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Sample records for cystic pancreatic neoplasms

  1. Pancreatic cystic neoplasms: a review of preoperative diagnosis and management*

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Xue-li; Zhang, Qi; Masood, Noman; Masood, Waqas; Zhang, Yun; Liang, Ting-bo

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cystic neoplasms (PCNs) are a diverse group of neoplasms in the pancreas, and are more increasingly encountered with widespread abdominal screening and improved imaging techniques. The most common types of PCNs are serous cystic neoplasms (SCNs), mucinous cystic neoplasms (MCNs), and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs). Clinicians frequently feel bewildered in the differential diagnosis and subsequent management among the various types of lesions in the pancreas, which may lead to overtreatment or delayed treatment. The current review provides recent developments in the understanding of the three most common types of PCNs, the latest modalities used in preoperative diagnosis and differential diagnosis, as well as the most up to date management. Suggestions for diagnosis and differential diagnosis of SCNs, MCNs, and IPMNs are also provided for young surgeons. Better understanding of these neoplasms is essential for clinicians to make accurate diagnosis and to provide the best management for patients. PMID:23463761

  2. Pancreatic endometrial cyst mimics mucinous cystic neoplasm of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Mederos, Michael A; Villafañe, Nicole; Dhingra, Sadhna; Farinas, Carlos; McElhany, Amy; Fisher, William E; Van Buren Ii, George

    2017-02-14

    Pancreatic cysts include a variety of benign, premalignant, and malignant lesions. Endometrial cysts in the pancreas are exceedingly rare lesions that are difficult to diagnose pre-operatively. This report describes the findings in a 43-year-old patient with a recent episode of acute pancreatitis who presented with a large cyst in the tail of the pancreas. Imaging demonstrated a loculated pancreatic cyst, and cyst fluid aspiration revealed an elevated amylase and carcinoembryonic antigen. The patient experienced an interval worsening of abdominal pain, fatigue, diarrhea, and a 15-pound weight loss 3 mo after the initial episode of pancreatitis. With concern for a possible pre-malignant lesion, the patient underwent a laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy, which revealed a 16 cm × 12 cm × 4 cm lesion. Final histopathology was consistent with an intra-pancreatic endometrial cyst. Here we discuss the overlapping imaging and laboratory features of pancreatic endometrial cysts and mucinous cystic neoplasms of the pancreas.

  3. Current perspectives on pancreatic serous cystic neoplasms: Diagnosis, management and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Peng; Yu, Zhong-Xun; Zhao, Yu-Pei; Dai, Meng-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cystic neoplasms have been increasingly recognized recently. Comprising about 16% of all resected pancreatic cystic neoplasms, serous cystic neoplasms are uncommon benign lesions that are usually asymptomatic and found incidentally. Despite overall low risk of malignancy, these pancreatic cysts still generate anxiety, leading to intensive medical investigations with considerable financial cost to health care systems. This review discusses the general background of serous cystic neoplasms, including epidemiology and clinical characteristics, and provides an updated overview of diagnostic approaches based on clinical features, relevant imaging studies and new findings that are being discovered pertaining to diagnostic evaluation. We also concisely discuss and propose management strategies for better quality of life. PMID:27022447

  4. Pancreatic endometrial cyst mimics mucinous cystic neoplasm of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Mederos, Michael A; Villafañe, Nicole; Dhingra, Sadhna; Farinas, Carlos; McElhany, Amy; Fisher, William E; Van Buren II, George

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cysts include a variety of benign, premalignant, and malignant lesions. Endometrial cysts in the pancreas are exceedingly rare lesions that are difficult to diagnose pre-operatively. This report describes the findings in a 43-year-old patient with a recent episode of acute pancreatitis who presented with a large cyst in the tail of the pancreas. Imaging demonstrated a loculated pancreatic cyst, and cyst fluid aspiration revealed an elevated amylase and carcinoembryonic antigen. The patient experienced an interval worsening of abdominal pain, fatigue, diarrhea, and a 15-pound weight loss 3 mo after the initial episode of pancreatitis. With concern for a possible pre-malignant lesion, the patient underwent a laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy, which revealed a 16 cm × 12 cm × 4 cm lesion. Final histopathology was consistent with an intra-pancreatic endometrial cyst. Here we discuss the overlapping imaging and laboratory features of pancreatic endometrial cysts and mucinous cystic neoplasms of the pancreas. PMID:28246486

  5. Incidental pancreatic cystic neoplasms in an asymptomatic healthy population of 21,745 individuals

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ye Rim; Park, Joo Kyung; Jang, Jin-Young; Kwon, Wooil; Yoon, Jeong Hee; Kim, Sun-Whe

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although incidental pancreatic cystic neoplasms are being diagnosed with increasing frequency, little is known about the accurate prevalence of pancreatic cysts in the general population. The aims of this study were to evaluate the crude prevalence rate of pancreatic cystic neoplasms in asymptomatic healthy adults, and calculate the age- and sex-adjusted nationwide prevalence rate. A total of 21,745 asymptomatic individuals who underwent abdominal computed tomography (CT) as a health screening examination were enrolled between 2003 and 2013 at the Seoul National University Hospital Healthcare System Gangnam Center. Nationwide population data of 2010 were collected from the National Statistical Office, Korea. Incidental pancreatic cystic neoplasms were found in 457 individuals whose mean age was 58.7 years. The types of neoplasms were reviewed by 2 separate designated radiologists and the final diagnosis was made as follows: intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm: 376 (82%), serous cystic neoplasm: 19 (4%), mucinous cystic neoplasm: 7 (2%), and indeterminate cysts: 55 (12%). Eight cases underwent operation. The crude prevalence rate was 2.1% and the age- and sex-adjusted expected nationwide prevalence was 2.2%. The prevalence increased with age. Here, we reported the first large-scale study among the healthy population to find out the prevalence rate of pancreatic cystic neoplasms; the age- and sex-adjusted prevalence was 2.2%, and increased with age. Further investigations regarding the clinical implications of incidental pancreatic neoplasms are necessary. PMID:28002329

  6. Prevalence, Diagnosis and Management of Pancreatic Cystic Neoplasms: Current Status and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Cystic neoplasms of the pancreas are found with increasing prevalence, especially in elderly asymptomatic individuals. Although the overall risk of malignancy is very low, the presence of these pancreatic cysts is associated with a large degree of anxiety and further medical investigation due to concerns about malignancy. This review discusses the different cystic neoplasms of the pancreas and reports diagnostic strategies based on clinical features and imaging data. Surgical and nonsurgical management of the most common cystic neoplasms, based on the recently revised Sendai guidelines, is also discussed, with special reference to intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN; particularly the branch duct variant), which is the lesion most frequently identified incidentally. IPMN pathology, its risk for development into pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, the pros and cons of current guidelines for management, and the potential role of endoscopic ultrasound in determining cancer risk are discussed. Finally, surgical treatment, strategies for surveillance of pancreatic cysts, and possible future directions are discussed. PMID:26343068

  7. Accuracy of endoscopic ultrasound in the evaluation of cystic pancreatic neoplasms: a community hospital experience.

    PubMed

    Wright, Gerald Paul; Morrow, Jay Bradley; Shaheen, Michael; Goslin, Brent J; Baatenburg, Lorel; Chung, Mathew H

    2014-04-01

    Reports on the use of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) in differentiating benign, premalignant, and malignant pancreatic lesions have been widely variable, particularly with cystic neoplasms. We evaluated the use of EUS for cystic pancreatic lesions in a community hospital setting. All patients who underwent EUS for cystic pancreatic neoplasms from 2007 to 2010 were reviewed. A final EUS diagnosis was determined based on the examiner's impression and fine-needle aspiration results if available. Lesions were stratified as benign, premalignant, or malignant. Patients underwent surgical resection, serial imaging studies, or medical oncology/palliative care consultation as indicated. One hundred eighteen patients with cystic pancreatic lesions underwent EUS during the study period. Endoscopic ultrasound diagnoses included 75 benign (63.6%), 35 premalignant (29.7%), and 8 malignant (4.2%) lesions. Thirty-eight patients (32.2%) underwent surgery, 77 (65.3%) were monitored with imaging, and 3 (2.5%) had unresectable malignancies. Elevated carcinoembryonic antigen levels showed a trend toward predicting mucinous cysts (P = 0.062). Accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for cystic lesions were 87.3%, 86.8%, 87.5%, 76.7%, and 93.3%, respectively. Endoscopic ultrasound is a valuable diagnostic modality in the evaluation of cystic pancreatic neoplasms in a community hospital setting.

  8. Activated Wnt Signaling in Stroma Contributes to Development of Pancreatic Mucinous Cystic Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Sano, Makoto; Driscoll, David R.; De Jesus-Monge, Wilfredo E.; Klimstra, David S.; Lewis, Brian C.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Pancreatic mucinous cystic neoplasm (MCN), a cystic tumor of the pancreas that develops most frequently in women, is a potential precursor to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. MCNs develop primarily in the body and tail of the pancreas and are characterized by the presence of a mucinous epithelium and ovarian-like subepithelial stroma. We investigated the involvement of Wnt signaling in KRAS-mediated pancreatic tumorigenesis and development of MCN in mice, and Wnt activation in human MCN samples. METHODS LSL-KrasG12D, Ptf1a-cre mice were crossed with elastase-tva mice to allow for introduction of genes encoded by the replication-competent avian sarcoma-leukosis virus long-terminal repeat with splice acceptor viruses to pancreatic acinar cells and acinar cell progenitors, postnatally and sporadically. Repeat with splice acceptor viruses that expressed Wnt1 were delivered to the pancreatic epithelium of these mice; pancreatic lesions were analyzed by histopathology and immunohistochemical analyses. We analyzed levels of factors in Wnt signaling pathways in 19 MCN samples from patients. RESULTS Expression of Wnt1 in the pancreatic acinar cells and acinar cell progenitors of female mice led to development of unilocular or multilocular epithelial cysts in the pancreas body and tail, similar to MCN. The cystic lesions resembled the estrogen receptor– and progesterone receptor–positive ovarian-like stroma of MCN, but lacked the typical mucinous epithelium. Activated Wnt signaling, based on nuclear localization of β-catenin, was detected in the stroma but not cyst epithelium. Wnt signaling to β-catenin was found to be activated in MCN samples from patients, within the ovarian-like stroma, consistent with the findings in mice. CONCLUSIONS Based on studies of mice and pancreatic MCN samples from patients, the canonical Wnt signaling pathway becomes activated and promotes development of the ovarian-like stroma to contribute to formation of MCNs. PMID

  9. Cystic Neoplasms of the Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Tran Cao, Hop S.; Kellogg, Benjamin; Lowy, Andrew M.; Bouvet, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Whereas pancreatic duct adenocarcinoma (PDA) is a well-studied (but still poorly understood) disease with a dismal prognosis, cystic neoplasms of the pancreas form a more recently recognized group of pancreatic tumors. They are diverse and variable in their pathologic characteristics, clinical course, and outcomes,1–3 although all portend a better overall prognosis than PDA. In recent years, with the improved sensitivity and increasing use of cross-sectional imaging in clinical practice, these lesions are more commonly identified,4 with many being discovered incidentally. Indeed, large radiological series using computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have reported detection rates of pancreatic cystic lesions between 1.2% and almost 20%,5,6 approaching the 24.3% prevalence rate in an autopsy series by Kimura and colleagues.7 Although most of these lesions are pseudocysts, a significant portion consist of cystic neoplasms, which are estimated to represent 10% to 15% of all primary pancreatic cystic lesions.8 Given the growing clinical relevance of these tumors, a keen understanding of their natural history and pathophysiology is needed. This article reviews pancreatic cystic neoplasms, with a focus on the challenges encountered in their diagnosis and treatment. PMID:20159515

  10. Managing incidental pancreatic cystic neoplasms with integrated molecular pathology is a cost-effective strategy.

    PubMed

    Das, Ananya; Brugge, William; Mishra, Girish; Smith, Dennis M; Sachdev, Mankanwal; Ellsworth, Eric

    2015-10-01

    Current guidelines recommend using endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) testing and cytology to manage incidental pancreatic cystic neoplasms (PCN); however, studies suggest a strategy including integrated molecular pathology (IMP) of cyst fluid may further aid in predicting risk of malignancy. Here, we evaluate several strategies for diagnosing and managing asymptomatic PCN using healthcare economic modeling. A third-party-payer perspective Markov decision model examined four management strategies in a hypothetical cohort of 1000 asymptomatic patients incidentally found to have a 3 cm solitary pancreatic cystic lesion. Strategy I used cross-sectional imaging, recommended surgery only if symptoms or risk factors emerged. Strategy II considered patients for resection without initial EUS. Strategy III (EUS + CEA + Cytology) referred only those with mucinous cysts (CEA > 192 ng/mL) for resection. Strategy IV implemented IMP; a commercially available panel provided a "Benign," "Mucinous," or "Aggressive" classification based on the level of mutational change in cyst fluid. "Benign" and "Mucinous" patients were followed with surveillance; "Aggressive" patients were referred for resection. Quality-adjusted life-years (QALY), relative risk with 95 %CI, Number Needed to Treat (NNT), and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were calculated. Strategy IV provided the greatest increase in QALY at nearly identical cost to the cheapest approach, Strategy I. Relative risk of malignancy compared to the current standard of care and nearest competing strategy, Strategy III, was 0.18 (95 %CI 0.06 - 0.53) with an NNT of 56 (95 %CI 34 - 120). Use of IMP was the most cost-effective strategy, supporting its routine clinical use.

  11. Are the Sendai and Fukuoka consensus guidelines for cystic mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas useful in the initial triage of all suspected pancreatic cystic neoplasms? A single-institution experience with 317 surgically-treated patients.

    PubMed

    Goh, Brian K P; Tan, Damien M Y; Thng, Choon-Hua; Lee, Ser-Yee; Low, Albert S C; Chan, Chung-Yip; Wong, Jen-San; Lee, Victor T W; Cheow, Peng-Chung; Chow, Pierce K H; Chung, Alexander Y F; Wong, Wai-Keong; Ooi, London L P J

    2014-06-01

    The Sendai Consensus Guidelines (SCG) were formulated in 2006 and updated in Fukuoka in 2012 (FCG) to guide management of cystic mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas. This study aims to evaluate the clinical utility of the SCG and FCG in the initial triage of all suspected pancreatic cystic neoplasms. Overall, 317 surgically-treated patients with a suspected pancreatic cystic neoplasm were classified according to the SCG as high risk (HR(SCG)) and low risk (LR(SCG)), and according to the FCG as high risk (HR(FCG)), worrisome (W(FCG)), and low risk (LR(FCG)). Cystic lesions of the pancreas (CLP) were classified as potentially malignant/malignant or benign according to the final pathology. The presence of symptoms, proximal lesions with obstructive jaundice, elevated serum carcinoembryonic antigen/carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CEA/CA 19-9), size ≥3 cm, presence of solid component, main pancreatic duct dilatation, thickened enhancing walls, and change in ductal caliber with distal atrophy were predictive of a potentially malignant/malignant CLP on univariate analyses. The positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of HR(SCG) and HR(ICG2012) for a potentially malignant/malignant lesion was 67 and 88 %, and 88 and 92.5 %, respectively. There were no malignant lesions in both LR groups but some potentially malignant lesions such as cystic pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms with uncertain behavior were classified as LR. The updated FCG was superior to the SCG for the initial triage of all suspected pancreatic cystic neoplasms. CLP in the LR(FCG) group can be safely managed conservatively, and those in the HR(FCG) group should undergo resection.

  12. A novel distinguishing system for the diagnosis of malignant pancreatic cystic neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiaoyong; Lu, Di; Xu, Xiao; Wang, Jianguo; Wu, Jian; Yan, Sheng; Zheng, Shu-sen

    2013-11-01

    To explore a simple and reliable non-invasive distinguishing system for the pre-operative evaluation of malignancy in pancreatic cystic neoplasm (PCN). This study first enrolled an observation cohort of 102 consecutive PCN patients. Demographic information, results of laboratory examinations, and computed tomography (CT) presentations were recorded and analyzed to achieve a distinguishing model/system for malignancy. A group of 21 patients was then included to validate the model/system prospectively. Based on the 11 malignancy-related features identified by univariate analysis, a distinguishing model for malignancy in PCN was established by multivariate analysis: PCN malignant score=2.967 × elevated fasting blood glucose (FBG) (≥6.16 mmol/L) ± 4.496 × asymmetrically thickened wall (or mural nodules ≥ 4 mm) ± 1.679 × septum thickening (≥2 mm)-5.134. With the optimal cut-off value selected as -2.8 in reference to the Youden index, the proposed system for malignant PCN was established: septum thickening (>2 mm), asymmetrically thickened wall (or mural nodules>4 mm), or elevated FBG (>6.16 mmol/L, accompanying commonly known malignant signs), the presence of at least one of these 3 features indicated malignancy in PCN. The accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of this system were 81.4%, 95.8% and 76.9%, respectively. MRI was performed on 32 patients, making correct prediction of malignancy explicitly in only 68.8% (22/32). The subsequent prospective validation study showed that the proposed distinguishing system had a predictive accuracy of 85.7% (18/21). Moreover, a higher model score, or aggregation of the features in the proposed system, indicated a higher grade of malignancy (carcinoma) in PCN. Elevated FBG (>6.16 mmol/L), asymmetrically thickened wall (or mural nodules>4 mm) and septum thickening (>2 mm) are of great value in differentiating the malignancy in PCN. The developed distinguishing system is reliable in the diagnosis of malignant PCN

  13. Cystic jejunal duplication with Heinrich’s type I ectopic pancreas, incidentally discovered in a patient with pancreatic tail neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Gurzu, Simona; Bara Jr, Tivadar; Bara, Tivadar; Fetyko, Annamaria; Jung, Ioan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to present a case of enteric duplication cyst and criteria for a proper differential diagnosis. A 51-year-old male was hospitalized for pancreatic tail neoplasm and distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy was performed. During surgery, a jejunal cystic lesion was incidentally detected and jejunectomy was performed. Microscopically, the cyst was observed to be covered by Keratin 7/Keratin 20 positive intestinal type epithelium and the muscularis layer was shared by the cyst and adjacent jejunum, without a cleavage plane between the cyst wall and jejunal muscularis propria. In the deep muscularis propria, a Heinrich’s type I ectopic pancreas was also noted. In the pancreatic tail, a low grade intraepithelial lesion (panIN-1a) was diagnosed. This case highlights the necessity for a correct differential diagnosis of such rare lesions. Roughly 30 cases of jejunal duplication cysts have been reported to date in the PubMed database. PMID:27672644

  14. In vivo identification of pancreatic cystic neoplasms with needle-based confocal laser endomicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tsujino, Takeshi; Yan-Lin Huang, Jason; Nakai, Yosuke; Samarasena, Jason B; Lee, John G; Chang, Kenneth J

    2015-08-01

    Pancreatic cystic lesions (PCLs) are increasingly identified with the widespread use of imaging modalities. The precise diagnosis of PCLs remains a challenge despite the use of CT, MRI, and EUS-FNA. Confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) is a new endoscopic imaging modality that provides real-time, very high magnification images. A smaller CLE probe, which can be passed through a 19-gauge FNA needle, is now available. Needle-based CLE during EUS has recently been examined to evaluate PLCs, and the specific criteria of nCLE for the diagnosis of PLCs have been proposed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A case of mucinous cystic neoplasm of the pancreas misdiagnosed as a pancreatic pseudocyst at the initial exam and resected after a 2-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Takuya; Haruta, Jun-Ichi; Yamaguchi, Takeo; Doisaki, Masao; Yama, Tsuyoki; Murate, Kentarou; Hattori, Shun; Hayakawa, Fumihiro; Yamada, Kenta; Yashika, Jun

    2015-04-01

    A 44-year-old woman was referred to our hospital because of a cystic lesion in the pancreatic body that was found by computed tomography (CT) as a result of a screening for impaired liver function after the patient presented with a high fever in 2011. Trans-abdominal ultrasonography (US) revealed a 33-mm unilocular cyst within the pancreatic body and a 5-mm hypoechoic mass in the pancreatic neck. Contrast-enhanced CT showed a slight enhancement around the cyst and a mild dilation of the main pancreatic duct, but neither septum nor nodule was detected inside. Contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasonography (CE-EUS) revealed a hyperechoic elevated lesion inside the cystic lesion without enhancement in the pancreatic body; CE-EUS also revealed a 5-mm homogeneous hypoechoic mass with a remarkable enhancement in the pancreatic neck with the use of Sonazoid(®) as a contrast medium. These lesions were diagnosed as a pancreatic pseudocyst and a neuroendocrine tumor (NET), respectively, and were followed up with periodic examinations. The cystic lesion showed contraction 6 months after the initial exam. However, US revealed an enlargement of the cystic lesion to 40 mm in diameter 2 years after the initial exam, and EUS showed irregular thickening of the wall with a cyst-in-cyst appearance. The diagnoses of a mucinous cystic neoplasm (MCN) and a concomitant small NET were made after a distal pancreatectomy. We herein report a rare case of MCN that showed various morphological changes over 2 years of observation.

  16. Spectrum and Classification of Cystic Neoplasms of the Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Greer, Jonathan B; Ferrone, Cristina R

    2016-04-01

    As patients are living longer and axial imaging is more widespread, increasing numbers of cystic neoplasms of the pancreas are found. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms and mucinous cystic neoplasms are the most common. The revised Sendai guidelines provide a safe algorithm for expectant management of certain cystic neoplasms; however, studies are ongoing to identify further subgroups that can be treated nonoperatively. For those patients with high-risk clinical features or symptoms, surgical resection can be performed safely at high-volume pancreatic centers. Accurate diagnosis is critical for accurate decision making.

  17. Overview of the clinical problem: facts and current issues of mucinous cystic neoplasms of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Jeurnink, S M; Vleggaar, F P; Siersema, P D

    2008-11-01

    Pancreatic cystic lesions are uncommon and consist of pseudocysts, congenital cysts and cystic neoplasms including mucinous cystic neoplasms, intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms and serous cystic neoplasms. Mucinous cystic neoplasms are large septated cysts without connection to the ductal system, characterised by the presence of thick-walled ovarian-type stroma and mucin. They occur predominantly in women and often are malignant. Therefore, surgical resection is recommended. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms are neoplasms with tall, columnar, mucin-containing epithelium involving the main pancreatic ducts or major side branches. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms occur in men and women in their 60s and 70s and may differentiate into malignant neoplasms. Therefore, surgical resection is mandatory. Serous cystic neoplasms appear as multiple cysts lined with cubic flat epithelium containing glycogen-rich cells with clear cytoplasm. They mainly occur in women in their 50s and are generally benign. Therefore, a conservative approach is recommended. As both mucinous cystic neoplasm and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms have a high malignant potential, it is important to differentiate between the various pancreatic cystic lesions. Several imaging techniques and tumour markers have been evaluated. Nonetheless, definitive guidelines to differentiate between serous cystic neoplasms, mucinous cystic neoplasms and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms are still poorly defined. A number of management issues regarding these neoplasms are still under debate, for example which imaging technique to use, differentiation between malignant or benign lesions and the preferred treatment modality for each pancreatic cystic neoplasm. Further research may lead to a definitive guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of mucinous cystic neoplasms, intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms and serous cystic neoplasms.

  18. Cystic Lesions in Autoimmune Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Gompertz, Macarena; Morales, Claudia; Aldana, Hernán; Castillo, Jaime; Berger, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) can be chronic or recurrent, but frequently completely reversible after steroid treatment. A cystic lesion in AIP is a rare finding, and it can mimic a pancreatic cystic neoplasm. Difficulties in an exact diagnosis interfere with treatment, and surgery cannot be avoided in some cases. We report the history of a 63-year-old male presenting with jaundice and pruritus. AIP was confirmed by imaging and elevated IgG4 blood levels, and the patient completely recovered after corticosteroid therapy. One year later, he presented with a recurrent episode of AIP with elevated IgG4 levels, accompanied by the appearance of multiple intrapancreatic cystic lesions. All but 1 of these cysts disappeared after steroid treatment, but the remaining cyst in the pancreatic head was even somewhat larger 1 year later. Pancreatoduodenectomy was finally performed. Histology showed the wall of the cystic lesion to be fibrotic; the surrounding pancreatic tissue presented fibrosis, atrophy and lymphoplasmacytic infiltration by IgG4-positive cells, without malignant elements. Our case illustrates the rare possibility that cystic lesions can be part of AIP. These pseudocysts appear in the pancreatic segments involved in the autoimmune disease and can be a consequence of the local inflammation or related to ductal strictures. Steroid treatment should be initiated, after which these cysts can completely disappear with recovery from AIP. Surgical intervention may be necessary in some exceptional cases.

  19. Evaluation of the 2015 AGA guidelines on pancreatic cystic neoplasms in a large surgically confirmed multicenter cohort

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Phillip S.; Muthusamy, V. Raman; Gaddam, Srinivas; Jaiyeola, Diana-Marie; Kim, Stephen; Sedarat, Alireza; Donahue, Timothy R.; Hosford, Lindsay; Wilson, Robert H.; Grande, David P.; Keswani, Rajesh N.; Kushnir, Vladimir M.; Mullady, Daniel; Edmundowicz, Steven A.; Early, Dayna S.; Komanduri, Srinadh; Wani, Sachin; Watson, Rabindra R.

    2017-01-01

    Absract Background and study aims The American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) recently published guidelines for the management of asymptomatic pancreatic cystic neoplasms (PCNs). We aimed to evaluate the diagnostic characteristics of the AGA guidelines in appropriately recommending surgery for malignant PCNs. Patients and methods A retrospective multicenter study was performed of patients who underwent endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) for evaluation of PCNs who ultimately underwent surgical resection from 2004 – 2014. Demographics, EUS characteristics, fine-needle aspiration (FNA) results, type of resection, and final pathologic diagnosis were recorded. Patients were categorized into 2 groups (surgery or surveillance) based on what the AGA guidelines would have recommended. Performance characteristics for the diagnosis of cancer or high-grade dysplasia (HGD) on surgical pathology were calculated. Results Three hundred patients underwent surgical resection for PCNs, of whom the AGA guidelines would have recommended surgery in 121 (40.3 %) and surveillance in 179 (59.7 %) patients. Among patients recommended for surgery, 45 (37.2 %) had cancer, whereas 76 (62.8 %) had no cancer/HGD. Among patients recommended for surveillance, 170 (95.0 %) had no cancer/HGD; however, 9 (5.0 %) patients had cancer that would have been missed. For the finding of cancer/HGD on surgical pathology, the AGA guidelines had 83.3 % sensitivity (95 % CI 70.7 – 92.1), 69.1 % specificity (95 % CI 62.9 – 74.8), 37.2 % positive predictive value (95 % CI 28.6 – 46.4), 95.0 % negative predictive value (95 % CI 90.7 – 97.7), and 71.7 % accuracy (95 % CI 67.4 – 74.6). Conclusions The 2015 AGA guidelines would have resulted in 60 % fewer patients being referred for surgical resection, and accurately recommended surveillance in 95 % of patients with asymptomatic PCNs. Future prospective studies are required to validate

  20. Evaluation of the 2015 AGA guidelines on pancreatic cystic neoplasms in a large surgically confirmed multicenter cohort.

    PubMed

    Ge, Phillip S; Muthusamy, V Raman; Gaddam, Srinivas; Jaiyeola, Diana-Marie; Kim, Stephen; Sedarat, Alireza; Donahue, Timothy R; Hosford, Lindsay; Wilson, Robert H; Grande, David P; Keswani, Rajesh N; Kushnir, Vladimir M; Mullady, Daniel; Edmundowicz, Steven A; Early, Dayna S; Komanduri, Srinadh; Wani, Sachin; Watson, Rabindra R

    2017-03-01

    Background and study aims The American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) recently published guidelines for the management of asymptomatic pancreatic cystic neoplasms (PCNs). We aimed to evaluate the diagnostic characteristics of the AGA guidelines in appropriately recommending surgery for malignant PCNs. Patients and methods A retrospective multicenter study was performed of patients who underwent endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) for evaluation of PCNs who ultimately underwent surgical resection from 2004 - 2014. Demographics, EUS characteristics, fine-needle aspiration (FNA) results, type of resection, and final pathologic diagnosis were recorded. Patients were categorized into 2 groups (surgery or surveillance) based on what the AGA guidelines would have recommended. Performance characteristics for the diagnosis of cancer or high-grade dysplasia (HGD) on surgical pathology were calculated. Results Three hundred patients underwent surgical resection for PCNs, of whom the AGA guidelines would have recommended surgery in 121 (40.3 %) and surveillance in 179 (59.7 %) patients. Among patients recommended for surgery, 45 (37.2 %) had cancer, whereas 76 (62.8 %) had no cancer/HGD. Among patients recommended for surveillance, 170 (95.0 %) had no cancer/HGD; however, 9 (5.0 %) patients had cancer that would have been missed. For the finding of cancer/HGD on surgical pathology, the AGA guidelines had 83.3 % sensitivity (95 % CI 70.7 - 92.1), 69.1 % specificity (95 % CI 62.9 - 74.8), 37.2 % positive predictive value (95 % CI 28.6 - 46.4), 95.0 % negative predictive value (95 % CI 90.7 - 97.7), and 71.7 % accuracy (95 % CI 67.4 - 74.6). Conclusions The 2015 AGA guidelines would have resulted in 60 % fewer patients being referred for surgical resection, and accurately recommended surveillance in 95 % of patients with asymptomatic PCNs. Future prospective studies are required to validate these guidelines

  1. Serum Carbohydrate Antigen 19-9 in Differential Diagnosis of Benign and Malignant Pancreatic Cystic Neoplasms: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Shaobo; Hu, Ya; Gao, Xiang; Liao, Quan; Zhao, Yupei

    2016-01-01

    Background Using serum carbohydrate antigen 19–9 (CA 19–9) in discriminating between benign and malignant pancreatic disease remains controversial. We aim to evaluate the diagnostic value of serum CA 19–9 in predicting malignant pancreatic cystic lesions. Methods Eligible studies were identified through searching MEDLINE and EMBASE prior to March 2016. Studies were assessed for quality using the Quality Assessment for Studies of Diagnostic Accuracy, 2nd version (QUADAS-2). Pooled sensitivity and specificity with 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated using random-effects models. Summary receiver operator characteristic (SROC) curves and the area under curve (AUC) were performed. Results A total of thirteen studies including 1437 patients were enrolled in this meta-analysis. The pooled sensitivity and specificity were 0.47(95% CI: 0.35–0.59), and 0.88(95% CI: 0.86–0.91), respectively, and the AUC was 0.87(95% CI, 0.84–0.90). Meta-regression analysis showed that sample size, region and reference standards were not the main sources of heterogeneity. Conclusions Serum CA 19–9 has satisfying pooled specificity while poor pooled sensitivity for discriminating benign from malignant PCNs. It deserves to be widely used as complementary to other clinical diagnostic methods. PMID:27835676

  2. Cystic precursors to invasive pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Matthaei, Hanno; Schulick, Richard D.; Hruban, Ralph H.; Maitra, Anirban

    2011-01-01

    Improvements in the sensitivity and quality of cross-sectional imaging have led to increasing numbers of patients being diagnosed with cystic lesions of the pancreas. In parallel, clinical, radiological, pathological and molecular studies have improved the systems for classifying these cysts. Patients with asymptomatic serous cystic neoplasms can be managed conservatively with regular monitoring; however, the clinical management of patients with intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms and mucinous cystic neoplasms is far more challenging, as it is difficult to determine whether these lesions will progress to malignancy. Fortunately, prospective studies have helped to establish that proposed clinical and radiological criteria (the Sendai guidelines) can be used to guide the care of patients with cystic lesions of the pancreas. Despite this progress in imaging and clinical guidelines, sensitive and specific tests have not yet been developed that can reliably predict the histology and biological properties of a cystic lesion. Such biomarkers are urgently needed, as noninvasive precursors of pancreatic cancer are curable, while the vast majority of invasive pancreatic adenocarcinomas are not. PMID:21383670

  3. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas with concurrent pancreatic and periampullary neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Sahora, K; Crippa, S; Zamboni, G; Ferrone, C; Warshaw, A L; Lillemoe, K; Mino-Kenudson, M; Falconi, M; Fernandez-del Castillo, C

    2016-02-01

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN) have been reported to be associated with concurrent, distinct pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (con-PDAC) in about 8% (range, 4-10%) of resected branch duct (BD) lesions. In addition, other pancreatic and ampullary tumors are occasionally diagnosed with IPMN in patients undergoing pancreatic surgery. The objective of this study is to describe the prevalence, clinicopathologic characteristics and prognosis of IPMN with concurrent pancreatic and ampullary neoplasms, especially con-PDAC. The combined databases of pancreatic resections from the Massachusetts General Hospital and the Negrar Hospital, Italy, were analyzed for patients who had been diagnosed with IPMN and concurrent pancreatic or ampullary neoplasms. 2762 patients underwent pancreatic surgery from January 2000 to December 2012. Sixteen percent (n = 441) had pathologically confirmed IPMN and 11% of these (n = 50) had a different distinct synchronous pancreatic neoplasm. The majority of these, 62%, were con-PDAC, followed by neuroendocrine neoplasms (10%) and ampullary carcinoma (10%). Less frequently, mucinous (6%) as well as serous cystic neoplasms (6%), adenosquamous carcinoma (4%) and distal bile duct cancer (2%) were diagnosed. Among all patients with synchronous neoplasms, 66% harbored BD-IPMN, 28% combined IPMN and 6% main duct IPMN. Abdominal pain and/or jaundice were the leading symptoms in half of patients. IPMN, mainly BD-IPMN, are associated with con-PDAC in about 7% of patients and account for 62% of all concurrent pancreatic/ampullary neoplasms. Other synchronous neoplasms may be found sporadically with IPMN without a suspected association. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. [Ultrasonography of pancreatic neoplasms].

    PubMed

    Innocenti, P; Falchini, M; Stecco, A

    1999-01-01

    Pancreatic tumors are the fourth cause of death in Occident: the 5-year-survival rate is less than 5% because of diagnostic difficulties, low clinical expression at early stage, and complexity of the surgical treatment. The role of ultrasound (US) is in early diagnosis, because also in early cancer there could be lymphatic spread or peritoneal involvement. There are multiple modalities to study the pancreas with US: abdominal US, "contact" US (endosonography and intra-operative or laparoscopic US). The first is not invasive, cheap but limited by extrinsic and intrinsic factors, the latter are respectively characterized by high cost, and need of endoscopic specialists for endosonography, the complementarity to laparoscopy or surgery for the laparoscopic/intraoperative US. Abdominal US is the first diagnostic step for the pancreas, but it is not affordable in 15-25% of patients, because of meteorism. In all the other cases, it represents the pancreas with a good contrast between the normal parenchyma and tumoral tissues. Abdominal US, together with biopsy, can define the resectability. Ecoendoscopy is actually dedicated to small tumors staging, but recent studies demonstrate the same results achieved by spiral TC. Laparoscopic US is a second step imaging in patients already selected for surgery. The first finality in US evaluation of tumor masses is early diagnosis of pancreatic cancer; it can give to some of these patients the opportunity of undergoing to surgical treatment. This could be achieved by a proper use of the moititude of ultrasonic abdominal explorations that are requested in daily practice. US, together with CT and MR, can define the resectability of the tumor, with further supplementar evaluation by mean of laparoscopic US. Intraoperative US is now indicated for planning and guiding the surgeon in resection of the pancreatic cancer.

  5. Hemosuccus pancreaticus caused by a mucinous cystic neoplasm of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Yuri; Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Fukuya, Akira; Nakamura, Fumika; Goji, Takahiro; Kitamura, Shinji; Kimura, Tetsuo; Okamoto, Koichi; Sogabe, Masahiro; Muguruma, Naoki; Shimada, Mitsuo; Bando, Yoshimi; Takayama, Tetsuji

    2017-04-01

    Hemosuccus pancreaticus is a gastrointestinal hemorrhage through the main pancreatic duct. Here, we report a rare case of hemosuccus pancreaticus due to a mucinous cystic neoplasm of the pancreas. A 62-year-old woman who had been followed for a branch duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm visited our emergency room due to severe abdominal pain and bloody discharge. Computed tomography revealed that the pancreatic cyst increased the tension of the wall and a high-density area indicative of bleeding into the cyst was observed. Endoscopy showed opening of and hemorrhaging from the papilla of Vater. The patient was diagnosed with hemosuccus pancreaticus caused by hemorrhaging into the cyst from the branch duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm. Based on this diagnosis, elective distal pancreatectomy was performed. The histopathological diagnosis was a mucinous cystic neoplasm with intermediate-grade dysplasia based upon the pathological findings that fibrous ovarian-type stroma existed abundantly and the stroma cells were positive for progesterone receptor and inhibin. Hemosuccus pancreaticus caused by a mucinous cystic neoplasm is extremely rare and there has been only one case reported to date. In conclusion, it should be recognized that pancreatic cystic neoplasms including mucinous cystic neoplasms may cause hemosuccus pancreaticus.

  6. Serous cystic neoplasms of the pancreas: clinicopathologic and molecular characteristics.

    PubMed

    Reid, Michelle D; Choi, Hyejeong; Balci, Serdar; Akkas, Gizem; Adsay, Volkan

    2014-11-01

    We herein summarize the pathology and most recent advances in the molecular genetics of serous cystic neoplasms of the pancreas. They typically present as relatively large, well-demarcated tumors (mean size, 6cm), predominantly occurring in females. Pre-operative diagnosis remains challenging; imaging findings and cyst fluid analysis often prove non-specific and fine-needle aspiration often does not yield diagnostic cells. Pathologically, they are characterized by a distinctive cytology referred to as "serous." Although they have ductal differentiation, they distinctly lack the mucin production that characterizes most other pancreatic ductal tumors, including ductal adenocarcinoma and its variants, intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) and mucinous cystic neoplasm (MCN). They instead produce abundant glycogen (glycogen-rich adenoma). Serous cystadenomas also lack the molecular alterations that characterize ductal neoplasms, such as mutation of KRAS (high prevalence in most mucinous ductal neoplasms), inactivation of SMAD4 (seen in ductal adenocarcinomas), and mutations in GNAS (seen in some IPMNs) and RNF43 (detected in MCNs and IPMNs). Instead, new molecular and immunohistochemical observations place serous pancreatic tumors closer to "clear cell neoplasms" seen in various other organs that are associated with the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) pathway, such as clear cell renal cell carcinomas and capillary hemangioblastomas. Patients with VHL syndrome have an increased risk of developing serous pancreatic tumors and somatic mutations of the VHL gene are common in these tumors along with modification of its downstream effectors including hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF1), glucose uptake and transporter-1 (GLUT-1), a common factor in clear cell (glycogen-rich) tumors, as well as expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), thought to be a factor in the striking capillarization of serous cystadenomas and other non-pancreatic clear cell tumors. VEGF may

  7. Advanced endoscopic ultrasound management techniques for preneoplastic pancreatic cystic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Arshad, Hafiz Muhammad Sharjeel; Bharmal, Sheila; Duman, Deniz Guney; Liangpunsakul, Suthat; Turner, Brian G

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cystic lesions can be benign, premalignant or malignant. The recent increase in detection and tremendous clinical variability of pancreatic cysts has presented a significant therapeutic challenge to physicians. Mucinous cystic neoplasms are of particular interest given their known malignant potential. This review article provides a brief but comprehensive review of premalignant pancreatic cystic lesions with advanced endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) management approaches. A comprehensive literature search was performed using PubMed, Cochrane, OVID and EMBASE databases. Preneoplastic pancreatic cystic lesions include mucinous cystadenoma and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm. The 2012 International Sendai Guidelines guide physicians in their management of pancreatic cystic lesions. Some of the advanced EUS management techniques include ethanol ablation, chemotherapeutic (paclitaxel) ablation, radiofrequency ablation and cryotherapy. In future, EUS-guided injections of drug-eluting beads and neodymium:yttrium aluminum agent laser ablation is predicted to be an integral part of EUS-guided management techniques. In summary, International Sendai Consensus Guidelines should be used to make a decision regarding management of pancreatic cystic lesions. Advanced EUS techniques are proving extremely beneficial in management, especially in those patients who are at high surgical risk. PMID:27574295

  8. Pancreatic solid cystic desmoid tumor: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bin; Zhu, Ling-Hua; Wu, Jia-Guo; Wang, Xian-Fa; Matro, Erik; Ni, Jun-Jun

    2013-12-14

    Desmoid tumors (DTs) are nonmetastatic, locally aggressive neoplasms with a high rate of postoperative recurrence. Pancreatic DTs are especially rare; only a few cases have been reported to date. This paper describes a case of a sporadic cystic DT of the pancreas managed successfully with central pancreatectomy, with no signs of recurrence 40 mo after surgery. According to the literature, this is the first reported case in China of a pancreatic DT presenting as a solid cystic lesion, as well as the first pancreatic DT managed with central pancreatectomy and pancreaticogastrostomy. We report the case for its rarity and emphasize disease management by concerted application of clinical, pathological, radiological and immunohistochemical analyses.

  9. Cystic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: To date a diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Caglià, Pietro; Cannizzaro, Maria Teresa; Tracia, Angelo; Amodeo, Luca; Tracia, Luciano; Buffone, Antonino; Amodeo, Corrado; Cannizzaro, Matteo Angelo

    2015-09-01

    Cystic PNETs are an uncommon neoplasms increasingly detected in current clinical practice which often present a diagnostic challenges to both the experienced radiologist and pathologist. The aim of this study was to review the available literature to summarize current data that compare and evaluate both the clinical and pathologic features of cystic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. A systematic review of the current literature was performed using the search engines EMBASE and PubMed to identify all studies reporting on cystic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. The MeSH search terms used were "cystic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors", "endocrine neoplasms", and "pancreatic cysts". Multiple combinations of the keywords and MeSH terms were used. The clinical evaluation of cystic pancreatic lesions appears to suffer from same limitations despite the improvement in the diagnostic tools. Subsequently, we highlight diagnostic pitfalls and differential diagnosis of these cystic tumors. In this review we discuss current advances in the application of the imaging modalities and characteristics features with special emphasize on endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), and EUS guide fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA). Cystic neuroendocrine tumor in the pancreas underlines the clinical impact of endoscopic ultrasound in the work-up of patients with unclear lesions in the pancreas. EUS-FNA cytology and cyst fluid analysis is a useful adjunct to abdominal imaging for the diagnosis of pancreatic cystic lesions. Due to the evident diagnostic difficulties, we hypothesize that cyst fluid characteristics, including cytomorphological features, is the most accurate test to achieve a preoperative diagnosis and to provide a basis for prognostic prediction. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Overview of the investigation and management of cystic neoplasms of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Spence, Robert A J; Dasari, Bobby; Love, Mark; Kelly, Barry; Taylor, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Cystic neoplasms of the pancreas contribute to 10-20% of pancreatic tumours. Malignant cystic tumours of the pancreas behave similar to adenocarcinomas and thus warrant aggressive management. However, certain benign cystic neoplasms do not require operative intervention. It is, therefore, important to differentiate benign lesions from malignant lesions and from those with malignant potential. To provide an overview of the role of radiological investigations in the management of cystic neoplasms of the pancreas, with emphasis on the characteristic features of aggressive tumours. The role of different imaging modalities is discussed, and an investigative algorithm suggested. A literature review was carried out on Medline, Cochrane library, and PubMed using the MeSH terms 'pancreas' and 'cysts' to source relevant papers. Search criteria were limited to English literature, meta-analyses, systematic reviews, prospective and retrospective case series, published during or after 1998. Each pancreatic cystic lesion has characteristic radiological findings. However, the diagnostic accuracy of individual imaging techniques is still limited. A combination of imaging modalities is essential for preoperative diagnosis. CT complemented by endoscopic ultrasound and cyst fluid analysis appears to be the most promising investigation in diagnosing cystic neoplasms. Follow-up with serial imaging is useful for lesions of uncertain aetiology. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Pathological and Molecular Evaluation of Pancreatic Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Rishi, Arvind; Goggins, Michael; Wood, Laura D.; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic neoplasms are morphologically and genetically heterogeneous and include wide variety of neoplasms ranging from benign to malignant with an extremely poor clinical outcome. Our understanding of these pancreatic neoplasms has improved significantly with recent advances in cancer sequencing. Awareness of molecular pathogenesis brings in new opportunities for early detection, improved prognostication, and personalized gene-specific therapies. Here we review the pathological classification of pancreatic neoplasms from their molecular and genetic perspective. All of the major tumor types that arise in the pancreas have been sequenced, and a new classification that incorporates molecular findings together with pathological findings is now possible (Table 1). This classification has significant implications for our understanding of why tumors aggregate in some families, for the development of early detection tests, and for the development of personalized therapies for patients with established cancers. Here we describe this new classification using the framework of the standard histological classification. PMID:25726050

  12. Chronic pancreatitis and cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Witt, H

    2003-01-01

    Recent discoveries of trypsinogen and trypsin inhibitor mutations in patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP) support the hypothesis that an inappropriate activation of pancreatic zymogens to active enzymes within the pancreatic parenchyma starts the inflammatory process. Current data suggest that CP may be inherited dominant, recessive, or complex as a result of mutations in the above mentioned or yet unidentified genes. Evaluation of patients with CP should include genetic testing. Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene and is characterised by pancreatic insufficiency and chronic bronchopulmonary infection. The progression and severity of pulmonary disease differs considerably between people with identical CFTR mutations and does not seem to correlate with the type or class of the CFTR mutation. The identification of further disease modifying genetic factors will increase the pathophysiological understanding and may help to identify new therapeutic targets. PMID:12651880

  13. Pathology and Molecular Genetics of Pancreatic Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Laura D.; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is fundamentally a genetic disease caused by the ac cumulation of somatic mutations in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. In the last decade, rapid advances in sequencing and bioinformatic technology led to an explosion in sequencing studies of cancer genomes, greatly expanding our knowledge of the genetic changes underlying a variety of tumor types. Several of these studies of cancer genomes have focused on pancreatic neoplasms, and cancers from the pancreas are some of the best characterized tumors at the genetic level. Pancreatic neoplasms encompass a wide array of clinical diseases, from benign cysts to deadly cancers, and the genetic alterations underlying neoplasms of the pancreas are similarly diverse. This new knowledge of pancreatic cancer genomes has deepened our understanding of tumorigenesis in the pancreas and has opened several promising new avenues for novel diagnostics and therapeutics. PMID:23187835

  14. Immunohistochemical analysis of steroidogenic enzymes in ovarian-type stroma of pancreatic mucinous cystic neoplasms: Comparative study of subepithelial stromal cells in intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Kazuyuki; Sasano, Hironobu; Moriya, Takuya; Takahashi, Yayoi; Sugimoto, Ryo; Mue, Yoshiharu; Murakami, Keigo; Fujishima, Fumiyoshi; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Morikawa, Takanori; Motoi, Fuyuhiko; Suzuki, Takashi; Unno, Michiaki; Sugai, Tamotsu

    2016-05-01

    Mucinous cystic neoplasms (MCNs) are generally defined as cyst-forming epithelial neoplasms that arise in the pancreas and harbor characteristic ovarian-type stroma beneath the epithelium. In this study, we compared the immunoreactivity of steroid-related factors in these subepithelial stromal cells in MCNs to those in intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) to further characterize this unique MCN ovarian-type stroma through evaluation of sex steroid biosynthesis. Twenty MCNs and twenty IPMNs were examined. Immunoreactivity of steroid hormone receptors, including estrogen receptor (ERα and ERβ), progesterone receptor (PR, PR-A, and PR-B), and androgen receptor (AR), was more frequently detected in MCN ovarian-type stromal cells than in IPMN stromal cells (P < 0.01). The H-scores (mean ± SD) of steroidogenic factor (SF)-1 were also significantly higher in MCNs (112.3 ± 33.1) than in IPMNs (0.9 ± 1.2) (P < 0.01). The steroidogenic enzymes cytochrome P450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc), cytochrome P450 17 alpha-hydroxylase (P450c17) and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD) showed immunoreactivity in 9/20 (45.0 %), 15/20 (75.0 %) and 13/20 (65.0 %), respectively, of ovarian-type stroma from MCN cases. These results demonstrate that the ovarian-type stroma of MCNs can express steroidogenic enzymes. Thus, the ovarian-type stroma of MCNs can produce sex steroids that may also act on these cells.

  15. Pancreatic Neoplasms in Pregnancy: Diagnosis, Complications, and Management

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Casey A.; Benarroch-Gampel, Jaime; Kilic, Gokhan; Kruse, Edward J.; Weber, Sharon M.; Riall, Taylor S.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Neoplasms of the pancreas during pregnancy are rare, with less than 25 cases of benign and malignant tumors reported in the literature. METHODS We present three unique cases of pancreatic tumors occurring during pregnancy—one mucinous cystic neoplasm and two adenocarcinomas. We review the literature regarding pancreatic neoplasms during pregnancy and discuss the diagnosis, complications, and management of these tumors. RESULTS MRI and ultrasound are the imaging modalities of choice in pregnancy. In patients with benign or premalignant tumors, surgical resection may be postponed until the second trimester. In symptomatic patients, or if there is a concern for intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), urgent surgical intervention should be performed. With malignant tumors, the benefit of delaying surgery must be balanced with the risk of maternal disease progression. Termination of the pregnancy should be discussed when a malignant tumor is diagnosed during the first trimester. Pancreatic tumors diagnosed during the third trimester may be resected after delivery. If malignant, early delivery of the fetus and subsequent maternal operation can be considered at appropriate fetal maturity. CONCLUSION When these tumors occur during pregnancy, they present a diagnostic and treatment dilemma, with variation in treatment based on gestational age and patient preference. PMID:22160782

  16. [Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm and recurrent pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Gálvez, Eduardo; Gálvez, Gustavo; Barboza, Aurelio; Barboza, Eduardo; Combe, Juan Manuel; Combe, Mario R; Combe, Juan; Arias Stella C, Javier; Arias Stella, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Ohashi described for the first time the IPMN on 1982 as a pancreatic neoplasia with mucine cells forming papillae and producing dilatation of the main pancreatic duct or its branches. The IPMN represent the 1% of the pancreatic tumors and 5% of the cystic neoplasias. It is potentially malignant in a period of five years being more frequent in males between 60-70 and clinically these patients' presents as acute, recurrent or chronic pancreatitis, with an incidence of malignancy from 25% to 70%. CT scan and cholangio MRI allows the diagnosis, the variety, localization and possibility of determine malignancy. The treatment is the Whipple resection. We are reporting the case of an obese middle age male, being observed along the last 10 years because of recurrent pancreatitis with a cystic lesion of the head of the pancreas. The CT scan, endoscopic-ultrasound and the analysis of the liquid content suggested a mucinous lesion, reason why the patient underwent a pancreatic-duodenal resection. The histology study confirms the diagnosis of IPMN.

  17. Surgical and molecular pathology of pancreatic neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Hackeng, Wenzel M; Hruban, Ralph H; Offerhaus, G Johan A; Brosens, Lodewijk A A

    2016-06-07

    Histologic characteristics have proven to be very useful for classifying different types of tumors of the pancreas. As a result, the major tumor types in the pancreas have long been classified based on their microscopic appearance. Recent advances in whole exome sequencing, gene expression profiling, and knowledge of tumorigenic pathways have deepened our understanding of the underlying biology of pancreatic neoplasia. These advances have not only confirmed the traditional histologic classification system, but also opened new doors to early diagnosis and targeted treatment. This review discusses the histopathology, genetic and epigenetic alterations and potential treatment targets of the five major malignant pancreatic tumors - pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor, solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm, acinar cell carcinoma and pancreatoblastoma.

  18. Analysis of clinical characteristics and treatment of pancreatic cystic tumors

    PubMed Central

    You, Lei; Xiao, Jianchun; Cao, Zhe; Zhang, Wanying; Liao, Quan; Dai, Menghua; Zhang, Taiping; Zhao, Yupei

    2016-01-01

    Objective To summarize experience in the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cystic neoplasms. Methods This is a retrospective study of 207 patients who were diagnosed with pancreatic cystic tumors at Peking Union Medical College Hospital between Jan 2009 and Mar 2014. Clinical data, such as clinical manifestations, radiological and pathological images and surgical recordings, were collected. Results Of the 207 included patients, females accounted for 76.81%, and the mean patient age was 52.04 years. Malignancy was more common in older patients who presented with marasmus and jaundice. Other risk factors included solid components in the tumor, a large tumor size, and elevated levels of tumor markers. Surgical treatment was required when a malignant tumor was suspected. The operation approach was selected based on the location, size and characteristics of the tumor. The position of the tumor relative to the pancreatic duct also played a significant role. Conclusions No specific symptoms were observed for the patients with pancreatic cystic tumors. Imaging played an important role in making a differential diagnosis. Furthermore, surgical treatment should be proposed for patients with significant symptoms and potentially malignant tumors. The tumor resection rate is high, suggestive of good prognosis. PMID:27877011

  19. Radiological description of cystic pancreatic tumors.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Torres, C; Larrosa López, R

    2016-01-01

    Although most cystic pancreatic lesions are pseudocysts, it is important to do a thorough differential diagnosis with true cystic tumors because cystic tumors are potentially malignant. Sometimes computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging cannot establish the definitive diagnosis, making it necessary to perform other imaging tests such as endoscopic ultrasound, which in addition to morphological information, can also enable cytologic and biochemical analysis of the lesion through puncture and aspiration of its contents. Combining all these findings nearly always provides enough diagnostic information to allow the appropriate approach in each case. This article describes the specific morphological characteristics for each cystic pancreatic tumor on computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and endoscopic ultrasound and reviews the guidelines for managing these types of lesions.

  20. Pancreatic endocrine neoplasms: Epidemiology and prognosis of pancreatic endocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Halfdanarson, Thorvardur R.; Rubin, Joseph; Farnell, Michael B.; Grant, Clive S.; Petersen, Gloria M.

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatic endocrine neoplasms (PETs) are uncommon tumors with an annual incidence less than 1 per 100,000 persons per year in the general population. PETs that produce hormones resulting in symptoms are designated as functional. The majority of PETs are nonfunctional. Of the functional tumors, insulinomas are the most common, followed by gastrinomas. The clinical course of patients with PETs is variable and depends on the extent of the disease and the treatment rendered. Patients with completely resected tumors generally have a good prognosis, and aggressive surgical therapy in patients with advanced disease may also prolong survival. The epidemiology, prognosis and established and novel prognostic markers of PETs are reviewed. PMID:18508996

  1. Combined laparoscopic spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy and islet autotransplantation for benign pancreatic neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Balzano, Gianpaolo; Carvello, Michele; Piemonti, Lorenzo; Nano, Rita; Ariotti, Riccardo; Mercalli, Alessia; Melzi, Raffaella; Maffi, Paola; Braga, Marco; Staudacher, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the safety and feasibility of laparoscopic spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy (LSPDP) with autologous islet transplantation (AIT) for benign tumors of the pancreatic body-neck. METHODS: Three non-diabetic, female patients (age 37, 44 and 35 years, respectively) were declared candidates for surgery, between May and September 2011, because of pancreatic body/neck cystic lesions. The planned operation was an LSPDP associated with AIT from the normal pancreas distal to the neoplasm. Islets isolation was performed on the residual pancreatic parenchyma after frozen section examination of the margin. Purified autologous islets were infused into the portal vein by a percutaneous transhepatic approach the day after surgery. RESULTS: The procedure was performed successfully in all the three cases, and the spleen was preserved along with its vessels. Mean operation time was 283 ± 52 min and average blood loss was 133 ± 57 mL. Residual pancreas weights were 33, 22 and 30 g, and 105.200, 40.390 and 94.790 islet equivalents were isolated, respectively. Surgical complications occurred in one patient (grade A pancreatic fistula). Postoperative stays were 6, 6 and 7 d, respectively. Histopathological evaluation revealed mucinous cystic neoplasm in cases 1 and 3, and serous cystic neoplasm in patient 2. No postoperative insulin administration was required. One patient developed a transient partial portal thrombosis 2 mo after islet infusion. Patients are insulin independent at a mean follow up of 8 ± 2 mo. CONCLUSION: Combination of LSPDP and AIT is feasible and could be effective to minimize the surgical impact for benign neoplasm of pancreatic body-neck. PMID:24744593

  2. Primary renal carcinoid tumor: A rare cystic renal neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jung-Hee

    2013-01-01

    We present the case of a 21-year-old man with an incidentally detected cystic renal mass. A well-defined, solid mass measuring approximately 8 cm x 6 cm with a cystic component was identified in the left kidney by abdominal multidetector computed tomography (CT) and ultrasonography. The mass was well-enhanced on the corticomedullary CT phase and washout of enhancement occurred on the nephrographic phase. The mass contained peripheral wall and septal calcifications in the cystic component. The lesion was resected and diagnosed as a primary renal carcinoid tumor. Primary carcinoid tumors of the kidney are extremely rare. This case is notable because of the rarity of this neoplasm and its unique radiologic and pathologic findings. A review of previously reported cases in the literature is also presented. PMID:24003360

  3. A case of focal autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) mimicking an intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN).

    PubMed

    Nakaji, So; Hirata, Nobuto; Fujii, Hiroyuki; Iwaki, Kosuke; Shiratori, Toshiyasu; Kobayashi, Masayoshi; Wakasugi, Satoshi; Ishii, Eiji; Takeyama, Hiroyuki; Hoshi, Kazuei

    2013-08-01

    The present case involved a 76-year-old man with a cystic mass in the head of his pancreas. The cystic lesion, which measured 17.7 × 9.8 mm, was first detected by ultrasonography (US) at the age of 72 years. Follow-up endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) performed at 4 years after the lesion had first been detected revealed a mural nodule measuring 14.0 × 8.4 mm in the cyst. Endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP) imaging revealed that the main pancreatic duct was in communication with the cyst and that there was no irregular narrowing of the main pancreatic duct. On the basis of these results, the patient was diagnosed with an intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN), and stomach-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed. A histopathological examination revealed that the interior of the cystic part of the lesion was lined by a pancreatic ductal epithelium. A pathological examination of the nodular lesion detected storiform fibrosis, severe lymphoplasmacytic infiltration, and hyperplasia in the pancreatic duct epithelium together with a small amount of mucus. On immunohistological staining, the infiltrating lymphoplasmacytes were found to be positive for IgG4. Accordingly, the patient was diagnosed with focal autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP). In conclusion, we reported a case of focal AIP mimicking IPMN. This case showed neither enlargement of the pancreas nor irregular narrowing of the main pancreatic duct.

  4. [Pancreatitis in cystic fibrosis: association with genotype and pancreatic status].

    PubMed

    Sojo Aguirre, A; Martínez Ezquerra, N; Bousoño García, C; García Novo, M D; Heredia González, S; Manzanares López-Manzanares, J; Baranda García, F; Vázquez Cordero, C

    2011-12-01

    Pancreatitis is an uncommon complication of cystic fibrosis (CF). Either single or recurrent acute episodes can occur and it occasionally may follow a protracted course with relentless destruction of the pancreas. Moreover mild mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) have been found in many cases of idiopathic chronic pancreatitis. We describe a group of patients with CF who had one or more episodes of pancreatitis. We have estimated its prevalence in a large population of patients with CF across Spain. A retrospective descriptive study was conducted by collecting the demographic, clinical and laboratory data, pancreatic status and genotype of CF patients who attended the CF Units in 5 Spanish hospitals. The overall number of CF patients under follow-up in the five centres was 520, of which 17 cases with pancreatitis were identified. The prevalence of pancreatitis in this population was 3.3%, higher than previously reported. Noticeably eight of the 17 patients (47.06%) had pancreatic insufficiency. This appears to be, partly, in contrast with that classically found, as this complication is usually associated with patients with a certain level of pancreatic reserve. No associations with genotype, age, gender or other factors were found. The prevalence of pancreatitis in our CF patients was higher than that found in other CF populations, and was not limited to patients with pancreatic sufficiency. It occurred mostly in teenagers and young adults often with mild pulmonary disease. The CF genotype was variable. The course of the patients should be carefully monitored, and further information on the long-term outcome of larger cohorts of patients is needed. Copyright © 2011 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Pancreatic resections for solid or cystic pancreatic masses in children.

    PubMed

    Muller, C O; Guérin, F; Goldzmidt, D; Fouquet, V; Franchi-Abella, S; Fabre, M; Branchereau, S; Martelli, H; Gauthier, F

    2012-03-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the diagnosis and management of solid pancreatic neoplasm in children and the type of surgical treatment, focusing on short- and long-term outcomes. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of all children who had undergone pancreatic resection for suspicion of pancreatic tumor in Kremlin Bicêtre Hospital, Paris, between 1986 and 2008. We studied the symptoms at diagnosis, the type of surgery, and the short- and long-term morbidity and mortality. Of 18 patients identified, there were 7 pseudopapillary tumors, 3 neuroblastomas, 2 rhabdomyosarcomas, 1 acinar cell carcinoma, 1 endocrine cell carcinoma, 1 renal angiomyolipoma, and 3 pancreatic cysts. Symptoms at diagnosis were abdominal trauma, abdominal mass, and jaundice. Operative procedures were duodenopancreatectomy (11), mid-pancreatic resections (2), splenopancreatectomy (2), distal pancreatectomy (1), and tumorectomy (2). There were no deaths related to surgery. The postoperative morbidity rate was 45%, including 2 cases of fistula (11%) occurring after a mid-pancreatic resection and a pancreaticoduodenectomy. The median follow-up was 4.2 years (range 2-11). There was no diabetes mellitus, but there was 1 case of fat diet intolerance requiring pancreatic enzyme substitution. All of the children had a growth curve within normal limits. In this experience, pancreatic resections have proven to be a safe and efficient procedure, with low long-term morbidity, for the treatment of tumoral and selected nontumoral pancreatic masses.

  6. Follicular Pancreatitis: A Distinct Form of Chronic Pancreatitis - An Additional Mimic of Pancreatic Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Rajib K; Xie, Bill H; Patton, Kurt T; Lisovsky, Mikhail; Burks, Eric; Behrman, Stephen W; Klimstra, David; Deshpande, Vikram

    2016-01-01

    Follicular pancreatitis is a recently described variant of chronic pancreatitis characterized clinically by the formation of a discrete pancreatic mass and histologically by the presence of florid lymphoid aggregates with reactive germinal centers. Our aim was to study the clinical and histologic features of follicular pancreatitis, as well as to critically examine potential overlap with autoimmune pancreatitis. Immunohistochemistry for Bcl-2, CD21, kappa and lambda light chains as well as IgG4 and IgG were performed. We found a total of six patients (male:female = 2:1, mean age = 57 years) who fulfilled the diagnosis of follicular pancreatitis in our institutions. Four had an incidental diagnosis while two presented with abdominal pain, fatigue and elevated liver enzymes. On imaging, three patients had a discrete solid mass while 2 cases showed a dilated main pancreatic duct, mimicking an intraductal pancreatic mucinous neoplasm on imaging. One patient had a lesion in the intra-pancreatic portion of the common bile duct. On histopathology, all cases showed numerous lymphoid follicles with Bcl-2 negative germinal centers either in a periductal or in a more diffuse (periductal and intra-parenchymal) fashion, but without attendant storiform fibrosis, obliterative phlebitis or granulocytic epithelial lesions. IgG4/IgG ratio was <40% in all 6 cases. A comparison cohort revealed germinal centers in 25% of type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis and 2% of type 2 autoimmune pancreatitis cases, but none were periductal in location. In conclusion, follicular pancreatitis, an under-recognized mimic of pancreatic neoplasms is characterized by intrapancreatic lymphoid follicles with reactive germinal centers. PMID:26563969

  7. Pathology and genetics of pancreatic neoplasms with acinar differentiation.

    PubMed

    Wood, Laura D; Klimstra, David S

    2014-11-01

    Pancreatic neoplasms with acinar differentiation, including acinar cell carcinoma, pancreatoblastoma, and carcinomas with mixed differentiation, are distinctive pancreatic neoplasms with a poor prognosis. These neoplasms are clinically, pathologically, and genetically unique when compared to other more common pancreatic neoplasms. Most occur in adults, although pancreatoblastomas usually affect children under 10 years old. All of these neoplasms exhibit characteristic histologic features including a solid or acinar growth pattern, dense neoplastic cellularity, uniform nuclei with prominent nucleoli, and granular eosinophilic cytoplasm. Exocrine enzymes are detectable by immunohistochemistry and, for carcinomas with mixed differentiation, neuroendocrine or ductal lineage markers are also expressed. The genetic alterations of this family of neoplasms largely differ from conventional ductal adenocarcinomas, with only rare mutations in TP53, KRAS, and p16, but no single gene or neoplastic pathway is consistently altered in acinar neoplasms. Instead, there is striking genomic instability, and a subset of cases has mutations in the APC/β-catenin pathway, mutations in SMAD4, RAF gene family fusions, or microsatellite instability. Therapeutically targetable mutations are often present. This review summarizes the clinical and pathologic features of acinar neoplasms and reviews the current molecular data on these uncommon tumors.

  8. Mucinous cystic neoplasms of the mesentery: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Metaxas, Georgios; Tangalos, Athanasios; Pappa, Polyxeni; Papageorgiou, Irene

    2009-05-19

    Mucinous cystic neoplasms arise in the ovary and various extra-ovarian sites. While their pathogenesis remains conjectural, their similarities suggest a common pathway of development. There have been rare reports involving the mesentery as a primary tumour site. A cystic mass of uncertain origin was demonstrated radiologically in a 22 year old female with chronic abdominal pain. At laparotomy, the mass was fixed within the colonic mesentery. Histology demonstrated a benign mucinous cystadenoma. We review the literature on mucinous cystic neoplasms of the mesentery and report on the pathogenesis, biologic behavior, diagnosis and treatment of similar extra-ovarian tumors. We propose an updated classification of mesenteric cysts and cystic tumors. Mucinous cystic neoplasms of the mesentery present almost exclusively in women and must be considered in the differential diagnosis of mesenteric tumors. Only full histological examination of a mucinous cystic neoplasm can exclude a borderline or malignant component. An updated classification of mesenteric cysts and cystic tumors is proposed.

  9. MicroRNA from pancreatic duct aspirate differentiates cystic lesions of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Henry, Jon C; Bassi, Claudio; Giovinazzo, Francesco; Bloomston, Mark

    2013-12-01

    Prognostication for cystic neoplasms of the pancreas continues to evolve. Beyond simple size and cystic fluid CEA determination, microRNA (miRNA) detection holds great promise as molecular diagnostics for cancer risk. In this study, we sought to identify miRNAs that could predict malignant potential of pancreatic cystic lesions. RNA was harvested from the pancreatic duct aspirate of 72 cystic neoplasms of the pancreas. Samples with adequate RNA concentration (≥ 3 ng/μL) were selected for qRTPCR profiling using assays to 379 of the most common miRNAs. miRNA profiles were correlated with histopathology from resected specimens and grouped by benign (serous cystadenomas), premalignant (intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms and mucinous cystadenomas), or malignant lesions (adenocarcinoma). Adequate RNA for analysis was obtained from 42 (58.3 %) of the samples. Malignant lesions were more likely to have adequate RNA (n = 17, 81 %) than either benign (n = 6, 33 %) or premalignant lesions (n = 19, 59 %; p = 0.011). Nine miRNA were identified as differentially expressed between benign and premalignant/malignant lesions (p < 0.05). A significant correlation was found between the number of differentially expressed miRNA and the likelihood of a premalignant/malignant lesion. All premalignant or malignant lesions expressed at least one miRNA surpassing the threshold of mean miRNA expression, whereas no benign lesions had more than one miRNA surpassing the threshold. The presence of RNA in the duct aspirate from patients with pancreatic cystic neoplasms may be a predictor of premalignancy or malignancy. miRNA may be utilized to further differentiate between benign, premalignant, and malignant cystic lesions of the pancreas.

  10. GNAS mutation is a frequent event in pancreatic intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms and associated adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Hosoda, Waki; Sasaki, Eiichi; Murakami, Yoshiko; Yamao, Kenji; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Yatabe, Yasushi

    2015-06-01

    In contrast to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDAs), intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) frequently harbour GNAS mutations. To characterise GNAS-mutated pancreatic carcinomas, we examined mutations of GNAS and KRAS in 290 pancreatic adenocarcinomas and 77 pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias (PanINs). In 64 % (39/61) of IPMNs and 37 % (11/30) of IPMN-associated adenocarcinomas, a GNAS mutation was found. GNAS mutations were frequent (78 %, 7/9) in mucinous carcinomas, with or without associated IPMN. In contrast, GNAS mutations were rarely observed in PDAs (1 %, 1/88) and PanINs (3 %, 2/77), and not at all in mucinous cystic neoplasms (MCNs) (0/10), neuroendocrine neoplasms (0/52), acinar cell neoplasms (0/16), serous cystadenomas (0/10), and solid-pseudopapillary neoplasms (0/14). We found GNAS mutations in 55/91 IPMNs with or without associated invasive carcinoma, solely in intestinal-type (78 %, 21/27) and gastric-type (62 %, 34/55) IPMNs. Of the IPMN-associated adenocarcinomas, mucinous-subtype tumours harboured GNAS mutations more frequently (83 %, 5/6) than tubular-subtype tumours (25 %, 6/24) (p = 0.02). We separately analysed GNAS in the adenocarcinoma and the IPMN component in the IPMN-associated adenocarcinomas. In all mucinous-subtype tumours, the two components exhibited identical genotypes. In contrast, the two components in 8 of 24 tubular-subtype tumours exhibited different genotypes, indicating intratumour heterogeneity. In conclusion, mucinous carcinomas with or without associated IPMN as well as IPMNs frequently harbour a GNAS mutation, reinforcing the notion that these constitute a spectrum of pancreatic tumours. Clinically and pathologically, these tumours are associated, but GNAS mutation sheds further light on this spectrum.

  11. Cystic and Papillary Neoplasm at the Hepatic Hilum Possibly Originating in the Peribiliary Glands

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, Takashi; Uesaka, Katsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Cystic neoplasms of the liver are divided into two types: mucinous cystic neoplasm and cystic intraductal papillary neoplasm of the bile duct. We herein report two cases of cystic and papillary neoplasm of the liver which differed from the abovementioned types. Case  1. A 70-year-old man. Radiologically, a cystic tumor measuring 20 mm in diameter was found at the hepatic hilum. Right hepatectomy was performed under a diagnosis of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (iCCA) based on the imaging findings. Case  2. A 70-year-old man. Radiologically, a cystic tumor measuring 60 mm in diameter was found at the hepatic hilum. Under a diagnosis of iCCA, left hepatic trisectionectomy was performed. In both cases, endoscopic retrograde cholangiography did not demonstrate communication between the cystic tumor and adjacent bile ducts. Pathologically, these two tumors were cystic neoplasms located at the hepatic hilum and were morphologically characterized by an intracystic papillary neoplasm composed of diffuse high-grade dysplasia and associated with an invasive carcinoma. Ovarian-like stroma was not found in the capsule of these tumors. Interestingly, there were peribiliary glands near these tumors, and MUC6 was expressed in these papillary neoplasms as well as in the peribiliary glands. These neoplasms might have arisen from the peribiliary glands. PMID:27656307

  12. Cystic Pancreatic Lymphangioma - Diagnostic Role of Endoscopic Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Diana; Costa, Mariana; Russo, Pedro; Simas, Luís; Baptista, Teresa; Ramos, Gonçalo

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cystic lymphangiomas are rare benign lesions that arise from lymphatic vessels, accounting for less than 0.2% of all pancreatic cysts. Typically it is asymptomatic and discovery occurs during imaging exams for non-pancreatic disease. In the past, a definite diagnosis was made through surgery, with complete resection of all tumoral tissue to prevent recurrence. Nowadays, the development of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) made it possible to identify these cysts combining morphologic ultrasound features, macroscopic aspirated fluid appearance, biochemical and cytological evaluation of the sample. We report two cases of cystic pancreatic lymphangioma diagnosed through EUS, allowing conservative management without surgery. These cases show that cystic pancreatic lymphangioma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of cystic pancreatic lesions and that EUS is an important tool for their recognition.

  13. High risk of acute pancreatitis after endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration of side branch intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Ali A.; Shahid, Haroon; Shah, Apeksha; Khurana, Tanvi; Huntington, William; Ghumman, Saad S.; Loren, David E.; Kowalski, Thomas E.; Laique, Sobia; Hayat, Umar; Eloubeidi, Mohamad A.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Data on the risk of acute pancreatitis following endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) of pancreatic cystic lesions are limited. The aim of our study was to evaluate the frequency of acute pancreatitis after EUS-FNA of pancreatic cysts and solid lesions, and determine whether there was a difference in pancreatitis risk in patients with side branch intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (SB-IPMN). Patients and Methods: A retrospective review of patients who underwent EUS-FNA of pancreatic cysts and solid lesions was performed. The primary outcome measure was development of acute pancreatitis after EUS-FNA. Factors associated with acute pancreatitis were examined by statistical analysis to determine independent predictors of acute pancreatitis. Statistical significance was determined at a P ≤ 0.05. Results: We identified 186 patients with pancreatic cystic lesions and 557 with solid lesions in which EUS-FNA was performed. The median size of the cysts was 19 mm (range: 10-66 mm). There were 37 IPMNs, 33 mucinous cystic neoplasms, 58 serous cysts and 46 pseudocysts and 12 solid-cystic ductal carcinomas. The majority of patients (75%) with solid lesions were diagnosed with adenocarcinoma. Patients with pancreatic cysts had a statistically greater frequency of developing pancreatitis after EUS-FNA when compared to those with solid lesions (2.6% vs. 0.36% respectively; P = 0.13). In patients with cysts, there were no statistically significant differences between the two groups (with and without pancreatitis) with regard to a cyst location, size of the cyst, and number of needle passes or trainee involvement. Patients with SB-IPMN had a statistically higher frequency of pancreatitis after EUS-FNA compared to those with other cyst types (8% vs. 1.3% respectively; odds ratio = 6.4, 95% confidence intervals = 1.0-40.3, P = 0.05). Discussion: Patients with SB-IPMN are at a higher risk of developing acute pancreatitis after

  14. Cyst Fluid Telomerase Activity Predicts the Histologic Grade of Cystic Neoplasms of the Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Hata, Tatsuo; Dal Molin, Marco; Suenaga, Masaya; Yu, Jun; Pittman, Meredith; Weiss, Matthew; Canto, Marcia I; Wolfgang, Christopher; Lennon, Anne Marie; Hruban, Ralph H; Goggins, Michael

    2016-10-15

    Pancreatic cysts frequently pose clinical dilemmas. On one hand, cysts with high-grade dysplasia offer opportunities for cure, on the other hand, those with low-grade dysplasia are easily over treated. Cyst fluid markers have the potential to improve the evaluation of these cysts. Because telomerase activity is commonly activated in malignant cells, we evaluated the diagnostic performance of cyst fluid telomerase activity measurements for predicting histologic grade. Telomerase activity was measured using telomerase repeat amplification with digital-droplet PCR in surgically aspirated cyst fluid samples from 219 patients who underwent pancreatic resection for a cystic lesion (184 discovery, 35 validation) and 36 patients who underwent endoscopic ultrasound fine-needle aspiration. Methodologic and clinical factors associated with telomerase activity were examined. Telomerase activity was reduced in samples that had undergone prior thawing. Among 119 samples not previously thawed, surgical cyst fluids from cystic neoplasms with high-grade dysplasia ± associated invasive cancer had higher telomerase activity [median (interquartile range), 1,158 (295.9-13,033)] copies/μL of cyst fluid than those without [19.74 (2.58-233.6) copies/μL; P < 0.001)]. Elevated cyst fluid telomerase activity had a diagnostic accuracy for invasive cancer/high-grade dysplasia of 88.1% (discovery), 88.6% (validation), and 88.2% (merged). Among cysts classified preoperatively as having "worrisome features," cyst fluid telomerase activity had high diagnostic performance (sensitivity 73.7%, specificity 90.6%, accuracy, 86.1%). In multivariate analysis, telomerase activity independently predicted the presence of invasive cancer/high-grade dysplasia. Cyst fluid telomerase activity can be a useful predictor of the neoplastic grade of pancreatic cysts. Clin Cancer Res; 22(20); 5141-51. ©2016 AACRSee related commentary by Allen et al., p. 4966. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Therapies in Pancreatic Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dennis; DiMaio, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has evolved from being primarily a diagnostic modality into an interventional endoscopic tool for the management of both benign and malignant gastrointestinal illnesses. EUS-guided therapy has garnered particular interest as a minimally invasive approach for the treatment of pancreatic cancer, a disease often complicated by its aggressive course and poor survival. The potential advantage of an EUS-guided approach revolves around real-time imaging for targeted therapy of a difficult to reach organ. In this review, we focus on EUS-guided therapies for pancreatic neoplasms. PMID:25802863

  16. Mucinous cystic neoplasms of the mesentery: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Metaxas, Georgios; Tangalos, Athanasios; Pappa, Polyxeni; Papageorgiou, Irene

    2009-01-01

    Background Mucinous cystic neoplasms arise in the ovary and various extra-ovarian sites. While their pathogenesis remains conjectural, their similarities suggest a common pathway of development. There have been rare reports involving the mesentery as a primary tumour site. Case presentation A cystic mass of uncertain origin was demonstrated radiologically in a 22 year old female with chronic abdominal pain. At laparotomy, the mass was fixed within the colonic mesentery. Histology demonstrated a benign mucinous cystadenoma. Methods and results We review the literature on mucinous cystic neoplasms of the mesentery and report on the pathogenesis, biologic behavior, diagnosis and treatment of similar extra-ovarian tumors. We propose an updated classification of mesenteric cysts and cystic tumors. Conclusion Mucinous cystic neoplasms of the mesentery present almost exclusively in women and must be considered in the differential diagnosis of mesenteric tumors. Only full histological examination of a mucinous cystic neoplasm can exclude a borderline or malignant component. An updated classification of mesenteric cysts and cystic tumors is proposed. PMID:19454018

  17. Endoscopic approach to the diagnosis of pancreatic cystic tumor

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguchi, Yoshiaki; Mine, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    Because of the aging of the population, prevalence of medical checkups, and advances in imaging studies, the number of pancreatic cystic lesions detected has increased. Once these lesions are detected, neoplastic cysts should be differentiated from non-neoplastic cysts. Furthermore, because of the malignant potential of some neoplastic pancreatic cysts, further differentiation between benign and malignant cysts should be made regardless of their size. Although endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has a very high diagnostic performance for pancreatic cystic lesions among the various imaging modalities, EUS findings alone are insufficient for the differentiation of pancreatic cysts and diagnosis of malignancy. In addition, cytology by EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA) has a high specificity but a low sensitivity for diagnosing malignancy in pancreatic cystic tumors. The levels of amylase, lipase, and tumor markers in pancreatic cystic fluid are considered auxiliary parameters for diagnosis of benign and malignant cysts, and a definitive diagnosis of malignancy using these parameters is difficult. Thus, in addition to EUS, cytology by EUS-FNA, and cystic fluid analysis, new techniques based on EUS-guided through-the-needle imaging, such as confocal laser endomicroscopy and cystoscopy, have been explored in recent years. PMID:26909130

  18. Update on surgical treatment of pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    D’Haese, Jan G; Tosolini, Chiara; Ceyhan, Güralp O; Kong, Bo; Esposito, Irene; Michalski, Christoph W; Kleeff, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (PNENs) are rare and account for only 2%-4% of all pancreatic neoplasms. All PNENs are potential (neurendocrine tumors PNETs) or overt (neuroendocrine carcinomas PNECs) malignant, but a subset of PNETs is low-risk. Even in case of low-risk PNETs surgical resection is frequently required to treat hormone-related symptoms and to obtain an appropriate pathological diagnosis. Low-risk PNETs in the body and the tail are ideal for minimally-invasive approaches which should be tailored to the individual patient. Generally, surgeons must aim for parenchyma sparing in these cases. In high-risk and malignant PNENs, indications for tumor resection are much wider than for pancreatic adenocarcinoma, in many cases due to the relatively benign tumor biology. Thus, patients with locally advanced and metastatic PNETs may benefit from extensive resection. In experienced hands, even multi-organ resections are accomplished with acceptable perioperative morbidity and mortality rates and are associated with excellent long term survival. However, poorly differentiated neoplasms with high proliferation rates are associated with a dismal prognosis and may frequently only be treated with chemotherapy. The evidence on surgical treatment of PNENs stems from reviews of mostly single-center series and some analyses of nation-wide tumor registries. No randomized trial has been performed to compare surgical and non-surgical therapies in potentially resectable PNEN. Though such a trial would principally be desirable, ethical considerations and the heterogeneity of PNENs preclude realization of such a study. In the current review, we summarize recent advances in the surgical treatment of PNENs. PMID:25320524

  19. Pancreatic changes in cystic fibrosis: CT and sonographic appearances

    SciTech Connect

    Daneman, A.; Gaskin, K.; Martin, D.J.; Cutz, E.

    1983-10-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) and sonographic appearances of the late stages of pancreatic damage in three patients with cystic fibrosis are illustrated. All three had severe exocrine pancreatic insufficiency with steatorrhea. In two patients CT revealed complete fatty replacement of the entire pancreas. In the third, increased echogenicity of the pancreas on sonography and the inhomogeneous attenuation on CT were interpreted as being the result of a combination of fibrosis, fatty replacement, calcification, and probable cyst formation.

  20. 64-Slice spiral computed tomography and three-dimensional reconstruction in the diagnosis of cystic pancreatic tumors

    PubMed Central

    WEN, ZHAOXIA; YAO, FENGQING; WANG, YUXING

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to describe the characteristics of cystic pancreatic tumors using computed tomography (CT) and to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy (DA) of post-imaging three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction. Clinical and imaging data, including multi-slice spiral CT scans, enhanced scans and multi-faceted reconstruction, from 30 patients with pathologically confirmed cystic pancreatic tumors diagnosed at the Linyi People's Hospital between August 2008 and June 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. Following the injection of Ultravist® 300 contrast agent, arterial, portal venous and parenchymal phase scans were obtained at 28, 60 and 150 sec, respectively, and 3D reconstructions of the CT images were generated. The average age of the patients was 38.4 years (range, 16–77 years), and the cohort included 5 males and 25 females (ratio, 1:5). The patients included 8 cases of mucinous cystadenoma (DA), 80%]; 9 cases of cystadenocarcinoma (DA, 84%); 6 cases of serous cystadenoma (DA, 100%); 3 cases of solid pseudopapillary tumor (DA, 100%); and 4 cases of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (DA, 100%). 3D reconstructions of CT images were generated and, in the 4 cases of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm, the tumor was connected to the main pancreatic duct and multiple mural nodules were detected in one of these cases. The DA of the 3D-reconstructed images of cystic pancreatic tumors was 89.3%. The 64-slice spiral CT and 3D-reconstructed CT images facilitated the visualization of cystic pancreatic tumor characteristics, in particular the connections between the tumor and the main pancreatic duct. In conclusion, the 3D reconstruction of multi-slice CT data may provide an important source of information for the surgical team, in combination with the available clinical data. PMID:27073473

  1. Natural History of Pancreatic Cysts.

    PubMed

    Larson, Alexander; Kwon, Richard S

    2017-03-17

    Pancreatic cystic neoplasms are discovered with increasing frequency. Accurate knowledge of the natural history of cystic neoplasms is crucial to develop useful and cost-effective strategies for surveillance and surgical resection. To date, the natural history of cystic neoplasms is still incomplete due to lack of adequate diagnostic accuracy in the absence of surgical pathology. Nevertheless, current evidence points to risk factors for malignant transformation to help clinical management. New biomarkers that accurately distinguish cyst neoplasms and those most likely to progress to cancer would help clarify the natural history of cystic neoplasms.

  2. Pancreatic Cystic Fluid Reference Set — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    The proposed reference set will be designed to evaluate biomarkers for the following applications aimed at determining whether a patient would benefit from surgical resection of their cystic lesion: 1. Distinguish between pancreatic cysts that have high-malignant potential and cysts that have low or no malignant potential at time of endoscopic ultrasound evaluation. a. By analysis of blood b. By analysis of pancreatic cystic fluid 2. Distinguish between cysts that have any malignant potential (high and low) and cysts that have no malignant potential (benign lesions) at time of endoscopic ultrasound evaluation. a. By analysis of blood b. By analysis of pancreatic cystic fluid 3. Distinguish between a cyst that is mucinous (malignant potential) or non-mucinous (no malignant potential) at time of endoscopic ultrasound evaluation. a. By analysis of blood b. By analysis of pancreatic cystic fluid 4. Distinguish between pancreatic cysts that have high-malignant potential and cysts that have low or no malignant potential at time of evaluation in surgery clinic. a. By analysis of blood 5. Distinguish between cysts that have any malignant potential (high and low) and cysts that have no malignant potential (benign lesions) at time of evaluation in surgery clinic. a. By analysis of blood 6. Distinguish between a cyst that is mucinous (malignant potential) or non-mucinous (no malignant potential) at time of evaluation in surgery clinic. a. By analysis of blood If successful in meeting these afore-mentioned objectives, these results can then be used in the development of future studies at identifying the need for additional evaluation (i.e., endoscopic ultrasound with fine needle aspiration) of an incidental cyst

  3. [Pancreatic infringement exocrine and endocrine in cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Kessler, L; Abély, M

    2016-12-01

    The exocrine pancreatic insufficiency affects more than 80% of cystic fibrosis (CF) infants. Pancreatic insufficiency is diagnosed by low levels of fecal elastase. An optimal caloric intake, a pancreatic enzyme treatment are the keys to maintain a good nutritional status. The fat soluble vitamins supplementation will be associated with pancreatic enzymes treatment and will be adapted to plasma levels. Iron and oligo-element deficiency such as zinc is common. The pancreatic enzymes function is not optimal in the proximal bowel: the intraluminal intestinal pH is low because of the absence of bicarbonate release by the pancreas. The use of proton pump inhibitors may improve the functionality of pancreatic enzymes treatment. New therapies such as ivacaftor in patients with a G551D mutation allows a weight gain in particular by restoring intestinal pH similar to controls. Lengthening of the life expectancy of patients with CF is accompanied by the emergence new aspects of the disease, especially diabetes, favored by pancreatic cystic fibrosis resulting in an anatomical destruction of pancreatic islets. Currently, diabetes affects a third of the patients after 20 years, and half after 30 years. Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes is a major factor of morbidity-mortality in all stages of the disease and is characterized by a preclinical phase of glucose intolerance particularly long reaching up to 10 years. Its pathophysiology combines a lack of insulin secretion, an insulin resistance secondary to chronic infection, and a decrease in the production of the GIP and GLP-1. The insulin secretion depending on the channel chlorine (Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator [CFTR]) activity at the membrane surface of insulin cell is reduced prior to the occurrence of pancreatic histological lesions. At the stage of diabetes, obtaining a normoglycemia by insulin treatment began very early allows to slow the decline of lung function and nutritional status. Given the silent

  4. Laparoscopic vs. open resection of noninvasive intraductal pancreatic mucinous neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Gumbs, Andrew A; Grès, Philippe; Madureira, Fabio A; Gayet, Brice

    2008-04-01

    Required resection margins for noninvasive intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) are a controversial issue. Over a 10-year period we have resected IPMNs from the entire pancreatic gland with minimally invasive techniques and compared our survival and complication rates with open controls to see if any difference in resection margins and outcomes could be observed. Data were collected retrospectively, including our first cases of advanced laparoscopic resections. Five-year Kaplan-Meier curves were calculated and statistical analysis was performed using the log rank and Student's T test for continuous variables. Chi square and Fisher's exact tests were used for analyzing categorical variables. From March 1997 to February 2006, we operated on 22 patients with noninvasive IPMNs, of which 9 (41%) were operated on laparoscopically and 13 (59%) using open techniques. Three patients underwent laparoscopic duodenopancreatectomy, compared to five in the open group. All resection margins were negative, but two patients required total pancreatectomy, both of which were performed laparoscopically. One of these was converted to open (11%) because of difficulty in reconstructing the biliary anastomosis. The overall complication rates were 56% for the laparoscopic group and 85% for the open group. Twenty-two percent of the laparoscopic group required reoperation and 11% required percutaneous drainage, compared to 15 and 23% in the open group, respectively. All patients are alive after a mean of 20 months (range = 2-43) in the laparoscopic group and 37 months (range = 1-121) in the open one (p > 0.05). Laparoscopic resection of noninvasive IPMNs of the entire pancreatic gland has similar complication and survival rates as open procedures. As a result, the laparoscopic approach is appropriate for noninvasive IPMNs of the entire pancreatic gland; however, larger cohorts are needed to see if any approach has superior outcomes. Because of these favorable results, studies are

  5. Role of Endoscopic Ultrasonography and Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography in the Clinical Assessment of Pancreatic Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Varadarajulu, Shyam; Bang, Ji Young

    2016-04-01

    Accurate diagnosis and staging of pancreatic neoplasms is essential for surgical planning and identification of locally advanced and metastatic disease that is incurable by surgery. The ability to position the endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) transducer close to the pancreas combined with the use of fine-needle aspiration enables the accurate diagnosis of pancreatic cysts and solid masses. EUS is also increasingly being used to procure core tissue for molecular analysis that facilitates personalized treatment of pancreatic cancer. Various therapeutic interventions can be undertaken under EUS guidance. This article focuses on the applications of EUS and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in pancreatic neoplasms.

  6. Cystic acantholytic dyskeratosis of the vulva: An unusual presentation of a follicular adnexal neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Kara Melissa Tiangco; Junkins-Hopkins, Jacqueline M.

    2016-01-01

    Acantholytic dyskeratosis (AD) is a histologic pattern seen in Darier's disease or dyskeratosis follicularis, warty dyskeratoma, and transient AD. This pattern is characterized by suprabasilar clefting, acantholysis, and formation of corps ronds and grains. We present a case of AD that is unique based on its genital location and cystic architecture. A 53-year-old woman presented with an otherwise asymptomatic cyst on her left vulva of uncertain duration. On microscopic examination, there were fragments of cystic epithelium with areas of hypergranulosis, acantholysis, corps ronds, and corps grains formation. These features are felt by the authors to be a unique presentation of a follicular adnexal neoplasm. PMID:27559500

  7. Biliary mucinous cystic neoplasm: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Safari, Mohammad Taghi; Shahrokh, Shabnam; Miri, Mohammad Bagher; Foroughi, Forough; Sadeghi, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Hepatobiliary cystadenomas (HBC) is a rare neoplasm which comprising less than one percent of liver cystic neoplasms. Although it’s known as a benign tumor, but they have a potential for neoplastic transformation. Making a proper diagnosis and ruling out of other differential diagnosis is important because of different treatment. In the present study, we described a case of HBC manifested as idiopathic dominant biliary stricture in common hepatic duct (CHD), on the basis of spiral CT scan and MRI, and elevated CA19-9. With a probable diagnosis of malignant biliary stricture, she underwent ERCP and cholangioscopy that were non-diagnostic and final diagnosis was made surgically. HBCs usually found incicentally as a cystic lesion and biliary stricture without visible cyst in imaging like that seen in cholangiocarcinoma is very unlikely. In truth, this patient is an unusual manifestation of one rare disease. PMID:28224034

  8. Multiple small "imaging" branch-duct type intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) in familial pancreatic cancer: indicator for concomitant high grade pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia?

    PubMed

    Bartsch, D K; Dietzel, K; Bargello, M; Matthaei, E; Kloeppel, G; Esposito, I; Heverhagen, J T; Gress, T M; Slater, E P; Langer, P

    2013-03-01

    Most screening programs for familial pancreatic cancer are currently based on endoscopic ultrasonography and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Cystic lesions, especially those suspicious for small intraductal pancreatic mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) of the branch ducts, can be visualized in up to 40 % of individuals at risk, but their pathological importance in the setting of FPC is yet not well established. Individuals at risk from a prospective screening program for familial pancreatic cancer with small "imaging" IPMNs of the branch-duct type (BD-IPMN) who underwent pancreatic resection were analysed regarding clinico-pathological data and the locations of pancreatic lesions. Five of 125 individuals at risk who underwent screening had multiple small (size 2-10 mm) unicystic lesions and/or multicystic single lesions in the pancreatic body and tail suspicious for BD-IPMNs upon MRI imaging and decided to undergo surgical resection after interdisciplinary counselling, although none fulfilled the consensus criteria for IPMN resection. Histological examination revealed BD-IPMNs with low or moderate dysplasia of the gastric type in combination with multifocal PanIN2 and PanIN3 lesions in 4 individuals. The remaining patient had only tiny ductectasias in the pancreatic tail with multifocal PanIN 2 lesions in the entire gland and one PanIN3 lesion in the pancreatic head. Intriguingly, the location of the most dysplastic histological lesions (PanIN3) did not correspond to the preoperatively detected lesions and were not visible in preoperative imaging. In the setting of FPC, the presence of multiple small "imaging" BD-IPMNs may indicate the presence of high-grade PanIN lesions elsewhere in the pancreas.

  9. Insulin secretion abnormalities in exocrine pancreatic sufficient cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Wooldridge, Jamie L; Szczesniak, Rhonda D; Fenchel, Matthew C; Elder, Deborah A

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study is to assess insulin secretion in pediatric cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with exocrine pancreatic sufficiency. Glucose and insulin responses during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) were measured in 146 CF patients. Patients were divided into exocrine sufficient (CF-PS) and insufficient (CF-PI) groups based on pancreatic enzyme usage and fecal elastase. A reference group included healthy, non-diabetic subjects. All CF groups showed reduced insulin secretion as measured by insulinogenic index. The CF-PS patients had normal glucose tolerance. There was a direct correlation between BMI z-score and insulin area under the curve. Patients with CF have reduced insulin secretion during an OGTT regardless of exocrine pancreatic status. The abnormal insulin secretion in all CF patients may predispose them for glucose intolerance, particularly when challenged by inflammation, infection, or nutritional deficiency. In addition, the diminished insulin secretion may contribute to increased catabolism. Lastly, the CF-related diabetes (CFRD) screening guidelines should be followed by all CF patients regardless of pancreatic status. Copyright © 2015 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Multiphoton microscopy as a diagnostic imaging modality for pancreatic neoplasms without hematoxylin and eosin stains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Youting; Chen, Jing; Chen, Hong; Hong, Zhipeng; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Yanling; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-09-01

    Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining of tissue samples is the standard approach in histopathology for imaging and diagnosing cancer. Recent reports have shown that multiphoton microscopy (MPM) provides better sample interface with single-cell resolution, which enhances traditional H&E staining and offers a powerful diagnostic tool with potential applications in oncology. The purpose of this study was to further expand the versatility of MPM by establishing the optical parameters required for imaging unstained histological sections of pancreatic neoplasms, thereby providing an efficient and environmentally sustainable alternative to H&E staining while improving the accuracy of pancreatic cancer diagnoses. We found that the high-resolution MPM images clearly distinguish between the structure of normal pancreatic tissues compared with pancreatic neoplasms in unstained histological sections, and discernable differences in tissue architecture and cell morphology between normal versus tumorigenic cells led to enhanced optical diagnosis of cancerous tissue. Moreover, quantitative assessment of the cytomorphological features visualized from MPM images showed significant differences in the nuclear-cytoplasmic ratios of pancreatic neoplasms compared with normal pancreas, as well as further distinguished pancreatic malignant tumors from benign tumors. These results indicate that the MPM could potentially serve as an optical tool for the diagnosis of pancreatic neoplasms in unstained histological sections.

  11. Multiphoton microscopy as a diagnostic imaging modality for pancreatic neoplasms without hematoxylin and eosin stains.

    PubMed

    Chen, Youting; Chen, Jing; Chen, Hong; Hong, Zhipeng; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Yanling; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-09-01

    Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining of tissue samples is the standard approach in histopathology for imaging and diagnosing cancer. Recent reports have shown that multiphoton microscopy (MPM) provides better sample interface with single-cell resolution, which enhances traditional H&E staining and offers a powerful diagnostic tool with potential applications in oncology. The purpose of this study was to further expand the versatility of MPM by establishing the optical parameters required for imaging unstained histological sections of pancreatic neoplasms, thereby providing an efficient and environmentally sustainable alternative to H&E staining while improving the accuracy of pancreatic cancer diagnoses. We found that the high-resolution MPM images clearly distinguish between the structure of normal pancreatic tissues compared with pancreatic neoplasms in unstained histological sections, and discernable differences in tissue architecture and cell morphology between normal versus tumorigenic cells led to enhanced optical diagnosis of cancerous tissue. Moreover, quantitative assessment of the cytomorphological features visualized from MPM images showed significant differences in the nuclear–cytoplasmic ratios of pancreatic neoplasms compared with normal pancreas, as well as further distinguished pancreatic malignant tumors from benign tumors. These results indicate that the MPM could potentially serve as an optical tool for the diagnosis of pancreatic neoplasms in unstained histological sections.

  12. Adjuvant Chemoradiotherapy After Pancreatic Resection for Invasive Carcinoma Associated With Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm of the Pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, Michael J.; Hsu, Charles C.; Pawlik, Timothy M.; Winter, Jordan; Hruban, Ralph H.; Guler, Mehmet; Schulick, Richard D.; Cameron, John L.; Laheru, Daniel A.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Herman, Joseph M.

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms are mucin-producing cystic neoplasms of the pancreas. One-third are associated with invasive carcinoma. We examined the benefit of adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for this cohort. Methods and Materials: Patients who had undergone pancreatic resection at Johns Hopkins Hospital between 1999 and 2004 were reviewed. Of these patients, 83 with a resected pancreatic mass were found to have an intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm with invasive carcinoma, 70 of whom met inclusion criteria for the present analysis. Results: The median age at surgery was 68 years. The median tumor size was 3.3 cm, and invasive carcinoma was present at the margin in 16% of the patients. Of the 70 patients, 50% had metastases to the lymph nodes and 64% had Stage II disease. The median survival was 28.0 months, and 2- and 5-year survival rate was 57% and 45%, respectively. Of the 70 patients, 40 had undergone adjuvant CRT. Those receiving CRT were more likely to have lymph node metastases, perineural invasion, and Stage II-III disease. The 2-year survival rate after surgery with vs. without CRT was 55.8% vs. 59.3%, respectively (p = NS). Patients with lymph node metastases or positive surgical margins benefited significantly from CRT (p = .047 and p = .042, respectively). On multivariate analysis, adjuvant CRT was associated with improved survival, with a relative risk of 0.43 (95% confidence interval, 0.19-0.95; p = .044) after adjusting for major confounders. Conclusion: Adjuvant CRT conferred a 57% decrease in the relative risk of mortality after pancreaticoduodenectomy for intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms with an associated invasive component after adjusting for major confounders. Patients with lymph node metastases or positive margins appeared to particularly benefit from CRT after definitive surgery.

  13. Cystic nephroma/mixed epithelial stromal tumor: a benign neoplasm with potential for recurrence.

    PubMed

    Sun, Belinda L; Abern, Michael; Garzon, Steven; Setty, Suman

    2015-05-01

    Cystic nephroma (CN) is a rare, benign, renal neoplasm composed of epithelial and stromal elements. Only about 200 cases have been reported since 1892 and recurrence has rarely been observed. We report a 32-year-old Hispanic woman, with a history of a right, complex cystic, renal mass treated by robotic decortication 2 years ago, who presented with flank pain, hematuria, and recurrent urinary tract infection. A magnetic resonance imaging study showed a 3.4-cm multicystic lesion with thickened septa and enhancement at the right kidney. The partial nephrectomy specimen revealed a well-circumscribed, multicystic tumor abutting the renal pelvis, with thick septa and smooth walls, filled with clear fluid. Microscopic examination showed variably sized cysts lined by cuboidal epithelium with focal hobnailing, without significant cytologic atypia and mitosis. The epithelial lining was positive for CK19, high molecular weight cytokeratin, and α-methylacyl-CoA racemase suggesting a primitive tubular epithelial phenotype. Primitive glomeruli-like structures were also present. The ovarian-like stroma was condensed around the cysts and was variably cellular with areas of muscle differentiation and thick-walled vessels. The stroma was positive for desmin, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and CD10. We suggest that CN represents a variable mixture of epithelial and stromal elements, immature glomerular, tubular, muscle, and vascular elements, which may be present in variable proportions creating a spectrum of lesions previously described as CN and mixed epithelial and stromal tumors (MEST). This case emphasizes that CN/MEST clinically/radiologically mimics other cystic renal neoplasms, especially cystic renal cell carcinoma and tubulocystic carcinoma, necessitating histopathological examination and immunohistochemial studies for definitive diagnosis. Additionally, CN has the tendency to recur when not completely excised initially.

  14. Pancreatic Candidiasis That Mimics a Malignant Pancreatic Cystic Tumor on Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Case Report in an Immunocompetent Patient.

    PubMed

    Seong, Minjung; Kang, Tae Wook; Ha, Sang Yun

    2015-01-01

    Candida is a commensal organism that is frequently found in the human gastrointestinal tract. It is the most common organism that causes pancreatic fungal infections. However, magnetic resonance imaging findings of Candida infection in the pancreas have not been described. We report imaging findings of pancreatic candidiasis in a patient in immunocompetent condition. It presented as a multi-septated cystic mass with a peripheral solid component in the background of pancreatitis and restricted diffusion on diffusion-weighted image that mimicked a malignant pancreatic cystic tumor.

  15. Insulin Secretion Abnormalities in Exocrine Pancreatic Sufficient Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wooldridge, Jamie L.; Szczesniak, Rhonda D.; Fenchel, Matthew C.; Elder, Deborah A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND To assess insulin secretion in pediatric cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with exocrine pancreatic sufficiency. METHODS Glucose and insulin responses during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) were measured in 146 CF patients. Patients were divided into exocrine sufficient (CF-PS) and insufficient (CF-PI) groups based on pancreatic enzyme usage and fecal elastase. A reference group included healthy, non-diabetic subjects. RESULTS All CF groups showed reduced insulin secretion as measured by insulinogenic index. The CF-PS patients had normal glucose tolerance. There was direct correlation between BMI z-score and insulin area under the curve. CONCLUSION Patients with CF have reduced insulin secretion during an OGTT regardless of exocrine pancreatic status. The abnormal insulin secretion in all CF patients may predispose them for glucose intolerance, particularly when challenged by inflammation, infection, or nutritional deficiency. In addition, the diminished insulin secretion may contribute to increased catabolism. Lastly, the CF-related diabetes (CFRD) screening guidelines should be followed by all CF patients regardless of pancreatic status. PMID:25754095

  16. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy for people with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Somaraju, Usha Rani; Solis-Moya, Arturo

    2014-10-13

    Most people with cystic fibrosis (80% to 90%) need pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy to prevent malnutrition. Enzyme preparations need to be taken whenever food is taken, and the dose needs to be adjusted according to the food consumed. A systematic review on the efficacy and safety of pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is needed to guide clinical practice, as there is variability between centres with respect to assessment of pancreatic function, time of commencing treatment, dose and choice of supplements. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy in children and adults with cystic fibrosis and to compare the efficacy and safety of different formulations of this therapy and their appropriateness in different age groups. Also, to compare the effects of pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy in cystic fibrosis according to different diagnostic subgroups (e.g. different ages at introduction of therapy and different categories of pancreatic function). We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register comprising references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. Most recent search: 14 August 2014.We also searched an ongoing trials website and the websites of the pharmaceutical companies who manufacture pancreatic enzyme replacements for any additional trials. Most recent search: 12 May 2014. Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials in people of any age, with cystic fibrosis and receiving pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy, at any dosage and in any formulation, for a period of not less than four weeks, compared to placebo or other pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy preparations. Two authors independently assessed trials and extracted outcome data. They also assessed the risk of bias of the trials included in the review. One parallel trial and 11 cross-over trials of children and

  17. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy for people with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Somaraju, Usha Rani; Solis-Moya, Arturo

    2016-11-23

    Most people with cystic fibrosis (80% to 90%) need pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy to prevent malnutrition. Enzyme preparations need to be taken whenever food is taken, and the dose needs to be adjusted according to the food consumed. A systematic review on the efficacy and safety of pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is needed to guide clinical practice, as there is variability between centres with respect to assessment of pancreatic function, time of commencing treatment, dose and choice of supplements. This is an updated version of a published review. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy in children and adults with cystic fibrosis and to compare the efficacy and safety of different formulations of this therapy and their appropriateness in different age groups. Also, to compare the effects of pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy in cystic fibrosis according to different diagnostic subgroups (e.g. different ages at introduction of therapy and different categories of pancreatic function). We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register comprising references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. Most recent search: 15 July 2016.We also searched an ongoing trials website and the websites of the pharmaceutical companies who manufacture pancreatic enzyme replacements for any additional trials. Most recent search: 22 July 2016. Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials in people of any age, with cystic fibrosis and receiving pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy, at any dosage and in any formulation, for a period of not less than four weeks, compared to placebo or other pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy preparations. Two authors independently assessed trials and extracted outcome data. They also assessed the risk of bias of the trials included in the review. One

  18. Added value of intravenous contrast-enhanced ultrasound for characterization of cystic pancreatic masses: a prospective study on 37 patients.

    PubMed

    Vasile, Tudor Andrei; Socaciu, Mihai; Stan Iuga, Roxana; Seicean, Andrada; Iancu, Cornel; al Hajjar, Nadim; Zaharie, Toader; Badea, Radu

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the added value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in the pancreatic cystic mass (PCM) diagnosis by using a qualitative and quantitative analysis in order to make a relevant characterization. Between December 2008 and November 2011, 37 patients with PCM discovered at ultrasound examination were prospectively followed. A qualitative and quantitative CEUS analysis was performed in order to differentiate etiologies of the PCM. In the quantitative analysis several parameters were followed: Peak Intensity (PI), Time to Peak (TTP), maximum ascending gradient (GRAD), Time to maximum gradient (TTG) and Area Under the Curve (AUC). Normalized ratios were also calculated. In all patients a definite cytological or histological diagnosis was obtained. Thirty-seven patients were studied: 12 with pancreatitis-associated pseudocyst and 25 with cystic tumors (10 serous cystic adenoma, 5 mucinous cystic adenoma, 6 cystadenocarcinomas, 2 solid pseudopapillary tumors and 2 intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms). There was a significant difference of the nAUC and nTTP between pseudocyst and cystic tumors, p=0.03 and p=0.01, respectively. A normalized TTP value above 7 sec was suggestive for the diagnosis of pseudocysts with 79.16 % accuracy. There was a significant difference of nTTP and nTTG between the benign and malignant lesions. nTTP < 9 sec and nTTG < 8.5 sec rules out malignant cysts in almost 90% of cases. The CEUS is useful in the diagnosis of PCM. The quantitative analysis of the enhancement of the cystic wall may discriminate the different types of the PCM.

  19. Natural history of pancreatic cystic lesions: a multicenter prospective observational study for evaluating the risk of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Eizaburo; Hirooka, Yoshiki; Kawashima, Hiroki; Ishikawa, Takuya; Kanamori, Akira; Ishikawa, Hideki; Sasaki, Yoji; Nonogaki, Koji; Hara, Kazuo; Hashimoto, Senju; Matsubara, Hiroshi; Hirai, Takanori; Sumi, Hajime; Sugimoto, Hiroyuki; Goto, Hidemi

    2017-09-05

    To elucidate the natural history of pancreatic cystic lesions (PCLs), including branch-duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (BD-IPMN), via mid-term follow-up analysis of a multicenter prospective observational study (NSPINAL study). From July 2011 to October 2016, 881 patients with PCLs were enrolled in NSPINAL study, and 664 patients with >12 months of follow-up were analysed. Every patient was asymptomatic, and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) was performed at the initial diagnosis to exclude high-risk individuals. Follow-up included EUS, CT or MRI at least once a year. Serial morphological changes and the pancreatic cancer (PC) incidence, including malignant progression of PCLs, were evaluated. The 664 patients (358 men) were followed for a median of 33.5 months (IQR 29). The cyst and MPD sizes were 16.6±9.3 mm and 2.3±1.0 mm, respectively. Morphologically, 518 cases were multilocular, 137 were unilocular, and 9 had a honeycomb pattern; 269 cases involved multifocal lesions. Ninety-six patients (14.5%) showed worsening progression on imaging. There were 2 resectable and 4 unresectable cases of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and 3 cases of malignant BD-IPMN. The 3-year risk of developing PC was 1.2%. The standardized incidence ratio (SIR) for PC among PCLs was 10.0 (95% CI 3.5-16.5), and the SIR among BD-IPMN was 16.6 (95% CI 5.1-28.1). Multivariate analysis showed that development of symptoms and worsening progression were significant predictors of PC. Malignant progression of PCLs, including PC development, is not uncommon. Patients with PCLs should be carefully monitored to detect PDAC at early stages. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. Atypical presentation of acute pancreatitis in a man with pancreatic insufficiency and cystic fibrosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Whether acute pancreatitis can occur in pancreatically insufficient individuals with cystic fibrosis remains a matter of debate. Case presentation We describe a case of acute pancreatitis occurring in a 52-year-old Caucasian Australian man with moderately severe cystic fibrosis lung disease and pancreatic insufficiency. An inflammatory mass within the head of his pancreas was confirmed using computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and pancreatic biopsy, but serum amylase and lipase remained normal throughout the acute phase of his illness. His symptoms and the pancreatic mass resolved following the insertion of a biliary stent and the introduction of ursodeoxycholic acid. Conclusion Our case report highlights the potential for acute pancreatitis to occur in patients with pancreatic insufficiency and cystic fibrosis. We further demonstrate that conventional biochemical markers that are normally assessed to confirm the diagnosis may not be of particular use. As patients with cystic fibrosis survive into their fourth and fifth decades of life, atypical presentations of acute pancreatitis may become more common. PMID:20718961

  1. Autoimmune pancreatitis type-1 associated with intraduct papillary mucinous neoplasm: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Vaquero, Eva C; Salcedo, Maria T; Cuatrecasas, Míriam; De León, Hannah; Merino, Xavier; Navarro, Salvador; Ginès, Angels; Abu-Suboh, Monder; Balsells, Joaquim; Fernández-Cruz, Laureano; Molero, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis lesions usually embrace both intraduct papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Patients at genetically-determined high risk of PDAC often harbor IPMN and/or chronic pancreatitis, suggesting IPMN, chronic pancreatitis and PDAC may share pathogenetic mechanisms. Chronic autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) may also herald PDAC. Concurrent IPMN and AIP have been reported in few patients. Here we describe two patients with IPMN who developed type-1 AIP fulfilling the Honolulu and Boston diagnostic criteria. AIP diffusively affected the whole pancreas, as well as peripancreatic lymph nodes and the gallbladder. Previous pancreatic resection of focal IPMN did not show features of AIP. One of the patients carried a CFTR class-I mutation. Of notice, serum IgG4 levels gradually decreased to normal values after IPMN excision. Common risk factors to IPMN and AIP may facilitate its coincidental generation. Copyright © 2014 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Pancreatic carcinogenesis and naturally occurring pancreatic neoplasms of rats and mice in the NCI carcinogenesis testing program.

    PubMed

    Milman, H A; Ward, J M; Chu, K C

    1978-01-01

    Over two hundred chemicals were examined in a two year rodent bioassay system for possible carcinogenicity. Of these, only nitrofen significantly increased the incidence of neoplasms of the exocrine pancreas of rats or mice (female Osborne-Mendel rats); azinphosmethyl was the only agent tested which significantly increased the incidence of islet-cell tumors of rats or mice (male Osborne-Mendel rats). The use of the rat (Osborne-Mendel or Fischer 344) and mouse (B6C3F1) as models for the detection of chemically-induced pancreatic neoplasms also was investigated. The incidences of specific neoplasms of the exocrine or endocrine pancreas produced by all chemicals tested were combined and compared with the combined incidences of similar neoplasms in control animals in order to increase the sensitivity of the test. The data obtained through this procedure suggests that the male rat may be a good, sensitive model for the detection of islet-cell tumors.

  3. Successful Control of Liver Metastases From Pancreatic Solid-Pseudopapillary Neoplasm (SPN) Using Hepatic Arterial Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Violari, Elena G. Brody, Lynn A.; Covey, Anne M.; Erinjeri, Joseph P.; Getrajdman, George I.; Sofocleous, Constantinos T.; Reidy, Diane L.; Jarnagin, William R.; Brown, Karen T.

    2015-04-15

    No systemic agents that are known to be effective for the treatment of solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm (SPN) are available. We report the prolonged and sustained control of metastatic pancreatic SPN to the liver using hepatic arterial embolization (HAE), where a total of 13 HAE sessions were performed over a 6-year period.

  4. Genetic determination of exocrine pancreatic function in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Kristidis, P; Bozon, D; Corey, M; Markiewicz, D; Rommens, J; Tsui, L C; Durie, P

    1992-06-01

    We showed elsewhere that the pancreatic function status of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients could be correlated to mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. Although the majority of CF mutations--including the most common, delta F508--strongly correlated with pancreatic insufficiency (PI), approximately 10% of the mutant alleles may confer pancreatic sufficiency (PS). To extend this observation, genomic DNA of 538 CF patients with well-documented pancreatic function status were analyzed for a series of known mutations in their CFTR genes. Only 20 of the 25 mutations tested were found in this population. They accounted for 84% of the CF chromosomes, with delta F508 being the most frequent (71%), and the other mutations accounted for less than 5% each. A total of 30 different, complete genotypes could be determined in 394 (73%) of the patients. The data showed that each genotype was associated only with PI or only with PS, but not with both. This result is thus consistent with the hypothesis that PI and PS in CF are predisposed by the genotype at the CFTR locus; the PS phenotype occurs in patients who have one or two mild CFTR mutations, such as R117H, R334W, R347P, A455E, and P574H, whereas the PI phenotype occurs in patients with two severe alleles, such as delta F508, delta I507, Q493X, G542X, R553X, W1282X, 621 + 1G----T, 1717-1G----A, 556delA, 3659delC, I148T, G480C, V520F, G551D, and R560T.

  5. Genetic determination of exocrine pancreatic function in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Kristidis, P; Bozon, D; Corey, M; Markiewicz, D; Rommens, J; Tsui, L C; Durie, P

    1992-01-01

    We showed elsewhere that the pancreatic function status of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients could be correlated to mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. Although the majority of CF mutations--including the most common, delta F508--strongly correlated with pancreatic insufficiency (PI), approximately 10% of the mutant alleles may confer pancreatic sufficiency (PS). To extend this observation, genomic DNA of 538 CF patients with well-documented pancreatic function status were analyzed for a series of known mutations in their CFTR genes. Only 20 of the 25 mutations tested were found in this population. They accounted for 84% of the CF chromosomes, with delta F508 being the most frequent (71%), and the other mutations accounted for less than 5% each. A total of 30 different, complete genotypes could be determined in 394 (73%) of the patients. The data showed that each genotype was associated only with PI or only with PS, but not with both. This result is thus consistent with the hypothesis that PI and PS in CF are predisposed by the genotype at the CFTR locus; the PS phenotype occurs in patients who have one or two mild CFTR mutations, such as R117H, R334W, R347P, A455E, and P574H, whereas the PI phenotype occurs in patients with two severe alleles, such as delta F508, delta I507, Q493X, G542X, R553X, W1282X, 621 + 1G----T, 1717-1G----A, 556delA, 3659delC, I148T, G480C, V520F, G551D, and R560T. PMID:1376016

  6. Predictive value of low serum pancreatic enzymes in invasive intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Yosuke; Masuda, Atsuhiro; Zen, Yoh; Takenaka, Mamoru; Toyama, Hirochika; Sofue, Keitaro; Shiomi, Hideyuki; Kobayashi, Takashi; Nakagawa, Takashi; Yamanaka, Koudai; Hoshi, Namiko; Yoshida, Masaru; Arisaka, Yoshifumi; Okabe, Yoshihiro; Kutsumi, Hiromu; Fukumoto, Takumi; Ku, Yonson; Azuma, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Despite evidence suggesting a role of chronic pancreatitis in pancreatic carcinogenesis, its relationship with invasive intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN) remains unclear. Low levels of pancreatic enzymes are predictive markers of advanced chronic pancreatitis. We investigated whether low pancreatic enzyme levels were associated with a higher incidence of invasive IPMN. This study included 146 consecutive patients who underwent surgical resection of IPMN between April 2001 and October 2014. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was conducted to assess the association between serum pancreatic enzymes and the incidence of invasive IPMN, with adjustment for clinical characteristics including alcohol consumption. The association of serum pancreatic enzymes with pathological pancreatic atrophy and inflammation in areas adjacent to or distant from the tumor was also evaluated. Low serum levels of pancreatic amylase and lipase were associated with a higher incidence of invasive IPMN (multivariable odds ratio [OR] = 9.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.99 to 35.1, P = 0.0001; OR = 14.2, 95% CI = 2.77 to 112, P = 0.001, respectively). Low serum pancreatic amylase and lipase levels were also associated with higher grade pancreatic atrophy in areas adjacent to the tumor (P = 0.011 and P = 0.017, respectively) and in areas distant from the tumor (P = 0.0002 and P = 0.001, respectively). Furthermore, low serum pancreatic amylase and lipase levels were associated with higher grade inflammation in areas distant from the tumor (P < 0.0001 and P = 0.001, respectively). Low serum pancreatic enzymes may be a predictive marker of invasive IPMN. Excessive alcohol consumption did not influence the association of low pancreatic enzyme levels with invasive IPMN. Copyright © 2016 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. In vivo characterization of pancreatic cystic lesions by needle-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (nCLE): proposition of a comprehensive nCLE classification confirmed by an external retrospective evaluation.

    PubMed

    Napoleon, Bertrand; Lemaistre, Anne-Isabelle; Pujol, Bertrand; Caillol, Fabrice; Lucidarme, Damien; Bourdariat, Raphaël; Morellon-Mialhe, Blandine; Fumex, Fabien; Lefort, Christine; Lepilliez, Vincent; Palazzo, Laurent; Monges, Geneviève; Poizat, Flora; Giovannini, Marc

    2016-06-01

    The differential diagnosis of solitary pancreatic cystic lesions is sometimes difficult. Needle-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (nCLE) performed during endoscopic ultrasound-fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) enables real-time imaging of the internal structure of such cysts. Criteria have already been described for serous cystadenoma and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN). The aims of the study were to determine new nCLE criteria for the diagnosis of pancreatic cystic lesions, to propose a comprehensive nCLE classification for the characterization of those lesions, and to carry out a first external retrospective validation . Thirty-three patients with a lone pancreatic cystic lesion were included (CONTACT 1 study). EUS-FNA was combined with nCLE. Diagnosis was based on either pathology result (Group 1, n = 20) or an adjudication committee consensus (Group 2, n = 13). Six investigators, unblinded, studied cases from Group 1 and identified nCLE criteria for mucinous cystic neoplasm (MCN), pseudocyst (PC), and cystic neuroendocrine neoplasm (NEN). Four external reviewers assessed, blinded, the yield and interobserver agreement for the newly identified (MCN, PC) and previously described (IPMN, SC) criteria in a subset of 31 cases. New nCLE criteria were described for MCN (thick gray line), PC (field of bright particles), and cystic NEN (black neoplastic cells clusters with white fibrous areas). These criteria correlated with the histological features of the corresponding lesions. In the retrospective validation, a conclusive nCLE result was obtained for 74 % of the cases (87 % "true" and 13 % "false" with respect to the final diagnosis). On this limited case series, the nCLE criteria showed a trend for high diagnostic specificity (>90 % for mucinous cysts, 100 % for non-mucinous cysts). Based on this newly completed atlas of interpretation criteria, nCLE could facilitate the diagnosis of pancreatic cystic lesion types.

  8. Intraductal Tubulopapillary Neoplasm of the Pancreas Masquerading as Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma: Review of the Literature with a Case Report.

    PubMed

    Savant, Deepika; Lee, Lili; Das, Kasturi

    2016-01-01

    Intraductal tubulopapillary neoplasm of the pancreas (ITPN) is a rare tumor which was first described in 2009. We report a case with cytologic and histologic findings and discuss the pitfalls in diagnosing this entity on cytology. An 82-year-old female presented with a pancreatic body mass measuring 3.3 cm. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration showed cells in cohesive clusters with high-grade nuclear atypia. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) showed the neoplastic cells to be positive for CK19, CD56 and chromogranin (focal). Ki-67 was high at 50-60%, and chymotrypsin was negative. On the basis of this pattern of staining, the cytologic diagnosis rendered was 'favors high-grade neuroendocrine carcinoma'. Distal pancreatic resection revealed a cystic 4-cm mass. Histologically, the tumor was seen arising from the duct with a solid growth pattern, tubule formation and papillary structures. IHC showed the tumor to be negative for chromogranin, synaptophysin, CD56, trypsin and chymotrypsin. The Ki-67 index was 70%. The final diagnosis was noninvasive ITPN. We review the literature and discuss the cytomorphologic features and IHC patterns characteristic of this new entity on cytology material in addition to the pitfalls of the cytologic diagnosis. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms at magnetic resonance imaging: comparison between grade 3 and grade 1/2 tumors

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Chuangen; Chen, Xiao; Xiao, Wenbo; Wang, Qidong; Sun, Ke; Wang, Zhongqiu

    2017-01-01

    Background The grading of pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (PanNENs) is associated with the choice of treatment strategy. The aim of this study is to identify the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features in differentiating pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNETs) grade 1/2 (G1/G2) and pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma grade 3 (PanNEC G3). Patients and methods A total of 59 patients with histologically proven PanNENs and who underwent pretreatment MRI were retrospectively analyzed. Tumor location, size, boundary, cystic or solid appearance, enhancement degree, pancreatic duct dilatation, metastases and MRI signal were evaluated. Apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) were measured on ADC maps. Receiver operating characteristic curve was used to determine the cut off values and the sensitivity and specificity of prediction. Spearman correlation and logistic regression analysis were adopted to identify the association between MRI features and pathological parameters. Results A total of 47 lesions were PanNETs G1/G2 and 12 lesions were PanNEC G3. G1/G2 tumors were more common with well-circumscribed border compared with PanNEC G3. Ill- defined boundary, big size, necrosis, low-moderate enhancement, pancreatic duct dilatation, metastases and high diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) intensity were more common in PanNEC G3 than in PanNETs G1/G2. The ADC values of PanNEC G3 were also significantly lower compared with the PanNETs G1/G2 and normal pancreatic parenchyma. The cut off value of ADC was 0.95×10−3 mm2/s for differentiating PanNEC G3 from PanNETs G1/G2 with 72.3% sensitivity and 91.6% specificity, respectively. Ki-67 index and mitosis count positively correlated with tumor size, pancreatic duct dilatation and metastases (P<0.05) and negatively correlated with ADC values (P<0.01), respectively. Regression analysis further showed that metastases and ADC value were associated with PanNENs grade. Conclusion Metastases and ADC value may have potential for

  10. Increased risk of idiopathic chronic pancreatitis in cystic fibrosis carriers.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Jonathan A; Neoptolemos, John P; Feng, Jinong; Yan, Jin; Jiang, Zefei; Greenhalf, William; McFaul, Christopher; Mountford, Roger; Sommer, Steve S

    2005-10-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a recessive disease caused by mutations of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. The risk of idiopathic chronic pancreatitis (ICP) is increased in individuals who have CFTR genotypes containing a CF-causing mutation plus a second pathogenic allele. It is unknown whether the risk of ICP is increased in CF carriers who have one CF-causing mutation plus one normal allele. In this study, 52 sporadic cases of ICP were ascertained through the European Registry of Hereditary Pancreatitis and Familial Pancreatic Cancer. Individuals with pathogenic cationic trypsinogen mutations were excluded. DNA was comprehensively tested for CFTR mutations using a robotically enhanced, multiplexed, and highly redundant form of single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis followed by DNA sequencing. Fifteen subjects had a total of 18 pathogenic CFTR alleles. Eight subjects had common CF-causing mutations. This group included seven CF carriers in whom the second CFTR allele was normal (4.3 times the expected frequency, P=0.0002). Three subjects had compound heterozygotes genotypes containing two pathogenic alleles (31 times the expected frequency, P<0.0001). A variant allele of uncertain significance (p.R75Q) was detected in eight of the 52 ICP subjects and at a similar frequency (13/96) in random donors. ICP differs from other established CFTR-related conditions in that ICP risk is increased in CF carriers who have one documented normal CFTR allele. Having two CFTR mutations imparts a higher relative risk, while having only one mutation imparts a higher attributable risk.

  11. Solid pseudopapillary epithelial neoplasm--a rare but curable pancreatic tumour in young women.

    PubMed

    Frost, M; Krige, J E J; Bornman, P C; Panieri, E; Beningfield, S J; Wainwright, H

    2011-04-01

    Solid pseudopapillary epithelial neoplasms (SPENs) of the pancreas are rare but curable tumours that have a low-grade malignant potential and occur almost exclusively in young women, with an excellent prognosis after complete resection. This study examines the clinicopathological characteristics of these tumours and evaluates the role of surgery in relation to their size and location. We reviewed the pre-, intra- and postoperative data on 21 patients with SPENs who underwent resection during a 30-year period. Data including demographic information, presenting symptoms and signs, extent of operation, histology, tumour markers and postoperative complications were evaluated to establish the optimal surgical management. All 21 tumours occurred in women (mean age 24.6 years, range 13-51 years). Sixteen patients presented with nonspecific abdominal complaints and a palpable abdominal mass, in 1 patient the tumour was found during emergency laparotomy for a complicated ovarian cyst, 1 patient presented with severe abdominal pain and shock due to a ruptured tumour, and in 3 patients the tumour was detected incidentally during imaging. The correct pre-operative diagnosis of SPEN was made in 10 patients. Incorrect preoperative diagnoses included hydatid cyst (3 patients), mesenteric cyst (2), pancreatic cystadenoma (2), ovarian cysts (1), islet cell tumour of the pancreas (1), and cavernous haemangioma of the liver (1). The mean diameter of the tumours was 12.5 cm (range 8 - 20 cm), and they occurred in the head (8), neck (5), body (2), and tail (6) of the pancreas. All SPENs were resected. Five patients had a pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy, 4 a central pancreatectomy with distal pancreaticogastrostomy, 8 a distal pancreatectomy, 3 a local resection and one a total pancreatectomy and portal vein graft. In 1 patient, 2 liver metastases were resected in addition to the pancreatic primary tumour. The patient who presented in shock with tumour rupture and bleeding

  12. Endoscopic ultrasound and computer tomography are inaccurate methods of classifying cystic pancreatic lesions.

    PubMed

    Gerke, H; Jaffe, T A; Mitchell, R M; Byrne, M F; Stiffler, H L; Branch, M S; Baillie, J; Jowell, P S

    2006-01-01

    Despite advances in imaging modalities, preoperative diagnosis of pancreatic cystic lesions remains difficult. To assess the accuracy of endoscopic ultrasound and computer tomography to preoperatively distinguish benign from potentially malignant and malignant pancreatic cystic lesions. Photograph series obtained from endoscopic ultrasound examinations of 66 patients with cystic pancreatic lesions were blindly reviewed by three endoscopic ultrasonographers. Forty-one of those 66 patients also underwent a computer tomography scan at our institution, which was blindly reviewed by a single radiologist. Computer tomography and endoscopic ultrasound classification into benign and malignant and potentially malignant pancreatic cystic lesions was correlated with the final diagnosis, which was established by surgical pathology (n = 43), diagnostic fine needle aspiration (n = 13) or follow-up imaging (n = 10). Interobserver agreement was measured using kappa statistics. Endoscopic ultrasound classification by the three examiners into benign versus malignant or potentially malignant cystic lesions was correct in 65-67%. Interobserver agreement was 50%. Kappa values for pairs of endoscopic ultrasound examiners were 0.16, 0.43 and 0.53. Computer tomography classification was correct in 71% and in agreement with the endoscopic ultrasound classification in 56-61% (kappa 0.12 to 0.27). Endoscopic ultrasound and computer tomography cannot accurately distinguish between benign pancreatic cystic lesions and malignant or potentially malignant ones. There is poor-to-modest interobserver agreement in classifying these lesions.

  13. Application of Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound in Cystic Pancreatic Lesions Using a Simplified Classification Diagnostic Criterion

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Zhihui; Yan, Kun; Wang, Yanjie; Qiu, Jianxing; Wu, Wei; Yang, Lei; Chen, Minhua

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Classification diagnosis was performed for cystic pancreatic lesions using ultrasound (US) and contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) to explore the diagnostic value of CEUS by comparison with enhanced CT. Methods. Sixty-four cases with cystic pancreatic lesions were included in this study. The cystic lesions of pancreas were classified into four types by US, CEUS, and CT: type I unilocular cysts; type II microcystic lesions; type III macrocystic lesions; and type IV cystic lesions with solid components or irregular thickening of the cystic wall or septa. Results. Eighteen type I, 7 type II, 10 type III, and 29 type IV cases were diagnosed by CT. The classification results by US were as follows: 6 type I; 5 type II; 4 type III; and 49 type IV cases. Compared with the results by enhanced CT, the kappa value was 0.36. Using CEUS, 15, 6, 12, and 31 cases were diagnosed as types I–IV, respectively. The kappa value was 0.77. Conclusion. CEUS has obvious superiority over US in the classification diagnostic accuracy in cystic pancreatic lesions and CEUS results showed substantial agreement with enhanced CT. CEUS could contribute to the differential diagnosis of cystic pancreatic diseases. PMID:26090467

  14. A male case of an undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells originating in an indeterminate mucin-producing cystic neoplasm of the pancreas. A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Wada, Takeyuki; Itano, Osamu; Oshima, Go; Chiba, Naokazu; Ishikawa, Hideki; Koyama, Yasumasa; Du, Wenlin; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2011-09-08

    We report a rare male case of an undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells originating in an indeterminate mucin-producing cystic neoplasm of the pancreas. A 59-year-old Japanese man with diabetes visited our hospital, complaining of fullness in the upper abdomen. A laboratory analysis revealed anemia (Hemoglobin; 9.7 g/dl) and elevated C-reactive protein (3.01 mg/dl). Carbohydrate antigen 19-9 was 274 U/ml and Carcinoembryonic antigen was 29.6 ng/ml. A computed tomography scan of the abdomen revealed a 14-cm cystic mass in the upper left quadrant of the abdomen that appeared to originate from the pancreatic tail. The patient underwent distal pancreatectomy/splenectomy/total gastrectomy/cholecystectomy. The mass consisted of a multilocular cystic lesion. Microscopically, the cyst was lined by cuboidal or columnar epithelium, including mucinous epithelium. Sarcomatous mononuclear cells and multinucleated osteoclast-like giant cells were found in the stroma. Ovarian-type stroma was not seen. We made a diagnosis of osteoclast-like giant cell tumor originating in an indeterminate mucin-producing cystic neoplasm of the pancreas. All surgical margins were negative, however, two peripancreatic lymph nodes were positive. The patient recovered uneventfully. Two months after the operation, multiple metastases occurred in the liver. He died 4 months after the operation.

  15. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Treatment of Pancreatic Cystic and Solid Masses

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic tumor is one of the most difficult diseases to diagnose and treat because of its anatomical location and characteristics. Recently, there have been several innovative trials on the treatment of pancreatic tumors using endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) because it allows selective access to the difficult to reach target organ along the gastrointestinal tract and can differentiate vessels by color Doppler. Among these trials, several have investigated EUS-guided ethanol lavage with or without paclitaxel for pancreatic cystic tumors. These studies show a 33% to 79% complete resolution rate with a favorable safety profile. Compared to EUS-guided ethanol lavage for pancreatic cystic tumors, EUS-guided radiofrequency ablation is considered a less invasive treatment method for pancreatic cancer. Although there are still several difficulties and concerns about complications, one clinical study reported 72.8% feasibility with favorable safety, and therefore, we anticipate the results of ongoing studies with these new less invasive techniques. PMID:26240804

  16. Contrast enhanced transabdominal ultrasound in the characterisation of pancreatic lesions with cystic appearance.

    PubMed

    Beyer-Enke, Stefan A; Hocke, Michael; Ignee, Andre; Braden, Barbara; Dietrich, Christoph F

    2010-09-06

    Contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) has been established for detection and characterisation of liver tumours and differential diagnosis of solid pancreatic lesions. The role of transabdominal CEUS in cystic pancreatic disease is less obvious. We prospectively evaluated CEUS for characterization of undetermined cystic pancreatic lesions with respect to the differential diagnosis of pseudocysts and cystic neoplasia and differentiation between benign and malignant disease (gold standard: histology or cytology). One-hundred and fourteen patients (63 males, 51 females; median age: 62 years, range: 33-87 years) were prospectively examined. Conventional B-mode and transabdominal CEUS. Conventional B-mode (criteria: solid nodules, septae), and contrast enhancing features of cystic pancreatic lesions (microperfusion of solid nodules) were analysed. Final diagnoses were made by surgery (47 patients) or histology/cytology and follow-up of at least one year (67 patients). Fifty patients proved to have neoplastic lesions (37 malignant, 13 of benign origin). Sixty-four patients had pseudocysts caused by acute (27 patients) or chronic pancreatitis (37 patients). Conventional B-mode had a sensitivity of 94% and a low specificity of 44% in the differentiation of pseudocysts versus neoplasia. CEUS had a higher specificity of 77% with the same sensitivity of conventional B-mode ultrasound. The combination of conventional ultrasound and CEUS improved the specificity even more to 97% with an unchanged sensitivity. CEUS was not reliable in the differentiation of benign and malignant neoplasia. CEUS improves the differentiation between pseudocysts and pancreatic neoplasia in comparison to the conventional B-mode imaging. The microvascularisation visualised using CEUS even in small nodules (with or without septae) associated with cystic lesions is an indicator for cystic pancreatic neoplasia.

  17. Lymphoepithelial cysts of the pancreas. Can preoperative imaging distinguish this benign lesion from malignant or pre-malignant cystic pancreatic lesions?

    PubMed

    Kavuturu, Srinivas; Sarwani, Nabeel E; Ruggeiro, Fransesca M; Deshaies, Isabelle; Kimchi, Eric T; Kaifi, Jussuf T; Staveley-O'Carroll, Kevin F; Gusani, Niraj J

    2013-05-10

    Lymphoepithelial cysts of the pancreas are rare true benign cystic tumors of the pancreas of uncertain etiology. Cystic neoplasms of the pancreas present a significant diagnostic dilemma in differentiating benign from premalignant or malignant variants. Since the first description of lymphoepithelial cysts in 1985, 109 cases have been reported in the literature. We describe 6 cases of this rare tumor, the preoperative imaging results, and a review the literature. Five males and one female ranging in age from 47 to 76 years underwent resection for lymphoepithelial cysts. Five patients presented with abdominal pain related to the lesion and in one patient the lesion was discovered incidentally. Four patients had elevated serum CA 19-9 levels. Pre-operative imaging with a CT scan and MRI of the abdomen typically revealed a well defined hypodense mass with Hounsfield units (HU) in the range of 15 to 20. One patient had papillary projections into the lesion. The mean size was 3.3 cm (ranging from 1.8 cm to 4 cm). All lesions were exophytic off the pancreatic parenchyma (1 cyst was located in the head of the pancreas, 2 were in the body, and 3 were in the tail region). Pre-operative EUS-guided/CT-guided needle aspiration, when performed, was not diagnostic. All patients underwent resection (one pancreaticoduodenectomy, five left pancreatectomies) to remove these cystic neoplasms. Pathology revealed a cyst lined by non-dysplastic squamous cells surrounded by sheets of benign lymphocytes. No evidence of malignancy was found. Lymphoepithelial cysts of the pancreas are rare and are characteristically seen in men. While a hypodense mass (less than 20 HU) with papillary projections should be considered suspicious for lymphoepithelial cyst, a definitive diagnosis cannot be made solely based on preoperative imaging. EUS-guided biopsy coupled with biochemical/tumor marker studies are increasingly being used as a diagnostic tool to help differentiate between the various types of

  18. Cystic dystrophy of the duodenal wall is not always associated with chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Pezzilli, Raffaele; Santini, Donatella; Calculli, Lucia; Casadei, Riccardo; Morselli-Labate, Antonio Maria; Imbrogno, Andrea; Fabbri, Dario; Taffurelli, Giovanni; Ricci, Claudio; Corinaldesi, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Cystic dystrophy of the duodenal wall is a rare form of the disease which was described in 1970 by French authors who reported the presence of focal pancreatic disease localized in an area comprising the C-loop of the duodenum and the head of the pancreas. German authors have defined this area as a “groove”. We report our recent experience on cystic dystrophy of the paraduodenal space and systematically review the data in the literature regarding the alterations of this space. A MEDLINE search of papers published between 1966 and 2010 was carried out and 59 papers were considered for the present study; there were 19 cohort studies and 40 case reports. The majority of patients having groove pancreatitis were middle aged. Mean age was significantly higher in patients having groove carcinoma. The diagnosis of cystic dystrophy of the duodenal wall can now be assessed by multidetector computer tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and endoscopic ultrasonography. These latter two techniques may also add more information on the involvement of the remaining pancreatic gland not involved by the duodenal malformation and they may help in differentiating “groove pancreatitis” from “groove adenocarcinoma”. In conclusion, chronic pancreatitis involving the entire pancreatic gland was present in half of the patients with cystic dystrophy of the duodenal wall and, in the majority of them, the pancreatitis had calcifications. PMID:22110260

  19. Ki-67 prognostic and therapeutic decision driven marker for pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (PNENs): A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Pezzilli, Raffaele; Partelli, Stefano; Cannizzaro, Renato; Pagano, Nico; Crippa, Stefano; Pagnanelli, Michele; Falconi, Massimo

    2016-03-01

    We systematically evaluate the current evidence regarding Ki-67 as a prognostic factor in pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms to evaluate the differences of this marker in primary tumors and in distant metastases as well as the values of Ki-67 obtained by fine needle aspiration and by histology. The literature search was carried out using the MEDLINE/PubMed database, and only papers published in the last 10 years were selected. The pancreatic tissue suitable for Ki-67 evaluation was obtained from surgical specimens in the majority of the studies. There was a concordance of 83% between preoperative and postoperative Ki-67 evaluation. Pooling the data of the studies which compared the Ki-67 values obtained in both cytological and surgical specimens, we found that they were not related. The assessment of Ki-67 was manual in the majority of the papers considered for this review. In order to eliminate manual counting, several imaging methods have been developed but none of them are routinely used at present. Twenty-two studies also explored the role of Ki-67 utilized as a prognostic marker for pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms and the majority of them showed that Ki-67 is a good prognostic marker of disease progression. Three studies explored the Ki-67 value in metastatic sites and one study demonstrated that, in metachronous and synchronous liver metastases, there was no significant variation in the index of proliferation. Ki-67 is a reliable prognostic marker for pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms. Copyright © 2015 Medical University of Bialystok. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  20. [Intraoperative ultrasonography in the staging of pancreatic head neoplasms].

    PubMed

    Alberti, Antonino; Dattola, Pasquale; Littori, Francesca; Dattola, Arturo; Maccarone, Pietro; Basile, Maurizio

    2002-01-01

    Tumours of the head of the pancreas constitute the fourth most common cause of cancer deaths. These tumours are characterised by low survival rates (5% at 5 years) and low surgical resectability rates (20-25%). Liver metastases, lymph-node and vascular involvement, and peritoneal metastases are, in our opinion, exclusion criteria for curative surgical resection. The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of intraoperative ultrasonography on the staging of such tumours. Over the period from 1990 to 2000 we introduced intraoperative ultrasonography in the staging of pancreatic cancer. We evaluated 51 patients who at preoperative staging had been regarded as candidates for surgical therapy consisting in a pancreaticoduodenectomy. All patients had been staged by preoperative abdominal ultrasound, ERCP, CT and MRI. Intraoperative ultrasound and colour-Doppler imaging (from 1997 on) revealed involvement of (i) the liver, (ii) the splenomesenteric vessels and (iii) the portal vein. Intraoperative ultrasonography yielded a diagnosis of occult liver metastases in 10 cases and signs of vascular involvement (absence of cleavage, partial and total thrombosis) in 12. One false-negative was registered. Intraoperative ultrasonography in our experience showed 98% sensitivity and specificity in the detection of vascular and lymph-node involvement. Its sensitivity in the detection of liver metastases was 100%. Intraoperative ultrasound is a procedure with a very high sensitivity in the operative staging of cancer of the head of the pancreas.

  1. In silico search for modifier genes associated with pancreatic and liver disease in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Génin, Emmanuelle; Férec, Claude

    2017-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis is the most common lethal autosomal recessive disorder in the white population, affecting among other organs, the lung, the pancreas and the liver. Whereas Cystic Fibrosis is a monogenic disease, many studies reveal a very complex relationship between genotype and clinical phenotype. Indeed, the broad phenotypic spectrum observed in Cystic Fibrosis is far from being explained by obvious genotype-phenotype correlations and it is admitted that Cystic Fibrosis disease is the result of multiple factors, including effects of the environment as well as modifier genes. Our objective was to highlight new modifier genes with potential implications in the lung, pancreatic and liver outcomes of the disease. For this purpose we performed a system biology approach which combined, database mining, literature mining, gene expression study and network analysis as well as pathway enrichment analysis and protein-protein interactions. We found that IFI16, CCNE2 and IGFBP2 are potential modifiers in the altered lung function in Cystic Fibrosis. We also found that EPHX1, HLA-DQA1, HLA-DQB1, DSP and SLC33A1, GPNMB, NCF2, RASGRP1, LGALS3 and PTPN13, are potential modifiers in pancreas and liver, respectively. Associated pathways indicate that immune system is likely involved and that Ubiquitin C is probably a central node, linking Cystic Fibrosis to liver and pancreatic disease. We highlight here new modifier genes with potential implications in Cystic Fibrosis. Nevertheless, our in silico analysis requires functional analysis to give our results a physiological relevance. PMID:28339466

  2. In silico search for modifier genes associated with pancreatic and liver disease in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Trouvé, Pascal; Génin, Emmanuelle; Férec, Claude

    2017-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis is the most common lethal autosomal recessive disorder in the white population, affecting among other organs, the lung, the pancreas and the liver. Whereas Cystic Fibrosis is a monogenic disease, many studies reveal a very complex relationship between genotype and clinical phenotype. Indeed, the broad phenotypic spectrum observed in Cystic Fibrosis is far from being explained by obvious genotype-phenotype correlations and it is admitted that Cystic Fibrosis disease is the result of multiple factors, including effects of the environment as well as modifier genes. Our objective was to highlight new modifier genes with potential implications in the lung, pancreatic and liver outcomes of the disease. For this purpose we performed a system biology approach which combined, database mining, literature mining, gene expression study and network analysis as well as pathway enrichment analysis and protein-protein interactions. We found that IFI16, CCNE2 and IGFBP2 are potential modifiers in the altered lung function in Cystic Fibrosis. We also found that EPHX1, HLA-DQA1, HLA-DQB1, DSP and SLC33A1, GPNMB, NCF2, RASGRP1, LGALS3 and PTPN13, are potential modifiers in pancreas and liver, respectively. Associated pathways indicate that immune system is likely involved and that Ubiquitin C is probably a central node, linking Cystic Fibrosis to liver and pancreatic disease. We highlight here new modifier genes with potential implications in Cystic Fibrosis. Nevertheless, our in silico analysis requires functional analysis to give our results a physiological relevance.

  3. Needle-Based Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy for Evaluation of Cystic Neoplasms of the Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Kadayifci, Abdurrahman; Atar, Mustafa; Basar, Omer; Forcione, David G; Brugge, William R

    2017-05-01

    The accurate diagnosis of cystic neoplasms of the pancreas (CNP) with current diagnostic methods is limited. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided needle-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (nCLE) is a new technique which can obtain images from the cyst wall during EUS-fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA). The aim of this study was to assess the safety, feasibility, and diagnostic value of nCLE for CNP. Patients who underwent EUS-FNA to evaluate a CNP larger than 2 cm were enrolled. The cyst was punctured with 19-G FNA needle preloaded with an nCLE probe. The images from different areas of the cyst wall were recorded. Using the final diagnosis defined by surgery or EUS-FNA cyst fluid analysis, the accuracy of the confocal images was defined. The procedure and image acquisition was successful in 18 of the 20 patients. Predefined typical structures for mucinous cysts were visualized in 8 of 12 (66%) cysts but none of the non-mucinous cysts. The superficial vascular network which is a typical finding of serous cysts was observed in 2 of 3 patients. The sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy of the findings of epithelial structures by nCLE were 66, 100, and 80%, respectively, for a mucinous cyst diagnosis. All patients tolerated the procedure well, and no adverse effects were determined. nCLE was found to be safe and feasible with high technical success, in this pilot study. With an overall accuracy of 80%, it has the potential to contribute to the diagnosis of CNP with specific imaging.

  4. Prostaglandin E2: A Pancreatic Fluid Biomarker of Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Yip-Schneider, Michele T; Carr, Rosalie A; Wu, Huangbing; Schmidt, C Max

    2017-10-01

    With the increased frequency of diagnostic imaging, pancreatic cysts are now detected in >3% of American adults. Most of these are intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) with well-established but variable malignant potential. A biomarker that predicts malignant potential or dysplastic grade would help determine which IPMNs require removal and which can be observed safely. We previously reported that pancreatic fluid prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) levels might have promise as a predictor of IPMN dysplasia and we seek to validate those results in the current study. Pancreatic cyst/duct fluid was prospectively collected from 100 patients with IPMN undergoing pancreatic resection. Surgical pathology revealed 47 low-/moderate-grade, 34 high-grade, and 20 invasive IPMNs. The PGE2 levels were assessed by ELISA and correlated with IPMN dysplasia grade, demographics, clinical radiologic/pathologic variables, acute/chronic pancreatitis, and NSAID use. Mean pancreatic cyst fluid PGE2 levels in high-grade and invasive IPMNs were significantly higher than low-/moderate-grade IPMNs (3.5 and 4.4 pg/μL, respectively, vs 1.2 pg/μL; p < 0.0016). At a threshold of 1.1 pg/μL, PGE2 was 63% sensitive, 79% specific, and 71% accurate for detection of high-grade/invasive IPMNs. When tested in the subset of IPMN patients with preoperative pancreatic cyst fluid CEA >192 ng/mL, PGE2 at a threshold of 0.5 pg/μL demonstrated 78% sensitivity, 100% specificity, and 86% accuracy for detection of high-grade/invasive IPMN. Our results validate pancreatic cyst fluid PGE2 as an indicator of IPMN dysplasia, especially in select patients with preoperative pancreatic cyst fluid CEA >192 ng/mL. The inclusion of PGE2/CEA in a diagnostic biomarker panel can facilitate more optimal treatment stratification of IPMN patients. Copyright © 2017 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. My Treatment Approach: Pancreatic Cysts.

    PubMed

    Basar, Omer; Brugge, William R

    2017-09-07

    Our treatment approach for either symptomatic or incidentally found pancreatic cysts continues to improve. The true incidence of pancreatic cysts is not known, and pancreatic cystic neoplasms, especially intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, are currently most commonly diagnosed and resected. This is a result of increasing awareness, widespread availability of imaging, and better understanding of the nature of pancreatic cysts as well. Recent studies on molecular analysis and devices such as microbiopsy forceps help us better define and select the treatment approach to alleviate symptoms and to prevent malignant tumors while avoiding unnecessary surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Modeling Cystic Fibrosis Using Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Human Pancreatic Ductal Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Simsek, Senem; Zhou, Ting; Robinson, Christopher L; Tsai, Su-Yi; Crespo, Miguel; Amin, Sadaf; Lin, Xiangyi; Hon, Jane; Evans, Todd; Chen, Shuibing

    2016-05-01

    We established an efficient strategy to direct human pluripotent stem cells, including human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and an induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) line derived from patients with cystic fibrosis, to differentiate into pancreatic ductal epithelial cells (PDECs). After purification, more than 98% of hESC-derived PDECs expressed functional cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. In addition, iPSC lines were derived from a patient with CF carrying compound frameshift and mRNA splicing mutations and were differentiated to PDECs. PDECs derived from Weill Cornell cystic fibrosis (WCCF)-iPSCs showed defective expression of mature CFTR protein and impaired chloride ion channel activity, recapitulating functional defects of patients with CF at the cellular level. These studies provide a new methodology to derive pure PDECs expressing CFTR and establish a "disease in a dish" platform to identify drug candidates to rescue the pancreatic defects of patients with CF. An efficient strategy was established to direct human pluripotent stem cells, including human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and an induced pluripotent stem cell line derived from patients with cystic fibrosis (CF-iPSCs), to differentiate into pancreatic ductal epithelial cells (PDECs). After purification, more than 98% of hESC-PDECs derived from CF-iPSCs showed defective expression of mature cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein and impaired chloride ion channel activity, recapitulating functional pancreatic defects of patients with CF at the cellular level. These studies provide a new methodology for deriving pure PDECs expressing CFTR, and they establish a "disease-in-a-dish" platform for identifying drug candidates to rescue the pancreatic defects of these patients. ©AlphaMed Press.

  7. Squamoid Cystosis of Pancreatic Ducts: A Variant of a Newly-Described Cystic Lesion, with Evidence for an Obstructive Etiology

    PubMed Central

    Foo, Wai Chin; Wang, Huamin; Prieto, Victor G.; Fleming, Jason B.; Abraham, Susan C.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a 40-year-old man who was found to have a cystic mass in the pancreatic tail during workup for weight loss and abdominal discomfort. Although computed tomography scan showed a single cyst associated with dilatation of the main pancreatic duct, gross and histologic examination of the distal pancreatectomy specimen actually revealed a central cyst that was surrounded by multiple smaller cystic spaces. This distinctive appearance was formed from extensive cystic dilatation and squamous metaplasia of the native pancreatic duct system. Further, a traumatic neuroma was discovered near the junction between normal and abnormal parenchyma. We believe that this case represents a variant of the newly-described squamoid cyst of pancreatic ducts which we term squamoid cystosis of pancreatic ducts. The presence of chronic pancreatitis and a traumatic neuroma supports the hypothesis that squamoid cysts are non-neoplastic lesions arising from prior duct obstruction. PMID:25276318

  8. Metastatic pancreatic carcinoma masquerading as cystic lung disease: a rare presentation.

    PubMed

    Stern, Emily; Huseini, Taha; Kuok, YiJin; Lake, Fiona

    2017-09-01

    This 52-year-old male ex-smoker presented with a six-month history of progressive breathlessness and weight loss. He deteriorated acutely, and was admitted with severe type 1 respiratory failure. Apart from diffuse coarse crackles on chest auscultation, physical examination was unremarkable. High-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) showed diffuse cystic changes throughout the lungs. A diagnosis of pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis (PLCH) was considered. Further workup identified a coincidental pancreatic lesion of uncertain significance, which remained indeterminate on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and on positron emission tomography (PET). Transbronchial biopsy revealed enteric differentiated adenocarcinoma exhibiting lepidic spread, and autopsy later confirmed primary pancreatic malignancy. This case demonstrates that metastatic pancreatic malignancy can present with severe respiratory failure and masquerade as cystic lung disease.

  9. Long-term experience with ZENPEP in infants with exocrine pancreatic insufficiency associated with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Wooldridge, Jamie L; Schaeffer, David; Jacobs, David; Thieroff-Ekerdt, Ruth

    2014-11-01

    The objective of our study was to determine whether infants with cystic fibrosis who developed exocrine pancreatic insufficiency in early infancy would tolerate long-term treatment with ZENPEP (pancrelipase) delayed-release capsules, containing 3000 US Pharmacopeia units of lipase/capsule, and demonstrate consistent long-term growth. The most common treatment-emergent adverse events were diarrhea, vomiting, and constipation (mild or moderate). At study completion, median weight-for-age percentiles increased from 22nd to 49th, median length-for-age percentiles increased from 36.5th to 42nd, and median weight-for-length percentiles increased from 41.5th to 55.5th. Long-term treatment (up to 12 months) of infants with exocrine pancreatic insufficiency owing to cystic fibrosis with ZENPEP was well tolerated and associated with improved growth parameters. This is the first long-term study of pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy conducted in this patient population.

  10. Pancreatic mixed serous neuroendocrine neoplasm with clear cells leading to diagnosis of von Hippel Lindau disease.

    PubMed

    Kakkar, Aanchal; Sharma, Mehar C; Yadav, Rajni; Panwar, Rajesh; Mathur, Sandeep R; Iyer, Venkateswaran K; Sahni, Peush

    2016-08-01

    Mixed serous neuroendocrine neoplasms are extremely rare tumors that are usually seen in female patients and are often associated with von Hippel Lindau (VHL) disease. We describe the case of a 38-year-old male who presented with complaints of anorexia, weight loss, and abdominal pain. CT abdomen showed a mass in the head of the pancreas, multiple small nodules in the body of pancreas, and bilateral adrenal masses. Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) from the mass showed features of a neuroendocrine tumor, with many of the cells demonstrating abundant clear cytoplasm. Histopathological examination of the pancreaticoduodenectomy specimen showed a mixed serous neuroendocrine neoplasm with two components viz. serous cystadenoma and neuroendocrine tumor (NET) World Health Organization (WHO) grade 2. In addition, he was diagnosed to have bilateral pheochromocytomas and a paraganglioma. The synchronicity of these tumors suggested the possibility of VHL disease. Thus, identification of a NET with clear cells or of a mixed serous neuroendocrine neoplasm should raise suspicion of VHL disease. In a mixed tumor, FNAC may identify only one of the two components. Thorough processing of all pancreatic serous tumors for pathological examination is recommended, as NET may occur as a small nodule within the serous cystadenoma.

  11. Non-pancreatic retroperitoneal mucinous neoplasms and a discussion of the differential diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Cobb, Camilla; Raza, Anwar Sultana

    2016-01-01

    Retroperitoneal mucinous neoplasms are common and have a wide range of differential diagnoses to consider. It is of utmost importance to maintain a multidisciplinary approach when evaluating these lesions. Clinical history, surgical impression and radiographic studies should be obtained and used in conjunction with morphology and immunohistochemistry to help guide the pathologist to the correct diagnosis. We recently encountered a case of a 51-year-old man who presented with an 11.5 cm left-sided retroperitoneal mucinous neoplasm. This lesion was initially diagnosed as a low-grade mucinous carcinoma of probable pancreatic origin at an outside facility, and he was subsequently treated with chemotherapy. One year later he presented to our institution and underwent retroperitoneal en bloc resection of the 7-cm residual multiloculated mucinous neoplasm. When discussed at tumor board additional medical history was obtained, and review of the patient’s chart revealed a remote history of left orchiectomy for a mixed malignant germ cell tumor and metastatic embryonal carcinoma in 2 of 34 retroperitoneal/para-aortic lymph nodes. With no clinical evidence of tumor in the pancreas or extension from it, the predominately para-aortic location of the tumor favors a mucinous carcinoma arising from a rest of mature metastatic/proliferating teratoma that persisted after chemotherapy. This case illustrates the importance of a thorough history, however remote, and correlation with imaging in the development of differential diagnoses, as well as, the need to consider non-pancreaticobiliary sources of retroperitoneal mucinous tumors. PMID:27034817

  12. Acinar neoplasms of the pancreas-A summary of 25 years of research.

    PubMed

    Klimstra, David S; Adsay, Volkan

    2016-09-01

    Our understanding about the family of acinar neoplasms of the pancreas has grown substantially over the past 25 years. The prototype is acinar cell carcinoma, an uncommon variant of pancreatic carcinoma that demonstrates production of pancreatic exocrine enzymes, verifiable using immunohistochemistry, and exhibits characteristic histologic features. Related neoplasms include mixed acinar carcinomas such as mixed acinar neuroendocrine carcinoma and mixed acinar ductal carcinoma. In the pediatric age group, pancreatoblastoma is also closely related. Cystic and extrapancreatic forms have been described. These neoplasms share molecular alterations that are distinct from the more common ductal and neuroendocrine neoplasms of the pancreas. Although there is a broad range of genetic findings, a number of potential therapeutic targets have emerged. This review explores the clinical and pathologic features of pancreatic acinar neoplasms along with their more common molecular phenotypes. The differential diagnosis with other pancreatic neoplasms is explored as well.

  13. Successful selective internal radiotherapy (SIRT) in a patient with a malignant solid pseudopapillary pancreatic neoplasm (SPN).

    PubMed

    Krug, S; Bartsch, D K; Schober, M; Librizzi, D; Pfestroff, A; Burbelko, M; Moll, R; Michl, P; Gress, T M

    2012-01-01

    Solid pseudopapillary neoplasms of the pancreas (SPNs, Gruber-Frantz-Tumor) are a rare entity representing 1-5% of all exocrine pancreatic tumors. The pseudocystic lesions preferentially affect young females <30 years, are mostly benign (∼90%) and normally present with unspecific symptoms. We describe the case of a 16-years-old Asian woman that was initially diagnosed with an SPN in the pancreatic head with mesenterial and hepatic metastases. After diagnosis, an extensive tumor resection was performed including pyloric-preserving pancreatic head resection followed by sequential resection of all hepatic metastases. After the patient was diagnosed with a hepatic recurrence and high intrahepatic tumor load, we chose a multimodal procedure and performed a selective internal radiotherapy (SIRT). Four years after SIRT and 10 years after initial diagnosis of metastatic SPN, the patient is in a good condition without any evidence for hepatic recurrence. This case represents a rare clinical course of a malignant and invasive SPN with an exceptionally long survival despite of high initial tumor burden. The selective internal radiotherapy is a suitable approach for inducing long-term remissions of the strongly vascularized liver metastases.

  14. Diagnostic and therapeutic guidelines for gastro-entero-pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (recommended by the Polish Network of Neuroendocrine Tumours).

    PubMed

    Kos-Kudła, Beata; Blicharz-Dorniak, Jolanta; Handkiewicz-Junak, Daria; Jarząb, Barbara; Jarząb, Michał; Kunikowska, Jolanta; Kuśnierz, Katarzyna; Król, Robert; Królicki, Leszek; Krzakowski, Maciej; Nasierowska-Guttmejer, Anna; Nowakowska-Duława, Ewa; Patkowski, Waldemar; Szawłowski, Andrzej W

    2013-01-01

    An increased interest in gastro-entero-pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (GEP NENs) has recently been observed. These are rare neoplasms and their detection in recent years has improved. Over 50% of GEP NENs are carcinoids, and they are usually found incidentally during surgery in the small intestine and appendix and at diagnosis in distant metastases, mainly to the liver. There is a need for co-operation between specialists in various disciplines of medicine in order to work out the diagnostic and therapeutic guidelines. In this publication, we present general recommendations of the Polish Network of Neuroendocrine Tumours for the management of patients with GEP NENs, developed at the Consensus Conference which took place in Kamień Śląski in April 2013. Members of the guidelines working groups were assigned sections of the 2008 guidance to update. In the subsequent parts of this publication, we present the rules of diagnostic and therapeutic management of: - neuroendocrine neoplasms of the stomach and duodenum (including gastrinoma); - pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms; - neuroendocrine neoplasms of the small intestine and the appendix; - colorectal neuroendocrine neoplasms. The proposed recommendations by Polish and foreign experts representing different fields of medicine (endocrinology, gastroenterology, surgery, oncology, nuclear medicine and pathology) will be helpful in the diagnosis and treatment of GEP NENs patients.

  15. Gli2 protein expression level is a feasible marker of ligand-dependent hedgehog activation in pancreatic neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Y; Sasajima, J; Mizukami, Y; Koizumi, K; Kawamoto, T; Ono, Y; Karasaki, H; Tanabe, H; Fujiya, M; Kohgo, Y

    2016-06-01

    The hedgehog pathway is known to promote proliferation of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) and has been shown to restrain tumor progression. To understand how hedgehog causes these effects, we sought to carefully examine protein expression of hedgehog signaling components during different tumor stages. Genetically engineered mice, Pdx1-Cre;LSL-KrasG12D and Pdx1-Cre;LSL-KrasG12D;p53lox/+, were utilized to model distinct phases of tumorigenesis, pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasm (PanIN) and PDA. Human pancreatic specimens of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) and PDA were also employed. PanIN and IPMN lesions highly express Sonic Hedgehog, at a level that is slightly higher than that observed in PDA. GLI2 protein is also expressed in both PanIN/IPMN and PDA. Although there was no difference in the nuclear staining, the cytoplasmic GLI2 level in PDA was modest in comparison to that in PanIN/IPMN. Hedgehog interacting protein was strongly expressed in the precursors, whereas the level in PDA was significantly attenuated. There were no differences in expression of Patched1 at early and late stages. Finally, a strong correlation between Sonic Hedgehog and GLI2 staining was found in both human and murine pancreatic tumors. The results indicate that the GLI2 protein level could serve as a feasible marker of ligand-dependent hedgehog activation in pancreatic neoplasms.

  16. Giant mucinous cystic adenoma with pancreatic atrophy mimicking dorsal agenesis of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Gagnière, Johan; Dupré, Aurélien; Ines, David Da; Tixier, Lucie; Pezet, Denis; Buc, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Mucinous cystic adenoma (MCA) of the pancreas is a rare benign cystic tumor with ovarian-like stroma and lack of communication with the pancreatic ductal system. The ovarian tissue is incorporated from the left gonad within the dorsal pancreas during embryogenesis. Consequently, congenital dorsal agenesis of the pancreas (DAP) cannot be associated with MCA. We report the case of a giant MCA associated with atrophy of the dorsal pancreas mimicking complete DAP. Pancreato-magnetic resonance imaging failed to identify the dorsal pancreas but the absence of diabetes mellitus and compression of the splenic vein with major tributaries rectified the diagnosis of secondary atrophy of the distal pancreas. Unusual proximal location of the cyst in the pancreas may have induced chronic obstruction of both the dorsal pancreatic duct and the splenic vein, with secondary atrophy of the distal pancreas. PMID:24672649

  17. Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Neoplasms: Basic Biology, Current Treatment Strategies and Prospects for the Future.

    PubMed

    Ohmoto, Akihiro; Rokutan, Hirofumi; Yachida, Shinichi

    2017-01-13

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (pNENs) are rare tumors accounting for only 1%-2% of all pancreatic tumors. pNENs are pathologically heterogeneous and are categorized into three groups (neuroendocrine tumor: NET G1, NET G2; and neuroendocrine carcinoma: NEC) on the basis of the Ki-67 proliferation index and the mitotic count according to the 2010 World Health Organization (WHO) classification of gastroenteropancreatic NENs. NEC in this classification includes both histologically well-differentiated and poorly differentiated subtypes, and modification of the WHO 2010 classification is under discussion based on genetic and clinical data. Genomic analysis has revealed NETs G1/G2 have genetic alterations in chromatin remodeling genes such as MEN1, DAXX and ATRX, whereas NECs have an inactivation of TP53 and RB1, and these data suggest that different treatment approaches would be required for NET G1/G2 and NEC. While there are promising molecular targeted drugs, such as everolimus or sunitinib, for advanced NET G1/G2, treatment stratification based on appropriate predictive and prognostic biomarkers is becoming an important issue. The clinical outcome of NEC is still dismal, and a more detailed understanding of the genetic background together with preclinical studies to develop new agents, including those already under investigation for small cell lung cancer (SCLC), will be needed to improve the prognosis.

  18. Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Neoplasms: Basic Biology, Current Treatment Strategies and Prospects for the Future

    PubMed Central

    Ohmoto, Akihiro; Rokutan, Hirofumi; Yachida, Shinichi

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (pNENs) are rare tumors accounting for only 1%–2% of all pancreatic tumors. pNENs are pathologically heterogeneous and are categorized into three groups (neuroendocrine tumor: NET G1, NET G2; and neuroendocrine carcinoma: NEC) on the basis of the Ki-67 proliferation index and the mitotic count according to the 2010 World Health Organization (WHO) classification of gastroenteropancreatic NENs. NEC in this classification includes both histologically well-differentiated and poorly differentiated subtypes, and modification of the WHO 2010 classification is under discussion based on genetic and clinical data. Genomic analysis has revealed NETs G1/G2 have genetic alterations in chromatin remodeling genes such as MEN1, DAXX and ATRX, whereas NECs have an inactivation of TP53 and RB1, and these data suggest that different treatment approaches would be required for NET G1/G2 and NEC. While there are promising molecular targeted drugs, such as everolimus or sunitinib, for advanced NET G1/G2, treatment stratification based on appropriate predictive and prognostic biomarkers is becoming an important issue. The clinical outcome of NEC is still dismal, and a more detailed understanding of the genetic background together with preclinical studies to develop new agents, including those already under investigation for small cell lung cancer (SCLC), will be needed to improve the prognosis. PMID:28098761

  19. Asymptomatic Pancreatic Cyst Neoplasms: Maximizing Survival and Quality of Life Using Markov-based Clinical Nomograms

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Benjamin M.; Spiegel, Brennan M.R.; Tomlinson, James S.; Farrell, James J.

    2010-01-01

    Background The natural history and management of pancreatic cysts, especially for branch duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (BD-IPMNs), remains uncertain. We developed evidence-based nomograms to assist with clinical decision-making. Methods We used decision analysis with Markov modeling to compare competing management strategies in a patient with a pancreatic head cyst radiographically suggestive of BD-IPMN, including: (1) initial pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD), (2) yearly non-invasive radiographic surveillance, (3) yearly invasive surveillance with endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), and (4) “do nothing.” We derived probability estimates systematic literature review. The primary outcomes were overall and quality-adjusted survival. We depicted the results in a series of nomograms accounting for age, co-morbidities, and cyst size. Results Initial PD was the dominant strategy to maximize overall survival for any cyst >2cm, regardless of age or comorbidities. In contrast, surveillance was the dominant strategy for any lesion <1cm. However, when measuring quality-adjusted survival, the “do nothing” approach maximized quality of life for all cysts <3cm in patients aged <75. Once age exceeded 85 years, non-invasive surveillance dominated. Initial PD did not maximize quality of life in any age group or cyst size. Concousions Management of pancreatic cysts can be guided using novel Markov-based clinical nomograms, and depends on age, cyst size, comorbidities, and whether patients value overall survival vs. quality-adjusted survival. For patients focused on overall survival, regardless of quality of life, surgery is optimal for lesions >2cm. For patients focused on quality-adjusted survival, a 3cm threshold is more appropriate for surgery except for the extreme elderly. PMID:19818780

  20. DOG1 (clone K9) is seldom expressed and not useful in the evaluation of pancreatic neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Hemminger, Jessica; Marsh, William L; Iwenofu, Obiajulu Hans; Frankel, Wendy L

    2012-07-01

    DOG1, a transmembrane calcium-regulated chloride channel protein, is a sensitive and specific marker for gastrointestinal stromal tumors compared with other spindle cell and epithelioid neoplasms. Overexpression has also been described in a variety of both benign and malignant epithelial neoplasms. Recently, DOG1 immunoreactivity has been reported in pancreatic solid pseudopapillary tumors (SPT), suggesting a role as a marker for SPT. Utilizing immunohistochemistry, we evaluated DOG1 expression in pancreatic neoplasms to determine the prevalence of staining and establish diagnostic utility. Multiple tissue microarrays (TMA) were created from cores of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded blocks containing pancreatic adenocarcinomas (n=112), neuroendocrine tumors (n=99), serous cystadenomas (n=28), and SPT (n=14) as well as normal pancreas (n=12). Immunoreactivity for DOG1 (clone K9) was assessed for intensity (1 to 3+), percentage of tumor positivity and location. Of the 99 cases of neuroendocrine tumors, only 2 (2%) were focally positive. Patchy staining was identified in 8 cases (7%) of adenocarcinoma of 1 to 2+ intensity, involving 15% to 80% of the tumor cells and primarily seen in a membranous and luminal distribution. In contrast to a previous report, no DOG1 positivity was observed in SPT, evaluated by both TMA and full sections. The TMAs of serous cystadenomas and normal pancreas were negative for DOG1. Rarely, pancreatic islets displayed granular, cytoplasmic staining. DOG1 antibody clone K9 is not a useful marker for SPT or other primary pancreatic neoplasms. Additional studies may be helpful to evaluate differences between clones of DOG1.

  1. 851 resected cystic tumors of the pancreas: A 33-year experience at the Massachusetts General Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Valsangkar, Nakul P.; Morales-Oyarvide, Vicente; Thayer, Sarah P.; Ferrone, Cristina R.; Wargo, Jennifer A.; Warshaw, Andrew L.; Castillo, Carlos Fernández-del

    2013-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to identify trends in the diagnosis and treatment of cystic neoplasms of the pancreas using a retrospective review of patients from a surgical database at an academic referral center during a 33-year period. Methods Patient characteristics, including demographics, pathology, and survival, were analyzed over 5 time periods between 1978 and 2011. Results A total of 851 consecutive patients underwent resection for a cystic neoplasm of the pancreas during a 33-year period. Sixty-five percent of patients were female, and mean age was 60 years. The most common pathologic diagnoses were intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (38%), mucinous cystic neoplasm (23%), serous cystadenoma (16%), and cystic neuroendocrine neoplasm (7%). There was a stepwise increase in the number of resections across time periods (67 between 1978 and 1989; 376 between 2005 and 2011), with a parallel increase in the proportion of incidentally discovered lesions (22% to 50%). Diagnosis of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm was very uncommon in the first 2 time periods (before the first recognition of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm as a distinct entity) but predominated in the last 2 (41% and 49%), and cystic neuroendocrine neoplasms, which constituted 3% of the cystic neoplasms in the first time-period, now comprise more than 8% of pancreatic cystic neoplasms. The proportion of malignant neoplasms decreased over time (41% between 1978 and 1989; 12% between 2005 and 2011), reflecting probably the earlier diagnosis and treatment of premalignant neoplasms. Although operative mortality was minimal (4/849, 0.5%), the postoperative complication rate was 38%. Overall 5-year survival for all mucinous lesions was 87%. Conclusion Cystic neoplasms of the pancreas are being diagnosed and treated with increasing frequency. At present, most are incidentally discovered intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms. (Surgery 2012;152:S4–12.) PMID:22770958

  2. Digital next-generation sequencing identifies low-abundance mutations in pancreatic juice samples collected from the duodenum of patients with pancreatic cancer and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jun; Sadakari, Yoshihiko; Shindo, Koji; Suenaga, Masaya; Brant, Aaron; Almario, Jose Alejandro Navarro; Borges, Michael; Barkley, Thomas; Fesharakizadeh, Shahriar; Ford, Madeline; Hruban, Ralph H; Shin, Eun Ji; Lennon, Anne Marie; Canto, Marcia Irene; Goggins, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Objective Secretin-stimulated pancreatic juice contains DNA shed from cells lining the pancreatic ducts. Genetic analysis of this fluid may form a test to detect pancreatic ductal neoplasia. Design We employed digital next-generation sequencing (‘digital NGS’) to detect low-abundance mutations in secretin-stimulated juice samples collected from the duodenum of subjects enrolled in Cancer of the Pancreas Screening studies at Johns Hopkins Hospital. For each juice sample, digital NGS necessitated 96 NGS reactions sequencing nine genes. The study population included 115 subjects (53 discovery, 62 validation) (1) with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), (2) intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN), (3) controls with non-suspicious pancreata. Results Cases with PDAC and IPMN were more likely to have mutant DNA detected in pancreatic juice than controls (both p<0.0001); mutant DNA concentrations were higher in patients with PDAC than IPMN (p=0.003) or controls (p<0.001). TP53 and/or SMAD4 mutations were commonly detected in juice samples from patients with PDAC and were not detected in controls (p<0.0001); mutant TP53/SMAD4 concentrations could distinguish PDAC from IPMN cases with 32.4% sensitivity, 100% specificity (area under the curve, AUC 0.73, p=0.0002) and controls (AUC 0.82, p<0.0001). Two of four patients who developed pancreatic cancer despite close surveillance had SMAD4/TP53 mutations from their cancer detected in juice samples collected over 1 year prior to their pancreatic cancer diagnosis when no suspicious pancreatic lesions were detected by imaging. Conclusions The detection in pancreatic juice of mutations important for the progression of low-grade dysplasia to high-grade dysplasia and invasive pancreatic cancer may improve the management of patients undergoing pancreatic screening and surveillance. PMID:27432539

  3. Differentiating Simple Hepatic Cysts from Mucinous Cystic Neoplasms: Radiological Features, Cyst Fluid Tumour Marker Analysis and Multidisciplinary Team Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Labib, Peter Lawrence Zaki; Aroori, Somaiah; Bowles, Matthew; Stell, David; Briggs, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    Differentiating hepatic mucinous cystic neoplasms (MCNs) from simple hepatic cysts (SCs) preoperatively is a challenging task. Our aim was to determine whether radiological features on ultrasound scan (USS), CT or MRI, cyst fluid tumour markers, or multidisciplinary team (MDT) outcomes could differentiate MCN from SC. A retrospective review of radiological features, cyst fluid tumour marker levels and MDT outcomes in 52 patients was performed. There were 13 patients with MCN, 38 with SC and one ciliated foregut cyst. MCNs were more often solitary (p = 0.006). Although no other individual radiological characteristic on USS, CT or MRI was predictive of MCN, MDT outcomes stating that a cyst was complex in nature were highly predictive (p = 0.0007). Cyst fluid carbohydrate antigen 19-9, carcino-embryonic antigen and cancer antigen 125 were unable to differentiate MCN from SC (p = 0.45, p = 0.49, and p = 0.73, respectively). MDT outcomes are of greatest value when trying to differentiate MCN from SC, as well as having a solitary cyst on imaging. Conventional cyst fluid tumour markers are unhelpful. All suspicious cystic liver lesions should be discussed pre-operatively by a hepatobiliary MDT to determine the most appropriate surgical approach. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Cystic tumors of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Morana, Giovanni; Guarise, Alessandro

    2006-01-01

    Cystic tumors of the pancreas are less frequent than solid lesions and are often detected incidentally, as many of these lesions are small and asymptomatic. However, they may be associated with pancreatitis or have malignant potential. With advancements in diagnostic imaging, cystic lesions of the pancreas are being detected with increasing frequency. Many lesions can cause a pancreatic cyst, most being non-neoplastic while approximately 10% are cystic tumors, ranging from benign to highly malignant tumors. With increasing experience it is becoming clear that the prevalence of pseudocyst among cystic lesions of the pancreas is lower than usually presumed. A presumptive diagnosis of pseudocyst based on imaging appearance alone can cause a diagnostic error, and neoplastic cysts of the pancreas are particularly susceptible to this misdiagnosis, which can result in inappropriate treatment. Cystic tumors of the pancreas are formed by serous or mucinous structures showing all stages of cellular differentiation. According to the WHO classification, they can be subdivided on the basis of their histological type and biological behavior into benign tumors, borderline tumors, and malignant tumors. Cystic pancreatic tumors can be subdivided into peripheral (serous cystadenomas, mucinous cystic tumors, solid and papillary epithelial neoplasms, cystic islet cell tumors), which do not communicate with the main pancreatic duct, and ductal tumors (mucinous tumor), according to their site of origin. On the basis of imaging criteria alone, it can be very difficult to differentiate non-tumoral cystic lesions from neoplastic ones. The management of these patients is complex, and it is important to correlate imaging findings with knowledge of the patient’s symptoms and of the natural history and predictors of malignancy in pancreatic cysts. PMID:16861136

  5. Stage IV Gastro-Entero-Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Neoplasms: A Risk Score to Predict Clinical Outcome.

    PubMed

    Panzuto, Francesco; Merola, Elettra; Pavel, Marianne Ellen; Rinke, Anja; Kump, Patrizia; Partelli, Stefano; Rinzivillo, Maria; Rodriguez-Laval, Victor; Pape, Ulrich Frank; Lipp, Rainer; Gress, Thomas; Wiedenmann, Bertram; Falconi, Massimo; Delle Fave, Gianfranco

    2017-04-01

    Several risk factors predict clinical outcome in gastro-entero-pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (GEP-NENs); however, the impact of their combination has not been investigated so far. A retrospective analysis of stage IV GEP-NENs was performed. Multivariate analysis for progression of disease (PD) was performed by Cox proportional hazards method to obtain a risk score. Area under the curve obtained by receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to assess the score performance. Progression-free survival analysis was performed by Kaplan-Meier method. Two hundred eighty-three stage IV GEP-NENs were evaluated, including 93 grade 1 neuroendocrine tumors (32.9%), 153 grade 2 neuroendocrine tumors (54%), and 37 grade 3 neuroendocrine carcinomas (13.1%). Independent risk factors for PD were Ki67, proportion of metastatic liver involvement, and presence of extra-abdominal metastases. The risk score was calculated as follows: (0.025 × Ki67) + [(0 if no liver metastases or liver involvement <25%) OR (0.405 if liver involvement 25%-50%) OR (0.462 if liver involvement >50%)] + [(0 if no extra-abdominal metastases) OR (0.528 if extra-abdominal metastases present)]. The risk score accuracy to predict PD was superior compared with the G grading system (area under the curve: 0.705 and 0.622, respectively). Three subgroups of patients with low, intermediate, and high risk of PD according to risk score were identified, median progression-free survival being 26 months, 19 months, and 12 months, respectively. In stage IV GEP-NENs, a risk score able to predict PD was obtained by combining Ki67, proportion of metastatic liver involvement, and presence of extra-abdominal metastases. The score may help to discriminate patients with different progression risk level to plan tailored therapeutic approaches and follow-up programs. The Oncologist 2017;22:409-415Implications for Practice: Clinical outcome of patients with advanced gastro-entero-pancreatic neuroendocrine

  6. Nab-paclitaxel and Gemcitabine vs Gemcitabine Alone as Adjuvant Therapy for Patients With Resected Pancreatic Cancer (the "Apact" Study)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-08-31

    Pancreatic Neoplasms; Digestive System Neoplasms; Neoplasms by Site; Neoplasms; Endocrine Gland Neoplasms; Pancreatic Diseases; Digestive System Diseases; Endocrine System Diseases; Gemcitabine; Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic

  7. Case report of pancreatic dermoid cyst: can fine needle aspiration make the diagnosis?

    PubMed

    Lyons, Daniel A; Coberly, Emily A; Hammoud, Ghassan M; Nicholl, Michael B

    2013-11-10

    Pancreatic dermoid cysts are rare, benign, germ cell tumors and part of the differential diagnosis for cystic neoplasms of the pancreas. A 35-year-old man presented with an incidentally discovered, 2 cm cystic pancreatic neoplasm of the pancreatic tail identified on CT scan. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) revealed a complex, honeycomb lesion. Fine needle aspiration (FNA) yielded a sample of whitish, necrotic material containing histiocytes, benign epithelial cells, and lymphocytes. After distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy was performed, histology revealed a cyst lined by stratified squamous epithelium with benign sebaceous units consistent with a pancreatic dermoid cysts. Although axial imaging reliably detects cystic neoplasms of the pancreas, diagnostic criteria for rare lesions are lacking; therefore alternative modalities such as EUS/FNA can be utilized. This case report highlights the EUS and FNA findings associated with pancreatic dermoid cysts.

  8. Laparoscopic vs open resection of pancreatic endocrine neoplasms: single institution's experience over 14 years.

    PubMed

    Gumbs, Andrew A; Grès, Philippe; Madureira, Fabio; Gayet, Brice

    2008-05-01

    Laparoscopic resection of benign pancreatic endocrine neoplasms (PENs) has become the standard of care for tumors in the pancreatic tail. Over a 14-year period, we have resected both benign and malignant tumors of the entire pancreas laparoscopically and compared our survival and complication rates with open controls. We collected our data retrospectively and reviewed our outcomes with an actuarial 5-year survival according to Kaplan-Meier. Patients who underwent minimally invasive techniques were compared to patients who were approached with open techniques. From April 1992 to September 2006, we operated on 31 patients for PENs: 13 (42%) were operated on using open techniques and 18 (58%) laparoscopically, and conversion occurred in one patient (6%). In the laparoscopic group, eight (47%) tumors were malignant compared to six (43%) in the open group. Operative times averaged 188 min for the minimally invasive approach and 305 min for the open approach (p = 0.02). Length of stay was 25 days (range 8-82) for the laparoscopic group compared to 20 days (range 6-63; p > 0.05). Overall morbidity and fistula rates ranged from 67 to 24% in the laparoscopic group to 69 to 38% in the open group (p > 0.05). There were no postoperative mortalities. The average follow-up was 63 months for the open group and 33 months for the laparoscopic group. The overall actuarial survival rates were both 90% at 5 years. Laparoscopic resection of benign and malignant PENs has similar overall complication and 5-year survival rates as the open technique; however, the laparoscopic approach is associated with shorter operative times.

  9. Gastric outlet obstruction secondary to solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm of the pancreas in an eight year old child. Report of a case.

    PubMed

    Bidassek, Rick; Spelter, Herbert; Gödde, Daniel; Zirngibl, Hubert; Ambe, Peter C

    2016-01-20

    Solid pseudopapillary neoplasm is a rare cystic tumor of the exocrine pancreas. Abdominal pain or discomfort is the most common symptom, usually in young females. Herein we report the case of an 8 - year old child presenting with symptoms of gastric outlet obstruction. A solid pseudopapillary neoplasm of the pancreatic caput was diagnosed and surgically removed.

  10. [Cystic dystrophy of aberrant pancreatic tissue in the duodenal wall. Diagnostic and therapeutic problems].

    PubMed

    Visset, J; Jais, F; Le Bodic, M F; Letessier, E; Hamy, A; Courant, O; Paineau, J

    1992-01-01

    The authors report the case of a 28-year-old man with a cystic dystrophy of aberrant pancreatic tissue (C.D.A.P.T.) presenting with a history of major abdominal pain. First diagnosis was chronic pancreatitis because of clinical presentation, alcoholic intoxication, and the results of medical imaging techniques. A vagotomy associated with a gastroenterostomy was performed. Several years later the abdominal pain relapsed and failed to be cure by means of medical treatment. A duodenopancreatectomy was performed. Histology demonstrated the diagnosis of C.D.A.P.T. C.D.A.P.T. is a benign disease of the pancreas, limited to its cephalic portion, without demonstrated pathogenesis. C.D.A.P.T. can be either isolated or associated with a chronic pancreatitis. Clinical diagnosis can be particularly difficult as indicated by a literature review. Abdominal pain is the main symptom. Clinical presentation is rarely related to a complication (stenosis). Endoscopy, sonogram, and CAT scan are three techniques of diagnosis value, but intraluminal-sonography is more efficient. Tumor excision is not recommendable. Treatment of C.D.A.P.T. by duodeno-pancreatectomy (D.P.) is often indicated because of concurrent chronic pancreatitis or suspected pancreatic carcinoma. In case of clinical diagnosis of C.D.A.P.T., fenestration of the cysts under endoscopic control is the only local treatment that can avoid D.P.

  11. Intermediate-range sweat chloride concentration and Pseudomonas bronchitis. A cystic fibrosis variant with preservation of exocrine pancreatic function.

    PubMed

    Stern, R C; Boat, T F; Abramowsky, C R; Matthews, L W; Wood, R E; Doershuk, C F

    1978-06-23

    We studied the clinical and laboratory characteristics of seven patients with sweat chloride concentration consistently between 40 and 60 mEq/liter. Each has chronic Pseudomonas bronchitis, and all lack digestive symptoms. Laboratory findings indicate the preservation of exocrine pancreatic function. The patients include two of five children in one family and two of four in another. In a third family, one of five siblings has an intermediate sweat chloride concentration, but another has a typical fibrosis value (105 mEq/liter). One patient died of respiratory failure; results of an autopsy showed bronchiolectasis typical of cystic fibrosis, but minimal pancreatic changes. The data suggest a genetic basis for this variant of cystic fibrosis. These patients may be homozygous for a portion of a closely linked multigene cystic fibrosis locus or may have modifier genes that ameliorate the pancreatic and sweat lesions.

  12. Digital Subtraction of Magnetic Resonance Images Improves Detection and Characterization of Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    De Robertis, Riccardo; Tinazzi Martini, Paolo; Cingarlini, Sara; Ortolani, Silvia; Butturini, Giovanni; Regi, Paolo; Landoni, Luca; Tortora, Giampaolo; Pederzoli, Paolo; D'Onofrio, Mirko

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of digital image subtraction of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) images for detection and characterization of pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (PanNENs). Magnetic resonance examinations of 50 histologically verified PanNENs were retrospectively evaluated by 2 radiologists; 50 ductal adenocarcinomas were included as a control group. Late arterial phase images and correspondent subtracted images were analyzed. Tumor detectability on a subjective 3-point scale and contrast-to-noise ratios were compared across sequences using paired Student t tests. Tumor signal intensity was compared between sequences using χ or Fisher exact tests. Subjective conspicuity and contrast-to-noise ratios of PanNENs were significantly higher on subtracted images compared with correspondent late arterial phase images (P < 0.001 and P = 0.002). The rate of clearly hyperenhancing PanNENs was higher on subtracted images compared with arterial phase images (76% vs 36%). Digital image subtraction improves tumor conspicuity and allows better characterization of PanNENs compared with late arterial phase images.

  13. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor and solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm: Key immunohistochemical profiles for differential diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Ohara, Yusuke; Oda, Tatsuya; Hashimoto, Shinji; Akashi, Yoshimasa; Miyamoto, Ryoichi; Enomoto, Tsuyoshi; Satomi, Kaishi; Morishita, Yukio; Ohkohchi, Nobuhiro

    2016-01-01

    AIM To reveal better diagnostic markers for differentiating neuroendocrine tumor (NET) from solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm (SPN), focusing primarily on immunohistochemical analysis. METHODS We reviewed 30 pancreatic surgical specimens of NET (24 cases) and SPN (6 cases). We carried out comprehensive immunohistochemical profiling using 9 markers: Synaptophysin, chromogranin A, pan-cytokeratin, E-cadherin, progesterone receptor, vimentin, α-1-antitrypsin, CD10, and β-catenin. RESULTS E-cadherin staining in NETs, and nuclear labeling of β-catenin in SPNs were the most sensitive and specific markers. Dot-like staining of chromogranin A might indicate the possibility of SPNs rather than NETs. The other six markers were not useful because their expression overlapped widely between NETs and SPNs. Moreover, two cases that had been initially diagnosed as NETs on the basis of their morphological features, demonstrated SPN-like immunohistochemical profiles. Careful diagnosis is crucial as we actually found two confusing cases showing disagreement between the tumor morphology and immunohistochemical profiles. CONCLUSION E-cadherin, chromogranin A, and β-catenin were the most useful markers which should be employed for differentiating between NET and SPN. PMID:27784972

  14. Detection of circulating pancreas epithelial cells in patients with pancreatic cystic lesions.

    PubMed

    Rhim, Andrew D; Thege, Fredrik I; Santana, Steven M; Lannin, Timothy B; Saha, Trisha N; Tsai, Shannon; Maggs, Lara R; Kochman, Michael L; Ginsberg, Gregory G; Lieb, John G; Chandrasekhara, Vinay; Drebin, Jeffrey A; Ahmad, Nuzhat; Yang, Yu-Xiao; Kirby, Brian J; Stanger, Ben Z

    2014-03-01

    Hematogenous dissemination is thought to be a late event in cancer progression. We recently showed in a genetic model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma that pancreas cells can be detected in the bloodstream before tumor formation. To confirm these findings in humans, we used microfluidic geometrically enhanced differential immunocapture to detect circulating pancreas epithelial cells in patient blood samples. We captured more than 3 circulating pancreas epithelial cells/mL in 7 of 21 (33%) patients with cystic lesions and no clinical diagnosis of cancer (Sendai criteria negative), 8 of 11 (73%) with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and in 0 of 19 patients without cysts or cancer (controls). These findings indicate that cancer cells are present in the circulation of patients before tumors are detected, which might be used in risk assessment.

  15. Role of contrast harmonic-endoscopic ultrasound in pancreatic cystic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Serrani, Marta; Lisotti, Andrea; Caletti, Giancarlo; Fusaroli, Pietro

    2017-01-01

    Incidental pancreatic cysts (PCs) are frequently encountered in the general population often in asymptomatic patients who undergo imaging tests to investigate unrelated conditions. The detection of a PC poses a significant clinical dilemma, as the differential diagnosis is quite broad ranging from benign to malignant conditions. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) with fine-needle aspiration (FNA) has been reported to be an accurate tool in the differential diagnosis; however, its sensitivity is suboptimal and false negative results do occur. Contrast harmonic EUS (CH-EUS) was demonstrated to be a useful tool to investigate pancreatic solid lesions to differentiate between benign and malignant ones. In the setting of PCs, CH-EUS could help identify areas of malignant growth inside the cystic cavities. Several studies have reported promising results showing malignant areas in PCs as hyperenhanced lesions. Confirmation of malignancy can then be obtained by FNA, which should be precisely targeted according to the findings of the contrast harmonic study. PMID:28218197

  16. Eosinophilic, Solid, and Cystic Renal Cell Carcinoma: Clinicopathologic Study of 16 Unique, Sporadic Neoplasms Occurring in Women.

    PubMed

    Trpkov, Kiril; Hes, Ondrej; Bonert, Michael; Lopez, Jose I; Bonsib, Stephen M; Nesi, Gabriella; Comperat, Eva; Sibony, Mathilde; Berney, Daniel M; Martinek, Petr; Bulimbasic, Stela; Suster, Saul; Sangoi, Ankur; Yilmaz, Asli; Higgins, John P; Zhou, Ming; Gill, Anthony J; Przybycin, Christopher G; Magi-Galluzzi, Cristina; McKenney, Jesse K

    2016-01-01

    A unique renal neoplasm characterized by eosinophilic cytoplasm and solid and cystic growth was recently reported in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). We searched multiple institutional archives and consult files in an attempt to identify a sporadic counterpart. We identified 16 morphologically identical cases, all in women, without clinical features of TSC. The median age was 57 years (range, 31 to 75 y). Macroscopically, tumors were tan and had a solid and macrocystic (12) or only solid appearance (4). Average tumor size was 50 mm (median, 38.5 mm; range, 15 to 135 mm). Microscopically, the tumors showed solid areas admixed with variably sized macrocysts and microcysts that were lined by cells with a pronounced hobnail arrangement. The cells had voluminous eosinophilic cytoplasm with prominent granular cytoplasmic stippling and round to oval nuclei with prominent nucleoli. Scattered histiocytes and lymphocytes were invariably present. Thirteen of 16 patients were stage pT1; 2 were pT2, and 1 was pT3a. The cells demonstrated a distinct immunoprofile: nuclear PAX8 expression, predominant CK20-positive/CK7-negative phenotype, patchy AMACR staining, but no CD117 reactivity. Thirteen of 14 patients with follow-up were alive and without disease progression after 2 to 138 months (mean: 53 mo; median: 37.5 mo); 1 patient died of other causes. Although similar to a subset of renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) seen in TSC, we propose that sporadic "eosinophilic, solid, and cystic RCC," which occurs predominantly in female individuals and is characterized by distinct morphologic features, predominant CK20-positive/CK7-negative immunophenotype, and indolent behavior, represents a novel subtype of RCC.

  17. Pancreatic phenotype in infants with cystic fibrosis identified by mutation screening

    PubMed Central

    Cipolli, Marco; Castellani, Carlo; Wilcken, Bridget; Massie, John; McKay, Karen; Gruca, Margie; Tamanini, Anna; Assael, Maurice Baroukh; Gaskin, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    Objective To determine the pancreatic phenotype of infants with cystic fibrosis (CF) diagnosed in the first week of life by a combined immunoreactive trypsin/mutation screening program. Design A prospective evaluation of pancreatic function in infants with CF at the time of neonatal diagnosis and up to the age of 12. Setting Two different centres (Verona, Italy and Westmead, Australia) to enable comparison of results between two regions where <60% or ⩾90% of patients, respectively, have at least one single ΔF508 a mutation. Patients 315 children with CF including 149 at Verona and 166 at Westmead. Interventions Fat balance studies over 3–5 days and pancreatic stimulation tests with main outcome measures being faecal fat or pancreatic colipase secretion. Patients with malabsorption are pancreatic insufficient (PI) or with normal absorption and pancreatic sufficient (PS). Results 34 infants (23%) at Verona and 46 (28%) at Westmead were PS at diagnosis. 15% of those with two class I, II or III “severe” mutations and 26/28 (93%) of those with class IV or V mutations were PS at this early age. Of the 80 infants with PS, 20 became PI before the age of 12. All 20 had two severe mutations. Conclusion Neonatal mutational screening programs for CF are less likely to detect PS patients with non‐ΔF508 mutations. Of PS patients who are detected, those with two severe class I, II or III mutations are at particularly high risk of becoming PI during early childhood. PMID:17449517

  18. Endometrial cysts within the liver: a rare entity and its differential diagnosis with mucinous cystic neoplasms of the liver.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Maylee; Terris, Benoit; Wu, Tsung-Teh; Zen, Yoh; Eng, Hock-Liew; Huang, Wan-Ting; Yeh, Matthew M

    2014-04-01

    Endometrial cysts within the liver are rare but can present as diagnostic challenges on small biopsies or frozen sections and may mimic mucinous cystic neoplasms (MCN) of the liver. Five cases of endometrial cysts and 6 cases of MCNs within the liver were collected. The clinicopathological, imaging, and immunohistochemical features were systematically reviewed and compared. The average size of the endometrial cysts was 8.3 cm. Four patients had a prior pelvic operation and coexisting endometriosis at other sites. All 5 cases of endometrial cysts had positive ER staining within both the epithelium and the stroma. PR was also positive in both epithelial and stromal cells in 4 cases. Four cases had additional immunostains performed, which all showed cytokeratin 19 and cytokeratin 7 positivity (only in epithelium) and CD10 positivity (only in stroma). α-Inhibin and calretinin were negative for both the epithelium and the stroma in all 4 cases. All 6 MCN cases (mean size, 11.1 cm) had positive ER, PR, and α-inhibin staining only in the stroma. ER and PR were positive in both the epithelium and stromal cells in endometrial cysts, whereas they were positive only in the stromal cells of MCNs. The stromal cells were CD10 positive and α-inhibin negative in endometrial cysts as opposed to the opposite staining pattern in MCNs. Awareness of this distinct staining pattern and the possibility of endometrial cysts in the liver can lead to accurate diagnoses and appropriate treatment modalities.

  19. CUX1: a modulator of tumour aggressiveness in pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Krug, Sebastian; Kühnemuth, Benjamin; Griesmann, Heidi; Neesse, Albrecht; Mühlberg, Leonie; Boch, Michael; Kortenhaus, Juliane; Fendrich, Volker; Wiese, Dominik; Sipos, Bence; Friemel, Juliane; Gress, Thomas M; Michl, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (PNENs) constitute a rare tumour entity, and prognosis and treatment options depend on tumour-mediating hallmarks such as angiogenesis, proliferation rate and resistance to apoptosis. The molecular pathways that determine the malignant phenotype are still insufficiently understood and this has limited the use of effective combination therapies in the past. In this study, we aimed to characterise the effect of the oncogenic transcription factor Cut homeobox 1 (CUX1) on proliferation, resistance to apoptosis and angiogenesis in murine and human PNENs. The expression and function of CUX1 were analysed using knockdown and overexpression strategies in Ins-1 and Bon-1 cells, xenograft models and a genetically engineered mouse model of insulinoma (RIP1Tag2). Regulation of angiogenesis was assessed using RNA profiling and functional tube-formation assays in HMEC-1 cells. Finally, CUX1 expression was assessed in a tissue microarray of 59 human insulinomas and correlated with clinicopathological data. CUX1 expression was upregulated during tumour progression in a time- and stage-dependent manner in the RIP1Tag2 model, and associated with pro-invasive and metastatic features of human insulinomas. Endogenous and recombinant CUX1 expression increased tumour cell proliferation, tumour growth, resistance to apoptosis, and angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, the pro-angiogenic effect of CUX1 was mediated via upregulation of effectors such as HIF1α and MMP9. CUX1 mediates an invasive pro-angiogenic phenotype and is associated with malignant behaviour in human insulinomas. © 2014 Society for Endocrinology.

  20. Outcome of the pancreatic remnant following segmental pancreatectomy for non-invasive intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jacob R; Meyer, Juliana E; Waters, Joshua A; Al-Haddad, Mohammad; DeWitt, John; Sherman, Stuart; Lillemoe, Keith D; Schmidt, C Max

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Intraductual papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) are often multifocal and involve the entire pancreas. Because of the morbidity associated with total pancreatectomy, surgeons will perform segmental pancreatectomy, resecting only the most ‘threatening’ IPMN lesion(s). We sought to determine whether the presence of residual IPMN following segmental pancreatectomy for non-invasive IPMN increases the risk for subsequent development of invasive pancreatic cancer and decreases survival. Methods Data on patients undergoing segmental resection of non-invasive IPMN during the period 1991–2010 at a high-volume academic institution were prospectively accrued. Results Of 243 patients who underwent segmental resection for IPMN, 191 (79%) demonstrated non-invasive pathology. Of these, 153 (80%) showed the absence and 38 (20%) the presence of residual IPMN at the initial operation. Of the 38 patients with residual IPMN, eight had positive IPMN margins, 23 had radiographic evidence of IPMN, and seven had both. During a mean follow-up of 73 months, 31 (20%) of 153 patients without residual IPMN developed a new radiographic lesion consistent with IPMN and, of these, three (10%) were found to represent invasive cancer. One (3%) of 38 patients with residual IPMN developed invasive cancer. In summary, in 191 initially non-invasive cases of IPMN, four invasive cancers (2%) developed during follow-up. The mean progression-free interval in these four patients was 54 months (range: 20–99 months). Conclusions Compared with patients undergoing complete operative IPMN clearance, patients with residual IPMN after segmental pancreatectomy do not demonstrate increased risk for the development of invasive disease or reduced survival. In patients without residual IPMN who later develop new IPMN, the risk for invasive IPMN is increased. PMID:21999588

  1. Digital next-generation sequencing identifies low-abundance mutations in pancreatic juice samples collected from the duodenum of patients with pancreatic cancer and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jun; Sadakari, Yoshihiko; Shindo, Koji; Suenaga, Masaya; Brant, Aaron; Almario, Jose Alejandro Navarro; Borges, Michael; Barkley, Thomas; Fesharakizadeh, Shahriar; Ford, Madeline; Hruban, Ralph H; Shin, Eun Ji; Lennon, Anne Marie; Canto, Marcia Irene; Goggins, Michael

    2017-09-01

    Secretin-stimulated pancreatic juice contains DNA shed from cells lining the pancreatic ducts. Genetic analysis of this fluid may form a test to detect pancreatic ductal neoplasia. We employed digital next-generation sequencing ('digital NGS') to detect low-abundance mutations in secretin-stimulated juice samples collected from the duodenum of subjects enrolled in Cancer of the Pancreas Screening studies at Johns Hopkins Hospital. For each juice sample, digital NGS necessitated 96 NGS reactions sequencing nine genes. The study population included 115 subjects (53 discovery, 62 validation) (1) with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), (2) intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN), (3) controls with non-suspicious pancreata. Cases with PDAC and IPMN were more likely to have mutant DNA detected in pancreatic juice than controls (both p<0.0001); mutant DNA concentrations were higher in patients with PDAC than IPMN (p=0.003) or controls (p<0.001). TP53 and/or SMAD4 mutations were commonly detected in juice samples from patients with PDAC and were not detected in controls (p<0.0001); mutant TP53/SMAD4 concentrations could distinguish PDAC from IPMN cases with 32.4% sensitivity, 100% specificity (area under the curve, AUC 0.73, p=0.0002) and controls (AUC 0.82, p<0.0001). Two of four patients who developed pancreatic cancer despite close surveillance had SMAD4/TP53 mutations from their cancer detected in juice samples collected over 1 year prior to their pancreatic cancer diagnosis when no suspicious pancreatic lesions were detected by imaging. The detection in pancreatic juice of mutations important for the progression of low-grade dysplasia to high-grade dysplasia and invasive pancreatic cancer may improve the management of patients undergoing pancreatic screening and surveillance. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  2. ACTH-secreting pancreatic neoplasms associated with Cushing syndrome: clinicopathologic study of 11 cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Maragliano, Roberta; Vanoli, Alessandro; Albarello, Luca; Milione, Massimo; Basturk, Olca; Klimstra, David S; Wachtel, Antonio; Uccella, Silvia; Vicari, Emanuela; Milesi, Marina; Davì, Maria Vittoria; Scarpa, Aldo; Sessa, Fausto; Capella, Carlo; La Rosa, Stefano

    2015-03-01

    Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-secreting pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNETs), although rare, are responsible for about 15% of ectopic Cushing syndrome (CS). They represent a challenging entity because their preoperatory diagnosis is frequently difficult, and clear-cut morphologic criteria useful to differentiate them from other types of PanNETs have not been defined. Ectopic ACTH secretion associated with CS can also be rarely due to pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma (ACC) and pancreatoblastoma, rare tumor types with morphologic features sometimes overlapping those of PanNETs and, for this reason, representing a diagnostic challenge for pathologists. We herein describe the clinicopathologic and immunohistochemical features of 10 PanNETs and 1 ACC secreting ACTH and associated with CS together with an extensive review of the literature to give the reader a comprehensive overview on ACTH-producing pancreatic neoplasms. ACTH-secreting PanNETs are aggressive neoplasms with an immunohistochemical profile that partially overlaps that of pituitary corticotroph adenomas. They are generally large and well-differentiated neoplasms without distinctive histologic features but with signs of aggressiveness including vascular and perineural invasion. They are more frequent in female individuals with a mean age of 42 years. At 5 and 10 years after diagnosis, 35% and 16.2% of patients, respectively, were alive. ACTH-secreting ACCs and pancreatoblastomas are very aggressive pediatric tumors with a poor prognosis. Using an appropriate immunohistochemical panel including ACTH, β-endorphin, trypsin, and BCL10 it is possible to recognize ACTH-secreting PanNETs and to distinguish them from the very aggressive ACTH-secreting ACCs.

  3. Pancreatic involvement by metastasizing neoplasms as determined by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration: A clinicopathologic characterization.

    PubMed

    Sekulic, Miroslav; Amin, Khalid; Mettler, Tetyana; Miller, Lizette K; Mallery, Shawn; Stewart, Jimmie

    2017-05-01

    Pancreatic tumors often represent primary neoplasms, however organ involvement with metastatic disease can occur. The use of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) to determine the underlying pathology provides guidance of clinical management. 25 cases were identified in a retrospective review of our institution's records from 2006 to 2016. Clinical parameters and prognosis are described. Metastatic lesions to the pancreas diagnosed by EUS-FNA accounted for 4.2% of all pancreatic neoplastic diagnoses, each lesion had a median greatest dimension of 1.5 cm, were most often located in the head of the pancreas, and by EUS were typically hypoechoic masses with variably defined borders. Patients were of a median age of 64 years old at diagnosis of the metastatic lesion(s) and the mean interval from primary diagnosis to the diagnosis of metastasis to the pancreas was 58.7 months (95% confidence interval, CI, 35.4 to 82.0 months). The rates of 24-month overall survival after diagnoses of metastatic renal cell carcinoma or all other neoplasms to the pancreas were 90% and 7% respectively. The origin of the neoplasms included the kidney (n = 10), colon (n = 4), ovary (n = 3), lung (n = 2), et al. Smear-based cytomorphology, and a combination of histomorphology and immunohistochemical studies from cell block preparations showed features consistent with the neoplasm of derivation. Metastases to the pancreas can be diagnosed via EUS-FNA, with enough specimen to conduct immunohistochemical studies if necessary to delineate origin. The determination of metastatic disease to the pancreas alters management and prognosis of the patient. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2017;45:418-425. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Enteric duplication cyst of the pancreas associated with chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Alexander S; Bluhm, David; Xiao, Shu-Yan; Waxman, Irving; Matthews, Jeffrey B

    2014-05-01

    Pancreas-associated enteric duplication cysts are rare developmental anomalies that communicate with the main pancreatic duct and may be associated with recurrent acute and chronic abdominal pain in children. In adults, these lesions may masquerade as pancreatic pseudocysts or pancreatic cystic neoplasms. An adult patient with a pancreas-associated enteric duplication is described which represents the first reported instance of association with both chronic calcific pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. The clinical spectrum of pancreas-associated enteric duplication cyst, including diagnostic and therapeutic options, is reviewed.

  5. Oncocytic-type intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN)-derived invasive oncocytic pancreatic carcinoma with brain metastasis - a case report.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Kun-Chun; Yu, Chi-Chang; Chen, Jim-Ray; Huang, Yu-Ting; Huang, Cheng-Cheng; Yeh, Chun-Nan; Tsai, Chien-Sheng; Chen, Li-Wei; Chen, Hsien-Cin; Hsu, Jun-Te; Wang, Cheng-Hsu; Chen, Huang-Yang

    2012-07-09

    Pancreatic cancer is a lethal disease without effective treatments at present. It ranks as s as 4th and 5th in cancer-related mortality in the western countries and worldwide. Locally advanced pancreatic duct carcinoma (PDAC) and metastatic PDAC, usually found the metastases over liver, peritoneum, or lung, have been shown to be with dismal prognosis. Brain metastasis is a rare entity and most cases reported before were found post-mortem. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas (IPMN) has been deemed as a precursor of PDAC with very slow progression rate. Here we reported a case diagnosed with IPMN-derived PDAC with brain metastasis. After surgeries for PDAC and brain metastasis, subsequent chemotherapy and radiotherapy were also given. One and half year after surgery, this patient is still living with good performance status, which may warrant individualization of therapeutic strategy for PDAC with only brain metastasis.

  6. Risk for mortality from causes other than pancreatic cancer in patients with intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Kawakubo, Kazumichi; Tada, Minoru; Isayama, Hiroyuki; Sasahira, Naoki; Nakai, Yousuke; Takahara, Naminatsu; Miyabayashi, Koji; Yamamoto, Keisuke; Mizuno, Suguru; Mohri, Dai; Kogure, Hirofumi; Sasaki, Takashi; Yamamoto, Natsuyo; Tateishi, Ryosuke; Hirano, Kenji; Ijichi, Hideaki; Tateishi, Keisuke; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2013-05-01

    The long-term prognosis in patients with intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) has not been determined. The aim of this study was to elucidate the risk for nonpancreatic cancer-specific mortality in patients with IPMN. Seven hundred ninety-three patients with IPMN who were followed up more than 1 year were included in this study. Fine and Gray competing risk regression was used to assess the risk for mortality unrelated to pancreatic cancer. A comorbidity score at diagnosis was assigned using the Adult Comorbidity Evaluation 27. After a median follow-up of 50 months, a high comorbidity score and age at diagnosis were significantly associated with a risk for mortality unrelated to pancreatic cancer. Adjusted hazards ratio and 95% confidence interval of each comorbidity burden were as follows: none, 1; mild, 2.68 (0.76-9.45; P = 0.124); moderate, 10.9 (3.19-37.1; P < 0.001); and severe, 32.0 (9.41-108.8; P < 0.001). Comorbidity burden did not affect the risk for pancreatic cancer-specific mortality. Comorbidity and age at diagnosis was significantly related to mortality unrelated to pancreatic cancer in patients with IPMN. For patients at high risk for nonpancreatic cancer mortality, a follow-up management may be more reasonable than surgery.

  7. Autoimmune pancreatitis associated with a large pancreatic pseudocyst

    PubMed Central

    Welsch, Thilo; Kleeff, Jörg; Esposito, Irene; Büchler, Markus W; Friess, Helmut

    2006-01-01

    Pancreatic cystic lesions comprise various entities with different histopathological characteristics and their differential diagnosis is often a challenge for clinicians. Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is usually not considered in the differential diagnosis of cystic lesions, but often mimics the morphological aspects of pancreatic neoplasm. We report the case of a 64-year-old male patient with a cystic pancreatic head lesion (diameter 5 cm) and stenosis of the distal bile duct requiring repeated stenting. Because of the clinical presentation together with moderate elevation of serum CA19-9 and massive elevation of cyst fluid CA19-9 (122.695 U/L; normal range: < 37.0 U/L), the patient underwent explorative laparotomy and pylorus preserving partial pancreaticoduodenectomy. Histology revealed surprisingly AIP with an inflammatory pseudocyst. In conclusion, cyst fluid analysis of tumor markers and cyst fluid cytology lack high accuracy to clearly differentiate cystic pancreatic lesions. Although AIP is rarely associated with pseudocysts, the disease has to be considered in the differential diagnosis of cystic pancreatic lesions. Early examination of serum IgG, IgG4 and auto-antibodies might save these patients from unnecessary endoscopical and surgical procedures. PMID:17007063

  8. Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms: Magnetic resonance imaging features according to grade and stage

    PubMed Central

    De Robertis, Riccardo; Cingarlini, Sara; Tinazzi Martini, Paolo; Ortolani, Silvia; Butturini, Giovanni; Landoni, Luca; Regi, Paolo; Girelli, Roberto; Capelli, Paola; Gobbo, Stefano; Tortora, Giampaolo; Scarpa, Aldo; Pederzoli, Paolo; D’Onofrio, Mirko

    2017-01-01

    AIM To describe magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features of pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (PanNENs) according to their grade and tumor-nodes-metastases stage by comparing them to histopathology and to determine the accuracy of MR imaging features in predicting their biological behavior. METHODS This study was approved by our institutional review board; requirement for informed patient consent was waived due to the retrospective nature of the study. Preoperative MR examinations of 55 PanNEN patients (29 men, 26 women; mean age of 57.6 years, range 21-83 years) performed between June 2013 and December 2015 were reviewed. Qualitative and quantitative features were compared between tumor grades and stages determined by histopathological analysis. RESULTS Ill defined margins were more common in G2-3 and stage III-IV PanNENs than in G1 and low-stage tumors (P < 0.001); this feature had high specificity in the identification of G2-3 and stage III-IV tumors (90.3% and 96%, 95%CI: 73.1-97.5 and 77.7-99.8). The mean apparent diffusion coefficient value was significantly lower in G2-3 and stage III-IV lesions compared to well differentiated and low-stage tumors (1.09 × 10-3 mm2/s vs 1.45 × 10-3 mm2/s and 1.10 × 10-3 mm2/s vs 1.53 × 10-3 mm2/s, P = 0.003 and 0.001). Receiving operator characteristic analysis determined optimal cut-offs of 1.21 and 1.28 × 10-3 mm2/s for the identification of G2-3 and stage III-IV tumors, with sensitivity and specificity values of 70.8/80.7% and 64.5/64% (95%CI: 48.7-86.6/60-92.7 and 45.4-80.2/42.6-81.3). CONCLUSION MR features of PanNENs vary according to their grade of differentiation and their stage at diagnosis and could predict the biological behavior of these tumors. PMID:28127201

  9. Cystic lesions in the pancreas: when to watch, when to resect.

    PubMed

    Balcom IV, J H; Fernandez-Del Castillo, C; Warshaw, A L

    2000-04-01

    The diagnosis of cystic lesions in the pancreas is becoming more common, largely due to the increases in diagnostic imaging done for other reasons. This review considers pseudocysts, mucinous cystic neoplasms, intraductal papillary mucinous tumors, and serous cystadenomas in some detail. The emphasis is on the fact that, through a careful history, physical examination, radiologic studies, and, often, cyst fluid analysis, a diagnosis can be reached expeditiously. This pursuit is important because two thirds of pancreatic cystic neoplasms are malignant or premalignant and should be resected, whereas pseudocysts and serous cystadenomas are benign, and, depending on the case, may be treated through observation, resection, or, for pseudocysts, by internal drainage.

  10. Disseminated Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Neoplasm (NEN) with an Uncommon Localisation in the Central Nervous System. A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Białkowska, Joanna; Kolasińska-Ćwikła, Agnieszka; Mroczkowska, Dorota; Sowa, Mariusz; Grabarczyk, Łukasz; Maksymowicz, Wojciech; Cichocki, Andrzej; Ćwikła, Jarosław B.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Background Neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN) are rare neoplasms that originate from neuroendocrine cells and are characterized by the potential of hormonal activity. Approximately 70% of these tumours are located in the gastrointestinal system (GI), followed by the bronchi, endocrine glands-like C cells of the thyroid (medullary carcinoma), the parasympathetic and sympathetic system (paragangliomas, pheochromocytoma) and other very rare locations. The prevalence of cerebral metastases in neuroendocrine tumours is estimated by various authors to be approximately 1.5–5%. When the primary tumour is located in the pancreas, it is associated with a risk of cerebral metastases lower than 2%. Case Report We describe a patient with a disseminated pancreatic NEN that presented with an isolated lesion in the brain. We gathered the important data via medical history,, observation, analysis of medical records, imaging and others diagnostic tests. Despite the fairly rare prevalence of cerebral metastases in NENs, a neurological work-up should be performed. This should include neuroimaging of the brain, preferably with MR, together with the somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS), in each clinically suspicious case. A histopathological examination of the CNS tumour can confirm a dedifferentiation of NEN in the direction of a neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC – neuroednocrine carcinoma) with a poor prognosis. Conclusions Cerebral metastases are diagnosed in 1.5–5% of patients with a neuroendocrine neoplasm. In each case suggestive of a dissemination into the central nervous system, MRI of the brain should be performed. PMID:28344687

  11. International phase III trial of liprotamase efficacy and safety in pancreatic-insufficient cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Borowitz, Drucy; Stevens, Christopher; Brettman, Lee R; Campion, Marilyn; Chatfield, Barbara; Cipolli, Marco

    2011-12-01

    Most cystic fibrosis (CF) patients have exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI) and need supplementation with pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy (PERT). Liprotamase, a novel non-porcine PERT containing highly purified biotechnology-derived lipase, protease, and amylase, has successfully undergone initial efficacy and safety testing. In this international phase III parallel-group, randomized-withdrawal, double-blind placebo-controlled trial, CF patients with EPI 7 years and older, including nutritionally and functionally compromised individuals, underwent baseline testing for coefficients of fat and nitrogen absorption (CFA and CNA) and stool weight and frequency while off PERT. After an open-label treatment period with liprotamase, subjects were randomized 1:1 to one liprotamase or placebo capsule taken with 3 meals and 2 snacks per day. The dose was fixed and increases were not allowed. The same measurements were obtained again after treatment with double-blind study drug or placebo. 138 subjects were randomized. The adjusted least squares mean (LSM) difference between the treatment and placebo groups for change in CFA was 15.1% (p=0.001) for the subgroup with baseline CFA <40%, 8.6% (p=0.006) for subjects with baseline CFA ≥40%, and 10.6% (p<0.001) for the overall intent-to-treat population. Similar results were seen for change in CNA. Stool weight was significantly decreased although not stool frequency. Liprotamase was well tolerated with no safety concerns identified. In a CF patient population reflective of that encountered in clinical practice, this trial demonstrated that liprotamase at a fixed dose of one capsule per meal or snack (5 capsules per day) was well tolerated and significantly increased fat absorption as measured by improvement in CFA, significantly increased protein absorption as measured by improvement in CNA, and significantly decreased stool weight. Copyright © 2011 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All

  12. New modalities in the treatment of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Heijerman, H G

    1992-10-01

    Pancreatic insufficiency is the second most important pathophysiological expression of cystic fibrosis (CF) and occurs in the majority of patients. It leads to fat malabsorption and high energy losses in the stools and is one of the major causes of malnutrition often seen in CF. Although the development of enteric-coated enzyme preparations offers a dramatic improvement in therapy, it is still difficult to achieve complete correction of fat malabsorption. The cause for this treatment failure is the relative acidic environment in the duodenum induced by a decreased pancreatic bicarbonate output. To improve the efficacy of enteric-coated preparations the dissolution of these preparations in the duodenum must be optimised in order to achieve a high intraduodenal enzyme concentration. With the aim to increase intraduodenal pH, additional therapy with H2-antagonists and oral prostaglandins has been tested without unequivocal success. Omeprazole, a gastric acid inhibitor with more potency and duration of action compared to H2-antagonists, improves the efficacy of enteric-coated capsules of pancreatin dramatically. With a daily dose of 20 mg in addition to Pancrease (3 x 4 capsules) near normalization of faecal fat excretion will be reached in most CF patients with persistent steatorrhoea.

  13. Colonic wall thickness, pancreatic enzyme dose and type of preparation in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Ramsden, W; Moya, E; Littlewood, J

    1998-01-01

    Increased colonic wall thickness has been reported in patients exposed to large doses of high strength pancreatic enzyme preparations who did not develop fibrosing colonopathy. This has been interpreted as evidence for a spectrum of subclinical disease. The relation between sonographically measured colonic wall thickness and pancreatic enzyme preparation and dose was studied in 86 children with cystic fibrosis (CF). Colonic wall thickness of a control group was also measured. The average thickness in all colonic regions was higher in the CF group (overall average range 0.7-2.5 mm v 0.6-1.4 mm in the control group). There was no significant relation between colonic wall thickness and age, sex, total dose of lipase, or copolymer. Apart from one patient with an early colonic stricture, none of those exposed to high doses of lipase, or the methacrylic acid copolymer Eudragit L30 D55, showed evidence of subclinical damage to the colon. The reproducibility of the sonographic measurements was poor.

 PMID:9875045

  14. Variants in Solute Carrier SLC26A9 Modify Prenatal Exocrine Pancreatic Damage in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Melissa R.; Soave, David; Li, Weili; Gong, Jiafen; Pace, Rhonda G.; Boëlle, Pierre-Yves; Cutting, Garry R.; Drumm, Mitchell L.; Knowles, Michael R.; Sun, Lei; Rommens, Johanna M.; Accurso, Frank; Durie, Peter R.; Corvol, Harriet; Levy, Hara; Sontag, Marci K.; Strug, Lisa J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To test the hypothesis that multiple constituents of the apical plasma membrane residing alongside the causal CF Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) protein, including known cystic fibrosis (CF) modifiers SLC26A9, SLC6A14, and SLC9A3, would be associated with prenatal exocrine pancreatic damage as measured by newborn screened (NBS) IRT levels. Study design NBS IRT measures and genome-wide genotype data were available on 111 subjects from Colorado, 37 subjects from Wisconsin, and 80 subjects from France. Multiple linear regression was used to determine whether any of eight SNPs in SLC26A9, SLC6A14 and SLC9A3 were associated with IRT and whether other constituents of the apical plasma membrane contributed to IRT. Results In the Colorado sample, three SLC26A9 SNPs were associated with NBS IRT (min P = 1.16 × 10−3; rs7512462), but no SLC6A14 or SLC9A3 SNPs were associated (P > 0.05). The rs7512462 association replicated in the Wisconsin sample (P = 0.03) but not in the French sample (P = 0.76). Furthermore, rs7512462 was the top ranked apical membrane constituent in the combined Colorado and Wisconsin sample. Conclusions NBS IRT is a biomarker of prenatal exocrine pancreatic disease in patients with CF, and a SNP in SLC26A9 accounts for significant IRT variability. This suggests SLC26A9 as a potential therapeutic target to ameliorate exocrine pancreatic disease. PMID:25771386

  15. Parental Depression and Pancreatic Enzymes Adherence in Children With Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Barker, David H; Quittner, Alexandra L

    2016-02-01

    Treatment adherence in cystic fibrosis (CF) is often poor, however, less is known about adherence to pancreatic enzymes, a critical component of the CF treatment regimen. Parent caregivers often report elevations in depression, and parental depression may adversely affect children's adherence. This prospective study evaluated adherence to pancreatic enzymes in 83 patients (1-13 years) . Adherence was measured across 3 months with electronic pill-caps . Weight was measured at baseline and a 3-month follow-up. Parental depressive symptoms were evaluated by using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). Adherence to pancreatic enzymes was 49.4% ± 3.4%. Adherence was higher at school (94.4% ± 6.1%) than at home (42.3% ± 3.1%), and higher for toddlers (50.6% ± 5.2%) than for school-aged children (37.5% ± 3.7%). Parents reported high rates of depressive symptoms (30% in the clinical range, 18% with moderate symptoms). Children of parents with symptoms of depression versus those without were less adherent (34.8% ± 4.5% vs 48.5% ± 4.1%), and adherence to enzymes was significantly related to 3-month weight outcomes. Average gain in weight z scores across 3 months was 0.5 ± 0.2for children who were >50% adherent and -0.1 ± 6.1for children who were <33% adherent. Parental depression had a signifcant, indirect effect on weight via adherence (-0.005 ± 0.003 gain in weight z score per CES-D unit ). High rates of parental depressive symptoms, coupled with its negative effects on adherence, suggest that measuring and treating parental depression may improve children's adherence to therapy. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  16. Design and utilization of the colorectal and pancreatic neoplasm virtual biorepository: An early detection research network initiative

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Waqas; Singh, Harpreet; Dzubinski, Lynda Ann; Schoen, Robert E.; Parwani, Anil V.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The Early Detection Research Network (EDRN) colorectal and pancreatic neoplasm virtual biorepository is a bioinformatics-driven system that provides high-quality clinicopathology-rich information for clinical biospecimens. This NCI-sponsored EDRN resource supports translational cancer research. The information model of this biorepository is based on three components: (a) development of common data elements (CDE), (b) a robust data entry tool and (c) comprehensive data query tools. Methods: The aim of the EDRN initiative is to develop and sustain a virtual biorepository for support of translational research. High-quality biospecimens were accrued and annotated with pertinent clinical, epidemiologic, molecular and genomic information. A user-friendly annotation tool and query tool was developed for this purpose. The various components of this annotation tool include: CDEs are developed from the College of American Pathologists (CAP) Cancer Checklists and North American Association of Central Cancer Registries (NAACR) standards. The CDEs provides semantic and syntactic interoperability of the data sets by describing them in the form of metadata or data descriptor. The data entry tool is a portable and flexible Oracle-based data entry application, which is an easily mastered, web-based tool. The data query tool facilitates investigators to search deidentified information within the warehouse through a “point and click” interface thus enabling only the selected data elements to be essentially copied into a data mart using a dimensional-modeled structure from the warehouse’s relational structure. Results: The EDRN Colorectal and Pancreatic Neoplasm Virtual Biorepository database contains multimodal datasets that are available to investigators via a web-based query tool. At present, the database holds 2,405 cases and 2,068 tumor accessions. The data disclosure is strictly regulated by user’s authorization. The high-quality and well

  17. Intraductal Oncocytic Papillary Neoplasms of the Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Kallen, Michael E; Naini, Bita V

    2016-09-01

    Intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasms (IOPNs) are cystic neoplasms with intraductal growth and complex papillae composed of oncocytic cells. IOPNs have been reported both in the pancreas and biliary tree, and are most likely closely related in these 2 locations. In the pancreas, these rare tumors are now considered 1 of the 4 histologic subtypes of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN). Significant differences in histology, immunophenotype, and molecular genetics have been reported between IOPNs and other IPMN subtypes. However, there are limited data regarding the clinical behavior and prognosis of IOPNs in comparison to other subtypes of IPMN. We review features of pancreatic IOPNs and discuss the differential diagnosis of other intraductal lesions in the pancreas.

  18. Intrapancreatic accessory spleen: utilization of fine needle aspiration for diagnosis of a potential mimic of a pancreatic neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Tara A.; Miller, Theodore R.

    2016-01-01

    Accessory spleen (AS) is not a rare occurrence, and with the second most common site being the tail of the pancreas, intrapancreatic AS (IPAS) can easily mimic a pancreatic neoplasm. Together with radiologic imaging findings, endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (FNA) can be used to assist in the diagnosis, preventing potentially unnecessary surgical procedures. The most common cytologic findings that have been described in the literature include a heterogenous population of small lymphocytes along with traversing small vessels. Immunohistochemical staining for CD8 has also been documented as a useful tool to support the diagnosis as it specifically highlights the endothelial cells of the splenic sinus. Here, we report two additional cases of IPAS diagnosed by FNA and discuss the potential pitfalls in diagnosis of this entity. PMID:27034814

  19. EUR-1008 pancreatic enzyme replacement is safe and effective in patients with cystic fibrosis and pancreatic insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Wooldridge, Jamie L; Heubi, James E; Amaro-Galvez, Rodolfo; Boas, Steven R; Blake, Kathryn V; Nasr, Samya Z; Chatfield, Barbara; McColley, Susanna A; Woo, Marlyn S; Hardy, Karen A; Kravitz, Richard M; Straforini, Cristina; Anelli, Marco; Lee, Candace

    2009-12-01

    EUR-1008 (Zenpep [pancrelipase]) is a new, enteric-coated, porcine-derived pancreatic enzyme product (PEP) developed for the treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with malabsorption associated with exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI). Unlike currently marketed PEPs, EUR-1008 contains the label-claimed lipase content. Safety and efficacy were assessed in younger (<7 years) and older (> or =7 years) CF patients with EPI. Two multicenter studies were conducted: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial in patients > or =7 years of age (N=34) and a supplemental, open-label study in children <7 years of age (N=19). Use of any medications altering gastric pH/motility was prohibited during the studies. Outcome measures in the randomized trial included changes in the coefficient of fat absorption (CFA), coefficient of nitrogen absorption (CNA), and signs/symptoms of malabsorption for EUR-1008 vs. placebo. Outcome measures in the supplemental study included safety and response (defined as no steatorrhea and no overt signs/symptoms of malabsorption) to EUR-1008 vs. previous enzyme treatment. In the randomized trial, EUR-1008 treatment compared to placebo resulted in a significantly higher mean CFA (88.3% vs. 62.8%, respectively) and CNA (87.2% vs. 65.7%, respectively) (both p<0.001) and reduced the incidence of malabsorption signs and symptoms in 32 evaluable patients. In the supplemental study, 11 of 19 patients met the criteria for responder with EUR-1008 at the end of the study vs. 10 of 19 patients at screening (previous PEP), and improvements in clinical symptoms were reported with EUR-1008 treatment. EUR-1008 was safe and well tolerated, and no serious drug-related AEs were reported in either study. EUR-1008 was safe, well tolerated, and effective in CF patients of all ages with EPI-associated malabsorption in two clinical trials. Treatment led to clinically and statistically significant improvements in CFA and CNA in the randomized study

  20. An isolated intestinal duplication cyst masquerading as a mucinous cystic neoplasm of the pancreas: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Weitman, Evan; Al Diffalha, Sameer; Centeno, Barbara; Hodul, Pamela

    2017-08-24

    Enteric duplication cysts presenting in adulthood are rare. Isolated enteric duplication cysts, which lack a connection to the GI tract or the adjacent mesenteric vasculature, have only been cited in six previous case reports. A 48-year-old female presented with a four-year history of intermittent nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. Computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen revealed a 7cm multi-lobular, calcified, cystic lesion intimately involved with the pancreas. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA) was non-diagnostic; however, the cyst fluid Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) level was significantly elevated leading to a presumed diagnosis of a mucinous cystic neoplasm (MCN) of the pancreas. Intraoperatively, the cystic mass was identified and notably did not have any true attachments to the neighboring pancreas, gastrointestinal tract or vasculature. Final pathology demonstrated an isolated small bowel duplication cyst. In this case a patient presented with a clinical picture consistent with an MCN of the pancreas. However, intraoperatively and on final pathology the mass was found to be an isolated enteric duplication cyst. This represents only the seventh such case report in an adult. Although rare, isolated enteric duplication cysts can be considered in a patient presenting with chronic abdominal pain and an abdominal mass on imaging. In this case we demonstrate that an isolated enteric duplication cyst can clinically mimic an MCN of the pancreas. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Molecular pathogenesis of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Thosani, Nirav; Dasari, Chandra S; Bhutani, Manoop S; Raimondo, Massimo; Guha, Sushovan

    2010-11-01

    Over the last 3 decades, there have been substantial improvements in diagnostic imaging and sampling techniques to evaluate pancreatic diseases. The modern technology has helped us to recognize premalignant conditions of pancreas including mucinous cystic neoplasms and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs). Differentiation between benign and malignant lesions and early detection of any malignant transformation in premalignant lesion are extremely important for further management decisions. Diagnostic cytology has limited sensitivity to further differentiate between benign, premalignant, and malignant lesions of the pancreas. There is limited information about the epidemiological risk factors and molecular mechanisms leading to development and further progression to malignancy of IPMNs. Several studies have shown that pancreatic juice and pancreatic tissue from the lesion can be tested for molecular markers including K-ras, p53, and p16 to differentiate between cancer and chronic inflammatory process. We review cellular signaling pathways that contribute to pathogenesis of IPMNs of the pancreas to further identify potential biomarkers and molecular targets.

  2. Autoantibodies to pancreatic hsp60 precede the development of glucose intolerance in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Jensen, P; Johansen, H K; Carmi, P; Høiby, N; Cohen, I R

    2001-09-01

    Persons expressing the genetic disease cystic fibrosis (CF) suffer from a high risk of developing impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes. The development of diabetes in CF has been attributed, in the past, to the destruction of pancreatic islets and their resident beta-cells secondary to the destruction of the surrounding tissue by mechanical clogging of the pancreatic exocrine ducts. However, the discovery that autoimmunity to the 60-kDa heat shock protein (hsp60) may cause type I diabetes in NOD mice raises the possibility that hsp60 autoimmunity may be involved in CF diabetes too; could the hyperimmunization to bacterial hsp60 characteristic of CF spread to self-hsp60 and hence to autoimmune diabetes? We now report that rising levels of IgG autoantibodies to hsp60 do indeed precede the appearance of glucose intolerance and diabetes in CF patients. We produced a recombinant human pancreatic hsp60 protein and investigated the IgG antibody response to hsp60 in prediabetic and non-diabetic patients with CF. To detect hsp60 autoantibodies in the presence of high levels of antibodies to bacterial hsp60, we absorbed test sera with the 60-kDa GroEL of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and used an immunostaining technique. Using this technique, 32 prediabetic CF patients were evaluated over a five-year period, three years, on the average, before the onset of glucose intolerance. We found that a significant increase in hsp60 autoantibody preceded impaired glucose tolerance (P=0.042, n=17), diabetes (P=0.011, n=15) and glucose intolerance (P=0.005, n=32). As has been observed in NOD mice and in type I diabetic patients, the hsp60 autoantibodies decline at the outbreak of glucose intolerance in the CF patients. The association of CF diabetes with the rise and fall of hsp60 autoimmunity suggests that the pathogenesis of the diabetes may not be merely mechanical, but arise in the wake of bacterial hyperimmunisation.

  3. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy in cystic fibrosis: dose, variability and coefficient of fat absorption.

    PubMed

    Calvo-Lerma, Joaquim; Martínez-Barona, Sandra; Masip, Etna; Fornés, Victoria; Ribes-Koninckx, Carmen

    2017-10-01

    Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy (PERT) remains a backbone in the nutritional treatment of cystic fibrosis. Currently, there is a lack of an evidence-based tool that allows dose adjustment. To date, no studies have found an association between PERT dose and fat absorption. Therefore, the aim of the study was to assess the influence of both the PERT dose and the variability in this dose on the coefficient of fat absorption (CFA). This is a retrospective longitudinal study of 16 pediatric patients (192 food records) with three consecutive visits to the hospital over a twelve-month period. Dietary fat intake and PERT were assessed via a four-day food record and fat content in stools was determined by means of a three-day stool sample collection. A beta regression model was built to explain the association between the CFA and the interaction between the PERT dose (lipase units [LU]/g dietary fat) and the variability in the PERT dose (standard deviation [SD]). The coefficient of fat absorption increased with the PERT dose when the variability in the dose was low. In contrast, even at the highest PERT dose values, the CFA decreased when the variability was high. The confidence interval suggested an association, although the analysis was not statistically significant. The variability in the PERT dose adjustment should be taken into consideration when performing studies on PERT efficiency. A clinical goal should be the maintenance of a constant PERT dose rather than trying to obtain an optimal value.

  4. Imaging considerations in intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Pedrosa, Ivan; Boparai, Dennis

    2010-01-01

    With the widespread use of cross-sectional imaging, particularly computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and the continuous improvement in the image quality of these techniques, the diagnosis of incidental pancreatic cysts has increased dramatically in the last decades. While the vast majority of these cysts are not clinically relevant, a small percentage of them will evolve into an invasive malignant tumor making their management challenging. Mucinous cystic neoplasms and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN) are the most common pancreatic cystic lesions with malignant potential. Imaging findings on CT and MRI correlate tightly with the presence of malignant degeneration in these neoplasms. IPMN can be classified based on their distribution as main duct, branch duct or mixed type lesions. MRI is superior to CT in demonstrating the communication of a branch duct IPMN with the main pancreatic duct (MPD). Most branch duct lesions are benign whereas tumors involving the MPD are frequently associated with malignancy. The presence of solid nodules, thick enhancing walls and/or septae, a wide (> 1 cm) connection of a side-branch lesion with the MPD and the size of the tumor > 3 cm are indicative of malignancy in a branch and mixed type IPMN. A main pancreatic duct > 6 mm, a mural nodule > 3 mm and an abnormal attenuating area in the adjacent pancreatic parenchyma on CT correlates with malignant disease in main duct and mixed type IPMN. An accurate characterization of these neoplasms by imaging is thus crucial for selecting the best management options. In this article, we review the imaging findings of IPMN including imaging predictors of malignancy and surgical resectability. We also discuss follow-up strategies for patients with surgically resected IPMN and patients with incidental pancreatic cysts. PMID:21160838

  5. How Is Cystic Fibrosis Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Cystic Fibrosis Treated? Cystic fibrosis (CF) has no cure. However, ... help oral pancreatic enzymes work better. Treatments for Cystic Fibrosis Complications A common complication of CF is diabetes . ...

  6. Pancreatic Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Das, Koushik K; Early, Dayna

    2017-09-06

    This review describes the rationale for pancreatic cancer screening, outlines groups that are at elevated risk for pancreatic cancer, and summarizes the relative risk in each setting. We also review the methods available for performing pancreatic cancer screening and the recommended screening intervals. Several genetic mutations have been identified that increase the risk for pancreatic cancer. Most are rare, however, and at-risk individuals are most often those with a strong family history of pancreatic cancer (with multiple family members affected) but no identifiable genetic mutation. Known genetic syndromes that increase the risk for pancreatic cancer include hereditary pancreatitis, familial atypical mole and multiple melanoma, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Lynch syndrome, BRCA mutations, and Li-Fraumeni syndrome. Genetic testing should be performed in conjunction with genetic counseling, and testing of an affected family member is preferred if possible.The goal of pancreatic cancer screening is to identify pancreatic cancer at an early, curable stage or, ideally, to identify precancerous lesions that can be resected to prevent the development of cancer. Imaging can be performed with either endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) or magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP). These techniques are generally considered to be complementary, although an advantage of EUS is that cysts or solid lesions can be sampled at the time of the procedure. Published results of small cohorts of high-risk patients in pancreatic cancer screening programs have demonstrated a high prevalence of small cystic lesions identified on EUS or MRCP, which often represent side-branch intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN). Knowledge of conditions and syndromes that increase pancreatic cancer risk allows one to identify those patients that may benefit from pancreatic cancer screening. As we gather evidence from large, international, multicenter cohorts of patients at high-risk for pancreatic

  7. Validation of diagnostic characteristics of needle based confocal laser endomicroscopy in differentiation of pancreatic cystic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, Somashekar G.; Swanson, Benjamin; Hart, Phil A.; El-Dika, Samer; Walker, Jon P.; McCarthy, Sean T.; Malli, Ahmad; Shah, Zarine K.; Conwell, Darwin L.

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims: Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided needle-based Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy (nCLE) characteristics of pancreatic cystic lesions (PCLs) have been identified in studies where the gold standard surgical histopathology was available in a minority of patients. There are diverging reports of interobserver agreement (IOA) and paucity of intraobserver reliability (IOR). Thus, we sought to validate current EUS-nCLE criteria of PCLs in a larger consecutive series of surgical patients. Methods: A retrospective analysis of patients who underwent EUS-nCLE at a single center was performed. For calculation of IOA (Fleiss’ kappa) and IOR (Cohen’s kappa), blinded nCLE-naïve observers (n = 6) reviewed nCLE videos of PCLs in two phases separated by a 2-week washout period. Results: EUS-nCLE was performed in 49 subjects, and a definitive diagnosis was available in 26 patients. The overall sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for diagnosing a mucinous PCL were 94 %, 82 %, and 89 %, respectively. The IOA for differentiating mucinous vs. non-mucinous PCL was “substantial” (κ = 0.67, 95 %CI 0.57, 0.77). The mean (± standard deviation) IOR was “substantial” (κ = 0.78 ± 0.13) for diagnosing mucinous PCLs. Both the IOAs and mean IORs were “substantial” for detection of known nCLE image patterns of papillae/epithelial bands of mucinous PCLs (IOA κ = 0.63; IOR κ = 0.76 ± 0.11), bright particles on a dark background of pseudocysts (IOA κ = 0.71; IOR κ = 0.78 ± 0.12), and fern-pattern or superficial vascular network of serous cystadenomas (IOA κ = 0.62; IOR κ = 0.68 ± 0.20). Three (6.1 % of 49) patients developed post-fine needle aspiration (FNA) pancreatitis. Conclusion: Characteristic EUS-nCLE patterns can be consistently identified and improve the diagnostic accuracy of PCLs. These results support further investigations to optimize EUS-nCLE while minimizing adverse events

  8. A case of mistaken identity: giant cystic pheochromocytoma.

    PubMed

    Antedomenico, Elena; Wascher, Robert A

    2005-01-01

    A 39-year-old Marshall Islands woman was referred for evaluation of an abdominal mass. Medical history was significant only for pulmonary tuberculosis and scrofula. The patient denied a personal or family history of pancreatic or endocrine disease. Physical examination revealed normal vital signs and a 12-cm mildly tender left upper quadrant mass. A computed tomography scan revealed an 11-cm cystic mass contiguous with the distal pancreas and closely associated with the hilum of the spleen and the left kidney. Based on these findings and the patient's history, a cystic neoplasm of the pancreas was suspected, and she was subsequently taken to the operating room for exploration. Intraoperatively, the patient became markedly hypertensive with manipulation of the mass, requiring intravenous nitroprusside. Histopathological evaluation confirmed the diagnosis of cystic pheochromocytoma (PCC). The patient's postoperative course was uncomplicated. Cystic PCCs may not present with the classic prodromal symptoms associated with solid PCCs. This case represents the complex and unsuspected presentation of an extremely rare functional cystic neoplasm. A high index of suspicion for cystic PCC is necessary when confronted with cystic lesions in the vicinity of the adrenal glands. Failure to recognize cystic PCC before resection may lead to uncontrollable hypertension in the operating room, with potentially serious consequences.

  9. Targeted DNA Sequencing Reveals Patterns of Local Progression in the Pancreatic Remnant Following Resection of Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm (IPMN) of the Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Pea, Antonio; Yu, Jun; Rezaee, Neda; Luchini, Claudio; He, Jin; Molin, Marco Dal; Griffin, James F.; Fedor, Helen; Fesharakizadeh, Shahriar; Salvia, Roberto; Weiss, Matthew J.; Bassi, Claudio; Cameron, John L.; Zheng, Lei; Scarpa, Aldo; Hruban, Ralph H.; Lennon, Anne Marie; Goggins, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to characterize patterns of local progression following resection for pancreatic intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN) using targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS). Background Progression of neoplastic disease in the remnant pancreas following resection of IPMN may include development of a new IPMN or ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). However, it is not clear whether this progression represents recurrence of the same neoplasm or an independent second neoplasm. Methods Targeted-NGS on genes commonly mutated in IPMN and PDAC was performed on tumors from (1) 13 patients who developed disease progression in the remnant pancreas following resection of IPMN; and (2) 10 patients who underwent a resection for PDAC and had a concomitant IPMN. Mutations in the tumors were compared in order to determine the relationship between neoplasms. In parallel, clinical and pathological characteristics of 260 patients who underwent resection of noninvasive IPMN were reviewed to identify risk factors associated with local progression. Results We identified 3 mechanisms underlying local progression in the remnant pancreas: (1) residual microscopic disease at the resection margin, (2) intraparenchymal spread of neoplastic cells, leading to an anatomically separate but genetically related recurrence, and (3) multifocal disease with genetically distinct lesions. Analysis of the 260 patients with noninvasive IPMNs showed that family history of pancreatic cancer (P = 0.027) and high-grade dysplasia (HGD) (P = 0.003) were independent risk factors for the development of an IPMN with HGD or an invasive carcinoma in the remnant pancreas. Conclusions Using NGS, we identify distinct mechanisms for development of metachronous or synchronous neoplasms in patients with IPMN. Patients with a primary IPMN with HGD or with positive family history are at an increased risk to develop subsequent high-risk neoplasms in the remnant pancreas. PMID:27433916

  10. Targeted DNA Sequencing Reveals Patterns of Local Progression in the Pancreatic Remnant Following Resection of Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm (IPMN) of the Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Pea, Antonio; Yu, Jun; Rezaee, Neda; Luchini, Claudio; He, Jin; Dal Molin, Marco; Griffin, James F; Fedor, Helen; Fesharakizadeh, Shahriar; Salvia, Roberto; Weiss, Matthew J; Bassi, Claudio; Cameron, John L; Zheng, Lei; Scarpa, Aldo; Hruban, Ralph H; Lennon, Anne Marie; Goggins, Michael; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Wood, Laura D

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize patterns of local progression following resection for pancreatic intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN) using targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS). Progression of neoplastic disease in the remnant pancreas following resection of IPMN may include development of a new IPMN or ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). However, it is not clear whether this progression represents recurrence of the same neoplasm or an independent second neoplasm. Targeted-NGS on genes commonly mutated in IPMN and PDAC was performed on tumors from (1) 13 patients who developed disease progression in the remnant pancreas following resection of IPMN; and (2) 10 patients who underwent a resection for PDAC and had a concomitant IPMN. Mutations in the tumors were compared in order to determine the relationship between neoplasms. In parallel, clinical and pathological characteristics of 260 patients who underwent resection of noninvasive IPMN were reviewed to identify risk factors associated with local progression. We identified 3 mechanisms underlying local progression in the remnant pancreas: (1) residual microscopic disease at the resection margin, (2) intraparenchymal spread of neoplastic cells, leading to an anatomically separate but genetically related recurrence, and (3) multifocal disease with genetically distinct lesions. Analysis of the 260 patients with noninvasive IPMNs showed that family history of pancreatic cancer (P = 0.027) and high-grade dysplasia (HGD) (P = 0.003) were independent risk factors for the development of an IPMN with HGD or an invasive carcinoma in the remnant pancreas. Using NGS, we identify distinct mechanisms for development of metachronous or synchronous neoplasms in patients with IPMN. Patients with a primary IPMN with HGD or with positive family history are at an increased risk to develop subsequent high-risk neoplasms in the remnant pancreas.

  11. Gallstone pancreatitis secondary to a pathological cystic duct stump in a setting of chronic pain syndrome: a diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Jamish; Tan, Jeffrey; Gandhi, Natasha

    2015-03-12

    A 32-year-old woman presented with epigastric pain. She was a patient with chronic pain syndrome and had visited the emergency department several times over the past year. She did not drink alcohol. She had a laparoscopic cholecystectomy for gallstone pancreatitis 4 years ago. Her lipase was 2020 with normal bilirubin. MR cholangiopancreatography revealed a cystic structure resembling a gallbladder in the gallbladder fossa. This was in connection with the biliary system. The structure also contained stones. A review of the histology did confirm the gallbladder had been removed. She proceeded to have a laparoscopic re-cholecystectomy and made an unremarkable recovery.

  12. Animal models of gastrointestinal and liver diseases. Animal models of cystic fibrosis: gastrointestinal, pancreatic, and hepatobiliary disease and pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Olivier, Alicia K.; Gibson-Corley, Katherine N.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple organ systems, including the gastrointestinal tract, pancreas, and hepatobiliary systems, are affected by cystic fibrosis (CF). Many of these changes begin early in life and are difficult to study in young CF patients. Recent development of novel CF animal models has expanded opportunities in the field to better understand CF pathogenesis and evaluate traditional and innovative therapeutics. In this review, we discuss manifestations of CF disease in gastrointestinal, pancreatic, and hepatobiliary systems of humans and animal models. We also compare the similarities and limitations of animal models and discuss future directions for modeling CF. PMID:25591863

  13. Animal models of gastrointestinal and liver diseases. Animal models of cystic fibrosis: gastrointestinal, pancreatic, and hepatobiliary disease and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Olivier, Alicia K; Gibson-Corley, Katherine N; Meyerholz, David K

    2015-03-15

    Multiple organ systems, including the gastrointestinal tract, pancreas, and hepatobiliary systems, are affected by cystic fibrosis (CF). Many of these changes begin early in life and are difficult to study in young CF patients. Recent development of novel CF animal models has expanded opportunities in the field to better understand CF pathogenesis and evaluate traditional and innovative therapeutics. In this review, we discuss manifestations of CF disease in gastrointestinal, pancreatic, and hepatobiliary systems of humans and animal models. We also compare the similarities and limitations of animal models and discuss future directions for modeling CF.

  14. Vitamin B12 Status in Children with Cystic Fibrosis and Pancreatic Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Maqbool, Asim; Schall, Joan I.; Mascarenhas, Maria R.; Dougherty, Kelly A.; Stallings, Virginia A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Unexpectedly high serum B12 concentrations were noted in most study subjects with cystic fibrosis (CF) and pancreatic insufficiency (PI) participating in a nutrition intervention at the baseline evaluation. The objectives of this study were to determine dietary, supplement-based and enzyme-based B12 intake, serum B12 concentrations, and predictors of vitamin B12 status in children with CF and PI. Study Design Serum B12 status was assessed in subjects (5-18 yrs) and categorized as elevated (Hi-B12) or within reference range (RR-B12) for age and sex. Serum homocysteine, plasma B6, red blood cell folate, height, weight, and body mass index Z scores, pulmonary function, energy, dietary and supplement-based vitamin intake were assessed. Results 106 subjects, mean age 10.4 ± 3.0 years participated. Median serum B12 was 1083 pg/ml, with 56% in the Hi-B12 group. Dietary and supplement-based B12 intake were both high representing 376% and 667% Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA). The Hi-B12 group had significantly greater supplement-based B12 intake than the RR-B12 group (1000 vs. 583% RDA, p<0.001). By multiple logistic regression analysis, high supplement-based B12 intake and age >12 years increased risk for Hi-B12, while higher FEV1 decreased risk (Pseudo-R2=0.18, P<0.001). Conclusions Serum B12 was elevated in the majority of children with CF and PI. Supplement-based B12 intake was 6 to 10 times the RDA, and strongly predicted elevated serum B12 status. The health consequences of lifelong high supplement-based B12 intake and high serum B12 are unknown and require further study, as does the inversed correlation between serum B12 and FEV1. PMID:24445504

  15. Differential diagnosis between pancreatic neuroendocrine and solid pseudopapillary neoplasms on endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Raddaoui, Emad M.; Almadi, Majid A.; Aljebreen, Abdulrahman M.; Alsaif, Faisal A.; AlShedoukhy, Ahlam A.; Al-Lehibi, Abed H.; Almohameed, Khalid A.; Tsolakis, Apostolos V.; AlAbbadi, Mousa A.; Almutrafi, Amna R.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the role of applying a limited panel of immunohistochemical stains on the cellblock preparation from samples obtained by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) in the aim of differentiating solid pseudopapillary neoplasms (SPNs) from neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). Methods: We retrospectively retrieved all the EUS-FNAs of the pancreas that have a diagnosis of NET or SPN that were performed at 2 tertiary care hospitals in Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia from May 2004 to December 2014. Diff-Quik, Papanicolaou, and Immunohistochemistry stains on cellblock preparations were performed. Results: Twenty cases were available (16 pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) and 4 SPNs). The pNETs were immunoreactive for synaptophysin, chromogranin A and CD56 while E-cadherin was diffusely to focally cytoplasmic positive. β-catenin was negative or showed focal cytoplasmic immunoreactivity. In comparison, SPNs were positive for vimentin, CD10, CD-56, focally positive for progesterone receptors and synaptophysin, and revealed nuclear immunostaining for β-catenin. They were negative for chromogranin A and E-cadherin. Conclusion: Based on EUS-FNA samples, nuclear immunoreactivity for β-catenin with loss of membranous immunostaining for E-Cadherin can potentially facilitate differentiating SPNs from pNETs. PMID:27381533

  16. Primary signet ring stromal tumor of the testis: a study of 13 cases indicating their phenotypic and genotypic analogy to pancreatic solid pseudopapillary neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Michalova, Kvetoslava; Michal, Michael; Kazakov, Dmitry V; Sedivcova, Monika; Hes, Ondrej; Hadravsky, Ladislav; Agaimy, Abbas; Tretiakova, Maria; Bacchi, Carlos; Hartmann, Arndt; Kuroda, Naoto; Bulimbasic, Stela; Coric, Marijana; Antic, Tatjana; Michal, Michal

    2017-09-01

    Primary signet ring stromal tumor of the testis (PSRSTT) is an extremely rare tumor described only twice in the literature. Pancreatic-analogue solid pseudopapillary neoplasm (SPN) of the testis is a recently reported entity with morphological overlap with PSRSTT. We reviewed our files to find all cases of PSRSTT to better characterize this entity. We studied 13 cases of PSRSTTs using histological, immunohistochemical (IHC), and molecular genetic methods and compared the results with pancreatic SPN. Grossly, the size of PSRSTTs ranged from 0.5 to 2 cm (mean 1.1). Microscopically, PSRSTTs predominantly showed a proliferation of low-grade epithelioid cells containing characteristic cytoplasmic vacuole dislodging the nucleus (signet ring cells) separated by fibrous septa into trabeculae and nests. The immunoprofile was characterized by immunoreactivity for β-catenin, cyclin D1 (nuclear positivity for both antibodies), CD10, vimentin, galectin-3, claudin 7, α-1-antitrypsin, CD56, and neuron-specific enolase and negativity for chromogranin, inhibin, calretinin, SF-1, NANOG, OCT3/4, and SALL4. In some cases, the IHC panel was restricted because of a limited amount of tissue. Molecular genetic analysis revealed mutations within exon 3 of the CTNNB1 encoding β-catenin in all analyzable cases. Based on histological similarities between pancreatic SPN and PSRSTT and their identical IHC and molecular genetic features, we assume that both neoplasms share the same pathogenesis, and thus, PSRSTT can be considered as a testicular analogue of pancreatic SPN. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Cystic fibrosis mutations for p.F508del compound heterozygotes predict sweat chloride levels and pancreatic sufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Sebro, R; Levy, H; Schneck, K; Dimmock, D; Raby, BA; Cannon, CL; Broeckel, U; Risch, NJ

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a monogenetic disease with a complex phenotype. Over 1500 mutations in the CFTR gene have been identified; however, the p.F508del mutation is most common. There has been limited correlation between the CFTR mutation genotype and the disease phenotypes. We evaluated the non-p.F508del mutation of 108 p.F508del compound heterozygotes using the biological classification method, Grantham and Sorting Intolerant from Tolerant (SIFT) scores to assess whether these scoring systems correlated with sweat chloride levels, pancreatic sufficiency, predicted FEV1, and risk of infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the last year. Mutations predicted to be ‘mild’ by the biological classification method are associated with more normal sweat chloride levels (p < 0.001), pancreatic sufficiency (p < 0.001) and decreased risk of infection with Pseudomonas in the last year (p = 0.014). Lower Grantham scores are associated with more normal sweat chloride levels (p < 0.001), and pancreatic sufficiency (p = 0.014). Higher SIFT scores are associated with more normal sweat chloride levels (p < 0.001) and pancreatic sufficiency (p = 0.011). There was no association between pulmonary function measured by predicted FEV1 and the biological classification (p = 0.98), Grantham (p = 0.28) or SIFT scores (p = 0.62), which suggests the pulmonary disease related to CF may involve other modifier genes and environmental factors. PMID:22035343

  18. Evidence for a causal relationship between early exocrine pancreatic disease and cystic fibrosis-related diabetes: a Mendelian randomization study.

    PubMed

    Soave, David; Miller, Melissa R; Keenan, Katherine; Li, Weili; Gong, Jiafen; Ip, Wan; Accurso, Frank; Sun, Lei; Rommens, Johanna M; Sontag, Marci; Durie, Peter R; Strug, Lisa J

    2014-06-01

    Circulating immunoreactive trypsinogen (IRT), a biomarker of exocrine pancreatic disease in cystic fibrosis (CF), is elevated in most CF newborns. In those with severe CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) genotypes, IRT declines rapidly in the first years of life, reflecting progressive pancreatic damage. Consistent with this progression, a less elevated newborn IRT measure would reflect more severe pancreatic disease, including compromised islet compartments, and potentially increased risk of CF-related diabetes (CFRD). We show in two independent CF populations that a lower newborn IRT estimate is associated with higher CFRD risk among individuals with severe CFTR genotypes, and we provide evidence to support a causal relationship. Increased loge(IRT) at birth was associated with decreased CFRD risk in Canadian and Colorado samples (hazard ratio 0.30 [95% CI 0.15-0.61] and 0.39 [0.18-0.81], respectively). Using Mendelian randomization with the SLC26A9 rs7512462 genotype as an instrumental variable since it is known to be associated with IRT birth levels in the CF population, we provide evidence to support a causal contribution of exocrine pancreatic status on CFRD risk. Our findings suggest CFRD risk could be predicted in early life and that maintained ductal fluid flow in the exocrine pancreas could delay the onset of CFRD.

  19. Lymphoepithelial cyst of the pancreas mimicking malignant cystic tumor: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Dong Hee; Sung, Ro Hyun; Kang, Min Ho; Choi, Jae Woon

    2015-08-01

    Lymphoepithelial cysts of the pancreas are a type of true cyst that can mimic pseudocysts and cystic neoplasms. They are very rare, non-malignant lesions that are unilocular or multilocular cystic lesions lined predominantly by mature squamous epithelium and surrounded by non-neoplastic lymphoid elements. We, herein, present a patient with a cystic pancreas tumor mimicking a malignant cystic neoplasm. The patient was admitted with upper abdominal discomfort. Computed tomography showed a 64×39 mm cystic mass in the pancreas tail. She underwent distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy. In the fluid analysis of the pancreas cystic mass, the CEA and CA19-9 were 618 ng/ml and 3.9 U/ml, respectively. The resected pancreas specimen showed a 6.5 cm-sized cyst the pancreas tail. The cyst was well circumscribed and multilocular. The final pathology report of the resected pancreas specimen noted that the cyst was multilocular, and the cyst lining was showing stratified squamous epithelium covering the lymphoid tissue (containing lymphoid follicles), which was consistent with a lymphoepithelial cyst. The patient recovered uneventfully from surgery and has been doing well for the past 3 months. A differential diagnosis of cystic pancreatic lesions is important. We suggest that lymphoepithelial cysts, although very rare, may be included in the differential diagnosis of cystic pancreatic tumors.

  20. Solid Pseudopapillary Tumour of Extrapancreatic Origin Presenting as Mesenteric Cystic Mass: A Diagnostic Dilemma.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Sudipta; Ghosh, Suman; Sarkar, Ranu

    2016-08-01

    Solid Pseudopapillary Tumour (SPT) is a rare and distinctive pancreatic exocrine neoplasm. Even Rarely, such primary SPT may originate from ectopic pancreatic tissues. We are hereby presenting one such unique case, where a 50-year-old female presented with pain and a mid-abdominal lump. Radiology revealed a well-defined outline located adjacent to the tail of pancreas. The excised mass was 19×14×7cm in dimension having zones of haemorrhage, necrosis and cystic spaces filled with necrotic debris. Microscopic examination confirmed the diagnosis of SPT. SPT originating in extrapancreatic location may mimic an ovarian cystic tumours or mesenteric cysts, its proper identification is crucial.

  1. Diagnosis of pancreatic tumors by endoscopic ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Hiroki; Kitano, Masayuki; Kamata, Ken; El-Masry, Muhammad; Kudo, Masatoshi

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic tumors are highly diverse, as they can be solid or cystic, and benign or malignant. Since their imaging features overlap considerably, it is often difficult to characterize these tumors. In addition, small pancreatic tumors, especially those less than 2 cm in diameter, are difficult to detect and diagnose. For characterizing pancreatic tumors and detecting small pancreatic tumors, endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is the most sensitive of the imaging procedures currently available. This technique also provides good results in terms of the preoperative staging of pancreatic tumors. EUS-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) has also proved to be a safe and useful method for tissue sampling of pancreatic tumors. Despite these advantages, however, it is still difficult to differentiate between benign and malignant, solid or cystic pancreatic tumors, malignant neoplasms, and chronic pancreatitis using EUS, even when EUS-FNA is performed. Recently, contrast-enhanced EUS with Doppler mode (CE-EUS) employing ultrasound contrast agents, which indicate vascularization in pancreatic lesions, has been found to be useful in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic tumors, especially small pancreatic tumors. However, Doppler ultrasonography with contrast-enhancement has several limitations, including blooming artifacts, poor spatial resolution, and low sensitivity to slow flow. Consequently, an echoendoscope was developed recently that has a broad-band transducer and an imaging mode that was designed specifically for contrast-enhanced harmonic EUS (CEH-EUS) with a second-generation ultrasound contrast agent. The CEH-EUS technique is expected to improve the differential diagnosis of pancreatic disease in the future. This review describes the EUS appearances of common solid and cystic pancreatic masses, the diagnostic accuracy of EUS-FNA, and the relative efficacies and advantages of CE-EUS and CEH-EUS along with their relative advantages and their complementary roles

  2. CFTR transcription defects in pancreatic sufficient cystic fibrosis patients with only one mutation in the coding region of CFTR

    PubMed Central

    Sheridan, Molly B; Hefferon, Timothy W; Wang, Nulang; Merlo, Christian; Milla, Carlos; Borowitz, Drucy; Green, Eric D; Mogayzel, Peter J; Cutting, Garry R

    2011-01-01

    Background Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) manifest a multisystem disease due to deleterious mutations in each gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). However, the role of dysfunctional CFTR is uncertain in individuals with mild forms of CF (ie, pancreatic sufficiency) and mutation in only one CFTR gene. Methods Eleven pancreatic sufficient (PS) CF patients with only one CFTR mutation identified after mutation screening (three patients), mutation scanning (four patients) or DNA sequencing (four patients) were studied. Bi-directional sequencing of the coding region of CFTR was performed in patients who had mutation screening or scanning. If a second CFTR mutation was not identified, CFTR mRNA transcripts from nasal epithelial cells were analysed to determine if any PS-CF patients harboured a second CFTR mutation that altered RNA expression. Results Sequencing of the coding regions of CFTR identified a second deleterious mutation in five of the seven patients who previously had mutation screening or mutation scanning. Five of the remaining six patients with only one deleterious mutation identified in the coding region of one CFTR gene had a pathologic reduction in the amount of RNA transcribed from their other CFTR gene (8.4–16% of wild type). Conclusions These results show that sequencing of the coding region of CFTR followed by analysis of CFTR transcription could be a useful diagnostic approach to confirm that patients with mild forms of CF harbour deleterious alterations in both CFTR genes. PMID:21097845

  3. R248G cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator mutation in three siblings presenting with recurrent acute pancreatitis and reproductive issues: a case series.

    PubMed

    Villalona, Seiichi; Glover-López, Guillermo; Ortega-García, Juan Antonio; Moya-Quiles, Rosa; Mondejar-López, Pedro; Martínez-Romero, Maria C; Rigabert-Montiel, Mariano; Pastor-Vivero, María D; Sánchez-Solís, Manuel

    2017-02-15

    Mutational combinations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, CFTR, gene have different phenotypic manifestations at the molecular level with varying clinical consequences for individuals possessing such mutations. Reporting cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator mutations is important in understanding the genotype-phenotype correlations and associated clinical presentations in patients with cystic fibrosis. Understanding the effects of mutations is critical in developing appropriate treatments for individuals affected with cystic fibrosis, non-classic cystic fibrosis, or cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator-related disorders. This is the first report of related individuals possessing the R248G missense cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator mutation and we present their associated clinical histories. All three patients are of Spanish descent. Deoxyribonucleic acid analysis revealed that all three siblings possessed a novel c.742A>G mutation, resulting in a p.Arg248Gly (R248G) amino acid change in exon 6 in trans with the known N1303K mutant allele. Case 1 patient is a 39-year-old infertile man presenting with congenital unilateral absence of the vas deferens and recurrent episodes of epigastric pain. Case 2 patient is a 32-year-old woman presenting with periods of infertility, two previous spontaneous abortions, recurrent epigastric pain, and recurrent pancreatitis. Case 3 patient is a 29-year-old woman presenting with recurrent pancreatitis and epigastric pain. We report the genotype-phenotype correlations and clinical manifestations of a novel R248G cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator mutation: congenital unilateral absence of the vas deferens in males, reduced female fertility, and recurrent acute pancreatitis. In addition, we discuss the possible functional consequences of the mutations at the molecular level.

  4. Incidence of health insurance claims for thyroid neoplasm and pancreatic malignancy in association with exenatide: signal refinement using active safety surveillance.

    PubMed

    Dore, David D; Seeger, John D; Chan, K Arnold

    2012-08-01

    As part of a regulatory postmarketing commitment, we assessed the risk of claims for thyroid and pancreatic cancer among users of exenatide using an active drug safety surveillance system. This active surveillance assessment used cohort methodology and commercial health insurance claims data to identify initiators of exenatide and propensity score-matched initiators of metformin or glyburide between June 2005 and September 2009, with up to 1 year of follow up through December 2009. The primary analysis estimated absolute and relative risk (RR) of inpatient or outpatient claims with diagnosis codes for thyroid neoplasm (benign or malignant) or pancreatic malignancies after exclusion of patients with a history of the same diagnosis at baseline. Among the matched comparison cohorts (N ≈ 32,800 each), there were 37 claims-suggested thyroid malignancies among exenatide initiators and 26 among metformin or glyburide initiators [RR 1.4; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.8-2.4]. This association was attenuated when limited to inpatient thyroid cancer claims (RR 0.9; CI 0.3-2.6). Exenatide use was not associated with an increased risk of benign thyroid neoplasm (RR 0.7; CI 0.3-1.7), or pancreatic cancer (RR 0.8; CI 0.5-1.6). Use of exenatide was associated with a modestly higher incidence of inpatient and outpatient claims, but not inpatient claims for thyroid malignancies. Exenatide was not associated with higher risk of benign thyroid neoplasm or pancreatic cancer. Misclassification of outcomes and exposure, and residual confounding remain limitations of this analysis to be considered when interpreting the results. We have initiated a formal epidemiologic investigation to explore these relationships.

  5. Long-term outcomes and prognostic factors in 78 Japanese patients with advanced pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms: a single-center retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Lingaku; Igarashi, Hisato; Fujimori, Nao; Hijioka, Masayuki; Kawabe, Ken; Oda, Yoshinao; Jensen, Robert T.; Ito, Tetsuhide

    2015-01-01

    Objective Despite an increase in the number of Japanese patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms, long-term outcomes and prognostic factors, especially for those with advanced disease, remain unclear. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 78 patients with unresectable pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms treated at our hospital from January 1987 to March 2015. Survival analyses were performed using Kaplan–Meier methods. Prognostic significance of several clinicopathological factors were analyzed by univariate and multivariate analyses using a Cox regression model. Results Median overall survivals of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (n = 64) and pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma (n = 14) were 83.7 and 9.1 months, respectively (hazard ratio: 0.02, 95% confidence interval: 0.01–0.08, P < 0.001). Although no significant differences were observed using a Ki-67 cut-off value of 2% (hazard ratio: 0.46, 95% confidence interval: 0.16–1.13, P = 0.0989), a Ki-67 cut-off of 10% was a significant predictor in patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (hazard ratio: 9.95, 95% confidence interval, 3.01–32.97, P < 0.001). Treatment after the advent of targeted therapy (hazard ratio: 0.07, 95% confidence interval: 0.03–0.19, P < 0.001) and the presence of bone metastases (hazard ratio: 4.38, 95% confidence interval: 1.42–11.29, P = 0.013) were significant prognostic factors in patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor evaluated by univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis also revealed that a Ki-67 index ≥10% (hazard ratio: 38.8, 95% confidence interval: 8.42–226.62, P < 0.001), approval of targeted therapy (hazard ratio: 0.02, 95% confidence interval: 0.00–0.11, P < 0.001) and bone metastases (hazard ratio: 5.56, 95% confidence interval: 1.10–24.00, P = 0.039) were independent prognostic factors. Conclusions We elucidated the long-term outcomes and prognostic factors in Japanese patients with advanced pancreatic

  6. A cystic fibrosis patient homozygous for 621 + 1G-->T mutation has a severe pulmonary disease, mild pancreatic insufficiency and a gastro-esophageal reflux.

    PubMed

    Witt, M; Pogorzelski, A; Zebrak, J; Rutkiewicz, E

    1996-09-01

    A cystic fibrosis patient homozygous for 621 + 1G-->T mutation of the CFTR gene has been identified during a molecular screening program of Polish CF families. The patient is currently a 21-year-old female with severe pulmonary involvement, mild pancreatic insufficiency and complicated gastroesophageal reflux.

  7. Vitamin B(12) status in children with cystic fibrosis and pancreatic insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Maqbool, Asim; Schall, Joan I; Mascarenhas, Maria R; Dougherty, Kelly A; Stallings, Virginia A

    2014-06-01

    Unexpectedly high serum B12 concentrations were noted in most study subjects with cystic fibrosis (CF) and pancreatic insufficiency (PI) participating in a nutrition intervention at the baseline evaluation. The objectives of this study were to determine dietary, supplement-based, and enzyme-based B12 intake, serum B12 concentrations, and predictors of vitamin B12 status in children with CF and PI. Serum B12 status was assessed in subjects (5-18 years) and categorized as elevated (serum B12 above reference range for age and sex [Hi-B12]) or within reference range (serum B12 within reference range for age and sex) for age and sex. Serum homocysteine, plasma B6, red blood cell folate, height, weight, and body mass index z scores, pulmonary function, energy, and dietary and supplement-based vitamin intake were assessed. A total of 106 subjects, mean age 10.4 ± 3.0 years, participated in the study. Median serum B12 was 1083 pg/mL, with 56% in the Hi-B12 group. Dietary and supplement-based B12 intakes were both high representing 376% and 667% recommended dietary allowance (RDA), respectively. The Hi-B12 group had significantly greater supplement-based B12 intake than the serum B12 within reference range for age and sex group (1000% vs 583% RDA, P < 0.001). Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that high supplement-based B12 intake and age >12 years increased the risk of Hi-B12, whereas higher forced expiratory volume at 1 second (FEV1) decreased the risk (pseudo-R = 0.18, P < 0.001). Serum B12 was elevated in the majority of children with CF and PI. Supplement-based B12 intake was 6 to 10 times the RDA, and strongly predicted elevated serum B12 status. The health consequences of lifelong high supplement-based B12 intake and high serum B12 are unknown and require further study, as does the inversed correlation between serum B12 and forced expiratory volume at 1 second.

  8. Dynamics of Fukuoka Criteria and Patient Management in Pancreatic Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasms (IPMNs) During Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Schellhaas, Barbara; Vitali, Francesco; Wildner, Dane; Görtz, Rüdiger S.; Pfeifer, Lukas; Konturek, Peter C.; Neurath, Markus F.; Strobel, Deike

    2017-01-01

    Background Pancreatic intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) present a clinical challenge. Evidence-based guidelines are lacking. The so-called “Fukuoka criteria” were developed to assess the risk of malignancy in IPMNs upon imaging. However, little is known about their diagnostic value and the natural course of IPMNs. Thus, the aim of this study was the assessment of Fukuoka criteria and patient management in pancreatic IPMNs during follow-up. Material/Methods IPMNs were identified via retrospective survey of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) examinations. Fukuoka criteria were assessed on EUS findings and additional imaging (CT, MRI, ultrasound). Patients’ symptoms and comorbidities were recorded. Dynamics of Fukuoka criteria and patient management were compared at first presentation and during follow-up. Results We screened 1324 EUS examinations. Sixty-five patients (male/female, 14/37; mean age, 68.8 years; range, 48–85 years) with IPMNs were identified (57 branch duct (BD-)IPMNs, 3 main duct (MD-) IPMNs, 5 mixed-type (MT)-IPMNs). Seven patients received surgical resection (4 BD-IPMNs, 2 MD-IPMNs, 1 MT-IPMN). Nine BD-IPMNs had neither surgery nor follow-up. Fifty-one patients (44 BD-IPMNs, 2 MD-IPMNs, 5 MT-IPMNs) underwent follow-up (mean duration, 18.7 months; range, 3–139 months). There were 15/51 patients who were initially Fukuoka-positive. One MD-IPMN, 4/5 MT-IPMNs, and 13/44 BD-IPMNs showed progressive changes but were not resected due to patients’ refusal or comorbidities. Four BD-IPMNs converted to Fukuoka-positive. Conclusions Evidence-based guidelines for non-invasive dignity assessment of IPMNs are lacking. In our study, MD-IPMNs displayed greater dynamics than BD-IPMNs and MT-IPMNs concerning Fukuoka criteria. Prospective long-term studies are needed to clarify prognostic significance of the single Fukuoka criteria and sensible duration of follow-up. PMID:28348359

  9. Prediction of survival and tumor recurrence in patients undergoing surgery for pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Kaltenborn, Alexander; Matzke, Svenja; Kleine, Moritz; Krech, Till; Ramackers, Wolf; Vondran, Florian W R; Klempnauer, Jürgen; Bektas, Hüseyin; Schrem, Harald

    2016-02-01

    This study strives to define prognostic models for outcome after surgery for malignant pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. Forty-one patients were included. Prognostic models for mortality and disease recurrence were developed with multivariate binary logistic regression. The proposed prognostic model for tumor recurrence risk after surgery in percentage (AUROC = 0.774, 95%CI = 0.611-0.937) is: Risk in % = Exp(Y)/(1 + Exp(Y)), with Y = -4.360 + (0.015 × tumor diameter in cm) + (0.010 × preoperative platelet count in thousand/μl) + (1.077 × distant metastases, if yes = 1; if no = 0) + (-0.026 × Ki-67-positive cells in %) + (-1.086 × upper abdominal pain, if yes = 1; if no = 0). The proposed prognostic model for observed 3-year survival probability after surgery in % (AUROC = 0.932, 95%CI = 0.857-0.999) is: Survival probability in % = Exp(Y)/(1 + Exp(Y)), with Y = -12.492 + (0.054 × preoperative platelet count in thousand/μl) + (0.112 × minimal distance of the resection margin from the tumor in mm) + (-1.574 × number of positive lymph nodes) + (2.292 × histological tumor infiltration, if yes = 1; if no = 0) CONCLUSIONS: The platelet count was identified as a relevant risk factor. Proposed prognostic models with good model-fit display properties that indicate potential clinical usefulness. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. A double blind lipase for lipase comparison of a high lipase and standard pancreatic enzyme preparation in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Bowler, I M; Wolfe, S P; Owens, H M; Sheldon, T A; Littlewood, J M; Walters, M P

    1993-01-01

    A standard acid resistant microsphere pancreatic enzyme preparation was compared with identical capsules half filled with mini-tablets of a new high lipase preparation in a randomised double blind crossover study in children with cystic fibrosis. Each patient received his/her usual number of capsules and the same dose of lipase during each period of the study. Eighteen patients completed the study. There were fewer gastrointestinal symptoms when pancreatic enzyme was supplied as the high lipase preparation. There was also a significant improvement in fat absorption (17%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 6 to 27), reduction in faecal fat output (15.8 g/day, 95% CI 6.4 to 22.5), and faecal energy loss (789 kJ/day, 95% CI 211 to 1384). It is concluded that half filled capsules of the new high lipase preparation are more effective than the standard preparation and it is likely that filled capsules would allow patients to use fewer than half the number of pancreatic enzyme capsules. PMID:7683190

  11. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas (IPMNs): epidemiology, diagnosis and future aspects.

    PubMed

    Konstantinou, Froso; Syrigos, Konstantinos N; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2013-03-10

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas (IPMNs) are potentially malignant intraductal epithelial neoplasms which consist of columnar, mucin-containing cells and arise from the epithelium of the main pancreatic duct or its branches. IPMNs as well as pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias (PanINs) and mucinous cystic neoplasms represent noninvasive precursors of invasive ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. The diagnosis of IPMNs includes radiographic (CT scanning, MRI, MRCP) and endoscopic evaluation (ERCP, EUS), PET, as well as serum tumor markers and molecular markers. The Sendai Consensus Guidelines help guide surgical resection for patients with IPMN. The follow-up of these patients, as well as of those who do not undergo surgical resection, is of great importance, since patients with IPMN appear to be at risk for other malignancies. Herein, the authors summarize the data presented at the 2013 ASCO Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium regarding incidence and clinicopathological characteristics of IPMN (Abstracts #324, #187 and #179).

  12. Cytological diagnosis of a rare case of solid pseudopapillary neoplasm of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Pailoor, Kirana; Kini, Hema; Rau, Aarthi R.; Kumar, Yogesh

    2010-01-01

    A 23-year-old woman presented to our hospital with nonspecific pain in the abdomen. She underwent radiological investigations, which revealed a solid and cystic mass in the tail end of the pancreas. The mass was diagnosed to be solid pseudopapillary neoplasm of the pancreas on intraoperative scrape cytology. This was further confirmed by histopathology. The cytological diagnosis enabled appropriate surgical treatment to be planned and carried out without undue delay. It is important to distinguish this rare tumor from other pancreatic tumors with similar cytohistologic features because, if diagnosed correctly and managed surgically, this neoplasm is associated with a good prognosis. PMID:21042533

  13. A comparison of enteric coated microspheres with enteric coated tablet pancreatic enzyme preparations in cystic fibrosis. A controlled study.

    PubMed

    Vyas, H; Matthew, D J; Milla, P J

    1990-01-01

    A comparative study of the efficacy of pH sensitive enteric coated microspheres (ECM) with an enteric coated tablet (ECT) pancreatic enzyme preparation was carried out in 20 children with cystic fibrosis in a double-blind double-placebo crossover manner. Steatorrhoea was assessed by 3 day faecal fat analysis and dosage of medication, stool frequency and consistency; abdominal pain and appetite were documented by a patient-kept diary card. ECM controlled steatorrhoea (11.8 +/- 9.2 g vs 23.2 +/- 18.9 g, P less than 0.02), stool frequency (1.7 +/- 0.6 vs 2.1 +/- 0.9, P less than 0.01) and abdominal pain (8.8 +/- 13.8 vs 23.4 +/- 24.1, P less than 0.05) significantly better than ECT. Out of 20 patients 17 preferred ECM to ECT (P less than 0.00036). ECM preparations should allow more satisfactory dietary management of patients with cystic fibrosis with longterm beneficial effect.

  14. Ancillary Studies, Including Immunohistochemistry and Molecular Studies, in Pancreatic Cytology.

    PubMed

    Reid, Michelle D; Centeno, Barbara A

    2014-03-01

    Fine-needle aspiration biopsy of the pancreas is indicated for sampling of solid and cystic masses. Preoperative cytologic diagnosis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and cystic lesions on cytology can be problematic, and ancillary studies may help confirm diagnosis. Ancillary studies in pancreatic cytology include special stains, immunohistochemistry, mutational analyses of specific genes, cyst fluid analysis of tumor markers and enzymes, and, in some instances, flow cytometry. Proteomics, microRNA sequencing, and whole-exome gene sequencing have been used to illustrate the progression of pancreatic neoplasms and identify key diagnostic markers. This article summarizes recent literature on ancillary studies in pancreatic fine-needle aspiration samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. What Is Pancreatic Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... treated unless they grow large or cause symptoms. Mucinous cystic neoplasms (MCNs) (also known as mucinous cystadenomas ) ... tumors are typically removed with surgery. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) are benign tumors that grow in ...

  16. [Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas (IPMN)--standards and new aspects].

    PubMed

    Distler, M; Welsch, T; Aust, D; Weitz, J; Grützmann, R

    2014-06-01

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN) of the pancreas belong to the heterogeneous group of cystic pancreatic lesions and have been diagnosed more frequently in recent years. Diagnosis and differentiation from other cystic lesions (pseudocysts, serous-cystic neoplasias [SCN], mucinous-cystic neoplasias [MCN], intraductal papillary-mucinous neoplasias [IPMN] and solid pseudopapillary neoplasias [SPN]) is often challenging. IPMN of the pancreas are considered as precursor lesions for the development of invasive pancreatic cancer. However, depending on the morphological (MD-IPMN, BD-IPMN) and histological subtype (intestinal, pancreatobiliary, oncocytic or gastric) the malignant potential of IPMNs varies significantly. Hence, early diagnosis and selection of the appropriate therapeutic strategy is necessary for optimal outcome and cure. There is a strong consensus for the resection of all MD-IPMN. Small BD-IPMN without signs of malignancy can be followed by observation. The increasing understanding of the histopathology and tumour biology of IPMN has led to an amendment of the 2006 International Association of Pancreatology (IAP) guidelines for the treatment of cystic pancreatic tumours. In consideration of recent data, recommendations for observation and/or follow-up of IPMN cannot be given definitely.

  17. Predictors of malignancy in intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas: analysis of 310 pancreatic resection patients at multiple high-volume centers.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Yamaue, Hiroki; Maguchi, Hiroyuki; Yamao, Kenji; Hirono, Seiko; Osanai, Manabu; Hijioka, Susumu; Hosoda, Waki; Nakamura, Yasushi; Shinohara, Toshiya; Yanagisawa, Akio

    2013-07-01

    The present study was a retrospective investigation of predictors of malignancy in intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) of the pancreas. The subjects were 310 patients who underwent pancreatic resection at 3 high-volume centers. Preoperative laboratory and imaging findings were analyzed in logistic regression analyses. Endoscopic ultrasonography measurements were essential for the size of mural nodules, and a central review was conducted for pathological diagnosis. Pathological diagnosis was benign IPMN in 150 cases and malignant in 160 (noninvasive carcinoma, n = 100; invasive, n = 60). In multivariate analysis, size of mural nodules, diameter of main pancreatic duct, and cyst size of branch pancreatic duct were independent predictors of malignancy, and areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve for these 3 factors were 0.798, 0.643, and 0.601, respectively. With 7 mm taken as the cutoff value for the size of mural nodules, the diagnosis of malignant IPMN had sensitivity of 74.3% and specificity of 72.7%. Carcinoma without nodules was present in 15 patients (15/160 [9.4%]). The size of mural nodules measured with endoscopic ultrasonography showed high predictive ability. However, about 10% of carcinoma patients did not have nodules, and the handling of the diagnosis in such cases is a problem for the future.

  18. Potential usefulness of mucin immunohistochemical staining of preoperative pancreatic biopsy or juice cytology specimens in the determination of treatment strategies for intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Hisaka, Toru; Horiuchi, Hiroyuki; Uchida, Shinji; Ishikawa, Hiroto; Kawahara, Ryuichi; Kawashima, Yusuke; Akashi, Masanori; Mikagi, Kazuhiro; Ishida, Yusuke; Okabe, Yoshinobu; Nakayama, Masamichi; Naito, Yoshiki; Yano, Hirohisa; Taira, Tomoki; Kawahara, Akihiko; Kage, Masayoshi; Kinoshita, Hisafumi; Shirozu, Kazuo

    2013-11-01

    We classified resected intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) into four subtypes (gastric, intestinal, pancreatobiliary and oncocytic) according to their morphological features and mucin expression, determined their clinicopathological characteristics and investigated the possibility of preoperatively diagnosing these subtypes. Sixty resected tumors, 4 preoperative tumor biopsies and 10 preoperative pancreatic juice cytology specimens were analyzed. The gastric and intestinal types accounted for the majority of IPMNs. Non-gastric type IPMNs were of high-grade malignancy. Many of the pancreatobiliary-type IPMNs were in an advanced stage and were associated with a poor prognosis. The results of mucin immunohistochemical staining of preoperative biopsy and surgically resected specimens were in agreement with each other, and in close agreement with those for pancreatic juice cytology specimens obtained from 10 patients during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). The immunostaining of preoperative biopsy specimens and ERCP-obtained pancreatic juice cytology specimens may be useful in the differential diagnosis of gastric and intestinal types of IPMN. If such techniques enable the preoperative diagnosis of IPMN subtypes, their use in combination with conventional preoperative imaging modalities may lead to surgical treatment best suited for the biological characteristics of the four subtypes.

  19. Mechanisms of CFTR functional variants that impair regulated bicarbonate permeation and increase risk for pancreatitis but not for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    LaRusch, Jessica; Jung, Jinsei; General, Ignacio J; Lewis, Michele D; Park, Hyun Woo; Brand, Randall E; Gelrud, Andres; Anderson, Michelle A; Banks, Peter A; Conwell, Darwin; Lawrence, Christopher; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Baillie, John; Alkaade, Samer; Cote, Gregory; Gardner, Timothy B; Amann, Stephen T; Slivka, Adam; Sandhu, Bimaljit; Aloe, Amy; Kienholz, Michelle L; Yadav, Dhiraj; Barmada, M Michael; Bahar, Ivet; Lee, Min Goo; Whitcomb, David C

    2014-07-01

    CFTR is a dynamically regulated anion channel. Intracellular WNK1-SPAK activation causes CFTR to change permeability and conductance characteristics from a chloride-preferring to bicarbonate-preferring channel through unknown mechanisms. Two severe CFTR mutations (CFTRsev) cause complete loss of CFTR function and result in cystic fibrosis (CF), a severe genetic disorder affecting sweat glands, nasal sinuses, lungs, pancreas, liver, intestines, and male reproductive system. We hypothesize that those CFTR mutations that disrupt the WNK1-SPAK activation mechanisms cause a selective, bicarbonate defect in channel function (CFTRBD) affecting organs that utilize CFTR for bicarbonate secretion (e.g. the pancreas, nasal sinus, vas deferens) but do not cause typical CF. To understand the structural and functional requirements of the CFTR bicarbonate-preferring channel, we (a) screened 984 well-phenotyped pancreatitis cases for candidate CFTRBD mutations from among 81 previously described CFTR variants; (b) conducted electrophysiology studies on clones of variants found in pancreatitis but not CF; (c) computationally constructed a new, complete structural model of CFTR for molecular dynamics simulation of wild-type and mutant variants; and (d) tested the newly defined CFTRBD variants for disease in non-pancreas organs utilizing CFTR for bicarbonate secretion. Nine variants (CFTR R74Q, R75Q, R117H, R170H, L967S, L997F, D1152H, S1235R, and D1270N) not associated with typical CF were associated with pancreatitis (OR 1.5, p = 0.002). Clones expressed in HEK 293T cells had normal chloride but not bicarbonate permeability and conductance with WNK1-SPAK activation. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest physical restriction of the CFTR channel and altered dynamic channel regulation. Comparing pancreatitis patients and controls, CFTRBD increased risk for rhinosinusitis (OR 2.3, p<0.005) and male infertility (OR 395, p<0.0001). WNK1-SPAK pathway-activated increases in CFTR

  20. Mechanisms of CFTR Functional Variants That Impair Regulated Bicarbonate Permeation and Increase Risk for Pancreatitis but Not for Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Michele D.; Park, Hyun Woo; Brand, Randall E.; Gelrud, Andres; Anderson, Michelle A.; Banks, Peter A.; Conwell, Darwin; Lawrence, Christopher; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Baillie, John; Alkaade, Samer; Cote, Gregory; Gardner, Timothy B.; Amann, Stephen T.; Slivka, Adam; Sandhu, Bimaljit; Aloe, Amy; Kienholz, Michelle L.; Yadav, Dhiraj; Barmada, M. Michael; Bahar, Ivet; Lee, Min Goo; Whitcomb, David C.

    2014-01-01

    CFTR is a dynamically regulated anion channel. Intracellular WNK1-SPAK activation causes CFTR to change permeability and conductance characteristics from a chloride-preferring to bicarbonate-preferring channel through unknown mechanisms. Two severe CFTR mutations (CFTRsev) cause complete loss of CFTR function and result in cystic fibrosis (CF), a severe genetic disorder affecting sweat glands, nasal sinuses, lungs, pancreas, liver, intestines, and male reproductive system. We hypothesize that those CFTR mutations that disrupt the WNK1-SPAK activation mechanisms cause a selective, bicarbonate defect in channel function (CFTRBD) affecting organs that utilize CFTR for bicarbonate secretion (e.g. the pancreas, nasal sinus, vas deferens) but do not cause typical CF. To understand the structural and functional requirements of the CFTR bicarbonate-preferring channel, we (a) screened 984 well-phenotyped pancreatitis cases for candidate CFTRBD mutations from among 81 previously described CFTR variants; (b) conducted electrophysiology studies on clones of variants found in pancreatitis but not CF; (c) computationally constructed a new, complete structural model of CFTR for molecular dynamics simulation of wild-type and mutant variants; and (d) tested the newly defined CFTRBD variants for disease in non-pancreas organs utilizing CFTR for bicarbonate secretion. Nine variants (CFTR R74Q, R75Q, R117H, R170H, L967S, L997F, D1152H, S1235R, and D1270N) not associated with typical CF were associated with pancreatitis (OR 1.5, p = 0.002). Clones expressed in HEK 293T cells had normal chloride but not bicarbonate permeability and conductance with WNK1-SPAK activation. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest physical restriction of the CFTR channel and altered dynamic channel regulation. Comparing pancreatitis patients and controls, CFTRBD increased risk for rhinosinusitis (OR 2.3, p<0.005) and male infertility (OR 395, p<<0.0001). WNK1-SPAK pathway-activated increases in CFTR

  1. Prevalence of Pancreatic Cystic Lesions Is Associated With Diabetes Mellitus and Obesity: An Analysis of 5296 Individuals Who Underwent a Preventive Medical Examination.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Suguru; Isayama, Hiroyuki; Nakai, Yousuke; Yoshikawa, Takeharu; Ishigaki, Kazunaga; Matsubara, Saburo; Yamamoto, Natsuyo; Ijichi, Hideaki; Tateishi, Keisuke; Tada, Minoru; Hayashi, Naoto; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2017-07-01

    Pancreatic cystic lesions (PCLs) are considered precursors of pancreatic cancer. Diabetes mellitus (DM) and obesity are known as risk factors for pancreatic cancer. We investigated the prevalence of PCLs in the general population and the relationship between PCLs and DM/obesity. This cross-sectional analysis included 5296 individuals who underwent a preventive medical examination between October 2006 and June 2013 at our institution. Magnetic resonance imaging, including magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, was performed using a 3.0-T system as part of a comprehensive health screening program. We investigated the prevalence and risk factors of PCLs. The prevalence of PCLs was 13.7%, which was increased according to age. Individuals with PCLs were more prone to obesity (body mass index, 24.0 vs 23.7 kg/m [P = 0.015]; waist circumference, 87.4 vs 85.5 cm [P < 0.001]). DM was more prevalent in individuals with PCLs (18.4% vs 10.5%, P < 0.001). In a multivariate analysis, age (odds ratio [OR], 1.06; P < 0.001), excess body mass index (OR, 1.26; P = 0.039), and DM (OR, 1.39; P = 0.005) were associated with PCLs. The prevalence of PCLs detected by magnetic resonance imaging in a preventive medical examination was 13.7%. Pancreatic cystic lesions were significantly associated with DM and obesity.

  2. Prevalence of Pancreatic Cystic Lesions Is Associated With Diabetes Mellitus and Obesity: An Analysis of 5296 Individuals Who Underwent a Preventive Medical Examination.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Suguru; Isayama, Hiroyuki; Nakai, Yousuke; Yoshikawa, Takeharu; Ishigaki, Kazunaga; Matsubara, Saburo; Yamamoto, Natsuyo; Ijichi, Hideaki; Tateishi, Keisuke; Tada, Minoru; Hayashi, Naoto; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2017-06-22

    Pancreatic cystic lesions (PCLs) are considered precursors of pancreatic cancer. Diabetes mellitus (DM) and obesity are known as risk factors for pancreatic cancer. We investigated the prevalence of PCLs in the general population and the relationship between PCLs and DM/obesity. This cross-sectional analysis included 5296 individuals who underwent a preventive medical examination between October 2006 and June 2013 at our institution. Magnetic resonance imaging, including magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, was performed using a 3.0-T system as part of a comprehensive health screening program. We investigated the prevalence and risk factors of PCLs. The prevalence of PCLs was 13.7%, which was increased according to age. Individuals with PCLs were more prone to obesity (body mass index, 24.0 vs 23.7 kg/m [P = 0.015]; waist circumference, 87.4 vs 85.5 cm [P < 0.001]). DM was more prevalent in individuals with PCLs (18.4% vs 10.5%, P < 0.001). In a multivariate analysis, age (odds ratio [OR], 1.06; P < 0.001), excess body mass index (OR, 1.26; P = 0.039), and DM (OR, 1.39; P = 0.005) were associated with PCLs. The prevalence of PCLs detected by magnetic resonance imaging in a preventive medical examination was 13.7%. Pancreatic cystic lesions were significantly associated with DM and obesity.

  3. [Pancreatic tumors: recent developments].

    PubMed

    Lariño Noia, José

    2014-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) still typically has a poor prognosis. In addition to smoking, obesity and new-onset diabetes mellitus are considered to be significant risk factors. An endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) remains the mainstay for diagnosis and on which the majority of advances are based. In this sense, needle-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (nCLE) is gaining importance in the differential diagnosis of solid pancreatic lesions and studies comparing different needle types (cytology vs. histology) for EUS-guided puncture. Intravenous contrast (IC-EUS) and elastography are additional tools associated with EUS that can assist in diagnosing PC. Regarding prognostic factors, the importance of the role of mesenteric-portal vein resection was emphasized, given the limited advances in treatment, as in previous years. Regarding cystic tumors, work focuses on validating the new international guidelines from Fukuoka 2012 (revised Sendai criteria) and on determining predictors of cystic lesion malignancy, mainly of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN). From a therapeutic point of view, there are theories regarding the usefulness of alcohol and the gemcitabine-paclitaxel combination in the ablation of small mucinous cystic lesions through EUS-injection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Multi-detector row CT of pancreatic islet cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Horton, Karen M; Hruban, Ralph H; Yeo, Charles; Fishman, Elliot K

    2006-01-01

    Pancreatic islet cell tumors (ICTs) are neuroendocrine neoplasms that produce and secrete hormones to a variable degree. These neoplasms can present a diagnostic challenge, both clinically and radiologically. ICTs can be classified as either syndromic or nonsyndromic on the basis of their clinical manifestations. Multi-detector row computed tomography (CT) plays an important role in the diagnosis and staging of both syndromic and nonsyndromic ICTs. In general, syndromic ICTs are less than 3 cm in size. They are typically hyperenhancing and are usually best seen on CT scans obtained during the arterial phase. Nonsyndromic ICTs tend to be larger than syndromic ICTs at presentation and are more likely to be cystic or necrotic. It is important for the radiologist to be familiar with appropriate CT protocol for the evaluation of patients with suspected pancreatic ICT and to understand the variable CT appearances of these neoplasms. (c) RSNA, 2006.

  5. Risk for Colorectal Adenomas Among Patients with Pancreatic Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasms: a Prospective Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Panic, Nikola; Capurso, Gabriele; Attili, Fabia; Vitale, Giovanna; Stigliano, Serena; Delle Fave, Gianfranco; Leoncini, Emanuele; Bulajic, Milutin; Di Giulio, Emilio; Costamagna, Guido; Boccia, Stefania; Larghi, Alberto

    2015-12-01

    It has been reported that patients with intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas are at an increased risk of colorectal cancer. The aim of our study was to investigate whether patients with intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms are at a higher risk of colorectal adenomas with respect to the general population, as this condition represents the precursor of sporadic colorectal cancer. A case-control study was conducted at the Catholic University and University Sapienza, Rome, Italy. The cases were patients with intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms without history of colorectal cancer, who had underwent screening colonoscopy for the first time. The controls were individuals who had underwent first time colonoscopy for screening or evaluation of non-specific abdominal symptoms. Chi-square and Fisher tests were used to compare the distributions of categorical variables. We enrolled 122 cases and 246 controls. Colorectal polyps were found in 52 cases (42.6%) and 79 controls (32.1%) (p<0.05). In 29 cases (23.8%) and 57 controls (23.2%) histological examination disclosed adenomatous polyps (p=0.90). There was no difference between the groups in relation to the presence of polyps with low-grade (19.7% vs. 19.8%, p=0.98) and high-grade dysplasia (4.9% vs. 4.5%, p=0.85). Patients with intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas are not at an increased risk for the development of adenomatous colorectal polyps.

  6. F18-FDG-PET/CT for evaluation of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN): a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Bertagna, Francesco; Treglia, Giorgio; Baiocchi, Gian Luca; Giubbini, Raffaele

    2013-04-01

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN) are intraductal mucin-producing neoplasms with tall columnar, mucin-containing epithelium, with or without papillary projections, involving the main pancreatic duct and/or major side branches. They account for approximately 25 % of all cystic neoplasms and can be subdivided into benign lesions, borderline lesions, and carcinoma. In this clinical scenario accurate preoperative diagnosis can eliminate unnecessary surgery, which is risky and potentially harmful, yet enable effective selection of patients who are candidates for surgery. In this review we try to provide a complete evaluation of the use of F18-FDG-PET/CT for diagnosis of this neoplasm on the basis of published papers. F18-FDG-PET/CT seems to be an useful technique for preoperative work-up of patients with suspected IPMN and is an improvement over conventional imaging in distinguishing benign from malignant lesions, especially for selecting patients for surgical treatment or for long-term follow-up.

  7. Frequent Detection of Pancreatic Lesions in Asymptomatic High-Risk Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Canto, Marcia Irene; Hruban, Ralph H.; Fishman, Elliot K.; Kamel, Ihab R.; Schulick, Richard; Zhang, Zhe; Topazian, Mark; Takahashi, Naoki; Fletcher, Joel; Petersen, Gloria; Klein, Alison P.; Axilbund, Jennifer; Griffin, Constance; Syngal, Sapna; Saltzman, John R.; Mortele, Koenraad J.; Lee, Jeffrey; Tamm, Eric; Vikram, Raghunandan; Bhosale, Priya; Margolis, Daniel; Farrell, James; Goggins, Michael

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS The risk of pancreatic cancer is increased in patients with a strong family history of pancreatic cancer or a predisposing germline mutation. Screening can detect curable, non-invasive pancreatic neoplasms, but the optimal imaging approach is not known. We determined the baseline prevalence and characteristics of pancreatic abnormalities using 3 imaging tests to screen asymptomatic, high-risk individuals (HRI). METHODS We screened 225 asymptomatic adult HRI at 5 academic US medical centers once, using computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS). We compared results in a blinded, independent fashion. RESULTS Ninety-two of 216 HRI (42%) were found to have at least 1 pancreatic mass (84 cystic, 3 solid) or a dilated pancreatic duct (n=5) by any of the imaging modalities. Fifty-one of the 84 HRI with a cyst (60.7%) had multiple lesions, typically small (mean 0.55 cm, range 2–39 mm), in multiple locations. The prevalence of pancreatic lesions increased with age; they were detected in 14% of subjects <50 years old, 34% of subjects 50–59 years old, and 53% of subjects 60–69 years old (P<.0001). CT, MRI, and EUS detected a pancreatic abnormality in 11%, 33.3%, and 42.6% of the HRI, respectively. Among these abnormalities, proven or suspected neoplasms were identified in 85 HRI (82 intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms [IPMN] and 3 pancreatic endocrine tumors). Three of 5 HRI who underwent pancreatic resection had high-grade dysplasia in <3 cm IPMNs and in multiple intraepithelial neoplasias. CONCLUSIONS Screening of asymptomatic HRI frequently detects small pancreatic cysts, including curable, non-invasive high-grade neoplasms. EUS and MRI detect pancreatic lesions better than CT. PMID:22245846

  8. Associating pancreaticostomy and biliary-irrigation for staged pancreaticoduodenectomy approach to pancreatic intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm with recurrent cholangitis and severe jaundice

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Chao; Lou, Siyuan; Zhou, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Patient concerns: A 63-year-old man was hospitalized with history of abdominal pain since more than 1 year, and that of fever with chills since 2 weeks. Diagnoses: Based on the laboratory investigations and radiologic findings, a preliminary diagnosis of pancreatic intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) with recurrent cholangitis and severe jaundice was made. Interventions: An initial attempt at endoscopic and image-guided drainage proved unsuccessful. Due to cholangitis, liver dysfunction, and hypoalbuminemia, the patient was deemed to be medically unfit for radical surgery. Therefore we considered a novel strategy of associating pancreaticostomy and biliary-irrigation for staged pancreaticoduodenectomy (APBSP). In the first stage, biliary tract double irrigation (endoscopic nasobiliary drainage and T-tube) in combination with pancreaticostomy was performed, which alleviated the symptoms and helped improve the general condition of the patient. In the second stage, radical pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed. Outcomes: Over a follow-up period of 23 months, no recurrence occurred. Lessons: In this report, we present a previously unreported treatment strategy for pancreatic IPMN with recurrent cholangitis and jaundice. The innovative treatment approach may help advance the understanding and management of this condition. PMID:27902614

  9. Does a family history of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and cyst size influence the follow-up strategy for intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas?

    PubMed

    Mandai, Koichiro; Uno, Koji; Yasuda, Kenjiro

    2014-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) family history and PDAC development in patients followed up for intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) and to assess the cyst size relevance in determining follow-up strategies. We analyzed 300 patients with branch duct and mixed-type IPMN who were followed up at our facility. Among the patients aged 70 years or older, the frequency of PDAC did not differ significantly between those with 1 first-degree relative with PDAC and those without a family history. Although patients with IPMNs of greater than or equal to 30 mm were followed up for a significantly shorter duration than those patients with IPMNs of less than 30 mm, the frequency of IPMN progression and malignant IPMN was significantly greater in the former. The frequency of IPMN progression and pancreatic cancer did not differ significantly according to IPMN size (<10, 10-20, and 20-30 mm) in cases without mural nodules. Patients with 1 first-degree relative with PDAC can be followed up using the same criteria for patients without a family history. Special attention should be paid to IPMN progression and malignant transformation in patients with IPMNs of greater than or equal to 30 mm, but cyst size need not be considered when determining follow-up strategies for patients with IPMNs of less than 30 mm without mural nodules.

  10. A MicroRNA Panel in Pancreatic Cyst Fluid for the Risk Stratification of Pancreatic Cysts in a Prospective Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Utomo, WK; Looijenga, LH; Bruno, MJ; Hansen, BE; Gillis, AJM; Biermann, K; Peppelenbosch, MP; Fuhler, GM; Braat, H

    2016-01-01

    A subset of pancreatic cystic neoplasms are regarded as precursor lesions of pancreatic cancer, but only a minority of all pancreatic cystic neoplasms will undergo malignant transformation. MicroRNAs are increasingly recognized as molecular targets in carcinogenesis. Previously, a 9-microRNA (miR) signature was suggested to discriminate between high risk and low risk pancreatic cystic neoplasm. In this study, we aimed to validate this 9-miR panel in a prospective cohort. Total miR was isolated from pancreatic cyst fluid and expression of miR18a, miR24, miR30a-3p, miR92a, miR99b, miR106b, miR142-3p, miR342-3p, and miR532-3p was analyzed by singleplex Taqman MicroRNA Assay. A total of 62 patient samples were analyzed. During follow-up, 24 (38.7%) patients underwent resection, of which 6 (9.7%) patients showed at least high grade dysplasia. A logistic regression model presented a “predicted risk” score which significantly differed between low and high risk cysts, either including all patients or only those with histological confirmation of diagnosis. Using a set cut-off of 50%, the sensitivity of the model for the total cohort was 10.0%, specificity 100.0%, positive predicted value 100.0%, negative predicted value 85.2%, and diagnostic accuracy of 85.5%. Thus, while observing a significant difference between low and high risk cysts, clinical implementation of this biomarker panel is as yet unlikely to be beneficial in the management of pancreatic cysts. PMID:28131248

  11. Intraductal tubulopapillary neoplasm of the pancreas on fine needle aspiration: case report with differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Guan, Hui; Gurda, Grzegorz; Lennon, Anne Marie; Hruban, Ralph H; Erozan, Yener S

    2014-02-01

    Intraductal tubulopapillary neoplasm (ITPN) is a rare primary pancreatic neoplasm accounting for less than 1% of all pancreatic exocrine neoplasms and 3% of intraductal neoplasms of the pancreas. Data on this entity are still limited. Here, we report a case of ITPN with cytopathologic and histopathologic findings. A 41-year-old woman with a 2.2 cm cyst in the head of the pancreas for five years was referred to our institution. The endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration produced cytospins were moderately cellular with a few fragments of markedly atypical epithelium. The neoplastic cells displayed high-grade nuclear atypia with enlarged, eccentric nuclei, anisonucleosis and prominent nucleoli, irregular nuclear membranes, high nucleus to cytoplasmic (N/C) ratios, and a moderate amount of cytoplasm with no intracytoplasmic mucin. Histologically, the lesion was found to be an ITPN with focal high-grade dysplasia. No invasive carcinoma was identified. The neoplastic cells exhibited luminal immunolabeling for MUC-1, but were negative for MUC-2, trypsin, chymotrypsin, and P53. Approximately 5% of the neoplastic cells showed Ki-67 immunoreactivity. ITPN of pancreas may be a source of markedly atypical epithelial cells in pancreatic cystic aspiration. Clinical and radiographic findings, molecular mutational analysis, in combination with cytological features are essential to differentiate it from other disease entities.

  12. Erlotinib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Pancreatic Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-07

    Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm of the Pancreas; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer

  13. Combined Bicarbonate Conductance-Impairing Variants in CFTR and SPINK1 Are Associated with Chronic Pancreatitis in Patients without Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Alexander; LaRusch, Jessica; Sun, Xiumei; Aloe, Amy; Lamb, Janette; Hawes, Robert; Cotton, Peter; Brand, Randall E.; Anderson, Michelle A.; Money, Mary E.; Banks, Peter A.; Lewis, Michele D.; Baillie, John; Sherman, Stuart; DiSario, James; Burton, Frank R.; Gardner, Timothy B.; Amann, Stephen T.; Gelrud, Andres; George, Ryan; Kassabian, Sirvart; Martinson, Jeremy; Slivka, Adam; Yadav, Dhiraj; Oruc, Nevin; Barmada, M. Michael; Frizzell, Raymond; Whitcomb, David C.

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims Idiopathic chronic pancreatitis (ICP) is a complex inflammatory disorder associated with multiple genetic and environmental factors. In individuals without cystic fibrosis (CF), variants of CFTR that inhibit bicarbonate conductance but maintain chloride conductance might selectively impair secretion of pancreatic juice, leading to trypsin activation and pancreatitis. We investigated whether sequence variants in the gene encoding the pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor, SPINK1, further increase the risk of pancreatitis in these patients. Methods We screened patients with ICP (sporadic or familial) and controls for variants in SPINK1 associated with chronic pancreatitis (CP) risk (in exon 3) and in all 27 exons of CFTR. The final study group included 53 patients with sporadic ICP, 27 probands with familial ICP, and 150 unrelated controls, plus 503 controls for limited genotyping. CFTR wild-type (wt) and p.R75Q were cloned and expressed in HEK293 cells and relative conductances of HCO3− and Cl− were measured. Results SPINK1 variants were identified in 36% of subjects and 3% controls (odds ratio [OR]=16.5). One variant of CFTR that has not been associated with CF, p.R75Q, was found in 16% of subjects and 5.4% controls (OR=3.4). Co-inheritance of CFTR p.R75Q and SPINK1 variants occurred in 8.75% of patients and 0.15% controls (OR=62.5). Patch-clamp recordings of cells that expressed CFTR p.R75Q demonstrated normal chloride currents but significantly reduced bicarbonate currents (P=0.0001). Conclusions The CFTR variant p.R75Q causes a selective defect in bicarbonate conductance and increases risk for pancreatitis. Co-inheritance of CF-associated, and some not associated, CFTR variants with SPINK1 variants significantly increase risk of ICP. PMID:20977904

  14. Pancreatitis - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... an organ or bone marrow transplant Cystic fibrosis Crohn disease and other disorders when the body's immune system ... lab tests to check the release of pancreatic enzymes. These include tests to check the: Blood amylase ...

  15. Peripancreatic fat necrosis worsens acute pancreatitis independent of pancreatic necrosis via unsaturated fatty acids increased in human pancreatic necrosis collections

    PubMed Central

    Noel, Pawan; Patel, Krutika; Durgampudi, Chandra; Trivedi, Ram N; de Oliveira, Cristiane; Crowell, Michael D; Pannala, Rahul; Lee, Kenneth; Brand, Randall; Chennat, Jennifer; Slivka, Adam; Papachristou, Georgios I; Khalid, Asif; Whitcomb, David C; DeLany, James P; Cline, Rachel A; Acharya, Chathur; Jaligama, Deepthi; Murad, Faris M; Yadav, Dhiraj; Navina, Sarah; Singh, Vijay P

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims Peripancreatic fat necrosis occurs frequently in necrotising pancreatitis. Distinguishing markers from mediators of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is important since targeting mediators may improve outcomes. We evaluated potential agents in human pancreatic necrotic collections (NCs), pseudocysts (PCs) and pancreatic cystic neoplasms and used pancreatic acini, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and an acute pancreatitis (AP) model to determine SAP mediators. Methods We measured acinar and PBMC injury induced by agents increased in NCs and PCs. Outcomes of caerulein pancreatitis were studied in lean rats coadministered interleukin (IL)-1β and keratinocyte chemoattractant/growth-regulated oncogene, triolein alone or with the lipase inhibitor orlistat. Results NCs had higher fatty acids, IL-8 and IL-1β versus other fluids. Lipolysis of unsaturated triglyceride and resulting unsaturated fatty acids (UFA) oleic and linoleic acids induced necro-apoptosis at less than half the concentration in NCs but other agents did not do so at more than two times these concentrations. Cytokine coadministration resulted in higher pancreatic and lung inflammation than caerulein alone, but only triolein coadministration caused peripancreatic fat stranding, higher cytokines, UFAs, multisystem organ failure (MSOF) and mortality in 97% animals, which were prevented by orlistat. Conclusions UFAs, IL-1β and IL-8 are elevated in NCs. However, UFAs generated via peripancreatic fat lipolysis causes worse inflammation and MSOF, converting mild AP to SAP. PMID:25500204

  16. Management of pancreatic, gastrointestinal and liver complications in adult cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Munck, A; Languepin, J; Debray, D; Lamireau, T; Abely, M; Huet, F; Maudinas, R; Michaud, L; Mas, E

    2015-06-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is a major source of morbidity in adults with cystic fibrosis (CF), with a wide range of complications, some of them being specific to the underlying disease. Abnormal CFTR function, with reduced bicarbonate and other ion transport levels through the apical surface of epithelial cells, affects the intestinal tract including the pancreas and the liver. Similarly to what is observed in the respiratory tract, gastrointestinal CFTR dysfunction leads to mucus accumulation, dysmotility, small bowel bacterial overgrowth and inflammation with alteration of innate immune responses, all of which being likely to be interrelated. In developed countries, almost half of patients with CF are adults followed in multidisciplinary CF care centres by pneumologists who often have to manage gastrointestinal complications. It therefore appears essential that adult gastroenterologists develop the expertise needed for managing CF gastrointestinal complications in close collaboration with multidisciplinary CF care centre teams to improve the quality of life of adults with CF. Copyright © 2015 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Incidents and adverse events of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration for pancreatic cystic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Du, Chen; Chai, Ning-Li; Linghu, En-Qiang; Li, Hui-Kai; Sun, Yu-Fa; Xu, Wei; Wang, Xiang-Dong; Tang, Ping; Yang, Jing

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the diagnostic value and safety mainly regarding incidents of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) for pancreatic cystic lesions (PCLs). METHODS A total of 150 consecutive patients with suspected PCLs were prospectively enrolled from April 2015 to November 2016. We finally enrolled 140 patients undergoing EUS-FNA. We compared the diagnostic accuracy of EUS-FNA and pathological diagnosis, which is regarded as the gold standard, for PCLs. Patients undergoing EUS-FNA at least 1 wk preoperatively were monitored for incidents and adverse events to evaluate its safety. RESULTS There were 88 (62.9%) women and 52 (37.1%) men among 140 patients, with a mean age of 50.1 (± 15.4) years. There were 67 cysts located in the head/uncinate of the pancreas and 67 in the body/tail, and 6 patients had at least 1 cyst in the pancreas. There were 75 patients undergoing surgery and 55 undergoing EUS-FNA with interval at least 1 wk before other operations, with 3 patients undergoing the procedure twice. The accuracy of EUS-FNA in differentiating benign and malignant lesions was 97.3% (73/75), while the accuracy of characterizing PCL subtype was 84.0% (63/75). The incident rate was 37.9% (22/58), whereas only 1 AE was observed in 58 cases. CONCLUSION EUS-FNA is effective and safe for diagnosis of PCLs, however procedure-related incidents are common. Caution should be taken in patients undergoing EUS-FNA. PMID:28852320

  18. Afatinib Dimaleate and Capecitabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Refractory Solid Tumors, Pancreatic Cancer or Biliary Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-08-04

    Advanced Malignant Solid Neoplasm; Bile Duct Carcinoma; Recurrent Malignant Solid Neoplasm; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IVB Pancreatic Cancer

  19. Differential ezrin and phosphorylated ezrin expression profiles between pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia, intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm, and invasive ductal carcinoma of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Oda, Yasunori; Aishima, Shinichi; Morimatsu, Katsuya; Hayashi, Akifumi; Shindo, Koji; Fujino, Minoru; Mizuuchi, Yusuke; Hattori, Masami; Tanaka, Masao; Oda, Yoshinao

    2013-08-01

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) and pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanINs) are important premalignant lesions of pancreatic cancer. Ezrin is a member of the ezrin, radixin, and moesin protein family and acts as a cross-linker between the plasma membrane and the actin cytoskeleton. We investigated the roles of ezrin during carcinogenesis in IPMN and invasive ductal carcinoma and examined whether ezrin was a prognostic factor. We examined ezrin and phosphorylated ezrin (p-ezrin) expression in 131 IPMNs, 47 PanINs, and 59 invasive ductal carcinomas by immunohistochemical staining. Ezrin and p-ezrin (tyr354) expressions were significantly higher in IPMN with an associated invasive carcinoma, compared with those in IPMN with high-grade dysplasia (P = .03 and P = .0007, respectively). In all grades of PanINs, ezrin and p-ezrin (tyr353) were highly expressed. In patients with invasive ductal carcinoma, the presence of PanIN-2 or PanIN-3 was significantly correlated with positive ezrin and p-ezrin (tyr353) expression of the invasive ductal carcinoma component (P = .01 and P = .0004). The negative p-ezrin (tyr353) expression group of invasive ductal carcinoma showed a significantly worse prognosis than did the positive p-ezrin (tyr353) expression group by survival analysis (P = .04) and was a statistically significant adverse prognostic factor by both univariate and multivariate analyses (P = .048 and P = .015). Ezrin phosphorylation sites differ between the developments of IPMN and PanIN. Although p-ezrin (tyr354) expression in IPMNs is associated with tumor invasion, p-ezrin (tyr353) expression in invasive ductal carcinoma plays an important role not in tumor invasion and metastasis but in the early development of PanINs.

  20. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) with high-grade dysplasia is a risk factor for the subsequent development of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma☆

    PubMed Central

    Rezaee, Neda; Barbon, Carlotta; Zaki, Ahmed; He, Jin; Salman, Bulent; Hruban, Ralph H.; Cameron, John L.; Herman, Joseph M.; Ahuja, Nita; Lennon, Anne Marie; Weiss, Matthew J.; Wood, Laura D.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Non-invasive intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) with high-grade dysplasia and IPMN-associated invasive pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) are frequently included under the term “malignancy”. The goal of this study is to clarify the difference between these two entities. Methods From 1996 to 2013, data of 616 patients who underwent pancreatic resection for an IPMN were reviewed. Results The median overall survival for patients with IPMN with high-grade dysplasia (92 months) was similar to survival for patients with IPMN with low/intermediate-grade dysplasia (118 months, p = 0.081), and superior to that of patients with IPMN-associated PDAC (29 months, p < 0.001). IPMN-associated PDAC had lymph node metastasis in 53%, perineural invasion in 58%, and vascular invasion in 33%. In contrast, no lymph node metastasis, perineural or vascular invasion was observed with high-grade dysplasia. None of the patients with IPMN with high-grade dysplasia developed recurrence outside the remnant pancreas. In stark contrast 58% of patients with IPMN-associated PDAC recurred outside the remnant pancreas. The rate of progression within the remnant pancreas was significant in patients with IPMN with high-grade (24%) and with low/intermediate dysplasia (22%, p = 0.816). Conclusion Non-invasive IPMN with high-grade dysplasia should not be considered a malignant entity. Compared to patients with IPMN with low/intermediate-grade dysplasia, those with high-grade dysplasia have an increased risk of subsequent development of PDAC in the remnant pancreas. PMID:27017163

  1. Are Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Para-aortic Contouring Guidelines for Pancreatic Neoplasm Applicable to Other Malignancies—Assessment of Nodal Distribution in Gynecological Malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Kabolizadeh, Peyman; Fulay, Suyash; Beriwal, Sushil

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy is used to reduce dose to adjacent critical structures while maintaining adequate target coverage, but it requires precise target localization. We report the 3-dimensional distribution of para-aortic (PA) lymph nodes (LN) in pelvic malignancies. We propose a guideline to accurately define the PA LN by anatomic landmarks and compare our data with published guidelines for pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis was performed on 46 patients with pelvic malignancies and positive PA LNs. Positive LNs were defined based on size and morphology or fluorodeoxyglucose avidity. All PA LNs were characterized into 3 groups based on location: left PA (between aorta and left psoas muscle), aortocaval (between aorta and inferior vena cava), and right paracaval (between inferior vena cava and right psoas muscle). Patients with retrocrural LNs were also analyzed. Results: One hundred thirty-three positive PA LNs were evaluated. The majority of the PA LNs were in the left PA (59%) and aortocaval (35) regions, and only 8% were in the right paracaval region. All patients with positive right paracaval LNs also had involved left PA LNs, with only 1 exception. The highest PA LN involvement was at the level of the renal vessels and was seen in 28% of patients. Of these patients with disease extending to renal vessels, 38% had retrocrural LN involvement. Conclusions: The nodal contouring for the PA region should not be defined by a fixed circumferential margin around the vessels. The left PA and aortocaval spaces should be covered adequately because these are common locations of PA LNs. For microscopic disease superiorly, contouring should extend up to renal vessels rather than a fixed bony landmark. For patients who have nodal involvement at renal vessels, one can consider including retrocrural LNs. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Para-aortic Contouring Guidelines for Pancreatic Neoplasm are not applicable to

  2. Fat Soluble Vitamins in Cystic Fibrosis and Pancreatic Insufficiency: Efficacy of a Nutrition Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Bertolaso, Chiara; Groleau, Veronique; Schall, Joan I.; Maqbool, Asim; Mascarenhas, Maria; Latham, Norma; Dougherty, Kelly A.; Stallings, Virginia A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To assess the impact of LYM-X-SORB™ (LXS), an organized lipid matrix that has previously been shown to be absorbable without pancreatic enzyme therapy on fat soluble vitamin status in children with CF and PI. Methods Children with CF and PI were randomized to daily LXS or an iso-caloric placebo comparison supplement for 12 months. Serum vitamins A (retinol), D (25-hydroxyvitamin D[25D]), E (α-tocopherol, α-tocopherol:cholesterol ratio) and K (%undercarboxylated osteocalcin [%ucOC] and plasma proteins induced by vitamin K absence factor II [PIVKA II]) were assessed at baseline and 12 months. Dietary intake was determined using 3-day weighed food records, and supplemental vitamin intake by a comprehensive questionnaire. Results 58 subjects (32 males, age 10.3±2.9 yrs [mean±SD]) with complete serum vitamin, dietary and supplemental vitamin data were analyzed. After adjusting for dietary and supplemental vitamin intake, serum retinol increased 3.0±1.4 μg/dL (coefficient±SE) (Adj R2=0.02, p=0.03) and vitamin K status improved as demonstrated by a decreased %ucOC of −6.0±1.6% by 12 months (Adj R2=0.15, p<0.001). These changes occurred in both the LXS and placebo comparison groups. No changes in serum 25D or α-tocopherol were detected. Both nutrition interventions increased caloric intake a mean of 83±666 kcal/d by 12 months. Conclusions Vitamin A and K status improved, while vitamin D and E status was unchanged over 12 month of LXS and iso-caloric placebo comparison supplement in children with CF and PI. PMID:24345827

  3. Precursor lesions in pancreatic cancer: morphological and molecular pathology.

    PubMed

    Scarlett, Christopher J; Salisbury, Elizabeth L; Biankin, Andrew V; Kench, James

    2011-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer has a dismal prognosis and is the fourth most common cause of cancer related death in Western societies. In large part this is due to its typically late presentation, usually as locally advanced or metastatic disease. Identification of the non-invasive precursor lesions to pancreatic cancer raises the possibility of surgical treatment or chemoprevention at an early stage in the evolution of this disease, when more amenable to therapeutic interventions. Precursor lesions to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, in particular pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN), have been recognised under a variety of synonyms for over 50 years. Over the past decade our understanding of the morphology, biological significance and molecular aberrations of these lesions has grown rapidly and there is now a widely accepted progression model integrating the accumulated morphological and molecular observations. Further progress is likely to be accelerated by improved mouse models of pancreatic cancer and by insight into the cancer genome gained by the International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC), in which an Australian consortium is leading the pancreatic cancer initiative. This review also outlines the morphological and molecular features of the other two precursors of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, i.e., intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms and mucinous cystic neoplasms.

  4. miRNA analysis in pancreatic cancer: the Dartmouth experience.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Francine B de; Liu, Xiaoying; Tsongalis, Gregory J

    2017-05-01

    Pancreatic cancer is considered one of the most lethal cancers being the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in adults in the United States because of the lack of early signs and symptoms and the lack of early detection. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the most common histological type among pancreatic cancers, representing 80%-90% of all solid tumors of the pancreas. The majority of PDAC develops from three precursor lesions: pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia, intraductual papillary mucinous neoplasm and mucinous cystic neoplasm. Although histologic tissue evaluation remains the gold standard for diagnosis, endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration has become the preferred modality for obtaining pathologic confirmation. At Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center (DHMC),we have developed and validated a microRNA (miRNA) panel for patients with pancreatic diseases that can be used in association with the gold standard method for diagnosis. miRNAs have an important role in biological processes, such as apoptosis, metabolism, cell growth and differentiation. In cancer, miRNAs can be classified as either oncogenic or tumor suppressor according to their function in the carcinogenic process. In this study, we describe the expression of many miRNA in benign and malignant pancreatic tissues as well as their clinical significance. For this reason, miRNAs have been considered potential biomarkers of pancreatic diseases that could potentially contribute to an early diagnosis, predict disease progression, accurately monitor disease, contribute to better treatment strategies and reduce mortality by improving disease management.

  5. Pigment Epithelium-derived Factor (PEDF) Blocks Wnt3a Protein-induced Autophagy in Pancreatic Intraepithelial Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jingjing; Belinsky, Glenn; Sagheer, Usman; Zhang, Xuchen; Grippo, Paul J; Chung, Chuhan

    2016-10-14

    An increase in autophagy characterizes pancreatic carcinogenesis, but the signals that regulate this process are incompletely understood. Because canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling is necessary for the transition from early to advanced pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) lesions, we assessed whether Wnt ligands and endogenous inhibitors of Wnt signaling modulate autophagy. In this study, canonical Wnt3a ligand induced autophagy markers and vacuoles in murine PanIN cells. Furthermore, pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), a secreted glycoprotein known for its anti-tumor properties, blocked Wnt3a-directed induction of autophagy proteins. Autophagy inhibition was complemented by reciprocal regulation of the oxidative stress enzymes, superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) and catalase. Transcriptional control of Sod2 expression was mediated by PEDF-induced NFκB nuclear translocation. PEDF-dependent SOD2 expression in PanIN lesions was recapitulated in a murine model of PanIN formation where PEDF was deleted. In human PanIN lesions, co-expression of PEDF and SOD2 was observed in the majority of early PanIN lesions (47/50, 94%), whereas PEDF and SOD2 immunolocalization in high-grade human PanIN-2/3 was uncommon (7/50, 14%). These results indicate that PEDF regulates autophagy through coordinate Wnt signaling blockade and NFκB activation.

  6. A Combination of Molecular Markers and Clinical Features Improve the Classification of Pancreatic Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Springer, Simeon; Wang, Yuxuan; Molin, Marco Dal; Masica, David L.; Jiao, Yuchen; Kinde, Isaac; Blackford, Amanda; Raman, Siva P.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Tomita, Tyler; Niknafs, Noushin; Douville, Christopher; Ptak, Janine; Dobbyn, Lisa; Allen, Peter J.; Klimstra, David S.; Schattner, Mark A.; Schmidt, C. Max; Yip-Schneider, Michele; Cummings, Oscar W.; Brand, Randall E.; Zeh, Herbert J.; Singhi, Aatur D.; Scarpa, Aldo; Salvia, Roberto; Malleo, Giuseppe; Zamboni, Giuseppe; Falconi, Massimo; Jang, Jin-Young; Kim, Sun-Whe; Kwon, Wooil; Hong, Seung-Mo; Song, Ki-Byung; Kim, Song Cheol; Swan, Niall; Murphy, Jean; Geoghegan, Justin; Brugge, William; Fernandez-Del Castillo, Carlos; Mino-Kenudson, Mari; Schulick, Richard; Edil, Barish H.; Adsay, Volkan; Paulino, Jorge; van Hooft, Jeanin; Yachida, Shinichi; Nara, Satoshi; Hiraoka, Nobuyoshi; Yamao, Kenji; Hijioka, Susuma; van der Merwe, Schalk; Goggins, Michael; Canto, Marcia Irene; Ahuja, Nita; Hirose, Kenzo; Makary, Martin; Weiss, Matthew J.; Cameron, John; Pittman, Meredith; Eshleman, James R.; Diaz, Luis A.; Papadopoulos, Nickolas; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Karchin, Rachel; Hruban, Ralph H.; Vogelstein, Bert; Lennon, Anne Marie

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims The management of pancreatic cysts poses challenges to both patients and their physicians. We investigated whether a combination of molecular markers and clinical information could improve the classification of pancreatic cysts and management of patients. Methods We performed a multi-center, retrospective study of 130 patients with resected pancreatic cystic neoplasms (12 serous cystadenomas, 10 solid-pseudopapillary neoplasms, 12 mucinous cystic neoplasms, and 96 intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms). Cyst fluid was analyzed to identify subtle mutations in genes known to be mutated in pancreatic cysts (BRAF, CDKN2A, CTNNB1, GNAS, KRAS, NRAS, PIK3CA, RNF43, SMAD4, TP53 and VHL); to identify loss of heterozygozity at CDKN2A, RNF43, SMAD4, TP53, and VHL tumor suppressor loci; and to identify aneuploidy. The analyses were performed using specialized technologies for implementing and interpreting massively parallel sequencing data acquisition. An algorithm was used to select markers that could classify cyst type and grade. The accuracy of the molecular markers were compared with that of clinical markers, and a combination of molecular and clinical markers. Results We identified molecular markers and clinical features that classified cyst type with 90%–100% sensitivity and 92%–98% specificity. The molecular marker panel correctly identified 67 of the 74 patients who did not require surgery, and could therefore reduce the number of unnecessary operations by 91%. Conclusions We identified a panel of molecular markers and clinical features that show promise for the accurate classification of cystic neoplasms of the pancreas and identification of cysts that require surgery. PMID:26253305

  7. Combining radiomic features with a miRNA classifier may improve prediction of malignant pathology for pancreatic intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Permuth, Jennifer B; Choi, Jung; Balarunathan, Yoganand; Kim, Jongphil; Chen, Dung-Tsa; Chen, Lu; Orcutt, Sonia; Doepker, Matthew P; Gage, Kenneth; Zhang, Geoffrey; Latifi, Kujtim; Hoffe, Sarah; Jiang, Kun; Coppola, Domenico; Centeno, Barbara A; Magliocco, Anthony; Li, Qian; Trevino, Jose; Merchant, Nipun; Gillies, Robert; Malafa, Mokenge

    2016-12-27

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) are pancreatic cancer precursors incidentally discovered by cross-sectional imaging. Consensus guidelines for IPMN management rely on standard radiologic features to predict pathology, but they lack accuracy. Using a retrospective cohort of 38 surgically-resected, pathologically-confirmed IPMNs (20 benign; 18 malignant) with preoperative computed tomography (CT) images and matched plasma-based 'miRNA genomic classifier (MGC)' data, we determined whether quantitative 'radiomic' CT features (+/- the MGC) can more accurately predict IPMN pathology than standard radiologic features 'high-risk' or 'worrisome' for malignancy. Logistic regression, principal component analyses, and cross-validation were used to examine associations. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value (PPV, NPV) were estimated. The MGC, 'high-risk,' and 'worrisome' radiologic features had area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) values of 0.83, 0.84, and 0.54, respectively. Fourteen radiomic features differentiated malignant from benign IPMNs (p<0.05) and collectively had an AUC=0.77. Combining radiomic features with the MGC revealed an AUC=0.92 and superior sensitivity (83%), specificity (89%), PPV (88%), and NPV (85%) than other models. Evaluation of uncertainty by 10-fold cross-validation retained an AUC>0.80 (0.87 (95% CI:0.84-0.89)). This proof-of-concept study suggests a noninvasive radiogenomic approach may more accurately predict IPMN pathology than 'worrisome' radiologic features considered in consensus guidelines.

  8. Evaluating the utility of existing patient-reported outcome scales in novel patient populations with pancreatic cancer, lung cancer, and myeloproliferative neoplasms using medicare current beneficiary survey data.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Jasmina I; Mytelka, Daniel S; Duh, Mei Sheng; Birnbaum, Howard G; Cummings, Alice Kate; San Roman, Alexandra M; Price, Gregory L; Swindle, Ralph W

    2013-01-01

    While there are validated patient-reported outcomes (PRO) instruments for use in specific cancer populations, no validated general instruments exist for use in conditions common to multiple cancers, such as muscle wasting and consequent physical disability. The Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS), a survey in a nationally representative sample of Medicare beneficiaries, includes items from three well known scales with general applicability to cancer patients: Katz activities of daily living (ADL), Rosow-Breslau instrumental ADL (IADL), and a subset of physical performance items from the Nagi scale. This study evaluated properties of the Katz ADL, Rosow-Breslau IADL, and a subset of the Nagi scale in patients with pancreatic cancer, lung cancer, and myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) using data from MCBS linked with Medicare claims in order to understand the potential utility of the three scales in these populations; understanding patient-perceived significance was not in scope. The study cohorts included Medicare beneficiaries aged ≥65 years as of 1 January of the year of their first cancer diagnosis with one or more health assessments in a community setting in the MCBS Access to Care data from 1991 to 2009. Beneficiaries had at least two diagnoses in de-identified Medicare claims data linked to the MCBS for one of the following cancers: pancreatic, lung, or MPN. The Katz ADL, Rosow-Breslau IADL, and Nagi scales were calculated to assess physical functioning over time from cancer diagnosis. Psychometric properties for each scale in each cohort were evaluated by testing for internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and responsiveness by comparing differences in mean scale scores over time as cancer progresses, and differences in mean scale scores before and after hospitalization (for lung cancer cohort). The study cohorts included 90 patients with pancreatic cancer, 863 with lung cancer, and 135 with MPN. Among each cancer cohort, the Katz ADL, Rosow

  9. Lessons from McCune-Albright syndrome-associated intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms: : GNAS-activating mutations in pancreatic carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Parvanescu, Alina; Cros, Jérôme; Ronot, Maxime; Hentic, Olivia; Grybek, Virginie; Couvelard, Anne; Levy, Philippe; Chanson, Philippe; Ruszniewski, Philippe; Sauvanet, Alain; Gaujoux, Sebastien

    2014-08-01

    GNAS-activating mutations are reported in intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) and in McCune-Albright syndrome, characterized by fibrous dysplasia, precocious puberty, and café au lait spots. Recently, IPMNs have been described as a McCune-Albright syndrome-associated tumor, present in about 15% of patients. The aim of the present work was to assess the prevalence of polyostotic fibrous dysplasia and McCune-Albright syndrome among patients operated on for presumptive sporadic IPMNs. All patients operated on for IPMNs between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2012, with available imaging were retrospectively screened for polyostotic fibrous dysplasia based on their preoperative abdominal or thoracoabdominal spiral computed tomography images. Systematic screening of 272 patients operated on for IPMNs revealed 1 patient with axial and peripheral polyostotic fibrous dysplasia and café au lait spots on clinical examination suggestive of McCune-Albright syndrome. This patient had been operated on for an unusually large invasive colloid adenocarcinoma (pT3N0M0 R0) derived from an intestinal subtype GNAS-mutated IPMN. The patient underwent adjuvant chemotherapy with gemcitabine for 6 months and was alive without recurrence 6 years later. Besides providing additional evidence of a syndromic IPMN as a feature of McCune-Albright syndrome, this observation is further evidence of the functional oncogenic consequences of GNAS mutations in the pancreas.

  10. Epidural Cystic Spinal Meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ji; Chen, Zheng-he; Wang, Zi-feng; Sun, Peng; Jin, Jie-tian; Zhang, Xiang-heng; Zhao, Yi-ying; Wang, Jian; Mou, Yong-gao; Chen, Zhong-ping

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cystic spinal meningioma (CSM) is an uncommon meningioma variant. Extradural CSMs are particularly rare and difficult to distinguish from other intraaxial tumors. This study presents a case of a 36-year-old woman with intraspinal extradual CSM at the thoracolumbar spine. She experienced persistent weakness, progressive numbness, and sensory disturbance in the right lower limb. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the patient revealed an irregular cystic mass at the thoracic 11 to lumbar 3 levels dorsally. This case was misdiagnosed as other neoplasms prior to surgery because of the atypical radiographic features and location of the tumor. Extradural CSMs should be considered in the differential diagnosis of intraspinal extradural cystic neoplasms. Complete removal of cystic wall provides an optimal outcome, rendering the lesion curable. PMID:26986119

  11. Efficacy and tolerability of Creon for Children in infants and toddlers with pancreatic exocrine insufficiency caused by cystic fibrosis: an open-label, single-arm, multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Carla; Fredella, Clara; Russo, Maria Chiara; Faelli, Nadia; Motta, Valentina; Valmarana, Lauretta; Longo, Luigina; D'Orazio, Ciro

    2009-08-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of a pancreatic enzyme preparation specifically developed for infants and small children with cystic fibrosis (CF). Twelve patients with CF younger than 24 months with pancreatic exocrine insufficiency and a coefficient of fat absorption (CFA) less than 70% were treated with Creon for Children (Solvay Pharmaceuticals GmbH, Hannover, Germany) minimicrospheres for 8 weeks. The primary end point was the mean change from baseline in the CFA after 2 weeks of treatment, based on 72-hour fat balance assessments. Two weeks' treatment with Creon for Children resulted in a significant increase in the mean CFA from 58.0% at baseline to 84.7% (P=0.0013) in the full analysis sample. There was a significant reduction of mean stool fat (from 13.3 to 5.3 g/d; P=0.001) and mean fecal energy loss (from 238.5 to 137.9 kJ/d; P=0.018) at 2 weeks. Dietary fat intake did not change, whereas an improvement was observed in stool frequency and characteristics. Patient weight and height increased over 8 weeks of treatment. No serious adverse event was reported. Creon for Children was well tolerated and significantly decreased fat malabsorption in infants with pancreatic exocrine insufficiency due to CF.

  12. Combining radiomic features with a miRNA classifier may improve prediction of malignant pathology for pancreatic intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Permuth, Jennifer B.; Choi, Jung; Balarunathan, Yoganand; Kim, Jongphil; Chen, Dung-Tsa; Chen, Lu; Orcutt, Sonia; Doepker, Matthew P.; Gage, Kenneth; Zhang, Geoffrey; Latifi, Kujtim; Hoffe, Sarah; Jiang, Kun; Coppola, Domenico; Centeno, Barbara A.; Magliocco, Anthony; Li, Qian; Trevino, Jose; Merchant, Nipun; Gillies, Robert; Malafa, Mokenge

    2016-01-01

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) are pancreatic cancer precursors incidentally discovered by cross-sectional imaging. Consensus guidelines for IPMN management rely on standard radiologic features to predict pathology, but they lack accuracy. Using a retrospective cohort of 38 surgically-resected, pathologically-confirmed IPMNs (20 benign; 18 malignant) with preoperative computed tomography (CT) images and matched plasma-based ‘miRNA genomic classifier (MGC)’ data, we determined whether quantitative ‘radiomic’ CT features (+/- the MGC) can more accurately predict IPMN pathology than standard radiologic features ‘high-risk’ or ‘worrisome’ for malignancy. Logistic regression, principal component analyses, and cross-validation were used to examine associations. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value (PPV, NPV) were estimated. The MGC, ‘high-risk,’ and ‘worrisome’ radiologic features had area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) values of 0.83, 0.84, and 0.54, respectively. Fourteen radiomic features differentiated malignant from benign IPMNs (p<0.05) and collectively had an AUC=0.77. Combining radiomic features with the MGC revealed an AUC=0.92 and superior sensitivity (83%), specificity (89%), PPV (88%), and NPV (85%) than other models. Evaluation of uncertainty by 10-fold cross-validation retained an AUC>0.80 (0.87 (95% CI:0.84-0.89)). This proof-of-concept study suggests a noninvasive radiogenomic approach may more accurately predict IPMN pathology than ‘worrisome’ radiologic features considered in consensus guidelines. PMID:27589689

  13. Pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... removal is sometimes performed along with a sphincterotomy. Stent placement. Using the endoscope, the doctor places a ... a narrowed pancreatic or bile duct. A temporary stent may be placed for a few months to ...

  14. Solid pseudopapillary neoplasm of the pancreas: CT imaging features and radiologic-pathologic correlation

    PubMed Central

    Anil, Gopinathan; Zhang, Junwei; Al-Hamar, Nawal Ebrahim; Nga, Min En

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to evaluate the imaging features of solid pseudopapillary neoplasm (SPN) of the pancreas with an emphasis on radiologic-pathologic correlation. METHODS Ten patients (all female; mean age, 32 years) with histologic or cytologic diagnosis of SPN encountered between January 2007 and December 2013 were included in this study. Preoperative computed tomography (CT) images were reviewed for location, attenuation, enhancement pattern, margin, shape, size, morphology, presence of capsule and calcification. CT appearances were correlated with histopathologic findings. RESULTS Tumors in the distal pancreatic body and tail had a tendency to be larger (mean size 12.6 cm vs. 4.0 cm). Six of the nine tumors that were resected had a fibrous pseudocapsule at histology, five of which could be identified on CT scan. Eight lesions had mixed hypoenhancing solid components and cystic areas corresponding to tumor necrosis and hemorrhage. The two smallest lesions were purely solid and nonencapsulated. Varied patterns of calcification were seen in four tumors. Three of the four pancreatic tail tumors invaded the spleen. At a median follow-up of 53 months, there was no evidence of recurrence in the nine patients who underwent surgical resection of the tumor. CONCLUSION A mixed solid and cystic pancreatic mass in a young woman is suggestive of SPN. However, smaller lesions may be completely solid. Splenic invasion can occur in pancreatic tail SPNs; however, in this series it did not adversely affect the long-term outcome. PMID:28089954

  15. Pancreatic enzyme supplementation as acid-resistant microspheres versus enteric-coated granules in cystic fibrosis. A double placebo-controlled cross-over study.

    PubMed

    Petersen, W; Heilmann, C; Garne, S

    1987-01-01

    In order to compare the efficacy of pancreatic enzyme supplementation as pH-sensitive enteric-coated microspheres Pancrease to that of conventional supplementation with enteric-coated Pancreatin in cystic fibrosis, a double blind cross-over study was conducted. Eleven patients under 12 years of age received each of the enzyme preparations for four weeks. Treatment efficacy was evaluated by means of a symptom score card recording stool frequency, consistency, colour, odour, abdominal cramps and appetite as well as a 3 days fat absorption test. Weight increments were recorded 3 months before the study when patients were on Pancreatin, and 3 months after the study when patients were on Pancrease. In eight of the patients fat absorption was improved on Pancrease, but the difference did not reach statistical significance. However, the patients experienced significantly less dyspeptic symptoms, decreased stool frequency, better appetite and increments in weight were significantly higher on Pancrease compared to Pancreatin.

  16. The high-grade (WHO G3) pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor category is morphologically and biologically heterogenous and includes both well differentiated and poorly differentiated neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Basturk, Olca; Yang, Zhaohai; Tang, Laura H; Hruban, Ralph H; Adsay, Volkan; McCall, Chad M; Krasinskas, Alyssa M; Jang, Kee-Taek; Frankel, Wendy L; Balci, Serdar; Sigel, Carlie; Klimstra, David S

    2015-05-01

    The 2010 World Health Organization (WHO) classification recommends that pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNETs) be graded on the basis of the mitotic rate and Ki67 index, with grade 2 (G2) PanNETs defined as having a mitotic rate of 2 to 20 mitotic figures/10 high-power fields or a Ki67 index of 3% to 20%. Grade 3 (G3) pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC) is defined as having >20 mitotic figures/10 high-power fields or a Ki67 index of >20%. However, some PanNETs show discordance between the mitotic rate and Ki67 index, usually having a Ki67 index in the G3 range but a mitotic rate suggesting G2, prompting us to examine the clinical significance of the Ki67 index in a large series of clinically well-characterized mitotic G2 PanNETs. Mitotic G2 well differentiated PanNETs, surgically resected at our institutions were reviewed. Of those, 19 cases had a Ki67>20% and were selected as the study group of grade-discordant (mitotic count G2/Ki67 index G3) PanNETs. For comparison, 53 grade-concordant (both mitotic count and Ki67 index G2) PanNETs matched for presenting stage with the discordant group as well as 43 morphologically poorly differentiated (either small cell or large cell type) pancreatic NECs were also included. The percentage of Ki67-positive neoplastic cells was quantified by manual counting of at least 500 cells on printed photographic images of "hot spots." The mean Ki67 index for grade-concordant and grade-discordant PanNETs and poorly differentiated NECs were 8.1% (range, 3% to 20%), 40% (range, 24% to 80%), and 70% (range, 40% to 98%), respectively. Overall, patients with grade-discordant PanNETs had significantly longer survival time compared with the patients with poorly differentiated NEC (median survival of 54.1 vs. 11 mo and 5 y survival of 29.1% vs. 16.1%; P=0.002). In addition, the survival time of the patients with grade-discordant PanNETs was shorter than that of the patients with grade-concordant PanNETs (median survival of 67.8 mo and 5

  17. Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Chronic ...

  18. Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Myelodysplastic/ ...

  19. Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm of Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Norman Oneil; al Qadhi, Hani; al Wahibi, Khalifa

    2015-01-01

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) of the pancreas are neoplasms that are characterized by ductal dilation, intraductal papillary growth, and thick mucus secretion. This relatively recently defined pathology is evolving in terms of its etiopathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis, management, and treatment guidelines. A PubMed database search was performed. All the relevant abstracts in English language were reviewed and the articles in which cases of IPMN could be identified were further scrutinized. Information of IPMN was derived, and duplication of information in several articles and those with areas of persisting uncertainties were excluded. The recent consensus guidelines were examined. The reported incidence of malignancy varies from 57% to 92% in the main duct-IPMN (MD-IPMN) and from 6% to 46% in the branch duct-IPMN (BD-IPMN). The features of high-risk malignant lesions that raise concern include obstructive jaundice in a patient with a cystic lesion in the pancreatic head, the findings on radiological imaging of a mass lesion of >30 mm, enhanced solid component, and the main pancreatic duct (MPD) of size ≥10 mm; while duct size 5-9 mm and cyst size <3 mm are considered as “worrisome features.” Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) are primary investigations in diagnosing and following up on these patients. The role of pancreatoscopy and the analysis of aspirated cystic fluid for cytology and DNA analysis is still to be established. In general, resection is recommended for most MD-IPMN, mixed variant, and symptomatic BD-IPMN. The 5-year survival of patients after surgical resection for noninvasive IPMN is reported to be at 77-100%, while for those with invasive carcinoma, it is significantly lower at 27-60%. The follow-up of these patients could vary from 6 months to 1 year and would depend on the risk stratification for invasive malignancy and the pathology of the resected specimen. The understanding of

  20. Pancreatic Cancer Screening of High-Risk Individuals in Arkansas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-06-12

    Pancreatic Neoplasms; Peutz-Jegher's Syndrome; BRCA1 Gene Mutation; BRCA2 Gene Mutation; Ataxia Telangiectasia; Familial Atypical Mole-Malignant Melanoma Syndrome; Colorectal Neoplasms, Hereditary Nonpolyposis; Hereditary Pancreatitis

  1. Cystic degeneration of neuro endocrine tumor of pancreas and Crohn's disease: true or coincidental association?

    PubMed

    Hedfi, Mohamed; Abbasi, Imed; Intissar, Chibani; Salwa, Ammar; Chouchen, Adnen

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic endocrine tumors (PETs) or islet cell tumors are rare lesions, the incidence of which is estimated to be less than 1 per 100,000 person-years in the general population. PETs can be divided into functional (exhibit a distinct clinical syndrome due to hormone hypersecretion) and non-functional tumors. The majority of PETs are non-functional. In spite of their rarity, cystic neoplasms of the pancreas are characterized by existing or potential malignancy that cannot be ignored during decisive process with regard to the choice of treatment. The purpose of this workis to find an association with Crohn's disease and cystic degeneration of a neuroendocrine tumor of the pancreas. Crohn's disease may affect extraintestinal organs, including the pancreas. In such cases, It seems certain that many patients diagnosed with Crohn disease (CD) are predisposed to a wider spectrum of cancers. We present a case of pancreatic cyst with no typical features of pseudocyst in the medical interview, with history of Crohn's disease, treated by caudal pancreatectomy. We tried to evaluate the clinical and morphological features of so-called cystic neoplasms associated with inflammatory bowel disease and to define their pathological characteristics.

  2. Diabetes in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Bridges, Nicola

    2013-05-01

    Cystic fibrosis related diabetes (CFRD) is a common complication of cystic fibrosis, caused by a fall in insulin secretion with age in individuals with pancreatic insufficiency. CFRD is associated with worse clinical status and increased mortality. Treatment of CFRD with insulin results in sustained improvements in lung function and nutrition. While clinical experience with insulin treatment in CF has increased, the selection of who to treat and glycaemic targets remain unclear. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Pancreatic pseudocyst should be treated by surgical drainage.

    PubMed Central

    Moran, B.; Rew, D. A.; Johnson, C. D.

    1994-01-01

    This debate reviews the arguments in favour of surgical or non-surgical techniques for the management of pancreatic pseudocysts. Surgery provides definitive management and has a low risk of recurrence; pancreatic resection may be required to achieve this. Surgical treatment of pancreatic pseudocyst is safe, with little morbidity and low mortality, and surgical drainage allows biopsy of the cyst wall to exclude a cystic neoplasm of the pancreas. Percutaneous techniques have the advantage of low morbidity and mortality, with less discomfort to the patient than a surgical incision. In selected patients, a good result can be anticipated. The balance of the evidence suggests that both approaches are useful in different patients. Pseudocyst management should be tailored to each individual case. PMID:8117022

  4. Negative sweat tests and cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Sarsfield, J K; Davies, J M

    1975-01-01

    Two brothers are described with chronic suppurative pulmonary disease. One has classical cystic fibrosis with complete pancreatic involvement and abnormal sweat test. The other had incomplete pancreatic disease with repeatedly normal sweat tests. The implications of a negative sweat test in patients with cystic fibrosis are discussed. Images FIG. PMID:1147688

  5. Incidental isolated pancreatic hydatid cyst.

    PubMed

    Kısaoğlu, Abdullah; Özoğul, Bünyami; Atamanalp, Sabri Selçuk; Pirimoğlu, Berhan; Aydınlı, Bülent; Korkut, Ercan

    2015-03-01

    Isolated pancreatic hydatid cysts are a rare parasitic disease even in endemic areas. It is difficult to discriminate primary pancreatic hydatid cysts from other cystic and solid lesions of the pancreas. This is a case report of an incidental isolated pancreatic hydatid cyst. A heterogeneous cystic lesion in the body of the pancreas was identified on magnetic resonance imaging of a patient previously diagnosed patient with cholelithiasis, and because of the malignant possibility of the lesion, splenectomy with distal pancreatectomy and cholecystectomy was performed. The histopathologic diagnosis was reported as a hydatid cyst. Pancreatic hydatid cysts should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic pseudocysts and cystic malignancies.

  6. High Volume Washing of the Abdomen in Increasing Survival After Surgery in Patients With Pancreatic Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-18

    Acinar Cell Carcinoma; Ampulla of Vater Adenocarcinoma; Cholangiocarcinoma; Duodenal Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm, Pancreatobiliary-Type; Periampullary Adenocarcinoma

  7. APN401 in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, or Other Solid Tumors That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-02

    Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Brain; Metastatic Solid Neoplasm; Recurrent Colorectal Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Recurrent Solid Neoplasm; Stage IV Colorectal Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVB Pancreatic Cancer; Unresectable Solid Neoplasm

  8. The Evolving Role of Pathology in New Developments, Classification, Terminology, and Diagnosis of Pancreatobiliary Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Reid, Michelle D; Lewis, Melinda M; Willingham, Field F; Adsay, N Volkan

    2017-03-01

    Pancreatobiliary tract lesions are increasingly being discovered because of more sensitive imaging modalities. Magnetic resonance imaging has identified incidental pancreatic cysts in 13.5% of patients of progressively increasing age. Pancreatobiliary tissue is more accessible through endoscopic ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging-guided biopsy procedures, and is now an integral part of pathologists' routine practice. Accordingly, several new tumor categories have been recently recognized, including intraductal tubulopapillary neoplasm, a new addition to tumoral intraepithelial neoplasms. Other entities have been reclassified, including the recent transition to 2-tiered grading of preinvasive neoplasms, as well as new perspectives on the distinctive biologic behavior of oncocytic intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) compared with other IPMN subtypes. This has led to proposals for revised staging of virtually every segment of the pancreatobiliary tree, with theranostic markers becoming an integral part of workup. Ki-67 is now an integral part of the classification of neuroendocrine tumors, with new definitions of "high-grade neuroendocrine carcinoma." Although bile duct brushings have opened new avenues for diagnosis, their sensitivity remains low and often requires concomitant fluorescent in situ hybridization to better define ambiguous cases. Various molecular pathways have been elucidated for pancreatic cysts, including KRAS for ductal neoplasia, GNAS for intestinal IPMNs, RNF3 for mucinous cysts, and VHL for serous cystic neoplasms, all key players in diagnostic workup. Integration of these updates into our understanding of pancreatobiliary disease requires active engagement of pathologists for appropriate specimen triage, judicious interpretation of results, and incorporation into reporting and staging. They also provide exciting opportunities for targeted therapy.

  9. Staging of neoplasms. Volume 7

    SciTech Connect

    Glazer, G.M.

    1986-01-01

    This book is divided into ten chapters. The first, an overview of the importance of staging, is followed by separate chapters on computed tomographic (CT) evaluation of lymph node metastases; metastatic disease to the thorax; staging of laryngeal, hypopharyngeal, esophageal, non-small cell lung, and renal carcinoma; and pediatric abdominal malignancies. CT staging of lymphomas is dealt with in a separate chapter. The final chapter summarizes initial experiences with staging of neoplasms by magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Other neoplasms, such as pelvic, pancreatic, and gastrointestinal, are not discussed in depth. The book concludes with ten case studies, most of which deal with pelvic and gastrointestinal malignancies.

  10. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging of solid and cystic lesions of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Miller, Frank H; Chen, Zongming E; Merrick, Laura; Mortele, Koenraad J; Hoff, Frederick L; Hammond, Nancy A; Yaghmai, Vahid; Vahid, Yaghmai; Nikolaidis, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is increasingly used in the detection and characterization of pancreatic lesions. Diffusion-weighted imaging may provide additional information to radiologists evaluating patients who have cystic or solid neoplasms of the pancreas. Because of greater freedom of motion of water molecules in fluid-rich environments, simple cysts in the pancreas have higher signal intensity on diffusion-weighted images with a b value of 0 sec/mm2 and lower signal intensity on high-b-value images. High apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values can be obtained on ADC maps because of the T2 “shine-through” effect. In contrast, solid neoplasms of the pancreas show increased signal intensity relative to the pancreas on diffusion-weighted images with a b value of 0 sec/mm2 and relatively high signal intensity on high-b-value images. Diffusion-weighted imaging can help detect solid pancreatic neoplasms with extremely dense cellularity or extracellular fibrosis by demonstrating significantly low ADC values, and these neoplasms may be better detected on diffusion-weighted MR images because of better contrast, although the resolution is generally worse. However, diffusion-weighted imaging may not be capable of helping definitively characterize solid lesions as inflammatory or neoplastic because of an overlap in ADC values between the two types. For example, it is difficult to distinguish poorly differentiated pancreatic adenocarcinoma from mass-forming pancreatitis at diffusion-weighted imaging because of similarly low ADC values attributed to dense fibrosis.

  11. Cystic tumors of the pancreas: imaging and management.

    PubMed

    Dewhurst, Catherine E; Mortele, Koenraad J

    2012-05-01

    Cystic tumors of the pancreas are a subset of rare pancreatic tumors that vary from benign to malignant. Many have specific imaging findings that allow them to be differentiated from each other. This article (1) reviews the imaging features of the common cystic pancreatic lesions, including serous microcystic adenoma, mucinous cystic tumor, intraductal papillary mucinous tumor, and solid pseudopapillary tumor, and including the less common lesions such as cystic endocrine tumors, cystic metastases, cystic teratomas, and lymphangiomas; and (2) provides comprehensive algorithms on how to manage the individual lesions, with recommendations on when to reimage patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Benign cystic peritoneal mesothelioma.

    PubMed Central

    Bhandarkar, D S; Smith, V J; Evans, D A; Taylor, T V

    1993-01-01

    The well defined but rare entity of benign cystic mesothelioma is reported. The aetiology of this neoplasm remains obscure. The presenting features make a precise preoperative diagnosis difficult; information provided by computed tomography and cytology may help. A firm diagnosis can only come from electron microscopic or immunohistochemical examination of the tumour. Diagnostic accuracy and diligent follow up are essential because, although the tumour is considered benign, it does tend towards local recurrence. Images PMID:8227441

  13. Suboptimal accuracy of carcinoembryonic antigen in differentiation of mucinous and nonmucinous pancreatic cysts: results of a large multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Gaddam, Srinivas; Ge, Phillip S; Keach, Joseph W; Mullady, Daniel; Fukami, Norio; Edmundowicz, Steven A; Azar, Riad R; Shah, Raj J; Murad, Faris M; Kushnir, Vladimir M; Watson, Rabindra R; Ghassemi, Kourosh F; Sedarat, Alireza; Komanduri, Srinadh; Jaiyeola, Diana-Marie; Brauer, Brian C; Yen, Roy D; Amateau, Stuart K; Hosford, Lindsay; Hollander, Thomas; Donahue, Timothy R; Schulick, Richard D; Edil, Barish H; McCarter, Martin; Gajdos, Csaba; Attwell, Augustin; Muthusamy, V Raman; Early, Dayna S; Wani, Sachin

    2015-12-01

    The exact cutoff value at which pancreatic cyst fluid carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level distinguishes pancreatic mucinous cystic neoplasms (MCNs) from pancreatic nonmucinous cystic neoplasms (NMCNs) is unclear. The aim of this multicenter retrospective study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of cyst fluid CEA levels in differentiating between MCNs and NMCNs. Consecutive patients who underwent EUS with FNA at 3 tertiary care centers were identified. Patients with histologic confirmation of cyst type based on surgical specimens served as the criterion standard for this analysis. Demographic characteristics, EUS morphology, FNA fluid, and cytology results were recorded. Multivariate logistic regression analysis to identify predictors of MCNs was performed. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves were generated for CEA levels. A total of 226 patients underwent surgery (mean age, 61 years, 96% white patients, 39% female patients) of whom 88% underwent Whipple's procedure or distal pancreatectomy. Based on surgical histopathology, there were 150 MCNs and 76 NMCNs cases. The median CEA level was 165 ng/mL. The area under the ROC curve for CEA levels in differentiating between MCNs and NMCNs was 0.77 (95% confidence interval, 0.71-0.84, P < .01) with a cutoff of 105 ng/mL, demonstrating a sensitivity and specificity of 70% and 63%, respectively. The cutoff value of 192 ng/mL yielded a sensitivity of 61% and a specificity of 77% and would misdiagnose 39% of MCN cases. Cyst fluid CEA levels have a clinically suboptimal accuracy level in differentiating MCNs from NMCNs. Future studies should focus on novel cyst fluid markers to improve risk stratification of pancreatic cystic neoplasms. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Pathological features and diagnosis of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Castellano-Megías, Víctor M; Andrés, Carolina Ibarrola-de; López-Alonso, Guadalupe; Colina-Ruizdelgado, Francisco

    2014-09-15

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) of the pancreas is a noninvasive epithelial neoplasm of mucin-producing cells arising in the main duct (MD) and/or branch ducts (BD) of the pancreas. Involved ducts are dilated and filled with neoplastic papillae and mucus in variable intensity. IPMN lacks ovarian-type stroma, unlike mucinous cystic neoplasm, and is defined as a grossly visible entity (≥ 5 mm), unlike pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasm. With the use of high-resolution imaging techniques, very small IPMNs are increasingly being identified. Most IPMNs are solitary and located in the pancreatic head, although 20%-40% are multifocal. Macroscopic classification in MD type, BD type and mixed or combined type reflects biological differences with important prognostic and preoperative clinical management implications. Based on cytoarchitectural atypia, IPMN is classified into low-grade, intermediate-grade and high-grade dysplasia. Based on histological features and mucin (MUC) immunophenotype, IPMNs are classified into gastric, intestinal, pancreatobiliary and oncocytic types. These different phenotypes can be observed together, with the IPMN classified according to the predominant type. Two pathways have been suggested: gastric phenotype corresponds to less aggressive uncommitted cells (MUC1 -, MUC2 -, MUC5AC +, MUC6 +) with the capacity to evolve to intestinal phenotype (intestinal pathway) (MUC1 -, MUC2 +, MUC5AC +, MUC6 - or weak +) or pancreatobiliary /oncocytic phenotypes (pyloropancreatic pathway) (MUC1 +, MUC 2-, MUC5AC +, MUC 6 +) becoming more aggressive. Prognosis of IPMN is excellent but critically worsens when invasive carcinoma arises (about 40% of IPMNs), except in some cases of minimal invasion. The clinical challenge is to establish which IPMNs should be removed because of their higher risk of developing invasive cancer. Once resected, they must be extensively sampled or, much better, submitted in its entirety for microscopic study to

  15. Pathological features and diagnosis of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Castellano-Megías, Víctor M; Andrés, Carolina Ibarrola-de; López-Alonso, Guadalupe; Colina-Ruizdelgado, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) of the pancreas is a noninvasive epithelial neoplasm of mucin-producing cells arising in the main duct (MD) and/or branch ducts (BD) of the pancreas. Involved ducts are dilated and filled with neoplastic papillae and mucus in variable intensity. IPMN lacks ovarian-type stroma, unlike mucinous cystic neoplasm, and is defined as a grossly visible entity (≥ 5 mm), unlike pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasm. With the use of high-resolution imaging techniques, very small IPMNs are increasingly being identified. Most IPMNs are solitary and located in the pancreatic head, although 20%-40% are multifocal. Macroscopic classification in MD type, BD type and mixed or combined type reflects biological differences with important prognostic and preoperative clinical management implications. Based on cytoarchitectural atypia, IPMN is classified into low-grade, intermediate-grade and high-grade dysplasia. Based on histological features and mucin (MUC) immunophenotype, IPMNs are classified into gastric, intestinal, pancreatobiliary and oncocytic types. These different phenotypes can be observed together, with the IPMN classified according to the predominant type. Two pathways have been suggested: gastric phenotype corresponds to less aggressive uncommitted cells (MUC1 -, MUC2 -, MUC5AC +, MUC6 +) with the capacity to evolve to intestinal phenotype (intestinal pathway) (MUC1 -, MUC2 +, MUC5AC +, MUC6 - or weak +) or pancreatobiliary /oncocytic phenotypes (pyloropancreatic pathway) (MUC1 +, MUC 2-, MUC5AC +, MUC 6 +) becoming more aggressive. Prognosis of IPMN is excellent but critically worsens when invasive carcinoma arises (about 40% of IPMNs), except in some cases of minimal invasion. The clinical challenge is to establish which IPMNs should be removed because of their higher risk of developing invasive cancer. Once resected, they must be extensively sampled or, much better, submitted in its entirety for microscopic study to

  16. Cyst fluid amylase and CEA levels in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic cysts: a single-center experience with histologically proven cysts.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hyoung-Chul; Kang, Hyun; Brugge, William R

    2014-12-01

    Cyst fluid amylase is a potential marker for pseudocysts and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN). This study aimed to evaluate the diagnostic role of cyst fluid amylase and to determine the optimal cutoff values of cyst fluid amylase and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) for the differential diagnosis of pancreatic cysts. Based on the pancreatic cyst database at Massachusetts General Hospital, a total of 78 patients with histologically proven cysts [pancreatic pseudocyst (PP), n = 16; mucinous cystic neoplasm, mucinous cystic neoplasm (MCN), n = 22; IPMN, n = 40] were selected. Complete cyst fluid amylase and CEA values were analyzed. Thirty two of 78 patients were male with median age of 60.4 years (range, 24-84). Cyst diameter ranged from 5 to 130 mm. For cyst fluid amylase, there was significant difference between PP and MCN (median, 30,034.50 vs. 4,723.50 U/L; p < 0.05) or IPMN (30,034.50 vs. 1,585.00; p = 0.001), but no difference between MCN and IPMN. For cyst fluid CEA, there was a significant difference between PP and MCN (median, 26.00 vs. 627.50 ng/mL; p < 0.001) or IPMN (26.00 vs. 356.50; p < 0.001). Median amylase and CEA values were significantly different between PP and mucinous neoplasms (MCN/IPMN) (p < 0.01 and p < 0.001). Optimal cutoff values of 6,800 U/mL for amylase and 50 ng/mL for CEA correlated with the crossover of the sensitivity and specificity curves for differentiating PP and mucinous neoplasms. The overall accuracies of cyst fluid amylase and CEA were 69 and 85%, respectively. Cyst fluid amylase analysis does not differentiate between MCN and IPMN. The combination of cyst fluid CEA and amylase value may increase the diagnostic accuracy for differentiating mucinous neoplasms from pseudocysts.

  17. Solid and papillary epithelial neoplasm of the pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A.C.; Lichtenstein, J.E.; Fishman, E.K.; Oertel, J.E.; Dachman, A.H.; Siegelman, S.S.

    1985-02-01

    Solid and papillary epithelial neoplasm of the pancreas is an uncommon low grade malignant tumor histologically distinct from the usual ductal adenocarcinoma and amenable to cure by surgical excision. It tends to occur in black women in their second or third decade of life and has often been misclassified as nonfunctional islet cell tumor or as cystadenoma or cystadenocarcinoma. Twelve cases were reviewed. Sonography and CT of solid and pipillary epithelial neoplasms depict a well-demarcated mass that can be solid, mixed cystic and solid, or largely cystic. The radiologic appearance is dependent on the maintenance of the integrity of the neoplasm versus the extent of retrogressive changes that have occurred.

  18. P-HPB-07: Needle-based confocal laser endomicroscopy for the diagnosis of pancreatic cystic lesions: An international external inter- and intra-observer study

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, Somashekar; Brugge, William; Dewitt, John; Napoleon, Bertrand; Kongkam, Pradermchai; Tan, Damien; Robles-Medranda, Carol; Conwell, Darwin

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS)-guided needle-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (nCLE) characteristics of common types of pancreatic cystic lesions (PCLs) although identified lacks external validation and surgical histopathology was available in a minority of subjects. We sought to externally validate EUS-nCLE images for differentiating PCLs in a larger series of subjects with a definitive diagnosis. Methods: Six expert endosonographers, blinded to clinical data, reviewed nCLE images of PCLs from 29 subjects with surgical (n = 23) or clinical (n = 6) correlation. After 2 weeks, the assessors reviewed the same images in a different sequence. The performance characteristics of nCLE and the kappa-statistic for interobserver agreement (IOA, 95% confidence interval [CI]) and intraobserver reliability (IOR, mean, standard deviation [SD]) for the identification of nCLE image patterns were calculated. Landis and Koch interpretation of kappa values was used. Results: A total of 29 (16 mucinous PCLs, 13 nonmucinous PCLs) nCLE patient videos were reviewed. The overall sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for the diagnosis of mucinous PCLs were 95%, 94%, and 95%, respectively. The IOA and IOR (mean, SD) were κ = 0.81 (almost-perfect), 95% CI 0.71–0.90 and κ = 0.86, 0.11 (almost-perfect), respectively. The overall specificity, sensitivity, and accuracy for the diagnosis of serous cystadenomas were 99%, 98%, and 98%, respectively. The IOA and IOR (mean, SD) for recognizing characteristic image pattern of serous cystadenomas were κ = 0.83 (almost-perfect), 95% CI 0.73–0.92 and κ = 0.85, 0.11 (almost-perfect), respectively. Conclusion: EUS-nCLE can provide virtual histology of PCLs with a high degree of accuracy and inter- and intra-observer agreement in differentiating mucinous versus nonmucinous PCLs. These preliminary results support larger multicenter studies to evaluate EUS-nCLE.

  19. Predictors for Surgical Referral in Patients With Pancreatic Cystic Lesions Undergoing Endoscopic Ultrasound: Results From a Large Multicenter Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Ge, Phillip S; Gaddam, Srinivas; Keach, Joseph W; Mullady, Daniel; Fukami, Norio; Edmundowicz, Steven A; Azar, Riad R; Shah, Raj J; Murad, Faris M; Kushnir, Vladimir M; Ghassemi, Kourosh F; Sedarat, Alireza; Watson, Rabindra R; Amateau, Stuart K; Brauer, Brian C; Yen, Roy D; Hosford, Lindsay; Hollander, Thomas; Donahue, Timothy R; Schulick, Richard D; Edil, Barish H; McCarter, Martin D; Gajdos, Csaba; Attwell, Augustin R; Muthusamy, V Raman; Early, Dayna S; Wani, Sachin

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) plays an integral role in the evaluation of pancreatic cysts lesions (PCLs). The aim of the study was to determine predictors of surgical referral in patients with PCLs undergoing EUS. We performed a multicenter retrospective study of patients undergoing EUS for evaluation of PCLs. Demographics, EUS characteristics, and fine-needle aspiration results were recorded. Patients were categorized into surgery or surveillance groups on the basis of post-EUS recommendations. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify predictors of surgical referral. 1804 patients were included. 1301 patients were recommended to undergo surveillance and 503 patients were referred for surgical evaluation, of which 360 patients underwent surgery. Multivariate analysis revealed the following 5 independent predictors of surgical referral: symptoms of weight loss on presentation (odds ratio [OR], 2.69; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.44-5.03), EUS findings of associated solid mass (OR, 7.34; 95% CI, 3.81-14.16), main duct communication (OR, 4.13; 95% CI, 1.71-9.98), multilocular macrocystic morphology (OR, 2.79; 95% CI, 1.78-4.38), and fine-needle aspiration findings of mucin on cytology (OR, 3.06; 95% CI, 1.94-4.82). This study identifies factors associated with surgical referral in patients with PCLs undergoing EUS. Future studies should focus on creation of risk stratification models to determine the need for surgery or enrollment in surveillance programs.

  20. Lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (autoimmune pancreatitis): evaluation with multidetector CT.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Satomi; Siegelman, Stanley S; Hruban, Ralph H; Fishman, Elliot K

    2008-01-01

    Lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis is a form of chronic pancreatitis characterized by a mixed inflammatory infiltrate that centers on the pancreatic ducts. It is a cause of benign pancreatic disease that can clinically mimic pancreatic cancer. Preoperative detection of lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis is important because patients usually respond to steroid therapy. Patients with lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis are often referred for computed tomography (CT) when they are suspected of having a pancreatic or biliary neoplasm; therefore, it is important to search for potential findings suggestive of lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis when typical findings of a pancreatic or biliary neoplasm are not found. Typical CT findings include diffuse or focal enlargement of the pancreas without dilatation of the main pancreatic duct. Focal enlargement is most commonly seen in the head of the pancreas, and the involved pancreas on contrast material-enhanced CT images may be iso-attenuating relative to the rest of the pancreas, or hypo-attenuating, especially during the early postcontrast phase. Thickening and contrast enhancement of the wall of the common bile duct and gallbladder may reflect inflammatory infiltrate and fibrosis associated with lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis. There are several features seen at CT that may help to differentiate lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis from pancreatic cancer, such as diffuse enlargement of the pancreas with minimal peripancreatic stranding in patients with obstructive jaundice, an absence of significant pancreatic atrophy, and an absence of significant main pancreatic duct dilatation. When these findings are encountered, clinical, other imaging, and serologic data should be evaluated.

  1. Alterations of pancreatic amylase secretion in the reserpinized rat model of cystic fibrosis. Effects of cerulein and EGF.

    PubMed

    Morisset, J; Bérubé, F L; Vanier, M; Benrezzak, O

    1994-08-01

    Reserpine treatment resulted in altered enzyme secretion from rat pancreatic acini in response to carbamylcholine and secretin (1,2). This study was undertaken: (1) To evaluate if the alterations caused by reserpine can be prevented by EGF and/or cerulein treatments; (2) To determine the time-course of secretion recovery after reserpine treatment; and (3) To establish if EGF and/or cerulein treatments can accelerate such a recovery after the reserpine treatment. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (250-265 g) were used in these experiments. In experiment I, rats divided into three groups received either reserpine (R) or the reserpine vehicle for the controls (C) and the pair-fed controls (PF) for 7 d. During treatment, PF and R rats were given SC, twice a day, saline, EGF (10 micrograms/kg), cerulein (1 microgram/kg), or both at the same dose. C rats received saline in gelatin. In experiment II, rats were treated for 7 d with reserpine or the vehicle as described in experiment I, were allowed a 30-d recovery period and then were killed. In experiment III, C, PF, and R rats were treated for 7 d as described in experiment I; on the 8th d and for the next 6 d, reserpine rats received saline (reserpine-saline), cerulein, EGF, or both cerulein +EGF at the same dose as indicated in experiment I. C and PF rats received saline in gelatin. After sacrifice, acini were prepared, and amylase dose-response curves to carbamylcholine (Cch) and secretin were established. EGF, cerulein, or their combination given to R rats did not improve the desensitized secretory response to Cch.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Myelodysplastic/ ...

  3. Intracellular HMGB1 as a novel tumor suppressor of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Rui; Xie, Yangchun; Zhang, Qiuhong; Hou, Wen; Jiang, Qingping; Zhu, Shan; Liu, Jinbao; Zeng, Dexing; Wang, Haichao; Bartlett, David L; Billiar, Timothy R; Zeh, Herbert J; Lotze, Michael T; Tang, Daolin

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) driven by oncogenic K-Ras remains among the most lethal human cancers despite recent advances in modern medicine. The pathogenesis of PDAC is partly attributable to intrinsic chromosome instability and extrinsic inflammation activation. However, the molecular link between these two events in pancreatic tumorigenesis has not yet been fully established. Here, we show that intracellular high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) remarkably suppresses oncogenic K-Ras-driven pancreatic tumorigenesis by inhibiting chromosome instability-mediated pro-inflammatory nucleosome release. Conditional genetic ablation of either single or both alleles of HMGB1 in the pancreas renders mice extremely sensitive to oncogenic K-Ras-driven initiation of precursor lesions at birth, including pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasms, intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, and mucinous cystic neoplasms. Loss of HMGB1 in the pancreas is associated with oxidative DNA damage and chromosomal instability characterized by chromosome rearrangements and telomere abnormalities. These lead to inflammatory nucleosome release and propagate K-Ras-driven pancreatic tumorigenesis. Extracellular nucleosomes promote interleukin 6 (IL-6) secretion by infiltrating macrophages/neutrophils and enhance oncogenic K-Ras signaling activation in pancreatic lesions. Neutralizing antibodies to IL-6 or histone H3 or knockout of the receptor for advanced glycation end products all limit K-Ras signaling activation, prevent cancer development and metastasis/invasion, and prolong animal survival in Pdx1-Cre;K-RasG12D/+;Hmgb1−/− mice. Pharmacological inhibition of HMGB1 loss by glycyrrhizin limits oncogenic K-Ras-driven tumorigenesis in mice under inflammatory conditions. Diminished nuclear and total cellular expression of HMGB1 in PDAC patients correlates with poor overall survival, supporting intracellular HMGB1 as a novel tumor suppressor with prognostic and therapeutic relevance in

  4. Gastrointestinal Manifestations of Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis has historically been considered a pulmonary disease, but with the increasing life expectancy of these patients, gastrointestinal manifestations are becoming more important. Furthermore, nutritional status is closely linked to pulmonary function and, thus, overall mortality. This article discusses gastrointestinal manifestations (which involve nutritional, pancreatic, hepatobiliary, and, in particular, gastrointestinal tract issues) of cystic fibrosis as well as management of the disease. In addition, the article discusses studies that have been critical to our understanding of gastrointestinal manifestations of cystic fibrosis. PMID:27330503

  5. A bizarre abdominal cystic lesion.

    PubMed

    Zucchini, Giorgia; Pezzilli, Raffaele; Ricci, Claudio; Casadei, Riccardo; Santini, Donatella; Calculli, Lucia; Corinaldesi, Roberto

    2010-09-06

    In spite of careful intraoperative precautions and gauze counts, mistakes can still occur during surgery. In the case reported, a retained gauze leaved during a surgical approach for removing a solid-cystic papillary tumor localized in the pancreatic tail, caused both persistent abdominal discomfort and the presence of an abdominal cystic lesion at imaging techniques. When a previous operative history is present, a foreign body should be taken into account in the differential diagnosis of a patient with an intra-abdominal cystic mass. Finally, radio-opaque marker should be routinely used by surgeons in order to reach a correct diagnosis in operated patients having retained gauze.

  6. CD200 Expression in Neuroendocrine Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Love, Jason E; Thompson, Kimberly; Kilgore, Mark R; Westerhoff, Maria; Murphy, Claire E; Papanicolau-Sengos, Antonios; McCormick, Kinsey A; Shankaran, Veena; Vandeven, Natalie; Miller, Faith; Blom, Astrid; Nghiem, Paul T; Kussick, Steven J

    2017-09-01

    CD200 expression has been well studied in hematopoietic malignancies; however, CD200 expression has not been well-characterized in neuroendocrine neoplasms. We examined CD200 expression in 391 neuroendocrine neoplasms from various anatomic sites. Tissue blocks containing pulmonary small cell carcinoma, pulmonary carcinoid, large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma, pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor, gastrointestinal carcinoid, and Merkel cell carcinoma were evaluated for CD200 expression by immunohistochemistry. A set of nonneuroendocrine carcinomas was stained for comparison. CD200 was expressed in 87% of the neuroendocrine neoplasms studied, including 60 of 72 (83%) pulmonary small cell carcinomas, 15 of 22 (68%) pulmonary carcinoids, three of four (75%) pulmonary large cell neuroendocrine carcinomas, 125 of 146 (86%) Merkel cell carcinomas, 79 of 83 (95%) gastrointestinal luminal carcinoids, and 56 of 60 (93%) pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. Thirty-two of 157 (20%) nonneuroendocrine carcinomas expressed CD200. In gastrointestinal carcinoid and pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms, CD200 negativity correlated with higher grade. CD200 is a relatively sensitive marker of neuroendocrine neoplasms and represents a potential therapeutic target in these difficult-to-treat malignancies.

  7. Needle-based confocal laser endomicroscopy for the diagnosis of pancreatic cystic lesions: an international external interobserver and intraobserver study (with videos).

    PubMed

    Krishna, Somashekar G; Brugge, William R; Dewitt, John M; Kongkam, Pradermchai; Napoleon, Bertrand; Robles-Medranda, Carlos; Tan, Damien; El-Dika, Samer; McCarthy, Sean; Walker, Jon; Dillhoff, Mary E; Manilchuk, Andrei; Schmidt, Carl; Swanson, Benjamin; Shah, Zarine K; Hart, Phil A; Conwell, Darwin L

    2017-10-01

    EUS-guided needle-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (nCLE) characteristics of common types of pancreatic cystic lesions (PCLs) have been identified; however, surgical histopathology was available in a minority of cases. We sought to assess the performance characteristics of EUS nCLE for differentiating mucinous from non-mucinous PCLs in a larger series of patients with a definitive diagnosis. Six endosonographers (nCLE experience >30 cases each) blinded to all clinical data, reviewed nCLE images of PCLs from 29 patients with surgical (n = 23) or clinical (n = 6) correlation. After 2 weeks, the assessors reviewed the same images in a different sequence. A tutorial on available and novel nCLE image patterns was provided before each review. The performance characteristics of nCLE and the κ statistic for interobserver agreement (IOA, 95% confidence interval [CI]), and intraobserver reliability (IOR, mean ± standard deviation [SD]) for identification of nCLE image patterns were calculated. Landis and Koch interpretation of κ values was used. A total of 29 (16 mucinous PCLs, 13 non-mucinous PCLs) nCLE patient videos were reviewed. The overall sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for the diagnosis of mucinous PCLs were 95%, 94%, and 95%, respectively. The IOA and IOR (mean ± SD) were κ = 0.81 (almost perfect); 95% CI, 0.71-0.90; and κ = 0.86 ± 0.11 (almost perfect), respectively. The overall specificity, sensitivity, and accuracy for the diagnosis of serous cystadenomas (SCAs) were 99%, 98%, and 98%, respectively. The IOA and IOR (mean ± SD) for recognizing the characteristic image pattern of SCA were κ = 0.83 (almost perfect); 95% CI, 0.73-0.92; and κ = 0.85 ± 0.11 (almost perfect), respectively. EUS-guided nCLE can provide virtual histology of PCLs with a high degree of accuracy and inter- and intraobserver agreement in differentiating mucinous versus non-mucinous PCLs. These preliminary results support larger multicenter studies to evaluate EUS n

  8. Intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasms of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Adsay, N V; Adair, C F; Heffess, C S; Klimstra, D S

    1996-08-01

    We describe the clinical and pathologic features of 11 intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasms of the pancreas, a hitherto unrecognized tumor. The patients were six men and five women, and most of the tumors were in the head (head: body/tail = 8:3). The mean patient age was 62 (range, 39-78), and the average tumor size was 6 cm. Grossly the tumors exhibited mucin-filled cysts containing nodular papillary projections. Dilated ducts communicating with the main tumor were sometimes noted. Microscopically the cystic structures appeared to represent dilated ducts containing intraductal tumor. The tumors were characterized by variably complex, arborizing papillary structures. The papillae had thin, delicate fibrovascular cores with focal myxoid changes and were lined by stratified oncocytic cells. Goblet cells and intra-epithelial mucin-containing lumina were present, the latter resulting in a characteristic cribriform pattern. The exuberance of the epithelial proliferation varied from case to case and between different regions within individual tumors; solid sheets of cells were often identified. Although the degree of cytologic atypia was not generally severe, the complexity of the architecture justified a designation of intraductal oncocytic papillary carcinoma in 10 of the 11 cases. In nine cases the tumor was entirely intraductal; one case exhibited focal microinvasion and another showed widespread invasive carcinoma, the invasive elements appearing cytologically similar to the intraductal papillary components. The oncocytic cells stained positively with phosphotungstic acid hematoxylin and Novelli stains. Immunohistochemically, all cases stained positively for B72.3, and five cases showed focal, weak luminal membrane staining for carcinoembryonic antigen. Ultrastructurally many of the cells were packed with mitochondria, and mucin was also identified. Seven patients were alive and free of tumor from 1 month to 3 years (average, 1 year) after resection. Two

  9. K-Ras and cyclooxygenase-2 coactivation augments intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm and Notch1 mimicking human pancreas lesions

    PubMed Central

    Chiblak, Sara; Steinbauer, Brigitte; Pohl-Arnold, Andrea; Kucher, Dagmar; Abdollahi, Amir; Schwager, Christian; Höft, Birgit; Esposito, Irene; Müller-Decker, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Mutational activation of K-Ras is an initiating event of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDAC) that may develop either from pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) or intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN). Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)-derived prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is causally related to pancreatic carcinogenesis. Here, we deciphered the impact of COX-2, a key modulator of inflammation, in concert with active mutant K-RasG12D on tumor burden and gene expression signature using compound mutant mouse lines. Concomitant activation of COX-2 and K-RasG12D accelerated the progression of pancreatic intraepithelial lesions predominantly with a cystic papillary phenotype resembling human IPMN. Transcriptomes derived from laser capture microdissected preneoplastic lesions of single and compound mutants revealed a signature that was significantly enriched in Notch1 signaling components. In vitro, Notch1 signaling was COX-2-dependent. In line with these findings, human IPMN stratified into intestinal, gastric and pancreatobillary types displayed Notch1 immunosignals with high prevalence, especially in the gastric lesions. In conclusion, a yet unknown link between activated Ras, protumorigenic COX-2 and Notch1 in IPMN onset was unraveled. PMID:27381829

  10. Recently described neoplasms of the sinonasal tract.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Justin A

    2016-03-01

    Surgical pathology of the sinonasal region (i.e., nasal cavity and the paranasal sinuses) is notoriously difficult, due in part to the remarkable diversity of neoplasms that may be encountered in this area. In addition, a number of neoplasms have been only recently described in the sinonasal tract, further compounding the difficulty for pathologists who are not yet familiar with them. This manuscript will review the clinicopathologic features of some of the recently described sinonasal tumor types: NUT midline carcinoma, HPV-related carcinoma with adenoid cystic-like features, SMARCB1 (INI-1) deficient sinonasal carcinoma, biphenotypic sinonasal sarcoma, and adamantinoma-like Ewing family tumor.

  11. Nutritional management of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Goodchild, M C

    1987-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis patients have an increased requirement for calories and probably for all the major nutrients. The newer, enteric-coated granular preparations of pancreatic enzyme are more effective than preceding preparations and should permit a normal fat intake. Recent work has emphasized the interdependence of respiratory disease and nutrition.

  12. Epidural Cystic Spinal Meningioma: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ji; Chen, Zheng-he; Wang, Zi-feng; Sun, Peng; Jin, Jie-tian; Zhang, Xiang-heng; Zhao, Yi-ying; Wang, Jian; Mou, Yong-gao; Chen, Zhong-ping

    2016-03-01

    Cystic spinal meningioma (CSM) is an uncommon meningioma variant. Extradural CSMs are particularly rare and difficult to distinguish from other intraaxial tumors. This study presents a case of a 36-year-old woman with intraspinal extradual CSM at the thoracolumbar spine. She experienced persistent weakness, progressive numbness, and sensory disturbance in the right lower limb. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the patient revealed an irregular cystic mass at the thoracic 11 to lumbar 3 levels dorsally. This case was misdiagnosed as other neoplasms prior to surgery because of the atypical radiographic features and location of the tumor. Extradural CSMs should be considered in the differential diagnosis of intraspinal extradural cystic neoplasms. Complete removal of cystic wall provides an optimal outcome, rendering the lesion curable.

  13. Childhood ovarian neoplasms in Ibadan, South-western Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ajani, Mustapha Akanji; Aramide, Kolawole Olanrewaju; Ajani, Tinuade Adesola; Salami, Ayodeji A; Okolo, Clement Abu

    2016-01-01

    Childhood ovarian neoplasms are very rare. Little information is available on the relative pattern and frequency of these tumors in Nigerian children. Earlier study done in Ibadan involved ovarian neoplasms in children and adolescents. The aim of this study is to review cases of ovarian neoplasms in children <15 years over a 22½ years period. This was a retrospective study. Twenty-four cases of childhood ovarian neoplasms were seen in patients <15 years of age. These cases were classified using the current World Health Organization histological classification of ovarian tumors. Childhood ovarian neoplasms accounted for 2.8% of all cases of ovarian tumors seen in this period. Fourteen (58.3%) cases of childhood ovarian neoplasms were benign, and 10 (41.7%) were malignant. Mature cystic teratoma occurring in 13 (54.2%) was the most common childhood ovarian neoplasm and was most prevalent between 10 and 14 years of age. Burkitt lymphoma was the most common 4 (40%) malignant childhood ovarian tumor and prevalent between 5 and 14 years of age. Mature cystic teratoma remains the single most common childhood ovarian neoplasms, and Burkitt's lymphoma is the most malignant childhood ovarian tumor in Ibadan, South-western Nigeria.

  14. [Pancreatic cancer linked to life style and genome].

    PubMed

    Sand, Juhani; Räty, Sari; Nordback, Isto

    2009-01-01

    Since the prognosis of pancreatic cancer is poor in spite of surgical and drug therapy, the focus should be on the prevention and early detection of the disease. In Europe, smoking accounts for up to 30% of pancreatic cancers, and heavy drinking increases the risk of chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. Diabetes can be a risk factor for pancreatic cancer and constitute its initial symptom. Obesity and low physical activity are linked to the risk of pancreatic cancer. An increased risk of pancreatic cancer is also associated with a hereditary inflammation, cystic fibrosis, and with part of cystic tumors of the pancreas.

  15. Endoscopic ultrasonography for surveillance of individuals at high risk for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lami, Gabriele; Biagini, Maria Rosa; Galli, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal disease with a genetic susceptibility and familial aggregation found in 3%-16% of patients. Early diagnosis remains the only hope for curative treatment and improvement of prognosis. This can be reached by the implementation of an intensive screening program, actually recommended for individuals at high-risk for pancreatic cancer development. The aim of this strategy is to identify pre-malignant precursors or asymptomatic pancreatic cancer lesions, curable by surgery. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) with or without fine needle aspiration (FNA) seems to be the most promising technique for early detection of pancreatic cancer. It has been described as a highly sensitive and accurate tool, especially for small and cystic lesions. Pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia, a precursor lesion which is highly represented in high-risk individuals, seems to have characteristics chronic pancreatitis-like changes well detected by EUS. Many screening protocols have demonstrated high diagnostic yields for pancreatic pre-malignant lesions, allowing prophylactic pancreatectomies. However, it shows a high interobserver variety even among experienced endosonographers and a low sensitivity in case of chronic pancreatitis. Some new techniques such as contrast-enhanced harmonic EUS, computer-aided diagnostic techniques, confocal laser endomicroscopy miniprobe and the detection of DNA abnormalities or protein markers by FNA, promise improvement of the diagnostic yield of EUS. As the resolution of imaging improves and as our knowledge of precursor lesions grows, we believe that EUS could become the most suitable method to detect curable pancreatic neoplasms in correctly identified asymptomatic at-risk patients. PMID:25031786

  16. Characterization of gene expression and activated signaling pathways in solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm of pancreas.

    PubMed

    Park, Minhee; Kim, Minhyung; Hwang, Daehee; Park, Misun; Kim, Won Kyu; Kim, Sang Kyum; Shin, Jihye; Park, Eun Sung; Kang, Chang Moo; Paik, Young-Ki; Kim, Hoguen

    2014-04-01

    Solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm is an uncommon pancreatic tumor with distinct clinicopathologic features. Solid-pseudopapillary neoplasms are characterized by mutations in exon 3 of CTNNB1. However, little is known about the gene and microRNA expression profiles of solid-pseudopapillary neoplasms. Thus, we sought to characterize solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm-specific gene expression and identify the signaling pathways activated in these tumors. Comparisons of gene expression in solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm to pancreatic ductal carcinomas, neuroendocrine tumors, and non-neoplastic pancreatic tissues identified solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm-specific mRNA and microRNA profiles. By analyzing 1686 (1119 upregulated and 567 downregulated) genes differentially expressed in solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm, we found that the Wnt/β-catenin, Hedgehog, and androgen receptor signaling pathways, as well as genes involved in epithelial mesenchymal transition, are activated in solid-pseudopapillary neoplasms. We validated these results experimentally by assessing the expression of β-catenin, WIF-1, GLI2, androgen receptor, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition-related markers with western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Our analysis also revealed 17 microRNAs, especially the miR-200 family and miR-192/215, closely associated with the upregulated genes associated with the three pathways activated in solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm and epithelial mesenchymal transition. Our results provide insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm tumorigenesis and its characteristic less epithelial cell differentiation than the other common pancreatic tumors.

  17. MicroRNA in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and its precursor lesions

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Yasmin G; Lucas, Aimee L

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the 4th deadliest cancer in the United States, due to its aggressive nature, late detection, and resistance to chemotherapy. The majority of PDAC develops from 3 precursor lesions, pancreatic intraepithelial lesions (PanIN), intraductual papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN), and mucinous cystic neoplasm. Early detection and surgical resection can increase PDAC 5-year survival rate from 6% for Stage IV to 50% for Stage I. To date, there are no reliable biomarkers that can detect PDAC. MicroRNAs (miRNA) are small noncoding RNAs (18-25 nucleotides) that regulate gene expression by affecting translation of messenger RNA (mRNA). A large body of evidence suggests that miRNAs are dysregulated in various types of cancers. MiRNA has been profiled as a potential biomarker in pancreatic tumor tissue, blood, cyst fluid, stool, and saliva. Four miRNA biomarkers (miR-21, miR-155, miR-196, and miR-210) have been consistently dysregulated in PDAC. MiR-21, miR-155, and miR-196 have also been dysregulated in IPMN and PanIN lesions suggesting their use as early biomarkers of this disease. In this review, we explore current knowledge of miRNA sampling, miRNA dysregulation in PDAC and its precursor lesions, and advances that have been made in using miRNA as a biomarker for PDAC and its precursor lesions. PMID:26798434

  18. Endoscopic ultrasound characteristics of pancreatic lymphoepithelial cysts: A case series from a large referral center

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, Kunal S.; DeWitt, John M.; Sherman, Stuart; Cramer, Harvey M.; Tirkes, Temel; Al-Haddad, Mohammad A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Lymphoepithelial cysts (LECs) of the pancreas are benign lesions that can mimic cystic neoplasms on imaging. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) features have not been well described. We aimed to describe the clinical and EUS characteristics of LECs and the present outcomes of management at a high-volume referral center. Materials and Methods: We identified patients who underwent EUS and were found to have LECs based on fine-needle aspiration (FNA) cytology or surgical pathology from existing databases. EUS features, imaging characteristics, and pathology results were described. Results: Sixteen patients were found to have 17 LECs. The mean size was 33 mm ± 15 mm. Locations within the pancreas included 10 lesions in the tail, 3 in the body, 1 in the uncinate process; the remaining 3 were exophytic. Six lesions were anechoic, 6 were hypoechoic, and 5 had mixed echogenicity. Nine lesions had mixed solid/cystic components, 7 were purely cystic, and 1 was solid. Cyst fluid was thick or viscous in six cases and thin in three. Eleven patients had diagnostic cytopathology. Six patients ultimately underwent surgery due to symptoms, nondiagnostic FNA, or other clinical concerns for malignancy. Conclusions: Pancreatic LECs have variable morphology and echogenicity on EUS, but the appearance of a cyst with variable solid and cystic components combined with the appearance of thick, turbid, and viscous aspirate should raise suspicion for an LEC. The majority of patients with LECs at our center avoided surgery for LECs on the basis of diagnostic EUS-FNA. PMID:27503157

  19. Gemcitabine Hydrochloride With or Without Erlotinib Hydrochloride Followed By the Same Chemotherapy Regimen With or Without Radiation Therapy and Capecitabine or Fluorouracil in Treating Patients With Pancreatic Cancer That Has Been Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-10-12

    Pancreatic Acinar Cell Carcinoma; Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Intraductal Papillary-Mucinous Neoplasm; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer AJCC v6 and v7

  20. [Assessment of neoplastic pancreatic focal injury by multidetector computed tomography].

    PubMed

    Ramírez Gaspar, Alberto Motta; Morató López Alberto, Emilio; Valenzuela Tamaris, Jorge; Castillo González, Federico Armando

    2012-01-01

    pancreatic focal neoplastic lesions (PFNL) should be characterized through image methods to differentiate from no neoplastic lesions, suggesting one or more probable diagnosis, and staging of malignant lesions, in order to help define the estrategy of medial or surgical management. The multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) offers multiple properties and advantages that enable adequate characterization of the PFNL. The objective of this study is to evaluate de usefulness of MDCT in characterizing PFNL. a descriptive, retrospective caseseries study has been conducted. It consisted of reviewing MDCT studies in which PFNL were found, over a period of 4 years 11 months from January 2006 to November 2010. we obtained 54 cases of PFNL which were characterized by MDCT; 75.9% for a specific diagnosis, and were categorized as indeterminate 24.1%, considering more than one possible diagnosis. The most frequent PFNL type was pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma in 51.9%. Pancreatic cystic neoplasms accounted for 16.7%. MDCT is useful for identifying and characterizing LFNP, this means the possibility of establishing one or more diagnostic possibilities and guide medical management.

  1. Fine-needle aspiration diagnosis of high grade adenoid cystic carcinoma metastatic to the pancreas.

    PubMed

    David, Doina; Masineni, Sreeharsha N; Giorgadze, Tamar

    2015-02-01

    Pancreatic tumors are mostly primary tumors, with only rare metastatic tumors described in the literature. Here we report an unusual case of fine-needle aspiration (FNA) diagnosis of high grade adenoid cystic carcinoma of the parotid gland metastatic to the pancreas. The aspirate smears were moderately cellular and revealed numerous basaloid neoplastic cells. The cytomorphologic differential diagnosis included primary pancreatic tumor with small cell morphology as well as metastatic tumors. By immunocytochemistry, the tumor cells were positive for cytokeratins (AE1/AE3, CAM5.2, and CK7), and CD117 (C-KIT), and negative for CD45, WT1, synaptophysin, chromogranin, CD56, TTF-1, and CK20. The cytomorphologic features and immunoprofile in our case were consistent with high-grade carcinoma metastases from patient's known salivary gland primary. To the best of our knowledge, this case is the first reported encounter of FNA diagnosis of pancreatic metastasis with small cell morphology from a salivary gland neoplasm as primary site.

  2. The Cystic Fibrosis of Exocrine Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Wilschanski, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein is highly expressed in the pancreatic duct epithelia, and permits anions and water to enter the ductal lumen. This results in an increased volume of alkaline fluid allowing the highly concentrated proteins secreted by the acinar cells to remain in a soluble state. This work will expound on the pathophysiology and pathology caused by the malfunctioning CFTR protein with special reference to ion transport and acid-base abnormalities both in humans and animal models. We will also discuss the relationship between cystic fibrosis (CF) and pancreatitis, and outline present and potential therapeutic approaches in CF treatment relevant to the pancreas. PMID:23637307

  3. A rare case of bilateral cystic partially differentiated nephroblastoma recurring as bilateral cystic Wilms tumour.

    PubMed

    Kurian, Jujju Jacob; Ninan, Pradeep Joseph

    2015-04-15

    Childhood cystic partially differentiated nephroblastoma (CPDN) is an uncommon renal neoplasm. Bilateral CPDN or CPDN co-existing with a cystic nephroma/Wilms tumour is extremely rare. Treatment of CPDN is by complete surgical excision. Although local recurrences are uncommon, distant metastases have not been described. We present a case of bilateral CPDN that, after complete excision, recurred as bilateral cystic Wilms tumour. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case in the literature where a bilateral CPDN has recurred as bilateral Wilms tumour.

  4. PGE(2) in pancreatic cyst fluid helps differentiate IPMN from MCN and predict IPMN dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, C Max; Yip-Schneider, Michele T; Ralstin, Matthew C; Wentz, Sabrina; DeWitt, John; Sherman, Stuart; Howard, Thomas J; McHenry, Lee; Dutkevitch, Sarah; Goggins, Michael; Nakeeb, Attila; Lillemoe, Keith D

    2008-02-01

    Current management of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) according to recently published International Consensus Guidelines depends upon distinguishing it from mucinous cystic neoplasms (MCNs). We have previously shown that prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) is increased in pancreatic cancer tissue over normal controls. Thus, we hypothesized that PGE(2) level in pancreatic fluid differentiates IPMN and MCN and is a biomarker of IPMN dysplasia. Pancreatic fluid was collected in 65 patients at the time of endoscopy (EUS or ERCP) or operation (OR) and analyzed by PGE(2) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). PGE(2) level was correlated with surgical pathologic diagnosis and dysplastic stage. Mean PGE(2) level (pg/microl) in IPMNs (2.2 +/- 0.6) was greater than in MCNs (0.2 +/- 0.1) (p < 0.05). Mean PGE(2) level of IPMN by dysplastic stage was 0.1 +/- 0.01 (low grade), 1.2 +/- 0.6 (medium grade), 4.4 +/- 0.9 (high grade), and 5.0 +/- 2.3 (invasive). Among invasive IPMN, PGE(2) level dropped in advanced cases with pancreatic ductal obstruction by tumor (0.3 +/- 0) vs non-obstructed (8.6 +/- 2.9). PGE(2) level may help in distinguishing IPMN from MCN in patients with known mucinous lesions. PGE(2) level may also be an indicator of malignant progression of IPMN before ductal obstruction by tumor. Prospective evaluation will be necessary to evaluate the clinical role of PGE(2) level in pancreatic fluid.

  5. [Cystic fibrosis in 2008].

    PubMed

    Durieu, I; Josserand, R Nove

    2008-11-01

    To describe the epidemiological, physiopathological, clinical and therapeutic knowledge concerning cystic fibrosis (CF). Important modifications in the health organization of the care concerning this orphan disease have been implemented in France. The life expectancy has dramatically increased, as well as the knowledge concerning the pathological structure and function of the CFTR gene and protein. This will lead to the development of emerging drug treatments for this lethal disease. The life expectancy is predicted to exceed 40 years for children born in the 2000s. As a result, there has been a tremendous growth of the adult population that reached 40% of the overall approximately 5000 patients included in the CF French registry (Observatoire National de la Mucoviscidose). Lung disease remains the primary cause of morbidity and mortality. The characteristic phenotypic presentation associates bronchial and rhinosinusal symptoms, pancreatic insufficiency and liver disease. Bronchial damage leads to progressive chronic respiratory insufficiency. Diabetes mellitus and osteoporosis frequently appears in adulthood. Neonatal screening has been implemented in France since 2002. It will prevent delayed diagnosis and its deleterious consequences. Some atypical cases of CF presenting only with one or two organ system involvement can be diagnosed in adulthood. Isolated chronic rhinosinusitis, bronchiectasis, congenital bilateral absence of vas deferens, recurrent pancreatitis, allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, and some case of cholangitis may so revealed late form of cystic fibrosis. The health care is organized in cystic fibrosis centres. Despite gene discovery, treatment still remains symptomatic, based on intensive pulmonary and nutritional treatments. Challenges for new treatments are to correct the basic defect, either by gene therapy or by pharmacological modulation of the abnormal physiological processes.

  6. Hereditary pancreatic cancer: a clinical perspective.

    PubMed

    Greer, Julia B; Lynch, Henry T; Brand, Randall E

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an extraordinarily deadly disease and is responsible for over 220,000 deaths worldwide each year. One of the greatest risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer is a positive family history. Hereditary pancreatitis patients have a greatly elevated pancreatic cancer risk and individuals with cystic fibrosis may rarely develop this cancer, but often at very young ages. Various genetically linked cancer syndromes have been associated with pancreatic cancer in mutation-positive family members. Finally, familial pancreatic cancer-defined as families with two or more first-degree relatives who have pancreatic cancer but do not have a known cancer syndrome-is a known entity whose disease-causing mutation remains unidentified. This article describes research to date on hereditary pancreatic cancer, addresses how best clinicians should recognise hereditary forms of pancreatic cancer and explains the emotional burden of discovering a potentially lethal mutation. Many controversies and unanswered questions in hereditary pancreatic cancer remain.

  7. Cystic Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an inherited disease of the mucus and sweat glands. It affects mostly your lungs, pancreas, liver, intestines, sinuses, and sex organs. CF causes your mucus to be thick and sticky. ...

  8. Cystic hygroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... white blood cells. This material is called embryonic lymphatic tissue. After birth, a cystic hygroma most often ... 198. Tower RL II, Camitta BM. Abnormalities of lymphatic vessels. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St Geme ...

  9. Treatment Options for Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Chronic ...

  10. General Information about Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Myelodysplastic/ ...

  11. Treatment Option Overview (Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Chronic ...

  12. Treatment Options for Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Myelodysplastic/ ...

  13. Treatment Option Overview (Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Myelodysplastic/ ...

  14. General Information about Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Chronic ...

  15. Cystic fibrosis - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - cystic fibrosis ... The following organizations are good resources for information on cystic fibrosis : Cystic Fibrosis Foundation -- www.cff.org March of Dimes -- www.marchofdimes.org/baby/cystic-fibrosis-and- ...

  16. Diagnostic Approach to Eosinophilic Renal Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Kryvenko, Oleksandr N.; Jorda, Merce; Argani, Pedram; Epstein, Jonathan I.

    2015-01-01

    Context Eosinophilic renal neoplasms include a spectrum of solid and papillary tumors ranging from indolent benign oncocytoma to highly aggressive malignancies. Recognition of the correct nature of the tumor, especially in biopsy specimens, is paramount for patient management. Objective To review the diagnostic approach to eosinophilic renal neoplasms with light microscopy and ancillary techniques. Data Sources Review of the published literature and personal experience. Conclusions The following tumors are in the differential diagnosis of oncocytic renal cell neoplasm: oncocytoma, chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (RCC), hybrid tumor, tubulocystic carcinoma, papillary RCC, clear cell RCC with predominant eosinophilic cell morphology, follicular thyroid-like RCC, hereditary leiomyomatosis–associated RCC, acquired cystic disease–associated RCC, rhabdoid RCC, microphthalmia transcription factor translocation RCC, epithelioid angiomyolipoma, and unclassified RCC. In low-grade nonpapillary eosinophilic neoplasms, distinction between oncocytoma and low-grade RCC mostly rests on histomorphology; however, cytokeratin 7 immunostain may be helpful. In high-grade nonpapillary lesions, there is more of a role for ancillary techniques, including immunohistochemistry for cytokeratin 7, CA9, CD10, racemase, HMB45, and Melan-A. In papillary eosinophilic neoplasms, it is important to distinguish sporadic type 2 papillary RCC from microphthalmia transcription factor translocation and hereditary leiomyomatosis–associated RCC. Histologic and cytologic features along with immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization tests for TFE3 (Xp11.2) and TFEB [t(6;11)] are reliable confirmatory tests. Eosinophilic epithelial neoplasms with architecture, cytology, and/or immunoprofile not qualifying for either of the established types of RCC should be classified as unclassified eosinophilic RCC and arbitrarily assigned a grade (low or high). PMID:25357116

  17. Japan Pancreatic Cancer Registry; 30th year anniversary: Japan Pancreas Society.

    PubMed

    Egawa, Shinichi; Toma, Hiroki; Ohigashi, Hiroaki; Okusaka, Takuji; Nakao, Akimasa; Hatori, Takashi; Maguchi, Hiroyuki; Yanagisawa, Akio; Tanaka, Masao

    2012-10-01

    Since 1981, the Japan Pancreas Society has been hosting a nationwide pancreatic cancer registry. To commemorate its 30th anniversary, we review its history and latest achievement. During 3 decades, more than 350 leading institutions in Japan contributed voluntarily to register and periodic follow-up. The registry was modified to protect privacy by encrypting and hash algorithm. From 1981 to 2007, 32,619 cumulative records were analyzed. The overall survival of invasive cancer was improved significantly. More patients with earlier stage or with intraductal and cystic neoplasms underwent resection. The strongest prognostic factor of Union for International Cancer Control (UICC) stage IIA and IIB tubular adenocarcinoma in the pancreatic head was histological grade, followed by tumor size, extent of lymph node dissection, and postoperative chemotherapy. The 5-year survival rate of Union for International Cancer Control stage 0 reached 85%. The improvement of survival of patients with invasive cancer in Japan can be attributed to the introduction of effective chemotherapies, regionalization, and the earlier diagnosis and treatment. Simple definition of "early pancreatic cancer" is needed. At the 30th year anniversary, the Japan Pancreas Society nationwide pancreatic cancer registry is more shining than ever for current perspectives and for future diagnostic and treatment tactics.

  18. [Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas, IPMN].

    PubMed

    Sirén, Jukka

    2013-01-01

    With the development and increasing use of imaging techniques, intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) is being detected with increasing frequency. Two forms of the disease are distinguished, the rare main duct form and the common accessory pancreatic duct form. The former often progresses to malignancy, the latter only seldom. The mixed form of IPMN exhibits features of both forms. In main duct IPMN, mucin production obstructs the pancreatic duct causing its dilatation and often symptoms typical of chronic pancreatitis. Main duct IPMN is always an indication for surgery, whereas monitoring is often sufficient for side duct IPMN.

  19. Cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Ratjen, Felix; Bell, Scott C; Rowe, Steven M; Goss, Christopher H; Quittner, Alexandra L; Bush, Andrew

    2015-05-14

    Cystic fibrosis is an autosomal recessive, monogenetic disorder caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. The gene defect was first described 25 years ago and much progress has been made since then in our understanding of how CFTR mutations cause disease and how this can be addressed therapeutically. CFTR is a transmembrane protein that transports ions across the surface of epithelial cells. CFTR dysfunction affects many organs; however, lung disease is responsible for the vast majority of morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis. Prenatal diagnostics, newborn screening and new treatment algorithms are changing the incidence and the prevalence of the disease. Until recently, the standard of care in cystic fibrosis treatment focused on preventing and treating complications of the disease; now, novel treatment strategies directly targeting the ion channel abnormality are becoming available and it will be important to evaluate how these treatments affect disease progression and the quality of life of patients. In this Primer, we summarize the current knowledge, and provide an outlook on how cystic fibrosis clinical care and research will be affected by new knowledge and therapeutic options in the near future. For an illustrated summary of this Primer, visit: http://go.nature.com/4VrefN.

  20. Hereditary Pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... meals throughout the day that are high in carbohydrates and low in protein and fat. Pancreatic enzymes ... the Pancreas NPF Centers Pancreatitis Centers Pancreatitis Center Application Pancreatic Cancer Centers Diagnosis of Pancreatic Cancer Pancreas ...

  1. Utilization of Ancillary Studies in the Cytologic Diagnosis of Biliary and Pancreatic Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Layfield, Lester J.; Ehya, Hormoz; Filie, Armando C.; Hruban, Ralph H.; Jhala, Nirag; Joseph, Loren; Vielh, Philippe; Pitman, Martha B.

    2015-01-01

    The Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology has developed a set of guidelines for pancreatobiliary cytology including indications for endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration, terminology and nomenclature of pancreatobiliary disease, ancillary testing, and post-biopsy management. All documents are based on the expertise of the authors, a review of the literature, discussions of the draft document at several national and international meetings, and synthesis of selected online comments of the draft document. This document presents the results of these discussions regarding the use of ancillary testing in the cytologic diagnosis of biliary and pancreatic lesions. Currently, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) appears to be the most clinically relevant ancillary technique for cytology of bile duct strictures. The addition of FISH analysis to routine cytologic evaluation appears to yield the highest sensitivity without loss in specificity. Loss of immunohistochemical staining for the protein product of the SMAD4 gene and positive staining for mesothelin support a diagnosis of ductal adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemical markers for endocrine and exocrine differentiation are sufficient for a diagnosis of endocrine and acinar tumors. Nuclear staining for beta-catenin supports a diagnosis of solid-pseudopapilary neoplasm. Cyst fluid analysis for amylase and carcinoembryonic antigen aids in the preoperative classification of pancreatic cysts. Many gene mutations (KRAS, GNAS, VHL, RNF43, and CTNNB1) may be of aid in the diagnosis of cystic neoplasms. Other ancillary techniques do not appear to improve diagnostic sensitivity sufficiently to justify their increased costs. PMID:24639398

  2. Intraductal tubular neoplasms of the pancreas: an overview.

    PubMed

    Chelliah, Adeline; Kalimuthu, Sangeetha; Chetty, Runjan

    2016-10-01

    Intraductal lesions of the pancreas are an uncommon but increasingly recognized group of entities mainly because of advances in imaging technology. In the past, precise categorization and understanding of true pancreatic intraduct neoplasms were hampered not only by their relative rarity but also because of the plethora of terminology and criteria used in nomenclature and diagnosis. Although significant progress has been made in the characterization of some of these lesions, as exemplified by intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, understanding of the rare intraductal tubular adenoma (ITA) and intraduct tubular carcinoma (ITC) continues to evolve. By definition, these are a group of intraductal, radiologically detectable neoplasms that can progress to or be associated with invasive adenocarcinoma and, as such, are precursor lesions to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Their often shared clinical and radiological features make precise histological diagnosis essential for appropriate management and optimal outcome. We provide an overview of these neoplasms and highlight recent developments in the understanding of ITA and ITC which have led to ITA being considered a variant of gastric-type intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms and ITC being encompassed within the intraductal tubulopapillary neoplasm category. We also emphasize the distinguishing histological features to aid diagnosis of these rare lesions.

  3. Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan CSPG4 as a novel hypoxia-sensitive marker in pancreatic tumors.

    PubMed

    Keleg, Shereen; Titov, Alexandr; Heller, Anette; Giese, Thomas; Tjaden, Christine; Ahmad, Sufian S; Gaida, Matthias M; Bauer, Andrea S; Werner, Jens; Giese, Nathalia A

    2014-01-01

    CSPG4 marks pericytes, undifferentiated precursors and tumor cells. We assessed whether the shed ectodomain of CSPG4 (sCSPG4) might circulate and reflect potential changes in CSPG4 tissue expression (pCSPG4) due to desmoplastic and malignant aberrations occurring in pancreatic tumors. Serum sCSPG4 was measured using ELISA in test (n = 83) and validation (n = 221) cohorts comprising donors (n = 11+26) and patients with chronic pancreatitis (n = 11+20) or neoplasms: benign (serous cystadenoma SCA, n = 13+20), premalignant (intraductal dysplastic IPMNs, n = 9+55), and malignant (IPMN-associated invasive carcinomas, n = 4+14; ductal adenocarcinomas, n = 35+86). Pancreatic pCSPG4 expression was evaluated using qRT-PCR (n = 139), western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. sCSPG4 was found in circulation, but its level was significantly lower in pancreatic patients than in donors. Selective maintenance was observed in advanced IPMNs and PDACs and showed a nodal association while lacking prognostic relevance. Pancreatic pCSPG4 expression was preserved or elevated, whereby neoplastic cells lacked pCSPG4 or tended to overexpress without shedding. Extreme pancreatic overexpression, membranous exposure and tissue(high)/sera(low)-discordance highlighted stroma-poor benign cystic neoplasm. SCA is known to display hypoxic markers and coincide with von-Hippel-Lindau and Peutz-Jeghers syndromes, in which pVHL and LBK1 mutations affect hypoxic signaling pathways. In vitro testing confined pCSPG4 overexpression to normal mesenchymal but not epithelial cells, and a third of tested carcinoma cell lines; however, only the latter showed pCSPG4-responsiveness to chronic hypoxia. siRNA-based knockdowns failed to reduce the malignant potential of either normoxic or hypoxic cells. Thus, overexpression of the newly established conditional hypoxic indicator, CSPG4, is apparently non-pathogenic in pancreatic malignancies but might mark distinct

  4. Chondroitin Sulfate Proteoglycan CSPG4 as a Novel Hypoxia-Sensitive Marker in Pancreatic Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Keleg, Shereen; Titov, Alexandr; Heller, Anette; Giese, Thomas; Tjaden, Christine; Ahmad, Sufian S.; Gaida, Matthias M.; Bauer, Andrea S.; Werner, Jens; Giese, Nathalia A.

    2014-01-01

    CSPG4 marks pericytes, undifferentiated precursors and tumor cells. We assessed whether the shed ectodomain of CSPG4 (sCSPG4) might circulate and reflect potential changes in CSPG4 tissue expression (pCSPG4) due to desmoplastic and malignant aberrations occurring in pancreatic tumors. Serum sCSPG4 was measured using ELISA in test (n = 83) and validation (n = 221) cohorts comprising donors (n = 11+26) and patients with chronic pancreatitis (n = 11+20) or neoplasms: benign (serous cystadenoma SCA, n = 13+20), premalignant (intraductal dysplastic IPMNs, n = 9+55), and malignant (IPMN-associated invasive carcinomas, n = 4+14; ductal adenocarcinomas, n = 35+86). Pancreatic pCSPG4 expression was evaluated using qRT-PCR (n = 139), western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. sCSPG4 was found in circulation, but its level was significantly lower in pancreatic patients than in donors. Selective maintenance was observed in advanced IPMNs and PDACs and showed a nodal association while lacking prognostic relevance. Pancreatic pCSPG4 expression was preserved or elevated, whereby neoplastic cells lacked pCSPG4 or tended to overexpress without shedding. Extreme pancreatic overexpression, membranous exposure and tissuehigh/seralow-discordance highlighted stroma-poor benign cystic neoplasm. SCA is known to display hypoxic markers and coincide with von-Hippel-Lindau and Peutz-Jeghers syndromes, in which pVHL and LBK1 mutations affect hypoxic signaling pathways. In vitro testing confined pCSPG4 overexpression to normal mesenchymal but not epithelial cells, and a third of tested carcinoma cell lines; however, only the latter showed pCSPG4-responsiveness to chronic hypoxia. siRNA-based knockdowns failed to reduce the malignant potential of either normoxic or hypoxic cells. Thus, overexpression of the newly established conditional hypoxic indicator, CSPG4, is apparently non-pathogenic in pancreatic malignancies but might mark distinct epithelial

  5. Genomic Landscapes of Pancreatic Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Laura D.; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a deadly disease with a dismal prognosis. However, recent advances in sequencing and bioinformatic technology have led to the systematic characterization of the genomes of all major tumor types in the pancreas. This characterization has revealed the unique genomic landscape of each tumor type. This knowledge will pave the way for improved diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to pancreatic tumors that take advantage of the genetic alterations in these neoplasms. PMID:25812653

  6. Cystic choroid plexus papilloma in the cavum septum pellucidum.

    PubMed

    Tuchman, Alexander; Kalhorn, Stephen P; Mikolaenko, Irina; Wisoff, Jeffrey H

    2009-12-01

    A choroid plexus papilloma is a rare CNS neoplasm arising from the neuroepithelial lining of the choroid plexus. A third ventricular location of a choroid plexus papilloma is rare compared with the more common sites in the lateral and fourth ventricles. Cystic choroid plexus papilloma represents an infrequent subtype that may present diagnostic ambiguity. The authors present a case of cystic choroid plexus papilloma within a cavum septum pellucidum that radiographically mimicked neurocysticercosis.

  7. Cystic fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... cannot be prevented. Screening those with a family history of the disease may detect the CF gene in many carriers. Alternative ... FJ. Cystic fibrosis. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap ...

  8. Diffuse Cystic Lung Disease. Part I

    PubMed Central

    Vassallo, Robert; Wikenheiser-Brokamp, Kathryn A.; McCormack, Francis X.

    2015-01-01

    The diffuse cystic lung diseases (DCLDs) are a group of pathophysiologically heterogenous processes that are characterized by the presence of multiple spherical or irregularly shaped, thin-walled, air-filled spaces within the pulmonary parenchyma. Although the mechanisms of cyst formation remain incompletely defined for all DCLDs, in most cases lung remodeling associated with inflammatory or infiltrative processes results in displacement, destruction, or replacement of alveolar septa, distal airways, and small vessels within the secondary lobules of the lung. The DCLDs can be broadly classified according to underlying etiology as those caused by low-grade or high-grade metastasizing neoplasms, polyclonal or monoclonal lymphoproliferative disorders, infections, interstitial lung diseases, smoking, and congenital or developmental defects. In the first of a two-part series, we present an overview of the cystic lung diseases caused by neoplasms, infections, smoking-related diseases, and interstitial lung diseases, with a focus on lymphangioleiomyomatosis and pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis. PMID:25906089

  9. Diffuse Cystic Lung Disease. Part I.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Nishant; Vassallo, Robert; Wikenheiser-Brokamp, Kathryn A; McCormack, Francis X

    2015-06-15

    The diffuse cystic lung diseases (DCLDs) are a group of pathophysiologically heterogenous processes that are characterized by the presence of multiple spherical or irregularly shaped, thin-walled, air-filled spaces within the pulmonary parenchyma. Although the mechanisms of cyst formation remain incompletely defined for all DCLDs, in most cases lung remodeling associated with inflammatory or infiltrative processes results in displacement, destruction, or replacement of alveolar septa, distal airways, and small vessels within the secondary lobules of the lung. The DCLDs can be broadly classified according to underlying etiology as those caused by low-grade or high-grade metastasizing neoplasms, polyclonal or monoclonal lymphoproliferative disorders, infections, interstitial lung diseases, smoking, and congenital or developmental defects. In the first of a two-part series, we present an overview of the cystic lung diseases caused by neoplasms, infections, smoking-related diseases, and interstitial lung diseases, with a focus on lymphangioleiomyomatosis and pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis.

  10. [Chronic pancreatitis, acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Mabuchi, T; Katada, N; Nishimura, D; Hoshino, H; Shimizu, F; Suzuki, R; Sano, H; Kato, K

    1998-11-01

    MRCP has been recognized as a safe and noninvasive diagnostic method. In the present study we evaluated the usefulness of MRCP in diagnosis of chronic and acute pancreatitis. Two-dimensional fast asymmetric spin-echo (FASE) MRCP was performed in 40 patients with chronic pancreatitis and 13 with acute pancreatitis. In 29 patients (72.5%) with chronic pancreatitis and 9 (66.7%) with acute pancreatitis, main pancreatic duct (MPD) was visualized entirely. MRCP could demonstrate the characteristic findings of chronic pancreatitis such as dilatation and irregularity of MPD in most cases. In acute pancreatitis, MRCP indicated that MPD was normal in diameter, but irregular in configuration compared with that of the control group. MRCP may facilitate the diagnosis of chronic and acute pancreatitis.

  11. Cystic fibrosis in Uruguay.

    PubMed

    Luzardo, Gerardo; Aznarez, Isabel; Crispino, Beatriz; Mimbacas, Adriana; Martínez, Liria; Poggio, Rossana; Zielenski, Julian; Tsui, Lap-Chee; Cardoso, Horacio

    2002-03-31

    We conducted clinical and genetic analyses of 52 cystic fibrosis (CF) patients in Uruguay, which is about half of the known affected individuals in the country. A relatively high proportion had a mild presentation, characterized by pancreatic sufficiency (28%), a strong pulmonary component (97%), and borderline sweat electrolyte measurements (25%). Mutational analysis of CF chromosomes demonstrated a relatively low incidence of the DeltaF508 allele (40%) and a large number of other cystic fibrosis conductance regulator mutations, with an overall detection rate of about 71%. Fifteen different mutations were detected in our patients: DeltaF508, G542X, R1162X, G85E, N1303K, R334W, R75Q, R74W, D1270N, W1282X, DeltaI507, 2789+5G-->A, R1066C, -816C/T, R553X, as well as RNA splicing variant IVS8-5T. This group of Uruguayan CF patients has some characteristics in common with other populations of similar origin (Hispanics), as well as some unique characteristics.

  12. Pyruvate Kinase M2 and Lactate Dehydrogenase A Are Overexpressed in Pancreatic Cancer and Correlate with Poor Outcome.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Goran Hamid; Olde Damink, S W M; Malago, Massimo; Dhar, Dipok Kumar; Pereira, Stephen P

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has a 5-year survival rate of less than 4%. Despite advances in diagnostic technology, pancreatic cancer continues to be diagnosed at a late and incurable stage. Accurate biomarkers for early diagnosis and to predict treatment response are urgently needed. Since alteration of glucose metabolism is one of the hallmarks of cancer cells, we proposed that pyruvate kinase type M2 (M2PK) and lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA) enzymes could represent novel diagnostic markers and potential therapeutic targets in pancreatic cancer. In 266 tissue sections from normal pancreas, pancreatic cystic neoplasms, pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and cancer, we evaluated the expression of PKM2, LDHA, Ki-67 and CD8+ by immunohistochemistry and correlated these markers with clinicopathological characteristics and patient survival. PKM2 and LDHA expression was also assessed by Western blot in 10 human pancreatic cancer cell lines. PKM2 expression increased progressively from cyst through PanIN to cancer, whereas LDHA was overexpressed throughout the carcinogenic process. All but one cell line showed high expression of both proteins. Patients with strong PKM2 and LDHA expression had significantly worse survival than those with weak PKM2 and/or LDHA expression (7.0 months vs. 27.9 months, respectively, p = 0.003, log rank test). The expression of both PKM2 and LDHA correlated directly with Ki-67 expression, and inversely with intratumoral CD8+ cell count. PKM2 was significantly overexpressed in poorly differentiated tumours and both PKM2 and LDHA were overexpressed in larger tumours. Multivariable analysis showed that combined expression of PKM2 and LDHA was an independent poor prognostic marker for survival. In conclusion, our results demonstrate a high expression pattern of two major glycolytic enzymes during pancreatic carcinogenesis, with increased expression in aggressive tumours and a significant adverse effect on survival.

  13. The role of laparoscopy and laparoscopic ultrasound in the diagnosis of cystic lesions of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Schachter, Pinhas P; Shimonov, Mordechai; Czerniak, Abraham

    2002-10-01

    With the widespread use of advanced imaging techniques, cystic lesions of the pancreas are now diagnosed relatively frequently. The nature of these lesions vary from benign cysts (serous cvstadenoma) or an inflammatory process (pseudocyst), to premalignant (mucinous cystadenoma) or frankly malignant lesions (cystadenocarcinoma). Differentiation of various types of pancreatic cysts presents a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge, as clinical presentation may be vague. Laparoscopic ultrasonography (LAPUS), the biopsy of the cystic wall, and analysis of the cystic aspirate, although expensive and rather invasive procedures, significantly contribute to the differential diagnosis of pancreatic cystic lesions.

  14. Ct-Guided Pancreatic Percutaneous Fine-needle Biopsy in Differential Diagnosis Between Pancreatic Cancer and Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Zerbi, Alessandro; Parolini, Danilo; Sironi, Sandro; Vanzulli, Angelo; Staudacher, Carlo; Faravelli, Agostino; Garancini, Paola; del Maschio, Alessandro; di Carlo, Valerio

    1989-01-01

    Differential diagnosis between pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis is still difficult to establish. In 63 patients with suspected pancreatic neoplasm we performed: serum CA 19-9 assessment, abdominal ultrasound, CT scan and CT-guided pancreatic percutaneous fine-needle biopsy. The conclusive diagnosis was pancreatic cancer in 40 patients and chronic pancreatitis in 23 patients. With regard to the differential diagnosis, sensitivity and specificity were respectively 80% and 78% for serum CA 19-9, 75% and 65% for abdominal US, 85% and 70% for CT scan, 00% and 87% for percutaneous fine-needle biopsy. We conclude that CT-guided percutaneous fine-needle biopsy is the most reliable method for differential diagnosis between pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis. PMID:2487070

  15. Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Buccal Mucosa: A Case Report with Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    S, Vidyalakshmi; R, Aravindhan

    2014-01-01

    Minor salivary gland neoplasms of the buccal mucosa are relatively uncommon. Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC), a well-defined entity, occurs most of the times in the parotid, submandibular glands and palate, as far as the intraoral site is concerned. Adenoid cystic carcinoma tends to have an indolent, extended clinical course with wide local infiltration and late distant metastases. We are presenting a case of an adenoid cystic carcinoma of the buccal mucosa in a 48-year-old female patient. PMID:24783155

  16. Simultaneous intraductal papillary neoplasms of the bile duct and pancreas treated with chemoradiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Valente, Roberto; Capurso, Gabriele; Pierantognetti, Paola; Iannicelli, Elsa; Piciucchi, Matteo; Romiti, Adriana; Mercantini, Paolo; Larghi, Alberto; Federici, Giulia Francesca; Barucca, Viola; Osti, Maria Falchetto; Di Giulio, Emilio; Ziparo, Vincenzo; Delle Fave, Gianfranco

    2012-01-01

    Some authors have suggested that intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the bile duct (IPMN-B) could be the the biliary counterpart of IPMN of the pancreas (IPMN-P) since they share several clinical-pathological features. These include prominent intraductal papillary proliferation pattern, a gastrointestinal phenotype, frequent mucin hyper-secretion and progression to mucinous carcinoma. To date there are just four reported cases of patients with synchronous IPMN-B and IPMN-P all of which were treated surgically. We hereby report the case of a 76-year-old woman who was incidentally diagnosed with both an asymptomatic 3 cm bulky fluid lesion obstructing the bile duct lumen, diagnosed as a malignant IPMN-B, and synchronous multiple pancreatic cystic lesions (10-13 mm) communicating with an irregular Wirsung, diagnosed as branch duct IPMN-P. Since surgery was ruled-out because of the patient’s age and preferences, she underwent a conservative management regimen comprising both chemotherapy and radiotherapy. This was effective in decreasing the mass size and in resolving subsequent jaundice. This is also the first reported case of IPMN-B successfully treated with chemoradiotherapy. Clinicians should consider medical treatment as an option in this clinical scenario, in patients who may be unfit for surgery. PMID:22403738

  17. Diabetes mellitus and bone disease in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Curran, David R; McArdle, John R; Talwalkar, Jaideep S

    2009-10-01

    Patients with cystic fibrosis are frequently affected with pancreatic insufficiency and are predisposed to the development of diabetes mellitus (DM) and bone demineralization. Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes mellitus is a clinical entity distinct from type 1 and type 2 diabetes, with important implications for the nutritional and pulmonary health of cystic fibrosis patients. This form of diabetes owes largely to insulin deficiency, but alterations in insulin sensitivity and hepatic glucose production have also been described. Therapy for cystic fibrosis-related diabetes differs substantially from type 2 DM, with careful attention to prandial glycemic excursions crucial to controlling its metabolic effects. Bone disease, including osteopenia and osteoporosis, also occurs with increased frequency in cystic fibrosis, owing to defects in intestinal absorption, chronic inflammation, lung disease, low body weight, and gonadal dysfunction. The pathogenesis, implications, diagnosis, and therapy of cystic fibrosis-related bone demineralization are discussed, with attention to recommended approaches to prevention of and treatment of established bone disease.

  18. Recent Progress in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Herman, Joseph M.; Laheru, Daniel A.; Klein, Alison P.; Erdek, Michael A.; Fishman, Elliot K.; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is currently one of the deadliest of the solid malignancies. However, surgery to resect neoplasms of the pancreas is safer and less invasive than ever, novel drug combinations have been shown to improve survival, advances in radiation therapy have resulted in less toxicity, and enormous strides have been made in our understanding of the fundamental genetics of pancreatic cancer. These advances provide hope but they also increase the complexity of caring for patients. It is clear that multidisciplinary care that provides comprehensive and coordinated evaluation and treatment is the most effective way to manage patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:23856911

  19. What Causes Cystic Fibrosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Cystic Fibrosis? A defect in the CFTR gene causes cystic ... in the severity of the disease. How Is Cystic Fibrosis Inherited? Every person inherits two CFTR genes—one ...

  20. CT characteristics of primary retroperitoneal neoplasms in children.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yufeng; Wang, Jichen; Peng, Yun; Zeng, Jinjin

    2010-09-01

    Primary retroperitoneal neoplasms are uncommon in children. Retroperitoneal neoplasms are either mesodermal, neurogenic, germ cell ectodermal or lymphatic in origin. In general, primary retroperitoneal neoplasms in children have different spectrum and prevalence compared to those in adults. Neuroblastoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, benign teratoma and lymphoma are the common retroperitoneal neoplasms. In this review, the clinical and CT futures of common retroperitoneal neoplasms in children are described. Coarse, amorphous, and mottled calcification are very common in neuroblastoma. Paraganglioma tends to show marked and early enhancement and may present with clinical symptoms associated with the excess catecholamine. Sarcomas are often very large and have heterogeneous appearance. Imaging cannot be reliably used to identify the type of retroperitoneal sarcomas due to overlapped radiographic features. In children, lipoblastoma is the most common lipomatous tumor in the retroperitoneum. The percentage of visible fat in tumor varies depending on the cellular composition of the lesion. The CT characteristics of teratoma are quite variable, which may be cystic, solid, on a combination of both. Typically teratoma appears as a large complex mass containing fluid, fat, fat-fluid level, and calcifications. Lymphoma is often homogeneous on both enhanced and unenhanced CT scans. Necrosis and calcification are rare on CT. In conclusion, making a final histological diagnosis of retroperitoneal tumor base on CT features is not often possible; however, CT can help to develop a differential diagnosis and determine the size and extent of the retroperitoneal neoplasms.

  1. Rare case of adult pancreatic hemangioma and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Tao; Yang, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic hemangiomas are a rare type of cystic tumor, with very few cases reported in the literature. Herein, we present the case of a 28-year-old woman who was admitted to our hospital for abdominal pain. A physical examination failed to reveal any abnormalities that could explain her symptoms. A contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed a multilocular cyst with moderately enhanced septa and fluid-fluid levels in the body and tail of the pancreas. A serous cystadenoma or pseudocyst of the pancreas was initially suspected, and the patient underwent a subtotal pancreatectomy and splenectomy. The pathologic diagnosis was a pancreatic hemangioma. This is the second case of pancreatic hemangioma with fluid-fluid levels reported in the literature. Upon imaging, the presentation of this tumor can resemble serous or mucinous cystadenomas, pseudocysts of the pancreas, and side-branch type intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms. This report reviews the clinical symptoms, radiologic features, pathologic characteristics, differential diagnoses, and treatment of this rare lesion type. PMID:26290651

  2. Endocrine Disorders in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Blackman, Scott M; Tangpricha, Vin

    2016-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis is frequently complicated by endocrine disorders. Diabetes can be expected to affect most with CF and pancreatic insufficiency and varies widely in age of onset, but early identification and treatment improve morbidity and mortality. Short stature can be exacerbated by relative delay of puberty and by use of inhaled corticosteroids. Bone disease in CF causes fragility fractures and should be assessed by monitoring bone mineral density and optimizing vitamin D status. Detecting and managing endocrine complications in CF can reduce morbidity and mortality in CF. These complications can be expected to become more common as the CF population ages. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Pancreatitis - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic pancreatitis - discharge; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - discharge; Acute pancreatitis - discharge ... fluids through an intravenous (IV) tube in your vein and nutrition through a feeding tube or IV. ...

  4. Hereditary Pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Donate E-News Sign-Up Home Hereditary Pancreatitis Hereditary Pancreatitis Hereditary Pancreatitis (HP) is a rare genetic condition characterized ... at least 1,000 individuals are affected with hereditary pancreatitis. HP has also been linked to an ...

  5. Morphological and immunohistochemical characterization of spontaneous thyroid gland neoplasms in guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus).

    PubMed

    Gibbons, P M; Garner, M M; Kiupel, M

    2013-03-01

    Reports of thyroid gland neoplasms in guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus) are rare, but thyroid tumors are among the most common neoplasms seen in cases submitted to Northwest ZooPath. This report describes the histological and immunohistochemical characteristics of thyroid neoplasms and lists the concurrent conditions found in guinea pig cases submitted to Northwest ZooPath during 1998 to 2008. Of 526 guinea pig case submissions, 19 had thyroid neoplasms. The most common clinical findings included a palpable mass on the ventral neck and progressive weight loss. Neoplasms were removed as an excisional biopsy from 7 guinea pigs, and 3 of these animals died within a few days after surgery. Radiographic mineral density was detected in 2 masses. Five of the neoplasms were reported as cystic; 5 were black or a dark color. Histologically, the neoplasms were classified as macrofollicular thyroid adenoma (8), thyroid cystadenoma (1), papillary thyroid adenoma (3), follicular thyroid carcinoma (5), follicular-compact thyroid carcinoma (1), and small-cell thyroid carcinoma (1). Osseous metaplasia was present in 8 neoplasms, and myeloid hyperplasia was present in 1 neoplasm. All 19 neoplasms were positive for thyroid transcription factor 1 and thyroglobulin but negative for parathyroid hormone and calcitonin. Numerous concurrent diseases, including hepatopathies, cardiomyopathies, and nephropathies, were present and considered to be the cause of death in many cases. Research is needed to determine the appropriate modalities for antemortem diagnosis and treatment and whether thyroid disease plays a role in the pathogenesis of chronic degenerative diseases in guinea pigs.

  6. [Surgical management of chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Regimbeau, Jean-Marc; Dumont, Frédéric; Yzet, Thierry; Chatelain, Denis; Bartoli, Eacute Ric; Brazier, Franck; Bréhant, Olivier; Dupas, Jean-Louis; Mauvais, François; Delcenserie, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Surgical indications for chronic pancreatitis can be schematically separated into five main groups: pain, effects of fibrosis on adjacent organs, the consequences of main pancreatic duct rupture above an obstruction, and suspected cancer. Finally surgery is also indicated in patients who cannot undergo endoscopic procedures (no accessible papilla) or who have too recently undergone this procedure. Surgical procedures include derivation (pancreatic, cystic, biliary) or mixed procedures combining derivation/resection or pancreatic resection. Finally splanchnicectomy can be discussed. Whatever the indication, surgical treatment must meet several goals: the approach to surgery must be multidisciplinary, surgery must be associated with low morbidity and mortality, preserve as much endocrine function as possible, improve quality of life, and be evaluated in the long term, as well as prospectively if possible. We clarify some important points about the management of patients with chronic pancreatitis before discussing the various treatments in detail.

  7. Glycomic and Proteomic Profiling of Pancreatic Cyst Fluids Identifies Hyperfucosylated Lactosamines on the N-linked Glycans of Overexpressed Glycoproteins*

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Benjamin F.; Goetz, John A.; House, Michael G.; Schmidt, C. Max; Novotny, Milos V.

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is now the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States, and it is associated with an alarmingly low 5-year survival rate of 5%. However, a patient's prognosis is considerably improved when the malignant lesions are identified at an early stage of the disease and removed by surgical resection. Unfortunately, the absence of a practical screening strategy and clinical diagnostic test for identifying premalignant lesions within the pancreas often prevents early detection of pancreatic cancer. To aid in the development of a molecular screening system for early detection of the disease, we have performed glycomic and glycoproteomic profiling experiments on 21 pancreatic cyst fluid samples, including fluids from mucinous cystic neoplasms and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, two types of mucinous cysts that are considered high risk to undergo malignant transformation. A total of 80 asparagine-linked (N-linked) glycans, including high mannose and complex structures, were identified. Of special interest was a series of complex N-linked glycans containing two to six fucose residues, located predominantly as substituents on β-lactosamine extensions. Following the observation of these “hyperfucosylated” glycans, bottom-up proteomics experiments utilizing a label-free quantitative approach were applied to the investigation of two sets of tryptically digested proteins derived from the cyst fluids: 1) all soluble proteins in the raw samples and 2) a subproteome of the soluble cyst fluid proteins that were selectively enriched for fucosylation through the use of surface-immobilized Aleuria aurantia lectin. A comparative analysis of these two proteomic data sets identified glycoproteins that were significantly enriched by lectin affinity. Several candidate glycoproteins that appear hyperfucosylated were identified, including triacylglycerol lipase and pancreatic α-amylase, which were 20- and 22-fold more abundant, respectively

  8. Glycomic and proteomic profiling of pancreatic cyst fluids identifies hyperfucosylated lactosamines on the N-linked glycans of overexpressed glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Mann, Benjamin F; Goetz, John A; House, Michael G; Schmidt, C Max; Novotny, Milos V

    2012-07-01

    Pancreatic cancer is now the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States, and it is associated with an alarmingly low 5-year survival rate of 5%. However, a patient's prognosis is considerably improved when the malignant lesions are identified at an early stage of the disease and removed by surgical resection. Unfortunately, the absence of a practical screening strategy and clinical diagnostic test for identifying premalignant lesions within the pancreas often prevents early detection of pancreatic cancer. To aid in the development of a molecular screening system for early detection of the disease, we have performed glycomic and glycoproteomic profiling experiments on 21 pancreatic cyst fluid samples, including fluids from mucinous cystic neoplasms and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, two types of mucinous cysts that are considered high risk to undergo malignant transformation. A total of 80 asparagine-linked (N-linked) glycans, including high mannose and complex structures, were identified. Of special interest was a series of complex N-linked glycans containing two to six fucose residues, located predominantly as substituents on β-lactosamine extensions. Following the observation of these "hyperfucosylated" glycans, bottom-up proteomics experiments utilizing a label-free quantitative approach were applied to the investigation of two sets of tryptically digested proteins derived from the cyst fluids: 1) all soluble proteins in the raw samples and 2) a subproteome of the soluble cyst fluid proteins that were selectively enriched for fucosylation through the use of surface-immobilized Aleuria aurantia lectin. A comparative analysis of these two proteomic data sets identified glycoproteins that were significantly enriched by lectin affinity. Several candidate glycoproteins that appear hyperfucosylated were identified, including triacylglycerol lipase and pancreatic α-amylase, which were 20- and 22-fold more abundant, respectively, following A

  9. Imaging features of myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Murphy, I G; Mitchell, E L; Raso-Barnett, L; Godfrey, A L; Godfrey, E M

    2017-10-01

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are a heterogeneous group of haematological disorders including polycythaemia vera (PV), essential thrombocythaemia (ET), primary myelofibrosis (PMF), and chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML). These disorders show large overlap in genetic and clinical presentations, and can have many different imaging manifestations. Unusual thromboses, embolic events throughout the systemic or pulmonary vasculature, or osseous findings can often be clues to the underlying disease. There is limited literature about the imaging features of these disorders, and this may result in under-diagnosis. Multiple treatments are available for symptom control, and the development of multiple new pharmacological inhibitors has significantly improved morbidity and prognosis. Knowledge of these conditions may enable the radiologist to suggest an MPN as a possible underlying cause for certain imaging findings, particularly unexplained splanchnic venous thrombosis, i.e. in the absence of chronic liver disease or pancreatitis. The aim of the present review is to outline using examples the different categories of MPN and illustrate the variety of radiological findings associated with these diseases. Copyright © 2017 The Royal College of Radiologists. All rights reserved.

  10. Myeloid neoplasms with eosinophilia.

    PubMed

    Reiter, Andreas; Gotlib, Jason

    2017-02-09

    Molecular diagnostics has generated substantial dividends in dissecting the genetic basis of myeloid neoplasms with eosinophilia. The family of diseases generated by dysregulated fusion tyrosine kinase (TK) genes is recognized by the World Health Organization (WHO) category, "Myeloid/lymphoid neoplasms with eosinophilia and rearrangement of PDGFRA, PDGFRB, or FGFR1, or with PCM1-JAK2" In addition to myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN), these patients can present with myelodysplastic syndrome/MPN, as well as de novo or secondary mixed-phenotype leukemias or lymphomas. Eosinophilia is a common, but not invariable, feature of these diseases. The natural history of PDGFRA- and PDGFRB-rearranged neoplasms has been dramatically altered by imatinib. In contrast, patients with FGFR1 and JAK2 fusion TK genes exhibit a more aggressive course and variable sensitivity to current TK inhibitors, and in most cases, long-term disease-free survival may only be achievable with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Similar poor prognosis outcomes may be observed with rearrangements of FLT3 or ABL1 (eg, both of which commonly partner with ETV6), and further investigation is needed to validate their inclusion in the current WHO-defined group of eosinophilia-associated TK fusion-driven neoplasms. The diagnosis chronic eosinophilic leukemia, not otherwise specified (CEL, NOS) is assigned to patients with MPN with eosinophilia and nonspecific cytogenetic/molecular abnormalities and/or increased myeloblasts. Myeloid mutation panels have identified somatic variants in patients with a provisional diagnosis of hypereosinophilia of undetermined significance, reclassifying some of these cases as eosinophilia-associated neoplasms. Looking forward, one of the many challenges will be how to use the results of molecular profiling to guide prognosis and selection of actionable therapeutic targets. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  11. Pancreatic multicenter ultrasound study (PAMUS).

    PubMed

    D'Onofrio, Mirko; Barbi, Emilio; Dietrich, Christoph F; Kitano, Masayuki; Numata, Kazushi; Sofuni, Atsushi; Principe, Francesco; Gallotti, Anna; Zamboni, Giulia A; Mucelli, Roberto Pozzi

    2012-04-01

    To describe the typical CEUS pattern of pancreatic lesions and to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in their characterization. All US and CEUS examinations of focal pancreatic masses performed in six centers during a period of five years were reviewed. Inclusion criteria were: focal pancreatic mass pathologically proved, visible at ultrasound (US) and studied with CEUS. All lesions were then evaluated for size, aspect and enhancement pattern. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values with 95% CIs were calculated to define diagnostic accuracy of CEUS in respect to pathology. Diagnostic confidence of US and CEUS, discerning between benign and malignant lesions, were represented by using ROC (receiver operating characteristics) curves. Agreement was evaluated by means of k statistics. 1439 pancreatic lesions were included. At CEUS the lesions were divided into solid (89%) and cystic (12%) masses and classified into six and eight categories, respectively. Among the solid lesions, adenocarcinomas were characterized with an accuracy of 87.8%. Among the cystic lesions, cystic tumors were diagnosed with an accuracy of 97.1%. ROC curve area increased from 0.637 for US to 0.877 for CEUS (p<0.0001). Inter-observer agreement was slightly higher for solid (k=0.78) than cystic (k=0.62) lesions. In none of the centers side effects were reported. CEUS is accurate in the characterization of pancreatic lesions. CEUS should be considered as a complementary imaging method for pancreatic lesions characterization. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Concurrent PEDF deficiency and Kras mutation induce invasive pancreatic cancer and adipose-rich stroma in mice.

    PubMed

    Grippo, Paul J; Fitchev, Philip S; Bentrem, David J; Melstrom, Laleh G; Dangi-Garimella, Surabhi; Krantz, Seth B; Heiferman, Michael J; Chung, Chuhan; Adrian, Kevin; Cornwell, Mona L; Flesche, Jan B; Rao, Sambasiva M; Talamonti, Mark S; Munshi, Hidayatullah G; Crawford, Susan E

    2012-10-01

    Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), a non-inhibitory SERPIN with potent antiangiogenic activity, has been recently implicated in metabolism and adipogenesis, both of which are known to influence pancreatic cancer progression. Increased pancreatic fat in human pancreatic tumour correlates with greater tumour dissemination while PEDF deficiency in mice promotes pancreatic hyperplasia and visceral obesity. Oncogenic Ras, the most common mutation in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), has similarly been shown to promote adipogenesis and premalignant lesions. In order to determine whether concurrent loss of PEDF is sufficient to promote adipogenesis and tumorigenesis in the pancreas, the authors ablated PEDF in an EL-Kras(G12D) mouse model of non-invasive cystic papillary neoplasms. EL-Kras(G12D)/PEDF deficient mice developed invasive PDAC associated with enhanced matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 expression and increased peripancreatic fat with adipocyte hypertrophy and intrapancreatic adipocyte infiltration (pancreatic steatosis). In support of increased adipogenesis, the stroma of the pancreas of EL-Kras(G12D)/PEDF deficient mice demonstrated higher tissue levels of two lipid droplet associated proteins, tail-interacting protein 47 (TIP47, perilipin 3) and adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP, Pperilipin 2), while adipose triglyceride lipase, a key factor in lipolysis, was decreased. In patients with PDAC, both tissue and serum levels of PEDF were decreased, stromal TIP47 expression was higher and the tissue VEGF to PEDF ratio was increased (p<0.05). These data highlight the importance of lipid metabolism in the tumour microenvironment and identify PEDF as a critical negative regulator of both adiposity and tumour invasion in the pancreas.

  13. Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of Accessory Parotid Gland: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Das, Somdipto; Nayak, Umanath K; Buggavetti, Rahul; Sekhar, Shobana

    2016-05-01

    The accessory parotid gland is salivary gland tissue separated from the main gland at a variable distance. This gland is histologically similar to the main gland, but has a higher incidence of malignant neoplasms than the main gland. Regarding the various malignant neoplasms, studies have shown higher incidences of mucoepidermoid carcinoma, with less than 2% being adenoid cystic carcinoma. We present a case of swelling in the midcheek region that, after clinical examination, was diagnosed as a case of neoplasm of the accessory parotid gland. On the basis of auxiliary investigations including intraoperative frozen section, it was concluded that it was adenoid cystic carcinoma, grade I, and after wide surgical resection, the tumor was removed without undergoing superficial parotidectomy. The patient received postoperative radiotherapy (RT) and was followed for 14 months without any recurrence or substantial facial asymmetry. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Pseudomyxoma Retroperitonei: ARare Cause of Retroperitoneal Cystic Mass.

    PubMed

    Al-Qahtani, Hamad Hadi; Asalamah, Saleh; Akeely, Mohammed; Alshakaki, Salman Mohammad

    2016-06-01

    Pseudomyxoma retroperitonei is a rare condition, characterized by accumulation of mucinous material in the retroperitoneal space, originating predominantly from the appendiceal mucinous neoplasms. A72-year-old male patient presented with a history of progressive right side abdominal pain for 5 months with a palpable abdominal mass. Ultrasound, computerized tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging showed large right abdominal multiloculated cystic lesion with heterogeneous echoic contents. Colonoscopy revealed normal mucosa with extramural pressure on the right colon and cecum. He underwent complete excision of the mass along with right hemicolectomy. The cystic mass was containing gelatinous material. Histopathology revealed low grade mucinous neoplasm. Pseudomyxoma retroperitonei should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patient presenting with progressive right side abdominal pain and retroperitoneal cystic mass.

  15. Three cases of mediastinal pancreatic pseudocysts

    PubMed Central

    Fujihara, Yoshio; Maeda, Kazunori; Okamoto, Masaru; Yanagitani, Atsushi; Tanaka, Kiwamu; Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Ogawa, Toshihide

    2016-01-01

    A rare complication of acute or chronic pancreatitis is the formation of a mediastinal pancreatic pseudocyst (MPP), which is caused by tracking of pancreatic fluids through anatomical openings of the diaphragm into the mediastinum. Herein, we report the imaging characteristics of three cases of this condition. Our results revealed three features in common: (i) the connection between the mediastinum and the pancreatic cystic lesion; (ii) the presence of pleural effusions; and (iii) imaging findings consistent with chronic pancreatitis, such as pancreatic atrophy and calcifications and dilatation and/or stricture of main pancreatic duct (MPD). Serial diameter changes of the MPD and of the adjacent pseudocysts were necessary for the determination of the therapeutic strategy used in each case. PMID:27330827

  16. The role of pancreatic ducts in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Hegyi, Peter; Rakonczay, Zoltan

    2015-07-01

    Pancreatic ducts secrete 2.5 l of alkaline, HCO3(-)-rich fluid daily which greatly contributes to the homeostasis of the pancreas. Ducts are also important in the pathophysiology of the pancreas; alteration of ductal function can lead to severe diseases such as cystic fibrosis and chronic pancreatitis. The role of pancreatic ducts in the development of acute pancreatitis has only been uncovered recently. Pancreatitis inducing agents like bile acids and ethanol dose-dependently affect pancreatic ductal secretion; low concentrations stimulate, whereas high concentrations inhibit secretion. The majority of the review will focus on the central role of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a critical protein in the regulation of ductal secretion, in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis which is highlighted by numerous investigations. Downregulation of CFTR expression results in increased severity of acute pancreatitis in mice. Furthermore, human genetic studies have demonstrated statistically significant association of CFTR mutations with acute recurrent pancreatitis. Overall, the data support the involvement of pancreatic ducts in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis.

  17. Hormonal abnormalities of the pancreas and gut in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Adrian, T E; McKiernan, J; Johnstone, D I; Hiller, E J; Vyas, H; Sarson, D L; Bloom, S R

    1980-09-01

    We have investigated the effect of cystic fibrosis on alimentary hormones in 10 children by measuring the pancreatic and gut hormone rsponse to a milk drink. Plasma insulin and gastric inhibitory peptide were both significantly reduced (P < 0.05 and P < 0.005, respectively, at 15 min) in the patients with cystic fibrosis, compared with controls, even though the early glucose rise was greater in the former group (P < 0.05 at 15 min). Fasting levels of pancreatic polypeptide were significantly lower in the fibrocystic children (P < 0.01), and the normal response to milk was completely abolished in these patients (P < 0.001). Fasting plasma enteroglucagon concentrations were grossly abolished in the cystic fibrosis patients (P < 0.001) and these remained elevated throughout the test. No significant differences were seen in basal or postmilk responses of plasma glucagon, gastrin, secretin, vasoactive intestinal peptide, or motilin in cystic fibrosis. It would thus appear that the pancreatic polypeptide cell is more susceptible to the effects of the disease process than the beta or alpha cell in cystic fibrosis. Some aspects of the abnormalities in the gastrointestinal endocrine system were similar to those seen in celiac disease and tropical sprue and may, therefore, effect a similar hormonal response in these patients with cystic fibrosis to those with mucosal damage.

  18. A resected case of two branch duct-type intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms showing different clinical courses after a two-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Hideki; Ohike, Nobuyuki; Norose, Tomoko; Isobe, Tomohide; Suzuki, Reika; Imai, Hideyuki; Shiokawa, Akira; Takimoto, Masafumi; Tabuchi, Akihiro; Takano, Yuichi; Yamamura, Eiichi; Nagahama, Masatsugu; Takeyama, Nobuyuki; Yokomizo, Kazuaki; Mizukami, Hiroki; Tanaka, Jun-Ichi; Aoki, Takeshi; Murakami, Masahiko

    2017-03-03

    The patient was a 60-year-old man without any particular complaints, but he underwent abdominal computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) due to a fatty liver, which revealed two similar cystic lesions regarded as branch duct-type intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (BD-IPMN) in the pancreatic body [BD-IPMN (b), 16 mm in size] and tail [BD-IPMN (t), 13 mm in size] without a "high-risk stigmata" or "worrisome features". He subsequently received follow-up by MRCP every 6 months. Two years later, MRCP showed prominent dilation of the main pancreatic duct (MPD) and mural nodule formation within the dilated MPD adjacent to the BD-IPMN (b). Distal pancreatectomy specimens revealed that the BD-IPMN (b) was lined by low-papillary gastric mucinous epithelium with low-to-intermediate-grade dysplasia and involved the MPD, forming a malignant mural nodule showing pancreatobiliary-type IPMN. In contrast, the BD-IPMN (t) was lined by flat, monolayer columnar gastric mucinous epithelium without atypia, which suggested the possibility of a "simple mucinous cyst". A genetic analysis showed KRAS mutation only in BD-IPMN (b). Differences in the histological and genetic findings between two similar BD-IPMNs in the present case may suggest what kinds of examinations should be performed in patients with BD-IPMNs without any worrisome features.

  19. Cystic fibrosis in pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Kent, N E; Farquharson, D F

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the outcomes of pregnancies in women with cystic fibrosis (CF) and to address issues pertinent to the obstetric care of such women. DATA SOURCES: English-language case reports and case series published from 1960 to 1991 identified through a search of MEDLINE and Index Medicus. The terms of reference were "cystic fibrosis" and "pregnancy". Not all the reports reviewed addressed all the outcomes under consideration. STUDY SELECTION: A total of 20 reports citing cases of pregnancy in women with CF. DATA EXTRACTION: Outcomes included the number of spontaneous abortions, pregnancies continued beyond 20 weeks, preterm deliveries, maternal deaths at 6 months and 2 years after delivery and perinatal deaths. Breast-feeding was addressed. Measures to assess the severity of maternal disease included the mean age at diagnosis of CF, weight gain during pregnancy, pulmonary function studies if available and the need for pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy. DATA SYNTHESIS: Of 217 pregnancies in 162 women spontaneous abortion occurred in 10 (4.6%). Pregnancy progressed beyond 20 weeks in 81.6% of cases; 24.3% of the deliveries were preterm. The maternal death rate did not exceed that among age-related women with CF who were not pregnant. The rate of perinatal death was 7.9%. Breast milk was not hypernatremic. Poor outcomes were associated with a weight gain of less than 4.5 kg and a forced vital capacity of less than 50% of the predicted value. CONCLUSIONS: Premature labour and delivery remain a significant risk for pregnant women with CF, contributing to a high rate of perinatal death. Maternal illness and death result from deteriorating pulmonary function. Breast-feeding is not contraindicated. Attention to energy intake and pulmonary function is important. PMID:8374843

  20. Robotic left pancreatectomy for pancreatic solid pseudopapillary tumor.

    PubMed

    Ntourakis, Dimitrios; Marzano, Ettore; De Blasi, Vito; Oussoultzoglou, Elie; Jaeck, Daniel; Pessaux, Patrick

    2011-03-01

    Solid pseudopapillary pancreatic tumors of pancreas are a rare entity, seen most often in females in their second or third decades. Although previously believed to be benign, this tumor is currently considered a low-grade malignant epithelial neoplasm with low metastatic rate and high overall survival.1,2 Its resection could be performed by robotic technique with respect to oncological principles to avoid tumor cell dissemination.3 In this multimedia article, we present a 28-year-old female with a history of hyperthyroidism who underwent a computed tomography (CT) scan because of a persistent high C-reactive protein level following caesarean section. This CT scan revealed a 7-cm cystic lesion of the pancreatic tail. The serum tumor marker CA 19-9 was normal. Further investigation with an magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan showed that the lesion was macrocystic with internal septas compatible with a solid pseudopapillary neoplasm.4 The patient was treated with robotic distal splenopanceatectomy (video). The operative time was 5 h with an estimated blood loss of 250 mL. No blood transfusion was necessary. The postoperative period was uneventful, and she was discharged on postoperative day 8. The histological finding revealed a solid pseudopapillary tumor of the pancreas pT2pN0 (0/14 lymph nodes removed). There was no evidence of clinical, biological, and radiological pancreatic fistula, and a control CT scan on postoperative day 8 did not show any abdominal fluid collection. The patient's 1 month follow-up was normal. The robotic distal splenopancreatectomy is a procedure that offers some technical and oncological advantages over the already described minimally invasive techniques for distal pancreatic tumors.5,6 These advantages are mainly due to the stability of the operative field, to the 3D and magnified vision, and to the articulated robotic arms.7-9 The 3D representation and the stability of the operative field facilitate the performance of operative

  1. Pancreatic tumors imaging: An update.

    PubMed

    Scialpi, Michele; Reginelli, Alfonso; D'Andrea, Alfredo; Gravante, Sabrina; Falcone, Giuseppe; Baccari, Paolo; Manganaro, Lucia; Palumbo, Barbara; Cappabianca, Salvatore

    2016-04-01

    Currently, ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance imaging (MRI) represent the mainstay in the evaluation of pancreatic solid and cystic tumors affecting pancreas in 80-85% and 10-15% of the cases respectively. Integration of US, CT or MR imaging is essential for an accurate assessment of pancreatic parenchyma, ducts and adjacent soft tissues in order to detect and to stage the tumor, to differentiate solid from cystic lesions and to establish an appropriate treatment. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of pancreatic tumors and the role of imaging in their diagnosis and management. In order to a prompt and accurate diagnosis and appropriate management of pancreatic lesions, it is crucial for radiologists to know the key findings of the most frequent tumors of the pancreas and the current role of imaging modalities. A multimodality approach is often helpful. If multidetector-row CT (MDCT) is the preferred initial imaging modality in patients with clinical suspicion for pancreatic cancer, multiparametric MRI provides essential information for the detection and characterization of a wide variety of pancreatic lesions and can be used as a problem-solving tool at diagnosis and during follow-up. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Huge Benign Ovarian Cystic Teratoma in a Patient with a History of Hansen's Disease.

    PubMed

    Okonta, Patrick I; Mofon, Chukwuemeke

    2014-01-01

    Mature ovarian cystic teratomas are common benign ovarian neoplasm derived from germ cells. With increasing availability of ultrasound services even in developing countries, the diagnosis of benign ovarian tumour is made earlier and the size of the ovarian tumour at diagnosis is relatively small. It is unusual to find an ovarian cystic teratoma larger than 10 cm. We report a huge mature ovarian cystic teratoma in a multipara with a history of Hansen's disease. We conclude that, in circumstances where women have restricted access to health care, the unusual finding of mature ovarian cystic teratoma larger than 10 cm is possible due to delayed presentation for diagnosis and treatment.

  3. Robotic resection of intraductal neoplasm of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Machado, Marcel A C; Makdissi, Fábio F; Surjan, Rodrigo C; Abdalla, Ricardo Z

    2009-12-01

    Minimally invasive techniques have been revolutionary and provide clinical evidence of decreased morbidity and comparable efficacy to traditional open surgery. Computer-assisted surgical devices have recently been approved for general surgical use. The aim of this study was to report the first known case of pancreatic resection with the use of a computer-assisted, or robotic, surgical device in Latin America. A 37-year-old female with a previous history of radical mastectomy for bilateral breast cancer due to a BRCA2 mutation presented with an acute pancreatitis episode. Radiologic investigation disclosed an intraductal pancreatic neoplasm located in the neck of the pancreas with atrophy of the body and tail. The main pancreatic duct was enlarged. The surgical decision was to perform a laparoscopic subtotal pancreatectomy, using the da Vinci robotic system (Intuitive Surgical, Sunnyvale, CA). Five trocars were used. Pancreatic transection was achieved with vascular endoscopic stapler. The surgical specimen was removed without an additional incision. Operative time was 240 minutes. Blood loss was minimal, and the patient did not receive a transfusion. The recovery was uneventful, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 4. The subtotal laparoscopic pancreatic resection can safely be performed. The da Vinci robotic system allowed for technical refinements of laparoscopic pancreatic resection. Robotic assistance improved the dissection and control of major blood vessels due to three-dimensional visualization of the operative field and instruments with wrist-type end-effectors.

  4. Malignant melanocytic neoplasm of pancreas with liver metastasis: Is it malignant melanoma or clear cell sarcoma?

    PubMed

    Kodiatte, Thomas Alex; George, Sam Varghese; Chacko, Raju Titus; Ramakrishna, Banumathi

    2017-01-01

    Malignant melanocytic neoplasm, usually seen in soft tissues, is rare in a visceral location and presents as a diagnostic dilemma. We present a case of pancreatic malignant melanocytic neoplasm with liver metastasis. A 58-year-old man presented with left upper abdominal swelling and loss of appetite. Imaging revealed a large mass arising from the pancreatic tail, and this was diagnosed as malignant neoplasm with melanocytic differentiation on biopsy with the possible differentials of malignant melanoma, clear cell sarcoma (CCS), and perivascular epithelioid cell neoplasm. The patient underwent distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy for the same. Follow-up imaging 6 months later showed a metastatic liver lesion, for which he also underwent a liver resection. BRAF mutational analysis was found to be negative. Both CCS and malignant melanoma have similar morphological features and melanocytic differentiation, but each harbors a distinct genetic background. Differentiation of both has diagnostic and therapeutic implications.

  5. Cystic fibrosis: need for mass deployable screening methods.

    PubMed

    Sengar, Aditya Singh; Agarwal, Anirudh; Singh, Manish K

    2014-10-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. CFTR is a member of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette superfamily of proteins and it functions as a chloride channel. CFTR largely controls the working of epithelial cells of the airways, the gastrointestinal tract, exocrine glands, and genitourinary system. Cystic fibrosis is responsible for severe chronic pulmonary disorders in children. Other maladies in the spectrum of this life-limiting disorder include nasal polyposis, pansinusitis, rectal prolapse, pancreatitis, cholelithiasis, insulin-dependent hyperglycemia, and cirrhosis. This review summarizes the recent state of art in the field of cystic fibrosis diagnostic methods with the help of CF literature published so far and proposes new research domains in the field of cystic fibrosis diagnosis.

  6. [Pathologic characteristics of malignant neoplasms occurring in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Arai, Tomio; Matsuda, Yoko; Aida, Junko; Takubo, Kaiyo

    2015-08-01

    Malignant neoplasm preferentially occurs in the elderly. Common cancers in the elderly are gastric, colorectal, lung and prostate cancers in men whereas colorectal, lung, gastric and pancreatic cancers in women. There are several characteristic features such as tumor location, histology, biological behavior and pathway of carcinogenesis in malignant neoplasms occurring in the elderly. Multiple cancers increase with aging. Although it is generally believed that carcinoma in the elderly shows well differentiation, slow growth, low incidence of metastasis and favorable prognosis, the tumor does not always show such features. Regarding biological behavior of malignant tumor in the elderly, age-related alterations of the host such as stromal weakness and decreased immune response against cancer cell invasion should be considered as well as characteristics of tumor cell itself. Thus, we need a specific strategy for treatment for malignant neoplasms in the elderly.

  7. CFTR: A new horizon in the pathomechanism and treatment of pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Hegyi, Péter; Wilschanski, Michael; Muallem, Shmuel; Lukacs, Gergely; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós; Uc, Aliye; Gray, Michael A.; Rakonczay, Zoltán; Maléth, József

    2017-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an ion channel that conducts chloride and bicarbonate ions across epithelial cell membranes. Mutations in the CFTR gene diminish the ion channel function and lead to impaired epithelial fluid transport in multiple organs such as the lung and the pancreas resulting in cystic fibrosis. Heterozygous carriers of CFTR mutations do not develop cystic fibrosis but exhibit increased risk for pancreatitis and associated pancreatic damage characterized by elevated mucus levels, fibrosis and cyst formation. Importantly, recent studies demonstrated that pancreatitis causing insults, such as alcohol, smoking or bile acids strongly inhibit CFTR function. Furthermore, human studies showed reduced levels of CFTR expression and function in all forms of pancreatitis. These findings indicate that impairment of CFTR is critical in the development of pancreatitis; therefore, correcting CFTR function could be the first specific therapy in pancreatitis. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the field and discuss new possibilities for the treatment of pancreatitis. PMID:26856995

  8. CFTR: A New Horizon in the Pathomechanism and Treatment of Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Hegyi, Péter; Wilschanski, Michael; Muallem, Shmuel; Lukacs, Gergely L; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós; Uc, Aliye; Gray, Michael A; Rakonczay, Zoltán; Maléth, József

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an ion channel that conducts chloride and bicarbonate ions across epithelial cell membranes. Mutations in the CFTR gene diminish the ion channel function and lead to impaired epithelial fluid transport in multiple organs such as the lung and the pancreas resulting in cystic fibrosis. Heterozygous carriers of CFTR mutations do not develop cystic fibrosis but exhibit increased risk for pancreatitis and associated pancreatic damage characterized by elevated mucus levels, fibrosis, and cyst formation. Importantly, recent studies demonstrated that pancreatitis causing insults, such as alcohol, smoking, or bile acids, strongly inhibit CFTR function. Furthermore, human studies showed reduced levels of CFTR expression and function in all forms of pancreatitis. These findings indicate that impairment of CFTR is critical in the development of pancreatitis; therefore, correcting CFTR function could be the first specific therapy in pancreatitis. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the field and discuss new possibilities for the treatment of pancreatitis.

  9. Lack of correlation between pulmonary disease and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator dysfunction in cystic fibrosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Mutations in both alleles of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene result in the disease cystic fibrosis, which usually manifests as chronic sinopulmonary disease, pancreatic insufficiency, elevated sodium chloride loss in sweat, infertility among men due to agenesis of the vas deferens and other symptoms including liver disease. Case presentation We describe a pair of African-American brothers, aged 21 and 27, with cystic fibrosis. They were homozygous for a rare frameshift mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator 3791delC, which would be expected to cause significant morbidity. Although 80% of cystic fibrosis patients are colonized with Pseudomonas aeruginosa by eight years of age, the older brother had no serum opsonic antibody titer to P. aeruginosa by age 13 and therefore would have failed to mount an effective antibody response to the alginate (mucoid polysaccharide) capsule of P. aeruginosa. He was not colonized with P. aeruginosa until 24 years of age. Similarly, the younger brother was not colonized with P. aeruginosa until age 20 and had no significant lung disease. Conclusion Despite a prevailing idea in cystic fibrosis research that the amount of functional cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator predicts clinical status, our results indicated that respiratory disease severity in cystic fibrosis exhibits phenotypic heterogeneity. If this heterogeneity is, in part, genetic, it is most likely derived from genes outside the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator locus. PMID:20420703

  10. Lack of correlation between pulmonary disease and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator dysfunction in cystic fibrosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Levy, Hara; Cannon, Carolynn L; Asher, Daniel; García, Christopher; Cleveland, Robert H; Pier, Gerald B; Knowles, Michael R; Colin, Andrew A

    2010-04-26

    Mutations in both alleles of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene result in the disease cystic fibrosis, which usually manifests as chronic sinopulmonary disease, pancreatic insufficiency, elevated sodium chloride loss in sweat, infertility among men due to agenesis of the vas deferens and other symptoms including liver disease. We describe a pair of African-American brothers, aged 21 and 27, with cystic fibrosis. They were homozygous for a rare frameshift mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator 3791delC, which would be expected to cause significant morbidity. Although 80% of cystic fibrosis patients are colonized with Pseudomonas aeruginosa by eight years of age, the older brother had no serum opsonic antibody titer to P. aeruginosa by age 13 and therefore would have failed to mount an effective antibody response to the alginate (mucoid polysaccharide) capsule of P. aeruginosa. He was not colonized with P. aeruginosa until 24 years of age. Similarly, the younger brother was not colonized with P. aeruginosa until age 20 and had no significant lung disease. Despite a prevailing idea in cystic fibrosis research that the amount of functional cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator predicts clinical status, our results indicated that respiratory disease severity in cystic fibrosis exhibits phenotypic heterogeneity. If this heterogeneity is, in part, genetic, it is most likely derived from genes outside the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator locus.

  11. Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Asay, Lyal D.

    1965-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis, a disease thought to be transmitted as a recessive genetic trait, is found as a disease in about one in 1,000 to one in 10,000 births. It involves all of the exocrine glands with presenting symptoms dependent upon the extent of involvement of any group of glands. Many aspects of the disease can be corrected by substitution therapy. This applies particularly to the use of animal pancreas for the steatorrhea and salt for prevention of heat prostration. Unfortunately, the obstructive pulmonary disease with secondary bronchial infections can only be treated symptomatically by the use of mucus thinning agents, postural drainage, and antibiotics. Nevertheless, longevity can be increased and a great deal of hope offered to the families of these unfortunate children by careful supervision of their medical care. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9.Figure 10.Figure 11. PMID:14288148

  12. L206W mutation of the cystic fibrosis gene, relatively frequent in French Canadians, is associated with atypical presentations of cystic fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Rozen, R.; Ferreira-Rajabi, L.; Robb, L.

    1995-07-03

    Cystic fibrosis is caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. Over 400 mutations have been reported at this locus. Although severe forms of cystic fibrosis are usually associated with pancreatic insufficiency, pulmonary dysfunction, and elevated sweat chloride, there is a wide range of phenotypes, including congenital absence of the vas deferens, observed with some of the milder mutations. The L206W mutation, which was first identified in patients from South France, is relatively frequent in French Canadians from Quebec. In this report, we document the atypical form of cystic fibrosis associated with this mutation in a cohort of 7 French Canadian probands. 20 refs.

  13. [Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours. What do we know of their history?].

    PubMed

    Navarro, Salvador

    2016-04-01

    Starting with Paul Langerhans, who first described pancreatic islets in 1869, this article reviews the various protagonists who, in the last century and a half, have contributed to the discovery of the main hormones originating in the pancreas, the analytical methods for their measurement, the imaging techniques for identifying tumoural location, and the various pancreatic neoplasms. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Espana.

  14. A pulmonary mucinous cystic tumour of borderline malignancy.

    PubMed

    Bacha, D; Ayadi-Kaddour, A; Smati, B; Kilani, T; El Mezni, F

    2008-06-01

    We report a well-documented case of pulmonary mucinous cystic tumour of borderline malignancy involving the left lower lobe. The lesion was found incidentally by chest radiograph and CT scan with a provisional diagnosis of bronchioloalveolar carcinoma. The tumour was 4 cm in its greatest dimension, cystic and filled with gelatinous mucus. Microscopically, the neoplastic mucinous epithelium was composed of cuboidal cells with focally nuclear stratification and mild to moderate nuclear atypia. The patient has remained free from recurrence or metastases for 6 years. Pulmonary mucinous cystic tumour of borderline malignancy is a rare, recently described neoplasm, which spans a spectrum of tumours with malignant potential. The recent World Health Organization classification of lung tumours does not recognize this entity, which has a very good prognosis, and as such should be distinguished from classic pulmonary adenocarcinoma. Histological diagnosis can be difficult to distinguish from cystic bronchioloalveolar carcinoma or metastatic mucinous adenocarcinoma.

  15. Pancreatic pseudocyst

    MedlinePlus

    ... More Acute pancreatitis Chronic pancreatitis Pancreatic abscess Shock Review Date 10/27/2015 Updated by: Subodh K. ... gastroenterologist with Gastrointestinal Specialists of Georgia, Austell, GA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by ...

  16. Pancreatic Cysts

    MedlinePlus

    ... triggering pancreatitis, you may need to have your gallbladder removed. If your pancreatitis is due to alcohol ... www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/pancreatic-cysts/basics/definition/CON-20024331 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and ...

  17. Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer usually begins in the cells that produce the juices. Some risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer include Smoking Long-term diabetes Chronic pancreatitis Certain ...

  18. Laparoscopic spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy for a primary hydatid cyst mimicking a mucinous cystic neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Tezcaner, Tugan; Ekici, Yahya; Aydın, Onur Huseyin; Barit, Gonca; Moray, Gökhan

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic hydatid cysts are fairly rare. The disease can be encountered concurrently with systemic involvement or as an isolated pancreatic involvement. We report the first case of spleen-preserving laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy for a pancreatic hydatid cyst. There was no complication or recurrence. A 55-year-old woman was admitted to our centre with epigastric and back pain. Upper abdominal magnetic resonance imaging revealed a solitary cystic lesion with septations at the pancreatic tail level measuring 24 mm × 18 mm, which was initially thought to be a pancreatic mucinous cystic neoplasia. She underwent laparoscopic spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy and cholecystectomy. Her post-operative course was uneventful and histopathological examination revealed a hydatid cyst in the pancreatic tail. PMID:28281482

  19. Quantification of CT images for the classification of high- and low-risk pancreatic cysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazit, Lior; Chakraborty, Jayasree; Attiyeh, Marc; Langdon-Embry, Liana; Allen, Peter J.; Do, Richard K. G.; Simpson, Amber L.

    2017-03-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the most lethal cancer with an overall 5-year survival rate of 7%1 due to the late stage at diagnosis and the ineffectiveness of current therapeutic strategies. Given the poor prognosis, early detection at a pre-cancerous stage is the best tool for preventing this disease. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN), cystic tumors of the pancreas, represent the only radiographically identifiable precursor lesion of pancreatic cancer and are known to evolve stepwise from low-to-high-grade dysplasia before progressing into an invasive carcinoma. Observation is usually recommended for low-risk (low- and intermediate-grade dysplasia) patients, while high-risk (high-grade dysplasia and invasive carcinoma) patients undergo resection; hence, patient selection is critically important in the management of pancreatic cysts.2 Radiologists use standard criteria such as main pancreatic duct size, cyst size, or presence of a solid enhancing component in the cyst to optimally select patients for surgery.3 However, these findings are subject to a radiologist's interpretation and have been shown to be inconsistent with regards to the presence of a mural nodule or solid component.4 We propose objective classification of risk groups based on quantitative imaging features extracted from CT scans. We apply new features that represent the solid component (i.e. areas of high intensity) within the cyst and extract standard texture features. An adaptive boost classifier5 achieves the best performance with area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.73 and accuracy of 77.3% for texture features. The random forest classifier achieves the best performance with AUC of 0.71 and accuracy of 70.8% with the solid component features.

  20. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pancreatitis Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Timothy Gardner, MD Acute pancreatitis is defined as ... pancreatitis in pregnancy. Reasons for Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy While acute pancreatitis is responsible for almost 1 ...

  1. The value of KRAS mutation testing with CEA for the diagnosis of pancreatic mucinous cysts

    PubMed Central

    Kadayifci, Abdurrahman; Al-Haddad, Mohammad; Atar, Mustafa; Dewitt, John M.; Forcione, David G.; Sherman, Stuart; Casey, Brenna W.; Fernandez-del Castillo, Carlos; Schmidt, C. Max; Pitman, Martha B.; Brugge, William R.

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims: Pancreatic cyst fluid (PCF) CEA has been shown to be the most accurate preoperative test for detection of cystic mucinous neoplasms (CMNs). This study aimed to assess the added value of PCF KRAS mutational analysis to CEA for diagnosis of CMNs. Patients and methods: This is a retrospective study of prospectively collected endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) fine-needle aspiration (FNA) data. KRAS mutation was determined by direct sequencing or equivalent methods. Cysts were classified histologically (surgical cohort) or by clinical (EUS or FNA) findings (clinical cohort). Performance characteristics of KRAS, CEA and their combination for detection of a cystic mucinous neoplasm (CMN) and malignancy were calculated. Results: The study cohort consisted of 943 patients: 147 in the surgical cohort and 796 in the clinical cohort. Overall, KRAS and CEA each had high specificity (100 % and 93.2 %), but low sensitivity (48.3 % and 56.3 %) for the diagnosis of a CMN. The positivity of KRAS or CEA increased the diagnostic accuracy (80.8 %) and AUC (0.84) significantly compared to KRAS (65.3 % and 0.74) or CEA (65.8 % and 0.74) alone, but only in the clinical cohort (P < 0.0001 for both). KRAS mutation was significantly more frequent in malignant CMNs compared to histologically confirmed non-malignant CMNs (73 % vs. 37 %, P = 0.001). The negative predictive value of KRAS mutation was 77.6 % in differentiating non-malignant cysts. Conclusions: The detection of a KRAS mutation in PCF is a highly specific test for mucinous cysts. It outperforms CEA for sensitivity in mucinous cyst diagnosis, but the data does not support its routine use. PMID:27092317

  2. Cystic fibrosis - nutritional considerations

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002437.htm Cystic fibrosis - nutrition To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-threatening disease that causes ...

  3. Effect of pancreatic enzyme supplements on iron absorption.

    PubMed

    Zempsky, W T; Rosenstein, B J; Carroll, J A; Oski, F A

    1989-08-01

    Iron deficiency has been reported in one third of patients with cystic fibrosis. There are data that suggest that iron absorption is increased with exocrine pancreatic deficiency and that administration of pancreatic enzymes may impair oral iron absorption. We compared oral iron absorption over a 3-hour period in the presence and absence of exogenous pancreatic enzymes in 13 stable young-adult patients with cystic fibrosis and 9 age-matched control patients. Although none of the patients with cystic fibrosis had a hemoglobin level less than 119 g/L, serum ferritin levels were less than 25 micrograms/L in 5 of the 13 patients, and the mean corpuscular volume was significantly lower in the patient group (86.1 +/- 2.7 vs 90.9 +/- 5 fL). Baseline mean serum iron levels were higher in controls (18.9 +/- 5.9 mumol/L) than in patients (11.9 +/- 6.3 mumol/L). There was no difference in iron absorption in the absence of exogenous pancreatic enzymes. Significant impairment of iron absorption was detected in both patients with cystic fibrosis and controls after administration of a preparation of pancreatic enzymes. There was an inverse relationship between iron stores, as measured by serum ferritin, and iron absorption. These findings suggest that long-term consumption of pancreatic enzymes by patients with cystic fibrosis may contribute to iron deficiency.

  4. Chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    DiMagno, Matthew J; DiMagno, Eugene P

    2012-09-01

    We review important new clinical observations in chronic pancreatitis reported in 2011. Smoking increases the risk of nongallstone acute pancreatitis and the progression of acute pancreatitis to chronic pancreatitis. Binge drinking during Oktoberfest did not associate with increased hospital admissions for acute pancreatitis. The unfolded protein response is an adaptive mechanism to maintain pancreatic health in response to noxious stimuli such as alcohol. Onset of diabetes mellitus in chronic pancreatitis is likely due to progressive disease rather than individual variables. Insufficient pancreatic enzyme dosing is common for treatment of pancreatic steatorrhea; 90 000 United States Pharmacopeia units of lipase should be given with meals. Surgical drainage provides sustained, superior pain relief compared with endoscopic treatment in patients advanced chronic pancreatitis with a dilated main duct ± pancreatic stones. The central acting gabapentoid pregabalin affords a modest 12% pain reduction in patients with chronic pancreatitis but approximately 30% of patients have significant side effects. Patients with nongallstone-related acute pancreatitis or chronic pancreatitis of any cause should cease smoking. Results of this year's investigations further elucidated the pancreatic pathobiology due to alcohol, onset of diabetes mellitus in chronic pancreatitis, and the mechanisms and treatment of neuropathic pain in chronic pancreatitis.

  5. Unusual presentation of a pancreatic cyst resulting from osteosarcoma metastasis.

    PubMed

    Akpinar, Burcu; Obuch, Joshua; Fukami, Norio; Pokharel, Sajal S

    2015-07-21

    Pancreatic metastases are uncommon. They have been reported in lung cancer, gastrointestinal malignancies, breast cancer, renal cell carcinoma, melanoma, lymphoma and sarcoma, and usually have solid morphology. Cystic metastasis to the pancreas is even more rare with few case reports in the literature. However, with the increasing use of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging as well as endoscopic ultrasound, more such lesions may be detected. Metastasis to the pancreas from osteosarcoma is highly unusual, but can be seen with the increasing survival of patients with osteosarcoma. We present an extremely rare case of a predominantly cystic lesion of the pancreas, which was diagnosed as metastasis from osteosarcoma. The pathophysiology of the cystic component of the metastasis of osteosarcoma is unknown. Cystic necrotic degeneration of the solid metastasis or pancreatitis secondary to the metastasis with development of associated fluid collection can be considered. Metastasis should remain a differential consideration even for primarily cystic lesions of the pancreas.

  6. Unusual presentation of a pancreatic cyst resulting from osteosarcoma metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Akpinar, Burcu; Obuch, Joshua; Fukami, Norio; Pokharel, Sajal S

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic metastases are uncommon. They have been reported in lung cancer, gastrointestinal malignancies, breast cancer, renal cell carcinoma, melanoma, lymphoma and sarcoma, and usually have solid morphology. Cystic metastasis to the pancreas is even more rare with few case reports in the literature. However, with the increasing use of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging as well as endoscopic ultrasound, more such lesions may be detected. Metastasis to the pancreas from osteosarcoma is highly unusual, but can be seen with the increasing survival of patients with osteosarcoma. We present an extremely rare case of a predominantly cystic lesion of the pancreas, which was diagnosed as metastasis from osteosarcoma. The pathophysiology of the cystic component of the metastasis of osteosarcoma is unknown. Cystic necrotic degeneration of the solid metastasis or pancreatitis secondary to the metastasis with development of associated fluid collection can be considered. Metastasis should remain a differential consideration even for primarily cystic lesions of the pancreas. PMID:26217098

  7. Odontogenic Cysts and Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Bilodeau, Elizabeth Ann; Collins, Bobby M

    2017-03-01

    This article reviews a myriad of common and uncommon odontogenic cysts and tumors. The clinical presentation, gross and microscopic features, differential diagnosis, prognosis, and diagnostic pitfalls are addressed for inflammatory cysts (periapical cyst, mandibular infected buccal cyst/paradental cyst), developmental cysts (dentigerous, lateral periodontal, glandular odontogenic, orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst), benign tumors (keratocystic odontogenic tumor, ameloblastoma, adenomatoid odontogenic tumor, calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor, ameloblastic fibroma and fibroodontoma, odontoma, squamous odontogenic tumor, calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor, primordial odontogenic tumor, central odontogenic fibroma, and odontogenic myxomas), and malignant tumors (clear cell odontogenic carcinoma, ameloblastic carcinoma, ameloblastic fibrosarcoma). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Summary Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (pNENs) are a heterogeneous group of tumors including well differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) and neuroendocrine carcinomas (pNECs). The incidence of pNENs has increased over the past few decades. Although, the understanding and interest for this tumor have also increased significantly, the debate about classification and diagnosis continues. Although the primary treatment for pNENs is surgical resection, there is still a lack of effective therapeutic options for patients with advanced unresectable pNENs. Although many therapeutic methods have proven effective, the choice of treatment and specific programs are still unclear. Our article presents an overview of pNENs, with a focus on their diagnostic work-up, clinical presentation and treatment options. PMID:28357177

  9. Molecular biology of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zavoral, Miroslav; Minarikova, Petra; Zavada, Filip; Salek, Cyril; Minarik, Marek

    2011-01-01

    In spite of continuous research efforts directed at early detection and treatment of pancreatic cancer, the outlook for patients affected by the disease remains dismal. With most cases still being diagnosed at advanced stages, no improvement in survival prognosis is achieved with current diagnostic imaging approaches. In the absence of a dominant precancerous condition, several risk factors have been identified including family history, chronic pancreatitis, smoking, diabetes mellitus, as well as certain genetic disorders such as hereditary pancreatitis, cystic fibrosis, familial atypical multiple mole melanoma, and Peutz–Jeghers and Lynch syndromes. Most pancreatic carcinomas, however, remain sporadic. Current progress in experimental molecular techniques has enabled detailed understanding of the molecular processes of pancreatic cancer development. According to the latest information, malignant pancreatic transformation involves multiple oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes that are involved in a variety of signaling pathways. The most characteristic aberrations (somatic point mutations and allelic losses) affect oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes within RAS, AKT and Wnt signaling, and have a key role in transcription and proliferation, as well as systems that regulate the cell cycle (SMAD/DPC, CDKN2A/p16) and apoptosis (TP53). Understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms should promote development of new methodology for early diagnosis and facilitate improvement in current approaches for pancreatic cancer treatment. PMID:21734801

  10. Occupation and lymphoid neoplasms.

    PubMed Central

    La Vecchia, C.; Negri, E.; D'Avanzo, B.; Franceschi, S.

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between occupation and exposure to a number of occupational agents and lymphoid neoplasms was investigated in a case-control study of 69 cases of Hodgkin's disease, 153 non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, 110 multiple myelomas and 396 controls admitted for acute diseases to a network of teaching and general hospitals in the greater Milan area. Among the cases, there was a significant excess of individuals ever occupied in agriculture and food processing: the multivariate relative risks (RR) were 2.1 (95% confidence interval, CI = 1.0-3.8) for Hodgkin's disease, 1.9 (95% CI = 1.2-3.0) for non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and 2.0 (95% CI = 1.1-3.5) for multiple myeloma. Significant trends for duration of exposure to herbicides were observed for lymphomas, but the association was stronger for overall occupation in agriculture than with the specific question of herbicide use. History of occupation in the chemical industry was more frequent among Hodgkin's disease (RR = 4.3, 95% CI = 1.4-10.2), and a significant trend in risk was observed between duration of exposure to benzene and other solvents and multiple myeloma. No significant relation was found between any of the lymphoid neoplasms considered and rubber, dye, painting, printing, tanning leather, photography, pharmaceuticals, wood, coal/gas and nuclear industries. PMID:2789947

  11. Follow-up of asymptomatic pancreatic cysts in clinical practice: A vignette questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Hol, Lieke; Bruno, Marco J; Cahen, Djuna L

    2016-01-01

    In absence of evidence-based guidelines of pancreatic cystic neoplasms (PCN), the management might vary among physicians. The aim of this survey was to assess the attitude of Dutch gastroenterologists (GE) towards the management of asymptomatic PCNs. An anonymous online questionnaire was distributed to all practicing GE (n = 381) in The Netherlands, in which four vignette patients with PCN were presented. In total 45% of GE responded. Most respondents would perform surveillance for a 10 mm PCN (78%) mainly with an interval of one year (57%). A shorter interval of three (26%) or six (57%) months was chosen for a 25 mm BD-IPMN. Ultrasound was recommended for surveillance by 19% for a 10 mm cyst. GE with EUS experience were more likely to apply EUS for surveillance of 10 mm cyst than those without (56% vs 28%; p < 0.001). The presence of a branch-duct intraductal mucinous neoplasm (BD-IPMN) with a mural nodule, dilated pancreatic duct (8 mm) or increased serum CA 19.9 (300 U/ml) were considered an indication for resection by respectively 88%, 68% and 51% of respondents. Dutch GE demonstrate substantial variability in the management of asymptomatic PCNs. A significant proportion of general GE still use ultrasound for surveillance of small PCNs, while GE with EUS experience were more likely to perform EUS. The presence of risk factors for malignant degeneration of IPMN were not recognized by a substantial proportion of GE. Data on the natural history of PCNs is required to provide input for evidence-based guidelines, which should lead to a more uniform approach. Copyright © 2016 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Duodenal leiomyosarcoma mimicking a pancreatic pseudocyst.

    PubMed

    Sperti, C; Pasquali, C; Di Prima, F; Baffa, R; Pedrazzoli, S

    1994-01-01

    A case of duodenal leiomyosarcoma presenting as a cystic mass is reported. Amylase, tumour markers levels in the cyst fluid and radiological findings suggested an inflammatory pancreatic pseudocyst. Exploratory laparotomy and frozen section examination showed a smooth muscle tumour of the duodenum. Pancreatoduodenectomy with pylorus-preser vation was performed and the patient remained symptom-free at 8 months follow-up.

  13. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours: correlation between MSCT features and pathological classification.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yanji; Dong, Zhi; Chen, Jie; Chan, Tao; Lin, Yuan; Chen, Minhu; Li, Zi-Ping; Feng, Shi-Ting

    2014-11-01

    We aimed to evaluate the multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) features of pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (P-NENs) and analyse the correlation between the MSCT features and pathological classification of P-NENs. Forty-one patients, preoperatively investigated by MSCT and subsequently operated on with a histological diagnosis of P-NENs, were included. Various MSCT features of the primary tumour, lymph node, and distant metastasis were analysed. The relationship between MSCT features and pathologic classification of P-NENs was analysed with univariate and multivariate models. Contrast-enhanced images showed significant differences among the three grades of tumours in the absolute enhancement (P = 0.013) and relative enhancement (P = 0.025) at the arterial phase. Univariate analysis revealed statistically significant differences among the tumours of different grades (based on World Health Organization [WHO] 2010 classification) in tumour size (P = 0.001), tumour contour (P < 0.001), cystic necrosis (P = 0.001), tumour boundary (P = 0.003), dilatation of the main pancreatic duct (P = 0.001), peripancreatic tissue or vascular invasion (P < 0.001), lymphadenopathy (P = 0.011), and distant metastasis (P = 0.012). Multivariate analysis suggested that only peripancreatic tissue or vascular invasion (HR 3.934, 95 % CI, 0.426-7.442, P = 0.028) was significantly associated with WHO 2010 pathological classification. MSCT is helpful in evaluating the pathological classification of P-NENs. • P-NENs are potentially malignant, and classification of P-NENs carries important prognostic value. • MSCT plays an important role in the diagnosis and staging of P-NENs. • Correlations between classification of P-NENs and imaging findings have not been systematically evaluated. • MSCT could predict P-NENs classification and may be a useful prognostication tool.

  14. Treatment and prognosis of rectal prolapse in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Stern, R C; Izant, R J; Boat, T F; Wood, R E; Matthews, L W; Doershuk, C F

    1982-04-01

    Rectal prolapse occurred in 112 (18.5%) of 605 cystic fibrosis patients. In 48 patients prolapse preceded diagnosis of cystic fibrosis, but physicians (pediatricians, pediatric and general surgeons, and proctologists) rarely appreciated its importance as a symptom of this disease. Prolapses frequently cease with institution of pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy following diagnosis of cystic fibrosis. However, even when the disease remains undiagnosed, the symptom is often transient and frequently resolves at 3-5 yr of age. Prolapse occurring initially after cystic fibrosis is diagnosed rarely responds to manipulation of diet or enzyme doses. Many patients develop a method of reduction which involves voluntary abdominal, perineal, and gluteal muscles and does not require manual pressure on the prolapsed segment. Most patients do not need specific treatment for the prolapse. Surgery is rarely necessary. A sweat test should be obtained on any child who has had even a single episode of rectal prolapse.

  15. Bilateral Cystic Adrenal Neuroblastoma with Cystic Liver metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Aslan, Mine; Kalyoncu, Ayse Ucar; Habibi, Hatice Arioz; Ozdemir, Gul Nihal; Koc, Basak; Adaletli, Ibrahim

    2017-01-01

    Bilateral congenital cystic adrenal neuroblastoma (NB) with cystic liver metastasis is a very rare condition and only few cases have been reported in the literature. Herein we report a case of a congenital bilateral cystic adrenal NB with cystic liver metastasis and briefly discuss characteristic imaging features of cystic NB. PMID:28163998

  16. Defining the diagnostic algorithm in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Horwhat, John David; Gress, Frank G

    2004-07-01

    Most patients with pancreatic cancer present with a mass on radiologic studies, however, not every pancreatic mass is cancer. Since radiological studies alone are insufficient to establish the diagnosis of a pancreatic mass and patient management depends on a definitive diagnosis; confirmatory cytology or histology is usually required. As a minimally invasive procedure, EUS and EUS FNA avoid the risk of cutaneous or peritoneal contamination that may occur with CT or US-guided investigations and is less invasive than surgical interventions. As a result, EUS FNA of pancreatic masses is becoming the standard for obtaining cytological diagnosis. This chapter presents an EUS-based diagnostic algorithm for the evaluation of pancreatic lesions and is based upon a review of the pertinent literature in the field of pancreatic endosonography that has been the most influential in helping to guide this evolving field. Realizing there is much overlap among the EUS characteristics of various pancreatic lesions, for the sake of simplicity we have structured our discussion in broad terms of solid versus cystic lesions and discuss various pancreatic lesions within this framework. The additional contributors to this round table discussion have been asked to provide a more dedicated, focused discussion of the various subcategories of pancreatic lesions in greater detail than we could hope to achieve here. We provide this final contribution to the round table as a means of bringing the discussion back to the big picture of pancreatic lesions, rather than trying to hone in on the fine details of any one subclass.

  17. Type 3c (pancreatogenic) diabetes mellitus secondary to chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Phil A; Bellin, Melena D; Andersen, Dana K; Bradley, David; Cruz-Monserrate, Zobeida; Forsmark, Christopher E; Goodarzi, Mark O; Habtezion, Aida; Korc, Murray; Kudva, Yogish C; Pandol, Stephen J; Yadav, Dhiraj; Chari, Suresh T

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a group of diseases defined by persistent hyperglycaemia. Type 2 diabetes, the most prevalent form, is characterised initially by impaired insulin sensitivity and subsequently by an inadequate compensatory insulin response. Diabetes can also develop as a direct consequence of other diseases, including diseases of the exocrine pancreas. Historically, diabetes due to diseases of the exocrine pancreas was described as pancreatogenic or pancreatogenous diabetes mellitus, but recent literature refers to it as type 3c diabetes. It is important to note that type 3c diabetes is not a single entity; it occurs because of a variety of exocrine pancreatic diseases with varying mechanisms of hyperglycaemia. The most commonly identified causes of type 3c diabetes are chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, haemochromatosis, cystic fibrosis, and previous pancreatic surgery. In this Review, we discuss the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and clinical relevance of type 3c diabetes secondary to chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and highlight several important knowledge gaps. PMID:28404095

  18. Hemolymphangioma: a rare differential diagnosis of cystic-solid or cystic tumors of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Dong, Fei; Zheng, Yi; Wu, Jian-Jun; Fu, Yan-Biao; Jin, Kai; Chao, Ming

    2013-06-14

    We report a case of pancreatic hemolymphangioma. Hemolymphangioma is a malformation of both lymphatic vessels and blood vessels. The incidence of this disease in the pancreas is extremely rare. To the best of our knowledge, only seven cases have been reported worldwide (PubMed). A 39-year-old woman with a one-day history of abdominal pain was admitted to our hospital. There was no obvious precipitating factor. The preoperative examination, including ultrasonography and computed tomography, showed a cystic-solid tumor in the pancreas, and it was considered to be a mucinous cystadenoma or cystadenocarcinoma. Pancreatic body-tail resection combined with splenectomy was performed. After the operation, the tumor was pathologically demonstrated to be a pancreatic hemolymphangioma. Although pancreatic hemolymphangioma is rare, we believe that it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of cystic-solid tumors of the pancreas, particularly when there is no sufficient evidence for diagnosing cystadenoma, cystadenocarcinoma or some other relatively common disease of the pancreas.

  19. [Neoplasms and medical thermodynamics].

    PubMed

    Klimek, Rudolf

    2003-09-01

    Oncology--just as every field of medicine that deals with etiology, diagnostics, pathomechanism and treatment of diseases--is only a part of the general human knowledge, whose all significant achievements must be used to protect human health. This pursuit has as its object not only the benefits form practical discoveries (L. Pasteur, W.C. Roentgen, P. Curie and M. Skłodowska-Curie, V. Schally etc.), but also theoretical generalizations (A. Einstein, W.K. Heisenberg and I. Prigogine). Unfortunately it is the lack and/or slow adaptation of that information, that is responsible for the still unsatisfactory progress in clinical oncology. Responsibility rests not only with oncologists, but primarily with editors of medical journals and textbooks, who have a moral duty to follow the entire general knowledge, especially in the field of the basic research. On the basis of an analysis of the contents of the Polish oncology textbooks and materials from the specialist conferences in gynaecologic oncology, they were found to: 1. Omit the current, particularly domestic literature, 2. Contain mostly works, whose conclusions are textbook information, 3. Rarely include studies in the area of medical thermodynamics, 4. Attempt to explain the effects of the modern technologies, e.g. fotodynamics or nanotechnology using theoretical generalizations which are inadequate for them, and 5. Disregard the rule primum non nocere not only in prevention but even in the treatment of neoplasms. Neoplastic disease has many conditionings and types because of the unique identity of the neoplasms which cause it and which are caused by universal and natural phenomena of the self-organizing dissipative structures. It requires not only early diagnosing but also causative treatment already in the precancerous states, which are better detected by modern methods based on the quantum thermodynamics (lasers, fotodynamics, nuclear magnetic resonance, genetic nanotechnology etc.).

  20. Molecular pathology of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Paini, Marina; Crippa, Stefano; Partelli, Stefano; Scopelliti, Filippo; Tamburrino, Domenico; Baldoni, Andrea; Falconi, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Since the first description of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) of the pancreas in the eighties, their identification has dramatically increased in the last decades, hand to hand with the improvements in diagnostic imaging and sampling techniques for the study of pancreatic diseases. However, the heterogeneity of IPMNs and their malignant potential make difficult the management of these lesions. The objective of this review is to identify the molecular characteristics of IPMNs in order to recognize potential markers for the discrimination of more aggressive IPMNs requiring surgical resection from benign IPMNs that could be observed. We briefly summarize recent research findings on the genetics and epigenetics of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, identifying some genes, molecular mechanisms and cellular signaling pathways correlated to the pathogenesis of IPMNs and their progression to malignancy. The knowledge of molecular biology of IPMNs has impressively developed over the last few years. A great amount of genes functioning as oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes have been identified, in pancreatic juice or in blood or in the samples from the pancreatic resections, but further researches are required to use these informations for clinical intent, in order to better define the natural history of these diseases and to improve their management. PMID:25110429

  1. Anomalous pancreatico-biliary ductal union with cystic dilatation of the bile duct.

    PubMed

    Richer, J P; Faure, J P; Morichau-Beauchant, M; Dugue, T; Maillot, N; Kamina, P; Carretier, M

    1998-01-01

    We report, in an adult, an asymptomatic association between cystic dilation of the bile duct (type IV A in Todani's classification) and anomalous pancreatico-biliary ductal union (APBD) with stones in a long common channel. In APBD, the connection between the common bile duct and the main pancreatic duct is located outside the duodenal wall andis therefore not under the influence of the sphincter of Boyden. An abnormally long common channel is in excess of 15 mm. Two types of convergence anomalies are defined according to whether the bile duct opens into the main pancreatic duct (BP) or the main pancreatic duct into the bile duct (PB). In APBD, there is probably a reverse pressure gradient between the bile and pancreatic ducts, with regurgitation of pancreatic juice into the bile duct, repeated attacks of cholangitis, stenosis and cystic dilatation. A long common channel is associated with a higher incidence of carcinoma of the gall bladder of the bile duct.

  2. Chronic Pancreatitis in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chronic Pancreatitis in Children Childhood Inherited Disorders Pancreatic Cancer Pancreatic Cancer Risks and Symptoms Staging of Pancreatic Cancer Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer Whipple Procedure Complementary Therapies Pancreatic Cancer Support ...

  3. Acute Pancreatitis in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chronic Pancreatitis in Children Childhood Inherited Disorders Pancreatic Cancer Pancreatic Cancer Risks and Symptoms Staging of Pancreatic Cancer Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer Whipple Procedure Complementary Therapies Pancreatic Cancer Support ...

  4. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chronic Pancreatitis in Children Childhood Inherited Disorders Pancreatic Cancer Pancreatic Cancer Risks and Symptoms Staging of Pancreatic Cancer Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer Whipple Procedure Complementary Therapies Pancreatic Cancer Support ...

  5. Craniofacial morphology in children with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hellsing, E; Brattström, V; Strandvik, B

    1992-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a hereditary metabolic disorder with clinical symptoms of abnormal mucus production. This blocks the airways, gives pancreatic insufficiency, and increases sweat electrolytes. The progressive respiratory disease often leads to respiratory insufficiency and cor pulmonale. The aim of the present investigation was to examine the facial morphology in children with cystic fibrosis. The sample comprised 11 children with cystic fibrosis, who were divided in two groups, one with gastrointestinal disorders and the other with predominantly respiratory insufficiency. Eleven healthy children with normal occlusions were selected as controls. Lateral skull radiographs obtained in natural head posture were digitized, and linear and angular variables for the different groups calculated and compared statistically. The cystic fibrosis group showed open bite, decreased posterior facial height, increased mandibular and craniocervical inclination. Additionally, within the CF-group, the children with respiratory insufficiency differed more from the controls than the children with gastrointestinal disorders. Despite the small number of subjects, the facial morphology of the CF children showed a similar pattern to that of children with nasal respiratory obstruction due to enlarged adenoids or tonsils.

  6. Percutaneous ablation of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    D’Onofrio, Mirko; Ciaravino, Valentina; De Robertis, Riccardo; Barbi, Emilio; Salvia, Roberto; Girelli, Roberto; Paiella, Salvatore; Gasparini, Camilla; Cardobi, Nicolò; Bassi, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is a highly aggressive tumor with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Prognosis and treatment depend on whether the tumor is resectable or not, which mostly depends on how quickly the diagnosis is made. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy can be both used in cases of non-resectable pancreatic cancer. In cases of pancreatic neoplasm that is locally advanced, non-resectable, but non-metastatic, it is possible to apply percutaneous treatments that are able to induce tumor cytoreduction. The aim of this article will be to describe the multiple currently available treatment techniques (radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation), their results, and their possible complications, with the aid of a literature review. PMID:27956791

  7. Digestive system dysfunction in cystic fibrosis: challenges for nutrition therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Somerset, Shawn

    2014-10-01

    Cystic fibrosis can affect food digestion and nutrient absorption. The underlying mutation of the cystic fibrosis trans-membrane regulator gene depletes functional cystic fibrosis trans-membrane regulator on the surface of epithelial cells lining the digestive tract and associated organs, where Cl(-) secretion and subsequently secretion of water and other ions are impaired. This alters pH and dehydrates secretions that precipitate and obstruct the lumen, causing inflammation and the eventual degradation of the pancreas, liver, gallbladder and intestine. Associated conditions include exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, impaired bicarbonate and bile acid secretion and aberrant mucus formation, commonly leading to maldigestion and malabsorption, particularly of fat and fat-soluble vitamins. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is used to address this insufficiency. The susceptibility of pancreatic lipase to acidic and enzymatic inactivation and decreased bile availability often impedes its efficacy. Brush border digestive enzyme activity and intestinal uptake of certain disaccharides and amino acids await clarification. Other complications that may contribute to maldigestion/malabsorption include small intestine bacterial overgrowth, enteric circular muscle dysfunction, abnormal intestinal mucus, and intestinal inflammation. However, there is some evidence that gastric digestive enzymes, colonic microflora, correction of fatty acid abnormalities using dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation and emerging intestinal biomarkers can complement nutrition management in cystic fibrosis.

  8. APC promoter is frequently methylated in pancreatic juice of patients with pancreatic carcinomas or periampullary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ginesta, Mireia M.; Diaz-Riascos, Zamira Vanessa; Busquets, Juli; Pelaez, Núria; Serrano, Teresa; Peinado, Miquel Àngel; Jorba, Rosa; García-Borobia, Francisco Javier; Capella, Gabriel; Fabregat, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Early detection of pancreatic and periampullary neoplasms is critical to improve their clinical outcome. The present authors previously demonstrated that DNA hypermethylation of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), histamine receptor H2 (HRH2), cadherin 13 (CDH13), secreted protein acidic and cysteine rich (SPARC) and engrailed-1 (EN-1) promoters is frequently detected in pancreatic tumor cells. The aim of the present study was to assess their prevalence in pancreatic juice of carcinomas of the pancreas and periampullary area. A total of 135 pancreatic juices obtained from 85 pancreatic cancer (PC), 26 ampullary carcinoma (AC), 10 intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) and 14 chronic pancreatitis (CP) patients were analyzed. The methylation status of the APC, HRH2, CDH13, SPARC and EN-1 promoters was analyzed using methylation specific-melting curve analysis (MS-MCA). Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) mutations were also tested with allele-specific quantitative polymerase chain reaction amplification. Out of the 5 promoters analyzed, APC (71%) and HRH2 (65%) were the most frequently methylated in PC juice. APC methylation was also detected at a high frequency in AC (76%) and IPMN (80%), but only occasionally observed in CP (7%). APC methylation had a high sensitivity (71–80%) for all types of cancer analyzed. The panel (where a sample scored as positive when ≥2 markers were methylated) did not outperform APC as a single marker. Finally, KRAS detection in pancreatic juice offered a lower sensitivity (50%) and specificity (71%) for detection of any cancer. APC hypermethylation in pancreatic juice, as assessed by MS-MCA, is a frequent event of potential clinical usefulness in the diagnosis of pancreatic and periampullary neoplasms. PMID:27602165

  9. Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition

    MedlinePlus

    ... Right Sport for You Healthy School Lunch Planner Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition KidsHealth > For Teens > Cystic Fibrosis: ... Food Enzyme Supplements Beating the Frustration What Is Cystic Fibrosis? At lunch, Lindsay often gets bored with having ...

  10. Cystic and ductal tumors of the pancreas: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Scoazec, J Y; Vullierme, M P; Barthet, M; Gonzalez, J M; Sauvanet, A

    2013-04-01

    Incidentally discovered cystic tumors of the pancreas (CTP) are an increasingly frequent entity. It is essential to differentiate lesions whose malignant potential is either nil or negligible (pseudocyst, serous cystadenoma, simple cysts) from lesions with intermediate malignant potential (intraductal papillary mucinous tumor of the pancreas [IPMN] involving the secondary ducts, cystic endocrine tumor) or those with high malignant potential (mucinous cystadenoma, solid pseudopapillary tumors and IPMN involving the main pancreatic duct). The approach to defining malignant potential is based on diagnostic CT scan, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), often complemented by EUS-guided cyst puncture for biochemical and cytological analysis of cyst fluid. Surgery for diagnostic purposes should be avoided because of its significant morbidity. For pseudocysts, simple cysts and serous cystadenomas, abstention is the general rule. Resection, preserving as much pancreatic parenchyma as possible, is the rule for IPMN involving the main pancreatic duct, mucinous cystadenomas, solid and pseudopapillary tumors, and cystic endocrine tumors. Resection is rarely indicated at the outset for IPMN involving secondary pancreatic ducts; morphologic observation is the general rule and preventive excision may be indicated secondarily. Good collaboration between surgeons, radiologists and endosonographists is necessary for optimal management of CTP.

  11. Endoscopic ultrasound in the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic disease

    PubMed Central

    Teshima, Christopher W; Sandha, Gurpal S

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is an important part of modern gastrointestinal endoscopy and now has an integral role in the diagnostic evaluation of pancreatic diseases. Furthermore, as EUS technology has advanced, it has increasingly become a therapeutic procedure, and the prospect of multiple applications of interventional EUS for the pancreas is truly on the near horizon. However, this review focuses on the established diagnostic and therapeutic roles of EUS that are used in current clinical practice. In particular, the diagnostic evaluation of acute pancreatitis, chronic pancreatitis, cystic pancreatic lesions and solid masses of the pancreas are discussed. The newer enhanced imaging modalities of elastography and contrast enhancement are evaluated in this context. The main therapeutic aspects of pancreatic EUS are then considered, namely celiac plexus block and celiac plexus neurolysis for pain control in chronic pancreatitis and pancreas cancer, and EUS-guided drainage of pancreatic fluid collections. PMID:25110426

  12. Myeloproliferative neoplasm stem cells.

    PubMed

    Mead, Adam J; Mullally, Ann

    2017-03-23

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) arise in the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment as a result of the acquisition of somatic mutations in a single HSC that provides a selective advantage to mutant HSC over normal HSC and promotes myeloid differentiation to engender a myeloproliferative phenotype. This population of somatically mutated HSC, which initiates and sustains MPNs, is termed MPN stem cells. In >95% of cases, mutations that drive the development of an MPN phenotype occur in a mutually exclusive manner in 1 of 3 genes: JAK2, CALR, or MPL The thrombopoietin receptor, MPL, is the key cytokine receptor in MPN development, and these mutations all activate MPL-JAK-STAT signaling in MPN stem cells. Despite common biological features, MPNs display diverse disease phenotypes as a result of both constitutional and acquired factors that influence MPN stem cells, and likely also as a result of heterogeneity in the HSC in which MPN-initiating mutations arise. As the MPN clone expands, it exerts cell-extrinsic effects on components of the bone marrow niche that can favor the survival and expansion of MPN stem cells over normal HSC, further sustaining and driving malignant hematopoiesis. Although developed as targeted therapies for MPNs, current JAK2 inhibitors do not preferentially target MPN stem cells, and as a result, rarely induce molecular remissions in MPN patients. As the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the clonal dominance of MPN stem cells advances, this will help facilitate the development of therapies that preferentially target MPN stem cells over normal HSC.

  13. Myeloproliferative Neoplasms in Children

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Inga

    2015-01-01

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) are a group of clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by aberrant proliferation of one or more myeloid lineages often with increased immature cells in the peripheral blood. The three classical BCR-ABL-negative MPNs are: 1) polycythemia vera (PV), 2) essential thrombocythemia (ET), and 3) primary myelofibrosis (PMF), which are typically disorders of older adults and are exceedingly rare in children. The diagnostic criteria for MPNs remain largely defined by clinical, laboratory and histopathology assessments in adults, but they have been applied to the pediatric population. The discovery of the JAK2 V617F mutation, and more recently, MPL and CALR mutations, are major landmarks in the understanding of MPNs. Nevertheless, they rarely occur in children, posing a significant diagnostic challenge given the lack of an objective, clonal marker. Therefore, in pediatric patients, the diagnosis must rely heavily on clinical and laboratory factors, and exclusion of secondary disorders to make an accurate diagnosis of MPN. This review focuses on the clinical presentation, diagnostic work up, differential diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of the classical BCR-ABL-negative MPNs (PV, ET and PMF) in children and highlights key differences to the adult diseases. Particular attention will be given to pediatric PMF, as it is the only disorder of this group that is observed in infants and young children, and in many ways appears to be a unique entity compared to adult PMF. PMID:26609329

  14. Genomics of Myeloproliferative Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Zoi, Katerina; Cross, Nicholas C P

    2017-03-20

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are a group of related clonal hematologic disorders characterized by excess accumulation of one or more myeloid cell lineages and a tendency to transform to acute myeloid leukemia. Deregulated JAK2 signaling has emerged as the central phenotypic driver of BCR -ABL1-negative MPNs and a unifying therapeutic target. In addition, MPNs show unexpected layers of genetic complexity, with multiple abnormalities associated with disease progression, interactions between inherited factors and phenotype driver mutations, and effects related to the order in which mutations are acquired. Although morphology and clinical laboratory analysis continue to play an important role in defining these conditions, genomic analysis is providing a platform for better disease definition, more accurate diagnosis, direction of therapy, and refined prognostication. There is an emerging consensus with regard to many prognostic factors, but there is a clear need to synthesize genomic findings into robust, clinically actionable and widely accepted scoring systems as well as the need to standardize the laboratory methodologies that are used.

  15. Myeloproliferative Neoplasms (MPNs) Patient Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-28

    Primary Myelofibrosis; Polycythemia Vera; Essential Thrombocythemia; Mastocytosis; Leukemia, Myeloid, Chronic, Atypical, BCR-ABL Negative; Leukemia, Myelomonocytic, Juvenile; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia-not Otherwise Specified; Myelodysplastic-Myeloproliferative Diseases; Neoplasms; Leukemia, Myelomonocytic, Chronic

  16. High dose Nutrizym 22 in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Shah, A; Dinwiddie, R; Madge, S; Prescott, P; Hudson, G

    1993-09-01

    New high dose pancreatic enzyme preparations could be potentially helpful to cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of the new high dose pancreatic enzyme preparation, Nutrizym 22 with the standard preparation Nutrizym GR. Twenty-five CF children (aged 7-16 years) entered the study and 22 completed it; 3 did not, due to non-compliance. All were taking Nutrizym GR for at least 2 weeks before entering the study. A randomised double blind, crossover method using standard Nutrizym GR or double strength Nutrizym 22 capsules was carried out over two consecutive 14-day periods. Crossover analyses of variance showed no statistically significant differences in actual weight gain, appetite, abdominal pain, stool consistency or faecal fat during the prestudy and study periods. It is concluded that half the capsule numbers of the high strength preparation are just as effective as the standard capsule dosage.

  17. Nutrition and growth in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hankard, Régis; Munck, Anne; Navarro, Jean

    2002-01-01

    Malnutrition is a common complication of chronic diseases in children and may lead to growth impairment (stunting). Malnutrition in cystic fibrosis (CF) results from increased energy expenditure, decreased energy intakes, malabsorption of ingested nutrients because of pancreatic insufficiency and chronic inflammation. Malnutrition and high levels of inflammatory cytokines affect IGF-1 production through interrelated mechanisms. Nutritional support was shown to improve both nutritional status and outcome in CF. However, some nutrients have a direct effect on the disease. n-3 fatty acids supplementation is able to correct lipid abnormalities resulting from a primary mechanism. Moreover, n-3 fatty acids have a direct effect on the inflammatory response, decreasing eicosanoid synthesis and modulating nuclear transcriptional factors nuclear factor kappaB and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors gamma. Nutritional support may be considered part of the care of the CF patient together with antibiotics, pancreatic enzymes and physiotherapy, influencing significantly the evolution of the disease.

  18. Spontaneous gastro-pancreatic fistula - a hitherto unknown natural history of IPMN?

    PubMed

    Rao, V; Sarkar, R; Smithies, A; Razack, A; Wedgwood, K

    2012-06-01

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) is a distinct group of benign pancreatic neoplasms often discovered incidentally on imaging. Apart from their malignant potential, little is known about their natural history as most are surgically resected. We report an unusual presentation and possible natural history of IPMN in a patient who refused surgery and hence was on regular follow up.

  19. Linc-ing Circulating Long Non-coding RNAs to the Diagnosis and Malignant Prediction of Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasms of the Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Permuth, Jennifer B; Chen, Dung-Tsa; Yoder, Sean J; Li, Jiannong; Smith, Andrew T; Choi, Jung W; Kim, Jongphil; Balagurunathan, Yoganand; Jiang, Kun; Coppola, Domenico; Centeno, Barbara A; Klapman, Jason; Hodul, Pam; Karreth, Florian A; Trevino, Jose G; Merchant, Nipun; Magliocco, Anthony; Malafa, Mokenge P; Gillies, Robert

    2017-09-05

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an aggressive disease that lacks effective biomarkers for early detection. We hypothesized that circulating long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) may act as diagnostic markers of incidentally-detected cystic PDAC precursors known as intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) and predictors of their pathology/histological classification. Using NanoString nCounter® technology, we measured the abundance of 28 candidate lncRNAs in pre-operative plasma from a cohort of pathologically-confirmed IPMN cases of various grades of severity and non-diseased controls. Results showed that two lncRNAs (GAS5 and SRA) aided in differentiating IPMNs from controls. An 8-lncRNA signature (including ADARB2-AS1, ANRIL, GLIS3-AS1, LINC00472, MEG3, PANDA, PVT1, and UCA1) had greater accuracy than standard clinical and radiologic features in distinguishing 'aggressive/malignant' IPMNs that warrant surgical removal from 'indolent/benign' IPMNs that can be observed. When the 8-lncRNA signature was combined with plasma miRNA data and quantitative 'radiomic' imaging features, the accuracy of predicting IPMN pathological classification improved. Our findings provide novel information on the ability to detect lncRNAs in plasma from patients with IPMNs and suggest that an lncRNA-based blood test may have utility as a diagnostic adjunct for identifying IPMNs and their pathology, especially when incorporated with biomarkers such as miRNAs, quantitative imaging features, and clinical data.

  20. Copy number gain of chromosome 3q is a recurrent event in patients with intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) associated with disease progression

    PubMed Central

    Astolfi, Annalisa; Grassi, Elisa; Casadei, Riccardo; Santini, Donatella; Panzacchi, Riccardo; Ricci, Claudio; Serravalle, Salvatore; Tarantino, Giuseppe; Falconi, Mirella; Teti, Gabriella; Indio, Valentina; Pession, Andrea; Minni, Francesco; Biasco, Guido; Di Marco, Mariacristina

    2016-01-01

    Background Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) is the most common cystic preneoplastic lesion of pancreatic cancer. We used an approach coupling high resolution cytogenetic analysis (Affymetrix Oncoscan FFPE Array) with clinically-oriented bioinformatic interpretation of data to understand the most relevant alterations of precursor lesions at different stages to identify new diagnostic markers. Results We identified multiple copy number alterations, particularly in lesions with severe dysplasia, with 7 IPMN with low-intermediate dysplasia carrying a nearly normal karyotype and 13 IPMN with complex Karyotype (> 4 alterations), showing high grade dysplasia. A specific gain of chromosome arm 3q was found in IPMN with complex Karyotype (92%). This gain of 3q is particularly interesting for the presence of oncogenes such as PIK3CA, GATA2 and TERC that are part of pathways that deregulate cell growth and promote disease progression. Quantitative PCR and FISH analysis confirmed the data. Further demonstration of the overexpression of the PIK3CA gene supports the identification of this alteration as a possible biomarker in the early identification of patients with IPMN at higher risk for disease progression. Materials and methods High resolution cytogenetic analysis was performed in 20 formalin fixed paraffin embedded samples of IPMN by Oncoscan FFPE assay. Results were validated by qPCR and FISH analysis. Conclusions The identification of these markers at an early stage of disease onset could help to identify patients at risk for cancer progression and new candidates for a more specific targeted therapy. PMID:27566563

  1. Neoplasms of the salivary glands in a Turkish adult population.

    PubMed

    Kara, Muhammed Isa; Göze, Fahrettin; Ezirganli, Seref; Polat, Serkan; Muderris, Suphi; Elagoz, Sahende

    2010-11-01

    This retrospective study aimed to investigate the types and distribution of neoplasm of salivary glands in a Turkish population. The histological diagnosis records of the Department of Pathology at Cumhuriyet University were reevaluated for 125 patients who were treated for salivary gland tumors from 1987 to 2008. The neoplasms were analyzed for histological diagnosis, age, sex, and site. The histological diagnoses were analyzed according to the 2005 WHO classification. A total of 125 primary salivary gland neoplasms, consisting of 95 (76%) benign and 30 (24%) malignant groups were recorded. The most common major and minor salivary gland sites were the parotid (61.6%) and palatal glands (9.6%), respectively. Pleomorphic adenoma was the most frequent benign tumor followed by Warthin's tumor. Among the malignant group, adenoid cystic carcinoma was the most prevalent. Age for all cases ranged from 16-80 years; mean age was 41.97 years, with a female to male ratio of 1:1.15. Although there were some discrepancies, the characteristics of salivary gland tumors of Turkish patients are in line with those of patients from other countries according to tumor type, tumor site distribution, and age and sex of patients.

  2. Molecular consequences of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene mutations in the exocrine pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, N; Corey, M; Forstner, G; Zielenski, J; Tsui, L-C; Ellis, L; Tullis, E; Durie, P

    2003-01-01

    Background and aims: We tested the hypothesis that the actual or predicted consequences of mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator gene correlate with the pancreatic phenotype and with measures of quantitative exocrine pancreatic function. Methods: We assessed 742 patients with cystic fibrosis for whom genotype and clinical data were available. At diagnosis, 610 were pancreatic insufficient, 110 were pancreatic sufficient, and 22 pancreatic sufficient patients progressed to pancreatic insufficiency after diagnosis. Results: We identified mutations on both alleles in 633 patients (85.3%), on one allele in 95 (12.8%), and on neither allele in 14 (1.9%). Seventy six different mutations were identified. The most common mutation was ΔF508 (71.3%) followed by G551D (2.9%), G542X (2.3%), 621+1G→T (1.2%), and W1282X (1.2%). Patients were categorized into five classes according to the predicted functional consequences of each mutation. Over 95% of patients with severe class I, II, and III mutations were pancreatic insufficient or progressed to pancreatic insufficiency. In contrast, patients with mild class IV and V mutations were consistently pancreatic sufficient. In all but four cases each genotype correlated exclusively with the pancreatic phenotype. Quantitative data of acinar and ductular secretion were available in 93 patients. Patients with mutations belonging to classes I, II, and III had greatly reduced acinar and ductular function compared with those with class IV or V mutations. Conclusion: The predicted or known functional consequences of specific mutant alleles correlate with the severity of pancreatic disease in cystic fibrosis. PMID:12865275

  3. Molecular consequences of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene mutations in the exocrine pancreas.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, N; Corey, M; Forstner, G; Zielenski, J; Tsui, L-C; Ellis, L; Tullis, E; Durie, P

    2003-08-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the actual or predicted consequences of mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator gene correlate with the pancreatic phenotype and with measures of quantitative exocrine pancreatic function. We assessed 742 patients with cystic fibrosis for whom genotype and clinical data were available. At diagnosis, 610 were pancreatic insufficient, 110 were pancreatic sufficient, and 22 pancreatic sufficient patients progressed to pancreatic insufficiency after diagnosis. We identified mutations on both alleles in 633 patients (85.3%), on one allele in 95 (12.8%), and on neither allele in 14 (1.9%). Seventy six different mutations were identified. The most common mutation was DeltaF508 (71.3%) followed by G551D (2.9%), G542X (2.3%), 621+1G-->T (1.2%), and W1282X (1.2%). Patients were categorized into five classes according to the predicted functional consequences of each mutation. Over 95% of patients with severe class I, II, and III mutations were pancreatic insufficient or progressed to pancreatic insufficiency. In contrast, patients with mild class IV and V mutations were consistently pancreatic sufficient. In all but four cases each genotype correlated exclusively with the pancreatic phenotype. Quantitative data of acinar and ductular secretion were available in 93 patients. Patients with mutations belonging to classes I, II, and III had greatly reduced acinar and ductular function compared with those with class IV or V mutations. The predicted or known functional consequences of specific mutant alleles correlate with the severity of pancreatic disease in cystic fibrosis.

  4. Living with Cystic Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Cystic Fibrosis If you or your child has cystic fibrosis (CF), you should learn as much as you can ... with your doctors to learn how to manage CF. Ongoing Care Having ongoing medical care by a ...

  5. Chromomycosis: Subcutaneous cystic type.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, S N; Bhise, P R; Sony, P R

    2000-01-01

    A 38-year -old male farmer presented with a solitary, asymptomatic, cystic lesion on the palm since last four years. He underwent excision of this cyst two times during this period but the lesion recurred near the same site. The histopathology and the microbiological examination led to the diagnosis of the rare subcutaneous cystic type of chromomycosis.

  6. [Contribution of endoscopic ultrasound to the diagnosis of pancreatic metastases from renal carcinoma. Apropos of two cases].

    PubMed

    Repiso, Alejandro; Gómez-Rodríguez, Rafael; Aso, Sonsoles; Domper, Francisco; Buendía, Encarnación; González de Frutos, Concepción; Pérez-Grueso, María José; Rodríguez-Merlo, Rufo; Carrobles, José María

    2007-03-01

    Pancreatic metastases represent 2% of pancreatic tumors. The neoplasms most frequently metastasizing to the pancreas are breast, lung, melanoma and kidney tumors. We present the cases of two patients with pancreatic metastases from renal carcinoma diagnosed 4 and 8 years after the diagnosis and surgical treatment of the primary renal tumor. In both patients, endoscopic ultrasound was useful in the detection and characterization of these pancreatic lesions and allowed fine-needle aspiration for cytological study to be performed.

  7. Pleuropulmonary blastoma in a young adult presenting as a ruptured cystic teratoma in radiology.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang Hun; Kim, Keun Il; Kim, Young Dae; Lee, Min Ki; Kim, Jee Yeon; Park, Do Youn; Sol, Mee Young; Suh, Kang Suek

    2003-01-01

    Pleuropulmonary blastoma (PPB) is a rare malignant dysontogenetic neoplasm primarily affecting children and is characterized histologically by a variably mixed blastematous and sarcomatous patterns. We herein report a very exceptional adult case of PPB. A 21-yr-old male patient presented with a left chest pain of two weeks' duration. A computed tomography scan revealed a large, multicystic tumor occupying the left lower hemithorax, leading to the impression of a ruptured mediastinal cystic teratoma. A thoracotomy for resection of the tumor was performed. On histologic examination, the tumor consisted of cystic walls and associated solid lesions which showed undifferentiated blastemal tissues with focal fibrosarcomatous and rhabdoid features. Immunohistochemically the tumor cells only showed diffuse strong positivity for vimentin. The histologic findings corresponded to a type II PPB. The authors suggest that PPB, especially of type I or II, should be included in the radiologic differential diagnosis of mediastinal cystic neoplasms in a young adult. PMID:12923341

  8. Importance of cone beam computed tomography for diagnosis of calcifying cystic odontogenic tumour associated to odontoma. Report of a case.

    PubMed

    Marques, Yonara-Maria-Freire-Soares; Botelho, Tessa-de Lucena; Xavier, Flávia-Caló-de Aquino; Rangel, Andrea-Leão; Rege, Inara-Carneiro-Costa; Mantesso, Andrea

    2010-05-01

    The calcifying cystic odontogenic tumour (CCOT) is a rare benign cystic neoplasm not infrequently associated with odontoma. This report documents a case of CCOT associated with compound odontoma arising in the anterior maxilla in a 25-year-old woman. Conventional radiographs showed a large calcified mass with poorly visualized radiolucent margins. The extent and condition of the internal structure of the CCOT associated with odontoma was able to be determined based on radiographic findings from cone beam computed tomography. This advanced image technique proved to be extremely useful in the radiographic assessment of this particular neoplasm of the jawbones.

  9. PCMdb: Pancreatic Cancer Methylation Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagpal, Gandharva; Sharma, Minakshi; Kumar, Shailesh; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Gupta, Sudheer; Gautam, Ankur; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.

    2014-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fifth most aggressive malignancy and urgently requires new biomarkers to facilitate early detection. For providing impetus to the biomarker discovery, we have developed Pancreatic Cancer Methylation Database (PCMDB, http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/pcmdb/), a comprehensive resource dedicated to methylation of genes in pancreatic cancer. Data was collected and compiled manually from published literature. PCMdb has 65907 entries for methylation status of 4342 unique genes. In PCMdb, data was compiled for both cancer cell lines (53565 entries for 88 cell lines) and cancer tissues (12342 entries for 3078 tissue samples). Among these entries, 47.22% entries reported a high level of methylation for the corresponding genes while 10.87% entries reported low level of methylation. PCMdb covers five major subtypes of pancreatic cancer; however, most of the entries were compiled for adenocarcinomas (88.38%) and mucinous neoplasms (5.76%). A user-friendly interface has been developed for data browsing, searching and analysis. We anticipate that PCMdb will be helpful for pancreatic cancer biomarker discovery.

  10. Neonatal screening for cystic fibrosis does not affect time to first infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Baussano, Iacopo; Tardivo, Irene; Bellezza-Fontana, Rossana; Forneris, Maria Pia; Lezo, Antonella; Anfossi, Luciano; Castello, Mario; Aleksandar, Veljkovic; Bignamini, Elisabetta

    2006-09-01

    Newborn screening for cystic fibrosis was introduced in the Piedmont region of Italy in the year 2000. Our aim with this study was to estimate the effect of newborn screening on the risk of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection at the regional cystic fibrosis pediatric reference center. The time to first infection with P aeruginosa within the historical cohort of cystic fibrosis children diagnosed between January 1, 1997, and June 30, 2004, was investigated, comparing survival functions and the adjusted hazard ratio of children diagnosed before and after newborn screening introduction. The role of pancreatic insufficiency was also concurrently investigated. Overall, 71 children diagnosed with cystic fibrosis were identified, 27 cases were clinically diagnosed before newborn screening introduction, and 5 of them presented with meconium ileus, whereas 44 were identified by newborn screening. Among them 35 needed pancreatic enzyme supplementation, whereas 34 children were infected with P aeruginosa. Both the nonparametric and semiparametric survival estimates failed to show any significant increase in the risk of P aeruginosa infection among screened children compared with historical controls. However, the median time from cystic fibrosis diagnosis to P aeruginosa infection among screened children was significantly shorter (183 vs 448 days). Children with impaired pancreatic function were at high risk of P aeruginosa infection. The results of the study suggest that health authorities should regard newborn screening for cystic fibrosis as an opportunity to improve care and outcomes among affected children and shift the focus from whether it is appropriate to screen to how to optimize biomedical and psychosocial outcomes of screening.

  11. Pancreatic cancer screening: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Gemmel, Christian; Eickhoff, Axel; Helmstädter, Lars; Riemann, Jürgen F

    2009-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a devastating disease with a median survival of approximately 6 months after diagnosis. Many factors are associated with a worse outcome; examples include late diagnosis, low resection rate, aggressive tumor behavior and a lack of an effective chemotherapy regimen. Owing to the low prevalence of pancreatic cancer relative to the diagnostic accuracy of present detection methods and the absence of promising treatment modalities, even in early stages, it is currently neither advisable nor cost effective to screen the general population. Efforts are focused on early screening of selected high-risk-cohorts, who account for approximately 10% of patients with pancreatic cancer. These include patients with chronic pancreatitis, individuals with a family history of pancreatic cancer, patients with hereditary pancreatitis, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, cystic fibrosis or familial atypical multiple mole melanoma. At present, a multimodal-screening approach of endoscopic ultrasound, computed tomography and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography appears to be the most effective method to screen for pancreatic cancer in high-risk patients. Continued efforts are needed to elucidate effective testing to identify patients with nonhereditary risk factors who will benefit from screening protocols. A combined approach of serum markers, genetic markers and specific imaging studies may prove to be the future of pancreatic screening.

  12. Time to reconsider Spitzoid neoplasms?

    PubMed Central

    Urso, Carmelo

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Background: Spitzoid neoplasms may pose significant diagnostic problems because in a fraction of them it is quite difficult or impossible to establish if they are benign or malignant lesions. An extraordinarily large number of studies have been made in attempts to solve this problem; regrettably, the histological criteria proposed and the various special sophisticated techniques employed have proven to be ineffective in making this distinction with confidence. Objectives: To explore the possible causes for this diagnostic failure and an attempt to identify the source of this problem. Method: A historical and technical analysis of the specialized literature is performed, critically evaluating the main points of this controversial topic. Results: The reasons for the diagnostic failure in Spitzoid neoplasms are not clear but could be the result of inappropriate conceptual representation. The analysis of available data and a rational review of old and new assumptions and concepts may suggest a different representation for Spitzoid neoplasms: Spitz nevus, atypical Spitz tumor and Spitzoid melanoma, rather than being three different tumors that are difficult or impossible to distinguish with assurance, could be viewed as one unique entity, Spitz tumor (ST). This tumor is a low-grade malignant neoplasm, in which the amount of intrinsic risk is variable, ranging from very low to high (ST1, ST2, ST3), and malignant potential could be estimated. Conclusions: The proposed alternative representation of Spitzoid neoplasms as a unique tumor may help in overcoming the difficulty in diagnosis of these tumors. PMID:27222771

  13. Refractory Jaundice From Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm Treated With Cholangioscopy-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation.

    PubMed

    Brown, Nicholas G; Camilo, Joel; McCarter, Martin; Shah, Raj J

    2016-04-01

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) are epithelial neoplasms treated with surgical resection when appropriate. We present a 79-year-old man with jandice refractory to endoscopic stenting. Biliary radiofrequency ablation (RFA) with cholangioscopy was used as palliation of obstructive jaundice due to a mucin-producing pancreatic IPMN with fistulous biliary communication. Clinical improvement permitted surgery, and he returned to pre-illness status at 17 months. The use of cholangioscopy in the setting of mucinous filling defects can guide over-the-wire RFA for palliation and may be a bridge to surgery.

  14. Malignant Nonfunctioning Neuroendocrine Neoplasm of the Pancreas in a 10-Year-Old Child.

    PubMed

    Marwan, Ahmed; Christein, John D

    2009-04-17

    Malignant neoplasms of the pancreas are extremely rare in children and only represent a small percentage of pediatric cancer-related deaths. The paucity of cases reported in the literature, in addition to the lack of understanding of biologic behavior, has led to a lack of consensus concerning optimal management strategy. Presentation differs compared to adult counterparts and generally prognosis is improved even when lymph node metastases occur. Here we review the literature and report the case of a 10-year-old autistic female with a malignant nonfunctioning pancreatic endocrine neoplasm of the head of the pancreas successfully extirpated via pancreaticoduodenectomy.

  15. Focal chronic pancreatitis mimicking pancreatic head carcinoma: are there suggestive features on ultrasound?

    PubMed

    Patlas, Michael; Deitel, Wayne; Taylor, Bryce; Gallinger, Steven; Wilson, Stephanie R

    2007-02-01

    Painless jaundice is one of the most common presentations of pancreatic head cancer. Chronic pancreatitis can also occasionally present with a mass or mass-like process in the pancreatic head, with the subsequent development of jaundice. In this retrospective review, we evaluate the clinical and imaging features of 22 patients presenting with painless jaundice, initially thought to have pancreatic head cancer and ultimately proven to have chronic focal pancreatitis, to determine whether there are any features on cross-sectional imaging to suggest the correct diagnosis. Patients (n = 22) were identified from the medical and imaging records of more than 400 patients with an original diagnosis of pancreatic cancer who were seen at our institution from 1995 to 2003. Of the patients, 17 were men and 5 were women (age range 25 to 82 years, mean age 54 years). Initial ultrasound showed a large, hypoechoic, well-defined mass in the pancreatic head, varying in size from 3 to 7.5 cm; 14 of 22 masses were > 5 cm in maximal diameter. Diagnosis of focal pancreatitis was proven by surgical pathology in 14 cases and suggested by percutaneous biopsy in 3 cases; for all patients, prolonged imaging follow-up (at least 1 year) showed no disease progression or evidence of malignancy. The mean follow-up in our study group was 31 months (range 12 to 72 months). Male sex, large size of the pancreatic head mass (mean diameter 5.5 cm), and lack of atrophy of the pancreatic body and tail were the only features associated with chronic inflammation rather than neoplasm as an explanation for a pancreatic head mass. Chronic pancreatitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of focal pancreatic masses, even in the absence of supporting clinical evidence.

  16. GATA3 immunohistochemical expression in salivary gland neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Lauren E; Begum, Shahnaz; Westra, William H; Bishop, Justin A

    2013-12-01

    GATA3 is a zinc finger transcription factor that regulates the normal development of many tissues and cell types. Recent studies have shown that immunohistochemical nuclear staining for GATA3 among tumors is highly restricted to carcinomas of breast and urothelial origin; however salivary gland tumors have not been tested. Given that breast and salivary gland tissues are very similar with respect to embryologic development and structure, we performed GATA3 staining on a spectrum of salivary gland neoplasms. GATA3 immunohistochemistry was performed on a diverse collection of 180 benign and malignant salivary gland neoplasms including 10 acinic cell carcinomas, 2 adenocarcinomas not otherwise specified, 41 adenoid cystic carcinomas, 2 epithelial-myoepithelial carcinomas, 1 low grade cribriform cystadenocarcinoma, 15 mammary analogue secretory carcinomas, 7 metastatic squamous cell carcinomas, 27 mucoepidermoid carcinomas, 2 oncocytic carcinomas, 5 oncocytomas, 34 pleomorphic adenomas, 4 polymorphous low grade adenocarcinomas, 25 salivary duct carcinomas, and 5 Warthin tumors. Staining for GATA3 was observed in 92/180 (51 %) of salivary gland tumors. GATA3 staining was observed in most of the tumor types, but diffuse immunolabeling was consistently seen in salivary duct carcinoma (25 of 25) and mammary analogue secretory carcinoma (15 of 15)-the two tumor types that most closely resemble breast neoplasia. Background benign salivary gland tissue was also usually weakly positive in both acini and ducts. GATA3 immunostaining is not restricted to tumors of breast and urothelial origin. Rather, it is expressed across many different types of salivary gland neoplasms. As a result, salivary gland origin should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a GATA3-positive carcinoma, particularly in the head and neck. Although GATA3 immunohistochemistry is not helpful in resolving the differential diagnosis between a primary salivary gland neoplasm and metastatic breast

  17. Hedgehog Signaling in Pancreatic Fibrosis and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yongyu; Bai, Yongheng; Dong, Jiaojiao; Li, Qiang; Jin, Yuepeng; Chen, Bicheng; Zhou, Mengtao

    2016-03-01

    The hedgehog signaling pathway was first discovered in the 1980s. It is a stem cell-related pathway that plays a crucial role in embryonic development, tissue regeneration, and organogenesis. Aberrant activation of hedgehog signaling leads to pathological consequences, including a variety of human tumors such as pancreatic cancer. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that blockade of this pathway with several small-molecule inhibitors can inhibit the development of pancreatic neoplasm. In addition, activated hedgehog signaling has been reported to be involved in fibrogenesis in many tissues, including the pancreas. Therefore, new therapeutic targets based on hedgehog signaling have attracted a great deal of attention to alleviate pancreatic diseases. In this review, we briefly discuss the recent advances in hedgehog signaling in pancreatic fibrogenesis and carcinogenesis and highlight new insights on their potential relationship with respect to the development of novel targeted therapies.

  18. Hedgehog Signaling in Pancreatic Fibrosis and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yongyu; Bai, Yongheng; Dong, Jiaojiao; Li, Qiang; Jin, Yuepeng; Chen, Bicheng; Zhou, Mengtao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The hedgehog signaling pathway was first discovered in the 1980s. It is a stem cell-related pathway that plays a crucial role in embryonic development, tissue regeneration, and organogenesis. Aberrant activation of hedgehog signaling leads to pathological consequences, including a variety of human tumors such as pancreatic cancer. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that blockade of this pathway with several small-molecule inhibitors can inhibit the development of pancreatic neoplasm. In addition, activated hedgehog signaling has been reported to be involved in fibrogenesis in many tissues, including the pancreas. Therefore, new therapeutic targets based on hedgehog signaling have attracted a great deal of attention to alleviate pancreatic diseases. In this review, we briefly discuss the recent advances in hedgehog signaling in pancreatic fibrogenesis and carcinogenesis and highlight new insights on their potential relationship with respect to the development of novel targeted therapies. PMID:26962810

  19. Sebaceous carcinoma arising in mature cystic teratoma of ovary.

    PubMed

    An, Hyo Jeong; Jung, Yong Han; Yoon, Hye Kyoung; Jung, Soo Jin

    2013-08-01

    Roughly 1% of mature cystic teratomas undergo malignant transformation. In particular, cutaneous-type adnexal neoplasms may occur in mature cystic teratomas. Sebaceous carcinomas, which arise from mature cystic teratomas, have rarely been observed, with only seven cases previously reported. Here, we present a case of a 69-year-old female who had pelvic pain for two weeks and who subsequently underwent bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy and hysterectomy. Her left ovary showed a unilocular cyst, measuring 22.0 cm in diameter, filled with sebaceous material and a few hairs. A luminally-protruding solid mass measuring 4.0 cm in diameter was also noted. Microscopic findings revealed lobular or diffusely arranged basophilic, atypical sebaceous cells connected to a typical mature cystic teratoma. Tumor cells demonstrated positive immunoreactivity for high molecular weight cytokeratin, cytokeratin 7, cytokeratin 19, epithelial membrane antigen, and carcinoembryonic antigen. Here, we present a case of sebaceous carcinoma arising from a mature cystic teratoma along with a review of previously published reports.

  20. [Nutrition, cystic fibrosis and the digestive tract].

    PubMed

    Olveira, Gabriel; Olveira, Casilda

    2008-05-01

    The prevalence of hyponutrition in cystic fibrosis is high although it may vary according to the different studies. Detection of hyponutrition should be done by combining different methods, depending on their availability. However, the simplest and most validated criterion is to measure at each visit the weight (and height in children) in order to calculate the body mass index and categorizing hyponutrition according to absolute criteria: in adults < 18.5 kg/m(2), and in children as percentiles of the body mass index. Worsening of the nutritional status is directly related with the decrease in lung function parameters and it has been proposed as a morbidity (and even mortality) predictive factor in people with cystic fibrosis, independently of the level of pulmonary dysfunction. Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency is present is approximately 70-90% of the patients with cystic fibrosis and the genotype-phenotype correlation is high. Most of the patients with exocrine pancreatic insufficiency tolerate a high-fat diet provided that they are treated with pancreatic enzymes at appropriate doses. The prevalence of diabetes increases with age, reaching up 40% of the cases in patients older than 30 years. Clinical liver involvement is less prevalent (it approximately affects 1/3 of the patients). Other intestinal complications such as meconial ileus, gastroesophageal reflux, obstruction of the distal intestine, or fibrosing colon disease may also condition malnourishment. In patients with cystic fibrosis, a usual high-fat diet providing 120%-150% of the recommended calories is advised. If the nutritional goals are not achieved or maintained with diet modifications, artificial supplements may be added, although the recommendation for their use has not been endorsed by solid scientific evidences. The most frequently used preparations usually are polymeric or hypercaloric. The indications for enteral (through a tube, especially gastrostomy) or parenteral nutritional support are

  1. CT of benign cystic abdominal masses in children

    SciTech Connect

    Haney, P.J.; Whitley, N.O.

    1984-06-01

    Computed tomography (CT) correctly portrayed the gross anatomic features of six mesenteric, omental, and ovarian cysts and diagnosed two pancreatic pseudocysts in children. Large, well defined, low-density masses were found, often containing septa and filling most of the abdomen and pelvis. CT displayed the size and extent of the mass and showed extrinsic compression of displacement of surrounding structures. Different pathologic entities may have similar CT appearances, particularly with very large cystic masses.

  2. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis for cystic fibrosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Biazotti, Maria Cristina Santoro; Pinto, Walter; de Albuquerque, Maria Cecília Romano Maciel; Fujihara, Litsuko Shimabukuro; Suganuma, Cláudia Haru; Reigota, Renata Bednar; Bertuzzo, Carmen Sílvia

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene. This disorder produces a variable phenotype including lung disease, pancreatic insufficiency, and meconium ileus plus bilateral agenesis of the vas deferens causing obstructive azoospermia and male infertility. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis is an alternative that allows identification of embryos affected by this or other genetic diseases. We report a case of couple with cystic fibrosis; the woman had the I148 T mutation and the man had the Delta F508 gene mutation. The couple underwent in vitro fertilization, associated with preimplantation genetic diagnosis, and with subsequent selection of healthy embryos for uterine transfer. The result was an uneventful pregnancy and delivery of a healthy male baby. PMID:25993078

  3. Pentoxifylline Treatment in Acute Pancreatitis (AP)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-14

    Acute Pancreatitis (AP); Gallstone Pancreatitis; Alcoholic Pancreatitis; Post-ERCP/Post-procedural Pancreatitis; Trauma Acute Pancreatitis; Hypertriglyceridemia Acute Pancreatitis; Idiopathic (Unknown) Acute Pancreatitis; Medication Induced Acute Pancreatitis; Cancer Acute Pancreatitis; Miscellaneous (i.e. Acute on Chronic Pancreatitis)

  4. Evaluation of p27 Expression in Salivary Gland Neoplasms; A Step Forward in Unveiling the Role of p27

    PubMed Central

    Malgaonkar, Nikhil I.; Abuderman, Abdulwahab; Kharma, MY; Al-Maweri, SA; Alaizari, NA; Altamimi, MA.; Darwish, S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Salivary gland neoplasms are not uncommon lesions that are seen in the head and neck region. The role of cell cycle regulators as well as that of oncogenes remains unexplored in the pathogenesis of these neoplasms. Aim Present study was conducted to evaluate the expression of p27 in the three common salivary gland neoplasms. Materials and Methods A total of 34 cases (19 pleomorphic adenoma, 8 mucoepidermoid carcinoma and 7 adenoid cystic carcinoma) were included. The sections were subjected to p27 staining and rated for the expression. Results Of the total 52.6% of pleomorphic adenoma cases, 25% of mucoepidermoid carcinoma cases and only 14.2% of adenoid cystic carcinoma cases showed strong expression suggesting variable p27 expression in both malignant neoplasms. Normal salivary gland tissue was stained as a positive control for the evaluation. Conclusion The results of the study suggest an important role for p27 in pathogenesis of mucoepidermoid carcinoma as well as adenoid cystic carcinoma while its role in pathogenesis of pleomorphic adenoma remains questionable keeping in view the strong expression of p27 in the same. PMID:27630940

  5. Obesity, pancreatitis, and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Gumbs, Andrew A

    2008-09-01

    The only universally accepted risk factors for the development of pancreatic cancer are a positive family history or a history of smoking. Although the contribution of pancreatitis to pancreatic carcinogenesis has been debated for decades in the epidemiology literature, the actual mechanism is still unclear. With the rising epidemic of obesity, scientists have begun to focus on the contribution of chronic inflammatory state of morbidly obese patients in an effort to better understand the contribution of inflammation to the comorbidities of obesity. Notably, population studies are beginning to show that one of the most serious potential comorbidities of obesity is an increased lifetime risk of developing cancer. In this article, the current literature that exists supporting this Chronic Inflammatory Hypothesis as it pertains to obesity and pancreatic carcinogenesis is reviewed. To date, studies have focused on interleukin-6, a cytokine known to play a role in obesity, chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. The anti-inflammatory adipocytokine, adiponectin, has also shown promise as a key player in this mechanism and has recently been found to be more specific than standard tumor markers in differentiating pancreatic cancer from chronic pancreatitis. If the pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer is related to hormone levels associated with obesity, such as adipocytokines, and cytokines associated with chronic inflammation, this could potentially lead to the development of new pancreatic cancer tumor markers and ultimately new therapies and methods of prevention.

  6. [Strategies for screening for pancreatic adenocarcinoma in high-risk patients: the place of endoscopic ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Béchade, Dominique

    2011-03-01

    Screening high-risk individuals with imaging tests, such endoscopic ultrasound and computed tomography, can lead to the detection and treatment of predominantly asymptomatic premalignant lesions. These pancreatic lesions consist of resectable, mostly branch-type non invasive intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms. Endoscopic ultrasound features of chronic pancreatitis are highly prevalent in high-risk individuals and these directly correlate with multifocal lobulocentric parenchymal atrophy due to pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia. Long-term, multi-prospective studies are needed to determine if screening for early pancreatic adenocarcinoma and timely intervention results in decreased pancreatic cancer incidence and mortality in high-risk individuals.

  7. Cystic fibrosis in adult age.

    PubMed

    Lerín, M; Prados, C; Martínez, M T; Maíz, L; Girón, R; Solé, A; Cabanillas, J J; Alvarez-Sala, R

    2014-01-01

    To know the prevalence of the patients diagnosed of cystic fibrosis (CF) older than 18 years old of five specific Spanish Units and to analyze their clinical, genetic and microbiological characteristics. Observational, cross-sectional, descriptive study of patients diagnosed with CF at age or older than 18 years. The variables analyzed were: current age, age at diagnosis, sex, nationality, lung function parameters, pathologies presented at diagnosis, microbiological features and genetic findings. Eigthy nine patients (14.8% of the total of 600 CF patients followed at the participating units), of which 45 patients were female (50.6%) and 44 were males (49.4%), were included with a mean age at diagnosis of 36.4 years. Eigthy one patients (91%) were Spaniards. The sweat test was diagnostic in 77 (86.5%) of the patients studied. The sweat test was diagnostic in 77 of the 89 patients studied (86.5%). The most frequently detected mutations were F508del/other and G542X/other, and the most frequent clinical findings at diagnosis were the presence of bronchiectasis in 33 patients (37.1%) followed by sterility in 12 patients (13.5%). The most common colonizing organisms were meticillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (S.aureus) (23.6%) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) (13.5%). Most patients presented a mild obstructive ventilatory defect and had no pancreatic involvement. The sweat test used to be indeterminate. CF is also a disease which diagnosis can be in adulthood. CF patients diagnosed in adulthood have a mild lung function and lower incidence of pancreatic involvement, so their prognosis tends to be favorable. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  8. Coincidence of GIST and pancreatic endocrine neoplasm in neurofibromatosis.

    PubMed

    Dominguez-Comesaña, Elias; Tome-Espiñeiro, Catherine; Ulla-Rocha, Jose L; Lorenzo-Lorenzo, Isabel; Lede-Fernandez, Angel; Portela-Serra, Jose L

    2011-09-01

    Carcinoids of the ampulla of Vater are infrequent tumors of which a quarter of cases have been detected in patients with type I neurofibromatosis. This hereditary disease is also associated with gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). However, the coincidence of these three entities together have only been formerly detected in five cases. A 53 year-old female patient, diagnosed with type I neurofibromatosis, with a malignant carcinoid of ampulla of Vater and multiple gastrointestinal stromal tumors in the duodenum and jejunum, was treated with total pancreatectomy and the excision of her intestinal tumors. Five-years on, a follow-up showed the patient to be well, and free from tumor recurrence. The coexistence of an ampullary carcinoid tumor, GIST and neurofibramatosis is very rare. Radical curative surgical resection is a good treatment option, but the optimal management of this is not yet well established.

  9. Surgical management of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Farnell, Michael B

    2008-03-01

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) of the pancreas is characterized by papillary growths within the pancreatic ductal system that are at risk for undergoing malignant transformation. Main duct IPMN carries a significant risk of malignancy, and operation is recommended regardless of the presence of symptoms. The risk of malignancy is much lower for side branch IPMN, and current evidence suggests that, in the absence of symptoms, mural nodules, positive cytology, or cyst size less than 3 cm, observation is warranted. When operation is indicated, targeted pancreatic resection with frozen-section analysis of margins is recommended. Pancreatoduodenectomy or distal pacreatectomy is appropriate for the majority. Only in about 10% of patients is the disease so diffuse at presentation that total pancreatectomy is necessary. Survival following pancreatic resection for noninvasive IPMN is excellent. The risk of recurrence following pancreatic resection for invasive IPMN is significant. Surveillance is warranted both for patients subjected to pancreatic resection and for those under observation with side branch IPMN. Much is yet to be learned regarding this neoplasm, and surgical management remains in evolution.

  10. Learning about Cystic Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cystic Fibrosis: Your Genes, Your Health [yourgenesyourhealth.org] Multimedia educational site including screening and treatment information. Hosted by the Dolan DNA Learning Center at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. What is ...

  11. Cystic Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Sonal; Rahim, Ahmed Mujib Bangalore; Parakkat, Nithin Kavassery; Kapoor, Shekhar; Mittal, Kumud; Sharma, Bhushan; Shivappa, Anil Bangalore

    2015-01-01

    Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor (AOT) is a well-established benign epithelial lesion of odontogenic origin. Rightfully called “the master of disguise,” this lesion has been known for its varied clinical and histoarchitectural patterns. Not only does AOT predominantly present radiologically as a unilocular cystic lesion enclosing the unerupted tooth (which is commonly mistaken as a dentigerous cyst) but the lesion also presents rarely with a cystic component histopathologically. We present one such unusual case of cystic AOT associated with an impacted canine, mimicking a dentigerous cyst. The present case aims to highlight the difference between cystic AOT and dentigerous cyst radiographically. The exact histogenesis of AOT and its variants still remains obscure. An attempt has been made to hypothesize the new school of thought regarding the origin of AOT. PMID:26579317

  12. What Is the Best Way to Identify Malignant Transformation Within Pancreatic IPMN: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Sultana, Asma; Jackson, Richard; Tim, Gilbert; Bostock, Emma; Psarelli, Eftychia E; Cox, Trevor F; Sutton, Robert; Ghaneh, Paula; Raraty, Michael G T; Neoptolemos, John P; Halloran, Christopher M

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Pancreatic intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasias (IPMNs) represent 25% of all cystic neoplasms and are precursor lesions for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. This study aims to identify the best imaging modality for detecting malignant transformation in IPMN, the sensitivity and specificity of risk features on imaging, and the usefulness of tumor markers in serum and cyst fluid to predict malignancy in IPMN. Methods: Databases were searched from November 2006 to March 2014. Pooled sensitivity and specificity of diagnostic techniques/imaging features of suspected malignancy in IPMN using a hierarchical summary receiver operator characteristic (HSROC) approach were performed. Results: A total of 467 eligible studies were identified, of which 51 studies met the inclusion criteria and 37 of these were incorporated into meta-analyses. The pooled sensitivity and specificity for risk features predictive of malignancy on computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging were 0.809 and 0.762 respectively, and on positron emission tomography were 0.968 and 0.911. Mural nodule, cyst size, and main pancreatic duct dilation found on imaging had pooled sensitivity for prediction of malignancy of 0.690, 0.682, and 0.614, respectively, and specificity of 0.798, 0.574, and 0.687. Raised serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) levels yielded sensitivity of 0.380 and specificity of 0903. Combining parameters yielded a sensitivity of 0.743 and specificity of 0.906. Conclusions: PET holds the most promise in identifying malignant transformation within an IPMN. Combining parameters increases sensitivity and specificity; the presence of mural nodule on imaging was the most sensitive whereas raised serum CA19-9 (>37 KU/l) was the most specific feature predictive of malignancy in IPMNs. PMID:26658837

  13. Drugs Approved for Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for myeloproliferative neoplasms. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  14. Intramural hemorrhage simulating gastric neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Sheward, S E; Davis, M; Amparo, E G; Gogel, H K

    1988-01-01

    We report a case of benign gastric ulcer with secondary extensive intramural hemorrhage causing a radiographic appearance consistent with a large ulcerated gastric neoplasm. This is the second such case reported and the first studied with sonography and computed tomographic scan. A brief review of the literature on intramural gastric hematoma is presented.

  15. The expression of FOXL2 in pancreatic, hepatobiliary, and renal tumors with ovarian-type stroma.

    PubMed

    Westerhoff, Maria; Tretiakova, Maria; Hart, John; Gwin, Katja; Liu, Xiuli; Zhou, Ming; Yeh, Matthew M; Antic, Tatjana

    2014-05-01

    FOXL2, a gene encoding a member of the fork-head-winged-helix family of transcription factors, is one of the earliest expressed genes during female gonadal development. It is expressed in normal ovarian stroma and ovarian neoplasms with granulosa cell lineage. Nonovarian tumors such as pancreatic mucinous cystic neoplasms (PMCs), hepatobiliary cystadenomas (HBCs), and mixed epithelial and stromal tumor of the kidney (MEST) have ovarian-type stroma. Immunohistochemical staining with FOXL2, estrogen receptor, and progesterone receptor was performed on 21 PMCs, 13 HBCs, and 10 MESTs and assessed for nuclear immunohistochemical positivity in the tumor stroma. All cases of PMC and HBC demonstrated nuclear reactivity for FOXL2 in the subepithelial stromal cells. Ninety percent of MEST demonstrated nuclear FOXL2 positivity. Estrogen receptor nuclear positivity was demonstrated in 57% of PMC, 77% of HBC, and 80% of MEST. Progesterone receptor nuclear positivity was present in 67% of PMC, 100% of HBC, and 90% of MEST. Clinical information was available for 37 patients. Seventy-eight percent of the patients had a history of obesity, heavy alcohol use, or hormone-related therapy. The 2 male patients had histories significant for morbid obesity and chronic alcoholism. FOXL2 is expressed from the early stages of ovarian development and has been shown to be mandatory for normal ovarian function. We have shown that it is also expressed in the aberrant ovarian-type stroma characteristic of PMC, HBC, and MEST. Most of such patients, including the rare male patients, have risk factors for hormonal abnormalities such as obesity and hormonal replacement therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Respiratory Screen: Sputum

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Chloride Sweat Test Lungs and Respiratory System Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition Cystic Fibrosis Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition Lungs and Respiratory System Contact Us Print Resources Send to a friend ...

  17. Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Respiratory Screen: Sputum

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Chloride Sweat Test Lungs and Respiratory System Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition Cystic Fibrosis Cystic Fibrosis: Diet and Nutrition Lungs and Respiratory System Contact Us Print Resources Send to a Friend ...

  18. What's it Like to Have Cystic Fibrosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... CPR: A Real Lifesaver Kids Talk About: Coaches Cystic Fibrosis KidsHealth > For Kids > Cystic Fibrosis Print A A ... strength to deal with cystic fibrosis. What Is CF? Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a disease that causes ...

  19. Pancreatic ectasia in uremic macaques.

    PubMed Central

    Bronson, R. T.; Strauss, W.; Wheeler, W.

    1982-01-01

    Pancreatic ectasia (PE) is a common incidental finding in people dying from uremia. It has been described as dilatation of acini, inspissation of secretions, and proliferation of ductal cells. PE occurred in 17 macaques, 11 of which were known to have been uremic. The lesion was studied by light and electronmicroscopy and histochemistry and by construction of a three-dimensional model of a dilated acinar ductal system from serial semithick Epon sections. Atrophic acinar cells interspersed with clumps of centroacinar cells lined all portions of the system. There was no evidence of ductular proliferation. Fibrillar material was present in the dilated acinar lumens and associated with epithelial cells and leukocytes, but no blockage of the system was demonstrated. The lesion is similar to those induced by a variety of experimental procedures and to the pancreatic lesions of cystic fibrosis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:6175218

  20. Cystic fibrosis: a clinical view.

    PubMed

    Castellani, Carlo; Assael, Baroukh M

    2017-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF), a monogenic disease caused by mutations in the CFTR gene on chromosome 7, is complex and greatly variable in clinical expression. Airways, pancreas, male genital system, intestine, liver, bone, and kidney are involved. The lack of CFTR or its impaired function causes fat malabsorption and chronic pulmonary infections leading to bronchiectasis and progressive lung damage. Previously considered lethal in infancy and childhood, CF has now attained median survivals of 50 years of age, mainly thanks to the early diagnosis through neonatal screening, recognition of mild forms, and an aggressive therapeutic attitude. Classical treatment includes pancreatic enzyme replacement, respiratory physiotherapy, mucolitics, and aggressive antibiotic therapy. A significant proportion of patients with severe symptoms still requires lung or, less frequently, liver transplantation. The great number of mutations and their diverse effects on the CFTR protein account only partially for CF clinical variability, and modifier genes have a role in modulating the clinical expression of the disease. Despite the increasing understanding of CFTR functioning, several aspects of CF need still to be clarified, e.g., the worse outcome in females, the risk of malignancies, the pathophysiology, and best treatment of comorbidities, such as CF-related diabetes or CF-related bone disorder. Research is focusing on new drugs restoring CFTR function, some already available and with good clinical impact, others showing promising preliminary results that need to be confirmed in phase III clinical trials.

  1. Huge Benign Ovarian Cystic Teratoma in a Patient with a History of Hansen's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Okonta, Patrick I.

    2014-01-01

    Mature ovarian cystic teratomas are common benign ovarian neoplasm derived from germ cells. With increasing availability of ultrasound services even in developing countries, the diagnosis of benign ovarian tumour is made earlier and the size of the ovarian tumour at diagnosis is relatively small. It is unusual to find an ovarian cystic teratoma larger than 10 cm. We report a huge mature ovarian cystic teratoma in a multipara with a history of Hansen's disease. We conclude that, in circumstances where women have restricted access to health care, the unusual finding of mature ovarian cystic teratoma larger than 10 cm is possible due to delayed presentation for diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25210635

  2. Enhancing Targeted Therapy for Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    Myeloproliferative Neoplasms PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Gary W. Reuther CONTRACTING...2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 30 2012-2 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Enhancing Targeted Therapy for Myeloproliferative Neoplasms ...AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Myeloproliferative neoplasms

  3. Enhancing Targeted Therapy for Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0450 TITLE: Enhancing Targeted Therapy for Myeloproliferative Neoplasms PRINCIPAL...TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED 30 Sep 2012 - 29 Sep 20144 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Enhancing Targeted Therapy for Myeloproliferative Neoplasms ... Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are blood cancers that affect almost 300,000 people in the United States. MPN drugs (JAK inhibitors) do not effectively

  4. Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Geokas, Michael C.

    1972-01-01

    For many decades two types of acute pancreatitis have been recognized: the edematous or interstitial and the hemorrhagic or necrotic. In most cases acute pancreatitis is associated with alcoholism or biliary tract disease. Elevated serum or urinary α-amylase is the most important finding in diagnosis. The presence of methemalbumin in serum and in peritoneal or pleural fluid supports the diagnosis of the hemorrhagic form of the disease in patients with a history and enzyme studies suggestive of pancreatitis. There is no characteristic clinical picture in acute pancreatitis, and its complications are legion. Pancreatic pseudocyst is probably the most common and pancreatic abscess is the most serious complication. The pathogenetic principle is autodigestion, but the precise sequence of biochemical events is unclear, especially the mode of trypsinogen activation and the role of lysosomal hydrolases. A host of metabolic derangements have been identified in acute pancreatitis, involving lipid, glucose, calcium and magnesium metabolism and changes of the blood clotting mechanism, to name but a few. Medical treatment includes intestinal decompression, analgesics, correction of hypovolemia and other supportive and protective measures. Surgical exploration is advisable in selected cases, when the diagnosis is in doubt, and is considered imperative in the presence of certain complications, especially pancreatic abscess. PMID:4559467

  5. Pancreatic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Sharf, B.; Bental, E.

    1971-01-01

    A 58 year old woman presenting with abdominal distress and a neuropsychiatric disturbance with evidence of focal neurological deficit is described. A diagnosis of pancreatic encephalopathy was made, and the patient was treated accordingly with pancreatic anti-enzymes. A survey of the literature is presented. Images PMID:5315218

  6. Pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Audrey; Herman, Joseph; Schulick, Rich; Hruban, Ralph H; Goggins, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made in our understanding of the biology of pancreatic cancer, and advances in patients’ management have also taken place. Evidence is beginning to show that screening first-degree relatives of individuals with several family members affected by pancreatic cancer can identify non-invasive precursors of this malignant disease. The incidence of and number of deaths caused by pancreatic tumours have been gradually rising, even as incidence and mortality of other common cancers have been declining. Despite developments in detection and management of pancreatic cancer, only about 4% of patients will live 5 years after diagnosis. Survival is better for those with malignant disease localised to the pancreas, because surgical resection at present offers the only chance of cure. Unfortunately, 80–85% of patients present with advanced unresectable disease. Furthermore, pancreatic cancer responds poorly to most chemotherapeutic agents. Hence, we need to understand the biological mechanisms that contribute to development and progression of pancreatic tumours. In this Seminar we will discuss the most common and deadly form of pancreatic cancer, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. PMID:21620466

  7. Omega-3 fatty acids for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Colleen; Jahnke, Nikki

    2011-08-10

    in participants taking omega-3 supplements compared to placebo. This review found that regular omega-3 supplements may provide some benefits for people with cystic fibrosis with relatively few adverse effects, although evidence is insufficient to draw firm conclusions or recommend routine use of these supplements in people with cystic fibrosis. This review has highlighted the lack of data for many outcomes meaningful to people with or making treatment decisions about cystic fibrosis. A large, long-term, multicentre, randomised controlled study is needed to determine any significant therapeutic effect and to assess the influence of disease severity, dosage and duration of treatment. Future researchers should note the need for additional pancreatic enzymes.

  8. Pitfalls in the biopsy diagnosis of intraoral minor salivary gland neoplasms: diagnostic considerations and recommended approach.

    PubMed

    Turk, Andrew T; Wenig, Bruce M

    2014-01-01

    Among the more common types of intraoral minor salivary gland neoplasms are pleomorphic adenoma, basal cell adenoma, polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinoma, and adenoid cystic carcinoma. These minor salivary gland neoplasms share similar morphologic features and to a large extent immunohistochemical findings. Differentiation between these benign and malignant neoplasms is often predicated on the presence or absence of invasion. As such, in the presence of limited tissue sampling that typifies the initial testing modalities, including fine needle aspiration biopsy and/or incisional biopsy, it often is not possible to differentiate a benign from malignant minor salivary gland neoplasm. The diagnostic difficulties arise from the absence in needle or incisional biopsy of the tumor's periphery to determine whether infiltrative growth is or is not present. In this manuscript we discuss limitations and considerations associated with evaluation of incisional biopsies of intraoral minor salivary gland tumors. We offer a diagnostic approach to evaluating these biopsies, and suggest diagnostic terminology for biopsy specimens in which distinction between benignancy and malignancy is not feasible. The pathologist's approach to this distinction is critical, as treatment of benign neoplasms is generally conservative, whereas malignant lesions may warrant more aggressive management.

  9. The use of pancreatic ductoscopy in the operative management of benign and malignant pancreatic disorders.

    PubMed

    Branum, G D; Pappas, T N; Meyers, W C

    1995-01-01

    Direct visualization of the pancreatic duct was helpful in decision making during complex pancreaticobiliary operations. Two-, 3-, or 5-mm scopes were introduced into the pancreatic ducts of 32 patients with pancreatic disorders. Scopes were passed into the ductal system of: (1) 16 patients undergoing pancreaticojejunostomy; (2) six patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy; (3) four patients with pancreatic pseudocysts or choledochal cysts: (4) two patients undergoing resection of the pancreatic tail; and (5) two patients undergoing accessory ductoplasty for pancreas divism or stricture. Eight patients had calculi removed utilizing the scope, and multiple strictures were identified and filleted. Pancreatic ductoscopy was used in two patients to document successful sphincteroplasty of an accessory duct. In two instances benign pancreatic duct tumors were removed. Pancreatic ductoscopy was used to search for coexistent duct neoplasms in the eight patients who underwent resection. The technique permits intraoperative inspection, biopsy, and removal of lesions intrinsic to the ductal system. Combined with surgical procedures this endoscopic method proved a useful adjunct in difficult cases.

  10. Filling defects in the pancreatic duct on endoscopic retrograde pancreatography.

    PubMed

    Taylor, A J; Carmody, T J; Schmalz, M J; Wiedmeyer, D A; Stewart, E T

    1992-12-01

    Filling defects in the pancreatic duct are a frequent finding during endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP) and have a variety of causes. Some filling defects may be artifactual or related to technical factors and, once their origin is recognized, can be disregarded. Others may be due to acute changes of pancreatitis and should prompt more careful injection of contrast material into the duct. Intraluminal masses may represent calculi or a neoplasm, either of which may require surgery or endoscopic intervention. The exact nature of these filling defects may not be apparent on radiographs, and other studies may be needed. This article reviews our approach to the evaluation of filling defects in the pancreatic duct.

  11. Imaging of pancreatic cancer: what the surgeon wants to know.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Randy; Steinman, Jonathan; Luk, Lyndon; Kluger, Michael D; Hecht, Elizabeth M

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death. Early detection is challenging because symptoms are relatively nonspecific. Imaging is vital in detecting and staging pancreatic tumors, and management depends on imaging findings. Radiologists should be aware of current surgical treatments for pancreatic neoplasms, as surgeons rely on interpretation of cross-sectional imaging for presurgical planning. Understanding postsurgical anatomy is critical to assess for complications and recurrence. This review will emphasize the role of the radiologist in planning for surgery and will review postoperative changes based on surgical intervention and common complications. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. EXOCRINE PANCREATIC CARCINOGENESIS IN THE GUPPY POECILIA RETICULATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exocrine pancreatic neoplasms developed in the guppy Poecilia reticulata following exposure to the direct acting carcinogen, methylazoxymethanol acetate (MAM-Ac). Fish 6- to 10-days old were exposed to nominal, nontoxic concentrations of 4 and 10 mg MAM-Ac 1-1 for 2 h and then tr...

  13. EXOCRINE PANCREATIC CARCINOGENESIS IN THE GUPPY (POECILIA RETICULATA).

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exocrine pancreatic neoplasms developed in the guppy (Poecilia reticulata) following exposure to the direct acting carcinogen, methylazoxymethanol acetate (MAM-Ac). Fish 6- to 10-days old were exposed to nominal, nontoxic concentrations of 4 and 10 mg MAM-Ac/L for 2 hr and then t...

  14. EXOCRINE PANCREATIC CARCINOGENESIS IN THE GUPPY POECILIA RETICULATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exocrine pancreatic neoplasms developed in the guppy Poecilia reticulata following exposure to the direct acting carcinogen, methylazoxymethanol acetate (MAM-Ac). Fish 6- to 10-days old were exposed to nominal, nontoxic concentrations of 4 and 10 mg MAM-Ac 1-1 for 2 h and then tr...

  15. EXOCRINE PANCREATIC CARCINOGENESIS IN THE GUPPY (POECILIA RETICULATA).

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exocrine pancreatic neoplasms developed in the guppy (Poecilia reticulata) following exposure to the direct acting carcinogen, methylazoxymethanol acetate (MAM-Ac). Fish 6- to 10-days old were exposed to nominal, nontoxic concentrations of 4 and 10 mg MAM-Ac/L for 2 hr and then t...

  16. Solid Pseudopapillary Neoplasms of the Pancreas: A Surgical and Genetic Enigma.

    PubMed

    Naar, Leon; Spanomichou, Despoina-Amalia; Mastoraki, Aikaterini; Smyrniotis, Vassilios; Arkadopoulos, Nikolaos

    2017-03-01

    Solid pseudopapillary neoplasms of the pancreas are rare tumors accounting for 1-2% of pancreatic exocrine neoplasms. This entity was first described by Dr. Frantz in 1959 and was defined by the World Health Organization in 1996 as "solid pseudopapillary tumor." It is most often a benign neoplasm, but 10-15% of the cases are malignant. Over the past decades, the incidence of this tumor is increasing. However, many surgeons are still unfamiliar with this neoplasm and its unique characteristics, which can lead to pitfalls in the diagnosis and treatment. The correct diagnosis of SPNP is of utmost importance since it has a low malignant potential and with the appropriate treatment, patients have a long life expectancy. There are many genetic alterations, involving various signaling pathways that have been associated with SPNP and are very important in diagnosing the tumor. The cornerstone of SPNP treatment includes surgical excision of the tumor, preserving as much pancreatic tissue as possible. We review the information in the literature regarding more organ-preserving techniques and possible clinical features that might indicate a malignant potential, thus demanding a more radical intraoperative excision.

  17. Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    DiMagno, Matthew J.; DiMagno, Eugene P.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review We review important new clinical observations in chronic pancreatitis (CP) reported in 2011. Recent findings Smoking increases the risk of non-gallstone acute pancreatitis (AP) and the progression of AP to CP. Binge drinking during Oktoberfest did not associate with increased hospital admissions for AP. The unfolded protein response is an adaptive mechanism to maintain pancreatic health in response to noxious stimuli such as alcohol. Onset of diabetes mellitus in CP is likely due to progressive disease rather than individual variables. Insufficient pancreatic enzyme dosing is common for treatment of pancreatic steatorrhea; 90,000 USP U of lipase should be given with meals. Surgical drainage provides sustained, superior pain relief compared to endoscopic treatment in patients advanced CP with a dilated main duct +/− pancreatic stones. The central acting gabapentoid pregabalin affords a modest 12% pain reduction in patients with CP but ~30% of patients have significant side effects. Summary Patients with non-gallstone related AP or CP of any etiology should cease smoking. Results of this year’s investigations further elucidated the pancreatic pathobiology due to alcohol, onset of diabetes mellitus in CP, and the mechanisms and treatment of neuropathic pain in CP. PMID:22782018

  18. Chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Kleeff, Jorg; Whitcomb, David C; Shimosegawa, Tooru; Esposito, Irene; Lerch, Markus M; Gress, Thomas; Mayerle, Julia; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Rebours, Vinciane; Akisik, Fatih; Muñoz, J Enrique Domínguez; Neoptolemos, John P

    2017-09-07

    Chronic pancreatitis is defined as a pathological fibro-inflammatory syndrome of the pancreas in individuals with genetic, environmental and/or other risk factors who develop persistent pathological responses to parenchymal injury or stress. Potential causes can include toxic factors (such as alcohol or smoking), metabolic abnormalities, idiopathic mechanisms, genetics, autoimmune responses and obstructive mechanisms. The pathophysiology of chronic pancreatitis is fairly complex and includes acinar cell injury, acinar stress responses, duct dysfunction, persistent or altered inflammation, and/or neuro-immune crosstalk, but these mechanisms are not completely understood. Chronic pancreatitis is characterized by ongoing inflammation of the pancreas that results in progressive loss of the endocrine and exocrine compartment owing to atrophy and/or replacement with fibrotic tissue. Functional consequences include recurrent or constant abdominal pain, diabetes mellitus (endocrine insufficiency) and maldigestion (exocrine insufficiency). Diagnosing early-stage chronic pancreatitis is challenging as changes are subtle, ill-defined and overlap those of other disorders. Later stages are characterized by variable fibrosis and calcification of the pancreatic parenchyma; dilatation, distortion and stricturing of the pancreatic ducts; pseudocysts; intrapancreatic bile duct stricturing; narrowing of the duodenum; and superior mesenteric, portal and/or splenic vein thrombosis. Treatment options comprise medical, radiological, endoscopic and surgical interventions, but evidence-based approaches are limited. This Primer highlights the major progress that has been made in understanding the pathophysiology, presentation, prevalence and management of chronic pancreatitis and its complications.

  19. Spontaneous endomyometrial neoplasms in aging Chinese hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Brownstein, D.G.; Brooks, A.L.

    1980-05-01

    Twenty-one endomyometrial neoplasms among 93 nulliparous noninbred Chinese hamsters were evaluated. The median survival time of the 93 females was 1040 days. The median age of hamsters with endomyometrial neoplasms was 1200 days. Neoplasms were classified as carcinomas or malignant mixed muellerian tumors of the endometrium and benign or malignant myometrial neoplasms. There were 13 endometrial adenocarcinomas. Three tumors were mixed adenosquamous carcinomas, which occurred in significantly older Chinese hamsters than did adenocarcinomas. Three malignant mixed muellerian tumors consisted of 2 carcinosarcomas and 1 mixed mesodermal tumor. The 2 myometrial neoplasms were a lelomyoma and a lelomyosarcoma. The classification and relative frequency of these neoplasms were similar to endomyometrial neoplasms of women, which makes Chinese hamsters useful subjects for studies of spontaneous endomyometrial cancers.

  20. Multifocal Primary Neoplasms in Kidney Allografts: Evaluation of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Robert J.; Ng, Keng Lim; Samaratunga, Hemamali; Del Vecchio, Sharon J.; Wood, Simon T.

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the fifth most common malignancy in kidney transplant recipients, with increased risk arising due to immunosuppression. De novo RCC occurrence in kidney allografts is much less common when compared with the native kidneys. Multifocal RCC in allograft kidneys is rarely described. In this report, we discuss two cases of de novo multifocal renal neoplasms in allograft kidneys. Case 1 had three distinct neoplastic lesions of >5 mm, and case 2 had four. Using the World Health Organization 2016 classification of adult renal tumours, case 1 had one clear-cell (cc) RCC (grade 3) and two papillary adenomas; all confined to the kidney. Case 2 had a nodular lesion classified as ccRCC (grade 4) with focal rhabdoid differentiation and some infiltration of renal sinus fat; a cc tubulopapillary RCC; a multilocular cystic renal neoplasm of low malignant potential; and a mucinous tubular and spindle cell carcinoma; the last three all confined to the kidney. This is the first report of mucinous tubular and spindle cell carcinoma in a kidney allograft. When considering multifocal RCC with discordant histology, it is likely that these represent independent tumourigenic events. PMID:28326280

  1. Mesothelial neoplasms presenting as, and mimicking, ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Mani, Haresh; Merino, Maria J

    2010-11-01

    Mesotheliomas of the abdominal cavity are rare tumors that primarily involve the peritoneum, mesentery, and omentum. The involvement of the viscera is usually secondary to bulky and extensive serosal disease. We describe 7 cases of mesothelioma in which the initial manifestation was that of an ovarian mass. All patients underwent surgery with a primary diagnosis of ovarian cancer. Clinical histories, gross features, and histology slides were reviewed. Immunostains were performed on all cases and electron microscopy was performed in 2 cases. The patients ranged in age from 22 to 52 years and the lesions ranged in size from 3.8 to 9 cm. Of the 7 cases, 4 were predominantly cystic and 3 were solid. Histologically, all cystic tumors were multicystic mesothelioma, whereas the 3 solid tumors were diffuse malignant mesotheliomas. One patient had a borderline mucinous tumor with the mesothelioma occurring as a mural nodule, an association not described earlier. The oldest patient in this series had a diffuse malignant mesothelioma of the peritoneum with predominant ovarian surface involvement. Mesothelial neoplasms can present as ovarian masses in young women. Awareness of this presentation is important to establish appropriate management.

  2. Radiographic and ultrasonographic findings of uterine neoplasms in nine dogs.

    PubMed

    Patsikas, Michail; Papazoglou, Lysimachos G; Jakovljevic, Samuel; Papaioannou, Nikolaos G; Papadopoulou, Paraskevi L; Soultani, Christina B; Chryssogonidis, Ioannis A; Kouskouras, Konstantinos A; Tziris, Nikolaos E; Charitanti, Afroditi A

    2014-01-01

    The records of nine female intact dogs with histologically confirmed uterine tumors were reviewed retrospectively, and the related radiographic and ultrasonographic signs of the lesions detected were recorded. Radiography revealed a soft-tissue opacity between the urinary bladder and colon in six of seven dogs with uterine body and/or cervical tumors, and a soft-tissue opacity in the midventral abdomen in two dogs with uterine horn tumors. Ultrasonography revealed masses in all dogs with uterine body/cervical tumors and could delineate the origin of the mass in one of two dogs with uterine horn tumors. The mass was characterized ultrasonographically as solid in three dogs (all leiomyomas), solid with cystic component in four dogs (two adenocarcinomas, one leiomyoma, and one fibroleiomyoma), and cystic in two (both leiomyomas). Hyperechoic foci in the mass were observed in three dogs. Ultrasonography was a useful method for demonstrating uterine body and/or cervical tumors. However, it was not possible to ascertain sonographically that a mass originated in a uterine horn unless there was associated evidence of uterine horn to which the mass could be traced. The ultrasonographic appearance of uterine tumors was variable, and the type of neoplasm could only be determined by taking biopsies of the mass.

  3. SOLID PSEUDOPAPILLARY NEOPLASM OF THE PANCREAS.

    PubMed

    Carlotto, Jorge Roberto Marcante; Torrez, Franz Robert Apodaca; Gonzalez, Adriano Miziara; Linhares, Marcelo Moura; Triviño, Tarcisio; Herani-Filho, Benedito; Goldenberg, Alberto; Lopes-Filho, Gaspar de Jesus; Lobo, Edson José

    2016-01-01

    The solid pseudopapillary neoplasm is a rare tumor of the pancreas. However, it´s etiology still maintain discussions. To analyze it´s clinical data, diagnosis and treatment. A retrospective study of medical records of all patients treated from January 1997 until July 2015. Were identified 17 cases. Most patients were women (94.11%) and the average age was 32.88 years. The main complaint was abdominal mass (47.05%). The most frequent location was in the body/tail of the pancreas (72.22%) and the most frequently performed surgery was distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy (64.70%). No patient had metastases at diagnosis. Conservative surgery for pancreatic parenchyma was performed in only three cases. The rate of complications in the postoperative period was 35.29% and the main complication was pancreatic fistula (29.41%). No patient underwent adjuvant treatment. The treatment is surgical and the most common clinical presentation is abdominal mass. Distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy was the most frequently performed surgery for its treatment. A neoplasia sólida pseudopapilar é tumor raro de pâncreas de tratamento cirúrgico. No entanto, sua causa ainda gera discussões. Analisar os dados clínicos, do diagnóstico e do tratamento da dessa neoplasia. Estudo retrospectivo com dados médicos de pacientes tratados entre janeiro de 1997 a julho de 2015. Foram identificados 17 casos. A maioria era de mulheres (94,11%) e a média de idade foi de 32,88 anos. A principal queixa era massa abdominal (47,05%). A localização mais frequente era no corpo/cauda do pâncreas (72,22%) e a operação mais realizada foi a pancreatectomia corpocaudal com esplenectomia (64,70%). Nenhum caso apresentou metástase no momento do diagnóstico. Operação conservadora de parênquima pancreático foi realizada em apenas três casos. A taxa de complicações no pós-operatório foi de 35,29% e a principal complicação foi fístula pancreática (29,41%). Nenhum paciente realizou

  4. Imaging of pediatric ovarian neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Epelman, Monica; Chikwava, Kudakwashe R; Chauvin, Nancy; Servaes, Sabah

    2011-09-01

    We review the clinical and imaging characteristics of the most common ovarian neoplasms in children and adolescents. Because of the widespread use of diagnostic imaging, incidental ovarian neoplasms might be encountered during the evaluation of abdominal pain, trauma or other indications and might pose a diagnostic dilemma. Conducting adequate imaging studies under these conditions is important, as management strategies differ according to the size and appearance of the lesion as well as the age of the patient. US dominates in gynecological imaging because of its excellent visualization, absence of ionizing radiation and sedation risks and comparatively low cost. For further examination of indeterminate lesions found using US, MRI is being used more progressively in this field, particularly for the evaluation of complex pelvic masses with the aim of distinguishing benign and malignant conditions and conditions requiring surgical intervention. CT is reserved primarily for tumor staging and follow-up and for emergency situations.

  5. Risk of neoplasms in acromegaly

    PubMed Central

    Szczepanek-Parulska, Ewelina; Fularz, Maciej; Woliński, Kosma

    2012-01-01

    Acromegaly is a chronic disease caused by the excessive secretion of growth hormone (GH), and as a result, of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). Untreated, the condition reduces the patients’ life expectancy and leads to a series of complications, among which an increased risk of carcinogenesis is considered most important. This paper is an analysis of the publications on the issue of the formation of neoplasms, both malignant and benign, in acromegalic patients. Although the influence of acromegaly on carcinogenesis remains controversial, a number of studies indicate that the frequency of developing tumors in this patient group is higher. Moreover, numerous publications particularly stress the increased risk of developing neoplasms in patients who had been untreated for a long period of time and show elevated levels of GH and IGF-1. Consequently, a quick diagnosis and the implementation of effective treatment play a key role in the management of this disease. PMID:23788865

  6. Cystic meningioma: unusual imaging appearance of a common intracranial tumor

    PubMed Central

    Layton, Kennith F.; Finn, S. Sam; Snipes, George J.; Opatowsky, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Meningiomas are common tumors of the central nervous system that account for approximately 15% of all intracranial tumors and are the most common extra-axial neoplasm. Most meningiomas are benign, although atypical and malignant meningiomas also exist. Typical imaging characteristics include a well-circumscribed, homogeneously enhancing, extra-axial mass on both computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. The presence of an associated cyst is an uncommon imaging feature that may make it difficult to distinguish the tumor from a primary intra-axial glial neoplasm. The presence of peritumoral edema can also be a misleading finding. We present a case of a woman who presented with a history of multiple recent falls, decreased energy, and increased somnolence and was found to have a “cystic meningioma.” Typical imaging characteristics, histologic subtypes, treatment, and prognosis are also discussed. PMID:21240328

  7. Adenoid cystic carcinoma of the sublingual gland: A case report

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) of the sublingual gland is an extremely rare neoplasm. The clinicopathological characteristics of ACC are slow-growing swelling with or without ulceration, perineural spread, local recurrence, and distant metastasis. This report describes a 58-year-old male who had a slowly growing swelling without ulceration on the right side of the mouth floor that had been present for 1 month. In a radiological examination, the mass showed multilocular cystic features and no bony or tongue muscle invasion. No enlarged cervical lymph nodes were detected. Excisional biopsy and histological analysis showed that the lesion was ACC. In addition to reporting a rare case of ACC, this report also discusses the differential diagnosis and treatment of ACC with a review of the relevant literature. PMID:28035309

  8. Mucinous Cystic Borderline Tumor of the Mesentery: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Poudel, R; Acharya, A; Pokhrel, S; Adhikari, S K

    2015-01-01

    Mucinous cystic neoplasms are rare tumors of uncertain histogenesis. They arise from the ovaries, pancreas, and other intra-abdominal sites but more unusually from the mesentery. They can present with abdominal pain, distension, or a palpable mass but are commonly an incidental finding. We present a case of a 33-year-old female who presented with complain of pain abdomen for one-year duration. On Physical examination there was a palpable lump in right lumbar region extending to right iliac fossa. CT scan of abdomen and pelvis suggested the mass to be a Mesenteric Cyst. Enucleation of the cyst was done and histopathology report revealed Mucinous Cystic borderline tumor of the Mesentery.

  9. Cardiac effects of noncardiac neoplasms

    SciTech Connect

    Schoen, F.J.; Berger, B.M.; Guerina, N.G.

    1984-11-01

    Clinically significant cardiovascular abnormalities may occur as secondary manifestations of noncardiac neoplasms. The principal cardiac effects of noncardiac tumors include the direct results of metastases to the heart or lungs, the indirect effects of circulating tumor products (causing nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis, myeloma-associated amyloidosis, pheochromocytoma-associated cardiac hypertrophy and myofibrillar degeneration, and carcinoid heart disease), and the undesired cardiotoxicities of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. 89 references.

  10. Solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm of the pancreas: A classical presentation with unique paranuclear dot like immunostaining with CD 99.

    PubMed

    Nair Anila, Kunjulekshmi Amma Raveendran; Nayak, Nileena; Muralee, Madhu; Venugopal, Bhaskaran Pillai; Mony, Rari P

    2015-01-01

    A 32-year-old lady presented with a history of abdominal pain and upper abdominal discomfort of 3 months duration. Her imaging studies done at a local hospital showed a solid-cystic mass involving head of the pancreas. The patient was referred to our surgical oncology department. On examination, there was a nontender mass in the epigastrium. An ultrasound scan guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA) was done which was showing classical features of solid-pseudo papillary neoplasm of the pancreas. With this preoperative diagnosis patient was taken up for surgery. Per operatively, there was a solid-cystic mass in the head of the pancreas. Pancreaticoduodenectomy was done. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry (IHC) confirmed the diagnosis of solid-pseudo papillary neoplasm of the pancreas. Apart from the routine IHC panel, CD 99 immunostain was also done which demonstrated the characteristic paranuclear dot-like staining observed in previous studies in the literature.

  11. [Neuroendocrine neoplasms of the breast].

    PubMed

    Anlauf, M; Neumann, M; Bomberg, S; Luczak, K; Heikaus, S; Gustmann, C; Antke, C; Ezziddin, S; Fottner, C; Pavel, M; Pape, U-F; Rinke, A; Lahner, H; Schott, M; Cremer, B; Hörsch, D; Baum, R P; Groh, U; Alkatout, I; Rudlowski, C; Scheler, P; Zirbes, T K; Hoffmann, J; Fehm, T; Gabbert, H E; Baldus, S E

    2015-05-01

    Neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN) of the breast are specific tumor entities. According to the literature up to 5% of breast neoplasms are malignant epithelial neoplasms of the breast. They are defined by a neuroendocrine (NE) architecture and cytology combined with an expression of the neuroendocrine vesicle markers chromogranin A and/or synaptophysin. The diagnosis is supplemented by the receptor status and the proliferative activity. According to the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of 2012 the following groups of NEN are distinguished: (1) invasive breast carcinoma with NE differentiation, (2) well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor (NET) and (3) poorly differentiated small cell carcinoma (NEC). This review article focuses on (1) the definition and basic principles of diagnostics, (2) the history, nomenclature and WHO classification from 2003 and 2012, (3) the frequency of breast NEN, (4) the hereditary background and functional activity, (5) the expression of receptors and (6) the possible clinical implications. In addition, the first results of a retrospective single center study (n = 465 patients with breast cancer over a time period of 4 years) on the frequency of NEN of the breast at the Breast Center of the University Hospital Düsseldorf are presented. In this study a frequency of 4.5% of NEN was found based on a diagnostic cut-off of > 50% Chromogranin A and/or synaptophysin positive tumor cells.

  12. Classification of Salivary Gland Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Patrick J

    2016-01-01

    Presently, there is no universal 'working' classification system acceptable to all clinicians involved in the diagnosis and management of patients with salivary gland neoplasms. The most recent World Health Organization Classification of Tumours: Head and Neck Tumours (Salivary Glands) (2005) for benign and malignant neoplasms represents the consensus of current knowledge and is considered the standard pathological classification based on which series should be reported. The TNM classification of salivary gland malignancies has stood the test of time, and using the stage groupings remains the current standard for reporting treated patients' outcomes. Many developments in molecular and genetic methods in the meantime have identified a number of new entities, and new findings for several of the well-established salivary malignancies need to be considered for inclusion in any new classification system. All clinicians involved in the diagnosis, assessment and treatment of patients with salivary gland neoplasms must understand and respect the need for the various classification systems, enabling them to work within a multidisciplinary clinical team environment.

  13. Retroperitoneal Cystic Malignant Fibrous Histiocytoma Mimicking a Psoas Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Madan Mohan; Bahri, Nandini; Watal, Pankaj; Rathod, Ketan; Thaker, Siddarth; Bhandari, Parthiv; Dhamecha, Ketul; Ajudia, Jasmin

    2015-01-01

    Primary neoplasms in the psoas muscle including schwannoma and soft tissue sarcoma with secondary cystic degeneration are rare entities. They are difficult to distinguish from psoas abscess purely based on radiological findings. Malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH) in the retroperitoneum is an uncommon entity in contrast to liposarcoma and leiomyosarcoma. Psoas abscess is a common infection in the retroperitoneum, especially in regions where tuberculosis is endemic. In the current case, the patient presented with gradually progressive lower abdominal pain and raised erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), lymphocyte count and sputum positive for acid fast bacilli. There was a presence of previous history of skeletal tuberculosis. Imaging revealed well-defined multilocular cystic lesion involving the left psoas muscle which along with the clinical scenario suggested psoas abscess. However, post-operative biopsy showed the lesion to be a MFH with extensive cystic degeneration. To the best of our knowledge, cystic MFH mimicking an abscess has been previously reported only once in an oncology literature. PMID:26557275

  14. Effectiveness of contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasound for detecting mural nodules in intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas and for making therapeutic decisions

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Mitsuru; Itoi, Takao; Ikeuchi, Nobuhito; Sofuni, Atsushi; Tsuchiya, Takayoshi; Ishii, Kentaro; Kamada, Kentaro; Umeda, Junko; Tanaka, Reina; Tonozuka, Ryosuke; Honjo, Mitsuyoshi; Mukai, Shuntaro; Moriyasu, Fuminori

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: There have been few studies to date evaluating the effectiveness of contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasound (CE-EUS) for detecting mural nodules in patients with branch duct-type intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (BD-IPMN) of the pancreas. We aim to evaluate the effectiveness of CE-EUS for detecting mural nodules in BD-IPMN. Patients and Methods: Of the 427 BD-IPMN patients, 21 patients (4.9%) in whom the presence of mural nodules was suggested by CE computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or in whom the presence of nodule-like lesions as shown by fundamental EUS, were examined by CE-EUS. Results: The mean diameter of cystic lesions was 29.8 ± 12.8 mm. The mean diameter of mural nodules was 9.5 ± 5.7 mm. BD-IPMN was detected in the pancreatic head in 16 cases, pancreatic body in 2 cases, and pancreatic tail in 3 cases. The mean follow-up period was 17.2 ± 11.9 months. The detection rates of mural nodule-like lesions in BD-IPMN patients on CT, MRI, and fundamental EUS were 36.8%, 63.2%, and 100%, respectively. The detection rates of true mural nodules in BD-IPMN patients on CT, MRI, and fundamental EUS were 85.7%, 71.4%, and 100%, respectively. The echo levels of mural nodule-like lesions on fundamental EUS were hyperechoic in 6 patients, isoechoic in 9 patients, and hypoechoic in 6 patients. The final diagnosis was mucus lumps in 14 patients and mural nodules in 7 patients. The contrast patterns observed were avascular, isovascular, and hypervascular in 14, 3, and 4 patients, respectively. No patients showed a hypovascular pattern. Fourteen patients showing an avascular pattern were diagnosed as having mucus lumps, and they were able to avoid surgical resection. Of the 7 patients who were diagnosed as having mural nodules, 5 underwent surgical resection. The pathological findings were adenocarcinoma in 2 patients and adenoma in 3 patients. Of the 3 adenoma patients, fundamental EUS demonstrated a hypoechoic

  15. Latest advances in pancreatic tumours.

    PubMed

    Lariño Noia, José

    2016-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer continues to have a bleak prognosis. Hardly any therapeutic advances have been made in the last few years and consequently most efforts have focused on preventing its development and o