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Sample records for cystic fibrosis support

  1. Cystic Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an inherited disease of the mucus and sweat glands. It affects mostly your lungs, pancreas, liver, intestines, sinuses, and sex organs. CF causes your mucus to be thick and sticky. ...

  2. Cystic fibrosis - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - cystic fibrosis ... The following organizations are good resources for information on cystic fibrosis : Cystic Fibrosis Foundation -- www.cff.org March of Dimes -- www.marchofdimes.org/baby/cystic-fibrosis-and- ...

  3. Cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Ratjen, Felix; Bell, Scott C; Rowe, Steven M; Goss, Christopher H; Quittner, Alexandra L; Bush, Andrew

    2015-05-14

    Cystic fibrosis is an autosomal recessive, monogenetic disorder caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. The gene defect was first described 25 years ago and much progress has been made since then in our understanding of how CFTR mutations cause disease and how this can be addressed therapeutically. CFTR is a transmembrane protein that transports ions across the surface of epithelial cells. CFTR dysfunction affects many organs; however, lung disease is responsible for the vast majority of morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis. Prenatal diagnostics, newborn screening and new treatment algorithms are changing the incidence and the prevalence of the disease. Until recently, the standard of care in cystic fibrosis treatment focused on preventing and treating complications of the disease; now, novel treatment strategies directly targeting the ion channel abnormality are becoming available and it will be important to evaluate how these treatments affect disease progression and the quality of life of patients. In this Primer, we summarize the current knowledge, and provide an outlook on how cystic fibrosis clinical care and research will be affected by new knowledge and therapeutic options in the near future. For an illustrated summary of this Primer, visit: http://go.nature.com/4VrefN.

  4. [Supporting the family after a diagnosis of cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Courlet, Amélie; Dodane, Marie-Agnès; Garnier, Frédérique

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of cystic fibrosis can upset the relationship between parents and their baby. The announcement signals the disappearance of the "perfect child" and it can be associated with a feeling of guilt on the part of the parents. The child health nurse has a central role in supporting the family during this difficult period, in order to favour the parent-child bond. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Increased congregational support for parents of children with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Szczesniak, Rhonda D; Zou, Yuanshu; Wetzel, J Denise; Krause, Neal; Grossoehme, Daniel H

    2015-04-01

    Positive health outcomes are related to adults' religious congregational participation. For parents of children with chronic disease, structured daily care routines and/or strict infection control precautions may limit participation. For this exploratory study, we examined the relationship between congregational support and religious coping by parents of children with cystic fibrosis (CF) compared to parents for whom child health issues were not significant stressors. CF parents reported higher levels of emotional support from congregation members and use of religious coping. Within-group differences were found for CF parents by denominational affiliation. Congregational support for parents dealing with child chronic disease is important.

  6. Cystic fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... cannot be prevented. Screening those with a family history of the disease may detect the CF gene in many carriers. Alternative ... FJ. Cystic fibrosis. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap ...

  7. Cystic fibrosis patients and families support cross-infection measures.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, A L; Armstrong, D; Carzino, R; Robinson, P

    2004-09-01

    A clonal strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) was isolated in 1999 at the Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia, after five unrelated children with cystic fibrosis (CF) died from severe lung disease aged <5 yrs. Subsequently, more than half of the patients in the clinic with PA were found to harbour this strain, and segregation measures were instituted at the hospital to prevent further spread. The aim of this study was to assess CF parent and patient responses to the segregation measures to determine overall support. A questionnaire was sent out to the families of 291 CF children treated at the centre. A 65% response rate was obtained. The majority of parents (85%) and patients > or=12 yrs old (63%) were positive about the segregation measures instituted. A total of 11% of parents and 25% of patients were unsure, and 4% of parents and 12% of children gave negative responses. Those who were not happy listed reasons such as concerns about the emotional impact of not socialising with other CF children, inconclusive evidence about person-person spread of infection and feelings of alienation created in the clinic by the separation. In conclusion, the majority of responding cystic fibrosis patients and their families understand and are supportive of infection control measures instituted at the Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia.

  8. What Causes Cystic Fibrosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Cystic Fibrosis? A defect in the CFTR gene causes cystic ... in the severity of the disease. How Is Cystic Fibrosis Inherited? Every person inherits two CFTR genes—one ...

  9. Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Asay, Lyal D.

    1965-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis, a disease thought to be transmitted as a recessive genetic trait, is found as a disease in about one in 1,000 to one in 10,000 births. It involves all of the exocrine glands with presenting symptoms dependent upon the extent of involvement of any group of glands. Many aspects of the disease can be corrected by substitution therapy. This applies particularly to the use of animal pancreas for the steatorrhea and salt for prevention of heat prostration. Unfortunately, the obstructive pulmonary disease with secondary bronchial infections can only be treated symptomatically by the use of mucus thinning agents, postural drainage, and antibiotics. Nevertheless, longevity can be increased and a great deal of hope offered to the families of these unfortunate children by careful supervision of their medical care. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9.Figure 10.Figure 11. PMID:14288148

  10. Cystic fibrosis - nutritional considerations

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002437.htm Cystic fibrosis - nutrition To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-threatening disease that causes ...

  11. How Is Cystic Fibrosis Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Cystic Fibrosis Treated? Cystic fibrosis (CF) has no cure. However, ... help oral pancreatic enzymes work better. Treatments for Cystic Fibrosis Complications A common complication of CF is diabetes . ...

  12. Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition

    MedlinePlus

    ... Right Sport for You Healthy School Lunch Planner Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition KidsHealth > For Teens > Cystic Fibrosis: ... Food Enzyme Supplements Beating the Frustration What Is Cystic Fibrosis? At lunch, Lindsay often gets bored with having ...

  13. Living with Cystic Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Cystic Fibrosis If you or your child has cystic fibrosis (CF), you should learn as much as you can ... with your doctors to learn how to manage CF. Ongoing Care Having ongoing medical care by a ...

  14. Screening for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Dodge, J A; Ryley, H C

    1982-01-01

    Practicable methods are now available for whole population screening of neonates for cystic fibrosis. Although diagnosis and treatment of the disease from birth has not yet been unequivocally shown to improve prognosis, existing evidence suggests that this is likely. Further ethical reasons are proposed in support of neonatal diagnosis and early treatment. The development of tests for prenatal diagnosis and carrier detection is under active investigation, and raises ethical problems for heterozygotes and their medical advisers. The heavy financial and emotional burden this disease imposes on the patient and the family should not be underestimated when policy decisions are made. PMID:7138066

  15. Cystic fibrosis and sleep.

    PubMed

    Katz, Eliot S

    2014-09-01

    Sleep disturbances are frequently observed in cystic fibrosis (CF). The resultant sleep fragmentation, short sleep duration, and gas-exchange abnormalities are postulated to contribute to the neurocognitive, cardiovascular, and metabolic abnormalities associated with CF. There are no outcomes data to establish the optimal procedure for screening and treating CF patients for sleep-related respiratory abnormalities. Therapy with supplemental oxygen and bilevel ventilation are widely considered to be effective in the short term, but there are few evidence-based data to support long-term improvements in morbidity and mortality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Learning about Cystic Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cystic Fibrosis: Your Genes, Your Health [yourgenesyourhealth.org] Multimedia educational site including screening and treatment information. Hosted by the Dolan DNA Learning Center at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. What is ...

  17. Diabetes in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Bridges, Nicola

    2013-05-01

    Cystic fibrosis related diabetes (CFRD) is a common complication of cystic fibrosis, caused by a fall in insulin secretion with age in individuals with pancreatic insufficiency. CFRD is associated with worse clinical status and increased mortality. Treatment of CFRD with insulin results in sustained improvements in lung function and nutrition. While clinical experience with insulin treatment in CF has increased, the selection of who to treat and glycaemic targets remain unclear. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Respiratory Screen: Sputum

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Chloride Sweat Test Lungs and Respiratory System Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition Cystic Fibrosis Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition Lungs and Respiratory System Contact Us Print Resources Send to a friend ...

  19. Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Respiratory Screen: Sputum

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Chloride Sweat Test Lungs and Respiratory System Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition Cystic Fibrosis Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition Lungs and Respiratory System Contact Us Print Resources Send to a Friend ...

  20. What's it Like to Have Cystic Fibrosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... CPR: A Real Lifesaver Kids Talk About: Coaches Cystic Fibrosis KidsHealth > For Kids > Cystic Fibrosis Print A A ... strength to deal with cystic fibrosis. What Is CF? Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a disease that causes ...

  1. Healthcare improvement is incomplete until it is published: the cystic fibrosis initiative to support scholarly publication.

    PubMed

    Stevens, David P; Marshall, Bruce C

    2014-04-01

    Preparation of this supplement, Ten years of improvement innovation in cystic fibrosis care, tested a strategy to support writing and scholarly publication by cystic fibrosis (CF) healthcare improvement professionals. Critical elements of the writing initiative included: a request for abstracts that was distributed to over 2000 professionals in the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation-supported improvement community to identify promising work; continuous peer review of manuscripts by co-authors and writing tutors; three webinars and a 2-day face-to-face writing retreat that addressed the challenges of successful scholarly healthcare improvement writing and publication; and finally, journal submission and formal external peer review. The SQUIRE Publication Guidelines provided content framework for manuscripts. 47 abstracts were submitted from which reviewers selected nine for participation. The 28 co-authors of these abstracts took part in the writing initiative. Authors' self-assessment showed that half had previously published fewer than five papers, while 80% considered themselves insufficiently prepared to write for the scholarly improvement literature. Eventually all of the nine abstracts led to full manuscripts, which were submitted to the journal for formal peer review. Of these, seven were accepted for publication and are included in this supplement. A formal initiative to develop and support scholarly writing-while resource-intensive-offers opportunities for wider publication by healthcare improvement professionals.

  2. Nutritional management of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, A

    1996-01-01

    Nutritional support is an integral part of the management of cystic fibrosis patients. It is arguably best provided by a qualified dietitian and nutritional care sister working in conjunction with the rest of the cystic fibrosis team. The patient's nutritional needs should be assessed, regularly reviewed, and nutritional treatment tailored to meet the changing clinical and psychosocial needs of the patient. Nutritional intervention is not without complications, and in particular attention to normal feeding behaviour and vigilance when instituting supplementary nutrition may prevent many feeding difficulties. PMID:8660059

  3. Value versus Use for Patients: Findings from an ICT supported Cystic Fibrosis Self-Management Project.

    PubMed

    Roehrer, Erin; Cummings, Elizabeth; Ellis, Leonie; Turner, Paul

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents findings from the implementation of an online symptom monitoring diary that was part of a broader project aimed to support self-management of cystic fibrosis and the development of an online community of practice (CoP). The findings challenge conventional perspectives on how value is acquired by patients and their families from electronic tools designed to provide them with support. Additionally, the findings highlight complex relationships between user needs and subsequent tool use that challenge approaches to the measurement of value from ehealth projects.

  4. The Cystic Fibrosis Intestine

    PubMed Central

    De Lisle, Robert C.; Borowitz, Drucy

    2013-01-01

    The clinical manifestations of cystic fibrosis (CF) result from dysfunction of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator protein (CFTR). The majority of people with CF have a limited life span as a consequence of CFTR dysfunction in the respiratory tract. However, CFTR dysfunction in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract occurs earlier in ontogeny and is present in all patients, regardless of genotype. The same pathophysiologic triad of obstruction, infection, and inflammation that causes disease in the airways also causes disease in the intestines. This article describes the effects of CFTR dysfunction on the intestinal tissues and the intraluminal environment. Mouse models of CF have greatly advanced our understanding of the GI manifestations of CF, which can be directly applied to understanding CF disease in humans. PMID:23788646

  5. [News in cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Delaisi, B

    2013-08-01

    The improvement over the last two decades in the treatment of cystic fibrosis led to an increase in life expectancy approaching 40 years at birth. Logically, the population of adult patients has been increasing and is currently 50% of patients followed in France. These therapeutic advances have justified the establishment in 2003 of a generalized neonatal screening for cystic fibrosis. The latest data of this screening show an incidence of CF of 1/5359 live births, far below the incidence of 1/2500 which was widely accepted twenty years ago. The performance of this screening is currently based on the dosage of trypsin immuno reactive, followed in case of exceeding the threshold of a search of the 30 most common mutations, can detect around 96% of 150 to 200 CF cases every year. Therefore, the possibility of a false negative of the screening cannot be excluded and evocative symptoms of cystic fibrosis, even for children born after 2003, will lead to prescribe a sweat test. While treatments available so far goal consequences of cystic fibrosis, a new therapeutic class to correct the functional defect of the mutated protein, called CFTR modulators, is emerging. Ivacaftor, leader of this new class, belonging to the category of "CFTR potentiator" got its access on the market in September 2012 for patients carrying the G551D mutation. New other molecules, named "CFTR correctors" which can have synergistic effect with ivacaftor and concern patients carrying the most common mutation--DF 508--are under development. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  6. Chronic illness: the importance of support for families caring for a child with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Coyne, I T

    1997-03-01

    The effect of chronic life-threatening illness on the family is one of the major problems confronting the health-care system today. Increasingly, parents have the major responsibility for the daily management of their child's condition. There is evidence that many parents lack the professional help and support which could ameliorate some of their problems. It is important that nurses have an understanding of how families cope with the burden of caring for a chronically ill child. Health professionals need clear guidelines on how to support these families in their role as primary care-givers. This paper examines how families of children with cystic fibrosis adapt to the illness in order to provide indicators for nursing practice and to enhance the care and support provided for these families. Effective coping strategies include: assigning meaning to the illness, sharing the burden, denial of diagnosis and incorporating therapy in a schedule.

  7. Cystic fibrosis and coeliac disease

    PubMed Central

    Goodchild, Mary C.; Nelson, R.; Anderson, Charlotte M.

    1973-01-01

    Two children, unrelated, in whom cystic fibrosis had been diagnosed at the ages of 14 weeks and 10 months, respectively, were found subsequently to suffer from coeliac disease as well. Both children are responding well to dietary gluten withdrawal and to conventional treatment for cystic fibrosis. It is suggested that cystic fibrosis may predispose to the development of coeliac disease. Therefore, jejunal biopsy may be a useful investigation in the occasional child with cystic fibrosis, who presents with unusual features, and who fails to thrive as well as expected. ImagesFIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 5FIG. 6 PMID:4517654

  8. Neonatal cystic fibrosis screening test

    MedlinePlus

    Cystic fibrosis screening - neonatal; Immunoreactive trypsinogen; IRT test; CF - screening ... better nutrition, growth, and lung function. This screening test helps doctors identify children with CF before they ...

  9. Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition

    MedlinePlus

    ... Getting an X-ray Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition KidsHealth > For Kids > Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition Print A A A What's in this article? ... is someone who knows all about food and nutrition. Each kid is different, but most kids with ...

  10. Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the Operating Room? Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition KidsHealth > For Kids > Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition A A A What's in this article? CF ... is someone who knows all about food and nutrition. Each kid is different, but most kids with ...

  11. [Cystic fibrosis in 2008].

    PubMed

    Durieu, I; Josserand, R Nove

    2008-11-01

    To describe the epidemiological, physiopathological, clinical and therapeutic knowledge concerning cystic fibrosis (CF). Important modifications in the health organization of the care concerning this orphan disease have been implemented in France. The life expectancy has dramatically increased, as well as the knowledge concerning the pathological structure and function of the CFTR gene and protein. This will lead to the development of emerging drug treatments for this lethal disease. The life expectancy is predicted to exceed 40 years for children born in the 2000s. As a result, there has been a tremendous growth of the adult population that reached 40% of the overall approximately 5000 patients included in the CF French registry (Observatoire National de la Mucoviscidose). Lung disease remains the primary cause of morbidity and mortality. The characteristic phenotypic presentation associates bronchial and rhinosinusal symptoms, pancreatic insufficiency and liver disease. Bronchial damage leads to progressive chronic respiratory insufficiency. Diabetes mellitus and osteoporosis frequently appears in adulthood. Neonatal screening has been implemented in France since 2002. It will prevent delayed diagnosis and its deleterious consequences. Some atypical cases of CF presenting only with one or two organ system involvement can be diagnosed in adulthood. Isolated chronic rhinosinusitis, bronchiectasis, congenital bilateral absence of vas deferens, recurrent pancreatitis, allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, and some case of cholangitis may so revealed late form of cystic fibrosis. The health care is organized in cystic fibrosis centres. Despite gene discovery, treatment still remains symptomatic, based on intensive pulmonary and nutritional treatments. Challenges for new treatments are to correct the basic defect, either by gene therapy or by pharmacological modulation of the abnormal physiological processes.

  12. Cystic fibrosis since 1938.

    PubMed

    Davis, Pamela B

    2006-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) was distinguished from celiac disease in 1938. Then, it was a pathologic diagnosis, life expectancy was approximately 6 months, and the autosomal recessive disease was believed to arise from abnormal mucus plugging exocrine ducts. Death often occurred from lung infection. Discovery of the sweat electrolyte defect in 1953 and standardization of the sweat test in 1959 allowed identification of milder cases, and CF was no longer considered only a disorder of mucus. In 1955, establishment of centers with programs of aggressive, comprehensive care initiated striking improvement in longevity. The pillars of care established then (attention to nutrition, airway clearance, treatment of lung infection) remain today. In 1983, chloride transport was identified as the basic physiologic CF defect, accompanied by increased sodium reabsorption. In 1980, we learned that inflammation contributes independently to lung disease and constitutes an independent therapeutic target. In 1989, the discovery of the CF gene demonstrated the basic defect to be in a cAMP-regulated chloride channel. This afforded new diagnostic tests, opportunities for research, and prospects for using the gene as therapy. Since then, substantial advances in basic and clinical research catalyzed therapeutic improvements: median survival age now exceeds 30 years. The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation center network provides not only opportunity to conduct clinical trials but also means to disseminate new therapies. In the future, treatments directed at the basic defect can be expected, with concomitant improvements in morbidity and mortality.

  13. Cystic fibrosis in Uruguay.

    PubMed

    Luzardo, Gerardo; Aznarez, Isabel; Crispino, Beatriz; Mimbacas, Adriana; Martínez, Liria; Poggio, Rossana; Zielenski, Julian; Tsui, Lap-Chee; Cardoso, Horacio

    2002-03-31

    We conducted clinical and genetic analyses of 52 cystic fibrosis (CF) patients in Uruguay, which is about half of the known affected individuals in the country. A relatively high proportion had a mild presentation, characterized by pancreatic sufficiency (28%), a strong pulmonary component (97%), and borderline sweat electrolyte measurements (25%). Mutational analysis of CF chromosomes demonstrated a relatively low incidence of the DeltaF508 allele (40%) and a large number of other cystic fibrosis conductance regulator mutations, with an overall detection rate of about 71%. Fifteen different mutations were detected in our patients: DeltaF508, G542X, R1162X, G85E, N1303K, R334W, R75Q, R74W, D1270N, W1282X, DeltaI507, 2789+5G-->A, R1066C, -816C/T, R553X, as well as RNA splicing variant IVS8-5T. This group of Uruguayan CF patients has some characteristics in common with other populations of similar origin (Hispanics), as well as some unique characteristics.

  14. Cystic fibrosis related diabetes.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, Donal; O'Connell, Jean

    2014-08-01

    Improved life expectancy in cystic fibrosis (CF) has led to an expanding population of adults with CF, now representing almost 50 % of the total CF population. This creates new challenges from long-term complications such as diabetes mellitus (DM), a condition that is present in 40 %-50 % of adults with CF. Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes (CFRD) results from a primary defect of insulin deficiency and although sharing features with type 1 (DM1) and type 2 diabetes (DM2), it is a clinically distinct condition. Progression to diabetes is associated with poorer CF clinical outcomes and increased mortality. CFRD is not associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and the prevalence of microvascular complications is lower than DM1 or DM2. Rather, the primary goal of insulin therapy is the preservation of lung function and optimization of nutritional status. There is increasing evidence that appropriate screening and early intervention with insulin can reverse weight loss and improve pulmonary function. This approach may include targeting postprandial hyperglycemia not detected by standard diagnostic tests such as the oral glucose tolerance test. Further clinical research is required to guide when and how much to intervene in patients who are already dealing with the burden of one chronic illness.

  15. Cystic Fibrosis: Prenatal Screening and Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Cystic Fibrosis: Prenatal Screening and Diagnosis Home For Patients Search ... Screening and Diagnosis FAQ171, June 2017 PDF Format Cystic Fibrosis: Prenatal Screening and Diagnosis Pregnancy What is cystic ...

  16. Gastrointestinal Manifestations of Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis has historically been considered a pulmonary disease, but with the increasing life expectancy of these patients, gastrointestinal manifestations are becoming more important. Furthermore, nutritional status is closely linked to pulmonary function and, thus, overall mortality. This article discusses gastrointestinal manifestations (which involve nutritional, pancreatic, hepatobiliary, and, in particular, gastrointestinal tract issues) of cystic fibrosis as well as management of the disease. In addition, the article discusses studies that have been critical to our understanding of gastrointestinal manifestations of cystic fibrosis. PMID:27330503

  17. Nutritional Issues in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Missale; Bozic, Molly; Mascarenhas, Maria R

    2016-03-01

    The importance of maintaining adequate nutrition in patients with cystic fibrosis has been well known for the past 3 decades. Achieving normal growth and maintaining optimal nutrition is associated with improved lung function. Comprehensive and consistent nutritional assessments at regular intervals can identify those at risk of nutritional failure and uncover micronutrient deficiencies contributing to malnutrition. Management of malnutrition in cystic fibrosis should follow a stepwise approach to determine the causes and comorbidities and to develop a nutritional plan. Nutritional management is crucial at every stage in a person's life with cystic fibrosis and remains a cornerstone of management.

  18. Pneumothorax in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Kioumis, Ioannis P.; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Huang, Haidong; Li, Qiang; Dryllis, Georgios; Pitsiou, Georgia; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Lampaki, Sofia; Porpodis, Konstantinos; Zaric, Bojan; Branislav, Perin; Mpoukovinas, Ioannis; Lazaridis, George

    2014-01-01

    Pneumothorax is recognized as a common and life-threatening complication in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, especially in those who are infected with P. aeruginosa, B. cepacia or Aspergillus, need enteral feeding, are diagnosed as suffering from allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA), developed massive hemoptysis, and their respiratory function is seriously compromised. Structural impairment and altered airflow dynamics in the lungs of CF patients are considered as the main predisposing factors, but also inhaled medications and non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) could increase the risk of pneumothorax. Clinical presentation could range from dramatic to very mild. Management of spontaneous pneumothorax occurring to patients with CF is essentially similar to that for non-CF patients. Therapeutic options include intercostal tube drainage, video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS), and medical or surgical pleurodesis. Pneumothorax increases both short- and long-term morbidity and mortality in CF patients and causes significant deterioration of their quality of life. PMID:25337406

  19. Cystic fibrosis in pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Kent, N E; Farquharson, D F

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the outcomes of pregnancies in women with cystic fibrosis (CF) and to address issues pertinent to the obstetric care of such women. DATA SOURCES: English-language case reports and case series published from 1960 to 1991 identified through a search of MEDLINE and Index Medicus. The terms of reference were "cystic fibrosis" and "pregnancy". Not all the reports reviewed addressed all the outcomes under consideration. STUDY SELECTION: A total of 20 reports citing cases of pregnancy in women with CF. DATA EXTRACTION: Outcomes included the number of spontaneous abortions, pregnancies continued beyond 20 weeks, preterm deliveries, maternal deaths at 6 months and 2 years after delivery and perinatal deaths. Breast-feeding was addressed. Measures to assess the severity of maternal disease included the mean age at diagnosis of CF, weight gain during pregnancy, pulmonary function studies if available and the need for pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy. DATA SYNTHESIS: Of 217 pregnancies in 162 women spontaneous abortion occurred in 10 (4.6%). Pregnancy progressed beyond 20 weeks in 81.6% of cases; 24.3% of the deliveries were preterm. The maternal death rate did not exceed that among age-related women with CF who were not pregnant. The rate of perinatal death was 7.9%. Breast milk was not hypernatremic. Poor outcomes were associated with a weight gain of less than 4.5 kg and a forced vital capacity of less than 50% of the predicted value. CONCLUSIONS: Premature labour and delivery remain a significant risk for pregnant women with CF, contributing to a high rate of perinatal death. Maternal illness and death result from deteriorating pulmonary function. Breast-feeding is not contraindicated. Attention to energy intake and pulmonary function is important. PMID:8374843

  20. Molecular Diagnosis of Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Deignan, Joshua L; Grody, Wayne W

    2016-01-01

    This unit describes a recommended approach to identifying causal genetic variants in an individual suspected of having cystic fibrosis. An introduction to the genetics and clinical presentation of cystic fibrosis is initially presented, followed by a description of the two main strategies used in the molecular diagnosis of cystic fibrosis: (1) an initial targeted variant panel used to detect only the most common cystic fibrosis-causing variants in the CFTR gene, and (2) sequencing of the entire coding region of the CFTR gene to detect additional rare causal CFTR variants. Finally, the unit concludes with a discussion regarding the analytic and clinical validity of these approaches. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  1. Haemophilus infection in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Rayner, R J; Hiller, E J; Ispahani, P; Baker, M

    1990-01-01

    Twenty seven patients with cystic fibrosis under the age of 12 years and 27 matched patients with asthma were followed up in a prospective study for one year. The isolation rate of non-capsulated strains of Haemophilus influenzae from cough swabs and sputum specimens taken at routine clinic visits every two months was significantly greater in cystic fibrosis than in asthma. Haemophilus para-influenzae was equally common in both groups. During exacerbations the isolation rate of H influenzae in cystic fibrosis was significantly greater than at other times, whereas in asthma there was no significant difference. The distribution of biotypes of H influenzae and H parainfluenzae was similar in the two groups. In cystic fibrosis, biotype I was associated with exacerbations. Biotype V was more common than in previous studies, but was not associated with exacerbations. PMID:2185699

  2. [Lung physiotherapy in cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Gursli, S; Haanaes, O C

    1991-02-28

    This article is intended as a brief practical guide for physicians and physiotherapists concerned with the treatment of cystic fibrosis. Physiotherapeutic techniques for the treatment of chest diseases have been developed and modified as advances have taken place in the medical management of cystic fibrosis. The article describes forced expiratory technique, positive expiratory pressure, postural drainage, autogenic drainage and other techniques. Patients with cystic fibrosis live longer and have a better quality of life than ever before, but progressive deterioration of lung function will always be their most serious problem. Physical activity and chest physiotherapy are essential parts of all treatment regimens for cystic fibrosis. It is important to realize that the physiotherapist is a very important member of the team which includes nurses, physicians-and the patient.

  3. Newborn screening for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Castellani, Carlo; Massie, John; Sontag, Marci; Southern, Kevin W

    2016-08-01

    Since the late 1970s when the potential of the immunoreactive trypsinogen assay for early identification of infants with cystic fibrosis was first recognised, the performance of newborn blood spot screening (NBS) has been continually assessed and its use has gradually expanded. NBS for cystic fibrosis is a cost-effective strategy and, if standards of care are fully implemented and robust management pathways are in place, has a positive effect on clinical outcomes. In the past decade, NBS has undergone rapid expansion and an unprecedented number of infants with cystic fibrosis have access to early diagnosis and care. Cystic fibrosis NBS has now moved on from the development phase and is entering an era of consolidation. In the future, research should focus on the rationalisation and optimisation of existing programmes, with particular attention to bioethical implications such as unwanted detection of carriers and inconclusive diagnoses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Physical training for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Bradley, J; Moran, F

    2008-01-23

    Physical training may form an important part of the care package for people with cystic fibrosis. To determine whether a prescribed regimen of physical training produces improvement or prevents deterioration in physiological and clinical outcomes in cystic fibrosis compared to no training. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register which comprises references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. Date of the most recent search: September 2007. All randomised and quasi-randomised controlled clinical trials in which a prescribed regimen of physical training is compared to no physical training in people with cystic fibrosis. Two authors independently selected studies for inclusion, assessed methodological quality and extracted data. Of the 26 studies identified, seven studies which included 231 participants, met the inclusion criteria. This review does provide some limited evidence from both short- and long-term studies that aerobic or anaerobic physical training has a positive effect on primary outcomes (exercise capacity, strength and lung function) but improvements are not consistent between studies. Conclusions about the efficacy of physical training in cystic fibrosis are limited by the small size, short duration and incomplete reporting of most of the studies included in this review. Physical training is already part of the care package offered to most people with cystic fibrosis and there is a lack of evidence to actively discourage this. The benefits obtained from including physical training in a package of care may be influenced by the type of training programme. Further research is needed to assess comprehensively the benefits of exercise programmes in people with cystic fibrosis and the relative benefits of the addition of aerobic versus anaerobic versus a combination of both types of physical training to the care

  5. Pneumococcal vaccines for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Laura; Southern, Kevin W

    2014-08-05

    Invasive pneumococcal disease is associated with significant mortality and many countries have introduced routine pneumococcal vaccination into their childhood immunisation programmes. Whilst pneumococcal disease in cystic fibrosis is uncommon, pneumococcal immunisation may offer some protection against pulmonary exacerbations caused by this pathogen. In the USA and UK pneumococcal vaccination is currently recommended for all children and adults with cystic fibrosis. To assess the efficacy of pneumococcal vaccines in reducing morbidity in people with cystic fibrosis. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Cystic Fibrosis Trials Register, which comprises references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. In addition, the pharmaceutical manufacturers of the polysaccharide and conjugate pneumococcal vaccines were approached.Date of the most recent search: 15 May 2014. Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing pneumococcal vaccination (with either a polysaccharide or conjugate pneumococcal vaccine) with non-vaccination or placebo in children or adults with cystic fibrosis were eligible for inclusion. No relevant trials were identified. There are no trials included in this review. As no trials were identified we cannot draw conclusions on the efficacy of routine pneumococcal immunisation in people with cystic fibrosis in reducing their morbidity or mortality. As many countries now include pneumococcal immunisation in their routine childhood vaccination schedule it is unlikely that future randomised controlled trials will be initiated. Rigorously conducted epidemiological studies may offer the opportunity to evaluate the efficacy of pneumococcal vaccination in reducing morbidity and mortality in people with cystic fibrosis.

  6. Pneumococcal vaccines for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Laura; Southern, Kevin W

    2012-09-12

    Invasive pneumococcal disease is associated with significant mortality and many countries have introduced routine pneumococcal vaccination into their childhood immunisation programmes. Whilst pneumococcal disease in cystic fibrosis is uncommon, pneumococcal immunisation may offer some protection against pulmonary exacerbations caused by this pathogen. In the USA and UK pneumococcal vaccination is currently recommended for all children and adults with cystic fibrosis. To assess the efficacy of pneumococcal vaccines in reducing morbidity in people with cystic fibrosis. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Cystic Fibrosis Trials Register, which comprises references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. In addition, the pharmaceutical manufacturers of the polysaccharide and conjugate pneumococcal vaccines were approached.Date of the most recent search: 10 July 2012. Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing pneumococcal vaccination (with either a polysaccharide or conjugate pneumococcal vaccine) with non-vaccination or placebo in children or adults with cystic fibrosis were eligible for inclusion. No relevant trials were identified. There are no trials included in this review. As no trials were identified we cannot draw conclusions on the efficacy of routine pneumococcal immunisation in people with cystic fibrosis in reducing their morbidity or mortality. As many countries now include pneumococcal immunisation in their routine childhood vaccination schedule it is unlikely that future randomised controlled trials will be initiated. Rigorously conducted epidemiological studies may offer the opportunity to evaluate the efficacy of pneumococcal vaccination in reducing morbidity and mortality in people with cystic fibrosis.

  7. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Cystic Fibrosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Cystic Fibrosis? The signs and symptoms of cystic fibrosis (CF) ... respiratory, digestive, or reproductive systems of the body. Cystic Fibrosis Figure A shows the organs that cystic fibrosis ...

  8. Hopkins Teen Central: Assessment of an internet-based support system for children with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, K B; Ravert, R D; Everton, A

    2001-02-01

    Support groups are an important therapeutic intervention for patients with chronic debilitating illnesses. Patients who are difficult to assemble in one physical location may benefit from participating in an electronic support group (ESG). ESGs for adolescents have not been evaluated, although studies have shown a benefit to adult ESGs. Our goals were to create a web-based support service for adolescents with cystic fibrosis (CF) and to qualitatively and quantitatively measure the effects that such a support site could have on patients' relationships with the clinic faculty and staff, access to and interaction with peers with CF, and understanding of CF. A highly interactive ESG was developed after discussions with a team of CF specialists and patients. Eighteen of 37 teenagers with CF agreed to use this site. Each patient was asked to assess his or her perceived availability of and comfort with the clinic staff and faculty, perceived support available through peers, knowledge about CF, and perceived usefulness of the Internet as a support tool. Participants logged into the site an average of 4 times each month. Teens who owned home computers accessed the site somewhat more frequently than did teens who were provided with home Internet access for the study. Most activity occurred in those sections of the site that described the participants and that allowed them to socialize. Over one half of the participants e-mailed each other at least once a week, with 77% e-mailing peers at least every other week. There was no significant difference in the participants' scores on a quiz about CF at the beginning and the end of the study; however, there was a significant decrease in perceptions about their knowledge about CF. At the conclusion of the study, participants believed that they had more friends who they could relate to than they did at the beginning of the study. Clinic staff noticed an increase in references to peers among the group who were using the site. In

  9. Cystic Fibrosis (CF): Chloride Sweat Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... to 2-Year-Old Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Chloride Sweat Test KidsHealth > For Parents > Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Chloride Sweat Test Print A A A What's in this ... en el sudor What It Is A chloride sweat test helps diagnose cystic fibrosis (CF) , an inherited ...

  10. Cystic Fibrosis (CF): Chloride Sweat Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1- to 2-Year-Old Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Chloride Sweat Test KidsHealth > For Parents > Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Chloride Sweat Test A A A What's in this ... cloruro en el sudor What It Is A chloride sweat test helps diagnose cystic fibrosis (CF) , an ...

  11. What's it Like to Have Cystic Fibrosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Cystic Fibrosis KidsHealth > For Kids > Cystic Fibrosis A A A What's in this article? What ... a condition she's known all her life — cystic fibrosis (say: SIS-tik fi-BRO-sus). Her parents ...

  12. Laboratory diagnosis of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Webster, H L

    1983-01-01

    The demonstration of abnormally high concentrations of electrolytes in eccrine sweat is still the only practical laboratory procedure available for diagnosis of cystic fibrosis. Properly performed, the sweat test is very reliable, but there are many published reports that all of the methods in current use frequently generate incorrect diagnoses. Analysis of potential for error in sweat test methods shows that of the three essential phases involved, stimulation, collection, and analysis, the major cause of intrinsic inaccuracy occurs in the collection process. In this case the problem is due to condensate formation, which leads to the subsequent analysis of nonrepresentative sweat. Human error is also an important cause of false results and is a direct function of the number of critical manual operations involved in the technic. This review provides a critical examination of sweat test methods, identifying problem areas and suggesting ways to improve procedures in the interests of clinically reliable laboratory data in support of diagnosis.

  13. Chronic pancreatitis and cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Witt, H

    2003-01-01

    Recent discoveries of trypsinogen and trypsin inhibitor mutations in patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP) support the hypothesis that an inappropriate activation of pancreatic zymogens to active enzymes within the pancreatic parenchyma starts the inflammatory process. Current data suggest that CP may be inherited dominant, recessive, or complex as a result of mutations in the above mentioned or yet unidentified genes. Evaluation of patients with CP should include genetic testing. Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene and is characterised by pancreatic insufficiency and chronic bronchopulmonary infection. The progression and severity of pulmonary disease differs considerably between people with identical CFTR mutations and does not seem to correlate with the type or class of the CFTR mutation. The identification of further disease modifying genetic factors will increase the pathophysiological understanding and may help to identify new therapeutic targets. PMID:12651880

  14. Survival rates in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Wilmott, R W; Tyson, S L; Dinwiddie, R; Matthew, D J

    1983-01-01

    Life tables were calculated for 273 British children with cystic fibrosis for the period 1974-9. There was a marked improvement in survival rates in the meconium ileus group compared with the 1969-73 data, but there was little improvement in patients presenting later with other symptoms. PMID:6639137

  15. Nutritional management of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Goodchild, M C

    1987-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis patients have an increased requirement for calories and probably for all the major nutrients. The newer, enteric-coated granular preparations of pancreatic enzyme are more effective than preceding preparations and should permit a normal fat intake. Recent work has emphasized the interdependence of respiratory disease and nutrition.

  16. [Therapeutic update in cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Durupt, S; Nove Josserand, R; Durieu, I

    2014-06-01

    We present the recent therapeutic advances in the cystic fibrosis care. It concerns improvements in symptomatic treatment with the development of dry powder inhaled antibiotics that improved quality of life, and innovative treatments namely the modulators of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane protein conductance regulator (CFTR), molecules which act specifically at the level of the defective mechanisms implied in the disease. The life expectancy of cystic fibrosis patients born after 2000, is estimated now to be about 50 years. This improvement of survival was obtained with the organization of the care within the specialized centers for cystic fibrosis (Centre de ressource et de compétences de la mucoviscidose) and remains still based on heavy symptomatic treatments. Dry powder inhaled antibiotics constitute a significant time saving for patients to whom all the care can achieve two hours daily. Since 2012, the modulators of CFTR, molecules allowing a pharmacological approach targeted according to the type of the mutations, allows a more specific approach of the disease. Ivacaftor (Kalydeco(®)) which potentialises the function of the CFTR protein expressed on the cellular surface is now available for patients with the G551D mutation. Lumacaftor is going to be tested in association with ivacaftor in patients with the F508del mutation, that is present in at least 75% of the patients. The ataluren which allows the production of a functional protein CFTR in patients with a no sense mutation is the third representing of this new therapeutic class. We presently have numerous symptomatic treatments for the cystic fibrosis care. The development of CFTR modulators, today available to a restricted number of patients treated with ivacaftor represents a very promising therapeutic avenue. It will represent probably the first step to a personalized treatment according to CFTR genotype.

  17. [Historical compilation of cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Navarro, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most common life-shortening recessively inherited disorder in the Caucasian population. The genetic mutation that most frequently provokes cystic fibrosis (ΔF508) appeared at least 53,000years ago. For many centuries, the disease was thought to be related to witchcraft and the "evil eye" and it was only in 1938 that Dorothy H. Andersen characterized this disorder and suspected its genetic origin. The present article reviews the pathological discoveries and diagnostic and therapeutic advances made in the last 75 years. The review ends with some considerations for the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  18. Pharmacogenetics of cystic fibrosis treatment.

    PubMed

    Carter, Suzanne C; McKone, Edward F

    2016-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is genetic autosomal recessive disease caused by reduced or absent function of CFTR protein. Treatments for patients with CF have primarily focused on the downstream end-organ consequences of defective CFTR. Since the discovery of the CFTR gene that causes CF in 1989 there have been tremendous advances in our understanding of the genetics and pathophysiology of CF. This has recently led to the development of new CFTR mutation-specific targeted therapies for select patients with CF. This review will discuss the characteristics of the CFTR gene, the CFTR mutations that cause CF and the new mutation specific pharmacological treatments including gene therapy that are contributing to the dawning of a new era in cystic fibrosis care.

  19. Biomarkers in Paediatric Cystic Fibrosis Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Kathryn A; Schultz, André; Stick, Stephen M

    2015-09-01

    Biomarkers in cystic fibrosis are used i. for the measurement of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator function in order to diagnose cystic fibrosis, and ii. to assess aspects of lung disease severity (e.g. inflammation, infection). Effective biomarkers can aid disease monitoring and contribute to the development of new therapies. The tests of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator function each have unique strengths and weaknesses, and biomarkers of inflammation, infection and tissue destruction have the potential to enhance the management of cystic fibrosis through the early detection of disease processes. The development of biomarkers of cystic fibrosis lung disease, in particular airway inflammation and infection, is influenced by the challenges of obtaining relevant samples from infants and children for whom early detection and treatment of disease might have the greatest long term benefits.

  20. Pseudomembranous colitis in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Nagakumar, Prasad

    2013-05-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients may require frequent courses of antibiotics and repeated hospital admissions. Although children with CF have high carriage rate for C.difficile, they rarely develop colitis. Pseudomembranous colitis is more common in adult post lung transplant CF patients. Although rare, paseudomembranous colitis should be considered in CF patients presenting with abdominal symptoms even in the absence of diarrhoea. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Cystic Fibrosis Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn Javascript on. Feature: Steady Advances Against Cystic Fibrosis Cystic Fibrosis Research Past Issues / Fall 2012 Table of Contents "Remarkable strides in cystic fibrosis research over the past two decades have culminated ...

  2. Chest physiotherapy in cystic fibrosis: improved tolerance with nasal pressure support ventilation.

    PubMed

    Fauroux, B; Boulé, M; Lofaso, F; Zérah, F; Clément, A; Harf, A; Isabey, D

    1999-03-01

    Chest physiotherapy (CPT) is an integral part of the treatment of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). CPT imposes additional respiratory work that may carry a risk of respiratory muscle fatigue. Inspiratory pressure support ventilation (PSV) is a new mode of ventilatory assistance designed to maintain a constant preset positive airway pressure during spontaneous inspiration with the goal of decreasing the patient's inspiratory work. The aim of our study was 1) to evaluate respiratory muscle fatigue and oxygen desaturation during CPT and 2) to determine whether noninvasive PSV can relieve these potential adverse effects of CPT. Sixteen CF patients in stable condition with a mean age of 13 +/- 4 years participated to the study. For CPT, we used the forced expiratory technique (FET), which consisted of one or more slow active expirations starting near the total lung capacity (TLC) and ending near the residual volume. After each expiration, the child was asked to perform a slow, nonmaximal, diaphragmatic inspiration. After one to four forced breathing cycles, the child was asked to cough and to expectorate. A typical 20-minute CPT session consisted of 10 to 15 FET maneuvers separated by rest periods of 10 to 20 breathing cycles each. During the study, each patient received two CPT sessions in random order on two different days, at the same time of day, with the same physiotherapist. During one of these two sessions, PSV was provided throughout the session (PSV session) via a nasal mask using the pressure support generator ARM25 designed for acute patients (TAEMA, Antony, France). The control session was performed with no nasal mask or PSV. Both CPT sessions were performed without supplemental oxygen. Lung function and maximal inspiratory pressures (PImax) and expiratory pressures (PEmax) were recorded before and after each CPT session. Mean lung function parameters were comparable before the PSV and the control sessions. Baseline pulse oximetry (SpO2) was significantly

  3. Negative sweat tests and cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Sarsfield, J K; Davies, J M

    1975-01-01

    Two brothers are described with chronic suppurative pulmonary disease. One has classical cystic fibrosis with complete pancreatic involvement and abnormal sweat test. The other had incomplete pancreatic disease with repeatedly normal sweat tests. The implications of a negative sweat test in patients with cystic fibrosis are discussed. Images FIG. PMID:1147688

  4. [Bronchopulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Munck, Anne; Bingen, Edouard

    2003-01-15

    Bronchopulmonary infection determines the vital prognosis of the patients with cystic fibrosis. Following Staphylococcus aureus infection, patients are colonized or cocolonized by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, greatly involved in the pulmonary deterioration; intensive antibiotic treatment of primocolonisation helps to prevent or delay chronic colonisation. Chronic colonization needs a rational long term antibiotic strategy to prevent the occurrence of multiresistant germs; antibiotic cures are performed every 3 or 4 months before pulmonary exacerbation symptoms. Antibiotherapy, physiotherapy and nutritional management helps to increase the survival and quality of life.

  5. Endocrine Disorders in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Blackman, Scott M; Tangpricha, Vin

    2016-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis is frequently complicated by endocrine disorders. Diabetes can be expected to affect most with CF and pancreatic insufficiency and varies widely in age of onset, but early identification and treatment improve morbidity and mortality. Short stature can be exacerbated by relative delay of puberty and by use of inhaled corticosteroids. Bone disease in CF causes fragility fractures and should be assessed by monitoring bone mineral density and optimizing vitamin D status. Detecting and managing endocrine complications in CF can reduce morbidity and mortality in CF. These complications can be expected to become more common as the CF population ages. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Environmental scan of cystic fibrosis research worldwide.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Janice

    2017-05-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a rare fatal genetic disease, affecting 70,000 to 100,000 people worldwide [1]. Numerous countries have specific charitable organizations dedicated to CF, with many funding research to find a cure or effective control for the disease. Cystic Fibrosis Canada, the largest charity in Canada dedicated to funding research and care in CF, conducted an environmental scan of these organizations to learn and better understand their research goals and funding process. A set of questions was sent to 25 CF charitable organizations around the world by email. Responses were consolidated to identify common practices and innovative approaches. Among respondents, there were variations in the amount of funds invested in research annually and the number of studies supported. Common themes identified included practicing an open call for research applications, evaluating applications using a peer review process, and placing an increased emphasis on patient engagement. Innovative approaches included funding one larger project; funding a series of sub-projects on a common theme; partially funding a research project; and, indefinitely funding part of a researcher's salary. Among CF charitable organizations, there are numerous approaches to research funding. Both similarities and differences were noted between these organizations, all of which share the common goal of working towards improving quality of life and survival for people with CF. Copyright © 2016 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Cystic Fibrosis: Brazilian ENT Experience

    PubMed Central

    Sih, Tania; Godinho, Ricardo; Franco, Leticia Paiva; Piltcher, Otávio

    2012-01-01

    Most published studies about Cystic Fibrosis (CF) are European or North American. There are still few publications about the characteristics of fibrocystic populations in developing countries. The incidence of cystic fibrosis (CF) in Brazil varies among different regions (1 : 10,000 in Minas Gerais, 1 : 9,500 in Paraná, 1 : 8,700 in Santa Catarina, and 1 : 1600 in Rio Grande do Sul). The prevalence of the DF508 mutation also varies according to population: 33% in Sao Paulo, 49% in Rio Grande do Sul, 27% in Santa Catarina, and 52% in Minas Gerais. Cough and nasal obstruction are the most common symptoms. The variation in nasal polyposis prevalence may be explained by population genotypic characteristics in a country that spans a continent. Findings on nasal endoscopy and computed tomography (CT) have better correlation than do this information compared with surgical and clinical history. Microbiologic studies suggest a high level of early contamination of the airways. Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) occurs in these patients as a result of ototoxic antibiotics. The data compiled in this paper is useful, but also lead to the general agreement that more research would be welcome due to the unique characteristics of this country. PMID:22611403

  8. Aspergillus infections in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    King, Jill; Brunel, Shan F; Warris, Adilia

    2016-07-05

    Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) suffer from chronic lung infection and airway inflammation. Respiratory failure secondary to chronic or recurrent infection remains the commonest cause of death and accounts for over 90% of mortality. Bacteria as Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia complex have been regarded the main CF pathogens and their role in progressive lung decline has been studied extensively. Little attention has been paid to the role of Aspergillus spp. and other filamentous fungi in the pathogenesis of non-ABPA (allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis) respiratory disease in CF, despite their frequent recovery in respiratory samples. It has become more apparent however, that Aspergillus spp. may play an important role in chronic lung disease in CF. Research delineating the underlying mechanisms of Aspergillus persistence and infection in the CF lung and its link to lung deterioration is lacking. This review summarizes the Aspergillus disease phenotypes observed in CF, discusses the role of CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator)-protein in innate immune responses and new treatment modalities. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Fungi in cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Moss, Richard B

    2015-04-01

    Bronchiectasis is a pathologic bronchial dilatation with loss of function that can result from multiple inflammatory and infectious injuries to the conducting airways of the lung. Molds, particularly the filamentous fungus Aspergillus fumigatus, have been implicated as a common cause of both cystic fibrosis (CF) and non-CF bronchiectasis, the latter primarily in patients with severe asthma. The pathogenesis of mold-associated bronchiectasis is usually due to atopic sensitization to mold allergens in the presence of active chronic endobronchial fungal infection with host innate and adaptive immune deviation to a Th2-dominated inflammation, a condition known as allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) (or allergic bronchopulmonary mycosis if a non-Aspergillus mold is implicated). Diagnostic criteria of ABPA continue to evolve, while treatment relies upon downregulation of the allergic inflammatory response with immunomodulatory agents and antifungal pharmacotherapy.

  10. Voice Disorder in Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lourenço, Bruna Mendes; Costa, Kauê Machado; da Silva Filho, Manoel

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a common autosomal recessive disorder with drastic respiratory symptoms, including shortness of breath and chronic cough. While most of cystic fibrosis treatment is dedicated to mitigating the effects of respiratory dysfunction, the potential effects of this disease on vocal parameters have not been systematically studied. We hypothesized that cystic fibrosis patients, given their characteristic respiratory disorders, would also present dysphonic symptoms. Given that voice disorders can severely impair quality of life, the identification of a potential cystic fibrosis-related dysphonia could be of great value for the clinical evaluation and treatment of this disease. We tested our hypothesis by measuring vocal parameters, using both objective physical measures and the GRBAS subjective evaluation method, in male and female cystic fibrosis patients undergoing conventional treatment and compared them to age and sex matched controls. We found that cystic fibrosis patients had a significantly lower vocal intensity and harmonic to noise ratio, as well as increased levels of jitter and shimmer. In addition, cystic fibrosis patients also showed higher scores of roughness, breathiness and asthenia, as well as a significantly altered general grade of dysphonia. When we segregated the results according to sex, we observed that, as a group, only female cystic fibrosis patients had significantly lower values of harmonic to noise ratio and an abnormal general grade of dysphonia in relation to matched controls, suggesting that cystic fibrosis exerts a more pronounced effect on vocal parameters of women in relation to men. Overall, the dysphonic characteristics of CF patients can be explained by dysfunctions in vocal fold movement and partial upper airway obstruction, potentially caused by the accumulation of mucus and chronic cough characteristic of CF symptomatology. Our results show that CF patients exhibit significant dysphonia and suggest they may

  11. Voice disorder in cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Lourenço, Bruna Mendes; Costa, Kauê Machado; da Silva Filho, Manoel

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a common autosomal recessive disorder with drastic respiratory symptoms, including shortness of breath and chronic cough. While most of cystic fibrosis treatment is dedicated to mitigating the effects of respiratory dysfunction, the potential effects of this disease on vocal parameters have not been systematically studied. We hypothesized that cystic fibrosis patients, given their characteristic respiratory disorders, would also present dysphonic symptoms. Given that voice disorders can severely impair quality of life, the identification of a potential cystic fibrosis-related dysphonia could be of great value for the clinical evaluation and treatment of this disease. We tested our hypothesis by measuring vocal parameters, using both objective physical measures and the GRBAS subjective evaluation method, in male and female cystic fibrosis patients undergoing conventional treatment and compared them to age and sex matched controls. We found that cystic fibrosis patients had a significantly lower vocal intensity and harmonic to noise ratio, as well as increased levels of jitter and shimmer. In addition, cystic fibrosis patients also showed higher scores of roughness, breathiness and asthenia, as well as a significantly altered general grade of dysphonia. When we segregated the results according to sex, we observed that, as a group, only female cystic fibrosis patients had significantly lower values of harmonic to noise ratio and an abnormal general grade of dysphonia in relation to matched controls, suggesting that cystic fibrosis exerts a more pronounced effect on vocal parameters of women in relation to men. Overall, the dysphonic characteristics of CF patients can be explained by dysfunctions in vocal fold movement and partial upper airway obstruction, potentially caused by the accumulation of mucus and chronic cough characteristic of CF symptomatology. Our results show that CF patients exhibit significant dysphonia and suggest they may

  12. Heart involvement in cystic fibrosis: A specific cystic fibrosis-related myocardial changes?

    PubMed

    Labombarda, Fabien; Saloux, Eric; Brouard, Jacques; Bergot, Emmanuel; Milliez, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a complex multi-systemic chronic disease characterized by progressive organ dysfunction with development of fibrosis, possibly affecting the heart. Over the last four decades pathological, experimental, and clinical evidence points towards the existence of a specific myocardial involvement in cystic fibrosis. Multi-modality cardiac imaging, especially recent echocardiographic techniques, evidenced diastolic and/or systolic ventricular dysfunction in cystic fibrosis leading to the concept of a cystic fibrosis-related cardiomyopathy. Hypoxemia and inflammation are among the most important factors for heart involvement in cystic fibrosis. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator was found to be involved in the regulation of cardiomyocyte contraction and may also account for cystic fibrosis-related myocardial dysfunction. This review, mainly focused on echocardiographic studies, seeks to synthesize the existing literature for and against the existence of heart involvement in cystic fibrosis, its mechanisms and prognostic implications. Careful investigation of the heart function may be helpful for risk stratification and therapeutic decisions in patients with cystic fibrosis.

  13. [New tools in cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Dournes, G; De Boeck, K; Bui, S; Vermeulen, F; Ramalho, A; Chateil, J-F; Laurent, F; Fayon, M

    2016-12-01

    The use of 3 novel tools available for the diagnosis and treatment in cystic fibrosis are described here. 1) The lung clearance index is a sensitive method which can detect functional impairment in the first months after birth. 2) Detailed morphological analyses of the lung can be performed with the new MRI sequences, without any contrast medium or risk of radiation. The analysis of functional MRI data (perfusion, diffusion, ventilation, inflammation) will be possible, and these data will be correlated to morphological data. The exploration of other organs such as the sinuses, liver and abdomen during the same examination represents another definite advantage. 3) Organoïds are a good example of personalized medicine. This tool explores CFTR function and treatment response in each of the 2000 or so known CFTR mutations. These tests are limited to specialized centers, mostly within a research context. However, their generalization after standardization is expected in the near future.

  14. Alcaligenes infection in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kenneth; Conway, Steven P; Brownlee, Keith G; Etherington, Christine; Peckham, Daniel G

    2002-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of chronic Alcaligenes species infection of the respiratory tract on the clinical status of patients with cystic fibrosis. We conducted a retrospective case-controlled study. The microbiological records of all patients attending the Leeds Regional Pediatric and Adult Cystic Fibrosis Units from 1992-1999 were examined. Chronic Alcaligenes infection was defined as a positive sputum culture on at least three occasions over a 6-month period. These patients were compared with controls matched for age, gender, respiratory function, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection status. Respiratory function tests, anthropometric data, Shwachman-Kulczycki score, Northern chest x-ray score, intravenous and nebulized antibiotic treatment, and corticosteroid treatment were compared from 2 years before to 2 years after Alcaligenes infection. From a clinic population of 557, 13 (2.3%) fulfilled the criteria for chronic infection. The median age at acquisition of infection was 17.2 years (range, 6.5-33.6). There was no significant difference in the changes of percentage predicted values for FEV(1), FVC, FEF(25-75), or Shwachman-Kulczycki and Northern chest x-ray scores, or in weight, height, and body mass index z-scores between Alcaligenes-infected cases and controls. There was also no significant difference in the use of antibiotics (intravenous and nebulized) or corticosteroids (inhaled and oral). We conclude that in our clinic, chronic infection with Alcaligenes species was uncommon. Chronically infected patients showed no excess deterioration in clinical or pulmonary function status from 2 years before to 2 years after primary acquisition.

  15. [Cystic fibrosis in a woman aged seventy].

    PubMed

    Ras, Janneke E; van Velzen, Edwin; van Berkhout, Ferdinand Teding; van den Brand, Joop J G

    2010-01-01

    A seventy-year-old woman was admitted to hospital with a Staphylococcus aureus respiratory tract infection. She had a history of extensive bronchiectasis and allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA). Cystic fibrosis (CF) was suspected and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene analysis showed F508del and R117H-7T mutations. In these mutations there is residual activity in the chloride channel in the cell membrane coded by the CFTR gene. This results in a much milder disease pattern varying from no disease at all to isolated organ disease. This type of disease is known as non-classical cystic fibrosis. In our patient the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis was made exceptionally late in life.

  16. Antibiotic-associated colitis and cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Pokorny, C S; Bye, P T; MacLeod, C; Selby, W S

    1992-09-01

    The use of antibiotics in patients with cystic fibrosis is widespread, and fecal carriage of Clostridium difficile occurs in up to 50% of these patients; however, antibiotic-associated colitis appears to be a rare occurrence. The reasons why this is so remain unknown. A case of antibiotic-associated colitis occurring in a patient with cystic fibrosis is described. Possible mechanisms for the rarity of antibiotic-associated colitis are reviewed and implications for prompt diagnosis and therapy are discussed.

  17. Cystic fibrosis therapeutics: the road ahead.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Lucas R; Ramsey, Bonnie W

    2013-01-01

    A great deal of excitement and hope has followed the successful trials and US Food and Drug Administration approval of the drug ivacaftor (Kalydeco), the first therapy available that targets the underlying defect that causes cystic fibrosis (CF). Although this drug has currently demonstrated a clinical benefit for a small minority of the CF population, the developmental pathway established by ivacaftor paves the way for other CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) modulators that may benefit many more patients. In addition to investigating CFTR modulators, researchers are actively developing numerous other innovative CF therapies. In this review, we use the catalog of treatments currently under evaluation with the support of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, known as the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Therapeutics Pipeline, as a platform to discuss the variety of candidate treatments for CF lung disease that promise to improve CF care. Many of these approaches target the individual components of the relentless cycle of airway obstruction, inflammation, and infection characteristic of lung disease in CF, whereas others are aimed directly at the gene defect, or the resulting dysfunctional protein, that instigates this cycle. We discuss how new findings from the laboratory have informed not only the development of novel therapeutics, but also the rationales for their use and the outcomes used to measure their effects. By reviewing the breadth of candidate treatments currently in development, as well as the recent progress in CF therapies reflected by the evolution of the therapeutics pipeline over the past few years, we hope to build upon the optimism and anticipation generated by the recent success of Kalydeco.

  18. [Nutrition, cystic fibrosis and the digestive tract].

    PubMed

    Olveira, Gabriel; Olveira, Casilda

    2008-05-01

    The prevalence of hyponutrition in cystic fibrosis is high although it may vary according to the different studies. Detection of hyponutrition should be done by combining different methods, depending on their availability. However, the simplest and most validated criterion is to measure at each visit the weight (and height in children) in order to calculate the body mass index and categorizing hyponutrition according to absolute criteria: in adults < 18.5 kg/m(2), and in children as percentiles of the body mass index. Worsening of the nutritional status is directly related with the decrease in lung function parameters and it has been proposed as a morbidity (and even mortality) predictive factor in people with cystic fibrosis, independently of the level of pulmonary dysfunction. Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency is present is approximately 70-90% of the patients with cystic fibrosis and the genotype-phenotype correlation is high. Most of the patients with exocrine pancreatic insufficiency tolerate a high-fat diet provided that they are treated with pancreatic enzymes at appropriate doses. The prevalence of diabetes increases with age, reaching up 40% of the cases in patients older than 30 years. Clinical liver involvement is less prevalent (it approximately affects 1/3 of the patients). Other intestinal complications such as meconial ileus, gastroesophageal reflux, obstruction of the distal intestine, or fibrosing colon disease may also condition malnourishment. In patients with cystic fibrosis, a usual high-fat diet providing 120%-150% of the recommended calories is advised. If the nutritional goals are not achieved or maintained with diet modifications, artificial supplements may be added, although the recommendation for their use has not been endorsed by solid scientific evidences. The most frequently used preparations usually are polymeric or hypercaloric. The indications for enteral (through a tube, especially gastrostomy) or parenteral nutritional support are

  19. Abnormal Ion Permeation through Cystic Fibrosis Respiratory Epithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knowles, M. R.; Stutts, M. J.; Spock, A.; Fischer, N.; Gatzy, J. T.; Boucher, R. C.

    1983-09-01

    The epithelium of nasal tissue excised from subjects with cystic fibrosis exhibited higher voltage and lower conductance than tissue from control subjects. Basal sodium ion absorption by cystic fibrosis and normal nasal epithelia equaled the short-circuit current and was amiloride-sensitive. Amiloride induced chloride ion secretion in normal but not cystic fibrosis tissue and consequently was more effective in inhibiting the short-circuit current in cystic fibrosis epithelia. Chloride ion-free solution induced a smaller hyperpolarization of cystic fibrosis tissue. The increased voltage and amiloride efficacy in cystic fibrosis reflect absorption of sodium ions across an epithelium that is relatively impermeable to chloride ions.

  20. Cystic fibrosis chronic rhinosinusitis: A comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Chaaban, Mohamad R.; Kejner, Alexandra; Rowe, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Advances in the care of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) have improved pulmonary outcomes and survival. In addition, rapid developments regarding the underlying genetic and molecular basis of the disease have led to numerous novel targets for treatment. However, clinical and basic scientific research focusing on therapeutic strategies for CF-associated chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) lags behind the evidence-based approaches currently used for pulmonary disease. Methods: This review evaluates the available literature and provides an update concerning the pathophysiology, current treatment approaches, and future pharmaceutical tactics in the management of CRS in patients with CF. Results: Optimal medical and surgical strategies for CF CRS are lacking because of a dearth of well-performed clinical trials. Medical and surgical interventions are supported primarily by level 2 or 3 evidence and are aimed at improving clearance of mucus, infection, and inflammation. A number of novel therapeutics that target the basic defect in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator channel are currently under investigation. Ivacaftor, a corrector of the G551D mutation, was recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration. However, sinonasal outcomes using this and other novel drugs are pending. Conclusion: CRS is a lifelong disease in CF patients that can lead to substantial morbidity and decreased quality of life. A multidisciplinary approach will be necessary to develop consistent and evidence-based treatment paradigms. PMID:24119602

  1. Emerging treatments in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Jones, Andrew M; Helm, Jennifer M

    2009-10-01

    There are a number of potential drugs for the treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF) currently undergoing clinical studies. A number of antibacterials formulated for delivery by inhalation are at various stages of study; these include dry-powder inhaler versions of colistin, tobramycin and ciprofloxacin, and formulations of azteonam, amikacin, levofloxacin, ciprofloxacin and fosfomycin/tobramycin for nebulization. Clinical trials of anti-inflammatory agents, including glutathione, phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors such as sildenafil, oral acetylcysteine, simvastatin, methotrexate, docosahexaenoic acid, hydroxychloroquine, pioglitazone and alpha1-antitrypsin, are ongoing. Ion channel modulating agents, such as lancovutide (Moli1901, duramycin) and denufosol, which activate alternate (non-CF transmembrane regulator [CFTR]) chloride channels, and GS 9411, a sodium channel antagonist, are now at the stages of clinical study and if successful, will offer a new category of therapeutic agent for the treatment of CF. Correction of the underlying gene effect, either by agents that help to correct the dysfunctional CFTR, such as ataluren, VX-770 and VX-809, or by gene transfer (gene therapy), is a particularly exciting prospect as a new therapy for CF and clinical studies are ongoing. This article reviews the exciting potential drug treatments for CF currently being evaluated in clinical studies, and also highlights some of the challenges faced by research and clinical teams in assessing the efficacy of potential new therapies for CF.

  2. Cystic fibrosis: a clinical view.

    PubMed

    Castellani, Carlo; Assael, Baroukh M

    2017-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF), a monogenic disease caused by mutations in the CFTR gene on chromosome 7, is complex and greatly variable in clinical expression. Airways, pancreas, male genital system, intestine, liver, bone, and kidney are involved. The lack of CFTR or its impaired function causes fat malabsorption and chronic pulmonary infections leading to bronchiectasis and progressive lung damage. Previously considered lethal in infancy and childhood, CF has now attained median survivals of 50 years of age, mainly thanks to the early diagnosis through neonatal screening, recognition of mild forms, and an aggressive therapeutic attitude. Classical treatment includes pancreatic enzyme replacement, respiratory physiotherapy, mucolitics, and aggressive antibiotic therapy. A significant proportion of patients with severe symptoms still requires lung or, less frequently, liver transplantation. The great number of mutations and their diverse effects on the CFTR protein account only partially for CF clinical variability, and modifier genes have a role in modulating the clinical expression of the disease. Despite the increasing understanding of CFTR functioning, several aspects of CF need still to be clarified, e.g., the worse outcome in females, the risk of malignancies, the pathophysiology, and best treatment of comorbidities, such as CF-related diabetes or CF-related bone disorder. Research is focusing on new drugs restoring CFTR function, some already available and with good clinical impact, others showing promising preliminary results that need to be confirmed in phase III clinical trials.

  3. [Azithromycin therapy in cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Máiz Carro, Luis; Cantón Moreno, Rafael

    2004-03-06

    Progressive lung disease, caused by chronic endobronchial colonization, is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Several pathogens, including Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are responsible for this effect. The steadily improving prognosis of CF has been attributed to the use of antibiotics with activity against these organisms. Despite a significant increase in the amount of published material demonstrating the potential role of macrolide antibiotics as antiinflammatory agents and their effects on bacterial virulence, their mechanism of action in CF patients is still unknown. Although there is a limited number of clinical trials assessing the efficacy and safety of azithromycin (AZM) in CF, increasing evidence suggests that 3 to 6-month AZM treatment in CF patients is safe and well tolerated. This treatment results in clinical improvement, decreasing the number of pulmonary exacerbations and increasing pulmonary function. Therefore, chronic treatment with AZM should be considered in CF patients added to conventional therapy. Clinical experience with macrolides other than AZM in CF patients is very limited.

  4. A web-based psychological support program for caregivers of children with cystic fibrosis: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Fidika, Astrid; Herle, Marion; Lehmann, Christine; Weiss, Christa; Knaevelsrud, Christine; Goldbeck, Lutz

    2015-02-04

    Parents caring for a child with Cystic Fibrosis (CF) are at high risk for psychological distress and have limited access to psychological care. Therefore, a web-based psychological support program for severely distressed parents of children with CF (WEP-CARE) was developed and evaluated for its feasibility and efficacy. A clinical expert panel developed WEP-CARE based on principles of cognitive-behavioral therapy. This web-based writing therapy comprises nine sessions, tailored for the specific needs of caregivers. The pilot study was conducted as a single-group intervention with pre-post-follow-up design. Out of 31 participants, 23 parents completed the intervention (21 female; mean age 37 years; SD = 6.2 years, range 25 - 48 years). Psychological symptoms and quality of life were assessed online by self-report measures at pre- and post-treatment and were followed up three months later. On average, the caregivers' symptoms of anxiety decreased statistically significant and clinical relevant about five points from an elevated (M = 11.4; SD =2.6) to a normal level (M = 6.7; SD = 2.6; p < .001) between pre and post treatment. Fear of disease progression (p < .001) and symptoms of depression (p = .02) significantly decreased as well. Quality of life significantly improved (p = .01). The effects were maintained at the 3-months follow-up assessment. WEP-CARE is feasible and promising regarding its efficacy to improve parental mental health and quality of life.

  5. Rehabilitation with Cystic Fibrosis: From Utopia to Reality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Richard T.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    The paper dispels some of the myths regarding cystic fibrosis (a genetic metabolism disorder), provides information on the latest developments in rehabilitation, summarizes research in the field, and projects future needs of the patient with cystic fibrosis. (SBH)

  6. CXCR4+ granulocytes reflect fungal cystic fibrosis lung disease.

    PubMed

    Carevic, Melanie; Singh, Anurag; Rieber, Nikolaus; Eickmeier, Olaf; Griese, Matthias; Hector, Andreas; Hartl, Dominik

    2015-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis airways are frequently colonised with fungi. However, the interaction of these fungi with immune cells and the clinical relevance in cystic fibrosis lung disease are incompletely understood.We characterised granulocytes in airway fluids and peripheral blood from cystic fibrosis patients with and without fungal colonisation, non-cystic fibrosis disease controls and healthy control subjects cross-sectionally and longitudinally and correlated these findings with lung function parameters.Cystic fibrosis patients with chronic fungal colonisation by Aspergillus fumigatus were characterised by an accumulation of a distinct granulocyte subset, expressing the HIV coreceptor CXCR4. Percentages of airway CXCR4(+) granulocytes correlated with lung disease severity in patients with cystic fibrosis.These studies demonstrate that chronic fungal colonisation with A. fumigatus in cystic fibrosis patients is associated with CXCR4(+) airway granulocytes, which may serve as a potential biomarker and therapeutic target in fungal cystic fibrosis lung disease.

  7. Rehabilitation with Cystic Fibrosis: From Utopia to Reality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Richard T.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    The paper dispels some of the myths regarding cystic fibrosis (a genetic metabolism disorder), provides information on the latest developments in rehabilitation, summarizes research in the field, and projects future needs of the patient with cystic fibrosis. (SBH)

  8. Liver Disease in Cystic Fibrosis: an Update

    PubMed Central

    Parisi, Giuseppe Fabio; Di Dio, Giovanna; Franzonello, Chiara; Gennaro, Alessia; Rotolo, Novella; Lionetti, Elena; Leonardi, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    Context Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most widespread autosomal recessive genetic disorder that limits life expectation amongst the Caucasian population. As the median survival has increased related to early multidisciplinary intervention, other manifestations of CF have emergedespecially for the broad spectrum of hepatobiliary involvement. The present study reviews the existing literature on liver disease in cystic fibrosis and describes the key issues for an adequate clinical evaluation and management of patients, with a focus on the pathogenetic, clinical and diagnostic-therapeutic aspects of liver disease in CF. Evidence Acquisition A literature search of electronic databases was undertaken for relevant studies published from 1990 about liver disease in cystic fibrosis. The databases searched were: EMBASE, PubMed and Cochrane Library. Results CF is due to mutations in the gene on chromosome 7 that encodes an amino acidic polypeptide named CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator). The hepatic manifestations include particular changes referring to the basic CFTR defect, iatrogenic lesions or consequences of the multisystem disease. Even though hepatobiliary disease is the most common non-pulmonary cause ofmortalityin CF (the third after pulmonary disease and transplant complications), only about the 33%ofCF patients presents clinically significant hepatobiliary disease. Conclusions Liver disease will have a growing impact on survival and quality of life of cystic fibrosis patients because a longer life expectancy and for this it is important its early recognition and a correct clinical management aimed atdelaying the onset of complications. This review could represent an opportunity to encourage researchers to better investigate genotype-phenotype correlation associated with the development of cystic fibrosis liver disease, especially for non-CFTR genetic polymorphisms, and detect predisposed individuals. Therapeutic trials are needed to find strategies of

  9. Nutrition and growth in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hankard, Régis; Munck, Anne; Navarro, Jean

    2002-01-01

    Malnutrition is a common complication of chronic diseases in children and may lead to growth impairment (stunting). Malnutrition in cystic fibrosis (CF) results from increased energy expenditure, decreased energy intakes, malabsorption of ingested nutrients because of pancreatic insufficiency and chronic inflammation. Malnutrition and high levels of inflammatory cytokines affect IGF-1 production through interrelated mechanisms. Nutritional support was shown to improve both nutritional status and outcome in CF. However, some nutrients have a direct effect on the disease. n-3 fatty acids supplementation is able to correct lipid abnormalities resulting from a primary mechanism. Moreover, n-3 fatty acids have a direct effect on the inflammatory response, decreasing eicosanoid synthesis and modulating nuclear transcriptional factors nuclear factor kappaB and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors gamma. Nutritional support may be considered part of the care of the CF patient together with antibiotics, pancreatic enzymes and physiotherapy, influencing significantly the evolution of the disease.

  10. Venous thromboembolism in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Clifford M

    2012-02-01

    The incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is increasing in the pediatric population. Individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF) have an increased risk of thrombosis due to central venous catheters (CVCs), as well as acquired thrombophilia secondary to inflammation, or deficiencies of anticoagulant proteins due to vitamin K deficiency and/or liver dysfunction. CVC-associated thrombosis commonly results in line occlusion, but may develop into serious life-threatening conditions such as deep venous thrombosis (DVT), superior vena cava syndrome or pulmonary embolism (PE). Post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) may be a long complication. Local occlusion of the catheter tip may be managed with instillation of thrombolytics (such as tPA) within the lumen of the catheter; however, CVC-associated thrombosis involving the proximal veins is most often is treated with systemic anticoagulation. Initial treatment with heparin is a standard approach, but thrombolytic therapy, which may carry higher bleeding risks, should be considered for life and limb threatening episodes of VTE. Recommended duration of anticoagulation with low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) or warfarin ranges from 3 to 6 months for major removable thrombotic risks; longer anticoagulation is considered for recurrent thrombosis, major persistent thrombophilia, or the continued presence of a major risk factor such as a CVC. While CVCs are the most common risk for development of VTE in children, studies have not demonstrated a clear benefit with routine use of systemic thromboprophylaxis. The incidence and risk factors of VTE in CF patients will be reviewed and principles of diagnosis and management will be summarized.

  11. Cystic fibrosis in adult age.

    PubMed

    Lerín, M; Prados, C; Martínez, M T; Maíz, L; Girón, R; Solé, A; Cabanillas, J J; Alvarez-Sala, R

    2014-01-01

    To know the prevalence of the patients diagnosed of cystic fibrosis (CF) older than 18 years old of five specific Spanish Units and to analyze their clinical, genetic and microbiological characteristics. Observational, cross-sectional, descriptive study of patients diagnosed with CF at age or older than 18 years. The variables analyzed were: current age, age at diagnosis, sex, nationality, lung function parameters, pathologies presented at diagnosis, microbiological features and genetic findings. Eigthy nine patients (14.8% of the total of 600 CF patients followed at the participating units), of which 45 patients were female (50.6%) and 44 were males (49.4%), were included with a mean age at diagnosis of 36.4 years. Eigthy one patients (91%) were Spaniards. The sweat test was diagnostic in 77 (86.5%) of the patients studied. The sweat test was diagnostic in 77 of the 89 patients studied (86.5%). The most frequently detected mutations were F508del/other and G542X/other, and the most frequent clinical findings at diagnosis were the presence of bronchiectasis in 33 patients (37.1%) followed by sterility in 12 patients (13.5%). The most common colonizing organisms were meticillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (S.aureus) (23.6%) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) (13.5%). Most patients presented a mild obstructive ventilatory defect and had no pancreatic involvement. The sweat test used to be indeterminate. CF is also a disease which diagnosis can be in adulthood. CF patients diagnosed in adulthood have a mild lung function and lower incidence of pancreatic involvement, so their prognosis tends to be favorable. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  12. Non-invasive ventilation for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Moran, Fidelma; Bradley, Judy M; Piper, Amanda J

    2017-02-20

    Non-invasive ventilation may be a means to temporarily reverse or slow the progression of respiratory failure in cystic fibrosis by providing ventilatory support and avoiding tracheal intubation. Using non-invasive ventilation, in the appropriate situation or individuals, can improve lung mechanics through increasing airflow and gas exchange and decreasing the work of breathing. Non-invasive ventilation thus acts as an external respiratory muscle. This is an update of a previously published review. To compare the effect of non-invasive ventilation versus no non-invasive ventilation in people with cystic fibrosis for airway clearance, during sleep and during exercise. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register comprising references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches, handsearching relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. We searched the reference lists of each trial for additional publications possibly containing other trials.Most recent search: 08 August 2016. Randomised controlled trials comparing a form of pressure preset or volume preset non-invasive ventilation to no non-invasive ventilation used for airway clearance or during sleep or exercise in people with acute or chronic respiratory failure in cystic fibrosis. Three reviewers independently assessed trials for inclusion criteria and methodological quality, and extracted data. Ten trials met the inclusion criteria with a total of 191 participants. Seven trials evaluated single treatment sessions, one evaluated a two-week intervention, one evaluated a six-week intervention and one a three-month intervention. It is only possible to blind trials of airway clearance and overnight ventilatory support to the outcome assessors. In most of the trials we judged there was an unclear risk of bias with regards to blinding due to inadequate descriptions. The six-week trial was the only one judged to have a low risk of bias for all

  13. Self-management education for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Savage, Eileen; Beirne, Paul V; Ni Chroinin, Muireann; Duff, Alistair; Fitzgerald, Tony; Farrell, Dawn

    2011-07-06

    Self-management education may help patients with cystic fibrosis and their families to choose, monitor and adjust treatment requirements for their illness, and also to manage the effects of illness on their lives. Although self-management education interventions have been developed for cystic fibrosis, no previous systematic review of the evidence of effectiveness of these interventions has been conducted. To assess the effects of self-management education interventions on improving health outcomes for patients with cystic fibrosis and their caregivers We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register (date of the last search: 23 February 2011).We also searched databases through EBSCO (CINAHL; Psychological and Behavioural Sciences Collection; PsychInfo; SocINDEX) and Elsevier (EMBASE) and handsearched relevant journals and conference proceedings (date of the last searches: 30th March 2011). Randomised controlled trials, quasi-randomised controlled trials or controlled clinical trials comparing different types of self-management education for cystic fibrosis or comparing self-management education with standard care or no intervention. Two authors assessed trial eligibility and risk of bias. Three authors extracted data. Four trials (involving a total of 269 participants) were included. The participants were children with cystic fibrosis and their parents or caregivers in three trials and adults with cystic fibrosis in one trial. The trials compared four different self-management education interventions versus standard treatment: (1) a training programme for managing cystic fibrosis in general; (2) education specific to aerosol and airway clearance treatments; (3) disease-specific nutrition education; and (4) general and disease-specific nutrition education. Training children to manage cystic fibrosis in general had no statistically significant effects on weight after six to eight weeks, mean difference -7.74 lb (95% confidence

  14. Self-management education for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Savage, Eileen; Beirne, Paul V; Ni Chroinin, Muireann; Duff, Alistair; Fitzgerald, Tony; Farrell, Dawn

    2014-09-08

    Self-management education may help patients with cystic fibrosis and their families to choose, monitor and adjust treatment requirements for their illness, and also to manage the effects of illness on their lives. Although self-management education interventions have been developed for cystic fibrosis, no previous systematic review of the evidence of effectiveness of these interventions has been conducted. To assess the effects of self-management education interventions on improving health outcomes for patients with cystic fibrosis and their caregivers We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register (date of the last search: 22 August 2013).We also searched databases through EBSCO (CINAHL; Psychological and Behavioural Sciences Collection; PsychInfo; SocINDEX) and Elsevier (Embase) and handsearched relevant journals and conference proceedings (date of the last searches: 01 February 2014 ). Randomised controlled trials, quasi-randomised controlled trials or controlled clinical trials comparing different types of self-management education for cystic fibrosis or comparing self-management education with standard care or no intervention. Two authors assessed trial eligibility and risk of bias. Three authors extracted data. Four trials (involving a total of 269 participants) were included. The participants were children with cystic fibrosis and their parents or caregivers in three trials and adults with cystic fibrosis in one trial. The trials compared four different self-management education interventions versus standard treatment: (1) a training programme for managing cystic fibrosis in general; (2) education specific to aerosol and airway clearance treatments; (3) disease-specific nutrition education; and (4) general and disease-specific nutrition education. Training children to manage cystic fibrosis in general had no statistically significant effects on weight after six to eight weeks, mean difference -7.74 lb (i.e. 3.51 kg) (95

  15. [Cystic fibrosis in a 70-year-old woman].

    PubMed

    Bruun, Lene Søndberg; Jensen, Michael Skov

    2002-05-06

    Cystic fibrosis is usually diagnosed in early childhood, and patients rarely live beyond the age of 40. We present a case of a 70-year-old woman, in whom cystic fibrosis was diagnosed with the rare mutation, R117C. Cystic fibrosis should therefore also be considered in older patients.

  16. Living with Cystic Fibrosis: A Guide for the Young Adult.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, Atlanta, GA.

    Intended for the young adult with cystic fibrosis, the booklet provides information on dealing with problems and on advances in treatment and detection related to the disease. Addressed are the following topics: description of cystic fibrosis; inheritance of cystic fibrosis; early diagnosis; friends, careers, and other matters; treatment;…

  17. Living with Cystic Fibrosis: A Guide for the Young Adult.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, Atlanta, GA.

    Intended for the young adult with cystic fibrosis, the booklet provides information on dealing with problems and on advances in treatment and detection related to the disease. Addressed are the following topics: description of cystic fibrosis; inheritance of cystic fibrosis; early diagnosis; friends, careers, and other matters; treatment;…

  18. Enteral tube feeding for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Morton, Alison; Wolfe, Susan

    2015-04-09

    Enteral tube feeding is routinely used in many cystic fibrosis centres when oral dietary and supplement intake has failed to achieve an adequate nutritional status. The use of this method of feeding is assessed on an individual basis taking into consideration the patients age and clinical status. To examine the evidence that in people with cystic fibrosis, supplemental enteral tube feeding improves nutritional status, respiratory function, and quality of life without significant adverse effects. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register which comprises references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. We also contacted the companies that market enteral feeds and reviewed their databases.Date of the most recent search of the Group's Cystic Fibrosis Trials Register: 13 February 2015.Date of the most recent hand search of PubMed and conference abstract books: 13 February 2015. All randomised controlled trials comparing supplemental enteral tube feeding for one month or longer with no specific intervention in people with cystic fibrosis. The searches identified 38 trials; however, none were eligible for inclusion in this review. There are no trials included in this review. Supplemental enteral tube feeding is widely used throughout the world to improve nutritional status in people with cystic fibrosis. The methods mostly used, nasogastric or gastrostomy feeding, are expensive and may have a negative effect on self-esteem and body image. Reported use of enteral tube feeding suggests that it results in nutritional and respiratory improvement; but, efficacy has not been fully assessed by randomised controlled trials. It is acknowledged, however, that performing a randomised controlled trial would be difficult due to the ethics of withholding an intervention in a group of patients whose nutritional status necessitates it.

  19. Enteral tube feeding for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Conway, Steven; Morton, Alison; Wolfe, Susan

    2012-12-12

    Enteral tube feeding is routinely used in many cystic fibrosis centres when oral dietary and supplement intake has failed to achieve an adequate nutritional status. The use of this method of feeding is assessed on an individual basis taking into consideration the patients age and clinical status. To examine the evidence that in people with cystic fibrosis, supplemental enteral tube feeding improves nutritional status, respiratory function, and quality of life without significant adverse effects. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register which comprises references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. We also contacted the companies that market enteral feeds and reviewed their databases.Date of the most recent search of the Group's Cystic Fibrosis Trials Register: 03 September 2012.Date of the most recent hand search of PubMed and conference abstract books: 15 June 2012. All randomised controlled trials comparing supplemental enteral tube feeding for one month or longer with no specific intervention in people with cystic fibrosis. Thirty-one trials were identified by the searches; however, none were eligible for inclusion in this review. There are no trials included in this review. Supplemental enteral tube feeding is widely used throughout the world to improve nutritional status in people with cystic fibrosis. The methods mostly used, nasogastric or gastrostomy feeding, are expensive and may have a negative effect on self-esteem and body image. Reported use of enteral tube feeding suggests that it results in nutritional and respiratory improvement; but, efficacy has not been fully assessed by randomised controlled trials. It is acknowledged, however, that performing a randomised controlled trial would be difficult due to the ethics of withholding an intervention in a group of patients whose nutritional status

  20. The Cystic Fibrosis of Exocrine Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Wilschanski, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein is highly expressed in the pancreatic duct epithelia, and permits anions and water to enter the ductal lumen. This results in an increased volume of alkaline fluid allowing the highly concentrated proteins secreted by the acinar cells to remain in a soluble state. This work will expound on the pathophysiology and pathology caused by the malfunctioning CFTR protein with special reference to ion transport and acid-base abnormalities both in humans and animal models. We will also discuss the relationship between cystic fibrosis (CF) and pancreatitis, and outline present and potential therapeutic approaches in CF treatment relevant to the pancreas. PMID:23637307

  1. Management Issues for Adolescents with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Withers, Adelaide Lindsay

    2012-01-01

    The healthy adolescent will encounter major changes in biological and psychosocial domains. The adolescent period can be greatly affected by a chronic illness. Cystic fibrosis is a terminal illness that can significantly affect an adolescent's biological, mental and psychosocial health. This paper discusses general issues to consider when managing an adolescent with a chronic medical condition, and specifically how cystic fibrosis may impact upon puberty, body image, risk-taking behaviours, mental health, independence, nonadherence, reproductive health, transition, lung transplantation, and end of life care. PMID:22991662

  2. Genetics of Cystic Fibrosis: Clinical Implications.

    PubMed

    Egan, Marie E

    2016-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a common life-shortening autosomal recessive genetic disorder caused by mutations in the gene that encodes for the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein (CFTR). Almost 2000 variants in the CFTR gene have been identified. The mutational classes are based on the functional consequences on CFTR. New therapies are being developed to target mutant CFTR and restore CFTR function. Understanding specific CF genotypes is essential for providing state-of-the art care to patients. In addition to the variation in CFTR genotype, there are several modifier genes that contribute to the respiratory phenotype.

  3. Diagnosis of Adult Patients with Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Nick, Jerry A; Nichols, David P

    2016-03-01

    The diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF) is being made with increasing frequency in adults. Patients with CF diagnosed in adulthood typically present with respiratory complaints, and often have recurrent or chronic airway infection. At the time of initial presentation individuals may appear to have clinical manifestation limited to a single organ, but with subclinical involvement of the respiratory tract. Adult-diagnosed patients have a good response to CF center care, and newly available cystic fibrosis transmembrane receptor-modulating therapies are promising for the treatment of residual function mutation, thus increasing the importance of the diagnosis in adults with unexplained bronchiectasis.

  4. Precision genomic medicine in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Eugene H.; Zabner, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    The successful application of precision genomic medicine requires an understanding of how a person’s genome can influence their disease phenotype and how medical therapies can provide personalized therapy to one’s genotype. In this review, we highlight advances in precision genomic medicine in cystic fibrosis (CF), a classic autosomal recessive genetic disorder. We discuss genotype-phenotype correlations in CF, genetic and environmental modifiers of disease, and pharmacogenetic therapies that target specific genetic mutations thereby addressing the primary defect of cystic fibrosis. PMID:26073768

  5. Psychological interventions for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Glasscoe, C A; Quittner, A L

    2003-01-01

    As survival estimates for cystic fibrosis (CF) steadily increase long-term management has become an important focus for intervention. Psychological interventions are largely concerned with emotional and social adjustments, adherence to treatment and quality of life, however no systematic review of such interventions has been undertaken for this disease. To describe the extent and quality of effectiveness studies utilising psychological interventions for CF and whether these interventions provide significant psychosocial and physical benefits in addition to standard care. Relevant trials were identified from searches of Ovid MEDLINE, the Cochrane trial registers for CF and Depression, Anxiety and Neurosis Groups and PsychINFO; unpublished trials were located through professional networks and Listserves. Most recent search: April 2003. This review included RCTs and quasi-randomised trials. Study participants were children and adults diagnosed with CF, and their immediate family members. Psychological interventions were from a broad range of modalities and outcomes were primarily psychosocial, although physical outcomes and cost effectiveness were also considered. Two reviewers independently selected relevant trials and assessed their methodological quality. For binary and continuous outcomes a pooled estimate of treatment effect was calculated for each outcome. This review is based on the findings of eight studies, representing data from a total of 358 participants. Studies fell into four conceptually similar groups: (1) gene pre-test education counselling for relatives of those with CF (one study); (2) biofeedback, massage and music therapy to assist physiotherapy (three studies); (3) behavioural intervention to improve dietary intake in children up to 12 years (three studies); and (4) self-administration of treatments to improve quality of life in adults (one study). Interventions were largely educational or behavioural, targeted at specific treatment concerns

  6. The diagnosis of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    De Boeck, Kris; Vermeulen, Francois; Dupont, Lieven

    2017-06-01

    Establishing the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF) is straight forward in the majority of patients: they present with a clear clinical picture (most frequently chronic respiratory symptoms plus malabsorption), the sweat chloride value is>60mmol/L and two known disease causing CFTR mutations are identified. In less than 5% of subjects, mainly those with a milder or limited phenotype, the diagnostic process is more complex, because initial diagnostic test results are inconclusive: sweat chloride concentration in the intermediate range, less than 2 CF causing mutations identified or both. These patients should be referred to expert centers where bioassays of CFTR function like nasal potential difference measurement or intestinal current measurement can be done. Still, in some patients, despite symptoms compatible with CF and some indication of CFTR dysfunction (e.g. only intermediate sweat chloride value), diagnostic criteria are not met (e.g. only 1 CFTR mutation identified). For these subjects, the term CFTR related disorder (CFTR-RD) is used. Patients with disseminated bronchiectasis, congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens and acute or recurrent pancreatitis may fall in this category. CF has a very wide disease spectrum and increasingly the diagnosis is being made during adult life, mainly in subjects with milder phenotypes. In many countries, nationwide CF newborn screening (NBS) has been introduced. In screen positive babies, the diagnosis of CF must be confirmed by a sweat test demonstrating a sweat chloride concentration above 60mmol/L. To achieve the benefit of NBS, every baby in whom the diagnosis of CF is confirmed must receive immediate follow-up and treatment in a CF reference center. CF NBS is not full proof: some diagnoses will be missed and in some babies the diagnosis cannot be confirmed nor ruled out with certainty. Screening algorithms that include gene sequencing will detect a high number of such babies that are screen positive with an

  7. Craniofacial morphology in children with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hellsing, E; Brattström, V; Strandvik, B

    1992-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a hereditary metabolic disorder with clinical symptoms of abnormal mucus production. This blocks the airways, gives pancreatic insufficiency, and increases sweat electrolytes. The progressive respiratory disease often leads to respiratory insufficiency and cor pulmonale. The aim of the present investigation was to examine the facial morphology in children with cystic fibrosis. The sample comprised 11 children with cystic fibrosis, who were divided in two groups, one with gastrointestinal disorders and the other with predominantly respiratory insufficiency. Eleven healthy children with normal occlusions were selected as controls. Lateral skull radiographs obtained in natural head posture were digitized, and linear and angular variables for the different groups calculated and compared statistically. The cystic fibrosis group showed open bite, decreased posterior facial height, increased mandibular and craniocervical inclination. Additionally, within the CF-group, the children with respiratory insufficiency differed more from the controls than the children with gastrointestinal disorders. Despite the small number of subjects, the facial morphology of the CF children showed a similar pattern to that of children with nasal respiratory obstruction due to enlarged adenoids or tonsils.

  8. Ivacaftor for patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, Claire E

    2014-10-01

    Ivacaftor is an oral bioavailable potentiator of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein. It is the first therapeutic agent that has been registered for clinical use which targets the basic defect in people with cystic fibrosis who carry a G551D mutation or other rarer specific gating mutations. Clinical trials have shown consistent and impressive clinical benefit that appears to be sustained over time in people with cystic fibrosis who carry a G551D mutation and similar benefits have been seen in those who carry rarer gating mutations. Ivacaftor is orally administered twice daily with a dose that does not vary between children aged 6 years through to adult life in patients with G551D. It appears to be well tolerated although there are potential interactions with drugs that are metabolised through CYPP450 CYP3A. Ivacaftor is also currently being trialled in combination with correctors for patients with the most common mutation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator the F508del mutation.

  9. Cystic fibrosis year in review 2016.

    PubMed

    Savant, Adrienne P; McColley, Susanna A

    2017-08-01

    In this article, we highlight cystic fibrosis (CF) research and case reports published in Pediatric Pulmonology during 2016. We also include articles from a variety of journals that are thematically related to these articles, or are of special interest to clinicians. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Exercise is medicine in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Wheatley, Courtney M; Wilkins, Brad W; Snyder, Eric M

    2011-07-01

    Exercise activates adrenergic and purinergic pathways that regulate activity of ion channels on airway epithelia cells and sweat glands. Therefore, we hypothesize that exercise is not only an important therapy for cystic fibrosis (CF) patients by facilitating systemic improvements but, more importantly, that exercise can improve the pathophysiological ion dysregulation at a cellular level, thereby enhancing quality of life in CF.

  11. Nutritional assessment in children with cystic fibrosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Optimal nutrition, including consuming 35–40% of calories (kcal) as fat, is a vital part of the management of cystic fibrosis (CF), and involves accurate assessment of dietary intake. We compared 3 methods of nutritional assessment in 8– to 14-year-old children (n=20) with CF: 1) a 24-h Dietary Reca...

  12. Zinc supplementation in children with cystic fibrosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) leads to malabsorption of macro- and micronutrients. Symptomatic zinc deficiency has been reported in CF but little is known about zinc homeostasis in children with CF. Zinc supplementation (Zn suppl) is increasingly common in children with CF but it is not without theoretcial r...

  13. Diabetes mellitus in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Alves, Crésio de Aragão Dantas; Aguiar, Renata Arruti; Alves, Ana Cláudia S; Santana, Maria Angélica

    2007-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes (CFRD) is the principal extra-pulmonary complication of cystic fibrosis, occurring in 15-30% of adult cystic fibrosis patients. The number of cystic fibrosis patients who develop diabetes is increasing in parallel with increases in life expectancy. The aim of this study was to review the physiopathology, clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment of CFRD. A bibliographic search of the Medline and Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature databases was made. Articles were selected from among those published in the last twenty years. Insulin deficiency, caused by reduced beta-cell mass, is the main etiologic mechanism, although insulin resistance also plays a role. Presenting features of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, CFRD typically affects individuals of approximately 20 years of age. It can also be accompanied by fasting, non-fasting or intermittent hyperglycemia. Glucose intolerance is associated with worsening of nutritional status, increased morbidity, decreased survival and reduced pulmonary function. Microvascular complications are always present, although macrovascular complications are rarely seen. An oral glucose tolerance test is recommended annually for patients > or = 10 years of age and for any patients presenting unexplained weight loss or symptoms of diabetes. Patients hospitalized with severe diseases should also be screened. If fasting hyperglycemia persists for more than 48 h, insulin therapy is recommended. Insulin administration remains the treatment of choice for diabetes and fasting hyperglycemia. Calories should not be restricted, and patients with CFRD should be managed by a multidisciplinary team.

  14. Dental treatment for people with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Harrington, N; Barry, P J; Barry, S M

    2016-06-01

    To describe the nature and consequences of the multi-system genetic condition cystic fibrosis with a view to ensuring optimal dental treatment planning for these patients. A literature search was conducted to identify the key medical and dental manifestations of cystic fibrosis. These findings are discussed and utilised to create recommendations for treatment planning in patients with cystic fibrosis for the practising dental practitioner. Cystic fibrosis is a complex, lethal, multisystem autosomal recessive disorder resulting from mutations on chromosome 7 which result in dysfunction of an ion channel that sits on epithelial surfaces. Respiratory disease remains the leading cause of mortality. Survival has greatly increased in recent decades secondary to improved treatment and specialist care. Specific dental manifestations of the disease may result from the condition itself or complications of treatment. Modification of patient management may be necessary to provide optimum patient care. The pathophysiology and clinical manifestations are relevant to practicing dental practitioners and inform recommendations to be utilised to ensure optimal treatment planning for these patients.

  15. [New prospects in cystic fibrosis treatment].

    PubMed

    Prados, C; Serrano, S; Alvarez-Sala, R; Villamor, J

    1997-04-01

    Only a few years ago, cystic fibrosis (CF) was considered the most frequent genetic disease in childhood, although survival has increased considerably in recent years owing to improved treatment. We discuss treatments that are still relevant as well as others that are under investigation now, aiming for better understanding of the disease and the therapies that have improved quality of life for CF patients.

  16. Physical exercise training for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Radtke, Thomas; Nolan, Sarah J; Hebestreit, Helge; Kriemler, Susi

    2015-06-28

    Physical exercise training may form an important part of regular care for people with cystic fibrosis. This is an update of previously published reviews. To determine the effects of physical exercise training compared to no training on aerobic exercise capacity, forced expiratory volume in one second, health-related quality of life and other patient-relevant (secondary) outcomes in cystic fibrosis. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register which comprises references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings.Date of the most recent search: 10 March 2015. All randomised and quasi-randomised controlled clinical trials comparing exercise training of any type and duration with conventional care in people with cystic fibrosis. Two authors independently selected studies for inclusion, assessed methodological quality and extracted data. Of the 48 studies identified, 13 studies which included 402 participants, met the inclusion criteria. The numbers in each study ranged from nine up to 72 participants; one study was in adults, six were in children and adolescents and six studies included all age ranges. Four studies of hospitalised participants lasted less than one month and nine studies were outpatient-based, lasting between two months and three years. The studies included participants with a wide range of disease severity and employed differing levels of supervision with a mixture of types of training. There was also wide variation in the quality of the included studies.This systematic review shows limited evidence from both short- and long-term studies that in people with cystic fibrosis aerobic or anaerobic physical exercise training or a combination of both has a positive effect on aerobic exercise capacity, pulmonary function and health-related quality of life. Although improvements are not consistent between studies and ranged

  17. Lung disease in mice with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Kent, G; Iles, R; Bear, C E; Huan, L J; Griesenbach, U; McKerlie, C; Frndova, H; Ackerley, C; Gosselin, D; Radzioch, D; O'Brodovich, H; Tsui, L C; Buchwald, M; Tanswell, A K

    1997-01-01

    The leading cause of mortality and morbidity in humans with cystic fibrosis is lung disease. Advances in our understanding of the pathogenesis of the lung disease of cystic fibrosis, as well as development of innovative therapeutic interventions, have been compromised by the lack of a natural animal model. The utility of the CFTR-knockout mouse in studying the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis has been limited because of their failure, despite the presence of severe intestinal disease, to develop lung disease. Herein, we describe the phenotype of an inbred congenic strain of CFTR-knockout mouse that develops spontaneous and progressive lung disease of early onset. The major features of the lung disease include failure of effective mucociliary transport, postbronchiolar over inflation of alveoli and parenchymal interstitial thickening, with evidence of fibrosis and inflammatory cell recruitment. We speculate that the basis for development of lung disease in the congenic CFTR-knockout mice is their observed lack of a non-CFTR chloride channel normally found in CFTR-knockout mice of mixed genetic background. PMID:9399953

  18. Omega-3 fatty acids for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Colleen; Jahnke, Nikki

    2011-08-10

    Studies suggest that a diet rich in omega-3 essential fatty acids may have beneficial anti-inflammatory effects for chronic conditions such as cystic fibrosis. To determine whether there is evidence that omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation reduces morbidity and mortality and to identify any adverse events associated with supplementation. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group's Trials Register comprising references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. Authors and persons interested in the subject of the review were contacted.Date of last search: 10 March 2011. Randomised controlled trials in people with cystic fibrosis comparing omega-3 fatty acid supplements with placebo. Two authors independently selected studies for inclusion, extracted data and assessed the risk of bias of the studies. The searches identified 13 studies; four studies with 91 participants were included. Two studies compared omega-3 fatty acids to olive oil for six weeks. One study compared a liquid dietary supplement containing omega-3 fatty acids to one without for six months. One study compared omega-3 fatty acids and omega-6 fatty acids to a control (capsules with customised fatty acid blends) for three months. Only one short-term study (19 participants) comparing omega-3 to placebo reported a significant improvement in lung function and Shwachman score and a reduction in sputum volume in the omega-3 group. Another study (43 participants) demonstrated a significant increase in serum phospholipid essential fatty acid content and a significant drop in the n-6/n-3 fatty acid ratio following omega-3 fatty acid supplementation compared to control. The longer-term study (17 participants) demonstrated a significant increase in essential fatty acid content in neutrophil membranes and a significant decrease in the leukotriene B4 to leukotriene B5 ratio

  19. Cystic fibrosis in Afro-Brazilians: XK haplotypes analysis supports the European origin of p.F508del mutation.

    PubMed

    de Souza, D A S; Faucz, F R; de Alexandre, R B; Santana, M A; de Souza, E L S; Reis, F J C; Pereira-Ferrari, L; Sotomaior, V S; Culpi, L; Phillips, J A; Raskin, S

    2017-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a common autosomal recessive disorder, being the p.F508del the most frequent mutation. Also, a nearby restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) named XK (KM19 and XV2C) is non-randomly associated with specific CF alleles. Our aim was to analyze the occurrence of the p.F508del mutation and XK haplotypes in Afro-Brazilians CF patients and controls, since these data is available for the other two main ethnic groups found in Brazil (Euro-Brazilians and Brazilian Amerindians), contributing for the whole comprehension of these haplotypes in the Brazilian population. A total of 103 patients and 54 controls were studied. PCR and PCR-RFLP methodologies were used to identify the presence of the p.F508del and the XK haplotype in the subjects. The combined data show that 84.2% of p.F508del mutation is associated with haplotype B and only 15.8% with haplotype A; no other haplotypes were found to be associated with this mutation. Our data suggest that the occurrence of p.F508del mutation and haplotype B in Afro-Brazilian patients occurs probably due to admixture with Euro-descendants. Therefore this mutation and haplotype could be used as a admixture marker.

  20. Cystic fibrosis lung disease in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Vender, Robert L

    2008-04-01

    As the longevity of all patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) continues to increase (median 2005 survival=36.8 years), more adult patients will be receiving their medical care from nonpediatric adult-care providers. Cystic fibrosis remains a fatal disease, with more than 80% of patients dying after the age of 18 years, and most deaths resulting from pulmonary disease. The changing epidemiology requires adult-care providers to become knowledgeable and competent in the clinical management of adults with CF. Physicians must understand the influence of specific genotype on phenotypic disease presentation and severity, the pathogenic factors determining lung disease onset and progression, the impact of comorbid disease factors such as CF-related diabetes and malnutrition upon lung disease severity, and the currently approved or standard accepted therapies used for chronic management of CF lung disease. This knowledge is critical to help alleviate morbidity and improve mortality for the rapidly expanding population of adults with CF.

  1. Cystic fibrosis and physiological responses to exercise.

    PubMed

    Williams, Craig A; Saynor, Zoe L; Tomlinson, Owen W; Barker, Alan R

    2014-12-01

    Cardiopulmonary exercise testing is underutilized within the clinical management of patients with cystic fibrosis. But within the last 5 years, there has been considerable interest in its implementation, which has included deliberations by the European Cystic Fibrosis Society about incorporating this method within the clinical assessment of patients. This review examines the current use of cardiopulmonary exercise testing in assessing the extent and cause(s) of exercise limitation from a pediatric perspective. Examples of the measured parameters and their interpretation are provided. Critical synthesis of recent work in the oxygen uptake (VO2) kinetics response to and following exercise is also discussed, and although identified more as a research tool, its utilization advances researchers understanding of the cardiovascular, respiratory and muscular limitations to exercise tolerance. Finally, exercise and its application in therapeutic interventions are highlighted and a number of recommendations made about the utility of exercise prescription.

  2. Inflammation and its genesis in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Nichols, David P; Chmiel, James F

    2015-10-01

    The host inflammatory response in cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease has long been recognized as a central pathological feature and an important therapeutic target. Indeed, many believe that bronchiectasis results largely from the oxidative and proteolytic damage comprised within an exuberant airway inflammatory response that is dominated by neutrophils. In this review, we address the longstanding argument of whether or not the inflammatory response is directly attributable to impairment of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator or only secondary to airway obstruction and chronic bacterial infection and challenge the importance of this distinction in the context of therapy. We also review the centrality of neutrophils in CF lung pathophysiology and highlight more recent data that suggest the importance of other cell types and signaling beyond NF-κB activation. We discuss how protease and redox imbalance are critical factors in CF airway inflammation and end by reviewing some of the more promising therapeutic approaches now under development.

  3. Asymptomatic carriage of Clostridium difficile in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Peach, S L; Borriello, S P; Gaya, H; Barclay, F E; Welch, A R

    1986-09-01

    Faecal samples from 37 patients with cystic fibrosis and 40 control patients at the Brompton Hospital and the London Chest Hospital were examined for the presence of Clostridium difficile. The organism was isolated from 2 (17%) of control patients who were receiving antibiotics and from one (3.6%) of control patients who had no antimicrobial treatment. Thirty two per cent of the patients with cystic fibrosis excreted C difficile, though none of them had diarrhoea. Two of the three isolates from control patients and nine of the 12 isolates from patients with cystic fibrosis produced toxin B (cytotoxin) in vitro. Toxin B was present in the stools of one of the control patients and three of the patients with cystic fibrosis; toxin A (enterotoxin) was not detected in the faeces of the patients with cystic fibrosis. Two cytotoxigenic strains of C difficile isolated from patients with cystic fibrosis were examined in hamsters; both were virulent, and the animals died.

  4. Asymptomatic carriage of Clostridium difficile in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Peach, S L; Borriello, S P; Gaya, H; Barclay, F E; Welch, A R

    1986-01-01

    Faecal samples from 37 patients with cystic fibrosis and 40 control patients at the Brompton Hospital and the London Chest Hospital were examined for the presence of Clostridium difficile. The organism was isolated from 2 (17%) of control patients who were receiving antibiotics and from one (3.6%) of control patients who had no antimicrobial treatment. Thirty two per cent of the patients with cystic fibrosis excreted C difficile, though none of them had diarrhoea. Two of the three isolates from control patients and nine of the 12 isolates from patients with cystic fibrosis produced toxin B (cytotoxin) in vitro. Toxin B was present in the stools of one of the control patients and three of the patients with cystic fibrosis; toxin A (enterotoxin) was not detected in the faeces of the patients with cystic fibrosis. Two cytotoxigenic strains of C difficile isolated from patients with cystic fibrosis were examined in hamsters; both were virulent, and the animals died. PMID:3093537

  5. Diabetes mellitus and bone disease in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Curran, David R; McArdle, John R; Talwalkar, Jaideep S

    2009-10-01

    Patients with cystic fibrosis are frequently affected with pancreatic insufficiency and are predisposed to the development of diabetes mellitus (DM) and bone demineralization. Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes mellitus is a clinical entity distinct from type 1 and type 2 diabetes, with important implications for the nutritional and pulmonary health of cystic fibrosis patients. This form of diabetes owes largely to insulin deficiency, but alterations in insulin sensitivity and hepatic glucose production have also been described. Therapy for cystic fibrosis-related diabetes differs substantially from type 2 DM, with careful attention to prandial glycemic excursions crucial to controlling its metabolic effects. Bone disease, including osteopenia and osteoporosis, also occurs with increased frequency in cystic fibrosis, owing to defects in intestinal absorption, chronic inflammation, lung disease, low body weight, and gonadal dysfunction. The pathogenesis, implications, diagnosis, and therapy of cystic fibrosis-related bone demineralization are discussed, with attention to recommended approaches to prevention of and treatment of established bone disease.

  6. Pregnancy and cystic fibrosis: Approach to contemporary management

    PubMed Central

    Tay, George; Callaway, Leonie; Bell, Scott C

    2014-01-01

    Over the previous 50 years survival of patients with cystic fibrosis has progressively increased. As a result of improvements in health care, increasing numbers of patients with cystic fibrosis are now considering starting families of their own. For the health care professionals who look after these patients, the assessment of the potential risks, and the process of guiding prospective parents through pregnancy and beyond can be both challenging and rewarding. To facilitate appropriate discussions about pregnancy, health care workers must have a detailed understanding of the various important issues that will ultimately need to be considered for any patient with cystic fibrosis considering parenthood. This review will address these issues. In particular, it will outline pregnancy outcomes for mothers with cystic fibrosis, issues that need to be taken into account when planning a pregnancy and the management of pregnancy for mothers with cystic fibrosis or mothers who have undergone organ transplantation as a result of cystic fibrosis. PMID:27512443

  7. Inspiratory muscle training for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Houston, Brian W; Mills, Nicola; Solis-Moya, Arturo

    2008-10-08

    Cystic fibrosis is the most common life-limiting genetic condition in Caucasians and the life-expectancy of those newly diagnosed is increasing. Inspiratory muscle training may be a way of improving the lung function and quality of life of people with cystic fibrosis. Hence there is a need to establish whether this intervention is beneficial. To determine the effect of inspiratory muscle training on health-related quality of life, pulmonary function and exercise tolerance. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials register comprising of references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings.Date of most recent search: April 2008. Randomised or quasi-randomised clinical controlled trials comparing different inspiratory muscle training regimens with each other or a control in people with cystic fibrosis. Three review authors independently applied the inclusion and exclusion criteria to publications and assessed the quality of the included studies. Seven studies were identified. Of these six studies with 140 participants met the review inclusion criteria. There was wide variation in the quality of the included studies. Data were not published in sufficient detail or with sufficiently similar outcome measures in these studies to perform meta-analyses. We have not found any evidence to suggest that this treatment is either beneficial or not. We would advise that practitioners evaluate on a case-by-case basis whether or not to employ this therapy. We recommend that future studies make more use of health-related quality of life and exercise tolerance measures; and that there is an agreement upon a single standard measure of classifying the clinical status of the participants.

  8. Cystic fibrosis: a mucosal immunodeficiency syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Taylor Sitarik; Prince, Alice

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) functions as a channel that regulates the transport of ions and the movement of water across the epithelial barrier. Mutations in CFTR, which form the basis for the clinical manifestations of cystic fibrosis, affect the epithelial innate immune function in the lung, resulting in exaggerated and ineffective airway inflammation that fails to eradicate pulmonary pathogens. Compounding the effects of excessive neutrophil recruitment, the mutant CFTR channel does not transport antioxidants to counteract neutrophil-associated oxidative stress. Whereas mutant CFTR expression in leukocytes outside of the lung does not markedly impair their function, the expected regulation of inflammation in the airways is clearly deficient in cystic fibrosis. The resulting bacterial infections, which are caused by organisms that have substantial genetic and metabolic flexibility, can resist multiple classes of antibiotics and evade phagocytic clearance. The development of animal models that approximate the human pulmonary phenotypes—airway inflammation and spontaneous infection—may provide the much-needed tools to establish how CFTR regulates mucosal immunity and to test directly the effect of pharmacologic potentiation and correction of mutant CFTR function on bacterial clearance. PMID:22481418

  9. Mycobacterium abscessus and Children with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Le Bourgeois, Muriel; Pierre-Audigier, Catherine; Offredo, Catherine; Guillemot, Didier; Halley, Sophie; Akoua-Koffi, Chantal; Vincent, Véronique; Sivadon-Tardy, Valérie; Ferroni, Agnès; Berche, Patrick; Scheinmann, Pierre; Lenoir, Gérard

    2003-01-01

    We prospectively studied 298 patients with cystic fibrosis (mean age 11.3 years; range 2 months to 32 years; sex ratio, 0.47) for nontuberculous mycobacteria in respiratory samples from January 1, 1996, to December 31, 1999. Mycobacterium abscessus was by far the most prevalent nontuberculous mycobacterium: 15 patients (6 male, 9 female; mean age 11.9 years; range 2.5–22 years) had at least one positive sample for this microorganism (versus 6 patients positive for M. avium complex), including 10 with >3 positive samples (versus 3 patients for M. avium complex). The M. abscessus isolates from 14 patients were typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis: each of the 14 patients harbored a unique strain, ruling out a common environmental reservoir or person-to-person transmission. Water samples collected in the cystic fibrosis center were negative for M. abscessus. This major mycobacterial pathogen in children and teenagers with cystic fibrosis does not appear to be acquired nosocomially. PMID:14720400

  10. [Treatment of Cystic Fibrosis with CFTR Modulators].

    PubMed

    Tümmler, B

    2016-05-01

    Personalized medicine promises that medical decisions, practices and products are tailored to the individual patient. Cystic fibrosis, an inherited disorder of chloride and bicarbonate transport in exocrine glands, is the first successful example of customized drug development for mutation-specific therapy. There are two classes of CFTR modulators: potentiators that increase the activity of CFTR at the cell surface, and correctors that either promote the read-through of nonsense mutations or facilitate the translation, folding, maturation and trafficking of mutant CFTR to the cell surface. The potentiator ivacaftor and the corrector lumacaftor are approved in Germany for the treatment of people with cystic fibrosis who carry a gating mutation such as p.Gly551Asp or who are homozygous for the most common mutation p.Phe508del, respectively. This report provides an overview of the basic defect in cystic fibrosis, the population genetics of CFTR mutations in Germany and the bioassays to assess CFTR function in humans together with the major achievements of preclinical research and clinical trials to bring CFTR modulators to the clinic. Some practical information on the use of ivacaftor and lumacaftor in daily practice and an update on pitfalls, challenges and novel strategies of bench-to-bedside development of CFTR modulators are also provided.

  11. Nutrition in patients with cystic fibrosis: a European Consensus.

    PubMed

    Sinaasappel, M; Stern, M; Littlewood, J; Wolfe, S; Steinkamp, G; Heijerman, Harry G M; Robberecht, E; Döring, G

    2002-06-01

    This document is the result of an European Consensus conference which took place in Artimino, Tuscany, Italy, in March 2001 involving 33 experts on nutrition in patients with cystic fibrosis, organised by the European Cystic Fibrosis Society, and sponsored by Axcan-Scandipharm, Baxter, Dr Falk Pharma, Fresenius, Nutricia, SHS International, Solvay Pharmaceuticals (major sponsor). The purpose of the conference was to develop a consensus document on nutrition in patients with cystic fibrosis based on current evidence.

  12. Azithromycin reduces spontaneous and induced inflammation in ΔF508 cystic fibrosis mice

    PubMed Central

    Legssyer, Rachida; Huaux, François; Lebacq, Jean; Delos, Monique; Marbaix, Etienne; Lebecque, Patrick; Lison, Dominique; Scholte, Bob J; Wallemacq, Pierre; Leal, Teresinha

    2006-01-01

    Background Inflammation plays a critical role in lung disease development and progression in cystic fibrosis. Azithromycin is used for the treatment of cystic fibrosis lung disease, although its mechanisms of action are poorly understood. We tested the hypothesis that azithromycin modulates lung inflammation in cystic fibrosis mice. Methods We monitored cellular and molecular inflammatory markers in lungs of cystic fibrosis mutant mice homozygous for the ΔF508 mutation and their littermate controls, either in baseline conditions or after induction of acute inflammation by intratracheal instillation of lipopolysaccharide from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which would be independent of interactions of bacteria with epithelial cells. The effect of azithromycin pretreatment (10 mg/kg/day) given by oral administration for 4 weeks was evaluated. Results In naive cystic fibrosis mice, a spontaneous lung inflammation was observed, characterized by macrophage and neutrophil infiltration, and increased intra-luminal content of the pro-inflammatory cytokine macrophage inflammatory protein-2. After induced inflammation, cystic fibrosis mice combined exaggerated cellular infiltration and lower anti-inflammatory interleukin-10 production. In cystic fibrosis mice, azithromycin attenuated cellular infiltration in both baseline and induced inflammatory condition, and inhibited cytokine (tumor necrosis factor-α and macrophage inflammatory protein-2) release in lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation. Conclusion Our findings further support the concept that inflammatory responses are upregulated in cystic fibrosis. Azithromycin reduces some lung inflammation outcome measures in cystic fibrosis mice. We postulate that some of the benefits of azithromycin treatment in cystic fibrosis patients are due to modulation of lung inflammation. PMID:17064416

  13. Use of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation's extensive sputum-culturing protocol for patients without cystic fibrosis: implications for infection control and antimicrobial resistance.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jennifer

    2014-05-01

    The US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation has guidelines for culturing respiratory tract specimens from patients with cystic fibrosis. Pulmonary physicians were surveyed regarding their use of these extensive cystic fibrosis culture protocols for patients without cystic fibrosis. The survey results and a discussion of the implications of these practices are reported.

  14. Chloride and potassium channels in cystic fibrosis airway epithelia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, Michael J.; Liedtke, Carole M.

    1986-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis, the most common lethal genetic disease in Caucasians, is characterized by a decreased permeability in sweat gland duct and airway epithelia. In sweat duct epithelium, a decreased Cl- permeability accounts for the abnormally increased salt content of sweat1. In airway epithelia a decreased Cl- permeability, and possibly increased sodium absorption, may account for the abnormal respiratory tract fluid2,3. The Cl- impermeability has been localized to the apical membrane of cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells4. The finding that hormonally regulated Cl- channels make the apical membrane Cl- permeable in normal airway epithelial cells5 suggested abnormal Cl- channel function in cystic fibrosis. Here we report that excised, cell-free patches of membrane from cystic fibrosis epithelial cells contain Cl- channels that have the same conductive properties as Cl- channels from normal cells. However, Cl- channels from cystic fibrosis cells did not open when they were attached to the cell. These findings suggest defective regulation of Cl- channels in cystic fibrosis epithelia; to begin to address this issue, we performed two studies. First, we found that isoprenaline, which stimulates Cl- secretion, increases cellular levels of cyclic AMP in a similar manner in cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis epithelial cells. Second, we show that adrenergic agonists open calcium-activated potassium channels, indirectly suggesting that calcium-dependent stimulus-response coupling is intact in cystic fibrosis. These data suggest defective regulation of Cl- channels at a site distal to cAMP accumulation.

  15. Oral calorie supplements for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Rosalind L; Rayner, Oli

    2017-05-04

    Poor nutrition occurs frequently in people with cystic fibrosis and is associated with other adverse outcomes. Oral calorie supplements are used to increase total daily calorie intake and improve weight gain. However, they are expensive and there are concerns they may reduce the amount of food eaten and not improve overall energy intake. This is an update of a previously published review. To establish whether in people with cystic fibrosis, oral calorie supplements: increase daily calorie intake; and improve overall nutritional intake, nutritional indices, lung function, survival and quality of life. To assess adverse effects associated with using these supplements. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis Trials Register comprising references from comprehensive electronic database searches, handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. We contacted companies marketing oral calorie supplements.Last search: 18 October 2016. Randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing use of oral calorie supplements for at least one month to increase calorie intake with no specific intervention or additional nutritional advice in people with cystic fibrosis. We independently selected the included trials, assessed risk of bias and extracted data. We contacted the authors of included trials and obtained additional information for two trials. We identified 21 trials and included three, reporting results from 131 participants lasting between three months and one year. Two trials compared supplements to additional nutritional advice and one to no intervention. Two of the included trials recruited only children. In one trial the risk of bias was low across all domains, in a second trial the risk of bias was largely unclear and in the third mainly low. Blinding of participants was unclear in two of the trials. Also, in one trial the clinical condition of groups appeared to be unevenly balanced at baseline and in another trial there were

  16. Lack of correlation between pulmonary disease and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator dysfunction in cystic fibrosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Mutations in both alleles of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene result in the disease cystic fibrosis, which usually manifests as chronic sinopulmonary disease, pancreatic insufficiency, elevated sodium chloride loss in sweat, infertility among men due to agenesis of the vas deferens and other symptoms including liver disease. Case presentation We describe a pair of African-American brothers, aged 21 and 27, with cystic fibrosis. They were homozygous for a rare frameshift mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator 3791delC, which would be expected to cause significant morbidity. Although 80% of cystic fibrosis patients are colonized with Pseudomonas aeruginosa by eight years of age, the older brother had no serum opsonic antibody titer to P. aeruginosa by age 13 and therefore would have failed to mount an effective antibody response to the alginate (mucoid polysaccharide) capsule of P. aeruginosa. He was not colonized with P. aeruginosa until 24 years of age. Similarly, the younger brother was not colonized with P. aeruginosa until age 20 and had no significant lung disease. Conclusion Despite a prevailing idea in cystic fibrosis research that the amount of functional cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator predicts clinical status, our results indicated that respiratory disease severity in cystic fibrosis exhibits phenotypic heterogeneity. If this heterogeneity is, in part, genetic, it is most likely derived from genes outside the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator locus. PMID:20420703

  17. Lack of correlation between pulmonary disease and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator dysfunction in cystic fibrosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Levy, Hara; Cannon, Carolynn L; Asher, Daniel; García, Christopher; Cleveland, Robert H; Pier, Gerald B; Knowles, Michael R; Colin, Andrew A

    2010-04-26

    Mutations in both alleles of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene result in the disease cystic fibrosis, which usually manifests as chronic sinopulmonary disease, pancreatic insufficiency, elevated sodium chloride loss in sweat, infertility among men due to agenesis of the vas deferens and other symptoms including liver disease. We describe a pair of African-American brothers, aged 21 and 27, with cystic fibrosis. They were homozygous for a rare frameshift mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator 3791delC, which would be expected to cause significant morbidity. Although 80% of cystic fibrosis patients are colonized with Pseudomonas aeruginosa by eight years of age, the older brother had no serum opsonic antibody titer to P. aeruginosa by age 13 and therefore would have failed to mount an effective antibody response to the alginate (mucoid polysaccharide) capsule of P. aeruginosa. He was not colonized with P. aeruginosa until 24 years of age. Similarly, the younger brother was not colonized with P. aeruginosa until age 20 and had no significant lung disease. Despite a prevailing idea in cystic fibrosis research that the amount of functional cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator predicts clinical status, our results indicated that respiratory disease severity in cystic fibrosis exhibits phenotypic heterogeneity. If this heterogeneity is, in part, genetic, it is most likely derived from genes outside the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator locus.

  18. Cystic Fibrosis Associated with Worse Survival After Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Black, Sylvester M; Woodley, Frederick W; Tumin, Dmitry; Mumtaz, Khalid; Whitson, Bryan A; Tobias, Joseph D; Hayes, Don

    2016-04-01

    Survival in cystic fibrosis patients after liver transplantation and liver-lung transplantation is not well studied. To discern survival rates after liver transplantation and liver-lung transplantation in patients with and without cystic fibrosis. The United Network for Organ Sharing database was queried from 1987 to 2013. Univariate Cox proportional hazards, multivariate Cox models, and propensity score matching were performed. Liver transplant and liver-lung transplant were performed in 212 and 53 patients with cystic fibrosis, respectively. Univariate Cox proportional hazards regression identified lower survival in cystic fibrosis after liver transplant compared to a reference non-cystic fibrosis liver transplant cohort (HR 1.248; 95 % CI 1.012, 1.541; p = 0.039). Supplementary analysis found graft survival was similar across the 3 recipient categories (log-rank test: χ(2) 2.68; p = 0.262). Multivariate Cox models identified increased mortality hazard among cystic fibrosis patients undergoing liver transplantation (HR 2.439; 95 % CI 1.709, 3.482; p < 0.001) and liver-lung transplantation (HR 2.753; 95 % CI 1.560, 4.861; p < 0.001). Propensity score matching of cystic fibrosis patients undergoing liver transplantation to non-cystic fibrosis controls identified a greater mortality hazard in the cystic fibrosis cohort using a Cox proportional hazards model stratified on matched pairs (HR 3.167; 95 % CI 1.265, 7.929, p = 0.014). Liver transplantation in cystic fibrosis is associated with poorer long-term patient survival compared to non-cystic fibrosis patients, although the difference is not due to graft survival.

  19. Natural Compounds as Therapeutic Agents in the Treatment Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Isha; Shah, Kalpit; Bradbury, Neil A

    2016-01-01

    The recent FDA approval of two drugs to treat the basic defect in cystic fibrosis has given hope to patients and their families battling this devastating disease. Over many years, with heavy financial investment from Vertex Pharmaceuticals and the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, pre-clinical evaluation of thousands of synthetic drugs resulted in the production of Kalydeco and Orkambi. Yet, despite the success of this endeavor, many other compounds have been proposed as therapeutic agents in the treatment of CF. Of note, several of these compounds are naturally occurring, and are present in spices from the grocery store and over the counter preparations in health food stores. In this short review, we look at three such compounds, genistein, curcumin, and resveratrol, and evaluate the scientific support for their use as therapeutic agents in the treatment of patients with CF. PMID:27081574

  20. The Km of NADH dehydrogenase is decreased in mitochondria of cystic fibrosis cells.

    PubMed

    Dechecchi, M C; Girella, E; Cabrini, G; Berton, G

    1988-01-01

    The kinetic properties of the NADH dehydrogenase of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, assayed as NADH-dependent rotenone-sensitive cytochrome c reductase have been studied in mitochondria isolated from mononuclear white blood cells in patients affected by cystic fibrosis. Data reported here show that the apparent Km of the enzyme for NADH is significantly decreased in cystic fibrosis mitochondria. These findings are independent of the age or the clinical state of the disease and have also been obtained with mitochondria isolated from cultured skin fibroblasts. These observations support the notion that cystic fibrosis is possibly accompanied by alterations of intracellular membranes and these are evident also in circulating cells and cultured fibroblasts.

  1. Death after cessation of treatment by cystic fibrosis patients: An international survey of clinicians.

    PubMed

    Pisaturo, Marisa; Deppen, Alain; Rochat, Isabelle; Robinson, Walter M; Hafen, Gaudenz M

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about cystic fibrosis patients, who are not considered to be terminally ill, and who die after voluntary cessation of treatment. This study was undertaken to provide an international snapshot of this issue. An online survey was distributed across three continents. Distribution to the medical directors of the cystic fibrosis centres affiliated with the US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, Cystic Fibrosis Australia (inclusion of New Zealand) and to every clinician member of the European Cystic Fibrosis Society. More than 200 cystic fibrosis patients not considered to be terminally ill and, who voluntarily ceased treatment, were reported by the clinicians surveyed. Detailed data were reported in 102 patients (4 children, 25 adolescents and 73 adults). Only one child, six adolescents and one adult were judged by clinicians not to be competent to make the decision to stop treatment. Time-consuming and low immediate-impact therapies, such as respiratory physiotherapy, were most frequently discontinued. Resignation was the main reported reason for discontinuing treatment, followed by reactive depression and lack of familial support. A total of 69% of the patients received palliative care and 72% died in the 6 months following cessation of treatment. Death of cystic fibrosis patients, not considered to be terminally ill, is reported in Europe, the United States and Australia due to voluntary cessation of treatment.

  2. Omega-3 fatty acids for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Colleen; Watson, Helen

    2016-01-05

    Studies suggest that a diet rich in omega-3 essential fatty acids may have beneficial anti-inflammatory effects for chronic conditions such as cystic fibrosis. This is an updated version of a previously published review. To determine whether there is evidence that omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation reduces morbidity and mortality and to identify any adverse events associated with supplementation. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group's Trials Register comprising references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. Authors and persons interested in the subject of the review were contacted.Date of last search: 13 August 2013. Randomised controlled trials in people with cystic fibrosis comparing omega-3 fatty acid supplements with placebo. Two authors independently selected studies for inclusion, extracted data and assessed the risk of bias of the studies. The searches identified 15 studies; four studies with 91 participants (children and adults) were included; duration of studies ranged from six weeks to six months. Two studies were judged to be at low risk of bias based on adequate randomisation but this was unclear in the other two studies. Three of the studies adequately blinded patients, however, the risk of bias was unclear in all studies with regards to allocation concealment and selective reporting.Two studies compared omega-3 fatty acids to olive oil for six weeks. One study compared a liquid dietary supplement containing omega-3 fatty acids to one without for six months. One study compared omega-3 fatty acids and omega-6 fatty acids to a control (capsules with customised fatty acid blends) for three months. Only one short-term study (19 participants) comparing omega-3 to placebo reported a significant improvement in lung function and Shwachman score and a reduction in sputum volume in the omega-3 group. Another

  3. Magnesium in cystic fibrosis--Systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Santi, Maristella; Milani, Gregorio P; Simonetti, Giacomo D; Fossali, Emilio F; Bianchetti, Mario G; Lava, Sebastiano A G

    2016-02-01

    The metabolism of sodium, potassium, and chloride and the acid-base balance are sometimes altered in cystic fibrosis. Textbooks and reviews only marginally address the homeostasis of magnesium in cystic fibrosis. We performed a search of the Medical Subject Headings terms (cystic fibrosis OR mucoviscidosis) AND (magnesium OR hypomagnes[a]emia) in the US National Library of Medicine and Excerpta Medica databases. We identified 25 reports dealing with magnesium and cystic fibrosis. The results of the review may be summarized as follows. First, hypomagnesemia affects more than half of the cystic fibrosis patients with advanced disease; second, magnesemia, which is normally age-independent, relevantly decreases with age in cystic fibrosis; third, aminoglycoside antimicrobials frequently induce both acute and chronic renal magnesium-wasting; fourth, sweat magnesium concentration was normal in cystic fibrosis patients; fifth, limited data suggest the existence of an impaired intestinal magnesium balance. Finally, stimulating observations suggest that magnesium supplements might achieve an improvement in respiratory muscle strength and mucolytic activity of both recombinant and endogenous deoxyribonuclease. The first comprehensive review of the literature confirms that, despite being one of the most prevalent minerals in the body, the importance of magnesium in cystic fibrosis is largely overlooked. In these patients, hypomagnesemia should be sought once a year. Furthermore, the potential of supplementation with this cation deserves more attention. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Cystic Fibrosis Revisited - a Review Study.

    PubMed

    Klimova, Blanka; Kuca, Kamil; Novotny, Michal; Maresova, Petra

    2017-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an incurable, chronic disease, which causes severe damages to respiratory and digestive tracts. It is the most common genetically inherited disease among caucasians. This disease is caused by defects in CF genes, the so-called mutations in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene population. At present over 100,000 people suffer from this disease worldwide. The purpose of this review study is to describe the pathophysiology of CF and provide the latest information on its diagnosis and treatment therapies with respect to the improvement of patient's quality of life and emphasis on targeted specialized care. The methodological approaches include a method of literature review of available sources exploring the issue of cystic fibrosis both from a global and specific perspective point of view. A search was performed in the databases PubMed, MEDLINE, Web of Science, Scopus, Springer and ScienceDirect. Furthermore, other sources cited in the analyzed studies were also examined. On the basis of evaluation of these literature sources, the research issue was explored. The main benefits (e.g., specialized centres for the treatment of CF exist or a new breakthrough in the gene therapy of CF has been made) and limitations (e.g., comorbidity of CF, lifelong and costly treatment, or adverse impact on patient's and caregiver's quality of life) in the treatment of narcolepsy are highlighted. CF requires an integrated treatment approach in specialized CF centers, involving various factors contributing to a better patient's state of health in the form of relevant and well-balanced non-pharmacological and pharmacological therapies. In addition, further large scale clinical trials are needed in order to develop compounds that are aimed at the most common classes of CFTR. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  5. Eating disorders in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Raymond, N C; Chang, P N; Crow, S J; Mitchell, J E; Dieperink, B S; Beck, M M; Crosby, R D; Clawson, C C; Warwick, W J

    2000-06-01

    This study was designed to examine rates of eating disorders and psychopathology in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Fifty-eight CF patients and 43 healthy control participants were evaluated using structured psychiatric interviews and rating scales. Two control participants and no CF patients were diagnosed with an eating disorder. Additionally, 11 CF patients were diagnosed with one or more psychiatric disorders. Group means on the rating scales did not show clinically meaningful elevations in either group. These data indicate no evidence for elevated rates of eating disorders in CF patients. Similarly, rates of other psychiatric disorders in the CF group were not greater than the prevalence reported in the general population.

  6. CYSTIC FIBROSIS: MICROBIOLOGY AND HOST RESPONSE

    PubMed Central

    Zemanick, Edith T.

    2016-01-01

    THE EARLIEST DESCRIPTIONS OF LUNG DISEASE IN PEOPLE WITH CYSTIC FIBROSIS (CF) DEMONSTRATED THE INVOLVEMENT OF THREE INTERACTING PATHOPHYSIOLOGICAL ELEMENTS IN CF AIRWAYS: MUCUS OBSTRUCTION, INFLAMMATION, AND INFECTION. OVER THE PAST 7 DECADES, OUR UNDERSTANDING OF CF RESPIRATORY MICROBIOLOGY AND INFLAMMATION HAS EVOLVED WITH THE INTRODUCTION OF NEW TREATMENTS, WITH INCREASED LONGEVITY, AND WITH INCREASINGLY SOPHISTICATED LABORATORY TECHNIQUES. IN THIS CHAPTER, WE WILL REVIEW THE CURRENT STATE OF UNDERSTANDING OF THE ROLES OF INFECTION AND INFLAMMATION AND THEIR ROLES IN DRIVING LUNG DISEASE. WE WILL ALSO DISCUSS HOW THIS CONSTANTLY EVOLVING INFORMATION IS USED TO INFORM CURRENT THERAPEUTIC STRATEGIES, MEASURES AND PREDICTORS OF DISEASE SEVERITY, AND RESEARCH PRIORITIES. PMID:27469179

  7. Vitamin K supplementation for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Jagannath, Vanitha A; Fedorowicz, Zbys; Thaker, Vidhu; Chang, Anne B

    2015-01-18

    Cystic fibrosis is a genetic disorder which can lead to multiorgan dysfunction. Malabsorption of fat and fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E, K) may occur and can cause subclinical deficiencies of some of these vitamins. Vitamin K is known to play an important role in both blood coagulation and bone formation. Supplementation with vitamin K appears to be one way of addressing the deficiency, but there is very limited agreement on the appropriate dose and frequency of use of these supplements. To assess the effects of vitamin K supplementation in people with cystic fibrosis and to determine the optimal dose and route of administration of vitamin K for both routine and therapeutic use. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group's Trials Register comprising references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings.Most recent search: 08 October 2014. Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials of all preparations of vitamin K used as a supplement compared to either no supplementation (or placebo) at any dose or route and for any duration, in children or adults diagnosed with cystic fibrosis (by sweat test or genetic testing). Two authors independently screened papers, extracted trial details and assessed their risk of bias. Two trials (total of 32 participants) each lasting one month were included in the review and were assessed as having a moderate risk of bias. One was a dose-ranging parallel group trial in children (aged 8 to 18 years); and the other (with an older cohort) had a cross-over design comparing supplements to no treatment, but no separate data were reported for the first intervention period. Neither of the trials addressed any of the primary outcomes (coagulation, bone formation and quality of life). Both trials reported the restoration of serum vitamin K and undercarboxylated osteocalcin levels to the normal range after one month of

  8. [Measurement of pulmonary inflammation in cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Fayon, M; Chiron, R; Abely, M

    2008-06-01

    Lung inflammation is a pivotal phenomenon in the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis. Inflammation can be measured and quantified within a research perspective, as well as in daily clinical practice. In this review paper, the "Inflammation Task Force" of the "Société Française de Mucoviscidose" has reviewed the literature regarding the various techniques currently available (bronchoalveolar lavage, sputum analysis, nasal wash and brushing, exhaled breath condensates, carbon monoxide and nitric oxide, and systemic measurements (plasma and urine)). The interpretation of all these determinations in children and adults is also discussed.

  9. [New therapeutic developments in cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Bui, S; Macey, J; Fayon, M; Bihouée, T; Burgel, P-R; Colomb, V; Corvol, H; Durieu, I; Hubert, D; Marguet, C; Mas, E; Munck, A; Murris-Espin, M; Reix, P; Sermet-Gaudelus, I

    2016-12-01

    Since the discovery of chloride secretion by the Cystic Fibrosis Transport regulator CFTR in 1983, and CFTR gene in 1989, knowledge about CFTR synthesis, maturation, intracellular transfer and function has dramatically expanded. These discoveries have led to the distribution of CF mutations into 6 classes with different pathophysiological mechanisms. In this article we will explore the state of art on CFTR synthesis and its chloride secretion function. We will then explore the consequences of the 6 classes of mutations on CFTR protein function and we will describe the new therapeutic developments aiming at correcting these defects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. [Cystic fibrosis: centers and care networks organization].

    PubMed

    Bellon, G

    2012-05-01

    More than 20 years after the gene discovery, without specific treatment, the observed improvement of the cystic fibrosis prognosis appears due to management's organization as well as early diagnosis (neonatal screening) or progress in symptomatic treatment. The CF Centers (CRCM) official recognition was a necessary step before generalization of routine neonatal screening (October, 2002). Actually French CF management relies on three levels of organization: CF centers, regional care networks and French CF Society, in close relationship with patients association (Vaincre la Mucoviscidose). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Airway clearance therapy in cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Pisi, Giovanna; Chetta, Alfredo

    2009-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common life-shortening inherited disease affecting Caucasian people. In CF, the major feature of lung disease is the retention of mucus due to impaired clearance of abnormally viscous airway secretions. Airway clearance techniques (ACTs) may significantly improve mucociliary clearance and gas exchange, thereby being of clinical benefit in reducing pulmonary complications in CF patients. ACTs include conventional chest physiotherapy, active cycle of breathing techniques, autogenic drainage, positive expiratory pressure and high-frequency chest compression. In order to suit the needs of patients, families and care-givers, ACTs need to be individually and continuously adapted.

  12. Cystic fibrosis-associated liver disease.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Ulrike; Dockter, Gerd; Lammert, Frank

    2010-10-01

    Liver disease is increasingly common in cystic fibrosis (CF). As new therapeutic options emerge, life expectancy increases and common hepatobiliary manifestations impact on quality of life and survival of CF patients. Hepatobiliary abnormalities in CF vary in nature and range from defects attributable to the underlying CFTR gene defect to those related to systemic disease and malnutrition. Today complications of liver disease represent the third most frequent cause of disease-related death in patients with CF. Here we review molecular and clinical genetics of CF, including genetic modifiers of CF-associated liver disease, and provide practical recommendations for genetic testing, diagnosis and treatment of hepatobiliary manifestations in CF.

  13. Genetic therapies for cystic fibrosis lung disease.

    PubMed

    Sinn, Patrick L; Anthony, Reshma M; McCray, Paul B

    2011-04-15

    The aim of gene therapy for cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease is to efficiently and safely express the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in the appropriate pulmonary cell types. Although CF patients experience multi-organ disease, the chronic bacterial lung infections and associated inflammation are the primary cause of shortened life expectancy. Gene transfer-based therapeutic approaches are feasible, in part, because the airway epithelium is directly accessible by aerosol delivery or instillation. Improvements in standard delivery vectors and the development of novel vectors, as well as emerging technologies and new animal models, are propelling exciting new research forward. Here, we review recent developments that are advancing this field of investigation.

  14. Vitamin D Deficiency in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Hall, William B.; Sparks, Amy A.; Aris, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis is the most common inherited genetic respiratory disorder in the Western World. Hypovitaminosis D is almost universal in CF patients, likely due to a combination of inadequate absorption, impaired metabolism, and lack of sun exposure. Inadequate levels are associated with the high prevalence of bone disease or osteoporosis in CF patients, which is associated with increased morbidity including fractures, kyphosis, and worsening pulmonary status. Treatment goals include regular monitoring 25 hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) levels with aggressive treatment for those with levels <75 nmol/L (<30 ng/mL). More research is needed to determine optimal supplementation goals and strategies. PMID:20148079

  15. Influenza immunization in children with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Adlard, P; Bryett, K

    1987-01-01

    Nineteen children with cystic fibrosis and aged between 5 and 13 years were randomized to receive two doses at monthly intervals of either a split-virion influenza vaccine (MFV-Ject, Institut Merieux) or a sub-unit vaccine (Fluvirin, Evans). In those completing the study, there was a satisfactory serological response. There was no statistically significant difference between the immunogenicity of the two vaccines as evaluated by haemagglutination inhibition or single radial haemolysis tests. The incidence of local side-effects was similar in the two groups.

  16. Vitamin K supplementation for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Jagannath, Vanitha A; Thaker, Vidhu; Chang, Anne B; Price, Amy I

    2017-08-22

    Cystic fibrosis is a genetic disorder which can lead to multiorgan dysfunction. Malabsorption of fat and fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E, K) may occur and can cause subclinical deficiencies of some of these vitamins. Vitamin K is known to play an important role in both blood coagulation and bone formation. Supplementation with vitamin K appears to be one way of addressing the deficiency, but there is very limited agreement on the appropriate dose and frequency of use of these supplements. This is an updated version of the review. To assess the effects of vitamin K supplementation in people with cystic fibrosis and to determine the optimal dose and route of administration of vitamin K for both routine and therapeutic use. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group's Trials Register comprising references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings.Most recent search: 30 January 2017. Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials of all preparations of vitamin K used as a supplement compared to either no supplementation (or placebo) at any dose or route and for any duration, in children or adults diagnosed with cystic fibrosis (by sweat test or genetic testing). Two authors independently screened papers, extracted trial details and assessed their risk of bias. Two trials (total of 32 participants) each lasting one month were included in the review and were assessed as having a moderate risk of bias. One was a dose-ranging parallel group trial in children (aged 8 to 18 years); and the other (with an older cohort) had a cross-over design comparing supplements to no treatment, but no separate data were reported for the first intervention period. Neither of the trials addressed any of the primary outcomes (coagulation, bone formation and quality of life). Both trials reported the restoration of serum vitamin K and undercarboxylated osteocalcin

  17. Vaccine strategies against cystic fibrosis pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Le Moigne, Vincent; Gaillard, Jean-Louis; Herrmann, Jean-Louis

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A great number of cystic fibrosis (CF) pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the Burkholderia cepacia and the Mycobacterium abscessus complex raised difficult therapeutic problems due to their intrinsic multi-resistance to numerous antibiotics. Vaccine strategies represent one of the key weapons against these multi-resistant bacteria in a number of clinical settings like CF. Different strategies are considered in order to develop such vaccines, linked either to priming the host response, or by exploiting genomic data derived from the bacterium. Interestingly, virulence factors synthesized by various pathogens might serve as targets for vaccine development and have been, for example, evaluated in the context of CF. PMID:26618824

  18. The Changing Microbial Epidemiology in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    LiPuma, John J.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Infection of the airways remains the primary cause of morbidity and mortality in persons with cystic fibrosis (CF). This review describes salient features of the epidemiologies of microbial species that are involved in respiratory tract infection in CF. The apparently expanding spectrum of species causing infection in CF and recent changes in the incidences and prevalences of infection due to specific bacterial, fungal, and viral species are described. The challenges inherent in tracking and interpreting rates of infection in this patient population are discussed. PMID:20375354

  19. Cystic fibrosis: need for mass deployable screening methods.

    PubMed

    Sengar, Aditya Singh; Agarwal, Anirudh; Singh, Manish K

    2014-10-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. CFTR is a member of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette superfamily of proteins and it functions as a chloride channel. CFTR largely controls the working of epithelial cells of the airways, the gastrointestinal tract, exocrine glands, and genitourinary system. Cystic fibrosis is responsible for severe chronic pulmonary disorders in children. Other maladies in the spectrum of this life-limiting disorder include nasal polyposis, pansinusitis, rectal prolapse, pancreatitis, cholelithiasis, insulin-dependent hyperglycemia, and cirrhosis. This review summarizes the recent state of art in the field of cystic fibrosis diagnostic methods with the help of CF literature published so far and proposes new research domains in the field of cystic fibrosis diagnosis.

  20. Pain is an underestimated symptom in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Masson, Alexandra; Kirszembaum, Maya; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle

    2017-08-12

    Life expectancy is increasing in cystic fibrosis and new aspects of the disease have to be taken into account in cystic fibrosis care. Pain is encountered among 70% of adult and pediatric patients with cystic fibrosis. This symptom is underestimated by the multidisciplinary team. It has been reported as impacting quality of life and adherence to treatments. The location of pain is inconstant among the different studies but the major symptoms are headaches, gastrointestinal, and chest pain. Pain is different for each patient and requires careful evaluation using questionnaires some of which specifically developed for patients with cystic fibrosis. Medical and nonmedical treatment such as ostheopathy or sophrology may relieve pain symptoms but have to be adjusted in the frame of a global personalized care. Pain maybe an underestimated symptom among patients with cystic fibrosis and impacts negatively on quality of life. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

  1. Optimising inhaled mannitol for cystic fibrosis in an adult population

    PubMed Central

    Flume, Patrick A.; Aitken, Moira L.; Agent, Penny; Charlton, Brett; Forster, Emma; Fox, Howard G.; Hebestreit, Helge; Kolbe, John; Zuckerman, Jonathan B; Button, Brenda M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract There has been remarkable progress in the treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients over the past 20 years. However, limitations of standard therapies have highlighted the need for a convenient alternative treatment to effectively target the pathophysiologic basis of CF-related disease by improving mucociliary clearance of airway secretions and consequently improve lung function and reduce respiratory exacerbations. Mannitol is an osmotic agent available as a dry powder, dispensed in a convenient disposable inhaler device for the treatment of adult patients with CF. Inhalation of mannitol as a dry powder is thought to change the viscoelastic properties of airway secretions, increase the hydration of the airway surface liquid and contribute to increased mucociliary and cough clearance of retained secretions. In two large phase 3 studies [1, 2], long-term use of inhaled mannitol resulted in a significant and clinically meaningful improvement in lung function relative to control in adult CF subjects and had an acceptable safety profile. Clinical experience with inhaled mannitol confirms that it is safe and effective. A minority of patients are unable to tolerate the medication. However, through training in proper inhaler technique and setting clear expectations regarding therapeutic effects, both the tolerance and adherence necessary for long term efficacy can be positively influenced. Educational aims To discuss the importance of airway clearance treatments in the management of cystic fibrosis. To describe the clinical data that supports the use of mannitol in adult patients with cystic fibrosis. To highlight the role of mannitol tolerance testing in screening for hyperresponsiveness. To provide practical considerations for patient education in use of mannitol inhaler. Key points Inhaled mannitol is a safe and effective option in adult patients with cystic fibrosis. Mannitol tolerance testing effectively screens for hyperresponsiveness prior to initiation

  2. Cystic fibrosis pulmonary guidelines: airway clearance therapies.

    PubMed

    Flume, Patrick A; Robinson, Karen A; O'Sullivan, Brian P; Finder, Jonathan D; Vender, Robert L; Willey-Courand, Donna-Beth; White, Terry B; Marshall, Bruce C

    2009-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disease characterized by dehydration of airway surface liquid and impaired mucociliary clearance. As a result, there is difficulty clearing pathogens from the lung, and patients experience chronic pulmonary infections and inflammation. Clearance of airway secretions has been a primary therapy for those with CF, and a variety of airway clearance therapies (ACTs) have been developed. Because ACTs are intrusive and require considerable time and effort, it is important that appropriate techniques are recommended on the basis of available evidence of efficacy and safety. Therefore, the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation established a committee to examine the clinical evidence for each therapy and provide guidance for their use. A systematic review was commissioned, which identified 7 unique reviews and 13 additional controlled trials that addressed one or more of the comparisons of interest and were deemed eligible for inclusion. Recommendations for use of the ACTs were made, balancing the quality of evidence and the potential harms and benefits. The committee determined that, although there is a paucity of controlled trials that assess the long-term effects of ACTs, the evidence quality overall for their use in CF is fair and the benefit is moderate. The committee recommends airway clearance be performed on a regular basis in all patients. There are no ACTs demonstrated to be superior to others, so the prescription of ACTs should be individualized. Aerobic exercise is recommended as an adjunctive therapy for airway clearance and for its additional benefits to overall health.

  3. Variable weight training in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Strauss, G D; Osher, A; Wang, C I; Goodrich, E; Gold, F; Colman, W; Stabile, M; Dobrenchuk, A; Keens, T G

    1987-08-01

    A six-month pilot study of variable weight training (VWT) was undertaken to assess its impact on body weight, pulmonary function, muscle size and strength, and social function in 12 adolescent and adult patients with moderately severe cystic fibrosis. Exercise for patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) has often been recommended as an adjunct to physical therapy, although aerobic exercise has not resulted in weight gain in CF. Compared to a three-month control period, six months of VWT resulted in significant increase in weight (2.88 kg, p less than .02), muscle size (1.6 to 1.8 cm upper arm, p less than .01), strength (increase from 16 to 32 muscle groups at normal strength, p less than .005), and decrease in residual volume (1.77 L, p less than .03) and RV/TLC (12.4 percent, p less than .02). There was no significant improvement in other measures of pulmonary or social function. VWT appears to be a form of exercise in which even moderately ill CF patients can engage safely, leading to desired weight gain and increased strength. These results warrant further study of the effects of VWT on pulmonary function and CF morbidity.

  4. Lessons learned from metabolomics in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Muhlebach, Marianne S; Sha, Wei

    2015-12-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a mono-genetic multi-system disease; however, respiratory manifestations cause the main morbidity and mortality where chronic bacterial infections lead to bronchiectasis and ultimately respiratory failure. Metabolomics allows a relatively complete snapshot of metabolic processes in a sample using different mass spectrometry methods. Sample types used for discovery of biomarkers or pathomechanisms in cystic fibrosis (CF) have included blood, respiratory secretions, and exhaled breath to date. Metabolomics has shown distinction of CF vs. non-CF for matrices of blood, exhaled breath, and respiratory epithelial cultures, each showing different pathways. Severity of lung disease has been addressed by studies in bronchoalveolar lavage and exhaled breath condensate showing separation by metabolites that the authors of each study related to inflammation; e.g., ethanol, acetone, purines. Lipidomics has been applied to blood and sputum samples showing associations with lung function and Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection status. Finally, studies of bacteria grown in vitro showed differences of bacterial metabolites to be associated with clinical parameters. Metabolomics, in the sense of global metabolomic profiling, is a powerful technique that has allowed discovery of pathways that had not previously been implicated in CF. These may include purines, mitochondrial pathways, and different aspects of glucose metabolism besides the known differences in lipid metabolism in CF. However, targeted studies to validate such potential metabolites and pathways of interest are necessary. Studies evaluating metabolites of bacterial origin are in their early stages. Thus further well-designed studies could be envisioned.

  5. [Vitamin E deficiency in cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Muñoz, C; Polanco, I; Hernanz, A; Carrasco, S; Barea, I; Murga, M L; Arroba, M L; Codoceo, R

    1987-12-01

    Plasma vitamin E levels were measured by high performance liquid chromatography in 42 children with cystic fibrosis and were correlated with the following parameters: sex, age, time of follow-up, clinical evolution (Schwachman score), vitamin E/cholesterol and faecal fat excretion. All children in this study received oral alfa-tocoferol (50-100 mg daily) from the diagnosis. According to the vitamin E level patients were distributed in two groups. Group I: 27 patients (64.3%) with normal concentrations. Group II: 15 patients (35.7%) with decreases plasma levels but without clinical manifestations. Steatorrhea was present in all children except 4 patients from group I and one patient from group II. On the other hand, vitamin E/cholesterol was normal in 80% of patients with vitamin E deficiency (group II). We did not find any correlation between plasma vitamin E levels and the different clinical and biological parameters studied. Further studies should be carried out to throw more light on the mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of vitamin E deficiency in patients with cystic fibrosis.

  6. Cystic fibrosis mortality trends in France.

    PubMed

    Bellis, Gil; Cazes, Marie-Hélène; Parant, Alain; Gaimard, Maryse; Travers, Cécile; Le Roux, Evelyne; Ravilly, Sophie; Rault, Gilles

    2007-05-01

    In 1992 France set up a national cystic fibrosis observatory (Observatoire national de la mucoviscidose, ONM) to monitor the state of health of patients on an annual basis. Using the ONM data, this study estimates the main indicators for life expectancy and assesses the total number of cystic fibrosis patients. The data for the years 1994 to 2003 are divided into 3-year periods. Life tables are drawn up for these periods, from which mean and median lengths of life are determined. Using the most recent life table, the number of births in 2003 and the incidence of the disease, the total population of patients can be estimated, assuming a stationary population. In 2001-2003, life expectancy at birth of patients registered with the ONM was 39.1 years and median length of life was 36.4 years. These results, substantially better than those of 1994-1996, are linked to improved conditions of patient inclusion in the ONM database, to improvements in their healthcare, but also to the limitations of the life tables. Based on the 2003 data, the total theoretical number of patients is 6490, and coverage by the ONM database is thus 63.2%. These provisional results demonstrate the need to convert the ONM observatory into a registry providing exhaustive coverage of all patients.

  7. Comparative biology of cystic fibrosis animal models.

    PubMed

    Fisher, John T; Zhang, Yulong; Engelhardt, John F

    2011-01-01

    Animal models of human diseases are critical for dissecting mechanisms of pathophysiology and developing therapies. In the context of cystic fibrosis (CF), mouse models have been the dominant species by which to study CF disease processes in vivo for the past two decades. Although much has been learned through these CF mouse models, limitations in the ability of this species to recapitulate spontaneous lung disease and several other organ abnormalities seen in CF humans have created a need for additional species on which to study CF. To this end, pig and ferret CF models have been generated by somatic cell nuclear transfer and are currently being characterized. These new larger animal models have phenotypes that appear to closely resemble human CF disease seen in newborns, and efforts to characterize their adult phenotypes are ongoing. This chapter will review current knowledge about comparative lung cell biology and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) biology among mice, pigs, and ferrets that has implications for CF disease modeling in these species. We will focus on methods used to compare the biology and function of CFTR between these species and their relevance to phenotypes seen in the animal models. These cross-species comparisons and the development of both the pig and the ferret CF models may help elucidate pathophysiologic mechanisms of CF lung disease and lead to new therapeutic approaches.

  8. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR)

    PubMed Central

    Corradi, Valentina; Vergani, Paola; Tieleman, D. Peter

    2015-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily. CFTR controls the flow of anions through the apical membrane of epithelia. Dysfunctional CFTR causes the common lethal genetic disease cystic fibrosis. Transitions between open and closed states of CFTR are regulated by ATP binding and hydrolysis on the cytosolic nucleotide binding domains, which are coupled with the transmembrane (TM) domains forming the pathway for anion permeation. Lack of structural data hampers a global understanding of CFTR and thus the development of “rational” approaches directly targeting defective CFTR. In this work, we explored possible conformational states of the CFTR gating cycle by means of homology modeling. As templates, we used structures of homologous ABC transporters, namely TM(287–288), ABC-B10, McjD, and Sav1866. In the light of published experimental results, structural analysis of the transmembrane cavity suggests that the TM(287–288)-based CFTR model could correspond to a commonly occupied closed state, whereas the McjD-based model could represent an open state. The models capture the important role played by Phe-337 as a filter/gating residue and provide structural information on the conformational transition from closed to open channel. PMID:26229102

  9. Targeting ion channels in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Mall, Marcus A; Galietta, Luis J V

    2015-09-01

    Mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene cause a characteristic defect in epithelial ion transport that plays a central role in the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis (CF). Hence, pharmacological correction of this ion transport defect by targeting of mutant CFTR, or alternative ion channels that may compensate for CFTR dysfunction, has long been considered as an attractive approach to a causal therapy of this life-limiting disease. The recent introduction of the CFTR potentiator ivacaftor into the therapy of a subgroup of patients with specific CFTR mutations was a major milestone and enormous stimulus for seeking effective ion transport modulators for all patients with CF. In this review, we discuss recent breakthroughs and setbacks with CFTR modulators designed to rescue mutant CFTR including the common mutation F508del. Further, we examine the alternative chloride channels TMEM16A and SLC26A9, as well as the epithelial sodium channel ENaC as alternative targets in CF lung disease, which remains the major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with CF. Finally, we will focus on the hurdles that still need to be overcome to make effective ion transport modulation therapies available for all patients with CF irrespective of their CFTR genotype.

  10. New horizons for cystic fibrosis treatment.

    PubMed

    Fajac, Isabelle; De Boeck, Kris

    2017-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis is an inherited multi-system disease associated with chronic lung infection, malabsorption, salt loss syndromes, male infertility and leading to numerous comorbidities. The landscape in cystic fibrosis care has changed markedly with currently more adult patients than children in many countries. Over 2000 different mutations in the CFTR gene have been reported and the majority are extremely rare. Understanding how CFTR mutations translate to disturbed synthesis or function of the CFTR protein has opened the way to 'personalized' treatments to correct the basic defect. The first 2 drugs have reached the clinic: a CFTR potentiator to augment CFTR channel function, and the combination of this potentiator with a corrector to increase CFTR expression at the cell membrane. To obtain robust correction of CFTR expression at the cell membrane, combinations of correctors with additive efficacy are under investigation. Other mutation type-specific treatments under clinical investigation are premature stop codon-read through drugs and antisense oligonucleotides that correct the basic defect at the mRNA level. Restoring the defective gene by gene editing can already be achieved ex vivo. Mutation agnostic treatments are explored as well: stabilizing CFTR expression at the cell membrane, circumventing the CFTR channel by blocking or activating other ion channels, and gene therapy. Combinations of these therapies can be anticipated. The pipeline of corrective strategies under clinical investigation is increasing continuously and a rising number of pharmaceutical companies are entering the field. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Cystic Fibrosis and the Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Reznikov, Leah R

    2017-05-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-shortening autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). CFTR is an anion channel that conducts bicarbonate and chloride across cell membranes. Although defective anion transport across epithelial cells is accepted as the basic defect in CF, many of the features observed in people with CF and organs affected by CF are modulated by the nervous system. This is of interest because CFTR expression has been reported in both the peripheral and central nervous systems, and it is well known that the transport of anions, such as chloride, greatly modulates neuronal excitability. Thus it is predicted that in CF, lack of CFTR in the nervous system affects neuronal function. Consistent with this prediction, several nervous system abnormalities and nervous system disorders have been described in people with CF and in animal models of CF. The goal of this special feature article is to highlight the expression and function of CFTR in the nervous system. Special emphasis is placed on nervous system abnormalities described in people with CF and in animal models of CF. Finally, features of CF that may be modulated by or attributed to faulty nervous system function are discussed. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Imaging the Abdominal Manifestations of Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, S.; Chan, V. O.; Ridge, C. A.

    2017-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a multisystem disease with a range of abdominal manifestations including those involving the liver, pancreas, and kidneys. Recent advances in management of the respiratory complications of the disease has led to a greater life expectancy in patients with CF. Subsequently, there is increasing focus on the impact of abdominal disease on quality of life and survival. Liver cirrhosis is the most important extrapulmonary cause of death in CF, yet significant challenges remain in the diagnosis of CF related liver disease. The capacity to predict those patients at risk of developing cirrhosis remains a significant challenge. We review representative abdominal imaging findings in patients with CF selected from the records of two academic health centres, with a view to increasing familiarity with the abdominal manifestations of the disease. We review their presentation and expected imaging findings, with a focus on the challenges facing diagnosis of the hepatic manifestations of the disease. An increased familiarity with these abdominal manifestations will facilitate timely diagnosis and management, which is paramount to further improving outcomes for patients with cystic fibrosis. PMID:28250993

  13. CFTR protein repair therapy in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Quintana-Gallego, Esther; Delgado-Pecellín, Isabel; Calero Acuña, Carmen

    2014-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a single gene, autosomal recessive disorder, in which more than 1,900 mutations grouped into 6 classes have been described. It is an example a disease that could be well placed to benefit from personalised medicine. There are currently 2 very different approaches that aim to correct the basic defect: gene therapy, aimed at correcting the genetic alteration, and therapy aimed at correcting the defect in the CFTR protein. The latter is beginning to show promising results, with several molecules under development. Ataluren (PTC124) is a molecule designed to make the ribosomes become less sensitive to the premature stop codons responsible for class i mutations. Lumacaftor (VX-809) is a CFTR corrector directed at class ii mutations, among which Phe508del is the most frequent, with encouraging results. Ivacaftor (VX-770) is a potentiator, the only one marketed to date, which has shown good efficacy for the class iii mutation Gly551Asp in children over the age of 6 and adults. These drugs, or a combination of them, are currently undergoing various clinical trials for other less common genetic mutations. In the last 5 years, CFTR has been designated as a therapeutic target. Ivacaftor is the first drug to treat the basic defect in cystic fibrosis, but only provides a response in a small number of patients. New drugs capable of restoring the CFTR protein damaged by the most common mutations are required.

  14. Human Genome Project and cystic fibrosis--a symbiotic relationship.

    PubMed

    Tolstoi, L G; Smith, C L

    1999-11-01

    When Watson and Crick determined the structure of DNA in 1953, a biological revolution began. One result of this revolution is the Human Genome Project. The primary goal of this international project is to obtain the complete nucleotide sequence of the human genome by the year 2005. Although molecular biologists and geneticists are most enthusiastic about the Human Genome Project, all areas of clinical medicine and fields of biology will be affected. Cystic fibrosis is the most common, inherited, lethal disease of white persons. In 1989, researchers located the cystic fibrosis gene on the long arm of chromosome 7 by a technique known as positional cloning. The most common mutation (a 3-base pair deletion) of the cystic fibrosis gene occurs in 70% of patients with cystic fibrosis. The knowledge gained from genetic research on cystic fibrosis will help researchers develop new therapies (e.g., gene) and improve standard therapies (e.g., pharmacologic) so that a patient's life span is increased and quality of life is improved. The purpose of this review is twofold. First, the article provides an overview of the Human Genome Project and its clinical significance in advancing interdisciplinary care for patients with cystic fibrosis. Second, the article includes a discussion of the genetic basis, pathophysiology, and management of cystic fibrosis.

  15. Diagnosing cystic fibrosis-related diabetes: current methods and challenges.

    PubMed

    Prentice, Bernadette; Hameed, Shihab; Verge, Charles F; Ooi, Chee Y; Jaffe, Adam; Widger, John

    2016-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes (CFRD) is the end-point of a spectrum of glucose abnormalities in cystic fibrosis that begins with early insulin deficiency and ultimately results in accelerated nutritional decline and loss of lung function. Current diagnostic and management regimens are unable to entirely reverse this clinical decline. This review summarises the current understanding of the pathophysiology of CFRD, the issues associated with using oral glucose tolerance tests in CF and the challenges faced in making the diagnosis of CFRD. Medline database searches were conducted using search terms "Cystic Fibrosis Related Diabetes", "Cystic Fibrosis" AND "glucose", "Cystic Fibrosis" AND "insulin", "Cystic Fibrosis" AND "Diabetes". Additionally, reference lists were studied. Expert commentary: Increasing evidence points to early glucose abnormalities being clinically relevant in cystic fibrosis and as such novel diagnostic methods such as continuous glucose monitoring or 30 minute sampled oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) may play a key role in the future in the screening and diagnosis of early glucose abnormalities in CF.

  16. Topical cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene replacement for cystic fibrosis-related lung disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tim W R; Southern, Kevin W; Perry, Luke A; Penny-Dimri, Jahan C; Aslam, Aisha A

    2016-06-17

    Cystic fibrosis is caused by a defective gene encoding a protein called the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), and is characterised by chronic lung infection resulting in inflammation and progressive lung damage that results in a reduced life expectancy. To determine whether topical CFTR gene replacement therapy to the lungs in people with cystic fibrosis is associated with improvements in clinical outcomes, and to assess any adverse effects. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register comprising references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches, handsearching relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings.Date of most recent search: 05 May 2016.An additional search of the National Institutes for Health (NIH) Genetic Modification Clinical Research Information System (GeMCRIS) was also performed for the years 1992 to 2015.Date of most recent search: 20 April 2016. Randomised controlled studies comparing topical CFTR gene delivery to the lung, using either viral or non-viral delivery systems, with placebo or an alternative delivery system in people with confirmed cystic fibrosis. The authors independently extracted data and assessed study quality. Authors of included studies were contacted and asked for any available additional data. Meta-analysis was limited due to differing study designs. Four randomised controlled studies met the inclusion criteria for this review, involving a total of 302 participants lasting from 29 days to 13 months; 14 studies were excluded. The included studies differed in terms of CFTR gene replacement agent and study design, which limited the meta-analysis. One study only enrolled adult males, the remaining studies included both males and females aged 12 years and over.Risk of bias in the studies was moderate. Random sequence generation and allocation concealment was only described in the more recent study; the remaining three studies were

  17. Enteral tube feeding for individuals with cystic fibrosis: Cystic Fibrosis Foundation evidence-informed guidelines.

    PubMed

    Schwarzenberg, Sarah Jane; Hempstead, Sarah E; McDonald, Catherine M; Powers, Scott W; Wooldridge, Jamie; Blair, Shaina; Freedman, Steven; Harrington, Elaine; Murphy, Peter J; Palmer, Lena; Schrader, Amy E; Shiel, Kyle; Sullivan, Jillian; Wallentine, Melissa; Marshall, Bruce C; Leonard, Amanda Radmer

    2016-11-01

    Nutrition is integral to the care of individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF). Better nutritional status is associated with improved pulmonary function. In some individuals with CF, enteral tube feeding can be useful in achieving optimal nutritional status. Current nutrition guidelines do not include detailed recommendations for enteral tube feeding. The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation convened an expert panel to develop enteral tube feeding recommendations based on a systematic review of the evidence and expert opinion. These guidelines address when to consider enteral tube feeding, assessment of confounding causes of poor nutrition in CF, preparation of the patient for placement of the enteral feeding tube, management of the tube after placement and education about enteral feeding. These recommendations are intended to guide the CF care team, individuals with CF, and their families through the enteral tube feeding process.

  18. Air Trapping and Airflow Obstruction in Newborn Cystic Fibrosis Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Ryan J.; Michalski, Andrew S.; Bauer, Christian; Abou Alaiwa, Mahmoud H.; Gross, Thomas J.; Awadalla, Maged S.; Bouzek, Drake C.; Gansemer, Nicholas D.; Taft, Peter J.; Hoegger, Mark J.; Diwakar, Amit; Ochs, Matthias; Reinhardt, Joseph M.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Beichel, Reinhard R.; Meyerholz, David K.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Air trapping and airflow obstruction are being increasingly identified in infants with cystic fibrosis. These findings are commonly attributed to airway infection, inflammation, and mucus buildup. Objectives: To learn if air trapping and airflow obstruction are present before the onset of airway infection and inflammation in cystic fibrosis. Methods: On the day they are born, piglets with cystic fibrosis lack airway infection and inflammation. Therefore, we used newborn wild-type piglets and piglets with cystic fibrosis to assess air trapping, airway size, and lung volume with inspiratory and expiratory X-ray computed tomography scans. Micro–computed tomography scanning was used to assess more distal airway sizes. Airway resistance was determined with a mechanical ventilator. Mean linear intercept and alveolar surface area were determined using stereologic methods. Measurements and Main Results: On the day they were born, piglets with cystic fibrosis exhibited air trapping more frequently than wild-type piglets (75% vs. 12.5%, respectively). Moreover, newborn piglets with cystic fibrosis had increased airway resistance that was accompanied by luminal size reduction in the trachea, mainstem bronchi, and proximal airways. In contrast, mean linear intercept length, alveolar surface area, and lung volume were similar between both genotypes. Conclusions: The presence of air trapping, airflow obstruction, and airway size reduction in newborn piglets with cystic fibrosis before the onset of airway infection, inflammation, and mucus accumulation indicates that cystic fibrosis impacts airway development. Our findings suggest that early airflow obstruction and air trapping in infants with cystic fibrosis might, in part, be caused by congenital airway abnormalities. PMID:24168209

  19. Cystic fibrosis pulmonary guidelines: treatment of pulmonary exacerbations.

    PubMed

    Flume, Patrick A; Mogayzel, Peter J; Robinson, Karen A; Goss, Christopher H; Rosenblatt, Randall L; Kuhn, Robert J; Marshall, Bruce C

    2009-11-01

    The natural history of cystic fibrosis lung disease is one of chronic progression with intermittent episodes of acute worsening of symptoms frequently called acute pulmonary exacerbations These exacerbations typically warrant medical intervention. It is important that appropriate therapies are recommended on the basis of available evidence of efficacy and safety. The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation therefore established a committee to define the key questions related to pulmonary exacerbations, review the clinical evidence using an evidence-based methodology, and provide recommendations to clinicians. It is hoped that these guidelines will be helpful to clinicians in the treatment of individuals with cystic fibrosis.

  20. Early bronchiectasis in cystic fibrosis detected by surveillance CT.

    PubMed

    Pillarisetti, Naveen; Linnane, Barry; Ranganathan, Sarath

    2010-08-01

    There is emerging evidence that cystic fibrosis lung disease begins early in infancy. Newborn screening allows early detection and surveillance of pulmonary disease and the possibility of early intervention in this life-shortening condition. We report two children with cystic fibrosis who underwent a comprehensive assessment from diagnosis that included measurement of lung function, limited-slice high-resolution CT and BAL performed annually. Early aggressive surveillance enabled significant lung disease and bronchiectasis to be detected during the first few years of life and led to a change in management, highlighting a clinical role for CT scanning during the preschool years in children with cystic fibrosis.

  1. European Cystic Fibrosis Society Standards of Care: Quality Management in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Stern, Martin; Bertrand, Dominique Pougheon; Bignamini, Elisabetta; Corey, Mary; Dembski, Birgit; Goss, Christopher H; Pressler, Tanja; Rault, Gilles; Viviani, Laura; Elborn, J Stuart; Castellani, Carlo

    2014-05-01

    Since the earliest days of cystic fibrosis (CF) treatment, patient data have been recorded and reviewed in order to identify the factors that lead to more favourable outcomes. Large data repositories, such as the US Cystic Fibrosis Registry, which was established in the 1960s, enabled successful treatments and patient outcomes to be recognized and improvement programmes to be implemented in specialist CF centres. Over the past decades, the greater volumes of data becoming available through Centre databases and patient registries led to the possibility of making comparisons between different therapies, approaches to care and indeed data recording. The quality of care for individuals with CF has become a focus at several levels: patient, centre, regional, national and international. This paper reviews the quality management and improvement issues at each of these levels with particular reference to indicators of health, the role of CF Centres, regional networks, national health policy, and international data registration and comparisons. Copyright © 2014 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. All rights reserved.

  2. Other mucoactive agents for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Bye, Peter T P; Elkins, Mark R

    2007-03-01

    This review examines specific mucoactive agents from three classes: expectorants, which add water to the airway; ion-transport modifiers, which promote ion and water transport across the epithelium of the airway; and mucokinetics, which improve cough-mediated clearance by increasing airflow or reducing sputum adhesivity. The agents are isotonic and hypertonic saline, mannitol, denufosol and beta-agonists. Our understanding of these agents has recently improved through pre-clinical research, clinical trials and, in particular, extensive research into the nature of the liquid lining the surface of the airway, both in health and in cystic fibrosis (CF). For each agent, recent research is reviewed, highlighting the evidence for possible mechanisms of action and for clinical efficacy in CF, as well as the implications for the optimal clinical application of the agent.

  3. Clostridium difficile in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Welkon, C J; Long, S S; Thompson, C M; Gilligan, P H

    1985-08-01

    One hundred seven patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and 54 other patients with risk factors for Clostridium difficile-associated disease were entered into a bacteriologic study to compare the rate of recovery of C difficile and cytotoxin in feces with occurrence of diarrhea and to investigate potentially protective or permissive relationships of fecal flora. Toxigenic C difficile was recovered from 22% of CF patients and 11% of patients with other diagnoses. Unlike the latter group, the majority (12/15) of CF patients who had cytotoxin recovered had formed stools and no history of diarrhea. Explanations for the lack of symptoms are speculative. Stool flora of CF patients was significantly more likely to include several bacteria with known inhibitory effects on C difficile. Recovery of C difficile and cytotoxin, however, was not associated with the decrease in rate of recovery or the mean bacterial count of any bacterium of fecal flora.

  4. High dose Nutrizym 22 in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Shah, A; Dinwiddie, R; Madge, S; Prescott, P; Hudson, G

    1993-09-01

    New high dose pancreatic enzyme preparations could be potentially helpful to cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of the new high dose pancreatic enzyme preparation, Nutrizym 22 with the standard preparation Nutrizym GR. Twenty-five CF children (aged 7-16 years) entered the study and 22 completed it; 3 did not, due to non-compliance. All were taking Nutrizym GR for at least 2 weeks before entering the study. A randomised double blind, crossover method using standard Nutrizym GR or double strength Nutrizym 22 capsules was carried out over two consecutive 14-day periods. Crossover analyses of variance showed no statistically significant differences in actual weight gain, appetite, abdominal pain, stool consistency or faecal fat during the prestudy and study periods. It is concluded that half the capsule numbers of the high strength preparation are just as effective as the standard capsule dosage.

  5. Autogenic Drainage in Children With Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Corten, Lieselotte; Morrow, Brenda M

    2017-04-01

    Airway clearance is an essential part of the management of cystic fibrosis (CF) as it facilitates clearance of viscous pulmonary secretions. This review aimed to determine the effect of autogenic drainage (AD) and assisted autogenic drainage (AAD) compared with no, sham, or other types of airway clearance in children with CF. Two pediatric randomized cross-over trials were identified on the use of AD in children with CF; no studies were available on the use of AAD. In one study AD had a positive influence on the Huang score, and is preferred over postural drainage in this population. We could not determine the efficacy of AD and AAD in children with CF. We recommend the implementation of pediatric-specific randomized controlled trials with adequate sample sizes, appropriate clinical outcome measures, and analysis of adverse effects.

  6. Genetic therapies for cystic fibrosis lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Sinn, Patrick L.; Anthony, Reshma M.; McCray, Paul B.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of gene therapy for cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease is to efficiently and safely express the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in the appropriate pulmonary cell types. Although CF patients experience multi-organ disease, the chronic bacterial lung infections and associated inflammation are the primary cause of shortened life expectancy. Gene transfer-based therapeutic approaches are feasible, in part, because the airway epithelium is directly accessible by aerosol delivery or instillation. Improvements in standard delivery vectors and the development of novel vectors, as well as emerging technologies and new animal models, are propelling exciting new research forward. Here, we review recent developments that are advancing this field of investigation. PMID:21422098

  7. Scoliosis in cystic fibrosis - an appraisal

    SciTech Connect

    Paling, M.R.; Spasovsky-Chernick, M.

    1982-03-01

    An unusually high prevalence (10%) of scoliosis is described in a series of 151 patients aged four years and older with cystic fibrosis. The scolioses were of the late onset (juvenile and adolescent) type, being typically thoracic with the curve convex to the right, although there was no significant preference for either sex. No direct relationship was found between the spinal curvature and the severity or distribution of the lung disease, although the worse scolioses tended to occur in patients with relatively severe pulmonary involvement. There was no evidence of metabolic bone disease as a predisposing cause. Some indication of a familial tendency towards scoliosis was apparent, and a genetic or constitutional basis is postulated with an unknown precipitating factor.

  8. Global impact of bronchiectasis and cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Redondo, Margarida; Keyt, Holly; Dhar, Raja

    2016-01-01

    Educational aims To recognise the clinical and radiological presentation of the spectrum of diseases associated with bronchiectasis. To understand variation in the aetiology, microbiology and burden of bronchiectasis and cystic fibrosis across different global healthcare systems. Bronchiectasis is the term used to refer to dilatation of the bronchi that is usually permanent and is associated with a clinical syndrome of cough, sputum production and recurrent respiratory infections. It can be caused by a range of inherited and acquired disorders, or may be idiopathic in nature. The most well recognised inherited disorder in Western countries is cystic fibrosis (CF), an autosomal recessive condition that leads to progressive bronchiectasis, bacterial infection and premature mortality. Both bronchiectasis due to CF and bronchiectasis due to other conditions are placing an increasing burden on healthcare systems internationally. Treatments for CF are becoming more effective leading to more adult patients with complex healthcare needs. Bronchiectasis not due to CF is becoming increasingly recognised, particularly in the elderly population. Recognition is important and can lead to identification of the underlying cause, appropriate treatment and improved quality of life. The disease is highly diverse in its presentation, requiring all respiratory physicians to have knowledge of the different “bronchiectasis syndromes”. The most common aetiologies and presenting syndromes vary depending on geography, with nontuberculous mycobacterial disease predominating in some parts of North America, post-infectious and idiopathic disease predominating in Western Europe, and post-tuberculosis bronchiectasis dominating in South Asia and Eastern Europe. Ongoing global collaborative studies will greatly advance our understanding of the international impact of bronchiectasis and CF. PMID:28210295

  9. Energy intake and nutrition counseling in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, V S; Mangrum, P J

    1982-02-01

    Historically, it has been thought that the patient with cystic fibrosis (CF) has a voracious appetite. It is now becoming apparent that many patients do not have caloric intakes which meet their full energy requirements. Our study of CF patient, utilizing, a five-day written record of food consumptions and direct observation, supports this finding and points out the need for further nutritional counseling in providing optimal care for these patients. The cause of increased nutrient requirements and considerations for individualization of counseling are briefly discussed.

  10. Screening for cystic fibrosis: what every NP should know.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Krysta N

    2013-09-10

    In a chronic childhood disease such as cystic fibrosis, it is important for nurse practitioners to be knowledgeable about the disease process, methods of mutation identification, and diagnostic criteria. Multiple studies have shown improved prognosis for patients diagnosed early.

  11. Complementary and alternative medicine use in children with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Giangioppo, Sandra; Kalaci, Odion; Radhakrishnan, Arun; Fleischer, Erin; Itterman, Jennifer; Lyttle, Brian; Price, April; Radhakrishnan, Dhenuka

    2016-11-01

    To estimate the overall prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine use among children with cystic fibrosis, determine specific modalities used, predictors of use and subjective helpfulness or harm from individual modalities. Of 53 children attending the cystic fibrosis clinic in London, Ontario (100% recruitment), 79% had used complementary and alternative medicine. The most commonly used modalities were air purifiers, humidifiers, probiotics, and omega-3 fatty acids. Family complementary and alternative medicine use was the only independent predictor of overall use. The majority of patients perceived benefit from specific modalities for cystic fibrosis symptoms. Given the high frequency and number of modalities used and lack of patient and disease characteristics predicting use, we recommend that health care providers should routinely ask about complementary and alternative medicine among all pediatric cystic fibrosis patients and assist patients in understanding the potential benefits and risks to make informed decisions about its use. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Modular microfluidic system as a model of cystic fibrosis airways

    PubMed Central

    Skolimowski, M.; Weiss Nielsen, M.; Abeille, F.; Skafte-Pedersen, P.; Sabourin, D.; Fercher, A.; Papkovsky, D.; Molin, S.; Taboryski, R.; Sternberg, C.; Dufva, M.; Geschke, O.; Emnéus, J.

    2012-01-01

    A modular microfluidic airways model system that can simulate the changes in oxygen tension in different compartments of the cystic fibrosis (CF) airways was designed, developed, and tested. The fully reconfigurable system composed of modules with different functionalities: multichannel peristaltic pumps, bubble traps, gas exchange chip, and cell culture chambers. We have successfully applied this system for studying the antibiotic therapy of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the bacteria mainly responsible for morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis, in different oxygen environments. Furthermore, we have mimicked the bacterial reinoculation of the aerobic compartments (lower respiratory tract) from the anaerobic compartments (cystic fibrosis sinuses) following an antibiotic treatment. This effect is hypothesised as the one on the main reasons for recurrent lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients. PMID:23908680

  13. Slower rise of exhaled breath temperature in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Bade, Geetanjali; Gupta, Sumita; Kabra, Sushil Kumar; Talwar, Anjana

    2015-02-01

    To measure exhaled breath temperature in patients with cystic fibrosis. 17 patients (6-18 years) with cystic fibrosis and 15 age- and gender-matched healthy controls were recruited in this cross sectional study. Exhaled breath temperature was measured in subjects recruited in both the groups with a device X-halo and analyzed as plateau temperature achieved and rate of temperature rise. Patients with cystic fibrosis showed no significant difference in plateau temperature [34.4(32.3-34.6) versus 33.9 (33.0-34.4)oC; P=0.35] while mean (SEM.) rate of temperature rise was significantly less in patients [0.09 (0.01) versus 0.14 (0.02) ƼC/s ; P=0.04] as compared to controls. There was a slower rise of exhaled breath temperature in patients with cystic fibrosis whereas plateau temperature was not significantly different from controls.

  14. Cystic fibrosis in adults. From researcher to practitioner.

    PubMed Central

    Marelich, G P; Cross, C E

    1996-01-01

    The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation currently tracks about 20,000 Americans with cystic fibrosis, an autosomal recessive genetic disease that leads to multisystem complications. With the institution of better therapeutic regimens over the past 2 decades, more patients with this disease are surviving to adulthood. Within the past decade, both clinical and basic science research in the field of cystic fibrosis has progressed at a rapid rate. The intent of this review is to introduce readers to the molecular, cellular, and systemic disorders of this disease. We discuss treatment strategies involving antibiotics, nutrition, immune-response mediators, chest physiotherapy, and sputum-active agents with respect to the airway dysfunction of cystic fibrosis. Other common complications, recent developments, transplantation, and gene therapy are also reviewed. PMID:8732732

  15. Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes: a distinct condition.

    PubMed

    Cano Megías, Marta; González Albarrán, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most common fatal inherited autosomal recessive disease in Caucasians, affecting approximately one out of every 2,000 births. Survival of patients with cystic fibrosis has significantly improved due to advances in respiratory and nutritional care, and their current average life expectancy is 30-40 years. Development of cystic fibrosis-related diabetes is a comorbidity that increases with age and may reach a prevalence up to 50% in adults. Its development is associated to impaired lung function and nutritional status, and early diagnosis and treatment are therefore essential to improve quality of life and performance status. Insulin therapy for diabetes and other early carbohydrate metabolism disorders may improve lung function and nutritional status of patients with cystic fibrosis.

  16. Treatment and prognosis of rectal prolapse in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Stern, R C; Izant, R J; Boat, T F; Wood, R E; Matthews, L W; Doershuk, C F

    1982-04-01

    Rectal prolapse occurred in 112 (18.5%) of 605 cystic fibrosis patients. In 48 patients prolapse preceded diagnosis of cystic fibrosis, but physicians (pediatricians, pediatric and general surgeons, and proctologists) rarely appreciated its importance as a symptom of this disease. Prolapses frequently cease with institution of pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy following diagnosis of cystic fibrosis. However, even when the disease remains undiagnosed, the symptom is often transient and frequently resolves at 3-5 yr of age. Prolapse occurring initially after cystic fibrosis is diagnosed rarely responds to manipulation of diet or enzyme doses. Many patients develop a method of reduction which involves voluntary abdominal, perineal, and gluteal muscles and does not require manual pressure on the prolapsed segment. Most patients do not need specific treatment for the prolapse. Surgery is rarely necessary. A sweat test should be obtained on any child who has had even a single episode of rectal prolapse.

  17. Reduced upper airway nitric oxide in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Balfour-Lynn, I M; Laverty, A; Dinwiddie, R

    1996-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) produced within the respiratory tract is detectable in exhaled and nasal air. Its synthesis may be induced by inflammatory cytokines and reduced by glucocorticoids. Increased concentrations have been found in asthma and bronchiectasis. In this study, NO concentrations were determined in 63 children with cystic fibrosis, of whom 13 were on inhaled steroids (mean age 13.3 years) and 50 were not (mean age 12.3 years); 57 normal children (mean age 12.2 years) were also studied. NO was measured by chemiluminescence analyser, exhaled NO following a relaxed vital capacity manoeuvre, and nasal NO with the breath held following a full inspiration. Mean concentration of exhaled NO in cystic fibrosis patients (no steroids) was 4.7 parts per billion (ppb) (95% confidence interval (CI) 4.0 to 5.3); this did not differ from values in normal children (mean 4.8 ppb, 95% CI 3.8 to 5.8) or in cystic fibrosis patients on inhaled steroids (mean 3.6 ppb, 95% CI 2.5 to 4.8). Nasal concentrations were significantly lower in cystic fibrosis patients, with or without inhaled steroids, than in normal children (cystic fibrosis, no inhaled steroids: 460 ppb, 95% CI 399 to 520; cystic fibrosis, inhaled steroids: 522 ppb, 95% CI 313 to 730, v normal children: 1024 ppb, 95% CI 896 to 1152, p < 0.0001). Considering the inflammatory nature of cystic fibrosis, it is surprising exhaled NO levels were not increased, but this may have been due to alteration in NO diffusion through thick mucus. The low nasal NO concentrations, which are probably the result of impaired flow from the paranasal sinuses, may contribute to the recurrent respiratory infections typical of cystic fibrosis. PMID:8984918

  18. Respiratory infections in patients with cystic fibrosis undergoing lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Leonard J; Noone, Peadar G

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is an inherited disease characterised by chronic respiratory infections associated with bronchiectasis. Lung transplantation has helped to extend the lives of patients with cystic fibrosis who have advanced lung disease. However, persistent, recurrent, and newly acquired infections can be problematic. Classic cystic fibrosis-associated organisms, such as Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, are generally manageable post-transplantation, and are associated with favourable outcomes. Burkholderia cenocepacia poses particular challenges, although other Burkholderia species are less problematic. Despite concerns about non-tuberculous mycobacteria, especially Mycobacterium abscessus, post-transplantation survival has not been definitively shown to be less than average in patients with these infections. Fungal species can be prevalent before and after transplantation and are associated with high morbidity, so should be treated aggressively. Appropriate viral screening and antiviral prophylaxis are necessary to prevent infection with and reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus and cytomegalovirus and their associated complications. Awareness of drug pharmacokinetics and interactions in cystic fibrosis is crucial to prevent toxic effects and subtherapeutic or supratherapeutic drug dosing. With the large range of potential infectious organisms in patients with cystic fibrosis, infection control in hospital and outpatient settings is important. Despite its complexity, lung transplantation in the cystic fibrosis population is safe, with good outcomes if the clinician is aware of all the potential pathogens and remains vigilant by means of surveillance and proactive treatment.

  19. Mechanisms of gastro-oesophageal reflux in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Cucchiara, S; Santamaria, F; Andreotti, M R; Minella, R; Ercolini, P; Oggero, V; de Ritis, G

    1991-01-01

    Abnormal degrees of gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) were detected by 24 hour intraoesophageal pH measurement in 12 of 14 children (mean age 7.9 years; range 5 months-16 years) affected by cystic fibrosis and complaining of symptoms suggesting GOR. These patients underwent combined recording of distal oesophageal motility and intraluminal pH in order to investigate mechanisms of GOR. Inappropriate lower oesophageal sphincter relaxation was the most common mechanism of reflux in all patients. Other mechanisms (appropriate relaxation or lowered pressure of the lower oesophageal sphincter, increased intragastric pressure) were detected less frequently. Frequency of inappropriate lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations was significantly higher in patients with cystic fibrosis than in other study groups (symptomatic GOR, GOR disease complicated by respiratory complaints). Inappropriate lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations occurred with the same frequency in patients with cystic fibrosis and in a group of children with GOR disease complicated by oesophagitis. Abnormalities of distal oesophageal contractions such as decreased amplitude or uncoordinated waves were also recorded in cystic fibrosis patients. Seven patients with cystic fibrosis completed a therapeutic trial for eight weeks consisting of postural treatment and oral cisapride, a new prokinetic drug. The oesophageal acid exposure improved in only three patients. We conclude that pathologic GOR is commonly associated with cystic fibrosis. The predominant reflux mechanism in these patients is a transient inappropriate lower oesophageal sphincter relaxation rather than a low steady state basal lower oesophageal sphincter pressure. PMID:2039253

  20. The clinical spectrum of chronic appendiceal abscess in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Allen, E D; Pfaff, J K; Taussig, L M; McCoy, K S

    1992-10-01

    To describe the varied characteristics seen in patients with cystic fibrosis who develop chronic abscess formation secondary to unrecognized appendicitis. Patient series. Cystic Fibrosis Care Centers in Columbus, Ohio, and Tucson, Ariz. Five patients with cystic fibrosis who developed chronic abdominal abscesses secondary to occult appendicitis are described. Two patients developed fistula formation with purulent fluid drainage before diagnosis. One patient developed an extensive psoas abscess. Another presented with prolonged fever of unknown origin. These patients were identified by retrospective review of the past 20-year experience at two Cystic Fibrosis Care Centers. Development of chronic abdominal abscess related to unrecognized appendicitis is a rare but important complication in patients with cystic fibrosis. Prompt diagnosis depends on physician familiarity with the varied presentations of this entity. Diagnostic abdominal computed tomography and/or ultrasonography should particularly be considered when patients with cystic fibrosis present with pain, mass, or drainage from the right flank; prolonged fever; a limp; or failure of suspected meconium ileus equivalent syndrome to respond promptly to cathartic measures.

  1. Hormonal abnormalities of the pancreas and gut in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Adrian, T E; McKiernan, J; Johnstone, D I; Hiller, E J; Vyas, H; Sarson, D L; Bloom, S R

    1980-09-01

    We have investigated the effect of cystic fibrosis on alimentary hormones in 10 children by measuring the pancreatic and gut hormone rsponse to a milk drink. Plasma insulin and gastric inhibitory peptide were both significantly reduced (P < 0.05 and P < 0.005, respectively, at 15 min) in the patients with cystic fibrosis, compared with controls, even though the early glucose rise was greater in the former group (P < 0.05 at 15 min). Fasting levels of pancreatic polypeptide were significantly lower in the fibrocystic children (P < 0.01), and the normal response to milk was completely abolished in these patients (P < 0.001). Fasting plasma enteroglucagon concentrations were grossly abolished in the cystic fibrosis patients (P < 0.001) and these remained elevated throughout the test. No significant differences were seen in basal or postmilk responses of plasma glucagon, gastrin, secretin, vasoactive intestinal peptide, or motilin in cystic fibrosis. It would thus appear that the pancreatic polypeptide cell is more susceptible to the effects of the disease process than the beta or alpha cell in cystic fibrosis. Some aspects of the abnormalities in the gastrointestinal endocrine system were similar to those seen in celiac disease and tropical sprue and may, therefore, effect a similar hormonal response in these patients with cystic fibrosis to those with mucosal damage.

  2. Management of the Upper Airway in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Illing, Elisa A.; Woodworth, Bradford A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review Upper airway disease engenders significant morbidity for patients with cystic fibrosis and is increasingly recognized as having a much greater role in pulmonary outcomes and quality of life than originally believed. Widespread disparate therapeutic strategies for cystic fibrosis chronic rhinosinusitis underscore the absence of a standardized treatment paradigm. This review outlines the most recent evidence-based trends in the management of upper airway disease in cystic fibrosis. Recent Findings The unified airway theory proposes that the sinuses are a focus of initial bacterial colonization which seeds the lower airway and may play a large role in maintaining lung infections. Mounting evidence suggests more aggressive treatment of the sinuses may confer significant improvement in pulmonary disease and quality of life outcomes in cystic fibrosis patients. However, there is a lack of high-level evidence regarding medical and surgical management of cystic fibrosis chronic rhinosinusitis that makes generalizations difficult. Summary Well designed clinical trials with long-term follow-up concerning medical and surgical interventions for cystic fibrosis sinus disease are required to establish standardized treatment protocols, but increased interest in the sinuses as a bacterial reservoir for pulmonary infections has generated considerable attention. PMID:25250804

  3. Rhinosinusitis in cystic fibrosis: not a simple story.

    PubMed

    Babinski, Dariusz; Trawinska-Bartnicka, Maria

    2008-05-01

    Chronic inflammation of sinuses and nasal mucosa is found in 74-100% patients suffering from cystic fibrosis, whereas nasal polyps in 6-44% patients. The aim of this paper is to assess rhinosinusitis types taking into account the forms of cystic fibrosis and the kind of CFTR gene mutation. The author presents material of 126 cystic fibrosis patients, 90 with typical clinical features and 36 with atypical phenotype. Genetic tests were carried out to determine the genotype of CFTR gene. The sample was divided into four groups according to the genotype effect on the chloride canal function. Cytological examination of nasal mucosa was carried out in all the patients. In 71.5% of patients with cystic fibrosis, infectious chronic non-specific rhinosinusitis was found. Other types of rhinosinusitis--acute infectious, chronic allergic and non-allergic with eosinophilia were found in 21.4% of patients, whereas in 7.1% of patients no clinical symptoms of rhinosinusitis were found. Nasal polyps were found in 23 (18.3%) patients with cystic fibrosis: in 21 patients with a typical form and in 2 patients with an atypical form. Nasal polyps were more frequent in groups with the genotype consisting of both "strong" mutations than in the group with unknown or "mild" mutations. Rhinosinusitis in cystic fibrosis patients is not homogenous pathology. Infectious chronic non-specific rhinosinusitis is found the most frequently, but other forms of rhinosinusitis appear quite often and they require proper treatment.

  4. Increased oral bioavailability of ciprofloxacin in cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed Central

    Christensson, B A; Nilsson-Ehle, I; Ljungberg, B; Lindblad, A; Malmborg, A S; Hjelte, L; Strandvik, B

    1992-01-01

    The altered pharmacokinetic properties of, e.g., aminoglycosides in cystic fibrosis patients have to be considered when pulmonary exacerbations are treated. Since reported data on ciprofloxacin, a fluorinated quinolone, are conflicting, we compared intravenous and oral administration in cystic fibrosis patients when treating them for mild symptoms of pulmonary infection. All of the patients were colonized with Pseudomonas species. Ciprofloxacin was administered orally (15 mg/kg of body weight) or intravenously (6 mg/kg) twice a day for at least 10 days during separate treatment periods. Five healthy volunteers received single intravenous and oral doses. Pharmacokinetic evaluations were performed at first dose and at steady state. The results showed that cystic fibrosis patients have increased oral bioavailability of ciprofloxacin (80% in cystic fibrosis patients versus 57% in volunteers) and increased total clearance (688 ml/min in CF patients versus 528 ml/min in volunteers). Our data indicate that the pharmacokinetic properties of ciprofloxacin are altered in cystic fibrosis patients with mild symptoms of pulmonary exacerbations and that the changes most probably are due to cystic fibrosis per se or to the impact of chronic infection. PMID:1489195

  5. US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and European Cystic Fibrosis Society consensus recommendations for the management of non-tuberculous mycobacteria in individuals with cystic fibrosis: executive summary

    PubMed Central

    Olivier, Kenneth N; Saiman, Lisa; Daley, Charles L; Herrmann, Jean-Louis; Nick, Jerry A; Noone, Peadar G; Bilton, Diana; Corris, Paul; Gibson, Ronald L; Hempstead, Sarah E; Koetz, Karsten; Sabadosa, Kathryn A; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Smyth, Alan R; van Ingen, Jakko; Wallace, Richard J; Winthrop, Kevin L; Marshall, Bruce C; Haworth, Charles S

    2016-01-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are ubiquitous environmental organisms that can cause chronic pulmonary infection, particularly in individuals with pre-existing inflammatory lung disease, such as cystic fibrosis (CF). Pulmonary disease (PD) caused by NTM has emerged as a major threat to the health of individuals with CF, but remains difficult to diagnose and problematic to treat. In response to this challenge, the US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (CFF) and the European Cystic Fibrosis Society (ECFS) convened a panel of 19 experts to develop consensus recommendations for the screening, investigation, diagnosis and management of NTM-PD in individuals with CF. PICO (population, intervention, comparison, outcome) methodology and systematic literature reviews were employed to inform draft recommendations, which were then modified to achieve consensus and subsequently circulated for public consultation within the USA and European CF communities. We have thus generated a series of pragmatic, evidence-based recommendations as an initial step in optimising management for this challenging condition. PMID:26678435

  6. Expression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator corrects defective chloride channel regulation in cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rich, Devra P.; Anderson, Matthew P.; Gregory, Richard J.; Cheng, Seng H.; Paul, Sucharita; Jefferson, Douglas M.; McCann, John D.; Klinger, Katherine W.; Smith, Alan E.; Welsh, Michael J.

    1990-09-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) was expressed in cultured cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells and Cl- channel activation assessed in single cells using a fluorescence microscopic assay and the patch-clamp technique. Expression of CFTR, but not of a mutant form of CFTR (ΔF508), corrected the Cl- channel defect. Correction of the phenotypic defect demonstrates a causal relationship between mutations in the CFTR gene and defective Cl- transport which is the hallmark of the disease.

  7. Facilitating Positive Psychosocial Adaptation in Children with Cystic Fibrosis by Increasing Family Communication and Problem-Solving Skills. A Research Report to the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stabler, Brian; And Others

    This study tested the effects of two group-oriented supportive and educational approaches on the parents of children with cystic fibrosis (CF). Thirteen families were randomly assigned either to a group which received information on medical and technical aspects of CF or to a group which received instruction in communication skills in addition to…

  8. Facilitating Positive Psychosocial Adaptation in Children with Cystic Fibrosis by Increasing Family Communication and Problem-Solving Skills. A Research Report to the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stabler, Brian; And Others

    This study tested the effects of two group-oriented supportive and educational approaches on the parents of children with cystic fibrosis (CF). Thirteen families were randomly assigned either to a group which received information on medical and technical aspects of CF or to a group which received instruction in communication skills in addition to…

  9. Active cycle of breathing technique for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    McKoy, Naomi A; Saldanha, Ian J; Odelola, Olaide A; Robinson, Karen A

    2012-12-12

    People with cystic fibrosis experience chronic airway infections as a result of mucus build up within the lungs. Repeated infections often cause lung damage and disease. Airway clearance therapies aim to improve mucus clearance, increase sputum production, and improve airway function. The active cycle of breathing technique (ACBT) is an airway clearance method that uses a cycle of techniques to loosen airway secretions including breathing control, thoracic expansion exercises, and the forced expiration technique. To compare the clinical effectiveness of ACBT with other airway clearance therapies in cystic fibrosis. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis Trials Register, compiled from electronic database searches and handsearching of journals and conference abstract books. We also searched the reference lists of relevant articles and reviews.Date of last search: 02 August 2012. Randomised or quasi-randomised controlled clinical studies, including cross-over studies, comparing ACBT with other airway clearance therapies in cystic fibrosis. Two review authors independently screened each article, abstracted data and assessed the risk of bias of each study. Sixty studies were identified of which 18 (375 participants) met the inclusion criteria. Five randomised controlled studies (127 participants) were included in the meta-analysis; four were of cross-over design. The 13 remaining studies were cross-over studies with inadequate reports for complete assessment.Included studies compared ACBT to autogenic drainage, airway oscillating devices, high frequency chest compression devices, conventional chest physiotherapy, and positive expiratory pressure. Patient preference varied: more patients preferred autogenic drainage over ACBT; more preferred ACBT over airway oscillating devices; and more were comfortable with ACBT versus high frequency chest compression. No significant difference was seen in sputum weight, lung function, or oxygen saturation between ACBT and autogenic

  10. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator-modifying medications: the future of cystic fibrosis treatment.

    PubMed

    Pettit, Rebecca S

    2012-01-01

    To review and evaluate cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) modulators for the treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF). Literature was accessed through MEDLINE (1977-January 2012), the Cochrane Library, and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (1977-March 2012). Search terms included ivacaftor, VX-770, VX-809, ataluren, PTC 124, CFTR modulator, and cystic fibrosis. All English-language articles identified from the data sources were evaluated for inclusion. Clinical trials and relevant review articles were evaluated for each CFTR modulator. CF is caused by a mutation in the gene that encodes for the CFTR protein; mutations can be separated into 5 different classes. Ivacaftor is a new CFTR potentiator that helps the CFTR channel open properly in patients with the CFTR mutation, G551D. Patients in one study had significant decreases in sweat chloride values and increases in pulmonary function tests. Ivacaftor was approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to be taken orally at a dose of 150 mg twice a day in G551D CF patients older than 6 years. Additional studies are investigating the use of ivacaftor in other gating mutations and in younger patients. VX-809 is a CFTR corrector that modulates the folding and trafficking of CFTR. VX-809 was originally studied alone in patients with F508del mutation but is now being used in combination with ivacaftor in Phase 2 studies. Ataluren allows the read through of premature stop codons, and studies in patients with CF with nonsense mutations show an increase in chloride transportation. Ataluren requires 3 times a day dosing and is currently in a Phase 3 placebo-controlled study. Three new agents, ivacaftor, VX-809, and ataluren, target the basic defects in CFTR production. Ivacaftor was recently FDA approved, while the other 2 agents are still in clinical trials. Patients with CF will benefit from personalized medicine based on their specific genotype.

  11. Abnormal electrochemical skin conductance in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hubert, Dominique; Brunswick, Philippe; Calvet, Jean-Henri; Dusser, Daniel; Fajac, Isabelle

    2011-01-01

    Electrochemical skin conductance measurement is an active electrophysiologic method in which incremental low direct voltage is applied on the skin. It generates a current due to reverse iontophoresis which previous studies suggested to be mostly related to chloride anion movements. As sweat chloride movements upon electric stimulation were likely to be impaired in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, we designed a proof-of-concept study to measure electrochemical skin conductance in CF patients and control subjects and to test the ability of this method to discriminate CF from controls. Electrochemical skin conductance was measured in 41 adult patients with classical CF and 20 healthy control subjects. Patients placed their hands and feet on nickel electrodes and an incremental low direct voltage was applied on the anode during 2min. The resulting voltage on the cathode and the current generated between anode and cathode were measured and from them, two electrochemical skin conductance variables were calculated: ESC, obtained when a low voltage of 1.6V was applied, and dESC which took into account electrochemical skin conductances obtained when low and high voltages were applied. ESC measurements on hands and feet were significantly different in CF patients (on feet: 75±10μSi), as compared with control subjects (62±13μSi, p<0.0001); dESC was also significantly different and more discriminative in CF patients (on feet: 34±24μSi), as compared with control subjects (93±24μSi, p<0.0001). dESC measurement provided a diagnostic specificity of 1 and a sensitivity of 0.93. These results show that electrochemical skin conductance which is easily and rapidly measured is abnormal in CF patients. Trial registry name in the European Clinical Trials Database (eudraCT): "EZSCAN MUCO1: Mesure de la conductance cutanée par chronoampérométrie", N°EUDRACT: 2007-A00221-52. Copyright © 2010 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Totally implantable vascular access devices for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    A-Rahman, A; Spencer, D

    2003-01-01

    Totally implantable vascular access devices are widely used in people with cystic fibrosis to provide intermittent venous access for therapeutic infusions. Their use is associated with some complications such as thrombosis, embolism and infection. To assess if totally implantable venous access devices are a safe and effective route for providing venous access for intermittent administration of intravenous antibiotics in people with cystic fibrosis, also to assess strategies to reduce possible complications of totally implantable venous access devices (e.g. anticoagulants to reduce the risk of thrombosis). We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group trials register which comprises references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches, handsearching relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. Date of the most recent search: May 2003. Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials which compared the use of totally implantable venous access devices in people with cystic fibrosis to other means of vascular access, trials which compared the different types of these devices against each other and trials which assessed strategies to reduce complications of these devices. No relevant trials were identified. No trials were included in this review. Totally implantable vascular access devices are widely used in people with cystic fibrosis to provide intermittent venous access for therapeutic infusions. Reports of their use in people with cystic fibrosis suggest that they are safe and effective. These reports also suggest that certain interventions might reduce the risk of complications; however, it is disappointing that these reports have not been assessed by randomised controlled trials. This systematic review identifies the need for a multicentre randomised controlled trial assessing both efficacy and possible adverse effects of totally implantable venous access devices in cystic fibrosis.

  13. Totally implantable vascular access devices for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    A-Rahman, Amel K M; Spencer, David

    2012-05-16

    Totally implantable vascular access devices are widely used in people with cystic fibrosis to provide intermittent venous access for therapeutic infusions. Their use is associated with some complications such as thrombosis, embolism and infection. To assess if totally implantable venous access devices provide a safe and effective route for venous access for intermittent administration of intravenous antibiotics in people with cystic fibrosis. Also to assess strategies to reduce possible complications of totally implantable venous access devices (e.g. anticoagulants to reduce the risk of thrombosis). We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register which comprises references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches, handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings.Date of the most recent search: 05 April 2012. Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials which compared the use of totally implantable venous access devices in people with cystic fibrosis to other means of vascular access, trials which compared the different types of these devices against each other and trials which assessed strategies to reduce complications of these devices. No relevant trials were identified. No trials were included in this review. Totally implantable vascular access devices are widely used in people with cystic fibrosis to provide intermittent venous access for therapeutic infusions. Reports of their use in people with cystic fibrosis suggest that they are safe and effective. These reports also suggest that certain interventions might reduce the risk of complications; however, it is disappointing that these reports have not been assessed by randomised controlled trials. This systematic review identifies the need for a multicentre randomised controlled trial assessing both efficacy and possible adverse effects of totally implantable venous access devices in cystic fibrosis.

  14. Anaerobic exercise in pediatric cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Klijn, Peter H; Terheggen-Lagro, Suzanne W; Van Der Ent, Cornelis K; Van Der Net, Janjaap; Kimpen, Jan L; Helders, Paul J

    2003-09-01

    Anaerobic fitness is important for daily functioning of children with cystic fibrosis (CF). The aim of this study was to assess the determinants of anaerobic performance in CF. Anaerobic performance was measured in 39 children with CF (mean age, 13.2 +/- 1.8 (SD) years, forced expired volume in 1 sec (FEV(1)) 81.6 +/- 22.1% predicted), using a Wingate anaerobic test. Significant associations were found for peak power (PP) and mean power (MP) with fat-free mass (FFM) body weight, body mass index, maximal isometric muscle force, and aerobic capacity. Pulmonary function was correlated with anaerobic indices when controlled for FFM. Multiple regression analysis indicated that FFM and FEV(1) accounted for 82% and 86% of the variability in PP and MP, respectively. Patients with moderate CF (FEV(1) < 80%), as compared to mild CF (FEV(1) >/= 80%), had higher PP (difference = 85 W, 95% CI = 27-144 W) and MP (difference = 53 W, 95% CI = 42-63 W) at equivalent FFM. Our results indicate that FFM and pulmonary function are important determinants of anaerobic exercise performance in children with CF. With progression of pulmonary disease, anaerobic performance may be enhanced. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. The Evolution of Cystic Fibrosis Care

    PubMed Central

    Ferkol, Thomas W.

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common life-limiting inherited illness of whites. Most of the morbidity and mortality in CF stems from impaired mucociliary clearance leading to chronic, progressive airways obstruction and damage. Significant progress has been made in the care of patients with CF, with advances focused on improving mucociliary clearance, minimizing inflammatory damage, and managing infections; these advances include new antimicrobial therapies, mucolytic and osmotic agents, and antiinflammatory treatments. More recently, researchers have targeted disease-causing mutations using therapies to promote gene transcription and improve channel function, which has led to impressive physiologic changes in some patients. As we develop more advanced, allele-directed therapies for the management of CF, it will become increasingly important to understand the specific genetic and environmental interactions that cause the significant heterogeneity of lung disease seen in the CF population. This understanding of CF endotypes will allow for more targeted, personalized therapies for future patients. This article reviews the genetic and molecular basis of CF lung disease, the treatments currently available, and novel therapies that are in development. PMID:25764168

  16. Cystic fibrosis and estrogens: a perfect storm

    PubMed Central

    Zeitlin, Pamela L.

    2008-01-01

    Irreversible destruction and widening of the airways due to acquired infections or genetic mutations as well as those of unknown cause are more severe in females. Differences between male and female anatomy, behavior, and hormonal state have been proposed to explain the increased incidence and severity in females with airway disease such as cystic fibrosis (CF); however, a mechanism to explain a sex-related difference has remained elusive. In this issue of the JCI, Coakley et al. report that elevations in the major estrogen hormone in humans — 17β-estradiol — reduce Ca2+-activated Cl– secretion by airway epithelial cells in culture, thereby disrupting ion and water balance (see the related article beginning on page 4025). They measure a similar diminution of nasal epithelial Ca2+-activated Cl– secretion in women with CF during the menstrual cycle phase at which 17β-estradiol level is at its highest. These data suggest that for about one week of a four-week menstrual cycle, women with CF will have a reduced ability to efficiently clear airway secretions, the buildup of which is a hallmark of CF. The authors suggest that these data warrant the testing of antiestrogen therapy in females with CF and propose an alternative avenue for CF therapeutic development. PMID:19033654

  17. Cystic fibrosis carrier population screening: a review.

    PubMed

    Rowley, P T; Loader, S; Levenkron, J C

    1997-01-01

    Population screening for cystic fibrosis (CF) carriers, now possible because of the cloning of the CFTR gene, merits evaluation because CF is common, serious, and without satisfactory treatment, and because prenatal diagnosis is available. Clinical trials of CF population carrier screening are reviewed. These trials have involved pregnant women, adults of both sexes of reproductive age, or adolescents. Schools, the usual setting for screening programs for adolescents, provide an excellent opportunity for a formal educational component and for comprehensive coverage of the population, but compared to a health-care setting, may entail subtle coercion and may compromise confidentiality. In the case of adults, many say they prefer screening before conception but do not see a physician for evaluation before conception and providers find screening more readily accomplished in the setting of a prenatal visit. Two large U.S. studies of prenatal screening with quite different subject populations and health-care settings encountered few of the adverse outcomes originally predicted for CF carrier population screening.

  18. Colonic disorders in adult cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Chaun, H

    2001-09-01

    By 1996, the median survival of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) in North America had increased to 31 years. With the markedly improved life expectancy, many CF patients are now adults. There is an associated increased risk of certain colonic disorders, and the emergence of other previously unrecognized disorders, in adult CF patients. The distal intestinal obstruction syndrome (DIOS), which is more common in older patients, is a frequent cause of abdominal pain. Intussusception may complicate DIOS; other differential diagnoses include appendiceal disease, volvolus, Crohn's disease, fibrosing colonopathy and colonic carcinoma. The diagnosis of acute appendicitis, although uncommon in patients with CF, is often delayed, and appendiceal abscess is a frequent complication. The prevalence of Crohn's disease in CF has been shown to be 17 times that of the general population. Right-sided microscopic colitis is a recently recognized entity in CF of uncertain clinical significance. Fibrosing colonopathy has been confined mostly to children with CF, attributed to the use of high strength pancreatic enzyme supplements, but it has been reported in three adults. Nine cases of carcinoma of the large intestine have been reported worldwide, associated with an apparent excess risk of digestive tract cancers in CF. Despite high carrier rates of Clostridium difficile in patients with CF, pseudomembranous colitis is distinctly rare, but severe cases complicated by toxic megacolon have been reported. In these patients, watery diarrhea is often absent. Adult CF patients with refractory or unexplained intestinal symptoms merit thorough investigations.

  19. Sodium chloride deficiency in cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Ozçelik, U; Göçmen, A; Kiper, N; Coşkun, T; Yilmaz, E; Ozgüç, M

    1994-11-01

    Sodium chloride deficiency (SCD) was observed within the 1st year of life in 12 of 46 cystic fibrosis (CF) patients between July 1989 and September 1992. All patients showed sweating, loss of appetite, fever, vomiting, irritation, dehydration, weakness, and cyanosis during an attack. Mean plasma sodium, potassium and chloride levels were 122.9 (range 106-135), 2.5 (range 1.6-3.5), and 73.3 (range 60-90) mEq/l respectively. Alkalosis and elevated plasma renin activity were detected in all patients. Of the patients, 50% showed microscopic haematuria, and hypercalciuria was detected in two out of four patients. Low urinary sodium and high urinary potassium were observed in the four examined patients. Increased creatinine, BUN and uric acid values returned to normal with treatment. All the patients were treated initially with intravenous fluids and electrolyte solutions. All patients were less than 7 months of age during the first attack, five received only breast milk and the others breast milk with formula milk. Their oral salt supplement was 2-4 mEq/kg per day, which is recommended for CF patients, but could be deficient in excessively sweating infants. The genotype of these patients might be cause of high salt losses. F508 is the most common mutation with the frequency of 38% in our CF patients with SCD, but the frequency of unknown mutations is high (54%).

  20. Appetite stimulants use in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Samya Z; Drury, Donna

    2008-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disease. It affects multiple body organs. The lungs and pancreas are the most affected which results in progressive lung damage and pancreatic insufficiency. Due to the disease process, CF patients require significantly higher caloric intake than recommended for other individuals. The nutritional goal for CF patients is to achieve normal growth and development and, once genetic potential is reached, to maintain good nutritional status throughout life. Evidence has shown that lung function is closely associated with nutritional status in CF and that nutritional status is an independent predictor of survival. Most CF patients are on a high calorie diet to help achieve normal growth and development and maintain good lung function. Inadequate caloric intake in CF can lead to malnutrition. Malnutrition in CF requires careful, multidisciplinary history taking, physical exam, and overall patient/family assessment. Only by determining the actual cause of the malnutrition can appropriate and safe therapies be used to treat it. Appetite stimulants, although efficacious in treating malnutrition in CF, should only be prescribed if decreased food intake secondary to inadequate appetite is the principal cause of the malnutrition and all other contributing factors have been assessed, ruled-out or treated. In this review, we attempted to summarize the use of several appetite stimulants used in CF and other diseases to improve appetite and maximize caloric intake.

  1. A millennial view of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Dodge, John A

    2015-01-01

    Although only identified as a distinct disease in the 1930s, it was soon apparent that Cystic Fibrosis (CF) had been present, but unrecognised, in European populations for many years - perhaps even centuries [1] . Within a decade of the early descriptions, the autosomal recessive nature of this genetic disease had been clarified, and its clinical features had been expanded. Secondary nutritional deficiencies complicated the underlying condition: the first clear description of CF as "a new disease", which included a speculation about its genetic basis (because there were 2 pairs of sibs in the case series) was published as Vitamin A deficiency in children [2]. The diagnosis was most often made at autopsy. When it was suspected in life, the diagnostic tests used included duodenal intubation to obtain fluid which would show impaired tryptic digestion of the coating of X-Ray film in CF children, and measurement of vitamin A in the blood. Some nutritional improvement could be expected with simple, rather inefficient pancreatic enzyme preparations, but it was not until mid-century that antibiotics began to treat pulmonary infections effectively. As a young doctor in the 1950s I soon became aware that the median age at death for affected children was about one year, and most died before reaching school age. .

  2. The cystic fibrosis lower airways microbial metagenome

    PubMed Central

    Moran Losada, Patricia; Chouvarine, Philippe; Dorda, Marie; Hedtfeld, Silke; Mielke, Samira; Schulz, Angela; Wiehlmann, Lutz

    2016-01-01

    Chronic airway infections determine most morbidity in people with cystic fibrosis (CF). Herein, we present unbiased quantitative data about the frequency and abundance of DNA viruses, archaea, bacteria, moulds and fungi in CF lower airways. Induced sputa were collected on several occasions from children, adolescents and adults with CF. Deep sputum metagenome sequencing identified, on average, approximately 10 DNA viruses or fungi and several hundred bacterial taxa. The metagenome of a CF patient was typically found to be made up of an individual signature of multiple, lowly abundant species superimposed by few disease-associated pathogens, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, as major components. The host-associated signatures ranged from inconspicuous polymicrobial communities in healthy subjects to low-complexity microbiomes dominated by the typical CF pathogens in patients with advanced lung disease. The DNA virus community in CF lungs mainly consisted of phages and occasionally of human pathogens, such as adeno- and herpesviruses. The S. aureus and P. aeruginosa populations were composed of one major and numerous minor clone types. The rare clones constitute a low copy genetic resource that could rapidly expand as a response to habitat alterations, such as antimicrobial chemotherapy or invasion of novel microbes. PMID:27730195

  3. The cystic fibrosis lower airways microbial metagenome.

    PubMed

    Moran Losada, Patricia; Chouvarine, Philippe; Dorda, Marie; Hedtfeld, Silke; Mielke, Samira; Schulz, Angela; Wiehlmann, Lutz; Tümmler, Burkhard

    2016-04-01

    Chronic airway infections determine most morbidity in people with cystic fibrosis (CF). Herein, we present unbiased quantitative data about the frequency and abundance of DNA viruses, archaea, bacteria, moulds and fungi in CF lower airways. Induced sputa were collected on several occasions from children, adolescents and adults with CF. Deep sputum metagenome sequencing identified, on average, approximately 10 DNA viruses or fungi and several hundred bacterial taxa. The metagenome of a CF patient was typically found to be made up of an individual signature of multiple, lowly abundant species superimposed by few disease-associated pathogens, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, as major components. The host-associated signatures ranged from inconspicuous polymicrobial communities in healthy subjects to low-complexity microbiomes dominated by the typical CF pathogens in patients with advanced lung disease. The DNA virus community in CF lungs mainly consisted of phages and occasionally of human pathogens, such as adeno- and herpesviruses. The S. aureus and P. aeruginosa populations were composed of one major and numerous minor clone types. The rare clones constitute a low copy genetic resource that could rapidly expand as a response to habitat alterations, such as antimicrobial chemotherapy or invasion of novel microbes.

  4. Is cystic fibrosis genetic medicine's canary?

    PubMed

    Lindee, Susan; Mueller, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    In 1989 the gene that causes cystic fibrosis (CF) was identified in a search accompanied by intense anticipation that the gene, once discovered, would lead rapidly to gene therapy. Many hoped that the disease would effectively disappear. Those affected were going to inhale vectors packed with functioning genes, which would go immediately to work in the lungs. It was a bewitching image, repeatedly invoked in both scientific and popular texts. Gene therapy clinical trials were carried out with a range of strategies and occasionally success seemed close, but by 1996 the idea that gene therapy for CF would quickly provide a cure was being abandoned by the communities engaged with treatment and research. While conventional wisdom holds that the death of Jesse Gelsinger in an unrelated gene therapy trial in 1999 produced new skepticism about gene therapy, the CF story suggests a different trajectory, and some different lessons. This article considers the rise and fall of gene therapy for CF and suggests that CF may provide a particularly compelling case study of a failed genomic technology, perhaps even of a medical "canary." The story of CF might be a kind of warning to us that genetic medicine may create as many problems as it solves, and that moving forward constructively with these techniques and practices requires many kinds of right information, not just about biology, but also about values, priorities, market forces, uncertainty, and consumer choice.

  5. Tracheal microaspiration in adult cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Ledson, M J; Wilson, G E; Tran, J; Walshaw, M J

    1998-01-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) has been implicated in the aetiology of lung disease. Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients have a high incidence of GOR symptoms with demonstrable episodes of oesophageal acidification. We studied 24-hour ambulatory tracheal and oesophageal pH in 11 CF patients with GOR symptoms to identify any episodes of tracheal acidification and define their temporal relation to oesophageal reflux and respiratory symptoms. 8 patients had evidence of significant GOR (DeMeester score mean 58; range 17-107) and in 6 it was gross (DeMeester score > 30). 4 patients had tracheal acidification (defined as tracheal pH < 5.5): all had greatly raised DeMeester scores. Two patterns of lowered tracheal pH were seen: a gradual drift downwards of tracheal pH to < 5.5 which recovered slowly, and an acute fall in tracheal pH to < 5.5 with rapid recovery. Only one patient had a fall in peak expiratory flow in conjunction with a decline in tracheal pH, and no association was found between the presence of tracheal microaspiration and pulmonary function. We conclude that tracheal acidification occurs in adult CF patients with GOR.

  6. [Italian Cystic Fibrosis Register - Report 2010].

    PubMed

    Amato, Annalisa; Ferrigno, Luigina; Salvatore, Marco; Toccaceli, Virgilia

    2016-01-01

    The Italian National CF Registry (INCFR) is based on the official agreement between the clinicians of the Italian National Referral Centers for Cystic Fibrosis and the researchers of the Istituto Superiore di Sanità (National Center for Rare Diseases; National Center for Epidemiology, Surveillance and Health Care Promotion). OBJECTIVES The main aim of INCFR is to contribute to the improvement in CF patients health care and clinical management through: i. the estimates of CF prevalence and incidence in Italy; ii. the analyses of medium and long term clinical and epidemiological trends of the disesase; iii. the identification of the main health care needs at regional and national level to contribute to the Health Care programmes and to the distribution of resources. MATERIALS AND METHODS Analyses and results described in the present Report are referred to patients in charge to the Italian National Referral Centers for Cystic Fibrosis in 2010. Data were sent by Centers by means of a specific software (Camilla, Ibis Informatica). The Italian National Referral Centers for Cystic Fibrosis sent a total of 5,271 individual records; 1,112 records were excluded from the analyses due to restricted inclusion criteria. The total number of patients included in INCFR for analyses is 4,159. RESULTS INCFR database includes all prevalent cases at 1th January 2010 as well as all new diagnoses done in 2010. The present Report has been organized into 9 sections. 1. Demography: estimated 2010 CF prevalence was 7/100,000 residents in Italy; 52% of the patients were male, CF distribution showed higher frequency in patients aged 7 to 35 years. In 2010, 48.9% of the patients were more than 18 years old. 2. Diagnoses: most of the CF patients were diagnosed before two years of age (66.7%); a significant percentage of patients (11.4%) was diagnosed in adult-age. 3. New diagnoses (2010): new diagnoses were 168. Sixty-five percent of them was diagnosed before the second year of age and 17%in

  7. [Therapeutic advances in cystic fibrosis in 2014].

    PubMed

    Durupt, S; Mazur, S; Reix, P

    2016-02-01

    Twenty-five years after the cystic fibrosis (CF) gene identification, this discovery actually begins to benefit to patients. Increasing our knowledge on CFTR biology, as well as technical progress made in order to screen for new drugs have made therapeutic strategies move an important step forward. It is likely that in the forthcoming years, the panel of molecules available for CF patients will be larger, with new activators and potentiators. The disease by itself may consequently change in its natural history. CF is an example of the so-called personalized medicine, aiming to fit treatment according to patient's genetic background. Ongoing clinical trials may enlarge the actually limited eligible number of CF patients for new drugs such as ivacaftor. Beyond this exciting and promising new therapeutic approach, one may not push symptomatic treatments on the side. Improvements have been made for inhaled antibiotics administration, aiming to simplify patient's life; clinical trials using new molecules able to liquefy mucus or with anti-inflammatory properties are actually underway. One important next step in the care for CF will be to design and conduct early intervention trials in CF infants. Newborn screening program have been widely implanted around the word, and cohorts studies have shown that both functional and structural abnormalities occurred very early, making the therapeutic window of opportunity tight. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. [Early lung disease in cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Fayon, M; Ladipo, Y; Galodé, F; Debelleix, S; Reix, P

    2016-12-01

    Recent data has shown that lung inflammation and infection subvene very early in very young infants with Cystic Fibrosis (CF). This leads to impaired lung function and structural damage, even in asymptomatic children. In the CF-pig model constitutional airway narrowing is present at birth, and is associated with defective mucus migration, and impaired bacterial clearance. At the age of 3 months, 25% of screened CF infants show decreased lung function. Air trapping is also present in 68% and bronchiectasis in 28% of patients. At the same age, the presence of neutrophil elastase in the bronchoalveolar lavage is an ominous sign since it triples the risk of bronchiectasis at the age of 3 years. Since only very few drug therapies have been validated in the preschool children, adapted clinical trials are warranted in this age group. Early interventions may have a huge impact on the natural history of CF, on the condition of not interfering with normal lung growth. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Lessons learned from the cystic fibrosis pig.

    PubMed

    Meyerholz, David K

    2016-07-01

    Deficient function in the anion channel cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator is the fundamental cause for CF. This is a monogenic condition that causes lesions in several organs including the respiratory tract, pancreas, liver, intestines, and reproductive tract. Lung disease is most notable, given it is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in people with CF. Shortly after the identification of CF transmembrane conductance regulator, CF mouse models were developed that did not show spontaneous lung disease as seen in humans, and this spurred development of additional CF animal models. Pig models were considered a leading choice for several reasons including their similarity to humans in respiratory anatomy, physiology, and in size for translational imaging. The first CF pig models were reported in 2008 and have been extremely valuable to help clarify persistent questions in the field and advance understanding of disease pathogenesis. Because CF pigs are susceptible to lung disease like humans, they have direct utility in translational research. In addition, CF pig models are useful to compare and contrast with current CF mouse models, human clinical studies, and even newer CF animal models being characterized. This "triangulation" strategy could help identify genetic differences that underlie phenotypic variations, so as to focus and accelerate translational research.

  10. Infection, inflammation and exercise in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Regular exercise is positively associated with health. It has also been suggested to exert anti-inflammatory effects. In healthy subjects, a single exercise session results in immune cell activation, which is characterized by production of immune modulatory peptides (e.g. IL-6, IL-8), a leukocytosis and enhanced immune cell functions. Upon cessation of exercise, immune activation is followed by a tolerizing phase, characterized by a reduced responsiveness of immune cells. Regular exercise of moderate intensity and duration has been shown to exert anti-inflammatory effects and is associated with a reduced disease incidence and viral infection susceptibility. Specific exercise programs may therefore be used to modify the course of chronic inflammatory and infectious diseases such as cystic fibrosis (CF). Patients with CF suffer from severe and chronic pulmonary infections and inflammation, leading to obstructive and restrictive pulmonary disease, exercise intolerance and muscle cachexia. Inflammation is characterized by a hyper-inflammatory phenotype. Patients are encouraged to engage in exercise programs to maintain physical fitness, quality of life, pulmonary function and health. In this review, we present an overview of available literature describing the association between regular exercise, inflammation and infection susceptibility and discuss the implications of these observations for prevention and treatment of inflammation and infection susceptibility in patients with CF. PMID:23497303

  11. IRON HOMEOSTASIS DURING CYSTIC FIBROSIS PULMONARY EXACERBATION

    PubMed Central

    Gifford, Alex H.; Moulton, Lisa A.; Dorman, Dana B.; Olbina, Gordana; Westerman, Mark; Parker, H. Worth; Stanton, Bruce A.; O’Toole, George A.

    2012-01-01

    Hypoferremia is a marker of disease severity in cystic fibrosis (CF). The effect of systemic antibiotics on iron homeostasis during CF pulmonary exacerbation (CFPE) is unknown. Our central hypotheses were that, by the completion of treatment, serum iron would increase, serum concentrations of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and hepcidin-25, two mediators of hypoferremia, would decrease, and sputum iron would decrease. Methods: Blood and sputum samples were collected from 12 subjects with moderate-to-severe CF (median percent-predicted forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1%) = 29%; median weight = 56 kg) within 24 hours of starting and completing a course of systemic antibiotics. Results: After treatment, subjects showed median FEV1% and body weight improvements of 4.5% and 2.0 kg, respectively (p <0.05). Median serum iron rose by 2.4 μmol/l (p <0.05), but 75% of patients remained hypoferremic. Median serum IL-6 and hepcidin-25 levels fell by 12.1 pg/ml and 37.5 ng/ml, respectively (p <0.05). Median serum erythropoietin (EPO) and hemoglobin levels were unaffected by treatment. We observed a trend toward lower sputum iron content after treatment. Conclusions: Hypoferremia is a salient characteristic of CFPE that improves with waning inflammation. Despite antibiotic treatment, many patients remain hypoferremic and anemic due to ineffective erythropoiesis. PMID:22883617

  12. Viruses in cystic fibrosis patients' airways.

    PubMed

    Billard, Lisa; Le Berre, Rozenn; Pilorgé, Léa; Payan, Christopher; Héry-Arnaud, Geneviève; Vallet, Sophie

    2017-11-01

    Although bacteria have historically been considered to play a major role in cystic fibrosis (CF) airway damage, a strong impact of respiratory viral infections (RVI) is also now recognized. Emerging evidence confirms that respiratory viruses are associated with deterioration of pulmonary function and exacerbation and facilitation of bacterial colonization in CF patients. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the current knowledge on respiratory viruses in CF airways, to discuss the resulting inflammation and RVI response, to determine how to detect the viruses, and to assess their clinical consequences, prevalence, and interactions with bacteria. The most predominant are Rhinoviruses (RVs), significantly associated with CF exacerbation. Molecular techniques, and especially multiplex PCR, help to diagnose viral infections, and the coming rise of metagenomics will extend knowledge of viral populations in the complex ecosystem of CF airways. Prophylaxis and vaccination are currently available only for Respiratory syncytial and Influenza virus (IV), but antiviral molecules are being tested to improve CF patients' care. All the points raised in this review highlight the importance of taking account of RVIs and their potential impact on the CF airway ecosystem.

  13. Lentiviral Vectors and Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Castellani, Stefano; Conese, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a chronic autosomic recessive syndrome, caused by mutations in the CF Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) gene, a chloride channel expressed on the apical side of the airway epithelial cells. The lack of CFTR activity brings a dysregulated exchange of ions and water through the airway epithelium, one of the main aspects of CF lung disease pathophysiology. Lentiviral (LV) vectors, of the Retroviridae family, show interesting properties for CF gene therapy, since they integrate into the host genome and allow long-lasting gene expression. Proof-of-principle that LV vectors can transduce the airway epithelium and correct the basic electrophysiological defect in CF mice has been given. Initial data also demonstrate that LV vectors can be repeatedly administered to the lung and do not give rise to a gross inflammatory process, although they can elicit a T cell-mediated response to the transgene. Future studies will clarify the efficacy and safety profile of LV vectors in new complex animal models with CF, such as ferrets and pigs. PMID:21994643

  14. [Inhaled antibiotic therapy in cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Girón Moreno, Rosa M; Salcedo Posadas, Antonio; Mar Gómez-Punter, Rosa

    2011-06-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most frequent fatal genetically-transmitted disease among Caucasians. Chronic bronchial infection, especially by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, is the main cause of morbidity and mortality in this disease. Aerosolized antibiotic therapy achieves high drug concentrations in the airway with low toxicity, allowing chronic use. Currently, two antibiotics have been approved for inhalation therapy, tobramycin inhalation solution and colistimethate sodium aerosol. There is less evidence from clinical trials for the latter. The main indication for these drugs is chronic bronchial colonization by P. aeruginosa, although there is increasing evidence of the importance of the primary infection by this bacterium, whether treated by oral or intravenous antibiotics or not. More controversial is the use of aerosolized antibiotic therapy in bacterial prophylaxis or respiratory exacerbations. For many years, intravenous formulations of distinct antibiotics for aerosolized use have been employed, which are in distinct phases of research for use in nebulizer therapy. In addition to being used to treat P. aeruginosa infection, aerosolized antibiotics have been used to treat other pathogens such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococus aureus, Mycobacterium abscessus and Aspergillus fumigatus.

  15. Guidelines for Diagnosis of Cystic Fibrosis in Newborns through Older Adults: Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Consensus Report

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Philip M.; Rosenstein, Beryl J.; White, Terry B.; Accurso, Frank J.; Castellani, Carlo; Cutting, Garry R.; Durie, Peter R.; Legrys, Vicky A.; Massie, John; Parad, Richard B.; Rock, Michael J.; Campbell, Preston W.

    2009-01-01

    Newborn screening (NBS) for cystic fibrosis (CF) is increasingly being implemented and is soon likely to be in use throughout the United States, because early detection permits access to specialized medical care and improves outcomes. The diagnosis of CF is not always straightforward, however. The sweat chloride test remains the gold standard for CF diagnosis but does not always give a clear answer. Genotype analysis also does not always provide clarity; more than 1500 mutations have been identified in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, not all of which result in CF. Harmful mutations in the gene can present as a spectrum of pathology ranging from sinusitis in adulthood to severe lung, pancreatic, or liver disease in infancy. Thus, CF identified postnatally must remain a clinical diagnosis. To provide guidance for the diagnosis of both infants with positive NBS results and older patients presenting with an indistinct clinical picture, the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation convened a meeting of experts in the field of CF diagnosis. Their recommendations, presented herein, involve a combination of clinical presentation, laboratory testing, and genetics to confirm a diagnosis of CF. PMID:18639722

  16. Relationships between cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, extracellular nucleotides and cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Marcet, Brice; Boeynaems, Jean-Marie

    2006-12-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is one of the most common lethal autosomal recessive genetic diseases in the Caucasian population, with a frequency of about 1 in 3000 livebirths. CF is due to a mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene encoding the CFTR protein, a cyclic adenosine 5'-monophosphate (cAMP)-regulated chloride channel localized in the apical membrane of epithelial cells. CFTR is a multifunctional protein which, in addition to be a Cl-channel, is also a regulator of multiple ion channels and other proteins. In particular CFTR has been reported to play a role in the outflow of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) from cells, but this remains controversial. Extracellular nucleotides are signaling molecules that regulate ion transport and mucociliary clearance by acting on P2 nucleotide receptors, in particular the P2Y(2) receptor. Nucleotides activating the P2Y(2) receptor represent thus one pharmacotherapeutic strategy to treat CF disease, via improvement of mucus hydration and mucociliary clearance in airways. Phase II clinical trials have recently shown that aerosolized denufosol (INS37217, Inspire(R)) improves pulmonary function in CF patients: denufosol was granted orphan drug status and phase III trials are planned. Here, we review what is known about the relationship between extracellular nucleotides and CFTR, the role of extracellular nucleotides in epithelial pathophysiology and their putative role as therapeutic agents.

  17. Targeting a genetic defect: cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator modulators in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Derichs, Nico

    2013-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by genetic mutations that affect the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. These mutations can impact the synthesis and transfer of the CFTR protein to the apical membrane of epithelial cells, as well as influencing the gating or conductance of chloride and bicarbonate ions through the channel. CFTR dysfunction results in ionic imbalance of epithelial secretions in several organ systems, such as the pancreas, gastrointestinal tract, liver and the respiratory system. Since discovery of the CFTR gene in 1989, research has focussed on targeting the underlying genetic defect to identify a disease-modifying treatment for CF. Investigated management strategies have included gene therapy and the development of small molecules that target CFTR mutations, known as CFTR modulators. CFTR modulators are typically identified by high-throughput screening assays, followed by preclinical validation using cell culture systems. Recently, one such modulator, the CFTR potentiator ivacaftor, was approved as an oral therapy for CF patients with the G551D-CFTR mutation. The clinical development of ivacaftor not only represents a breakthrough in CF care but also serves as a noteworthy example of personalised medicine.

  18. Guidelines for diagnosis of cystic fibrosis in newborns through older adults: Cystic Fibrosis Foundation consensus report.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Philip M; Rosenstein, Beryl J; White, Terry B; Accurso, Frank J; Castellani, Carlo; Cutting, Garry R; Durie, Peter R; Legrys, Vicky A; Massie, John; Parad, Richard B; Rock, Michael J; Campbell, Preston W

    2008-08-01

    Newborn screening (NBS) for cystic fibrosis (CF) is increasingly being implemented and is soon likely to be in use throughout the United States, because early detection permits access to specialized medical care and improves outcomes. The diagnosis of CF is not always straightforward, however. The sweat chloride test remains the gold standard for CF diagnosis but does not always give a clear answer. Genotype analysis also does not always provide clarity; more than 1500 mutations have been identified in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, not all of which result in CF. Harmful mutations in the gene can present as a spectrum of pathology ranging from sinusitis in adulthood to severe lung, pancreatic, or liver disease in infancy. Thus, CF identified postnatally must remain a clinical diagnosis. To provide guidance for the diagnosis of both infants with positive NBS results and older patients presenting with an indistinct clinical picture, the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation convened a meeting of experts in the field of CF diagnosis. Their recommendations, presented herein, involve a combination of clinical presentation, laboratory testing, and genetics to confirm a diagnosis of CF.

  19. A metagenomic approach to characterize temperate bacteriophage populations from Cystic Fibrosis and non-Cystic Fibrosis bronchiectasis patients

    PubMed Central

    Tariq, Mohammad A.; Everest, Francesca L. C.; Cowley, Lauren A.; De Soyza, Anthony; Holt, Giles S.; Bridge, Simon H.; Perry, Audrey; Perry, John D.; Bourke, Stephen J.; Cummings, Stephen P.; Lanyon, Clare V.; Barr, Jeremy J.; Smith, Darren L.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa), normally a soil commensal, is an important opportunistic pathogen in Cystic Fibrosis (CF) and non-Cystic Fibrosis Bronchiectasis (nCFBR). Persistent infection correlates with accelerated decline in lung function and early mortality. The horizontal transfer of DNA by temperate bacteriophages can add gene function and selective advantages to their bacterial host within the constrained environment of the lower lung. In this study, we chemically induce temperate bacteriophages from clonal cultures of Pa and identify their mixed viral communities employing metagenomic approaches. We compared 92 temperate phage metagenomes stratified from these clinical backgrounds (47 CF and 45 nCFBR Pa isolates) using MG-RAST and GeneWise2. KEGG analysis shows the complexity of temperate phage accessory gene carriage increases with duration and severity of the disease. Furthermore, we identify the presence of Ig-like motifs within phage structural genes linked to bacterial adhesion and carbohydrate binding including Big_2, He_Pig, and Fn3. This study provides the first clinical support to the proposed bacteriophage adherence to mucus (BAM) model and the evolution of phages interacting at these mucosal surfaces over time. PMID:25741327

  20. Loss of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator Impairs Intestinal Oxalate Secretion.

    PubMed

    Knauf, Felix; Thomson, Robert B; Heneghan, John F; Jiang, Zhirong; Adebamiro, Adedotun; Thomson, Claire L; Barone, Christina; Asplin, John R; Egan, Marie E; Alper, Seth L; Aronson, Peter S

    2017-01-01

    Patients with cystic fibrosis have an increased incidence of hyperoxaluria and calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis. Net intestinal absorption of dietary oxalate results from passive paracellular oxalate absorption as modified by oxalate back secretion mediated by the SLC26A6 oxalate transporter. We used mice deficient in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (Cftr) to test the hypothesis that SLC26A6-mediated oxalate secretion is defective in cystic fibrosis. We mounted isolated intestinal tissue from C57BL/6 (wild-type) and Cftr(-/-) mice in Ussing chambers and measured transcellular secretion of [(14)C]oxalate. Intestinal tissue isolated from Cftr(-/-) mice exhibited significantly less transcellular oxalate secretion than intestinal tissue of wild-type mice. However, glucose absorption, another representative intestinal transport process, did not differ in Cftr(-/-) tissue. Compared with wild-type mice, Cftr(-/-) mice showed reduced expression of SLC26A6 in duodenum by immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis. Furthermore, coexpression of CFTR stimulated SLC26A6-mediated Cl(-)-oxalate exchange in Xenopus oocytes. In association with the profound defect in intestinal oxalate secretion, Cftr(-/-) mice had serum and urine oxalate levels 2.5-fold greater than those of wild-type mice. We conclude that defective intestinal oxalate secretion mediated by SLC26A6 may contribute to the hyperoxaluria observed in this mouse model of cystic fibrosis. Future studies are needed to address whether similar mechanisms contribute to the increased risk for calcium oxalate stone formation observed in patients with cystic fibrosis.

  1. A functional CFTR assay using primary cystic fibrosis intestinal organoids.

    PubMed

    Dekkers, Johanna F; Wiegerinck, Caroline L; de Jonge, Hugo R; Bronsveld, Inez; Janssens, Hettie M; de Winter-de Groot, Karin M; Brandsma, Arianne M; de Jong, Nienke W M; Bijvelds, Marcel J C; Scholte, Bob J; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E S; van den Brink, Stieneke; Clevers, Hans; van der Ent, Cornelis K; Middendorp, Sabine; Beekman, Jeffrey M

    2013-07-01

    We recently established conditions allowing for long-term expansion of epithelial organoids from intestine, recapitulating essential features of the in vivo tissue architecture. Here we apply this technology to study primary intestinal organoids of people suffering from cystic fibrosis, a disease caused by mutations in CFTR, encoding cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator. Forskolin induces rapid swelling of organoids derived from healthy controls or wild-type mice, but this effect is strongly reduced in organoids of subjects with cystic fibrosis or in mice carrying the Cftr F508del mutation and is absent in Cftr-deficient organoids. This pattern is phenocopied by CFTR-specific inhibitors. Forskolin-induced swelling of in vitro-expanded human control and cystic fibrosis organoids corresponds quantitatively with forskolin-induced anion currents in freshly excised ex vivo rectal biopsies. Function of the CFTR F508del mutant protein is restored by incubation at low temperature, as well as by CFTR-restoring compounds. This relatively simple and robust assay will facilitate diagnosis, functional studies, drug development and personalized medicine approaches in cystic fibrosis.

  2. Active cycle of breathing technique for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Mckoy, Naomi A; Wilson, Lisa M; Saldanha, Ian J; Odelola, Olaide A; Robinson, Karen A

    2016-07-05

    People with cystic fibrosis experience chronic airway infections as a result of mucus build up within the lungs. Repeated infections often cause lung damage and disease. Airway clearance therapies aim to improve mucus clearance, increase sputum production, and improve airway function. The active cycle of breathing technique (also known as ACBT) is an airway clearance method that uses a cycle of techniques to loosen airway secretions including breathing control, thoracic expansion exercises, and the forced expiration technique. This is an update of a previously published review. To compare the clinical effectiveness of the active cycle of breathing technique with other airway clearance therapies in cystic fibrosis. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis Trials Register, compiled from electronic database searches and handsearching of journals and conference abstract books. We also searched the reference lists of relevant articles and reviews.Date of last search: 25 April 2016. Randomised or quasi-randomised controlled clinical studies, including cross-over studies, comparing the active cycle of breathing technique with other airway clearance therapies in cystic fibrosis. Two review authors independently screened each article, abstracted data and assessed the risk of bias of each study. Our search identified 62 studies, of which 19 (440 participants) met the inclusion criteria. Five randomised controlled studies (192 participants) were included in the meta-analysis; three were of cross-over design. The 14 remaining studies were cross-over studies with inadequate reports for complete assessment. The study size ranged from seven to 65 participants. The age of the participants ranged from six to 63 years (mean age 22.33 years). In 13 studies, follow up lasted a single day. However, there were two long-term randomised controlled studies with follow up of one to three years. Most of the studies did not report on key quality items, and therefore, have an unclear risk of

  3. Parent routines for managing cystic fibrosis in children

    PubMed Central

    Grossoehme, Daniel H.; Filigno, Stephanie Spear; Bishop, Meredith

    2014-01-01

    Management of cystic fibrosis (CF) is burdensome and adherence is often suboptimal. Family routines are associated with adherence and health outcomes in other disease populations. Few studies have examined routines in CF. The study's aim was to describe parent experiences developing and utilizing CF care routines. Semi-structured interviews with a convenience sample of 25 parents of children under 13 years of age with CF were analyzed using phenomenological analysis. Three domains emerged: parent experiences developing a routine, support systems facilitating maintenance of routines, and challenges with maintaining care routines. Parents found routines difficult to establish, used trial and error, encountered barriers, and found support helpful to manage care demands. Some parents chose to deviate from their routine. Providing anticipatory guidance to promote the use of care routines and strategies to manage potential challenges may facilitate use of routines and improve CF management. PMID:24838648

  4. Draft genome sequences of four Achromobacter ruhlandii strains isolated from cystic fibrosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Elenice RA; Rocha, Géssica A; Ferreira, Alex G; Leão, Robson S; Albano, Rodolpho M; Marques, Elizabeth A

    2016-01-01

    Achromobacter species are being increasingly isolated from the respiratory tract of cystic fibrosis patients. Recent reports indicate that Achromobacter ruhlandii is a potential human pathogen in cystic fibrosis-related infections. Here we report the draft genome of four A. ruhlandii strains isolated from cystic fibrosis patients in Brazil. This report describes A. ruhlandii as a potential opportunistic pathogen in cystic fibrosis and provides a framework to for additional enquires into potential virulence factors and resistance mechanisms within this species. PMID:27812598

  5. A novel case of diabetic muscle necrosis in a patient with cystic fibrosis-related diabetes.

    PubMed

    Chalasani, Sreelatha; Bettadahalli, Shankar S; Bhupathi, Satya V; Aswani, Vijay H

    2013-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a recessive autosomal disease caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene. Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes (CFRD) is a common comorbidity of cystic fibrosis. Diabetic myonecrosis is a rare self-limited complication of poorly controlled diabetes mellitus that commonly presents with acute, intense pain and swelling of lower extremities and responds well to conservative management. We report the first case of diabetic myonecrosis in a patient with CFRD.

  6. Draft genome sequences of four Achromobacter ruhlandii strains isolated from cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Elenice Ra; Rocha, Géssica A; Ferreira, Alex G; Leão, Robson S; Albano, Rodolpho M; Marques, Elizabeth A

    2016-12-01

    Achromobacter species are being increasingly isolated from the respiratory tract of cystic fibrosis patients. Recent reports indicate that Achromobacter ruhlandii is a potential human pathogen in cystic fibrosis-related infections. Here we report the draft genome of four A. ruhlandii strains isolated from cystic fibrosis patients in Brazil. This report describes A. ruhlandii as a potential opportunistic pathogen in cystic fibrosis and provides a framework to for additional enquires into potential virulence factors and resistance mechanisms within this species.

  7. Pharmacokinetics of ciprofloxacin in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, R L; Koup, J R; Williams-Warren, J; Weber, A; Heggen, L; Stempel, D; Smith, A L

    1987-01-01

    We studied the pharmacokinetics of ciprofloxacin in 12 adult males with and 12 adult males without cystic fibrosis (CF). In a randomized crossover sequence, the subjects received 200 mg intravenously or 750 mg orally. With intravenous dosing, subjects also received 651 mg of iothalamate, a marker of glomerular filtration, and 700 mg of antipyrine, an indicator of hepatic oxidative drug metabolism. Pharmacokinetic parameters were determined by model independent methods. In the CF subjects, the ciprofloxacin concentration in serum during the first hour after intravenous administration was higher, and the oral absorption rate was slower. Other parameters did not differ between the groups. Mean concentrations in serum 5 min postinfusion were 3.08 and 2.14 micrograms/ml, and mean peak concentrations after oral dosing were 3.24 and 3.34 micrograms/ml in subjects with and without CF, respectively. Mean values for elimination half-life in all subjects were 4.8 and 5.0 h after intravenous and oral administration, respectively. The mean renal clearances in all subjects after intravenous and oral administration were 19.4 and 14.5 liters/h and accounted for 64 and 47% of the total clearance, respectively. These values were significantly greater than renal iothalamate clearance, indicating that tubular secretion contributed to the renal clearance of ciprofloxacin. A total of 69 and 35.4% of the administered ciprofloxacin was recovered from the urine within 48 h after intravenous and oral administration, respectively. The mean bioavailability was 71.2% and did not differ between the groups. We conclude that similar dosing regimens can be used to treat patients with CF and their normal counterparts. PMID:3619423

  8. Influenza-associated cystic fibrosis pulmonary exacerbations.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Justin R; Neuzil, Kathleen M; Victor, John C; Wald, Anna; Aitken, Moira L; Goss, Christopher H

    2010-04-01

    Although cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common inherited respiratory disease, the burden of influenza among individuals with CF is not well characterized. We used the CF Foundation Patient Registry to determine the relationship between pulmonary exacerbation incidence rate and influenza virus season from July 2003 through June 2007. The outcome of interest, pulmonary exacerbation, was defined as treatment of a respiratory illness with IV antibiotics. Each influenza season was defined as all months during which >/= 15% of laboratory tests for influenza virus were positive in the US influenza virologic surveillance system. We calculated incidence rates of pulmonary exacerbation during the influenza and summertime seasons as well as relative rates with 95% CIs. A multivariate regression model adjusted for demographic and clinical predictors. In 2003, the patient cohort size was 21,506 patients, and 7,727 patients experienced at least one pulmonary exacerbation. The overall pulmonary exacerbation incidence rate in the influenza season was 595.0 per 10,000 person-months compared with a summertime baseline of 549.6 per 10,000 person-months. The incidence rate ratio was 1.08 (95% CI: 1.06, 1.10). Multivariate analysis did not change our estimate of risk (adjusted odds ratio: 1.07; 95% CI: 1.05, 1.10). An estimated annual excess of 147.6 per 10,000 person-months or an excess 2.1% of total exacerbations occur during the influenza season. Our data demonstrate a substantial contribution of the influenza season to CF morbidity. Further studies to determine any causal link between influenza infection and CF pulmonary exacerbations are necessary.

  9. Cystic Fibrosis in the African Diaspora.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Cheryl; Pepper, Michael S

    2017-01-01

    Identifying mutations that cause cystic fibrosis (CF) is important for making an early, unambiguous diagnosis, which, in turn, is linked to better health and a greater life expectancy. In patients of African descent, a molecular diagnosis is often confounded by the fact that the majority of investigations undertaken to identify causative mutations have been conducted on European populations, and CF-causing mutations tend to be population specific. We undertook a survey of published data with the aim of identifying causative CF mutations in patients of African descent in the Americas. We found that 1,584 chromosomes had been tested in only 6 countries, of which 876 alleles (55.3%) still remained unidentified. There were 59 mutations identified. Of those, 41 have been shown to cause CF, 17 have no associated functional studies, and one (R117H) is of varying clinical consequence. The most common mutations identified in the patients of African descent were: ΔF508 (29.4% identified in the United States, Colombia, Brazil, and Venezuela); 3120 + 1G>A (8.4% identified in Brazil, the United States, and Colombia); G85E (3.8% identified in Brazil); 1811 + 1.6kbA>G (3.7% identified in Colombia); and 1342 - 1G>C (3.1% identified in the United States). The majority of the mutations identified (81.4%) have been described in just one country. Our findings indicate that there is a need to fully characterize the spectrum of CF mutations in the diaspora to improve diagnostic accuracy for these patients and facilitate treatment.

  10. Diagnosis of Cystic Fibrosis in Nonscreened Populations.

    PubMed

    Sosnay, Patrick R; White, Terry B; Farrell, Philip M; Ren, Clement L; Derichs, Nico; Howenstine, Michelle S; Nick, Jerry A; De Boeck, Kris

    2017-02-01

    Although the majority of cases of cystic fibrosis (CF) are now diagnosed through newborn screening, there is still a need to standardize the diagnostic criteria for those diagnosed outside of the neonatal period. This is because newborn screening started relatively recently, it is not performed everywhere, and even for individuals who were screened, there is the possibility of a false negative. To limit irreversible organ pathology, a timely diagnosis of CF and institution of CF therapies can greatly benefit these patients. Experts on CF diagnosis were convened at the 2015 CF Foundation Diagnosis Consensus Conference. The participants reviewed and discussed published works and instructive cases of CF diagnosis in individuals presenting with signs, symptoms, or a family history of CF. Through a modified Delphi methodology, several consensus statements were agreed upon. These consensus statements were updates of prior CF diagnosis conferences and recommendations. CF diagnosis in individuals outside of newborn screening relies on the clinical evidence and on evidence of CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) dysfunction. Clinical evidence can include typical organ pathologies seen in CF such as bronchiectasis or pancreatic insufficiency but often represent a broad range of severity including mild cases. CFTR dysfunction can be demonstrated using sweat chloride testing, CFTR molecular genetic analysis, or CFTR physiologic tests. On the basis of the large number of patients with bona fide CF currently followed in registries with sweat chloride levels between 30 and 40 mmol/L, the threshold considered "intermediate" was lowered from 40 mmol/L in the prior diagnostic guidelines to 30 mmol/L. The CF diagnosis was also discussed in the context of CFTR-related disorders in which CFTR dysfunction may be present, but the individual does not meet criteria for CF. CF diagnosis remains a rare but important condition that can be diagnosed when characteristic clinical

  11. Diagnosis of Cystic Fibrosis in Screened Populations.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Philip M; White, Terry B; Howenstine, Michelle S; Munck, Anne; Parad, Richard B; Rosenfeld, Margaret; Sommerburg, Olaf; Accurso, Frank J; Davies, Jane C; Rock, Michael J; Sanders, Don B; Wilschanski, Michael; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Blau, Hannah; Gartner, Silvia; McColley, Susanna A

    2017-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) can be difficult to diagnose, even when newborn screening (NBS) tests yield positive results. This challenge is exacerbated by the multitude of NBS protocols, misunderstandings about screening vs diagnostic tests, and the lack of guidelines for presumptive diagnoses. There is also confusion regarding the designation of age at diagnosis. To improve diagnosis and achieve standardization in definitions worldwide, the CF Foundation convened a committee of 32 experts with a mission to develop clear and actionable consensus guidelines on diagnosis of CF with an emphasis on screened populations, especially the newborn population. A comprehensive literature review was performed with emphasis on relevant articles published during the past decade. After reviewing the common screening protocols and outcome scenarios, 14 of 27 consensus statements were drafted that apply to screened populations. These were approved by 80% or more of the participants. It is recommended that all diagnoses be established by demonstrating dysfunction of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channel, initially with a sweat chloride test and, when needed, potentially with newer methods assessing membrane transport directly, such as intestinal current measurements. Even in babies with 2 CF-causing mutations detected via NBS, diagnosis must be confirmed by demonstrating CFTR dysfunction. The committee also recommends that the latest classifications identified in the Clinical and Functional Translation of CFTR project [http://www.cftr2.org/index.php] should be used to aid with CF diagnosis. Finally, to avoid delays in treatment, we provide guidelines for presumptive diagnoses and recommend how to determine the age of diagnosis. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Poetry, Music, Writing and Painting; Developing the artistic talents of Adults with Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Webb, Anthony Kevin; Fitzjohn, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Art is an expressive outlet for the physical limitations and emotional frustrations of living with a life limiting condition such cystic fibrosis. In the Manchester Adult Cystic Fibrosis Centre we have facilitated the sharing of the inherent artistic talent of our patients with the support of painters, musicians, potters, creative writers, photographers and textile specialists and our own ward staff in our dedicated 22 bed CF inpatient unit. The programme has provided some splendid works that enliven our ward and, more importantly, continue to inspire our patients as they attempt to overcome the socially limiting consequences of hospital admission.

  13. Atomic Structure of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhe; Chen, Jue

    2016-12-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an anion channel evolved from the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family. In this study, we determined the structure of zebrafish CFTR in the absence of ATP by electron cryo-microscopy to 3.7 Å resolution. Human and zebrafish CFTR share 55% sequence identity, and 42 of the 46 cystic-fibrosis-causing missense mutational sites are identical. In CFTR, we observe a large anion conduction pathway lined by numerous positively charged residues. A single gate near the extracellular surface closes the channel. The regulatory domain, dephosphorylated, is located in the intracellular opening between the two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs), preventing NBD dimerization and channel opening. The structure also reveals why many cystic-fibrosis-causing mutations would lead to defects either in folding, ion conduction, or gating and suggests new avenues for therapeutic intervention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis for cystic fibrosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Biazotti, Maria Cristina Santoro; Pinto, Walter; de Albuquerque, Maria Cecília Romano Maciel; Fujihara, Litsuko Shimabukuro; Suganuma, Cláudia Haru; Reigota, Renata Bednar; Bertuzzo, Carmen Sílvia

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene. This disorder produces a variable phenotype including lung disease, pancreatic insufficiency, and meconium ileus plus bilateral agenesis of the vas deferens causing obstructive azoospermia and male infertility. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis is an alternative that allows identification of embryos affected by this or other genetic diseases. We report a case of couple with cystic fibrosis; the woman had the I148 T mutation and the man had the Delta F508 gene mutation. The couple underwent in vitro fertilization, associated with preimplantation genetic diagnosis, and with subsequent selection of healthy embryos for uterine transfer. The result was an uneventful pregnancy and delivery of a healthy male baby. PMID:25993078

  15. Antiinflammatory therapies for cystic fibrosis: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Prescott, William A; Johnson, Cary E

    2005-04-01

    Inflammation is a major component of the vicious cycle characterizing cystic fibrosis pulmonary disease. If untreated, this inflammatory process irreversibly damages the airways, leading to bronchiectasis and ultimately respiratory failure. Antiinflammatory drugs for cystic fibrosis lung disease appear to have beneficial effects on disease parameters. These agents include oral corticosteroids and ibuprofen, as well as azithromycin, which, in addition to its antimicrobial effects, also possesses antiinflammatory properties. Inhaled corticosteroids, colchicine, methotrexate, montelukast, pentoxifylline, nutritional supplements, and protease replacement have not had a significant impact on the disease. Therapy with oral corticosteroids, ibuprofen, and fish oil is limited by adverse effects. Azithromycin appears to be safe and effective, and is thus the most promising antiinflammatory therapy available for patients with cystic fibrosis. Pharmacologic therapy with antiinflammatory agents should be started early in the disease course, before extensive irreversible lung damage has occurred.

  16. Prenatal diagnosis of cystic fibrosis: 10-years experience.

    PubMed

    Hadj Fredj, S; Ouali, F; Siala, H; Bibi, A; Othmani, R; Dakhlaoui, B; Zouari, F; Messaoud, T

    2015-06-01

    We present in this study our 10years experience in prenatal diagnosis of cystic fibrosis performed in the Tunisian population. Based on family history, 40 Tunisian couples were selected for prenatal diagnosis. Fetal DNA was isolated from amniotic fluid collected by transabdominal amniocentesis or from chronic villi by transcervical chorionic villus sampling. The genetic analysis for cystic fibrosis mutations was performed by denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis and denaturing high-pressure liquid phase chromatography. We performed microsatellites analysis by capillary electrophoresis in order to verify the absence of maternal cell contamination. Thirteen fetuses were affected, 21 were heterozygous carriers and 15 were healthy with two normal alleles of CFTR gene. Ten couples opted for therapeutic abortion. The microsatellites genotyping showed the absence of contamination of the fetal DNA by maternal DNA in 93.75%. Our diagnostic strategy provides rapid and reliable prenatal diagnosis at risk families of cystic fibrosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Vaccine strategies against bacterial pathogens in cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Le Moigne, V; Gaillard, J-L; Herrmann, J-L

    2016-02-01

    A large number of cystic fibrosis pathogens such as bacteria of the Burkholderia cepacia complex, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, or Mycobacterium abscessus are associated with complex therapeutic problems due to their inherent resistance to antibiotics. No vaccine is currently available against those pathogens. Vaccines are therefore crucial to combat these multidrug-resistant bacteria in specific clinical situations including cystic fibrosis. Various strategies may be considered to develop these vaccines. Similar virulence factors are expressed during the infection with various pathogens; they could thus be used as antigen to assess cross-protection. Many clinical trials are currently being conducted to try and develop a prophylactic treatment for patients presenting with cystic fibrosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. [Physical activity and exercise training for patients with cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Karila, C; Ravilly, S; Gauthier, R; Tardif, C; Neveu, H; Maire, J; Ramel, S; Cracowski, C; Legallais, P; Foure, H; Halm, A-M; Saugier, J; Bordas, G; Loire, N; Kirszenbaum, M; Dassonville, J; Mely, L; Wuyam, B; Giovannetti, P; Ouksel, H; Ellaffi, M; Denjean, A

    2010-04-01

    In France patients with cystic fibrosis benefit from a multidisciplinary follow-up in Cystic Fibrosis Centres. In this follow-up, despite the numerous therapeutic benefits of exercise in this disease, little emphasis is placed on the promotion of physical activity. The aim of this article is to improve this aspect of management, giving advice from a working group of experts, based on the medical literature and clinical experience. These proposals include quantification of physical activity, evaluation of exercise, training and rehabilitation programs and finally, modification of behaviour to include physical activity in the overall cystic fibrosis treatment strategy. It is intended to set up multicentre studies to evaluate the impact of these proposals. Copyright 2010 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Prenatal screening for cystic fibrosis: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Richards, Carolyn S; Grody, Wayne W

    2004-01-01

    Prenatal screening for cystic fibrosis is reviewed. The disease, gene involved, molecular basis of disease, genotype/phenotype correlations and pilot trials are discussed, as well as historical perspectives, background and American College of Medical Genetics/American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommendations. A number of complex challenges to the implementation of cystic fibrosis screening exist, including mutation testing of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR), as well as laboratory and clinical issues. Current technologies for CFTR testing include reverse dot blots, amplification refractory mutation detection systems, oligonucleotide ligation assays, the Invader assay and NanoChip system. Emerging technologies are also considered, as well as quality assurance measures including analytical and clinical validation, reporting, residual risk calculations and prenatal diagnosis. An even greater challenge is clinical implementation, which focuses upon education and communication, choosing models, reporting, counseling and prenatal diagnosis. Copyright Future Drugs Ltd.

  20. Clinical features of cystic fibrosis patients with rare genotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Castaldo, G; Rippa, E; Raia, V; Salvatore, D; Massa, C; de Ritis, G; Salvatore, F

    1996-01-01

    We describe the clinical features of seven cystic fibrosis patients from southern Italy who bear rare genotypes: (1) a patient homozygous for the 2183 AA-->G mutation who was affected by a very early pulmonary form of cystic fibrosis, and five patients who were compound heterozygotes either for the 2183 AA-->G mutation or for the I148T mutation, in both instances with the delta F508 mutation; and (2) a patient homozygous for the early nonsense R553X mutation who showed only a moderately severe form of cystic fibrosis. Our results confirm that environmental or genetic factors unrelated to the CF disease contribute significantly to the development of the phenotype. Images PMID:8825054

  1. Cystic fibrosis and pregnancy: counseling, obstetrical management and perinatal outcome.

    PubMed

    Grigoriadis, Charalampos; Tympa, Aliki; Theodoraki, Kassiani

    2015-03-01

    The progress in research of in vitro fertilization and fetal-maternal medicine allows more women and men, with fertility problems due to cystic fibrosis, to have a baby. In the majority of cases, pregnancy in women with cystic fibrosis results in favorable maternal and fetal outcomes. However, the incidence of preterm delivery, intrauterine growth restriction, caesarean section and deterioration of the maternal health are increased. Pre-pregnancy counseling is a crucial component of overall obstetric care, especially in women with poor pulmonary function. Additionally, closer monitoring during pregnancy with a multidisciplinary approach is required. The value of serial ultrasound scans and fetal Doppler assessment is important for the control of maternal and fetal wellbeing, as well as for the definition of the appropriate timing of delivery. In this article, clinical issues of pregnant women with cystic fibrosis are reviewed; counseling, obstetrical management and perinatal outcomes are being discussed.

  2. Breakthrough therapies: Cystic fibrosis (CF) potentiators and correctors.

    PubMed

    Solomon, George M; Marshall, Susan G; Ramsey, Bonnie W; Rowe, Steven M

    2015-10-01

    Cystic Fibrosis is caused by mutations in the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator (CFTR) gene resulting in abnormal protein function. Recent advances of targeted molecular therapies and high throughput screening have resulted in multiple drug therapies that target many important mutations in the CFTR protein. In this review, we provide the latest results and current progress of CFTR modulators for the treatment of cystic fibrosis, focusing on potentiators of CFTR channel gating and Phe508del processing correctors for the Phe508del CFTR mutation. Special emphasis is placed on the molecular basis underlying these new therapies and emerging results from the latest clinical trials. The future directions for augmenting the rescue of Phe508del with CFTR modulators are also emphasized.

  3. Breakthrough Therapies: Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Potentiators and Correctors

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, George M.; Marshall, Susan G.; Ramsey, Bonnie W.; Rowe, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis is caused by mutations in the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator (CFTR) gene resulting in abnormal protein function. Recent advances of targeted molecular therapies and high throughput screening have resulted in multiple drug therapies that target many important mutations in the CFTR protein. In this review, we provide the latest results and current progress of CFTR modulators for the treatment of cystic fibrosis, focusing on potentiators of CFTR channel gating and Phe508del processing correctors for the Phe508del CFTR mutation. Special emphasis is placed on the molecular basis underlying these new therapies and emerging results from the latest clinical trials. The future directions for augmenting the rescue of Phe508del with CFTR modulators is also emphasized. PMID:26097168

  4. [Isolation of Nocardia species in patients with cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Barrio, M Isabel; Martínez, M Carmen; Prados, Concepción; Girón, Rosa M; Maiz, Luis; Martínez, M Teresa

    2008-02-01

    The isolation of Nocardia species from the respiratory secretions of patients with cystic fibrosis presents problems with important clinical implications. From the sputum culture of a total of 387 patients with cystic fibrosis, Nocardia species was isolated in 9 cases (2%; 8 females and 1 male) with a mean (SD) age of 17 (7) years. Sixty-seven percent of the patients were asymptomatic and no relevant radiographic or analytical changes were detected. In only 3 patients was of Nocardia species isolated again in successive samples. Two patients were not treated, 7 were treated with cotrimoxazole and 3 with minocycline; in 2 cases therapy was intravenous. After a mean follow-up of 48 (33) months, all patients had improved. Isolation of Nocardia species from the secretions of patients with cystic fibrosis does not necessarily imply infection and the need for treatment should be assessed on an individual basis.

  5. 21 CFR 866.5910 - Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Quality control material for cystic fibrosis... Test Systems § 866.5910 Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays. (a) Identification. Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays. A quality control material for...

  6. 21 CFR 866.5910 - Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Quality control material for cystic fibrosis... Test Systems § 866.5910 Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays. (a) Identification. Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays. A quality control material for...

  7. Caring for Children with Cystic Fibrosis: A Collaborative Clinical and School Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strawhacker, MaryAnn Tapper; Wellendorf, Joyce

    2004-01-01

    Earlier diagnosis and more effective treatments have improved both morbidity and mortality associated with cystic fibrosis, making regular school attendance a reality. School nurses have a unique opportunity to assist students with cystic fibrosis successfully manage their disease. Medical treatment for cystic fibrosis can be complex, leaving…

  8. New animal models of cystic fibrosis: what are they teaching us?

    PubMed Central

    Keiser, Nicholas W.; Engelhardt, John F.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review Cystic fibrosis is the first human genetic disease to benefit from the directed engineering of three different species of animal models (mice, pigs, and ferrets). Recent studies on the cystic fibrosis pig and ferret models are providing new information about the pathophysiology of cystic fibrosis in various organ systems. Additionally, new conditional cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) knockout mice are teaching unexpected lessons about CFTR function in surprising cellular locations. Comparisons between these animal models and the human condition are key to dissecting the complexities of disease pathophysiology in cystic fibrosis. Recent findings Cystic fibrosis pigs and ferrets have provided new models to study the spontaneous development of disease in the lung and pancreas, two organs that are largely spared overt spontaneous disease in cystic fibrosis mice. New cystic fibrosis mouse models are now interrogating CFTR functions involved in growth and inflammation at an organ-based level using conditional knockout technology. Together, these models are providing new insights on the human condition. Summary Basic and clinical cystic fibrosis research will benefit greatly from the comparative pathophysiology of cystic fibrosis mice, pigs, and ferrets. Both similarities and differences between these three cystic fibrosis models will inform pathophysiologically important mechanisms of CFTR function in humans and aid in the development of both organ-specific and general therapies for cystic fibrosis. PMID:21857224

  9. Caring for Children with Cystic Fibrosis: A Collaborative Clinical and School Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strawhacker, MaryAnn Tapper; Wellendorf, Joyce

    2004-01-01

    Earlier diagnosis and more effective treatments have improved both morbidity and mortality associated with cystic fibrosis, making regular school attendance a reality. School nurses have a unique opportunity to assist students with cystic fibrosis successfully manage their disease. Medical treatment for cystic fibrosis can be complex, leaving…

  10. Immune modulation following aerobic exercise in children with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Boas, S R; Danduran, M J; McColley, S A; Beaman, K; O'Gorman, M R

    2000-05-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated altered immune response following exercise in healthy adults and children. As data are lacking in children with cystic fibrosis, we evaluated the immune response following acute exercise and hypothesized that acute increases in cellular changes would be seen but would be blunted in subjects with CF. Leukocytes, lymphocytes, and their subsets as well as natural killer cell number and activity were determined before, immediately after, and one hour post exhaustive exercise in 15 children with cystic fibrosis (8-21 yrs, FEV1 69.5+/-18.0%, colonized with P aeruginosa) and 15 healthy controls (8-18 yrs, FEV1 107.5+/-10.7%). At baseline the cystic fibrosis group had greater leukocytes (9.25+/-2.83 vs. 5.17+/-0.96 x 10(9) cells/liter). Immediately post exercise, the cystic fibrosis group demonstrated increases in cell counts for leukocytes (32.4%), lymphocytes (61.8%), granulocytes (36.4%), monocytes (76.2%), and natural killer cells (315%). Similar percentage increases were seen in cell counts for the controls (leukocytes: 39.5%, lymphocytes: 78.5%, granulocytes: 32.0%, monocytes: 75.9%, and NK cells: 442%). Natural killer cell activity also increased by 57.9% in the group with cystic fibrosis and by 43.6% in the healthy controls. Except for elevated leukocyte and granulocyte counts, values returned to baseline at one hour post-exercise. In conclusion, the cellular immune response to acute exercise in children with mild to moderate cystic fibrosis appears normal.

  11. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Children with Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Dziekiewicz, Marcin A; Banaszkiewicz, Aleksandra; Urzykowska, Agnieszka; Lisowska, Aleksandra; Rachel, Marta; Sands, Dorota; Walkowiak, Jaroslaw; Radzikowski, Andrzej; Albrecht, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Previously published studies have indicated that gastroesophageal reflux (GER) disease is common in pediatric patients with cystic fibrosis. The aim of the present study was to get insight into the incidence of GER and to characterize the nature of reflux episodes in children with cystic fibrosis. This was a multicenter, prospective study of children with cystic fibrosis older than 18 months. Forty four consecutive patients (22 boys, mean age 10.4 ± 3.6, range 3.0-17.8 years) were enrolled into the study. All patients underwent 24 h pH-impedance monitoring. GER were classified according to the widely recognized criteria as an acid, weakly acid, weakly alkaline, or proximal. The pH-impedance trace was considered abnormal when acid exposure was >6 %. GER was diagnosed in 24/44 (54.5 %) children. A total of 1585 (median 35, range 7-128) reflux episodes were detected; 1199 (75.6 %) were acidic, 382 (24.1 %) weakly acidic, and 4 (0.3 %) weakly alkaline. Six hundred and ninety-one (43.6 %) reflux episodes reached the proximal esophagus. In 14/44 patients typical GER symptoms were present. We conclude that the incidence of GER in children with cystic fibrosis is very high. In the majority of patients typical GER symptoms are absent. Therefore, diagnostic procedures should be considered, regardless of lacking symptoms. Although acid reflux episodes predominate in children with cystic fibrosis, classical pH-metry may not constitute a sufficient diagnostic method in this population because of a relatively high number of proximal reflux episodes. Such episodes also indicate an increased risk for aspiration. The pH-impedance diagnostic measurement is advocated when suspecting GER in children with cystic fibrosis.

  12. Novel molecular approaches to cystic fibrosis gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tim W. R.; Matthews, David A.; Blair, G. Eric

    2005-01-01

    Gene therapy holds promise for the treatment of a range of inherited diseases, such as cystic fibrosis. However, efficient delivery and expression of the therapeutic transgene at levels sufficient to result in phenotypic correction of cystic fibrosis pulmonary disease has proved elusive. There are many reasons for this lack of progress, both macroscopically in terms of airway defence mechanisms and at the molecular level with regard to effective cDNA delivery. This review of approaches to cystic fibrosis gene therapy covers these areas in detail and highlights recent progress in the field. For gene therapy to be effective in patients with cystic fibrosis, the cDNA encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein must be delivered effectively to the nucleus of the epithelial cells lining the bronchial tree within the lungs. Expression of the transgene must be maintained at adequate levels for the lifetime of the patient, either by repeat dosage of the vector or by targeting airway stem cells. Clinical trials of gene therapy for cystic fibrosis have demonstrated proof of principle, but gene expression has been limited to 30 days at best. Results suggest that viral vectors such as adenovirus and adeno-associated virus are unsuited to repeat dosing, as the immune response reduces the effectiveness of each subsequent dose. Nonviral approaches, such as cationic liposomes, appear more suited to repeat dosing, but have been less effective. Current work regarding non-viral gene delivery is now focused on understanding the mechanisms involved in cell entry, endosomal escape and nuclear import of the transgene. There is now increasing evidence to suggest that additional ligands that facilitate endosomal escape or contain a nuclear localization signal may enhance liposome-mediated gene delivery. Much progress in this area has been informed by advances in our understanding of the mechanisms by which viruses deliver their genomes to the nuclei of host

  13. "Cystic fibrotics could survive cholera, choleraics could survive cystic fibrosis"; hypothesis that explores new horizons in treatment of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Azimi, Arsalan

    2015-12-01

    Cystic fibrosis, the most common inherited disease of white population, is a disease of CFTR channels, in which mucosal function of many organs especially respiratory tract is impaired. Decreased mucociliary clearance and accumulation of mucus in airways facilitates colonization of infectious microorganisms, followed by infection. Following chronic infection, persistent inflammation ensues, which results in airway remodeling and deterioration of mucociliary clearance and result in a vicious cycle. Here, it is hypothesized that cholera toxin (CT) could ameliorate symptoms of cystic fibrosis as CT could dilute the thickened mucus, improve mucociliary clearance and alleviate airway obstruction. CT strengthens immunity of airway mucosa and it could attenuates bacterial growth and reduce persistency of infection. CT also modulates cellular immune response and it could decrease airway inflammation, hinder airway remodeling and prevent respiratory deterioration. Thereby it is hypothesized that CT could target and ameliorate many of pathophysiologic steps of the disease and it explores new horizons in treatment of CF. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Fluoroquinolones in the treatment of bronchopulmonary disease in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Fluoroquinolones are commonly used to treat lung infections in those with cystic fibrosis. Patients with cystic fibrosis are susceptible to lung infection with common bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus and Haemophilus influenzae, but also are prone to infection by opportunistic bacteria, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The good oral bioavailability and broad antimicrobial spectrum of activity, including anti-pseudomonal properties make this class of antimicrobial attractive. We review the evidence assessing the use of fluoroquinolones in the context of preventing and eradicating early lung infection and in managing chronic lung infection and pulmonary exacerbations. The safety of fluoroquinolones and the use of newer agents in the class is also discussed. PMID:22968160

  15. Cystic fibrosis genetics: from molecular understanding to clinical application.

    PubMed

    Cutting, Garry R

    2015-01-01

    The availability of the human genome sequence and tools for interrogating individual genomes provide an unprecedented opportunity to apply genetics to medicine. Mendelian conditions, which are caused by dysfunction of a single gene, offer powerful examples that illustrate how genetics can provide insights into disease. Cystic fibrosis, one of the more common lethal autosomal recessive Mendelian disorders, is presented here as an example. Recent progress in elucidating disease mechanism and causes of phenotypic variation, as well as in the development of treatments, demonstrates that genetics continues to play an important part in cystic fibrosis research 25 years after the discovery of the disease-causing gene.

  16. [Isolation of Geosmithia argillacea in a cystic fibrosis patient].

    PubMed

    Labbé, F; Babchia, S; Evreux, F; Chenal, P

    2013-09-01

    We report the case of an 11-year-old child with cystic fibrosis where Geosmithia argillacea has been isolated from sputum. This is a filamentous fungus (mold) recently described as emergent infectious agent in cystic fibrosis patients. In our case, the presence of G. argillacea was not associated with clinical disorder. However, recent evidence shows that it can be responsible for very serious invasive infection, especially in chronic granulomatous disease and may be, after lung transplantation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. The Effect of Isoproterenol on Airway Obstruction in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Featherby, Elizabeth A.; Weng, Tzong-Ruey; Levison, Henry

    1970-01-01

    The effect of isoproterenol inhalations was studied on 95 occasions in 47 patients with cystic fibrosis. Spirometric and airway resistance measurements showed small but statistically significant changes in the MMEF, MBC and airway resistance, although there was considerable variation from patient to patient. Over-inflation of the lungs, as indicated by a high thoracic gas volume, was not significantly decreased by the administration of the drug. It is suggested that before using isoproterenol routinely as a treatment for cystic fibrosis, response to this drug should be measured in each individual patient. PMID:5445046

  18. The Approach to Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Talwalkar, Jaideep S; Murray, Thomas S

    2016-03-01

    There is a high prevalence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in patients with cystic fibrosis and clear epidemiologic links between chronic infection and morbidity and mortality exist. Prevention and early identification of infection are critical, and stand to improve with the advent of new vaccines and laboratory methods. Once the organism is identified, a variety of treatment options are available. Aggressive use of antipseudomonal antibiotics is the standard of care for acute pulmonary exacerbations in cystic fibrosis, and providers must take into account specific patient characteristics when making treatment decisions related to antibiotic selection, route and duration of administration, and site of care.

  19. Australian standards of care for cystic fibrosis-related diabetes.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Peter G; Wagenaar, Monica; Matson, Angela G; Craig, Maria E; Holmes-Walker, Deborah Jane; Katz, Tamarah; Hameed, Shihab

    2014-02-01

    Multiple guidelines have been published over the last few years for the diagnosis and management of cystic fibrosis (CF) and cystic fibrosis related diabetes (CFRD), although some of the recommendations are based on extrapolation from other forms of diabetes and/or expert opinions. This document seeks to combine the guidelines to provide an Australian approach to the management of CFRD and establish the guidelines within the Australian CF Standards of Care. It is intended that this document will provide assistance to doctors, nurses, dietitians, physiotherapists, diabetes educators and CF patients concerning the issues surrounding CFRD, and will be reviewed and updated in 2016.

  20. Cystic fibrosis genetics: from molecular understanding to clinical application

    PubMed Central

    Cutting, Garry R.

    2015-01-01

    The availability of the human genome sequence and tools for interrogating individual genomes provide an unprecedented opportunity to apply genetics to medicine. Mendelian conditions, which are caused by dysfunction of a single gene, offer powerful examples that illustrate how genetics can provide insights into disease. Cystic fibrosis, one of the more common lethalautosomal recessive Mendelian disorders, is presented here as an example. Recent progress in elucidating disease mechanism and causes of phenotypic variation, as well as in the development of treatments, demonstrates that genetics continues to play an important part in cystic fibrosis research 25 years after the d iscove1y of the disease-causing gene. PMID:25404111

  1. Catamenial hemoptysis and pneumothoraces in a patient with cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Chris M; Nolan, Robert; Lougheed, M Diane

    2007-01-01

    Hemoptysis or pneumothorax that recurs with the onset of menses is strongly suggestive of thoracic endometriosis syndrome (TES). TES is a rare disorder, with relatively few cases reported in the literature. A 32-year-old woman with cystic fibrosis, who over a period of several months had experienced recurrent catamenial hemoptysis and pneumothoraces, including an episode of life-threatening hemoptysis that coincided with menstruation, is presented. Thoracic computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans, as well as a bronchosopic evaluation that demonstrated endobronchial lesions that disappeared after menses, support the diagnosis of TES in the present patient. The patient was treated empirically with danazol and subsequently underwent a successful double-lung transplantation. Danazol was discontinued postoperatively, and she was started on an oral contraceptive. Eighteen months post-transplant, she has not experienced a recurrence of her catamenial symptoms, despite having resumed a regular menstrual cycle. PMID:17703246

  2. Pancreatic changes in cystic fibrosis: CT and sonographic appearances

    SciTech Connect

    Daneman, A.; Gaskin, K.; Martin, D.J.; Cutz, E.

    1983-10-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) and sonographic appearances of the late stages of pancreatic damage in three patients with cystic fibrosis are illustrated. All three had severe exocrine pancreatic insufficiency with steatorrhea. In two patients CT revealed complete fatty replacement of the entire pancreas. In the third, increased echogenicity of the pancreas on sonography and the inhomogeneous attenuation on CT were interpreted as being the result of a combination of fibrosis, fatty replacement, calcification, and probable cyst formation.

  3. Structure-function analysis of a double-mutant cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein occurring in disorders related to cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Fanen, P; Clain, J; Labarthe, R; Hulin, P; Girodon, E; Pagesy, P; Goossens, M; Edelman, A

    1999-06-11

    A number of disorders related to cystic fibrosis have been described since the cloning of the cystic fibrosis gene, including infertility due to the congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens. We have identified, in several patients, complex cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator genotypes like double-mutant alleles. We have now analyzed the structure-function relationships of one of these mutants, R74W-D1270N cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, expressed in HeLa cells, to evaluate the contribution of each mutation in the phenotype. We found that R74W cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator appears to be a polymorphism, while D1270N cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator could be responsible for the congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens phenotype. The combination of the two produced a more severe effect on the chloride conductance pathway as well as on the phenotype.

  4. Bacterial activity in cystic fibrosis lung infections

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Geraint B; Carroll, Mary P; Serisier, David J; Hockey, Peter M; Kehagia, Valia; Jones, Graeme R; Bruce, Kenneth D

    2005-01-01

    Background Chronic lung infections are the primary cause of morbidity and mortality in Cystic Fibrosis (CF) patients. Recent molecular biological based studies have identified a surprisingly wide range of hitherto unreported bacterial species in the lungs of CF patients. The aim of this study was to determine whether the species present were active and, as such, worthy of further investigation as potential pathogens. Methods Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP) profiles were generated from PCR products amplified from 16S rDNA and Reverse Transcription Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RT-T-RFLP) profiles, a marker of metabolic activity, were generated from PCR products amplified from 16S rRNA, both extracted from the same CF sputum sample. To test the level of activity of these bacteria, T-RFLP profiles were compared to RT-T-RFLP profiles. Results Samples from 17 individuals were studied. Parallel analyses identified a total of 706 individual T-RF and RT-T-RF bands in this sample set. 323 bands were detected by T-RFLP and 383 bands were detected by RT-T-RFLP (statistically significant; P ≤ 0.001). For the group as a whole, 145 bands were detected in a T-RFLP profile alone, suggesting metabolically inactive bacteria. 205 bands were detected in an RT-T-RFLP profile alone and 178 bands were detected in both, suggesting a significant degree of metabolic activity. Although Pseudomonas aeruginosa was present and active in many patients, a low occurrence of other species traditionally considered to be key CF pathogens was detected. T-RFLP profiles obtained for induced sputum samples provided by healthy individuals without CF formed a separate cluster indicating a low level of similarity to those from CF patients. Conclusion These results indicate that a high proportion of the bacterial species detected in the sputum from all of the CF patients in the study are active. The widespread activity of bacterial species in these samples

  5. Oral calorie supplements for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Rosalind L; Walters, Sarah

    2012-10-17

    Poor nutrition occurs frequently in people with cystic fibrosis (CF) and is associated with other adverse outcomes. Oral calorie supplements are used to increase total daily calorie intake and improve weight gain. However, they are expensive and there are concerns they may reduce the amount of food eaten and not improve overall energy intake. To establish whether in people with CF, oral calorie supplements: increase daily calorie intake; and improve overall nutritional intake, nutritional indices, lung function, survival and quality of life. To assess adverse effects associated with using these supplements. We searched the Cochrane CF Trials Register comprising references from comprehensive electronic database searches, handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. We contacted companies marketing oral calorie supplements.Last search: 19 July 2012. Randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing use of oral calorie supplements for at least one month to increase calorie intake with no specific intervention or additional nutritional advice in people with CF. We independently selected the included trials, assessed risk of bias and extracted data. We contacted the authors of included trials and obtained additional information for two trials. We identified 21 trials and included three, reporting results from 131 participants. There were no significant differences between people receiving supplements or dietary advice alone for change in weight, height, body mass index, z score or other indices of nutrition or growth. Changes in weight (kg) at three, six and twelve months respectively were: MD 0.32 (95% CI -0.09 to 0.72); MD 0.47 (95% CI -0.07 to 1.02 ); and MD 0.16 (-0.68 to 1.00). Total calorie intake was greater in people taking supplements at 12 months, MD 265.70 (95% CI 42.94 to 488.46). There were no significant differences between the groups for anthropometric measures of body composition, lung function

  6. Airway Clearance Devices for Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The purpose of this evidence-based analysis is to examine the safety and efficacy of airway clearance devices (ACDs) for cystic fibrosis and attempt to differentiate between devices, where possible, on grounds of clinical efficacy, quality of life, safety and/or patient preference. Background Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a common, inherited, life-limiting disease that affects multiple systems of the human body. Respiratory dysfunction is the primary complication and leading cause of death due to CF. CF causes abnormal mucus secretion in the airways, leading to airway obstruction and mucus plugging, which in turn can lead to bacterial infection and further mucous production. Over time, this almost cyclical process contributes to severe airway damage and loss of respiratory function. Removal of airway secretions, termed airway clearance, is thus an integral component of the management of CF. A variety of methods are available for airway clearance, some requiring mechanical devices, others physical manipulation of the body (e.g. physiotherapy). Conventional chest physiotherapy (CCPT), through the assistance of a caregiver, is the current standard of care for achieving airway clearance, particularly in young patients up to the ages of six or seven. CF patients are, however, living much longer now than in decades past. The median age of survival in Canada has risen to 37.0 years for the period of 1998-2002 (5-year window), up from 22.8 years for the 5-year window ending in 1977. The prevalence has also risen accordingly, last recorded as 3,453 in Canada in 2002, up from 1,630 in 1977. With individuals living longer, there is a greater need for independent methods of airway clearance. Airway Clearance Devices There are at least three classes of airway clearance devices: positive expiratory pressure devices (PEP), airway oscillating devices (AOD; either handheld or stationary) and high frequency chest compression (HFCC)/mechanical percussion (MP

  7. Breaking bad news, the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis in childhood.

    PubMed

    Havermans, Trudy; Tack, Jessica; Vertommen, Anneke; Proesmans, Marijke; de Boeck, Kris

    2015-07-01

    The day parents are told their child has cystic fibrosis (CF) is imprinted in their memory. Parents often show strong emotions (e.g. shock, anxiety); they need to cope with bad news and restructure their lives taking into account CF. The aims of this study are (1) to explore how parents recall circumstances of the CF diagnosis and the information they received and (2) to investigate their current coping styles. Parents (n=38) of 20 children (diagnosed during the past 5 years) were interviewed using a semi-structured interview. Coping was assessed using the Utrecht Coping List. The association between coping and time since diagnosis/severity of illness was investigated. Fifteen parents first heard the term 'CF' from their local pediatrician or GP. All were informed in detail by the CF specialist. All parents recalled specifics about the information, the attitude of the doctor, their thoughts and emotions. Most parents were satisfied with the content and manner in which they had received information. Nineteen appreciated the doctor showing some emotions during the talks. One couple criticized the doctor for not showing emotions. Parents reported higher use (than normative scores) of the active coping style 'social support seeking' and the accommodative coping styles 'palliative reaction pattern' and 'comforting cognitions'. Perception of severity of illness was associated with higher scores on palliative coping. This study shows the importance of physicians and CF teams to tailor the way of providing bad news to parents' needs and preferences. It is important to help and encourage parents to use active or accommodative coping strategies. The diagnosis is the starting point of a long-term relationship. 'Doing things well from the start' helps families to learn to live with CF and treatment. Copyright © 2014 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Early detection of cystic fibrosis lung disease: multiple‐breath washout versus raised volume tests

    PubMed Central

    Lum, Sooky; Gustafsson, Per; Ljungberg, Henrik; Hülskamp, Georg; Bush, Andrew; Carr, Siobhán B; Castle, Rosemary; Hoo, Ah‐fong; Price, John; Ranganathan, Sarath; Stroobant, John; Wade, Angie; Wallis, Colin; Wyatt, Hilary; Stocks, Janet

    2007-01-01

    Background Lung clearance index (LCI), a measure of ventilation inhomogeneity derived from the multiple‐breath inert gas washout (MBW) technique, has been shown to detect abnormal lung function more readily than spirometry in preschool children with cystic fibrosis, but whether this holds true during infancy is unknown. Objectives To compare the extent to which parameters derived from the MBW and the raised lung volume rapid thoraco–abdominal compression (RVRTC) techniques identify diminished airway function in infants with cystic fibrosis when compared with healthy controls. Methods Measurements were performed during quiet sleep, with the tidal breathing MBW technique being performed before the forced expiratory manoeuvres. Results Measurements were obtained in 39 infants with cystic fibrosis (mean (SD) age 41.4 (22.0) weeks) and 21 controls (37.0 (15.1) weeks). Infants with cystic fibrosis had a significantly higher respiratory rate (38 (10) vs 32 (5) bpm) and LCI (8.4 (1.5) vs 7.2 (0.3)), and significantly lower values for all forced expiratory flow‐volume parameters compared with controls. Girls with cystic fibrosis had significantly lower forced expiratory volume (FEV0.5 and FEF25–75 ) than boys (mean (95% CI girls–boys): –1.2 (–2.1 to −0.3) for FEV0.5 Z score; FEF25–75: –1.2 (–2.2 to −0.15)). When using both the MBW and RVRTC techniques, abnormalities were detected in 72% of the infants with cystic fibrosis, with abnormalities detected in 41% using both techniques and a further 15% by each of the two tests performed. Conclusions These findings support the view that inflammatory and/or structural changes in the airways of children with cystic fibrosis start early in life, and have important implications regarding early detection and interventions. Monitoring of early lung disease and functional status in infants and young children with cystic fibrosis may be enhanced by using both MBW and the RVRTC. PMID:17121870

  9. L206W mutation of the cystic fibrosis gene, relatively frequent in French Canadians, is associated with atypical presentations of cystic fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Rozen, R.; Ferreira-Rajabi, L.; Robb, L.

    1995-07-03

    Cystic fibrosis is caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. Over 400 mutations have been reported at this locus. Although severe forms of cystic fibrosis are usually associated with pancreatic insufficiency, pulmonary dysfunction, and elevated sweat chloride, there is a wide range of phenotypes, including congenital absence of the vas deferens, observed with some of the milder mutations. The L206W mutation, which was first identified in patients from South France, is relatively frequent in French Canadians from Quebec. In this report, we document the atypical form of cystic fibrosis associated with this mutation in a cohort of 7 French Canadian probands. 20 refs.

  10. Country to country variation: what can be learnt from national cystic fibrosis registries.

    PubMed

    Goss, Christopher Hooper

    2015-11-01

    This review will address the evolving science involving international comparisons of populations of persons living with cystic fibrosis. Understanding the current clinical outcomes in cystic fibrosis is critical prior to assessing such comparisons. Countries that differ in clinical approaches provide natural experiments to assess those approaches. Recent studies have highlighted that the population of persons with cystic fibrosis is changing; estimates predict a continued growth of cystic fibrosis populations with substantial increases in persons with cystic fibrosis who are adults. Additional work highlighted differences in subpopulations (i.e. children); US cystic fibrosis children appear to have better lung function, but similar nutritional status, compared to UK cystic fibrosis children. These differences were associated with differences in intensity of care, with a higher proportion of US children receiving more cystic fibrosis-specific therapies. Additional research raises important questions regarding potential sampling bias in different patient registries and differing rates of unconfirmed cases of cystic fibrosis. These and other limitations are highlighted. Differences in both demographics and clinical outcomes in cystic fibrosis between nations can be informative, but, like many types of observational research, are at risk of unrecognized bias. Despite this limitation, these comparisons can lead to substantive improvements in care in cystic fibrosis.

  11. Exercise for all cystic fibrosis patients: is the evidence strengthening?

    PubMed

    Hebestreit, Helge; Kriemler, Susi; Radtke, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Regular physical activity and exercise have become important components of cystic fibrosis care. This review summarizes the recent evidence in favour of regular exercise in cystic fibrosis that has accumulated over the past years. Several recently published small randomized-controlled trials and observational studies have added to our knowledge on positive effects of exercise training on pulmonary function and aerobic fitness in cystic fibrosis. Relevant outcomes, such as body posture, health-related quality of life and rate of hospitalization, are increasingly studied. Findings from these studies suggest that exercise might also be beneficial for these outcomes. So far, many important questions such as the best way of integrating exercise in cystic fibrosis care and the determination of the optimal strategies for training and motivation remain mostly unanswered. Over the past years, evidence for the beneficial effects of regular exercise on lung health and aerobic exercise capacity is strengthening. Despite the fact that most of the knowledge is based on small studies, the observed effects are encouraging and there is no reason why exercise should not be implemented in all patients' care.

  12. Non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis: review and recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Livnat, Galit

    2009-01-01

    Bronchiectasis is an abnormal dilatation of bronchi and bronchioles associated with repeated cycles of airway infection and inflammation. This review will focus on non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis in children, with regard to etiology, diagnosis, treatment options, and recent advances. PMID:20948713

  13. Mycobacterium chimaera pulmonary infection complicating cystic fibrosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Bacrie, Stéphan; David, Marion; Stremler, Nathalie; Dubus, Jean-Christophe; Rolain, Jean-Marc; Drancourt, Michel

    2011-09-22

    Mycobacterium chimaera is a recently described species within the Mycobacterium avium complex. Its pathogenicity in respiratory tract infection remains disputed. It has never been isolated during cystic fibrosis respiratory tract infection. An 11-year-old boy of Asian ethnicity who was born on Réunion Island presented to our hospital with cystic fibrosis after a decline in his respiratory function over the course of seven years. We found that the decline in his respiratory function was correlated with the persistent presence of a Mycobacterium avium complex organism further identified as M. chimaera. Using sequencing-based methods of identification, we observed that M. chimaera organisms contributed equally to respiratory tract infections in patients with cystic fibrosis when compared with M. avium subsp. hominissuis isolates. We believe that M. chimaera should be regarded as an emerging opportunistic respiratory pathogen in patients with cystic fibrosis, including young children, and that its detection warrants long-lasting appropriate anti-mycobacterial treatment to eradicate it.

  14. Clostridium difficile pancolitis in adults with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Barker, H C; Haworth, C S; Williams, D; Roberts, P; Bilton, D

    2008-09-01

    We report three cases of Clostridium difficile pancolitis in adults with cystic fibrosis (CF) in whom the presenting symptoms were atypical. All three required treatment with systemic steroids, in addition to oral vancomycin and metronidazole to achieve resolution of the colitis. This experience suggests that C. difficile colitis should be considered in individuals with CF presenting with non-specific abdominal symptoms.

  15. Students as Technicians: Screening Newborns for Cystic Fibrosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gusky, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    In this activity, freshman college students learn biotechnology techniques while playing the role of a laboratory technician. They perform simulations of three diagnostic tests used to screen newborns for cystic fibrosis. By performing an ELISA, a PCR analysis, and a conductivity test, students learn how biotechnology techniques can be used to…

  16. Students as Technicians: Screening Newborns for Cystic Fibrosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gusky, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    In this activity, freshman college students learn biotechnology techniques while playing the role of a laboratory technician. They perform simulations of three diagnostic tests used to screen newborns for cystic fibrosis. By performing an ELISA, a PCR analysis, and a conductivity test, students learn how biotechnology techniques can be used to…

  17. New and emerging targeted therapies for cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a monogenic autosomal recessive disorder that affects about 70 000 people worldwide. The clinical manifestations of the disease are caused by defects in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. The discovery of the CFTR gene in 1989 has led to a sophisticated understanding of how thousands of mutations in the CFTR gene affect the structure and function of the CFTR protein. Much progress has been made over the past decade with the development of orally bioavailable small molecule drugs that target defective CFTR proteins caused by specific mutations. Furthermore, there is considerable optimism about the prospect of gene replacement or editing therapies to correct all mutations in cystic fibrosis. The recent approvals of ivacaftor and lumacaftor represent the genesis of a new era of precision medicine in the treatment of this condition. These drugs are having a positive impact on the lives of people with cystic fibrosis and are potentially disease modifying. This review provides an update on advances in our understanding of the structure and function of the CFTR, with a focus on state of the art targeted drugs that are in development. PMID:27030675

  18. Mycobacterium chimaera pulmonary infection complicating cystic fibrosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium chimaera is a recently described species within the Mycobacterium avium complex. Its pathogenicity in respiratory tract infection remains disputed. It has never been isolated during cystic fibrosis respiratory tract infection. Case presentation An 11-year-old boy of Asian ethnicity who was born on Réunion Island presented to our hospital with cystic fibrosis after a decline in his respiratory function over the course of seven years. We found that the decline in his respiratory function was correlated with the persistent presence of a Mycobacterium avium complex organism further identified as M. chimaera. Conclusion Using sequencing-based methods of identification, we observed that M. chimaera organisms contributed equally to respiratory tract infections in patients with cystic fibrosis when compared with M. avium subsp. hominissuis isolates. We believe that M. chimaera should be regarded as an emerging opportunistic respiratory pathogen in patients with cystic fibrosis, including young children, and that its detection warrants long-lasting appropriate anti-mycobacterial treatment to eradicate it. PMID:21939536

  19. Achromobacter xylosoxidans: Characterization of Strains in Brazilian Cystic Fibrosis Patients▿

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Rosana H. V.; Carvalho-Assef, Ana Paula; Albano, Rodolpho M.; Folescu, Tania W.; Jones, Marcia C. M. F.; Leão, Robson S.; Marques, Elizabeth A.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the possibility of cross-infection among cystic fibrosis patients in two Brazilian reference centers. Achromobacter xylosoxidans isolates (n = 122) were recovered over a 5-year period from 39 patients. Isolates were genetically heterogeneous, but one genotype was present in 56% of the patients, suggesting that cross-infection may have occurred. PMID:21849686

  20. Achromobacter xylosoxidans: characterization of strains in Brazilian cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Rosana H V; Carvalho-Assef, Ana Paula; Albano, Rodolpho M; Folescu, Tania W; Jones, Marcia C M F; Leão, Robson S; Marques, Elizabeth A

    2011-10-01

    We investigated the possibility of cross-infection among cystic fibrosis patients in two Brazilian reference centers. Achromobacter xylosoxidans isolates (n = 122) were recovered over a 5-year period from 39 patients. Isolates were genetically heterogeneous, but one genotype was present in 56% of the patients, suggesting that cross-infection may have occurred.

  1. Microbiology of airway disease in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Gilligan, P H

    1991-01-01

    Individuals with cystic fibrosis have abbreviated life spans primarily due to chronic airway infection. A limited number of types of organisms are responsible for these infections, with Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa being of primary importance. In the pre-antibiotic era, greater than 90% of deaths due to infection were caused by S. aureus and death usually occurred in the first 2 years of life. With the advent of effective antistaphylococcal therapy, life spans increased and P. aeruginosa became the pathogen of primary importance. P. aeruginosa isolates recovered from patients with cystic fibrosis have a unique phenotypic characteristic referred to as "mucoid." The mucoid phenotype is due to the production of a mucoid exopolysaccharide. A mucoid exopolysaccharide is believed to play a central role in the establishment of chronic pseudomonal lung infection in these patients. A third organism, Pseudomonas cepacia, has recently been detected in the airways of older patients with cystic fibrosis and is associated with increased mortality. The virulence of P. cepacia is not understood, but the organism is extremely refractory to antimicrobial therapy. Other bacteria, including Haemophilus influenzae and members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, appear to play a secondary role in airway infection. Aspergillus fumigatus is the most important fungal agent causing allergic bronchopulmonary disease. The role of viruses has only recently been examined. At least in some patients with cystic fibrosis, respiratory syncytial virus may be important in predisposing to subsequent bacterial infections. PMID:1900735

  2. Improved sweat test method for the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Carter, E P; Barrett, A D; Heeley, A F; Kuzemko, J A

    1984-01-01

    We describe a new technique of collecting sweat for measurement of osmolality and sodium concentrations. Eighty two subjects were studied--39 controls and 43 patients with cystic fibrosis. Adequate amounts of sweat were obtained in 81 subjects and sweat was analysed for both osmolality and sodium concentrations in 73 subjects. The 34 controls gave sweat osmolality and sodium values ranging from 62 to 196 mmol/kg and 9 to 72 mmol/l respectively. The 39 cystic fibrosis patients gave osmolality values ranging from 220 to 416 mmol/kg and sodium concentrations ranging from 60 to 150 mmol/l. Sweat osmolality alone was determined in eight infants under 50 days of age--four later developed the clinical features of cystic fibrosis and four, in whom cystic fibrosis was suspected, were later excluded. Sweat osmolality values in these two groups ranged from 255 to 345 mmol/kg and 87 to 123 mmol/kg respectively. The simplicity of collecting sweat and the measurement of osmolality offer distinct advantages over techniques previously described. PMID:6497428

  3. Chronic rhinovirus infection in an adult with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Flight, William G; Bright-Thomas, Rowland J; Tilston, Peter; Mutton, Kenneth J; Guiver, Malcolm; Webb, A Kevin; Jones, Andrew M

    2013-11-01

    Rhinovirus is a common cause of exacerbations of cystic fibrosis (CF) and is usually considered a self-limiting infection. We report a case of chronic infection with rhinovirus A type 33 in a 43-year-old male with CF which has persisted for over 2 years.

  4. Strength and Conditioning for the Person with Cystic Fibrosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, Mike

    2001-01-01

    Discusses how a strength and conditioning program can be safety incorporated into the daily life of people with cystic fibrosis as a complementary therapy to medications, regular checkups, bronchial drainage, and respiratory therapy, examining physical restrictions and guidelines, exercise prescriptions, and exercise applications, and explaining…

  5. New and emerging targeted therapies for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Quon, Bradley S; Rowe, Steven M

    2016-03-30

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a monogenic autosomal recessive disorder that affects about 70,000 people worldwide. The clinical manifestations of the disease are caused by defects in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. The discovery of the CFTR gene in 1989 has led to a sophisticated understanding of how thousands of mutations in the CFTR gene affect the structure and function of the CFTR protein. Much progress has been made over the past decade with the development of orally bioavailable small molecule drugs that target defective CFTR proteins caused by specific mutations. Furthermore, there is considerable optimism about the prospect of gene replacement or editing therapies to correct all mutations in cystic fibrosis. The recent approvals of ivacaftor and lumacaftor represent the genesis of a new era of precision medicine in the treatment of this condition. These drugs are having a positive impact on the lives of people with cystic fibrosis and are potentially disease modifying. This review provides an update on advances in our understanding of the structure and function of the CFTR, with a focus on state of the art targeted drugs that are in development.

  6. The Cystic Fibrosis Database: Content and Research Opportunities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, William M., Jr.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Describes the files contained in the Cystic Fibrosis (CF) database and discusses educational and research opportunities using this database. Topics discussed include queries, evaluating the relevance of items retrieved, and use of the database in an online searching course in the School of Information and Library Science at the University of North…

  7. Vocational Rehabilitation of the Person with Cystic Fibrosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isralsky, Marc; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Explored vocational development, self-concept, and vocational adjustment of persons with cystic fibrosis. The following measures of vocational development correlated with work adjustment: vocational plans, educational plans, initiative, occupational information, and average vocational development score. Vocational development did not correlate…

  8. Psychological Concomitants of Cystic Fibrosis in Children and Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kashani, Javad H.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Administered several psychiatric inventories to 30 cystic fibrosis and 30 matched control children and their parents. Data analysis revealed few differences in either psychopathological symptoms or psychiatric diagnoses between groups. Differences were either physical in nature or did not depart enough from normal scores to merit label of high…

  9. Strength and Conditioning for the Person with Cystic Fibrosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, Mike

    2001-01-01

    Discusses how a strength and conditioning program can be safety incorporated into the daily life of people with cystic fibrosis as a complementary therapy to medications, regular checkups, bronchial drainage, and respiratory therapy, examining physical restrictions and guidelines, exercise prescriptions, and exercise applications, and explaining…

  10. The Cystic Fibrosis Database: Content and Research Opportunities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, William M., Jr.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Describes the files contained in the Cystic Fibrosis (CF) database and discusses educational and research opportunities using this database. Topics discussed include queries, evaluating the relevance of items retrieved, and use of the database in an online searching course in the School of Information and Library Science at the University of North…

  11. Vocational Rehabilitation of the Person with Cystic Fibrosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isralsky, Marc; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Explored vocational development, self-concept, and vocational adjustment of persons with cystic fibrosis. The following measures of vocational development correlated with work adjustment: vocational plans, educational plans, initiative, occupational information, and average vocational development score. Vocational development did not correlate…

  12. Psychological Concomitants of Cystic Fibrosis in Children and Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kashani, Javad H.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Administered several psychiatric inventories to 30 cystic fibrosis and 30 matched control children and their parents. Data analysis revealed few differences in either psychopathological symptoms or psychiatric diagnoses between groups. Differences were either physical in nature or did not depart enough from normal scores to merit label of high…

  13. Digestive system dysfunction in cystic fibrosis: challenges for nutrition therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Somerset, Shawn

    2014-10-01

    Cystic fibrosis can affect food digestion and nutrient absorption. The underlying mutation of the cystic fibrosis trans-membrane regulator gene depletes functional cystic fibrosis trans-membrane regulator on the surface of epithelial cells lining the digestive tract and associated organs, where Cl(-) secretion and subsequently secretion of water and other ions are impaired. This alters pH and dehydrates secretions that precipitate and obstruct the lumen, causing inflammation and the eventual degradation of the pancreas, liver, gallbladder and intestine. Associated conditions include exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, impaired bicarbonate and bile acid secretion and aberrant mucus formation, commonly leading to maldigestion and malabsorption, particularly of fat and fat-soluble vitamins. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is used to address this insufficiency. The susceptibility of pancreatic lipase to acidic and enzymatic inactivation and decreased bile availability often impedes its efficacy. Brush border digestive enzyme activity and intestinal uptake of certain disaccharides and amino acids await clarification. Other complications that may contribute to maldigestion/malabsorption include small intestine bacterial overgrowth, enteric circular muscle dysfunction, abnormal intestinal mucus, and intestinal inflammation. However, there is some evidence that gastric digestive enzymes, colonic microflora, correction of fatty acid abnormalities using dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation and emerging intestinal biomarkers can complement nutrition management in cystic fibrosis.

  14. [CFTR and ENaC functions in cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Palma, Alejandra G; Kotsias, Basilio A; Marino, Gabriela I

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is caused by dysfunction or lack of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a chloride channel that has a key role in maintaining ion and water homoeostasis in different tissues. CFTR is a cyclic AMP-activated Cl- channel found in the apical and basal plasma membrane of airway, intestinal, and exocrine epithelial cells. One of CFTR's primary roles in the lungs is to maintain homoeostasis of the airway surface liquid layer through its function as a chloride channel and its regulation of the epithelial sodium channel ENaC. More than 1900 CFTR mutations have been identified in the cftr gene. The disease is characterized by viscous secretions of the exocrine glands in multiple organs and elevated levels of sweat sodium chloride. In cystic fibrosis, salt and fluid absorption is prevented by the loss of CFTR and ENaC is not appropriately regulated, resulting in increased fluid and sodium resorption from the airways and formation of a contracted viscous surface liquid layer. In the sweat glands both Na+ and Cl- ions are retained in the lumen, causing significant loss of electrolytes during sweating. Thus, elevated sweat NaCl concentration is the basis of the classic pilocarpine-induced sweat test as a diagnostic feature of the disease. Here we discuss the ion movement of Cl- and Na+ ions in two tissues, sweat glands and in the air surface as well as the role of ENaC in the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis.

  15. Chronic Rhinovirus Infection in an Adult with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Bright-Thomas, Rowland J.; Tilston, Peter; Mutton, Kenneth J.; Guiver, Malcolm; Webb, A. Kevin; Jones, Andrew M.

    2013-01-01

    Rhinovirus is a common cause of exacerbations of cystic fibrosis (CF) and is usually considered a self-limiting infection. We report a case of chronic infection with rhinovirus A type 33 in a 43-year-old male with CF which has persisted for over 2 years. PMID:23966488

  16. 78 FR 26681 - Medical Criteria for Evaluating Cystic Fibrosis

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-07

    ... ADMINISTRATION RIN 0960-AF58 Medical Criteria for Evaluating Cystic Fibrosis AGENCY: Social Security... additional information regarding this teleconference, please contact Cheryl Williams, Office of Medical... disability benefits. 3. Information we received from medical experts and members of the public. 4. Proposed...

  17. Pathology mimicking distal intestinal obstruction syndrome in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Dalzell, A M; Heaf, D P; Carty, H

    1990-05-01

    Eight patients with cystic fibrosis had chronic abdominal pain and the other features of distal intestinal obstruction syndrome. Coexistent abdominal pathology was shown in six patients. Two had a small bowel volvulus, and the others had Crohn's disease, a small bowel fistula, appendix abscess, and an ovarian dermoid. Opiate abuse exacerbated symptoms in two other patients.

  18. US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and European Cystic Fibrosis Society consensus recommendations for the management of non-tuberculous mycobacteria in individuals with cystic fibrosis: executive summary.

    PubMed

    Floto, R Andres; Olivier, Kenneth N; Saiman, Lisa; Daley, Charles L; Herrmann, Jean-Louis; Nick, Jerry A; Noone, Peadar G; Bilton, Diana; Corris, Paul; Gibson, Ronald L; Hempstead, Sarah E; Koetz, Karsten; Sabadosa, Kathryn A; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Smyth, Alan R; van Ingen, Jakko; Wallace, Richard J; Winthrop, Kevin L; Marshall, Bruce C; Haworth, Charles S

    2016-01-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are ubiquitous environmental organisms that can cause chronic pulmonary infection, particularly in individuals with pre-existing inflammatory lung disease, such as cystic fibrosis (CF). Pulmonary disease (PD) caused by NTM has emerged as a major threat to the health of individuals with CF, but remains difficult to diagnose and problematic to treat. In response to this challenge, the US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (CFF) and the European Cystic Fibrosis Society (ECFS) convened a panel of 19 experts to develop consensus recommendations for the screening, investigation, diagnosis and management of NTM-PD in individuals with CF. PICO (population, intervention, comparison, outcome) methodology and systematic literature reviews were employed to inform draft recommendations, which were then modified to achieve consensus and subsequently circulated for public consultation within the USA and European CF communities. We have thus generated a series of pragmatic, evidence-based recommendations as an initial step in optimising management for this challenging condition. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  19. US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and European Cystic Fibrosis Society consensus recommendations for the management of non-tuberculous mycobacteria in individuals with cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Olivier, Kenneth N; Saiman, Lisa; Daley, Charles L; Herrmann, Jean-Louis; Nick, Jerry A; Noone, Peadar G; Bilton, Diana; Corris, Paul; Gibson, Ronald L; Hempstead, Sarah E; Koetz, Karsten; Sabadosa, Kathryn A; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Smyth, Alan R; van Ingen, Jakko; Wallace, Richard J; Winthrop, Kevin L; Marshall, Bruce C; Haworth, Charles S

    2016-01-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are ubiquitous environmental organisms that can cause chronic pulmonary infection, particularly in individuals with pre-existing inflammatory lung disease such as cystic fibrosis (CF). Pulmonary disease caused by NTM has emerged as a major threat to the health of individuals with CF but remains difficult to diagnose and problematic to treat. In response to this challenge, the US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (CFF) and the European Cystic Fibrosis Society (ECFS) convened an expert panel of specialists to develop consensus recommendations for the screening, investigation, diagnosis and management of NTM pulmonary disease in individuals with CF. Nineteen experts were invited to participate in the recommendation development process. Population, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome (PICO) methodology and systematic literature reviews were employed to inform draft recommendations. An anonymous voting process was used by the committee to reach consensus. All committee members were asked to rate each statement on a scale of: 0, completely disagree, to 9, completely agree; with 80% or more of scores between 7 and 9 being considered ‘good’ agreement. Additionally, the committee solicited feedback from the CF communities in the USA and Europe and considered the feedback in the development of the final recommendation statements. Three rounds of voting were conducted to achieve 80% consensus for each recommendation statement. Through this process, we have generated a series of pragmatic, evidence-based recommendations for the screening, investigation, diagnosis and treatment of NTM infection in individuals with CF as an initial step in optimising management for this challenging condition. PMID:26666259

  20. US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and European Cystic Fibrosis Society consensus recommendations for the management of non-tuberculous mycobacteria in individuals with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Floto, R Andres; Olivier, Kenneth N; Saiman, Lisa; Daley, Charles L; Herrmann, Jean-Louis; Nick, Jerry A; Noone, Peadar G; Bilton, Diana; Corris, Paul; Gibson, Ronald L; Hempstead, Sarah E; Koetz, Karsten; Sabadosa, Kathryn A; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Smyth, Alan R; van Ingen, Jakko; Wallace, Richard J; Winthrop, Kevin L; Marshall, Bruce C; Haworth, Charles S

    2016-01-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are ubiquitous environmental organisms that can cause chronic pulmonary infection, particularly in individuals with pre-existing inflammatory lung disease such as cystic fibrosis (CF). Pulmonary disease caused by NTM has emerged as a major threat to the health of individuals with CF but remains difficult to diagnose and problematic to treat. In response to this challenge, the US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (CFF) and the European Cystic Fibrosis Society (ECFS) convened an expert panel of specialists to develop consensus recommendations for the screening, investigation, diagnosis and management of NTM pulmonary disease in individuals with CF. Nineteen experts were invited to participate in the recommendation development process. Population, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome (PICO) methodology and systematic literature reviews were employed to inform draft recommendations. An anonymous voting process was used by the committee to reach consensus. All committee members were asked to rate each statement on a scale of: 0, completely disagree, to 9, completely agree; with 80% or more of scores between 7 and 9 being considered 'good' agreement. Additionally, the committee solicited feedback from the CF communities in the USA and Europe and considered the feedback in the development of the final recommendation statements. Three rounds of voting were conducted to achieve 80% consensus for each recommendation statement. Through this process, we have generated a series of pragmatic, evidence-based recommendations for the screening, investigation, diagnosis and treatment of NTM infection in individuals with CF as an initial step in optimising management for this challenging condition.

  1. Antenatal testing for cystic fibrosis in Cuba, 1988-2011.

    PubMed

    Collazo, Teresa; López, Ixchel; Clark, Yulia; Piloto, Yaixa; González, Laura; Gómez, Manuel; García, Marileivis; Reyes, Lidice; Rodríguez, Fidel

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Cystic fibrosis is a multisystem autosomal recessive disease with wide variability in clinical severity. It is incurable and characterized by elevated and premature mortality, as well as poor quality of life. Its frequency, lethality and devastating impact on both the physical and psychological wellbeing of patients and their families, make it a serious health problem. Its frequency in Cuba is 1 in 9862 live births, where marked molecular heterogeneity of the CFTR gene makes molecular diagnosis difficult. Six mutations have been identified that together enable molecular characterization of only 55.5% of cystic fibrosis chromosomes. This paper presents national results of antenatal diagnostic testing, using direct and indirect methods, for detection of cystic fibrosis. OBJECTIVE Characterize the Cuban public health system's experience with antenatal molecular testing for cystic fibrosis from 1988 through 2011. METHODS A retrospective descriptive study was conducted with results of antenatal diagnostic testing of amniotic fluid, performed nationwide from 1988 through 2011, for 108 fetuses of couples with some risk of having children affected by cystic fibrosis, who requested testing. Polymerase chain reaction detected mutations p.F508del, p.G542X, p.R1162X, p.R334W, p.R553X and c.3120+1G>A, and markers XV2C and KM19. Data were analyzed using absolute frequencies and percentages, and presented in tables. RESULTS For 93 cases (86.1%), testing for cystic fibrosis was done using direct analysis of mutations p.F508del, p.G542X, p.R1162X, p.R334W, p.R553X and c.3120+1G>A; five cases (4.6%) were tested indirectly using markers XV2C/Taq I and KM19/Pst I; and 10 (9.3%) were tested using a combination of the two methods. A total of 72 diagnoses (66.7% of studies done) were concluded, of which there were 20 healthy fetuses, 16 affected, 27 carrier, and 9 who were either healthy or carriers of an unknown mutation. CONCLUSIONS Direct or indirect molecular study was

  2. Palliative drug treatments for breathlessness in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Nishant; Singh, Meenu; Agarwal, Amit; Thumburu, Kiran K

    2017-08-10

    Cystic fibrosis is a life-limiting autosomal recessive genetic illness. A feeling of shortness of breath is common in cystic fibrosis, especially as the disease progresses. Reversing the underlying cause is the priority when treating breathlessness (dyspnoea), but when it is not feasible, palliation (easing) becomes the primary goal to improve an individual's quality of life. A range of drugs administered by various routes have been used, but no definite guidelines are available. A systematic review is needed to evaluate such treatments. To assess the efficacy and safety of drugs used to ease breathlessness in people with cystic fibrosis. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis Trials Register, compiled from electronic database searches and handsearching of journals and conference abstract books.Date of last search: 24 July 2017.We searched databases (clinicaltrials.gov, the ISRCTN registry, the Clinical Trials Registry India and WHO ICTRP) for ongoing trials. These searches were last run on 31 July 2017. We planned to include randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials in people with cystic fibrosis (diagnosed by a positive sweat chloride test or genetic testing) who have breathlessness. We considered studies comparing any drugs used for easing breathlessness to another drug administered by any route (inhaled (nebulised), intravenous, oral, subcutaneous, transmucosal (including buccal, sublingual and intra-nasal) and transdermal). The authors assessed the search results according to the pre-defined inclusion criteria. The search yielded only one study (cross-over in design), which did not fulfil the inclusion criteria as no data were available from the first treatment period alone. Due to the lack of available evidence, this review cannot provide any information for clinical practice. The authors call for specific research in this area after taking into account relevant ethical considerations. The research should focus on the efficacy and safety of the

  3. Pregnancy outcome in women with cystic fibrosis-related diabetes.

    PubMed

    Reynaud, Quitterie; Poupon-Bourdy, Stéphanie; Rabilloud, Muriel; Al Mufti, Lina; Rousset Jablonski, Christine; Lemonnier, Lydie; Nove-Josserand, Raphaële; Touzet, Sandrine; Durieu, Isabelle

    2017-10-01

    With increasing life expectancy, more women with cystic fibrosis and diabetes mellitus become pregnant. We investigated how pre-gestational diabetes (cystic fibrosis-related diabetes) influenced pregnancy outcome and the clinical status of these women. We analyzed all pregnancies reported to the French cystic fibrosis registry between 2001 and 2012, and compared forced expiratory volume (FEV1 ) and body mass index before and after pregnancy in women with and without pre-gestational diabetes having a first delivery. A total 249 women delivered 314 infants. Among these, 189 women had a first delivery and 29 of these had pre-gestational diabetes. There was a trend towards a higher rate of assisted conception among diabetic women (53.8%) than non-diabetic women (34.5%, p = 0.06), and the rate of cesarean section was significantly higher in diabetic women (48% vs. 21.4%, p = 0.005). The rate of preterm birth and mean infant birthweight did not differ significantly between diabetic and non-diabetic women. Forced expiratory volume before pregnancy was significantly lower in the diabetic group. The decline in forced expiratory volume and body mass index following pregnancy did not differ between the women with and those without pre-gestational diabetes. Pre-gestational diabetes in women with cystic fibrosis is associated with a higher rate of cesarean section but does not seem to have a clinically significant impact on fetal growth or preterm delivery. The changes in maternal pulmonary and nutritional status following pregnancy in women with cystic fibrosis were not influenced by pre-gestational diabetes. © 2017 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  4. Synthesis of sulfated oligosaccharides by cystic fibrosis trachea epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mendicino, J; Sangadala, S

    1999-11-01

    The mucin glycoproteins in tracheal mucus of patients with cystic fibrosis is more highly sulfated than the corresponding secretions from healthy individuals [16]. In order to further characterize these differences in sulfation and possibly also glycosylation patterns, we compared the structures of sulfated mucin oligosaccharides synthesized by continuously cultured human tracheal cells transformed by simian virus 40. The synthesis of highly sulfated oligosaccharide chains in mucins secreted by normal human epithelial and submucosal cell lines were compared with mucins formed by cystic fibrosis tracheal epithelial and submucosal cell lines. The epithelial cell lines from cystic fibrosis trachea showed a higher rate of sulfate uptake and a significantly higher rate of synthesis and sulfation of high molecular weight chains. Mucins synthesized by each cell line in the presence of 35SO4 were isolated and oligosaccharide chains were released by beta-elimination and separated by ion exchange chromatography and gel filtration. The sulfated high molecular weight chains synthesized by the cystic fibrosis cell lines were characterized by methylation analysis and sequential glycosidase digestion before and after desulfation. Carbohydrate analysis yielded Fuc, Gal and GlcNAc in a ratio of 1:2:2.2 and only one galactosaminitol residue for about every 150-200 sugar residues present. The average molecular size of oligosaccharide chains in these fractions was between 30,000-40,000 daltons. These studies show that increased sulfation of oligosaccharides in mucins synthesized by cells from cystic fibrosis trachea is accompanied by a significant increase in the extension of a basic branched structure present in many of the lower molecular weight oligosaccharides.

  5. Treatment and prognosis of nasal polyps in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Stern, R C; Boat, T F; Wood, R E; Matthews, L W; Doershuk, C F

    1982-12-01

    Nasal polyposis complicated the course of fibrosis in 157 (26%) of 605 patients. Onset before age 5 years or after age 20 years was rare. Polyposis was the initial symptom of cystic fibrosis in 13 patients. Common symptoms included obstruction to nasal air flow, mouth breathing, epistaxis, and rhinorrhea. Intranasal and oral corticosteroids and antihistamines were ineffective in preventing recurrences but did occasionally afford symptomatic relief of obstruction. Nineteen (31%) of 62 patients who never had surgery had spontaneous and permanent disappearance of polyps. Simple polypectomy was an adequate procedure for patients with substantial nasal symptoms. There were no visual complications. Other surgical complications were rare. Children and adolescents with nasal polyps should have sweat tests by pilocarpine iontophoresis to rule out cystic fibrosis.

  6. Molecular characterization of Achromobacter isolates from cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis patients in Madrid, Spain.

    PubMed

    Barrado, Laura; Brañas, Patricia; Orellana, M Ángeles; Martínez, M Teresa; García, Gloria; Otero, Joaquín R; Chaves, Fernando

    2013-06-01

    Multilocus sequence typing and nrdA sequence analysis identified 6 different species or genogroups and 13 sequence types (STs) among 15 Achromobacter isolates from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and 7 species or genogroups and 11 STs among 11 isolates from non-CF patients. Achromobacter xylosoxidans was the most frequently isolated species among CF patients.

  7. Molecular Characterization of Achromobacter Isolates from Cystic Fibrosis and Non-Cystic Fibrosis Patients in Madrid, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Barrado, Laura; Brañas, Patricia; Orellana, M. Ángeles; Martínez, M. Teresa; García, Gloria; Otero, Joaquín R.

    2013-01-01

    Multilocus sequence typing and nrdA sequence analysis identified 6 different species or genogroups and 13 sequence types (STs) among 15 Achromobacter isolates from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and 7 species or genogroups and 11 STs among 11 isolates from non-CF patients. Achromobacter xylosoxidans was the most frequently isolated species among CF patients. PMID:23536401

  8. Oral calorie supplements for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Rosalind L; Rayner, Oli

    2014-11-03

    Poor nutrition occurs frequently in people with cystic fibrosis (CF) and is associated with other adverse outcomes. Oral calorie supplements are used to increase total daily calorie intake and improve weight gain. However, they are expensive and there are concerns they may reduce the amount of food eaten and not improve overall energy intake. To establish whether in people with CF, oral calorie supplements: increase daily calorie intake; and improve overall nutritional intake, nutritional indices, lung function, survival and quality of life. To assess adverse effects associated with using these supplements. We searched the Cochrane CF Trials Register comprising references from comprehensive electronic database searches, handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. We contacted companies marketing oral calorie supplements.Last search: 03 July 2014. Randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing use of oral calorie supplements for at least one month to increase calorie intake with no specific intervention or additional nutritional advice in people with CF. We independently selected the included trials, assessed risk of bias and extracted data. We contacted the authors of included trials and obtained additional information for two trials. We identified 21 trials and included three, reporting results from 131 participants lasting between three months and one year. Two trials compared supplements to additional nutritional advice and one to no intervention. Two of the included trials recruited only children. In one trial the risk of bias was low across all domains, in a second trial the risk of bias was largely unclear and in the third mainly low. Blinding of participants was unclear in two of the trials. Also, in one trial the clinical condition of groups appeared to be unevenly balanced at baseline and in another trial there were concerns surrounding allocation concealment. There were no significant differences between

  9. Nursing interventions in monitoring the adolescent with Cystic Fibrosis: a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Reisinho, Maria da Conceição Marinho Sousa Ribeiro Oliveira; Gomes, Bárbara Pereira

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: to search for nursing interventions focused on the improvement of quality of life and promotion of self-care of adolescents suffering from the Cystic Fibrosis. Method: literature review. The inclusion criteria were: primary studies and studies with interventions developed by nurses in the adolescent population with Cystic Fibrosis, using Portuguese, Spanish, French and English with no time limit, and supported by the databases Scopus, Web of Science and CINAHL. The search expressions were: nursing AND care AND adolescent AND "Cystic Fibrosis" AND ("quality of life" OR "self-care"). Results: a total of 59 articles was retrieved; 8 matched the criteria chosen. Nursing interventions targeted at adolescents with Cystic Fibrosis and their family members were identified. These interventions were organized according to the nurses' role, namely caregiver, coordinator, counsellor, researcher, trainer and care partner. Conclusions: nursing interventions targeted at following up the adolescent during the entire therapeutic process, involving the presence of parents/significant others, since both the adolescent and family have to be responsible for self-care. Healthcare professionals should be capable of identifying the specific needs of patients with chronic disease and their family, permitting a better understanding and adaptation to the health-disease transition process. PMID:27982311

  10. Ataluren and similar compounds (specific therapies for premature termination codon class I mutations) for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Aslam, Aisha A; Higgins, Colin; Sinha, Ian P; Southern, Kevin W

    2017-01-19

    selective outcome reporting, especially when reporting on the trial's post hoc subgroup of participants by chronic inhaled antibiotic use.The trial was sponsored by PTC Therapeutics Incorporated with grant support by the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, the Food and Drug Administration's Office of Orphan Products Development and the National Institutes of Health (NIH).The trial reported no significant difference between treatment groups in quality of life, assessed by the Cystic Fibrosis Questionnaire-Revised respiratory domain score and no improvement in respiratory function measures (mean difference of relative change in forced expiratory volume at one second 2.97% (95% confidence interval -0.58 to 6.52)). Ataluren was associated with a significantly higher rate of episodes of renal impairment, risk ratio 17.70 (99% confidence interval 1.28 to 244.40). The trial reported no significant treatment effect for ataluren for the review's secondary outcomes: pulmonary exacerbation; computerised tomography score; weight; body mass index; and sweat chloride. No deaths were reported in the trial.A post hoc subgroup analysis of participants not receiving chronic inhaled tobramycin (n = 146) demonstrated favourable results for ataluren (n = 72) for relative change in % predicted forced expiratory volume at one second and pulmonary exacerbation rate. Participants receiving chronic inhaled tobramycin appeared to have a reduced rate of pulmonary exacerbation compared to those not receiving chronic inhaled tobramycin. This drug interaction was not anticipated and may affect the interpretation of the trial results. There is currently insufficient evidence to determine the effect of ataluren as a therapy for people with cystic fibrosis with class I mutations. Future trials should carefully assess for adverse events, notably renal impairment and consider the possibility of drug interactions. Cross-over trials should be avoided given the potential for the treatment to change the natural history

  11. Chest CT Features of Cystic Fibrosis in Korea: Comparison with Non-Cystic Fibrosis Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yang, So Yeon; Cha, Min Jae; Kim, Tae Jung; Kim, Tae Sung; Yoon, Hyun Jung

    2017-01-01

    Objective Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a rare congenital disease in Korea, and its clinical and imaging findings are unclear. The objective of our study was to describe the clinical and CT features of CF in Korea and compare its features with those of other diseases mimicking CF. Materials and Methods From November 1994 to December 2014, a presumptive diagnosis of CF was made in 23 patients based on clinical or radiological examination. After the exclusion of 10 patients without diagnostic confirmation, 13 patients were included in the study. A diagnosis of CF was made with the CF gene study. CT findings were evaluated for the presence and distribution of parenchymal abnormalities including bronchiectasis, tree-in-bud (TIB) pattern, mucus plugging, consolidation, and mosaic attenuation. Results Of the 13 patients, 7 (median age, 15 years) were confirmed as CF, 4 (median age, 19 years) had primary ciliary dyskinesia, 1 had bronchiectasis of unknown cause, and 1 had chronic asthma. CT of patients with CF showed bilateral bronchiectasis, TIB pattern, mosaic attenuation, and mucus plugging in all patients, with upper lung predominance (57%). In CT of the non-CF patients, bilateral bronchiectasis, TIB pattern, mosaic attenuation, and mucus plugging were also predominant features, with lower lung predominance (50%). Conclusion Korean patients with CF showed bilateral bronchiectasis, cellular bronchiolitis, mucus plugging, and mosaic attenuation, which overlapped with those of non-CF patients. CF gene study is recommended for the definitive diagnosis of CF in patients with these clinical and imaging features. PMID:28096734

  12. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator modulators in cystic fibrosis: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Béla Z; Haaf, Jérémy B; Leal, Teresinha; Noel, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    Mutations of the CFTR gene cause cystic fibrosis (CF), the most common recessive monogenic disease worldwide. These mutations alter the synthesis, processing, function, or half-life of CFTR, the main chloride channel expressed in the apical membrane of epithelial cells in the airway, intestine, pancreas, and reproductive tract. Lung disease is the most critical manifestation of CF. It is characterized by airway obstruction, infection, and inflammation that lead to fatal tissue destruction. In spite of great advances in early and multidisciplinary medical care, and in our understanding of the pathophysiology, CF is still considerably reducing the life expectancy of patients. This review highlights the current development in pharmacological modulators of CFTR, which aim at rescuing the expression and/or function of mutated CFTR. While only Kalydeco® and Orkambi® are currently available to patients, many other families of CFTR modulators are undergoing preclinical and clinical investigations. Drug repositioning and personalized medicine are particularly detailed in this review as they represent the most promising strategies for restoring CFTR function in CF. PMID:27703398

  13. Genotypes and phenotypes in cystic fibrosis and cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator-related disorders.

    PubMed

    Bombieri, Cristina; Seia, Manuela; Castellani, Carlo

    2015-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is characterized by remarkable variability in severity, rate of disease progression, and organ involvement. In spite of the considerable amount of data collected on the relationship between genotype and phenotype in CF, this is still a challenging matter of debate. Barriers to the interpretation of this connection are the large number of mutations in the CF transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene, the difficulties in attributing several of them to a specific mode of dysfunction, and a limited number of the almost 2,000 mutations so far detected, which have been clinically annotated. In addition to that, the heterogeneity of clinical manifestations in individuals with the same CFTR genotypes indicates that disease severity is modulated by other genes and by environmental factors, of which the most relevant is possibly treatment in its aspects of appropriateness, early start in life, and adherence. The phenotype variability extends to conditions, named CFTR-related disorders, which are connected with CFTR dysfunction, but do not satisfy diagnostic criteria for CF. The current level of knowledge does not allow use of the CFTR genotype to predict individual outcome and cannot be used as an indicator of CF prognosis. This might change with the development of treatments targeting specific mutations and possibly capable of changing the natural history of the disease.

  14. European Cystic Fibrosis Society Standards of Care: Framework for the Cystic Fibrosis Centre.

    PubMed

    Conway, Steven; Balfour-Lynn, Ian M; De Rijcke, Karleen; Drevinek, Pavel; Foweraker, Juliet; Havermans, Trudy; Heijerman, Harry; Lannefors, Louise; Lindblad, Anders; Macek, Milan; Madge, Sue; Moran, Maeve; Morrison, Lisa; Morton, Alison; Noordhoek, Jacquelien; Sands, Dorota; Vertommen, Anneke; Peckham, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    A significant increase in life expectancy in successive birth cohorts of people with cystic fibrosis (CF) is a result of more effective treatment for the disease. It is also now widely recognized that outcomes for patients cared for in specialist CF Centres are better than for those who are not. Key to the effectiveness of the specialist CF Centre is the multidisciplinary team (MDT), which should include consultants, clinical nurse specialist, microbiologist, physiotherapist, dietitian, pharmacist, clinical psychologist, social worker, clinical geneticist and allied healthcare professionals, all of whom should be experienced in CF care. Members of the MDT are also expected to keep up to date with developments in CF through continued professional development, attendance at conferences, auditing and involvement in research. Specialists CF Centres should also network with other Centres both nationally and internationally, and feed Centre data to registries in order to further the understanding of the disease. This paper provides a framework for the specialist CF Centre, including the organisation of the Centre and the individual roles of MDT members, as well as highlighting the value of CF organisations and disease registries.

  15. The role of exercise in maintaining health in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, Tiffany J; Elkins, Mark R; Bye, Peter T P

    2011-11-01

    Consensus statements about the care of people with cystic fibrosis (CF) recommend exercise as part of a wider management strategy. Many of these recommendations are based on high-quality evidence that regular exercise improves some important clinical outcomes, such as lung function and quality of life. However, the evidence about the effect of exercise on other clinical outcomes is less extensive or lower in quality. This article will review the physiological effects of exercise on a range of outcomes in people with CF, the mechanisms by which exercise may improve these outcomes and the quality and findings of clinical research into the effects of exercise in the management of CF. Substantial evidence confirms that exercise significantly reduces the rate of decline in lung function in people with CF, at least in part by increasing mucus clearance. Regular exercise training over 6 months improves aerobic exercise capacity. Bone health is often poor in people with CF, but only indirect evidence supports that increasing the amount of exercise will have a beneficial effect on bone density. CF-related diabetes is also a common sequela of the disease, but again only evidence from type-2 diabetes exists to support exercise as a way of managing it. Although its effects on some outcomes are unclear, the overall effect of exercise on quality of life is substantially beneficial and the evidence available for other specific outcomes is directly or indirectly supportive, so it appears appropriate to recommend it in clinical practice. © 2011 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

  16. CFTR, bicarbonate, and the pathophysiology of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Borowitz, Drucy

    2015-10-01

    The gene that encodes for the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator protein (CFTR) was identified in 1989, yet major pathophysiologic questions remain unanswered. There is emerging evidence that CFTR is a bicarbonate channel, a driver of chloride-bicarbonate exchange and through its action on local pH, a regulator of other ion channels and of proteins that function optimally in a neutral environment. In both the respiratory and gastrointestinal (GI) tracts, bicarbonate drives ionic content and fluid on epithelial surfaces, allows mucins to unfold and become slippery, and contributes to innate immunity. In the GI tract bicarbonate neutralizes gastric acid to support digestion and absorption. When CFTR is dysfunctional, lack of bicarbonate secretion disrupts these normal processes and thus leads directly to the clinical symptoms and signs of CF. This article synthesizes evidence from cell, animal, and human investigations that support these concepts. Bicarbonate secretion does not seem to be the same in all tissues and varies with physiologic demand. Thus, tissue type and whether conditions are baseline or stimulated needs to be taken into account when evaluating the evidence concerning the role of bicarbonate in the pathophysiology of CF as a regulator of local pH. Basic and applied research that focuses on the role of CFTR-mediated bicarbonate secretion helps explain many of the diverse clinical manifestations that are CF. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Airway epithelial control of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Campόdonico, Victoria L; Gadjeva, Mihaela; Paradis-Bleau, Catherine; Uluer, Ahmet; Pier, Gerald B

    2013-01-01

    Defective expression or function of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) underlies the hypersusceptibility of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients to chronic airway infections, particularly with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. CFTR is involved in the specific recognition of P. aeruginosa, thereby contributing to effective innate immunity and proper hydration of the airway surface layer (ASL). In CF, the airway epithelium fails to initiate an appropriate innate immune response, allowing the microbe to bind to mucus plugs that are then not properly cleared because of the dehydrated ASL. Recent studies have identified numerous CFTR-dependent factors that are recruited to the epithelial plasma membrane in response to infection and that are needed for bacterial clearance, a process that is defective in CF patients hypersusceptible to infection with this organism. PMID:18262467

  18. Progress in cystic fibrosis and the CF Therapeutics Development Network

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Steven M; Borowitz, Drucy S; Burns, Jane L; Clancy, John P; Donaldson, Scott H; Retsch-Bogart, George; Sagel, Scott D; Ramsey, Bonnie W

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF), the most common life-shortening genetic disorder in Caucasians, affects approximately 70 000 individuals worldwide. In 1998, the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (CFF) launched the CF Therapeutics Development Network (CF-TDN) as a central element of its Therapeutics Development Programme. Designed to accelerate the clinical evaluation of new therapies needed to fulfil the CFF mission to control and cure CF, the CF-TDN has conducted 75 clinical trials since its inception, and has contributed to studies as varied as initial safety and proof of concept trials to pivotal programmes required for regulatory approval. This review highlights recent and significant research efforts of the CF-TDN, including a summary of contributions to studies involving CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) modulators, airway surface liquid hydrators and mucus modifiers, anti-infectives, anti-inflammatories, and nutritional therapies. Efforts to advance CF biomarkers, necessary to accelerate the therapeutic goals of the network, are also summarised. PMID:22960984

  19. Riboflavin deficiency in cystic fibrosis: three case reports.

    PubMed

    McCabe, H

    2001-10-01

    Three cases of clinical riboflavin deficiency are reported in children aged 2-10 years attending a regional Cystic Fibrosis clinic. Riboflavin deficiency presented as angular stomatitis in all three patients. Patients were confirmed to be riboflavin deficient by assaying the activity of erythrocyte glutathione reductase. Patients were not on routine supplements of water-soluble vitamins before presentation and were treated with riboflavin supplements as part of a water-soluble vitamin complex. At presentation, one patient had poor nutritional status, but two patients were adequately nourished, receiving overnight Gastrostomy feeds. Data on these two patients indicate an adequate dietary intake of riboflavin, suggesting a mechanism for increased requirements, inadequate absorption or utilization. Additional deficiencies of thiamin, pyridoxine and iron were also observed. This paper reports the occurrence of a vitamin deficiency not previously reported in the cystic fibrosis population.

  20. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator expression in human hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Mulberg, A E; Weyler, R T; Altschuler, S M; Hyde, T M

    1998-01-05

    We have previously characterized the expression of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein (CFTR) gene, mRNA and protein in rat brain with reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR amplification, in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry. We now report that the CFTR mRNA is expressed in the human anterior hypothalamus, an area involved in regulation of appetite, resting energy expenditure and sexual differentiation. Expression of CFTR in neurons localized to this region may elucidate the pathogenesis of other non-pulmonary manifestations of cystic fibrosis which commonly are observed in children with CF, including congenital absence of the vas deferens. Neuron-specific expression of CFTR in brain may be involved in the regulation of homeostatic functions including reproductive function and fertility through effects on neurosecretion, i.e. GnRH release. Dysregulation of normal neuropeptide vesicle trafficking by mutant CFTR in brain my lead to alteration in physiological function.

  1. Animal Models of Cystic Fibrosis Pathology: Phenotypic Parallels and Divergences

    PubMed Central

    McElvaney, Noel G.

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. The resultant characteristic ion transport defect results in decreased mucociliary clearance, bacterial colonisation, and chronic neutrophil-dominated inflammation. Much knowledge surrounding the pathophysiology of the disease has been gained through the generation of animal models, despite inherent limitations in each. The failure of certain mouse models to recapitulate the phenotypic manifestations of human disease has initiated the generation of larger animals in which to study CF, including the pig and the ferret. This review will summarise the basic phenotypes of three animal models and describe the contributions of such animal studies to our current understanding of CF. PMID:27340661

  2. [Inhaled treatments in cystic fibrosis: what's new in 2013?].

    PubMed

    Dubus, J-C; Bassinet, L; Chedevergne, F; Delaisi, B; Desmazes-Dufeu, N; Reychler, G; Vecellio, L

    2014-04-01

    In the past few years some new inhaled drugs and inhalation devices have been proposed for the treatment of cystic fibrosis. Breath-controlled nebulizers allow increased pulmonary deposition, with a lower variability and a shorter delivery time. The new dry powder formulations of tobramycin, colistine and mannitol require a change in the inhalation technique which must be slow and deep. In the field of the inhaled mucolytic drugs, hypertonic saline and mannitol have an indication in some patients. With regard to antibiotics, dry-powder tobramycin and colistine can be substituted for the same drug delivered by nebulization. Nebulized aztreonam needs more studies to determine its place. These new treatments represent a definite advance for cystic fibrosis patients and need to be known by all practitioners. Their position in our therapeutic arsenal remains to be accurately defined. Copyright © 2013 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Cystic fibrosis carrier screening in Veneto (Italy): an ethical analysis.

    PubMed

    Bruni, Tommaso; Mameli, Matteo; Pravettoni, Gabriella; Boniolo, Giovanni

    2012-08-01

    A recent study by Castellani et al. (JAMA 302(23):2573-2579, 2009) describes the population-level effects of the choices of individuals who underwent molecular carrier screening for cystic fibrosis (CF) in Veneto, in the northeastern part of Italy, between 1993 and 2007. We discuss some of the ethical issues raised by the policies and individual choices that are the subject of this study. In particular, (1) we discuss the ethical issues raised by the acquisition of genetic information through antenatal carrier testing; (2) we consider whether by choosing to procreate naturally these couples can harm the resulting child and/or other members of society, and what the moral implications of such harm would be; (3) we consider whether by choosing to avoid natural procreation carrier couples can harm current or future individuals affected by cystic fibrosis; (4) we discuss whether programs that make carrier testing available can be considered eugenic programs.

  4. Pleural effusions in non-transplanted cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Belanger, Adam R; Nguyen, Kimtuyen; Osman, Umar; Gilbert, Christopher R; Allen, Katie; Al Rais, Ahmad Farid; Yarmus, Lonny; Akulian, Jason A

    2017-07-01

    Pleural effusions are considered rare in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. There is a paucity of available information in the literature concerning the nature and significance of pleural effusions in non-transplanted CF patients. We conducted a multicenter retrospective evaluation of non-transplanted adult CF patients. Given the small sample size, only descriptive statistics were performed. A total of 17 CF patients with pleural effusion were identified, of whom 9 patients underwent thoracentesis. The crude incidence of pleural effusion was 43 per 10,000 person-years in hospitalized CF patients at large CF centers. All sampled effusions were inflammatory in nature. All samples submitted for culture grew at least one organism. Pleural effusions are rare in adult non-transplanted CF patients. These fluid collections appear to be quite inflammatory with a higher rate of empyema than in the general population. Copyright © 2016 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Fractional measurements of sweat osmolality in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Simmonds, E; Alfaham, M; Prosser, R; Penney, M D

    1989-01-01

    After pilocarpine iontophoresis the change of sweat concentration during collection was studied by vapour pressure osmometry in 24 patients with cystic fibrosis and 24 healthy controls. There was a continuous but proportionate fall in sweat concentrations during the collection period. Mean (SD) initial sweat concentration in the control group was 154.4 (32.6) mmol/kg falling, after 50 microliters of sweat produced, to 92.9 (15.8) mmol/kg. In the cystic fibrosis group it was 315.9 (35.8) mmol/kg falling to 247.4 (24.9) mmol/kg. Despite different rates of fall in concentrations, separation of the two groups was maintained throughout. We conclude that there are implications for the potential improvement of the predictive value of the sweat test. PMID:2624477

  6. Analysis of 16 cystic fibrosis mutations in Mexican patients

    SciTech Connect

    Villalobos-Torres, C.; Rojas-Martinez, A.; Barrera-Saldana, H.A.

    1997-04-14

    We carried out molecular analysis of 80 chromosomes from 40 unrelated Mexican patients with a diagnosis of cystic fibrosis. The study was performed in two PCR steps: a preliminary one to identify mutation AF508, the most frequent cause of cystic fibrosis worldwide, and the second a reverse dot-blot with allele-specific oligonucleotide probes to detect 15 additional common mutations in the Caucasian population. A frequency of 45% for AF508 was found, making it the most common in our sample of Mexican patients. Another five mutations (G542X, 3849 + 10 kb C{r_arrow}T, N1303K, S549N, and 621 + 1 G{r_arrow}T) were detected, and these accounted for 11.25%. The remaining mutations (43.75%) were undetectable with the methodology used. 20 refs., 2 tabs.

  7. Multifunctional superparamagnetic nanoparticles for enhanced drug transport in cystic fibrosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armijo, Leisha M.; Brandt, Yekaterina I.; Rivera, Antonio C.; Cook, Nathaniel C.; Plumley, John B.; Withers, Nathan J.; Kopciuch, Michael; Smolyakov, Gennady A.; Huber, Dale L.; Smyth, Hugh D.; Osinski, Marek

    2012-10-01

    Iron oxide colloidal nanoparticles (ferrofluids) are investigated for application in the treatment of cystic fibrosis lung infections, the leading cause of mortality in cystic fibrosis patients. We investigate the use of iron oxide nanoparticles to increase the effectiveness of administering antibiotics through aerosol inhalation using two mechanisms: directed particle movement in the presence of an inhomogeneous static external magnetic field and magnetic hyperthermia. Magnetic hyperthermia is an effective method for decreasing the viscosity of the mucus and biofilm, thereby enhancing drug, immune cell, and antibody penetration to the affected area. Iron oxide nanoparticles of various sizes and morphologies were synthesized and tested for specific losses (heating power). Nanoparticles in the superparamagnetic to ferromagnetic size range exhibited excellent heating power. Additionally, iron oxide / zinc selenide core/shell nanoparticles were prepared, in order to enable imaging of the iron oxide nanoparticles. We also report on synthesis and characterization of MnSe/ZnSeS alloyed quantum dots.

  8. ATPase activity of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator.

    PubMed

    Li, C; Ramjeesingh, M; Wang, W; Garami, E; Hewryk, M; Lee, D; Rommens, J M; Galley, K; Bear, C E

    1996-11-08

    The gene mutated in cystic fibrosis codes for the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a cyclic AMP-activated chloride channel thought to be critical for salt and water transport by epithelial cells. Plausible models exist to describe a role for ATP hydrolysis in CFTR channel activity; however, biochemical evidence that CFTR possesses intrinsic ATPase activity is lacking. In this study, we report the first measurements of the rate of ATP hydrolysis by purified, reconstituted CFTR. The mutation CFTRG551D resides within a motif conserved in many nucleotidases and is known to cause severe human disease. Following reconstitution the mutant protein exhibited both defective ATP hydrolysis and channel gating, providing direct evidence that CFTR utilizes ATP to gate its channel activity.

  9. Family structure and mothers' caregiving of children with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Gayer, Debra; Ganong, Lawrence

    2006-11-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to examine differences in the experiences of mothers of children with cystic fibrosis who are in diverse family structures (first-marriage families, stepfamily households, single-parent households). In particular, mothers' perceptions of children's health, adherence to prescribed treatments, and help received from others were compared and predictors of treatment adherence were examined. Children's health and adherence to treatment regimens were not related to family structure. Mothers had the major responsibility for seeing that cystic fibrosis treatments were followed, regardless of family structure. Single mothers received less help than married and repartnered mothers. Married fathers helped with treatments more than nonresidential divorced fathers and stepfathers. Implications for nursing practice and suggestions for future research are offered.

  10. Cystic fibrosis compatible with a full term army engagement.

    PubMed

    Jackson, S M J S; Cooper, N K

    2011-09-01

    A case of a specialist senior non-commissioned officer with cystic fibrosis (CF) is described. Partial expression of the CF trait is well known and sporadic cases are detected from time to time at recruitment, during recruit training and service. Respiratory symptoms may be mis-diagnosed as self-limiting asthma until a sweat chloride or other specific test for CF is performed.

  11. Partial splenectomy in cystic fibrosis patients with hypersplenism

    PubMed Central

    Thalhammer, G; Eber, E; Uranus, S; Pfeifer, J; Zach, M; Kelly, D; de Ville, de Goyet J

    2003-01-01

    We report three cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with hypersplenism who underwent partial splenectomy. The postoperative course was uneventful in two patients; one patient developed a complication necessitating resection of the rest of the spleen. Haematological parameters improved and oesophageal varices regressed in all patients. On follow up, one patient showed a normal spleen, the other a normally functioning accessory spleen; the third patient again developed splenomegaly with hypersplenism. Partial splenectomy is a promising therapeutic option for CF patients with hypersplenism. PMID:12538318

  12. Improvement of hepatic steatosis in cystic fibrosis with ivacaftor therapy.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Don; Warren, Patrick S; McCoy, Karen S; Sheikh, Shahid I

    2015-05-01

    Treatment of liver disease, including hepatic steatosis, in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) is limited. With the development of ivacaftor, which corrects the gating defect of the CF transmembrane regulator channel, there is a potential new therapy available for this subgroup of the CF patient population. We present an adolescent with CF who had significant improvement in hepatic steatosis with ivacaftor treatment while hypothesizing on a mechanism of why it occurred.

  13. Airway clearance techniques in the treatment of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    McIlwaine, M P; Davidson, A G

    1996-11-01

    Airway clearance is a major component of the management of cystic fibrosis. In North America, the airway clearance technique of choice has been physiotherapy using postural drainage combined with chest percussion, deep breathing and vibration. The disadvantages of this technique, the introduction of newer airway clearance techniques, and a greater emphasis on exercise has sparked a growing trend to prescribing individualized programs combining exercise with strategies adapted to the needs of each patient.

  14. Vitamin K and the management of patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Durie, P R

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the advisability of routine vitamin K supplementation in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). DATA SOURCES: Studies identified through a MEDLINE search with the use of MeSH terms vitamin K, cystic fibrosis, PIVKA-II (protein induced by vitamin K absence-II), coagulation abnormality and cystic fibrosis, and hepatic disorder and cystic fibrosis. STUDY SELECTION: Six articles published between January 1981 and December 1992 were selected: one general review of vitamin K in infancy and five studies involving clinical trials of vitamin K supplementation or screening for fat-soluble vitamins, vitamin K or PIVKA-II in patients with CF. Review articles on nutrition in patients with CF, technical reports, letters, comments and case studies not bearing directly on these issues were excluded. DATA EXTRACTION: Findings in these articles were analysed and compared to determine whether routine supplementation in all patients with CF is indicated, whether specific subgroups of these patients are susceptible to vitamin K deficiency and areas in which future research is needed. RESULTS: There is no consensus on routine vitamin K supplementation in patients with CF. Studies have found a few cases of vitamin K deficiency among the population of people with CF. In addition, various factors--including pancreatic failure, liver disease, bowel resection and long-term use of antibiotics--can put some of these patients at risk of vitamin K deficiency. CONCLUSIONS: Specific indications for routine vitamin K supplementation in all patients with CF have not yet been identified. Pending further studies, it would be prudent to consider routine supplementation in patients with CF and severe noncholestatic and cholestatic liver disease, major small-bowel resection, pancreatic insufficiency or lung disease necessitating frequent use of antibiotics. A stronger body of evidence is needed as a basis for clinical strategies. PMID:7922929

  15. A simplified cystic fibrosis scoring system (a preliminary report)

    PubMed Central

    Cooperman, E. M.; Park, M.; McKee, J.; Assad, J. P.

    1971-01-01

    The inherent variability in the natural severity of cystic fibrosis (CF) makes each aspect of therapy of this condition difficult to isolate and to evaluate objectively. There is little hope of resolving the problems which arise as a result until a way of measuring the severity of the disease at any one point in time is devised. We present a simplified CF scoring system (analogous to the Apgar scoring system for the newborn) based on five simple measurements. PMID:5118677

  16. [Towards an improved antenatal screening for cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Serre, J-L; Feingold, J; Simon-Bouy, B; Muller, F

    2003-04-01

    Cystic Fibrosis is an autosomal and recessive lethal disease which affects in France one newborn in 3.000. New technologies may afford quite a cheap and efficient screening for a large set of mutations within the same assay in order to test their presence or absence. These procedures are very valuable for prenatal diagnosis for further pregnancies when couples at risk have been identified through a first affected newborn. But, for carriers or couples at risk before the birth of a first child, these antenatal screening methods remain of limited efficacy. However carrier screening would be the only way, on a public health standpoint, to decrease the disease frequency as no therapy seems to emerge till now. Recently hyperechogenic fetal bowel at routine ultrasound in the second trimester has been recognized to be associated with various deleterious conditions, especially cystic fibrosis. These observations lead praticians to investigate for parent CFTRmutations screening and subsequent prenatal diagnosis if the two parents are carriers. Through data issued from two prospective investigations, our study aimed at the estimation of both the sensibility and efficiency of the screening for cystic fibrosis using ultrasound foetal bowel examination. Using the frequency of the disease in the population and the number of affected fetuses within the hyperechoic sample (20 in 641 in a recent study), our analysis may lead to the conclusion that fetal echogenic bowel may concern about 0.75% of fetuses. Orders of magnitude of the sensibility and efficiency of cystic fibrosis screening through fetal echogenic bowel are calculated and lead to the conclusion that sonographic screening might decrease the number of affected newborn more than two time less.

  17. Early severe anemia as the first sign of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Sismanlar, Tugba; Aslan, Ayşe Tana; Köse, Mehmet; Pekcan, Sevgi; Ezgü, Fatih Süheyl; Budakoğlu, Işıl İrem; Yenicesu, İdil

    2016-09-01

    Severe anemia is reported to occur rarely in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). This study aimed to determine the factors associated with early severe anemia in infants with CF. This study included 231 infants with CF from 3 pediatric CF centers ten year period that were retrospectively reviewed in terms of severe anemia as the first sign of CF. Factors that could affect anemia, such as age, pancreatic insufficiency, mutations, vitamin A and E, and albumin level were evaluated. Clinical and laboratory findings in CF patients that presented with severe anemia and no respiratory symptoms were compared to those in CF patients that did not present with severe anemia. Severe anemia as the first sign of CF was noted in 17 of 231 patients. Patient age, prolonged PT/INR and the albumin level differed significantly between the 2 groups of patients (P < 0.001). Feeding pattern, pancreatic insufficiency, vitamin E and A levels, and the types of genetic mutations did not differ between the 2 groups. The mean hemoglobin level was 5.59 ± 0.21 g/dL and respiratory symptoms began a mean 6.3 months after diagnosis of CF in the anemia group. In early infancy severe anemia in the absence of respiratory symptoms can be the first sign of CF. CF should be considered in the differential diagnosis of severe anemia in infants. Anemia can occur several months before respiratory symptoms in patients with CF and may be caused due to several reasons. • Severe anemia as a first sign is reported to occur rarely in patients with cystic fibrosis. • Although anemia is well known in cystic fibrosis, factors that cause severe anemia are not known clearly. What is New: • This study shows the importance of severe anemia as the first sign of cystic fibrosis. • Anemia can occur several months before respiratory symptoms in patients with CF.

  18. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator mutations at a referral center for cystic fibrosis*

    PubMed Central

    Coutinho, Cyntia Arivabeni de Araújo Correia; Marson, Fernando Augusto de Lima; Ribeiro, Antônio Fernando; Ribeiro, José Dirceu; Bertuzzo, Carmen Silvia

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the frequency of six mutations (F508del, G542X, G551D, R553X, R1162X, and N1303K) in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) diagnosed, at a referral center, on the basis of abnormal results in two determinations of sweat sodium and chloride concentrations. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study involving 70 patients with CF. The mean age of the patients was 12.38 ± 9.00 years, 51.43% were female, and 94.29% were White. Mutation screening was performed with polymerase chain reaction (for F508del), followed by enzymatic digestion (for other mutations). Clinical analysis was performed on the basis of gender, age, ethnicity, pulmonary/gastrointestinal symptoms, and Shwachman-Kulczycki (SK) score. RESULTS: All of the patients showed pulmonary symptoms, and 8 had no gastrointestinal symptoms. On the basis of the SK scores, CF was determined to be mild, moderate, and severe in 22 (42.3%), 17 (32.7%), and 13 (25.0%) of the patients, respectively. There was no association between F508del mutation and disease severity by SK score. Of the 140 alleles analyzed, F508del mutation was identified in 70 (50%). Other mutations (G542X, G551D, R553X, R1162X, and N1303K) were identified in 12 (7.93%) of the alleles studied. In F508del homozygous patients with severe disease, the OR was 0.124 (95% CI: 0.005-0.826). CONCLUSIONS: In 50% of the alleles studied, the molecular diagnosis of CF was confirmed by identifying a single mutation (F508del). If we consider the analysis of the six most common mutations in the Brazilian population (including F508del), the molecular diagnosis was confirmed in 58.57% of the alleles studied. PMID:24310628

  19. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator Modulators: Implications for the Management of Depression and Anxiety in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Talwalkar, Jaideep S; Koff, Jonathan L; Lee, Hochang B; Britto, Clemente J; Mulenos, Arielle M; Georgiopoulos, Anna M

    Individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF) are at high risk for depression and anxiety, which are associated with worse medical outcomes. Novel therapies for CF hold great promise for improving physical health, but the effects of these therapies on mental health remain poorly understood. This review aims to familiarize psychiatrists with the potential effect of novel CF therapies on depression and anxiety. We discuss novel therapies that directly target the mutant CF protein, the CF transmembrane regulator (CFTR), which are called CFTR modulators. We summarize depression and anxiety screening and treatment guidelines under implementation in accredited CF centers. Case vignettes highlight the complexities of caring for individuals with CF with comorbid depression and anxiety, including patients experiencing worsening depression and anxiety proximate to initiation of CFTR modulator therapy, and management of drug-drug interactions. Although CFTR modulator therapies provide hope for improving clinical outcomes, worsening depression and anxiety occurs in some patients when starting these novel agents. This phenomenon may be multifactorial, with hypothesized contributions from CFTR modulator-psychotropic medication interactions, direct effects of CFTR modulators on central nervous system function, the psychologic effect of starting a potentially life-altering drug, and typical triggers of depression and anxiety such as stress, pain, and inflammation. The medical and psychiatric complexity of many individuals with CF warrants more direct involvement of mental health specialists on the multidisciplinary CF team. Inclusion of mental health variables in patients with CF registries will facilitate further examination at an epidemiologic level. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Diagnosis of Cystic Fibrosis: Consensus Guidelines from the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Philip M; White, Terry B; Ren, Clement L; Hempstead, Sarah E; Accurso, Frank; Derichs, Nico; Howenstine, Michelle; McColley, Susanna A; Rock, Michael; Rosenfeld, Margaret; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Southern, Kevin W; Marshall, Bruce C; Sosnay, Patrick R

    2017-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF), caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, continues to present diagnostic challenges. Newborn screening and an evolving understanding of CF genetics have prompted a reconsideration of the diagnosis criteria. To improve diagnosis and achieve standardized definitions worldwide, the CF Foundation convened a committee of 32 experts in CF diagnosis from 9 countries to develop clear and actionable consensus guidelines on the diagnosis of CF and to clarify diagnostic criteria and terminology for other disorders associated with CFTR mutations. An a priori threshold of ≥80% affirmative votes was required for acceptance of each recommendation statement. After reviewing relevant literature, the committee convened to review evidence and cases. Following the conference, consensus statements were developed by an executive subcommittee. The entire consensus committee voted and approved 27 of 28 statements, 7 of which needed revisions and a second round of voting. It is recommended that diagnoses associated with CFTR mutations in all individuals, from newborn to adult, be established by evaluation of CFTR function with a sweat chloride test. The latest mutation classifications annotated in the Clinical and Functional Translation of CFTR project (http://www.cftr2.org/index.php) should be used to aid in diagnosis. Newborns with a high immunoreactive trypsinogen level and inconclusive CFTR functional and genetic testing may be designated CFTR-related metabolic syndrome or CF screen positive, inconclusive diagnosis; these terms are now merged and equivalent, and CFTR-related metabolic syndrome/CF screen positive, inconclusive diagnosis may be used. International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th Revision codes for use in diagnoses associated with CFTR mutations are included. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. A haplotype framework for cystic fibrosis mutations in Iran.

    PubMed

    Elahi, Elahe; Khodadad, Ahmad; Kupershmidt, Ilya; Ghasemi, Fereshteh; Alinasab, Babak; Naghizadeh, Ramin; Eason, Robert G; Amini, Mahshid; Esmaili, Mehran; Esmaeili Dooki, Mohammad R; Sanati, Mohammad H; Davis, Ronald W; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Thorstenson, Yvonne R

    2006-02-01

    This is the first comprehensive profile of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) mutations and their corresponding haplotypes in the Iranian population. All of the 27 CFTR exons of 60 unrelated Iranian CF patients were sequenced to identify disease-causing mutations. Eleven core haplotypes of CFTR were identified by genotyping six high-frequency simple nucleotide polymorphisms. The carrier frequency of 2.5 in 100 (1 in 40) was estimated from the frequency of heterozygous patients and suggests that contrary to popular belief, cystic fibrosis may be a common, under-diagnosed disease in Iran. A heterogeneous mutation spectrum was observed at the CFTR locus in 60 cystic fibrosis (CF) patients from Iran. Twenty putative disease-causing mutations were identified on 64 (53%) of the 120 chromosomes. The five most common Iranian mutations together represented 37% of the expected mutated alleles. The most frequent mutation, DeltaF508 (p.F508del), represented only 16% of the expected mutated alleles. The next most frequent mutations were c.1677del2 (p.515fs) at 7.5%, c.4041C>G (p.N1303K) at 5.6%, c.2183AA>G (p.684fs) at 5%, and c.3661A>T (p.K1177X) at 2.5%. Three of the five most frequent Iranian mutations are not included in a commonly used panel of CF mutations, underscoring the importance of identifying geographic-specific mutations in this population.

  2. Personalized medicine for cystic fibrosis: establishing human model systems.

    PubMed

    Mou, Hongmei; Brazauskas, Karissa; Rajagopal, Jayaraj

    2015-10-01

    With over 1,500 identifiable mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene that result in distinct functional and phenotypical abnormalities, it is virtually impossible to perform randomized clinical trials to identify the best therapeutics for all patients. Therefore, a personalized medicine approach is essential. The only way to realistically accomplish this is through the development of improved in vitro human model systems. The lack of a readily available and infinite supply of human CFTR-expressing airway epithelial cells is a key bottleneck. We propose that a concerted two-pronged approach is necessary for patient-specific cystic fibrosis research to continue to prosper and realize its potential: (1) more effective culture and differentiation conditions for growing primary human airway and nasal epithelial cells and (2) the development of collective protocols for efficiently differentiating disease- and patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) into pure populations of adult epithelial cells. Ultimately, we need a personalized human model system for cystic fibrosis with the capacity for uncomplicated bankability, widespread availability, and universal applicability for patient-specific disease modeling, novel pharmacotherapy investigation and screening, and readily executable genetic modification. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Recurrent Clostridium difficile colitis in cystic fibrosis: an emerging problem.

    PubMed

    Egressy, Katarine; Jansen, Michaelene; Meyer, Keith C

    2013-01-01

    To examine the incidence of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), including patients who had undergone lung transplantation, and review clinical findings in hospitalized patients with C. difficile colitis. A retrospective chart review was performed to examine the clinical presentation and management of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) who received care at the University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics (UWHC) from 1994 to 2011 and were prospectively identified with C. difficile colitis. Ten cases of C. difficile associated disease (CDAD) occurred in patients with CF followed by our Adult CF Center over a period of 17 years, and 4 patients were bilateral lung transplant recipients. Two of the lung transplant recipients had recurrent CDAD that lead to fulminant pancolitis, surgical intervention, and shock. Two patients in the non-transplant group experienced recurrent C. difficile infection that led to fulminant pancolitis with associated systemic inflammatory response syndrome and required colectomy. C. difficile colitis can cause life threatening illness in patients with CF, and symptoms may be subtle and/or atypical and lead to significant delay in diagnosis. Patients with recurrent C. difficile colitis are at high risk of fatal outcome, and empiric therapy should be considered for patients with previous C. difficile colitis even in the absence of disease when broad-spectrum antibiotics are given to treat bacterial infection. Copyright © 2012 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Lumacaftor/Ivacaftor: A Review in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Deeks, Emma D

    2016-08-01

    Lumacaftor/ivacaftor (Orkambi™) is a fixed-dose tablet containing a corrector (lumacaftor) and potentiator (ivacaftor) of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and is the first therapy approved to treat the underlying cause of cystic fibrosis in patients (aged ≥12 years) homozygous for the most common CFTR mutation, F508del. Lumacaftor improves the processing of F508del CFTR and its transport to the cell surface, while ivacaftor increases the channel's open probability and transport of chloride. In two 24-week trials in the approved patient population (TRAFFIC and TRANSPORT), lumacaftor 400 mg plus ivacaftor 250 mg, administered every 12 h in combination with standard therapy, was associated with an ≈3 % statistically significant improvement in lung function relative to placebo (as measured by the percent predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 s). Lumacaftor plus ivacaftor did not significantly improve respiratory symptoms, although reduced pulmonary exacerbations to a clinically meaningful extent and, in one trial (TRANSPORT), significantly improved body mass index (BMI). In an ongoing extension of these studies (PROGRESS), lumacaftor plus ivacaftor provided clinical benefit over a further 72 weeks of treatment. Lumacaftor plus ivacaftor had an acceptable tolerability profile, with the most common adverse events being respiratory or gastrointestinal in nature. Thus, lumacaftor/ivacaftor expands the treatment options available for patients with cystic fibrosis homozygous for the F508del-CFTR mutation, although its precise place in clinical practice remains to be determined.

  5. Children with cystic fibrosis benefit from massage therapy.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Reif, M; Field, T; Krasnegor, J; Martinez, E; Schwartzman, M; Mavunda, K

    1999-04-01

    To measure the effects of parents giving massage therapy to their children with cystic fibrosis to reduce anxiety in parents and their children and to improve the children's mood and peak air flow readings. Twenty children (5-12 years old) with cystic fibrosis and their parents were randomly assigned to a massage therapy or a reading control group. Parents in the treatment group were instructed and asked to conduct a 20-minute child massage every night at bedtime for one month. Parents in the reading control group were instructed to read for 20 minutes a night with their child for one month. On days 1 and 30, parents and children answered questions relating to present anxiety levels and children answered questions relating to mood, and their peak air flow was measured. Following the first and last massage session, children and parents reported reduced anxiety. Mood and peak air flow readings also improved for children in the massage therapy group. These findings suggest that parents may reduce anxiety levels by massaging their children with cystic fibrosis and their children may benefit from receiving massage by having less anxiety and improved mood, which in turn may facilitate breathing.

  6. Transtracheal aspiration in pulmonary infection in children with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Brook, I; Fink, R

    1983-01-01

    Six transtracheal aspirations (TTA) and expectorated sputum specimens were collected from four children suffering from cystic fibrosis who had pulmonary infection. Specimens obtained from both sites were cultured for aerobic bacteria and TTA aspirates were also cultured for anaerobes. Differences in bacteria isolated in TTA and sputum aspirates were present in all instances. Six isolates were recovered in both sites (three Pseudomonas aeruginosa, two Staphylococcus aureus and one Aspergillus flavus). Five aerobic isolates were recovered only in the expectorated sputum and not in TTA aspirations (two Klebsiella pneumoniae and one each of P. aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis). Nine organisms were isolated only from the TTA (two each of Veillonella parvula and Alpha hemolytic streptococci, and one each of Bacteroides fragilis, B. melaninogenicus, Lactobacillus sp., Haemophilus influenzae and Gamma hemolytic streptococci). The recovery of anaerobic organisms from four of the six TTA specimens suggests a possible role for these organisms in the etiology of pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis. We found TTA to be helpful in the bacterial diagnosis and management of pulmonary infections in cystic fibrosis.

  7. Left ventricular and aortic dysfunction in cystic fibrosis mice.

    PubMed

    Sellers, Zachary M; Kovacs, Attila; Weinheimer, Carla J; Best, Philip M

    2013-09-01

    Left ventricular (LV) abnormalities have been reported in cystic fibrosis (CF); however, it remains unclear if loss of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) function causes heart defects independent of lung disease. Using gut-corrected F508del CFTR mutant mice (ΔF508), which do not develop human lung disease, we examined in vivo heart and aortic function via 2D transthoracic echocardiography and LV catheterization. ΔF508 mouse hearts showed LV concentric remodeling along with enhanced inotropy (increased +dP/dt, fractional shortening, decreased isovolumetric contraction time) and greater lusitropy (-dP/dt, Tau). Aortas displayed increased stiffness and altered diastolic flow. β-adrenergic stimulation revealed diminished cardiac reserve (attenuated +dP/dt,-dP/dt, LV pressure). In a mouse model of CF, CFTR mutation leads to LV remodeling with alteration of cardiac and aortic functions in the absence of lung disease. As CF patients live longer, more active lives, their risk for cardiovascular disease should be considered. Copyright © 2012 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Care of the adult patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Perino, B; Trevisan, A; Falchetti, A; Gaia, E; Petrarulo, M

    1993-12-01

    Although no therapeutic breakthrough has taken place, the life expectancy of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) has dramatically increased in the last 20 yrs. Nowadays, more than 80% of the patients outlive 18 yrs of age, with a mean survival age approaching 28 yrs. These favourable results are due mainly to early diagnosis and continuous treatment in specialized centres. The main therapeutic items are: prevention and early treatment of lung infections, mainly due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, drainage of bronchial secretions (postural drainage, forced expiratory techniques, positive-expiratory-pressure mask, autogenic drainage,...), substitutive therapy with pancreatic enzymes and hypercaloric diet. Thus cystic fibrosis is increasingly a disease which involves adults, with many related problems, which span from the difficulties of prescribing an effective antibiotic therapy in cases with multiple resistances, to combining the need for a long daily physiotherapy schedule with school or a working life. Sexual problems and related psychological troubles are an important issue in the management of cystic fibrosis in adult patients, and are accordingly treated.

  9. A Haplotype Framework for Cystic Fibrosis Mutations in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Elahi, Elahe; Khodadad, Ahmad; Kupershmidt, Ilya; Ghasemi, Fereshteh; Alinasab, Babak; Naghizadeh, Ramin; Eason, Robert G.; Amini, Mahshid; Esmaili, Mehran; Esmaeili Dooki, Mohammad R.; Sanati, Mohammad H.; Davis, Ronald W.; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Thorstenson, Yvonne R.

    2006-01-01

    This is the first comprehensive profile of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) mutations and their corresponding haplotypes in the Iranian population. All of the 27 CFTR exons of 60 unrelated Iranian CF patients were sequenced to identify disease-causing mutations. Eleven core haplotypes of CFTR were identified by genotyping six high-frequency simple nucleotide polymorphisms. The carrier frequency of 2.5 in 100 (1 in 40) was estimated from the frequency of heterozygous patients and suggests that contrary to popular belief, cystic fibrosis may be a common, under-diagnosed disease in Iran. A heterogeneous mutation spectrum was observed at the CFTR locus in 60 cystic fibrosis (CF) patients from Iran. Twenty putative disease-causing mutations were identified on 64 (53%) of the 120 chromosomes. The five most common Iranian mutations together represented 37% of the expected mutated alleles. The most frequent mutation, ΔF508 (p.F508del), represented only 16% of the expected mutated alleles. The next most frequent mutations were c.1677del2 (p.515fs) at 7.5%, c.4041C>G (p.N1303K) at 5.6%, c.2183AA>G (p.684fs) at 5%, and c.3661A>T (p.K1177X) at 2.5%. Three of the five most frequent Iranian mutations are not included in a commonly used panel of CF mutations, underscoring the importance of identifying geographic-specific mutations in this population. PMID:16436643

  10. Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy in the UK and Elsewhere

    PubMed Central

    Pytel, Kamila M.; Alton, Eric W.F.W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene was identified in 1989. This opened the door for the development of cystic fibrosis (CF) gene therapy, which has been actively pursued for the last 20 years. Although 26 clinical trials involving approximately 450 patients have been carried out, the vast majority of these trials were short and included small numbers of patients; they were not designed to assess clinical benefit, but to establish safety and proof-of-concept for gene transfer using molecular end points such as the detection of recombinant mRNA or correction of the ion transport defect. The only currently published trial designed and powered to assess clinical efficacy (defined as improvement in lung function) administered AAV2-CFTR to the lungs of patients with CF. The U.K. Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy Consortium completed, in the autumn of 2014, the first nonviral gene therapy trial designed to answer whether repeated nonviral gene transfer (12 doses over 12 months) can lead to clinical benefit. The demonstration that the molecular defect in CFTR can be corrected with small-molecule drugs, and the success of gene therapy in other monogenic diseases, is boosting interest in CF gene therapy. Developments are discussed here. PMID:25838137

  11. [Reproducibility of the walking test in patients with cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Jorquera Guillén, M A; Salcedo Posadas, A; Villa Asensi, J R; Girón Moreno, R M; Neira Rodríguez, M A; Sequeiros González, A

    1999-11-01

    The walking test is a useful and objective method for evaluating the tolerance for exercise in patients with chronic bronchopulmonary diseases. Our objective was to check the reproducibility of this test and evaluate whether there are differences between tests of varying duration (2 and 6 minutes) in a group of patients with cystic fibrosis. We utilized the walking test on 29 patients who were in a stable phase and under care in the Cystic Fibrosis Unit of our hospital. Two tests were carried out, one of 2 minutes and the other of 6 minutes duration, both of which were repeated after a 15-minute interval. The reproducibility of the walking test in this type of patient was very good and we found an excellent correlation between the two-minute test and the six-minute test. We did not observe a training effect when the test was repeated. The two minute walking test has a high reproducibility and we propose this test, because it is shorter and more comfortable for pediatric patients with cystic fibrosis, in order to evaluate the evolution, progressive deterioration of the of the patient and the response to different types of treatments.

  12. Validity of a modified shuttle test in adult cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, J.; Howard, J.; Wallace, E.; Elborn, S.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The purpose of this study was to provide some evidence of the validity of a modified shuttle test (MST) by comparing performance on the MST with peak oxygen consumption (V̇O2peak) measured during a treadmill test in a group of adult patients with cystic fibrosis.
METHOD—Twenty patients with stable cystic fibrosis performed a ramped maximal treadmill test (STEEP protocol) and the MST using a randomised balanced design.
RESULTS—The relationship between the distance achieved on the MST and V̇O2peak was strong (r = 0.95, p<0.01) with 90% of the variance in V̇O2peak explained by the variance in MST distance. The relationship was represented by the regression equation (with 95% confidence intervals) V̇O2peak = 6.83 (2.85 to 10.80) + 0.028 (0.019 to 0.024)× MST distance.
CONCLUSION—This study provides evidence of the construct validity of the MST as an objective measure of exercise capacity in adults with cystic fibrosis.

 PMID:10212110

  13. Model of mucociliary clearance in cystic fibrosis lungs.

    PubMed

    Kurbatova, P; Bessonov, N; Volpert, V; Tiddens, H A W M; Cornu, C; Nony, P; Caudri, D

    2015-05-07

    Mucus clearance is a primary innate defense mechanism in the human airways. Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. CF is characterized by dehydration of airway surface liquid and impaired mucociliary clearance. As a result, microorganisms are not efficiently removed from the airways, and patients experience chronic pulmonary infections and inflammation. We propose a new physiologically based mathematical model of muco-ciliary transport consisting of the two major components of the mucociliary clearance system: (i) periciliary liquid layer (PCL) and (ii) mucus layer. We study mucus clearance under normal conditions and in CF patients. Restoring impaired clearance of airway secretions in one of the major goals of therapy in patients with CF. We consider the action of the aerosolized and inhaled medication dornase alfa, which reduces the viscosity of cystic fibrosis mucus, by selectively cleaving the long DNA strands it contains. The results of the model simulations stress the potential relevance of the location of the drug deposition in the central or peripheral airways. Mucus clearance was increased in case the drug was primarily deposited peripherally, i.e. in the small airways.

  14. Recent advances in understanding and managing cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Alton, Eric W.F.W.

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most common autosomal recessive genetic disease in Caucasians and has been extensively studied for many decades. The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene was identified in 1989. It encodes a complex protein which has numerous cellular functions. Our understanding of cystic fibrosis pathophysiology and genetics is constantly expanding and being refined, leading to improved management of the disease and increased life expectancy in affected individuals. PMID:26097737

  15. Birth distribution in cystic fibrosis in Saguenay-Lac-St-Jean, Quebec, Canada.

    PubMed

    Daigneault, J; Aubin, G; Simard, F; De Braekeleer, M

    1991-09-01

    Although a seasonal trend in the birth distribution has been reported in cystic fibrosis (CF), this finding is still very controversial. The birth distribution of 113 patients with cystic fibrosis born in Saguenay-Lac-St-Jean (complete ascertainment) was analysed using two different statistical methods. Our results showed no monthly or seasonal birth variation. It is likely that a bias owing to incomplete ascertainment might explain why some previous studies found a seasonal trend in the birth distribution of cystic fibrosis.

  16. Highlights of the 28(th) North American Cystic Fibrosis Conference 2014.

    PubMed

    Nwokoro, Chinedu E C

    2015-10-01

    This is a selection of papers presented at the 28(th) North American Cystic Fibrosis Conference held in Atlanta in October 2014. The papers discussed are thought to be of particular interest to CF caregivers in the UK. Topics discussed include recent progress in the modification of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR), the potential of OligoG, a novel inhaled alginate mucolytic, and the changing approach to cystic fibrosis-related diabetes screening.

  17. Psychosocial Response to Uncertain Newborn Screening Results for Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hayeems, Robin Z; Miller, Fiona A; Barg, Carolyn J; Bombard, Yvonne; Carroll, June C; Tam, Karen; Kerr, Elizabeth; Chakraborty, Pranesh; Potter, Beth K; Patton, Sarah; Bytautas, Jessica P; Taylor, Louise; Davies, Christine; Milburn, Jennifer; Price, April; Gonska, Tanja; Keenan, Katherine; Ratjen, Felix; Guttmann, Astrid

    2017-05-01

    To explore the psychosocial implications of diagnostic uncertainty that result from inconclusive results generated by newborn bloodspot screening (NBS) for cystic fibrosis (CF). Using a mixed methods prospective cohort study of children who received NBS for CF, we compared psychosocial outcomes of parents whose children who received persistently inconclusive results with those whose children received true positive or screen-negative results. Mothers of infants who received inconclusive results (n = 17), diagnoses of CF (n = 15), and screen-negative results (n = 411) were surveyed; 23 parent interviews were completed. Compared with mothers of infants with true positive/screen-negative results, mothers of infants with inconclusive results reported greater perceived uncertainty (P < .006) but no differences in anxiety or vulnerability (P > .05). Qualitatively, parents valued being connected to experts but struggled with the meaning of an uncertain diagnosis, worried about their infant's health-related vulnerability, and had mixed views about surveillance. Inconclusive CF NBS results were not associated with anxiety or vulnerability but led to health-related uncertainty and qualitative concerns. Findings should be considered alongside efforts to optimize protocols for CF screening and surveillance. Educational and psychosocial supports are warranted for these families. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Rationale for hypertonic saline therapy for cystic fibrosis lung disease.

    PubMed

    Tarran, Robert; Donaldson, Scott; Boucher, Richard C

    2007-06-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by alterations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator ( CFTCR) gene. More than 1400 mutations in the CFTCR gene have been described, but the most common mutation (noted in 70% of CF chromosomes) is DeltaF508. Alterations in the CFTCR gene result in deranged sodium and chloride ion transport channels. This leads to failure of airway epithelia to hydrate their surfaces normally, particularly in response to infectious or toxic insults. Additional effects include mucus adhesion to airway surface, chronic inflammation, and infections. The concept that airway surface dehydration can cause CF-like lung disease is supported by in vitro data and in vivo animal models. Rehydrating airway surfaces may reduce or prevent lung injury and damage. Short- and longer term studies have shown that inhalation of hypertonic saline is well tolerated and improves lung function, reduces exacerbations, and improves quality of life in CF patients. This review discusses the importance of airway epithelial sodium and chloride channels in the pathogenesis of CF, and strategies (particularly the use of inhaled hypertonic saline) to reverse or minimize lung inflammation and injury in this disease.

  19. Physiotherapy and cystic fibrosis: what is the evidence base?

    PubMed

    McIlwaine, Maggie Patricia; Lee Son, Nicole Marie; Richmond, Melissa Lynn

    2014-11-01

    To provide a comprehensive overview and evidence to support the role of physiotherapy in the management of individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF) including airway clearance, exercise, and musculoskeletal concerns which can affect activities of daily living and respiratory health. Several long-term studies have looked at the efficacy of airway clearance techniques, including active cycle of breathing techniques, autogenic drainage, high frequency chest wall oscillation, postural drainage, positive expiratory pressure (PEP), and oscillating PEP. Each of these studies reported some efficacy of airway clearance in maintaining health with no one technique being superior to another. However, one study suggested that high frequency chest wall oscillation was not as effective as PEP in maintaining health in CF patients. Individual preference needs to be considered when selecting a technique. Recent studies have found exercise to increase mucociliary clearance peripherally. Musculoskeletal issues, including posture, bone density, urinary incontinence, and pain should be assessed and managed in individuals to improve the mechanics of breathing and overall well-being. The role of physiotherapy in CF is complex and includes airway clearance, exercise, and management of the long-term sequelae of musculoskeletal issues. More rigorous physiotherapy studies are required to assist with evidence based practice.

  20. Increased expression of senescence markers in cystic fibrosis airways

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Jessica K.; Degan, Simone; Kummarapurugu, Apparao B.; Zheng, Shuo; Haridass, Prashamsha; Voynow, Judith A.

    2013-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is a chronic lung disease characterized by chronic neutrophilic airway inflammation and increased levels of neutrophil elastase (NE) in the airways. We have previously reported that NE treatment triggers cell cycle arrest. Cell cycle arrest can lead to senescence, a complete loss of replicative capacity. Importantly, senescent cells can be proinflammatory and would perpetuate CF chronic inflammation. By immunohistochemistry, we evaluated whether airway sections from CF and control subjects expressed markers of senescence, including p16INK4a (p16), a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, phospho-Histone H2A.X (γH2A.X), and phospho-checkpoint 2 kinase (phospho-Chk2), which are also DNA damage response markers. Compared with airway epithelium from control subjects, CF airway epithelium had increased levels of expression of all three senescence markers. We hypothesized that the high load of NE in the CF airway triggers epithelial senescence by upregulating expression of p16, which inhibits cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4). Normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells, cultured in air-liquid interface were treated with NE (0, 200, and 500 nM) to induce visible injury. Total cell lysates were collected and evaluated by Western analysis for p16 protein expression and CDK4 kinase activity. NE significantly increased p16 expression and decreased CDK4 kinase activity in NHBE cells. These results support the concept that NE triggers expression of senescence markers in CF airway epithelial cells. PMID:23316069

  1. Neonatal screening for cystic fibrosis: present and future.

    PubMed

    Wilcken, B; Travert, G

    1999-12-01

    Despite there being effective tests for detecting cystic fibrosis (CF) using newborn screening blood samples, screening in neonates has not had universal approval because of uncertainty about its benefits. After up to 18 y experience, at a recent conference in Caen several aspects attracted universal agreement. There is still major delay in clinical diagnosis after the onset of symptoms. There is short-term benefit in early diagnosis by screening, with reduced morbidity in the first 2 y, evidence of significant nutritional benefits up to the age of 10 y, and probable respiratory benefit over this time frame. There is great potential for research into treatment modalities and no evidence of significant psychological harm to CF babies from early diagnosis. With a screening protocol that includes a DNA test there is some unwanted carrier detection and careful genetic counselling is needed. There is no evidence yet that screening will extend the life of CF patients, so some doubts remain as to its overall effectiveness, and there have been no good studies on comparative costs in screened and unscreened cohorts. Even so, the weight of evidence suggests very worthwhile advantages for screened babies and their families. Because of this, it is unlikely that further trials will take place. It may be that the onus now is on those who do not support screening to justify this stance to parents who may favour it.

  2. Effect of sinus surgery on pulmonary function in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Madonna, D; Isaacson, G; Rosenfeld, R M; Panitch, H

    1997-03-01

    The impact of sinus surgery on the pulmonary status of cystic fibrosis patients is unknown. This retrospective study reviewed the charts of the cystic fibrosis patients presenting to our institution's cystic fibrosis center with nasal obstruction, recurrent sinusitis, and nasal polyposis. This group subsequently underwent endoscopic ethmoidectomy and antrostomy. Fourteen of the 15 patients, ages 5-24 years, received preoperative and postoperative pulmonary function testing obtained by spirometry. The data were compiled and analyzed statistically. Our results suggested no significant improvement in the pulmonary function of cystic fibrosis patients after sinus surgery.

  3. Flow rate and inorganic components of submandibular saliva in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Blomfield, Jeanette; Warton, Kathryn L.; Brown, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    The inorganic components of submandibular saliva were determined in 35 patients with cystic fibrosis and in 28 controls. No differences due to flow rate were apparent between the two groups. At comparable flow rates, cystic fibrosis submandibular saliva had higher concentrations of calcium, sodium, and chloride, and similar concentrations of magnesium, inorganic phosphate, potassium, copper, and zinc. The insoluble, turbid fraction of the cystic fibrosis submandibular saliva contained both calcium and phosphate, and these were precipitated in a ratio which was consistent with hydroxyapatite. The secretory granules are postulated as the source of the excess calcium in cystic fibrosis submandibular saliva. PMID:4705932

  4. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein expression in the male excretory duct system during development.

    PubMed

    Marcorelles, Pascale; Gillet, Danièle; Friocourt, Gaëlle; Ledé, Françoise; Samaison, Laura; Huguen, Geneviève; Ferec, Claude

    2012-03-01

    Sterility due to bilateral destruction in utero or in early infancy resulting in congenital absence of the vas deferens is the rule in male patients with cystic fibrosis. To understand the developmental pattern of this anomaly, the microscopic morphology of the male excretory system was analyzed during development and the expression of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein was explored by immunohistochemistry. We observed that cystic fibrosis fetuses had no excretory ducts agenesis or obstruction until 22 weeks of gestation. However, a focal inflammatory pattern and mucinous plugs in the oldest cystic fibrosis case suggested a disruptive mechanism. Immunolabeling of cytoplasmic epithelial cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein was demonstrated in all cystic fibrosis and control cases with a similar pattern of expression of the protein between age-matched controls and cystic fibrosis cases. At midgestation, an apical intensification appeared in both cystic fibrosis and control cases and was stable during the remainder of fetal life. No gradient of intensity could be detected between the different segments of the excretory tract. These findings are different from those reported in adults. The absence of any morphologic anomaly until 22 weeks of gestation, the focal destruction of the epithelial structures during the second trimester, and the chronological pattern of expression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator are of interest for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of this disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Intestinal inflammation is a frequent feature of cystic fibrosis and is reduced by probiotic administration.

    PubMed

    Bruzzese, E; Raia, V; Gaudiello, G; Polito, G; Buccigrossi, V; Formicola, V; Guarino, A

    2004-10-01

    To assess the incidence of intestinal inflammation in children with cystic fibrosis and to investigate whether probiotics decrease it. In this two-phase, controlled, prospective study, faecal calprotectin was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 30 children with cystic fibrosis, 30 healthy controls and 15 children with active inflammatory bowel disease. Ten children with cystic fibrosis received Lactobacillus GG, and faecal calprotectin was re-measured 4 weeks later. Rectal nitric oxide production was measured with the rectal dialysis bag technique in 20 children with cystic fibrosis, 20 healthy controls and 15 children with inflammatory bowel disease. Five children with cystic fibrosis received Lactobacillus GG and nitric oxide was re-measured 4 weeks later. Mean faecal calprotectin was significantly higher in the two groups of patients than in controls. Abnormal values were detected in 27 of 30 cystic fibrosis and in 15 of 15 inflammatory bowel disease children. Also mean nitric oxide production was increased in both group of patients, and abnormal values were detected in 19 of 20 cystic fibrosis and in 15 of 15 inflammatory bowel disease children. Calprotectin and nitric oxide concentrations were reduced after probiotics administration. Intestinal inflammation is a major feature of cystic fibrosis and is reduced by probiotics. The latter finding suggests that intestinal microflora play a major role in intestinal inflammation in cystic fibrosis children.

  6. Risk factors for bronchiectasis in children with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Sly, Peter D; Gangell, Catherine L; Chen, Linping; Ware, Robert S; Ranganathan, Sarath; Mott, Lauren S; Murray, Conor P; Stick, Stephen M

    2013-05-23

    Bronchiectasis develops early in the course of cystic fibrosis, being detectable in infants as young as 10 weeks of age, and is persistent and progressive. We sought to determine risk factors for the onset of bronchiectasis, using data collected by the Australian Respiratory Early Surveillance Team for Cystic Fibrosis (AREST CF) intensive surveillance program. We examined data from 127 consecutive infants who received a diagnosis of cystic fibrosis after newborn screening. Chest computed tomography (CT) and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) were performed, while the children were in stable clinical condition, at 3 months and 1, 2, and 3 years of age. Longitudinal data were used to determine risk factors associated with the detection of bronchiectasis from 3 months to 3 years of age. The point prevalence of bronchiectasis at each visit increased from 29.3% at 3 months of age to 61.5% at 3 years of age. In multivariate analyses, risk factors for bronchiectasis were presentation with meconium ileus (odds ratio, 3.17; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.51 to 6.66; P=0.002), respiratory symptoms at the time of CT and BAL (odds ratio, 2.27; 95% CI, 1.24 to 4.14; P=0.008), free neutrophil elastase activity in BAL fluid (odds ratio, 3.02; 95% CI, 1.70 to 5.35; P<0.001), and gas trapping on expiratory CT (odds ratio, 2.05; 95% CI, 1.17 to 3.59; P=0.01). Free neutrophil elastase activity in BAL fluid at 3 months of age was associated with persistent bronchiectasis (present on two or more sequential scans), with the odds seven times as high at 12 months of age and four times as high at 3 years of age. Neutrophil elastase activity in BAL fluid in early life was associated with early bronchiectasis in children with cystic fibrosis. (Funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia and Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Therapeutics.)

  7. [Cystic Fibrosis Cloud database: An information system for storage and management of clinical and microbiological data of cystic fibrosis patients].

    PubMed

    Prieto, Claudia I; Palau, María J; Martina, Pablo; Achiary, Carlos; Achiary, Andrés; Bettiol, Marisa; Montanaro, Patricia; Cazzola, María L; Leguizamón, Mariana; Massillo, Cintia; Figoli, Cecilia; Valeiras, Brenda; Perez, Silvia; Rentería, Fernando; Diez, Graciela; Yantorno, Osvaldo M; Bosch, Alejandra

    2016-01-01

    The epidemiological and clinical management of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients suffering from acute pulmonary exacerbations or chronic lung infections demands continuous updating of medical and microbiological processes associated with the constant evolution of pathogens during host colonization. In order to monitor the dynamics of these processes, it is essential to have expert systems capable of storing and subsequently extracting the information generated from different studies of the patients and microorganisms isolated from them. In this work we have designed and developed an on-line database based on an information system that allows to store, manage and visualize data from clinical studies and microbiological analysis of bacteria obtained from the respiratory tract of patients suffering from cystic fibrosis. The information system, named Cystic Fibrosis Cloud database is available on the http://servoy.infocomsa.com/cfc_database site and is composed of a main database and a web-based interface, which uses Servoy's product architecture based on Java technology. Although the CFC database system can be implemented as a local program for private use in CF centers, it can also be used, updated and shared by different users who can access the stored information in a systematic, practical and safe manner. The implementation of the CFC database could have a significant impact on the monitoring of respiratory infections, the prevention of exacerbations, the detection of emerging organisms, and the adequacy of control strategies for lung infections in CF patients.

  8. Considerations for the Conduct of Clinical Trials with Antiinflammatory Agents in Cystic Fibrosis. A Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Workshop Report.

    PubMed

    Torphy, Theodore J; Allen, Janet; Cantin, André M; Konstan, Michael W; Accurso, Frank J; Joseloff, Elizabeth; Ratjen, Felix A; Chmiel, James F

    2015-09-01

    Inflammation leads to lung destruction and loss of pulmonary function in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Drugs that modulate the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) have recently been approved. Although the impact of CFTR modulators on sweat chloride and lung function are exciting, they have not yet demonstrated an effect on inflammation. Therefore, CF antiinflammatory drug development must continue. Unfortunately, the lack of clarity with this process has left investigators and industry sponsors frustrated. The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation established a working group in early 2014 to address this issue. There are many inflammatory processes disrupted in CF, and, therefore, there are many potential targets amenable to antiinflammatory therapy. Regardless of a drug's specific mechanism of action, it must ultimately affect the neutrophil or its products to impact CF. The working group concluded that before bringing new antiinflammatory drugs to clinical trial, preclinical safety studies must be conducted in disease-relevant models to assuage safety concerns. Furthermore, although studies of antiinflammatory therapies must first establish safety in adults, subsequent studies must involve children, as they are most likely to reap the most benefit. The working group also recommended that pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic studies and early-phase safety studies be performed before proceeding to larger studies of longer duration. In addition, innovative study designs may improve the likelihood of adequately assessing treatment response and mitigating risk before conducting multiyear studies. Learning from past experiences and incorporating this knowledge into new drug development programs will be instrumental in bringing new antiinflammatory therapies to patients.

  9. Applications of microscopy to genetic therapy of cystic fibrosis and other human diseases.

    PubMed

    Moninger, Thomas O; Nessler, Randy A; Moore, Kenneth C

    2006-01-01

    Gene therapy has become an extremely important and active field of biomedical research. Microscopy is an integral component of this effort. This chapter presents an overview of imaging techniques used in our facility in support of cystic fibrosis gene therapy research. Instrumentation used in these studies includes light and confocal microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Techniques outlined include negative staining, cryo-electron microscopy, three-dimentional reconstruction, enzyme cytochemistry, immunocytochemistry, and fluorescence imaging.

  10. Autopsy confirmation of severe pulmonary interstitial fibrosis secondary to Munchausen syndrome presenting as cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Croft, Philip R; Racz, Mark I; Bloch, John D; Palmer, Charles H

    2005-09-01

    Chronic factitious disorder with physical symptoms, or Munchausen syndrome, is a well-recognized but uncommonly diagnosed psychiatric condition characterized by the deliberate production of signs and symptoms of disease in order to receive medical attention. Clinical suspicion of this disease is rarely confirmed by autopsy, as the patients usually do not die as a consequence of feigning illness. Here we report the autopsy confirmation of a case of a suspected Munchausen syndrome patient who presented with a history of cystic fibrosis. Examination of the lungs demonstrated extensive severe interstitial fibrosis, and polariscopic examination revealed a large quantity of crystalline material throughout the tissue; X-ray diffraction identified the material as talc. Synopses of published cases of Munchausen syndrome presenting as cystic fibrosis, and cases of Munchausen syndrome with pulmonary talcosis are presented as part of the discussion.

  11. Abnormal Glucose Tolerance in Infants and Young Children with Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Yi, Yaling; Norris, Andrew W; Wang, Kai; Sun, Xingshen; Uc, Aliye; Moran, Antoinette; Engelhardt, John F; Ode, Katie Larson

    2016-10-15

    In cystic fibrosis, abnormal glucose tolerance is associated with decreased lung function and worsened outcomes. Translational evidence indicates that abnormal glucose tolerance may begin in early life. To determine whether very young children with cystic fibrosis have increased abnormal glucose tolerance prevalence compared with control subjects. The secondary objective was to compare area under the curve for glucose and insulin in children with cystic fibrosis with control subjects. This is a prospective multicenter study in children ages 3 months to 5 years with and without cystic fibrosis. Oral glucose tolerance testing with glucose, insulin, and C-peptide was sampled at 0, 10, 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes. Twenty-three children with cystic fibrosis and nine control subjects had complete data. All control subjects had normal glucose tolerance. Nine of 23 subjects with cystic fibrosis had abnormal glucose tolerance (39%; P = 0.03). Of those, two met criteria for cystic fibrosis-related diabetes, two indeterminate glycemia, and six impaired glucose tolerance. Children with cystic fibrosis failed to exhibit the normal increase in area under the curve insulin with age observed in control subjects (P < 0.01), despite increased area under the curve glucose (P = 0.02). Abnormal glucose tolerance is notably prevalent among young children with cystic fibrosis. Children with cystic fibrosis lack the normal increase in insulin secretion that occurs in early childhood despite increased glucose. These findings demonstrate that glycemic abnormalities begin very early in cystic fibrosis, possibly because of insufficient insulin secretion.

  12. Increasing calorie consumption in children with cystic fibrosis: replication with 2-year follow-up.

    PubMed Central

    Stark, L J; Knapp, L G; Bowen, A M; Powers, S W; Jelalian, E; Evans, S; Passero, M A; Mulvihill, M M; Hovell, M

    1993-01-01

    Three mildly malnourished children with cystic fibrosis and their parents participated in a behavioral group-treatment program that focused on promoting and maintaining increased calorie consumption. Treatment included nutritional education, gradually increasing calorie goals, contingency management, and relaxation training, and was evaluated in a multiple baseline design across four meals. Children's calorie intake increased across meals, and total calorie intake was 32% to 60% above baseline at posttreatment. Increased calorie consumption was maintained at the 96-week follow-up (2 years posttreatment). The children's growth rates in weight and height were greater during the 2 years following treatment than the year prior to treatment. Increases in pace of eating and calories consumed per minute were also observed 1 year posttreatment. These findings replicated and extended earlier research supporting the efficacy of behavioral intervention in the treatment of malnutrition in children with cystic fibrosis. Images Figure 3 PMID:8307828

  13. [French guidelines for sweat test practice and interpretation for cystic fibrosis neonatal screening].

    PubMed

    Sermet-Gaudelus, I; Munck, A; Rota, M; Roussey, M; Feldmann, D; Nguyen-Khoa, T

    2010-09-01

    These guidelines aim to standardize the standard operating procedures for the sweat test in newborn cystic fibrosis (CF) screening. They have been implemented by the national Neonatal Screening working group of the French Federation for Cystic Fibrosis. It is recommended that the sweat test be performed when the infant weighs more than 3 kg and is at least 3 weeks of age. Sweat gland secretion is stimulated by transdermal administration of pilocarpine by iontophoresis. Sweat is preferentially collected in a Macroduct coil. Diagnosis of CF is based on the sweat chloride level. A sweat chloride level below 30 mmol/l very probably rules out CF; 60 mmol/l or higher supports the diagnosis of CF. Values between 30 and 60 mmol/l are considered abnormal. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Parents' religious coping styles in the first year after their child's cystic fibrosis diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Grossoehme, Daniel H; Ragsdale, Judy; Cotton, Sian; Wooldridge, Jamie L; Grimes, Lisa; Seid, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Parents of children diagnosed with cystic fibrosis described it as "devastating." Given religion's importance to many Americans, parents may utilize religious coping. Relatively little is known about parents' use of religious coping to handle their child's illness. Interviews with 15 parents about their use of religion in the year following their child's cystic fibrosis diagnosis were coded for religious coping styles. Sixteen styles were identified. Positive religious coping styles were more frequent than negative styles (previously associated with poorer health outcomes), and occurred more frequently than in other studies. Religious coping styles used to make meaning, gain control, or seek comfort/intimacy with God were equally prevalent. The most common styles were: Pleading, Collaboration, Benevolent Religious Reappraisals, and Seeking Spiritual Support. Parents described active rather than passive coping styles. Religious coping involving religious others was rare. Clinical attention to negative religious coping may prevent it becoming chronic and negatively affecting health.

  15. First isolation of two colistin-resistant emerging pathogens, Brevundimonas diminuta and Ochrobactrum anthropi, in a woman with cystic fibrosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Menuet, Magalie; Bittar, Fadi; Stremler, Nathalie; Dubus, Jean-Christophe; Sarles, Jacques; Raoult, Didier; Rolain, Jean-Marc

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Cystic fibrosis afflicted lungs support the growth of many bacteria rarely implicated in other cases of human infections. Case presentation We report the isolation and identification, by 16S rRNA amplification and sequencing, of two emerging pathogens resistant to colistin, Brevundimonas diminuta and Ochrobactrum anthropi, in a 17-year-old woman with cystic fibrosis and pneumonia. The patient eventually responded well to a 2-week regime of imipenem and tobramycin. Conclusion Our results clearly re-emphasize the emergence of new colistin-resistant pathogens in patients with cystic fibrosis. PMID:19061488

  16. Allergic Bronchopulmonary Aspergillosis in Asthma and Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Knutsen, Alan P.; Slavin, Raymond G.

    2011-01-01

    Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) is a Th2 hypersensitivity lung disease in response to Aspergillus fumigatus that affects asthmatic and cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Sensitization to A. fumigatus is common in both atopic asthmatic and CF patients, yet only 1-2% of asthmatic and 7–9% of CF patients develop ABPA. ABPA is characterized by wheezing and pulmonary infiltrates which may lead to pulmonary fibrosis and/or bronchiectasis. The inflammatory response is characterized by Th2 responses to Aspergillus allergens, increased serum IgE and eosinophilia. A number of genetic risks have recently been identified in the development of ABPA. These include HLA-DR and HLA-DQ, IL-4 receptor alpha chain (IL-4RA) polymorphisms, IL-10-1082GA promoter polymorphisms, surfactant protein A2 (SP-A2) polymorphisms, and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR) mutations. The studies indicate that ABPA patients are genetically at risk to develop skewed and heightened Th2 responses to A. fumigatus antigens. These genetic risk studies and their consequences of elevated biologic markers may aid in identifying asthmatic and CF patients who are at risk to the development of ABPA. Furthermore, these studies suggest that immune modulation with medications such as anti-IgE, anti-IL-4 and/or IL-13 monoclonal antibodies may be helpful in the treatment of ABPA. PMID:21603163

  17. Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis in asthma and cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Knutsen, Alan P; Slavin, Raymond G

    2011-01-01

    Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) is a Th2 hypersensitivity lung disease in response to Aspergillus fumigatus that affects asthmatic and cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Sensitization to A. fumigatus is common in both atopic asthmatic and CF patients, yet only 1-2% of asthmatic and 7-9% of CF patients develop ABPA. ABPA is characterized by wheezing and pulmonary infiltrates which may lead to pulmonary fibrosis and/or bronchiectasis. The inflammatory response is characterized by Th2 responses to Aspergillus allergens, increased serum IgE and eosinophilia. A number of genetic risks have recently been identified in the development of ABPA. These include HLA-DR and HLA-DQ, IL-4 receptor alpha chain (IL-4RA) polymorphisms, IL-10-1082GA promoter polymorphisms, surfactant protein A2 (SP-A2) polymorphisms, and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR) mutations. The studies indicate that ABPA patients are genetically at risk to develop skewed and heightened Th2 responses to A. fumigatus antigens. These genetic risk studies and their consequences of elevated biologic markers may aid in identifying asthmatic and CF patients who are at risk to the development of ABPA. Furthermore, these studies suggest that immune modulation with medications such as anti-IgE, anti-IL-4 and/or IL-13 monoclonal antibodies may be helpful in the treatment of ABPA.

  18. Inhaled therapy in cystic fibrosis: agents, devices and regimens

    PubMed Central

    Parrott, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Key points There have been significant advances in both inhalation medicines and delivery devices with “intelligent nebulisers” and “dry-powder inhalers” becoming commonplace in CF care. Inhaled medicines generate high levels of a drug within the airways with limited systemic effects, offering safe and convenient antibiotic and mucolytic therapy for individuals with CF. Variations in adherence are not unique to CF; however, treatment burden is high and therefore fast inhaled drug delivery devices may assist individuals in completing the prescribed treatment regimes. Prescribers of inhaled medicines have a responsibility to consider, in addition to efficacy, the appropriated drug/device combination for each individual in order to promote adherence and achieve the desired clinical benefit. Summary The recognised mainstay daily treatments for cystic fibrosis (CF) focus on inhaled and oral medications, airway clearance and optimised nutrition. This review discusses recent advances in inhaled therapies for the management of CF, including devices such as intelligent nebulisers, drug formulations and supporting evidence for inhaled antibiotics (for the management of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and muco-active drugs. We include practical advice for clinicians regarding the optimisation of inhalation technique and education. The influence of adherence on the use of inhaled therapies in CF is also reviewed. Educational aims To inform readers about the history and progression of inhaled therapies for people with CF with reference to the literature supporting current practice. To highlight the factors that may impact the success of inhaled therapies, including those which are device specific such as drug deposition and those which influence adherence. PMID:26306111

  19. Subepithelial fibrosis and degradation of the bronchial extracellular matrix in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Durieu, I; Peyrol, S; Gindre, D; Bellon, G; Durand, D V; Pacheco, Y

    1998-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a genetic disease caused by mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene. Chronic inflammation and proteolysis lead to progressive damage of the bronchial wall. Extracellular matrix determines the structural organization and the mechanical properties of lung airways. It was thus examined in nine patients with cystic fibrosis (six bronchial biopsies and three lobectomies) in order to assess its level of alteration. The submucosal changes in matrix protein distribution were analyzed by immunochemistry and electron microscopy: the subepithelial basal lamina was thinned; an acellular collagen fiber layer composed of interstitial collagens (types I and III) subtended by tenascin and devoid of elastin-associated microfibrils was deposited beneath the basal lamina; this dense fibrous deposit generally formed a thick layer and could extend into the bronchial wall; the bronchial elastic framework lost arborescent distribution and appeared slender, packed, or lacunar; ultrastructural observation gave evidence for elastic and collagenic fiber lysis. Proteolytic activity is probably the major cause of matrix degradation. Fibrosis appears as a repair process rather than as an active fibrogenesis. The reversibility of extracellular matrix alterations is an important challenge and various interventions such as anti-inflammatory treatments can be targeted to halt or reverse this degradation process.

  20. Oscillating devices for airway clearance in people with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Lisa; Agnew, Jennifer

    2014-07-20

    Chest physiotherapy is widely prescribed to assist the clearance of airway secretions in people with cystic fibrosis. Oscillating devices generate intra- or extra-thoracic oscillations orally or external to the chest wall. Internally they create variable resistances within the airways, generating controlled oscillating positive pressure which mobilises mucus. Extra-thoracic oscillations are generated by forces outside the respiratory system, e.g. high frequency chest wall oscillation. To identify whether oscillatory devices, oral or chest wall, are effective for mucociliary clearance and whether they are equivalent or superior to other forms of airway clearance in the successful management of secretions in people with cystic fibrosis. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register comprising references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and hand searches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. Latest search of the Cystic Fibrosis Trials Register: 13 January 2014. Randomised controlled studies and controlled clinical studies of oscillating devices compared with any other form of physiotherapy in people with cystic fibrosis. Single-treatment interventions (therapy technique used only once in the comparison) were excluded. Two authors independently applied the inclusion criteria to publications and assessed the quality of the included studies. The searches identified 68 studies with a total of 288 references; 35 studies (total of 1050 participants) met the inclusion criteria. Studies varied in duration from up to one week to one year; 20 of the studies were cross-over in design. The studies also varied in type of intervention and the outcomes measured, furthermore data were not published in sufficient detail in most of these studies, so meta-analysis was limited. Few studies were considered to have a low risk of bias in any domain. It is not possible to blind participants and

  1. Vitamin E supplementation in people with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Okebukola, Peter O; Kansra, Sonal; Barrett, Joanne

    2017-03-06

    People with cystic fibrosis are at an increased risk of fat-soluble vitamin deficiency including vitamin E. Vitamin E deficiency can cause a host of conditions such as haemolytic anaemia, cerebellar ataxia and cognitive difficulties. Vitamin E supplementation is widely recommended in cystic fibrosis and aims to ameliorate this deficiency. This is an updated version of the review. To determine the effects of any level of vitamin E supplementation on the frequency of vitamin E deficiency disorders in people with cystic fibrosis. We searched the Cochrane Group's Cystic Fibrosis Trials Register and also searched international trial registers for any ongoing clinical trials that were not identified during our register search.Date of last search of the Register: 10 October 2016. Date of last search of international trial registers: 15 February 2017. Randomised controlled trials and quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing any preparation of vitamin E supplementation to placebo or no supplement, regardless of dosage or duration. Two authors extracted outcome data from each study (published information) and assessed the risk of bias of each included study. Four studies with a total of 141 participants were included in the review, two of these were in children (aged six months to 14.5 years), and the other two did not specify participants' age. All studies used different formulations and doses of vitamin E for various durations of treatment (10 days to six months). Two studies compared the supplementation of fat-soluble as well as water-soluble formulations to no supplementation in different arms of the same study. A third study compared a water-soluble formulation to a placebo; and in the fourth study a fat-soluble formulation of vitamin E was assessed against placebo.At one month, three months and six months, water-soluble vitamin E significantly improved serum vitamin E levels compared with control: at one month, two studies, mean difference 17.66 (95% confidence

  2. Vitamin E supplementation in people with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Okebukola, Peter O; Kansra, Sonal; Barrett, Joanne

    2014-12-09

    People with cystic fibrosis are at an increased risk of fat-soluble vitamin deficiency including vitamin E. Vitamin E deficiency can cause a host of conditions such as haemolytic anaemia, cerebellar ataxia and cognitive difficulties. Vitamin E supplementation is widely recommended in cystic fibrosis and aims to ameliorate this deficiency. To determine the effects of any level of vitamin E supplementation on the frequency of vitamin E deficiency disorders in people with cystic fibrosis. We searched the Cochrane Group's Cystic Fibrosis Trials Register and also searched international trial registers for any ongoing clinical trials that were not identified during our register search.Date of last search of the Register: 10 February 2014. Date of last search of international trial registers: 30 August 2014. Randomised controlled trials and quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing any preparation of vitamin E supplementation to placebo or no supplement, regardless of dosage or duration. Two authors extracted outcome data from each study (published information) and assessed the risk of bias of each included study. Four studies with a total of 141 participants were included in the review, two of these were in children (aged six months to 14.5 years), and the other two did not specify participants' age. All studies used different formulations and doses of vitamin E for various durations of treatment (10 days to six months). Two studies compared the supplementation of fat-soluble as well as water-soluble formulations to no supplementation in different arms of the same study. A third study compared a water-soluble formulation to a placebo; and in the fourth study a fat-soluble formulation of vitamin E was assessed against placebo.At one month, three months and six months, water-soluble vitamin E significantly improved serum vitamin E levels compared with control: at one month, two studies, mean difference 17.66 (95% confidence interval 10.59 to 24.74); at three months, one

  3. Prevalence of cystic fibrosis mutations in pregnancies with fetal echogenic bowel.

    PubMed

    Sepulveda, W; Leung, K Y; Robertson, M E; Kay, E; Mayall, E S; Fisk, N M

    1996-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of the most common cystic fibrosis mutations in pregnancies complicated by fetal echogenic bowel by using DNA testing. Forty-five pregnancies with fetal echogenic bowel were studied prospectively for cystic fibrosis mutations. Using polymerase chain reaction, DNA from fetal amniocytes (n = 21), fetal blood (n = 5), or parental blood (n = 19) was amplified and tested for delta F508, G551D, G542X, and 621 + 1G-->T cystic fibrosis mutations, which account for about 85% of the mutations in the British population. In selected cases, further mutations were tested according to the parental ethnic background. Only one of the 26 fetuses screened was heterozygous for cystic fibrosis mutations. Among 38 parental samples screened from the remaining 19 pregnancies, cystic fibrosis mutations were detected in two cases, only one of the parents being a carrier in each case. The prevalence of cystic fibrosis carrier status in fetal and parental samples (1:26 and 1:19, respectively) is within the expected prevalence in the British population (1:25). No fetuses were affected by cystic fibrosis in this series, but five were found to have growth restriction, two trisomy 21, two congenital infection, and two bowel obstruction. Our results suggest that ultrasonographic detection of fetal echogenic bowel is not associated with an increased prevalence of cystic fibrosis mutations in pregnancies at low risk for this disease.

  4. 21 CFR 866.5910 - Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... nucleic acid assays. 866.5910 Section 866.5910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Test Systems § 866.5910 Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays. (a) Identification. Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays. A quality control material...

  5. 21 CFR 866.5910 - Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... nucleic acid assays. 866.5910 Section 866.5910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Test Systems § 866.5910 Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays. (a) Identification. Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays. A quality control material...

  6. 21 CFR 866.5910 - Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... nucleic acid assays. 866.5910 Section 866.5910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Test Systems § 866.5910 Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays. (a) Identification. Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays. A quality control material...

  7. Pseudomonas infection and mucociliary and absorptive clearance in the cystic fibrosis lung.

    PubMed

    Locke, Landon W; Myerburg, Michael M; Weiner, Daniel J; Markovetz, Matthew R; Parker, Robert S; Muthukrishnan, Ashok; Weber, Lawrence; Czachowski, Michael R; Lacy, Ryan T; Pilewski, Joseph M; Corcoran, Timothy E

    2016-05-01

    Airway surface liquid hyperabsorption and mucus accumulation are key elements of cystic fibrosis lung disease that can be assessed in vivo using functional imaging methods. In this study we evaluated experimental factors affecting measurements of mucociliary clearance (MCC) and small-molecule absorption (ABS) and patient factors associated with abnormal absorption and mucus clearance.Our imaging technique utilises two radiopharmaceutical probes delivered by inhalation. Measurement repeatability was assessed in 10 adult cystic fibrosis subjects. Experimental factors were assessed in 29 adult and paediatric cystic fibrosis subjects (51 scans). Patient factors were assessed in a subgroup with optimal aerosol deposition (37 scans; 24 subjects). Paediatric subjects (n=9) underwent initial and 2-year follow-up scans. Control subjects from a previously reported study are included for comparison.High rates of central aerosol deposition influenced measurements of ABS and, to a lesser extent, MCC. Depressed MCC in cystic fibrosis was only detectable in subjects with previous Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. Cystic fibrosis subjects without P. aeruginosa had similar MCC to control subjects. Cystic fibrosis subjects had consistently higher ABS rates.We conclude that the primary experimental factor affecting MCC/ABS measurements is central deposition percentage. Depressed MCC in cystic fibrosis is associated with P. aeruginosa infection. ABS is consistently increased in cystic fibrosis.

  8. Cystic Fibrosis in a Female Infant with Cardiac, Ocular, and Musculoskeletal Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Farooqui, Azhar; Eldin, Susan Gamal; Ali, Muna Dawood; AlTalhi, Ali; AlDigheari, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) remains the most common hereditary disease in the western population. Its concomitant presence with other congenital abnormalities is a rare phenomenon with very little documentation. In this case report we describe a case of cystic fibrosis in a female infant with cardiac, ocular, and musculoskeletal abnormalities. A brief literature review is also provided. PMID:26693372

  9. Self-Efficacy, Pulmonary Function, Perceived Health and Global Quality of Life of Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahl, Astrid K.; Rustoen ,Tone; Hanestad, Berit R.; Gjengedal, Eva; Moum, Torbjorn

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the extent that pulmonary function is related to perceived health status and global quality of life in adults suffering from cystic fibrosis, and the extent that self-efficacy modifies these relationships. Our sample comprised 86 adults (48% female; mean age, 29 years; age range, 18-54 years) with cystic fibrosis, recruited…

  10. Cystic Fibrosis Survival Better in Canada Than in U.S.

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164055.html Cystic Fibrosis Survival Better in Canada Than in U.S. Canadians ... MONDAY, March 13, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- People with cystic fibrosis are living longer than ever, but those in ...

  11. Renal diseases in adults with cystic fibrosis: a 40 year single centre experience.

    PubMed

    Wilcock, M J; Ruddick, A; Gyi, K M; Hodson, M E

    2015-10-01

    There is a sizable literature describing renal disease in patients with cystic fibrosis. Previous studies have focused on single disease processes alone, most commonly renal stone disease or acute kidney injury. In this study we report for the first time on the prevalence of all forms of renal disease in a cystic fibrosis population. A retrospective review of adult patients with cystic fibrosis attending the Adult Cystic Fibrosis Department at the Royal Brompton Hospital was carried out by searching the department's database to identify patients with renal problems and subsequently retrieving clinical information from medical notes. The prevalence of all renal diseases in our population was 5.1 %. The most commonly identified problem was renal stones. At 2.0 % the prevalence of renal stones in adult patients with cystic fibrosis was comparable to the general population. A range of other renal diseases were identified, the next most common being drug-induced acute kidney injury. A range of cystic fibrosis independent and attributable diseases has been identified but no cystic fibrosis specific disease. In contrast to other cystic fibrosis centres no increased prevalence of renal stones was found.

  12. Self-Efficacy, Pulmonary Function, Perceived Health and Global Quality of Life of Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahl, Astrid K.; Rustoen ,Tone; Hanestad, Berit R.; Gjengedal, Eva; Moum, Torbjorn

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the extent that pulmonary function is related to perceived health status and global quality of life in adults suffering from cystic fibrosis, and the extent that self-efficacy modifies these relationships. Our sample comprised 86 adults (48% female; mean age, 29 years; age range, 18-54 years) with cystic fibrosis, recruited…

  13. Clinical presentation of metabolic alkalosis in an adult patient with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Sweetser, Lisel J; Douglas, James A; Riha, Renata L; Bell, Scott C

    2005-03-01

    In subtropical and tropical climates, dehydration is common in cystic fibrosis patients with respiratory exacerbations. This may lead to a clinical presentation of metabolic alkalosis with associated hyponatraemia and hypochloraemia. An adult cystic fibrosis patient who presented with a severe respiratory exacerbation accompanied by metabolic alkalosis is presented and the effects of volume correction are reported.

  14. DNase and atelectasis in non-cystic fibrosis pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Hendriks, Tom; de Hoog, Matthijs; Lequin, Maarten H; Devos, Annick S; Merkus, Peter JFM

    2005-01-01

    Introduction No evidence based treatment is available for atelectasis. We aimed to evaluate the clinical and radiologic changes in pediatric patients who received DNase for persistent atelectasis that could not be attributed to cardiovascular causes, and who were unresponsive to treatment with inhaled bronchodilators and physiotherapy. Methods All non-cystic fibrosis pediatric patients who received nebulised or endotracheally instilled DNase for atelectasis between 1998 and 2002, with and without mechanical ventilation, were analysed in a retrospective descriptive study. The endpoints were the blood pCO2, the heart rate, the respiratory rate, the FiO2 and the chest X-ray scores before and after treatment. Results In 25 of 30 patients (median [range] age, 1.6 [0.1–11] years) who met inclusion criteria, paired data of at least three endpoints were available. All clinical parameters improved significantly within 2 hours (P < 0.01), except for the heart rate (P = 0.06). Chest X-ray scores improved significantly within 24 hours after DNase treatment (P < 0.001). Individual improvement was observed in 17 patients and no clinical change was observed in five patients. Temporary deterioration (n = 3) was associated with increased airway obstruction and desaturations. No other complications were observed. Conclusion After treatment with DNase for atelectasis of presumably infectious origin in non-cystic fibrosis pediatric patients, rapid clinical improvement was observed within 2 hours and radiologic improvement was documented within 24 hours in the large majority of children, and increased airway obstruction and ventilation–perfusion mismatch occurred in three children, possibly due to rapid mobilisation of mucus. DNase may be an effective treatment for infectious atelectasis in non-cystic fibrosis pediatric patients. PMID:16137347

  15. Ceftazidime in cystic fibrosis: pharmacokinetics and therapeutic response.

    PubMed

    Kercsmar, C M; Stern, R C; Reed, M D; Myers, C M; Murdell, D; Blumer, J L

    1983-07-01

    The pharmacokinetics of ceftazidime were assessed following a single-dose in 20 patients (8 to 30 years) with cystic fibrosis. All patients received 50 mg/kg (0.9 to 3.5 g) bolus over 30 to 60 sec. Multiple timed samples were obtained over 8 h and analysed by a sensitive HPLC technique. Two-compartment pharmacokinetic analysis revealed means (+/- S.D.) T 1/2 alpha, 0.45 (0.20) h; T 1/2 beta, 1.74 (0.63) h; Vd, 270.0 (50.0) ml/kg; Vc, 190.0 (50.0) ml/kg and Cl beta, 133.7 (22.8) ml/min/1.73 m2. Probenecid pretreatment in six patients was without effect on T 1/2 beta and Cl beta. Urinary excretion was (% of dose) 0 to 2 h, 65.4 (11.1); 2 to 4 h, 14.9 (3.4) and 4 to 8 h, 9.8 (5.8). Ceftazidime was used to treat pulmonary exacerbations in 12 adult cystic fibrosis patients with multiply-resistant Pseudomonas species. Each patient received 2 g iv 8-hourly for 14 to 35 days. Ten of 12 patients showed dramatic improvement as determined by increased appetite and weight gain and arterial pCO2. No hepatic, renal or bone-marrow toxicity was noted. Ceftazidime is an effective antipseudomonal agent possessing favourable pharmacokinetic characteristics with potential use in the treatment of pulmonary exacerbations in cystic fibrosis.

  16. Cystic Fibrosis Patents: A Case Study of Successful Licensing

    PubMed Central

    Minear, Mollie A.; Kapustij, Cristina; Boden, Kaeleen; Chandrasekharan, Subhashini; Cook-Deegan, Robert

    2013-01-01

    From 2006–2010, Duke University’s Center for Public Genomics prepared eight case studies examining the effects of gene patent licensing practices on clinical access to genetic testing for ten clinical conditions. One of these case studies focused on the successful licensing practices employed by the University of Michigan and the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto for patents covering the CFTR gene and its ΔF508 mutation that causes a majority of cystic fibrosis cases. Since the licensing of these patents has not impeded clinical access to genetic testing, we sought to understand how this successful licensing model was developed and whether it might be applicable to other gene patents. We interviewed four key players who either were involved in the initial discussions regarding the structure of licensing or who have recently managed the licenses and collected related documents. Important features of the licensing planning process included thoughtful consideration of potential uses of the patent; anticipation of future scientific discoveries and technological advances; engagement of relevant stakeholders, including the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation; and using separate licenses for in-house diagnostics versus kit manufacture. These features led to the development of a licensing model that has not only allowed the patent holders to avoid the controversy that has plagued other gene patents, but has also allowed research, development of new therapeutics, and wide-spread dissemination of genetic testing for cystic fibrosis. Although this licensing model may not be applicable to all gene patents, it serves as a model in which gene patent licensing can successfully enable innovation, investment in therapeutics research, and protect intellectual property while respecting the needs of patients, scientists, and public health. PMID:24231943

  17. Cystic Fibrosis Patents: A Case Study of Successful Licensing.

    PubMed

    Minear, Mollie A; Kapustij, Cristina; Boden, Kaeleen; Chandrasekharan, Subhashini; Cook-Deegan, Robert

    2013-03-01

    From 2006-2010, Duke University's Center for Public Genomics prepared eight case studies examining the effects of gene patent licensing practices on clinical access to genetic testing for ten clinical conditions. One of these case studies focused on the successful licensing practices employed by the University of Michigan and the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto for patents covering the CFTR gene and its ΔF508 mutation that causes a majority of cystic fibrosis cases. Since the licensing of these patents has not impeded clinical access to genetic testing, we sought to understand how this successful licensing model was developed and whether it might be applicable to other gene patents. We interviewed four key players who either were involved in the initial discussions regarding the structure of licensing or who have recently managed the licenses and collected related documents. Important features of the licensing planning process included thoughtful consideration of potential uses of the patent; anticipation of future scientific discoveries and technological advances; engagement of relevant stakeholders, including the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation; and using separate licenses for in-house diagnostics versus kit manufacture. These features led to the development of a licensing model that has not only allowed the patent holders to avoid the controversy that has plagued other gene patents, but has also allowed research, development of new therapeutics, and wide-spread dissemination of genetic testing for cystic fibrosis. Although this licensing model may not be applicable to all gene patents, it serves as a model in which gene patent licensing can successfully enable innovation, investment in therapeutics research, and protect intellectual property while respecting the needs of patients, scientists, and public health.

  18. Reduced Arylsulfatase B Activity in Leukocytes from Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Girish; Burke, Jenifer; Bhattacharyya, Sumit; Sharma, Neha; Katyal, Shivani; Park, R. Lucy; Tobacman, Joanne

    2013-01-01

    Summary The enzyme Arylsulfatase B (ARSB; N-acetylgalactosamine-4-sulfatase) removes 4-sulfate groups from chondroitin-4-sulfate and dermatan sulfate and is required for the degradation of these sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Since these GAGs accumulate in patients with Cystic Fibrosis (CF), we investigated the activity of ARSB in leukocytes of patients with CF, to consider if reduced activity of ARSB might contribute to the pathophysiology of CF. Previous cell-based experiments had demonstrated that when the deficiency of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) was corrected in bronchial epithelial cells, the ARSB activity increased significantly. De-identified, citrated blood samples were collected from 16 children with cystic fibrosis and 31 control subjects, seen in the Pediatric Clinic at Rush University Medical Center. Polymorphonuclear (PMN) and mononuclear cell (MC) populations were separated by density gradient, and blinded determinations of ARSB activity were performed using the exogenous substrate 4-methylumbilliferyl sulfate. Interleukin-6 was measured in the plasma samples by ELISA. ARSB activity was significantly less in the PMN and MC from the CF patients than controls (p<0.0001, unpaired t-test, two-tailed). Interleukin-6 levels in plasma were significantly greater in the CF population (p<0.001). Mean age, age range, and male:female ratio of CF patients and controls were similar, and no association of ARSB activity with age, gender, or CFTR genotype was evident. Since recombinant human ARSB is used successfully for replacement therapy in Mucopolysaccharidosis VI, it may be useful to restore ARSB activity to normal levels and increase degradation of sulfated GAGs in CF patients. PMID:22550062

  19. Fluoroquinolones in the treatment of bronchopulmonary disease in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Matthew; Smyth, Alan

    2012-12-01

    Fluoroquinolones are commonly used to treat lung infections in patients with cystic fibrosis. These patients are susceptible to lung infection with common bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus and Haemophilus influenzae, but are also prone to infection by opportunistic bacteria, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The good oral bioavailability and broad antimicrobial spectrum of activity, including antipseudomonal properties, make this class of antimicrobial attractive. We review the evidence assessing the use of fluoroquinolones in the context of preventing and eradicating early lung infection and in managing chronic lung infection and pulmonary exacerbations. The safety of fluoroquinolones and the use of newer agents in the class are also discussed.

  20. Lung Transplantation and Survival in Children with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Liou, Theodore G.; Adler, Frederick R.; Cox, David R.; Cahill, Barbara C.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND The effects of lung transplantation on the survival and quality of life in children with cystic fibrosis are uncertain. METHODS We used data from the U.S. Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Patient Registry and from the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network to identify children with cystic fibrosis who were on the waiting list for lung transplantation during the period from 1992 through 2002. We performed proportional-hazards survival modeling, using multiple clinically relevant covariates that were available before the children were on the waiting list and the interactions of these covariates with lung transplantation as a time-dependent covariate. The data were insufficient in quality and quantity for a retrospective quality-of-life analysis. RESULTS A total of 248 of the 514 children on the waiting list underwent lung transplantation in the United States during the period from 1992 through 2002. Proportional-hazards modeling identified four variables besides transplantation that were associated with changes in survival. Burkholderia cepacia infection decreased survival, regardless of whether the patient underwent transplantation. A diagnosis of diabetes before the patient was placed on the waiting list decreased survival while the patient was on the waiting list but did not decrease survival after transplantation, whereas older age did not affect waiting-list survival but decreased post-transplantation survival. Staphylococcus aureus infection increased waiting-list survival but decreased post-transplantation survival. Using age, diabetes status, and S. aureus infection status as covariates, we estimated the effect of transplantation on survival for each patient group, expressed as a hazard factor of less than 1 for a benefit and more than 1 for a risk of harm. Five patients had a significant estimated benefit, 315 patients had a significant risk of harm, 76 patients had an insignificant benefit, and 118 patients had an insignificant risk of harm

  1. Lung Transplantation and Survival in Children with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Liou, Theodore G.; Adler, Frederick R.; Cox, David R.; Cahill, Barbara C.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The effects of lung transplantation on the survival and quality of life in children with cystic fibrosis are uncertain. METHODS We used data from the U.S. Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Patient Registry and from the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network to identify children with cystic fibrosis who were on the waiting list for lung transplantation during the period from 1992 through 2002. We performed proportional-hazards survival modeling, using multiple clinically relevant covariates that were available before the children were on the waiting list and the interactions of these covariates with lung transplantation as a time-dependent covariate. The data were insufficient in quality and quantity for a retrospective quality-of-life analysis. RESULTS A total of 248 of the 514 children on the waiting list underwent lung transplantation in the United States during the period from 1992 through 2002. Proportional-hazards modeling identified four variables besides transplantation that were associated with changes in survival. Burkholderia cepacia infection was associated with a trend toward decreased survival, regardless of whether the patient underwent transplantation. A diagnosis of diabetes before the patient was placed on the waiting list decreased survival while the patient was on the waiting list but did not decrease survival after transplantation, whereas older age did not affect waiting-list survival but decreased post-transplantation survival. Staphylococcus aureus infection increased waiting-list survival but decreased post-transplantation survival. Using age, diabetes status, and S. aureus infection status as covariates, we estimated the effect of transplantation on survival for each patient group, expressed as a hazard factor of less than 1 for a benefit and more than 1 for a risk of harm. Five patients had a significant estimated benefit, 283 patients had a significant risk of harm, 102 patients had an insignificant benefit, and 124 patients

  2. State of progress in treating cystic fibrosis respiratory disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Since the discovery of the gene associated with cystic fibrosis (CF), there has been tremendous progress in the care of patients with this disease. New therapies have entered the market and are part of the standard treatment of patients with CF, and have been associated with marked improvement in survival. Now there are even more promising therapies directed at different components of the pathophysiology of this disease. In this review, our current knowledge of the pathophysiology of lung disease in patients with CF is described, along with the current treatment of CF lung disease, and the therapies in development that offer great promise to our patients. PMID:22883684

  3. Complications of gastroesophageal reflux in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Bendig, D W; Seilheimer, D K; Wagner, M L; Ferry, G D; Barrison, G M

    1982-04-01

    Seven patients with cystic fibrosis who had complications of gastroesophageal reflux including abdominal pain, peptic esophagitis, upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage, and esophageal stricture are described. We believe that these are gastrointestinal complications of CF and that they may be responsible for significant morbidity. The mechanical influence of a depressed diaphragm caused by hyperinflation, along with increased abdominal pressure with chronic coughing, may contribute to GER in CF. Early detection and treatment are important not only to prevent esophageal complications but also to increase the quality of life by relief of pain and by avoiding the resultant decrease in appetite, which can contribute to malnutrition.

  4. Transepithelial nasal potential difference (NPD) measurements in cystic fibrosis (CF).

    PubMed

    Sands, Dorota

    2013-01-01

    The main underlying physiologic abnormality in cystic fibrosis (CF) is dysfunction of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), which results in abnormal transport of sodium and chloride across epithelial surfaces. CFTR function could be tested in vivo using measurements of nasal transepithelial potential difference (PD). Nasal measurements show characteristic features of CF epithelia, including hyperpolarized baseline readings (basal PD), excessive depolarization in response to sodium channel inhibitors, such as amiloride (ΔAmiloride), and little or no chloride (Cl-) secretion in response to isoproterenol in a chloride-free solution (ΔCl- free-isoproterenol). PD test is applied for CF diagnosis and monitoring of new therapeutic modulations and corrections.

  5. Cerebral abscess as a complication of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Cooper, D M; Russell, L E; Henry, R L

    1994-06-01

    Two male patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), both 18 years old, developed frontal lobe brain abscesses. Both patients presented with histories of intermittent headache over several days and occasional vomiting. Headache was not more evident in the mornings and not associated with visual disturbance in either patient. Neither was hypertensive nor had visual disturbance. Both patients had documented pansinusitis and nasal polyposis. Both men had had few admissions for pulmonary exacerbations, and neither was significantly malnourished. The abscess in neither patient grew Pseudomonas species.

  6. Anabolic agent use in adults with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Green, Heather D; Barry, Peter J; Jones, Andrew M

    2015-10-01

    The use of non-prescribed anabolic agents amongst non-athletes is increasing with young, adult males with cystic fibrosis (CF) in the highest risk demographic. There is evidence that anabolic agents increase weight and muscle mass in adults with a variety of catabolic conditions but there is no evidence for their use in hormone sufficient adults with CF. We report a case of anabolic agent use in a male adult with CF and review the clinical features of anabolic agent use with a focus on adults with CF. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. [Pancreatic infringement exocrine and endocrine in cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Kessler, L; Abély, M

    2016-12-01

    The exocrine pancreatic insufficiency affects more than 80% of cystic fibrosis (CF) infants. Pancreatic insufficiency is diagnosed by low levels of fecal elastase. An optimal caloric intake, a pancreatic enzyme treatment are the keys to maintain a good nutritional status. The fat soluble vitamins supplementation will be associated with pancreatic enzymes treatment and will be adapted to plasma levels. Iron and oligo-element deficiency such as zinc is common. The pancreatic enzymes function is not optimal in the proximal bowel: the intraluminal intestinal pH is low because of the absence of bicarbonate release by the pancreas. The use of proton pump inhibitors may improve the functionality of pancreatic enzymes treatment. New therapies such as ivacaftor in patients with a G551D mutation allows a weight gain in particular by restoring intestinal pH similar to controls. Lengthening of the life expectancy of patients with CF is accompanied by the emergence new aspects of the disease, especially diabetes, favored by pancreatic cystic fibrosis resulting in an anatomical destruction of pancreatic islets. Currently, diabetes affects a third of the patients after 20 years, and half after 30 years. Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes is a major factor of morbidity-mortality in all stages of the disease and is characterized by a preclinical phase of glucose intolerance particularly long reaching up to 10 years. Its pathophysiology combines a lack of insulin secretion, an insulin resistance secondary to chronic infection, and a decrease in the production of the GIP and GLP-1. The insulin secretion depending on the channel chlorine (Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator [CFTR]) activity at the membrane surface of insulin cell is reduced prior to the occurrence of pancreatic histological lesions. At the stage of diabetes, obtaining a normoglycemia by insulin treatment began very early allows to slow the decline of lung function and nutritional status. Given the silent

  8. [Cystic fibrosis: how to use pulmonary function tests].

    PubMed

    Counil, F P; Karila, C; Le Bourgeois, M; Matecki, S; Lebras, M N; Couderc, L; Fajac, I; Reynaud-Gaubert, M; Bellet, M; Gauthier, R; Denjean, A

    2007-06-01

    Neonatal screening for cystic fibrosis (CF) leads to early dedicated specialist care for all patients. Pulmonary function tests (PFT) are mandatory for routine monitoring of CF patients. The aim of this article is to review the current guidelines for PFTs in CF, particularly the type of test, the age and the clinical status of the patient. The regular use of spirometry is generally accepted. Many other tests are used but their clinical value in the routine follow-up of CF patients remains to be established. Further efforts should be made to evaluate the value of PFTs in CF, particularly in very young children.

  9. [National French guidelines for management of infants with cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Sermet-Gaudelus, I; Couderc, L; Vrielynck, S; Brouard, J; Weiss, L; Wizla, N; Llerena, C; Lebourgeois, M; Bailly, C; Dirou, A; Renouil, M; Dalphin, M-L; Rault, G; Munck, A; Roussey, M

    2014-06-01

    These guidelines aim to standardize the care of infants diagnosed with a typical form of cystic fibrosis (CF) at neonatal screening. They have been implemented by the National Working Group for Neonatal Screening of the French Federation for CF and have been validated using the Delphi methodology by a large group of clinicians involved in the care of CF infants. These guidelines encompass management and organization of care at diagnosis and describe nutritional, digestive, and respiratory monitoring and treatment during the first 2 years of life. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. PPARγ as a therapeutic target in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Dekkers, Johanna F; van der Ent, Cornelis K; Kalkhoven, Eric; Beekman, Jeffrey M

    2012-05-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is characterized by a proinflammatory pulmonary condition that may result from increased infections and altered intracellular metabolism in CFTR-deficient cells. The lipid-activated transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) has well-established roles in immune cell function and inflammatory modulation and has been demonstrated to play an important role in the heightened inflammatory response in CF cells. Here, we summarize current literature describing PPARγ-dependent alterations of CF cells and discuss the potential of PPARγ ligands for treating CF. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Molecular modelling approaches for cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator studies.

    PubMed

    Odolczyk, Norbert; Zielenkiewicz, Piotr

    2014-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is one of the most common genetic disorders, caused by loss of function mutations in the gene encoding the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. CFTR is a member of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters superfamily and functions as an ATP-gated anion channel. This review summarises the vast majority of the efforts which utilised molecular modelling approaches to gain insight into the various aspects of CFTR protein, related to its structure, dynamic properties, function and interactions with other protein partners, or drug-like compounds, with emphasis to its relation to CF disease.

  12. Susceptibility of Candida albicans from Cystic Fibrosis Patients.

    PubMed

    Sabino, Raquel; Carolino, Elisabete; Moss, Richard B; Banaei, Niaz; Verissimo, Cristina; Stevens, David A

    2017-04-18

    Candida albicans is a common microbe, colonizer and potential pathogen found in respiratory cultures of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Because of possible development of resistance in patient isolates resulting from residence in the abnormal milieu of CF patient airways, or from exposure to antifungals, and considering the possibility of patient-to-patient spread of microbes and reports of elevated resistance to other fungal pathogens, it was important to assay the susceptibility of isolates of Candida and compare that profile to isolates from the community. In our center, and unlike another fungal pathogen, no increase in resistance of Candida isolates of the CF cohort was found.

  13. Genetics and epithelial cell dysfunction in cystic fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Riordan, J.R.; Buchwald, M.

    1987-01-01

    This book examines the advances being made in the study of the physiology, cell biology, and molecular genetics of cystic fibrosis. Emphasis is placed on various areas of research that involve epithelial cells (e.g., the CF-specific phenotypes exhibited by epithelial cells, abnormalities in epithelium ion transport, chloride channel regulation in CF epithelial.) Coverage is presented on the current status of CF, including data on the incidence of the disease, its mode of inheritance, chromosomal localization, genetic heterogeneity, and screening and management.

  14. Highlights from the 2015 North American Cystic Fibrosis Conference.

    PubMed

    Zemanick, Edith T; Ong, Thida; Daines, Cori L; Dellon, Elisabeth P; Muhlebach, Marianne S; Esther, Charles R

    2016-06-01

    The 29th Annual North American Cystic Fibrosis Conference was held in Phoenix, Arizona on October 8-10, 2015. Abstracts were published in a supplement to Pediatric Pulmonology.(1) In this review, we summarize presentations in several of the topic areas addressed at the conference. Our goal is to provide an overview of presentations with relevance to emerging or changing concepts in several areas rather than a comprehensive review. Citations from the conference are by first author and abstract number or symposium number, as designated in the supplement. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2016;51:650-657. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Two frameshift mutations in the cystic fibrosis gene

    PubMed Central

    Iannuzzi, Michael C.; Stern, Robert C.; Collins, Francis S.; Hon, Catherine Tom; Hidaka, Noriko; Strong, Theresa; Becker, Lisa; Drumm, Mitchell L.; White, Marga B.; Gerrard, Bernard; Dean, Michael

    1991-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a recessive disease caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. We have identified in exon 7 two frameshift mutations, one caused by a two-nucleotide insertion and the other caused by a one-nucleotide deletion; these mutations–CF1154insTC and CF1213delT, respectively, are predicted to shift the reading frame of the protein and to introduce UAA(ochre) termination codons at residues 369 and 368. ImagesFigure 2 PMID:1990834

  16. Pseudomonas Biofilms, Cystic Fibrosis, and Phage: a Silver Lining?

    PubMed Central

    Brüssow, Harald

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT In contrast to usual laboratory conditions, most bacteria in the human body grow in biofilms. Encased in a structured matrix, many pathogens display heightened resistance to antibiotics. Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients represent a prime example of the clinical challenges that antibiotic resistance in biofilms can represent. In the March 6, 2012 issue of mBio, Colin Hill and his colleagues report on experiments that add to the evidence that Pseudomonas phages are a potential treatment option for these infections. PMID:22493030

  17. Health Human Resources Guidelines: Minimum Staffing Standards and Role Descriptions for Canadian Cystic Fibrosis Healthcare Teams

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In cystic fibrosis clinics across Canada, the most common barrier that healthcare workers face when providing care to their patients is having too little time. The Health Human Resources Guidelines were developed to define specifically what amounts of time should be allocated for each discipline of cystic fibrosis clinical care and to provide a description of all the roles involved, reinforcing how these work together to provide comprehensive multidisciplinary care. With involvement from all cystic fibrosis clinics in Canada, through the use of a tailored survey, the Health Human Resources Guidelines are an exclusively Canadian document that has been developed for implementation across the country. The guidelines have been incorporated into a national Accreditation Site Visit program for use in evaluating and improving care across the country and have been distributed to all Canadian cystic fibrosis clinics. The guidelines provide hospital administrators with clear benchmarks for allocating personnel resources to the cystic fibrosis clinics hosted within their institutions. PMID:27445556

  18. Health Human Resources Guidelines: Minimum Staffing Standards and Role Descriptions for Canadian Cystic Fibrosis Healthcare Teams.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Ian D

    2016-01-01

    In cystic fibrosis clinics across Canada, the most common barrier that healthcare workers face when providing care to their patients is having too little time. The Health Human Resources Guidelines were developed to define specifically what amounts of time should be allocated for each discipline of cystic fibrosis clinical care and to provide a description of all the roles involved, reinforcing how these work together to provide comprehensive multidisciplinary care. With involvement from all cystic fibrosis clinics in Canada, through the use of a tailored survey, the Health Human Resources Guidelines are an exclusively Canadian document that has been developed for implementation across the country. The guidelines have been incorporated into a national Accreditation Site Visit program for use in evaluating and improving care across the country and have been distributed to all Canadian cystic fibrosis clinics. The guidelines provide hospital administrators with clear benchmarks for allocating personnel resources to the cystic fibrosis clinics hosted within their institutions.

  19. [Nutritional status of adults with cystic fibrosis - current methods of assessment].

    PubMed

    Szabla, Anna; Skorupa, Wojciech; Milewska, Magdalena; Weker, Halina

    2015-11-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is one of the most frequent monogenic disease in the Caucasian population, inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern. This is a multiple organ disease and its main manifestations include pulmonary and gastrointestinal dysfunction. The exocrine pancreatic deficiency results in impaired digestion and absorption what may lead to malnutrition and vitamins and minerals deficiencies. The life expectancy of cystic fibrosis patients has been increasing over the past years, so there is a need to verify usefulness of existing or create new methods of nutritional status assessment. The aim of this paper was presentation current data on the methods of assessment and monitoring of nutritional status. Particular attention has been paid to appropriate nutritional support in prevention and treatment of malnutrition patients with cystic fibrosis. On the basis of recent literature we can conclude that the advanced nutritional status assessment is recommended in patient with CF by using anthropometrical methods, body composition analysis and biochemical data. Good nutritional status is connected with pulmonary functions, quality and life length.

  20. Magnetomotive optical coherence elastography for relating lung structure and function in cystic fibrosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhetri, Raghav K.; Carpenter, Jerome; Superfine, Richard; Randell, Scott H.; Oldenburg, Amy L.

    2010-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic defect in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein and is the most common life-limiting genetic condition affecting the Caucasian population. It is an autosomal recessive, monogenic inherited disorder characterized by failure of airway host defense against bacterial infection, which results in bronchiectasis, the breakdown of airway wall extracellular matrix (ECM). In this study, we show that the in vitro models consisting of human tracheo-bronchial-epithelial (hBE) cells grown on porous supports with embedded magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) at an air-liquid interface are suitable for long term, non-invasive assessment of ECM remodeling using magnetomotive optical coherence elastography (MMOCE). The morphology of ex vivo CF and normal lung tissues using OCT and correlative study with histology is also examined. We also demonstrate a quantitative measure of normal and CF airway elasticity using MMOCE. The improved understanding of pathologic changes in CF lung structure and function and the novel method of longitudinal in vitro ECM assessment demonstrated in this study may lead to new in vivo imaging and elastography methods to monitor disease progression and treatment in cystic fibrosis.

  1. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator-Related Metabolic Syndrome and Cystic Fibrosis Screen Positive, Inconclusive Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Ren, Clement L; Borowitz, Drucy S; Gonska, Tanja; Howenstine, Michelle S; Levy, Hara; Massie, John; Milla, Carlos; Munck, Anne; Southern, Kevin W

    2017-02-01

    An unintended consequence of cystic fibrosis (CF) newborn screening (NBS) is the identification of infants with a positive NBS test but inconclusive diagnostic testing. These infants are classified as CF transmembrane conductance regulator-related metabolic syndrome (CRMS) in the US and CF screen positive, inconclusive diagnosis (CFSPID) in other countries. Diagnostic and management decisions of these infants are challenges for CF healthcare professionals and stressful situations for families. As CF NBS has become more widespread across the world, increased information about the epidemiology and outcomes of these infants is becoming available. These data were reviewed at the 2015 CF Foundation Diagnosis Consensus Conference, and a harmonized definition of CRMS and CFSPID was developed. At the consensus conference, participants reviewed published and unpublished studies of CRMS/CFSPID and used a modified Delphi methodology to develop a harmonized approach to the definition of CRMS/CFSPID. Several studies of CRMS/CFSPID from populations around the world have been published in the past year. Although the studies vary in the number of infants studied, study design, and outcome measures, there have been some consistent findings. CRMS/CFSPID occurs relatively frequently, with CF:CRMS that ranges from 3 to 5 cases of CF for every 1 case of CRMS/CFSPID in regions where gene sequencing is not used. The incidence varies by NBS protocol used, and in some regions more cases of CRMS/CFSPID are detected than cases of CF. The majority of individuals with CRMS/CFSPID do not develop CF disease or progress to a diagnosis of CF. However, between 10% and 20% of asymptomatic infants can develop clinical features concerning for CF, such as a respiratory culture positive for Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Most studies have only reported short-term outcomes in the first 1-3 years of life; the long-term outcomes of CRMS/CFSPID remain unknown. The European CF Society definition of CFSPID and the

  2. Muscle size and cardiorespiratory response to exercise in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Moser, C; Tirakitsoontorn, P; Nussbaum, E; Newcomb, R; Cooper, D M

    2000-11-01

    The mechanism responsible for diminished exercise performance in cystic fibrosis (CF) is not clear. We hypothesized that reduced muscle size, rather than an intrinsic muscle defect, was the primary factor in such diminished exercise performance. Twenty-two subjects with CF (14 females and eight males, aged 6.5 to 17.7 yr, with FEV(1) of 46% to 111% predicted) participated in a study of this hypothesis, and were compared with healthy children tested in the same laboratory. Muscle size was estimated from midthigh muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) obtained by magnetic resonance imaging, and fitness was determined by progressive cycle ergometer exercise testing with breath-by-breath measurements of gas exchange. Peak oxygen consumption (V O(2)) was reduced in CF subjects (956 +/- 81 [mean +/- SEM] ml/min, as compared with 1,473 +/- 54 ml/min in controls; p < 0.00001). Surprisingly, CF subjects had a lower peak V O(2) per CSA (mean for CF subjects 70 +/- 3% predicted, p < 0.0001) than did controls, whereas muscle CSA in CF subjects was not significantly smaller than in controls. The scaling parameters of peak V O(2) and muscle CSA did not differ significantly between healthy controls (0.80 +/- 0.16) and CF subjects (1.03 +/- 0.12). Indexes of aerobic function that are less effort-dependent than peak V O(2) were also lower in the CF subjects (e.g., the slope of V O(2) versus work rate [WR] (DeltaV O(2)/DeltaWR) was 68 +/- 2% predicted; p < 0.005). The study data did not support the initial hypothesis, and suggest a muscle-related abnormality in oxygen metabolism in patients with CF.

  3. Cystic fibrosis carrier population screening in the primary care setting.

    PubMed

    Loader, S; Caldwell, P; Kozyra, A; Levenkron, J C; Boehm, C D; Kazazian, H H; Rowley, P T

    1996-07-01

    To determine the receptivity of prenatal care providers and their patients to carrier testing for cystic fibrosis (CF), we offered free carrier screening, followed by genetic counseling of carriers, to all prenatal care providers in Rochester, NY, for all their female patients of reproductive age, pregnant or not. Of 124 prenatal care providers, only 37 elected to participate, but many of these offered screening only to pregnant women. The acceptance rate among pregnant women was approximately 57%. The most common reasons for accepting screening were to obtain reassurance (50.7%) and to avoid having a child with CF (27.8 %). The most common reasons for declining screening were not intending to terminate a pregnancy for CF (32.4%) and believing that the chance of having a CF child was very low (32.2%). Compared with decliners, acceptors were more likely to have no children, regarded having a child with CF as more serious, believed themselves more susceptible to having such a child, knew more about CF, would be more likely to terminate a pregnancy if the fetus were shown to have CF, and more strongly supported offering CF screening to women of reproductive age. Of 4,879 women on whom results were obtained, 124 were found to be carriers. Of these 124 carriers, the partners of 106 were tested. Of the five at-risk couples, four requested prenatal diagnosis and one requested neonatal diagnosis. No woman found to be a carrier whose partner tested negative requested prenatal diagnosis. Except for the imperfect knowledge of those testing negative, none of the adverse outcomes predicted for CF carrier testing in the general population were observed in this study.

  4. Cystic fibrosis carrier population screening in the primary care setting.

    PubMed Central

    Loader, S.; Caldwell, P.; Kozyra, A.; Levenkron, J. C.; Boehm, C. D.; Kazazian, H. H.; Rowley, P. T.

    1996-01-01

    To determine the receptivity of prenatal care providers and their patients to carrier testing for cystic fibrosis (CF), we offered free carrier screening, followed by genetic counseling of carriers, to all prenatal care providers in Rochester, NY, for all their female patients of reproductive age, pregnant or not. Of 124 prenatal care providers, only 37 elected to participate, but many of these offered screening only to pregnant women. The acceptance rate among pregnant women was approximately 57%. The most common reasons for accepting screening were to obtain reassurance (50.7%) and to avoid having a child with CF (27.8 %). The most common reasons for declining screening were not intending to terminate a pregnancy for CF (32.4%) and believing that the chance of having a CF child was very low (32.2%). Compared with decliners, acceptors were more likely to have no children, regarded having a child with CF as more serious, believed themselves more susceptible to having such a child, knew more about CF, would be more likely to terminate a pregnancy if the fetus were shown to have CF, and more strongly supported offering CF screening to women of reproductive age. Of 4,879 women on whom results were obtained, 124 were found to be carriers. Of these 124 carriers, the partners of 106 were tested. Of the five at-risk couples, four requested prenatal diagnosis and one requested neonatal diagnosis. No woman found to be a carrier whose partner tested negative requested prenatal diagnosis. Except for the imperfect knowledge of those testing negative, none of the adverse outcomes predicted for CF carrier testing in the general population were observed in this study. Images p236-a p236-b p236-c PMID:8659530

  5. Characteristics of Resting Metabolic Rate in Critically Ill, Mechanically Ventilated Adults With Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Frankenfield, David C; Ashcraft, Christine M; Drasher, Tammy L; Reid, Elizabeth K; Vender, Robert L

    2017-05-01

    Critically ill patients with cystic fibrosis may be especially sensitive to the negative consequences of overfeeding and underfeeding, yet there is almost no information available about the energy needs of these patients. The purpose of this study was to characterize the metabolic rate of critically ill adult patients with cystic fibrosis requiring mechanical ventilation. This was an observational study in which the resting metabolic rate, oxygen consumption, and carbon dioxide production of adult patients with cystic fibrosis requiring critical care, sedation, and mechanical ventilation were measured with indirect calorimetry. This group was compared with a cohort of adult critical care patients without cystic fibrosis. Twelve patients with cystic fibrosis were identified and measured. These were compared with a control group of 25 critically ill patients. Both groups were underweight (body mass index, 17.4 ± 4.0 kg/m(2) in cystic fibrosis and 18.4 ± 2.3 kg/m(2) in control). Adjusting for differences in age, sex, height, and weight, there was no difference in resting metabolic rate between the cystic fibrosis and control groups (1702 ± 193 vs 1642 ± 194 kcal/d, P = .388). Measured resting metabolic rate matched predicted values 58% of the time in cystic fibrosis and 60% of the time in control. The resting metabolic rate of sedated adult patients with cystic fibrosis being assisted with mechanical ventilation is not different from that of adult critical care patients without cystic fibrosis. In both these underweight groups, accurate prediction of resting metabolic rate is difficult to obtain.

  6. Interactions between Neutrophils and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Rada, Balázs

    2017-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) affects 70,000 patients worldwide. Morbidity and mortality in CF is largely caused by lung complications due to the triad of impaired mucociliary clearance, microbial infections and chronic inflammation. Cystic fibrosis airway inflammation is mediated by robust infiltration of polymorphonuclear neutrophil granulocytes (PMNs, neutrophils). Neutrophils are not capable of clearing lung infections and contribute to tissue damage by releasing their dangerous cargo. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen causing infections in immunocompromised individuals. P. aeruginosa is a main respiratory pathogen in CF infecting most patients. Although PMNs are key to attack and clear P. aeruginosa in immunocompetent individuals, PMNs fail to do so in CF. Understanding why neutrophils cannot clear P. aeruginosa in CF is essential to design novel therapies. This review provides an overview of the antimicrobial mechanisms by which PMNs attack and eliminate P. aeruginosa. It also summarizes current advances in our understanding of why PMNs are incapable of clearing P. aeruginosa and how this bacterium adapts to and resists PMN-mediated killing in the airways of CF patients chronically infected with P. aeruginosa. PMID:28282951

  7. Dornase Alfa for Non-Cystic Fibrosis Pediatric Pulmonary Atelectasis.

    PubMed

    Thornby, Krisy-Ann; Johnson, Ashley; Axtell, Samantha

    2014-08-01

    To review the literature evaluating the efficacy of dornase alfa for non-cystic fibrosis pediatric patients with pulmonary atelectasis. Articles were retrieved after a search of MEDLINE/PubMed (1946 to April 2014), and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (1970-April 2014) was performed using the terms dornase alfa, recombinant human deoxyribonuclease, pulmonary, persistent, and atelectasis. Other relevant articles referenced from the MEDLINE search were also utilized. Data sources were limited to English language clinical trials and case studies including only children; 8 clinical trials and 12 case reports met the criteria. Dornase alfa is used as an off-label treatment option for pulmonary atelectasis because limited treatment modalities exist after conventional therapy has failed. We evaluated 8 clinical trials and 12 case reports involving this pediatric population with varying primary diagnoses. The majority of patients experienced improvement in atelectasis, suggesting benefit after receiving treatment with dornase alfa. However, the outcomes were possibly confounded by those receiving combination therapies, varying primary diagnoses, and varying end points evaluated. Dornase alfa was overall well tolerated, with only a few patients experiencing worsening atelectasis posttreatment. Dornase alfa may be considered as a therapeutic option in non-cystic fibrosis pediatric patients with pulmonary atelectasis, who require treatment intervention when conventional therapy is unsuccessful. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. Practical Guidelines: Lung Transplantation in Patients with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Hirche, T. O.; Knoop, C.; Hebestreit, H.; Shimmin, D.; Solé, A.; Elborn, J. S.; Ellemunter, H.; Aurora, P.; Hogardt, M.; Wagner, T. O. F.; ECORN-CF Study Group

    2014-01-01

    There are no European recommendations on issues specifically related to lung transplantation (LTX) in cystic fibrosis (CF). The main goal of this paper is to provide CF care team members with clinically relevant CF-specific information on all aspects of LTX, highlighting areas of consensus and controversy throughout Europe. Bilateral lung transplantation has been shown to be an important therapeutic option for end-stage CF pulmonary disease. Transplant function and patient survival after transplantation are better than in most other indications for this procedure. Attention though has to be paid to pretransplant morbidity, time for referral, evaluation, indication, and contraindication in children and in adults. This review makes extensive use of specific evidence in the field of lung transplantation in CF patients and addresses all issues of practical importance. The requirements of pre-, peri-, and postoperative management are discussed in detail including bridging to transplant and postoperative complications, immune suppression, chronic allograft dysfunction, infection, and malignancies being the most important. Among the contributors to this guiding information are 19 members of the ECORN-CF project and other experts. The document is endorsed by the European Cystic Fibrosis Society and sponsored by the Christiane Herzog Foundation. PMID:24800072

  9. Lung transplantation in patients with cystic fibrosis: the Israeli experience.

    PubMed

    Prais, Dario; Raviv, Yael; Shitrit, David; Yellin, Alon; Sahar, Gideon; Bendayan, Danielle; Yahav, Yaacov; Efrati, Ori; Reichart, Nira; Blau, Hannah; Bakal, Ilana; Buchman, Gila; Saute, Milton; Vidne, Bernardo; Kramer, Mordechai R

    2006-06-01

    Lung transplantation is a well-established therapeutic option for end-stage lung disease in cystic fibrosis. Although it confers a clear survival advantage, outcome differs among centers according to local experience, patient selection, transplantation procedure, and postoperative care. To evaluate the national Israeli experience with lung transplantation in patients with CF. We reviewed the medical charts of all CF patients who underwent lung transplantation between January 1996 and June 2005 at the two Israeli centers that perform this procedure. Eighteen transplantations were performed in 17 patients. Mean patient age at transplantation was 25.3 +/- 9.1 years, and mean duration of follow-up in survivors (n=14) was 37.2 months (range 1-113 months). The actuarial survival rate was 88% at 1 year and 74% at 5 years. Pulmonary function, expressed as percent of predicted normal forced expiratory volume in 1 sec, improved from 22.4 +/- 8.1% to 76 +/- 16.8% at one year after transplantation. Bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome was diagnosed in 5 patients (29%), of whom 2 died and 2 are currently candidates for retransplantation. Median time to onset of BOS was 34.2 months (range 17-64 months). In Israel, the early and intermediate-term results of lung transplantation for cystic fibrosis are encouraging. BOS remains a major complication that threatens long-term outcome.

  10. Strategies for the etiological therapy of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Maiuri, Luigi; Raia, Valeria; Kroemer, Guido

    2017-11-01

    Etiological therapies aim at repairing the underlying cause of cystic fibrosis (CF), which is the functional defect of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein owing to mutations in the CFTR gene. Among these, the F508del CFTR mutation accounts for more than two thirds of CF cases worldwide. Two somehow antinomic schools of thought conceive CFTR repair in a different manner. According to one vision, drugs should directly target the mutated CFTR protein to increase its plasma membrane expression (correctors) or improve its ion transport function (potentiators). An alternative strategy consists in modulating the cellular environment and proteostasis networks in which the mutated CFTR protein is synthesized, traffics to its final destination, the plasma membrane, and is turned over. We will analyze distinctive advantages and drawbacks of these strategies in terms of their scientific and clinical dimensions, and we will propose a global strategy for CF research and development based on a reconciliatory approach. Moreover, we will discuss the utility of preclinical biomarkers that may guide the personalized, patient-specific implementation of CF therapies.

  11. Physiological effects of vibration in subjects with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    McCarren, B; Alison, J A

    2006-06-01

    The physiological mechanisms by which vibration and other physiotherapy interventions may clear secretions in subjects with cystic fibrosis are unknown. The main aim of this study was to compare the expiratory flow rates and frequencies of airflow oscillation of vibration to those of Acapella(R), Flutter(R), positive expiratory pressure and percussion. Respiratory flow rates were measured during interventions, the order of which was randomised. The oscillation of the airflow of the interventions was determined by frequency spectral analysis. In 18 young adult subjects with cystic fibrosis, the mean peak expiratory flow rate of vibration was greater than Flutter(R), percussion, Acapella(R) and positive expiratory pressure. The mean+/-sd of the oscillation of the airflow of vibration (8.4+/-0.4 Hz) was lower than Acapella(R) (13.5+/-1.7 Hz) and Flutter(R) (11.3+/-1.5 Hz) but similar to percussion (7.3+/-0.3 Hz). Theoretically, the higher peak expiratory flow rate of vibration compared to the other physiotherapy interventions may promote secretion clearance. In addition, the frequency of oscillation of vibration was within the range demonstrated to increase mucus transport. This study has provided some evidence for the physiological rationale for the use of vibration to aid secretion clearance.

  12. Left ventricular and aortic dysfunction in cystic fibrosis mice

    PubMed Central

    Sellers, Zachary M.; Kovacs, Attila; Weinheimer, Carla J.; Best, Philip M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Left ventricular (LV) abnormalities have been reported in cystic fibrosis (CF); however, it remains unclear if loss of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) function causes heart defects independent of lung disease. Methods Using gut-corrected F508del CFTR mutant mice (ΔF508), which do not develop human lung disease, we examined in vivo heart and aortic function via 2D transthoracic echocardiography and LV catheterization. Results ΔF508 mouse hearts showed LV concentric remodeling along with enhanced inotropy (increased +dP/dt, fractional shortening, decreased isovolumetric contraction time) and greater lusitropy (−dP/dt, Tau). Aortas displayed increased stiffness and altered diastolic flow. β-adrenergic stimulation revealed diminished cardiac reserve (attenuated +dP/dt,−dP/dt, LV pressure). Conclusions In a mouse model of CF, CFTR mutation leads to LV remodeling with alteration of cardiac and aortic functions in the absence of lung disease. As CF patients live longer, more active lives, their risk for cardiovascular disease should be considered. PMID:23269368

  13. New mechanical aid to physiotherapy in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Flower, K A; Eden, R I; Lomax, L; Mann, N M; Burgess, J

    1979-01-01

    The force of impact and frequency of percussion by physiotherapists and parents of children with cystic fibrosis were analysed on a special test rig and incorporated in a prototype percussor. In adult volunteers and cadavers a maximum intrathoracic pressure could be achieved by a critical frequency of mechanical percussion which was higher than that reached by physiotherapists and parents. Consequently the percussor was redesigned to operate at this optimum frequency. It was then discovered that if the percussor was pressed firmly enough against the chest, this maximum intrathoracic pressure could be indicated by quivering of the voice. In a continuing study of intrathoracic pressures obtained mechanically and manually the Salford percussor's produced higher pressures than the physiotherapists' and maintained them constantly, while the physiotherapists' efforts and results varied from one to another. Hospital and domiciliary use of the percussor have shown it to help in the first stage of the physiotherapy routine for patients with cystic fibrosis. The percussor should enable adolescents and adults to treat themselves and encourage twice-daily and more effective chest treatments. It is easy to apply and its speed and efficiency should enable parents to improve the quality of their chest therapy for younger children at home. Its long-term benefits are difficult to assess because of the nature of the disease. PMID:497750

  14. Fungi in the cystic fibrosis lung: bystanders or pathogens?

    PubMed

    Chotirmall, Sanjay H; McElvaney, Noel G

    2014-07-01

    Improvement to the life expectancy of people with cystic fibrosis (PWCF) brings about novel challenges including the need for evaluation of the role of fungi in the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung. To determine if such organisms represent bystanders or pathogens affecting clinical outcomes we review the existing knowledge from a clinical, biochemical, inflammatory and immunological perspective. The prevalence and importance of fungi in the CF airway has likely been underestimated with the most frequently isolated filamentous fungi being Aspergillus fumigatus and Scedosporium apiospermum and the major yeast Candida albicans. Developing non-culture based microbiological methods for fungal detection has improved both our classification and understanding of their clinical consequences including localized, allergic and systemic infections. Cross-kingdom interaction between bacteria and fungi are discussed as is the role of biofilms further affecting clinical outcome. A combination of host and pathogen-derived factors determines if a particular fungus represents a commensal, colonizer or pathogen in the setting of CF. The underlying immune state, disease severity and treatment burden represent key host variables whilst fungal type, form, chronicity and virulence including the ability to evade immune recognition determines the pathogenic potential of a specific fungus at a particular point in time. Further research in this emerging field is warranted to fully elucidate the spectrum of disease conferred by the presence of fungi in the CF airway and the indications for therapeutic interventions.

  15. The Cystic Fibrosis Gene: A Molecular Genetic Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Tsui, Lap-Chee; Dorfman, Ruslan

    2013-01-01

    The positional cloning of the gene responsible for cystic fibrosis (CF) was the important first step in understanding the basic defect and pathophysiology of the disease. This study aims to provide a historical account of key developments as well as factors that contributed to the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene identification work. A redefined gene structure based on the full sequence of the gene derived from the Human Genome Project is presented, along with brief reviews of the transcription regulatory sequences for the CFTR gene, the role of mRNA splicing in gene regulation and CF disease, and, various related sequences in the human genome and other species. Because CF mutations and genotype-phenotype correlations are covered by our colleagues (Ferec C, Cutting GR. 2012. Assessing the disease-liability of mutations in CFTR. Cold Spring Harb Perspect Med doi: 10.1101/cshperspect.a009480), we only attempt to provide an introduction of the CF mutation database here for reference purposes. PMID:23378595

  16. Employment and work disability in adults with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Laborde-Castérot, Hervé; Donnay, Carole; Chapron, Jeanne; Burgel, Pierre-Régis; Kanaan, Reem; Honoré, Isabelle; Dusser, Daniel; Choudat, Dominique; Hubert, Dominique

    2012-03-01

    As a result of prolonged survival, more patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) participate in the labour force. The aim of this study was to evaluate their education, occupation levels and risk factors for work disability. 207 patients answered a self-administered questionnaire about their educational level and work status. Independently, medical records were reviewed for illness severity indicators. 39 patients (19%) were students, 117 (57%) were in the labour force, 13 (6%) were seeking employment and 38 (18%) were inactive. CF patients had a higher educational level and were more likely to hold skilled jobs and to work part time than the general population. FEV1 and educational level were the strongest predictive factors of disability. Many CF patients have access to professional life. Their higher educational levels improve the chances of attaining employment, which highlights the need for career counselling. Working part time helps to maintain employment despite declining health. Copyright © 2011 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Hypertonic saline releases the attached small intestinal cystic fibrosis mucus.

    PubMed

    Ermund, Anna; Meiss, Lauren N; Scholte, Bob J; Hansson, Gunnar C

    2015-01-01

    Hypertonic saline inhalation has become a cornerstone in the treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF), but its effect on CF mucus is still not understood. In CF, mucus stagnates in the airways, causing mucus plugging, and forming a substrate for bacterial invasion. Using horizontal Ussing-type chambers to allow easy access to the tissue, we have recently shown that the small intestinal mucus of CF mice is attached to the epithelium and not freely movable as opposed to normal mucus, thus pointing to a similarity between the CF mucus in the ileum and airways. In the same type of system, we investigated how hypertonic saline affects mucus thickness, attachment and penetrability to fluorescent beads the size of bacteria in ileal explants from the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator mutant (ΔF508) mouse, in order to characterize how this common therapy affects mucus properties. Hypertonic saline (1.75-5%) detached the mucus from the epithelium, but the mucus remained impenetrable to beads the size of bacteria. This approach might be used to test other mucolytic interventions in CF. © 2014 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  18. Hypertonic saline releases the attached small intestinal cystic fibrosis mucus

    PubMed Central

    Ermund, Anna; Meiss, Lauren N; Scholte, Bob J; Hansson, Gunnar C

    2015-01-01

    Hypertonic saline inhalation has become a cornerstone in the treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF), but its effect on CF mucus is still not understood. In CF, mucus stagnates in the airways, causing mucus plugging, and forming a substrate for bacterial invasion. Using horizontal Ussing-type chambers to allow easy access to the tissue, we have recently shown that the small intestinal mucus of CF mice is attached to the epithelium and not freely movable as opposed to normal mucus, thus pointing to a similarity between the CF mucus in the ileum and airways. In the same type of system, we investigated how hypertonic saline affects mucus thickness, attachment and penetrability to fluorescent beads the size of bacteria in ileal explants from the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator mutant (ΔF508) mouse, in order to characterize how this common therapy affects mucus properties. Hypertonic saline (1.75–5%) detached the mucus from the epithelium, but the mucus remained impenetrable to beads the size of bacteria. This approach might be used to test other mucolytic interventions in CF. PMID:25311799

  19. [Transition from paediatric to adult cystic fibrosis care centre].

    PubMed

    Durieu, I; Reynaud, Q; Nove-Josserand, R

    2016-02-01

    The number of adolescents and young adults with chronic diseases has increased dramatically over the last decade. This led paediatric teams to organize the transition to adult centres with the aim to ensure the quality of care and prognosis, adherence to survey and treatment. To promote a good work and family life is also a challenge. Several studies have shown the importance of a successful transition in cystic fibrosis (CF) in order to prevent complications and loss monitoring and to improve the perception of patients and their families. In France in 2003, cystic fibrosis centres (CRCM) have been identified and among them of adult CF centres. The regular increase of the adult centre's active file requires improving the transition process. It is necessary to improve the transition process and to prepare the young patient and their family early during adolescence. The process in place should concern the whole aspects of care, i.e., medical, psychological and educational. The transition to adulthood will be successful if it results in a stable state of the disease allowing family and career plans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. [Patient education in cystic fibrosis: what skills for the patient?].

    PubMed

    David, V; Iguenane, J; Ravilly, S

    2007-01-01

    In France since 2002 two major changes have occurred in the management of patients with cystic fibrosis: systematic neonatal screening and the establishment of specialised CF centres. One of the roles of the CF centres is therapeutic education of the patients and their families. The proposed educational approach consists of 4 steps: an educational diagnosis to assess the patient; an educational contract based on the capabilities and objectives previously identified by the team; implementation of the education programme which organises the teaching of the patient and, finally, evaluation. With the goal of facilitating the establishment of patient education in the CF centres we present the learning objectives for patients suffering from cystic fibrosis, based on the capabilities that the patients need to acquire in the course of the education programme. Based on the capabilities and learning objectives of the patients the working party are developing valid tools for the instructor/carer. They present the outcomes of the meetings, the educational principles of implementation and the respective roles of the patient and the carer.

  1. Genotype-phenotype correlation for pulmonary function in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    de Gracia, J; Mata, F; Alvarez, A; Casals, T; Gatner, S; Vendrell, M; de la Rosa, D; Guarner, L; Hermosilla, E

    2005-01-01

    Background: Since the CFTR gene was cloned, more than 1000 mutations have been identified. To date, a clear relationship has not been established between genotype and the progression of lung damage. A study was undertaken of the relationship between genotype, progression of lung disease, and survival in adult patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Methods: A prospective cohort of adult patients with CF and two CFTR mutations followed up in an adult cystic fibrosis unit was analysed. Patients were classified according to functional effects of classes of CFTR mutations and were grouped based on the CFTR molecular position on the epithelial cell surface (I–II/I–II, I–II/III–V). Spirometric values, progression of lung disease, probability of survival, and clinical characteristics were analysed between groups. Results: Seventy four patients were included in the study. Patients with genotype I–II/I–II had significantly lower current spirometric values (p<0.001), greater loss of pulmonary function (p<0.04), a higher proportion of end-stage lung disease (p<0.001), a higher risk of suffering from moderate to severe lung disease (odds ratio 7.12 (95% CI 1.3 to 40.5)) and a lower probability of survival than patients with genotype I–II/III, I–II/IV and I–II/V (p<0.001). Conclusions: The presence of class I or II mutations on both chromosomes is associated with worse respiratory disease and a lower probability of survival. PMID:15994263

  2. Insulin secretion abnormalities in exocrine pancreatic sufficient cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Wooldridge, Jamie L; Szczesniak, Rhonda D; Fenchel, Matthew C; Elder, Deborah A

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study is to assess insulin secretion in pediatric cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with exocrine pancreatic sufficiency. Glucose and insulin responses during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) were measured in 146 CF patients. Patients were divided into exocrine sufficient (CF-PS) and insufficient (CF-PI) groups based on pancreatic enzyme usage and fecal elastase. A reference group included healthy, non-diabetic subjects. All CF groups showed reduced insulin secretion as measured by insulinogenic index. The CF-PS patients had normal glucose tolerance. There was a direct correlation between BMI z-score and insulin area under the curve. Patients with CF have reduced insulin secretion during an OGTT regardless of exocrine pancreatic status. The abnormal insulin secretion in all CF patients may predispose them for glucose intolerance, particularly when challenged by inflammation, infection, or nutritional deficiency. In addition, the diminished insulin secretion may contribute to increased catabolism. Lastly, the CF-related diabetes (CFRD) screening guidelines should be followed by all CF patients regardless of pancreatic status. Copyright © 2015 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Achromobacter xylosoxidans respiratory tract infection in cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Lambiase, A; Catania, M R; Del Pezzo, M; Rossano, F; Terlizzi, V; Sepe, A; Raia, V

    2011-08-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the frequency of Achromobacter xylosoxidans infection in a cohort of cystic fibrosis patients, to investigate antimicrobial sensitivity, to establish possible clonal likeness among strains, and to address the clinical impact of this infection or colonization on the general outcome of these patients. The study was undertaken between January 2004 and December 2008 on 300 patients receiving care at the Regional Cystic Fibrosis Center of the Naples University "Federico II". Sputum samples were checked for bacterial identification. For DNA fingerprinting, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was carried out. Fifty-three patients (17.6%) had at least one positive culture for A. xylosoxidans; of these, 6/53 (11.3%) patients were defined as chronically infected and all were co-colonized by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Of the patients, 18.8% persistently carried multidrug-resistant isolates. Macrorestriction analysis showed the presence of seven major clusters. DNA fingerprinting also showed a genetic relationship among strains isolated from the same patients at different times. The results of DNA fingerprinting indicate evidence of bacterial clonal likeness among the enrolled infected patients. We found no significant differences in the forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1)) and body mass index (BMI) when comparing the case group of A. xylosoxidans chronically infected patients with the control group of P. aeruginosa chronically infected patients.

  4. Molecular epidemiology of Aspergillus collected from cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Sabino, Raquel; Ferreira, Jose A G; Moss, Richard B; Valente, Joana; Veríssimo, Cristina; Carolino, Elisabete; Clemons, Karl V; Everson, Cassie; Banaei, Niaz; Penner, John; Stevens, David A

    2015-07-01

    Aspergillus respiratory infection is a common complication in cystic fibrosis (CF) and is associated with loss of pulmonary function and allergic disease. Fifty-three Aspergillus isolates recovered from CF patients were identified to species by Internal Transcribed Spacer Region (ITS), β-tubulin, and calmodulin sequencing. Three species complexes (Terrei, Nigri, and Fumigati) were found. Identification to species level gave a single Aspergillus terreus sensu stricto, one Aspergillus niger sensu stricto and 51 Aspergillus fumigatus sensu stricto isolates. No cryptic species were found. To our knowledge, this is the first prospective study of Aspergillus species in CF using molecular methods. The paucity of non-A. fumigatus and of cryptic species of A. fumigatus suggests a special association of A. fumigatus sensu stricto with CF airways, indicating it likely displays unique characteristics making it suitable for chronic residence in that milieu. These findings could refine an epidemiologic and therapeutic approach geared to this pathogen. Copyright © 2014 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Impact of exacerbations of cystic fibrosis on muscle strength

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Adult patients with cystic fibrosis have peripheral muscle weakness, which is related to exercise intolerance and poor prognosis. The influence of acute exacerbations on muscle strength has been poorly studied. This study aimed to investigate whether quadriceps force (QF), as assessed with an involuntary technique, changes during intravenous antibiotics therapy (IVAT) for an exacerbation. Methods QF was measured in 20 patients using twitch stimulation of the femoral nerve at the day of hospitalization (day 1) and at termination (day 14) of the IVAT. Physical activity was monitored during IVAT using a SenseWear armband. Ten stable patients served as control subjects. Results QF did not change during exacerbation (potentiated twitch force at day 1: 140 ± 42 N, at day 14: 140 ± 47 N), but a decrease was observed in individual patients. Changes in twitch force during exacerbation were correlated with time spent in activities of at least moderate intensity (r = 0.61, p = 0.007). Conclusions QF does not systematically decrease during exacerbations of cystic fibrosis. Individual changes in QF are well correlated with daily time spent in activities of at least moderate intensity. PMID:23601143

  6. Airway acidification initiates host defense abnormalities in cystic fibrosis mice.

    PubMed

    Shah, Viral S; Meyerholz, David K; Tang, Xiao Xiao; Reznikov, Leah; Abou Alaiwa, Mahmoud; Ernst, Sarah E; Karp, Philip H; Wohlford-Lenane, Christine L; Heilmann, Kristopher P; Leidinger, Mariah R; Allen, Patrick D; Zabner, Joseph; McCray, Paul B; Ostedgaard, Lynda S; Stoltz, David A; Randak, Christoph O; Welsh, Michael J

    2016-01-29

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the gene that encodes the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) anion channel. In humans and pigs, the loss of CFTR impairs respiratory host defenses, causing airway infection. But CF mice are spared. We found that in all three species, CFTR secreted bicarbonate into airway surface liquid. In humans and pigs lacking CFTR, unchecked H(+) secretion by the nongastric H(+)/K(+) adenosine triphosphatase (ATP12A) acidified airway surface liquid, which impaired airway host defenses. In contrast, mouse airways expressed little ATP12A and secreted minimal H(+); consequently, airway surface liquid in CF and non-CF mice had similar pH. Inhibiting ATP12A reversed host defense abnormalities in human and pig airways. Conversely, expressing ATP12A in CF mouse airways acidified airway surface liquid, impaired defenses, and increased airway bacteria. These findings help explain why CF mice are protected from infection and nominate ATP12A as a potential therapeutic target for CF. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  7. CYSTIC FIBROSIS: AN INHERITED DISEASE AFFECTING MUCIN-PRODUCING ORGANS

    PubMed Central

    Ehre, Camille; Ridley, Caroline; Thornton, David J

    2014-01-01

    Our current understanding of cystic fibrosis (CF) has revealed that the biophysical properties of mucus play a considerable role in the pathogenesis of the disease in view of the fact that most mucus-producing organs are affected in CF patients. In this review, we discuss the potential causal relationship between altered cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) function and the production of mucus with abnormal biophysical properties in the intestine and lungs, highlighting what has been learned from cell cultures and animal models that mimic CF pathogenesis. A similar cascade of events, including mucus obstruction, infection and inflammation, is common to all epithelia affected by impaired surface hydration. Hence, the main structural components of mucus, namely the polymeric, gel-forming mucins, are critical to the onset of the disease. Defective CFTR leads to epithelial surface dehydration, altered pH/electrolyte composition and mucin concentration. Further, it can influence mucin transition from the intracellular to extracellular environment, potentially resulting in aberrant mucus gel formation. While defective HCO3− production has long been identified as a feature of CF, it has only recently been considered as a key player in the transition phase of mucins. We conclude by examining the influence of mucins on the biophysical properties of CF sputum and discuss existing and novel therapies aimed at removing mucus from the lungs. PMID:24685676

  8. The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and its stability.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xin; Clews, Jack; Kargas, Vasileios; Wang, Xiaomeng; Ford, Robert C

    2017-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is responsible for the disease cystic fibrosis (CF). It is a membrane protein belonging to the ABC transporter family functioning as a chloride/anion channel in epithelial cells around the body. There are over 1500 mutations that have been characterised as CF-causing; the most common of these, accounting for ~70 % of CF cases, is the deletion of a phenylalanine at position 508. This leads to instability of the nascent protein and the modified structure is recognised and then degraded by the ER quality control mechanism. However, even pharmacologically 'rescued' F508del CFTR displays instability at the cell's surface, losing its channel function rapidly and it is rapidly removed from the plasma membrane for lysosomal degradation. This review will, therefore, explore the link between stability and structure/function relationships of membrane proteins and CFTR in particular and how approaches to study CFTR structure depend on its stability. We will also review the application of a fluorescence labelling method for the assessment of the thermostability and the tertiary structure of CFTR.

  9. Too much salt, too little soda: cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Quinton, Paul M

    2007-08-25

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) of the pancreas is the most widely accepted name of the most common fatal inherited single gene defect disease among Caucasians. Its incidence among other races is thought to be significantly less, but mutations in the gene have been reported in most, if not all, major populations. This review is intended to give general concepts of the molecular as well as physiological basis of the pathology that develops in the disease. First, an overview of the organ pathology and genetics is presented, followed by the molecular structure of the gene product (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, CFTR), its properties, functions, and controls as currently understood. Second, since mutations appear to be expressed primarily as a defect in electrolyte transport, effects and mechanisms of pathology are presented for two characteristically affected organs where the etiology is best described: the sweat gland, which excretes far too much NaCl ("salt") and the pancreas, which excretes far too little HCO3(- )("soda"). Unfortunately, morbidity and mortality in CF develop principally from refractory airway infections, the basis of which remains controversial. Consequently, we conclude by considering possible mechanisms by which defects in anion transport might predispose the CF lung to chronic infections.

  10. Cancer risk among lung transplant recipients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Fink, Aliza K; Yanik, Elizabeth L; Marshall, Bruce C; Wilschanski, Michael; Lynch, Charles F; Austin, April A; Copeland, Glenn; Safaeian, Mahboobeh; Engels, Eric A

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated increased digestive tract cancers among individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF), particularly among lung transplant recipients. We describe cancer incidence among CF and non-CF lung recipients. We used data from the US transplant registry and 16 cancer registries. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) compared cancer incidence to the general population, and competing risk methods were used for the cumulative incidence of colorectal cancer. We evaluated 10,179 lung recipients (1681 with CF). Risk was more strongly increased in CF recipients than non-CF recipients for overall cancer (SIR 9.9 vs. 2.7) and multiple cancers including colorectal cancer (24.2 vs. 1.7), esophageal cancer (56.3 vs. 1.3), and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (61.8 vs. 9.4). At five years post-transplant, colorectal cancer was diagnosed in 0.3% of CF recipients aged <50 at transplant and 6.4% aged ≥50. CF recipients have increased risk for colorectal cancer, suggesting a need for enhanced screening. Copyright © 2016 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. All rights reserved.

  11. Molecular basis of cystic fibrosis in the Republic of Macedonia.

    PubMed

    Petreska, L; Koceva, S; Plaseska, D; Chernick, M; Gordova-Muratovska, A; Fustic, S; Nestorov, R; Efremov, G D

    1998-09-01

    Eighty-three cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and their families, belonging to various ethnic groups living in the Republic of Macedonia were studied for molecular defects in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, and for the associated extragenic marker loci XV-2c and KM19. The DNA methodology used included characterization of CFTR mutations in 19 exons (and flanking sequences) of the gene and analysis of distribution of the XV-2c/KM19 haplotypes among normal (N) and CF chromosomes by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification followed by dot blot hybridization, restriction digestion, single-strand conformational polymorphism, constant denaturing gel electrophoresis, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, and sequencing. We identified 58.4% (97/166) of the CF chromosomes. Nine different CFTR gene mutations, including three novel ones, were found. Eight known and one new CFTR intragene polymorphisms were also characterized. The haplotype analysis of the XV-2c/TaqI and KM19/PstI polymorphic loci have shown that haplotype C is the most frequently found haplotype among the non-deltaF508 CF chromosomes from Macedonia (36.5%). The results demonstrate the broad heterogeneity of CF origin in this part of the Balkan Peninsula.

  12. Airway acidification initiates host defense abnormalities in cystic fibrosis mice

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Viral S.; Meyerholz, David K.; Tang, Xiao Xiao; Reznikov, Leah; Alaiwa, Mahmoud Abou; Ernst, Sarah E.; Karp, Philip H.; Wohlford-Lenane, Christine L.; Heilmann, Kristopher P.; Leidinger, Mariah R.; Allen, Patrick D.; Zabner, Joseph; McCray, Paul B.; Ostedgaard, Lynda S.; Stoltz, David A.; Randak, Christoph O.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the gene that encodes the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) anion channel. In humans and pigs, the loss of CFTR impairs respiratory host defenses, causing airway infection. But CF mice are spared. We found that in all three species, CFTR secreted bicarbonate into airway surface liquid. In humans and pigs lacking CFTR, unchecked H+ secretion by the nongastric H+/K+ adenosine triphosphatase (ATP12A) acidified airway surface liquid, which impaired airway host defenses. In contrast, mouse airways expressed little ATP12A and secreted minimal H+; consequently, airway surface liquid in CF and non-CF mice had similar pH. Inhibiting ATP12A reversed host defense abnormalities in human and pig airways. Conversely, expressing ATP12A in CF mouse airways acidified airway surface liquid, impaired defenses, and increased airway bacteria. These findings help explain why CF mice are protected from infection and nominate ATP12A as a potential therapeutic target for CF. PMID:26823428

  13. Cystic fibrosis sputum: a barrier to the transport of nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Sanders, N N; De Smedt, S C; Van Rompaey, E; Simoens, P; De Baets, F; Demeester, J

    2000-11-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is characterized by the presence of a viscoelastic mucus layer in the upper airways and bronchi. The underlying problem is a mutation in the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein. Clinical studies of gene transfer for CF are ongoing. For gene delivery to the airways of CF patients to be effective, the mucus covering the target cells must be overcome. We therefore examined the extent to which CF sputum presents a physical barrier to the transport of nanospheres of a size comparable to that of lipoplexes and other transfection systems currently being clinically evaluated for CF gene therapy. We observed that an extremely low percentage of nanospheres (< 0.3%) moved through a 220-microm-thick CF sputum layer after 150 min. The largest nanospheres studied (560 nm) were almost completely blocked by the sputum, whereas the smaller nanospheres (124 nm) were retarded only by a factor of 1.3 as compared with buffer. Surprisingly, the nanospheres diffused significantly more easily through the more viscoelastic sputum samples. We hypothesize that the structure of the network in sputum becomes more macroporous when the sputum becomes more viscoelastic. Sputum from a patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease retarded the transport of nanospheres to the same extent as did CF sputum. When directly mixed with CF sputum, recombinant human deoxyribonuclease I moderately facilitated the transport of nanospheres through CF sputum.

  14. Chest physiotherapy compared to no chest physiotherapy for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Warnock, Louise; Gates, Alison

    2015-12-21

    Chest physiotherapy is widely used in people with cystic fibrosis in order to clear mucus from the airways. This is an updated version of previously published reviews. To determine the effectiveness and acceptability of chest physiotherapy compared to no treatment or spontaneous cough alone to improve mucus clearance in cystic fibrosis. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register which comprises references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings.Date of the most recent search of the Group's Cystic Fibrosis Trials Register: 02 June 2015. Randomised or quasi-randomised clinical studies in which a form of chest physiotherapy (airway clearance technique) were taken for consideration in people with cystic fibrosis compared with either no physiotherapy treatment or spontaneous cough alone. Both authors independently assessed study eligibility, extracted data and assessed the risk of bias in the included studies. There was heterogeneity in the published outcomes, with variable reporting which meant pooling of the data for meta-analysis was not possible. The searches identified 157 studies, of which eight cross-over studies (data from 96 participants) met the inclusion criteria. There were differences between studies in the way that interventions were delivered, with several of the intervention groups combining more than one treatment modality. One included study looked at autogenic drainage, six considered conventional chest physiotherapy, three considered oscillating positive expiratory pressure, seven considered positive expiratory pressure and one considered high pressure positive expiratory pressure. Of the eight studies, six were single-treatment studies and in two, the treatment intervention was performed over two consecutive days (once daily in one, twice daily in the other). This enormous heterogeneity in the treatment

  15. Chest physiotherapy compared to no chest physiotherapy for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Warnock, Louise; Gates, Alison; van der Schans, Cees P

    2013-09-04

    Chest physiotherapy is widely used in people with cystic fibrosis in order to clear mucus from the airways. To determine the effectiveness and acceptability of chest physiotherapy compared to no treatment or spontaneous cough alone to improve mucus clearance in cystic fibrosis. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register which comprises references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings.Date of the most recent search of the Group's Cystic Fibrosis Trials Register: 04 February 2013. Randomised or quasi-randomised clinical studies in which a form of chest physiotherapy (airway clearance technique) were taken for consideration in people with cystic fibrosis compared with either no physiotherapy treatment or spontaneous cough alone. Both authors independently assessed study eligibility, extracted data and assessed study quality. There was heterogeneity in the published outcomes, with variable reporting which meant pooling of the data for meta-analysis was not possible. The searches identified 144 studies, of which eight cross-over studies (data from 96 participants) met the inclusion criteria. There were differences between studies in the way that interventions were delivered, with several of the intervention groups combining more than one treatment modality. One included study looked at autogenic drainage, six considered conventional chest physiotherapy, three considered oscillating positive expiratory pressure, seven considered positive expiratory pressure and one considered high pressure positive expiratory pressure. Of the eight studies, six were single-treatment studies and in two, the treatment intervention was performed over two consecutive days (once daily in one, twice daily in the other). This enormous heterogeneity in the treatment interventions prevented any meta-analyses from being performed.Four studies, involving

  16. Incidental late diagnosis of cystic fibrosis following AH1N1 influenza virus pneumonia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Iadevaia, Carlo; Iacotucci, Paola; Carnovale, Vincenzo; Calabrese, Cecilia; Rea, Gaetano; Ferrara, Nicola; Perrotta, Fabio; Mazzarella, Gennaro; Bianco, Andrea

    2017-10-01

    Cystic fibrosis is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by chronic progressive multisystem involvement. AH1N1 virus infections caused classic influenza symptoms in the majority of cystic fibrosis patients while others experienced severe outcomes. We report a case of late incidental cystic fibrosis diagnosis in a young Caucasian man suffering from respiratory failure following infection due to AH1N1 influenza virus. The patient was admitted to our department with fever, cough, and dyspnea at rest unresponsive to antibiotics CONCLUSIONS: Late diagnosis of cystic fibrosis in uncommon. This report highlights the importance of early cystic fibrosis diagnosis to minimize risk of occurrence of potential life-threatening complications.

  17. Nasal mucociliary clearance and ciliary beat frequency in cystic fibrosis compared with sinusitis and bronchiectasis.

    PubMed Central

    Rutland, J; Cole, P J

    1981-01-01

    Nasal ciliary function and mucociliary clearance were studied in patients with cystic fibrosis and in three control groups. Ciliary beat frequency and nasal clearance time were measured in groups of 10 subjects with cystic fibrosis, sinusitis and bronchiectasis and age and sex-matched control subjects. Ciliary beat frequency was also measured in normal subjects matched as bronchiectasis controls. Cystic fibrosis patients and their controls, patients with sinusitis, and the bronchiectasis controls did not differ in ciliary beat frequency, but it was slower in the patients with bronchiectasis (p less than 0.05). Nasal mucociliary clearance in cystic fibrosis and bronchiectasis was slower than in the cystic fibrosis controls (p less than 0.001) and in patients with sinusitis (p less than 0.01). The finding of a normal beat frequency in cystic fibrosis cilia studied in vitro together with abnormal nasal mucociliary clearance measured in vivo in the same patients suggests the existence of an abnormality of mucus in vivo. The innate function of cystic fibrosis cilia, as measured in vitro by beat frequency, is normal. PMID:7314040

  18. Clinical practice and genetic counseling for cystic fibrosis and CFTR-related disorders

    PubMed Central

    Moskowitz, Samuel M.; Chmiel, James F.; Sternen, Darci L.; Cheng, Edith; Gibson, Ronald L; Marshall, Susan G.; Cutting, Garry R.

    2009-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator-related disorders encompass a disease spectrum from focal male reproductive tract involvement in congenital absence of the vas deferens to multiorgan involvement in classic cystic fibrosis. The reproductive, gastrointestinal, and exocrine manifestations of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator deficiency are correlated with CFTR genotype, whereas the respiratory manifestations that are the main cause of morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis are less predictable. Molecular genetic testing of CFTR has led to new diagnostic strategies and will enable targeting of molecular therapies now in development. Older diagnostic methods that measure sweat chloride and nasal potential difference nonetheless remain important because of their sensitivity and specificity. In addition, the measurement of immunoreactive trypsinogen and the genotyping of CFTR alleles are key to newborn screening programs because of low cost. The multiorgan nature of cystic fibrosis leads to a heavy burden of care, thus therapeutic regimens are tailored to the specific manifestations present in each patient. The variability of cystic fibrosis lung disease and the variable expressivity of mild CFTR alleles complicate genetic counseling for this autosomal recessive disorder. Widespread implementation of newborn screening programs among populations with significant cystic fibrosis mutation carrier frequencies is expected to result in increasing demands on genetic counseling resources. PMID:19092437

  19. In silico search for modifier genes associated with pancreatic and liver disease in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Génin, Emmanuelle; Férec, Claude

    2017-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis is the most common lethal autosomal recessive disorder in the white population, affecting among other organs, the lung, the pancreas and the liver. Whereas Cystic Fibrosis is a monogenic disease, many studies reveal a very complex relationship between genotype and clinical phenotype. Indeed, the broad phenotypic spectrum observed in Cystic Fibrosis is far from being explained by obvious genotype-phenotype correlations and it is admitted that Cystic Fibrosis disease is the result of multiple factors, including effects of the environment as well as modifier genes. Our objective was to highlight new modifier genes with potential implications in the lung, pancreatic and liver outcomes of the disease. For this purpose we performed a system biology approach which combined, database mining, literature mining, gene expression study and network analysis as well as pathway enrichment analysis and protein-protein interactions. We found that IFI16, CCNE2 and IGFBP2 are potential modifiers in the altered lung function in Cystic Fibrosis. We also found that EPHX1, HLA-DQA1, HLA-DQB1, DSP and SLC33A1, GPNMB, NCF2, RASGRP1, LGALS3 and PTPN13, are potential modifiers in pancreas and liver, respectively. Associated pathways indicate that immune system is likely involved and that Ubiquitin C is probably a central node, linking Cystic Fibrosis to liver and pancreatic disease. We highlight here new modifier genes with potential implications in Cystic Fibrosis. Nevertheless, our in silico analysis requires functional analysis to give our results a physiological relevance. PMID:28339466

  20. Health Related Quality of Life in Indian Children with Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Kir, Devika; Gupta, Sumita; Jolly, George; Kalaivani, M; Lodha, Rakesh; Kabra, S K

    2015-05-01

    This study was devised to translate Cystic Fibrosis Questionnaire-Revised to Hindi and administer it to Indian children and adolescents diagnosed with cystic fibrosis. Cross-sectional study. This study was carried out in cystic fibrosis patients attending Pediatric Chest Clinic of a tertiary-care hospital in Northern India from July 2012 to December 2012. 45 children (6-13 years) and their parents, and 14 adolescents. Patients with unstable health in the past two weeks were excluded. Cystic Fibrosis Questionnaire- Revised translated in Hindi was administered. Clinical evaluation and scoring, throat swab cultures and spirometry were also done during the same visit. Health Related Quality of Life scores were the primary measures, and clinical scores, swab cultures and spirometry were secondary measures. Cronbachs alpha ranged from 0.020-0.863.The Factor analysis indicated that most test-items correlated more with competing scales than the intended scales. Convergence between self and proxy-rating was found to be dependent on the domain. The Cystic Fibrosis Questionnaire- Revised scores correlated well with clinical scores (r=0.65,P=0.011), Pseudomonas spp culture data and pulmonary function tests. There was an inverse relation between Health Related Quality of Life scores and age at diagnosis (r=-0.339, P=0.02). Hindi versions of Cystic Fibrosis Questionnaire- Revised: Child, Adolescent and Parents instruments will act as an important step towards data on Health Related Quality of Life of Indian patients with cystic fibrosis.

  1. Multiple-Breath Washout Outcomes Are Sensitive to Inflammation and Infection in Children with Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Kathryn A; Foong, Rachel E; Grdosic, Jasmine; Harper, Alana; Skoric, Billy; Clem, Charles; Davis, Miriam; Turkovic, Lidija; Stick, Stephen M; Davis, Stephanie D; Ranganathan, Sarath C; Hall, Graham L

    2017-09-01

    The lung clearance index is a measure of ventilation distribution derived from the multiple-breath washout technique. The lung clearance index is increased in the presence of lower respiratory tract inflammation and infection in infants with cystic fibrosis; however, the associations during the preschool years are unknown. We assessed the ability of the lung clearance index to detect the presence and extent of lower respiratory tract inflammation and infection in preschool children with cystic fibrosis. Ventilation distribution outcomes were assessed at 82 visits with 58 children with cystic fibrosis and at 38 visits with 31 healthy children aged 3-6 years. Children with cystic fibrosis also underwent bronchoalveolar lavage fluid collection for detection of lower respiratory tract inflammation and infection. Associations between multiple-breath washout indices and the presence and extent of airway inflammation and infection were assessed using linear mixed effects models. Lung clearance index was elevated in children with cystic fibrosis (mean [SD], 8.00 [1.45]) compared with healthy control subjects (6.67 [0.56]). In cystic fibrosis, the lung clearance index was elevated in individuals with lower respiratory tract infections (difference compared with uninfected [95% confidence interval], 0.62 [0.06, 1.18]) and correlated with the extent of airway inflammation. These data suggest that the lung clearance index may be a useful surveillance tool for monitoring the presence and extent of lower airway inflammation and infection in preschool children with cystic fibrosis.

  2. In silico search for modifier genes associated with pancreatic and liver disease in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Trouvé, Pascal; Génin, Emmanuelle; Férec, Claude

    2017-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis is the most common lethal autosomal recessive disorder in the white population, affecting among other organs, the lung, the pancreas and the liver. Whereas Cystic Fibrosis is a monogenic disease, many studies reveal a very complex relationship between genotype and clinical phenotype. Indeed, the broad phenotypic spectrum observed in Cystic Fibrosis is far from being explained by obvious genotype-phenotype correlations and it is admitted that Cystic Fibrosis disease is the result of multiple factors, including effects of the environment as well as modifier genes. Our objective was to highlight new modifier genes with potential implications in the lung, pancreatic and liver outcomes of the disease. For this purpose we performed a system biology approach which combined, database mining, literature mining, gene expression study and network analysis as well as pathway enrichment analysis and protein-protein interactions. We found that IFI16, CCNE2 and IGFBP2 are potential modifiers in the altered lung function in Cystic Fibrosis. We also found that EPHX1, HLA-DQA1, HLA-DQB1, DSP and SLC33A1, GPNMB, NCF2, RASGRP1, LGALS3 and PTPN13, are potential modifiers in pancreas and liver, respectively. Associated pathways indicate that immune system is likely involved and that Ubiquitin C is probably a central node, linking Cystic Fibrosis to liver and pancreatic disease. We highlight here new modifier genes with potential implications in Cystic Fibrosis. Nevertheless, our in silico analysis requires functional analysis to give our results a physiological relevance.

  3. Desensitisation of neutrophil responses by systemic interleukin 8 in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Y.; Dean, T. P.; Church, M. K.; Warner, J. O.; Shute, J. K.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Inflammation associated with neutrophil infiltration is a commonly observed feature of children with cystic fibrosis. Production of the major neutrophil chemotactic cytokine interleukin 8 (IL-8) is potentially of great importance in the pathology of cystic fibrosis. Concentrations of IL-8 in both sputum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid have been found to be higher in children with cystic fibrosis than in controls. The IL-8 induced chemotactic response and numbers of IL-8 receptors on peripheral neutrophils obtained from children with cystic fibrosis have been compared with a control group of children. METHODS--Cells were isolated from 18 patients with cystic fibrosis (aged 4-20 years) and 13 controls (aged 5-12 years) by dextran centrifugation followed by separation on Lymphoprep. Chemotaxis was assayed using multiwell microchemotaxis chambers and 5 microns polycarbonate filters. Filters were fixed and stained with Haema-Gurr for counting. Results were expressed as numbers of neutrophils per high power field (HPF). RESULTS--At the optimum concentration (1 x 10(-8) mol/l) the number of cells migrating were similar for controls (150 (12)/HPF) and for the cystic fibrosis group (140 (14)/HPF)). At lower concentrations the numbers of neutrophils migrating were lower for the cystic fibrosis group. Scatchard analysis of 125I-labelled IL-8 binding revealed lower numbers of receptors on neutrophils from patients with cystic fibrosis (22,000 per cell) than from controls (75,000 per cell). CONCLUSIONS--Reduced responsiveness to IL-8 of neutrophils from patients with cystic fibrosis is associated with receptor desensitisation as a result of exposure to high systemic levels of IL-8. PMID:7940424

  4. Cystic fibrosis: current survival and population estimates to the year 2000.

    PubMed Central

    Elborn, J S; Shale, D J; Britton, J R

    1991-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Survival from cystic fibrosis is increasing rapidly. Estimates of the extent of this improvement should allow health care facilities to be planned to deal with the expanding population of patients with cystic fibrosis. Estimates of life expectancy are also essential if accurate information on current prognosis is to be given to parents of an affected child, or to prospective parents deciding whether to proceed with a pregnancy where the fetus may be affected. METHODS: Survival trends in the national data on cystic fibrosis have been analysed to produce estimates of the likely size of the cystic fibrosis population over the next decade and to predict the life expectancy of children born with cystic fibrosis in the years up to 1990. RESULTS: In England and Wales the estimated number of patients with cystic fibrosis is at present about 5200, of whom 3300 (63%) are aged under 16 years. By the year 2000 the total population will increase to 6000, with 3400 (57%) aged under 16. Thus the number of children with cystic fibrosis will remain fairly constant over the next 10 years, whereas adult numbers will increase by about 36% (from 1901 to 2577). The median life expectancy of children with cystic fibrosis born in 1990 is estimated to be 40 years, double that of 20 years ago. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that health service provision for children will not need to change substantially over the next 10 years whereas services for adults will need to increase by about a third. Parents can be counselled that the median life expectancy of a newborn child with cystic fibrosis is currently likely to be of the order of 40 years. PMID:1792634

  5. Exercise oxidative skeletal muscle metabolism in adolescents with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Werkman, Maarten; Jeneson, Jeroen; Helders, Paul; Arets, Bert; van der Ent, Kors; Velthuis, Birgitta; Nievelstein, Rutger; Takken, Tim; Hulzebos, Erik

    2016-03-01

    What is the central question of this study? Do intrinsic abnormalities in oxygenation and/or muscle oxidative metabolism contribute to exercise intolerance in adolescents with mild cystic fibrosis? What is the main finding and its importance? This study found no evidence that in adolescents with mild cystic fibrosis in a stable clinical state intrinsic abnormalities in skeletal muscle oxidative metabolism seem to play a clinical significant role. Based on these results, we concluded that there is no metabolic constraint to benefit from exercise training. Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) are reported to have limited exercise capacity. There is no consensus about a possible abnormality in skeletal muscle oxidative metabolism in CF. Our aim was to test the hypothesis that abnormalities in oxygenation and/or muscle oxidative metabolism contribute to exercise intolerance in adolescents with mild CF. Ten adolescents with CF (12-18 years of age; forced expiratory volume in 1 s >80% of predicted; and resting oxygen saturation >94%) and 10 healthy age-matched control (HC) subjects were tested with supine cycle ergometry using near-infrared spectroscopy and (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy to study skeletal muscle oxygenation and oxidative metabolism during rest, exercise and recovery. No statistically significant (P > 0.1) differences in peak workload and peak oxygen uptake per kilogram lean body mass were found between CF and HC subjects. No differences were found between CF and HC subjects in bulk changes of quadriceps phosphocreatine (P = 0.550) and inorganic phosphate (P = 0.896) content and pH (P = 0.512) during symptom-limited exercise. Furthermore, we found statistically identical kinetics for phosphocreatine resynthesis during recovery for CF and HC subjects (P = 0.53). No statistically significant difference in peak exercise arbitrary units for total haemoglobin content was found between CF and HC subjects (P = 0.66). The results of this study provide

  6. Oscillating devices for airway clearance in people with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Lisa; Agnew, Jennifer

    2009-01-21

    Chest physiotherapy is widely prescribed to assist the clearance of airway secretions in people with cystic fibrosis (CF). Oscillating devices generate intra- or extra-thoracic oscillations orally or external to the chest wall. Internally they create variable resistances within the airways, generating controlled oscillating positive pressure which mobilises mucus. Extra-thoracic oscillations are generated by forces outside the respiratory system, e.g. high frequency chest wall oscillation. To determine the effectiveness and acceptability of oscillating devices compared to other forms of physiotherapy to improve respiratory function, mucus clearance and other outcomes in people with CF. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register comprising references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and hand searches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. Most recent search of the Cystic Fibrosis Trials Register: November 2008. Randomised controlled studies and controlled clinical studies of oscillating devices compared with any other form of physiotherapy in people with CF. Two authors independently applied the inclusion criteria to publications and assessed the quality of the included studies. Two hundred and sixty-five studies were identified; thirty studies (total of 708 participants) met the inclusion criteria. Single treatment interventions (therapy technique used only once in the comparison) were excluded. Studies varied in duration from up to one week to one year in duration. Nineteen of the studies were cross-over in design. Data were not published in sufficient detail in most of these studies to perform meta-analysis.Forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV(1)) was the most frequently measured outcome. Results did not show significant difference in effect between oscillating devices and other methods of airway clearance on FEV(1) or other lung function parameters. Where there

  7. Pseudomembranous colitis in four patients with cystic fibrosis following lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Yates, B; Murphy, D M; Fisher, A J; Gould, F K; Lordan, J L; Dark, J H; Corris, P A

    2007-06-01

    Pseudomembranous colitis is an uncommon complication in patients with cystic fibrosis, despite the use of multiple high-dose antibiotic regimens and the frequency of hospital admissions. Four patients from a total of 137 patients with cystic fibrosis undergoing lung transplantation are described who developed fulminant pseudomembranous colitis. Initial presentation was variable and the mortality rate was 50% despite urgent colectomy. In one case the presenting abdominal distension was thought to be due to meconium ileus equivalent. It is concluded that Clostridium difficile colitis may be a difficult diagnosis in patients with cystic fibrosis and follows a fulminant course after lung transplantation.

  8. Severe Clostridium difficile-associated colitis in young patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Rivlin, J; Lerner, A; Augarten, A; Wilschanski, M; Kerem, E; Ephros, M A

    1998-01-01

    We report four patients with cystic fibrosis and fulminant Clostridium difficile-associated colitis: two died, and one required hemicolectomy. Three of four patients carried the N1303K mutation. Severe and fatal C. difficile colitis can occur in cystic fibrosis patients, possibly with a genotype-specific predilection (i.e., N1303K/other). Because cystic fibrosis patients may have a wide spectrum of gastrointestinal symptoms, disease caused by C. difficile must be considered when these patients have acute abdominal pain, diarrhea, or severe leukocytosis.

  9. Disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs in people with cystic fibrosis-related arthritis.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Judith; Rangaraj, Satyapal

    2012-09-12

    Arthritis remains a relatively infrequent complication of cystic fibrosis, but is a cause of significant morbidity when it does occur. Two distinct types of arthritis are described in cystic fibrosis: cystic fibrosis-related arthropathy and hypertrophic osteoarthropathy. Management of arthritis in people with cystic fibrosis is uncertain and complex because of the underlying disease and its treatment. To review the effectiveness and safety of disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs for the management of arthritis related to cystic fibrosis in adults and children. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Cystic Fibrosis Trials Register which comprises references identified from comprehensive electronic database handsearches of relevant journal and abstract books of conference proceedings.Date of most recent search: 10 July 2012. Randomised controlled trials which compared the efficacy and safety of disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (e.g. methotrexate, gold, sulfasalazine, penicillamine, leflunomide, hydroxychloroquine and newer agents such as biologic disease modifying agents and monoclonal antibodies) with each other, with no treatment or with placebo for cystic fibrosis-related arthropathy or hypertrophic osteoarthropathy. No relevant studies were identified. No studies were included in this review. Although it is generally recognised that cystic fibrosis-related arthritis can be episodic and resolve spontaneously, treatment with analgesics and anti-inflammatory agents may be needed. But when episodic symptoms progress to persistent disease, disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs may be needed to limit the course of the disease. It is disappointing that no randomised controlled trials to rigorously evaluate these drugs could be found. This systematic review has identified the need for a well-designed adequately powered randomised controlled trial to assess the efficacy and safety of disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs for the

  10. Blunted perception of neural respiratory drive and breathlessness in patients with cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Jolley, Caroline J.; Elston, Caroline; Moxham, John; Rafferty, Gerrard F.

    2016-01-01

    The electromyogram recorded from the diaphragm (EMGdi) and parasternal intercostal muscle using surface electrodes (sEMGpara) provides a measure of neural respiratory drive (NRD), the magnitude of which reflects lung disease severity in stable cystic fibrosis. The aim of this study was to explore perception of NRD and breathlessness in both healthy individuals and patients with cystic fibrosis. Given chronic respiratory loading and increased NRD in cystic fibrosis, often in the absence of breathlessness at rest, we hypothesised that patients with cystic fibrosis would be able to tolerate higher levels of NRD for a given level of breathlessness compared to healthy individuals during exercise. 15 cystic fibrosis patients (mean forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) 53.5% predicted) and 15 age-matched, healthy controls were studied. Spirometry was measured in all subjects and lung volumes measured in the cystic fibrosis patients. EMGdi and sEMGpara were recorded at rest and during incremental cycle exercise to exhaustion and expressed as a percentage of maximum (% max) obtained from maximum respiratory manoeuvres. Borg breathlessness scores were recorded at rest and during each minute of exercise. EMGdi % max and sEMGpara % max and associated Borg breathlessness scores differed significantly between healthy subjects and cystic fibrosis patients at rest and during exercise. The relationship between EMGdi % max and sEMGpara % max and Borg score was shifted to the right in the cystic fibrosis patients, such that at comparable levels of EMGdi % max and sEMGpara % max the cystic fibrosis patients reported significantly lower Borg breathlessness scores compared to the healthy individuals. At Borg score 1 (clinically significant increase in breathlessness from baseline) corresponding levels of EMGdi % max (20.2±12% versus 32.15±15%, p=0.02) and sEMGpara % max (18.9±8% versus 29.2±15%, p=0.04) were lower in the healthy individuals compared to the cystic fibrosis

  11. Blunted perception of neural respiratory drive and breathlessness in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Charles C; Jolley, Caroline J; Elston, Caroline; Moxham, John; Rafferty, Gerrard F

    2016-01-01

    The electromyogram recorded from the diaphragm (EMGdi) and parasternal intercostal muscle using surface electrodes (sEMGpara) provides a measure of neural respiratory drive (NRD), the magnitude of which reflects lung disease severity in stable cystic fibrosis. The aim of this study was to explore perception of NRD and breathlessness in both healthy individuals and patients with cystic fibrosis. Given chronic respiratory loading and increased NRD in cystic fibrosis, often in the absence of breathlessness at rest, we hypothesised that patients with cystic fibrosis would be able to tolerate higher levels of NRD for a given level of breathlessness compared to healthy individuals during exercise. 15 cystic fibrosis patients (mean forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) 53.5% predicted) and 15 age-matched, healthy controls were studied. Spirometry was measured in all subjects and lung volumes measured in the cystic fibrosis patients. EMGdi and sEMGpara were recorded at rest and during incremental cycle exercise to exhaustion and expressed as a percentage of maximum (% max) obtained from maximum respiratory manoeuvres. Borg breathlessness scores were recorded at rest and during each minute of exercise. EMGdi % max and sEMGpara % max and associated Borg breathlessness scores differed significantly between healthy subjects and cystic fibrosis patients at rest and during exercise. The relationship between EMGdi % max and sEMGpara % max and Borg score was shifted to the right in the cystic fibrosis patients, such that at comparable levels of EMGdi % max and sEMGpara % max the cystic fibrosis patients reported significantly lower Borg breathlessness scores compared to the healthy individuals. At Borg score 1 (clinically significant increase in breathlessness from baseline) corresponding levels of EMGdi % max (20.2±12% versus 32.15±15%, p=0.02) and sEMGpara % max (18.9±8% versus 29.2±15%, p=0.04) were lower in the healthy individuals compared to the cystic fibrosis

  12. Active cycle of breathing technique for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Karen A; McKoy, Naomi; Saldanha, Ian; Odelola, Olaide A

    2010-11-10

    People with cystic fibrosis (CF) experience chronic airway infections as a result of mucus build up within the lungs. Repeated infections often cause lung damage and disease. Airway clearance therapies aim to improve mucus clearance, increase sputum production, and improve airway function. The active cycle of breathing technique (ACBT) is an airway clearance method that uses a cycle of techniques to loosen airway secretions including breathing control, thoracic expansion exercises, and the forced expiration technique. To compare the clinical effectiveness of ACBT with other airway clearance therapies in CF. We searched the Cochrane CF Trials Register, compiled from electronic database searches and handsearching of journals and conference abstract books. We also searched the reference lists of relevant articles and reviews.Last search: 05 August 2010. Randomised or quasi-randomised controlled clinical studies, including crossover studies, comparing ACBT with other airway clearance therapies in CF. Two review authors independently screened each article, abstracted data and assessed the risk of bias of each study. Fifty-eight studies were identified of which 17 (346 participants) met the inclusion criteria. Four randomised controlled studies (98 participants) were included in the meta-analysis; three were of crossover design. The 13 remaining studies were crossover studies with inadequate reports for complete assessment.Included studies compared ACBT to autogenic drainage, airway oscillating devices, high frequency chest compression devices, and conventional chest physiotherapy. Patient preference varied: more patients preferred autogenic drainage over ACBT, more preferred ACBT over airway oscillating devices, and more were comfortable with ACBT versus high frequency chest compression. No significant difference was seen in sputum weight between ACBT and autogenic drainage or between ACBT and airway oscillating devices. There was no significant difference in lung

  13. International Committee on Mental Health in Cystic Fibrosis: Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and European Cystic Fibrosis Society consensus statements for screening and treating depression and anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Quittner, Alexandra L; Abbott, Janice; Georgiopoulos, Anna M; Goldbeck, Lutz; Smith, Beth; Hempstead, Sarah E; Marshall, Bruce; Sabadosa, Kathryn A; Elborn, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Studies measuring psychological distress in individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF) have found high rates of both depression and anxiety. Psychological symptoms in both individuals with CF and parent caregivers have been associated with decreased lung function, lower body mass index, worse adherence, worse health-related quality of life, more frequent hospitalisations and increased healthcare costs. To identify and treat depression and anxiety in CF, the CF Foundation and the European CF Society invited a panel of experts, including physicians, psychologists, psychiatrists, nurses, social workers, a pharmacist, parents and an individual with CF, to develop consensus recommendations for clinical care. Over 18 months, this 22-member committee was divided into four workgroups: Screening; Psychological Interventions; Pharmacological Treatments and Implementation and Future Research, and used the Population, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome methodology to develop questions for literature search and review. Searches were conducted in PubMed, PsychINFO, ScienceDirect, Google Scholar, Psychiatry online and ABDATA by a methodologist at Dartmouth. The committee reviewed 344 articles, drafted statements and set an 80% acceptance for each recommendation statement as a consensus threshold prior to an anonymous voting process. Fifteen guideline recommendation statements for screening and treatment of depression and anxiety in individuals with CF and parent caregivers were finalised by vote. As these recommendations are implemented in CF centres internationally, the process of dissemination, implementation and resource provision should be closely monitored to assess barriers and concerns, validity and use. PMID:26452630

  14. Determinants of respiratory pump function in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Dassios, Theodore

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory failure constitutes the major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with Cystic Fibrosis (CF). Respiratory failure could either be due to lung parenchyma damage or to insufficiency of the respiratory pump which consists of the respiratory muscles, the rib cage and the neuromuscular transmission pathways. Airway obstruction, hyperinflation and malnutrition have been historically recognised as the major determinants of respiratory pump dysfunction in CF. Recent research has identified chronic infection, genetic predisposition, dietary and pharmaceutical interventions as possible additional determinants of this impairment. Furthermore, new methodological approaches in assessing respiratory pump function have led to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of respiratory pump failure in CF. Finally, respiratory muscle function could be partially preserved in CF patients with structured interventions such as aerobic exercise, inspiratory muscle training and non-invasive ventilation and CF patients could consequently be relatively protected from respiratory fatigue and respiratory failure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Growth hormone and exercise tolerance in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hütler, Matthias; Beneke, Ralph

    2004-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-limiting inherited disorder characterised by pulmonary disease, pancreatic dysfunction and symptoms of malnutrition that are all interrelated with low exercise capacity and poor survival rate. Therapy with growth hormone (GH) may improve the reduced dimensional and functional capacity associated with poor nutritional status and catabolism and therefore improve exercise tolerance, quality of life and survival rate in patients with CF. The literature about GH treatment and its effect on exercise tolerance are rather limited, not always consistent and methodological concerns restrict further analysis. GH treatment may have beneficial effects on both growth and exercise tolerance without serious complications in prepubertal children with CF. The observed dimensional changes of the muscular, cardiovascular and pulmonary system seem to improve aerobic exercise capacity and respiratory and peripheral muscle strength. The physiological background of the observed changes is not yet fully understood, therefore, larger-scale studies with an optimised design are required.

  16. Adherence to chest physiotherapy in adults with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Myers, Lynn B; Horn, Sandra A

    2006-11-01

    Chest physiotherapy (CP) is seen as a cornerstone of Cystic Fibrosis (CF) treatment. However, previous studies have suggested that adherence to CP is low. This study of adults with CF (N = 563) investigated CP adherence and associated factors. Only 29.5 per cent reported undertaking daily CP. Predictors of adherence included problems with fitting CP into lifestyle, a perception that CP does not help, physical consequences of CP, doing exercises instead and doing CP as and when necessary. These variables accounted for 45 per cent of the variance in adherence. Content analysis revealed a number of themes related to adherence to CP. Future studies should explore the benefits of daily CP and attempt to devise simple interventions to maximize adherence to CP.

  17. Therapies aimed at airway inflammation in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Konstan, M W

    1998-09-01

    Therapies aimed at decreasing the inflammatory response present a new strategy for treating cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. Alternate day prednisone may be beneficial, however, unacceptable adverse effects limit long-term use. Inhaled corticosteroids are under investigation as a safer alternative. High-dose ibuprofen twice daily has been shown to decrease the progression of CF lung disease and is without significant toxicity. Other NSAIDs and pentoxifylline and fish oil are under consideration. Antiproteases and antioxidants are also being studied. The rationale for all of these agents lies in their potential to decrease neutrophil influx into the lung, and counteract injurious products of neutrophils. Adding anti-inflammatory therapy to an already comprehensive treatment program will hopefully decrease morbidity and improve the quality of life for patients with CF.

  18. Infection in cystic fibrosis: impact of the environment and climate.

    PubMed

    Ramsay, K A; Stockwell, R E; Bell, S C; Kidd, T J

    2016-01-01

    In many countries numbers of adults with cystic fibrosis (CF) exceed that of children, with median survival predicted to surpass 50 years. Increasing longevity is, in part, due to intensive therapies including eradication of early infection and suppressive therapies and pulmonary exacerbations. Initial infections with common CF pathogens are thought to arise from the natural environment. We review the impact of climate and environment on infection in CF. Specifically, several studies indicate that higher ambient temperatures, proximity to the equator and the summer season may be linked to the increased prevalence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in people with CF. The environment may also play an important role in the acquisition of Gram negative organisms other than P. aeruginosa. There is emerging data suggesting that climatic and environmental factors are likely to impact on the risk of infection with NTM and fungi in people which are found extensively throughout the natural environment.

  19. Comparison of two percutaneous intravenous "midline" catheters in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Lacy, D E; Spencer, D A; Venkataraman, M; Ruiz, G; Weller, P H

    1996-01-01

    Administration of intravenous antibiotics in cystic fibrosis has been facilitated by the use of midline catheters; percutaneous lines inserted through a peripheral vein and advanced into a large but noncentral vein. In a randomized study, a 23-gauge silastic catheter (Vygon EC, Cirencester, United Kingdom) was compared with the Hydrocath (Viggo-Spectromed, Swindon, United Kingdom), a 22-gauge hydrophillic coated polyurethane catheter inserted using the Seldinger technique. Fifty eight courses of intravenous antibiotics were given, 28 through the Hydrocath (median age 11 years, range 1.5-17.5 years) and 30 through the silastic catheter, (median age 11 years, range 0.5-17.5). Mean line survival was equal. The Hydrocath took longer to insert and was associated with more pain on insertion. However, administration of antibiotics was easier through the Hydrocath and overall satisfaction was higher in those who had the Hydrocath. Both catheters performed well, but administration of antibiotics was easier through the Hydrocath.

  20. Oral anti-pseudomonal antibiotics for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Remmington, Tracey; Jahnke, Nikki; Harkensee, Christian

    2016-07-14

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most common bacterial pathogen causing lung infections in people with cystic fibrosis and appropriate antibiotic therapy is vital. Antibiotics for pulmonary exacerbations are usually given intravenously, and for long-term treatment, via a nebuliser. Oral anti-pseudomonal antibiotics with the same efficacy and safety as intravenous or nebulised antibiotics would benefit people with cystic fibrosis due to ease of treatment and avoidance of hospitalisation. This is an update of a previous review. To determine the benefit or harm of oral anti-pseudomonal antibiotic therapy for people with cystic fibrosis, colonised with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, in the:1. treatment of a pulmonary exacerbation; and2. long-term treatment of chronic infection. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register comprising references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings.We contacted pharmaceutical companies and checked reference lists of identified trials.Date of last search: 08 July 2016. Randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing any dose of oral anti-pseudomonal antibiotics, to other combinations of inhaled, oral or intravenous antibiotics, or to placebo or usual treatment for pulmonary exacerbations and long-term treatment. Two authors independently selected the trials, extracted data and assessed quality. We contacted trial authors to obtain missing information. We included three trials examining pulmonary exacerbations (171 participants) and two trials examining long-term therapy (85 participants). We regarded the most important outcomes as quality of life and lung function. The analysis did not identify any statistically significant difference between oral anti-pseudomonal antibiotics and other treatments for these outcome measures for either pulmonary exacerbations or long-term treatment. One of the