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Sample records for cystic fibrosis clinical

  1. Cystic fibrosis: a clinical view.

    PubMed

    Castellani, Carlo; Assael, Baroukh M

    2017-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF), a monogenic disease caused by mutations in the CFTR gene on chromosome 7, is complex and greatly variable in clinical expression. Airways, pancreas, male genital system, intestine, liver, bone, and kidney are involved. The lack of CFTR or its impaired function causes fat malabsorption and chronic pulmonary infections leading to bronchiectasis and progressive lung damage. Previously considered lethal in infancy and childhood, CF has now attained median survivals of 50 years of age, mainly thanks to the early diagnosis through neonatal screening, recognition of mild forms, and an aggressive therapeutic attitude. Classical treatment includes pancreatic enzyme replacement, respiratory physiotherapy, mucolitics, and aggressive antibiotic therapy. A significant proportion of patients with severe symptoms still requires lung or, less frequently, liver transplantation. The great number of mutations and their diverse effects on the CFTR protein account only partially for CF clinical variability, and modifier genes have a role in modulating the clinical expression of the disease. Despite the increasing understanding of CFTR functioning, several aspects of CF need still to be clarified, e.g., the worse outcome in females, the risk of malignancies, the pathophysiology, and best treatment of comorbidities, such as CF-related diabetes or CF-related bone disorder. Research is focusing on new drugs restoring CFTR function, some already available and with good clinical impact, others showing promising preliminary results that need to be confirmed in phase III clinical trials.

  2. Cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Ratjen, Felix; Bell, Scott C; Rowe, Steven M; Goss, Christopher H; Quittner, Alexandra L; Bush, Andrew

    2015-05-14

    Cystic fibrosis is an autosomal recessive, monogenetic disorder caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. The gene defect was first described 25 years ago and much progress has been made since then in our understanding of how CFTR mutations cause disease and how this can be addressed therapeutically. CFTR is a transmembrane protein that transports ions across the surface of epithelial cells. CFTR dysfunction affects many organs; however, lung disease is responsible for the vast majority of morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis. Prenatal diagnostics, newborn screening and new treatment algorithms are changing the incidence and the prevalence of the disease. Until recently, the standard of care in cystic fibrosis treatment focused on preventing and treating complications of the disease; now, novel treatment strategies directly targeting the ion channel abnormality are becoming available and it will be important to evaluate how these treatments affect disease progression and the quality of life of patients. In this Primer, we summarize the current knowledge, and provide an outlook on how cystic fibrosis clinical care and research will be affected by new knowledge and therapeutic options in the near future. For an illustrated summary of this Primer, visit: http://go.nature.com/4VrefN.

  3. Genetics of Cystic Fibrosis: Clinical Implications.

    PubMed

    Egan, Marie E

    2016-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a common life-shortening autosomal recessive genetic disorder caused by mutations in the gene that encodes for the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein (CFTR). Almost 2000 variants in the CFTR gene have been identified. The mutational classes are based on the functional consequences on CFTR. New therapies are being developed to target mutant CFTR and restore CFTR function. Understanding specific CF genotypes is essential for providing state-of-the art care to patients. In addition to the variation in CFTR genotype, there are several modifier genes that contribute to the respiratory phenotype.

  4. Cystic Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an inherited disease of the mucus and sweat glands. It affects mostly your lungs, pancreas, liver, intestines, sinuses, and sex organs. CF causes your mucus to be thick and sticky. ...

  5. Cystic fibrosis - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - cystic fibrosis ... The following organizations are good resources for information on cystic fibrosis : Cystic Fibrosis Foundation -- www.cff.org March of Dimes -- www.marchofdimes.org/baby/cystic-fibrosis-and- ...

  6. Clinical features of cystic fibrosis patients with rare genotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Castaldo, G; Rippa, E; Raia, V; Salvatore, D; Massa, C; de Ritis, G; Salvatore, F

    1996-01-01

    We describe the clinical features of seven cystic fibrosis patients from southern Italy who bear rare genotypes: (1) a patient homozygous for the 2183 AA-->G mutation who was affected by a very early pulmonary form of cystic fibrosis, and five patients who were compound heterozygotes either for the 2183 AA-->G mutation or for the I148T mutation, in both instances with the delta F508 mutation; and (2) a patient homozygous for the early nonsense R553X mutation who showed only a moderately severe form of cystic fibrosis. Our results confirm that environmental or genetic factors unrelated to the CF disease contribute significantly to the development of the phenotype. Images PMID:8825054

  7. Cystic fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... cannot be prevented. Screening those with a family history of the disease may detect the CF gene in many carriers. Alternative ... FJ. Cystic fibrosis. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap ...

  8. Diabetes in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Bridges, Nicola

    2013-05-01

    Cystic fibrosis related diabetes (CFRD) is a common complication of cystic fibrosis, caused by a fall in insulin secretion with age in individuals with pancreatic insufficiency. CFRD is associated with worse clinical status and increased mortality. Treatment of CFRD with insulin results in sustained improvements in lung function and nutrition. While clinical experience with insulin treatment in CF has increased, the selection of who to treat and glycaemic targets remain unclear. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. What Causes Cystic Fibrosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Cystic Fibrosis? A defect in the CFTR gene causes cystic ... in the severity of the disease. How Is Cystic Fibrosis Inherited? Every person inherits two CFTR genes—one ...

  10. Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Asay, Lyal D.

    1965-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis, a disease thought to be transmitted as a recessive genetic trait, is found as a disease in about one in 1,000 to one in 10,000 births. It involves all of the exocrine glands with presenting symptoms dependent upon the extent of involvement of any group of glands. Many aspects of the disease can be corrected by substitution therapy. This applies particularly to the use of animal pancreas for the steatorrhea and salt for prevention of heat prostration. Unfortunately, the obstructive pulmonary disease with secondary bronchial infections can only be treated symptomatically by the use of mucus thinning agents, postural drainage, and antibiotics. Nevertheless, longevity can be increased and a great deal of hope offered to the families of these unfortunate children by careful supervision of their medical care. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9.Figure 10.Figure 11. PMID:14288148

  11. The clinical spectrum of chronic appendiceal abscess in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Allen, E D; Pfaff, J K; Taussig, L M; McCoy, K S

    1992-10-01

    To describe the varied characteristics seen in patients with cystic fibrosis who develop chronic abscess formation secondary to unrecognized appendicitis. Patient series. Cystic Fibrosis Care Centers in Columbus, Ohio, and Tucson, Ariz. Five patients with cystic fibrosis who developed chronic abdominal abscesses secondary to occult appendicitis are described. Two patients developed fistula formation with purulent fluid drainage before diagnosis. One patient developed an extensive psoas abscess. Another presented with prolonged fever of unknown origin. These patients were identified by retrospective review of the past 20-year experience at two Cystic Fibrosis Care Centers. Development of chronic abdominal abscess related to unrecognized appendicitis is a rare but important complication in patients with cystic fibrosis. Prompt diagnosis depends on physician familiarity with the varied presentations of this entity. Diagnostic abdominal computed tomography and/or ultrasonography should particularly be considered when patients with cystic fibrosis present with pain, mass, or drainage from the right flank; prolonged fever; a limp; or failure of suspected meconium ileus equivalent syndrome to respond promptly to cathartic measures.

  12. Multidimensional Clinical Phenotyping of an Adult Cystic Fibrosis Patient Population

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, Douglas J.; Bailey, Barbara A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is a multi-systemic disease resulting from mutations in the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator (CFTR) gene and has major manifestations in the sino-pulmonary, and gastro-intestinal tracts. Clinical phenotypes were generated using 26 common clinical variables to generate classes that overlapped quantiles of lung function and were based on multiple aspects of CF systemic disease. Methods The variables included age, gender, CFTR mutations, FEV1% predicted, FVC% predicted, height, weight, Brasfield chest xray score, pancreatic sufficiency status and clinical microbiology results. Complete datasets were compiled on 211 subjects. Phenotypes were identified using a proximity matrix generated by the unsupervised Random Forests algorithm and subsequent clustering by the Partitioning around Medoids (PAM) algorithm. The final phenotypic classes were then characterized and compared to a similar dataset obtained three years earlier. Findings Clinical phenotypes were identified using a clustering strategy that generated four and five phenotypes. Each strategy identified 1) a low lung health scores phenotype, 2) a younger, well-nourished, male-dominated class, 3) various high lung health score phenotypes that varied in terms of age, gender and nutritional status. This multidimensional clinical phenotyping strategy identified classes with expected microbiology results and low risk clinical phenotypes with pancreatic sufficiency. Interpretation This study demonstrated regional adult CF clinical phenotypes using non-parametric, continuous, ordinal and categorical data with a minimal amount of subjective data to identify clinically relevant phenotypes. These studies identified the relative stability of the phenotypes, demonstrated specific phenotypes consistent with published findings and identified others needing further study. PMID:25822311

  13. Clinical presentation of metabolic alkalosis in an adult patient with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Sweetser, Lisel J; Douglas, James A; Riha, Renata L; Bell, Scott C

    2005-03-01

    In subtropical and tropical climates, dehydration is common in cystic fibrosis patients with respiratory exacerbations. This may lead to a clinical presentation of metabolic alkalosis with associated hyponatraemia and hypochloraemia. An adult cystic fibrosis patient who presented with a severe respiratory exacerbation accompanied by metabolic alkalosis is presented and the effects of volume correction are reported.

  14. Novel Outcome Measures for Clinical Trials in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Tiddens, Harm AWM; Puderbach, Michael; Venegas, Jose G; Ratjen, Felix; Donaldson, Scott H; Davis, Stephanie D; Rowe, Steven M; Sagel, Scott D; Higgins, Mark; Waltz, David A

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a common inherited condition caused by mutations in the gene encoding the CF transmembrane regulator protein. With increased understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying CF and the development of new therapies there comes the need to develop new outcome measures to assess the disease, its progression and response to treatment. As there are limitations to the current endpoints accepted for regulatory purposes, a workshop to discuss novel endpoints for clinical trials in CF was held in Anaheim, California in November 2011. The pros and cons of novel outcome measures with potential utility for evaluation of novel treatments in CF were critically evaluated. The highlights of the 2011 workshop and subsequent advances in technologies and techniques that could be used to inform the development of clinical trial endpoints are summarized in this review. Pediatr Pulmonol. © 2014 The Authors. Pediatric Pulmonology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25641878

  15. [Cystic Fibrosis Cloud database: An information system for storage and management of clinical and microbiological data of cystic fibrosis patients].

    PubMed

    Prieto, Claudia I; Palau, María J; Martina, Pablo; Achiary, Carlos; Achiary, Andrés; Bettiol, Marisa; Montanaro, Patricia; Cazzola, María L; Leguizamón, Mariana; Massillo, Cintia; Figoli, Cecilia; Valeiras, Brenda; Perez, Silvia; Rentería, Fernando; Diez, Graciela; Yantorno, Osvaldo M; Bosch, Alejandra

    2016-01-01

    The epidemiological and clinical management of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients suffering from acute pulmonary exacerbations or chronic lung infections demands continuous updating of medical and microbiological processes associated with the constant evolution of pathogens during host colonization. In order to monitor the dynamics of these processes, it is essential to have expert systems capable of storing and subsequently extracting the information generated from different studies of the patients and microorganisms isolated from them. In this work we have designed and developed an on-line database based on an information system that allows to store, manage and visualize data from clinical studies and microbiological analysis of bacteria obtained from the respiratory tract of patients suffering from cystic fibrosis. The information system, named Cystic Fibrosis Cloud database is available on the http://servoy.infocomsa.com/cfc_database site and is composed of a main database and a web-based interface, which uses Servoy's product architecture based on Java technology. Although the CFC database system can be implemented as a local program for private use in CF centers, it can also be used, updated and shared by different users who can access the stored information in a systematic, practical and safe manner. The implementation of the CFC database could have a significant impact on the monitoring of respiratory infections, the prevention of exacerbations, the detection of emerging organisms, and the adequacy of control strategies for lung infections in CF patients.

  16. Cystic fibrosis - nutritional considerations

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002437.htm Cystic fibrosis - nutrition To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-threatening disease that causes ...

  17. Cystic fibrosis genetics: from molecular understanding to clinical application.

    PubMed

    Cutting, Garry R

    2015-01-01

    The availability of the human genome sequence and tools for interrogating individual genomes provide an unprecedented opportunity to apply genetics to medicine. Mendelian conditions, which are caused by dysfunction of a single gene, offer powerful examples that illustrate how genetics can provide insights into disease. Cystic fibrosis, one of the more common lethal autosomal recessive Mendelian disorders, is presented here as an example. Recent progress in elucidating disease mechanism and causes of phenotypic variation, as well as in the development of treatments, demonstrates that genetics continues to play an important part in cystic fibrosis research 25 years after the discovery of the disease-causing gene.

  18. Cystic fibrosis genetics: from molecular understanding to clinical application

    PubMed Central

    Cutting, Garry R.

    2015-01-01

    The availability of the human genome sequence and tools for interrogating individual genomes provide an unprecedented opportunity to apply genetics to medicine. Mendelian conditions, which are caused by dysfunction of a single gene, offer powerful examples that illustrate how genetics can provide insights into disease. Cystic fibrosis, one of the more common lethalautosomal recessive Mendelian disorders, is presented here as an example. Recent progress in elucidating disease mechanism and causes of phenotypic variation, as well as in the development of treatments, demonstrates that genetics continues to play an important part in cystic fibrosis research 25 years after the d iscove1y of the disease-causing gene. PMID:25404111

  19. Considerations for the Conduct of Clinical Trials with Antiinflammatory Agents in Cystic Fibrosis. A Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Workshop Report.

    PubMed

    Torphy, Theodore J; Allen, Janet; Cantin, André M; Konstan, Michael W; Accurso, Frank J; Joseloff, Elizabeth; Ratjen, Felix A; Chmiel, James F

    2015-09-01

    Inflammation leads to lung destruction and loss of pulmonary function in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Drugs that modulate the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) have recently been approved. Although the impact of CFTR modulators on sweat chloride and lung function are exciting, they have not yet demonstrated an effect on inflammation. Therefore, CF antiinflammatory drug development must continue. Unfortunately, the lack of clarity with this process has left investigators and industry sponsors frustrated. The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation established a working group in early 2014 to address this issue. There are many inflammatory processes disrupted in CF, and, therefore, there are many potential targets amenable to antiinflammatory therapy. Regardless of a drug's specific mechanism of action, it must ultimately affect the neutrophil or its products to impact CF. The working group concluded that before bringing new antiinflammatory drugs to clinical trial, preclinical safety studies must be conducted in disease-relevant models to assuage safety concerns. Furthermore, although studies of antiinflammatory therapies must first establish safety in adults, subsequent studies must involve children, as they are most likely to reap the most benefit. The working group also recommended that pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic studies and early-phase safety studies be performed before proceeding to larger studies of longer duration. In addition, innovative study designs may improve the likelihood of adequately assessing treatment response and mitigating risk before conducting multiyear studies. Learning from past experiences and incorporating this knowledge into new drug development programs will be instrumental in bringing new antiinflammatory therapies to patients.

  20. Highly effective cystic fibrosis clinical research teams: critical success factors.

    PubMed

    Retsch-Bogart, George Z; Van Dalfsen, Jill M; Marshall, Bruce C; George, Cynthia; Pilewski, Joseph M; Nelson, Eugene C; Goss, Christopher H; Ramsey, Bonnie W

    2014-08-01

    Bringing new therapies to patients with rare diseases depends in part on optimizing clinical trial conduct through efficient study start-up processes and rapid enrollment. Suboptimal execution of clinical trials in academic medical centers not only results in high cost to institutions and sponsors, but also delays the availability of new therapies. Addressing the factors that contribute to poor outcomes requires novel, systematic approaches tailored to the institution and disease under study. To use clinical trial performance metrics data analysis to select high-performing cystic fibrosis (CF) clinical research teams and then identify factors contributing to their success. Mixed-methods research, including semi-structured qualitative interviews of high-performing research teams. CF research teams at nine clinical centers from the CF Foundation Therapeutics Development Network. Survey of site characteristics, direct observation of team meetings and facilities, and semi-structured interviews with clinical research team members and institutional program managers and leaders in clinical research. Critical success factors noted at all nine high-performing centers were: 1) strong leadership, 2) established and effective communication within the research team and with the clinical care team, and 3) adequate staff. Other frequent characteristics included a mature culture of research, customer service orientation in interactions with study participants, shared efficient processes, continuous process improvement activities, and a businesslike approach to clinical research. Clinical research metrics allowed identification of high-performing clinical research teams. Site visits identified several critical factors leading to highly successful teams that may help other clinical research teams improve clinical trial performance.

  1. Renal involvement in cystic fibrosis: diseases spectrum and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Yahiaoui, Yasmina; Jablonski, Mathieu; Hubert, Dominique; Mosnier-Pudar, Helen; Noël, Laure-Hélène; Stern, Marc; Grenet, Dominique; Grünfeld, Jean-Pierre; Chauveau, Dominique; Fakhouri, Fadi

    2009-05-01

    Clinically relevant kidney involvement is uncommonly described in adult patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). We sought to report on a series of patients with CF and kidney biopsy-documented renal involvement. A retrospective study was undertaken in two referral centers for adult patients with CF in Paris, France. Patients who had undergone a biopsy of native kidneys between 1992 and 2008 were identified, and their medical records were reviewed. We identified 13 adult patients with CF and renal disease. Proteinuria was present in all but two cases and was associated with progressive renal impairment in four patients (median serum creatinine 85 micromol/L; range 53 to 144 micromol/L). Renal biopsy disclosed a heterogeneous spectrum of nephropathies including AA amyloidosis (n = 3), diabetic glomerulopathy (n = 3), FSGS (n = 2), minimal-change disease (n = 1), postinfectious glomerulonephritis (n = 1), IgA nephropathy related to Henoch-Schönlein purpura (n = 1), membranous nephropathy (n = 1), and chronic interstitial nephropathy (n = 1). Chronic renal failure occurred in five patients, and one patient reached ESRD. Although rare, clinically significant renal disease may arise in young adult patients with CF. Given the wide spectrum of diseases that may be encountered, definite diagnosis by kidney biopsy is mandatory to optimize clinical treatment of these complex patients, particularly in the perspective of organ transplantation.

  2. Baseline Ultrasound and Clinical Correlates in Children with Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Leung, Daniel H; Ye, Wen; Molleston, Jean P; Weymann, Alexander; Ling, Simon; Paranjape, Shruti M; Romero, Rene; Schwarzenberg, Sara Jane; Palermo, Joseph; Alonso, Estella M; Murray, Karen F; Marshall, Bruce C; Sherker, Averell H; Siegel, Marilyn J; Krishnamurthy, Rajesh; Harned, Roger; Karmazyn, Boaz; Magee, John C; Narkewicz, Michael R

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the relationship between abdominal ultrasound findings and demographic, historical, and clinical features in children with cystic fibrosis (CF). Children age 3-12 years with CF without known cirrhosis, were enrolled in a prospective, multicenter study of ultrasound to predict hepatic fibrosis. Consensus ultrasound patterns were assigned by 3 radiologists as normal, heterogeneous, homogeneous, or cirrhosis. Data were derived from direct collection and US or Toronto CF registries. χ(2) or ANOVA were used to compare variables among ultrasound groups and between normal and abnormal. Logistic regression was used to study risk factors for having abnormal ultrasound. Findings in 719 subjects were normal (n = 590, 82.1%), heterogeneous (64, 8.9%), homogeneous (41, 5.7%), and cirrhosis (24, 3.3%). Cirrhosis (P = .0004), homogeneous (P < .0001), and heterogeneous (P = .03) were older than normal. More males were heterogeneous (P = .001). More heterogeneous (15.0%, P = .009) and cirrhosis (25.0%, P = .005) had CF-related diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance vs normal (5.4%). Early infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (<2 years old) was associated with a lower risk (OR 0.42, P = .0007) of abnormal. Ursodeoxycholic acid use (OR 3.69, P < .0001) and CF-related diabetes (OR 2.21, P = .019) were associated with increased risk of abnormal. Unsuspected cirrhosis is seen in 3.3% of young patients with CF, heterogeneous in 8.9%. Abnormal ultrasound is associated with CF-related diabetes, and early P aeruginosa is associated with normal ultrasound. Prospective assessment of these risk factors may identify potential interventional targets. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01144507. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. How Is Cystic Fibrosis Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Cystic Fibrosis Treated? Cystic fibrosis (CF) has no cure. However, ... help oral pancreatic enzymes work better. Treatments for Cystic Fibrosis Complications A common complication of CF is diabetes . ...

  4. Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition

    MedlinePlus

    ... Right Sport for You Healthy School Lunch Planner Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition KidsHealth > For Teens > Cystic Fibrosis: ... Food Enzyme Supplements Beating the Frustration What Is Cystic Fibrosis? At lunch, Lindsay often gets bored with having ...

  5. The Cystic Fibrosis Intestine

    PubMed Central

    De Lisle, Robert C.; Borowitz, Drucy

    2013-01-01

    The clinical manifestations of cystic fibrosis (CF) result from dysfunction of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator protein (CFTR). The majority of people with CF have a limited life span as a consequence of CFTR dysfunction in the respiratory tract. However, CFTR dysfunction in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract occurs earlier in ontogeny and is present in all patients, regardless of genotype. The same pathophysiologic triad of obstruction, infection, and inflammation that causes disease in the airways also causes disease in the intestines. This article describes the effects of CFTR dysfunction on the intestinal tissues and the intraluminal environment. Mouse models of CF have greatly advanced our understanding of the GI manifestations of CF, which can be directly applied to understanding CF disease in humans. PMID:23788646

  6. Living with Cystic Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Cystic Fibrosis If you or your child has cystic fibrosis (CF), you should learn as much as you can ... with your doctors to learn how to manage CF. Ongoing Care Having ongoing medical care by a ...

  7. Molecular Diagnosis of Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Deignan, Joshua L; Grody, Wayne W

    2016-01-01

    This unit describes a recommended approach to identifying causal genetic variants in an individual suspected of having cystic fibrosis. An introduction to the genetics and clinical presentation of cystic fibrosis is initially presented, followed by a description of the two main strategies used in the molecular diagnosis of cystic fibrosis: (1) an initial targeted variant panel used to detect only the most common cystic fibrosis-causing variants in the CFTR gene, and (2) sequencing of the entire coding region of the CFTR gene to detect additional rare causal CFTR variants. Finally, the unit concludes with a discussion regarding the analytic and clinical validity of these approaches. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  8. Achromobacter xylosoxidans in cystic fibrosis: prevalence and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    De Baets, Frans; Schelstraete, Petra; Van Daele, Sabine; Haerynck, Filomeen; Vaneechoutte, Mario

    2007-01-01

    Achromobacter xylosoxidans is increasingly cultured in sputum from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients; nevertheless, there are few published data on the clinical impact of this infection or chronic colonisation. Relying on DNA fingerprinting techniques we studied the prevalence of A. xylosoxidans in our CF population. In a retrospective case control study the clinical status of patients with at least 3 sputum cultures positive for A. xylosoxidans over at least 9 months, at the moment of the first positive culture and during the period of colonisation were compared to age (+/-1 year), gender and to Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonisation controlled CF patients who had never A. xylosoxidans positive sputum cultures. The prevalence of patients with at least one positive A. xylosoxidans culture was 17.9%. 5.3% of the patients fulfilled the criteria of our definition of colonisation. Colonised patients had a median age of 20 years (range 11-27 years) and a mean colonisation period of 1.5 (+/-0.9) years. At the moment of the first positive culture we found significantly lower Bhalla scores on HRCT scans of the lungs (11+/-3 versus 16+/-3, p<0.002), lower Brasfield chest X-ray scores (14+/-3 versus 18+/-3, p<0.019), lower FVC values (70%+/-22 versus 94%+/-12, p<0.017) and lower FEV(1) values (55%+/-32 versus 78%+/-23, p=0.123), although the latter did not reach significance. There was no significant difference in body mass index (BMI) (18.7+/-3 kg/m2 versus 19.6+/-3 kg/m2, p=0.8). Over the study period A. xylosoxidans-colonised patients did have more need for intravenous antibiotic treatment courses (19 versus 5, p<0.001); nevertheless, there was no significant difference in lung function decline over the study period (FVC: -6.25+/-12.34% versus -5.62+/-8.30%, p 0.77, FEV1: -5.62+/-8.30% versus -1.87+/-11.58%, p<0.47). The prevalence of A. xylosoxidans infection or colonisation is probably underestimated. Colonised patients are mostly older, with more pronounced lung damage and

  9. Haemophilus infection in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Rayner, R J; Hiller, E J; Ispahani, P; Baker, M

    1990-01-01

    Twenty seven patients with cystic fibrosis under the age of 12 years and 27 matched patients with asthma were followed up in a prospective study for one year. The isolation rate of non-capsulated strains of Haemophilus influenzae from cough swabs and sputum specimens taken at routine clinic visits every two months was significantly greater in cystic fibrosis than in asthma. Haemophilus para-influenzae was equally common in both groups. During exacerbations the isolation rate of H influenzae in cystic fibrosis was significantly greater than at other times, whereas in asthma there was no significant difference. The distribution of biotypes of H influenzae and H parainfluenzae was similar in the two groups. In cystic fibrosis, biotype I was associated with exacerbations. Biotype V was more common than in previous studies, but was not associated with exacerbations. PMID:2185699

  10. Newborn screening for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Castellani, Carlo; Massie, John; Sontag, Marci; Southern, Kevin W

    2016-08-01

    Since the late 1970s when the potential of the immunoreactive trypsinogen assay for early identification of infants with cystic fibrosis was first recognised, the performance of newborn blood spot screening (NBS) has been continually assessed and its use has gradually expanded. NBS for cystic fibrosis is a cost-effective strategy and, if standards of care are fully implemented and robust management pathways are in place, has a positive effect on clinical outcomes. In the past decade, NBS has undergone rapid expansion and an unprecedented number of infants with cystic fibrosis have access to early diagnosis and care. Cystic fibrosis NBS has now moved on from the development phase and is entering an era of consolidation. In the future, research should focus on the rationalisation and optimisation of existing programmes, with particular attention to bioethical implications such as unwanted detection of carriers and inconclusive diagnoses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Physical training for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Bradley, J; Moran, F

    2008-01-23

    Physical training may form an important part of the care package for people with cystic fibrosis. To determine whether a prescribed regimen of physical training produces improvement or prevents deterioration in physiological and clinical outcomes in cystic fibrosis compared to no training. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register which comprises references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. Date of the most recent search: September 2007. All randomised and quasi-randomised controlled clinical trials in which a prescribed regimen of physical training is compared to no physical training in people with cystic fibrosis. Two authors independently selected studies for inclusion, assessed methodological quality and extracted data. Of the 26 studies identified, seven studies which included 231 participants, met the inclusion criteria. This review does provide some limited evidence from both short- and long-term studies that aerobic or anaerobic physical training has a positive effect on primary outcomes (exercise capacity, strength and lung function) but improvements are not consistent between studies. Conclusions about the efficacy of physical training in cystic fibrosis are limited by the small size, short duration and incomplete reporting of most of the studies included in this review. Physical training is already part of the care package offered to most people with cystic fibrosis and there is a lack of evidence to actively discourage this. The benefits obtained from including physical training in a package of care may be influenced by the type of training programme. Further research is needed to assess comprehensively the benefits of exercise programmes in people with cystic fibrosis and the relative benefits of the addition of aerobic versus anaerobic versus a combination of both types of physical training to the care

  12. 75 FR 45646 - Design of Clinical Trials of Aerosolized Antimicrobials for the Treatment of Cystic Fibrosis...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-03

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Design of Clinical Trials of Aerosolized Antimicrobials for... design of clinical trials of aerosolized antimicrobials in patients with cystic fibrosis. The input from this public workshop will help in developing topics for further discussion. Dates and Times: The public...

  13. Learning about Cystic Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cystic Fibrosis: Your Genes, Your Health [yourgenesyourhealth.org] Multimedia educational site including screening and treatment information. Hosted by the Dolan DNA Learning Center at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. What is ...

  14. Caring for Children with Cystic Fibrosis: A Collaborative Clinical and School Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strawhacker, MaryAnn Tapper; Wellendorf, Joyce

    2004-01-01

    Earlier diagnosis and more effective treatments have improved both morbidity and mortality associated with cystic fibrosis, making regular school attendance a reality. School nurses have a unique opportunity to assist students with cystic fibrosis successfully manage their disease. Medical treatment for cystic fibrosis can be complex, leaving…

  15. Caring for Children with Cystic Fibrosis: A Collaborative Clinical and School Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strawhacker, MaryAnn Tapper; Wellendorf, Joyce

    2004-01-01

    Earlier diagnosis and more effective treatments have improved both morbidity and mortality associated with cystic fibrosis, making regular school attendance a reality. School nurses have a unique opportunity to assist students with cystic fibrosis successfully manage their disease. Medical treatment for cystic fibrosis can be complex, leaving…

  16. Cystic fibrosis related diabetes.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, Donal; O'Connell, Jean

    2014-08-01

    Improved life expectancy in cystic fibrosis (CF) has led to an expanding population of adults with CF, now representing almost 50 % of the total CF population. This creates new challenges from long-term complications such as diabetes mellitus (DM), a condition that is present in 40 %-50 % of adults with CF. Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes (CFRD) results from a primary defect of insulin deficiency and although sharing features with type 1 (DM1) and type 2 diabetes (DM2), it is a clinically distinct condition. Progression to diabetes is associated with poorer CF clinical outcomes and increased mortality. CFRD is not associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and the prevalence of microvascular complications is lower than DM1 or DM2. Rather, the primary goal of insulin therapy is the preservation of lung function and optimization of nutritional status. There is increasing evidence that appropriate screening and early intervention with insulin can reverse weight loss and improve pulmonary function. This approach may include targeting postprandial hyperglycemia not detected by standard diagnostic tests such as the oral glucose tolerance test. Further clinical research is required to guide when and how much to intervene in patients who are already dealing with the burden of one chronic illness.

  17. [Cystic fibrosis in 2008].

    PubMed

    Durieu, I; Josserand, R Nove

    2008-11-01

    To describe the epidemiological, physiopathological, clinical and therapeutic knowledge concerning cystic fibrosis (CF). Important modifications in the health organization of the care concerning this orphan disease have been implemented in France. The life expectancy has dramatically increased, as well as the knowledge concerning the pathological structure and function of the CFTR gene and protein. This will lead to the development of emerging drug treatments for this lethal disease. The life expectancy is predicted to exceed 40 years for children born in the 2000s. As a result, there has been a tremendous growth of the adult population that reached 40% of the overall approximately 5000 patients included in the CF French registry (Observatoire National de la Mucoviscidose). Lung disease remains the primary cause of morbidity and mortality. The characteristic phenotypic presentation associates bronchial and rhinosinusal symptoms, pancreatic insufficiency and liver disease. Bronchial damage leads to progressive chronic respiratory insufficiency. Diabetes mellitus and osteoporosis frequently appears in adulthood. Neonatal screening has been implemented in France since 2002. It will prevent delayed diagnosis and its deleterious consequences. Some atypical cases of CF presenting only with one or two organ system involvement can be diagnosed in adulthood. Isolated chronic rhinosinusitis, bronchiectasis, congenital bilateral absence of vas deferens, recurrent pancreatitis, allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, and some case of cholangitis may so revealed late form of cystic fibrosis. The health care is organized in cystic fibrosis centres. Despite gene discovery, treatment still remains symptomatic, based on intensive pulmonary and nutritional treatments. Challenges for new treatments are to correct the basic defect, either by gene therapy or by pharmacological modulation of the abnormal physiological processes.

  18. Cystic fibrosis since 1938.

    PubMed

    Davis, Pamela B

    2006-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) was distinguished from celiac disease in 1938. Then, it was a pathologic diagnosis, life expectancy was approximately 6 months, and the autosomal recessive disease was believed to arise from abnormal mucus plugging exocrine ducts. Death often occurred from lung infection. Discovery of the sweat electrolyte defect in 1953 and standardization of the sweat test in 1959 allowed identification of milder cases, and CF was no longer considered only a disorder of mucus. In 1955, establishment of centers with programs of aggressive, comprehensive care initiated striking improvement in longevity. The pillars of care established then (attention to nutrition, airway clearance, treatment of lung infection) remain today. In 1983, chloride transport was identified as the basic physiologic CF defect, accompanied by increased sodium reabsorption. In 1980, we learned that inflammation contributes independently to lung disease and constitutes an independent therapeutic target. In 1989, the discovery of the CF gene demonstrated the basic defect to be in a cAMP-regulated chloride channel. This afforded new diagnostic tests, opportunities for research, and prospects for using the gene as therapy. Since then, substantial advances in basic and clinical research catalyzed therapeutic improvements: median survival age now exceeds 30 years. The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation center network provides not only opportunity to conduct clinical trials but also means to disseminate new therapies. In the future, treatments directed at the basic defect can be expected, with concomitant improvements in morbidity and mortality.

  19. Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Respiratory Screen: Sputum

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Chloride Sweat Test Lungs and Respiratory System Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition Cystic Fibrosis Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition Lungs and Respiratory System Contact Us Print Resources Send to a friend ...

  20. Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Respiratory Screen: Sputum

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Chloride Sweat Test Lungs and Respiratory System Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition Cystic Fibrosis Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition Lungs and Respiratory System Contact Us Print Resources Send to a Friend ...

  1. What's it Like to Have Cystic Fibrosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... CPR: A Real Lifesaver Kids Talk About: Coaches Cystic Fibrosis KidsHealth > For Kids > Cystic Fibrosis Print A A ... strength to deal with cystic fibrosis. What Is CF? Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a disease that causes ...

  2. Cystic fibrosis in Uruguay.

    PubMed

    Luzardo, Gerardo; Aznarez, Isabel; Crispino, Beatriz; Mimbacas, Adriana; Martínez, Liria; Poggio, Rossana; Zielenski, Julian; Tsui, Lap-Chee; Cardoso, Horacio

    2002-03-31

    We conducted clinical and genetic analyses of 52 cystic fibrosis (CF) patients in Uruguay, which is about half of the known affected individuals in the country. A relatively high proportion had a mild presentation, characterized by pancreatic sufficiency (28%), a strong pulmonary component (97%), and borderline sweat electrolyte measurements (25%). Mutational analysis of CF chromosomes demonstrated a relatively low incidence of the DeltaF508 allele (40%) and a large number of other cystic fibrosis conductance regulator mutations, with an overall detection rate of about 71%. Fifteen different mutations were detected in our patients: DeltaF508, G542X, R1162X, G85E, N1303K, R334W, R75Q, R74W, D1270N, W1282X, DeltaI507, 2789+5G-->A, R1066C, -816C/T, R553X, as well as RNA splicing variant IVS8-5T. This group of Uruguayan CF patients has some characteristics in common with other populations of similar origin (Hispanics), as well as some unique characteristics.

  3. A new method to improve the clinical evaluation of cystic fibrosis patients by mucus viscoelastic properties.

    PubMed

    Tomaiuolo, Giovanna; Rusciano, Giulia; Caserta, Sergio; Carciati, Antonio; Carnovale, Vincenzo; Abete, Pasquale; Sasso, Antonio; Guido, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    In cystic fibrosis (CF) patients airways mucus shows an increased viscoelasticity due to the concentration of high molecular weight components. Such mucus thickening eventually leads to bacterial overgrowth and prevents mucus clearance. The altered rheological behavior of mucus results in chronic lung infection and inflammation, which causes most of the cases of morbidity and mortality, although the cystic fibrosis complications affect other organs as well. Here, we present a quantitative study on the correlation between cystic fibrosis mucus viscoelasticity and patients clinical status. In particular, a new diagnostic parameter based on the correlation between CF sputum viscoelastic properties and the severity of the disease, expressed in terms of FEV1 and bacterial colonization, was developed. By using principal component analysis, we show that the types of colonization and FEV1 classes are significantly correlated to the elastic modulus, and that the latter can be used for CF severity classification with a high predictive efficiency (88%). The data presented here show that the elastic modulus of airways mucus, given the high predictive efficiency, could be used as a new clinical parameter in the prognostic evaluation of cystic fibrosis.

  4. Clinical Mechanism of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Potentiator Ivacaftor in G551D-mediated Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Heltshe, Sonya L.; Gonska, Tanja; Donaldson, Scott H.; Borowitz, Drucy; Gelfond, Daniel; Sagel, Scott D.; Khan, Umer; Mayer-Hamblett, Nicole; Van Dalfsen, Jill M.; Joseloff, Elizabeth; Ramsey, Bonnie W.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Ivacaftor is a cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) potentiator recently approved for patients with CF age 6 and older with the G551D mutation. Objectives: To evaluate ivacaftor in a postapproval setting and determine mechanism of action and response of clinically relevant markers. Methods: We conducted a longitudinal cohort study in 2012–2013 in G551D CF patients age 6 and older with no prior exposure to ivacaftor. Study assessments were performed at baseline, 1, 3, and 6 months after ivacaftor initiation. Substudies evaluated mucociliary clearance, β-adrenergic sweat secretion rate, gastrointestinal pH, and sputum inflammation and microbiology Measurements and Main Results: A total of 151 of 153 subjects were prescribed ivacaftor and 88% completed the study through 6 months. FEV1 % predicted improved from baseline to 6 months (mean absolute change, 6.7%; P < 0.001). Similarly, body mass index improved from baseline to 6 months (mean change, 0.8 kg/m2; P < 0.001). Sweat chloride decreased from baseline to 6 months (mean change, −53.8 mmol/L; 95% confidence interval, −57.7 to −49.9; P < 0.001), reflecting augmented CFTR function. There was significant improvement in hospitalization rate (P < 0.001) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa burden (P < 0.01). Significant improvements in mucociliary clearance (P < 0.001), gastrointestinal pH (P = 0.001), and microbiome were also observed, providing clinical mechanisms underlying the therapeutic benefit of ivacaftor. Conclusions: Significant clinical and physiologic improvements were observed on initiation of ivacaftor in a broad patient population, including reduced infection with P. aeruginosa. Biomarker studies substantially improve the understanding of the mechanistic consequences of CFTR modulation on pulmonary and gastrointestinal physiology. PMID:24927234

  5. Nutritional management of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, A

    1996-01-01

    Nutritional support is an integral part of the management of cystic fibrosis patients. It is arguably best provided by a qualified dietitian and nutritional care sister working in conjunction with the rest of the cystic fibrosis team. The patient's nutritional needs should be assessed, regularly reviewed, and nutritional treatment tailored to meet the changing clinical and psychosocial needs of the patient. Nutritional intervention is not without complications, and in particular attention to normal feeding behaviour and vigilance when instituting supplementary nutrition may prevent many feeding difficulties. PMID:8660059

  6. What is the clinical significance of filamentous fungi positive sputum cultures in patients with cystic fibrosis?

    PubMed

    Liu, Jane C; Modha, Deborah E; Gaillard, Erol A

    2013-05-01

    In patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), the isolation of filamentous fungi, in particular Aspergillus spp. in the respiratory secretions is a common occurrence. Most of these patients do not fulfil the clinical criteria for a diagnosis of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA). The clinical relevance of filamentous fungi and whether antifungal therapy should be started in patients with persistent respiratory exacerbations who do not respond to two or more courses of appropriate oral or intravenous antibiotics and in whom no other organisms are isolated from respiratory secretions is a dilemma for the CF clinician. In this article, we review the epidemiology and clinical significance of filamentous fungi in the non-ABPA CF lung, with an emphasis on Aspergillus spp. colonisation (AC), the clinical relevance of Aspergillus spp. positive respiratory cultures and the outcome following antifungal therapy in these patients. Copyright © 2013 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Pneumothorax in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Kioumis, Ioannis P.; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Huang, Haidong; Li, Qiang; Dryllis, Georgios; Pitsiou, Georgia; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Lampaki, Sofia; Porpodis, Konstantinos; Zaric, Bojan; Branislav, Perin; Mpoukovinas, Ioannis; Lazaridis, George

    2014-01-01

    Pneumothorax is recognized as a common and life-threatening complication in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, especially in those who are infected with P. aeruginosa, B. cepacia or Aspergillus, need enteral feeding, are diagnosed as suffering from allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA), developed massive hemoptysis, and their respiratory function is seriously compromised. Structural impairment and altered airflow dynamics in the lungs of CF patients are considered as the main predisposing factors, but also inhaled medications and non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) could increase the risk of pneumothorax. Clinical presentation could range from dramatic to very mild. Management of spontaneous pneumothorax occurring to patients with CF is essentially similar to that for non-CF patients. Therapeutic options include intercostal tube drainage, video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS), and medical or surgical pleurodesis. Pneumothorax increases both short- and long-term morbidity and mortality in CF patients and causes significant deterioration of their quality of life. PMID:25337406

  8. Antibiotic Tolerance Induced by Lactoferrin in Clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Andrés, María T.; Viejo-Diaz, Mónica; Pérez, Francisco; Fierro, José F.

    2005-01-01

    Lactoferrin-induced cell depolarization and a delayed tobramycin-killing effect on Pseudomonas aeruginosa cells were correlated. This antibiotic tolerance effect (ATE) reflects the ability of a defense protein to modify the activity of an antibiotic as a result of its modulatory effect on bacterial physiology. P. aeruginosa isolates from cystic fibrosis patients showed higher ATE values (≤6-fold) than other clinical strains. PMID:15793153

  9. Baseline ultrasound and clinical correlates in children with cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Daniel H.; Ye, Wen; Molleston, Jean P.; Weymann, Alexander; Ling, Simon; Paranjape, Shruti M.; Romero, Rene; Schwarzenberg, Sara Jane; Palermo, Joseph; Alonso, Estella M.; Murray, Karen F.; Marshall, Bruce C.; Sherker, Averell H.; Siegel, Marilyn J.; Krishnamurthy, Rajesh; Harned, Roger; Karmazyn, Boaz; Magee, John C.; Narkewicz, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between abdominal ultrasound (US) findings and demographic, historical and clinical features in children with CF. Study design Children age 3-12 years with CF without known cirrhosis, were enrolled in a prospective, multi-center study of US to predict hepatic fibrosis. Consensus US patterns were assigned by 3 radiologists as normal, heterogeneous, homogeneous, or cirrhosis. Data were derived from direct collection and U.S. or Toronto CF registries. Chi-square or ANOVA were used to compare variables among US groups and between normal and abnormal. Logistic regression was used to study risk factors for having abnormal US. Results Findings in 719 subjects were normal (n=590, 82.1%), heterogeneous (64, 8.9%), homogeneous (41, 5.7%), and cirrhosis (24, 3.3%). Cirrhosis (p=0.0004), homogeneous (p<0.0001) and heterogeneous (p=0.03) were older than normal. More males were heterogeneous (p=0.001). More heterogeneous (15.0%, p=0.009) and cirrhosis (25.0%, p=0.005) had CF-related diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance versus normal (5.4%). Early infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (<2 years old) was associated with a lower risk (OR 0.42, p=0.0007) of abnormal. Ursodeoxycholic acid use (OR 3.69, p <0.0001) and CF-related diabetes (OR 2.21, p=0.019) were associated with increased risk of abnormal. Conclusions Unsuspected cirrhosis is seen in 3.3% of young patients with CF, heterogeneous in 8.9%. abnormal US is associated with CF-related diabetes, and early P aeruginosa is associated with normal US. Prospective assessment of these risk factors may identify potential interventional targets. PMID:26254836

  10. Detection of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Activity in Early-Phase Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Steven M.; Accurso, Frank; Clancy, John P.

    2007-01-01

    Advances in our understanding of cystic fibrosis pathogenesis have led to strategies directed toward treatment of underlying causes of the disease rather than treatments of disease-related symptoms. To expedite evaluation of these emerging therapies, early-phase clinical trials require extension of in vivo cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)–detecting assays to multicenter trial formats, including nasal potential difference and sweat chloride measurements. Both of these techniques can be used to fulfill diagnostic criteria for the disease, and can discriminate various levels of CFTR function. Full realization of these assays in multicenter clinical trials requires identification of sources of nonbiological intra- and intersite variability, and careful attention to study design and statistical analysis of study-generated data. In this review, we discuss several issues important to the performance of these assays, including efforts to identify and address aspects that can contribute to inconsistent and/or potentially erroneous results. Adjunctive means of detecting CFTR including mRNA expression, immunocytochemical localization, and other methods are also discussed. Recommendations are presented to advance our understanding of these biomarkers and to improve their capacity to predict cystic fibrosis outcomes. PMID:17652506

  11. Clinical impact of a highly prevalent Pseudomonas aeruginosa clone in Dutch cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    de Vrankrijker, A M M; Brimicombe, R W; Wolfs, T F W; Heijerman, H G M; van Mansfeld, R; van Berkhout, F T; Willems, R J L; Bonten, M J M; van der Ent, C K

    2011-03-01

    Studies suggest that infection with highly prevalent Pseudomonas aeruginosa clones in cystic fibrosis (CF) is associated with an unfavourable clinical outcome. We studied the clinical characteristics of patients infected with a recently described, highly prevalent P. aeruginosa clone (ST406) in two CF centres in The Netherlands. Multilocus sequence typing data were available for 219 patients, of whom 40 (18.3%) were infected with ST406 and 179 with other sequence types. ST406 infection was independently associated with age, having a sibling with ST406 infection and use of inhaled antibiotics, but not with unfavourable clinical outcome, suggesting that high transmissibility is not necessarily associated with high virulence.

  12. [News in cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Delaisi, B

    2013-08-01

    The improvement over the last two decades in the treatment of cystic fibrosis led to an increase in life expectancy approaching 40 years at birth. Logically, the population of adult patients has been increasing and is currently 50% of patients followed in France. These therapeutic advances have justified the establishment in 2003 of a generalized neonatal screening for cystic fibrosis. The latest data of this screening show an incidence of CF of 1/5359 live births, far below the incidence of 1/2500 which was widely accepted twenty years ago. The performance of this screening is currently based on the dosage of trypsin immuno reactive, followed in case of exceeding the threshold of a search of the 30 most common mutations, can detect around 96% of 150 to 200 CF cases every year. Therefore, the possibility of a false negative of the screening cannot be excluded and evocative symptoms of cystic fibrosis, even for children born after 2003, will lead to prescribe a sweat test. While treatments available so far goal consequences of cystic fibrosis, a new therapeutic class to correct the functional defect of the mutated protein, called CFTR modulators, is emerging. Ivacaftor, leader of this new class, belonging to the category of "CFTR potentiator" got its access on the market in September 2012 for patients carrying the G551D mutation. New other molecules, named "CFTR correctors" which can have synergistic effect with ivacaftor and concern patients carrying the most common mutation--DF 508--are under development. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  13. Infection with transmissible strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and clinical outcomes in adults with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Aaron, Shawn D; Vandemheen, Katherine L; Ramotar, Karam; Giesbrecht-Lewis, Tracy; Tullis, Elizabeth; Freitag, Andreas; Paterson, Nigel; Jackson, Mary; Lougheed, M Diane; Dowson, Christopher; Kumar, Vijay; Ferris, Wendy; Chan, Francis; Doucette, Steve; Fergusson, Dean

    2010-11-17

    Studies from Australia and the United Kingdom have shown that some patients with cystic fibrosis are infected with common transmissible strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. To determine the prevalence and incidence of infection with transmissible strains of P. aeruginosa and whether presence of the organism was associated with adverse clinical outcomes in Canada. Prospective observational cohort study of adult patients cared for at cystic fibrosis clinics in Ontario, Canada, with enrollment from September 2005 to September 2008. Sputum was collected at baseline, 3 months, and yearly thereafter for 3 years; and retrieved P. aeruginosa isolates were genotyped. Vital status (death or lung transplant) was assessed for all enrolled patients until December 31, 2009. Incidence and prevalence of P. aeruginosa isolation, rates of decline in lung function, and time to death or lung transplantation. Of the 446 patients with cystic fibrosis studied, 102 were discovered to be infected with 1 of 2 common transmissible strains of P. aeruginosa at study entry. Sixty-seven patients were infected with strain A (15%), 32 were infected with strain B (7%), and 3 were simultaneously infected with both strains (0.6%). Strain A was found to be genetically identical to the Liverpool epidemic strain but strain B has not been previously described as an epidemic strain. The incidence rate of new infections with these 2 transmissible strains was relatively low (7.0 per 1000 person-years; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.8-12.2 per 1000 person-years). Compared with patients infected with unique strains of P. aeruginosa, patients infected with the Liverpool epidemic strain (strain A) and strain B had similar declines in lung function (difference in decline in percent predicted forced expiratory volume in the first second of expiration of 0.64% per year [95% CI, -1.52% to 2.80% per year] and 1.66% per year [95% CI, -1.00% to 4.30%], respectively). However, the 3-year rate of death or lung

  14. Heart involvement in cystic fibrosis: A specific cystic fibrosis-related myocardial changes?

    PubMed

    Labombarda, Fabien; Saloux, Eric; Brouard, Jacques; Bergot, Emmanuel; Milliez, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a complex multi-systemic chronic disease characterized by progressive organ dysfunction with development of fibrosis, possibly affecting the heart. Over the last four decades pathological, experimental, and clinical evidence points towards the existence of a specific myocardial involvement in cystic fibrosis. Multi-modality cardiac imaging, especially recent echocardiographic techniques, evidenced diastolic and/or systolic ventricular dysfunction in cystic fibrosis leading to the concept of a cystic fibrosis-related cardiomyopathy. Hypoxemia and inflammation are among the most important factors for heart involvement in cystic fibrosis. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator was found to be involved in the regulation of cardiomyocyte contraction and may also account for cystic fibrosis-related myocardial dysfunction. This review, mainly focused on echocardiographic studies, seeks to synthesize the existing literature for and against the existence of heart involvement in cystic fibrosis, its mechanisms and prognostic implications. Careful investigation of the heart function may be helpful for risk stratification and therapeutic decisions in patients with cystic fibrosis.

  15. Cystic fibrosis and coeliac disease

    PubMed Central

    Goodchild, Mary C.; Nelson, R.; Anderson, Charlotte M.

    1973-01-01

    Two children, unrelated, in whom cystic fibrosis had been diagnosed at the ages of 14 weeks and 10 months, respectively, were found subsequently to suffer from coeliac disease as well. Both children are responding well to dietary gluten withdrawal and to conventional treatment for cystic fibrosis. It is suggested that cystic fibrosis may predispose to the development of coeliac disease. Therefore, jejunal biopsy may be a useful investigation in the occasional child with cystic fibrosis, who presents with unusual features, and who fails to thrive as well as expected. ImagesFIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 5FIG. 6 PMID:4517654

  16. Neonatal cystic fibrosis screening test

    MedlinePlus

    Cystic fibrosis screening - neonatal; Immunoreactive trypsinogen; IRT test; CF - screening ... better nutrition, growth, and lung function. This screening test helps doctors identify children with CF before they ...

  17. Clinical practice and genetic counseling for cystic fibrosis and CFTR-related disorders

    PubMed Central

    Moskowitz, Samuel M.; Chmiel, James F.; Sternen, Darci L.; Cheng, Edith; Gibson, Ronald L; Marshall, Susan G.; Cutting, Garry R.

    2009-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator-related disorders encompass a disease spectrum from focal male reproductive tract involvement in congenital absence of the vas deferens to multiorgan involvement in classic cystic fibrosis. The reproductive, gastrointestinal, and exocrine manifestations of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator deficiency are correlated with CFTR genotype, whereas the respiratory manifestations that are the main cause of morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis are less predictable. Molecular genetic testing of CFTR has led to new diagnostic strategies and will enable targeting of molecular therapies now in development. Older diagnostic methods that measure sweat chloride and nasal potential difference nonetheless remain important because of their sensitivity and specificity. In addition, the measurement of immunoreactive trypsinogen and the genotyping of CFTR alleles are key to newborn screening programs because of low cost. The multiorgan nature of cystic fibrosis leads to a heavy burden of care, thus therapeutic regimens are tailored to the specific manifestations present in each patient. The variability of cystic fibrosis lung disease and the variable expressivity of mild CFTR alleles complicate genetic counseling for this autosomal recessive disorder. Widespread implementation of newborn screening programs among populations with significant cystic fibrosis mutation carrier frequencies is expected to result in increasing demands on genetic counseling resources. PMID:19092437

  18. Clinical impact of Achromobacter xylosoxidans colonization/infection in patients with cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Firmida, M.C.; Pereira, R.H.V.; Silva, E.A.S.R.; Marques, E.A.; Lopes, A.J.

    2016-01-01

    The rate of diagnosis of colonization/infection of the airways with Achromobacter xylosoxidans has increased in cystic fibrosis patients, but its clinical significance is still controversial. This retrospective, case-control study aimed to evaluate the clinical impact of A. xylosoxidans colonization/infection in cystic fibrosis patients. Individuals who were chronically colonized/infected (n=10), intermittently colonized/infected (n=15), and never colonized/infected with A. xylosoxidans (n=18) were retrospectively evaluated during two periods that were 2 years apart. Demographic characteristics, clinical data, lung function, and chronic bacterial co-colonization data were evaluated. Of the total study population, 87% were pediatric patients and 65.1% were female. Individuals chronically colonized/infected with A. xylosoxidans had decreased forced expiratory volume in 1 s (51.7% in the chronic colonization/infection group vs 82.7% in the intermittent colonization/infection group vs 76% in the never colonized/infected group). Compared with the other two groups, the rate of co-colonization with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was higher in individuals chronically colonized/infected with A. xylosoxidans (P=0.002). Changes in lung function over 2 years in the three groups were not significant, although a trend toward a greater decrease in lung function was observed in the chronically colonized/infected group. Compared with the other two groups, there was a greater number of annual hospitalizations in patients chronically colonized/infected with A. xylosoxidans (P=0.033). In cystic fibrosis patients, there was an increased frequency of A. xylosoxidans colonization/infection in children, and lung function was reduced in patients who were chronically colonized/infected with A. xylosoxidans. Additionally, there were no differences in clinical outcomes during the 2-year period, except for an increased number of hospitalizations in patients with A. xylosoxidans

  19. Clinical impact of Achromobacter xylosoxidans colonization/infection in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Firmida, M C; Pereira, R H V; Silva, E A S R; Marques, E A; Lopes, A J

    2016-01-01

    The rate of diagnosis of colonization/infection of the airways with Achromobacter xylosoxidans has increased in cystic fibrosis patients, but its clinical significance is still controversial. This retrospective, case-control study aimed to evaluate the clinical impact of A. xylosoxidans colonization/infection in cystic fibrosis patients. Individuals who were chronically colonized/infected (n=10), intermittently colonized/infected (n=15), and never colonized/infected with A. xylosoxidans (n=18) were retrospectively evaluated during two periods that were 2 years apart. Demographic characteristics, clinical data, lung function, and chronic bacterial co-colonization data were evaluated. Of the total study population, 87% were pediatric patients and 65.1% were female. Individuals chronically colonized/infected with A. xylosoxidans had decreased forced expiratory volume in 1 s (51.7% in the chronic colonization/infection group vs 82.7% in the intermittent colonization/infection group vs 76% in the never colonized/infected group). Compared with the other two groups, the rate of co-colonization with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was higher in individuals chronically colonized/infected with A. xylosoxidans (P=0.002). Changes in lung function over 2 years in the three groups were not significant, although a trend toward a greater decrease in lung function was observed in the chronically colonized/infected group. Compared with the other two groups, there was a greater number of annual hospitalizations in patients chronically colonized/infected with A. xylosoxidans (P=0.033). In cystic fibrosis patients, there was an increased frequency of A. xylosoxidans colonization/infection in children, and lung function was reduced in patients who were chronically colonized/infected with A. xylosoxidans. Additionally, there were no differences in clinical outcomes during the 2-year period, except for an increased number of hospitalizations in patients with A. xylosoxidans.

  20. CXCR4+ granulocytes reflect fungal cystic fibrosis lung disease.

    PubMed

    Carevic, Melanie; Singh, Anurag; Rieber, Nikolaus; Eickmeier, Olaf; Griese, Matthias; Hector, Andreas; Hartl, Dominik

    2015-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis airways are frequently colonised with fungi. However, the interaction of these fungi with immune cells and the clinical relevance in cystic fibrosis lung disease are incompletely understood.We characterised granulocytes in airway fluids and peripheral blood from cystic fibrosis patients with and without fungal colonisation, non-cystic fibrosis disease controls and healthy control subjects cross-sectionally and longitudinally and correlated these findings with lung function parameters.Cystic fibrosis patients with chronic fungal colonisation by Aspergillus fumigatus were characterised by an accumulation of a distinct granulocyte subset, expressing the HIV coreceptor CXCR4. Percentages of airway CXCR4(+) granulocytes correlated with lung disease severity in patients with cystic fibrosis.These studies demonstrate that chronic fungal colonisation with A. fumigatus in cystic fibrosis patients is associated with CXCR4(+) airway granulocytes, which may serve as a potential biomarker and therapeutic target in fungal cystic fibrosis lung disease.

  1. A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase IIB clinical trial of repeated application of gene therapy in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Alton, Eric W F W; Boyd, A Christopher; Cheng, Seng H; Cunningham, Steve; Davies, Jane C; Gill, Deborah R; Griesenbach, Uta; Higgins, Tracy; Hyde, Stephen C; Innes, J Alastair; Murray, Gordon D; Porteous, David J

    2013-11-01

    The UK Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy Consortium has been working towards clinical gene therapy for patients with cystic fibrosis for several years. We have recently embarked on a large, multi-dose clinical trial of a non-viral, liposome-based formulation powered for the first time to detect clinical benefit. The article describes the details of the protocol.

  2. Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing molecules correlate with clinical status in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Halliday, Nigel; Cámara, Miguel; Barrett, David A.; Williams, Paul; Forrester, Douglas L.; Simms, Rebecca; Smyth, Alan R.; Honeybourne, David; Whitehouse, Joanna L.; Nash, Edward F.; Dewar, Jane; Clayton, Andrew; Knox, Alan J.; Fogarty, Andrew W.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces quorum sensing signal molecules that are potential biomarkers for infection. A prospective study of 60 cystic fibrosis patients with chronic P. aeruginosa, who required intravenous antibiotics for pulmonary exacerbations, was undertaken. Clinical measurements and biological samples were obtained at the start and end of the treatment period. Additional data were available for 29 of these patients when they were clinically stable. Cross-sectionally, quorum sensing signal molecules were detectable in the sputum, plasma and urine of 86%, 75% and 83% patients, respectively. They were positively correlated between the three biofluids. Positive correlations were observed for most quorum sensing signal molecules in sputum, plasma and urine, with quantitative measures of pulmonary P. aeruginosa load at the start of a pulmonary exacerbation. Plasma concentrations of 2-nonyl-4-hydroxy-quinoline (NHQ) were significantly higher at the start of a pulmonary exacerbation compared to clinical stability (p<0.01). Following the administration of systemic antibiotics, plasma 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline (p=0.02) and NHQ concentrations (p<0.01) decreased significantly. In conclusion, quorum sensing signal molecules are detectable in cystic fibrosis patients with pulmonary P. aeruginosa infection and are positively correlated with quantitative measures of P. aeruginosa. NHQ correlates with clinical status and has potential as a novel biomarker for P. aeruginosa infection. PMID:26022946

  3. Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing molecules correlate with clinical status in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Barr, Helen L; Halliday, Nigel; Cámara, Miguel; Barrett, David A; Williams, Paul; Forrester, Douglas L; Simms, Rebecca; Smyth, Alan R; Honeybourne, David; Whitehouse, Joanna L; Nash, Edward F; Dewar, Jane; Clayton, Andrew; Knox, Alan J; Fogarty, Andrew W

    2015-10-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces quorum sensing signal molecules that are potential biomarkers for infection.A prospective study of 60 cystic fibrosis patients with chronic P. aeruginosa, who required intravenous antibiotics for pulmonary exacerbations, was undertaken. Clinical measurements and biological samples were obtained at the start and end of the treatment period. Additional data were available for 29 of these patients when they were clinically stable.Cross-sectionally, quorum sensing signal molecules were detectable in the sputum, plasma and urine of 86%, 75% and 83% patients, respectively. They were positively correlated between the three biofluids. Positive correlations were observed for most quorum sensing signal molecules in sputum, plasma and urine, with quantitative measures of pulmonary P. aeruginosa load at the start of a pulmonary exacerbation. Plasma concentrations of 2-nonyl-4-hydroxy-quinoline (NHQ) were significantly higher at the start of a pulmonary exacerbation compared to clinical stability (p<0.01). Following the administration of systemic antibiotics, plasma 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline (p=0.02) and NHQ concentrations (p<0.01) decreased significantly.In conclusion, quorum sensing signal molecules are detectable in cystic fibrosis patients with pulmonary P. aeruginosa infection and are positively correlated with quantitative measures of P. aeruginosa. NHQ correlates with clinical status and has potential as a novel biomarker for P. aeruginosa infection.

  4. Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition

    MedlinePlus

    ... Getting an X-ray Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition KidsHealth > For Kids > Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition Print A A A What's in this article? ... is someone who knows all about food and nutrition. Each kid is different, but most kids with ...

  5. Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the Operating Room? Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition KidsHealth > For Kids > Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition A A A What's in this article? CF ... is someone who knows all about food and nutrition. Each kid is different, but most kids with ...

  6. Screening for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Dodge, J A; Ryley, H C

    1982-01-01

    Practicable methods are now available for whole population screening of neonates for cystic fibrosis. Although diagnosis and treatment of the disease from birth has not yet been unequivocally shown to improve prognosis, existing evidence suggests that this is likely. Further ethical reasons are proposed in support of neonatal diagnosis and early treatment. The development of tests for prenatal diagnosis and carrier detection is under active investigation, and raises ethical problems for heterozygotes and their medical advisers. The heavy financial and emotional burden this disease imposes on the patient and the family should not be underestimated when policy decisions are made. PMID:7138066

  7. Cystic fibrosis and sleep.

    PubMed

    Katz, Eliot S

    2014-09-01

    Sleep disturbances are frequently observed in cystic fibrosis (CF). The resultant sleep fragmentation, short sleep duration, and gas-exchange abnormalities are postulated to contribute to the neurocognitive, cardiovascular, and metabolic abnormalities associated with CF. There are no outcomes data to establish the optimal procedure for screening and treating CF patients for sleep-related respiratory abnormalities. Therapy with supplemental oxygen and bilevel ventilation are widely considered to be effective in the short term, but there are few evidence-based data to support long-term improvements in morbidity and mortality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Voice Disorder in Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lourenço, Bruna Mendes; Costa, Kauê Machado; da Silva Filho, Manoel

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a common autosomal recessive disorder with drastic respiratory symptoms, including shortness of breath and chronic cough. While most of cystic fibrosis treatment is dedicated to mitigating the effects of respiratory dysfunction, the potential effects of this disease on vocal parameters have not been systematically studied. We hypothesized that cystic fibrosis patients, given their characteristic respiratory disorders, would also present dysphonic symptoms. Given that voice disorders can severely impair quality of life, the identification of a potential cystic fibrosis-related dysphonia could be of great value for the clinical evaluation and treatment of this disease. We tested our hypothesis by measuring vocal parameters, using both objective physical measures and the GRBAS subjective evaluation method, in male and female cystic fibrosis patients undergoing conventional treatment and compared them to age and sex matched controls. We found that cystic fibrosis patients had a significantly lower vocal intensity and harmonic to noise ratio, as well as increased levels of jitter and shimmer. In addition, cystic fibrosis patients also showed higher scores of roughness, breathiness and asthenia, as well as a significantly altered general grade of dysphonia. When we segregated the results according to sex, we observed that, as a group, only female cystic fibrosis patients had significantly lower values of harmonic to noise ratio and an abnormal general grade of dysphonia in relation to matched controls, suggesting that cystic fibrosis exerts a more pronounced effect on vocal parameters of women in relation to men. Overall, the dysphonic characteristics of CF patients can be explained by dysfunctions in vocal fold movement and partial upper airway obstruction, potentially caused by the accumulation of mucus and chronic cough characteristic of CF symptomatology. Our results show that CF patients exhibit significant dysphonia and suggest they may

  9. Voice disorder in cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Lourenço, Bruna Mendes; Costa, Kauê Machado; da Silva Filho, Manoel

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a common autosomal recessive disorder with drastic respiratory symptoms, including shortness of breath and chronic cough. While most of cystic fibrosis treatment is dedicated to mitigating the effects of respiratory dysfunction, the potential effects of this disease on vocal parameters have not been systematically studied. We hypothesized that cystic fibrosis patients, given their characteristic respiratory disorders, would also present dysphonic symptoms. Given that voice disorders can severely impair quality of life, the identification of a potential cystic fibrosis-related dysphonia could be of great value for the clinical evaluation and treatment of this disease. We tested our hypothesis by measuring vocal parameters, using both objective physical measures and the GRBAS subjective evaluation method, in male and female cystic fibrosis patients undergoing conventional treatment and compared them to age and sex matched controls. We found that cystic fibrosis patients had a significantly lower vocal intensity and harmonic to noise ratio, as well as increased levels of jitter and shimmer. In addition, cystic fibrosis patients also showed higher scores of roughness, breathiness and asthenia, as well as a significantly altered general grade of dysphonia. When we segregated the results according to sex, we observed that, as a group, only female cystic fibrosis patients had significantly lower values of harmonic to noise ratio and an abnormal general grade of dysphonia in relation to matched controls, suggesting that cystic fibrosis exerts a more pronounced effect on vocal parameters of women in relation to men. Overall, the dysphonic characteristics of CF patients can be explained by dysfunctions in vocal fold movement and partial upper airway obstruction, potentially caused by the accumulation of mucus and chronic cough characteristic of CF symptomatology. Our results show that CF patients exhibit significant dysphonia and suggest they may

  10. [Microbiological parameters of clinical interest in pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Ballestero, S; Escobar, H; Suárez, L; Baquero, F

    1996-04-01

    A 5-year study in patients with cystic fibrosis was carried out in order to gain a better understanding of the microbiological factors influencing clinical status and evolution. Fifty-two patients were evaluated (mean age 16.6 years, range 0-36) during a 5 years-period (July 1988- July 1992). The clinical score of Shwachman and pulmonary function were evaluated at the beginning and at the end of the study period. Quantitative bacterial cultures were performed every 3 weeks recording the different colonical morphotypes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Beside the expected results regarding the prevalence of P. aeruginosa (80.7%) and Staphylococcus aureus (65.5%), a low rate of chronic infection with Burkholderia cepacia (1.9%) and high with S. maltophilia (9.6%) was found and it is worth noting the presence of Salmonella spp. in 3 patients. Microbial colonization followed the classical age-related sequence with 53.8% of patients older than 10 colonized with mucoid strains of P. aeruginosa. Colonization with mucoid Pseudomonas, increase in sputum bacterial counts and high diversity in colonizing morphotypes were parameters related with reduced clinical scores. The sequential study of the bacterial colonization in cystic fibrosis is important to follow the prognosis and evolution of the disease, and therefore, to choose the most effective therapy.

  11. Discovery of Clinically Approved Agents That Promote Suppression of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Nonsense Mutations.

    PubMed

    Mutyam, Venkateshwar; Du, Ming; Xue, Xiaojiao; Keeling, Kim M; White, E Lucile; Bostwick, J Robert; Rasmussen, Lynn; Liu, Bo; Mazur, Marina; Hong, Jeong S; Falk Libby, Emily; Liang, Feng; Shang, Haibo; Mense, Martin; Suto, Mark J; Bedwell, David M; Rowe, Steven M

    2016-11-01

    Premature termination codons (PTCs) in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene cause cystic fibrosis (CF). Several agents are known to suppress PTCs but are poorly efficacious or toxic. To determine whether there are clinically available agents that elicit translational readthrough and improve CFTR function sufficient to confer therapeutic benefit to patients with CF with PTCs. Two independent screens, firefly luciferase and CFTR-mediated transepithelial chloride conductance assay, were performed on a library of 1,600 clinically approved compounds using fisher rat thyroid cells stably transfected with stop codons. Select agents were further evaluated using secondary screening assays including short circuit current analysis on primary cells from patients with CF. In addition, the effect of CFTR modulators (ivacaftor) was tested in combination with the most efficacious agents. From the primary screen, 48 agents were selected as potentially active. Following confirmatory tests in the transepithelial chloride conductance assay and prioritizing agents based on favorable pharmacologic properties, eight agents were advanced for secondary screening. Ivacaftor significantly increased short circuit current following forskolin stimulation in cells treated with pyranoradine tetraphosphate, potassium p-aminobenzoate, and escin as compared with vehicle control. Escin, an herbal agent, consistently induced readthrough activity as demonstrated by enhanced CFTR expression and function in vitro. Clinically approved drugs identified as potential readthrough agents, in combination with ivacaftor, may induce nonsense suppression to restore therapeutic levels of CFTR function. One or more agents may be suitable to advance to human testing.

  12. Burkholderia cepacia complex: clinical course in cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Folescu, Tania Wrobel; da Costa, Claudia Henrique; Cohen, Renata Wrobel Folescu; da Conceição Neto, Orlando Carlos; Albano, Rodolpho Mattos; Marques, Elizabeth Andrade

    2015-12-08

    Pulmonary deterioration after B.cepacia complex (BCC) colonization has a heterogeneous pattern. The aim was to investigate the clinical outcome of BCC colonization in CF patients chronically colonized with P. aeruginosa. CF patients chronically colonized with P. aeruginosa were divided into three groups: intermittent (I), chronic (II) and no colonization (III) with BCC. Body mass index (BMI) percentile and spirometric parameters were analyzed at three different times in each group. Fifty-six patients chronically colonized with P. aeruginosa were included. Of these, 27 also had evidence of BCC colonization (13 intermittent and 14 chronic). BMI percentile was significantly lower among patients chronically colonized by both P. aeruginosa and BCC. Mean values of FEV1 and FVC % were also significantly lower in these patients, both at the time of chronic BCC colonization and 24 months forward. Chronic BCC colonization is associated with significant loss of lung function. Lower BMI might be a risk factor for chronic BCC colonization, preceding these events.

  13. Key findings of the US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation's clinical practice benchmarking project.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Michael P; Sabadosa, Kathryn A; Quinton, Hebe B; Marshall, Bruce C; Schechter, Michael S

    2014-04-01

    Benchmarking is the process of using outcome data to identify high-performing centres and determine practices associated with their outstanding performance. The US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (CFF) Patient Registry contains centre-specific outcomes data for all CFF-certified paediatric and adult cystic fibrosis (CF) care programmes in the USA. The CFF benchmarking project analysed these registry data, adjusting for differences in patient case mix known to influence outcomes, and identified the top-performing US paediatric and adult CF care programmes for pulmonary and nutritional outcomes. Separate multidisciplinary paediatric and adult benchmarking teams each visited 10 CF care programmes, five in the top quintile for pulmonary outcomes and five in the top quintile for nutritional outcomes. Key practice patterns and approaches present in both paediatric and adult programmes with outstanding clinical outcomes were identified and could be summarised as systems, attitudes, practices, patient/family empowerment and projects. These included: (1) the presence of strong leadership and a well-functioning care team working with a systematic approach to providing consistent care; (2) high expectations for outcomes among providers and families; (3) early and aggressive management of clinical declines, avoiding reliance on 'rescues'; and (4) patients/families that were engaged, empowered and well informed on disease management and its rationale. In summary, assessment of practice patterns at CF care centres with top-quintile pulmonary and nutritional outcomes provides insight into characteristic practices that may aid in optimising patient outcomes.

  14. Cystic Fibrosis: Prenatal Screening and Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Cystic Fibrosis: Prenatal Screening and Diagnosis Home For Patients Search ... Screening and Diagnosis FAQ171, June 2017 PDF Format Cystic Fibrosis: Prenatal Screening and Diagnosis Pregnancy What is cystic ...

  15. [Life-threatening hemoptysis in cystic fibrosis: clinical characteristics and management in 36 episodes].

    PubMed

    Máiz, Luis; Girón, Rosa; Martínez, María Teresa; Prados, Concepción; Escobar, Héctor; Garzón, Gonzalo; Sánchez, Juan; Mingo, Alberto; Blázquez, Javier

    2002-03-09

    Our goal was to evaluate the clinical characteristics and management of life-threatening hemoptysis in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). We included adult CF patients followed up at the Cystic Fibrosis Units of the Autonomous Community of Madrid who had life-threatening hemoptysis from June 1990 to December 1999. Twelve CF patients (4 females) developed 36 episodes of life-threatening hemoptysis (30 massive and 6 recurrent). Lung disease was moderate to severe. Sputum cultures revealed Pseudomonas aeruginosa in 10 patients. Thirteen episodes (36%) resolved upon antibiotic treatment and 3 (8%) after antibiotic therapy and bronchoscopy. Bronchial artery embolization (BAE) was performed in 20 of 36 events. Immediate technique success was achieved in 80% episodes (16 of 20) after one session, 85% (17/20) after two sessions, and 95% (19/20) after three sessions. No major complications associated with the procedure were seen. The overall recurrence rate per episode was 69% (24 of 35 episodes in 6 patients) with a mean time of recurrence of 13 months. There were no massive hemoptysis-associated deaths during the follow-up. Life-threatening hemoptysis is a frequent complication in CF patients who have moderate or severe lung disease. When conservative therapeutic measures (including antibiotics) fail to control it, BAE should be performed. When performed by expert professionals, BAE is effective and safe to immediate control of life-threatening hemoptysis in patients with CF.

  16. Clinical Impact of Blood Culture Results in Acutely Ill Hospitalized Adult Patients With Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Vender, Robert J.; Vender, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Blood cultures are obtained clinically to confirm site and source of acute infection as well as to guide effective antibiotic therapies. Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) are at risk for blood stream infection (BSI) as identified from positive blood culture results. Methods A retrospective chart review was performed of 190 adult CF patients from January 1, 2001 through December 1, 2015. All positive blood culture results were identified as to clinical relevance and source of BSI. Results There were a total of 3,053 blood cultures. One hundred fifty-one positive blood cultures were considered pathogenic and clinically significant. Venous access device-related BSI was identified in 31 evaluable patients and 106 blood cultures. Nineteen patients and 45 positive blood cultures were attributable to organ-specific sources. Conclusion Two patterns of BSI were identified: 1) venous access device infections without causal mortality and 2) organ-specific site infections with associated 26% mortality. PMID:27829951

  17. Gastrointestinal Manifestations of Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis has historically been considered a pulmonary disease, but with the increasing life expectancy of these patients, gastrointestinal manifestations are becoming more important. Furthermore, nutritional status is closely linked to pulmonary function and, thus, overall mortality. This article discusses gastrointestinal manifestations (which involve nutritional, pancreatic, hepatobiliary, and, in particular, gastrointestinal tract issues) of cystic fibrosis as well as management of the disease. In addition, the article discusses studies that have been critical to our understanding of gastrointestinal manifestations of cystic fibrosis. PMID:27330503

  18. Nutritional Issues in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Missale; Bozic, Molly; Mascarenhas, Maria R

    2016-03-01

    The importance of maintaining adequate nutrition in patients with cystic fibrosis has been well known for the past 3 decades. Achieving normal growth and maintaining optimal nutrition is associated with improved lung function. Comprehensive and consistent nutritional assessments at regular intervals can identify those at risk of nutritional failure and uncover micronutrient deficiencies contributing to malnutrition. Management of malnutrition in cystic fibrosis should follow a stepwise approach to determine the causes and comorbidities and to develop a nutritional plan. Nutritional management is crucial at every stage in a person's life with cystic fibrosis and remains a cornerstone of management.

  19. Bowel ultrasound imaging in patients with cystic fibrosis: Relationship with clinical symptoms and CFTR genotype.

    PubMed

    Fraquelli, Mirella; Baccarin, Alessandra; Corti, Fabiola; Conti, Clara Benedetta; Russo, Maria Chiara; Della Valle, Serena; Pozzi, Roberta; Cressoni, Massimo; Conte, Dario; Colombo, Carla

    2016-03-01

    Ultrasound imaging is used to assess bowel abnormalities in gastrointestinal diseases. We aimed to assess the rate of predefined bowel ultrasound signs and their relationship with gastrointestinal symptoms and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) genotype in cystic fibrosis patients in regular follow-up. Prospective study of 70 consecutive patients with cystic fibrosis and 45 controls who underwent abdominal ultrasound; pertinent findings were related to gastrointestinal symptoms and, in cystic fibrosis patients, to pancreatic status, malabsorption degree, lipase intake, CFTR genotype (classified as severe or mild against functional class of CFTR mutations). 96% patients showed at least one abnormal bowel ultrasound sign. Most frequent signs were lymph node enlargement (64%), bowel loop dilatation (55%), thick corpuscular intraluminal content (49%), bowel wall hypervascularization (26%), thickened bowel wall (22%) and intussusception (17%). Patients with recurrent abdominal pain showed more bowel wall hypervascularization than patients without recurrent pain (47% vs. 19%, respectively; p = 0.02) and intussusception (58% vs. 17%, respectively; p < 0.01). Genotype was not associated to specific bowel ultrasound signs. Patients with bowel loop intussusception showed greater lipase intake than those without intussusception (8.118 ± 2.083 vs. 5.994 ± 4.187, respectively; p < 0.01). Cystic fibrosis patients present a higher rate of bowel ultrasound abnormalities than controls. Bowel ultrasound abnormalities are associated with abdominal symptoms. Copyright © 2015 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Immunoglobulin and IgG subclass levels in a regional pediatric cystic fibrosis clinic.

    PubMed

    Garside, J P; Kerrin, D P; Brownlee, K G; Gooi, H C; Taylor, J M; Conway, S P

    2005-02-01

    The aim of this study was to report serum immunoglobulin (Ig) and IgG subclass levels in a large pediatric population with cystic fibrosis, and relate these to measures of disease severity. Total immunoglobulin levels were measured in 154 patients, and IgG subclass levels were measured in 136 patients and compared to age-related normal population data and to levels reported in previously published studies of children with cystic fibrosis. Clinical data were also collected: genotype; height, weight, and BMI standard deviation scores; FEV(1) (as percent predicted); Shwachmann-Kulczycki (S-K) and Northern chest X-ray scores; and Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection status. The clinical well-being of patients with hypo- or hyper-gammaglobulinemia was compared with age- and sex-matched control patients who had normal levels of gammaglobulin. IgG subclass levels were measured, and the results were compared with previous studies. Eleven patients had hypergammaglobulinemia (7.8% compared with 0-69% in the published literature). Patients with hypergammaglobulinemia had lower FEV(1) percent-predicted values, and worse S-K and Northern chest X-ray scores than controls. Three patients had hypogammaglobulinemia (1.9% compared with 0-10.8% in the published literature). There was no difference in any clinical parameter between controls and those with hypogammaglobulinemia. Nineteen patients (14%) had low levels of IgG1, and 40 patients (29%) had low levels of IgG2. The low percentage of patients with abnormally high immunoglobulin levels probably reflects the improved respiratory status of today's children with CF. The low percentage of those with low IgG probably reflects better nutritional status. The finding of worse lung function and clinical scores in patients with hypergammaglobulinemia agrees with the published literature. The high percentage of patients with low IgG2 was unexpected and was not previously reported. The clinical significance of this in patients with CF is

  1. Cystic fibrosis in pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Kent, N E; Farquharson, D F

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the outcomes of pregnancies in women with cystic fibrosis (CF) and to address issues pertinent to the obstetric care of such women. DATA SOURCES: English-language case reports and case series published from 1960 to 1991 identified through a search of MEDLINE and Index Medicus. The terms of reference were "cystic fibrosis" and "pregnancy". Not all the reports reviewed addressed all the outcomes under consideration. STUDY SELECTION: A total of 20 reports citing cases of pregnancy in women with CF. DATA EXTRACTION: Outcomes included the number of spontaneous abortions, pregnancies continued beyond 20 weeks, preterm deliveries, maternal deaths at 6 months and 2 years after delivery and perinatal deaths. Breast-feeding was addressed. Measures to assess the severity of maternal disease included the mean age at diagnosis of CF, weight gain during pregnancy, pulmonary function studies if available and the need for pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy. DATA SYNTHESIS: Of 217 pregnancies in 162 women spontaneous abortion occurred in 10 (4.6%). Pregnancy progressed beyond 20 weeks in 81.6% of cases; 24.3% of the deliveries were preterm. The maternal death rate did not exceed that among age-related women with CF who were not pregnant. The rate of perinatal death was 7.9%. Breast milk was not hypernatremic. Poor outcomes were associated with a weight gain of less than 4.5 kg and a forced vital capacity of less than 50% of the predicted value. CONCLUSIONS: Premature labour and delivery remain a significant risk for pregnant women with CF, contributing to a high rate of perinatal death. Maternal illness and death result from deteriorating pulmonary function. Breast-feeding is not contraindicated. Attention to energy intake and pulmonary function is important. PMID:8374843

  2. Outcome measures for clinical trials assessing treatment of cystic fibrosis lung disease

    PubMed Central

    VanDevanter, Donald R; Konstan, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a complex genetic disease characterized by death from loss of lung function. Therapies target pathophysiologic changes associated with pulmonary disease progression. Although therapeutic mechanisms differ, efficacy demonstration is limited to a few accepted outcome measures, each with shortcomings that are becoming more pronounced as CF population health improves. Pulmonary function improvement (as forced expiratory volume in 1 s [FEV1]) and reduction of pulmonary exacerbation risk are commonly used outcomes. Changes in FEV1 decline rate, quality of life, linear growth and/or weight gain are less utilized outcomes. Validated outcomes tend to work best in subjects with more aggressive or advanced lung disease and less so in healthier subjects. Assays of effects on primary therapeutic targets have yet to be validated as surrogate measures of clinical efficacy. As CF population health improves, it will become increasingly difficult to employ current clinical outcome measures to demonstrate efficacy. PMID:26146539

  3. [Lung physiotherapy in cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Gursli, S; Haanaes, O C

    1991-02-28

    This article is intended as a brief practical guide for physicians and physiotherapists concerned with the treatment of cystic fibrosis. Physiotherapeutic techniques for the treatment of chest diseases have been developed and modified as advances have taken place in the medical management of cystic fibrosis. The article describes forced expiratory technique, positive expiratory pressure, postural drainage, autogenic drainage and other techniques. Patients with cystic fibrosis live longer and have a better quality of life than ever before, but progressive deterioration of lung function will always be their most serious problem. Physical activity and chest physiotherapy are essential parts of all treatment regimens for cystic fibrosis. It is important to realize that the physiotherapist is a very important member of the team which includes nurses, physicians-and the patient.

  4. Assessment of Correlation between Sweat Chloride Levels and Clinical Features of Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Raina, Manzoor A.; Khan, Mosin S.; Malik, Showkat A.; Raina, AB Hameed; Makhdoomi, Mudassir J.; Bhat, Javed I.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disorder and the incidence of this disease is undermined in Northern India. The distinguishable salty character of the sweat belonging to individuals suffering from CF makes sweat chloride estimation essential for diagnosis of CF disease. Aim The aim of this prospective study was to elucidate the relationship of sweat chloride levels with clinical features and pattern of CF. Materials and Methods A total of 182 patients, with clinical features of CF were included in this study for quantitative measurement of sweat chloride. Sweat stimulation and collection involved pilocarpine iontophoresis based on the Gibson and Cooks methodology. The quantitative estimation of chloride was done by Schales and Schales method with some modifications. Cystic Fibrosis Trans Membrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) mutation status was recorded in case of patients with borderline sweat chloride levels to correlate the results and for follow-up. Results Out of 182 patients having clinical features consistent with CF, borderline and elevated sweat chloride levels were present in 9 (5%) and 41 (22.5%) subjects respectively. Elevated sweat chloride levels were significantly associated with wheeze, Failure To Thrive (FTT), history of CF in Siblings, product of Consanguineous Marriage (CM), digital clubbing and steatorrhoea on univariate analysis. On multivariate analysis only wheeze, FTT and steatorrhoea were found to be significantly associated with elevated sweat chloride levels (p<0.05). Among the nine borderline cases six cases were positive for at least two CFTR mutations and rest of the three cases were not having any mutation in CFTR gene. Conclusion The diagnosis is often delayed and the disease is advanced in most patients at the time of diagnosis. Sweat testing is a gold standard for diagnosis of CF patients as genetic mutation profile being heterozygous and unlikely to become diagnostic test. PMID:28208841

  5. Pneumococcal vaccines for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Laura; Southern, Kevin W

    2014-08-05

    Invasive pneumococcal disease is associated with significant mortality and many countries have introduced routine pneumococcal vaccination into their childhood immunisation programmes. Whilst pneumococcal disease in cystic fibrosis is uncommon, pneumococcal immunisation may offer some protection against pulmonary exacerbations caused by this pathogen. In the USA and UK pneumococcal vaccination is currently recommended for all children and adults with cystic fibrosis. To assess the efficacy of pneumococcal vaccines in reducing morbidity in people with cystic fibrosis. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Cystic Fibrosis Trials Register, which comprises references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. In addition, the pharmaceutical manufacturers of the polysaccharide and conjugate pneumococcal vaccines were approached.Date of the most recent search: 15 May 2014. Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing pneumococcal vaccination (with either a polysaccharide or conjugate pneumococcal vaccine) with non-vaccination or placebo in children or adults with cystic fibrosis were eligible for inclusion. No relevant trials were identified. There are no trials included in this review. As no trials were identified we cannot draw conclusions on the efficacy of routine pneumococcal immunisation in people with cystic fibrosis in reducing their morbidity or mortality. As many countries now include pneumococcal immunisation in their routine childhood vaccination schedule it is unlikely that future randomised controlled trials will be initiated. Rigorously conducted epidemiological studies may offer the opportunity to evaluate the efficacy of pneumococcal vaccination in reducing morbidity and mortality in people with cystic fibrosis.

  6. Pneumococcal vaccines for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Laura; Southern, Kevin W

    2012-09-12

    Invasive pneumococcal disease is associated with significant mortality and many countries have introduced routine pneumococcal vaccination into their childhood immunisation programmes. Whilst pneumococcal disease in cystic fibrosis is uncommon, pneumococcal immunisation may offer some protection against pulmonary exacerbations caused by this pathogen. In the USA and UK pneumococcal vaccination is currently recommended for all children and adults with cystic fibrosis. To assess the efficacy of pneumococcal vaccines in reducing morbidity in people with cystic fibrosis. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Cystic Fibrosis Trials Register, which comprises references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. In addition, the pharmaceutical manufacturers of the polysaccharide and conjugate pneumococcal vaccines were approached.Date of the most recent search: 10 July 2012. Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing pneumococcal vaccination (with either a polysaccharide or conjugate pneumococcal vaccine) with non-vaccination or placebo in children or adults with cystic fibrosis were eligible for inclusion. No relevant trials were identified. There are no trials included in this review. As no trials were identified we cannot draw conclusions on the efficacy of routine pneumococcal immunisation in people with cystic fibrosis in reducing their morbidity or mortality. As many countries now include pneumococcal immunisation in their routine childhood vaccination schedule it is unlikely that future randomised controlled trials will be initiated. Rigorously conducted epidemiological studies may offer the opportunity to evaluate the efficacy of pneumococcal vaccination in reducing morbidity and mortality in people with cystic fibrosis.

  7. Management of pulmonary exacerbations in cystic fibrosis: still an unmet medical need in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Justicia, José Luis; Solé, Amparo; Quintana-Gallego, Esther; Gartner, Silvia; de Gracia, Javier; Prados, Concepción; Máiz, Luis

    2015-04-01

    Pulmonary exacerbation (PEx) is a hallmark of cystic fibrosis. Although several criteria have been proposed for the definition of PEx, no consensus has yet been reached. Very often, many PEx cases go unreported. A standardized and validated definition is needed to reduce variability in clinical practice. The pathophysiology of recurrent episodes remains unclear, and both onset and risk are multifactorial. PEx leads to increased healthcare costs, impaired quality of life and a cycle in which PEx causes loss of lung function, which predisposes to further episodes. The number of episodes affects survival. Although early diagnosis and aggressive treatment are highly recommended, measures to prevent the emergence of new PEx are even more important. In particular, inhaled antibiotics administered under new treatment schedules could play a key role in preventing exacerbations and thus delay decline in lung function and reduce mortality. The primary objective is zero exacerbations.

  8. The differential clinical impact of human coronavirus species in children with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    da Silva Filho, Luiz Vicente Ribeiro Ferreira; Zerbinati, Rodrigo Melim; Tateno, Adriana Fumie; Boas, Lucy Vilas; de Almeida, Marina Buarque; Levi, José Eduardo; Drexler, Jan Felix; Drosten, Christian; Pannuti, Cláudio Sérgio

    2012-08-01

    We investigated the clinical impact of human coronaviruses (HCoV) OC43, 229E, HKU1 and NL63 in pediatric patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) during routine and exacerbation visits. A total of 408 nasopharyngeal aspirate samples were obtained from 103 patients over a 1-year period. Samples positive for HCoV were submitted for nucleotide sequencing to determine the species. Nineteen samples (4.65%) were positive for HCoV, of which 8 were positive for NL63, 6 for OC43, 4 for HKU1, and 1 for 229E. Identification of HCoV was not associated with an increased rate of respiratory exacerbations, but NL63-positive patients had higher exacerbation rates than patients who were positive for other HCoV species.

  9. Association between clinical antibiotic resistance and susceptibility of Pseudomonas in the cystic fibrosis lung

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Gunther; Mahrt, Niels; Tueffers, Leif; Barbosa, Camilo; Harjes, Malte; Adolph, Gernot; Friedrichs, Anette; Krenz-Weinreich, Annegret; Rosenstiel, Philip; Schulenburg, Hinrich

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives: Cystic fibrosis patients suffer from chronic lung infections that require long-term antibiotic therapy. Pseudomonas readily evolve resistance, rendering antibiotics ineffective. In vitro experiments suggest that resistant bacteria may be treated by exploiting their collateral sensitivity to other antibiotics. Here, we investigate correlations of sensitivity and resistance profiles of Pseudomonas aeruginosa that naturally adapted to antibiotics in the cystic fibrosis lung. Methodology: Resistance profiles for 13 antibiotics were obtained using broth dilution, E-test and VITEK mass spectroscopy. Genetic variants were determined from whole-genome sequences and interrelationships among isolates were analyzed using 13 MLST loci. Result: Our study focused on 45 isolates from 13 patients under documented treatment with antibiotics. Forty percent of these were clinically resistant and 15% multi-drug resistant. Colistin resistance was found once, despite continuous colistin treatment and even though colistin resistance can readily evolve experimentally in the laboratory. Patients typically harbored multiple genetically and phenotypically distinct clones. However, genetically similar clones often had dissimilar resistance profiles. Isolates showed mutations in genes encoding cell wall synthesis, alginate production, efflux pumps and antibiotic modifying enzymes. Cross-resistance was commonly observed within antibiotic classes and between aminoglycosides and β-lactam antibiotics. No evidence was found for consistent phenotypic resistance to one antibiotic and sensitivity to another within one genotype. Conclusions and implications: Evidence supporting potential collateral sensitivity in clinical P. aeruginosa isolates remains equivocal. However, cross-resistance within antibiotic classes is common. Colistin therapy is promising since resistance to it was rare despite its intensive use in the studied patients. PMID:27193199

  10. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Cystic Fibrosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Cystic Fibrosis? The signs and symptoms of cystic fibrosis (CF) ... respiratory, digestive, or reproductive systems of the body. Cystic Fibrosis Figure A shows the organs that cystic fibrosis ...

  11. Liver Disease in Cystic Fibrosis: an Update

    PubMed Central

    Parisi, Giuseppe Fabio; Di Dio, Giovanna; Franzonello, Chiara; Gennaro, Alessia; Rotolo, Novella; Lionetti, Elena; Leonardi, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    Context Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most widespread autosomal recessive genetic disorder that limits life expectation amongst the Caucasian population. As the median survival has increased related to early multidisciplinary intervention, other manifestations of CF have emergedespecially for the broad spectrum of hepatobiliary involvement. The present study reviews the existing literature on liver disease in cystic fibrosis and describes the key issues for an adequate clinical evaluation and management of patients, with a focus on the pathogenetic, clinical and diagnostic-therapeutic aspects of liver disease in CF. Evidence Acquisition A literature search of electronic databases was undertaken for relevant studies published from 1990 about liver disease in cystic fibrosis. The databases searched were: EMBASE, PubMed and Cochrane Library. Results CF is due to mutations in the gene on chromosome 7 that encodes an amino acidic polypeptide named CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator). The hepatic manifestations include particular changes referring to the basic CFTR defect, iatrogenic lesions or consequences of the multisystem disease. Even though hepatobiliary disease is the most common non-pulmonary cause ofmortalityin CF (the third after pulmonary disease and transplant complications), only about the 33%ofCF patients presents clinically significant hepatobiliary disease. Conclusions Liver disease will have a growing impact on survival and quality of life of cystic fibrosis patients because a longer life expectancy and for this it is important its early recognition and a correct clinical management aimed atdelaying the onset of complications. This review could represent an opportunity to encourage researchers to better investigate genotype-phenotype correlation associated with the development of cystic fibrosis liver disease, especially for non-CFTR genetic polymorphisms, and detect predisposed individuals. Therapeutic trials are needed to find strategies of

  12. Peripheral muscle abnormalities in cystic fibrosis: Etiology, clinical implications and response to therapeutic interventions.

    PubMed

    Gruet, Mathieu; Troosters, Thierry; Verges, Samuel

    2017-09-01

    Peripheral muscle dysfunction is an important systemic consequence of cystic fibrosis (CF) with major clinical implications, such as exercise intolerance and reduced quality of life. Evidence is now accumulating that lack of physical activity is unlikely to be the sole explanation for peripheral muscle dysfunction of patients with CF. Particularly, the demonstration of CFTR expression in both murine and human skeletal muscle suggests the potential implication of intrinsic CF-related factors. By combining data from both human and animal models, this review describes CF peripheral muscle abnormalities and critically reviews the advances in understanding the impact of the underlying mechanisms. We also describe how peripheral muscles respond to intervention in this population. Methodological concerns and directions for future research are also considered. Peripheral muscle atrophy and weakness is prevalent in patients with CF and associated with reduced aerobic and anaerobic performances. Further investigations are however needed to confirm alterations in peripheral muscle endurance and fatigability. Physical inactivity is probably the major contributor of peripheral muscle abnormalities in patients with CF with mild-to-moderate phenotypes. However, the relative influence of additional factors (e.g. inflammation, metabolic abnormalities) probably increases with disease severity making specific and individualized interventions necessary in severe patients. Exercise training is the most effective intervention to address peripheral muscle dysfunction but other strategies, such as neuromuscular electrical stimulation and nutritional or hormonal supplementation may be of interest in some patients. Investigations are needed to determine whether pharmacological interventions such as CFTR modulators are effective to address this condition. To better elucidate the etiology of peripheral muscle dysfunction in CF, future studies should combine measurements at the cellular level

  13. Current and future treatment options for cystic fibrosis lung disease: latest evidence and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Edmondson, Claire; Davies, Jane C.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment for cystic fibrosis (CF) has conventionally targeted downstream consequences of the defect such as mucus plugging and infection. More recently, significant advances have been made in treating the root cause of the disease, namely a defective CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. This review summarizes current pulmonary treatment options and highlights advances in research and development of new therapies. PMID:27347364

  14. Concomitant cystic fibrosis and coeliac disease: reminder of an important clinical lesson

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Cymberknoh, Malena; Wilschanski, Michael

    2009-01-01

    A 3½-year-old apparently healthy girl with normal development presented with steatorrhoea. Both positive serum anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody levels and an intestinal biopsy were consistent with coeliac disease. A positive sweat test and genetic analysis confirmed cystic fibrosis. PMID:21686738

  15. Cystic Fibrosis: Brazilian ENT Experience

    PubMed Central

    Sih, Tania; Godinho, Ricardo; Franco, Leticia Paiva; Piltcher, Otávio

    2012-01-01

    Most published studies about Cystic Fibrosis (CF) are European or North American. There are still few publications about the characteristics of fibrocystic populations in developing countries. The incidence of cystic fibrosis (CF) in Brazil varies among different regions (1 : 10,000 in Minas Gerais, 1 : 9,500 in Paraná, 1 : 8,700 in Santa Catarina, and 1 : 1600 in Rio Grande do Sul). The prevalence of the DF508 mutation also varies according to population: 33% in Sao Paulo, 49% in Rio Grande do Sul, 27% in Santa Catarina, and 52% in Minas Gerais. Cough and nasal obstruction are the most common symptoms. The variation in nasal polyposis prevalence may be explained by population genotypic characteristics in a country that spans a continent. Findings on nasal endoscopy and computed tomography (CT) have better correlation than do this information compared with surgical and clinical history. Microbiologic studies suggest a high level of early contamination of the airways. Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) occurs in these patients as a result of ototoxic antibiotics. The data compiled in this paper is useful, but also lead to the general agreement that more research would be welcome due to the unique characteristics of this country. PMID:22611403

  16. Inhaled antibiotics in the treatment of non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis: clinical and drug delivery perspectives.

    PubMed

    Sugianto, Tiffanie Daisy; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2016-01-01

    Non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis (NCFB) is a chronic, progressive, suppurative lung disease characterized by permanent dilatation of bronchial subdivisions, which further causes accumulation of sputum and bacterial infections. The advent of inhaled antibiotics over the past two decades has been expected to effectively attenuate the problem of chronic bacterial infections in CF and NCFB subjects with higher, local drug concentrations and minimal systemic side effects. This review summarizes and evaluates current clinical evidence of efficacy and adverse effects of inhaled antibiotics in NCFB, as well as ongoing preclinical and clinical studies, followed by a discussion of issues and challenges in clinical practice and drug delivery strategies, together with future research directions. The evidence base of the clinical efficacy of inhaled antibiotics in NCFB is limited and the degrees of reported clinical benefits have been modest and conflicting. Challenges surrounding inhaled antibiotics application and development include the lack of knowledge of disease factors and optimum management strategies, unreceptive lung pathophysiology and the lack of factors that support compliance and tolerability. Nonetheless, research continues to give birth to new clinical findings and novel formulations such as combination antibiotics and sustained-release formulations, which add great value to the development of efficacious, safe and convenient inhalable antibiotics of the future.

  17. Diabetes mellitus and bone disease in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Curran, David R; McArdle, John R; Talwalkar, Jaideep S

    2009-10-01

    Patients with cystic fibrosis are frequently affected with pancreatic insufficiency and are predisposed to the development of diabetes mellitus (DM) and bone demineralization. Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes mellitus is a clinical entity distinct from type 1 and type 2 diabetes, with important implications for the nutritional and pulmonary health of cystic fibrosis patients. This form of diabetes owes largely to insulin deficiency, but alterations in insulin sensitivity and hepatic glucose production have also been described. Therapy for cystic fibrosis-related diabetes differs substantially from type 2 DM, with careful attention to prandial glycemic excursions crucial to controlling its metabolic effects. Bone disease, including osteopenia and osteoporosis, also occurs with increased frequency in cystic fibrosis, owing to defects in intestinal absorption, chronic inflammation, lung disease, low body weight, and gonadal dysfunction. The pathogenesis, implications, diagnosis, and therapy of cystic fibrosis-related bone demineralization are discussed, with attention to recommended approaches to prevention of and treatment of established bone disease.

  18. Consensus on the use and interpretation of cystic fibrosis mutation analysis in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Castellani, C.; Cuppens, H.; Macek, M.; Cassiman, J.J.; Kerem, E.; Durie, P.; Tullis, E.; Assael, B.M.; Bombieri, C.; Brown, A.; Casals, T.; Claustres, M.; Cutting, G.R.; Dequeker, E.; Dodge, J.; Doull, I.; Farrell, P.; Ferec, C.; Girodon, E.; Johannesson, M.; Kerem, B.; Knowles, M.; Munck, A.; Pignatti, P.F.; Radojkovic, D.; Rizzotti, P.; Schwarz, M.; Stuhrmann, M.; Tzetis, M.; Zielenski, J.; Elborn, J.S.

    2009-01-01

    It is often challenging for the clinician interested in cystic fibrosis (CF) to interpret molecular genetic results, and to integrate them in the diagnostic process. The limitations of genotyping technology, the choice of mutations to be tested, and the clinical context in which the test is administered can all influence how genetic information is interpreted. This paper describes the conclusions of a consensus conference to address the use and interpretation of CF mutation analysis in clinical settings. Although the diagnosis of CF is usually straightforward, care needs to be exercised in the use and interpretation of genetic tests: genotype information is not the final arbiter of a clinical diagnosis of CF or CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein related disorders. The diagnosis of these conditions is primarily based on the clinical presentation, and is supported by evaluation of CFTR function (sweat testing, nasal potential difference) and genetic analysis. None of these features are sufficient on their own to make a diagnosis of CF or CFTR-related disorders. Broad genotype/phenotype associations are useful in epidemiological studies, but CFTR genotype does not accurately predict individual outcome. The use of CFTR genotype for prediction of prognosis in people with CF at the time of their diagnosis is not recommended. The importance of communication between clinicians and medical genetic laboratories is emphasized. The results of testing and their implications should be reported in a manner understandable to the clinicians caring for CF patients. PMID:18456578

  19. Infant lung function tests as endpoints in the ISIS multicenter clinical trial in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Davis, Stephanie D; Ratjen, Felix; Brumback, Lyndia C; Johnson, Robin C; Filbrun, Amy G; Kerby, Gwendolyn S; Panitch, Howard B; Donaldson, Scott H; Rosenfeld, Margaret

    2016-05-01

    The Infant Study of Inhaled Saline (ISIS) in CF was the first multicenter clinical trial to utilize infant pulmonary function tests (iPFTs) as an endpoint. Secondary analysis of ISIS data was conducted in order to assess feasibility of iPFT measures and their associations with respiratory symptoms. Standard deviations were calculated to aid in power calculations for future clinical trials. Seventy-three participants enrolled, 70 returned for the final visit; 62 (89%) and 45 (64%) had acceptable paired functional residual capacity (FRC) and raised volume measurements, respectively. Mean baseline FEV0.5, FEF75 and FRC z-scores were 0.3 (SD: 1.2), -0.2 (SD: 2.0), and 1.8 (SD: 2.0). iPFTs are not appropriate primary endpoints for multicenter clinical trials due to challenges of obtaining acceptable data and near-normal average raised volume measurements. Raised volume measures have potential to serve as secondary endpoints in future clinical CF trials. Copyright © 2015 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Alcaligenes infection in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kenneth; Conway, Steven P; Brownlee, Keith G; Etherington, Christine; Peckham, Daniel G

    2002-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of chronic Alcaligenes species infection of the respiratory tract on the clinical status of patients with cystic fibrosis. We conducted a retrospective case-controlled study. The microbiological records of all patients attending the Leeds Regional Pediatric and Adult Cystic Fibrosis Units from 1992-1999 were examined. Chronic Alcaligenes infection was defined as a positive sputum culture on at least three occasions over a 6-month period. These patients were compared with controls matched for age, gender, respiratory function, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection status. Respiratory function tests, anthropometric data, Shwachman-Kulczycki score, Northern chest x-ray score, intravenous and nebulized antibiotic treatment, and corticosteroid treatment were compared from 2 years before to 2 years after Alcaligenes infection. From a clinic population of 557, 13 (2.3%) fulfilled the criteria for chronic infection. The median age at acquisition of infection was 17.2 years (range, 6.5-33.6). There was no significant difference in the changes of percentage predicted values for FEV(1), FVC, FEF(25-75), or Shwachman-Kulczycki and Northern chest x-ray scores, or in weight, height, and body mass index z-scores between Alcaligenes-infected cases and controls. There was also no significant difference in the use of antibiotics (intravenous and nebulized) or corticosteroids (inhaled and oral). We conclude that in our clinic, chronic infection with Alcaligenes species was uncommon. Chronically infected patients showed no excess deterioration in clinical or pulmonary function status from 2 years before to 2 years after primary acquisition.

  1. Diagnosis of Adult Patients with Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Nick, Jerry A; Nichols, David P

    2016-03-01

    The diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF) is being made with increasing frequency in adults. Patients with CF diagnosed in adulthood typically present with respiratory complaints, and often have recurrent or chronic airway infection. At the time of initial presentation individuals may appear to have clinical manifestation limited to a single organ, but with subclinical involvement of the respiratory tract. Adult-diagnosed patients have a good response to CF center care, and newly available cystic fibrosis transmembrane receptor-modulating therapies are promising for the treatment of residual function mutation, thus increasing the importance of the diagnosis in adults with unexplained bronchiectasis.

  2. Airway Microbiota in Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid from Clinically Well Infants with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Brandie D.; Williams, Cynthia B.; Stevens, Mark J.; Robertson, Charles E.; Welchlin, Cole W.; Moen, Catherine E.; Zemanick, Edith T.; Harris, Jonathan K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Upper airway cultures guide the identification and treatment of lung pathogens in infants with cystic fibrosis (CF); however, this may not fully reflect the spectrum of bacteria present in the lower airway. Our objectives were to characterize the airway microbiota using bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) from asymptomatic CF infants during the first year of life and to investigate the relationship between BALF microbiota, standard culture and clinical characteristics. Methods BALF, nasopharyngeal (NP) culture and infant pulmonary function testing data were collected at 6 months and one year of age during periods of clinical stability from infants diagnosed with CF by newborn screening. BALF was analyzed for total bacterial load by qPCR and for bacterial community composition by 16S ribosomal RNA sequencing. Clinical characteristics and standard BALF and NP culture results were recorded over five years of longitudinal follow-up. Results 12 BALF samples were collected from 8 infants with CF. Streptococcus, Burkholderia, Prevotella, Haemophilus, Porphyromonas, and Veillonella had the highest median relative abundance in infant CF BALF. Two of the 3 infants with repeat BALF had changes in their microbial communities over six months (Morisita-Horn diversity index 0.36, 0.38). Although there was excellent percent agreement between standard NP and BALF cultures, these techniques did not routinely detect all bacteria identified by sequencing. Conclusions BALF in asymptomatic CF infants contains complex microbiota, often missed by traditional culture of airway secretions. Anaerobic bacteria are commonly found in the lower airways of CF infants. PMID:27930727

  3. Improved growth and clinical, nutritional, and respiratory changes in response to nutritional therapy in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, R; Cooksley, W G; Cooke, W D

    1980-09-01

    To investigate the role of nutritional factors in growth and in the clinical, nurtitional, and respiratory status in cystic fibrosis, we studied 12 problem CF patients from six months before to six months after a period of supplemental parenteral nutrition. During the initial six months' observation period on appropriate conventional therapy, the patients (aged 0.5 to 11 years) had inadequate growth and weight gain, a total of 21 active pulmonary infections, and, despite dietary supplements, inadequate ad libitum nutrient intakes. After nutritional therapy, providing a balanced consistent hypercaloric intake for 21 days, catch-up weight gain occurred by one month and continued at six months; catch-up in linear growth was observed by three months and continued at six months. In addition, significantly fewer pulmonary infections were observed in the six months' post-therapy (n = 3), sustained and significant improvements were noted in clinical score and plumonary function, and there was a marked improvement in well-being and ad libitum nutrient intake. We conclude that adequate nutritional support can favorably affect growth, clinical status, and the course of chronic pulmonary disease in problem cases of CF.

  4. Clinical Sensitivity of Cystic Fibrosis Mutation Panels in a Diverse Population.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Erin E; Stevens, Colleen F; Saavedra-Matiz, Carlos A; Tavakoli, Norma P; Krein, Lea M; Parker, April; Zhang, Zhen; Maloney, Breanne; Vogel, Beth; DeCelie-Germana, Joan; Kier, Catherine; Anbar, Ran D; Berdella, Maria N; Comber, Paul G; Dozor, Allen J; Goetz, Danielle M; Guida, Louis; Kattan, Meyer; Ting, Andrew; Voter, Karen Z; van Roey, Patrick; Caggana, Michele; Kay, Denise M

    2016-02-01

    Infants are screened for cystic fibrosis (CF) in New York State (NYS) using an IRT-DNA algorithm. The purpose of this study was to validate and assess clinical validity of the US FDA-cleared Illumina MiSeqDx CF 139-Variant Assay (139-VA) in the diverse NYS CF population. The study included 439 infants with CF identified via newborn screening (NBS) from 2002 to 2012. All had been screened using the Abbott Molecular CF Genotyping Assay or the Hologic InPlex CF Molecular Test. All with CF and zero or one mutation were tested using the 139-VA. DNA extracted from dried blood spots was reliably and accurately genotyped using the 139-VA. Sixty-three additional mutations were identified. Clinical sensitivity of three panels ranged from 76.2% (23 mutations recommended for screening by ACMG/ACOG) to 79.7% (current NYS 39-mutation InPlex panel), up to 86.0% for the 139-VA. For all, sensitivity was highest in Whites and lowest in the Black population. Although the sample size was small, there was a nearly 20% increase in sensitivity for the Black CF population using the 139-VA (68.2%) over the ACMG/ACOG and InPlex panels (both 50.0%). Overall, the 139-VA is more sensitive than other commercially available panels, and could be considered for NBS, clinical, or research laboratories conducting CF screening. © 2015 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  5. CLINICAL PRACTICES FOR INTERMEDIATE/EQUIVICAL SWEAT TESTS FOLLOWING ABNORMAL CYSTIC FIBROSIS NEWBORN SCREENS

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Megan R.; Adamski, Craig R.; Tluczek, Audrey

    2013-01-01

    Background Newborn screening (NBS) for cystic fibrosis (CF) has become standard practice in many countries. Consequently, the prevalence of infants with intermediate/equivalent sweat test results has increased. This study examined clinical practices in the United States (US) related to intermediate sweat test results subsequent to NBS. Methods Telephone surveys were conducted with staff from 77 (47% response rate) US CF centers documenting clinical practices related to intermediate/equivalent sweat chloride levels (30–59 mmol/L) following abnormal NBS. Results Thirty percent of centers followed CF Foundation guidelines for classifying intermediate/equivalent results. There was much variability in sweat testing procedures, diagnostic labels, additional diagnostics, addressing prognosis, and services offered to parents. CF center staff identified a need for resources to better address the uncertainty associated with intermediate/equivalent results. Conclusion Findings warrant evaluation of barriers to adherence with existing guidelines and establishment of internationally accepted, evidenced-based, clinical standards for infants with intermediate/equivalent CF NBS results. PMID:21855423

  6. Cystic Fibrosis (CF): Chloride Sweat Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... to 2-Year-Old Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Chloride Sweat Test KidsHealth > For Parents > Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Chloride Sweat Test Print A A A What's in this ... en el sudor What It Is A chloride sweat test helps diagnose cystic fibrosis (CF) , an inherited ...

  7. Cystic Fibrosis (CF): Chloride Sweat Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1- to 2-Year-Old Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Chloride Sweat Test KidsHealth > For Parents > Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Chloride Sweat Test A A A What's in this ... cloruro en el sudor What It Is A chloride sweat test helps diagnose cystic fibrosis (CF) , an ...

  8. What's it Like to Have Cystic Fibrosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Cystic Fibrosis KidsHealth > For Kids > Cystic Fibrosis A A A What's in this article? What ... a condition she's known all her life — cystic fibrosis (say: SIS-tik fi-BRO-sus). Her parents ...

  9. Laboratory diagnosis of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Webster, H L

    1983-01-01

    The demonstration of abnormally high concentrations of electrolytes in eccrine sweat is still the only practical laboratory procedure available for diagnosis of cystic fibrosis. Properly performed, the sweat test is very reliable, but there are many published reports that all of the methods in current use frequently generate incorrect diagnoses. Analysis of potential for error in sweat test methods shows that of the three essential phases involved, stimulation, collection, and analysis, the major cause of intrinsic inaccuracy occurs in the collection process. In this case the problem is due to condensate formation, which leads to the subsequent analysis of nonrepresentative sweat. Human error is also an important cause of false results and is a direct function of the number of critical manual operations involved in the technic. This review provides a critical examination of sweat test methods, identifying problem areas and suggesting ways to improve procedures in the interests of clinically reliable laboratory data in support of diagnosis.

  10. Self-management education for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Savage, Eileen; Beirne, Paul V; Ni Chroinin, Muireann; Duff, Alistair; Fitzgerald, Tony; Farrell, Dawn

    2011-07-06

    Self-management education may help patients with cystic fibrosis and their families to choose, monitor and adjust treatment requirements for their illness, and also to manage the effects of illness on their lives. Although self-management education interventions have been developed for cystic fibrosis, no previous systematic review of the evidence of effectiveness of these interventions has been conducted. To assess the effects of self-management education interventions on improving health outcomes for patients with cystic fibrosis and their caregivers We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register (date of the last search: 23 February 2011).We also searched databases through EBSCO (CINAHL; Psychological and Behavioural Sciences Collection; PsychInfo; SocINDEX) and Elsevier (EMBASE) and handsearched relevant journals and conference proceedings (date of the last searches: 30th March 2011). Randomised controlled trials, quasi-randomised controlled trials or controlled clinical trials comparing different types of self-management education for cystic fibrosis or comparing self-management education with standard care or no intervention. Two authors assessed trial eligibility and risk of bias. Three authors extracted data. Four trials (involving a total of 269 participants) were included. The participants were children with cystic fibrosis and their parents or caregivers in three trials and adults with cystic fibrosis in one trial. The trials compared four different self-management education interventions versus standard treatment: (1) a training programme for managing cystic fibrosis in general; (2) education specific to aerosol and airway clearance treatments; (3) disease-specific nutrition education; and (4) general and disease-specific nutrition education. Training children to manage cystic fibrosis in general had no statistically significant effects on weight after six to eight weeks, mean difference -7.74 lb (95% confidence

  11. Self-management education for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Savage, Eileen; Beirne, Paul V; Ni Chroinin, Muireann; Duff, Alistair; Fitzgerald, Tony; Farrell, Dawn

    2014-09-08

    Self-management education may help patients with cystic fibrosis and their families to choose, monitor and adjust treatment requirements for their illness, and also to manage the effects of illness on their lives. Although self-management education interventions have been developed for cystic fibrosis, no previous systematic review of the evidence of effectiveness of these interventions has been conducted. To assess the effects of self-management education interventions on improving health outcomes for patients with cystic fibrosis and their caregivers We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register (date of the last search: 22 August 2013).We also searched databases through EBSCO (CINAHL; Psychological and Behavioural Sciences Collection; PsychInfo; SocINDEX) and Elsevier (Embase) and handsearched relevant journals and conference proceedings (date of the last searches: 01 February 2014 ). Randomised controlled trials, quasi-randomised controlled trials or controlled clinical trials comparing different types of self-management education for cystic fibrosis or comparing self-management education with standard care or no intervention. Two authors assessed trial eligibility and risk of bias. Three authors extracted data. Four trials (involving a total of 269 participants) were included. The participants were children with cystic fibrosis and their parents or caregivers in three trials and adults with cystic fibrosis in one trial. The trials compared four different self-management education interventions versus standard treatment: (1) a training programme for managing cystic fibrosis in general; (2) education specific to aerosol and airway clearance treatments; (3) disease-specific nutrition education; and (4) general and disease-specific nutrition education. Training children to manage cystic fibrosis in general had no statistically significant effects on weight after six to eight weeks, mean difference -7.74 lb (i.e. 3.51 kg) (95

  12. Advancing clinical development pathways for new CFTR modulators in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Mayer-Hamblett, Nicole; Boyle, Michael; VanDevanter, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-shortening genetic disease affecting approximately 70 000 individuals worldwide. Until recently, drug development efforts have emphasised therapies treating downstream signs and symptoms resulting from the underlying CF biological defect: reduced function of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. The current CF drug development landscape has expanded to include therapies that enhance CFTR function by either restoring wild-type CFTR protein expression or increasing (modulating) the function of mutant CFTR proteins in cells. To date, two systemic small-molecule CFTR modulators have been evaluated in pivotal clinical trials in individuals with CF and specific mutant CFTR genotypes that have led to regulatory review and/or approval. Advances in the discovery of CFTR modulators as a promising new class of therapies have been impressive, yet work remains to develop highly effective, disease-modifying modulators for individuals of all CF genotypes. The objectives of this review are to outline the challenges and opportunities in drug development created by systemic genotype-specific CFTR modulators, highlight the advantages of sweat chloride as an established biomarker of CFTR activity to streamline early-phase development and summarise options for later phase clinical trial designs that respond to the adoption of approved genotype-specific modulators into standard of care. An optimal development framework will be needed to move the most promising therapies efficiently through the drug development pipeline and ultimately deliver efficacious and safe therapies to all individuals with CF. PMID:26903594

  13. Clinical and Genetic Features in Patients with Cystic Fibrosis in Southwestern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Farjadian, Shirin; Moghtaderi, Mozhgan; Kashef, Sara; Alyasin, Soheila; Najib, Khadijehsadat; Saki, Forough

    2013-01-01

    Objective Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a common autosomal recessive genetic disease caused by a mutation in the CF transmembrane conductance regulatory (CFTR) gene. This study attempted to identify the most common CFTR mutations and any correlations between certain mutations and the clinical presentation of the disease in CF patients in southwestern Iran. Methods Twenty nine common CFTR gene mutations were examined in 45 CF patients. Findings Chronic cough, intestinal obstruction, dehydration, heat exhaustion and steatorrhea were the most common early clinical symptoms among our patients. The most common mutation was ΔF508, with an allele frequency of 21%. The homozygous ΔF508 mutation was observed in eight patients (18%), and three patients (7%) were ΔF508 carriers. The 2183AA > G mutation was observed in four patients, one of whom was also a ΔF508 carrier. The R1162X mutation was detected in two patients. The G542X, R334W and N1303K mutations were detected each in one patient, the first of whom was also a ΔF508 carrier. Conclusion Out of 45 patients, 27 (60%) had none of the CFTR gene mutations we tested for. The most frequent mutations in southwestern Iranian patients with CF should be identified by sequencing the entire CFTR gene in order to optimize the design of a diagnostic kit for common regional mutations. PMID:23724185

  14. Clinical Outcomes Associated with Achromobacter Species Infection in Patients with Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Somayaji, Ranjani; Stanojevic, Sanja; Tullis, D Elizabeth; Stephenson, Anne L; Ratjen, Felix; Waters, Valerie

    2017-09-01

    Achromobacter species are increasingly identified in individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF), but the clinical outcomes in these patients remain poorly understood. We aimed to determine the association of Achromobacter infection on clinical outcomes in pediatric and adult patients with CF. A cohort study of pediatric and adult patients with CF was conducted from 1997 to 2014 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Achromobacter spp. infection was categorized as no history of infection, intermittent infection, and chronic infection (two or more positive cultures in the preceding 12 months). Cox models were used to estimate risk of death or transplantation. Mixed-effects models were used to assess odds of pulmonary exacerbations and effect on lung function (FEV1%) by Achromobacter spp. A total of 1,103 patients were followed-up over the course of 18 years; 88 patients (7.3%) had one or more culture for Achromobacter species. Chronic Achromobacter infection was associated with a greater risk of death or transplantation compared with in patients with no history of infection (adjusted hazard ratio, 2.03; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-3.95; P = 0.036). Pulmonary exacerbations were more common in patients with chronic infection, but after adjusting for confounding factors, the effect was no longer significant. The chronic group had lower FEV1%, but it did not worsen after developing chronic infection. Patients with CF and chronic Achromobacter infection are at increased risk of death or transplantation.

  15. Advancing clinical development pathways for new CFTR modulators in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Mayer-Hamblett, Nicole; Boyle, Michael; VanDevanter, Donald

    2016-05-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-shortening genetic disease affecting approximately 70,000 individuals worldwide. Until recently, drug development efforts have emphasised therapies treating downstream signs and symptoms resulting from the underlying CF biological defect: reduced function of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. The current CF drug development landscape has expanded to include therapies that enhance CFTR function by either restoring wild-type CFTR protein expression or increasing (modulating) the function of mutant CFTR proteins in cells. To date, two systemic small-molecule CFTR modulators have been evaluated in pivotal clinical trials in individuals with CF and specific mutant CFTR genotypes that have led to regulatory review and/or approval. Advances in the discovery of CFTR modulators as a promising new class of therapies have been impressive, yet work remains to develop highly effective, disease-modifying modulators for individuals of all CF genotypes. The objectives of this review are to outline the challenges and opportunities in drug development created by systemic genotype-specific CFTR modulators, highlight the advantages of sweat chloride as an established biomarker of CFTR activity to streamline early-phase development and summarise options for later phase clinical trial designs that respond to the adoption of approved genotype-specific modulators into standard of care. An optimal development framework will be needed to move the most promising therapies efficiently through the drug development pipeline and ultimately deliver efficacious and safe therapies to all individuals with CF.

  16. Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in patients with cystic fibrosis: scientific evidence regarding clinical impact, diagnosis, and treatment*

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Luiz Vicente Ribeiro Ferreira; Ferreira, Flavia de Aguiar; Reis, Francisco José Caldeira; de Britto, Murilo Carlos Amorim; Levy, Carlos Emilio; Clark, Otavio; Ribeiro, José Dirceu

    2013-01-01

    Evidence-based techniques have been increasingly used in the creation of clinical guidelines and the development of recommendations for medical practice. The use of levels of evidence allows the reader to identify the quality of scientific information that supports the recommendations made by experts. The objective of this review was to address current concepts related to the clinical impact, diagnosis, and treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in patients with cystic fibrosis. For the preparation of this review, the authors defined a group of questions that would be answered in accordance with the principles of PICO–an acronym based on questions regarding the Patients of interest, Intervention being studied, Comparison of the intervention, and Outcome of interest. For each question, a structured review of the literature was performed using the Medline database in order to identify the studies with the methodological design most appropriate to answering the question. The questions were designed so that each of the authors could write a response. A first draft was prepared and discussed by the group. Recommendations were then made on the basis of the level of scientific evidence, in accordance with the classification system devised by the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine, as well as the level of agreement among the members of the group. PMID:24068273

  17. Classification of malnutrition in cystic fibrosis: implications for evaluating and benchmarking clinical practice performance2

    PubMed Central

    HuiChuan, J Lai; Suzanne, M Shoff

    2008-01-01

    Background In 2005, the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (CFF) revised the nutrition classification guidelines to eliminate the use of percentage of ideal body weight (%IBW) to define “nutritional failure”; the CFF also recommended that children with cystic fibrosis maintain a body mass index percentile (BMIp) ≥ 50th. Objective We assessed the effect of the 2005 CFF nutrition classification guidelines on evaluating the performance of nutritional care practices. Design Data from 14 702 children reported to the 2002 CFF Patient Registry were analyzed to compare malnutrition rates in 113 cystic fibrosis centers in the United States. Nutritional failure was defined according to the 2002 CFF criteria—ie, height < 5th percentile, %IBW < 90%, or BMIp < 10th. “Below BMI goal” was defined according to the 2005 CFF criterion, ie BMIp < 50th. Results Eliminating %IBW resulted in a 6% reduction (from 33% to 27%) in the nutritional failure rate in the United States. The use of BMIp < 50th led to the classification of 57% of children as below the BMI goal. Misclassification of nutritional failure according to %IBW ranged from 1% to 16% among 113 centers and was greater in the centers with a larger proportion of tall patients. After the elimination of %IBW, one-third of centers changed to a different tertile ranking for nutritional failure rates (kappa = 0.50, moderate-to-poor agreement). More than half the centers changed to a different tertile ranking, from nutritional failure to below BMI goal (kappa = 0.22, poor agreement). Conclusion Eliminating misclassification by %IBW and implementing the new BMI goal led to profound and unequal changes in malnutrition rates across cystic fibrosis centers. PMID:18614737

  18. Enteral tube feeding for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Morton, Alison; Wolfe, Susan

    2015-04-09

    Enteral tube feeding is routinely used in many cystic fibrosis centres when oral dietary and supplement intake has failed to achieve an adequate nutritional status. The use of this method of feeding is assessed on an individual basis taking into consideration the patients age and clinical status. To examine the evidence that in people with cystic fibrosis, supplemental enteral tube feeding improves nutritional status, respiratory function, and quality of life without significant adverse effects. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register which comprises references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. We also contacted the companies that market enteral feeds and reviewed their databases.Date of the most recent search of the Group's Cystic Fibrosis Trials Register: 13 February 2015.Date of the most recent hand search of PubMed and conference abstract books: 13 February 2015. All randomised controlled trials comparing supplemental enteral tube feeding for one month or longer with no specific intervention in people with cystic fibrosis. The searches identified 38 trials; however, none were eligible for inclusion in this review. There are no trials included in this review. Supplemental enteral tube feeding is widely used throughout the world to improve nutritional status in people with cystic fibrosis. The methods mostly used, nasogastric or gastrostomy feeding, are expensive and may have a negative effect on self-esteem and body image. Reported use of enteral tube feeding suggests that it results in nutritional and respiratory improvement; but, efficacy has not been fully assessed by randomised controlled trials. It is acknowledged, however, that performing a randomised controlled trial would be difficult due to the ethics of withholding an intervention in a group of patients whose nutritional status necessitates it.

  19. Enteral tube feeding for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Conway, Steven; Morton, Alison; Wolfe, Susan

    2012-12-12

    Enteral tube feeding is routinely used in many cystic fibrosis centres when oral dietary and supplement intake has failed to achieve an adequate nutritional status. The use of this method of feeding is assessed on an individual basis taking into consideration the patients age and clinical status. To examine the evidence that in people with cystic fibrosis, supplemental enteral tube feeding improves nutritional status, respiratory function, and quality of life without significant adverse effects. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register which comprises references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. We also contacted the companies that market enteral feeds and reviewed their databases.Date of the most recent search of the Group's Cystic Fibrosis Trials Register: 03 September 2012.Date of the most recent hand search of PubMed and conference abstract books: 15 June 2012. All randomised controlled trials comparing supplemental enteral tube feeding for one month or longer with no specific intervention in people with cystic fibrosis. Thirty-one trials were identified by the searches; however, none were eligible for inclusion in this review. There are no trials included in this review. Supplemental enteral tube feeding is widely used throughout the world to improve nutritional status in people with cystic fibrosis. The methods mostly used, nasogastric or gastrostomy feeding, are expensive and may have a negative effect on self-esteem and body image. Reported use of enteral tube feeding suggests that it results in nutritional and respiratory improvement; but, efficacy has not been fully assessed by randomised controlled trials. It is acknowledged, however, that performing a randomised controlled trial would be difficult due to the ethics of withholding an intervention in a group of patients whose nutritional status

  20. Abdominal symptoms in cystic fibrosis and their relation to genotype, history, clinical and laboratory findings

    PubMed Central

    Tabori, Harold; Jaudszus, Anke; Mentzel, Hans-Joachim; Renz, Diane M.; Reinsch, Steffen; Lorenz, Michael; Michl, Ruth; Gerber, Andrea; Lehmann, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Background & aims Abdominal symptoms (AS) are a hallmark of the multiorgan-disease cystic fibrosis (CF). However, the abdominal involvement in CF is insufficiently understood and, compared to the pulmonary manifestation, still receives little scientific attention. Aims were to assess and quantify AS and to relate them to laboratory parameters, clinical findings, and medical history. Methods A total of 131 patients with CF of all ages were assessed with a new CF-specific questionnaire (JenAbdomen-CF score 1.0) on abdominal pain and non-pain symptoms, disorders of appetite, eating, and bowel movements as well as symptom-related quality of life. Results were metrically dimensioned and related to abdominal manifestations, history of surgery, P. aeruginosa and S. aureus colonization, genotype, liver enzymes, antibiotic therapy, lung function, and nutritional status. Results AS during the preceding 3 months were reported by all of our patients. Most common were lack of appetite (130/131) and loss of taste (119/131) followed by abdominal pain (104/131), flatulence (102/131), and distention (83/131). Significantly increased AS were found in patients with history of rectal prolapse (p = 0.013), distal intestinal obstruction syndrome (p = 0.013), laparotomy (p = 0.022), meconium ileus (p = 0.037), pancreas insufficiency (p = 0.042), or small bowel resection (p = 0.048) as well as in patients who have been intermittently colonized with P. aeruginosa (p = 0.006) compared to patients without history of these events. In contrast, no statistically significant associations were found to CF-associated liver disease, chronic pathogen colonization, lung function, CF-related diabetes, and nutritional status. Conclusion As the complex abdominal involvement in CF is still not fully understood, the assessment of the common AS is of major interest. In this regard, symptom questionnaires like the herein presented are meaningful and practical tools facilitating a wider understanding of the

  1. Abdominal symptoms in cystic fibrosis and their relation to genotype, history, clinical and laboratory findings.

    PubMed

    Tabori, Harold; Arnold, Christin; Jaudszus, Anke; Mentzel, Hans-Joachim; Renz, Diane M; Reinsch, Steffen; Lorenz, Michael; Michl, Ruth; Gerber, Andrea; Lehmann, Thomas; Mainz, Jochen G

    2017-01-01

    Abdominal symptoms (AS) are a hallmark of the multiorgan-disease cystic fibrosis (CF). However, the abdominal involvement in CF is insufficiently understood and, compared to the pulmonary manifestation, still receives little scientific attention. Aims were to assess and quantify AS and to relate them to laboratory parameters, clinical findings, and medical history. A total of 131 patients with CF of all ages were assessed with a new CF-specific questionnaire (JenAbdomen-CF score 1.0) on abdominal pain and non-pain symptoms, disorders of appetite, eating, and bowel movements as well as symptom-related quality of life. Results were metrically dimensioned and related to abdominal manifestations, history of surgery, P. aeruginosa and S. aureus colonization, genotype, liver enzymes, antibiotic therapy, lung function, and nutritional status. AS during the preceding 3 months were reported by all of our patients. Most common were lack of appetite (130/131) and loss of taste (119/131) followed by abdominal pain (104/131), flatulence (102/131), and distention (83/131). Significantly increased AS were found in patients with history of rectal prolapse (p = 0.013), distal intestinal obstruction syndrome (p = 0.013), laparotomy (p = 0.022), meconium ileus (p = 0.037), pancreas insufficiency (p = 0.042), or small bowel resection (p = 0.048) as well as in patients who have been intermittently colonized with P. aeruginosa (p = 0.006) compared to patients without history of these events. In contrast, no statistically significant associations were found to CF-associated liver disease, chronic pathogen colonization, lung function, CF-related diabetes, and nutritional status. As the complex abdominal involvement in CF is still not fully understood, the assessment of the common AS is of major interest. In this regard, symptom questionnaires like the herein presented are meaningful and practical tools facilitating a wider understanding of the abdominal symptoms in CF. Furthermore, they

  2. [Indoor fungal exposure: What impact on clinical and biological status regarding Aspergillus during cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Pricope, D; Deneuville, E; Frain, S; Chevrier, S; Belaz, S; Roussey, M; Gangneux, J-P

    2015-06-01

    The sources of exposure during diseases due to Aspergillus fungi in cystic fibrosis patients are still poorly explored. We assessed home fungal exposure in patients suffering from cystic fibrosis and analysed its impact on the presence of Aspergillus biological markers, the colonisation of airways, as well as the sensitization and Aspergillus serology. Between March 2012 and August 2012, 34 patients benefited from a visit performed by a home environment medical adviser including sampling for mycological analysis. The number of colonies of Aspergillus was not significantly different in the various sampling sites (P=0.251), but the number of non-Aspergillus colonies was much higher in the kitchen (P=0.0045). Subsequently, home fungal exposure was compared between the groups "absence of Aspergillus-related markers" and "presence of Aspergillus-related markers". Home exposure to Aspergillus (P=0.453) and non-Aspergillus (P=0.972) flora was not significant between the 2 groups. Within this series of 34 patients that should be expanded, we note an absence of clear relationship between home exposure and the Aspergillus-linked markers in patients suffering from cystic fibrosis. This result should be taken into account regarding too restrictive hygiene advices provided to families, given the fact that fungal exposure can also results from activities performed away from home. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Clinical features of cystic fibrosis patients with rare genotypes in Saguenay Lac-Saint-Jean (Quebec, Canada).

    PubMed

    de Braekeleer, M; Mari, G; Verlingue, C; Allard, C; Leblanc, J P; Simard, F; Aubin, G; Férec, C

    1997-01-01

    We describe the clinical features of six cystic fibrosis (CF) patients from Saguenay Lac-Saint-Jean who bear rare genotypes. Two patients with a delta F508/I148T genotype had pancreatic insufficiency, as did two patients compound heterozygous for the 621 + 1G-->T mutation who also had a major growth retardation. One CF adult who carried a delta F508/Q890X genotype had meconium ileus and bronchiectasis. The sixth patient (A455E/R117C) had borderline sweat chloride concentrations; the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis had remained doubtful until the molecular analysis showed the presence of two CF mutations. The seventh patient with a delta F508/R1158X genotype experienced several complications and is now 43 years old.

  4. Ivacaftor for patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, Claire E

    2014-10-01

    Ivacaftor is an oral bioavailable potentiator of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein. It is the first therapeutic agent that has been registered for clinical use which targets the basic defect in people with cystic fibrosis who carry a G551D mutation or other rarer specific gating mutations. Clinical trials have shown consistent and impressive clinical benefit that appears to be sustained over time in people with cystic fibrosis who carry a G551D mutation and similar benefits have been seen in those who carry rarer gating mutations. Ivacaftor is orally administered twice daily with a dose that does not vary between children aged 6 years through to adult life in patients with G551D. It appears to be well tolerated although there are potential interactions with drugs that are metabolised through CYPP450 CYP3A. Ivacaftor is also currently being trialled in combination with correctors for patients with the most common mutation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator the F508del mutation.

  5. Physiotherapy for cystic fibrosis in Australia and New Zealand: A clinical practice guideline.

    PubMed

    Button, Brenda M; Wilson, Christine; Dentice, Ruth; Cox, Narelle S; Middleton, Anna; Tannenbaum, Esta; Bishop, Jennifer; Cobb, Robyn; Burton, Kate; Wood, Michelle; Moran, Fiona; Black, Ryan; Bowen, Summar; Day, Rosemary; Depiazzi, Julie; Doiron, Katherine; Doumit, Michael; Dwyer, Tiffany; Elliot, Alison; Fuller, Louise; Hall, Kathleen; Hutchins, Matthew; Kerr, Melinda; Lee, Annemarie L; Mans, Christina; O'Connor, Lauren; Steward, Ranjana; Potter, Angela; Rasekaba, Tshepo; Scoones, Rebecca; Tarrant, Ben; Ward, Nathan; West, Samantha; White, Dianne; Wilson, Lisa; Wood, Jamie; Holland, Anne E

    2016-05-01

    Physiotherapy management is a key element of care for people with cystic fibrosis (CF) throughout the lifespan. Although considerable evidence exists to support physiotherapy management of CF, there is documented variation in practice. The aim of this guideline is to optimize the physiotherapy management of people with CF in Australia and New Zealand. A systematic review of the literature in key areas of physiotherapy practice for CF was undertaken. Recommendations were formulated based on National Health and Medical Research Council (Australia) guidelines and considered the quality, quantity and level of the evidence; the consistency of the body of evidence; the likely clinical impact; and applicability to physiotherapy practice in Australia and New Zealand. A total of 30 recommendations were made for airway clearance therapy, inhalation therapy, exercise assessment and training, musculoskeletal management, management of urinary incontinence, managing the newly diagnosed patient with CF, delivery of non-invasive ventilation, and physiotherapy management before and after lung transplantation. These recommendations can be used to underpin the provision of evidence-based physiotherapy care to people with CF in Australia and New Zealand.

  6. Association of Lung Function, Chest Radiographs and Clinical Features in Infants with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Rosenfeld, Margaret; Farrell, Philip M.; Kloster, Margaret; Swanson, Jonathan O.; Vu, Thuy; Brumback, Lyndia; Acton, James D.; Castile, Robert G.; Colin, Andrew A.; Conrad, Carol K.; Hart, Meeghan A.; Kerby, Gwendolyn S.; Hiatt, Peter W.; Mogayzel, Peter J.; Johnson, Robin C.; Davis, Stephanie D.

    2013-01-01

    Background The optimal strategy for monitoring cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease in infancy remains unclear. Objective To describe longitudinal associations between infant pulmonary function tests (iPFTs), chest radiograph (CXR) scores and other characteristics. Methods CF patients ≤ 24 months old were enrolled in a 10-center study evaluating iPFTs 4 times over a year. CXRs ~1 year apart were scored with the Wisconsin and Brasfield systems. Associations of iPFT parameters with clinical characteristics were evaluated with mixed effects models. Results The 100 participants contributed 246 acceptable flow/volume (FEV0.5, FEF75) and 303 acceptable functional residual capacity (FRC) measurements and 171 CXRs. Both Brasfield and Wisconsin CXR scores worsened significantly over the 1 year interval. Worse Wisconsin CXR scores and S. aureus were both associated with hyperinflation (significantly increased FRC) but not with diminished FEV0.5 or FEF75. Parent-reported cough was associated with significantly diminished FEF75 but not with hyperinflation. Conclusions In this infant cohort in whom we previously reported worsening in average lung function, CXR scores also worsened over a year. The significant associations detected between both Wisconsin CXR score and S. aureus and hyperinflation, as well as between cough and diminished flows, reinforce the ability of iPFTs and CXRs to detect early CF lung disease. PMID:23722613

  7. Strategies in early clinical development for the treatment of basic defects of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Dhooghe, Barbara; Haaf, Jérémy Boris; Noel, Sabrina; Leal, Teresinha

    2016-01-01

    Twenty-six years after the identification of the gene responsible for cystic fibrosis (CF), controversies still surround the pathogenesis of the disease that continues to burden and shorten lives. Therefore, finding effective therapeutic strategies that target the basic defect of CF is crucially needed. This review offers a comprehensive survey of fundamental therapies in early stages of development for the treatment of CF. The first part describes recent strategies targeting the basic defect either at the gene or at the transcript level. The second part summarizes a panel of novel strategies targeting protein repair. The third part reports strategies targeting non-CFTR channels. Recent major breakthroughs in CF therapy have been made, raising hope to find a cure for CF. Apart from Vertex corrector and potentiator molecules (lumacaftor, ivacaftor, VX-661) and from ataluren, used to correct nonsense mutations, most compounds being currently tested are in very early (I-II) phases of development and definitive clinical results are keenly expected. Among the broad list of molecules and strategies being tested, the QR-010 compound and inhibitors of phosphodiesterase type 5 (sildenafil, vardenafil) could reveal a strong potentiality as therapeutic candidates to cure CF.

  8. Development, clinical utility, and place of ivacaftor in the treatment of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Ruth; Elphick, Heather E

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-limiting, multisystem disease characterized by thick viscous secretions leading to recurrent lung infections, bronchiectasis, and progressive deterioration in lung function. CF is caused by loss or dysfunction of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein which is responsible for transepithelial chloride and water transport. Improved understanding of CFTR protein dysfunction has allowed the development of mutation-specific small-molecule compounds which directly target the underlying CFTR defect. Ivacaftor is the first licensed small-molecule compound for CF patients which targets the CFTR gating mutation Gly551Asp (previously termed G551D) and has the potential to be truly disease-modifying. Ivacaftor is an oral medication given twice daily and has shown benefit in terms of an increase in lung function, decreased sweat chloride, weight gain, improvement in patient-reported quality of life, and reduction in number of respiratory exacerbations in clinical trials. Although ivacaftor is currently only licensed for use in approximately 5% of the CF population (those who have at least one Gly551Asp mutation), the developmental pathway established by ivacaftor paves the way for other CFTR modulators that may benefit many more patients. In particular, a CFTR modulator for those with the Phe508del deletion (previously ∆F508) would allow 90% of the CF population to benefit from disease-modifying treatment.

  9. Physiotherapy for cystic fibrosis in Australia and New Zealand: A clinical practice guideline*

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Christine; Dentice, Ruth; Cox, Narelle S.; Middleton, Anna; Tannenbaum, Esta; Bishop, Jennifer; Cobb, Robyn; Burton, Kate; Wood, Michelle; Moran, Fiona; Black, Ryan; Bowen, Summar; Day, Rosemary; Depiazzi, Julie; Doiron, Katherine; Doumit, Michael; Dwyer, Tiffany; Elliot, Alison; Fuller, Louise; Hall, Kathleen; Hutchins, Matthew; Kerr, Melinda; Lee, Annemarie L.; Mans, Christina; O'Connor, Lauren; Steward, Ranjana; Potter, Angela; Rasekaba, Tshepo; Scoones, Rebecca; Tarrant, Ben; Ward, Nathan; West, Samantha; White, Dianne; Wilson, Lisa; Wood, Jamie; Holland, Anne E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Physiotherapy management is a key element of care for people with cystic fibrosis (CF) throughout the lifespan. Although considerable evidence exists to support physiotherapy management of CF, there is documented variation in practice. The aim of this guideline is to optimize the physiotherapy management of people with CF in Australia and New Zealand. A systematic review of the literature in key areas of physiotherapy practice for CF was undertaken. Recommendations were formulated based on National Health and Medical Research Council (Australia) guidelines and considered the quality, quantity and level of the evidence; the consistency of the body of evidence; the likely clinical impact; and applicability to physiotherapy practice in Australia and New Zealand. A total of 30 recommendations were made for airway clearance therapy, inhalation therapy, exercise assessment and training, musculoskeletal management, management of urinary incontinence, managing the newly diagnosed patient with CF, delivery of non‐invasive ventilation, and physiotherapy management before and after lung transplantation. These recommendations can be used to underpin the provision of evidence‐based physiotherapy care to people with CF in Australia and New Zealand. PMID:27086904

  10. Evaluation of colistin susceptibility in multidrug-resistant clinical isolates from cystic fibrosis, France.

    PubMed

    Biswas, S; Dubus, J-C; Reynaud-Gaubert, M; Stremler, N; Rolain, J-M

    2013-11-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients has led to the use of colistin drug and the emergence of colistin-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. The aim of this study was to compare the disk diffusion and Etest methods for colistin susceptibility testing on MDR bacteria associated with CF from Marseille, France. Forty-nine MDR clinical isolates (27 Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, 22 Achromobacter xylosoxidans) were used in this study. Disk diffusion and Etest assays were used to assess the reliability of these two techniques. For S. maltophilia, 25 out of 27 isolates had low minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs, 0.125-0.75 mg/L), whereas two isolates displayed high MICs (32 mg/L). Similarly, 19 out of 22 A. xylosoxidans isolates had low MICs (0.75-3.0 mg/L), whereas three isolates had high MICs (32-256 mg/L). The diameters of zone inhibition with a 50-μg colistin disk displayed a good correlation with the MICs obtained by the Etest. Susceptible and resistant strains were eventually separated using a disk diffusion assay at a cut-off of ≤ 12 mm for a 50-μg disk. Colistin displayed excellent activity against S. maltophilia and A. xylosoxidans and the disk diffusion assay could be confidently used to determine the susceptibility to colistin for MDR Gram-negative bacteria in the context of CF.

  11. The clinical significance of the gut microbiota in cystic fibrosis and the potential for dietary therapies.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Somerset, Shawn

    2014-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is characterised by many comorbidities related to aberrant mucosa and chronic inflammation in the respiratory and digestive systems. The intestinal mucosa serves as the primary interface between the gut microbiota and endocrine, neural and immune systems. There is emerging evidence that aberrant intestinal mucosa in CF may associate with an altered gut microbiota. Compared to healthy subjects, the overall bacterial abundance and species richness seems to be reduced in CF, accompanied by a trend in suppression of Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes spp. and an augmentation of potentially pathogenic species. There is also some concordance of gut and respiratory microbiotas in CF infants over time. The clinical significance of these observations awaits investigation. The gut microbiota have some potential in CF management by affecting inflammatory and immune responses, and influencing aberrant mucosa. As an important modifiable factor, diet therapies such as probiotics and prebiotics have shown initial promise in improving CF related conditions associated with chronic inflammation. More studies are needed to confirm this, as well as the efficacy of other dietary strategies such as modulating dietary fat and indigestible carbohydrate. Similarly, dietary modification of gut microbiota to optimise nutritional status in CF may be feasible, although more CF-specific studies are warranted.

  12. GH improves growth and clinical status in children with cystic fibrosis -- a review of published studies.

    PubMed

    Hardin, Dana S

    2004-08-01

    Children with cystic fibrosis (CF) have problems with poor linear growth and inadequate weight gain. Nutritional augmentation has been the mainstay of therapy for improving both weight and height in CF; however, inadequate growth continues to be a problem. Furthermore, protein catabolism has been documented even in non-acutely ill adults and children with CF, and could adversely affect longitudinal growth. Human recombinant GH has positive effects on nitrogen balance, and multiple studies have demonstrated improved height and weight in children treated with GH. The purpose of this article is to summarize studies evaluating GH use in children with CF. All published studies of GH use in children with CF have demonstrated significant improvement in height velocity and height Z score. All studies but one, in which subjects were treated only three times per week with GH, have demonstrated improvement in weight as reported by weight velocity and/or weight Z score, and one trial has demonstrated a substantial improvement when GH was used to augment nutritional therapy. Several reports suggest that GH treatment results in improved forced vital capacity, and multiple studies have found improved clinical status as measured by decreased hospitalizations and courses of intravenous antibiotics. Furthermore studies to date also suggest that GH results in improvement in exercise tolerance and bone accumulation. To date significant side effects, including glucose intolerance, have not been reported. Thus mounting evidence suggests that human recombinant GH provides safe and effective therapy in children with CF.

  13. Genetic testing of sperm donors for cystic fibrosis and spinal muscular atrophy: evaluation of clinical utility.

    PubMed

    Landaburu, I; Gonzalvo, M-C; Clavero, A; Ramirez, J-P; Yoldi, A; Mozas, J; Zamora, S; Martinez, L; Castilla, J-A

    2013-09-01

    To evaluate the clinical utility of genetic testing for cystic fibrosis (CF) and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) in sperm donors. We studied the results of the genetic tests for CF and SMA applied to 372 sperm donor candidates. The CF carrier screening test analysed 32 mutations on the CFTR gene. Regarding SMA, the carrier test studied possible deletions of SMN1/2 by Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) methodology. The carrier frequency obtained was greater for SMA than for CF. After adjusting the results obtained for the sensitivity of the tests, and taking into account the prevalence of female carriers in our population, the probability of transmission of the disease to the child from a donor with a negative genetic test was about five times lower in the case of SMA than in CF, although this difference was not statistically significant. The number of donors needed to screen (NNS) to avoid the occurrence of a child being affected by CF and SMA in our population was similar in both cases (1591 vs. 1536). This study demonstrates the need to include SMA among the diseases for which genetic screening is performed in the process of sperm donor selection. We believe that testing donors for SMA is as important and as useful as doing so for CF. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Complement Effectors of Inflammation in Cystic Fibrosis Lung Fluid Correlate with Clinical Measures of Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sass, Laura A.; Hair, Pamela S.; Perkins, Amy M.; Shah, Tushar A.; Krishna, Neel K.; Cunnion, Kenji M.

    2015-01-01

    In cystic fibrosis (CF), lung damage is mediated by a cycle of obstruction, infection, and inflammation. Here we explored complement inflammatory effectors in CF lung fluid. In this study soluble fractions (sols) from sputum samples of 15 CF patients were assayed for complement effectors and analyzed with clinical measurements. The pro-inflammatory peptide C5a was increased 4.8-fold (P = 0.04) in CF sols compared with controls. Incubation of CF sols with P. aeruginosa or S. aureus increased C5a concentration 2.3-fold (P = 0.02). A peptide inhibitor of complement C1 (PIC1) completely blocked the increase in C5a concentration from P. aeruginosa in CF sol in vitro (P = 0.001). C5a concentration in CF sol correlated inversely with body mass index (BMI) percentile in children (r = -0.77, P = 0.04). C3a, which has anti-inflammatory effects, correlated positively with FEV1% predicted (rs = 0.63, P = 0.02). These results suggest that complement effectors may significantly impact inflammation in CF lung fluid. PMID:26642048

  15. Complement Effectors of Inflammation in Cystic Fibrosis Lung Fluid Correlate with Clinical Measures of Disease.

    PubMed

    Sass, Laura A; Hair, Pamela S; Perkins, Amy M; Shah, Tushar A; Krishna, Neel K; Cunnion, Kenji M

    2015-01-01

    In cystic fibrosis (CF), lung damage is mediated by a cycle of obstruction, infection, and inflammation. Here we explored complement inflammatory effectors in CF lung fluid. In this study soluble fractions (sols) from sputum samples of 15 CF patients were assayed for complement effectors and analyzed with clinical measurements. The pro-inflammatory peptide C5a was increased 4.8-fold (P = 0.04) in CF sols compared with controls. Incubation of CF sols with P. aeruginosa or S. aureus increased C5a concentration 2.3-fold (P = 0.02). A peptide inhibitor of complement C1 (PIC1) completely blocked the increase in C5a concentration from P. aeruginosa in CF sol in vitro (P = 0.001). C5a concentration in CF sol correlated inversely with body mass index (BMI) percentile in children (r = -0.77, P = 0.04). C3a, which has anti-inflammatory effects, correlated positively with FEV1% predicted (rs = 0.63, P = 0.02). These results suggest that complement effectors may significantly impact inflammation in CF lung fluid.

  16. Clinical audit results in earlier nutritional intervention in malnourished children with cystic fibrosis with improved outcome.

    PubMed

    Ledder, Oren; Oliver, Mark R; Heine, Ralf G; Graham, Joanne; Volders, Evelyn; Robinson, Philip J

    2015-10-01

    The association between nutritional status, pulmonary function and survival in cystic fibrosis (CF) is well established. A previous case series from the Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne (RCH), demonstrated suboptimal referral practices and highlighted the importance of early nutritional interventions in children with CF. Various qualitative changes were made to our CF service, and this study assesses the effects of these practice changes timing of gastrostomy and clinical outcome in patients who underwent gastrostomy insertion. Clinical audit of all CF patients who had undergone gastrostomy insertion from 2002 to 2010 at Royal Children's Hospital. Clinical data, including nutritional parameters, respiratory function and survival, were collected at 2 years prior and 2 years post gastrostomy insertion. Data were compared with the previous study from 1989 to 1997. Patients with CF who underwent gastrostomy insertion between 2002 and 2010 (n = 22) had higher weight-for-age scores (-1.5 ± 0.68 vs. -2.67 ± 1.06; P = 0.0001) and higher forced expiratory volume in 1 s (68% ± 22 vs. 52% ± 18.5; P = 0.006), compared with the cohort from 1989 to 1997 (n = 37). These differences were maintained at 2-year follow-up. Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonisation rate was 100% in 1989-1997 vs. 41% in 2002-2010; P = 0.0001. The 2-year survival post-gastrostomy insertion improved from 70% to 100%; P = 0.004. Earlier referral of patients in the recent cohort resulted in sustained improvements in weight-for-age and lung function. Survival at 2 years post-procedure was significantly improved. This study confirms the value of clinical audits and subsequent re-evaluation of clinical services. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2015 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  17. CFTR genotype and clinical outcomes of adult patients carried as cystic fibrosis disease.

    PubMed

    Bonadia, Luciana Cardoso; de Lima Marson, Fernando Augusto; Ribeiro, Jose Dirceu; Paschoal, Ilma Aparecida; Pereira, Monica Corso; Ribeiro, Antonio Fernando; Bertuzzo, Carmen Silvia

    2014-05-01

    There are nearly 2000 cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) mutations that cause cystic fibrosis (CF). These mutations are classified into six classes; on the one hand, the first three classes cause severe disease involvement in early childhood, on the other hand, the Class IV, V and VI mutations cause minor severe disease in the same age. Nowadays, with therapeutic advances in CF management and competence of pediatricians, physicians of adults have to deal with two groups of CF patients: (i) adults diagnosed in childhood with severe mutations and (ii) adults who initiated symptoms in adulthood and with Class IV, V and VI mutations. The aim of this study was to analyze adults from a clinical center, treated as CF disease, screening the CFTR genotype and evaluating the clinical characteristics. Thirty patients followed as CF disease at the University Hospital were enrolled. After a complete molecular CFTR negative screening and sweat test levels between 40 and 59mEq/L, five patients were characterized as non-CF disease and were excluded. Molecular screening was performed by CFTR gene sequencing/MLPA or by specific mutation screening. Clinical data was obtained from medical records. The patients were divided into three groups: (1) patients with Class I, II and III mutations in two CFTR alleles; (2) genotype with at least one allele of Class IV, V or VI CFTR mutations and, (3) non-identified CFTR mutation+one patient with one allele with CFTR mutation screened (Class I). There was an association of CFTR class mutation and sodium/chloride concentration in the sweat test (sodium: p=0.040; chloride: p=0.016), onset of digestive symptoms (p=0.012), lung function parameter (SpO2 - p=0.016), Bhalla score (p=0.021), age at diagnosis (p=0.008) and CF-related diabetes (p=0.029). There was an association between Pseudomonas aeruginosa chronic colonization (as clinical marker for the lung disease status) and lung impairment (FEV1% - p=0.027; Bhalla score - p=0.021), CF

  18. Lack of correlation between pulmonary disease and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator dysfunction in cystic fibrosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Mutations in both alleles of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene result in the disease cystic fibrosis, which usually manifests as chronic sinopulmonary disease, pancreatic insufficiency, elevated sodium chloride loss in sweat, infertility among men due to agenesis of the vas deferens and other symptoms including liver disease. Case presentation We describe a pair of African-American brothers, aged 21 and 27, with cystic fibrosis. They were homozygous for a rare frameshift mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator 3791delC, which would be expected to cause significant morbidity. Although 80% of cystic fibrosis patients are colonized with Pseudomonas aeruginosa by eight years of age, the older brother had no serum opsonic antibody titer to P. aeruginosa by age 13 and therefore would have failed to mount an effective antibody response to the alginate (mucoid polysaccharide) capsule of P. aeruginosa. He was not colonized with P. aeruginosa until 24 years of age. Similarly, the younger brother was not colonized with P. aeruginosa until age 20 and had no significant lung disease. Conclusion Despite a prevailing idea in cystic fibrosis research that the amount of functional cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator predicts clinical status, our results indicated that respiratory disease severity in cystic fibrosis exhibits phenotypic heterogeneity. If this heterogeneity is, in part, genetic, it is most likely derived from genes outside the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator locus. PMID:20420703

  19. Lack of correlation between pulmonary disease and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator dysfunction in cystic fibrosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Levy, Hara; Cannon, Carolynn L; Asher, Daniel; García, Christopher; Cleveland, Robert H; Pier, Gerald B; Knowles, Michael R; Colin, Andrew A

    2010-04-26

    Mutations in both alleles of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene result in the disease cystic fibrosis, which usually manifests as chronic sinopulmonary disease, pancreatic insufficiency, elevated sodium chloride loss in sweat, infertility among men due to agenesis of the vas deferens and other symptoms including liver disease. We describe a pair of African-American brothers, aged 21 and 27, with cystic fibrosis. They were homozygous for a rare frameshift mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator 3791delC, which would be expected to cause significant morbidity. Although 80% of cystic fibrosis patients are colonized with Pseudomonas aeruginosa by eight years of age, the older brother had no serum opsonic antibody titer to P. aeruginosa by age 13 and therefore would have failed to mount an effective antibody response to the alginate (mucoid polysaccharide) capsule of P. aeruginosa. He was not colonized with P. aeruginosa until 24 years of age. Similarly, the younger brother was not colonized with P. aeruginosa until age 20 and had no significant lung disease. Despite a prevailing idea in cystic fibrosis research that the amount of functional cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator predicts clinical status, our results indicated that respiratory disease severity in cystic fibrosis exhibits phenotypic heterogeneity. If this heterogeneity is, in part, genetic, it is most likely derived from genes outside the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator locus.

  20. Survival rates in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Wilmott, R W; Tyson, S L; Dinwiddie, R; Matthew, D J

    1983-01-01

    Life tables were calculated for 273 British children with cystic fibrosis for the period 1974-9. There was a marked improvement in survival rates in the meconium ileus group compared with the 1969-73 data, but there was little improvement in patients presenting later with other symptoms. PMID:6639137

  1. Nutritional management of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Goodchild, M C

    1987-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis patients have an increased requirement for calories and probably for all the major nutrients. The newer, enteric-coated granular preparations of pancreatic enzyme are more effective than preceding preparations and should permit a normal fat intake. Recent work has emphasized the interdependence of respiratory disease and nutrition.

  2. Emerging treatments in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Jones, Andrew M; Helm, Jennifer M

    2009-10-01

    There are a number of potential drugs for the treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF) currently undergoing clinical studies. A number of antibacterials formulated for delivery by inhalation are at various stages of study; these include dry-powder inhaler versions of colistin, tobramycin and ciprofloxacin, and formulations of azteonam, amikacin, levofloxacin, ciprofloxacin and fosfomycin/tobramycin for nebulization. Clinical trials of anti-inflammatory agents, including glutathione, phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors such as sildenafil, oral acetylcysteine, simvastatin, methotrexate, docosahexaenoic acid, hydroxychloroquine, pioglitazone and alpha1-antitrypsin, are ongoing. Ion channel modulating agents, such as lancovutide (Moli1901, duramycin) and denufosol, which activate alternate (non-CF transmembrane regulator [CFTR]) chloride channels, and GS 9411, a sodium channel antagonist, are now at the stages of clinical study and if successful, will offer a new category of therapeutic agent for the treatment of CF. Correction of the underlying gene effect, either by agents that help to correct the dysfunctional CFTR, such as ataluren, VX-770 and VX-809, or by gene transfer (gene therapy), is a particularly exciting prospect as a new therapy for CF and clinical studies are ongoing. This article reviews the exciting potential drug treatments for CF currently being evaluated in clinical studies, and also highlights some of the challenges faced by research and clinical teams in assessing the efficacy of potential new therapies for CF.

  3. [Therapeutic update in cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Durupt, S; Nove Josserand, R; Durieu, I

    2014-06-01

    We present the recent therapeutic advances in the cystic fibrosis care. It concerns improvements in symptomatic treatment with the development of dry powder inhaled antibiotics that improved quality of life, and innovative treatments namely the modulators of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane protein conductance regulator (CFTR), molecules which act specifically at the level of the defective mechanisms implied in the disease. The life expectancy of cystic fibrosis patients born after 2000, is estimated now to be about 50 years. This improvement of survival was obtained with the organization of the care within the specialized centers for cystic fibrosis (Centre de ressource et de compétences de la mucoviscidose) and remains still based on heavy symptomatic treatments. Dry powder inhaled antibiotics constitute a significant time saving for patients to whom all the care can achieve two hours daily. Since 2012, the modulators of CFTR, molecules allowing a pharmacological approach targeted according to the type of the mutations, allows a more specific approach of the disease. Ivacaftor (Kalydeco(®)) which potentialises the function of the CFTR protein expressed on the cellular surface is now available for patients with the G551D mutation. Lumacaftor is going to be tested in association with ivacaftor in patients with the F508del mutation, that is present in at least 75% of the patients. The ataluren which allows the production of a functional protein CFTR in patients with a no sense mutation is the third representing of this new therapeutic class. We presently have numerous symptomatic treatments for the cystic fibrosis care. The development of CFTR modulators, today available to a restricted number of patients treated with ivacaftor represents a very promising therapeutic avenue. It will represent probably the first step to a personalized treatment according to CFTR genotype.

  4. Gender Differences in Clinical Presentations of Cystic Fibrosis Patients in Azeri Turkish Population

    PubMed Central

    Vahedi, Leila; Jabarpoor-Bonyadi, Morteza; Ghojazadeh, Morteza; Vahedi, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Background Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disorder with several clinical presentations. This study was undertaken in the Azeri Turkish population in Iran, to investigate gender differences in the age at onset and diagnosis, age of death, and duration of illness of CF. Methods The data of 331 CF patients from 2001 to 2015 was surveyed. Parameters including age, sex, ΔF508 mutation, age at onset, age at diagnosis, age of death and clinical presentations were evaluated for both sexes, using descriptive analysis. The association of gender with these variables was studied using logistic regression, chi-square test and Mann-Whitney U test by SPSS version 18. Odds ratio with a confidence interval of 95% and p≤0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results The study included 191 males (57.7%) and 140 females (42.3%), all showing statistically significant difference (p<0.001). Age duration differed between genders. Male and female patients were further under 9 and 4 years, respectively. The occurrence of ΔF508 mutation was 0.51 times more in females than in males. Age, diagnosis and sex were closely associated: males were diagnosed at a significantly later age than females (p=0.05). While this compression performed based on clinical presentations, males with respiratory disease had a later median age at diagnosis than females at lifespan (p=0.001). The risk of infertility in males was approximately two times greater than in females (p=0.02). Conclusion These findings indicate gender differences in CF patients. Future studies are needed to establish other differences and evaluate the causes for the gender variations. PMID:27790278

  5. Multicenter Evaluation of Infant Lung Function Tests as Cystic Fibrosis Clinical Trial Endpoints

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Stephanie D.; Rosenfeld, Margaret; Kerby, Gwendolyn S.; Brumback, Lyndia; Kloster, Margaret H.; Acton, James D.; Colin, Andrew A.; Conrad, Carol K.; Hart, Meeghan A.; Hiatt, Peter W.; Mogayzel, Peter J.; Johnson, Robin C.; Wilcox, Stephanie L.; Castile, Robert G.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: The conducting of clinical trials in infants with cystic fibrosis (CF) has been hindered by lack of sensitive outcome measures. Objectives: To evaluate safety, feasibility, and ability to detect abnormalities in lung function of serial pulmonary function tests (PFTs) in infants with CF. Methods: Multicenter observational study using a commercial device, rigorous training, ongoing quality control, and over-reading of data by an independent panel. Raised volume rapid thoracoabdominal compression technique and plethysmography were performed at enrollment and at 6 and 12 months, with an additional 1-month reproducibility visit. Measurements and Main Results: A total of 342 procedures were performed in 100 infants with CF at 10 centers. FRC measurements were acceptable at a higher proportion of study visits (89%) than raised volume (72%) or fractional lung volume (68%) measurements. Average Z scores for many parameters differed significantly from historical control values. Mean (95% confidence interval) Z scores were: −0.52 (−0.78 to −0.25) for forced expiratory flow at 75% (FEF75) for FVC; 1.92 (1.39–2.45) for FRC; 1.22 (0.68–1.76) for residual volume; 0.87 (0.60–1.13) for FRC/total lung capacity; and 0.66 (0.27–1.06) for residual volume/total lung capacity. For future multicenter clinical trials using infant PFTs as primary endpoints, minimum detectable treatment effects are presented for several sample sizes. Conclusions: In this 10-center study, key PFT measures were significantly different in infants with CF than in historical control subjects. However, infant PFTs do not yet appear ready as primary efficacy endpoints for multicenter clinical trials, particularly at inexperienced sites, based on acceptability rates, variability, and potentially large sample sizes required to detect reasonable treatment effects. PMID:20622043

  6. Variation in lung function is associated with worse clinical outcomes in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Heinzmann-Filho, João Paulo; Pinto, Leonardo Araujo; Marostica, Paulo José Cauduro; Donadio, Márcio Vinícius Fagundes

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the variation in lung function over one year is associated with worse clinical outcomes, as well as with a decline in lung function in the following years, in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). METHODS: This was a retrospective study involving CF patients (4-19 years of age), evaluated over a three-year period. We evaluated demographic characteristics, chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection, antibiotic use, hospitalization, six-minute walk distance (6MWD), and lung function. The inclusion criterion was having undergone pulmonary function testing at least three times in the first year and at least once in each of the next two years. RESULTS: We evaluated 35 CF patients. The variation in FEV1 in the first year (ΔFEV1) was greater among those who, in the third year, showed reduced FEV1, had a below-average 6MWD, or were hospitalized than among those with normal FEV1, normal 6MWD, or no hospital admissions, in that same year (p < 0.05), although no such difference was found for antibiotic use in the third year. Subjects showing a ΔFEV1 ≥ 10% also showed a greater decline in FEV1 over the two subsequent years (p = 0.04). The ΔFEV1 also showed an inverse correlation with absolute FEV1 in the third year (r = −0.340, p = 0.04) and with the rate of FEV1 decline (r = −0.52, p = 0.001). Linear regression identified ΔFEV1 as a predictor of FEV1 decline (coefficient of determination, 0.27). CONCLUSIONS: Significant variation in lung function over one year seems to be associated with a higher subsequent rate of FEV1 decline and worse clinical outcomes in CF patients. Short-term ΔFEV1 might prove useful as a predictor of CF progression in clinical practice. PMID:26785959

  7. Craniofacial morphology in children with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hellsing, E; Brattström, V; Strandvik, B

    1992-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a hereditary metabolic disorder with clinical symptoms of abnormal mucus production. This blocks the airways, gives pancreatic insufficiency, and increases sweat electrolytes. The progressive respiratory disease often leads to respiratory insufficiency and cor pulmonale. The aim of the present investigation was to examine the facial morphology in children with cystic fibrosis. The sample comprised 11 children with cystic fibrosis, who were divided in two groups, one with gastrointestinal disorders and the other with predominantly respiratory insufficiency. Eleven healthy children with normal occlusions were selected as controls. Lateral skull radiographs obtained in natural head posture were digitized, and linear and angular variables for the different groups calculated and compared statistically. The cystic fibrosis group showed open bite, decreased posterior facial height, increased mandibular and craniocervical inclination. Additionally, within the CF-group, the children with respiratory insufficiency differed more from the controls than the children with gastrointestinal disorders. Despite the small number of subjects, the facial morphology of the CF children showed a similar pattern to that of children with nasal respiratory obstruction due to enlarged adenoids or tonsils.

  8. Diabetes mellitus in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Alves, Crésio de Aragão Dantas; Aguiar, Renata Arruti; Alves, Ana Cláudia S; Santana, Maria Angélica

    2007-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes (CFRD) is the principal extra-pulmonary complication of cystic fibrosis, occurring in 15-30% of adult cystic fibrosis patients. The number of cystic fibrosis patients who develop diabetes is increasing in parallel with increases in life expectancy. The aim of this study was to review the physiopathology, clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment of CFRD. A bibliographic search of the Medline and Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature databases was made. Articles were selected from among those published in the last twenty years. Insulin deficiency, caused by reduced beta-cell mass, is the main etiologic mechanism, although insulin resistance also plays a role. Presenting features of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, CFRD typically affects individuals of approximately 20 years of age. It can also be accompanied by fasting, non-fasting or intermittent hyperglycemia. Glucose intolerance is associated with worsening of nutritional status, increased morbidity, decreased survival and reduced pulmonary function. Microvascular complications are always present, although macrovascular complications are rarely seen. An oral glucose tolerance test is recommended annually for patients > or = 10 years of age and for any patients presenting unexplained weight loss or symptoms of diabetes. Patients hospitalized with severe diseases should also be screened. If fasting hyperglycemia persists for more than 48 h, insulin therapy is recommended. Insulin administration remains the treatment of choice for diabetes and fasting hyperglycemia. Calories should not be restricted, and patients with CFRD should be managed by a multidisciplinary team.

  9. Dental treatment for people with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Harrington, N; Barry, P J; Barry, S M

    2016-06-01

    To describe the nature and consequences of the multi-system genetic condition cystic fibrosis with a view to ensuring optimal dental treatment planning for these patients. A literature search was conducted to identify the key medical and dental manifestations of cystic fibrosis. These findings are discussed and utilised to create recommendations for treatment planning in patients with cystic fibrosis for the practising dental practitioner. Cystic fibrosis is a complex, lethal, multisystem autosomal recessive disorder resulting from mutations on chromosome 7 which result in dysfunction of an ion channel that sits on epithelial surfaces. Respiratory disease remains the leading cause of mortality. Survival has greatly increased in recent decades secondary to improved treatment and specialist care. Specific dental manifestations of the disease may result from the condition itself or complications of treatment. Modification of patient management may be necessary to provide optimum patient care. The pathophysiology and clinical manifestations are relevant to practicing dental practitioners and inform recommendations to be utilised to ensure optimal treatment planning for these patients.

  10. Impact of acute antibiotic therapy on the pulmonary exacerbation endpoint in cystic fibrosis clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Mayer-Hamblett, Nicole; Saiman, Lisa; Lands, Larry C; Anstead, Michael; Rosenfeld, Margaret; Kloster, Margaret; Fisher, Leigh; Ratjen, Felix

    2013-09-01

    In a chronic disease setting such as cystic fibrosis (CF), antibiotics are often prescribed for emergent symptoms and it is unclear whether this affects endpoints in a clinical trial. Pulmonary exacerbations (PEs) are defined episodes of acute worsening and a key clinical efficacy measure in CF. Our hypothesis was that acute antibiotics given for illnesses not meeting the PE definition may alter estimates of treatment effect that do not account for this antibiotic use. A randomized, placebo-controlled trial of azithromycin (AZ) including 260 participants with CF was utilized for this study. PEs were defined using a priori criteria. Physician initiated antibiotic therapy (PIT) not meeting the PE endpoint was characterized and its impact on treatment effect assessed. 40% (104/260) of participants were prescribed 188 courses of PIT in the absence of a PE; 19% (25/129) of placebo and 10% (13/131) of AZ participants received ≥2 courses of PIT and never fulfilled the PE definition (9% difference, 95% confidence interval: 1%, 18%, p = 0.04). Accounting for PIT through use of a composite endpoint including time to PE or need for repeated PIT altered treatment effect estimates (a 56% reduction in the event rate comparing AZ to placebo [p < 0.0001] as compared to a 50% reduction not accounting for PIT [p = 0.003]). PIT is common in CF and may impact treatment effect estimates. Optimization of the PE endpoint to include meaningful events necessitating treatment may improve our ability to conduct efficient trials by reducing the sample size 30-50%, ultimately enabling rapid evaluation of new therapies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Rectal forceps biopsy procedure in cystic fibrosis: technical aspects and patients perspective for clinical trials feasibility.

    PubMed

    Servidoni, Maria F; Sousa, Marisa; Vinagre, Adriana M; Cardoso, Silvia R; Ribeiro, Maria A; Meirelles, Luciana R; de Carvalho, Rita B; Kunzelmann, Karl; Ribeiro, Antônio F; Ribeiro, José D; Amaral, Margarida D

    2013-05-20

    Measurements of CFTR function in rectal biopsies ex vivo have been used for diagnosis and prognosis of Cystic Fibrosis (CF) disease. Here, we aimed to evaluate this procedure regarding: i) viability of the rectal specimens obtained by biopsy forceps for ex vivo bioelectrical and biochemical laboratory analyses; and ii) overall assessment (comfort, invasiveness, pain, sedation requirement, etc.) of the rectal forceps biopsy procedure from the patients perspective to assess its feasibility as an outcome measure in clinical trials. We compared three bowel preparation solutions (NaCl 0.9%, glycerol 12%, mannitol), and two biopsy forceps (standard and jumbo) in 580 rectal specimens from 132 individuals (CF and non-CF). Assessment of the overall rectal biopsy procedure (obtained by biopsy forceps) by patients was carried out by telephone surveys to 75 individuals who underwent the sigmoidoscopy procedure. Integrity and friability of the tissue specimens correlate with their transepithelial resistance (r = -0.438 and -0.305, respectively) and are influenced by the bowel preparation solution and biopsy forceps used, being NaCl and jumbo forceps the most compatible methods with the electrophysiological analysis. The great majority of the individuals (76%) did not report major discomfort due to the short procedure time (max 15 min) and considered it relatively painless (79%). Importantly, most (88%) accept repeating it at least for one more time and 53% for more than 4 times. Obtaining rectal biopsies with a flexible endoscope and jumbo forceps after bowel preparation with NaCl solution is a safe procedure that can be adopted for both adults and children of any age, yielding viable specimens for CFTR bioelectrical/biochemical analyses. The procedure is well tolerated by patients, demonstrating its feasibility as an outcome measure in clinical trials.

  12. Rectal forceps biopsy procedure in cystic fibrosis: technical aspects and patients perspective for clinical trials feasibility

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Measurements of CFTR function in rectal biopsies ex vivo have been used for diagnosis and prognosis of Cystic Fibrosis (CF) disease. Here, we aimed to evaluate this procedure regarding: i) viability of the rectal specimens obtained by biopsy forceps for ex vivo bioelectrical and biochemical laboratory analyses; and ii) overall assessment (comfort, invasiveness, pain, sedation requirement, etc.) of the rectal forceps biopsy procedure from the patients perspective to assess its feasibility as an outcome measure in clinical trials. Methods We compared three bowel preparation solutions (NaCl 0.9%, glycerol 12%, mannitol), and two biopsy forceps (standard and jumbo) in 580 rectal specimens from 132 individuals (CF and non-CF). Assessment of the overall rectal biopsy procedure (obtained by biopsy forceps) by patients was carried out by telephone surveys to 75 individuals who underwent the sigmoidoscopy procedure. Results Integrity and friability of the tissue specimens correlate with their transepithelial resistance (r = −0.438 and −0.305, respectively) and are influenced by the bowel preparation solution and biopsy forceps used, being NaCl and jumbo forceps the most compatible methods with the electrophysiological analysis. The great majority of the individuals (76%) did not report major discomfort due to the short procedure time (max 15 min) and considered it relatively painless (79%). Importantly, most (88%) accept repeating it at least for one more time and 53% for more than 4 times. Conclusions Obtaining rectal biopsies with a flexible endoscope and jumbo forceps after bowel preparation with NaCl solution is a safe procedure that can be adopted for both adults and children of any age, yielding viable specimens for CFTR bioelectrical/biochemical analyses. The procedure is well tolerated by patients, demonstrating its feasibility as an outcome measure in clinical trials. PMID:23688510

  13. Do children with cystic fibrosis receiving outreach care have poorer clinical outcomes than those treated at a specialist cystic fibrosis centre?

    PubMed

    Weber, Heinrich C; Robinson, Philip F; Saxby, Nicole; Beggs, Sean A; Els, Ingrid; Ehrlich, Rodney I

    2017-02-01

    Although cystic fibrosis (CF) centre care is generally considered ideal, children living in regional Australia receive outreach care supported by the academic CF centres. This is a retrospective database review of children with CF treated at the Royal Children's Hospital in Melbourne and its outreach clinics in Albury (Victoria), and Tasmania. The aim was to compare the outcomes of children with CF managed at an academic centre with that of outreach care, using lung function, nutritional status and Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonisation. Three models of care, namely CF centre care, Shared care and predominantly Local care, were compared, based on the level of involvement of CF centre multidisciplinary team. In our analyses, we controlled for potential confounders, such as socio-economic status and the degree of remoteness, to determine its effect on the outcome measures. There was no difference in lung function, i.e. forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1 ), the prevalence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonisation or nutritional status (body mass index (BMI)) between those receiving CF centre care and various modes of outreach care. Neither socio-economic status, measured by the Socio-Economic Index for Area (SEIFA) for disadvantage, nor distance from an urban centre (Australian Standard for Geographical Classification (ASGC)) were associated with lung function and nutritional outcome measures. There was however an association between increased Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonisation and poorer socio-economic status. Outcomes in children with CF in regional and remote areas receiving outreach care supported by an academic CF centre were no different from children receiving CF centre care. © 2016 The Authors. Australian Journal of Rural Health published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of National Rural Health Alliance.

  14. [Azithromycin therapy in cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Máiz Carro, Luis; Cantón Moreno, Rafael

    2004-03-06

    Progressive lung disease, caused by chronic endobronchial colonization, is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Several pathogens, including Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are responsible for this effect. The steadily improving prognosis of CF has been attributed to the use of antibiotics with activity against these organisms. Despite a significant increase in the amount of published material demonstrating the potential role of macrolide antibiotics as antiinflammatory agents and their effects on bacterial virulence, their mechanism of action in CF patients is still unknown. Although there is a limited number of clinical trials assessing the efficacy and safety of azithromycin (AZM) in CF, increasing evidence suggests that 3 to 6-month AZM treatment in CF patients is safe and well tolerated. This treatment results in clinical improvement, decreasing the number of pulmonary exacerbations and increasing pulmonary function. Therefore, chronic treatment with AZM should be considered in CF patients added to conventional therapy. Clinical experience with macrolides other than AZM in CF patients is very limited.

  15. [Historical compilation of cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Navarro, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most common life-shortening recessively inherited disorder in the Caucasian population. The genetic mutation that most frequently provokes cystic fibrosis (ΔF508) appeared at least 53,000years ago. For many centuries, the disease was thought to be related to witchcraft and the "evil eye" and it was only in 1938 that Dorothy H. Andersen characterized this disorder and suspected its genetic origin. The present article reviews the pathological discoveries and diagnostic and therapeutic advances made in the last 75 years. The review ends with some considerations for the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  16. Pharmacogenetics of cystic fibrosis treatment.

    PubMed

    Carter, Suzanne C; McKone, Edward F

    2016-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is genetic autosomal recessive disease caused by reduced or absent function of CFTR protein. Treatments for patients with CF have primarily focused on the downstream end-organ consequences of defective CFTR. Since the discovery of the CFTR gene that causes CF in 1989 there have been tremendous advances in our understanding of the genetics and pathophysiology of CF. This has recently led to the development of new CFTR mutation-specific targeted therapies for select patients with CF. This review will discuss the characteristics of the CFTR gene, the CFTR mutations that cause CF and the new mutation specific pharmacological treatments including gene therapy that are contributing to the dawning of a new era in cystic fibrosis care.

  17. Biomarkers in Paediatric Cystic Fibrosis Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Kathryn A; Schultz, André; Stick, Stephen M

    2015-09-01

    Biomarkers in cystic fibrosis are used i. for the measurement of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator function in order to diagnose cystic fibrosis, and ii. to assess aspects of lung disease severity (e.g. inflammation, infection). Effective biomarkers can aid disease monitoring and contribute to the development of new therapies. The tests of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator function each have unique strengths and weaknesses, and biomarkers of inflammation, infection and tissue destruction have the potential to enhance the management of cystic fibrosis through the early detection of disease processes. The development of biomarkers of cystic fibrosis lung disease, in particular airway inflammation and infection, is influenced by the challenges of obtaining relevant samples from infants and children for whom early detection and treatment of disease might have the greatest long term benefits.

  18. Pseudomembranous colitis in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Nagakumar, Prasad

    2013-05-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients may require frequent courses of antibiotics and repeated hospital admissions. Although children with CF have high carriage rate for C.difficile, they rarely develop colitis. Pseudomembranous colitis is more common in adult post lung transplant CF patients. Although rare, paseudomembranous colitis should be considered in CF patients presenting with abdominal symptoms even in the absence of diarrhoea. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A first-year dornase alfa treatment impact on clinical parameters of patients with cystic fibrosis: the Brazilian cystic fibrosis multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    Rozov, Tatiana; Silva, Fernando Antônio A. e; Santana, Maria Angélica; Adde, Fabíola Villac; Mendes, Rita Heloisa

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the clinical impact of the first year treatment with dornase alfa, according to age groups, in a cohort of Brazilian Cystic Fibrosis (CF) patients. METHODS: The data on 152 eligible patients, from 16 CF reference centers, that answered the medical questionnaires and performed laboratory tests at baseline (T0), and at six (T2) and 12 (T4) months after dornase alfa initiation, were analyzed. Three age groups were assessed: six to 11, 12 to 13, and >14 years. Pulmonary tests, airway microbiology, emergency room visits, hospitalizations, emergency and routine treatments were evaluated. Student's t-test, chi-square test and analysis of variance were used when appropriated. RESULTS: Routine treatments were based on respiratory physical therapy, regular exercises, pancreatic enzymes, vitamins, bronchodilators, corticosteroids, and antibiotics. In the six months prior the study (T0 phase), hospitalizations for pulmonary exacerbations occurred in 38.0, 10.0 and 61.4% in the three age groups, respectively. After one year of intervention, there was a significant reduction in the number of emergency room visits in the six to 11 years group. There were no significant changes in forced expiratory volume in one second (VEF1), in forced vital capacity (FVC), in oxygen saturation (SpO2), and in Tiffenau index for all age groups. A significant improvement in Shwachman-Kulczychi score was observed in the older group. In the last six months of therapy, chronic or intermittent colonization by P. aeruginosa was detected in 75.0, 71.4 and 62.5% of the studied groups, respectively, while S. aureus colonization was identified in 68.6, 66.6 and 41.9% of the cases. CONCLUSIONS: The treatment with dornase alfa promoted the maintenance of pulmonary function parameters and was associated with a significant reduction of emergency room visits due to pulmonary exacerbations in the six to 11 years age group, with better clinical scores in the >14 age group, one year after the

  20. Cystic Fibrosis Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn Javascript on. Feature: Steady Advances Against Cystic Fibrosis Cystic Fibrosis Research Past Issues / Fall 2012 Table of Contents "Remarkable strides in cystic fibrosis research over the past two decades have culminated ...

  1. Is the raised volume rapid thoracic compression technique ready for use in clinical trials in infants with cystic fibrosis?

    PubMed

    Matecki, Stefan; Kent, Lisa; de Boeck, Kris; Le Bourgeois, Muriel; Zielen, Stefan; Braggion, Cesare; Arets, H G M; Bradley, Judy; Davis, Stephanie; Sermet, Isabelle; Reix, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The European Cystic Fibrosis Society Clinical Trial Network (ECFS-CTN) has established a Standardization Committee to undertake a rigorous evaluation of promising outcome measures with regard to use in multicentre clinical trials in cystic fibrosis (CF). The aim of this article is to present a review of literature on clinimetric properties of the infant raised-volume rapid thoracic compression (RVRTC) technique in the context of CF, to summarise the consensus amongst the group on feasibility and answer key questions regarding the promotion of this technique to surrogate endpoint status. A literature search (from 1985 onwards) identified 20 papers that met inclusion criteria of RVRTC use in infants with CF. Data were extracted and tabulated regarding repeatability, validity, correlation with other outcome measures, responsiveness and reference values. A working group discussed the tables and answered 4 key questions. Overall, RVRTC in particular forced expiratory volume in 0.5s, showed good clinimetric properties despite presence of individual variability. Few studies showed a relationship between RVRTC and inflammation and infection, and to date, data remains limited regarding the responsiveness of RVRTC after an intervention. Concerns were raised regarding feasibility in multi-centre studies and availability of reference values. The ECFS-CTN Working Group considers that RVRTC cannot be used as a primary outcome in clinical trials in infants with CF before universal standardization of this measurement is achieved and implementation of inter-institutional networking is in place. We advise its use currently in phase I/II trials and as a secondary endpoint in phase III studies. We emphasise the need for (1) more short-term variability and longitudinal 'natural history' studies, and (2) robust reference values for commercially available devices. Copyright © 2015 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Cystic fibrosis and physiological responses to exercise.

    PubMed

    Williams, Craig A; Saynor, Zoe L; Tomlinson, Owen W; Barker, Alan R

    2014-12-01

    Cardiopulmonary exercise testing is underutilized within the clinical management of patients with cystic fibrosis. But within the last 5 years, there has been considerable interest in its implementation, which has included deliberations by the European Cystic Fibrosis Society about incorporating this method within the clinical assessment of patients. This review examines the current use of cardiopulmonary exercise testing in assessing the extent and cause(s) of exercise limitation from a pediatric perspective. Examples of the measured parameters and their interpretation are provided. Critical synthesis of recent work in the oxygen uptake (VO2) kinetics response to and following exercise is also discussed, and although identified more as a research tool, its utilization advances researchers understanding of the cardiovascular, respiratory and muscular limitations to exercise tolerance. Finally, exercise and its application in therapeutic interventions are highlighted and a number of recommendations made about the utility of exercise prescription.

  3. A Genotypic-Oriented View of CFTR Genetics Highlights Specific Mutational Patterns Underlying Clinical Macrocategories of Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Lucarelli, Marco; Bruno, Sabina Maria; Pierandrei, Silvia; Ferraguti, Giampiero; Stamato, Antonella; Narzi, Fabiana; Amato, Annalisa; Cimino, Giuseppe; Bertasi, Serenella; Quattrucci, Serena; Strom, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a monogenic disease caused by mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. The genotype–phenotype relationship in this disease is still unclear, and diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic challenges persist. We enrolled 610 patients with different forms of CF and studied them from a clinical, biochemical, microbiological and genetic point of view. Overall, there were 125 different mutated alleles (11 with novel mutations and 10 with complex mutations) and 225 genotypes. A strong correlation between mutational patterns at the genotypic level and phenotypic macrocategories emerged. This specificity appears to largely depend on rare and individual mutations, as well as on the varying prevalence of common alleles in different clinical macrocategories. However, 19 genotypes appeared to underlie different clinical forms of the disease. The dissection of the pathway from the CFTR mutated genotype to the clinical phenotype allowed to identify at least two components of the variability usually found in the genotype–phenotype relationship. One component seems to depend on the genetic variation of CFTR, the other component on the cumulative effect of variations in other genes and cellular pathways independent from CFTR. The experimental dissection of the overall biological CFTR pathway appears to be a powerful approach for a better comprehension of the genotype–phenotype relationship. However, a change from an allele-oriented to a genotypic-oriented view of CFTR genetics is mandatory, as well as a better assessment of sources of variability within the CFTR pathway. PMID:25910067

  4. Human Genome Project and cystic fibrosis--a symbiotic relationship.

    PubMed

    Tolstoi, L G; Smith, C L

    1999-11-01

    When Watson and Crick determined the structure of DNA in 1953, a biological revolution began. One result of this revolution is the Human Genome Project. The primary goal of this international project is to obtain the complete nucleotide sequence of the human genome by the year 2005. Although molecular biologists and geneticists are most enthusiastic about the Human Genome Project, all areas of clinical medicine and fields of biology will be affected. Cystic fibrosis is the most common, inherited, lethal disease of white persons. In 1989, researchers located the cystic fibrosis gene on the long arm of chromosome 7 by a technique known as positional cloning. The most common mutation (a 3-base pair deletion) of the cystic fibrosis gene occurs in 70% of patients with cystic fibrosis. The knowledge gained from genetic research on cystic fibrosis will help researchers develop new therapies (e.g., gene) and improve standard therapies (e.g., pharmacologic) so that a patient's life span is increased and quality of life is improved. The purpose of this review is twofold. First, the article provides an overview of the Human Genome Project and its clinical significance in advancing interdisciplinary care for patients with cystic fibrosis. Second, the article includes a discussion of the genetic basis, pathophysiology, and management of cystic fibrosis.

  5. Diagnosing cystic fibrosis-related diabetes: current methods and challenges.

    PubMed

    Prentice, Bernadette; Hameed, Shihab; Verge, Charles F; Ooi, Chee Y; Jaffe, Adam; Widger, John

    2016-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes (CFRD) is the end-point of a spectrum of glucose abnormalities in cystic fibrosis that begins with early insulin deficiency and ultimately results in accelerated nutritional decline and loss of lung function. Current diagnostic and management regimens are unable to entirely reverse this clinical decline. This review summarises the current understanding of the pathophysiology of CFRD, the issues associated with using oral glucose tolerance tests in CF and the challenges faced in making the diagnosis of CFRD. Medline database searches were conducted using search terms "Cystic Fibrosis Related Diabetes", "Cystic Fibrosis" AND "glucose", "Cystic Fibrosis" AND "insulin", "Cystic Fibrosis" AND "Diabetes". Additionally, reference lists were studied. Expert commentary: Increasing evidence points to early glucose abnormalities being clinically relevant in cystic fibrosis and as such novel diagnostic methods such as continuous glucose monitoring or 30 minute sampled oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) may play a key role in the future in the screening and diagnosis of early glucose abnormalities in CF.

  6. Physical exercise training for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Radtke, Thomas; Nolan, Sarah J; Hebestreit, Helge; Kriemler, Susi

    2015-06-28

    Physical exercise training may form an important part of regular care for people with cystic fibrosis. This is an update of previously published reviews. To determine the effects of physical exercise training compared to no training on aerobic exercise capacity, forced expiratory volume in one second, health-related quality of life and other patient-relevant (secondary) outcomes in cystic fibrosis. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register which comprises references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings.Date of the most recent search: 10 March 2015. All randomised and quasi-randomised controlled clinical trials comparing exercise training of any type and duration with conventional care in people with cystic fibrosis. Two authors independently selected studies for inclusion, assessed methodological quality and extracted data. Of the 48 studies identified, 13 studies which included 402 participants, met the inclusion criteria. The numbers in each study ranged from nine up to 72 participants; one study was in adults, six were in children and adolescents and six studies included all age ranges. Four studies of hospitalised participants lasted less than one month and nine studies were outpatient-based, lasting between two months and three years. The studies included participants with a wide range of disease severity and employed differing levels of supervision with a mixture of types of training. There was also wide variation in the quality of the included studies.This systematic review shows limited evidence from both short- and long-term studies that in people with cystic fibrosis aerobic or anaerobic physical exercise training or a combination of both has a positive effect on aerobic exercise capacity, pulmonary function and health-related quality of life. Although improvements are not consistent between studies and ranged

  7. Clinical utility of C-reactive protein to predict treatment response during cystic fibrosis pulmonary exacerbations

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ashutosh; Kirkpatrick, Gordon; Chen, Virginia; Skolnik, Kate; Hollander, Zsuzsanna; Wilcox, Pearce; Quon, Bradley S.

    2017-01-01

    Rationale C-reactive protein (CRP) is a systemic marker of inflammation that correlates with disease status in cystic fibrosis (CF). The clinical utility of CRP measurement to guide pulmonary exacerbation (PEx) treatment decisions remains uncertain. Objectives To determine whether monitoring CRP during PEx treatment can be used to predict treatment response. We hypothesized that early changes in CRP can be used to predict treatment response. Methods We reviewed all PEx events requiring hospitalization for intravenous (IV) antibiotics over 2 years at our institution. 83 PEx events met our eligibility criteria. CRP levels from admission to day 5 were evaluated to predict treatment non-response, using a modified version of a prior published composite definition. CRP was also evaluated to predict time until next exacerbation (TUNE). Measurements and main results 53% of 83 PEx events were classified as treatment non-response. Paradoxically, 24% of PEx events were characterized by a ≥ 50% increase in CRP levels within the first five days of treatment. Absolute change in CRP from admission to day 5 was not associated with treatment non-response (p = 0.58). Adjusted for FEV1% predicted, admission log10 CRP was associated with treatment non-response (OR: 2.39; 95% CI: 1.14 to 5.91; p = 0.03) and shorter TUNE (HR: 1.60; 95% CI: 1.13 to 2.27; p = 0.008). The area under the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve of admission CRP to predict treatment non-response was 0.72 (95% CI 0.61–0.83; p<0.001). 23% of PEx events were characterized by an admission CRP of > 75 mg/L with a specificity of 90% for treatment non-response. Conclusions Admission CRP predicts treatment non-response and time until next exacerbation. A very elevated admission CRP (>75mg/L) is highly specific for treatment non-response and might be used to target high-risk patients for future interventional studies aimed at improving exacerbation outcomes. PMID:28178305

  8. Relationship between the chest radiograph, regional lung function studies, exercise tolerance, and clinical condition in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Coates, A L; Boyce, P; Shaw, D G; Godfrey, S; Mearns, M

    1981-01-01

    This study evaluated the accuracy of the interpretation of the chest film in delineating localised abnormalities of ventilation and perfusion, as well as the overall severity of airways obstruction, exercise tolerance, and clinical condition in children with cystic fibrosis. Radiographic findings in various regions of the chest film were compared with the functional values obtained with regional lung function tests which evaluated the arrival and disappearance of boluses of radioactive nitrogen given by inhalation and infusion. While the more severely affected areas on the chest radiograph were found to correlate with similar regions on the lung function tests, as did overall scores, errors occurred in some cases if the x-ray film alone was used as a judge of regional physiological derangement. In addition the degree of airways obstruction, the exercise tolerance on a cycle ergometer, and clinical grading, each correlated significantly with the radiographic score. We conclude that the chest radiograph is a good indicator of the overall severity of the lung disease and that it correlates well with exercise tolerance and clinical condition in cystic fibrosis. PMID:7469460

  9. Cystic fibrosis lung disease in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Vender, Robert L

    2008-04-01

    As the longevity of all patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) continues to increase (median 2005 survival=36.8 years), more adult patients will be receiving their medical care from nonpediatric adult-care providers. Cystic fibrosis remains a fatal disease, with more than 80% of patients dying after the age of 18 years, and most deaths resulting from pulmonary disease. The changing epidemiology requires adult-care providers to become knowledgeable and competent in the clinical management of adults with CF. Physicians must understand the influence of specific genotype on phenotypic disease presentation and severity, the pathogenic factors determining lung disease onset and progression, the impact of comorbid disease factors such as CF-related diabetes and malnutrition upon lung disease severity, and the currently approved or standard accepted therapies used for chronic management of CF lung disease. This knowledge is critical to help alleviate morbidity and improve mortality for the rapidly expanding population of adults with CF.

  10. Cystic fibrosis pulmonary guidelines: treatment of pulmonary exacerbations.

    PubMed

    Flume, Patrick A; Mogayzel, Peter J; Robinson, Karen A; Goss, Christopher H; Rosenblatt, Randall L; Kuhn, Robert J; Marshall, Bruce C

    2009-11-01

    The natural history of cystic fibrosis lung disease is one of chronic progression with intermittent episodes of acute worsening of symptoms frequently called acute pulmonary exacerbations These exacerbations typically warrant medical intervention. It is important that appropriate therapies are recommended on the basis of available evidence of efficacy and safety. The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation therefore established a committee to define the key questions related to pulmonary exacerbations, review the clinical evidence using an evidence-based methodology, and provide recommendations to clinicians. It is hoped that these guidelines will be helpful to clinicians in the treatment of individuals with cystic fibrosis.

  11. Early bronchiectasis in cystic fibrosis detected by surveillance CT.

    PubMed

    Pillarisetti, Naveen; Linnane, Barry; Ranganathan, Sarath

    2010-08-01

    There is emerging evidence that cystic fibrosis lung disease begins early in infancy. Newborn screening allows early detection and surveillance of pulmonary disease and the possibility of early intervention in this life-shortening condition. We report two children with cystic fibrosis who underwent a comprehensive assessment from diagnosis that included measurement of lung function, limited-slice high-resolution CT and BAL performed annually. Early aggressive surveillance enabled significant lung disease and bronchiectasis to be detected during the first few years of life and led to a change in management, highlighting a clinical role for CT scanning during the preschool years in children with cystic fibrosis.

  12. [Treatment of Cystic Fibrosis with CFTR Modulators].

    PubMed

    Tümmler, B

    2016-05-01

    Personalized medicine promises that medical decisions, practices and products are tailored to the individual patient. Cystic fibrosis, an inherited disorder of chloride and bicarbonate transport in exocrine glands, is the first successful example of customized drug development for mutation-specific therapy. There are two classes of CFTR modulators: potentiators that increase the activity of CFTR at the cell surface, and correctors that either promote the read-through of nonsense mutations or facilitate the translation, folding, maturation and trafficking of mutant CFTR to the cell surface. The potentiator ivacaftor and the corrector lumacaftor are approved in Germany for the treatment of people with cystic fibrosis who carry a gating mutation such as p.Gly551Asp or who are homozygous for the most common mutation p.Phe508del, respectively. This report provides an overview of the basic defect in cystic fibrosis, the population genetics of CFTR mutations in Germany and the bioassays to assess CFTR function in humans together with the major achievements of preclinical research and clinical trials to bring CFTR modulators to the clinic. Some practical information on the use of ivacaftor and lumacaftor in daily practice and an update on pitfalls, challenges and novel strategies of bench-to-bedside development of CFTR modulators are also provided.

  13. Inspiratory muscle training for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Houston, Brian W; Mills, Nicola; Solis-Moya, Arturo

    2008-10-08

    Cystic fibrosis is the most common life-limiting genetic condition in Caucasians and the life-expectancy of those newly diagnosed is increasing. Inspiratory muscle training may be a way of improving the lung function and quality of life of people with cystic fibrosis. Hence there is a need to establish whether this intervention is beneficial. To determine the effect of inspiratory muscle training on health-related quality of life, pulmonary function and exercise tolerance. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials register comprising of references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings.Date of most recent search: April 2008. Randomised or quasi-randomised clinical controlled trials comparing different inspiratory muscle training regimens with each other or a control in people with cystic fibrosis. Three review authors independently applied the inclusion and exclusion criteria to publications and assessed the quality of the included studies. Seven studies were identified. Of these six studies with 140 participants met the review inclusion criteria. There was wide variation in the quality of the included studies. Data were not published in sufficient detail or with sufficiently similar outcome measures in these studies to perform meta-analyses. We have not found any evidence to suggest that this treatment is either beneficial or not. We would advise that practitioners evaluate on a case-by-case basis whether or not to employ this therapy. We recommend that future studies make more use of health-related quality of life and exercise tolerance measures; and that there is an agreement upon a single standard measure of classifying the clinical status of the participants.

  14. Cystic fibrosis in adult age.

    PubMed

    Lerín, M; Prados, C; Martínez, M T; Maíz, L; Girón, R; Solé, A; Cabanillas, J J; Alvarez-Sala, R

    2014-01-01

    To know the prevalence of the patients diagnosed of cystic fibrosis (CF) older than 18 years old of five specific Spanish Units and to analyze their clinical, genetic and microbiological characteristics. Observational, cross-sectional, descriptive study of patients diagnosed with CF at age or older than 18 years. The variables analyzed were: current age, age at diagnosis, sex, nationality, lung function parameters, pathologies presented at diagnosis, microbiological features and genetic findings. Eigthy nine patients (14.8% of the total of 600 CF patients followed at the participating units), of which 45 patients were female (50.6%) and 44 were males (49.4%), were included with a mean age at diagnosis of 36.4 years. Eigthy one patients (91%) were Spaniards. The sweat test was diagnostic in 77 (86.5%) of the patients studied. The sweat test was diagnostic in 77 of the 89 patients studied (86.5%). The most frequently detected mutations were F508del/other and G542X/other, and the most frequent clinical findings at diagnosis were the presence of bronchiectasis in 33 patients (37.1%) followed by sterility in 12 patients (13.5%). The most common colonizing organisms were meticillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (S.aureus) (23.6%) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) (13.5%). Most patients presented a mild obstructive ventilatory defect and had no pancreatic involvement. The sweat test used to be indeterminate. CF is also a disease which diagnosis can be in adulthood. CF patients diagnosed in adulthood have a mild lung function and lower incidence of pancreatic involvement, so their prognosis tends to be favorable. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  15. Negative sweat tests and cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Sarsfield, J K; Davies, J M

    1975-01-01

    Two brothers are described with chronic suppurative pulmonary disease. One has classical cystic fibrosis with complete pancreatic involvement and abnormal sweat test. The other had incomplete pancreatic disease with repeatedly normal sweat tests. The implications of a negative sweat test in patients with cystic fibrosis are discussed. Images FIG. PMID:1147688

  16. [Aspergillus fumigatus and Candida albicans in cystic fibrosis: clinical significance and specific immune response involving serum immunoglobulins G, A, and M].

    PubMed

    Máiz, Luis; Cuevas, Manuela; Lamas, Adelaida; Sousa, Aurora; Quirce, Santiago; Suárez, Lucrecia

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical significance of Aspergillus fumigatus and Candida albicans in respiratory secretions from patients with cystic fibrosis and to assess the immune response to these fungi in serum. The study included 66 patients with cystic fibrosis (34 men; mean age, 16.2 years). Sera from 15 healthy individuals were used as controls. The serum concentrations of immunoglobulin (Ig) G, IgA, and IgM against A fumigatus and C albicans were higher in patients than in the control group. There was no correlation between the presence of A fumigatus in respiratory secretions and the immune response to the fungus measured in serum. In contrast, the presence of C albicans in respiratory secretions was correlated with the immune response to that fungus. The likelihood of obtaining A fumigatus cultures from respiratory secretions increased with age. The presence of these fungi in respiratory samples was not a risk factor for greater respiratory impairment. In response to increased colonization of the lower respiratory tract by A fumigatus and C albicans, patients with cystic fibrosis have elevated serum levels of IgG, IgA, and IgM against those fungi. In patients with cystic fibrosis, culture of sputum and oropharyngeal secretions is adequate for the assessment of lower respiratory tract colonization by C albicans but not A fumigatus. Fungal colonization of the lower respiratory tract is not a risk factor for greater respiratory impairment in patients with cystic fibrosis.

  17. [Bronchopulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Munck, Anne; Bingen, Edouard

    2003-01-15

    Bronchopulmonary infection determines the vital prognosis of the patients with cystic fibrosis. Following Staphylococcus aureus infection, patients are colonized or cocolonized by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, greatly involved in the pulmonary deterioration; intensive antibiotic treatment of primocolonisation helps to prevent or delay chronic colonisation. Chronic colonization needs a rational long term antibiotic strategy to prevent the occurrence of multiresistant germs; antibiotic cures are performed every 3 or 4 months before pulmonary exacerbation symptoms. Antibiotherapy, physiotherapy and nutritional management helps to increase the survival and quality of life.

  18. Endocrine Disorders in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Blackman, Scott M; Tangpricha, Vin

    2016-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis is frequently complicated by endocrine disorders. Diabetes can be expected to affect most with CF and pancreatic insufficiency and varies widely in age of onset, but early identification and treatment improve morbidity and mortality. Short stature can be exacerbated by relative delay of puberty and by use of inhaled corticosteroids. Bone disease in CF causes fragility fractures and should be assessed by monitoring bone mineral density and optimizing vitamin D status. Detecting and managing endocrine complications in CF can reduce morbidity and mortality in CF. These complications can be expected to become more common as the CF population ages. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Cystic fibrosis: a mucosal immunodeficiency syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Taylor Sitarik; Prince, Alice

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) functions as a channel that regulates the transport of ions and the movement of water across the epithelial barrier. Mutations in CFTR, which form the basis for the clinical manifestations of cystic fibrosis, affect the epithelial innate immune function in the lung, resulting in exaggerated and ineffective airway inflammation that fails to eradicate pulmonary pathogens. Compounding the effects of excessive neutrophil recruitment, the mutant CFTR channel does not transport antioxidants to counteract neutrophil-associated oxidative stress. Whereas mutant CFTR expression in leukocytes outside of the lung does not markedly impair their function, the expected regulation of inflammation in the airways is clearly deficient in cystic fibrosis. The resulting bacterial infections, which are caused by organisms that have substantial genetic and metabolic flexibility, can resist multiple classes of antibiotics and evade phagocytic clearance. The development of animal models that approximate the human pulmonary phenotypes—airway inflammation and spontaneous infection—may provide the much-needed tools to establish how CFTR regulates mucosal immunity and to test directly the effect of pharmacologic potentiation and correction of mutant CFTR function on bacterial clearance. PMID:22481418

  20. New animal models of cystic fibrosis: what are they teaching us?

    PubMed Central

    Keiser, Nicholas W.; Engelhardt, John F.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review Cystic fibrosis is the first human genetic disease to benefit from the directed engineering of three different species of animal models (mice, pigs, and ferrets). Recent studies on the cystic fibrosis pig and ferret models are providing new information about the pathophysiology of cystic fibrosis in various organ systems. Additionally, new conditional cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) knockout mice are teaching unexpected lessons about CFTR function in surprising cellular locations. Comparisons between these animal models and the human condition are key to dissecting the complexities of disease pathophysiology in cystic fibrosis. Recent findings Cystic fibrosis pigs and ferrets have provided new models to study the spontaneous development of disease in the lung and pancreas, two organs that are largely spared overt spontaneous disease in cystic fibrosis mice. New cystic fibrosis mouse models are now interrogating CFTR functions involved in growth and inflammation at an organ-based level using conditional knockout technology. Together, these models are providing new insights on the human condition. Summary Basic and clinical cystic fibrosis research will benefit greatly from the comparative pathophysiology of cystic fibrosis mice, pigs, and ferrets. Both similarities and differences between these three cystic fibrosis models will inform pathophysiologically important mechanisms of CFTR function in humans and aid in the development of both organ-specific and general therapies for cystic fibrosis. PMID:21857224

  1. Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa co-infection is associated with cystic fibrosis-related diabetes and poor clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Limoli, D H; Yang, J; Khansaheb, M K; Helfman, B; Peng, L; Stecenko, A A; Goldberg, J B

    2016-06-01

    Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes (CFRD) patients suffer from accelerated rates of pulmonary decline compared to cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with normal glucose tolerance (NGT). However, the mechanisms underlying this difference are unknown. While CFRD is associated with increased respiratory infections, a link between infection and enhanced pulmonary dysfunction remains unclear. The development of glucose intolerance is spectral, resulting in impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) prior to the diagnosis of CFRD. Inclusion of IGT patients within the NGT group may diminish the ability to identify correlations with CFRD. With this in mind, this study aimed to determine if the association between CFRD and respiratory infections is correlated with pulmonary decline. Respiratory cultures from 234 CF patients with confirmed diagnosis of NGT or CFRD were analyzed to measure rates of infection, focusing on the two most prevalent bacteria in CF, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Infection status was correlated with pulmonary function and confounding clinical variables including age, gender, blood glucose levels, and CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) phenotype were considered in multivariate analyses. CFRD patients, particularly those with extremely high blood glucose levels, were more likely than NGT patients to be co-infected with S. aureus and P. aeruginosa, compared to infection with only one pathogen. Co-infection was associated with decreased lung function and increased frequency of pulmonary exacerbations, even after adjustment for confounding variables. Alterations in the microbial community composition, as opposed to the presence of a single pathogen, may account for greater pulmonary decline in CFRD patients.

  2. Identification of outer membrane Porin D as a vitronectin-binding factor in cystic fibrosis clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Paulsson, Magnus; Singh, Birendra; Al-Jubair, Tamim; Su, Yu-Ching; Høiby, Niels; Riesbeck, Kristian

    2015-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a pathogen that frequently colonizes patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Several pathogens are known to bind vitronectin to increase their virulence. Vitronectin has been shown to enhance P. aeruginosa adhesion to host epithelial cells. We screened clinical isolates from the airways of CF patients and from the bloodstream of patients with bacteremia for binding of vitronectin. Two-dimensional SDS-PAGE and a proteomic approach were used to identify vitronectin-receptors in P. aeruginosa. P. aeruginosa from the airways of CF patients (n=27) bound more vitronectin than bacteremic isolates (n=15, p=0.025). Porin D (OprD) was identified as a vitronectin-binding protein. A P. aeruginosa oprD transposon insertion mutant had a decreased binding to soluble and immobilized vitronectin (p≤0.001). P. aeruginosa isolates obtained from CF patients significantly bound vitronectin. Porin D was defined as a novel P. aeruginosa vitronectin-receptor, and we postulate that the Porin D-dependent interaction with vitronectin may be important for colonization. Copyright © 2015 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Aspergillus infections in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    King, Jill; Brunel, Shan F; Warris, Adilia

    2016-07-05

    Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) suffer from chronic lung infection and airway inflammation. Respiratory failure secondary to chronic or recurrent infection remains the commonest cause of death and accounts for over 90% of mortality. Bacteria as Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia complex have been regarded the main CF pathogens and their role in progressive lung decline has been studied extensively. Little attention has been paid to the role of Aspergillus spp. and other filamentous fungi in the pathogenesis of non-ABPA (allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis) respiratory disease in CF, despite their frequent recovery in respiratory samples. It has become more apparent however, that Aspergillus spp. may play an important role in chronic lung disease in CF. Research delineating the underlying mechanisms of Aspergillus persistence and infection in the CF lung and its link to lung deterioration is lacking. This review summarizes the Aspergillus disease phenotypes observed in CF, discusses the role of CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator)-protein in innate immune responses and new treatment modalities. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Country to country variation: what can be learnt from national cystic fibrosis registries.

    PubMed

    Goss, Christopher Hooper

    2015-11-01

    This review will address the evolving science involving international comparisons of populations of persons living with cystic fibrosis. Understanding the current clinical outcomes in cystic fibrosis is critical prior to assessing such comparisons. Countries that differ in clinical approaches provide natural experiments to assess those approaches. Recent studies have highlighted that the population of persons with cystic fibrosis is changing; estimates predict a continued growth of cystic fibrosis populations with substantial increases in persons with cystic fibrosis who are adults. Additional work highlighted differences in subpopulations (i.e. children); US cystic fibrosis children appear to have better lung function, but similar nutritional status, compared to UK cystic fibrosis children. These differences were associated with differences in intensity of care, with a higher proportion of US children receiving more cystic fibrosis-specific therapies. Additional research raises important questions regarding potential sampling bias in different patient registries and differing rates of unconfirmed cases of cystic fibrosis. These and other limitations are highlighted. Differences in both demographics and clinical outcomes in cystic fibrosis between nations can be informative, but, like many types of observational research, are at risk of unrecognized bias. Despite this limitation, these comparisons can lead to substantive improvements in care in cystic fibrosis.

  5. Complementary and alternative medicine use in children with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Giangioppo, Sandra; Kalaci, Odion; Radhakrishnan, Arun; Fleischer, Erin; Itterman, Jennifer; Lyttle, Brian; Price, April; Radhakrishnan, Dhenuka

    2016-11-01

    To estimate the overall prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine use among children with cystic fibrosis, determine specific modalities used, predictors of use and subjective helpfulness or harm from individual modalities. Of 53 children attending the cystic fibrosis clinic in London, Ontario (100% recruitment), 79% had used complementary and alternative medicine. The most commonly used modalities were air purifiers, humidifiers, probiotics, and omega-3 fatty acids. Family complementary and alternative medicine use was the only independent predictor of overall use. The majority of patients perceived benefit from specific modalities for cystic fibrosis symptoms. Given the high frequency and number of modalities used and lack of patient and disease characteristics predicting use, we recommend that health care providers should routinely ask about complementary and alternative medicine among all pediatric cystic fibrosis patients and assist patients in understanding the potential benefits and risks to make informed decisions about its use. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Cystic fibrosis in adults. From researcher to practitioner.

    PubMed Central

    Marelich, G P; Cross, C E

    1996-01-01

    The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation currently tracks about 20,000 Americans with cystic fibrosis, an autosomal recessive genetic disease that leads to multisystem complications. With the institution of better therapeutic regimens over the past 2 decades, more patients with this disease are surviving to adulthood. Within the past decade, both clinical and basic science research in the field of cystic fibrosis has progressed at a rapid rate. The intent of this review is to introduce readers to the molecular, cellular, and systemic disorders of this disease. We discuss treatment strategies involving antibiotics, nutrition, immune-response mediators, chest physiotherapy, and sputum-active agents with respect to the airway dysfunction of cystic fibrosis. Other common complications, recent developments, transplantation, and gene therapy are also reviewed. PMID:8732732

  7. Fungi in cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Moss, Richard B

    2015-04-01

    Bronchiectasis is a pathologic bronchial dilatation with loss of function that can result from multiple inflammatory and infectious injuries to the conducting airways of the lung. Molds, particularly the filamentous fungus Aspergillus fumigatus, have been implicated as a common cause of both cystic fibrosis (CF) and non-CF bronchiectasis, the latter primarily in patients with severe asthma. The pathogenesis of mold-associated bronchiectasis is usually due to atopic sensitization to mold allergens in the presence of active chronic endobronchial fungal infection with host innate and adaptive immune deviation to a Th2-dominated inflammation, a condition known as allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) (or allergic bronchopulmonary mycosis if a non-Aspergillus mold is implicated). Diagnostic criteria of ABPA continue to evolve, while treatment relies upon downregulation of the allergic inflammatory response with immunomodulatory agents and antifungal pharmacotherapy.

  8. Change in sweat chloride as a clinical end point in cystic fibrosis clinical trials: the ivacaftor experience.

    PubMed

    Durmowicz, Anthony G; Witzmann, Kimberly A; Rosebraugh, Curtis J; Chowdhury, Badrul A

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-shortening inherited disease caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR), which encodes for the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) ion channel that regulates chloride and water transport across the surface of epithelial cells. Ivacaftor, a drug recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration, represents the first mutation-specific therapy for CF. It is a CFTR channel modulator and improves CFTR function in patients with CF who have a G551D mutation. A clinical trial performed to support ivacaftor dose selection demonstrated a dose-response relationship between improvement in FEV(1) and decrease in sweat chloride, a measure of CFTR function. Validation of such a relationship between FEV(1) and sweat chloride would facilitate development of new drugs that target the defective CFTR. Subsequently, in phase 3 studies, ivacaftor 150 mg bid resulted in significant improvements in FEV(1) (10%-12%) and reduction in sweat chloride (approximately 50 mmol/L). However, a decrease in sweat chloride did not correlate with improvement in FEV(1), nor did there appear to be a threshold level for change in sweat chloride above which an improvement in FEV(1) was apparent. The lack of correlation of sweat chloride with improvement in FEV(1) speaks to the multiplicity of factors, physiologic, environmental, and genetic, that likely modulate CF disease severity. Future clinical trials of drugs that are directed to the defective CFTR will need take into account the uncertainty of using even established measurements, such as sweat chloride, as clinical end points.

  9. Rhinosinusitis in cystic fibrosis: not a simple story.

    PubMed

    Babinski, Dariusz; Trawinska-Bartnicka, Maria

    2008-05-01

    Chronic inflammation of sinuses and nasal mucosa is found in 74-100% patients suffering from cystic fibrosis, whereas nasal polyps in 6-44% patients. The aim of this paper is to assess rhinosinusitis types taking into account the forms of cystic fibrosis and the kind of CFTR gene mutation. The author presents material of 126 cystic fibrosis patients, 90 with typical clinical features and 36 with atypical phenotype. Genetic tests were carried out to determine the genotype of CFTR gene. The sample was divided into four groups according to the genotype effect on the chloride canal function. Cytological examination of nasal mucosa was carried out in all the patients. In 71.5% of patients with cystic fibrosis, infectious chronic non-specific rhinosinusitis was found. Other types of rhinosinusitis--acute infectious, chronic allergic and non-allergic with eosinophilia were found in 21.4% of patients, whereas in 7.1% of patients no clinical symptoms of rhinosinusitis were found. Nasal polyps were found in 23 (18.3%) patients with cystic fibrosis: in 21 patients with a typical form and in 2 patients with an atypical form. Nasal polyps were more frequent in groups with the genotype consisting of both "strong" mutations than in the group with unknown or "mild" mutations. Rhinosinusitis in cystic fibrosis patients is not homogenous pathology. Infectious chronic non-specific rhinosinusitis is found the most frequently, but other forms of rhinosinusitis appear quite often and they require proper treatment.

  10. Oral calorie supplements for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Rosalind L; Rayner, Oli

    2017-05-04

    Poor nutrition occurs frequently in people with cystic fibrosis and is associated with other adverse outcomes. Oral calorie supplements are used to increase total daily calorie intake and improve weight gain. However, they are expensive and there are concerns they may reduce the amount of food eaten and not improve overall energy intake. This is an update of a previously published review. To establish whether in people with cystic fibrosis, oral calorie supplements: increase daily calorie intake; and improve overall nutritional intake, nutritional indices, lung function, survival and quality of life. To assess adverse effects associated with using these supplements. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis Trials Register comprising references from comprehensive electronic database searches, handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. We contacted companies marketing oral calorie supplements.Last search: 18 October 2016. Randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing use of oral calorie supplements for at least one month to increase calorie intake with no specific intervention or additional nutritional advice in people with cystic fibrosis. We independently selected the included trials, assessed risk of bias and extracted data. We contacted the authors of included trials and obtained additional information for two trials. We identified 21 trials and included three, reporting results from 131 participants lasting between three months and one year. Two trials compared supplements to additional nutritional advice and one to no intervention. Two of the included trials recruited only children. In one trial the risk of bias was low across all domains, in a second trial the risk of bias was largely unclear and in the third mainly low. Blinding of participants was unclear in two of the trials. Also, in one trial the clinical condition of groups appeared to be unevenly balanced at baseline and in another trial there were

  11. Swimming Motility in a Longitudinal Collection of Clinical Isolates of Burkholderia cepacia Complex Bacteria from People with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Zlosnik, James E. A.; Mori, Paul Y.; To, Derek; Leung, James; Hird, Trevor J.; Speert, David P.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic bacterial lung infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality. While a range of bacteria are known to be capable of establishing residence in the CF lung, only a small number have a clearly established link to deteriorating clinical status. The two bacteria with the clearest roles in CF lung disease are Pseudomonas aeruginosa and bacteria belonging to the Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC). A number of common adaptations by P. aeruginosa strains to chronic lung infection in CF have been well described. Typically, initial isolates of P. aeruginosa are nonmucoid and display a range of putative virulence determinants. Upon establishment of chronic infection, subsequent isolates ultimately show a reduction in putative virulence determinants, including swimming motility, along with an acquisition of the mucoid phenotype and increased levels of antimicrobial resistance. Infections by BCC are marked by an unpredictable, but typically worse, clinical outcome. However, in contrast to P. aeruginosa infections in CF, studies describing adaptive changes in BCC bacterial phenotype during chronic lung infections are far more limited. To further enhance our understanding of chronic lung infections by BCC bacteria in CF, we assessed the swimming motility phenotype in 551 isolates of BCC bacteria from cystic fibrosis (CF) lung infections between 1981 and 2007. These data suggest that swimming motility is not typically lost by BCC during chronic infection, unlike as seen in P. aeruginosa infections. Furthermore, while we observed a statistically significant link between mucoidy and motility, we did not detect any link between motility phenotype and clinical outcome. These studies highlight the need for further work to understand the adaptive changes of BCC bacteria during chronic infection in the CF lung. PMID:25203161

  12. The diagnosis of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    De Boeck, Kris; Vermeulen, Francois; Dupont, Lieven

    2017-06-01

    Establishing the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF) is straight forward in the majority of patients: they present with a clear clinical picture (most frequently chronic respiratory symptoms plus malabsorption), the sweat chloride value is>60mmol/L and two known disease causing CFTR mutations are identified. In less than 5% of subjects, mainly those with a milder or limited phenotype, the diagnostic process is more complex, because initial diagnostic test results are inconclusive: sweat chloride concentration in the intermediate range, less than 2 CF causing mutations identified or both. These patients should be referred to expert centers where bioassays of CFTR function like nasal potential difference measurement or intestinal current measurement can be done. Still, in some patients, despite symptoms compatible with CF and some indication of CFTR dysfunction (e.g. only intermediate sweat chloride value), diagnostic criteria are not met (e.g. only 1 CFTR mutation identified). For these subjects, the term CFTR related disorder (CFTR-RD) is used. Patients with disseminated bronchiectasis, congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens and acute or recurrent pancreatitis may fall in this category. CF has a very wide disease spectrum and increasingly the diagnosis is being made during adult life, mainly in subjects with milder phenotypes. In many countries, nationwide CF newborn screening (NBS) has been introduced. In screen positive babies, the diagnosis of CF must be confirmed by a sweat test demonstrating a sweat chloride concentration above 60mmol/L. To achieve the benefit of NBS, every baby in whom the diagnosis of CF is confirmed must receive immediate follow-up and treatment in a CF reference center. CF NBS is not full proof: some diagnoses will be missed and in some babies the diagnosis cannot be confirmed nor ruled out with certainty. Screening algorithms that include gene sequencing will detect a high number of such babies that are screen positive with an

  13. Management of the Upper Airway in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Illing, Elisa A.; Woodworth, Bradford A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review Upper airway disease engenders significant morbidity for patients with cystic fibrosis and is increasingly recognized as having a much greater role in pulmonary outcomes and quality of life than originally believed. Widespread disparate therapeutic strategies for cystic fibrosis chronic rhinosinusitis underscore the absence of a standardized treatment paradigm. This review outlines the most recent evidence-based trends in the management of upper airway disease in cystic fibrosis. Recent Findings The unified airway theory proposes that the sinuses are a focus of initial bacterial colonization which seeds the lower airway and may play a large role in maintaining lung infections. Mounting evidence suggests more aggressive treatment of the sinuses may confer significant improvement in pulmonary disease and quality of life outcomes in cystic fibrosis patients. However, there is a lack of high-level evidence regarding medical and surgical management of cystic fibrosis chronic rhinosinusitis that makes generalizations difficult. Summary Well designed clinical trials with long-term follow-up concerning medical and surgical interventions for cystic fibrosis sinus disease are required to establish standardized treatment protocols, but increased interest in the sinuses as a bacterial reservoir for pulmonary infections has generated considerable attention. PMID:25250804

  14. Chronic pancreatitis and cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Witt, H

    2003-01-01

    Recent discoveries of trypsinogen and trypsin inhibitor mutations in patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP) support the hypothesis that an inappropriate activation of pancreatic zymogens to active enzymes within the pancreatic parenchyma starts the inflammatory process. Current data suggest that CP may be inherited dominant, recessive, or complex as a result of mutations in the above mentioned or yet unidentified genes. Evaluation of patients with CP should include genetic testing. Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene and is characterised by pancreatic insufficiency and chronic bronchopulmonary infection. The progression and severity of pulmonary disease differs considerably between people with identical CFTR mutations and does not seem to correlate with the type or class of the CFTR mutation. The identification of further disease modifying genetic factors will increase the pathophysiological understanding and may help to identify new therapeutic targets. PMID:12651880

  15. [New tools in cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Dournes, G; De Boeck, K; Bui, S; Vermeulen, F; Ramalho, A; Chateil, J-F; Laurent, F; Fayon, M

    2016-12-01

    The use of 3 novel tools available for the diagnosis and treatment in cystic fibrosis are described here. 1) The lung clearance index is a sensitive method which can detect functional impairment in the first months after birth. 2) Detailed morphological analyses of the lung can be performed with the new MRI sequences, without any contrast medium or risk of radiation. The analysis of functional MRI data (perfusion, diffusion, ventilation, inflammation) will be possible, and these data will be correlated to morphological data. The exploration of other organs such as the sinuses, liver and abdomen during the same examination represents another definite advantage. 3) Organoïds are a good example of personalized medicine. This tool explores CFTR function and treatment response in each of the 2000 or so known CFTR mutations. These tests are limited to specialized centers, mostly within a research context. However, their generalization after standardization is expected in the near future.

  16. Does cystic fibrosis neonatal screening detect atypical CF forms? Extended genetic characterization and 4-year clinical follow-up.

    PubMed

    Narzi, L; Ferraguti, G; Stamato, A; Narzi, F; Valentini, S B; Lelli, A; Delaroche, I; Lucarelli, M; Strom, R; Quattrucci, S

    2007-07-01

    The neonatal screening protocol for cystic fibrosis (CF) is based on a first determination of blood immunoreactive trypsin (IRT1), followed by a first level genetic test that includes the 31 worldwide most common mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene (DNA31), and a second determination of blood immunoreactive trypsin (IRT2). This approach identifies, in addition to affected subjects, a high proportion of newborns with hypertrypsinaemia at birth, in whom only one mutation is identified and who have a negative or borderline sweat test and pancreatic sufficiency. Although it has been suggested that hypertrypsinaemia may be caused by a single CFTR mutation, whether such neonates should be merely considered as healthy carriers remains a matter of debate as hypertrypsinaemia at birth may be a biochemical marker of a CFTR malfunction because of a second mild mutation. We analyzed, by means of an extended sequencing protocol, 32 newborns who tested positive at an IRT1/DNA31/IRT2 screening protocol and in whom only one CFTR mutation was found. The results obtained demonstrate that 62.5% of these newborns were also carrying a second mild CFTR mutation. The high proportion of compound heterozygous subjects, combined with the results of a 4-year follow-up in nine of these subjects all of whom displaying initial CF clinical symptoms, suggest that it may be possible to use the IRT1/DNA31/IRT2 protocol of neonatal screening to identify newborns with atypical forms of CF. In view of these findings, an extended genetic search for subjects with compound heterozygosity and a periodic clinical assessment should be considered.

  17. Eating disorders in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Raymond, N C; Chang, P N; Crow, S J; Mitchell, J E; Dieperink, B S; Beck, M M; Crosby, R D; Clawson, C C; Warwick, W J

    2000-06-01

    This study was designed to examine rates of eating disorders and psychopathology in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Fifty-eight CF patients and 43 healthy control participants were evaluated using structured psychiatric interviews and rating scales. Two control participants and no CF patients were diagnosed with an eating disorder. Additionally, 11 CF patients were diagnosed with one or more psychiatric disorders. Group means on the rating scales did not show clinically meaningful elevations in either group. These data indicate no evidence for elevated rates of eating disorders in CF patients. Similarly, rates of other psychiatric disorders in the CF group were not greater than the prevalence reported in the general population.

  18. [Measurement of pulmonary inflammation in cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Fayon, M; Chiron, R; Abely, M

    2008-06-01

    Lung inflammation is a pivotal phenomenon in the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis. Inflammation can be measured and quantified within a research perspective, as well as in daily clinical practice. In this review paper, the "Inflammation Task Force" of the "Société Française de Mucoviscidose" has reviewed the literature regarding the various techniques currently available (bronchoalveolar lavage, sputum analysis, nasal wash and brushing, exhaled breath condensates, carbon monoxide and nitric oxide, and systemic measurements (plasma and urine)). The interpretation of all these determinations in children and adults is also discussed.

  19. Airway clearance therapy in cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Pisi, Giovanna; Chetta, Alfredo

    2009-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common life-shortening inherited disease affecting Caucasian people. In CF, the major feature of lung disease is the retention of mucus due to impaired clearance of abnormally viscous airway secretions. Airway clearance techniques (ACTs) may significantly improve mucociliary clearance and gas exchange, thereby being of clinical benefit in reducing pulmonary complications in CF patients. ACTs include conventional chest physiotherapy, active cycle of breathing techniques, autogenic drainage, positive expiratory pressure and high-frequency chest compression. In order to suit the needs of patients, families and care-givers, ACTs need to be individually and continuously adapted.

  20. Cystic fibrosis-associated liver disease.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Ulrike; Dockter, Gerd; Lammert, Frank

    2010-10-01

    Liver disease is increasingly common in cystic fibrosis (CF). As new therapeutic options emerge, life expectancy increases and common hepatobiliary manifestations impact on quality of life and survival of CF patients. Hepatobiliary abnormalities in CF vary in nature and range from defects attributable to the underlying CFTR gene defect to those related to systemic disease and malnutrition. Today complications of liver disease represent the third most frequent cause of disease-related death in patients with CF. Here we review molecular and clinical genetics of CF, including genetic modifiers of CF-associated liver disease, and provide practical recommendations for genetic testing, diagnosis and treatment of hepatobiliary manifestations in CF.

  1. Vaccine strategies against cystic fibrosis pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Le Moigne, Vincent; Gaillard, Jean-Louis; Herrmann, Jean-Louis

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A great number of cystic fibrosis (CF) pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the Burkholderia cepacia and the Mycobacterium abscessus complex raised difficult therapeutic problems due to their intrinsic multi-resistance to numerous antibiotics. Vaccine strategies represent one of the key weapons against these multi-resistant bacteria in a number of clinical settings like CF. Different strategies are considered in order to develop such vaccines, linked either to priming the host response, or by exploiting genomic data derived from the bacterium. Interestingly, virulence factors synthesized by various pathogens might serve as targets for vaccine development and have been, for example, evaluated in the context of CF. PMID:26618824

  2. [Cystic fibrosis in a woman aged seventy].

    PubMed

    Ras, Janneke E; van Velzen, Edwin; van Berkhout, Ferdinand Teding; van den Brand, Joop J G

    2010-01-01

    A seventy-year-old woman was admitted to hospital with a Staphylococcus aureus respiratory tract infection. She had a history of extensive bronchiectasis and allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA). Cystic fibrosis (CF) was suspected and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene analysis showed F508del and R117H-7T mutations. In these mutations there is residual activity in the chloride channel in the cell membrane coded by the CFTR gene. This results in a much milder disease pattern varying from no disease at all to isolated organ disease. This type of disease is known as non-classical cystic fibrosis. In our patient the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis was made exceptionally late in life.

  3. Antibiotic-associated colitis and cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Pokorny, C S; Bye, P T; MacLeod, C; Selby, W S

    1992-09-01

    The use of antibiotics in patients with cystic fibrosis is widespread, and fecal carriage of Clostridium difficile occurs in up to 50% of these patients; however, antibiotic-associated colitis appears to be a rare occurrence. The reasons why this is so remain unknown. A case of antibiotic-associated colitis occurring in a patient with cystic fibrosis is described. Possible mechanisms for the rarity of antibiotic-associated colitis are reviewed and implications for prompt diagnosis and therapy are discussed.

  4. [Vitamin E deficiency in cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Muñoz, C; Polanco, I; Hernanz, A; Carrasco, S; Barea, I; Murga, M L; Arroba, M L; Codoceo, R

    1987-12-01

    Plasma vitamin E levels were measured by high performance liquid chromatography in 42 children with cystic fibrosis and were correlated with the following parameters: sex, age, time of follow-up, clinical evolution (Schwachman score), vitamin E/cholesterol and faecal fat excretion. All children in this study received oral alfa-tocoferol (50-100 mg daily) from the diagnosis. According to the vitamin E level patients were distributed in two groups. Group I: 27 patients (64.3%) with normal concentrations. Group II: 15 patients (35.7%) with decreases plasma levels but without clinical manifestations. Steatorrhea was present in all children except 4 patients from group I and one patient from group II. On the other hand, vitamin E/cholesterol was normal in 80% of patients with vitamin E deficiency (group II). We did not find any correlation between plasma vitamin E levels and the different clinical and biological parameters studied. Further studies should be carried out to throw more light on the mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of vitamin E deficiency in patients with cystic fibrosis.

  5. New horizons for cystic fibrosis treatment.

    PubMed

    Fajac, Isabelle; De Boeck, Kris

    2017-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis is an inherited multi-system disease associated with chronic lung infection, malabsorption, salt loss syndromes, male infertility and leading to numerous comorbidities. The landscape in cystic fibrosis care has changed markedly with currently more adult patients than children in many countries. Over 2000 different mutations in the CFTR gene have been reported and the majority are extremely rare. Understanding how CFTR mutations translate to disturbed synthesis or function of the CFTR protein has opened the way to 'personalized' treatments to correct the basic defect. The first 2 drugs have reached the clinic: a CFTR potentiator to augment CFTR channel function, and the combination of this potentiator with a corrector to increase CFTR expression at the cell membrane. To obtain robust correction of CFTR expression at the cell membrane, combinations of correctors with additive efficacy are under investigation. Other mutation type-specific treatments under clinical investigation are premature stop codon-read through drugs and antisense oligonucleotides that correct the basic defect at the mRNA level. Restoring the defective gene by gene editing can already be achieved ex vivo. Mutation agnostic treatments are explored as well: stabilizing CFTR expression at the cell membrane, circumventing the CFTR channel by blocking or activating other ion channels, and gene therapy. Combinations of these therapies can be anticipated. The pipeline of corrective strategies under clinical investigation is increasing continuously and a rising number of pharmaceutical companies are entering the field. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Cystic Fibrosis Revisited - a Review Study.

    PubMed

    Klimova, Blanka; Kuca, Kamil; Novotny, Michal; Maresova, Petra

    2017-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an incurable, chronic disease, which causes severe damages to respiratory and digestive tracts. It is the most common genetically inherited disease among caucasians. This disease is caused by defects in CF genes, the so-called mutations in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene population. At present over 100,000 people suffer from this disease worldwide. The purpose of this review study is to describe the pathophysiology of CF and provide the latest information on its diagnosis and treatment therapies with respect to the improvement of patient's quality of life and emphasis on targeted specialized care. The methodological approaches include a method of literature review of available sources exploring the issue of cystic fibrosis both from a global and specific perspective point of view. A search was performed in the databases PubMed, MEDLINE, Web of Science, Scopus, Springer and ScienceDirect. Furthermore, other sources cited in the analyzed studies were also examined. On the basis of evaluation of these literature sources, the research issue was explored. The main benefits (e.g., specialized centres for the treatment of CF exist or a new breakthrough in the gene therapy of CF has been made) and limitations (e.g., comorbidity of CF, lifelong and costly treatment, or adverse impact on patient's and caregiver's quality of life) in the treatment of narcolepsy are highlighted. CF requires an integrated treatment approach in specialized CF centers, involving various factors contributing to a better patient's state of health in the form of relevant and well-balanced non-pharmacological and pharmacological therapies. In addition, further large scale clinical trials are needed in order to develop compounds that are aimed at the most common classes of CFTR. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  7. Cystic fibrosis therapeutics: the road ahead.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Lucas R; Ramsey, Bonnie W

    2013-01-01

    A great deal of excitement and hope has followed the successful trials and US Food and Drug Administration approval of the drug ivacaftor (Kalydeco), the first therapy available that targets the underlying defect that causes cystic fibrosis (CF). Although this drug has currently demonstrated a clinical benefit for a small minority of the CF population, the developmental pathway established by ivacaftor paves the way for other CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) modulators that may benefit many more patients. In addition to investigating CFTR modulators, researchers are actively developing numerous other innovative CF therapies. In this review, we use the catalog of treatments currently under evaluation with the support of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, known as the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Therapeutics Pipeline, as a platform to discuss the variety of candidate treatments for CF lung disease that promise to improve CF care. Many of these approaches target the individual components of the relentless cycle of airway obstruction, inflammation, and infection characteristic of lung disease in CF, whereas others are aimed directly at the gene defect, or the resulting dysfunctional protein, that instigates this cycle. We discuss how new findings from the laboratory have informed not only the development of novel therapeutics, but also the rationales for their use and the outcomes used to measure their effects. By reviewing the breadth of candidate treatments currently in development, as well as the recent progress in CF therapies reflected by the evolution of the therapeutics pipeline over the past few years, we hope to build upon the optimism and anticipation generated by the recent success of Kalydeco.

  8. [Nutrition, cystic fibrosis and the digestive tract].

    PubMed

    Olveira, Gabriel; Olveira, Casilda

    2008-05-01

    The prevalence of hyponutrition in cystic fibrosis is high although it may vary according to the different studies. Detection of hyponutrition should be done by combining different methods, depending on their availability. However, the simplest and most validated criterion is to measure at each visit the weight (and height in children) in order to calculate the body mass index and categorizing hyponutrition according to absolute criteria: in adults < 18.5 kg/m(2), and in children as percentiles of the body mass index. Worsening of the nutritional status is directly related with the decrease in lung function parameters and it has been proposed as a morbidity (and even mortality) predictive factor in people with cystic fibrosis, independently of the level of pulmonary dysfunction. Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency is present is approximately 70-90% of the patients with cystic fibrosis and the genotype-phenotype correlation is high. Most of the patients with exocrine pancreatic insufficiency tolerate a high-fat diet provided that they are treated with pancreatic enzymes at appropriate doses. The prevalence of diabetes increases with age, reaching up 40% of the cases in patients older than 30 years. Clinical liver involvement is less prevalent (it approximately affects 1/3 of the patients). Other intestinal complications such as meconial ileus, gastroesophageal reflux, obstruction of the distal intestine, or fibrosing colon disease may also condition malnourishment. In patients with cystic fibrosis, a usual high-fat diet providing 120%-150% of the recommended calories is advised. If the nutritional goals are not achieved or maintained with diet modifications, artificial supplements may be added, although the recommendation for their use has not been endorsed by solid scientific evidences. The most frequently used preparations usually are polymeric or hypercaloric. The indications for enteral (through a tube, especially gastrostomy) or parenteral nutritional support are

  9. Cystic fibrosis chronic rhinosinusitis: A comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Chaaban, Mohamad R.; Kejner, Alexandra; Rowe, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Advances in the care of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) have improved pulmonary outcomes and survival. In addition, rapid developments regarding the underlying genetic and molecular basis of the disease have led to numerous novel targets for treatment. However, clinical and basic scientific research focusing on therapeutic strategies for CF-associated chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) lags behind the evidence-based approaches currently used for pulmonary disease. Methods: This review evaluates the available literature and provides an update concerning the pathophysiology, current treatment approaches, and future pharmaceutical tactics in the management of CRS in patients with CF. Results: Optimal medical and surgical strategies for CF CRS are lacking because of a dearth of well-performed clinical trials. Medical and surgical interventions are supported primarily by level 2 or 3 evidence and are aimed at improving clearance of mucus, infection, and inflammation. A number of novel therapeutics that target the basic defect in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator channel are currently under investigation. Ivacaftor, a corrector of the G551D mutation, was recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration. However, sinonasal outcomes using this and other novel drugs are pending. Conclusion: CRS is a lifelong disease in CF patients that can lead to substantial morbidity and decreased quality of life. A multidisciplinary approach will be necessary to develop consistent and evidence-based treatment paradigms. PMID:24119602

  10. Abnormal Ion Permeation through Cystic Fibrosis Respiratory Epithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knowles, M. R.; Stutts, M. J.; Spock, A.; Fischer, N.; Gatzy, J. T.; Boucher, R. C.

    1983-09-01

    The epithelium of nasal tissue excised from subjects with cystic fibrosis exhibited higher voltage and lower conductance than tissue from control subjects. Basal sodium ion absorption by cystic fibrosis and normal nasal epithelia equaled the short-circuit current and was amiloride-sensitive. Amiloride induced chloride ion secretion in normal but not cystic fibrosis tissue and consequently was more effective in inhibiting the short-circuit current in cystic fibrosis epithelia. Chloride ion-free solution induced a smaller hyperpolarization of cystic fibrosis tissue. The increased voltage and amiloride efficacy in cystic fibrosis reflect absorption of sodium ions across an epithelium that is relatively impermeable to chloride ions.

  11. Relationship Between Clinical Variables and Health-Related Quality of Life in Young Adult Subjects With Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Forte, Gabriele C; Barni, Gabriela C; Perin, Christiano; Casarotto, Fernanda C; Fagondes, Simone C; Dalcin, Paulo de Tarso Roth

    2015-10-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) has received much attention in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). The goal of this study was to evaluate the association between clinical, lung function, sleep quality, and polysomnographic variables with 2 HRQOL questionnaires, the shorter-version World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL-BREF) and Cystic Fibrosis Quality of Life (CFQOL) questionnaires, in adult subjects with CF. In a cross-sectional study, 51 subjects underwent clinical evaluation and overnight polysomnography and answered WHOQOL-BREF, CFQOL, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and Epworth Sleepiness Scale questionnaires. In addition, pulmonary function tests, 6-min walk tests, and echocardiography were performed. For WHOQOL-BREF scores, the sleep quality index was associated with the physical domain; the percent-of-predicted 6-min walk distance (6MWD) and sleepiness scale were associated with the psychological domain; the percent-of-predicted FEV1 and sleep quality index were associated with the social relationship domain; and the sleep quality index was associated with the environment domain. For CFQOL scores, age at diagnosis, clinical score, and sleep quality index were associated with the physical functioning domain; the percent-of-predicted 6MWD and pulmonary arterial systolic pressure were associated with the role domain; sex and sleep quality index were associated with the vitality domain; the apnea-hypopnea index was associated with the emotional functioning domain; sex and body mass index (BMI) were associated with the body image domain; the percent-of-predicted 6MWD and sleep quality index were associated with the health perception domain; age, sex, BMI, and arousal index were associated with the weight domain; age, sex, percent-of-predicted FEV1, percent-of-predicted 6MWD, and pulmonary arterial systolic pressure were associated with the respiratory symptom domain; and the clinical score was associated with the digestive symptom domain. The

  12. Prenatal screening for cystic fibrosis: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Richards, Carolyn S; Grody, Wayne W

    2004-01-01

    Prenatal screening for cystic fibrosis is reviewed. The disease, gene involved, molecular basis of disease, genotype/phenotype correlations and pilot trials are discussed, as well as historical perspectives, background and American College of Medical Genetics/American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommendations. A number of complex challenges to the implementation of cystic fibrosis screening exist, including mutation testing of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR), as well as laboratory and clinical issues. Current technologies for CFTR testing include reverse dot blots, amplification refractory mutation detection systems, oligonucleotide ligation assays, the Invader assay and NanoChip system. Emerging technologies are also considered, as well as quality assurance measures including analytical and clinical validation, reporting, residual risk calculations and prenatal diagnosis. An even greater challenge is clinical implementation, which focuses upon education and communication, choosing models, reporting, counseling and prenatal diagnosis. Copyright Future Drugs Ltd.

  13. Other mucoactive agents for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Bye, Peter T P; Elkins, Mark R

    2007-03-01

    This review examines specific mucoactive agents from three classes: expectorants, which add water to the airway; ion-transport modifiers, which promote ion and water transport across the epithelium of the airway; and mucokinetics, which improve cough-mediated clearance by increasing airflow or reducing sputum adhesivity. The agents are isotonic and hypertonic saline, mannitol, denufosol and beta-agonists. Our understanding of these agents has recently improved through pre-clinical research, clinical trials and, in particular, extensive research into the nature of the liquid lining the surface of the airway, both in health and in cystic fibrosis (CF). For each agent, recent research is reviewed, highlighting the evidence for possible mechanisms of action and for clinical efficacy in CF, as well as the implications for the optimal clinical application of the agent.

  14. Cystic fibrosis pulmonary guidelines: airway clearance therapies.

    PubMed

    Flume, Patrick A; Robinson, Karen A; O'Sullivan, Brian P; Finder, Jonathan D; Vender, Robert L; Willey-Courand, Donna-Beth; White, Terry B; Marshall, Bruce C

    2009-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disease characterized by dehydration of airway surface liquid and impaired mucociliary clearance. As a result, there is difficulty clearing pathogens from the lung, and patients experience chronic pulmonary infections and inflammation. Clearance of airway secretions has been a primary therapy for those with CF, and a variety of airway clearance therapies (ACTs) have been developed. Because ACTs are intrusive and require considerable time and effort, it is important that appropriate techniques are recommended on the basis of available evidence of efficacy and safety. Therefore, the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation established a committee to examine the clinical evidence for each therapy and provide guidance for their use. A systematic review was commissioned, which identified 7 unique reviews and 13 additional controlled trials that addressed one or more of the comparisons of interest and were deemed eligible for inclusion. Recommendations for use of the ACTs were made, balancing the quality of evidence and the potential harms and benefits. The committee determined that, although there is a paucity of controlled trials that assess the long-term effects of ACTs, the evidence quality overall for their use in CF is fair and the benefit is moderate. The committee recommends airway clearance be performed on a regular basis in all patients. There are no ACTs demonstrated to be superior to others, so the prescription of ACTs should be individualized. Aerobic exercise is recommended as an adjunctive therapy for airway clearance and for its additional benefits to overall health.

  15. Lessons learned from metabolomics in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Muhlebach, Marianne S; Sha, Wei

    2015-12-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a mono-genetic multi-system disease; however, respiratory manifestations cause the main morbidity and mortality where chronic bacterial infections lead to bronchiectasis and ultimately respiratory failure. Metabolomics allows a relatively complete snapshot of metabolic processes in a sample using different mass spectrometry methods. Sample types used for discovery of biomarkers or pathomechanisms in cystic fibrosis (CF) have included blood, respiratory secretions, and exhaled breath to date. Metabolomics has shown distinction of CF vs. non-CF for matrices of blood, exhaled breath, and respiratory epithelial cultures, each showing different pathways. Severity of lung disease has been addressed by studies in bronchoalveolar lavage and exhaled breath condensate showing separation by metabolites that the authors of each study related to inflammation; e.g., ethanol, acetone, purines. Lipidomics has been applied to blood and sputum samples showing associations with lung function and Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection status. Finally, studies of bacteria grown in vitro showed differences of bacterial metabolites to be associated with clinical parameters. Metabolomics, in the sense of global metabolomic profiling, is a powerful technique that has allowed discovery of pathways that had not previously been implicated in CF. These may include purines, mitochondrial pathways, and different aspects of glucose metabolism besides the known differences in lipid metabolism in CF. However, targeted studies to validate such potential metabolites and pathways of interest are necessary. Studies evaluating metabolites of bacterial origin are in their early stages. Thus further well-designed studies could be envisioned.

  16. CFTR protein repair therapy in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Quintana-Gallego, Esther; Delgado-Pecellín, Isabel; Calero Acuña, Carmen

    2014-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a single gene, autosomal recessive disorder, in which more than 1,900 mutations grouped into 6 classes have been described. It is an example a disease that could be well placed to benefit from personalised medicine. There are currently 2 very different approaches that aim to correct the basic defect: gene therapy, aimed at correcting the genetic alteration, and therapy aimed at correcting the defect in the CFTR protein. The latter is beginning to show promising results, with several molecules under development. Ataluren (PTC124) is a molecule designed to make the ribosomes become less sensitive to the premature stop codons responsible for class i mutations. Lumacaftor (VX-809) is a CFTR corrector directed at class ii mutations, among which Phe508del is the most frequent, with encouraging results. Ivacaftor (VX-770) is a potentiator, the only one marketed to date, which has shown good efficacy for the class iii mutation Gly551Asp in children over the age of 6 and adults. These drugs, or a combination of them, are currently undergoing various clinical trials for other less common genetic mutations. In the last 5 years, CFTR has been designated as a therapeutic target. Ivacaftor is the first drug to treat the basic defect in cystic fibrosis, but only provides a response in a small number of patients. New drugs capable of restoring the CFTR protein damaged by the most common mutations are required.

  17. Vaccine strategies against bacterial pathogens in cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Le Moigne, V; Gaillard, J-L; Herrmann, J-L

    2016-02-01

    A large number of cystic fibrosis pathogens such as bacteria of the Burkholderia cepacia complex, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, or Mycobacterium abscessus are associated with complex therapeutic problems due to their inherent resistance to antibiotics. No vaccine is currently available against those pathogens. Vaccines are therefore crucial to combat these multidrug-resistant bacteria in specific clinical situations including cystic fibrosis. Various strategies may be considered to develop these vaccines. Similar virulence factors are expressed during the infection with various pathogens; they could thus be used as antigen to assess cross-protection. Many clinical trials are currently being conducted to try and develop a prophylactic treatment for patients presenting with cystic fibrosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Rehabilitation with Cystic Fibrosis: From Utopia to Reality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Richard T.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    The paper dispels some of the myths regarding cystic fibrosis (a genetic metabolism disorder), provides information on the latest developments in rehabilitation, summarizes research in the field, and projects future needs of the patient with cystic fibrosis. (SBH)

  19. Rehabilitation with Cystic Fibrosis: From Utopia to Reality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Richard T.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    The paper dispels some of the myths regarding cystic fibrosis (a genetic metabolism disorder), provides information on the latest developments in rehabilitation, summarizes research in the field, and projects future needs of the patient with cystic fibrosis. (SBH)

  20. Whole-Genome Sequencing of Three Clonal Clinical Isolates of B. cenocepacia from a Patient with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Ruth R.; Hird, Trevor J.; Tang, Patrick; Zlosnik, James E. A.

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia cepacia complex bacteria are amongst the most feared of pathogens in cystic fibrosis (CF). The BCC comprises at least 20 distinct species that can cause chronic and unpredictable lung infections in CF. Historically the species B. cenocepacia has been the most prevalent in CF infections and has been associated in some centers with high rates of mortality. Modeling chronic infection by B. cenocepacia in the laboratory is challenging and no models exist which effectively recapitulate CF disease caused by BCC bacteria. Therefore our understanding of factors that contribute towards the morbidity and mortality caused by this organism is limited. In this study we used whole-genome sequencing to examine the evolution of 3 clonal clinical isolates of B. cenocepacia from a patient with cystic fibrosis. The first isolate was from the beginning of infection, and the second two almost 10 years later during the final year of the patients’ life. These isolates also demonstrated phenotypic heterogeneity, with the first isolate displaying the mucoid phenotype (conferred by the overproduction of exopolysaccharide), while one of the later two was nonmucoid. In addition we also sequenced a nonmucoid derivative of the initial mucoid isolate, acquired in the laboratory by antibiotic pressure. Examination of sequence data revealed that the two late stage isolates shared 20 variant nucleotides in common compared to the early isolate. However, despite their isolation within 10 months of one another, there was also considerable variation between the late stage isolates, including 42 single nucleotide variants and three deletions. Additionally, no sequence differences were identified between the initial mucoid isolate and its laboratory acquired nonmucoid derivative, however transcript analysis indicated at least partial down regulation of genes involved in exopolysaccharide production. Our study examines the progression of B. cenocepacia throughout chronic infection

  1. Venous thromboembolism in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Clifford M

    2012-02-01

    The incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is increasing in the pediatric population. Individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF) have an increased risk of thrombosis due to central venous catheters (CVCs), as well as acquired thrombophilia secondary to inflammation, or deficiencies of anticoagulant proteins due to vitamin K deficiency and/or liver dysfunction. CVC-associated thrombosis commonly results in line occlusion, but may develop into serious life-threatening conditions such as deep venous thrombosis (DVT), superior vena cava syndrome or pulmonary embolism (PE). Post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) may be a long complication. Local occlusion of the catheter tip may be managed with instillation of thrombolytics (such as tPA) within the lumen of the catheter; however, CVC-associated thrombosis involving the proximal veins is most often is treated with systemic anticoagulation. Initial treatment with heparin is a standard approach, but thrombolytic therapy, which may carry higher bleeding risks, should be considered for life and limb threatening episodes of VTE. Recommended duration of anticoagulation with low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) or warfarin ranges from 3 to 6 months for major removable thrombotic risks; longer anticoagulation is considered for recurrent thrombosis, major persistent thrombophilia, or the continued presence of a major risk factor such as a CVC. While CVCs are the most common risk for development of VTE in children, studies have not demonstrated a clear benefit with routine use of systemic thromboprophylaxis. The incidence and risk factors of VTE in CF patients will be reviewed and principles of diagnosis and management will be summarized.

  2. [Physical activity and exercise training for patients with cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Karila, C; Ravilly, S; Gauthier, R; Tardif, C; Neveu, H; Maire, J; Ramel, S; Cracowski, C; Legallais, P; Foure, H; Halm, A-M; Saugier, J; Bordas, G; Loire, N; Kirszenbaum, M; Dassonville, J; Mely, L; Wuyam, B; Giovannetti, P; Ouksel, H; Ellaffi, M; Denjean, A

    2010-04-01

    In France patients with cystic fibrosis benefit from a multidisciplinary follow-up in Cystic Fibrosis Centres. In this follow-up, despite the numerous therapeutic benefits of exercise in this disease, little emphasis is placed on the promotion of physical activity. The aim of this article is to improve this aspect of management, giving advice from a working group of experts, based on the medical literature and clinical experience. These proposals include quantification of physical activity, evaluation of exercise, training and rehabilitation programs and finally, modification of behaviour to include physical activity in the overall cystic fibrosis treatment strategy. It is intended to set up multicentre studies to evaluate the impact of these proposals. Copyright 2010 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Cystic fibrosis and pregnancy: counseling, obstetrical management and perinatal outcome.

    PubMed

    Grigoriadis, Charalampos; Tympa, Aliki; Theodoraki, Kassiani

    2015-03-01

    The progress in research of in vitro fertilization and fetal-maternal medicine allows more women and men, with fertility problems due to cystic fibrosis, to have a baby. In the majority of cases, pregnancy in women with cystic fibrosis results in favorable maternal and fetal outcomes. However, the incidence of preterm delivery, intrauterine growth restriction, caesarean section and deterioration of the maternal health are increased. Pre-pregnancy counseling is a crucial component of overall obstetric care, especially in women with poor pulmonary function. Additionally, closer monitoring during pregnancy with a multidisciplinary approach is required. The value of serial ultrasound scans and fetal Doppler assessment is important for the control of maternal and fetal wellbeing, as well as for the definition of the appropriate timing of delivery. In this article, clinical issues of pregnant women with cystic fibrosis are reviewed; counseling, obstetrical management and perinatal outcomes are being discussed.

  4. Breakthrough therapies: Cystic fibrosis (CF) potentiators and correctors.

    PubMed

    Solomon, George M; Marshall, Susan G; Ramsey, Bonnie W; Rowe, Steven M

    2015-10-01

    Cystic Fibrosis is caused by mutations in the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator (CFTR) gene resulting in abnormal protein function. Recent advances of targeted molecular therapies and high throughput screening have resulted in multiple drug therapies that target many important mutations in the CFTR protein. In this review, we provide the latest results and current progress of CFTR modulators for the treatment of cystic fibrosis, focusing on potentiators of CFTR channel gating and Phe508del processing correctors for the Phe508del CFTR mutation. Special emphasis is placed on the molecular basis underlying these new therapies and emerging results from the latest clinical trials. The future directions for augmenting the rescue of Phe508del with CFTR modulators are also emphasized.

  5. Breakthrough Therapies: Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Potentiators and Correctors

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, George M.; Marshall, Susan G.; Ramsey, Bonnie W.; Rowe, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis is caused by mutations in the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator (CFTR) gene resulting in abnormal protein function. Recent advances of targeted molecular therapies and high throughput screening have resulted in multiple drug therapies that target many important mutations in the CFTR protein. In this review, we provide the latest results and current progress of CFTR modulators for the treatment of cystic fibrosis, focusing on potentiators of CFTR channel gating and Phe508del processing correctors for the Phe508del CFTR mutation. Special emphasis is placed on the molecular basis underlying these new therapies and emerging results from the latest clinical trials. The future directions for augmenting the rescue of Phe508del with CFTR modulators is also emphasized. PMID:26097168

  6. [Isolation of Nocardia species in patients with cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Barrio, M Isabel; Martínez, M Carmen; Prados, Concepción; Girón, Rosa M; Maiz, Luis; Martínez, M Teresa

    2008-02-01

    The isolation of Nocardia species from the respiratory secretions of patients with cystic fibrosis presents problems with important clinical implications. From the sputum culture of a total of 387 patients with cystic fibrosis, Nocardia species was isolated in 9 cases (2%; 8 females and 1 male) with a mean (SD) age of 17 (7) years. Sixty-seven percent of the patients were asymptomatic and no relevant radiographic or analytical changes were detected. In only 3 patients was of Nocardia species isolated again in successive samples. Two patients were not treated, 7 were treated with cotrimoxazole and 3 with minocycline; in 2 cases therapy was intravenous. After a mean follow-up of 48 (33) months, all patients had improved. Isolation of Nocardia species from the secretions of patients with cystic fibrosis does not necessarily imply infection and the need for treatment should be assessed on an individual basis.

  7. [Isolation of Geosmithia argillacea in a cystic fibrosis patient].

    PubMed

    Labbé, F; Babchia, S; Evreux, F; Chenal, P

    2013-09-01

    We report the case of an 11-year-old child with cystic fibrosis where Geosmithia argillacea has been isolated from sputum. This is a filamentous fungus (mold) recently described as emergent infectious agent in cystic fibrosis patients. In our case, the presence of G. argillacea was not associated with clinical disorder. However, recent evidence shows that it can be responsible for very serious invasive infection, especially in chronic granulomatous disease and may be, after lung transplantation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. [Cystic fibrosis in a 70-year-old woman].

    PubMed

    Bruun, Lene Søndberg; Jensen, Michael Skov

    2002-05-06

    Cystic fibrosis is usually diagnosed in early childhood, and patients rarely live beyond the age of 40. We present a case of a 70-year-old woman, in whom cystic fibrosis was diagnosed with the rare mutation, R117C. Cystic fibrosis should therefore also be considered in older patients.

  9. Living with Cystic Fibrosis: A Guide for the Young Adult.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, Atlanta, GA.

    Intended for the young adult with cystic fibrosis, the booklet provides information on dealing with problems and on advances in treatment and detection related to the disease. Addressed are the following topics: description of cystic fibrosis; inheritance of cystic fibrosis; early diagnosis; friends, careers, and other matters; treatment;…

  10. Living with Cystic Fibrosis: A Guide for the Young Adult.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, Atlanta, GA.

    Intended for the young adult with cystic fibrosis, the booklet provides information on dealing with problems and on advances in treatment and detection related to the disease. Addressed are the following topics: description of cystic fibrosis; inheritance of cystic fibrosis; early diagnosis; friends, careers, and other matters; treatment;…

  11. The Cystic Fibrosis of Exocrine Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Wilschanski, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein is highly expressed in the pancreatic duct epithelia, and permits anions and water to enter the ductal lumen. This results in an increased volume of alkaline fluid allowing the highly concentrated proteins secreted by the acinar cells to remain in a soluble state. This work will expound on the pathophysiology and pathology caused by the malfunctioning CFTR protein with special reference to ion transport and acid-base abnormalities both in humans and animal models. We will also discuss the relationship between cystic fibrosis (CF) and pancreatitis, and outline present and potential therapeutic approaches in CF treatment relevant to the pancreas. PMID:23637307

  12. Management Issues for Adolescents with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Withers, Adelaide Lindsay

    2012-01-01

    The healthy adolescent will encounter major changes in biological and psychosocial domains. The adolescent period can be greatly affected by a chronic illness. Cystic fibrosis is a terminal illness that can significantly affect an adolescent's biological, mental and psychosocial health. This paper discusses general issues to consider when managing an adolescent with a chronic medical condition, and specifically how cystic fibrosis may impact upon puberty, body image, risk-taking behaviours, mental health, independence, nonadherence, reproductive health, transition, lung transplantation, and end of life care. PMID:22991662

  13. Precision genomic medicine in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Eugene H.; Zabner, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    The successful application of precision genomic medicine requires an understanding of how a person’s genome can influence their disease phenotype and how medical therapies can provide personalized therapy to one’s genotype. In this review, we highlight advances in precision genomic medicine in cystic fibrosis (CF), a classic autosomal recessive genetic disorder. We discuss genotype-phenotype correlations in CF, genetic and environmental modifiers of disease, and pharmacogenetic therapies that target specific genetic mutations thereby addressing the primary defect of cystic fibrosis. PMID:26073768

  14. Health Human Resources Guidelines: Minimum Staffing Standards and Role Descriptions for Canadian Cystic Fibrosis Healthcare Teams

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In cystic fibrosis clinics across Canada, the most common barrier that healthcare workers face when providing care to their patients is having too little time. The Health Human Resources Guidelines were developed to define specifically what amounts of time should be allocated for each discipline of cystic fibrosis clinical care and to provide a description of all the roles involved, reinforcing how these work together to provide comprehensive multidisciplinary care. With involvement from all cystic fibrosis clinics in Canada, through the use of a tailored survey, the Health Human Resources Guidelines are an exclusively Canadian document that has been developed for implementation across the country. The guidelines have been incorporated into a national Accreditation Site Visit program for use in evaluating and improving care across the country and have been distributed to all Canadian cystic fibrosis clinics. The guidelines provide hospital administrators with clear benchmarks for allocating personnel resources to the cystic fibrosis clinics hosted within their institutions. PMID:27445556

  15. Health Human Resources Guidelines: Minimum Staffing Standards and Role Descriptions for Canadian Cystic Fibrosis Healthcare Teams.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Ian D

    2016-01-01

    In cystic fibrosis clinics across Canada, the most common barrier that healthcare workers face when providing care to their patients is having too little time. The Health Human Resources Guidelines were developed to define specifically what amounts of time should be allocated for each discipline of cystic fibrosis clinical care and to provide a description of all the roles involved, reinforcing how these work together to provide comprehensive multidisciplinary care. With involvement from all cystic fibrosis clinics in Canada, through the use of a tailored survey, the Health Human Resources Guidelines are an exclusively Canadian document that has been developed for implementation across the country. The guidelines have been incorporated into a national Accreditation Site Visit program for use in evaluating and improving care across the country and have been distributed to all Canadian cystic fibrosis clinics. The guidelines provide hospital administrators with clear benchmarks for allocating personnel resources to the cystic fibrosis clinics hosted within their institutions.

  16. Autogenic Drainage in Children With Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Corten, Lieselotte; Morrow, Brenda M

    2017-04-01

    Airway clearance is an essential part of the management of cystic fibrosis (CF) as it facilitates clearance of viscous pulmonary secretions. This review aimed to determine the effect of autogenic drainage (AD) and assisted autogenic drainage (AAD) compared with no, sham, or other types of airway clearance in children with CF. Two pediatric randomized cross-over trials were identified on the use of AD in children with CF; no studies were available on the use of AAD. In one study AD had a positive influence on the Huang score, and is preferred over postural drainage in this population. We could not determine the efficacy of AD and AAD in children with CF. We recommend the implementation of pediatric-specific randomized controlled trials with adequate sample sizes, appropriate clinical outcome measures, and analysis of adverse effects.

  17. Global impact of bronchiectasis and cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Redondo, Margarida; Keyt, Holly; Dhar, Raja

    2016-01-01

    Educational aims To recognise the clinical and radiological presentation of the spectrum of diseases associated with bronchiectasis. To understand variation in the aetiology, microbiology and burden of bronchiectasis and cystic fibrosis across different global healthcare systems. Bronchiectasis is the term used to refer to dilatation of the bronchi that is usually permanent and is associated with a clinical syndrome of cough, sputum production and recurrent respiratory infections. It can be caused by a range of inherited and acquired disorders, or may be idiopathic in nature. The most well recognised inherited disorder in Western countries is cystic fibrosis (CF), an autosomal recessive condition that leads to progressive bronchiectasis, bacterial infection and premature mortality. Both bronchiectasis due to CF and bronchiectasis due to other conditions are placing an increasing burden on healthcare systems internationally. Treatments for CF are becoming more effective leading to more adult patients with complex healthcare needs. Bronchiectasis not due to CF is becoming increasingly recognised, particularly in the elderly population. Recognition is important and can lead to identification of the underlying cause, appropriate treatment and improved quality of life. The disease is highly diverse in its presentation, requiring all respiratory physicians to have knowledge of the different “bronchiectasis syndromes”. The most common aetiologies and presenting syndromes vary depending on geography, with nontuberculous mycobacterial disease predominating in some parts of North America, post-infectious and idiopathic disease predominating in Western Europe, and post-tuberculosis bronchiectasis dominating in South Asia and Eastern Europe. Ongoing global collaborative studies will greatly advance our understanding of the international impact of bronchiectasis and CF. PMID:28210295

  18. Non-invasive ventilation for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Moran, Fidelma; Bradley, Judy M; Piper, Amanda J

    2017-02-20

    capacity (interface used was unclear) and did not reported on any of the review's primary outcomes. The trial found no clear differences between non-invasive ventilation compared to no non-invasive ventilation for any of our outcomes.Three trials reported on adverse effects. One trial, evaluating non-invasive ventilation for airway clearance, reported that a participant withdrew at the start of the trial due to pain on respiratory muscle testing. One trial evaluating non-invasive ventilation for overnight support reported that one participant could not tolerate an increase in inspiratory positive airway pressure. A second trial evaluating non-invasive ventilation in this setting reported that one participant did not tolerate the non-invasive ventilation mask, one participant developed a pneumothorax when breathing room air and two participants experienced aerophagia which resolved when inspiratory positive airway pressure was decreased. Non-invasive ventilation may be a useful adjunct to other airway clearance techniques, particularly in people with cystic fibrosis who have difficulty expectorating sputum. Non-invasive ventilation, used in addition to oxygen, may improve gas exchange during sleep to a greater extent than oxygen therapy alone in moderate to severe disease. The effect of NIV on exercise is unclear. These benefits of non-invasive ventilation have largely been demonstrated in single treatment sessions with small numbers of participants. The impact of this therapy on pulmonary exacerbations and disease progression remain unclear. There is a need for long-term randomised controlled trials which are adequately powered to determine the clinical effects of non-invasive ventilation in cystic fibrosis airway clearance and exercise.

  19. Novel molecular approaches to cystic fibrosis gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tim W. R.; Matthews, David A.; Blair, G. Eric

    2005-01-01

    Gene therapy holds promise for the treatment of a range of inherited diseases, such as cystic fibrosis. However, efficient delivery and expression of the therapeutic transgene at levels sufficient to result in phenotypic correction of cystic fibrosis pulmonary disease has proved elusive. There are many reasons for this lack of progress, both macroscopically in terms of airway defence mechanisms and at the molecular level with regard to effective cDNA delivery. This review of approaches to cystic fibrosis gene therapy covers these areas in detail and highlights recent progress in the field. For gene therapy to be effective in patients with cystic fibrosis, the cDNA encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein must be delivered effectively to the nucleus of the epithelial cells lining the bronchial tree within the lungs. Expression of the transgene must be maintained at adequate levels for the lifetime of the patient, either by repeat dosage of the vector or by targeting airway stem cells. Clinical trials of gene therapy for cystic fibrosis have demonstrated proof of principle, but gene expression has been limited to 30 days at best. Results suggest that viral vectors such as adenovirus and adeno-associated virus are unsuited to repeat dosing, as the immune response reduces the effectiveness of each subsequent dose. Nonviral approaches, such as cationic liposomes, appear more suited to repeat dosing, but have been less effective. Current work regarding non-viral gene delivery is now focused on understanding the mechanisms involved in cell entry, endosomal escape and nuclear import of the transgene. There is now increasing evidence to suggest that additional ligands that facilitate endosomal escape or contain a nuclear localization signal may enhance liposome-mediated gene delivery. Much progress in this area has been informed by advances in our understanding of the mechanisms by which viruses deliver their genomes to the nuclei of host

  20. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator-modifying medications: the future of cystic fibrosis treatment.

    PubMed

    Pettit, Rebecca S

    2012-01-01

    To review and evaluate cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) modulators for the treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF). Literature was accessed through MEDLINE (1977-January 2012), the Cochrane Library, and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (1977-March 2012). Search terms included ivacaftor, VX-770, VX-809, ataluren, PTC 124, CFTR modulator, and cystic fibrosis. All English-language articles identified from the data sources were evaluated for inclusion. Clinical trials and relevant review articles were evaluated for each CFTR modulator. CF is caused by a mutation in the gene that encodes for the CFTR protein; mutations can be separated into 5 different classes. Ivacaftor is a new CFTR potentiator that helps the CFTR channel open properly in patients with the CFTR mutation, G551D. Patients in one study had significant decreases in sweat chloride values and increases in pulmonary function tests. Ivacaftor was approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to be taken orally at a dose of 150 mg twice a day in G551D CF patients older than 6 years. Additional studies are investigating the use of ivacaftor in other gating mutations and in younger patients. VX-809 is a CFTR corrector that modulates the folding and trafficking of CFTR. VX-809 was originally studied alone in patients with F508del mutation but is now being used in combination with ivacaftor in Phase 2 studies. Ataluren allows the read through of premature stop codons, and studies in patients with CF with nonsense mutations show an increase in chloride transportation. Ataluren requires 3 times a day dosing and is currently in a Phase 3 placebo-controlled study. Three new agents, ivacaftor, VX-809, and ataluren, target the basic defects in CFTR production. Ivacaftor was recently FDA approved, while the other 2 agents are still in clinical trials. Patients with CF will benefit from personalized medicine based on their specific genotype.

  1. Psychological interventions for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Glasscoe, C A; Quittner, A L

    2003-01-01

    As survival estimates for cystic fibrosis (CF) steadily increase long-term management has become an important focus for intervention. Psychological interventions are largely concerned with emotional and social adjustments, adherence to treatment and quality of life, however no systematic review of such interventions has been undertaken for this disease. To describe the extent and quality of effectiveness studies utilising psychological interventions for CF and whether these interventions provide significant psychosocial and physical benefits in addition to standard care. Relevant trials were identified from searches of Ovid MEDLINE, the Cochrane trial registers for CF and Depression, Anxiety and Neurosis Groups and PsychINFO; unpublished trials were located through professional networks and Listserves. Most recent search: April 2003. This review included RCTs and quasi-randomised trials. Study participants were children and adults diagnosed with CF, and their immediate family members. Psychological interventions were from a broad range of modalities and outcomes were primarily psychosocial, although physical outcomes and cost effectiveness were also considered. Two reviewers independently selected relevant trials and assessed their methodological quality. For binary and continuous outcomes a pooled estimate of treatment effect was calculated for each outcome. This review is based on the findings of eight studies, representing data from a total of 358 participants. Studies fell into four conceptually similar groups: (1) gene pre-test education counselling for relatives of those with CF (one study); (2) biofeedback, massage and music therapy to assist physiotherapy (three studies); (3) behavioural intervention to improve dietary intake in children up to 12 years (three studies); and (4) self-administration of treatments to improve quality of life in adults (one study). Interventions were largely educational or behavioural, targeted at specific treatment concerns

  2. Determination of the Minimal Clinically Important Difference Scores for the Cystic Fibrosis Questionnaire-Revised Respiratory Symptom Scale in Two Populations of Patients With Cystic Fibrosis and Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa Airway Infection

    PubMed Central

    Quittner, Alexandra L.; Modi, Avani C.; Wainwright, Claire; Otto, Kelly; Kirihara, Jean; Montgomery, A. Bruce

    2009-01-01

    Background: The Cystic Fibrosis Questionnaire-Revised (CFQ-R) is a validated patient-reported outcome (PRO) containing both generic scales and scales specific to cystic fibrosis (CF). The minimal clinically important difference (MCID) score for a PRO corresponds to the smallest clinically relevant change a patient can detect. MCID scores for the CFQ-R respiratory symptom (CFQ-R-Respiratory) scale were determined using data from two 28 day, open-label, tobramycin inhalation solution (TIS) studies in patients with CF and chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa airway infection. At study enrollment, patients in the study 1-exacerbation had symptoms indicative of pulmonary exacerbation (n = 84; < 14 years of age, 31 patients; ≥ 14 years of age, 53 patients); patients in study 2-stable had stable respiratory symptoms (n = 140; < 14 years of age, 14 patients; ≥ 14 years, 126 patients). Methods: The anchor-based method utilized a global rating-of-change questionnaire (GRCQ) that assessed patients' perceptions of change in their respiratory symptoms after TIS treatment. The mean change from baseline CFQ-R-Respiratory scores were mapped onto the GRCQ to estimate the MCID. The two distribution-based methods were as follows: (1) 0.5 SD of mean change in CFQ-R-Respiratory scores (baseline to end of TIS treatment); and (2) 1 SEM for baseline CFQ-R-Respiratory scores. Triangulation of these three estimates defined the MCIDs. Results: MCID scores were larger for patients in study 1-exacerbation (8.5 points) than for those in study 2-stable (4.0 points), likely reflecting differences in patient disease status (exacerbation/stable) between these studies. Conclusions: Patient benefit from new and current CF therapies can be evaluated using changes in CFQ-R-Respiratory scores. Using the MCID provides a systematic way to interpret these changes, and facilitates the identification of CF treatments that improve both symptoms and physiologic variables, potentially leading to better treatment

  3. Guidelines for Diagnosis of Cystic Fibrosis in Newborns through Older Adults: Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Consensus Report

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Philip M.; Rosenstein, Beryl J.; White, Terry B.; Accurso, Frank J.; Castellani, Carlo; Cutting, Garry R.; Durie, Peter R.; Legrys, Vicky A.; Massie, John; Parad, Richard B.; Rock, Michael J.; Campbell, Preston W.

    2009-01-01

    Newborn screening (NBS) for cystic fibrosis (CF) is increasingly being implemented and is soon likely to be in use throughout the United States, because early detection permits access to specialized medical care and improves outcomes. The diagnosis of CF is not always straightforward, however. The sweat chloride test remains the gold standard for CF diagnosis but does not always give a clear answer. Genotype analysis also does not always provide clarity; more than 1500 mutations have been identified in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, not all of which result in CF. Harmful mutations in the gene can present as a spectrum of pathology ranging from sinusitis in adulthood to severe lung, pancreatic, or liver disease in infancy. Thus, CF identified postnatally must remain a clinical diagnosis. To provide guidance for the diagnosis of both infants with positive NBS results and older patients presenting with an indistinct clinical picture, the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation convened a meeting of experts in the field of CF diagnosis. Their recommendations, presented herein, involve a combination of clinical presentation, laboratory testing, and genetics to confirm a diagnosis of CF. PMID:18639722

  4. Guidelines for diagnosis of cystic fibrosis in newborns through older adults: Cystic Fibrosis Foundation consensus report.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Philip M; Rosenstein, Beryl J; White, Terry B; Accurso, Frank J; Castellani, Carlo; Cutting, Garry R; Durie, Peter R; Legrys, Vicky A; Massie, John; Parad, Richard B; Rock, Michael J; Campbell, Preston W

    2008-08-01

    Newborn screening (NBS) for cystic fibrosis (CF) is increasingly being implemented and is soon likely to be in use throughout the United States, because early detection permits access to specialized medical care and improves outcomes. The diagnosis of CF is not always straightforward, however. The sweat chloride test remains the gold standard for CF diagnosis but does not always give a clear answer. Genotype analysis also does not always provide clarity; more than 1500 mutations have been identified in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, not all of which result in CF. Harmful mutations in the gene can present as a spectrum of pathology ranging from sinusitis in adulthood to severe lung, pancreatic, or liver disease in infancy. Thus, CF identified postnatally must remain a clinical diagnosis. To provide guidance for the diagnosis of both infants with positive NBS results and older patients presenting with an indistinct clinical picture, the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation convened a meeting of experts in the field of CF diagnosis. Their recommendations, presented herein, involve a combination of clinical presentation, laboratory testing, and genetics to confirm a diagnosis of CF.

  5. TNF-alpha promoter polymorphism in relation to TNF-alpha production and clinical status in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Schmitt-Grohé, Sabina; Stüber, Frank; Book, Malte; Bargon, Joachim; Wagner, Thomas O; Naujoks, Christian; Schubert, Ralf; Lentze, Michael J; Zielen, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    The severity of lung disease in cystic fibrosis may be related to the genetic propensity of the host to produce tumor necrosis fector alpha (TNF-alpha). A polymorphism in the promoter region of the TNF-alpha gene at nucleotide 308 relative to the transcription start site may be important in determing the host's TNF-alpha response. The aim of this study was to assess the correlation between a TNF-308 promoter polymorphism, ex vivo TNF-alpha production (before and after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation), and clinical status [FEV1, weight (z-score), BMI, Shwachman score, incidence of diabetes mellitus, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection). Genotyping for the biallelic TNF-308 polymorphism was performed by using a real-time PCR cycler. Patients (homozygous for Delta F 508) were grouped according to genotype (TNF2 carriers, n = 16, median age = 15 yr, female/male = 5/11; TNF1 homozygotes, n = 37, median age = 21 yr, female/male = 18/19). TNF-alpha was measured using a chemiluminescent immunometric assay. There was a trend toward higher TNF-alpha values [median TNF2 carriers vs. TNF1 homozygotes: x = 56 vs. 43.5 pg/ml, n.s. (Mann-Whitney U-test] in those carrying the polymorphism and better lung function results [FEV(1) (%) 81 vs. 65, n.s.]. These differences equalized [TNF2 carriers vs. TNF1 56 vs. 51 pg/ml, n.s.; FEV1 (%) 84 vs. 79, n.s.] after age adjustment (+/- 2 yr, n = 15, median age TNF2 vs. TNF1-17/18 yr). There were no significant differences for TNF values after LPS stimulation and the incidence of diabetes mellitus. The TNF-308 promoter polymorphism does not seem to influence TNF-alpha release in whole blood cells and clinical status.

  6. Cystic fibrosis year in review 2016.

    PubMed

    Savant, Adrienne P; McColley, Susanna A

    2017-08-01

    In this article, we highlight cystic fibrosis (CF) research and case reports published in Pediatric Pulmonology during 2016. We also include articles from a variety of journals that are thematically related to these articles, or are of special interest to clinicians. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Exercise is medicine in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Wheatley, Courtney M; Wilkins, Brad W; Snyder, Eric M

    2011-07-01

    Exercise activates adrenergic and purinergic pathways that regulate activity of ion channels on airway epithelia cells and sweat glands. Therefore, we hypothesize that exercise is not only an important therapy for cystic fibrosis (CF) patients by facilitating systemic improvements but, more importantly, that exercise can improve the pathophysiological ion dysregulation at a cellular level, thereby enhancing quality of life in CF.

  8. Nutritional assessment in children with cystic fibrosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Optimal nutrition, including consuming 35–40% of calories (kcal) as fat, is a vital part of the management of cystic fibrosis (CF), and involves accurate assessment of dietary intake. We compared 3 methods of nutritional assessment in 8– to 14-year-old children (n=20) with CF: 1) a 24-h Dietary Reca...

  9. Zinc supplementation in children with cystic fibrosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) leads to malabsorption of macro- and micronutrients. Symptomatic zinc deficiency has been reported in CF but little is known about zinc homeostasis in children with CF. Zinc supplementation (Zn suppl) is increasingly common in children with CF but it is not without theoretcial r...

  10. [New prospects in cystic fibrosis treatment].

    PubMed

    Prados, C; Serrano, S; Alvarez-Sala, R; Villamor, J

    1997-04-01

    Only a few years ago, cystic fibrosis (CF) was considered the most frequent genetic disease in childhood, although survival has increased considerably in recent years owing to improved treatment. We discuss treatments that are still relevant as well as others that are under investigation now, aiming for better understanding of the disease and the therapies that have improved quality of life for CF patients.

  11. New and emerging targeted therapies for cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a monogenic autosomal recessive disorder that affects about 70 000 people worldwide. The clinical manifestations of the disease are caused by defects in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. The discovery of the CFTR gene in 1989 has led to a sophisticated understanding of how thousands of mutations in the CFTR gene affect the structure and function of the CFTR protein. Much progress has been made over the past decade with the development of orally bioavailable small molecule drugs that target defective CFTR proteins caused by specific mutations. Furthermore, there is considerable optimism about the prospect of gene replacement or editing therapies to correct all mutations in cystic fibrosis. The recent approvals of ivacaftor and lumacaftor represent the genesis of a new era of precision medicine in the treatment of this condition. These drugs are having a positive impact on the lives of people with cystic fibrosis and are potentially disease modifying. This review provides an update on advances in our understanding of the structure and function of the CFTR, with a focus on state of the art targeted drugs that are in development. PMID:27030675

  12. Improved sweat test method for the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Carter, E P; Barrett, A D; Heeley, A F; Kuzemko, J A

    1984-01-01

    We describe a new technique of collecting sweat for measurement of osmolality and sodium concentrations. Eighty two subjects were studied--39 controls and 43 patients with cystic fibrosis. Adequate amounts of sweat were obtained in 81 subjects and sweat was analysed for both osmolality and sodium concentrations in 73 subjects. The 34 controls gave sweat osmolality and sodium values ranging from 62 to 196 mmol/kg and 9 to 72 mmol/l respectively. The 39 cystic fibrosis patients gave osmolality values ranging from 220 to 416 mmol/kg and sodium concentrations ranging from 60 to 150 mmol/l. Sweat osmolality alone was determined in eight infants under 50 days of age--four later developed the clinical features of cystic fibrosis and four, in whom cystic fibrosis was suspected, were later excluded. Sweat osmolality values in these two groups ranged from 255 to 345 mmol/kg and 87 to 123 mmol/kg respectively. The simplicity of collecting sweat and the measurement of osmolality offer distinct advantages over techniques previously described. PMID:6497428

  13. New and emerging targeted therapies for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Quon, Bradley S; Rowe, Steven M

    2016-03-30

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a monogenic autosomal recessive disorder that affects about 70,000 people worldwide. The clinical manifestations of the disease are caused by defects in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. The discovery of the CFTR gene in 1989 has led to a sophisticated understanding of how thousands of mutations in the CFTR gene affect the structure and function of the CFTR protein. Much progress has been made over the past decade with the development of orally bioavailable small molecule drugs that target defective CFTR proteins caused by specific mutations. Furthermore, there is considerable optimism about the prospect of gene replacement or editing therapies to correct all mutations in cystic fibrosis. The recent approvals of ivacaftor and lumacaftor represent the genesis of a new era of precision medicine in the treatment of this condition. These drugs are having a positive impact on the lives of people with cystic fibrosis and are potentially disease modifying. This review provides an update on advances in our understanding of the structure and function of the CFTR, with a focus on state of the art targeted drugs that are in development.

  14. Palliative drug treatments for breathlessness in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Nishant; Singh, Meenu; Agarwal, Amit; Thumburu, Kiran K

    2017-08-10

    Cystic fibrosis is a life-limiting autosomal recessive genetic illness. A feeling of shortness of breath is common in cystic fibrosis, especially as the disease progresses. Reversing the underlying cause is the priority when treating breathlessness (dyspnoea), but when it is not feasible, palliation (easing) becomes the primary goal to improve an individual's quality of life. A range of drugs administered by various routes have been used, but no definite guidelines are available. A systematic review is needed to evaluate such treatments. To assess the efficacy and safety of drugs used to ease breathlessness in people with cystic fibrosis. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis Trials Register, compiled from electronic database searches and handsearching of journals and conference abstract books.Date of last search: 24 July 2017.We searched databases (clinicaltrials.gov, the ISRCTN registry, the Clinical Trials Registry India and WHO ICTRP) for ongoing trials. These searches were last run on 31 July 2017. We planned to include randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials in people with cystic fibrosis (diagnosed by a positive sweat chloride test or genetic testing) who have breathlessness. We considered studies comparing any drugs used for easing breathlessness to another drug administered by any route (inhaled (nebulised), intravenous, oral, subcutaneous, transmucosal (including buccal, sublingual and intra-nasal) and transdermal). The authors assessed the search results according to the pre-defined inclusion criteria. The search yielded only one study (cross-over in design), which did not fulfil the inclusion criteria as no data were available from the first treatment period alone. Due to the lack of available evidence, this review cannot provide any information for clinical practice. The authors call for specific research in this area after taking into account relevant ethical considerations. The research should focus on the efficacy and safety of the

  15. Pregnancy outcome in women with cystic fibrosis-related diabetes.

    PubMed

    Reynaud, Quitterie; Poupon-Bourdy, Stéphanie; Rabilloud, Muriel; Al Mufti, Lina; Rousset Jablonski, Christine; Lemonnier, Lydie; Nove-Josserand, Raphaële; Touzet, Sandrine; Durieu, Isabelle

    2017-10-01

    With increasing life expectancy, more women with cystic fibrosis and diabetes mellitus become pregnant. We investigated how pre-gestational diabetes (cystic fibrosis-related diabetes) influenced pregnancy outcome and the clinical status of these women. We analyzed all pregnancies reported to the French cystic fibrosis registry between 2001 and 2012, and compared forced expiratory volume (FEV1 ) and body mass index before and after pregnancy in women with and without pre-gestational diabetes having a first delivery. A total 249 women delivered 314 infants. Among these, 189 women had a first delivery and 29 of these had pre-gestational diabetes. There was a trend towards a higher rate of assisted conception among diabetic women (53.8%) than non-diabetic women (34.5%, p = 0.06), and the rate of cesarean section was significantly higher in diabetic women (48% vs. 21.4%, p = 0.005). The rate of preterm birth and mean infant birthweight did not differ significantly between diabetic and non-diabetic women. Forced expiratory volume before pregnancy was significantly lower in the diabetic group. The decline in forced expiratory volume and body mass index following pregnancy did not differ between the women with and those without pre-gestational diabetes. Pre-gestational diabetes in women with cystic fibrosis is associated with a higher rate of cesarean section but does not seem to have a clinically significant impact on fetal growth or preterm delivery. The changes in maternal pulmonary and nutritional status following pregnancy in women with cystic fibrosis were not influenced by pre-gestational diabetes. © 2017 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  16. Relationships between cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, extracellular nucleotides and cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Marcet, Brice; Boeynaems, Jean-Marie

    2006-12-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is one of the most common lethal autosomal recessive genetic diseases in the Caucasian population, with a frequency of about 1 in 3000 livebirths. CF is due to a mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene encoding the CFTR protein, a cyclic adenosine 5'-monophosphate (cAMP)-regulated chloride channel localized in the apical membrane of epithelial cells. CFTR is a multifunctional protein which, in addition to be a Cl-channel, is also a regulator of multiple ion channels and other proteins. In particular CFTR has been reported to play a role in the outflow of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) from cells, but this remains controversial. Extracellular nucleotides are signaling molecules that regulate ion transport and mucociliary clearance by acting on P2 nucleotide receptors, in particular the P2Y(2) receptor. Nucleotides activating the P2Y(2) receptor represent thus one pharmacotherapeutic strategy to treat CF disease, via improvement of mucus hydration and mucociliary clearance in airways. Phase II clinical trials have recently shown that aerosolized denufosol (INS37217, Inspire(R)) improves pulmonary function in CF patients: denufosol was granted orphan drug status and phase III trials are planned. Here, we review what is known about the relationship between extracellular nucleotides and CFTR, the role of extracellular nucleotides in epithelial pathophysiology and their putative role as therapeutic agents.

  17. Targeting a genetic defect: cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator modulators in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Derichs, Nico

    2013-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by genetic mutations that affect the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. These mutations can impact the synthesis and transfer of the CFTR protein to the apical membrane of epithelial cells, as well as influencing the gating or conductance of chloride and bicarbonate ions through the channel. CFTR dysfunction results in ionic imbalance of epithelial secretions in several organ systems, such as the pancreas, gastrointestinal tract, liver and the respiratory system. Since discovery of the CFTR gene in 1989, research has focussed on targeting the underlying genetic defect to identify a disease-modifying treatment for CF. Investigated management strategies have included gene therapy and the development of small molecules that target CFTR mutations, known as CFTR modulators. CFTR modulators are typically identified by high-throughput screening assays, followed by preclinical validation using cell culture systems. Recently, one such modulator, the CFTR potentiator ivacaftor, was approved as an oral therapy for CF patients with the G551D-CFTR mutation. The clinical development of ivacaftor not only represents a breakthrough in CF care but also serves as a noteworthy example of personalised medicine.

  18. Lung disease in mice with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Kent, G; Iles, R; Bear, C E; Huan, L J; Griesenbach, U; McKerlie, C; Frndova, H; Ackerley, C; Gosselin, D; Radzioch, D; O'Brodovich, H; Tsui, L C; Buchwald, M; Tanswell, A K

    1997-01-01

    The leading cause of mortality and morbidity in humans with cystic fibrosis is lung disease. Advances in our understanding of the pathogenesis of the lung disease of cystic fibrosis, as well as development of innovative therapeutic interventions, have been compromised by the lack of a natural animal model. The utility of the CFTR-knockout mouse in studying the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis has been limited because of their failure, despite the presence of severe intestinal disease, to develop lung disease. Herein, we describe the phenotype of an inbred congenic strain of CFTR-knockout mouse that develops spontaneous and progressive lung disease of early onset. The major features of the lung disease include failure of effective mucociliary transport, postbronchiolar over inflation of alveoli and parenchymal interstitial thickening, with evidence of fibrosis and inflammatory cell recruitment. We speculate that the basis for development of lung disease in the congenic CFTR-knockout mice is their observed lack of a non-CFTR chloride channel normally found in CFTR-knockout mice of mixed genetic background. PMID:9399953

  19. Omega-3 fatty acids for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Colleen; Jahnke, Nikki

    2011-08-10

    Studies suggest that a diet rich in omega-3 essential fatty acids may have beneficial anti-inflammatory effects for chronic conditions such as cystic fibrosis. To determine whether there is evidence that omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation reduces morbidity and mortality and to identify any adverse events associated with supplementation. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group's Trials Register comprising references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. Authors and persons interested in the subject of the review were contacted.Date of last search: 10 March 2011. Randomised controlled trials in people with cystic fibrosis comparing omega-3 fatty acid supplements with placebo. Two authors independently selected studies for inclusion, extracted data and assessed the risk of bias of the studies. The searches identified 13 studies; four studies with 91 participants were included. Two studies compared omega-3 fatty acids to olive oil for six weeks. One study compared a liquid dietary supplement containing omega-3 fatty acids to one without for six months. One study compared omega-3 fatty acids and omega-6 fatty acids to a control (capsules with customised fatty acid blends) for three months. Only one short-term study (19 participants) comparing omega-3 to placebo reported a significant improvement in lung function and Shwachman score and a reduction in sputum volume in the omega-3 group. Another study (43 participants) demonstrated a significant increase in serum phospholipid essential fatty acid content and a significant drop in the n-6/n-3 fatty acid ratio following omega-3 fatty acid supplementation compared to control. The longer-term study (17 participants) demonstrated a significant increase in essential fatty acid content in neutrophil membranes and a significant decrease in the leukotriene B4 to leukotriene B5 ratio

  20. Renal diseases in adults with cystic fibrosis: a 40 year single centre experience.

    PubMed

    Wilcock, M J; Ruddick, A; Gyi, K M; Hodson, M E

    2015-10-01

    There is a sizable literature describing renal disease in patients with cystic fibrosis. Previous studies have focused on single disease processes alone, most commonly renal stone disease or acute kidney injury. In this study we report for the first time on the prevalence of all forms of renal disease in a cystic fibrosis population. A retrospective review of adult patients with cystic fibrosis attending the Adult Cystic Fibrosis Department at the Royal Brompton Hospital was carried out by searching the department's database to identify patients with renal problems and subsequently retrieving clinical information from medical notes. The prevalence of all renal diseases in our population was 5.1 %. The most commonly identified problem was renal stones. At 2.0 % the prevalence of renal stones in adult patients with cystic fibrosis was comparable to the general population. A range of other renal diseases were identified, the next most common being drug-induced acute kidney injury. A range of cystic fibrosis independent and attributable diseases has been identified but no cystic fibrosis specific disease. In contrast to other cystic fibrosis centres no increased prevalence of renal stones was found.

  1. Antenatal testing for cystic fibrosis in Cuba, 1988-2011.

    PubMed

    Collazo, Teresa; López, Ixchel; Clark, Yulia; Piloto, Yaixa; González, Laura; Gómez, Manuel; García, Marileivis; Reyes, Lidice; Rodríguez, Fidel

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Cystic fibrosis is a multisystem autosomal recessive disease with wide variability in clinical severity. It is incurable and characterized by elevated and premature mortality, as well as poor quality of life. Its frequency, lethality and devastating impact on both the physical and psychological wellbeing of patients and their families, make it a serious health problem. Its frequency in Cuba is 1 in 9862 live births, where marked molecular heterogeneity of the CFTR gene makes molecular diagnosis difficult. Six mutations have been identified that together enable molecular characterization of only 55.5% of cystic fibrosis chromosomes. This paper presents national results of antenatal diagnostic testing, using direct and indirect methods, for detection of cystic fibrosis. OBJECTIVE Characterize the Cuban public health system's experience with antenatal molecular testing for cystic fibrosis from 1988 through 2011. METHODS A retrospective descriptive study was conducted with results of antenatal diagnostic testing of amniotic fluid, performed nationwide from 1988 through 2011, for 108 fetuses of couples with some risk of having children affected by cystic fibrosis, who requested testing. Polymerase chain reaction detected mutations p.F508del, p.G542X, p.R1162X, p.R334W, p.R553X and c.3120+1G>A, and markers XV2C and KM19. Data were analyzed using absolute frequencies and percentages, and presented in tables. RESULTS For 93 cases (86.1%), testing for cystic fibrosis was done using direct analysis of mutations p.F508del, p.G542X, p.R1162X, p.R334W, p.R553X and c.3120+1G>A; five cases (4.6%) were tested indirectly using markers XV2C/Taq I and KM19/Pst I; and 10 (9.3%) were tested using a combination of the two methods. A total of 72 diagnoses (66.7% of studies done) were concluded, of which there were 20 healthy fetuses, 16 affected, 27 carrier, and 9 who were either healthy or carriers of an unknown mutation. CONCLUSIONS Direct or indirect molecular study was

  2. [Therapeutic advances in cystic fibrosis in 2014].

    PubMed

    Durupt, S; Mazur, S; Reix, P

    2016-02-01

    Twenty-five years after the cystic fibrosis (CF) gene identification, this discovery actually begins to benefit to patients. Increasing our knowledge on CFTR biology, as well as technical progress made in order to screen for new drugs have made therapeutic strategies move an important step forward. It is likely that in the forthcoming years, the panel of molecules available for CF patients will be larger, with new activators and potentiators. The disease by itself may consequently change in its natural history. CF is an example of the so-called personalized medicine, aiming to fit treatment according to patient's genetic background. Ongoing clinical trials may enlarge the actually limited eligible number of CF patients for new drugs such as ivacaftor. Beyond this exciting and promising new therapeutic approach, one may not push symptomatic treatments on the side. Improvements have been made for inhaled antibiotics administration, aiming to simplify patient's life; clinical trials using new molecules able to liquefy mucus or with anti-inflammatory properties are actually underway. One important next step in the care for CF will be to design and conduct early intervention trials in CF infants. Newborn screening program have been widely implanted around the word, and cohorts studies have shown that both functional and structural abnormalities occurred very early, making the therapeutic window of opportunity tight. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Inflammation and its genesis in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Nichols, David P; Chmiel, James F

    2015-10-01

    The host inflammatory response in cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease has long been recognized as a central pathological feature and an important therapeutic target. Indeed, many believe that bronchiectasis results largely from the oxidative and proteolytic damage comprised within an exuberant airway inflammatory response that is dominated by neutrophils. In this review, we address the longstanding argument of whether or not the inflammatory response is directly attributable to impairment of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator or only secondary to airway obstruction and chronic bacterial infection and challenge the importance of this distinction in the context of therapy. We also review the centrality of neutrophils in CF lung pathophysiology and highlight more recent data that suggest the importance of other cell types and signaling beyond NF-κB activation. We discuss how protease and redox imbalance are critical factors in CF airway inflammation and end by reviewing some of the more promising therapeutic approaches now under development.

  4. INFANT LUNG FUNCTION TESTS AS ENDPOINTS IN THE ISIS MULTICENTER CLINICAL TRIAL IN CYSTIC FIBROSIS

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Stephanie D.; Ratjen, Felix; Brumback, Lyndia C.; Johnson, Robin C.; Filbrun, Amy G.; Kerby, Gwendolyn S.; Panitch, Howard B.; Donaldson, Scott H.; Rosenfeld, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Background The Infant Study of Inhaled Saline (ISIS) in CF was the first multicenter clinical trial to utilize infant pulmonary function tests (iPFTs) as an endpoint. Methods Secondary analysis of ISIS data was conducted in order to assess feasibility of iPFT measures and their associations with respiratory symptoms. Standard deviations were calculated to aid in power calculations for future clinical trials. Results 73 participants enrolled, 70 returned for the final visit; 62 (89%) and 45 (64%) had acceptable paired functional residual volume (FRC) and raised volume measurements, respectively. Mean baseline FEV0.5, FEF75 and FRC z-scores were 0.3 (SD: 1.2), −0.2 (SD: 2.0) and 1.8 (SD: 2.0). Conclusions iPFTs are not appropriate primary endpoints for multicenter clinical trials due to challenges of obtaining acceptable data and near-normal average raised volume measurements. Raised volume measures have potential to serve as secondary endpoints in future clinical CF trials. PMID:26547590

  5. Asymptomatic carriage of Clostridium difficile in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Peach, S L; Borriello, S P; Gaya, H; Barclay, F E; Welch, A R

    1986-09-01

    Faecal samples from 37 patients with cystic fibrosis and 40 control patients at the Brompton Hospital and the London Chest Hospital were examined for the presence of Clostridium difficile. The organism was isolated from 2 (17%) of control patients who were receiving antibiotics and from one (3.6%) of control patients who had no antimicrobial treatment. Thirty two per cent of the patients with cystic fibrosis excreted C difficile, though none of them had diarrhoea. Two of the three isolates from control patients and nine of the 12 isolates from patients with cystic fibrosis produced toxin B (cytotoxin) in vitro. Toxin B was present in the stools of one of the control patients and three of the patients with cystic fibrosis; toxin A (enterotoxin) was not detected in the faeces of the patients with cystic fibrosis. Two cytotoxigenic strains of C difficile isolated from patients with cystic fibrosis were examined in hamsters; both were virulent, and the animals died.

  6. Asymptomatic carriage of Clostridium difficile in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Peach, S L; Borriello, S P; Gaya, H; Barclay, F E; Welch, A R

    1986-01-01

    Faecal samples from 37 patients with cystic fibrosis and 40 control patients at the Brompton Hospital and the London Chest Hospital were examined for the presence of Clostridium difficile. The organism was isolated from 2 (17%) of control patients who were receiving antibiotics and from one (3.6%) of control patients who had no antimicrobial treatment. Thirty two per cent of the patients with cystic fibrosis excreted C difficile, though none of them had diarrhoea. Two of the three isolates from control patients and nine of the 12 isolates from patients with cystic fibrosis produced toxin B (cytotoxin) in vitro. Toxin B was present in the stools of one of the control patients and three of the patients with cystic fibrosis; toxin A (enterotoxin) was not detected in the faeces of the patients with cystic fibrosis. Two cytotoxigenic strains of C difficile isolated from patients with cystic fibrosis were examined in hamsters; both were virulent, and the animals died. PMID:3093537

  7. Pregnancy and cystic fibrosis: Approach to contemporary management

    PubMed Central

    Tay, George; Callaway, Leonie; Bell, Scott C

    2014-01-01

    Over the previous 50 years survival of patients with cystic fibrosis has progressively increased. As a result of improvements in health care, increasing numbers of patients with cystic fibrosis are now considering starting families of their own. For the health care professionals who look after these patients, the assessment of the potential risks, and the process of guiding prospective parents through pregnancy and beyond can be both challenging and rewarding. To facilitate appropriate discussions about pregnancy, health care workers must have a detailed understanding of the various important issues that will ultimately need to be considered for any patient with cystic fibrosis considering parenthood. This review will address these issues. In particular, it will outline pregnancy outcomes for mothers with cystic fibrosis, issues that need to be taken into account when planning a pregnancy and the management of pregnancy for mothers with cystic fibrosis or mothers who have undergone organ transplantation as a result of cystic fibrosis. PMID:27512443

  8. Health Related Quality of Life in Indian Children with Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Kir, Devika; Gupta, Sumita; Jolly, George; Kalaivani, M; Lodha, Rakesh; Kabra, S K

    2015-05-01

    This study was devised to translate Cystic Fibrosis Questionnaire-Revised to Hindi and administer it to Indian children and adolescents diagnosed with cystic fibrosis. Cross-sectional study. This study was carried out in cystic fibrosis patients attending Pediatric Chest Clinic of a tertiary-care hospital in Northern India from July 2012 to December 2012. 45 children (6-13 years) and their parents, and 14 adolescents. Patients with unstable health in the past two weeks were excluded. Cystic Fibrosis Questionnaire- Revised translated in Hindi was administered. Clinical evaluation and scoring, throat swab cultures and spirometry were also done during the same visit. Health Related Quality of Life scores were the primary measures, and clinical scores, swab cultures and spirometry were secondary measures. Cronbachs alpha ranged from 0.020-0.863.The Factor analysis indicated that most test-items correlated more with competing scales than the intended scales. Convergence between self and proxy-rating was found to be dependent on the domain. The Cystic Fibrosis Questionnaire- Revised scores correlated well with clinical scores (r=0.65,P=0.011), Pseudomonas spp culture data and pulmonary function tests. There was an inverse relation between Health Related Quality of Life scores and age at diagnosis (r=-0.339, P=0.02). Hindi versions of Cystic Fibrosis Questionnaire- Revised: Child, Adolescent and Parents instruments will act as an important step towards data on Health Related Quality of Life of Indian patients with cystic fibrosis.

  9. Abnormal electrochemical skin conductance in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hubert, Dominique; Brunswick, Philippe; Calvet, Jean-Henri; Dusser, Daniel; Fajac, Isabelle

    2011-01-01

    Electrochemical skin conductance measurement is an active electrophysiologic method in which incremental low direct voltage is applied on the skin. It generates a current due to reverse iontophoresis which previous studies suggested to be mostly related to chloride anion movements. As sweat chloride movements upon electric stimulation were likely to be impaired in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, we designed a proof-of-concept study to measure electrochemical skin conductance in CF patients and control subjects and to test the ability of this method to discriminate CF from controls. Electrochemical skin conductance was measured in 41 adult patients with classical CF and 20 healthy control subjects. Patients placed their hands and feet on nickel electrodes and an incremental low direct voltage was applied on the anode during 2min. The resulting voltage on the cathode and the current generated between anode and cathode were measured and from them, two electrochemical skin conductance variables were calculated: ESC, obtained when a low voltage of 1.6V was applied, and dESC which took into account electrochemical skin conductances obtained when low and high voltages were applied. ESC measurements on hands and feet were significantly different in CF patients (on feet: 75±10μSi), as compared with control subjects (62±13μSi, p<0.0001); dESC was also significantly different and more discriminative in CF patients (on feet: 34±24μSi), as compared with control subjects (93±24μSi, p<0.0001). dESC measurement provided a diagnostic specificity of 1 and a sensitivity of 0.93. These results show that electrochemical skin conductance which is easily and rapidly measured is abnormal in CF patients. Trial registry name in the European Clinical Trials Database (eudraCT): "EZSCAN MUCO1: Mesure de la conductance cutanée par chronoampérométrie", N°EUDRACT: 2007-A00221-52. Copyright © 2010 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Mycobacterium abscessus and Children with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Le Bourgeois, Muriel; Pierre-Audigier, Catherine; Offredo, Catherine; Guillemot, Didier; Halley, Sophie; Akoua-Koffi, Chantal; Vincent, Véronique; Sivadon-Tardy, Valérie; Ferroni, Agnès; Berche, Patrick; Scheinmann, Pierre; Lenoir, Gérard

    2003-01-01

    We prospectively studied 298 patients with cystic fibrosis (mean age 11.3 years; range 2 months to 32 years; sex ratio, 0.47) for nontuberculous mycobacteria in respiratory samples from January 1, 1996, to December 31, 1999. Mycobacterium abscessus was by far the most prevalent nontuberculous mycobacterium: 15 patients (6 male, 9 female; mean age 11.9 years; range 2.5–22 years) had at least one positive sample for this microorganism (versus 6 patients positive for M. avium complex), including 10 with >3 positive samples (versus 3 patients for M. avium complex). The M. abscessus isolates from 14 patients were typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis: each of the 14 patients harbored a unique strain, ruling out a common environmental reservoir or person-to-person transmission. Water samples collected in the cystic fibrosis center were negative for M. abscessus. This major mycobacterial pathogen in children and teenagers with cystic fibrosis does not appear to be acquired nosocomially. PMID:14720400

  11. Environmental scan of cystic fibrosis research worldwide.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Janice

    2017-05-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a rare fatal genetic disease, affecting 70,000 to 100,000 people worldwide [1]. Numerous countries have specific charitable organizations dedicated to CF, with many funding research to find a cure or effective control for the disease. Cystic Fibrosis Canada, the largest charity in Canada dedicated to funding research and care in CF, conducted an environmental scan of these organizations to learn and better understand their research goals and funding process. A set of questions was sent to 25 CF charitable organizations around the world by email. Responses were consolidated to identify common practices and innovative approaches. Among respondents, there were variations in the amount of funds invested in research annually and the number of studies supported. Common themes identified included practicing an open call for research applications, evaluating applications using a peer review process, and placing an increased emphasis on patient engagement. Innovative approaches included funding one larger project; funding a series of sub-projects on a common theme; partially funding a research project; and, indefinitely funding part of a researcher's salary. Among CF charitable organizations, there are numerous approaches to research funding. Both similarities and differences were noted between these organizations, all of which share the common goal of working towards improving quality of life and survival for people with CF. Copyright © 2016 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Nutrition in patients with cystic fibrosis: a European Consensus.

    PubMed

    Sinaasappel, M; Stern, M; Littlewood, J; Wolfe, S; Steinkamp, G; Heijerman, Harry G M; Robberecht, E; Döring, G

    2002-06-01

    This document is the result of an European Consensus conference which took place in Artimino, Tuscany, Italy, in March 2001 involving 33 experts on nutrition in patients with cystic fibrosis, organised by the European Cystic Fibrosis Society, and sponsored by Axcan-Scandipharm, Baxter, Dr Falk Pharma, Fresenius, Nutricia, SHS International, Solvay Pharmaceuticals (major sponsor). The purpose of the conference was to develop a consensus document on nutrition in patients with cystic fibrosis based on current evidence.

  13. Artificial intelligence techniques: An efficient new approach to challenge the assessment of complex clinical fields such as airway clearance techniques in patients with cystic fibrosis?

    PubMed

    Slavici, Titus; Almajan, Bogdan

    2013-04-01

    To construct an artificial intelligence application to assist untrained physiotherapists in determining the appropriate physiotherapy exercises to improve the quality of life of patients with cystic fibrosis. A total of 42 children (21 boys and 21 girls), age range 6-18 years, participated in a clinical survey between 2001 and 2005. Data collected during the clinical survey were entered into a neural network in order to correlate the health state indicators of the patients and the type of physiotherapy exercise to be followed. Cross-validation of the network was carried out by comparing the health state indicators achieved after following a certain physiotherapy exercise and the health state indicators predicted by the network. The lifestyle and health state indicators of the survey participants improved. The network predicted the health state indicators of the participants with an accuracy of 93%. The results of the cross-validation test were within the error margins of the real-life indicators. Using data on the clinical state of individuals with cystic fibrosis, it is possible to determine the most effective type of physiotherapy exercise for improving overall health state indicators.

  14. Use of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation's extensive sputum-culturing protocol for patients without cystic fibrosis: implications for infection control and antimicrobial resistance.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jennifer

    2014-05-01

    The US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation has guidelines for culturing respiratory tract specimens from patients with cystic fibrosis. Pulmonary physicians were surveyed regarding their use of these extensive cystic fibrosis culture protocols for patients without cystic fibrosis. The survey results and a discussion of the implications of these practices are reported.

  15. Large-insert genome analysis technology detects structural variation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical strains from cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Hayden, Hillary S; Gillett, Will; Saenphimmachak, Channakhone; Lim, Regina; Zhou, Yang; Jacobs, Michael A; Chang, Jean; Rohmer, Laurence; D'Argenio, David A; Palmieri, Anthony; Levy, Ruth; Haugen, Eric; Wong, Gane K S; Brittnacher, Mitch J; Burns, Jane L; Miller, Samuel I; Olson, Maynard V; Kaul, Rajinder

    2008-06-01

    Large-insert genome analysis (LIGAN) is a broadly applicable, high-throughput technology designed to characterize genome-scale structural variation. Fosmid paired-end sequences and DNA fingerprints from a query genome are compared to a reference sequence using the Genomic Variation Analysis (GenVal) suite of software tools to pinpoint locations of insertions, deletions, and rearrangements. Fosmids spanning regions that contain new structural variants can then be sequenced. Clonal pairs of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from four cystic fibrosis patients were used to validate the LIGAN technology. Approximately 1.5 Mb of inserted sequences were identified, including 743 kb containing 615 ORFs that are absent from published P. aeruginosa genomes. Six rearrangement breakpoints and 220 kb of deleted sequences were also identified. Our study expands the "genome universe" of P. aeruginosa and validates a technology that complements emerging, short-read sequencing methods that are better suited to characterizing single-nucleotide polymorphisms than structural variation.

  16. Chloride and potassium channels in cystic fibrosis airway epithelia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, Michael J.; Liedtke, Carole M.

    1986-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis, the most common lethal genetic disease in Caucasians, is characterized by a decreased permeability in sweat gland duct and airway epithelia. In sweat duct epithelium, a decreased Cl- permeability accounts for the abnormally increased salt content of sweat1. In airway epithelia a decreased Cl- permeability, and possibly increased sodium absorption, may account for the abnormal respiratory tract fluid2,3. The Cl- impermeability has been localized to the apical membrane of cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells4. The finding that hormonally regulated Cl- channels make the apical membrane Cl- permeable in normal airway epithelial cells5 suggested abnormal Cl- channel function in cystic fibrosis. Here we report that excised, cell-free patches of membrane from cystic fibrosis epithelial cells contain Cl- channels that have the same conductive properties as Cl- channels from normal cells. However, Cl- channels from cystic fibrosis cells did not open when they were attached to the cell. These findings suggest defective regulation of Cl- channels in cystic fibrosis epithelia; to begin to address this issue, we performed two studies. First, we found that isoprenaline, which stimulates Cl- secretion, increases cellular levels of cyclic AMP in a similar manner in cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis epithelial cells. Second, we show that adrenergic agonists open calcium-activated potassium channels, indirectly suggesting that calcium-dependent stimulus-response coupling is intact in cystic fibrosis. These data suggest defective regulation of Cl- channels at a site distal to cAMP accumulation.

  17. Cystic fibrosis carrier population screening: a review.

    PubMed

    Rowley, P T; Loader, S; Levenkron, J C

    1997-01-01

    Population screening for cystic fibrosis (CF) carriers, now possible because of the cloning of the CFTR gene, merits evaluation because CF is common, serious, and without satisfactory treatment, and because prenatal diagnosis is available. Clinical trials of CF population carrier screening are reviewed. These trials have involved pregnant women, adults of both sexes of reproductive age, or adolescents. Schools, the usual setting for screening programs for adolescents, provide an excellent opportunity for a formal educational component and for comprehensive coverage of the population, but compared to a health-care setting, may entail subtle coercion and may compromise confidentiality. In the case of adults, many say they prefer screening before conception but do not see a physician for evaluation before conception and providers find screening more readily accomplished in the setting of a prenatal visit. Two large U.S. studies of prenatal screening with quite different subject populations and health-care settings encountered few of the adverse outcomes originally predicted for CF carrier population screening.

  18. Colonic disorders in adult cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Chaun, H

    2001-09-01

    By 1996, the median survival of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) in North America had increased to 31 years. With the markedly improved life expectancy, many CF patients are now adults. There is an associated increased risk of certain colonic disorders, and the emergence of other previously unrecognized disorders, in adult CF patients. The distal intestinal obstruction syndrome (DIOS), which is more common in older patients, is a frequent cause of abdominal pain. Intussusception may complicate DIOS; other differential diagnoses include appendiceal disease, volvolus, Crohn's disease, fibrosing colonopathy and colonic carcinoma. The diagnosis of acute appendicitis, although uncommon in patients with CF, is often delayed, and appendiceal abscess is a frequent complication. The prevalence of Crohn's disease in CF has been shown to be 17 times that of the general population. Right-sided microscopic colitis is a recently recognized entity in CF of uncertain clinical significance. Fibrosing colonopathy has been confined mostly to children with CF, attributed to the use of high strength pancreatic enzyme supplements, but it has been reported in three adults. Nine cases of carcinoma of the large intestine have been reported worldwide, associated with an apparent excess risk of digestive tract cancers in CF. Despite high carrier rates of Clostridium difficile in patients with CF, pseudomembranous colitis is distinctly rare, but severe cases complicated by toxic megacolon have been reported. In these patients, watery diarrhea is often absent. Adult CF patients with refractory or unexplained intestinal symptoms merit thorough investigations.

  19. A millennial view of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Dodge, John A

    2015-01-01

    Although only identified as a distinct disease in the 1930s, it was soon apparent that Cystic Fibrosis (CF) had been present, but unrecognised, in European populations for many years - perhaps even centuries [1] . Within a decade of the early descriptions, the autosomal recessive nature of this genetic disease had been clarified, and its clinical features had been expanded. Secondary nutritional deficiencies complicated the underlying condition: the first clear description of CF as "a new disease", which included a speculation about its genetic basis (because there were 2 pairs of sibs in the case series) was published as Vitamin A deficiency in children [2]. The diagnosis was most often made at autopsy. When it was suspected in life, the diagnostic tests used included duodenal intubation to obtain fluid which would show impaired tryptic digestion of the coating of X-Ray film in CF children, and measurement of vitamin A in the blood. Some nutritional improvement could be expected with simple, rather inefficient pancreatic enzyme preparations, but it was not until mid-century that antibiotics began to treat pulmonary infections effectively. As a young doctor in the 1950s I soon became aware that the median age at death for affected children was about one year, and most died before reaching school age. .

  20. Is cystic fibrosis genetic medicine's canary?

    PubMed

    Lindee, Susan; Mueller, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    In 1989 the gene that causes cystic fibrosis (CF) was identified in a search accompanied by intense anticipation that the gene, once discovered, would lead rapidly to gene therapy. Many hoped that the disease would effectively disappear. Those affected were going to inhale vectors packed with functioning genes, which would go immediately to work in the lungs. It was a bewitching image, repeatedly invoked in both scientific and popular texts. Gene therapy clinical trials were carried out with a range of strategies and occasionally success seemed close, but by 1996 the idea that gene therapy for CF would quickly provide a cure was being abandoned by the communities engaged with treatment and research. While conventional wisdom holds that the death of Jesse Gelsinger in an unrelated gene therapy trial in 1999 produced new skepticism about gene therapy, the CF story suggests a different trajectory, and some different lessons. This article considers the rise and fall of gene therapy for CF and suggests that CF may provide a particularly compelling case study of a failed genomic technology, perhaps even of a medical "canary." The story of CF might be a kind of warning to us that genetic medicine may create as many problems as it solves, and that moving forward constructively with these techniques and practices requires many kinds of right information, not just about biology, but also about values, priorities, market forces, uncertainty, and consumer choice.

  1. [Early lung disease in cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Fayon, M; Ladipo, Y; Galodé, F; Debelleix, S; Reix, P

    2016-12-01

    Recent data has shown that lung inflammation and infection subvene very early in very young infants with Cystic Fibrosis (CF). This leads to impaired lung function and structural damage, even in asymptomatic children. In the CF-pig model constitutional airway narrowing is present at birth, and is associated with defective mucus migration, and impaired bacterial clearance. At the age of 3 months, 25% of screened CF infants show decreased lung function. Air trapping is also present in 68% and bronchiectasis in 28% of patients. At the same age, the presence of neutrophil elastase in the bronchoalveolar lavage is an ominous sign since it triples the risk of bronchiectasis at the age of 3 years. Since only very few drug therapies have been validated in the preschool children, adapted clinical trials are warranted in this age group. Early interventions may have a huge impact on the natural history of CF, on the condition of not interfering with normal lung growth. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Lessons learned from the cystic fibrosis pig.

    PubMed

    Meyerholz, David K

    2016-07-01

    Deficient function in the anion channel cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator is the fundamental cause for CF. This is a monogenic condition that causes lesions in several organs including the respiratory tract, pancreas, liver, intestines, and reproductive tract. Lung disease is most notable, given it is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in people with CF. Shortly after the identification of CF transmembrane conductance regulator, CF mouse models were developed that did not show spontaneous lung disease as seen in humans, and this spurred development of additional CF animal models. Pig models were considered a leading choice for several reasons including their similarity to humans in respiratory anatomy, physiology, and in size for translational imaging. The first CF pig models were reported in 2008 and have been extremely valuable to help clarify persistent questions in the field and advance understanding of disease pathogenesis. Because CF pigs are susceptible to lung disease like humans, they have direct utility in translational research. In addition, CF pig models are useful to compare and contrast with current CF mouse models, human clinical studies, and even newer CF animal models being characterized. This "triangulation" strategy could help identify genetic differences that underlie phenotypic variations, so as to focus and accelerate translational research.

  3. Viruses in cystic fibrosis patients' airways.

    PubMed

    Billard, Lisa; Le Berre, Rozenn; Pilorgé, Léa; Payan, Christopher; Héry-Arnaud, Geneviève; Vallet, Sophie

    2017-11-01

    Although bacteria have historically been considered to play a major role in cystic fibrosis (CF) airway damage, a strong impact of respiratory viral infections (RVI) is also now recognized. Emerging evidence confirms that respiratory viruses are associated with deterioration of pulmonary function and exacerbation and facilitation of bacterial colonization in CF patients. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the current knowledge on respiratory viruses in CF airways, to discuss the resulting inflammation and RVI response, to determine how to detect the viruses, and to assess their clinical consequences, prevalence, and interactions with bacteria. The most predominant are Rhinoviruses (RVs), significantly associated with CF exacerbation. Molecular techniques, and especially multiplex PCR, help to diagnose viral infections, and the coming rise of metagenomics will extend knowledge of viral populations in the complex ecosystem of CF airways. Prophylaxis and vaccination are currently available only for Respiratory syncytial and Influenza virus (IV), but antiviral molecules are being tested to improve CF patients' care. All the points raised in this review highlight the importance of taking account of RVIs and their potential impact on the CF airway ecosystem.

  4. [Inhaled antibiotic therapy in cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Girón Moreno, Rosa M; Salcedo Posadas, Antonio; Mar Gómez-Punter, Rosa

    2011-06-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most frequent fatal genetically-transmitted disease among Caucasians. Chronic bronchial infection, especially by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, is the main cause of morbidity and mortality in this disease. Aerosolized antibiotic therapy achieves high drug concentrations in the airway with low toxicity, allowing chronic use. Currently, two antibiotics have been approved for inhalation therapy, tobramycin inhalation solution and colistimethate sodium aerosol. There is less evidence from clinical trials for the latter. The main indication for these drugs is chronic bronchial colonization by P. aeruginosa, although there is increasing evidence of the importance of the primary infection by this bacterium, whether treated by oral or intravenous antibiotics or not. More controversial is the use of aerosolized antibiotic therapy in bacterial prophylaxis or respiratory exacerbations. For many years, intravenous formulations of distinct antibiotics for aerosolized use have been employed, which are in distinct phases of research for use in nebulizer therapy. In addition to being used to treat P. aeruginosa infection, aerosolized antibiotics have been used to treat other pathogens such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococus aureus, Mycobacterium abscessus and Aspergillus fumigatus.

  5. Progress in cystic fibrosis and the CF Therapeutics Development Network

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Steven M; Borowitz, Drucy S; Burns, Jane L; Clancy, John P; Donaldson, Scott H; Retsch-Bogart, George; Sagel, Scott D; Ramsey, Bonnie W

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF), the most common life-shortening genetic disorder in Caucasians, affects approximately 70 000 individuals worldwide. In 1998, the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (CFF) launched the CF Therapeutics Development Network (CF-TDN) as a central element of its Therapeutics Development Programme. Designed to accelerate the clinical evaluation of new therapies needed to fulfil the CFF mission to control and cure CF, the CF-TDN has conducted 75 clinical trials since its inception, and has contributed to studies as varied as initial safety and proof of concept trials to pivotal programmes required for regulatory approval. This review highlights recent and significant research efforts of the CF-TDN, including a summary of contributions to studies involving CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) modulators, airway surface liquid hydrators and mucus modifiers, anti-infectives, anti-inflammatories, and nutritional therapies. Efforts to advance CF biomarkers, necessary to accelerate the therapeutic goals of the network, are also summarised. PMID:22960984

  6. Riboflavin deficiency in cystic fibrosis: three case reports.

    PubMed

    McCabe, H

    2001-10-01

    Three cases of clinical riboflavin deficiency are reported in children aged 2-10 years attending a regional Cystic Fibrosis clinic. Riboflavin deficiency presented as angular stomatitis in all three patients. Patients were confirmed to be riboflavin deficient by assaying the activity of erythrocyte glutathione reductase. Patients were not on routine supplements of water-soluble vitamins before presentation and were treated with riboflavin supplements as part of a water-soluble vitamin complex. At presentation, one patient had poor nutritional status, but two patients were adequately nourished, receiving overnight Gastrostomy feeds. Data on these two patients indicate an adequate dietary intake of riboflavin, suggesting a mechanism for increased requirements, inadequate absorption or utilization. Additional deficiencies of thiamin, pyridoxine and iron were also observed. This paper reports the occurrence of a vitamin deficiency not previously reported in the cystic fibrosis population.

  7. Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy in the UK and Elsewhere

    PubMed Central

    Pytel, Kamila M.; Alton, Eric W.F.W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene was identified in 1989. This opened the door for the development of cystic fibrosis (CF) gene therapy, which has been actively pursued for the last 20 years. Although 26 clinical trials involving approximately 450 patients have been carried out, the vast majority of these trials were short and included small numbers of patients; they were not designed to assess clinical benefit, but to establish safety and proof-of-concept for gene transfer using molecular end points such as the detection of recombinant mRNA or correction of the ion transport defect. The only currently published trial designed and powered to assess clinical efficacy (defined as improvement in lung function) administered AAV2-CFTR to the lungs of patients with CF. The U.K. Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy Consortium completed, in the autumn of 2014, the first nonviral gene therapy trial designed to answer whether repeated nonviral gene transfer (12 doses over 12 months) can lead to clinical benefit. The demonstration that the molecular defect in CFTR can be corrected with small-molecule drugs, and the success of gene therapy in other monogenic diseases, is boosting interest in CF gene therapy. Developments are discussed here. PMID:25838137

  8. [Italian Cystic Fibrosis Register - Report 2010].

    PubMed

    Amato, Annalisa; Ferrigno, Luigina; Salvatore, Marco; Toccaceli, Virgilia

    2016-01-01

    The Italian National CF Registry (INCFR) is based on the official agreement between the clinicians of the Italian National Referral Centers for Cystic Fibrosis and the researchers of the Istituto Superiore di Sanità (National Center for Rare Diseases; National Center for Epidemiology, Surveillance and Health Care Promotion). OBJECTIVES The main aim of INCFR is to contribute to the improvement in CF patients health care and clinical management through: i. the estimates of CF prevalence and incidence in Italy; ii. the analyses of medium and long term clinical and epidemiological trends of the disesase; iii. the identification of the main health care needs at regional and national level to contribute to the Health Care programmes and to the distribution of resources. MATERIALS AND METHODS Analyses and results described in the present Report are referred to patients in charge to the Italian National Referral Centers for Cystic Fibrosis in 2010. Data were sent by Centers by means of a specific software (Camilla, Ibis Informatica). The Italian National Referral Centers for Cystic Fibrosis sent a total of 5,271 individual records; 1,112 records were excluded from the analyses due to restricted inclusion criteria. The total number of patients included in INCFR for analyses is 4,159. RESULTS INCFR database includes all prevalent cases at 1th January 2010 as well as all new diagnoses done in 2010. The present Report has been organized into 9 sections. 1. Demography: estimated 2010 CF prevalence was 7/100,000 residents in Italy; 52% of the patients were male, CF distribution showed higher frequency in patients aged 7 to 35 years. In 2010, 48.9% of the patients were more than 18 years old. 2. Diagnoses: most of the CF patients were diagnosed before two years of age (66.7%); a significant percentage of patients (11.4%) was diagnosed in adult-age. 3. New diagnoses (2010): new diagnoses were 168. Sixty-five percent of them was diagnosed before the second year of age and 17%in

  9. Recurrent Clostridium difficile colitis in cystic fibrosis: an emerging problem.

    PubMed

    Egressy, Katarine; Jansen, Michaelene; Meyer, Keith C

    2013-01-01

    To examine the incidence of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), including patients who had undergone lung transplantation, and review clinical findings in hospitalized patients with C. difficile colitis. A retrospective chart review was performed to examine the clinical presentation and management of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) who received care at the University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics (UWHC) from 1994 to 2011 and were prospectively identified with C. difficile colitis. Ten cases of C. difficile associated disease (CDAD) occurred in patients with CF followed by our Adult CF Center over a period of 17 years, and 4 patients were bilateral lung transplant recipients. Two of the lung transplant recipients had recurrent CDAD that lead to fulminant pancolitis, surgical intervention, and shock. Two patients in the non-transplant group experienced recurrent C. difficile infection that led to fulminant pancolitis with associated systemic inflammatory response syndrome and required colectomy. C. difficile colitis can cause life threatening illness in patients with CF, and symptoms may be subtle and/or atypical and lead to significant delay in diagnosis. Patients with recurrent C. difficile colitis are at high risk of fatal outcome, and empiric therapy should be considered for patients with previous C. difficile colitis even in the absence of disease when broad-spectrum antibiotics are given to treat bacterial infection. Copyright © 2012 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Lumacaftor/Ivacaftor: A Review in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Deeks, Emma D

    2016-08-01

    Lumacaftor/ivacaftor (Orkambi™) is a fixed-dose tablet containing a corrector (lumacaftor) and potentiator (ivacaftor) of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and is the first therapy approved to treat the underlying cause of cystic fibrosis in patients (aged ≥12 years) homozygous for the most common CFTR mutation, F508del. Lumacaftor improves the processing of F508del CFTR and its transport to the cell surface, while ivacaftor increases the channel's open probability and transport of chloride. In two 24-week trials in the approved patient population (TRAFFIC and TRANSPORT), lumacaftor 400 mg plus ivacaftor 250 mg, administered every 12 h in combination with standard therapy, was associated with an ≈3 % statistically significant improvement in lung function relative to placebo (as measured by the percent predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 s). Lumacaftor plus ivacaftor did not significantly improve respiratory symptoms, although reduced pulmonary exacerbations to a clinically meaningful extent and, in one trial (TRANSPORT), significantly improved body mass index (BMI). In an ongoing extension of these studies (PROGRESS), lumacaftor plus ivacaftor provided clinical benefit over a further 72 weeks of treatment. Lumacaftor plus ivacaftor had an acceptable tolerability profile, with the most common adverse events being respiratory or gastrointestinal in nature. Thus, lumacaftor/ivacaftor expands the treatment options available for patients with cystic fibrosis homozygous for the F508del-CFTR mutation, although its precise place in clinical practice remains to be determined.

  11. Optimising inhaled mannitol for cystic fibrosis in an adult population

    PubMed Central

    Flume, Patrick A.; Aitken, Moira L.; Agent, Penny; Charlton, Brett; Forster, Emma; Fox, Howard G.; Hebestreit, Helge; Kolbe, John; Zuckerman, Jonathan B; Button, Brenda M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract There has been remarkable progress in the treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients over the past 20 years. However, limitations of standard therapies have highlighted the need for a convenient alternative treatment to effectively target the pathophysiologic basis of CF-related disease by improving mucociliary clearance of airway secretions and consequently improve lung function and reduce respiratory exacerbations. Mannitol is an osmotic agent available as a dry powder, dispensed in a convenient disposable inhaler device for the treatment of adult patients with CF. Inhalation of mannitol as a dry powder is thought to change the viscoelastic properties of airway secretions, increase the hydration of the airway surface liquid and contribute to increased mucociliary and cough clearance of retained secretions. In two large phase 3 studies [1, 2], long-term use of inhaled mannitol resulted in a significant and clinically meaningful improvement in lung function relative to control in adult CF subjects and had an acceptable safety profile. Clinical experience with inhaled mannitol confirms that it is safe and effective. A minority of patients are unable to tolerate the medication. However, through training in proper inhaler technique and setting clear expectations regarding therapeutic effects, both the tolerance and adherence necessary for long term efficacy can be positively influenced. Educational aims To discuss the importance of airway clearance treatments in the management of cystic fibrosis. To describe the clinical data that supports the use of mannitol in adult patients with cystic fibrosis. To highlight the role of mannitol tolerance testing in screening for hyperresponsiveness. To provide practical considerations for patient education in use of mannitol inhaler. Key points Inhaled mannitol is a safe and effective option in adult patients with cystic fibrosis. Mannitol tolerance testing effectively screens for hyperresponsiveness prior to initiation

  12. Diagnosis of Cystic Fibrosis in Nonscreened Populations.

    PubMed

    Sosnay, Patrick R; White, Terry B; Farrell, Philip M; Ren, Clement L; Derichs, Nico; Howenstine, Michelle S; Nick, Jerry A; De Boeck, Kris

    2017-02-01

    Although the majority of cases of cystic fibrosis (CF) are now diagnosed through newborn screening, there is still a need to standardize the diagnostic criteria for those diagnosed outside of the neonatal period. This is because newborn screening started relatively recently, it is not performed everywhere, and even for individuals who were screened, there is the possibility of a false negative. To limit irreversible organ pathology, a timely diagnosis of CF and institution of CF therapies can greatly benefit these patients. Experts on CF diagnosis were convened at the 2015 CF Foundation Diagnosis Consensus Conference. The participants reviewed and discussed published works and instructive cases of CF diagnosis in individuals presenting with signs, symptoms, or a family history of CF. Through a modified Delphi methodology, several consensus statements were agreed upon. These consensus statements were updates of prior CF diagnosis conferences and recommendations. CF diagnosis in individuals outside of newborn screening relies on the clinical evidence and on evidence of CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) dysfunction. Clinical evidence can include typical organ pathologies seen in CF such as bronchiectasis or pancreatic insufficiency but often represent a broad range of severity including mild cases. CFTR dysfunction can be demonstrated using sweat chloride testing, CFTR molecular genetic analysis, or CFTR physiologic tests. On the basis of the large number of patients with bona fide CF currently followed in registries with sweat chloride levels between 30 and 40 mmol/L, the threshold considered "intermediate" was lowered from 40 mmol/L in the prior diagnostic guidelines to 30 mmol/L. The CF diagnosis was also discussed in the context of CFTR-related disorders in which CFTR dysfunction may be present, but the individual does not meet criteria for CF. CF diagnosis remains a rare but important condition that can be diagnosed when characteristic clinical

  13. Cystic Fibrosis Associated with Worse Survival After Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Black, Sylvester M; Woodley, Frederick W; Tumin, Dmitry; Mumtaz, Khalid; Whitson, Bryan A; Tobias, Joseph D; Hayes, Don

    2016-04-01

    Survival in cystic fibrosis patients after liver transplantation and liver-lung transplantation is not well studied. To discern survival rates after liver transplantation and liver-lung transplantation in patients with and without cystic fibrosis. The United Network for Organ Sharing database was queried from 1987 to 2013. Univariate Cox proportional hazards, multivariate Cox models, and propensity score matching were performed. Liver transplant and liver-lung transplant were performed in 212 and 53 patients with cystic fibrosis, respectively. Univariate Cox proportional hazards regression identified lower survival in cystic fibrosis after liver transplant compared to a reference non-cystic fibrosis liver transplant cohort (HR 1.248; 95 % CI 1.012, 1.541; p = 0.039). Supplementary analysis found graft survival was similar across the 3 recipient categories (log-rank test: χ(2) 2.68; p = 0.262). Multivariate Cox models identified increased mortality hazard among cystic fibrosis patients undergoing liver transplantation (HR 2.439; 95 % CI 1.709, 3.482; p < 0.001) and liver-lung transplantation (HR 2.753; 95 % CI 1.560, 4.861; p < 0.001). Propensity score matching of cystic fibrosis patients undergoing liver transplantation to non-cystic fibrosis controls identified a greater mortality hazard in the cystic fibrosis cohort using a Cox proportional hazards model stratified on matched pairs (HR 3.167; 95 % CI 1.265, 7.929, p = 0.014). Liver transplantation in cystic fibrosis is associated with poorer long-term patient survival compared to non-cystic fibrosis patients, although the difference is not due to graft survival.

  14. Natural Compounds as Therapeutic Agents in the Treatment Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Isha; Shah, Kalpit; Bradbury, Neil A

    2016-01-01

    The recent FDA approval of two drugs to treat the basic defect in cystic fibrosis has given hope to patients and their families battling this devastating disease. Over many years, with heavy financial investment from Vertex Pharmaceuticals and the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, pre-clinical evaluation of thousands of synthetic drugs resulted in the production of Kalydeco and Orkambi. Yet, despite the success of this endeavor, many other compounds have been proposed as therapeutic agents in the treatment of CF. Of note, several of these compounds are naturally occurring, and are present in spices from the grocery store and over the counter preparations in health food stores. In this short review, we look at three such compounds, genistein, curcumin, and resveratrol, and evaluate the scientific support for their use as therapeutic agents in the treatment of patients with CF. PMID:27081574

  15. The Km of NADH dehydrogenase is decreased in mitochondria of cystic fibrosis cells.

    PubMed

    Dechecchi, M C; Girella, E; Cabrini, G; Berton, G

    1988-01-01

    The kinetic properties of the NADH dehydrogenase of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, assayed as NADH-dependent rotenone-sensitive cytochrome c reductase have been studied in mitochondria isolated from mononuclear white blood cells in patients affected by cystic fibrosis. Data reported here show that the apparent Km of the enzyme for NADH is significantly decreased in cystic fibrosis mitochondria. These findings are independent of the age or the clinical state of the disease and have also been obtained with mitochondria isolated from cultured skin fibroblasts. These observations support the notion that cystic fibrosis is possibly accompanied by alterations of intracellular membranes and these are evident also in circulating cells and cultured fibroblasts.

  16. Vitamin K and the management of patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Durie, P R

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the advisability of routine vitamin K supplementation in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). DATA SOURCES: Studies identified through a MEDLINE search with the use of MeSH terms vitamin K, cystic fibrosis, PIVKA-II (protein induced by vitamin K absence-II), coagulation abnormality and cystic fibrosis, and hepatic disorder and cystic fibrosis. STUDY SELECTION: Six articles published between January 1981 and December 1992 were selected: one general review of vitamin K in infancy and five studies involving clinical trials of vitamin K supplementation or screening for fat-soluble vitamins, vitamin K or PIVKA-II in patients with CF. Review articles on nutrition in patients with CF, technical reports, letters, comments and case studies not bearing directly on these issues were excluded. DATA EXTRACTION: Findings in these articles were analysed and compared to determine whether routine supplementation in all patients with CF is indicated, whether specific subgroups of these patients are susceptible to vitamin K deficiency and areas in which future research is needed. RESULTS: There is no consensus on routine vitamin K supplementation in patients with CF. Studies have found a few cases of vitamin K deficiency among the population of people with CF. In addition, various factors--including pancreatic failure, liver disease, bowel resection and long-term use of antibiotics--can put some of these patients at risk of vitamin K deficiency. CONCLUSIONS: Specific indications for routine vitamin K supplementation in all patients with CF have not yet been identified. Pending further studies, it would be prudent to consider routine supplementation in patients with CF and severe noncholestatic and cholestatic liver disease, major small-bowel resection, pancreatic insufficiency or lung disease necessitating frequent use of antibiotics. A stronger body of evidence is needed as a basis for clinical strategies. PMID:7922929

  17. Autopsy confirmation of severe pulmonary interstitial fibrosis secondary to Munchausen syndrome presenting as cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Croft, Philip R; Racz, Mark I; Bloch, John D; Palmer, Charles H

    2005-09-01

    Chronic factitious disorder with physical symptoms, or Munchausen syndrome, is a well-recognized but uncommonly diagnosed psychiatric condition characterized by the deliberate production of signs and symptoms of disease in order to receive medical attention. Clinical suspicion of this disease is rarely confirmed by autopsy, as the patients usually do not die as a consequence of feigning illness. Here we report the autopsy confirmation of a case of a suspected Munchausen syndrome patient who presented with a history of cystic fibrosis. Examination of the lungs demonstrated extensive severe interstitial fibrosis, and polariscopic examination revealed a large quantity of crystalline material throughout the tissue; X-ray diffraction identified the material as talc. Synopses of published cases of Munchausen syndrome presenting as cystic fibrosis, and cases of Munchausen syndrome with pulmonary talcosis are presented as part of the discussion.

  18. In silico search for modifier genes associated with pancreatic and liver disease in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Génin, Emmanuelle; Férec, Claude

    2017-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis is the most common lethal autosomal recessive disorder in the white population, affecting among other organs, the lung, the pancreas and the liver. Whereas Cystic Fibrosis is a monogenic disease, many studies reveal a very complex relationship between genotype and clinical phenotype. Indeed, the broad phenotypic spectrum observed in Cystic Fibrosis is far from being explained by obvious genotype-phenotype correlations and it is admitted that Cystic Fibrosis disease is the result of multiple factors, including effects of the environment as well as modifier genes. Our objective was to highlight new modifier genes with potential implications in the lung, pancreatic and liver outcomes of the disease. For this purpose we performed a system biology approach which combined, database mining, literature mining, gene expression study and network analysis as well as pathway enrichment analysis and protein-protein interactions. We found that IFI16, CCNE2 and IGFBP2 are potential modifiers in the altered lung function in Cystic Fibrosis. We also found that EPHX1, HLA-DQA1, HLA-DQB1, DSP and SLC33A1, GPNMB, NCF2, RASGRP1, LGALS3 and PTPN13, are potential modifiers in pancreas and liver, respectively. Associated pathways indicate that immune system is likely involved and that Ubiquitin C is probably a central node, linking Cystic Fibrosis to liver and pancreatic disease. We highlight here new modifier genes with potential implications in Cystic Fibrosis. Nevertheless, our in silico analysis requires functional analysis to give our results a physiological relevance. PMID:28339466

  19. In silico search for modifier genes associated with pancreatic and liver disease in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Trouvé, Pascal; Génin, Emmanuelle; Férec, Claude

    2017-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis is the most common lethal autosomal recessive disorder in the white population, affecting among other organs, the lung, the pancreas and the liver. Whereas Cystic Fibrosis is a monogenic disease, many studies reveal a very complex relationship between genotype and clinical phenotype. Indeed, the broad phenotypic spectrum observed in Cystic Fibrosis is far from being explained by obvious genotype-phenotype correlations and it is admitted that Cystic Fibrosis disease is the result of multiple factors, including effects of the environment as well as modifier genes. Our objective was to highlight new modifier genes with potential implications in the lung, pancreatic and liver outcomes of the disease. For this purpose we performed a system biology approach which combined, database mining, literature mining, gene expression study and network analysis as well as pathway enrichment analysis and protein-protein interactions. We found that IFI16, CCNE2 and IGFBP2 are potential modifiers in the altered lung function in Cystic Fibrosis. We also found that EPHX1, HLA-DQA1, HLA-DQB1, DSP and SLC33A1, GPNMB, NCF2, RASGRP1, LGALS3 and PTPN13, are potential modifiers in pancreas and liver, respectively. Associated pathways indicate that immune system is likely involved and that Ubiquitin C is probably a central node, linking Cystic Fibrosis to liver and pancreatic disease. We highlight here new modifier genes with potential implications in Cystic Fibrosis. Nevertheless, our in silico analysis requires functional analysis to give our results a physiological relevance.

  20. Omega-3 fatty acids for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Colleen; Watson, Helen

    2016-01-05

    Studies suggest that a diet rich in omega-3 essential fatty acids may have beneficial anti-inflammatory effects for chronic conditions such as cystic fibrosis. This is an updated version of a previously published review. To determine whether there is evidence that omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation reduces morbidity and mortality and to identify any adverse events associated with supplementation. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group's Trials Register comprising references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. Authors and persons interested in the subject of the review were contacted.Date of last search: 13 August 2013. Randomised controlled trials in people with cystic fibrosis comparing omega-3 fatty acid supplements with placebo. Two authors independently selected studies for inclusion, extracted data and assessed the risk of bias of the studies. The searches identified 15 studies; four studies with 91 participants (children and adults) were included; duration of studies ranged from six weeks to six months. Two studies were judged to be at low risk of bias based on adequate randomisation but this was unclear in the other two studies. Three of the studies adequately blinded patients, however, the risk of bias was unclear in all studies with regards to allocation concealment and selective reporting.Two studies compared omega-3 fatty acids to olive oil for six weeks. One study compared a liquid dietary supplement containing omega-3 fatty acids to one without for six months. One study compared omega-3 fatty acids and omega-6 fatty acids to a control (capsules with customised fatty acid blends) for three months. Only one short-term study (19 participants) comparing omega-3 to placebo reported a significant improvement in lung function and Shwachman score and a reduction in sputum volume in the omega-3 group. Another

  1. Magnesium in cystic fibrosis--Systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Santi, Maristella; Milani, Gregorio P; Simonetti, Giacomo D; Fossali, Emilio F; Bianchetti, Mario G; Lava, Sebastiano A G

    2016-02-01

    The metabolism of sodium, potassium, and chloride and the acid-base balance are sometimes altered in cystic fibrosis. Textbooks and reviews only marginally address the homeostasis of magnesium in cystic fibrosis. We performed a search of the Medical Subject Headings terms (cystic fibrosis OR mucoviscidosis) AND (magnesium OR hypomagnes[a]emia) in the US National Library of Medicine and Excerpta Medica databases. We identified 25 reports dealing with magnesium and cystic fibrosis. The results of the review may be summarized as follows. First, hypomagnesemia affects more than half of the cystic fibrosis patients with advanced disease; second, magnesemia, which is normally age-independent, relevantly decreases with age in cystic fibrosis; third, aminoglycoside antimicrobials frequently induce both acute and chronic renal magnesium-wasting; fourth, sweat magnesium concentration was normal in cystic fibrosis patients; fifth, limited data suggest the existence of an impaired intestinal magnesium balance. Finally, stimulating observations suggest that magnesium supplements might achieve an improvement in respiratory muscle strength and mucolytic activity of both recombinant and endogenous deoxyribonuclease. The first comprehensive review of the literature confirms that, despite being one of the most prevalent minerals in the body, the importance of magnesium in cystic fibrosis is largely overlooked. In these patients, hypomagnesemia should be sought once a year. Furthermore, the potential of supplementation with this cation deserves more attention. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. CYSTIC FIBROSIS: MICROBIOLOGY AND HOST RESPONSE

    PubMed Central

    Zemanick, Edith T.

    2016-01-01

    THE EARLIEST DESCRIPTIONS OF LUNG DISEASE IN PEOPLE WITH CYSTIC FIBROSIS (CF) DEMONSTRATED THE INVOLVEMENT OF THREE INTERACTING PATHOPHYSIOLOGICAL ELEMENTS IN CF AIRWAYS: MUCUS OBSTRUCTION, INFLAMMATION, AND INFECTION. OVER THE PAST 7 DECADES, OUR UNDERSTANDING OF CF RESPIRATORY MICROBIOLOGY AND INFLAMMATION HAS EVOLVED WITH THE INTRODUCTION OF NEW TREATMENTS, WITH INCREASED LONGEVITY, AND WITH INCREASINGLY SOPHISTICATED LABORATORY TECHNIQUES. IN THIS CHAPTER, WE WILL REVIEW THE CURRENT STATE OF UNDERSTANDING OF THE ROLES OF INFECTION AND INFLAMMATION AND THEIR ROLES IN DRIVING LUNG DISEASE. WE WILL ALSO DISCUSS HOW THIS CONSTANTLY EVOLVING INFORMATION IS USED TO INFORM CURRENT THERAPEUTIC STRATEGIES, MEASURES AND PREDICTORS OF DISEASE SEVERITY, AND RESEARCH PRIORITIES. PMID:27469179

  3. Vitamin K supplementation for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Jagannath, Vanitha A; Fedorowicz, Zbys; Thaker, Vidhu; Chang, Anne B

    2015-01-18

    Cystic fibrosis is a genetic disorder which can lead to multiorgan dysfunction. Malabsorption of fat and fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E, K) may occur and can cause subclinical deficiencies of some of these vitamins. Vitamin K is known to play an important role in both blood coagulation and bone formation. Supplementation with vitamin K appears to be one way of addressing the deficiency, but there is very limited agreement on the appropriate dose and frequency of use of these supplements. To assess the effects of vitamin K supplementation in people with cystic fibrosis and to determine the optimal dose and route of administration of vitamin K for both routine and therapeutic use. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group's Trials Register comprising references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings.Most recent search: 08 October 2014. Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials of all preparations of vitamin K used as a supplement compared to either no supplementation (or placebo) at any dose or route and for any duration, in children or adults diagnosed with cystic fibrosis (by sweat test or genetic testing). Two authors independently screened papers, extracted trial details and assessed their risk of bias. Two trials (total of 32 participants) each lasting one month were included in the review and were assessed as having a moderate risk of bias. One was a dose-ranging parallel group trial in children (aged 8 to 18 years); and the other (with an older cohort) had a cross-over design comparing supplements to no treatment, but no separate data were reported for the first intervention period. Neither of the trials addressed any of the primary outcomes (coagulation, bone formation and quality of life). Both trials reported the restoration of serum vitamin K and undercarboxylated osteocalcin levels to the normal range after one month of

  4. [New therapeutic developments in cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Bui, S; Macey, J; Fayon, M; Bihouée, T; Burgel, P-R; Colomb, V; Corvol, H; Durieu, I; Hubert, D; Marguet, C; Mas, E; Munck, A; Murris-Espin, M; Reix, P; Sermet-Gaudelus, I

    2016-12-01

    Since the discovery of chloride secretion by the Cystic Fibrosis Transport regulator CFTR in 1983, and CFTR gene in 1989, knowledge about CFTR synthesis, maturation, intracellular transfer and function has dramatically expanded. These discoveries have led to the distribution of CF mutations into 6 classes with different pathophysiological mechanisms. In this article we will explore the state of art on CFTR synthesis and its chloride secretion function. We will then explore the consequences of the 6 classes of mutations on CFTR protein function and we will describe the new therapeutic developments aiming at correcting these defects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. [Cystic fibrosis: centers and care networks organization].

    PubMed

    Bellon, G

    2012-05-01

    More than 20 years after the gene discovery, without specific treatment, the observed improvement of the cystic fibrosis prognosis appears due to management's organization as well as early diagnosis (neonatal screening) or progress in symptomatic treatment. The CF Centers (CRCM) official recognition was a necessary step before generalization of routine neonatal screening (October, 2002). Actually French CF management relies on three levels of organization: CF centers, regional care networks and French CF Society, in close relationship with patients association (Vaincre la Mucoviscidose). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Genetic therapies for cystic fibrosis lung disease.

    PubMed

    Sinn, Patrick L; Anthony, Reshma M; McCray, Paul B

    2011-04-15

    The aim of gene therapy for cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease is to efficiently and safely express the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in the appropriate pulmonary cell types. Although CF patients experience multi-organ disease, the chronic bacterial lung infections and associated inflammation are the primary cause of shortened life expectancy. Gene transfer-based therapeutic approaches are feasible, in part, because the airway epithelium is directly accessible by aerosol delivery or instillation. Improvements in standard delivery vectors and the development of novel vectors, as well as emerging technologies and new animal models, are propelling exciting new research forward. Here, we review recent developments that are advancing this field of investigation.

  7. Vitamin D Deficiency in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Hall, William B.; Sparks, Amy A.; Aris, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis is the most common inherited genetic respiratory disorder in the Western World. Hypovitaminosis D is almost universal in CF patients, likely due to a combination of inadequate absorption, impaired metabolism, and lack of sun exposure. Inadequate levels are associated with the high prevalence of bone disease or osteoporosis in CF patients, which is associated with increased morbidity including fractures, kyphosis, and worsening pulmonary status. Treatment goals include regular monitoring 25 hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) levels with aggressive treatment for those with levels <75 nmol/L (<30 ng/mL). More research is needed to determine optimal supplementation goals and strategies. PMID:20148079

  8. Influenza immunization in children with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Adlard, P; Bryett, K

    1987-01-01

    Nineteen children with cystic fibrosis and aged between 5 and 13 years were randomized to receive two doses at monthly intervals of either a split-virion influenza vaccine (MFV-Ject, Institut Merieux) or a sub-unit vaccine (Fluvirin, Evans). In those completing the study, there was a satisfactory serological response. There was no statistically significant difference between the immunogenicity of the two vaccines as evaluated by haemagglutination inhibition or single radial haemolysis tests. The incidence of local side-effects was similar in the two groups.

  9. Vitamin K supplementation for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Jagannath, Vanitha A; Thaker, Vidhu; Chang, Anne B; Price, Amy I

    2017-08-22

    Cystic fibrosis is a genetic disorder which can lead to multiorgan dysfunction. Malabsorption of fat and fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E, K) may occur and can cause subclinical deficiencies of some of these vitamins. Vitamin K is known to play an important role in both blood coagulation and bone formation. Supplementation with vitamin K appears to be one way of addressing the deficiency, but there is very limited agreement on the appropriate dose and frequency of use of these supplements. This is an updated version of the review. To assess the effects of vitamin K supplementation in people with cystic fibrosis and to determine the optimal dose and route of administration of vitamin K for both routine and therapeutic use. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group's Trials Register comprising references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings.Most recent search: 30 January 2017. Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials of all preparations of vitamin K used as a supplement compared to either no supplementation (or placebo) at any dose or route and for any duration, in children or adults diagnosed with cystic fibrosis (by sweat test or genetic testing). Two authors independently screened papers, extracted trial details and assessed their risk of bias. Two trials (total of 32 participants) each lasting one month were included in the review and were assessed as having a moderate risk of bias. One was a dose-ranging parallel group trial in children (aged 8 to 18 years); and the other (with an older cohort) had a cross-over design comparing supplements to no treatment, but no separate data were reported for the first intervention period. Neither of the trials addressed any of the primary outcomes (coagulation, bone formation and quality of life). Both trials reported the restoration of serum vitamin K and undercarboxylated osteocalcin

  10. The Changing Microbial Epidemiology in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    LiPuma, John J.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Infection of the airways remains the primary cause of morbidity and mortality in persons with cystic fibrosis (CF). This review describes salient features of the epidemiologies of microbial species that are involved in respiratory tract infection in CF. The apparently expanding spectrum of species causing infection in CF and recent changes in the incidences and prevalences of infection due to specific bacterial, fungal, and viral species are described. The challenges inherent in tracking and interpreting rates of infection in this patient population are discussed. PMID:20375354

  11. Cystic fibrosis: need for mass deployable screening methods.

    PubMed

    Sengar, Aditya Singh; Agarwal, Anirudh; Singh, Manish K

    2014-10-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. CFTR is a member of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette superfamily of proteins and it functions as a chloride channel. CFTR largely controls the working of epithelial cells of the airways, the gastrointestinal tract, exocrine glands, and genitourinary system. Cystic fibrosis is responsible for severe chronic pulmonary disorders in children. Other maladies in the spectrum of this life-limiting disorder include nasal polyposis, pansinusitis, rectal prolapse, pancreatitis, cholelithiasis, insulin-dependent hyperglycemia, and cirrhosis. This review summarizes the recent state of art in the field of cystic fibrosis diagnostic methods with the help of CF literature published so far and proposes new research domains in the field of cystic fibrosis diagnosis.

  12. Pain is an underestimated symptom in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Masson, Alexandra; Kirszembaum, Maya; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle

    2017-08-12

    Life expectancy is increasing in cystic fibrosis and new aspects of the disease have to be taken into account in cystic fibrosis care. Pain is encountered among 70% of adult and pediatric patients with cystic fibrosis. This symptom is underestimated by the multidisciplinary team. It has been reported as impacting quality of life and adherence to treatments. The location of pain is inconstant among the different studies but the major symptoms are headaches, gastrointestinal, and chest pain. Pain is different for each patient and requires careful evaluation using questionnaires some of which specifically developed for patients with cystic fibrosis. Medical and nonmedical treatment such as ostheopathy or sophrology may relieve pain symptoms but have to be adjusted in the frame of a global personalized care. Pain maybe an underestimated symptom among patients with cystic fibrosis and impacts negatively on quality of life. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

  13. Blunted perception of neural respiratory drive and breathlessness in patients with cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Jolley, Caroline J.; Elston, Caroline; Moxham, John; Rafferty, Gerrard F.

    2016-01-01

    The electromyogram recorded from the diaphragm (EMGdi) and parasternal intercostal muscle using surface electrodes (sEMGpara) provides a measure of neural respiratory drive (NRD), the magnitude of which reflects lung disease severity in stable cystic fibrosis. The aim of this study was to explore perception of NRD and breathlessness in both healthy individuals and patients with cystic fibrosis. Given chronic respiratory loading and increased NRD in cystic fibrosis, often in the absence of breathlessness at rest, we hypothesised that patients with cystic fibrosis would be able to tolerate higher levels of NRD for a given level of breathlessness compared to healthy individuals during exercise. 15 cystic fibrosis patients (mean forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) 53.5% predicted) and 15 age-matched, healthy controls were studied. Spirometry was measured in all subjects and lung volumes measured in the cystic fibrosis patients. EMGdi and sEMGpara were recorded at rest and during incremental cycle exercise to exhaustion and expressed as a percentage of maximum (% max) obtained from maximum respiratory manoeuvres. Borg breathlessness scores were recorded at rest and during each minute of exercise. EMGdi % max and sEMGpara % max and associated Borg breathlessness scores differed significantly between healthy subjects and cystic fibrosis patients at rest and during exercise. The relationship between EMGdi % max and sEMGpara % max and Borg score was shifted to the right in the cystic fibrosis patients, such that at comparable levels of EMGdi % max and sEMGpara % max the cystic fibrosis patients reported significantly lower Borg breathlessness scores compared to the healthy individuals. At Borg score 1 (clinically significant increase in breathlessness from baseline) corresponding levels of EMGdi % max (20.2±12% versus 32.15±15%, p=0.02) and sEMGpara % max (18.9±8% versus 29.2±15%, p=0.04) were lower in the healthy individuals compared to the cystic fibrosis

  14. Blunted perception of neural respiratory drive and breathlessness in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Charles C; Jolley, Caroline J; Elston, Caroline; Moxham, John; Rafferty, Gerrard F

    2016-01-01

    The electromyogram recorded from the diaphragm (EMGdi) and parasternal intercostal muscle using surface electrodes (sEMGpara) provides a measure of neural respiratory drive (NRD), the magnitude of which reflects lung disease severity in stable cystic fibrosis. The aim of this study was to explore perception of NRD and breathlessness in both healthy individuals and patients with cystic fibrosis. Given chronic respiratory loading and increased NRD in cystic fibrosis, often in the absence of breathlessness at rest, we hypothesised that patients with cystic fibrosis would be able to tolerate higher levels of NRD for a given level of breathlessness compared to healthy individuals during exercise. 15 cystic fibrosis patients (mean forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) 53.5% predicted) and 15 age-matched, healthy controls were studied. Spirometry was measured in all subjects and lung volumes measured in the cystic fibrosis patients. EMGdi and sEMGpara were recorded at rest and during incremental cycle exercise to exhaustion and expressed as a percentage of maximum (% max) obtained from maximum respiratory manoeuvres. Borg breathlessness scores were recorded at rest and during each minute of exercise. EMGdi % max and sEMGpara % max and associated Borg breathlessness scores differed significantly between healthy subjects and cystic fibrosis patients at rest and during exercise. The relationship between EMGdi % max and sEMGpara % max and Borg score was shifted to the right in the cystic fibrosis patients, such that at comparable levels of EMGdi % max and sEMGpara % max the cystic fibrosis patients reported significantly lower Borg breathlessness scores compared to the healthy individuals. At Borg score 1 (clinically significant increase in breathlessness from baseline) corresponding levels of EMGdi % max (20.2±12% versus 32.15±15%, p=0.02) and sEMGpara % max (18.9±8% versus 29.2±15%, p=0.04) were lower in the healthy individuals compared to the cystic fibrosis

  15. Early severe anemia as the first sign of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Sismanlar, Tugba; Aslan, Ayşe Tana; Köse, Mehmet; Pekcan, Sevgi; Ezgü, Fatih Süheyl; Budakoğlu, Işıl İrem; Yenicesu, İdil

    2016-09-01

    Severe anemia is reported to occur rarely in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). This study aimed to determine the factors associated with early severe anemia in infants with CF. This study included 231 infants with CF from 3 pediatric CF centers ten year period that were retrospectively reviewed in terms of severe anemia as the first sign of CF. Factors that could affect anemia, such as age, pancreatic insufficiency, mutations, vitamin A and E, and albumin level were evaluated. Clinical and laboratory findings in CF patients that presented with severe anemia and no respiratory symptoms were compared to those in CF patients that did not present with severe anemia. Severe anemia as the first sign of CF was noted in 17 of 231 patients. Patient age, prolonged PT/INR and the albumin level differed significantly between the 2 groups of patients (P < 0.001). Feeding pattern, pancreatic insufficiency, vitamin E and A levels, and the types of genetic mutations did not differ between the 2 groups. The mean hemoglobin level was 5.59 ± 0.21 g/dL and respiratory symptoms began a mean 6.3 months after diagnosis of CF in the anemia group. In early infancy severe anemia in the absence of respiratory symptoms can be the first sign of CF. CF should be considered in the differential diagnosis of severe anemia in infants. Anemia can occur several months before respiratory symptoms in patients with CF and may be caused due to several reasons. • Severe anemia as a first sign is reported to occur rarely in patients with cystic fibrosis. • Although anemia is well known in cystic fibrosis, factors that cause severe anemia are not known clearly. What is New: • This study shows the importance of severe anemia as the first sign of cystic fibrosis. • Anemia can occur several months before respiratory symptoms in patients with CF.

  16. Personalized medicine for cystic fibrosis: establishing human model systems.

    PubMed

    Mou, Hongmei; Brazauskas, Karissa; Rajagopal, Jayaraj

    2015-10-01

    With over 1,500 identifiable mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene that result in distinct functional and phenotypical abnormalities, it is virtually impossible to perform randomized clinical trials to identify the best therapeutics for all patients. Therefore, a personalized medicine approach is essential. The only way to realistically accomplish this is through the development of improved in vitro human model systems. The lack of a readily available and infinite supply of human CFTR-expressing airway epithelial cells is a key bottleneck. We propose that a concerted two-pronged approach is necessary for patient-specific cystic fibrosis research to continue to prosper and realize its potential: (1) more effective culture and differentiation conditions for growing primary human airway and nasal epithelial cells and (2) the development of collective protocols for efficiently differentiating disease- and patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) into pure populations of adult epithelial cells. Ultimately, we need a personalized human model system for cystic fibrosis with the capacity for uncomplicated bankability, widespread availability, and universal applicability for patient-specific disease modeling, novel pharmacotherapy investigation and screening, and readily executable genetic modification. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Normalization of sweat chloride concentration and clinical improvement with ivacaftor in a patient with cystic fibrosis with mutation S549N.

    PubMed

    McGarry, Meghan E; Nielson, Dennis W

    2013-10-01

    The cystic fibrosis (CF) protein forms an anion channel in epithelial cells, and the absence or defective function of this channel results in the clinical manifestations of CF. CF is an autosomal recessive disorder, and its many disease-causing mutations divide into five or six classes. There are 10 known class 3 gating mutations, the most common of which is G551D. Ivacaftor is a drug that in vitro increases open time and transepithelial chloride transport in all 10 gating mutations, but it is approved for use only in patients with the G551D mutation. We report complete normalization of sweat chloride concentration and rapid clinical improvement over 6 weeks of treatment with ivacaftor in a patient with CF with the gating mutation S549N. The findings suggest that ivacaftor should be considered for use in patients with any of the known gating mutations.

  18. Influenza-associated cystic fibrosis pulmonary exacerbations.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Justin R; Neuzil, Kathleen M; Victor, John C; Wald, Anna; Aitken, Moira L; Goss, Christopher H

    2010-04-01

    Although cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common inherited respiratory disease, the burden of influenza among individuals with CF is not well characterized. We used the CF Foundation Patient Registry to determine the relationship between pulmonary exacerbation incidence rate and influenza virus season from July 2003 through June 2007. The outcome of interest, pulmonary exacerbation, was defined as treatment of a respiratory illness with IV antibiotics. Each influenza season was defined as all months during which >/= 15% of laboratory tests for influenza virus were positive in the US influenza virologic surveillance system. We calculated incidence rates of pulmonary exacerbation during the influenza and summertime seasons as well as relative rates with 95% CIs. A multivariate regression model adjusted for demographic and clinical predictors. In 2003, the patient cohort size was 21,506 patients, and 7,727 patients experienced at least one pulmonary exacerbation. The overall pulmonary exacerbation incidence rate in the influenza season was 595.0 per 10,000 person-months compared with a summertime baseline of 549.6 per 10,000 person-months. The incidence rate ratio was 1.08 (95% CI: 1.06, 1.10). Multivariate analysis did not change our estimate of risk (adjusted odds ratio: 1.07; 95% CI: 1.05, 1.10). An estimated annual excess of 147.6 per 10,000 person-months or an excess 2.1% of total exacerbations occur during the influenza season. Our data demonstrate a substantial contribution of the influenza season to CF morbidity. Further studies to determine any causal link between influenza infection and CF pulmonary exacerbations are necessary.

  19. Cystic Fibrosis in the African Diaspora.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Cheryl; Pepper, Michael S

    2017-01-01

    Identifying mutations that cause cystic fibrosis (CF) is important for making an early, unambiguous diagnosis, which, in turn, is linked to better health and a greater life expectancy. In patients of African descent, a molecular diagnosis is often confounded by the fact that the majority of investigations undertaken to identify causative mutations have been conducted on European populations, and CF-causing mutations tend to be population specific. We undertook a survey of published data with the aim of identifying causative CF mutations in patients of African descent in the Americas. We found that 1,584 chromosomes had been tested in only 6 countries, of which 876 alleles (55.3%) still remained unidentified. There were 59 mutations identified. Of those, 41 have been shown to cause CF, 17 have no associated functional studies, and one (R117H) is of varying clinical consequence. The most common mutations identified in the patients of African descent were: ΔF508 (29.4% identified in the United States, Colombia, Brazil, and Venezuela); 3120 + 1G>A (8.4% identified in Brazil, the United States, and Colombia); G85E (3.8% identified in Brazil); 1811 + 1.6kbA>G (3.7% identified in Colombia); and 1342 - 1G>C (3.1% identified in the United States). The majority of the mutations identified (81.4%) have been described in just one country. Our findings indicate that there is a need to fully characterize the spectrum of CF mutations in the diaspora to improve diagnostic accuracy for these patients and facilitate treatment.

  20. Diagnosis of Cystic Fibrosis in Screened Populations.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Philip M; White, Terry B; Howenstine, Michelle S; Munck, Anne; Parad, Richard B; Rosenfeld, Margaret; Sommerburg, Olaf; Accurso, Frank J; Davies, Jane C; Rock, Michael J; Sanders, Don B; Wilschanski, Michael; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Blau, Hannah; Gartner, Silvia; McColley, Susanna A

    2017-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) can be difficult to diagnose, even when newborn screening (NBS) tests yield positive results. This challenge is exacerbated by the multitude of NBS protocols, misunderstandings about screening vs diagnostic tests, and the lack of guidelines for presumptive diagnoses. There is also confusion regarding the designation of age at diagnosis. To improve diagnosis and achieve standardization in definitions worldwide, the CF Foundation convened a committee of 32 experts with a mission to develop clear and actionable consensus guidelines on diagnosis of CF with an emphasis on screened populations, especially the newborn population. A comprehensive literature review was performed with emphasis on relevant articles published during the past decade. After reviewing the common screening protocols and outcome scenarios, 14 of 27 consensus statements were drafted that apply to screened populations. These were approved by 80% or more of the participants. It is recommended that all diagnoses be established by demonstrating dysfunction of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channel, initially with a sweat chloride test and, when needed, potentially with newer methods assessing membrane transport directly, such as intestinal current measurements. Even in babies with 2 CF-causing mutations detected via NBS, diagnosis must be confirmed by demonstrating CFTR dysfunction. The committee also recommends that the latest classifications identified in the Clinical and Functional Translation of CFTR project [http://www.cftr2.org/index.php] should be used to aid with CF diagnosis. Finally, to avoid delays in treatment, we provide guidelines for presumptive diagnoses and recommend how to determine the age of diagnosis. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Maintenance of nutritional status in patients with cystic fibrosis: new and emerging therapies.

    PubMed

    Kalnins, Daina; Wilschanski, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Poor clinical outcomes in cystic fibrosis are often associated with undernutrition. Normal growth and development should be achieved in cystic fibrosis, and nutritional counseling is paramount at all ages. Prevention and early detection of growth failure is the key to successful nutritional intervention. The advance in nutritional management is certainly one factor that has contributed to the improved survival in recent decades. This review outlines the major nutritional parameters in the management of the patient with cystic fibrosis, including recent advances in pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy and fat-soluble vitamin therapy. There are sections on complicated clinical situations which directly affect nutrition, for example, before and after lung transplantation, cystic fibrosis-related diabetes, and bone health.

  2. Maintenance of nutritional status in patients with cystic fibrosis: new and emerging therapies

    PubMed Central

    Kalnins, Daina; Wilschanski, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Poor clinical outcomes in cystic fibrosis are often associated with undernutrition. Normal growth and development should be achieved in cystic fibrosis, and nutritional counseling is paramount at all ages. Prevention and early detection of growth failure is the key to successful nutritional intervention. The advance in nutritional management is certainly one factor that has contributed to the improved survival in recent decades. This review outlines the major nutritional parameters in the management of the patient with cystic fibrosis, including recent advances in pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy and fat-soluble vitamin therapy. There are sections on complicated clinical situations which directly affect nutrition, for example, before and after lung transplantation, cystic fibrosis-related diabetes, and bone health. PMID:22787388

  3. [Technical aspects and relevance of energy expenditure and physical activity assessment in clinical research for cystic fibrosis patients].

    PubMed

    Béghin, L; Michaud, L; Turck, D; Gottrand, F

    2005-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is characterized by deteriorating lung function and mal-digestion, which result in growth failure and/or under-nutrition. Several factors, alone or combined, contribute to malnutrition in CF: poor energy intake, elevation of energy loss as a result of malabsorption, increasing resting energy expenditure due to genetic mutation and/or pulmonary exacerbation. Several techniques have been used to assess energy expenditure and physical activity in order to better understand mechanisms of malnutrition in CF and follow therapeutic interventions. Indirect calorimetry (IC) studies have shown that resting energy expenditure (REE) was 10-22% higher than predictive values. This increase could be attributed to chronic inflammation as a result of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) infection. Indeed, intravenous antibiotic therapy decreases REE. Doubly labelled water technique and heart rate monitoring calibrated against IC techniques shows that total energy expenditure (TEE) was not different than in healthy children. Physical activity level assessed by the ratio TEE-REE is also not different between CF of healthy children. Recently, new accelerometry technics, easier to use and less invasive have been successfully used in order to assess physical activity level in CF. Precise and ambulatory assessment of energy expenditure and physical activity permit to check and adapt dietary allowances in CF. These techniques could be simultaneously used and be helpful to assess efficacy of intervention studies.

  4. Low Glycaemic Index Dietary Interventions in Youth with Cystic Fibrosis: A Systematic Review and Discussion of the Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Balzer, Ben W. R.; Graham, Christie L.; Craig, Maria E.; Selvadurai, Hiran; Donaghue, Kim C.; Brand-Miller, Jennie C.; Steinbeck, Kate S.

    2012-01-01

    A systematic review was conducted to assess what is known about the effect of low glycaemic index (GI) diets on glycaemic control, weight and quality of life in youth with cystic fibrosis (CF). Eligibility criteria were systematic reviews, randomised and non-randomised trials of low GI dietary interventions in CF. Outcomes examined were glycaemic control, quality of life, anthropometry and respiratory function. Reference lists were manually searched and experts in the field were consulted. Four studies met the eligibility criteria; two were excluded because they did not include data on any of the outcomes. The remaining two were studies that examined GI secondary to any other intervention: one used GI as a factor in enteral feeds and the other incorporated low GI dietary education into its treatment methodology. There is insufficient evidence to recommend use of low GI diets in CF. Since there is evidence to support use of low GI diets in type 1, type 2 and gestational diabetes, low GI diets should be tested as an intervention for CF. The potential risks and benefits of a low GI diet in CF are discussed. PMID:22606371

  5. Low glycaemic index dietary interventions in youth with cystic fibrosis: a systematic review and discussion of the clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Balzer, Ben W R; Graham, Christie L; Craig, Maria E; Selvadurai, Hiran; Donaghue, Kim C; Brand-Miller, Jennie C; Steinbeck, Kate S

    2012-04-01

    A systematic review was conducted to assess what is known about the effect of low glycaemic index (GI) diets on glycaemic control, weight and quality of life in youth with cystic fibrosis (CF). Eligibility criteria were systematic reviews, randomised and non-randomised trials of low GI dietary interventions in CF. Outcomes examined were glycaemic control, quality of life, anthropometry and respiratory function. Reference lists were manually searched and experts in the field were consulted. Four studies met the eligibility criteria; two were excluded because they did not include data on any of the outcomes. The remaining two were studies that examined GI secondary to any other intervention: one used GI as a factor in enteral feeds and the other incorporated low GI dietary education into its treatment methodology. There is insufficient evidence to recommend use of low GI diets in CF. Since there is evidence to support use of low GI diets in type 1, type 2 and gestational diabetes, low GI diets should be tested as an intervention for CF. The potential risks and benefits of a low GI diet in CF are discussed.

  6. Chest CT Features of Cystic Fibrosis in Korea: Comparison with Non-Cystic Fibrosis Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yang, So Yeon; Cha, Min Jae; Kim, Tae Jung; Kim, Tae Sung; Yoon, Hyun Jung

    2017-01-01

    Objective Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a rare congenital disease in Korea, and its clinical and imaging findings are unclear. The objective of our study was to describe the clinical and CT features of CF in Korea and compare its features with those of other diseases mimicking CF. Materials and Methods From November 1994 to December 2014, a presumptive diagnosis of CF was made in 23 patients based on clinical or radiological examination. After the exclusion of 10 patients without diagnostic confirmation, 13 patients were included in the study. A diagnosis of CF was made with the CF gene study. CT findings were evaluated for the presence and distribution of parenchymal abnormalities including bronchiectasis, tree-in-bud (TIB) pattern, mucus plugging, consolidation, and mosaic attenuation. Results Of the 13 patients, 7 (median age, 15 years) were confirmed as CF, 4 (median age, 19 years) had primary ciliary dyskinesia, 1 had bronchiectasis of unknown cause, and 1 had chronic asthma. CT of patients with CF showed bilateral bronchiectasis, TIB pattern, mosaic attenuation, and mucus plugging in all patients, with upper lung predominance (57%). In CT of the non-CF patients, bilateral bronchiectasis, TIB pattern, mosaic attenuation, and mucus plugging were also predominant features, with lower lung predominance (50%). Conclusion Korean patients with CF showed bilateral bronchiectasis, cellular bronchiolitis, mucus plugging, and mosaic attenuation, which overlapped with those of non-CF patients. CF gene study is recommended for the definitive diagnosis of CF in patients with these clinical and imaging features. PMID:28096734

  7. Topical cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene replacement for cystic fibrosis-related lung disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tim W R; Southern, Kevin W; Perry, Luke A; Penny-Dimri, Jahan C; Aslam, Aisha A

    2016-06-17

    Cystic fibrosis is caused by a defective gene encoding a protein called the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), and is characterised by chronic lung infection resulting in inflammation and progressive lung damage that results in a reduced life expectancy. To determine whether topical CFTR gene replacement therapy to the lungs in people with cystic fibrosis is associated with improvements in clinical outcomes, and to assess any adverse effects. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register comprising references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches, handsearching relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings.Date of most recent search: 05 May 2016.An additional search of the National Institutes for Health (NIH) Genetic Modification Clinical Research Information System (GeMCRIS) was also performed for the years 1992 to 2015.Date of most recent search: 20 April 2016. Randomised controlled studies comparing topical CFTR gene delivery to the lung, using either viral or non-viral delivery systems, with placebo or an alternative delivery system in people with confirmed cystic fibrosis. The authors independently extracted data and assessed study quality. Authors of included studies were contacted and asked for any available additional data. Meta-analysis was limited due to differing study designs. Four randomised controlled studies met the inclusion criteria for this review, involving a total of 302 participants lasting from 29 days to 13 months; 14 studies were excluded. The included studies differed in terms of CFTR gene replacement agent and study design, which limited the meta-analysis. One study only enrolled adult males, the remaining studies included both males and females aged 12 years and over.Risk of bias in the studies was moderate. Random sequence generation and allocation concealment was only described in the more recent study; the remaining three studies were

  8. Variable weight training in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Strauss, G D; Osher, A; Wang, C I; Goodrich, E; Gold, F; Colman, W; Stabile, M; Dobrenchuk, A; Keens, T G

    1987-08-01

    A six-month pilot study of variable weight training (VWT) was undertaken to assess its impact on body weight, pulmonary function, muscle size and strength, and social function in 12 adolescent and adult patients with moderately severe cystic fibrosis. Exercise for patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) has often been recommended as an adjunct to physical therapy, although aerobic exercise has not resulted in weight gain in CF. Compared to a three-month control period, six months of VWT resulted in significant increase in weight (2.88 kg, p less than .02), muscle size (1.6 to 1.8 cm upper arm, p less than .01), strength (increase from 16 to 32 muscle groups at normal strength, p less than .005), and decrease in residual volume (1.77 L, p less than .03) and RV/TLC (12.4 percent, p less than .02). There was no significant improvement in other measures of pulmonary or social function. VWT appears to be a form of exercise in which even moderately ill CF patients can engage safely, leading to desired weight gain and increased strength. These results warrant further study of the effects of VWT on pulmonary function and CF morbidity.

  9. Cystic fibrosis mortality trends in France.

    PubMed

    Bellis, Gil; Cazes, Marie-Hélène; Parant, Alain; Gaimard, Maryse; Travers, Cécile; Le Roux, Evelyne; Ravilly, Sophie; Rault, Gilles

    2007-05-01

    In 1992 France set up a national cystic fibrosis observatory (Observatoire national de la mucoviscidose, ONM) to monitor the state of health of patients on an annual basis. Using the ONM data, this study estimates the main indicators for life expectancy and assesses the total number of cystic fibrosis patients. The data for the years 1994 to 2003 are divided into 3-year periods. Life tables are drawn up for these periods, from which mean and median lengths of life are determined. Using the most recent life table, the number of births in 2003 and the incidence of the disease, the total population of patients can be estimated, assuming a stationary population. In 2001-2003, life expectancy at birth of patients registered with the ONM was 39.1 years and median length of life was 36.4 years. These results, substantially better than those of 1994-1996, are linked to improved conditions of patient inclusion in the ONM database, to improvements in their healthcare, but also to the limitations of the life tables. Based on the 2003 data, the total theoretical number of patients is 6490, and coverage by the ONM database is thus 63.2%. These provisional results demonstrate the need to convert the ONM observatory into a registry providing exhaustive coverage of all patients.

  10. Comparative biology of cystic fibrosis animal models.

    PubMed

    Fisher, John T; Zhang, Yulong; Engelhardt, John F

    2011-01-01

    Animal models of human diseases are critical for dissecting mechanisms of pathophysiology and developing therapies. In the context of cystic fibrosis (CF), mouse models have been the dominant species by which to study CF disease processes in vivo for the past two decades. Although much has been learned through these CF mouse models, limitations in the ability of this species to recapitulate spontaneous lung disease and several other organ abnormalities seen in CF humans have created a need for additional species on which to study CF. To this end, pig and ferret CF models have been generated by somatic cell nuclear transfer and are currently being characterized. These new larger animal models have phenotypes that appear to closely resemble human CF disease seen in newborns, and efforts to characterize their adult phenotypes are ongoing. This chapter will review current knowledge about comparative lung cell biology and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) biology among mice, pigs, and ferrets that has implications for CF disease modeling in these species. We will focus on methods used to compare the biology and function of CFTR between these species and their relevance to phenotypes seen in the animal models. These cross-species comparisons and the development of both the pig and the ferret CF models may help elucidate pathophysiologic mechanisms of CF lung disease and lead to new therapeutic approaches.

  11. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR)

    PubMed Central

    Corradi, Valentina; Vergani, Paola; Tieleman, D. Peter

    2015-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily. CFTR controls the flow of anions through the apical membrane of epithelia. Dysfunctional CFTR causes the common lethal genetic disease cystic fibrosis. Transitions between open and closed states of CFTR are regulated by ATP binding and hydrolysis on the cytosolic nucleotide binding domains, which are coupled with the transmembrane (TM) domains forming the pathway for anion permeation. Lack of structural data hampers a global understanding of CFTR and thus the development of “rational” approaches directly targeting defective CFTR. In this work, we explored possible conformational states of the CFTR gating cycle by means of homology modeling. As templates, we used structures of homologous ABC transporters, namely TM(287–288), ABC-B10, McjD, and Sav1866. In the light of published experimental results, structural analysis of the transmembrane cavity suggests that the TM(287–288)-based CFTR model could correspond to a commonly occupied closed state, whereas the McjD-based model could represent an open state. The models capture the important role played by Phe-337 as a filter/gating residue and provide structural information on the conformational transition from closed to open channel. PMID:26229102

  12. Targeting ion channels in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Mall, Marcus A; Galietta, Luis J V

    2015-09-01

    Mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene cause a characteristic defect in epithelial ion transport that plays a central role in the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis (CF). Hence, pharmacological correction of this ion transport defect by targeting of mutant CFTR, or alternative ion channels that may compensate for CFTR dysfunction, has long been considered as an attractive approach to a causal therapy of this life-limiting disease. The recent introduction of the CFTR potentiator ivacaftor into the therapy of a subgroup of patients with specific CFTR mutations was a major milestone and enormous stimulus for seeking effective ion transport modulators for all patients with CF. In this review, we discuss recent breakthroughs and setbacks with CFTR modulators designed to rescue mutant CFTR including the common mutation F508del. Further, we examine the alternative chloride channels TMEM16A and SLC26A9, as well as the epithelial sodium channel ENaC as alternative targets in CF lung disease, which remains the major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with CF. Finally, we will focus on the hurdles that still need to be overcome to make effective ion transport modulation therapies available for all patients with CF irrespective of their CFTR genotype.

  13. Cystic Fibrosis and the Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Reznikov, Leah R

    2017-05-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-shortening autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). CFTR is an anion channel that conducts bicarbonate and chloride across cell membranes. Although defective anion transport across epithelial cells is accepted as the basic defect in CF, many of the features observed in people with CF and organs affected by CF are modulated by the nervous system. This is of interest because CFTR expression has been reported in both the peripheral and central nervous systems, and it is well known that the transport of anions, such as chloride, greatly modulates neuronal excitability. Thus it is predicted that in CF, lack of CFTR in the nervous system affects neuronal function. Consistent with this prediction, several nervous system abnormalities and nervous system disorders have been described in people with CF and in animal models of CF. The goal of this special feature article is to highlight the expression and function of CFTR in the nervous system. Special emphasis is placed on nervous system abnormalities described in people with CF and in animal models of CF. Finally, features of CF that may be modulated by or attributed to faulty nervous system function are discussed. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Imaging the Abdominal Manifestations of Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, S.; Chan, V. O.; Ridge, C. A.

    2017-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a multisystem disease with a range of abdominal manifestations including those involving the liver, pancreas, and kidneys. Recent advances in management of the respiratory complications of the disease has led to a greater life expectancy in patients with CF. Subsequently, there is increasing focus on the impact of abdominal disease on quality of life and survival. Liver cirrhosis is the most important extrapulmonary cause of death in CF, yet significant challenges remain in the diagnosis of CF related liver disease. The capacity to predict those patients at risk of developing cirrhosis remains a significant challenge. We review representative abdominal imaging findings in patients with CF selected from the records of two academic health centres, with a view to increasing familiarity with the abdominal manifestations of the disease. We review their presentation and expected imaging findings, with a focus on the challenges facing diagnosis of the hepatic manifestations of the disease. An increased familiarity with these abdominal manifestations will facilitate timely diagnosis and management, which is paramount to further improving outcomes for patients with cystic fibrosis. PMID:28250993

  15. European Cystic Fibrosis Society Standards of Care: Framework for the Cystic Fibrosis Centre.

    PubMed

    Conway, Steven; Balfour-Lynn, Ian M; De Rijcke, Karleen; Drevinek, Pavel; Foweraker, Juliet; Havermans, Trudy; Heijerman, Harry; Lannefors, Louise; Lindblad, Anders; Macek, Milan; Madge, Sue; Moran, Maeve; Morrison, Lisa; Morton, Alison; Noordhoek, Jacquelien; Sands, Dorota; Vertommen, Anneke; Peckham, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    A significant increase in life expectancy in successive birth cohorts of people with cystic fibrosis (CF) is a result of more effective treatment for the disease. It is also now widely recognized that outcomes for patients cared for in specialist CF Centres are better than for those who are not. Key to the effectiveness of the specialist CF Centre is the multidisciplinary team (MDT), which should include consultants, clinical nurse specialist, microbiologist, physiotherapist, dietitian, pharmacist, clinical psychologist, social worker, clinical geneticist and allied healthcare professionals, all of whom should be experienced in CF care. Members of the MDT are also expected to keep up to date with developments in CF through continued professional development, attendance at conferences, auditing and involvement in research. Specialists CF Centres should also network with other Centres both nationally and internationally, and feed Centre data to registries in order to further the understanding of the disease. This paper provides a framework for the specialist CF Centre, including the organisation of the Centre and the individual roles of MDT members, as well as highlighting the value of CF organisations and disease registries.

  16. Clinical spectrum in homozygotes and compound heterozygotes inheriting cystic fibrosis mutation 3849+10kbC>T: Significance for geneticists

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, F.; Li, Zhen; Arzimanoglou, I.

    1995-09-25

    We describe patients inheriting cystic fibrosis (CF) mutation 3849+10kbC>T as homozygotes or compound heterozygotes. Three unrelated homozygotes for this mutation were all pancreatic-sufficient and sweat test-negative or inconclusive. Among the compound heterozygotes, both pancreatic sufficiency and insufficiency, as well as positive and negative/inconclusive sweat test results are reported, expanding the range of clinical expression associated with inheritance of this mutation. 3849+10kbC>T is one of several CF mutations that can result in atypical or variant forms of CF. For geneticists, the diagnosis of variant CF has implications for recurrence risk and prognosis counseling of the families of affected individuals, and possibly for CF carrier screening in the general population. 19 refs., 1 tab.

  17. Improved clinical and radiographic outcomes after treatment with ivacaftor in a young adult with cystic fibrosis with the P67L CFTR mutation.

    PubMed

    Yousef, Shatha; Solomon, George M; Brody, Alan; Rowe, Steven M; Colin, Andrew A

    2015-03-01

    The underlying cause of cystic fibrosis (CF) is the loss of epithelial chloride and bicarbonate transport due to mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene encoding the CFTR protein. Ivacaftor is a gene-specific CFTR potentiator that augments in vivo chloride transport in CFTR mutations affecting channel gating. Originally approved for the G511D CFTR mutation, ivacaftor is now approved for eight additional alleles exhibiting gating defects and has also been tested in R117H, a CFTR mutation with residual function that exhibits abnormal gating. P67L is a class 4 conductance (nongating) mutation exhibiting residual CFTR function. We report marked clinical improvement, normalization of spirometry, and dramatic reduction in radiographic structural airway changes after > 1 year of treatment with ivacaftor in a young adult with the compound heterozygous genotype P67L/F508del CFTR. The case suggests that ivacaftor may have a potential benefit for patients with CF with nongating mutations.

  18. Recombinant Human DNase I Reduces the Viscosity of Cystic Fibrosis Sputum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shak, Steven; Capon, Daniel J.; Hellmiss, Renate; Marsters, Scot A.; Baker, Carrie L.

    1990-12-01

    Respiratory distress and progressive lung destruction in cystic fibrosis can be attributed to bacterial persistence and the accumulation of viscous purulent secretions in the airways. More than 30 yr ago it was suggested that the large amounts of DNA in purulent secretions contribute to its viscosity and that bovine pancreatic DNase I could reduce the viscosity. To evaluate the potential clinical utility of recombinant human DNase I (rhDNase) in the treatment of cystic fibrosis, we have cloned, sequenced, and expressed rhDNase. Catalytic amounts of rhDNase greatly reduce the viscosity of purulent cystic fibrosis sputum, transforming it within minutes from a nonflowing viscous gel to a flowing liquid. The reduction in viscosity is associated with a decrease in size of DNA in the sputum. Inhalation of a rhDNase aerosol may be a simple direct approach that will help individuals with cystic fibrosis and other patients with pneumonia or bronchitis to clear their airways of purulent secretions.

  19. Hyponatremia-associated rhabdomyolysis following exercise in an adolescent with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Kaskavage, Jillian; Sklansky, Daniel

    2012-07-01

    Adolescents with well-controlled cystic fibrosis, including good lung function and appropriate growth, commonly participate in competitive athletic activities. We present the case of an adolescent male with cystic fibrosis, hyponatremia, dehydration, and rhabdomyolysis after participating in football practice on a summer morning. The patient presented with severe myalgia and serum sodium of 129 mmol/L, chloride 90 mmol/L, and creatine phosphokinase 1146 U/L. Aggressive hydration with intravenous 0.9% saline resulted in clinical improvement with no renal or muscular sequelae. Health care providers need to educate patients with cystic fibrosis about maintaining adequate hydration and sodium repletion during exercise. Research is needed regarding the appropriate amount and composition of oral rehydration fluids in exercising individuals with cystic fibrosis, as the physiology encountered in these patients provides a unique challenge to maintaining electrolyte balance and stimulation of thirst.

  20. Risk factors for bronchiectasis in children with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Sly, Peter D; Gangell, Catherine L; Chen, Linping; Ware, Robert S; Ranganathan, Sarath; Mott, Lauren S; Murray, Conor P; Stick, Stephen M

    2013-05-23

    Bronchiectasis develops early in the course of cystic fibrosis, being detectable in infants as young as 10 weeks of age, and is persistent and progressive. We sought to determine risk factors for the onset of bronchiectasis, using data collected by the Australian Respiratory Early Surveillance Team for Cystic Fibrosis (AREST CF) intensive surveillance program. We examined data from 127 consecutive infants who received a diagnosis of cystic fibrosis after newborn screening. Chest computed tomography (CT) and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) were performed, while the children were in stable clinical condition, at 3 months and 1, 2, and 3 years of age. Longitudinal data were used to determine risk factors associated with the detection of bronchiectasis from 3 months to 3 years of age. The point prevalence of bronchiectasis at each visit increased from 29.3% at 3 months of age to 61.5% at 3 years of age. In multivariate analyses, risk factors for bronchiectasis were presentation with meconium ileus (odds ratio, 3.17; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.51 to 6.66; P=0.002), respiratory symptoms at the time of CT and BAL (odds ratio, 2.27; 95% CI, 1.24 to 4.14; P=0.008), free neutrophil elastase activity in BAL fluid (odds ratio, 3.02; 95% CI, 1.70 to 5.35; P<0.001), and gas trapping on expiratory CT (odds ratio, 2.05; 95% CI, 1.17 to 3.59; P=0.01). Free neutrophil elastase activity in BAL fluid at 3 months of age was associated with persistent bronchiectasis (present on two or more sequential scans), with the odds seven times as high at 12 months of age and four times as high at 3 years of age. Neutrophil elastase activity in BAL fluid in early life was associated with early bronchiectasis in children with cystic fibrosis. (Funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia and Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Therapeutics.)

  1. [Cystic fibrosis: how to use pulmonary function tests].

    PubMed

    Counil, F P; Karila, C; Le Bourgeois, M; Matecki, S; Lebras, M N; Couderc, L; Fajac, I; Reynaud-Gaubert, M; Bellet, M; Gauthier, R; Denjean, A

    2007-06-01

    Neonatal screening for cystic fibrosis (CF) leads to early dedicated specialist care for all patients. Pulmonary function tests (PFT) are mandatory for routine monitoring of CF patients. The aim of this article is to review the current guidelines for PFTs in CF, particularly the type of test, the age and the clinical status of the patient. The regular use of spirometry is generally accepted. Many other tests are used but their clinical value in the routine follow-up of CF patients remains to be established. Further efforts should be made to evaluate the value of PFTs in CF, particularly in very young children.

  2. Genotypes and phenotypes in cystic fibrosis and cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator-related disorders.

    PubMed

    Bombieri, Cristina; Seia, Manuela; Castellani, Carlo

    2015-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is characterized by remarkable variability in severity, rate of disease progression, and organ involvement. In spite of the considerable amount of data collected on the relationship between genotype and phenotype in CF, this is still a challenging matter of debate. Barriers to the interpretation of this connection are the large number of mutations in the CF transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene, the difficulties in attributing several of them to a specific mode of dysfunction, and a limited number of the almost 2,000 mutations so far detected, which have been clinically annotated. In addition to that, the heterogeneity of clinical manifestations in individuals with the same CFTR genotypes indicates that disease severity is modulated by other genes and by environmental factors, of which the most relevant is possibly treatment in its aspects of appropriateness, early start in life, and adherence. The phenotype variability extends to conditions, named CFTR-related disorders, which are connected with CFTR dysfunction, but do not satisfy diagnostic criteria for CF. The current level of knowledge does not allow use of the CFTR genotype to predict individual outcome and cannot be used as an indicator of CF prognosis. This might change with the development of treatments targeting specific mutations and possibly capable of changing the natural history of the disease.

  3. Enteral tube feeding for individuals with cystic fibrosis: Cystic Fibrosis Foundation evidence-informed guidelines.

    PubMed

    Schwarzenberg, Sarah Jane; Hempstead, Sarah E; McDonald, Catherine M; Powers, Scott W; Wooldridge, Jamie; Blair, Shaina; Freedman, Steven; Harrington, Elaine; Murphy, Peter J; Palmer, Lena; Schrader, Amy E; Shiel, Kyle; Sullivan, Jillian; Wallentine, Melissa; Marshall, Bruce C; Leonard, Amanda Radmer

    2016-11-01

    Nutrition is integral to the care of individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF). Better nutritional status is associated with improved pulmonary function. In some individuals with CF, enteral tube feeding can be useful in achieving optimal nutritional status. Current nutrition guidelines do not include detailed recommendations for enteral tube feeding. The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation convened an expert panel to develop enteral tube feeding recommendations based on a systematic review of the evidence and expert opinion. These guidelines address when to consider enteral tube feeding, assessment of confounding causes of poor nutrition in CF, preparation of the patient for placement of the enteral feeding tube, management of the tube after placement and education about enteral feeding. These recommendations are intended to guide the CF care team, individuals with CF, and their families through the enteral tube feeding process.

  4. Air Trapping and Airflow Obstruction in Newborn Cystic Fibrosis Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Ryan J.; Michalski, Andrew S.; Bauer, Christian; Abou Alaiwa, Mahmoud H.; Gross, Thomas J.; Awadalla, Maged S.; Bouzek, Drake C.; Gansemer, Nicholas D.; Taft, Peter J.; Hoegger, Mark J.; Diwakar, Amit; Ochs, Matthias; Reinhardt, Joseph M.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Beichel, Reinhard R.; Meyerholz, David K.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Air trapping and airflow obstruction are being increasingly identified in infants with cystic fibrosis. These findings are commonly attributed to airway infection, inflammation, and mucus buildup. Objectives: To learn if air trapping and airflow obstruction are present before the onset of airway infection and inflammation in cystic fibrosis. Methods: On the day they are born, piglets with cystic fibrosis lack airway infection and inflammation. Therefore, we used newborn wild-type piglets and piglets with cystic fibrosis to assess air trapping, airway size, and lung volume with inspiratory and expiratory X-ray computed tomography scans. Micro–computed tomography scanning was used to assess more distal airway sizes. Airway resistance was determined with a mechanical ventilator. Mean linear intercept and alveolar surface area were determined using stereologic methods. Measurements and Main Results: On the day they were born, piglets with cystic fibrosis exhibited air trapping more frequently than wild-type piglets (75% vs. 12.5%, respectively). Moreover, newborn piglets with cystic fibrosis had increased airway resistance that was accompanied by luminal size reduction in the trachea, mainstem bronchi, and proximal airways. In contrast, mean linear intercept length, alveolar surface area, and lung volume were similar between both genotypes. Conclusions: The presence of air trapping, airflow obstruction, and airway size reduction in newborn piglets with cystic fibrosis before the onset of airway infection, inflammation, and mucus accumulation indicates that cystic fibrosis impacts airway development. Our findings suggest that early airflow obstruction and air trapping in infants with cystic fibrosis might, in part, be caused by congenital airway abnormalities. PMID:24168209

  5. DNase and atelectasis in non-cystic fibrosis pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Hendriks, Tom; de Hoog, Matthijs; Lequin, Maarten H; Devos, Annick S; Merkus, Peter JFM

    2005-01-01

    Introduction No evidence based treatment is available for atelectasis. We aimed to evaluate the clinical and radiologic changes in pediatric patients who received DNase for persistent atelectasis that could not be attributed to cardiovascular causes, and who were unresponsive to treatment with inhaled bronchodilators and physiotherapy. Methods All non-cystic fibrosis pediatric patients who received nebulised or endotracheally instilled DNase for atelectasis between 1998 and 2002, with and without mechanical ventilation, were analysed in a retrospective descriptive study. The endpoints were the blood pCO2, the heart rate, the respiratory rate, the FiO2 and the chest X-ray scores before and after treatment. Results In 25 of 30 patients (median [range] age, 1.6 [0.1–11] years) who met inclusion criteria, paired data of at least three endpoints were available. All clinical parameters improved significantly within 2 hours (P < 0.01), except for the heart rate (P = 0.06). Chest X-ray scores improved significantly within 24 hours after DNase treatment (P < 0.001). Individual improvement was observed in 17 patients and no clinical change was observed in five patients. Temporary deterioration (n = 3) was associated with increased airway obstruction and desaturations. No other complications were observed. Conclusion After treatment with DNase for atelectasis of presumably infectious origin in non-cystic fibrosis pediatric patients, rapid clinical improvement was observed within 2 hours and radiologic improvement was documented within 24 hours in the large majority of children, and increased airway obstruction and ventilation–perfusion mismatch occurred in three children, possibly due to rapid mobilisation of mucus. DNase may be an effective treatment for infectious atelectasis in non-cystic fibrosis pediatric patients. PMID:16137347

  6. European Cystic Fibrosis Society Standards of Care: Quality Management in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Stern, Martin; Bertrand, Dominique Pougheon; Bignamini, Elisabetta; Corey, Mary; Dembski, Birgit; Goss, Christopher H; Pressler, Tanja; Rault, Gilles; Viviani, Laura; Elborn, J Stuart; Castellani, Carlo

    2014-05-01

    Since the earliest days of cystic fibrosis (CF) treatment, patient data have been recorded and reviewed in order to identify the factors that lead to more favourable outcomes. Large data repositories, such as the US Cystic Fibrosis Registry, which was established in the 1960s, enabled successful treatments and patient outcomes to be recognized and improvement programmes to be implemented in specialist CF centres. Over the past decades, the greater volumes of data becoming available through Centre databases and patient registries led to the possibility of making comparisons between different therapies, approaches to care and indeed data recording. The quality of care for individuals with CF has become a focus at several levels: patient, centre, regional, national and international. This paper reviews the quality management and improvement issues at each of these levels with particular reference to indicators of health, the role of CF Centres, regional networks, national health policy, and international data registration and comparisons. Copyright © 2014 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. All rights reserved.

  7. Cystic Fibrosis Patents: A Case Study of Successful Licensing

    PubMed Central

    Minear, Mollie A.; Kapustij, Cristina; Boden, Kaeleen; Chandrasekharan, Subhashini; Cook-Deegan, Robert

    2013-01-01

    From 2006–2010, Duke University’s Center for Public Genomics prepared eight case studies examining the effects of gene patent licensing practices on clinical access to genetic testing for ten clinical conditions. One of these case studies focused on the successful licensing practices employed by the University of Michigan and the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto for patents covering the CFTR gene and its ΔF508 mutation that causes a majority of cystic fibrosis cases. Since the licensing of these patents has not impeded clinical access to genetic testing, we sought to understand how this successful licensing model was developed and whether it might be applicable to other gene patents. We interviewed four key players who either were involved in the initial discussions regarding the structure of licensing or who have recently managed the licenses and collected related documents. Important features of the licensing planning process included thoughtful consideration of potential uses of the patent; anticipation of future scientific discoveries and technological advances; engagement of relevant stakeholders, including the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation; and using separate licenses for in-house diagnostics versus kit manufacture. These features led to the development of a licensing model that has not only allowed the patent holders to avoid the controversy that has plagued other gene patents, but has also allowed research, development of new therapeutics, and wide-spread dissemination of genetic testing for cystic fibrosis. Although this licensing model may not be applicable to all gene patents, it serves as a model in which gene patent licensing can successfully enable innovation, investment in therapeutics research, and protect intellectual property while respecting the needs of patients, scientists, and public health. PMID:24231943

  8. Cystic Fibrosis Patents: A Case Study of Successful Licensing.

    PubMed

    Minear, Mollie A; Kapustij, Cristina; Boden, Kaeleen; Chandrasekharan, Subhashini; Cook-Deegan, Robert

    2013-03-01

    From 2006-2010, Duke University's Center for Public Genomics prepared eight case studies examining the effects of gene patent licensing practices on clinical access to genetic testing for ten clinical conditions. One of these case studies focused on the successful licensing practices employed by the University of Michigan and the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto for patents covering the CFTR gene and its ΔF508 mutation that causes a majority of cystic fibrosis cases. Since the licensing of these patents has not impeded clinical access to genetic testing, we sought to understand how this successful licensing model was developed and whether it might be applicable to other gene patents. We interviewed four key players who either were involved in the initial discussions regarding the structure of licensing or who have recently managed the licenses and collected related documents. Important features of the licensing planning process included thoughtful consideration of potential uses of the patent; anticipation of future scientific discoveries and technological advances; engagement of relevant stakeholders, including the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation; and using separate licenses for in-house diagnostics versus kit manufacture. These features led to the development of a licensing model that has not only allowed the patent holders to avoid the controversy that has plagued other gene patents, but has also allowed research, development of new therapeutics, and wide-spread dissemination of genetic testing for cystic fibrosis. Although this licensing model may not be applicable to all gene patents, it serves as a model in which gene patent licensing can successfully enable innovation, investment in therapeutics research, and protect intellectual property while respecting the needs of patients, scientists, and public health.

  9. Neonatal screening for cystic fibrosis does not affect time to first infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Baussano, Iacopo; Tardivo, Irene; Bellezza-Fontana, Rossana; Forneris, Maria Pia; Lezo, Antonella; Anfossi, Luciano; Castello, Mario; Aleksandar, Veljkovic; Bignamini, Elisabetta

    2006-09-01

    Newborn screening for cystic fibrosis was introduced in the Piedmont region of Italy in the year 2000. Our aim with this study was to estimate the effect of newborn screening on the risk of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection at the regional cystic fibrosis pediatric reference center. The time to first infection with P aeruginosa within the historical cohort of cystic fibrosis children diagnosed between January 1, 1997, and June 30, 2004, was investigated, comparing survival functions and the adjusted hazard ratio of children diagnosed before and after newborn screening introduction. The role of pancreatic insufficiency was also concurrently investigated. Overall, 71 children diagnosed with cystic fibrosis were identified, 27 cases were clinically diagnosed before newborn screening introduction, and 5 of them presented with meconium ileus, whereas 44 were identified by newborn screening. Among them 35 needed pancreatic enzyme supplementation, whereas 34 children were infected with P aeruginosa. Both the nonparametric and semiparametric survival estimates failed to show any significant increase in the risk of P aeruginosa infection among screened children compared with historical controls. However, the median time from cystic fibrosis diagnosis to P aeruginosa infection among screened children was significantly shorter (183 vs 448 days). Children with impaired pancreatic function were at high risk of P aeruginosa infection. The results of the study suggest that health authorities should regard newborn screening for cystic fibrosis as an opportunity to improve care and outcomes among affected children and shift the focus from whether it is appropriate to screen to how to optimize biomedical and psychosocial outcomes of screening.

  10. Clostridium difficile in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Welkon, C J; Long, S S; Thompson, C M; Gilligan, P H

    1985-08-01

    One hundred seven patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and 54 other patients with risk factors for Clostridium difficile-associated disease were entered into a bacteriologic study to compare the rate of recovery of C difficile and cytotoxin in feces with occurrence of diarrhea and to investigate potentially protective or permissive relationships of fecal flora. Toxigenic C difficile was recovered from 22% of CF patients and 11% of patients with other diagnoses. Unlike the latter group, the majority (12/15) of CF patients who had cytotoxin recovered had formed stools and no history of diarrhea. Explanations for the lack of symptoms are speculative. Stool flora of CF patients was significantly more likely to include several bacteria with known inhibitory effects on C difficile. Recovery of C difficile and cytotoxin, however, was not associated with the decrease in rate of recovery or the mean bacterial count of any bacterium of fecal flora.

  11. High dose Nutrizym 22 in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Shah, A; Dinwiddie, R; Madge, S; Prescott, P; Hudson, G

    1993-09-01

    New high dose pancreatic enzyme preparations could be potentially helpful to cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of the new high dose pancreatic enzyme preparation, Nutrizym 22 with the standard preparation Nutrizym GR. Twenty-five CF children (aged 7-16 years) entered the study and 22 completed it; 3 did not, due to non-compliance. All were taking Nutrizym GR for at least 2 weeks before entering the study. A randomised double blind, crossover method using standard Nutrizym GR or double strength Nutrizym 22 capsules was carried out over two consecutive 14-day periods. Crossover analyses of variance showed no statistically significant differences in actual weight gain, appetite, abdominal pain, stool consistency or faecal fat during the prestudy and study periods. It is concluded that half the capsule numbers of the high strength preparation are just as effective as the standard capsule dosage.

  12. Genetic therapies for cystic fibrosis lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Sinn, Patrick L.; Anthony, Reshma M.; McCray, Paul B.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of gene therapy for cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease is to efficiently and safely express the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in the appropriate pulmonary cell types. Although CF patients experience multi-organ disease, the chronic bacterial lung infections and associated inflammation are the primary cause of shortened life expectancy. Gene transfer-based therapeutic approaches are feasible, in part, because the airway epithelium is directly accessible by aerosol delivery or instillation. Improvements in standard delivery vectors and the development of novel vectors, as well as emerging technologies and new animal models, are propelling exciting new research forward. Here, we review recent developments that are advancing this field of investigation. PMID:21422098

  13. Scoliosis in cystic fibrosis - an appraisal

    SciTech Connect

    Paling, M.R.; Spasovsky-Chernick, M.

    1982-03-01

    An unusually high prevalence (10%) of scoliosis is described in a series of 151 patients aged four years and older with cystic fibrosis. The scolioses were of the late onset (juvenile and adolescent) type, being typically thoracic with the curve convex to the right, although there was no significant preference for either sex. No direct relationship was found between the spinal curvature and the severity or distribution of the lung disease, although the worse scolioses tended to occur in patients with relatively severe pulmonary involvement. There was no evidence of metabolic bone disease as a predisposing cause. Some indication of a familial tendency towards scoliosis was apparent, and a genetic or constitutional basis is postulated with an unknown precipitating factor.

  14. Nutrition and growth in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hankard, Régis; Munck, Anne; Navarro, Jean

    2002-01-01

    Malnutrition is a common complication of chronic diseases in children and may lead to growth impairment (stunting). Malnutrition in cystic fibrosis (CF) results from increased energy expenditure, decreased energy intakes, malabsorption of ingested nutrients because of pancreatic insufficiency and chronic inflammation. Malnutrition and high levels of inflammatory cytokines affect IGF-1 production through interrelated mechanisms. Nutritional support was shown to improve both nutritional status and outcome in CF. However, some nutrients have a direct effect on the disease. n-3 fatty acids supplementation is able to correct lipid abnormalities resulting from a primary mechanism. Moreover, n-3 fatty acids have a direct effect on the inflammatory response, decreasing eicosanoid synthesis and modulating nuclear transcriptional factors nuclear factor kappaB and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors gamma. Nutritional support may be considered part of the care of the CF patient together with antibiotics, pancreatic enzymes and physiotherapy, influencing significantly the evolution of the disease.

  15. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator modulators in cystic fibrosis: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Béla Z; Haaf, Jérémy B; Leal, Teresinha; Noel, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    Mutations of the CFTR gene cause cystic fibrosis (CF), the most common recessive monogenic disease worldwide. These mutations alter the synthesis, processing, function, or half-life of CFTR, the main chloride channel expressed in the apical membrane of epithelial cells in the airway, intestine, pancreas, and reproductive tract. Lung disease is the most critical manifestation of CF. It is characterized by airway obstruction, infection, and inflammation that lead to fatal tissue destruction. In spite of great advances in early and multidisciplinary medical care, and in our understanding of the pathophysiology, CF is still considerably reducing the life expectancy of patients. This review highlights the current development in pharmacological modulators of CFTR, which aim at rescuing the expression and/or function of mutated CFTR. While only Kalydeco® and Orkambi® are currently available to patients, many other families of CFTR modulators are undergoing preclinical and clinical investigations. Drug repositioning and personalized medicine are particularly detailed in this review as they represent the most promising strategies for restoring CFTR function in CF. PMID:27703398

  16. Anabolic agent use in adults with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Green, Heather D; Barry, Peter J; Jones, Andrew M

    2015-10-01

    The use of non-prescribed anabolic agents amongst non-athletes is increasing with young, adult males with cystic fibrosis (CF) in the highest risk demographic. There is evidence that anabolic agents increase weight and muscle mass in adults with a variety of catabolic conditions but there is no evidence for their use in hormone sufficient adults with CF. We report a case of anabolic agent use in a male adult with CF and review the clinical features of anabolic agent use with a focus on adults with CF. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Pseudomonas Biofilms, Cystic Fibrosis, and Phage: a Silver Lining?

    PubMed Central

    Brüssow, Harald

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT In contrast to usual laboratory conditions, most bacteria in the human body grow in biofilms. Encased in a structured matrix, many pathogens display heightened resistance to antibiotics. Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients represent a prime example of the clinical challenges that antibiotic resistance in biofilms can represent. In the March 6, 2012 issue of mBio, Colin Hill and his colleagues report on experiments that add to the evidence that Pseudomonas phages are a potential treatment option for these infections. PMID:22493030

  18. Fungi in the cystic fibrosis lung: bystanders or pathogens?

    PubMed

    Chotirmall, Sanjay H; McElvaney, Noel G

    2014-07-01

    Improvement to the life expectancy of people with cystic fibrosis (PWCF) brings about novel challenges including the need for evaluation of the role of fungi in the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung. To determine if such organisms represent bystanders or pathogens affecting clinical outcomes we review the existing knowledge from a clinical, biochemical, inflammatory and immunological perspective. The prevalence and importance of fungi in the CF airway has likely been underestimated with the most frequently isolated filamentous fungi being Aspergillus fumigatus and Scedosporium apiospermum and the major yeast Candida albicans. Developing non-culture based microbiological methods for fungal detection has improved both our classification and understanding of their clinical consequences including localized, allergic and systemic infections. Cross-kingdom interaction between bacteria and fungi are discussed as is the role of biofilms further affecting clinical outcome. A combination of host and pathogen-derived factors determines if a particular fungus represents a commensal, colonizer or pathogen in the setting of CF. The underlying immune state, disease severity and treatment burden represent key host variables whilst fungal type, form, chronicity and virulence including the ability to evade immune recognition determines the pathogenic potential of a specific fungus at a particular point in time. Further research in this emerging field is warranted to fully elucidate the spectrum of disease conferred by the presence of fungi in the CF airway and the indications for therapeutic interventions.

  19. Screening for cystic fibrosis: what every NP should know.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Krysta N

    2013-09-10

    In a chronic childhood disease such as cystic fibrosis, it is important for nurse practitioners to be knowledgeable about the disease process, methods of mutation identification, and diagnostic criteria. Multiple studies have shown improved prognosis for patients diagnosed early.

  20. Modular microfluidic system as a model of cystic fibrosis airways

    PubMed Central

    Skolimowski, M.; Weiss Nielsen, M.; Abeille, F.; Skafte-Pedersen, P.; Sabourin, D.; Fercher, A.; Papkovsky, D.; Molin, S.; Taboryski, R.; Sternberg, C.; Dufva, M.; Geschke, O.; Emnéus, J.

    2012-01-01

    A modular microfluidic airways model system that can simulate the changes in oxygen tension in different compartments of the cystic fibrosis (CF) airways was designed, developed, and tested. The fully reconfigurable system composed of modules with different functionalities: multichannel peristaltic pumps, bubble traps, gas exchange chip, and cell culture chambers. We have successfully applied this system for studying the antibiotic therapy of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the bacteria mainly responsible for morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis, in different oxygen environments. Furthermore, we have mimicked the bacterial reinoculation of the aerobic compartments (lower respiratory tract) from the anaerobic compartments (cystic fibrosis sinuses) following an antibiotic treatment. This effect is hypothesised as the one on the main reasons for recurrent lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients. PMID:23908680

  1. Slower rise of exhaled breath temperature in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Bade, Geetanjali; Gupta, Sumita; Kabra, Sushil Kumar; Talwar, Anjana

    2015-02-01

    To measure exhaled breath temperature in patients with cystic fibrosis. 17 patients (6-18 years) with cystic fibrosis and 15 age- and gender-matched healthy controls were recruited in this cross sectional study. Exhaled breath temperature was measured in subjects recruited in both the groups with a device X-halo and analyzed as plateau temperature achieved and rate of temperature rise. Patients with cystic fibrosis showed no significant difference in plateau temperature [34.4(32.3-34.6) versus 33.9 (33.0-34.4)oC; P=0.35] while mean (SEM.) rate of temperature rise was significantly less in patients [0.09 (0.01) versus 0.14 (0.02) ƼC/s ; P=0.04] as compared to controls. There was a slower rise of exhaled breath temperature in patients with cystic fibrosis whereas plateau temperature was not significantly different from controls.

  2. Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes: a distinct condition.

    PubMed

    Cano Megías, Marta; González Albarrán, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most common fatal inherited autosomal recessive disease in Caucasians, affecting approximately one out of every 2,000 births. Survival of patients with cystic fibrosis has significantly improved due to advances in respiratory and nutritional care, and their current average life expectancy is 30-40 years. Development of cystic fibrosis-related diabetes is a comorbidity that increases with age and may reach a prevalence up to 50% in adults. Its development is associated to impaired lung function and nutritional status, and early diagnosis and treatment are therefore essential to improve quality of life and performance status. Insulin therapy for diabetes and other early carbohydrate metabolism disorders may improve lung function and nutritional status of patients with cystic fibrosis.

  3. Treatment and prognosis of rectal prolapse in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Stern, R C; Izant, R J; Boat, T F; Wood, R E; Matthews, L W; Doershuk, C F

    1982-04-01

    Rectal prolapse occurred in 112 (18.5%) of 605 cystic fibrosis patients. In 48 patients prolapse preceded diagnosis of cystic fibrosis, but physicians (pediatricians, pediatric and general surgeons, and proctologists) rarely appreciated its importance as a symptom of this disease. Prolapses frequently cease with institution of pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy following diagnosis of cystic fibrosis. However, even when the disease remains undiagnosed, the symptom is often transient and frequently resolves at 3-5 yr of age. Prolapse occurring initially after cystic fibrosis is diagnosed rarely responds to manipulation of diet or enzyme doses. Many patients develop a method of reduction which involves voluntary abdominal, perineal, and gluteal muscles and does not require manual pressure on the prolapsed segment. Most patients do not need specific treatment for the prolapse. Surgery is rarely necessary. A sweat test should be obtained on any child who has had even a single episode of rectal prolapse.

  4. Reduced upper airway nitric oxide in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Balfour-Lynn, I M; Laverty, A; Dinwiddie, R

    1996-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) produced within the respiratory tract is detectable in exhaled and nasal air. Its synthesis may be induced by inflammatory cytokines and reduced by glucocorticoids. Increased concentrations have been found in asthma and bronchiectasis. In this study, NO concentrations were determined in 63 children with cystic fibrosis, of whom 13 were on inhaled steroids (mean age 13.3 years) and 50 were not (mean age 12.3 years); 57 normal children (mean age 12.2 years) were also studied. NO was measured by chemiluminescence analyser, exhaled NO following a relaxed vital capacity manoeuvre, and nasal NO with the breath held following a full inspiration. Mean concentration of exhaled NO in cystic fibrosis patients (no steroids) was 4.7 parts per billion (ppb) (95% confidence interval (CI) 4.0 to 5.3); this did not differ from values in normal children (mean 4.8 ppb, 95% CI 3.8 to 5.8) or in cystic fibrosis patients on inhaled steroids (mean 3.6 ppb, 95% CI 2.5 to 4.8). Nasal concentrations were significantly lower in cystic fibrosis patients, with or without inhaled steroids, than in normal children (cystic fibrosis, no inhaled steroids: 460 ppb, 95% CI 399 to 520; cystic fibrosis, inhaled steroids: 522 ppb, 95% CI 313 to 730, v normal children: 1024 ppb, 95% CI 896 to 1152, p < 0.0001). Considering the inflammatory nature of cystic fibrosis, it is surprising exhaled NO levels were not increased, but this may have been due to alteration in NO diffusion through thick mucus. The low nasal NO concentrations, which are probably the result of impaired flow from the paranasal sinuses, may contribute to the recurrent respiratory infections typical of cystic fibrosis. PMID:8984918

  5. Vitamin E supplementation in people with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Okebukola, Peter O; Kansra, Sonal; Barrett, Joanne

    2017-03-06

    People with cystic fibrosis are at an increased risk of fat-soluble vitamin deficiency including vitamin E. Vitamin E deficiency can cause a host of conditions such as haemolytic anaemia, cerebellar ataxia and cognitive difficulties. Vitamin E supplementation is widely recommended in cystic fibrosis and aims to ameliorate this deficiency. This is an updated version of the review. To determine the effects of any level of vitamin E supplementation on the frequency of vitamin E deficiency disorders in people with cystic fibrosis. We searched the Cochrane Group's Cystic Fibrosis Trials Register and also searched international trial registers for any ongoing clinical trials that were not identified during our register search.Date of last search of the Register: 10 October 2016. Date of last search of international trial registers: 15 February 2017. Randomised controlled trials and quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing any preparation of vitamin E supplementation to placebo or no supplement, regardless of dosage or duration. Two authors extracted outcome data from each study (published information) and assessed the risk of bias of each included study. Four studies with a total of 141 participants were included in the review, two of these were in children (aged six months to 14.5 years), and the other two did not specify participants' age. All studies used different formulations and doses of vitamin E for various durations of treatment (10 days to six months). Two studies compared the supplementation of fat-soluble as well as water-soluble formulations to no supplementation in different arms of the same study. A third study compared a water-soluble formulation to a placebo; and in the fourth study a fat-soluble formulation of vitamin E was assessed against placebo.At one month, three months and six months, water-soluble vitamin E significantly improved serum vitamin E levels compared with control: at one month, two studies, mean difference 17.66 (95% confidence

  6. Vitamin E supplementation in people with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Okebukola, Peter O; Kansra, Sonal; Barrett, Joanne

    2014-12-09

    People with cystic fibrosis are at an increased risk of fat-soluble vitamin deficiency including vitamin E. Vitamin E deficiency can cause a host of conditions such as haemolytic anaemia, cerebellar ataxia and cognitive difficulties. Vitamin E supplementation is widely recommended in cystic fibrosis and aims to ameliorate this deficiency. To determine the effects of any level of vitamin E supplementation on the frequency of vitamin E deficiency disorders in people with cystic fibrosis. We searched the Cochrane Group's Cystic Fibrosis Trials Register and also searched international trial registers for any ongoing clinical trials that were not identified during our register search.Date of last search of the Register: 10 February 2014. Date of last search of international trial registers: 30 August 2014. Randomised controlled trials and quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing any preparation of vitamin E supplementation to placebo or no supplement, regardless of dosage or duration. Two authors extracted outcome data from each study (published information) and assessed the risk of bias of each included study. Four studies with a total of 141 participants were included in the review, two of these were in children (aged six months to 14.5 years), and the other two did not specify participants' age. All studies used different formulations and doses of vitamin E for various durations of treatment (10 days to six months). Two studies compared the supplementation of fat-soluble as well as water-soluble formulations to no supplementation in different arms of the same study. A third study compared a water-soluble formulation to a placebo; and in the fourth study a fat-soluble formulation of vitamin E was assessed against placebo.At one month, three months and six months, water-soluble vitamin E significantly improved serum vitamin E levels compared with control: at one month, two studies, mean difference 17.66 (95% confidence interval 10.59 to 24.74); at three months, one

  7. Dornase Alfa for Non-Cystic Fibrosis Pediatric Pulmonary Atelectasis.

    PubMed

    Thornby, Krisy-Ann; Johnson, Ashley; Axtell, Samantha

    2014-08-01

    To review the literature evaluating the efficacy of dornase alfa for non-cystic fibrosis pediatric patients with pulmonary atelectasis. Articles were retrieved after a search of MEDLINE/PubMed (1946 to April 2014), and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (1970-April 2014) was performed using the terms dornase alfa, recombinant human deoxyribonuclease, pulmonary, persistent, and atelectasis. Other relevant articles referenced from the MEDLINE search were also utilized. Data sources were limited to English language clinical trials and case studies including only children; 8 clinical trials and 12 case reports met the criteria. Dornase alfa is used as an off-label treatment option for pulmonary atelectasis because limited treatment modalities exist after conventional therapy has failed. We evaluated 8 clinical trials and 12 case reports involving this pediatric population with varying primary diagnoses. The majority of patients experienced improvement in atelectasis, suggesting benefit after receiving treatment with dornase alfa. However, the outcomes were possibly confounded by those receiving combination therapies, varying primary diagnoses, and varying end points evaluated. Dornase alfa was overall well tolerated, with only a few patients experiencing worsening atelectasis posttreatment. Dornase alfa may be considered as a therapeutic option in non-cystic fibrosis pediatric patients with pulmonary atelectasis, who require treatment intervention when conventional therapy is unsuccessful. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. Active cycle of breathing technique for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    McKoy, Naomi A; Saldanha, Ian J; Odelola, Olaide A; Robinson, Karen A

    2012-12-12

    People with cystic fibrosis experience chronic airway infections as a result of mucus build up within the lungs. Repeated infections often cause lung damage and disease. Airway clearance therapies aim to improve mucus clearance, increase sputum production, and improve airway function. The active cycle of breathing technique (ACBT) is an airway clearance method that uses a cycle of techniques to loosen airway secretions including breathing control, thoracic expansion exercises, and the forced expiration technique. To compare the clinical effectiveness of ACBT with other airway clearance therapies in cystic fibrosis. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis Trials Register, compiled from electronic database searches and handsearching of journals and conference abstract books. We also searched the reference lists of relevant articles and reviews.Date of last search: 02 August 2012. Randomised or quasi-randomised controlled clinical studies, including cross-over studies, comparing ACBT with other airway clearance therapies in cystic fibrosis. Two review authors independently screened each article, abstracted data and assessed the risk of bias of each study. Sixty studies were identified of which 18 (375 participants) met the inclusion criteria. Five randomised controlled studies (127 participants) were included in the meta-analysis; four were of cross-over design. The 13 remaining studies were cross-over studies with inadequate reports for complete assessment.Included studies compared ACBT to autogenic drainage, airway oscillating devices, high frequency chest compression devices, conventional chest physiotherapy, and positive expiratory pressure. Patient preference varied: more patients preferred autogenic drainage over ACBT; more preferred ACBT over airway oscillating devices; and more were comfortable with ACBT versus high frequency chest compression. No significant difference was seen in sputum weight, lung function, or oxygen saturation between ACBT and autogenic

  9. Respiratory infections in patients with cystic fibrosis undergoing lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Leonard J; Noone, Peadar G

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is an inherited disease characterised by chronic respiratory infections associated with bronchiectasis. Lung transplantation has helped to extend the lives of patients with cystic fibrosis who have advanced lung disease. However, persistent, recurrent, and newly acquired infections can be problematic. Classic cystic fibrosis-associated organisms, such as Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, are generally manageable post-transplantation, and are associated with favourable outcomes. Burkholderia cenocepacia poses particular challenges, although other Burkholderia species are less problematic. Despite concerns about non-tuberculous mycobacteria, especially Mycobacterium abscessus, post-transplantation survival has not been definitively shown to be less than average in patients with these infections. Fungal species can be prevalent before and after transplantation and are associated with high morbidity, so should be treated aggressively. Appropriate viral screening and antiviral prophylaxis are necessary to prevent infection with and reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus and cytomegalovirus and their associated complications. Awareness of drug pharmacokinetics and interactions in cystic fibrosis is crucial to prevent toxic effects and subtherapeutic or supratherapeutic drug dosing. With the large range of potential infectious organisms in patients with cystic fibrosis, infection control in hospital and outpatient settings is important. Despite its complexity, lung transplantation in the cystic fibrosis population is safe, with good outcomes if the clinician is aware of all the potential pathogens and remains vigilant by means of surveillance and proactive treatment.

  10. Mechanisms of gastro-oesophageal reflux in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Cucchiara, S; Santamaria, F; Andreotti, M R; Minella, R; Ercolini, P; Oggero, V; de Ritis, G

    1991-01-01

    Abnormal degrees of gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) were detected by 24 hour intraoesophageal pH measurement in 12 of 14 children (mean age 7.9 years; range 5 months-16 years) affected by cystic fibrosis and complaining of symptoms suggesting GOR. These patients underwent combined recording of distal oesophageal motility and intraluminal pH in order to investigate mechanisms of GOR. Inappropriate lower oesophageal sphincter relaxation was the most common mechanism of reflux in all patients. Other mechanisms (appropriate relaxation or lowered pressure of the lower oesophageal sphincter, increased intragastric pressure) were detected less frequently. Frequency of inappropriate lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations was significantly higher in patients with cystic fibrosis than in other study groups (symptomatic GOR, GOR disease complicated by respiratory complaints). Inappropriate lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations occurred with the same frequency in patients with cystic fibrosis and in a group of children with GOR disease complicated by oesophagitis. Abnormalities of distal oesophageal contractions such as decreased amplitude or uncoordinated waves were also recorded in cystic fibrosis patients. Seven patients with cystic fibrosis completed a therapeutic trial for eight weeks consisting of postural treatment and oral cisapride, a new prokinetic drug. The oesophageal acid exposure improved in only three patients. We conclude that pathologic GOR is commonly associated with cystic fibrosis. The predominant reflux mechanism in these patients is a transient inappropriate lower oesophageal sphincter relaxation rather than a low steady state basal lower oesophageal sphincter pressure. PMID:2039253

  11. Hormonal abnormalities of the pancreas and gut in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Adrian, T E; McKiernan, J; Johnstone, D I; Hiller, E J; Vyas, H; Sarson, D L; Bloom, S R

    1980-09-01

    We have investigated the effect of cystic fibrosis on alimentary hormones in 10 children by measuring the pancreatic and gut hormone rsponse to a milk drink. Plasma insulin and gastric inhibitory peptide were both significantly reduced (P < 0.05 and P < 0.005, respectively, at 15 min) in the patients with cystic fibrosis, compared with controls, even though the early glucose rise was greater in the former group (P < 0.05 at 15 min). Fasting levels of pancreatic polypeptide were significantly lower in the fibrocystic children (P < 0.01), and the normal response to milk was completely abolished in these patients (P < 0.001). Fasting plasma enteroglucagon concentrations were grossly abolished in the cystic fibrosis patients (P < 0.001) and these remained elevated throughout the test. No significant differences were seen in basal or postmilk responses of plasma glucagon, gastrin, secretin, vasoactive intestinal peptide, or motilin in cystic fibrosis. It would thus appear that the pancreatic polypeptide cell is more susceptible to the effects of the disease process than the beta or alpha cell in cystic fibrosis. Some aspects of the abnormalities in the gastrointestinal endocrine system were similar to those seen in celiac disease and tropical sprue and may, therefore, effect a similar hormonal response in these patients with cystic fibrosis to those with mucosal damage.

  12. Increased oral bioavailability of ciprofloxacin in cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed Central

    Christensson, B A; Nilsson-Ehle, I; Ljungberg, B; Lindblad, A; Malmborg, A S; Hjelte, L; Strandvik, B

    1992-01-01

    The altered pharmacokinetic properties of, e.g., aminoglycosides in cystic fibrosis patients have to be considered when pulmonary exacerbations are treated. Since reported data on ciprofloxacin, a fluorinated quinolone, are conflicting, we compared intravenous and oral administration in cystic fibrosis patients when treating them for mild symptoms of pulmonary infection. All of the patients were colonized with Pseudomonas species. Ciprofloxacin was administered orally (15 mg/kg of body weight) or intravenously (6 mg/kg) twice a day for at least 10 days during separate treatment periods. Five healthy volunteers received single intravenous and oral doses. Pharmacokinetic evaluations were performed at first dose and at steady state. The results showed that cystic fibrosis patients have increased oral bioavailability of ciprofloxacin (80% in cystic fibrosis patients versus 57% in volunteers) and increased total clearance (688 ml/min in CF patients versus 528 ml/min in volunteers). Our data indicate that the pharmacokinetic properties of ciprofloxacin are altered in cystic fibrosis patients with mild symptoms of pulmonary exacerbations and that the changes most probably are due to cystic fibrosis per se or to the impact of chronic infection. PMID:1489195

  13. Reduced Arylsulfatase B Activity in Leukocytes from Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Girish; Burke, Jenifer; Bhattacharyya, Sumit; Sharma, Neha; Katyal, Shivani; Park, R. Lucy; Tobacman, Joanne

    2013-01-01

    Summary The enzyme Arylsulfatase B (ARSB; N-acetylgalactosamine-4-sulfatase) removes 4-sulfate groups from chondroitin-4-sulfate and dermatan sulfate and is required for the degradation of these sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Since these GAGs accumulate in patients with Cystic Fibrosis (CF), we investigated the activity of ARSB in leukocytes of patients with CF, to consider if reduced activity of ARSB might contribute to the pathophysiology of CF. Previous cell-based experiments had demonstrated that when the deficiency of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) was corrected in bronchial epithelial cells, the ARSB activity increased significantly. De-identified, citrated blood samples were collected from 16 children with cystic fibrosis and 31 control subjects, seen in the Pediatric Clinic at Rush University Medical Center. Polymorphonuclear (PMN) and mononuclear cell (MC) populations were separated by density gradient, and blinded determinations of ARSB activity were performed using the exogenous substrate 4-methylumbilliferyl sulfate. Interleukin-6 was measured in the plasma samples by ELISA. ARSB activity was significantly less in the PMN and MC from the CF patients than controls (p<0.0001, unpaired t-test, two-tailed). Interleukin-6 levels in plasma were significantly greater in the CF population (p<0.001). Mean age, age range, and male:female ratio of CF patients and controls were similar, and no association of ARSB activity with age, gender, or CFTR genotype was evident. Since recombinant human ARSB is used successfully for replacement therapy in Mucopolysaccharidosis VI, it may be useful to restore ARSB activity to normal levels and increase degradation of sulfated GAGs in CF patients. PMID:22550062

  14. US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and European Cystic Fibrosis Society consensus recommendations for the management of non-tuberculous mycobacteria in individuals with cystic fibrosis: executive summary

    PubMed Central

    Olivier, Kenneth N; Saiman, Lisa; Daley, Charles L; Herrmann, Jean-Louis; Nick, Jerry A; Noone, Peadar G; Bilton, Diana; Corris, Paul; Gibson, Ronald L; Hempstead, Sarah E; Koetz, Karsten; Sabadosa, Kathryn A; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Smyth, Alan R; van Ingen, Jakko; Wallace, Richard J; Winthrop, Kevin L; Marshall, Bruce C; Haworth, Charles S

    2016-01-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are ubiquitous environmental organisms that can cause chronic pulmonary infection, particularly in individuals with pre-existing inflammatory lung disease, such as cystic fibrosis (CF). Pulmonary disease (PD) caused by NTM has emerged as a major threat to the health of individuals with CF, but remains difficult to diagnose and problematic to treat. In response to this challenge, the US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (CFF) and the European Cystic Fibrosis Society (ECFS) convened a panel of 19 experts to develop consensus recommendations for the screening, investigation, diagnosis and management of NTM-PD in individuals with CF. PICO (population, intervention, comparison, outcome) methodology and systematic literature reviews were employed to inform draft recommendations, which were then modified to achieve consensus and subsequently circulated for public consultation within the USA and European CF communities. We have thus generated a series of pragmatic, evidence-based recommendations as an initial step in optimising management for this challenging condition. PMID:26678435

  15. Oscillating devices for airway clearance in people with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Lisa; Agnew, Jennifer

    2014-07-20

    Chest physiotherapy is widely prescribed to assist the clearance of airway secretions in people with cystic fibrosis. Oscillating devices generate intra- or extra-thoracic oscillations orally or external to the chest wall. Internally they create variable resistances within the airways, generating controlled oscillating positive pressure which mobilises mucus. Extra-thoracic oscillations are generated by forces outside the respiratory system, e.g. high frequency chest wall oscillation. To identify whether oscillatory devices, oral or chest wall, are effective for mucociliary clearance and whether they are equivalent or superior to other forms of airway clearance in the successful management of secretions in people with cystic fibrosis. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register comprising references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and hand searches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. Latest search of the Cystic Fibrosis Trials Register: 13 January 2014. Randomised controlled studies and controlled clinical studies of oscillating devices compared with any other form of physiotherapy in people with cystic fibrosis. Single-treatment interventions (therapy technique used only once in the comparison) were excluded. Two authors independently applied the inclusion criteria to publications and assessed the quality of the included studies. The searches identified 68 studies with a total of 288 references; 35 studies (total of 1050 participants) met the inclusion criteria. Studies varied in duration from up to one week to one year; 20 of the studies were cross-over in design. The studies also varied in type of intervention and the outcomes measured, furthermore data were not published in sufficient detail in most of these studies, so meta-analysis was limited. Few studies were considered to have a low risk of bias in any domain. It is not possible to blind participants and

  16. The novel complex allele [A238V;F508del] of the CFTR gene: clinical phenotype and possible implications for cystic fibrosis etiological therapies.

    PubMed

    Diana, Anna; Polizzi, Angela Maria; Santostasi, Teresa; Ratclif, Luigi; Pantaleo, Maria Giuseppina; Leonetti, Giuseppina; Iusco, Danila Rosa; Gallo, Crescenzio; Conese, Massimo; Manca, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    Few mutations in cis have been annotated for F508del homozygous patients. Southern Italy patients who at a first analysis appeared homozygous for the F508del mutation (n=63) or compound heterozygous for the F508del and another mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (n=155) were searched for the A238V mutation in exon 6. The allelic frequency of the complex allele [A238V;F508del] was 0.04. When the whole data set was used (comprised also of 56 F508del/F508del and 34 F508del/other mutation controls), no differences reached the statistical significance in the clinical parameters, except chloride concentrations which were lower in [A238V;F508del]/other mutation compared with F508del/other mutation (P=0.03). The two study groups presented less complications than the control groups. Within the minimal data set (34 F508del/F508del, 27 F508del/other mutation, 4 [A238V;F508del]/F508del cases and 5 [A238V;F508del]/other mutation cases); that is, presenting all the variables in each patient, forced expiratory volume in 1 s and forced vital capacity presented a trend to lower levels in the study groups in comparison with the F508del/F508del group, and C-reactive protein approximated statistically significant higher levels in the [A238V;F508del]/other mutation as compared with F508del/F508del patients (P=0.09). The analysis of statistical dependence among the variables showed a significant anticorrelation between chloride and body mass index in the [A238V;F508del]/other mutation group. In conclusion, the complex allele [A238V;F508del] seems to be associated with less general complications than in the control groups, on the other hand possibly giving a worse pulmonary phenotype and higher systemic/local inflammatory response. These findings have implications for the correct recruitment and clinical response of F508del patients in the clinical trials testing the new etiological drugs for cystic fibrosis.

  17. Expression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator corrects defective chloride channel regulation in cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rich, Devra P.; Anderson, Matthew P.; Gregory, Richard J.; Cheng, Seng H.; Paul, Sucharita; Jefferson, Douglas M.; McCann, John D.; Klinger, Katherine W.; Smith, Alan E.; Welsh, Michael J.

    1990-09-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) was expressed in cultured cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells and Cl- channel activation assessed in single cells using a fluorescence microscopic assay and the patch-clamp technique. Expression of CFTR, but not of a mutant form of CFTR (ΔF508), corrected the Cl- channel defect. Correction of the phenotypic defect demonstrates a causal relationship between mutations in the CFTR gene and defective Cl- transport which is the hallmark of the disease.

  18. Changes of CFTR functional measurements and clinical improvements in cystic fibrosis patients with non p.Gly551Asp gating mutations treated with ivacaftor.

    PubMed

    Mesbahi, Myriam; Shteinberg, Michal; Wilschanski, Michael; Hatton, Aurelie; Nguyen-Khoa, Thao; Friedman, Hannah; Cohen, Michael; Escabasse, Virginie; Le Bourgeois, Muriel; Lucidi, Vicenzina; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Bassinet, Laurence; Livnat, Galit

    2017-01-01

    Ivacaftor, a CFTR potentiator, has been found to improve CFTR function and clinical outcomes in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) gating mutations. We investigated the effects of ivacaftor on CFTR functional measurement in CF patients carrying gating mutations other than p.Gly551Asp. Two siblings aged 13 and 12 carrying the p.Ser549Asn mutation, two sisters (45 and 43years old) compound heterozygotes for p.Asp1152His and p.Gly1244Glu, a 37year old man homozygous for the p.Gly1244Glu mutation, and a 7year old girl with p.Arg352Gln and p.Gly1244Glu mutations commenced treatment with ivacaftor. NPD was performed in all the patients and approached normal for four patients who had also clinical improvement (p.Ser549Asn compound heterozygotes, and p.Asp1152His/p.Gly1244Glu siblings). Beta-adrenergic sweat chloride secretion performed in thep.Asp1152His/p.Gly1244Glu patients improved significantly. The p.Gly1244Glu mutation homozygous patient, who had undergone an ileal resection with ileostomy and enterocutaneous fistula, did not respond clinically to ivacaftor and did not modify his sweat test. These results highlight the importance of different CFTR activity measurements to explore CFTR modulator efficacy.

  19. Lung Transplantation and Survival in Children with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Liou, Theodore G.; Adler, Frederick R.; Cox, David R.; Cahill, Barbara C.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND The effects of lung transplantation on the survival and quality of life in children with cystic fibrosis are uncertain. METHODS We used data from the U.S. Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Patient Registry and from the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network to identify children with cystic fibrosis who were on the waiting list for lung transplantation during the period from 1992 through 2002. We performed proportional-hazards survival modeling, using multiple clinically relevant covariates that were available before the children were on the waiting list and the interactions of these covariates with lung transplantation as a time-dependent covariate. The data were insufficient in quality and quantity for a retrospective quality-of-life analysis. RESULTS A total of 248 of the 514 children on the waiting list underwent lung transplantation in the United States during the period from 1992 through 2002. Proportional-hazards modeling identified four variables besides transplantation that were associated with changes in survival. Burkholderia cepacia infection decreased survival, regardless of whether the patient underwent transplantation. A diagnosis of diabetes before the patient was placed on the waiting list decreased survival while the patient was on the waiting list but did not decrease survival after transplantation, whereas older age did not affect waiting-list survival but decreased post-transplantation survival. Staphylococcus aureus infection increased waiting-list survival but decreased post-transplantation survival. Using age, diabetes status, and S. aureus infection status as covariates, we estimated the effect of transplantation on survival for each patient group, expressed as a hazard factor of less than 1 for a benefit and more than 1 for a risk of harm. Five patients had a significant estimated benefit, 315 patients had a significant risk of harm, 76 patients had an insignificant benefit, and 118 patients had an insignificant risk of harm

  20. Lung Transplantation and Survival in Children with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Liou, Theodore G.; Adler, Frederick R.; Cox, David R.; Cahill, Barbara C.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The effects of lung transplantation on the survival and quality of life in children with cystic fibrosis are uncertain. METHODS We used data from the U.S. Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Patient Registry and from the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network to identify children with cystic fibrosis who were on the waiting list for lung transplantation during the period from 1992 through 2002. We performed proportional-hazards survival modeling, using multiple clinically relevant covariates that were available before the children were on the waiting list and the interactions of these covariates with lung transplantation as a time-dependent covariate. The data were insufficient in quality and quantity for a retrospective quality-of-life analysis. RESULTS A total of 248 of the 514 children on the waiting list underwent lung transplantation in the United States during the period from 1992 through 2002. Proportional-hazards modeling identified four variables besides transplantation that were associated with changes in survival. Burkholderia cepacia infection was associated with a trend toward decreased survival, regardless of whether the patient underwent transplantation. A diagnosis of diabetes before the patient was placed on the waiting list decreased survival while the patient was on the waiting list but did not decrease survival after transplantation, whereas older age did not affect waiting-list survival but decreased post-transplantation survival. Staphylococcus aureus infection increased waiting-list survival but decreased post-transplantation survival. Using age, diabetes status, and S. aureus infection status as covariates, we estimated the effect of transplantation on survival for each patient group, expressed as a hazard factor of less than 1 for a benefit and more than 1 for a risk of harm. Five patients had a significant estimated benefit, 283 patients had a significant risk of harm, 102 patients had an insignificant benefit, and 124 patients

  1. Cystic fibrosis patients and families support cross-infection measures.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, A L; Armstrong, D; Carzino, R; Robinson, P

    2004-09-01

    A clonal strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) was isolated in 1999 at the Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia, after five unrelated children with cystic fibrosis (CF) died from severe lung disease aged <5 yrs. Subsequently, more than half of the patients in the clinic with PA were found to harbour this strain, and segregation measures were instituted at the hospital to prevent further spread. The aim of this study was to assess CF parent and patient responses to the segregation measures to determine overall support. A questionnaire was sent out to the families of 291 CF children treated at the centre. A 65% response rate was obtained. The majority of parents (85%) and patients > or=12 yrs old (63%) were positive about the segregation measures instituted. A total of 11% of parents and 25% of patients were unsure, and 4% of parents and 12% of children gave negative responses. Those who were not happy listed reasons such as concerns about the emotional impact of not socialising with other CF children, inconclusive evidence about person-person spread of infection and feelings of alienation created in the clinic by the separation. In conclusion, the majority of responding cystic fibrosis patients and their families understand and are supportive of infection control measures instituted at the Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia.

  2. Cystic fibrosis sputum: a barrier to the transport of nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Sanders, N N; De Smedt, S C; Van Rompaey, E; Simoens, P; De Baets, F; Demeester, J

    2000-11-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is characterized by the presence of a viscoelastic mucus layer in the upper airways and bronchi. The underlying problem is a mutation in the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein. Clinical studies of gene transfer for CF are ongoing. For gene delivery to the airways of CF patients to be effective, the mucus covering the target cells must be overcome. We therefore examined the extent to which CF sputum presents a physical barrier to the transport of nanospheres of a size comparable to that of lipoplexes and other transfection systems currently being clinically evaluated for CF gene therapy. We observed that an extremely low percentage of nanospheres (< 0.3%) moved through a 220-microm-thick CF sputum layer after 150 min. The largest nanospheres studied (560 nm) were almost completely blocked by the sputum, whereas the smaller nanospheres (124 nm) were retarded only by a factor of 1.3 as compared with buffer. Surprisingly, the nanospheres diffused significantly more easily through the more viscoelastic sputum samples. We hypothesize that the structure of the network in sputum becomes more macroporous when the sputum becomes more viscoelastic. Sputum from a patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease retarded the transport of nanospheres to the same extent as did CF sputum. When directly mixed with CF sputum, recombinant human deoxyribonuclease I moderately facilitated the transport of nanospheres through CF sputum.

  3. Oral protein energy supplements for children with cystic fibrosis: CALICO multicentre randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Poustie, Vanessa J; Russell, Jayne E; Watling, Ruth M; Ashby, Deborah; Smyth, Rosalind L

    2006-03-18

    To determine whether oral protein energy supplements, used long term in children with cystic fibrosis who are moderately malnourished, improve nutritional and other outcomes. Multicentre randomised controlled trial. Seven specialist paediatric cystic fibrosis centres and their associated shared care clinics and seven smaller paediatric cystic fibrosis clinics. 102 children with cystic fibrosis, aged between 2 and 15 years, who were moderately malnourished. Oral protein energy supplements in addition to usual dietary advice compared with dietary advice alone, for 12 months. Change in body mass index centile over one year. Use of supplements was not associated with a change in body mass index centile (mean difference 2.99 centile points, 95% confidence interval -2.70 to 8.68) or other nutritional and spirometric outcomes in this group of children. Long term use of oral protein energy supplements did not result in an improvement in nutritional status or other clinical outcomes in children with cystic fibrosis who were moderately malnourished. Oral protein energy supplements should not be regarded as an essential part of the management of this group of children. ISRCTN: 95744468.

  4. Oral calorie supplements for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Rosalind L; Rayner, Oli

    2014-11-03

    Poor nutrition occurs frequently in people with cystic fibrosis (CF) and is associated with other adverse outcomes. Oral calorie supplements are used to increase total daily calorie intake and improve weight gain. However, they are expensive and there are concerns they may reduce the amount of food eaten and not improve overall energy intake. To establish whether in people with CF, oral calorie supplements: increase daily calorie intake; and improve overall nutritional intake, nutritional indices, lung function, survival and quality of life. To assess adverse effects associated with using these supplements. We searched the Cochrane CF Trials Register comprising references from comprehensive electronic database searches, handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. We contacted companies marketing oral calorie supplements.Last search: 03 July 2014. Randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing use of oral calorie supplements for at least one month to increase calorie intake with no specific intervention or additional nutritional advice in people with CF. We independently selected the included trials, assessed risk of bias and extracted data. We contacted the authors of included trials and obtained additional information for two trials. We identified 21 trials and included three, reporting results from 131 participants lasting between three months and one year. Two trials compared supplements to additional nutritional advice and one to no intervention. Two of the included trials recruited only children. In one trial the risk of bias was low across all domains, in a second trial the risk of bias was largely unclear and in the third mainly low. Blinding of participants was unclear in two of the trials. Also, in one trial the clinical condition of groups appeared to be unevenly balanced at baseline and in another trial there were concerns surrounding allocation concealment. There were no significant differences between

  5. Sepsis Caused by Achromobacter Xylosoxidans in a Child with Cystic Fibrosis and Severe Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Stobbelaar, Kim; Van Hoorenbeeck, Kim; Lequesne, Monique; De Dooy, Jozef; Ho, Erwin; Vlieghe, Erika; Ieven, Margaretha; Verhulst, Stijn

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 10 Final Diagnosis: Sepsis Symptoms: Fever • hypotension • not tollerating enteral feeds • respiratory deterioration Medication: — Clinical Procedure: IV antibiotics • lungtransplantion Specialty: Pediatrics and Neonatology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Achromobacter xylosoxidans is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, opportunistic pathogen that can be responsible for various severe nosocomial and community-acquired infections. It has been found in immunocompromised patients and patients with several other underlying conditions, but the clinical role of this microorganism in cystic fibrosis is unclear. Case Report: We describe a case of septic shock caused by A. xylosoxidans in a 10-year-old child with cystic fibrosis and severe lung disease. Conclusions: As the prevalence of A. xylosoxidans in cystic fibrosis patients is rising and patient-to-patient transmission is highly probable, further studies are warranted to determine its role and to document the appropriate treatment strategy for eradication and long-term treatment of this organism. PMID:27498677

  6. Achromobacter xylosoxidans genomic characterization and correlation of randomly amplified polymorphic DNA profiles with relevant clinical features [corrected] of cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Magni, Annarita; Trancassini, Maria; Varesi, Paola; Iebba, Valerio; Curci, Anna; Pecoraro, Claudia; Cimino, Giuseppe; Schippa, Serena; Quattrucci, Serena

    2010-04-01

    Achromobacter xylosoxidans is an emerging pathogen increasingly being isolated from respiratory samples of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Its role and clinical significance in lung pathogenesis have not yet been clarified. The aim of the present study was to genetically characterize A. xylosoxidans strains isolated from CF patients by use of randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) profiles and to look for a possible correlation between RAPD profiles and the patients' clinical features, such as their spirometry values, the presence of concomitant chronic bacterial flora at the time of isolation, and the persistent or intermittent presence of A. xylosoxidans strains. A set of 106 strains of A. xylosoxidans were typed by RAPD analysis, and their profiles were analyzed by agglomerative hierarchical classification (AHC) and associated with the patient characteristics mentioned above by factorial discriminant analysis (FDA). The overall results obtained in this study showed that (i) there is a marked genetic relationship between strains isolated from the same patients at different times, (ii) characteristic RAPD profiles are associated with different predicted classes for forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1%), (iii) some characteristic RAPD profiles are associated with different concomitant chronic flora (CCF) profiles, and (iv) there is a significant division of RAPD profiles into "persistent strains" and "intermittent strains" of A. xylosoxidans. These findings seem to imply that the lung habitats found in CF patients are capable of shaping and selecting the colonizing bacterial flora, as seems to be the case for the A. xylosoxidans strains studied.

  7. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator mutations at a referral center for cystic fibrosis*

    PubMed Central

    Coutinho, Cyntia Arivabeni de Araújo Correia; Marson, Fernando Augusto de Lima; Ribeiro, Antônio Fernando; Ribeiro, José Dirceu; Bertuzzo, Carmen Silvia

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the frequency of six mutations (F508del, G542X, G551D, R553X, R1162X, and N1303K) in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) diagnosed, at a referral center, on the basis of abnormal results in two determinations of sweat sodium and chloride concentrations. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study involving 70 patients with CF. The mean age of the patients was 12.38 ± 9.00 years, 51.43% were female, and 94.29% were White. Mutation screening was performed with polymerase chain reaction (for F508del), followed by enzymatic digestion (for other mutations). Clinical analysis was performed on the basis of gender, age, ethnicity, pulmonary/gastrointestinal symptoms, and Shwachman-Kulczycki (SK) score. RESULTS: All of the patients showed pulmonary symptoms, and 8 had no gastrointestinal symptoms. On the basis of the SK scores, CF was determined to be mild, moderate, and severe in 22 (42.3%), 17 (32.7%), and 13 (25.0%) of the patients, respectively. There was no association between F508del mutation and disease severity by SK score. Of the 140 alleles analyzed, F508del mutation was identified in 70 (50%). Other mutations (G542X, G551D, R553X, R1162X, and N1303K) were identified in 12 (7.93%) of the alleles studied. In F508del homozygous patients with severe disease, the OR was 0.124 (95% CI: 0.005-0.826). CONCLUSIONS: In 50% of the alleles studied, the molecular diagnosis of CF was confirmed by identifying a single mutation (F508del). If we consider the analysis of the six most common mutations in the Brazilian population (including F508del), the molecular diagnosis was confirmed in 58.57% of the alleles studied. PMID:24310628

  8. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator Modulators: Implications for the Management of Depression and Anxiety in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Talwalkar, Jaideep S; Koff, Jonathan L; Lee, Hochang B; Britto, Clemente J; Mulenos, Arielle M; Georgiopoulos, Anna M

    Individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF) are at high risk for depression and anxiety, which are associated with worse medical outcomes. Novel therapies for CF hold great promise for improving physical health, but the effects of these therapies on mental health remain poorly understood. This review aims to familiarize psychiatrists with the potential effect of novel CF therapies on depression and anxiety. We discuss novel therapies that directly target the mutant CF protein, the CF transmembrane regulator (CFTR), which are called CFTR modulators. We summarize depression and anxiety screening and treatment guidelines under implementation in accredited CF centers. Case vignettes highlight the complexities of caring for individuals with CF with comorbid depression and anxiety, including patients experiencing worsening depression and anxiety proximate to initiation of CFTR modulator therapy, and management of drug-drug interactions. Although CFTR modulator therapies provide hope for improving clinical outcomes, worsening depression and anxiety occurs in some patients when starting these novel agents. This phenomenon may be multifactorial, with hypothesized contributions from CFTR modulator-psychotropic medication interactions, direct effects of CFTR modulators on central nervous system function, the psychologic effect of starting a potentially life-altering drug, and typical triggers of depression and anxiety such as stress, pain, and inflammation. The medical and psychiatric complexity of many individuals with CF warrants more direct involvement of mental health specialists on the multidisciplinary CF team. Inclusion of mental health variables in patients with CF registries will facilitate further examination at an epidemiologic level. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Diagnosis of Cystic Fibrosis: Consensus Guidelines from the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Philip M; White, Terry B; Ren, Clement L; Hempstead, Sarah E; Accurso, Frank; Derichs, Nico; Howenstine, Michelle; McColley, Susanna A; Rock, Michael; Rosenfeld, Margaret; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Southern, Kevin W; Marshall, Bruce C; Sosnay, Patrick R

    2017-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF), caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, continues to present diagnostic challenges. Newborn screening and an evolving understanding of CF genetics have prompted a reconsideration of the diagnosis criteria. To improve diagnosis and achieve standardized definitions worldwide, the CF Foundation convened a committee of 32 experts in CF diagnosis from 9 countries to develop clear and actionable consensus guidelines on the diagnosis of CF and to clarify diagnostic criteria and terminology for other disorders associated with CFTR mutations. An a priori threshold of ≥80% affirmative votes was required for acceptance of each recommendation statement. After reviewing relevant literature, the committee convened to review evidence and cases. Following the conference, consensus statements were developed by an executive subcommittee. The entire consensus committee voted and approved 27 of 28 statements, 7 of which needed revisions and a second round of voting. It is recommended that diagnoses associated with CFTR mutations in all individuals, from newborn to adult, be established by evaluation of CFTR function with a sweat chloride test. The latest mutation classifications annotated in the Clinical and Functional Translation of CFTR project (http://www.cftr2.org/index.php) should be used to aid in diagnosis. Newborns with a high immunoreactive trypsinogen level and inconclusive CFTR functional and genetic testing may be designated CFTR-related metabolic syndrome or CF screen positive, inconclusive diagnosis; these terms are now merged and equivalent, and CFTR-related metabolic syndrome/CF screen positive, inconclusive diagnosis may be used. International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th Revision codes for use in diagnoses associated with CFTR mutations are included. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Neuraminidase inhibitors for the treatment of influenza infection in people with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Jagannath, Vanitha A; Asokan, G V; Fedorowicz, Zbys; Lee, Tim W R

    2016-02-24

    treatment of influenza infection in people with cystic fibrosis. The absence of high level evidence for the effectiveness of these interventions emphasises the need for well-designed, adequately powered, randomised controlled clinical studies.

  11. Neuraminidase inhibitors for the treatment of influenza infection in people with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Jagannath, Vanitha A; Asokan, G V; Fedorowicz, Zbys; Lee, Tim W R

    2014-02-10

    the treatment of influenza infection in people with cystic fibrosis. The absence of high level evidence for the effectiveness of these interventions emphasises the need for well-designed, adequately powered, randomised controlled clinical trials.

  12. Neuraminidase inhibitors for the treatment of influenza infection in people with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Jagannath, Vanitha A; Asokan, G V; Fedorowicz, Zbys; Singaram, Jai Shanthini; Lee, Tim Wr

    2010-03-17

    the treatment of influenza infection in people with cystic fibrosis. The absence of high level evidence for the effectiveness of these interventions emphasises the need for well-designed, adequately powered, randomised controlled clinical trials.

  13. A metagenomic approach to characterize temperate bacteriophage populations from Cystic Fibrosis and non-Cystic Fibrosis bronchiectasis patients

    PubMed Central

    Tariq, Mohammad A.; Everest, Francesca L. C.; Cowley, Lauren A.; De Soyza, Anthony; Holt, Giles S.; Bridge, Simon H.; Perry, Audrey; Perry, John D.; Bourke, Stephen J.; Cummings, Stephen P.; Lanyon, Clare V.; Barr, Jeremy J.; Smith, Darren L.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa), normally a soil commensal, is an important opportunistic pathogen in Cystic Fibrosis (CF) and non-Cystic Fibrosis Bronchiectasis (nCFBR). Persistent infection correlates with accelerated decline in lung function and early mortality. The horizontal transfer of DNA by temperate bacteriophages can add gene function and selective advantages to their bacterial host within the constrained environment of the lower lung. In this study, we chemically induce temperate bacteriophages from clonal cultures of Pa and identify their mixed viral communities employing metagenomic approaches. We compared 92 temperate phage metagenomes stratified from these clinical backgrounds (47 CF and 45 nCFBR Pa isolates) using MG-RAST and GeneWise2. KEGG analysis shows the complexity of temperate phage accessory gene carriage increases with duration and severity of the disease. Furthermore, we identify the presence of Ig-like motifs within phage structural genes linked to bacterial adhesion and carbohydrate binding including Big_2, He_Pig, and Fn3. This study provides the first clinical support to the proposed bacteriophage adherence to mucus (BAM) model and the evolution of phages interacting at these mucosal surfaces over time. PMID:25741327

  14. Totally implantable vascular access devices for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    A-Rahman, A; Spencer, D

    2003-01-01

    Totally implantable vascular access devices are widely used in people with cystic fibrosis to provide intermittent venous access for therapeutic infusions. Their use is associated with some complications such as thrombosis, embolism and infection. To assess if totally implantable venous access devices are a safe and effective route for providing venous access for intermittent administration of intravenous antibiotics in people with cystic fibrosis, also to assess strategies to reduce possible complications of totally implantable venous access devices (e.g. anticoagulants to reduce the risk of thrombosis). We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group trials register which comprises references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches, handsearching relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. Date of the most recent search: May 2003. Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials which compared the use of totally implantable venous access devices in people with cystic fibrosis to other means of vascular access, trials which compared the different types of these devices against each other and trials which assessed strategies to reduce complications of these devices. No relevant trials were identified. No trials were included in this review. Totally implantable vascular access devices are widely used in people with cystic fibrosis to provide intermittent venous access for therapeutic infusions. Reports of their use in people with cystic fibrosis suggest that they are safe and effective. These reports also suggest that certain interventions might reduce the risk of complications; however, it is disappointing that these reports have not been assessed by randomised controlled trials. This systematic review identifies the need for a multicentre randomised controlled trial assessing both efficacy and possible adverse effects of totally implantable venous access devices in cystic fibrosis.

  15. Totally implantable vascular access devices for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    A-Rahman, Amel K M; Spencer, David

    2012-05-16

    Totally implantable vascular access devices are widely used in people with cystic fibrosis to provide intermittent venous access for therapeutic infusions. Their use is associated with some complications such as thrombosis, embolism and infection. To assess if totally implantable venous access devices provide a safe and effective route for venous access for intermittent administration of intravenous antibiotics in people with cystic fibrosis. Also to assess strategies to reduce possible complications of totally implantable venous access devices (e.g. anticoagulants to reduce the risk of thrombosis). We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register which comprises references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches, handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings.Date of the most recent search: 05 April 2012. Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials which compared the use of totally implantable venous access devices in people with cystic fibrosis to other means of vascular access, trials which compared the different types of these devices against each other and trials which assessed strategies to reduce complications of these devices. No relevant trials were identified. No trials were included in this review. Totally implantable vascular access devices are widely used in people with cystic fibrosis to provide intermittent venous access for therapeutic infusions. Reports of their use in people with cystic fibrosis suggest that they are safe and effective. These reports also suggest that certain interventions might reduce the risk of complications; however, it is disappointing that these reports have not been assessed by randomised controlled trials. This systematic review identifies the need for a multicentre randomised controlled trial assessing both efficacy and possible adverse effects of totally implantable venous access devices in cystic fibrosis.

  16. Practical Guidelines: Lung Transplantation in Patients with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Hirche, T. O.; Knoop, C.; Hebestreit, H.; Shimmin, D.; Solé, A.; Elborn, J. S.; Ellemunter, H.; Aurora, P.; Hogardt, M.; Wagner, T. O. F.; ECORN-CF Study Group

    2014-01-01

    There are no European recommendations on issues specifically related to lung transplantation (LTX) in cystic fibrosis (CF). The main goal of this paper is to provide CF care team members with clinically relevant CF-specific information on all aspects of LTX, highlighting areas of consensus and controversy throughout Europe. Bilateral lung transplantation has been shown to be an important therapeutic option for end-stage CF pulmonary disease. Transplant function and patient survival after transplantation are better than in most other indications for this procedure. Attention though has to be paid to pretransplant morbidity, time for referral, evaluation, indication, and contraindication in children and in adults. This review makes extensive use of specific evidence in the field of lung transplantation in CF patients and addresses all issues of practical importance. The requirements of pre-, peri-, and postoperative management are discussed in detail including bridging to transplant and postoperative complications, immune suppression, chronic allograft dysfunction, infection, and malignancies being the most important. Among the contributors to this guiding information are 19 members of the ECORN-CF project and other experts. The document is endorsed by the European Cystic Fibrosis Society and sponsored by the Christiane Herzog Foundation. PMID:24800072

  17. Strategies for the etiological therapy of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Maiuri, Luigi; Raia, Valeria; Kroemer, Guido

    2017-11-01

    Etiological therapies aim at repairing the underlying cause of cystic fibrosis (CF), which is the functional defect of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein owing to mutations in the CFTR gene. Among these, the F508del CFTR mutation accounts for more than two thirds of CF cases worldwide. Two somehow antinomic schools of thought conceive CFTR repair in a different manner. According to one vision, drugs should directly target the mutated CFTR protein to increase its plasma membrane expression (correctors) or improve its ion transport function (potentiators). An alternative strategy consists in modulating the cellular environment and proteostasis networks in which the mutated CFTR protein is synthesized, traffics to its final destination, the plasma membrane, and is turned over. We will analyze distinctive advantages and drawbacks of these strategies in terms of their scientific and clinical dimensions, and we will propose a global strategy for CF research and development based on a reconciliatory approach. Moreover, we will discuss the utility of preclinical biomarkers that may guide the personalized, patient-specific implementation of CF therapies.

  18. Hypertonic saline releases the attached small intestinal cystic fibrosis mucus.

    PubMed

    Ermund, Anna; Meiss, Lauren N; Scholte, Bob J; Hansson, Gunnar C

    2015-01-01

    Hypertonic saline inhalation has become a cornerstone in the treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF), but its effect on CF mucus is still not understood. In CF, mucus stagnates in the airways, causing mucus plugging, and forming a substrate for bacterial invasion. Using horizontal Ussing-type chambers to allow easy access to the tissue, we have recently shown that the small intestinal mucus of CF mice is attached to the epithelium and not freely movable as opposed to normal mucus, thus pointing to a similarity between the CF mucus in the ileum and airways. In the same type of system, we investigated how hypertonic saline affects mucus thickness, attachment and penetrability to fluorescent beads the size of bacteria in ileal explants from the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator mutant (ΔF508) mouse, in order to characterize how this common therapy affects mucus properties. Hypertonic saline (1.75-5%) detached the mucus from the epithelium, but the mucus remained impenetrable to beads the size of bacteria. This approach might be used to test other mucolytic interventions in CF. © 2014 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. Genotype-phenotype correlation for pulmonary function in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    de Gracia, J; Mata, F; Alvarez, A; Casals, T; Gatner, S; Vendrell, M; de la Rosa, D; Guarner, L; Hermosilla, E

    2005-01-01

    Background: Since the CFTR gene was cloned, more than 1000 mutations have been identified. To date, a clear relationship has not been established between genotype and the progression of lung damage. A study was undertaken of the relationship between genotype, progression of lung disease, and survival in adult patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Methods: A prospective cohort of adult patients with CF and two CFTR mutations followed up in an adult cystic fibrosis unit was analysed. Patients were classified according to functional effects of classes of CFTR mutations and were grouped based on the CFTR molecular position on the epithelial cell surface (I–II/I–II, I–II/III–V). Spirometric values, progression of lung disease, probability of survival, and clinical characteristics were analysed between groups. Results: Seventy four patients were included in the study. Patients with genotype I–II/I–II had significantly lower current spirometric values (p<0.001), greater loss of pulmonary function (p<0.04), a higher proportion of end-stage lung disease (p<0.001), a higher risk of suffering from moderate to severe lung disease (odds ratio 7.12 (95% CI 1.3 to 40.5)) and a lower probability of survival than patients with genotype I–II/III, I–II/IV and I–II/V (p<0.001). Conclusions: The presence of class I or II mutations on both chromosomes is associated with worse respiratory disease and a lower probability of survival. PMID:15994263

  20. Achromobacter xylosoxidans respiratory tract infection in cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Lambiase, A; Catania, M R; Del Pezzo, M; Rossano, F; Terlizzi, V; Sepe, A; Raia, V

    2011-08-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the frequency of Achromobacter xylosoxidans infection in a cohort of cystic fibrosis patients, to investigate antimicrobial sensitivity, to establish possible clonal likeness among strains, and to address the clinical impact of this infection or colonization on the general outcome of these patients. The study was undertaken between January 2004 and December 2008 on 300 patients receiving care at the Regional Cystic Fibrosis Center of the Naples University "Federico II". Sputum samples were checked for bacterial identification. For DNA fingerprinting, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was carried out. Fifty-three patients (17.6%) had at least one positive culture for A. xylosoxidans; of these, 6/53 (11.3%) patients were defined as chronically infected and all were co-colonized by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Of the patients, 18.8% persistently carried multidrug-resistant isolates. Macrorestriction analysis showed the presence of seven major clusters. DNA fingerprinting also showed a genetic relationship among strains isolated from the same patients at different times. The results of DNA fingerprinting indicate evidence of bacterial clonal likeness among the enrolled infected patients. We found no significant differences in the forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1)) and body mass index (BMI) when comparing the case group of A. xylosoxidans chronically infected patients with the control group of P. aeruginosa chronically infected patients.

  1. Anaerobic exercise in pediatric cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Klijn, Peter H; Terheggen-Lagro, Suzanne W; Van Der Ent, Cornelis K; Van Der Net, Janjaap; Kimpen, Jan L; Helders, Paul J

    2003-09-01

    Anaerobic fitness is important for daily functioning of children with cystic fibrosis (CF). The aim of this study was to assess the determinants of anaerobic performance in CF. Anaerobic performance was measured in 39 children with CF (mean age, 13.2 +/- 1.8 (SD) years, forced expired volume in 1 sec (FEV(1)) 81.6 +/- 22.1% predicted), using a Wingate anaerobic test. Significant associations were found for peak power (PP) and mean power (MP) with fat-free mass (FFM) body weight, body mass index, maximal isometric muscle force, and aerobic capacity. Pulmonary function was correlated with anaerobic indices when controlled for FFM. Multiple regression analysis indicated that FFM and FEV(1) accounted for 82% and 86% of the variability in PP and MP, respectively. Patients with moderate CF (FEV(1) < 80%), as compared to mild CF (FEV(1) >/= 80%), had higher PP (difference = 85 W, 95% CI = 27-144 W) and MP (difference = 53 W, 95% CI = 42-63 W) at equivalent FFM. Our results indicate that FFM and pulmonary function are important determinants of anaerobic exercise performance in children with CF. With progression of pulmonary disease, anaerobic performance may be enhanced. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. The Evolution of Cystic Fibrosis Care

    PubMed Central

    Ferkol, Thomas W.

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common life-limiting inherited illness of whites. Most of the morbidity and mortality in CF stems from impaired mucociliary clearance leading to chronic, progressive airways obstruction and damage. Significant progress has been made in the care of patients with CF, with advances focused on improving mucociliary clearance, minimizing inflammatory damage, and managing infections; these advances include new antimicrobial therapies, mucolytic and osmotic agents, and antiinflammatory treatments. More recently, researchers have targeted disease-causing mutations using therapies to promote gene transcription and improve channel function, which has led to impressive physiologic changes in some patients. As we develop more advanced, allele-directed therapies for the management of CF, it will become increasingly important to understand the specific genetic and environmental interactions that cause the significant heterogeneity of lung disease seen in the CF population. This understanding of CF endotypes will allow for more targeted, personalized therapies for future patients. This article reviews the genetic and molecular basis of CF lung disease, the treatments currently available, and novel therapies that are in development. PMID:25764168

  3. Cystic fibrosis and estrogens: a perfect storm

    PubMed Central

    Zeitlin, Pamela L.

    2008-01-01

    Irreversible destruction and widening of the airways due to acquired infections or genetic mutations as well as those of unknown cause are more severe in females. Differences between male and female anatomy, behavior, and hormonal state have been proposed to explain the increased incidence and severity in females with airway disease such as cystic fibrosis (CF); however, a mechanism to explain a sex-related difference has remained elusive. In this issue of the JCI, Coakley et al. report that elevations in the major estrogen hormone in humans — 17β-estradiol — reduce Ca2+-activated Cl– secretion by airway epithelial cells in culture, thereby disrupting ion and water balance (see the related article beginning on page 4025). They measure a similar diminution of nasal epithelial Ca2+-activated Cl– secretion in women with CF during the menstrual cycle phase at which 17β-estradiol level is at its highest. These data suggest that for about one week of a four-week menstrual cycle, women with CF will have a reduced ability to efficiently clear airway secretions, the buildup of which is a hallmark of CF. The authors suggest that these data warrant the testing of antiestrogen therapy in females with CF and propose an alternative avenue for CF therapeutic development. PMID:19033654

  4. Sodium chloride deficiency in cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Ozçelik, U; Göçmen, A; Kiper, N; Coşkun, T; Yilmaz, E; Ozgüç, M

    1994-11-01

    Sodium chloride deficiency (SCD) was observed within the 1st year of life in 12 of 46 cystic fibrosis (CF) patients between July 1989 and September 1992. All patients showed sweating, loss of appetite, fever, vomiting, irritation, dehydration, weakness, and cyanosis during an attack. Mean plasma sodium, potassium and chloride levels were 122.9 (range 106-135), 2.5 (range 1.6-3.5), and 73.3 (range 60-90) mEq/l respectively. Alkalosis and elevated plasma renin activity were detected in all patients. Of the patients, 50% showed microscopic haematuria, and hypercalciuria was detected in two out of four patients. Low urinary sodium and high urinary potassium were observed in the four examined patients. Increased creatinine, BUN and uric acid values returned to normal with treatment. All the patients were treated initially with intravenous fluids and electrolyte solutions. All patients were less than 7 months of age during the first attack, five received only breast milk and the others breast milk with formula milk. Their oral salt supplement was 2-4 mEq/kg per day, which is recommended for CF patients, but could be deficient in excessively sweating infants. The genotype of these patients might be cause of high salt losses. F508 is the most common mutation with the frequency of 38% in our CF patients with SCD, but the frequency of unknown mutations is high (54%).

  5. Appetite stimulants use in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Samya Z; Drury, Donna

    2008-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disease. It affects multiple body organs. The lungs and pancreas are the most affected which results in progressive lung damage and pancreatic insufficiency. Due to the disease process, CF patients require significantly higher caloric intake than recommended for other individuals. The nutritional goal for CF patients is to achieve normal growth and development and, once genetic potential is reached, to maintain good nutritional status throughout life. Evidence has shown that lung function is closely associated with nutritional status in CF and that nutritional status is an independent predictor of survival. Most CF patients are on a high calorie diet to help achieve normal growth and development and maintain good lung function. Inadequate caloric intake in CF can lead to malnutrition. Malnutrition in CF requires careful, multidisciplinary history taking, physical exam, and overall patient/family assessment. Only by determining the actual cause of the malnutrition can appropriate and safe therapies be used to treat it. Appetite stimulants, although efficacious in treating malnutrition in CF, should only be prescribed if decreased food intake secondary to inadequate appetite is the principal cause of the malnutrition and all other contributing factors have been assessed, ruled-out or treated. In this review, we attempted to summarize the use of several appetite stimulants used in CF and other diseases to improve appetite and maximize caloric intake.

  6. The cystic fibrosis lower airways microbial metagenome

    PubMed Central

    Moran Losada, Patricia; Chouvarine, Philippe; Dorda, Marie; Hedtfeld, Silke; Mielke, Samira; Schulz, Angela; Wiehlmann, Lutz

    2016-01-01

    Chronic airway infections determine most morbidity in people with cystic fibrosis (CF). Herein, we present unbiased quantitative data about the frequency and abundance of DNA viruses, archaea, bacteria, moulds and fungi in CF lower airways. Induced sputa were collected on several occasions from children, adolescents and adults with CF. Deep sputum metagenome sequencing identified, on average, approximately 10 DNA viruses or fungi and several hundred bacterial taxa. The metagenome of a CF patient was typically found to be made up of an individual signature of multiple, lowly abundant species superimposed by few disease-associated pathogens, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, as major components. The host-associated signatures ranged from inconspicuous polymicrobial communities in healthy subjects to low-complexity microbiomes dominated by the typical CF pathogens in patients with advanced lung disease. The DNA virus community in CF lungs mainly consisted of phages and occasionally of human pathogens, such as adeno- and herpesviruses. The S. aureus and P. aeruginosa populations were composed of one major and numerous minor clone types. The rare clones constitute a low copy genetic resource that could rapidly expand as a response to habitat alterations, such as antimicrobial chemotherapy or invasion of novel microbes. PMID:27730195

  7. The cystic fibrosis lower airways microbial metagenome.

    PubMed

    Moran Losada, Patricia; Chouvarine, Philippe; Dorda, Marie; Hedtfeld, Silke; Mielke, Samira; Schulz, Angela; Wiehlmann, Lutz; Tümmler, Burkhard

    2016-04-01

    Chronic airway infections determine most morbidity in people with cystic fibrosis (CF). Herein, we present unbiased quantitative data about the frequency and abundance of DNA viruses, archaea, bacteria, moulds and fungi in CF lower airways. Induced sputa were collected on several occasions from children, adolescents and adults with CF. Deep sputum metagenome sequencing identified, on average, approximately 10 DNA viruses or fungi and several hundred bacterial taxa. The metagenome of a CF patient was typically found to be made up of an individual signature of multiple, lowly abundant species superimposed by few disease-associated pathogens, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, as major components. The host-associated signatures ranged from inconspicuous polymicrobial communities in healthy subjects to low-complexity microbiomes dominated by the typical CF pathogens in patients with advanced lung disease. The DNA virus community in CF lungs mainly consisted of phages and occasionally of human pathogens, such as adeno- and herpesviruses. The S. aureus and P. aeruginosa populations were composed of one major and numerous minor clone types. The rare clones constitute a low copy genetic resource that could rapidly expand as a response to habitat alterations, such as antimicrobial chemotherapy or invasion of novel microbes.

  8. Tracheal microaspiration in adult cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Ledson, M J; Wilson, G E; Tran, J; Walshaw, M J

    1998-01-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) has been implicated in the aetiology of lung disease. Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients have a high incidence of GOR symptoms with demonstrable episodes of oesophageal acidification. We studied 24-hour ambulatory tracheal and oesophageal pH in 11 CF patients with GOR symptoms to identify any episodes of tracheal acidification and define their temporal relation to oesophageal reflux and respiratory symptoms. 8 patients had evidence of significant GOR (DeMeester score mean 58; range 17-107) and in 6 it was gross (DeMeester score > 30). 4 patients had tracheal acidification (defined as tracheal pH < 5.5): all had greatly raised DeMeester scores. Two patterns of lowered tracheal pH were seen: a gradual drift downwards of tracheal pH to < 5.5 which recovered slowly, and an acute fall in tracheal pH to < 5.5 with rapid recovery. Only one patient had a fall in peak expiratory flow in conjunction with a decline in tracheal pH, and no association was found between the presence of tracheal microaspiration and pulmonary function. We conclude that tracheal acidification occurs in adult CF patients with GOR.

  9. Infection, inflammation and exercise in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Regular exercise is positively associated with health. It has also been suggested to exert anti-inflammatory effects. In healthy subjects, a single exercise session results in immune cell activation, which is characterized by production of immune modulatory peptides (e.g. IL-6, IL-8), a leukocytosis and enhanced immune cell functions. Upon cessation of exercise, immune activation is followed by a tolerizing phase, characterized by a reduced responsiveness of immune cells. Regular exercise of moderate intensity and duration has been shown to exert anti-inflammatory effects and is associated with a reduced disease incidence and viral infection susceptibility. Specific exercise programs may therefore be used to modify the course of chronic inflammatory and infectious diseases such as cystic fibrosis (CF). Patients with CF suffer from severe and chronic pulmonary infections and inflammation, leading to obstructive and restrictive pulmonary disease, exercise intolerance and muscle cachexia. Inflammation is characterized by a hyper-inflammatory phenotype. Patients are encouraged to engage in exercise programs to maintain physical fitness, quality of life, pulmonary function and health. In this review, we present an overview of available literature describing the association between regular exercise, inflammation and infection susceptibility and discuss the implications of these observations for prevention and treatment of inflammation and infection susceptibility in patients with CF. PMID:23497303

  10. IRON HOMEOSTASIS DURING CYSTIC FIBROSIS PULMONARY EXACERBATION

    PubMed Central

    Gifford, Alex H.; Moulton, Lisa A.; Dorman, Dana B.; Olbina, Gordana; Westerman, Mark; Parker, H. Worth; Stanton, Bruce A.; O’Toole, George A.

    2012-01-01

    Hypoferremia is a marker of disease severity in cystic fibrosis (CF). The effect of systemic antibiotics on iron homeostasis during CF pulmonary exacerbation (CFPE) is unknown. Our central hypotheses were that, by the completion of treatment, serum iron would increase, serum concentrations of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and hepcidin-25, two mediators of hypoferremia, would decrease, and sputum iron would decrease. Methods: Blood and sputum samples were collected from 12 subjects with moderate-to-severe CF (median percent-predicted forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1%) = 29%; median weight = 56 kg) within 24 hours of starting and completing a course of systemic antibiotics. Results: After treatment, subjects showed median FEV1% and body weight improvements of 4.5% and 2.0 kg, respectively (p <0.05). Median serum iron rose by 2.4 μmol/l (p <0.05), but 75% of patients remained hypoferremic. Median serum IL-6 and hepcidin-25 levels fell by 12.1 pg/ml and 37.5 ng/ml, respectively (p <0.05). Median serum erythropoietin (EPO) and hemoglobin levels were unaffected by treatment. We observed a trend toward lower sputum iron content after treatment. Conclusions: Hypoferremia is a salient characteristic of CFPE that improves with waning inflammation. Despite antibiotic treatment, many patients remain hypoferremic and anemic due to ineffective erythropoiesis. PMID:22883617

  11. Lentiviral Vectors and Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Castellani, Stefano; Conese, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a chronic autosomic recessive syndrome, caused by mutations in the CF Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) gene, a chloride channel expressed on the apical side of the airway epithelial cells. The lack of CFTR activity brings a dysregulated exchange of ions and water through the airway epithelium, one of the main aspects of CF lung disease pathophysiology. Lentiviral (LV) vectors, of the Retroviridae family, show interesting properties for CF gene therapy, since they integrate into the host genome and allow long-lasting gene expression. Proof-of-principle that LV vectors can transduce the airway epithelium and correct the basic electrophysiological defect in CF mice has been given. Initial data also demonstrate that LV vectors can be repeatedly administered to the lung and do not give rise to a gross inflammatory process, although they can elicit a T cell-mediated response to the transgene. Future studies will clarify the efficacy and safety profile of LV vectors in new complex animal models with CF, such as ferrets and pigs. PMID:21994643

  12. Active cycle of breathing technique for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Mckoy, Naomi A; Wilson, Lisa M; Saldanha, Ian J; Odelola, Olaide A; Robinson, Karen A

    2016-07-05

    People with cystic fibrosis experience chronic airway infections as a result of mucus build up within the lungs. Repeated infections often cause lung damage and disease. Airway clearance therapies aim to improve mucus clearance, increase sputum production, and improve airway function. The active cycle of breathing technique (also known as ACBT) is an airway clearance method that uses a cycle of techniques to loosen airway secretions including breathing control, thoracic expansion exercises, and the forced expiration technique. This is an update of a previously published review. To compare the clinical effectiveness of the active cycle of breathing technique with other airway clearance therapies in cystic fibrosis. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis Trials Register, compiled from electronic database searches and handsearching of journals and conference abstract books. We also searched the reference lists of relevant articles and reviews.Date of last search: 25 April 2016. Randomised or quasi-randomised controlled clinical studies, including cross-over studies, comparing the active cycle of breathing technique with other airway clearance therapies in cystic fibrosis. Two review authors independently screened each article, abstracted data and assessed the risk of bias of each study. Our search identified 62 studies, of which 19 (440 participants) met the inclusion criteria. Five randomised controlled studies (192 participants) were included in the meta-analysis; three were of cross-over design. The 14 remaining studies were cross-over studies with inadequate reports for complete assessment. The study size ranged from seven to 65 participants. The age of the participants ranged from six to 63 years (mean age 22.33 years). In 13 studies, follow up lasted a single day. However, there were two long-term randomised controlled studies with follow up of one to three years. Most of the studies did not report on key quality items, and therefore, have an unclear risk of

  13. Growing up with cystic fibrosis: achievement, life satisfaction, and mental health.

    PubMed

    Besier, Tanja; Goldbeck, Lutz

    2012-12-01

    Significant improvements in survival of patients with cystic fibrosis lead clinicians and researchers to focus on how patients can be enabled to lead as normal a life as possible throughout their entire life span. The study aimed at analyzing the vocational and social achievement, life satisfaction, and psychological well-being of adolescents and adults with cystic fibrosis. During a routine clinic visit, 670 German patients with cystic fibrosis (12-64 years, M = 23.1) completed questionnaires on their vocational and social achievement, life satisfaction, and symptoms of anxiety and depression. Cross-sectional analyses were applied across four age-groups (12-20 years, 21-30 years, 31-40 years, and 41 years and older). Most patients with cystic fibrosis reached employment and independence from their parents during adulthood. Life satisfaction was negatively associated with age, with the largest difference between the second and third life decade. A strong negative association of anxious and depressive symptoms with life satisfaction was found. Lung function was significantly positively related to life satisfaction, even though this association was less pronounced. Most patients with cystic fibrosis achieve ordinary social and vocational development into adulthood. A favorable mental health status seems more important than pulmonary function to maintain a good satisfaction with life.

  14. Antimicrobial resistance in the respiratory microbiota of people with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Sherrard, Laura J; Tunney, Michael M; Elborn, J Stuart

    2014-08-23

    Cystic fibrosis is characterised by chronic polymicrobial infection and inflammation in the airways of patients. Antibiotic treatment regimens, targeting recognised pathogens, have substantially contributed to increased life expectancy of patients with this disease. Although the emergence of antimicrobial resistance and selection of highly antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains is of major concern, the clinical relevance in cystic fibrosis is yet to be defined. Resistance has been identified in recognised cystic fibrosis pathogens and in other bacteria (eg, Prevotella and Streptococcus spp) detected in the airway microbiota, but their role in the pathophysiology of infection and inflammation in chronic lung disease is unclear. Increased antibiotic resistance in cystic fibrosis might be attributed to a range of complex factors including horizontal gene transfer, hypoxia, and biofilm formation. Strategies to manage antimicrobial resistance consist of new antibiotics or localised delivery of antimicrobial agents, iron sequestration, inhibition of quorum-sensing, and resistome analysis. Determination of the contributions of every bacterial species to lung health or disease in cystic fibrosis might also have an important role in the management of antibiotic resistance.

  15. Loss of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator Impairs Intestinal Oxalate Secretion.

    PubMed

    Knauf, Felix; Thomson, Robert B; Heneghan, John F; Jiang, Zhirong; Adebamiro, Adedotun; Thomson, Claire L; Barone, Christina; Asplin, John R; Egan, Marie E; Alper, Seth L; Aronson, Peter S

    2017-01-01

    Patients with cystic fibrosis have an increased incidence of hyperoxaluria and calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis. Net intestinal absorption of dietary oxalate results from passive paracellular oxalate absorption as modified by oxalate back secretion mediated by the SLC26A6 oxalate transporter. We used mice deficient in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (Cftr) to test the hypothesis that SLC26A6-mediated oxalate secretion is defective in cystic fibrosis. We mounted isolated intestinal tissue from C57BL/6 (wild-type) and Cftr(-/-) mice in Ussing chambers and measured transcellular secretion of [(14)C]oxalate. Intestinal tissue isolated from Cftr(-/-) mice exhibited significantly less transcellular oxalate secretion than intestinal tissue of wild-type mice. However, glucose absorption, another representative intestinal transport process, did not differ in Cftr(-/-) tissue. Compared with wild-type mice, Cftr(-/-) mice showed reduced expression of SLC26A6 in duodenum by immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis. Furthermore, coexpression of CFTR stimulated SLC26A6-mediated Cl(-)-oxalate exchange in Xenopus oocytes. In association with the profound defect in intestinal oxalate secretion, Cftr(-/-) mice had serum and urine oxalate levels 2.5-fold greater than those of wild-type mice. We conclude that defective intestinal oxalate secretion mediated by SLC26A6 may contribute to the hyperoxaluria observed in this mouse model of cystic fibrosis. Future studies are needed to address whether similar mechanisms contribute to the increased risk for calcium oxalate stone formation observed in patients with cystic fibrosis.

  16. A functional CFTR assay using primary cystic fibrosis intestinal organoids.

    PubMed

    Dekkers, Johanna F; Wiegerinck, Caroline L; de Jonge, Hugo R; Bronsveld, Inez; Janssens, Hettie M; de Winter-de Groot, Karin M; Brandsma, Arianne M; de Jong, Nienke W M; Bijvelds, Marcel J C; Scholte, Bob J; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E S; van den Brink, Stieneke; Clevers, Hans; van der Ent, Cornelis K; Middendorp, Sabine; Beekman, Jeffrey M

    2013-07-01

    We recently established conditions allowing for long-term expansion of epithelial organoids from intestine, recapitulating essential features of the in vivo tissue architecture. Here we apply this technology to study primary intestinal organoids of people suffering from cystic fibrosis, a disease caused by mutations in CFTR, encoding cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator. Forskolin induces rapid swelling of organoids derived from healthy controls or wild-type mice, but this effect is strongly reduced in organoids of subjects with cystic fibrosis or in mice carrying the Cftr F508del mutation and is absent in Cftr-deficient organoids. This pattern is phenocopied by CFTR-specific inhibitors. Forskolin-induced swelling of in vitro-expanded human control and cystic fibrosis organoids corresponds quantitatively with forskolin-induced anion currents in freshly excised ex vivo rectal biopsies. Function of the CFTR F508del mutant protein is restored by incubation at low temperature, as well as by CFTR-restoring compounds. This relatively simple and robust assay will facilitate diagnosis, functional studies, drug development and personalized medicine approaches in cystic fibrosis.

  17. Family Stress with Chronic Childhood Illness: Cystic Fibrosis, Neuromuscular Disease, and Renal Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holroyd, Jean; Guthrie, Donald

    1986-01-01

    Parents of children with neuromuscular disease, cystic fibrosis, and renal disease were compared with parents of control subjects matched by age to the clinical cases. The three clinical groups exhibited different patterns of stressful response, consistent with the nature of their illnesses and the requirements for care imposed on the families.…

  18. Family Stress with Chronic Childhood Illness: Cystic Fibrosis, Neuromuscular Disease, and Renal Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holroyd, Jean; Guthrie, Donald

    1986-01-01

    Parents of children with neuromuscular disease, cystic fibrosis, and renal disease were compared with parents of control subjects matched by age to the clinical cases. The three clinical groups exhibited different patterns of stressful response, consistent with the nature of their illnesses and the requirements for care imposed on the families.…

  19. Severe Achromobacter xylosoxidans infection and loss of sputum bacterial diversity in an adult patient with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Talbot, Nick P; Flight, William G

    2016-08-01

    Achromobacter spp. are emerging pathogens in the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis. We report the case of an adult patient with cystic fibrosis and chronic A. xylosoxidans infection who experienced rapid, progressive clinical deterioration. Metagenomic analysis of the sputum revealed that the airway microbiota was almost entirely dominated by A. xylosoxidans. We review the impact of this organism on lung function and the airway microbiome in cystic fibrosis, and discuss the potential for cross-infection between patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Chest physiotherapy compared to no chest physiotherapy for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Warnock, Louise; Gates, Alison

    2015-12-21

    Chest physiotherapy is widely used in people with cystic fibrosis in order to clear mucus from the airways. This is an updated version of previously published reviews. To determine the effectiveness and acceptability of chest physiotherapy compared to no treatment or spontaneous cough alone to improve mucus clearance in cystic fibrosis. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register which comprises references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings.Date of the most recent search of the Group's Cystic Fibrosis Trials Register: 02 June 2015. Randomised or quasi-randomised clinical studies in which a form of chest physiotherapy (airway clearance technique) were taken for consideration in people with cystic fibrosis compared with either no physiotherapy treatment or spontaneous cough alone. Both authors independently assessed study eligibility, extracted data and assessed the risk of bias in the included studies. There was heterogeneity in the published outcomes, with variable reporting which meant pooling of the data for meta-analysis was not possible. The searches identified 157 studies, of which eight cross-over studies (data from 96 participants) met the inclusion criteria. There were differences between studies in the way that interventions were delivered, with several of the intervention groups combining more than one treatment modality. One included study looked at autogenic drainage, six considered conventional chest physiotherapy, three considered oscillating positive expiratory pressure, seven considered positive expiratory pressure and one considered high pressure positive expiratory pressure. Of the eight studies, six were single-treatment studies and in two, the treatment intervention was performed over two consecutive days (once daily in one, twice daily in the other). This enormous heterogeneity in the treatment

  1. Chest physiotherapy compared to no chest physiotherapy for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Warnock, Louise; Gates, Alison; van der Schans, Cees P

    2013-09-04

    Chest physiotherapy is widely used in people with cystic fibrosis in order to clear mucus from the airways. To determine the effectiveness and acceptability of chest physiotherapy compared to no treatment or spontaneous cough alone to improve mucus clearance in cystic fibrosis. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register which comprises references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings.Date of the most recent search of the Group's Cystic Fibrosis Trials Register: 04 February 2013. Randomised or quasi-randomised clinical studies in which a form of chest physiotherapy (airway clearance technique) were taken for consideration in people with cystic fibrosis compared with either no physiotherapy treatment or spontaneous cough alone. Both authors independently assessed study eligibility, extracted data and assessed study quality. There was heterogeneity in the published outcomes, with variable reporting which meant pooling of the data for meta-analysis was not possible. The searches identified 144 studies, of which eight cross-over studies (data from 96 participants) met the inclusion criteria. There were differences between studies in the way that interventions were delivered, with several of the intervention groups combining more than one treatment modality. One included study looked at autogenic drainage, six considered conventional chest physiotherapy, three considered oscillating positive expiratory pressure, seven considered positive expiratory pressure and one considered high pressure positive expiratory pressure. Of the eight studies, six were single-treatment studies and in two, the treatment intervention was performed over two consecutive days (once daily in one, twice daily in the other). This enormous heterogeneity in the treatment interventions prevented any meta-analyses from being performed.Four studies, involving

  2. Screening policy for cystic fibrosis: the role of evidence.

    PubMed

    Wilfond, Benjamin S

    1995-01-01

    Setting priorities about medical services, including genetic testing services, often occurs in an extemporaneous fashion. Normative assumptions may not be examined critically, although doing so is a necessary component of making health policy decisions about clinical practice. The normative dimension to health policy questions suggests a need for greater public participation in the development of clinical practice guidelines. The experiences of newborn screening and carrier screening for cystic fibrosis in the United States can be examined within the framework of two models of health policy development that help explain the role in health policy development of normative assumptions and public participation. Specifically, this paper focuses on assumptions about what counts as sufficient empirical data to make health policy decisions.

  3. Report of the European Respiratory Society/European Cystic Fibrosis Society task force on the care of adults with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Elborn, J Stuart; Bell, Scott C; Madge, Susan L; Burgel, Pierre-Regis; Castellani, Carlo; Conway, Steven; De Rijcke, Karleen; Dembski, Birgit; Drevinek, Pavel; Heijerman, Harry G M; Innes, J Alistair; Lindblad, Anders; Marshall, Bruce; Olesen, Hanne V; Reimann, Andreas L; Solé, Ampara; Viviani, Laura; Wagner, Thomas O F; Welte, Tobias; Blasi, Francesco

    2016-02-01

    The improved survival in people with cystic fibrosis has led to an increasing number of patients reaching adulthood. This trend is likely to be maintained over the next decades, suggesting a need to increase the number of centres with expertise in the management of adult patients with cystic fibrosis. These centres should be capable of delivering multidisciplinary care addressing the complexity of the disease, in addition to addressing the psychological burden on patients and their families. Further issues that require attention are organ transplantation and end of life management.Lung disease in adults with cystic fibrosis drives most of the clinical care requirements, and major life-threatening complications, such as respiratory infection, respiratory failure, pneumothorax and haemoptysis, and the management of lung transplantation require expertise from trained respiratory physicians. The taskforce therefore strongly reccommends that medical leadership in multidisciplinary adult teams should be attributed to a respiratory physician adequately trained in cystic fibrosis management.The task force suggests the implementation of a core curriculum for trainees in adult respiratory medicine and the selection and accreditation of training centres that deliver postgraduate training to the standards of the HERMES programme. Copyright ©ERS 2016.

  4. Exercise oxidative skeletal muscle metabolism in adolescents with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Werkman, Maarten; Jeneson, Jeroen; Helders, Paul; Arets, Bert; van der Ent, Kors; Velthuis, Birgitta; Nievelstein, Rutger; Takken, Tim; Hulzebos, Erik

    2016-03-01

    What is the central question of this study? Do intrinsic abnormalities in oxygenation and/or muscle oxidative metabolism contribute to exercise intolerance in adolescents with mild cystic fibrosis? What is the main finding and its importance? This study found no evidence that in adolescents with mild cystic fibrosis in a stable clinical state intrinsic abnormalities in skeletal muscle oxidative metabolism seem to play a clinical significant role. Based on these results, we concluded that there is no metabolic constraint to benefit from exercise training. Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) are reported to have limited exercise capacity. There is no consensus about a possible abnormality in skeletal muscle oxidative metabolism in CF. Our aim was to test the hypothesis that abnormalities in oxygenation and/or muscle oxidative metabolism contribute to exercise intolerance in adolescents with mild CF. Ten adolescents with CF (12-18 years of age; forced expiratory volume in 1 s >80% of predicted; and resting oxygen saturation >94%) and 10 healthy age-matched control (HC) subjects were tested with supine cycle ergometry using near-infrared spectroscopy and (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy to study skeletal muscle oxygenation and oxidative metabolism during rest, exercise and recovery. No statistically significant (P > 0.1) differences in peak workload and peak oxygen uptake per kilogram lean body mass were found between CF and HC subjects. No differences were found between CF and HC subjects in bulk changes of quadriceps phosphocreatine (P = 0.550) and inorganic phosphate (P = 0.896) content and pH (P = 0.512) during symptom-limited exercise. Furthermore, we found statistically identical kinetics for phosphocreatine resynthesis during recovery for CF and HC subjects (P = 0.53). No statistically significant difference in peak exercise arbitrary units for total haemoglobin content was found between CF and HC subjects (P = 0.66). The results of this study provide

  5. Draft genome sequences of four Achromobacter ruhlandii strains isolated from cystic fibrosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Elenice RA; Rocha, Géssica A; Ferreira, Alex G; Leão, Robson S; Albano, Rodolpho M; Marques, Elizabeth A

    2016-01-01

    Achromobacter species are being increasingly isolated from the respiratory tract of cystic fibrosis patients. Recent reports indicate that Achromobacter ruhlandii is a potential human pathogen in cystic fibrosis-related infections. Here we report the draft genome of four A. ruhlandii strains isolated from cystic fibrosis patients in Brazil. This report describes A. ruhlandii as a potential opportunistic pathogen in cystic fibrosis and provides a framework to for additional enquires into potential virulence factors and resistance mechanisms within this species. PMID:27812598

  6. A novel case of diabetic muscle necrosis in a patient with cystic fibrosis-related diabetes.

    PubMed

    Chalasani, Sreelatha; Bettadahalli, Shankar S; Bhupathi, Satya V; Aswani, Vijay H

    2013-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a recessive autosomal disease caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene. Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes (CFRD) is a common comorbidity of cystic fibrosis. Diabetic myonecrosis is a rare self-limited complication of poorly controlled diabetes mellitus that commonly presents with acute, intense pain and swelling of lower extremities and responds well to conservative management. We report the first case of diabetic myonecrosis in a patient with CFRD.

  7. Draft genome sequences of four Achromobacter ruhlandii strains isolated from cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Elenice Ra; Rocha, Géssica A; Ferreira, Alex G; Leão, Robson S; Albano, Rodolpho M; Marques, Elizabeth A

    2016-12-01

    Achromobacter species are being increasingly isolated from the respiratory tract of cystic fibrosis patients. Recent reports indicate that Achromobacter ruhlandii is a potential human pathogen in cystic fibrosis-related infections. Here we report the draft genome of four A. ruhlandii strains isolated from cystic fibrosis patients in Brazil. This report describes A. ruhlandii as a potential opportunistic pathogen in cystic fibrosis and provides a framework to for additional enquires into potential virulence factors and resistance mechanisms within this species.

  8. Pharmacokinetics of ciprofloxacin in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, R L; Koup, J R; Williams-Warren, J; Weber, A; Heggen, L; Stempel, D; Smith, A L

    1987-01-01

    We studied the pharmacokinetics of ciprofloxacin in 12 adult males with and 12 adult males without cystic fibrosis (CF). In a randomized crossover sequence, the subjects received 200 mg intravenously or 750 mg orally. With intravenous dosing, subjects also received 651 mg of iothalamate, a marker of glomerular filtration, and 700 mg of antipyrine, an indicator of hepatic oxidative drug metabolism. Pharmacokinetic parameters were determined by model independent methods. In the CF subjects, the ciprofloxacin concentration in serum during the first hour after intravenous administration was higher, and the oral absorption rate was slower. Other parameters did not differ between the groups. Mean concentrations in serum 5 min postinfusion were 3.08 and 2.14 micrograms/ml, and mean peak concentrations after oral dosing were 3.24 and 3.34 micrograms/ml in subjects with and without CF, respectively. Mean values for elimination half-life in all subjects were 4.8 and 5.0 h after intravenous and oral administration, respectively. The mean renal clearances in all subjects after intravenous and oral administration were 19.4 and 14.5 liters/h and accounted for 64 and 47% of the total clearance, respectively. These values were significantly greater than renal iothalamate clearance, indicating that tubular secretion contributed to the renal clearance of ciprofloxacin. A total of 69 and 35.4% of the administered ciprofloxacin was recovered from the urine within 48 h after intravenous and oral administration, respectively. The mean bioavailability was 71.2% and did not differ between the groups. We conclude that similar dosing regimens can be used to treat patients with CF and their normal counterparts. PMID:3619423

  9. Detection of multiple cystic fibrosis mutations by reverse dot blot hybridization: a technology for carrier screening.

    PubMed

    Chehab, F F; Wall, J

    1992-05-01

    We describe the implementation of a modified version of the reverse dot blot hybridization technology to detect eight cystic fibrosis mutations. The method is simple, quick, reliable, inexpensive, and nonradioactive and utilizes the sensitivity of the polymerase chain reaction coupled with colored or chemiluminescent substrates for mutation detection. We have used this system in a clinical laboratory to identify the delta F508, G542X, G551D, R553X, 621 + 1G----T, W1282X, N1303K, and 1717G----A mutations. The technique is practical for genotyping individuals at many potential mutation sites, as in cystic fibrosis and beta-thalassemia, in which over 95 mutations can cause disease. This technology appears to be the method of choice for the widespread carrier screening of multiple cystic fibrosis mutations.

  10. Sepsis Caused by Achromobacter Xylosoxidans in a Child with Cystic Fibrosis and Severe Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Stobbelaar, Kim; Van Hoorenbeeck, Kim; Lequesne, Monique; De Dooy, Jozef; Ho, Erwin; Vlieghe, Erika; Ieven, Margaretha; Verhulst, Stijn

    2016-08-08

    BACKGROUND Achromobacter xylosoxidans is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, opportunistic pathogen that can be responsible for various severe nosocomial and community-acquired infections. It has been found in immunocompromised patients and patients with several other underlying conditions, but the clinical role of this microorganism in cystic fibrosis is unclear. CASE REPORT We describe a case of septic shock caused by A. xylosoxidans in a 10-year-old child with cystic fibrosis and severe lung disease. CONCLUSIONS As the prevalence of A. xylosoxidans in cystic fibrosis patients is rising and patient-to-patient transmission is highly probable, further studies are warranted to determine its role and to document the appropriate treatment strategy for eradication and long-term treatment of this organism.

  11. Early Anti-Pseudomonal Acquisition in Young Patients with Cystic Fibrosis: Rationale and Design of the EPIC Clinical Trial and Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Treggiari, Miriam M; Rosenfeld, Margaret; Mayer-Hamblett, Nicole; Retsch-Bogart, George; Gibson, Ronald L.; Williams, Judy; Emerson, Julia; Kronmal, Richard A; Ramsey, Bonnie W

    2009-01-01

    Background The primary cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) is progressive obstructive pulmonary disease due to chronic endobronchial infection, particularly with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa). Risk factors for and clinical impact of early Pa infection in young CF patients are less well understood. Purpose The present studies are designed to evaluate risk factors and outcomes associated with early Pa acquisition, and the benefits and harms of four anti-pseudomonal treatment regimens in young CF patients initiated after the first Pa positive respiratory culture. Methods The Early Pseudomonas Infection Control (EPIC) program consists of two studies, a randomized multicenter trial in CF patients ages 1–12 years at first isolation of Pa from a respiratory culture, and a longitudinal cohort study enrolling Pa-negative patients. Using a factorial design, trial participants are assigned for 18 months to either anti-pseudomonal treatment on a scheduled quarterly basis (cycled therapy) or based on recovery of Pa from quarterly respiratory cultures (culture-based therapy). The study drugs include inhaled tobramycin (300 mg BID) for 28 days, combined with either oral ciprofloxacin (15–20 mg/kg BID) or oral placebo for 14 days. The primary endpoints of the trial are the time to pulmonary exacerbation requiring IV antibiotics or hospitalization for respiratory symptoms, and the proportion of patients with new Pa-positive respiratory cultures during the study. The broad goals of the observational study are to describe the risk factors and outcomes associated with early acquisition of Pa. 306 patients were randomized in the clinical trial and 1,787 were enrolled in the cohort study. Conclusions These companion studies will provide valuable epidemiological and microbiological information on early CF lung disease and Pa acquisition, and safety and clinical efficacy data on anti-pseudomonal treatment strategies for early Pa infections in the

  12. Atomic Structure of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhe; Chen, Jue

    2016-12-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an anion channel evolved from the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family. In this study, we determined the structure of zebrafish CFTR in the absence of ATP by electron cryo-microscopy to 3.7 Å resolution. Human and zebrafish CFTR share 55% sequence identity, and 42 of the 46 cystic-fibrosis-causing missense mutational sites are identical. In CFTR, we observe a large anion conduction pathway lined by numerous positively charged residues. A single gate near the extracellular surface closes the channel. The regulatory domain, dephosphorylated, is located in the intracellular opening between the two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs), preventing NBD dimerization and channel opening. The structure also reveals why many cystic-fibrosis-causing mutations would lead to defects either in folding, ion conduction, or gating and suggests new avenues for therapeutic intervention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis for cystic fibrosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Biazotti, Maria Cristina Santoro; Pinto, Walter; de Albuquerque, Maria Cecília Romano Maciel; Fujihara, Litsuko Shimabukuro; Suganuma, Cláudia Haru; Reigota, Renata Bednar; Bertuzzo, Carmen Sílvia

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene. This disorder produces a variable phenotype including lung disease, pancreatic insufficiency, and meconium ileus plus bilateral agenesis of the vas deferens causing obstructive azoospermia and male infertility. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis is an alternative that allows identification of embryos affected by this or other genetic diseases. We report a case of couple with cystic fibrosis; the woman had the I148 T mutation and the man had the Delta F508 gene mutation. The couple underwent in vitro fertilization, associated with preimplantation genetic diagnosis, and with subsequent selection of healthy embryos for uterine transfer. The result was an uneventful pregnancy and delivery of a healthy male baby. PMID:25993078

  14. Antiinflammatory therapies for cystic fibrosis: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Prescott, William A; Johnson, Cary E

    2005-04-01

    Inflammation is a major component of the vicious cycle characterizing cystic fibrosis pulmonary disease. If untreated, this inflammatory process irreversibly damages the airways, leading to bronchiectasis and ultimately respiratory failure. Antiinflammatory drugs for cystic fibrosis lung disease appear to have beneficial effects on disease parameters. These agents include oral corticosteroids and ibuprofen, as well as azithromycin, which, in addition to its antimicrobial effects, also possesses antiinflammatory properties. Inhaled corticosteroids, colchicine, methotrexate, montelukast, pentoxifylline, nutritional supplements, and protease replacement have not had a significant impact on the disease. Therapy with oral corticosteroids, ibuprofen, and fish oil is limited by adverse effects. Azithromycin appears to be safe and effective, and is thus the most promising antiinflammatory therapy available for patients with cystic fibrosis. Pharmacologic therapy with antiinflammatory agents should be started early in the disease course, before extensive irreversible lung damage has occurred.

  15. Prenatal diagnosis of cystic fibrosis: 10-years experience.

    PubMed

    Hadj Fredj, S; Ouali, F; Siala, H; Bibi, A; Othmani, R; Dakhlaoui, B; Zouari, F; Messaoud, T

    2015-06-01

    We present in this study our 10years experience in prenatal diagnosis of cystic fibrosis performed in the Tunisian population. Based on family history, 40 Tunisian couples were selected for prenatal diagnosis. Fetal DNA was isolated from amniotic fluid collected by transabdominal amniocentesis or from chronic villi by transcervical chorionic villus sampling. The genetic analysis for cystic fibrosis mutations was performed by denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis and denaturing high-pressure liquid phase chromatography. We performed microsatellites analysis by capillary electrophoresis in order to verify the absence of maternal cell contamination. Thirteen fetuses were affected, 21 were heterozygous carriers and 15 were healthy with two normal alleles of CFTR gene. Ten couples opted for therapeutic abortion. The microsatellites genotyping showed the absence of contamination of the fetal DNA by maternal DNA in 93.75%. Our diagnostic strategy provides rapid and reliable prenatal diagnosis at risk families of cystic fibrosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Can Cystic Fibrosis Patients Finally Catch a Breath With Lumacaftor/Ivacaftor?

    PubMed

    Schneider, E K; Reyes-Ortega, F; Li, J; Velkov, T

    2017-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-limiting disease caused by defective or deficient cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) activity. The recent US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of lumacaftor combined with ivacaftor (Orkambi) targets patients with the F508del-CFTR. The question remains: Is this breakthrough combination therapy the "magic-bullet" cure for the vast majority of patients with CF? This review covers the contemporary clinical and scientific knowledge-base for lumacaftor/ivacaftor and highlights the emerging issues from recent conflicting literature reports.

  17. 21 CFR 866.5910 - Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Quality control material for cystic fibrosis... Test Systems § 866.5910 Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays. (a) Identification. Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays. A quality control material for...

  18. 21 CFR 866.5910 - Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Quality control material for cystic fibrosis... Test Systems § 866.5910 Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays. (a) Identification. Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays. A quality control material for...

  19. Challenges in pulmonary fibrosis. 3: Cystic lung disease.

    PubMed

    Cosgrove, Gregory P; Frankel, Stephen K; Brown, Kevin K

    2007-09-01

    Cystic lung disease is a frequently encountered problem caused by a diverse group of diseases. Distinguishing true cystic lung disease from other entities, such as cavitary lung disease and emphysema, is important given the differing prognostic implications. In this paper the features of the cystic lung diseases are reviewed and contrasted with their mimics, and the clinical and radiographic features of both diffuse (pulmonary Langerhans' cell histiocytosis and lymphangioleiomyomatosis) and focal or multifocal cystic lung disease are discussed.

  20. Challenges in pulmonary fibrosis · 3: Cystic lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Cosgrove, Gregory P; Frankel, Stephen K; Brown, Kevin K

    2007-01-01

    Cystic lung disease is a frequently encountered problem caused by a diverse group of diseases. Distinguishing true cystic lung disease from other entities, such as cavitary lung disease and emphysema, is important given the differing prognostic implications. In this paper the features of the cystic lung diseases are reviewed and contrasted with their mimics, and the clinical and radiographic features of both diffuse (pulmonary Langerhans' cell histiocytosis and lymphangioleiomyomatosis) and focal or multifocal cystic lung disease are discussed. PMID:17726170

  1. Multiplex PCR reveals that viruses are more frequent than bacteria in children with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Miró-Cañís, Sílvia; Capilla-Rubio, Sílvia; Marzo-Checa, Laura; Fontanals-Aymerich, Dionisia; Sanfeliu-Sala, Isabel; Espasa-Soley, Mateu; Asensio-de-la-Cruz, Oscar

    2017-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a degenerative disease characterized by progressive epithelial secretory gland dysfunction associated with repeated respiratory infections. Bacterial infections are very frequent in children with cystic fibrosis, but because rapid METHODS: for screening for the wide variety of potentially involved viruses were unavailable until recently, the frequency of viral presence is unknown. Multiplex PCR enables screening for many viruses involved in respiratory infections. This study aimed to evaluate the frequency of viruses and bacteria in respiratory specimens from children with cystic fibrosis and to clarify the incidence and characteristics (seasonality and age of patients) of different viruses detected in children with cystic fibrosis. In this 2-year prospective study, we obtained paired nasopharyngeal-swab and sputum specimens from children with cystic fibrosis during clinical respiratory examinations separated by at least 14days. We analyzed viruses in nasopharyngeal-swab specimens with multiplex PCR and bacteria in sputum with standard methods. We analyzed 368 paired specimens from 33 children. We detected viruses in 154 (41.8%) and bacteria in 132 (35.9%). Bacteria were commoner in spring and summer; viruses were commoner in autumn and winter. In every season, Staphylococcus aureus was the commonest bacteria and rhinovirus was the commonest virus. Nearly all infections with Haemophilus influenzae occurred in autumn and winter. Viruses were more prevalent in children <5 years old, and bacteria were more prevalent in children ≥12 years old. Multiplex PCR screening for respiratory viruses is feasible in children with cystic fibrosis; the clinical implications of screening warrant further study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Sputum glucose and glycemic control in cystic fibrosis-related diabetes: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Van Sambeek, Lindsey; Cowley, Elise S; Newman, Dianne K; Kato, Roberta

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes affects up to half of cystic fibrosis patients and is associated with increased mortality and more frequent pulmonary exacerbations. However, it is unclear to what degree good glycemic control might mitigate these risks and clinical outcomes have not previously been studied in relation to glucose from the lower airways, the site of infection and CF disease progression. We initially hypothesized that diabetic cystic fibrosis patients with glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)) > 6.5% have worse pulmonary function, longer and more frequent exacerbations and also higher sputum glucose levels than patients with HbA(1c) ≤ 6.5% or cystic fibrosis patients without diabetes. To test this, we analyzed spontaneously expectorated sputum samples from 88 cystic fibrosis patients. The median sputum glucose concentration was 0.70 mM (mean, 4.75 mM; range, 0-64.6 mM). Sputum glucose was not correlated with age, sex, body mass index, diabetes diagnosis, glycemic control, exacerbation frequency or length, or pulmonary function. Surprisingly, sputum glucose was highest in subjects with normal glucose tolerance, suggesting the dynamics of glycemic control, sputum glucose and pulmonary infections are more complex than previously thought. Two-year mean HbA(1c) was positively correlated with the length of exacerbation admission (p < 0.01), and negatively correlated with measures of pulmonary function (p < 0.01). While total number of hospitalizations for exacerbations were not significantly different, subjects with an HbA(1c) > 6.5% were hospitalized on average 6 days longer than those with HbA(1c) ≤ 6.5% (p < 0.01). Current clinical care guidelines for cystic fibrosis-related diabetes target HbA(1c) ≤ 7% to limit long-term microvascular damage, but more stringent glycemic control (HbA(1c) ≤ 6.5%) may further reduce the short-term pulmonary complications.

  3. Immune modulation following aerobic exercise in children with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Boas, S R; Danduran, M J; McColley, S A; Beaman, K; O'Gorman, M R

    2000-05-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated altered immune response following exercise in healthy adults and children. As data are lacking in children with cystic fibrosis, we evaluated the immune response following acute exercise and hypothesized that acute increases in cellular changes would be seen but would be blunted in subjects with CF. Leukocytes, lymphocytes, and their subsets as well as natural killer cell number and activity were determined before, immediately after, and one hour post exhaustive exercise in 15 children with cystic fibrosis (8-21 yrs, FEV1 69.5+/-18.0%, colonized with P aeruginosa) and 15 healthy controls (8-18 yrs, FEV1 107.5+/-10.7%). At baseline the cystic fibrosis group had greater leukocytes (9.25+/-2.83 vs. 5.17+/-0.96 x 10(9) cells/liter). Immediately post exercise, the cystic fibrosis group demonstrated increases in cell counts for leukocytes (32.4%), lymphocytes (61.8%), granulocytes (36.4%), monocytes (76.2%), and natural killer cells (315%). Similar percentage increases were seen in cell counts for the controls (leukocytes: 39.5%, lymphocytes: 78.5%, granulocytes: 32.0%, monocytes: 75.9%, and NK cells: 442%). Natural killer cell activity also increased by 57.9% in the group with cystic fibrosis and by 43.6% in the healthy controls. Except for elevated leukocyte and granulocyte counts, values returned to baseline at one hour post-exercise. In conclusion, the cellular immune response to acute exercise in children with mild to moderate cystic fibrosis appears normal.

  4. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Children with Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Dziekiewicz, Marcin A; Banaszkiewicz, Aleksandra; Urzykowska, Agnieszka; Lisowska, Aleksandra; Rachel, Marta; Sands, Dorota; Walkowiak, Jaroslaw; Radzikowski, Andrzej; Albrecht, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Previously published studies have indicated that gastroesophageal reflux (GER) disease is common in pediatric patients with cystic fibrosis. The aim of the present study was to get insight into the incidence of GER and to characterize the nature of reflux episodes in children with cystic fibrosis. This was a multicenter, prospective study of children with cystic fibrosis older than 18 months. Forty four consecutive patients (22 boys, mean age 10.4 ± 3.6, range 3.0-17.8 years) were enrolled into the study. All patients underwent 24 h pH-impedance monitoring. GER were classified according to the widely recognized criteria as an acid, weakly acid, weakly alkaline, or proximal. The pH-impedance trace was considered abnormal when acid exposure was >6 %. GER was diagnosed in 24/44 (54.5 %) children. A total of 1585 (median 35, range 7-128) reflux episodes were detected; 1199 (75.6 %) were acidic, 382 (24.1 %) weakly acidic, and 4 (0.3 %) weakly alkaline. Six hundred and ninety-one (43.6 %) reflux episodes reached the proximal esophagus. In 14/44 patients typical GER symptoms were present. We conclude that the incidence of GER in children with cystic fibrosis is very high. In the majority of patients typical GER symptoms are absent. Therefore, diagnostic procedures should be considered, regardless of lacking symptoms. Although acid reflux episodes predominate in children with cystic fibrosis, classical pH-metry may not constitute a sufficient diagnostic method in this population because of a relatively high number of proximal reflux episodes. Such episodes also indicate an increased risk for aspiration. The pH-impedance diagnostic measurement is advocated when suspecting GER in children with cystic fibrosis.

  5. C-Reactive Protein in Stable Cystic Fibrosis: An Additional Indicator of Clinical Disease Activity and Risk of Future Pulmonary Exacerbations

    PubMed Central

    Matouk, Elias; Nguyen, Dao; Benedetti, Andrea; Bernier, Joanie; Gruber, James; Landry, Jennifer; Rousseau, Simon; Ahlgren, Heather G; Lands, Larry C; Wojewodka, Gabriella; Radzioch, Danuta

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In stable adult cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, we assessed the role of baseline high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) on CF clinical variables and frequency of intravenous (IV) treated pulmonary exacerbations (PExs) 1-year post-baseline. Methods We recruited 51 clinically stable CF patients from our Adult CF Center. We incorporated collected parameters into Matouk CF clinical score and CF questionnaire-revised quality of life score (QOL). We used the clinical minus complications subscores as a clinical disease activity score (CDAS). We dichotomized our patients according to the cohort median baseline hs-CRP of 5.2 mg/L. Results Patients in the high hs-CRP group (≥ 5.2 mg/L) demonstrated worse CDAS (r=0.67, p=0.0001) and QOL scores (r=0.57, p=0.0017) at a given FEV1% predicted. In both hs-CRP groups, prior-year IV-treated PExs and baseline CDASs were significant predictors of future IV-treated PExs. Interestingly, the association between baseline CDAS and future PExs frequency was more robust in the high compared to the low hs-CRP group (r=−0.88, p<0.0001, r=−0.48, p=0.017, respectively) with a steeper regression slope (p=0.001). In addition, a significant interaction was demonstrated between elevated baseline hs-CRP levels and CDASs for the prediction of increased risk of future PExs (p=0.02). This interaction provided an additional indicator of clinical disease activity and added another dimension to the prior year PExs frequency phenotype to identify patients at increased risk for future PExs. Conclusion Stable CF patients with elevated baseline hs-CRP (≥ 5.2 mg/L) demonstrated worse clinical disease activity and QOL scores at a given level of disease severity (FEV1% predicted). Elevated baseline hs-CRP values combined with clinical disease activity scores are associated with increased risk for future IV-treated PExs even in those with mild clinical disease activity scores. PMID:28066689

  6. "Cystic fibrotics could survive cholera, choleraics could survive cystic fibrosis"; hypothesis that explores new horizons in treatment of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Azimi, Arsalan

    2015-12-01

    Cystic fibrosis, the most common inherited disease of white population, is a disease of CFTR channels, in which mucosal function of many organs especially respiratory tract is impaired. Decreased mucociliary clearance and accumulation of mucus in airways facilitates colonization of infectious microorganisms, followed by infection. Following chronic infection, persistent inflammation ensues, which results in airway remodeling and deterioration of mucociliary clearance and result in a vicious cycle. Here, it is hypothesized that cholera toxin (CT) could ameliorate symptoms of cystic fibrosis as CT could dilute the thickened mucus, improve mucociliary clearance and alleviate airway obstruction. CT strengthens immunity of airway mucosa and it could attenuates bacterial growth and reduce persistency of infection. CT also modulates cellular immune response and it could decrease airway inflammation, hinder airway remodeling and prevent respiratory deterioration. Thereby it is hypothesized that CT could target and ameliorate many of pathophysiologic steps of the disease and it explores new horizons in treatment of CF. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Standard versus biofilm antimicrobial susceptibility testing to guide antibiotic therapy in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Waters, Valerie; Ratjen, Felix

    2012-11-14

    The antibiotics used to treat pulmonary infections in people with cystic fibrosis are typically chosen based on the results of antimicrobial susceptibility testing performed on bacteria traditionally grown in a planktonic mode (grown in a liquid). However, there is considerable evidence to suggest that Pseudomonas aeruginosa actually grows in a biofilm (or slime layer) in the airways of cystic fibrosis patients with chronic pulmonary infections. Therefore, choosing antibiotics based on biofilm rather than conventional antimicrobial susceptibility testing could potentially improve response to treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in people with cystic fibrosis. To compare biofilm antimicrobial susceptibility testing-driven therapy to conventional antimicrobial susceptibility testing-driven therapy in the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in people with cystic fibrosis. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis Trials Register, compiled from electronic database searches and handsearching of journals and conference abstract books. We also searched a registry of ongoing trials and the reference lists of relevant articles and reviews.Most recent search: 02 August 2012. Randomized controlled trials of antibiotic therapy based on biofilm antimicrobial susceptibility testing compared to antibiotic therapy based on conventional antimicrobial susceptibility testing in the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa pulmonary infection in individuals with cystic fibrosis. Both authors independently selected trials, assessed their risk of bias and extracted data from eligible trials. Additionally, the authors contacted the trial investigators to obtain further information. The search identified one multicentre, randomized, double-blind controlled clinical trial eligible for inclusion in the review (39 participants). This trial prospectively assessed whether the use of biofilm antimicrobial susceptibility testing improved microbiological and clinical outcomes in participants

  8. Disrupted intestinal microbiota and intestinal inflammation in children with cystic fibrosis and its restoration with Lactobacillus GG: a randomised clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Bruzzese, Eugenia; Callegari, Maria Luisa; Raia, Valeria; Viscovo, Sara; Scotto, Riccardo; Ferrari, Susanna; Morelli, Lorenzo; Buccigrossi, Vittoria; Lo Vecchio, Andrea; Ruberto, Eliana; Guarino, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal inflammation is a hallmark of cystic fibrosis (CF). Administration of probiotics can reduce intestinal inflammation and the incidence of pulmonary exacerbations. We investigated the composition of intestinal microbiota in children with CF and analyzed its relationship with intestinal inflammation. We also investigated the microflora structure before and after Lactobacillus GG (LGG) administration in children with CF with and without antibiotic treatment. The intestinal microbiota were analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Intestinal inflammation was assessed by measuring fecal calprotectin (CLP) and rectal nitric oxide (rNO) production in children with CF as compared with healthy controls. We then carried out a small double-blind randomized clinical trial with LGG. Twenty-two children with CF children were enrolled in the study (median age, 7 years; range, 2-9 years). Fecal CLP and rNO levels were higher in children with CF than in healthy controls (184±146 µg/g vs. 52±46 µg/g; 18±15 vs. 2.6±1.2 µmol/L NO2 (-), respectively; P<0.01). Compared with healthy controls, children with CF had significantly different intestinal microbial core structures. The levels of Eubacterium rectale, Bacteroides uniformis, Bacteroides vulgatus, Bifidobacterium adolescentis, Bifidobacterium catenulatum, and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii were reduced in children with CF. A similar but more extreme pattern was observed in children with CF who were taking antibiotics. LGG administration reduced fecal CLP and partially restored intestinal microbiota. There was a significant correlation between reduced microbial richness and intestinal inflammation. CF causes qualitative and quantitative changes in intestinal microbiota, which may represent a novel therapeutic target in the treatment of CF. Administration of probiotics restored gut microbiota, supporting the

  9. Disrupted Intestinal Microbiota and Intestinal Inflammation in Children with Cystic Fibrosis and Its Restoration with Lactobacillus GG: A Randomised Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bruzzese, Eugenia; Callegari, Maria Luisa; Raia, Valeria; Viscovo, Sara; Scotto, Riccardo; Ferrari, Susanna; Morelli, Lorenzo; Buccigrossi, Vittoria; Lo Vecchio, Andrea; Ruberto, Eliana; Guarino, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Intestinal inflammation is a hallmark of cystic fibrosis (CF). Administration of probiotics can reduce intestinal inflammation and the incidence of pulmonary exacerbations. We investigated the composition of intestinal microbiota in children with CF and analyzed its relationship with intestinal inflammation. We also investigated the microflora structure before and after Lactobacillus GG (LGG) administration in children with CF with and without antibiotic treatment. Methods The intestinal microbiota were analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Intestinal inflammation was assessed by measuring fecal calprotectin (CLP) and rectal nitric oxide (rNO) production in children with CF as compared with healthy controls. We then carried out a small double-blind randomized clinical trial with LGG. Results Twenty-two children with CF children were enrolled in the study (median age, 7 years; range, 2–9 years). Fecal CLP and rNO levels were higher in children with CF than in healthy controls (184±146 µg/g vs. 52±46 µg/g; 18±15 vs. 2.6±1.2 µmol/L NO2−, respectively; P<0.01). Compared with healthy controls, children with CF had significantly different intestinal microbial core structures. The levels of Eubacterium rectale, Bacteroides uniformis, Bacteroides vulgatus, Bifidobacterium adolescentis, Bifidobacterium catenulatum, and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii were reduced in children with CF. A similar but more extreme pattern was observed in children with CF who were taking antibiotics. LGG administration reduced fecal CLP and partially restored intestinal microbiota. There was a significant correlation between reduced microbial richness and intestinal inflammation. Conclusions CF causes qualitative and quantitative changes in intestinal microbiota, which may represent a novel therapeutic target in the treatment of CF. Administration of

  10. Clinical characteristics and epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in children with cystic fibrosis from a center with a high MRSA prevalence.

    PubMed

    Harik, Nada S; Com, Gulnur; Tang, Xinyu; Melguizo Castro, Maria; Stemper, Mary E; Carroll, John L

    2016-04-01

    We describe the clinical characteristics and epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in children with cystic fibrosis (CF) from the U.S. CF center with the highest MRSA prevalence. Medical records of children with CF were retrospectively reviewed from 1997-2009. MRSA clinical isolates from 2007-2009 were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction and pulsed field gel electrophoresis. The prevalence of MRSA was 1% in 1997 and 49% in 2009. Fifty-five children (26%) had persistent MRSA infection. Sixty-eight percent of MRSA isolates were hospital-associated (HA) MRSA, of which 52% were pulsed-field type USA 100. Ninety-three percent of HA MRSA isolates were clindamycin resistant. Twelve children acquired MRSA before 1 year of age, 83% of whom were hospitalized prior to acquisition of MRSA. Ten of 11 sibling pairs carried indistinguishable MRSA strains. Children with persistent MRSA were hospitalized more often (P = .01), required inhaled medications more frequently (P = .01), and had higher rates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa coinfection (P < .001). MRSA prevalence in children with CF is increasing, and most children are infected with HA MRSA. Exposure to health care facilities and gastrointestinal surgeries may facilitate early acquisition of MRSA. Siblings carry indistinguishable MRSA strains, indicating household transmission of MRSA. Children with persistent MRSA had worse pulmonary morbidity. Coinfection with MRSA and P aeruginosa is likely associated with further increased pulmonary morbidity. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Defining the disease liability of variants in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene

    PubMed Central

    Sosnay, Patrick R; Siklosi, Karen R; Van Goor, Fredrick; Kaniecki, Kyle; Yu, Haihui; Sharma, Neeraj; Ramalho, Anabela S; Amaral, Margarida D; Dorfman, Ruslan; Zielenski, Julian; Masica, David L; Karchin, Rachel; Millen, Linda; Thomas, Philip J; Patrinos, George P; Corey, Mary; Lewis, Michelle H; Rommens, Johanna M; Castellani, Carlo; Penland, Christopher M; Cutting, Garry R

    2013-01-01

    Allelic heterogeneity in disease-causing genes presents a substantial challenge to the translation of genomic variation to clinical practice. Few of the almost 2,000 variants in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene have empirical evidence that they cause cystic fibrosis. To address this gap, we collected both genotype and phenotype data for 39,696 cystic fibrosis patients in registries and clinics in North America and Europe. Among these patients, 159 CFTR variants had an allele frequency of ≥0.01%. These variants were evaluated for both clinical severity and functional consequence with 127 (80%) meeting both clinical and functional criteria consistent with disease. Assessment of disease penetrance in 2,188 fathers of cystic fibrosis patients enabled assignment of 12 of the remaining 32 variants as neutral while the other 20 variants remained indeterminate. This study illustrates that sourcing data directly from well-phenotyped subjects can address the gap in our ability to interpret clinically-relevant genomic variation. PMID:23974870

  12. Fluoroquinolones in the treatment of bronchopulmonary disease in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Fluoroquinolones are commonly used to treat lung infections in those with cystic fibrosis. Patients with cystic fibrosis are susceptible to lung infection with common bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus and Haemophilus influenzae, but also are prone to infection by opportunistic bacteria, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The good oral bioavailability and broad antimicrobial spectrum of activity, including anti-pseudomonal properties make this class of antimicrobial attractive. We review the evidence assessing the use of fluoroquinolones in the context of preventing and eradicating early lung infection and in managing chronic lung infection and pulmonary exacerbations. The safety of fluoroquinolones and the use of newer agents in the class is also discussed. PMID:22968160

  13. The Effect of Isoproterenol on Airway Obstruction in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Featherby, Elizabeth A.; Weng, Tzong-Ruey; Levison, Henry

    1970-01-01

    The effect of isoproterenol inhalations was studied on 95 occasions in 47 patients with cystic fibrosis. Spirometric and airway resistance measurements showed small but statistically significant changes in the MMEF, MBC and airway resistance, although there was considerable variation from patient to patient. Over-inflation of the lungs, as indicated by a high thoracic gas volume, was not significantly decreased by the administration of the drug. It is suggested that before using isoproterenol routinely as a treatment for cystic fibrosis, response to this drug should be measured in each individual patient. PMID:5445046

  14. The Approach to Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Talwalkar, Jaideep S; Murray, Thomas S

    2016-03-01

    There is a high prevalence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in patients with cystic fibrosis and clear epidemiologic links between chronic infection and morbidity and mortality exist. Prevention and early identification of infection are critical, and stand to improve with the advent of new vaccines and laboratory methods. Once the organism is identified, a variety of treatment options are available. Aggressive use of antipseudomonal antibiotics is the standard of care for acute pulmonary exacerbations in cystic fibrosis, and providers must take into account specific patient characteristics when making treatment decisions related to antibiotic selection, route and duration of administration, and site of care.

  15. Australian standards of care for cystic fibrosis-related diabetes.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Peter G; Wagenaar, Monica; Matson, Angela G; Craig, Maria E; Holmes-Walker, Deborah Jane; Katz, Tamarah; Hameed, Shihab

    2014-02-01

    Multiple guidelines have been published over the last few years for the diagnosis and management of cystic fibrosis (CF) and cystic fibrosis related diabetes (CFRD), although some of the recommendations are based on extrapolation from other forms of diabetes and/or expert opinions. This document seeks to combine the guidelines to provide an Australian approach to the management of CFRD and establish the guidelines within the Australian CF Standards of Care. It is intended that this document will provide assistance to doctors, nurses, dietitians, physiotherapists, diabetes educators and CF patients concerning the issues surrounding CFRD, and will be reviewed and updated in 2016.

  16. Body image and cystic fibrosis: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Tierney, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    A slight frame and poor appetite are common among patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) yet healthy body weight has been related to a better prognosis. A review of studies exploring body image (BI) among adults and adolescents with CF was conducted. Seven electronic databases were searched for potential papers. They located 128 references, of which 24 were read in full and 12 included in the review. Accepted papers suggested females with CF had a better BI compared to males, but this could compromise survival, given their preference for a low body weight. Males may be more motivated to adhere to nutritional advice because they favor a larger form. Practitioners should broach the topic of BI at clinic appointments to ensure this does not have a detrimental impact on self-management, although more research is required to guide professionals in this task.

  17. [NUTRITIONAL STATUS ASSESSMENT IN PATIENTS WITH CYSTIC FIBROSIS].

    PubMed

    Lambe, Cécile; Mallet, Pascale; Bailly, Céline; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle

    2015-10-01

    Prognosis of cystic fibrosis has been largely modified over the past 30 years. Optimization of nutrition is one of the most important contributing factors of this improvement. Nutritional defect result from the conjunction of loss of calories, maldigestion, hypercatabolism and insufficient intake. Pancreatic opotherapy and ADEK vitamin administration is mandatory in pancreatic insufficient patients. Nutritional status must be evaluated at each clinics to detect nutritional defect as early as possible. Nutritional intake must be hypercaloric, normalipidic and adapted to the tastes of the patient. The clinician must be aware of at risk nutritional period: first year of life, puberty, infectious exacerbation, respiratory worsening and diabetes, In neonatal screened babies, recovery of birth weight percentile must be targeted at 6 months, and for the height must be in accordance to genetic height at 2 years. In all cases it is mandatory to treat denutrition by oral supplementation and if necessay enteral nutrition.

  18. Cystic fibrosis in Latin America-Improving the awareness.

    PubMed

    Silva Filho, Luiz Vicente Ribeiro F; Castaños, Claudio; Ruíz, Héctor Hernán

    2016-11-01

    The burden of cystic fibrosis (CF) in Latin America is being increasingly recognized and is significant compared with other regions of the world. In this short communication, we assess the current situation in some Latin American countries and make suggestions for possible directions for future focus. We discuss the work that remains in deciphering how the various genetic, environmental and medical factors interact and influence outcomes in different ethnic groups. We also consider the need for consistency in both research and access to services across Latin America, including CF registries, neonatal screening programs, access to specialized CF healthcare practitioners, transition to adult clinics and treatment regimens. Progress in these areas is likely to build on the advances to date, and improve the lives of patients in Latin America who are affected by this debilitating and life-limiting disorder.

  19. [Non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis: diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Huber, L C; Bürgi, U; Schuurmans, M M; Benden, C

    2014-08-01

    Bronchiectasis is the term used for irreversibly dilated airways. Exact epidemiological information on the frequency of bronchiectasis is not available, but the morphological findings are increasingly detected and the associated syndrome is more frequently diagnosed due to improved imaging techniques and increased awareness among chest physicians. The workup of these patients includes a wide panel of investigations guided by patient history and clinical presentation. Despite thorough evaluation the aetiology frequently remains unclear. Chronic infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa is associated with a severe course of the disease and its detection has impacts on the therapeutic management. Chest physiotherapy, mucoactive substances and antibiotics are the mainstay of therapy. In this review the evaluation of bronchiectasis and the recent therapeutic insights for non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis are discussed.

  20. Outbreak of Corynebacterium pseudodiphtheriticum Infection in Cystic Fibrosis Patients, France

    PubMed Central

    Bittar, Fadi; Cassagne, Carole; Bosdure, Emmanuelle; Stremler, Nathalie; Dubus, Jean-Christophe; Sarles, Jacques; Reynaud-Gaubert, Martine; Raoult, Didier

    2010-01-01

    An increasing body of evidence indicates that nondiphtheria corynebacteria may be responsible for respiratory tract infections. We report an outbreak of Corynebacterium pseudodiphtheriticum infection in children with cystic fibrosis (CF). To identify 18 C. pseudodiphtheriticum strains isolated from 13 French children with CF, we used molecular methods (partial rpoB gene sequencing) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. Clinical symptoms were exhibited by 10 children (76.9%), including cough, rhinitis, and lung exacerbations. The results of MALDI-TOF identification matched perfectly with those obtained from molecular identification. Retrospective analysis of sputum specimens by using specific real-time PCR showed that ≈20% of children with CF were colonized with these bacteria, whereas children who did not have CF had negative test results. Our study reemphasizes the conclusion that correctly identifying bacteria at the species level facilitates detection of an outbreak of new or emerging infections in humans. PMID:20678316

  1. Outbreak of Corynebacterium pseudodiphtheriticum infection in cystic fibrosis patients, France.

    PubMed

    Bittar, Fadi; Cassagne, Carole; Bosdure, Emmanuelle; Stremler, Nathalie; Dubus, Jean Christophe; Sarles, Jacques; Reynaud-Gaubert, Martine; Raoult, Didier; Rolain, Jean-Marc

    2010-08-01

    An increasing body of evidence indicates that nondiphtheria corynebacteria may be responsible for respiratory tract infections. We report an outbreak of Corynebacterium pseudodiphtheriticum infection in children with cystic fibrosis (CF). To identify 18 C. pseudodiphtheriticum strains isolated from 13 French children with CF, we used molecular methods (partial rpoB gene sequencing) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. Clinical symptoms were exhibited by 10 children (76.9%), including cough, rhinitis, and lung exacerbations. The results of MALDI-TOF identification matched perfectly with those obtained from molecular identification. Retrospective analysis of sputum specimens by using specific real-time PCR showed that approximately 20% of children with CF were colonized with these bacteria, whereas children who did not have CF had negative test results. Our study reemphasizes the conclusion that correctly identifying bacteria at the species level facilitates detection of an outbreak of new or emerging infections in humans.

  2. The Influence of Genetics on Cystic Fibrosis Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Knowles, Michael R.; Drumm, Mitchell

    2012-01-01

    Technological advances in genetics have made feasible and affordable large studies to identify genetic variants that cause or modify a trait. Genetic studies have been carried out to assess variants in candidate genes, as well as polymorphisms throughout the genome, for their associations with heritable clinical outcomes of cystic fibrosis (CF), such as lung disease, meconium ileus, and CF-related diabetes. The candidate gene approach has identified some predicted relationships, while genome-wide surveys have identified several genes that would not have been obvious disease-modifying candidates, such as a methionine sulfoxide transferase gene that influences intestinal obstruction, or a region on chromosome 11 proximate to genes encoding a transcription factor and an apoptosis controller that associates with lung function. These unforeseen associations thus provide novel insight into disease pathophysiology, as well as suggesting new therapeutic strategies for CF. PMID:23209180

  3. Ethnic intermarriage and its consequences for cystic fibrosis carrier screening.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, F; Schoelkopf, J; Li, Z; Arzimanoglou, I I; Shaham, M; Udey, J; Arzimanoglou, I

    1995-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis gene mutations can vary in frequency between different ethnic populations. However, there is a rising trend of ethnic intermarriage in the United States, a situation suggesting that differences in specific mutation frequencies currently apparent in Europe may not persist for long in this country. Therefore, limited mutation screens targeted at specific ethnic groups and risk calculations based on data from more homogeneous European populations may not be appropriate in the United States. The genetic consequences of ethnic admixture are also likely to extend to other recessive diseases (e.g., Tay-Sachs, thalassemia), which, in the past, have been limited largely to particular ethnic, racial, or religious subgroups, with implications for public health agencies overseeing newborn screening programs for genetic diseases and for clinical genetics programs offering population-based carrier-detection programs, carrier risk assessment, and counseling.

  4. The altered gut microbiota in adults with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Burke, D G; Fouhy, F; Harrison, M J; Rea, M C; Cotter, P D; O'Sullivan, O; Stanton, C; Hill, C; Shanahan, F; Plant, B J; Ross, R P

    2017-03-09

    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disease that affects the function of a number of organs, principally the lungs, but also the gastrointestinal tract. The manifestations of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) dysfunction in the gastrointestinal tract, as well as frequent antibiotic exposure, undoubtedly disrupts the gut microbiota. To analyse the effects of CF and its management on the microbiome, we compared the gut microbiota of 43 individuals with CF during a period of stability, to that of 69 non-CF controls using 454-pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. The impact of clinical parameters, including antibiotic therapy, on the results was also assessed. The CF-associated microbiome had reduced microbial diversity, an increase in Firmicutes and a reduction in Bacteroidetes compared to the non-CF controls. While the greatest number of differences in taxonomic abundances of the intestinal microbiota was observed between individuals with CF and the healthy controls, gut microbiota differences were also reported between people with CF when grouped by clinical parameters including % predicted FEV1 (measure of lung dysfunction) and the number of intravenous (IV) antibiotic courses in the previous 12 months. Notably, CF individuals presenting with severe lung dysfunction (% predicted FEV1 ≤ 40%) had significantly (p < 0.05) reduced gut microbiota diversity relative to those presenting with mild or moderate dysfunction. A significant negative correlation (-0.383, Simpson's Diversity Index) was also observed between the number of IV antibiotic courses and gut microbiota diversity. This is one of the largest single-centre studies on gut microbiota in stable adults with CF and demonstrates the significantly altered gut microbiota, including reduced microbial diversity seen in CF patients compared to healthy controls. The data show the impact that CF and it's management have on gut microbiota, presenting the opportunity to

  5. Oscillating devices for airway clearance in people with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Lisa; Agnew, Jennifer

    2009-01-21

    Chest physiotherapy is widely prescribed to assist the clearance of airway secretions in people with cystic fibrosis (CF). Oscillating devices generate intra- or extra-thoracic oscillations orally or external to the chest wall. Internally they create variable resistances within the airways, generating controlled oscillating positive pressure which mobilises mucus. Extra-thoracic oscillations are generated by forces outside the respiratory system, e.g. high frequency chest wall oscillation. To determine the effectiveness and acceptability of oscillating devices compared to other forms of physiotherapy to improve respiratory function, mucus clearance and other outcomes in people with CF. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register comprising references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and hand searches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. Most recent search of the Cystic Fibrosis Trials Register: November 2008. Randomised controlled studies and controlled clinical studies of oscillating devices compared with any other form of physiotherapy in people with CF. Two authors independently applied the inclusion criteria to publications and assessed the quality of the included studies. Two hundred and sixty-five studies were identified; thirty studies (total of 708 participants) met the inclusion criteria. Single treatment interventions (therapy technique used only once in the comparison) were excluded. Studies varied in duration from up to one week to one year in duration. Nineteen of the studies were cross-over in design. Data were not published in sufficient detail in most of these studies to perform meta-analysis.Forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV(1)) was the most frequently measured outcome. Results did not show significant difference in effect between oscillating devices and other methods of airway clearance on FEV(1) or other lung function parameters. Where there

  6. Dual core quantum dots for highly quantitative ratiometric detection of trypsin activity in cystic fibrosis patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelló Serrano, Iván; Stoica, Georgiana; Matas Adams, Alba; Palomares, Emilio

    2014-10-01

    We present herein two colour encoded silica nanospheres (2nanoSi) for the fluorescence quantitative ratiometric determination of trypsin in humans. Current detection methods for cystic fibrosis diagnosis are slow, costly and suffer from false positives. The 2nanoSi proved to be a highly sensitive, fast (minutes), and single-step approach nanosensor for the screening and diagnosis of cystic fibrosis, allowing the quantification of trypsin concentrations in a wide range relevant for clinical applications (25-350 μg L-1). Furthermore, as trypsin is directly related to the development of cystic fibrosis (CF), different human genotypes, i.e. CF homozygotic, CF heterozygotic, and unaffected, respectively, can be determined using our 2nanoSi nanospheres. We anticipate the 2nanoSi system to be a starting point for non-invasive, easy-to-use and cost effective ratiometric fluorescent biomarkers for recessive genetic diseases like human cystic fibrosis. In a screening program in which the goal is to detect disease and also the carrier status, early diagnosis could be of great help.We present herein two colour encoded silica nanospheres (2nanoSi) for the fluorescence quantitative ratiometric determination of trypsin in humans. Current detection methods for cystic fibrosis diagnosis are slow, costly and suffer from false positives. The 2nanoSi proved to be a highly sensitive, fast (minutes), and single-step approach nanosensor for the screening and diagnosis of cystic fibrosis, allowing the quantification of trypsin concentrations in a wide range relevant for clinical applications (25-350 μg L-1). Furthermore, as trypsin is directly related to the development of cystic fibrosis (CF), different human genotypes, i.e. CF homozygotic, CF heterozygotic, and unaffected, respectively, can be determined using our 2nanoSi nanospheres. We anticipate the 2nanoSi system to be a starting point for non-invasive, easy-to-use and cost effective ratiometric fluorescent biomarkers for

  7. Nebulized and oral thiol derivatives for pulmonary disease in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Nash, Edward F; Stephenson, Anne; Ratjen, Felix; Tullis, Elizabeth

    2009-01-21

    Cystic fibrosis is an inherited condition resulting in thickened, sticky respiratory secretions. Respiratory failure, due to recurrent pulmonary infection and inflammation, is the most common cause of mortality. Muco-active therapies (e.g. dornase alfa and nebulized hypertonic saline) may decrease sputum viscosity, increase airway clearance of sputum, reduce infection and inflammation and improve lung function. Thiol derivatives, either oral or nebulized, have shown benefit in other respiratory diseases. Their mode of action is likely to differ according to the route of administration. There are several thiol derivatives, and it is unclear which of these may be beneficial in cystic fibrosis. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of nebulized and oral thiol derivatives in people with cystic fibrosis. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register, comprising references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches, hand searches of relevant journals, abstract books and conference proceedings.Most recent search: November 2008. Randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials comparing nebulized or oral thiol derivatives to placebo or another thiol derivative in people with cystic fibrosis. The authors independently assessed trials for inclusion, analysed methodological quality and extracted data. Searches identified 18 trials; eight (seven older than 10 years) (234 participants) are included. Three trials of nebulized thiol derivatives were identified (one compared 20% n-acetylcysteine to 2% n-acetylcysteine; another compared sodium-2-mercaptoethane sulphonate to 7% hypertonic saline; and another compared glutathione to 4% hypertonic saline). Although generally well-tolerated with no significant adverse effects, there was no evidence of significant clinical benefit in our primary outcomes in participants receiving these treatments.Five studies of oral thiol derivatives were identified. Three studies compared n

  8. Nebulized and oral thiol derivatives for pulmonary disease in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Tam, Julian; Nash, Edward F; Ratjen, Felix; Tullis, Elizabeth; Stephenson, Anne

    2013-07-12

    Cystic fibrosis is an inherited condition resulting in thickened, sticky respiratory secretions. Respiratory failure, due to recurrent pulmonary infection and inflammation, is the most common cause of mortality. Muco-active therapies (e.g. dornase alfa and nebulized hypertonic saline) may decrease sputum viscosity, increase airway clearance of sputum, reduce infection and inflammation and improve lung function. Thiol derivatives, either oral or nebulized, have shown benefit in other respiratory diseases. Their mode of action is likely to differ according to the route of administration. There are several thiol derivatives, and it is unclear which of these may be beneficial in cystic fibrosis. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of nebulized and oral thiol derivatives in people with cystic fibrosis. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register, comprising references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches, hand searches of relevant journals, abstract books and conference proceedings.Most recent search: 13 June 2013.We also conducted a PubMed search on 26 February 2013 for relevant published articles. Randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials comparing nebulized or oral thiol derivatives to placebo or another thiol derivative in people with cystic fibrosis. The authors independently assessed trials for inclusion, analysed risk of bias and extracted data. Searches identified 23 trials; nine trials (255 participants) are included, of these seven trials are more than 10 years old. Three trials of nebulized thiol derivatives were identified (one compared 20% N-acetylcysteine to 2% N-acetylcysteine; another compared sodium-2-mercaptoethane sulphonate to 7% hypertonic saline; and another compared glutathione to 4% hypertonic saline). Although generally well-tolerated with no significant adverse effects, there was no evidence of significant clinical benefit in our primary outcomes in participants receiving

  9. Pancreatic changes in cystic fibrosis: CT and sonographic appearances

    SciTech Connect

    Daneman, A.; Gaskin, K.; Martin, D.J.; Cutz, E.

    1983-10-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) and sonographic appearances of the late stages of pancreatic damage in three patients with cystic fibrosis are illustrated. All three had severe exocrine pancreatic insufficiency with steatorrhea. In two patients CT revealed complete fatty repl