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Sample records for cystic pancreatic neoplasms

  1. Pancreatic Cystic Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Limaiem, Faten; Khalfallah, Tahar; Farhat, Leila Ben; Bouraoui, Saâdia; Lahmar, Ahlem; Mzabi, Sabeh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cystic neoplasms of the pancreas are rare and constitute approximately 0.5% of all pancreatic neoplasms. Aims: The study was to describe clinicopathological features of pancreatic cystic tumors. Patients and Methods: In our retrospective study, we reviewed 10 cases of pancreatic cystic neoplasms that were diagnosed at the pathology department of Mongi Slim hospital over a 14-year period (2000-2013). We adopted the latest World Health Organization (WHO) classification (2010) in grouping all tumors. Results: There were one male and nine female patients (sex ratio M/F = 1:9) aged between 21 and 68 years (mean = 37.5 years). The most common clinical presentation was epigastric and abdominal pain (n = 6) followed by vomiting (n = 3). Abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan disclosed a cystic lesion of the pancreas ranging in size between 2 and 10 cm (mean = 6.75 cm). All patients underwent surgical treatment. Histopathological examination of the surgical specimen established the diagnosis of solid pseudopapillary neoplasm (n = 2), serous cystic neoplasm (n = 2), mucinous cystadenoma (n = 4), mucinous cystadenocarcinoma (n = 1), and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm with invasive carcinoma (n = 1). Conclusion: Better understanding of pancreatic cystic neoplasms is essential for clinicians to make accurate diagnosis and to provide the best management for patients. PMID:25210676

  2. Current perspectives on pancreatic serous cystic neoplasms: Diagnosis, management and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Peng; Yu, Zhong-Xun; Zhao, Yu-Pei; Dai, Meng-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cystic neoplasms have been increasingly recognized recently. Comprising about 16% of all resected pancreatic cystic neoplasms, serous cystic neoplasms are uncommon benign lesions that are usually asymptomatic and found incidentally. Despite overall low risk of malignancy, these pancreatic cysts still generate anxiety, leading to intensive medical investigations with considerable financial cost to health care systems. This review discusses the general background of serous cystic neoplasms, including epidemiology and clinical characteristics, and provides an updated overview of diagnostic approaches based on clinical features, relevant imaging studies and new findings that are being discovered pertaining to diagnostic evaluation. We also concisely discuss and propose management strategies for better quality of life. PMID:27022447

  3. Pancreatic cystic neoplasms: Review of current knowledge, diagnostic challenges, and management options

    PubMed Central

    Jana, Tanima; Shroff, Jennifer; Bhutani, Manoop S.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cystic lesions are being detected with increasing frequency, largely due to advances in cross-sectional imaging. The most common neoplasms include serous cystadenomas, mucinous cystic neoplasms, intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, solid pseudopapillary neoplasms, and cystic pancreatic endocrine neoplasms. Computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) are currently used as imaging modalities. EUS-guided fine needle aspiration has proved to be a useful diagnostic tool, and enables an assessment of tumor markers, cytology, chemistries, and DNA analysis. Here, we review the current literature on pancreatic cystic neoplasms, including classification, diagnosis, treatment, and recommendations for surveillance. Data for this manuscript was acquired via searching the literature from inception to December 2014 on PubMed and Ovid MEDLINE. PMID:25821410

  4. Large pancreatic mucinous cystic neoplasm during pregnancy: what should be done?.

    PubMed

    Tica, Andrei Adrian; Tica, Oana Sorina; Saftoiu, Adrian; Camen, Dragos; Tica, Vlad Iustin

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic mucinous cystic neoplasms are uncommon and their occurrence in pregnancy is extremely rare. The authors report the unique case of a newborn weighing 3,620 g, delivered vaginally with no complications by a patient with a large 'silent' pancreatic mucinous cystic neoplasms, and analyze the very few other reports. With no available protocol, this case highlights an interesting dilemma on the management of pregnancy and delivery as well on the timing of pancreatic surgery. Despite its limitations, MRI remains the most accurate investigation either for differentiating the mucinous from nonmucinous cysts or for evaluating the malignancy, but echography is also very useful. Without symptoms, all low-grade malignant potential tumors, independent of the moment of their diagnosis during pregnancy, should be resected 2-3 months after delivery and we believe that the best option is a term vaginal birth, even in the presence of a large cyst and large fetus. On the contrary, all high-grade malignant potential tumors, discovered in the first two trimesters of pregnancy should be resected during the second trimester, and followed by a vaginal delivery at term. If high-grade malignant potential tumor is diagnosed in the third trimester, an early vaginal delivery followed by surgery is recommended. Finally, the patient's preference is crucial.

  5. Cytopathological Analysis of Cyst Fluid Enhances Diagnostic Accuracy of Mucinous Pancreatic Cystic Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Utomo, Wesley K; Braat, Henri; Bruno, Marco J; van Eijck, Casper H J; Groot Koerkamp, Bas; Krak, Nanda C; van de Vreede, Adriaan; Fuhler, Gwenny M; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P; Biermann, Katharina

    2015-06-01

    Widespread use of cross-sectional imaging and increasing age of the general population has increased the number of detected pancreatic cystic lesions. However, several pathological entities with a variety in malignant potential have to be discriminated to allow clinical decision making. Discrimination between mucinous pancreatic cystic neoplasms (PCNs) and nonmucinous pancreatic lesions is the primary step in the clinical work-up, as malignant transformation is mostly associated with mucinous PCN. We performed a retrospective analysis of all resected PCN in our tertiary center from 2000 to 2014, to evaluate preoperative diagnostic performance and the results of implementation of the consensus guidelines over time. This was followed by a prospective cohort study of patients with an undefined pancreatic cyst, where the added value of cytopathological mucin evaluation to carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in cyst fluid for the discrimination of mucinous PCN and nonmucinous cysts was investigated. Retrospective analysis showed 115 patients operated for a PCN, with a correct preoperative classification in 96.2% of the patients. High-grade dysplasia or invasive carcinoma was observed in only 32.3% of mucinous PCN. In our prospective cohort (n = 71), 57.7% of patients were classified as having a mucinous PCN. CEA ≥ 192 ng/mL had an accuracy of 63.4%, and cytopathological mucin evaluation an accuracy of 73.0%. Combining these 2 tests further improved diagnostic accuracy of a mucinous PCN to 76.8%. CEA level and mucin evaluation were not predictive of the degree of dysplasia. These findings show that adding cytopathology to cyst fluid biochemistry improves discrimination between mucinous PCN and nonmucinous cysts.

  6. Mucinous Cystic Neoplasms of Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Naveed, Shah; Qari, Hasina; Banday, Tanveer; Altaf, Asma; Para, Mah

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the actual management of mucinous cystic neoplasm (MCN) of the pancreas. A systematic review was performed in December 2009 by consulting PubMed MEDLINE for publications and matching the key words “pancreatic mucinous cystic neoplasm”, “pancreatic mucinous cystic tumor”, “pancreatic mucinous cystic mass”, “pancreatic cyst” and “pancreatic cystic neoplasm” to identify English language articles describing the diagnosis and treatment of the MCN of the pancreas. In total, 16,322 references ranging from January 1969 to December 2009 were analyzed and 77 articles were identified. No articles published before 1996 were selected because MCNs were not previously considered to be a completely autonomous disease. Definition, epidemiology, anatomopathological findings, clinical presentation, preoperative evaluation, treatment and prognosis were reviewed. MCNs are pancreatic mucin-producing cysts with a distinctive ovarian-type stroma localized in the body-tail of the gland and occurring in middle-aged females. The majority of MCNs are slow growing and asymptomatic. The prevalence of invasive carcinoma varies between 6% and 55%. Preoperative diagnosis depends on a combination of clinical features, tumor markers, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging, endoscopic ultrasound with cyst fluid analysis and positron emission tomography-CT. Surgery is indicated for all MCNs.

  7. Cystic jejunal duplication with Heinrich’s type I ectopic pancreas, incidentally discovered in a patient with pancreatic tail neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Gurzu, Simona; Bara Jr, Tivadar; Bara, Tivadar; Fetyko, Annamaria; Jung, Ioan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to present a case of enteric duplication cyst and criteria for a proper differential diagnosis. A 51-year-old male was hospitalized for pancreatic tail neoplasm and distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy was performed. During surgery, a jejunal cystic lesion was incidentally detected and jejunectomy was performed. Microscopically, the cyst was observed to be covered by Keratin 7/Keratin 20 positive intestinal type epithelium and the muscularis layer was shared by the cyst and adjacent jejunum, without a cleavage plane between the cyst wall and jejunal muscularis propria. In the deep muscularis propria, a Heinrich’s type I ectopic pancreas was also noted. In the pancreatic tail, a low grade intraepithelial lesion (panIN-1a) was diagnosed. This case highlights the necessity for a correct differential diagnosis of such rare lesions. Roughly 30 cases of jejunal duplication cysts have been reported to date in the PubMed database. PMID:27672644

  8. Cystic jejunal duplication with Heinrich's type I ectopic pancreas, incidentally discovered in a patient with pancreatic tail neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Gurzu, Simona; Bara, Tivadar; Bara, Tivadar; Fetyko, Annamaria; Jung, Ioan

    2016-09-16

    The aim of this study was to present a case of enteric duplication cyst and criteria for a proper differential diagnosis. A 51-year-old male was hospitalized for pancreatic tail neoplasm and distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy was performed. During surgery, a jejunal cystic lesion was incidentally detected and jejunectomy was performed. Microscopically, the cyst was observed to be covered by Keratin 7/Keratin 20 positive intestinal type epithelium and the muscularis layer was shared by the cyst and adjacent jejunum, without a cleavage plane between the cyst wall and jejunal muscularis propria. In the deep muscularis propria, a Heinrich's type I ectopic pancreas was also noted. In the pancreatic tail, a low grade intraepithelial lesion (panIN-1a) was diagnosed. This case highlights the necessity for a correct differential diagnosis of such rare lesions. Roughly 30 cases of jejunal duplication cysts have been reported to date in the PubMed database. PMID:27672644

  9. Laparoscopic approach to distal pancreatectomy in pancreatic cystic neoplasms – report of three cases and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Kwiatkowski, Andrzej P.; Paśnik, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    The development of cross-section imaging increased the number of diagnosed pancreatic cystic neoplasms (PCNs). Many of these lesions, located frequently in the body or tail of the organ, require resection. We present three cases of patients undergoing laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy because of PCNs, describing the technique along with the post-operative course. The reviewed literature confirms the benefits of the laparoscopic approach, yet it lacks randomized, controlled trials. We also present two spleen-preserving surgical techniques – with and without ligation of the splenic vessels. Both of these procedures can be performed with laparoscopy or laparotomy, but there is no consensus which should be the method of choice. PMID:26649104

  10. Premalignant cystic neoplasms of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Dudeja, Vikas; Allen, Peter J

    2015-02-01

    Due to increasing utilization of cross-sectional imaging, asymptomatic pancreatic cysts are frequently being diagnosed. Many of these cysts have premalignant potential and offer a unique opportunity for cancer prevention. Mucinous cystic neoplasm and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm are the major premalignant cystic neoplasms of pancreas. The prediction of the risk of malignancy (incidental and future risk of malignant transformation) and balancing the risks of watchful waiting with that of operative management with associated mortality and morbidity is the key to the management of these lesions. We review the literature that has contributed to the development of our approach to the management of these cystic neoplasms. We provide an overview of the key features used in diagnosis and in predicting malignancy. Particular attention is given to the natural history and management decision making.

  11. A case of mucinous cystic neoplasm of the pancreas misdiagnosed as a pancreatic pseudocyst at the initial exam and resected after a 2-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Takuya; Haruta, Jun-Ichi; Yamaguchi, Takeo; Doisaki, Masao; Yama, Tsuyoki; Murate, Kentarou; Hattori, Shun; Hayakawa, Fumihiro; Yamada, Kenta; Yashika, Jun

    2015-04-01

    A 44-year-old woman was referred to our hospital because of a cystic lesion in the pancreatic body that was found by computed tomography (CT) as a result of a screening for impaired liver function after the patient presented with a high fever in 2011. Trans-abdominal ultrasonography (US) revealed a 33-mm unilocular cyst within the pancreatic body and a 5-mm hypoechoic mass in the pancreatic neck. Contrast-enhanced CT showed a slight enhancement around the cyst and a mild dilation of the main pancreatic duct, but neither septum nor nodule was detected inside. Contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasonography (CE-EUS) revealed a hyperechoic elevated lesion inside the cystic lesion without enhancement in the pancreatic body; CE-EUS also revealed a 5-mm homogeneous hypoechoic mass with a remarkable enhancement in the pancreatic neck with the use of Sonazoid(®) as a contrast medium. These lesions were diagnosed as a pancreatic pseudocyst and a neuroendocrine tumor (NET), respectively, and were followed up with periodic examinations. The cystic lesion showed contraction 6 months after the initial exam. However, US revealed an enlargement of the cystic lesion to 40 mm in diameter 2 years after the initial exam, and EUS showed irregular thickening of the wall with a cyst-in-cyst appearance. The diagnoses of a mucinous cystic neoplasm (MCN) and a concomitant small NET were made after a distal pancreatectomy. We herein report a rare case of MCN that showed various morphological changes over 2 years of observation.

  12. Overview of the clinical problem: facts and current issues of mucinous cystic neoplasms of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Jeurnink, S M; Vleggaar, F P; Siersema, P D

    2008-11-01

    Pancreatic cystic lesions are uncommon and consist of pseudocysts, congenital cysts and cystic neoplasms including mucinous cystic neoplasms, intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms and serous cystic neoplasms. Mucinous cystic neoplasms are large septated cysts without connection to the ductal system, characterised by the presence of thick-walled ovarian-type stroma and mucin. They occur predominantly in women and often are malignant. Therefore, surgical resection is recommended. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms are neoplasms with tall, columnar, mucin-containing epithelium involving the main pancreatic ducts or major side branches. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms occur in men and women in their 60s and 70s and may differentiate into malignant neoplasms. Therefore, surgical resection is mandatory. Serous cystic neoplasms appear as multiple cysts lined with cubic flat epithelium containing glycogen-rich cells with clear cytoplasm. They mainly occur in women in their 50s and are generally benign. Therefore, a conservative approach is recommended. As both mucinous cystic neoplasm and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms have a high malignant potential, it is important to differentiate between the various pancreatic cystic lesions. Several imaging techniques and tumour markers have been evaluated. Nonetheless, definitive guidelines to differentiate between serous cystic neoplasms, mucinous cystic neoplasms and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms are still poorly defined. A number of management issues regarding these neoplasms are still under debate, for example which imaging technique to use, differentiation between malignant or benign lesions and the preferred treatment modality for each pancreatic cystic neoplasm. Further research may lead to a definitive guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of mucinous cystic neoplasms, intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms and serous cystic neoplasms. PMID:18499541

  13. Gastric Duplication Cyst With Elevated Amylase: An Unusual Presentation Mimicking Pancreatic Cystic Neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Karanovic, Djuro; Chalhoub, Walid; Ajmera, Akash; Maufa, Fuad; Zeck, Jay C.; Shafa, Shervin; Johnson, Lynt; Haddad, Nadim

    2015-01-01

    Enteric duplication cysts (EDCs) are benign congenital anomalies that are found incidentally in adults. Gastric duplication cysts (GDCs) are the least common subtype of EDC, but when located near the pancreas, may resemble other neoplastic conditions. We report a case of GDC adjacent to the pancreas with high cystic fluid amylase and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and 3 different epithelia (respiratory, gastric, and intestinal), all diagnosed via endoscopic ultrasound with fine-needle aspiration. PMID:26157922

  14. Gastric Duplication Cyst With Elevated Amylase: An Unusual Presentation Mimicking Pancreatic Cystic Neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Sultan, Mohamed; Karanovic, Djuro; Chalhoub, Walid; Ajmera, Akash; Maufa, Fuad; Zeck, Jay C; Shafa, Shervin; Johnson, Lynt; Haddad, Nadim

    2015-01-01

    Enteric duplication cysts (EDCs) are benign congenital anomalies that are found incidentally in adults. Gastric duplication cysts (GDCs) are the least common subtype of EDC, but when located near the pancreas, may resemble other neoplastic conditions. We report a case of GDC adjacent to the pancreas with high cystic fluid amylase and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and 3 different epithelia (respiratory, gastric, and intestinal), all diagnosed via endoscopic ultrasound with fine-needle aspiration.

  15. Cystic Lesions in Autoimmune Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Gompertz, Macarena; Morales, Claudia; Aldana, Hernán; Castillo, Jaime; Berger, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) can be chronic or recurrent, but frequently completely reversible after steroid treatment. A cystic lesion in AIP is a rare finding, and it can mimic a pancreatic cystic neoplasm. Difficulties in an exact diagnosis interfere with treatment, and surgery cannot be avoided in some cases. We report the history of a 63-year-old male presenting with jaundice and pruritus. AIP was confirmed by imaging and elevated IgG4 blood levels, and the patient completely recovered after corticosteroid therapy. One year later, he presented with a recurrent episode of AIP with elevated IgG4 levels, accompanied by the appearance of multiple intrapancreatic cystic lesions. All but 1 of these cysts disappeared after steroid treatment, but the remaining cyst in the pancreatic head was even somewhat larger 1 year later. Pancreatoduodenectomy was finally performed. Histology showed the wall of the cystic lesion to be fibrotic; the surrounding pancreatic tissue presented fibrosis, atrophy and lymphoplasmacytic infiltration by IgG4-positive cells, without malignant elements. Our case illustrates the rare possibility that cystic lesions can be part of AIP. These pseudocysts appear in the pancreatic segments involved in the autoimmune disease and can be a consequence of the local inflammation or related to ductal strictures. Steroid treatment should be initiated, after which these cysts can completely disappear with recovery from AIP. Surgical intervention may be necessary in some exceptional cases.

  16. Management of mucinous cystic neoplasms of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Testini, Mario; Gurrado, Angela; Lissidini, Germana; Venezia, Pietro; Greco, Luigi; Piccinni, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the actual management of mucinous cystic neoplasm (MCN) of the pancreas. A systematic review was performed in December 2009 by consulting PubMed MEDLINE for publications and matching the key words “pancreatic mucinous cystic neoplasm”, “pancreatic mucinous cystic tumour”, “pancreatic mucinous cystic mass”, “pancreatic cyst”, and “pancreatic cystic neoplasm” to identify English language articles describing the diagnosis and treatment of the mucinous cystic neoplasm of the pancreas. In total, 16 322 references ranging from January 1969 to December 2009 were analysed and 77 articles were identified. No articles published before 1996 were selected because MCNs were not previously considered to be a completely autonomous disease. Definition, epidemiology, anatomopathological findings, clinical presentation, preoperative evaluation, treatment and prognosis were reviewed. MCNs are pancreatic mucin-producing cysts with a distinctive ovarian-type stroma localized in the body-tail of the gland and occurring in middle-aged females. The majority of MCNs are slow growing and asymptomatic. The prevalence of invasive carcinoma varies between 6% and 55%. Preoperative diagnosis depends on a combination of clinical features, tumor markers, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging, endoscopic ultrasound with cyst fluid analysis, and positron emission tomography-CT. Surgery is indicated for all MCNs. PMID:21128317

  17. Cystic micropapillary neoplasm of peribiliary glands with concomitant perihilar cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Tsuneyuki; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Ito, Takaaki; Okamura, Yukiyasu; Sugiura, Teiichi; Uesaka, Katsuhiko; Nakanuma, Yasuni

    2016-02-21

    We report a case of a 75-year-old man with cystic micropapillary neoplasm of peribiliary glands detected preoperatively by radiologic examination. Enhanced computed tomography showed a low-density mass 2.2 cm in diameter in the right hepatic hilum and a cystic lesion around the common hepatic duct. Under a diagnosis of perihilar cholangiocarcinoma, right hepatectomy with caudate lobectomy and bile duct resection were performed. Pathological examination revealed perihilar cholangiocarcinoma mainly involving the right hepatic duct. The cystic lesion was multilocular and covered by columnar lining epithelia exhibiting increased proliferative activity and p53 nuclear expression; it also contained foci of micropapillary and glandular proliferation. Therefore, the lesion was diagnosed as a cystic micropapillary neoplasm of peribiliary glands and resembled flat branch-type intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas. Histological examination showed the lesion was discontinuous with the perihilar cholangiocarcinoma. Immunohistochemistry showed the cystic neoplasm was strongly positive for MUC6 and that the cholangiocarcinoma was strongly positive for MUC5AC and S100P. These results suggest these two lesions have different origins. This case warrants further study on whether this type of neoplasm is associated with concomitant cholangiocarcinoma as observed in pancreatic intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm with concomitant pancreatic duct adenocarcinoma. PMID:26900302

  18. Giant mucinous cystic neoplasms of pancreas and liver with unusual adipose tissue component: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ghatak, Supriyo; Ray, Sukanta; Sonar, Pankaj Kr; Das, Somak; Basu, Keya; Mridha, Asit Ranjan; Bhattacharyya, Avik; Sarkar, Rajib

    2012-12-01

    Simultaneous occurrence of pancreatic and hepatic mucinous cystic neoplasms is very rarely reported in the literature. We present a case with extensive fatty component of the pancreatic tumour arising from the head of the pancreas and attaining a huge size before being treated by Whipple's pancreatoduodenectomy and subsequently by a right hepatectomy for the hepatic tumour.

  19. Pathological and Molecular Evaluation of Pancreatic Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Rishi, Arvind; Goggins, Michael; Wood, Laura D.; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic neoplasms are morphologically and genetically heterogeneous and include wide variety of neoplasms ranging from benign to malignant with an extremely poor clinical outcome. Our understanding of these pancreatic neoplasms has improved significantly with recent advances in cancer sequencing. Awareness of molecular pathogenesis brings in new opportunities for early detection, improved prognostication, and personalized gene-specific therapies. Here we review the pathological classification of pancreatic neoplasms from their molecular and genetic perspective. All of the major tumor types that arise in the pancreas have been sequenced, and a new classification that incorporates molecular findings together with pathological findings is now possible (Table 1). This classification has significant implications for our understanding of why tumors aggregate in some families, for the development of early detection tests, and for the development of personalized therapies for patients with established cancers. Here we describe this new classification using the framework of the standard histological classification. PMID:25726050

  20. Chronic pancreatitis and cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Witt, H

    2003-01-01

    Recent discoveries of trypsinogen and trypsin inhibitor mutations in patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP) support the hypothesis that an inappropriate activation of pancreatic zymogens to active enzymes within the pancreatic parenchyma starts the inflammatory process. Current data suggest that CP may be inherited dominant, recessive, or complex as a result of mutations in the above mentioned or yet unidentified genes. Evaluation of patients with CP should include genetic testing. Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene and is characterised by pancreatic insufficiency and chronic bronchopulmonary infection. The progression and severity of pulmonary disease differs considerably between people with identical CFTR mutations and does not seem to correlate with the type or class of the CFTR mutation. The identification of further disease modifying genetic factors will increase the pathophysiological understanding and may help to identify new therapeutic targets. PMID:12651880

  1. Immunohistochemical analysis of steroidogenic enzymes in ovarian-type stroma of pancreatic mucinous cystic neoplasms: Comparative study of subepithelial stromal cells in intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Kazuyuki; Sasano, Hironobu; Moriya, Takuya; Takahashi, Yayoi; Sugimoto, Ryo; Mue, Yoshiharu; Murakami, Keigo; Fujishima, Fumiyoshi; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Morikawa, Takanori; Motoi, Fuyuhiko; Suzuki, Takashi; Unno, Michiaki; Sugai, Tamotsu

    2016-05-01

    Mucinous cystic neoplasms (MCNs) are generally defined as cyst-forming epithelial neoplasms that arise in the pancreas and harbor characteristic ovarian-type stroma beneath the epithelium. In this study, we compared the immunoreactivity of steroid-related factors in these subepithelial stromal cells in MCNs to those in intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) to further characterize this unique MCN ovarian-type stroma through evaluation of sex steroid biosynthesis. Twenty MCNs and twenty IPMNs were examined. Immunoreactivity of steroid hormone receptors, including estrogen receptor (ERα and ERβ), progesterone receptor (PR, PR-A, and PR-B), and androgen receptor (AR), was more frequently detected in MCN ovarian-type stromal cells than in IPMN stromal cells (P < 0.01). The H-scores (mean ± SD) of steroidogenic factor (SF)-1 were also significantly higher in MCNs (112.3 ± 33.1) than in IPMNs (0.9 ± 1.2) (P < 0.01). The steroidogenic enzymes cytochrome P450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc), cytochrome P450 17 alpha-hydroxylase (P450c17) and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD) showed immunoreactivity in 9/20 (45.0 %), 15/20 (75.0 %) and 13/20 (65.0 %), respectively, of ovarian-type stroma from MCN cases. These results demonstrate that the ovarian-type stroma of MCNs can express steroidogenic enzymes. Thus, the ovarian-type stroma of MCNs can produce sex steroids that may also act on these cells.

  2. [Splenoportography in pancreatic tumors and retroperitoneal neoplasms].

    PubMed

    Roshchektaev, N V

    1975-01-01

    Along with other methods of investigation splenoportography was performed in 29 patients with tumors and in 2 patients with cystic affection of the pancreas. Moreover, in 5 cases splenoportography was performed due to a suspicion to pancreatic tumor, and also in 6 patients with retroperitoneal tumors and in 7-with renal tumors. In all these patients with pancreatic tumors splenoportograms have shown changes on the part of a splenoportal trunk, which corresponded to the localization and degree of spread of a tumor in most cases. Splenoportography is felt to be rational in retroperitoneal tumors. In such cases splenoportography would contribute to a detailed determination of tumor localization and its relation with the liver.

  3. Concomitant pancreatic endocrine neoplasm and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Kadota, Yoshie; Shinoda, Masahiro; Tanabe, Minoru; Tsujikawa, Hanako; Ueno, Akihisa; Masugi, Yohei; Oshima, Go; Nishiyama, Ryo; Tanaka, Masayuki; Mihara, Kisho; Abe, Yuta; Yagi, Hiroshi; Kitago, Minoru; Itano, Osamu; Kawachi, Shigeyuki; Aiura, Koichi; Tanimoto, Akihiro; Sakamaoto, Michiie; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2013-03-21

    We report a case of concomitant pancreatic endocrine neoplasm (PEN) and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN). A 74-year-old man had been followed-up for mixed-type IPMN for 10 years. Recent magnetic resonance images revealed an increase in size of the branch duct IPMN in the pancreas head, while the dilation of the main pancreatic duct showed minimal change. Although contrast-enhanced computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging did not reveal any nodules in the branch duct IPMN, endoscopic ultrasound indicated a suspected nodule in the IPMN. A malignancy in the branch duct IPMN was suspected and we performed pylorus-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy with lymphadenectomy. The resected specimen contained a cystic lesion, 10 x 10 mm in diameter, in the head of the pancreas. Histological examination revealed that the dilated main pancreatic duct and the branch ducts were composed of intraductal papillary mucinous adenoma with mild atypia. No evidence of carcinoma was detected in the specimen. Incidentally, a 3-mm nodule consisting of small neuroendocrine cells was found in the main pancreatic duct. The cells demonstrated positive staining for chromogranin A, synaptophysin, and glucagon but negative staining for insulin and somatostatin. Therefore, the 3-mm nodule was diagnosed as a PEN. Since the mitotic count per 10 high-power fields was less than 2 and the Ki-67 index was less than 2%, the PEN was pathologically classified as low-grade (G1) according to the 2010 World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. Herein, we review the case and relevant studies in the literature and discuss issues related to the synchronous occurrence of the relatively rare tumors, PEN and IPMN.

  4. Radiological description of cystic pancreatic tumors.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Torres, C; Larrosa López, R

    2016-01-01

    Although most cystic pancreatic lesions are pseudocysts, it is important to do a thorough differential diagnosis with true cystic tumors because cystic tumors are potentially malignant. Sometimes computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging cannot establish the definitive diagnosis, making it necessary to perform other imaging tests such as endoscopic ultrasound, which in addition to morphological information, can also enable cytologic and biochemical analysis of the lesion through puncture and aspiration of its contents. Combining all these findings nearly always provides enough diagnostic information to allow the appropriate approach in each case. This article describes the specific morphological characteristics for each cystic pancreatic tumor on computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and endoscopic ultrasound and reviews the guidelines for managing these types of lesions.

  5. Pancreatic pseudocyst or a cystic tumor of the pancreas?

    PubMed Central

    Rabie, Mohammad Ezzedien; El Hakeem, Ismail; Al Skaini, Mohammad Saad; El Hadad, Ahmad; Jamil, Salim; Tahir Shah, Mian; Obaid, Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic pseudocysts are the most common cystic lesions of the pancreas and may complicate acute pancreatitis, chronic pancreatitis, or pancreatic trauma. While the majority of acute pseudocysts resolve spontaneously, few may require drainage. On the other hand, pancreatic cystic tumors, which usually require extirpation, may disguise as pseudocysts. Hence, the distinction between the two entities is crucial for a successful outcome. We conducted this study to highlight the fundamental differences between pancreatic pseudocysts and cystic tumors so that relevant management plans can be devised. We reviewed the data of patients with pancreatic cystic lesions that underwent intervention between June 2007 and December 2010 in our hospital. We identified 9 patients (5 males and 4 females) with a median age of 40 years (range, 30–70 years). Five patients had pseudocysts, 2 had cystic tumors, and 2 had diseases of undetermined pathology. Pancreatic pseudocysts were treated by pseudocystogastrostomy in 2 cases and percutaneous drainage in 3 cases. One case recurred after percutaneous drainage and required pseudocystogastrostomy. The true pancreatic cysts were serous cystadenoma, which was treated by distal pancreatectomy, and mucinous cystadenocarcinoma, which was initially treated by drainage, like a pseudocyst, and then by distal pancreatectomy when its true nature was revealed. We conclude that every effort should be exerted to distinguish between pancreatic pseudocysts and cystic tumors of the pancreas to avoid the serious misjudgement of draining rather than extirpating a pancreatic cystic tumor. Additionally, percutaneous drainage of a pancreatic pseudocyst is a useful adjunct that may substitute for surgical drainage. PMID:23958054

  6. Prognosis of Minimally Invasive Carcinoma Arising in Mucinous Cystic Neoplasms of the Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Gloria H.; Wang, Huamin; Bellizzi, Andrew M.; Klein, Alison P.; Askin, Frederic B.; Schwartz, Lauren Ende; Schulick, Richard D.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Cameron, John L.; O’Reilly, Eileen M.; Yu, Kenneth H.; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2012-01-01

    While patients with surgically resected non-invasive mucinous cystic neoplasms (MCNs) of the pancreas are cured, the behavior of surgically resected minimally invasive adenocarcinomas arising in MCN has not been well established. We report 16 surgically resected MCNs with minimal invasion defined as unifocal or multifocal microscopic invasive adenocarcinoma confined to the ovarian stroma of the MCN without capsular or pancreatic parenchymal invasion. Pathological findings were correlated with patient demographics, type of surgery, and long-term follow-up. Our study included 15 females and 1 male ranging in age from 25–66 years. The patients were followed for a mean of 48.6 months (range 12–148 months). The MCNs ranged in size from 3.5–25 cm and were all located in the body/tail of the gland. Lymphovascular invasion was not identified in any of the cases and all lymph nodes were negative for tumor. Ten neoplasms had unifocal invasion, while 6 had multifocal invasion. Twelve of the neoplasms were partially submitted for microscopic examination while 4 were submitted entirely. Only one of the 16 minimally invasive MCNs recurred, and that tumor had been minimally sampled pathologically. Our study demonstrates that the majority of patients with minimally invasive adenocarcinoma arising in MCN are cured by surgery, particularly if the neoplasms are completely examined histologically. PMID:23388125

  7. Cystic and Papillary Neoplasm at the Hepatic Hilum Possibly Originating in the Peribiliary Glands

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, Takashi; Uesaka, Katsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Cystic neoplasms of the liver are divided into two types: mucinous cystic neoplasm and cystic intraductal papillary neoplasm of the bile duct. We herein report two cases of cystic and papillary neoplasm of the liver which differed from the abovementioned types. Case  1. A 70-year-old man. Radiologically, a cystic tumor measuring 20 mm in diameter was found at the hepatic hilum. Right hepatectomy was performed under a diagnosis of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (iCCA) based on the imaging findings. Case  2. A 70-year-old man. Radiologically, a cystic tumor measuring 60 mm in diameter was found at the hepatic hilum. Under a diagnosis of iCCA, left hepatic trisectionectomy was performed. In both cases, endoscopic retrograde cholangiography did not demonstrate communication between the cystic tumor and adjacent bile ducts. Pathologically, these two tumors were cystic neoplasms located at the hepatic hilum and were morphologically characterized by an intracystic papillary neoplasm composed of diffuse high-grade dysplasia and associated with an invasive carcinoma. Ovarian-like stroma was not found in the capsule of these tumors. Interestingly, there were peribiliary glands near these tumors, and MUC6 was expressed in these papillary neoplasms as well as in the peribiliary glands. These neoplasms might have arisen from the peribiliary glands. PMID:27656307

  8. Cystic and Papillary Neoplasm at the Hepatic Hilum Possibly Originating in the Peribiliary Glands

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, Takashi; Uesaka, Katsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Cystic neoplasms of the liver are divided into two types: mucinous cystic neoplasm and cystic intraductal papillary neoplasm of the bile duct. We herein report two cases of cystic and papillary neoplasm of the liver which differed from the abovementioned types. Case  1. A 70-year-old man. Radiologically, a cystic tumor measuring 20 mm in diameter was found at the hepatic hilum. Right hepatectomy was performed under a diagnosis of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (iCCA) based on the imaging findings. Case  2. A 70-year-old man. Radiologically, a cystic tumor measuring 60 mm in diameter was found at the hepatic hilum. Under a diagnosis of iCCA, left hepatic trisectionectomy was performed. In both cases, endoscopic retrograde cholangiography did not demonstrate communication between the cystic tumor and adjacent bile ducts. Pathologically, these two tumors were cystic neoplasms located at the hepatic hilum and were morphologically characterized by an intracystic papillary neoplasm composed of diffuse high-grade dysplasia and associated with an invasive carcinoma. Ovarian-like stroma was not found in the capsule of these tumors. Interestingly, there were peribiliary glands near these tumors, and MUC6 was expressed in these papillary neoplasms as well as in the peribiliary glands. These neoplasms might have arisen from the peribiliary glands.

  9. Cystic and Papillary Neoplasm at the Hepatic Hilum Possibly Originating in the Peribiliary Glands.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Takashi; Uesaka, Katsuhiko; Nakanuma, Yasuni

    2016-01-01

    Cystic neoplasms of the liver are divided into two types: mucinous cystic neoplasm and cystic intraductal papillary neoplasm of the bile duct. We herein report two cases of cystic and papillary neoplasm of the liver which differed from the abovementioned types. Case  1. A 70-year-old man. Radiologically, a cystic tumor measuring 20 mm in diameter was found at the hepatic hilum. Right hepatectomy was performed under a diagnosis of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (iCCA) based on the imaging findings. Case  2. A 70-year-old man. Radiologically, a cystic tumor measuring 60 mm in diameter was found at the hepatic hilum. Under a diagnosis of iCCA, left hepatic trisectionectomy was performed. In both cases, endoscopic retrograde cholangiography did not demonstrate communication between the cystic tumor and adjacent bile ducts. Pathologically, these two tumors were cystic neoplasms located at the hepatic hilum and were morphologically characterized by an intracystic papillary neoplasm composed of diffuse high-grade dysplasia and associated with an invasive carcinoma. Ovarian-like stroma was not found in the capsule of these tumors. Interestingly, there were peribiliary glands near these tumors, and MUC6 was expressed in these papillary neoplasms as well as in the peribiliary glands. These neoplasms might have arisen from the peribiliary glands. PMID:27656307

  10. Retroperitoneal bronchogenic cyst mimicking pancreatic cystic lesion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shin-E; Tsai, Yi-Fang; Su, Cheng-Hsi; Shyr, Yi-Ming; Lee, Rheun-Chuan; Tsai, Wan-Chen; Li, Fen-Yau; Chen, Tien-Hua; Wu, Chew-Wun; Lui, Wing-Yiu

    2006-11-01

    Retroperitoneal bronchogenic cyst is detected extremely rarely and often masquerades as other diseases. Here, we report 2 cases of retroperitoneal bronchogenic cyst mimicking pancreatic mucinous tumor. Histologically, both cysts were composed of ciliated respiratory-like epithelium with abundant mucin content, smooth muscle bundles and mature cartilage, compatible with the diagnosis of retroperitoneal bronchogenic cyst. In addition to these 2 cases, another 42 retroperitoneal bronchogenic cysts reported in the English literature were collected for review and analysis. Twelve (28%) were located over the peripancreatic area. Just over half (51%) of them were asymptomatic. No accurate preoperative diagnosis could be made for any of the lesions. About a third (33.3%) of the peripancreatic retroperitoneal bronchogenic cysts masqueraded as pancreatic cystic lesions.

  11. Pancreatic mucinous cystic tumor in Turner syndrome: How a tumor bends to a genetic disease☆

    PubMed Central

    Pizzi, Marco; Pennelli, Gianmaria; Merante-Boschin, Isabella; Fassan, Matteo; Pelizzo, Maria Rosa; Rugge, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Mucinous cystic neoplasms (MCN) are uncommon tumors of the pancreatic corpus/tail occurring mostly in middle-aged women, with a variable clinico-biological behavior. On histology, MCNs concurrently show an epithelial mucosecreting component with ovarian-type stromal cells. PRESENTATION OF CASE This report describes the first case of a pancreatic MCN with no ovarian-type stroma in a patient with Turner syndrome (TS). DISCUSSION The mesenchymal component of MCN presumably results from the intra-pancreatic entrapment of ovarian stroma during embryogenesis. In our case, the absence of such stromal component may relate to the “dysgenetic” changes in the ovary involved in TS. CONCLUSION The present case of primary pancreatic MCN arising in a TS-patient triggers some original speculation on the morphogenesis of pancreatic MCN, also expanding the current clinico-pathological knowledge of this extremely rare entity. PMID:24096346

  12. Pancreatic intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm in a patient with Lynch syndrome.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Meghan R; Jayaraj, Arjun; Xiong, Wei; Yeh, Matthew M; Raskind, Wendy H; Pillarisetty, Venu G

    2015-03-01

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) is a mucin-producing epithelial neoplasm that carries a risk of progression to invasive pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Lynch syndrome is an autosomal dominant condition caused by germline mutations in mismatch repair genes such as MSH2 that lead to microsatellite instability and increased risk of tumor formation. Although families with Lynch syndrome have an increased risk of pancreatic cancer, a clear connection between Lynch syndrome and IPMN has not been drawn. We present a report of a 58 year-old Caucasian woman with multiple cancers and a germline mutation of MSH2 consistent with Lynch syndrome. A screening abdominal computed tomography scan revealed a dilated main pancreatic duct and cystic ductular structure in the uncinate process that were consistent with IPMN of the main pancreatic duct on excision. Immunohistochemistry and polymerase chain reaction of the patient's pancreas specimen did not reveal microsatellite instability or mismatch repair gene loss of expression or function. Our findings may be explained by the fact that loss of mismatch repair function and microsatellite instability is a late event in neoplastic transformation. Given the relative rarity of main duct IPMN, its appearance in the setting of somatic MSH2 mutation suggests that IPMN may fit into the constellation of Lynch syndrome related malignancies. PMID:25759555

  13. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Therapies in Pancreatic Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dennis; DiMaio, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has evolved from being primarily a diagnostic modality into an interventional endoscopic tool for the management of both benign and malignant gastrointestinal illnesses. EUS-guided therapy has garnered particular interest as a minimally invasive approach for the treatment of pancreatic cancer, a disease often complicated by its aggressive course and poor survival. The potential advantage of an EUS-guided approach revolves around real-time imaging for targeted therapy of a difficult to reach organ. In this review, we focus on EUS-guided therapies for pancreatic neoplasms. PMID:25802863

  14. Mucinous cystic neoplasms of the mesentery: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Metaxas, Georgios; Tangalos, Athanasios; Pappa, Polyxeni; Papageorgiou, Irene

    2009-01-01

    Background Mucinous cystic neoplasms arise in the ovary and various extra-ovarian sites. While their pathogenesis remains conjectural, their similarities suggest a common pathway of development. There have been rare reports involving the mesentery as a primary tumour site. Case presentation A cystic mass of uncertain origin was demonstrated radiologically in a 22 year old female with chronic abdominal pain. At laparotomy, the mass was fixed within the colonic mesentery. Histology demonstrated a benign mucinous cystadenoma. Methods and results We review the literature on mucinous cystic neoplasms of the mesentery and report on the pathogenesis, biologic behavior, diagnosis and treatment of similar extra-ovarian tumors. We propose an updated classification of mesenteric cysts and cystic tumors. Conclusion Mucinous cystic neoplasms of the mesentery present almost exclusively in women and must be considered in the differential diagnosis of mesenteric tumors. Only full histological examination of a mucinous cystic neoplasm can exclude a borderline or malignant component. An updated classification of mesenteric cysts and cystic tumors is proposed. PMID:19454018

  15. Endoscopic approach to the diagnosis of pancreatic cystic tumor

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguchi, Yoshiaki; Mine, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    Because of the aging of the population, prevalence of medical checkups, and advances in imaging studies, the number of pancreatic cystic lesions detected has increased. Once these lesions are detected, neoplastic cysts should be differentiated from non-neoplastic cysts. Furthermore, because of the malignant potential of some neoplastic pancreatic cysts, further differentiation between benign and malignant cysts should be made regardless of their size. Although endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has a very high diagnostic performance for pancreatic cystic lesions among the various imaging modalities, EUS findings alone are insufficient for the differentiation of pancreatic cysts and diagnosis of malignancy. In addition, cytology by EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA) has a high specificity but a low sensitivity for diagnosing malignancy in pancreatic cystic tumors. The levels of amylase, lipase, and tumor markers in pancreatic cystic fluid are considered auxiliary parameters for diagnosis of benign and malignant cysts, and a definitive diagnosis of malignancy using these parameters is difficult. Thus, in addition to EUS, cytology by EUS-FNA, and cystic fluid analysis, new techniques based on EUS-guided through-the-needle imaging, such as confocal laser endomicroscopy and cystoscopy, have been explored in recent years. PMID:26909130

  16. Repeating regional acute pancreatitis in the head of the pancreas caused by intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms in the tail: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Asari, Sadaki; Matsumoto, Ippei; Toyama, Hirochika; Shinzeki, Makoto; Goto, Tadahiro; Shirakawa, Sachiyo; Yamada, Isamu; Ajiki, Tetsuo; Fukumoto, Takumi; Ito, Tomoo; Ku, Yonson

    2012-04-01

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) of the pancreas is a distinct entity characterized by papillary proliferations of mucin-producing epithelial cells with excessive mucin production and cystic dilatation of the pancreatic ducts. The clinical presentation often involves recurrent episodes of pancreatitis associated with the temporal obstruction of the main pancreatic duct caused by the hypersecretion of mucin. We herein describe a case in which the patient repeatedly experienced the occurrence of idiopathic acute pancreatitis in the head of the pancreas over a 9-year period, and who was ultimately was cured by distal pancreatectomy for IPMNs in the pancreatic tail. This case illustrates the potential pitfalls in the diagnosis of IPMNs owing to a discrepancy between the site of pancreatitis and that of the IPMN. The possible mechanisms linking acute pancreatitis with the formation of IPMNs are also reviewed.

  17. Pancreatic changes in cystic fibrosis: CT and sonographic appearances

    SciTech Connect

    Daneman, A.; Gaskin, K.; Martin, D.J.; Cutz, E.

    1983-10-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) and sonographic appearances of the late stages of pancreatic damage in three patients with cystic fibrosis are illustrated. All three had severe exocrine pancreatic insufficiency with steatorrhea. In two patients CT revealed complete fatty replacement of the entire pancreas. In the third, increased echogenicity of the pancreas on sonography and the inhomogeneous attenuation on CT were interpreted as being the result of a combination of fibrosis, fatty replacement, calcification, and probable cyst formation.

  18. 64-Slice spiral computed tomography and three-dimensional reconstruction in the diagnosis of cystic pancreatic tumors

    PubMed Central

    WEN, ZHAOXIA; YAO, FENGQING; WANG, YUXING

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to describe the characteristics of cystic pancreatic tumors using computed tomography (CT) and to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy (DA) of post-imaging three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction. Clinical and imaging data, including multi-slice spiral CT scans, enhanced scans and multi-faceted reconstruction, from 30 patients with pathologically confirmed cystic pancreatic tumors diagnosed at the Linyi People's Hospital between August 2008 and June 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. Following the injection of Ultravist® 300 contrast agent, arterial, portal venous and parenchymal phase scans were obtained at 28, 60 and 150 sec, respectively, and 3D reconstructions of the CT images were generated. The average age of the patients was 38.4 years (range, 16–77 years), and the cohort included 5 males and 25 females (ratio, 1:5). The patients included 8 cases of mucinous cystadenoma (DA), 80%]; 9 cases of cystadenocarcinoma (DA, 84%); 6 cases of serous cystadenoma (DA, 100%); 3 cases of solid pseudopapillary tumor (DA, 100%); and 4 cases of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (DA, 100%). 3D reconstructions of CT images were generated and, in the 4 cases of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm, the tumor was connected to the main pancreatic duct and multiple mural nodules were detected in one of these cases. The DA of the 3D-reconstructed images of cystic pancreatic tumors was 89.3%. The 64-slice spiral CT and 3D-reconstructed CT images facilitated the visualization of cystic pancreatic tumor characteristics, in particular the connections between the tumor and the main pancreatic duct. In conclusion, the 3D reconstruction of multi-slice CT data may provide an important source of information for the surgical team, in combination with the available clinical data. PMID:27073473

  19. Expression of KIT (CD117) in neoplasms of the head and neck: an ancillary marker for adenoid cystic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mino, M; Pilch, B Z; Faquin, W C

    2003-12-01

    Adenoid cystic carcinoma is an indolent salivary gland malignancy that is associated with a poor long-term prognosis. The distinction of adenoid cystic carcinoma from other head and neck neoplasms can occasionally be problematic, particularly in small biopsies. Recent studies suggest that KIT (CD117) might be useful as an ancillary marker for adenoid cystic carcinoma; however, the expression of KIT in other benign and malignant head and neck neoplasms, including those that might mimic adenoid cystic carcinoma, has not been well studied. Here we use two different antibodies against KIT to evaluate its expression in a series of 66 adenoid cystic carcinomas compared with its expression in 98 other neoplasms of the head and neck. Overall, 94% (n = 62) of adenoid cystic carcinomas from various anatomic sites and of various histologic subtypes were positive for at least one of the KIT antibodies, and 77% (n = 50) of adenoid cystic carcinoma cases were positive for both antibodies. This contrasted with only 8% (n = 8) of other head and neck neoplasms that were positive for both KIT antibodies (P <.001). It was of note that certain neoplasms, including pleomorphic adenoma, basal cell adenoma, polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinoma, and basal cell carcinoma, that can show histologic overlap with adenoid cystic carcinoma had significantly less KIT immunoreactivity than did adenoid cystic carcinoma (P <.001). In contrast, KIT expression did not reliably distinguish adenoid cystic carcinoma from basal cell adenocarcinoma and basaloid squamous carcinoma (P >.05). The overall sensitivity of the two KIT antibodies for adenoid cystic carcinoma was 82-89%, and the specificity was 87-88%. The findings in this study support the potential use of KIT immunoexpression for distinguishing adenoid cystic carcinoma from many other benign and malignant head and neck neoplasms.

  20. Pancreatic Cystic Fluid Reference Set — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    The proposed reference set will be designed to evaluate biomarkers for the following applications aimed at determining whether a patient would benefit from surgical resection of their cystic lesion: 1. Distinguish between pancreatic cysts that have high-malignant potential and cysts that have low or no malignant potential at time of endoscopic ultrasound evaluation. a. By analysis of blood b. By analysis of pancreatic cystic fluid 2. Distinguish between cysts that have any malignant potential (high and low) and cysts that have no malignant potential (benign lesions) at time of endoscopic ultrasound evaluation. a. By analysis of blood b. By analysis of pancreatic cystic fluid 3. Distinguish between a cyst that is mucinous (malignant potential) or non-mucinous (no malignant potential) at time of endoscopic ultrasound evaluation. a. By analysis of blood b. By analysis of pancreatic cystic fluid 4. Distinguish between pancreatic cysts that have high-malignant potential and cysts that have low or no malignant potential at time of evaluation in surgery clinic. a. By analysis of blood 5. Distinguish between cysts that have any malignant potential (high and low) and cysts that have no malignant potential (benign lesions) at time of evaluation in surgery clinic. a. By analysis of blood 6. Distinguish between a cyst that is mucinous (malignant potential) or non-mucinous (no malignant potential) at time of evaluation in surgery clinic. a. By analysis of blood If successful in meeting these afore-mentioned objectives, these results can then be used in the development of future studies at identifying the need for additional evaluation (i.e., endoscopic ultrasound with fine needle aspiration) of an incidental cyst

  1. Gastrointestinal, Pancreatic, and Hepatobiliary Manifestations of Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Sathe, Meghana Nitin; Freeman, Alvin Jay

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary disease is the primary cause of morbidity and mortality in people with cystic fibrosis (CF), but significant involvement within gastrointestinal, pancreatic, and hepatobiliary systems occurs as well. As in the airways, defects in CFTR alter epithelial surface fluid, mucus viscosity, and pH, increasing risk of stasis through the various hollow epithelial-lined structures of the gastrointestinal tract. This exerts secondary influences that are responsible for most gastrointestinal, pancreatic, and hepatobiliary manifestations of CF. Understanding these gastrointestinal morbidities of CF is essential in understanding and treating CF as a multisystem disease process and improving overall patient care. PMID:27469182

  2. Multiple small "imaging" branch-duct type intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) in familial pancreatic cancer: indicator for concomitant high grade pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia?

    PubMed

    Bartsch, D K; Dietzel, K; Bargello, M; Matthaei, E; Kloeppel, G; Esposito, I; Heverhagen, J T; Gress, T M; Slater, E P; Langer, P

    2013-03-01

    Most screening programs for familial pancreatic cancer are currently based on endoscopic ultrasonography and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Cystic lesions, especially those suspicious for small intraductal pancreatic mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) of the branch ducts, can be visualized in up to 40 % of individuals at risk, but their pathological importance in the setting of FPC is yet not well established. Individuals at risk from a prospective screening program for familial pancreatic cancer with small "imaging" IPMNs of the branch-duct type (BD-IPMN) who underwent pancreatic resection were analysed regarding clinico-pathological data and the locations of pancreatic lesions. Five of 125 individuals at risk who underwent screening had multiple small (size 2-10 mm) unicystic lesions and/or multicystic single lesions in the pancreatic body and tail suspicious for BD-IPMNs upon MRI imaging and decided to undergo surgical resection after interdisciplinary counselling, although none fulfilled the consensus criteria for IPMN resection. Histological examination revealed BD-IPMNs with low or moderate dysplasia of the gastric type in combination with multifocal PanIN2 and PanIN3 lesions in 4 individuals. The remaining patient had only tiny ductectasias in the pancreatic tail with multifocal PanIN 2 lesions in the entire gland and one PanIN3 lesion in the pancreatic head. Intriguingly, the location of the most dysplastic histological lesions (PanIN3) did not correspond to the preoperatively detected lesions and were not visible in preoperative imaging. In the setting of FPC, the presence of multiple small "imaging" BD-IPMNs may indicate the presence of high-grade PanIN lesions elsewhere in the pancreas.

  3. Cystic lesions of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Karoumpalis, Ioannis; Christodoulou, Dimitrios K.

    2016-01-01

    Different types of benign or malignant cystic lesions can be observed in the pancreas. Pancreatic cystic lesions are classified under pathology terms into simple retention cysts, pseudocysts and cystic neoplasms. Mucinous cystic neoplasm is a frequent type of cystic neoplasm and has a malignant potential. Serous cystadenoma follows in frequency and is usually benign. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms are the most commonly resected cystic pancreatic neoplasms characterized by dilated segments of the main pancreatic duct and/or side branches, the wall of which is covered by mucus secreting cells. These neoplasms can occupy the pancreatic head or any part of the organ. Solid pseudopapillary tumor is rare, has a low tendency for malignancy, and is usually located in the pancreatic body or tail. Endoscopic ultrasound with the use of fine-needle aspiration and cytology permits discrimination of those lesions. In this review, the main characteristics of those lesions are presented, as well as recommendations regarding their follow up and management according to recent guidelines. PMID:27065727

  4. Mucinous cystic neoplasm of the liver with low grade dysplasia of the liver.

    PubMed

    Pirdopska, T; Terziev, I; Taneva, I; Dimitrova, V

    2014-01-01

    Mucinous cystic neoplasm (MCN) with low grade dysplasia of the liver is rare. It had been previously called hepatobiliary cystadenoma and is seen almost exclusively in women without an associated invasive carcinoma. There are different theories for development of MCN of the liver. One of these is developing from endodermal immature stroma or primary yolk cells implanted during embryogenesis. Another theory refers to the prevalence of hepatic mucinous cystic neoplasm in segment IV, which may support an implant origin because hamartomatous lesions commonly develop in segment IV. The third theory concerns the expression of oestrogen receptor or progesterone receptor in ovarian-like stroma, which also supports a putative role for female hormones in the tumorogenesis. MCN of the liver is a cystic-forming epithelial neoplasm, usually showing no communication with the bile ducts, composed of cuboidal to columnar, variably mucin-producing epithelium, associated with ovarian-type subepithelial stroma. We present a case of MCN with low grade dysplasia of the liver in a young woman whose working surgical diagnosis was Echinococcus cyst. The MCN diagnosis was confirmed with Immunohistochemical study.

  5. Adenoid cystic carcinoma of the upper trachea: a rare neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Binoy Kumar; Barman, Geetanjali; Singh, Shobhit; Ahmed, Kuddush

    2013-01-01

    Primary malignant tracheal tumors are not common and adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) of trachea is rare. We report an extremely rare case of ACC of proximal trachea, which was diagnosed in a 42-year-old male who presents with 6-month history of dyspnea. Lateral skiagram of neck, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a broad-based polypoidal soft tissue mass arising from posterior wall of the proximal trachea. Biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of ACC. The patient was treated by surgical resection followed by radiotherapy and is on regular follow-up. Follow-up at 18 months post-treatment showed no local recurrence or distant metastases. The literature on tracheal ACC is reviewed. Image findings are briefly discussed. PMID:24228208

  6. Acute pancreatitis: pancreas divisum with ventral duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Gurram, Krishna C; Czapla, Agata; Thakkar, Shyam

    2014-10-07

    Acute recurrent pancreatitis occurs rarely in individuals with pancreas divisum. A 39-year-old woman with no significant history presented with pancreatitis. CT scan and MRI suggested acute on chronic pancreatitis with calcifications and pancreatic divisum. An endoscopic ultrasound demonstrated complete pancreas divisum. A large calcification measuring 12 mm × 6 mm was seen in the head of the pancreas with associated dilation of the ventral pancreatic duct. Fine-needle aspiration of the dilated ventral pancreatic duct showed an amylase level of 36,923 U/L and a carcinoembryonic antigen of 194. A ventral duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm was suspected and a pancreaticoduodenectomy procedure was recommended. After the procedure, pathology demonstrated an intraductal papillary lesion in the main duct with moderate dysplasia. A pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia, grade 2 was also present. Margins of resection were clear. This case represents the importance of assessing for secondary causes of pancreatitis in pancreas divisum.

  7. Acute pancreatitis: pancreas divisum with ventral duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Gurram, Krishna C; Czapla, Agata; Thakkar, Shyam

    2014-01-01

    Acute recurrent pancreatitis occurs rarely in individuals with pancreas divisum. A 39-year-old woman with no significant history presented with pancreatitis. CT scan and MRI suggested acute on chronic pancreatitis with calcifications and pancreatic divisum. An endoscopic ultrasound demonstrated complete pancreas divisum. A large calcification measuring 12 mm × 6 mm was seen in the head of the pancreas with associated dilation of the ventral pancreatic duct. Fine-needle aspiration of the dilated ventral pancreatic duct showed an amylase level of 36 923 U/L and a carcinoembryonic antigen of 194. A ventral duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm was suspected and a pancreaticoduodenectomy procedure was recommended. After the procedure, pathology demonstrated an intraductal papillary lesion in the main duct with moderate dysplasia. A pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia, grade 2 was also present. Margins of resection were clear. This case represents the importance of assessing for secondary causes of pancreatitis in pancreas divisum. PMID:25293684

  8. Multiphoton microscopy as a diagnostic imaging modality for pancreatic neoplasms without hematoxylin and eosin stains.

    PubMed

    Chen, Youting; Chen, Jing; Chen, Hong; Hong, Zhipeng; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Yanling; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-09-01

    Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining of tissue samples is the standard approach in histopathology for imaging and diagnosing cancer. Recent reports have shown that multiphoton microscopy (MPM) provides better sample interface with single-cell resolution, which enhances traditional H&E staining and offers a powerful diagnostic tool with potential applications in oncology. The purpose of this study was to further expand the versatility of MPM by establishing the optical parameters required for imaging unstained histological sections of pancreatic neoplasms, thereby providing an efficient and environmentally sustainable alternative to H&E staining while improving the accuracy of pancreatic cancer diagnoses. We found that the high-resolution MPM images clearly distinguish between the structure of normal pancreatic tissues compared with pancreatic neoplasms in unstained histological sections, and discernable differences in tissue architecture and cell morphology between normal versus tumorigenic cells led to enhanced optical diagnosis of cancerous tissue. Moreover, quantitative assessment of the cytomorphological features visualized from MPM images showed significant differences in the nuclear–cytoplasmic ratios of pancreatic neoplasms compared with normal pancreas, as well as further distinguished pancreatic malignant tumors from benign tumors. These results indicate that the MPM could potentially serve as an optical tool for the diagnosis of pancreatic neoplasms in unstained histological sections.

  9. Multiphoton microscopy as a diagnostic imaging modality for pancreatic neoplasms without hematoxylin and eosin stains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Youting; Chen, Jing; Chen, Hong; Hong, Zhipeng; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Yanling; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-09-01

    Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining of tissue samples is the standard approach in histopathology for imaging and diagnosing cancer. Recent reports have shown that multiphoton microscopy (MPM) provides better sample interface with single-cell resolution, which enhances traditional H&E staining and offers a powerful diagnostic tool with potential applications in oncology. The purpose of this study was to further expand the versatility of MPM by establishing the optical parameters required for imaging unstained histological sections of pancreatic neoplasms, thereby providing an efficient and environmentally sustainable alternative to H&E staining while improving the accuracy of pancreatic cancer diagnoses. We found that the high-resolution MPM images clearly distinguish between the structure of normal pancreatic tissues compared with pancreatic neoplasms in unstained histological sections, and discernable differences in tissue architecture and cell morphology between normal versus tumorigenic cells led to enhanced optical diagnosis of cancerous tissue. Moreover, quantitative assessment of the cytomorphological features visualized from MPM images showed significant differences in the nuclear-cytoplasmic ratios of pancreatic neoplasms compared with normal pancreas, as well as further distinguished pancreatic malignant tumors from benign tumors. These results indicate that the MPM could potentially serve as an optical tool for the diagnosis of pancreatic neoplasms in unstained histological sections.

  10. Adjuvant Chemoradiotherapy After Pancreatic Resection for Invasive Carcinoma Associated With Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm of the Pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, Michael J.; Hsu, Charles C.; Pawlik, Timothy M.; Winter, Jordan; Hruban, Ralph H.; Guler, Mehmet; Schulick, Richard D.; Cameron, John L.; Laheru, Daniel A.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Herman, Joseph M.

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms are mucin-producing cystic neoplasms of the pancreas. One-third are associated with invasive carcinoma. We examined the benefit of adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for this cohort. Methods and Materials: Patients who had undergone pancreatic resection at Johns Hopkins Hospital between 1999 and 2004 were reviewed. Of these patients, 83 with a resected pancreatic mass were found to have an intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm with invasive carcinoma, 70 of whom met inclusion criteria for the present analysis. Results: The median age at surgery was 68 years. The median tumor size was 3.3 cm, and invasive carcinoma was present at the margin in 16% of the patients. Of the 70 patients, 50% had metastases to the lymph nodes and 64% had Stage II disease. The median survival was 28.0 months, and 2- and 5-year survival rate was 57% and 45%, respectively. Of the 70 patients, 40 had undergone adjuvant CRT. Those receiving CRT were more likely to have lymph node metastases, perineural invasion, and Stage II-III disease. The 2-year survival rate after surgery with vs. without CRT was 55.8% vs. 59.3%, respectively (p = NS). Patients with lymph node metastases or positive surgical margins benefited significantly from CRT (p = .047 and p = .042, respectively). On multivariate analysis, adjuvant CRT was associated with improved survival, with a relative risk of 0.43 (95% confidence interval, 0.19-0.95; p = .044) after adjusting for major confounders. Conclusion: Adjuvant CRT conferred a 57% decrease in the relative risk of mortality after pancreaticoduodenectomy for intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms with an associated invasive component after adjusting for major confounders. Patients with lymph node metastases or positive margins appeared to particularly benefit from CRT after definitive surgery.

  11. A case of papillary-cystic epithelial neoplasm of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Alm, P; Jönsson, P E; Karp, W; Lindberg, L G; Stenram, U; Sundler, F

    1981-03-01

    A 16-year-old girl presented with a left-sided abdominal mass. X-ray examination and computed tomography disclosed a well-defined tumor close to the tail of the pancreas, stretching the pancreatic branches from the splenic artery as demonstrated by arteriography. Ultrasonography suggested a partly cystic character. Cytologic fine-needle biopsy, histopathological and electron microscopical examination disclosed a cysto-papillary tumor, probably benign, and of an exocrine, ductular origin, and with pseudo-cystic areas similar to those found in adenoid cystic carcinoma of salivary glands. Immunohistochemistry did not demonstrate the presence of polypeptide hormones. The patient is without signs of tumor recurrence 18 months after operation.

  12. Low interobserver agreement in cytology grading of mucinous pancreatic neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Sigel, Carlie; Edelweiss, Marcia; Tong, Leung Chu; Magda, Joanna; Oen, Handy; Sigel, Keith; Zakowski, Maureen

    2015-01-01

    Background Identifying high grade features in pancreatic mucinous neoplasms (MN) is important for patient management. It is not clear if MNs can be graded with reproducibility in routine practice. We evaluated interobserver variability in grading MNs and identification of neoplastic mucin in endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspirations (EUS-FNA). Methods We created a 54 case grading set from histologically confirmed MNs (N=44) and nonmucinous lesions (NML) with abundant gastrointestinal contamination (N=10). Six observers received a tutorial, reviewed pre-screened slides, and recorded: 1) a diagnosis according to a 6-tiered system (TS) (nondiagnostic (NDX), atypical (ATP), mucinous cyst low grade (LG), mucinous cyst high grade (HG), suspicious for adenocarcinoma (SSPA), positive for adenocarcinoma (PA)); 2) a diagnosis with cyst fluid CEA (CEADX); and 3) the presence of neoplastic mucin. Interobserver agreement (IOA ) was evaluated by calculation of Kappa coefficients. Diagnostic accuracy was not evaluated. Results IOA was lowest for 6-TS (K=0.13, P<.001). CEADX was available for 18 (33%) cases, including 6/24 (25%) of LG. CEADX modestly improved IOA for combined tiers of the 6-TS with ATP and LG as separate categories. The highest IOA was with a 3-TS (NDX, ATP/LG, HG/SSPA/PA; K=0.28, P<.001) and various 4-TS (K=0.22-0.23). IOA was low for neoplastic mucin (K=0.15, P<.001). Conclusions In a study using simulated cytology practice, observers showed fair IOA for grading MNs and low IOA for identifying neoplastic mucin. Knowledge of cyst fluid CEA level modestly improved IOA for low grade lesions. PMID:25355052

  13. Pancreatic Candidiasis That Mimics a Malignant Pancreatic Cystic Tumor on Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Case Report in an Immunocompetent Patient.

    PubMed

    Seong, Minjung; Kang, Tae Wook; Ha, Sang Yun

    2015-01-01

    Candida is a commensal organism that is frequently found in the human gastrointestinal tract. It is the most common organism that causes pancreatic fungal infections. However, magnetic resonance imaging findings of Candida infection in the pancreas have not been described. We report imaging findings of pancreatic candidiasis in a patient in immunocompetent condition. It presented as a multi-septated cystic mass with a peripheral solid component in the background of pancreatitis and restricted diffusion on diffusion-weighted image that mimicked a malignant pancreatic cystic tumor.

  14. Cystic nephroma/mixed epithelial stromal tumor: a benign neoplasm with potential for recurrence.

    PubMed

    Sun, Belinda L; Abern, Michael; Garzon, Steven; Setty, Suman

    2015-05-01

    Cystic nephroma (CN) is a rare, benign, renal neoplasm composed of epithelial and stromal elements. Only about 200 cases have been reported since 1892 and recurrence has rarely been observed. We report a 32-year-old Hispanic woman, with a history of a right, complex cystic, renal mass treated by robotic decortication 2 years ago, who presented with flank pain, hematuria, and recurrent urinary tract infection. A magnetic resonance imaging study showed a 3.4-cm multicystic lesion with thickened septa and enhancement at the right kidney. The partial nephrectomy specimen revealed a well-circumscribed, multicystic tumor abutting the renal pelvis, with thick septa and smooth walls, filled with clear fluid. Microscopic examination showed variably sized cysts lined by cuboidal epithelium with focal hobnailing, without significant cytologic atypia and mitosis. The epithelial lining was positive for CK19, high molecular weight cytokeratin, and α-methylacyl-CoA racemase suggesting a primitive tubular epithelial phenotype. Primitive glomeruli-like structures were also present. The ovarian-like stroma was condensed around the cysts and was variably cellular with areas of muscle differentiation and thick-walled vessels. The stroma was positive for desmin, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and CD10. We suggest that CN represents a variable mixture of epithelial and stromal elements, immature glomerular, tubular, muscle, and vascular elements, which may be present in variable proportions creating a spectrum of lesions previously described as CN and mixed epithelial and stromal tumors (MEST). This case emphasizes that CN/MEST clinically/radiologically mimics other cystic renal neoplasms, especially cystic renal cell carcinoma and tubulocystic carcinoma, necessitating histopathological examination and immunohistochemial studies for definitive diagnosis. Additionally, CN has the tendency to recur when not completely excised initially. PMID:25525149

  15. The oncocytic subtype is genetically distinct from other pancreatic intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm subtypes.

    PubMed

    Basturk, Olca; Tan, Marcus; Bhanot, Umesh; Allen, Peter; Adsay, Volkan; Scott, Sasinya N; Shah, Ronak; Berger, Michael F; Askan, Gokce; Dikoglu, Esra; Jobanputra, Vaidehi; Wrzeszczynski, Kazimierz O; Sigel, Carlie; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine; Klimstra, David S

    2016-09-01

    In 2010, the World Health Organization reclassified the entity originally described as intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasm as the 'oncocytic subtype' of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm. Although several key molecular alterations of other intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm subtypes have been discovered, including common mutations in KRAS, GNAS, and RNF3, those of oncocytic subtype have not been well characterized. We analyzed 11 pancreatic 'oncocytic subtype' of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms. Nine pancreatic 'oncocytic subtype' of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms uniformly exhibited typical entity-defining morphology of arborizing papillae lined by layers of cells with oncocytic cytoplasm, prominent, nucleoli, and intraepithelial lumina. The remaining two were atypical. One lacked the arborizing papilla and had flat oncocytic epithelium only; the other one had focal oncocytic epithelium in a background of predominantly intestinal subtype intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm. Different components of this case were analyzed separately. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded specimens of all cases were microdissected and subjected to high-depth-targeted next-generation sequencing for a panel of 300 key cancer-associated genes in a platform that enabled the identification of sequence mutations, copy number alterations, and select structural rearrangements involving all targeted genes. Fresh frozen specimens of two cases were also subjected to whole-genome sequencing. For the nine typical pancreatic 'oncocytic subtype' of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, the number of mutations per case, identified by next-generation sequencing, ranged from 1 to 10 (median=4). None of these cases had KRAS or GNAS mutations and only one had both RNF43 and PIK3R1 mutations. ARHGAP26, ASXL1, EPHA8, and ERBB4 genes were somatically altered in more than one of these typical 'oncocytic subtype' of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms but not in

  16. Safety and Efficacy of EUS-Guided Ethanol Ablation for Treating Small Solid Pancreatic Neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Paik, Woo Hyun; Seo, Dong Wan; Dhir, Vinay; Wang, Hsiu-Po

    2016-01-01

    The strategy for treating small borderline malignant pancreatic neoplasms--such as neuroendocrine tumor (NET) and solid pseudopapillary neoplasm (SPN)--is surgical resection. However, pancreatic resection of these lesions still causes significant morbidity. We evaluated the safety and efficacy of EUS-guided ethanol ablation to treat small solid pancreatic neoplasms. A total of 8 patients with small borderline malignant pancreatic neoplasms and co-morbidities who refused surgery were included. We identified 2 cases of nonfunctioning NET, 3 cases of insulinomas, 1 case of gastrinoma, and 2 cases of SPN. EUS-guided ethanol ablation was performed, and treatment outcomes were assessed with clinical symptom, hormone assay, and imaging study. The mean tumor diameter was 15  mm (range, 7-29  mm), and the median volume of injected ethanol was 2.8  mL (range, 1.2-10.5  mL). There was 1 severe acute pancreatitis after EUS-guided ethanol ablation with 20-gauge CPN needle. During follow-up (median 16.5 months), 6 patients achieved treatment success; however, 2 patients (1 nonfunctioning NET and 1 SPN) still had persistent tumors. The patient with persistent SPN underwent surgical resection and the histopathological results showed peripancreatic infiltration with perineural invasion. Among 6 patients who achieved initial treatment success, 1 patient experienced tumor recurrence within 15 months and underwent repeated EUS-guided ethanol ablation. In conclusion, EUS-guided ethanol ablation therapy is a promising option for patients with small solid pancreatic neoplasm. Multiple sessions or surgical interventions may be required if there is a recurrent or persistent mass, and procedure-related adverse events must be carefully monitored.

  17. Successful Control of Liver Metastases From Pancreatic Solid-Pseudopapillary Neoplasm (SPN) Using Hepatic Arterial Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Violari, Elena G. Brody, Lynn A.; Covey, Anne M.; Erinjeri, Joseph P.; Getrajdman, George I.; Sofocleous, Constantinos T.; Reidy, Diane L.; Jarnagin, William R.; Brown, Karen T.

    2015-04-15

    No systemic agents that are known to be effective for the treatment of solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm (SPN) are available. We report the prolonged and sustained control of metastatic pancreatic SPN to the liver using hepatic arterial embolization (HAE), where a total of 13 HAE sessions were performed over a 6-year period.

  18. Retroperitoneal bronchogenic cyst as a differential diagnosis of pancreatic mucinous cystic tumor.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Roland; Lindell, Gert; Cwikiel, Wojciech; Dawiskiba, Sigmund

    2003-01-01

    Cystic tumors of the pancreas where a pseudocyst has not been able to be excluded has been considered potentially proliferative and pre-malignant or malignant and thus aggressive surgical approach has been advocated. Retroperitoneal cystic tumors are rare and among these bronchogenic cysts are extremely infrequent. The present paper describes a case of bronchogenic cyst in association with the pancreas in which diagnostic work-up was not able to exclude a proliferative pancreatic cystic tumor.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of cystic pancreatic lesions in adults: an update in current diagnostic features and management.

    PubMed

    Barral, Matthias; Soyer, Philippe; Dohan, Anthony; Laurent, Valérie; Hoeffel, Christine; Fishman, Elliot K; Boudiaf, Mourad

    2014-02-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has become a widespread diagnostic solving tool for the detection and characterization of a large range of pancreatic cystic lesions. Benign and malignant cystic lesions of the pancreas including serous microcystic adenoma, mucinous cystic tumor, intraductal papillary mucinous tumor, solid pseudopapillary tumor, and also the less common lesions such as cystic endocrine tumors, cystic metastases, and lymphangiomas have suggestive MR imaging presentation that allows them to be differentiated from each other. Knowledge of MR imaging findings of cystic pancreatic lesions is critical to help suggest the diagnosis and chose the best therapeutic approach. The purpose of this review is to discuss and illustrate MR imaging features that are helpful for pancreatic cystic lesion detection and characterization and to provide an update in current MR imaging diagnostic features and management. PMID:24263208

  20. Benign retroperitoneal schwannoma mimicking a pancreatic cystic tumor: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, W C; Lin, P W; Chang, K C

    1998-01-01

    A rare case of benign retroperitoneal schwannoma mimicking a pancreatic cystic tumor is reported herein. The tumor mass, based on a computed tomography scan and an abdominal echo examination, was initially suspected to be a mucinous cystadenoma or cystadenocarcinoma of the pancreas. However, the surgical and pathohistological findings made a final diagnosis of benign pancreatic schwannoma. The patient is doing well at a 2-year follow-up. The tumor, 18x17x15 cm in size, represented the largest among reported pancreatic schwannomas. Furthermore, a comprehensive review of reported cases of pancreatic schwannoma was carried out to summarize corresponding findings, including benign or malignant forms, adherence to other tissues, cystic change of the tumor, as well as relation to von Recklinghausen's neurofibromatosis.

  1. The safety of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration of pancreatic cystic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Won Jae; Brugge, William R.

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is widely used in the evaluation of various pancreatic diseases including pancreatic cystic lesions (PCLs). EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) of PCLs provides cyst fluid, which is used for the differentiation of PCLs. EUS-FNA of PCLs is a safe procedure with a low complication rate. Contrary to the concerns expressed by some investigators, preoperative EUS-FNA of mucinous PCLs is unlikely to increase the frequency of postoperative peritoneal seeding. PMID:26643695

  2. European experts consensus statement on cystic tumours of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Del Chiaro, Marco; Verbeke, Caroline; Salvia, Roberto; Klöppel, Gunter; Werner, Jens; McKay, Colin; Friess, Helmut; Manfredi, Riccardo; Van Cutsem, Eric; Löhr, Matthias; Segersvärd, Ralf

    2013-09-01

    Cystic lesions of the pancreas are increasingly recognized. While some lesions show benign behaviour (serous cystic neoplasm), others have an unequivocal malignant potential (mucinous cystic neoplasm, branch- and main duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm and solid pseudo-papillary neoplasm). European expert pancreatologists provide updated recommendations: diagnostic computerized tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging are indicated in all patients with cystic lesion of the pancreas. Endoscopic ultrasound with cyst fluid analysis may be used but there is no evidence to suggest this as a routine diagnostic method. The role of pancreatoscopy remains to be established. Resection should be considered in all symptomatic lesions, in mucinous cystic neoplasm, main duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm and solid pseudo-papillary neoplasm as well as in branch duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm with mural nodules, dilated main pancreatic duct >6mm and possibly if rapidly increasing in size. An oncological partial resection should be performed in main duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm and in lesions with a suspicion of malignancy, otherwise organ preserving procedures may be considered. Frozen section of the transection margin in intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm is suggested. Follow up after resection is recommended for intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm, solid pseudo-papillary neoplasm and invasive cancer.

  3. Long-term experience with ZENPEP in infants with exocrine pancreatic insufficiency associated with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Wooldridge, Jamie L; Schaeffer, David; Jacobs, David; Thieroff-Ekerdt, Ruth

    2014-11-01

    The objective of our study was to determine whether infants with cystic fibrosis who developed exocrine pancreatic insufficiency in early infancy would tolerate long-term treatment with ZENPEP (pancrelipase) delayed-release capsules, containing 3000 US Pharmacopeia units of lipase/capsule, and demonstrate consistent long-term growth. The most common treatment-emergent adverse events were diarrhea, vomiting, and constipation (mild or moderate). At study completion, median weight-for-age percentiles increased from 22nd to 49th, median length-for-age percentiles increased from 36.5th to 42nd, and median weight-for-length percentiles increased from 41.5th to 55.5th. Long-term treatment (up to 12 months) of infants with exocrine pancreatic insufficiency owing to cystic fibrosis with ZENPEP was well tolerated and associated with improved growth parameters. This is the first long-term study of pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy conducted in this patient population.

  4. Gli2 protein expression level is a feasible marker of ligand-dependent hedgehog activation in pancreatic neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Y; Sasajima, J; Mizukami, Y; Koizumi, K; Kawamoto, T; Ono, Y; Karasaki, H; Tanabe, H; Fujiya, M; Kohgo, Y

    2016-06-01

    The hedgehog pathway is known to promote proliferation of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) and has been shown to restrain tumor progression. To understand how hedgehog causes these effects, we sought to carefully examine protein expression of hedgehog signaling components during different tumor stages. Genetically engineered mice, Pdx1-Cre;LSL-KrasG12D and Pdx1-Cre;LSL-KrasG12D;p53lox/+, were utilized to model distinct phases of tumorigenesis, pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasm (PanIN) and PDA. Human pancreatic specimens of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) and PDA were also employed. PanIN and IPMN lesions highly express Sonic Hedgehog, at a level that is slightly higher than that observed in PDA. GLI2 protein is also expressed in both PanIN/IPMN and PDA. Although there was no difference in the nuclear staining, the cytoplasmic GLI2 level in PDA was modest in comparison to that in PanIN/IPMN. Hedgehog interacting protein was strongly expressed in the precursors, whereas the level in PDA was significantly attenuated. There were no differences in expression of Patched1 at early and late stages. Finally, a strong correlation between Sonic Hedgehog and GLI2 staining was found in both human and murine pancreatic tumors. The results indicate that the GLI2 protein level could serve as a feasible marker of ligand-dependent hedgehog activation in pancreatic neoplasms. PMID:27543868

  5. Surgical therapy of a large pancreatic solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, Frank; Keough, Valerie; Huang, Weei-Yuan; Molinari, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Solid-pseudopapillary neoplasms (SPNs) of the exocrine pancreas are rare, accounting for only 2% of pancreatic tumours. These tumours predominantly affect women during the second and third decades of life. They frequently present with vague symptoms and can pose a diagnostic challenge. Surgical resection remains the treatment of choice that can cure up to 95% of patients when negative resection margins are obtained. SPNs diagnosed during pregnancy are exceptional and with profound implications on the mother and fetus. The authors present a case of an asymptomatic SPN in a 24-year-old woman diagnosed at 14 weeks of gestation on a routine prenatal ultrasound. Distal pancreatectomy, splenectomy and cholecystectomy were successfully performed at 18 weeks of gestation. A healthy full-term male child was born 5 months following surgery without complications. PMID:24445849

  6. Blood concentrations of pancreatitis associated protein in neonates: relevance to neonatal screening for cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Sarles, J.; Barthellemy, S.; Ferec, C.; Iovanna, J.; Roussey, M.; Farriaux, J.; Toutain, A.; Berthelot, J.; Maurin, N.; Codet, J.; Berthezene, P.; Dagorn, J.

    1999-01-01

    AIM—To determine whether pancreatitis associated protein (PAP) is a marker for cystic fibrosis which could be used in neonatal screening for the disease.
METHODS—PAP was assayed on screening cards from 202 807 neonates. Babies with PAP ⩾ 15 ng/ml, or ⩾ 11.5 ng/ml and immunoreactive trypsinogen (IRT) ⩾ 700 ng/ml were recalled for clinical examination, sweat testing, and cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene analysis.
RESULTS—Median PAP value was 2.8 ng/ml. Forty four cases of cystic fibrosis were recorded. Recalled neonates (n=398) included only 11 carriers. A receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that PAP above 8.0 ng/ml would select 0.76% of babies, including all those with cystic fibrosis, except for one with meconium ileus and two with mild CFTR mutations. Screening 27146 babies with both PAP and IRT showed that only 0.12% had PAP> 8.0 ng/ml and IRT > 700 ng/ml, including all cases of cystic fibrosis.
CONCLUSION—PAP is increased in most neonates with cystic fibrosis and could be used for CF screening. Its combination with IRT looks promising.

 PMID:10325788

  7. Nonepithelial Neoplasms of the Pancreas: Radiologic-Pathologic Correlation, Part 1--Benign Tumors: From the Radiologic Pathology Archives.

    PubMed

    Manning, Maria A; Srivastava, Amogh; Paal, Edina E; Gould, Charles F; Mortele, Koenraad J

    2016-01-01

    Solid and cystic pancreatic neoplasms are being recognized more frequently with increasing utilization and spatial resolution of modern imaging techniques. In addition to the more common primary pancreatic solid (ductal adenocarcinoma) and cystic neoplasms of epithelial origin, nonepithelial neoplasms of the pancreas may appear as well-defined solid or cystic neoplasms. Most of these lesions have characteristic imaging features, such as a well-defined border, which allows differentiation from ductal adenocarcinoma. Solid masses include neurofibroma, ganglioneuroma, leiomyoma, lipoma, and perivascular epithelioid cell tumor (PEComa). Schwannomas and desmoid tumors can be solid or cystic. Cystic tumors include mature cystic teratoma and lymphangioma. Lipoma, PEComa, and mature cystic teratoma can contain fat, and ganglioneuroma and mature cystic teratoma may contain calcification. Although these unusual benign neoplasms are rare, the radiologist should at least consider them in the differential diagnosis of well-defined lesions of the pancreas. The goal of this comprehensive review is to improve understanding of these rare primary pancreatic mesenchymal tumors. PMID:26761535

  8. Giant mucinous cystic adenoma with pancreatic atrophy mimicking dorsal agenesis of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Gagnière, Johan; Dupré, Aurélien; Ines, David Da; Tixier, Lucie; Pezet, Denis; Buc, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Mucinous cystic adenoma (MCA) of the pancreas is a rare benign cystic tumor with ovarian-like stroma and lack of communication with the pancreatic ductal system. The ovarian tissue is incorporated from the left gonad within the dorsal pancreas during embryogenesis. Consequently, congenital dorsal agenesis of the pancreas (DAP) cannot be associated with MCA. We report the case of a giant MCA associated with atrophy of the dorsal pancreas mimicking complete DAP. Pancreato-magnetic resonance imaging failed to identify the dorsal pancreas but the absence of diabetes mellitus and compression of the splenic vein with major tributaries rectified the diagnosis of secondary atrophy of the distal pancreas. Unusual proximal location of the cyst in the pancreas may have induced chronic obstruction of both the dorsal pancreatic duct and the splenic vein, with secondary atrophy of the distal pancreas. PMID:24672649

  9. [Cystic tumors of the pancreas - - our experience with diagnostics].

    PubMed

    Krechler, T; Ulrych, J; Dvořák, M; Hoskovec, D; Macášek, J; Švestka, T; Hořejš, J

    2013-07-01

    Number of newly diagnosed cystic pancreatic tumors is permanently increasing. This fact is primarily related to the development of new diagnostic methods. The main representative ones are: serous cystadenoma, mucinous cystic neoplasm, intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm and solid pseudopapillar tumor. Because of the malignant potential of these lesions, proper indication of surgical treatment is extremely important. The article highlights and describes our experience in diagnostics and therapy of cystic pancreatic tumors diagnosed in the General Teaching Hospital Prague in the period: 1/ 2008- 12/ 2012. All patients were investigated by computerised tomography and endoscopic ultrasound with fine -  needle aspiration biopsy. Thirty seven patients in total were diagnosed with cystic pancreatic tumors: 19 with serous cystadenoma, 5 with mucinous cystic neoplasm, 5 with mucinous cystadenocarcinoma, 5 with intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm and 3 with solid pseudopapillar tumor. In 14 cases patients were indicated for surgery, in 1 case signs of malignant transformation were found. Determination of the optimal strategy for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in patients with cystic pancreatic tumors requires the dia-gnosis, treatment and followup observation in adequately equiped specialized centers. PMID:23909261

  10. Ductal branch-oriented pancreatic resection for an intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm in the uncinate process that caused recurrent acute pancreatitis: a case report of successful treatment.

    PubMed

    Natsume, Toshiyuki; Maruyama, Takashi; Kobayashi, Akitoshi; Shimizu, Shinichiro; Tanaka, Hajime; Matsuzaki, Hiroshi; Miyazaki, Akinari; Ohta, Takumi; Sato, Yayoi; Yamamoto, Yuji; Aikawa, Mizuho; Otsuka, Ryota; Yanagihara, Akitoshi

    2013-12-01

    Acute pancreatitis reportedly occurs in about 15 % of cases of branch duct (BD)-intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs), with two-thirds of BD-IPMNs being located in the head or uncinate process of the pancreas. However, the surgical indications and optimal treatment methods for BD-IPMNs have not been established. A 59-year-old Japanese male with epigastralgia was admitted to our hospital. A multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT) scan disclosed grade I acute pancreatitis. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography disclosed a 1.5-cm BD-IPMN in the uncinate process. Two months after discharge, the epigastralgia recurred, and MDCT again revealed grade I pancreatitis. Due to the repeated episodes of pancreatitis, we performed ductal branch-oriented pancreatic resection. To detect the inferior branch of the Wirsung duct and avoid the development of a pancreatic fistula, we injected indigo carmine into the tumor which confirmed ligation of the inferior branch. Histopathologically, the tumor proved to be an adenoma. The postoperative course was uneventful in both the short- and long-term follow-up and, to date, there has been no recurrence of pancreatitis, or diabetes mellitus during the 6 years since pancreatectomy. This procedure is one of the methods that can be used for the successful resection of a BD-IPMN in the uncinate process that caused recurrent acute pancreatitis.

  11. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Gene Mutations and Risk for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    McWilliams, Robert R.; Petersen, Gloria M.; Rabe, Kari G.; Holtegaard, Leonard M.; Lynch, Pamela J.; Bishop, Michele D.; Highsmith, W. Edward

    2009-01-01

    Background Mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene are common in white persons and are associated with pancreatic disease. The purpose of this case-control study was to determine whether CFTR mutations confer a higher risk of pancreatic cancer. Methods In a case-control study, we compared the rates of 39 common cystic fibrosis–associated CFTR mutations between 949 white patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma and 13,340 white controls from a clinical laboratory database for prenatal testing for CFTR mutations. The main outcome measure was the CFTR mutation frequency in patients and controls. Results Overall, 50 (5.3%) of 949 patients with pancreatic cancer carried a common CFTR mutation versus 510 (3.8%) of 13,340 controls (odds ratio, 1.40; 95% confidence interval, 1.04–1.89; P=.027). Among patients who were younger when their disease was diagnosed (<60 years), the carrier frequency was higher than in controls (odds ratio, 1.82; 95% CI, 1.14–2.94; P=.011). In patient-only analyses, the presence of a mutation was associated with younger age (median 62 vs 67 years; P=.034). In subgroups, the difference was seen only among ever-smokers, (60 vs 65 years, p=.028). Subsequent sequencing analysis of the CFTR gene detected 8 (16%) compound heterozygotes among the 50 patients initially detected to have 1 mutation. Conclusions Carrying a disease-associated mutation in CFTR is associated with a modest increase in risk for pancreatic cancer. Those affected appear to be diagnosed at a younger age, especially among smokers. Clinical evidence of antecedent pancreatitis was uncommon among both carriers and noncarriers of CFTR mutations. PMID:19885835

  12. Laparoscopic resection of an adrenal pseudocyst mimicking a retroperitoneal mucinous cystic neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bum-Soo; Joo, Sun-Hyung; Choi, Sung-Il; Song, Jeong-Yoon

    2009-06-21

    Adrenal pseudocysts are rare cystic masses that arise within the adrenal gland and are usually non-functional and asymptomatic. Adrenal pseudocysts consist of a fibrous wall without a cellular lining. We report a patient with a 9 cm, left-sided suprarenal cystic mass who presented with abdominal discomfort of 2 years' duration. A 38-year-old woman was referred to our service for evaluation of abdominal discomfort and gastrointestinal symptoms. Routine laboratory tests were within normal limits. An abdominal computed tomography scan showed a 9 cm x 8 cm x 8 cm well-defined cystic lesion displacing the left kidney. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a cystic lesion with low signal intensity on the T1-weighted image and high signal intensity on the T2-weighted image. A laparoscopic left adrenalectomy was performed to diagnose the lesion. The final pathology showed an adrenal pseudocyst without a cellular lining. The patient had no postoperative complications and she was discharged four days after surgery.

  13. Nab-paclitaxel and Gemcitabine vs Gemcitabine Alone as Adjuvant Therapy for Patients With Resected Pancreatic Cancer (the "Apact" Study)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-24

    Pancreatic Neoplasms; Digestive System Neoplasms; Neoplasms by Site; Neoplasms; Endocrine Gland Neoplasms; Pancreatic Diseases; Digestive System Diseases; Endocrine System Diseases; Gemcitabine; Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic

  14. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor and solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm: Key immunohistochemical profiles for differential diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Ohara, Yusuke; Oda, Tatsuya; Hashimoto, Shinji; Akashi, Yoshimasa; Miyamoto, Ryoichi; Enomoto, Tsuyoshi; Satomi, Kaishi; Morishita, Yukio; Ohkohchi, Nobuhiro

    2016-01-01

    AIM To reveal better diagnostic markers for differentiating neuroendocrine tumor (NET) from solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm (SPN), focusing primarily on immunohistochemical analysis. METHODS We reviewed 30 pancreatic surgical specimens of NET (24 cases) and SPN (6 cases). We carried out comprehensive immunohistochemical profiling using 9 markers: Synaptophysin, chromogranin A, pan-cytokeratin, E-cadherin, progesterone receptor, vimentin, α-1-antitrypsin, CD10, and β-catenin. RESULTS E-cadherin staining in NETs, and nuclear labeling of β-catenin in SPNs were the most sensitive and specific markers. Dot-like staining of chromogranin A might indicate the possibility of SPNs rather than NETs. The other six markers were not useful because their expression overlapped widely between NETs and SPNs. Moreover, two cases that had been initially diagnosed as NETs on the basis of their morphological features, demonstrated SPN-like immunohistochemical profiles. Careful diagnosis is crucial as we actually found two confusing cases showing disagreement between the tumor morphology and immunohistochemical profiles. CONCLUSION E-cadherin, chromogranin A, and β-catenin were the most useful markers which should be employed for differentiating between NET and SPN.

  15. A Sporadic Desmoid Tumor: an Exceptional Pancreatic Cystic-Solid Mass.

    PubMed

    Ardakani, Jalal Vahedian; Mehrjardi, Ali Zare; Wadji, Massoud Baghai; Saraee, Amir

    2016-08-01

    Desmoid tumors are locally aggressive and non-metastatic neoplasms with a high rate of recurrence. Desmoid tumors of the pancreas are, however, very rare, and only a few cases have been reported in the literature. This paper reports an anecdotal case of a diffuse pancreatic desmoid tumor with the involvement of the pancreatic head, body, and-partially-tail. The patient underwent the Whipple procedure and subtotal pancreatectomy. Histopathological assessment showed that the tissues were partly positive for smooth muscle actin, but not for S100 or PanCK. The Ki67 index of the cells was only 1 %. Unfortunately, the patient died on the 10th postoperative day due to massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:27574352

  16. Detection of circulating pancreas epithelial cells in patients with pancreatic cystic lesions.

    PubMed

    Rhim, Andrew D; Thege, Fredrik I; Santana, Steven M; Lannin, Timothy B; Saha, Trisha N; Tsai, Shannon; Maggs, Lara R; Kochman, Michael L; Ginsberg, Gregory G; Lieb, John G; Chandrasekhara, Vinay; Drebin, Jeffrey A; Ahmad, Nuzhat; Yang, Yu-Xiao; Kirby, Brian J; Stanger, Ben Z

    2014-03-01

    Hematogenous dissemination is thought to be a late event in cancer progression. We recently showed in a genetic model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma that pancreas cells can be detected in the bloodstream before tumor formation. To confirm these findings in humans, we used microfluidic geometrically enhanced differential immunocapture to detect circulating pancreas epithelial cells in patient blood samples. We captured more than 3 circulating pancreas epithelial cells/mL in 7 of 21 (33%) patients with cystic lesions and no clinical diagnosis of cancer (Sendai criteria negative), 8 of 11 (73%) with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and in 0 of 19 patients without cysts or cancer (controls). These findings indicate that cancer cells are present in the circulation of patients before tumors are detected, which might be used in risk assessment. PMID:24333829

  17. Novel CFTR Mutations in a Korean Infant with Cystic Fibrosis and Pancreatic Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Young June; Ko, Jae Sung; Han, Jae Jun; Shim, Jung Ok; Koh, Young Yull; Lee, Ran; Ki, Chang-Seok; Kim, Jong-Won; Kim, Jung Ho

    2010-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disease that is very rare in Asians: only a few cases have been reported in Korea. We treated a female infant with CF who had steatorrhea and failure to thrive. Her sweat chloride concentration was 102.0 mM/L. Genetic analysis identified two novel mutations including a splice site mutation (c.1766+2T>C) and a frameshift mutation (c.3908dupA; Asn1303LysfsX6). Pancreatic enzyme replacement and fat-soluble vitamin supplementation enabled the patient to get a catch-up growth. This is the first report of a Korean patient with CF demonstrating pancreatic insufficiency. CF should therefore be considered in the differential diagnosis of infants with steatorrhea and failure to thrive. PMID:20052365

  18. Detection of circulating pancreas epithelial cells in patients with pancreatic cystic lesions.

    PubMed

    Rhim, Andrew D; Thege, Fredrik I; Santana, Steven M; Lannin, Timothy B; Saha, Trisha N; Tsai, Shannon; Maggs, Lara R; Kochman, Michael L; Ginsberg, Gregory G; Lieb, John G; Chandrasekhara, Vinay; Drebin, Jeffrey A; Ahmad, Nuzhat; Yang, Yu-Xiao; Kirby, Brian J; Stanger, Ben Z

    2014-03-01

    Hematogenous dissemination is thought to be a late event in cancer progression. We recently showed in a genetic model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma that pancreas cells can be detected in the bloodstream before tumor formation. To confirm these findings in humans, we used microfluidic geometrically enhanced differential immunocapture to detect circulating pancreas epithelial cells in patient blood samples. We captured more than 3 circulating pancreas epithelial cells/mL in 7 of 21 (33%) patients with cystic lesions and no clinical diagnosis of cancer (Sendai criteria negative), 8 of 11 (73%) with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and in 0 of 19 patients without cysts or cancer (controls). These findings indicate that cancer cells are present in the circulation of patients before tumors are detected, which might be used in risk assessment.

  19. Eosinophilic, Solid, and Cystic Renal Cell Carcinoma: Clinicopathologic Study of 16 Unique, Sporadic Neoplasms Occurring in Women.

    PubMed

    Trpkov, Kiril; Hes, Ondrej; Bonert, Michael; Lopez, Jose I; Bonsib, Stephen M; Nesi, Gabriella; Comperat, Eva; Sibony, Mathilde; Berney, Daniel M; Martinek, Petr; Bulimbasic, Stela; Suster, Saul; Sangoi, Ankur; Yilmaz, Asli; Higgins, John P; Zhou, Ming; Gill, Anthony J; Przybycin, Christopher G; Magi-Galluzzi, Cristina; McKenney, Jesse K

    2016-01-01

    A unique renal neoplasm characterized by eosinophilic cytoplasm and solid and cystic growth was recently reported in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). We searched multiple institutional archives and consult files in an attempt to identify a sporadic counterpart. We identified 16 morphologically identical cases, all in women, without clinical features of TSC. The median age was 57 years (range, 31 to 75 y). Macroscopically, tumors were tan and had a solid and macrocystic (12) or only solid appearance (4). Average tumor size was 50 mm (median, 38.5 mm; range, 15 to 135 mm). Microscopically, the tumors showed solid areas admixed with variably sized macrocysts and microcysts that were lined by cells with a pronounced hobnail arrangement. The cells had voluminous eosinophilic cytoplasm with prominent granular cytoplasmic stippling and round to oval nuclei with prominent nucleoli. Scattered histiocytes and lymphocytes were invariably present. Thirteen of 16 patients were stage pT1; 2 were pT2, and 1 was pT3a. The cells demonstrated a distinct immunoprofile: nuclear PAX8 expression, predominant CK20-positive/CK7-negative phenotype, patchy AMACR staining, but no CD117 reactivity. Thirteen of 14 patients with follow-up were alive and without disease progression after 2 to 138 months (mean: 53 mo; median: 37.5 mo); 1 patient died of other causes. Although similar to a subset of renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) seen in TSC, we propose that sporadic "eosinophilic, solid, and cystic RCC," which occurs predominantly in female individuals and is characterized by distinct morphologic features, predominant CK20-positive/CK7-negative immunophenotype, and indolent behavior, represents a novel subtype of RCC. PMID:26414221

  20. Molecular Diagnostics in the Evaluation of Pancreatic Cysts.

    PubMed

    Theisen, Brian K; Wald, Abigail I; Singhi, Aatur D

    2016-09-01

    Within the past few decades, there has been a dramatic increase in the detection of incidental pancreatic cysts. It is reported a pancreatic cyst is identified in up to 2.6% of abdominal scans. Many of these cysts, including serous cystadenomas and pseudocysts, are benign and can be monitored clinically. In contrast, mucinous cysts, which include intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms and mucinous cystic neoplasms, have the potential to progress to pancreatic adenocarcinoma. In this review, we discuss the current management guidelines for pancreatic cysts, their underlying genetics, and the integration of molecular testing in cyst classification and prognostication. PMID:27523971

  1. Multiple malignant salivary gland neoplasms: mucoepidermoid carcinoma of palate and adenoid cystic carcinoma of floor of mouth.

    PubMed

    Whitt, Joseph C; Schafer, Duane R; Callihan, Michael D

    2008-03-01

    Salivary gland tumors usually occur as single lesions. To have more than one tumor is unusual. We report a case of an adult male who presented with a mucoepidermoid carcinoma involving the minor salivary glands of the palate at age 57 years, followed by an adenoid cystic carcinoma of the floor of mouth at age 63 years. The patient later succumbed to non-Hodgkin lymphoma at age 72 years. There are 31 acceptable cases of multiple malignant salivary gland neoplasms reported in the world literature. Multiple malignant tumors of the same histologic type are more common than those of different histologic type. Bilateral acinic cell adenocarcinoma was the most frequent combination of multiple salivary gland malignancy, accounting for 14 cases (10 synchronous and four metachronous). All involved the parotid glands bilaterally with the exception of one case that involved parotid and submandibular gland. Polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinoma accounted for three of the four cases of multiple malignant tumors involving minor salivary glands. Individuals with a history of malignancy are at risk for the development of additional malignant tumors and should receive appropriate clinical follow-up. PMID:20614341

  2. Enteric duplication cyst of the pancreas associated with chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Alexander S; Bluhm, David; Xiao, Shu-Yan; Waxman, Irving; Matthews, Jeffrey B

    2014-05-01

    Pancreas-associated enteric duplication cysts are rare developmental anomalies that communicate with the main pancreatic duct and may be associated with recurrent acute and chronic abdominal pain in children. In adults, these lesions may masquerade as pancreatic pseudocysts or pancreatic cystic neoplasms. An adult patient with a pancreas-associated enteric duplication is described which represents the first reported instance of association with both chronic calcific pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. The clinical spectrum of pancreas-associated enteric duplication cyst, including diagnostic and therapeutic options, is reviewed.

  3. Pancreatic Hepatoid Carcinoma Mimicking a Solid Pseudopapillary Neoplasm: A Challenging Case on Endoscopic Ultrasound-guided Fine-needle Aspiration.

    PubMed

    Akimoto, Yutaka; Kato, Hironari; Matsumoto, Kazuyuki; Harada, Ryo; Oda, Shinsuke; Fushimi, Soichiro; Mizukawa, Shou; Yabe, Shuntaro; Uchida, Daisuke; Seki, Hiroyuki; Tomoda, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Naoki; Horiguchi, Shigeru; Tsutsumi, Koichiro; Yagi, Takahito; Okada, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    A 59-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for treatment of a 45 mm pancreatic mass found during a medical examination. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration cytology showed polygonal cells with pseudopapillary structures. The tumor cells were positive for nuclear/cytoplasmic β-catenin and CD10, and negative for chromogranin A. After a tentative diagnosis of a solid pseudopapillary neoplasm, middle pancreatectomy was performed. Histologically, polygonal cells with abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm formed in the trabeculae and were immunohistochemically positive for HepPar1 and protein induced by vitamin K absence or antagonist-II. The tumor was finally diagnosed to be pancreatic hepatoid carcinoma. No recurrence occurred for 12 months, even without adjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:27580541

  4. Malabsorption Blood Test: Assessing Fat Absorption in Patients with Cystic Fibrosis and Pancreatic Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Mascarenhas, Maria R.; Mondick, John; Barrett, Jeffrey S.; Wilson, Martha; Stallings, Virginia A.; Schall, Joan I.

    2015-01-01

    The Malabsorption Blood Test (MBT), consisting of pentadecanoic acid (PA), a free fatty acid and triheptadecanoic acid (THA), a triglyceride that requires pancreatic lipase for absorption of the heptadecanoic acid (HA), was developed to assess fat malabsorption in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and pancreatic insufficiency (PI). The objective was to construct a population pharmacokinetic (PK) model to describe PA and HA disposition in healthy subjects and CF subjects. A model was simultaneously fit to PA and HA concentrations, consisting of one compartment disposition and a transit model to describe absorption. PA bioavailability estimates for CF subjects without pancreatic enzyme administration [1.07 (0.827,1.42)] and with enzymes [0.88 (0.72,1.09)] indicated PA absorption comparable to healthy subjects. HA bioavailability in CF without enzyme administration was 0.0292 (0.0192,0.0459), and with enzymes increased to 0.606 (0.482,0.823). In CF, compared to taking enzymes with the MBT, HA bioavailability was further decreased by factors of 0.829 (0.664,0.979) and 0.78 (0.491,1.13) with enzymes taken 30 and 60 minutes after MBT, respectively. The MBT detected differences in fat absorption in subjects with CF with and without enzyme administration and with changes in enzyme timing. Future studies will address application of the MBT in CF and other malabsorption diagnoses. PMID:25689042

  5. Alcohol Disrupts Levels and Function of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator to Promote Development of Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Maléth, József; Balázs, Anita; Pallagi, Petra; Balla, Zsolt; Kui, Balázs; Katona, Máté; Judák, Linda; Németh, István; Kemény, Lajos V.; Rakonczay, Zoltán; Venglovecz, Viktória; Földesi, Imre; Pető, Zoltán; Somorácz, Áron; Borka, Katalin; Perdomo, Doranda; Lukacs, Gergely L.; Gray, Mike A.; Monterisi, Stefania; Zaccolo, Manuela; Sendler, Matthias; Mayerle, Julia; Kühn, Jens-Peter; Lerch, Markus M.; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós; Hegyi, Péter

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Excessive consumption of ethanol is one of the most common causes of acute and chronic pancreatitis. Alterations to the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) also cause pancreatitis. However, little is known about the role of CFTR in the pathogenesis of alcohol-induced pancreatitis. METHODS We measured CFTR activity based on chloride concentrations in sweat from patients with cystic fibrosis, patients admitted to the emergency department because of excessive alcohol consumption, and healthy volunteers. We measured CFTR levels and localization in pancreatic tissues and in patients with acute or chronic pancreatitis induced by alcohol. We studied the effects of ethanol, fatty acids, and fatty acid ethyl esters on secretion of pancreatic fluid and HCO3− , levels and function of CFTR, and exchange of Cl− for HCO3− in pancreatic cell lines as well as in tissues from guinea pigs and CFTR knockout mice after administration of alcohol. RESULTS Chloride concentrations increased in sweat samples from patients who acutely abused alcohol but not in samples from healthy volunteers, indicating that alcohol affects CFTR function. Pancreatic tissues from patients with acute or chronic pancreatitis had lower levels of CFTR than tissues from healthy volunteers. Alcohol and fatty acids inhibited secretion of fluid and HCO3− , as well as CFTR activity, in pancreatic ductal epithelial cells. These effects were mediated by sustained increases in concentrations of intracellular calcium and adenosine 3’,5’-cyclic monophosphate, depletion of adenosine triphosphate, and depolarization of mitochondrial membranes. In pancreatic cell lines and pancreatic tissues of mice and guinea pigs, administration of ethanol reduced expression of CFTR messenger RNA, reduced the stability of CFTR at the cell surface, and disrupted folding of CFTR at the endoplasmic reticulum. CFTR knockout mice given ethanol or fatty acids developed more

  6. Immunohistochemical analysis of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Vivian; Dueber, Julie; Wright, Jesse P; Cates, Justin; Revetta, Frank; Parikh, Alexander A; Merchant, Nipun B; Shi, Chanjuan

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the role of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (PanNENs). METHODS Tissue microarrays containing 88 PanNENs were immunohistochemically labeled with antibodies to β-catenin, E-cadherin, adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), chromogranin and synaptophysin. One case had only metastatic tumors resected, whereas others (n = 87) received pancreatectomy with or without partial hepatectomy. Pathology slides, demographic, clinicopathologic, and follow up data were reviewed. Patients’ demographics, clinicopathologic features, and immunohistochemical results from 87 primary tumors were compared between patients with low stage (stage I/II) and high stage (stage III/IV) tumors. In addition, correlation of immunohistochemical results from primary tumors with disease-specific survival (DSS) was evaluated. RESULTS Strong membranous β-catenin staining in the primary tumor was observed in all 13 stage III/IV PanNENs as compared to 47% (35/74) of stage I/II tumors (P < 0.01). However, the strong membranous β-catenin staining was unassociated with tumor grade or DSS. Decreased membranous β-catenin staining was associated with decreased membranous E-cadherin labeling. Nuclear β-catenin staining was seen in 15% (2/13) of stage III/IV PanNENs as compared to 0% (0/74) of stage I/II tumors (P = 0.02). The case with metastasectomy only also showed nuclear β-catenin staining. Two of the three cases with nuclear β-catenin staining were familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) patients. Lack of APC expression was seen in 70% (57/81) of the cases, including the 3 cases with nuclear β-catenin staining. Expression of E-cadherin and APC in primary tumor was not correlated with tumor grade, tumor stage, or disease specific survival. CONCLUSION The Wnt/β-catenin pathway was altered in some PanNENs, but did not Impact DSS. PanNENs in FAP patients demonstrated nuclear β-catenin accumulation and loss of APC. PMID:27574554

  7. Prognostic markers in smear preparations for pancreatic endocrine neoplasms: A cytomorphologic study and statistical analysis of 20 potential prognostic features

    PubMed Central

    Layfield, Lester J.; Schmidt, Robert L.; Campbell, Jack; Esebua, Magda

    2016-01-01

    Background: Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology guidelines place low- and intermediate-grade pancreatic endocrine tumors into the “neoplastic, other” category whereas high-grade pancreatic endocrine tumors are placed in the “malignant” category. No attempt was made to stratify pancreatic endocrine tumors in the “neoplastic, other” category by likelihood for metastases. Histologically, pancreatic endocrine tumors are divided into well, intermediate, and poorly differentiated examples based on mitotic count and Ki-67 proliferation index (PI). PI has been used in the evaluation of cytologic specimens utilizing cell block material. Unfortunately, cell block material may not always be available for analysis, and little data exists as to cytomorphologic features in smear preparations which might distinguish between low- and intermediate-grade endocrine neoplasms and predict metastases. Methods: We studied 36 cases of Diff-Quik stained smear preparations for 20 morphologic features to determine which best-classified cases into poor and not poor outcome categories. Hierarchical logistic regression analysis was used to determine associations between the morphologic features and outcomes. Results: Absolute agreement between raters ranged from 51% to 97% across the 20 morphologic features. About 12 of the 20 morphologic features showed statistically significant associations with poor outcome. Mitoses, irregular nuclear membranes, and 3-fold variation in nuclear size are the best discriminators between poor and not poor outcomes. Conclusions: A scoring system was developed utilizing mitoses, irregular nuclear membranes, and 3-fold variation in nuclear size to divide smears of pancreatic endocrine tumors into poor and not poor outcome groups. The scoring system achieved 84% accuracy in separating cases into poor and not poor outcomes.

  8. Variants in Solute Carrier SLC26A9 Modify Prenatal Exocrine Pancreatic Damage in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Melissa R.; Soave, David; Li, Weili; Gong, Jiafen; Pace, Rhonda G.; Boëlle, Pierre-Yves; Cutting, Garry R.; Drumm, Mitchell L.; Knowles, Michael R.; Sun, Lei; Rommens, Johanna M.; Accurso, Frank; Durie, Peter R.; Corvol, Harriet; Levy, Hara; Sontag, Marci K.; Strug, Lisa J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To test the hypothesis that multiple constituents of the apical plasma membrane residing alongside the causal CF Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) protein, including known cystic fibrosis (CF) modifiers SLC26A9, SLC6A14, and SLC9A3, would be associated with prenatal exocrine pancreatic damage as measured by newborn screened (NBS) IRT levels. Study design NBS IRT measures and genome-wide genotype data were available on 111 subjects from Colorado, 37 subjects from Wisconsin, and 80 subjects from France. Multiple linear regression was used to determine whether any of eight SNPs in SLC26A9, SLC6A14 and SLC9A3 were associated with IRT and whether other constituents of the apical plasma membrane contributed to IRT. Results In the Colorado sample, three SLC26A9 SNPs were associated with NBS IRT (min P = 1.16 × 10−3; rs7512462), but no SLC6A14 or SLC9A3 SNPs were associated (P > 0.05). The rs7512462 association replicated in the Wisconsin sample (P = 0.03) but not in the French sample (P = 0.76). Furthermore, rs7512462 was the top ranked apical membrane constituent in the combined Colorado and Wisconsin sample. Conclusions NBS IRT is a biomarker of prenatal exocrine pancreatic disease in patients with CF, and a SNP in SLC26A9 accounts for significant IRT variability. This suggests SLC26A9 as a potential therapeutic target to ameliorate exocrine pancreatic disease. PMID:25771386

  9. A Transient Metabolic Recovery from Early Life Glucose Intolerance in Cystic Fibrosis Ferrets Occurs During Pancreatic Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Yi, Yaling; Sun, Xingshen; Gibson-Corley, Katherine; Xie, Weiliang; Liang, Bo; He, Nan; Tyler, Scott R; Uc, Aliye; Philipson, Louis H; Wang, Kai; Hara, Manami; Ode, Katie Larson; Norris, Andrew W; Engelhardt, John F

    2016-05-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF)-related diabetes in humans is intimately related to exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, yet little is known about how these 2 disease processes simultaneously evolve in CF. In this context, we examined CF ferrets during the evolution of exocrine pancreatic disease. At 1 month of age, CF ferrets experienced a glycemic crisis with spontaneous diabetic-level hyperglycemia. This occurred during a spike in pancreatic inflammation that was preceded by pancreatic fibrosis and loss of β-cell mass. Surprisingly, there was spontaneous normalization of glucose levels at 2-3 months, with intermediate hyperglycemia thereafter. Mixed meal tolerance was impaired at all ages, but glucose intolerance was not detected until 4 months. Insulin secretion in response to hyperglycemic clamp and to arginine was impaired. Insulin sensitivity, measured by euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp, was normal. Pancreatic inflammation rapidly diminished after 2 months of age during a period where β-cell mass rose and gene expression of islet hormones, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ, and adiponectin increased. We conclude that active CF exocrine pancreatic inflammation adversely affects β-cells but is followed by islet resurgence. We predict that very young humans with CF may experience a transient glycemic crisis and postulate that pancreatic inflammatory to adipogenic remodeling may facilitate islet adaptation in CF. PMID:26862997

  10. Intraductal Oncocytic Papillary Neoplasms of the Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Kallen, Michael E; Naini, Bita V

    2016-09-01

    Intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasms (IOPNs) are cystic neoplasms with intraductal growth and complex papillae composed of oncocytic cells. IOPNs have been reported both in the pancreas and biliary tree, and are most likely closely related in these 2 locations. In the pancreas, these rare tumors are now considered 1 of the 4 histologic subtypes of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN). Significant differences in histology, immunophenotype, and molecular genetics have been reported between IOPNs and other IPMN subtypes. However, there are limited data regarding the clinical behavior and prognosis of IOPNs in comparison to other subtypes of IPMN. We review features of pancreatic IOPNs and discuss the differential diagnosis of other intraductal lesions in the pancreas. PMID:27575268

  11. Preoperative Folfirinox for Resectable Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma - A Phase II Study

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-16

    Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Poorly Differentiated Malignant Neoplasm; Resectable Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Undifferentiated Pancreatic Carcinoma

  12. Influence of antacid and formulation on effectiveness of pancreatic enzyme supplementation in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Braggion, C; Borgo, G; Faggionato, P; Mastella, G

    1987-01-01

    A series of treatment trials, involving food balances based on determination of fat coefficient absorption, nitrogen faecal loss, and daily faecal weight, was performed in 82 patients with cystic fibrosis. Results showed that a conventional powdered pancreatic extract (Pancrex V) required a high dosage to achieve reasonable improvement in fat and nitrogen absorption (200 mg/kg body weight/day on average) and rarely restored digestion to normal. Bicarbonate (5.2 g/m2 body surface/day) slightly enhanced the enzymatic activity of the powdered extract, this being more apparent in those with more severe steatorrhoea. There was no advantage in providing the extract in microgranules protected by cellulose acetatephthalate. A product based on fungal lipase and protease (Krebsilasi) proved to be ineffective in correcting fat and protein absorption. The two recent products prepared in pH sensitive microspheres (Pancrex V microspheres and Pancreas-Prolipase) had similar advantages in digestive activity. Compared with the traditional preparations, they offered a number of practical advantages, including a smaller number of capsules (particularly Pancrex V microspheres) and improved palatability. PMID:3036018

  13. Endoscopic ultrasound fine-needle aspiration characteristics of primary adenocarcinoma versus other malignant neoplasms of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Gagovic, Veronika; Spier, Bret J; DeLee, Ryan J; Barancin, Courtney; Lindstrom, Mary; Einstein, Michael; Byrne, Siobhan; Harter, Josephine; Agni, Rashmi; Pfau, Patrick R; Frick, Terrence J; Soni, Anurag; Gopal, Deepak V

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) with fine-needle aspiration (FNA) is often used to assist in the evaluation of pancreatic lesions and may help to diagnose benign versus malignant neoplasms. However, there is a paucity of literature regarding comparative EUS characteristics of various malignant pancreatic neoplasms (primary and metastatic). OBJECTIVE: To compare and characterize primary pancreatic adenocarcinoma versus other malignant neoplasms, hereafter referred to as nonprimary pancreatic adenocarcinoma (NPPA), diagnosed by EUS-guided FNA. METHODS: The present study was a retrospective analysis of a prospectively maintained database. The setting was a tertiary care, academic medical centre. Patients referred for suspected pancreatic neoplasms were evaluated. Based on EUS-FNA characteristics, primary pancreatic adenocarcinoma was differentiated from other malignant neoplasms. The subset of other neoplasms was defined as malignant lesions that were ‘NPPAs’ (ie, predominantly solid or solid/cystic based on EUS appearance and primary malignant lesions or metastatic lesions to the pancreas). Pancreatic masses that were benign cystic lesions (pseudocyst, simple cyst, serous cystadenoma) and focal inflammatory lesions (acute, chronic and autoimmune pancreatitis) were excluded. RESULTS: A total of 230 patients were evaluated using EUS-FNA for suspected pancreatic mass lesions. Thirty-eight patients were excluded because they were diagnosed with inflammatory lesions or had purely benign cysts. One hundred ninety-two patients had confirmed malignant pancreatic neoplasms (ie, pancreatic adenocarcinoma [n=144], NPPA [n=48]). When comparing adenocarcinoma with NPPA lesions, there was no significant difference in mean age (P=0.0675), sex (P=0.3595) or average lesion size (P=0.3801). On average, four FNA passes were necessary to establish a cytological diagnosis in both lesion subtypes (P=0.396). Adenocarcinomas were more likely to be located in the pancreatic head

  14. Solid adenoma with exclusive hepatocellular differentiation: a new variant among pancreatic benign neoplasms?

    PubMed

    Cuilliere, Peggy; Lazure, Thierry; Bui, Matthieu; Fabre, Monique; Buffet, Catherine; Gayral, François; Bedossa, Pierre

    2002-11-01

    We report a unique, previously unreported pancreatic tumor with hepatoid differentiation associated with serous microcystic adenoma in a 70-year-old man. These two lesions localized, respectively, at the body and the tail of the pancreas, were found incidentally on abdominal ultrasonography. Serum alpha-fetoprotein was not increased and no hepatic lesion was displayed on computed tomography. A subtotal pancreatectomy with splenectomy was performed. The patient is alive and well 12 months after resection. Pathological examination showed a very unusual encapsulated solid tumor with hepatocytic differentiation, bile production and immunoreactivity for hepatocyte paraffin-1 antibody. The tumor cells were negative for endocrine (neuron-specific enolase, chromogranin A, synaptophysin) and acinar (amylase, trypsin) markers. Ultrastructurally, zymogen and neurosecretory granules were absent. The features of the tumor were almost indistinguishable from those of hepatocellular adenoma; therefore, we believe that this solid hepatoid tumor may represent a variant of pancreatic adenoma. Recognition of this entity is important because the only reported pancreatic hepatoid tumors to date have been malignant. The main differential diagnoses include hepatoid ductal adenocarcinoma, hepatoid acinar cell carcinoma, primitive hepatoid endocrine tumor, and metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:12447684

  15. Adrenal lymphangioma masquerading as a pancreatic tail cyst

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hae Il; Ahn, Taesung; Son, Myoung Won; Kim, Zisun; Bae, Sang Ho; Lee, Moon Soo; Kim, Chang Ho; Cho, Hyon Doek

    2014-01-01

    Cystic lymphangiomas of the adrenal gland are rare. A 79-year-old female presented in the emergency room with epigastric discomfort, and an immovable mass was palpated in her abdomen upon physical examination. Imaging studies revealed a large cystic lesion in the pancreatic tail. The radiologic impression ruled out the possibility of a mucinous cystic neoplasm, or a pseudocyst in the pancreas. The operative findings demonstrated that the cystic mass originated in the left adrenal gland. A laparoscopic excision of the cystic mass was performed, and immunohistochemistry confirmed that this mass was a lymphangioma of the adrenal gland. Several prior reports have suggested that lymphangioma can mimic renal or splenic cysts. However, lymphangioma cases mimicking pancreatic cysts are very rare. PMID:25278717

  16. Animal models of gastrointestinal and liver diseases. Animal models of cystic fibrosis: gastrointestinal, pancreatic, and hepatobiliary disease and pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Olivier, Alicia K.; Gibson-Corley, Katherine N.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple organ systems, including the gastrointestinal tract, pancreas, and hepatobiliary systems, are affected by cystic fibrosis (CF). Many of these changes begin early in life and are difficult to study in young CF patients. Recent development of novel CF animal models has expanded opportunities in the field to better understand CF pathogenesis and evaluate traditional and innovative therapeutics. In this review, we discuss manifestations of CF disease in gastrointestinal, pancreatic, and hepatobiliary systems of humans and animal models. We also compare the similarities and limitations of animal models and discuss future directions for modeling CF. PMID:25591863

  17. Animal models of gastrointestinal and liver diseases. Animal models of cystic fibrosis: gastrointestinal, pancreatic, and hepatobiliary disease and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Olivier, Alicia K; Gibson-Corley, Katherine N; Meyerholz, David K

    2015-03-15

    Multiple organ systems, including the gastrointestinal tract, pancreas, and hepatobiliary systems, are affected by cystic fibrosis (CF). Many of these changes begin early in life and are difficult to study in young CF patients. Recent development of novel CF animal models has expanded opportunities in the field to better understand CF pathogenesis and evaluate traditional and innovative therapeutics. In this review, we discuss manifestations of CF disease in gastrointestinal, pancreatic, and hepatobiliary systems of humans and animal models. We also compare the similarities and limitations of animal models and discuss future directions for modeling CF.

  18. Vitamin B12 Status in Children with Cystic Fibrosis and Pancreatic Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Maqbool, Asim; Schall, Joan I.; Mascarenhas, Maria R.; Dougherty, Kelly A.; Stallings, Virginia A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Unexpectedly high serum B12 concentrations were noted in most study subjects with cystic fibrosis (CF) and pancreatic insufficiency (PI) participating in a nutrition intervention at the baseline evaluation. The objectives of this study were to determine dietary, supplement-based and enzyme-based B12 intake, serum B12 concentrations, and predictors of vitamin B12 status in children with CF and PI. Study Design Serum B12 status was assessed in subjects (5-18 yrs) and categorized as elevated (Hi-B12) or within reference range (RR-B12) for age and sex. Serum homocysteine, plasma B6, red blood cell folate, height, weight, and body mass index Z scores, pulmonary function, energy, dietary and supplement-based vitamin intake were assessed. Results 106 subjects, mean age 10.4 ± 3.0 years participated. Median serum B12 was 1083 pg/ml, with 56% in the Hi-B12 group. Dietary and supplement-based B12 intake were both high representing 376% and 667% Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA). The Hi-B12 group had significantly greater supplement-based B12 intake than the RR-B12 group (1000 vs. 583% RDA, p<0.001). By multiple logistic regression analysis, high supplement-based B12 intake and age >12 years increased risk for Hi-B12, while higher FEV1 decreased risk (Pseudo-R2=0.18, P<0.001). Conclusions Serum B12 was elevated in the majority of children with CF and PI. Supplement-based B12 intake was 6 to 10 times the RDA, and strongly predicted elevated serum B12 status. The health consequences of lifelong high supplement-based B12 intake and high serum B12 are unknown and require further study, as does the inversed correlation between serum B12 and FEV1. PMID:24445504

  19. Differential diagnosis between pancreatic neuroendocrine and solid pseudopapillary neoplasms on endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Raddaoui, Emad M.; Almadi, Majid A.; Aljebreen, Abdulrahman M.; Alsaif, Faisal A.; AlShedoukhy, Ahlam A.; Al-Lehibi, Abed H.; Almohameed, Khalid A.; Tsolakis, Apostolos V.; AlAbbadi, Mousa A.; Almutrafi, Amna R.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the role of applying a limited panel of immunohistochemical stains on the cellblock preparation from samples obtained by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) in the aim of differentiating solid pseudopapillary neoplasms (SPNs) from neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). Methods: We retrospectively retrieved all the EUS-FNAs of the pancreas that have a diagnosis of NET or SPN that were performed at 2 tertiary care hospitals in Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia from May 2004 to December 2014. Diff-Quik, Papanicolaou, and Immunohistochemistry stains on cellblock preparations were performed. Results: Twenty cases were available (16 pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) and 4 SPNs). The pNETs were immunoreactive for synaptophysin, chromogranin A and CD56 while E-cadherin was diffusely to focally cytoplasmic positive. β-catenin was negative or showed focal cytoplasmic immunoreactivity. In comparison, SPNs were positive for vimentin, CD10, CD-56, focally positive for progesterone receptors and synaptophysin, and revealed nuclear immunostaining for β-catenin. They were negative for chromogranin A and E-cadherin. Conclusion: Based on EUS-FNA samples, nuclear immunoreactivity for β-catenin with loss of membranous immunostaining for E-Cadherin can potentially facilitate differentiating SPNs from pNETs. PMID:27381533

  20. Cystic fibrosis mutations for p.F508del compound heterozygotes predict sweat chloride levels and pancreatic sufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Sebro, R; Levy, H; Schneck, K; Dimmock, D; Raby, BA; Cannon, CL; Broeckel, U; Risch, NJ

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a monogenetic disease with a complex phenotype. Over 1500 mutations in the CFTR gene have been identified; however, the p.F508del mutation is most common. There has been limited correlation between the CFTR mutation genotype and the disease phenotypes. We evaluated the non-p.F508del mutation of 108 p.F508del compound heterozygotes using the biological classification method, Grantham and Sorting Intolerant from Tolerant (SIFT) scores to assess whether these scoring systems correlated with sweat chloride levels, pancreatic sufficiency, predicted FEV1, and risk of infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the last year. Mutations predicted to be ‘mild’ by the biological classification method are associated with more normal sweat chloride levels (p < 0.001), pancreatic sufficiency (p < 0.001) and decreased risk of infection with Pseudomonas in the last year (p = 0.014). Lower Grantham scores are associated with more normal sweat chloride levels (p < 0.001), and pancreatic sufficiency (p = 0.014). Higher SIFT scores are associated with more normal sweat chloride levels (p < 0.001) and pancreatic sufficiency (p = 0.011). There was no association between pulmonary function measured by predicted FEV1 and the biological classification (p = 0.98), Grantham (p = 0.28) or SIFT scores (p = 0.62), which suggests the pulmonary disease related to CF may involve other modifier genes and environmental factors. PMID:22035343

  1. Relationship between CFTR and CTRC variants and the clinical phenotype in late-onset cystic fibrosis disease with chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Tomaiuolo, Anna C; Sofia, Valentina M; Surace, Cecilia; Majo, Fabio; Genovese, Silvia; Petrocchi, Stefano; Grotta, Simona; Alghisi, Federico; Lucidi, Vincenzina; Angioni, Adriano

    2015-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF), the most common autosomal recessive disease in whites, is caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). So far, >1900 mutations have been described, most of which are nonsense, missense, and frameshift, and can lead to severe phenotypes, reducing the level of function of the CFTR protein. Synonymous variations are usually considered silent without pathogenic effects. However, synonymous mutations exhibiting exon skipping as a consequence of aberrant splicing of pre-mRNA differ. Herein, we describe the effect of the aberrant splicing of the c.273G>C (G91G) synonymous variation found in a 9-year-old white (ΔF508) patient affected by CF and pancreatitis associated with a variant in chymotrypsin C (CTRC). Magnetic resonance imaging showed an atrophic pancreatic gland with substitution of the pancreatic parenchyma with three cysts. Genetic examination revealed compound heterozygosity for the c.1521_1523delCTT (ΔF508) pathogenic variant and the c.273G>C (G91G) variant in CFTR. Sweat test results confirmed the diagnosis of CF. We have thus identified a synonymous variation (G91G) causing the skipping of exon 3 in a CF patient carrying the ΔF508 mutation. However, the clinical phenotype with pancreatic symptoms encouraged us to investigate a panel of pancreas-related genes, which resulted in finding a known sequence variation inside CTRC. We further discuss the role of these variants and their possible interactions in determining the current phenotype.

  2. Hematogenous Gastric Metastasis of Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sasajima, Junpei; Okamoto, Kotaro; Taniguchi, Masato

    2016-01-01

    While the gastric involvement of pancreatic cancer is occasionally observed as the result of direct invasion, hematogenous gastric metastasis is rare. A 72-year-old Japanese male presented with general fatigue, pollakiuria, and thirst. Computed tomography revealed a 4.6-cm solid mass in the pancreatic tail and a 4.2-cm multilocular cystic mass in the pancreatic head with multiple liver and lymphatic metastasis. Notably, two solid masses were detected in the gastric wall of the upper body and the antrum; both were separated from the primary pancreatic cancer and seemed to be located in the submucosal layer. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed a submucosal tumor with a normal mucosa in the posterior wall of the upper body of the stomach, suggesting the gastric hematogenous metastasis of pancreatic cancer. The suspected diagnosis was unresectable pancreatic cancer with multiple metastases that was concomitant with the intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas. PMID:27403106

  3. Hematogenous Gastric Metastasis of Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sasajima, Junpei; Okamoto, Kotaro; Taniguchi, Masato

    2016-01-01

    While the gastric involvement of pancreatic cancer is occasionally observed as the result of direct invasion, hematogenous gastric metastasis is rare. A 72-year-old Japanese male presented with general fatigue, pollakiuria, and thirst. Computed tomography revealed a 4.6-cm solid mass in the pancreatic tail and a 4.2-cm multilocular cystic mass in the pancreatic head with multiple liver and lymphatic metastasis. Notably, two solid masses were detected in the gastric wall of the upper body and the antrum; both were separated from the primary pancreatic cancer and seemed to be located in the submucosal layer. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed a submucosal tumor with a normal mucosa in the posterior wall of the upper body of the stomach, suggesting the gastric hematogenous metastasis of pancreatic cancer. The suspected diagnosis was unresectable pancreatic cancer with multiple metastases that was concomitant with the intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas. PMID:27403106

  4. Solid Pseudopapillary Tumour of Extrapancreatic Origin Presenting as Mesenteric Cystic Mass: A Diagnostic Dilemma.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Sudipta; Ghosh, Suman; Sarkar, Ranu

    2016-08-01

    Solid Pseudopapillary Tumour (SPT) is a rare and distinctive pancreatic exocrine neoplasm. Even Rarely, such primary SPT may originate from ectopic pancreatic tissues. We are hereby presenting one such unique case, where a 50-year-old female presented with pain and a mid-abdominal lump. Radiology revealed a well-defined outline located adjacent to the tail of pancreas. The excised mass was 19×14×7cm in dimension having zones of haemorrhage, necrosis and cystic spaces filled with necrotic debris. Microscopic examination confirmed the diagnosis of SPT. SPT originating in extrapancreatic location may mimic an ovarian cystic tumours or mesenteric cysts, its proper identification is crucial. PMID:27656450

  5. Solid Pseudopapillary Tumour of Extrapancreatic Origin Presenting as Mesenteric Cystic Mass: A Diagnostic Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Suman; Sarkar, Ranu

    2016-01-01

    Solid Pseudopapillary Tumour (SPT) is a rare and distinctive pancreatic exocrine neoplasm. Even Rarely, such primary SPT may originate from ectopic pancreatic tissues. We are hereby presenting one such unique case, where a 50-year-old female presented with pain and a mid-abdominal lump. Radiology revealed a well-defined outline located adjacent to the tail of pancreas. The excised mass was 19×14×7cm in dimension having zones of haemorrhage, necrosis and cystic spaces filled with necrotic debris. Microscopic examination confirmed the diagnosis of SPT. SPT originating in extrapancreatic location may mimic an ovarian cystic tumours or mesenteric cysts, its proper identification is crucial. PMID:27656450

  6. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration for the diagnosis of pancreatic cysts by combined cytopathology and cystic content analysis

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Amanda K; Zhou, Zhongren

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in imaging technology have resulted in an increase in incidental discoveries of pancreatic cystic lesions. Pancreatic cysts comprise a wide variety of lesions and include non-neoplastic cysts and neoplastic cysts. Because some pancreatic cysts have more of a malignant potential than others, it is absolutely essential that an accurate diagnosis is rendered so that effective care can be given to each patient. In many centers, endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA) has emerged as the modality of choice that enables one to distinguish between mucinous and non-mucinous lesion, diagnose malignancy and collect cyst fluid for further diagnostic studies, such as pancreatic enzyme levels, molecular analysis and other tumor biomarkers. The current review will focus on EUS-guided FNA and the cytological diagnosis for pancreatic cysts. PMID:26504505

  7. Evidence-based practice recommendations for nutrition-related management of children and adults with cystic fibrosis and pancreatic insufficiency: results of a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Stallings, Virginia A; Stark, Lori J; Robinson, Karen A; Feranchak, Andrew P; Quinton, Hebe

    2008-05-01

    The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation established a process of systematic review of evidence to inform the development of clinical care guidelines and encourage evidence-based practice. The Subcommittee on Growth and Nutrition reviewed the evidence in two areas: energy intake and dosing for pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy. Evidence-based recommendations are presented here. Also, an ad hoc working group conducted a review of the literature and performed new analyses using the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Patient Registry to update the recommendations for growth and weight-status monitoring. These Registry data-based recommendations are presented.

  8. Nocturnal hydration--an effective modality to reduce recurrent abdominal pain and recurrent pancreatitis in patients with adult-onset cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Obideen, Kamil; Wehbi, Mohammad; Hoteit, Maarouf; Cai, Qiang

    2006-10-01

    Recurrent abdominal pain and recurrent pancreatitis are common problems associated with some patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). There is no known effective method to prevent recurrent abdominal pain and recurrent pancreatitis in such patients. The objective of this study was to determine whether nocturnal hydration (NH) prevents recurrent abdominal pain and recurrent acute pancreatitis in patients with adult-onset CF. Adult CF patients who were referred to our Pancreatic Diseases Clinic for recurrent abdominal pain and pancreatitis were enrolled in the study. Each patient was encouraged to drink plenty of water during the night and established a 6-month diary (3 months before and 3 months after NH was initiated), recording the frequency and severity of their abdominal pain, the amount of pain medication taken, and the volume of their water intake. We also reviewed the number of doctor's clinic visits, emergency room visits, and hospitalizations for about 1 year before and 1 year after the initiation of the NH. The frequency and the severity of abdominal pain in this group of patients were significantly reduced. The amount of pain medication and the number of emergency room visits and hospitalizations for abdominal pain and acute pancreatitis were reduced. NH is a simple and cost-effective method to prevent recurrent abdominal pain and pancreatitis in patients with adult-onset CF.

  9. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and SLC26 transporters in HCO₃⁻ secretion by pancreatic duct cells.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, Hiroshi; Steward, Martin; Naruse, Satoru

    2007-08-25

    Pancreatic duct cells secrete HCO3(-) ions into a HCO3(-)-rich luminal fluid (~140 mmol/L in human) against at least a 6-fold concentration gradient. Candidate mechanisms for HCO3(-) transport across the apical membrane include Cl(-)-HCO3(-)exchange by an SLC26 anion transporter and diffusion via the HCO3(-) conductance of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Members of the SLC26 family are known to mediate Cl(-)-HCO3(-) exchange across the apical membrane of other epithelia and both SLC26A6 and SLC26A3 have been detected in pancreatic ducts. Co-expression studies have also revealed that murine slc26a6 and slc26a3 physically interact with CFTR through the STAS domain of slc26 and the R domain of CFTR, resulting in mutually enhanced activity. Other studies have indicated that these exchangers are electrogenic: slc26a6 mediating 1Cl(-)-2HCO3(-) exchange and slc26a3 mediating 2Cl(-)-1HCO3(-) exchange. Recent experiments using isolated pancreatic ducts from slc26a6(-)/(-) mice suggest that slc26a6 mediates most of the Cl(-)-dependent secretion of HCO3(-) across the apical membrane in the mouse and the data are consistent with the reported electrogenicity of slc26a6. However, the role of SLC26A6 in human pancreatic HCO3(-) secretion is less clear because human ducts are capable of secreting much higher concentrations of HCO3(-). The role of SLC26A6 must now be evaluated in a species such as the guinea pig which, like the human, is capable of secreting HCO3(-) at a concentration of ~140 mmol/L. From existing guinea pig data we calculate that a 1Cl(-)-2HCO3(-) exchanger such as slc26a6 would be unable to secrete HCO3(-) against such a steep gradient. On the other hand, the HCO3(-) conductance of CFTR could theoretically support secretion of HCO3(-) to a much higher concentrations. CFTR may therefore play a more important role than SLC26A6 in HCO3(-) secretion by the guinea pig and human pancreas.

  10. Mechanisms of CFTR Functional Variants That Impair Regulated Bicarbonate Permeation and Increase Risk for Pancreatitis but Not for Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Michele D.; Park, Hyun Woo; Brand, Randall E.; Gelrud, Andres; Anderson, Michelle A.; Banks, Peter A.; Conwell, Darwin; Lawrence, Christopher; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Baillie, John; Alkaade, Samer; Cote, Gregory; Gardner, Timothy B.; Amann, Stephen T.; Slivka, Adam; Sandhu, Bimaljit; Aloe, Amy; Kienholz, Michelle L.; Yadav, Dhiraj; Barmada, M. Michael; Bahar, Ivet; Lee, Min Goo; Whitcomb, David C.

    2014-01-01

    CFTR is a dynamically regulated anion channel. Intracellular WNK1-SPAK activation causes CFTR to change permeability and conductance characteristics from a chloride-preferring to bicarbonate-preferring channel through unknown mechanisms. Two severe CFTR mutations (CFTRsev) cause complete loss of CFTR function and result in cystic fibrosis (CF), a severe genetic disorder affecting sweat glands, nasal sinuses, lungs, pancreas, liver, intestines, and male reproductive system. We hypothesize that those CFTR mutations that disrupt the WNK1-SPAK activation mechanisms cause a selective, bicarbonate defect in channel function (CFTRBD) affecting organs that utilize CFTR for bicarbonate secretion (e.g. the pancreas, nasal sinus, vas deferens) but do not cause typical CF. To understand the structural and functional requirements of the CFTR bicarbonate-preferring channel, we (a) screened 984 well-phenotyped pancreatitis cases for candidate CFTRBD mutations from among 81 previously described CFTR variants; (b) conducted electrophysiology studies on clones of variants found in pancreatitis but not CF; (c) computationally constructed a new, complete structural model of CFTR for molecular dynamics simulation of wild-type and mutant variants; and (d) tested the newly defined CFTRBD variants for disease in non-pancreas organs utilizing CFTR for bicarbonate secretion. Nine variants (CFTR R74Q, R75Q, R117H, R170H, L967S, L997F, D1152H, S1235R, and D1270N) not associated with typical CF were associated with pancreatitis (OR 1.5, p = 0.002). Clones expressed in HEK 293T cells had normal chloride but not bicarbonate permeability and conductance with WNK1-SPAK activation. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest physical restriction of the CFTR channel and altered dynamic channel regulation. Comparing pancreatitis patients and controls, CFTRBD increased risk for rhinosinusitis (OR 2.3, p<0.005) and male infertility (OR 395, p<<0.0001). WNK1-SPAK pathway-activated increases in CFTR

  11. PDX-1, CDX-2, TTF-1, and CK7: a reliable immunohistochemical panel for pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Chan, Elaine S; Alexander, Jacob; Swanson, Paul E; Jain, Dhanpat; Yeh, Matthew M

    2012-05-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) occur in virtually all sites of the body. As NETs arising in different organs share similar morphologic features, distinguishing metastatic from primary NETs on the basis of morphologic grounds alone is difficult. Pancreatic duodenal homeobox 1 (PDX-1) is a Hox-type transcription factor that is essential for both exocrine and endocrine pancreatic differentiation and maintenance of β-cell function. We investigated PDX-1 as an immunohistochemical (IHC) marker in primary pancreatic NETs. Eighty primary NETs [25 pancreatic, 29 bronchopulmonary, and 26 in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract] and 13 metastatic NETs in the liver were studied. Clinical and radiologic data were reviewed to confirm the stated primary sites. IHC analysis for PDX-1, CDX-2, thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1), keratin 7 (CK7), and keratin 20 (CK20) was performed, and the results were based on review blinded to the primary sites. PDX-1 was seen in 18 of 25 (72%) pancreatic NETs; in contrast, only 3 of 29 (10%) bronchopulmonary NETs and 1 of 26 (4%) GI NETs were positive. PDX-1 was therefore 93% specific and 72% sensitive for pancreatic NETs. TTF-1 was expressed only in bronchopulmonary NETs; all other NETs were negative for TTF-1. CK7 was also very specific (92%) and moderately sensitive (66%) for bronchopulmonary NETs. CDX-2 was seen in 22 of 26 (85%) cases of GI NETs and in only 1 of 51 (2%) cases of extra-GI NETs. Thus, CDX-2 was 98% specific and 85% sensitive for GI NETs. In terms of metastatic NETs found in the liver, PDX-1 was positive in 5 of 5 cases of metastatic pancreatic NETs and 2 of 2 cases of metastatic duodenal NETs. PDX-1 is highly specific, with very good overall diagnostic accuracy for pancreatic NETs. An IHC panel including PDX-1, CDX-2, TTF-1, CK7, and CK20 may be useful in distinguishing NETs of pancreatic origin from other primaries.

  12. Diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopic approaches to intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Turner, Brian G; Brugge, William R

    2010-10-27

    Pancreatic cystic lesions are increasingly identified on routine imaging. One specific lesion, known as intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN), is a mucinous, pancreatic lesion characterized by papillary cells projecting from the pancreatic ductal epithelium. The finding of mucin extruding from the ampulla is essentially pathognomonic for diagnosing these lesions. IPMNs are of particular interest due to their malignant potential. Lesions range from benign, adenomatous growths to high-grade dysplasia and invasive cancer. These mucinous lesions therefore require immediate attention to determine the probability of malignancy and whether observation or resection is the best management choice. Unresected lesions need long-term surveillance monitoring for malignant transformation. The accurate diagnosis of these lesions is particularly challenging due to the substantial similarities in morphology of pancreatic cystic lesions and limitations in current imaging technologies. Endoscopic evaluation of these lesions provides additional imaging, molecular, and histologic data to aid in the identification of IPMN and to determine treatment course. The aim of this article is to focus on the diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopic approaches to IPMN.

  13. A Listeria Vaccine and Depletion of T-Regulatory Cells Activate Immunity Against Early Stage Pancreatic Intraepithelial Neoplasms and Prolong Survival of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Keenan, Bridget P.; Saenger, Yvonne; Kafrouni, Michel I.; Leubner, Ashley; Lauer, Peter; Maitra, Anirban; Rucki, Agnieszka A.; Gunderson, Andrew J.; Coussens, Lisa M.; Brockstedt, Dirk G.; Dubensky, Thomas W.; Hassan, Raffit; Armstrong, Todd D.; Jaffee, Elizabeth M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Premalignant lesions and early stage tumors contain immunosuppressive microenvironments that create barriers for cancer vaccines. KrasG12D/+;Trp53R172H/+;Pdx-1-Cre (KPC) mice, which express an activated form of Kras in pancreatic tissues, develop pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasms (PanIN) that progress to pancreatic ductal adeno-carcinoma (PDA). We used these mice to study immune suppression in PDA. METHODS We immunized KPC and KrasG12D/+;Pdx-1-Cre mice with attenuated intracellular Listeria monocytogenes (which induces CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell immunity) engineered to express KrasG12D (LM-Kras). The vaccine was given alone or in sequence with an anti-CD25 antibody (PC61) and cyclophosphamide, to deplete T-regulatory (Treg) cells. Survival times were measured; pancreatic and spleen tissues were collected and analyzed by histologic, flow cytometry, and immunohistochemical analyses. RESULTS Interferon γ-mediated, CD8+ T-cell responses were observed in KPC and KrasG12D/+;Pdx-1-Cre mice given LM-Kras, but not in unvaccinated mice. Administration of LM-Kras to KPC mice 4–6 weeks old (with early stage PanINs), depleted of Treg cells, significantly prolonged survival and reduced PanIN progression (median survival, 265 days), compared with unvaccinated mice (median survival, 150 days; P = .002), mice given only LM-Kras (median survival, 150 days; P = .050), and unvaccinated mice depleted of Treg cells (median (medium survival, 170 days; P = .048). In 8- to 12-week-old mice (with late-stage PanINs),¼LM-Kras, alone or in combination with Treg cell depletion, did not increase survival time or slow PanIN progression. The combination of LM-Kras and Treg cell depletion reduced numbers of Foxp3+CD4+ T cells in pancreatic lymph nodes, increased numbers of CD4+ T cells that secrete interleukin 17 and interferon g, and caused CD11b+Gr1+ cells in the pancreas to acquire an immunostimulatory phenotype. CONCLUSIONS Immunization of KPC mice with Listeria monocytogenes

  14. Solid-cystic (papillary-cystic) tumours within and outside the pancreas in men: report of two patients.

    PubMed

    Klöppel, G; Maurer, R; Hofmann, E; Lüthold, K; Oscarson, J; Forsby, N; Ihse, I; Ljungberg, O; Heitz, P U

    1991-01-01

    Solid-cystic (papillary-cystic) tumours (SCT) of the pancreas are distinctive neoplasms with a predilection for young female patients. This is the first detailed report describing the occurrence of SCT in two young male patients. Except for the extapancreatic occurrence of one of the tumours (in the retroperitoneal region behind the head of the pancreas), all other clinicopathological features were identical to those characterizing the SCT in women. Immunostaining was (at least focally) positive for Lu 5 (broad spectrum keratin marker), vimentin and alpha-1-antitrypsin. The tumours were negative for neuroendocrine markers (except for neuron-specific enolase), pancreatic hormones and enzymes, pancreatic stone protein, carcinoembryonic antigen, CA 19-9 and nuclear oestrogen and progesterone receptors. This report does not support the suggested female sex hormone dependence of SCT.

  15. Choline supplementation alters some amino acid concentrations with no change in homocysteine in children with cystic fibrosis and pancreatic insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Alshaikh, Belal; Schall, Joan I; Maqbool, Asim; Mascarenhas, Maria; Bennett, Michael J; Stallings, Virginia A

    2016-05-01

    The present study determined the plasma amino acid status in children with cystic fibrosis (CF) and pancreatic insufficiency (PI) in the modern medical and nutritional care setting and investigated the effect of choline supplementation on amino acid status. A total of 110 children aged 5 to 18 years with CF and PI were randomized to receive choline-enriched structured lipid (LYM-X-SORB) or placebo with similar energy and fat content. Plasma amino acids were measured at baseline and 3 and 12 months. We hypothesized that choline supplementation would result in lower plasma homocysteine concentrations in children with CF. At baseline, dietary protein intake was high and the amino acid profile was within laboratory reference ranges in most participants. Alanine and cysteine were elevated in 24% and 36% of participants, respectively. Children with baseline alanine above reference range had improved weight, body mass index, and fat-free mass. Low homocysteine was found in 62% of children 11 years and older. After 3 and 12 months, there was no effect of choline supplementation on methionine or homocysteine status. Compared with placebo, choline supplementation resulted in increased glycine and decreased threonine, histidine, valine, and total branch chained amino acids at 12 months. In conclusion, daily choline supplementation with LYM-X-SORB did not alter methionine-homocysteine metabolism but did result in alterations in other amino acids in children with CF and PI.

  16. Frequent Detection of Pancreatic Lesions in Asymptomatic High-Risk Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Canto, Marcia Irene; Hruban, Ralph H.; Fishman, Elliot K.; Kamel, Ihab R.; Schulick, Richard; Zhang, Zhe; Topazian, Mark; Takahashi, Naoki; Fletcher, Joel; Petersen, Gloria; Klein, Alison P.; Axilbund, Jennifer; Griffin, Constance; Syngal, Sapna; Saltzman, John R.; Mortele, Koenraad J.; Lee, Jeffrey; Tamm, Eric; Vikram, Raghunandan; Bhosale, Priya; Margolis, Daniel; Farrell, James; Goggins, Michael

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS The risk of pancreatic cancer is increased in patients with a strong family history of pancreatic cancer or a predisposing germline mutation. Screening can detect curable, non-invasive pancreatic neoplasms, but the optimal imaging approach is not known. We determined the baseline prevalence and characteristics of pancreatic abnormalities using 3 imaging tests to screen asymptomatic, high-risk individuals (HRI). METHODS We screened 225 asymptomatic adult HRI at 5 academic US medical centers once, using computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS). We compared results in a blinded, independent fashion. RESULTS Ninety-two of 216 HRI (42%) were found to have at least 1 pancreatic mass (84 cystic, 3 solid) or a dilated pancreatic duct (n=5) by any of the imaging modalities. Fifty-one of the 84 HRI with a cyst (60.7%) had multiple lesions, typically small (mean 0.55 cm, range 2–39 mm), in multiple locations. The prevalence of pancreatic lesions increased with age; they were detected in 14% of subjects <50 years old, 34% of subjects 50–59 years old, and 53% of subjects 60–69 years old (P<.0001). CT, MRI, and EUS detected a pancreatic abnormality in 11%, 33.3%, and 42.6% of the HRI, respectively. Among these abnormalities, proven or suspected neoplasms were identified in 85 HRI (82 intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms [IPMN] and 3 pancreatic endocrine tumors). Three of 5 HRI who underwent pancreatic resection had high-grade dysplasia in <3 cm IPMNs and in multiple intraepithelial neoplasias. CONCLUSIONS Screening of asymptomatic HRI frequently detects small pancreatic cysts, including curable, non-invasive high-grade neoplasms. EUS and MRI detect pancreatic lesions better than CT. PMID:22245846

  17. A MicroRNA Panel in Pancreatic Cyst Fluid for the Risk Stratification of Pancreatic Cysts in a Prospective Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Utomo, WK; Looijenga, LH; Bruno, MJ; Hansen, BE; Gillis, AJM; Biermann, K; Peppelenbosch, MP; Fuhler, GM; Braat, H

    2016-01-01

    A subset of pancreatic cystic neoplasms are regarded as precursor lesions of pancreatic cancer, but only a minority of all pancreatic cystic neoplasms will undergo malignant transformation. MicroRNAs are increasingly recognized as molecular targets in carcinogenesis. Previously, a 9-microRNA (miR) signature was suggested to discriminate between high risk and low risk pancreatic cystic neoplasm. In this study, we aimed to validate this 9-miR panel in a prospective cohort. Total miR was isolated from pancreatic cyst fluid and expression of miR18a, miR24, miR30a-3p, miR92a, miR99b, miR106b, miR142-3p, miR342-3p, and miR532-3p was analyzed by singleplex Taqman MicroRNA Assay. A total of 62 patient samples were analyzed. During follow-up, 24 (38.7%) patients underwent resection, of which 6 (9.7%) patients showed at least high grade dysplasia. A logistic regression model presented a “predicted risk” score which significantly differed between low and high risk cysts, either including all patients or only those with histological confirmation of diagnosis. Using a set cut-off of 50%, the sensitivity of the model for the total cohort was 10.0%, specificity 100.0%, positive predicted value 100.0%, negative predicted value 85.2%, and diagnostic accuracy of 85.5%. Thus, while observing a significant difference between low and high risk cysts, clinical implementation of this biomarker panel is as yet unlikely to be beneficial in the management of pancreatic cysts.

  18. Erlotinib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Pancreatic Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-07

    Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm of the Pancreas; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer

  19. Mucin-producing pancreatic tumors: historical review of its nosological concept.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, M; Manabe, T

    1994-08-01

    A brief historic outline of the problem of mucin-producing pancreatic tumors is presented. Based on the authors' observations, clinical aspects and pathomorphology of these tumors have been described. The authors propose their own classification of this tumor type which is based on the literature published so far. Their classification also takes into account the localization of lesions. Reference is made to the concept described by the term "mucinous ductetatic/cystic lesions" (MDCL) and it is also pointed out that mucinous carcinoma may develop on the background of MDCL. Since the appearance of the term "mucus secreting pancreatic cancer" or "mucin-producing pancreatic tumor", many similar and/or related conditions have been described especially in Japan under the same or different names. However, there seems to be some confusion about the concept of this condition not only among clinicians but also among pathologists. In addition, another entity, mucinous cystic neoplasms of the pancreas, was proposed and may have provided some overlap with the former conditions in its concept. Furthermore, definitions of these two conditions varied according to the authors. In this paper, therefore, we review and critically analyze cases of mucin-producing pancreatic tumor (MPPT) as well as mucinous cystic neoplasm (MCN) of the pancreas, and intend to classify them under a generic term, i.e. "mucinous ductectatic/cystic lesions (MDCL) of the pancreas". PMID:7947630

  20. Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, R M S; Byrne, M F; Baillie, J

    2003-04-26

    In the past decade, our understanding of the genetic basis, pathogenesis, and natural history of pancreatitis has grown strikingly. In severe acute pancreatitis, intensive medical support and non-surgical intervention for complications keeps patients alive; surgical drainage (necrosectomy) is reserved for patients with infected necrosis for whom supportive measures have failed. Enteral feeding has largely replaced the parenteral route; controversy remains with respect to use of prophylactic antibiotics. Although gene therapy for chronic pancreatitis is years away, our understanding of the roles of gene mutations in hereditary and sporadic pancreatitis offers tantalising clues about the disorder's pathogenesis. The division between acute and chronic pancreatitis has always been blurred: now, genetics of the disorder suggest a continuous range of disease rather than two separate entities. With recognition of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia, we see that chronic pancreatitis is a premalignant disorder in some patients. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic ultrasound are destined to replace endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography for many diagnostic indications in pancreatic disease.

  1. Pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the hormones insulin and glucagon into the bloodstream. Pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas. It happens when digestive enzymes start digesting the pancreas itself. Pancreatitis can be acute or chronic. Either form is ...

  2. Partial pancreatic head resection for intraductal papillary mucinous carcinoma originating in a branch of the duct of santorini.

    PubMed

    Nakagohri, T; Konishi, M; Inoue, K; Izuishi, K; Kinoshita, T

    2002-01-01

    We report partial pancreatic head resection of intraductal papillary mucinous carcinoma originating in a branch of the duct of Santorini. The tumor was located in the ventral part of pancreatic head at a distance from the Wirsung duct. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography accurately showed the communication between the duct of Santorini and the cystic tumor, and was useful for determining the part of the pancreas to be resected. Both the duct of Wirsung and the duct of Santorini were preserved. Partial pancreatic head resection would play an important role in surgical management of low-grade malignant neoplasm.

  3. Are Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Para-aortic Contouring Guidelines for Pancreatic Neoplasm Applicable to Other Malignancies—Assessment of Nodal Distribution in Gynecological Malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Kabolizadeh, Peyman; Fulay, Suyash; Beriwal, Sushil

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy is used to reduce dose to adjacent critical structures while maintaining adequate target coverage, but it requires precise target localization. We report the 3-dimensional distribution of para-aortic (PA) lymph nodes (LN) in pelvic malignancies. We propose a guideline to accurately define the PA LN by anatomic landmarks and compare our data with published guidelines for pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis was performed on 46 patients with pelvic malignancies and positive PA LNs. Positive LNs were defined based on size and morphology or fluorodeoxyglucose avidity. All PA LNs were characterized into 3 groups based on location: left PA (between aorta and left psoas muscle), aortocaval (between aorta and inferior vena cava), and right paracaval (between inferior vena cava and right psoas muscle). Patients with retrocrural LNs were also analyzed. Results: One hundred thirty-three positive PA LNs were evaluated. The majority of the PA LNs were in the left PA (59%) and aortocaval (35) regions, and only 8% were in the right paracaval region. All patients with positive right paracaval LNs also had involved left PA LNs, with only 1 exception. The highest PA LN involvement was at the level of the renal vessels and was seen in 28% of patients. Of these patients with disease extending to renal vessels, 38% had retrocrural LN involvement. Conclusions: The nodal contouring for the PA region should not be defined by a fixed circumferential margin around the vessels. The left PA and aortocaval spaces should be covered adequately because these are common locations of PA LNs. For microscopic disease superiorly, contouring should extend up to renal vessels rather than a fixed bony landmark. For patients who have nodal involvement at renal vessels, one can consider including retrocrural LNs. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Para-aortic Contouring Guidelines for Pancreatic Neoplasm are not applicable to

  4. Fat Soluble Vitamins in Cystic Fibrosis and Pancreatic Insufficiency: Efficacy of a Nutrition Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Bertolaso, Chiara; Groleau, Veronique; Schall, Joan I.; Maqbool, Asim; Mascarenhas, Maria; Latham, Norma; Dougherty, Kelly A.; Stallings, Virginia A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To assess the impact of LYM-X-SORB™ (LXS), an organized lipid matrix that has previously been shown to be absorbable without pancreatic enzyme therapy on fat soluble vitamin status in children with CF and PI. Methods Children with CF and PI were randomized to daily LXS or an iso-caloric placebo comparison supplement for 12 months. Serum vitamins A (retinol), D (25-hydroxyvitamin D[25D]), E (α-tocopherol, α-tocopherol:cholesterol ratio) and K (%undercarboxylated osteocalcin [%ucOC] and plasma proteins induced by vitamin K absence factor II [PIVKA II]) were assessed at baseline and 12 months. Dietary intake was determined using 3-day weighed food records, and supplemental vitamin intake by a comprehensive questionnaire. Results 58 subjects (32 males, age 10.3±2.9 yrs [mean±SD]) with complete serum vitamin, dietary and supplemental vitamin data were analyzed. After adjusting for dietary and supplemental vitamin intake, serum retinol increased 3.0±1.4 μg/dL (coefficient±SE) (Adj R2=0.02, p=0.03) and vitamin K status improved as demonstrated by a decreased %ucOC of −6.0±1.6% by 12 months (Adj R2=0.15, p<0.001). These changes occurred in both the LXS and placebo comparison groups. No changes in serum 25D or α-tocopherol were detected. Both nutrition interventions increased caloric intake a mean of 83±666 kcal/d by 12 months. Conclusions Vitamin A and K status improved, while vitamin D and E status was unchanged over 12 month of LXS and iso-caloric placebo comparison supplement in children with CF and PI. PMID:24345827

  5. Gemcitabine Hydrochloride With or Without Erlotinib Hydrochloride Followed By the Same Chemotherapy Regimen With or Without Radiation Therapy and Capecitabine or Fluorouracil in Treating Patients With Pancreatic Cancer That Has Been Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-04

    Pancreatic Acinar Cell Carcinoma; Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Intraductal Papillary-Mucinous Neoplasm; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer

  6. An apparent idiopathic case of relapsing acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Nocente, R; Silveri, N G; Gasbarrini, A; Cicconi, V; Caminiti, G; Mutignani, M; Manfredi, R; Gasbarrini, G

    2001-01-01

    We describe a case of relapsing acute pancreatitis apparently idiopathic in a 55-year-old man. The patient did not smoke and was a modest and irregular drinker of wine. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography showed an initial dilatation of secondary ducts like a chronic pancreatitis of class I of Cremer. Ultrasound and computed tomography resulted negative for pancreatic lesions. In the follow-up however, magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography detected the presence of an intraductal mucin-hypersecreting neoplasm, a duct-ectatic mucinous cystic tumor of the pancreas, in the uncinate process. This is a benign lesion clearly recognized nowadays by magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, because this radiological technique shows the grape-like clusters of cystic lesions in secondary ducts communicating with the main duct on the same plane. The radiological picture above excludes a malignant lesion and a biopsy specimen is not required. Furthermore, an intraductal mucin-hypersecreting neoplasm of the pancreas does not require an immediate surgical resection because of its slow evolution and can be followed-up. Conversely cystoadenocarcinoma spreads in peripheral ducts and does not communicate with the Wirsung duct. It requires both surgical resection and a biopsy specimen for histological diagnosis. In the last episode of acute pancreatitis, a sphincterotomy was performed at endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and our patient had no more pain for one year.

  7. Retroperitoneal cystic masses: CT, clinical, and pathologic findings and literature review.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dal Mo; Jung, Dong Hae; Kim, Hana; Kang, Jee Hee; Kim, Sun Ho; Kim, Ji Hye; Hwang, Hee Young

    2004-01-01

    Cystic lesions of the retroperitoneum can be classified as either neoplastic or nonneoplastic. Neoplastic lesions include cystic lymphangioma, mucinous cystadenoma, cystic teratoma, cystic mesothelioma, müllerian cyst, epidermoid cyst, tailgut cyst, bronchogenic cyst, cystic change in solid neoplasms, pseudomyxoma retroperitonei, and perianal mucinous carcinoma. Nonneoplastic lesions include pancreatic pseudocyst, nonpancreatic pseudocyst, lymphocele, urinoma, and hematoma. Because the clinical implications of and therapeutic strategies for retroperitoneal cystic masses vary depending on the cause, the ability to noninvasively differentiate between masses is important. Although there is substantial overlap of computed tomographic (CT) findings in various retroperitoneal cysts, some CT features, along with clinical characteristics, may suggest a specific diagnosis. CT may provide important information regarding lesion location, size, and shape; the presence and thickness of a wall; the presence of septa, calcifications, or fat; and involvement of adjacent structures. The most important clinical parameters include patient gender, age, symptoms, and clinical history. Familiarity with the CT and clinical features of various retroperitoneal cystic masses facilitates accurate diagnosis and treatment.

  8. Laparoscopic pancreatic surgery.

    PubMed

    Mori, Toshiyuki; Abe, Nobutsugu; Sugiyama, Masanori; Atomi, Yutaka

    2005-01-01

    In the past, in the pancreas, a minimally invasive technique was only used for diagnostic laparoscopy in evaluating periampullary malignancy. Recent advances in operative techniques and instrumentation have empowered surgeons to perform virtually all procedures in the pancreas, including the Whipple procedure. Some of these procedures represent the most sophisticated application of minimally invasive surgery, and their outcomes are reportedly better than those of conventional open approaches. In addition to the evaluation of resectability in periampullary malignancy, palliative procedures, including biliary bypasses and gastrojejunostomy, can be performed laparoscopically. Although it is reportedly feasible to perform a Whipple procedure laparescopically, no benefit of the laparoscopic approach over the conventional open approach has been documented. Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy, with or without preserving the spleen, is technically easier than the Whipple procedure, and is more widely accepted. Indications for laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy include cystic neoplasms and islet-cell tumors located in the pancreatic body or tail. Complications of acute and chronic pancreatitis may be treated with the use of surgical laparoscopy. When infected necrotizing pancreatitis is identified, surgical intervention for drainage and debridement is required. According to the type and location of infected necrotizing pancreatitis, three laparoscopic operative approaches have been reported: infracolic debridement, retroperitoneal debridement, and laparoscopic transgastric pancreatic necrosectomy. When internal drainage is indicated for a pseudocyst, a minimally invasive technique is a promising option. Laparoscopic pseudocyst gastrostomy, cyst jejunostomy, or cyst duodenostomy can be performed, depending on the size and location of the pseudocyst. Especially when a pseudocyst is located in close contact with the posterior wall of the stomach, it is best drained by a

  9. Cystic Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Diseases > Lung Disease Lookup > Cystic Fibrosis Cystic Fibrosis Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is an inherited disease that ... quality of life has improved. Learn About Cystic Fibrosis Cystic fibrosis is a genetic (inherited) condition that ...

  10. Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Myelodysplastic/ ...

  11. Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Chronic ...

  12. Pancreatic Cancer Screening of High-Risk Individuals in Arkansas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-20

    Pancreatic Neoplasms; Peutz-Jegher's Syndrome; BRCA1 Gene Mutation; BRCA2 Gene Mutation; Ataxia Telangiectasia; Familial Atypical Mole-Malignant Melanoma Syndrome; Colorectal Neoplasms, Hereditary Nonpolyposis; Hereditary Pancreatitis

  13. Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm of Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Norman Oneil; al Qadhi, Hani; al Wahibi, Khalifa

    2015-01-01

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) of the pancreas are neoplasms that are characterized by ductal dilation, intraductal papillary growth, and thick mucus secretion. This relatively recently defined pathology is evolving in terms of its etiopathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis, management, and treatment guidelines. A PubMed database search was performed. All the relevant abstracts in English language were reviewed and the articles in which cases of IPMN could be identified were further scrutinized. Information of IPMN was derived, and duplication of information in several articles and those with areas of persisting uncertainties were excluded. The recent consensus guidelines were examined. The reported incidence of malignancy varies from 57% to 92% in the main duct-IPMN (MD-IPMN) and from 6% to 46% in the branch duct-IPMN (BD-IPMN). The features of high-risk malignant lesions that raise concern include obstructive jaundice in a patient with a cystic lesion in the pancreatic head, the findings on radiological imaging of a mass lesion of >30 mm, enhanced solid component, and the main pancreatic duct (MPD) of size ≥10 mm; while duct size 5-9 mm and cyst size <3 mm are considered as “worrisome features.” Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) are primary investigations in diagnosing and following up on these patients. The role of pancreatoscopy and the analysis of aspirated cystic fluid for cytology and DNA analysis is still to be established. In general, resection is recommended for most MD-IPMN, mixed variant, and symptomatic BD-IPMN. The 5-year survival of patients after surgical resection for noninvasive IPMN is reported to be at 77-100%, while for those with invasive carcinoma, it is significantly lower at 27-60%. The follow-up of these patients could vary from 6 months to 1 year and would depend on the risk stratification for invasive malignancy and the pathology of the resected specimen. The understanding of

  14. Efficacy and Safety of a New Formulation of Pancrelipase (Ultrase MT20) in the Treatment of Malabsorption in Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Konstan, Michael W.; Liou, Theodore G.; Strausbaugh, Steven D.; Ahrens, Richard; Kanga, Jamshed F.; Graff, Gavin R.; Moffett, Kathryn; Millard, Susan L.; Nasr, Samya Z.; Siméon, Édith; Spénard, Jean; Grondin, Josée

    2010-01-01

    Background. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is the standard of care for treatment of malabsorption in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (PI). Aim. To evaluate efficacy and safety of a new formulation of pancrelipase (Ultrase MT20) in patients with CF and PI. Coefficients of fat absorption (CFA%) and nitrogen absorption (CNA%) were the main efficacy parameters. Safety was evaluated by monitoring laboratory analyses, adverse events (AEs), and overall signs and symptoms. Methods. Patients (n = 31) were randomized in a crossover design comparing this pancrelipase with placebo during 2 inpatient evaluation periods (6-7 days each). Fat and protein/nitrogen ingestion and excretion were measured from food diaries and 72-hour stool collections. CFA% and CNA% were calculated for each period and compared. Results. Twenty-four patients provided analyzable data. This pancrelipase increased mean CFA% and CNA% (+34.7% and +25.7%, resp., P < .0001 for both), reduced stool frequency, and improved stool consistency compared with placebo. Placebo-treated patients reported more AEs, with gastrointestinal symptoms being the most frequently reported AE. Conclusions. This pancrelipase is a safe and effective treatment for malabsorption associated with exocrine PI in patients with CF. PMID:21197074

  15. Diabetes in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Bridges, Nicola

    2013-05-01

    Cystic fibrosis related diabetes (CFRD) is a common complication of cystic fibrosis, caused by a fall in insulin secretion with age in individuals with pancreatic insufficiency. CFRD is associated with worse clinical status and increased mortality. Treatment of CFRD with insulin results in sustained improvements in lung function and nutrition. While clinical experience with insulin treatment in CF has increased, the selection of who to treat and glycaemic targets remain unclear.

  16. Serous neoplasms of the pancreas constitute a continuous spectrum of morphological patterns rather than distinct clinico-pathological variants. A study of 40 cases.

    PubMed

    Pająk, Jacek; Liszka, Łukasz; Mrowiec, Sławomir; Zielińska-Pająk, Ewa; Gołka, Dariusz; Lampe, Paweł

    2011-12-01

    Serous neoplasms (SN) of the pancreas account for 1-2% of all pancreatic tumours. Six morphological variants of SN were previously recognized: serous microcystic (cyst)adenoma, serous macrocystic (cyst)adenoma, von Hippel-Lindau-associated serous cystic neoplasm, solid serous adenoma/neoplasm, mixed serous-neuroendocrine neoplasm and serous cystadenocarcinoma. It was recently postulated that SN shows a continuous spectrum of morphological patterns rather than distinct clinico-pathological subtypes. To address this issue, we performed a detailed review of 40 SN cases diagnosed at our institution between 1989 and 2011. We found 11 cases of serous microcystic (cyst)adenoma, 5 cases of serous macrocystic (cyst)adenoma, and a single case of von Hippel-Lindau-associated serous cystic neoplasm. Apart from that, we found 20 cases of SN which showed features of both microcystic and macrocystic (cyst)adenomas, 2 cases of small 'incipient' SN and a single case of a mixed microcystic and solid adenoma. In conclusion, we showed that 'borderline' lesions among SNs truly exist and are not rare. The reason for such a wide diversity of morphological patterns of SN remains unknown.

  17. Incidental isolated pancreatic hydatid cyst.

    PubMed

    Kısaoğlu, Abdullah; Özoğul, Bünyami; Atamanalp, Sabri Selçuk; Pirimoğlu, Berhan; Aydınlı, Bülent; Korkut, Ercan

    2015-03-01

    Isolated pancreatic hydatid cysts are a rare parasitic disease even in endemic areas. It is difficult to discriminate primary pancreatic hydatid cysts from other cystic and solid lesions of the pancreas. This is a case report of an incidental isolated pancreatic hydatid cyst. A heterogeneous cystic lesion in the body of the pancreas was identified on magnetic resonance imaging of a patient previously diagnosed patient with cholelithiasis, and because of the malignant possibility of the lesion, splenectomy with distal pancreatectomy and cholecystectomy was performed. The histopathologic diagnosis was reported as a hydatid cyst. Pancreatic hydatid cysts should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic pseudocysts and cystic malignancies.

  18. Pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the abdomen. In 1 out of 4 childhood cases, a cause is never found. What are the symptoms of pancreatitis? Inflammation of the pancreas is often associated with pain in the upper abdomen and/or the back which may develop slowly, ...

  19. High Volume Washing of the Abdomen in Increasing Survival After Surgery in Patients With Pancreatic Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-18

    Acinar Cell Carcinoma; Ampulla of Vater Adenocarcinoma; Cholangiocarcinoma; Duodenal Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm, Pancreatobiliary-Type; Periampullary Adenocarcinoma

  20. Heterotopic gastrointestinal mucosa and pancreatic tissue in a retroperitoneal tumor.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Naoki; Hakamada, Kenichi; Narumi, Shunji; Totsuka, Eishi; Aoki, Kazunori; Kamata, Yoshimasa; Sasaki, Mutsuo

    2006-01-01

    We believe that this is the first report of a retroperitoneal tumor consisting of heterotopic gastrointestinal mucosa and pancreatic tissue. The patient was a 19-year-old woman with the chief complaint being occasional back pain. Abdominal computerized tomography demonstrated a 3.1 x 2.5 x 3.2-cm low-density solid and cystic lesion adjoining the left renal vein between the aorta and inferior vena cava. Angiography revealed that the inferior vena cava was displaced by the hypovascular tumor. The retroperitoneal lesion was diagnosed preoperatively as a benign tumor such as a neurogenic neoplasm or lymphangioma. At laparotomy, a cystic tumor was found, which existed behind the inferior vena cava and renal vessels, and contained reddish-brown fluid, suggesting hemorrhage in the past. The cut surface of the tumor showed a unilocular cyst with partially hypertrophic wall. Histopathological examination revealed a cystic tumor lined with heterotopic gastric and duodenal mucosa, with pancreatic tissue in the muscularis propria. In addition, evidence of bleeding from the gastric mucosa was observed in the cystic tumor. External secretion from these tissues could have triggered the hemorrhage and expanded the tumor, possibly resulting in the back pain.

  1. Imaging of miscellaneous pancreatic pathology (trauma, transplant, infections, and deposition).

    PubMed

    Holalkere, Nagaraj-Setty; Soto, Jorge

    2012-05-01

    In this article's coverage of miscellaneous pancreatic topics, a brief review of pancreatic trauma; pancreatic transplantation; rare infections, such as tuberculosis; deposition disorders, including fatty replacement and hemochromatosis; cystic fibrosis; and others are discussed with pertinent case examples.

  2. Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm of the Pancreas: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Shu-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) is a cystic tumor of the pancreas. The etiology is unknown, but increasing evidence suggests the involvement of several tumorigenesis pathways, including an association with hereditary syndromes. IPMN occurs more commonly in men, with the mean age at diagnosis between 64 and 67 years old. At the time of diagnosis, it may be benign, with or without dysplasia, or frankly malignant with an invasive carcinoma. Tumors arising from the main pancreatic duct are termed main-duct IPMNs, those involving the branch ducts, branch-duct IPMNs. In general, small branch-duct IPMNs are benign, particularly in asymptomatic patients, and can be safely followed. In contrast, main-duct tumors should be surgically resected and examined carefully for an invasive component. In the absence of invasion, patient's survival is excellent, from 94 to 100%. For patients with an IPMN-associated invasive carcinoma, the prognosis overall is better than those with a de novo pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, with a 5-year survival of 40% to 60% in some series. However, no survival advantage can be demonstrated if the invasive component in an IPMN patient is that of the conventional tubular type (versus mucinous carcinoma). Several histomorphologic variants are recognized, although the clinical significance of this “subtyping” is not well defined. PMID:24278753

  3. Natural History and Management of Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasms: Current Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Stefan; Lerch, Markus M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background With the use of modern cross-sectional abdominal imaging modalities, an increasing number of cystic pancreatic lesions are identified incidentally. Although there is no pathological diagnosis available in most cases, it is believed that the majority of these lesions display small branch-duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (BD-IPMNs) of the pancreas. Even though a number of large clinical series have been published, many uncertainties remain with regard to this entity of mucinous cystic neoplasms. Methods Systematic literature review. Results Main-duct (MD) and mixed-type IPMNs harbor a high risk of malignant transformation. It is conceivable that most IPMNs with involvement of the main duct tend to progress to invasive carcinoma over time. Thus, formal oncologic resection is the treatment of choice in surgically fit patients. In contrast, the data regarding BD-IPMN remain equivocal, resulting in conflicting concepts. To date, it is not clear whether and which BD-IPMNs progress to carcinoma and how long this progression takes. Conclusion While patients with MD-IPMNs should undergo surgical resection if comorbidities and life expectancy permit this, the management of small BD-IPMNs remains controversial. Population-based studies with long-term follow-up are needed to define which cohort of patients can be observed safely without immediate resection. PMID:26288612

  4. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy during pancreatic insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Berry, Amy J

    2014-06-01

    Pancreatic stimulation and therefore digestion is a tightly controlled and hormonally mediated process. Any alterations affecting any of the systematic steps for successful digestion and absorption to occur will impair appropriate pancreatic enzymatic secretion, entry into the bowel lumen, functionality once inside the lumen, and thus appropriate mixing with foods and nutrients. Many causes of pancreatic insufficiency may require the initiation of pancreatic enzyme therapy, including but not limited to cystic fibrosis, pancreatic cancer, acute and chronic pancreatitis, and pancreatic surgery. This purpose of this article is to help clarify the conditions that cause pancreatic insufficiency, how to determine if the patient is malabsorbing, and the best use of pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy for treatment in these conditions. The first step in determining if pancreatic enzyme therapy is appropriate is to determine if the patient is malabsorbing specifically due to pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. An overview of the methods used to determine pancreatic insufficiency is provided, as well as appropriate treatment methods. Recent Food and Drug Administration regulations require a more thorough process, including randomized controlled trials to prove the safety and efficacy of pancreatic enzymes, to approve them for use. The studies used to verify efficacy also are examined. Last, dosing guidelines and some unconventional ways to administer pancreatic enzymes, such as during enteral feedings, are reviewed.

  5. Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Myelodysplastic/ ...

  6. Salivary gland neoplasms in children.

    PubMed

    Ogata, H; Ebihara, S; Mukai, K

    1994-04-01

    We reviewed 20 children with salivary gland neoplasms treated at the National Cancer Center Hospital between 1964 and 1990. Retrospective analyses of pathological features and the clinical courses of these cases constituted the bases of the present study. The age of onset was late childhood in 19 cases, ranging from 9 to 20 years, but one patient was 1 year old. Approximately half (55%) the neoplasms were malignant. Histologically, all the benign neoplasms were pleomorphic adenomas (nine cases) and the most common malignant neoplasm was mucoepidermoid carcinoma (six cases, 55%), followed by adenocarcinoma (three cases, 27%), adenoid cystic carcinoma (one case, 9%) and malignant mixed tumor (one case, 9%). Recurrences of pleomorphic adenomas occurred only in the three patients initially treated with enucleation; meanwhile, five patients treated with superficial parotidectomy, and one with submandibular glandectomy, had no recurrence. Recurrences of malignant tumors occurred in all six patients initially treated with enucleation only and in one with superficial parotidectomy but not in two patients treated with total parotidectomy. In seven patients treated with prophylactic neck dissection, no metastasis was identified pathologically. The results support no enucleation of the tumor being applied at the first operation for curing both benign and malignant salivary gland tumors. The indication for radical neck dissection appears to be limited.

  7. Precursor Lesions of Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Higashi, Michiyo; Yamada, Norishige; Goto, Masamichi

    2008-01-01

    This review article describes morphological aspects, gene abnormalities, and mucin expression profiles in precursor lesions such as pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN), intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN), and mucinous cystic neoplasm (MCN) of the pancreas, as well as their relation to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). The gene abnormalities in precursors of PDAC are summarized as follows: (1) KRAS mutation and p16/CDKN2A inactivation are early events whose frequencies increase with the dysplasia grade in both PanIN and IPMN; (2) TP53 mutation and SMAD4/DPC4 inactivation are late events observed in PanIN3 or carcinomatous change of IPMN in both PanIN and IPMN, although the frequency of the TP53 mutation is lower in IPMN than in PDAC; and (3) also in MCN, KRAS mutation is an early event whose frequency increases with the dysplasia grade, whereas TP53 mutation and SMAD4/DPC4 inactivation are evident only in the carcinoma. The mucin expression profiles in precursors of PDAC are summarized as follows: (1) MUC1 expression increases with the PanIN grade, and is high in PDAC; (2) the expression pattern of MUC2 differs markedly between the major subtypes of IPMN with different malignancy potentials (i.e., IPMN-intestinal type with MUC2+ expression and IPMN-gastric type with MUC2- expression); (3) MUC2 is not expressed in any grade of PanINs, which is useful for differentiating PanIN from intestinal-type IPMN; (4) de novo expression of MUC4, which appears to increase with the dysplasia grade; and (5) high de novo expression of MUC5AC in all grades of PanINs, all types of IPMN, MCN, and PDAC. PMID:20485640

  8. K-Ras and cyclooxygenase-2 coactivation augments intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm and Notch1 mimicking human pancreas lesions

    PubMed Central

    Chiblak, Sara; Steinbauer, Brigitte; Pohl-Arnold, Andrea; Kucher, Dagmar; Abdollahi, Amir; Schwager, Christian; Höft, Birgit; Esposito, Irene; Müller-Decker, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Mutational activation of K-Ras is an initiating event of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDAC) that may develop either from pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) or intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN). Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)-derived prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is causally related to pancreatic carcinogenesis. Here, we deciphered the impact of COX-2, a key modulator of inflammation, in concert with active mutant K-RasG12D on tumor burden and gene expression signature using compound mutant mouse lines. Concomitant activation of COX-2 and K-RasG12D accelerated the progression of pancreatic intraepithelial lesions predominantly with a cystic papillary phenotype resembling human IPMN. Transcriptomes derived from laser capture microdissected preneoplastic lesions of single and compound mutants revealed a signature that was significantly enriched in Notch1 signaling components. In vitro, Notch1 signaling was COX-2-dependent. In line with these findings, human IPMN stratified into intestinal, gastric and pancreatobillary types displayed Notch1 immunosignals with high prevalence, especially in the gastric lesions. In conclusion, a yet unknown link between activated Ras, protumorigenic COX-2 and Notch1 in IPMN onset was unraveled. PMID:27381829

  9. Clinicopathological Characteristics and Molecular Analyses of Multifocal Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasms of the Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Matthaei, Hanno; Norris, Alexis L.; Tsiatis, Athanasios C.; Olino, Kelly; Hong, Seung-Mo; dal Molin, Marco; Goggins, Michael G.; Canto, Marcia; Horton, Karen M.; Jackson, Keith D.; Capelli, Paola; Zamboni, Giuseppe; Bortesi, Laura; Furukawa, Toru; Egawa, Shinichi; Ishida, Masaharu; Ottomo, Shigeru; Unno, Michiaki; Motoi, Fuyuhiko; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Edil, Barish H.; Cameron, John L.; Eshleman, James R.; Schulick, Richard D.; Maitra, Anirban; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To examine the clinicopathologic features and clonal relationship of multifocal intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) of the pancreas. Background Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms are increasingly diagnosed cystic precursor lesions of pancreatic cancer. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms can be multifocal and a potential cause of recurrence after partial pancreatectomy. Methods Thirty four patients with histologically documented multifocal IPMNs were collected and their clinicopathologic features catalogued. In addition, thirty multifocal IPMNs arising in 13 patients from 3 hospitals were subjected to laser microdissection followed by KRAS pyrosequencing and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) analysis on chromosomes 6q and 17p. Finally, we sought to assess the clonal relationships among multifocal IPMNs. Results We identified 34 patients with histologically documented multifocal IPMNs. Synchronous IPMNs were present in 29 patients (85%), whereas 5 (15%) developed clinically significant metachronous IPMNs. Six patients (18%) had a history of familial pancreatic cancer. A majority of multifocal IPMNs (86% synchronous, 100% metachronous) were composed of branch duct lesions, and typically demonstrated a gastric-foveolar subtype epithelium with low or intermediate grades of dysplasia. Three synchronous IPMNs (10%) had an associated invasive cancer. Molecular analysis of multiple IPMNs from 13 patients demonstrated nonoverlapping KRAS gene mutations in 8 patients (62%) and discordant LOH profiles in 7 patients (54%); independent genetic alterations were established in 9 of the 13 patients (69%). Conclusions The majority of multifocal IPMNs arise independently and exhibit a gastric-foveolar subtype, with low to intermediate dysplasia. These findings underscore the importance of life-long follow-up after resection for an IPMN. PMID:22167000

  10. Salivary gland neoplasms: an analysis of 74 cases.

    PubMed

    Sirohi, Deepika; Sharma, Rohit; Sinha, Ramen; Suresh Menon, P

    2009-06-01

    Between 2006 and 2009, 74 cases of salivary gland neoplasms were analyzed retrospectively, of which 44 (60%) were benign and 30 (40%) malignant. 61 % percent of neoplasms were in the parotid gland, 22% in the minor salivary glands including sublingual salivary glands, and 17% in the submandibular glands. The most common benign neoplasm was pleomorphic adenoma (64%), and the most common malignant neoplasm were adenoid cystic carcinoma (17%) and mucoepidermoid carcinoma (23%). We analyze the incidence and distribution of all types of salivary gland neoplasms in our series, and provide data for comparison with other epidemiological studies from different geographical sites and races. Demographic data from these studies help us to a better understanding of the biological and clinical characteristics of the disease. Further epidemiological surveys should be encouraged for better understanding of the disease and to provide early and better treatment of salivary gland neoplasms.

  11. Retroperitoneal cystic lymphangioma.

    PubMed

    Nuzzo, G; Lemmo, G; Marrocco-Trischitta, M M; Boldrini, G; Giovannini, I

    1996-03-01

    Two cases of retroperitoneal cystic lymphangioma (CL) are presented; the current literature on this rare, benign neoplasm of the lymphatic system is reviewed. This tumor consists of various numbers of cyst-like cavities filled with a serous, serosanguineous or chylous fluid. The histogenesis of CL is still uncertain. Most commonly CL occurs in the neck and in the axillary region, whereas it is rare in the retroperitoneum. Although retroperitoneal CL is a benign lesion, it may cause significant morbidity due to its large size, and its often invasive character with a strong tendency to secondary infection. The treatment of choice is surgical excision.

  12. Cyst infection of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas: management of a rare complication: report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kenji; Karasaki, Hidenori; Mizukami, Yusuke; Kawamoto, Toru; Kono, Toru; Imai, Koji; Einama, Takahiro; Taniguchi, Masahiko; Kohgo, Yutaka; Furukawa, Hiroyuki

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the cyst infection of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm in 2 patients. The patients were 62- and 74-year-old men. The initial symptom was acute febrile abdominal pain. Laboratory tests revealed severe infection (C-reactive protein concentrations were 23.3 µg/mL in patient 1 and 22.3 µg/mL in patient 2) and multilocular cystic masses (the diameters were 70 mm in patient 1 and 50 mm in patient 2) at the pancreatic head that involved peripancreatic vessels were demonstrated by computed tomography. Laboratory and radiographic findings were markedly improved by endoscopic transpapillary drainage. The enteric bacteria were detected in the drainage specimens. Curative resection was achieved, and histological findings indicated a carcinoma in situ in patient 1 and an invasive carcinoma in patient 2. Neither hyperamylasemia nor histological fat necrosis, frequently observed in acute pancreatitis, was evident. Both patients were free from recurrence after surgery (17 months in patient 1, and 18 months in patient 2). Cyst infection is an unknown complication of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm. Transpapillary drainage is highly recommended as an initial intervention. It is difficult to distinguish between cyst infection and unresectable invasive carcinoma with imaging modalities; however, surgical intervention after drainage may contribute to long-term survival. PMID:24622083

  13. Characterization of pancreatic lesions from MT-tgf alpha, Ela-myc and MT-tgf alpha/Ela-myc single and double transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Liao, Dezhong Joshua; Wang, Yong; Wu, Jiusheng; Adsay, Nazmi Volkan; Grignon, David; Khanani, Fayyaz; Sarkar, Fazlul H

    2006-07-05

    In order to identify good animal models for investigating therapeutic and preventive strategies for pancreatic cancer, we analyzed pancreatic lesions from several transgenic models and made a series of novel findings. Female MT-tgf alpha mice of the MT100 line developed pancreatic proliferation, acinar-ductal metaplasia, multilocular cystic neoplasms, ductal adenocarcinomas and prominent fibrosis, while the lesions in males were less severe. MT-tgf alpha-ES transgenic lines of both sexes developed slowly progressing lesions that were similar to what was seen in MT100 males. In both MT100 and MT-tgf alpha-ES lines, TGF alpha transgene was expressed mainly in proliferating ductal cells. Ela-myc transgenic mice with a mixed C57BL/6, SJL and FVB genetic background developed pancreatic tumors at 2-7 months of age, and half of the tumors were ductal adenocarcinomas, similar to what was reported originally by Sandgren et al 1. However, in 20% of the mice, the tumors metastasized to the liver. MT100/Ela-myc and MT-tgf alpha-ES/Ela-myc double transgenic mice developed not only acinar carcinomas and mixed carcinomas as previously reported but also various ductal-originated lesions, including multilocular cystic neoplasms and ductal adenocarcinomas. The double transgenic tumors were more malignant and metastasized to the liver at a higher frequency (33%) compared with the Ela-myc tumors. Sequencing of the coding region of p16ink4, k-ras and Rb cDNA in small numbers of pancreatic tumors did not identify mutations. The short latency for tumor development, the variety of tumor morphology and the liver metastases seen in Ela-myc and MT-tgf alpha/Ela-myc mice make these animals good models for investigating new therapeutic and preventive strategies for pancreatic cancer.

  14. Hereditary pancreatitis for the endoscopist.

    PubMed

    Patel, Milan R; Eppolito, Amanda L; Willingham, Field F

    2013-03-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis shares a majority of clinical and morphologic features with chronic alcoholic pancreatitis, but may present at an earlier age. The term hereditary pancreatitis has primarily been associated with mutations in the serine protease 1 gene (PRSS1) which encodes for cationic trypsinogen. PRSS1 mutations account for approximately 68-81% of hereditary pancreatitis. Mutations in other genes, primarily serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 (SPINK1) and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) are also associated with hereditary pancreatitis. While chronic alcoholic pancreatitis may develop in the fourth or fifth decades, patients with hereditary pancreatitis may develop symptoms in the first or second decades of life. Hereditary pancreatitis is diagnosed either by detecting a causative gene mutation or by the presence of chronic pancreatitis in two first-degree or three second-degree relatives, in two or more generations, without precipitating factors and with a negative workup for known causes. Patients with hereditary pancreatitis may have recurrent acute pancreatitis and may develop pancreatic exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Hereditary pancreatitis may involve premature trypsinogen activation or decreased control of trypsin. Recurrent inflammation can lead to acute pancreatitis and subsequently to chronic pancreatitis with parenchymal calcification. There is a markedly increased risk of pancreatic carcinoma compared with the general population. Patients are often referred for evaluation of pancreatitis, biliary or pancreatic ductal dilatation, jaundice, biliary obstruction, pancreatic duct stone or stricture, pancreatic pseudocysts, and for evaluation for malignancy. Medical treatment includes pancreatic enzyme supplementation, nutritional supplementation, diabetes management, and palliation of pain. Patients should avoid tobacco use and alcohol exposure. Hereditary pancreatitis is reviewed and recommendations for

  15. Giant cystic pheochromocytoma: A silent entity

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Amit; Bains, Lovenish; Agarwal, Manish Kumar; Gupta, Renu

    2016-01-01

    Pheochromocytoma is a catecholamine secreting tumor that originate from chromaffin cells. Usually, it is solid neoplasm of the adrenal medulla, however cystic pheochromocytoma is a rare neuro-endocrine tumour that is frequently asymptomatic and often diagnosed incidentally on imaging or intra-operatively. Only a few cases of cystic pheochromocytomas have been reported in the world literature. We present a case of giant cystic pheochromocytoma in a 65 years old lady who presented with a large retroperitoneal lump, which is probably the world's third largest pheochromocytoma as per the available indexed literature. PMID:27453669

  16. Giant cystic pheochromocytoma: A silent entity.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Amit; Bains, Lovenish; Agarwal, Manish Kumar; Gupta, Renu

    2016-01-01

    Pheochromocytoma is a catecholamine secreting tumor that originate from chromaffin cells. Usually, it is solid neoplasm of the adrenal medulla, however cystic pheochromocytoma is a rare neuro-endocrine tumour that is frequently asymptomatic and often diagnosed incidentally on imaging or intra-operatively. Only a few cases of cystic pheochromocytomas have been reported in the world literature. We present a case of giant cystic pheochromocytoma in a 65 years old lady who presented with a large retroperitoneal lump, which is probably the world's third largest pheochromocytoma as per the available indexed literature.

  17. Cystic fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Infertility (in men) Repeated inflammation of the pancreas ( pancreatitis ) Respiratory symptoms Clubbed fingers ... failure Diabetes Infertility Liver disease or liver failure, pancreatitis, biliary cirrhosis Malnutrition Nasal polyps and sinusitis Osteoporosis ...

  18. Clinicopathological Features of Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasms of Pancreas in a Tertiary Care Center: A 14 Year Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Kodiatte, Thomas Alex; Rymbai, Manbha L.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Pancreatic surgeries are usually performed for inflammatory conditions and neoplasms. Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm (IPMN) account for approximately 5-7% of all pancreatic neoplasms in western literature. To the best of our knowledge, there has been no published literature in Indian subcontinent on IPMN. Aim To assess the spectrum of different pancreatic pathologies on pancreatic resection specimens. Also, to review and share the experience on the clinicopathological features of IPMNs in our institute. Materials and Methods This was a 14 year retrospective study of all cases where pancreatic surgeries were done for pancreatic pathology. The slides and blocks of diagnosed cases of IPMNs were retrieved from the department archives, reviewed and a detailed study on the histopathological features was done. Results Among the 377 pancreatic surgical specimens, pancreatitis was the most common diagnosis followed by exocrine neoplasms and endocrine neoplasms. IPMN constituted 3.2 % of all pancreatic neoplasms. Histologically, the most common type was the gastric foveolar type. Pancreatobiliary type was aggressive and associated with an invasive component and had evidence of metastasis on follow up. Conclusion IPMNs are rare neoplasms of pancreas with a male predominance. They are usually indolent except for the pancreatobiliary type which may have an aggressive course, often associated with an invasive adenocarcinoma component. Diligent follow up is recommended. PMID:27656444

  19. MicroRNA in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and its precursor lesions

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Yasmin G; Lucas, Aimee L

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the 4th deadliest cancer in the United States, due to its aggressive nature, late detection, and resistance to chemotherapy. The majority of PDAC develops from 3 precursor lesions, pancreatic intraepithelial lesions (PanIN), intraductual papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN), and mucinous cystic neoplasm. Early detection and surgical resection can increase PDAC 5-year survival rate from 6% for Stage IV to 50% for Stage I. To date, there are no reliable biomarkers that can detect PDAC. MicroRNAs (miRNA) are small noncoding RNAs (18-25 nucleotides) that regulate gene expression by affecting translation of messenger RNA (mRNA). A large body of evidence suggests that miRNAs are dysregulated in various types of cancers. MiRNA has been profiled as a potential biomarker in pancreatic tumor tissue, blood, cyst fluid, stool, and saliva. Four miRNA biomarkers (miR-21, miR-155, miR-196, and miR-210) have been consistently dysregulated in PDAC. MiR-21, miR-155, and miR-196 have also been dysregulated in IPMN and PanIN lesions suggesting their use as early biomarkers of this disease. In this review, we explore current knowledge of miRNA sampling, miRNA dysregulation in PDAC and its precursor lesions, and advances that have been made in using miRNA as a biomarker for PDAC and its precursor lesions. PMID:26798434

  20. Cystic mesothelioma of the peritoneum.

    PubMed

    O'Neil, J D; Ros, P R; Storm, B L; Buck, J L; Wilkinson, E J

    1989-02-01

    Cystic mesothelioma (CM) of the peritoneum is a rare, benign neoplasm that occurs predominantly in women and tends to recur locally. It has received little attention (to our knowledge, a single case report) in the radiology literature. Five cases of CM are presented. Computed tomography (CT) was performed in three cases, ultrasound (US) in four cases, and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in one case. Twenty-eight cases reported in the literature are reviewed for comparison. CM shows a clear predilection for the surfaces of the pelvic viscera but is seen in other areas of the peritoneum and retroperitoneum. The neoplasm was intraperitoneal in three cases and primarily retroperitoneal in the other two cases. In all CT and US studies performed, a single large, multilocular cystic mass was demonstrated. MR imaging, performed in one case, showed that the lesion had signal characteristics typical of a watery collection low in solute concentration. It is concluded that CM of the peritoneum has a nonspecific multilocular cystic appearance on images, which does not permit it to be differentiated from other cystic lesions.

  1. Endoscopic ultrasound characteristics of pancreatic lymphoepithelial cysts: A case series from a large referral center

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, Kunal S.; DeWitt, John M.; Sherman, Stuart; Cramer, Harvey M.; Tirkes, Temel; Al-Haddad, Mohammad A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Lymphoepithelial cysts (LECs) of the pancreas are benign lesions that can mimic cystic neoplasms on imaging. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) features have not been well described. We aimed to describe the clinical and EUS characteristics of LECs and the present outcomes of management at a high-volume referral center. Materials and Methods: We identified patients who underwent EUS and were found to have LECs based on fine-needle aspiration (FNA) cytology or surgical pathology from existing databases. EUS features, imaging characteristics, and pathology results were described. Results: Sixteen patients were found to have 17 LECs. The mean size was 33 mm ± 15 mm. Locations within the pancreas included 10 lesions in the tail, 3 in the body, 1 in the uncinate process; the remaining 3 were exophytic. Six lesions were anechoic, 6 were hypoechoic, and 5 had mixed echogenicity. Nine lesions had mixed solid/cystic components, 7 were purely cystic, and 1 was solid. Cyst fluid was thick or viscous in six cases and thin in three. Eleven patients had diagnostic cytopathology. Six patients ultimately underwent surgery due to symptoms, nondiagnostic FNA, or other clinical concerns for malignancy. Conclusions: Pancreatic LECs have variable morphology and echogenicity on EUS, but the appearance of a cyst with variable solid and cystic components combined with the appearance of thick, turbid, and viscous aspirate should raise suspicion for an LEC. The majority of patients with LECs at our center avoided surgery for LECs on the basis of diagnostic EUS-FNA. PMID:27503157

  2. Chronic pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic pancreatitis - chronic; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - chronic; Acute pancreatitis - chronic ... abuse over many years. Repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis can lead to chronic pancreatitis. Genetics may be ...

  3. Endosonography in the diagnosis and management of pancreatic cysts.

    PubMed

    Kadiyala, Vivek; Lee, Linda S

    2015-03-16

    Rapid advances in radiologic technology and increased cross-sectional imaging have led to a sharp rise in incidental discoveries of pancreatic cystic lesions. These cystic lesions include non-neoplastic cysts with no risk of malignancy, neoplastic non-mucinous serous cystadenomas with little or no risk of malignancy, as well as neoplastic mucinous cysts and solid pseudopapillary neoplasms both with varying risk of malignancy. Accurate diagnosis is imperative as management is guided by symptoms and risk of malignancy. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) allows high resolution evaluation of cyst morphology and precise guidance for fine needle aspiration (FNA) of cyst fluid for cytological, chemical and molecular analysis. Initially, clinical evaluation and radiologic imaging, preferably with magnetic resonance imaging of the pancreas and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, are performed. In asymptomatic patients where diagnosis is unclear and malignant risk is indeterminate, EUS-FNA should be used to confirm the presence or absence of high-risk features, differentiate mucinous from non-mucinous lesions, and diagnose malignancy. After analyzing the cyst fluid for viscosity, cyst fluid carcinoembryonic antigen, amylase, and cyst wall cytology should be obtained. DNA analysis may add useful information in diagnosing mucinous cysts when the previous studies are indeterminate. New molecular biomarkers are being investigated to improve diagnostic capabilities and management decisions in these challenging cystic lesions. Current guidelines recommend surgical pancreatic resection as the standard of care for symptomatic cysts and those with high-risk features associated with malignancy. EUS-guided cyst ablation is a promising minimally invasive, relatively low-risk alternative to both surgery and surveillance. PMID:25789091

  4. Histopathologically Proven Autoimmune Pancreatitis Mimicking Neuroendocrine Tumor or Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Onda, Shinji; Okamoto, Tomoyoshi; Kanehira, Masaru; Fujioka, Shuichi; Harada, Tohru; Hano, Hiroshi; Fukunaga, Masaharu; Yanaga, Katsuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) can be difficult to distinguish from pancreatic cancer. We report a case of histopathologically proven AIP mimicking neuroendocrine tumor (NET) or pancreatic cancer in a 53-year-old man. He was referred to our hospital for further evaluation of a pancreatic mass detected on ultrasonography at a medical check-up. Abdominal ultrasonography showed a 15-mm hypoechoic mass located in the pancreatic body. Computed tomography revealed a tumor without any contrast enhancement, and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated the mass to be hyperintense on diffusion-weighted image. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography revealed slight dilatation of a branch of the pancreatic duct without stricture of the main pancreatic duct. The common bile duct seemed intact. Under suspicion of a non-functioning NET or malignant neoplasm, laparotomy was performed. At laparotomy, an elastic firm and well-circumscribed mass was found suggestive of a non-functioning NET, thus enucleation was performed. Histopathologically, the lesion corresponded to AIP. PMID:22423237

  5. Pancreatic metastasis from mycosis fungoides mimicking primary pancreatic tumor.

    PubMed

    Ceriolo, Paola; Fausti, Valentina; Cinotti, Elisa; Bonadio, Silvia; Raffaghello, Lizzia; Bianchi, Giovanna; Orcioni, Giulio Fraternali; Fiocca, Roberto; Rongioletti, Franco; Pistoia, Vito; Borgonovo, Giacomo

    2016-03-28

    Mycosis fungoides (MF) is a cutaneous T-cell lymphoma that can undergo local progression with possible systemic dissemination. We report a case of a patient affected by MF with a pancreatic mass that was a diagnostic challenge between primitive tumor and pancreatic metastasis from MF. Clinical setting findings and imaging studies raised the suspicion of a pancreatic primary neoplasm. A diagnostic clue was provided by the combined histomorphologic/immunohistochemical study of pancreatic and cutaneous biopsies, which revealed a pancreatic localization of MF. Considering the rarity of metastatic localization of MF to the pancreas, we next investigated whether chemokine-chemokine receptor interactions could be involved in the phenomenon to provide new insight into the possible mechanisms underlying metastatic localization of MF to the pancreas. Histological analyses of archival pancreatic tissue demonstrated that glucagon-secreting cells of the pancreatic islets expressed the CCL27 chemokine, which may have attracted in our case metastatic MF cells expressing the complementary receptor CCR10.

  6. Cystic Echinococcosis

    PubMed Central

    Brunetti, Enrico; McCloskey, Cindy

    2015-01-01

    Echinococcosis is one of the 17 neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) recognized by the World Health Organization. The two major species of medical importance are Echinococcus granulosus and Echinococcus multilocularis. E. granulosus affects over 1 million people and is responsible for over $3 billion in expenses every year. In this minireview, we discuss aspects of the epidemiology, clinical manifestations, and diagnosis of cystic echinococcosis or cystic hydatid disease caused by E. granulosus. PMID:26677245

  7. Cystic Echinococcosis.

    PubMed

    Agudelo Higuita, Nelson Iván; Brunetti, Enrico; McCloskey, Cindy

    2016-03-01

    Echinococcosis is one of the 17 neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) recognized by the World Health Organization. The two major species of medical importance are Echinococcus granulosus and Echinococcus multilocularis. E. granulosus affects over 1 million people and is responsible for over $3 billion in expenses every year. In this minireview, we discuss aspects of the epidemiology, clinical manifestations, and diagnosis of cystic echinococcosis or cystic hydatid disease caused by E. granulosus. PMID:26677245

  8. General Information about Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Chronic ...

  9. Treatment Options for Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Myelodysplastic/ ...

  10. Treatment Option Overview (Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Myelodysplastic/ ...

  11. Treatment Option Overview (Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Chronic ...

  12. Treatment Options for Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Chronic ...

  13. General Information about Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Myelodysplastic/ ...

  14. Salivary gland neoplasms: a 21year review of cases seen at University College Hospital, Ibadan.

    PubMed

    Kolude, B; Lawoyin, J O; Akang, E E

    2001-01-01

    The present study updates the experience of salivary gland tumours in Ibadan. All cases of benign and malignant salivary gland neoplasms histologically diagnosed between 1975 and 1995 in the Oral Pathology Department and Cancer Registry of the University College Hospital, Ibadan were reviewed. Salivary gland neoplasms accounted for 3.5% of head and neck neoplasms, the majority (46.5%) occurring in the parotid, followed by the submandibular (18.1%) and palatal glands (10.7%). The ratio of benign to malignant neoplasms was 1.1 to 1. Mucoepidermoid carcinoma and adenoid cystic carcinoma were the most common malignant neoplasms. There was a predilection of adenoid cystic carcinoma for the submandibular gland.

  15. Methods and outcomes of screening for pancreatic adenocarcinoma in high-risk individuals.

    PubMed

    Capurso, Gabriele; Signoretti, Marianna; Valente, Roberto; Arnelo, Urban; Lohr, Matthias; Poley, Jan-Werner; Delle Fave, Gianfranco; Del Chiaro, Marco

    2015-07-25

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a lethal neoplasia, for which secondary prevention (i.e., screening) is advisable for high-risk individuals with "familiar pancreatic cancer" and with other specific genetic syndromes (Peutz-Jeghers, p16, BRCA2, PALB and mismatch repair gene mutation carriers). There is limited evidence regarding the accuracy of screening tests, their acceptability, costs and availability, and agreement on whom to treat. Successful target of screening are small resectable PDAC, intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms with high-grade dysplasia and advanced pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia. Both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) are employed for screening, and the overall yield for pre-malignant or malignant pancreatic lesions is of about 20% with EUS and 14% with MRI/magnetic resonance colangiopancreatography. EUS performs better for solid and MRI for cystic lesions. However, only 2% of these detected lesions can be considered a successful target, and there are insufficient data demonstrating that resection of benign or low grade lesions improves survival. Many patients in the published studies therefore seemed to have received an overtreatment by undergoing surgery. It is crucial to better stratify the risk of malignancy individually, and to better define optimal screening intervals and methods either with computerized tools or molecular biomarkers, possibly in large multicentre studies. At the moment, screening should be carefully performed within research protocols at experienced centres, offering involved individuals medical and psychological advice. PMID:26240684

  16. Cystic fibrosis - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - cystic fibrosis ... The following organizations are good resources for information on cystic fibrosis : Cystic Fibrosis Foundation -- www.cff.org March of Dimes -- www.marchofdimes.org/baby/cystic-fibrosis-and- ...

  17. Diagnostic Approach to Eosinophilic Renal Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Kryvenko, Oleksandr N.; Jorda, Merce; Argani, Pedram; Epstein, Jonathan I.

    2015-01-01

    Context Eosinophilic renal neoplasms include a spectrum of solid and papillary tumors ranging from indolent benign oncocytoma to highly aggressive malignancies. Recognition of the correct nature of the tumor, especially in biopsy specimens, is paramount for patient management. Objective To review the diagnostic approach to eosinophilic renal neoplasms with light microscopy and ancillary techniques. Data Sources Review of the published literature and personal experience. Conclusions The following tumors are in the differential diagnosis of oncocytic renal cell neoplasm: oncocytoma, chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (RCC), hybrid tumor, tubulocystic carcinoma, papillary RCC, clear cell RCC with predominant eosinophilic cell morphology, follicular thyroid-like RCC, hereditary leiomyomatosis–associated RCC, acquired cystic disease–associated RCC, rhabdoid RCC, microphthalmia transcription factor translocation RCC, epithelioid angiomyolipoma, and unclassified RCC. In low-grade nonpapillary eosinophilic neoplasms, distinction between oncocytoma and low-grade RCC mostly rests on histomorphology; however, cytokeratin 7 immunostain may be helpful. In high-grade nonpapillary lesions, there is more of a role for ancillary techniques, including immunohistochemistry for cytokeratin 7, CA9, CD10, racemase, HMB45, and Melan-A. In papillary eosinophilic neoplasms, it is important to distinguish sporadic type 2 papillary RCC from microphthalmia transcription factor translocation and hereditary leiomyomatosis–associated RCC. Histologic and cytologic features along with immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization tests for TFE3 (Xp11.2) and TFEB [t(6;11)] are reliable confirmatory tests. Eosinophilic epithelial neoplasms with architecture, cytology, and/or immunoprofile not qualifying for either of the established types of RCC should be classified as unclassified eosinophilic RCC and arbitrarily assigned a grade (low or high). PMID:25357116

  18. [Retroperitoneal cystic lymphangioma].

    PubMed

    Waisberg, J; Pezzolo, S; Henrique, A C; Kerr, L M; Speranzini, M B

    1999-01-01

    The lymphangioma is a rare disease, more frequently reported in children and just occasionally in the adult patient. The lymphangioma is considered a benign neoplasm of embryonic origin of the lymphatic vessels. Its habitual location is in the cervical and axillary area; it is rarely found in the abdominal cavity and exceptionally in the retroperitonio. In this latter location, the lesion habitually is asymptomatic. The clinical diagnosis of the retroperitoneal cystic lymphangioma is not often due to its rarity and the absence of clinical expression. The size of the lesion is more important than its location to the symptomatology development. The findings of the abdominal ultrasonography and computerized tomography of the abdomen usually show a cystic lesion and its location. The treatment is surgical and it consists of the resection of the cyst or group of cysts once the liquid accumulation in its interior may be responsible for the development of some important complications of this disease. The cure is obtained when the lesion is completely resected also with the resection of eventual adhesive structures. The relapse may take place when the resection is incomplete. A case of retroperitoneal lymphangioma in a female adult patient as incidental finding of abdominal ultra-sonography is described. It is discussed the clinical picture, the radiologic diagnosis, the treatment and the prognostic of this unusual disease.

  19. Intraductal tubular neoplasms of the pancreas: an overview.

    PubMed

    Chelliah, Adeline; Kalimuthu, Sangeetha; Chetty, Runjan

    2016-10-01

    Intraductal lesions of the pancreas are an uncommon but increasingly recognized group of entities mainly because of advances in imaging technology. In the past, precise categorization and understanding of true pancreatic intraduct neoplasms were hampered not only by their relative rarity but also because of the plethora of terminology and criteria used in nomenclature and diagnosis. Although significant progress has been made in the characterization of some of these lesions, as exemplified by intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, understanding of the rare intraductal tubular adenoma (ITA) and intraduct tubular carcinoma (ITC) continues to evolve. By definition, these are a group of intraductal, radiologically detectable neoplasms that can progress to or be associated with invasive adenocarcinoma and, as such, are precursor lesions to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Their often shared clinical and radiological features make precise histological diagnosis essential for appropriate management and optimal outcome. We provide an overview of these neoplasms and highlight recent developments in the understanding of ITA and ITC which have led to ITA being considered a variant of gastric-type intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms and ITC being encompassed within the intraductal tubulopapillary neoplasm category. We also emphasize the distinguishing histological features to aid diagnosis of these rare lesions.

  20. Pancreatic enzyme pharmacotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ferrone, Marcus; Raimondo, Massimo; Scolapio, James S

    2007-06-01

    Supplemental pancreatic enzyme preparations are provided to patients with conditions of pancreatic exocrine deficiency such as chronic pancreatitis and cystic fibrosis. These patients frequently experience steatorrhea, which occurs from inadequate fat absorption. The delivery of sufficient enzyme concentrations into the duodenal lumen simultaneously with meals can reduce nutrient malabsorption, improve the symptoms of steatorrhea, and in some cases alleviate the pain associated with chronic pancreatitis. Current clinical practices dictate administration of lipase 25,000-40,000 units/meal by using pH-sensitive pancrelipase microspheres, along with dosage increases, compliance checks, and differential diagnosis in cases of treatment failure. Despite the large number of specialty enzyme replacements available commercially, many patients remain dissatisfied with standard therapy, and future developments are needed to optimize treatment in these individuals.

  1. Diagnostic significance of the pancreatic displacement with extrapancreatic oval-shaped low activity area on scintigram.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, K; Nakayama, C; Kamoi, I; Matsuura, K

    1977-01-01

    To aid in the differential diagnosis of upper abdominal tumors, pancreatic scintigraphy was performed in 62 cases. The findings were rather characteristic for pancreatic cysts; namely, pancreatic displacement and, adjacently, an oval-shaped activity area whose count was lower than background. Pancreatic displacement was observed with comparatively large retroperitoneal masses. Low activity areas were observed in cystic lesions. Both findings were noted in 7 (54%) of 13 pancreatic cyst cases. Among the 12 cases with these findings, 7 (58%) had pancreatic cysts.

  2. A Rare Case of Isolated Pancreatic Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Waintraub, Daniel J.; D’Souza, Lionel S.; Madrigal, Emilio; Harshan, Manju; Ascunce, Gil I.

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic tuberculosis (TB) is a rare but important entity to consider when evaluating a pancreatic mass, especially in patients from endemic areas. Its clinical and radiologic features may mimic those of a pancreatic neoplasm, making it a difficult clinical diagnosis. We present a case of a 31-year-old Indian man who presented with fevers, night sweats, weight loss, and epigastric pain. Abdominal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a pancreatic head mass. Biopsy of the mass was consistent with pancreatic tuberculosis. PMID:27807553

  3. Association of cystic nephroma with angiomyolipoma in the same kidney.

    PubMed

    Val-Bernal, J F; Hernández-Nieto, E; Garijo, M F

    2000-01-01

    The synchronous occurrence of two different renal tumors in a patient is a rare event. Here we report an incidentally discovered coexistence of cystic nephroma with angiomyolipoma in the right kidney. The patient was a 68-year-old woman without the tuberous sclerosis complex. To the best of our knowledge, this combination of neoplasms has not yet been described before. This rare situation emphasizes the need for careful diagnosis and the correct management of coincident renal neoplasms.

  4. Chronic Low Back Pain due to Retroperitoneal Cystic Lymphangioma.

    PubMed

    Fattahi, Asieh Sadat; Maddah, Godratollah; Motamedolshariati, Mohammad; Ghiasi-Moghadam, Taghi

    2014-03-01

    Abdominal cystic lymphangioma is a rare benign neoplasm. Less than 1% of lymphangiomas is in the retroperitoneum. Lymphangioma is mostly asymptomatic. Chronic symptoms were reported in retroperitoneal type more than others. Acute symptoms due to complications like infection, cyst rupture or hemorrhage may occur. We report an 18-years-old girl with low back pain from 6 months ago with huge pelvic mass and diagnosis of retroperitoneal cystic lymphangioma.

  5. Cystic Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an inherited disease of the mucus and sweat glands. It affects mostly your lungs, pancreas, liver, intestines, sinuses, and sex organs. CF causes your mucus to be thick and sticky. The mucus clogs the lungs, causing breathing problems and ...

  6. [Cystic angiomatosis].

    PubMed

    Fernández Jiménez, I; Alvarez Muñoz, V; Peláez Mata, D; Díaz Blanco, M; Galbe Sada, M; Antuña García, M J

    2000-04-01

    A case of cystic angiomatosis is presented in a patient whose clinical sign were the presence of an inguinoescrotal mass due to a retroperitoneal lymphangioma, visceral splenic lesions and diffuse skeletal lesions. This rare entity is discussed and a brief review of the literature is made.

  7. Pyruvate Kinase M2 and Lactate Dehydrogenase A Are Overexpressed in Pancreatic Cancer and Correlate with Poor Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad, Goran Hamid; Olde Damink, S. W. M.; Malago, Massimo; Dhar, Dipok Kumar; Pereira, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has a 5-year survival rate of less than 4%. Despite advances in diagnostic technology, pancreatic cancer continues to be diagnosed at a late and incurable stage. Accurate biomarkers for early diagnosis and to predict treatment response are urgently needed. Since alteration of glucose metabolism is one of the hallmarks of cancer cells, we proposed that pyruvate kinase type M2 (M2PK) and lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA) enzymes could represent novel diagnostic markers and potential therapeutic targets in pancreatic cancer. In 266 tissue sections from normal pancreas, pancreatic cystic neoplasms, pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and cancer, we evaluated the expression of PKM2, LDHA, Ki-67 and CD8+ by immunohistochemistry and correlated these markers with clinicopathological characteristics and patient survival. PKM2 and LDHA expression was also assessed by Western blot in 10 human pancreatic cancer cell lines. PKM2 expression increased progressively from cyst through PanIN to cancer, whereas LDHA was overexpressed throughout the carcinogenic process. All but one cell line showed high expression of both proteins. Patients with strong PKM2 and LDHA expression had significantly worse survival than those with weak PKM2 and/or LDHA expression (7.0 months vs. 27.9 months, respectively, p = 0.003, log rank test). The expression of both PKM2 and LDHA correlated directly with Ki-67 expression, and inversely with intratumoral CD8+ cell count. PKM2 was significantly overexpressed in poorly differentiated tumours and both PKM2 and LDHA were overexpressed in larger tumours. Multivariable analysis showed that combined expression of PKM2 and LDHA was an independent poor prognostic marker for survival. In conclusion, our results demonstrate a high expression pattern of two major glycolytic enzymes during pancreatic carcinogenesis, with increased expression in aggressive tumours and a significant adverse effect on survival. PMID:26989901

  8. Pyruvate Kinase M2 and Lactate Dehydrogenase A Are Overexpressed in Pancreatic Cancer and Correlate with Poor Outcome.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Goran Hamid; Olde Damink, S W M; Malago, Massimo; Dhar, Dipok Kumar; Pereira, Stephen P

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has a 5-year survival rate of less than 4%. Despite advances in diagnostic technology, pancreatic cancer continues to be diagnosed at a late and incurable stage. Accurate biomarkers for early diagnosis and to predict treatment response are urgently needed. Since alteration of glucose metabolism is one of the hallmarks of cancer cells, we proposed that pyruvate kinase type M2 (M2PK) and lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA) enzymes could represent novel diagnostic markers and potential therapeutic targets in pancreatic cancer. In 266 tissue sections from normal pancreas, pancreatic cystic neoplasms, pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and cancer, we evaluated the expression of PKM2, LDHA, Ki-67 and CD8+ by immunohistochemistry and correlated these markers with clinicopathological characteristics and patient survival. PKM2 and LDHA expression was also assessed by Western blot in 10 human pancreatic cancer cell lines. PKM2 expression increased progressively from cyst through PanIN to cancer, whereas LDHA was overexpressed throughout the carcinogenic process. All but one cell line showed high expression of both proteins. Patients with strong PKM2 and LDHA expression had significantly worse survival than those with weak PKM2 and/or LDHA expression (7.0 months vs. 27.9 months, respectively, p = 0.003, log rank test). The expression of both PKM2 and LDHA correlated directly with Ki-67 expression, and inversely with intratumoral CD8+ cell count. PKM2 was significantly overexpressed in poorly differentiated tumours and both PKM2 and LDHA were overexpressed in larger tumours. Multivariable analysis showed that combined expression of PKM2 and LDHA was an independent poor prognostic marker for survival. In conclusion, our results demonstrate a high expression pattern of two major glycolytic enzymes during pancreatic carcinogenesis, with increased expression in aggressive tumours and a significant adverse effect on survival.

  9. Cystic Change in Pleomorphic Adenoma: A Rare Finding and a Diagnostic Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Khetrapal, Shaan; Jetley, Sujata; Hassan, Mohd. Jaseem

    2015-01-01

    Pleomorphic adenoma forms the majority of salivary gland neoplasms. Cystic change in pleomorphic adenomas is a diagnostic dilemma and can mimic mucoepidermoid carcinoma, mucocele or carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma and squamous cell carcinoma. Hereby we report this interesting and rare case of cystic pleomorphic adenoma in a 32-year-old male. PMID:26675071

  10. Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Buccal Mucosa: A Case Report with Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    S, Vidyalakshmi; R, Aravindhan

    2014-01-01

    Minor salivary gland neoplasms of the buccal mucosa are relatively uncommon. Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC), a well-defined entity, occurs most of the times in the parotid, submandibular glands and palate, as far as the intraoral site is concerned. Adenoid cystic carcinoma tends to have an indolent, extended clinical course with wide local infiltration and late distant metastases. We are presenting a case of an adenoid cystic carcinoma of the buccal mucosa in a 48-year-old female patient. PMID:24783155

  11. Salivary-type neoplasms of the sinonasal tract.

    PubMed

    Manning, J T; Batsakis, J G

    1991-08-01

    Salivary-type neoplasms of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses are numerically dominated by adenoid cystic carcinomas and pleomorphic adenomas. All others, benign or malignant, are rarely encountered and are usually biologically and histologically low-grade. Sites of origin in the sinonasal tract conform to the density and distribution of the seromucous glands and hence are most often nasal (septum and turbinates) or ostial.

  12. Environmental risk factors for chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Nitsche, Claudia; Simon, Peter; Weiss, F Ulrich; Fluhr, Gabriele; Weber, Eckhard; Gärtner, Simone; Behn, Claas O; Kraft, Matthias; Ringel, Jörg; Aghdassi, Ali; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis has long been thought to be mainly associated with immoderate alcohol consumption. The observation that only ∼10% of heavy drinkers develop chronic pancreatitis not only suggests that other environmental factors, such as tobacco smoke, are potent additional risk factors, but also that the genetic component of pancreatitis is more common than previously presumed. Either disease-causing or protective traits have been indentified for mutations in different trypsinogen genes, the gene for the trypsin inhibitor SPINK1, chymotrypsinogen C, and the cystic fibrosis transmembane conductance regulator (CFTR). Other factors that have been proposed to contribute to pancreatitis are obesity, diets high in animal protein and fat, as well as antioxidant deficiencies. For the development of pancreatic cancer, preexisting chronic pancreatitis, more prominently hereditary pancreatitis, is a risk factor. The data on environmental risk factors for pancreatic cancer are, with the notable exception of tobacco smoke, either sparse, unconfirmed or controversial. Obesity appears to increase the risk of pancreatic cancer in the West but not in Japan. Diets high in processed or red meat, diets low in fruits and vegetables, phytochemicals such as lycopene and flavonols, have been proposed and refuted as risk or protective factors in different trials. The best established and single most important risk factor for cancer as well as pancreatitis and the one to clearly avoid is tobacco smoke.

  13. Recent Progress in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Herman, Joseph M.; Laheru, Daniel A.; Klein, Alison P.; Erdek, Michael A.; Fishman, Elliot K.; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is currently one of the deadliest of the solid malignancies. However, surgery to resect neoplasms of the pancreas is safer and less invasive than ever, novel drug combinations have been shown to improve survival, advances in radiation therapy have resulted in less toxicity, and enormous strides have been made in our understanding of the fundamental genetics of pancreatic cancer. These advances provide hope but they also increase the complexity of caring for patients. It is clear that multidisciplinary care that provides comprehensive and coordinated evaluation and treatment is the most effective way to manage patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:23856911

  14. Rare case of adult pancreatic hemangioma and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Lu, Tao; Yang, Cheng

    2015-08-14

    Pancreatic hemangiomas are a rare type of cystic tumor, with very few cases reported in the literature. Herein, we present the case of a 28-year-old woman who was admitted to our hospital for abdominal pain. A physical examination failed to reveal any abnormalities that could explain her symptoms. A contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed a multilocular cyst with moderately enhanced septa and fluid-fluid levels in the body and tail of the pancreas. A serous cystadenoma or pseudocyst of the pancreas was initially suspected, and the patient underwent a subtotal pancreatectomy and splenectomy. The pathologic diagnosis was a pancreatic hemangioma. This is the second case of pancreatic hemangioma with fluid-fluid levels reported in the literature. Upon imaging, the presentation of this tumor can resemble serous or mucinous cystadenomas, pseudocysts of the pancreas, and side-branch type intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms. This report reviews the clinical symptoms, radiologic features, pathologic characteristics, differential diagnoses, and treatment of this rare lesion type.

  15. Endocrine Disorders in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Blackman, Scott M; Tangpricha, Vin

    2016-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis is frequently complicated by endocrine disorders. Diabetes can be expected to affect most with CF and pancreatic insufficiency and varies widely in age of onset, but early identification and treatment improve morbidity and mortality. Short stature can be exacerbated by relative delay of puberty and by use of inhaled corticosteroids. Bone disease in CF causes fragility fractures and should be assessed by monitoring bone mineral density and optimizing vitamin D status. Detecting and managing endocrine complications in CF can reduce morbidity and mortality in CF. These complications can be expected to become more common as the CF population ages. PMID:27469183

  16. Pancreatitis - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic pancreatitis - discharge; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - discharge; Acute pancreatitis - discharge ... fluids through an intravenous (IV) tube in your vein and nutrition through a feeding tube or IV. ...

  17. Bilateral parotid neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Williams, C

    1980-09-01

    We are reporting what we believe to be the second case of bilateral parotid neoplasm occuring synchronously with differing histologies. We believe that this neoplasm may represent a specific propensity of parotid tissue in a given individual to develop neoplasia in a multipotential glandular organ subject to many neoplastic diseases. There also exists the possibility that this condition may represent an immune deficiency specific to the parotid gland. The case reports that have been reviewed demonstrate that a secondary neoplasm may arise from benign mixed tumors. We question whether this is an example of monistic origin of acinic cell tumor from a mixed-cell tumor or, perhaps, dualistic expression for this salivary gland to develop a multiplicity of anaplastic and metaplastic growth variants. In approaching a case with bilateral parotid involvement, the physician must be aware of the rare possibility that benign and malignant tumors may coexist. He must be prepared to proceed with more radical extirpation than simple superficial parotidectomy.

  18. Individual susceptibility to alcoholic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Apte, Minoti V; Pirola, Romano C; Wilson, Jeremy S

    2008-03-01

    The observation that only a minority of heavy drinkers develop pancreatitis has prompted an intensive search for a trigger factor/cofactor/susceptibility factor that may precipitate a clinical attack. Putative susceptibility factors examined so far include diet, smoking, amount and type of alcohol consumed, the pattern of drinking and lipid intolerance. In addition, a range of inherited factors have been assessed including blood group antigens, human leukocyte antigen serotypes, alpha-1-antitrypsin phenotypes and several genotypes. The latter group comprises mutations/polymorphisms in genes related to alcohol-metabolizing enzymes, detoxifying enzymes, pancreatic digestive enzymes, pancreatic enzyme inhibitors, cystic fibrosis and cytokines. Disappointingly, despite this concerted research effort, no clear association has been established between the above factors and alcoholic pancreatitis. Experimentally, the secretagogue cholecystokinin (CCK) has been investigated as a candidate 'trigger' for alcoholic pancreatitis. However, the clinical relevance of CCK as a trigger factor has to be questioned, as it is difficult to envisage a situation in humans where abnormally high levels of CCK would be released into the circulation to trigger pancreatitis in alcoholics. In contrast, bacterial endotoxemia is a candidate cofactor that does have relevance to the clinical situation. Plasma lipopolysaccharide (LPS, an endotoxin) levels are significantly higher in drinkers (either after chronic alcohol intake or a single binge) compared to non-drinkers. We have recently shown that alcohol-fed animals challenged with otherwise innocuous doses of LPS exhibit significant pancreatic injury. Moreover, repeated LPS exposure in alcohol-fed rats leads to progressive injury to the gland characterized by significant pancreatic fibrosis. These studies support the concept that endotoxin may be an important factor in the initiation and progression of alcoholic pancreatitis. Scope remains for

  19. Colorectal neoplasm and acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Bhansali, Anil; Dutta, Pinaki; Bhat, Mohammad Hayat; Sinha, S K; Kochar, R; Vaiphi, K

    2006-01-01

    The risk for colorectal carcinoma in acromegaly remains controversial. In our earlier study, we have demonstrated that the risk of colorectal carcinoma in Asian Indians with acromegaly is not increased and after this report, routine colonoscopy in our patients with acromegaly was abandoned. Subsequently, two consecutive young men aged 30 and 35, one 6 years after and other at the time of diagnosis of acromegaly had colorectal carcinoma respectively. None of them had family history of colonic neoplasm. These two younger patients with no other predisposition for colorectal neoplasm suggests that colonoscopy should be done in all patients with acromegaly at diagnosis and they should remain under surveillance.

  20. Three cases of mediastinal pancreatic pseudocysts

    PubMed Central

    Fujihara, Yoshio; Maeda, Kazunori; Okamoto, Masaru; Yanagitani, Atsushi; Tanaka, Kiwamu; Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Ogawa, Toshihide

    2016-01-01

    A rare complication of acute or chronic pancreatitis is the formation of a mediastinal pancreatic pseudocyst (MPP), which is caused by tracking of pancreatic fluids through anatomical openings of the diaphragm into the mediastinum. Herein, we report the imaging characteristics of three cases of this condition. Our results revealed three features in common: (i) the connection between the mediastinum and the pancreatic cystic lesion; (ii) the presence of pleural effusions; and (iii) imaging findings consistent with chronic pancreatitis, such as pancreatic atrophy and calcifications and dilatation and/or stricture of main pancreatic duct (MPD). Serial diameter changes of the MPD and of the adjacent pseudocysts were necessary for the determination of the therapeutic strategy used in each case. PMID:27330827

  1. The spectrum of computed tomographic appearance of metastatic masses from testicular neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Zingas, A P; Jain, A B; Loredo, R D; Kling, G A

    1984-01-01

    Metastatic masses from testicular neoplasms were evaluated with respect to their computed tomographic characteristics. They were divided in three categories: cystic, semicystic, and solid. The common denominator in the first two categories was the presence of teratomatous components. The nonteratomatous masses were solid.

  2. CFTR: A New Horizon in the Pathomechanism and Treatment of Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Hegyi, Péter; Wilschanski, Michael; Muallem, Shmuel; Lukacs, Gergely L; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós; Uc, Aliye; Gray, Michael A; Rakonczay, Zoltán; Maléth, József

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an ion channel that conducts chloride and bicarbonate ions across epithelial cell membranes. Mutations in the CFTR gene diminish the ion channel function and lead to impaired epithelial fluid transport in multiple organs such as the lung and the pancreas resulting in cystic fibrosis. Heterozygous carriers of CFTR mutations do not develop cystic fibrosis but exhibit increased risk for pancreatitis and associated pancreatic damage characterized by elevated mucus levels, fibrosis, and cyst formation. Importantly, recent studies demonstrated that pancreatitis causing insults, such as alcohol, smoking, or bile acids, strongly inhibit CFTR function. Furthermore, human studies showed reduced levels of CFTR expression and function in all forms of pancreatitis. These findings indicate that impairment of CFTR is critical in the development of pancreatitis; therefore, correcting CFTR function could be the first specific therapy in pancreatitis. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the field and discuss new possibilities for the treatment of pancreatitis. PMID:26856995

  3. L206W mutation of the cystic fibrosis gene, relatively frequent in French Canadians, is associated with atypical presentations of cystic fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Rozen, R.; Ferreira-Rajabi, L.; Robb, L.

    1995-07-03

    Cystic fibrosis is caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. Over 400 mutations have been reported at this locus. Although severe forms of cystic fibrosis are usually associated with pancreatic insufficiency, pulmonary dysfunction, and elevated sweat chloride, there is a wide range of phenotypes, including congenital absence of the vas deferens, observed with some of the milder mutations. The L206W mutation, which was first identified in patients from South France, is relatively frequent in French Canadians from Quebec. In this report, we document the atypical form of cystic fibrosis associated with this mutation in a cohort of 7 French Canadian probands. 20 refs.

  4. [Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours. What do we know of their history?].

    PubMed

    Navarro, Salvador

    2016-04-01

    Starting with Paul Langerhans, who first described pancreatic islets in 1869, this article reviews the various protagonists who, in the last century and a half, have contributed to the discovery of the main hormones originating in the pancreas, the analytical methods for their measurement, the imaging techniques for identifying tumoural location, and the various pancreatic neoplasms.

  5. Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer usually begins in the cells that produce the juices. Some risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer include Smoking Long-term diabetes Chronic pancreatitis Certain ...

  6. Pancreatic metastasis from mycosis fungoides mimicking primary pancreatic tumor

    PubMed Central

    Ceriolo, Paola; Fausti, Valentina; Cinotti, Elisa; Bonadio, Silvia; Raffaghello, Lizzia; Bianchi, Giovanna; Orcioni, Giulio Fraternali; Fiocca, Roberto; Rongioletti, Franco; Pistoia, Vito; Borgonovo, Giacomo

    2016-01-01

    Mycosis fungoides (MF) is a cutaneous T-cell lymphoma that can undergo local progression with possible systemic dissemination. We report a case of a patient affected by MF with a pancreatic mass that was a diagnostic challenge between primitive tumor and pancreatic metastasis from MF. Clinical setting findings and imaging studies raised the suspicion of a pancreatic primary neoplasm. A diagnostic clue was provided by the combined histomorphologic/immunohistochemical study of pancreatic and cutaneous biopsies, which revealed a pancreatic localization of MF. Considering the rarity of metastatic localization of MF to the pancreas, we next investigated whether chemokine-chemokine receptor interactions could be involved in the phenomenon to provide new insight into the possible mechanisms underlying metastatic localization of MF to the pancreas. Histological analyses of archival pancreatic tissue demonstrated that glucagon-secreting cells of the pancreatic islets expressed the CCL27 chemokine, which may have attracted in our case metastatic MF cells expressing the complementary receptor CCR10. PMID:27022231

  7. The value of KRAS mutation testing with CEA for the diagnosis of pancreatic mucinous cysts

    PubMed Central

    Kadayifci, Abdurrahman; Al-Haddad, Mohammad; Atar, Mustafa; Dewitt, John M.; Forcione, David G.; Sherman, Stuart; Casey, Brenna W.; Fernandez-del Castillo, Carlos; Schmidt, C. Max; Pitman, Martha B.; Brugge, William R.

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims: Pancreatic cyst fluid (PCF) CEA has been shown to be the most accurate preoperative test for detection of cystic mucinous neoplasms (CMNs). This study aimed to assess the added value of PCF KRAS mutational analysis to CEA for diagnosis of CMNs. Patients and methods: This is a retrospective study of prospectively collected endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) fine-needle aspiration (FNA) data. KRAS mutation was determined by direct sequencing or equivalent methods. Cysts were classified histologically (surgical cohort) or by clinical (EUS or FNA) findings (clinical cohort). Performance characteristics of KRAS, CEA and their combination for detection of a cystic mucinous neoplasm (CMN) and malignancy were calculated. Results: The study cohort consisted of 943 patients: 147 in the surgical cohort and 796 in the clinical cohort. Overall, KRAS and CEA each had high specificity (100 % and 93.2 %), but low sensitivity (48.3 % and 56.3 %) for the diagnosis of a CMN. The positivity of KRAS or CEA increased the diagnostic accuracy (80.8 %) and AUC (0.84) significantly compared to KRAS (65.3 % and 0.74) or CEA (65.8 % and 0.74) alone, but only in the clinical cohort (P < 0.0001 for both). KRAS mutation was significantly more frequent in malignant CMNs compared to histologically confirmed non-malignant CMNs (73 % vs. 37 %, P = 0.001). The negative predictive value of KRAS mutation was 77.6 % in differentiating non-malignant cysts. Conclusions: The detection of a KRAS mutation in PCF is a highly specific test for mucinous cysts. It outperforms CEA for sensitivity in mucinous cyst diagnosis, but the data does not support its routine use. PMID:27092317

  8. What Causes Cystic Fibrosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Causes Cystic Fibrosis? A defect in the CFTR gene causes cystic fibrosis (CF). This gene makes ... and very salty sweat. Research suggests that the CFTR protein also affects the body in other ways. ...

  9. Learning about Cystic Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... order to digest food. Cystic Fibrosis: A Single Gene Disease Mutations in a single gene - the Cystic ... the defective gene, or correcting the defective protein. Gene Therapy Research Offers Promise of a Cure for ...

  10. Acquired cystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Levine, E

    1996-09-01

    ACKD is characterized by the development of many fluid-filled renal cysts and sometimes neoplasms in the kidneys of individuals with chronic renal failure but without a history of hereditary cystic disease. The condition is seen mainly in dialysis patients, but often begins in patients with ESRD before dialysis is started. Most patients with ACKD are asymptomatic, but the disorder may be associated with such serious complications as retroperitoneal hemorrhage and metastatic renal cell carcinoma. The diagnosis of ACKD and its complications is best achieved by CT scanning, although US and MR imaging may be useful in evaluation, particularly in patients not treated with dialysis. Cyst hemorrhage is common in ACKD and may cause flank pain and hematuria. Hemorrhagic cysts may be recognized by their CT scan, sonographic, or MR imaging features. Hemorrhagic cysts may rupture into the perinephric space causing large perinephric hematomas. These can usually be treated-conservatively. Patients with ACKD, particularly those treated with dialysis, have an increased risk of renal cell carcinoma. Renal cell carcinoma may also develop in the native kidneys of renal transplant recipients with good graft function many years after transplantation. Annual imaging of the native kidneys of all dialysis patients or of transplant recipients for the development of carcinoma is not justified, however, because it has not been shown to have a significant effect on patient outcome. Screening may, however, be useful in selected dialysis patients with good general medical condition and who have known risk factors for renal cell carcinoma including prolonged dialysis, large kidneys, ACKD, and male gender. Screening of the native kidneys of transplant recipients may be performed when they are referred for US evaluation of the renal allograft.

  11. Diffuse Cystic Lung Diseases: Diagnostic Considerations.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kai-Feng; Feng, Ruie; Cui, Han; Tian, Xinlun; Wang, Hanping; Zhao, Jing; Huang, Hui; Zhang, Weihong; Lo, Bee Hong

    2016-06-01

    Diffuse cystic lung disease (DCLD) is a group of heterogeneous diseases that present as diffuse cystic changes in the lung on computed tomography of the chest. Most DCLD diseases are rare, although they might resemble common diseases such as emphysema and bronchiectasis. Main causes of DCLD include lymphangioleiomyomatosis, Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome, pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis, lymphoid interstitial pneumonia, amyloidosis, light-chain deposition disease, Sjögren syndrome, and primary or metastatic neoplasm. We discuss clinical factors that are helpful in the differential diagnosis of DCLDsuch as sex and age, symptoms and signs, extrapulmonary presentations, cigarette smoking, and family history. Investigations for DCLD include high-resolution computed tomography, biochemical and histopathological studies, genetic tests, pulmonary function tests, and bronchoscopic and video-assisted thoracoscopic biopsies. A proposed diagnostic algorithm would enhance ease of diagnosing most cases of DCLD. PMID:27231867

  12. Differentiating neoplasms of hair germ

    PubMed Central

    Headington, J. T.

    1970-01-01

    Differentiating neoplasms of hair germ are benign epithelial-mesenchymal tumours of skin in which hair follicle development may be partly or completely recapitulated. The epithelial component is equivalent to the hair germ. The mesenchymal component is equivalent to the dermal papilla. Epithelial-mesenchymal interaction results in the morphogenesis of hair follicles. In neoplasms showing stromal induction, there is centrifugal organizations: hair bulbs are found at the periphery of tumour lobules and hairs are projected centrally to lie within small keratinizing cysts. Neoplasms of hair germ without advanced morpho-differentiation are termed `trichoblastomas', and those neoplasms in which hair follicle development is advanced are called `trichogenic trichoblastomas'. Images PMID:5476873

  13. Taxonomy of salivary gland neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Sreeja, C; Shahela, Tanveer; Aesha, Syeda; Satish, Muthu Kumar

    2014-03-01

    Classification of neoplasms of any organ should be predicted on the patterns of differentiation that reflect the organization and cell types of the parental tissue. The ability to classify a neoplasm instills confidence in its predicted biologic behavior and the selection of treatment. There has not been a single universally used classification system for salivary gland tumor. Histogenetic and morphogenetic concepts and the developing information on various molecular parameters will have significant influence on the classification of salivary glands tumors. In this article we would highlight the histogenetic and morphogenetic concepts in salivary gland neoplasms and elaborate on the taxonomic system of classification of salivary gland neoplasms. PMID:24783163

  14. Taxonomy of Salivary Gland Neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Sreeja, C.; Shahela, Tanveer; Aesha, Syeda; Satish, Muthu Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Classification of neoplasms of any organ should be predicted on the patterns of differentiation that reflect the organization and cell types of the parental tissue. The ability to classify a neoplasm instills confidence in its predicted biologic behavior and the selection of treatment. There has not been a single universally used classification system for salivary gland tumor. Histogenetic and morphogenetic concepts and the developing information on various molecular parameters will have significant influence on the classification of salivary glands tumors. In this article we would highlight the histogenetic and morphogenetic concepts in salivary gland neoplasms and elaborate on the taxonomic system of classification of salivary gland neoplasms. PMID:24783163

  15. Living with Cystic Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Cystic Fibrosis If you or your child has cystic fibrosis (CF), you should learn as much as you ... about CF Care Centers, go to the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation's Care Center Network Web page. It's standard ...

  16. Molecular biology of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Zavoral, Miroslav; Minarikova, Petra; Zavada, Filip; Salek, Cyril; Minarik, Marek

    2011-06-28

    In spite of continuous research efforts directed at early detection and treatment of pancreatic cancer, the outlook for patients affected by the disease remains dismal. With most cases still being diagnosed at advanced stages, no improvement in survival prognosis is achieved with current diagnostic imaging approaches. In the absence of a dominant precancerous condition, several risk factors have been identified including family history, chronic pancreatitis, smoking, diabetes mellitus, as well as certain genetic disorders such as hereditary pancreatitis, cystic fibrosis, familial atypical multiple mole melanoma, and Peutz-Jeghers and Lynch syndromes. Most pancreatic carcinomas, however, remain sporadic. Current progress in experimental molecular techniques has enabled detailed understanding of the molecular processes of pancreatic cancer development. According to the latest information, malignant pancreatic transformation involves multiple oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes that are involved in a variety of signaling pathways. The most characteristic aberrations (somatic point mutations and allelic losses) affect oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes within RAS, AKT and Wnt signaling, and have a key role in transcription and proliferation, as well as systems that regulate the cell cycle (SMAD/DPC, CDKN2A/p16) and apoptosis (TP53). Understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms should promote development of new methodology for early diagnosis and facilitate improvement in current approaches for pancreatic cancer treatment.

  17. Hereditary Pancreatic and Hepatobiliary Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Ashraf; Kowdley, Gopal C.; Pawlik, Timothy M.; Cunningham, Steven C.

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary etiologies of pancreatic and hepatobiliary cancers are increasingly recognized. An estimated >10% of pancreatic and increasing number of hepatobiliary cancers are hereditary. The cumulative risk of hereditary pancreatic cancer ranges from measurable but negligible in cystic fibrosis to a sobering 70% in cases of hereditary pancreatitis. Candidates for pancreatic cancer surveillance are those with a risk pancreatic cancer estimated to be >10-fold that of the normal population. Screening for pancreatic cancer in high-risk individuals is typically performed by endoscopic ultrasound and should begin at least 10 years prior to the age of the youngest affected relative. Disease states known to be associated with increased risk of hepatocellular cancer include hereditary hemochromatosis, autoimmune hepatitis, porphyria, and α1-antitrypsin deficiency, with relative risks as high as 36-fold. Although much less is known about hereditary bile-duct cancers, Muir-Torre syndrome and bile salt export pump deficiency are diseases whose association with hereditary carcinogenesis is under investigation. PMID:22312493

  18. Select Neoplasms of the Sinonasal Tract.

    PubMed

    García, Joaquín J; Wenig, Bruce M

    2011-12-01

    The sinonasal tract (SNT) includes the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses (maxillary, ethmoid, frontal, and sphenoid) and may give rise to a variety of nonneoplastic and neoplastic proliferations, including benign and malignant neoplasms. The benign neoplasms of the SNT include epithelial neoplasms of surface epithelial origin, minor salivary gland origin, and mesenchymal origin. The spectrum of malignant neoplasms of the SNT includes epithelial malignancies, sinonasal undifferentiated carcinoma, malignant salivary gland neoplasms, neuroectodermal neoplasms, neuroendocrine neoplasms, melanocytic neoplasm, and sarcomas. This article concentrates on some of the more common types of benign and malignant neoplasms.

  19. 13C-labeled mixed triglyceride breath test (13C MTG-BT) in healthy children and children with cystic fibrosis (CF) under pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy (PERT): a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Denise C; Delvin, Edgard E; Albert, Caroline; Marcotte, Jacques E; Pelletier, Véronique A; Seidman, Ernest G

    2008-12-01

    The MTG-BT estimates the hydrolysis of triacyl-glycerols by pancreatic lipase, and appears attractive for monitoring exogenous lipase requirements in patients with exocrine pancreatic insufficiency. To assess the test's discrimination capacity and repeatability, 9 CF patients with PERT and 10 healthy children underwent the (13)C-MTG-BT twice, at a 2- to 4-week interval. The test distinguished well between patients with severe exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (SEPI) and healthy subjects. However, within-subject variability for postprandial per thousand(13)C-enrichment and postprandial % dose recovery (PDR) was high in both groups. Therefore, the (13)C-MTG-BT seems useful to distinguish between SEPI and normal exocrine pancreatic function, but requires further development to improve its repeatability.

  20. Immunopathological study of neuropeptide expression in human salivary gland neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Y; Deguchi, H; Nakahata, A; Kurashima, C; Hirokawa, K

    1990-01-01

    The immunoreactivity of anti-neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and anti-Leu-7 on formalin-fixed sections of human salivary gland neoplasms was determined by the avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex method. In addition, neuropeptides, such as vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, somatostatin, and substance P, in human salivary gland neoplasms were expressed, whereas other polypeptides, including glucagon, cholecystokinin, leu-enkephalin and calcitonin, were absent. When 182 paraffin-embedded examples of human salivary gland tumors, including 112 benign and 70 malignant neoplasms, were examined immunohistochemically, positive immunoreactivity was observed in: 51 cases with NSE (59%) and 46 cases with Leu-7 (54%) of 86 pleomorphic adenomas; 11 cases with Leu-7 (61%) of 18 Warthin's tumors; 7 cases with Leu-7 (58%) of 12 acinic cell carcinomas; 5 cases with NSE (31%) of 16 adenoid cystic carcinomas; 5 cases with NSE (42%) and 4 cases with Leu-7 (33%) of 12 adenocarcinomas; 4 cases with NSE (25%) and 6 cases with Leu-7 (38%) of 16 undifferentiated carcinomas. The other tumors, such as oxyphilic adenomas, basal cell adenomas, epidermoid carcinomas, and mucoepidermoid carcinomas, were nonreactive. Neuropeptides were observed in the neoplastic epithelial cells of certain tumors such as Warthin's tumors, acinic cell carcinomas, adenocarcinomas and undifferentiated carcinomas. These findings suggest the possibility that cells of neuroendocrine origin, present in certain neoplastic salivary gland epithelia may play a significant role in the histogenesis of human salivary gland neoplasms.

  1. Occupation and lymphoid neoplasms.

    PubMed Central

    La Vecchia, C.; Negri, E.; D'Avanzo, B.; Franceschi, S.

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between occupation and exposure to a number of occupational agents and lymphoid neoplasms was investigated in a case-control study of 69 cases of Hodgkin's disease, 153 non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, 110 multiple myelomas and 396 controls admitted for acute diseases to a network of teaching and general hospitals in the greater Milan area. Among the cases, there was a significant excess of individuals ever occupied in agriculture and food processing: the multivariate relative risks (RR) were 2.1 (95% confidence interval, CI = 1.0-3.8) for Hodgkin's disease, 1.9 (95% CI = 1.2-3.0) for non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and 2.0 (95% CI = 1.1-3.5) for multiple myeloma. Significant trends for duration of exposure to herbicides were observed for lymphomas, but the association was stronger for overall occupation in agriculture than with the specific question of herbicide use. History of occupation in the chemical industry was more frequent among Hodgkin's disease (RR = 4.3, 95% CI = 1.4-10.2), and a significant trend in risk was observed between duration of exposure to benzene and other solvents and multiple myeloma. No significant relation was found between any of the lymphoid neoplasms considered and rubber, dye, painting, printing, tanning leather, photography, pharmaceuticals, wood, coal/gas and nuclear industries. PMID:2789947

  2. Chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Chari, S T; DiMagno, E P

    2000-09-01

    In the past year, there has been at least one important clinical paper that sheds light on the character and natural history of painful chronic pancreatitis, which has important clinical implications. In addition, several novel mutations have been described in the cationic trypsinogen gene in patients with hereditary pancreatitis. The mechanism by which these mutations cause pancreatic disease remains speculative. The diagnosis of early chronic pancreatitis is controversial. A novel noninvasive pancreatic function test (measurement of postprandial APOB-48) was reported but is unlikely to be a sensitive test of pancreatic function. Pancreatic fibrosis is frequently seen in alcoholics without chronic pancreatitis, and this makes it difficult to interpret the findings on endoscopic ultrasonogram. Recent studies highlight the difficulty in abolishing pancreatic steatorrhea. Recently fibrosing colonopathy in adult patients has been reported. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy combined with endoscopic therapy failed to benefit patients with calcific chronic pancreatitis.

  3. SOLID PSEUDOPAPILLARY NEOPLASM OF THE PANCREAS

    PubMed Central

    CARLOTTO, Jorge Roberto Marcante; TORREZ, Franz Robert Apodaca; GONZALEZ, Adriano Miziara; LINHARES, Marcelo Moura; TRIVIÑO, Tarcisio; HERANI-FILHO, Benedito; GOLDENBERG, Alberto; LOPES-FILHO, Gaspar de Jesus; LOBO, Edson José

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The solid pseudopapillary neoplasm is a rare tumor of the pancreas. However, it´s etiology still maintain discussions. Aim: To analyze it´s clinical data, diagnosis and treatment. Methods: A retrospective study of medical records of all patients treated from January 1997 until July 2015. Results: Were identified 17 cases. Most patients were women (94.11%) and the average age was 32.88 years. The main complaint was abdominal mass (47.05%). The most frequent location was in the body/tail of the pancreas (72.22%) and the most frequently performed surgery was distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy (64.70%). No patient had metastases at diagnosis. Conservative surgery for pancreatic parenchyma was performed in only three cases. The rate of complications in the postoperative period was 35.29% and the main complication was pancreatic fistula (29.41%). No patient underwent adjuvant treatment. Conclusions: The treatment is surgical and the most common clinical presentation is abdominal mass. Distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy was the most frequently performed surgery for its treatment. PMID:27438034

  4. Echocardiographic features of a mediastinal pancreatic pseudocyst.

    PubMed Central

    Aroney, C N; Nicholson, M R; Shevland, J E

    1985-01-01

    Cross sectional echocardiography detected a mediastinal pancreatic pseudocyst which caused extracardiac compression in a 49 year old man. Computed tomography confirmed the presence of a cystic lesion lying behind the heart and extending from the pancreas to above the carina. Surgical decompression resulted in resolution of the clinical and echocardiographic findings. Images PMID:3994874

  5. Molecular pathology of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Paini, Marina; Crippa, Stefano; Partelli, Stefano; Scopelliti, Filippo; Tamburrino, Domenico; Baldoni, Andrea; Falconi, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Since the first description of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) of the pancreas in the eighties, their identification has dramatically increased in the last decades, hand to hand with the improvements in diagnostic imaging and sampling techniques for the study of pancreatic diseases. However, the heterogeneity of IPMNs and their malignant potential make difficult the management of these lesions. The objective of this review is to identify the molecular characteristics of IPMNs in order to recognize potential markers for the discrimination of more aggressive IPMNs requiring surgical resection from benign IPMNs that could be observed. We briefly summarize recent research findings on the genetics and epigenetics of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, identifying some genes, molecular mechanisms and cellular signaling pathways correlated to the pathogenesis of IPMNs and their progression to malignancy. The knowledge of molecular biology of IPMNs has impressively developed over the last few years. A great amount of genes functioning as oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes have been identified, in pancreatic juice or in blood or in the samples from the pancreatic resections, but further researches are required to use these informations for clinical intent, in order to better define the natural history of these diseases and to improve their management. PMID:25110429

  6. [Pancreatic Diseases].

    PubMed

    Schöfl, Rainer

    2016-06-22

    The author presents his personal choice of practical relevant papers of pancreatic diseases from 2014 to 2015. Nutritional factors and hypertriglycidemia are discussed as causes of acute pancreatitis. Tools to avoid post-ERCP(endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography) pancreatitis are described and the natural course of fluid collections and pseudocysts is demonstrated. The value of secretin-MRCP(magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography) for diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis is illustrated. Data help to choose the minimally effective prednisolone dose in autoimmune pancreatitis. The increased prevalence of fractures in patients with chronic pancreatitis highlights the necessity of screening for bone density loss. The association of vitamin D intake with pancreatic cancer is described. The probability of cancer in IPNM is shown and innovative surgical concepts to reduce the loss of pancreatic function are presented. Finally neoadjuvant concepts for the treatment of pancreatic cancer are highlighted. PMID:27329710

  7. Digestive system dysfunction in cystic fibrosis: challenges for nutrition therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Somerset, Shawn

    2014-10-01

    Cystic fibrosis can affect food digestion and nutrient absorption. The underlying mutation of the cystic fibrosis trans-membrane regulator gene depletes functional cystic fibrosis trans-membrane regulator on the surface of epithelial cells lining the digestive tract and associated organs, where Cl(-) secretion and subsequently secretion of water and other ions are impaired. This alters pH and dehydrates secretions that precipitate and obstruct the lumen, causing inflammation and the eventual degradation of the pancreas, liver, gallbladder and intestine. Associated conditions include exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, impaired bicarbonate and bile acid secretion and aberrant mucus formation, commonly leading to maldigestion and malabsorption, particularly of fat and fat-soluble vitamins. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is used to address this insufficiency. The susceptibility of pancreatic lipase to acidic and enzymatic inactivation and decreased bile availability often impedes its efficacy. Brush border digestive enzyme activity and intestinal uptake of certain disaccharides and amino acids await clarification. Other complications that may contribute to maldigestion/malabsorption include small intestine bacterial overgrowth, enteric circular muscle dysfunction, abnormal intestinal mucus, and intestinal inflammation. However, there is some evidence that gastric digestive enzymes, colonic microflora, correction of fatty acid abnormalities using dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation and emerging intestinal biomarkers can complement nutrition management in cystic fibrosis. PMID:25053610

  8. Digestive system dysfunction in cystic fibrosis: challenges for nutrition therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Somerset, Shawn

    2014-10-01

    Cystic fibrosis can affect food digestion and nutrient absorption. The underlying mutation of the cystic fibrosis trans-membrane regulator gene depletes functional cystic fibrosis trans-membrane regulator on the surface of epithelial cells lining the digestive tract and associated organs, where Cl(-) secretion and subsequently secretion of water and other ions are impaired. This alters pH and dehydrates secretions that precipitate and obstruct the lumen, causing inflammation and the eventual degradation of the pancreas, liver, gallbladder and intestine. Associated conditions include exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, impaired bicarbonate and bile acid secretion and aberrant mucus formation, commonly leading to maldigestion and malabsorption, particularly of fat and fat-soluble vitamins. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is used to address this insufficiency. The susceptibility of pancreatic lipase to acidic and enzymatic inactivation and decreased bile availability often impedes its efficacy. Brush border digestive enzyme activity and intestinal uptake of certain disaccharides and amino acids await clarification. Other complications that may contribute to maldigestion/malabsorption include small intestine bacterial overgrowth, enteric circular muscle dysfunction, abnormal intestinal mucus, and intestinal inflammation. However, there is some evidence that gastric digestive enzymes, colonic microflora, correction of fatty acid abnormalities using dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation and emerging intestinal biomarkers can complement nutrition management in cystic fibrosis.

  9. APC promoter is frequently methylated in pancreatic juice of patients with pancreatic carcinomas or periampullary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ginesta, Mireia M.; Diaz-Riascos, Zamira Vanessa; Busquets, Juli; Pelaez, Núria; Serrano, Teresa; Peinado, Miquel Àngel; Jorba, Rosa; García-Borobia, Francisco Javier; Capella, Gabriel; Fabregat, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Early detection of pancreatic and periampullary neoplasms is critical to improve their clinical outcome. The present authors previously demonstrated that DNA hypermethylation of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), histamine receptor H2 (HRH2), cadherin 13 (CDH13), secreted protein acidic and cysteine rich (SPARC) and engrailed-1 (EN-1) promoters is frequently detected in pancreatic tumor cells. The aim of the present study was to assess their prevalence in pancreatic juice of carcinomas of the pancreas and periampullary area. A total of 135 pancreatic juices obtained from 85 pancreatic cancer (PC), 26 ampullary carcinoma (AC), 10 intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) and 14 chronic pancreatitis (CP) patients were analyzed. The methylation status of the APC, HRH2, CDH13, SPARC and EN-1 promoters was analyzed using methylation specific-melting curve analysis (MS-MCA). Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) mutations were also tested with allele-specific quantitative polymerase chain reaction amplification. Out of the 5 promoters analyzed, APC (71%) and HRH2 (65%) were the most frequently methylated in PC juice. APC methylation was also detected at a high frequency in AC (76%) and IPMN (80%), but only occasionally observed in CP (7%). APC methylation had a high sensitivity (71–80%) for all types of cancer analyzed. The panel (where a sample scored as positive when ≥2 markers were methylated) did not outperform APC as a single marker. Finally, KRAS detection in pancreatic juice offered a lower sensitivity (50%) and specificity (71%) for detection of any cancer. APC hypermethylation in pancreatic juice, as assessed by MS-MCA, is a frequent event of potential clinical usefulness in the diagnosis of pancreatic and periampullary neoplasms.

  10. APC promoter is frequently methylated in pancreatic juice of patients with pancreatic carcinomas or periampullary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ginesta, Mireia M.; Diaz-Riascos, Zamira Vanessa; Busquets, Juli; Pelaez, Núria; Serrano, Teresa; Peinado, Miquel Àngel; Jorba, Rosa; García-Borobia, Francisco Javier; Capella, Gabriel; Fabregat, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Early detection of pancreatic and periampullary neoplasms is critical to improve their clinical outcome. The present authors previously demonstrated that DNA hypermethylation of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), histamine receptor H2 (HRH2), cadherin 13 (CDH13), secreted protein acidic and cysteine rich (SPARC) and engrailed-1 (EN-1) promoters is frequently detected in pancreatic tumor cells. The aim of the present study was to assess their prevalence in pancreatic juice of carcinomas of the pancreas and periampullary area. A total of 135 pancreatic juices obtained from 85 pancreatic cancer (PC), 26 ampullary carcinoma (AC), 10 intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) and 14 chronic pancreatitis (CP) patients were analyzed. The methylation status of the APC, HRH2, CDH13, SPARC and EN-1 promoters was analyzed using methylation specific-melting curve analysis (MS-MCA). Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) mutations were also tested with allele-specific quantitative polymerase chain reaction amplification. Out of the 5 promoters analyzed, APC (71%) and HRH2 (65%) were the most frequently methylated in PC juice. APC methylation was also detected at a high frequency in AC (76%) and IPMN (80%), but only occasionally observed in CP (7%). APC methylation had a high sensitivity (71–80%) for all types of cancer analyzed. The panel (where a sample scored as positive when ≥2 markers were methylated) did not outperform APC as a single marker. Finally, KRAS detection in pancreatic juice offered a lower sensitivity (50%) and specificity (71%) for detection of any cancer. APC hypermethylation in pancreatic juice, as assessed by MS-MCA, is a frequent event of potential clinical usefulness in the diagnosis of pancreatic and periampullary neoplasms. PMID:27602165

  11. How Is Cystic Fibrosis Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Cystic Fibrosis Diagnosed? Doctors diagnose cystic fibrosis (CF) based on ... to see whether the baby has CF. Cystic Fibrosis Carrier Testing People who have one normal CFTR ...

  12. Endoscopic ultrasonography for evaluating patients with recurrent pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Petrone, Maria Chiara; Arcidiacono, Paolo G; Testoni, Pier Alberto

    2008-02-21

    Acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP) is still a complex diagnostic and therapeutic challenge in clinical practice. In up to 30% of cases of ARP, it is not possible to establish the etiology of the disease. In the other 70%, many factors play an etiological role in ARP: microlithiasis, sphincter of Oddi dysfunction (SOD), pancreas divisum, hereditary pancreatitis, cystic fibrosis, a choledochocele, annular pancreas, an anomalous pancreatobiliary junction, pancreatic tumors or chronic pancreatitis are diagnosed. EUS should be useful in ARP as it is sensitive for diagnosing bile duct stones, gallbladder sludge, pancreatic lesions, ductal abnormalities and chronic pancreatitis. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) appears to be diagnostic in the majority of patients with previously unexplained pancreatitis, and offers an alternative to endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) as the initial diagnostic test in patients with ARP.

  13. [Current strategy to cure pancreatic cancer].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Masao

    2002-03-01

    For more than a decade extensive retroperitoneal dissection, chemotherapy, or radiotherapy has not prolonged the survival of patients with pancreatic cancer. Two prospective randomized studies addressing the clinical significance of extensive dissection or pancreatic resection for advanced cancer are now in progress. Nonetheless, at present, resection offers the patient the only possibility of cure. Although the diagnosis of curable pancreatic cancer is difficult, recent evidences have given a few hints. The first is pancreatic duct dilatation caused by cancerous stricture. The second is diabetes as a sign of pancreatic cancer. Our prospective pancreatographic screening of diabetic patients selected by our criteria(Table 1) revealed 7 cancers in 98 patients(7.1%). Within 3 years from diagnosis, the prevalence was 15%. Although the 7 cancers were advanced, this suggests that earlier examinations in diabetic patients may possibly lead to earlier diagnosis. The third is a small cystic lesion as a sentinel of pancreatic cancer. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography with cytology of the pancreatic juice may show the presence of in situ cancer in patients with a pancreatic cyst. At the moment, careful checks for the presence of these hints seem to be the only strategy to offer a chance for cure to patients with pancreatic cancer.

  14. The breadth of imaging findings of groove pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Hungerford, John P; Neill Magarik, Meaghan Anne; Hardie, Andrew D

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of groove pancreatitis involves progressive cystic degeneration of hamartomatous pancreas rests which lie within the duodenal wall. Hamartomatous pancreatic rests can occur in other locations, but when located within the pancreaticoduodenal groove can lead to a particular clinical presentation following the development of fibrotic and inflammatory tissue. Although this is not a disease of the pancreas itself, the pancreatic duct and biliary system is frequently secondarily involved in this regional process. Identification of this entity and its varied appearances as a distinct pathology is essential given the unique management issues of groove pancreatitis.

  15. Cystic Fibrosis Diagnosis and Newborn Screening.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Margaret; Sontag, Marci K; Ren, Clement L

    2016-08-01

    The diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF) has evolved over the past decade as newborn screening has become universal in the United States and elsewhere. The heterogeneity of phenotypes associated with CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) dysfunction and mutations in the CFTR gene has become clearer, ranging from classic pancreatic-insufficient CF to manifestations in only 1 organ system to indeterminate diagnoses identified by newborn screening. The tools available for diagnosis have also expanded. This article reviews the newest diagnostic criteria for CF, newborn screening, prenatal screening and diagnosis, and indeterminate diagnoses in newborn-screened infants and symptomatic adults. PMID:27469178

  16. Retroperitoneal cystic neuroendocrine tumor. A case report.

    PubMed

    Scapinello, A; D'Amore, E S; Cavazzana, A O; Gramegna, V; Ninfo, V

    1995-10-01

    A 21 cm retroperitoneal cystic mass was excised from a 71 year old woman. The cyst was filled with a hemorrhagic fluid and contained a 5 cm parietal hemorrhagic nodule. On histology, the nodule was composed of a uniform population of round cells arranged in trabeculae and nests. The neoplastic cells were immunoreactive to cytokeratin, EMA, NSE, chromogranin A, pancreatic polypeptide (PP) and Gastrin (G). Ultrastructural observation of neurosecretory granules confirmed the neuroendocrine nature of the tumor. No other lesions were detected and a diagnosis of primary epithelial neuroendocrine tumor was rendered. The histogenesis of the tumor including the possibility of a paraganglionic origin is discussed.

  17. A rare case of three different tumors in the same pancreatic specimen: a case report and brief review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Paiella, Salvatore; Luchini, Claudio; Amodio, Antonio; Rusev, Borislav; Bassi, Claudio; Manfredi, Riccardo; Frulloni, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Solid pseudopapillary tumors (SPT) of the pancreas are rare neoplasms mainly affecting young women. Pancreatic serous cystadenomas (SCAs) and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNETs) account for about 2% of all pancreatic neoplasms. The combination of these three lesions, to our knowledge, has never been described in literature. Here we report a case of combined SPT, SCA and PanNET affecting a 33-year-old woman. PMID:27284489

  18. Childhood pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Uretsky, G; Goldschmiedt, M; James, K

    1999-05-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a rare finding in childhood but probably more common than is generally realized. This condition should be considered in the evaluation of children with vomiting and abdominal pain, because it can cause significant morbidity and mortality. Clinical suspicion is required to make the diagnosis, especially when the serum amylase concentration is normal. Recurrent pancreatitis may be familial as a result of inherited biochemical or anatomic abnormalities. Patients with hereditary pancreatitis are at high risk for pancreatic cancer.

  19. Myeloproliferative Neoplasms in Children

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Inga

    2015-01-01

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) are a group of clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by aberrant proliferation of one or more myeloid lineages often with increased immature cells in the peripheral blood. The three classical BCR-ABL-negative MPNs are: 1) polycythemia vera (PV), 2) essential thrombocythemia (ET), and 3) primary myelofibrosis (PMF), which are typically disorders of older adults and are exceedingly rare in children. The diagnostic criteria for MPNs remain largely defined by clinical, laboratory and histopathology assessments in adults, but they have been applied to the pediatric population. The discovery of the JAK2 V617F mutation, and more recently, MPL and CALR mutations, are major landmarks in the understanding of MPNs. Nevertheless, they rarely occur in children, posing a significant diagnostic challenge given the lack of an objective, clonal marker. Therefore, in pediatric patients, the diagnosis must rely heavily on clinical and laboratory factors, and exclusion of secondary disorders to make an accurate diagnosis of MPN. This review focuses on the clinical presentation, diagnostic work up, differential diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of the classical BCR-ABL-negative MPNs (PV, ET and PMF) in children and highlights key differences to the adult diseases. Particular attention will be given to pediatric PMF, as it is the only disorder of this group that is observed in infants and young children, and in many ways appears to be a unique entity compared to adult PMF. PMID:26609329

  20. Endocrinology of testicular neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Pearson, J C

    1981-02-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis finely regulates levels of circulating sex steroids--especially testosterone and estradiol--and spermatogenesis. Testosterone, directly as an androgen and as a prehormone for estradiol, regulates LH secretion at both hypothalamic and pituitary levels. Leydig cells, principally under the control of LH, produce testosterone. Sertoli cells, under the control of FSH, and sensitive to intratesticular levels of testosterone, produce estradiol. This locally produced estrogen seems to be necessary for maturation of the germ cells. An abnormality in this sensitive control system, leading to elevations in gonadotrophins or steroid levels, may be etiologically important in both germ cell and nongerm cell neoplasia. Testicular cancers are associated frequently with endocrinologic manifestations, which may be more disabling to the patient than the malignant potential of the tumor, especially with childhood Leydig cell tumors. Estrogen dominance with an elevated estrogen/testosterone ratio can be seen in any testicular neoplasm and may result in gynecomastia. It may be due to a decrease in circulating testosterone or to an increase in estrogens. Virilization is seen frequently in Leydig cell tumors of adolescents. Further elucidation of hormonal interrelationships should lead to better understanding of the genesis of testicular neoplasia and to more effective therapy.

  1. Myeloproliferative Neoplasms (MPNs) Patient Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-28

    Primary Myelofibrosis; Polycythemia Vera; Essential Thrombocythemia; Mastocytosis; Leukemia, Myeloid, Chronic, Atypical, BCR-ABL Negative; Leukemia, Myelomonocytic, Juvenile; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia-not Otherwise Specified; Myelodysplastic-Myeloproliferative Diseases; Neoplasms; Leukemia, Myelomonocytic, Chronic

  2. Low-grade appendiceal mucinous neoplasm mimicking an adnexal mass.

    PubMed

    Cristian, Daniel Alin; Grama, Florin Andrei; Becheanu, Gabriel; Pop, Anamaria; Popa, Ileana; Şurlin, Valeriu; Stănilescu, Sorin; Bratu, Ana Magdalena; Burcoş, Traean

    2015-01-01

    We present a rare case of malignant epithelial neoplasm of the appendix, an uncommon disorder encountered in clinical practice, which poses a variety of diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. We report a particular case in which the appendix was abnormally located in the pelvis, mimicking an adnexal mass. Therefore, it was difficult to make the preoperative diagnosis on clinical examination, imaging studies and laboratory tests and we discovered the lesion during the diagnostic laparoscopy. No lymphadenopathy or mucinous ascites were found. The case was completely handled via the laparoscopic approach keeping the appendix intact during the operation. The frozen section, the detailed histopathology overview as well as multiple immunostaining with a complex panel of markers report diagnosed a low-grade appendiceal mucinous neoplasm (LAMN) with no invasion of the wall. No adjuvant therapy was considered needed. At a one-year follow-up oncological assessment, the patient was free of disease. In women with cystic mass in the right iliac fossa an appendiceal mucocele should be considered in the differential diagnosis. Laparoscopic appendectomy can represent an adequate operation for the appendiceal mucinous neoplasm if the histological report is clear and surgical precautionary measures are taken.

  3. Nutrient Status of Adults with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    GORDON, CATHERINE M.; ANDERSON, ELLEN J.; HERLYN, KAREN; HUBBARD, JANE L.; PIZZO, ANGELA; GELBARD, RONDI; LAPEY, ALLEN; MERKEL, PETER A.

    2011-01-01

    Nutrition is thought to influence disease status in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). This cross-sectional study sought to evaluate nutrient intake and anthropometric data from 64 adult outpatients with cystic fibrosis. Nutrient intake from food and supplements was compared with the Dietary Reference Intakes for 16 nutrients and outcomes influenced by nutritional status. Attention was given to vitamin D and calcium given potential skeletal implications due to cystic fibrosis. Measurements included weight, height, body composition, pulmonary function, and serum metabolic parameters. Participants were interviewed about dietary intake, supplement use, pulmonary function, sunlight exposure, and pain. The participants’ mean body mass index (±standard deviation) was 21.8±4.9 and pulmonary function tests were normal. Seventy-eight percent used pancreatic enzyme replacement for malabsorption. Vitamin D deficiency [25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD)<37.5 nmol/L] was common: 25 (39%) were deficient despite adequate vitamin D intake. Lipid profiles were normal in the majority, even though total and saturated fat consumption represented 33.0% and 16.8% of energy intake, respectively. Reported protein intake represented 16.9% of total energy intake (range 10%–25%). For several nutrients, including vitamin D and calcium, intake from food and supplements in many participants exceeded recommended Tolerable Upper Intake Levels. Among adults with cystic fibrosis, vitamin D deficiency was common despite reported adequate intake, and lipid profiles were normal despite a relatively high fat intake. Mean protein consumption was adequate, but the range of intake was concerning, as both inadequate or excessive intake may have deleterious skeletal effects. These findings call into question the applicability of established nutrient thresholds for patients with cystic fibrosis. PMID:18060897

  4. PEDIATRIC PANCREATITIS

    PubMed Central

    Pohl, John F.; Uc, Aliye

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review The purpose of this review is to describe recent developments in pediatric pancreatitis and to discuss etiologies and current management. Recent Findings Although recent studies have estimated the annual incidence of pediatric acute pancreatitis approaching that of adults, there are no established guidelines about its diagnosis and treatment in children. Genetic and structural/congenital abnormalities are emerging as the primary risk factors for pediatric acute recurrent and chronic pancreatitis. Specifically, chronic pancreatitis is associated with a significant socioeconomic burden in children. Both medical and surgical therapies are proposed for pediatric chronic pancreatitis, but there is little evidence that they are beneficial. Summary Acute, acute recurrent and chronic pancreatitis create significant health issues in the pediatric population. Medical and surgical therapies exist to potentially treat these conditions, but the pediatric data is limited and the cohorts are small. A multidisciplinary and multicenter approach is necessary to better determine pancreatic disease processes and treatment options in children. PMID:26181572

  5. The Pancreatic Duct Ligated (Mini)pig as a Model for Pancreatic Exocrine Insufficiency in Man.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Peter Colin; Hoffmann, Katrin; Kamphues, Josef; Möeler, Anne

    2016-10-01

    Modern therapy of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI) using pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy (PERT) has largely been very effective and has greatly helped in improving the nutritional status of patients with PEI and in increasing the life expectancy in cystic fibrosis. It is believed that the use of predictable large animal models could play an important role in assessing and developing new therapies. This article reviews the pancreatic duct ligated (adult) minipig as a chronic model of total PEI, with a detailed look at the influence of PEI and response to PERT on prececal compared to fecal digestibility, to directly investigate effects on protein and starch digestion and absorption. In addition, the piglet with PEI is reviewed as a model for PEI in young patients with the aim of further improving the therapy and nutritional status of young patients with cystic fibrosis. PMID:27623555

  6. The Pancreatic Duct Ligated (Mini)pig as a Model for Pancreatic Exocrine Insufficiency in Man.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Peter Colin; Hoffmann, Katrin; Kamphues, Josef; Möeler, Anne

    2016-10-01

    Modern therapy of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI) using pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy (PERT) has largely been very effective and has greatly helped in improving the nutritional status of patients with PEI and in increasing the life expectancy in cystic fibrosis. It is believed that the use of predictable large animal models could play an important role in assessing and developing new therapies. This article reviews the pancreatic duct ligated (adult) minipig as a chronic model of total PEI, with a detailed look at the influence of PEI and response to PERT on prececal compared to fecal digestibility, to directly investigate effects on protein and starch digestion and absorption. In addition, the piglet with PEI is reviewed as a model for PEI in young patients with the aim of further improving the therapy and nutritional status of young patients with cystic fibrosis.

  7. Surgery for Benign Salivary Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, M Boyd; Iro, Heinrich

    2016-01-01

    Salivary neoplasms are relatively infrequent entities that account for only 4% of tumors of the head and neck. Although slow-growing lesions of the preauricular area and submandibular space are often confused with sebaceous cysts, lymph nodes, or lipomas by the non-otolaryngologist, otolaryngologists-head and neck surgeons recognize that all preauricular and submandibular masses should be considered a salivary neoplasm until proven otherwise. Surgery remains the treatment of choice for benign salivary gland neoplasms; however, techniques continue to evolve in order to preserve salivary function and reduce surgical morbidity. The goals of management of benign salivary neoplasms include accurate diagnosis of the lesion, complete surgical extirpation, and functional preservation of adjacent cranial nerves. Accurate diagnosis is aided by appropriate preoperative physical examination, imaging, and fine needle aspiration biopsy. Benign neoplasms typically present as slow-growing, painless, mobile masses without adverse features, such as tissue fixation, ulceration, a cranial nerve deficit, or regional lymphadenopathy. Preoperative imaging with ultrasonography, computed tomography, or magnetic resonance imaging reveals well-circumscribed lesions without an infiltrative growth pattern or associated adenopathy. Fine needle aspiration biopsy may favor a benign neoplasm, supporting the clinical presentation. Surgery for a benign or malignant salivary neoplasm is in essence a false dichotomy since the surgeon can never be completely confident of the diagnosis until the specimen is removed. The surgeon must recognize the significant overlap between benign and malignant salivary masses in terms of clinical presentation, imaging, and cytology, which requires the surgeon to remain vigilant and flexible at the time of surgery should tissue characteristics or frozen section analysis suggest a malignant process.

  8. PCMdb: Pancreatic Cancer Methylation Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagpal, Gandharva; Sharma, Minakshi; Kumar, Shailesh; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Gupta, Sudheer; Gautam, Ankur; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.

    2014-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fifth most aggressive malignancy and urgently requires new biomarkers to facilitate early detection. For providing impetus to the biomarker discovery, we have developed Pancreatic Cancer Methylation Database (PCMDB, http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/pcmdb/), a comprehensive resource dedicated to methylation of genes in pancreatic cancer. Data was collected and compiled manually from published literature. PCMdb has 65907 entries for methylation status of 4342 unique genes. In PCMdb, data was compiled for both cancer cell lines (53565 entries for 88 cell lines) and cancer tissues (12342 entries for 3078 tissue samples). Among these entries, 47.22% entries reported a high level of methylation for the corresponding genes while 10.87% entries reported low level of methylation. PCMdb covers five major subtypes of pancreatic cancer; however, most of the entries were compiled for adenocarcinomas (88.38%) and mucinous neoplasms (5.76%). A user-friendly interface has been developed for data browsing, searching and analysis. We anticipate that PCMdb will be helpful for pancreatic cancer biomarker discovery.

  9. [Indications of enteral nutrition in pancreatic disorders].

    PubMed

    Botta, D; Gauthier, A P

    1988-11-01

    In the treatment of disorders of the pancreas, artificial nutrition must satisfy nutritional requirements while avoiding stimulation of exocrine pancreatic juice observed during oral feeding. Although total parenteral nutrition (PN) induces pancreatic hyposecretion or weak pancreatic stimulation, enteral nutrition (EN) whether elementary or semi-elementary type stimulates pancreatic secretion and the release of CCK, with weaker stimulation in case of intrajejunal feeding. In acute pancreatitis, semi-elemental EN by jejunal feeding has successfully been used in the treatment of moderately serious cases, once the acute phase of the disease has been passed. Although PN remains the best indication for the treatment of pancreatic fistula, several studies have reported the closure of pancreatic fistulas during elementary enteral feeding administered by jejunal route. In the treatment of chronic pancreatitis, EN especially provides nutritional support for very undernourished patients, most often in the preoperative context. Finally, in children suffering from cystic fibrosis of the pancreas, prolonged sessions of EN provide marked improvement in the nutritional and respiratory status of these patients.

  10. Pancreatic cancer screening: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Gemmel, Christian; Eickhoff, Axel; Helmstädter, Lars; Riemann, Jürgen F

    2009-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a devastating disease with a median survival of approximately 6 months after diagnosis. Many factors are associated with a worse outcome; examples include late diagnosis, low resection rate, aggressive tumor behavior and a lack of an effective chemotherapy regimen. Owing to the low prevalence of pancreatic cancer relative to the diagnostic accuracy of present detection methods and the absence of promising treatment modalities, even in early stages, it is currently neither advisable nor cost effective to screen the general population. Efforts are focused on early screening of selected high-risk-cohorts, who account for approximately 10% of patients with pancreatic cancer. These include patients with chronic pancreatitis, individuals with a family history of pancreatic cancer, patients with hereditary pancreatitis, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, cystic fibrosis or familial atypical multiple mole melanoma. At present, a multimodal-screening approach of endoscopic ultrasound, computed tomography and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography appears to be the most effective method to screen for pancreatic cancer in high-risk patients. Continued efforts are needed to elucidate effective testing to identify patients with nonhereditary risk factors who will benefit from screening protocols. A combined approach of serum markers, genetic markers and specific imaging studies may prove to be the future of pancreatic screening. PMID:19210116

  11. Clinical Impact of the KL-6 Concentration of Pancreatic Juice for Diagnosing Pancreatic Masses

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Kazuya; Takeda, Yohei; Harada, Kenichi; Onoyama, Takumi; Kawata, Soichiro; Horie, Yasushi; Sakamoto, Teruhisa; Ueki, Masaru; Miura, Norimasa; Murawaki, Yoshikazu

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim. Pancreatic juice cytology (PJC) is considered optimal for differentially diagnosing pancreatic masses, but the accuracy of PJC ranges from 46.7% to 93.0%. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical impact of measuring the KL-6 concentration of pancreatic juice for diagnosing pancreatic masses. Methods. PJC and the KL-6 concentration measurements of pancreatic juice were performed for 70 consecutive patients with pancreatic masses (39 malignancies and 31 benign). Results. The average KL-6 concentration of pancreatic juice was significantly higher for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs) (167.7 ± 396.1 U/mL) and intraductal papillary mucinous carcinomas (IPMCs) (86.9 ± 21.1 U/mL) than for pancreatic inflammatory lesions (17.5 ± 15.7 U/mL, P = 0.034) and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (14.4 ± 2.0 U/mL, P = 0.026), respectively. When the cut-off level of the KL-6 concentration of pancreatic juice was 16 U/mL, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the KL-6 concentration of pancreatic juice alone were 79.5%, 64.5%, and 72.9%, respectively. Adding the KL-6 concentration of pancreatic juice to PJC when making a diagnosis caused the values of sensitivity and accuracy of PJC to increase by 15.3% (P = 0.025) and 8.5% (P = 0.048), respectively. Conclusions. The KL-6 concentration of pancreatic juice may be as useful as PJC for diagnosing PDACs. PMID:26451373

  12. Intra-oral salivary gland neoplasms: a retrospective study of 98 cases.

    PubMed

    Chau, M N; Radden, B G

    1986-07-01

    The findings of a retrospective study of 98 minor salivary neoplasms are reported. The patient's ages ranged from 13-79 years and there was an equal sex distribution. Sixty-one of the lesions were benign, 53 being pleomorphic adenomas and 8 monomorphic adenomas. Of the malignant tumors, 19 were muco-epidermoid tumors, 12 adenoid cystic carcinomas, 4 adenocarcinomas, 1 carcinoma ex-pleomorphic adenoma and 1 epidermoid carcinoma. One striking finding was the difference in age at the time of presentation for patients with muco-epidermoid tumors compared with those with adenoid cystic carcinomas. Seventy-four percent of the patients with muco-epidermoid tumors were under 50 years of age, but 75% of those with adenoid cystic carcinomas were over 50 years.

  13. [Perinephric liposarcoma mimicking cystic renal tumor].

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Akio; Oyama, Masafumi

    2002-03-01

    Liposarcoma is one of the most common primary retroperitoneal neoplasms, and the perinephric region is a frequent location for them. Liposarcomas show a variety of radiographic features in terms of histological types and tumor sizes, so the specific diagnosis of liposarcoma is often difficult. We present a unique case of perinephric dedifferentiated liposarcoma mimicking cystic renal tumor. A 71-year-old man presented himself at our hospital with a palpable mass in his upper right abdomen. Abdominal computerized tomography (CT) revealed a well-defined cystic mass at the lower pole of the right kidney that contained heterogeneous solid components and small foci of fat. There were no signs of lymphadenopathy or tumor thrombus in the renal vein. Metastatic evaluation by chest x-ray and bone scan was negative. The probable diagnosis was cystic renal cell carcinoma or atypical angiomyolipoma. Because we could not exclude the possibility of cystic malignancy, a right radical nephrectomy was performed. Grossly, the tumor was predominantly encapsulated by a unilocular fibrous capsule and was filled with bloody fluid and debris. The anterior portion of the tumor was composed of various-sized soft and rubbery masses covered with necrotic tissue. The histological diagnosis was dedifferentiated liposarcoma arising in the perinephric retroperitoneum with extensive necrosis, and the cyst wall was composed of a necrotic tumor with a well differentiated liposarcoma and a fibrous capsule. Although the tumor widely covered the right kidney, there was no microscopic invasion of the kidney. No signs of tumor recurrence were noted six months after the operation.

  14. Hedgehog Signaling in Pancreatic Fibrosis and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yongyu; Bai, Yongheng; Dong, Jiaojiao; Li, Qiang; Jin, Yuepeng; Chen, Bicheng; Zhou, Mengtao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The hedgehog signaling pathway was first discovered in the 1980s. It is a stem cell-related pathway that plays a crucial role in embryonic development, tissue regeneration, and organogenesis. Aberrant activation of hedgehog signaling leads to pathological consequences, including a variety of human tumors such as pancreatic cancer. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that blockade of this pathway with several small-molecule inhibitors can inhibit the development of pancreatic neoplasm. In addition, activated hedgehog signaling has been reported to be involved in fibrogenesis in many tissues, including the pancreas. Therefore, new therapeutic targets based on hedgehog signaling have attracted a great deal of attention to alleviate pancreatic diseases. In this review, we briefly discuss the recent advances in hedgehog signaling in pancreatic fibrogenesis and carcinogenesis and highlight new insights on their potential relationship with respect to the development of novel targeted therapies. PMID:26962810

  15. Hedgehog Signaling in Pancreatic Fibrosis and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yongyu; Bai, Yongheng; Dong, Jiaojiao; Li, Qiang; Jin, Yuepeng; Chen, Bicheng; Zhou, Mengtao

    2016-03-01

    The hedgehog signaling pathway was first discovered in the 1980s. It is a stem cell-related pathway that plays a crucial role in embryonic development, tissue regeneration, and organogenesis. Aberrant activation of hedgehog signaling leads to pathological consequences, including a variety of human tumors such as pancreatic cancer. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that blockade of this pathway with several small-molecule inhibitors can inhibit the development of pancreatic neoplasm. In addition, activated hedgehog signaling has been reported to be involved in fibrogenesis in many tissues, including the pancreas. Therefore, new therapeutic targets based on hedgehog signaling have attracted a great deal of attention to alleviate pancreatic diseases. In this review, we briefly discuss the recent advances in hedgehog signaling in pancreatic fibrogenesis and carcinogenesis and highlight new insights on their potential relationship with respect to the development of novel targeted therapies. PMID:26962810

  16. Pentoxifylline Treatment in Acute Pancreatitis (AP)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-14

    Acute Pancreatitis (AP); Gallstone Pancreatitis; Alcoholic Pancreatitis; Post-ERCP/Post-procedural Pancreatitis; Trauma Acute Pancreatitis; Hypertriglyceridemia Acute Pancreatitis; Idiopathic (Unknown) Acute Pancreatitis; Medication Induced Acute Pancreatitis; Cancer Acute Pancreatitis; Miscellaneous (i.e. Acute on Chronic Pancreatitis)

  17. [Nutrition, cystic fibrosis and the digestive tract].

    PubMed

    Olveira, Gabriel; Olveira, Casilda

    2008-05-01

    The prevalence of hyponutrition in cystic fibrosis is high although it may vary according to the different studies. Detection of hyponutrition should be done by combining different methods, depending on their availability. However, the simplest and most validated criterion is to measure at each visit the weight (and height in children) in order to calculate the body mass index and categorizing hyponutrition according to absolute criteria: in adults < 18.5 kg/m(2), and in children as percentiles of the body mass index. Worsening of the nutritional status is directly related with the decrease in lung function parameters and it has been proposed as a morbidity (and even mortality) predictive factor in people with cystic fibrosis, independently of the level of pulmonary dysfunction. Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency is present is approximately 70-90% of the patients with cystic fibrosis and the genotype-phenotype correlation is high. Most of the patients with exocrine pancreatic insufficiency tolerate a high-fat diet provided that they are treated with pancreatic enzymes at appropriate doses. The prevalence of diabetes increases with age, reaching up 40% of the cases in patients older than 30 years. Clinical liver involvement is less prevalent (it approximately affects 1/3 of the patients). Other intestinal complications such as meconial ileus, gastroesophageal reflux, obstruction of the distal intestine, or fibrosing colon disease may also condition malnourishment. In patients with cystic fibrosis, a usual high-fat diet providing 120%-150% of the recommended calories is advised. If the nutritional goals are not achieved or maintained with diet modifications, artificial supplements may be added, although the recommendation for their use has not been endorsed by solid scientific evidences. The most frequently used preparations usually are polymeric or hypercaloric. The indications for enteral (through a tube, especially gastrostomy) or parenteral nutritional support are

  18. GATA3 immunohistochemical expression in salivary gland neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Lauren E; Begum, Shahnaz; Westra, William H; Bishop, Justin A

    2013-12-01

    GATA3 is a zinc finger transcription factor that regulates the normal development of many tissues and cell types. Recent studies have shown that immunohistochemical nuclear staining for GATA3 among tumors is highly restricted to carcinomas of breast and urothelial origin; however salivary gland tumors have not been tested. Given that breast and salivary gland tissues are very similar with respect to embryologic development and structure, we performed GATA3 staining on a spectrum of salivary gland neoplasms. GATA3 immunohistochemistry was performed on a diverse collection of 180 benign and malignant salivary gland neoplasms including 10 acinic cell carcinomas, 2 adenocarcinomas not otherwise specified, 41 adenoid cystic carcinomas, 2 epithelial-myoepithelial carcinomas, 1 low grade cribriform cystadenocarcinoma, 15 mammary analogue secretory carcinomas, 7 metastatic squamous cell carcinomas, 27 mucoepidermoid carcinomas, 2 oncocytic carcinomas, 5 oncocytomas, 34 pleomorphic adenomas, 4 polymorphous low grade adenocarcinomas, 25 salivary duct carcinomas, and 5 Warthin tumors. Staining for GATA3 was observed in 92/180 (51 %) of salivary gland tumors. GATA3 staining was observed in most of the tumor types, but diffuse immunolabeling was consistently seen in salivary duct carcinoma (25 of 25) and mammary analogue secretory carcinoma (15 of 15)-the two tumor types that most closely resemble breast neoplasia. Background benign salivary gland tissue was also usually weakly positive in both acini and ducts. GATA3 immunostaining is not restricted to tumors of breast and urothelial origin. Rather, it is expressed across many different types of salivary gland neoplasms. As a result, salivary gland origin should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a GATA3-positive carcinoma, particularly in the head and neck. Although GATA3 immunohistochemistry is not helpful in resolving the differential diagnosis between a primary salivary gland neoplasm and metastatic breast

  19. Meconium ileus equivalent in older patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hanly, J G; Fitzgerald, M X

    1983-04-30

    Meconium ileus equivalent is one of the lesser known manifestations of cystic fibrosis, and occurs most often in older patients. With the improved overall survival of patients with cystic fibrosis, one would expect to see this condition more often in the future. Of 53 patients attending our cystic fibrosis clinic for adolescents and adults, eight had experienced a total of 25 episodes of meconium ileus equivalent. Recurrent attacks occurred in seven patients, of whom four had at least four separate, well documented episodes: these episodes were associated with obvious recognised precipitating factors in only three patients. All patients responded to appropriate medical treatment with acetylcysteine or sodium diatrizoate, including three who had previously undergone surgery for meconium ileus equivalent elsewhere. Controversies remain, however, concerning the role of prophylactic medical management with acetylcysteine, sodium diatrizoate, and pancreatic supplements. PMID:6404483

  20. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis for cystic fibrosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Biazotti, Maria Cristina Santoro; Pinto, Walter; de Albuquerque, Maria Cecília Romano Maciel; Fujihara, Litsuko Shimabukuro; Suganuma, Cláudia Haru; Reigota, Renata Bednar; Bertuzzo, Carmen Sílvia

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene. This disorder produces a variable phenotype including lung disease, pancreatic insufficiency, and meconium ileus plus bilateral agenesis of the vas deferens causing obstructive azoospermia and male infertility. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis is an alternative that allows identification of embryos affected by this or other genetic diseases. We report a case of couple with cystic fibrosis; the woman had the I148 T mutation and the man had the Delta F508 gene mutation. The couple underwent in vitro fertilization, associated with preimplantation genetic diagnosis, and with subsequent selection of healthy embryos for uterine transfer. The result was an uneventful pregnancy and delivery of a healthy male baby. PMID:25993078

  1. Fine-needle aspiration study of cystic papillary thyroid carcinoma: Rare cytological findings

    PubMed Central

    Mokhtari, Maral; Kumar, Perikala Vijayananda; Hayati, Kamran

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cystic papillary thyroid carcinoma (CPTC) is a variant of papillary carcinoma that has many mimickers in cytological grounds. Aim: To study the cytomorphologic features of CPTC and compare them to those of other cystic thyroid lesions using fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC). We also aimed to identify the cytomorphologic features that distinguish CPTC from other cystic thyroid lesions. Materials and Methods: Seventy-three cases of CPTC were included in the study. The cytomorphologic features of these cases were analyzed. The FNA smears of other thyroid lesions with cystic changes (300 colloid goiters, 290 adenomatoid nodules, 11 follicular neoplasms, and 9 hurtle cell neoplasm) were also studied. Results: The smears in CPTC revealed isolated follicular cells, small groups of cells with scalloped margins, cell swirls, small clusters with a cartwheel pattern, papillary clusters, intranuclear inclusions, nuclear grooves, sticky colloid, intracellular colloids, psammoma bodies, multinucleated giant cells, and foamy and hemosiderin laden macrophages. Small groups of cells with scalloped borders, cellular swirls, and small clusters with a cartwheel pattern were seen in CPTC, but not in other cystic lesions. Interestingly, mesothelial-like cells and hemophagocytic cells were seen in five and three cases of CPTC, respectively, but not in other cystic lesions. Conclusion: Mesothelial-like cells and hemophagocytic cells were observed in five and three cases of CPTC, respectively. Similar finding have not been previously reported in the literature.

  2. Chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Shounak; Chari, Suresh T

    2016-05-01

    Chronic pancreatitis describes a wide spectrum of fibro-inflammatory disorders of the exocrine pancreas that includes calcifying, obstructive, and steroid-responsive forms. Use of the term chronic pancreatitis without qualification generally refers to calcifying chronic pancreatitis. Epidemiology is poorly defined, but incidence worldwide seems to be on the rise. Smoking, drinking alcohol, and genetic predisposition are the major risk factors for chronic calcifying pancreatitis. In this Seminar, we discuss the clinical features, diagnosis, and management of chronic calcifying pancreatitis, focusing on pain management, the role of endoscopic and surgical intervention, and the use of pancreatic enzyme-replacement therapy. Management of patients is often challenging and necessitates a multidisciplinary approach. PMID:26948434

  3. Preoperative evaluation and management of the pancreatic head mass.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Claudius; Fernández-Del Castillo, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of a pancreatic head mass encompasses a wide range of clinical entities that include both solid and cystic lesions. This chapter focuses on our approach to the patient presenting with a newly found pancreatic head mass with the main goals of determining the risk of the lesion being malignant or premalignant, resectability if the patient is appropriate for surgical intervention, assessment of need for multimodality treatment and determination the patient's surgical risk.

  4. Evaluation of p27 Expression in Salivary Gland Neoplasms; A Step Forward in Unveiling the Role of p27

    PubMed Central

    Malgaonkar, Nikhil I.; Abuderman, Abdulwahab; Kharma, MY; Al-Maweri, SA; Alaizari, NA; Altamimi, MA.; Darwish, S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Salivary gland neoplasms are not uncommon lesions that are seen in the head and neck region. The role of cell cycle regulators as well as that of oncogenes remains unexplored in the pathogenesis of these neoplasms. Aim Present study was conducted to evaluate the expression of p27 in the three common salivary gland neoplasms. Materials and Methods A total of 34 cases (19 pleomorphic adenoma, 8 mucoepidermoid carcinoma and 7 adenoid cystic carcinoma) were included. The sections were subjected to p27 staining and rated for the expression. Results Of the total 52.6% of pleomorphic adenoma cases, 25% of mucoepidermoid carcinoma cases and only 14.2% of adenoid cystic carcinoma cases showed strong expression suggesting variable p27 expression in both malignant neoplasms. Normal salivary gland tissue was stained as a positive control for the evaluation. Conclusion The results of the study suggest an important role for p27 in pathogenesis of mucoepidermoid carcinoma as well as adenoid cystic carcinoma while its role in pathogenesis of pleomorphic adenoma remains questionable keeping in view the strong expression of p27 in the same. PMID:27630940

  5. Chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Chari, S T; DiMagno, E P

    2001-09-01

    An increasing number of novel mutations are associated with chronic pancreatitis. Some cause a high-penetrance, autosomal dominant type of clinical picture (eg, mutations at codons 29 and 122 of the cationic trypsinogen gene), whereas others have a low penetrance or are frequent in the general population (eg, mutations in Kazal type 1 [SPINK1] and in codons 16, 22, and 23 of the cationic trypsinogen gene) and act as disease modifiers. The results of recent studies indicate that smoking adversely affects the course and complications of chronic pancreatitis (more frequent and faster rate of calcification and higher risk of development of pancreatic cancer). Thus, regardless of the cause of chronic pancreatis, patients with this condition should not smoke. Using current diagnostic criteria, the accuracy of endoscopic ultrasound for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis is not good. For example, 39% of dyspeptic persons without any other evidence of chronic pancreatitis fulfilled the endoscopic ultrasound criteria for chronic pancreatitis. Diabetes frequently occurs in chronic pancreatitis, but it is not prevented or increased by pancreatic surgery. Islet cell autotransplantation holds promise for the prevention of diabetes in patients requiring total pancreatectomy if the pancreas is not extensively fibrotic. Splenic vein occlusion is present in 7% of patients undergoing surgery for chronic pancreatitis, but fewer than one fifth of these patients have variceal bleeding before or after surgery.

  6. Cystic Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Sonal; Rahim, Ahmed Mujib Bangalore; Parakkat, Nithin Kavassery; Kapoor, Shekhar; Mittal, Kumud; Sharma, Bhushan; Shivappa, Anil Bangalore

    2015-01-01

    Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor (AOT) is a well-established benign epithelial lesion of odontogenic origin. Rightfully called “the master of disguise,” this lesion has been known for its varied clinical and histoarchitectural patterns. Not only does AOT predominantly present radiologically as a unilocular cystic lesion enclosing the unerupted tooth (which is commonly mistaken as a dentigerous cyst) but the lesion also presents rarely with a cystic component histopathologically. We present one such unusual case of cystic AOT associated with an impacted canine, mimicking a dentigerous cyst. The present case aims to highlight the difference between cystic AOT and dentigerous cyst radiographically. The exact histogenesis of AOT and its variants still remains obscure. An attempt has been made to hypothesize the new school of thought regarding the origin of AOT. PMID:26579317

  7. Overexpression of lymphoid enhancer-binding factor 1 (LEF1) in solid-pseudopapillary neoplasms of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Singhi, Aatur D; Lilo, Mhammed; Hruban, Ralph H; Cressman, Kristi L; Fuhrer, Kimberly; Seethala, Raja R

    2014-10-01

    Solid-pseudopapillary neoplasms are rare, but are distinctive pancreatic tumors of low-malignant potential. While the histogenesis of these tumors is unclear, they are often associated with gain-of-function mutations in the catenin (cadherin-associated protein), beta 1 (88 kDa), or CTNNB1 gene, resulting in nuclear accumulation of CTNNB1. CTNNB1 is a central component of the Wnt signaling pathway and mediates gene expression through the lymphoid enhancer-binding factor 1 (LEF1) /T-cell factor transcription complex. Although LEF1 has a pivotal role in the transactivation of Wnt/CTNNB1 responsive genes, the status of LEF1 in solid-pseudopapillary neoplasms and other pancreatic tumors has not been examined. We analyzed both LEF1 and CTNNB1 in a large cohort of pancreatic tumors (n=155). In all cases of solid-pseudopapillary neoplasms including surgical resections (n=27) and cytologic samples (n=8) had strong and diffuse nuclear labeling for both LEF1 and CTNNB1. The surrounding uninvolved pancreatic parenchyma was devoid of any LEF1 staining. All resection and cytologic specimens from well-differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (n=44; n=29, respectively), high-grade pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinomas (n=2; n=1), pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (n=25; n=12), and acinar cell carcinomas (n=9; n=2) studied were negative for both nuclear LEF1 and CTNNB1. However, nuclear LEF1 and CTNNB1 were detected in all four resected pancreatoblastomas (no cytologic specimens were available for immunolabeling), but primarily centered around and within squamoid corpuscles. In summary, abnormal CTNNB1 accumulation was accompanied by nuclear LEF1 overexpression in both solid-pseudopapillary neoplasms and pancreatoblastomas. But, in contrast to pancreatoblastomas, a diffuse, nuclear labeling was observed in solid-pseudopapillary neoplasms and further implicates the CTNNB1/LEF1 transcriptional complex in the development of solid-pseudopapillary neoplasms. In addition, as part

  8. Overexpression of Lymphoid Enhancer-Binding Factor 1 (LEF1) in solid-pseudopapillary neoplasms of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Singhi, Aatur D; Lilo, Mhammed; Hruban, Ralph H; Cressman, Kristi L; Fuhrer, Kimberly; Seethala, Raja R

    2015-01-01

    Solid-pseudopapillary neoplasms are rare, but are distinctive pancreatic tumors of low-malignant potential. While the histogenesis of these tumors is unclear, they are often associated with gain-of-function mutations in the catenin (cadherin-associated protein), beta 1 (88 kDa), or CTNNB1 gene, resulting in nuclear accumulation of CTNNB1. CTNNB1 is a central component of the Wnt signaling pathway and mediates gene expression through the lymphoid enhancer-binding factor 1 (LEF1) /T-cell factor transcription complex. Although LEF1 has a pivotal role in the transactivation of Wnt/CTNNB1 responsive genes, the status of LEF1 in solid-pseudopapillary neoplasms and other pancreatic tumors has not been examined. We analyzed both LEF1 and CTNNB1 in a large cohort of pancreatic tumors (n=155). In all cases of solid-pseudopapillary neoplasms including surgical resections (n=27) and cytologic samples (n=8) had strong and diffuse nuclear labeling for both LEF1 and CTNNB1. The surrounding uninvolved pancreatic parenchyma was devoid of any LEF1 staining. All resection and cytologic specimens from well-differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (n=44; n=29, respectively), high-grade pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinomas (n=2; n=1), pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (n=25; n=12), and acinar cell carcinomas (n=9; n=2) studied were negative for both nuclear LEF1 and CTNNB1. However, nuclear LEF1 and CTNNB1 were detected in all four resected pancreatoblastomas (no cytologic specimens were available for immunolabeling), but primarily centered around and within squamoid corpuscles. In summary, abnormal CTNNB1 accumulation was accompanied by nuclear LEF1 overexpression in both solid-pseudopapillary neoplasms and pancreatoblastomas. But, in contrast to pancreatoblastomas, a diffuse, nuclear labeling was observed in solid-pseudopapillary neoplasms and further implicates the CTNNB1/ LEF1 transcriptional complex in the development of solid-pseudopapillary neoplasms. In addition, as part

  9. Update on pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    McKenna, Logan R.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) are relatively rare tumors comprising 1-2% of all pancreas neoplasms. In the last 10 years our understanding of this disease has increased dramatically allowing for advancements in the treatment of pNETs. Surgical excision remains the primary therapy for localized tumors and only potential for cure. New surgical techniques using laparoscopic approaches to complex pancreatic resections are a major advancement in surgical therapy and increasingly possible. With early detection being less common, most patients present with metastatic disease. Management of these patients requires multidisciplinary care combining the best of surgery, chemotherapy and other targeted therapies. In addition to surgical advances, recently, there have been significant advances in systemic therapy and targeted molecular therapy. PMID:25493258

  10. Drugs Approved for Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for myeloproliferative neoplasms. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  11. Respiratory Conditions Update: Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, Lyle L

    2016-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive genetic disease that occurs in approximately 1 in 2,500 white live births. It is less common in nonwhite individuals. A dysfunctional epithelial chloride channel leads to excessively thick mucus affecting multiple organ systems. Common issues include mucous plugging of the airway, lung inflammation, chronic pulmonary infections, intestinal malabsorption, and malnutrition. Universal screening of newborns for CF is recommended in many countries. CF can be diagnosed based on clinical evidence of disease along with genetic testing or other laboratory evidence of chloride channel dysfunction. Pulmonary system dysfunction causes the most morbidity and mortality. Pulmonary function testing is the primary modality used to monitor CF progression. Therapies include chest physiotherapy, mucolytics, antibiotics, anti-inflammatory drugs, targeted therapies, and vaccines. Dysfunction of the exocrine pancreas and gastrointestinal tract leads to malabsorption, malnutrition, and intestinal obstruction. Nutrition should be optimized with adequate calories, pancreatic enzymes, and appropriate dietary supplements. Complications, including acute pulmonary exacerbations, gastrointestinal conditions, chronic rhinosinusitis, CF-related diabetes, osteoporosis, infertility, and psychosocial issues, must be managed. At the appropriate time, lung transplantation and end-of-life issues must be addressed. PMID:27576234

  12. Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Respiratory Screen: Sputum

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Chloride Sweat Test Lungs and Respiratory System Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition Cystic Fibrosis Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition Lungs and Respiratory System Contact Us Print Resources Send to a friend ...

  13. Management of fibrosing pancreatitis in children presenting with obstructive jaundice

    PubMed Central

    Sylvester, F; Shuckett, B; Cutz, E; Durie, P; Marcon, M

    1998-01-01

    Background—Children with fibrosing pancreatitis are conventionally treated surgically to relieve common bile duct (CBD) obstruction caused by pancreatic compression. Residual pancreatic function has not been formally tested in these patients. 
Aims—To evaluate the usefulness of non-surgical temporary drainage in children with fibrosing pancreatitis and to assess pancreatic function after resolution of their CBD obstruction. 
Patients—Four children (1.5-13 years; three girls). 
Methods and results—Abdominal sonography and computed tomography revealed diffuse enlargement of the pancreas, predominantly the head. The CBD was dilated due to compression by the head of the pancreas. Pancreatic biopsy specimens obtained in three patients showed notable acinar cell atrophy and extensive fibrosis. Cystic fibrosis was excluded. No other cause of pancreatitis was identified. Pancreatic tissue from one patient contained viral DNA sequences for parvovirus B19 detected by polymerase chain reaction; serum IgM to parvovirus was positive. Three patients had temporary drainage of the CBD and one patient underwent a choledochojejunostomy. Serial imaging studies revealed resolution of the CBD obstruction with reduction in pancreatic size. Exocrine pancreatic function deteriorated. Three patients developed pancreatic insufficiency within two to four months of presentation. The fourth patient has notably diminished pancreatic function, but remains pancreatic sufficient. None has diabetes mellitus. 
Conclusions—Temporary drainage of the CBD obstruction is recommended in fibrosing pancreatitis in children along with close monitoring of the clinical course, before considering surgery. 

 Keywords: pancreatitis; jaundice; common bile duct obstruction; children PMID:9824357

  14. Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Geokas, Michael C.

    1972-01-01

    For many decades two types of acute pancreatitis have been recognized: the edematous or interstitial and the hemorrhagic or necrotic. In most cases acute pancreatitis is associated with alcoholism or biliary tract disease. Elevated serum or urinary α-amylase is the most important finding in diagnosis. The presence of methemalbumin in serum and in peritoneal or pleural fluid supports the diagnosis of the hemorrhagic form of the disease in patients with a history and enzyme studies suggestive of pancreatitis. There is no characteristic clinical picture in acute pancreatitis, and its complications are legion. Pancreatic pseudocyst is probably the most common and pancreatic abscess is the most serious complication. The pathogenetic principle is autodigestion, but the precise sequence of biochemical events is unclear, especially the mode of trypsinogen activation and the role of lysosomal hydrolases. A host of metabolic derangements have been identified in acute pancreatitis, involving lipid, glucose, calcium and magnesium metabolism and changes of the blood clotting mechanism, to name but a few. Medical treatment includes intestinal decompression, analgesics, correction of hypovolemia and other supportive and protective measures. Surgical exploration is advisable in selected cases, when the diagnosis is in doubt, and is considered imperative in the presence of certain complications, especially pancreatic abscess. PMID:4559467

  15. [Hereditary pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Dyrla, Przemysław; Nowak, Tomasz; Gil, Jerzy; Adamiec, Cezary; Bobula, Mariusz; Saracyn, Marek

    2016-02-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis (HP) is a rare, heterogeneous familial disease and should be suspected in any patient who has suffered at least two attacks of acute pancreatitis for which there is no underlying cause and unexplained chronic pancreatitis with a family history in a first- or second degree relative. with an early onset, mostly during childhood. Genetic factors have been implied in cases of familial chronic pancreatitis. The most common are mutations of the PRSS1 gene on the long arm of the chromosome 7, encoding for the cationic trypsinogen. The inheritance pattern is autosomal dominant with an incomplete penetrance (80%). The inflammation results in repeated DNA damage, error-prone repair mechanisms and the progressive accumulation of genetic mutations. Risk of pancreatic adenocarcinoma is a major concern of many patients with hereditary chronic pancreatitis, but the individual risk is poorly defined. Better risk models of pancreatic cancer in individual patients based on etiology of pancreatitis, family history, genetics, smoking, alcohol, diabetes and the patient's age are needed. PMID:27000817

  16. Improving outcomes in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Warwick, Geoffrey; Elston, Caroline

    2011-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common fatal inherited disease in Caucasian people. Inheritance follows an autosomal recessive pattern. Recent data indicate that there are more than 9,000 patients with CF in the UK. At a cellular level there is an abnormal CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a protein essential for chloride and sodium homoeostasis, caused by a mutation in the CF gene. The consequence of this abnormal protein is thick, viscous secretions in the lungs and GI tract, which lead to recurrent lung infections and pancreatic insufficiency with intestinal malabsorption. Most patients present in early childhood with classic CF. They show one or more of the typical CF phenotypic characteristics (chronic pulmonary disease, GI symptoms and malabsorption, nutritional abnormalities and sinus disease). A minority of patients have atypical CF. They tend to present at an older age, often in adulthood, are mainly pancreatic sufficient, have milder disease and a better prognosis. When CF is suspected the diagnosis can be confirmed by measuring sweat chloride concentration and by looking for CFTR mutations. Immunoreactive trypsinogen is measured in blood taken from a heel prick in all neonates, and is a marker of pancreatic injury consistent with (but not specific for) CF. PMID:21932505

  17. Pancreatic injury.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Nasim; Vernick, Jerome J

    2009-12-01

    Injury to the pancreas, because of its retroperitoneal location, is a rare occurrence, most commonly seen with penetrating injuries (gun shot or stab wounds). Blunt trauma to the pancreas accounts for only 25% of the cases. Pancreatic injuries are associated with high morbidity and mortality due to accompanying vascular and duodenal injuries. Pancreatic injuries are not always easy to diagnose resulting in life threatening complications. Physical examination as well as serum amylase is not diagnostic following blunt trauma. Computed tomography (CT) scan can delineate the injury or transaction of the pancreas. Endoscopic retrograde pancreaticography (ERCP) is the main diagnostic modality for evaluation of the main pancreatic duct. Unrecognized ductal injury leads to pancreatic pseudocyst, fistula, abscess, and other complications. Management depends upon the severity of the pancreatic injury as well as associated injuries. Damage control surgery in hemodynamic unstable patients reduces morbidity and mortality.

  18. Pitfalls in the biopsy diagnosis of intraoral minor salivary gland neoplasms: diagnostic considerations and recommended approach.

    PubMed

    Turk, Andrew T; Wenig, Bruce M

    2014-01-01

    Among the more common types of intraoral minor salivary gland neoplasms are pleomorphic adenoma, basal cell adenoma, polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinoma, and adenoid cystic carcinoma. These minor salivary gland neoplasms share similar morphologic features and to a large extent immunohistochemical findings. Differentiation between these benign and malignant neoplasms is often predicated on the presence or absence of invasion. As such, in the presence of limited tissue sampling that typifies the initial testing modalities, including fine needle aspiration biopsy and/or incisional biopsy, it often is not possible to differentiate a benign from malignant minor salivary gland neoplasm. The diagnostic difficulties arise from the absence in needle or incisional biopsy of the tumor's periphery to determine whether infiltrative growth is or is not present. In this manuscript we discuss limitations and considerations associated with evaluation of incisional biopsies of intraoral minor salivary gland tumors. We offer a diagnostic approach to evaluating these biopsies, and suggest diagnostic terminology for biopsy specimens in which distinction between benignancy and malignancy is not feasible. The pathologist's approach to this distinction is critical, as treatment of benign neoplasms is generally conservative, whereas malignant lesions may warrant more aggressive management.

  19. Filling defects in the pancreatic duct on endoscopic retrograde pancreatography.

    PubMed

    Taylor, A J; Carmody, T J; Schmalz, M J; Wiedmeyer, D A; Stewart, E T

    1992-12-01

    Filling defects in the pancreatic duct are a frequent finding during endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP) and have a variety of causes. Some filling defects may be artifactual or related to technical factors and, once their origin is recognized, can be disregarded. Others may be due to acute changes of pancreatitis and should prompt more careful injection of contrast material into the duct. Intraluminal masses may represent calculi or a neoplasm, either of which may require surgery or endoscopic intervention. The exact nature of these filling defects may not be apparent on radiographs, and other studies may be needed. This article reviews our approach to the evaluation of filling defects in the pancreatic duct.

  20. [Hepatic and pancreatic laparoscopic surgery].

    PubMed

    Pardo, F; Rotellar, F; Valentí, V; Pastor, C; Poveda, I; Martí-Cruchaga, P; Zozaya, G

    2005-01-01

    The development of laparoscopic surgery also includes the more complex procedures of abdominal surgery such as those that affect the liver and the pancreas. From diagnostic laparoscopy, accompanied by laparoscopic echography, to major hepatic or pancreatic resections, the laparoscopic approach has spread and today encompasses practically all of the surgical procedures in hepatopancreatic pathology. Without forgetting that the aim of minimally invasive surgery is not a better aesthetic result but the reduction of postoperative complications, it is undeniable that the laparoscopic approach has brought great benefits for the patient in every type of surgery except, for the time being, in the case of big resections such as left or right hepatectomy or resections of segments VII and VIII. Pancreatic surgery has undergone a great development with laparoscopy, especially in the field of distal pancreatectomy due to cystic and neuroendocrine tumours where the approach of choice is laparoscopic. Laparoscopy similarly plays an important role, together with echolaparoscopy, in staging pancreatic tumours, prior to open surgery or for indicating suitable treatment. In coming years, it is to be hoped that it will continue to undergo an exponential development and, together with the advances in robotics, it will be possible to witness a greater impact of the laparoscopic approach on the field of hepatic and pancreatic surgery. PMID:16511579

  1. Preoperative cytological diagnosis of papillary cystic variant of acinic cell carcinoma: A key consideration in patient management.

    PubMed

    Datar, Sonali S; Poflee, Sandhya V; Pande, Nandu P; Umap, Pradeep S

    2015-01-01

    Preoperative diagnosis of malignant salivary gland tumors is difficult as radiological imaging procedures have low sensitivity rate for detecting malignancy in parotid gland tumors. With careful and detailed analysis of cytological features, guided fine needle aspiration cytology can prove to be a reliable diagnostic modality that can help in differential diagnosis of cystic parotid malignancies from cystic benign tumors and non-neoplastic lesions. Papillary cystic variant of acinic cell carcinoma is a rare, cystic, primary neoplasm of salivary gland that occurs commonly in parotid. The tumor shows high local recurrence rate and has poorer prognosis compared to classic acinic cell carcinoma. Preoperative cytological diagnosis of papillary cystic variant of acinic cell carcinoma of parotid, in the case described here was the basis for adequate and timely surgical management with good results.

  2. EXOCRINE PANCREATIC CARCINOGENESIS IN THE GUPPY POECILIA RETICULATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exocrine pancreatic neoplasms developed in the guppy Poecilia reticulata following exposure to the direct acting carcinogen, methylazoxymethanol acetate (MAM-Ac). Fish 6- to 10-days old were exposed to nominal, nontoxic concentrations of 4 and 10 mg MAM-Ac 1-1 for 2 h and then tr...

  3. EXOCRINE PANCREATIC CARCINOGENESIS IN THE GUPPY (POECILIA RETICULATA).

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exocrine pancreatic neoplasms developed in the guppy (Poecilia reticulata) following exposure to the direct acting carcinogen, methylazoxymethanol acetate (MAM-Ac). Fish 6- to 10-days old were exposed to nominal, nontoxic concentrations of 4 and 10 mg MAM-Ac/L for 2 hr and then t...

  4. RAF/MEK dependence of KRAS mutant pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Hanrahan, Aphrothiti J.; Solit, David B.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Sentence Studies employing genetically engineered mouse models indicate that RAF activation is sufficient to induce pancreas intraepithelial neoplasms (PanINs) suggesting that MEK inhibitor-based combination approaches may have clinical utility in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas. PMID:22886659

  5. Retroperitoneal dermoid presenting as an infected pancreatic cyst.

    PubMed

    Dewar, G; Arnold, M; Li, A K

    1990-06-01

    Bacteroides fragilis infection of a juxtapancreatic benign cystic retroperitoneal teratoma in a 28 year old Chinese male is reported. Preliminary drainage was followed by excision. The radiological and pathological findings of this rare tumour are reported with emphasis on the differential diagnosis which includes inflammatory and neoplastic pancreatic cysts.

  6. Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    DiMagno, Matthew J.; DiMagno, Eugene P.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review We review important new clinical observations in chronic pancreatitis (CP) reported in 2011. Recent findings Smoking increases the risk of non-gallstone acute pancreatitis (AP) and the progression of AP to CP. Binge drinking during Oktoberfest did not associate with increased hospital admissions for AP. The unfolded protein response is an adaptive mechanism to maintain pancreatic health in response to noxious stimuli such as alcohol. Onset of diabetes mellitus in CP is likely due to progressive disease rather than individual variables. Insufficient pancreatic enzyme dosing is common for treatment of pancreatic steatorrhea; 90,000 USP U of lipase should be given with meals. Surgical drainage provides sustained, superior pain relief compared to endoscopic treatment in patients advanced CP with a dilated main duct +/− pancreatic stones. The central acting gabapentoid pregabalin affords a modest 12% pain reduction in patients with CP but ~30% of patients have significant side effects. Summary Patients with non-gallstone related AP or CP of any etiology should cease smoking. Results of this year’s investigations further elucidated the pancreatic pathobiology due to alcohol, onset of diabetes mellitus in CP, and the mechanisms and treatment of neuropathic pain in CP. PMID:22782018

  7. Spontaneous endomyometrial neoplasms in aging Chinese hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Brownstein, D.G.; Brooks, A.L.

    1980-05-01

    Twenty-one endomyometrial neoplasms among 93 nulliparous noninbred Chinese hamsters were evaluated. The median survival time of the 93 females was 1040 days. The median age of hamsters with endomyometrial neoplasms was 1200 days. Neoplasms were classified as carcinomas or malignant mixed muellerian tumors of the endometrium and benign or malignant myometrial neoplasms. There were 13 endometrial adenocarcinomas. Three tumors were mixed adenosquamous carcinomas, which occurred in significantly older Chinese hamsters than did adenocarcinomas. Three malignant mixed muellerian tumors consisted of 2 carcinosarcomas and 1 mixed mesodermal tumor. The 2 myometrial neoplasms were a lelomyoma and a lelomyosarcoma. The classification and relative frequency of these neoplasms were similar to endomyometrial neoplasms of women, which makes Chinese hamsters useful subjects for studies of spontaneous endomyometrial cancers.

  8. A Rare Anomaly of Biliary System: MRCP Evidence of a Cystic Duct Cyst.

    PubMed

    Goya, Cemil; Arslan, Mehmet Serif; Yavuz, Alpaslan; Hamidi, Cihad; Kuday, Suzan; Okur, Mehmet Hanifi; Aydogdu, Bahattin

    2014-01-01

    Cystic duct cysts are a rare congenital anomaly. While the other bile duct cysts (choledochus and the intrahepatic bile ducts) are classified according to the classification described by Tadoni, there is no classification method described by the cystic duct cysts, although it is claimed that the cystic duct cysts may constitute a new "Type 6" category. Only a limited number of patients with cystic duct cysts have been reported in the literature. The diagnosis is usually made in the neonatal period or during childhood. The clinical symptoms are nonspecific and usually include pain in the right upper quadrant and jaundice. The condition may also present with biliary colic, cholangitis, cholelithiasis, or pancreatitis. In our case, the abdominal ultrasonography (US) performed on a 6-year-old female patient who presented with pain in the right upper quadrant pointed out an anechoic cyst at the neck of the gall bladder. Based on the magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) results, a cystic dilatation was diagnosed in the cystic duct. The aim of this case-report presentation was to discuss the US and MRCP findings of the cystic dilatation of cystic duct, which is an extremely rare condition, in the light of the literature information. PMID:24987540

  9. Cardiac effects of noncardiac neoplasms

    SciTech Connect

    Schoen, F.J.; Berger, B.M.; Guerina, N.G.

    1984-11-01

    Clinically significant cardiovascular abnormalities may occur as secondary manifestations of noncardiac neoplasms. The principal cardiac effects of noncardiac tumors include the direct results of metastases to the heart or lungs, the indirect effects of circulating tumor products (causing nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis, myeloma-associated amyloidosis, pheochromocytoma-associated cardiac hypertrophy and myofibrillar degeneration, and carcinoid heart disease), and the undesired cardiotoxicities of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. 89 references.

  10. [Neuroendocrine neoplasms of the breast].

    PubMed

    Anlauf, M; Neumann, M; Bomberg, S; Luczak, K; Heikaus, S; Gustmann, C; Antke, C; Ezziddin, S; Fottner, C; Pavel, M; Pape, U-F; Rinke, A; Lahner, H; Schott, M; Cremer, B; Hörsch, D; Baum, R P; Groh, U; Alkatout, I; Rudlowski, C; Scheler, P; Zirbes, T K; Hoffmann, J; Fehm, T; Gabbert, H E; Baldus, S E

    2015-05-01

    Neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN) of the breast are specific tumor entities. According to the literature up to 5% of breast neoplasms are malignant epithelial neoplasms of the breast. They are defined by a neuroendocrine (NE) architecture and cytology combined with an expression of the neuroendocrine vesicle markers chromogranin A and/or synaptophysin. The diagnosis is supplemented by the receptor status and the proliferative activity. According to the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of 2012 the following groups of NEN are distinguished: (1) invasive breast carcinoma with NE differentiation, (2) well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor (NET) and (3) poorly differentiated small cell carcinoma (NEC). This review article focuses on (1) the definition and basic principles of diagnostics, (2) the history, nomenclature and WHO classification from 2003 and 2012, (3) the frequency of breast NEN, (4) the hereditary background and functional activity, (5) the expression of receptors and (6) the possible clinical implications. In addition, the first results of a retrospective single center study (n = 465 patients with breast cancer over a time period of 4 years) on the frequency of NEN of the breast at the Breast Center of the University Hospital Düsseldorf are presented. In this study a frequency of 4.5% of NEN was found based on a diagnostic cut-off of > 50% Chromogranin A and/or synaptophysin positive tumor cells.

  11. Classification of Salivary Gland Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Patrick J

    2016-01-01

    Presently, there is no universal 'working' classification system acceptable to all clinicians involved in the diagnosis and management of patients with salivary gland neoplasms. The most recent World Health Organization Classification of Tumours: Head and Neck Tumours (Salivary Glands) (2005) for benign and malignant neoplasms represents the consensus of current knowledge and is considered the standard pathological classification based on which series should be reported. The TNM classification of salivary gland malignancies has stood the test of time, and using the stage groupings remains the current standard for reporting treated patients' outcomes. Many developments in molecular and genetic methods in the meantime have identified a number of new entities, and new findings for several of the well-established salivary malignancies need to be considered for inclusion in any new classification system. All clinicians involved in the diagnosis, assessment and treatment of patients with salivary gland neoplasms must understand and respect the need for the various classification systems, enabling them to work within a multidisciplinary clinical team environment.

  12. Solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm of the pancreas: A classical presentation with unique paranuclear dot like immunostaining with CD 99.

    PubMed

    Nair Anila, Kunjulekshmi Amma Raveendran; Nayak, Nileena; Muralee, Madhu; Venugopal, Bhaskaran Pillai; Mony, Rari P

    2015-01-01

    A 32-year-old lady presented with a history of abdominal pain and upper abdominal discomfort of 3 months duration. Her imaging studies done at a local hospital showed a solid-cystic mass involving head of the pancreas. The patient was referred to our surgical oncology department. On examination, there was a nontender mass in the epigastrium. An ultrasound scan guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA) was done which was showing classical features of solid-pseudo papillary neoplasm of the pancreas. With this preoperative diagnosis patient was taken up for surgery. Per operatively, there was a solid-cystic mass in the head of the pancreas. Pancreaticoduodenectomy was done. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry (IHC) confirmed the diagnosis of solid-pseudo papillary neoplasm of the pancreas. Apart from the routine IHC panel, CD 99 immunostain was also done which demonstrated the characteristic paranuclear dot-like staining observed in previous studies in the literature.

  13. Strategies for screening for pancreatic adenocarcinoma in high-risk patients.

    PubMed

    Canto, Marcia Irene

    2007-08-01

    Identification of high-risk individuals, genetic counseling, and informed consent are important components of a screening program for familial pancreatic cancer. Screening high-risk individuals with imaging tests, such endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and computed tomography (CT), can lead to the detection and treatment of predominantly asymptomatic early pancreatic neoplasms, as well as extra-pancreatic tumors. These pancreatic neoplasms consist of resectable, mostly branch-type non-invasive intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs). EUS can visualize these very early IPMNs as focal duct ectasias or cysts. EUS features of chronic pancreatitis are highly prevalent in high-risk individuals and these directly correlate with multifocal lobulocentric parenchymal atrophy due to multifocal pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN). No one molecular marker is ready for "prime time" screening of high-risk individuals. Translational studies are underway to discover novel biomarkers for IPMNs, PanIN-3 lesions, or microinvasive adenocarcinoma, which are likely to be cured by timely intervention. Long-term, multi-prospective studies are needed to determine if screening for early pancreatic neoplasia and timely intervention results in decreased pancreatic cancer incidence and mortality in high-risk individuals.

  14. Differential expression of epithelial cell adhesion molecule in salivary gland neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Phattarataratip, Ekarat; Masorn, Marisa; Jarupoonphol, Werapong; Supatthanayut, Sirinpaporn; Saeoweiang, Pichanee

    2016-10-01

    Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) is the epithelial-specific molecule expressed on various epithelial cell types. The function of EpCAM involves cellular adhesion, proliferation, and signaling in both normal tissues and cancers. The purposes of this study were to investigate the EpCAM expression in salivary gland neoplasms and examine its relationship with pathologic characteristics. Forty-two cases of salivary gland neoplasms, including 20 mucoepidermoid carcinomas (MECs), 11 adenoid cystic carcinomas (ACCs), 9 pleomorphic adenomas (PAs), and 2 polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinomas (PLGAs) were enrolled. Epithelial cell adhesion molecule expression was analyzed immunohistochemically using MOC-31 and BerEP4 antibodies. Results showed that the majority of MECs and all PLGAs showed EpCAM expression in more than 50% of neoplastic cells, whereas most PAs and ACCs did not express this protein. In MECs, most EpCAM-positive neoplastic cells were clear cells, glandular epithelial cells, and intermediate cells, whereas squamous cells and mucous cells were largely negative. The expression was limited to ductal epithelium in EpCAM-positive PAs and ACCs. The decreased EpCAM expression in MECs was significantly associated with microscopically diminished cystic components, the presence of small nest invasion at invasive front, cellular anaplasia, vascular invasion, and high pathologic grade. These data suggested that EpCAM showed different expression pattern among salivary gland neoplasms and in different grades of MECs. PMID:27649957

  15. Adenoid cystic carcinoma. Analysis of fifty oral cases.

    PubMed

    Tarpley, T M; Giansanti, J S

    1976-04-01

    Fifty cases of oral minor salivary gland adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) are analyzed and reported. Oral ACC frequently masquerades as a benign neoplasm, and in the majority of cases there is no pain or ulceration. The most common location is in the palate; a plea is made for incisional biopsy of all oral lesions suspected of salivary gland origin. Survival rates show a progressive decrease with time, and there were no survivors beyond 20 years. In this study, there was a positive correlation between duration of the lesion before diagnosis and the salvage rate, but no correlation was found with the size of the presenting lesion.

  16. Laparoscopic duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiayu; Zhou, Yucheng; Mou, Yiping; Xia, Tao; Xu, Xiaowu; Jin, Weiwei; Zhang, Renchao; Lu, Chao; Chen, Ronggao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Solid pseudopapillary neoplasms (SPNs) of the pancreas are uncommon neoplasms and are potentially malignant. Complete resection is advised due to rare recurrence and metastasis. Duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection (DPPHR) is indicated for SPNs located in the pancreatic head and is only performed using the open approach. To the best of our knowledge, there are no reports describing laparoscopic DPPHR (LDPPHR) for SPNs. Methods: Herein, we report a case of 41-year-old female presented with a 1-week history of epigastric abdominal discomfort, and founded an SPN of the pancreatic head by abdominal computed tomography/magnetic resonance, who was treated by radical LDPPHR without complications, such as pancreatic fistula and bile leakage. Histological examination of the resected specimen confirmed the diagnosis of SPN. Results: The patient was discharged 1 week after surgery following an uneventful postoperative period. She was followed up 3 months without readmission and local recurrence according to abdominal ultrasound. Conclusion: LDPPHR is a safe, feasible, and effective surgical procedure for SPNs. PMID:27512859

  17. Acute pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... rate Lab tests that show the release of pancreatic enzymes will be done. These include: Increased blood amylase level Increased serum blood lipase level Increased urine amylase ... swelling of the pancreas include: CT scan of the abdomen MRI of ...

  18. Pancreatitis - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... perform lab tests to check the release of pancreatic enzymes. These include tests to check the: Blood amylase level Blood lipase level Urine amylase level Other blood tests ... the pancreas include: Ultrasound of the abdomen (most common) CT ...

  19. Pancreatic abscess.

    PubMed Central

    Gartell, P C

    1982-01-01

    Three cases of pancreatic abscess are described to show the difficulties in diagnosis and that inadequate treatment is invariably fatal. Early recognition and prompt surgical drainage, together with biliary decompression if indicated, are advised. PMID:7069670

  20. Hereditary Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Rivera Rivera, Edgardo D; Chugh, Ankur; Cordova, Jonathon; Young, Sona

    2016-02-01

    A 13-year-old boy with a strong family history of hereditary pancreatitis was found to have a PRSS1 mutation after being tested at age 5 years during his first documented incident of pancreatitis. Since then, a multidisciplinary team has been treating him for the diagnosis of hereditary pancreatitis. His pain episodes increased in severity over the past several months such that the pain began to severely interfere with his daily life. After extensive discussion, a total pancreatectomy with auto islet cell transplant was performed. He is now pain free and does not require any insulin. This leads us to the questions of what is hereditary pancreatitis and how is it diagnosed? What are the management and follow-up strategies needed for these patients? This article addresses these questions and informs the reader about this diagnosis and the importance of having a high index of clinical suspicion. PMID:26878183

  1. [Atypical intraperitoneal cystic masses].

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Pérez, S T; Baeza-Herrera, C; Villalobos-Castillejos, A; González-Mateos, T; Aguilar-Venegas, M

    2010-01-01

    Omental, mesenteric and retroperitoneal cystic masses are very rare in pediatric population. They usually present as asymptomatic abdominal tumors and only occasionally a preoperative diagnosis is made. We presented 4 cases presented to our hospital during a 2-year period. All patients were male with an age ranged from 5 months to 7 years. Three patients had previous diagnosis of cystic mass by abdominal ultrasound. Three patients presented with acute abdomen and one patient with bowel obstruction. All patients underwent successful resection of the mass with no perioperative mortality.

  2. Chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Maisonneuve, Patrick; Lowenfels, Albert B

    2002-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in the USA in both sexes. Early diagnosis is difficult and the overall mortality rate is high. Individuals at high risk for pancreatic cancer include smokers, and persons with all forms of chronic alcoholic, metabolic, tropical or hereditary pancreatitis. The duration of exposure to inflammation seems to be the major factor involved in the transition from benign to malignant condition. Smoking, which appears to further accelerate the carcinogenic transformation, remains the strongest risk factor amenable to preventive intervention.

  3. Anaplastic carcinoma of the pancreas arising in an intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm: A case report

    PubMed Central

    FUJII, KENSUKE; NITTA, TOSHIKATSU; KAWASAKI, HIROSHI; KATAOKA, JUN; TOMINAGA, TOMO; INOUE, YOSHIHIRO; KADOTA, EIJI; ISHIBASHI, TAKASHI; UCHIYAMA, KAZUHISA

    2016-01-01

    We herein report a case of anaplastic carcinoma of the pancreas arising in an intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN). A 68-year-old Japanese woman was admitted to our hospital complaining of fatigue. Computed tomography revealed an irregular mass in the pancreatic head, which displayed high-signal intensity on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Accordingly, the patient was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy. The histopathological findings revealed intraductal papillary proliferative changes involving the main and branch ducts of the pancreatic head. Based on the immunohistochemistry results, the intraductal lesion was diagnosed as IPMN. The pathological diagnosis for the invasive carcinoma was anaplastic giant-cell carcinoma of the pancreas (ACP), and the focus of IPMN dedifferentiation to ACP was found to be located at the periphery of the IPMN. At 18 months postoperatively, the patient remains disease-free. PMID:26870354

  4. Autoimmune pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Omiyale, Ayodeji Oluwarotimi

    2016-06-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare, distinct and increasingly recognized form of pancreatitis which has autoimmune features. The international consensus diagnostic criteria (ICDC) for AIP recently described two subtypes; type 1[lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP)] and type 2 [idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP) or AIP with granulocytic epithelial lesion (GEL)]. Type 1 is the more common form of the disease worldwide and current understanding suggests that it is a pancreatic manifestation of immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD). In contrast, type 2 AIP is a pancreas-specific disease not associated with IgG4 and mostly without the overt extra-pancreatic organ involvement seen in type 1. The pathogenesis of AIP is not completely understood and its clinical presentation is non-specific. It shares overlapping features with more sinister pathologies such as cancer of the pancreas, which continues to pose a diagnostic challenge for clinicians. The diagnostic criteria requires a variable combination of histopathological, imaging and serological features in the presence of typical extrapancreatic lesions and a predictable response to steroids. PMID:27294040

  5. Autoimmune pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare, distinct and increasingly recognized form of pancreatitis which has autoimmune features. The international consensus diagnostic criteria (ICDC) for AIP recently described two subtypes; type 1[lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP)] and type 2 [idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP) or AIP with granulocytic epithelial lesion (GEL)]. Type 1 is the more common form of the disease worldwide and current understanding suggests that it is a pancreatic manifestation of immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD). In contrast, type 2 AIP is a pancreas-specific disease not associated with IgG4 and mostly without the overt extra-pancreatic organ involvement seen in type 1. The pathogenesis of AIP is not completely understood and its clinical presentation is non-specific. It shares overlapping features with more sinister pathologies such as cancer of the pancreas, which continues to pose a diagnostic challenge for clinicians. The diagnostic criteria requires a variable combination of histopathological, imaging and serological features in the presence of typical extrapancreatic lesions and a predictable response to steroids. PMID:27294040

  6. Pancreatic Cancer Early Detection Program

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-30

    Pancreatic Cancer; Pancreas Cancer; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Familial Pancreatic Cancer; BRCA 1/2; HNPCC; Lynch Syndrome; Hereditary Pancreatitis; FAMMM; Familial Atypical Multiple Mole Melanoma; Peutz Jeghers Syndrome

  7. PDX-1 (pancreatic/duodenal homeobox-1 protein 1).

    PubMed

    Pedica, F; Beccari, S; Pedron, S; Montagna, L; Piccoli, P; Doglioni, C; Chilosi, M

    2014-12-01

    The homeodomain-containing transcription factor pancreatic duodenal homeobox 1 (PDX-1) plays a key role in pancreatic development and β-cell function. It is a major regulator of transcription in pancreatic cells, and transactivates the insulin gene by binding to a specific DNA motif in its promoter region. Glucose also regulates insulin gene transcription through PDX-1. It has been shown that PDX-1 is required for maintaining pancreatic islet functions by activating gene expression and has a dual role in pancreatic development. It initially contributes to pancreatic formation during embryogenesis and subsequently regulates the pancreatic islet cell physiology in mature islet cells. Because of this key role in the embryologic development of the pancreas, PDX-1 expression has been investigated in pancreatic cancer cell lines and human tumors. Moreover, a few reports have described expression of PDX-1 in other human neoplasms and have investigated its potential role in differential diagnosis, but data on normal human tissues are lacking. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of pancreas formation, and especially the function of PDX-1, may contribute to the improved treatment and prevention of debilitating diseases such as diabetes, insulinomas and pancreatic carcinomas. Nevertheless, further studies are needed concerning its possible application in routine practice.

  8. Maintenance of nutritional status in patients with cystic fibrosis: new and emerging therapies

    PubMed Central

    Kalnins, Daina; Wilschanski, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Poor clinical outcomes in cystic fibrosis are often associated with undernutrition. Normal growth and development should be achieved in cystic fibrosis, and nutritional counseling is paramount at all ages. Prevention and early detection of growth failure is the key to successful nutritional intervention. The advance in nutritional management is certainly one factor that has contributed to the improved survival in recent decades. This review outlines the major nutritional parameters in the management of the patient with cystic fibrosis, including recent advances in pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy and fat-soluble vitamin therapy. There are sections on complicated clinical situations which directly affect nutrition, for example, before and after lung transplantation, cystic fibrosis-related diabetes, and bone health. PMID:22787388

  9. Recombinant Human DNase I Reduces the Viscosity of Cystic Fibrosis Sputum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shak, Steven; Capon, Daniel J.; Hellmiss, Renate; Marsters, Scot A.; Baker, Carrie L.

    1990-12-01

    Respiratory distress and progressive lung destruction in cystic fibrosis can be attributed to bacterial persistence and the accumulation of viscous purulent secretions in the airways. More than 30 yr ago it was suggested that the large amounts of DNA in purulent secretions contribute to its viscosity and that bovine pancreatic DNase I could reduce the viscosity. To evaluate the potential clinical utility of recombinant human DNase I (rhDNase) in the treatment of cystic fibrosis, we have cloned, sequenced, and expressed rhDNase. Catalytic amounts of rhDNase greatly reduce the viscosity of purulent cystic fibrosis sputum, transforming it within minutes from a nonflowing viscous gel to a flowing liquid. The reduction in viscosity is associated with a decrease in size of DNA in the sputum. Inhalation of a rhDNase aerosol may be a simple direct approach that will help individuals with cystic fibrosis and other patients with pneumonia or bronchitis to clear their airways of purulent secretions.

  10. Maintenance of nutritional status in patients with cystic fibrosis: new and emerging therapies.

    PubMed

    Kalnins, Daina; Wilschanski, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Poor clinical outcomes in cystic fibrosis are often associated with undernutrition. Normal growth and development should be achieved in cystic fibrosis, and nutritional counseling is paramount at all ages. Prevention and early detection of growth failure is the key to successful nutritional intervention. The advance in nutritional management is certainly one factor that has contributed to the improved survival in recent decades. This review outlines the major nutritional parameters in the management of the patient with cystic fibrosis, including recent advances in pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy and fat-soluble vitamin therapy. There are sections on complicated clinical situations which directly affect nutrition, for example, before and after lung transplantation, cystic fibrosis-related diabetes, and bone health.

  11. CT of soft-tissue neoplasms

    SciTech Connect

    Weekes, R.G.; McLeod, R.A.; Reiman, H.M.; Pritchard, D.J.

    1985-02-01

    The computed tomographic scans (CT) of 84 patients with untreated soft-tissue neoplasms were studied, 75 with primary and nine with secondary lesions. Each scan was evaluated using several criteria: homogeneity and density, presence and type of calcification, presence of bony destruction, involvement of multiple muscle groups, definition of adjacent fat, border definition, and vessel or nerve involvement. CT demonstrated the lesion in all 84 patients and showed excellent anatomic detail in 64 of the 75 patients with primary neoplasms. The CT findings were characteristic enough to suggest the histology of the neoplasm in only 13 lesions (nine lipomas, three hemangiomas, one neurofibroma). No malignant neoplasm had CT characteristics specific enough to differentiate it from any other malignant tumor. However, malignant neoplasms could be differentiated from benign neoplasms in 88% of the cases.

  12. Cone Beam Computed Tomography Findings in Calcifying Cystic Odontogenic Tumor Associated with Odontome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Phulambrikar, Tushar; Vilas Kant, Sanchita; Kode, Manasi; Magar, Shaliputra

    2015-01-01

    The calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor (CCOT) is a rare cystic odontogenic neoplasm frequently found in association with odontome. This report documents a case of CCOT associated with an odontome arising in the anterior maxilla in a 28-year-old man. Conventional radiographs showed internal calcification within the lesion but were unable to visualize its relation with the adjacent structures and its accurate extent. In this case cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) could accurately reveal the extent and the internal structure of the lesion which aided the presumptive diagnosis of the lesion as CCOT. This advanced imaging technique proved to be extremely useful in the radiographic assessment and management of this neoplasm of the maxilla. PMID:26636128

  13. Second Malignant Neoplasms Following Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sanath

    2012-01-01

    More than half of all cancer patients receive radiotherapy as a part of their treatment. With the increasing number of long-term cancer survivors, there is a growing concern about the risk of radiation induced second malignant neoplasm [SMN]. This risk appears to be highest for survivors of childhood cancers. The exact mechanism and dose-response relationship for radiation induced malignancy is not well understood, however, there have been growing efforts to develop strategies for the prevention and mitigation of radiation induced cancers. This review article focuses on the incidence, etiology, and risk factors for SMN in various organs after radiotherapy. PMID:23249860

  14. Testicular neoplasm diagnosed by ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Senay, B A; Stein, B S

    1986-06-01

    The diagnosis of testicular cancer is usually made by the findings of a testicular mass on physical examination. In rare cases a young man will present with retroperitoneal nodes and a normal testicular examination. In such cases a testicular ultrasound may localize the testis which harbors a subclinical neoplasm. In addition serum markers of B-HCG and AFP are essential. As a screening procedure a urine pregnancy test is helpful, since it can be obtained quickly while quantitative B-HCG and APF results are delayed. PMID:3523046

  15. [Skin adnexal and salivary gland neoplasms. Similarities and differences of selected patients].

    PubMed

    Mentzel, T

    2004-02-01

    Benign and malignant skin adnexal neoplasms, especially glandular lesions, show morphologically striking similarities to salivary gland tumors. On the other hand, histological and clinical differences are evident, and knowledge of their existence is important for adequate treatment and reliable prognostication. In this review similarities and differences of selected entities are briefly described and discussed. The following entities are reviewed: cylindroma (vs. membranous variant of basal cell adenoma), sebaceoma (vs. sebaceous adenoma), syringocystadenoma papilliferum (vs. sialadenoma papilliferum), chondroid syringoma (vs. pleomorphic adenoma), cutaneous myoepithelioma (vs. myoepithelioma of salivary glands), cutaneous malignant myoepithelioma (vs. malignant myoepithelioma of salivary glands), cutaneous adenoid cystic carcinoma (vs. adenoid cystic carcinoma of salivary glands), and mucinous eccrine carcinoma (vs. mucous carcinoma of salivary glands).

  16. Congenital cystic choristoma mimicking cervical lymphangioma.

    PubMed

    Moon, Suk-Bae; Park, Kwi-Won; Yun, Woong-Jae; Patten, Phillip P; Jung, Sung-Eun

    2008-09-01

    Choristoma is a tissue or mass with a normal histology at an abnormal location, and cystic choristoma has rarely been reported in the head and neck region. Cervical cystic masses in neonates are usually diagnosed as cystic lymphangioma. The authors present a case of a congenital laterocervical cystic mass that appeared to be lymphangioma, but which turned out to be a cystic choristoma.

  17. Calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor in a 5-year-old boy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Desai, Rajiv S; Sabnis, Rajesh; Bhuta, Bansari A; Yadav, Archana

    2015-03-01

    The calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor (CCOT), formerly known as calcifying odontogenic cyst, is a rare developmental neoplasm/cyst of odontogenic epithelial origin with considerable histopathologic diversity and variable clinical behaviour. The occurrence of CCOT in the first decade of life is very uncommon. We report an interestingly rare variant of CCOT with ameloblastomatous proliferation affecting the mandibular left posterior region associated with an impacted permanent tooth in a 5-year-old boy.

  18. Human papillomavirus-associated neoplasms of the sinonasal tract and nasopharynx.

    PubMed

    Thavaraj, Selvam

    2016-03-01

    It is now well established that human papillomavirus (HPV) is an important causative factor in a subgroup of head and neck cancer. In the head and neck, while HPV is strongly associated with squamous cell carcinoma arising in the oropharynx, there is a growing interest in HPV-associated neoplasms of non-oropharyngeal origin including those which arise within sinonasal and nasopharyngeal mucosa. This article reviews current literature on the association of HPV with Scheiderian papillomas, sinonasal squamous cell carcinoma, sinonasal undifferentiated carcinoma, carcinoma with adenoid cystic-like features, and nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Several clinical implications of HPV detection in sinonasal and nasopharyngeal carcinomas are briefly discussed.

  19. Uterine adenosarcomas are mesenchymal neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Piscuoglio, Salvatore; Burke, Kathleen A; Ng, Charlotte K Y; Papanastasiou, Anastasios D; Geyer, Felipe C; Macedo, Gabriel S; Martelotto, Luciano G; de Bruijn, Ino; De Filippo, Maria R; Schultheis, Anne M; Ioris, Rafael A; Levine, Douglas A; Soslow, Robert A; Rubin, Brian P; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Weigelt, Britta

    2016-02-01

    Uterine adenosarcomas (UAs) are biphasic lesions composed of a malignant mesenchymal (ie stromal) component and an epithelial component. UAs are generally low-grade and have a favourable prognosis, but may display sarcomatous overgrowth (SO), which is associated with a worse outcome. We hypothesized that, akin to breast fibroepithelial lesions, UAs are mesenchymal neoplasms in which clonal somatic genetic alterations are restricted to the mesenchymal component. To characterize the somatic genetic alterations in UAs and to test this hypothesis, we subjected 20 UAs to a combination of whole-exome (n = 6), targeted capture (n = 13) massively parallel sequencing (MPS) and/or RNA sequencing (n = 6). Only three genes, FGFR2, KMT2C and DICER1, were recurrently mutated, all in 2/19 cases; however, 26% (5/19) and 21% (4/19) of UAs harboured MDM2/CDK4/HMGA2 and TERT gene amplification, respectively, and two cases harboured fusion genes involving NCOA family members. Using a combination of laser-capture microdissection and in situ techniques, we demonstrated that the somatic genetic alterations detected by MPS were restricted to the mesenchymal component. Furthermore, mitochondrial DNA sequencing of microdissected samples revealed that epithelial and mesenchymal components of UAs were clonally unrelated. In conclusion, here we provide evidence that UAs are genetically heterogeneous lesions and mesenchymal neoplasms. PMID:26592504

  20. Predictive 5-Year Survivorship Model of Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Liou, Theodore G.; Adler, Frederick R.; FitzSimmons, Stacey C.; Cahill, Barbara C.; Hibbs, Jonathan R.; Marshall, Bruce C.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to create a 5-year survivorship model to identify key clinical features of cystic fibrosis. Such a model could help researchers and clinicians to evaluate therapies, improve the design of prospective studies, monitor practice patterns, counsel individual patients, and determine the best candidates for lung transplantation. The authors used information from the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Patient Registry (CFFPR), which has collected longitudinal data on approximately 90% of cystic fibrosis patients diagnosed in the United States since 1986. They developed multivariate logistic regression models by using data on 5,820 patients randomly selected from 11,630 in the CFFPR in 1993. Models were tested for goodness of fit and were validated for the remaining 5,810 patients for 1993. The validated 5-year survivorship model included age, forced expiratory volume in 1 second as a percentage of predicted normal, gender, weight-for-age z score, pancreatic sufficiency, diabetes mellitus, Staphylococcus aureus infection, Burkerholderia cepacia infection, and annual number of acute pulmonary exacerbations. The model provides insights into the complex nature of cystic fibrosis and supplies a rigorous tool for clinical practice and research. PMID:11207152

  1. Recurrent malignant salivary gland neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Bigas, M A; Sako, K; Razack, M S; Shedd, D P; Bakamjian, V Y; Castillo, N B; Rao, U

    1989-10-01

    Recurrent salivary gland malignancies present difficult therapeutic decisions and poor prognosis in many instances, and treatment becomes of a palliative nature only. As many of the salivary gland malignancies we see are of the recurrent type, the following study was done to determine the efficacy of a vigorous attempt at retreatment. During the period January 1, 1960, through December 31, 1984, 352 patients with major and minor salivary gland tumors were evaluated at our institution. There were 149 benign lesions and 203 patients with malignant tumors. Of these, 99 patients had recurrent and metastatic tumors that had been treated initially elsewhere. Thirty-three of these patients were able to be treated with curative intent: surgery, 21; surgery plus radiation, 9; radiation therapy alone, 2; and radiation plus chemotherapy, 1. The 5 year survival with no evidence of disease was achieved in three patients with surgery alone and two patients with surgery plus radiation therapy. The group of five patients was comprised of two patients with adenoid cystic carcinomas of the parotid, one with intermediate grade mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the parotid, one, sebaceous cell carcinoma of the parotid, and one, adenoid cystic carcinoma of an accessory salivary gland. The results of this study serve to re-emphasize the relative poor yield of attempts at retreatment of loco-regional recurrence of salivary gland tumors.

  2. KRAS and GNAS Mutations in Pancreatic Juice Collected From the Duodenum of Patients at High Risk for Neoplasia Undergoing Endoscopic Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Eshleman, James R.; Norris, Alexis L.; Sadakari, Yoshihiko; Debeljak, Marija; Borges, Michael; Harrington, Colleen; Lin, Elaine; Brant, Aaron; Barkley, Thomas; Almario, J. Alejandro; Topazian, Mark; Farrell, James; Syngal, Sapna; Lee, Jeffrey H.; Yu, Jun; Hruban, Ralph H.; Kanda, Mitsuro; Canto, Marcia Irene; Goggins, Michael

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Pancreatic imaging can identify neoplastic cysts but not microscopic neoplasms. Mutation analysis of pancreatic fluid following secretin stimulation might identify microscopic neoplasias in the pancreatic duct system. We determined the prevalence of mutations in KRAS and GNAS genes in pancreatic juice from subjects undergoing endoscopic ultrasound for suspected pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN), intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, or pancreatic adenocarcinoma. METHODS Secretin-stimulated juice samples were collected from the duodenum of 272 subjects enrolled in Cancer of the Pancreas Screening studies; 194 subjects were screened because of a family history of, or genetic predisposition to, pancreatic cancer and 78 were evaluated for pancreatic cancer (n=30) or other disorders (controls: pancreatic cysts, pancreatitis, or normal pancreata, n=48). Mutations were detected by digital high-resolution melt-curve analysis and pyrosequencing. The number of replicates containing a mutation determined the mutation score. RESULTS KRAS mutations were detected in pancreatic juice from larger percentages of subjects with pancreatic cancer (73%) or undergoing cancer screening (50%) than controls (19%) (P=.0005). A greater proportion of patients with pancreatic cancer had at least 1 KRAS mutation detected 3 or more times (47%) than screened subjects (21%) or controls (6%, P=.002). Among screened subjects, mutations in KRAS (but not GNAS) were found in similar percentages of patients with or without pancreatic cysts. However, a greater proportion of patients over 50 ys old had KRAS mutations (54.6%) than younger patients (36.3%) (P=.032); the older subjects also more mutations in KRAS (P=.02). CONCLUSIONS Mutations in KRAS are detected in pancreatic juice from the duodenum of 73% of patients with pancreatic cancer, and 50% of asymptomatic individuals with a high risk for pancreatic cancer. However, KRAS mutations are detected in pancreatic juice

  3. [Pancreatic ultrasonography].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Rodríguez, T; Segura-Grau, A; Rodríguez-Lorenzo, A; Segura-Cabral, J M

    2015-04-01

    Despite the recent technological advances in imaging, abdominal ultrasonography continues to be the first diagnostic test indicated in patients with a suspicion of pancreatic disease, due to its safety, accessibility and low cost. It is an essential technique in the study of inflammatory processes, since it not only assesses changes in pancreatic parenchyma, but also gives an indication of the origin (bile or alcoholic). It is also essential in the detection and tracing of possible complications as well as being used as a guide in diagnostic and therapeutic punctures. It is also the first technique used in the study of pancreatic tumors, detecting them with a sensitivity of around 70% and a specificity of 90%.

  4. [Pancreatic pseudocysts].

    PubMed

    Stăncescu, M; Ciurea, S

    1989-01-01

    Clinical, evolutive and therapeutical aspects were studied, of 66 cases of patients with pancreatic pseudocysts hospitalized in the clinic over a period of 27 years. Particular modalities of onset were, those of patients with duodenal stenosis, mechanical jaundice, ascites and pleurisy, those in whom symptomatology suggested kidney or cholecystic disease. The intraoperative diagnosis raises the problem of differentiating a retroperitoneal tumor, identifying the possible association with a pancreatic cancer, and the condition when the pseudocysts are found at a certain distance from the pancreas itself. The therapeutical methods are codified, but recidives are possible. Cholecystectomy removes the biliary cause of pancreatitis which can determine the development of pseudocysts. The death rate of these cases was 6.3%.

  5. Is there a role for stool metabolomics in cystic fibrosis?

    PubMed

    Kaakoush, Nadeem O; Pickford, Russell; Jaffe, Adam; Ooi, Chee Y

    2016-08-01

    A number of studies utilizing metabolomics have focused on the pathophysiology of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. Here, we performed fecal metabolomics on pancreatic insufficient (PI) and sufficient (PS) children with CF and compared them with healthy controls (HC). Fecal metabolomics can differentiate between PS-CF and PI-CF. We identified a potential biomarker of disease severity or cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator function (m/z, 463.247; retention time, 0.570717 min) that discriminates between HC versus PS-CF versus PI-CF. We also identified lipoyl-GMP as a potential novel inflammatory biomarker, and elevation in fecal glycerol 1,2-didodecanoate 3-tetradecanoate may provide clues to the pathogenesis of intestinal inflammation. For the first time, we demonstrate the potential applications of fecal metabolomics in CF. PMID:27553892

  6. Gross cystic disease fluid protein-15 in salivary gland tumors.

    PubMed

    Swanson, P E; Pettinato, G; Lillemoe, T J; Wick, M R

    1991-02-01

    Gross cystic disease fluid protein-15 (GCDFP-15) is a 15-kd glycoprotein that is expressed by normal apocrine epithelia and in a majority of breast carcinomas. However, recent studies have demonstrated that this substance is also present in tumors of the salivary glands, sweat glands, and prostate gland. To determine whether the expression of CGDFP-15 might aid in the differential diagnosis of salivary gland lesions, the anti-GCDFP-15 monoclonal antibody D6 was applied to paraffin sections of 133 such neoplasms. Benign tumors (76% reactive) were more often labeled than malignant lesions (28% reactive) by this antibody; overall, 53 (41%) of 133 cases were positive for GCDFP-15. Notably, the tubuloglandular components in 17 (81%) of 21 pleomorphic adenomas were reactive, but no example of either adenoid cystic carcinoma or polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinoma were labeled. In contrast, 24% of adenocarcinomas stained with this antibody. The apparent expression of GCDFP-15 by a spectrum of salivary gland tumors supports their biologic relationship to lesions of the cutaneous apocrine glands and breast. Furthermore, the demonstration of this determinant may be of use in suggesting the salivary gland nature of poorly differentiated carcinomas of the head and neck, and it may facilitate the separation of pleomorphic adenoma from histologically similar malignant neoplasms in the salivary glands themselves.

  7. Cytologic diagnosis of adenoid cystic carcinoma of salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Nagel, H; Hotze, H J; Laskawi, R; Chilla, R; Droese, M

    1999-06-01

    The cytomorphologic features in fine-needle aspiration (FNA) biopsies from 31 primary and 33 recurrent adenoid cystic carcinomas (ACC) were investigated. The correct FNA diagnosis was established in 24 of 31 primary ACC (77%). The diagnostic clue in aspirates from ACC are large globules of extracellular matrix, partially surrounded by basaloid tumor cells. In FNAs with predominance of basaloid tumor cells, but lacking characteristic globules, all other benign and malignant salivary gland tumors of epithelial-myoepithelial differentiation should be considered in the cytologic diagnosis. Pleomorphic adenoma is most frequently confused with ACC, and therefore, the cytologic findings in FNAs from 50 pleomorphic adenomas were compared with those diagnosed as ACC. Furthermore, rare neoplasms of salivary glands with epithelial-myoepithelial cell differentiation, including basal-cell adenoma and carcinoma, epithelial-myoepithelial carcinoma, and polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinoma, as well as some nonsalivary gland neoplasms presenting an adenoid cystic pattern, must be considered. The cytologic features of these entities are discussed in detail with respect to the cytologic diagnostic criteria of ACC.

  8. Computed Tomography of Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Furlow, Bryant

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic disease often is asymptomatic until tissue damage and complications occur or until malignancies have reached advanced stages and have metastasized. Contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography plays a central role in diagnosing, staging, and treatment planning for pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. This article introduces the functional anatomy of the pancreas and common bile duct and the epidemiology, pathobiology, and computed tomography imaging of pancreatitis, calculi, and pancreatic cancer.

  9. Retrospective analysis of clinicopathological features of solid pseudopapillary neoplasm of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Ugras, Nesrin; Yerci, Ömer; Coşkun, Sinem Kantarcıoğlu; Ocakoğlu, Gökhan; Sarkut, Pınar; Dündar, Halit Ziya

    2016-07-01

    Solid pseudopapillary neoplasm (SPN) of the pancreas is a rare neoplasm that accounts for 2-3% of all primary pancreatic neoplasms. This study aimed to characterize clinicopathological features associated with SPNs and to retrospectively evaluate the relationship of these features with predictive parameters associated with aggressive behavior. We reviewed 16 cases of SPN of the pancreas that had been diagnosed between 2005 and 2014 at our pathology department. A total of 16 cases, 15 female and one male, were evaluated in this study. The patient age ranged from 13 years to 63 years with a median of 35.70 years. The mean tumor diameter ranged from 2 cm to 18 cm with a mean diameter of 5.90 cm. We identified a significant association between the presence of clear cells and perineural invasion (p=0.019), which was considered to be a predictive factor for aggressive behavior. Other features (i.e., localization, nuclear grooves, central hyalinization, myxoid stroma, eosinophilic bodies, foamy histiocyte aggregates, multinucleated cells, and calcification) were not significantly associated with predictive factors for aggressive behavior. One patient died as a result of a pancreatic fistula that developed as a postoperative complication. The remaining 15 patients are alive and have not demonstrated any signs of recurrence or metastasis. The current study suggested that the presence of clear cells might serve as a possible prognostic indicator of perineural invasion, which is a predictive parameter associated with aggressive behavior in SPN. PMID:27450024

  10. Cervicothoracic cystic dysraphism.

    PubMed

    Valeur, Natalie S; Iyer, Ramesh S; Ishak, Gisele E

    2016-09-01

    Cystic dysraphism of the cervical and upper thoracic spine is very rare. It differs from the much more common lumbosacral dysraphism in appearance and structure, and usually portends a better prognosis due to lack of functional neurological tissue in the dysraphic sac and absent or less severe intracranial anomalies. There is ambiguity in the literature regarding terminology because of the paucity of cases. We present cases of the most common type of cervicothoracic cystic dysraphism and emphasize differences from lumbosacral myelomeningocele. Patient outcome depends on the presence of associated anomalies and whether complete surgical resection is performed. Imaging plays a critical role in surgical planning, screening the central nervous system for additional anomalies, and in the postoperative setting for evaluation of retethering. PMID:27147079

  11. 9 CFR 311.11 - Neoplasms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Neoplasms. 311.11 Section 311.11 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.11 Neoplasms. (a)...

  12. Cystic pulmonary hydatidosis

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Malay; Pathania, Rajnish; Jhobta, Anupam; Thakur, Babu Ram; Chopra, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is a zoonotic parasitic disease caused by the larval stages of the cestode Echinococcus granulosus. Worldwide, pulmonary hydatid cyst is a significant problem medically, socially, and economically. Surgery is the definitive therapy of pulmonary hydatidosis. Benzimidazoles may be considered in patients with a surgical contraindication. This review will focus on pathogenesis, lifecycle, clinical features, and management of pulmonary hydatid disease. PMID:27051107

  13. Serous Neoplasms of the Pancreas: A Clinicopathologic Analysis of 193 Cases and Literature Review With New Insights on Macrocystic and Solid Variants and Critical Reappraisal of So-called "Serous Cystadenocarcinoma".

    PubMed

    Reid, Michelle D; Choi, Hye-Jeong; Memis, Bahar; Krasinskas, Alyssa M; Jang, Kee-Taek; Akkas, Gizem; Maithel, Shishir K; Sarmiento, Juan M; Kooby, David A; Basturk, Olca; Adsay, Volkan

    2015-12-01

    The literature on "variants" and "malignant" counterparts of pancreatic serous cystic neoplasms (SCNs) is highly conflicted. Clinicopathologic characteristics of 193 SCNs were investigated, along with a critical literature review. For the macrocystic (oligocystic) variant, in this largest series, a demographic profile in contrast to current literature was elucidated, with 21% frequency, predominance in female individuals (4:1), body/tail location (1.7×), younger age of patients (mean age, 50 y), and frequent radiologic misdiagnosis as other megacystic neoplasms. Solid SCNs were rare (n=4, 2%) and often misinterpreted radiologically as neuroendocrine tumors. Available fine-needle aspiration in 11 cases was diagnostic in only 1. Radiologic impression was "malignancy" in 5%. Associated secondary tumors were detected in 13% of resections, mostly neuroendocrine. Secondary "infiltration" (direct adhesion/penetration) of spleen, stomach, colon, and/or adjacent nodes was seen in 6 (3%) fairly large SCNs (mean, 11 cm) with no distant metastasis. Three SCNs recurred locally, but completeness of original resection could not be verified. Our only hepatic SCN lacked a concurrent pancreatic tumor. Literature appraisal revealed that there are virtually no deaths that are directly attributable to dissemination/malignant behavior of SCNs, and most cases reported as "malignant" in fact would no longer fulfill the more recent World Health Organization criteria but instead would represent either (1) local adhesion/persistence of tumor, (2) cases with no histologic verification of malignancy, or (3) liver SCNs with benevolent behavior (likely representing multifocality, rather than true metastasis, especially considering there was no fatality related to this and no reported metastases to other remote sites). In conclusion, in contrast to the literature, the clinicopathologic characteristics of solid and macrocystic SCN variants are similar to their microcystic counterpart, although

  14. Appraisal of needle-based confocal laser endomicroscopy in the diagnosis of pancreatic cysts

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, Somashekar G; Lee, Jeffery H

    2016-01-01

    Nearly 2.5% of cross-sectional imaging studies will report a finding of a cystic pancreatic lesion. Even though most of these are incidental findings, it remains very concerning for both patients and treating clinicians. Differentiating and predicting malignant transformation in pancreatic cystic lesions is clinically challenging. Current evaluation of suspicious cystic lesions includes a combination of radiologic imaging, endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and cyst fluid analyses. Despite these attempts, precise diagnostic stratification among non-mucinous, mucinous, and malignant cystic lesions is often not possible until surgical resection. EUS-guided needle based confocal laser endomicroscopy (nCLE) for evaluation of pancreatic cysts is emerging as a powerful technique with remarkable potential. Though limited imaging data from 3 large clinical trials (INSPECT, DETECT and CONTACT) are currently the reference standard for nCLE imaging, nonetheless these have not been validated in large studies. The aim of this review article is to review the evolving role of EUS-guided nCLE in management of pancreatic cystic lesions in terms of its significance, adverse events, limitations, and implications. PMID:26819534

  15. Right intrahepatic pseudocyst following acute pancreatitis: an unusual location after acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Balzan, Silvio; Kianmanesh, Reza; Farges, Olivier; Sauvanet, Alain; O'toole, Dermot; Levy, Philippe; Ruszniewski, Philippe; Ogata, Satoshi; Belghiti, Jacques

    2005-01-01

    The location of a pseudocyst (PC) in the liver is an exceptional event, and intrahepatic PCs are mainly located in the left lobe. We report here a case of right intrahepatic PC following acute pancreatitis associated with cystic (aberrant pancreatic) dystrophy of the duodenal wall (CDDW) and chronic pancreatitis. Morphological assessment (ultrasound, computed tomography [CT] scan, and cholangio-magnetic resonance imaging [MRI]) revealed a 10-cm right intrahepatic collection and rupture of the main pancreatic duct. Percutaneous puncture permitted us to detect a high level of amylase in the collection, confirming the diagnosis of intrahepatic PC. Surgical drainage concomitant with pancreatico-duodenectomy for the treatment of CDDW resulted in disappearance of the collection. The mechanism involved in this patient was rupture of the pancreatic duct in the retroperitoneal cavity and erosion reaching the right hepatic parenchyma. Although intrahepatic PCs are rare, the diagnosis of intrahepatic PC complicating acute pancreatitis can be confirmed by a high level of amylase in the collection. Asymptomatic intrahepatic PCs can be treated conservatively, and symptomatic intrahepatic PCs can be managed either transcutaneously or surgically.

  16. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation of the Pancreatic Tumors: A Promising Tool in Management of Pancreatic Tumors

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Radiofrequency ablation is a well-established antitumor treatment and is recognized as one of the least invasive therapeutic modalities for pancreatic neoplasm. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided radiofrequency ablation (EUS-RFA) delivery can be used to treat both pancreatic cancer and asymptomatic premalignant pancreatic neoplasms and may serve as a less invasive alternative to surgical resection. This is an appealing option that may result in less morbidity and mortality. The aim of this review was to summarize and evaluate the clinical and technical effectiveness of EUS-guided RFA of pancreatic neoplasms. Methods. A through literature review was performed to identify the studies describing this novel technique. In this review article, we have summarized human case series. The indications, techniques, limitations, and complications reported are discussed. Results. A total of six studies were included. Overall, a 100% technical success rate was reported in human studies. Complications related to endoscopic ultrasound-guided radiofrequency ablation delivery have been described; however, few cases have presented life-threatening outcomes. Conclusion. We believe that this novel technique can be a safe and effective alternative approach in the management of selected patients. PMID:27478820

  17. Molecular Diagnosis of Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Deignan, Joshua L; Grody, Wayne W

    2016-01-01

    This unit describes a recommended approach to identifying causal genetic variants in an individual suspected of having cystic fibrosis. An introduction to the genetics and clinical presentation of cystic fibrosis is initially presented, followed by a description of the two main strategies used in the molecular diagnosis of cystic fibrosis: (1) an initial targeted variant panel used to detect only the most common cystic fibrosis-causing variants in the CFTR gene, and (2) sequencing of the entire coding region of the CFTR gene to detect additional rare causal CFTR variants. Finally, the unit concludes with a discussion regarding the analytic and clinical validity of these approaches.

  18. Calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor associated with an odontome – a diverse lesion encountered

    PubMed Central

    Radheshyam, Chourasia; Alokenath, Bandyopadhyay; Kumar, Harish; Abikshyeet, Panda

    2015-01-01

    The human jaw is an exclusive habitat for odontogenic lesions. Ghost cells associated odontogenic lesions are a diverse group with a variety of presentations in the jaws. Calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor is a benign cystic neoplasm of odontogenic origin which demonstrates ghost cells in the epithelial component. This tumor sometimes mimics the features of a cyst clinically and radiographically, but histopathologically as well as behavior-wise shows the features of a tumor. Many classification systems have been proposed and revised from time to time. Presently a dualistic concept is highlighted to classify this group of lesions. The present case highlights a case of calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor associated with a complex composite odontome, which appeared like a cyst clinically and radiographically. PMID:26345145

  19. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma: Risk factors, screening, and early detection

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Andrew E; Hernandez, Yasmin G; Frucht, Harold; Lucas, Aimee L

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth most common cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States, with over 38000 deaths in 2013. The opportunity to detect pancreatic cancer while it is still curable is dependent on our ability to identify and screen high-risk populations before their symptoms arise. Risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer include multiple genetic syndromes as well as modifiable risk factors. Genetic conditions include hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome, Lynch Syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis, Peutz-Jeghers Syndrome, familial atypical multiple mole melanoma syndrome, hereditary pancreatitis, cystic fibrosis, and ataxia-telangiectasia; having a genetic predisposition can raise the risk of developing pancreatic cancer up to 132-fold over the general population. Modifiable risk factors, which include tobacco exposure, alcohol use, chronic pancreatitis, diet, obesity, diabetes mellitus, as well as certain abdominal surgeries and infections, have also been shown to increase the risk of pancreatic cancer development. Several large-volume centers have initiated such screening protocols, and consensus-based guidelines for screening high-risk groups have recently been published. The focus of this review will be both the genetic and modifiable risk factors implicated in pancreatic cancer, as well as a review of screening strategies and their diagnostic yields. PMID:25170203

  20. [Benign neoplasms of female urethra].

    PubMed

    Usunova, I; Vladimirov, V

    2009-01-01

    In clinical practice neoplasms of female urethra are found usually in adult women. They can also be found in adolescent girls and as rare congenital abnormality. Those conditions are most frequently detected during gynecological or urological examination. Symptoms are few. Lesions are situated at the outer orifice of urethra at the broad basis. Authors have diagnosed and treated 331 patients between 26 and 87 years. Electro coagulation has been performed in 185 patients. Surgical excision has been performed in 41 patients. Excision with following electrocoagulation has been performed in 18 patients. Conservative treatment has been performed in 87 patients. Histological sample analysis has provided diagnosis of urethral polyp, caruncle and mucosal prolaps. Second electrocoagulation after surgical excision has been performed in 5 patients. Collaboration between urologists and gynecologists is essential for early diagnosis, prophylaxis and successful treatment of above mentioned diseases. PMID:19496462

  1. [Benign neoplasms of female urethra].

    PubMed

    Usunova, I; Vladimirov, V

    2009-01-01

    In clinical practice neoplasms of female urethra are found usually in adult women. They can also be found in adolescent girls and as rare congenital abnormality. Those conditions are most frequently detected during gynecological or urological examination. Symptoms are few. Lesions are situated at the outer orifice of urethra at the broad basis. Authors have diagnosed and treated 331 patients between 26 and 87 years. Electro coagulation has been performed in 185 patients. Surgical excision has been performed in 41 patients. Excision with following electrocoagulation has been performed in 18 patients. Conservative treatment has been performed in 87 patients. Histological sample analysis has provided diagnosis of urethral polyp, caruncle and mucosal prolaps. Second electrocoagulation after surgical excision has been performed in 5 patients. Collaboration between urologists and gynecologists is essential for early diagnosis, prophylaxis and successful treatment of above mentioned diseases.

  2. [Lysophosphatidic acid and malignant neoplasms].

    PubMed

    Jesionowska, Anna; Cecerska-Heryć, Elżbieta; Marczuk, Natalia; Safranow, Krzysztof; Dołęgowska, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a lipid compound which plays an important role in the human body, enabling its proper development and functioning. The extracellular LPA is mainly formed of lysophospholipids by the action of autotaxin. LPA activates specific G protein coupled receptors on the cell surface, which results in activation of intracellular signaling pathways, resulting in an increased production of proteins such as VEGF, MMP and uPA. The effect is increased cell proliferation, migration, survival and morphological changes. Aberrant expression of LPA receptors or autotaxin is present in various neoplasms. LPA may be used as a potential diagnostic marker, because its concentrations in the plasma of ovarian cancer patients are significantly higher than in the control group. Scientific research is focused on the searching for the compounds that inhibit the effects of LPA. The promising results of preclinical trials suggest potential usefulness of these compounds in the fight against cancer. PMID:27048092

  3. Sinonasal teratocarcinosarcoma: an unusual neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Fernández, P L; Cardesa, A; Alós, L; Pinto, J; Traserra, J

    1995-03-01

    Sinonasal teratocarcinosarcoma (SNTCS) is a very unusual and aggressive neoplasm characterized by the combination of malignant teratoma and carcinosarcoma features, of which less than forty cases have been reported in the literature. We report on a 75-year-old man with SNTCS that involved the left ethmoid, maxillary and sphenoidal sinuses. The tumor showed a complex histological pattern with mature and immature glands, benign squamous and malignant poorly differentiated epithelia, as well as neuroblastoma-like tissue and sarcoma component with rhabdomyoblastic differentiation. This peculiar blend of tissue types makes the diagnosis of this entity a difficult challenge, especially in small biopsies or in tumors only partially removed. This tumor must be differentiated from several types of carcinomas, esthesioneuroblastoma, craniopharyngioma, malignant mixed tumor of salivary gland type and germ cell tumors. The present case represents, to our knowledge, the third SNTCS described in the european literature.

  4. [NUTRITIONAL STATUS ASSESSMENT IN PATIENTS WITH CYSTIC FIBROSIS].

    PubMed

    Lambe, Cécile; Mallet, Pascale; Bailly, Céline; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle

    2015-10-01

    Prognosis of cystic fibrosis has been largely modified over the past 30 years. Optimization of nutrition is one of the most important contributing factors of this improvement. Nutritional defect result from the conjunction of loss of calories, maldigestion, hypercatabolism and insufficient intake. Pancreatic opotherapy and ADEK vitamin administration is mandatory in pancreatic insufficient patients. Nutritional status must be evaluated at each clinics to detect nutritional defect as early as possible. Nutritional intake must be hypercaloric, normalipidic and adapted to the tastes of the patient. The clinician must be aware of at risk nutritional period: first year of life, puberty, infectious exacerbation, respiratory worsening and diabetes, In neonatal screened babies, recovery of birth weight percentile must be targeted at 6 months, and for the height must be in accordance to genetic height at 2 years. In all cases it is mandatory to treat denutrition by oral supplementation and if necessay enteral nutrition.

  5. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3

    MedlinePlus

    ... historical Searches are case-insensitive Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3 Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: 720x576 ... Large: 3000x2400 View Download Title: Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3 Description: Stage III pancreatic cancer; drawing shows cancer ...

  6. Solid Variant of Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma: Difficulties in Diagnostic Recognition.

    PubMed

    Ben Salha, Imen; Bhide, Shree; Mourtzoukou, Despoina; Fisher, Cyril; Thway, Khin

    2016-08-01

    Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is a malignant neoplasm that mainly affects the salivary glands but has been described in many other anatomical sites. It is composed of basaloid cells with myoepithelial/basal cell differentiation and ductal epithelial cells that proliferate in a fibrous stroma, with variable amounts of myxohyaline material. Three patterns (cribriform, tubular, and solid) occur, and the solid variant is characterized by a predominant compact sheet-like and nested pattern of rounded basaloid cells lacking obvious cribriform or tubular architecture. The solid variant has significant morphological and immunohistochemical overlap with a large range of neoplasms of different lineages, including other carcinomas and sarcomas. We describe a case of solid variant ACC of the paranasal sinuses, which showed an almost entirely solid pattern of growth (in >95% of cells) and which on initial biopsy showed no features of classical ACC. This highlights the potential for diagnostic misinterpretation with a variety of other neoplasms, which is particularly important because of the significant difference in treatment for ACC and tumors in its differential diagnosis.

  7. Male reproductive system neoplasms. Special listing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-07-01

    This Special Listing of Current Cancer Research Projects is a publication of the International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) Program of the National Cancer Institute. Each Listing contains descriptions of ongoing projects in one selected cancer research area. The research areas include: Experimental prostate carcinogenesis and related biology; Epidemiology of prostatic neoplasms; Preclinical studies of prostatic cancers; Diagnosis and prognosis of prostatic cancer; Therapy of prostatic cancer; Experimental testicular carcinogenesis and related biology; Epidemiology of testicular cancer; Diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of testicular neoplasms; Penile and other reproductive system neoplasms.

  8. Myeloproliferative Neoplasms: A Contemporary Review.

    PubMed

    Tefferi, Ayalew; Pardanani, Animesh

    2015-04-01

    Polycythemia vera (PV), essential thrombocythemia (ET), and primary myelofibrosis (PMF) constitute the BCR-ABL1-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms and are characterized by mutually exclusive Janus kinase 2 (JAK2), calreticulin (CALR), and myeloproliferative leukemia virus oncogene (MPL) mutations; respective frequencies of these mutations are approximately 95%, 0%, and 0% in PV, 60%, 20%, and 3% in ET, and 60%, 25%, and 7% in PMF. These mutations might be accompanied by other mutations that are less specific to myeloproliferative neoplasms but are prognostically relevant, such as additional sex combs-like 1 (ASXL1). Characteristic bone marrow morphology is required for World Health Organization-compliant diagnosis, especially in distinguishing ET from prefibrotic PMF and masked PV. Survival is the longest in ET, although still inferior to that of the age- and sex-matched control population; median survivals for patients younger than 60 years are approximately 33 years for ET, 24 for PV, and 15 for PMF. Major disease complications include thrombosis and leukemic or fibrotic transformation. In PV and ET, risk factors for survival include older age, leukocytosis, and thrombosis, whereas JAK2 mutation in ET is associated with increased risk of thrombosis. In PMF, type 1 or type 1-like CALR mutations are associated with superior and ASXL1 with inferior survival. Prevention of thrombosis in PV is secured by phlebotomy (hematocrit target <45%) and in both PV and ET by low-dose aspirin therapy; high-risk patients derive additional antithrombotic benefit from cytoreductive therapy with hydroxyurea as first-line and interferon-alfa and busulfan as second-line drugs of choice. Although the JAK inhibitor ruxolitinib was recently approved for use in hydroxyurea-resistant PV, its role in routine clinical practice remains debatable. In myelofibrosis, stem cell transplant is the current treatment of choice for genetically or clinically high-risk disease; for all other patients

  9. Cystic Fibrosis Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, Bonnie W.

    2013-01-01

    A great deal of excitement and hope has followed the successful trials and US Food and Drug Administration approval of the drug ivacaftor (Kalydeco), the first therapy available that targets the underlying defect that causes cystic fibrosis (CF). Although this drug has currently demonstrated a clinical benefit for a small minority of the CF population, the developmental pathway established by ivacaftor paves the way for other CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) modulators that may benefit many more patients. In addition to investigating CFTR modulators, researchers are actively developing numerous other innovative CF therapies. In this review, we use the catalog of treatments currently under evaluation with the support of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, known as the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Therapeutics Pipeline, as a platform to discuss the variety of candidate treatments for CF lung disease that promise to improve CF care. Many of these approaches target the individual components of the relentless cycle of airway obstruction, inflammation, and infection characteristic of lung disease in CF, whereas others are aimed directly at the gene defect, or the resulting dysfunctional protein, that instigates this cycle. We discuss how new findings from the laboratory have informed not only the development of novel therapeutics, but also the rationales for their use and the outcomes used to measure their effects. By reviewing the breadth of candidate treatments currently in development, as well as the recent progress in CF therapies reflected by the evolution of the therapeutics pipeline over the past few years, we hope to build upon the optimism and anticipation generated by the recent success of Kalydeco. PMID:23276843

  10. Neoplasms of the Small Bowel

    PubMed Central

    Silberman, Howard; Crichlow, Robert W.; Caplan, Howard S.

    1974-01-01

    Small bowel tumors are unusual lesions exhibiting nonspecific clinical features often diagnosed at an advanced stage. In the cases studied at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania nearly all the 32 patients with malignancies were symptomatic whereas in the 34 patients with benign lesions the condition was discovered as an incidental finding in about half of the patients. Weight loss, palpable mass or anemia usually indicated malignancy. Small bowel radiography was the most useful diagnostic aid in the present series. While the etiology of these lesions is unknown, villous adenomas probably bear a relationship to carcinoma. The association between chronic regional enteritis and small bowel tumors is unestablished but suggestive. An analysis of reported series reveals a disproportionate incidence of additional primary tumors in patients with small bowel neoplasms. Surgical extirpation is indicated for curative treatment. In the present series, resection in hope of cure was carried out in 25 of 32 malignant tumors resulting in eight five-year survivals. One of these latter lived nine years with disseminated malignant carcinoid reflecting the occasional indolent course of this tumor. PMID:4842978

  11. Recurrent Benign Salivary Gland Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Witt, Robert Lee; Nicolai, Piero

    2016-01-01

    The most important causes of recurrence of benign pleomorphic adenoma are enucleation with intraoperative spillage and incomplete tumor excision in association with characteristic histologic findings for the lesion (incomplete pseudocapsule and the presence of pseudopodia). Most recurrent pleomorphic adenomas (RPAs) are multinodular. MRI is the imaging method of choice for their assessment. Nerve integrity monitoring may reduce morbidity of RPA surgery. Although treatment of RPA must be individualized, total parotidectomy is generally recommended given the multicentricity of the lesions. However, surgery alone may be inadequate for controlling RPA over the long term. There is growing evidence from retrospective series that postoperative radiotherapy results in significantly better local control. A high percentage of RPAs are incurable. All patients should therefore be informed about the possibility of needing multiple treatment procedures, with possible impairment of facial nerve function, and radiation therapy for RPA. Reappearance of Warthin tumor is a metachronous occurrence of a new focus or residual incomplete excision of all primary multicentric foci of Warthin tumor. Selected cases can be observed. Conservative surgical management can include partial superficial parotidectomy or extracapsular dissection. Not uncommonly, other major and minor salivary gland neoplasms, including myoepithelioma, basal cell adenoma, oncocytoma, canalicular adenoma, cystadenoma, and ductal papilloma, follow an indolent course after surgical resection, with rare cases of recurrence.

  12. Histogenesis of salivary gland neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, N; Agarwal, A; Raj, V; Chandra, S

    2013-01-01

    Salivary gland tumors are one of the most complex and relatively rare group of lesions encountered in oral pathology practice. Their complexity is attributed to heterogeneity of the cells of origin of these lesions. The problem is compounded by the ability of these cells to differentiate and modify into various morphological subtypes resulting in a myraid of histomorphological patterns. This also leads to a frequent overlap of microscopic features among various neoplasms and sometimes even between benign and malignant lesions causing significant diagnostic dilemma which sometimes may even not be resolved by immunohistochemical studies. Despite this the knowledge of histogenesis and morhogenetic concepts of salivary gland tumorigenesis greatly helps the pathologist in classifying these lesions as well as determining the prognosis. It will also help in development of newer strategies for differentiating these lesions and making an early diagnosis. The present article is aimed at reviewing and summarizing the current concepts regarding the histogenesis of salivary gland tumors and their relevance to routine diagnosis and classification of these lesions.

  13. Histopathology of gastrointestinal neuroendocrine neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Hirabayashi, Kenichi; Zamboni, Giuseppe; Nishi, Takayuki; Tanaka, Akira; Kajiwara, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Naoya

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal neuroendocrine neoplasms (GI-NENs) arise from neuroendocrine cells distributed mainly in the mucosa and submucosa of the gastrointestinal tract. In 2010, the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of NENs of the digestive system was changed, categorizing these tumors as grade 1 neuroendocrine tumor (NET), grade-2NET, neuroendocrine carcinoma (large- or small-cell type), or mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC). Such a classification is based on the Ki-67 index and mitotic count in histological material. For the accurate pathological diagnosis and grading of NENs, it is important to clearly recognize the characteristic histological features of GI-NENs and to understand the correct method of counting Ki-67 and mitoses. In this review, we focus on the histopathological features of GI-NENs, particularly regarding biopsy and cytological diagnoses, neuroendocrine markers, genetic and molecular features, and the evaluation of the Ki-67 index and mitotic count. In addition, we will address the histological features of GI-NEN in specific organs. PMID:23346552

  14. Management of Inoperable Malignant Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Kiess, Ana P; Quon, Harry

    2016-01-01

    For patients with inoperable salivary gland malignancy, radiation therapy has significant limitations but has been the mainstay of treatment. With standard photon radiation (X-rays), the 10-year loco-regional control (LRC) and overall survival rates are only ∼25%. Neutron radiation has potential biological advantages over photon radiation because it causes increased DNA damage, and studies of patients with inoperable salivary gland malignancy have shown improved 6-year LRC and overall survival of ∼60%. However, neutron radiation may also increase the risk of late toxicities, especially central nervous system toxicities after treatment of tumors involving the base of the skull. Proton radiation has potential physical advantages due to minimal exit dose through normal tissues, and a recent study has demonstrated 90% 5-year LRC after combined proton/photon radiation for adenoid cystic carcinoma involving the base of the skull. Stereotactic radiosurgery has also been used in combination with neutrons or standard photons as a technique to boost the skull base. The use of concurrent chemotherapy as a radiosensitizer has been considered based on extrapolation of data on squamous cell carcinomas, but further data are needed on inoperable salivary gland malignancies. Newer targeted therapies are also under investigation, and clinical trial enrollment is encouraged. PMID:27093559

  15. Computerized tomography in evaluation of hepatic neoplasms

    SciTech Connect

    Luna, R.F.; Resende, C.; Tishler, J.M.A.; Aldrete, J.S.; Shin, M.S.; Rubin, E.; Rahn, N.H.

    1984-08-01

    The authors reviewed their experience with computerized tomography (CT) of the abdomen in 212 patients with histologically documented liver neoplasms seen during a 30-month period. The CT findings in cavernous hemangioma and focal nodular hyperplasia were specific, and permitted accurate diagnosis of this lesion before biopsy. The CT appearance of all other lesions was variable. CT is useful in providing an accurate evaluation of the intrahepatic and extrahepatic extent of the neoplasm.

  16. Automated screening of pigmentary skin neoplasms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudrin, Konstantin G.; Matorin, Oleg V.; Reshetov, Igor V.

    2015-01-01

    We have analysed the clinical symptoms and the malignization signs of pigmented skin neoplasms. We have estimated the complex of clinical parameters which could be measured for the purpose of skin screening diagnostic via digital image processing. Allowable errors of clinical parameter characterization have been calculated, and the origin of these errors has been discussed. Proposed technique for automated screening of pigmentary skin neoplasms should become an effective tool for early skin diagnostics.

  17. Autoimmune pancreatitis can develop into chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) has been recognized as a distinct type of pancreatitis that is possibly caused by autoimmune mechanisms. AIP is characterized by high serum IgG4 and IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration in affected pancreatic tissue. Acute phase AIP responds favorably to corticosteroid therapy and results in the amelioration of clinical findings. However, the long-term prognosis and outcome of AIP remain unclear. We have proposed a working hypothesis that AIP can develop into ordinary chronic pancreatitis resembling alcoholic pancreatitis over a long-term course based on several clinical findings, most notably frequent pancreatic stone formation. In this review article, we describe a series of study results to confirm our hypothesis and clarify that: 1) pancreatic calcification in AIP is closely associated with disease recurrence; 2) advanced stage AIP might have earlier been included in ordinary chronic pancreatitis; 3) approximately 40% of AIP patients experience pancreatic stone formation over a long-term course, for which a primary risk factor is narrowing of both Wirsung’s and Santorini’s ducts; and 4) nearly 20% of AIP patients progress to confirmed chronic pancreatitis according to the revised Japanese Clinical Diagnostic Criteria, with independent risk factors being pancreatic head swelling and non-narrowing of the pancreatic body duct. PMID:24884922

  18. The Epidemiology of Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Dhiraj; Lowenfels, Albert B.

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is one of the most frequent gastrointestinal causes for hospital admission in the US. Chronic pancreatitis, although lower in incidence, significantly reduces patients’ quality of life. Pancreatic cancer has high mortality and is 1 of the top 5 causes of death from cancer. The burden of pancreatic disorders is expected to increase over time. The risk and etiology of pancreatitis differ with age and sex, and all pancreatic disorders affect Blacks more than any other race. Gallstones are the most common cause of acute pancreatitis, and early cholecystectomy eliminates the risk of future attacks. Alcohol continues to be the single most important risk factor for chronic pancreatitis. Smoking is an independent risk factor for acute and chronic pancreatitis, and its effects could synergize with those of alcohol. Significant risk factors for pancreatic cancer include smoking and non-O blood groups. Alcohol abstinence and smoking cessation can alter progression of pancreatitis and reduce recurrence; smoking cessation is the most effective strategy to reduce the risk of pancreatic cancer. PMID:23622135

  19. Composite pheochromocytoma masquerading as solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm of pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Geetanjali; Saran, Ravindra Kumar; Godhi, Satyajit; Srivastava, Siddharth; Saluja, Sundeep Singh; Mishra, Pramod Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Pheochromocytoma and ganglioneuroma form rare composite tumours of the adrenal medulla comprising less than 3% of all sympathoadrenal tumours. We present a case of intraoperatively detected adrenal medullary tumour of composite pheochromocytoma and ganglioneuroma diagnosed on histopathology, in a normotensive patient. A 50-year-old male with a past history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease presented with abdominal pain and significant weight loss since one month. Ultrasound and contrast-enhanced computed tomography abdomen revealed a large lobulated lesion in the distal body and tail of pancreas suggestive of solid and papillary neoplasm of body and tail of pancreas. Intra-operatively, a 15 cm × 10 cm solid lesion with cystic areas was seen arising from the left lower pole of the adrenal gland pushing the pancreas which appeared unremarkable. In our case, exploratory laparotomy with tumour excision was done. Extensive sectioning and microscopic examination of this adrenal tumour confirmed a diagnosis of composite Pheochromocytoma with Ganglioneuroma on histopathology. Immunophenotyping with S-100 further supported the diagnosis. The goal of this report is to increase the awareness of this rare disease and to further identify its variable presentation. PMID:25984524

  20. Neoplasms of the nasopharynx in children.

    PubMed

    Snow, J B

    1977-02-01

    Neoplasms of the nasopharynx are rare in children, but they threaten the child's life when they do occur. The nasopharynx tends to harbor dysontogenetic neoplasms. After classification into benign and malignant groups, nasopharyngeal neoplasms in children can be further characterized according to the age of the patients in which the clinical manifestations usually appear. Dermoids and teratomas are the most frequently encountered neoplasms of the nasopharynx in infants and may produce airway obstruction and dysphagia. Among the benign tumors of the nasopharynx in children, the juvenile angiofibroma deserves the most attention. With the onset in puberty, these neoplasms may cause recurrent massive bleeding and orbital and intracranial complications. Evaluation of the extent of the neoplasm and the source of the blood supply has been improved with bilateral selective internal and external carotid angiography. Intracranial and orbital invasion is regarded as an indication for radiotherapy. Surgery has been made somewhat safer by preoperative estrogen therapy and angiographic embolization of the major arterial supply. Patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the nasopharynx have immunologic similarities to patients with Burkitt's lymphomia and infectious mononucleosis; The etiologic role of the Epstein-Barr virus is considered. The parts played by radiation therapy, surgery, chemotherapy, and cryosurgery in the treatment of children with carcinoma of the nasopharynx are discussed. The value of radical neck dissection after radiation therapy is critically reviewed. The prognosis in patients with carcinoma of the nasopharynx is better in females than in males and better in children than in adults.

  1. Magnetic-Targeted Doxorubicin in Treating Patients With Cancer Metastatic to the Liver

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2005-06-23

    Metastases, Neoplasm; Colorectal Neoplasms; Esophageal Neoplasms; Stomach Neoplasms; Pancreatic Neoplasms; Breast Neoplasms; Melanoma; Sarcoma; Gastrointestinal Neoplasms; Lung Neoplasms; Liver Neoplasms; Cholangiocarcinoma

  2. Bilateral adrenal cysts and ectopic pancreatic tissue in Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome: is a conservative approach acceptable?

    PubMed

    Rahmah, R; Yong, J F; Sharifa, N A; Kuhnle, U

    2004-06-01

    Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome is a common overgrowth syndrome associated with an increased risk of neoplasias which might be explained by the nature and localization of the genetic defect. While malignant tumors are often associated with hemihypertrophy, benign tumors are also found. We report a patient with the typical features of Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome with two histologically different abdominal tumors, bilateral cystic adrenals and ectopic pancreatic tissue present at birth. In both tumors no malignancy could be detected. Ectopic pancreatic tissue is rarely seen and has been described in Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome only once. After extirpation of the ectopic pancreatic tissue the cystic adrenals were left in situ since macroscopically no normal adrenal tissue could be identified and separated. Regular ultrasound examinations revealed complete resolution of the cystic adrenals within 24 months. Thus it seems that a conservative approach in selected tumors associated with the Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome might be acceptable.

  3. Ciliated pancreatic foregut cyst: MRI, EUS, and cytologic features.

    PubMed

    Alessandrino, Francesco; Allard, Felicia D; Mortelé, Koenraad J

    2016-01-01

    Ciliated foregut cysts are extremely uncommon pancreatic cystic lesions, with-to the best of our knowledge-only five cases previously reported in the English literature. We report herein on a case of a ciliated foregut cyst of the pancreas connected with the duct of Wirsung. The magnetic resonance imaging, endoultrasonographic, and cytologic features are described and a brief review of literature is also presented. PMID:26526788

  4. Diagnosis and Treatment of Mucinous Appendiceal Neoplasm Presented as Acute Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Kehagias, Ioannis; Markopoulos, Georgios; Papandreou, Thanasis; Kraniotis, Pantelis

    2016-01-01

    Appendiceal mucocele is a rare cause of acute abdomen. Mucinous appendiceal neoplasms represent 0.2–0.7% of all appendix specimens. The aim of this study is to report a case of a mucinous appendiceal neoplasm presented as acute appendicitis, discussing the clinical and surgical approach in the emergency setting. A 72-year-old female patient was admitted to the emergency department with a clinical examination indicative of acute abdomen. The patient underwent abdominal computed tomography scan which revealed a cystic lesion in the right iliac fossa measuring 8.3 × 5.2 × 4.1 cm, with calcified walls, and a mean density indicative of high protein content. The patient was taken to the operating room and a right hemicolectomy was performed. The postoperative course was unremarkable. The histopathological examination revealed a low-grade mucinous appendiceal neoplasm with negative regional lymph nodes. Ultrasound and CT are useful in diagnosing appendiceal mucocele and synchronous cancers in the emergency setting. The initial operation should include appendectomy and resection of the appendicular mesenteric fat along with any fluid collection for cytologic examination. During urgent appendectomy it is important to consider every mucocele as malignant in order to avoid iatrogenic perforation causing pseudomyxoma peritonei. Although laparotomy is recommended, the laparoscopic approach is not contraindicated. PMID:27066284

  5. Gene expression screening of salivary gland neoplasms: molecular markers of potential histogenetic and clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Maruya, Shin-Ichiro; Kim, Hyung-Woo; Weber, Randal S; Lee, Jack J; Kies, Merril; Luna, Mario A; Batsakis, John G; El-Naggar, Adel K

    2004-08-01

    Salivary gland neoplasms comprise phenotypically and biologically diverse lesions of uncertain histogenesis. The molecular events associated with their development and clinicopathological heterogeneity remain unknown. To reveal these events, we performed microarray expression analysis using a nylon-filter membrane platform on 18 primary lesions representing the most common benign and malignant types. Our study identified a small set of genes that are differentially altered between normal salivary gland tissues and benign and malignant tumors. Of the 5000 genes arrayed, 136 genes were differentially expressed by normal tissue, benign tumors, and various malignant neoplasms. Hierarchical clustering analysis differentiated between adenoid cystic carcinomas (ACCs) and other malignant subtypes. Non-ACC specimens manifested overlapping patterns of gene expression within and between tumors. Most of the differentially expressed genes share functional similarities with members of the adhesion, proliferation, and signal transduction pathways. Our study identified: 1) a set of genes that differentiate normal tissue from tumor specimens, 2) genes that differentiate pleomorphic adenoma and ACCs from other malignant salivary gland neoplasms, and 3) different patterns of expression between ACCs arising from major and minor salivary gland sites. The differentially expressed genes provide new information on potential genetic events of biological significance in future studies of salivary gland tumorigenesis.

  6. Mechanisms of lipid malabsorption in Cystic Fibrosis: the impact of essential fatty acids deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Peretti, N; Marcil, V; Drouin, E; Levy, E

    2005-01-01

    Transport mechanisms, whereby alimentary lipids are digested and packaged into small emulsion particles that enter intestinal cells to be translocated to the plasma in the form of chylomicrons, are impaired in cystic fibrosis. The purpose of this paper is to focus on defects that are related to intraluminal and intracellular events in this life-limiting genetic disorder. Specific evidence is presented to highlight the relationship between fat malabsorption and essential fatty acid deficiency commonly found in patients with cystic fibrosis that are often related to the genotype. Given the interdependency of pulmonary disease, pancreatic insufficiency and nutritional status, greater attention should be paid to the optimal correction of fat malabsorption and essential fatty acid deficiency in order to improve the quality of life and extend the life span of patients with cystic fibrosis. PMID:15869703

  7. Acute Cholecystitis Caused by Malignant Cystic Duct Obstruction: Treatment with Metallic Stent Placement

    SciTech Connect

    Miyayama, Shiro Yamashiro, Masashi; Takeda, Taro; Aburano, Hiroyuki; Komatsu, Tetsuya; Sanada, Taku; Kosaka, Shotaro; Toya, Daisyu; Matsui, Osamu

    2008-07-15

    We report the successful management of acute cholecystitis using cystic duct stent placement in 3 patients with inoperable malignant cystic duct obstruction (2 cholangiocarcinoma and 1 pancreatic carcinoma). All patients underwent stent placement in the bile duct, using an uncovered stent in 2 and a covered stent in 1, to relieve jaundice occurring 8-184 days (mean 120 days) before the development of acute cholecystitis. The occluded cystic duct was traversed by a microcatheter and a stent was implanted 4-17 days (mean 12 days) after cholecystostomy. Acute cholecystitis was improved after the procedure in all patients. Two patients died 3 and 10 months later, while 1 has survived without cholecystitis for 22 months after the procedure to date.

  8. Current issues in the nutritional management of children with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Daniels, L A; Davidson, G P

    1989-10-01

    Recent evidence suggests that malnutrition has a negative impact on pulmonary function in children with cystic fibrosis. In the past, dietary management has aimed at high energy low fat intake, but this has recently been shown to fall far short of the 120-150% of the recommended daily allowance for energy cystic fibrosis patients require. This paper outlines the current principles of nutritional management for children with cystic fibrosis. These include a high energy, high fat containing diet (within limits of individual tolerance); high carbohydrate intake; high salt intake; replacement of fat-soluble vitamins; appropriate use of pancreatic enzyme preparations; and supplemental feeding when indicated. It is vital that a nutrition education programme be established for each child and his or her family so that the emphasis shifts from treatment of malnutrition to prevention. The long-term aim must be to promote an independent, healthy lifestyle which incorporates good nutrition and other healthy pursuits such as exercise. PMID:2686614

  9. CYSTIC FIBROSIS AND ANTIBIOTIC HYPERSENSITIVITY: PRESENT KNOWLEDGE AND PRACTICAL APPROACH.

    PubMed

    Caimmi, D; Chiron, R; Tremblay, F; Caimmi, S; Ricci, A; Licari, A; Marseglia, G L

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is one of the most common fatal genetic diseases (1 in 2500 births). The defect causing the disease is localized on the 7q31 gene, which codifies for the CFTR (Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator) transmembrane protein. CFTR is a chloride channel localized on the epithelial cells of the mucosa of the respiratory tract, pancreatic ducts, biliary tree, intestine, vas deferens and sweat glands. More than 2000 different mutations are currently known; some are prominent or relatively frequent, ranging from one population to another. The most frequent complications of cystic fibrosis are those affecting the bronchial tree. Patients suffer from recurrent lung infections, which involve a progressive loss of lung function. The pulmonary infections are frequent or chronic and limit the quality of life of patients. In addition to being enormously exposed to antibiotics, they have many more opportunities to develop hypersensitivity reactions to these molecules. Only a complete allergy work-up with a detailed analysis of the clinical history, skin tests and provocation test can show if the patient has actually experienced an allergic hypersensitivity reaction. Desensitization is to be considered as a treatment that may help patients benefit from antibiotic treatment in those cases in which they have a proven allergy to a certain molecule. PMID:26634585

  10. Calreticulin Mutations in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Lavi, Noa

    2014-01-01

    With the discovery of the JAK2V617F mutation in patients with Philadelphia chromosome-negative (Ph−) myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) in 2005, major advances have been made in the diagnosis of MPNs, in understanding of their pathogenesis involving the JAK/STAT pathway, and finally in the development of novel therapies targeting this pathway. Nevertheless, it remains unknown which mutations exist in approximately one-third of patients with non-mutated JAK2 or MPL essential thrombocythemia (ET) and primary myelofibrosis (PMF). At the end of 2013, two studies identified recurrent mutations in the gene encoding calreticulin (CALR) using whole-exome sequencing. These mutations were revealed in the majority of ET and PMF patients with non-mutated JAK2 or MPL but not in polycythemia vera patients. Somatic 52-bp deletions (type 1 mutations) and recurrent 5-bp insertions (type 2 mutations) in exon 9 of the CALR gene (the last exon encoding the C-terminal amino acids of the protein calreticulin) were detected and found always to generate frameshift mutations. All detected mutant calreticulin proteins shared a novel amino acid sequence at the C-terminal. Mutations in CALR are acquired early in the clonal history of the disease, and they cause activation of JAK/STAT signaling. The CALR mutations are the second most frequent mutations in Ph− MPN patients after the JAK2V617F mutation, and their detection has significantly improved the diagnostic approach for ET and PMF. The characteristics of the CALR mutations as well as their diagnostic, clinical, and pathogenesis implications are discussed in this review. PMID:25386351

  11. Pancreatic gout and the role of multimodality imaging in its management.

    PubMed

    Koh, Huiliang; Low, How Cheng; Seet, Ju Ee; Chua, Wynne Yuru

    2016-01-01

    Uric acid deposition in the pancreas is very rare and neither an endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) nor a contrast-enhanced CT image of this condition has ever been published. We describe a case of asymptomatic pancreatic gout that was detected incidentally on CT. Imaging features mimicked pancreatic neoplasm, warranting further evaluation with EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration. Samples revealed debris encrusted with monosodium urate crystals. Follow-up CT showed complete resolution with urate-lowering therapy. We aim to augment current knowledge on the imaging of pancreatic gout and discuss its management. PMID:27190122

  12. Nutritional Issues in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Missale; Bozic, Molly; Mascarenhas, Maria R

    2016-03-01

    The importance of maintaining adequate nutrition in patients with cystic fibrosis has been well known for the past 3 decades. Achieving normal growth and maintaining optimal nutrition is associated with improved lung function. Comprehensive and consistent nutritional assessments at regular intervals can identify those at risk of nutritional failure and uncover micronutrient deficiencies contributing to malnutrition. Management of malnutrition in cystic fibrosis should follow a stepwise approach to determine the causes and comorbidities and to develop a nutritional plan. Nutritional management is crucial at every stage in a person's life with cystic fibrosis and remains a cornerstone of management.

  13. Cystic dystrophy of the gastric and duodenal wall developing in heterotopic pancreas: an unrecognised entity.

    PubMed Central

    Fléjou, J F; Potet, F; Molas, G; Bernades, P; Amouyal, P; Fékété, F

    1993-01-01

    Ten patients in whom cystic dystrophy developed in a heterotopic pancreas of the duodenal (nine patients) or gastric (one patient) wall are reported. All were young or middle aged white men, only two of whom were alcoholic. The symptoms were caused by intestinal or biliary stenosis, or both, secondary to the inflammation and fibrosis. Only endosonography provided strong evidence for the diagnosis in three patients. All patients underwent surgery: a pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed in eight patients. The surgical specimen showed cystic lesions of the gut wall, occurring in inflammatory and fibrous heterotopic pancreatic tissue. The pancreas proper was normal in all patients. It is suggested that cystic dystrophy is an uncommon and serious complication of heterotopic pancreas. Similar cases associated with chronic pancreatitis of the pancreas have been observed and it is suggested that this process could be responsible for some of the chronic pancreatitis encountered in young, non-alcoholic patients. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8097180

  14. Pancreatic panniculitis associated with pancreatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guannan; Cao, Zhe; Yang, Gang; Wu, Wenming; Zhang, Taiping; Zhao, Yupei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Pancreatic panniculitis is a very rare complication of pancreatic cancer, most often accompanying rare acinar cell carcinoma. We herein report a case of pancreatic panniculitis that was associated with pancreatic mucinous adenocarcinoma. Patient information: A 57-year-old male was referred to our hospital for weight loss. A physical examination revealed subcutaneous nodules on his lower extremities. The blood test showed abnormal increases in amylase, lipase, and carbohydrate antigen 19–9 levels. A computed tomography scan detected a hypodense 2 × 1.5 cm solid mass with an unclear margin in the head of the pancreas. The biopsy of subcutaneous nodules on the lower extremities was conducted and revealed lobular panniculitis. Pancreatic cancer and pancreatic panniculitis were strongly suspected. After the administration of octreotide acetate and the Whipple procedure, the serous amylase and lipase levels returned to normal, and the pancreatic panniculitis had almost resolved by 4 weeks later. Conclusion: Pancreatic panniculitis is a rare complication of pancreatic cancer. However, in the presence of a pancreatic mass, as in this case, clinicians should be aware that panniculitis may be the sentinel of pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:27495045

  15. Pneumothorax in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Kioumis, Ioannis P.; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Huang, Haidong; Li, Qiang; Dryllis, Georgios; Pitsiou, Georgia; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Lampaki, Sofia; Porpodis, Konstantinos; Zaric, Bojan; Branislav, Perin; Mpoukovinas, Ioannis; Lazaridis, George

    2014-01-01

    Pneumothorax is recognized as a common and life-threatening complication in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, especially in those who are infected with P. aeruginosa, B. cepacia or Aspergillus, need enteral feeding, are diagnosed as suffering from allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA), developed massive hemoptysis, and their respiratory function is seriously compromised. Structural impairment and altered airflow dynamics in the lungs of CF patients are considered as the main predisposing factors, but also inhaled medications and non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) could increase the risk of pneumothorax. Clinical presentation could range from dramatic to very mild. Management of spontaneous pneumothorax occurring to patients with CF is essentially similar to that for non-CF patients. Therapeutic options include intercostal tube drainage, video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS), and medical or surgical pleurodesis. Pneumothorax increases both short- and long-term morbidity and mortality in CF patients and causes significant deterioration of their quality of life. PMID:25337406

  16. [Cystic testicular lesions in infancy].

    PubMed

    Calleja Escudero, J; Pascual Samaniego, M; Garrido Redondo, M; Matas Gómez, V; Fernández Domínguez, L; Fernández del Busto, E

    2004-09-01

    The present article reports a case 11 month-old infant with a right intratesticular cyst. We analyze the etiology, differential diagnosis and management off all cystic lesions of the pediatric testis. Patient age at presentation, examination features, tumor markers and sonographic appearance may assist in making a presumptive and occasionally definitive diagnosis preoperatively. The differential diagnosis include intratesticular simple cyst, epidermoid cyst, tunica albuginea cyst, testicular teratoma, juvenil granulosa cell tumor-gonadal stromal tumor, cystic dysplasia of the rete testis, cystic lymphangioma, and testicular torsion. Usually enucleation is the best treatment. A thorough understanding of potentially cystic testis lesions in children leads to the best management choices and often to preservation of a substantial portion of the affected testis.

  17. Genetics Home Reference: cystic fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... protects the linings of the airways, digestive system, reproductive system, and other organs and tissues. In people with ... experience health problems affecting the respiratory, digestive, and reproductive systems. Most men with cystic fibrosis have congenital bilateral ...

  18. Acinar-to-ductal metaplasia accompanies c-myc-induced exocrine pancreatic cancer progression in transgenic rodents.

    PubMed

    Grippo, Paul J; Sandgren, Eric P

    2012-09-01

    Several important characteristics of exocrine pancreatic tumor pathogenesis remain incompletely defined, including identification of the cell of origin. Most human pancreatic neoplasms are ductal adenocarcinomas. However, acinar cells have been proposed as the source of some ductal neoplasms through a process of acinar-to-ductal metaplasia. The oncogenic transcription factor c-myc is associated with human pancreatic neoplasms. Transgenic mice overexpressing c-myc under control of acinar cell-specific elastase (Ela) gene regulatory elements not only develop acinar cell carcinomas but also mixed neoplasms that display both acinar-like neoplastic cells and duct-like neoplastic cells. In this report, we demonstrate that, first, c-myc is sufficient to induce acinar hyperplasia, though neoplastic lesions develop focally. Second, cell proliferation remains elevated in the neoplastic duct cell compartment of mixed neoplasms. Third, the proliferation/apoptosis ratio in cells from all lesion types remains constant, suggesting that differential regulation of these processes is not a feature of cancer progression in this model. Fourth, before the development of mixed neoplasms, there is transcriptional activation of the duct cell-specific cytokeratin-19 gene promoter in multicellular foci of amylase-positive acinar neoplasms. This observation provides direct evidence for metaplasia as the mechanism underlying development of ductal neoplastic cells within the context of an acinar neoplasm and suggests that the stimulus for this transformation acts over a multicellular domain or field within a neoplasm. Finally, focal ductal elements develop in some acinar cell carcinomas in Ela-c-myc transgenic rats, indicating that myc-associated acinar-to-ductal metaplasia is not restricted to the mouse.

  19. Cystic glioblastoma multiforme masquerading as a cerebral tuberculoma

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Mahboob; Siddiqui, Bushra; Qadri, Shagufta; Faridi, Shahbaz

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is by far the most common and most aggressive malignant neoplasm of the primary brain tumours. It arises from the astrocytes and classified as WHO grade 4 astrocytoma. Diagnosis of GBM is sometimes difficult as radiological picture sometimes mimic with cerebral tuberculoma. In both the cases contrast-enhanced CT may show similar finding of a mass lesion with a hypodense centre surrounded by a ring of enhancement and any cyst if present. In the present case, a 45-year-old male patient presented with seizures and headache, a provisional diagnosis of tuberculoma was made on the basis of clinical and CT findings. However, on grounds of suspicion the patient was operated and fluid from the cyst was sent peroperatively for cytopathological examination which suggested the diagnosis of cystic GBM. This helped the surgeon to do maximum debulking of the tumour. Diagnosis was further confirmed by histopathology. PMID:25326570

  20. A Rare Case of an Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm of Pancreas Fistulizing Into Duodenum With Adult Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pipaliya, Nirav; Rathi, Chetan; Parikh, Pathik; Patel, Ruchir; Ingle, Meghraj; Sawant, Prabha

    2015-01-01

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) accounts for 20-50% of all cystic neoplasms of the pancreas. Rarely, IPMN, whether benign or malignant, can fistulize into adjacent organs like duodenum, stomach or common bile duct. IPMN can be associated with other diseases like Peutz-Jeghers syndrome and familial adenomatous polyposis. Association with adult polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is extremely rare. We report a case of a 60-year-old male with a large IPMN in the head of the pancreas diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging, endoscopic ultrasound and cyst fluid analysis. It was complicated by fistula formation into the second part of the duodenum. Patient was simultaneously having adult polycystic kidney disease. There is only one case report of uncomplicated IPMN with ADPKD in the literature so far. And even rarer, there is no any case report of fistulizing IPMN with ADPKD reported so far, to the best of our knowledge.

  1. A millennial view of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Dodge, John A

    2015-01-01

    Although only identified as a distinct disease in the 1930s, it was soon apparent that Cystic Fibrosis (CF) had been present, but unrecognised, in European populations for many years - perhaps even centuries [1] . Within a decade of the early descriptions, the autosomal recessive nature of this genetic disease had been clarified, and its clinical features had been expanded. Secondary nutritional deficiencies complicated the underlying condition: the first clear description of CF as "a new disease", which included a speculation about its genetic basis (because there were 2 pairs of sibs in the case series) was published as Vitamin A deficiency in children [2]. The diagnosis was most often made at autopsy. When it was suspected in life, the diagnostic tests used included duodenal intubation to obtain fluid which would show impaired tryptic digestion of the coating of X-Ray film in CF children, and measurement of vitamin A in the blood. Some nutritional improvement could be expected with simple, rather inefficient pancreatic enzyme preparations, but it was not until mid-century that antibiotics began to treat pulmonary infections effectively. As a young doctor in the 1950s I soon became aware that the median age at death for affected children was about one year, and most died before reaching school age. . PMID:26003065

  2. Update on gene modifiers in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Collaco, Joseph M.; Cutting, Garry R.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a common, life-limiting monogenic disease, which typically manifests as progressive bronchiectasis, exocrine pancreatic dysfunction, and recurrent sinopulmonary infections. Although the gene responsible for CF (CFTR) was described in 1989, it has become increasingly evident that modifier genes and environmental factors play substantial roles in determining the severity of disease, particularly lung disease. Identifying these factors is crucial in devising therapies and other interventions to decrease the morbidity and mortality associated with this disorder. Recent findings Although many genes have been proposed as potential modifiers of CF, only a handful have withstood the test of replication. Several of the replicated findings reveal that genes affecting inflammation and infection response play a key role in modifying CF lung disease severity. Interactions between CFTR genotype, modifier genes, and environmental factors have been documented to influence lung function measures and infection status in CF patients. Summary Several genes have been demonstrated to affect disease severity in CF. Furthermore, it is likely that gene–gene and gene–environment interactions can explain a substantial portion of the variation of lung disease. Ongoing genome-wide studies are likely to identify novel genetic modifiers. Continued exploration of the role of genetic and nongenetic modifiers of CF is likely to yield new options for combating this debilitating disease. PMID:18812833

  3. Studies of pancreatic carcinogenesis in different animal models

    SciTech Connect

    Scarpelli, D.G.; Rao, M.S.; Reddy, J.K.

    1984-06-01

    Pancreatic carcinomas can be induced in rats, guinea pigs, and hamsters by a variety of carcinogens. The types of neoplasms which arise vary with the species of rodent. In the rat, they consist exclusively of acinar cells, in the other species the lesions are adenocarcinomas resembling those derived from pancreatic ductules and ducts, those in hamster more so than in guinea pigs. Careful sequential studies in the guinea pig and hamster suggest that acinar cells together with ductular and duct cells are involved in the genesis of duct adenocarcinomas. In each rodent model, the acinar cell appears to be quite sensitive to continued exposure to carcinogen. In each instance, acini undergo modulation, and in the guinea pig and hamster, permanent metaplastic transformation to ductlike structures. Such cells assume an enhanced capacity for cell proliferation which persists following cessation of carcinogen treatment. Other studies suggest that adult pancreatic acinar cells possess a surprising degree of plasticity. Their involvement in the pathogenesis of neoplasms resembling pancreatic ducts is not unlike other carcinogenic sequences where extensive cell modulation and metaplasia precede and are an integral part of the neoplastic transformation. 55 references, 9 figures, 4 tables.

  4. Loss of cftr function leads to pancreatic destruction in larval zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Navis, Adam; Bagnat, Michel

    2016-01-01

    The development and function of many internal organs requires precisely regulated fluid secretion. A key regulator of vertebrate fluid secretion is an anion channel, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Loss of CFTR function leads to defects in fluid transport and cystic fibrosis (CF), a complex disease characterized by a loss of fluid secretion and mucus buildup in many organs including the lungs, liver, and pancreas. Several animal models including mouse, ferret and pig have been generated to investigate the pathophysiology of CF. However, these models have limited accessibility to early processes in the development of CF and are not amenable for forward genetic or chemical screens. Here, we show that Cftr is expressed and localized to the apical membrane of the zebrafish pancreatic duct and that loss of cftr function leads to destruction of the exocrine pancreas and a cystic fibrosis phenotype that mirrors human disease. Our analyses reveal that the cftr mutant pancreas initially develops normally, then rapidly loses pancreatic tissue during larval life, reflecting pancreatic disease in CF. Altogether, we demonstrate that the cftr mutant zebrafish is a powerful new model for pancreatitis and pancreatic destruction in CF. This accessible model will allow more detailed investigation into the mechanisms that drive CF of the pancreas and facilitate development of new therapies to treat the disease. PMID:25592226

  5. Pancreatic tuberculosis in a human immunodeficiency virus positive patient: a case report.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jianfeng; Tadi, Kiranmayi; Halpern, Michelle; Feurdean, Mirela; McNelis, Joseph; Brensilver, Jeffrey

    2008-02-14

    Despite the increased incidence of tuberculosis related to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in recent decades, pancreatic tuberculosis has rarely been described. We report a case of pancreatic tuberculosis in a 39-year-old African man who presented with progressive dysphagia, vomiting, weight loss and productive cough, accompanied by localized epigastric pain and one episode of melena. HIV-1 testing was positive and lymphocyte subset profile showed CD(4) count of 9/mm(3). Abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan with contrast revealed a cystic mass in the body of the pancreas, significant portal and retroperitoneal cystic adenopathy, and multiple cystic lesions in the spleen and liver. CT guided cyst aspiration and node biopsy detected Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The patient responded well on antituberculosis and antiretroviral therapy. Tuberculosis rarely involves the pancreas, probably due to the presence of pancreatic enzymes which interfere with the seeding of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Pancreatic tuberculosis is considered to be the result of dissemination of the infection from nearby lymphatic nodes. Endoscopic ultrasound or CT guided fine needle aspiration for cytology is the recommended diagnostic technique. Although the prognosis is good with anti-tuberculosis treatment, it could be fatal without correct diagnosis and treatment. The clinician's high index of suspicion of pancreatic tuberculosis and application of FNAB to obtain pathological evidence are extremely important to a correct diagnosis, especially in young HIV positive patients.

  6. Spontaneous gastric squamous cell carcinomas and other neoplasms in Greenland collared lemmings (Dicrostonyx groenlandicus).

    PubMed Central

    Barker, I K; Mallory, F F; Brooks, R J

    1982-01-01

    Malignant neoplasms were present in 39/66 Dicrostonyx groenlandicus of varying ages, examined from a laboratory colony. The presence of multiple neoplasms in some resulted in an overall average of 1.15 tumors/affected animal. Gastric squamous papillomas were present in nine, and locally invasive or metastatic gastric squamous cell carcinomas in a further 36 animals. Three mammary adenocarcinomas, one pancreatic islet cell tumor, one probable pancreatic adenocarcinoma and one adrenal cortical adenoma were also seen in lemmings with gastric tumors. Two others had mammary adenocarcinoma alone, and one animal had bilateral Harderian gland adenocarcinoma. Lesions resembling glomerulonephrosis of rats were seen in 23/51 animals whose kidneys were examined. These findings were not considered artefacts of captivity since concurrent gastric squamous cell carcinoma, mammary adenocarcinoma and glomerulonephrosis were present in the single animal examined directly from the wild at Eskimo Point, Northwest Territories. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. PMID:6751508

  7. Pancreatic tuberculosis with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: a case report and systematic review.

    PubMed

    Meesiri, Somchai

    2012-02-21

    Pancreatic tuberculosis (TB) is a relatively rare disease that can mimic carcinoma, lymphoma, cystic neoplasia, retroperitoneal tumors, pancreatitis or pseudocysts. Here, I report the case of a 31-year-old immigrant Burmese woman who exhibited epigastralgia, fever, weight loss and an epigastric mass. The patient was diagnosed with pancreatic TB and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, and was treated with antituberculous drugs and percutaneous catheter drainage without a laparotomy. The clinical presentation, radiographic investigation and management of pancreatic TB are summarized in this paper to emphasize the importance of considering this rare disease in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic masses concomitant with human immunodeficiency virus infection. I also emphasize the need for both histopathological and microbiological diagnosis via fine-needle aspiration.

  8. Differential expression of p63 isotypes (DeltaN and TA) in salivary gland neoplasms: biological and diagnostic implications.

    PubMed

    Maruya, Shin-Ichiro; Kies, Merrill S; Williams, Michelle; Myers, Jeffery N; Weber, Randal S; Batsakis, John G; El-Naggar, Adel K

    2005-07-01

    To determine the association between the expression of p63 gene isoforms (TA and DeltaN) and salivary gland tumorigenesis, we performed reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis of these markers in 71 benign and malignant salivary gland neoplasms. The results were correlated with the expression of Notch ligand JAG1 gene and the clinicopathologic features and the full-length p63 protein expression by immunohistochemistry. Both p63 isoforms were either negative or weakly expressed in normal salivary gland tissues. TAp63 was highly expressed in most benign tumors and was either negative or weakly positive in most carcinomas. Conversely, DeltaNp63 was negative or faintly positive in most benign neoplasms and was highly expressed in adenoid cystic, mucoepidermoid, and myoepithelial carcinomas. Immunohistochemical analysis using anti-full-length p63 protein showed ubiquitous nuclear staining in basal and myoepithelial cells in both benign and malignant neoplasms. JAG1 was expressed in most benign and malignant tumors and did not correlate with p63 isoforms expression. We conclude that (1) p63 isoforms are differentially expressed in most benign and malignant tumors and may play distinct biological roles in certain salivary gland neoplasms; (2) p63 immunostaining do not correlate with the isoforms expression; and (3) isoform-specific antibodies are required for better cellular localization and biological correlations.

  9. Intrathoracic neoplasms in the dog and cat

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1991-06-01

    Neoplasms of the thoracic cavity are as diverse as the structures and tissues that comprise the thorax. This paper summarizes the clinical signs, diagnosis and treatment of thoracic neoplasms in the dog and cat. Specific diagnostic techniques are evaluated, as is the utility of imaging techniques for clinical staging. Surgery is recommended as the treatment of choice for intrathoracic neoplasms, with exception for multiple tumor masses, metastasis, or poor patient health. Radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and hyperthermia are discussed individually or in combination with surgery or each other. Prognosis for specific tumors is discussed, as is lymph node involvement as a prognostic indicator. As the use of newer diagnostic procedures become more available in veterinary medicine, it should be possible to offer patients a variety of positive choices that will enhance their survival and quality of life.

  10. Diagnosis and management of endocrine gland neoplasms

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1989-05-01

    Functional and nonfunctional neoplasms of the endocrine glands constitute some of the more challenging diagnostic and therapeutic problems in veterinary cancer medicine. The clinical signs are usually the result of an overproduction of hormones that are normally biosynthesized by the neoplastic endocrine gland (orthoendocrine syndromes), as opposed to those that are the result of hormones that are not normally biosynthesized and secreted by those cells that have undergone neoplastic transformation (paraendocrine syndromes, also known as endocrine paraneoplastic syndromes or ectopic hormone syndromes). The biological effects produced by a neoplasm may be out of proportion to the actual size of the tumor. This report focuses on the clinical signs and syndromes associated with neoplasms of the thyroid, adrenal glands and pancreas. Discussion will focus on the mechanisms producing the clinical signs, diagnosis, staging, therapy and prognosis. 2 tabs.

  11. Imaging of Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Thoeni, Ruedi F

    2015-11-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammation of the pancreas. Several classification systems have been used in the past but were considered unsatisfactory. A revised Atlanta classification of acute pancreatitis was published that assessed the clinical course and severity of disease; divided acute pancreatitis into interstitial edematous pancreatitis and necrotizing pancreatitis; discerned an early phase (first week) from a late phase (after the first week); and focused on systemic inflammatory response syndrome and organ failure. This article focuses on the revised classification of acute pancreatitis, with emphasis on imaging features, particularly on newly-termed fluid collections and implications for the radiologist.

  12. Pancreatic manifestations in von Hippel–Lindau disease: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Ayloo, Subhashini; Molinari, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Pancreatic manifestations in Von Hippel–Lindau (VHL) disease can present as a multitude of forms, and their management can be challenging. Presentation of the case A 66-year-old woman presented with increasing abdominal girth without other associated symptoms of nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, weight-loss, and jaundice. Her medical and surgical histories were significant for type II diabetes, cerebral tumor resection, bilateral nephrectomies, and laser photocoagulation of retinal hemangiomas. Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen showed a massive multi-cystic lesion in the pancreas and the patient was referred to our hepatopancreatic biliary center. Discussion The findings on the subsequent cross-sectional MRI imaging signified pancreatic manifestations in VHL disease. Conclusion The management of VHL disease-associated benign pancreatic cystic lesions involves interval monitoring with cross-sectional imaging for malignant changes/development. PMID:26945487

  13. Preoperative glucose abnormalities in patients with pancreatic tumours

    PubMed Central

    Durlik, Marek; Kałuża, Bernadetta; Milczarczyk, Alicja; Franek, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Pancreatic cancer is a neoplasm characterised by poor prognosis. The only effective, possible treatment is radical surgery, but most patients do not qualify for surgery because of delayed diagnosis. Aim To determine if assessment of endocrine pancreatic function could serve as a means of screening for pancreatic cancer. Material and methods This prospective study was conducted on a group of 50 patients diagnosed with pancreatic tumour, who were qualified for surgery. Results From 1.07.2010 to 4.07.2011 a further 50 patients were added to the study group. They had been admitted to the hospital with pancreatic tumours. During the preoperative period, nine of these people had been treated for diabetes, 14 were newly diagnosed with diabetes and 15 had been diagnosed with impaired glucose tolerance, but only 12 had a normal glucose profile. Afterwards, patients underwent the surgical treatment. Histopathological examination revealed that out of the 50 operated patients, 36 suffered from malignant disease, and of these only four had no impaired glucose tolerance before treatment. Conclusions In most cases, patients with pancreatic tumours have impaired glucose tolerance. Screening patients over 50 years of age could speed up diagnosis and surgical treatment. PMID:25061491

  14. Pancreatic true cysts--diagnosis and treatment difficulties.

    PubMed

    Vilcea, I D; Vasile, I; Mirea, C; Mesină, C; Calota, F; Pasalega, M; Cheie, M; Dumitrescu, T; Mogoanta, S; Vilcea, A-M

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic true cysts represent a rare, heterogeneous group of pancreatic tumors; therapeutic strategy is based on patient's general status, cyst topography, and especially the estimated risk of malignancy. This paper aim is to present 7 cases of pancreatic true cysts, operated on a six years period (January 2004-January 2010) in our surgical clinic: 2 men and 5 women, aged between 24-61 years old; cyst diameter varies between 3.5-15 cm, tumor location being pancreatic head in two cases and the distal pancreas in 5 cases. Surgical treatment consisted in cyst enucleation (two cases), splenopancreatectomy (three cases), duodenopancreatectomy (one case), and subtotal splenopancreatectomy (one case). Histology was represented by serous cystadenoma (one case), mucinous cystadenoma (2 cases), intraductal papillary mucinous cystadenoma (one case), and papillary cystadenocarcinoma (3 cases).Postoperative results were good in all cases, with 3 postoperative pancreatic external fistulas, resolved conservatory; no case of post-pancreatectomy diabetes mellitus was registered. In conclusion, surgical removal of the pancreatic cystic tumors is necessary, especially due to the risk of malignancy, at least in the absence of rigorous histological proofs of benignancy. Postoperative results are favorable in terms of postoperative morbidity and mortality.

  15. Stenting of the Cystic Duct in Benign Disease: A Definitive Treatment for the Elderly and Unwell

    SciTech Connect

    Hersey, N.; Goode, S. D.; Peck, R. J. Lee, F.

    2015-08-15

    PurposeThere have been few case reports describing cystic duct stent insertion in the management of acute cholecystitis secondary to benign disease with no case series published to date. We present our series demonstrating the role of cystic duct stents in managing benign gallbladder disease in those patients unfit for surgery.Materials and MethodsThirty three patients unfit for surgery in our institution underwent cystic duct stent insertion for the management of acute cholecystitis in the period June 2008 to June 2013. Patients underwent a mixture of transperitoneal and transhepatic gallbladder puncture. The cystic duct was cannulated with a hydrophilic guidewire which was subsequently passed through the common bile duct and into the duodenum. An 8Fr 12-cm double-pigtail stent was placed with the distal end lying within the duodenum and the proximal end within the gallbladder.ResultsTen patients presented with gallbladder perforation, 21 patients with acute cholecystitis, 1 with acute cholangitis and 1 with necrotising pancreatitis. The technical success rate was 91 %. We experienced a 13 % complication rate with 3 % mortality rate at 30 days.ConclusionCystic duct stent insertion can be successfully used to manage acute cholecystitis, gallbladder empyema or gallbladder perforations in those unfit for surgery and should be considered alongside external gallbladder drainage as a definitive mid-term treatment option.

  16. Challenges in Consolidated Reporting of Hematopoietic Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Ohgami, Robert S; Arber, Daniel A

    2013-12-01

    This article focuses on the challenges of generating comprehensive diagnostic reports in hematopathology. In particular, two main challenges that diagnosticians face are (1) interpreting and understanding the rapid advances in molecular and genetic pathology, which have gained increasing importance in classifications of hematopoietic neoplasms, and (2) managing the logistics of reporting ancillary studies and incorporating them effectively into a final synthesized report. This article summarizes many important genetic findings in hematopoietic neoplasms, which are required for accurate diagnoses, and discusses practical issues to generating accurate and complete hematopathology reports.

  17. Pancreatic-pleural fistula in chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Elkaoui, Hakim; Atoini, Fouad; Bouchentouf, Sidi Mohamed; El Omari, Fatima; Mahi, Mohamed; Ait Ali, Abdelmounaim; Bounaim, Ahmed; Sair, Khalid; Zentar, Aziz

    2012-03-01

    Pancreatic-pleural fistula is a rare condition and few data related to its diagnosis and treatment are available. A fistulous connection linking the pancreas with the pleura via the diaphragm or mediastinum through the retroperitoneal area is formed. We report on a case with pancreatic-pleural fistula at its early stages in an alcoholic male patient aged 45 years with known chronic pancreatitis. The operation by Roux-en-Y jejuno-pseudocystostomy was followed by chest tube drainage. PMID:22560825

  18. Pancreatic blood flow in experimental acute pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, A.R.; Millar, A.M.; Taylor, T.V.

    1982-05-01

    The etiology and pathogenesis of acute necrotizing hemorrhagic pancreatitis remain controversial. Recent work has suggested that an early fall in pancreatic blood flow, causing ischemia, may be the initiating factor. Using an established rat model of hemorrhagic pancreatitis and the fractional indicator distribution technique with /sup 86/RbCl, pancreatic blood flow and tissue perfusion have been measured at various times in the condition. Six groups of ten rats were studied: control sham operation and pancreatitis groups were sacrificed at 1, 6, and 24 hr. Pancreatic blood flow (% of cardiac output) and perfusion (blood flow/g tissue) were measured. Blood flow was increased by a maximum of 53% at 1 hr (P less than 0.001) and remained elevated for 24 hr, and perfusion was increased by a maximum of 70% (P less than 0.001) at 1 hr and remained elevated at 6 hr. Pancreatic perfusion declines after 6 hr due to increasing gland edema. The results demonstrate a significant increase in pancreatic blood flow and perfusion in experimentally induced acute pancreatitis, suggesting a primary inflammatory response, and refute the ischemic etiological theory.

  19. Basal autophagy maintains pancreatic acinar cell homeostasis and protein synthesis and prevents ER stress

    PubMed Central

    Antonucci, Laura; Fagman, Johan B.; Kim, Ju Youn; Todoric, Jelena; Gukovsky, Ilya; Mackey, Mason; Ellisman, Mark H.; Karin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic acinar cells possess very high protein synthetic rates as they need to produce and secrete large amounts of digestive enzymes. Acinar cell damage and dysfunction cause malnutrition and pancreatitis, and inflammation of the exocrine pancreas that promotes development of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), a deadly pancreatic neoplasm. The cellular and molecular mechanisms that maintain acinar cell function and whose dysregulation can lead to tissue damage and chronic pancreatitis are poorly understood. It was suggested that autophagy, the principal cellular degradative pathway, is impaired in pancreatitis, but it is unknown whether impaired autophagy is a cause or a consequence of pancreatitis. To address this question, we generated Atg7Δpan mice that lack the essential autophagy-related protein 7 (ATG7) in pancreatic epithelial cells. Atg7Δpan mice exhibit severe acinar cell degeneration, leading to pancreatic inflammation and extensive fibrosis. Whereas ATG7 loss leads to the expected decrease in autophagic flux, it also results in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, accumulation of dysfunctional mitochondria, oxidative stress, activation of AMPK, and a marked decrease in protein synthetic capacity that is accompanied by loss of rough ER. Atg7Δpan mice also exhibit spontaneous activation of regenerative mechanisms that initiate acinar-to-ductal metaplasia (ADM), a process that replaces damaged acinar cells with duct-like structures. PMID:26512112

  20. Mucolytics in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Henke, Markus O; Ratjen, Felix

    2007-03-01

    Mucus accumulation in the lower airways is a key feature of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. The major component of mucus in CF is not mucin derived from mucus producing cells but rather pus that includes viscous material such as polymerized DNA derived from degraded neutrophils. This has important implications for mucolytic therapy aiming to improve mucus clearance from the airways, since degradation of mucin may not be a suitable treatment strategy. In addition, thinning of secretions may not always be beneficial, since it may negatively affect certain aspects of mucus transport such as cough clearance. While inhaled N-acetylcysteine has been used as a mucolytic drug in CF for decades, there is little evidence that it has any beneficial effect. Dornase alfa has been shown to reduce pulmonary exacerbations and improve lung function and is currently the only mucolytic agent with proven efficacy in CF. Newer agents targeting other components of CF mucus, such as filamentous actin, are currently in development. Ultimately, drugs that are mucokinetic, which preserve viscoelasticity, rather than mucolytic may prove to be beneficial for CF lung disease in the future. PMID:17419975

  1. Cystic Fibrosis Sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Le, Christopher; McCrary, Hilary C; Chang, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator gene(CFTR) resulting in impaired ion transport. Nearly all people with CF will develop chronic rhino-sinusitis (CRS) and present with the characteristic viscous mucus, impaired mucociliary clearance and chronic inflammation/infection of the sinonasal cavity. While some individuals with CF can appear relatively asymptomatic in terms of their sinus disease, commonly reported symptoms include anosmia, headache, facial pain, nasal obstruction, chronic congestion and nasal discharge. Nasal endoscopy typically reveals mucosal edema, purulent discharge and nasal polyposis. Computed tomography (CT) imaging classically demonstrates the distinguishing findings of sinus hypoplasia or aplasia with generalized opacification, medial bulging of the lateral sinonasal sidewall and a demineralized uncinate process. Current treatment for CF sinusitis includes the use of hypertonic saline, topical and systemic steroids, antibiotics and endoscopic surgery. Research investigating novel therapies designed at targeting the primary defect of CF is showing promise for reversal of CF sinus disease, in addition to potential for disease prevention. PMID:27466844

  2. PULMONARY CYSTIC ECHINOCOCCOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Santivanez, Saul; Garcia, Hector H.

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary cystic echinococosis, a zoonosis caused by the larvae of the dog tapeworm Echinococcus granulosus, is considered as a major public health problem in those countries where dogs are used to care for large herds because of the incapacitating effects produced in affected population. The ratio lung:liver involvement is higher in children than in adults. A higher proportion of lung cases are discovered incidentally on a routine x-ray evaluation; the majority of infected people remain asymptomatic until the cyst enlarges sufficiently to cause symptoms. The majority of symptoms are caused by mass effect from the cyst volume; the presence of complications caused by cysts broke changes the clinical presentation; the principal complication is cyst rupture, producing cough, chest pain, hemoptysis, or vomica. Diagnosis is obtained by imaging evaluation (Chest X-ray or CT scan), supported by serology in the majority of cases. Surgery is the main therapeutic approach, having as principal objective, the removal of the parasite, preventing intraoperative dissemination; the use of pre surgical chemotherapy reduces the chances of seeding and recurrence; treatment using benzimidazoles is the preferred treatment when surgery is not available, or complete removal is not feasible PMID:20216420

  3. Pancreatitis - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... common bile duct and block the flow of pancreatic enzymes out of the pancreas into the intestine. Pancreatitis ... three to five days, to prevent secretion of enzymes by the pancreas. He will also receive pain medication to control ...

  4. SNP Array in Hematopoietic Neoplasms: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jinming; Shao, Haipeng

    2015-01-01

    Cytogenetic analysis is essential for the diagnosis and prognosis of hematopoietic neoplasms in current clinical practice. Many hematopoietic malignancies are characterized by structural chromosomal abnormalities such as specific translocations, inversions, deletions and/or numerical abnormalities that can be identified by karyotype analysis or fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) studies. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays offer high-resolution identification of copy number variants (CNVs) and acquired copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity (LOH)/uniparental disomy (UPD) that are usually not identifiable by conventional cytogenetic analysis and FISH studies. As a result, SNP arrays have been increasingly applied to hematopoietic neoplasms to search for clinically-significant genetic abnormalities. A large numbers of CNVs and UPDs have been identified in a variety of hematopoietic neoplasms. CNVs detected by SNP array in some hematopoietic neoplasms are of prognostic significance. A few specific genes in the affected regions have been implicated in the pathogenesis and may be the targets for specific therapeutic agents in the future. In this review, we summarize the current findings of application of SNP arrays in a variety of hematopoietic malignancies with an emphasis on the clinically significant genetic variants. PMID:27600067

  5. The new WHO nomenclature: lymphoid neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Leclair, Susan J; Rodak, Bernadette F

    2002-01-01

    The development of the WHO classification of lymphoid neoplasms is a remarkable example of cooperation and communication between pathologists and oncologists from around the world. Joint classification committees of the major hematopathology societies will periodically review and update this classification, facilitating further progress in the understanding and treatment of hematologic malignancies.

  6. [Viruses as agents inducing cutaneous neoplasms].

    PubMed

    Bravo Puccio, Francisco

    2013-03-01

    The oncogenic role of viruses in cutaneous neoplasms has been known by humankind for more than a century, when the origin of the common wart, or verruca vulgaris, was attributed to the human papilloma virus (HPV). Currently, virus-induced cutaneous neoplasms may be grouped into solid tumors and lymphoproliferative disorders. HPV, from which various serotypes are now known, each being linked to a specific neoplasm, the human herpes virus type 8 producing Kaposi sarcoma, and the Merkel cell polyomavirus, highlight among the first group. Regarding the lymphoproliferative disorders, we should mention the human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-1), which is responsible for the T-cell lymphomas, in which the cutaneous manifestations are non-specific and have a wide spectrum, thus posing a challenge for differential diagnosis. The Epstein Barr virus, linked to nasal lymphomas of NK/T-cells and Hydroa-like cutaneous lymphomas, is also part of this group. In an era in which the genetic and molecular aspects of cancer research prevail, we may not leave behind the concept of neoplasms as a result an infection with a viral agent, which opens a wide array of new possibilities for cancer treatment based on antiviral drugs. PMID:23612818

  7. SNP Array in Hematopoietic Neoplasms: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jinming; Shao, Haipeng

    2015-01-01

    Cytogenetic analysis is essential for the diagnosis and prognosis of hematopoietic neoplasms in current clinical practice. Many hematopoietic malignancies are characterized by structural chromosomal abnormalities such as specific translocations, inversions, deletions and/or numerical abnormalities that can be identified by karyotype analysis or fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) studies. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays offer high-resolution identification of copy number variants (CNVs) and acquired copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity (LOH)/uniparental disomy (UPD) that are usually not identifiable by conventional cytogenetic analysis and FISH studies. As a result, SNP arrays have been increasingly applied to hematopoietic neoplasms to search for clinically-significant genetic abnormalities. A large numbers of CNVs and UPDs have been identified in a variety of hematopoietic neoplasms. CNVs detected by SNP array in some hematopoietic neoplasms are of prognostic significance. A few specific genes in the affected regions have been implicated in the pathogenesis and may be the targets for specific therapeutic agents in the future. In this review, we summarize the current findings of application of SNP arrays in a variety of hematopoietic malignancies with an emphasis on the clinically significant genetic variants.

  8. Cholescintigraphy: gallbladder nonvisualization secondary to neoplasm

    SciTech Connect

    Lecklitner, M.L.; Rosen, P.R.; Nusynowitz, M.L.

    1981-08-01

    Whereas the diagnosis of acute cholecystitis is characterized by nonvisualization of the gallbladder with Tc-99m iminodiacetic acid derivatives, nonvisualization is not specific for acute cholecystitis. The first reported case of nonvisualization of the gallbladder due to neoplasm is added to an expanding list of causes of nonvisualization other than the more frequent causes: acute and chronic cholecystitis.

  9. Neoplasms identified in free-flying birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Siegfried, L.M.

    1983-01-01

    Nine neoplasms were identified in carcasses of free-flying wild birds received at the National Wildlife Health Laboratory; gross and microscopic descriptions are reported herein. The prevalence of neoplasia in captive and free-flying birds is discussed, and lesions in the present cases are compared with those previously described in mammals and birds.

  10. Using Cystic Fibrosis Therapies for Non-Cystic Fibrosis Bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    ElMaraachli, Wael; Conrad, Douglas J; Wang, Angela C C

    2016-03-01

    Non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis (NCFB) is an increasingly prevalent disease that places a significant burden on patients and health systems globally. Although many of the therapies used to treat NCFB were originally developed as cystic fibrosis (CF) therapies, not all of them have been demonstrated to be efficacious in NCFB and some may even be harmful. This article explores the evidence for which therapeutic strategies used to treat CF have been translated into the care of NCFB. The conclusion is that therapies for adult NCFB cannot be simply extrapolated from CF clinical trials, and in some instances, doing so may actually result in harm.

  11. Molecular Pathology: Prognostic and Diagnostic Genomic Markers for Myeloid Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Frank C

    2016-09-01

    Application of next-generation sequencing (NGS) on myeloid neoplasms has expanded our knowledge of genomic alterations in this group of diseases. Genomic alterations in myeloid neoplasms are complex, heterogeneous, and not specific to a disease entity. NGS-based panel testing of myeloid neoplasms can complement existing diagnostic modalities and is gaining acceptance in the clinics and diagnostic laboratories. Prospective, randomized trials to evaluate the prognostic significance of genomic markers in myeloid neoplasms are under way in academic medical centers. PMID:27523973

  12. A Case of Bilateral Cystic Partially Differentiated Nephroblastoma vs Cystic Wilms' Tumor: Highlighting a Diagnostic Dilemma.

    PubMed

    Stout, Thomas E; Au, Jason K; Hicks, J M; Gargollo, Patricio C

    2016-06-01

    Cystic partially differentiated nephroblastoma (CPDN) is a rare multicystic renal tumor along the spectrum of cystic nephroma and cystic Wilms' tumor. There have only been two previously reported cases of bilateral CPDN in the literature. We present here a case of bilateral CPDN vs cystic Wilms' tumor treated with neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy in addition to a bilateral partial nephrectomy. We also review the relevant literature regarding CPDN in an effort to aid in diagnosis and management of these rare cystic renal tumors.

  13. Comparison of immunoreactive serum trypsinogen and lipase in Cystic Fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd-Still, J.D.; Weiss, S.; Wessel, H.; Fong, L.; Conway, J.J.

    1984-01-01

    The incidence of Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is 1 in 2,000. Early detection and treatment of CF may necessitate newborn screening with a reliable and cost-effective test. Serum immunoreactive trypsinogen (IRT) an enzyme produced by the pancreas, is detectable by radioimmunoassay (RIA) techniques. Recently, it has been shown that IRT is elevated in CF infants for the first few months of life and levels become subnormal as pancreatic insufficiency progresses. Other enzymes produced by the pancreas, such as lipase, are also elevated during this time. The author's earlier work confirmed previous reports of elevated IRT levels in CF infants. The development of a new RIA for lipase (nuclipase) has enabled comparison of these 2 pancreatic enzymes in C.F. Serum IRT and lipase determinations were performed on 2 groups of CF patients; infants under 1 year of age, and children between 1 and 18 years of age. Control populations of the same age groups were included. The results showed that both trypsin (161 +- 92 ng/ml, range 20 to 400) and lipase (167 +- 151 ng/ml, range 29 to 500) are elevated in CF in the majority of infants. Control infants had values of IRT ranging from 20 to 29.5 ng/ml and lipase values ranging from 23 to 34 ng/ml. IRT becomes subnormal in most CF patients by 8 years of age as pancreatic function insufficiency increases. Lipase levels and IRT levels correlate well in infancy, but IRT is a more sensitive indicator of pancreatic insufficiency in older patients with CF.

  14. Cystic Fibrosis below the Diaphragm: Abdominal Findings in Adult Patients.

    PubMed

    Lavelle, Lisa P; McEvoy, Sinead H; Ni Mhurchu, Elaine; Gibney, Robert G; McMahon, Colm J; Heffernan, Eric J; Malone, Dermot E

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common lethal autosomal recessive disease in the white population. Mutation of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator gene on chromosome 7 results in production of abnormally viscous mucus and secretions in the lungs of patients with CF. A similar pathologic process occurs in the gastrointestinal tract, pancreas, and hepatobiliary system. Inspissated mucus causes luminal obstruction and resultant clinical and radiologic complications associated with the disease process. Pancreatic involvement can result in exocrine and endocrine insufficiency, pancreatic atrophy, fatty replacement, or lipomatous pseudohypertrophy. Acute and chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic calcification, cysts, and cystosis also occur. Hepatic manifestations include hepatic steatosis, focal biliary and multilobular cirrhosis, and portal hypertension. Biliary complications include cholelithiasis, microgallbladder, and sclerosing cholangitis. The entire digestive tract can be involved. Distal ileal obstruction syndrome, intussusception, appendicitis, chronic constipation, colonic wall thickening, fibrosing colonopathy, pneumatosis intestinalis, gastroesophageal reflux, and peptic ulcer disease have been described. Renal manifestations include nephrolithiasis and secondary amyloidosis. The educational objectives of this review are to reveal the abdominal manifestations of CF to facilitate focused analysis of cross-sectional imaging in adult patients. Life expectancy in patients with CF continues to improve because of a combination of aggressive antibiotic treatment, improved emphasis on nutrition and physiotherapy, and development of promising new CF transmembrane conductance regulator modulators. As lung function and survival improve, extrapulmonary conditions, including hepatic and gastrointestinal malignancy, will be an increasing cause of morbidity and mortality. Awareness of the expected abdominal manifestations of CF may assist radiologists in identifying

  15. [Cystic cancer of the kidney].

    PubMed

    el Moussaoui, A; Dakir, M; Sarf, I; Aboutaeib, R; el Mrini, M; Benjelloun, S

    1997-01-01

    Cystic renal cancer is uncommon and raises real preoperative diagnostic problems, requiring the use of medical imaging, and sometimes even surgery. The authors report 3 cases of cystic renal cancer in 2 men and 1 woman, aged 87, 67 and 20 years, respectively. Three patients presented with the urological triad (haematuria, pain and lumbar mass). Ultrasonography suggested the diagnosis of cystic cancer in all 3 cases. Computed tomography was performed in 2 patients and more precisely confirmed the ultrasound findings. Selective arteriography, performed in one patient, confirmed the hypothesis of malignancy. Surgical exploration resulted in radical total nephrectomy. Histology confirmed the diagnosis of adenocarcinoma. The course was favourable in 2 cases after a follow-up of 4 years. One patient presented a local recurrence with pulmonary metastases 6 months after the operation. A review of the literature illustrates the diagnostic difficulties of this form of renal cancer.

  16. [Abdominal cystic tumor revealing lymphangioleiomyomatosis].

    PubMed

    Barbier, L; Ebbo, M; Andrac-Meyer, L; Schneilitz, N; Le Treut, Y-P; Reynaud-Gaubert, M; Hardwigsen, J

    2009-02-01

    We report the case of a 39 year-old woman with many years of intermittent abdominal pain who was found to have cystic masses evocative of cystic lymphangioma involving the posterior mediastinal and retroperitoneum. Worsening abdominal pain led to a recommendation for laparoscopic unroofing and decompression of the cysts. During the postoperative period, hemorrhagic shock required reintervention with excision of the tumoral mass. Pathologic examination revealed lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM). On the 15th postoperative day, the patient developed a chylopneumothorax which required prolonged chest tube drainage. The presence of multiple polycystic lesions in the pulmonary parenchyma supported the diagnosis of diffuse LAM with primary extrapulmonary presentation. This diagnosis should be considered preoperatively since it modifies the treatment: a complete excision of the cystic lesions seems to be necessary in order to prevent bleeding and lymphatic extravasation.

  17. Primary ovarian neuroendocrine tumor arising in association with a mature cystic teratoma: A case report.

    PubMed

    Orsi, Nicolas M; Menon, Mini

    2016-08-01

    Primary ovarian carcinoid tumors are exceptionally rare entities accounting for approximately 0.1% of all ovarian neoplasms. This report describes a primary ovarian neuroendocrine tumor arising in association with a mature cystic teratoma in a 65 year-old woman. Macroscopically, the unilateral adnexal tumor was composed of cystic, solid and mucinous elements which resolved into a dual component lesion histologically. The majority of the tumor displayed an organoid architecture with mild to moderate pleomorphism and no discernible mitotic activity, while approximately 10% consisted of sheets and groups of cells with highly pleomorphic nuclei, necrosis and occasional mitoses. Features of a mature cystic teratoma were seen very focally. Immunohistochemistry revealed strong, diffuse positivity for CD56 and synaptophysin. Chromogranin immunonegativity was noted and there was an absence of nuclear β-catenin accumulation. Ki-67 index was 10-12%. Although there is no established diagnostic framework for primary ovarian carcinoid tumors, this case was diagnosed as a well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor, Grade 2 (intermediate grade), arising in association with a mature cystic teratoma/dermoid cyst. This case highlights the need to develop ovarian diagnostic criteria in this area. PMID:27508272

  18. Smell in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Lindig, J; Steger, C; Beiersdorf, N; Michl, R; Beck, J F; Hummel, T; Mainz, J G

    2013-03-01

    In cystic fibrosis (CF), the most frequent life threatening inherited disease in Caucasians, sinonasal mucosa is regularly affected by defective mucociliary clearance. This facilitates pathogen colonization into CF airways and causes frequent symptoms of rhinosinusitis, including an impaired sense of smell. Despite probable effects on nutrition and overall health, CF-rhinosinusitis is little understood: CF-associated smelling deficiencies reported in literature vary between 12 and 71 %. The aim of this study was to assess olfactory and gustatory function in relation to sinonasal symptoms and sinonasal colonization, and lung function and nutrition. Thirty-five CF patients of different ages were compared to 35 age-matched healthy controls. Olfactory function was assessed by 'Sniffin'Sticks', gustatory qualities by "Taste-strips", and symptoms by sino-nasal outcome test 20 (SNOT-20). Normosmia was found in 62.8 % of healthy controls but only in 28.6 % of CF patients. In contrast the majority of CF patients exhibited a smell loss; almost 62.9 % of them were hyposmic, and 8.6 % functionally anosmic. Importantly, reduced olfactory function only affected odor thresholds, which were significantly increased in CF, not odor identification. This suggests that the olfactory dysfunction in CF results from the olfactory periphery due to either problems in conduction and/or a functional lesion due to the inflammatory process. SNOT-20 scores increased continuously from normosmic to hyposmic and anosmic CF patients (means 7.2/11.1/28.3 points). Neither sinonasal pathogen colonization, gender, pulmonary function, nor allergy or sinonasal surgery appeared to have significant effects on olfactory function and taste. Olfactory disorders are considerably more frequent in CF patients than in age-matched healthy controls. Assessing these parameters within CF-routine care should be considered because of their importance to nutrition and, thus, overall therapy outcome.

  19. Primary tumors of the external and middle ear. Benign and malignant glandular neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Dehner, L P; Chen, K T

    1980-01-01

    Glandular neoplasms represented 14% of primary tumors of the external and middle ear at the University of Minnesota. Although the collective term "ceruminoma" has been used in the past, four distinctive histopathologic patterns were recognized among our 12 cases: adenoma (four cases), pleomorphic adenoma (one case), adenoid cystic carcinoma (two cases) and adenocarcinoma (five cases). The prognosis correlated with these subgroups. A thorough review of the English literature also tended to support the rationale for the subclassification of so-called ceruminomas. The prevailing histogenetic view is that these tumors are derived from the modified apocrine glands of the auditory canal, the ceruminous glands. In some instances, these tumors may originate from ectopic salivary gland tissue.

  20. 131Iodine-Tenatumomab Treatment in Tenascin-C Positive Cancer Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-09

    Breast Neoplasm; Head and Neck Neoplasm; Skin Neoplasm; Respiratory Tract Neoplasm; Urogenital Neoplasm; Digestive System Neoplasm; Pancreatic Neoplasm; Connective and Soft Tissue Neoplasm; Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin

  1. Clinical approach to incidental pancreatic cysts

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Austin L; Lee, Linda S

    2016-01-01

    The approach to incidentally noted pancreatic cysts is constantly evolving. While surgical resection is indicated for malignant or higher risk cysts, correctly identifying these highest risk pancreatic cystic lesions remains difficult. Using parameters including cyst size, presence of solid components, and pancreatic duct involvement, the 2012 International Association of Pancreatology (IAP) and the 2015 American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) guidelines have sought to identify the higher risk patients who would benefit from further evaluation using endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). Not only can EUS help further assess the presence of solid component and nodules, but also fine needle aspiration of cyst fluid aids in diagnosis by obtaining cellular, molecular, and genetic data. The impact of new endoscopic innovations with novel methods of direct visualization including confocal endomicroscopy require further validation. This review also highlights the differences between the 2012 IAP and 2015 AGA guidelines, which include the thresholds for sending patients for EUS and surgery and methods, interval, and duration of surveillance for unresected cysts. PMID:26811661

  2. [Historical compilation of cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Navarro, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most common life-shortening recessively inherited disorder in the Caucasian population. The genetic mutation that most frequently provokes cystic fibrosis (ΔF508) appeared at least 53,000years ago. For many centuries, the disease was thought to be related to witchcraft and the "evil eye" and it was only in 1938 that Dorothy H. Andersen characterized this disorder and suspected its genetic origin. The present article reviews the pathological discoveries and diagnostic and therapeutic advances made in the last 75 years. The review ends with some considerations for the future.

  3. Newborn intraabdominal cystic lymphatic malformations.

    PubMed

    Lin, J I; Fisher, J; Caty, M G

    2000-08-01

    Cystic lymphatic malformations are rare causes of abdominal masses in the newborn. Also known as mesenteric, omental, or retroperitoneal cysts, they can present in a variety of ways including, intestinal obstruction, volvulus, nonspecific abdominal pain, intracystic hemorrhage, or as an asymptomatic abdominal mass. Abdominal ultrasound scan provides a definitive diagnosis in most suspected cases. Complete resection is possible in most patients except those with extensive retroperitoneal involvement. Recurrence is unusual when complete resection is accomplished. Because most case series with complete data suggest that these entities are lymphatic malformations, the authors suggest the more specific term, cystic lymphatic malformations, be used to describe these lesions.

  4. [Adrenal cystic masses. Our experience].

    PubMed

    Costantino, V; Petrin, P; Da Lio, C; Zaramella, D; Pedrazzoli, S

    1993-10-01

    Cystic masses of the adrenal gland are clinically and pathologically rare findings and few cases have been reported up to now in the medical literature. In the present work 5 new cases are reported: 3 adrenal pseudocysts, 1 lymphangioma, 1 cystic pheochromocytoma. In 3 cases there were clinical symptoms of retroperitoneal mass (lumbar pain, palpable mass, digestive symptoms); in 3 cases conventional radiology was helpful; ultrasonography was used for diagnosis in 1, CT scan in 2. In the pheochromocytoma case the real nature of the mass was determined through fluid hormone determination after fine needle puncture. All cases were treated by surgery.

  5. [Historical compilation of cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Navarro, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most common life-shortening recessively inherited disorder in the Caucasian population. The genetic mutation that most frequently provokes cystic fibrosis (ΔF508) appeared at least 53,000years ago. For many centuries, the disease was thought to be related to witchcraft and the "evil eye" and it was only in 1938 that Dorothy H. Andersen characterized this disorder and suspected its genetic origin. The present article reviews the pathological discoveries and diagnostic and therapeutic advances made in the last 75 years. The review ends with some considerations for the future. PMID:26070393

  6. Pancreatic Cancer Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Amundadottir, Laufey T.

    2016-01-01

    Although relatively rare, pancreatic tumors are highly lethal [1]. In the United States, an estimated 48,960 individuals will be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and 40,560 will die from this disease in 2015 [1]. Globally, 337,872 new pancreatic cancer cases and 330,391 deaths were estimated in 2012 [2]. In contrast to most other cancers, mortality rates for pancreatic cancer are not improving; in the US, it is predicted to become the second leading cause of cancer related deaths by 2030 [3, 4]. The vast majority of tumors arise in the exocrine pancreas, with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) accounting for approximately 95% of tumors. Tumors arising in the endocrine pancreas (pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors) represent less than 5% of all pancreatic tumors [5]. Smoking, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D), obesity and pancreatitis are the most consistent epidemiological risk factors for pancreatic cancer [5]. Family history is also a risk factor for developing pancreatic cancer with odds ratios (OR) ranging from 1.7-2.3 for first-degree relatives in most studies, indicating that shared genetic factors may play a role in the etiology of this disease [6-9]. This review summarizes the current knowledge of germline pancreatic cancer risk variants with a special emphasis on common susceptibility alleles identified through Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS). PMID:26929738

  7. Pancreatitis in children.

    PubMed

    Winchester, M

    1992-12-01

    The pathophysiology of pancreatic autodigestion is poorly understood. Pancreatitis affects all age groups, and the diagnosis is sometimes missed when serum amylase and lipase activities are not measured in the child with abdominal pain. Acute pancreatitis in children has become a more commonly seen condition and the causes have varied. Laboratory and radiological studies play an important role in determining the diagnosis and prognosis. Family history is important in the diagnosis of idiopathic hereditary pancreatitis. Most acute episodes resolve with supportive care, but the mortality in acute pancreatitis is currently about 15% (Hadorn et al., 1980). Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography or an endoscopic retrograde pancreatogram may be necessary to investigate relapses of pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis can be a life-threatening condition requiring lifetime medical management.

  8. Multidimensional Clinical Phenotyping of an Adult Cystic Fibrosis Patient Population

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, Douglas J.; Bailey, Barbara A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is a multi-systemic disease resulting from mutations in the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator (CFTR) gene and has major manifestations in the sino-pulmonary, and gastro-intestinal tracts. Clinical phenotypes were generated using 26 common clinical variables to generate classes that overlapped quantiles of lung function and were based on multiple aspects of CF systemic disease. Methods The variables included age, gender, CFTR mutations, FEV1% predicted, FVC% predicted, height, weight, Brasfield chest xray score, pancreatic sufficiency status and clinical microbiology results. Complete datasets were compiled on 211 subjects. Phenotypes were identified using a proximity matrix generated by the unsupervised Random Forests algorithm and subsequent clustering by the Partitioning around Medoids (PAM) algorithm. The final phenotypic classes were then characterized and compared to a similar dataset obtained three years earlier. Findings Clinical phenotypes were identified using a clustering strategy that generated four and five phenotypes. Each strategy identified 1) a low lung health scores phenotype, 2) a younger, well-nourished, male-dominated class, 3) various high lung health score phenotypes that varied in terms of age, gender and nutritional status. This multidimensional clinical phenotyping strategy identified classes with expected microbiology results and low risk clinical phenotypes with pancreatic sufficiency. Interpretation This study demonstrated regional adult CF clinical phenotypes using non-parametric, continuous, ordinal and categorical data with a minimal amount of subjective data to identify clinically relevant phenotypes. These studies identified the relative stability of the phenotypes, demonstrated specific phenotypes consistent with published findings and identified others needing further study. PMID:25822311

  9. Recurrent acute pancreatitis and persistent hyperamylasemia as a presentation of pancreatic osteoclastic giant cell tumor: an unusual presentation of a rare tumor.

    PubMed

    Rustagi, Tarun; Rampurwala, Murtuza; Rai, Mridula; Golioto, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Giant cell tumors of the pancreas are rare neoplasms divided into three forms: osteoclastic, pleomorphic, and mixed. We report an unusual case of a 62-year-old male presenting with recurrent acute pancreatitis and found to have a mass in the head of the pancreas on routine imaging. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography showed a main pancreatic duct stricture, with brush cytology revealing the diagnosis of osteoclastic giant cell tumor of the pancreas. Whipple's procedure was successfully performed for resection of this tumor. and IAP.

  10. Retroperitoneal lymphangioma: A report of 2 cases and a review of the literature regarding the differential diagnoses of retroperitoneal cystic masses

    PubMed Central

    DI MARCO, MARIACRISTINA; GRASSI, ELISA; VECCHIARELLI, SILVIA; DURANTE, SANDRA; MACCHINI, MARINA; BIASCO, GUIDO

    2016-01-01

    Cystic lymphangioma is a type of benign tumor originating from the lymph vessels. The tumor commonly occurs in childhood, in the head or neck regions, and retroperitoneal localization and presentations in adulthood are rare. Determining a pre-operative diagnosis is often challenging, and in the majority of cases, a diagnosis is only possible subsequent to the histological examination of the surgical specimen. A radical resection is the recommended treatment for cystic lymphangioma, and recurrence is usually due to an incomplete excision of the mass. The present study reports 2 cases of cystic lymphangioma, localized in the pancreatic gland and duodenal wall respectively, which were treated with surgical resection. The study also briefly reviews the literature regarding the differential diagnosis of retroperitoneal cystic masses. PMID:27123082

  11. Cystic pineocytoma--case report.

    PubMed

    Momozaki, N; Ikezaki, K; Abe, M; Fukui, M; Fujii, K; Kishikawa, T

    1992-03-01

    Pineocytoma and pineoblastoma, originating from pineal parenchyma, are rare and usually solid. An unusual case of totally cystic pineocytoma in a 37-year-old female is reported. The tumor showed neuronal differentiation and had a good outcome. Prominent calcification associated with pineocytoma and pineoblastoma is an useful finding to differentiate these from benign pineal cysts. PMID:1377802

  12. TRPM8 Ion Channels as Potential Cancer Biomarker and Target in Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yee, Nelson S

    2016-01-01

    This article provides a review and discussion of the transient receptor potential melastatin-subfamily member 8 (TRPM8) ion channel as a potential biomarker and target in cancer. TRPM8 is a Ca(2+)-permeable channel that plays a major physiological role in cellular sensation and transduction of cold temperature. TRPM8 is aberrantly expressed in a variety of solid tumors including pancreatic cancer. In pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines and tissues, TRPM8 is overexpressed as compared to normal pancreatic ductal epithelia. Analysis of anti-TRPM8 immunoreactivity in pancreatic adenocarcinoma indicates positive correlation of TRPM8 expression with tumor size and stages. The biological roles of TRPM8 in pancreatic cancer cells have been revealed from studies using RNA interference-mediated silencing of TRPM8. The experimental data show that TRPM8 channels are required for sustaining proliferation and cell cycle progression, preventing replicative senescence, and promoting cell invasion. Evidence to date implicates a contributory role of TRPM8 channels in the pathogenesis of pancreatic neoplasms and other tumors. Research focus on the mechanisms that underlie TRPM8-mediated roles in tumor growth and metastasis may help establish a novel link of physicochemical changes with pancreatic carcinogenesis. Translational and clinical investigation to exploit TRPM8 as a molecular biomarker and therapeutic target is expected to make a positive impact on precision medicine in pancreatic cancer and other malignant diseases.

  13. [Multiple primary neoplasms with renal neurilemmoma: a case report and literature review].

    PubMed

    Qiu, Min; Tian, Xiao-jun; Ma, Lu-lin; Lu, Min; Lu, Jian; Yan, Ye

    2015-08-18

    Multiple primary neoplasms are not common, those containing renal neurilemoma are even more rare. Our study involves the diagnosis and treatment of a female patient with multiple primary neoplasms with renal neurilemoma. She was previously diagnosed with left ovarian dermoid cyst, right posterior mediastinal neurilemmoma, left forearm neurilemmoma, and papillary thyroid carcinoma, underwent operation treatment. Physical examination reveals a left renal mass with a left adrenal tumor a month before, and underwent retroperitoneal laparoscopic left adrenal nodule resection and left partial nephrectomy. Operation was successful, without conversions to open. Artery occlusion time was 18 min, and blood loss was 20 mL. Post operation pathologic result shows a left renal cellular leiomyoma neurilemmoma with focal cystic change, and tumor diameter was about 3 cm. Immunohistochemistry reports S-100 (+), Ki-67 (15%+), and short-term follow-up without recurrence. In our case of study, even though the tumors were heterochronism, they were both treated with surgical resection. Renal neurilemoma is benign. Laparoscopic partial nephrectomy is not only minimally invasive, fast in recovery, but most importantly preserves renal tissue to the largest extent. It can prevent preoperative pathological uncertainty, which often undergoes radical nephrectomy.

  14. Mucins in neoplasms of pancreas, ampulla of Vater and biliary system

    PubMed Central

    Moschovis, Dimitrios; Bamias, Giorgos; Delladetsima, Ioanna

    2016-01-01

    Tumors of the pancreas, the ampulla of Vater, and the extrahepatic and intrahepatic bile ducts have significant histological similarities due to the common embryonic origin of the pancreatobiliary system. This obviates the need for discovery of biomarkers with diagnostic and prognostic value for these tumors. Mucins, especially MUC-1, -2, -4 and -5AC, are important candidates for developing into such reliable biomarkers. Increased expression of MUC1 occurs in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas and is associated with increased degrees of dysplasia in pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN). Positive expression of MUC2 in intraductal papillary mucinus neoplasms (IPMN) of the intestinal type indicates high potential progression to invasive carcinoma with de novo expression of MUC1, while absence of MUC2 expression in IPMNs of gastric type implies low potential to malignant evolution. De novo MUC4 expression correlates to the severity of dysplasia in PanIN and is associated with a poor prognosis in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas. In biliary intraepithelial neoplasia (BilIN), increased expression of MUC1 is associated with higher degrees of dysplasia. Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas (ICC) are characterized by increased expression of all glycoforms of MUC1. Positive MUC2 expression in intraductal papillary neoplasm of the bile ducts (IPNB) of the intestinal type indicates high malignant potential with de novo expression of MUC1 in the invasive element. Absent MUC2 expression in any degree of BilIN may prove useful in differentiating them from IPNB. De novo expression of MUC4 is associated with poor prognosis in patients with ICC or carcinoma of the extrahepatic bile ducts (EHBDC). High de novo expression of MUC5AC is found in all degrees of BilIN and all types of IPNB and ICC. The MUC5AC is useful in the detection of neoplastic lesions of the bile duct at an early stage. Increased expression of mucin MUC1 in carcinoma of the ampulla of Vater

  15. Management of Recurrent Malignant Salivary Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Merdad, Mazin; Richmon, Jeremy D; Quon, Harry

    2016-01-01

    The management of malignant salivary gland neoplasms is based on a surgical paradigm, with intraoperative findings and pathology guiding the role of local-regional adjuvant therapy. Despite high rates of local control, local relapse can be a dominant pattern of recurrence, presenting therapeutic challenges. Although an optimal management approach has not been established, aggressive salvage surgery is favored given the morbidity associated with tumor progression at the skull base and the lack of significant response associated with other available treatment modalities. Postoperative radiotherapy has been demonstrated to be effective in the initial management of malignant salivary gland neoplasms and is generally favored for recurrent, surgically resectable tumors for the appropriate patient. PMID:27093607

  16. Endoscopic submucosal dissection for colorectal neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Takamaru, Hiroyuki; Mori, Genki; Yamada, Masayoshi; Kinjo, Yuzuru; So, Eriko; Abe, Seiichiro; Otake, Yosuke; Nakajima, Takeshi; Matsuda, Takahisa; Saito, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is an established therapeutic technique for the treatment of gastrointestinal neoplasms. Because it is typically completed as en bloc resection, this technique provides a complete specimen for precise pathological evaluation. On the other hand, ESD is not as widely applied in treating colorectal neoplasms as with gastric cancers, due to its technical difficulty, longer procedure time, and increased risk of perforation. However, some devices that facilitate ESD and improve the safety of the procedure have been recently reported, and the use of the technique has gradually spread worldwide. Endoscopists who begin to perform ESD need to recognize the indications of ESD, the technical issue involved in this procedure, and its associated complications. This review outlines the methods and certain types of devices used for colorectal ESD. PMID:25333002

  17. Intrathoracic neoplasms in the dog and cat

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    Very little is known regarding the epidemiology, etiology, and mechanisms of spontaneous intrathoracic neoplasia in companion animals. Much of what we know or suspect about thoracic neoplasia in animals has been extrapolated from experimentally-induced neoplasms. Most studies of thoracic neoplasia have focused on the pathology of primary and metastatic neoplasms of the lung with little attention given to diagnostic and therapeutic considerations. Although the cited incidence rate for primary respiratory tract neoplasia is low, 8.5 cases per 100,000 dogs and 5.5 cases per 100,000 cats, intrathoracic masses often attract attention out of proportion to their actual importance since they are often readily visualized on routine thoracic radiographs.

  18. Paraneoplastic pemphigus without an underlying neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Park, G T; Lee, J H; Yun, S J; Lee, S C; Lee, J B

    2007-03-01

    We describe a 52-year-old man with paraneoplastic pemphigus (PNP) without any evidence of an underlying neoplasm over an 8-year follow-up period. He had a chronic relapsing vesiculobullous eruption for approximately 7 years (from April 1998 to May 2005). Initially, scattered flaccid vesicles with crusts developed on the face and trunk, which waxed and waned several times. Our patient was diagnosed as having PNP based on immunopathological criteria for PNP, i.e. histopathological, immunoblotting and immunoprecipitation analyses. However, physical and laboratory examinations including serial blood tests with peripheral blood smear, whole-body positron emission tomography/computed tomography and abdominal ultrasound were unable to detect any underlying neoplasm over an 8-year follow-up period. PMID:17300250

  19. MED-C Registry: Advanced Malignancy or Myelodysplasia, Tested by Standard Sequencing and Treated by Physician Choice

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-08

    Neoplasms; Lung Neoplasms; Colon Neoplasms; Breast Neoplasms; Pancreatic Neoplasms; Prostate Neoplasms; Kidney Neoplasms; Liver Neoplasms; Rectal Neoplasms; Hematologic Neoplasms; Multiple Myeloma; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Ovarian Neoplasms; Bladder Neoplasms; Testicular Neoplasms; Endometrial Neoplasms; Brain Neoplasms; Biliary Tract Neoplasms; Head and Neck Neoplasms; Uterine Cervical Neoplasms; Skin Neoplasms; Melanoma; Gastric Neoplasms; Anal Neoplasms; Sarcoma

  20. Evidence for a Cystic Fibrosis Enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Adriaanse, Marlou P. M.; van der Sande, Linda J. T. M.; van den Neucker, Anita M.; Menheere, Paul P. C. A.; Dompeling, Edward; Buurman, Wim A.; Vreugdenhil, Anita C. E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous studies have suggested the existence of enteropathy in cystic fibrosis (CF), which may contribute to intestinal function impairment, a poor nutritional status and decline in lung function. This study evaluated enterocyte damage and intestinal inflammation in CF and studied its associations with nutritional status, CF-related morbidities such as impaired lung function and diabetes, and medication use. Methods Sixty-eight CF patients and 107 controls were studied. Levels of serum intestinal-fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP), a specific marker for enterocyte damage, were retrospectively determined. The faecal intestinal inflammation marker calprotectin was prospectively studied. Nutritional status, lung function (FEV1), exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI), CF-related diabetes (CFRD) and use of proton pump inhibitors (PPI) were obtained from the medical charts. Results Serum I-FABP levels were elevated in CF patients as compared with controls (p<0.001), and correlated negatively with FEV1 predicted value in children (r-.734, p<0.05). Faecal calprotectin level was elevated in 93% of CF patients, and correlated negatively with FEV1 predicted value in adults (r-.484, p<0.05). No correlation was found between calprotectin levels in faeces and sputum. Faecal calprotectin level was significantly associated with the presence of CFRD, EPI, and PPI use. Conclusion This study demonstrated enterocyte damage and intestinal inflammation in CF patients, and provides evidence for an inverse correlation between enteropathy and lung function. The presented associations of enteropathy with important CF-related morbidities further emphasize the clinical relevance. PMID:26484665

  1. [Grading of head and neck neoplasms].

    PubMed

    Agaimy, A; Weichert, W

    2016-07-01

    Tumors of the head and neck form a heterogeneous group of benign and malignant neoplasms with significant differences in biological behavior and therapeutic strategies. Squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) of the larynx, pharynx and oral cavity represent the most frequent and, thus, clinically most important malignant neoplasms in this anatomical region. Similar to other neoplasms, grading of head and neck malignancies is based on evaluation of the tumor histology usually including both architectural and cytological features; however, the current consensus grading for head and neck SCC is of limited prognostic and therapeutic value and the reproducibility is low. Therefore, novel grading criteria have been proposed that are based on additional parameters, such as the type of tumor growth pattern at the invasive front (so-called tumor budding). These novel algorithms, however, have not yet been officially endorsed into guidelines. Salivary gland (SG) neoplasms, although less frequent, constitute a second important pathologically and clinically complex group of tumors at this location. In contrast to SCC, grading of these tumors is of high clinical importance. Based on the large variety of carcinoma entities of the SG, both entity-specific (e. g. mucoepidermoid carcinoma) algorithms but also algorithms, which are solely based on the recognition of a specific carcinoma variant with subsequent automatic assignment of the tumor grade (e. g. acinic cell carcinoma and salivary duct carcinoma) are in use. In the sinonasal tract, grading is important for non-intestinal type adenocarcinoma and esthesioneuroblastoma. In this article the most important grading schemes and criteria for head and neck malignancies are presented and their prognostic and therapeutic implications are discussed. PMID:27342593

  2. [Therapeutic update in cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Durupt, S; Nove Josserand, R; Durieu, I

    2014-06-01

    We present the recent therapeutic advances in the cystic fibrosis care. It concerns improvements in symptomatic treatment with the development of dry powder inhaled antibiotics that improved quality of life, and innovative treatments namely the modulators of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane protein conductance regulator (CFTR), molecules which act specifically at the level of the defective mechanisms implied in the disease. The life expectancy of cystic fibrosis patients born after 2000, is estimated now to be about 50 years. This improvement of survival was obtained with the organization of the care within the specialized centers for cystic fibrosis (Centre de ressource et de compétences de la mucoviscidose) and remains still based on heavy symptomatic treatments. Dry powder inhaled antibiotics constitute a significant time saving for patients to whom all the care can achieve two hours daily. Since 2012, the modulators of CFTR, molecules allowing a pharmacological approach targeted according to the type of the mutations, allows a more specific approach of the disease. Ivacaftor (Kalydeco(®)) which potentialises the function of the CFTR protein expressed on the cellular surface is now available for patients with the G551D mutation. Lumacaftor is going to be tested in association with ivacaftor in patients with the F508del mutation, that is present in at least 75% of the patients. The ataluren which allows the production of a functional protein CFTR in patients with a no sense mutation is the third representing of this new therapeutic class. We presently have numerous symptomatic treatments for the cystic fibrosis care. The development of CFTR modulators, today available to a restricted number of patients treated with ivacaftor represents a very promising therapeutic avenue. It will represent probably the first step to a personalized treatment according to CFTR genotype.

  3. Factors associated with FEV1 decline in cystic fibrosis: analysis of the ECFS patient registry.

    PubMed

    Kerem, Eitan; Viviani, Laura; Zolin, Anna; MacNeill, Stephanie; Hatziagorou, Elpis; Ellemunter, Helmut; Drevinek, Pavel; Gulmans, Vincent; Krivec, Uros; Olesen, Hanne

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary insufficiency is the main cause of death in cystic fibrosis (CF). We analysed forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) data of 14,732 patients registered in the European Cystic Fibrosis Society Patient Registry (ECFSPR) database in 2007. We used linear and logistic regressions to investigate associations between FEV1 % predicted and clinical outcomes. Body mass index (BMI), chronic infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, pancreatic status and CF-related diabetes (CFRD) showed a statistically significant (all p<0.0001) and clinically relevant effect on FEV1 % pred after adjusting for age. Patients with a lower BMI experience a six-fold increased odds ratio (95% CI 5.0-7.3) of having severe lung disease (FEV1 <40% pred) compared to patients with normal BMI. Being chronically infected with P. aeruginosa increases the odds ratio of severe lung disease by 2.4 (95% CI 2.0-2.7), and patients with pancreatic insufficiency experience a 2.0-fold increased odds ratio (95% CI 1.6-2.5) of severe lung disease compared to pancreatic sufficient patients. Patients with CFRD have a 1.8-fold increased odds ratio (95% CI 1.6-2.2) compared to patients not affected. These potential risk factors for pulmonary disease in patients with CF are to some degree preventable or treatable. We emphasise the importance of their early identification through frequent routine tests, the implementation of infection control measures, and a timely initiation of relevant therapies.

  4. Endocrine neoplasms in familial syndromes of hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Li, Yulong; Simonds, William F

    2015-06-01

    Familial syndromes of hyperparathyroidism, including multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1), multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN2A), and the hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumor (HPT-JT), comprise 2-5% of primary hyperparathyroidism cases. Familial syndromes of hyperparathyroidism are also associated with a range of endocrine and nonendocrine tumors, including potential malignancies. Complications of the associated neoplasms are the major causes of morbidities and mortalities in these familial syndromes, e.g., parathyroid carcinoma in HPT-JT syndrome; thymic, bronchial, and enteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors in MEN1; and medullary thyroid cancer and pheochromocytoma in MEN2A. Because of the different underlying mechanisms of neoplasia, these familial tumors may have different characteristics compared with their sporadic counterparts. Large-scale clinical trials are frequently lacking due to the rarity of these diseases. With technological advances and the development of new medications, the natural history, diagnosis, and management of these syndromes are also evolving. In this article, we summarize the recent knowledge on endocrine neoplasms in three familial hyperparathyroidism syndromes, with an emphasis on disease characteristics, molecular pathogenesis, recent developments in biochemical and radiological evaluation, and expert opinions on surgical and medical therapies. Because these familial hyperparathyroidism syndromes are associated with a wide variety of tumors in different organs, this review is focused on those endocrine neoplasms with malignant potential. PMID:27207564

  5. Salivary Gland Neoplasms in Children and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Patrick J; Eisele, David W

    2016-01-01

    Salivary gland neoplasms (SGNs) in children are uncommon. Epithelial SGNs (ESGNs) comprise the majority (95%), with the remaining being mesenchymal SGNs (MeSGNs). Pleomorphic adenoma is the most frequently encountered benign neoplasm, mucoepidermoid carcinoma is the most frequent malignant ESGN, and rhabdomyosarcoma is the most frequent malignant MeSGN. ESGN presents in the second decade, whereas MeSGN presents in the first and second decades. Swelling without pain or neurological signs is the main presentation of both benign and malignant neoplasms. Making an accurate preoperative histological diagnosis is important, so a needle biopsy or a perioperative frozen section is useful when there is doubt about the disease status of the patient; the excised tumour margin is also important. Surgical excision should aim to achieve clear margin excision in benign and malignant ESGNs, minimising the need for adjuvant radiotherapy and maximising the long-term likelihood of patient cure. Benign ESGNs are uncommon, and excision is curative, whereas malignant ESGN and MeSGN should be managed by a multidisciplinary paediatric oncology team.

  6. Salivary gland neoplasms in Lagos, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Arotiba, G T

    1996-01-01

    This 14 year retrospective clinico-statistical analysis of 237 salivary gland neoplasms in Lagos, Nigeria, was undertaken with a view to providing further insights into the presentation of this disease in Africans. These neoplasms constituted 10.0% of all head and neck neoplasms, and were most frequently situated at the parotid gland (32.1%), the palate (24.9%) and the submandibular gland (19.4%). While parotid squamous cell carcinoma affected more males (41.2%) than females (4.7%) (P = 0.03); parotid mucoepidermoid carcinoma affected more females (53.3%) than males (11.8%) (P = 0.0149). Furthermore, labial salivary gland tumours affected more females (6.8%) than males (1.7%) (P = 0.05). At presentation, patients with palatal tumours were relatively more advanced in age (Peak = 6th decade) than those with parotid and submandibular tumours (Peak = 3rd decade). Males presenting with pleomorphic adenoma were relatively younger than their female counterparts. This is especially true of palatal pleomorphic adenoma. The recurrence rate for benign tumours was 4.8%. Majority of patients with malignant tumours (83.9%) had significant local extension, regional or distant metastasis at presentation. In twenty-nine percent of these patients with cancer, the disease was controlled for 1-5 years of follow-ups. However, a quarter of these patients with cancer defaulted the planned treatment regime because they could not afford the cost of treatment or they opted for traditional medical care.

  7. Fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes.

    PubMed

    Goundan, Poorani; Junqueira, Ana; Kelleher-Yassen, Donna; Steenkamp, Devin

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to review the relevant literature related to the epidemiology, pathophysiology, natural history, clinical features and treatment of fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes (FCPD). We review the English-language literature on this topic published between 1956 and 2014. FCPD is a form of diabetes usually associated with chronic calcific pancreatitis. It has been predominantly, though not exclusively, described in lean, young adults living in tropical developing countries. Historically linked to malnutrition, the etiology of this phenotype has not been clearly elucidated, nor has there been a clear consensus on specific diagnostic criteria or clinical features. Affected individuals usually present with a long-standing history of abdominal pain, which may begin as early as childhood. Progressive pancreatic endocrine and exocrine dysfunction, consistent with chronic pancreatitis is expected. Common causes of chronic pancreatitis, such as alcohol abuse, are usually absent. Typical radiographic and pathological features include coarse pancreatic calcifications, main pancreatic duct dilation, pancreatic fibrosis and atrophy. Progressive microvascular complications are common, but diabetic ketoacidosis is remarkably unusual. Pancreatic carcinoma is an infrequently described long term complication. FCPD is an uncommon diabetes phenotype characterized by early onset non-alcoholic chronic pancreatitis with hyperglycemia, insulin deficiency and a striking resistance to ketosis. PMID:26472503

  8. Pathogenic PALB2 mutation in metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma and neuroendocrine tumour: A case report

    PubMed Central

    CHAN, DAVID; CLARKE, STEPHEN; GILL, ANTHONY J.; CHANTRILL, LORRAINE; SAMRA, JAS; LI, BOB T.; BARNES, TRISTAN; NAHAR, KAZI; PAVLAKIS, NICK

    2015-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the pancreas is an aggressive malignancy with poor prognosis. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (PNET) comprise ~3% of primary pancreatic neoplasms and they are more heterogeneous in their histological character and outcome. This is the case report of a 73-year-old female patient with synchronously diagnosed pancreatic adenocarcinoma and PNET, which is likely associated with a pathogenic partner and localizer of breast cancer 2, early onset (PALB2) mutation. The potential pathogenic significance of PALB2 and its association with various malignancies were investigated and the potential role of PALB2 in conferring sensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents, such as mitomycin C and cisplatin, was discussed. This case report highlights the significance of ongoing research into the molecular pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer, which may help guide the selection of optimal treatments for this disease, as well as the need for ongoing study of PALB2 as a possible predictive marker of response to DNA-damaging agents. PMID:26171187

  9. Intracholecystic papillary-tubular neoplasms (ICPN) of the gallbladder (neoplastic polyps, adenomas, and papillary neoplasms that are ≥1.0 cm): clinicopathologic and immunohistochemical analysis of 123 cases.

    PubMed

    Adsay, Volkan; Jang, Kee-Taek; Roa, Juan Carlos; Dursun, Nevra; Ohike, Nobuyuki; Bagci, Pelin; Basturk, Olca; Bandyopadhyay, Sudeshna; Cheng, Jeanette D; Sarmiento, Juan M; Escalona, Oscar Tapia; Goodman, Michael; Kong, So Yeon; Terry, Paul

    2012-09-01

    displayed some foci of low-grade dysplasia, and 15/47 (32%) had no identifiable invasion. (4) Overall, 55% of the cases had an associated invasive carcinoma (pancreatobiliary type, 58; others, 10). Factors associated significantly with invasion were the extent of high-grade dysplasia, cell type (biliary or foveolar), and papilla formation. Among systematically analyzed invasive carcinomas, tumoral intraepithelial neoplasia was detected in 6.4% (39/606). (5) The 3-year actuarial survival was 90% for cases without invasion and 60% for those associated with invasion. In contrast, those associated with invasion had a far better clinical outcome compared with pancreatobiliary-type GB carcinomas (3-yr survival, 27%), and this survival advantage persisted even with stage-matched comparison. Death occurred in long-term follow-up even in a few noninvasive cases (4/55; median 73.5 mo) emphasizing the importance of long-term follow-up. In conclusion, tumoral preinvasive neoplasms (≥1 cm) in the GB are analogous to their pancreatic and biliary counterparts (biliary intraductal papillary neoplasms, pancreatic intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, and intraductal tubulopapillary neoplasms). They show variable cellular lineages, a spectrum of dysplasia, and a mixture of papillary or tubular growth patterns, often with significant overlap, warranting their classification under 1 unified parallel category, intracholecystic papillary-tubular neoplasm. Intracholecystic papillary-tubular neoplasms are relatively indolent neoplasia with significantly better prognosis compared with pancreatobiliary-type GB carcinomas. In contrast, even seemingly innocuous examples such as those referred to as "pyloric gland adenomas" can progress to carcinoma and be associated with invasion and fatal outcome. PMID:22895264

  10. Hereditary pancreatitis of 3 Chinese children

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Li-Na; Chen, Ying-Wei; Yan, Wei-Hui; Lu, Li-Na; Tao, Yi-Jing; Cai, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Hereditary pancreatitis (HP) is quite rare and is distinguished by incomplete penetrance presentation as early-onset relapsing pancreatitis, usually beginning in childhood. HP is now known to be commonly relevant to mutations in the PRSS1 (gene-encoding cationic trypsinogen), SPINK1 (serine protease inhibitor, Kazal type 1), CFTR (cystic fibrosis), carboxypeptidase A1 (CPA1), and chymotrypsin C (CTRC) genes as reported in some Caucasian studies. HP has a variable spectrum of severity and may develop complications. Methods & Results: We describe the clinical course of 3 preschool children, hospitalized with postprandial abdominal pain, whose laboratory tests showed high serum amylase. Similar episodes of abdominal pain led to readmission, and the patients recovered quickly after using symptomatic therapy. The condition of the first boy, who developed a pancreatic tail pseudocyst and splenic infarction, was especially complicated. The boy underwent 2 endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatographies and stenting, along with a surgical procedure that completely relieved his symptoms for 3 months. The 3 patients and their parents were given genetic testing. All of the patients carried 1 or more gene mutations inherited from their mothers, fathers, or both parents; however, none of the parents were affected. Conclusion: For children with repeated pancreatitis, clinicians should consider HP in the differential diagnosis. It is reliable to perform gene sequencing on suspicious patients and their parents. Multidisciplinary and comprehensive treatment should be recommended to manage HP and its complications. Cholangiopancreatography and stenting is a relatively minimally invasive approach when compared with surgery and can be tried as an early intervention. Surgical procedures should be reserved for patients with complications. PMID:27603351

  11. Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer This page lists cancer ... in pancreatic cancer that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer Abraxane (Paclitaxel Albumin-stabilized ...

  12. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2B

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2B Description: Stage IIB pancreatic cancer; drawing shows cancer in the pancreas and in nearby lymph nodes. Also shown are the bile duct, pancreatic duct, and duodenum. Stage IIB pancreatic cancer. Cancer has spread to nearby lymph nodes and ...

  13. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2A

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2A Description: Stage IIA pancreatic cancer; drawing shows cancer in the pancreas and duodenum. The bile duct and pancreatic duct are also shown. Stage IIA pancreatic cancer. Cancer has spread to nearby tissue and organs ...

  14. Laparoscopic management of a cystic artery pseudoaneurysm in a patient with calculus cholecystitis

    PubMed Central

    Loizides, Sofronis; Ali, Asad; Newton, Richard; Singh, Krishna Kumar

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Pseudoaneurysm of the cystic artery is very rare. In the majority of cases it has been reported as a post-operative complication of laparoscopic cholecystectomy, however it has also been associated with the presence of acute cholecystitis or pancreatitis. When these pseudoaneurysms rupture they can lead to intraperitoneal bleeding, haemobilia and upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage. Radiological as well as open surgical approaches have been described for control of this rare pathology. PRESENTATION OF CASE We report the laparoscopic surgical management of an incidental, unruptured cystic artery pseudoaneurysm in a patient presenting with acute cholecystitis. DISCUSSION Cystic artery pseudoaneurysm is a rare entity and as such there is no consensus on the clinical management of this condition. A variety of treatment strategies have been reported in the literature including radiological selective embolisation and coiling, open cholecystectomy with ligation of the aneurysm, or a two-step approach involving radiological management of the pseudoaneurysm followed by an elective cholecystectomy. CONCLUSION In this report we have demonstrated that laparoscopic management of a cystic artery pseudoaneurysm with simultaneous laparoscopic cholecystectomy is feasible and safe. This avoids multiple invasive procedures and decreases morbidity associated with open surgery. PMID:26291047

  15. Nutrition in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Nompleggi, D J

    1999-08-01

    Pancreatitis is a common disorder. Numerous factors have been implicated in the pathogenesis of acute and chronic pancreatitis, but the exact mechanisms of these conditions are still poorly understood. Depending on the cause of the disorder, patients who have pancreatitis are usually not malnourished and are able to eat within 5 to 7 days of disease onset. In these patients, nutritional support is unnecessary. However, severe disease induces a catabolic state similar to that seen in trauma and sepsis, resulting in rapid weight loss and increased morbidity and mortality. Thus, vigorous nutritional support may be useful in the treatment of severe pancreatitis. Studies have shown that parenteral and enteral nutritional support are well tolerated and can maintain or improve nutritional status in patients with pancreatitis. This article reviews nutritional assessment and therapy in pancreatitis.

  16. Emerging role of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator - an epithelial chloride channel in gastrointestinal cancers.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yuning; Guan, Xiaoqing; Yang, Zhe; Li, Chunying

    2016-03-15

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a glycoprotein with 1480 amino acids, has been well established as a chloride channel mainly expressed in the epithelial cells of various tissues and organs such as lungs, sweat glands, gastrointestinal system, and reproductive organs. Although defective CFTR leads to cystic fibrosis, a common genetic disorder in the Caucasian population, there is accumulating evidence that suggests a novel role of CFTR in various cancers, especially in gastroenterological cancers, such as pancreatic cancer and colon cancer. In this review, we summarize the emerging findings that link CFTR with various cancers, with focus on the association between CFTR defects and gastrointestinal cancers as well as the underlying mechanisms. Further study of CFTR in cancer biology may help pave a new way for the diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal cancers. PMID:26989463

  17. Emerging role of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator - an epithelial chloride channel in gastrointestinal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yuning; Guan, Xiaoqing; Yang, Zhe; Li, Chunying

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a glycoprotein with 1480 amino acids, has been well established as a chloride channel mainly expressed in the epithelial cells of various tissues and organs such as lungs, sweat glands, gastrointestinal system, and reproductive organs. Although defective CFTR leads to cystic fibrosis, a common genetic disorder in the Caucasian population, there is accumulating evidence that suggests a novel role of CFTR in various cancers, especially in gastroenterological cancers, such as pancreatic cancer and colon cancer. In this review, we summarize the emerging findings that link CFTR with various cancers, with focus on the association between CFTR defects and gastrointestinal cancers as well as the underlying mechanisms. Further study of CFTR in cancer biology may help pave a new way for the diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal cancers. PMID:26989463

  18. Correlative Imaging in a Patient with Cystic Thymoma: CT, MR and PET/CT Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Romeo, Valeria; Esposito, Alfredo; Maurea, Simone; Camera, Luigi; Mainenti, Pier Paolo; Palmieri, Giovannella; Buonerba, Carlo; Salvatore, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Cystic thymoma is a rare variant of thymic neoplasm characterized by almost complete cystic degeneration with mixed internal structure. We describe a case of a 60 year-old woman with a cystic thymoma studied with advanced tomographic imaging stydies. CT, MRI and PET/CT with 18F-FDG were performed; volumetric CT and MRI images provided better anatomic evaluation for pre-operative assessment, while PET/CT was helpful for lesion characterization based on 18F-FDG uptake. Although imaging studies are mandatory for pre-operative evaluation of cystic thymoma, final diagnosis still remains surgical. Case Report A 60-year-old woman with recent chest pain and no history of previous disease was admitted to our departement to investigate the result of a previous chest X-ray that showed bilateral mediastinal enlargement; for this purpose, enhanced chest CT scan was performed using a 64-rows scanner (Toshiba, Aquilion 64, Japan) before and after intravenous bolus administration of iodinated non ionic contrast agent; CT images demonstrated the presence of a large mediastinal mass (11×8 cm) located in the anterior mediastinum who extended from the anonymous vein to the cardio-phrenic space, compressing the left atrium and causing medium lobe atelectasis; bilateral pleural effusion was also present. Conclusions In conclusion, correlative imaging plays a foundamental role for the diagnostic evaluation of patient with cystic thymoma. In particular, volumetric CT and MRI studies can provide better anatomic informations regarding internal structure and local tumor spread for pre-operative assessment. Conversely, metabolic imaging using 18F-FDG PET/CT is helpful for lesion characterization differentiating benign from malignant lesion on the basis of intense tracer uptake. The role of PET/MRI is still under investigation. However, final diagnosis still remains surgical even though imaging studies are mandatory for pre-operative patient management. PMID:25593635

  19. Smoking and Pancreatic Disease.

    PubMed

    Edderkaoui, Mouad; Thrower, Edwin

    2013-11-01

    Smoking is a major risk factor for chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. However, the mechanisms through which it causes the diseases remain unknown. In the present manuscript we reviewed the latest knowledge gained on the effect of cigarette smoke and smoking compounds on cell signaling pathways mediating both diseases. We also reviewed the effect of smoking on the pancreatic cell microenvironment including inflammatory cells and stellate cells.

  20. [Acute pancreatitis and obstructive jaundice secondary to metastases from lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Belhassen-García, Moncef; Velasco-Tirado, Virginia; Carpio-Pérez, Adela; Soler-Fernández, María Carmen; López-Bernús, Amparo; Pardo-Lledias, Javier; Fuentes-Pardo, Lucía; Iglesias-Gómez, Alicia

    2009-12-01

    Lung cancer is one of the most frequent neoplasms. The symptoms are due to the cancer itself, its extension, and associated paraneoplastic syndromes. Although biliopancreatic metastases are common, biliopancreatic involvement as the initial symptom of lung cancer--whether as pancreatitis or obstructive jaundice--is rare. We describe our clinical experience, reporting two patients with acute pancreatitis and one patient with obstructive jaundice as the clinical presentation of advanced lung cancer. We also provide a brief review that highlights the absence of guidelines in this situation.

  1. Cystic fibrosis from the gastroenterologist's perspective.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Chee Y; Durie, Peter R

    2016-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a life-limiting, recessive disease caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. Increased survival outcomes and the multisystem nature of the disease, including the involvement of hepatobiliary and gastrointestinal tracts, now require the need for more extensive knowledge and expertise in cystic fibrosis among gastroenterologists. Manifestations are either a direct consequence of the primary defect in cystic fibrosis or a secondary complication of the disease or therapy. Adult patients with cystic fibrosis also have an increased risk of malignancy in the gastrointestinal and pancreatico-biliary tracts compared with the general population. Novel treatments that target the basic defects in the CFTR protein have emerged, but to date not much is known about their effects on the gastrointestinal and hepatobiliary systems. The introduction of such therapies has provided new opportunities for the application of intestinal endpoints in clinical trials and the understanding of underlying disease mechanisms that affect the gut in cystic fibrosis.

  2. Biomarkers in Paediatric Cystic Fibrosis Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Kathryn A; Schultz, André; Stick, Stephen M

    2015-09-01

    Biomarkers in cystic fibrosis are used i. for the measurement of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator function in order to diagnose cystic fibrosis, and ii. to assess aspects of lung disease severity (e.g. inflammation, infection). Effective biomarkers can aid disease monitoring and contribute to the development of new therapies. The tests of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator function each have unique strengths and weaknesses, and biomarkers of inflammation, infection and tissue destruction have the potential to enhance the management of cystic fibrosis through the early detection of disease processes. The development of biomarkers of cystic fibrosis lung disease, in particular airway inflammation and infection, is influenced by the challenges of obtaining relevant samples from infants and children for whom early detection and treatment of disease might have the greatest long term benefits.

  3. Rare biliary cystic tumors: a case series of biliary cystadenomas and cystadenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Abhirup; Shah, Sudeep R; Singh, Abhiyutthan; Joshi, Anand; Desai, Devendra

    2016-01-01

    Cystic lesions of the liver are common and a major proportion is formed by parasitic cysts and simple cysts. Biliary cystic tumors (BCTs), namely biliary cystadenoma (BCA) and biliary cystadenocarcinoma (BCAC), are rare tumors which usually arise from the intrahepatic biliary tree. BCAs have malignant potential and are difficult to differentiate from BCAC pre-operatively on radiological imaging. Here we have presented 4 patients with BCTs and reviewed the literature pertaining to them.The data of four patients with BCA/BCAC diagnosed and treated at our institute were retrieved from our database and records were reviewed for age, sex, history, imaging, surgery, pathology and follow-up. Mean age of the patients was 53.5 years (range 30-71 years). Two male and two female patients presented with abdominal pain, of which one male patient had pancreatitis at diagnosis. Characteristic features were seen on pre-operative imaging (cystic lesions with internal septations) and biliary communication was identified in the patient with pancreatitis. Three patients were diagnosed with a BCA on final histology, while one patient had a BCAC. Following surgical resection, all the patients are asymptomatic and disease free with a mean follow-up of 24 months (range 10-40 months). In conclusion, BCTs should be suspected in the presence of a well-encapsulated, cystic hepatic lesion with internal septations. Although pre-operative distinction between BCA and BCAC is difficult, the lesion, whenever possible, should be completely resected as long-term outcomes are good, especially with BCA. PMID:27049501

  4. Pharmacogenetics of cystic fibrosis treatment.

    PubMed

    Carter, Suzanne C; McKone, Edward F

    2016-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is genetic autosomal recessive disease caused by reduced or absent function of CFTR protein. Treatments for patients with CF have primarily focused on the downstream end-organ consequences of defective CFTR. Since the discovery of the CFTR gene that causes CF in 1989 there have been tremendous advances in our understanding of the genetics and pathophysiology of CF. This has recently led to the development of new CFTR mutation-specific targeted therapies for select patients with CF. This review will discuss the characteristics of the CFTR gene, the CFTR mutations that cause CF and the new mutation specific pharmacological treatments including gene therapy that are contributing to the dawning of a new era in cystic fibrosis care. PMID:27490265

  5. Mesenteric cystic lymphangioma mimicking malignancy.

    PubMed

    Hureibi, Khalid; Sunidar, Osama A

    2014-01-01

    Mesenteric cystic lymphangiomas are benign tumours arising from the mesentery, and have no known aetiology. Patients might be discovered incidentally to have asymptomatic mesenteric cysts, or they can present with symptoms such as pain, nausea and vomiting. A 27-year-old man presented with vague abdominal pain, loss of appetite, postprandial fullness and significant weight loss. There was no lymphadenopathy, and abdominal examination was unremarkable. CT showed a mesenteric mass and a diagnosis of abdominal lymphoma was suggested. There was no evidence of pulmonary tuberculosis on chest X-ray and the purified protein derivative test was negative. On laparotomy, a 5×9×7 cm sessile cyst containing thick white fluid and arising from the ileal mesentery was found and completely removed. Histopathology proved a diagnosis of mesenteric cystic lymphangioma. The patient made uneventful recovery, and was asymptomatic on clinical follow-up after 6 weeks. PMID:25178885

  6. Mesenteric cystic lymphangioma mimicking malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Hureibi, Khalid; Sunidar, Osama A

    2014-01-01

    Mesenteric cystic lymphangiomas are benign tumours arising from the mesentery, and have no known aetiology. Patients might be discovered incidentally to have asymptomatic mesenteric cysts, or they can present with symptoms such as pain, nausea and vomiting. A 27-year-old man presented with vague abdominal pain, loss of appetite, postprandial fullness and significant weight loss. There was no lymphadenopathy, and abdominal examination was unremarkable. CT showed a mesenteric mass and a diagnosis of abdominal lymphoma was suggested. There was no evidence of pulmonary tuberculosis on chest X-ray and the purified protein derivative test was negative. On laparotomy, a 5×9×7 cm sessile cyst containing thick white fluid and arising from the ileal mesentery was found and completely removed. Histopathology proved a diagnosis of mesenteric cystic lymphangioma. The patient made uneventful recovery, and was asymptomatic on clinical follow-up after 6 weeks. PMID:25178885

  7. Non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Al Subie, Haya; Fitzgerald, Dominic A

    2012-05-01

    Non-cystic fibrosis (CF) bronchiectasis is said to be a declining problem in developed countries, although its prevalence in indigenous communities in Australia and New Zealand is among the highest reported in the world. Early childhood pneumonia and underlying conditions such as immunodeficiency and primary ciliary dyskinesia need to be considered in the aetiology. A high-resolution computerised tomography scan is the key investigation in children with a chronic wet cough in whom bronchiectasis is suspected. Regardless of the cause, the treatment of bronchiectasis is centred upon facilitating the clearance of airway secretions and the treatment of pulmonary exacerbations. This review aims to provide general paediatricians with an update on the presenting features, investigation and management of non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis. PMID:21040075

  8. Adenoid cystic carcinoma of trachea.

    PubMed

    Vigg, Ajit; Mantri, Sumant; Vigg, Avanti; Vigg, Arul

    2004-01-01

    A 20-year-old male, presented with cough, haemoptysis, breathlessness and wheezing for the past one month. Contrast enhanced computerised tomographic (CECT), scan of chest and fibreoptic bronchoscopy revealed an endotracheal mass that on histopathological examination showed adenoid cystic carcinoma of trachea. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan of chest confirmed involvement of adjacent prevertebral, para-oesophageal and subcarinal lymph nodes rendering the tumour inoperable. PMID:15515830

  9. [Retroperitoneal cystic mesothelioma and lymphangioma].

    PubMed

    Segura Martín, M; Lorenzo Romero, J G; Hernández Millán, I; Pastor Guzmán, J M; Salinas Sánchez, A S; Ruiz Mondéjar, R; Virseda Rodríguez, J A

    1998-03-01

    Retroperitoneal cysts are uncommon entities of difficult diagnosis because of their insidious symptomatology. Urinary apparatus involvement is quite often the mode of presentation and the reason for calling on the urologist. The origin of many of these retroperitoneal cysts remains practically unknown. Surgery with exeresis is the choice management method. Follow-up is necessary for cystic mesothelioma because of the highly frequent relapses. The outlook of hormonal conservative therapy for relapses appears as a future alternative to treatment.

  10. [What is new in the pathology of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors?].

    PubMed

    Komminoth, P; Perren, A

    2015-05-01

    The diagnostics of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNEN) have changed in recent years especially concerning the World Health Organization (WHO) classification, TNM staging and grading. Furthermore, some new prognostic and predictive immunohistochemical markers have been introduced. Most progress, however, has been made in the molecular pathogenesis of these neoplasms. Using next generation sequencing techniques, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, hypoxia and epigenetic changes were identified as key players in tumorigenesis. In this article the most important developments of morphological as well as immunohistochemical diagnostics together with the molecular background of PanNEN are summarized.

  11. Is Pancreatic Cancer Hereditary?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials Pain Management Nutrition and Exercise Holistic Care Pathology Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasms Islet Cell Tumors & Endocrine ... 410-933-7262 Site Map Policies & Credits News Pathology Home Goldman Center © 2016 Johns Hopkins University

  12. Non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    McShane, Pamela J; Naureckas, Edward T; Tino, Gregory; Strek, Mary E

    2013-09-15

    There is renewed interest in non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis, which is a cause of significant morbidity in adults and can be diagnosed by high-resolution chest computed tomography scan. No longer mainly a complication after pulmonary infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, diverse disease processes and mechanisms have been demonstrated to result in the chronic cough, purulent sputum production, and airway dilation that characterize this disease. Improved understanding of the role of mucus stasis in causing bacterial colonization has led to increased emphasis on the use of therapies that enhance airway clearance. Inhalational antibiotics reduce the bacterial burden associated with a worse outcome. Low-dose, chronic macrolide therapy has been shown to decrease exacerbation frequency and airway inflammation. For the first time, a number of therapies for non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis are undergoing testing in clinical research trials designed specifically for this population. This concise clinical review focuses on the major etiologies, diagnostic testing, microbiology, and management of patients with adult non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis. Systematic evaluation identifies a specific cause in the majority of patients and may affect subsequent treatment. We outline current therapies and review the data that support their use. PMID:23898922

  13. BRCC3 mutations in myeloid neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Dayong; Nagata, Yasunobu; Grossmann, Vera; Radivoyevitch, Tomas; Okuno, Yusuke; Nagae, Genta; Hosono, Naoko; Schnittger, Susanne; Sanada, Masashi; Przychodzen, Bartlomiej; Kon, Ayana; Polprasert, Chantana; Shen, Wenyi; Clemente, Michael J.; Phillips, James G.; Alpermann, Tamara; Yoshida, Kenichi; Nadarajah, Niroshan; Sekeres, Mikkael A.; Oakley, Kevin; Nguyen, Nhu; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Shiozawa, Yusuke; Chiba, Kenichi; Tanaka, Hiroko; Koeffler, H. Phillip; Klein, Hans-Ulrich; Dugas, Martin; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Miyano, Satoru; Haferlach, Claudia; Kern, Wolfgang; Haferlach, Torsten; Du, Yang; Ogawa, Seishi; Makishima, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Next generation sequencing technologies have provided insights into the molecular heterogeneity of various myeloid neoplasms, revealing previously unknown somatic genetic events. In our cohort of 1444 cases analyzed by next generation sequencing, somatic mutations in the gene BRCA1-BRCA2-containing complex 3 (BRCC3) were identified in 28 cases (1.9%). BRCC3 is a member of the JAMM/MPN+ family of zinc metalloproteases capable of cleaving Lys-63 linked polyubiquitin chains, and is implicated in DNA repair. The mutations were located throughout its coding region. The average variant allelic frequency of BRCC3 mutations was 30.1%, and by a serial sample analysis at two different time points a BRCC3 mutation was already identified in the initial stage of a myelodysplastic syndrome. BRCC3 mutations commonly occurred in nonsense (n=12), frameshift (n=4), and splice site (n=5) configurations. Due to the marginal male dominance (odds ratio; 2.00, 0.84–4.73) of BRCC3 mutations, the majority of mutations (n=23; 82%) were hemizygous. Phenotypically, BRCC3 mutations were frequently observed in myelodysplastic syndromes and myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms and associated with -Y abnormality (odds ratio; 3.70, 1.25–11.0). Clinically, BRCC3 mutations were also related to higher age (P=0.01), although prognosis was not affected. Knockdown of Brcc3 gene expression in murine bone marrow lineage negative, Sca1 positive, c-kit positive cells resulted in 2-fold more colony formation and modest differentiation defect. Thus, BRCC3 likely plays a role as tumor-associated gene in myelodysplastic syndromes and myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms. PMID:26001790

  14. BRCC3 mutations in myeloid neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Huang, Dayong; Nagata, Yasunobu; Grossmann, Vera; Radivoyevitch, Tomas; Okuno, Yusuke; Nagae, Genta; Hosono, Naoko; Schnittger, Susanne; Sanada, Masashi; Przychodzen, Bartlomiej; Kon, Ayana; Polprasert, Chantana; Shen, Wenyi; Clemente, Michael J; Phillips, James G; Alpermann, Tamara; Yoshida, Kenichi; Nadarajah, Niroshan; Sekeres, Mikkael A; Oakley, Kevin; Nguyen, Nhu; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Shiozawa, Yusuke; Chiba, Kenichi; Tanaka, Hiroko; Koeffler, H Phillip; Klein, Hans-Ulrich; Dugas, Martin; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Miyano, Satoru; Haferlach, Claudia; Kern, Wolfgang; Haferlach, Torsten; Du, Yang; Ogawa, Seishi; Makishima, Hideki

    2015-08-01

    Next generation sequencing technologies have provided insights into the molecular heterogeneity of various myeloid neoplasms, revealing previously unknown somatic genetic events. In our cohort of 1444 cases analyzed by next generation sequencing, somatic mutations in the gene BRCA1-BRCA2-containing complex 3 (BRCC3) were identified in 28 cases (1.9%). BRCC3 is a member of the JAMM/MPN+ family of zinc metalloproteases capable of cleaving Lys-63 linked polyubiquitin chains, and is implicated in DNA repair. The mutations were located throughout its coding region. The average variant allelic frequency of BRCC3 mutations was 30.1%, and by a serial sample analysis at two different time points a BRCC3 mutation was already identified in the initial stage of a myelodysplastic syndrome. BRCC3 mutations commonly occurred in nonsense (n=12), frameshift (n=4), and splice site (n=5) configurations. Due to the marginal male dominance (odds ratio; 2.00, 0.84-4.73) of BRCC3 mutations, the majority of mutations (n=23; 82%) were hemizygous. Phenotypically, BRCC3 mutations were frequently observed in myelodysplastic syndromes and myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms and associated with -Y abnormality (odds ratio; 3.70, 1.25-11.0). Clinically, BRCC3 mutations were also related to higher age (P=0.01), although prognosis was not affected. Knockdown of Brcc3 gene expression in murine bone marrow lineage negative, Sca1 positive, c-kit positive cells resulted in 2-fold more colony formation and modest differentiation defect. Thus, BRCC3 likely plays a role as tumor-associated gene in myelodysplastic syndromes and myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms. PMID:26001790

  15. Bone grafting in the surgical management of osseous neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Leonheart, E E; Mendicino, R W

    1996-01-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of osseous neoplasms are challenges for the foot and ankle surgeon. Osseous neoplasms are potentially debilitating, thus appropriate diagnosis and management are critical to success. Resection of these lesions can result in large osseous deficits, requiring bone grafting for replacement. The graft may provide osteogenesis, structural support, or both. This article presents possible surgical therapeutic alternatives in management of benign and low-grade malignant osseous neoplasms in the foot and ankle. PMID:8915860

  16. An Intracranial Gliosis Mimicking Neoplasm: A Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Zhi-hong; Wang, Guo-liang; Yi, Xiang-hua; Wang, Pei-jun

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial gliosis has no typical clinical signals or imaging characteristics. Therefore, it can be easily misdiagnosed as neoplasm. Hereby, we report a unique case of gliosis that grew outward from the surface of the brain. MRI depicted its signal and enhancement pattern similar to the cerebral gray matter. The diagnosis was confirmed by pathology and immunohistochemistry. Although it was difficult to reach a diagnosis, correlating its origin, growing pattern and MR features and knowing that gliosis can present this way may help in differentiating it from other diseases.

  17. Pulmonary disease in gestational trophoblastic neoplasms.

    PubMed Central

    McNair, O. M.; Polk, O. D.

    1992-01-01

    Gestational trophoblastic neoplasms can present as pulmonary nodules without significant disease of the reproductive organs. This article describes a case of metastatic gestational trophoblastic disease to the lungs. This entity must be considered in the differential diagnosis in any female of reproductive age who presents with multiple pulmonary nodules. Thoracotomy has a limited role in the initial evaluation of patients with this disease. However, it may be needed in patients who have evidence of persistent pulmonary disease, despite appropriate therapy. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1324326

  18. Rare extracranial localization of primary intracranial neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Arndt, Susan; Wiech, Thorsten; Mader, Irina; Aschendorff, Antje; Maier, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Meningioma, craniopharyngeoma and glioma are mainly intracranial lesions. Nevertheless, in rare cases these entities may occur solely as extracranial lesions that may present as intranasal/sinusoidal masses, with headaches and nasal obstruction. We present three cases of common intracranial tumors, with purely extracranial extension. The three described cases demonstrate, that preoperative MRI and CT imaging is important for differential diagnosis to exclude intracranial connections of the tumors. A definitive diagnosis requires specialized immunohistochemical examinations. In all cases of intranasal or pharyngeal neoplasm the diagnosis of meningioma, craniopharyngeoma and glioma should be considered as differential diagnosis to optimize the surgical procedure. PMID:18416840

  19. Tracking the Clonal Evolution of Adenosquamous Carcinoma, a Rare Variant of Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm of the Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaka, Suguru; Karasaki, Hidenori; Ono, Yusuke; Ogata, Munehiko; Oikawa, Kensuke; Tamakawa, Susumu; Chiba, Shin-Ichi; Muraki, Miho; Yokochi, Tomoki; Funakoshi, Hiroshi; Kono, Toru; Nagashima, Kazuo; Mizukami, Yusuke

    2016-07-01

    Adenosquamous carcinoma (ASC) is an uncommon variant of pancreatic neoplasm. We sought to trace the mode of tumor progression using specimens of ASC associated with intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) of the pancreas. A resected specimen of the primary pancreatic ASC, developed in a 72-year-old man, was subjected to mutation profiling using amplicon-targeted sequencing and digital polymerase chain reaction. DNA was isolated from each histological compartment including noninvasive IPMN, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and adenocarcinoma (AC). Histologically, an IPMN with a large mural nodule was identified. The invasive tumor predominantly consisted of SCC, and a smaller AC was found around the lesion. Squamous metaplasias were sporadically distributed within benign IPMNs. Mutation alleles KRAS and GNAS were identified in all specimens of IPMN including the areas of squamous metaplasia. In addition, these mutations were found in SCC and AC. Clear transition from flat/low-papillary IPMN to SCC indicated a potent invasion front, and the SCC compartment was genetically unique, because the area has a higher frequency of mutation KRAS. The invasive tumors with distinct histological appearances shared the form of noninvasive IPMN as a common precursor, rather than de novo cancer, suggesting the significance of a genetic profiling scheme of tumors associated with IPMN. PMID:27295533

  20. Palliation in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Kruse, E James

    2010-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer is rarely curable, and because of its location causes significant symptoms for patients in need of palliation. The common problems of incurable pancreatic cancer are biliary obstruction, duodenal obstruction, and pain. Approaches include surgical, endoscopic and radiologic interventions. This article discusses the palliative options and controversies related to these symptoms.

  1. Pancreatitis in cats.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, P Jane; Williams, David A

    2012-08-01

    Pancreatitis was considered a rare disease in the cat until a couple of decades ago when several retrospective studies of severe acute pancreatitis were published. It was apparent that few of the diagnostic tests of value in the dog were helpful in cats. With increasing clinical suspicion, availability of abdominal ultrasonography, and introduction of pancreas-specific blood tests of increasing utility, it is now accepted that acute pancreatitis is probably almost as common in cats as it is in dogs, although the etiology(s) remain more obscure. Pancreatitis in cats often co-exists with inflammatory bowel disease, less commonly with cholangitis, and sometimes with both. Additionally, pancreatitis may trigger hepatic lipidosis, while other diseases, such as diabetes mellitus, may be complicated by pancreatitis. Therapy is similar to that used in dogs, with added emphasis on early nutritional support to prevent hepatic lipidosis. Less is known about chronic pancreatitis than the acute form, but chronic pancreatitis is more common in cats than it is in dogs and may respond positively to treatment with corticosteroids.

  2. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma: Outstanding problems

    PubMed Central

    Zakharova, Olga P; Karmazanovsky, Grigory G; Egorov, Viacheslav I

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma remains the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death and is one of the most aggressive malignant tumors with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 4%. Surgical resection remains the only potentially curative treatment but is only possible for 15%-20% of patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. About 40% of patients have locally advanced nonresectable disease. In the past, determination of pancreatic cancer resectability was made at surgical exploration. The development of modern imaging techniques has allowed preoperative staging of patients. Institutions disagree about the criteria used to classify patients. Vascular invasion in pancreatic cancers plays a very important role in determining treatment and prognosis. There is no evidence-based consensus on the optimal preoperative imaging assessment of patients with suspected pancreatic cancer and a unified definition of borderline resectable pancreatic cancer is also lacking. Thus, there is much room for improvement in all aspects of treatment for pancreatic cancer. Multi-detector computed tomography has been widely accepted as the imaging technique of choice for diagnosing and staging pancreatic cancer. With improved surgical techniques and advanced perioperative management, vascular resection and reconstruction are performed more frequently; patients thought once to be unresectable are undergoing radical surgery. However, when attempting heroic surgery, a realistic approach concerning the patient’s age and health status, probability of recovery after surgery, perioperative morbidity and mortality and life quality after tumor resection is necessary. PMID:22655124

  3. Endometrioid Paraovarian Borderline Cystic Tumor in an Infant with Proteus Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Vasquez, Liliana; Tello, Mariela; Maza, Ivan; Oscanoa, Monica; Dueñas, Milagros; Castro, Haydee; Latorre, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian and paraovarian neoplasms are uncommon in children, mainly originating from germ cell tumors and, least frequently, epithelial tumors. There is an association between genital tract tumors and Proteus syndrome, a rare, sporadic, and progressive entity, characterized by a postnatal overgrowth in several tissues caused by a mosaic mutation in the AKT1 gene. We describe a 20-month-old asymptomatic infant with Proteus syndrome who developed an endometrioid paraovarian borderline cystic tumor. This is the youngest patient so far reported in the literature with this rare syndrome and an adnexal tumor of borderline malignancy. A total of nine patients have been described with female tract tumors and associated Proteus syndrome, which includes bilateral ovarian cystadenomas and other benign masses. A paraovarian neoplasm is extremely rare in children and could be considered a criterion for Proteus syndrome. Standardized staging and treatment of these tumors are not well established; however, most authors conclude that these neoplasms must be treated as their ovarian counterparts. PMID:26558123

  4. Folliculosebaceous Cystic Hamartoma With Spindle Cell Lipoma-Like Stromal Features

    PubMed Central

    Skupsky, Hadas; Cassarino, David

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Folliculosebaceous cystic hamartoma is a distinctive cutaneous hamartoma composed of follicular, sebaceous, and mesenchymal components. The lesions are most commonly found on the face and scalp of young adults, with approximately 30% occurring in the nasal or paranasal regions of the face. The clinical differential diagnoses are extensive and include epidermoid cyst, dermal nevus, soft fibroma, and adnexal tumors including sebaceous neoplasms. Here, the authors present a case of a 24-year-old man who presented for evaluation of an asymptomatic growth on the nose, which had slowly enlarged over 9 years. On examination, there was a 0.6 cm dome-shaped flesh-colored papule on the nasal bridge. The clinical differential included dermatofibroma versus intradermal nevus. A shave biopsy was performed, and histological examination of the sections showed a proliferation of multiple enlarged and irregular-appearing sebaceous glands attached to a cystic follicular structure. The associated dermal mesenchymal component consisted of numerous mature-appearing adipocytes associated with a fibromyxoid stroma, prominent collections of mucin, and bundles of ropey collagen resembling a spindle cell lipoma. This combination of a folliculosebaceous cystic hamartoma with a spindle cell lipoma-like mesenchymal proliferation is unusual and has not been previously reported. PMID:26588344

  5. Folliculosebaceous Cystic Hamartoma With Spindle Cell Lipoma-Like Stromal Features.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Catherine M; Skupsky, Hadas; Cassarino, David

    2015-12-01

    Folliculosebaceous cystic hamartoma is a distinctive cutaneous hamartoma composed of follicular, sebaceous, and mesenchymal components. The lesions are most commonly found on the face and scalp of young adults, with approximately 30% occurring in the nasal or paranasal regions of the face. The clinical differential diagnoses are extensive and include epidermoid cyst, dermal nevus, soft fibroma, and adnexal tumors including sebaceous neoplasms. Here, the authors present a case of a 24-year-old man who presented for evaluation of an asymptomatic growth on the nose, which had slowly enlarged over 9 years. On examination, there was a 0.6 cm dome-shaped flesh-colored papule on the nasal bridge. The clinical differential included dermatofibroma versus intradermal nevus. A shave biopsy was performed, and histological examination of the sections showed a proliferation of multiple enlarged and irregular-appearing sebaceous glands attached to a cystic follicular structure. The associated dermal mesenchymal component consisted of numerous mature-appearing adipocytes associated with a fibromyxoid stroma, prominent collections of mucin, and bundles of ropey collagen resembling a spindle cell lipoma. This combination of a folliculosebaceous cystic hamartoma with a spindle cell lipoma-like mesenchymal proliferation is unusual and has not been previously reported.

  6. Natural course of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Beger, H G; Rau, B; Mayer, J; Pralle, U

    1997-02-01

    Acute pancreatitis comprises, in terms of clinical, pathologic, biochemical, and bacteriologic data, four entities. Interstitial edematous pancreatitis and necrotizing pancreatitis are the most frequent clinical manifestations; pancreatic pseudocyst and pancreatic abscess are late complications after necrotizing pancreatitis, developing after 3 to 5 weeks. Determinants of the natural course of acute pancreatitis are pancreatic parenchymal necrosis, extrapancreatic retroperitoneal fatty tissue necrosis, biologically active compounds in pancreatic ascites, and infection of necrosis. Early in the course of acute pancreatitis multiple organ failure is the consequence of various inflammatory mediators that are released from the inflammatory process and from activated leukocytes attracted by pancreatic injury. During the late course, starting the second week, local and systemic septic complications are dominant. Around 80% of deaths in acute pancreatitis are caused by septic complications. The infection of pancreatic necrosis occurs in 8% to 12% of acute pancreatitis and in 30% to 40% of patients with necrotizing pancreatitis. Bacteriologic analysis of intraoperative smears and aspirates reveals predominantly gram-negative germs deriving from the intestine, most frequently Escherichia coli. It has been confirmed that after necrotizing pancreatitis a considerable large group of patients suffer long-lasting exocrine and endocrine insufficiency.

  7. Advances in the Diagnosis of Neuroendocrine Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Harshad R; Singh, Aviral; Baum, Richard P

    2016-09-01

    Somatostatin receptor PET/CT using (68)Ga-labeled somatostatin analogs, is a mainstay for the evaluation of the somatostatin receptor status in neuroendocrine neoplasms. In addition, the assessment of glucose metabolism by (18)F-FDG PET/CT at diagnosis can overcome probable shortcomings of histopathologic grading. This offers a systematic theranostic approach for the management of neuroendocrine neoplasms, that is, patient selection for the appropriate treatment-surgery, somatostatin analogs, peptide receptor radionuclide therapy, targeted therapies like everolimus and sunitinib, or chemotherapy-and also for therapy response monitoring. Novel targets, for example, the chemokine receptor CXCR4 in higher-grade tumors and glucagon like peptide-1 receptor in insulinomas, appear promising for imaging. Scandium-44 and Copper-64, especially on account of their longer half-life (for pretherapeutic dosimetry) and cyclotron production (which favors mass production), might be the potential alternatives to (68)Ga for PET/CT imaging. The future of molecular imaging lies in Radiomics, that is, qualitative and quantitative characterization of tumor phenotypes in correlation with tumor genomics and proteomics, for a personalized cancer management. PMID:27553465

  8. The management of salivary neoplasms: an overview.

    PubMed

    Spiro, R H

    1985-01-01

    From 1939 through 1973, 2,807 patients with salivary gland tumors received definitive treatment at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. This included 1,965 patients (70%) with parotid gland lesions, 244 patients (8%) with neoplasms in the submandibular gland, and 607 patients (22%) with tumors which arose in the predominantly mucus secreting glands (minor salivary) which line the upper aerodigestive tract. The proportion with malignant tumors was 25, 43, and 82% in the parotid, submandibular and minor salivary glands, respectively; benign tumors occurred more often in women. Mucoepidermoid, acinic cell and most adenocarcinomas were subdivided according to histologic grade and all patients were retrospectively staged according to criteria established by the American Joint Committee on Cancer Staging. Treatment was almost exclusively surgical and the extent of the operation performed depended on the extent of the tumor rather than its histology. In patients with malignant parotid tumors, the facial nerve was sacrificed only if it was adherent to or directly involved by the tumor. Lymphadenectomy was usually reserved for those patients who had palpable metastases. Prolonged follow-up (10 years minimum in this study) is necessary in order to appreciate the slow growth of some salivary neoplasms. Results depended upon the complex interplay between the site of origin, the clinical stage, and the histologic appearance of the tumors. This study antedates our current interest in postoperative radiation therapy, but other reports suggest that combination therapy enhances local control.

  9. Minor salivary gland neoplasm in children.

    PubMed

    Spuntarelli, Giorgio; Santecchia, Luigino; Urbani, Urbano; Zama, Mario

    2013-03-01

    In this article, we present a review of the literature, and we focus on 2 particular cases of cancer of the salivary glands accessory in pediatric patients The accessory parotid is the site of congenital and acquired lesions. In adults, the acquired lesions are often neoplastic and are usually similar to those seen in the main parotid gland. The disorders in children are less well defined, as only a few cases have been reported.The accessory parotid gland, or accessory parotid, is a nodule of normal salivary tissue separated from the main parotid gland, located on the masseter muscle, to which it is bound by an extension of the masseteric fascia and connected to the Stensen duct at that level. In contrast to the extensive literature on acquired lesions of the accessory parotid in adults, very few cases of malignant or benign lesions of the accessory parotid in children could be found in the literature. A review of several articles reporting lesions of the accessory parotid in adult patients, reporting 3 or more cases each for a total of 71 patients, showed 24 malignant neoplasms, 39 benign neoplasms, and 8 nonneoplastic lesions. Lesions of the accessory parotid are quite rare in children but should be considered when facing mass located in the cheek.

  10. Review of idiopathic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jason Kihyuk; Enns, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in understanding of pancreatitis and advances in technology have uncovered the veils of idiopathic pancreatitis to a point where a thorough history and judicious use of diagnostic techniques elucidate the cause in over 80% of cases. This review examines the multitude of etiologies of what were once labeled idiopathic pancreatitis and provides the current evidence on each. This review begins with a background review of the current epidemiology of idiopathic pancreatitis prior to discussion of various etiologies. Etiologies of medications, infections, toxins, autoimmune disorders, vascular causes, and anatomic and functional causes are explored in detail. We conclude with management of true idiopathic pancreatitis and a summary of the various etiologic agents. Throughout this review, areas of controversies are highlighted. PMID:18081217

  11. Clinical nutrition in pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    McClave, S A; Snider, H; Owens, N; Sexton, L K

    1997-10-01

    In patients with acute pancreatitis or an acute flare of chronic pancreatitis, a discrepancy exists between increased protein/calorie requirements induced by a hypermetabolic stress state and reduced ingestion/assimilation of exogenous nutrients, which promotes progressive nutritional deterioration. Patients with severe pancreatitis (defined by > or =3 Ranson criteria, an APACHE II score of > or =10, development of major organ failure, and/or presence of pancreatic necrosis) are more likely to require aggressive nutritional support than patients with mild disease. The type of formula and level of the gastrointestinal tract into which nutrients are infused determine the degree to which pancreatic exocrine secretion is stimulated. Animal studies and early prospective randomized controlled trials in humans suggest that total enteral nutrition via jejunal feeding may be the preferred route to parenteral alimentation in this disease setting.

  12. High risk factors of pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Camara, Soriba Naby; Yin, Tao; Yang, Ming; Li, Xiang; Gong, Qiong; Zhou, Jing; Zhao, Gang; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Aroun, Tajoo; Kuete, Martin; Ramdany, Sonam; Camara, Alpha Kabinet; Diallo, Aissatou Taran; Feng, Zhen; Ning, Xin; Xiong, Jiong-Xin; Tao, Jing; Qin, Qi; Zhou, Wei; Cui, Jing; Huang, Min; Guo, Yao; Gou, Shan-Miao; Wang, Bo; Liu, Tao; Olivier, Ohoya Etsaka Terence; Conde, Tenin; Cisse, Mohamed; Magassouba, Aboubacar Sidiki; Ballah, Sneha; Keita, Naby Laye Moussa; Souare, Ibrahima Sory; Toure, Aboubacar; Traore, Sadamoudou; Balde, Abdoulaye Korse; Keita, Namory; Camara, Naby Daouda; Emmanuel, Dusabe; Wu, He-Shui; Wang, Chun-You

    2016-06-01

    Over the past decades, cancer has become one of the toughest challenges for health professionals. The epidemiologists are increasingly directing their research efforts on various malignant tumor worldwide. Of note, incidence of cancers is on the rise more quickly in developed countries. Indeed, great endeavors have to be made in the control of the life-threatening disease. As we know it, pancreatic cancer (PC) is a malignant disease with the worst prognosis. While little is known about the etiology of the PC and measures to prevent the condition, so far, a number of risk factors have been identified. Genetic factors, pre-malignant lesions, predisposing diseases and exogenous factors have been found to be linked to PC. Genetic susceptibility was observed in 10% of PC cases, including inherited PC syndromes and familial PC. However, in the remaining 90%, their PC might be caused by genetic factors in combination with environmental factors. Nonetheless, the exact mechanism of the two kinds of factors, endogenous and exogenous, working together to cause PC remains poorly understood. The fact that most pancreatic neoplasms are diagnosed at an incurable stage of the disease highlights the need to identify risk factors and to understand their contribution to carcinogenesis. This article reviews the high risk factors contributing to the development of PC, to provide information for clinicians and epidemiologists.

  13. A hepatoid carcinoma of the pancreatic head.

    PubMed

    Stamatova, D; Theilmann, L; Spiegelberg, C

    2016-12-01

    Hepatoid carcinoma (HC) is an extremely rare form of neoplasm. Its cellular structure resembles that of a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). To date, only 26 cases of hepatoid carcinoma of the pancreas have been reported in the literature. We report the diagnosis of a hepatoid carcinoma of the pancreatic head in a 78-year-old male patient. The tumor was detected incidentally during routine abdominal ultrasound scanning. Laboratory tests did not show any abnormalities except for a monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance. After CT, MRI, and laparoscopic biopsy that failed to obtain the diagnosis, the patient underwent a Whipple procedure. The final pathology report described a hepatoid carcinoma of the pancreatic head (pathological T3, N0 (0/10), L0, V0, R0, M0). After the patient recovered, no further therapy was recommended by the tumor board and he was discharged. Regular follow-up was suggested; however, the patient suddenly died of acute coronary artery disease 2 months after surgery. PMID:27488314

  14. High risk factors of pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Camara, Soriba Naby; Yin, Tao; Yang, Ming; Li, Xiang; Gong, Qiong; Zhou, Jing; Zhao, Gang; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Aroun, Tajoo; Kuete, Martin; Ramdany, Sonam; Camara, Alpha Kabinet; Diallo, Aissatou Taran; Feng, Zhen; Ning, Xin; Xiong, Jiong-Xin; Tao, Jing; Qin, Qi; Zhou, Wei; Cui, Jing; Huang, Min; Guo, Yao; Gou, Shan-Miao; Wang, Bo; Liu, Tao; Olivier, Ohoya Etsaka Terence; Conde, Tenin; Cisse, Mohamed; Magassouba, Aboubacar Sidiki; Ballah, Sneha; Keita, Naby Laye Moussa; Souare, Ibrahima Sory; Toure, Aboubacar; Traore, Sadamoudou; Balde, Abdoulaye Korse; Keita, Namory; Camara, Naby Daouda; Emmanuel, Dusabe; Wu, He-Shui; Wang, Chun-You

    2016-06-01

    Over the past decades, cancer has become one of the toughest challenges for health professionals. The epidemiologists are increasingly directing their research efforts on various malignant tumor worldwide. Of note, incidence of cancers is on the rise more quickly in developed countries. Indeed, great endeavors have to be made in the control of the life-threatening disease. As we know it, pancreatic cancer (PC) is a malignant disease with the worst prognosis. While little is known about the etiology of the PC and measures to prevent the condition, so far, a number of risk factors have been identified. Genetic factors, pre-malignant lesions, predisposing diseases and exogenous factors have been found to be linked to PC. Genetic susceptibility was observed in 10% of PC cases, including inherited PC syndromes and familial PC. However, in the remaining 90%, their PC might be caused by genetic factors in combination with environmental factors. Nonetheless, the exact mechanism of the two kinds of factors, endogenous and exogenous, working together to cause PC remains poorly understood. The fact that most pancreatic neoplasms are diagnosed at an incurable stage of the disease highlights the need to identify risk factors and to understand their contribution to carcinogenesis. This article reviews the high risk factors contributing to the development of PC, to provide information for clinicians and epidemiologists. PMID:27376795

  15. Acute Obstructive Suppurative Pancreatic Ductitis

    PubMed Central

    Palakodeti, Sandeep; Munroe, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Acute obstructive suppurative pancreatic ductitis (AOSPD) is a rare clinical entity defined as suppuration from the pancreatic duct without concomitant pancreatic cyst, abscess, or necrosis. We describe a case of AOSPD in a woman with a past medical history of type 2 diabetes and chronic pancreatitis who presented with abdominal sepsis, which resolved only after therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Our case highlights the importance of considering AOSPD as a cause of abdominal sepsis particularly in patients with chronic pancreatitis or any recent pancreatic duct instrumentation and demonstrates that treatment requires prompt drainage and decompression of the pancreatic duct.

  16. Various diffusion magnetic resonance imaging techniques for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Meng-Yue; Zhang, Xiao-Ming; Chen, Tian-Wu; Huang, Xiao-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors and remains a treatment-refractory cancer with a poor prognosis. Currently, the diagnosis of pancreatic neoplasm depends mainly on imaging and which methods are conducive to detecting small lesions. Compared to the other techniques, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has irreplaceable advantages and can provide valuable information unattainable with other noninvasive or minimally invasive imaging techniques. Advances in MR hardware and pulse sequence design have particularly improved the quality and robustness of MRI of the pancreas. Diffusion MR imaging serves as one of the common functional MRI techniques and is the only technique that can be used to reflect the diffusion movement of water molecules in vivo. It is generally known that diffusion properties depend on the characterization of intrinsic features of tissue microdynamics and microstructure. With the improvement of the diffusion models, diffusion MR imaging techniques are increasingly varied, from the simplest and most commonly used technique to the more complex. In this review, the various diffusion MRI techniques for pancreatic cancer are discussed, including conventional diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), multi-b DWI based on intra-voxel incoherent motion theory, diffusion tensor imaging and diffusion kurtosis imaging. The principles, main parameters, advantages and limitations of these techniques, as well as future directions for pancreatic diffusion imaging are also discussed. PMID:26753059

  17. Malignant infiltrating intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm with internal fistula: one case report and clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiao-Liang; Meng, Wen-Bo; Zhang, Lei; Zhou, Wen-Ce; Li, Xun

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) is a rare tumor that originates in the pancreatic duct. The diagnosis of benign, borderline or malignant to IPMN is significant in terms of making an appropriate treatment plan and prognosis. This article summarizes our clinical experience of a case report and discussion by literature review. Methods and case report: A 73 year old male patient was admitted for an occupying lesion of the pancreas. The magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) scan considered IPMN, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) also confirmed diagnosis of IPMN. Both the biliary and pancreatic duct stents were replaced, but we did not obtain any evidence by cytological evaluation. One month later, ERCP and intraductal ultrasonography (IDUS) showed infiltrating growth of the tumor. Endoscopic ultrasonography guided fine-needle aspiration was performed at the same time, and pathological diagnosis was suggested as borderline IPMN. Results: In the absence of pathological support, the patient presented with the clinical diagnosis of infiltrating intraductal papillary mucinous adenocarcinoma (IPMC) and was recommended for surgery. However, the patient and his family refused surgery, and were discharged. Subsequently, the patient died 6.5 months (197 days) following first diagnosis. Conclusions: Currently, the definition and classification of IPMN is done by specification, although there remain some difficulties in diagnosing its subtypes. For diagnostic purposes, CT, MRCP, ERCP, IDUS, EUS and EUS-FNA can all be applied. Cytological negative pathology might not completely rule out malignancy, and would still require further examination and follow-up. PMID:26885135

  18. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas: making a disposition using the natural history.

    PubMed

    Traverso, L William; Moriya, Toshiyuki; Hashimoto, Yasushi

    2012-04-01

    The process of Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN) follows the adenoma-to-carcinoma sequence. If it progresses to malignancy about 5 years is required. Even though the process is slow IPMN provides the clinician with the opportunity to avoid malignancy if the patient is at risk. The natural history as observed through Kaplan Meier event curves for occurrence of malignancy show the process to malignancy is much faster (50% within 2 years) if pancreatitis-like symptoms are present or if the main pancreatic duct (MPD) is involved. Almost all decisions to resect (95% in our experience) are based on the presence of symptoms or the MPD location. Cyst size is used infrequently. Every patient with an IPMN should always have a planned follow-up and the frequency depends on the perceived risk of malignancy-immediate imaging if becomes symptomatic to every 2 to 3 years if asymptomatic side branch lesions. The natural history provides modern guidelines for making decisions in patients with a newly discovered IPMN.

  19. Clinical Analysis of 36 Cases of Autoimmune Pancreatitis in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xingang; Zhang, Xinpeng; Li, Wei; Jiang, Li; Zhang, Xiaoli; Guo, Yun; Wang, Xiaofei

    2012-01-01

    Background To improve the early identification of autoimmune pancreatitis in China by a retrospective analysis of clinical data from AIP patients. Methodology/Principal Findings The analysis included 36 patients admitted by the surgery department of our hospital from January 2003 to October 2011 whose postoperative pathological confirmations were consistent with the histological criteria of Honolulu Consensus Document. The clinical phenotypes associated with the histopathologic patterns of LPSP and IDCP were referred to as type 1 and type 2 of AIP, respectively. A retrospective analysis of clinical features, serological data, pathological findings and imageological records was performed in line with the subtypes of AIP. Type 1 showing a sex predilection (males) was commonly more dominant than type 2 in all AIP. Type 2 without a gender predilection was, on average, a decade younger than type 1. Type 1 was inferior to type 2 in ALT, ALP and γ-GT with statistical significance (P = 0.044, 0.025 and 0.013). Type 1 was inferior to type 2 in AST with difference close to statistical significance (P = 0.072). Histopathology revealed frequent lymphoplasmacytic infiltration with less frequent infiltration of neutrophils, eosinophils and fibroblasts. Diffuse and intensive interstitial fibrosis could be seen. The changes of pancreatic head were more frequently seen in type 2 than in type 1 (P = 0.05). Plasma cells staining of IgG4 at a density of over 30 or more cells per high-power field appeared to be a specific finding in China with type 1. Imageology found a diffusely or focally enlarged pancreas, most frequently a mass or enlargement in the pancreatic head, characteristic capsule-like rim, calcification or pancreatic calculus and cystic degeneration. Conclusions/Significance AIP is a unique type of chronic pancreatitis and has distinctive serological, pathological and imageological characteristics, which should be used for differentiation from pancreatic

  20. Innovations in macroscopic evaluation of pancreatic specimens and radiologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Triantopoulou, Charikleia; Papaparaskeva, Kleo; Agalianos, Christos; Dervenis, Christos

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of a novel dissection technique of surgical specimens in different cases of pancreatic tumors and provide a radiologic pathologic correlation. In our hospital, that is a referral center for pancreatic diseases, the macroscopic evaluation of the pancreatectomy specimens is performed by the pathologists using the axial slicing technique (instead of the traditional procedure with longitudinal opening of the main pancreatic and/or common bile duct and slicing along the plane defined by both ducts). The specimen is sliced in an axial plane that is perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the descending duodenum. The procedure results in a large number of thin slices (3-4 mm). This plane is identical to that of CT or MRI and correlation between pathology and imaging is straightforward. We studied 70 cases of suspected different solid and cystic pancreatic tumors and we correlated the tumor size and location, the structure-consistency (areas of necrosis-hemorrhage-fibrosis-inflammation), the degree of vessels' infiltration, the size of pancreatic and common bile duct and the distance from resection margins. Missed findings by imaging or pitfalls were recorded and we tried to explain all discrepancies between radiology evaluation and the histopathological findings. Radiologic-pathologic correlation is extremely important, adding crucial information on imaging limitations and enabling quality assessment of surgical specimens. The deep knowledge of different pancreatic tumors' consistency and way of extension helps to improve radiologists' diagnostic accuracy and minimize the radiological-surgical mismatching, preventing patients from unnecessary surgery. PMID:27069980