connect

    Nakashima, Yukiko; Morimoto, Mayuka; Toda, Ken-ichi; Shinya, Tomohiro; Sato, Keizo; Takahashi, Satoru

    2015-07-03

    Cysteine-rich motor neuron 1 (CRIM1) is upregulated only in extracellular matrix gels by angiogenic factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). It then plays a critical role in the tube formation of endothelial cells. In the present study, we investigated the effects of increased CRIM1 on other endothelial functions such as proliferation and migration. Knock down of CRIM1 had no effect on VEGF-induced proliferation or migration of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), indicating that basal CRIM1 is not involved in the proliferation or migration of endothelial cells. Stable CRIM1-overexpressing endothelial F-2 cells, termed CR1 and CR2, were constructed, because it was difficult to prepare monolayer HUVECs that expressed high levels of CRIM1. Proliferation was reduced and migration was accelerated in both CR1 and CR2 cells, compared with normal F-2 cells. Furthermore, the transient overexpression of CRIM1 resulted in decreased proliferation and increased migration of bovine aortic endothelial cells. In contrast, neither proliferation nor migration of COS-7 cells were changed by the overexpression of CRIM1. These results demonstrate that increased CRIM1 reduces the proliferation and accelerates the migration of endothelial cells. These CRIM1 effects might contribute to tube formation of endothelial cells. CRIM1 induced by angiogenic factors may serve as a regulator in endothelial cells to switch from proliferating cells to morphological differentiation. - Highlights: • CRIM1 was upregulated only in tubular endothelial cells, but not in monolayers. • Increased CRIM1 reduced the proliferation of endothelial cells. • Increased CRIM1 accelerated the migration of endothelial cells. • Increased CRIM1 had no effect on the proliferation or migration of COS-7 cells.

  18. A New, High Yield, Rapid, and Cost-Effective Protocol to Deprotection of Cysteine-Rich Conopeptide, Omega-Conotoxin MVIIA.

    PubMed

    Eisapoor, Seyed Sahand; Jamili, Shahla; Shahbazzadeh, Delavar; Ghavam Mostafavi, Pargol; Pooshang Bagheri, Kamran

    2016-05-01

    Almost all conopeptides purified from Conus venoms are cysteine-rich peptides. Among them, omega-conotoxin MVIIA, FDA approved peptide drug (Prialt(®)), selected as a cysteine-rich model that its protection from oxidation is critical during solid phase synthesis. Deprotection of cysteines is a crucial step after peptide synthesis. The current study aimed to set up a new highly efficient deprotection protocol for omega-conotoxin MVIIA. Deprotection was performed based on mercury acetate with significant major modification. The protocol accomplished based on the best molar ratio of peptide/mercury/2-ME that adjusted to 0.2 mm/3 mm/10 mm (50 μg/1 mg/10 μL). The yield and purity of omega-conotoxin MVIIA obtained at 93 and 95%, respectively. The total time of protocol shortened to 90 min instead of 6-20 h in routine methods. In this study, omega-conotoxin MVIIA was recovered in high yield and in the shortest time. Despite of other known protocols, molar ratio adjusted to minimum amount. In conclusion, this protocol would be suggested to cost-effective deprotection of thiol groups for similar cysteine-rich peptides.

  19. Functional innovation from changes in protein domains and their combinations.

    PubMed

    Lees, Jonathan G; Dawson, Natalie L; Sillitoe, Ian; Orengo, Christine A

    2016-06-01

    Domains are the functional building blocks of proteins. In this work we discuss how domains can contribute to the evolution of new functions. Domains themselves can evolve through various mechanisms, altering their intrinsic function. Domains can also facilitate functional innovations by combining with other domains to make novel proteins. We discuss the mechanisms by which domain and domain combinations support functional innovations. We highlight interesting examples where changes in domain combination promote changes at the domain level.

  20. ECOD: an evolutionary classification of protein domains.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hua; Schaeffer, R Dustin; Liao, Yuxing; Kinch, Lisa N; Pei, Jimin; Shi, Shuoyong; Kim, Bong-Hyun; Grishin, Nick V

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the evolution of a protein, including both close and distant relationships, often reveals insight into its structure and function. Fast and easy access to such up-to-date information facilitates research. We have developed a hierarchical evolutionary classification of all proteins with experimentally determined spatial structures, and presented it as an interactive and updatable online database. ECOD (Evolutionary Classification of protein Domains) is distinct from other structural classifications in that it groups domains primarily by evolutionary relationships (homology), rather than topology (or "fold"). This distinction highlights cases of homology between domains of differing topology to aid in understanding of protein structure evolution. ECOD uniquely emphasizes distantly related homologs that are difficult to detect, and thus catalogs the largest number of evolutionary links among structural domain classifications. Placing distant homologs together underscores the ancestral similarities of these proteins and draws attention to the most important regions of sequence and structure, as well as conserved functional sites. ECOD also recognizes closer sequence-based relationships between protein domains. Currently, approximately 100,000 protein structures are classified in ECOD into 9,000 sequence families clustered into close to 2,000 evolutionary groups. The classification is assisted by an automated pipeline that quickly and consistently classifies weekly releases of PDB structures and allows for continual updates. This synchronization with PDB uniquely distinguishes ECOD among all protein classifications. Finally, we present several case studies of homologous proteins not recorded in other classifications, illustrating the potential of how ECOD can be used to further biological and evolutionary studies.

  1. Model peptide studies of sequence regions in the elastomeric biomineralization protein, Lustrin A. I. The C-domain consensus-PG-, -NVNCT-motif.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Wustman, Brandon A; Morse, Daniel; Evans, John Spencer

    2002-05-01

    The lustrin superfamily represents a unique group of biomineralization proteins localized between layered aragonite mineral plates (i.e., nacre layer) in mollusk shell. Recent atomic force microscopy (AFM) pulling studies have demonstrated that the lustrin-containing organic nacre layer in the abalone, Haliotis rufescens, exhibits a typical sawtooth force-extension curve with hysteretic recovery. This force extension behavior is reminiscent of reversible unfolding and refolding in elastomeric proteins such as titin and tenascin. Since secondary structure plays an important role in force-induced protein unfolding and refolding, the question is, What secondary structure(s) exist within the major domains of Lustrin A? Using a model peptide (FPGKNVNCTSGE) representing the 12-residue consensus sequence found near the N-termini of the first eight cysteine-rich domains (C-domains) within the Lustrin A protein, we employed CD, NMR spectroscopy, and simulated annealing/minimization to determine the secondary structure preferences for this sequence. At pH 7.4, we find that the 12-mer sequence adopts a loop conformation, consisting of a "bend" or "turn" involving residues G3-K4 and N7-C8-T9, with extended conformations arising at F1-G3; K4-V6; T9-S10-G11 in the sequence. Minor pH-dependent conformational effects were noted for this peptide; however, there is no evidence for a salt-bridge interaction between the K4 and E12 side chains. The presence of a loop conformation within the highly conserved -PG-, -NVNCT- sequence of C1-C8 domains may have important structural and mechanistic implications for the Lustrin A protein with regard to elastic behavior.

  2. Inferring Evolutionary Scenarios for Protein Domain Compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedenhoeft, John; Krause, Roland; Eulenstein, Oliver

    Essential cellular processes are controlled by functional interactions of protein domains, which can be inferred from their evolutionary histories. Methods to reconstruct these histories are challenged by the complexity of reconstructing macroevolutionary events. In this work we model these events using a novel network-like structure that represents the evolution of domain combinations, called plexus. We describe an algorithm to find a plexus that represents the evolution of a given collection of domain histories as phylogenetic trees with the minimum number of macroevolutionary events, and demonstrate its effectiveness in practice.

  3. Genetic variability and natural selection at the ligand domain of the Duffy binding protein in brazilian Plasmodium vivax populations

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Plasmodium vivax malaria is a major public health challenge in Latin America, Asia and Oceania, with 130-435 million clinical cases per year worldwide. Invasion of host blood cells by P. vivax mainly depends on a type I membrane protein called Duffy binding protein (PvDBP). The erythrocyte-binding motif of PvDBP is a 170 amino-acid stretch located in its cysteine-rich region II (PvDBPII), which is the most variable segment of the protein. Methods To test whether diversifying natural selection has shaped the nucleotide diversity of PvDBPII in Brazilian populations, this region was sequenced in 122 isolates from six different geographic areas. A Bayesian method was applied to test for the action of natural selection under a population genetic model that incorporates recombination. The analysis was integrated with a structural model of PvDBPII, and T- and B-cell epitopes were localized on the 3-D structure. Results The results suggest that: (i) recombination plays an important role in determining the haplotype structure of PvDBPII, and (ii) PvDBPII appears to contain neutrally evolving codons as well as codons evolving under natural selection. Diversifying selection preferentially acts on sites identified as epitopes, particularly on amino acid residues 417, 419, and 424, which show strong linkage disequilibrium. Conclusions This study shows that some polymorphisms of PvDBPII are present near the erythrocyte-binding domain and might serve to elude antibodies that inhibit cell invasion. Therefore, these polymorphisms should be taken into account when designing vaccines aimed at eliciting antibodies to inhibit erythrocyte invasion. PMID:21092207

  4. Folding mechanism of a multiple independently-folding domain protein: double B domain of protein A.

    PubMed

    Arora, Pooja; Hammes, Gordon G; Oas, Terrence G

    2006-10-10

    The antibody binding properties of staphylococcal protein A (SpA) can be attributed to the presence of five highly homologous domains (E, D, A, B, and C). Although the folding of the B domain of protein A (BdpA) is well-characterized, the folding behavior of this domain in the context of full-length SpA in the cell remains unexplored. The sequence of the B domain is 89 and 91% identical to those of domains A and C, respectively. We have fused B domain sequences (BBdpA) as a close approximation of the A-B or B-C portion of SpA. Circular dichroism and fluorescence-detected denaturation curves of BBdpA are experimentally indistinguishable from those of BdpA. The rate constants for folding and unfolding from NMR line shape analysis for the single- and double-domain proteins are the same within experimental uncertainties (+/-20%). These results support the designation of SpA as a multiple independently-folding domain (MIFD) protein. We develop a mathematical model that describes the folding thermodynamics and kinetics of MIFD proteins. The model depicts MIFD protein folding and unfolding as a parallel network and explicitly calculates the flux through all parallel pathways. These fluxes are combined to give a complete description of the global thermodynamics and kinetics of the folding and unfolding of MIFD proteins. The global rates for complete folding and unfolding of a MIFD protein and those of the individual domains depend on the stability of the protein. We show that the global unfolding rate of a MIFD protein may be many orders of magnitude slower than that of the constituent domains.

  5. BAR domain proteins regulate Rho GTPase signaling

    PubMed Central

    Aspenström, Pontus

    2014-01-01

    BAR proteins comprise a heterogeneous group of multi-domain proteins with diverse biological functions. The common denominator is the Bin-Amphiphysin-Rvs (BAR) domain that not only confers targeting to lipid bilayers, but also provides scaffolding to mold lipid membranes into concave or convex surfaces. This function of BAR proteins is an important determinant in the dynamic reconstruction of membrane vesicles, as well as of the plasma membrane. Several BAR proteins function as linkers between cytoskeletal regulation and membrane dynamics. These links are provided by direct interactions between BAR proteins and actin-nucleation-promoting factors of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein family and the Diaphanous-related formins. The Rho GTPases are key factors for orchestration of this intricate interplay. This review describes how BAR proteins regulate the activity of Rho GTPases, as well as how Rho GTPases regulate the function of BAR proteins. This mutual collaboration is a central factor in the regulation of vital cellular processes, such as cell migration, cytokinesis, intracellular transport, endocytosis, and exocytosis. PMID:25483303

  6. The matricellular protein CCN1 controls retinal angiogenesis by targeting VEGF, Src homology 2 domain phosphatase-1 and Notch signaling.

    PubMed

    Chintala, Hemabindu; Krupska, Izabela; Yan, Lulu; Lau, Lester; Grant, Maria; Chaqour, Brahim

    2015-07-01

    Physiological angiogenesis depends on the highly coordinated actions of multiple angiogenic regulators. CCN1 is a secreted cysteine-rich and integrin-binding matricellular protein required for proper cardiovascular development. However, our understanding of the cellular origins and activities of this molecule is incomplete. Here, we show that CCN1 is predominantly expressed in angiogenic endothelial cells (ECs) at the leading front of actively growing vessels in the mouse retina. Endothelial deletion of CCN1 in mice using a Cre-Lox system is associated with EC hyperplasia, loss of pericyte coverage and formation of dense retinal vascular networks lacking the normal hierarchical arrangement of arterioles, capillaries and venules. CCN1 is a product of an immediate-early gene that is transcriptionally induced in ECs in response to stimulation by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). We found that CCN1 activity is integrated with VEGF receptor 2 (VEGF-R2) activation and downstream signaling pathways required for tubular network formation. CCN1-integrin binding increased the expression of and association between Src homology 2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-1 (SHP-1) and VEGF-R2, which leads to rapid dephosphorylation of VEGF-R2 tyrosine, thus preventing EC hyperproliferation. Predictably, CCN1 further brings receptors/signaling molecules into proximity that are otherwise spatially separated. Furthermore, CCN1 induces integrin-dependent Notch activation in cultured ECs, and its targeted gene inactivation in vivo alters Notch-dependent vascular specification and remodeling, suggesting that functional levels of Notch signaling requires CCN1 activity. These data highlight novel functions of CCN1 as a naturally optimized molecule, fine-controlling key processes in physiological angiogenesis and safeguarding against aberrant angiogenic responses.

  7. Linking in domain-swapped protein dimers

    PubMed Central

    Baiesi, Marco; Orlandini, Enzo; Trovato, Antonio; Seno, Flavio

    2016-01-01

    The presence of knots has been observed in a small fraction of single-domain proteins and related to their thermodynamic and kinetic properties. The exchanging of identical structural elements, typical of domain-swapped proteins, makes such dimers suitable candidates to validate the possibility that mutual entanglement between chains may play a similar role for protein complexes. We suggest that such entanglement is captured by the linking number. This represents, for two closed curves, the number of times that each curve winds around the other. We show that closing the curves is not necessary, as a novel parameter G′, termed Gaussian entanglement, is strongly correlated with the linking number. Based on 110 non redundant domain-swapped dimers, our analysis evidences a high fraction of chains with a significant intertwining, that is with |G′| > 1. We report that Nature promotes configurations with negative mutual entanglement and surprisingly, it seems to suppress intertwining in long protein dimers. Supported by numerical simulations of dimer dissociation, our results provide a novel topology-based classification of protein-swapped dimers together with some preliminary evidence of its impact on their physical and biological properties. PMID:27659606

  8. Joining RDC data from flexible protein domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sgheri, Luca

    2010-11-01

    We study the inverse problem of determining the conformational freedom of two protein domains from residual dipolar coupling (RDC) measurements. For each paramagnetic ion attached to one of the domains we obtain a magnetic susceptibility tensor χ from the RDC of couples of atoms of that domain, and a mean paramagnetic susceptibility tensor {\\bar{\\chi }} from the RDC of couples of atoms of the other domain. The latter is an integral average of rotations of χ which depends on the conformational freedom of the two domains. In this paper we consider the case when we have data from paramagnetic ions attached separately to each of the domains. We prove that in this case not all the elements of χ and {\\bar{\\chi }} are independent. We derive the mathematical equations for the compatibility of the measurements and show how these relations can be used in the presence of noisy data to determine a compatible set of χ and {\\bar{\\chi }} with an unconstrained minimization. If available, information about the shape of the noise can be included in the target function. We show that in this case the compatible set obtained has a reduced error with respect to the noisy data.

  9. hSP, the domain-duplicated homolog of pS2 protein, is co-expressed with pS2 in stomach but not in breast carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Tomasetto, C; Rio, M C; Gautier, C; Wolf, C; Hareuveni, M; Chambon, P; Lathe, R

    1990-01-01

    Approximately 50% of human breast tumors secrete a small cysteine-rich protein, pS2, of unknown function. pS2 protein was recently found to be homologous to a porcine protein with hormonogastric activity, pancreatic spasmolytic polypeptide (PSP), in which the 5-cysteine domain present in pS2 is tandemly duplicated. We have characterized cDNA species encoding PSP and its human and mouse counterparts, hSP and mSP. We show that hSP and pS2 are separately encoded in the genome, and that the two proteins are co-expressed in normal stomach epithelium. However, expression of hSP was not detected in breast tumors. Computer analysis revealed that the pattern of conserved cysteine residues in hSP and pS2, the P domain, is present at the N termini of two other mammalian proteins, intestinal sucrase-isomaltase and lysosomal alpha-glucosidase. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 3. Fig. 5. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. PMID:2303034

  10. A small cysteine-rich protein from the Asian soybean rust fungus, Phakopsora pachyrhizi, suppresses plant immunity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Asian soybean rust fungus, Phakopsora pachyrhizi, is an obligate pathogen capable of causing explosive disease epidemics that drastically reduce the yield of soybean (Glycine max). Currently, the molecular mechanisms by which P. pachyrhizi and other rust fungi cause disease are poorly understood...

  11. Protein function annotation using protein domain family resources.

    PubMed

    Das, Sayoni; Orengo, Christine A

    2016-01-15

    As a result of the genome sequencing and structural genomics initiatives, we have a wealth of protein sequence and structural data. However, only about 1% of these proteins have experimental functional annotations. As a result, computational approaches that can predict protein functions are essential in bridging this widening annotation gap. This article reviews the current approaches of protein function prediction using structure and sequence based classification of protein domain family resources with a special focus on functional families in the CATH-Gene3D resource.

  12. Structure and function of WD40 domain proteins.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chao; Min, Jinrong

    2011-03-01

    The WD40 domain exhibits a β-propeller architecture, often comprising seven blades. The WD40 domain is one of the most abundant domains and also among the top interacting domains in eukaryotic genomes. In this review, we will discuss the identification, definition and architecture of the WD40 domains. WD40 domain proteins are involved in a large variety of cellular processes, in which WD40 domains function as a protein-protein or protein-DNA interaction platform. WD40 domain mediates molecular recognition events mainly through the smaller top surface, but also through the bottom surface and sides. So far, no WD40 domain has been found to display enzymatic activity. We will also discuss the different binding modes exhibited by the large versatile family of WD40 domain proteins. In the last part of this review, we will discuss how post-translational modifications are recognized by WD40 domain proteins.

  13. Phylogenetic Analysis of Brassica rapa MATH-Domain Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Liming; Huang, Yong; Hu, Yan; He, Xiaoli; Shen, Wenhui; Liu, Chunlin; Ruan, Ying

    2013-01-01

    The MATH (meprin and TRAF-C homology) domain is a fold of seven anti-parallel β-helices involved in protein-protein interaction. Here, we report the identification and characterization of 90 MATH-domain proteins from the Brassica rapa genome. By sequence analysis together with MATH-domain proteins from other species, the B. rapa MATH-domain proteins can be grouped into 6 classes. Class-I protein has one or several MATH domains without any other recognizable domain; Class-II protein contains a MATH domain together with a conserved BTB (Broad Complex, Tramtrack, and Bric-a-Brac ) domain; Class-III protein belongs to the MATH/Filament domain family; Class-IV protein contains a MATH domain frequently combined with some other domains; Class-V protein has a relative long sequence but contains only one MATH domain; Class-VI protein is characterized by the presence of Peptidase and UBQ (Ubiquitinylation) domains together with one MATH domain. As part of our study regarding seed development of B. rapa, six genes are screened by SSH (Suppression Subtractive Hybridization) and their expression levels are analyzed in combination with seed developmental stages, and expression patterns suggested that Bra001786, Bra03578 and Bra036572 may be seed development specific genes, while Bra001787, Bra020541 and Bra040904 may be involved in seed and flower organ development. This study provides the first characterization of the MATH domain proteins in B. rapa PMID:24179444

  14. Independent Structural Domains in Paramyxovirus Polymerase Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Dochow, Melanie; Krumm, Stefanie A.; Crowe, James E.; Moore, Martin L.; Plemper, Richard K.

    2012-01-01

    All enzymatic activities required for genomic replication and transcription of nonsegmented negative strand RNA viruses (or Mononegavirales) are believed to be concentrated in the viral polymerase (L) protein. However, our insight into the organization of these different enzymatic activities into a bioactive tertiary structure remains rudimentary. Fragments of Mononegavirales polymerases analyzed to date cannot restore bioactivity through trans-complementation, unlike the related L proteins of segmented NSVs. We investigated the domain organization of phylogenetically diverse Paramyxovirus L proteins derived from measles virus (MeV), Nipah virus (NiV), and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). Through a comprehensive in silico and experimental analysis of domain intersections, we defined MeV L position 615 as an interdomain candidate in addition to the previously reported residue 1708. Only position 1708 of MeV and the homologous positions in NiV and RSV L also tolerated the insertion of epitope tags. Splitting of MeV L at residue 1708 created fragments that were unable to physically interact and trans-complement, but strikingly, these activities were reconstituted by the addition of dimerization tags to the fragments. Equivalently split fragments of NiV, RSV, and MeV L oligomerized with comparable efficiency in all homo- and heterotypic combinations, but only the homotypic pairs were able to trans-complement. These results demonstrate that synthesis as a single polypeptide is not required for the Mononegavirales polymerases to adopt a proper tertiary conformation. Paramyxovirus polymerases are composed of at least two truly independent folding domains that lack a traditional interface but require molecular compatibility for bioactivity. The functional probing of the L domain architecture through trans-complementation is anticipated to be applicable to all Mononegavirales polymerases. PMID:22215662

  15. Synthetic mimetics of protein secondary structure domains

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Nathan T.; Katt, William P.; Hamilton, Andrew D.

    2010-01-01

    Proteins modulate the majority of all biological functions and are primarily composed of highly organized secondary structural elements such as helices, turns and sheets. Many of these functions are affected by a small number of key protein–protein contacts, often involving one or more of these well-defined structural elements. Given the ubiquitous nature of these protein recognition domains, their mimicry by peptidic and non-peptidic scaffolds has become a major focus of contemporary research. This review examines several key advances in secondary structure mimicry over the past several years, particularly focusing upon scaffolds that show not only promising projection of functional groups, but also a proven effect in biological systems. PMID:20123744

  16. Modular protein domains: an engineering approach toward functional biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Lin, Charng-Yu; Liu, Julie C

    2016-08-01

    Protein domains and peptide sequences are a powerful tool for conferring specific functions to engineered biomaterials. Protein sequences with a wide variety of functionalities, including structure, bioactivity, protein-protein interactions, and stimuli responsiveness, have been identified, and advances in molecular biology continue to pinpoint new sequences. Protein domains can be combined to make recombinant proteins with multiple functionalities. The high fidelity of the protein translation machinery results in exquisite control over the sequence of recombinant proteins and the resulting properties of protein-based materials. In this review, we discuss protein domains and peptide sequences in the context of functional protein-based materials, composite materials, and their biological applications.

  17. Evolution of Protein Domain Repeats in Metazoa

    PubMed Central

    Schüler, Andreas; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich

    2016-01-01

    Repeats are ubiquitous elements of proteins and they play important roles for cellular function and during evolution. Repeats are, however, also notoriously difficult to capture computationally and large scale studies so far had difficulties in linking genetic causes, structural properties and evolutionary trajectories of protein repeats. Here we apply recently developed methods for repeat detection and analysis to a large dataset comprising over hundred metazoan genomes. We find that repeats in larger protein families experience generally very few insertions or deletions (indels) of repeat units but there is also a significant fraction of noteworthy volatile outliers with very high indel rates. Analysis of structural data indicates that repeats with an open structure and independently folding units are more volatile and more likely to be intrinsically disordered. Such disordered repeats are also significantly enriched in sites with a high functional potential such as linear motifs. Furthermore, the most volatile repeats have a high sequence similarity between their units. Since many volatile repeats also show signs of recombination, we conclude they are often shaped by concerted evolution. Intriguingly, many of these conserved yet volatile repeats are involved in host-pathogen interactions where they might foster fast but subtle adaptation in biological arms races. Key Words: protein evolution, domain rearrangements, protein repeats, concerted evolution. PMID:27671125

  18. Extra domains in secondary transport carriers and channel proteins.

    PubMed

    Barabote, Ravi D; Tamang, Dorjee G; Abeywardena, Shannon N; Fallah, Neda S; Fu, Jeffrey Yu Chung; Lio, Jeffrey K; Mirhosseini, Pegah; Pezeshk, Ronnie; Podell, Sheila; Salampessy, Marnae L; Thever, Mark D; Saier, Milton H

    2006-10-01

    "Extra" domains in members of the families of secondary transport carrier and channel proteins provide secondary functions that expand, amplify or restrict the functional nature of these proteins. Domains in secondary carriers include TrkA and SPX domains in DASS family members, DedA domains in TRAP-T family members (both of the IT superfamily), Kazal-2 and PDZ domains in OAT family members (of the MF superfamily), USP, IIA(Fru) and TrkA domains in ABT family members (of the APC superfamily), ricin domains in OST family members, and TrkA domains in AAE family members. Some transporters contain highly hydrophilic domains consisting of multiple repeat units that can also be found in proteins of dissimilar function. Similarly, transmembrane alpha-helical channel-forming proteins contain unique, conserved, hydrophilic domains, most of which are not found in carriers. In some cases the functions of these domains are known. They may be ligand binding domains, phosphorylation domains, signal transduction domains, protein/protein interaction domains or complex carbohydrate-binding domains. These domains mediate regulation, subunit interactions, or subcellular targeting. Phylogenetic analyses show that while some of these domains are restricted to closely related proteins derived from specific organismal types, others are nearly ubiquitous within a particular family of transporters and occur in a tremendous diversity of organisms. The former probably became associated with the transporters late in the evolutionary process; the latter probably became associated with the carriers much earlier. These domains can be located at either end of the transporter or in a central region, depending on the domain and transporter family. These studies provide useful information about the evolution of extra domains in channels and secondary carriers and provide novel clues concerning function.

  19. Stochastic single-molecule dynamics of synaptic membrane protein domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahraman, Osman; Li, Yiwei; Haselwandter, Christoph A.

    2016-09-01

    Motivated by single-molecule experiments on synaptic membrane protein domains, we use a stochastic lattice model to study protein reaction and diffusion processes in crowded membranes. We find that the stochastic reaction-diffusion dynamics of synaptic proteins provide a simple physical mechanism for collective fluctuations in synaptic domains, the molecular turnover observed at synaptic domains, key features of the single-molecule trajectories observed for synaptic proteins, and spatially inhomogeneous protein lifetimes at the cell membrane. Our results suggest that central aspects of the single-molecule and collective dynamics observed for membrane protein domains can be understood in terms of stochastic reaction-diffusion processes at the cell membrane.

  20. Functional and evolutionary analyses of Helicobacter pylori HP0231 (DsbK) protein with strong oxidative and chaperone activity characterized by a highly diverged dimerization domain.

    PubMed

    Bocian-Ostrzycka, Katarzyna M; Łasica, Anna M; Dunin-Horkawicz, Stanisław; Grzeszczuk, Magdalena J; Drabik, Karolina; Dobosz, Aneta M; Godlewska, Renata; Nowak, Elżbieta; Collet, Jean-Francois; Jagusztyn-Krynicka, Elżbieta K

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori does not encode the classical DsbA/DsbB oxidoreductases that are crucial for oxidative folding of extracytoplasmic proteins. Instead, this microorganism encodes an untypical two proteins playing a role in disulfide bond formation - periplasmic HP0231, which structure resembles that of EcDsbC/DsbG, and its redox partner, a membrane protein HpDsbI (HP0595) with a β-propeller structure. The aim of presented work was to assess relations between HP0231 structure and function. We showed that HP0231 is most closely related evolutionarily to the catalytic domain of DsbG, even though it possesses a catalytic motif typical for canonical DsbA proteins. Similarly, the highly diverged N-terminal dimerization domain is homologous to the dimerization domain of DsbG. To better understand the functioning of this atypical oxidoreductase, we examined its activity using in vivo and in vitro experiments. We found that HP0231 exhibits oxidizing and chaperone activities but no isomerizing activity, even though H. pylori does not contain a classical DsbC. We also show that HP0231 is not involved in the introduction of disulfide bonds into HcpC (Helicobacter cysteine-rich protein C), a protein involved in the modulation of the H. pylori interaction with its host. Additionally, we also constructed a truncated version of HP0231 lacking the dimerization domain, denoted HP0231m, and showed that it acts in Escherichia coli cells in a DsbB-dependent manner. In contrast, HP0231m and classical monomeric EcDsbA (E. coli DsbA protein) were both unable to complement the lack of HP0231 in H. pylori cells, though they exist in oxidized forms. HP0231m is inactive in the insulin reduction assay and possesses high chaperone activity, in contrast to EcDsbA. In conclusion, HP0231 combines oxidative functions characteristic of DsbA proteins and chaperone activity characteristic of DsbC/DsbG, and it lacks isomerization activity.

  1. Functional and evolutionary analyses of Helicobacter pylori HP0231 (DsbK) protein with strong oxidative and chaperone activity characterized by a highly diverged dimerization domain

    PubMed Central

    Bocian-Ostrzycka, Katarzyna M.; Łasica, Anna M.; Dunin-Horkawicz, Stanisław; Grzeszczuk, Magdalena J.; Drabik, Karolina; Dobosz, Aneta M.; Godlewska, Renata; Nowak, Elżbieta; Collet, Jean-Francois; Jagusztyn-Krynicka, Elżbieta K.

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori does not encode the classical DsbA/DsbB oxidoreductases that are crucial for oxidative folding of extracytoplasmic proteins. Instead, this microorganism encodes an untypical two proteins playing a role in disulfide bond formation – periplasmic HP0231, which structure resembles that of EcDsbC/DsbG, and its redox partner, a membrane protein HpDsbI (HP0595) with a β-propeller structure. The aim of presented work was to assess relations between HP0231 structure and function. We showed that HP0231 is most closely related evolutionarily to the catalytic domain of DsbG, even though it possesses a catalytic motif typical for canonical DsbA proteins. Similarly, the highly diverged N-terminal dimerization domain is homologous to the dimerization domain of DsbG. To better understand the functioning of this atypical oxidoreductase, we examined its activity using in vivo and in vitro experiments. We found that HP0231 exhibits oxidizing and chaperone activities but no isomerizing activity, even though H. pylori does not contain a classical DsbC. We also show that HP0231 is not involved in the introduction of disulfide bonds into HcpC (Helicobacter cysteine-rich protein C), a protein involved in the modulation of the H. pylori interaction with its host. Additionally, we also constructed a truncated version of HP0231 lacking the dimerization domain, denoted HP0231m, and showed that it acts in Escherichia coli cells in a DsbB-dependent manner. In contrast, HP0231m and classical monomeric EcDsbA (E. coli DsbA protein) were both unable to complement the lack of HP0231 in H. pylori cells, though they exist in oxidized forms. HP0231m is inactive in the insulin reduction assay and possesses high chaperone activity, in contrast to EcDsbA. In conclusion, HP0231 combines oxidative functions characteristic of DsbA proteins and chaperone activity characteristic of DsbC/DsbG, and it lacks isomerization activity. PMID:26500620

  2. The Kringle-like Domain Facilitates Post-endoplasmic Reticulum Changes to Premelanosome Protein (PMEL) Oligomerization and Disulfide Bond Configuration and Promotes Amyloid Formation*

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Tina; Watt, Brenda; Spruce, Lynn A.; Seeholzer, Steven H.; Marks, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    The formation of functional amyloid must be carefully regulated to prevent the accumulation of potentially toxic products. Premelanosome protein (PMEL) forms non-toxic functional amyloid fibrils that assemble into sheets upon which melanins ultimately are deposited within the melanosomes of pigment cells. PMEL is synthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum but forms amyloid only within post-Golgi melanosome precursors; thus, PMEL must traverse the secretory pathway in a non-amyloid form. Here, we identified two pre-amyloid PMEL intermediates that likely regulate the timing of fibril formation. Analyses by non-reducing SDS-PAGE, size exclusion chromatography, and sedimentation velocity revealed two native high Mr disulfide-bonded species that contain Golgi-modified forms of PMEL. These species correspond to disulfide bond-containing dimeric and monomeric PMEL isoforms that contain no other proteins as judged by two-dimensional PAGE of metabolically labeled/immunoprecipitated PMEL and by mass spectrometry of affinity-purified complexes. Metabolic pulse-chase analyses, small molecule inhibitor treatments, and evaluation of site-directed mutants suggest that the PMEL dimer forms around the time of endoplasmic reticulum exit and is resolved by disulfide bond rearrangement into a monomeric form within the late Golgi or a post-Golgi compartment. Mutagenesis of individual cysteine residues within the non-amyloid cysteine-rich Kringle-like domain stabilizes the disulfide-bonded dimer and impairs fibril formation as determined by electron microscopy. Our data show that the Kringle-like domain facilitates the resolution of disulfide-bonded PMEL dimers and promotes PMEL functional amyloid formation, thereby suggesting that PMEL dimers must be resolved to monomers to generate functional amyloid fibrils. PMID:26694611

  3. Tetramer formation in Arabidopsis MADS domain proteins: analysis of a protein-protein interaction network

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background MADS domain proteins are transcription factors that coordinate several important developmental processes in plants. These proteins interact with other MADS domain proteins to form dimers, and it has been proposed that they are able to associate as tetrameric complexes that regulate transcription of target genes. Whether the formation of functional tetramers is a widespread property of plant MADS domain proteins, or it is specific to few of these transcriptional regulators remains unclear. Results We analyzed the structure of the network of physical interactions among MADS domain proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana. We determined the abundance of subgraphs that represent the connection pattern expected for a MADS domain protein heterotetramer. These subgraphs were significantly more abundant in the MADS domain protein interaction network than in randomized analogous networks. Importantly, these subgraphs are not significantly frequent in a protein interaction network of TCP plant transcription factors, when compared to expectation by chance. In addition, we found that MADS domain proteins in tetramer-like subgraphs are more likely to be expressed jointly than proteins in other subgraphs. This effect is mainly due to proteins in the monophyletic MIKC clade, as there is no association between tetramer-like subgraphs and co-expression for proteins outside this clade. Conclusions Our results support that the tendency to form functional tetramers is widespread in the MADS domain protein-protein interaction network. Our observations also suggest that this trend is prevalent, or perhaps exclusive, for proteins in the MIKC clade. Because it is possible to retrodict several experimental results from our analyses, our work can be an important aid to make new predictions and facilitates experimental research on plant MADS domain proteins. PMID:24468197

  4. Design of protein function leaps by directed domain interface evolution

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jin; Koide, Akiko; Makabe, Koki; Koide, Shohei

    2008-01-01

    Most natural proteins performing sophisticated tasks contain multiple domains where an active site is located at the domain interface. Comparative structural analyses suggest that major leaps in protein function occur through gene recombination events that connect two or more protein domains to generate a new active site, frequently occurring at the newly created domain interface. However, such functional leaps by combination of unrelated domains have not been directly demonstrated. Here we show that highly specific and complex protein functions can be generated by joining a low-affinity peptide-binding domain with a functionally inert second domain and subsequently optimizing the domain interface. These directed evolution processes dramatically enhanced both affinity and specificity to a level unattainable with a single domain, corresponding to >500-fold and >2,000-fold increases of affinity and specificity, respectively. An x-ray crystal structure revealed that the resulting “affinity clamp” had clamshell architecture as designed, with large additional binding surface contributed by the second domain. The affinity clamps having a single-nanomolar dissociation constant outperformed a monoclonal antibody in immunochemical applications. This work establishes evolutionary paths from isolated domains with primitive function to multidomain proteins with sophisticated function and introduces a new protein-engineering concept that allows for the generation of highly functional affinity reagents to a predefined target. The prevalence and variety of natural interaction domains suggest that numerous new functions can be designed by using directed domain interface evolution. PMID:18445649

  5. Purification and Structural Analysis of LEM-Domain Proteins.

    PubMed

    Herrada, Isaline; Bourgeois, Benjamin; Samson, Camille; Buendia, Brigitte; Worman, Howard J; Zinn-Justin, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    LAP2-emerin-MAN1 (LEM)-domain proteins are modular proteins characterized by the presence of a conserved motif of about 50 residues. Most LEM-domain proteins localize at the inner nuclear membrane, but some are also found in the endoplasmic reticulum or nuclear interior. Their architecture has been analyzed by predicting the limits of their globular domains, determining the 3D structure of these domains and in a few cases calculating the 3D structure of specific domains bound to biological targets. The LEM domain adopts an α-helical fold also found in SAP and HeH domains of prokaryotes and unicellular eukaryotes. The LEM domain binds to BAF (barrier-to-autointegration factor; BANF1), which interacts with DNA and tethers chromatin to the nuclear envelope. LAP2 isoforms also share an N-terminal LEM-like domain, which binds DNA. The structure and function of other globular domains that distinguish LEM-domain proteins from each other have been characterized, including the C-terminal dimerization domain of LAP2α and C-terminal WH and UHM domains of MAN1. LEM-domain proteins also have large intrinsically disordered regions that are involved in intra- and intermolecular interactions and are highly regulated by posttranslational modifications in vivo.

  6. Comparative analysis of ATRX, a chromatin remodeling protein.

    PubMed

    Park, Daniel J; Pask, Andrew J; Huynh, Kim; Renfree, Marilyn B; Harley, Vincent R; Graves, Jennifer A Marshall

    2004-09-15

    The ATRX protein, associated with X-linked alpha-thalassaemia, mental retardation and developmental abnormalities including genital dysgenesis, has been proposed to function as a global transcriptional regulator within a multi-protein complex. However, an understanding of the composition and mechanics of this machinery has remained elusive. We applied inter-specific comparative analysis to identify conserved elements which may be involved in regulating the conformation of chromatin. As part of this study, we cloned and sequenced the entire translatable coding region (7.4 kb) of the ATRX gene from a model marsupial (tammar wallaby, Macropus eugenii). We identify an ATRX ancestral core, conserved between plants, fish and mammals, comprising the cysteine-rich and SWI2/SNF2 helicase-like regions and protein interaction domains. Our data are consistent with the model of the cysteine-rich region as a DNA-binding zinc finger adjacent to a protein-binding (plant homeodomain-like) domain. Alignment of vertebrate ATRX sequences highlights other conserved elements, including a negatively charged mammalian sequence which we propose to be involved in binding of positively charged histone tails.

  7. A systematic analysis reveals an essential role for high-affinity iron uptake system, haemolysin and CFEM domain-containing protein in iron homoeostasis and virulence in Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Vivek Kumar; Suneetha, Korivi Jyothiraj; Kaur, Rupinder

    2014-10-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for all living organisms and human pathogens employ a battery of factors to scavenge iron from the high-affinity iron-binding host proteins. In the present study, we have elucidated, via a candidate gene approach, major iron acquisition and homoeostatic mechanisms operational in an opportunistic human fungal pathogen Candida glabrata. Phenotypic, biochemical and molecular analysis of a set of 13 C. glabrata strains, deleted for proteins potentially implicated in iron metabolism, revealed that the high-affinity reductive iron uptake system is required for utilization of alternate carbon sources and for growth under both in vitro iron-limiting and in vivo conditions. Furthermore, we show for the first time that the cysteine-rich CFEM (common in fungal extracellular membranes) domain-containing cell wall structural protein, CgCcw14, and a putative haemolysin, CgMam3, are essential for maintenance of intracellular iron content, adherence to epithelial cells and virulence. Consistent with their roles in iron homoeostasis, mitochondrial aconitase activity was lower and higher in mutants disrupted for high-affinity iron transport, and haemolysin respectively. Additionally, we present evidence that the mitochondrial frataxin, CgYfh1, is pivotal to iron metabolism. Besides yielding insights into major in vitro and in vivo iron acquisition strategies, our findings establish high-affinity iron uptake mechanisms as critical virulence determinants in C. glabrata.

  8. WW domain-containing proteins: retrospectives and the future.

    PubMed

    Salah, Zaidoun; Alian, Akram; Aqeilan, Rami I

    2012-01-01

    WW domains are protein modules that mediate protein-protein interactions through recognition of proline-rich peptide motifs (PRM) and phosphorylated serine/threonine-proline sites. WW domains are found in many different structural and signaling proteins that are involved in a variety of cellular processes, including RNA transcription and processing, protein trafficking and stability, receptor signaling, and control of the cytoskeleton. WW domain-containing proteins and complexes have been implicated in major human diseases including cancer as well as in major signaling cascades such as the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway, making them targets for new diagnostics and therapeutics. In this review, we discuss how WW domains provide versatile platforms that link individual proteins into physiologically important networks and the indispensible role of WW domain-containing proteins in biology and pathology, especially tumorogenesis.

  9. Fold of the conserved DTC domain in deltex proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Obiero, Josiah; Walker, John R.; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano

    2012-04-30

    Human Deltex 3-like (DTX3L) is a member of the Deltex family of proteins. Initially identified as a B-lymphoma and BAL-associated protein, DTX3L is an E3 ligase that regulates subcellular localization of its partner protein, BAL, by a dynamic nucleocytoplasmic trafficking mechanism. Unlike other members of the Deltex family of proteins, DTX3L lacks the highly basic N-terminal motif and the central proline-rich motif present in other Deltex proteins, and instead contains other unique N-terminal domains. The C-terminal domains are, however, homologous with other members of the Deltex family of proteins; these include a RING domain and a previously unidentified C-terminal domain. In this study, we report the high-resolution crystal structure of this previously uncharacterized C-terminal domain of human DTX3L, which we term the Deltex C-terminal domain.

  10. Fuzzy domains: new way of describing flexibility and interdependence of the protein domains.

    PubMed

    Yesylevskyy, Semen O; Kharkyanen, Valery N

    2009-03-01

    We proposed the innovative method of domain identification based on the concept of the fuzzy domains. In this method each residue of the protein can belong to several domains simultaneously with certain weights, which reflect to what extent this residue shares the motion pattern of the given domain. Our method allows describing the fuzzy boundaries between the domains and the gradual changes of the motion pattern from one domain to the other. It provides the reasonable compromise between the continuous change of the protein dynamics from one residue to the other and the discrete description of the structure in terms of small number of domains. We suggested quantitative criterion, which shows the overall degree of domain flexibility in the protein. The concept of the fuzzy domains provides an innovative way of visualization of domain flexibility, which makes the gradual transitions between the domains clearly visible and comparable to available experimental and structural data. In the future, the concept of the fuzzy domains can be used in the coarse-grained simulations of the domain dynamics in order to account for internal protein flexibility.

  11. Selectivity filters and cysteine-rich extracellular loops in voltage-gated sodium, calcium, and NALCN channels

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Robert F.; Guan, W.; Zhorov, Boris S.; Spafford, J. David

    2015-01-01

    How nature discriminates sodium from calcium ions in eukaryotic channels has been difficult to resolve because they contain four homologous, but markedly different repeat domains. We glean clues from analyzing the changing pore region in sodium, calcium and NALCN channels, from single-cell eukaryotes to mammals. Alternative splicing in invertebrate homologs provides insights into different structural features underlying calcium and sodium selectivity. NALCN generates alternative ion selectivity with splicing that changes the high field strength (HFS) site at the narrowest level of the hourglass shaped pore where the selectivity filter is located. Alternative splicing creates NALCN isoforms, in which the HFS site has a ring of glutamates contributed by all four repeat domains (EEEE), or three glutamates and a lysine residue in the third (EEKE) or second (EKEE) position. Alternative splicing provides sodium and/or calcium selectivity in T-type channels with extracellular loops between S5 and P-helices (S5P) of different lengths that contain three or five cysteines. All eukaryotic channels have a set of eight core cysteines in extracellular regions, but the T-type channels have an infusion of 4–12 extra cysteines in extracellular regions. The pattern of conservation suggests a possible pairing of long loops in Domains I and III, which are bridged with core cysteines in NALCN, Cav, and Nav channels, and pairing of shorter loops in Domains II and IV in T-type channel through disulfide bonds involving T-type specific cysteines. Extracellular turrets of increasing lengths in potassium channels (Kir2.2, hERG, and K2P1) contribute to a changing landscape above the pore selectivity filter that can limit drug access and serve as an ion pre-filter before ions reach the pore selectivity filter below. Pairing of extended loops likely contributes to the large extracellular appendage as seen in single particle electron cryo-microscopy images of the eel Nav1 channel. PMID

  12. Domain mobility in proteins: functional and evolutionary implications.

    PubMed

    Basu, Malay Kumar; Poliakov, Eugenia; Rogozin, Igor B

    2009-05-01

    A substantial fraction of eukaryotic proteins contains multiple domains, some of which show a tendency to occur in diverse domain architectures and can be considered mobile (or 'promiscuous'). These promiscuous domains are typically involved in protein-protein interactions and play crucial roles in interaction networks, particularly those contributing to signal transduction. They also play a major role in creating diversity of protein domain architecture in the proteome. It is now apparent that promiscuity is a volatile and relatively fast-changing feature in evolution, and that only a few domains retain their promiscuity status throughout evolution. Many such domains attained their promiscuity status independently in different lineages. Only recently, we have begun to understand the diversity of protein domain architectures and the role the promiscuous domains play in evolution of this diversity. However, many of the biological mechanisms of protein domain mobility remain shrouded in mystery. In this review, we discuss our present understanding of protein domain promiscuity, its evolution and its role in cellular function.

  13. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of Chlamydia trachomatis DsbA Reveals a Cysteine-Rich and Weakly Oxidising Oxidoreductase

    PubMed Central

    Byriel, Karl; Huston, Wilhelmina M.; Furlong, Emily; Heras, Begoña; Martin, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    The Gram negative bacteria Chlamydia trachomatis is an obligate intracellular human pathogen that can cause pelvic inflammatory disease, infertility and blinding trachoma. C. trachomatis encodes a homolog of the dithiol oxidoreductase DsbA. Bacterial DsbA proteins introduce disulfide bonds to folding proteins providing structural bracing for secreted virulence factors, consequently these proteins are potential targets for antimicrobial drugs. Despite sharing functional and structural characteristics, the DsbA enzymes studied to date vary widely in their redox character. In this study we show that the truncated soluble form of the predicted membrane anchored protein C. trachomatis DsbA (CtDsbA) has oxidase activity and redox properties broadly similar to other characterized DsbA proteins. However CtDsbA is distinguished from other DsbAs by having six cysteines, including a second disulfide bond, and an unusual dipeptide sequence in its catalytic motif (Cys-Ser-Ala-Cys). We report the 2.7 Å crystal structure of CtDsbA revealing a typical DsbA fold, which is most similar to that of DsbA-II type proteins. Consistent with this, the catalytic surface of CtDsbA is negatively charged and lacks the hydrophobic groove found in EcDsbA and DsbAs from other enterobacteriaceae. Biochemical characterization of CtDsbA reveals it to be weakly oxidizing compared to other DsbAs and with only a mildly destabilizing active site disulfide bond. Analysis of the crystal structure suggests that this redox character is consistent with a lack of contributing factors to stabilize the active site nucleophilic thiolate relative to more oxidizing DsbA proteins. PMID:28030602

  14. Modelling protein functional domains in signal transduction using Maude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sriram, M. G.

    2003-01-01

    Modelling of protein-protein interactions in signal transduction is receiving increased attention in computational biology. This paper describes recent research in the application of Maude, a symbolic language founded on rewriting logic, to the modelling of functional domains within signalling proteins. Protein functional domains (PFDs) are a critical focus of modern signal transduction research. In general, Maude models can simulate biological signalling networks and produce specific testable hypotheses at various levels of abstraction. Developing symbolic models of signalling proteins containing functional domains is important because of the potential to generate analyses of complex signalling networks based on structure-function relationships.

  15. Do proteins facilitate the formation of cholesterol-rich domains?

    PubMed

    Epand, Richard M

    2004-11-03

    Both biological and model membranes can exhibit the formation of domains. A brief review of some of the diverse methodologies used to identify the presence of domains in membranes is given. Some of these domains are enriched in cholesterol. The segregation of lipids into cholesterol-rich domains can occur in both pure lipid systems as well as membranes containing peptides and proteins. Peptides and proteins can promote the formation of cholesterol-rich domains not only by preferentially interacting with cholesterol and being sequestered into these regions of the membrane, but also indirectly as a consequence of being excluded from cholesterol-rich domains. The redistribution of components is dictated by the thermodynamics of the system. The formation of domains in a biological membrane is a consequence of all of the intermolecular interactions including those among lipid molecules as well as between lipids and proteins.

  16. Interaction between Functional Domains of Bacillus thuringiensis Insecticidal Crystal Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Rang, Cécile; Vachon, Vincent; de Maagd, Ruud A.; Villalon, Mario; Schwartz, Jean-Louis; Bosch, Dirk; Frutos, Roger; Laprade, Raynald

    1999-01-01

    Interactions among the three structural domains of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1 toxins were investigated by functional analysis of chimeric proteins. Hybrid genes were prepared by exchanging the regions coding for either domain I or domain III among Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac, Cry1C, and Cry1E. The activity of the purified trypsin-activated chimeric toxins was evaluated by testing their effects on the viability and plasma membrane permeability of Sf9 cells. Among the parental toxins, only Cry1C was active against these cells and only chimeras possessing domain II from Cry1C were functional. Combination of domain I from Cry1E with domains II and III from Cry1C, however, resulted in an inactive toxin, indicating that domain II from an active toxin is necessary, but not sufficient, for activity. Pores formed by chimeric toxins in which domain I was from Cry1Ab or Cry1Ac were slightly smaller than those formed by toxins in which domain I was from Cry1C. The properties of the pores formed by the chimeras are therefore likely to result from an interaction between domain I and domain II or III. Domain III appears to modulate the activity of the chimeric toxins: combination of domain III from Cry1Ab with domains I and II of Cry1C gave a protein which was more strongly active than Cry1C. PMID:10388684

  17. Continuous and discontinuous domains: an algorithm for the automatic generation of reliable protein domain definitions.

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, A. S.; Barton, G. J.

    1995-01-01

    An algorithm is presented for the fast and accurate definition of protein structural domains from coordinate data without prior knowledge of the number or type of domains. The algorithm explicitly locates domains that comprise one or two continuous segments of protein chain. Domains that include more than two segments are also located. The algorithm was applied to a nonredundant database of 230 protein structures and the results compared to domain definitions obtained from the literature, or by inspection of the coordinates on molecular graphics. For 70% of the proteins, the derived domains agree with the reference definitions, 18% show minor differences and only 12% (28 proteins) show very different definitions. Three screens were applied to identify the derived domains least likely to agree with the subjective definition set. These screens revealed a set of 173 proteins, 97% of which agree well with the subjective definitions. The algorithm represents a practical domain identification tool that can be run routinely on the entire structural database. Adjustment of parameters also allows smaller compact units to be identified in proteins. PMID:7663343

  18. Delineation of modular proteins: domain boundary prediction from sequence information.

    PubMed

    Kong, Lesheng; Ranganathan, Shoba

    2004-06-01

    The delineation of domain boundaries of a given sequence in the absence of known 3D structures or detectable sequence homology to known domains benefits many areas in protein science, such as protein engineering, protein 3D structure determination and protein structure prediction. With the exponential growth of newly determined sequences, our ability to predict domain boundaries rapidly and accurately from sequence information alone is both essential and critical from the viewpoint of gene function annotation. Anyone attempting to predict domain boundaries for a single protein sequence is invariably confronted with a plethora of databases that contain boundary information available from the internet and a variety of methods for domain boundary prediction. How are these derived and how well do they work? What definition of 'domain' do they use? We will first clarify the different definitions of protein domains, and then describe the available public databases with domain boundary information. Finally, we will review existing domain boundary prediction methods and discuss their strengths and weaknesses.

  19. ELISA: a unified, multidimensional view of the protein domain universe.

    PubMed

    Shakhnovich, Boris E; Harvey, John Max; Delisi, Charles

    2004-01-01

    ELISA (http://romi.bu.edu/elisa/) is a database that was designed for flexibility in defining interesting queries about protein domain evolution. We have defined and included both the inherent characteristics of the domains such as structure and function and comparisons of these characteristics between domains. Thus, the database is useful in defining structural and functional links between related protein domains and by extension sequences that encode them. In this database we introduce and employ a novel method of functional annotation and comparison. For each protein domain we create a probabilistic functional annotation tree using GO. We have designed an algorithm that accurately compares these trees and thus provides a measure of "functional distance" between two protein domains. Along with functional annotation, we have also included structural comparison between protein domains and best sequence comparisons to all known genomes. The latter enables researchers to dynamically do searches for domains sharing similar phylogenetic profiles. This combination of data and tools enables the researcher to design complex queries to carry out research in the areas of protein domain evolution, structure prediction and functional annotation of novel sequences.

  20. Protein universe containing a PUA RNA-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Cerrudo, Carolina S; Ghiringhelli, Pablo D; Gomez, Daniel E

    2014-01-01

    Here, we review current knowledge about pseudouridine synthase and archaeosine transglycosylase (PUA)-domain-containing proteins to illustrate progress in this field. A methodological analysis of the literature about the topic was carried out, together with a 'qualitative comparative analysis' to give a more comprehensive review. Bioinformatics methods for whole-protein or protein-domain identification are commonly based on pairwise protein sequence comparisons; we added comparison of structures to detect the whole universe of proteins containing the PUA domain. We present an update of proteins having this domain, focusing on the specific proteins present in Homo sapiens (dyskerin, MCT1, Nip7, eIF2D and Nsun6), and explore the existence of these in other species. We also analyze the phylogenetic distribution of the PUA domain in different species and proteins. Finally, we performed a structural comparison of the PUA domain through data mining of structural databases, determining a conserved structural motif, despite the differences in the sequence, even among eukaryotes, archaea and bacteria. All data discussed in this review, both bibliographic and analytical, corroborate the functional importance of the PUA domain in RNA-binding proteins.

  1. The history of the CATH structural classification of protein domains.

    PubMed

    Sillitoe, Ian; Dawson, Natalie; Thornton, Janet; Orengo, Christine

    2015-12-01

    This article presents a historical review of the protein structure classification database CATH. Together with the SCOP database, CATH remains comprehensive and reasonably up-to-date with the now more than 100,000 protein structures in the PDB. We review the expansion of the CATH and SCOP resources to capture predicted domain structures in the genome sequence data and to provide information on the likely functions of proteins mediated by their constituent domains. The establishment of comprehensive function annotation resources has also meant that domain families can be functionally annotated allowing insights into functional divergence and evolution within protein families.

  2. Convergent Evolution of Endosymbiont Differentiation in Dalbergioid and Inverted Repeat-Lacking Clade Legumes Mediated by Nodule-Specific Cysteine-Rich Peptides1

    PubMed Central

    Czernic, Pierre; Gully, Djamel; Cartieaux, Fabienne; Moulin, Lionel; Guefrachi, Ibtissem; Patrel, Delphine; Pierre, Olivier; Fardoux, Joël; Chaintreuil, Clémence; Nguyen, Phuong; Gressent, Frédéric; Da Silva, Corinne; Poulain, Julie; Wincker, Patrick; Rofidal, Valérie; Hem, Sonia; Barrière, Quentin; Arrighi, Jean-François; Mergaert, Peter; Giraud, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Nutritional symbiotic interactions require the housing of large numbers of microbial symbionts, which produce essential compounds for the growth of the host. In the legume-rhizobium nitrogen-fixing symbiosis, thousands of rhizobium microsymbionts, called bacteroids, are confined intracellularly within highly specialized symbiotic host cells. In Inverted Repeat-Lacking Clade (IRLC) legumes such as Medicago spp., the bacteroids are kept under control by an arsenal of nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) peptides, which induce the bacteria in an irreversible, strongly elongated, and polyploid state. Here, we show that in Aeschynomene spp. legumes belonging to the more ancient Dalbergioid lineage, bacteroids are elongated or spherical depending on the Aeschynomene spp. and that these bacteroids are terminally differentiated and polyploid, similar to bacteroids in IRLC legumes. Transcriptome, in situ hybridization, and proteome analyses demonstrated that the symbiotic cells in the Aeschynomene spp. nodules produce a large diversity of NCR-like peptides, which are transported to the bacteroids. Blocking NCR transport by RNA interference-mediated inactivation of the secretory pathway inhibits bacteroid differentiation. Together, our results support the view that bacteroid differentiation in the Dalbergioid clade, which likely evolved independently from the bacteroid differentiation in the IRLC clade, is based on very similar mechanisms used by IRLC legumes. PMID:26286718

  3. Convergent Evolution of Endosymbiont Differentiation in Dalbergioid and Inverted Repeat-Lacking Clade Legumes Mediated by Nodule-Specific Cysteine-Rich Peptides.

    PubMed

    Czernic, Pierre; Gully, Djamel; Cartieaux, Fabienne; Moulin, Lionel; Guefrachi, Ibtissem; Patrel, Delphine; Pierre, Olivier; Fardoux, Joël; Chaintreuil, Clémence; Nguyen, Phuong; Gressent, Frédéric; Da Silva, Corinne; Poulain, Julie; Wincker, Patrick; Rofidal, Valérie; Hem, Sonia; Barrière, Quentin; Arrighi, Jean-François; Mergaert, Peter; Giraud, Eric

    2015-10-01

    Nutritional symbiotic interactions require the housing of large numbers of microbial symbionts, which produce essential compounds for the growth of the host. In the legume-rhizobium nitrogen-fixing symbiosis, thousands of rhizobium microsymbionts, called bacteroids, are confined intracellularly within highly specialized symbiotic host cells. In Inverted Repeat-Lacking Clade (IRLC) legumes such as Medicago spp., the bacteroids are kept under control by an arsenal of nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) peptides, which induce the bacteria in an irreversible, strongly elongated, and polyploid state. Here, we show that in Aeschynomene spp. legumes belonging to the more ancient Dalbergioid lineage, bacteroids are elongated or spherical depending on the Aeschynomene spp. and that these bacteroids are terminally differentiated and polyploid, similar to bacteroids in IRLC legumes. Transcriptome, in situ hybridization, and proteome analyses demonstrated that the symbiotic cells in the Aeschynomene spp. nodules produce a large diversity of NCR-like peptides, which are transported to the bacteroids. Blocking NCR transport by RNA interference-mediated inactivation of the secretory pathway inhibits bacteroid differentiation. Together, our results support the view that bacteroid differentiation in the Dalbergioid clade, which likely evolved independently from the bacteroid differentiation in the IRLC clade, is based on very similar mechanisms used by IRLC legumes.

  4. Bacteria–zinc co-localization implicates enhanced synthesis of cysteine-rich peptides in zinc detoxification when Brassica juncea is inoculated with Rhizobium leguminosarum

    PubMed Central

    Adediran, Gbotemi A; Ngwenya, Bryne T; Mosselmans, J Frederick W; Heal, Kate V

    2016-01-01

    Some plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB) are enigmatic in enhancing plant growth in the face of increased metal accumulation in plants. Since most PGPB colonize the plant root epidermis, we hypothesized that PGPB confer tolerance to metals through changes in speciation at the root epidermis. We employed a novel combination of fluorophore-based confocal laser scanning microscopic imaging and synchrotron based microscopic X-ray fluorescence mapping with X-ray absorption spectroscopy to characterize bacterial localization, zinc (Zn) distribution and speciation in the roots of Brassica juncea grown in Zn contaminated media (400 mg kg−1 Zn) with the endophytic Pseudomonas brassicacearum and rhizospheric Rhizobium leguminosarum. PGPB enhanced epidermal Zn sequestration relative to PGBP-free controls while the extent of endophytic accumulation depended on the colonization mode of each PGBP. Increased root accumulation of Zn and increased tolerance to Zn was associated predominantly with R. leguminosarum and was likely due to the coordination of Zn with cysteine-rich peptides in the root endodermis, suggesting enhanced synthesis of phytochelatins or glutathione. Our mechanistic model of enhanced Zn accumulation and detoxification in plants inoculated with R. leguminosarum has particular relevance to PGPB enhanced phytoremediation of soils contaminated through mining and oxidation of sulphur-bearing Zn minerals or engineered nanomaterials such as ZnS. PMID:26263508

  5. Protein domain definition should allow for conditional disorder.

    PubMed

    Yegambaram, Kavestri; Bulloch, Esther M M; Kingston, Richard L

    2013-11-01

    Proteins are often classified in a binary fashion as either structured or disordered. However this approach has several deficits. Firstly, protein folding is always conditional on the physiochemical environment. A protein which is structured in some circumstances will be disordered in others. Secondly, it hides a fundamental asymmetry in behavior. While all structured proteins can be unfolded through a change in environment, not all disordered proteins have the capacity for folding. Failure to accommodate these complexities confuses the definition of both protein structural domains and intrinsically disordered regions. We illustrate these points with an experimental study of a family of small binding domains, drawn from the RNA polymerase of mumps virus and its closest relatives. Assessed at face value the domains fall on a structural continuum, with folded, partially folded, and near unstructured members. Yet the disorder present in the family is conditional, and these closely related polypeptides can access the same folded state under appropriate conditions. Any heuristic definition of the protein domain emphasizing conformational stability divides this domain family in two, in a way that makes no biological sense. Structural domains would be better defined by their ability to adopt a specific tertiary structure: a structure that may or may not be realized, dependent on the circumstances. This explicitly allows for the conditional nature of protein folding, and more clearly demarcates structural domains from intrinsically disordered regions that may function without folding.

  6. CBS domains: structure, function, and pathology in human proteins.

    PubMed

    Ignoul, Sofie; Eggermont, Jan

    2005-12-01

    The cystathionine-beta-synthase (CBS) domain is an evolutionarily conserved protein domain that is present in the proteome of archaebacteria, prokaryotes, and eukaryotes. CBS domains usually come in tandem repeats and are found in cytosolic and membrane proteins performing different functions (metabolic enzymes, kinases, and channels). Crystallographic studies of bacterial CBS domains have shown that two CBS domains form an intramolecular dimeric structure (CBS pair). Several human hereditary diseases (homocystinuria, retinitis pigmentosa, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, myotonia congenital, etc.) can be caused by mutations in CBS domains of, respectively, cystathionine-beta-synthase, inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase, AMP kinase, and chloride channels. Despite their clinical relevance, it remains to be established what the precise function of CBS domains is and how they affect the structural and/or functional properties of an enzyme, kinase, or channel. Depending on the protein in which they occur, CBS domains have been proposed to affect multimerization and sorting of proteins, channel gating, and ligand binding. However, recent experiments revealing that CBS domains can bind adenosine-containing ligands such ATP, AMP, or S-adenosylmethionine have led to the hypothesis that CBS domains function as sensors of intracellular metabolites.

  7. Unexpected diversity in Shisa-like proteins suggests the importance of their roles as transmembrane adaptors.

    PubMed

    Pei, Jimin; Grishin, Nick V

    2012-03-01

    The Shisa family of single-transmembrane proteins is characterized by an N-terminal cysteine-rich domain and a proline-rich C-terminal region. Its founding member, Xenopus Shisa, promotes head development by antagonizing Wnt and FGF signaling. Recently, a mouse brain-specific Shisa protein CKAMP44 (Shisa9) was shown to play an important role in AMPA receptor desensitization. We used sequence similarity searches against protein, genome and EST databases to study the evolutionary origin and phylogenetic distribution of Shisa homologs. In addition to nine Shisa subfamilies in vertebrates, we detected distantly related Shisa homologs that possess an N-terminal domain with six conserved cysteines. These Shisa-like proteins include FAM159 and KIAA1644 mainly from vertebrates, and members from various bilaterian invertebrates and Porifera, suggesting their presence in the last common ancestor of Metazoa. Shisa-like genes have undergone large expansions in Branchiostoma floridae and Saccoglossus kowalevskii, and appear to have been lost in certain insects. Pattern-based searches against eukaryotic proteomes also uncovered several other families of predicted single-transmembrane proteins with a similar cysteine-rich domain. We refer to these proteins (Shisa/Shisa-like, WBP1/VOPP1, CX, DUF2650, TMEM92, and CYYR1) as STMC6 proteins (single-transmembrane proteins with conserved 6 cysteines). STMC6 genes are widespread in Metazoa, with the human genome containing 17 members. Frequent occurrences of PY motifs in STMC6 proteins suggest that most of them could interact with WW-domain-containing proteins, such as the NEDD4 family E3 ubiquitin ligases, and could play critical roles in protein degradation and sorting. STMC6 proteins are likely transmembrane adaptors that regulate membrane proteins such as cell surface receptors.

  8. Cholesterol and the interaction of proteins with membrane domains.

    PubMed

    Epand, Richard M

    2006-07-01

    Cholesterol is not uniformly distributed in biological membranes. One of the factors influencing the formation of cholesterol-rich domains in membranes is the unequal lateral distribution of proteins in membranes. Certain proteins are found in cholesterol-rich domains. In some of these cases, it is as a consequence of the proteins interacting directly with cholesterol. There are several structural features of a protein that result in the protein preferentially associating with cholesterol-rich domains. One of the best documented of these is certain types of lipidations. In addition, however, there are segments of a protein that can preferentially sequester cholesterol. We discuss two examples of these cholesterol-recognition elements: the cholesterol recognition/interaction amino acid consensus (CRAC) domain and the sterol-sensing domain (SSD). The requirements for a CRAC motif are quite flexible and predict that a large number of sequences could recognize cholesterol. There are, however, certain proteins that are known to interact with cholesterol-rich domains of cell membranes that have CRAC motifs, and synthetic peptides corresponding to these segments also promote the formation of cholesterol-rich domains. Modeling studies have provided a rationale for certain requirements of the CRAC motif. The SSD is a larger protein segment comprising five transmembrane domains. The amino acid sequence YIYF is found in several SSD and in certain other proteins for which there is evidence that they interact with cholesterol-rich domains. The CRAC sequences as well as YIYF are generally found adjacent to a transmembrane helical segment. These regions appear to have a strong influence of the localization of certain proteins into domains in biological membranes. In addition to the SSD, there is also a domain found in soluble proteins, the START domain, that binds lipids. Certain proteins with START domains specifically bind cholesterol and are believed to function in

  9. Allosteric properties of PH domains in Arf regulatory proteins.

    PubMed

    Roy, Neeladri Sekhar; Yohe, Marielle E; Randazzo, Paul A; Gruschus, James M

    2016-01-01

    Pleckstrin Homology (PH) domains bind phospholipids and proteins. They are critical regulatory elements of a number enzymes including guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) for Ras-superfamily guanine nucleotide binding proteins such as ADP-ribosylation factors (Arfs). Recent studies have indicated that many PH domains may bind more than one ligand cooperatively. Here we discuss the molecular basis of PH domain-dependent allosteric behavior of 2 ADP-ribosylation factor exchange factors, Grp1 and Brag2, cooperative binding of ligands to the PH domains of Grp1 and the Arf GTPase-activating protein, ASAP1, and the consequences for activity of the associated catalytic domains.

  10. Discrete structure of van der Waals domains in globular proteins.

    PubMed

    Berezovsky, Igor N

    2003-03-01

    Most globular proteins are divisible by domains, distinct substructures of the globule. The notion of hierarchy of the domains was introduced earlier via van der Waals energy profiles that allow one to subdivide the proteins into domains (subdomains). The question remains open as to what is the possible structural connection of the energy profiles. The recent discovery of the loop-n-lock elements in the globular proteins suggests such a structural connection. A direct comparison of the segmentation by van der Waals energy criteria with the maps of the locked loops of nearly standard size reveals a striking correlation: domains in general appear to consist of one to several such loops. In addition, it was demonstrated that a variety of subdivisions of the same protein into domains is just a regrouping of the loop-n-lock elements.

  11. Quantifying information transfer by protein domains: Analysis of the Fyn SH2 domain structure

    PubMed Central

    Lenaerts, Tom; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper; Stricher, Francois; Serrano, Luis; Schymkowitz, Joost WH; Rousseau, Frederic

    2008-01-01

    Background Efficient communication between distant sites within a protein is essential for cooperative biological response. Although often associated with large allosteric movements, more subtle changes in protein dynamics can also induce long-range correlations. However, an appropriate formalism that directly relates protein structural dynamics to information exchange between functional sites is still lacking. Results Here we introduce a method to analyze protein dynamics within the framework of information theory and show that signal transduction within proteins can be considered as a particular instance of communication over a noisy channel. In particular, we analyze the conformational correlations between protein residues and apply the concept of mutual information to quantify information exchange. Mapping out changes of mutual information on the protein structure then allows visualizing how distal communication is achieved. We illustrate the approach by analyzing information transfer by the SH2 domain of Fyn tyrosine kinase, obtained from Monte Carlo dynamics simulations. Our analysis reveals that the Fyn SH2 domain forms a noisy communication channel that couples residues located in the phosphopeptide and specificity binding sites and a number of residues at the other side of the domain near the linkers that connect the SH2 domain to the SH3 and kinase domains. We find that for this particular domain, communication is affected by a series of contiguous residues that connect distal sites by crossing the core of the SH2 domain. Conclusion As a result, our method provides a means to directly map the exchange of biological information on the structure of protein domains, making it clear how binding triggers conformational changes in the protein structure. As such it provides a structural road, next to the existing attempts at sequence level, to predict long-range interactions within protein structures. PMID:18842137

  12. Selection of soluble protein expression constructs: the experimental determination of protein domain boundaries.

    PubMed

    Dyson, Michael R

    2010-08-01

    Proteins can contain multiple domains each of which is capable of possessing a separate independent function and three-dimensional structure. It is often useful to clone and express individual protein domains to study their biochemical properties and for structure determination. However, the annotated domain boundaries in databases such as Pfam or SMART are not always accurate. The present review summarizes various strategies for the experimental determination of protein domain boundaries.

  13. Membrane and Protein Interactions of the Pleckstrin Homology Domain Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Lenoir, Marc; Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben; Overduin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The human genome encodes about 285 proteins that contain at least one annotated pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. As the first phosphoinositide binding module domain to be discovered, the PH domain recruits diverse protein architectures to cellular membranes. PH domains constitute one of the largest protein superfamilies, and have diverged to regulate many different signaling proteins and modules such as Dbl homology (DH) and Tec homology (TH) domains. The ligands of approximately 70 PH domains have been validated by binding assays and complexed structures, allowing meaningful extrapolation across the entire superfamily. Here the Membrane Optimal Docking Area (MODA) program is used at a genome-wide level to identify all membrane docking PH structures and map their lipid-binding determinants. In addition to the linear sequence motifs which are employed for phosphoinositide recognition, the three dimensional structural features that allow peripheral membrane domains to approach and insert into the bilayer are pinpointed and can be predicted ab initio. The analysis shows that conserved structural surfaces distinguish which PH domains associate with membrane from those that do not. Moreover, the results indicate that lipid-binding PH domains can be classified into different functional subgroups based on the type of membrane insertion elements they project towards the bilayer. PMID:26512702

  14. Membrane and Protein Interactions of the Pleckstrin Homology Domain Superfamily.

    PubMed

    Lenoir, Marc; Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben; Overduin, Michael

    2015-10-23

    The human genome encodes about 285 proteins that contain at least one annotated pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. As the first phosphoinositide binding module domain to be discovered, the PH domain recruits diverse protein architectures to cellular membranes. PH domains constitute one of the largest protein superfamilies, and have diverged to regulate many different signaling proteins and modules such as Dbl homology (DH) and Tec homology (TH) domains. The ligands of approximately 70 PH domains have been validated by binding assays and complexed structures, allowing meaningful extrapolation across the entire superfamily. Here the Membrane Optimal Docking Area (MODA) program is used at a genome-wide level to identify all membrane docking PH structures and map their lipid-binding determinants. In addition to the linear sequence motifs which are employed for phosphoinositide recognition, the three dimensional structural features that allow peripheral membrane domains to approach and insert into the bilayer are pinpointed and can be predicted ab initio. The analysis shows that conserved structural surfaces distinguish which PH domains associate with membrane from those that do not. Moreover, the results indicate that lipid-binding PH domains can be classified into different functional subgroups based on the type of membrane insertion elements they project towards the bilayer.

  15. Domain tree-based analysis of protein architecture evolution.

    PubMed

    Forslund, Kristoffer; Henricson, Anna; Hollich, Volker; Sonnhammer, Erik L L

    2008-02-01

    Understanding the dynamics behind domain architecture evolution is of great importance to unravel the functions of proteins. Complex architectures have been created throughout evolution by rearrangement and duplication events. An interesting question is how many times a particular architecture has been created, a form of convergent evolution or domain architecture reinvention. Previous studies have approached this issue by comparing architectures found in different species. We wanted to achieve a finer-grained analysis by reconstructing protein architectures on complete domain trees. The prevalence of domain architecture reinvention in 96 genomes was investigated with a novel domain tree-based method that uses maximum parsimony for inferring ancestral protein architectures. Domain architectures were taken from Pfam. To ensure robustness, we applied the method to bootstrap trees and only considered results with strong statistical support. We detected multiple origins for 12.4% of the scored architectures. In a much smaller data set, the subset of completely domain-assigned proteins, the figure was 5.6%. These results indicate that domain architecture reinvention is a much more common phenomenon than previously thought. We also determined which domains are most frequent in multiply created architectures and assessed whether specific functions could be attributed to them. However, no strong functional bias was found in architectures with multiple origins.

  16. The evolution of filamin – A protein domain repeat perspective

    PubMed Central

    Light, Sara; Sagit, Rauan; Ithychanda, Sujay S.; Qin, Jun; Elofsson, Arne

    2013-01-01

    Particularly in higher eukaryotes, some protein domains are found in tandem repeats, performing broad functions often related to cellular organization. For instance, the eukaryotic protein filamin interacts with many proteins and is crucial for the cytoskeleton. The functional properties of long repeat domains are governed by the specific properties of each individual domain as well as by the repeat copy number. To provide better understanding of the evolutionary and functional history of repeating domains, we investigated the mode of evolution of the filamin domain in some detail. Among the domains that are common in long repeat proteins, sushi and spectrin domains evolve primarily through cassette tandem duplications while scavenger and immunoglobulin repeats appear to evolve through clustered tandem duplications. Additionally, immunoglobulin and filamin repeats exhibit a unique pattern where every other domain shows high sequence similarity. This pattern may be the result of tandem duplications, serve to avert aggregation between adjacent domains or it is the result of functional constraints. In filamin, our studies confirm the presence of interspersed integrin binding domains in vertebrates, while invertebrates exhibit more varied patterns, including more clustered integrin binding domains. The most notable case is leech filamin, which contains a 20 repeat expansion and exhibits unique dimerization topology. Clearly, invertebrate filamins are varied and contain examples of similar adjacent integrin-binding domains. Given that invertebrate integrin shows more similarity to the weaker filamin binder, integrin β3, it is possible that the distance between integrin-binding domains is not as crucial for invertebrate filamins as for vertebrates. PMID:22414427

  17. Classification of domain movements in proteins using dynamic contact graphs.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Daniel; Cawley, Gavin; Hayward, Steven

    2013-01-01

    A new method for the classification of domain movements in proteins is described and applied to 1822 pairs of structures from the Protein Data Bank that represent a domain movement in two-domain proteins. The method is based on changes in contacts between residues from the two domains in moving from one conformation to the other. We argue that there are five types of elemental contact changes and that these relate to five model domain movements called: "free", "open-closed", "anchored", "sliding-twist", and "see-saw." A directed graph is introduced called the "Dynamic Contact Graph" which represents the contact changes in a domain movement. In many cases a graph, or part of a graph, provides a clear visual metaphor for the movement it represents and is a motif that can be easily recognised. The Dynamic Contact Graphs are often comprised of disconnected subgraphs indicating independent regions which may play different roles in the domain movement. The Dynamic Contact Graph for each domain movement is decomposed into elemental Dynamic Contact Graphs, those that represent elemental contact changes, allowing us to count the number of instances of each type of elemental contact change in the domain movement. This naturally leads to sixteen classes into which the 1822 domain movements are classified.

  18. Exogenous agents that target transmembrane domains of proteins.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hang

    2008-01-01

    Although membrane proteins account for approximately one third of all proteins encoded in the human genome, the functions and structures of their transmembrane domains are much less understood than the water-soluble regions. A major hurdle in studying these transmembrane domains is the lack of appropriate exogenous agents that can be used as specific probes. Despite the daunting challenges, major strides have recently been made in targeting the transmembrane domains of a variety of membrane proteins. High affinity and selectivity have been achieved in model biophysical systems, membranes of bacteria, and mammalian cells.

  19. Characterization of the spore surface and exosporium proteins of Clostridium sporogenes; implications for Clostridium botulinum group I strains.

    PubMed

    Janganan, Thamarai K; Mullin, Nic; Tzokov, Svetomir B; Stringer, Sandra; Fagan, Robert P; Hobbs, Jamie K; Moir, Anne; Bullough, Per A

    2016-10-01

    Clostridium sporogenes is a non-pathogenic close relative and surrogate for Group I (proteolytic) neurotoxin-producing Clostridium botulinum strains. The exosporium, the sac-like outermost layer of spores of these species, is likely to contribute to adhesion, dissemination, and virulence. A paracrystalline array, hairy nap, and several appendages were detected in the exosporium of C. sporogenes strain NCIMB 701792 by EM and AFM. The protein composition of purified exosporium was explored by LC-MS/MS of tryptic peptides from major individual SDS-PAGE-separated protein bands, and from bulk exosporium. Two high molecular weight protein bands both contained the same protein with a collagen-like repeat domain, the probable constituent of the hairy nap, as well as cysteine-rich proteins CsxA and CsxB. A third cysteine-rich protein (CsxC) was also identified. These three proteins are also encoded in C. botulinum Prevot 594, and homologues (75-100% amino acid identity) are encoded in many other Group I strains. This work provides the first insight into the likely composition and organization of the exosporium of Group I C. botulinum spores.

  20. An ambiguity principle for assigning protein structural domains.

    PubMed

    Postic, Guillaume; Ghouzam, Yassine; Chebrek, Romain; Gelly, Jean-Christophe

    2017-01-01

    Ambiguity is the quality of being open to several interpretations. For an image, it arises when the contained elements can be delimited in two or more distinct ways, which may cause confusion. We postulate that it also applies to the analysis of protein three-dimensional structure, which consists in dividing the molecule into subunits called domains. Because different definitions of what constitutes a domain can be used to partition a given structure, the same protein may have different but equally valid domain annotations. However, knowledge and experience generally displace our ability to accept more than one way to decompose the structure of an object-in this case, a protein. This human bias in structure analysis is particularly harmful because it leads to ignoring potential avenues of research. We present an automated method capable of producing multiple alternative decompositions of protein structure (web server and source code available at www.dsimb.inserm.fr/sword/). Our innovative algorithm assigns structural domains through the hierarchical merging of protein units, which are evolutionarily preserved substructures that describe protein architecture at an intermediate level, between domain and secondary structure. To validate the use of these protein units for decomposing protein structures into domains, we set up an extensive benchmark made of expert annotations of structural domains and including state-of-the-art domain parsing algorithms. The relevance of our "multipartitioning" approach is shown through numerous examples of applications covering protein function, evolution, folding, and structure prediction. Finally, we introduce a measure for the structural ambiguity of protein molecules.

  1. An ambiguity principle for assigning protein structural domains

    PubMed Central

    Postic, Guillaume; Ghouzam, Yassine; Chebrek, Romain; Gelly, Jean-Christophe

    2017-01-01

    Ambiguity is the quality of being open to several interpretations. For an image, it arises when the contained elements can be delimited in two or more distinct ways, which may cause confusion. We postulate that it also applies to the analysis of protein three-dimensional structure, which consists in dividing the molecule into subunits called domains. Because different definitions of what constitutes a domain can be used to partition a given structure, the same protein may have different but equally valid domain annotations. However, knowledge and experience generally displace our ability to accept more than one way to decompose the structure of an object—in this case, a protein. This human bias in structure analysis is particularly harmful because it leads to ignoring potential avenues of research. We present an automated method capable of producing multiple alternative decompositions of protein structure (web server and source code available at www.dsimb.inserm.fr/sword/). Our innovative algorithm assigns structural domains through the hierarchical merging of protein units, which are evolutionarily preserved substructures that describe protein architecture at an intermediate level, between domain and secondary structure. To validate the use of these protein units for decomposing protein structures into domains, we set up an extensive benchmark made of expert annotations of structural domains and including state-of-the-art domain parsing algorithms. The relevance of our “multipartitioning” approach is shown through numerous examples of applications covering protein function, evolution, folding, and structure prediction. Finally, we introduce a measure for the structural ambiguity of protein molecules. PMID:28097215

  2. 14-3-3 proteins, FHA domains and BRCT domains in the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Duaa H; Yaffe, Michael B

    2009-09-02

    The DNA damage response depends on the concerted activity of protein serine/threonine kinases and modular phosphoserine/threonine-binding domains to relay the damage signal and recruit repair proteins. The PIKK family of protein kinases, which includes ATM/ATR/DNA-PK, preferentially phosphorylate Ser-Gln sites, while their basophilic downstream effecter kinases, Chk1/Chk2/MK2 preferentially phosphorylate hydrophobic-X-Arg-X-X-Ser/Thr-hydrophobic sites. A subset of tandem BRCT domains act as phosphopeptide binding modules that bind to ATM/ATR/DNA-PK substrates after DNA damage. Conversely, 14-3-3 proteins interact with substrates of Chk1/Chk2/MK2. FHA domains have been shown to interact with substrates of ATM/ATR/DNA-PK and CK2. In this review we consider how substrate phosphorylation together with BRCT domains, FHA domains and 14-3-3 proteins function to regulate ionizing radiation-induced nuclear foci and help to establish the G(2)/M checkpoint. We discuss the role of MDC1 a molecular scaffold that recruits early proteins to foci, such as NBS1 and RNF8, through distinct phosphodependent interactions. In addition, we consider the role of 14-3-3 proteins and the Chk2 FHA domain in initiating and maintaining cell cycle arrest.

  3. Domain view: a web tool for protein domain visualization and analysis.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaokang; Bingman, Craig A; Wesenberg, Gary E; Sun, Zhaohui; Phillips, George N

    2010-12-01

    The identification of sequence-based protein domains and their boundaries is often a prelude to structure determination. An accurate prediction of disordered regions, secondary structures and low complexity segments of target protein sequences can improve the efficiency of selection in structural genomics and also aid in design of constructs for directed structural biology studies. At the Center for Eukaryotic Structural Genomics (CESG) we have developed DomainView, a web tool to visualize and analyze predicted protein domains, disordered regions, secondary structures and low complexity segments of target protein sequences for selection of experimental protein structure attempts. DomainView consists of a relational database and a web graphical-user interface. The database was developed based on MySQL, which stores data from target protein sequences and their domains, disordered regions, secondary structures and low complexity segments. The program of the web user interface is a Perl CGI script. When a user searches for a target protein sequence, the script displays the combinational information about the domains and other features of that target sequence graphically on a web page by querying the database. The graphical representation for each feature is linked to a web page showing more detailed annotation information or to a new window directly running the corresponding prediction program to show further information about that feature.

  4. Proteasomes and protein conjugation across domains of life.

    PubMed

    Maupin-Furlow, Julie

    2011-12-19

    Like other energy-dependent proteases, proteasomes, which are found across the three domains of life, are self-compartmentalized and important in the early steps of proteolysis. Proteasomes degrade improperly synthesized, damaged or misfolded proteins and hydrolyse regulatory proteins that must be specifically removed or cleaved for cell signalling. In eukaryotes, proteins are typically targeted for proteasome-mediated destruction through polyubiquitylation, although ubiquitin-independent pathways also exist. Interestingly, actinobacteria and archaea also covalently attach small proteins (prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein (Pup) and small archaeal modifier proteins (Samps), respectively) to certain proteins, and this may serve to target the modified proteins for degradation by proteasomes.

  5. Targeting of passenger protein domains to multiple intracellular membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Janiak, F; Glover, J R; Leber, B; Rachubinski, R A; Andrews, D W

    1994-01-01

    The role of passenger domains in protein targeting was examined by fusing previously characterized targeting motifs to different protein sequences. To compare the targeting requirements for a variety of subcellular compartments, targeting of the fusion proteins was examined for endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria and peroxisomes in vitro and in yeast. Although most passenger domains were only partially passive to translocation, motif-dependent targeting via motifs positioned at either end of one passenger domain (gPA) was demonstrated for all of the subcellular compartments tested. The data presented extend earlier suggestions that translocation competence is an intrinsic property of the passenger protein. However, the properties that determine protein targeting are not mutually exclusive for the compartments tested. Therefore, although the primary determinant of specificity is the targeting motif, our results suggest that translocation competence of the targeted protein augments the fidelity of transport. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8198533

  6. Structural and biochemical characterization of an RNA/DNA binding motif in the N-terminal domain of RecQ4 helicases

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Francesca; Mojumdar, Aditya; Zucchelli, Chiara; Bhardwaj, Amit; Buratti, Emanuele; Vindigni, Alessandro; Musco, Giovanna; Onesti, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    The RecQ4 helicase belongs to the ubiquitous RecQ family but its exact role in the cell is not completely understood. In addition to the helicase domain, RecQ4 has a unique N-terminal part that is essential for viability and is constituted by a region homologous to the yeast Sld2 replication initiation factor, followed by a cysteine-rich region, predicted to fold as a Zn knuckle. We carried out a structural and biochemical analysis of both the human and Xenopus laevis RecQ4 cysteine-rich regions, and showed by NMR spectroscopy that the Xenopus fragment indeed assumes the canonical Zn knuckle fold, whereas the human sequence remains unstructured, consistent with the mutation of one of the Zn ligands. Both the human and Xenopus Zn knuckles bind to a variety of nucleic acid substrates, with a mild preference for RNA. We also investigated the effect of a segment located upstream the Zn knuckle that is highly conserved and rich in positively charged and aromatic residues, partially overlapping with the C-terminus of the Sld2-like domain. In both the human and Xenopus proteins, the presence of this region strongly enhances binding to nucleic acids. These results reveal novel possible roles of RecQ4 in DNA replication and genome stability. PMID:26888063

  7. Evidence for the presence of collagenous domains in Candida albicans cell surface proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Sepúlveda, P; Murgui, A; López-Ribot, J L; Casanova, M; Timoneda, J; Martínez, J P

    1995-01-01

    Rabbit polyclonal antibodies (PAbs) directed towards the amino-terminal cysteine-rich 7S domain (PAb anti-7S), the major internal collagenous domain (PAb anti-type IV), and the C-terminal noncollagenous region (PAb anti-NC1) of the type IV collagen molecule were probed by indirect immunofluorescence against Candida albicans blastoconidia and germinated blastoconidia. Most nongerminating cells and mother blastoconidia from which germ tubes originated showed strong fluorescence when PAb anti-7S was used, whereas with PAb anti-type IV, fluorescence was found almost exclusively on the surface of filamentous forms. A patched fluorescent pattern rather than a homogenous confluent fluorescence was observed in all cases. No fluorescent cells were observed with PAb anti-NC1. By Western immunoblotting, PAb anti-type IV cross-reacted primarily with a polypeptide of 37 kDa present in wall extracts obtained from intact cells of both growth forms by treatment with beta-mercaptoethanol, whereas PAb anti-7S recognized a major 58-kDa antigen also present in both extracts, along with some other high-molecular-mass (> 106-kDa) polydisperse species present only in the material released from blastoconidia with beta-mercaptoethanol. No reactive bands were observed when PAb anti-NC1 was used as a probe in Western immunoblotting experiments. The sensitivities or resistances to collagenase digestion of the different polypeptides that cross-reacted with PAbs anti-type IV and anti-7S suggest the existence of cell wall components in C. albicans that contain epitopes that mimic the collagenous domains of the type IV collagen molecule. PMID:7768595

  8. de Gennes Narrowing Describes the Relative Motion of Protein Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Liang; Smolin, Nikolai; Smith, Jeremy C.

    2014-04-01

    The relative motion of structural domains is essential for the biological function of many proteins. Here, by analyzing neutron scattering data and performing molecular dynamics simulations, we find that interdomain motion in several proteins obeys the principle of de Gennes narrowing, in which the wave vector dependence of the interdomain diffusion coefficient is inversely proportional to the interdomain structure factor. Thus, the rate of interdomain motion is inversely proportional to the probability distribution of the spatial configurations of domains.

  9. Neuregulin 1 Expression and Electrophysiological Abnormalities in the Neuregulin 1 Transmembrane Domain Heterozygous Mutant Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Elisabeth; Shaw, Alex; Liu, Shijie; Huang, Xu-Feng; Pinault, Didier; Karl, Tim; O’Brien, Terence J.; Shannon Weickert, Cynthia; Jones, Nigel C.

    2015-01-01

    Background The Neuregulin 1 transmembrane domain heterozygous mutant (Nrg1 TM HET) mouse is used to investigate the role of Nrg1 in brain function and schizophrenia-like behavioural phenotypes. However, the molecular alterations in brain Nrg1 expression that underpin the behavioural observations have been assumed, but not directly determined. Here we comprehensively characterise mRNA Nrg1 transcripts throughout development of the Nrg1 TM HET mouse. In addition, we investigate the regulation of high-frequency (gamma) electrophysiological oscillations in this mutant mouse to associate molecular changes in Nrg1 with a schizophrenia-relevant neurophysiological profile. Methods Using exonic probes spanning the cysteine-rich, epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like, transmembrane and intracellular domain encoding regions of Nrg1, mRNA levels were measured using qPCR in hippocampus and frontal cortex from male and female Nrg1 TM HET and wild type-like (WT) mice throughout development. We also performed electrophysiological recordings in adult mice and analysed gamma oscillatory at baseline, in responses to auditory stimuli and to ketamine. Results In both hippocampus and cortex, Nrg1 TM HET mice show significantly reduced expression of the exon encoding the transmembrane domain of Nrg1 compared with WT, but unaltered mRNA expression encoding the extracellular bioactive EGF-like and the cysteine-rich (type III) domains, and development-specific and region-specific reductions in the mRNA encoding the intracellular domain. Hippocampal Nrg1 protein expression was not altered, but NMDA receptor NR2B subunit phosphorylation was lower in Nrg1 TM HET mice. We identified elevated ongoing and reduced sensory-evoked gamma power in Nrg1 TM HET mice. Interpretation We found no evidence to support the claim that the Nrg1 TM HET mouse represents a simple haploinsufficient model. Further research is required to explore the possibility that mutation results in a gain of Nrg1 function. PMID

  10. Evolution of a protein domain interaction network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Li-Feng; Shi, Jian-Jun; Guan, Shan

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we attempt to understand complex network evolution from the underlying evolutionary relationship between biological organisms. Firstly, we construct a Pfam domain interaction network for each of the 470 completely sequenced organisms, and therefore each organism is correlated with a specific Pfam domain interaction network; secondly, we infer the evolutionary relationship of these organisms with the nearest neighbour joining method; thirdly, we use the evolutionary relationship between organisms constructed in the second step as the evolutionary course of the Pfam domain interaction network constructed in the first step. This analysis of the evolutionary course shows: (i) there is a conserved sub-network structure in network evolution; in this sub-network, nodes with lower degree prefer to maintain their connectivity invariant, and hubs tend to maintain their role as a hub is attached preferentially to new added nodes; (ii) few nodes are conserved as hubs; most of the other nodes are conserved as one with very low degree; (iii) in the course of network evolution, new nodes are added to the network either individually in most cases or as clusters with relative high clustering coefficients in a very few cases.

  11. Singlet CH domain containing human multidomain proteins: an inventory.

    PubMed

    Friedberg, Felix

    2010-03-01

    The actin cytoskeleton presents the basic force in processes such as cytokinesis, endocytosis, vesicular trafficking and cell migration. Here, we list 30 human singlet CH (calpononin homology/actin binding) containing multidomain molecules, each encoded by one gene. We show the domain distributions as given by the SMART program. These mosaic proteins organize geographically the placement of selected proteins in proximity within the cell. In most instances, their precise location, their actin binding capacity by way of the singlet CH (or by other domains?) and their physiological functions need further elucidation. A dendrogram based solely on the relationship for the human singlet CH domains (in terms of AA sequences) for the various molecules that possess the domain, implies that the singlet descended from a common ancestor which in turn sprouted three main branches of protein products. Each branch bifurcated multiple times thus accounting for a cornucopia of products. Wherever, additional (unassigned), highly homologous regions exist in related proteins (e.g., in LIM and LMO7 or in Tangerin and EH/BP1), these unrecognized domain regions await assignment as specific functional domains. Frequently genes coding multidomain proteins duplicated. The varying modular nature within multidomain proteins should have accelerated evolutionary changes to a degree not feasible to achieve by means of mere post-duplication mutational changes.

  12. Insights into Hox protein function from a large scale combinatorial analysis of protein domains.

    PubMed

    Merabet, Samir; Litim-Mecheri, Isma; Karlsson, Daniel; Dixit, Richa; Saadaoui, Mehdi; Monier, Bruno; Brun, Christine; Thor, Stefan; Vijayraghavan, K; Perrin, Laurent; Pradel, Jacques; Graba, Yacine

    2011-10-01

    Protein function is encoded within protein sequence and protein domains. However, how protein domains cooperate within a protein to modulate overall activity and how this impacts functional diversification at the molecular and organism levels remains largely unaddressed. Focusing on three domains of the central class Drosophila Hox transcription factor AbdominalA (AbdA), we used combinatorial domain mutations and most known AbdA developmental functions as biological readouts to investigate how protein domains collectively shape protein activity. The results uncover redundancy, interactivity, and multifunctionality of protein domains as salient features underlying overall AbdA protein activity, providing means to apprehend functional diversity and accounting for the robustness of Hox-controlled developmental programs. Importantly, the results highlight context-dependency in protein domain usage and interaction, allowing major modifications in domains to be tolerated without general functional loss. The non-pleoitropic effect of domain mutation suggests that protein modification may contribute more broadly to molecular changes underlying morphological diversification during evolution, so far thought to rely largely on modification in gene cis-regulatory sequences.

  13. Anchors aweigh: protein localization and transport mediated by transmembrane domains.

    PubMed

    Cosson, Pierre; Perrin, Jackie; Bonifacino, Juan S

    2013-10-01

    The transmembrane domains (TMDs) of integral membrane proteins have emerged as major determinants of intracellular localization and transport in the secretory and endocytic pathways. Unlike sorting signals in cytosolic domains, TMD sorting determinants are not conserved amino acid sequences but physical properties such as the length and hydrophilicity of the transmembrane span. The underlying sorting machinery is still poorly characterized, but several mechanisms have been proposed, including TMD recognition by transmembrane sorting receptors and partitioning into membrane lipid domains. Here we review the nature of TMD sorting determinants and how they may dictate transmembrane protein localization and transport.

  14. Anchors Aweigh: Protein Traffic Mediated by Transmembrane Domains

    PubMed Central

    Cosson, Pierre; Perrin, Jackie; Bonifacino, Juan S.

    2013-01-01

    The transmembrane domains (TMDs) of integral membrane proteins have emerged as major determinants of intracellular localization and transport in the secretory and endocytic pathways. Unlike sorting signals in the cytosolic domains, TMD sorting determinants are not conserved amino-acid sequences but physical properties such as length and hydrophilicity of the transmembrane span. The underlying sorting machinery is still poorly characterized but several mechanisms have been proposed, including TMD recognition by transmembrane sorting receptors and partitioning into membrane lipid domains. Here we review the nature of TMD sorting determinants and how they may dictate transmembrane protein localization and transport. PMID:23806646

  15. Cellular functions of phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate and FYVE domain proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Gillooly, D J; Simonsen, A; Stenmark, H

    2001-01-01

    PtdIns3P is a phosphoinositide 3-kinase product that has been strongly implicated in regulating membrane trafficking in both mammalian and yeast cells. PtdIns3P has been shown to be specifically located on membranes associated with the endocytic pathway. Proteins that contain FYVE zinc-finger domains are recruited to PtdIns3P-containing membranes. Structural information is now available concerning the interaction between FYVE domains and PtdIns3P. A number of proteins have been identified which contain a FYVE domain, and in this review we discuss the functions of PtdIns3P and its FYVE-domain-containing effector proteins in membrane trafficking, cytoskeletal regulation and receptor signalling. PMID:11284710

  16. Cloning, expression and purification of the SRCR domains of glycoprotein 340.

    PubMed

    Purushotham, Sangeetha; Deivanayagam, Champion

    2013-08-01

    Glycoprotein 340 (gp340), an innate immunity molecule is secreted luminally by monolayered epithelia and associated glands within the human oral cavity. Gp340 contains 14 scavenger receptor cysteine rich (SRCR) domains, two CUB (C1r/C1s Uegf Bmp1) domains and one zona pellucida (ZP) domain. Oral streptococci are known to adhere to the tooth immobilized gp340 via its surface protein Antigen I/II (AgI/II), which is considered to be the critical first step in pathogenesis that eventually results in colonization and infection. In order to decipher the interactions between gp340's domains and oral streptococcal AgI/II domains, we undertook to express human gp340's first SRCR domain (SRCR1) and the first three tandem SRCR domains (SRCR123) in Drosophila S2 cells. While our initial attempts with human codons did not produce optimal results, codon-optimization for expression in Drosophila S2 cells and usage of inducible/secretory Drosophila expression system (DES) pMT/BiP/V5-HisA vector greatly enhanced the expression of the SRCR domains. Here we report the successful cloning, expression, and purification of the SRCR domains of gp340. Recognition of expressed SRCRs by the conformational dependent gp340 antibody indicate that these domains are appropriately folded and furthermore, surface plasmon resonance studies confirmed functional adherence of the SRCR domains to AgI/II.

  17. Structural basis of Smoothened regulation by its extracellular domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, Eamon F. X.; Sircar, Ria; Miller, Paul S.; Hedger, George; Luchetti, Giovanni; Nachtergaele, Sigrid; Tully, Mark D.; Mydock-McGrane, Laurel; Covey, Douglas F.; Rambo, Robert P.; Sansom, Mark S. P.; Newstead, Simon; Rohatgi, Rajat; Siebold, Christian

    2016-07-01

    Developmental signals of the Hedgehog (Hh) and Wnt families are transduced across the membrane by Frizzled-class G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) composed of both a heptahelical transmembrane domain (TMD) and an extracellular cysteine-rich domain (CRD). How the large extracellular domains of GPCRs regulate signalling by the TMD is unknown. We present crystal structures of the Hh signal transducer and oncoprotein Smoothened, a GPCR that contains two distinct ligand-binding sites: one in its TMD and one in the CRD. The CRD is stacked atop the TMD, separated by an intervening wedge-like linker domain. Structure-guided mutations show that the interface between the CRD, linker domain and TMD stabilizes the inactive state of Smoothened. Unexpectedly, we find a cholesterol molecule bound to Smoothened in the CRD binding site. Mutations predicted to prevent cholesterol binding impair the ability of Smoothened to transmit native Hh signals. Binding of a clinically used antagonist, vismodegib, to the TMD induces a conformational change that is propagated to the CRD, resulting in loss of cholesterol from the CRD-linker domain-TMD interface. Our results clarify the structural mechanism by which the activity of a GPCR is controlled by ligand-regulated interactions between its extracellular and transmembrane domains.

  18. Domain conservation in several volvocalean cell wall proteins.

    PubMed

    Woessner, J P; Molendijk, A J; van Egmond, P; Klis, F M; Goodenough, U W; Haring, M A

    1994-11-01

    Based on our previous work demonstrating that (SerPro)x epitopes are common to extensin-like cell wall proteins in Chlamydomonas' reinhardtii, we looked for similar proteins in the distantly related species C. eugametos. Using a polyclonal antiserum against a (SerPro)10 oligopeptide, we found distinct sets of stage-specific polypeptides immunoprecipitated from in vitro translations of C. eugametos RNA. Screening of a C. eugametos cDNA expression library with the antiserum led to the isolation of a cDNA (WP6) encoding a (SerPro)x-rich multidomain wall protein. Analysis of a similarly selected cDNA (VSP-3) from a C. reinhardtii cDNA expression library revealed that it also coded for a (SerPro)x-rich multidomain wall protein. The C-terminal rod domains of VSP-3 and WP6 are highly homologous, while the N-terminal domains are dissimilar; however, the N-terminal domain of VSP-3 is homologous to the globular domain of a cell wall protein from Volvox carteri. Exon shuffling might be responsible for this example of domain conservation over 350 million years of volvocalean cell wall protein evolution.

  19. The PUB domain: a putative protein-protein interaction domain implicated in the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, T; Park, H; Till, E A; Lennarz, W J

    2001-10-12

    Cytoplasmic peptide:N-glycanase (PNGase) is a de-N-glycosylating enzyme which may be involved in the proteasome-dependent pathway for degradation of misfolded glycoproteins formed in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that are exported into the cytoplasm. A cytoplasmic PNGase found in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Png1p, is widely distributed in higher eukaryotes as well as in yeast (Suzuki, T., et al. J. Cell Biol. 149, 1039-1051, 2000). The recently uncovered complete genome sequence of Arabidopsis thaliana prompted us to search for the protein homologue of Png1p in this organism. Interestingly, when the mouse Png1p homologue sequence was used as a query, not only a Png1p homologue containing a transglutaminase-like domain that is believed to contain a catalytic triad for PNGase activity, but also four proteins which had a domain of 46 amino acids in length that exhibited significant similarity to the N-terminus of mouse Png1p were identified. Moreover, three of these homologous proteins were also found to possess a UBA or UBX domain, which are found in various proteins involved in the ubiquitin-related pathway. We name this newly found homologous region the PUB (Peptide:N-glycanase/UBA or UBX-containing proteins) domain and propose that this domain may mediate protein-protein interactions.

  20. Viral Macro Domains Reverse Protein ADP-Ribosylation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Changqing; Debing, Yannick; Jankevicius, Gytis; Neyts, Johan; Ahel, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT ADP-ribosylation is a posttranslational protein modification in which ADP-ribose is transferred from NAD+ to specific acceptors to regulate a wide variety of cellular processes. The macro domain is an ancient and highly evolutionarily conserved protein domain widely distributed throughout all kingdoms of life, including viruses. The human TARG1/C6orf130, MacroD1, and MacroD2 proteins can reverse ADP-ribosylation by acting on ADP-ribosylated substrates through the hydrolytic activity of their macro domains. Here, we report that the macro domain from hepatitis E virus (HEV) serves as an ADP-ribose-protein hydrolase for mono-ADP-ribose (MAR) and poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) chain removal (de-MARylation and de-PARylation, respectively) from mono- and poly(ADP)-ribosylated proteins, respectively. The presence of the HEV helicase in cis dramatically increases the binding of the macro domain to poly(ADP-ribose) and stimulates the de-PARylation activity. Abrogation of the latter dramatically decreases replication of an HEV subgenomic replicon. The de-MARylation activity is present in all three pathogenic positive-sense, single-stranded RNA [(+)ssRNA] virus families which carry a macro domain: Coronaviridae (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus and human coronavirus 229E), Togaviridae (Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus), and Hepeviridae (HEV), indicating that it might be a significant tropism and/or pathogenic determinant. IMPORTANCE Protein ADP-ribosylation is a covalent posttranslational modification regulating cellular protein activities in a dynamic fashion to modulate and coordinate a variety of cellular processes. Three viral families, Coronaviridae, Togaviridae, and Hepeviridae, possess macro domains embedded in their polyproteins. Here, we show that viral macro domains reverse cellular ADP-ribosylation, potentially cutting the signal of a viral infection in the cell. Various poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases which are notorious guardians of cellular

  1. Replication of murine coronavirus requires multiple cysteines in the endodomain of spike protein

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jinhua; Lv, Jun; Wang, Yuyan; Gao, Shuang; Yao, Qianqian; Qu, Di; Ye, Rong

    2012-06-05

    A conserved cysteine-rich motif located between the transmembrane domain and the endodomain is essential for membrane fusion and assembly of coronavirus spike (S) protein. Here, we proved that three cysteines within the motif, but not dependent on position, are minimally required for the survival of the recombinant mouse hepatitis virus. When the carboxy termini with these mutated motifs of S proteins were respectively introduced into a heterogeneous protein, both incorporation into lipid rafts and S-palmitoylation of these recombinant proteins showed a similar quantity requirement to cysteine residues. Meanwhile, the redistribution of these proteins on cellular surface indicated that the absence of the positively charged rather than cysteine residues in the motif might lead the dramatic reduction in syncytial formation of some mutants with the deleted motifs. These results suggest that multiple cysteine as well as charged residues concurrently improves the membrane-associated functions of S protein in viral replication and cytopathogenesis.

  2. A new and unexpected domain-domain interaction in the AraC protein.

    PubMed

    Cole, Stephanie Dirla; Schleif, Robert

    2012-05-01

    An interaction between the dimerization domains and DNA binding domains of the dimeric AraC protein has previously been shown to facilitate repression of the Escherichia coli araBAD operon by AraC in the absence of arabinose. A new interaction between the domains of AraC in the presence of arabinose is reported here, the regulatory consequences of which are unknown. Evidence for the interaction is the following: the dissociation rate of arabinose-bound AraC from half-site DNA is considerably faster than that of free DNA binding domain, and the affinity of the dimerization domains for arabinose is increased when half-site DNA is bound. In addition, an increase in the fluorescence intensity of tryptophan residues located in the arabinose-bound dimerization domain is observed upon binding of half-site DNA to the DNA binding domains. Direct physical evidence of the new domain-domain interaction is demonstrated by chemical crosslinking and NMR experiments.

  3. Global Patterns of Protein Domain Gain and Loss in Superkingdoms

    PubMed Central

    Nasir, Arshan; Kim, Kyung Mo; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    Domains are modules within proteins that can fold and function independently and are evolutionarily conserved. Here we compared the usage and distribution of protein domain families in the free-living proteomes of Archaea, Bacteria and Eukarya and reconstructed species phylogenies while tracing the history of domain emergence and loss in proteomes. We show that both gains and losses of domains occurred frequently during proteome evolution. The rate of domain discovery increased approximately linearly in evolutionary time. Remarkably, gains generally outnumbered losses and the gain-to-loss ratios were much higher in akaryotes compared to eukaryotes. Functional annotations of domain families revealed that both Archaea and Bacteria gained and lost metabolic capabilities during the course of evolution while Eukarya acquired a number of diverse molecular functions including those involved in extracellular processes, immunological mechanisms, and cell regulation. Results also highlighted significant contemporary sharing of informational enzymes between Archaea and Eukarya and metabolic enzymes between Bacteria and Eukarya. Finally, the analysis provided useful insights into the evolution of species. The archaeal superkingdom appeared first in evolution by gradual loss of ancestral domains, bacterial lineages were the first to gain superkingdom-specific domains, and eukaryotes (likely) originated when an expanding proto-eukaryotic stem lineage gained organelles through endosymbiosis of already diversified bacterial lineages. The evolutionary dynamics of domain families in proteomes and the increasing number of domain gains is predicted to redefine the persistence strategies of organisms in superkingdoms, influence the make up of molecular functions, and enhance organismal complexity by the generation of new domain architectures. This dynamics highlights ongoing secondary evolutionary adaptations in akaryotic microbes, especially Archaea. PMID:24499935

  4. Crystal structure of Bacillus subtilis anti-TRAP protein, an antagonist of TRAP/RNA interaction

    PubMed Central

    Shevtsov, Mikhail B.; Chen, Yanling; Gollnick, Paul; Antson, Alfred A.

    2005-01-01

    In Bacillus subtilis the anti-TRAP protein (AT) is produced in response to the accumulation of uncharged tRNATrp. AT regulates expression of genes involved in tryptophan biosynthesis and transport by binding to the tryptophan-activated trp RNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP) and preventing its interaction with several mRNAs. Here, we report the x-ray structure of AT at 2.8 Å resolution, showing that the protein subunits assemble into tight trimers. Four such trimers are further associated into a 12-subunit particle in which individual trimers are related by twofold and threefold symmetry axes. Twelve DnaJ-like, cysteine-rich zinc-binding domains form spikes on the surface of the dodecamer. Available data suggest several possible ways for AT to interact with the 11-subunit TRAP. Interaction between the two symmetry-mismatching molecules could be assisted by the flexible nature of AT zinc-binding domains. PMID:16306262

  5. Characterization of Two Dinoflagellate Cold Shock Domain Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Beauchemin, Mathieu; Roy, Sougata; Pelletier, Sarah; Averback, Alexandra; Lanthier, Frederic

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Roughly two-thirds of the proteins annotated as transcription factors in dinoflagellate transcriptomes are cold shock domain-containing proteins (CSPs), an uncommon condition in eukaryotic organisms. However, no functional analysis has ever been reported for a dinoflagellate CSP, and so it is not known if they do in fact act as transcription factors. We describe here some of the properties of two CSPs from the dinoflagellate Lingulodinium polyedrum, LpCSP1 and LpCSP2, which contain a glycine-rich C-terminal domain and an N-terminal cold shock domain phylogenetically related to those in bacteria. However, neither of the two LpCSPs act like the bacterial CSP, since they do not functionally complement the Escherichia coli quadruple cold shock domain protein mutant BX04, and cold shock does not induce LpCSP1 and LpCSP2 to detectable levels, based on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Both CSPs bind to RNA and single-stranded DNA in a nonspecific manner in electrophoretic mobility shift assays, and both proteins also bind double-stranded DNA nonspecifically, albeit more weakly. These CSPs are thus unlikely to act alone as sequence-specific transcription factors. IMPORTANCE Dinoflagellate transcriptomes contain cold shock domain proteins as the major component of the proteins annotated as transcription factors. We show here that the major family of cold shock domain proteins in the dinoflagellate Lingulodinium do not bind specific sequences, suggesting that transcriptional control is not a predominant mechanism for regulating gene expression in this group of protists. PMID:27303711

  6. Repeat proteins challenge the concept of structural domains.

    PubMed

    Espada, Rocío; Parra, R Gonzalo; Sippl, Manfred J; Mora, Thierry; Walczak, Aleksandra M; Ferreiro, Diego U

    2015-10-01

    Structural domains are believed to be modules within proteins that can fold and function independently. Some proteins show tandem repetitions of apparent modular structure that do not fold independently, but rather co-operate in stabilizing structural forms that comprise several repeat-units. For many natural repeat-proteins, it has been shown that weak energetic links between repeats lead to the breakdown of co-operativity and the appearance of folding sub-domains within an apparently regular repeat array. The quasi-1D architecture of repeat-proteins is crucial in detailing how the local energetic balances can modulate the folding dynamics of these proteins, which can be related to the physiological behaviour of these ubiquitous biological systems.

  7. An Algebro-Topological Description of Protein Domain Structure

    PubMed Central

    Penner, Robert Clark; Knudsen, Michael; Wiuf, Carsten; Andersen, Jørgen Ellegaard

    2011-01-01

    The space of possible protein structures appears vast and continuous, and the relationship between primary, secondary and tertiary structure levels is complex. Protein structure comparison and classification is therefore a difficult but important task since structure is a determinant for molecular interaction and function. We introduce a novel mathematical abstraction based on geometric topology to describe protein domain structure. Using the locations of the backbone atoms and the hydrogen bonds, we build a combinatorial object – a so-called fatgraph. The description is discrete yet gives rise to a 2-dimensional mathematical surface. Thus, each protein domain corresponds to a particular mathematical surface with characteristic topological invariants, such as the genus (number of holes) and the number of boundary components. Both invariants are global fatgraph features reflecting the interconnectivity of the domain by hydrogen bonds. We introduce the notion of robust variables, that is variables that are robust towards minor changes in the structure/fatgraph, and show that the genus and the number of boundary components are robust. Further, we invesigate the distribution of different fatgraph variables and show how only four variables are capable of distinguishing different folds. We use local (secondary) and global (tertiary) fatgraph features to describe domain structures and illustrate that they are useful for classification of domains in CATH. In addition, we combine our method with two other methods thereby using primary, secondary, and tertiary structure information, and show that we can identify a large percentage of new and unclassified structures in CATH. PMID:21629687

  8. Formation and organization of protein domains in the immunological synapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Andreas; Mahadevan, L.

    2014-11-01

    The cellular basis for the adaptive immune response during antigen recognition relies on a specialized protein interface known as the immunological synapse. Here, we propose a minimal mathematical model for the dynamics of the IS that encompass membrane mechanics, hydrodynamics and protein kinetics. Simple scaling laws describe the dynamics of protein clusters as a function of membrane stiffness, rigidity of the adhesive proteins, and fluid flow in the synaptic cleft. Numerical simulations complement the scaling laws by quantifying the nucleation, growth and stabilization of proteins domains on the size of the cell. Direct comparison with experiment suggests that passive dynamics suffices to describe the short-time formation and organization of protein clusters, while the stabilization and long time dynamics of the synapse is likely determined by active cytoskeleton processes triggered by receptor binding. Our study reveals that the fluid flow generated by the interplay between membrane deformation and protein binding kinetics can assist immune cells in regulating protein sorting.

  9. ELMO Domains, Evolutionary and Functional Characterization of a Novel GTPase-activating Protein (GAP) Domain for Arf Protein Family GTPases*

    PubMed Central

    East, Michael P.; Bowzard, J. Bradford; Dacks, Joel B.; Kahn, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    The human family of ELMO domain-containing proteins (ELMODs) consists of six members and is defined by the presence of the ELMO domain. Within this family are two subclassifications of proteins, based on primary sequence conservation, protein size, and domain architecture, deemed ELMOD and ELMO. In this study, we used homology searching and phylogenetics to identify ELMOD family homologs in genomes from across eukaryotic diversity. This demonstrated not only that the protein family is ancient but also that ELMOs are potentially restricted to the supergroup Opisthokonta (Metazoa and Fungi), whereas proteins with the ELMOD organization are found in diverse eukaryotes and thus were likely the form present in the last eukaryotic common ancestor. The segregation of the ELMO clade from the larger ELMOD group is consistent with their contrasting functions as unconventional Rac1 guanine nucleotide exchange factors and the Arf family GTPase-activating proteins, respectively. We used unbiased, phylogenetic sorting and sequence alignments to identify the most highly conserved residues within the ELMO domain to identify a putative GAP domain within the ELMODs. Three independent but complementary assays were used to provide an initial characterization of this domain. We identified a highly conserved arginine residue critical for both the biochemical and cellular GAP activity of ELMODs. We also provide initial evidence of the function of human ELMOD1 as an Arf family GAP at the Golgi. These findings provide the basis for the future study of the ELMOD family of proteins and a new avenue for the study of Arf family GTPases. PMID:23014990

  10. SNP@Domain: a web resource of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within protein domain structures and sequences

    PubMed Central

    Han, Areum; Kang, Hyo Jin; Cho, Yoobok; Lee, Sunghoon; Kim, Young Joo; Gong, Sungsam

    2006-01-01

    The single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in conserved protein regions have been thought to be strong candidates that alter protein functions. Thus, we have developed SNP@Domain, a web resource, to identify SNPs within human protein domains. We annotated SNPs from dbSNP with protein structure-based as well as sequence-based domains: (i) structure-based using SCOP and (ii) sequence-based using Pfam to avoid conflicts from two domain assignment methodologies. Users can investigate SNPs within protein domains with 2D and 3D maps. We expect this visual annotation of SNPs within protein domains will help scientists select and interpret SNPs associated with diseases. A web interface for the SNP@Domain is freely available at and from . PMID:16845090

  11. Pleiotropic roles of cold shock domain proteins in plants.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Kentaro; Imai, Ryozo

    2011-01-01

    The cold shock domain (CSD) is a nucleic acid binding domain that is widely conserved from bacteria to higher plants and animals. In Escherichia coli, cold shock proteins (CSPs) are composed solely of a CSD and function as RNA chaperones that destabilize RNA secondary structures. Cellular RNAs tend to be folded into unfavorable structures under low temperature conditions, and RNA chaperones resolve these structures, recovering functionality of the RNAs. CSP functions are associated mainly with cold adaptation, but they are also involved in other biological processes under normal growth conditions. Eukaryotic CSD proteins contain auxiliary domains in addition to the CSD and regulate many biological processes such as development and stress tolerance. In plants, it has been demonstrated that CSD proteins play essential roles in acquiring freezing tolerance. In addition, it has been suggested that some plant CSD proteins regulate embryo development, flowering time, and fruit development. In this review, we summarize the pleiotropic biological functions of CSP proteins in plants and discuss possible mechanisms by which plant CSD proteins regulate the functions of RNA molecules.

  12. Methods of use of cellulose binding domain proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1997-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  13. Methods of use of cellulose binding domain proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1997-09-23

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  14. Morbillivirus and henipavirus attachment protein cytoplasmic domains differently affect protein expression, fusion support and particle assembly.

    PubMed

    Sawatsky, Bevan; Bente, Dennis A; Czub, Markus; von Messling, Veronika

    2016-05-01

    The amino-terminal cytoplasmic domains of paramyxovirus attachment glycoproteins include trafficking signals that influence protein processing and cell surface expression. To characterize the role of the cytoplasmic domain in protein expression, fusion support and particle assembly in more detail, we constructed chimeric Nipah virus (NiV) glycoprotein (G) and canine distemper virus (CDV) haemagglutinin (H) proteins carrying the respective heterologous cytoplasmic domain, as well as a series of mutants with progressive deletions in this domain. CDV H retained fusion function and was normally expressed on the cell surface with a heterologous cytoplasmic domain, while the expression and fusion support of NiV G was dramatically decreased when its cytoplasmic domain was replaced with that of CDV H. The cell surface expression and fusion support functions of CDV H were relatively insensitive to cytoplasmic domain deletions, while short deletions in the corresponding region of NiV G dramatically decreased both. In addition, the first 10 residues of the CDV H cytoplasmic domain strongly influence its incorporation into virus-like particles formed by the CDV matrix (M) protein, while the co-expression of NiV M with NiV G had no significant effect on incorporation of G into particles. The cytoplasmic domains of both the CDV H and NiV G proteins thus contribute differently to the virus life cycle.

  15. Structural basis for Smoothened regulation by its extracellular domains

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Paul S.; Hedger, George; Luchetti, Giovanni; Nachtergaele, Sigrid; Tully, Mark D.; Mydock-McGrane, Laurel; Covey, Douglas F.; Rambo, Robert P.; Sansom, Mark S. P.; Rohatgi, Rajat; Siebold, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Developmental signals of the Hedgehog (Hh) and Wnt families are transduced across the membrane by Frizzled-class G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) composed of both a heptahelical transmembrane domain (TMD) and an extracellular cysteine-rich domain (CRD). How such large extracellular domains of GPCRs regulate signalling by the TMD is unknown. We present crystal structures of the Hh signal transducer and oncoprotein Smoothened (SMO), which contains two distinct ligand-binding sites in its TMD and CRD. The CRD is stacked atop the TMD, separated by an intervening wedge-like linker domain (LD). Structure-guided mutations show that the interface between the CRD, LD and TMD stabilises the inactive state of SMO. Unexpectedly, we find a cholesterol molecule bound to SMO in the CRD-binding site. Mutations predicted to prevent cholesterol binding impair the ability of SMO to transmit native Hh signals. Binding of a clinically used antagonist, vismodegib, to the TMD induces a conformational change that is propagated to the CRD, resulting in loss of cholesterol from the CRD-LD-TMD interface. Our work elucidates the structural mechanism by which the activity of a GPCR is controlled by ligand-regulated interactions between its extracellular and transmembrane domains. PMID:27437577

  16. Single-stranded DNA-binding proteins regulate the abundance of LIM domain and LIM domain-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhixiong; Meng, Xianzhang; Cai, Ying; Liang, Hong; Nagarajan, Lalitha; Brandt, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    The LIM domain-binding protein Ldb1 is an essential cofactor of LIM-homeodomain (LIM-HD) and LIM-only (LMO) proteins in development. The stoichiometry of Ldb1, LIM-HD, and LMO proteins is tightly controlled in the cell and is likely a critical determinant of their biological actions. Single-stranded DNA-binding proteins (SSBPs) were recently shown to interact with Ldb1 and are also important in developmental programs. We establish here that two mammalian SSBPs, SSBP2 and SSBP3, contribute to an erythroid DNA-binding complex that contains the transcription factors Tal1 and GATA-1, the LIM domain protein Lmo2, and Ldb1 and binds a bipartite E-box-GATA DNA sequence motif. In addition, SSBP2 was found to augment transcription of the Protein 4.2 (P4.2) gene, a direct target of the E-box-GATA-binding complex, in an Ldb1-dependent manner and to increase endogenous Ldb1 and Lmo2 protein levels, E-box-GATA DNA-binding activity, and P4.2 and β-globin expression in erythroid progenitors. Finally, SSBP2 was demonstrated to inhibit Ldb1 and Lmo2 interaction with the E3 ubiquitin ligase RLIM, prevent RLIM-mediated Ldb1 ubiquitination, and protect Ldb1 and Lmo2 from proteasomal degradation. These results define a novel biochemical function for SSBPs in regulating the abundance of LIM domain and LIM domain-binding proteins. PMID:17437998

  17. Defining the boundaries: structure and function of LOB domain proteins.

    PubMed

    Majer, Christine; Hochholdinger, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The plant-specific LBD (Lateral Organ Boundaries Domain) gene family is essential in the regulation of plant lateral organ development and is involved in the regulation of anthocyanin and nitrogen metabolism. LBD proteins contain a characteristic LOB domain composed of a C-motif required for DNA-binding, a conserved glycine residue, and a leucine-zipper-like sequence required for protein-protein interactions. Recently, several LBD genes associated with mutant phenotypes related to almost all aspects of plant development, including embryo, root, leaf, and inflorescence development have been functionally characterized. These novel insights contribute to a better understanding of the molecular definition of boundaries between organs or boundaries between organs and meristems and the regulation of these processes by environmental cues and phytohormones.

  18. Membrane shape instabilities induced by BAR domain proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgart, Tobias

    2014-03-01

    Membrane curvature has developed into a forefront of membrane biophysics. Numerous proteins involved in membrane curvature sensing and membrane curvature generation have recently been discovered, including proteins containing the crescent-shaped BAR domain as membrane binding and shaping module. Accordingly, the structure determination of these proteins and their multimeric complexes is increasingly well-understood. Substantially less understood, however, are thermodynamic and kinetic aspects and the detailed mechanisms of how these proteins interact with membranes in a curvature-dependent manner. New experimental approaches need to be combined with established techniques to be able to fill in these missing details. Here we use model membrane systems in combination with a variety of biophysical techniques to characterize mechanistic aspects of BAR domain protein function. This includes a characterization of membrane curvature sensing and membrane generation. We also establish kinetic and thermodynamic aspects of BAR protein dimerization in solution, and investigate kinetic aspects of membrane binding. We present two new approaches to investigate membrane shape instabilities and demonstrate that membrane shape instabilities can be controlled by protein binding and lateral membrane tension. This work is supported through NIH grant GM-097552 and NSF grant CBET-1053857.

  19. BC-box protein domain-related mechanism for VHL protein degradation

    PubMed Central

    Pozzebon, Maria Elena; Varadaraj, Archana; Mattoscio, Domenico; Jaffray, Ellis G.; Miccolo, Claudia; Galimberti, Viviana; Tommasino, Massimo; Hay, Ronald T.; Chiocca, Susanna

    2013-01-01

    The tumor suppressor VHL (von Hippel–Lindau) protein is a substrate receptor for Ubiquitin Cullin Ring Ligase complexes (CRLs), containing a BC-box domain that associates to the adaptor Elongin B/C. VHL targets hypoxia-inducible factor 1α to proteasome-dependent degradation. Gam1 is an adenoviral protein, which also possesses a BC-box domain that interacts with the host Elongin B/C, thereby acting as a viral substrate receptor. Gam1 associates with both Cullin2 and Cullin5 to form CRL complexes targeting the host protein SUMO enzyme SAE1 for proteasomal degradation. We show that Gam1 protein expression induces VHL protein degradation leading to hypoxia-inducible factor 1α stabilization and induction of its downstream targets. We also characterize the CRL-dependent mechanism that drives VHL protein degradation via proteasome. Interestingly, expression of Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling (SOCS) domain-containing viral proteins and cellular BC-box proteins leads to VHL protein degradation, in a SOCS domain-containing manner. Our work underscores the exquisite ability of viral domains to uncover new regulatory mechanisms by hijacking key cellular proteins. PMID:24145437

  20. Prediction of Cancer Proteins by Integrating Protein Interaction, Domain Frequency, and Domain Interaction Data Using Machine Learning Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Many proteins are known to be associated with cancer diseases. It is quite often that their precise functional role in disease pathogenesis remains unclear. A strategy to gain a better understanding of the function of these proteins is to make use of a combination of different aspects of proteomics data types. In this study, we extended Aragues's method by employing the protein-protein interaction (PPI) data, domain-domain interaction (DDI) data, weighted domain frequency score (DFS), and cancer linker degree (CLD) data to predict cancer proteins. Performances were benchmarked based on three kinds of experiments as follows: (I) using individual algorithm, (II) combining algorithms, and (III) combining the same classification types of algorithms. When compared with Aragues's method, our proposed methods, that is, machine learning algorithm and voting with the majority, are significantly superior in all seven performance measures. We demonstrated the accuracy of the proposed method on two independent datasets. The best algorithm can achieve a hit ratio of 89.4% and 72.8% for lung cancer dataset and lung cancer microarray study, respectively. It is anticipated that the current research could help understand disease mechanisms and diagnosis. PMID:25866773

  1. Evolutionary history and genome organization of DUF1220 protein domains.

    PubMed

    O'Bleness, Majesta S; Dickens, C Michael; Dumas, Laura J; Kehrer-Sawatzki, Hildegard; Wyckoff, Gerald J; Sikela, James M

    2012-09-01

    DUF1220 protein domains exhibit the most extreme human lineage-specific (HLS) copy number increase of any protein coding region in the human genome and have recently been linked to evolutionary and pathological changes in brain size (e.g., 1q21-associated microcephaly). These findings lend support to the view that DUF1220 domain dosage is a key factor in the determination of primate (and human) brain size. Here we analyze 41 animal genomes and present the most complete account to date of the evolutionary history and genome organization of DUF1220 domains and the gene family that encodes them (NBPF). Included among the novel features identified by this analysis is a DUF1220 domain precursor in nonmammalian vertebrates, a unique predicted promoter common to all mammalian NBPF genes, six distinct clades into which DUF1220 sequences can be subdivided, and a previously unknown member of the NBPF gene family (NBPF25). Most importantly, we show that the exceptional HLS increase in DUF1220 copy number (from 102 in our last common ancestor with chimp to 272 in human; an average HLS increase of ~28 copies every million years since the Homo/Pan split) was driven by intragenic domain hyperamplification. This increase primarily involved a 4.7 kb, tandemly repeated three DUF1220 domain unit we have named the HLS DUF1220 triplet, a motif that is a likely candidate to underlie key properties unique to the Homo sapiens brain. Interestingly, all copies of the HLS DUF1220 triplet lie within a human-specific pericentric inversion that also includes the 1q12 C-band, a polymorphic heterochromatin expansion that is unique to the human genome. Both cytogenetic features likely played key roles in the rapid HLS DUF1220 triplet hyperamplification, which is among the most striking genomic changes specific to the human lineage.

  2. Control of domain swapping in bovine odorant-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Ramoni, Roberto; Vincent, Florence; Ashcroft, Alison E; Accornero, Paolo; Grolli, Stefano; Valencia, Christel; Tegoni, Mariella; Cambillau, Christian

    2002-01-01

    As revealed by the X-ray structure, bovine odorant-binding protein (OBPb) is a domain swapped dimer [Tegoni, Ramoni, Bignetti, Spinelli and Cambillau (1996) Nat. Struct. Biol. 3, 863-867; Bianchet, Bains, Petosi, Pevsner, Snyder, Monaco and Amzel (1996) Nat. Struct. Biol. 3, 934-939]. This contrasts with all known mammalian OBPs, which are monomers, and in particular with porcine OBP (OBPp), sharing 42.3% identity with OBPb. By the mechanism of domain swapping, monomers are proposed to evolve into dimers and oligomers, as observed in human prion. Comparison of bovine and porcine OBP sequences pointed at OBPp glycine 121, in the hinge linking the beta-barrel to the alpha-helix. The absence of this residue in OBPb might explain why the normal lipocalin beta-turn is not formed. In order to decipher the domain swapping determinants we have produced a mutant of OBPb in which a glycine residue was inserted after position 121, and a mutant of OBPp in which glycine 121 was deleted. The latter mutation did not result in dimerization, while OBPb-121Gly+ became monomeric, suggesting that domain swapping was reversed. Careful structural analysis revealed that besides the presence of a glycine in the hinge, the dimer interface formed by the C-termini and by the presence of the lipocalins conserved disulphide bridge may also control domain swapping. PMID:11931632

  3. Rapid expansion of the protein disulfide isomerase gene family facilitates the folding of venom peptides

    PubMed Central

    Safavi-Hemami, Helena; Li, Qing; Jackson, Ronneshia L.; Song, Albert S.; Boomsma, Wouter; Bandyopadhyay, Pradip K.; Gruber, Christian W.; Purcell, Anthony W.; Yandell, Mark; Olivera, Baldomero M.

    2016-01-01

    Formation of correct disulfide bonds in the endoplasmic reticulum is a crucial step for folding proteins destined for secretion. Protein disulfide isomerases (PDIs) play a central role in this process. We report a previously unidentified, hypervariable family of PDIs that represents the most diverse gene family of oxidoreductases described in a single genus to date. These enzymes are highly expressed specifically in the venom glands of predatory cone snails, animals that synthesize a remarkably diverse set of cysteine-rich peptide toxins (conotoxins). Enzymes in this PDI family, termed conotoxin-specific PDIs, significantly and differentially accelerate the kinetics of disulfide-bond formation of several conotoxins. Our results are consistent with a unique biological scenario associated with protein folding: The diversification of a family of foldases can be correlated with the rapid evolution of an unprecedented diversity of disulfide-rich structural domains expressed by venomous marine snails in the superfamily Conoidea. PMID:26957604

  4. Single-domain protein folding: a multi-faceted problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junier, Ivan; Ritort, Felix

    2006-08-01

    We review theoretical approaches, experiments and numerical simulations that have been recently proposed to investigate the folding problem in single-domain proteins. From a theoretical point of view, we emphasize the energy landscape approach. As far as experiments are concerned, we focus on the recent development of single-molecule techniques. In particular, we compare the results obtained with two main techniques: single protein force measurements with optical tweezers and single-molecule fluorescence in studies on the same protein (RNase H). This allows us to point out some controversial issues such as the nature of the denatured and intermediate states and possible folding pathways. After reviewing the various numerical simulation techniques, we show that on-lattice protein-like models can help to understand many controversial issues.

  5. Hendra virus fusion protein transmembrane domain contributes to pre-fusion protein stability.

    PubMed

    Webb, Stacy; Nagy, Tamas; Moseley, Hunter; Fried, Michael; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2017-02-17

    Enveloped viruses utilize fusion (F) proteins studding the surface of the virus to facilitate membrane fusion with a target cell membrane. Fusion of the viral envelope with a cellular membrane is required for release of viral genomic material so the virus can ultimately reproduce and spread. To drive fusion, the F protein undergoes an irreversible conformational change, transitioning from a meta-stable pre-fusion conformation to a more thermodynamically stable post-fusion structure. Understanding the elements which control stability of the pre-fusion state and triggering to the post-fusion conformation is important for understanding F protein function. Mutations in F protein transmembrane (TM) domains implicated the TM domain in the fusion process, but the structural and molecular details in fusion remain unclear. Previously, analytical ultracentrifugation was utilized to demonstrate that isolated TM domains of Hendra virus F protein associate in a monomer-trimer equilibrium (Smith EC, et al. Trimeric transmembrane domain interactions in paramyxovirus fusion proteins. 2013. J Biol Chem. 288, 35726). To determine factors driving this association, 140 paramyxovirus F protein TM domain sequences were analyzed. A heptad repeat of β-branched residues was found and analysis of the Hendra virus F TM domain revealed a heptad repeat leucine-isoleucine zipper motif (LIZ). Replacement of the LIZ with alanine resulted in dramatically reduced TM-TM association. Mutation of the LIZ in the whole protein resulted in decreased protein stability, including pre-fusion conformation stability. Together our data suggest that the heptad repeat LIZ contributed to TM-TM association and is important for F protein function and pre-fusion stability.

  6. The KP4 killer protein gene family

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Killer protein 4 (KP4) is a well studied toxin secreted by the maize smut fungus Ustilago maydis that kills sensitive Ustilago strains as well as inhibits Fusarium and plant root growth. This small, cysteine rich protein is encoded by a virus that depends on host survival for replication. KP4 functi...

  7. Proteins on the catwalk: modelling the structural domains of the CCN family of proteins.

    PubMed

    Holbourn, Kenneth P; Perbal, Bernard; Ravi Acharya, K

    2009-03-01

    The CCN family of proteins (CCN1, CCN2, CCN3, CCN4, CCN5 and CCN6) are multifunctional mosaic proteins that play keys roles in crucial areas of physiology such as angiogenesis, skeletal development tumourigenesis, cell proliferation, adhesion and survival. This expansive repertoire of functions comes through a modular structure of 4 discrete domains that act both independently and in concert. How these interactions with ligands and with neighbouring domains lead to the biological effects is still to be explored but the molecular structure of the domains is likely to play an important role in this. In this review we have highlighted some of the key features of the individual domains of CCN family of proteins based on their biological effects using a homology modelling approach.

  8. The β1 domain of protein G can replace the chorismate mutase domain of the T-protein.

    PubMed

    Osuna, Joel; Flores, Humberto; Saab-Rincón, Gloria

    2012-02-17

    T-protein is composed of chorismate mutase (AroQ(T)) fused to the N-terminus of prephenate dehydrogenase (TyrA). Here, we report the replacement of AroQ(T) with the β1-domain of protein G (Gβ1). The TyrA domain shows a strong dehydrogenase activity within the context of this fusion, and our data indicate that Gβ1-TyrA folds into a dimeric conformation. Amino acid substitutions in the Gβ1 domain of Gβ1-TyrA identified residues involved in stabilizing the TyrA dimeric conformation. Gβ1 substitutions in the N-terminal β-hairpin eliminated Gβ1-TyrA expression, whereas Gβ1-TyrA tolerated Gβ1 substitutions in the C-terminal β-hairpin and in the α-helix. All of the characterized variants folded into a dimeric conformation. The importance of the β2-strand in forming a Gβ1 homo-dimerization interface explains the relevance of the first-β-hairpin in stabilizing the dimeric TyrA protein.

  9. Using support vector machine for improving protein-protein interaction prediction utilizing domain interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Singhal, Mudita; Shah, Anuj R.; Brown, Roslyn N.; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2010-10-02

    Understanding protein interactions is essential to gain insights into the biological processes at the whole cell level. The high-throughput experimental techniques for determining protein-protein interactions (PPI) are error prone and expensive with low overlap amongst them. Although several computational methods have been proposed for predicting protein interactions there is definite room for improvement. Here we present DomainSVM, a predictive method for PPI that uses computationally inferred domain-domain interaction values in a Support Vector Machine framework to predict protein interactions. DomainSVM method utilizes evidence of multiple interacting domains to predict a protein interaction. It outperforms existing methods of PPI prediction by achieving very high explanation ratios, precision, specificity, sensitivity and F-measure values in a 10 fold cross-validation study conducted on the positive and negative PPIs in yeast. A Functional comparison study using GO annotations on the positive and the negative test sets is presented in addition to discussing novel PPI predictions in Salmonella Typhimurium.

  10. Normalized Cut Algorithm for Automated Assignment of Protein Domains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samanta, M. P.; Liang, S.; Zha, H.; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present a novel computational method for automatic assignment of protein domains from structural data. At the core of our algorithm lies a recently proposed clustering technique that has been very successful for image-partitioning applications. This grap.,l-theory based clustering method uses the notion of a normalized cut to partition. an undirected graph into its strongly-connected components. Computer implementation of our method tested on the standard comparison set of proteins from the literature shows a high success rate (84%), better than most existing alternative In addition, several other features of our algorithm, such as reliance on few adjustable parameters, linear run-time with respect to the size of the protein and reduced complexity compared to other graph-theory based algorithms, would make it an attractive tool for structural biologists.

  11. The two distinctive metal ion binding domains of the wheat metallothionein Ec-1.

    PubMed

    Peroza, Estevão A; Kaabi, Ali Al; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Wellenreuther, Gerd; Freisinger, Eva

    2009-03-01

    Metallothioneins are small cysteine-rich proteins believed to play a role, among others, in the homeostasis of essential metal ions such as Zn(II) and Cu(I). Recently, we could show that wheat E(c)-1 is coordinating its six Zn(II) ions in form of metal-thiolate clusters analogously to the vertebrate metallothioneins. Specifically, two Zn(II) ions are bound in the N-terminal and four in the C-terminal domain. In the following, we will present evidence for the relative independence of the two domains from each other with respect to their metal ion binding abilities, and uncover three intriguing peculiarities of the protein. Firstly, one Zn(II) ion of the N-terminal domain is relative resistant to complete replacement with Cd(II) indicating the presence of a Zn(II)-binding site with increased stability. Secondly, the C-terminal domain is able to coordinate an additional fifth metal ion, though with reduced affinity, which went undetected so far. Finally, reconstitution of apoE(c)-1 with an excess of Zn(II) shows a certain amount of sub-stoichiometrically metal-loaded species. The possible relevance of these finding for the proposed biological functions of wheat E(c)-1 will be discussed. In addition, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements on both, the full-length and the truncated protein, provide final evidence for His participation in metal ion binding.

  12. Basic Endochitinases Are Major Proteins in Castanea sativa Cotyledons 1

    PubMed Central

    Collada, Carmen; Casado, Rosa; Fraile, Aurora; Aragoncillo, Cipriano

    1992-01-01

    Basic endochitinases are abundant proteins in Castanea sativa Mill. cotyledons. Three basic chitinases were purified with molecular masses of 25, 26, and 32 kD (Ch1, Ch2, and Ch3) and with isoelectric points between 8 and 9.5. Antibodies raised against Ch1 cross-reacted with Ch2 and Ch3. However, Ch3 showed differences when compared with the other two enzymes, especially in its higher cysteine content. The size, amino acid composition, and N-terminal sequence of Ch1 indicate that it is a class II endochitinase and, therefore, has no cysteine-rich hevein domain. Ch1 inhibits the growth of the fungus Trichoderma viride. The biological role of these endochitinases is discussed. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:16653058

  13. Method for identification of rigid domains and hinge residues in proteins based on exhaustive enumeration.

    PubMed

    Sim, Jaehyun; Sim, Jun; Park, Eunsung; Lee, Julian

    2015-06-01

    Many proteins undergo large-scale motions where relatively rigid domains move against each other. The identification of rigid domains, as well as the hinge residues important for their relative movements, is important for various applications including flexible docking simulations. In this work, we develop a method for protein rigid domain identification based on an exhaustive enumeration of maximal rigid domains, the rigid domains not fully contained within other domains. The computation is performed by mapping the problem to that of finding maximal cliques in a graph. A minimal set of rigid domains are then selected, which cover most of the protein with minimal overlap. In contrast to the results of existing methods that partition a protein into non-overlapping domains using approximate algorithms, the rigid domains obtained from exact enumeration naturally contain overlapping regions, which correspond to the hinges of the inter-domain bending motion. The performance of the algorithm is demonstrated on several proteins.

  14. Identifying the hierarchy of dynamic domains in proteins using the data of molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Yesylevskyy, Semen O

    2010-04-01

    The Hierarchical Domain-Wise Alignment (HDWA) technique of domain identification in proteins is presented. HDWA is designed to identify hierarchically organized dynamic domains in proteins using the MD trajectories by eliminating systematic motions from MD trajectories recursively in a model-free manner. The method is tested on the proteins from different structural classes.

  15. ABI domain-containing proteins contribute to surface protein display and cell division in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Frankel, Matthew B; Wojcik, Brandon M; DeDent, Andrea C; Missiakas, Dominique M; Schneewind, Olaf

    2010-10-01

    The human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus requires cell wall anchored surface proteins to cause disease. During cell division, surface proteins with YSIRK signal peptides are secreted into the cross-wall, a layer of newly synthesized peptidoglycan between separating daughter cells. The molecular determinants for the trafficking of surface proteins are, however, still unknown. We screened mutants with non-redundant transposon insertions by fluorescence-activated cell sorting for reduced deposition of protein A (SpA) into the staphylococcal envelope. Three mutants, each of which harboured transposon insertions in genes for transmembrane proteins, displayed greatly reduced envelope abundance of SpA and surface proteins with YSIRK signal peptides. Characterization of the corresponding mutations identified three transmembrane proteins with abortive infectivity (ABI) domains, elements first described in lactococci for their role in phage exclusion. Mutations in genes for ABI domain proteins, designated spdA, spdB and spdC (surface protein display), diminish the expression of surface proteins with YSIRK signal peptides, but not of precursor proteins with conventional signal peptides. spdA, spdB and spdC mutants display an increase in the thickness of cross-walls and in the relative abundance of staphylococci with cross-walls, suggesting that spd mutations may represent a possible link between staphylococcal cell division and protein secretion.

  16. Investigating the Role of Large-Scale Domain Dynamics in Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Delaforge, Elise; Milles, Sigrid; Huang, Jie-rong; Bouvier, Denis; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing; Sattler, Michael; Hart, Darren J.; Blackledge, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered linkers provide multi-domain proteins with degrees of conformational freedom that are often essential for function. These highly dynamic assemblies represent a significant fraction of all proteomes, and deciphering the physical basis of their interactions represents a considerable challenge. Here we describe the difficulties associated with mapping the large-scale domain dynamics and describe two recent examples where solution state methods, in particular NMR spectroscopy, are used to investigate conformational exchange on very different timescales. PMID:27679800

  17. Hydrophobic-cluster analysis of plant protein sequences. A domain homology between storage and lipid-transfer proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Henrissat, B; Popineau, Y; Kader, J C

    1988-01-01

    Hydrophobic-cluster analysis was used to characterize a conserved domain located near the C-terminal amino acid sequence of wheat (Triticum aestivum) storage proteins. This domain was transformed into a linear template for a global search for similarities in over 5200 protein sequences. In addition to proteins that had already been found to exhibit homology to wheat storage proteins, a previously unreported homology was found with non-specific lipid-transfer proteins from castor bean (Ricinus communis) and from spinach (Spinacia oleracea) leaf. Hydrophobic-cluster analysis of various members of the present protein group clearly shows a typical domain structure where (i) variable and conserved domains are located along the sequence at precise positions, (ii) the conserved domains probably reflect a common ancestor, and (iii) the unique properties of a given protein (chain cut into subunits, repetitive domains, trypsin-inhibitor active site) are associated with the variable domains. PMID:3214430

  18. Pathway logic modeling of protein functional domains in signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Talcott, C; Eker, S; Knapp, M; Lincoln, P; Laderoute, K

    2004-01-01

    Protein functional domains (PFDs) are consensus sequences within signaling molecules that recognize and assemble other signaling components into complexes. Here we describe the application of an approach called Pathway Logic to the symbolic modeling signal transduction networks at the level of PFDs. These models are developed using Maude, a symbolic language founded on rewriting logic. Models can be queried (analyzed) using the execution, search and model-checking tools of Maude. We show how signal transduction processes can be modeled using Maude at very different levels of abstraction involving either an overall state of a protein or its PFDs and their interactions. The key insight for the latter is our algebraic representation of binding interactions as a graph.

  19. Experimental mapping of soluble protein domains using a hierarchical approach.

    PubMed

    Pedelacq, Jean-Denis; Nguyen, Hau B; Cabantous, Stephanie; Mark, Brian L; Listwan, Pawel; Bell, Carolyn; Friedland, Natasha; Lockard, Meghan; Faille, Alexandre; Mourey, Lionel; Terwilliger, Thomas C; Waldo, Geoffrey S

    2011-10-01

    Exploring the function and 3D space of large multidomain protein targets often requires sophisticated experimentation to obtain the targets in a form suitable for structure determination. Screening methods capable of selecting well-expressed, soluble fragments from DNA libraries exist, but require the use of automation to maximize chances of picking a few good candidates. Here, we describe the use of an insertion dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) vector to select in-frame fragments and a split-GFP assay technology to filter-out constructs that express insoluble protein fragments. With the incorporation of an IPCR step to create high density, focused sublibraries of fragments, this cost-effective method can be performed manually with no a priori knowledge of domain boundaries while permitting single amino acid resolution boundary mapping. We used it on the well-characterized p85α subunit of the phosphoinositide-3-kinase to demonstrate the robustness and efficiency of our methodology. We then successfully tested it onto the polyketide synthase PpsC from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a potential drug target involved in the biosynthesis of complex lipids in the cell envelope. X-ray quality crystals from the acyl-transferase (AT), dehydratase (DH) and enoyl-reductase (ER) domains have been obtained.

  20. Experimental mapping of soluble protein domains using a hierarchical approach

    PubMed Central

    Pedelacq, Jean-Denis; Nguyen, Hau B.; Cabantous, Stephanie; Mark, Brian L.; Listwan, Pawel; Bell, Carolyn; Friedland, Natasha; Lockard, Meghan; Faille, Alexandre; Mourey, Lionel; Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Waldo, Geoffrey S.

    2011-01-01

    Exploring the function and 3D space of large multidomain protein targets often requires sophisticated experimentation to obtain the targets in a form suitable for structure determination. Screening methods capable of selecting well-expressed, soluble fragments from DNA libraries exist, but require the use of automation to maximize chances of picking a few good candidates. Here, we describe the use of an insertion dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) vector to select in-frame fragments and a split-GFP assay technology to filter-out constructs that express insoluble protein fragments. With the incorporation of an IPCR step to create high density, focused sublibraries of fragments, this cost-effective method can be performed manually with no a priori knowledge of domain boundaries while permitting single amino acid resolution boundary mapping. We used it on the well-characterized p85α subunit of the phosphoinositide-3-kinase to demonstrate the robustness and efficiency of our methodology. We then successfully tested it onto the polyketide synthase PpsC from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a potential drug target involved in the biosynthesis of complex lipids in the cell envelope. X-ray quality crystals from the acyl-transferase (AT), dehydratase (DH) and enoyl-reductase (ER) domains have been obtained. PMID:21771856

  1. AGL15, a MADS domain protein expressed in developing embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Heck, G R; Perry, S E; Nichols, K W; Fernandez, D E

    1995-01-01

    To extend our knowledge of genes expressed during early embryogenesis, the differential display technique was used to identify and isolate mRNA sequences that accumulate preferentially in young Brassica napus embryos. One of these genes encodes a new member of the MADS domain family of regulatory proteins; it has been designated AGL15 (for AGAMOUS-like). AGL15 shows a novel pattern of expression that is distinct from those of previously characterized family members. RNA gel blot analyses and in situ hybridization techniques were used to demonstrate that AGL15 mRNA accumulated primarily in the embryo and was present in all embryonic tissues, beginning at least as early as late globular stage in B. napus. Genomic and cDNA clones corresponding to two AGL15 genes from B. napus and the homologous single-copy gene from Arabidopsis, which is located on chromosome 5, were isolated and analyzed. Antibodies prepared against overexpressed Brassica AGL15 lacking the conserved MADS domain were used to probe immunoblots, and AGL15-related proteins were found in embryos of a variety of angiosperms, including plants as distantly related as maize. Based on these data, we suggest that AGL15 is likely to be an important component of the regulatory circuitry directing seed-specific processes in the developing embryo. PMID:7549483

  2. The binding domain structure of retinoblastoma-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Figge, J.; Breese, K.; Vajda, S.; Zhu, Q. L.; Eisele, L.; Andersen, T. T.; MacColl, R.; Friedrich, T.; Smith, T. F.

    1993-01-01

    The retinoblastoma gene product (Rb), a cellular growth suppressor, complexes with viral and cellular proteins that contain a specific binding domain incorporating three invariant residues: Leu-X-Cys-X-Glu, where X denotes a nonconserved residue. Hydrophobic and electrostatic properties are strongly conserved in this segment even though the nonconserved amino acids vary considerably from one Rb-binding protein to another. In this report, we present a diagnostic computer pattern for a high-affinity Rb-binding domain featuring the three conserved residues as well as the conserved physico-chemical properties. Although the pattern encompasses only 10 residues (with only 4 of these explicitly defined), it exhibits 100% sensitivity and 99.95% specificity in database searches. This implies that a certain pattern of structural and physico-chemical properties encoded by this short sequence is sufficient to govern specific Rb binding. We also present evidence that the secondary structural conformation through this region is important for effective Rb binding. PMID:8382993

  3. Identifying different transcribed proteins in the newly described Theraphosidae Pamphobeteus verdolaga.

    PubMed

    Estrada-Gómez, Sebastian; Vargas-Muñoz, Leidy Johana; Saldarriaga-Córdoba, Mónica; Cifuentes, Yeimy; Perafan, Carlos

    2017-04-01

    Theraphosidae spider venoms are well known for possess a complex mixture of protein and non-protein compounds in their venom. The objective of this study was to report and identify different proteins translated from the venom gland DNA information of the recently described Theraphosidae spider Pamphobeteus verdolaga. Using a venom gland transcriptomic analysis, we reported a set of the first complete sequences of seven different proteins of the recenlty described Theraphosidae spider P. verdolaga. Protein analysis indicates the presence of different proteins on the venom composition of this new spider, some of them uncommon in the Theraphosidae family. MS/MS analysis of P. verdolaga showed different fragments matching sphingomyelinases (sicaritoxin), barytoxins, hexatoxins, latroinsectotoxins, and linear (zadotoxins) peptides. Only four of the MS/MS fragments showed 100% sequence similarity with one of the transcribed proteins. Transcriptomic analysis showed the presence of different groups of proteins like phospholipases, hyaluronidases, inhibitory cysteine knots (ICK) peptides among others. The three database of protein domains used in this study (Pfam, SMART and CDD) showed congruency in the search of unique conserved protein domain for only four of the translated proteins. Those proteins matched with EF-hand proteins, cysteine rich secretory proteins, jingzhaotoxins, theraphotoxins and hexatoxins, from different Mygalomorphae spiders belonging to the families Theraphosidae, Barychelidae and Hexathelidae. None of the analyzed sequences showed a complete 100% similarity.

  4. Electroporation of the photosynthetic membrane: structural changes in protein and lipid-protein domains.

    PubMed Central

    Rosemberg, Y; Rotenberg, M; Korenstein, R

    1994-01-01

    A biological membrane undergoes a reversible permeability increase through structural changes in the lipid domain when exposed to high external electric fields. The present study shows the occurrence of electric field-induced changes in the conductance of the proton channel of the H(+)-ATPase as well as electric field-induced structural changes in the lipid-protein domain of photosystem (PS) II in the photosynthetic membrane. The study was carried out by analyzing the electric field-stimulated delayed luminescence (EPL), which originates from charge recombination in the protein complexes of PS I and II of photosynthetic vesicles. We established that a small fraction of the total electric field-induced conductance change was abolished by N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD), an inhibitor of the H(+)-ATPase. This reversible electric field-induced conductance change has characteristics of a small channel and possesses a lifetime < or = 1 ms. To detect electric field-induced changes in the lipid-protein domains of PS II, we examined the effects of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) on EPL. Higher values of EPL were observed from vesicles that were exposed in the presence of PLA2 to an electroporating electric field than to a nonelectroporating electric field. The effect of the electroporating field was a long-lived one, lasting for a period > or = 2 min. This effect was attributed to long-lived electric field-induced structural changes in the lipid-protein domains of PS II. PMID:7811916

  5. A domain shared by the Polycomb group proteins Scm and ph mediates heterotypic and homotypic interactions.

    PubMed

    Peterson, A J; Kyba, M; Bornemann, D; Morgan, K; Brock, H W; Simon, J

    1997-11-01

    The Sex comb on midleg (Scm) and polyhomeotic (ph) proteins are members of the Polycomb group (PcG) of transcriptional repressors. PcG proteins maintain differential patterns of homeotic gene expression during development in Drosophila flies. The Scm and ph proteins share a homology domain with 38% identity over a length of 65 amino acids, termed the SPM domain, that is located at their respective C termini. Using the yeast two-hybrid system and in vitro protein-binding assays, we show that the SPM domain mediates direct interaction between Scm and ph. Binding studies with isolated SPM domains from Scm and ph show that the domain is sufficient for these protein interactions. These studies also show that the Scm-ph and Scm-Scm domain interactions are much stronger than the ph-ph domain interaction, indicating that the isolated domain has intrinsic binding specificity determinants. Analysis of site-directed point mutations identifies residues that are important for SPM domain function. These binding properties, predicted alpha-helical secondary structure, and conservation of hydrophobic residues prompt comparisons of the SPM domain to the helix-loop-helix and leucine zipper domains used for homotypic and heterotypic protein interactions in other transcriptional regulators. In addition to in vitro studies, we show colocalization of the Scm and ph proteins at polytene chromosome sites in vivo. We discuss the possible roles of the SPM domain in the assembly or function of molecular complexes of PcG proteins.

  6. Computational Prediction of Protein Function Based on Weighted Mapping of Domains and GO Terms

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Zhixia; Guo, Maozu; Dai, Qiguo; Wang, Chunyu; Li, Jin; Liu, Xiaoyan

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel method, SeekFun, to predict protein function based on weighted mapping of domains and GO terms. Firstly, a weighted mapping of domains and GO terms is constructed according to GO annotations and domain composition of the proteins. The association strength between domain and GO term is weighted by symmetrical conditional probability. Secondly, the mapping is extended along the true paths of the terms based on GO hierarchy. Finally, the terms associated with resident domains are transferred to host protein and real annotations of the host protein are determined by association strengths. Our careful comparisons demonstrate that SeekFun outperforms the concerned methods on most occasions. SeekFun provides a flexible and effective way for protein function prediction. It benefits from the well-constructed mapping of domains and GO terms, as well as the reasonable strategy for inferring annotations of protein from those of its domains. PMID:24868539

  7. Improving protein-protein interaction article classification using biological domain knowledge.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yifei; Guo, Hongjian; Liu, Feng; Manderick, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Interaction Article Classification (IAC) is a specific text classification application in biological domain that tries to find out which articles describe Protein-Protein Interactions (PPIs) to help extract PPIs from biological literature more efficiently. However, the existing text representation and feature weighting schemes commonly used for text classification are not well suited for IAC. We capture and utilise biological domain knowledge, i.e. gene mentions also known as protein or gene names in the articles, to address the problem. We put forward a new gene mention order-based approach that highlights the important role of gene mentions to represent the texts. Furthermore, we also incorporate the information concerning gene mentions into a novel feature weighting scheme called Gene Mention-based Term Frequency (GMTF). By conducting experiments, we show that using the proposed representation and weighting schemes, our Interaction Article Classifier (IACer) performs better than other leading systems for the moment.

  8. A functional protein pore with a "retro" transmembrane domain.

    PubMed Central

    Cheley, S.; Braha, O.; Lu, X.; Conlan, S.; Bayley, H.

    1999-01-01

    Extended retro (reversed) peptide sequences have not previously been accommodated within functional proteins. Here, we show that the entire transmembrane portion of the beta-barrel of the pore-forming protein alpha-hemolysin can be formed by retrosequences comprising a total of 175 amino acid residues, 25 contributed by the central sequence of each subunit of the heptameric pore. The properties of wild-type and retro heptamers in planar bilayers are similar. The single-channel conductance of the retro pore is 15% less than that of the wild-type heptamer and its current-voltage relationship denotes close to ohmic behavior, while the wild-type pore is weakly rectifying. Both wild-type and retro pores are very weakly anion selective. These results and the examination of molecular models suggest that beta-barrels may be especially accepting of retro sequences compared to other protein folds. Indeed, the ability to form a retro domain could be diagnostic of a beta-barrel, explaining, for example, the activity of the retro forms of many membrane-permeabilizing peptides. By contrast with the wild-type subunits, monomeric retro subunits undergo premature assembly in the absence of membranes, most likely because the altered central sequence fails to interact with the remainder of the subunit, thereby initiating assembly. Despite this difficulty, a technique was devised for obtaining heteromeric pores containing both wild-type and retro subunits. Most probably as a consequence of unfavorable interstrand side-chain interactions, the heteromeric pores are less stable than either the wild-type or retro homoheptamers, as judged by the presence of subconductance states in single-channel recordings. Knowledge about the extraordinary plasticity of the transmembrane beta-barrel of alpha-hemolysin will be very useful in the de novo design of functional membrane proteins based on the beta-barrel motif. PMID:10386875

  9. Autophagy protein Rubicon mediates phagocytic NADPH oxidase activation in response to microbial infection or TLR stimulation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chul-Su; Lee, Jong-Soo; Rodgers, Mary; Min, Chan-Ki; Lee, June-Yong; Kim, Hee Jin; Lee, Kwang-Hoon; Kim, Chul-Joong; Oh, Byungha; Zandi, Ebrahim; Yue, Zhenyu; Kramnik, Igor; Liang, Chengyu; Jung, Jae U

    2012-03-15

    Phagocytosis and autophagy are two important and related arms of the host's first-line defense against microbial invasion. Rubicon is a RUN domain containing cysteine-rich protein that functions as part of a Beclin-1-Vps34-containing autophagy complex. We report that Rubicon is also an essential, positive regulator of the NADPH oxidase complex. Upon microbial infection or Toll-like-receptor 2 (TLR2) activation, Rubicon interacts with the p22phox subunit of the NADPH oxidase complex, facilitating its phagosomal trafficking to induce a burst of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inflammatory cytokines. Consequently, ectopic expression or depletion of Rubicon profoundly affected ROS, inflammatory cytokine production, and subsequent antimicrobial activity. Rubicon's actions in autophagy and in the NADPH oxidase complex are functionally and genetically separable, indicating that Rubicon functions in two ancient innate immune machineries, autophagy and phagocytosis, depending on the environmental stimulus. Rubicon may thus be pivotal to generating an optimal intracellular immune response against microbial infection.

  10. Using Hierarchical Clustering of Secreted Protein Families to Classify and Rank Candidate Effectors of Rust Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Diane G. O.; Win, Joe; Cano, Liliana M.; Szabo, Les J.; Kamoun, Sophien; Raffaele, Sylvain

    2012-01-01

    Rust fungi are obligate biotrophic pathogens that cause considerable damage on crop plants. Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici, the causal agent of wheat stem rust, and Melampsora larici-populina, the poplar leaf rust pathogen, have strong deleterious impacts on wheat and poplar wood production, respectively. Filamentous pathogens such as rust fungi secrete molecules called disease effectors that act as modulators of host cell physiology and can suppress or trigger host immunity. Current knowledge on effectors from other filamentous plant pathogens can be exploited for the characterisation of effectors in the genome of recently sequenced rust fungi. We designed a comprehensive in silico analysis pipeline to identify the putative effector repertoire from the genome of two plant pathogenic rust fungi. The pipeline is based on the observation that known effector proteins from filamentous pathogens have at least one of the following properties: (i) contain a secretion signal, (ii) are encoded by in planta induced genes, (iii) have similarity to haustorial proteins, (iv) are small and cysteine rich, (v) contain a known effector motif or a nuclear localization signal, (vi) are encoded by genes with long intergenic regions, (vii) contain internal repeats, and (viii) do not contain PFAM domains, except those associated with pathogenicity. We used Markov clustering and hierarchical clustering to classify protein families of rust pathogens and rank them according to their likelihood of being effectors. Using this approach, we identified eight families of candidate effectors that we consider of high value for functional characterization. This study revealed a diverse set of candidate effectors, including families of haustorial expressed secreted proteins and small cysteine-rich proteins. This comprehensive classification of candidate effectors from these devastating rust pathogens is an initial step towards probing plant germplasm for novel resistance components. PMID:22238666

  11. Distribution of PASTA domains in penicillin-binding proteins and serine/threonine kinases of Actinobacteria.

    PubMed

    Ogawara, Hiroshi

    2016-09-01

    PASTA domains (penicillin-binding protein and serine/threonine kinase-associated domains) have been identified in penicillin-binding proteins and serine/threonine kinases of Gram-positive Firmicutes and Actinobacteria. They are believed to bind β-lactam antibiotics, and be involved in peptidoglycan metabolism, although their biological function is not definitively clarified. Actinobacteria, especially Streptomyces species, are distinct in that they undergo complex cellular differentiation and produce various antibiotics including β-lactams. This review focuses on the distribution of PASTA domains in penicillin-binding proteins and serine/threonine kinases in Actinobacteria. In Actinobacteria, PASTA domains are detectable exclusively in class A but not in class B penicillin-binding proteins, in sharp contrast to the cases in other bacteria. In penicillin-binding proteins, PASTA domains distribute independently from taxonomy with some distribution bias. Particularly interesting thing is that no Streptomyces species have penicillin-binding protein with PASTA domains. Protein kinases in Actinobacteria possess 0 to 5 PASTA domains in their molecules. Protein kinases in Streptomyces can be classified into three groups: no PASTA domain, 1 PASTA domain and 4 PASTA domain-containing groups. The 4 PASTA domain-containing groups can be further divided into two subgroups. The serine/threonine kinases in different groups may perform different functions. The pocket region in one of these subgroup is more dense and extended, thus it may be involved in binding of ligands like β-lactams more efficiently.

  12. Grain sorghum proteomics: An integrated approach towards characterization of seed storage proteins in kafirin allelic variants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seed protein composition determines quality traits, such as value for food, feedstock and biomaterials uses. Sorghum seed proteins are predominantly prolamins known as kafirins. Located primarily on the periphery of storage protein bodies, cysteine-rich ß- and gama-kafirins are thought to prevent en...

  13. Lipid transfer protein-mediated resistance to a trichothecene mycotoxin – Novel players in FHB resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipid transfer proteins are a class of basic cysteine rich proteins characterized by an eight cysteine motif backbone with intrinsic antimicrobial activities against bacterial and fungal pathogens. Previously, we identified two type IV nonspecific lipid transfer protein (nsLTP) genes (LTP4.4 and LTP...

  14. Anti-idiotypic protein domains selected from protein A-based affibody libraries.

    PubMed

    Eklund, Malin; Axelsson, Lars; Uhlén, Mathias; Nygren, Per-Ake

    2002-08-15

    Three pairs of small protein domains showing binding behavior in analogy with anti-idiotypic antibodies have been selected using phage display technology. From an affibody protein library constructed by combinatorial variegation of the Fc binding surface of the 58 residue staphylococcal protein A (SPA)-derived domain Z, affibody variants have been selected to the parental SPA scaffold and to two earlier identified SPA-derived affibodies. One selected affibody (Z(SPA-1)) was shown to recognize each of the five domains of wild-type SPA with dissociation constants (K(D)) in the micromolar range. The binding of the Z(SPA-1) affibody to its parental structure was shown to involve the Fc binding site of SPA, while the Fab-binding site was not involved. Similarly, affibodies showing anti-idiotypic binding characteristics were also obtained when affibodies previously selected for binding to Taq DNA polymerase and human IgA, respectively, were used as targets for selections. The potential applications for these types of affinity pairs were exemplified by one-step protein recovery using affinity chromatography employing the specific interactions between the respective protein pair members. These experiments included the purification of the Z(SPA-1) affibody from a total Escherichia coli cell lysate using protein A-Sepharose, suggesting that this protein A/antiprotein A affinity pair could provide a basis for novel affinity gene fusion systems. The use of this type of small, robust, and easily expressed anti-idiotypic affibody pair for affinity technology applications, including self-assembled protein networks, is discussed.

  15. Structural organization and interactions of transmembrane domains in tetraspanin proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kovalenko, Oleg V; Metcalf, Douglas G; DeGrado, William F; Hemler, Martin E

    2005-01-01

    Background Proteins of the tetraspanin family contain four transmembrane domains (TM1-4) linked by two extracellular loops and a short intracellular loop, and have short intracellular N- and C-termini. While structure and function analysis of the larger extracellular loop has been performed, the organization and role of transmembrane domains have not been systematically assessed. Results Among 28 human tetraspanin proteins, the TM1-3 sequences display a distinct heptad repeat motif (abcdefg)n. In TM1, position a is occupied by structurally conserved bulky residues and position d contains highly conserved Asn and Gly residues. In TM2, position a is occupied by conserved small residues (Gly/Ala/Thr), and position d has a conserved Gly and two bulky aliphatic residues. In TM3, three a positions of the heptad repeat are filled by two leucines and a glutamate/glutamine residue, and two d positions are occupied by either Phe/Tyr or Val/Ile/Leu residues. No heptad motif is apparent in TM4 sequences. Mutations of conserved glycines in human CD9 (Gly25 and Gly32 in TM1; Gly67 and Gly74 in TM2) caused aggregation of mutant proteins inside the cell. Modeling of the TM1-TM2 interface in CD9, using a novel algorithm, predicts tight packing of conserved bulky residues against conserved Gly residues along the two helices. The homodimeric interface of CD9 was mapped, by disulfide cross-linking of single-cysteine mutants, to the vicinity of residues Leu14 and Phe17 in TM1 (positions g and c) and Gly77, Gly80 and Ala81 in TM2 (positions d, g and a, respectively). Mutations of a and d residues in both TM1 and TM2 (Gly25, Gly32, Gly67 and Gly74), involved in intramolecular TM1-TM2 interaction, also strongly diminished intermolecular interaction, as assessed by cross-linking of Cys80. Conclusion Our results suggest that tetraspanin intra- and intermolecular interactions are mediated by conserved residues in adjacent, but distinct regions of TM1 and TM2. A key structural element that

  16. Mutual effects of disorder and order in fusion proteins between intrinsically disordered domains and fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Lotti, Marina; Longhi, Sonia

    2012-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins are being paid an increasing amount of interest due to the understanding of the crucial role that flexible regions play in molecular recognition and in signaling. Accordingly, reports focusing on the structural and functional characterization of intrinsically disordered proteins or regions are growing exponentially. Relatively few studies have however been reported on the mutual effects of ordered and disordered moieties in artificial fusion proteins. In this review, we focus on the few available experimental data based on the use of chimeras in which fluorescent proteins were fused to disordered domains of different lengths, compactness and propensity to form secondary structures. The impact of the artificial fusion on the conformational and functional properties of the resulting proteins is discussed.

  17. CDD/SPARCLE: functional classification of proteins via subfamily domain architectures.

    PubMed

    Marchler-Bauer, Aron; Bo, Yu; Han, Lianyi; He, Jane; Lanczycki, Christopher J; Lu, Shennan; Chitsaz, Farideh; Derbyshire, Myra K; Geer, Renata C; Gonzales, Noreen R; Gwadz, Marc; Hurwitz, David I; Lu, Fu; Marchler, Gabriele H; Song, James S; Thanki, Narmada; Wang, Zhouxi; Yamashita, Roxanne A; Zhang, Dachuan; Zheng, Chanjuan; Geer, Lewis Y; Bryant, Stephen H

    2017-01-04

    NCBI's Conserved Domain Database (CDD) aims at annotating biomolecular sequences with the location of evolutionarily conserved protein domain footprints, and functional sites inferred from such footprints. An archive of pre-computed domain annotation is maintained for proteins tracked by NCBI's Entrez database, and live search services are offered as well. CDD curation staff supplements a comprehensive collection of protein domain and protein family models, which have been imported from external providers, with representations of selected domain families that are curated in-house and organized into hierarchical classifications of functionally distinct families and sub-families. CDD also supports comparative analyses of protein families via conserved domain architectures, and a recent curation effort focuses on providing functional characterizations of distinct subfamily architectures using SPARCLE: Subfamily Protein Architecture Labeling Engine. CDD can be accessed at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Structure/cdd/cdd.shtml.

  18. The Leptospiral Antigen Lp49 is a Two-Domain Protein with Putative Protein Binding Function

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira Giuseppe,P.; Oliveira Neves, F.; Nascimento, A.; Gomes Guimaraes, B.

    2008-01-01

    Pathogenic Leptospira is the etiological agent of leptospirosis, a life-threatening disease that affects populations worldwide. Currently available vaccines have limited effectiveness and therapeutic interventions are complicated by the difficulty in making an early diagnosis of leptospirosis. The genome of Leptospira interrogans was recently sequenced and comparative genomic analysis contributed to the identification of surface antigens, potential candidates for development of new vaccines and serodiagnosis. Lp49 is a membrane-associated protein recognized by antibodies present in sera from early and convalescent phases of leptospirosis patients. Its crystal structure was determined by single-wavelength anomalous diffraction using selenomethionine-labelled crystals and refined at 2.0 Angstroms resolution. Lp49 is composed of two domains and belongs to the all-beta-proteins class. The N-terminal domain folds in an immunoglobulin-like beta-sandwich structure, whereas the C-terminal domain presents a seven-bladed beta-propeller fold. Structural analysis of Lp49 indicates putative protein-protein binding sites, suggesting a role in Leptospira-host interaction. This is the first crystal structure of a leptospiral antigen described to date.

  19. The SBASE protein domain library, release 2.0: a collection of annotated protein sequence segments.

    PubMed Central

    Pongor, S; Skerl, V; Cserzö, M; Hátsági, Z; Simon, G; Bevilacqua, V

    1993-01-01

    SBASE 2.0 is the second release of SBASE, a collection of annotated protein domain sequences. SBASE entries represent various structural, functional, ligand-binding and topogenic segments of proteins [Pongor, S. et al. (1993) Prot. Eng., in press]. This release contains 34,518 entries provided with standardized names and it is cross-referenced to the major protein and nucleic acid databanks as well as to the PROSITE catalog of protein sequence patterns [Bairoch, A. (1992) Nucl. Acids Res., 20 suppl, 2013-2018]. SBASE can be used for establishing domain homologies using different database-search tools such as FASTA [Lipman and Pearson (1985) Science, 227, 1436-1441], FASTDB [Brutlag et al. (1990) Comp. Appl. Biosci., 6, 237-245] or BLAST3 [Altschul and Lipman (1990) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 87, 5509-5513] which is especially useful in the case of loosely defined domain types for which efficient consensus patterns can not be established. SBASE 2.0 and a set of search and retrieval tools are freely available on request to the authors or by anonymous 'ftp' file transfer from mean value of ftp.icgeb.trieste.it. PMID:8332532

  20. Proteins with an Euonymus lectin-like domain are ubiquitous in Embryophyta

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Cloning of the Euonymus lectin led to the discovery of a novel domain that also occurs in some stress-induced plant proteins. The distribution and the diversity of proteins with an Euonymus lectin (EUL) domain were investigated using detailed analysis of sequences in publicly accessible genome and transcriptome databases. Results Comprehensive in silico analyses indicate that the recently identified Euonymus europaeus lectin domain represents a conserved structural unit of a novel family of putative carbohydrate-binding proteins, which will further be referred to as the Euonymus lectin (EUL) family. The EUL domain is widespread among plants. Analysis of retrieved sequences revealed that some sequences consist of a single EUL domain linked to an unrelated N-terminal domain whereas others comprise two in tandem arrayed EUL domains. A new classification system for these lectins is proposed based on the overall domain architecture. Evolutionary relationships among the sequences with EUL domains are discussed. Conclusion The identification of the EUL family provides the first evidence for the occurrence in terrestrial plants of a highly conserved plant specific domain. The widespread distribution of the EUL domain strikingly contrasts the more limited or even narrow distribution of most other lectin domains found in plants. The apparent omnipresence of the EUL domain is indicative for a universal role of this lectin domain in plants. Although there is unambiguous evidence that several EUL domains possess carbohydrate-binding activity further research is required to corroborate the carbohydrate-binding properties of different members of the EUL family. PMID:19930663

  1. The PDZ Domain of the LIM Protein Enigma Binds to β-Tropomyosin

    PubMed Central

    Guy, Pamela M.; Kenny, Daryn A.; Gill, Gordon N.

    1999-01-01

    PDZ and LIM domains are modular protein interaction motifs present in proteins with diverse functions. Enigma is representative of a family of proteins composed of a series of conserved PDZ and LIM domains. The LIM domains of Enigma and its most related family member, Enigma homology protein, bind to protein kinases, whereas the PDZ domains of Enigma and family member actin-associated LIM protein bind to actin filaments. Enigma localizes to actin filaments in fibroblasts via its PDZ domain, and actin-associated LIM protein binds to and colocalizes with the actin-binding protein α-actinin-2 at Z lines in skeletal muscle. We show that Enigma is present at the Z line in skeletal muscle and that the PDZ domain of Enigma binds to a skeletal muscle target, the actin-binding protein tropomyosin (skeletal β-TM). The interaction between Enigma and skeletal β-TM was specific for the PDZ domain of Enigma, was abolished by mutations in the PDZ domain, and required the PDZ-binding consensus sequence (Thr-Ser-Leu) at the extreme carboxyl terminus of skeletal β-TM. Enigma interacted with isoforms of tropomyosin expressed in C2C12 myotubes and formed an immunoprecipitable complex with skeletal β-TM in transfected cells. The association of Enigma with skeletal β-TM suggests a role for Enigma as an adapter protein that directs LIM-binding proteins to actin filaments of muscle cells. PMID:10359609

  2. Exploring metazoan evolution through dynamic and holistic changes in protein families and domains

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Proteins convey the majority of biochemical and cellular activities in organisms. Over the course of evolution, proteins undergo normal sequence mutations as well as large scale mutations involving domain duplication and/or domain shuffling. These events result in the generation of new proteins and protein families. Processes that affect proteome evolution drive species diversity and adaptation. Herein, change over the course of metazoan evolution, as defined by birth/death and duplication/deletion events within protein families and domains, was examined using the proteomes of 9 metazoan and two outgroup species. Results In studying members of the three major metazoan groups, the vertebrates, arthropods, and nematodes, we found that the number of protein families increased at the majority of lineages over the course of metazoan evolution where the magnitude of these increases was greatest at the lineages leading to mammals. In contrast, the number of protein domains decreased at most lineages and at all terminal lineages. This resulted in a weak correlation between protein family birth and domain birth; however, the correlation between domain birth and domain member duplication was quite strong. These data suggest that domain birth and protein family birth occur via different mechanisms, and that domain shuffling plays a role in the formation of protein families. The ratio of protein family birth to protein domain birth (domain shuffling index) suggests that shuffling had a more demonstrable effect on protein families in nematodes and arthropods than in vertebrates. Through the contrast of high and low domain shuffling indices at the lineages of Trichinella spiralis and Gallus gallus, we propose a link between protein redundancy and evolutionary changes controlled by domain shuffling; however, the speed of adaptation among the different lineages was relatively invariant. Evaluating the functions of protein families that appeared or disappeared at the

  3. ADAM and ADAMTS Family Proteins and Snake Venom Metalloproteinases: A Structural Overview

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Soichi

    2016-01-01

    A disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM) family proteins constitute a major class of membrane-anchored multidomain proteinases that are responsible for the shedding of cell-surface protein ectodomains, including the latent forms of growth factors, cytokines, receptors and other molecules. Snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs) are major components in most viper venoms. SVMPs are primarily responsible for hemorrhagic activity and may also interfere with the hemostatic system in envenomed animals. SVMPs are phylogenetically most closely related to ADAMs and, together with ADAMs and related ADAM with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS) family proteinases, constitute adamalysins/reprolysins or the M12B clan (MEROPS database) of metalloproteinases. Although the catalytic domain structure is topologically similar to that of other metalloproteinases such as matrix metalloproteinases, the M12B proteinases have a modular structure with multiple non-catalytic ancillary domains that are not found in other proteinases. Notably, crystallographic studies revealed that, in addition to the conserved metalloproteinase domain, M12B members share a hallmark cysteine-rich domain designated as the “ADAM_CR” domain. Despite their name, ADAMTSs lack disintegrin-like structures and instead comprise two ADAM_CR domains. This review highlights the current state of our knowledge on the three-dimensional structures of M12B proteinases, focusing on their unique domains that may collaboratively participate in directing these proteinases to specific substrates. PMID:27196928

  4. CDvist: A webserver for identification and visualization of conserved domains in protein sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Adebali, Ogun; Ortega, Davi R.; Zhulin, Igor B.

    2014-12-18

    Identification of domains in protein sequences allows their assigning to biological functions. Several webservers exist for identification of protein domains using similarity searches against various databases of protein domain models. However, none of them provides comprehensive domain coverage while allowing bulk querying and their visualization schemes can be improved. To address these issues, we developed CDvist (a comprehensive domain visualization tool), which combines the best available search algorithms and databases into a user-friendly framework. First, a given protein sequence is matched to domain models using high-specificity tools and only then unmatched segments are subjected to more sensitive algorithms resulting in a best possible comprehensive coverage. In conclusion, bulk querying and rich visualization and download options provide improved functionality to domain architecture analysis.

  5. CDvist: A webserver for identification and visualization of conserved domains in protein sequences

    DOE PAGES

    Adebali, Ogun; Ortega, Davi R.; Zhulin, Igor B.

    2014-12-18

    Identification of domains in protein sequences allows their assigning to biological functions. Several webservers exist for identification of protein domains using similarity searches against various databases of protein domain models. However, none of them provides comprehensive domain coverage while allowing bulk querying and their visualization schemes can be improved. To address these issues, we developed CDvist (a comprehensive domain visualization tool), which combines the best available search algorithms and databases into a user-friendly framework. First, a given protein sequence is matched to domain models using high-specificity tools and only then unmatched segments are subjected to more sensitive algorithms resulting inmore » a best possible comprehensive coverage. In conclusion, bulk querying and rich visualization and download options provide improved functionality to domain architecture analysis.« less

  6. Co-evolutionary Analysis of Domains in Interacting Proteins Reveals Insights into Domain–Domain Interactions Mediating Protein–Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Jothi, Raja; Cherukuri, Praveen F.; Tasneem, Asba; Przytycka, Teresa M.

    2006-01-01

    Recent advances in functional genomics have helped generate large-scale high-throughput protein interaction data. Such networks, though extremely valuable towards molecular level understanding of cells, do not provide any direct information about the regions (domains) in the proteins that mediate the interaction. Here, we performed co-evolutionary analysis of domains in interacting proteins in order to understand the degree of co-evolution of interacting and non-interacting domains. Using a combination of sequence and structural analysis, we analyzed protein–protein interactions in F1-ATPase, Sec23p/Sec24p, DNA-directed RNA polymerase and nuclear pore complexes, and found that interacting domain pair(s) for a given interaction exhibits higher level of co-evolution than the noninteracting domain pairs. Motivated by this finding, we developed a computational method to test the generality of the observed trend, and to predict large-scale domain–domain interactions. Given a protein–protein interaction, the proposed method predicts the domain pair(s) that is most likely to mediate the protein interaction. We applied this method on the yeast interactome to predict domain–domain interactions, and used known domain–domain interactions found in PDB crystal structures to validate our predictions. Our results show that the prediction accuracy of the proposed method is statistically significant. Comparison of our prediction results with those from two other methods reveals that only a fraction of predictions are shared by all the three methods, indicating that the proposed method can detect known interactions missed by other methods. We believe that the proposed method can be used with other methods to help identify previously unrecognized domain–domain interactions on a genome scale, and could potentially help reduce the search space for identifying interaction sites. PMID:16949097

  7. The extracellular domain of Smoothened regulates ciliary localization and is required for high-level Hh signaling.

    PubMed

    Aanstad, Pia; Santos, Nicole; Corbit, Kevin C; Scherz, Paul J; Trinh, Le A; Salvenmoser, Willi; Huisken, Jan; Reiter, Jeremy F; Stainier, Didier Y R

    2009-06-23

    Members of the Hedgehog (Hh) family of secreted proteins function as morphogens to pattern developing tissues and control cell proliferation. The seven-transmembrane domain (7TM) protein Smoothened (Smo) is essential for the activation of all levels of Hh signaling. However, the mechanisms by which Smo differentially activates low- or high-level Hh signaling are not known. Here we show that a newly identified mutation in the extracellular domain (ECD) of zebrafish Smo attenuates Smo signaling. The Smo agonist purmorphamine induces the stabilization, ciliary translocation, and high-level signaling of wild-type Smo. In contrast, purmorphamine induces the stabilization but not the ciliary translocation or high-level signaling of the Smo ECD mutant protein. Surprisingly, a truncated form of Smo that lacks the cysteine-rich domain of the ECD localizes to the cilium but is unable to activate high-level Hh signaling. We also present evidence that cilia may be required for Hh signaling in early zebrafish embryos. These data indicate that the ECD, previously thought to be dispensable for vertebrate Smo function, both regulates Smo ciliary localization and is essential for high-level Hh signaling.

  8. Archaeal surface layer proteins contain beta propeller, PKD, and beta helix domains and are related to metazoan cell surface proteins.

    PubMed

    Jing, Hua; Takagi, Junichi; Liu, Jin-huan; Lindgren, Sara; Zhang, Rong-guang; Joachimiak, A; Wang, Jia-huai; Springer, Timothy A

    2002-10-01

    The surface layer of archaeobacteria protects cells from extreme environments and, in Methanosarcina, may regulate cell adhesion. We identify three domain types that account for the complete architecture of numerous Methanosarcina surface layer proteins (SLPs). We solve the crystal structure for two of these domains, which correspond to the two N-terminal domains of an M. mazei SLP. One domain displays a unique, highly symmetrical, seven-bladed beta propeller fold, and the other belongs to the polycystic kidney disease (PKD) superfamily fold. The third domain is predicted to adopt a beta helix fold. These domains have homologs in metazoan cell surface proteins, suggesting remarkable relationships between domains in archaeal SLPs and metazoan cell surface proteins.

  9. Impact of protein domains on PE_PGRS30 polar localization in Mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    De Maio, Flavio; Maulucci, Giuseppe; Minerva, Mariachiara; Anoosheh, Saber; Palucci, Ivana; Iantomasi, Raffaella; Palmieri, Valentina; Camassa, Serena; Sali, Michela; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Bitter, Wilbert; Manganelli, Riccardo; De Spirito, Marco; Delogu, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    PE_PGRS proteins are unique to the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and a number of other pathogenic mycobacteria. PE_PGRS30, which is required for the full virulence of M. tuberculosis (Mtb), has three main domains, i.e. an N-terminal PE domain, repetitive PGRS domain and the unique C-terminal domain. To investigate the role of these domains, we expressed a GFP-tagged PE_PGRS30 protein and a series of its functional deletion mutants in different mycobacterial species (Mtb, Mycobacterium bovis BCG and Mycobacterium smegmatis) and analysed protein localization by confocal microscopy. We show that PE_PGRS30 localizes at the mycobacterial cell poles in Mtb and M. bovis BCG but not in M. smegmatis and that the PGRS domain of the protein strongly contributes to protein cellular localization in Mtb. Immunofluorescence studies further showed that the unique C-terminal domain of PE_PGRS30 is not available on the surface, except when the PGRS domain is missing. Immunoblot demonstrated that the PGRS domain is required to maintain the protein strongly associated with the non-soluble cellular fraction. These results suggest that the repetitive GGA-GGN repeats of the PGRS domain contain specific sequences that contribute to protein cellular localization and that polar localization might be a key step in the PE_PGRS30-dependent virulence mechanism.

  10. Comparative analysis of SET domain proteins in maize and Arabidopsis reveals multiple duplications preceding the divergence of monocots and dicots.

    PubMed

    Springer, Nathan M; Napoli, Carolyn A; Selinger, David A; Pandey, Ritu; Cone, Karen C; Chandler, Vicki L; Kaeppler, Heidi F; Kaeppler, Shawn M

    2003-06-01

    Histone proteins play a central role in chromatin packaging, and modification of histones is associated with chromatin accessibility. SET domain [Su(var)3-9, Enhancer-of-zeste, Trithorax] proteins are one class of proteins that have been implicated in regulating gene expression through histone methylation. The relationships of 22 SET domain proteins from maize (Zea mays) and 32 SET domain proteins from Arabidopsis were evaluated by phylogenetic analysis and domain organization. Our analysis reveals five classes of SET domain proteins in plants that can be further divided into 19 orthology groups. In some cases, such as the Enhancer of zeste-like and trithorax-like proteins, plants and animals contain homologous proteins with a similar organization of domains outside of the SET domain. However, a majority of plant SET domain proteins do not have an animal homolog with similar domain organization, suggesting that plants have unique mechanisms to establish and maintain chromatin states. Although the domains present in plant and animal SET domain proteins often differ, the domains found in the plant proteins have been generally implicated in protein-protein interactions, indicating that most SET domain proteins operate in complexes. Combined analysis of the maize and Arabidopsis SET domain proteins reveals that duplication of SET domain proteins in plants is extensive and has occurred via multiple mechanisms that preceded the divergence of monocots and dicots.

  11. Fast kinase domain-containing protein 3 is a mitochondrial protein essential for cellular respiration

    SciTech Connect

    Simarro, Maria; Gimenez-Cassina, Alfredo; Kedersha, Nancy; Lazaro, Jean-Bernard; Adelmant, Guillaume O.; Marto, Jarrod A.; Rhee, Kirsten; Tisdale, Sarah; Danial, Nika; Benarafa, Charaf; Orduna, Anonio; Anderson, Paul

    2010-10-22

    Research highlights: {yields} Five members of the FAST kinase domain-containing proteins are localized to mitochondria in mammalian cells. {yields} The FASTKD3 interactome includes proteins involved in various aspects of mitochondrial metabolism. {yields} Targeted knockdown of FASTKD3 significantly reduces basal and maximal mitochondrial oxygen consumption. -- Abstract: Fas-activated serine/threonine phosphoprotein (FAST) is the founding member of the FAST kinase domain-containing protein (FASTKD) family that includes FASTKD1-5. FAST is a sensor of mitochondrial stress that modulates protein translation to promote the survival of cells exposed to adverse conditions. Mutations in FASTKD2 have been linked to a mitochondrial encephalomyopathy that is associated with reduced cytochrome c oxidase activity, an essential component of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. We have confirmed the mitochondrial localization of FASTKD2 and shown that all FASTKD family members are found in mitochondria. Although human and mouse FASTKD1-5 genes are expressed ubiquitously, some of them are most abundantly expressed in mitochondria-enriched tissues. We have found that RNA interference-mediated knockdown of FASTKD3 severely blunts basal and stress-induced mitochondrial oxygen consumption without disrupting the assembly of respiratory chain complexes. Tandem affinity purification reveals that FASTKD3 interacts with components of mitochondrial respiratory and translation machineries. Our results introduce FASTKD3 as an essential component of mitochondrial respiration that may modulate energy balance in cells exposed to adverse conditions by functionally coupling mitochondrial protein synthesis to respiration.

  12. Functional domains of plant chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase: regulation by autoinhibitory and visinin-like domains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandiran, S.; Takezawa, D.; Wang, W.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1997-01-01

    A novel calcium-binding calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) with a catalytic domain, calmodulin-binding domain, and a neural visinin-like domain was cloned and characterized from plants [Patil et al., (1995) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 92, 4797-4801; Takezawa et al. (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 8126-8132]. The mechanisms of CCaMK activation by calcium and calcium/calmodulin were investigated using various deletion mutants. The use of deletion mutants of CCaMK lacking either one, two, or all three calcium-binding EF hands indicated that all three calcium-binding sites in the visinin-like domain were crucial for the full calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase activity. As each calcium-binding EF hand was deleted, there was a gradual reduction in calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase activity from 100 to 4%. Another mutant (amino acids 1-322) which lacks both the visinin-like domain containing three EF hands and the calmodulin-binding domain was constitutively active, indicating the presence of an autoinhibitory domain around the calmodulin-binding domain. By using various synthetic peptides and the constitutively active mutant, we have shown that CCaMK contains an autoinhibitory domain within the residues 322-340 which overlaps its calmodulin-binding domain. Kinetic studies with both ATP and the GS peptide substrate suggest that the autoinhibitory domain of CCaMK interacts only with the peptide substrate binding motif of the catalytic domain, but not with the ATP-binding motif.

  13. The role of internal duplication in the evolution of multi-domain proteins.

    PubMed

    Nacher, J C; Hayashida, M; Akutsu, T

    2010-08-01

    Many proteins consist of several structural domains. These multi-domain proteins have likely been generated by selective genome growth dynamics during evolution to perform new functions as well as to create structures that fold on a biologically feasible time scale. Domain units frequently evolved through a variety of genetic shuffling mechanisms. Here we examine the protein domain statistics of more than 1000 organisms including eukaryotic, archaeal and bacterial species. The analysis extends earlier findings on asymmetric statistical laws for proteome to a wider variety of species. While proteins are composed of a wide range of domains, displaying a power-law decay, the computation of domain families for each protein reveals an exponential distribution, characterizing a protein universe composed of a thin number of unique families. Structural studies in proteomics have shown that domain repeats, or internal duplicated domains, represent a small but significant fraction of genome. In spite of its importance, this observation has been largely overlooked until recently. We model the evolutionary dynamics of proteome and demonstrate that these distinct distributions are in fact rooted in an internal duplication mechanism. This process generates the contemporary protein structural domain universe, determines its reduced thickness, and tames its growth. These findings have important implications, ranging from protein interaction network modeling to evolutionary studies based on fundamental mechanisms governing genome expansion.

  14. SET and MYND domain containing protein 3 in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lei; Xu, A-Man

    2017-01-01

    Lysine methylation plays a vital role in histone modification. Deregulations of lysine methyltransferases and demethylases have been frequently observed in human cancers. The SET and MYND domain containing protein 3 (SMYD3) is a novel histone lysine methyltransferase and it functions by regulating chromatin during the development of myocardial and skeletal muscle. It has been recently unveiled to play significant roles in human cancer genesis and progression via regulating various key cancer-associated genes and pathways and promoting cell proliferation and migration. Upregulation of SMYD3 expression is present in multiple cancer types, suggesting it as a potential prognostic marker. Herein the structure, substrates and targets of SMYD3, and its effects on initiation, invasion and metastasis of diverse tumors (e.g., esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, gastric cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, cholangiocarcinoma, breast cancer, prostate cancer, and leukemia) are systematically reviewed, providing clues for the development of novel SMYD3-specific personalized anti-cancer therapy. SMYD3 inhibitors (e.g., BCI-121 and novobiocin) could hopefully fight against tumors with efficacy. PMID:28123630

  15. Characterization of domain-peptide interaction interface: prediction of SH3 domain-mediated protein-protein interaction network in yeast by generic structure-based models.

    PubMed

    Hou, Tingjun; Li, Nan; Li, Youyong; Wang, Wei

    2012-05-04

    Determination of the binding specificity of SH3 domain, a peptide recognition module (PRM), is important to understand their biological functions and reconstruct the SH3-mediated protein-protein interaction network. In the present study, the SH3-peptide interactions for both class I and II SH3 domains were characterized by the intermolecular residue-residue interaction network. We developed generic MIEC-SVM models to infer SH3 domain-peptide recognition specificity that achieved satisfactory prediction accuracy. By investigating the domain-peptide recognition mechanisms at the residue level, we found that the class-I and class-II binding peptides have different binding modes even though they occupy the same binding site of SH3. Furthermore, we predicted the potential binding partners of SH3 domains in the yeast proteome and constructed the SH3-mediated protein-protein interaction network. Comparison with the experimentally determined interactions confirmed the effectiveness of our approach. This study showed that our sophisticated computational approach not only provides a powerful platform to decipher protein recognition code at the molecular level but also allows identification of peptide-mediated protein interactions at a proteomic scale. We believe that such an approach is general to be applicable to other domain-peptide interactions.

  16. Small Molecule-Induced Domain Swapping as a Mechanism for Controlling Protein Function and Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Karchin, Joshua M.; Ha, Jeung-Hoi; Namitz, Kevin E.; Cosgrove, Michael S.; Loh, Stewart N.

    2017-01-01

    Domain swapping is the process by which identical proteins exchange reciprocal segments to generate dimers. Here we introduce induced domain swapping (INDOS) as a mechanism for regulating protein function. INDOS employs a modular design consisting of the fusion of two proteins: a recognition protein that binds a triggering molecule, and a target protein that undergoes a domain swap in response to binding of the triggering ligand. The recognition protein (FK506 binding protein) is inserted into functionally-inactivated point mutants of two target proteins (staphylococcal nuclease and ribose binding protein). Binding of FK506 to the FKBP domain causes the target domain to first unfold, then refold via domain swap. The inactivating mutations become ‘swapped out’ in the dimer, increasing nuclease and ribose binding activities by 100-fold and 15-fold, respectively, restoring them to near wild-type values. INDOS is intended to convert an arbitrary protein into a functional switch, and is the first example of rational design in which a small molecule is used to trigger protein domain swapping and subsequent activation of biological function. PMID:28287617

  17. Development of a protein microarray using sequence-specific DNA binding domain on DNA chip surface

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yoo Seong; Pack, Seung Pil; Yoo, Young Je . E-mail: yjyoo@snu.ac.kr

    2005-04-22

    A protein microarray based on DNA microarray platform was developed to identify protein-protein interactions in vitro. The conventional DNA chip surface by 156-bp PCR product was prepared for a substrate of protein microarray. High-affinity sequence-specific DNA binding domain, GAL4 DNA binding domain, was introduced to the protein microarray as fusion partner of a target model protein, enhanced green fluorescent protein. The target protein was oriented immobilized directly on the DNA chip surface. Finally, monoclonal antibody of the target protein was used to identify the immobilized protein on the surface. This study shows that the conventional DNA chip can be used to make a protein microarray directly, and this novel protein microarray can be applicable as a tool for identifying protein-protein interactions.

  18. Genetic, structural, and molecular insights into the function of ras of complex proteins domains.

    PubMed

    Civiero, Laura; Dihanich, Sybille; Lewis, Patrick A; Greggio, Elisa

    2014-07-17

    Ras of complex proteins (ROC) domains were identified in 2003 as GTP binding modules in large multidomain proteins from Dictyostelium discoideum. Research into the function of these domains exploded with their identification in a number of proteins linked to human disease, including leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) and death-associated protein kinase 1 (DAPK1) in Parkinson's disease and cancer, respectively. This surge in research has resulted in a growing body of data revealing the role that ROC domains play in regulating protein function and signaling pathways. In this review, recent advances in the structural information available for proteins containing ROC domains, along with insights into enzymatic function and the integration of ROC domains as molecular switches in a cellular and organismal context, are explored.

  19. The CRM domain: an RNA binding module derived from an ancient ribosome-associated protein.

    PubMed

    Barkan, Alice; Klipcan, Larik; Ostersetzer, Oren; Kawamura, Tetsuya; Asakura, Yukari; Watkins, Kenneth P

    2007-01-01

    The CRS1-YhbY domain (also called the CRM domain) is represented as a stand-alone protein in Archaea and Bacteria, and in a family of single- and multidomain proteins in plants. The function of this domain is unknown, but structural data and the presence of the domain in several proteins known to interact with RNA have led to the proposal that it binds RNA. Here we describe a phylogenetic analysis of the domain, its incorporation into diverse proteins in plants, and biochemical properties of a prokaryotic and eukaryotic representative of the domain family. We show that a bacterial member of the family, Escherichia coli YhbY, is associated with pre-50S ribosomal subunits, suggesting that YhbY functions in ribosome assembly. GFP fused to a single-domain CRM protein from maize localizes to the nucleolus, suggesting that an analogous activity may have been retained in plants. We show further that an isolated maize CRM domain has RNA binding activity in vitro, and that a small motif shared with KH RNA binding domains, a conserved "GxxG" loop, contributes to its RNA binding activity. These and other results suggest that the CRM domain evolved in the context of ribosome function prior to the divergence of Archaea and Bacteria, that this function has been maintained in extant prokaryotes, and that the domain was recruited to serve as an RNA binding module during the evolution of plant genomes.

  20. Defining the Domain Arrangement of the Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex Component Rictor Protein

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ping; Zhang, Ning; Nussinov, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complexes play a pivotal role in the cell. Raptor and Rictor proteins interact with mTOR to form two distinct complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2, respectively. While the domain structure of Raptor is known, current bioinformatics tools failed to classify the domains in Rictor. Here we focus on identifying specific domains in Rictor by searching for conserved regions. We scanned the pdb structural database and constructed three protein domain datasets. Next we carried out multiple pairwise sequence alignments of the proteins in the domain dataset. By analyzing the z-scores of Rictor sequence similarity to protein sequences in the dataset, we assigned the structural and functional domains of Rictor. We found that, like Raptor, Rictor also has HEAT and WD40 domains, which could be the common motif binding to mTORC. Rictor may also have pleckstrin homology domains, which mediate cellular localization and transmit signals to downstream targets, as well as a domain that is homologous to 50S protein L17 and human 39S protein L17. This putative ribosome binding domain could mediate mTORC2–ribosome interaction. PMID:26176550

  1. Structure of the C-terminal heme-binding domain of THAP domain containing protein 4 from Homo sapiens

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Bingman, Craig A.; Phillips, Jr., George N.

    2012-03-15

    The thanatos (the Greek god of death)-associated protein (THAP) domain is a sequence-specific DNA-binding domain that contains a C2-CH (Cys-Xaa{sub 2-4}-Cys-Xaa{sub 35-50}-Cys-Xaa{sub 2}-His) zinc finger that is similar to the DNA domain of the P element transposase from Drosophila. THAP-containing proteins have been observed in the proteome of humans, pigs, cows, chickens, zebrafish, Drosophila, C. elegans, and Xenopus. To date, there are no known THAP domain proteins in plants, yeast, or bacteria. There are 12 identified human THAP domain-containing proteins (THAP0-11). In all human THAP protein, the THAP domain is located at the N-terminus and is {approx}90 residues in length. Although all of the human THAP-containing proteins have a homologous N-terminus, there is extensive variation in both the predicted structure and length of the remaining protein. Even though the exact function of these THAP proteins is not well defined, there is evidence that they play a role in cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle modulation, chromatin modification, and transcriptional regulation. THAP-containing proteins have also been implicated in a number of human disease states including heart disease, neurological defects, and several types of cancers. Human THAP4 is a 577-residue protein of unknown function that is proposed to bind DNA in a sequence-specific manner similar to THAP1 and has been found to be upregulated in response to heat shock. THAP4 is expressed in a relatively uniform manner in a broad range of tissues and appears to be upregulated in lymphoma cells and highly expressed in heart cells. The C-terminal domain of THAP4 (residues 415-577), designated here as cTHAP4, is evolutionarily conserved and is observed in all known THAP4 orthologs. Several single-domain proteins lacking a THAP domain are found in plants and bacteria and show significant levels of homology to cTHAP4. It appears that cTHAP4 belongs to a large class of proteins that have yet to be fully

  2. Identification of candidate effector proteins potentially involved in Fusarium graminearum-wheat interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pathogen-derived small secreted cysteine-rich proteins (SSCPs) are known to be a common source of fungal effectors that trigger resistance or susceptibility in specific host plants. This group of proteins has not been well studied in Fusarium graminearum, the primary cause of Fusarium head blight (...

  3. ALP/Enigma PDZ-LIM domain proteins in the heart.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ming; Cheng, Hongqiang; Banerjee, Indroneal; Chen, Ju

    2010-04-01

    Actinin-associated LIM protein (ALP) and Enigma are two subfamilies of Postsynaptic density 95, discs large and zonula occludens-1 (PDZ)-Lin-11, Isl1 and Mec-3 (LIM) domain containing proteins. ALP family members have one PDZ and one LIM domain, whereas Enigma proteins contain one PDZ and three LIM domains. Four ALP and three Enigma proteins have been identified in mammals, each having multiple splice variants and unique expression patterns. Functionally, these proteins bind through their PDZ domains to alpha-actinin and bind through their LIM domains or other internal protein interaction domains to other proteins, including signaling molecules. ALP and Enigma proteins have been implicated in cardiac and skeletal muscle structure, function and disease, neuronal function, bipolar disorder, tumor growth, platelet and epithelial cell motility and bone formation. This review will focus on recent advances in the biological roles of ALP/Enigma PDZ-LIM domain proteins in cardiac muscle and provide insights into mechanisms by which mutations in these proteins are related to human cardiac disease.

  4. IQGAP Proteins Reveal an Atypical Phosphoinositide (aPI) Binding Domain with a Pseudo C2 Domain Fold

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Miles J.; Gray, Alexander; Schenning, Martijn; Agacan, Mark; Tempel, Wolfram; Tong, Yufeng; Nedyalkova, Lyudmila; Park, Hee-Won; Leslie, Nicholas R.; van Aalten, Daan M.F.; Downes, C. Peter; Batty, Ian H.

    2012-10-16

    Class I phosphoinositide (PI) 3-kinases act through effector proteins whose 3-PI selectivity is mediated by a limited repertoire of structurally defined, lipid recognition domains. We describe here the lipid preferences and crystal structure of a new class of PI binding modules exemplified by select IQGAPs (IQ motif containing GTPase-activating proteins) known to coordinate cellular signaling events and cytoskeletal dynamics. This module is defined by a C-terminal 105-107 amino acid region of which IQGAP1 and -2, but not IQGAP3, binds preferentially to phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PtdInsP3). The binding affinity for PtdInsP3, together with other, secondary target-recognition characteristics, are comparable with those of the pleckstrin homology domain of cytohesin-3 (general receptor for phosphoinositides 1), an established PtdInsP3 effector protein. Importantly, the IQGAP1 C-terminal domain and the cytohesin-3 pleckstrin homology domain, each tagged with enhanced green fluorescent protein, were both re-localized from the cytosol to the cell periphery following the activation of PI 3-kinase in Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts, consistent with their common, selective recognition of endogenous 3-PI(s). The crystal structure of the C-terminal IQGAP2 PI binding module reveals unexpected topological similarity to an integral fold of C2 domains, including a putative basic binding pocket. We propose that this module integrates select IQGAP proteins with PI 3-kinase signaling and constitutes a novel, atypical phosphoinositide binding domain that may represent the first of a larger group, each perhaps structurally unique but collectively dissimilar from the known PI recognition modules.

  5. Structure and function of Toll/interleukin-1 receptor/resistance protein (TIR) domains.

    PubMed

    Ve, Thomas; Williams, Simon J; Kobe, Bostjan

    2015-02-01

    The Toll/interleukin-1 receptor/resistance protein (TIR) domain is a protein-protein interaction domain consisting of 125-200 residues, widely distributed in animals, plants and bacteria but absent from fungi, archea and viruses. In plants and animals, these domains are found in proteins with functions in innate immune pathways, while in bacteria, some TIR domain-containing proteins interfere with the innate immune pathways in the host. TIR domains function as protein scaffolds, mostly involving self-association and homotypic interactions with other TIR domains. In the last 15 years, the three-dimensional structures of TIR domains from several mammalian, plant and bacterial proteins have been reported. These structures, jointly with functional data including the identification of interacting proteins, have started to provide insight into the molecular basis of the assembly of animal and plant immune signaling complexes, and for host immunosuppression by bacterial pathogens. This review focuses on the current knowledge of the structures of the TIR domains and how the structure relates to function.

  6. Crystal Structure of the Protein Kinase Domain of Yeast AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Snf1

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolph,M.; Amodeo, G.; Bai, Y.; Tong, L.

    2005-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a master metabolic regulator, and is an important target for drug development against diabetes, obesity, and other diseases. AMPK is a hetero-trimeric enzyme, with a catalytic ({alpha}) subunit, and two regulatory ({beta} and {gamma}) subunits. Here we report the crystal structure at 2.2 Angstrom resolution of the protein kinase domain (KD) of the catalytic subunit of yeast AMPK (commonly known as SNF1). The Snf1-KD structure shares strong similarity to other protein kinases, with a small N-terminal lobe and a large C-terminal lobe. Two negative surface patches in the structure may be important for the recognition of the substrates of this kinase.

  7. Reconstituting Protein Interaction Networks Using Parameter-Dependent Domain-Domain Interactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-07

    Superfamily ( SF ) [33], and SMART [34,35]. PFAM domains: FH2, Drf_FH3, and two Drf_GBD domains; SF domains: Formin homology 2 domain (FH2 domain) and ARM...annotation data from six commonly used annotation databases: PFAM-A (release 25.0) [32], Superfamily ( SF ) [33], SMART [34,35], PRODOM [36], TIGRFAM [37... SF 3,651 62.1 962,602 33.0 1,355 1,307 0.79 SMART 3,023 51.4 455,523 15.6 392 379 0.66 PRODOM 146 2.5 19,760 0.7 111 111 0.02 TIGRFAM 3,019 51.3

  8. Dystrophin contains multiple independent membrane-binding domains.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Junling; Kodippili, Kasun; Yue, Yongping; Hakim, Chady H; Wasala, Lakmini; Pan, Xiufang; Zhang, Keqing; Yang, Nora N; Duan, Dongsheng; Lai, Yi

    2016-09-01

    Dystrophin is a large sub-sarcolemmal protein. Its absence leads to Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Binding to the sarcolemma is essential for dystrophin to protect muscle from contraction-induced injury. It has long been thought that membrane binding of dystrophin depends on its cysteine-rich (CR) domain. Here, we provide in vivo evidence suggesting that dystrophin contains three additional membrane-binding domains including spectrin-like repeats (R)1-3, R10-12 and C-terminus (CT). To systematically study dystrophin membrane binding, we split full-length dystrophin into ten fragments and examined subcellular localizations of each fragment by adeno-associated virus-mediated gene transfer. In skeletal muscle, R1-3, CR domain and CT were exclusively localized at the sarcolemma. R10-12 showed both cytosolic and sarcolemmal localization. Importantly, the CR-independent membrane binding was conserved in murine and canine muscles. A critical function of the CR-mediated membrane interaction is the assembly of the dystrophin-associated glycoprotein complex (DGC). While R1-3 and R10-12 did not restore the DGC, surprisingly, CT alone was sufficient to establish the DGC at the sarcolemma. Additional studies suggest that R1-3 and CT also bind to the sarcolemma in the heart, though relatively weak. Taken together, our study provides the first conclusive in vivo evidence that dystrophin contains multiple independent membrane-binding domains. These structurally and functionally distinctive membrane-binding domains provide a molecular framework for dystrophin to function as a shock absorber and signaling hub. Our results not only shed critical light on dystrophin biology and DMD pathogenesis, but also provide a foundation for rationally engineering minimized dystrophins for DMD gene therapy.

  9. Different functional modes of BAR domain proteins in formation and plasticity of mammalian postsynapses.

    PubMed

    Kessels, Michael M; Qualmann, Britta

    2015-09-01

    A plethora of cell biological processes involve modulations of cellular membranes. By using extended lipid-binding interfaces, some proteins have the power to shape membranes by attaching to them. Among such membrane shapers, the superfamily of Bin-Amphiphysin-Rvs (BAR) domain proteins has recently taken center stage. Extensive structural work on BAR domains has revealed a common curved fold that can serve as an extended membrane-binding interface to modulate membrane topologies and has allowed the grouping of the BAR domain superfamily into subfamilies with structurally slightly distinct BAR domain subtypes (N-BAR, BAR, F-BAR and I-BAR). Most BAR superfamily members are expressed in the mammalian nervous system. Neurons are elaborately shaped and highly compartmentalized cells. Therefore, analyses of synapse formation and of postsynaptic reorganization processes (synaptic plasticity) - a basis for learning and memory formation - has unveiled important physiological functions of BAR domain superfamily members. These recent advances, furthermore, have revealed that the functions of BAR domain proteins include different aspects. These functions are influenced by the often complex domain organization of BAR domain proteins. In this Commentary, we review these recent insights and propose to classify BAR domain protein functions into (1) membrane shaping, (2) physical integration, (3) action through signaling components, and (4) suppression of other BAR domain functions.

  10. The J-domain proteins of Arabidopsis thaliana: an unexpectedly large and diverse family of chaperones.

    PubMed

    Miernyk, J A

    2001-07-01

    A total of 89 J-domain proteins were identified in the genome of the model flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana. The deduced amino acid sequences of the J-domain proteins were analyzed for an assortment of structural features and motifs. Based on the results of sequence comparisons and structure and function predictions, 51 distinct families were identified. The families ranged in size from 1 to 6 members. Subcellular localizations of the A thaliana J-domain proteins were predicted; species were found in both the soluble and membrane compartments of all cellular organelles. Based on digital Northern analysis, the J-domain proteins could be separated into groups of low, medium, and moderate expression levels. This genomics-based analysis of the A thaliana J-domain proteins establishes a framework for detailed studies of biological function and specificity. It additionally provides a comprehensive basis for evolutionary comparisons.

  11. Implications of 3D domain swapping for protein folding, misfolding and function.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, Frederic; Schymkowitz, Joost; Itzhaki, Laura S

    2012-01-01

    Three-dimensional domain swapping is the process by which two identical protein chains exchange a part of their structure to form an intertwined dimer or higher-order oligomer. The phenomenon has been observed in the crystal structures of a range of different proteins. In this chapter we review the experiments that have been performed in order to understand the sequence and structural determinants of domain-swapping and these show how the general principles obtained can be used to engineer proteins to domain swap. We discuss the role of domain swapping in regulating protein function and as one possible mechanism of protein misfolding that can lead to aggregation and disease. We also review a number of interesting pathways of macromolecular assembly involving β-strand insertion or complementation that are related to the domain-swapping phenomenon.

  12. Domain loss facilitates accelerated evolution and neofunctionalization of duplicate snake venom metalloproteinase toxin genes.

    PubMed

    Casewell, Nicholas R; Wagstaff, Simon C; Harrison, Robert A; Renjifo, Camila; Wüster, Wolfgang

    2011-09-01

    Gene duplication is a key mechanism for the adaptive evolution and neofunctionalization of gene families. Large multigene families often exhibit complex evolutionary histories as a result of frequent gene duplication acting in concordance with positive selection pressures. Alterations in the domain structure of genes, causing changes in the molecular scaffold of proteins, can also result in a complex evolutionary history and has been observed in functionally diverse multigene toxin families. Here, we investigate the role alterations in domain structure have on the tempo of evolution and neofunctionalization of multigene families using the snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs) as a model system. Our results reveal that the evolutionary history of viperid (Serpentes: Viperidae) SVMPs is repeatedly punctuated by domain loss, with the single loss of the cysteine-rich domain, facilitating the formation of P-II class SVMPs, occurring prior to the convergent loss of the disintegrin domain to form multiple P-I SVMP structures. Notably, the majority of phylogenetic branches where domain loss was inferred to have occurred exhibited highly significant evidence of positive selection in surface-exposed amino acid residues, resulting in the neofunctionalization of P-II and P-I SVMP classes. These results provide a valuable insight into the mechanisms by which complex gene families evolve and detail how the loss of domain structures can catalyze the accelerated evolution of novel gene paralogues. The ensuing generation of differing molecular scaffolds encoded by the same multigene family facilitates gene neofunctionalization while presenting an evolutionary advantage through the retention of multiple genes capable of encoding functionally distinct proteins.

  13. Dynamics and Adaptive Benefits of Protein Domain Emergence and Arrangements during Plant Genome Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Kersting, Anna R.; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich; Moore, Andrew D.; Grath, Sonja

    2012-01-01

    Plant genomes are generally very large, mostly paleopolyploid, and have numerous gene duplicates and complex genomic features such as repeats and transposable elements. Many of these features have been hypothesized to enable plants, which cannot easily escape environmental challenges, to rapidly adapt. Another mechanism, which has recently been well described as a major facilitator of rapid adaptation in bacteria, animals, and fungi but not yet for plants, is modular rearrangement of protein-coding genes. Due to the high precision of profile-based methods, rearrangements can be well captured at the protein level by characterizing the emergence, loss, and rearrangements of protein domains, their structural, functional, and evolutionary building blocks. Here, we study the dynamics of domain rearrangements and explore their adaptive benefit in 27 plant and 3 algal genomes. We use a phylogenomic approach by which we can explain the formation of 88% of all arrangements by single-step events, such as fusion, fission, and terminal loss of domains. We find many domains are lost along every lineage, but at least 500 domains are novel, that is, they are unique to green plants and emerged more or less recently. These novel domains duplicate and rearrange more readily within their genomes than ancient domains and are overproportionally involved in stress response and developmental innovations. Novel domains more often affect regulatory proteins and show a higher degree of structural disorder than ancient domains. Whereas a relatively large and well-conserved core set of single-domain proteins exists, long multi-domain arrangements tend to be species-specific. We find that duplicated genes are more often involved in rearrangements. Although fission events typically impact metabolic proteins, fusion events often create new signaling proteins essential for environmental sensing. Taken together, the high volatility of single domains and complex arrangements in plant genomes

  14. Polydom: a secreted protein with pentraxin, complement control protein, epidermal growth factor and von Willebrand factor A domains.

    PubMed Central

    Gilgès, D; Vinit, M A; Callebaut, I; Coulombel, L; Cacheux, V; Romeo, P H; Vigon, I

    2000-01-01

    To identify extracellular proteins with epidermal growth factor (EGF) domains that are potentially involved in the control of haemopoiesis, we performed degenerate reverse-transcriptase-mediated PCR on the murine bone-marrow stromal cell line MS-5 and isolated a new partial cDNA encoding EGF-like domains related to those in the Notch proteins. Cloning and sequencing of the full-length cDNA showed that it encoded a new extracellular multi-domain protein that we named polydom. This 387 kDa mosaic protein contained a signal peptide followed by a new association of eight different protein domains, including a pentraxin domain and a von Willebrand factor type A domain, ten EGF domains, and 34 complement control protein modules. The human polydom mRNA is strongly expressed in placenta, its expression in the other tissues being weak or undetectable. The particular multidomain structure of the encoded protein suggests an important biological role in cellular adhesion and/or in the immune system. PMID:11062057

  15. Antibodies against MAEBL Ligand Domains M1 and M2 Inhibit Sporozoite Development In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Preiser, Peter; Rénia, Laurent; Singh, Naresh; Balu, Bharath; Jarra, William; Voza, Tatiana; Kaneko, Osamu; Blair, Peter; Torii, Motomi; Landau, Irène; Adams, John H.

    2004-01-01

    MAEBL is a type 1 membrane protein that is implicated in the merozoite invasion of erythrocytes and sporozoite invasion of mosquito salivary glands. This apical organelle protein is structurally similar to the ebl erythrocyte binding proteins, such as EBA-175, except that the tandem ligand domains of MAEBL are similar to part of the extracellular domain of apical membrane antigen 1 and not the Duffy binding-like domain. Although midgut and salivary gland sporozoites are morphologically similar, salivary gland sporozoites undergo a period of new gene expression after infecting the salivary glands, display distinct phenotypic differences, and are more infectious for the mammalian host. The objectives of this project were to determine the molecular form of MAEBL in the infectious salivary gland sporozoites and whether the ligand has a role in the sporozoite development to exoerythrocytic stages in hepatocytes. We determined that MAEBL is newly expressed in salivary gland sporozoites and in a form distinct from what is present in the midgut sporozoites or present in erythrocytic stages. Both ligand domains (M1 and M2) were expressed as part of a full-length membrane form of MAEBL in the salivary gland sporozoites in contrast to the other stages that retain only the M2 ligand domain as part of the membrane form of the protein. Antisera developed against the cysteine-rich regions of the extracellular portion of MAEBL inhibited sporozoite development to exoerythrocytic forms in vitro. Together these data indicate that MAEBL has a role in this third developmental stage in the life cycle of the malaria parasite. Thus, MAEBL is another target for pre-erythrocytic-stage vaccine development against malaria parasites. PMID:15155670

  16. Structure and function of regulator of G protein signaling homology domains.

    PubMed

    Tesmer, John J G

    2009-01-01

    All regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins contain a conserved domain of approximately 130 amino acids that binds to activated heterotrimeric G protein α subunits (Gα) and accelerates their rate of GTP hydrolysis. Homologous domains are found in at least six other protein families, including a family of Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors (RhoGEFs) and the G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs). Although some of the RhoGEF and GRK RGS-like domains can also bind to activated Gα subunits, they do so in distinct ways and with much lower levels of GTPase activation. In other protein families, the domains have as of yet no obvious relationship to heterotrimeric G protein signaling. These RGS homology (RH) domains are now recognized as mediators of extraordinarily diverse protein-protein interactions. Through these interactions, they play roles that range from enzyme to molecular scaffold to signal transducing module. In this review, the atomic structures of RH domains from RGS proteins, Axins, RhoGEFs, and GRKs are compared in light of what is currently known about their functional roles.

  17. Cytoplasmic Ig-Domain Proteins: Cytoskeletal Regulators with a Role in Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Otey, Carol A.; Dixon, Richard; Stack, Christianna; Goicoechea, Silvia M.

    2009-01-01

    Immunoglobulin domains are found in a wide variety of functionally diverse transmembrane proteins, and also in a smaller number of cytoplasmic proteins. Members of this latter group are usually associated with the actin cytoskeleton, and most of them bind directly to either actin or myosin, or both. Recently, studies of inherited human disorders have identified disease-causing mutations in five cytoplasmic Ig-domain proteins: myosin-binding protein C, titin, myotilin, palladin, and myopalladin. Together with results obtained from cultured cells and mouse models, these clinical studies have yielded novel insights into the unexpected roles of Ig domain proteins in mechanotransduction and signaling to the nucleus. An emerging theme in this field is that cytoskeleton-associated Ig domain proteins are more than structural elements of the cell, and may have evolved to fill different needs in different cellular compartments. PMID:19466753

  18. Versatile TPR domains accommodate different modes of target protein recognition and function.

    PubMed

    Allan, Rudi Kenneth; Ratajczak, Thomas

    2011-07-01

    The tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) motif is one of many repeat motifs that form structural domains in proteins that can act as interaction scaffolds in the formation of multi-protein complexes involved in numerous cellular processes such as transcription, the cell cycle, protein translocation, protein degradation and host defence against invading pathogens. The crystal structures of many TPR domain-containing proteins have been determined, showing TPR motifs as two anti-parallel α-helices packed in tandem arrays to form a structure with an amphipathic groove which can bind a target peptide. This is however not the only mode of target recognition by TPR domains, with short amino acid insertions and alternative TPR motif conformations also shown to contribute to protein interactions, highlighting diversity in TPR domains and the versatility of this structure in mediating biological events.

  19. Bax transmembrane domain interacts with prosurvival Bcl-2 proteins in biological membranes

    PubMed Central

    Andreu-Fernández, Vicente; Sancho, Mónica; Genovés, Ainhoa; Lucendo, Estefanía; Todt, Franziska; Lauterwasser, Joachim; Funk, Kathrin; Jahreis, Günther; Pérez-Payá, Enrique; Mingarro, Ismael; Edlich, Frank; Orzáez, Mar

    2017-01-01

    The Bcl-2 (B-cell lymphoma 2) protein Bax (Bcl-2 associated X, apoptosis regulator) can commit cells to apoptosis via outer mitochondrial membrane permeabilization. Bax activity is controlled in healthy cells by prosurvival Bcl-2 proteins. C-terminal Bax transmembrane domain interactions were implicated recently in Bax pore formation. Here, we show that the isolated transmembrane domains of Bax, Bcl-xL (B-cell lymphoma-extra large), and Bcl-2 can mediate interactions between Bax and prosurvival proteins inside the membrane in the absence of apoptotic stimuli. Bcl-2 protein transmembrane domains specifically homooligomerize and heterooligomerize in bacterial and mitochondrial membranes. Their interactions participate in the regulation of Bcl-2 proteins, thus modulating apoptotic activity. Our results suggest that interactions between the transmembrane domains of Bax and antiapoptotic Bcl-2 proteins represent a previously unappreciated level of apoptosis regulation. PMID:28028215

  20. Maximum occurrence analysis of protein conformations for different distributions of paramagnetic metal ions within flexible two-domain proteins.

    PubMed

    Luchinat, Claudio; Nagulapalli, Malini; Parigi, Giacomo; Sgheri, Luca

    2012-02-01

    Multidomain proteins are composed of rigid domains connected by (flexible) linkers. Therefore, the domains may experience a large degree of reciprocal reorientation. Pseudocontact shifts and residual dipolar couplings arising from one or more paramagnetic metals successively placed in a single metal binding site in the protein can be used as restraints to assess the degree of mobility of the different domains. They can be used to determine the maximum occurrence (MO) of each possible protein conformation, i.e. the maximum weight that such conformations can have independently of the real structural ensemble, in agreement with the provided restraints. In the case of two-domain proteins, the metal ions can be placed all in the same domain, or distributed between the two domains. It has been demonstrated that the quantity of independent information for the characterization of the system is larger when all metals are bound in the same domain. At the same time, it has been shown that there are practical advantages in placing the metals in different domains. Here, it is shown that distributing the metals between the domains provides a tool for defining a coefficient of compatibility among the restraints obtained from different metals, without a significant decrease of the capability of the MO values to discriminate among conformations with different weights.

  1. Pinkbar is an epithelial-specific BAR domain protein that generates planar membrane structures

    SciTech Connect

    Pykäläinen, Anette; Boczkowska, Malgorzata; Zhao, Hongxia; Saarikangas, Juha; Rebowski, Grzegorz; Jansen, Maurice; Hakanen, Janne; Koskela, Essi V.; Peränen, Johan; Vihinen, Helena; Jokitalo, Eija; Salminen, Marjo; Ikonen, Elina; Dominguez, Roberto; Lappalainen, Pekka

    2013-05-29

    Bin/amphipysin/Rvs (BAR)-domain proteins sculpt cellular membranes and have key roles in processes such as endocytosis, cell motility and morphogenesis. BAR domains are divided into three subfamilies: BAR- and F-BAR-domain proteins generate positive membrane curvature and stabilize cellular invaginations, whereas I-BAR-domain proteins induce negative curvature and stabilize protrusions. We show that a previously uncharacterized member of the I-BAR subfamily, Pinkbar, is specifically expressed in intestinal epithelial cells, where it localizes to Rab13-positive vesicles and to the plasma membrane at intercellular junctions. Notably, the BAR domain of Pinkbar does not induce membrane tubulation but promotes the formation of planar membrane sheets. Structural and mutagenesis analyses reveal that the BAR domain of Pinkbar has a relatively flat lipid-binding interface and that it assembles into sheet-like oligomers in crystals and in solution, which may explain its unique membrane-deforming activity.

  2. Mapping of chorismate mutase and prephenate dehydrogenase domains in the Escherichia coli T-protein.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuqing; Vincent, Sarah; Wilson, David B; Ganem, Bruce

    2003-02-01

    The Escherichia coli bifunctional T-protein transforms chorismic acid to p-hydroxyphenylpyruvic acid in the l-tyrosine biosynthetic pathway. The 373 amino acid T-protein is a homodimer that exhibits chorismate mutase (CM) and prephenate dehydrogenase (PDH) activities, both of which are feedback-inhibited by tyrosine. Fifteen genes coding for the T-protein and various fragments thereof were constructed and successfully expressed in order to characterize the CM, PDH and regulatory domains. Residues 1-88 constituted a functional CM domain, which was also dimeric. Both the PDH and the feedback-inhibition activities were localized in residues 94-373, but could not be separated into discrete domains. The activities of cloned CM and PDH domains were comparatively low, suggesting some cooperative interactions in the native state. Activity data further indicate that the PDH domain, in which NAD, prephenate and tyrosine binding sites were present, was more unstable than the CM domain.

  3. Specificity Profiling of Protein-Binding Domains Using One-Bead-One-Compound Peptide Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Kunys, Andrew R.; Lian, Wenlong; Pei, Dehua

    2013-01-01

    One-bead-one-compound (OBOC) libraries consist of structurally related compounds (e.g., peptides) covalently attached to a solid support, with each resin bead carrying a unique compound. OBOC libraries of high structural diversity can be rapidly synthesized and screened without the need of any special equipment and therefore can be employed in any chemical or biochemical laboratory. OBOC peptide libraries have been widely used to map the ligand specificity of proteins, to determine the substrate specificity of enzymes, and to develop inhibitors against macromolecular targets. They have proven particularly useful in profiling the binding specificity of protein modular domains (e.g., SH2 domains, BIR domains, and PDZ domains) and subsequently using the specificity information to predict the protein targets of these domains. The protocols outlined in this article describe the methodologies for synthesizing and screening OBOC peptide libraries against SH2 and PDZ domains and the related data analysis. PMID:23788558

  4. Gene3D: Multi-domain annotations for protein sequence and comparative genome analysis.

    PubMed

    Lees, Jonathan G; Lee, David; Studer, Romain A; Dawson, Natalie L; Sillitoe, Ian; Das, Sayoni; Yeats, Corin; Dessailly, Benoit H; Rentzsch, Robert; Orengo, Christine A

    2014-01-01

    Gene3D (http://gene3d.biochem.ucl.ac.uk) is a database of protein domain structure annotations for protein sequences. Domains are predicted using a library of profile HMMs from 2738 CATH superfamilies. Gene3D assigns domain annotations to Ensembl and UniProt sequence sets including >6000 cellular genomes and >20 million unique protein sequences. This represents an increase of 45% in the number of protein sequences since our last publication. Thanks to improvements in the underlying data and pipeline, we see large increases in the domain coverage of sequences. We have expanded this coverage by integrating Pfam and SUPERFAMILY domain annotations, and we now resolve domain overlaps to provide highly comprehensive composite multi-domain architectures. To make these data more accessible for comparative genome analyses, we have developed novel search algorithms for searching genomes to identify related multi-domain architectures. In addition to providing domain family annotations, we have now developed a pipeline for 3D homology modelling of domains in Gene3D. This has been applied to the human genome and will be rolled out to other major organisms over the next year.

  5. Occurrence of protein disulfide bonds in different domains of life: a comparison of proteins from the Protein Data Bank.

    PubMed

    Bošnjak, I; Bojović, V; Šegvić-Bubić, T; Bielen, A

    2014-03-01

    Disulfide bonds (SS bonds) are important post-translational modifications of proteins. They stabilize a three-dimensional (3D) structure (structural SS bonds) and also have the catalytic or regulatory functions (redox-active SS bonds). Although SS bonds are present in all groups of organisms, no comparative analyses of their frequency in proteins from different domains of life have been made to date. Using the Protein Data Bank, the number and subcellular locations of SS bonds in Archaea, Bacteria and Eukarya have been compared. Approximately three times higher frequency of proteins with SS bonds in eukaryotic secretory organelles (e.g. endoplasmic reticulum) than in bacterial periplasmic/secretory pathways was calculated. Protein length also affects the SS bond frequency: the average number of SS bonds is positively correlated with the length for longer proteins (>200 amino acids), while for the shorter and less stable proteins (<200 amino acids) this correlation is negative. Medium-sized proteins (250-350 amino acids) indicated a high number of SS bonds only in Archaea which could be explained by the need for additional protein stabilization in hyperthermophiles. The results emphasize higher capacity for the SS bond formation and isomerization in Eukarya when compared with Archaea and Bacteria.

  6. Transcriptional synergy between LIM-homeodomain proteins and basic helix-loop-helix proteins: the LIM2 domain determines specificity.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, J D; Zhang, W; Rudnick, A; Rutter, W J; German, M S

    1997-01-01

    LIM-homeodomain proteins direct cellular differentiation by activating transcription of cell-type-specific genes, but this activation requires cooperation with other nuclear factors. The LIM-homeodomain protein Lmx1 cooperates with the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) protein E47/Pan-1 to activate the insulin promoter in transfected fibroblasts. In this study, we show that two proteins originally called Lmx1 are the closely related products of two distinct vertebrate genes, Lmx1.1 and Lmx1.2. We have used yeast genetic systems to delineate the functional domains of the Lmx1 proteins and to characterize the physical interactions between Lmx1 proteins and E47/Pan-1 that produce synergistic transcriptional activation. The LIM domains of the Lmx1 proteins, and particularly the second LIM domain, mediate both specific physical interactions and transcriptional synergy with E47/Pan-1. The LIM domains of the LIM-homeodomain protein Isl-1, which cannot mediate transcriptional synergy with E47/Pan-1, do not interact with E47/Pan-1. In vitro studies demonstrate that the Lmx1.1 LIM2 domain interacts specifically with the bHLH domain of E47/Pan-1. These studies provide the basis for a model of the assembly of LIM-homeodomain-containing complexes on DNA elements that direct cell-type-restricted transcription in differentiated tissues. PMID:9199284

  7. Structural basis of interactions between epidermal growth factor receptor and SH2 domain proteins.

    PubMed

    Sierke, S L; Longo, G M; Koland, J G

    1993-02-26

    The structural basis of the interactions between the activated epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor and SH2 domain proteins was investigated. The c-src SH2 domain (second domain of src homology) was expressed as a recombinant fusion protein, and an in vitro assay was developed to monitor EGF receptor/SH2 domain interactions. EGF receptor tyrosine kinase domain (TKD) forms expressed in the baculovirus/insect cell system were shown to bind to the SH2 domain when phosphorylated. These TKD/SH2 domain interactions were characterized by dissociation constants of 60-320 nM. Deletion analysis indicated that the entire SH2 domain was required for recognition of the phosphorylated TKD. The binding of a highly truncated TKD protein to the SH2 domain suggested that the sites recognized by the SH2 domain included the EGF receptor autophosphorylation site, tyr992. A phosphorylated EGF receptor peptide containing tyr992 was also shown to interact with the SH2 domain. This residue may therefore mediate interactions between the EGF receptor and tyrosine kinases in the src family.

  8. Clustering amino acid contents of protein domains: biochemical functions of proteins and implications for origin of biological macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Torshin, I Y

    2001-04-01

    Structural classes of protein domains correlate with their amino acid compositions. Several successful algorithms (that use only amino acid composition) have been elaborated for the prediction of structural class or potential biochemical significance. This work deals with dynamic classification (clustering) of the domains on the basis of their amino acid composition. Amino acid contents of domains from a non-redundant PDB set were clustered in 20-dimensional space of amino acid contents. Despite the variations of an empirical parameter and non-redundancy of the set, only one large cluster (tens-hundreds of proteins) surrounded by hundreds of small clusters (1-5 proteins), was identified. The core of the largest cluster contains at least 64% DNA (nucleotide)-interacting protein domains from various sources. About 90% of the proteins of the core are intracellular proteins. 83% of the DNA/nucleotide interacting domains in the core belong to the mixed alpha-beta folds (a+b, a/b), 14% are all-alpha (mostly helices) and all-beta (mostly beta-strands) proteins. At the same time, when core domains that belong to one organism (E.coli) are considered, over 80% of them prove to be DNA/nucleotide interacting proteins. The core is compact: amino acid contents of domains from the core lie in relatively narrow and specific ranges. The core also contains several Fe-S cluster-binding domains, amino acid contents of the core overlap with ferredoxin and CO-dehydrogenase clusters, the oldest known proteins. As Fe-S clusters are thought to be the first biocatalysts, the results are discussed in relation to contemporary experiments and models dealing with the origin of biological macromolecules. The origin of most primordial proteins is considered here to be a result of co-adsorption of nucleotides and amino acids on specific clays, followed by en-block polymerization of the adsorbed mixtures of amino acids.

  9. SH2 domain proteins as high-affinity receptor tyrosine kinase substrates.

    PubMed

    Sierke, S L; Koland, J G

    1993-09-28

    Activation of a growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) is accompanied by a rapid autophosphorylation of the receptor on tyrosine residues. Receptor activation has been shown to promote the association of signal-transducing proteins containing SH2 domains (second domain of src homology). These receptor-associated proteins can, in turn, be phosphorylated by the RTK, an event which presumably regulates their activities. It has been suggested that SH2 domains in signal-transducing proteins target these proteins as substrates of the activated RTK. To test this hypothesis, recombinant proteins were generated that contained tyrosine phosphorylation sites of the erbB3 receptor and/or the SH2 domain of c-src. Incorporation of the SH2 domain led to a decrease in KM and an increase in Vmax for the substrate. The KM determined for one chimeric SH2/erbB3 substrate was among the lowest reported for epidermal growth factor RTK substrates. Experiments with a truncated kinase lacking C-terminal autophosphorylation sites indicated that the reduction in KM for these substrates was mediated by interactions between the substrate SH2 domain and phosphotyrosine residues of the RTK. These interactions could also inhibit RTK activity. These results demonstrate that the SH2 domain can effectively target substrates to a RTK and that SH2 domain proteins can regulate RTK activity.

  10. Structure and Function of the TIR Domain from the Grape NLR Protein RPV1

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Simon J.; Yin, Ling; Foley, Gabriel; Casey, Lachlan W.; Outram, Megan A.; Ericsson, Daniel J.; Lu, Jiang; Boden, Mikael; Dry, Ian B.; Kobe, Bostjan

    2016-01-01

    The N-terminal Toll/interleukin-1 receptor/resistance protein (TIR) domain has been shown to be both necessary and sufficient for defense signaling in the model plants flax and Arabidopsis. In examples from these organisms, TIR domain self-association is required for signaling function, albeit through distinct interfaces. Here, we investigate these properties in the TIR domain containing resistance protein RPV1 from the wild grapevine Muscadinia rotundifolia. The RPV1 TIR domain, without additional flanking sequence present, is autoactive when transiently expressed in tobacco, demonstrating that the TIR domain alone is capable of cell-death signaling. We determined the crystal structure of the RPV1 TIR domain at 2.3 Å resolution. In the crystals, the RPV1 TIR domain forms a dimer, mediated predominantly through residues in the αA and αE helices (“AE” interface). This interface is shared with the interface discovered in the dimeric complex of the TIR domains from the Arabidopsis RPS4/RRS1 resistance protein pair. We show that surface-exposed residues in the AE interface that mediate the dimer interaction in the crystals are highly conserved among plant TIR domain-containing proteins. While we were unable to demonstrate self-association of the RPV1 TIR domain in solution or using yeast 2-hybrid, mutations of surface-exposed residues in the AE interface prevent the cell-death autoactive phenotype. In addition, mutation of residues known to be important in the cell-death signaling function of the flax L6 TIR domain were also shown to be required for RPV1 TIR domain mediated cell-death. Our data demonstrate that multiple TIR domain surfaces control the cell-death function of the RPV1 TIR domain and we suggest that the conserved AE interface may have a general function in TIR-NLR signaling. PMID:28008335

  11. Cooperative folding of intrinsically disordered domains drives assembly of a strong elongated protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruszka, Dominika T.; Whelan, Fiona; Farrance, Oliver E.; Fung, Herman K. H.; Paci, Emanuele; Jeffries, Cy M.; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Baldock, Clair; Baumann, Christoph G.; Brockwell, David J.; Potts, Jennifer R.; Clarke, Jane

    2015-06-01

    Bacteria exploit surface proteins to adhere to other bacteria, surfaces and host cells. Such proteins need to project away from the bacterial surface and resist significant mechanical forces. SasG is a protein that forms extended fibrils on the surface of Staphylococcus aureus and promotes host adherence and biofilm formation. Here we show that although monomeric and lacking covalent cross-links, SasG maintains a highly extended conformation in solution. This extension is mediated through obligate folding cooperativity of the intrinsically disordered E domains that couple non-adjacent G5 domains thermodynamically, forming interfaces that are more stable than the domains themselves. Thus, counterintuitively, the elongation of the protein appears to be dependent on the inherent instability of its domains. The remarkable mechanical strength of SasG arises from tandemly arrayed `clamp' motifs within the folded domains. Our findings reveal an elegant minimal solution for the assembly of monomeric mechano-resistant tethers of variable length.

  12. A novel Toll like receptor with two TIR domains (HcToll-2) is involved in regulation of antimicrobial peptide gene expression of Hyriopsis cumingii.

    PubMed

    Ren, Qian; Lan, Jiang-Feng; Zhong, Xue; Song, Xiao-Jun; Ma, Fei; Hui, Kai-Min; Wang, Wen; Yu, Xiao-Qiang; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2014-07-01

    Animal Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are involved in innate immunity. Toll proteins are generally transmembrane proteins. In this study, an atypical Toll-like receptor (HcToll-2) was identified from the triangle-shell pearl mussel Hyriopsis cumingii, which belongs to phylum Mollusca. Unlike the typical Toll like receptors with extracellular leucine-rich repeats (LRRs), transmembrane, and intracellular Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domains, HcToll-2 has two homologous TIR domains located at the C-terminal (designated as HcTIR1 and HcTIR2) and lacks a transmembrane domain. Phylogenetic analysis showed that HcTIR1 was clustered with TIR of sea anemone Toll, and HcTIR2 was clustered with TIR of Drosophila Toll. HcToll-2 mRNA could be detected in the hepatopancreas and was upregulated after challenge with Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Recombinant HcLRR protein with GST tag could bind to bacteria and also to LPS and PGN. Over-expression of both HcTIR1 and HcTIR2 induced drosomycin genes in Drosophila S2 cells. RNAi analysis showed that HcToll-2 was required for the expression of theromacin, which is a cysteine-rich antimicrobial peptide (AMP) gene. This research is the first report of an atypical Toll-like receptor HcToll-2 involved in antibacterial immunity through induction of AMP expression.

  13. Mapping of domains on HIV envelope protein mediating association with calnexin and protein-disulfide isomerase.

    PubMed

    Papandréou, Marie-Jeanne; Barbouche, Rym; Guieu, Régis; Rivera, Santiago; Fantini, Jacques; Khrestchatisky, Michel; Jones, Ian M; Fenouillet, Emmanuel

    2010-04-30

    The cell catalysts calnexin (CNX) and protein-disulfide isomerase (PDI) cooperate in establishing the disulfide bonding of the HIV envelope (Env) glycoprotein. Following HIV binding to lymphocytes, cell-surface PDI also reduces Env to induce the fusogenic conformation. We sought to define the contact points between Env and these catalysts to illustrate their potential as therapeutic targets. In lysates of Env-expressing cells, 15% of the gp160 precursor, but not gp120, coprecipitated with CNX, whereas only 0.25% of gp160 and gp120 coprecipitated with PDI. Under in vitro conditions, which mimic the Env/PDI interaction during virus/cell contact, PDI readily associated with Env. The domains of Env interacting in cellulo with CNX or in vitro with PDI were then determined using anti-Env antibodies whose binding site was occluded by CNX or PDI. Antibodies against domains V1/V2, C2, and the C terminus of V3 did not bind CNX-associated Env, whereas those against C1, V1/V2, and the CD4-binding domain did not react with PDI-associated Env. In addition, a mixture of the latter antibodies interfered with PDI-mediated Env reduction. Thus, Env interacts with intracellular CNX and extracellular PDI via discrete, largely nonoverlapping, regions. The sites of interaction explain the mode of action of compounds that target these two catalysts and may enable the design of further new competitive agents.

  14. Mapping of Domains on HIV Envelope Protein Mediating Association with Calnexin and Protein-disulfide Isomerase*

    PubMed Central

    Papandréou, Marie-Jeanne; Barbouche, Rym; Guieu, Régis; Rivera, Santiago; Fantini, Jacques; Khrestchatisky, Michel; Jones, Ian M.; Fenouillet, Emmanuel

    2010-01-01

    The cell catalysts calnexin (CNX) and protein-disulfide isomerase (PDI) cooperate in establishing the disulfide bonding of the HIV envelope (Env) glycoprotein. Following HIV binding to lymphocytes, cell-surface PDI also reduces Env to induce the fusogenic conformation. We sought to define the contact points between Env and these catalysts to illustrate their potential as therapeutic targets. In lysates of Env-expressing cells, 15% of the gp160 precursor, but not gp120, coprecipitated with CNX, whereas only 0.25% of gp160 and gp120 coprecipitated with PDI. Under in vitro conditions, which mimic the Env/PDI interaction during virus/cell contact, PDI readily associated with Env. The domains of Env interacting in cellulo with CNX or in vitro with PDI were then determined using anti-Env antibodies whose binding site was occluded by CNX or PDI. Antibodies against domains V1/V2, C2, and the C terminus of V3 did not bind CNX-associated Env, whereas those against C1, V1/V2, and the CD4-binding domain did not react with PDI-associated Env. In addition, a mixture of the latter antibodies interfered with PDI-mediated Env reduction. Thus, Env interacts with intracellular CNX and extracellular PDI via discrete, largely nonoverlapping, regions. The sites of interaction explain the mode of action of compounds that target these two catalysts and may enable the design of further new competitive agents. PMID:20202930

  15. Chemical Ligation of Folded Recombinant Proteins: Segmental Isotopic Labeling of Domains for NMR Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Rong; Ayers, Brenda; Cowburn, David; Muir, Tom W.

    1999-01-01

    A convenient in vitro chemical ligation strategy has been developed that allows folded recombinant proteins to be joined together. This strategy permits segmental, selective isotopic labeling of the product. The src homology type 3 and 2 domains (SH3 and SH2) of Abelson protein tyrosine kinase, which constitute the regulatory apparatus of the protein, were individually prepared in reactive forms that can be ligated together under normal protein-folding conditions to form a normal peptide bond at the ligation junction. This strategy was used to prepare NMR sample quantities of the Abelson protein tyrosine kinase-SH(32) domain pair, in which only one of the domains was labeled with 15N Mass spectrometry and NMR analyses were used to confirm the structure of the ligated protein, which was also shown to have appropriate ligand-binding properties. The ability to prepare recombinant proteins with selectively labeled segments having a single-site mutation, by using a combination of expression of fusion proteins and chemical ligation in vitro, will increase the size limits for protein structural determination in solution with NMR methods. In vitro chemical ligation of expressed protein domains will also provide a combinatorial approach to the synthesis of linked protein domains.

  16. Structure of the GH1 domain of guanylate kinase-associated protein from Rattus norvegicus

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Junsen; Yang, Huiseon; Eom, Soo Hyun; Chun, ChangJu; Im, Young Jun

    2014-09-12

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The crystal structure of GKAP homology domain 1 (GH1) was determined. • GKAP GH1 is a three-helix bundle connected by short flexible loops. • The predicted helix α4 associates weakly with the helix α3, suggesting dynamic nature of the GH1 domain. - Abstract: Guanylate-kinase-associated protein (GKAP) is a scaffolding protein that links NMDA receptor-PSD-95 to Shank–Homer complexes by protein–protein interactions at the synaptic junction. GKAP family proteins are characterized by the presence of a C-terminal conserved GKAP homology domain 1 (GH1) of unknown structure and function. In this study, crystal structure of the GH1 domain of GKAP from Rattus norvegicus was determined in fusion with an N-terminal maltose-binding protein at 2.0 Å resolution. The structure of GKAP GH1 displays a three-helix bundle connected by short flexible loops. The predicted helix α4 which was not visible in the crystal structure associates weakly with the helix α3 suggesting dynamic nature of the GH1 domain. The strict conservation of GH1 domain across GKAP family members and the lack of a catalytic active site required for enzyme activity imply that the GH1 domain might serve as a protein–protein interaction module for the synaptic protein clustering.

  17. Systematic Mapping of WNT-FZD Protein Interactions Reveals Functional Selectivity by Distinct WNT-FZD Pairs*

    PubMed Central

    Dijksterhuis, Jacomijn P.; Baljinnyam, Bolormaa; Stanger, Karen; Sercan, Hakki O.; Ji, Yun; Andres, Osler; Rubin, Jeffrey S.; Hannoush, Rami N.; Schulte, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    The seven-transmembrane-spanning receptors of the FZD1–10 class are bound and activated by the WNT family of lipoglycoproteins, thereby inducing a complex network of signaling pathways. However, the specificity of the interaction between mammalian WNT and FZD proteins and the subsequent signaling cascade downstream of the different WNT-FZD pairs have not been systematically addressed to date. In this study, we determined the binding affinities of various WNTs for different members of the FZD family by using bio-layer interferometry and characterized their functional selectivity in a cell system. Using purified WNTs, we show that different FZD cysteine-rich domains prefer to bind to distinct WNTs with fast on-rates and slow off-rates. In a 32D cell-based system engineered to overexpress FZD2, FZD4, or FZD5, we found that WNT-3A (but not WNT-4, -5A, or -9B) activated the WNT-β-catenin pathway through FZD2/4/5 as measured by phosphorylation of LRP6 and β-catenin stabilization. Surprisingly, different WNT-FZD pairs showed differential effects on phosphorylation of DVL2 and DVL3, revealing a previously unappreciated DVL isoform selectivity by different WNT-FZD pairs in 32D cells. In summary, we present extensive mapping of WNT-FZD cysteine-rich domain interactions complemented by analysis of WNT-FZD pair functionality in a unique cell system expressing individual FZD isoforms. Differential WNT-FZD binding and selective functional readouts suggest that endogenous WNT ligands evolved with an intrinsic natural bias toward different downstream signaling pathways, a phenomenon that could be of great importance in the design of FZD-targeting drugs. PMID:25605717

  18. Differential activities of cellular and viral macro domain proteins in binding of ADP-ribose metabolites.

    PubMed

    Neuvonen, Maarit; Ahola, Tero

    2009-01-09

    Macro domain is a highly conserved protein domain found in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Macro domains are also encoded by a set of positive-strand RNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm of animal cells, including coronaviruses and alphaviruses. The functions of the macro domain are poorly understood, but it has been suggested to be an ADP-ribose-binding module. We have here characterized three novel human macro domain proteins that were found to reside either in the cytoplasm and nucleus [macro domain protein 2 (MDO2) and ganglioside-induced differentiation-associated protein 2] or in mitochondria [macro domain protein 1 (MDO1)], and compared them with viral macro domains from Semliki Forest virus, hepatitis E virus, and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus, and with a yeast macro protein, Poa1p. MDO2 specifically bound monomeric ADP-ribose with a high affinity (K(d)=0.15 microM), but did not bind poly(ADP-ribose) efficiently. MDO2 also hydrolyzed ADP-ribose-1'' phosphate, resembling Poa1p in all these properties. Ganglioside-induced differentiation-associated protein 2 did not show affinity for ADP-ribose or its derivatives, but instead bound poly(A). MDO1 was generally active in these reactions, including poly(A) binding. Individual point mutations in MDO1 abolished monomeric ADP-ribose binding, but not poly(ADP-ribose) binding; in poly(ADP-ribose) binding assays, the monomer did not compete against polymer binding. The viral macro proteins bound poly(ADP-ribose) and poly(A), but had a low affinity for monomeric ADP-ribose. Thus, the viral proteins do not closely resemble any of the human proteins in their biochemical functions. The differential activity profiles of the human proteins implicate them in different cellular pathways, some of which may involve RNA rather than ADP-ribose derivatives.

  19. Redox-coupled structural changes of the catalytic a' domain of protein disulfide isomerase.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Koya; Satoh, Tadashi; Yagi-Utsumi, Maho; Le Gulluche, Anne-Charlotte; Anzai, Takahiro; Uekusa, Yoshinori; Kamiya, Yukiko; Kato, Koichi

    2015-09-14

    Protein disulfide isomerase functions as a folding catalyst in the endoplasmic reticulum. Its b' and a' domains provide substrate-binding sites and undergo a redox-dependent domain rearrangement coupled to an open-closed structural change. Here we determined the first solution structure of the a' domain in its oxidized form and thereby demonstrate that oxidation of the a' domain induces significant conformational changes not only in the vicinity of the active site but also in the distal b'-interfacial segment. Based on these findings, we propose that this conformational transition triggers the domain segregation coupled with the exposure of the hydrophobic surface.

  20. Role of oligomerization domains in thrombospondins and other extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Engel, Jürgen

    2004-06-01

    Coiled coils, collagen triple helices and globular oligomerization domains mediate the subunit assembly of many proteins in vertebrates and invertebrates. Oligomerization offers functional advantages including multivalency, increased binding strength and the combined function of different domains. These features are seen in natural proteins and may be introduced by protein engineering. The special focus of this review is on oligomerization domain of extracellular matrix proteins. For thrombospondins, initial interesting results on the functional role of oligomerization have been published. Other features remain to be explored. For example, it is not clear why thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2 are trimers whereas thrombospondins-3 to -5 are pentamers. To stimulate this type of research, this review makes a survey of oligomerization domains and their functional role in extracellular matrix proteins.

  1. Solid-state nanopore analysis of the PDZ2 protein domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, Kevin; Haq, Raza; Jurgens, Maike; Mulero, Rafael; Prabhu, Anmiv; Jemth, Per; Edel, Joshua; Kim, Minjun

    2010-03-01

    The PDZ2 protein domain plays a significant role in biology; specifically as a ubiquitous binding domain for a variety of proteins found in organisms from bacteria to humans. PDZ2 and a single-point mutant were characterized using nanopores to help elucidate the structure-function relationship of this protein and provide a framework for more complex studies involving protein folding/binding. The translocation properties and unfolding of this domain was interrogated by the ionic-current blockade method using a single digit nanometer solid-state pore. By conducting these experiments under a wide variety of fluidic conditions, significantly different ionic current blockades were recorded and provided a method for sensing the folding/unfolding characteristics of the PDZ2 protein domain and its single-point mutant.

  2. LdFlabarin, a New BAR Domain Membrane Protein of Leishmania Flagellum

    PubMed Central

    Thonnus, Magali; Salin, Bénédicte; Boissier, Fanny; Blancard, Corinne; Sauvanet, Cécile; Metzler, Christelle; Espiau, Benoît; Sahin, Annelise; Merlin, Gilles

    2013-01-01

    During the Leishmania life cycle, the flagellum undergoes successive assembly and disassembly of hundreds of proteins. Understanding these processes necessitates the study of individual components. Here, we investigated LdFlabarin, an uncharacterized L. donovani flagellar protein. The gene is conserved within the Leishmania genus and orthologous genes only exist in the Trypanosoma genus. LdFlabarin associates with the flagellar plasma membrane, extending from the base to the tip of the flagellum as a helicoidal structure. Site-directed mutagenesis, deletions and chimera constructs showed that LdFlabarin flagellar addressing necessitates three determinants: an N-terminal potential acylation site and a central BAR domain for membrane targeting and the C-terminal domain for flagellar specificity. In vitro, the protein spontaneously associates with liposomes, triggering tubule formation, which suggests a structural/morphogenetic function. LdFlabarin is the first characterized Leishmania BAR domain protein, and the first flagellum-specific BAR domain protein. PMID:24086735

  3. Mutations located on both F1 and F2 subunits of the Newcastle disease virus fusion protein confer resistance to neutralization with monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Neyt, C; Geliebter, J; Slaoui, M; Morales, D; Meulemans, G; Burny, A

    1989-01-01

    The fusion gene sequence of six Newcastle disease virus escape mutants revealed that residues important for the integrity of antigenic site 1 and antigenic site 2 were located, respectively, on the F2 subunit and within the cysteine-rich domain of the F1 subunit. We further report the antibody-binding capacity of these mutants. PMID:2463386

  4. The b' domain provides the principal peptide-binding site of protein disulfide isomerase but all domains contribute to binding of misfolded proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Klappa, P; Ruddock, L W; Darby, N J; Freedman, R B

    1998-01-01

    Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) is a very efficient catalyst of folding of many disulfide-bonded proteins. A great deal is known about the catalytic functions of PDI, while little is known about its substrate binding. We recently demonstrated by cross-linking that PDI binds peptides and misfolded proteins, with high affinity but broad specificity. To characterize the substrate-binding site of PDI, we investigated the interactions of various recombinant fragments of human PDI, expressed in Escherichia coli, with different radiolabelled model peptides. We observed that the b' domain of human PDI is essential and sufficient for the binding of small peptides. In the case of larger peptides, specifically a 28 amino acid fragment derived from bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor, or misfolded proteins, the b' domain is essential but not sufficient for efficient binding, indicating that contributions from additional domains are required. Hence we propose that the different domains of PDI all contribute to the binding site, with the b' domain forming the essential core. PMID:9463371

  5. The mammalian START domain protein family in lipid transport in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Clark, Barbara J

    2012-03-01

    Lipid transfer proteins of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein-related lipid transfer (START) domain family are defined by the presence of a conserved ∼210 amino acid sequence that folds into an α/β helix-grip structure forming a hydrophobic pocket for ligand binding. The mammalian START proteins bind diverse ligands, such as cholesterol, oxysterols, phospholipids, sphingolipids, and possibly fatty acids, and have putative roles in non-vesicular lipid transport, thioesterase enzymatic activity, and tumor suppression. However, the biological functions of many members of the START domain protein family are not well established. Recent research has focused on characterizing the cell-type distribution and regulation of the START proteins, examining the specificity and directionality of lipid transport, and identifying disease states associated with dysregulation of START protein expression. This review summarizes the current concepts of the proposed physiological and pathological roles for the mammalian START domain proteins in cholesterol and lipid trafficking.

  6. Design, pharmacology, and NMR structure of a minimized cystine knot with agouti-related protein activity.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Pilgrim J; McNulty, Joseph C; Yang, Ying-Kui; Thompson, Darren A; Chai, Biaoxin; Gantz, Ira; Barsh, Gregory S; Millhauser, Glenn L

    2002-06-18

    The agouti-related protein (AGRP) is an endogenous antagonist of the melanocortin receptors MC3R and MC4R found in the hypothalamus and exhibits potent orexigenic activity. The cysteine-rich C-terminal domain of this protein, corresponding to AGRP(87-132), exhibits receptor binding affinity and antagonism equivalent to that of the full-length protein. The NMR structure of this active domain was recently determined and suggested that melanocortin receptor contacts were made primarily by two loops presented by a well-structured cystine knot domain within AGRP(87-132) [McNulty et al. (2001) Biochemistry 40, 15520-15527]. This hypothesis is tested here with NMR structure and activity studies of a 34-residue AGRP analogue designed to contain only the cystine knot domain. The designed miniprotein folds to a homogeneous product, retains the desired cystine knot architecture, functions as an antagonist, and maintains the melanocortin receptor pharmacological profile of AGRP(87-132). The AGRP-like activity of this molecule supports the hypothesis that indeed the cystine knot region possesses the melanocortin receptor contact points. Moreover, this potent AGRP analogue is synthetically accessible, may serve in the development of therapeutics for the treatment of diseases related to energy balance. and may also find use as a new reagent for probing melanocortin receptor structure and function.

  7. The NHR domains of Neuralized and related proteins: Beyond Notch signalling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sili; Boulianne, Gabrielle L

    2017-01-01

    Neuralized Homology Repeats (NHRs) were first identified in Neuralized, an E3-ubiquitin ligase that plays a key role in the Notch signalling pathway. Since their original discovery, NHR domains have been shown to regulate protein-protein interactions in a broad range of developmental processes and in a wide variety of species from flies to humans. The NHR family of proteins can be categorized into three groups: (1) those that contain a RING finger, (2) those that contain a SOCS box and, (3) those that only have NHR domains. Here we review the structure and function of NHR domains in various cellular and developmental processes.

  8. Preparation and reactivity of a tetranuclear Fe(II) core in the metallothionein α-domain.

    PubMed

    Sano, Yohei; Onoda, Akira; Sakurai, Rie; Kitagishi, Hiroaki; Hayashi, Takashi

    2011-05-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are small cysteine-rich proteins which exhibit high affinities for various metal ions and play roles in storage of essential metals and detoxification of toxic metals. Studies on the redox properties of MTs have been quite limited. Recently, we focused on the α-domain of MT (MTα) as a protein matrix and incorporated a tetranuclear metal cluster as a reductant. UV-visible, CD and MS data indicate the formation of the stable tetranuclear metal-cysteine cluster in the MTα matrix with Fe(II)(4)-MTα and Co(II)(4)-MTα species existing in water. Furthermore, the Fe(II)(4)-MTα species was found to promote the reduction of met-myoglobin and azobenzene derivatives under mild conditions. Particularly, the stoichiometric reduction of methyl red with Fe(II)(4)-MTα (1:1) was found to proceed with a conversion of 98% over a period of 6h at 25°C. This indicates that all of the four Fe(II) cores contribute to the reduction. In this paper, we describe the preparation and reactivity of the tetranuclear iron cluster in the protein matrix.

  9. A Protein Domain and Family Based Approach to Rare Variant Association Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Tom G.; Shihab, Hashem A.; Rivas, Manuel A.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Campbell, Colin; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Gaunt, Tom R.

    2016-01-01

    Background It has become common practice to analyse large scale sequencing data with statistical approaches based around the aggregation of rare variants within the same gene. We applied a novel approach to rare variant analysis by collapsing variants together using protein domain and family coordinates, regarded to be a more discrete definition of a biologically functional unit. Methods Using Pfam definitions, we collapsed rare variants (Minor Allele Frequency ≤ 1%) together in three different ways 1) variants within single genomic regions which map to individual protein domains 2) variants within two individual protein domain regions which are predicted to be responsible for a protein-protein interaction 3) all variants within combined regions from multiple genes responsible for coding the same protein domain (i.e. protein families). A conventional collapsing analysis using gene coordinates was also undertaken for comparison. We used UK10K sequence data and investigated associations between regions of variants and lipid traits using the sequence kernel association test (SKAT). Results We observed no strong evidence of association between regions of variants based on Pfam domain definitions and lipid traits. Quantile-Quantile plots illustrated that the overall distributions of p-values from the protein domain analyses were comparable to that of a conventional gene-based approach. Deviations from this distribution suggested that collapsing by either protein domain or gene definitions may be favourable depending on the trait analysed. Conclusion We have collapsed rare variants together using protein domain and family coordinates to present an alternative approach over collapsing across conventionally used gene-based regions. Although no strong evidence of association was detected in these analyses, future studies may still find value in adopting these approaches to detect previously unidentified association signals. PMID:27128313

  10. Isolation and characterization of a cone snail protease with homology to CRISP proteins of the pathogenesis-related protein superfamily.

    PubMed

    Milne, Trudy J; Abbenante, Giovanni; Tyndall, Joel D A; Halliday, Judy; Lewis, Richard J

    2003-08-15

    The pathogenesis-related (PR) protein superfamily is widely distributed in the animal, plant, and fungal kingdoms and is implicated in human brain tumor growth and plant pathogenesis. The precise biological activity of PR proteins, however, has remained elusive. Here we report the characterization, cloning and structural homology modeling of Tex31 from the venom duct of Conus textile. Tex31 was isolated to >95% purity by activity-guided fractionation using a para-nitroanilide substrate based on the putative cleavage site residues found in the propeptide precursor of conotoxin TxVIA. Tex31 requires four residues including a leucine N-terminal of the cleavage site for efficient substrate processing. The sequence of Tex31 was determined using two degenerate PCR primers designed from N-terminal and tryptic digest Edman sequences. A BLAST search revealed that Tex31 was a member of the PR protein superfamily and most closely related to the CRISP family of mammalian proteins that have a cysteine-rich C-terminal tail. A homology model constructed from two PR proteins revealed that the likely catalytic residues in Tex31 fall within a structurally conserved domain found in PR proteins. Thus, it is possible that other PR proteins may also be substrate-specific proteases.

  11. Activation of nanoscale allosteric protein domain motion revealed by neutron spin echo spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Zimei; Farago, Bela; Callaway, David

    2012-02-01

    NHERF1 is a multi-domain scaffolding protein that assembles the signaling complexes, and regulates the cell surface expression and endocytic recycling of a variety of membrane proteins. The ability of the two PDZ domains in NHERF1 to assemble protein complexes is allosterically modulated by a membrane-cytoskeleton linker protein ezrin, whose binding site is located as far as 110 angstroms away from the PDZ domains. Here, using neutron spin echo (NSE) spectroscopy, selective deuterium labeling, and theoretical analyses, we reveal the activation of interdomain motion in NHERF1 on nanometer length scales and on sub-microsecond time scales upon forming a complex with ezrin. We show that a much simplified coarse-grained model is sufficient to describe inter-domain motion of a multi-domain protein or protein complex. We expect that future NSE experiments will benefit by exploiting our approach of selective deuteration to resolve the specific domain motions of interest from a plethora of global translational and rotational motions. The results demonstrate that propagation of allosteric signals to distal sites involves the activation of long-range coupled domain motions on submicrosecond time scales, and that these coupled motions can be distinguished and characterized by NSE.

  12. Differential Occurrence of Interactions and Interaction Domains in Proteins Containing Homopolymeric Amino Acid Repeats

    PubMed Central

    Pelassa, Ilaria; Fiumara, Ferdinando

    2015-01-01

    Homopolymeric amino acids repeats (AARs), which are widespread in proteomes, have often been viewed simply as spacers between protein domains, or even as “junk” sequences with no obvious function but with a potential to cause harm upon expansion as in genetic diseases associated with polyglutamine or polyalanine expansions, including Huntington disease and cleidocranial dysplasia. A growing body of evidence indicates however that at least some AARs can form organized, functional protein structures, and can regulate protein function. In particular, certain AARs can mediate protein-protein interactions, either through homotypic AAR-AAR contacts or through heterotypic contacts with other protein domains. It is still unclear however, whether AARs may have a generalized, proteome-wide role in shaping protein-protein interaction networks. Therefore, we have undertaken here a bioinformatics screening of the human proteome and interactome in search of quantitative evidence of such a role. We first identified the sets of proteins that contain repeats of any one of the 20 amino acids, as well as control sets of proteins chosen at random in the proteome. We then analyzed the connectivity between the proteins of the AAR-containing protein sets and we compared it with that observed in the corresponding control networks. We find evidence for different degrees of connectivity in the different AAR-containing protein networks. Indeed, networks of proteins containing polyglutamine, polyglutamate, polyproline, and other AARs show significantly increased levels of connectivity, whereas networks containing polyleucine and other hydrophobic repeats show lower degrees of connectivity. Furthermore, we observed that numerous protein-protein, -nucleic acid, and -lipid interaction domains are significantly enriched in specific AAR protein groups. These findings support the notion of a generalized, combinatorial role of AARs, together with conventional protein interaction domains, in

  13. Recombinant disintegrin domain of human ADAM9 inhibits migration and invasion of DU145 prostate tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Ana Carolina Baptista Moreno; Cardoso, Ana Carolina Ferreira; Selistre-de-Araujo, Heloisa Sobreiro; Cominetti, Márcia Regina

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important features of malignant cells is their capacity to invade adjacent tissues and metastasize to distant organs. This process involves the creation, by tumor and stroma cells, of a specific microenvironment, suitable for proliferation, migration and invasion of tumor cells. The ADAM family of proteins has been involved in these processes. This work aimed to investigate the role of the recombinant disintegrin domain of the human ADAM9 (rADAM9D) on the adhesive and mobility properties of DU145 prostate tumor cells. rADAM9D was able to support DU145 cell adhesion, inhibit the migration of DU145 cells, as well as the invasion of this cell line through matrigel in vitro. Overall this work demonstrates that rADAM9D induces specific cellular migratory properties when compared with different constructs having additional domains, specially those of metalloproteinase and cysteine-rich domains. Furthermore, we showed that rADAM9D was able to inhibit cell adhesion, migration and invasion mainly through interacting with α6β1 in DU145 tumor cell line. These results may contribute to the development of new therapeutic strategies for prostate cancer. PMID:26211476

  14. Functional characterization of candidate effector proteins identified from the wheat scab fungus Fusarium graminearum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fungal pathogens often produce certain small secreted cysteine-rich proteins (SSCPs) during pathogenesis that may function in triggering resistance or susceptibility in specific host plants. We have recently identified a total of 190 SSCPs encoded in the genome of the wheat scab fungus Fusarium gra...

  15. 3DSwap: curated knowledgebase of proteins involved in 3D domain swapping.

    PubMed

    Shameer, Khader; Shingate, Prashant N; Manjunath, S C P; Karthika, M; Pugalenthi, Ganesan; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan

    2011-01-01

    Three-dimensional domain swapping is a unique protein structural phenomenon where two or more protein chains in a protein oligomer share a common structural segment between individual chains. This phenomenon is observed in an array of protein structures in oligomeric conformation. Protein structures in swapped conformations perform diverse functional roles and are also associated with deposition diseases in humans. We have performed in-depth literature curation and structural bioinformatics analyses to develop an integrated knowledgebase of proteins involved in 3D domain swapping. The hallmark of 3D domain swapping is the presence of distinct structural segments such as the hinge and swapped regions. We have curated the literature to delineate the boundaries of these regions. In addition, we have defined several new concepts like 'secondary major interface' to represent the interface properties arising as a result of 3D domain swapping, and a new quantitative measure for the 'extent of swapping' in structures. The catalog of proteins reported in 3DSwap knowledgebase has been generated using an integrated structural bioinformatics workflow of database searches, literature curation, by structure visualization and sequence-structure-function analyses. The current version of the 3DSwap knowledgebase reports 293 protein structures, the analysis of such a compendium of protein structures will further the understanding molecular factors driving 3D domain swapping.

  16. Structure of the caspase-recruitment domain from a zebrafish guanylate-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Jin, Tengchuan; Huang, Mo; Smith, Patrick; Jiang, Jiansheng; Xiao, T Sam

    2013-08-01

    The caspase-recruitment domain (CARD) mediates homotypic protein-protein interactions that assemble large oligomeric signaling complexes such as the inflammasomes during innate immune responses. Structural studies of the mammalian CARDs demonstrate that their six-helix bundle folds belong to the death-domain superfamily, whereas such studies have not been reported for other organisms. Here, the zebrafish interferon-induced guanylate-binding protein 1 (zIGBP1) was identified that contains an N-terminal GTPase domain and a helical domain typical of the mammalian guanylate-binding proteins, followed by a FIIND domain and a C-terminal CARD similar to the mammalian inflammasome proteins NLRP1 and CARD8. The structure of the zIGBP1 CARD as a fusion with maltose-binding protein was determined at 1.47 Å resolution. This revealed a six-helix bundle fold similar to the NLRP1 CARD structure with the bent α1 helix typical of all known CARD structures. The zIGBP1 CARD surface contains a positively charged patch near its α1 and α4 helices and a negatively charged patch near its α2, α3 and α5 helices, which may mediate its interaction with partner domains. Further studies using binding assays and other analyses will be required in order to address the physiological function(s) of this zebrafish protein.

  17. Retinoblastoma-binding protein 1 has an interdigitated double Tudor domain with DNA binding activity.

    PubMed

    Gong, Weibin; Wang, Jinfeng; Perrett, Sarah; Feng, Yingang

    2014-02-21

    Retinoblastoma-binding protein 1 (RBBP1) is a tumor and leukemia suppressor that binds both methylated histone tails and DNA. Our previous studies indicated that RBBP1 possesses a Tudor domain, which cannot bind histone marks. In order to clarify the function of the Tudor domain, the solution structure of the RBBP1 Tudor domain was determined by NMR and is presented here. Although the proteins are unrelated, the RBBP1 Tudor domain forms an interdigitated double Tudor structure similar to the Tudor domain of JMJD2A, which is an epigenetic mark reader. This indicates the functional diversity of Tudor domains. The RBBP1 Tudor domain structure has a significant area of positively charged surface, which reveals a capability of the RBBP1 Tudor domain to bind nucleic acids. NMR titration and isothermal titration calorimetry experiments indicate that the RBBP1 Tudor domain binds both double- and single-stranded DNA with an affinity of 10-100 μM; no apparent DNA sequence specificity was detected. The DNA binding mode and key interaction residues were analyzed in detail based on a model structure of the Tudor domain-dsDNA complex, built by HADDOCK docking using the NMR data. Electrostatic interactions mediate the binding of the Tudor domain with DNA, which is consistent with NMR experiments performed at high salt concentration. The DNA-binding residues are conserved in Tudor domains of the RBBP1 protein family, resulting in conservation of the DNA-binding function in the RBBP1 Tudor domains. Our results provide further insights into the structure and function of RBBP1.

  18. Modulation of neurotransmitter receptors and synaptic differentiation by proteins containing complement-related domains.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Minoru; Hama, Chihiro

    2011-02-01

    Neurotransmitter receptors play central roles in basic neurotransmission and synaptic plasticity. Recent studies have revealed that some transmembrane and extracellular proteins bind to neurotransmitter receptors, forming protein complexes that are required for proper synaptic localization or gating of core receptor molecules. Consequently, the components of these complexes contribute to long-term potentiation, a process that is critical for learning and memory. Here, we review factors that regulate neurotransmitter receptors, with a focus on proteins containing CUB (complement C1r/C1s, Uegf, Bmp1) or CCP (complement control protein) domains, which are frequently found in complement system proteins. Proteins that contain these domains are structurally distinct from TARPs (transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins), and may constitute new protein families that modulate either the localization or function of neurotransmitter receptors. In addition, other CCP domain-containing proteins participate in dendritic patterning and/or synaptic differentiation, although current evidence has not identified any direct activities on neurotransmitter receptors. Some of these proteins are involved in pathologic conditions such as epileptic seizure and mental retardation. Together, these lines of information have shown that CUB and CCP domain-containing proteins contribute to a wide variety of neuronal events that ultimately establish neural circuits.

  19. Reciprocal Influence of Protein Domains in the Cold-Adapted Acyl Aminoacyl Peptidase from Sporosarcina psychrophila

    PubMed Central

    Parravicini, Federica; Natalello, Antonino; Papaleo, Elena; De Gioia, Luca; Doglia, Silvia Maria; Lotti, Marina; Brocca, Stefania

    2013-01-01

    Acyl aminoacyl peptidases are two-domain proteins composed by a C-terminal catalytic α/β-hydrolase domain and by an N-terminal β-propeller domain connected through a structural element that is at the N-terminus in sequence but participates in the 3D structure of the C-domain. We investigated about the structural and functional interplay between the two domains and the bridge structure (in this case a single helix named α1-helix) in the cold-adapted enzyme from Sporosarcina psychrophila (SpAAP) using both protein variants in which entire domains were deleted and proteins carrying substitutions in the α1-helix. We found that in this enzyme the inter-domain connection dramatically affects the stability of both the whole enzyme and the β-propeller. The α1-helix is required for the stability of the intact protein, as in other enzymes of the same family; however in this psychrophilic enzyme only, it destabilizes the isolated β-propeller. A single charged residue (E10) in the α1-helix plays a major role for the stability of the whole structure. Overall, a strict interaction of the SpAAP domains seems to be mandatory for the preservation of their reciprocal structural integrity and may witness their co-evolution. PMID:23457536

  20. Efficient secretion of a folded protein domain by a monomeric bacterial autotransporter.

    PubMed

    Skillman, Kristen M; Barnard, Travis J; Peterson, Janine H; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Bernstein, Harris D

    2005-11-01

    Bacterial autotransporters are proteins that contain a small C-terminal 'beta domain' that facilitates translocation of a large N-terminal 'passenger domain' across the outer membrane (OM) by an unknown mechanism. Here we used EspP, an autotransporter produced by Escherichia coli 0157:H7, as a model protein to gain insight into the transport reaction. Initially we found that the passenger domain of a truncated version of EspP (EspPDelta1-851) was translocated efficiently across the OM. Blue Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, analytical ultracentrifugation and other biochemical methods showed that EspPDelta1-851 behaves as a compact monomer and strongly suggest that the channel formed by the beta domain is too narrow to accommodate folded polypeptides. Surprisingly, we found that a folded protein domain fused to the N-terminus of EspPDelta1-851 was efficiently translocated across the OM. Further analysis revealed that the passenger domain of wild-type EspP also folds at least partially in the periplasm. To reconcile these data, we propose that the EspP beta domain functions primarily to target and anchor the protein and that an external factor transports the passenger domain across the OM.

  1. Methyl-CpG-binding domain proteins: readers of the epigenome.

    PubMed

    Du, Qian; Luu, Phuc-Loi; Stirzaker, Clare; Clark, Susan J

    2015-01-01

    How DNA methylation is interpreted and influences genome regulation remains largely unknown. Proteins of the methyl-CpG-binding domain (MBD) family are primary candidates for the readout of DNA methylation as they recruit chromatin remodelers, histone deacetylases and methylases to methylated DNA associated with gene repression. MBD protein binding requires both functional MBD domains and methyl-CpGs; however, some MBD proteins also bind unmethylated DNA and active regulatory regions via alternative regulatory domains or interaction with the nucleosome remodeling deacetylase (NuRD/Mi-2) complex members. Mutations within MBD domains occur in many diseases, including neurological disorders and cancers, leading to loss of MBD binding specificity to methylated sites and gene deregulation. Here, we summarize the current state of knowledge about MBD proteins and their role as readers of the epigenome.

  2. Protein domain networks: Scale-free mixing of positive and negative exponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nacher, J. C.; Hayashida, M.; Akutsu, T.

    2006-07-01

    Many biological studies have been focused on the study of proteins, since proteins are essential for most cell functions. Although proteins are unique, they share certain common properties. For example, well-defined regions within a protein can fold independently from the rest of the protein and have their own function. They are called protein domains, and served as protein building blocks. In this article, we present a theoretical model for studying the protein domain networks, where one node of the network corresponds to one protein and two proteins are connected if they contain the same domain. The resulting distribution of nodes with a given degree, k, shows not only a power-law with negative exponent γ=-1, but it resembles the superposition of two power-law functions, one with a negative exponent and another with a positive exponent β=1. We call this distribution pattern “ scale-free mixing”. To explain the emergence of this superposition of power-laws, we propose a basic model with two main components: (1) mutation and (2) duplication of domains. Precisely, duplication gives rise to complete subgraphs (i.e., cliques) on the network, thus for several values of k a large number of nodes with degree k is produced, which explains the positive power-law branch of the degree distribution. In order to compare our model with experimental data, we generate protein domain networks with data from the UniProt Knowledgebase-Swissprot database for protein sequences and using InterPro, Pfam and Smart for domain databases. Our results indicate that the signal of this scale-free mixing pattern is also observed in the experimental data and it is conserved among organisms as Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Arabidopsis thaliana, Drosophila melanogaster, Mus musculus, and Homo sapiens.

  3. Histone Code Modulation by Oncogenic PWWP-domain Protein in Breast Cancers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    Hoffmann MJ. Transcription factor networks in embryonic stem cells and testicular cancer and the definition of epigenetics. Epigenetics 2007; 2(1): 37-42...PWWP-domain Protein in Breast Cancers PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Zeng-Quan Yang, Ph.D...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Histone Code Modulation by Oncogenic PWWP-domain Protein in Breast Cancers 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-09-1-0109 5c

  4. Protein translocation channel of mitochondrial inner membrane and matrix-exposed import motor communicate via two-domain coupling protein.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Rupa; Gladkova, Christina; Mapa, Koyeli; Witte, Gregor; Mokranjac, Dejana

    2015-12-29

    The majority of mitochondrial proteins are targeted to mitochondria by N-terminal presequences and use the TIM23 complex for their translocation across the mitochondrial inner membrane. During import, translocation through the channel in the inner membrane is coupled to the ATP-dependent action of an Hsp70-based import motor at the matrix face. How these two processes are coordinated remained unclear. We show here that the two domain structure of Tim44 plays a central role in this process. The N-terminal domain of Tim44 interacts with the components of the import motor, whereas its C-terminal domain interacts with the translocation channel and is in contact with translocating proteins. Our data suggest that the translocation channel and the import motor of the TIM23 complex communicate through rearrangements of the two domains of Tim44 that are stimulated by translocating proteins.

  5. Sequence-specific interaction between the disintegrin domain of mouse ADAM 2 (fertilin beta) and murine eggs. Role of the alpha(6) integrin subunit.

    PubMed

    Bigler, D; Takahashi, Y; Chen, M S; Almeida, E A; Osbourne, L; White, J M

    2000-04-21

    Little is yet known about the biological and biochemical properties of the disintegrin-like domains of ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) proteins. Mouse ADAM 2 (mADAM 2; fertilin beta) is a sperm surface protein involved in murine fertilization. We produced recombinant proteins containing the disintegrin-like domain of mADAM 2 in both insect cells and in bacteria. The protein produced in insect cells (baculo D+C) contained a signal sequence followed by the disintegrin-like and cysteine-rich domains; it was purified from the medium of recombinant baculovirus-infected cells. A bacterial construct containing the disintegrin-like domain was produced in Escherichia coli as a glutathione S-transferase chimera. Baculo D+C, as well as the D domain of the bacterial construct (released with thrombin), bound to the microvillar surface of murine eggs. Using concentrations in the range of 1 to 5 microM, both recombinant proteins strongly inhibited sperm-egg binding and fusion; the baculovirus-produced protein exhibited a somewhat greater extent of inhibition (approximately 75 versus approximately 55% maximal inhibition). Substitution of alanine for each of the five charged residues within the disintegrin loop of mADAM 2 revealed a critical importance for the aspartic acid at position nine. Binding of both recombinant proteins to the egg was inhibited by the function blocking anti-alpha(6) monoclonal antibody, GoH3, but not by a nonfunction-blocking anti-alpha(6) monoclonal antibody. Binding was also inhibited by a peptide analogue of, and with an antibody against, the disintegrin loop of mADAM 2.

  6. The Transactivation Domains of the p53 Protein.

    PubMed

    Raj, Nitin; Attardi, Laura D

    2017-01-03

    The p53 tumor suppressor is a transcriptional activator, with discrete domains that participate in sequence-specific DNA binding, tetramerization, and transcriptional activation. Mutagenesis and reporter studies have delineated two distinct activation domains (TADs) and specific hydrophobic residues within these TADs that are critical for their function. Knockin mice expressing p53 mutants with alterations in either or both of the two TADs have revealed that TAD1 is critical for responses to acute DNA damage, whereas both TAD1 and TAD2 participate in tumor suppression. Biochemical and structural studies have identified factors that bind either or both TADs, including general transcription factors (GTFs), chromatin modifiers, and negative regulators, helping to elaborate a model through which p53 activates transcription. Posttranslational modifications (PTMs) of the p53 TADs through phosphorylation also regulate TAD activity. Together, these studies on p53 TADs provide great insight into how p53 serves as a tumor suppressor.

  7. The Charcot Marie Tooth disease protein LITAF is a zinc-binding monotopic membrane protein

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Wenxia; Wunderley, Lydia; Barrett, Anne L.; High, Stephen; Woodman, Philip G.

    2016-01-01

    LITAF (LPS-induced TNF-activating factor) is an endosome-associated integral membrane protein important for multivesicular body sorting. Several mutations in LITAF cause autosomal-dominant Charcot Marie Tooth disease type 1C. These mutations map to a highly conserved C-terminal region, termed the LITAF domain, which includes a 22 residue hydrophobic sequence and flanking cysteine-rich regions that contain peptide motifs found in zinc fingers. Although the LITAF domain is thought to be responsible for membrane integration, the membrane topology of LITAF has not been established. Here, we have investigated whether LITAF is a tail-anchored (TA) membrane-spanning protein or monotopic membrane protein. When translated in vitro, LITAF integrates poorly into ER-derived microsomes compared with Sec61β, a bona fide TA protein. Furthermore, introduction of N-linked glycosylation reporters shows that neither the N-terminal nor C-terminal domains of LITAF translocate into the ER lumen. Expression in cells of an LITAF construct containing C-terminal glycosylation sites confirms that LITAF is not a TA protein in cells. Finally, an immunofluorescence-based latency assay showed that both the N- and C-termini of LITAF are exposed to the cytoplasm. Recombinant LITAF contains 1 mol/mol zinc, while mutation of predicted zinc-binding residues disrupts LITAF membrane association. Hence, we conclude that LITAF is a monotopic membrane protein whose membrane integration is stabilised by a zinc finger. The related human protein, CDIP1 (cell death involved p53 target 1), displays identical membrane topology, suggesting that this mode of membrane integration is conserved in LITAF family proteins. PMID:27582497

  8. Travelling lipid domains in a dynamic model for protein-induced pattern formation in biomembranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Karin; Bär, Markus

    2005-06-01

    Cell membranes are composed of a mixture of lipids. Many biological processes require the formation of spatial domains in the lipid distribution of the plasma membrane. We have developed a mathematical model that describes the dynamic spatial distribution of acidic lipids in response to the presence of GMC proteins and regulating enzymes. The model encompasses diffusion of lipids and GMC proteins, electrostatic attraction between acidic lipids and GMC proteins as well as the kinetics of membrane attachment/detachment of GMC proteins. If the lipid-protein interaction is strong enough, phase separation occurs in the membrane as a result of free energy minimization and protein/lipid domains are formed. The picture is changed if a constant activity of enzymes is included into the model. We chose the myristoyl-electrostatic switch as a regulatory module. It consists of a protein kinase C that phosphorylates and removes the GMC proteins from the membrane and a phosphatase that dephosphorylates the proteins and enables them to rebind to the membrane. For sufficiently high enzymatic activity, the phase separation is replaced by travelling domains of acidic lipids and proteins. The latter active process is typical for nonequilibrium systems. It allows for a faster restructuring and polarization of the membrane since it acts on a larger length scale than the passive phase separation. The travelling domains can be pinned by spatial gradients in the activity; thus the membrane is able to detect spatial clues and can adapt its polarity dynamically to changes in the environment.

  9. A nuclear localization domain in the hnRNP A1 protein

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The heterogeneous nuclear RNP (hnRNP) A1 protein is one of the major pre-mRNA/mRNA binding proteins in eukaryotic cells and one of the most abundant proteins in the nucleus. It is localized to the nucleoplasm and it also shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. The amino acid sequence of A1 contains two RNP motif RNA-binding domains (RBDs) at the amino terminus and a glycine-rich domain at the carboxyl terminus. This configuration, designated 2x RBD-Gly, is representative of perhaps the largest family of hnRNP proteins. Unlike most nuclear proteins characterized so far, A1 (and most 2x RBD-Gly proteins) does not contain a recognizable nuclear localization signal (NLS). We have found that a segment of ca. 40 amino acids near the carboxyl end of the protein (designated M9) is necessary and sufficient for nuclear localization; attaching this segment to the bacterial protein beta- galactosidase or to pyruvate kinase completely localized these otherwise cytoplasmic proteins to the nucleus. The RBDs and another RNA binding motif found in the glycine-rich domain, the RGG box, are not required for A1 nuclear localization. M9 is a novel type of nuclear localization domain as it does not contain sequences similar to classical basic-type NLS. Interestingly, sequences similar to M9 are found in other nuclear RNA-binding proteins including hnRNP A2. PMID:7730395

  10. Protective activity of the CnaBE3 domain conserved among Staphylococcus aureus Sdr proteins.

    PubMed

    Becherelli, Marco; Prachi, Prachi; Viciani, Elisa; Biagini, Massimiliano; Fiaschi, Luigi; Chiarot, Emiliano; Nosari, Sarah; Brettoni, Cecilia; Marchi, Sara; Biancucci, Marco; Fontana, Maria Rita; Montagnani, Francesca; Bagnoli, Fabio; Barocchi, Michèle A; Manetti, Andrea G O

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen, commensal of the human skin and nares, but also responsible for invasive nosocomial as well as community acquired infections. Staphylococcus aureus adheres to the host tissues by means of surface adhesins, such as SdrC, SdrD, and SdrE proteins. The Sdr family of proteins together with a functional A domain, contain respectively two, three or five repeated sequences called B motifs which comprise the CnaB domains. SdrD and SdrE proteins were reported to be protective in animal models against invasive diseases or lethal challenge with human clinical S. aureus isolates. In this study we identified a 126 amino acid sequence containing a CnaB domain, conserved among the three Sdr proteins. The three fragments defined here as CnaBC2, D5 and E3 domains even though belonging to phylogenetically distinct strains, displayed high sequence similarity. Based on the sequence conservation data, we selected the CnaBE3 domain for further analysis and characterization. Polyclonal antibodies raised against the recombinant CnaBE3 domain recognized SdrE, SdrC and SdrD proteins of different S. aureus lineages. Moreover, we demonstrated that the CnaBE3 domain was expressed in vivo during S. aureus infections, and that immunization of this domain alone significantly reduces the bacterial load in mice challenged with S. aureus. Furthermore, we show that the reduction of bacteria by CnaBE3 vaccination is due to functional antibodies. Finally, we demonstrated that the region of the SdrE protein containing the CnaBE3 domain was resistant to trypsin digestion, a characteristic often associated with the presence of an isopeptide bond.

  11. The CCN Family Proteins: Modulators of Bone Development and Novel Targets in Bone-Associated Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Po-Chun; Cheng, Hsu-Chen; Yang, Shun-Fa; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    The CCN family of proteins is composed of six extracellular matrix-associated proteins that play crucial roles in skeletal development, wound healing, fibrosis, and cancer. Members of the CCN family share four conserved cysteine-rich modular domains that trigger signal transduction in cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, differentiation, and survival through direct binding to specific integrin receptors and heparan sulfate proteoglycans. In the present review, we discuss the roles of the CCN family proteins in regulating resident cells of the bone microenvironment. In vertebrate development, the CCN family plays a critical role in osteo/chondrogenesis and vasculo/angiogenesis. These effects are regulated through signaling via integrins, bone morphogenetic protein, vascular endothelial growth factor, Wnt, and Notch via direct binding to CCN family proteins. Due to the important roles of CCN family proteins in skeletal development, abnormal expression of CCN proteins is related to the tumorigenesis of primary bone tumors such as osteosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, and chondrosarcoma. Additionally, emerging studies have suggested that CCN proteins may affect progression of secondary metastatic bone tumors by moderating the bone microenvironment. CCN proteins could therefore serve as potential therapeutic targets for drug development against primary and metastatic bone tumors. PMID:24551846

  12. The CCN family proteins: modulators of bone development and novel targets in bone-associated tumors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Po-Chun; Cheng, Hsu-Chen; Yang, Shun-Fa; Lin, Chiao-Wen; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    The CCN family of proteins is composed of six extracellular matrix-associated proteins that play crucial roles in skeletal development, wound healing, fibrosis, and cancer. Members of the CCN family share four conserved cysteine-rich modular domains that trigger signal transduction in cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, differentiation, and survival through direct binding to specific integrin receptors and heparan sulfate proteoglycans. In the present review, we discuss the roles of the CCN family proteins in regulating resident cells of the bone microenvironment. In vertebrate development, the CCN family plays a critical role in osteo/chondrogenesis and vasculo/angiogenesis. These effects are regulated through signaling via integrins, bone morphogenetic protein, vascular endothelial growth factor, Wnt, and Notch via direct binding to CCN family proteins. Due to the important roles of CCN family proteins in skeletal development, abnormal expression of CCN proteins is related to the tumorigenesis of primary bone tumors such as osteosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, and chondrosarcoma. Additionally, emerging studies have suggested that CCN proteins may affect progression of secondary metastatic bone tumors by moderating the bone microenvironment. CCN proteins could therefore serve as potential therapeutic targets for drug development against primary and metastatic bone tumors.

  13. p23 and HSP20/alpha-crystallin proteins define a conserved sequence domain present in other eukaryotic protein families.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Ranea, J A; Mirey, Gladys; Camonis, Jacques; Valencia, Alfonso

    2002-10-09

    We identified families of proteins characterized by the presence of a domain similar to human p23 protein, which include proteins such as Sgt1, involved in the yeast kinetochore assembly; melusin, involved in specific interactions with the cytoplasmic integrin beta1 domain; Rar1, related to pathogenic resistance in plants, and to development in animals; B5+B5R flavo-hemo cytochrome NAD(P)H oxidoreductase type B in humans and mice; and NudC, involved in nucleus migration during mitosis. We also found that p23 and the HSP20/alpha-crystallin family of heat shock proteins, which share the same three-dimensional folding, show a pattern of conserved residues that points to a common origin in the evolution of both protein domains. The p23 and HSP20/alpha-crystallin phylogenetic relationship and their similar role in chaperone activity suggest a common function, probably involving protein-protein interaction, for those proteins containing p23-like domains.

  14. Molecular evolution of monotreme and marsupial whey acidic protein genes.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Julie A; Lefèvre, Christophe; Nicholas, Kevin R

    2007-01-01

    Whey acidic protein (WAP), a major whey protein present in milk of a number of mammalian species has characteristic cysteine-rich domains known as four-disulfide cores (4-DSC). Eutherian WAP, expressed in the mammary gland throughout lactation, has two 4-DSC domains, (DI-DII) whereas marsupial WAP, expressed only during mid-late lactation, contains an additional 4-DSC (DIII), and has a DIII-D1-DII configuration. We report the expression and evolution of echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus) and platypus (Onithorhynchus anatinus) WAP cDNAs. Predicted translation of monotreme cDNAs showed echidna WAP contains two 4-DSC domains corresponding to DIII-DII, whereas platypus WAP contains an additional domain at the C-terminus with homology to DII and has the configuration DIII-DII-DII. Both monotreme WAPs represent new WAP protein configurations. We propose models for evolution of the WAP gene in the mammalian lineage either through exon loss from an ancient ancestor or by rapid evolution via the process of exon shuffling. This evolutionary outcome may reflect differences in lactation strategy between marsupials, monotremes, and eutherians, and give insight to biological function of the gene products. WAP four-disulfide core domain 2 (WFDC2) proteins were also identified in echidna, platypus and tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii) lactating mammary cells. WFDC2 proteins are secreted proteins not previously associated with lactation. Mammary gland expression of tammar WFDC2 during the course of lactation showed WFDC2 was elevated during pregnancy, reduced in early lactation and absent in mid-late lactation.

  15. Structure and evolutionary origin of the gene encoding a human serum mannose-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, M E; Brickell, P M; Craig, R K; Summerfield, J A

    1989-01-01

    The N-terminal sequence of the major human serum mannose-binding protein (MBP1) was shown to be identical at all positions determined with the amino acid sequence predicted from a cDNA clone of a human liver MBP mRNA. An oligonucleotide corresponding to part of the sequence of this cDNA clone was used to isolate a cosmid genomic clone containing a homologous gene. The intron/exon structure of this gene was found to closely resemble that of the gene encoding a rat liver MBP (MBP A). The nucleotide sequence of the exons differed in several places from that of the human cDNA clone published by Ezekowitz, Day & Herman [(1988) J. Exp. Med. 167, 1034-1046]. The MBP molecule comprises a signal peptide, a cysteine-rich domain, a collagen-like domain, a 'neck' region and a carbohydrate-binding domain. Each domain is encoded by a separate exon. This genomic organization lends support to the hypothesis that the gene arose during evolution by a process of exon shuffling. Several consensus sequences that may be involved in controlling the expression of human serum MBP have been identified in the promoter region of the gene. The consensus sequences are consistent with the suggestion that this mammalian serum lectin is regulated as an acute-phase protein synthesized by the liver. PMID:2590164

  16. An alternative scenario for the formation of specialized protein nano-domains (cluster phases) in biomembranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Destainville, N.

    2010-09-01

    We discuss a realistic scenario, accounting for the existence of sub-micrometric protein domains in cell membranes. At the biological level, such membrane domains have been shown to be specialized, in order to perform a determined biological task, in the sense that they gather one or a few protein species out of the hundreds of different ones that a cell membrane may contain. By analyzing the balance between mixing entropy and protein affinities, we propose that such protein sorting in distinct domains can be explained without appealing to pre-existing lipidic micro-phase separations, as in the lipid raft scenario. We show that the proposed scenario is compatible with known physical interactions between membrane proteins, even if thousands of different species coexist.

  17. Predicting protein N-glycosylation by combining functional domain and secretion information.

    PubMed

    Li, Sujun; Liu, Boshu; Cai, Yudong; Li, Yixue

    2007-08-01

    Protein N-glycosylation plays an important role in protein function. Yet, at present, few computational methods are available for the prediction of this protein modification. This prompted our development of a support vector machine (SVM)-based method for this task, as well as a partial least squares (PLS) regression based prediction method for comparison. A functional domain feature space was used to create SVM and PLS models, which achieved accuracies of 83.91% and 79.89%, respectively, as evaluated by a leave-one-out cross-validation. Subsequently, SVM and PLS models were developed based on functional domain and protein secretion information, which yielded accuracies of 89.13% and 86%, respectively. This analysis demonstrates that the protein functional domain and secretion information are both efficient predictors of N-glycosylation.

  18. The HPr Proteins from the Thermophile Bacillus stearothermophilus Can Form Domain-swapped Dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Sridharan, Sudharsan; Razvi, Abbas; Scholtz, J. Martin; Sacchettini, James C.

    2010-07-20

    The study of proteins from extremophilic organisms continues to generate interest in the field of protein folding because paradigms explaining the enhanced stability of these proteins still elude us and such studies have the potential to further our knowledge of the forces stabilizing proteins. We have undertaken such a study with our model protein HPr from a mesophile, Bacillus subtilis, and a thermophile, Bacillus stearothermophilus. We report here the high-resolution structures of the wild-type HPr protein from the thermophile and a variant, F29W. The variant proved to crystallize in two forms: a monomeric form with a structure very similar to the wild-type protein as well as a domain-swapped dimer. Interestingly, the structure of the domain-swapped dimer for HPr is very different from that observed for a homologous protein, Crh, from B. subtilis. The existence of a domain-swapped dimer has implications for amyloid formation and is consistent with recent results showing that the HPr proteins can form amyloid fibrils. We also characterized the conformational stability of the thermophilic HPr proteins using thermal and solvent denaturation methods and have used the high-resolution structures in an attempt to explain the differences in stability between the different HPr proteins. Finally, we present a detailed analysis of the solution properties of the HPr proteins using a variety of biochemical and biophysical methods.

  19. Protein Domain of Unknown Function 3233 is a Translocation Domain of Autotransporter Secretory Mechanism in Gamma proteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Ananth; Yogeeshwari, S.; Sircar, Sanchari; Agrawal, Shipra

    2011-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the enteropathogenic gram negative bacteria is one of the main causative agents of waterborne diseases like cholera. About 1/3rd of the organism's genome is uncharacterised with many protein coding genes lacking structure and functional information. These proteins form significant fraction of the genome and are crucial in understanding the organism's complete functional makeup. In this study we report the general structure and function of a family of hypothetical proteins, Domain of Unknown Function 3233 (DUF3233), which are conserved across gram negative gammaproteobacteria (especially in Vibrio sp. and similar bacteria). Profile and HMM based sequence search methods were used to screen homologues of DUF3233. The I-TASSER fold recognition method was used to build a three dimensional structural model of the domain. The structure resembles the transmembrane beta-barrel with an axial N-terminal helix and twelve antiparallel beta-strands. Using a combination of amphipathy and discrimination analysis we analysed the potential transmembrane beta-barrel forming properties of DUF3233. Sequence, structure and phylogenetic analysis of DUF3233 indicates that this gram negative bacterial hypothetical protein resembles the beta-barrel translocation unit of autotransporter Va secretory mechanism with a gene organisation that differs from the conventional Va system. PMID:22073138

  20. IS-Dom: a dataset of independent structural domains automatically delineated from protein structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebina, Teppei; Umezawa, Yuki; Kuroda, Yutaka

    2013-05-01

    Protein domains that can fold in isolation are significant targets in diverse area of proteomics research as they are often readily analyzed by high-throughput methods. Here, we report IS-Dom, a dataset of Independent Structural Domains (ISDs) that are most likely to fold in isolation. IS-Dom was constructed by filtering domains from SCOP, CATH, and DomainParser using quantitative structural measures, which were calculated by estimating inter-domain hydrophobic clusters and hydrogen bonds from the full length protein's atomic coordinates. The ISD detection protocol is fully automated, and all of the computed interactions are stored in the server which enables rapid update of IS-Dom. We also prepared a standard IS-Dom using parameters optimized by maximizing the Youden's index. The standard IS-Dom, contained 54,860 ISDs, of which 25.5 % had high sequence identity and termini overlap with a Protein Data Bank (PDB) cataloged sequence and are thus experimentally shown to fold in isolation [coined autonomously folded domain (AFDs)]. Furthermore, our ISD detection protocol missed less than 10 % of the AFDs, which corroborated our protocol's ability to define structural domains that are able to fold independently. IS-Dom is available through the web server (http://domserv.lab.tuat.ac.jp/IS-Dom.html), and users can either, download the standard IS-Dom dataset, construct their own IS-Dom by interactively varying the parameters, or assess the structural independence of newly defined putative domains.

  1. ERAD of proteins containing aberrant transmembrane domains requires ubiquitylation of cytoplasmic lysine residues

    PubMed Central

    Briant, Kit; Koay, Yee-Hui; Otsuka, Yuka; Swanton, Eileithyia

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clearance of misfolded proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is mediated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system in a process known as ER-associated degradation (ERAD). The mechanisms through which proteins containing aberrant transmembrane domains are degraded by ERAD are poorly understood. To address this question, we generated model ERAD substrates based on CD8 with either a non-native transmembrane domain but a folded ER luminal domain (CD8TMD*), or the native transmembrane domain but a misfolded luminal domain (CD8LUM*). Although both chimeras were degraded by ERAD, we found that the location of the folding defect determined the initial site of ubiquitylation. Ubiquitylation of cytoplasmic lysine residues was required for the extraction of CD8TMD* from the ER membrane during ERAD, whereas CD8LUM* continued to be degraded in the absence of cytoplasmic lysine residues. Cytoplasmic lysine residues were also required for degradation of an additional ERAD substrate containing an unassembled transmembrane domain and when a non-native transmembrane domain was introduced into CD8LUM*. Our results suggest that proteins with defective transmembrane domains are removed from the ER through a specific ERAD mechanism that depends upon ubiquitylation of cytoplasmic lysine residues. PMID:26446255

  2. Charting the Landscape of Tandem BRCT Domain-Mediated Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Nicholas T.; Mesquita, Rafael D.; Sweet, Michael; Carvalho, Marcelo A.; Li, Xueli; Liu, Yun; Nguyen, Huey; Thomas, C. Eric; Iversen, Edwin S.; Marsillac, Sylvia; Karchin, Rachel; Koomen, John; Monteiro, Alvaro N.A.

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells have evolved an intricate system to resolve DNA damage to prevent its transmission to daughter cells. This system, collectively known as the DNA damage response (DDR) network, includes a large number of proteins responsible for detection of DNA damage, promotion of repair, and coordination with cell cycle progression. Because defects in this network can lead to cancer, this network constitutes a barrier against tumorigenesis. The BRCT domain is a modular protein domain critical for relaying signals in the DDR. We performed a systematic analysis of protein-protein interactions involving tandem BRCT domains (tBRCT) in the DDR by combining literature curation, yeast two hybrid (Y2H) screens, and tandem affinity purification coupled to mass spectrometry (TAP-MS). We identified one previously unrecognized BRCT protein and generated human protein-protein interaction network for this type of modular domain. This study also reveals several novel components in DNA damage signaling such as COMMD1 and mTORC2. Additionally, integration of tBRCT domain interactions with DDR phosphoprotein studies and analysis of kinase-substrate interactions revealed signaling subnetworks that may aid in understanding the involvement of tBRCT in disease and DNA repair. PMID:22990118

  3. DNA binding residues in the RQC domain of Werner protein are critical for its catalytic activities.

    PubMed

    Tadokoro, Takashi; Kulikowicz, Tomasz; Dawut, Lale; Croteau, Deborah L; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2012-06-01

    Werner protein (WRN), member of the RecQ helicase family, is a helicase and exonuclease, and participates in multiple DNA metabolic processes including DNA replication, recombination and DNA repair. Mutations in the WRN gene cause Werner syndrome, associated with premature aging, genome instability and cancer predisposition. The RecQ C-terminal (RQC) domain of WRN, containing α2-α3 loop and β-wing motifs, is important for DNA binding and for many protein interactions. To better understand the critical functions of this domain, we generated recombinant WRN proteins (using a novel purification scheme) with mutations in Arg-993 within the α2-α3 loop of the RQC domain and in Phe-1037 of the -wing motif. We then studied the catalytic activities and DNA binding of these mutant proteins as well as some important functional protein interactions. The mutant proteins were defective in DNA binding and helicase activity, and interestingly, they had deficient exonuclease activity and strand annealing function. The RQC domain of WRN has not previously been implicated in exonuclease or annealing activities. The mutant proteins could not stimulate NEIL1 incision activity as did the wild type. Thus, the Arg-993 and Phe-1037 in the RQC domain play essential roles in catalytic activity, and in functional interactions mediated by WRN.

  4. Fusion protein of retinol-binding protein and albumin domain III reduces liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hongsik; Jeong, Hyeyeun; Park, Sangeun; Yoo, Wonbaek; Choi, Soyoung; Choi, Kyungmin; Lee, Min-Goo; Lee, Mihwa; Cha, DaeRyong; Kim, Young-Sik; Han, Jeeyoung; Kim, Wonkon; Park, Sun-Hwa; Oh, Junseo

    2015-06-01

    Activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) play a key role in liver fibrosis, and inactivating HSCs has been considered a promising therapeutic approach. We previously showed that albumin and its derivative designed for stellate cell-targeting, retinol-binding protein-albumin domain III fusion protein (referred to as R-III), inactivate cultured HSCs. Here, we investigated the mechanism of action of albumin/R-III in HSCs and examined the anti-fibrotic potential of R-III in vivo. R-III treatment and albumin expression downregulated retinoic acid (RA) signaling which was involved in HSC activation. RA receptor agonist and retinaldehyde dehydrogenase overexpression abolished the anti-fibrotic effect of R-III and albumin, respectively. R-III uptake into cultured HSCs was significantly decreased by siRNA-STRA6, and injected R-III was localized predominantly in HSCs in liver. Importantly, R-III administration reduced CCl4- and bile duct ligation-induced liver fibrosis. R-III also exhibited a preventive effect against CCl4-inducd liver fibrosis. These findings suggest that the anti-fibrotic effect of albumin/R-III is, at least in part, mediated by downregulation of RA signaling and that R-III is a good candidate as a novel anti-fibrotic drug.

  5. Mass spectrometric identification of proteins that interact through specific domains of the poly(A) binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chongxu; Nielsen, Maria E. O.; Chiang, Yueh-Chin; Kierkegaard, Morten; Wang, Xin; Lee, Darren J.; Andersen, Jens S.; Yao, Gang

    2013-01-01

    Poly(A) binding protein (PAB1) is involved in a number of RNA metabolic functions in eukaryotic cells and correspondingly is suggested to associate with a number of proteins. We have used mass spectrometric analysis to identify 55 non-ribosomal proteins that specifically interact with PAB1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Because many of these factors may associate only indirectly with PAB1 by being components of the PAB1-mRNP structure, we additionally conducted mass spectrometric analyses on seven metabolically defined PAB1 deletion derivatives to delimit the interactions between these proteins and PAB1. These latter analyses identified 13 proteins whose associations with PAB1 were reduced by deleting one or another of PAB1’s defined domains. Included in this list of 13 proteins were the translation initiation factors eIF4G1 and eIF4G2, translation termination factor eRF3, and PBP2, all of whose previously known direct interactions with specific PAB1 domains were either confirmed, delimited, or extended. The remaining nine proteins that interacted through a specific PAB1 domain were CBF5, SLF1, UPF1, CBC1, SSD1, NOP77, yGR250c, NAB6, and GBP2. In further study, UPF1, involved in nonsense-mediated decay, was confirmed to interact with PAB1 through the RRM1 domain. We additionally established that while the RRM1 domain of PAB1 was required for UPF1-induced acceleration of deadenylation during nonsense-mediated decay, it was not required for the more critical step of acceleration of mRNA decapping. These results begin to identify the proteins most likely to interact with PAB1 and the domains of PAB1 through which these contacts are made. PMID:22836166

  6. Mass spectrometric identification of proteins that interact through specific domains of the poly(A) binding protein.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Roy; Denis, Clyde L; Zhang, Chongxu; Nielsen, Maria E O; Chiang, Yueh-Chin; Kierkegaard, Morten; Wang, Xin; Lee, Darren J; Andersen, Jens S; Yao, Gang

    2012-09-01

    Poly(A) binding protein (PAB1) is involved in a number of RNA metabolic functions in eukaryotic cells and correspondingly is suggested to associate with a number of proteins. We have used mass spectrometric analysis to identify 55 non-ribosomal proteins that specifically interact with PAB1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Because many of these factors may associate only indirectly with PAB1 by being components of the PAB1-mRNP structure, we additionally conducted mass spectrometric analyses on seven metabolically defined PAB1 deletion derivatives to delimit the interactions between these proteins and PAB1. These latter analyses identified 13 proteins whose associations with PAB1 were reduced by deleting one or another of PAB1's defined domains. Included in this list of 13 proteins were the translation initiation factors eIF4G1 and eIF4G2, translation termination factor eRF3, and PBP2, all of whose previously known direct interactions with specific PAB1 domains were either confirmed, delimited, or extended. The remaining nine proteins that interacted through a specific PAB1 domain were CBF5, SLF1, UPF1, CBC1, SSD1, NOP77, yGR250c, NAB6, and GBP2. In further study, UPF1, involved in nonsense-mediated decay, was confirmed to interact with PAB1 through the RRM1 domain. We additionally established that while the RRM1 domain of PAB1 was required for UPF1-induced acceleration of deadenylation during nonsense-mediated decay, it was not required for the more critical step of acceleration of mRNA decapping. These results begin to identify the proteins most likely to interact with PAB1 and the domains of PAB1 through which these contacts are made.

  7. In planta localisation patterns of MADS domain proteins during floral development in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Urbanus, Susan L; de Folter, Stefan; Shchennikova, Anna V; Kaufmann, Kerstin; Immink, Richard GH; Angenent, Gerco C

    2009-01-01

    Background MADS domain transcription factors play important roles in various developmental processes in flowering plants. Members of this family play a prominent role in the transition to flowering and the specification of floral organ identity. Several studies reported mRNA expression patterns of the genes encoding these MADS domain proteins, however, these studies do not provide the necessary information on the temporal and spatial localisation of the proteins. We have made GREEN FLUORESCENT PROTEIN (GFP) translational fusions with the four MADS domain proteins SEPALLATA3, AGAMOUS, FRUITFULL and APETALA1 from the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and analysed the protein localisation patterns in living plant tissues by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Results We unravelled the protein localisation patterns of the four MADS domain proteins at a cellular and subcellular level in inflorescence and floral meristems, during development of the early flower bud stages, and during further differentiation of the floral organs. The protein localisation patterns revealed a few deviations from known mRNA expression patterns, suggesting a non-cell autonomous action of these factors or alternative control mechanisms. In addition, we observed a change in the subcellular localisation of SEPALLATA3 from a predominantly nuclear localisation to a more cytoplasmic localisation, occurring specifically during petal and stamen development. Furthermore, we show that the down-regulation of the homeodomain transcription factor WUSCHEL in ovular tissues is preceded by the occurrence of both AGAMOUS and SEPALLATA3 proteins, supporting the hypothesis that both proteins together suppress WUSCHEL expression in the ovule. Conclusion This approach provides a highly detailed in situ map of MADS domain protein presence during early and later stages of floral development. The subcellular localisation of the transcription factors in the cytoplasm, as observed at certain stages during

  8. Calcium binding domains and calcium-induced conformational transition of SPARC/BM-40/osteonectin, an extracellular glycoprotein expressed in mineralized and nonmineralized tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, J.; Taylor, W.; Paulsson, M.; Sage, H.; Hogan, B.

    1987-11-03

    PSARC, BM-40, and osteonectin are identical or very closely related extracellular proteins of apparent M/sub r/ 43,000 (M/sub r/ 33,000 predicted from sequence). They were originally isolated from parietal endoderm cells, basement membrane producing tumors, and bone, respectively, but are rather widely distributed in various tissues. In view of the calcium binding activity reported for osteonectin, the authors analyzed the SPARC sequence and found two putative calcium binding domains. One is an N-terminal acid region with clusters of glutamic acid residues. This region, although neither ..gamma..-carboxylated nor homologous, resembles the ..gamma..-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) domain of vitamin K dependent proteins of the blood clotting system in charge density, size of negatively charged clusters, and linkage to the rest of the molecule by a cysteine-rich domain. The other region is an EF-hand calcium binding domain located near the C-terminus. A disulfide bond between the E and F helix is predicted from modeling the EF-hand structure with the known coordinates of intestinal calcium binding protein. The disulfide bridge apparently serves to stabilize the isolated calcium loop in the extracellular protein. As observed for cytoplasmic EF-hand-containing proteins and for Gla domain containing proteins, a major conformational transition is induced in BM-40 upon binding of several Ca/sup 2 +/ ions. This is accompanied by a 35% increase in ..cap alpha..-helicity. A pronounced sigmoidicity of the dependence of the circular dichroism signal at 220 nm on calcium concentration indicates that the process is cooperative. In view of its properties, abundance, and wide distribution, it is proposed that SPARC/BM-40/osteonectin has a rather general regulatory function in calcium-dependent processes of the extra-cellular matrix.

  9. SPECTRUS: A Dimensionality Reduction Approach for Identifying Dynamical Domains in Protein Complexes from Limited Structural Datasets.

    PubMed

    Ponzoni, Luca; Polles, Guido; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Micheletti, Cristian

    2015-08-04

    Identifying dynamical, quasi-rigid domains in proteins provides a powerful means for characterizing functionally oriented structural changes via a parsimonious set of degrees of freedom. In fact, the relative displacements of few dynamical domains usually suffice to rationalize the mechanics underpinning biological functionality in proteins and can even be exploited for structure determination or refinement purposes. Here we present SPECTRUS, a general scheme that, by solely using amino acid distance fluctuations, can pinpoint the innate quasi-rigid domains of single proteins or large complexes in a robust way. Consistent domains are usually obtained by using either a pair of representative structures or thousands of conformers. The functional insights offered by the approach are illustrated for biomolecular systems of very different size and complexity such as kinases, ion channels, and viral capsids. The decomposition tool is available as a software package and web server at spectrus.sissa.it.

  10. Discovery of cancer drug targets by CRISPR-Cas9 screening of protein domains.

    PubMed

    Shi, Junwei; Wang, Eric; Milazzo, Joseph P; Wang, Zihua; Kinney, Justin B; Vakoc, Christopher R

    2015-06-01

    CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing technology holds great promise for discovering therapeutic targets in cancer and other diseases. Current screening strategies target CRISPR-Cas9-induced mutations to the 5' exons of candidate genes, but this approach often produces in-frame variants that retain functionality, which can obscure even strong genetic dependencies. Here we overcome this limitation by targeting CRISPR-Cas9 mutagenesis to exons encoding functional protein domains. This generates a higher proportion of null mutations and substantially increases the potency of negative selection. We also show that the magnitude of negative selection can be used to infer the functional importance of individual protein domains of interest. A screen of 192 chromatin regulatory domains in murine acute myeloid leukemia cells identifies six known drug targets and 19 additional dependencies. A broader application of this approach may allow comprehensive identification of protein domains that sustain cancer cells and are suitable for drug targeting.

  11. Biochemical and functional significance of F-BAR domain proteins interaction with WASP/N-WASP.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yolande; Aardema, Jorie; Corey, Seth J

    2013-04-01

    The Bin-Amphiphysin-Rvs (BAR) domain family of proteins includes groups which promote positive (classical BAR, N-BAR, and F-BAR) and negative (I-BAR) membrane deformation. Of these groups, the F-BAR subfamily is the most diverse in its biochemical properties. F-BAR domain proteins dimerize to form a tight scaffold about the membrane. The F-BAR domain provides a banana-shaped, alpha-helical structure that senses membrane curvature. Different types of F-BAR domain proteins contain tyrosine kinase or GTPase activities; some interact with phosphatases and RhoGTPases. Most possess an SH3 domain that facilitates the recruitment and activation of WASP/N-WASP. Thus, F-BAR domain proteins affect remodeling of both membrane and the actin cytoskeleton. The purpose of this review is to highlight the role of F-BAR proteins in coupling WASP/N-WASP to cytoskeletal remodeling. A role for F-BAR/WASP interaction in human diseases affecting nervous, blood, and neoplastic tissues is discussed.

  12. Effect of interdomain linker length on an antagonistic folding-unfolding equilibrium between two protein domains.

    PubMed

    Cutler, Thomas A; Mills, Brandon M; Lubin, David J; Chong, Lillian T; Loh, Stewart N

    2009-02-27

    Fusion of one protein domain with another is a common event in both evolution and protein engineering experiments. When insertion is at an internal site (e.g., a surface loop or turn), as opposed to one of the termini, conformational strain can be introduced into both domains. Strain is manifested by an antagonistic folding-unfolding equilibrium between the two domains, which we previously showed can be parameterized by a coupling free-energy term (DeltaG(X)). The extent of strain is predicted to depend primarily on the ratio of the N-to-C distance of the guest protein to the distance between ends of the surface loop in the host protein. Here, we test that hypothesis by inserting ubiquitin (Ub) into the bacterial ribonuclease barnase (Bn), using peptide linkers from zero to 10 amino acids each. DeltaG(X) values are determined by measuring the extent to which Co(2+) binding to an engineered site on the Ub domain destabilizes the Bn domain. All-atom, unforced Langevin dynamics simulations are employed to gain structural insight into the mechanism of mechanically induced unfolding. Experimental and computational results find that the two domains are structurally and energetically uncoupled when linkers are long and that DeltaG(X) increases with decreasing linker length. When the linkers are fewer than two amino acids, strain is so great that one domain unfolds the other. However, the protein is able to refold as dimers and higher-order oligomers. The likely mechanism is a three-dimensional domain swap of the Bn domain, which relieves conformational strain. The simulations suggest that an effective route to mechanical unfolding begins with disruption of the hydrophobic core of Bn near the Ub insertion site.

  13. Rapid Activation of Bone Morphogenic Protein 9 by Receptor-mediated Displacement of Pro-domains*

    PubMed Central

    Kienast, Yvonne; Jucknischke, Ute; Scheiblich, Stefan; Thier, Martina; de Wouters, Mariana; Haas, Alexander; Lehmann, Christian; Brand, Verena; Bernicke, Dirk; Honold, Konrad; Lorenz, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    By non-covalent association after proteolytic cleavage, the pro-domains modulate the activities of the mature growth factor domains across the transforming growth factor-β family. In the case of bone morphogenic protein 9 (BMP9), however, the pro-domains do not inhibit the bioactivity of the growth factor, and the BMP9·pro-domain complexes have equivalent biological activities as the BMP9 mature ligand dimers. By using real-time surface plasmon resonance, we could demonstrate that either binding of pro-domain-complexed BMP9 to type I receptor activin receptor-like kinase 1 (ALK1), type II receptors, co-receptor endoglin, or to mature BMP9 domain targeting antibodies leads to immediate and complete displacement of the pro-domains from the complex. Vice versa, pro-domain binding by an anti-pro-domain antibody results in release of the mature BMP9 growth factor. Based on these findings, we adjusted ELISA assays to measure the protein levels of different BMP9 variants. Although mature BMP9 and inactive precursor BMP9 protein were directly detectable by ELISA, BMP9·pro-domain complex could only be measured indirectly as dissociated fragments due to displacement of mature growth factor and pro-domains after antibody binding. Our studies provide a model in which BMP9 can be readily activated upon getting into contact with its receptors. This increases the understanding of the underlying biology of BMP9 activation and also provides guidance for ELISA development for the detection of circulating BMP9 variants. PMID:26677222

  14. Network mapping among the functional domains of Chikungunya virus nonstructural proteins.

    PubMed

    Rana, Jyoti; Rajasekharan, Sreejith; Gulati, Sahil; Dudha, Namrata; Gupta, Amita; Chaudhary, Vijay Kumar; Gupta, Sanjay

    2014-10-01

    Formation of virus specific replicase complex is among the most important steps that determines the fate of viral transcription and replication during Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infection. In the present study, the authors have computationally generated a 3D structure of CHIKV late replicase complex on the basis of the interactions identified among the domains of CHIKV nonstructural proteins (nsPs) which make up the late replicase complex. The interactions among the domains of CHIKV nsPs were identified using systems such as pull down, protein interaction ELISA, and yeast two-hybrid. The structures of nsPs were generated using I-TASSER and the biological assembly of the replicase complex was determined using ZRANK and RDOCK. A total of 36 interactions among the domains and full length proteins were tested and 12 novel interactions have been identified. These interactions included the homodimerization of nsP1 and nsP4 through their respective C-ter domains; the associations of nsP2 helicase domain and C-ter domain of nsP4 with methyltransferase and membrane binding domains of nsP1; the interaction of nsP2 protease domain with C-ter domain of nsP4; and the interaction of nsP3 macro and alphavirus unique domains with the C-ter domain of nsP1. The novel interactions identified in the current study form a network of organized associations that suggest the spatial arrangement of nsPs in the late replicase complex of CHIKV.

  15. Genomic and functional characterization of the diverse immunoglobulin domain-containing protein (DICP) family

    PubMed Central

    Haire, Robert N.; Cannon, John P.; O’Driscoll, Marci L.; Ostrov, David A.; Mueller, M. Gail; Turner, Poem M.; Litman, Ronda T.; Litman, Gary W.; Yoder, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    A heretofore-unrecognized multigene family encoding diverse immunoglobulin (Ig) domain-containing proteins (DICPs) was identified in the zebrafish genome. Twenty-nine distinct loci mapping to three chromosomal regions encode receptor-type structures possessing two classes of Ig ectodomains (D1 and D2). The sequence and number of Ig domains, transmembrane regions and signaling motifs varies between DICPs. Interindividual polymorphism and alternative RNA processing contribute to DICP diversity. Molecular models indicate that most D1 domains are of the variable (V) type; D2 domains are Ig-like. Sequence differences between D1 domains are concentrated in hypervariable regions on the front sheet strands of the Ig fold. Recombinant DICP Ig domains bind lipids, a property shared by mammalian CD300 and TREM family members. These findings suggest that novel multigene families encoding diversified immune receptors have arisen in different vertebrate lineages and effect parallel patterns of ligand recognition that potentially impact species-specific advantages. PMID:22386706

  16. Genome-wide analysis and functional characterization of candidate effector proteins potentially involved in Fusarium graminearum-wheat interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fungal pathogens often produce certain small secreted cysteine-rich proteins (SSCPs) during pathogenesis that may function in triggering resistance or susceptibility in specific host plants. We have identified a total of 190 SSCPs encoded in the genome of the wheat scab fungus Fusarium graminearum a...

  17. Sparc Protein Is Required for Normal Growth of Zebrafish Otoliths

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Young-Jin; Stevenson, Amy K.; Yau, Peter M.

    2008-01-01

    Otoliths and the homologous otoconia in the inner ear are essential for balance. Their morphogenesis is less understood than that of other biominerals, such as bone, and only a small number of their constituent proteins have been characterized. As a novel approach to identify unknown otolith proteins, we employed shotgun proteomics to analyze crude extracts from trout and catfish otoliths. We found three proteins that had not been associated previously with otolith or otoconia formation: ‘Secreted acidic cysteine rich glycoprotein’ (Sparc), an important bone protein that binds collagen and Ca2+; precerebellin-like protein, which contains a C1q domain and may associate with the collagenous otolin-1 during its assembly into a framework; and neuroserpin, a serine protease inhibitor that may regulate local protease activity during framework assembly. We then used the zebrafish to investigate whether Sparc plays a role in otolith morphogenesis. Immunodetection demonstrated that Sparc is a true constituent of otoliths. Knockdown of Sparc expression in morphant zebrafish resulted in four principal types of defective otoliths: smaller, extra and ectopic, missing and fused, or completely absent. Smaller size was the predominant phenotype and independent of the severity of otic-vesicle defects. These results suggested that Sparc is directly required for normal otolith growth. PMID:18784957

  18. α/β-hydrolase domain containing protein 15 (ABHD15)--an adipogenic protein protecting from apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Walenta, Evelyn; Pessentheiner, Ariane R; Pelzmann, Helmut J; Deutsch, Alexander; Goeritzer, Madeleine; Kratky, Dagmar; Hackl, Hubert; Oh, Da Young; Prokesch, Andreas; Bogner-Strauss, Juliane G

    2013-01-01

    Our knowledge about adipocyte metabolism and development is steadily growing, yet many players are still undefined. Here, we show that α/β-hydrolase domain containing protein 15 (Abhd15) is a direct and functional target gene of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), the master regulator of adipogenesis. In line, Abhd15 is mainly expressed in brown and white adipose tissue and strongly upregulated during adipogenesis in various murine and human cell lines. Stable knockdown of Abhd15 in 3T3-L1 cells evokes a striking differentiation defect, as evidenced by low lipid accumulation and decreased expression of adipocyte marker genes. In preconfluent cells, knockdown of Abhd15 leads to impaired proliferation, which is caused by apoptosis, as we see an increased SubG1 peak, caspase 3/7 activity, and BAX protein expression as well as a reduction in anti-apoptotic BCL-2 protein. Furthermore, apoptosis-inducing amounts of palmitic acid evoke a massive increase of Abhd15 expression, proposing an apoptosis-protecting role for ABHD15. On the other hand, in mature adipocytes physiological (i.e. non-apoptotic) concentrations of palmitic acid down-regulate Abhd15 expression. Accordingly, we found that the expression of Abhd15 in adipose tissue is reduced in physiological situations with high free fatty acid levels, like high-fat diet, fasting, and aging as well as in genetically obese mice. Collectively, our results position ABHD15 as an essential component in the development of adipocytes as well as in apoptosis, thereby connecting two substantial factors in the regulation of adipocyte number and size. Together with its intricate regulation by free fatty acids, ABHD15 might be an intriguing new target in obesity and diabetes research.

  19. ENH, containing PDZ and LIM domains, heart/skeletal muscle-specific protein, associates with cytoskeletal proteins through the PDZ domain.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, N; Hoshijima, M; Oyasu, M; Saito, N; Tanizawa, K; Kuroda, S

    2000-06-07

    The Enigma homologue protein (ENH), containing an N-terminal PDZ domain and three C-terminal LIM domains, is a heart and skeletal muscle-specific protein that has been shown to preferentially interact with protein kinase C beta (PKCbeta) through the LIM domains (Kuroda et al., J. Biol. Chem. 271, 31029-31032, 1996). We here demonstrate that ENH is colocalized with a cytoskeletal protein alpha-actinin in the Z-disk region of rat neonatal cardiomyocytes. Pull-down assays using the glutathione-S-transferase-fusion system also showed the interaction of the PDZ domain of ENH with actin and alpha-actinin. Furthermore, by combined use of the in silico and conventional cDNA cloning methods, we have isolated three ENH-related clones from a mouse heart-derived cDNA library: mENH1 (591 amino acid residues) corresponding to rat ENH, mENH2 (337 residues), and mENH3 (239 residues); the latter two containing only a single PDZ domain. Deciphering their cDNA sequences, these mENH1-3 mRNAs appear to be generated from a single mENH gene by alternative splicing. Northern blot analyses using human cancer cells and mouse embryos have shown expression of each mENH mRNA to vary considerably among the cell types and during the developmental stage. Together with a recent finding that PKCbeta is markedly activated in the cardiac hypertrophic signaling, these results suggest that ENH1 plays an important role in the heart development by scaffolding PKCbeta to the Z-disk region and that ENH2 and ENH3 negatively modulate the scaffolding activity of ENH1.

  20. Purification and Structural Analysis of SUN and KASH Domain Proteins.

    PubMed

    Esra Demircioglu, F; Cruz, Victor E; Schwartz, Thomas U

    2016-01-01

    Molecular tethers span the nuclear envelope to mechanically connect the cytoskeleton and nucleoskeleton. These bridge-like tethers, termed linkers of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complexes, consist of SUN proteins at the inner nuclear membrane and KASH proteins at the outer nuclear membrane. LINC complexes are central to a variety of cell activities including nuclear positioning and mechanotransduction, and LINC-related abnormalities are associated with a spectrum of tissue-specific diseases, termed laminopathies or envelopathies. Protocols used to study the biochemical and structural characteristics of core elements of SUN-KASH complexes are described here to facilitate further studies in this new field of cell biology.

  1. Roots of angiosperm formins: The evolutionary history of plant FH2 domain-containing proteins

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Shuffling of modular protein domains is an important source of evolutionary innovation. Formins are a family of actin-organizing proteins that share a conserved FH2 domain but their overall domain architecture differs dramatically between opisthokonts (metazoans and fungi) and plants. We performed a phylogenomic analysis of formins in most eukaryotic kingdoms, aiming to reconstruct an evolutionary scenario that may have produced the current diversity of domain combinations with focus on the origin of the angiosperm formin architectures. Results The Rho GTPase-binding domain (GBD/FH3) reported from opisthokont and Dictyostelium formins was found in all lineages except plants, suggesting its ancestral character. Instead, mosses and vascular plants possess the two formin classes known from angiosperms: membrane-anchored Class I formins and Class II formins carrying a PTEN-like domain. PTEN-related domains were found also in stramenopile formins, where they have been probably acquired independently rather than by horizontal transfer, following a burst of domain rearrangements in the chromalveolate lineage. A novel RhoGAP-related domain was identified in some algal, moss and lycophyte (but not angiosperm) formins that define a specific branch (Class III) of the formin family. Conclusion We propose a scenario where formins underwent multiple domain rearrangements in several eukaryotic lineages, especially plants and chromalveolates. In plants this replaced GBD/FH3 by a probably inactive RhoGAP-like domain, preserving a formin-mediated association between (membrane-anchored) Rho GTPases and the actin cytoskeleton. Subsequent amplification of formin genes, possibly coincident with the expansion of plants to dry land, was followed by acquisition of alternative membrane attachment mechanisms present in extant Class I and Class II formins, allowing later loss of the RhoGAP-like domain-containing formins in angiosperms. PMID:18430232

  2. Characterization of a Fasciola gigantica protein carrying two DM9 domains reveals cellular relocalization property.

    PubMed

    Phadungsil, Wansika; Smooker, Peter M; Vichasri-Grams, Suksiri; Grams, Rudi

    2016-01-01

    Even at the present age of whole-organism analysis, e.g., genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics, the biological roles of many proteins remain unresolved. Classified among the proteins of unknown function is a family of proteins harboring repeats of the DM9 domain, a 60-75 amino acids motif first described in a small number of Drosophila melanogaster proteins. Proteins may carry two or more DM9 domains either in combination with other domains or as their sole constituent. Here we have characterized a 16.8 kDa Fasciola gigantica protein comprising two tandem repeated DM9 domains (FgDM9-1). The protein was located in the parenchyma of the immature and mature parasite and consequently it was not detected in the ES product of the parasite but only in the whole worm extract. Interestingly, extraction with SDS yielded a substantially higher amount of the protein suggesting association with insoluble cell components. In Sf9 insect cells a heterologously expressed EGFP-FgDM9-1 chimera showed cell-wide distribution but relocated to vesicle-like structures in the cytoplasm after stimulating cellular stress by bacteria, heat shock or chloroquine. These structures did not colocalize with the markers of endocytosis/phagocytosis ubiquitin, RAB7, GABARAP. The same behavior was noted for Aedes aegypti PRS1, a homologous mosquito DM9 protein as a positive control while EGFP did not exhibit such relocation in the insect cells. Cross-linking experiments on soluble recombinant FgDM9-1 indicated that the protein can undergo specific oligomerization. It is speculated that proteins carrying the DM9 domain have a role in vesicular transport in flatworms and insects.

  3. Exploring metazoan evolution through dynamic and holistic changes in protein families and domains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding proteome evolution is important for deciphering processes that drive species diversity and adaptation. Herein, the dynamics of change in protein families and protein domains over the course of metazoan evolution was explored. Change, as defined by birth/death and duplication/deletion ...

  4. Insights into the evolution and domain structure of ataxin-2 proteins across eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Ataxin-2 is an evolutionarily conserved protein first identified in humans as responsible for spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2). The molecular basis of SCA2 is the expansion of a polyglutamine tract in Ataxin-2, encoding a Lsm domain that may bind RNA and a PAM2 motif that enables interaction with the poly (A) binding protein. Although the association with SCA2 has been verified, a detailed molecular function for Ataxin-2 has not been established. Results We have undertaken a survey of Ataxin-2 proteins across all eukaryotic domains. In eukaryotes, except for vertebrates and land plants, a single ortholog was identified. Notably, with the exception of birds, two Ataxin-2 genes exist in vertebrates. Expansion was observed in land plants and a novel class lacking the LsmAD domain was identified. Large polyQ tracts appear limited to primates and insects of the orders Hymenoptera and Diptera. A common feature across Ataxin-2 orthologs is the presence of proline-rich motifs, formerly described in the human protein. Conclusion Our analysis provides valuable information on the evolution and domain structure of Ataxin-2 proteins. Proline-rich motifs that may mediate protein interactions are widespread in Ataxin-2 proteins, but expansion of polyglutamine tracts associated with spinocerebellar ataxia type 2, is present only in primates, as well as some insects. Our analysis of Ataxin-2 proteins provides also a source to examine orthologs in a number of different species. PMID:25027299

  5. Role of Internal Water on Protein Thermal Stability: The Case of Homologous G Domains.

    PubMed

    Rahaman, Obaidur; Kalimeri, Maria; Melchionna, Simone; Hénin, Jérôme; Sterpone, Fabio

    2015-07-23

    In this work, we address the question of whether the enhanced stability of thermophilic proteins has a direct connection with internal hydration. Our model systems are two homologous G domains of different stability: the mesophilic G domain of the elongation factor thermal unstable protein from E. coli and the hyperthermophilic G domain of the EF-1α protein from S. solfataricus. Using molecular dynamics simulation at the microsecond time scale, we show that both proteins host water molecules in internal cavities and that these molecules exchange with the external solution in the nanosecond time scale. The hydration free energy of these sites evaluated via extensive calculations is found to be favorable for both systems, with the hyperthermophilic protein offering a slightly more favorable environment to host water molecules. We estimate that, under ambient conditions, the free energy gain due to internal hydration is about 1.3 kcal/mol in favor of the hyperthermophilic variant. However, we also find that, at the high working temperature of the hyperthermophile, the cavities are rather dehydrated, meaning that under extreme conditions other molecular factors secure the stability of the protein. Interestingly, we detect a clear correlation between the hydration of internal cavities and the protein conformational landscape. The emerging picture is that internal hydration is an effective observable to probe the conformational landscape of proteins. In the specific context of our investigation, the analysis confirms that the hyperthermophilic G domain is characterized by multiple states and it has a more flexible structure than its mesophilic homologue.

  6. A domain-centric analysis of oomycete plant pathogen genomes reveals unique protein organization.

    PubMed

    Seidl, Michael F; Van den Ackerveken, Guido; Govers, Francine; Snel, Berend

    2011-02-01

    Oomycetes comprise a diverse group of organisms that morphologically resemble fungi but belong to the stramenopile lineage within the supergroup of chromalveolates. Recent studies have shown that plant pathogenic oomycetes have expanded gene families that are possibly linked to their pathogenic lifestyle. We analyzed the protein domain organization of 67 eukaryotic species including four oomycete and five fungal plant pathogens. We detected 246 expanded domains in fungal and oomycete plant pathogens. The analysis of genes differentially expressed during infection revealed a significant enrichment of genes encoding expanded domains as well as signal peptides linking a substantial part of these genes to pathogenicity. Overrepresentation and clustering of domain abundance profiles revealed domains that might have important roles in host-pathogen interactions but, as yet, have not been linked to pathogenicity. The number of distinct domain combinations (bigrams) in oomycetes was significantly higher than in fungi. We identified 773 oomycete-specific bigrams, with the majority composed of domains common to eukaryotes. The analyses enabled us to link domain content to biological processes such as host-pathogen interaction, nutrient uptake, or suppression and elicitation of plant immune responses. Taken together, this study represents a comprehensive overview of the domain repertoire of fungal and oomycete plant pathogens and points to novel features like domain expansion and species-specific bigram types that could, at least partially, explain why oomycetes are such remarkable plant pathogens.

  7. In vitro antitumor activity of Latcripin-15 regulator of chromosome condensation 1 domain protein

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Li; Wang, Xiaoli; Li, Xingyun; Liu, Ben; Zhang, Wei; Cao, Jing; Ning, Anhong; Huang, Min; Zhong, Mintao

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is one of the most significant health problems worldwide and thus the development of novel therapeutic agents with fewer side effects is required. The present study investigated the in vitro anticancer effects of a newly isolated fungal protein. In this study, Latcripin-15 (LP-15) regulator of chromosome condensation 1 (RCC1) domain protein, which is obtained from the Lentinula edodes C91-3 fungal strain, was identified, cloned, expressed, purified and re-folded to assess the in vitro antitumor activity of the protein. LP-15 RCC1 full-length cDNA was isolated from Lentinula edodes using 3′ and 5′-rapid amplification of cDNA ends and then cloned, expressed, purified and re-folded in vitro. In addition, the effects of the isolated LP-15 RCC1 protein's functional domain on the viability and apoptosis of human lung cancer A549 cells were assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, transmission electron microscopy, flow cytometry and Hoechst 33258 staining. The LP-15 RCC1 functional domain protein was successfully expressed, purified and re-folded in vitro. Treatment with the LP-15 RCC1 functional domain protein significantly reduced tumor cell viability and induced apoptosis in A549 cells. The results of the present study indicate that the LP-15 RCC1 functional domain requires further investigation as a novel therapeutic agent for cancer therapy. PMID:27899975

  8. Crystal structure of the homology domain of the eukaryotic DNA replication proteins Sld3/Treslin.

    PubMed

    Itou, Hiroshi; Muramatsu, Sachiko; Shirakihara, Yasuo; Araki, Hiroyuki

    2014-09-02

    The initiation of eukaryotic chromosomal DNA replication requires the formation of an active replicative helicase at the replication origins of chromosomal DNA. Yeast Sld3 and its metazoan counterpart Treslin are the hub proteins mediating protein associations critical for the helicase formation. Here, we show the crystal structure of the central domain of Sld3 that is conserved in Sld3/Treslin family of proteins. The domain consists of two segments with 12 helices and is sufficient to bind to Cdc45, the essential helicase component. The structure model of the Sld3-Cdc45 complex, which is crucial for the formation of the active helicase, is proposed.

  9. Engineered staphylococcal protein A's IgG-binding domain with cathepsin L inhibitory activity

    SciTech Connect

    Bratkovic, Tomaz . E-mail: tomaz.bratkovic@ffa.uni-lj.si; Berlec, Ales; Popovic, Tatjana; Lunder, Mojca; Kreft, Samo; Urleb, Uros; Strukelj, Borut

    2006-10-13

    Inhibitory peptide of papain-like cysteine proteases, affinity selected from a random disulfide constrained phage-displayed peptide library, was grafted to staphylococcal protein A's B domain. Scaffold protein was additionally modified in order to allow solvent exposed display of peptide loop. Correct folding of fusion proteins was confirmed by CD-spectroscopy and by the ability to bind the Fc-region of rabbit IgG, a characteristic of parent domain. The recombinant constructs inhibited cathepsin L with inhibitory constants in the low-micromolar range.

  10. Crystal structure of the dimeric protein core of decorin, the archetypal small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycan.

    PubMed

    Scott, Paul G; McEwan, Paul A; Dodd, Carole M; Bergmann, Ernst M; Bishop, Paul N; Bella, Jordi

    2004-11-02

    Decorin is a ubiquitous extracellular matrix proteoglycan with a variety of important biological functions that are mediated by its interactions with extracellular matrix proteins, cytokines, and cell surface receptors. Decorin is the prototype of the family of small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycans and proteins (SLRPs), characterized by a protein core composed of leucine-rich repeats (LRRs), flanked by two cysteine-rich regions. We report here the crystal structure of the dimeric protein core of decorin, the best characterized member of the SLRP family. Each monomer adopts the curved solenoid fold characteristic of LRR domains, with a parallel beta-sheet on the inside interwoven with loops containing short segments of beta-strands, 3(10) helices, and polyproline II helices on the outside. Two main features are unique to this structure. First, decorin dimerizes through the concave surfaces of the LRR domains, which have been implicated previously in protein-ligand interactions. The amount of surface buried in this dimer rivals the buried surfaces of some of the highest-affinity macromolecular complexes reported to date. Second, the C-terminal region adopts an unusual capping motif that involves a laterally extended LRR and a disulfide bond. This motif seems to be unique to SLRPs and has not been observed in any other LRR protein structure to date. Possible implications of these features for decorin ligand binding and SLRP function are discussed.

  11. Efficient segmental isotope labeling of multi-domain proteins using Sortase A.

    PubMed

    Freiburger, Lee; Sonntag, Miriam; Hennig, Janosch; Li, Jian; Zou, Peijian; Sattler, Michael

    2015-09-01

    NMR studies of multi-domain protein complexes provide unique insight into their molecular interactions and dynamics in solution. For large proteins domain-selective isotope labeling is desired to reduce signal overlap, but available methods require extensive optimization and often give poor ligation yields. We present an optimized strategy for segmental labeling of multi-domain proteins using the S. aureus transpeptidase Sortase A. Critical improvements compared to existing protocols are (1) the efficient removal of cleaved peptide fragments by centrifugal filtration and (2) a strategic design of cleavable and non-cleavable affinity tags for purification. Our approach enables routine production of milligram amounts of purified segmentally labeled protein for NMR and other biophysical studies.

  12. Resilience of biochemical activity in protein domains in the face of structural divergence.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dapeng; Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Burroughs, A Maxwell; Aravind, L

    2014-06-01

    Recent studies point to the prevalence of the evolutionary phenomenon of drastic structural transformation of protein domains while continuing to preserve their basic biochemical function. These transformations span a wide spectrum, including simple domains incorporated into larger structural scaffolds, changes in the structural core, major active site shifts, topological rewiring and extensive structural transmogrifications. Proteins from biological conflict systems, such as toxin-antitoxin, restriction-modification, CRISPR/Cas, polymorphic toxin and secondary metabolism systems commonly display such transformations. These include endoDNases, metal-independent RNases, deaminases, ADP ribosyltransferases, immunity proteins, kinases and E1-like enzymes. In eukaryotes such transformations are seen in domains involved in chromatin-related peptide recognition and protein/DNA-modification. Intense selective pressures from 'arms-race'-like situations in conflict and macromolecular modification systems could favor drastic structural divergence while preserving function.

  13. Review the role of terminal domains during storage and assembly of spider silk proteins.

    PubMed

    Eisoldt, Lukas; Thamm, Christopher; Scheibel, Thomas

    2012-06-01

    Fibrous proteins in nature fulfill a wide variety of functions in different structures ranging from cellular scaffolds to very resilient structures like tendons and even extra-corporal fibers such as silks in spider webs or silkworm cocoons. Despite their different origins and sequence varieties many of these fibrous proteins share a common building principle: they consist of a large repetitive core domain flanked by relatively small non-repetitive terminal domains. Amongst protein fibers, spider dragline silk shows prominent mechanical properties that exceed those of man-made fibers like Kevlar. Spider silk fibers assemble in a spinning process allowing the transformation from an aqueous solution into a solid fiber within milliseconds. Here, we highlight the role of the non-repetitive terminal domains of spider dragline silk proteins during storage in the gland and initiation of the fiber assembly process.

  14. Vaccinia Virus Immunomodulator A46: A Lipid and Protein-Binding Scaffold for Sequestering Host TIR-Domain Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Radakovics, Katharina; Smith, Terry K.; Bobik, Nina; Round, Adam; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina; Usón, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Vaccinia virus interferes with early events of the activation pathway of the transcriptional factor NF-kB by binding to numerous host TIR-domain containing adaptor proteins. We have previously determined the X-ray structure of the A46 C-terminal domain; however, the structure and function of the A46 N-terminal domain and its relationship to the C-terminal domain have remained unclear. Here, we biophysically characterize residues 1–83 of the N-terminal domain of A46 and present the X-ray structure at 1.55 Å. Crystallographic phases were obtained by a recently developed ab initio method entitled ARCIMBOLDO_BORGES that employs tertiary structure libraries extracted from the Protein Data Bank; data analysis revealed an all β-sheet structure. This is the first such structure solved by this method which should be applicable to any protein composed entirely of β-sheets. The A46(1–83) structure itself is a β-sandwich containing a co-purified molecule of myristic acid inside a hydrophobic pocket and represents a previously unknown lipid-binding fold. Mass spectrometry analysis confirmed the presence of long-chain fatty acids in both N-terminal and full-length A46; mutation of the hydrophobic pocket reduced the lipid content. Using a combination of high resolution X-ray structures of the N- and C-terminal domains and SAXS analysis of full-length protein A46(1–240), we present here a structural model of A46 in a tetrameric assembly. Integrating affinity measurements and structural data, we propose how A46 simultaneously interferes with several TIR-domain containing proteins to inhibit NF-κB activation and postulate that A46 employs a bipartite binding arrangement to sequester the host immune adaptors TRAM and MyD88. PMID:27973613

  15. Flexible DNA binding of the BTB/POZ-domain protein FBI-1.

    PubMed

    Pessler, Frank; Hernandez, Nouria

    2003-08-01

    POZ-domain transcription factors are characterized by the presence of a protein-protein interaction domain called the POZ or BTB domain at their N terminus and zinc fingers at their C terminus. Despite the large number of POZ-domain transcription factors that have been identified to date and the significant insights that have been gained into their cellular functions, relatively little is known about their DNA binding properties. FBI-1 is a BTB/POZ-domain protein that has been shown to modulate HIV-1 Tat trans-activation and to repress transcription of some cellular genes. We have used various viral and cellular FBI-1 binding sites to characterize the interaction of a POZ-domain protein with DNA in detail. We find that FBI-1 binds to inverted sequence repeats downstream of the HIV-1 transcription start site. Remarkably, it binds efficiently to probes carrying these repeats in various orientations and spacings with no particular rotational alignment, indicating that its interaction with DNA is highly flexible. Indeed, FBI-1 binding sites in the adenovirus 2 major late promoter, the c-fos gene, and the c-myc P1 and P2 promoters reveal variously spaced direct, inverted, and everted sequence repeats with the consensus sequence G(A/G)GGG(T/C)(C/T)(T/C)(C/T) for each repeat.

  16. Activity of a Two-Domain Antifreeze Protein Is Not Dependent on Linker Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Nolan B.; Nishimiya, Yoshiyuki; Tsuda, Sakae; Sönnichsen, Frank D.

    2007-01-01

    The reported NMR structure of RD3, a naturally occurring two-domain antifreeze protein, suggests that the two nearly identical domains are oriented to allow simultaneous binding of their active regions to the ice surface. It is implied that the nine residues linking the two domains play a role in this alignment, but this has not been established. We have designed and expressed a modified form of RD3 that replaces the nine-residue linker with a generic sequence of one serine and eight glycine residues to test the importance of the linker amino acid sequence. The modified linker is shown to have significantly different characteristics compared to the original linker. Heteronuclear nuclear Overhauser effect experiments show that the new linker residues have more mobility than the linker residues in the native protein. Further, NMR data show that the folding of the C-terminal domain is somewhat perturbed by the altered linker. Finally, distributions of residual dipolar couplings indicate that the two domains tumble and move independently of each other. Nevertheless, the thermal hysteresis activity of the modified protein is indistinguishable from that of native RD3, proving that increased activity of the two-domain antifreeze protein is not dependent on structure of the linker. PMID:17056724

  17. Metazoans evolved by taking domains from soluble proteins to expand intercellular communication network

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Hyun-Jun; Kim, Inhae; Bowie, James U.; Kim, Sanguk

    2015-01-01

    A central question in animal evolution is how multicellular animals evolved from unicellular ancestors. We hypothesize that membrane proteins must be key players in the development of multicellularity because they are well positioned to form the cell-cell contacts and to provide the intercellular communication required for the creation of complex organisms. Here we find that a major mechanism for the necessary increase in membrane protein complexity in the transition from non-metazoan to metazoan life was the new incorporation of domains from soluble proteins. The membrane proteins that have incorporated soluble domains in metazoans are enriched in many of the functions unique to multicellular organisms such as cell-cell adhesion, signaling, immune defense and developmental processes. They also show enhanced protein-protein interaction (PPI) network complexity and centrality, suggesting an important role in the cellular diversification found in complex organisms. Our results expose an evolutionary mechanism that contributed to the development of higher life forms. PMID:25923201

  18. Metazoans evolved by taking domains from soluble proteins to expand intercellular communication network.

    PubMed

    Nam, Hyun-Jun; Kim, Inhae; Bowie, James U; Kim, Sanguk

    2015-04-29

    A central question in animal evolution is how multicellular animals evolved from unicellular ancestors. We hypothesize that membrane proteins must be key players in the development of multicellularity because they are well positioned to form the cell-cell contacts and to provide the intercellular communication required for the creation of complex organisms. Here we find that a major mechanism for the necessary increase in membrane protein complexity in the transition from non-metazoan to metazoan life was the new incorporation of domains from soluble proteins. The membrane proteins that have incorporated soluble domains in metazoans are enriched in many of the functions unique to multicellular organisms such as cell-cell adhesion, signaling, immune defense and developmental processes. They also show enhanced protein-protein interaction (PPI) network complexity and centrality, suggesting an important role in the cellular diversification found in complex organisms. Our results expose an evolutionary mechanism that contributed to the development of higher life forms.

  19. Selection on Network Dynamics Drives Differential Rates of Protein Domain Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Mannakee, Brian K.; Gutenkunst, Ryan N.

    2016-01-01

    The long-held principle that functionally important proteins evolve slowly has recently been challenged by studies in mice and yeast showing that the severity of a protein knockout only weakly predicts that protein’s rate of evolution. However, the relevance of these studies to evolutionary changes within proteins is unknown, because amino acid substitutions, unlike knockouts, often only slightly perturb protein activity. To quantify the phenotypic effect of small biochemical perturbations, we developed an approach to use computational systems biology models to measure the influence of individual reaction rate constants on network dynamics. We show that this dynamical influence is predictive of protein domain evolutionary rate within networks in vertebrates and yeast, even after controlling for expression level and breadth, network topology, and knockout effect. Thus, our results not only demonstrate the importance of protein domain function in determining evolutionary rate, but also the power of systems biology modeling to uncover unanticipated evolutionary forces. PMID:27380265

  20. PDZ Affinity Chromatography: A general method for affinity purification of proteins based on PDZ domains and their ligands

    PubMed Central

    Walkup, Ward G.; Kennedy, Mary B.

    2014-01-01

    PDZ (PSD-95, DiscsLarge, ZO1) domains function in nature as protein binding domains within scaffold and membrane-associated proteins. They comprise ~ 90 residues and make specific, high affinity interactions with complementary C-terminal peptide sequences, with other PDZ domains, and with phospholipids. We hypothesized that the specific, strong interactions of PDZ domains with their ligands would make them well suited for use in affinity chromatography. Here we describe a novel affinity chromatography method applicable for the purification of proteins that contain PDZ domain-binding ligands, either naturally or introduced by genetic engineering. We created a series of affinity resins comprised of PDZ domains from the scaffold protein PSD-95, or from neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), coupled to solid supports. We used them to purify heterologously expressed neuronal proteins or protein domains containing endogenous PDZ domain ligands, eluting the proteins with free PDZ domain peptide ligands. We show that Proteins of Interest (POIs) lacking endogenous PDZ domain ligands can be engineered as fusion products containing C-terminal PDZ domain ligand peptides or internal, N- or C-terminal PDZ domains and then can be purified by the same method. Using this method, we recovered recombinant GFP fused to a PDZ-domain ligand in active form as verified by fluorescence yield. Similarly, chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) and β-Galactosidase (LacZ) fused to a C-terminal PDZ domain ligand or an N-terminal PDZ domain were purified in active form as assessed by enzymatic assay. In general, PDZ domains and ligands derived from PSD-95 were superior to those from nNOS for this method. PDZ Domain Affinity Chromatography promises to be a versatile and effective method for purification of a wide variety of natural and recombinant proteins. PMID:24607360

  1. PDZ affinity chromatography: a general method for affinity purification of proteins based on PDZ domains and their ligands.

    PubMed

    Walkup, Ward G; Kennedy, Mary B

    2014-06-01

    PDZ (PSD-95, DiscsLarge, ZO1) domains function in nature as protein binding domains within scaffold and membrane-associated proteins. They comprise ∼90 residues and make specific, high affinity interactions with complementary C-terminal peptide sequences, with other PDZ domains, and with phospholipids. We hypothesized that the specific, strong interactions of PDZ domains with their ligands would make them well suited for use in affinity chromatography. Here we describe a novel affinity chromatography method applicable for the purification of proteins that contain PDZ domain-binding ligands, either naturally or introduced by genetic engineering. We created a series of affinity resins comprised of PDZ domains from the scaffold protein PSD-95, or from neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), coupled to solid supports. We used them to purify heterologously expressed neuronal proteins or protein domains containing endogenous PDZ domain ligands, eluting the proteins with free PDZ domain peptide ligands. We show that Proteins of Interest (POIs) lacking endogenous PDZ domain ligands can be engineered as fusion products containing C-terminal PDZ domain ligand peptides or internal, N- or C-terminal PDZ domains and then can be purified by the same method. Using this method, we recovered recombinant GFP fused to a PDZ domain ligand in active form as verified by fluorescence yield. Similarly, chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) and β-Galactosidase (LacZ) fused to a C-terminal PDZ domain ligand or an N-terminal PDZ domain were purified in active form as assessed by enzymatic assay. In general, PDZ domains and ligands derived from PSD-95 were superior to those from nNOS for this method. PDZ Domain Affinity Chromatography promises to be a versatile and effective method for purification of a wide variety of natural and recombinant proteins.

  2. Signal Activation and Inactivation by the Gα Helical Domain: A Long-Neglected Partner in G Protein Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Dohlman, Henrik G.; Jones, Janice C.

    2013-01-01

    Heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide–binding proteins (G proteins) are positioned at the top of many signal transduction pathways. The G protein α subunit is composed of two domains, one that resembles Ras and another that is composed entirely of α helices. Historically, most attention has focused on the Ras-like domain, but emerging evidence reveals that the helical domain is an active participant in G protein signaling. PMID:22649098

  3. Identification of a novel contactin-associated transmembrane receptor with multiple domains implicated in protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Peles, E; Nativ, M; Lustig, M; Grumet, M; Schilling, J; Martinez, R; Plowman, G D; Schlessinger, J

    1997-01-01

    Receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase beta (RPTPbeta) expressed on the surface of glial cells binds to the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored recognition molecule contactin on neuronal cells leading to neurite outgrowth. We describe the cloning of a novel contactin-associated transmembrane receptor (p190/Caspr) containing a mosaic of domains implicated in protein-protein interactions. The extracellular domain of Caspr contains a neurophilin/coagulation factor homology domain, a region related to fibrinogen beta/gamma, epidermal growth factor-like repeats, neurexin motifs as well as unique PGY repeats found in a molluscan adhesive protein. The cytoplasmic domain of Caspr contains a proline-rich sequence capable of binding to a subclass of SH3 domains of signaling molecules. Caspr and contactin exist as a complex in rat brain and are bound to each other by means of lateral (cis) interactions in the plasma membrane. We propose that Caspr may function as a signaling component of contactin, enabling recruitment and activation of intracellular signaling pathways in neurons. The binding of RPTPbeta to the contactin-Caspr complex could provide a mechanism for cell-cell communication between glial cells and neurons during development. PMID:9118959

  4. Spiroplasma eriocheiris Adhesin-Like Protein (ALP) Interacts with Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) Domain Proteins to Facilitate Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Libo; Liu, Yuhan; Gao, Qi; Xu, Xuechuan; Ning, Mingxiao; Bi, Jingxiu; Liu, Hui; Liu, Min; Gu, Wei; Wang, Wen; Meng, Qingguo

    2017-01-01

    Spiroplasma eriocheiris is a novel pathogen found in recent years, causing the tremor disease (TD) of Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis. Like Spiroplasma mirum, S. eriocheiris infects the newborn mouse (adult mice are not infected) and can cause cataract. Adhesion-related protein is an important protein involved in the interaction between pathogen and host. In this study, the Adhesin-like Protein (ALP) of S. eriocheiris was detected on its outer membrane by using immune electron microscopy, and was found to be involved in the bacterium's infection of mouse embryo fibroblasts (3T6-Swiss albino). Yeast two-hybrid analysis demonstrated that ALP interacts with a diverse group of mouse proteins. The interactions between recombinant partial fibulin7 (FBLN7; including two epidermal growth factor [EGF] domains) and ALP were confirmed by Far-western blotting and colocalization. We synthetized the domains of FBLN7 [EGF domain: amino acids 136–172 and complement control protein (CCP) domain: 81–134 amino acids], and demonstrated that only EGF domain of FBLN7 can interact with ALP. Because the EGF domain has high degree of similarity to EGF, it can activate the downstream EGFR signaling pathway, in key site amino acids. The EGFR pathway in 3T6 cells was restrained after rALP stimulation resulting from competitive binding of ALP to EGF. The unborn mouse, newborn mouse, and the adult mouse with cataract have a small amount of expressed FBLN7; however, none was detected in the brain and very little expression was seen in the eye of normal adult mice. In short, ALP as a S. eriocheiris surface protein, is critical for infection and further supports the role of ALP in S. eriocheiris infection by competitive effection of the EGF/EGFR axis of the target cells. PMID:28184355

  5. The emerging importance of the SPX domain-containing proteins in phosphate homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Secco, David; Wang, Chuang; Arpat, Bulak A; Wang, Zhiye; Poirier, Yves; Tyerman, Stephen D; Wu, Ping; Shou, Huixia; Whelan, James

    2012-03-01

    Plant growth and development are strongly influenced by the availability of nutrients in the soil solution. Among them, phosphorus (P) is one of the most essential and most limiting macro-elements for plants. In the environment, plants are often confronted with P starvation as a result of extremely low concentrations of soluble inorganic phosphate (Pi) in the soil. To cope with these conditions, plants have developed a wide spectrum of mechanisms aimed at increasing P use efficiency. At the molecular level, recent studies have shown that several proteins carrying the SPX domain are essential for maintaining Pi homeostasis in plants. The SPX domain is found in numerous eukaryotic proteins, including several proteins from the yeast PHO regulon, involved in maintaining Pi homeostasis. In plants, proteins harboring the SPX domain are classified into four families based on the presence of additional domains in their structure, namely the SPX, SPX-EXS, SPX-MFS and SPX-RING families. In this review, we highlight the recent findings regarding the key roles of the proteins containing the SPX domain in phosphate signaling, as well as providing further research directions in order to improve our knowledge on P nutrition in plants, thus enabling the generation of plants with better P use efficiency.

  6. Duplex (or quadruplet) CH domain containing human multidomain proteins: an inventory.

    PubMed

    Friedberg, Felix

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, the inventory presented for singlet CH (calponin homology/actin binding) domain containing human multidomain proteins is extended to several duplex and one quadruplet CH containing forms. Invariably, the duplexes are located at the begin of the molecules. The regions connecting the two CH units suggest amino acid conservations which allows the placing of 18 duplex containing molecules into six groups wherein the gene for one member in each group created the others more recently by gene duplication. The ancient multidomain proteins, possibly, were primarily the result of an exon shuffling (transposition) mechanism that also guided the placing of the CH singlet or duplex domain at the amino end of the newly created proteins. A mechanism that creates pseudogenes could conceivably produce genes that encode multi-domain proteins. Intragenomic duplications (slippage) might have facilitated the occurrence of encoding repeats, thus allowing for the creation of multiple identical