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Sample records for cytokines content irradiated

  1. Pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine content in human peripheral blood after its transcutaneous (in vivo) and direct (in vitro) irradiation with polychromatic visible and infrared light.

    PubMed

    Zhevago, Natalya A; Samoilova, Kira A

    2006-04-01

    The aim of this randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial was to investigate changes in the content of 10 cytokines in the human peripheral blood after transcutaneous and in vitro irradiation with polychromatic visible and infrared (IR) polarized light at therapeutic dose. The role of cytokines in development of anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory, and wound-healing effects of visible and IR light remains poorly studied. The sacral area of volunteers was exposed (480-3400 nm, 95% polarization, 12 J/cm(2)); in parallel, the blood samples of the same subjects were irradiated in vitro (2.4 J/cm(2)). Determination of cytokine content was performed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). A dramatic decrease in the level of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha, IL-6, and IFN-gamma was revealed: at 0.5 h after exposure of volunteers (with the initial parameters exceeding the norm), the cytokine contents fell, on average, 34, 12, and 1.5 times. The reduced concentrations of TNF-alpha and IL-6 were preserved after four daily exposures, whereas levels of IFN-gamma and IL-12 decreased five and 15 times. At 0.5 h and at later times, the amount of anti-inflammatory cytokines was found to rise: that of IL-10 rose 2.7-3.5 times (in subjects with normal initial parameters) and of TGF-beta1 1.4-1.5 times (in the cases of its decreased level). A peculiarity of the light effect was a fast rise of IFN-gamma at 3.3-4.0 times in subjects with normal initial values. The content of IL-1beta, IL-2, IFN-alpha, and IL-4 did not change. Similar regularities of the light effects were recorded after in vitro irradiation of blood, as well as on mixing the irradiated and non-irradiated autologous blood at a volume ratio 1:10 (i.e., at modeling the events in a vascular bed of the exposed person when a small amount of the transcutaneously photomodified blood contacts its main circulating volume). Exposure of a small area of the human body to light leads to a fast decrease in the

  2. Inflammatory cytokines are suppressed by light-emitting diode irradiation of P. gingivalis LPS-treated human gingival fibroblasts: inflammatory cytokine changes by LED irradiation.

    PubMed

    Choi, HongRan; Lim, WonBong; Kim, InAe; Kim, JiSun; Ko, YoungJong; Kwon, Hyukil; Kim, SangWoo; Kabir, K M Ahsan; Li, Xiaojie; Kim, Oksu; Lee, YoungJoon; Kim, SeoYune; Kim, OkJoon

    2012-03-01

    Human gingival fibroblasts (hGFs) play an important role in the inflammatory reaction to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from P. gingivalis, which infects periodontal connective tissue. In addition, although light-emitting diode (LED) irradiation has been reported to have biostimulatory effects, including anti-inflammatory activity, the pathological mechanisms of these effects are unclear. This study examined the effects of 635-nm irradiation of P. gingivalis LPS-treated human gingival fibroblasts on inflammatory cytokine profiles and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, which is involved in cytokine production. Gingival fibroblasts treated or not treated with P. gingivalis LPS were irradiated with 635-nm LED light, and cytokine profiles in the supernatant were assessed using a human inflammation antibody array. Expression of cyclooxyginase-2 (COX-2) protein and phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK 1/2), p38, and c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) were assessed by Western-blot analysis to determine the effects on the MAPK pathway, and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) in the supernatant was measured using an enzyme-linked immunoassay. COX-2 protein expression and PGE(2) production were significantly increased in the LPS-treated group and decreased by LED irradiation. LPS treatment of gingival fibroblasts led to the increased release of the pro-inflammatory-related cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-8, whereas LED irradiation inhibited their release. Analysis of MAPK signal transduction revealed a considerable decrease in p38 phosphorylation in response to 635-nm radiation either in the presence or absence of LPS. In addition, 635-nm LED irradiation significantly promoted JNK phosphorylation in the presence of LPS. LED irradiation can inhibit activation of pro-inflammatory cytokines, mediate the MAPK signaling pathway, and may be clinically useful as an anti-inflammatory tool.

  3. Cytokine expression and ultrastructural alterations in fresh-frozen, freeze-dried and γ-irradiated human amniotic membranes.

    PubMed

    Paolin, Adolfo; Trojan, Diletta; Leonardi, Antonio; Mellone, Stefano; Volpe, Antonio; Orlandi, Augusto; Cogliati, Elisa

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this work was to compare the effects on human amniotic membrane of freeze-drying and γ-irradiation at doses of 10, 20 and 30 kGy, with freezing. For this purpose, nine cytokines (interleukin 10, platelet-derived growth factor-AA, platelet-derived growth factor-BB, basic fibroblast growth factor, epidermal growth factor, transforming growth factor beta 1, and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase-1, -2, and -4) were titrated in 5 different preparations for each of 3 amniotic membranes included in the study. In addition, the extracellular matrix structure of each sample was assessed by transmission electron microscopy. While freeze-drying did not seem to affect the biological structure or cytokine content of the different amniotic membrane samples, γ-irradiation led to a significant decrease in the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase-4, basic fibroblast growth factor and epidermal growth factor, and induced structural damage to the epithelium, basement membrane and lamina densa. The higher the irradiation dose the more severe the damage to the amniotic membrane structure. In conclusion, the Authors recommend processing amniotic membrane under sterile conditions to guarantee safety at every step rather than final sterilization with γ-irradiation, thereby avoiding alteration to the biological characteristics of the amniotic membrane.

  4. Profiling of Cytokines Secreted by Conventional Aqueous Outflow Pathway Endothelial Cells Activated In Vitro and Ex Vivo With Laser Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado, Jorge A.; Chau, Phuonglan; Wu, Jianfeng; Juster, Richard; Shifera, Amde Selassie; Geske, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To profile which cytokine genes are differentially expressed (DE) as up- or downregulated by cultured human trabecular meshwork (TMEs) and Schlemm's canal endothelial cells (SCEs) after three experimental treatments consisting of selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) irradiation, exposure to media conditioned either by SLT-irradiated TMEs (TME-cm) or by SCEs (SCE-cm). Also, to profile which cytokines are upregulated ex vivo in SLT-irradiated human conventional aqueous outflow pathway (CAOP) tissues. Methods After each treatment, Affymetrix microarray assays were used to detect upregulated and downregulated genes for cytokines and their receptors in TMEs and SCEs. ELISA and protein antibody arrays were used to detect upregulated cytokines secreted in SLT-irradiated CAOP tissues ex vivo. Results The SLT irradiation upregulated numerous cytokine genes in TMEs, but only a few in SCEs. Exposure to TME- and SCE-cm induced SCEs to upregulate many more cytokine genes than TMEs. Selective laser trabeculoplasty irradiation and exposure to TME-cm downregulated several cytokine genes in TMEs but none in SCEs. Selective laser trabeculoplasty irradiation induced one upregulated and three downregulated cytokine-receptor genes in TMEs but none in SCEs. Exposure to TME-cm induced upregulation of one and downregulation of another receptor gene in TMEs, whereas two unique cytokine-receptor genes were upregulated in SCEs. Cytokine protein expression analysis showed that at least eight cytokines were upregulated in SLT-irradiated human CAOP tissues in situ/ex vivo. Conclusions This study has helped us identify a cytokine signaling pathway and to consider newly identified mechanisms regulating aqueous outflow that may lay the foundation for the future development of cytokine-based glaucoma therapies. PMID:26529044

  5. Cytokine production of the neutrophils and macrophages in time of phagocytosis under influence of infrared low-level laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudik, Dmitry V.; Tikhomirova, Elena I.; Tuchina, Elena S.

    2006-08-01

    Influence of infrared low-level laser irradiation (LLLI) on induction of synthesis of some cytokines such as interleykin-1 (Il-1), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interferon-γ (INF-γ), interleykin-8 (Il-8) and interleykin-4 (Il-4) by the neutrophils and macrophages in time of bacterial cells phagocytosis that was searched. As the object of analysis we used peritoneal macrophages from white mice and neutrophils from peripheral blood of healthy donors. We used the laser diod with spectrum maximum of 850 nm with doses 300, 900 and 1500 mJ (exposition -60, 180 and 300 s respectively; capacity - 5 mW). We carried out the Enzyme-Linked Immunospot Assay (ELISA) to determine cytokine content during phagocytosis after 3 h and 6 h. We found dynamics in production of the cytokines, which was different for the neutrophils and macrophages. We showed that the infrared LLLI has significant stimulating activity on the proinflammatory cytokines production by neutrophils and macrophages. Moreover we revealed dynamics changing in the Il-8 and Il-4 production.

  6. [Changes in cytokine content in the peripheral blood of volunteers after their exposure to polychromatic visible and infrared light].

    PubMed

    Zhevago, N A; Samoĭlova, K A; Obolenskaia, K D; Sokolov, D I

    2005-01-01

    Anti-inflammatory, immunomodulating and wound-healing effects of visible and infrared (IR) radiation from laser and non-laser sources are widely used in current medicine. However, the role of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in development of these effects has been poorly studied. A randomized, placebo-controlled, double blind study was made. Using ELISA, the content of 10 cytokines was studied in the peripheral blood of volunteers after a single and four daily irradiations of the sacral area (D = 15 cm) with polychromatic visible + IR polarized light (480-3400 nm, 12 J/cm2). The phototherapeutic sessions were accompanied by four blood exfusions for the study (to a total volume of 80 ml). In the control (placebo) group, irradiation was imitated, and blood samples of the same volume were drawn at the same time intervals as in volunteers of the main group. A fast decrease in the level of pro-inflammatory cytokines was revealed as soon as in 0.5 h after the irradiation. This level was retained until the end of the phototherapeutic course. At the parameters exceeding the norm, the contents of TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IFN-gamma fell, on average, by 34, 12 and 1.5 times, respectively. By the end of the course, the levels of IFN-gamma and of IL-12 decreased by 5 and 15 times, respectively. A fast decrease (by two-fold) was also characteristic of normal values of IL-6. Neither IL-1beta, nor IL-2 were detected in blood plasma of the examined people both before and after the irradiation. In parallel with a decrease in the proinflammatory factor levels the amount of anti-inflammatory cytokines was found to rise: that of IL-10--by 2.7-3.5 times in 0.5 h and at later terms at the initially normal parameters, and that of TGF-beta1--by 1.4-1.5 times at the initially decreased level. The IL-4 content did not change. A characteristic feature of the light effect was a fast rise of IFN-gamma amount--by 3.3-4.0 times in individuals with its initially normal level, with no changes in

  7. The influence of Gamma Irradiation on flavonoïds content during storage of irradiated clementina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oufedjikh, H.; Mahrouz, M.; Lacroix, M.; Amiot, M. J.; Taccini, M.

    1998-06-01

    The influence of Gamma irradiation on content of some important flavonoïds (flavonones glycosides and polymethoxylated flavones) was evaluated during storage of Moroccan clementina treated at a mean dose of 0.3 kGy and stored three months at 3'C. Results shows that at day one, gamma irradiation induced degradation of small quantities of these flavonoïds, however after 14 days of storage, the content of these compounds was significantly higher (p≤0.05) in irradiated samples. Irradiation stimulated biosynthesis of flavonoïds after 14 days of storage. Hesperidin was the major flavanones compounds in clementines. Nobiletin and Heptamethoxyflavone were the major polymethoxylated flavones in clementines. Our study demonstrated that the content of these compounds was significantly higher (p≤0.05) in irradiated samples.

  8. Regulation of tomato fruit ascorbate content is more highly dependent on fruit irradiance than leaf irradiance.

    PubMed

    Gautier, Hélène; Massot, Capucine; Stevens, Rebecca; Sérino, Sylvie; Génard, Michel

    2009-02-01

    The mechanisms involving light control of vitamin C content in fruits are not yet fully understood. The present study aimed to evaluate the impact of fruit and leaf shading on ascorbate (AsA) accumulation in tomato fruit and to determine how fruit sugar content (as an AsA precursor) affected AsA content. Cherry tomato plants were grown in a glasshouse. The control treatment (normally irradiated fruits and irradiated leaves) was compared with the whole-plant shading treatment and with leaf or fruit shading treatments in fruits harvested at breaker stage. In a second experiment, the correlation between sugars and AsA was studied during ripening. Fruit shading was the most effective treatment in reducing fruit AsA content. Under normal conditions, AsA and sugar content were correlated and increased with the ripening stage. Reducing fruit irradiance strongly decreased the reduced AsA content (-74 %), without affecting sugars, so that sugar and reduced AsA were no longer correlated. Leaf shading delayed fruit ripening: it increased the accumulation of oxidized AsA in green fruits (+98 %), whereas it decreased the reduced AsA content in orange fruits (-19 %), suggesting that fruit AsA metabolism also depends on leaf irradiance. Under fruit shading only, the absence of a correlation between sugars and reduced AsA content indicated that fruit AsA content was not limited by leaf photosynthesis or sugar substrate, but strongly depended on fruit irradiance. Leaf shading most probably affected fruit AsA content by delaying fruit ripening, and suggested a complex regulation of AsA metabolism which depends on both fruit and leaf irradiance and fruit ripening stage.

  9. Regulation of tomato fruit ascorbate content is more highly dependent on fruit irradiance than leaf irradiance

    PubMed Central

    Gautier, Hélène; Massot, Capucine; Stevens, Rebecca; Sérino, Sylvie; Génard, Michel

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims The mechanisms involving light control of vitamin C content in fruits are not yet fully understood. The present study aimed to evaluate the impact of fruit and leaf shading on ascorbate (AsA) accumulation in tomato fruit and to determine how fruit sugar content (as an AsA precursor) affected AsA content. Methods Cherry tomato plants were grown in a glasshouse. The control treatment (normally irradiated fruits and irradiated leaves) was compared with the whole-plant shading treatment and with leaf or fruit shading treatments in fruits harvested at breaker stage. In a second experiment, the correlation between sugars and AsA was studied during ripening. Key Results Fruit shading was the most effective treatment in reducing fruit AsA content. Under normal conditions, AsA and sugar content were correlated and increased with the ripening stage. Reducing fruit irradiance strongly decreased the reduced AsA content (−74 %), without affecting sugars, so that sugar and reduced AsA were no longer correlated. Leaf shading delayed fruit ripening: it increased the accumulation of oxidized AsA in green fruits (+98 %), whereas it decreased the reduced AsA content in orange fruits (−19 %), suggesting that fruit AsA metabolism also depends on leaf irradiance. Conclusions Under fruit shading only, the absence of a correlation between sugars and reduced AsA content indicated that fruit AsA content was not limited by leaf photosynthesis or sugar substrate, but strongly depended on fruit irradiance. Leaf shading most probably affected fruit AsA content by delaying fruit ripening, and suggested a complex regulation of AsA metabolism which depends on both fruit and leaf irradiance and fruit ripening stage. PMID:19033285

  10. Evaluation of low level laser therapy irradiation parameters on rat muscle inflammation through systemic blood cytokines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantineo, Matias; Pinheiro, João. P.; Morgado, António M.

    2014-02-01

    Low level laser therapy (LLLT) has been used for inflammation treatment. Here, we evaluate the effect of different doses, using continuous (830 and 980 nm) and pulsed illumination (830 nm), in the treatment of inflammation induced in the gastrocnemius muscle of Wistar rats, through cytokines concentration in systemic blood and histological analysis of muscle tissue. Animals were randomly divided into five groups per wavelength (5 animals per group: 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 mW) plus a control group. LLLT was applied during five days, with constant exposure time and irradiated area (3 minutes; 0.5026 cm2). Blood was collected on days 0, 3 and 6. TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-2 and IL-6 cytokines were quantified by ELISA. Rats were killed on day 6. Muscle inflammatory cells were counted using optical microscopy. Treatment effects occurred for all applied doses (largest effect at 40 mW: 7.2 J, 14 J/cm2 per irradiation), with reduction of proinflammatory TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 cytokines and lower number of inflammatory cells. Results were better for 830 nm. Identical methodology was used with pulsed illumination. Average power (40 mW) and duty cycle were kept constant (80%) at five frequencies (5, 25, 50, 100 and 200 Hz). Treatment effects were observed at higher frequencies, with no significant differences between them. However, the treatment effect was lower than for continuous illumination. LLLT effect on inflammation treatment can be monitored by measuring systemic blood cytokines. A larger treatment effect was observed with continuous illumination, where results seem to be compatible with a biphasic dose response.

  11. Low-level laser irradiation alters cardiac cytokine expression following acute myocardial infarction: a potential mechanism for laser therapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhikai; Wu, Yihe; Zhang, Hao; Jin, Peifeng; Wang, Wei; Hou, Jianfeng; Wei, Yingjie; Hu, Shengshou

    2011-06-01

    Low-level laser irradiation (LLLI) has the potential of exerting cardioprotective effect following myocardial infarction (MI). The authors hypothesized that LLLI could influence the expression of cardiac cytokines and contribute to the reversal of ventricular remodeling. LLLI regulates the expression of cytokines after tissue damage. However, little is known concerning the alteration of the cardiac cytokine expression profile after LLLI. MI was created by coronary ligation. The surviving rats were divided randomly into laser and control groups. 33 rats were exposed to a diode laser (635  nm, 5  mW, CW, laser, beam spot size 0.8  cm(2), 6  mW/cm(2), 150  sec, 0.8  J, 1J/cm(2)) as laser group. Another 33 rats received only coronary ligation and served as control group. 28 rats received a thoracotomy without coronary ligation (sham group). One day after laser irradiation, 5 rats from each group were sacrificed and the heart tissues were analyzed by cytokine antibody arrays. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was performed to confirm its reliability. Two weeks after MI, cardiac function and structure were evaluated by echocardiography and histological study. Cytokine antibody array indicated 4 cytokines were significantly changed after laser therapy. ELISA confirmed that granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor and fractalkine were the cytokines involved in the response to therapeutic laser irradiation. However, there was no difference in cytokine release between various groups at 2 weeks after MI. Although LLLI did not improve the damaged heart function, it did reduce the infarct area expansion. The antibody-based protein array technology was applied for screening the cytokine expression profile following MI, with or without laser irradiation. The expression of multiple cytokines was regulated in the acute phase after LLLI. Our results revealed a potential novel mechanism for applying laser therapy to the treatment of heart disease.

  12. Corrugated Waveguide Mode Content Analysis Using Irradiance Moments

    PubMed Central

    Jawla, Sudheer K.; Shapiro, Michael A.; Idei, Hiroshi; Temkin, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel, relatively simple method for determining the mode content of the linearly polarized modes of a corrugated waveguide using the moments of the intensity pattern of the field radiated from the end of the waveguide. This irradiance moment method is based on calculating the low-order irradiance moments, using measured intensity profiles only, of the radiated field from the waveguide aperture. Unlike the phase retrieval method, this method does not use or determine the phase distribution at the waveguide aperture. The new method was benchmarked numerically by comparison with sample mode mixtures. The results predict less than ±0.7% error bar in the retrieval of the mode content. The method was also tested using high-resolution experimental data from beams radiated from 63.5 mm and 19 mm corrugated waveguides at 170 and 250 GHz, respectively. The results showed a very good agreement of the mode content retrieved using the irradiance moment method versus the phase retrieval technique. The irradiance moment method is most suitable for cases where the modal power is primarily in the fundamental HE11 mode, with <8% of the power in high-order modes. PMID:25821260

  13. Irradiation of light emitting diode at 850nm inhibits T cell-induced cytokine expression.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Kyung Ah; Kim, Chang-Hyun; Choi, Yunseok; Park, Chan Do; Lee, Ai-Young

    2012-01-01

    An anti-inflammatory effect of light obtained from light-emitting diodes (LEDs) has been discovered, however, limited ranges of wavelengths have been used and the action mechanism has been rarely demonstrated. We sought to analyze the immunomodulatory effect of LED on Jurkat T cells and human T cells. Jurkat T cells with/without stimulation were irradiated once or five times using seven ranges of LED wavelengths, from 415nm to 940nm. Cytotoxic effects were examined by an MTT assay. Changes in T cell-induced cytokines, including IL-2, IL-4, IL-10, IL-12 and IFN-gamma, and their upstream signaling molecules, ZAP-70 and PKCθ, were examined by real-time PCR, ELISA, and Western blot analysis. The effect of the LED wavelength, whose effect was identified on Jurkat T cells, was also examined in human CD3+ T cells with/without stimulation and in Dermatophagoides farinae-induced atopic dermatitis (AD) NC/Nga mice. Lower doses of LED irradiation at 850nm inhibited T cell-derived cytokines without inducing cell death in both Jurkat T cells and human T cells. Repeated exposure resulted in a greater increase of inhibitory effects than that observed with a single exposure, and these effects were identified in the NC/Nga AD model. Although more remains to be clarified, these results may support the clinical application of LED for immune regulation. Copyright © 2011 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Increases Cytokine Production and Cutaneous Inflammation in Response to Ultraviolet Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    El-Abaseri, Taghrid Bahig; Repertinger, Susan K.; Hansen, Laura A.

    2013-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is activated in cutaneous keratinocytes upon ultraviolet (UV) exposure and has been implicated in ultraviolet-(UV-)induced inflammation and skin tumorigenesis. Egfr mutant mice and EGFR inhibitors were used to investigate the hypothesis that EGFR activation augments inflammation following UV irradiation. Topical treatment of mouse skin with the EGFR inhibitor AG1478 before UV exposure suppressed UV-induced erythema, edema, mast cell infiltration, and neutrophil infiltration. Genetic ablation of Egfr and EGFR inhibition by AG1478 also suppressed the increase in the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin-1α, KC (murine IL-8), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) after UV exposure of cultured keratinocytes. Finally, genetic ablation of inhibition of EGFR in cultured keratinocytes decreased p38 activation after UV, while inhibition of p38 kinase reduced COX-2 expression after UV. These data demonstrate that EGFR regulates multiple aspects of UV-induced inflammation and suggest activation of p38 kinase leading to increased COX-2 and cytokine expression as one mechanism through which it acts. PMID:23878744

  15. Dynamic and Static Exercises Differentially Affect Plasma Cytokine Content in Elite Endurance- and Strength-Trained Athletes and Untrained Volunteers.

    PubMed

    Kapilevich, Leonid V; Zakharova, Anna N; Kabachkova, Anastasia V; Kironenko, Tatyana A; Orlov, Sergei N

    2017-01-01

    Extensive exercise increases the plasma content of IL-6, IL-8, IL-15, leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), and several other cytokines via their augmented transcription in skeletal muscle cells. However, the relative impact of aerobic and resistant training interventions on cytokine production remains poorly defined. In this study, we compared effects of dynamic and static load on cytokine plasma content in elite strength- and endurance-trained athletes vs. healthy untrained volunteers. The plasma cytokine content was measured before, immediately after, and 30 min post-exercise using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Pedaling on a bicycle ergometer increased IL-6 and IL-8 content in the plasma of trained athletes by about 4- and 2-fold, respectively. In contrast to dynamic load, weightlifting had negligible impact on these parameters in strength exercise-trained athletes. Unlike IL-6 and IL-8, dynamic exercise had no impact on IL-15 and LIF, whereas static load increases the content of these cytokines by ~50%. Two-fold increment of IL-8 content seen in athletes subjected to dynamic exercise was absent in untrained individuals, whereas the ~50% increase in IL-15 triggered by static load in the plasma of weightlifting athletes was not registered in the control group. Thus, our results show the distinct impact of static and dynamic exercises on cytokine content in the plasma of trained athletes. They also demonstrate that both types of exercises differentially affect cytokine content in plasma of athletes and untrained persons.

  16. Dynamic and Static Exercises Differentially Affect Plasma Cytokine Content in Elite Endurance- and Strength-Trained Athletes and Untrained Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Kapilevich, Leonid V.; Zakharova, Anna N.; Kabachkova, Anastasia V.; Kironenko, Tatyana A.; Orlov, Sergei N.

    2017-01-01

    Extensive exercise increases the plasma content of IL-6, IL-8, IL-15, leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), and several other cytokines via their augmented transcription in skeletal muscle cells. However, the relative impact of aerobic and resistant training interventions on cytokine production remains poorly defined. In this study, we compared effects of dynamic and static load on cytokine plasma content in elite strength- and endurance-trained athletes vs. healthy untrained volunteers. The plasma cytokine content was measured before, immediately after, and 30 min post-exercise using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Pedaling on a bicycle ergometer increased IL-6 and IL-8 content in the plasma of trained athletes by about 4- and 2-fold, respectively. In contrast to dynamic load, weightlifting had negligible impact on these parameters in strength exercise-trained athletes. Unlike IL-6 and IL-8, dynamic exercise had no impact on IL-15 and LIF, whereas static load increases the content of these cytokines by ~50%. Two-fold increment of IL-8 content seen in athletes subjected to dynamic exercise was absent in untrained individuals, whereas the ~50% increase in IL-15 triggered by static load in the plasma of weightlifting athletes was not registered in the control group. Thus, our results show the distinct impact of static and dynamic exercises on cytokine content in the plasma of trained athletes. They also demonstrate that both types of exercises differentially affect cytokine content in plasma of athletes and untrained persons. PMID:28194116

  17. Gamma irradiation of human dendritic cells influences proliferation and cytokine profile of T cells in autologous mixed lymphocyte reaction.

    PubMed

    Cao, Meng-De; Chen, Zong-De; Xing, Ying

    2004-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are the most potent antigen-presenting cells (APC); their ability to induce proliferation of T cells in a mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) assay is commonly used for the evaluation of their function. It is a general thought that gamma irradiation of APC does not influence their ability to activate T-cell proliferation, but the data from several studies are controversial. To further determine the mechanisms involved in DC-induced T-cell activation in MLR assay, human DC induced from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were gamma-irradiated and determine their effects on the proliferation and cytokine profiles of T cells in an autologous MLR. DC were induced from the PBMC of 11 multiple sclerosis (MS) patients with RMPI 640 medium containing recombinant human GM-CSF (rhGM-CSF; 800 U/ml) and recombinant human IL-4 (rhIL-4; 500 U/ml). DC harvested on day 7 were divided into two equal parts. One part was not irradiated (naive DC); the other was gamma-irradiated at a dose of 30 Gy. Cell surface molecules were analyzed by flow cytometry. T-cell proliferation was determined using a beta-scintillation counter. The levels of IL-2, IL-4, IL-6 and IL-10 in co-culture supernatants were measured by ELISA. The results indicated that gamma irradiation reduced expression of CD86, CD80 and HLA-DR molecules on DC, especially CD86 (P=0.0072). DC, irradiated or non-irradiated, effectively stimulated autologous T-cell proliferation. Compared to naive DC, irradiated DC showed a markedly lower capacity to promote T-cell proliferation (P=0.0073), and strikingly up-regulated secretion of IL-4 (P=0.0145) and IL-2 (P=0.0323) by autologous T cells. No significant differences were noted in IL-6 and IL-10 production between T cells co-cultured with naive DC and irradiated DC (P>0.05). It is concluded that gamma irradiation of DC not only influences the phenotype of DC but also alters their capacity to stimulate the proliferation and the cytokine profiles of autologous T

  18. Labile iron pool and ferritin content in developing rat brain gamma-irradiated in utero.

    PubMed

    Robello, Elizabeth; Galatro, Andrea; Puntarulo, Susana

    2009-05-01

    This study was aimed to assess the content of total Fe, Ferritin (Ft) and labile Fe pool (LIP) in developing rat brain exposed in utero to 1 Gy of gamma-irradiation. A significant increase (2.3-fold) in the total Fe content of the fetal rat brain irradiated in utero was observed from 1 to 4h post-irradiation, as compared to the content in non-irradiated brain. Ft was analyzed by immunoblotting. The Ft protein was composed by 20 kDa subunits. According to the analysis of the band density in the Western blot, the Ft content decreased by 77+/-15% 2h after gamma-irradiation, as compared to the values in non-irradiated samples. The effect of gamma-irradiation on the LIP was studied by both electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and by a fluorescence technique employing calcein (CA). A reduction on the LIP was detected at 2h post-irradiation, independently of the methodology employed for the assay. Since NO content increased in the same time frame of LIP decreasing, a protective role for NO is suggested in fetal rat brain exposed to gamma-irradiation. The data presented in this work are the first experimental evidence suggesting that, as part of the network of the cellular response to limit irradiation-dependent injury, a complex interaction between Fe and NO could be triggered.

  19. ESR detection procedure of irradiated papaya containing high water content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Masahiro; Shimoyama, Yuhei; Ukai, Mitsuko; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko

    2011-05-01

    ESR signals were recorded from irradiated papaya at liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K), and freeze-dried irradiated papaya at room temperature (295 K). Two side peaks from the flesh at the liquid nitrogen temperature indicated a linear dose response for 3-14 days after the γ-irradiation. The line shapes recorded from the freeze-dried specimens were sharper than those at liquid nitrogen temperature.

  20. Effects of γ-irradiation on phenolics content, antioxidant activity and physicochemical properties of whole grainrice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Yafang; Tang, Fufu; Xu, Feifei; Wang, Yuefei; Bao, Jinsong

    2013-04-01

    Three rice genotypes with different color were gamma irradiated at a dose of 2, 4, 6, 8and 10 kGy. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of gamma irradiation on the phenolics content and the antioxidant activity, as well as physicochemical properties of whole grain rice. The bound phenolics content in all the genotypes were significantly increased with the increase of dose of irradiation. Gamma irradiation at high dose significantly increased the free, bound and total antioxidant activities of three rice genotypes except for the free antioxidant activities of red rice. Though the color parameters were slightly changed, these changes could not be visibly identified. Rapid visco-analyzer (RVA) viscosities and gel hardness decreased continuously with the increase of the irradiation doses. It is suggested that gamma irradiation enhanced the antioxidant potential and eating quality of whole grainrice.

  1. Short-term uvb-irradiation leads to putative limbal stem cell damage and niche cell-mediated upregulation of macrophage recruiting cytokines.

    PubMed

    Notara, Maria; Refaian, N; Braun, G; Steven, P; Bock, F; Cursiefen, C

    2015-11-01

    Ultraviolet light B (UVB)-irradiation is linked to various ocular pathologies such as limbal stem cell defects in pterygium. Despite the large circumstantial evidence linking UVB irradiation and limbal epithelial stem cell damage, the precise molecular responses of limbal stem cells to UVB irradiation are unclear. Here the effect of UVB irradiation on the putative stem cell phenotype, limbal niche cells and the subsequent effects on corneal (lymph)angiogenic privilege were investigated. Primary human limbal epithelial stem cells and fibroblasts were irradiated with 0.02 J/cm(2) of UVB, a low dose corresponding to 3 min of solar irradiation. UVB irradiation caused significant reduction of limbal epithelial and limbal fibroblast proliferation for 24 h, but apoptosis of limbal epithelial stem cells only. Moreover, UVB induced stem-like character loss of limbal epithelial cells, as their colony forming efficiency and putative stem cell marker expression significantly decreased. Interestingly, limbal epithelial cells co-cultured with UVB-irradiated limbal fibroblasts also exhibited loss of stem cell character and decrease of colony forming efficiency. Conditioned media from limbal epithelial cells inhibited lymphatic endothelial cell proliferation and tube network complexity; however this effect diminished following UVB irradiation. In contrast, pro-inflammatory and macrophage-recruiting cytokines such as TNFα, IFNγ and MCP1 were significantly upregulated following cell irradiation of limbal fibroblasts. These data demonstrate the key role of the limbal stem cell niche in response to UVB and subsequent (lymph)angiogenic and inflammatory events. These data suggest that the known pro(lymph)angiogenic effect of UVB irradiation in pterygium is not linked to a direct up-regulation of pro-angiogenic cytokines, but rather to indirect macrophage-recruiting cytokines being upregulated after UVB irradiation. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights

  2. Irradiation Effects on Phenolic Content, Lipid and Protein Oxidation and Scavenger Ability of Soybean Seeds

    PubMed Central

    Štajner, Dubravka; Milošević, Mirjana; Popović, Boris M.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of medium doses of γ-irradiation (1–10 kGy) on total phenolic and tannin contents, lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation intensity and soluble protein content of soybean seeds, (genotype Ana), was investigated. Screening for antioxidant ability was performed using FRAP and DPPH methods. Total phenolic and tannin contents and DPPH scavenger activity were increased, while protein oxidation intensity was decreased by applied doses of γ-irradiation. Gamma irradiation provoked insignificant changes in lipid peroxidation and soluble protein content, while protein oxidation intensity was significantly decreased when dose of 10 kGy was applied. Presented results implicated that increased antioxidant capacity and protein stability of soybean seeds were increased after application of γ-irradiation.

  3. Increased metallothionein content in rat liver induced by x irradiation and exposure to high oxygen tension

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraishi, N.; Aono, K.; Utsumi, K.

    1983-08-01

    X irradiation and exposure to high oxygen tension are known to induce lipid peroxidation. The effects of these stresses on hepatic content of metallothionein, which may be involved in the regulation of zinc and copper metabolism, have been studied. The amount of metallothionein in rat liver was increased 11-fold by a high dose of X irradiation (1000 R). Increased metallothionein content (about 15 times) was also observed in liver of rats exposed to high oxygen tension for 3 days.

  4. Effects of helium content of microstructural development in Type 316 stainless steel under neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Maziasz, P.J.

    1985-11-01

    This work investigated the sensitivity of microstructural evolution, particularly precipitate development, to increased helium content during thermal aging and during neutron irradiation. Helium (110 at. ppM) was cold preinjected into solution annealed (SA) DO-heat type 316 stainess steel (316) via cyclotron irradiation. These specimens were then exposed side by side with uninjected samples. Continuous helium generation was increased considerably relative to EBR-II irradiation by irradiation in HFIR. Data were obtained from quantitative analytical electron microscopy (AEM) in thin foils and on extraction replicas. 480 refs., 86 figs., 19 tabs.

  5. Régulation de la production, par des cellules endothéliales, de cytokines pro-inflammatoires après irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Meeren, A.; Lafont, H.; Mathé, D.

    1998-04-01

    Gamma irradiation leads to an increased production of interleukin- (IL)-6 and IL-8 by human endothelial cells. In order to regulate the radio-induced production of these pro-inflammatory cytokines, we used the immunoregulatory cytokines IL-4 and IL-10. These agents were added either before or after a 10 Gy-irradiation. Our results show that it is possible to decrease the radio-induced production of IL-6 and IL-8 with the use of IL-4 and IL-10. Differences in the intensity of the response have been observed according to the time of treatment. The anti-inflammatory potential of both IL-4 and IL-10 was more pronounced when added after irradiation. Après irradiation gamma, des cellules endothéliales humaines ont une production accrue des interleukines (IL-) -6 et -8. Dans le but de réguler la production de ces cytokines pro-inflammatoires, nous avons utilisé des cytokines dites anti-inflammatoires, l'IL-4 et l'IL-10. Ces agents ont été ajoutés soit avant soit après une irradiation de 10Gy. Nos résultats montrent qu'il est possible de diminuer les productions radio-induites d'IL-6 et d'IL-8 par l'IL-4 et l'IL-10. Des différences dans l'intensité de la réponse ont toutefois été observées selon que l'IL-4 ou l'IL-10 ont été ajoutées avant ou après irradiation; leur efficacité anti-inflammatoire étant plus marquée lorsque les cytokines sont ajoutées après l'irradiation.

  6. Gene expression of hematoregulatory cytokines is elevated endogenously after sublethal gamma irradiation and is differentially enhanced by therapeutic administration of biologic response modifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, V.M.; Adamovicz, J.J.; Madonna, G.S.; Gause, W.C.; Elliott, T.B.; Moore, M.M.; Ledney, G.D.; Jackson, W.E. III

    1994-09-01

    Prompt, cytokine-mediated restoration of hematopoiesis is a prerequisite for survival after irradiation. Therapy with biologic response modifiers (BRMs), such as LPS, 3D monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), and synthetic trehalose dicrynomycolate (S-TDCM) presumably accelerates hematopoietic recovery after irradiation are poorly defined. One hour after sublethal (7.0 Gy) {sup 60}Co gamma irradiation, B6D2F1/J female mice received a single i.p. injection of LPS, MPL, S-TDCM, an extract from Serratia marcescens (Sm-BRM), or Tween 80 in saline (TS). Five hours later, a quantitative reverse transcription-PCR assay demonstrated marked splenic gene expression for IL-1{beta}, IL-3, IL-6, and granulocyte-CSF (G-CSF). Enhanced gene expression for TNF-{alpha}, macrophage-CSF (M-CSF), and stem cell factor (SCF) was not detected. Injection of any BRM further enhanced cytokine gene expression and plasma levels of CSF activity within 24 h after irradiation and hastened bone marrow recovery. Mice injected with S-TDCM or Sm-BRM sustained expression of the IL-6 gene for at least 24 h after irradiation. Sm-BRM-treated mice exhibited greater gene expression for IL-1{beta}, IL-3, TNF-{alpha}, and G-CSF at day 1 than any other BRM. When challenged with 2 LD{sub 50/30} of Klebsiella pneumoniae 4 days after irradiation, 100% of Sm-BRM-treated mice and 70% of S-TDCM-treated mice survived, whereas {le}30% of mice treated with LPS, MPL, or TS survived. Thus, sublethal irradiation induces transient, splenic cytokine gene expression that can be differentially amplified and prolonged by BRMs. BRMs that sustained and/or enhanced irradiation-induced expression of specific cytokine genes improved survival after experimental infection. 67 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Irradiation Effect on Oxidative Condition and Tocopherol Content of Vegetable Oils

    PubMed Central

    Lalas, Stavros; Gortzi, Olga; Tsaknis, John; Sflomos, Konstantinos

    2007-01-01

    The effect on induction period and tocopherol content after γ-irradiation on samples of olive oil and seed oils (sunflower and soybean) was determined. In seed oil samples 0, 100, 200 and 300 ppm of δ-tocopherol were added before irradiation with 1, 2 and 3kGy. The results of induction period showed that, after irradiation, all samples presented a significant decreased in resistance to oxidation. However, this decrease was minimized when δ-tocopherol was added. Irradiation significantly decreased the level of tocopherols. δ-Tocopherol appeared more sensitive in irradiation process than α- and γ-tocopherol. The addition of δ-tocopherol significantly reduced, in most cases, the depletion of the other tocopherols.

  8. Dose and dose rate effects of whole-body gamma-irradiation: II. Hematological variables and cytokines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gridley, D. S.; Pecaut, M. J.; Miller, G. M.; Moyers, M. F.; Nelson, G. A.

    2001-01-01

    The goal of part II of this study was to evaluate the effects of gamma-radiation on circulating blood cells, functional characteristics of splenocytes, and cytokine expression after whole-body irradiation at varying total doses and at low- and high-dose-rates (LDR, HDR). Young adult C57BL/6 mice (n = 75) were irradiated with either 1 cGy/min or 80 cGy/min photons from a 60Co source to cumulative doses of 0.5, 1.5, and 3.0 Gy. The animals were euthanized at 4 days post-exposure for in vitro assays. Significant dose- (but not dose-rate-) dependent decreases were observed in erythrocyte and blood leukocyte counts, hemoglobin, hematocrit, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced 3H-thymidine incorporation, and interleukin-2 (IL-2) secretion by activated spleen cells when compared to sham-irradiated controls (p < 0.05). Basal proliferation of leukocytes in the blood and spleen increased significantly with increasing dose (p < 0.05). Significant dose rate effects were observed only in thrombocyte counts. Plasma levels of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) and splenocyte secretion of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) were not affected by either the dose or dose rate of radiation. The data demonstrate that the responses of blood and spleen were largely dependent upon the total dose of radiation employed and that an 80-fold difference in the dose rate was not a significant factor in the great majority of measurements.

  9. Dose and dose rate effects of whole-body gamma-irradiation: II. Hematological variables and cytokines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gridley, D. S.; Pecaut, M. J.; Miller, G. M.; Moyers, M. F.; Nelson, G. A.

    2001-01-01

    The goal of part II of this study was to evaluate the effects of gamma-radiation on circulating blood cells, functional characteristics of splenocytes, and cytokine expression after whole-body irradiation at varying total doses and at low- and high-dose-rates (LDR, HDR). Young adult C57BL/6 mice (n = 75) were irradiated with either 1 cGy/min or 80 cGy/min photons from a 60Co source to cumulative doses of 0.5, 1.5, and 3.0 Gy. The animals were euthanized at 4 days post-exposure for in vitro assays. Significant dose- (but not dose-rate-) dependent decreases were observed in erythrocyte and blood leukocyte counts, hemoglobin, hematocrit, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced 3H-thymidine incorporation, and interleukin-2 (IL-2) secretion by activated spleen cells when compared to sham-irradiated controls (p < 0.05). Basal proliferation of leukocytes in the blood and spleen increased significantly with increasing dose (p < 0.05). Significant dose rate effects were observed only in thrombocyte counts. Plasma levels of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) and splenocyte secretion of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) were not affected by either the dose or dose rate of radiation. The data demonstrate that the responses of blood and spleen were largely dependent upon the total dose of radiation employed and that an 80-fold difference in the dose rate was not a significant factor in the great majority of measurements.

  10. Effect of nickel content on the neutron irradiation embrittlement of Ni-Mo-Cr steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chang-Hoon; Kasada, R.; Kimura, A.; Lee, Bong-Sang; Suh, Dong-Woo; Lee, Hu-Chul

    2013-11-01

    The influence of nickel on the neutron irradiation embrittlement of Ni-Mo-Cr reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels was investigated using alloys containing nickel in the range of 0.9-3.5 wt%. In all investigated alloys, the neutron irradiation with two dose conditions of 4.5 × 1019 neutron/cm2 at 290 °C and 9.0 × 1019 neutron/cm2 at 290 °C, respectively, increased the hardness and ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT). However, the increases of the hardness and DBTT resulting from the neutron irradiation were primarily affected by the irradiation dose that is closely related to the generation of irradiation defects, but not by the nickel content. In addition, a linear relationship between the changes in the hardness and DBTT subjected to the irradiation was confirmed. These results demonstrate that increasing the nickel content up to 3.5 wt% does not have a harmful effect on the irradiation embrittlement of Ni-Mo-Cr reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels.

  11. Influence of nickel and beryllium content on swelling behavior of copper irradiated with fast neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, B.N.; Garner, F.A.; Edwards, D.J.; Evans, J.H.

    1996-10-01

    In the 1970`s, the effects of nickel content on the evolution of dislocation microstructures and the formation and growth of voids in Cu-Ni alloys were studied using 1 MeV electrons in a high voltage electron microscope. The swelling rate was found to decrease rapidly with increasing nickel content. The decrease in the swelling rate was associated with a decreasing void growth rate with increasing nickel content at irradiation temperatures up to 450{degrees}C. At 500{degrees}C, both void size and swelling rate were found to peak at 1 and 2% Ni, respectively, and then to decrease rapidly with increasing nickel content. However, recent work has demonstrated that the swelling behavior of Cu-5%Ni irradiated with fission neutrons is very similar for that of pure copper. The present experiments were designed to investigate this apparent discrepancy.

  12. The Effect of Solar Irradiated Vibrio cholerae on the Secretion of Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines and Chemokines by the JAWS II Dendritic Cell Line In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Ssemakalu, Cornelius Cano; Ubomba-Jaswa, Eunice; Motaung, Keolebogile Shirley; Pillay, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The use of solar irradiation to sterilize water prior to its consumption has resulted in the reduction of water related illnesses in waterborne disease endemic communities worldwide. Currently, research on solar water disinfection (SODIS) has been directed towards understanding the underlying mechanisms through which solar irradiation inactivates the culturability of microorganisms in water, enhancement of the disinfection process, and the health impact of SODIS water consumption. However, the immunological consequences of SODIS water consumption have not been explored. In this study, we investigated the effect that solar irradiated V. cholerae may have had on the secretion of cytokines and chemokines by the JAWS II dendritic cell line in vitro. The JAWS II dendritic cell line was stimulated with the different strains of V. cholerae that had been: (i) prepared in PBS, (ii) inactivated through a combination of heat and chemical, (iii) solar irradiated, and (iv) non-solar irradiated, in bottled water. As controls, LPS (1 μg/ml) and CTB (1 μg/ml) were used as stimulants. After 48 hours of stimulation the tissue culture media from each treatment was qualitatively and quantitatively analysed for the presence of IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-7, IL-10, IL-12p40, IL-12p70, IL-15, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, MIP-2, RANTES, TNF-α, IL-23 and IL-27. Results showed that solar irradiated cultures of V. cholerae induced dendritic cells to secrete significant (p<0.05) levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in comparison to the unstimulated dendritic cells. Furthermore, the amount of pro-inflammatory cytokines secreted by the dendritic cells in response to solar irradiated cultures of V. cholerae was not as high as observed in treatments involving non-solar irradiated cultures of V. cholerae or LPS. Our results suggest that solar irradiated microorganisms are capable of inducing the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. This novel finding is key towards understanding the

  13. The Effect of Solar Irradiated Vibrio cholerae on the Secretion of Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines and Chemokines by the JAWS II Dendritic Cell Line In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ssemakalu, Cornelius Cano; Ubomba-Jaswa, Eunice; Motaung, Keolebogile Shirley; Pillay, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The use of solar irradiation to sterilize water prior to its consumption has resulted in the reduction of water related illnesses in waterborne disease endemic communities worldwide. Currently, research on solar water disinfection (SODIS) has been directed towards understanding the underlying mechanisms through which solar irradiation inactivates the culturability of microorganisms in water, enhancement of the disinfection process, and the health impact of SODIS water consumption. However, the immunological consequences of SODIS water consumption have not been explored. In this study, we investigated the effect that solar irradiated V. cholerae may have had on the secretion of cytokines and chemokines by the JAWS II dendritic cell line in vitro. The JAWS II dendritic cell line was stimulated with the different strains of V. cholerae that had been: (i) prepared in PBS, (ii) inactivated through a combination of heat and chemical, (iii) solar irradiated, and (iv) non-solar irradiated, in bottled water. As controls, LPS (1 μg/ml) and CTB (1 μg/ml) were used as stimulants. After 48 hours of stimulation the tissue culture media from each treatment was qualitatively and quantitatively analysed for the presence of IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-7, IL-10, IL-12p40, IL-12p70, IL-15, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, MIP-2, RANTES, TNF-α, IL-23 and IL-27. Results showed that solar irradiated cultures of V. cholerae induced dendritic cells to secrete significant (p<0.05) levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in comparison to the unstimulated dendritic cells. Furthermore, the amount of pro-inflammatory cytokines secreted by the dendritic cells in response to solar irradiated cultures of V. cholerae was not as high as observed in treatments involving non-solar irradiated cultures of V. cholerae or LPS. Our results suggest that solar irradiated microorganisms are capable of inducing the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. This novel finding is key towards understanding the

  14. Evaluation of the effect of led irradiator spectral content on the development of greenhouse plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turanov, S. B.; Yakovlev, A. N.; Korepanov, V. I.; Buzmakova, D. A.; Grechkina, T. V.

    2016-11-01

    The work presents the results of an experiment studying the effect of radiation spectral content (considering its equal intensity in terms of photosynthetically active radiation) on the growth and development of greenhouse model plants. The results demonstrate that the effective development of model subjects requires the adaptation of radiation spectral content according to the growth period and plant type, unlike the illumination level. The obtained results demonstrate the necessity of the creation of adaptive irradiation unit.

  15. The effects of gamma irradiation on the vitamin E content and sensory qualities of pecan nuts ( Carya illinoensis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taipina, Magda S.; Lamardo, Leda C. A.; Rodas, Maria A. B.; del Mastro, Nelida L.

    2009-07-01

    Pecan nuts ( Carya illinoensis) were treated with gamma irradiation and evaluated for changes in vitamin E content and sensory properties. Irradiation at 1 and 3 kGy resulted in no changes in vitamin E content measured as α-tocopherol equivalents by a colorimetric method. A trained sensory panel found that irradiation at 1 kGy produced no significant changes in appearance, aroma, texture and flavor attributes. The vitamin E content of irradiated pecan nuts remained stable, but from the point of view of sensory quality a dose of merely 1 kGy can be considered as recommendable.

  16. Role of Cytokines in Intervertebral Disc Degeneration: Pain and Disc-content

    PubMed Central

    Risbud, Makarand V.; Shapiro, Irving. M

    2014-01-01

    Degeneration of the intervertebral disc is the major contributor to back/neck and radicular pain. It is characterized by an elevation in levels of the inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1 α/β, IL-6 and IL-17 secreted by the disc cells themselves; these cytokines promote matrix degradation, chemokine production and changes in cell phenotype. The resulting imbalance between catabolic and anabolic responses leads to degeneration, as well as herniation and radicular pain. Release of chemokines from degenerating discs promote infiltration and activation of T and B cells, macrophages, neutrophils, and mast cells further amplifying the inflammatory cascade. Immunocyte migration into the disc is accompanied by the appearance of microvasculature and nerve fibers arising from the dorsal root ganglion (DRG). In this inflammatory milieu, neurogenic factors in particular nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derive neurotrophic factor (BDNF) generated by disc and immune cells induce expression of pain associated cation channels in DRGs. Depolarization of these channels is likely to promote discogenic and radicular pain and reinforce the cytokine-mediated degenerative cascade. Taken together, the enhanced understanding of the contribution of cytokines and immune cells to catabolic and nociceptive processes provide new targets for treating symptomatic disc disease. PMID:24166242

  17. Content of proinflammatory cytokine in patients with clinical remission of chronic herpes infection during immunocorrection.

    PubMed

    Obukhova, O O; Shvayuk, A P; Gorbenko, O M; Trunov, A N; Trunova, L A

    2008-12-01

    The concentrations of cytokines (interleukin-1beta, interleukin-6, and interferon-gamma) in blood plasma from patients with remission of chronic herpes infection were measured during immunocorrective therapy. Our results indicate that immunocorrection is pathogenetically substantiated and immunologically effective. It was manifested in reduction of inflammation and activation of antiviral protection.

  18. Effect of gamma 60Co irradiation on the lipid content and fatty acid composition of Nannochloropsis sp. microalgae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermavitalini, Dini; Sari, Ika Puspita; Prasetyo, Endry Nugroho; Abdulgani, Nurlita; Saputro, Triono Bagus

    2017-06-01

    Nannochloropsissp. has been identified as a promising feed stock for biodiesel production in recent years. Nannochloropsis sp. have high lipid content between 31-68 % of dry biomass weight. Mutagenesis induced by Gamma 60Co irradiation can be utilized to alter Nannochloropsis sp. characteristic to get microalgae mutant strain that can produce a higher lipid content than the wild strain. The aim of this research was to know the effect of gamma 60Co irradiation to the biomass, lipid content and fatty acid compotition of Nannochloropsis sp. microalgae. In this research, irradiation was done in different doses there were 0, 2, 4, 6 and 10 Gray (Gy). Measuring microalgae biomass and lipid content were done in late exponential phase at the end of each treatment. Research design used is random complete with 95 % confident level for quantitative analysis based on biomass and lipid content. Fatty acid compotition was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Results showed that gamma irradiated gave an effect on lipid content and fatty acid profile of Nannochloropsis sp. Tukey test showed total lipid content of control micoalgae (0 Gy) was significat different with 10 Gy irradiated microalgae, but no significant different with 2,4 and 6 Gy irradiated microalgae. The highest lipid content were found in 10 Gy irradiated microalgae equal to 62.65 %. Fatty acid profile of 10 Gy irradiated Nannochloropsis sp. had 9 fatty acids while control Nannochloropsis sp. had 6 fatty acids.

  19. Drying and irradiation of calf and horse serum. II. Influence on mycoplasma content of the calf sera.

    PubMed

    Jurmanová, K; Veber, P; Lesko, J; Hána, L

    1975-05-01

    Drying of calf sera produced only a negligible change in their content of Acholeplasma laidlawii organisms and reduced the content of Mycoplasma arginini organisms by 2 to 4 logs. Gamma-irradiation of liquid and dried calf sera killed M. arginini and A. laidlawii organisms at irradiation levels of 0.2-0.3 and 0.4-0.6 Mrads, respectively.

  20. Antioxidant capacities and total phenolic contents increase with gamma irradiation in two types of Malaysian honey.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Saba Zuhair; Yusoff, Kamaruddin Mohd; Makpol, Suzana; Yusof, Yasmin Anum Mohd

    2011-07-27

    Two types of monofloral Malaysian honey (Gelam and Nenas) were analyzed to determine their antioxidant activities and total phenolic and flavonoid contents, with and without gamma irradiation. Our results showed that both types of honey can scavenge free radicals and exhibit high antioxidant-reducing power; however, Gelam honey exhibited higher antioxidant activity (p < 0.05) than Nenas honey, which is in good correlation (r = 0.9899) with its phenolic contents. Interestingly, we also noted that both irradiated honeys have higher antioxidant activities and total phenolic and flavonoid contents compared to nonirradiated honeys by Folin-Ciocalteu and UV-spectrophotometry methods, respectively. However, HPLC analysis for phenolic compounds showed insignificant increase between irradiated and nonirradiated honeys. The phenolic compounds such as: caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid, ellagic acid, p- coumaric acid, quercetin and hesperetin as indicated by HPLC method were found to be higher in Gelam honey versus Nenas honey. In conclusion, irradiation of honey causes enhanced antioxidant activities and flavonoid compounds.

  1. [A study on cytokine levels and nitric oxide content in rabbit aqueous humor after lens extraction and intraocular lens implantation].

    PubMed

    Qi, Ming-xin; Huang, Xiu-rong; Shen, Shi-ren; Zheng, Liang-pu; Lin, Jiu-mao; Wei, Lin

    2003-01-01

    To investigate the relationship among inflammatory reaction and cytokine levels, nitric oxide (NO) content in aqueous humor after intraocular lens implantation. Eighteen New Zealand rabbits were divided randomly into 3 groups (each 6 rabbits): (1) control group, (2) extracapsular cataract extraction group (ECCE) and (3) ECCE and posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation group (ECCE + IOL). The inflammation of all experimental rabbit eyes were observed by a zoom-photo slit-lamp microscope 0, 1, 3, 7, 14, 30 days postoperatively, including corneal edema and anterior chamber exudation. Meanwhile, aqueous humor was drawn for white blood cell (WBC) count and classification, as well as for NO(2)(-)/NO(3)(-) and cytokine assays, including interleukin-2 (IL-2), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Statistics were taken by SPSS software. (1) The anterior chamber exudation was the most serious and monocyte/macrophage in aqueous humor were the highest in ECCE + IOL group in postoperative 7 - 14 days. (2) The levels of IL-2, TNF-alpha and the content of NO(2)(-)/NO(3)(-) in aqueous humor of ECCE + IOL group were higher than that in ECCE group and control group in the postoperative 1 - 14 days respectively, and they increased to their peak values at the postoperative 3 - 7 days and decreased gradually after postoperative two weeks. (3) The change regularity of IL-2, TNF-alpha, NO(2)(-)/NO(3)(-) and inflammatory reaction in each group were basically similar, i.e. the more serious the reaction, the higher the levels of the contents. The intraocular inflammation after intraocular lens implantation is closely related to the changes of cytokine levels and NO content in aqueous humor.

  2. Effects of Vinification Techniques Combined with UV-C Irradiation on Phenolic Contents of Red Wines.

    PubMed

    Tahmaz, Hande; Söylemezoğlu, Gökhan

    2017-06-01

    Red wines are typically high in phenolic and antioxidant capacity and both of which can be increased by vinification techniques. This study employed 3 vinification techniques to assess the increase in phenolic compounds and antioxidant capacity. Wines were obtained from Boğazkere grape cultivar by techniques of classical maceration, cold maceration combined with ultraviolet light (UV) irradiation, and thermovinification combined with UV irradiation and changes in phenolic contents were examined. Total phenolic and anthocyanin contents and trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity of wines were measured spectrophotometrically and phenolic contents (+)-catechin, (-)-epicatechin, rutin, quercetin, trans-resveratrol, and cis-resveratrol were measured by High Pressure Liquid Chromatography with Diode Array Detection (HPLC-DAD). As a result of the study, the highest phenolic content except for quercetin was measured in the wines obtained by thermovinification combined with UV irradiation. We demonstrated that the highest phenolic compounds with health effect, total phenolic compounds, total anthocyanin, and antioxidant activity were obtained from thermovinification with UV-C treatment than classical wine making. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  3. Ageing and irradiance enhance vitamin E content in green edible tissues from crop plants.

    PubMed

    Lizarazo, Karol; Fernández-Marín, Beatriz; Becerril, José María; García-Plazaola, José Ignacio

    2010-09-01

    Tocopherol (vitamin E) is an antioxidant essential in human nutrition. Several approaches have aimed to enhance tocopherol content in crops by the genetic modification of plants, a practice that generates some social concern. As tocopherol accumulates with leaf age in some wild plants and the antioxidant mechanisms respond with flexibility to stress conditions, it is hypothesised that tocopherol content can be increased in edible plants by the manipulation of harvesting time and growth conditions, in particular irradiance. Ontogenic changes in tocopherol concentration have been studied in photosynthetic tissues of edible leaves (lettuce, spinach, corn salad and dandelion) and green fruits (cucumber and pepper). In all species, tocopherol content increased with tissue age. Spinach showed the fastest rate of tocopherol accumulation, and growth at higher irradiance had a synergistic effect on the rate of accumulation. The same irradiance dependence of this accumulation was observed in fruits, but a final decrease with senescence occurred in cucumber. This study demonstrates that the content of tocopherol in vegetables can be notably enhanced (or reduced) by simply selecting the appropriate harvesting time and/or by manipulating the environmental conditions during the growth period. Copyright 2010 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Technical Letter Report on the Cracking of Irradiated Cast Stainless Steels with Low Ferrite Content

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.; Alexandreanu, B.; Natesan, K.

    2014-11-01

    Crack growth rate and fracture toughness J-R curve tests were performed on CF-3 and CF-8 cast austenite stainless steels (CASS) with 13-14% of ferrite. The tests were conducted at ~320°C in either high-purity water with low dissolved oxygen or in simulated PWR water. The cyclic crack growth rates of CF-8 were higher than that of CF-3, and the differences between the aged and unaged specimens were small. No elevated SCC susceptibility was observed among these samples, and the SCC CGRs of these materials were comparable to those of CASS alloys with >23% ferrite. The fracture toughness values of unirradiated CF-3 were similar between unaged and aged specimens, and neutron irradiation decreased the fracture toughness significantly. The fracture toughness of CF-8 was reduced after thermal aging, and declined further after irradiation. It appears that while lowering ferrite content may help reduce the tendency of thermal aging embrittlement, it is not very effective to mitigate irradiation-induced embrittlement. Under a combined condition of thermal aging and irradiation, neutron irradiation plays a dominant role in causing embrittlement in CASS alloys.

  5. Literature review of United States utilities computer codes for calculating actinide isotope content in irradiated fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Horak, W.C.; Lu, Ming-Shih

    1991-12-01

    This paper reviews the accuracy and precision of methods used by United States electric utilities to determine the actinide isotopic and element content of irradiated fuel. After an extensive literature search, three key code suites were selected for review. Two suites of computer codes, CASMO and ARMP, are used for reactor physics calculations; the ORIGEN code is used for spent fuel calculations. They are also the most widely used codes in the nuclear industry throughout the world. Although none of these codes calculate actinide isotopics as their primary variables intended for safeguards applications, accurate calculation of actinide isotopic content is necessary to fulfill their function.

  6. Magnesium Sulfate Prevents Placental Ischemia-Induced Increases in Brain Water Content and Cerebrospinal Fluid Cytokines in Pregnant Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Linda W.; Warrington, Junie P.

    2016-01-01

    Magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) is the most widely used therapy in the clinic to prevent the progression of preeclampsia, a hypertensive disorder of pregnancy, to eclampsia. Eclampsia, manifested as unexplained seizures and/or coma during pregnancy or postpartum, accounts for ~13% of maternal deaths worldwide. While MgSO4 continues to be used in the clinic, the mechanisms by which it exerts its protective actions are not well understood. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that MgSO4 protects against placental ischemia-induced increases in brain water content and cerebrospinal fluid cytokines. To test this hypothesis, MgSO4 was administered via mini-osmotic pump (60 mg/day, i.p.) to pregnant and placental ischemic rats, induced by mechanical reduction of uterine perfusion pressure, from gestational day 14–19. This treatment regimen of MgSO4 led to therapeutic level of 2.8 ± 0.6 mmol/L Mg in plasma. MgSO4 had no effect on improving placental ischemia-induced changes in mean arterial pressure, number of live fetuses, or fetal and placental weight. Placental ischemia increased, while MgSO4 prevented the increase in water content in the anterior cerebrum. Cytokine and chemokine levels were measured in the cerebrospinal fluid using a multi-plex assay. Results demonstrate that cerebrospinal fluid, obtained via the cisterna magna, had reduced protein, albumin, interleukin (IL)-17A, IL-18, IL-2, eotaxin, fractalkine, interferon gamma, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-2 following MgSO4 treatment. These data support the hypothesis that MgSO4 offers neuroprotection by preventing placental ischemia-induced cerebral edema and reducing levels of cytokines/chemokines in the cerebrospinal fluid. PMID:28008305

  7. The megakaryocyte DNA content and platelet formation after the sublethal whole body irradiation of rats

    SciTech Connect

    Tanum, G.

    1984-04-01

    The DNA content of rat bone marrow megakaryocytes (MK) was studied by Feulgen photometry, following whole body irradiation with 2 Gy. The DNA measurements were preceded by acetylcholinesterase staining to avoid missing the smaller 2N-8N MK. The number of 2N-8N MK declined immediately following irradiation, whereas the number of 16N-64N MK remained normal for 4 days before decreasing. The number of 2N-8N and 16N-64N MK reached minimum around days 7 and 10, respectively, and thereafter increased to supranormal values at days 14 and 20, respectively. Platelet production, measured by /sup 35/S incorporation into platelets, increased during the first 4 days, then decreased to minimum about day 10. A rise to supranormal values was present at day 20. All values were about normal 30 days after exposure. The observed pattern may be explained as follows: Most of the 16N-64N MK survive the applied dose and maintain their ability to produce platelets. Some of the 2N-4N and 8N MK survive irradiation and transform into platelet-producing MK. No influx of cells from the MK stem cell compartment into the MK compartment can be observed before day 7 after irradiation. One explanation for this time lag may be that thrombocytopenia, which does not occur before then, is an essential stimulus for MK stem cell activation.

  8. Enhancing the growth, photosynthetic capacity and artemisinin content in Artemisia annua L. by irradiated sodium alginate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aftab, Tariq; Khan, M. Masroor A.; Idrees, M.; Naeem, M.; Moinuddin; Hashmi, Nadeem; Varshney, Lalit

    2011-07-01

    Degrading the natural bioactive agents by ionizing radiation and then using them as growth promoting substances is a novel emerging technology to exploit the genetic potential of crops in terms of growth, yield and quality. Polysaccharides, such as sodium alginate, have proven to be wonderful growth promoting substances in their depolymerized form for various plants. The effect of depolymerized form of sodium alginate, produced by irradiating the latter by 60Co gamma rays, was studied on Artemisia annua L. with regard to growth attributes, physiological and biochemical parameters and artemisinin content. The study revealed that the irradiated sodium alginate (ISA), applied as leaf-sprays at a concentration of 20-120 mg L -1, improved the growth attributes, photosynthetic capability, enzyme activities and artemisinin content of the plant significantly. Application of ISA at 80 mg L -1 increased the values of the attributes studied to the maximum extent. The enhancement of leaf-artemisinin content was ascribed to the ISA-enhanced H 2O 2 content in the leaves.

  9. Effects of PVA, agar contents, and irradiation doses on properties of PVA/ws-chitosan/glycerol hydrogels made by γ-irradiation followed by freeze-thawing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaomin; Zhu, Zhiyong; Liu, Qi; Chen, Xiliang; Ma, Mingwang

    2008-08-01

    Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA)/water soluble chitosan (ws-chitosan)/glycerol hydrogels were prepared by γ-irradiation and γ-irradiation followed by freeze-thawing, respectively. The effects of irradiation dose and the contents of PVA and agar on the swelling, rheological, and thermal properties of these hydrogels were investigated. The swelling capacity decreases while the mechanical strength increases with increasing PVA or agar content. Increasing the irradiation dose leads to an increase in chemical crosslinking density but a decrease in physical crosslinking density. Hydrogels made by irradiation followed by freeze-thawing own smaller swelling capacity but larger mechanical strength than those made by pure irradiation. The storage modulus of the former hydrogels decreases above 50 °C and above 70 °C it comes to the same value as that prepared by irradiation. The ordered association of PVA is influenced by both chemical and physical crosslinkings and by the presence of ws-chitosan and glycerol. These hydrogels are high sensitive to pH and ionic strength, indicating that they may be useful in stimuli-responsive drug release system.

  10. Changes in human bone marrow fat content associated with changes in hematopoietic stem cell numbers and cytokine levels with aging.

    PubMed

    Tuljapurkar, Sonal R; McGuire, Timothy R; Brusnahan, Susan K; Jackson, John D; Garvin, Kevin L; Kessinger, Margaret A; Lane, Judy T; O' Kane, Barbara J; Sharp, John G

    2011-11-01

    Hematological deficiencies increase with aging, including anemias, reduced responses to hematopoietic stress and myelodysplasias. This investigation tested the hypothesis that increased bone marrow (BM) fat content in humans with age was associated with decreased numbers of side population (SP) hematopoietic stem cells, and this decrease correlated with changes in cytokine levels. BM was obtained from the femoral head and trochanteric region of the femur removed at surgery for total hip replacement (N = 100 subjects). In addition, BM from cadavers (N = 36), with no evidence of hip disease, was evaluated for fat content. Whole trabecular marrow samples were ground in a sterile mortar and pestle, and cellularity and lipid content determined. Marrow cells were stained with Hoechst dye and SP profiles were acquired. Plasma levels of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1, stromal-derived factor (SDF)-1 and interleukin (IL)-6 were measured using ELISA. Fat content in the BM of human subjects and cadavers increased with age. The numbers of SP stem cells in BM as well as plasma IGF-1 and SDF-1 levels decreased in correlation with increased BM fat. IL-6 had no relationship to changes in marrow fat. These data suggest that increased BM fat may be associated with a decreased number of SP stem cells and IGF-1 and SDF-1 levels with aging. These data further raise a more general question as to the role of adipose cells in the regulation of tissue stem cells.

  11. Changes in human bone marrow fat content associated with changes in hematopoietic stem cell numbers and cytokine levels with aging

    PubMed Central

    Tuljapurkar, Sonal R; McGuire, Timothy R; Brusnahan, Susan K; Jackson, John D; Garvin, Kevin L; Kessinger, Margaret A; Lane, Judy T; O' Kane, Barbara J; Sharp, John G

    2011-01-01

    Hematological deficiencies increase with aging, including anemias, reduced responses to hematopoietic stress and myelodysplasias. This investigation tested the hypothesis that increased bone marrow (BM) fat content in humans with age was associated with decreased numbers of side population (SP) hematopoietic stem cells, and this decrease correlated with changes in cytokine levels. BM was obtained from the femoral head and trochanteric region of the femur removed at surgery for total hip replacement (N = 100 subjects). In addition, BM from cadavers (N = 36), with no evidence of hip disease, was evaluated for fat content. Whole trabecular marrow samples were ground in a sterile mortar and pestle, and cellularity and lipid content determined. Marrow cells were stained with Hoechst dye and SP profiles were acquired. Plasma levels of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1, stromal-derived factor (SDF)-1 and interleukin (IL)-6 were measured using ELISA. Fat content in the BM of human subjects and cadavers increased with age. The numbers of SP stem cells in BM as well as plasma IGF-1 and SDF-1 levels decreased in correlation with increased BM fat. IL-6 had no relationship to changes in marrow fat. These data suggest that increased BM fat may be associated with a decreased number of SP stem cells and IGF-1 and SDF-1 levels with aging. These data further raise a more general question as to the role of adipose cells in the regulation of tissue stem cells. PMID:21923862

  12. Analysis of the (148)Gd and (154)Dy Content in Proton-Irradiated Lead Targets.

    PubMed

    Talip, Z; Pfister, S; Dressler, R; David, J C; Vögele, A; Vontobel, P; Michel, R; Schumann, D

    2017-06-20

    This work presents the determination of the (148)Gd and (154)Dy content in Pb targets irradiated by 220-2600 MeV protons. It includes the chemical separation of lanthanides, followed by the preparation of proper samples, by molecular plating technique, for α-spectrometry measurements. The experimental cross section results were compared with theoretical predictions, calculated with the INCL++-ABLA07 code. The comparisons showed a satisfactory agreement for (148)Gd (less than within a factor two), while measured (154)Dy cross sections are higher than the theoretical values.

  13. Water color affects the stratification, surface temperature, heat content, and mean epilimnetic irradiance of small lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Houser, J.N.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of water color on lake stratification, mean epilimnetic irradiance, and lake temperature dynamics were examined in small, north-temperate lakes that differed widely in water color (1.5-19.8 m -1). Among these lakes, colored lakes differed from clear lakes in the following ways: (i) the epilimnia were shallower and colder, and mean epilimnetic irradiance was reduced; (ii) the diel temperature cycles were more pronounced; (iii) whole-lake heat accumulation during stratification was reduced. The depth of the epilimnion ranged from 2.5 m in the clearest lake to 0.75 m in the most colored lake, and 91% of the variation in epilimnetic depth was explained by water color. Summer mean morning epilimnetic temperature was ???2??C cooler in the most colored lake compared with the clearest lake. In clear lakes, the diel temperature range (1.4 ?? 0.7??C) was significantly (p = 0.01) less than that in the most colored lake (2.1 ?? 1.0??C). Change in whole-lake heat content was negatively correlated with water color. Increasing water color decreased light penetration more than thermocline depth, leading to reduced mean epilimnetic irradiance in the colored lakes. Thus, in these small lakes, water color significantly affected temperature, thermocline depth, and light climate. ?? 2006 NRC.

  14. Paramagnetic Defects in Electron-Irradiated Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia: Effect of Yttria Content

    SciTech Connect

    Costantini, Jean-Marc; Beuneu, Francois; Morrison-Smith, Sarah; Devanathan, Ram; Weber, William J

    2011-01-01

    We have studied the effect of the yttria content on the paramagnetic centres in electron-irradiated yttria-stabilized zirconia (ZrO2: Y3+) or YSZ. Single crystals with 9.5 mol% or 18 mol% Y2O3 were irradiated with electrons of 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 and 2.5 MeV. The paramagnetic centre production was studied by X-band EPR spectroscopy. The same paramagnetic centres were identified for both chemical compositions, namely two electron centres, i.e. i) F+-type centres (involving singly ionized oxygen vacancies), and ii) so-called T centres (Zr3+ in a trigonal symmetry site), and hole-centres. A strong effect is observed on the production of hole-centres which are strongly enhanced when doubling the yttria content. However, no striking effect is found on the electron centres (except the enhancement of an extra line associated to the F+-type centres). It is concluded that hole-centres are produced by inelastic interactions, whereas F+-type centres are produced by elastic collisions with no effect of the yttria content on the defect production rate. In the latter case, the threshold displacement energy (Ed) of oxygen is estimated from the electron-energy dependence of the F+-type centre production rate, with no significant effect of the yttria content on Ed. An Ed value larger than 120 eV is found. Accordingly, classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with a Buckingham-type potential show that Ed values for Y and O are likely to be in excess of 200 eV. Due to the difficulty in displacing O or Y atoms, the radiation-induced defects may alternatively be a result of Zr atom displacements for Ed = 80 1 eV with subsequent defect re-arrangement.

  15. Paramagnetic defects in electron-irradiated yttria-stabilized zirconia: Effect of yttria content

    SciTech Connect

    Costantini, Jean-Marc; Beuneu, Francois; Morrison-Smith, Sarah E.; Devanathan, Ramaswami; Weber, William J.

    2011-12-20

    We have studied the effect of the yttria content on the paramagnetic centres in electron-irradiated yttria-stabilized zirconia (ZrO2: Y3+) or YSZ. Single crystals with 9.5 mol% or 18 mol% Y2O3 were irradiated with electrons of 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 and 2.5 MeV. The paramagnetic centre production was studied by X-band EPR spectroscopy. The same paramagnetic centres were identified for both chemical compositions, namely two electron centres, i.e. i) F+-type centres (involving singly ionized oxygen vacancies), and ii) so-called T centres (Zr3+ in a trigonal symmetry site), and hole-centres. A strong effect is observed on the production of hole-centres which are strongly enhanced when doubling the yttria content. However, no striking effect is found on the electron centres (except the enhancement of an extra line associated to the F+-type centres). It is concluded that hole-centres are produced by inelastic interactions, whereas F+-type centres are produced by elastic collisions with no effect of the yttria content on the defect production rate. In the latter case, the threshold displacement energy (Ed) of oxygen is estimated from the electron-energy dependence of the F+-type centre production rate, with no significant effect of the yttria content on Ed. An Ed value larger than 120 eV is found. Accordingly, classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with a Buckingham-type potential show that Ed values for Y and O are likely to be in excess of 200 eV. It is concluded that F+-type centres might be actually oxygen divacancies (F2+-type centres). Due to the difficulty in displacing O or Y atoms, the radiation-induced defects may alternatively be a result of Zr atom displacements for Ed = 80 ± 1 eV with subsequent defect re-arrangement.

  16. Effects of added fermentable carbohydrates in the diet on intestinal proinflammatory cytokine-specific mRNA content in weaning piglets.

    PubMed

    Pié, S; Awati, A; Vida, S; Falluel, I; Williams, B A; Oswald, I P

    2007-03-01

    There is increasing evidence showing that dietary supplementation with prebiotics can be effective in the treatment of intestinal inflammation. Because weaning time is characterized by rapid intestinal inflammation, this study investigated the effect of a diet supplemented with a combination of 4 fermentable carbohydrates (lactulose, inulin, sugarbeet pulp, and wheat starch) on the mRNA content of proinflammatory cytokines in newly weaned piglets. Cytokines (IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12p40, IL-18, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha) were analyzed using a semiquantitative reverse-transcription PCR technique on d 1, 4, and 10 in the ileum and colon of piglets fed either a test diet (CHO) or a control diet. In addition to the diet, the effect of enforced fasting on cytokine mRNA content was also evaluated. No effect of fasting was observed on the pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNA content. Our results showed that the CHO diet induced an up-regulation of IL-6 mRNA content in the colon of piglets 4 d postweaning. This up-regulation was specific for the animals fed the CHO diet and was not observed in animals fed the control diet. An increase in IL-1beta mRNA content was also observed on d 4 postweaning in all of the piglets. Correlations between proinflammatory cytokines and the end-products of fermentation indicated that the regulation of cytokines may be linked with some of the fermentation end-products such as branched-chain fatty acids, which are in turn end-products of protein fermentation.

  17. Cytokine Contents in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia: Association with ZAP70 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Işıksaçan, Nilgün; Çınar, Suzan; Aktaş Çetin, Esin; Aktan, Melih; Deniz, Günnur

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a disease that shows varying clinical progression, and expression of the protein tyrosine kinase ZAP70 has been described as a very valuable prognostic factor. Patients with ZAP70 positivity are characterized by worse clinical course and significantly shorter progression-free and overall survival. In this study, intracytoplasmic interferon gamma (IFN-γ) and interleukin-4 (IL-4) content of T, B, and CLL cells in CLL patients and their correlations with Rai staging and ZAP70 positivity were investigated. Materials and Methods: CLL patients newly diagnosed or in follow-up at the İstanbul University İstanbul Medical Faculty Hematology Department were included in this study. These patients were classified according to Rai staging and ZAP70 expression. IL-4, IFN-γ, and ZAP70 expressions in peripheral blood T, B, and CLL cells were measured by four-color flow cytometry. Results: There was a statistically significant correlation between advanced disease and ZAP70 positivity. IL-4-secreting T cells were significantly increased; however, IFN-γ secretion was significantly decreased in CLL patients compared to healthy individuals, whereas IL-4-secreting B cells were significantly diminished in contrast to T cells. Conclusion: These findings suggest damage in the cellular immunity and that IL-4 might lead to many complications and may be important in disease progression. PMID:26376785

  18. Vitamin D2, Ergosterol, and Vitamin B2 Content in Commercially Dried Mushrooms Marketed in China and Increased Vitamin D2 Content Following UV-C Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guocheng; Cai, Weixi; Xu, Baojun

    2016-11-21

    Mushrooms are a great source of vitamin D and vitamin B2; however, the content of these vitamins in dried mushrooms has not fully been investigated. Thus, the objectives of this study were to determine the contents of vitamin D2, ergosterol, and vitamin B2 in commercially dried edible mushrooms in China and to investigate the effect of UV-C irradiation on fresh mushrooms. Among the 35 species of dried mushrooms considered for this study, the average ergosterol content was 1.98 mg/g, while the average vitamin D2 content was 16.88 µg/g. The average vitamin B2 content in dried mushrooms was 12.68 µg/g. Fresh shaggy ink caps and oyster mushrooms, when exposed to UV-C at 254 nm at a dose of 0.25 J/cm(2) for 10, 30, and 60 min, showed significantly (p < 0.05) increased vitamin D2 content (229.7 and 67.0 µg/g, respectively) as compared to its fresh counterparts. The conversion of ergosterol to vitamin D2 induced by UV-C irradiation at 0.25 J/cm(2) was significant (p < 0.05). In conclusion, dried commercial mushrooms have higher contents of ergosterol and vitamin D2 than fresh mushrooms. UV-C radiation can be used to increase vitamin D2 content in mushrooms.

  19. Effects of irradiation and semistarvation on rat thyrotropin beta subunit messenger ribonucleic acid, pituitary thyrotropin content, and thyroid hormone levels

    SciTech Connect

    Litten, R.Z. ); Carr, F.E. ); Fein, H.G.; Smallridge, R.C. )

    1990-01-01

    The effect of radiation-induced anorexia on serum thyrotropin (TSH), pituitary TSH-{beta} mRNA, pituitary TSH content, serum thyroxine (T{sub 4}), and serum 3,5,3{prime}-triiodothyronine (T{sub 3}) was investigated using feed-matched controls. Rats received 10 Gy gamma whole-body irradiation and were examined 1-3 days postirradiation. Feed-matched and untreated controls were also studied. The average food intake of the irradiated and feed-matched groups was approximately 18% of the untreated controls. Over the three day period both the irradiated and feed-matched groups lost a significant amount of body weight. The serum T{sub 4} levels of both the irradiated and feed-matched groups were not significantly different from each other, but were significantly depressed when compared to the untreated control group. The serum TSH and T{sub 3} were, however, significantly greater in the irradiated than the feed-matched groups at day 3 posttreatment. To determine if the difference in the serum TSH level between the two groups was due to a pretranslational alteration in TSH production, we measured the TSH-{beta} mRNA using an RNA blot hybridization assay. We found that the TSH-{beta} mRNA level was the same in the irradiated and feed-matched groups, suggesting that the mechanism responsible for the radiation-induced increase in the serum TSH level is posttranscriptional. Pituitary TSH content in the irradiated rats was significantly less than in pair-fed controls, suggesting that irradiation may permit enhanced secretion of stored hormone.

  20. Phenolic Content and Antioxidant Activity of Extracts from Whole Buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench) With or Without Microwave Irradiation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of extracting phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity from buckwheat with water, 50% aqueous ethanol, or 100% ethanol using microwave irradiation or a water bath for 15 min at various temperatures (23 – 150 °C). The phenolic content of...

  1. How do tissues respond to damage at the cellular level? The role of cytokines in irradiated tissues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    The capacity of ionizing radiation to affect tissue function, control tumor growth and elicit pathological sequelae has been attributed in great part to its effects on cellular DNA, which, as the transmitter of genetic information, can both register damage and perpetuate it. Nonetheless, multicellular organisms function as the result of the cooperation of many cell types. What then occurs when individual cells are damaged by ionizing radiation? Is tissue response a sum of cellular effects such as cell death and DNA damage? Or does the tissue respond as a coherent unit to the damage of its parts? In this paper, data in support of the latter model that indicate a role for cytokines, in particular transforming growth factor beta1, as critical components of extracellular signaling pathways that mediate tissue response to radiation will be reviewed. The key to manipulating the consequences of radiation exposure lies in understanding the complex interplay of events initiated at the cellular level, but acting on the tissue.

  2. How do tissues respond to damage at the cellular level? The role of cytokines in irradiated tissues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    The capacity of ionizing radiation to affect tissue function, control tumor growth and elicit pathological sequelae has been attributed in great part to its effects on cellular DNA, which, as the transmitter of genetic information, can both register damage and perpetuate it. Nonetheless, multicellular organisms function as the result of the cooperation of many cell types. What then occurs when individual cells are damaged by ionizing radiation? Is tissue response a sum of cellular effects such as cell death and DNA damage? Or does the tissue respond as a coherent unit to the damage of its parts? In this paper, data in support of the latter model that indicate a role for cytokines, in particular transforming growth factor beta1, as critical components of extracellular signaling pathways that mediate tissue response to radiation will be reviewed. The key to manipulating the consequences of radiation exposure lies in understanding the complex interplay of events initiated at the cellular level, but acting on the tissue.

  3. CIPROFLOXACIN INCREASES SURVIVAL AFTER IONIZING IRRADIATION COMBINED INJURY: γ-H2AX FORMATION, CYTOKINE/CHEMOKINE, AND RED BLOOD CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Kiang, Juliann G.; Fukumoto, Risaku

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation alone (radiation injury, as abbreviated RI) or combined with traumatic tissue injury (radiation combined injury, as abbreviated CI) is a crucial life-threatening factor in nuclear and radiological accidents. It is well-documented that RI and CI occur at the molecular, cellular, tissue, and system levels. However, their mechanisms remain largely unclear. It has been observed in dogs, pigs, rats, guinea pigs, and mice that radiation exposure combined with burns, wounds, or bacterial infection results in greater mortality than radiation exposure alone. In our laboratory, we found that B6D2F1/J female mice exposed to 9.75 Gy 60Co-γ photon radiation followed by 15% total body surface area wounds experienced 50% higher mortality (over 30-day observation period) compared to irradiation alone. CI enhanced DNA damages, amplified iNOS activation, induced massive release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, overexpressed MMPs and TLRs and aggravated sepsis that led to cell death. In the present study, B6D2F1/J mice received CI were treated with ciprofloxacin (CIP, 90 mg/kg p.o., q.d. within 2h after CI through day 21). At day 1, CIP treatment significantly reduced CI-induced γ-H2AX formation. At day 10, CIP treatment not only significantly reduced cytokine/chemokine concentrations, including IL-6 and KC (i.e., IL-8 in human), but also enhanced IL-3 production compared to vehicle-treated controls. CIP also elevated red blood cell counts, hemoglobin levels and hematocrits. At day 30, CIP treatment increased 45% survival after CI (i.e., 2.3-fold increase over vehicle treatment). The results suggest that CIP may prove to be an effective therapeutic drug for CI. PMID:24776905

  4. Antioxidative treatment inhibits the release of thrombogenic tissue factor from irradiation- and cytokine-induced endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Szotowski, Björn; Antoniak, Silvio; Goldin-Lang, Petra; Tran, Quoc-Viet; Pels, Klaus; Rosenthal, Peter; Bogdanov, Vladimir Y; Borchert, Hans-Hubert; Schultheiss, Heinz-Peter; Rauch, Ursula

    2007-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the antioxidants pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on the ionizing radiation (IR)- and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) induced tissue factor (TF) expression and its release from human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). HUVECs were irradiated with a single dose of either 5 Gy or 10 Gy and stimulated with TNF-alpha (10 ng/mL) in the presence or absence of PDTC and NAC, respectively. Quantitative real-time PCR, ELISA, and TF activity measurements were performed, including TF activity in the supernatant. Apoptosis was detected by flow cytometric active caspase-3 measurement and formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by chemiluminescence. We demonstrated a thus far uninvestigated persistent induction of TF expression in HUVECs after treatment with IR and TNF-alpha. Combined stimulation with IR and TNF-alpha led to an immense shedding of microparticle-associated TF which was positively correlated with apoptosis and ROS formation. Antioxidative pre-treatment reduced not only apoptosis and ROS formation, but also the release of thrombogenic microparticles. Antioxidative treatment inhibited apoptosis and shedding of microparticles, thereby reducing thrombogenicity. Thus, antioxidants may help to prevent late thrombosis after antiproliferative treatment when used in combination with anticoagulants.

  5. Effect of various laser irradiations on the mineral content of dentin

    PubMed Central

    Dilber, Erhan; Malkoc, Meral Arslan; Ozturk, A. Nilgun; Ozturk, Firat

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the mineral content of dentin irradiation with Erbium: yttrium-aliminum-garnet (Er:YAG), Neodmiyum:yttrium-aliminum garnet (Nd:YAG) and potassium titanium phosphate (KTP) laser used for in the treatment of dentin hypersensitivity. Methods: Six extracted wisdom, unerupted molar teeth were used in this study. The enamel of the teeth was removed with a conventional bur under water cooling to expose the dentin surface. The teeth were mounted in a slow-speed, diamond-saw, sectioning machine. Two dentin slabs were obtained from each tooth and each slab was sectioned so that 4 slabs were made from each teeth. Then dentin slabs were randomly divided into four groups. Group A: Control Group, Group B: Er:YAG laser, Group C: Nd:YAG laser, Group D: KTP laser. The levels of Ca, K, Mg, Na,P and Ca/P mineral ratio in each dentin slab were measured by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Data were analysed by one way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey HSD tests. One sample from each group was prepared for scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results: There were no significant differences between the groups for Ca, K, Mg, Na,P and Ca/P mineral ratio (P>.05). SEM photographs indicated that there were melted areas around the exposed dentin tubules in groups treated with Er:YAG and KTP lasers. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that laser etching with the Er:YAG, Nd:YAG, KTP laser systems did not affect the compositional structure of the dentin surfaces. PMID:23407579

  6. Effect of various laser irradiations on the mineral content of dentin.

    PubMed

    Dilber, Erhan; Malkoc, Meral Arslan; Ozturk, A Nilgun; Ozturk, Firat

    2013-01-01

    THE AIM OF THIS STUDY WAS TO EVALUATE THE MINERAL CONTENT OF DENTIN IRRADIATION WITH ERBIUM: yttrium-aliminum-garnet (Er:YAG), Neodmiyum:yttrium-aliminum garnet (Nd:YAG) and potassium titanium phosphate (KTP) laser used for in the treatment of dentin hypersensitivity. Six extracted wisdom, unerupted molar teeth were used in this study. The enamel of the teeth was removed with a conventional bur under water cooling to expose the dentin surface. The teeth were mounted in a slow-speed, diamond-saw, sectioning machine. Two dentin slabs were obtained from each tooth and each slab was sectioned so that 4 slabs were made from each teeth. Then dentin slabs were randomly divided into four groups. Group A: Control Group, Group B: Er:YAG laser, Group C: Nd:YAG laser, Group D: KTP laser. The levels of Ca, K, Mg, Na,P and Ca/P mineral ratio in each dentin slab were measured by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Data were analysed by one way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey HSD tests. One sample from each group was prepared for scanning electron microscopy (SEM). There were no significant differences between the groups for Ca, K, Mg, Na,P and Ca/P mineral ratio (P>.05). SEM photographs indicated that there were melted areas around the exposed dentin tubules in groups treated with Er:YAG and KTP lasers. This study demonstrated that laser etching with the Er:YAG, Nd:YAG, KTP laser systems did not affect the compositional structure of the dentin surfaces.

  7. Effect of supplemental UV-A irradiation in solid-state lighting on the growth and phytochemical content of microgreens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazaitytė, A.; Viršilė, A.; Jankauskienė, J.; Sakalauskienė, S.; Samuolienė, G.; Sirtautas, R.; Novičkovas, A.; Dabašinskas, L.; Miliauskienė, J.; Vaštakaitė, V.; Bagdonavičienė, A.; Duchovskis, P.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we sought to find and employ positive effects of UV-A irradiation on cultivation and quality of microgreens. Therefore, the goal of our study was to investigate the influence of 366, 390, and 402 nm UV-A LED wavelengths, supplemental for the basal solid-state lighting system at two UV-A irradiation levels on the growth and phytochemical contents of different microgreen plants. Depending on the species, supplemental UV-A irradiation can improve antioxidant properties of microgreens. In many cases, a significant increase in the investigated phytochemicals was found under 366 and 390 nm UV-A wavelengths at the photon flux density (12.4 μmol m-2 s-1). The most pronounced effect of supplemental UV-A irradiation was detected in pak choi microgreens. Almost all supplemental UV-A irradiation treatments resulted in increased leaf area and fresh weight, in higher 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl free-radical scavenging activity, total phenols, anthocyanins, ascorbic acid, and α-tocopherol.

  8. Two types of T helper cells in mice: Differences in cellular immune functions and cytokine secretion - selective reduction of one type after total lymphoid irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, H.Z.

    1989-01-01

    As observed from a large panel of mouse T helper clones, there are at least two subsets of CD4{sup +} T cells that both differ in function and demonstrate distinct patterns of cytokine secretion after antigen or mitogen stimulation. Th1 cells synthesize IL-2, INF-{gamma} and lymphotoxin. They produce a DTH reaction in the footpads of naive mice. In addition, Th1 cells are required for the generation of CTL, and they appear to augment IgG2a antibody production. In contrast, by secreting IL-4, IL-5, and IL-6, Th2 cells play an essential role in humoral immunity. TLI consists of high dose, fractionated irradiation delivered selectively to the major lymphoid tissues. Four to six weeks after TLI, the CD4{sup +} cells of the treated mice (counted as a percentage of the total spleen lymphocytes) recover to the similar levels as those in normal BALB/c mice. These CD4{sup +} cells can help normal syngeneic B cells to produce a vigorous antibody response to TNP-KLH in adoptive cell transfer experiments, but the same cells are inactive in the MLR, and they fail to transfer DTH in TNP-KLH primed syngeneic BALB/c mice.

  9. Hemorrhage enhances cytokine, complement component 3, and caspase-3, and regulates microRNAs associated with intestinal damage after whole-body gamma-irradiation in combined injury.

    PubMed

    Kiang, Juliann G; Smith, Joan T; Anderson, Marsha N; Elliott, Thomas B; Gupta, Paridhi; Balakathiresan, Nagaraja S; Maheshwari, Radha K; Knollmann-Ritschel, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Hemorrhage following whole-body γ-irradiation in a combined injury (CI) model increases mortality compared to whole-body γ-irradiation alone (RI). The decreased survival in CI is accompanied by increased bone marrow injury, decreased hematocrit, and alterations of miRNA in the kidney. In this study, our aim was to examine cytokine homeostasis, susceptibility to systemic bacterial infection, and intestinal injury. More specifically, we evaluated the interleukin-6 (IL-6)-induced stress proteins including C-reactive protein (CRP), complement 3 (C3), Flt-3 ligand, and corticosterone. CD2F1 male mice received 8.75 Gy 60Co gamma photons (0.6 Gy/min, bilateral) which was followed by a hemorrhage of 20% of the blood volume. In serum, RI caused an increase of IL-1, IL-2, IL-3, IL-5, IL-6, IL-12, IL-13, IL-15, IL-17A, IL-18, G-CSF, CM-CSF, eotaxin, IFN-γ, MCP-1, MIP, RANTES, and TNF-α, which were all increased by hemorrhage alone, except IL-9, IL-17A, and MCP-1. Nevertheless, CI further elevated RI-induced increases of these cytokines except for G-CSF, IFN- γ and RANTES in serum. In the ileum, hemorrhage in the CI model significantly enhanced RI-induced IL-1β, IL-3, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12p70, IL-13, IL-18, and TNF-α concentrations. In addition, Proteus mirabilis Gram(-) was found in only 1 of 6 surviving RI mice on Day 15, whereas Streptococcus sanguinis Gram(+) and Sphingomonas paucimobilis Gram(-) were detected in 2 of 3 surviving CI mice (with 3 CI mice diseased due to inflammation and infection before day 15) at the same time point. Hemorrhage in the CI model enhanced the RI-induced increases in C3 and decreases in CRP concentrations. However, hemorrhage alone did not alter the basal levels, but hemorrhage in the CI model displayed similar increases in Flt-3 ligand levels as RI did. Hemorrhage alone altered the basal levels of corticosterone early after injury, which then returned to the baseline, but in RI mice and CI mice the increased corticosterone concentration

  10. Effect of initial oxygen content on the void swelling behavior of fast neutron irradiated copper

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.; Garner, F.A.

    1998-03-01

    Density measurements were performed on high purity copper specimens containing {le}10 wt.ppm and {approximately}120 wt.ppm oxygen following irradiation in FFTF MOTA 2B. Significant amounts of swelling were observed in both the oxygen-free and oxygen-doped specimens following irradiation to {approximately}17 dpa at 375 C and {approximately}47 dpa at 430 C. Oxygen doping up to 360 appm (90 wt.ppm) did not significantly affect the void swelling of copper for these irradiation conditions.

  11. Gamma irradiation degradation/modification of 5-ethylidene 2-norbornene (ENB)-based ethylene propylene diene rubber (EPDM) depending on ENB content of EPDM and type/content of peroxides used in vulcanization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özdemir, Tonguç

    2008-06-01

    In this study, the radiation degradation/modification of the vulcanized EPDM and the effects of dose rate, peroxide type/content in vulcanization system and ENB content of EPDM were studied to investigate the change in the extend of the modification/degradation of the mechanical properties of vulcanized EPDM via gamma irradiation. In addition, thermal, dynamic mechanical, ATR-FTIR, TGA, TGA-FTIR tests were carried out to understand the change of properties of vulcanized EPDM via irradiation. Samples were irradiated with two different dose rates of 1280 and 64.6 Gy/h. Total dose of irradiation was up to 184 kGy. The FTIR spectral analysis showed structural changes of EPDM via irradiation. It was observed that the dose rate changed the mechanical properties with different extends. The change of ENB content of EPDM and peroxide type and content in vulcanization system affect extend of the modification/degradation of the EPDM's properties.

  12. Resistance exercise modulates lipid plasma profile and cytokine content in the adipose tissue of tumour-bearing rats.

    PubMed

    Donatto, F F; Neves, R X; Rosa, F O; Camargo, R G; Ribeiro, H; Matos-Neto, E M; Seelaender, M

    2013-02-01

    Cancer cachexia is a multifactorial syndrome characterised by progressive weight loss, frequently accompanied by anorexia, sarcopenia, and chronic systemic inflammation. The white adipose tissue is markedly affected by cachexia and contributes to this syndrome throught the secretion of pro-inflammatory factors which reach the adjacent tissues and the circulation. A nonpharmacologic intervention that may attenuate cancer cachexia is chronic physical activity, but the effect of resistance training upon adipose tissue inflammation in cachexia has never been examined. For that purpose we designed a protocol in which animals were randomly assigned to a control group (CT, n=7), a Tumour bearing group (TB, n=7), a Resistance Trained group (RT, n=7) and a Resistance Trained tumour bearing group (RTTB, n=7). Trained rats climbed a vertical ladder with an extra load attached to the tail, representing 75-90% of total body mass, 3 times per week, for 8 weeks. In the 6 th week of resistance training, tumour cells (3 × 10(7) Walker 256 carcinosarcoma) were inoculated in the tumour groups. Body, adipose tissue, muscle and tumour mass was determined, as well a blood biochemical parameters, and the hormone and cytokine profile assessed. The glycogen content of the liver and muscle was measured. IL-10, IL-6 and TNF-α protein expression was evaluated in the mesenteric adipose tissue (MEAT) examined. Resistance training increased by 9% body weight gain in RTTB (final weight 310.8 ± 9.8 g), when compared with TB (final weight 288.3 ± 4.9 g). LDL-c levels were decreased in RTTB (0.28 ± 0.9 mmol/L) by 43% when compared with TB (0.57 ± 0.1 mmol/L). HDL-c levels were increased in RTTB (1.31 ± 0.12 mmol/L) by 15% in regard to CT (1.13 ± 0.7 mmol/L) and 22% as compared with TB (1.07 ± 0.07 mmol/L). RTTB testosterone levels (577 ± 131 ng/mL) were 55% higher when compared with CT (254 ± 41.3 ng/mL) and 63% higher when compared with TB (221 ± 23.1 ng/mL). Adiponectin levels were

  13. Radiological risks from irradiation of cargo contents with EURITRACK neutron inspection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giroletti, E.; Bonomi, G.; Donzella, A.; Viesti, G.; Zenoni, A.

    2012-07-01

    The radiological risk for the population related to the neutron irradiation of cargo containers with a tagged neutron inspection system has been studied. Two possible effects on the public health have been assessed: the modification of the nutritional and organoleptic properties of the irradiated materials, in particular foodstuff, and the neutron activation of consumer products (i.e. food and pharmaceuticals). The result of this study is that irradiation of food and foodstuff, pharmaceutical and medical devices in container cargoes would neither modify the properties of the irradiated material nor produce effective doses of concern for public health. Furthermore, the dose received by possible stowaways present inside the container during the inspection is less than the annual effective dose limit defined by European Legislation for the public.

  14. Evaluation of protein content, lysine and sulfur-containing amino acids content and electrophoretic patterns of soluble proteins for gamma-irradiated semolina before and after milling of durum wheat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzeh, F. S.; Amr, A. S.

    2009-11-01

    Influenced of gamma irradiation (0, 0.25, 1, 2.5, 5 and 10 kGy) on total nitrogen, lysine and sulfur-containing amino acids content and electrophoretic patterns of soluble proteins of semolina was studied. The effect of irradiation before and after milling on previous parameters was also investigated. Protein content of semolina was not affected with gamma irradiation before and after milling. Up to 10 kGy dose, cystine and methionine were not significantly changed, although they increased slightly with increasing irradiation dose. Lysine content decreased significantly ( P≤0.05) at irradiation dose higher than 5 kGy. At 10 kGy dose, lysine decreased 5% and 14% for irradiated semolina and that obtained from irradiated wheat grains, respectively. The bands number and intensity of soluble proteins decreased with increasing irradiation dose higher than 5 kGy, as shown on SDS-PAGE electrophoresis. Irradiated semolina and semolina obtained from irradiated wheat grains at 10 kGy showed 13 and 15 bands, respectively. Unirradiated sample showed 19 bands.

  15. Evaluation of photon irradiation treatment upon calcium content of ribs of Wistar rats using micro-XRF

    SciTech Connect

    Parreiras Nogueira, Liebert; Barroso, Regina Cely; Pereira de Almeida, Andre; Braz, Delson; Almeida, Carlos Eduardo de; Salata, Camila; Andrade, Cherley Borba; Silva, Claudia Marcello da

    2012-05-17

    Therapeutic doses of radiation have been shown to have deleterious consequences on bone health. Among the treatment strategies used for breast cancer treatment, the most used are radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Radiotherapy may be given to destroy the cancer cells using high-dose x-rays. Protocols vary considerably, but generally whole body irradiation totals from 10 to 15 Gy, whereas local therapy totals from 40 to 70 Gy. In clinical practice, the quantitative evaluation of bone tissue relies on measurements of bone mineral density values, which are closely associated with the risk of osteoporotic fracture. Improved survivorship rates of cancer patients receiving radiotherapy increase the importance of understanding the mechanisms and long-term effects of radiation-induced bone loss. In this work, we investigated the variation on calcium distribution in ribs of female Wistar rats (Rattus norvegicus) submitted to photon irradiation with a single dose of 20 Gy. The determination of the calcium distribution was performed using synchrotron radiation microfluorescence (SR-{mu}XRF) at the X-ray Fluorescence beamline at Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS). Animals were irradiated using the linear accelerator Varian registered (CLINAC 2100) at the University Centre for Cancer Control of the State University of Rio de Janeiro (CUCC/UERJ). The total dose delivered was 20 Gy. The animals were about three months old and weighting about 200g. They were distributed into two groups (seven per group): control (did not receive any treatment) and irradiated (submitted to irradiation procedure) groups. Results showed that calcium content decreased within the dorsal ribs of rats submitted to radiotherapy in comparison to the control group.

  16. Evaluation of photon irradiation treatment upon calcium content of ribs of Wistar rats using micro-XRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogueira, Liebert Parreiras; Barroso, Regina Cély; de Almeida, André Pereira; Braz, Delson; de Almeida, Carlos Eduardo; Salata, Camila; Andrade, Cherley Borba; da Silva, Claudia Marcello

    2012-05-01

    Therapeutic doses of radiation have been shown to have deleterious consequences on bone health. Among the treatment strategies used for breast cancer treatment, the most used are radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Radiotherapy may be given to destroy the cancer cells using high-dose x-rays. Protocols vary considerably, but generally whole body irradiation totals from 10 to 15 Gy, whereas local therapy totals from 40 to 70 Gy. In clinical practice, the quantitative evaluation of bone tissue relies on measurements of bone mineral density values, which are closely associated with the risk of osteoporotic fracture. Improved survivorship rates of cancer patients receiving radiotherapy increase the importance of understanding the mechanisms and long-term effects of radiation-induced bone loss. In this work, we investigated the variation on calcium distribution in ribs of female Wistar rats (Rattus norvegicus) submitted to photon irradiation with a single dose of 20 Gy. The determination of the calcium distribution was performed using synchrotron radiation microfluorescence (SR-μXRF) at the X-ray Fluorescence beamline at Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS). Animals were irradiated using the linear accelerator Varian® (CLINAC 2100) at the University Centre for Cancer Control of the State University of Rio de Janeiro (CUCC/UERJ). The total dose delivered was 20 Gy. The animals were about three months old and weighting about 200g. They were distributed into two groups (seven per group): control (did not receive any treatment) and irradiated (submitted to irradiation procedure) groups. Results showed that calcium content decreased within the dorsal ribs of rats submitted to radiotherapy in comparison to the control group.

  17. Enhancing the Total Phenolic Content and Antioxidants of Lemon Pomace Aqueous Extracts by Applying UV-C Irradiation to the Dried Powder

    PubMed Central

    Papoutsis, Konstantinos; Vuong, Quan V.; Pristijono, Penta; Golding, John B.; Bowyer, Michael C.; Scarlett, Christopher J.; Stathopoulos, Costas E.

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have shown that UV-C (ultraviolet C) irradiation promotes the bioactive compounds and antioxidants of fresh fruits and vegetables. The aim of this study was to apply UV irradiation in dried lemon pomace powder for enhancing its phenolic content and antioxidant properties, thus more bioactive compounds should be available for extraction and utilization. Lemon pomace dried powder was placed under a UV lamp and treated with dosages of 4, 19, 80 and 185 kJ·m−2, while untreated powder was used as a control. UV-C irradiation significantly affected the total phenolic content, total flavonoid content, proanthocyanidins, and antioxidant capacity measured by cupric reducing antioxidant capacity (CUPRAC) and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) of the lemon pomace dried powder, while it did not affect the vitamin C content. UV-C irradiation of 19 kJ·m−2 resulted in 19% higher total phenolic content than the control, while UV-C irradiation of 180 kJ·m−2 resulted in 28% higher total flavonoid content than the control. The antioxidant capacity was reduced when UV-C irradiation more than 4 kJ·m−2 was applied. The results of this study indicate that UV-C treatment has the potential to increase the extraction of bioactive compounds of dried lemon pomace at relatively high dosages. PMID:28231150

  18. Enhancing the Total Phenolic Content and Antioxidants of Lemon Pomace Aqueous Extracts by Applying UV-C Irradiation to the Dried Powder.

    PubMed

    Papoutsis, Konstantinos; Vuong, Quan V; Pristijono, Penta; Golding, John B; Bowyer, Michael C; Scarlett, Christopher J; Stathopoulos, Costas E

    2016-08-23

    Several studies have shown that UV-C (ultraviolet C) irradiation promotes the bioactive compounds and antioxidants of fresh fruits and vegetables. The aim of this study was to apply UV irradiation in dried lemon pomace powder for enhancing its phenolic content and antioxidant properties, thus more bioactive compounds should be available for extraction and utilization. Lemon pomace dried powder was placed under a UV lamp and treated with dosages of 4, 19, 80 and 185 kJ·m(-2), while untreated powder was used as a control. UV-C irradiation significantly affected the total phenolic content, total flavonoid content, proanthocyanidins, and antioxidant capacity measured by cupric reducing antioxidant capacity (CUPRAC) and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) of the lemon pomace dried powder, while it did not affect the vitamin C content. UV-C irradiation of 19 kJ·m(-2) resulted in 19% higher total phenolic content than the control, while UV-C irradiation of 180 kJ·m(-2) resulted in 28% higher total flavonoid content than the control. The antioxidant capacity was reduced when UV-C irradiation more than 4 kJ·m(-2) was applied. The results of this study indicate that UV-C treatment has the potential to increase the extraction of bioactive compounds of dried lemon pomace at relatively high dosages.

  19. A Hyperlipidic Diet Combined with Short-Term Ovariectomy Increases Adiposity and Hyperleptinemia and Decreases Cytokine Content in Mesenteric Adipose Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Neto, Nelson Inacio Pinto; Rodrigues, Maria Elizabeth Sousa; Hachul, Ana Claudia Losinskas; Moreno, Mayara Franzoi; Boldarine, Valter Tadeu; Ribeiro, Eliane Beraldi; Oyama, Lila Missae; Oller do Nascimento, Claudia Maria

    2015-01-01

    Four-week-old female Wistar rats were divided into two groups and fed a control diet (C) or a hyperlipidic diet (H) for 4 weeks. Rats from each group underwent ovariectomy (OVX) or sham surgery (SHAM). They received C or H for the next four weeks. The body weight gain (BW), food efficiency (FE), and carcass lipid content were higher in the OVX H than in the SHAM H. The OVX H exhibited a higher serum leptin level than other groups. IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-10 content of mesenteric (MES) adipose tissue was lower in the OVX H than in the OVX C. IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-10 content of retroperitoneal (RET) adipose tissue was lower in the SHAM H than in the SHAM C. The SHAM H showed decreased TG relative to the SHAM C. Similar results were obtained in relation to IL-6Rα, TNFR1, TLR-4, and MyD88 contents in the MES and RET white adipose tissue among the groups. A hyperlipidic diet for 8 weeks combined with short-term ovariectomy decreases the cytokine content of MES adipose tissues but increases BW, enhancing FE and elevating serum leptin levels. These suggest that the absence of estrogens promotes metabolic changes that may contribute to installation of a proinflammatory process induced by a hyperlipidic diet. PMID:26170534

  20. Oxygen-Content-Controllable Graphene Oxide from Electron-Beam-Irradiated Graphite: Synthesis, Characterization, and Removal of Aqueous Lead [Pb(II)].

    PubMed

    Bai, Jing; Sun, Huimin; Yin, Xiaojie; Yin, Xianqiang; Wang, Shengsen; Creamer, Anne Elise; Xu, Lijun; Qin, Zhi; He, Feng; Gao, Bin

    2016-09-28

    A high-energy electron beam was applied to irradiate graphite for the preparation of graphene oxide (GO) with a controllable oxygen content. The obtained GO sheets were analyzed with various characterization tools. The results revealed that the oxygen-containing groups of GO increased with increasing irradiation dosages. Hence, oxygen-content-controllable synthesis of GO can be realized by changing the irradiation dosages. The GO sheets with different irradiation dosages were then used to adsorb aqueous Pb(II). The effects of contact time, pH, initial lead ion concentration, and ionic strength on Pb(II) sorption onto different GO sheets were examined. The sorption process was found to be very fast (completed within 20 min) at pH 5.0. Except ionic strength, which showed no/little effect on lead sorption, the other factors affected the sorption of aqueous Pb(II) onto GO. The maximum Pb(II) sorption capacities of GO increased with irradiation dosages, confirming that electron-beam irradiation was an effective way to increase the oxygen content of GO. These results suggested that irradiated GO with a controllable oxygen content is a promising nanomaterial for environmental cleanup, particularly for the treatment of cationic metal ions, such as Pb(II).

  1. Effect of oat bran on time to exhaustion, glycogen content and serum cytokine profile following exhaustive exercise

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of oat bran supplementation on time to exhaustion, glycogen stores and cytokines in rats submitted to training. The animals were divided into 3 groups: sedentary control group (C), an exercise group that received a control chow (EX) and an exercise group that received a chow supplemented with oat bran (EX-O). Exercised groups were submitted to an eight weeks swimming training protocol. In the last training session, the animals performed exercise to exhaustion, (e.g. incapable to continue the exercise). After the euthanasia of the animals, blood, muscle and hepatic tissue were collected. Plasma cytokines and corticosterone were evaluated. Glycogen concentrations was measured in the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles, and liver. Glycogen synthetase-α gene expression was evaluated in the soleus muscle. Statistical analysis was performed using a factorial ANOVA. Time to exhaustion of the EX-O group was 20% higher (515 ± 3 minutes) when compared with EX group (425 ± 3 minutes) (p = 0.034). For hepatic glycogen, the EX-O group had a 67% higher concentrations when compared with EX (p = 0.022). In the soleus muscle, EX-O group presented a 59.4% higher glycogen concentrations when compared with EX group (p = 0.021). TNF-α was decreased, IL-6, IL-10 and corticosterone increased after exercise, and EX-O presented lower levels of IL-6, IL-10 and corticosterone levels in comparison with EX group. It was concluded that the chow rich in oat bran increase muscle and hepatic glycogen concentrations. The higher glycogen storage may improve endurance performance during training and competitions, and a lower post-exercise inflammatory response can accelerate recovery. PMID:20955601

  2. Charging process of polyurethane based composites under electronic irradiation: Effects of cellulose fiber content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjadj, Aomar; Jbara, Omar; Tara, Ahmed; Gilliot, Mickael; Dellis, Jean-Luc

    2013-09-01

    The study deals with the charging effect of polyurethanes-based composites reinforced with cellulose fibers, under electronic beam irradiation in a scanning electron microscope. The results indicate that the leakage current and the trapped charge as well as the kinetics of charging process significantly change beyond a critical concentration of 10% cellulose fibers. These features are correlated with the cellulose concentration-dependence of the electrical properties, specifically resistivity and capacitance, of the composite.

  3. Charging process of polyurethane based composites under electronic irradiation: Effects of cellulose fiber content

    SciTech Connect

    Hadjadj, Aomar; Jbara, Omar; Tara, Ahmed; Gilliot, Mickael; Dellis, Jean-Luc

    2013-09-23

    The study deals with the charging effect of polyurethanes-based composites reinforced with cellulose fibers, under electronic beam irradiation in a scanning electron microscope. The results indicate that the leakage current and the trapped charge as well as the kinetics of charging process significantly change beyond a critical concentration of 10% cellulose fibers. These features are correlated with the cellulose concentration-dependence of the electrical properties, specifically resistivity and capacitance, of the composite.

  4. Comparative effects of irradiation, fumigation, and storage on the free amino acids and sugar contents of green, black and oolong teas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kausar, Tusneem; Akram, Kashif; Kwon, Joong-Ho

    2013-05-01

    Food irradiation or chemical fumigation can be used to ensure the hygienic quality of teas. The comparative effects of gamma irradiation (5 and 10 kGy) and fumigation (MeBr and PH3) were investigated on the amino acids and sugar contents of Camellia sinensis (green, black and oolong teas) during storage (15±12 °C). The major amino acids found in teas were theanine and glutamic acid. Irradiation increased amino acids such as, leucine, alanine, and glutamic acid, and decreased the histidine. PH3 fumigation resulted in a decrease of tyrosine content; however, the effect of MeBr fumigation was negligible. Storage showed no significant effect on the amino acid content of the irradiated and fumigated teas. Sucrose, glucose, and fructose contents significantly increased upon gamma irradiation (p≤0.05). However, fumigation and subsequent storage did not affect the sugar contents. Irradiation could be a preferred alternative choice to address food safety problems as fumigation is restricted in many countries.

  5. Effect of UV-B Irradiation on Physiologically Active Substance Content and Antioxidant Properties of the Medicinal Caterpillar Fungus Cordyceps militaris (Ascomycetes).

    PubMed

    Huang, Shih-Jeng; Lin, Chun-Ping; Mau, Jeng-Leun; Li, Yu-Shan; Tsai, Shu-Yao

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet-B (UV-B) light irradiation is a well-known technique for converting vitamin D2 from ergosterol in mushroom fruit bodies. Mushrooms are a natural and nonanimal food source of vitamin D2. We studied the effect of UV-B light irradiation on the amount of vitamin D2 and physiologically active substances in Cordyceps militaris and their antioxidant properties. After UV-B irradiation for 2 hours, the vitamin D2 content of freshly harvested C. militaris fruiting bodies, mycelia, whole submerged culture (WSC), and homogenized submerged culture (HSC) increased from 0 to 0.03 to 0.22 to 1.11 mg/g, but the ergosterol content was reduced from 1.36 to 2.50 to 1.24 to 2.06 mg/g, respectively. After UV-B irradiation, the amount of adenosine, cordycepin, and ergothioneine of fruiting bodies dramatically increased 32-128%, but the polysaccharide content slightly decreased 36%. The reverse trends were observed in mycelia, WSC, and HSC. UV-B irradiation could reduce the effective concentrations at 50% of fruiting bodies for ethanolic and hot water extracts in reducing power, scavenging, and chelating abilities, whereas mycelia, WSC, and HSC of ethanolic extracts increased effective concentrations at 50% in reducing power, scavenging, and chelating abilities. UV-B irradiation slightly increased flavonoid content (10-56%) and slightly affected total phenol content.

  6. [Change in glutathione content in rat thymocytes under apoptosis induced by H2O2 or irradiation].

    PubMed

    Koval', T V; Nazarova, O O; Matyshevs'ka, O P

    2008-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) content as well as GSH-peroxidase and GSH-reductase activity in isolated rat thymocytes X-irradiated in a dose of 4.5 Gy or treated with 0.1 mM H2O2 were studied in a period preceding the appearance of apoptosis morphological symptoms. The early adaptive response of thymocytes to radiation - increase of both GSH content and glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase activity was revealed. On the contrary the rapid fall of GSH level in H2O2-treated thymocytes was observed simultaneousely with glutathione reductase inhibition and enhanced GSH consumption by glutathione peroxidase, this disbalance of GSH-dependent antioxidant system probably facilitates mitochondrial way of apoptosis.

  7. Influence of CuO content on the structure of lithium fluoroborate glasses: Spectral and gamma irradiation studies.

    PubMed

    Abdelghany, A M; ElBatal, H A; EzzElDin, F M

    2015-10-05

    Glasses of lithium fluoroborate of the composition LiF 15%-B2O3 85% with increasing CuO as added dopant were prepared and characterized by combined optical and FTIR spectroscopy before and after gamma irradiation. The optical spectrum of the undoped glass reveals strong UV absorption with two distinct peaks at about 235 and 310 nm and with no visible bands. This strong UV absorption is related to the presence of unavoidable trace iron impurity (Fe(3+)) within the materials used for the preparation of this glass. After irradiation, the spectrum of the undoped glass shows a decrease of the intensity of the UV bands together with the resolution of an induced visible broad band centered at about 520 nm. The CuO doped glasses reveal the same UV absorption beside a very broad visible band centered at 780 nm and this band shows extension and splitting to several component peaks with higher CuO contents. Upon gamma irradiation, the spectra of all CuO-doped glasses reveal pronounced decrease of their intensities. The response of irradiation on the studied glasses is correlated with suggested photochemical reactions together with some shielding effect of the copper ions. The observed visible band is related to the presence of copper as distorted octahedral Cu(2+) ions. Infrared absorption spectra of the prepared glasses show repetitive characteristic triangular and tetrahedral borate units similar to that published from alkali or alkaline earth oxides B2O3 glasses. A suggested formation of (BO3/2F) tetrahedral units is advanced through action of LiF on B2O3 and these suggested units showing the same position and number as BO4 tetrahedra.

  8. Annealing of paramagnetic centres in electron- and ion-irradiated yttria-stabilized zirconia: effect of yttria content

    SciTech Connect

    Costantini, Jean-Marc; Beuneu, Francois; Weber, William J

    2014-01-01

    We have studied the effect of the yttria content on the recovery of paramagnetic centres in electron-irradiated yttria-stabilized zirconia (ZrO2: Y3+). Single crystals with 9.5 mol% or 18 mol% Y2O3 were irradiated with electrons of 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 and 2.5 MeV. Paramagnetic centre thermal annealing was studied by X-band EPR spectroscopy. Hole-centres are found to be annealed more quickly, or at a lower temperature, for 18 mol% than for 9.5 mol% Y2O3. At long annealing times, a non-zero asymptotic behaviour is observed in the isothermal annealing curves of hole-centres and F+-type centres between 300 and 500 K. The normalized asymptotic concentration of both defects has a maximum value of about 0.5 for annealing temperatures near 375 K, below the onset of the (isochronal) recovery stage, regardless of the yttria content. Such an uncommon behaviour is analyzed on the basis of either kinetic rate equations of charge transfer or equilibria between point defects with different charge states.

  9. Antioxidant Capacities and Total Phenolic Contents Enhancement with Acute Gamma Irradiation in Curcuma alismatifolia (Zingiberaceae) Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Taheri, Sima; Abdullah, Thohirah Lee; Karimi, Ehsan; Oskoueian, Ehsan; Ebrahimi, Mahdi

    2014-01-01

    The present study was conducted in order to assess the effect of various doses of acute gamma irradiation (0, 10, 15, and 20 Gy) on the improvement of bioactive compounds and their antioxidant properties of Curcuma alismatifolia var. Sweet pink. The high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography (GC) analysis uncovered that various types of phenolic, flavonoid compounds, and fatty acids gradually altered in response to radiation doses. On the other hand, antioxidant activities determined by 1,1-Diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH), ferric reduction, antioxidant power (FRAP), and 2,2-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) radical scavenging assay showed a higher irradiation level significantly increased the antioxidant properties. This study revealed an efficient effect of varying levels of gamma radiation, based on the pharmaceutical demand to enhance the accumulation and distribution of bioactive compounds such as phenolic and flavonoid compounds, fatty acids, as well as their antioxidant activities in the leaves of C. alismatifolia var. Sweet pink. PMID:25056545

  10. Wollastonite based-Chemically Bonded Phosphate Ceramics with lead oxide contents under gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colorado, H. A.; Pleitt, J.; Hiel, C.; Yang, J. M.; Hahn, H. T.; Castano, C. H.

    2012-06-01

    The shielding properties to gamma rays as well as the effect of lead concentration incorporated into Chemically Bonded Phosphate Ceramics (CBPCs) composites are presented. The Wollastonite-based CBPC was fabricated by mixing a patented aqueous phosphoric acid formulation with Wollastonite powder. CBPC has been proved to be good structural material, with excellent thermal resistant properties, and research already showed their potential for radiation shielding applications. Wollastonite-based CBPC is a composite material itself with several crystalline and amorphous phases. Irradiation experiments were conducted on different Wollastonite-based CBPCs with lead oxide. Radiation shielding potential, attenuation coefficients in a broad range of energies pertinent to engineering applications and density experiments showing the effect of the PbO additions (to improve gamma shielding capabilities) are also presented. Microstructure was identified by using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction.

  11. Temporal Evolution of the High-energy Irradiation and Water Content of TRAPPIST-1 Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourrier, V.; de Wit, J.; Bolmont, E.; Stamenković, V.; Wheatley, P. J.; Burgasser, A. J.; Delrez, L.; Demory, B.-O.; Ehrenreich, D.; Gillon, M.; Jehin, E.; Leconte, J.; Lederer, S. M.; Lewis, N.; Triaud, A. H. M. J.; Van Grootel, V.

    2017-09-01

    The ultracool dwarf star TRAPPIST-1 hosts seven Earth-size transiting planets, some of which could harbor liquid water on their surfaces. Ultraviolet observations are essential to measuring their high-energy irradiation and searching for photodissociated water escaping from their putative atmospheres. Our new observations of the TRAPPIST-1 Lyα line during the transit of TRAPPIST-1c show an evolution of the star emission over three months, preventing us from assessing the presence of an extended hydrogen exosphere. Based on the current knowledge of the stellar irradiation, we investigated the likely history of water loss in the system. Planets b to d might still be in a runaway phase, and planets within the orbit of TRAPPIST-1g could have lost more than 20 Earth oceans after 8 Gyr of hydrodynamic escape. However, TRAPPIST-1e to h might have lost less than three Earth oceans if hydrodynamic escape stopped once they entered the habitable zone (HZ). We caution that these estimates remain limited by the large uncertainty on the planet masses. They likely represent upper limits on the actual water loss because our assumptions maximize the X-rays to ultraviolet-driven escape, while photodissociation in the upper atmospheres should be the limiting process. Late-stage outgassing could also have contributed significant amounts of water for the outer, more massive planets after they entered the HZ. While our results suggest that the outer planets are the best candidates to search for water with the JWST, they also highlight the need for theoretical studies and complementary observations in all wavelength domains to determine the nature of the TRAPPIST-1 planets and their potential habitability.

  12. Development and calibration of the shielded measurement system for fissile contents measurements on irradiated nuclear fuel in dry storage.

    SciTech Connect

    Mosby, W. R.; Jensen, B. A.

    2002-05-31

    In recent years there has been a trend towards storage of Irradiated Nuclear Fuel (INF) in dry conditions rather than in underwater environments. At the same time, the Department of Energy (DOE) has begun encouraging custodians of INF to perform measurements on INF for which no recent fissile contents measurement data exists. INF, in the form of spent fuel from Experimental Breeder Reactor 2 (EBR-II), has been stored in close-fitting, dry underground storage locations at the Radioactive Scrap and Waste Facility (RSWF) at Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) for many years. In Fiscal Year 2000, funding was obtained from the DOE Office of Safeguards and Security Technology Development Program to develop and prepare for deployment a Shielded Measurement System (SMS) to perform fissile content measurements on INF stored in the RSWF. The SMS is equipped to lift an INF item out of its storage location, perform scanning neutron coincidence and high-resolution gamma-ray measurements, and restore the item to its storage location. The neutron and gamma-ray measurement results are compared to predictions based on isotope depletion and Monte Carlo neutral-particle transport models to provide confirmation of the accuracy of the models and hence of the fissile material contents of the item as calculated by the same models. This paper describes the SMS and discusses the results of the first calibration and validation measurements performed with the SMS.

  13. Cryptochrome and Phytochrome Cooperatively but Independently Reduce Active Gibberellin Content in Rice Seedlings under Light Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Hirose, Fumiaki; Inagaki, Noritoshi; Hanada, Atsushi; Yamaguchi, Shinjiro; Kamiya, Yuji; Miyao, Akio; Hirochika, Hirohiko; Takano, Makoto

    2012-01-01

    In contrast to a wealth of knowledge about the photoregulation of gibberellin metabolism in dicots, that in monocots remains largely unclear. In this study, we found that a blue light signal triggers reduction of active gibberellin content in rice seedlings with simultaneous repression of two gibberellin 20-oxidase genes (OsGA20ox2 and OsGA20ox4) and acute induction of four gibberellin 2-oxidase genes (OsGA2ox4–OsGA2ox7). For further examination of the regulation of these genes, we established a series of cryptochrome-deficient lines through reverse genetic screening from a Tos17 mutant population and construction of knockdown lines based on an RNA interference technique. By using these lines and phytochrome mutants, we elucidated that cryptochrome 1 (cry1), consisting of two species in rice plants (cry1a and cry1b), is indispensable for robust induction of the GA2ox genes. On the other hand, repression of the GA20ox genes is mediated by phytochromes. In addition, we found that the phytochromes also mediate the repression of a gibberellin 3-oxidase gene (OsGA3ox2) in the light. These results imply that, in rice seedlings, phytochromes mediate the repression of gibberellin biosynthesis capacity, while cry1 mediates the induction of gibberellin inactivation capacity. The cry1 action was demonstrated to be dominant in the reduction of active gibberellin content, but, in rice seedlings, the cumulative effects of these independent actions reduced active gibberellin content in the light. This pathway design in which different types of photoreceptors independently but cooperatively regulate active gibberellin content is unique from the viewpoint of dicot research. This redundancy should provide robustness to the response in rice plants. PMID:22764280

  14. [Effect on content of serum inflammatory cytokines of patients with ankylosing spondylitis in early stage treated by long snake moxibustion at Governor Vessel and functional exercise].

    PubMed

    Li, Wan-gui; Tu, Qian; Gu, Xue-juan

    2010-03-01

    To explore the clinical effect and mechanism of long snake moxibustion combined with functional exercise for treatment of ankylosing spondylitis in early stage. Seventy-eight cases of ankylosing spondylitis in early stage were randomly divided into an observation group and a control group, 39 cases in each group. The observation group was treated with long snake moxibustion from Dazhui (GV 14) to Yaoshu (GV 2) combined with functional exercise; the control group was treated with oral administration of Sulfasalazine. The effects of the two groups were observed, and contents of erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) were tested before and after treatment. The total effective rate of 89.7% (35/39) in the observation group, was superior to that of 76.9% (30/39) in the control group (P<0.05). The contents of ESR, TNF-alpha, and ICAM-1 showed downtrend after treatment in the both groups (P<0.05, P<0.01), and the observation group decreased more obviously (all P<0.01). Long snake moxibustion at Governor Vessel combined with functional exercise for treatment of ankylosing spondylitis in early stage, can significantly improve clinical symptoms, decrease the level of serum inflammatory cytokines, and the effect is superior to that of Sulfasalazine oral administration.

  15. Modeling of secondary treated wastewater disinfection by UV irradiation: effects of suspended solids content.

    PubMed

    Brahmi, Mounaouer; Belhadi, Noureddine Hamed; Hamdi, Helmi; Hassen, Abdennaceur

    2010-01-01

    This work aimed to study UV-resistant strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, to propose a formulation of the kinetics of secondary treated wastewater disinfection and to underline the influence of suspended solids on the inactivation kinetics of these strains. Some investigations were carried out for the validation of some simulation models, from the simplest, the kinetics model of Chick-Watson reduced to first order, to rather complex models such as multi-kinetic and Collins-Selleck models. Results revealed that the involved processes of UV irradiation were too complex to be approached by a simplified formulation, even in the case of specific strains of microorganisms and the use of nearly constant UV radiation intensity. In fact, the application of Chick-Watson model in its original form is not representative of the kinetics of UV disinfection. Modification, taking into account the speed change during the disinfection process, has not significantly improved results. On the other hand, the application of Collins-Selleck model demonstrates that it was necessary to exceed a least dose of critical radiation to start the process of inactivation. To better explain the process of inactivation, we have assumed that the action of disinfectant on the survival of lonely microorganisms is faster than its action on suspended solids protected or agglomerated to each others. We can assume in this case the existence of two inactivation kinetics during the processes (parallel and independent) of the first-order. For this reason, the application of a new kinetic model by introducing a third factor reflecting the influence of suspended solids in water on disinfection kinetics appeared to be determinant for modeling UV inactivation of P. aeruginosa in secondary treated wastewater.

  16. Effects of total body irradiation on fatty acid and total lipid content of rats.

    PubMed

    Chukwuemeka, Nwokocha; Philippe, Mounmbegna; Magdalene, Nwokocha; Onyezuligbo, Onyekachi

    2012-01-01

    We examined time-dependent changes in plasma lipids of rats given total body irradiation (TBI) with X-rays at 3 Gy. for consecutive periods. Animals were exposed to x ray radiations consecutively for 20 days at 5 day interval thereafter five animals were picked at random and sacrificed (5, 10, 15 and 20 days after beginning the exposure). The triacylglycerols and total cholesterol serum levels were significant differences between control and experimental groups after the first exposure (5 days), values for the triacylglcerols were significantly higher with the second (day 10) and third (day 15) radiation exposures but not with the fourth radiation exposures (day 20) (p<0.05). However, the serum cholesterol values were not found to be significant with the second and third exposures but with the fourth exposure (day 20) (p<0.05). The serum HDL-C concentrations were not significantly different between control and experimental groups at any time analyzed. But the LDL cholesterol was found to decrease on days 5 and 20 of the experimental period. Our results indicate that the applied long term exposure to x rays ionization radiations exposure may induce slight but statistically significant alterations in some serum lipids profile of rats, within the physiological range. The mechanisms for the effects of these ionizing radiations on serum lipid profile are not well understand yet, we suggest that the changes could be due to some non-specific stress reactions. The consequences of our observation are not known yet, but could point to some possible clinical intervention.

  17. Storage temperature and UV-irradiation influence on the ergosterol content in edible mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Villares, Ana; Mateo-Vivaracho, Laura; García-Lafuente, Ana; Guillamón, Eva

    2014-03-15

    Ergosterol (5,7,22-ergostatrien-3β-ol) and ergosteryl derivatives from different genera of edible mushrooms were separated and quantified by an isocratic reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method. The technique allowed a rapid separation of free ergosterol and two ergosteryl derivatives occurring in mushrooms. The ergosterol content varied considerably depending on the fungus. Thus, the species Agaricus bisporus and Hygrophorus marzuolus presented high quantities of ergosterol (6.4-6.8 mg/g, dry matter) followed by Pleurotus ostreatus, Calocybe gambosa, Lentinus edodes, and Boletus edulis (3.3-4.0mg/g). In contrast, other species, such as Cantharellus cibarius, Lactarius deliciosus and Craterellus cornucopioides, contained significantly lower ergosterol amounts (0.2-0.4 mg/g). Two ergosteryl derivatives were found in mushrooms and also the content depended on the fungus. The stability of ergosterol, in terms of the formation of ergosterol peroxide, was evaluated under different storage temperatures and UV radiation. The lower the temperature (-20°C) and the radiation time (10 min), the lower ergosterol oxidation was observed.

  18. Irradiation with a low-level diode laser induces the developmental endothelial locus-1 gene and reduces proinflammatory cytokines in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Fujimura, Takeki; Mitani, Akio; Fukuda, Mitsuo; Mogi, Makio; Osawa, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Shinko; Aino, Makoto; Iwamura, Yuki; Miyajima, Shinichi; Yamamoto, Hiromitsu; Noguchi, Toshihide

    2014-05-01

    We demonstrated previously that low-level diode laser irradiation with an indocyanine green-loaded nanosphere coated with chitosan (ICG-Nano/c) had an antimicrobial effect, and thus could be used for periodontal antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT). Since little is known about the effects of aPDT on periodontal tissue, we here investigated the effect of low-level laser irradiation, with and without ICG-Nano/c, on cultured epithelial cells. Human oral epithelial cells were irradiated in a repeated pulse mode (duty cycle, 10 %; pulse width, 100 ms; peak power output, 5 W). The expression of the developmental endothelial locus 1 (Del-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8, and the intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) were evaluated in Ca9-22 cells stimulated by laser irradiation and Escherichia coli-derived lipopolysaccharide (LPS). A wound healing assay was carried out on SCC-25 cells irradiated by diode laser with or without ICG-Nano/c. The mRNA expression of Del-1, which is known to have anti-inflammatory activity, was significantly upregulated by laser irradiation (p < 0.01). Concurrently, LPS-induced IL-6 and IL-8 expression was significantly suppressed in the LPS + laser group (p < 0.01). ICAM-1 expression was significantly higher in the LPS + laser group than in the LPS only or control groups. Finally, compared with the control, the migration of epithelial cells was significantly increased by diode laser irradiation with or without ICG-Nano/c. These results suggest that, in addition to its antimicrobial effect, low-level diode laser irradiation, with or without ICG-Nano/c, can suppress excessive inflammatory responses via a mechanism involving Del-1, and assists in wound healing.

  19. Effect of gamma irradiation on the thiamine, riboflavin and vitamin B 6 content in two varieties of Brazilian beans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villavicencio, A. L. C. H. A. L. C. H.; Mancini-Filho, J. J.; Delincée, H. H.; Bognár, A. A.

    2000-03-01

    The effect of 60Co gamma rays on the content of several B-vitamins in two varieties of Brazilian beans has been studied. Carioca ( Phaseolus vulgaris L. var. Carioca) and Macaçar beans ( Vigna unguiculata L. Walp, var. Macaçar) were irradiated at doses of 0, 0.5, 1.0, 2.5, 5.0 and 10 kGy, and subsequently stored at ambient temperature for 6 months. The content of vitamin B 1, B 2 and B 6 was analysed by HPLC. In addition, the optimum cooking time was established for each dose and bean variety. A taste panel evaluated sensory properties. Only slight changes were measured for thiamine and riboflavin, whereas a dose-dependent decrease was noted for pyridoxine, which, however, was significant only at the highest doses of 5 and 10 kGy. Cooking time was considerably reduced with increasing radiation dose, but accompanied by a loss of the sensory quality. However, at the disinfestation dose up to 1 kGy, acceptable ratings were obtained for the sensory evaluation. In conclusion, for insect disinfestation of Brazilian beans radiation processing is a promising technology.

  20. Effect of gamma irradiation on phenol content, antioxidant activity and biological activity of black maca and red maca extracts (Lepidium meyenii walp).

    PubMed

    Zevallos-Concha, A; Nuñez, D; Gasco, M; Vasquez, C; Quispe, M; Gonzales, G F

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to determine the effects of gamma irradiation on UV spectrum on maca, total content of polyphenols, 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical-scavenging activities and in vivo biological activities of red and black maca extracts (Lepidium meyenii). Adult mice of the strain Swiss aged 3 months and weighing 30-35 g in average were used to determine biological activities. Daily sperm production, effect on testosterone-induced prostate hyperplasia and forced swimming test were used to determine the effect of irradiation on biological activities of maca extracts. Irradiation did not show differences in UV spectrum but improves the amount of total polyphenols in red maca as well as in black maca extracts. In both cases, black maca extract has more content of polyphenols than red maca extract (p < 0.01). Gamma irradiation significantly increased the antioxidant capacity (p < 0.05). No difference was observed in daily sperm production when irradiated and nonirradiated maca extract were administered to mice (p > 0.05). Black maca extract but not red maca extract has more swimming endurance capacity in the forced swimming test. Irradiation of black maca extract increased the swimming time to exhaustion (p < 0.05). This is not observed with red maca extract (p > 0.05). Testosterone enanthate (TE) increased significantly the ventral prostate weight. Administration of red maca extract in animals treated with TE prevented the increase in prostate weight. Irradiation did not modify effect of red maca extract on prostate weight (p > 0.05). In conclusion, irradiation does not alter the biological activities of both black maca and red maca extracts. It prevents the presence of microorganisms in the extracts of black or red maca, but the biological activities were maintained.

  1. Responses of He-Ne laser irradiation on agronomical characters and chlorogenic acid content of brinjal (Solanum melongena L.) var. Mattu Gulla.

    PubMed

    Swathy, Surendrababu P; Kiran, Kodsara Ramachandra; Rao, Madhura S; Mahato, Krishna K; Rao, Mattu Radhakrishna; Satyamoorthy, Kapaettu; Muthusamy, Annamalai

    2016-11-01

    Exposure to laser irradiation on seeds brings about the changes in agronomical characteristics of the plants. Solanum melongena L. var. Mattu Gulla, a variety of brinjal is of high economic value due to its unique colour and flavour. The aim of the study was to understand the influence of Helium-Neon (He-Ne) laser irradiation on agronomical characters of Solanum melongena L. var. Mattu Gulla in the field conditions. Various growth characteristics including seed germination percentage, survival rate, plant height, number of branches, and flowers and fruits were estimated during different developmental stages of the brinjal. In addition, the chlorogenic acid content of fruits obtained from the laser irradiated seeds were quantified using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP- HPLC). The plants from the seeds irradiated with different doses (20, 25 and 30J/cm(2)) of He-Ne laser showed significant enhancement on the growth characteristics when compared to the non-irradiated control groups. He-Ne laser irradiation also improved the yield characteristics of the plants significantly in in vivo conditions in comparison with control group. 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was performed using methanolic extract of matured fruit of Mattu Gulla on HepG2 and fibroblast cell lines. The IC50 values of fruit extract from laser irradiated groups were found to be similar to non-irradiated control groups. Chlorogenic acid content was found to be higher in 20J/cm(2) and lower in 30J/cm(2) treated fruit tissue. The current study thus elucidates the role of He-Ne laser as a biostimulator on brinjal var. Mattu Gulla not only in the in vitro conditions but also in the in vivo field conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Hematopoietic cytokines.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Donald

    2008-01-15

    The production of hematopoietic cells is under the tight control of a group of hematopoietic cytokines. Each cytokine has multiple actions mediated by receptors whose cytoplasmic domains contain specialized regions initiating the various responses-survival, proliferation, differentiation commitment, maturation, and functional activation. Individual cytokines can be lineage specific or can regulate cells in multiple lineages, and for some cell types, such as stem cells or megakaryocyte progenitors, the simultaneous action of multiple cytokines is required for proliferative responses. The same cytokines control basal and emergency hematopoietic cell proliferation. Three cytokines, erythropoietin, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, have now been in routine clinical use to stimulate cell production and in total have been used in the management of many millions of patients. In this little review, discussion will be restricted to those cytokines well established as influencing the production of hematopoietic cells and will exclude newer candidate regulators and those active on lymphoid cells. As requested, this account will describe the cytokines in a historical manner, using a sequential format of discovery, understanding, validation, and puzzlement, a sequence that reflects the evolving views on these cytokines over the past 50 years.

  3. The co-induced effects of molybdenum and cadmium on the mRNA expression of inflammatory cytokines and trace element contents in duck kidneys.

    PubMed

    Cao, Huabin; Gao, Feiyan; Xia, Bing; Xiao, Qingyang; Guo, Xiaoquan; Hu, Guoliang; Zhang, Caiying

    2016-11-01

    The aims of this study were determining the co-induced effects of dietary Cadmium (Cd) and high intake of Molybdenum (Mo) on renal toxicity in ducks. 240 healthy 11-day-old ducks were randomly divided into 6 groups, which were treated with Mo or/and Cd at different doses added to the basal diet for 120 days. Ducks of control group were fed with basal diet, LMo and HMo groups were fed with 15mg/kg Mo and 100mg/kg Mo respectively; ducks of Cd group were provided with 4mg/kg Cd which was added into basal diet. Two combination groups were treated with 15mg/kg Mo+4mg/kg Cd and 100mg/kg Mo+4mg/kg Cd respectively. On days 30, 60, 90 and 120, the mRNA expression levels of inflammatory cytokines and contents of trace elements were detected. In addition, transmission electron microscopic examination was used for ultrastructural studies. The results indicated that the mRNA expression levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) showed an upward tendency in treatment groups in comparison with control group, and in the later period of the experiment it showed a significant rise in joint groups compared with the Mo and Cd group (P<0.01); the contents of copper (Cu) and iron (Fe) decreased in joint groups in the later period (P<0.05) while the contents of Mo and Cd significantly increased (P<0.01); zinc (Zn) and selenium (Se) concentration had a slight downtrend in treated groups, but showed no significant difference (P>0.05). The ultrastructural analysis showed that kidney tissues were severely injured in joint groups on day 120. These results suggested that the combination of Mo and Cd could aggravate damages to the kidney. In addition, dietary of Mo or/and Cd caused the decrease of Cu, Fe, Zn, and Se contents, inflammatory response and pathological lesions whose mechanism is somehow linked with Mo and Cd deposition in kidney. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Gene Expression of Hematoregulatory Cytokines is Elevated Endogenously After Sublethal Gamma Irradiation and is Differentially Enhanced by Therapeutic Administration of Biologic Response Modifiers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    reconstitution of medullary Days After Irradiation and extramedullary hematopoiesis after sublethal irradia- FIGURE 7. Comparative elects of BRMs on 30-day...stimulating factor on recovery from radiation-induced hcmopoi,:tic Other studies have documented the absence of myeloid aplasia . EAp. henatoL 21:33W

  5. Apparatus for in situ determination of burnup, cooling time and fissile content of an irradiated nuclear fuel assembly in a fuel storage pond

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, John R.; Halbig, James K.; Menlove, Howard O.; Klosterbuer, Shirley F.

    1985-01-01

    A detector head for in situ inspection of irradiated nuclear fuel assemblies submerged in a water-filled nuclear fuel storage pond. The detector head includes two parallel arms which extend from a housing and which are spaced apart so as to be positionable on opposite sides of a submerged fuel assembly. Each arm includes an ionization chamber and two fission chambers. One fission chamber in each arm is enclosed in a cadmium shield and the other fission chamber is unshielded. The ratio of the outputs of the shielded and unshielded fission chambers is used to determine the boron content of the pond water. Correcting for the boron content, the neutron flux and gamma ray intensity are then used to verify the declared exposure, cooling time and fissile material content of the irradiated fuel assembly.

  6. Apparatus for in situ determination of burnup, cooling time and fissile content of an irradiated nuclear fuel assembly in a fuel storage pond

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, J.R.; Halbig, J.K.; Menlove, H.O.; Klosterbuer, S.F.

    1984-01-01

    A detector head for in situ inspection of irradiated nuclear fuel assemblies submerged in a water-filled nuclear fuel storage pond. The detector head includes two parallel arms which extend from a housing and which are spaced apart so as to be positionable on opposite sides of a submerged fuel assembly. Each arm includes an ionization chamber and two fission chambers. One fission chamber in each arm is enclosed in a cadmium shield and the other fission chamber is unshielded. The ratio of the outputs of the shielded and unshielded fission chambers is used to determine the boron content of the pond water. Correcting for the boron content, the neutron flux and gamma ray intensity are then used to verify the declared exposure, cooling time and fissile material content of the irradiated fuel assembly.

  7. Peripheral blood corticotropin-releasing factor, adrenocorticotropic hormone and cytokine (Interleukin Beta, Interleukin 6, tumor necrosis factor alpha) levels after high- and low-dose total-body irradiation in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Girinsky, T.A.; Pallardy, M.; Comoy, E.; Benassi, T.; Roger, R.; Ganem, G.; Socie, G.; Cossett, J.M.; Magdelenat, H.

    1994-09-01

    Total-body irradiation (TBI) induces an increase in levels of granulocytes and cortisol in blood. To explore the underlying mechanisms, we studied 26 patients who had TBI prior to bone marrow transplantation. Our findings suggest that only a high dose of TBI (10 Gy) was capable of activating the hypothalamopituitary area since corticotropin-releasing factor and blood adrenocorticotropic hormone levels increased at the end of the TBI. There was a concomitant increase in the levels of interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor in blood, suggesting that these cytokines might activate the hypothalamo-pituitary adrenal axis. Interleukin 1 was not detected. Since vascular injury is a common after radiation treatment, it is possible that interleukin 6 was secreted by endothelial cells. The exact mechanisms of the production of cyctokines induced by ionizing radiation remain to be determined. 25 refs., 1 fig.

  8. Separation of two sub-groups with different DNA content after treatment of T-47D breast cancer cells with low dose-rate irradiation and intermittent hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Mikalsen, Stine Gyland; Jeppesen Edin, Nina; Sandvik, Joe Alexander; Pettersen, Erik Olai

    2017-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that combined treatment with internal ultra-low dose-rate irradiation selectively inactivated hypoxic T-47D breast cancer cells after three to five weeks of treatment. However, 2-3% of the hypoxic cells were found to survive and restart proliferation upon re-oxygenation. Purpose To investigate the metastatic potential and characteristics of radiosensitivity of these surviving cells, named T - 47 DS. Material and Methods The T - 47 DS cells were grown in ambient air without irradiation. A cloning experiment identified two sub-groups with different DNA content ([Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]). Furthermore, radiosensitivity and presence of hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS) was measured by Co-60 challenge irradiation and relative migration was determined by scratch assays. Results The two subpopulations of T - 47 DS had different DNA content; one had abnormally high DNA content ([Formula: see text]) and one had DNA content similar to wild-type T-47D cells ([Formula: see text]). HRS was surprisingly present in cells of the cloned population [Formula: see text], but was absent in cells of both [Formula: see text] and T - 47 DS. The radio response of T - 47 DS, [Formula: see text] at higher radiation doses were similar to that of T-47D cells, and neither subpopulation showed increased migration compared with wild-type T-47D. Conclusion No increase in the risk of metastasis was found and only slight changes in radiosensitivity in response to conventional clinical doses was observed. Thus, the data suggest that if ultra-low dose-rate irradiation is used for targeting the hypoxic tumor fraction, conventional high dose-rate irradiation can be used to eradicate eventual surviving cells as well as cells in the well oxygenated areas of the tumor.

  9. Alteration of radioprotective effects of heat-killed Lactobacillus casei in X-irradiated C3H/He mouse related to blood level of proinflammatory cytokines by corticoids.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Izumi; Tanaka, Mika; Satoh, Akiko; Kurematsu, Ayako; Ishiwata, Akiko; Suzuki, Keiko; Ishihara, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that a pre-administration of proinflammatory cytokines alters hematopoietic progenitor cells to promote an increase resistance against radiation and increases the survival rate in mice irradiated with lethal doses of radiation. Inflammation stimulators, such as some bacterial constituents, are also reported to have similar radioprotective action. We found that pre-administration of heat-killed Lactobacillus casei (HLC) to mice increases the level of interleukin (IL)-1 beta in circulation as well as the survival rate following lethal dose of radiation. Since HLC stimulates early immune responses, effects by drugs to modify inflammation were studied. The increase of both blood IL-1 beta levels and survival rates by HLC were simultaneously accelerated by coadministration of mineralocorticoid and inhibited by glucocorticoids or corticotropin. Neither parameter was modified by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory or anti-rheumatoid drugs. This suggests that both expected radioprotective action and unexpected systemic action, realized as an increase in plasma cytokines, by inflammation-related radioprotectors can be controlled by the coadministration of drugs at least in C3H/He mice, based on consideration of their pharmacological properties.

  10. The suppression of pineal melatonin content and N-acetyltransferase activity by different light irradiances in the Syrian hamster: a dose-response relationship.

    PubMed

    Brainard, G C; Richardson, B A; King, T S; Matthews, S A; Reiter, R J

    1983-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the influence of various irradiances of cool white fluorescent light on the suppression of pineal N-acetyltransferase activity (NAT) and melatonin content in hamsters. Groups of animals were exposed to light irradiances ranging from 0.00-1.86 microwatts (microW)/cm2 for 20 min during the night. Both pineal NAT and melatonin were similarly depressed by the light irradiances in a dose-related manner. The shape of the resultant dose-response curves and the calculated ED50 for NAT (0.066 microW/cm2) and melatonin (0.058 microW/cm2) were remarkably similar. These findings may be relevant to the physiological control of the pineal by natural illumination.

  11. Enhancement in furanocoumarin content and phenylalanine ammonia lyase activity in developing seedlings of Psoralea corylifolia L. in response to gamma irradiation of seeds.

    PubMed

    Jan, Sumira; Parween, Talat; Siddiqi, T O; Mahmooduzzafar

    2012-08-01

    Gamma irradiation of seeds is known to be an important factor in stimulating biochemical and physiological processes. The aim of the present study was to investigate phenylpropanoids and associated enzymes responsible for the production of active metabolites. Furanocoumarin content was estimated in seeds of Psoralea corylifolia L. during two successive generations (G(1) and G(2)) where as phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) activity was measured in leaves at different developmental stages of P. corylifolia L. raised from seeds irradiated with variable doses of gamma rays. Maximum accumulation of psoralen and isopsoralen was observed at 15 and 20 kGy doses during G(1) and G(2) generations, respectively. Psoralen proved to be the dominating metabolite in terms of its concentration, while isopsoralen was accumulated at relatively lower concentrations in successive generations. PAL activity was induced maximally following 15 and 20 kGy in G(1) plants and was preceded by psoralen and isopsoralen accumulation which peaked at the same dose rates in both generations. These effects were transmitted and prevalent in the next generation, that is, G(2) (indirectly irradiated). These long-term changes in plant metabolomics demonstrate genomic instability induced by gamma irradiation. However, no detrimental effects were seen at any irradiation dose in seeds. Furanocoumarin concentrations were also enhanced at 15 and 20 kGy. The present study further points out the persistence of changes in the biosynthesis of coumarin derivatives in the next generation. However, accumulation of these metabolites does not lead to any lethal effects.

  12. Post-harvest UV-B irradiation induces changes of phenol contents and corresponding biosynthetic gene expression in peaches and nectarines.

    PubMed

    Scattino, Claudia; Castagna, Antonella; Neugart, Susanne; Chan, Helen M; Schreiner, Monika; Crisosto, Carlos H; Tonutti, Pietro; Ranieri, Annamaria

    2014-11-15

    In the present study the possibility of enhancing phenolic compound contents in peaches and nectarines by post-harvest irradiation with UV-B was assessed. Fruits of 'Suncrest' and 'Babygold 7' peach and 'Big Top' nectarine cultivars were irradiated with UV-B for 12 h, 24 h and 36 h. Control fruits underwent the same conditions but UV-B lamps were screened by benzophenone-treated polyethylene film. The effectiveness of the UV-B treatment in modulating the concentration of phenolic compounds and the expression of the phenylpropanoid biosynthetic genes, was genotype-dependent. 'Big Top' and 'Suncrest' fruits were affected by increasing health-promoting phenolics whereas in 'Babygold 7' phenolics decreased after UV-B irradiation. A corresponding trend was exhibited by most of tested phenylpropanoid biosynthesis genes. Based on these results UV-B irradiation can be considered a promising technique to increase the health-promoting potential of peach fruits and indirectly to ameliorate the aesthetic value due to the higher anthocyanin content. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Enhancement of antioxidant properties and increase of content of vitamin D2 and non-volatile components in fresh button mushroom, Agaricus bisporus (higher Basidiomycetes) by γ-irradiation.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Shu-Yao; Mau, Jeng-Leun; Huang, Shih-Jeng

    2014-01-01

    Agaricus bisporus is a popular culinary-medicinal mushroom in Taiwan, and γ-irradiation could extend its shelf life. Our objective was to study the content of vitamin D2 and the taste components and antioxidant properties of ethanolic extracts from A. bisporus with various doses of γ-irradiation. After irradiation, the vitamin D2 content of 5-10 kGy irradiated mushrooms was in the range of 5.22-7.90 µg/g, higher than that of the unirradiated control (2.24 µg/g). For all treatments, the total content of soluble sugars and polyols ranged from 113 to 142 mg/g, and the monosodium glutamate-like components ranged from 6.57 to 13.50 mg/g, among which the 2.5 kGy irradiated sample has the highest content of flavor 5'-nucleotide. About antioxidant properties, 10 kGy irradiated samples exhibited lower EC50 values than did other samples. EC50 values were less than 5 mg/mL for ethanolic extracts. Total phenols were the major antioxidant components and the total content was 13.24-22.78 mg gallic acid equivalents/g. Based on the results obtained, γ-irradiation could be used to improve the vitamin D2 content and intensity of umami taste in fresh mushrooms. In addition, γ-irradiation not only maintained the antioxidant properties of mushrooms but also enhanced the antioxidant properties to some extent.

  14. The dependence of helium generation rate on nickel content of Fe-Cr-Ni alloys irradiated at high dpa levels in fast reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, F.A.; Oliver, B.M.; Greenwood, L.R.

    1997-04-01

    With a few exceptions in the literature, it is generally accepted that it is nickel in Fe-Cr-Ni alloys that produces most of the transmutant helium and that the helium generation rate should scale linearly with the nickel content. Surprisingly, this assumption is based only on irradiations of pure nickel and has never been tested in an alloy series. There have also been no extensive tests of the predictions for helium production in alloys in various fast reactors spectra.

  15. Effects of lactic acid fermentation and gamma irradiation of barley on antinutrient contents and nutrient digestibility in mink (Mustela vison) with and without dietary enzyme supplement.

    PubMed

    Skrede, Anders; Sahlstrøm, Stefan; Ahlstrøm, Oystein; Connor, Kirsti Hjelme; Skrede, Grete

    2007-06-01

    The experiment was conducted to study the effects of fermentation of barley, using two different strains of lactic acid bacteria, a Lactobacillus plantarum/pentosus strain isolated from spontaneously fermented rye sourdough (AD2) and a starch-degrading Lactobacillus plantarum (AM4), on contents of mixed-linked (1 --> 3) (1 --> 4)-beta-glucans, alpha-amylase inhibitor activity, inositol phosphates, and apparent digestibility of macronutrients in mink. Effects of fermentation were compared with effects of gamma irradiation (gamma-irradiation: 60Co gamma-rays at 25 kGy). The diets were fed to mink with and without a supplementary enzyme preparation. Both lactic acid fermentation and gamma-irradiation followed by soaking and incubation, reduced concentrations of soluble beta-glucans, phytate and alpha-amylase inhibitor activity. Dietary enzyme supplementation increased significantly digestibility of crude protein, fat, starch and crude carbohydrate (CHO). Fermentation of the barley increased digestibility of starch and CHO. Fermentation with lactic acid bacteria AD2 resulted in higher starch and CHO digestibility than strain AM4, and had greater effect than gamma-irradiation, soaking and incubation. The highest digestibility of starch and CHO was obtained after AD2 fermentation followed by enzyme supplementation. It is concluded that both lactic acid fermentation of barley and enzyme supplementation have positive nutritional implications in the mink by limiting the effects of antinutrients and improving digestibility and energy utilization.

  16. Inflammatory cytokine-induced changes in neural network activity measured by waveform analysis of high-content calcium imaging in murine cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Clarkson, Benjamin D S; Kahoud, Robert J; McCarthy, Christina B; Howe, Charles L

    2017-08-22

    During acute neuroinflammation, increased levels of cytokines within the brain may contribute to synaptic reorganization that results in long-term changes in network hyperexcitability. Indeed, inflammatory cytokines are implicated in synaptic dysfunction in epilepsy and in an array of degenerative and autoimmune diseases of the central nervous system. Current tools for studying the impact of inflammatory factors on neural networks are either insufficiently fast and sensitive or require complicated and costly experimental rigs. Calcium imaging offers a reasonable surrogate for direct measurement of neuronal network activity, but traditional imaging paradigms are confounded by cellular heterogeneity and cannot readily distinguish between glial and neuronal calcium transients. While the establishment of pure neuron cultures is possible, the removal of glial cells ignores physiologically relevant cell-cell interactions that may be critical for circuit level disruptions induced by inflammatory factors. To overcome these issues, we provide techniques and algorithms for image processing and waveform feature extraction using automated analysis of spontaneous and evoked calcium transients in primary murine cortical neuron cultures transduced with an adeno-associated viral vector driving the GCaMP6f reporter behind a synapsin promoter. Using this system, we provide evidence of network perturbations induced by the inflammatory cytokines TNFα, IL1β, and IFNγ.

  17. Hydrogen production via reforming of biogas over nanostructured Ni/Y catalyst: Effect of ultrasound irradiation and Ni-content on catalyst properties and performance

    SciTech Connect

    Sharifi, Mahdi; Haghighi, Mohammad; Abdollahifar, Mozaffar

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Synthesis of nanostructured Ni/Y catalyst by sonochemical and impregnation methods. • Enhancement of size distribution and active phase dispersion by employing sonochemical method. • Evaluation of biogas reforming over Ni/Y catalyst with different Ni-loadings. • Preparation of highly active and stable catalyst with low Ni content for biogas reforming. • Getting H{sub 2}/CO very close to equilibrium ratio by employing sonochemical method. - Abstract: The effect of ultrasound irradiation and various Ni-loadings on dispersion of active phase over zeolite Y were evaluated in biogas reforming for hydrogen production. X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller, Fourier transform infrared analysis and TEM analysis were employed to observe the characteristics of nanostructured catalysts. The characterizations implied that utilization of ultrasound irradiation enhanced catalyst physicochemical properties including high dispersion of Ni on support, smallest particles size and high catalyst surface area. The reforming reactions were carried out at GHSV = 24 l/g.h, P = 1 atm, CH{sub 4}/CO{sub 2} = 1 and temperature range of 550–850 °C. Activity test displayed that ultrasound irradiated Ni(5 wt.%)/Y had the best performance and the activity remained stable during 600 min. Furthermore, the proposed reaction mechanism showed that there are three major reaction channels in biogas reforming.

  18. Inflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Cerami, A

    1992-01-01

    The immune system produces cytokines and other humoral factors to protect the host when threatened by inflammatory agents, microbial invasion, or injury. In some cases this complex defense network successfully restores normal homeostasis, but at other times the overproduction of immunoregulatory mediators may actually prove deleterious to the host. Some examples of immune system-mediated injury have been extensively investigated including anaphylactic shock, autoimmune disease, and immune complex disorders. More recently it has become clear that the cytokine cachectin/tumor necrosis factor (TNF) occupies a key role in the pathophysiology associated with diverse inflammatory states and other serious illnesses including septic shock and cachexia. For example, when cachectin/TNF is produced by resident macrophages during early microbial infection, it mediates an inflammatory response that may alienate and repel the attacking organisms. If the infection spreads, however, the subsequent release of large quantities of cachectin/TNF into the circulation may be catastrophic and trigger a state of lethal shock. These toxic effects occur by direct action of TNF on host cells and by the interaction with a cascade of other endogenous mediators including interleukin-1 and interferon-gamma. The biology of cachectin/TNF will be reviewed, along with the potential for modulating the effects of this pluripotent molecule in a variety of pathologic states.

  19. Continuous Observations of Leaf Transpiration Isotopic Composition in Two Dryland Species Highlight Sensitivity to Changes in Irradiance and Soil Water Content.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wayland, H.; Caylor, K. K.

    2014-12-01

    Advances in optical isotope techniques have enabled near-continuous determination of leaf transpiration isotopic composition (δT), allowing researchers to trace water movement through the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum at fine temporal scales. However, to date very few direct measurements of δT are available. We applied a novel flow-through chamber method developed by Wang et al. (2011) to monitor short-term variability in leaf transpired water isotopic composition of two African savanna trees, Vachiella tortillis and Senegalia mellifera, in response to variable irradiance and soil water content. Single leaves were inserted into a custom cuvette connected to an off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (IA-ICOS) water vapor isotope analyzer and allowed to reach isotopic steady-state. Measurements were taken on alternating species every 10 minutes for two hours during mid-morning when plants were most active. Above-canopy irradiance and soil moisture at rooting depth were recorded daily at 1- and 10-minute intervals, respectively. We found that shading initiated rapid depletion of δ2H and δ18O in both species, though differences were more pronounced in V. tortillis. Similarly, an increase in irradiance caused δ18O enrichment of transpired water by up to 5‰ on the order of minutes. Interestingly, soil water content was positively correlated with δ2H: in drier conditions transpired water was more depleted relative to wetter conditions. Our results suggest that the isotopic composition of leaf water within a canopy may vary considerably depending on leaf location and amount of radiation received. These findings have important implications for models of plant water isotopes and underscore the need for additional direct observations of δT .

  20. Experimental and Model Study of Changes in Spectral Solar Irradiance in the Atmosphere of Large City due to Tropospheric NO{sub 2} Content

    SciTech Connect

    Chubarova, N. Ye.; Lebedev, V. V.; Partola, V. S.; Larin, I. K.; Lezina, Ye. A.; Rublev, A. N.

    2009-03-11

    An experimental and model approach has been used to study the NO{sub 2} vertical profiles and its effect on solar irradiance. The profiles of NO{sub 2} were obtained using gas analyzers, which had been installed at different levels at the Moscow State University (MSU) located at the south-western part of Moscow and at the Ostankino tower located at the north of Moscow up to the height of 350 m. Using these data diurnal and spatial variability of the NO{sub 2} content in the most polluted part of planetary boundary layer (PBL) has been analyzed within the large megalopolis. On the base of photochemical modeling we have simulated the diurnal cycle of NO{sub 2} vertical profiles for summer and winter conditions and have compared the results with the experimental ones. Using the RT modeling with input gaseous and aerosol parameters of the atmosphere obtained from the MSU Meteorological Observatory we have estimated the attenuation of spectral solar irradiance in UV and visible region of spectrum due to the NO{sub 2} content in the polluted atmosphere for different seasons.

  1. [Cytokines in bone diseases. What is cytokine?].

    PubMed

    Murakami, Yousuke; Kohsaka, Hitoshi

    2010-10-01

    Cytokines have an essential role for cell-cell communication. They can regulate cell proliferation, differentiation, survival, and function. Interaction of cell surface receptor with cytokines is necessary for control of physiological responses. Activation of cytokine receptors transduces specific signal in the receptor-expressing cells, resulting that cytokines can regulate specific cell population. Thus, cytokines contribute directly or indirectly to morphogenesis, host defense and immune response, play critical roles for homeostasis and development.

  2. Cytokines in Radiobiological Responses: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Schaue, Dörthe; Kachikwu, Evelyn L.; McBride, William H.

    2013-01-01

    Cytokines function in many roles that are highly relevant to radiation research. This review focuses on how cytokines are structurally organized, how they are induced by radiation, and how they orchestrate mesenchymal, epithelial and immune cell interactions in irradiated tissues. Pro-inflammatory cytokines are the major components of immediate early gene programs and as such can be rapidly activated after tissue irradiation. They converge with the effects of ionizing radiation in that both generate free radicals including reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS). “Self” molecules secreted or released from cells after irradiation feed the same paradigm by signaling for ROS and cytokine production. As a result, multilayered feedback control circuits can be generated that perpetuate the radiation tissue damage response. The pro-inflammatory phase persists until such times as perceived challenges to host integrity are eliminated. Antioxidant, anti-inflammatory cytokines then act to restore homeostasis. The balance between pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory forces may shift to and fro for a long time after radiation exposure, creating waves as the host tries to deal with persisting pathogenesis. Individual cytokines function within socially interconnected groups to direct these integrated cellular responses. They hunt in packs and form complex cytokine networks that are nested within each other so as to form mutually reinforcing or antagonistic forces. This yin-yang balance appears to have redox as a fulcrum. Because of their social organization, cytokines appear to have a considerable degree of redundancy and it follows that an elevated level of a specific cytokine in a disease situation or after irradiation does not necessarily implicate it causally in pathogenesis. In spite of this, “driver” cytokines are emerging in pathogenic situations that can clearly be targeted for therapeutic benefit, including in radiation settings. Cytokines can greatly

  3. The effects of γ-irradiation on garlic oil content in garlic bulbs and on the radiolysis of allyl trisulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genshuan, Wei; Guanghui, Wang; Ruipu, Yang; Jilan, Wu

    1996-02-01

    A study of the effects of γ-radiation on garlic oil content in garlic bulbs and on the radiolysis of allyl trisulfide and disulfide was carried out. The content of garlic oil in fresh garlic bulbs treated by gamma ray keeps nearly constant when stored for 10 months. The main components of garlic oil are allyl trisulfide (about 60%) and allyl disulfide (about 30%). The G values of radiolysis products of allyl disulfide and trisulfide in ethanol system were determined. The results show that allyl trisulfide is a very effective solvated electron scavenger and can oxidize CH 3CHOH radical into acetaldehyde, which means that the formation of 2,3-butanediol is extensively inhibited.

  4. Clinical investigation of bacterial species and endotoxin in endodontic infection and evaluation of root canal content activity against macrophages by cytokine production.

    PubMed

    Martinho, Frederico C; Leite, Fábio R M; Nascimento, Gustavo G; Cirelli, Joni A; Gomes, Brenda P F A

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated the presence of different Gram-negative bacterial species and the levels of endotoxins found in primary endodontic infection (PEI), determining their stimulation ability against macrophages through the levels of interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and evaluated their relationship with clinical and radiographic findings. Samples were taken from 21 root canals with primary endodontic infection with apical periodontitis (PEIAP). Molecular techniques were used for bacterial detection. Limulus amebocyte lysate assay was used to measure endotoxins. Pro-inflammatory cytokines were measured by ELISA assay. All samples were positive for bacterial DNA (21/21). Prevotella nigrescens (57.2 %) was the most frequent species. Higher levels of endotoxins were found in teeth with pain on palpation and exudation (all p < 0.05). Positive correlations were found between endotoxins and the levels of TNF-α and IL-1β, whereas a negative correlation was found between endotoxin and the amount of IL-10 (p < 0.05). Endotoxin levels were found to be a risk factor for exudation and increased the number of Gram-negative bacterial species for the presence of a larger area of bone destruction (all p < 0.05). A wide variety of Gram-negative bacterial species are involved in primary endodontic infection, with participation of different Treponema species. Thus, the levels of endotoxins and the number of Gram-negative bacteria species present in root canals were considered risk factors for the severity of endodontic infection. The present study revealed that Gram-negative bacterial species and endotoxins play an important role in the development of signs/symptoms and the severity of bone destruction, this knowledge is essential for the establishment of an effective therapy.

  5. Posttranscriptional regulation of cytokine expression.

    PubMed

    Kovarik, Pavel; Ebner, Florian; Sedlyarov, Vitaly

    2017-01-01

    Expression of cytokines and chemokines is regulated at multiple steps during the transfer of the genetic information from DNA sequence to the functional protein. The multilayered control of cytokine expression reflects the need of the immune system to precisely and rapidly adjust the magnitude and duration of immune responses to external cues. Common features of the regulation of cytokine expression are temporal and highly dynamic changes in cytokine mRNA stability. Failures in the timing and extent of mRNA decay can result in disease. Recent advances in transcriptome-wide approaches began to shed light into the complex network of cis-acting sequence elements and trans-acting factors controlling mRNA stability. These approaches led to the discovery of novel unexpected paradigms but they also revealed new questions. This review will discuss the control of cytokine mRNA stability both in the context of high content approaches as well as focused mechanistic studies and animal models. The article highlights the need for systems biology approaches as important means to understand how cytokine mRNA decay helps maintain the immune and tissue homeostasis, and to explore options for therapeutical exploitation of mRNA stability regulation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Interspecific prediction of photosynthetic light response curves using specific leaf mass and leaf nitrogen content: effects of differences in soil fertility and growth irradiance

    PubMed Central

    Lachapelle, Pierre-Philippe; Shipley, Bill

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Previous work has shown that the entire photosynthetic light response curve, based on both Mitscherlich and Michaelis–Menten functions, could be predicted in an interspecific context through allometric relations linking the parameters of these functions to two static leaf traits: leaf nitrogen (N) content and leaf mass per area (LMA). This paper describes to what extent these allometric relations are robust to changes in soil fertility and the growth irradiance of the plants. Methods Plants of 25 herbaceous species were grown under controlled conditions in factorial combinations of low/high soil fertility and low/high growth irradiance. Net photosynthetic rates per unit dry mass were measured at light intensities ranging from 0 to 700 µmol m−2 s−1 photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). Key Results The differing growth environments induced large changes in N, LMA and in each of the parameter estimates of the Mitscherlich and Michaelis–Menten functions. However, the differing growth environments induced only small (although significant) changes in the allometric relationships linking N and LMA to the parameters of the two functions. As a result, 88 % (Mitcherlich) and 89 % (Michaelis–Menten) of the observed net photosynthetic rates over the full range of light intensities (0–700 µmol m−2 s−1 PAR) and across all four growth environments could be predicted using only N and LMA using the same allometric relations. Conclusions These results suggest the possibility of predicting net photosynthetic rates in nature across species over the full range of light intensities using readily available data. PMID:22442344

  7. Accelerated hydrolysis method to estimate the amino acid content of wheat (Triticum durum Desf.) flour using microwave irradiation.

    PubMed

    Kabaha, Khaled; Taralp, Alpay; Cakmak, Ismail; Ozturk, Levent

    2011-04-13

    The technique of microwave-assisted acid hydrolysis was applied to wholegrain wheat (Triticum durum Desf. cv. Balcali 2000) flour in order to speed the preparation of samples for analysis. The resultant hydrolysates were chromatographed and quantified in an automated amino acid analyzer. The effect of different hydrolysis temperatures, times and sample weights was examined using flour dispersed in 6 N HCl. Within the range of values tested, the highest amino acid recoveries were generally obtained by setting the hydrolysis parameters to 150 °C, 3 h and 200 mg sample weight. These conditions struck an optimal balance between liberating amino acid residues from the wheat matrix and limiting their subsequent degradation or transformation. Compared to the traditional 24 h reflux method, the hydrolysates were prepared in dramatically less time, yet afforded comparable ninhydrin color yields. Under optimal hydrolysis conditions, the total amino acid recovery corresponded to at least 85.1% of the total protein content, indicating the efficient extraction of amino acids from the flour matrix. The findings suggest that this microwave-assisted method can be used to rapidly profile the amino acids of numerous wheat grain samples, and can be extended to the grain analysis of other cereal crops.

  8. Reasons for reduced activities of 17 alpha-hydroxylase and C17-C20 lyase in spite of increased contents of cytochrome P-450 in mature rat testis fetally irradiated with 60Co.

    PubMed

    Inano, H; Ishii-Ohba, H; Suzuki, K; Ikeda, K

    1990-05-01

    Pregnant rats received whole body irradiation with 2.6 Gy gamma-ray from a 60Co source at Day 20 of gestation. When pups were 4 months old, activities of electron transport system and steroid monooxygenase in tests were assayed. The content of total cytochrome P-450 in the irradiated testes had increased to 170% of that in non-irradiated rats, but NADPH-cytochrome P-450 reductase activity had reduced to 36% of the control. Also, amounts of cytochrome b5 in testicular microsomal fraction were decreased markedly after irradiation, but no significant change of NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase activity was observed in the treated pups. Because both 17 alpha-hydroxylase and C17-C20 lyase activities tended to be decreased by fetal irradiation, testosterone production from progesterone and 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone was reduced to about 30% of the control. From these results, it has been suggested that the testicular cytochrome P-450 is radioresistant but steroid monooxygenase activities are reduced after the fetal irradiation. We propose that the discrepancy arises from the marked decrement of NADPH-cytochrome P-450 reductase activity.

  9. Cytokines in Drosophila immunity.

    PubMed

    Vanha-Aho, Leena-Maija; Valanne, Susanna; Rämet, Mika

    2016-02-01

    Cytokines are a large and diverse group of small proteins that can affect many biological processes, but most commonly cytokines are known as mediators of the immune response. In the event of an infection, cytokines are produced in response to an immune stimulus, and they function as key regulators of the immune response. Cytokines come in many shapes and sizes, and although they vary greatly in structure, their functions have been well conserved in evolution. The immune signaling pathways that respond to cytokines are remarkably conserved from fly to man. Therefore, Drosophila melanogaster, provides an excellent platform for studying the biology and function of cytokines. In this review, we will describe the cytokines and cytokine-like molecules found in the fly and discuss their roles in host immunity. Copyright © 2015 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Cytokines and skeletal physiology.

    PubMed

    Goldring, S R; Goldring, M B

    1996-03-01

    Cytokines are soluble factors that play a critical role in mediating cell to cell interactions within skeletal tissues. These effects are mediated by paracrine, autocrine, and juxtacrine mechanisms. There are also examples in which the cytokines can function in an endocrine fashion. The regulatory functions of the cytokines are performed throughout life, beginning with bone growth and development and continuing in the mature organism, in which bone remodeling is regulated. The cytokines can be grouped into distinct families based on their principal biologic activity and cell target. However, the activities of the cytokines are pleiotropic, and they exhibit considerable overlap and redundancy in their actions. The molecular cloning of the cytokines and their receptors and elucidation of their common structural features have aided in the understanding of the molecular basis for the redundancy and pleiotropy of cytokine effects. Examination of most physiologic processes in which cytokines play an important regulatory role reveals that cytokines rarely exert their biologic activities in isolation. Instead, these soluble factors usually are produced locally in concert with many other cytokines. The interaction of these structurally and functionally distinct factors in a highly ordered temporal and spatial sequence creates a cytokine network that ultimately determines a given tissue's response. Continued investigation into the molecular and biologic mechanisms by which cytokines regulate bone cell function will provide additional insights into normal bone physiology and permit more effective and specific use of these factors in the treatment of skeletal disorders.

  11. Cytokines in sleep regulation.

    PubMed

    Krueger, J M; Takahashi, S; Kapás, L; Bredow, S; Roky, R; Fang, J; Floyd, R; Renegar, K B; Guha-Thakurta, N; Novitsky, S

    1995-01-01

    The central thesis of this essay is that the cytokine network in brain is a key element in the humoral regulation of sleep responses to infection and in the physiological regulation of sleep. We hypothesize that many cytokines, their cellular receptors, soluble receptors, and endogenous antagonists are involved in physiological sleep regulation. The expressions of some cytokines are greatly amplified by microbial challenge. This excess cytokine production during infection induces sleep responses. The excessive sleep and wakefulness that occur at different times during the course of the infectious process results from dynamic changes in various cytokines that occur during the host's response to infectious challenge. Removal of any one somnogenic cytokine inhibits normal sleep, alters the cytokine network by changing the cytokine mix, but does not completely disrupt sleep due to the redundant nature of the cytokine network. The cytokine network operates in a paracrine/autocrine fashion and is responsive to neuronal use. Finally, cytokines elicit their somnogenic actions via endocrine and neurotransmitter systems as well as having direct effects neurons and glia. Evidence in support of these postulates is reviewed in this essay.

  12. Cytokines and feeding.

    PubMed

    Plata-Salamán, C R

    2001-12-01

    Various categories of cytokines participate in the control of feeding, including interleukin-1 and -6 and other activators of gp 130, leptin (ob protein), interleukin-8 and other chemokines, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interferon-alpha. These feeding-inhibitory cytokines may play a role in the regulation of food intake during physiological (eg a role proposed for leptin) and pathophysiological (eg proinflammatory cytokines) conditions. Data show that various cytokines participate in acute and chronic disease-associated anorexia such as during infection, inflammation or malignancy. Food intake suppression (reported as anorexia) is also a common central manifestation observed during cytokine immunotherapy in humans. The concept of local production of various cytokines within specific brain regions in response to peripheral challenges and pathophysiological processes has broad implications for the interpretation of brain cytokines as mediators or participants in CNS modulation of feeding and anorexia.

  13. Modulation of radiation-induced alterations in oxidative stress and cytokine expression in lung tissue by Panax ginseng extract.

    PubMed

    Jang, Seong Soon; Kim, Hyeong Geug; Han, Jong Min; Lee, Jin Seok; Choi, Min Kyung; Huh, Gil Ja; Son, Chang Gue

    2015-02-01

    We investigated the modulating effect of Panax ginseng extract (PGE) on radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) by measuring early changes in oxidative stress levels, cytokine expression, and the histopathology of mouse lung tissue treated with high dose of X-ray radiation. The mice were pretreated with 25, 50, and 100-mg/kg doses of PGE orally for four consecutive days, and their thoraces were then exposed to 15-Gy X-ray radiation 1 h after the last administration of PGE on day 4. The pretreatments with 50 and 100 mg/kg PGE led to significant reductions in the elevation of lipid peroxidation levels at 2 and 10 days, respectively, after irradiation. The mice pretreated with PGE exhibited dose-dependent reductions in the irradiation-induced production of tumor necrosis factor α and transforming growth factor β1 cytokines 10 days after irradiation, with these reductions nearly reaching the control levels after the 100-mg/kg dose. Furthermore, together with providing significant protection against reductions in catalase activity and glutathione content, pretreatment with 100 mg/kg PGE resulted in a marked attenuation of the severity of inflammatory changes in lung tissue 10 days after irradiation. A high pretreatment dose of PGE may be a useful pharmacological approach for protection against RILI.

  14. Growth factor and pro-inflammatory cytokine contents in platelet-rich plasma (PRP), plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF), advanced platelet-rich fibrin (A-PRF), and concentrated growth factors (CGF).

    PubMed

    Masuki, Hideo; Okudera, Toshimitsu; Watanebe, Taisuke; Suzuki, Masashi; Nishiyama, Kazuhiko; Okudera, Hajime; Nakata, Koh; Uematsu, Kohya; Su, Chen-Yao; Kawase, Tomoyuki

    2016-12-01

    The development of platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) drastically simplified the preparation procedure of platelet-concentrated biomaterials, such as platelet-rich plasma (PRP), and facilitated their clinical application. PRF's clinical effectiveness has often been demonstrated in pre-clinical and clinical studies; however, it is still controversial whether growth factors are significantly concentrated in PRF preparations to facilitate wound healing and tissue regeneration. To address this matter, we performed a comparative study of growth factor contents in PRP and its derivatives, such as advanced PRF (A-PRF) and concentrated growth factors (CGF). PRP and its derivatives were prepared from the same peripheral blood samples collected from healthy donors. A-PRF and CGF preparations were homogenized and centrifuged to produce extracts. Platelet and white blood cell counts in A-PRF and CGF preparations were determined by subtracting those counts in red blood cell fractions, supernatant acellular serum fractions, and A-PRF/CGF exudate fractions from those counts of whole blood samples. Concentrations of growth factors (TGF-β1, PDGF-BB, VEGF) and pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6) were determined using ELISA kits. Compared to PRP preparations, both A-PRF and CGF extracts contained compatible or higher levels of platelets and platelet-derived growth factors. In a cell proliferation assay, both A-PRF and CGF extracts significantly stimulated the proliferation of human periosteal cells without significant reduction at higher doses. These data clearly demonstrate that both A-PRF and CGF preparations contain significant amounts of growth factors capable of stimulating periosteal cell proliferation, suggesting that A-PRF and CGF preparations function not only as a scaffolding material but also as a reservoir to deliver certain growth factors at the site of application.

  15. Genetic toxicity of cytokines.

    PubMed

    Lazutka, J R

    1996-12-12

    Review of the literature shows that such cytokines as human interferons alpha and gamma, tumor necrosis factor alpha, epidermal growth factor and interleukin-2 may exhibit genotoxic properties in human peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures. For all above cytokines, except interleukin-2, parabolic-like relationship between the dose and the frequency of sister chromatid exchanges was found. Although the mechanisms of these genotoxic actions remain largely unknown, generation of free radicals or interaction with enzymes such as DNA topoisomerase II may be suspected. Human interferon alpha also may be considered as an antimutagenic compound in human cells. Human tumor necrosis factor alpha has been reported to enhance cytotoxicity and DNA fragmentation produced by DNA topoisomerase II-targeted anticancer drugs. At the same time, it has some radio- and chemoprotective properties in vitro and in vivo. Despite these facts, the question about genotoxicity of cytokines is not answered. Some problems must be resolved before receiving the final answer. First, much more cytokines must be tested for their genotoxic activity. Second, appropriate test-systems must be designed. Third, genotoxicity studies of cytokines must account for cytokine interaction in the cytokine network as well as for such cytokine-induced effects as cytotoxicity and apoptosis. Fourth, in each case, it is necessary to have experimental evidence that observed genotoxic effects were caused by cytokine under investigation and not by the other factors.

  16. Cytokines in psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Baliwag, Jaymie; Barnes, Drew H; Johnston, Andrew

    2015-06-01

    Psoriasis is a common inflammatory skin disease with an incompletely understood etiology. The disease is characterized by red, scaly and well-demarcated skin lesions formed by the hyperproliferation of epidermal keratinocytes. This hyperproliferation is driven by cytokines secreted by activated resident immune cells, an infiltrate of T cells, dendritic cells and cells of the innate immune system, as well as the keratinocytes themselves. Psoriasis has a strong hereditary character and has a complex genetic background. Genome-wide association studies have identified polymorphisms within or near a number of genes encoding cytokines, cytokine receptors or elements of their signal transduction pathways, further implicating these cytokines in the psoriasis pathomechanism. A considerable number of inflammatory cytokines have been shown to be elevated in lesional psoriasis skin, and the serum concentrations of a subset of these also correlate with psoriasis disease severity. The combined effects of the cytokines found in psoriasis lesions likely explain most of the clinical features of psoriasis, such as the hyperproliferation of keratinocytes, increased neovascularization and skin inflammation. Thus, understanding which cytokines play a pivotal role in the disease process can suggest potential therapeutic targets. A number of cytokines have been therapeutically targeted with success, revolutionizing treatment of this disease. Here we review a number of key cytokines implicated in the pathogenesis of psoriasis.

  17. Cytokines in psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Baliwag, Jaymie; Barnes, Drew H.; Johnston, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis is a common inflammatory skin disease with an incompletely understood etiology. The disease is characterized by red, scaly and well-demarcated skin lesions formed by the hyperproliferation of epidermal keratinocytes. This hyperproliferation is driven by cytokines secreted by activated resident immune cells, an infiltrate of T cells, dendritic cells and cells of the innate immune system, as well as the keratinocytes themselves. Psoriasis has a strong hereditary character and has a complex genetic background. Genome-wide association studies have identified polymorphisms within or near a number of genes encoding cytokines, cytokine receptors or elements of their signal transduction pathways, further implicating these cytokines in the psoriasis pathomechanism. A considerable number of inflammatory cytokines have been shown to be elevated in lesional psoriasis skin, and the serum concentrations of a subset of these also correlate with psoriasis disease severity. The combined effects of the cytokines found in psoriasis lesions likely explain most of the clinical features of psoriasis, such as the hyperproliferation of keratinocytes, increased neovascularization and skin inflammation. Thus, understanding which cytokines play a pivotal role in the disease process can suggest potential therapeutic targets. A number of cytokines have been therapeutically targeted with success, revolutionizing treatment of this disease. Here we review a number of key cytokines implicated in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. PMID:25585875

  18. Cytokine quantitation: technologies and applications.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, Naresh; Asthana, Deshratn

    2007-05-01

    Assessment of cytokines in body fluids, cells or tissues provides important information in understanding of disease process and designing treatment strategies. Today, wide range of cytokine assays are available, including; measurement of levels of cytokines (direct) or cytokine soluble receptor levels (indirect) in body fluids or cellular supernatants (immunoassays and cytokine bioassays), measurement of cytokines produced by population of cells (multiparametric flow cytometry, magnetic beads based quantitation of cytokine producing cells, mRNA based assays), measurement of cytokines produced by single cells (Enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT), Intra-cytoplasmic cytokine staining (ICC), mRNA based assays) and detection of cytokines in tissues (immunostaining). Improved understanding of cytokine interactions has led to a consensus that simultaneous assessment of many cytokines in a biological sample provides more comprehensive information rather than assessing a single cytokine. Thus, technologies that measure one cytokine at a time are being gradually replaced by multiplex-type formats (DNA and protein microarrays).

  19. Ciprofloxacin Modulates Cytokine/Chemokine Profile in Serum, Improves Bone Marrow Repopulation, and Limits Apoptosis and Autophagy in Ileum after Whole Body Ionizing Irradiation Combined with Skin-Wound Trauma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-08

    human body by a combination of radiation exposure and other insults that include physical wounds and thermal burns , namely radiation combined injury...Res 173: 319–332. 4. Kiang JG, Garrison BR, Burns TM, Zhai M, Dews IC, et al. (2012) Wound trauma alters ionizing radiation dose assessment. Cell...Whole Body Ionizing Irradiation Combined with Skin- Wound Trauma Risaku Fukumoto1, Lynnette H. Cary2, Nikolai V. Gorbunov1, Eric D. Lombardini3, Thomas B

  20. Ciprofloxacin Modulates Cytokine/Chemokine Profile in Serum, Improves Bone Marrow Repopulation, and Limits Apoptosis and Autophagy in Ileum after Whole Body Ionizing Irradiation Combined with Skin-Wound Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Fukumoto, Risaku; Cary, Lynnette H.; Gorbunov, Nikolai V.; Lombardini, Eric D.; Elliott, Thomas B.; Kiang, Juliann G.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation combined injury (CI) is a radiation injury (RI) combined with other types of injury, which generally leads to greater mortality than RI alone. A spectrum of specific, time-dependent pathophysiological changes is associated with CI. Of these changes, the massive release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, severe hematopoietic and gastrointestinal losses and bacterial sepsis are important treatment targets to improve survival. Ciprofloxacin (CIP) is known to have immunomodulatory effect besides the antimicrobial activity. The present study reports that CIP ameliorated pathophysiological changes unique to CI that later led to major mortality. B6D2F1/J mice received CI on day 0, by RI followed by wound trauma, and were treated with CIP (90 mg/kg p.o., q.d. within 2 h after CI through day 10). At day 10, CIP treatment not only significantly reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine concentrations, including interleukin-6 (IL-6) and KC (i.e., IL-8 in human), but it also enhanced IL-3 production compared to vehicle-treated controls. Mice treated with CIP displayed a greater repopulation of bone marrow cells. CIP also limited CI-induced apoptosis and autophagy in ileal villi, systemic bacterial infection, and IgA production. CIP treatment led to LD0/10 compared to LD20/10 for vehicle-treated group after CI. Given the multiple beneficial activities of CIP shown in our experiments, CIP may prove to be a useful therapeutic drug for CI. PMID:23520506

  1. Insights into cytokine-receptor interactions from cytokine engineering.

    PubMed

    Spangler, Jamie B; Moraga, Ignacio; Mendoza, Juan L; Garcia, K Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Cytokines exert a vast array of immunoregulatory actions critical to human biology and disease. However, the desired immunotherapeutic effects of native cytokines are often mitigated by toxicity or lack of efficacy, either of which results from cytokine receptor pleiotropy and/or undesired activation of off-target cells. As our understanding of the structural principles of cytokine-receptor interactions has advanced, mechanism-based manipulation of cytokine signaling through protein engineering has become an increasingly feasible and powerful approach. Modified cytokines, both agonists and antagonists, have been engineered with narrowed target cell specificities, and they have also yielded important mechanistic insights into cytokine biology and signaling. Here we review the theory and practice of cytokine engineering and rationalize the mechanisms of several engineered cytokines in the context of structure. We discuss specific examples of how structure-based cytokine engineering has opened new opportunities for cytokines as drugs, with a focus on the immunotherapeutic cytokines interferon, interleukin-2, and interleukin-4.

  2. Cytokines and mucosal immunity.

    PubMed

    Bamias, Giorgos; Arseneau, Kristen O; Cominelli, Fabio

    2014-11-01

    Cytokines are integral mediators for maintaining intestinal mucosal homeostasis, as well as prominent effector molecules during chronic gut inflammatory diseases. This review focuses on recent studies of the role of specific cytokines in mucosal immunity. Dichotomous, or even opposing, functions have been described for several cytokines involved in intestinal innate immunity (most notably for members of the interleukin-1 family), which depend on the specific inflammatory conditions within the intestinal mucosa. For example, both interleukin-1α and interleukin-33 exhibit 'alarmin'-type properties that can signal tissue or cell damage, which further add to their well described proinflammatory roles. Costimulatory molecules of the tumor necrosis factor/tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, such as TNF-like cytokine 1A and LIGHT, are actively involved in mucosal proinflammatory pathways, but also may exert protection against infectious agents to facilitate recovery from acute inflammation. Finally, innate lymphoid cells are increasingly recognized as important cellular sources of pivotal mucosal cytokines, including the interleukin-23/T helper 17 cytokine, interleukin-22. Elucidating the complexity of cytokine signaling within the normal mucosa and during acute and chronic inflammation will be a pivotal step toward understanding the pathogenesis of immune-mediated gut diseases and developing effective therapies to treat them.

  3. Recombinant cytokines from plants.

    PubMed

    Sirko, Agnieszka; Vaněk, Tomas; Góra-Sochacka, Anna; Redkiewicz, Patrycja

    2011-01-01

    Plant-based platforms have been successfully applied for the last two decades for the efficient production of pharmaceutical proteins. The number of commercialized products biomanufactured in plants is, however, rather discouraging. Cytokines are small glycosylated polypeptides used in the treatment of cancer, immune disorders and various other related diseases. Because the clinical use of cytokines is limited by high production costs they are good candidates for plant-made pharmaceuticals. Several research groups explored the possibilities of cost-effective production of animal cytokines in plant systems. This review summarizes recent advances in this field.

  4. Cytokines and pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, K; Phan, S H

    1996-01-01

    In the past several years, significant progress in many aspects of pulmonary fibrosis research has been made. Among them, the finding that a variety of cytokines play important roles in the complex process appears most intriguing. These cytokines include at least transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), platelet-derived growth factor, fibroblast growth factors, (TGF-alpha), interleukin-1, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha. These cytokines have been demonstrated to be produced at the sites of active fibrosis where they appear to be expressed by activated inflammatory cells, such as macrophages and eosinophils. More interestingly, other noninflammatory lung cells including mesenchymal cells, such as myofibroblasts, and epithelial cells, have been found to be significant sources as well, albeit in most instances at somewhat different time points than those by inflammatory cells. Study of the individual cytokines in vitro has revealed a variety of potential roles for these cytokines in the regulation of the fibrotic process in vivo, including chemoattractant, mitogenic activities for fibroblasts, stimulation of extracellular matrix and alpha-smooth muscle actin gene expression, alteration of the contractile phenotype of fibroblasts and regulation of diverse functions of lung inflammatory and epithelial cells which can further impact on the fibrotic process by autocrine and paracrine mechanisms. Of these cytokines, it appears that TGF-beta is probably the most important cytokine in terms of the direct stimulation of lung matrix expression which typifies fibrosis. Recently however, there is accumulating evidence to indicate that the situation is much more complex than any one single cytokine being solely responsible for the fibrotic response. The concept of complex lung cytokine networks, orchestrated by a few key cytokines, such as TNF-alpha, being responsible for this response has

  5. Inhibiting inflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Kluth, D C; Rees, A J

    1996-11-01

    Acute glomerulonephritis is a common cause of renal dysfunction and ultimately renal failure. The inflammation involved is a tightly regulated response with pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines playing key roles. Interleukin-1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) are the principal pro-inflammatory cytokines produced by intrinsic cells and infiltrating leukocytes. IL-1 and TNF can be directly antagonized using IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) or binding proteins such as soluble receptors or antibodies. Alternatively, cytokines with anti-inflammatory properties can be used to decrease IL-1 and TNF synthesis, increase the production of their natural antagonists and deactivate inflammatory cells such as macrophages. This review will focus on these anti-inflammatory cytokines, principally IL-4, IL-6, IL-10 and IL-13, and highlight recent research of their activities in existing models of renal disease. The results of these experiments offer a promising new avenue of treatment.

  6. Cytokines and thyroid function.

    PubMed

    Ajjan, R A; Watson, P F; Weetman, A P

    1996-01-01

    Cytokines play a crucial role in autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD) through various mechanisms. They are produced in the thyroid by intrathyroidal inflammatory cells, in particular lymphocytes, as well as by the thyroid follicular cells (TFC) themselves and may thus act in a cascade to enhance the autoimmune process (Fig. 1). Cytokines upregulate the inflammatory reaction through stimulation of both T and B cells, resulting in antibody production and tissue injury. In addition, intrathyroidal cytokines induce immunological changes in TFC including enhancement of both major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II molecule expression, and upregulation of adhesion and complement regulatory molecule expression. Cytokines can also modulate both growth and function of TFC and have a role in extrathyroidal complications of ATD, most importantly thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy (TAO), where they induce fibroblast proliferation and enhance the production of glycosaminoglycans (GAG), resulting in proptosis and the other clinical features of the disease. In addition to these effects, exogenous administration of cytokines has been associated with impairment of thyroid function ranging from the appearance of autoantibodies alone to the development of frank thyroid dysfunction. Cytokines have also been implicated in subacute thyroiditis (SAT) and amiodarone-induced thyroid dysfunction, as well as in thyroid function abnormalities occurring in patients with non-thyroidal illnesses (NTI). Genetic variations in cytokine genes represent potential risk factors for ATD, and disease associations have been described for polymorphisms in IL-1ra and TNF beta genes. Recent experimental evidence suggests the possibility of novel cytokine-based therapeutic approaches for ATD and its complications, in particular TAO.

  7. [Cytokine pattern in various forms of sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Rudack, C; Hauser, U; Wagenmann, M; Bachert, C; Ganzer, U

    1998-01-01

    Inflammatory sinus diseases include acute sinusitis, chronic purulent sinusitis, and chronic polypoid rhinosinusitis. We investigated the cytokine profile of different types of rhinosinusitis in order to evaluate whether a distinct form of rhinosinusitis is associated with the expression of a specific cytokine profile. Fresh sinus mucosa obtained during routine surgery from patients with acute sinusitis (n = 10), chronic sinusitis (n = 7), antrochoanal polyp (n = 10), nasal polyps (n = 8), and controls of turbinate mucosa (n = 7) were homogenized. The cytokine protein content (IL-1 beta,IL-3,IL-5,IL-6,IL-8,GM-CSF) of tissue homogenates was measured using ELISA technique. In the group of proinflammatory cytokines, the protein levels measured for interleukin IL-8, a proinflammatory cytokine, IL-1 beta, and IL-6 were elevated in acute sinusitis. In the group of eosinophil-activating cytokines interleukin-3, -5 and granulocyte an makrophage-colony stimulating factor, we measured a significantly elevated protein level of IL-5 in nasal polyp tissue in contrast to significantly elevated IL-3 protein level in chronic sinusitis. These findings suggest that IL-8 plays a pivotal role in neutrophil-dominated and IL-5 in eosinophil-dominated sinusitis. IL-3 seems to sustain chronic inflammation.

  8. Cytokines and Blastocyst Hatching.

    PubMed

    Seshagiri, Polani B; Vani, Venkatappa; Madhulika, Pathak

    2016-03-01

    Blastocyst implantation into the uterine endometrium establishes early pregnancy. This event is regulated by blastocyst- and/or endometrium-derived molecular factors which include hormones, growth factors, cell adhesion molecules, cytokines and proteases. Their coordinated expression and function are critical for a viable pregnancy. A rate-limiting event that immediately precedes implantation is the hatching of blastocyst. Ironically, blastocyst hatching is tacitly linked to peri-implantation events, although it is a distinct developmental phenomenon. The exact molecular network regulating hatching is still unclear. A number of implantation-associated molecular factors are expressed in the pre-implanting blastocyst. Among others, cytokines, expressed by peri-implantation blastocysts, are thought to be important for hatching, making blastocysts implantation competent. Pro-inflammatory (IL-6, LIF, GM-CSF) and anti-inflammatory (IL-11, CSF-1) cytokines improve hatching rates; they modulate proteases (MMPs, tPAs, cathepsins and ISP1). However, functional involvement of cytokines and their specific mediation of hatching-associated proteases are unclear. There is a need to understand mechanistic roles of cytokines and proteases in blastocyst hatching. This review will assess the available knowledge on blastocyst-derived pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines and their role in potentially regulating blastocyst hatching. They have implications in our understanding of early embryonic loss and infertility in mammals, including humans.

  9. Cytokines and autoimmunity.

    PubMed Central

    Cavallo, M G; Pozzilli, P; Thorpe, R

    1994-01-01

    Although the immunopathology of most autoimmune diseases has been well defined, the mechanisms responsible for the breakdown of self-tolerance and which lead to the development of systemic and organ-specific autoaggression are still unclear. Evidence has accumulated which supports a role for a disregulated production of cytokines by leucocytes and possibly other cells in the pathogenesis of some autoimmune diseases. However, due to the complexity and heterogeneity of cytokine effects in the regulation of the immune response, it is difficult to determine whether abnormalities in the patterns of cytokine production are primary or secondary to the pathological process. Confusion is also caused by the fact that the biological activities of cytokines are multiple and often overlapping, and consequently it is difficult to focus on a unique effect of any one cytokine. Characterization of the potential and actual involvement of cytokines is important not only for a better understanding of the pathogenesis of autoimmune conditions, but particularly because of the implications for the development of immunotherapeutic strategies for the prevention and treatment of the diseases. PMID:8149655

  10. Antioxidant Activity and Phenolic Content of Defatted Buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench) Flour in Water or Ethanol Heated using Microwave Irradiation at Varying Temperatures

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum) has potential to be a nutritionally beneficial crop due to its high phenolic content and antioxidant activity. We explored new technologies to enhance buckwheat phenolic content and antioxidant activity. Buckwheat achenes were ground and flour was extracted for 15 ...

  11. Oral application of cytokines.

    PubMed

    Georgiades, J A; Fleischmann, W R

    1996-01-01

    A number of different laboratories reported on studies with orally administered interferons and cytokines. Their observations extend previous observations which showed that orally administered interferons and cytokines can exert both local and systemic effects. As difficult as it may be to understand how orally administered interferons and cytokines may exert both effects, the increasing number of laboratories that demonstrate biological effects with orally administered cytokines suggests that serious consideration be given to the possibility that orally administered interferons and cytokines can indeed exert effects. They also raise the possibility that these effects may have biological relevance for the treatment of human disease. Moreover, they may indicate that the nasal/oral region is a window on the environment. It is most important, however, to assure that these experiments are performed with special care to avoid presenting preliminary data that is not properly controlled. It is essential to carry out these studies with sufficient animals or patients to ascertain their significance; and to plan the studies as double-blind evaluations to avoid misinterpretations when subjective tests are used. Nevertheless, the overall data presented give one the impression of an area that should be pursued.

  12. [Cytokines and asthma].

    PubMed

    Gani, F; Senna, G; Piglia, P; Grosso, B; Mezzelani, P; Pozzi, E

    1998-10-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory lung disease in which eosinophils are one of the most important involved cells. These cells accumulate in the lung because of cytokines, which are able to regulate cellular responses. The role of cytokines is well known in allergic asthma: IL4, IL5, IL3, GMCSF are the principally cytokine involved. IL4 regulate IgE synthesis while IL5, (and IL3) cause the activation and accumulation of eosinophils. In non allergic asthma, whilst only IL5 seemed to be important recent data, shows that also IL4 plays an important role. Therefore nowadays no relevant difference seems to exist between allergic and non allergic asthma; instead the primer is different: the allergen in allergic asthma and often an unknown factor in the non allergic asthma. Recently other cytokines have been proved to play a role in the pathogenesis of asthma. IL8 is chemotactic not only for neutrophils but also for eosinophils and might cause chronic inflammation in severe asthma. IL13 works like IL4, while RANTES seems to be a more important chemotactic agent than IL5. Finally IL10, which immunoregulates T lymphocyte responses, may reduce asthma inflammation. In conclusion cytokine made us to learn more about the pathogenesis of asthma even if we do not yet know when and how asthma inflammation develops.

  13. Comparison of endpoints relevant to toxicity assessments in 3 generations of CD-1 mice fed irradiated natural and purified ingredient diets with varying soy protein and isoflavone contents

    PubMed Central

    Camacho, Luísa; Lewis, Sherry M.; Vanlandingham, Michelle M.; Juliar, Beth E.; Olson, Greg R.; Patton, Ralph E.; da Costa, Gonçalo Gamboa; Woodling, Kellie; Sepehr, Estatira; Bryant, Matthew S.; Doerge, Daniel R.; Basavarajappa, Mallikarjuna S.; Felton, Robert P.; Delclos, K. Barry

    2016-01-01

    Diet is an important variable in toxicology. There are mixed reports on the impact of soy components on energy utilization, fat deposition, and reproductive parameters. Three generations of CD-1 mice were fed irradiated natural ingredient diets with varying levels of soy (NIH-41, 5K96, or 5008/5001), purified irradiated AIN-93 diet, or the AIN-93 formulation modified with ethanol-washed soy protein concentrate (SPC) or SPC with isoflavones (SPC-IF). NIH-41 was the control for pairwise comparisons. Minimal differences were observed among natural ingredient diet groups. F0 males fed AIN-93, SPC, and SPC-IF diets had elevated glucose levels and lower insulin levels compared with the NIH-41 group. In both sexes of the F1 and F2 generations, the SPC and SPC-IF groups had lower body weight gains than the NIH-41 controls and the AIN-93 group had an increased percent body fat at postnatal day 21. AIN-93 F1 pups had higher baseline glucose than NIH-41 controls, but diet did not significantly affect breeding performance or responses to glucose or uterotrophic challenges. Reduced testes weight and sperm in the AIN-93 group may be related to low thiamine levels. Our observations underline the importance of careful selection, manufacturing procedures, and nutritional characterization of diets used in toxicological studies. PMID:27234134

  14. Cytokines in nasal polyposis, acute and chronic sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Rudack, C; Stoll, W; Bachert, C

    1998-01-01

    Cytokines are potent biologic factors involved in the regulation of inflammation, immune defense, and wound healing. Recently, growing interest has developed in the role of cytokines in chronic sinusitis and nasal polyposis. In the present study, we investigated the cytokine profile of different types of rhinosinusitis in order to evaluate whether a specific form of rhinosinusitis is associated with the expression of a certain cytokine profile. Sinus mucosa from patients with acute sinusitis (n = 10), chronic sinusitis (n = 7), antrochoanal polyp (n = 10), nasal polyps (n = 8) and controls of turbinate mucosa (n = 7) were sampled. The cytokine protein content (IL-1 beta, IL-3, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8, IL-13, GM-CSF, interferon-gamma) of tissue homogenates was measured using ELISA technique. In acute sinusitis, the synthesis of proinflammatory cytokines and of the neutrophil chemokine IL-8 and IL-3 appeared to be upregulated. Chronic sinusitis mucosa demonstrated no significantly increased concentrations of the measured cytokines. In bilateral nasal polyposis, but not in antrochoanal polyps, the eosinophil related cytokine IL-5 was strongly upregulated. From these findings, it appears that specific cytokine patterns are found in different forms of sinusitis, and that IL-5 may represent the most important cytokine responsible for tissue eosinophilia in nasal polyposis.

  15. Immunoreactive cytokines within primates.

    PubMed

    Ahne, W; Mayr, A; Wiesner, H

    1996-12-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells of primates (man, orang utan, gorilla, baboon), rodents (mouse, rat), carnivores (cat, dog), artiodactyls (cattle, goat, pig) and perissodactyls (horse) were isolated and stimulated with mitogens (5 micrograms/ml LPS, 5 micrograms/ml PHA) at 37 degrees C. Cytokines immunoreactive to monoclonal antibodies (mAb) directed to human cytokines (TNF-alpha, IL-1 alpha, IL-2, IL-6, IFN-gamma) could be detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in the case of primates only. The mAb used did not recognize cytokines of the other mammalian species investigated. The results demonstrate the close relationship within the primates from the immunophysiological point of view.

  16. Sepsis and cytokines: current status.

    PubMed

    Blackwell, T S; Christman, J W

    1996-07-01

    Sepsis is a constellation of clinical signs and symptoms resulting from excessive systemic host inflammatory response to infection. This inflammatory response is largely mediated by cytokines, which are released into the systemic circulation. Plasma concentrations of specific cytokines, TNF alpha, IL-1 beta, IL-6 and IL-8 are frequently elevated in human sepsis and cytokine concentrations correlate with severity and outcome of sepsis. In addition to pro-inflammatory cytokines, soluble cytokine receptors, cytokine receptor antagonists and counter-inflammatory cytokines are also produced in large quantities in patients with sepsis; however, the specific role of these molecules in sepsis remains undefined. A complex interaction of cytokines and cytokine-neutralizing molecules probably determines the clinical presentation and course of sepsis. Intervening in this sequence of events to modify the host inflammatory responses may prove to be a beneficial treatment strategy for sepsis, but currently tested anticytokine therapies have been largely unsuccessful.

  17. Effect of microwave irradiation on TATB explosive.

    PubMed

    Yu, Weifei; Zhang, Tonglai; Huang, Yigang; Yang, Li; Li, Gang; Li, Haibo; Li, Jinshan; Huang, Hui

    2009-09-15

    Finished TATB (1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene) explosive safety under 800W microwave irradiation was experimented. No burning, deflagration and detonation were observed during 30-min continuous irradiation and no remarkable change were observed after irradiation according to HPLC, particles size analysis, and differential thermal analysis. Wet TATB sampled from synthesis line was irradiated with microwave vacuum method and irradiated TATB was measured to accord with military standard specifications including appearance, moisture and volatile, chloride content, HPLC, mean particle size, DTA exothermic peak, ash, acetone soluble content, PH value, etc. Microwave vacuum desiccation was deemed laborsaving, energy-efficient, and practicable compared to conventional processing method.

  18. Photocatalytic performance of the SiO2 sphere/ n-type TiO2/ p-type CuBiS2 composite catalysts coated with different contents of Ag nanoparticles under ultraviolet and visible light irradiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Hairus; Kuo, Dong-Hau

    2016-08-01

    Photocatalytic performance of the SiO2 sphere/ n-type TiO2/ p-type CuBiS2 composite catalysts with different contents of silver nanoparticles (abbreviated as SiO2/ n-TiO2/ p-CuBiS2/Ag) toward the photodegradation of Acid Black 1 ( AB 1) dye under ultraviolet (UV) and visible light was investigated. The composite catalyst spheres were analyzed their crystal structure, microstructure, optical absorbance capabilities, and photodegradation capabilities of AB 1 dye. The best photodegradation performances of the 20 mg composite powder with only ~5 mg photoactive catalysts showed the degradation of AB 1 dye in 5 min under UV and 60 min under visible light irradiations. The concept of composite catalyst with numerous nano p- n diodes and its photodegradation mechanism were proposed.

  19. Cytokines in human milk.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, M D; Srivastava, A; Brouhard, B; Saneto, R; Groh-Wargo, S; Kubit, J

    1996-09-01

    Breast feeding improves the health of children. The greatest significance is to host defense, prevention of autoimmunity, and development of the digestive system; however, the underlying mechanisms for these effects are not well understood. Based on recent evidence that cytokines might be important in these processes, we have used ELISA to quantitate the cytokines in human colostrum, transitional, and mature milk from mothers delivering preterm or at term. We also used reverse transcription PCR to test breast milk cells for the production of cytokine mRNA. No significant (< 10 pg/ml) GM-CSF, SCF, LIF, MIP-1 alpha, IL-2, IL-4, IL-11, IL-12, IL-13, IL-15, sIL-2R, or IFN-gamma was detected. And, in contrast to earlier studies using bioassays or RIA, no significant IL-1 beta, TNF-alpha, or IL-6 was present; nor was IL-10, which had been tested using less specific antibodies. We did confirm the presence of high levels of M-CSF, which remained high throughout lactation. Human milk contained latent, but not free, TGF-beta 1, and especially TGF-beta 2, both of which may be activated by gastric acid pH. High levels of IL-1RA were detected, and like activated TGF-beta, may protect against autoimmunity. Chemokines, particularly GRO-alpha and MCP-1, but also RANTES and IL-8, were present and could protect against infection. Maternal cells in breast milk expressed mRNA for MCP-1 (20/20), IL-8 (14/20), TGF-beta 1 (14/16), TGF-beta 2 (4/6), M-CSF (9/12), IL-6 (6/12) and IL-1 beta (7/12), and may be a source of these cytokines. mRNA for IL-2, IL-10, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha was not detected and only weak expression was found for RANTES (1/18). There was considerable variability between individual women, and women delivering preterm had lower levels of several cytokines in colostrum than women delivering at term. Yet, cytokine levels remained high months to years into lactation, providing immunological benefit to the breastfed infant/child.

  20. Cytokines in Acute Chikungunya

    PubMed Central

    Venugopalan, Anuradha; Ghorpade, Ravi P.; Chopra, Arvind

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Acute chikungunya (CHIKV) is predominantly an acute onset of excruciatingly painful, self-limiting musculoskeletal (MSK) arbovirus illness and this was further reported by us during the 2006 Indian epidemic [Chopra et al. Epidemiol Infect 2012]. Selected serum cytokines profile in subjects within one month of onset of illness is being presented. Methods Out of 509 clinical CHIKV cases (43% population) identified during a rural population survey, 225 subjects consented blood investigations. 132 examined within 30 days of febrile onset are the study cohort. Anti-CHIKV IgM and IgG antibodies tested by immunochromatography and indirect immunofluorescence respectively. Interferons (IFN)-α, -β and -γ, Interferon Gamma-Induced Protein-10 (CXCL-10/IP-10), Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNF-α), Interleukin-1β (IL-1β), Interleukin-6 (IL-6), Interleukin-13 (IL-13), Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 (MCP-1), Interleukin–4 (IL-4) and Interleukin–10 (IL-10) performed by ELISA. Samples collected from neighboring community a year prior to the epidemic used as healthy controls. Results Seropositivity for anti-CHIKV IgM and IgG was 65% and 52% respectively. IFN-α, IFN-β, IFN-γ, CXCL10/IP-10 and IL-1β showed intense response in early acute phase. Cytokines (particularly TNF-α, MCP-1, IL-4, IL-6 and IL-10) was maximum in extended symptomatic phase and remained elevated in recovered subjects. Higher (p<0.05) IFN and IL-4 seen in patients seropositive for anti-CHIKV IgG. Elderly cases (≥65 years) showed elevated cytokines (except IFN) and anti-CHIKV antibodies near similar to younger subjects. Significant correlations (p<0.05) found between cytokines and clinical features (fatigue, low back ache, myalgia) and anti-CHIKV antibodies. Conclusion An intense cytokine milieu was evident in the early and immediate persistent symptomatic phase and in recovered subjects. Early persistent IgM and lower IgG to anti-CHKV and intense Th2 cytokine phenotype seem to be

  1. Coordinate cytokine regulatory sequences

    DOEpatents

    Frazer, Kelly A.; Rubin, Edward M.; Loots, Gabriela G.

    2005-05-10

    The present invention provides CNS sequences that regulate the cytokine gene expression, expression cassettes and vectors comprising or lacking the CNS sequences, host cells and non-human transgenic animals comprising the CNS sequences or lacking the CNS sequences. The present invention also provides methods for identifying compounds that modulate the functions of CNS sequences as well as methods for diagnosing defects in the CNS sequences of patients.

  2. Cytokines and anti-cytokines as therapeutics--an update.

    PubMed

    Tayal, Vandana; Kalra, Bhupinder Singh

    2008-01-28

    Cytokines which comprise of a family of proteins--interleukins, lymphokines, monokines, interferons, and chemokines, are important components of the immune system. They act in concert with specific cytokine inhibitors and soluble cytokine receptors to regulate the human immune response. Their physiologic role in inflammation and pathologic role in systemic inflammatory states are now well recognized. An imbalance in cytokine production or cytokine receptor expression and/or dysregulation of a cytokine process contributes to various pathological disorders. Research is progressing rapidly in the area of cytokines and their therapeutic targets, the two major therapeutic modalities being the administration of purified recombinant cytokines and the use of their antagonists in various inflammatory disorders. However, given the large number of cytokines, it is disappointing that only relatively few can be used clinically. In the present article, we have made an attempt to review and present a glimpse of the history as well as up to date information that is pertinent to cytokines and anti-cytokine therapies in the treatment of cancer, autoimmune disorders and various other related diseases.

  3. Tissue irradiator

    DOEpatents

    Hungate, F.P.; Riemath, W.F.; Bunnell, L.R.

    1975-12-16

    A tissue irradiator is provided for the in-vivo irradiation of body tissue. The irradiator comprises a radiation source material contained and completely encapsulated within vitreous carbon. An embodiment for use as an in- vivo blood irradiator comprises a cylindrical body having an axial bore therethrough. A radioisotope is contained within a first portion of vitreous carbon cylindrically surrounding the axial bore, and a containment portion of vitreous carbon surrounds the radioisotope containing portion, the two portions of vitreous carbon being integrally formed as a single unit. Connecting means are provided at each end of the cylindrical body to permit connections to blood- carrying vessels and to provide for passage of blood through the bore. In a preferred embodiment, the radioisotope is thulium-170 which is present in the irradiator in the form of thulium oxide. A method of producing the preferred blood irradiator is also provided, whereby nonradioactive thulium-169 is dispersed within a polyfurfuryl alcohol resin which is carbonized and fired to form the integral vitreous carbon body and the device is activated by neutron bombardment of the thulium-169 to produce the beta-emitting thulium-170.

  4. [Food irradiation].

    PubMed

    Migdał, W

    1995-01-01

    A worldwide standard on food irradiation was adopted in 1983 by Codex Alimentarius Commission of the Joint Food Standard Programme of the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations and the World Health Organization (WHO). As a result, 41 countries have approved the use of irradiation for treating one or more food items and the number is increasing. Generally, irradiation is used to: food loses, food spoilage, disinfestation, safety and hygiene. The number of countries which use irradiation for processing food for commercial purposes has been increasing steadily from 19 in 1987 to 33 today. In the frames of the national programme on the application of irradiation for food preservation and hygienization an experimental plant for electron beam processing has been established in Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology. The plant is equipped with a small research accelerator Pilot (19MeV, 1 kW) and an industrial unit Elektronika (10MeV, 10 kW). On the basis of the research there were performed at different scientific institutions in Poland, health authorities have issued permission for irradiation for: spices, garlic, onions, mushrooms, potatoes, dry mushrooms and vegetables.

  5. [Prognostication of acute-pancreatitis-associated pulmonary injury based on determination of cytokines levels].

    PubMed

    Fedorkiv, M B; Hudz, I M; Shevchuk, I M

    2013-07-01

    The results of examination of 68 patients, admitted to hospital for an acute pancreatitis during 48 h from its occurrence, were analyzed. In all the patients the cytokines (IL-8, IL-10, TNF-alpha) content was determined in the blood, using immunoenzymal analysis. Algorithm of prognostication of an acute pancreatitis-associated pulmonary injury, basing on determination of the cytokines contents, was elaborated.

  6. Cytokines in human leptospirosis.

    PubMed

    Papa, Anna; Kotrotsiou, Tzimoula

    2015-12-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonotic disease with increased public health concern. Cytokines produced in response to the infection with pathogenic leptospires have been proposed to be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. The aim of the study was to measure and evaluate the levels of 27 cytokines in patients with acute leptospirosis. The levels of 27 cytokines were measured from 42 acute leptospirosis cases; 47 samples were obtained from severe cases. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS. IL-6, IL-8, GM-CSF, IP-10, MCP-1, and VEGF levels differed significantly between the severe cases and the control group, while GM-CSF levels differed significantly between the mild cases and the control group (p<0.05). IL-6, IP-10 and MCP-1 were elevated in most cases. IP-10 was significantly higher in severe than in non-severe cases (p<0.05). The high IP-10 levels suggest a cellular immune response, despite the fact that leptospires are not intracellular organisms. IL-1ra, MCP-1, MIP-1b and TNF-α peaked 1-5 days post onset of illness (p.o.i.), IL-1b, IL-6, IL-8, IL-9, GM-CSF, IP-10 and MIP-1a peaked 6-10 days p.o.i., while VEGF peaked later (11-15 days p.o.i.). TNF-α was significantly lower in the severe cases with pulmonary involvement (p<0.05). Having a better insight into the host immune response in leptospirosis could be the basis for immunotherapeutic targets, especially for the severe cases in which antibiotic treatment is not enough. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. An overview of cytokines and cytokine antagonists as therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Raymond P; Young, Howard A; Rosenberg, Amy S

    2009-12-01

    Cytokine-based therapies have the potential to provide novel treatments for cancer, autoimmune diseases, and many types of infectious disease. However, to date, the full clinical potential of cytokines as drugs has been limited by a number of factors. To discuss these limitations and explore ways to overcome them, the FDA partnered with the New York Academy of Sciences in March 2009 to host a two-day forum to discuss more effective ways to harness the clinical potential of cytokines and cytokine antagonists as therapeutic agents. The first day was focused primarily on the use of recombinant cytokines as therapeutic agents for treatment of human diseases. The second day focused largely on the use of cytokine antagonists as therapeutic agents for treatment of human diseases. This issue of the Annals includes more than a dozen papers that summarize much of the information that was presented during this very informative two-day conference.

  8. Interactive Cytokine Regulation of Synoviocyte Lubricant Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Blewis, Megan E.; Lao, Brian J.; Schumacher, Barbara L.; Bugbee, William D.; Firestein, Gary S.

    2010-01-01

    Cytokine regulation of synovial fluid (SF) lubricants, hyaluronan (HA), and proteoglycan 4 (PRG4) is important in health, injury, and disease of synovial joints, and may also provide powerful regulation of lubricant secretion in bioreactors for articulating tissues. This study assessed lubricant secretion rates by human synoviocytes and the molecular weight (MW) of secreted lubricants in response to interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-17, IL-32, transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), applied individually and in all combinations. Lubricant secretion rates were assessed using ELISA and binding assays, and lubricant MW was assessed using gel electrophoresis and Western blotting. HA secretion rates were increased ∼40-fold by IL-1β, and increased synergistically to ∼80-fold by the combination of IL-1β + TGF-β1 or TNF-α + IL-17. PRG4 secretion rates were increased ∼80-fold by TGF-β1, and this effect was counterbalanced by IL-1β and TNF-α. HA MW was predominantly <1 MDa for controls and individual cytokine stimulation, but was concentrated at >3 MDa after stimulation by IL-1β + TGF-β1 + TNF-α to resemble the distribution in human SF. PRG4 MW was unaffected by cytokines and similar to that in human SF. These results contribute to an understanding of the relationship between SF cytokine and lubricant content in health, injury, and disease, and provide approaches for using cytokines to modulate lubricant secretion rates and MW to help achieve desired lubricant composition of fluid in bioreactors. PMID:19908966

  9. Interactive cytokine regulation of synoviocyte lubricant secretion.

    PubMed

    Blewis, Megan E; Lao, Brian J; Schumacher, Barbara L; Bugbee, William D; Sah, Robert L; Firestein, Gary S

    2010-04-01

    Cytokine regulation of synovial fluid (SF) lubricants, hyaluronan (HA), and proteoglycan 4 (PRG4) is important in health, injury, and disease of synovial joints, and may also provide powerful regulation of lubricant secretion in bioreactors for articulating tissues. This study assessed lubricant secretion rates by human synoviocytes and the molecular weight (MW) of secreted lubricants in response to interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-17, IL-32, transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta1), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), applied individually and in all combinations. Lubricant secretion rates were assessed using ELISA and binding assays, and lubricant MW was assessed using gel electrophoresis and Western blotting. HA secretion rates were increased approximately 40-fold by IL-1beta, and increased synergistically to approximately 80-fold by the combination of IL-1beta + TGF-beta1 or TNF-alpha + IL-17. PRG4 secretion rates were increased approximately 80-fold by TGF-beta1, and this effect was counterbalanced by IL-1beta and TNF-alpha. HA MW was predominantly <1 MDa for controls and individual cytokine stimulation, but was concentrated at >3 MDa after stimulation by IL-1beta + TGF-beta1 + TNF-alpha to resemble the distribution in human SF. PRG4 MW was unaffected by cytokines and similar to that in human SF. These results contribute to an understanding of the relationship between SF cytokine and lubricant content in health, injury, and disease, and provide approaches for using cytokines to modulate lubricant secretion rates and MW to help achieve desired lubricant composition of fluid in bioreactors.

  10. Irradiation subassembly

    DOEpatents

    Seim, O.S.; Filewicz, E.C.; Hutter, E.

    1973-10-23

    An irradiation subassembly for use in a nuclear reactor is described which includes a bundle of slender elongated irradiation -capsules or fuel elements enclosed by a coolant tube and having yieldable retaining liner between the irradiation capsules and the coolant tube. For a hexagonal bundle surrounded by a hexagonal tube the yieldable retaining liner may consist either of six segments corresponding to the six sides of the tube or three angular segments each corresponding in two adjacent sides of the tube. The sides of adjacent segments abut and are so cut that metal-tometal contact is retained when the volume enclosed by the retaining liner is varied and Springs are provided for urging the segments toward the center of the tube to hold the capsules in a closely packed configuration. (Official Gazette)

  11. IRRADIATION EFFECTS ON THE PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF SEWAGE SLUDGE

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M-J.; Lee, J-K.; Yoo, D-H.; Ho, K.

    2004-10-05

    The radiation effects on the physical characteristic of the sewage sludge were studied in order to obtain information which will be used for study on the enhancement of the sludge's dewaterability. Water contents, capillary suction time, zeta potential, irradiation dose, sludge acidity, total solid concentration, sludge particle size and microbiology before and after irradiation were investigated. Irradiation gave an effect on physical characteristics sludge. Water content in sludge cake could be reduced by irradiation at the dose of 10kGy.

  12. Contributions of toluene and alpha-pinene to SOA formed in an irradiated toluene/alpha-pinene/NO(x)/ air mixture: comparison of results using 14C content and SOA organic tracer methods.

    PubMed

    Offenberg, John H; Lewis, Charles W; Lewandowski, Michael; Jaoui, Mohammed; Kleindienst, Tadeusz E; Edney, Edward O

    2007-06-01

    An organic tracer method, recently proposed for estimating individual contributions of toluene and alpha-pinene to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation, was evaluated by conducting a laboratory study where a binary hydrocarbon mixture, containing the anthropogenic aromatic hydrocarbon, toluene, and the biogenic monoterpene, alpha-pinene, was irradiated in air in the presence of NO(x) to form SOA. The contributions of toluene and alpha-pinene to the total SOA concentration, calculated using the organic tracer method, were compared with those obtained with a more direct 14C content method. In the study, SOA to SOC ratios of 2.07 +/- 0.08 and 1.41 +/- 0.04 were measured for toluene and (alpha-pinene SOA, respectively. The individual tracer-based SOA contributions of 156 microg m(-3) for toluene and 198 microg m(-)3 for alpha-pinene, which together accounted for 82% of the gravimetrically determined total SOA concentration, compared well with the 14C values of 182 and 230 microg m(-3) measured for the respective SOA precursors. While there are uncertainties associated with the organic tracer method, largely due to the chemical complexity of SOA forming chemical mechanisms, the results of this study suggest the organic tracer method may serve as a useful tool for determining whether a precursor hydrocarbon is a major SOA contributor.

  13. Irradiated foods

    MedlinePlus

    ... it reduces the risk for food poisoning . Food irradiation is used in many countries. It was first approved in the U.S. to prevent sprouts on white potatoes, and to control insects on wheat and in certain spices and seasonings.

  14. Circulating cytokines reflect the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in atherosclerotic plaques.

    PubMed

    Edsfeldt, Andreas; Grufman, Helena; Asciutto, Giuseppe; Nitulescu, Mihaela; Persson, Ana; Nilsson, Marie; Nilsson, Jan; Gonçalves, Isabel

    2015-08-01

    Inflammation is a key factor in the development of plaque rupture and acute cardiovascular events. Although imaging techniques can be used to identify vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques, we are lacking non-invasive methods, such as plasma markers of plaque inflammation that could help to identify presence of vulnerable plaques. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether increased plasma levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines reflects inflammatory activity within atherosclerotic plaques. Cytokines were measured using Luminex immunoassay in 200 homogenized plaque extracts and plasma, obtained from 197 subjects undergoing carotid surgery. Plasma levels of macrophage inflammatory protein-1β (MIP-1β), tumor necrosis factor- α (TNF-α) and fractalkine correlated significantly, not only with plaque levels of the same cytokines but also with the abundance of several pro-inflammatory and atherogenic cytokines assessed in plaque tissue. High plasma levels (upper tertile) of MIP-1β, TNF-α and fractalkine identified the presence of a plaque with high inflammation (above median of a score based on the plaque content of MIP-1β, TNF-α, interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and fractalkine) with a sensitivity between 65 and 67% and a specificity between 78 and 83%. Furthermore, this study shows that high plasma levels of MIP-1β, TNF-α and fractalkine predict future transient ischemic attacks. Our findings show that the plasma levels of MIP-1β, TNF-α and fractalkine reflect the levels of several pro-atherogenic cytokines in plaque tissue and might be possible plasma markers for a vulnerable atherosclerotic disease. We thereby propose that these cytokines can be used as surrogate markers for the identification of patients with high-risk plaques. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Cytokines and gastrointestinal disease mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Przemioslo, R T; Ciclitira, P J

    1996-03-01

    Cytokines mediate immune responses and are detectable in the normal gastrointestinal mucosa. It is unclear how cytokines are physiologically regulated but in inflammatory enteropathies their expression is often greatly increased and may account for the tissue damage observed. T-cells may be sub-divided according to the pattern of cytokines which they secrete. TH1 cytokine expression is increased in delayed type IV cell mediate immune responses whereas TH2 cytokines are raised in diseases in which humoral mechanisms are more important. Cytokines are secreted by macrophages in relatively greater amounts than from T-cells. They are non-specific products of inflammation and may account for the majority of tissue damage seen in mucosal disease. The pattern of cytokine secretion may determine the immunopathogenesis of an inflammatory disorder. The ultimate goal of cytokine research is the development of therapeutic measures based on a better understanding of their actions which may be achieved with a better understanding of the molecular immune-microenvironment in inflammatory enteropathies. Studies with transgenic mice and gene targeted mice have important implications to the understanding of the immune system and its role in intestinal diseases.

  16. Cytokines: sources, receptors and signalling.

    PubMed

    Barrett, K E

    1996-03-01

    Cytokines are a family of protein mediators that are important in transducing information between various cell types. These messengers are synthesized by a broad spectrum of cells. Cellular sources of cytokines include those cell types considered to play pivotal roles in the immune system as well as in inflammatory responses, including lymphocytes, monocytes and mast cells. Emerging data indicate that non-immune cells, including epithelial cells and fibroblasts, may also be important sources of certain cytokines. Cytokines fulfill a number of roles during immune and inflammatory reactions, and may display overlapping or redundant functions. In part, this redundancy may arise from the fact that cytokine receptors are not all unique entities, but may be divided into families. Many cytokine receptors have a subunit structure, with common subunits shared between receptors, and serving as affinity modifiers/signal transducers. Cytokines exert their effects on target cells by activating intracellular signalling mechanisms. In addition to 'classical' signal transduction path-ways, new data indicate that cytokines may also exemplify molecules that utilize novel signalling mechanisms, including the Jak-STAT pathways of transcriptional regulation and pathways involving the novel lipid second messenger, ceramide. In conclusion, molecular techniques have enabled the identification of many new cytokines, and the elucidation of their binding sites and mechanisms of action. This information has provided new insights into this complex area. Moreover, an understanding of the molecular basis of cytokine action and the pathways that lead to their acute and chronic effects may, in turn, facilitate interventions to prevent or modify their actions in disease states.

  17. Cytokine therapy for craniosynostosis.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Mark P; Moursi, Amr M; Opperman, Lynne A; Siegel, Michael I

    2004-03-01

    The birth prevalence of craniosynostosis (premature suture fusion) is 300-500 per 1,000,000 live births. Surgical management involves the release of the synostosed suture. In many cases, however, the suturectomy site rapidly reossifies, further restricts the growing brain and alters craniofacial growth. This resynostosis requires additional surgery, which increases patient morbidity and mortality. New findings in bone biology and molecular pathways involved with suture fusion, combined with novel tissue engineering techniques, may allow the design of targeted and complementary therapies to decrease complications inherent in high-risk surgical procedures. This paper selectively reviews recent advances in i) identifying genetic mutations and the aetiopathogenesis of a number of craniosynostotic conditions; ii) cranial suture biology and molecular biochemical pathways involved in suture fusion; and iii) the design, development and application of various vehicles and tissue engineered constructs to deliver cytokines and genes to cranial sutures. Such biologically based therapies may be used as surgical adjuncts to rescue fusing sutures or help manage postoperative resynostosis.

  18. Cytokine receptors and hematopoietic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Robb, L

    2007-10-15

    Colony-stimulating factors and other cytokines signal via their cognate receptors to regulate hematopoiesis. In many developmental systems, inductive signalling determines cell fate and, by analogy with this, it has been postulated that cytokines, signalling via their cognate receptors, may play an instructive role in lineage specification in hematopoiesis. An alternative to this instructive hypothesis is the stochastic or permissive hypothesis. The latter proposes that commitment to a particular hematopoietic lineage is an event that occurs independently of extrinsic signals. It predicts that the role of cytokines is to provide nonspecific survival and proliferation signals. In this review, we look at the role of cytokine receptor signalling in hematopoiesis and consider the evidence for both hypotheses. Data from experiments that genetically manipulate receptor gene expression in vitro or in vivo are reviewed. Experiments in which cytokine receptors were installed in multipotential cells showed that, in some cases, stimulation with the cognate ligand could lead to alterations in lineage output. The creation of genetically manipulated mouse strains demonstrated that cytokine receptors are required for expansion and survival of single lineages but did not reveal a role in lineage commitment. We conclude that hematopoietic differentiation involves mainly stochastic events, but that cytokine receptors also have some instructive role.

  19. Mnk Kinases in Cytokine Signaling and Regulation of Cytokine Responses

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Sonali; Platanias, Leonidas C.

    2013-01-01

    The kinases Mnk1 and Mnk2 are activated downstream of the p38 MAPK and MEK/ERK signaling pathways. Extensive work over the years has shown that these kinases control phosphorylation of the eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) and regulate engagement of other effector elements, including hnRNPA1 and PSF. Mnk kinases are ubiquitously expressed and play critical roles in signaling for various cytokine receptors, while there is emerging evidence that they have important functions as mediators of pro-inflammatory cytokine production. In this review the mechanisms of activation of MNK pathways by cytokine receptors are addressed and their roles in diverse cytokine-dependent biological processes are reviewed. The clinical-translational implications of such work and the relevance of future development of specific MNK inhibitors for the treatment of malignancies and auto-immune disorders are discussed. PMID:23710261

  20. Treatment of platelet concentrates with ultraviolet C light for pathogen reduction increases cytokine accumulation.

    PubMed

    Sandgren, Per; Berlin, Gösta; Tynngård, Nahreen

    2016-06-01

    Pathogen reduction technologies use photoactive substances in combination with ultraviolet (UV) light to inactivate pathogens. A new method uses only UVC light for pathogen reduction. This study assesses the effects of UVC light treatment on cytokine release in platelet (PLT) concentrates (PCs). A PC with 35% plasma and 65% PLT additive solution (SSP+) was prepared from five buffy coats. Three such PCs were pooled and divided into 3 units. One unit was used as a nonirradiated control, the second was a gamma-irradiated control, and the third unit was treated with UVC light technology. Ten units of each type were investigated. Cytokine release was analyzed on Days 1, 5, and 7 of storage. Correlation between cytokines, PLT surface markers, and hemostatic properties was investigated. Swirling was well preserved and pH was above the reference limit of 6.4 during storage of PLTs in all groups. Cytokine levels increased during storage in all groups but to a larger degree in PCs treated with UVC light. Only weak correlation was found between cytokines and PLT surface markers (r < 0.5). However, several cytokines showed strong correlation (r > 0.6) with the PLTs' ability to promote clot retraction. UVC treatment resulted in increased release from PLT alpha granules as evident by a higher cytokine release compared to nonirradiated and gamma-irradiated PCs. The clinical relevance of these findings needs to be further evaluated. © 2016 AABB.

  1. The Function of Fish Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Jun; Secombes, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    What is known about the biological activity of fish cytokines is reviewed. Most of the functional studies performed to date have been in teleost fish, and have focused on the induced effects of cytokine recombinant proteins, or have used loss- and gain-of-function experiments in zebrafish. Such studies begin to tell us about the role of these molecules in the regulation of fish immune responses and whether they are similar or divergent to the well-characterised functions of mammalian cytokines. This knowledge will aid our ability to determine and modulate the pathways leading to protective immunity, to improve fish health in aquaculture. PMID:27231948

  2. Cytokines and cytokine-specific therapy in asthma.

    PubMed

    Desai, Dhananjay; Brightling, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Asthma is increasing in prevalence worldwide. It is characterized by typical symptoms and variable airway obstruction punctuated with episodes of worsening symptoms known as exacerbations. Underlying this clinical expression of disease is airway inflammation and remodeling. Cytokines and their networks are implicated in the innate and adaptive immune responses driving airway inflammation in asthma and are modulated by host-environment interactions. Asthma is a complex heterogeneous disease, and the paradigm of Th2 cytokine-mediated eosinophilic inflammation as a consequence of allergic sensitization has been challenged and probably represents a subgroup of asthma. Indeed, as attention has switched to the importance of severe asthma, which represents the highest burden both to the patient and health care provider, there is an increasing recognition of inflammatory subphenotypes that are likely to be driven by different cytokine networks. Interestingly, these networks may be specific to aspects of clinical expression as well as inflammatory cell profiles and therefore present novel phenotype-specific therapeutic strategies. Here, we review the breadth of cytokines implicated in the pathogenesis of asthma and focus upon the outcomes of early clinical trials conducted using cytokines or cytokine-blocking therapies.

  3. [Cytokines and their role in intercellular interactions].

    PubMed

    Pal'tsev, M A

    1996-01-01

    Cytokines include interferons, colony-stimulating factors, interleukins and growth factors. 6 groups of cytokines are distinguished depending on the direction of their function. They provide regulation of intercellular interaction, initiate nonspecific inflammatory response, control growth and differentiation of hematopoietic and residential cells, activate the cells of the inflammatory infiltrate, stimulate hematopoiesis. Regulation of the cytokine activity is brought about at the level of their secretion, expression of the cytokines receptors as well as by means of other cytokines and soluble cytokine-binding factors and inhibitors. The use of cytokines and antibodies against them, receptor antagonists and soluble cytokine receptors is increasing for immunotherapy of various diseases.

  4. Cytokines in myocarditis and cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Matsumori, A

    1996-05-01

    Myocarditis is thought to be caused by various viruses, and accumulating evidence links viral myocarditis with the eventual development of dilated cardiomyopathy. Recently the importance of hepatitis C virus infection was noted in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. Cytokines are increasingly recognized as an important factor in the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of myocarditis and cardiomyopathy. Elevated circulating cytokines have been reported in patients with heart failure, and various cytokines have been shown to depress myocardial contractility in vitro and in vivo. A number of recent studies showed that cytokines generated by activated immune cells cause an increase in NO (nitric oxide) via induction of NO synthase. Increased generation of NO may induce negative inotropism and myocardial damage. This review discusses the etiology and pathogenesis of myocarditis and cardiomyopathy from this point of view.

  5. Tumor-induced perturbations of cytokines and immune cell networks.

    PubMed

    Burkholder, Brett; Huang, Ren-Yu; Burgess, Rob; Luo, Shuhong; Jones, Valerie Sloane; Zhang, Wenji; Lv, Zhi-Qiang; Gao, Chang-Yu; Wang, Bao-Ling; Zhang, Yu-Ming; Huang, Ruo-Pan

    2014-04-01

    Until recently, the intrinsically high level of cross-talk between immune cells, the complexity of immune cell development, and the pleiotropic nature of cytokine signaling have hampered progress in understanding the mechanisms of immunosuppression by which tumor cells circumvent native and adaptive immune responses. One technology that has helped to shed light on this complex signaling network is the cytokine antibody array, which facilitates simultaneous screening of dozens to hundreds of secreted signal proteins in complex biological samples. The combined applications of traditional methods of molecular and cell biology with the high-content, high-throughput screening capabilities of cytokine antibody arrays and other multiplexed immunoassays have revealed a complex mechanism that involves multiple cytokine signals contributed not just by tumor cells but by stromal cells and a wide spectrum of immune cell types. This review will summarize the interactions among cancerous and immune cell types, as well as the key cytokine signals that are required for tumors to survive immunoediting in a dormant state or to grow and spread by escaping it. Additionally, it will present examples of how probing secreted cell-cell signal networks in the tumor microenvironment (TME) with cytokine screens have contributed to our current understanding of these processes and discuss the implications of this understanding to antitumor therapies. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Stabilization of a hydrophobic recombinant cytokine by human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Hawe, Andrea; Friess, Wolfgang

    2007-11-01

    The objective was to evaluate the impact of pH and NaCl content on aggregation, particle formation, and solubility of a hydrophobic recombinant human cytokine in formulations with human serum albumin (HSA) as stabilizing excipient. While cytokine-HSA formulations were stable at physiological pH, a tremendous increase in turbidity at pH 5.0, close to the isoelectric point of HSA was caused by a partially irreversible precipitation. By dynamic light scattering (DLS), disc centrifugation, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and light obscuration it could be shown that the turbidity was mainly caused by particles larger than 120 nm. SDS-PAGE provided evidence that the precipitation at pH 5.0 was mainly caused by the cytokine. The HSA-stabilizers Na-octanoate and Na-N-acetyltryptophante were less effective in preventing the turbidity increase of unstabilized-HSA compared to NaCl. The interactions between HSA and cytokine were weakened by NaCl, as determined by fluorescence spectroscopy. The positive effect of NaCl on the formulation could be attributed to a direct stabilization of HSA and weaker interactions between HSA and the cytokine, which in consequence provided an overall stabilization of the cytokine. Copyright 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. The volume effect in irradiated mouse colorectum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skwarchuk, Mark William

    1997-11-01

    Damage of the colorectum is the dose-limiting normal tissue complication following radiotherapy of prostate and cervical cancers. One approach for decreasing complications is to physically reduce the treatment volume. Mathematical models have been previously developed to describe the change in associated toxicity with a change in irradiated volume, i.e. the 'volume effect', for serial-type normal tissues including the colorectum. The first goal of this thesis was to test the hypothesis that there would not be a threshold length in the development of obstruction after irradiation of mouse colorectum, as predicted by the Probability model of the volume effect. The second goal was to examine if there were differences in the threshold and in the incidence of colorectal obstruction after irradiation of two mouse strains, C57B1/6 (C57) and C3Hf/Kam (C3H), previously found to be fibrosis-prone and-resistant, respectively, after lung irradiation due, in part, to genetic differences. The hypothesis examined was that differences in incidence between strains were due to the differential expression of the fibrogenic cytokines TGF/beta and TNF/alpha. Various lengths of C57 and C3H mouse colorectum were irradiated and the incidence of colorectal obstruction was followed up to 15 months. A threshold length was observed for both mouse strains, in contradiction of model predictions. The mechanism of the threshold was epithelial regeneration after irradiation. C57 mice had significantly higher incidence of colorectal obstruction compared to C3H mice, especially at smaller irradiated lengths. Colorectal tissue was obtained at various times after irradiation and prepared for histology, immunohistochemistry and RNase protection assay for measurement of TGF/beta 1, 2, 3 and TNF/alpha mRNA. Distinct strain differences in the histological time of appearance and spatial locations of fibrosis were observed. However, there were no consistent strain difference in mRNA levels or

  8. An experimental model-based exploration of cytokines in ablative radiation-induced lung injury in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hong, Zhen-Yu; Song, Kwang Hyun; Yoon, Joo-Heon; Cho, Jaeho; Story, Michael D

    2015-06-01

    Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy is a newly emerging radiotherapy treatment method that, compared with conventionally fractionated radiation therapy (CFRT), allows an ablative dose of radiation to be delivered to a confined area around a tumor. The aim of the present study was to investigate the changes of various cytokines that may be involved in ablative radiation-induced lung injury in vitro and in vivo. In the in vivo study, ablative-dose radiation was delivered to a small volume of the left lung of C3H/HeJCr mice using a small-animal irradiator. The levels of 24 cytokines in the peripheral blood were tested at several time points after irradiation. For the in vitro study, three mouse cell types (type II pneumocytes, alveolar macrophages, and fibroblasts) known to play important roles in radiation-induced pneumonitis and lung fibrosis were analyzed using a co-culture system. In the in vivo study, we found obvious patterns of serum cytokine changes depending on the volume of tissue irradiated (2-mm vs. 3.5-mm collimator). Only the levels of 3 cytokines increased with the 2-mm collimator at the acute phase (1-2 weeks after irradiation), while the majority of cytokines were elevated with the 3.5-mm collimator. In the in vitro co-culture system, after the cells were given an ablative dose of irradiation, the levels of five cytokines (GM-CSF, G-CSF, IL-6, MCP-1, and KC) increased significantly in a dose-dependent manner. The cytokine levels in our radiation-induced lung injury model showed specific changes, both in vivo and in vitro. These results imply that biological studies related to ablative-dose small-volume irradiation should be investigated using the corresponding experimental models rather than on those simulating large-volume CFRT.

  9. Circadian Rhythm in Cytokines Administration.

    PubMed

    Trufakin, Valery A; Shurlygina, Anna V

    2016-01-01

    In recent times, a number of diseases involving immune system dysfunction have appeared. This increases the importance of research aimed at finding and developing optimized methods for immune system correction. Numerous studies have found a positive effect in using cytokines to treat a variety of diseases, yet the clinical use of cytokines is limited by their toxicity. Research in the field of chronotherapy, aimed at designing schedules of medicine intake using circadian biorhythms of endogenous production of factors, and receptors' expression to the factors on the target cells, as well as chronopharmacodynamics and chronopharmacokinetics of medicines may contribute to the solution of this problem. Advantages of chronotherapy include a greater effectiveness of treatment, reduced dose of required drugs, and minimized adverse effects. This review presents data on the presence of circadian rhythms of spontaneous and induced cytokine production, as well as the expression of cytokine receptors in the healthy body and in a number of diseases. The article reviews various effects of cytokines, used at different times of the day in humans and experimental animals, as well as possible mechanisms underlying the chronodependent effects of cytokines. The article presents the results of chronotherapeutic modes of administering IL-2, interferons, G-CSF, and GM-CSF in treatment of various types of cancer as well as in experimental models of immune suppression and inflammation, which lead to a greater effectiveness of therapy, the possibility of reducing or increasing the dosage, and reduced drug toxicity. Further research in this field will contribute to the effectiveness and safety of cytokine therapy.

  10. Cytokine profile of breast cell lines after different radiation doses.

    PubMed

    Bravatà, Valentina; Minafra, Luigi; Forte, Giusi Irma; Cammarata, Francesco Paolo; Russo, Giorgio; Di Maggio, Federica Maria; Augello, Giuseppa; Lio, Domenico; Gilardi, Maria Carla

    2017-09-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) treatment activates inflammatory processes causing the release of a great amount of molecules able to affect the cell survival. The aim of this study was to analyze the cytokine signature of conditioned medium produced by non-tumorigenic mammary epithelial cell line MCF10A, as well as MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines, after single high doses of IR in order to understand their role in high radiation response. We performed a cytokine profile of irradiated conditioned media of MCF10A, MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines treated with 9 or 23 Gy, by Luminex and ELISA analyses. Overall, our results show that both 9 Gy and 23 Gy of IR induce the release within the first 72 h of cytokines and growth factors potentially able to influence the tumor outcome, with a dose-independent and cell-line dependent signature. Moreover, our results show that the cell-senescence phenomenon does not correlate with the amount of 'senescence-associated secretory phenotype' (SASP) molecules released in media. Thus, additional mechanisms are probably involved in this process. These data open the possibility to evaluate cytokine profile as useful marker in modulating the personalized radiotherapy in breast cancer care.

  11. IL-12 family cytokines: immunological playmakers.

    PubMed

    Vignali, Dario A A; Kuchroo, Vijay K

    2012-07-19

    The interleukin 12 (IL-12) family is unique in having the only heterodimeric cytokines, including IL-12, IL-23, IL-27 and IL-35. This feature endows these cytokines with a unique set of connections and functional interactions not shared by other cytokine families. Despite sharing many structural features and molecular partners, cytokines of the IL-12 family mediate surprisingly diverse functional effects. Here we discuss the unique and unusual structural and functional characteristics of this cytokine family. We outline how cells might interpret seemingly similar cytokine signals to give rise to the diverse functional outcomes that characterize this cytokine family. We also discuss the therapeutic implications of this complexity.

  12. Phytosanitary Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Hallman, Guy J.; Blackburn, Carl M.

    2016-01-01

    Phytosanitary treatments disinfest traded commodities of potential quarantine pests. Phytosanitary irradiation (PI) treatments use ionizing radiation to accomplish this, and, since their international commercial debut in 2004, the use of this technology has increased by ~10% annually. Generic PI treatments (one dose is used for a group of pests and/or commodities, although not all have been tested for efficacy) are used in virtually all commercial PI treatments, and new generic PI doses are proposed, such as 300 Gy, for all insects except pupae and adult Lepidoptera (moths). Fresh fruits and vegetables tolerate PI better than any other broadly used treatment. Advances that would help facilitate the use of PI include streamlining the approval process, making the technology more accessible to potential users, lowering doses and broadening their coverage, and solving potential issues related to factors that might affect efficacy. PMID:28231103

  13. Cytokine/anti-cytokine therapy - novel treatments for asthma?

    PubMed

    Hansbro, Philip M; Kaiko, Gerard E; Foster, Paul S

    2011-05-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways and there are no preventions or cures. Inflammatory cells through the secretion of cytokines and pro-inflammatory molecules are thought to play a critical role in pathogenesis. Type 2 CD4(+) lymphocytes (Th2 cells) and their cytokines predominate in mild to moderate allergic asthma, whereas severe steroid-resistant asthma has more of a mixed Th2/Th1 phenotype with a Th17 component. Other immune cells, particularly neutrophils, macrophages and dendritic cells, as well structural cells such as epithelial and airway smooth muscle cells also produce disease-associated cytokines in asthma. Increased levels of these immune cells and cytokines have been identified in clinical samples and their potential role in disease demonstrated in studies using mouse models of asthma. Clinical trials with inhibitors of cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-4, -5 and tumour necrosis factor-α have had success in some studies but not others. This may reflect the design of the clinical trials, including treatments regimes and the patient population included in these studies. IL-13, -9 and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor are currently being evaluated in clinical trials or preclinically and the outcome of these studies is eagerly awaited. Roles for IL-25, -33, thymic stromal lymphopoietin, interferon-γ, IL-17 and -27 in the regulation of asthma are just emerging, identifying new ways to treat inflammation. Careful interpretation of results from mouse studies will inform the development and application of therapeutic approaches for asthma. The most effective approaches may be combination therapies that suppress multiple cytokines and a range of redundant and disconnected pathways that separately contribute to asthma pathogenesis. Astute application of these approaches may eventually lead to the development of effective asthma therapeutics. Here we review the current state of knowledge in the field. © 2011 The Authors

  14. Use of cytokines in infection.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Naoko; Xing, Zhou

    2004-11-01

    Infectious disease remains an ever-growing health concern worldwide due to increasing antibiotic-resistant microbial strains, immune-compromised populations, international traffic and globalisation, and bioterrorism. There exists an urgent need to develop novel prophylactic and therapeutic strategies. In addition to classic antibiotic therapeutics, immune-modulatory molecules such as cytokines or their inhibitors represent a promising form of antimicrobial therapeutics or immune adjuvant used for the purpose of vaccination. These molecules, in the form of either recombinant protein or transgene, exert their antimicrobial effect by enhancing infectious agent-specific immune activation or memory development, or by dampening undesired inflammatory and immune responses resulting from infection and host defence mechanisms. In the last two decades, a number of cytokine therapy-based experimental and clinical trials have been conducted, and some of these efforts have led to the routine clinical use of cytokines. For instance, although IFNs have been used to treat hepatitis C with great success, many other cytokines are yet to be fully evaluated for their antimicrobial potential. This review discusses the biology and therapeutic potential of selected immune modulatory cytokines and their inhibitors, including granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, IFN-gamma, IL-12 and TNF.

  15. PML control of cytokine signaling.

    PubMed

    Maarifi, Ghizlane; Chelbi-Alix, Mounira K; Nisole, Sébastien

    2014-10-01

    The promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein is a tumor suppressor acting as the organizer of nuclear matrix-associated structures named nuclear bodies (NBs). The involvement of PML in various cell processes, including cell death, senescence or antiviral defense underlines the multiple functions of PML due to its ability to interact with various partners either in the cytoplasm or in the nucleus. The importance of paracrine signaling in the regulation of PML expression is well established. More recently, a growing body of evidence also supports PML as a key regulator of cytokine signaling. These findings shed light on unsuspected biological functions of PML such as immune response, inflammation and cytokine-induced apoptosis. Here we review the current understanding of the pleiotropic activities of PML on cytokine-induced signaling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Agents to reduce cytokine storm

    PubMed Central

    Gerlach, Herwig

    2016-01-01

    The increasing insight into pathomechanisms of dysregulated host response in several inflammatory diseases led to the implementation of the term “cytokine storm” in the literature more than 20 years ago. Direct toxic effects as well as indirect immunomodulatory mechanisms during cytokine storm have been described and were the basis for the rationale to use several substances and devices in life-threatening infections and hyperinflammatory states. Clinical trials have been performed, most of them in the form of minor, investigator-initiated protocols; major clinical trials focused mostly on sepsis and septic shock. The following review tries to summarize the background, pathophysiology, and results of clinical investigations that had implications for the development of therapeutic strategies and international guidelines for the management of hyperinflammation during syndromes of cytokine storm in adult patients, predominantly in septic shock. PMID:28105327

  17. Agents to reduce cytokine storm.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, Herwig

    2016-01-01

    The increasing insight into pathomechanisms of dysregulated host response in several inflammatory diseases led to the implementation of the term "cytokine storm" in the literature more than 20 years ago. Direct toxic effects as well as indirect immunomodulatory mechanisms during cytokine storm have been described and were the basis for the rationale to use several substances and devices in life-threatening infections and hyperinflammatory states. Clinical trials have been performed, most of them in the form of minor, investigator-initiated protocols; major clinical trials focused mostly on sepsis and septic shock. The following review tries to summarize the background, pathophysiology, and results of clinical investigations that had implications for the development of therapeutic strategies and international guidelines for the management of hyperinflammation during syndromes of cytokine storm in adult patients, predominantly in septic shock.

  18. Evaluation of reduced allergenicity of irradiated peanut extract using splenocytes from peanut-sensitized mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Sejo; Jang, Da-In; Lee, Ju-Woon; Kim, Jae-Hun; Byun, Myung-Woo; Lee, Soo-Young

    2009-07-01

    Peanut (PN) allergy is one of the most serious forms of IgE-mediated food hypersensitivity. Gamma irradiation has been widely used for the preservation of food. The results of our previous studies showed that the IgE-binding capacity to several antigens were profoundly reduced after gamma irradiation. In this study, we evaluated the changes of allergenecity and cytokine production profiles after exposure of irradiated PN extract in a PN-allergy mouse model. Mice were sensitized to PN extract by intragastric administration on days 0, 1, 2, and 7, and then challenged on day 21. Four weeks later, we evaluated the cytokine production patterns and proliferation responses of splenocytes that were stimulated with intact PN extract, compared to 10 and 50 kGy irradiated PN extract. When the cells were stimulated with 10 kGy of irradiated PN extract, a higher level of production of IFN-γ and IL-10 cytokines was observed. However, stimulation with 50 kGy of irradiated PN extract resulted in a higher level of production of only IFN-γ cytokines. In addition, the Th1/Th2 ratio increased in response to treatment with gamma-irradiated PNs. The results of this study show that the allergenicity of PN extracts could be reduced by gamma irradiation which caused downregulation of Th2 lymphocyte activity in the PN-sensitized mice.

  19. Depression, cytokines, and pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Breitbart, William; Rosenfeld, Barry; Tobias, Kristen; Pessin, Hayley; Ku, Geoffrey Y.; Yuan, Jianda; Gibson, Christopher; Wolchok, Jedd

    2014-01-01

    Background To examine the relationships between cytokines, depression, and pancreatic cancer. Method 75 individuals were recruited from two New York City hospitals (a cancer center and a psychiatric hospital) and comprised 4 subgroups: patients with adenocarcinoma of the pancreas who did (n=17) and did not (n=26) have a diagnosis of Major Depressive Episode (MDE), and healthy participants with (n=7) and without (n=25) MDE. All individuals completed a battery of self-report measures. Sera was assayed using Meso Scale Discovery techniques to measure the following pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines: IL-1beta, IL-2, IL-3, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12p70, IFN-gamma, TGF-beta, and TNF-alpha; we also calculated the IL-2/IL-4 ratio. Results Pancreatic cancer patients had significantly higher levels of IL-6 and IL-10, and significantly lower TGF-beta levels than healthy participants. When the sample was divided into those with and without MDE, the groups only differed with regard to serum IL-6 levels. No significant cancer×depression interaction effect was observed. Severity of depressive symptoms was also significantly correlated with IL-6, rs=.28, p=.02, while hopelessness was associated with IFN-alpha, rs=.34, p=.006. Pain, fatigue and sleep disturbance were associated with several of the cytokines assayed including IL-1beta (pain intensity), IL-4 (pain intensity and overall sleep quality), IL-12p70 (pain intensity), TGF-beta (fatigue intensity), but anxiety was not associated with any of the cytokines assayed. Conclusions This study demonstrated an association between depression and IL-6, but not with other cytokines. Moreover, IL-6 was not significantly associated with other measures of psychological distress (anxiety, hopelessness) or with symptom distress (pain, fatigue, sleep quality), although some cytokines assayed were associated with specific symptoms. The implications of these findings for the etiology and treatment of depression in pancreatic cancer

  20. Cytokine crowdsourcing: multicellular production of TH17-associated cytokines.

    PubMed

    Busman-Sahay, Kathleen O; Walrath, Travis; Huber, Samuel; O'Connor, William

    2015-03-01

    In the 2 decades since its discovery, IL-17A has become appreciated for mounting robust, protective responses against bacterial and fungal pathogens. When improperly regulated, however, IL-17A can play a profoundly pathogenic role in perpetuating inflammation and has been linked to a wide variety of debilitating diseases. IL-17A is often present in a composite milieu that includes cytokines produced by TH17 cells (i.e., IL-17F, IL-21, IL-22, and IL-26) or associated with other T cell lineages (e.g., IFN-γ). These combinatorial effects add mechanistic complexity and more importantly, contribute differentially to disease outcome. Whereas TH17 cells are among the best-understood cell types that secrete IL-17A, they are frequently neither the earliest nor dominant producers. Indeed, non-TH17 cell sources of IL-17A can dramatically alter the course and severity of inflammatory episodes. The dissection of the temporal regulation of TH17-associated cytokines and the resulting net signaling outcomes will be critical toward understanding the increasingly intricate role of IL-17A and TH17-associated cytokines in disease, informing our therapeutic decisions. Herein, we discuss important non-TH17 cell sources of IL-17A and other TH17-associated cytokines relevant to inflammatory events in mucosal tissues.

  1. Temporal Onset of Hypoxia and Oxidative Stress After Pulmonary Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Fleckenstein, Katharina; Zgonjanin, Larisa; Chen Liguang; Rabbani, Zahid; Jackson, Isabel L.; Thrasher, Bradley; Kirkpatrick, John; Foster, W. Michael; Vujaskovic, Zeljko . E-mail: vujas@radonc.duke.edu

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate the temporal onset of hypoxia following irradiation, and to show how it relates to pulmonary vascular damage, macrophage accumulation, and the production of reactive oxygen species and cytokines. Our previous studies showed that tissue hypoxia in the lung after irradiation contributed to radiation-induced injury. Methods and Materials: Female Fisher 344 rats were irradiated to the right hemithorax with a single dose of 28 Gy. Serial studies were performed up to 20 weeks following irradiation. Radionuclide lung-perfusion studies were performed to detect changes in pulmonary vasculature. Immunohistochemical studies were conducted to study macrophages, tissue hypoxia (carbonic anhydrase-9 marker), oxidative stress (8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine), and the expression of profibrogenic (transforming growth factor-{beta} [TGF-{beta}]) and proangiogenic (vascular endothelial growth factor [VEGF]) cytokines. Results: Significant changes in lung perfusion along with tissue hypoxia were observed 3 days after irradiation. Significant oxidative stress was detected 1 week after radiation, whereas macrophages started to accumulate at 4 weeks. A significant increase in TGF-{beta} expression was seen within 1 day after radiation, and for VEGF at 2 weeks after radiation. Levels of hypoxia, oxidative stress, and both cytokines continued to rise with time after irradiation. The steepest increase correlated with vast macrophage accumulation. Conclusions: Early changes in lung perfusion, among other factors initiate, the development of hypoxia and chronic oxidative stress after irradiation. Tissue hypoxia is associated with a significant increase in the activation of macrophages and their continuous production of reactive oxygen species, stimulating the production of fibrogenic and angiogenic cytokines, and maintaining the development of chronic radiation-induced lung injury.

  2. Magnesium Decreases Inflammatory Cytokine Production: A Novel Innate Immunomodulatory Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, Jun; Romani, Andrea M.; Valentin-Torres, Alice M.; Luciano, Angel A.; Ramirez Kitchen, Christina M.; Funderburg, Nicholas; Mesiano, Sam; Bernstein, Helene B.

    2013-01-01

    MgSO4 exposure before preterm birth is neuroprotective, reducing the risk of cerebral palsy and major motor dysfunction. Neonatal inflammatory cytokine levels correlate with neurologic outcome, leading us to assess the effect of MgSO4 on cytokine production in humans. We found reduced maternal TNF-α and IL-6 production following in vivo MgSO4 treatment. Short-term exposure to a clinically effective MgSO4 concentration in vitro substantially reduced the frequency of neonatal monocytes producing TNF-α and IL-6 under constitutive and TLR-stimulated conditions, decreasing cytokine gene and protein expression, without influencing cell viability or phagocytic function. In summary, MgSO4 reduced cytokine production in intrapartum women, term and preterm neonates, demonstrating effectiveness in those at risk for inflammation-associated adverse perinatal outcomes. By probing the mechanism of decreased cytokine production, we found that the immunomodulatory effect was mediated by magnesium and not the sulfate moiety, and it was reversible. Cellular magnesium content increased rapidly upon MgSO4 exposure, and reduced cytokine production occurred following stimulation with different TLR ligands as well as when magnesium was added after TLR stimulation, strongly suggesting that magnesium acts intracellularly. Magnesium increased basal IκBα levels, and upon TLR stimulation was associated with reduced NF-κB activation and nuclear localization. These findings establish a new paradigm for innate immunoregulation, whereby magnesium plays a critical regulatory role in NF-κB activation, cytokine production, and disease pathogenesis. PMID:22611240

  3. Suppression of proinflammatory cytokines in monocytes by a tetravalent guanylhydrazone

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    An overproduction of proinflammatory cytokines by activated macrophages/monocytes mediates the injurious sequelae of inflammation, septic shock, tissue injury, and cachexia. We recently synthesized a tetravalent guanylhydrazone compound (CNI-1493) that inhibits cytokine- inducible arginine transport and nitric oxide (NO) production in macrophages, and protects mice against lethal endotoxemia and carrageenan-induced inflammation. During these investigations we noticed that CNI-1493 effectively prevented lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- induced NO production, even when added in concentrations 10-fold less than required to competitively inhibit L-arginine uptake, suggesting that the suppressive effects of this guanylhydrazone compound might extend to other LPS-induced responses. Here, we report that CNI-1493 suppressed the LPS-stimulated production of proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor [TNF], interleukins 1beta and 6, macrophage inflammatory proteins 1alpha and 1beta) from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Cytokine suppression was specific, in that CNI-1493 did not inhibit either the constitutive synthesis of transforming growth factor beta or the upregulation of major histocompatibility complex class II by interferon gamma (IFN-gamma). In contrast to the macrophage suppressive actions of dexamethasone, which are overridden in the presence of IFN-gamma, CNI-1493 retained its suppressive effects even in the presence of IFN-gamma. The mechanism of cytokine- suppressive action by CNI-1493 was independent of extracellular L- arginine content and NO production and is not restricted to induction by LPS. As a selective inhibitor of macrophage activation that prevents TNF production, this tetravalent guanylhydrazone could be useful in the development of cytokine-suppressive agents for the treatment of diseases mediated by overproduction of cytokines. PMID:8642296

  4. Effect of gamma irradiation on quality of kiwifruit ( Actinidia deliciosa var. deliciosa cv. Hayward)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    kim, Kyoung-Hee; Yook, Hong-Sun

    2009-06-01

    Ionizing radiation is able to inactivate the three pathogens of Botrytis cinerea, Diaporthe actinidiae, and Botryosphaeria dothidea in kiwifruit. Irradiated kiwifruits appeared softer compared to non-irradiated kiwifruits. The color and organic acid content of kiwifruits were minimally affected by the irradiation. Irradiated fruits showed a decrease in the total soluble solids content with increasing irradiation dose. Irradiation of kiwifruit up to 3 kGy had negative effects on vitamin C content and antioxidant activity, but it contributed to improving sensory quality.

  5. Cytokines and the skin barrier.

    PubMed

    Hänel, Kai H; Cornelissen, Christian; Lüscher, Bernhard; Baron, Jens Malte

    2013-03-26

    The skin is the largest organ of the human body and builds a barrier to protect us from the harmful environment and also from unregulated loss of water. Keratinocytes form the skin barrier by undergoing a highly complex differentiation process that involves changing their morphology and structural integrity, a process referred to as cornification. Alterations in the epidermal cornification process affect the formation of the skin barrier. Typically, this results in a disturbed barrier, which allows the entry of substances into the skin that are immunologically reactive. This contributes to and promotes inflammatory processes in the skin but also affects other organs. In many common skin diseases, including atopic dermatitis and psoriasis, a defect in the formation of the skin barrier is observed. In these diseases the cytokine composition within the skin is different compared to normal human skin. This is the result of resident skin cells that produce cytokines, but also because additional immune cells are recruited. Many of the cytokines found in defective skin are able to influence various processes of differentiation and cornification. Here we summarize the current knowledge on cytokines and their functions in healthy skin and their contributions to inflammatory skin diseases.

  6. Cytokines and the Skin Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Hänel, Kai H.; Cornelissen, Christian; Lüscher, Bernhard; Baron, Jens Malte

    2013-01-01

    The skin is the largest organ of the human body and builds a barrier to protect us from the harmful environment and also from unregulated loss of water. Keratinocytes form the skin barrier by undergoing a highly complex differentiation process that involves changing their morphology and structural integrity, a process referred to as cornification. Alterations in the epidermal cornification process affect the formation of the skin barrier. Typically, this results in a disturbed barrier, which allows the entry of substances into the skin that are immunologically reactive. This contributes to and promotes inflammatory processes in the skin but also affects other organs. In many common skin diseases, including atopic dermatitis and psoriasis, a defect in the formation of the skin barrier is observed. In these diseases the cytokine composition within the skin is different compared to normal human skin. This is the result of resident skin cells that produce cytokines, but also because additional immune cells are recruited. Many of the cytokines found in defective skin are able to influence various processes of differentiation and cornification. Here we summarize the current knowledge on cytokines and their functions in healthy skin and their contributions to inflammatory skin diseases. PMID:23531535

  7. Bystander Effects Induced by Medium From Irradiated Cells: Similar Transcriptome Responses in Irradiated and Bystander K562 Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Herok, Robert; Konopacka, Maria; Polanska, Joanna; Swierniak, Andrzej; Rogolinski, Jacek; Jaksik, Roman; Hancock, Ronald; Rzeszowska-Wolny, Joanna

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: Cells exposed to ionizing radiation release factors that induce deoxyribonucleic acid damage, chromosomal instability, apoptosis, and changes in the proliferation rate of neighboring unexposed cells, phenomena known as bystander effects. This work analyzes and compares changes in global transcript levels induced by direct irradiation and by bystander effects in K562 (human erythroleukemia) cells. Methods and Materials: Cells were X-irradiated with 4 Gy or transferred into culture medium collected from cells 1 h after irradiation (irradiation-conditioned medium). Global transcript profiles were assessed after 36 h of growth by use of Affymetrix microarrays (Affymetrix, Santa Clara, CA) and the kinetics of change of selected transcripts by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Results: The level of the majority (72%) of transcripts changed similarly (increase, decrease, or no change) in cells grown in irradiation-conditioned medium or irradiated, whereas only 0.6% showed an opposite response. Transcript level changes in bystander and irradiated cells were significantly different from those in untreated cells grown for the same amount of time and were confirmed by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction for selected genes. Signaling pathways in which the highest number of transcripts changed in both conditions were found in the following groups: neuroactive ligand-receptor, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, Janus Kinase-Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription (JAK-STAT) and Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) In control cells more transcripts were downregulated than in irradiated and bystander cells with transcription factors YBX1 and STAT5B, heat shock protein HSPA1A, and ribonucleic acid helicase DDX3X as examples. Conclusions: The transcriptomes of cells grown in medium from X-irradiated cells or directly irradiated show very similar changes. Signals released by irradiated cells may cause

  8. Formulation and stability of cytokine therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Lipiäinen, Tiina; Peltoniemi, Marikki; Sarkhel, Sanjay; Yrjönen, Teijo; Vuorela, Heikki; Urtti, Arto; Juppo, Anne

    2015-02-01

    Cytokines are messenger proteins that regulate the proliferation and differentiation of cells and control immune responses. Interferons, interleukins, and growth factors have applications in cancer, autoimmune, and viral disease treatment. The cytokines are susceptible to chemical and physical instability. This article reviews the structure and stability issues of clinically used cytokines, as well as formulation strategies for improved stability. Some general aspects for identifying most probable stability concerns, selecting excipients, and developing stable cytokine formulations are presented. The vast group of cytokines offers possibilities for new biopharmaceuticals. The formulation approaches of the current cytokine products could facilitate development of new biopharmaceuticals.

  9. Use of Irradiated Foods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brynjolfsson, A.

    1985-01-01

    The safety of irradiated foods is reviewed. Guidelines and regulations for processing irradiated foods are considered. The radiolytic products formed in food when it is irradiated and its wholesomeness is discussed. It is concluded that food irradiation processing is not a panacea for all problems in food processing but when properly used will serve the space station well.

  10. Use of Irradiated Foods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brynjolfsson, A.

    1985-01-01

    The safety of irradiated foods is reviewed. Guidelines and regulations for processing irradiated foods are considered. The radiolytic products formed in food when it is irradiated and its wholesomeness is discussed. It is concluded that food irradiation processing is not a panacea for all problems in food processing but when properly used will serve the space station well.

  11. Cytokine/anti-cytokine therapy – novel treatments for asthma?

    PubMed Central

    Hansbro, Philip M; Kaiko, Gerard E; Foster, Paul S

    2011-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways and there are no preventions or cures. Inflammatory cells through the secretion of cytokines and pro-inflammatory molecules are thought to play a critical role in pathogenesis. Type 2 CD4+ lymphocytes (Th2 cells) and their cytokines predominate in mild to moderate allergic asthma, whereas severe steroid-resistant asthma has more of a mixed Th2/Th1 phenotype with a Th17 component. Other immune cells, particularly neutrophils, macrophages and dendritic cells, as well structural cells such as epithelial and airway smooth muscle cells also produce disease-associated cytokines in asthma. Increased levels of these immune cells and cytokines have been identified in clinical samples and their potential role in disease demonstrated in studies using mouse models of asthma. Clinical trials with inhibitors of cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-4, -5 and tumour necrosis factor-α have had success in some studies but not others. This may reflect the design of the clinical trials, including treatments regimes and the patient population included in these studies. IL-13, -9 and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor are currently being evaluated in clinical trials or preclinically and the outcome of these studies is eagerly awaited. Roles for IL-25, -33, thymic stromal lymphopoietin, interferon-γ, IL-17 and -27 in the regulation of asthma are just emerging, identifying new ways to treat inflammation. Careful interpretation of results from mouse studies will inform the development and application of therapeutic approaches for asthma. The most effective approaches may be combination therapies that suppress multiple cytokines and a range of redundant and disconnected pathways that separately contribute to asthma pathogenesis. Astute application of these approaches may eventually lead to the development of effective asthma therapeutics. Here we review the current state of knowledge in the field. LINKED ARTICLES This

  12. Immunoregulatory cytokines and chronic tonsillitis

    PubMed Central

    Todorović, Miroljub M.; Zvrko, Elvir Z.

    2013-01-01

    The purposes of the present study were to determine the distribution of cells producing cytokines: tumor necrosis factor a (TNF-α) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) in different morphological sections of tonsils in patients with tonsillar hypertrophy (TH) and recurrent tonsillitis (RT), to analyze the level of production of these cytokines in TH and RT and evaluate the potential of peripheral blood lymphocytes for production of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin 4 (IL-4). Analyzed materials consisted of the tonsils after tonsillectomy and blood taken from patients right before tonsillectomy (study group) and blood taken from healthy donors (control group). We used histological and immunohistochemical method, morphometric methods for the quantification of TNF-α and IL-6 producing cells and immunological methods for determining the concentration of IFN-γ and IL-4. Most of TNF-α producing cells are settled in the subepithelial region (55%). Numerical density of TNF-α producing cells in the crypt epithelium, subepithelial and interfollicular region was significantly higher in RT compared with TH. The concentration of IFN-γ is three times higher in RT then in TH. After the stimulation of peripheral blood lymphocytes in culture there was no significant increase in concentrations of IL-4. The index of stimulation of IFN-γ was the highest in the RT, and of IL-4 in TH. The production of Th1-type cytokines (TNF-α and IFN-γ) is higher in RT compared with TH. In both forms of tonsillitis, production of Th1-type cytokines is higher in relation to the production of Th2-type cytokines (IL-6 and IL-4). PMID:24289758

  13. Immunoregulatory cytokines and chronic tonsillitis.

    PubMed

    Todorović, Miroljub M; Zvrko, Elvir Z

    2013-11-01

    The purposes of the present study were to determine the distribution of cells producing cytokines: tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) in different morphological sections of tonsils in patients with tonsillar hypertrophy (TH) and recurrent tonsillitis (RT), to analyze the level of production of these cytokines in TH and RT and evaluate the potential of peripheral blood lymphocytes for production of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin 4 (IL-4). Analyzed materials consisted of the tonsils after tonsillectomy and blood taken from patients right before tonsillectomy (study group) and blood taken from healthy donors (control group).We used histological and immunohistochemical method, morphometric methods for the quantification of TNF-α and IL- 6 producing cells and immunological methods for determining the concentration of IFN-γ and IL-4. Most of TNF-α producing cells are settled in the subepithelial region (55%). Numerical density of TNF-α producing cells in the crypt epithelium, subepithelial and interfollicular region was significantly higher in RT compared with TH. The concentration of IFN-γ is three times higher in RT then in TH. After the stimulation of peripheral blood lymphocytes in culture there was no significant increase in concentrations of IL- 4. The index of stimulation of IFN-γ was the highest in the RT, and of IL- 4 in TH. The production of Th1-type cytokines (TNF-α and IFN-γ) is higher in RT compared with TH. In both forms of tonsillitis, production of Th1-type cytokines is higher in relation to the production of Th2-type cytokines (IL-6 and IL-4).

  14. RERTR-8 Irradiation Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    D. M. Perez; M. A. Lillo; G. S. Chang; G. A. Roth; N. E. Woolstenhulme; D. M. Wachs

    2011-12-01

    The Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) experiment RERTR-8, was designed to test monolithic mini-fuel plates fabricated via hot isostatic pressing (HIP), the effect of molybdenum (Mo) content on the monolithic fuel behavior, and the efficiency of ternary additions to dispersion fuel particles on the interaction layer behavior at higher burnup. The following report summarizes the life of the RERTR-8 experiment through end of irradiation, including as-run neutronic analysis, thermal analysis and hydraulic testing results.

  15. Detection of irradiated liquor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shengchu, Qi; Jilan, Wu; Rongyao, Yuan

    D-2,3-butanediol is formed by irradiation processes in irradiated liquors. This radiolytic product is not formed in unirradiated liquors and its presence can therefore be used to identify whether a liquor has been irradiated or not. The relation meso/dl≈1 for 2,3-butanediol and the amount present in irradiated liquors may therefore be used as an indication of the dose used in the irradiation.

  16. Microbiological decontamination of natural honey by irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migdał, W.; Owczarczyk, H. B.; K ȩdzia, B.; Hołderna-K ȩdzia, E.; Madajczyk, D.

    2000-03-01

    Degree of microbiological decontamination, organoleptic and physico-chemical properties of natural honeys were investigated after radiation treatment. Seven kinds of honeys were irradiated with the beams of 10 MeV electrons from a 10 kW linear accelerator "Elektronika 10-10" at the dose 10 kGy. It was shown, that after irradiation, the total count of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria and moulds decrease by 99%. The antibiotic value in investigated honeys increased in turn from 1.67 to 2.67 after irradiation. Such factors and parameters of investigated honeys as their consistency, content of water and saccharose, acidity, the diastase and 5-HMF values were not changed significantly after irradiation. Decontamination by irradiation is a process which allows us to obtain high microbiological purity of honeys. It is especially needed, when honeys are used in surgical treatment of injuries and in nutrition of babies with food deficiency.

  17. Disinfestation of different cereal products by irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovács, E.; Kiss, I.; Boros, A.; Horváth, Ny.; Tóth, J.; Gyulai, P.; Szalma, Á.

    The sensitivity of overlineTribolium confusum - small flour beetle - to radiation was studied in a dose range of 0-0.8 kGy. We found that the insect egg was the most sensitive to radiation, then larvae and pupae followed it. 0.2 kGy dose of irradiation kills these forms or their further development is inhibited. Imagoes do not immediately die after 0.8 kGy dose of irradiation; the young imagoes are more sensitive to radiation than the aged ones. 0.4 kGy average dose of irradiation is a suitable protection against overlineTribolium confusum. Disinfestation experiments were performed with wheat-germ and wheat-bran and parallelly the most important ingredients of the two products were analysed. The vitamin E content and the rate of lipid-oxidation of wheat germ were determined. The vitamin E content decreased after radiation treatment, however, during storage of at least 6 months, it remained at a level specified by food quality standards (higher than 10 mg%). Carbohydrate content of wheat-bran (water soluble carbohydrate content, crude-fibre and dietary fibre content) did not change at all. Storability of radiation disinfested wheat-germ was 8 months, wheat-bran 3-4 months. On the base of the results 2-2 tons of wheat-germ and wheat-bran were irradiated and trial marked in 1985. In 1986 the irradiation of 10 tons of wheat-germ is planned.

  18. Antioxidant tolerance of kidney after irradiation.

    PubMed

    Bukan, Neslihan; Güney, Yildiz; Hiçsönmez, Ayşe; Bilgihan, Ayşe

    2003-03-01

    Different doses of irradiation were performed in which group 1 (non-irradiated), group 2 (8 Gy/single dose/whole body) and group 3 (15 Gy/single dose/whole body) were formed of guinea pigs. After 24 hr of radiation exposure the levels of lipid peroxidation product, malondialdehyde, (MDA), glutathione (GSH) and activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) were measured in the whole kidney. The MDA content increased in animals irradiated with 8 and 15 Gy. And group 3 showed an increase the level of MDA. GSH contents of kidney in group 2 and 3 increased. The activity of SOD decreased markedly in group 3 when compared with control group. The activity of GSH-Px decreased significantly in group 2 and group 3 in comparison to controls. It may be concluded that a high dose of ionizing irradiation cause excessive oxidative stress in kidney.

  19. Buffering Capacity and Size of siRNA Polyplexes Influence Cytokine Levels

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Qixin; Chou, Szu-Ting; Scaria, Puthupparampil V; Woodle, Martin C; Mixson, A James

    2012-01-01

    Induction of cytokines by small interfering RNA (siRNA) polyplexes has been a significant concern of researchers attempting to minimize the toxicity of this promising therapy. Although cationic carriers of siRNA are known to increase cytokine levels, few systematic studies have been done to determine what properties of the carrier are important to modulate cytokines. Because branched histidine-lysine (HK) peptides are effective carriers of siRNA and their sequence can be readily modified, we selected this class of carrier to determine which sequences of the peptide were important for cytokine induction. With the use of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), the HK peptide with a higher number of histidines (H3K(+H)4b) in complex with siRNA induced lower levels of cytokines compared with other HK (e.g., H2K4b, H3K4b, H3K(+N)4b) siRNA nanoplexes. Notably, these peptides' siRNA polyplexes showed a similar pattern of cytokine induction when injected intravenously in a mouse model, i.e., the HK with higher content of histidines induced cytokines the least. As indicated by the pH-sensitive dye within acidic endosomes, the greater pH-buffering capacity of H3K(+H)4b compared with other HK peptides may explain why cytokine levels were reduced. In addition to buffering capacity, the size of HK polyplexes markedly influenced cytokine production. PMID:23032972

  20. Neuropsychiatric aspects of cytokines research: an overview.

    PubMed

    Malek-Ahmadi, P

    1996-01-01

    Cytokines are a group of proteins primarily synthesized by various immune cells. They have multiple functions within the immune system and have been implicated in a number of disease states. There is growing evidence that some cytokines are also synthesized in the central nervous system. Taking into consideration that some cytokines are also capable of inducing behavioral effects, it has been suggested that cytokines may play a role in some psychiatric and neurologic disorders.

  1. Influence of gamma ray irradiation on metakaolin based sodium geopolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambertin, D.; Boher, C.; Dannoux-Papin, A.; Galliez, K.; Rooses, A.; Frizon, F.

    2013-11-01

    Effects of gamma irradiation on metakaolin based Na-geopolymer have been investigated by external irradiation. The experiments were carried out in a gamma irradiator with 60Co sources up to 1000 kGy. Various Na-geopolymer with three H2O/Na2O ratios have been studied in terms of hydrogen radiolytic yield. The results show that hydrogen production increases linearly with water content. Gamma irradiation effects on Na-geopolymer microstructure have been investigated with porosity measurements and X-ray pair distribution function analysis. A change of pore size distribution and a structural relaxation have been found after gamma ray irradiation.

  2. DNA Repair and Cytokines: TGF-β, IL-6, and Thrombopoietin as Different Biomarkers of Radioresistance

    PubMed Central

    Centurione, Lucia; Aiello, Francesca B.

    2016-01-01

    Double strand breaks (DSBs) induced by radiotherapy are highly cytotoxic lesions, leading to chromosomal aberrations and cell death. Ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated (ATM)-dependent DNA-damage response, non-homologous end joining, and homologous recombination pathways coordinately contribute to repairing DSBs in higher eukaryotes. It is known that the expression of DSB repair genes is increased in tumors, which is one of the main reasons for radioresistance. The inhibition of DSB repair pathways may be useful to increase tumor cell radiosensitivity and may target stem cell-like cancer cells, known to be the most radioresistant tumor components. Commonly overexpressed in neoplastic cells, cytokines confer radioresistance by promoting proliferation, survival, invasion, and angiogenesis. Unfortunately, tumor irradiation increases the expression of various cytokines displaying these effects, including transforming growth factor-beta and interleukin-6. Recently, the capabilities of these cytokines to support DNA repair pathways and the ATM-dependent DNA response have been demonstrated. Thrombopoietin, essential for megakaryopoiesis and very important for hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) homeostasis, has also been found to promote DNA repair in a highly selective manner. These findings reveal a novel mechanism underlying cytokine-related radioresistance, which may be clinically relevant. Therapies targeting specific cytokines may be used to improve radiosensitivity. Specific inhibitors may be chosen in consideration of different tumor microenvironments. Thrombopoietin may be useful in fending off irradiation-induced loss of HSCs. PMID:27500125

  3. Targeting sortilin in immune cells reduces proinflammatory cytokines and atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Mortensen, Martin B.; Kjolby, Mads; Gunnersen, Stine; Larsen, Jakob V.; Palmfeldt, Johan; Falk, Erling; Nykjaer, Anders; Bentzon, Jacob F.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified a link between genetic variation at the human chromosomal locus 1p13.3 and coronary artery disease. The gene encoding sortilin (SORT1) has been implicated as the causative gene within the locus, as sortilin regulates hepatic lipoprotein metabolism. Here we demonstrated that sortilin also directly affects atherogenesis, independent of its regulatory role in lipoprotein metabolism. In a mouse model of atherosclerosis, deletion of Sort1 did not alter plasma cholesterol levels, but reduced the development of both early and late atherosclerotic lesions. We determined that sortilin is a high-affinity receptor for the proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IFN-γ. Moreover, macrophages and Th1 cells (both of which mediate atherosclerotic plaque formation) lacking sortilin had reduced secretion of IL-6 and IFN-γ, but not of other measured cytokines. Transfer of sortilin-deficient BM into irradiated atherosclerotic mice reduced atherosclerosis and systemic markers of inflammation. Together, these data demonstrate that sortilin influences cytokine secretion and that targeting sortilin in immune cells attenuates inflammation and reduces atherosclerosis. PMID:25401472

  4. Cytokine determinants of viral tropism

    PubMed Central

    McFadden, Grant; Mohamed, Mohamed R.; Rahman, Masmudur M.; Bartee, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The specificity of a given virus for a ceil type, tissue or species — collectively known as viral tropism — is an important factor in determining the outcome of viral infection in any particular host. Owing to the increased prevalence of zoonotic infections and the threat of emerging and re-emerging pathogens, gaining a better understanding of the factors that determine viral tropism has become particularly important. In this Review, we summarize our current understanding of the central role of antiviral and pro-inflammatory cytokines, particularly the interferons and tumour necrosis factor, in dictating viral tropism and how these cytokine pathways can be exploited therapeutically for cancer treatment and to better counter future threats from emerging zoonotic pathogens. PMID:19696766

  5. Cytokine determinants of viral tropism.

    PubMed

    McFadden, Grant; Mohamed, Mohamed R; Rahman, Masmudur M; Bartee, Eric

    2009-09-01

    The specificity of a given virus for a cell type, tissue or species - collectively known as viral tropism - is an important factor in determining the outcome of viral infection in any particular host. Owing to the increased prevalence of zoonotic infections and the threat of emerging and re-emerging pathogens, gaining a better understanding of the factors that determine viral tropism has become particularly important. In this Review, we summarize our current understanding of the central role of antiviral and pro-inflammatory cytokines, particularly the interferons and tumour necrosis factor, in dictating viral tropism and how these cytokine pathways can be exploited therapeutically for cancer treatment and to better counter future threats from emerging zoonotic pathogens.

  6. Gamma irradiation reduces the immunological toxicity of doxorubicin, anticancer drug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae-Hun; Sung, Nak-Yun; Raghavendran, H. Balaji; Yoon, Yohan; Song, Beom-Seok; Choi, Jong-il; Yoo, Young-Choon; Byun, Myung-Woo; Hwang, Young-Jeong; Lee, Ju-Woon

    2009-07-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a widely used anticancer agent, but exhibits some immunological toxicity to patients during chemotherapy. The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of gamma irradiation on the immunological response and the inhibition activity on in vivo tumor mass of DOX. The results showed that DOX irradiated at 10 and 20 kGy reduce the inhibition of mouse peritoneal macrophage proliferation and induce the release of cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6) when compared with non-irradiated DOX. The cytotoxicity against human breast (MCF-7), murine colon adenocarcinoma (Colon 26) and human monocytic (THP-1) tumor cell were not significantly different between non-irradiated and irradiated DOX ( P<0.05). In vivo study on the tumor mass inhibition, gamma-irradiated DOX showed a considerable inhibition of tumor mass and this effect was statistically non-significant as compared with non-irradiated DOX. In conclusion, gamma irradiation could be regarded as a potential method for reducing the immunological toxicity of DOX. Further researches is needed to reveal the formation and activity of radiolysis products by gamma irradiation.

  7. Cytokine Signature in Infective Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Izabella Rodrigues; Ferrari, Teresa Cristina Abreu; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Campi-Azevedo, Ana Carolina; Rodrigues, Luan Vieira; Guimarães Júnior, Milton Henriques; Barros, Thais Lins Souza; Gelape, Cláudio Léo; Sousa, Giovane Rodrigo; Nunes, Maria Carmo Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is a severe disease with high mortality rate. Cytokines participate in its pathogenesis and may contribute to early diagnosis improving the outcome. This study aimed to evaluate the cytokine profile in IE. Serum concentrations of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were measured by cytometric bead array (CBA) at diagnosis in 81 IE patients, and compared with 34 healthy subjects and 30 patients with non-IE infections, matched to the IE patients by age and gender. Mean age of the IE patients was 47±17 years (range, 15–80 years), and 40 (50%) were male. The IE patients had significantly higher serum concentrations of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and TNF-α as compared to the healthy individuals. The median levels of IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-12 were higher in the IE than in the non-IE infections group. TNF-α and IL-12 levels were higher in staphylococcal IE than in the non-staphylococcal IE subgroup. There was a higher proportion of both low IL-10 producers and high producers of IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-12 in the staphylococcal IE than in the non-staphylococcal IE subgroup. This study reinforces a relationship between the expression of proinflammatory cytokines, especially IL-1β, IL-12 and TNF-α, and the pathogenesis of IE. A lower production of IL-10 and impairment in cytokine network may reflect the severity of IE and may be useful for risk stratification. PMID:26225421

  8. Cytokines, Neovascularization and Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-10-01

    obtained. Eight micron histologic sections were prepared and analyzed by immunohistochemistry using chicken-anti human IL-8 antibody and the Avidin -Biotin... Egg yolks containing antibody were processed as previously described (need ref). Antibody titer and specificity were assessed by double-immunodiffusion...vitro cytokine paper Scott H. Kurtzman, M.D. Hill, NJ) prepared in Hunger’s Titer Max (CYTRX Corp., Norcross, GA). Egg yolks containing antibody were

  9. Local brain heavy ion irradiation induced Immunosuppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Runhong; Deng, Yulin; Huiyang Zhu, Bitlife.; Zhao, Tuo; Wang, Hailong; Yu, Yingqi; Ma, Hong; Wang, Xiao; Zhuang, Fengyuan; Qing, Hong

    Purpose: To investigate the long term effect of acute local brain heavy ion irradiation on the peripheral immune system in rat model. Methodology: Only the brain of adult male Wistar rats were radiated by heavy ions at the dose of 15 Gy. One, two and three months after irradiation, thymus and spleen were analyzed by four ways. Tunel assay was performed to evaluate the percentage of apoptotic cells in thymus and spleen, level of Inflammatory cytokines (IL-2, IL-6, SSAO, and TNF-α) was detected by ELISA assay, the differentiation of thymus T lymphocyte subsets were measured by flow cytometry and the relative expression levels of genes related to thymus immune cell development were measured by using quantitative real-time PCR. Results: Thymus and spleen showed significant atrophy from one month to three months after irradiation. A high level of apoptosis in thymus and spleen were obtained and the latter was more vulnerable, also, high level of inflammatory cytokines were found. Genes (c-kit, Rag1, Rag2 and Sca1) related to thymus lymphocytes’ development were down-regulated. Conclusion: Local area radiation in the rat brain would cause the immunosuppression, especially, the losing of cell-mediated immune functions. In this model, radiation caused inflammation and then induced apoptosis of cells in the immune organs, which contributed to immunosuppression.

  10. Cytokine-induced sickness behavior.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Keith W; Bluthé, Rose-Marie; Dantzer, Robert; Zhou, Jian-Hua; Shen, Wen-Hong; Johnson, Rodney W; Broussard, Suzanne R

    2003-02-01

    The behavioral repertoire of humans and animals changes dramatically following infection. Sick individuals have little motivation to eat, are listless, complain of fatigue and malaise, loose interest in social activities and have significant changes in sleep patterns. They display an inability to experience pleasure, have exaggerated responses to pain and fail to concentrate. Proinflammatory cytokines acting in the brain cause sickness behaviors. These nearly universal behavioral changes are a manifestation of a central motivational state that is designed to promote recovery. Exaggerated symptoms of sickness in cancer patients, such as cachexia, can be life-threatening. However, quality of life is often drastically impaired before the cancer becomes totally debilitating. Although basic studies in psychoneuroimmunology have defined proinflammatory cytokines as the central mediators of sickness behavior, a much better understanding of how cytokine and neurotransmitter receptors communicate with each other is needed. Advances that have been made during the past decade should now be extended to clinical studies in an attempt to alleviate sickness symptoms and improve quality of life for cancer patients.

  11. Cytokines and the immune response.

    PubMed

    Van der Meide, P H; Schellekens, H

    1996-01-01

    Cytokines participate in many physiological processes including the regulation of immune and inflammatory responses. These effector molecules are produced transiently and locally controlling the amplitude and duration of the response. A variety of experiments has shown that excessive or insufficient production may significantly contribute to the pathophysiology of a range of diseases. Particularly cytokines released by CD4+ T cells at the onset of an immune response are thought to be decisive for pathological or physiological consequences. The meeting in Budapest was focussed on cytokines known to contribute to the pathophysiology of autoimmune diseases, infectious diseases and allograft rejection (e.g., IL-1, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, TNF-alpha and IFN-alpha, -beta, -gamma). A central role for IFN-gamma in autoimmunity was suggested by blocking experiments in vivo using monoclonal antibodies and soluble forms of the IFN-gamma receptor (IFN-gamma SR). These agents ameliorated disease development in a variety of experimental autoimmune diseases in rodents. In a mouse model for the human disease Myasthenia gravis, IFN-alpha was found to reduce both the incidence and progression of the disease. Treatment of R. aurantiacus-infected mice with anti-IL-4 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) was reported to interfere with the regression of granulomas in spleen and liver, most likely through inadequate IL-4-mediated suppression of IFN-gamma production. In addition, it was shown that mice with disrupted IFN-gamma R genes died rapidly after infection with the BCG strain of M. bovis, whereas normal mice survived the infection. IL-12 was found to be the main inductor of IFN-gamma during the lethal Shwartzman reaction. TNF-alpha was identified as the principal cause of mortality after the second injection with LPS. In a variety of studies examining the role of cytokines in the pathogenesis of AIDS, much attention was given to the in vitro effects of HIV-1 and/or the HIV-1 viral membrane

  12. Cytokines: a primer for plastic surgeons.

    PubMed

    Remick, D G

    1995-11-01

    Cytokines are peptide mediators of inflammation that are being extensively studied in several aspects of disease. I provide an introduction to the general features of cytokine biology. Cytokines may be considered as either proinflammatory or anti-inflammatory compounds, and they also have potent hematopoietic effects. Basic information about the biological properties of the cytokines and their receptors and mechanisms of postreceptor signal transduction is presented. Lymphocytes have been subclassified into specific cell types, and the Th1 and Th2 classifications are discussed. Cytokines are administered exogenously to augment aspects of the immune response; this approach has been particularily well established for the hematopoietic growth factors. In other diseases, inhibition of cytokines has been attempted by several approaches, including monoclonal antibodies, soluble receptors, and receptor antagonists. Finally, the general methods of measuring cytokines and the advantages/pitfalls associated with these methods are reviewed.

  13. Cytokine levels in rat blood and brain structures after administration of lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Abramova, A Yu; Pertsov, S S; Kozlov, A Yu; Nikenina, E V; Kalinichenko, L S; Dudnik, E N; Alekseeva, I V

    2013-08-01

    We compared cytokine profile of rat serum and brain structures after immune status modulation by LPS (30 μg/kg intraperitoneally). The content of inflammatory (IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6, IFN-γ, and TNF-α) and anti-inflammatory (IL-4 and IL-10) cytokines in biological samples of animals was measured on days 1 and 7 after antigenic stimulation. LPS administration reduced the levels of both inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines in the peripheral blood of the rats, especially on the 1st day. LPS administration was also accompanied by specific changes in cytokine content in the dorsal hippocampus and anterior cingulate cortex. Antigenic stimulation increased the level of anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-4 and IL-10 in the examined brain tissues, the changes were most pronounced on day 1 after LPS injection. No significant changes in the levels of proinflammatory cytokines in the brain tissue of animals were found at the above terms after LPS injection. Thus, peripheral LPS administration to rats shifts the balance between the inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines in the CNS structures towards the latter.

  14. Commercial food irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Black, E.F.; Libby, L.M.

    1983-06-01

    Food irradiation is discussed. Irradiation exposes food to gamma rays from a cobalt-60 or a cesium-137 source, or to high-energy electrons emitted by an electron accelerator. A major advantage is that food can be packaged either before or after treatment. FDA regulations with regard to irradiation are discussed. Comments on an 'Advance Notice' on irradiation, published by the FDA in 1981 are summarized.

  15. Physicochemical and structural characteristics of rice starch modified by irradiation.

    PubMed

    Polesi, Luís Fernando; Sarmento, Silene Bruder Silveira; Moraes, Jaqueline de; Franco, Célia Maria Landi; Canniatti-Brazaca, Solange Guidolin

    2016-01-15

    This work evaluated the physicochemical and structural properties of rice starch of the cultivars IAC 202 and IRGA 417 modified by irradiation. Starch samples were irradiated by (60)Co in doses 1, 2 and 5kGy, on a rate of 0.4kGy/h. A control not irradiated was used for comparison. The granule morphology and A-type X-ray diffraction pattern were not altered by irradiation. There was an increase in amylose content, carboxyl content and acidity with irradiation. Gamma radiation did not affect the thermal properties of IAC202, but increased gelatinization temperature of IRGA417, in the higher dose (5kGy). The number of long chains of amylopectin was reduced and short chains were increased for IAC202, whereas for IRGA 417, the opposite was observed, probably due to cross-linking of starch chains. Starches had their physicochemical and structural properties modified by irradiation differently.

  16. Mechanisms of Normal Tissue Injury From Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Citrin, Deborah E; Mitchell, James B

    2017-10-01

    Normal tissue injury from irradiation is an unfortunate consequence of radiotherapy. Technologic improvements have reduced the risk of normal tissue injury; however, toxicity causing treatment breaks or long-term side effects continues to occur in a subset of patients. The molecular events that lead to normal tissue injury are complex and span a variety of biologic processes, including oxidative stress, inflammation, depletion of injured cells, senescence, and elaboration of proinflammatory and profibrogenic cytokines. This article describes selected recent advances in normal tissue radiobiology. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Influence of irradiation upon few-layered graphene using electron-beams and gamma-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuqing; Feng, Yi; Mo, Fei; Qian, Gang; Chen, Yangming; Yu, Dongbo; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Xuebin

    2014-07-01

    Few-layered graphene (FLG) is irradiated by electron beams and gamma rays. After 100 keV electron irradiation, the edges of FLG start bending, shrinking, and finally generate gaps and carbon onions due to sputtering and knock-on damage mechanism. When the electron beam energy is increased further to 200 keV, FLG suffers rapid and catastrophic destruction. Unlike electron irradiation, Compton effect is the dominant damage mechanism in gamma irradiation. The irradiation results indicate the crystallinity of FLG decreases first, then restores as increasing irradiation doses, additionally, the ratio (O/C) of FLG surface and the relative content of oxygen groups increases after irradiation.

  18. Influence of irradiation upon few-layered graphene using electron-beams and gamma-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yuqing; Feng, Yi Mo, Fei; Qian, Gang; Chen, Yangming; Yu, Dongbo; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Xuebin

    2014-07-14

    Few-layered graphene (FLG) is irradiated by electron beams and gamma rays. After 100 keV electron irradiation, the edges of FLG start bending, shrinking, and finally generate gaps and carbon onions due to sputtering and knock-on damage mechanism. When the electron beam energy is increased further to 200 keV, FLG suffers rapid and catastrophic destruction. Unlike electron irradiation, Compton effect is the dominant damage mechanism in gamma irradiation. The irradiation results indicate the crystallinity of FLG decreases first, then restores as increasing irradiation doses, additionally, the ratio (O/C) of FLG surface and the relative content of oxygen groups increases after irradiation.

  19. Control of apoptosis in hematopoiesis and leukemia by cytokines, tumor suppressor and oncogenes.

    PubMed

    Lotem, J; Sachs, L

    1996-06-01

    Hematopoietic cells require certain cytokines including colony-stimulating factors and interleukins to maintain viability. Without these cytokines the program of apoptotic cell death is activated. Cells from many myeloid leukemias require cytokines for viability, and apoptosis is also activated in these leukemic cells after cytokine withdrawal resulting in reduced leukemogenicity. The same cytokines protect normal and leukemic cells from induction of apoptosis by irradiation and cytotoxic chemotherapeutic compounds. This suggests that decreasing the levels of viability inducing cytokines may increase the effectiveness of cytotoxic anti-cancer therapy. The susceptibility of normal and cancer cells to induction of apoptosis is also regulated by the balance between apoptosis-inducing genes such as the tumor suppressor wild-type p53, and c-myc and bax, and apoptosis-suppressing genes such as the oncogene mutant p53, and bcl-2 and bcl-XL. Cell susceptibility to induction of apoptosis in leukemic cells could be enhanced by increased expression of apoptosis-inducing genes and/or decreased expression of apoptosis-suppressing genes. Modulation of expression of apoptosis-regulating genes should thus also be useful for improvement of anti-cancer therapy.

  20. Induction of interleukin-1β by mouse mammary tumor irradiation promotes triple negative breast cancer cells invasion and metastasis development.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, Gina; Therriault, Hélène; Bujold, Rachel; Saucier, Caroline; Paquette, Benoit

    2017-05-01

    Radiotherapy increases the level of inflammatory cytokines, some of which are known to promote metastasis. In a mouse model of triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), we determined whether irradiation of the mammary tumor increases the level of key cytokines and favors the development of lung metastases. D2A1 TNBC cells were implanted in the mammary glands of a Balb/c mouse and then 7 days old tumors were irradiated (4 × 6 Gy). The cytokines IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-17 and MIP-2 were quantified in plasma before, midway and after irradiation. The effect of tumor irradiation on the invasion of cancer cells, the number of circulating tumor cells (CTC) and lung metastases were also measured. TNBC tumor irradiation significantly increased the plasma level of IL-1β, which was associated with a greater number of CTC (3.5-fold) and lung metastases (2.3-fold), compared to sham-irradiated animals. Enhancement of D2A1 cell invasion in mammary gland was associated with an increase of the matrix metalloproteinases-2 and -9 activity (MMP-2, -9). The ability of IL-1β to stimulate the invasiveness of irradiated D2A1 cells was confirmed by in vitro invasion chamber assays. Irradiation targeting a D2A1 tumor and its microenvironment increased the level of the inflammatory cytokine IL-1β and was associated with the promotion of cancer cell invasion and lung metastasis development.

  1. Thermally activated deformation of irradiated reactor pressure vessel steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhmert, J.; Müller, G.

    2002-03-01

    Temperature and strain rate change tensile tests were performed on two VVER 1000-type reactor pressure vessel welds with different contents of nickel in unirradiated and irradiated conditions in order to determine the activation parameters of the contribution of the thermally activated deformation. There are no differences of the activation parameters in the unirradiated and the irradiated conditions as well as for the two different materials. This shows that irradiation hardening preferentially results from a friction hardening mechanism by long-range obstacles.

  2. 60Co irradiation of Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli induces Stx phage.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tatsuo; Kojio, Seiichi; Taneike, Ikue; Nakagawa, Saori; Iwakura, Nobuhiro; Wakisaka-Saito, Noriko

    2003-05-16

    Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC), an important cause of hemolytic uremic syndrome, was completely killed by (60)Co irradiation at 1 x l0(3) gray (1 kGy) or higher. However, a low dose of irradiation (0.1-0.3 kGy) markedly induced Stx phage from STEC. Stx production was observed in parallel to the phage induction. Inactivation of Stx phage required a higher irradiation dose than that for bacterial killing. Regarding Stx, cytotoxicity was susceptible to irradiation, but cytokine induction activity was more resistant than Stx phage. The findings suggest that (1). although (60)Co irradiation is an effective means to kill the bacteria, it does induce Stx phage at a lower irradiation dose, with a risk of Stx phage transfer and emergence of new Stx-producing strains, and (2). irradiation differentially inactivates some activities of Stx.

  3. Welding irradiated stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Kanne, W.R. Jr.; Chandler, G.T.; Nelson, D.Z.; Franco-Ferreira, E.A.

    1993-12-31

    Conventional welding processes produced severe underbead cracking in irradiated stainless steel containing 1 to 33 appm helium from n,a reactions. A shallow penetration overlay technique was successfully demonstrated for welding irradiated stainless steel. The technique was applied to irradiated 304 stainless steel that contained 10 appm helium. Surface cracking, present in conventional welds made on the same steel at the same and lower helium concentrations, was eliminated. Underbead cracking was minimal compared to conventional welding methods. However, cracking in the irradiated material was greater than in tritium charged and aged material at the same helium concentrations. The overlay technique provides a potential method for repair or modification of irradiated reactor materials.

  4. Topical Administration of Manuka Oil Prevents UV-B Irradiation-Induced Cutaneous Photoaging in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Oh Sook; Yang, Beom Seok

    2013-01-01

    Manuka tree is indigenous to New Zealand, and its essential oil has been used as a traditional medicine to treat wounds, fever, and pain. Although there is a growing interest in the use of manuka oil for antiaging skin care products, little is known about its bioactivity. Solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation is the primary environmental factor causing skin damage and consequently premature aging. Therefore, we evaluated manuka oil for its effects against photoaging in UV-B-irradiated hairless mice. Topical application of manuka oil suppressed the UV-B-induced increase in skin thickness and wrinkle grading in a dose-dependent manner. Application of 10% manuka oil reduced the average length, depth, and % area of wrinkles significantly, and this was correlated with inhibition of loss of collagen fiber content and epidermal hyperplasia. Furthermore, we observed that manuka oil could suppress UV-B-induced skin inflammation by inhibiting the production of inflammatory cytokines. Taken together, this study provides evidence that manuka oil indeed possesses antiphotoaging activity, and this is associated with its inhibitory activity against skin inflammation induced by UV irradiation. PMID:23762170

  5. Ultraviolet irradiation induces the accumulation of chondroitin sulfate, but not other glycosaminoglycans, in human skin.

    PubMed

    Werth, Benjamin Boegel; Bashir, Muhammad; Chang, Laura; Werth, Victoria P

    2011-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light alters cutaneous structure and function. Prior work has shown loss of dermal hyaluronan after UV-irradiation of human skin, yet UV exposure increases total glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content in mouse models. To more fully describe UV-induced alterations to cutaneous GAG content, we subjected human volunteers to intermediate-term (5 doses/week for 4 weeks) or single-dose UV exposure. Total dermal uronyl-containing GAGs increased substantially with each of these regimens. We found that UV exposure substantially increased dermal content of chondroitin sulfate (CS), but not hyaluronan, heparan sulfate, or dermatan sulfate. UV induced the accumulation of both the 4-sulfated (C4S) and 6-sulfated (C6S) isoforms of CS, but in distinct distributions. Next, we examined several CS proteoglycan core proteins and found a significant accumulation of dermal and endothelial serglycin, but not of decorin or versican, after UV exposure. To examine regulation in vitro, we found that UVB in combination with IL-1α, a cytokine upregulated by UV radiation, induced serglycin mRNA in cultured dermal fibroblasts, but did not induce the chondroitin sulfate synthases. Overall, our data indicate that intermediate-term and single-dose UVB exposure induces specific GAGs and proteoglycan core proteins in human skin in vivo. These molecules have important biologic functions and contribute to the cutaneous response to UV.

  6. Bioanalytical Chemistry of Cytokines-A Review

    PubMed Central

    Stenken, Julie A.; Poschenrieder, Andreas J.

    2014-01-01

    Cytokines are bioactive proteins produced by many different cells of the immune system. Due to their role in different inflammatory disease states and maintaining homeostasis, there is enormous clinical interest in the quantitation of cytokines. The typical standard methods for quantitation of cytokines are immunoassay-based techniques including enzyme-linked immusorbent assays (ELISA) and bead-based immunoassays read by either standard or modified flow cytometers. A review of recent developments in analytical methods for measurements of cytokine proteins is provided. This review briefly covers cytokine biology and the analysis challenges associated with measurement of these biomarker proteins for understanding both health and disease. New techniques applied to immunoassay-based assays are presented along with the uses of aptamers, electrochemistry, mass spectrometry, optical resonator-based methods. Methods used for elucidating the release of cytokines from single cells as well as in vivo collection methods are described. PMID:25467452

  7. Bioanalytical chemistry of cytokines--a review.

    PubMed

    Stenken, Julie A; Poschenrieder, Andreas J

    2015-01-01

    Cytokines are bioactive proteins produced by many different cells of the immune system. Due to their role in different inflammatory disease states and maintaining homeostasis, there is enormous clinical interest in the quantitation of cytokines. The typical standard methods for quantitation of cytokines are immunoassay-based techniques including enzyme-linked immusorbent assays (ELISA) and bead-based immunoassays read by either standard or modified flow cytometers. A review of recent developments in analytical methods for measurements of cytokine proteins is provided. This review briefly covers cytokine biology and the analysis challenges associated with measurement of these biomarker proteins for understanding both health and disease. New techniques applied to immunoassay-based assays are presented along with the uses of aptamers, electrochemistry, mass spectrometry, optical resonator-based methods. Methods used for elucidating the release of cytokines from single cells as well as in vivo collection methods are described.

  8. Tritium analysis of irradiated burnable poison rods

    SciTech Connect

    D'Annucci, F.; Baro, G.; Pardue, E.B.S.; Rommelaere, W.

    1982-10-01

    To investigate the tritium content in the various components and to determine the /sup 10/B burnup, a postirradiation examination was carried out on three burnable poison rods that had been irradiated in the first cycle of the Oconee 2 Reactor. The results of the analysis reveal that the Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/-B/sub 4/C pellets retain the major portion (greater than or equal to99%) of all the tritium generated; only a very small quantity (less than or equal to0.5%) of the tritium produced is absorbed by the cladding and no tritium was detected in the plenum gas. Comparison of the average postirradiation /sup 10/B content with the preirradiation content indicates that almost all of the /sup 10/B has been consumed. The experimental results are in good agreement with the calculated tritium content of an irradiated poison rod.

  9. Directed covalent immobilization of fluorescently labeled cytokines.

    PubMed

    Recker, Tobias; Haamann, Daniel; Schmitt, Anne; Küster, Andrea; Klee, Doris; Barth, Stefan; Müller-Newen, Gerhard

    2011-06-15

    Cytokines are important mediators coordinating inflammation and wound healing in response to tissue damage and infection. Therefore, immobilization of cytokines on the surface of biomaterials is a promising approach to improve biocompatibility. Soluble cytokines signal through receptors on the cell surface leading to cell differentiation, proliferation, or other effector functions. Random immobilization of cytokines on surfaces will result in a large fraction of inactive protein due to impaired cytokine--receptor interaction. We developed a strategy that combined (i) directed covalent coupling of cytokines, (ii) quantification of coupling efficiency through fluorescence detection, and (iii) a reliable protease cleavage assay to control orientation of coupling. For this purpose, fusion proteins of the SNAP-tag followed by an enterokinase recognition site, yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), and the cytokine of interest being either interleukin-6 (IL-6) or oncostatin M (OSM) were generated. The SNAP-tag is a derivative of O(6)-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase that couples itself covalently to benzylguanine. Bioactivities of the SNAP-YFP-cytokines were shown to be comparable with the nontagged cytokines. Efficient coupling of SNAP-YFP-cytokines to benzylguanine-modified beads was demonstrated by flow cytometry. The fact that enterokinase treatment released most of the fluorescence from the beads is indicative for directed coupling and only marginal adsorptive binding. Cellular responses to SNAP-YFP-cytokine beads were analyzed in cellular lysates and by confocal microscopy indicating that the directionally immobilized cytokines are fully signaling competent with respect to the activation of ERK and STAT3. The strategy presented here is generally applicable for the directed covalent immobilization of fluorescently labeled proteins including the convenient and reliable control of coupling efficiency and orientation.

  10. Treatment of cytokine-induced depression.

    PubMed

    Capuron, Lucile; Hauser, Peter; Hinze-Selch, Dunja; Miller, Andrew H; Neveu, Pierre J

    2002-10-01

    A high proportion of cancer and hepatitis C patients who receive cytokine immunotherapy develop symptoms of depression that are indistinguishable from those found in major depressive disorders. These symptoms are alleviated by anti-depressant treatment. Moreover, preventive treatment with anti-depressants, in particular selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) attenuates IFN-alpha-associated symptoms of depression, anxiety, and neurotoxicity. The intermediate mechanisms of these effects are still unclear. Studies suggest that the state of depression is associated with an increase in plasma levels of various cytokines and soluble cytokine receptors. Furthermore, anti-depressants have been shown to shift the cytokine network towards a decreased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and an increased production of anti-inflammatory cytokines. Other studies suggest that anti-depressants can also modify immune reactivity by acting on neural structures involved in neuroimmunomodulation. It is possible that anti-depressants could help to normalize the serotoninergic neurotransmission that is likely disrupted during immunotherapy due to the potent effects of cytokines on the metabolism of the amino acid precursor tryptophan. Further work is needed to optimize strategies for preventing neuropsychiatric side effects of cytokine immunotherapy, to clarify the mechanisms involved in the alleviating effects of anti-depressants on cytokine-induced depression, as well as to assess the possible consequences of anti-depressant therapy on the efficacy of immunotherapy on the disease process.

  11. Effect of space flight on cytokine production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    Space flight has been shown to alter many immunological responses. Among those affected are the production of cytokines, Cytokines are the messengers of the immune system that facilitate communication among cells that allow the interaction among cells leading to the development of immune responses. Included among the cytokines are the interferons, interleukins, and colony stimulating factors. Cytokines also facilitate communication between the immune system and other body systems, such as the neuroendocrine and musculoskeletal systems. Some cytokines also have direct protective effects on the host, such as interferon, which can inhibit the replication of viruses. Studies in both humans and animals indicate that models of space flight as well as actual space flight alter the production and action of cytokines. Included among these changes are altered interferon production, altered responsiveness of bone marrow cells to granulocyte/monocyte-colony stimulating factor, but no alteration in the production of interleukin-3. This suggests that there are selective effects of space flight on immune responses, i.e. not all cytokines are affected in the same fashion by space flight. Tissue culture studies also suggest that there may be direct effects of space flight on the cells responsible for cytokine production and action. The results of the above study indicate that the effects of space flight on cytokines may be a fundamental mechanism by which space flight not only affects immune responses, but also other biological systems of the human.

  12. Current status and challenges of cytokine pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Zídek, Z; Anzenbacher, P; Kmoníčková, E

    2009-01-01

    The major concern of pharmacology about cytokines has originated from plentiful data showing association between gross changes in their production and pathophysiological processes. Despite the enigmatic role of cytokines in diseases, a number of them have become a subject of cytokine and anti-cytokine immunotherapies. Production of cytokines can be influenced by many endogenous and exogenous stimuli including drugs. Cells of the immune system, such as macrophages and lymphocytes, are richly endowed with receptors for the mediators of physiological functions, such as biogenic amines, adenosine, prostanoids, steroids, etc. Drugs, agonists or antagonists of these receptors can directly or indirectly up- and down-regulate secretion of cytokines and expression of cytokine receptors. Vice versa, cytokines interfere with drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics through the interactions with cytochrome P450 and multiple drug resistance proteins. The aim of the review is to encourage more intensive studies in these fields of cytokine pharmacology. It also outlines major areas of searching promising candidates for immunotherapeutic interventions. PMID:19371342

  13. Local expression of antiinflammatory cytokines in cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamura, M; Modlin, R L; Ohmen, J D; Moy, R L

    1993-01-01

    To characterize the nature of the local cytokine response to cancer, we chose to investigate cytokine patterns in biopsy specimens of basal cell carcinoma (BCC). We hypothesized that a distinct pattern of local cytokine production may be characteristic of BCC, a neoplasia of epidermis, in comparison to the pattern of seborrheic keratosis (SK), a benign growth of epidermis. We analyzed cytokine mRNAs in BCC versus SK by performing polymerase chain reaction on mRNA derived from biopsy specimens. The mRNAs encoding cytokines for IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor were strongly expressed in BCC lesions and weakly expressed in SK lesions. Conversely, IL-2, IFN-gamma, and lymphotoxin mRNAs were strongly expressed in SK lesions and weakly expressed in BCC lesions. The response to malignancy, BCC, was typified by cytokines characteristic of murine TH2 cells. This cytokine pattern favors humoral immunity with concomitant immunosuppression of cell-mediated immune responses. In comparison, the response to the benign growth, SK, was typified by cytokines characteristic of murine TH1 cells that favor cell-mediated immune reactions. The findings of a distinct cytokine pattern in skin cancer provide a framework to develop strategies for immunologic intervention. Images PMID:8450029

  14. Cytokines and immune surveillance in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1993-01-01

    Evidence from both human and rodent studies has indicated that alterations in immunological parameters occur after space flight. Among the parameters shown, by us and others, to be affected is the production of interferons. Interferons are a family of cytokines that are antiviral and play a major role in regulating immune responses that control resistance to infection. Alterations in interferon and other cytokine production and activity could result in changes in immunity and a possible compromise of host defenses against both opportunistic and external infections. The purpose of the present study is to further explore the effects of space flight on cytokines and cytokine-directed immunological function.

  15. Free-radical concentrations and other properties of pile-irradiated coals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedel, R.A.; Breger, I.A.

    1959-01-01

    Five coals reacted quite differently when they were exposed to pile-irradiation. Little or no change was found in free-radical content for the three coals of lowest carbon content, whereas the two coals of highest carbon content were found to have a considerable increase in free-radical content. The infrared spectra and the apparent hardness of the irradiated coals of higher carbon content indicate that polymerization occurred. Radiation of these coals in chemical reagents may promote reactivity.

  16. Blue light irradiation suppresses dendritic cells activation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Michael R; Abel, Manuela; Lopez Kostka, Susanna; Rudolph, Berenice; Becker, Detlef; von Stebut, Esther

    2013-08-01

    Blue light is a UV-free irradiation suitable for treating chronic skin inflammation, for example, atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, and hand- and foot eczema. However, a better understanding of the mode of action is still missing. For this reason, we investigated whether dendritic cells (DC) are directly affected by blue light irradiation in vitro. Here, we report that irradiation neither induced apoptosis nor maturation of monocyte-derived and myeloid DC. However, subsequent DC maturation upon LPS/IFNγ stimulation was impaired in a dose-dependent manner as assessed by maturation markers and cytokine release. Moreover, the potential of this DC to induce cytokine secretion from allogeneic CD4 T cells was reduced. In conclusion, unlike UV irradiation, blue light irradiation at high and low doses only resulted in impaired DC maturation upon activation and a reduced subsequent stimulatory capacity in allogeneic MLRs with strongest effects at higher doses. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Changes in total ascorbic acid and carotenoids in minimally processed irradiated Arugula (Eruca sativa Mill) stored under refrigeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, Tatiana Pacheco; Martins, Cecília Geraldes; Faria, Adelia Ferreira; Bíscola, Vanessa; de Oliveira Souza, Kátia Leani; Mercadante, Adriana Zerlotti; Cordenunsi, Beatriz Rosana; Landgraf, Mariza

    2013-09-01

    This work investigated the effects of irradiation (0, 1 and 2 kGy) on the content of bioactive compounds such as vitamin C and carotenoids with provitamin A activity in arugula during the storage at 5±1 °C for up to 13 and 16 days, respectively. The vitamin C content decreased in non-irradiated as well as irradiated (1 and 2 kGy) samples during the storage period. On the other hand, no significant change in the content of carotenoids with provitamin A activity was observed after irradiation or storage period. Thus, the irradiation had minimal detrimental effects on the contents of carotenoids in arugula.

  18. Inflammatory cytokines in pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is an “umbrella term” used for a spectrum of entities resulting in an elevation of the pulmonary arterial pressure. Clinical symptoms include dyspnea and fatigue which in the absence of adequate therapeutic intervention may lead to progressive right heart failure and death. The pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension is characterized by three major processes including vasoconstriction, vascular remodeling and microthrombotic events. In addition accumulating evidence point to a cytokine driven inflammatory process as a major contributor to the development of pulmonary hypertension. This review summarizes the latest clinical and experimental developments in inflammation associated with pulmonary hypertension with special focus on Interleukin-6, and its role in vascular remodeling in pulmonary hypertension. PMID:24739042

  19. Evaluating Posttranscriptional Regulation of Cytokine Genes

    PubMed Central

    Rattenbacher, Bernd; Bohjanen, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    A wide variety of cytokines are necessary for cell–cell communication in multicellular organisms, and cytokine dysregulation has detrimental effects, leading to disease states. Thus, it is a necessity that the expression of cytokines is tightly controlled. Regulation of cytokine gene expression takes place at different levels, including transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Ultimately, the steady-state levels of cytokine transcripts are determined by the equilibrium of transcription and degradation of this mRNA. Degradation rates of cytokine mRNAs can be measured in cells by blocking transcription with actinomycin D, harvesting RNA after different time points, and evaluating mRNA levels over time by northern blot. Cis-acting elements that mediate the rapid decay of numerous cytokine transcripts, including AU-rich elements (AREs), are found in the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of these transcripts. Putative regulatory cis-elements can be cloned into the 3′ UTR of a reporter transcript in order to assess their function in regulating mRNA decay. Cis-elements, such as AREs, regulate cytokine mRNA decay by binding to trans-acting proteins, such as tristetraprolin or HuR. These RNA-binding proteins can be visualized using electromobility shift assays or UV crosslinking assays based on their binding to radioactively labeled RNA sequences. RNA-binding proteins that regulate cytokine mRNA decay can be purified using an RNA affinity method, using their target RNA sequence as the bait. In this chapter, we review the methods for measuring cytokine mRNA decay and methods for characterizing the cis-acting elements and trans-acting factors that regulate cytokine mRNA decay. PMID:22131026

  20. Thermoluminescence of irradiated foodstuffs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oduko, J. M.; Spyrou, N. M.

    Measurements have been made of the thermoluminescent response of a number of foodstuffs, namely spices, chicken bone, eggshell and strawberries. From the results, irradiated samples can be clearly distinguished from unirradiated ones for several weeks after irradiation of 5-10 kGy, or in the case of some spices for up to 20 months. It is concluded that measurement of thermoluminescence is a promising technique for detecting the irradiation of foodstuffs.

  1. Reduction of allergenicity of irradiated ovalbumin in ovalbumin-allergic mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Ju-Woon; Kim, Jae-Hun; Byun, Eui-Baek; Lee, Soo-Young; Kang, Il-Jun; Byun, Myung-Woo

    2007-11-01

    Egg allergy is one of the most serious of the immediate hypersensitivity reactions to foods. Such an allergic disorder is mediated by IgE antibodies stimulated by T-helper type 2 (Th2) lymphocytes. This study was undertaken to evaluate changes of allergenicity and cytokine profiles by exposure of irradiated ovalbumin (OVA), a major allergen of egg white, in the OVA-allergic mice model. OVA solutions (2 mg/ml in 0.01 M phosphate buffered saline (PBS) were gamma-irradiated to 50 and 100 kGy. The allergenicity in the OVA-allergy-induced mice model was remarkably reduced when challenged with irradiated OVA. Cultures of spleen cells harvested from OVA-sensitized mice showed a significant decrease in Th2 cytokine levels of ILs-4 and -5 with a concomitant increase in Th1 cytokine levels of IL-12 when co-cultured with irradiated OVA. However, IFN- γ level decreased dependant on the radiation dose of co-cultured OVA. The levels of IgEs and Th2-cytokine were reduced dependant on the radiation dose. These data show that the irradiated OVA could downregulate the activity of Th2 lymphocytes in OVA-sensitized mice.

  2. Postharvest quality of dragon fruit (Hylocereus spp.) after x-ray irradiation quarantine treatment

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The quality of three dragon fruit clones (Hylocereus sp.) was determined following x-ray irradiation for disinfestation of quarantine pests. Fruit were treated with irradiation doses of 0, 200, 400, 600, or 800 Gy and stored for 12 days at 10 °C. Irradiation did not affect soluble solids content, ti...

  3. Compartmentalized Cytokine Responses in Hidradenitis Suppurativa

    PubMed Central

    Savva, Athina; Kersten, Brigit; Pistiki, Aikaterini; van de Veerdonk, Frank L.; Netea, Mihai G.; van der Meer, Jos W.; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Favorable treatment outcomes with TNF blockade led us to explore cytokine responses in hidradenitis suppurativa (HS). Methods Blood monocytes of 120 patients and 24 healthy volunteers were subtyped by flow cytometry. Isolated blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were stimulated for cytokine production; this was repeated in 13 severe patients during treatment with etanercept. Cytokines in pus were measured. Results CD14brightCD16dim inflammatory monocytes and patrolling monocytes were increased in Hurley III patients. Cytokine production by stimulated PBMCs was low compared to controls but the cytokine gene copies did not differ, indicating post-translational inhibition. The low production of IL-17 was restored, when cells were incubated with adalimumab. In pus, high concentrations of pro-inflammatory cytokines were detected. Based on the patterns, six different cytokine profiles were discerned, which are potentially relevant for the choice of treatment. Clinical improvement with etanercept was predicted by increased production of IL-1β and IL-17 by PBMCs at week 8. Conclusions Findings indicate compartmentalized cytokine expression in HS; high in pus but suppressed in PBMCs. This is modulated through blockade of TNF. PMID:26091259

  4. Basophils, cytokines, and the allergic inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    DuBuske, L M

    1996-01-01

    Immediate allergic response has long been recognized to be related to the activation of mast cells by antigen. The role of the mast cells as producers of cytokines, however, has only more recently been extensively studied. The effect of TH2 lymphocytes in the inflammatory process is now well recognized in animal models. The central role of cytokines in the allergic inflammatory response is currently an area of intense clinical investigation. Cytokines influence production, migration, and activation of basophils. A wide array of cytokines is produced by mast cells upon initiation of the immediate allergic response. These cytokines influence a number of other different cells including basophils and eosinophils, and also activate lymphocytes, thus perpetuating allergic inflammation.

  5. Cytokines and Immune Responses in Murine Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kusters, Pascal J H; Lutgens, Esther

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease of the vessel wall characterized by activation of the innate immune system, with macrophages as the main players, as well as the adaptive immune system, characterized by a Th1-dominant immune response. Cytokines play a major role in the initiation and regulation of inflammation. In recent years, many studies have investigated the role of these molecules in experimental models of atherosclerosis. While some cytokines such as TNF or IFNγ clearly had atherogenic effects, others such as IL-10 were found to be atheroprotective. However, studies investigating the different cytokines in experimental atherosclerosis revealed that the cytokine system is complex with both disease stage-dependent and site-specific effects. In this review, we strive to provide an overview of the main cytokines involved in atherosclerosis and to shed light on their individual role during atherogenesis.

  6. Interactions between Autophagy and Inhibitory Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tian-tian; Li, Wei-Min; Yao, Yong-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a degradative pathway that plays an essential role in maintaining cellular homeostasis. Most early studies of autophagy focused on its involvement in age-associated degeneration and nutrient deprivation. However, the immunological functions of autophagy have become more widely studied in recent years. Autophagy has been shown to be an intrinsic cellular defense mechanism in the innate and adaptive immune responses. Cytokines belong to a broad and loose category of proteins and are crucial for innate and adaptive immunity. Inhibitory cytokines have evolved to permit tolerance to self while also contributing to the eradication of invading pathogens. Interactions between inhibitory cytokines and autophagy have recently been reported, revealing a novel mechanism by which autophagy controls the immune response. In this review, we discuss interactions between autophagy and the regulatory cytokines IL-10, transforming growth factor-β, and IL-27. We also mention possible interactions between two newly discovered cytokines, IL-35 and IL-37, and autophagy. PMID:27313501

  7. Single high-dose irradiation aggravates eosinophil-mediated fibrosis through IL-33 secreted from impaired vessels in the skin compared to fractionated irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eun-Jung; Kim, Jun Won; Yoo, Hyun; Kwak, Woori; Choi, Won Hoon; Cho, Seoae; Choi, Yu Jeong; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Cho, Jaeho

    2015-08-14

    We have revealed in a porcine skin injury model that eosinophil recruitment was dose-dependently enhanced by a single high-dose irradiation. In this study, we investigated the underlying mechanism of eosinophil-associated skin fibrosis and the effect of high-dose-per-fraction radiation. The dorsal skin of a mini-pig was divided into two sections containing 4-cm{sup 2} fields that were irradiated with 30 Gy in a single fraction or 5 fractions and biopsied regularly over 14 weeks. Eosinophil-related Th2 cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, and C–C motif chemokine-11 (CCL11/eotaxin) were evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR. RNA-sequencing using 30 Gy-irradiated mouse skin and functional assays in a co-culture system of THP-1 and irradiated-human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were performed to investigate the mechanism of eosinophil-mediated radiation fibrosis. Single high-dose-per-fraction irradiation caused pronounced eosinophil accumulation, increased profibrotic factors collagen and transforming growth factor-β, enhanced production of eosinophil-related cytokines including IL-4, IL-5, CCL11, IL-13, and IL-33, and reduced vessels compared with 5-fraction irradiation. IL-33 notably increased in pig and mouse skin vessels after single high-dose irradiation of 30 Gy, as well as in irradiated HUVECs following 12 Gy. Blocking IL-33 suppressed the migration ability of THP-1 cells and cytokine secretion in a co-culture system of THP-1 cells and irradiated HUVECs. Hence, high-dose-per-fraction irradiation appears to enhance eosinophil-mediated fibrotic responses, and IL-33 may be a key molecule operating in eosinophil-mediated fibrosis in high-dose-per fraction irradiated skin. - Highlights: • Single high-dose irradiation aggravates eosinophil-mediated fibrosis through IL-33. • Vascular endothelial cells damaged by high-dose radiation secrete IL-33. • Blocking IL-33 suppressed migration of inflammatory cells and cytokine secretion. • IL

  8. Cytokines and pregnancy in rheumatic disease.

    PubMed

    Østensen, Monika; Förger, Frauke; Villiger, Peter M

    2006-06-01

    Cytokines are important mediators involved in the successful outcome of pregnancy. The concept of pregnancy as biased toward a Th2 immune response states that Th1 type cytokines are associated with pregnancy failure and that Th2 cytokines are protective and counteract pregnancy-related disorders. Studies at the level of the maternal-fetal interface, in the maternal circulation and in cells of peripheral blood have shown that the Th2 concept of pregnancy is an oversimplification. Both Th1 and Th2 type cytokines play a role at different stages of pregnancy and are adapted to the localization and function of cells and tissues. The changes of local and systemic cytokine patterns during pregnancy correspond to neuroendocrine changes with hormones as powerful modulators of cytokine expression. Several autoimmune disorders show a modulation of disease activity during and after pregnancy. In rheumatic diseases with a predominance of a Th1 immune response, a shift to a Th2 type immune response during pregnancy has been regarded as beneficial. Studies of pregnant patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have shown a cytokine expression similar to that found in healthy pregnant women. Significant differences were present only for a few cytokines and seemed related to the activity of the underlying disease. Interestingly, a gestational increase of cytokine inhibitors interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) and soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor (sTNFR) in the circulation corresponded to low disease activity in RA. The influence of hormones and cytokines on autoimmune disease is an issue for further study.

  9. Safety evaluation of irradiated foods in China: A condensed report

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, D. )

    1989-03-01

    Eight trials, with 439 human volunteers who consumed irradiated foods including rice, potatoes, mushrooms, peanuts, and Chinese sausages, as well as diets composed of multiple irradiated foods (irradiated at dosages of 0.2 to 8 kGy) that accounted for 60-66% of the entire diet, were carried out for 2-3 months according to a unified protocol. No adverse effects on body weight, blood pressure, ECG, hematology, blood enzyme activities, serum lipids or blood or urine 17-hydroxycortisol contents and no chromosomal aberration of peripheral blood lymphocytes were found. It is especially worthwhile to note that there was no change in the polyploidy after consumption of irradiated diets. On the basis of these results and a comprehensive analysis of the physical and chemical characteristics of irradiated foods, temporary hygienic standards for irradiated rice, potatoes, onions, garlic, Chinese sausages, peanuts, and mushrooms were promulgated by the Chinese Ministry of Public Health.

  10. Effect of gamma irradiation on the physicochemical properties of alkali-extracted rice starch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashwar, Bilal Ahmad; Shah, Asima; Gani, Asir; Rather, Sajad Ahmad; Wani, Sajad Mohd.; Wani, Idrees Ahmed; Masoodi, Farooq Ahmad; Gani, Adil

    2014-06-01

    Starches isolated from two newly released rice varieties (K-322 and K-448) were subject to irradiation at 0, 5, 10, and 20 kGy doses. Comparative study between native (not irradiated) and irradiated starch samples was carried out to evaluate the changes in physicochemical, morphological and pasting properties due to gamma irradiation. Significant decrease was found in apparent amylose content, pH, swelling power, syneresis, and pasting properties, whereas carboxyl content, water absorption capacity, and transmittance were found to increase with the increase in irradiation dose. Granule morphology of native and irradiated starches under scanning electron microscope revealed that granules were polygonal or irregular in shape. The starch granules were somewhat deformed by gamma irradiation. X-ray diffraction pattern showed A type of pattern in native as well as irradiated starches.

  11. A review of the influence of growth factors and cytokines in in vitro human keratinocyte migration.

    PubMed

    Peplow, Philip V; Chatterjee, Marissa P

    2013-04-01

    Keratinocyte migration from the wound edge is a crucial step in the reepithelization of cutaneous wounds. Growth factors and cytokines, released from cells that invade the wound matrix, play an important role, and several in vitro assays have been performed to elucidate this. The purposes of this study were to review in vitro human studies on keratinocyte migration to identify those growth factors or cytokines that stimulate keratinocyte migration and whether these assays might serve as a screening procedure prior to testing combinations of growth factors or cytokines to promote wound closure in vivo. Research papers investigating effect of growth factors and cytokines on human keratinocyte migration in vitro were retrieved from library sources, PubMed databases, reference lists of papers, and searches of relevant journals. Fourteen different growth factors and cytokines enhanced migration in scratch wound assay and HGF together with TGF-β, and IGF-1 with EGF, were more stimulatory than either growth factor alone. HGF with TGF-β1 had a greater chemokinetic effect than either growth factor alone in transmigration assay. TGF-β1, FGF-7, FGF-2 and AGF were chemotactic to keratinocytes. EGF, TGF-α, IL-1α, IGF and MGSA enhanced cell migration on ECM proteins. Many growth factors and cytokines enhanced migration of keratinocytes in vitro, and certain combinations of growth factors were more stimulatory than either alone. These and other combinations that stimulate keratinocyte migration in vitro should be tested for effect on wound closure and repair in vivo. The scratch wound assay provides a useful, inexpensive and easy-to-perform screening method for testing individual or combinations of growth factors or cytokines, or growth factors combined with other modalities such as laser irradiation, prior to performing wound healing studies with laboratory animals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Protect Human Islets from Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Telford Y.; Seeberger, Karen L.; Kin, Tatsuya; Adesida, Adetola; Jomha, Nadr; Shapiro, A. M. James; Korbutt, Gregory S.

    2012-01-01

    Transplantation of human islets is an attractive alternative to daily insulin injections for patients with type 1 diabetes. However, the majority of islet recipients lose graft function within five years. Inflammation is a primary contributor to graft loss, and inhibiting pro-inflammatory cytokine activity can reverse inflammation mediated dysfunction of islet grafts. As mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) possess numerous immunoregulatory properties, we hypothesized that MSCs could protect human islets from pro-inflammatory cytokines. Five hundred human islets were co-cultured with 0.5 or 1.0×106 human MSCs derived from bone marrow or pancreas for 24 hours followed by 48 hour exposure to interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin 1β. Controls include islets cultured alone (± cytokines) and with human dermal fibroblasts (± cytokines). For all conditions, glucose stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS), total islet cellular insulin content, islet β cell apoptosis, and potential cytoprotective factors secreted in the culture media were determined. Cytokine exposure disrupted human islet GSIS based on stimulation index and percentage insulin secretion. Conversely, culture with 1.0×106 bMSCs preserved GSIS from cytokine treated islets. Protective effects were not observed with fibroblasts, indicating that preservation of human islet GSIS after exposure to pro-inflammatory cytokines is MSC dependent. Islet β cell apoptosis was observed in the presence of cytokines; however, culture of bMSCs with islets prevented β cell apoptosis after cytokine treatment. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) as well as matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9 were also identified as putative secreted cytoprotective factors; however, other secreted factors likely play a role in protection. This study, therefore, demonstrates that MSCs may be beneficial for islet engraftment by promoting cell survival and reduced inflammation. PMID:22666480

  13. Neutron Irradiation Resistance of RAFM Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Gaganidze, Ermile; Dafferner, Bernhard; Aktaa, Jarir

    2008-07-01

    The neutron irradiation resistance of the reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel EUROFER97 and international reference steels (F82H-mod, OPTIFER-Ia, GA3X and MANET-I) have been investigated after irradiation in the Petten High Flux Reactor up to 16.3 dpa at different irradiation temperatures (250-450 deg. C). The embrittlement behavior and hardening are investigated by instrumented Charpy-V tests with sub-size specimens. Neutron irradiation-induced embrittlement and hardening of EUROFER97 was studied under different heat treatment conditions. Embrittlement and hardening of as-delivered EUROFER97 steel are comparable to those of reference steels. Heat treatment of EUROFER97 at a higher austenitizing temperature substantially improves the embrittlement behaviour at low irradiation temperatures. Analysis of embrittlement vs. hardening behavior of RAFM steels within a proper model in terms of the parameter C={delta}DBTT/{delta}{sigma} indicates hardening-dominated embrittlement at irradiation temperatures below 350 deg. C with 0.17 {<=} C {<=} 0.53 deg. C/MPa. Scattering of C at irradiation temperatures above 400 deg. C indicates non hardening embrittlement. A role of He in a process of embrittlement is investigated in EUROFER97 based steels, that are doped with different contents of natural B and the separated {sup 10}B-isotope (0.008-0.112 wt.%). Testing on small scale fracture mechanical specimens for determination of quasi-static fracture toughness will be also presented in a view of future irradiation campaigns. (authors)

  14. Enhancing cytokine-induced killer cell therapy of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunsheng; Suksanpaisan, Lukkana; Chen, Yun-Wen; Russell, Stephen J; Peng, Kah-Whye

    2013-06-01

    Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells are in clinical testing against various tumor types, including multiple myeloma. In this study, we show that CIK cells have activity against subcutaneous and disseminated models of human myeloma (KAS-6/1), which can be enhanced by infecting the CIK cells with an oncolytic measles virus (MV) or by pretreating the myeloma cells with ionizing radiation (XRT). KAS-6/1 cells were killed by coculture with CIK or MV-infected CIK (CIK/MV) cells, and the addition of an anti-NKG2D antibody inhibited cytolysis by 50%. However, human bone marrow stromal cells can reduce CIK and CIK/MV mediated killing of myeloma cells (RPMI 8226, JJN-3 and MM1). In vivo, CIK and CIK/MV prolonged the survival of mice with systemic myeloma, although CIK/MV showed enhanced antitumor activity compared with CIK. Irradiation of the KAS-6/1 cells induced mRNA and protein expression of NKG2D ligands, MICA, and MICB in a dose-dependent manner and enhanced delivery of CIK/MV to the irradiated tumors. In both subcutaneous and disseminated myeloma models, XRT at 2 Gy resulted in superior prolongation of the survival of mice given CIK/MV therapy compared with CIK/MV with no XRT. This study demonstrates the potential of CIK against myeloma and that the combination of virotherapy with radiation could be used to further enhance therapeutic outcome using CIK cells.

  15. Cells and cytokines in pollinosis.

    PubMed

    Carlos, A G; Carlos, M L; Santos, M A; Melo, A

    1998-09-01

    Pollinosis is a spontaneous model of allergic disease self limited in time. In order to evaluate immune response during pollen exposition cellular populations CD2, CD4, CD8, CD19, CD22, CD23, CD28, CD29, CD45RA, CD45RO have been studied before, during and after pollen season by flux cytometry. Simultaneous assays of soluble CD23 and cytokines IL-2, IL-4 and IL-2 soluble receptor have been done by an ELISA method. A decrease of CD23 PBC was observed during pollen season maintained afterwards without significant changes in sol CD23. The level of CD45RO memory cells decreased during pollen season with an opposed pattern for CD45RA naive cells. PBC expressing integrin chain CD29 were also decreased during the peak of pollen season. These results show that allergen exposition triggers a turnover of CD45 PBC, a decrease of low affinity IgE receptor CD23 in PBC and a consumption or binding of cells presenting the CD29 integrin chain. Cellular mechanisms are deeply implied in the immune response to pollens and cellular changes can be used as allergic inflammation markers in pollinosis.

  16. Inflammatory cytokines in newborn infants.

    PubMed Central

    Sarandakou, A; Giannaki, G; Malamitsi-Puchner, A; Rizos, D; Hourdaki, E; Protonotariou, E; Phocas, I

    1998-01-01

    Serum levels of IL-1beta, IL-6 and TNF-alpha were measured in 48 healthy, termed neonates on the 1st (N1), 5th (N5) and 40th (N40) day after birth, compared with those in maternal serum (MS), umbilical cord (UC) and adult controls. Cytokine values in N1 and N5 were significantly elevated, than those in UC and in controls (P<0.0001). IL-1beta and IL-6 declined significantly from N1 to N40 (P<0.0001), while TNF-alpha increased significantly from N1 to N5 and declined thereafter. MS infinity IL-1beta and IL-6, but not MS infinity TNF-alpha, were significantly higher than those of controls (P<0.0001). IL-1beta values depended on the mode of delivery. In conclusion, the increased concentrations of IL-1beta, IL-6 and TNF-alpha during the perinatal period might suggest their involvement in an inflammation-like process during normal parturition, and reflect also a newborn immune response to the stress of delivery and environmental changes. PMID:9883964

  17. Resistin as an Intrahepatic Cytokine

    PubMed Central

    Bertolani, Cristiana; Sancho-Bru, Pau; Failli, Paola; Bataller, Ramon; Aleffi, Sara; DeFranco, Raffaella; Mazzinghi, Benedetta; Romagnani, Paola; Milani, Stefano; Ginés, Pere; Colmenero, Jordi; Parola, Maurizio; Gelmini, Stefania; Tarquini, Roberto; Laffi, Giacomo; Pinzani, Massimo; Marra, Fabio

    2006-01-01

    Obesity and insulin resistance accelerate the progression of fibrosis during chronic liver disease. Resistin antagonizes insulin action in rodents, but its role in humans is still controversial. The aims of this study were to investigate resistin expression in human liver and to evaluate whether resistin may affect the biology of activated human hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), key modulators of hepatic fibrogenesis. Resistin gene expression was low in normal human liver but was increased in conditions of severe fibrosis. Up-regulation of resistin during chronic liver damage was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. In a group of patients with alcoholic hepatitis, resistin expression correlated with inflammation and fibrosis, suggesting a possible action on HSCs. Exposure of cultured HSCs to recombinant resistin resulted in increased expression of the proinflammatory chemokines monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and interleukin-8, through activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB. Resistin induced a rapid increase in intracellular calcium concentration, mainly through calcium release from intracellular inositol triphosphate-sensitive pools. The intracellular calcium chelator BAPTA-AM blocked resistin-induced NF-κB activation and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 expression. In conclusion, this study shows a role for resistin as an intrahepatic cytokine exerting proinflammatory actions in HSCs, via a Ca2+/NF-κB-dependent pathway and suggests involvement of this adipokine in the pathophysiology of liver fibrosis. PMID:17148667

  18. Photonic crystal enhanced cytokine immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Mathias, Patrick C; Ganesh, Nikhil; Cunningham, Brian T

    2009-01-01

    Photonic crystal surfaces are demonstrated as a means for enhancing the detection sensitivity and resolution for assays that use a fluorescent tag to quantify the concentration of an analyte protein molecule in a liquid test sample. Computer modeling of the spatial distribution of resonantly coupled electromagnetic fields on the photonic crystal surface are used to estimate the magnitude of enhancement factor compared to performing the same fluorescent assay on a plain glass surface, and the photonic crystal structure is fabricated and tested to experimentally verify the performance using a sandwich immunoassay for the protein Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). The demonstrated photonic crystal fabrication method utilizes a nanoreplica molding technique that allows for large-area inexpensive fabrication of the structure in a format that is compatible with confocal microarray laser scanners. The signal-to-noise ratio for fluorescent spots on the photonic crystal is increased by at least five-fold relative to the glass slide, allowing a TNF-alpha concentration of 1.6 pg/ml to be distinguished from noise on a photonic crystal surface. In addition, the minimum quantitative limit of detection on the photonic crystal surface is one-third the limit on the glass slide - a decrease from 18 pg/ml to 6 pg/ml. The increased performance of the immunoassay allows for more accurate quantitation of physiologically relevant concentrations of TNF-alpha in a protein microarray format that can be expanded to multiple cytokines.

  19. Comminuting irradiated ferritic steel

    DOEpatents

    Bauer, Roger E.; Straalsund, Jerry L.; Chin, Bryan A.

    1985-01-01

    Disclosed is a method of comminuting irradiated ferritic steel by placing the steel in a solution of a compound selected from the group consisting of sulfamic acid, bisulfate, and mixtures thereof. The ferritic steel is used as cladding on nuclear fuel rods or other irradiated components.

  20. MASSIVE LEAKAGE IRRADIATOR

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Szilard, L.; Christy, R.F.; Friedman, F.L.

    1961-05-30

    An irradiator designed to utilize the neutrons that leak out of a reactor around its periphery is described. It avoids wasting neutron energy and reduces interference with the core flux to a minimum. This is done by surrounding all or most of the core with removable segments of the material to be irradiated within a matrix of reflecting material.

  1. Perspective on food irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-02-01

    Recent US Food and Drug Administration approval of irradiation treatment for fruit, vegetables and pork has stimulated considerable discussion in the popular press on the safety and efficacy of irradiation processing of food. This perspective is designed to summarize the current scientific information available on this issue.

  2. Effect of gamma irradiation on the thermal and rheological properties of grain amaranth starch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiangli; Kasapis, Stefan; Bao, Jinsong; Corke, Harold

    2009-11-01

    Physical properties of starch from two cultivars of gamma-irradiated grain amaranth with different amylose content were investigated. Pasting viscosities decreased continuously with the increase in dosages of irradiation. Furthermore, different irradiation dosages resulted in modification of the thermal properties and crystallinity of starch. Dynamic oscillation on shear was also employed, temperature and frequency sweeps showed that changes in storage modulus and loss modulus were significant, with Tibet Yellow producing more elastic gels as compared to Hy030 at different irradiation dosages.

  3. Glucidic and lipidic metabolic changes in rats induced by irradiation and the effect of adrenalectomy.

    PubMed

    Groza, P; Ghizari, E; Butculescu, I; Ciontescu, L; Ciuntu, L

    1975-01-01

    In experiments on X-irradiated rats (1000 R) the hepatic glycogen, total lipids, phospholipids content, and plasma glucose, cholesterol and beta-lipoprotein concentration were determined in intact and adrenalectomized animals. It was confirmed that irradiation produces a hepatic glycogen and blood glucose increased concentration. The glucidic metabolic response on irradiation is diminished by adrenalectomy. The adrenalectomy-induced modifications in the lipid metabolism of irradiated rats are more inconstant, which corresponds with its relative independence from glucocorticoid hormones.

  4. Irradiation Creep in Graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Ubic, Rick; Butt, Darryl; Windes, William

    2014-03-13

    An understanding of the underlying mechanisms of irradiation creep in graphite material is required to correctly interpret experimental data, explain micromechanical modeling results, and predict whole-core behavior. This project will focus on experimental microscopic data to demonstrate the mechanism of irradiation creep. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy should be able to image both the dislocations in graphite and the irradiation-induced interstitial clusters that pin those dislocations. The team will first prepare and characterize nanoscale samples of virgin nuclear graphite in a transmission electron microscope. Additional samples will be irradiated to varying degrees at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) facility and similarly characterized. Researchers will record microstructures and crystal defects and suggest a mechanism for irradiation creep based on the results. In addition, the purchase of a tensile holder for a transmission electron microscope will allow, for the first time, in situ observation of creep behavior on the microstructure and crystallographic defects.

  5. Hypothesis: compartmentalization of cytokines in intraabdominal infection.

    PubMed

    Schein, M; Wittmann, D H; Holzheimer, R; Condon, R E

    1996-06-01

    Although the proximal role of systemic cytokines in the infectious-inflammatory cascades is well recognized, the magnitude and meaning of its intraperitoneal levels in peritonitis have received little attention. We hypothesized that in peritonitis a significant and clinically relevant cytokine-mediated inflammatory response is compartmentalized in the peritoneal cavity. MEDLINE was used to search the literature for all articles dealing with experimental, primary, and secondary bacterial peritonitis and cytokines. Bacterial peritonitis is associated with an immense intraperitoneally compartmentalized cytokine response, with plasma levels of cytokines representing only the tip of the iceberg. Although certain amount of cytokines may be beneficial to the peritoneal defense mechanisms, higher levels correlate with adverse outcome. Thus it is plausible to look at acute peritonitis as initially a combined infective (microorganism) and inflammatory (cytokines) process. The clinical significance of the distinction between peritoneal inflammation and infection and the relevance of our findings to the stratification and treatment of peritonitis are discussed. Current surgical and antibiotic therapy for peritonitis is able to clear the peritoneal cavity of infective concentration of bacteria, but many patients continue to die of an uncontrolled activation of the inflammatory cascade. We suggest that one potential venue for therapeutic progress is the modulation of the compartmentalized peritoneal inflammatory response.

  6. Vaccination with cytokines in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Delavallée, Laure; Assier, Eric; Denys, Anne; Falgarone, Géraldine; Zagury, Jean-François; Muller, Sylvianne; Bessis, Natacha; Boissier, Marie-Christophe

    2008-01-01

    Most autoimmune diseases have an unknown etiology, but all involve cytokines cascade in their development. At the present time, several cytokines have been identified as major targets in various autoimmune diseases, involving the development of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against those cytokines. Even if MAbs are indeed efficient, the passive immunotherapies also present some disadvantages and are expensive. To counter this, several strategies have been developed, including active immunotherapy, based on the vaccination principle. The aim of such a strategy is to induce a B cell response and to obtain autoantibodies able to neutralize the interaction of the self-cytokine with its receptor. To that purpose, cytokines (entire or peptide) are either coupled with a protein-carrier or virus-like particle, or modified with foreign Th cell epitopes. DNA vaccination can also be used with cytokine sequences. This review focuses on the different vaccination strategies with cytokines (including Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF)alpha, Interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), IL-17) in different autoimmune diseases in preclinical studies; the benefit/risk ratio of such a strategy and the present development of clinical trials in some autoimmune diseases are also discussed.

  7. Side effects of cytokines approved for therapy.

    PubMed

    Baldo, Brian A

    2014-11-01

    Cytokines, currently known to be more than 130 in number, are small MW (<30 kDa) key signaling proteins that modulate cellular activities in immunity, infection, inflammation and malignancy. Key to understanding their function is recognition of their pleiotropism and often overlapping and functional redundancies. Classified here into 9 main families, most of the 20 approved cytokine preparations (18 different cytokines; 3 pegylated), all in recombinant human (rh) form, are grouped in the hematopoietic growth factor, interferon, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) families. In the hematopoietin family, approved cytokines are aldesleukin (rhIL-2), oprelvekin (rhIL-11), filgrastim and tbo-filgrastim (rhG-CSF), sargramostim (rhGM-CSF), metreleptin (rh-leptin) and the rh-erythropoietins, epoetin and darbepoietin alfa. Anakinra, a recombinant receptor antagonist for IL-1, is in the IL-1 family; recombinant interferons alfa-1, alfa-2, beta-1 and gamma-1 make up the interferon family; palifermin (rhKGF) and becaplermin (rhPDGF) are in the PDGF family; and rhBMP-2 and rhBMP-7 represent the TGFβ family. The main physicochemical features, FDA-approved indications, modes of action and side effects of these approved cytokines are presented. Underlying each adverse events profile is their pleiotropism, potency and capacity to release other cytokines producing cytokine 'cocktails'. Side effects, some serious, occur despite cytokines being endogenous proteins, and this therefore demands caution in attempts to introduce individual members into the clinic. This caution is reflected in the relatively small number of cytokines currently approved by regulatory agencies and by the fact that 14 of the FDA-approved preparations carry warnings, with 10 being black box warnings.

  8. Cytokine pattern of the breast tumor supernatant.

    PubMed

    Autenshlyus, A I; Kunts, T A; Karpukhina, K V; Mikhaylova, E S; Varaksin, N A; Marinkin, I O; Lyakhovich, V V

    2016-09-01

    Cytokine production was evaluated in supernatants of cultured tumor cells that were obtained by biopsy of the breast invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) and breast fibroadenoma (FA) and grown in vitro. In the IDC supernatants, the concentrations of pro-inflammatory (pro-oncogenic) cytokines IL-17, IL-18, and IFNγ and of IL-1 receptor antagonist were significantly higher than in the FA cell supernatants. The concentrations of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and MCP-1 protein in supernatants of IDC cells were significantly lower than those determined in FA supernatants.

  9. Th17 cytokines induce pro-fibrotic cytokines release from human eosinophils

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Subepithelial fibrosis is one of the most critical structural changes affecting bronchial airway function during asthma. Eosinophils have been shown to contribute to the production of pro-fibrotic cytokines, TGF-β and IL-11, however, the mechanism regulating this process is not fully understood. Objective In this report, we investigated whether cytokines associated with inflammation during asthma may induce eosinophils to produce pro-fibrotic cytokines. Methods Eosinophils were isolated from peripheral blood of 10 asthmatics and 10 normal control subjects. Eosinophils were stimulated with Th1, Th2 and Th17 cytokines and the production of TGF-β and IL-11 was determined using real time PCR and ELISA assays. Results The basal expression levels of eosinophil derived TGF-β and IL-11 cytokines were comparable between asthmatic and healthy individuals. Stimulating eosinophils with Th1 and Th2 cytokines did not induce expression of pro-fibrotic cytokines. However, stimulating eosinophils with Th17 cytokines resulted in the enhancement of TGF-β and IL-11 expression in asthmatic but not healthy individuals. This effect of IL-17 on eosinophils was dependent on p38 MAPK activation as inhibiting the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, but not other kinases, inhibited IL-17 induced pro-fibrotic cytokine release. Conclusions Th17 cytokines might contribute to airway fibrosis during asthma by enhancing production of eosinophil derived pro-fibrotic cytokines. Preventing the release of pro-fibrotic cytokines by blocking the effect of Th17 cytokines on eosinophils may prove to be beneficial in controlling fibrosis for disorders with IL-17 driven inflammation such as allergic and autoimmune diseases. PMID:23496774

  10. Th17 cytokines induce pro-fibrotic cytokines release from human eosinophils.

    PubMed

    Al-Muhsen, Saleh; Letuve, Severine; Vazquez-Tello, Alejandro; Pureza, Mary Angeline; Al-Jahdali, Hamdan; Bahammam, Ahmed S; Hamid, Qutayba; Halwani, Rabih

    2013-03-13

    Subepithelial fibrosis is one of the most critical structural changes affecting bronchial airway function during asthma. Eosinophils have been shown to contribute to the production of pro-fibrotic cytokines, TGF-β and IL-11, however, the mechanism regulating this process is not fully understood. In this report, we investigated whether cytokines associated with inflammation during asthma may induce eosinophils to produce pro-fibrotic cytokines. Eosinophils were isolated from peripheral blood of 10 asthmatics and 10 normal control subjects. Eosinophils were stimulated with Th1, Th2 and Th17 cytokines and the production of TGF-β and IL-11 was determined using real time PCR and ELISA assays. The basal expression levels of eosinophil derived TGF-β and IL-11 cytokines were comparable between asthmatic and healthy individuals. Stimulating eosinophils with Th1 and Th2 cytokines did not induce expression of pro-fibrotic cytokines. However, stimulating eosinophils with Th17 cytokines resulted in the enhancement of TGF-β and IL-11 expression in asthmatic but not healthy individuals. This effect of IL-17 on eosinophils was dependent on p38 MAPK activation as inhibiting the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, but not other kinases, inhibited IL-17 induced pro-fibrotic cytokine release. Th17 cytokines might contribute to airway fibrosis during asthma by enhancing production of eosinophil derived pro-fibrotic cytokines. Preventing the release of pro-fibrotic cytokines by blocking the effect of Th17 cytokines on eosinophils may prove to be beneficial in controlling fibrosis for disorders with IL-17 driven inflammation such as allergic and autoimmune diseases.

  11. Ex vivo culture rescues hematopoietic stem cells with long-term repopulating capacity following harvest from lethally irradiated mice.

    PubMed

    Chute, John P; Fung, Jennifer; Muramoto, Garrett; Erwin, Robert

    2004-03-01

    High-dose ionizing radiation can cause lethal myeloablation in exposed individuals. We examined whether ex vivo culture could rescue hematopoietic stem cells with repopulating capacity following harvest from lethally irradiated animals. We exposed B6.SJL mice to 1050 cGy, harvested their irradiated bone marrow (BM), and examined whether ex vivo culture of the irradiated BM mononuclear cells (MNC) with porcine microvascular endothelial cells (PMVEC) or cytokines alone could rescue hematopoietic cells with in vitro colony-forming activity, in vivo radioprotective capacity, and long-term repopulating potential. PMVEC coculture supported the recovery of fourfold and 80-fold greater numbers of total cells and colony-forming cells (CFC) compared to cyokines alone following 1050 cGy irradiation. All control mice irradiated with 1050 cGy died by day 30, as did mice transplanted with 1050 cGy-irradiated BM MNC. In contrast, transplantation of 1050 cGy-irradiated/PMVEC-cultured BM was fully radioprotective in 12 of 16 recipient mice (75%) exposed to 1050 cGy. Six of the 12 CD45.2+ mice (50%) transplanted with 1050 cGy-irradiated/PMVEC-cultured cells showed long-term (>6 months) multilineage repopulation derived from irradiated donor CD45.1+ cells. Surprisingly, transplantation of identical doses of 1050 cGy-irradiated/cytokine-cultured BM was also radioprotective in 50% of irradiated recipient mice and 50% of these mice demonstrated donor-derived repopulation. Fully functional BM stem and progenitor cells can be rescued following harvest from lethally irradiated animals via ex vivo culture with PMVEC or cytokines alone. This method can serve as a model for the rapid ex vivo rescue and transplantation of autologous BM progenitors in the treatment of victims of radiation injury.

  12. Neutrophil myeloperoxidase destruction by ultraviolet irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hanker, J.; Giammara, B.; Strauss, G.

    1988-01-01

    The peroxidase activity of enriched leukocyte preparations on coverslips was determined cytochemically with a newly developed method. The techniques utilizes diaminobenzidine medium and cupric nitrate intensification and is suitable for analysis with light microscopy, SEM, and TEM. Blood specimens from control individuals were studied with and without in vitro UV irradiation and compared with those from psoriasis patients exposed therapeutically to various types of UV in phototherapy. All UV irradiated samples showed diminished neutrophil myeloperoxidase (MP) activity although that of the principal eosinophil peroxidase was unaffected. The SEMs supported the contention that decreased neutrophil MP activity might be related to UV induced degranulation. It is believed to be possible, eventually, to equate the observed MP degranulation effect after UV irradiation with diminished ability to fight bacterial infections.

  13. Cytokines, Neovascularization and Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-10-01

    which support tumor growth and metastasis. In order to test our hypothesis, we are examining t ie expression of 11-8 antigen in human breast tissue using...Revised 1985). S4 For the protection of human subjects, the investigator(s) adhered to policies of applicable Federal Law 45 CFR 46. In conducting...Contents INTRODUCTION 5 BODY: EXPERIMENTAL METHODS AND RESULTS 6 Specific Aim I- To characterize IL-8 expression in human breast cancer 6 Study IA- To

  14. [Gingival fluid cytokine profile in patients after dental implantation and by periimplantitis].

    PubMed

    Tsarev, V N; Nikolaeva, E N; Ippolitov, E V; Tsareva, T V

    2013-01-01

    The study included 32 patients with complications which have developed 3 months to 14 years after dental implants placement. ELISA method was used to assess cytokines content in various sites of tooth alignment in patients with Herpesviridae and periodontopathogenics bacteria associated periimplantitis. The results prove the necessity for Herpesviridae and selected bacteria monitoring after dental implantation.

  15. Control of Hepatitis B Virus by Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yuchen; Protzer, Ulrike

    2017-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains a major public health problem worldwide with more than 240 million individuals chronically infected. Current treatments can control HBV replication to a large extent, but cannot eliminate HBV infection. Cytokines have been shown to control HBV replication and contribute to HBV cure in different models. Cytokines play an important role in limiting acute HBV infection in patients and mediate a non-cytolytic clearance of the virus. In this review, we summarize the effects of cytokines and cytokine-induced cellular signaling pathways on different steps of the HBV life cycle, and discuss possible strategies that may contribute to the eradication of HBV through innate immune activation. PMID:28117695

  16. Dynamical Systems, Cytokine Storms, and Blood Filtration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Glenn; Hubler, Alfred

    2008-03-01

    Various infections and non-infectious diseases can trigger immune cells and the proteins (cytokines) the cells use to communicate with each other to be caught in a positive feedback loop; this ``cytokine storm'' is frequently fatal. By examining the network of cytokine-immune cell interactions we will illustrate why anti-mediator drugs have been generally ineffective in stopping this feedback. A more effective approach may be to try and reduce interactions by dampening many signals at once by filtering the cytokines out of the blood directly (think dialysis). We will argue that feedback on an out of control nonlinear dynamical system is easier to understand than its normal healthy state and apply filtration to a toy model of immune response.

  17. Mucosal cytokine network in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Andoh, Akira; Yagi, Yuhki; Shioya, Makoto; Nishida, Atsushi; Tsujikawa, Tomoyuki; Fujiyama, Yoshihide

    2008-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease (CD) are characterized by ongoing mucosal inflammation in which dysfunction of the host immunologic response against dietary factors and commensal bacteria is involved. The chronic inflammatory process leads to disruption of the epithelial barrier, and the formation of epithelial ulceration. This permits easy access for the luminal microbiota and dietary antigens to cells resident in the lamina propria, and stimulates further pathological immune cell responses. Cytokines are essential mediators of the interactions between activated immune cells and non-immune cells, including epithelial and mesenchymal cells. The clinical efficacy of targeting TNF-α clearly indicates that cytokines are the therapeutic targets in IBD patients. In this manuscript, we focus on the biological activities of recently-reported cytokines [Interleukin (IL)-17 cytokine family, IL-31 and IL-32], which might play a role through interaction with TNF-α in the pathophysiology of IBD. PMID:18777592

  18. Alaskan Commodities Irradiation Project

    SciTech Connect

    Zarling, J.P.; Swanson, R.B.; Logan, R.R.; Das, D.K.; Lewis, C.E.; Workman, W.G.; Tumeo, M.A.; Hok, C.I.; Birklid, C.A.; Bennett, F.L.

    1988-12-01

    The ninety-ninth US Congress commissioned a six-state food irradiation research and development program to evaluate the commercial potential of this technology. Hawaii, Washington, Iowa, Oklahoma and Florida as well as Alaska have participated in the national program; various food products including fishery products, red meats, tropical and citrus fruits and vegetables have been studied. The purpose of the Alaskan study was to review and evaluate those factors related to the technical and economic feasibility of an irradiator in Alaska. This options analysis study will serve as a basis for determining the state's further involvement in the development of food irradiation technology. 40 refs., 50 figs., 53 tabs.

  19. Test reactor irradiation coordination

    SciTech Connect

    Heartherly, D.W.; Siman Tov, I.I.; Sparks, D.W.

    1995-10-01

    This task was established to supply and coordinate irradiation services needed by NRC contractors other than ORNL. These services include the design and assembly of irradiation capsules as well as arranging for their exposure, disassembly, and return of specimens. During this period, the final design of the facility and specimen baskets was determined through an iterative process involving the designers and thermal analysts. The resulting design should permit the irradiation of all test specimens to within 5{degrees}C of their desired temperature. Detailing of all parts is ongoing and should be completed during the next reporting period. Procurement of the facility will also be initiated during the next review period.

  20. Effect of electron irradiation on the gel properties of Collichthys lucidus surimi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Siyao; Lv, Liangyu; Yang, Wenge; Xu, Dalun; Lou, Qiaoming; Zhang, Jinjie

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of electron irradiation on the gel properties of Collichthys lucidus surimi. The results showed that irradiation decreased the trichloroacetic acid-soluble peptide content of the surimi gel. At 5 kGy, a more compact and ordered gel network structure was achieved, resulting in a higher gel strength, whiteness, and water-holding capacity than non-irradiated surimi gel. During heat-induced formation of the gel, the α-helix content decreased, whilst the β-sheet and β-turn content increased. Irradiation treatments also decreased the α-helix content and increased β-sheet content, and this transformation is beneficial for the protein denaturation and gel formation. Collectively, the results suggest that electron irradiation, at an optimal dose of 5 kGy, could be an effective method for application in the surimi manufacturing industry

  1. Cytokine Production in the Serum and Spleen of Mice from Day 6 to 14 of Gestation: Cytokines/Placenta/ Spleen/Serum

    PubMed Central

    Iconomidou, Bessy

    1995-01-01

    Pregnancy, like most biologic phenomena, involves the action of cytokines. These proteins have a short half-life and are believed to exert their effect close to their site of production, where diagnostic tests cannot be easily performed. Here we show that the cytokine content in the maternal serum reflects cytokine production and secretion from maternal spleen cells, which also correlates with production from decidual cells. We show that GM-CSF, IL- 3, and IL-10 are present in the serum at specific time intervals during the first half of murine pregnancy, which correlates with their production from maternal spleen cells. Purified GM-CSF and IL-3 from spleen-cell-culture supernatants are biologically active molecules, able to stimulate placental-cell proliferation. Furthermore, TNF-0, which has been identified in many cases of fetal rejection as well as in labor, is shown to be naturally produced during the second half of pregnancy. Additionally, within the limits of the sensitivity of the technique we have used, the detection of IL-4 and the absence of detectable levels of IL- 2 in the maternal serum strongly comforts the hypothesis that pregnancy is a Th2-dependent phenomenon. The results presented in this paper show that the cytokine profile during pregnancy can be monitored by simple blood tests, which may be of relevance both in the followup of a physiological human pregnancy and to the diagnosis of recurrent abortions due to cytokine imbalance. PMID:8924760

  2. Temporomandibular joint cytokine profiles in the horse.

    PubMed

    Carmalt, James L; Gordon, John R; Allen, Andrew L

    2006-06-01

    It has been suggested that dental abnormalities lead to temporomandibular joint inflammation and pain that may be mitigated by regular dental care. There is considerable literature on the pathophysiology of equine joint disease including studies on cytokine profiles in diseased appendicular joints. This study examined the effects of age and dental malocclusions summarized as a dental pathology score on equine temporomandibular joint cytokine (IL-1, IL-6, IL-8, TNF alpha and TGF-beta1, -beta2, -beta3) concentrations. TGF-beta3 was not detected in any joint sample. IL-1, IL-6 and TNF alpha were not influenced by age. Foals had significantly lower concentrations of lL-8 and TGF-beta1, and higher levels of TGF-beta2 compared with older horses. Age did not effect cytokine concentration in older horses although there was a trend towards increasing 1L-8 with age. The dental pathology score increased with age in mature horses, however there was no effect of dental pathology score on cytokine concentration. There was no effect of incisor eruption, and presence or number of periodontal lesions on temporomandibular joint cytokine concentration. Our findings indicate that age but not dental pathology affected temporomandibular joint proinflammatory cytokine concentration in this population of horses.

  3. The role of cytokines in cancer.

    PubMed

    Oppenheim, J; Fujiwara, H

    1996-10-01

    The role of cytokines was intensively discussed over the course of a two and a half day meeting sponsored by the US-JAPAN Cancer Cooperative Research Program of the Office of International Affairs, National Cancer Institute and held at The National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland on 15-17 January 1996. Most of the first day was devoted to a discussion of the role of cytokines in modulating angiogenesis and the consequent effect of this on tumor growth and metastases. This was followed by sessions on the effect of various cytokines in enhancing or suppressing immunological responses to tumors. Several presentations focused on the direct inhibitory or growth promoting effects of cytokines on tumor growth. The final session consisted of a comparison of the efficacy of different approaches to tumor vaccination including gene therapy, enhanced antigen presentation, use of polymeric carriers or of DNA vectors. For background information the reader is referred to appropriate chapters on the role of cytokines in neoplastic diseases (Oppenheim JJ, Rossio JL, Gearing AJH, eds. In Clinical Application of Cytokines: Role of Pathogenesis, Diagnosis and Therapy. Oxford University Press, New York, 1993 [1]).

  4. T cell cytokines and disease prevention.

    PubMed

    Wood, P R; Seow, H F

    1996-11-01

    Until recently, work on cytokines has been dominated by the use of murine or human molecules. In the last 5 years we have seen a rapid expansion in the production of bovine, ovine and porcine cytokine reagents. cDNA clones, recombinant proteins and monoclonal antibody probes are not available for a wide variety of cytokines from veterinary species. One of the most interesting recent proposals in immunology has been the division of T helper cells into two classes. Th1 cells have been characterised by the production of gamma-interferon, interleukin (IL)-2, tumour necrosis factor-beta (lymphotoxin-alpha) and the ability to mediate delayed-type hypersensitivity responses, and Th2 cells by their production of IL-4, IL-5, IL-6 and IL-10 and the ability to stimulate production of mast cells, eosinophils and IgE. An important issue for us is to determine whether polarisation of T helper cells to Th1 or Th2 occurs in veterinary species. This paper will attempt to review the status of the Th1 and Th2 debate for sheep, cattle and pigs. It will also discuss the potential for the use of cytokines in modulating the type of immune response following vaccination. By incorporation of particular cytokines into vaccine formulations or the inhibition of production of specific cytokines it may be possible to redirect the nature of the immune response to a particular antigen.

  5. Cytokines as predictive biomarkers of alloreactivity.

    PubMed

    Brunet, M

    2012-09-08

    Clinical use of valid biomarkers enables the prediction of alloreactive response (risk of rejection) and personal susceptibility to immunosuppressive treatment could lead to personalized immunosuppressive therapy. In clinical transplantation, it has been reported that cytokine production and secretion could be modified by immunosuppressive drugs, as well as during the rejection process. Some cytokines such as interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-2, IL-10, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β have been identified as candidate biomarkers that correlate with graft outcome and personal response to immunosuppressive agents. This review will focus on the current state of knowledge, indicating that monitoring changes in cytokine production could be used to predict the risk of rejection and to guide immunosuppression therapy in transplant recipients. In addition, many questions regarding the characteristics and standardization of the methods used for cytokine monitoring (ELISA; ELISPOT; Flow Cytometry) that need to be addressed before these assays can be clinically applied will be discussed in light of recent studies showing an association between the expression of some cytokines and genetic variants, the impact of immunosuppression, and the incidence of rejection. The clinical implementation of cytokine monitoring should be tested in prospective multicenter clinical trials with standard operating procedures and objective interpretation of the results obtained. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Multiplex cytokine analysis of Werner syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Makoto; Hayata, Koichiro; Chiba, Junji; Matsuura, Masaaki; Iwaki-Egawa, Sachiko; Watanabe, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Summary We reported a minor inflammation-driven ageing (inflammageing) assessed by highly sensitive CRP (hsCRP) in normal individuals and patients with Werner syndrome (WS), followed by an ageing associated Th2-biased cytokine change in normal ageing in the previous papers. To further study the association of hsCRP and 26 cytokines/chemokines in 35 WS patients, a multiple cytokine array system was used in the same serum samples as were examined for hsCRP. The serum levels of Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, and GM-CSF), Th1 products (IL-2, TNFα, IL-12, and IFNγ) and monocyte/macrophage products (MCP-1, basic FGF and G-CSF) in WS were significantly elevated compared with normal ageing. Elevated hsCRP level in WS was significantly correlated with IL-6, IL-12 and VEGF levels, if age and sex were taken into account. A pro-inflammatory cytokine/chemokine circuit-stimulated immunological shift to Th2 in WS was similar to normal ageing. These cytokine/chemokine changes may induce a systemic chronic inflammation monitored by hsCRP, though these immunological changes in WS were more complicated than normal ageing, possibly due to the WS-specific chronic inflammation such as skin ulcer, diabetes mellitus and central obesity with visceral fat deposition. Further study may warrant the pathophysiology of Th2 shift and Th2-biased inflammageing in normal ageing and WS. PMID:26668779

  7. [Proinflammatory cytokines in patients with pyelonephritis].

    PubMed

    Gaĭseniuk, F Z; Driianskaia, V E; Drannik, G N; Rudenko, M Iu; Lavrenchuk, O V; Stepanova, N M; Stashevskaia, N V; Busygina, Iu S

    2013-09-01

    The antiinflammatory cytokines participate in antiinfective immunity, that is why it is advisable to study their peculiarities in determination of the role in immunologic pathogenesis of pyelonephritis. Of the work is to study the levels of pro-inflammatory blood cytokines in the patients with pyelonephritis (PN), to determine the peculiarities in acute and chronic its course in children and adults. The immuno-enzymic method ELISA and the corresponding test-systems were used to study the levels of cytokines in blood. There were studied the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF, MCP and IL-23) in blood serum of patients with acute (APN) and chronic (CPN) pyelonephritis. The analysis showed the reliable increase in levels of all studied findings in both forms of PN--both in all 173 patients and in every group--children (87) and adults (86). The MCP-1 levels in APN are reliably higher than in CPN, while in TNF-b and IL-23--do not differ. The levels of all three cytokines in blood of adults were higher than in children in APN, but TNF--in CPN as well. The high level of TNF, MCP-1 and IL-23 in blood of adults and children confirm their important role both in APN and CPN, but MCP-1 can be considered as a predictor of acute/exacerbation of chronic pyelonephritis. By the findings of the studied cytokines, more expressed immune response was noted in the adults.

  8. Cytokines and HCV-Related Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Fallahi, Poupak; Ferri, Clodoveo; Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Corrado, Alda; Sansonno, Domenico; Antonelli, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    Cytokines are intercellular mediators involved in viral control and liver damage being induced by infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV). The complex cytokine network operating during initial infection allows a coordinated, effective development of both innate and adaptive immune responses. However, HCV interferes with cytokines at various levels and escapes immune response by inducing a T-helper (Th)2/T cytotoxic 2 cytokine profile. Inability to control infection leads to the recruitment of inflammatory infiltrates into the liver parenchyma by interferon (IFN)-gamma-inducible CXC chemokine ligand (CXCL)-9, -10, and -11 chemokines, which results in sustained liver damage and eventually in liver cirrhosis. The most important systemic HCV-related extrahepatic diseases—mixed cryoglobulinemia, lymphoproliferative disorders, thyroid autoimmune disorders, and type 2 diabetes—are associated with a complex dysregulation of the cytokine/chemokine network, involving proinflammatory and Th1 chemokines. The therapeutical administration of cytokines such as IFN-alpha may result in viral clearance during persistent infection and reverts this process. PMID:22611419

  9. Cytokines and HCV-related disorders.

    PubMed

    Fallahi, Poupak; Ferri, Clodoveo; Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Corrado, Alda; Sansonno, Domenico; Antonelli, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    Cytokines are intercellular mediators involved in viral control and liver damage being induced by infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV). The complex cytokine network operating during initial infection allows a coordinated, effective development of both innate and adaptive immune responses. However, HCV interferes with cytokines at various levels and escapes immune response by inducing a T-helper (Th)2/T cytotoxic 2 cytokine profile. Inability to control infection leads to the recruitment of inflammatory infiltrates into the liver parenchyma by interferon (IFN)-gamma-inducible CXC chemokine ligand (CXCL)-9, -10, and -11 chemokines, which results in sustained liver damage and eventually in liver cirrhosis. The most important systemic HCV-related extrahepatic diseases--mixed cryoglobulinemia, lymphoproliferative disorders, thyroid autoimmune disorders, and type 2 diabetes--are associated with a complex dysregulation of the cytokine/chemokine network, involving proinflammatory and Th1 chemokines. The therapeutical administration of cytokines such as IFN-alpha may result in viral clearance during persistent infection and reverts this process.

  10. IL-17 family: cytokines, receptors and signaling

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Chunfang; Wu, Ling; Li, Xiaoxia

    2013-01-01

    The interleukin 17 (IL-17) family, a subset of cytokines consisting of IL-17A-F, plays crucial roles in host defense against microbial organisms and in the development of inflammatory diseases. Although IL-17A is the signature cytokine produced by T helper 17 (Th17) cells, IL-17A and other IL-17 family cytokines have multiple sources ranging from immune cells to non-immune cells. The IL-17 family signals via their correspondent receptors and activates downstream pathways that include NFκB, MAPKs and C/EBPs to induce the expression of anti-microbial peptides, cytokines and chemokines. The proximal adaptor Act1 is a common mediator during the signaling of all IL-17 cytokines so far and is thus involved in IL-17 mediated host defense and IL-17-driven autoimmune conditions. This review will give an overview and recent updates on the IL-17family, the activation and regulation of IL-17 signaling as well as diseases associated with this cytokine family PMID:24011563

  11. Commercial sunscreen formulations: UVB irradiation stability and effect on UVB irradiation-induced skin oxidative stress and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Vilela, Fernanda M P; Oliveira, Franciane M; Vicentini, Fabiana T M C; Casagrande, Rubia; Verri, Waldiceu A; Cunha, Thiago M; Fonseca, Maria J V

    2016-10-01

    Evidence shows that sunscreens undergo degradation processes induced by UV irradiation forming free radicals, which reduces skin protection. In this regard, the biological effects of three commercial sunscreen formulations upon UVB irradiation in the skin were investigated. The three formulations had in common the presence of benzophenone-3 added with octyl methoxycinnamate or octyl salycilate or both, which are regular UV filters in sunscreens. The results show that formulations F1 and F2 presented partial degradation upon UVB irradiation. Formulations F1 and F2 presented higher skin penetration profiles than F3. None of the formulations avoided UVB irradiation-induced GSH depletion, but inhibited reduction of SOD activity, suggesting the tested formulations did not present as a major mechanism inhibiting all UVB irradiation-triggered oxidative stress pathways. The formulations avoided the increase of myeloperoxidase activity and cytokine production (IL-1β and TNF-α), but with different levels of protection in relation to the IL-1β release. Concluding, UVB irradiation can reduce the stability of sunscreens, which in turn, present the undesirable properties of reaching viable skin. Additionally, the same SPF does not mean that different sunscreens will present the same biological effects as SPF is solely based on a skin erythema response. This found opens up perspectives to consider additional studies to reach highly safe sunscreens. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Content Wizard.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehlers-Zavala, Fabiola P.

    2001-01-01

    This classroom tip focuses on sustained-content language teaching. The game described--content wizard-- illustrates a practical technique for incorporating a range of language and academic skills into subject matter lessons for English-as-a-Second-Language learners. (Author/VWL)

  13. [The irradiation process].

    PubMed

    Barillot, I; Chauvet, B; Hannoun Lévi, J M; Lisbona, A; Leroy, T; Mahé, M A

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the regulatory framework of the radiotherapy practice in France, the external irradiation and brachytherapy process and the guidelines for patient follow-up.

  14. Food irradiation in perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henon, Y. M.

    1995-02-01

    Food irradiation already has a long history of hopes and disappointments. Nowhere in the world it plays the role that it should have, including in the much needed prevention of foodborne diseases. Irradiated food sold well wherever consumers were given a chance to buy them. Differences between national regulations do not allow the international trade of irradiated foods. While in many countries food irradiation is still illegal, in most others it is regulated as a food additive and based on the knowledge of the sixties. Until 1980, wholesomeness was the big issue. Then the "prerequisite" became detection methods. Large amounts of money have been spent to design and validate tests which, in fact, aim at enforcing unjustified restrictions on the use of the process. In spite of all the difficulties, it is believed that the efforts of various UN organizations and a growing legitimate demand for food safety should in the end lead to recognition and acceptance.

  15. AGC-2 Irradiation Report

    SciTech Connect

    Rohrbaugh, David Thomas; Windes, William; Swank, W. David

    2016-06-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will be a helium-cooled, very high temperature reactor (VHTR) with a large graphite core. In past applications, graphite has been used effectively as a structural and moderator material in both research and commercial high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) designs.[ , ] Nuclear graphite H 451, used previously in the United States for nuclear reactor graphite components, is no longer available. New nuclear graphites have been developed and are considered suitable candidates for the new NGNP reactor design. To support the design and licensing of NGNP core components within a commercial reactor, a complete properties database must be developed for these current grades of graphite. Quantitative data on in service material performance are required for the physical, mechanical, and thermal properties of each graphite grade with a specific emphasis on data related to the life limiting effects of irradiation creep on key physical properties of the NGNP candidate graphites. Based on experience with previous graphite core components, the phenomenon of irradiation induced creep within the graphite has been shown to be critical to the total useful lifetime of graphite components. Irradiation induced creep occurs under the simultaneous application of high temperatures, neutron irradiation, and applied stresses within the graphite components. Significant internal stresses within the graphite components can result from a second phenomenon—irradiation induced dimensional change. In this case, the graphite physically changes i.e., first shrinking and then expanding with increasing neutron dose. This disparity in material volume change can induce significant internal stresses within graphite components. Irradiation induced creep relaxes these large internal stresses, thus reducing the risk of crack formation and component failure. Obviously, higher irradiation creep levels tend to relieve more internal stress, thus allowing the

  16. Plant responses to UV-B irradiation are modified by UV-A irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Middleton, E.M.; Teramura, A.H. Univ. of Maryland, College Park )

    1993-06-01

    The increasing UV-B radiation (0.28-0.32 [mu]m) reaching the earth's surface is an important concern. Plant response in artificial UV-B irradiation studies has been difficult to assess, especially regarding photosynthetic pigments, because the fluorescent lamps also produce UV-A (0.32-0.40[mu]m) radiation which is involved with blue light in pigment synthesis. Both UV-A and UV-B irradiances were controlled in two glasshouse experiments conducted under relatively high PPFD (> 1300[mu]mol m[sup [minus]2] s[sup [minus]1]) at two biologically effective daily UV-B irradiances (10.7 and 14.1 kJ m[sup [minus]2]); UV-A irradiances were matched in Controls ([approximately]5, 9 kJ m[sup [minus]2]). Normal, chlorophyll-deficient, and flavonoid-deficient isolines of soybean cultivar, Clark, were utilized. Many growth/ pigment variables exhibited a statistically significant interaction between light quality and quantity: in general, UV-A radiation moderated the damaging effects of UV-B radiation. Regression analyses demonstrated that a single negative function related photosynthetic efficiency to carotenoid Content (r[sup 2] =0.73, P[le]0.001), implying a [open quotes]cost[close quotes] in maintaining carotenoids for photoprotection. A stomatal limitation to photosynthesis was verified and carotenoid content was correlated with UV-B absorbing compound levels, in UV-B irradiated plants.

  17. Total lymphoid irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, D.E.; Ferguson, R.M.; Simmons, R.L.; Kim, T.H.; Slavin, S.; Najarian, J.S.

    1983-05-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation by itself can produce sufficient immunosuppression to prolong the survival of a variety of organ allografts in experimental animals. The degree of prolongation is dose-dependent and is limited by the toxicity that occurs with higher doses. Total lymphoid irradiation is more effective before transplantation than after, but when used after transplantation can be combined with pharmacologic immunosuppression to achieve a positive effect. In some animal models, total lymphoid irradiation induces an environment in which fully allogeneic bone marrow will engraft and induce permanent chimerism in the recipients who are then tolerant to organ allografts from the donor strain. If total lymphoid irradiation is ever to have clinical applicability on a large scale, it would seem that it would have to be under circumstances in which tolerance can be induced. However, in some animal models graft-versus-host disease occurs following bone marrow transplantation, and methods to obviate its occurrence probably will be needed if this approach is to be applied clinically. In recent years, patient and graft survival rates in renal allograft recipients treated with conventional immunosuppression have improved considerably, and thus the impetus to utilize total lymphoid irradiation for its immunosuppressive effect alone is less compelling. The future of total lymphoid irradiation probably lies in devising protocols in which maintenance immunosuppression can be eliminated, or nearly eliminated, altogether. Such protocols are effective in rodents. Whether they can be applied to clinical transplantation remains to be seen.

  18. 3-aminobenzamide, a poly (ADP ribose) polymerase inhibitor, enhances wound healing in whole body gamma irradiated model.

    PubMed

    El-Hamoly, Tarek; El-Denshary, Ezzeddin S; Saad, Shokry Mohamed; El-Ghazaly, Mona A

    2015-09-01

    The custom use of radiotherapy was found to participate in the development of chronic unhealed wounds. In general, exposure to gamma radiation stimulates the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that eventually leads to damaging effect. Conversely, overexpression of a nuclear poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase enzyme (PARP) after oxidative insult extremely brings about cellular injury due to excessive consumption of NAD and ATP. Here, we dedicated our study to investigate the role of 3-aminobenzamide (3-AB), a PARP inhibitor, on pregamma irradiated wounds. Two full-thickness (6 mm diameter) wounds were created on the dorsum of Swiss albino mouse. The progression of wound contraction was monitored by capturing daily photo images. Exposure to gamma radiation (6Gy) exacerbated the normal healing of excisional wounds. Remarkably, topical application of 3-AB cream (50 µM) revealed a marked acceleration in the rate of wound contraction. Likewise, PARP inhibition ameliorated the unbalanced oxidative/nitrosative status of granulated skin tissues. Such effect was significantly revealed by the correction of the reduced antioxidant capacity and the enhanced lipid peroxidation, hydrogen peroxide, and myeloperoxidase contents. Moreover, application of 3-AB modified the cutaneous nitrite content throughout healing process. Conversely, the expressions of pro-inflammatory cytokines were down-regulated by PARP inhibition. The mitochondrial ATP content showed a lower consumption rate on 3-AB-treated wound bed as well. In parallel, the mRNA expressions of Sirt-1 and acyl-COA oxidase-2 (ACOX-2) were up-regulated; whom functions control the mitochondrial ATP synthesis and lipid metabolism. The current data suggested that inhibition of PARP-1 enzyme may accelerate the delayed wound healing in whole body gamma irradiated mice by early modifying the oxidative stress as well as the inflammatory response. © 2015 by the Wound Healing Society.

  19. Anti-cytokine autoantibodies in postherpetic neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Bayat, Ahmad; Burbelo, Peter D; Browne, Sarah K; Quinlivan, Mark; Martinez, Bianca; Holland, Steven M; Buvanendran, Asokumar; Kroin, Jeffrey S; Mannes, Andrew J; Breuer, Judith; Cohen, Jeffrey I; Iadarola, Michael J

    2015-10-20

    The mechanisms by which varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivation causes postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), a debilitating chronic pain condition, have not been fully elucidated. Based on previous studies identifying a causative role for anti-cytokine autoantibodies in patients with opportunistic infections, we explored this possibility in PHN. Sera from herpes zoster (HZ) patients without and with PHN (N = 115 and 83, respectively) were examined for the presence of autoantibodies against multiple cytokines, and other known autoantigens. In addition, a cohort of patients with complex regional pain syndrome or neuropathic pain was tested for autoantibodies against selected cytokines. Antibody levels against VZV, Epstein Barr virus, and herpes simplex virus-2 were also measured in the HZ and PHN patients. Patient sera with high levels of anti-cytokine autoantibodies were functionally tested for in vitro neutralizing activity. Six PHN subjects demonstrated markedly elevated levels of single, autoantibodies against interferon-α, interferon-γ, GM-CSF, or interleukin-6. In contrast, the HZ and the pain control group showed low or no autoantibodies, respectively, against these four cytokines. Further analysis revealed that one PHN patient with high levels of anti-interleukin-6 autoantibodies had a markedly depressed antibody level to VZV, potentially reflecting poor T cell immunity against VZV. In vitro functional testing revealed that three of the five anti-cytokine autoantibody positive PHN subjects had neutralizing autoantibodies against interferon-α, GM-CSF or interleukin-6. In contrast, none of the HZ patients without PHN had neutralizing autoantibodies. These results suggest the possibility that sporadic anti-cytokine autoantibodies in some subjects may cause an autoimmune immunodeficiency syndrome leading to uncontrolled VZV reactivation, nerve damage and subsequent PHN.

  20. Cytokines induce selective granulocyte chemotactic responses.

    PubMed

    Bittleman, D B; Erger, R A; Casale, T B

    1996-02-01

    Neutrophils, eosinophils and cytokines are important in allergic airway inflammatory responses. However, it is unclear how cytokines selectively influence neutrophils versus eosinophils to migrate to an inflammatory site. The cytokines, transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1), interleukin (IL)-1alpha, IL-5, IL-8, granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), are released subsequent to allergic reactions and affect both neutrophil and eosinophil functions. We studied whether these cytokines differed in capacity to induce human neutrophil versus eosinophil migration through naked filters and human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) and human pulmonary type II-like epithelial (A549) cell monolayers grown on filters. Dose-response experiments using all barriers were performed for each granulocyte and cytokine. TGF-beta1 did not induce granulocyte migration. IL-5 induced eosinophil migration only through naked filters. IL-1alpha stimulated neutrophil migration through cellular barriers, but not through naked filters. TNF-alpha and GM-CSF induced neutrophil and eosinophil migration through filters, but only neutrophil migration through cellular monolayers. Only IL-8 induced significant neutrophil and eosinophil migration; however, there were clear-cut differences between the neutrophilotactic and eosinophilotactic responses through all barriers employed. Thus, our data show that these cytokines induce distinct chemotactic responses for neutrophils versus eosinophils. Moreover, by using relevant cellular barriers versus naked filters, our data better examines the capability of these cytokines to induce selective granulocyte migration to an inflammatory site in lung diseases such as asthma.

  1. Inflammatory cytokines in animal health and disease.

    PubMed

    Murtaugh, M P; Baarsch, M J; Zhou, Y; Scamurra, R W; Lin, G

    1996-11-01

    Inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin-1 (IL-1), IL-6 and IL-8, are rapidly induced early in a disease or injury process. They mediate and modulate myriad healing processes but, if overexpressed, may exacerbate the severity of a disease condition. In order to test this concept and to establish a foundation for the role of inflammatory cytokines in the pathogenesis of gram-negative bacterial infections in the respiratory tract of animals, the patterns of inflammatory cytokine expression were determined in experimental porcine pleuropneumonia. We observed that IL-1 and IL-6, but not TNF, were rapidly and dramatically elevated in the lavage fluid of the lung within 24 h of infection. The increased levels of IL-1 might contribute to increased severity of disease, but elevated IL-6 levels were consistent with a protective acute phase response. Additional studies were performed to examine the hypothesis that IL-4 expression later in infection might be involved in turning off the inflammatory response and promoting an antigen-specific humoral immune response. Interleukin-4 efficiently suppressed inflammatory cytokine production in alveolar macrophages. Its expression was induced in peripheral blood mononuclear cells by TNF, IL-4, and by reexposure to a specific antigen. To obtain the maximum amount of information on the role of inflammatory cytokines in animals of veterinary significance it will be useful to perform studies in species such that evolutionary relatedness will allow widespread application of the findings. Furthermore, the variety of molecules involved in inflammatory cytokine regulation will require much more extensive investigations of the relevant enzymes, inhibitors and receptors in veterinary species. Finally, the complexity and redundancy of immune defenses in animals mean that attempts to modulate health status through manipulation of inflammatory cytokines must be performed with caution and that a multiplicity of

  2. Effects of antirheumatic agents on cytokines.

    PubMed

    Barrera, P; Boerbooms, A M; van de Putte, L B; van der Meer, J W

    1996-02-01

    A review of the literature concerning the effects of traditional antirheumatic drugs on cytokines and the cytokine and anticytokine approaches already used in the therapy of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is presented. Many antirheumatic drugs are capable of cytokine modulation in vitro. Corticosteroids inhibit the transcription of a broad spectrum of genes including those encoding monocyte, T cell-derived cytokines and several hemopoietic growth factors, whereas drugs such as cyclosporin A and D-penicillamine interfere with T cell activation more specifically by suppressing interleukin 2 (IL-2) production. The in vivo effects of drug therapy on cytokines in RA patients are less well established. Gold compounds reduce circulating IL-6 levels and the expression of monocyte-derived cytokines, such as IL-1, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), and IL-6, in the rheumatoid synovium. Decreases in circulating IL-6, soluble IL-2 (sIL-2R), and TNF receptors and in synovial fluid IL-1 levels have been reported with methotrexate. Reductions in circulating IL-6 and sIL-2R concentrations have also been observed with cyclosporin and corticosteroids, whereas azathioprine reduces IL-6 but not sIL-2R. Studies on sulfasalazine are conflicting and the in vivo effects of D-penicillamine and antimalarials have not been studied yet. Interferon gamma therapy is not effective in RA but may prove a useful antifibrotic for systemic sclerosis. Colony stimulating factors improve the granulocytopenia associated with Felty's syndrome or drug toxicities but can induce arthritis flares and should be reserved to treat infectious complications. Promising results are being obtained with selective antagonism of TNF and IL-1 in RA, and combinations of anticytokine strategies with traditional antirheumatic drugs have been already envisaged. These should preferably be based in a broader knowledge of the effects of antirheumatic agents on the cytokine network.

  3. Cytokine inhibition in the treatment of COPD

    PubMed Central

    Caramori, Gaetano; Adcock, Ian M; Di Stefano, Antonino; Chung, Kian Fan

    2014-01-01

    Cytokines play an important part in many pathobiological processes of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), including the chronic inflammatory process, emphysema, and altered innate immune response. Proinflammatory cytokines of potential importance include tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interferon-γ, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-17, IL-18, IL-32, and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), and growth factors such as transforming growth factor-β. The current objectives of COPD treatment are to reduce symptoms, and to prevent and reduce the number of exacerbations. While current treatments achieve these goals to a certain extent, preventing the decline in lung function is not currently achievable. In addition, reversal of corticosteroid insensitivity and control of the fibrotic process while reducing the emphysematous process could also be controlled by specific cytokines. The abnormal pathobiological process of COPD may contribute to these fundamental characteristics of COPD, and therefore targeting cytokines involved may be a fruitful endeavor. Although there has been much work that has implicated various cytokines as potentially playing an important role in COPD, there have been very few studies that have examined the effect of specific cytokine blockade in COPD. The two largest studies that have been reported in the literature involve the use of blocking antibody to TNFα and CXCL8 (IL-8), and neither has provided benefit. Blocking the actions of CXCL8 through its CXCR2 receptor blockade was not successful either. Studies of antibodies against IL-17, IL-18, IL-1β, and TSLP are currently either being undertaken or planned. There is a need to carefully phenotype COPD and discover good biomarkers of drug efficacy for each specific target. Specific groups of COPD patients should be targeted with specific anticytokine therapy if there is evidence of high expression of that cytokine and there are features of the clinical expression of COPD that will respond

  4. Effect of gamma irradiation on the conversion of ginsenoside Rb1 to Rg3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae-Hun; Kwon, Sun-Kyu; Sung, Nak-Yun; Jung, Pil-Mun; Choi, Jong-il; Kim, Jae-Kyung; Sharma, Arun K.; Lee, Ju-Woon

    2012-08-01

    Ginsenosides, the most important secondary metabolites in ginseng, have various biological activities. Many studies have focused on the conversion of one of the major ginsenosides, Rb1, to the more active minor ginsenoside, Rg3. This study was carried out to investigate the effect of gamma irradiation on the conversion of Rb1 to Rg3. Rb1 solutions were gamma-irradiated at doses of 10 and 30 kGy and analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). HPLC chromatograms showed a decreased content of Rb1 with increasing irradiation dose, but the content of Rg3 was increased. The highest content of Rg3 was present in the 30 kGy-irradiated Rb1 sample. The cytotoxic effects tested in cancer cell lines were increased in the gamma-irradiated group. Therefore, these results suggest that gamma irradiation can be an effective method for the conversion of the ginsenoside Rb1 to Rg3.

  5. Death by Protein Damage in Irradiated Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this article in press as: M.J. Daly, Death by protein damage in irradiated cells, DNA Repair (2011), doi:10.1016/j.dnarep.2011.10.024...ARTICLE IN PRESSG ModelDNAREP-1629; No. of Pages 10 DNA Repair (2011) – Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect DNA Repair jo u...oxidation Carbonylation DNA double strand break (DSB) repair Manganese (II) antioxidant complexes Reactive oxygen species (ROS) Metabolite accumulation

  6. Low-level laser therapy on skeletal muscle inflammation: evaluation of irradiation parameters.

    PubMed

    Mantineo, Matías; Pinheiro, João P; Morgado, António M

    2014-09-01

    We evaluated the effect of different irradiation parameters in low-level laser therapy (LLLT) for treating inflammation induced in the gastrocnemius muscle of rats through cytokines concentration in systemic blood and analysis of muscle tissue. We used continuous (830 and 980 nm) and pulsed illuminations (830 nm). Animals were divided into five groups per wavelength (10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 mW), and a control group. LLLT was applied during 5 days with a constant irradiation time and area. TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-2, and IL-6 cytokines were quantified by ELISA. Inflammatory cells were counted using microscopy. Identical methodology was used with pulsed illumination. Average power (40 mW) and duty cycle were kept constant (80%) at five frequencies (5, 25, 50, 100, and 200 Hz). For continuous irradiation, treatment effects occurred for all doses, with a reduction of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 cytokines and inflammatory cells. Continuous irradiation at 830 nm was more effective, a result explained by the action spectrum of cytochrome c oxidase (CCO). Best results were obtained for 40 mW, with data suggesting a biphasic dose response. Pulsed wave irradiation was only effective for higher frequencies, a result that might be related to the rate constants of the CCO internal electron transfer process.

  7. Low-level laser therapy on skeletal muscle inflammation: evaluation of irradiation parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantineo, Matías; Pinheiro, João P.; Morgado, António M.

    2014-09-01

    We evaluated the effect of different irradiation parameters in low-level laser therapy (LLLT) for treating inflammation induced in the gastrocnemius muscle of rats through cytokines concentration in systemic blood and analysis of muscle tissue. We used continuous (830 and 980 nm) and pulsed illuminations (830 nm). Animals were divided into five groups per wavelength (10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 mW), and a control group. LLLT was applied during 5 days with a constant irradiation time and area. TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-2, and IL-6 cytokines were quantified by ELISA. Inflammatory cells were counted using microscopy. Identical methodology was used with pulsed illumination. Average power (40 mW) and duty cycle were kept constant (80%) at five frequencies (5, 25, 50, 100, and 200 Hz). For continuous irradiation, treatment effects occurred for all doses, with a reduction of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 cytokines and inflammatory cells. Continuous irradiation at 830 nm was more effective, a result explained by the action spectrum of cytochrome c oxidase (CCO). Best results were obtained for 40 mW, with data suggesting a biphasic dose response. Pulsed wave irradiation was only effective for higher frequencies, a result that might be related to the rate constants of the CCO internal electron transfer process.

  8. A genetic contribution to circulating cytokines and obesity in children

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cytokines are considered to be involved in obesity-related metabolic diseases. Study objectives are to determine the heritability of circulating cytokine levels, to investigate pleiotropy between cytokines and obesity traits, and to present genome scan results for cytokines in 1030 Hispanic children...

  9. A method to extract cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases from Schirmer strips and analyze using Luminex.

    PubMed

    VanDerMeid, Karl R; Su, Stephanie P; Krenzer, Kathleen L; Ward, Keith W; Zhang, Jin-Zhong

    2011-04-27

    The Schirmer's test is commonly used in the clinic for the diagnosis of dry eye disease by measuring tear volume. This report describes a procedure which can be used to recover tears from the Schirmer strip for the measurement of multiple tear cytokines as well as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) by Luminex technology. Cytokine and MMP recovery was determined by using spiked Schirmer strips presoaked with known cytokines or MMPs prepared in PBS with 1% BSA. In a clinical study, tears were collected from 5 subjects using Schirmer strips. Strips were stored on ice immediately after removal from the subject and stored dry at -20 °C for 16-24 h. Cytokines were extracted from the Schirmer strip in 0.5 M NaCl with 0.5% Tween-20. Concentrations of cytokines and MMPs in collected tear samples were analyzed by Luminex using both a 10-cytokine and a 5-MMP kit. The standard curves for the assay in both the kit assay buffer and extraction buffer were identical for 9 of the 10 cytokines and all 5 MMPs. In the clinical sample all the cytokines (interleukin 1α [IL-1α], IL-1β, IL-1ra, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-13, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 [MCP-1], and tumor necrosis factor-α [TNF-α]) and 5 MMPs (MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-7, MMP-9, and MMP-10) tested were detected in at least 50% of the 10 subject samples. Recoveries from extracted Schirmer strips were >60% for 8 of the 10 cytokines and all MMPs. Numerous cytokines and MMPs were detected in the tear samples collected using the Schirmer strip, including many that have been implicated in ocular surface disease. This procedure may be used to evaluate the cytokine and MMP content in tear samples in clinical studies, especially for the evaluation of dry eye therapeutics. Because the Schirmer test is routine in the assessment of dry eye, this method offers the opportunity to evaluate both the quantity and quality of the tears.

  10. Cancer Therapeutic Effects of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles Are Associated with Oxidative Stress and Cytokine Induction.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Rina; Luo, Yi; Sasaki, Takamitsu; Fujii, Kiyomu; Ohmori, Hitoshi; Kuniyasu, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are considered to influence the inflammatory process; however, the precise mechanism and the significance in tumors are still not clear. In this study, when CT26 and LL2 mouse cancer cells were treated with 6-nm anatase titanium dioxide NPs (TDNPs) without ultraviolet irradiation, oxidative stress and induction of inflammatory cytokines were observed. Oxidative stress was further increased by disease-associated conditions such as high glucose concentrations and hypoxia. Inhaled or orally administered TDNPs generated granulomatous lesions in the lungs and colon of the rodent models tested, with increased oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines. Oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines were also found in cancer cells treated with gold or carbon black NPs. Treatment of CT26 cells with 10- to 70-nm rutile TDNPs showed that smaller NPs produced more oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines than larger ones did. To avoid diffusion of TDNPs and to minimize toxicity, 10-nm TDNPs were suspended in a collagen gel inserted into a subcutaneous tumor in a CT26 mouse. A single TDNP treatment via this method inhibited tumor growth in a size- and dose-dependent manner, and resulted in lower levels of urinary 8-OHdG when compared to systemically administered TDNPs. These findings suggest that TDNPs might be useful for the local treatment of tumors. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Blood irradiation: Rationale and technique

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.C. )

    1990-01-01

    Upon request by the local American Red Cross, the Savannah Regional Center for Cancer Care irradiates whole blood or blood components to prevent post-transfusion graft-versus-host reaction in patients who have severely depressed immune systems. The rationale for blood irradiation, the total absorbed dose, the type of patients who require irradiated blood, and the regulations that apply to irradiated blood are presented. A method of irradiating blood using a linear accelerator is described.

  12. Skin rejuvenation using cosmetic products containing growth factors, cytokines, and matrikines: a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Aldag, Caroline; Nogueira Teixeira, Diana; Leventhal, Phillip S

    2016-01-01

    Skin aging is primarily due to alterations in the dermal extracellular matrix, especially a decrease in collagen I content, fragmentation of collagen fibrils, and accumulation of amorphous elastin material, also known as elastosis. Growth factors and cytokines are included in several cosmetic products intended for skin rejuvenation because of their ability to promote collagen synthesis. Matrikines and matrikine-like peptides offer the advantage of growth factor-like activities but better skin penetration due to their much smaller molecular size. In this review, we summarize the commercially available products containing growth factors, cytokines, and matrikines for which there is evidence that they promote skin rejuvenation. PMID:27877059

  13. Ionoluminescence of fused silica under swift ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saavedra, R.; Jiménez-Rey, D.; Martin, P.; Vila, R.

    2016-09-01

    Ion beam induced luminescence spectra have been in-situ recorded during He+ (2.5 MeV), O4+ (13.5 MeV) and Si4+ (24.4 MeV) irradiations for three vitreous silica grades with different OH content (KU1, KS-4V and Infrasil 301). Remarkable changes in the ionoluminescence spectra of the three silica grades were observed for low ion fluences. He+ irradiated samples exhibited higher luminescence than equivalent ones irradiated with heavier O4+ and Si4+ ions. KU1 samples with the highest OH content showed the lowest blue luminescence. Blue luminescence maximum during ion irradiations with O4+ and Si4+ ions is correlated with structural changes.

  14. Using chemo-drugs or irradiation to break immune tolerance and facilitate immunotherapy in solid cancer.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yawen; Dou, Yan; Duan, Lili; Cong, Changsheng; Gao, Aiqin; Lai, Qinghua; Sun, Yuping

    2015-03-01

    The immunity is dual host-protective and tumor-promoting in cancer development and progression. Many immune suppressive cells and cytokines in microenvironment can prevent cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) and natural killer cells (NK) from killing tumor cells. Chemotherapy drugs and irradiation have been reported helpful in breaking immune tolerance and creating microenvironment for adoptive cell therapy. Low-dose cyclophosphamide or gemcitabine therapy can selectively deplete T regulatory cells (Treg). Paclitaxel can alter cytokine network at the tumor site, and 5-fluorouracil shows a pronounced effect on myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) depletion. Local tumor irradiation and total body irradiation (TBI) can also affect tumor microenvironment and facilitate immunotherapy. In this review, we summarize the particular effects of these agents and methods on immunomodulation, as well as their potential values in immunotherapy. The combination with immunotherapy represents a novel therapeutic strategy.

  15. Th1 cytokine-based immunotherapy for cancer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong-Mei

    2014-10-01

    Cytokine-based immunotherapy is executed by harnessing cytokines to activate the immune system to suppress tumors. Th1-type cytokines including IL-1, IL-2, IL-12 and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor are potent stimulators of Th1 differentiation and Th1-based antitumor response. Many preclinical studies demonstrated the antitumor effects of Th1 cytokines but their clinical efficacy is limited. Multiple factors influence the efficacy of immunotherapy for tumors. For instance immunosuppressive cells in the tumor microenvironment can produce inhibitory cytokines which suppress antitumor immune response. Most studies on cytokine immunotherapy focused on how to boost Th1 response; many studies combined cytokine-based therapy with other treatments to reverse immunosuppression in tumor microenvironment. In addition, cytokines have pleiotropic functions and some cytokines show paradoxical activities under different settings. Better understanding the physiological and pathological functions of cytokines helps clinicians to design Th1-based cancer therapy in clinical practice.

  16. Estrogen, cytokines, and pathogenesis of postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Pacifici, R

    1996-08-01

    In summary, available data demonstrate that IL-1 and TNF are the causative agents underlying the bone loss induced by estrogen deficiency. Indeed, these factors are produced in bone and the bone marrow, released in larger amounts from cells of estrogen-deficient subjects, and indispensable for reproducing the effects of estrogen deficiency in bone. These observations support the hypothesis that the bone sparing effect of estrogen is due to the ability of the hormone to block osteoclastogenesis, the activation of mature osteoclasts and, as recently demonstrated, the rate of apoptotic osteoclast death. Although IL-1 and TNF play a prominent causal role in these events, the bone-sparing effect of estrogen is mediated by numerous cytokines which, by simultaneously stimulating multiple target cells, induce effects that are not accounted for by any one single factor (Fig. 2). The ability of estrogen to regulate some, but not all, the cytokines involved in this process is not inconsistent with this hypothesis because cytokines have potent synergistic effects. Thus, a considerable increase in bone resorption may result from a relatively small increase in the concentration of only a few of the bone-resorbing factors present in the bone microenvironment. This concept is best illustrated by the study of Miyaura et al. demonstrating that the concentrations of either IL-1, IL-6, IL-6 receptor, or prostaglandins detected in the bone marrow of OVX mice are insufficient to account for the increased bone resorption caused by estrogen withdrawal. In contrast, the increase in bone resorption induced by OVX can be explained by the cumulative effects of these cytokines. Thus, a better understanding of the cooperative effects of cytokines and a recognition that the contribution of individual cytokines to postmenopausal bone loss varies with the passage of time after menopause are necessary to fully understand the mechanism of action of estrogen in bone. Although the relevance of

  17. Antibody-cytokine fusion proteins for treatment of cancer: engineering cytokines for improved efficacy and safety.

    PubMed

    Young, Patricia A; Morrison, Sherie L; Timmerman, John M

    2014-10-01

    The true potential of cytokine therapies in cancer treatment is limited by the inability to deliver optimal concentrations into tumor sites due to dose-limiting systemic toxicities. To maximize the efficacy of cytokine therapy, recombinant antibody-cytokine fusion proteins have been constructed by a number of groups to harness the tumor-targeting ability of monoclonal antibodies. The aim is to guide cytokines specifically to tumor sites where they might stimulate more optimal anti-tumor immune responses while avoiding the systemic toxicities of free cytokine therapy. Antibody-cytokine fusion proteins containing interleukin (IL)-2, IL-12, IL-21, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α, and interferons (IFNs) α, β, and γ have been constructed and have shown anti-tumor activity in preclinical and early-phase clinical studies. Future priorities for development of this technology include optimization of tumor targeting, bioactivity of the fused cytokine, and choice of appropriate agents for combination therapies. This review is intended to serve as a framework for engineering an ideal antibody-cytokine fusion protein, focusing on previously developed constructs and their clinical trial results.

  18. The results and analysis of irradiation experiments conducted on reactor vessel plate and weld materials

    SciTech Connect

    Biemiller, E.C.; Carter, R.G.; Rosinski, S.T.

    1996-09-01

    This paper documents the extensive amount of experimental work on radiation damage to reactor vessel materials carried out by Yankee Atomic Electric Company (YAEC) and others in support of a licensing effort to restart the Yankee Rowe nuclear power plant. The effect of plate nickel content and microstructure on irradiation damage sensitivity was assessed. Typical reactor pressure vessel plate materials each containing 0.24% (by weight) copper, but different nickel contents at 0.19% and 0.63% were heat treated to produce different microstructures. A Linde 80 weld containing 0.30% copper and 1.00% nickel was produced and heat treated to test microstructure effects on the irradiation response of weld metal. Materials taken from plate surface locations (vs 1/4%) were included to test whether or not the improved toughness properties of the plate surface layer, resulting from a rapid quench, is maintained after irradiation. Irradiations were conducted at two irradiation temperatures, 500 F (260 C) and 550 F (288 C), to determine the effect of irradiation temperature on embrittlement. The results of this irradiation testing and additional data from a DOE/Sandia National Laboratories irradiation study show an irradiation temperature effect that is not consistent, but varies with the materials tested. The test results demonstrate that for nickel bearing steels, the superior toughness of plate surface material is maintained even after irradiation to high fluences, and for the copper content tested, nickel has little effect on irradiation response. A mixed effect of microstructure/heat treatment on the materials` irradiation response was noted. Phosphorus potentially played a role in the irradiation response of the low nickel material irradiated at 500 F (288 C) but did not show prominence in the irradiations for the same material conducted at 500 F (260 C).

  19. Cytokines in Neuropathic Pain and Associated Depression.

    PubMed

    Lees, Justin G; Fivelman, Brett; Duffy, Samuel S; Makker, Preet G S; Perera, Chamini J; Moalem-Taylor, Gila

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathic pain occurs as a result of lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory nervous system and is present in a diverse set of peripheral and central pathologies such as nerve trauma, diabetic neuropathy, post-herpetic neuralgia, chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, spinal cord injury and multiple sclerosis. Debilitating symptoms including allodynia, hyperalgesia and spontaneous pain have a substantial negative impact on patients' quality of life. The currently available therapeutic treatments are generally ineffective and characterised by poor response rates. Accumulating evidence suggests that neuroinflammation and cytokine signalling play a critical role in neuropathic pain. Numerous experimental studies have demonstrated that certain pro-inflammatory cytokines are elevated in neuropathic pain conditions, and administration of these cytokines can elicit pain hypersensitivity in the absence of injury or disease. This phenomenon is also apparent in the 'sickness response', which encompasses a broad inflammatory response to disease and injury and involves a series of physiological and behavioural changes including pain hypersensitivity. Interestingly, the 'sickness response' is also similar in nature to some of the defining characteristics of the depressed state of affective disorder. In this review, we explore links that may relate the co-existence of depression in neuropathic pain patients with the activity of cytokines and discuss the role of several key pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines in neuropathic pain.

  20. Are cytokines possible mediators of cancer cachexia?

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Y; Yoshikawa, T; Matsumoto, A; Svaninger, G; Gelin, J

    1996-01-01

    The possible role of cytokines in the development of cancer cachexia was reviewed from the literature. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, interferon (IFN)-gamma and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) can elicit many but not all host changes seen in cancer cachexia, including loss of appetite, loss of body weight, and the induction of acute-phase protein synthesis. However, these cytokines are not always demonstrated in the circulation of the cancer patients. The inability to detect circulating cytokines may be due to their low rate of production, their short half-life and rapid clearance from plasma, or their mode of action (autocrine or paracrine). Different cytokines are induced to stimulate the same response. This is very different from hormonal regulation, where a hormone acts on a cell directly through a specific receptor without depending on other mediators. Specific antibodies including anti-IFN-gamma, anti-TNF and anti-IL-6 antibodies, as well as the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin, have been used to reverse cancer cachexia. Overlapping physiologic activities make it unlikely that a single substance is the sole cause of cancer cachexia. It is hoped that further investigation on other cytokines and their possible relationships with hormones will help to clarify the mechanisms of cancer cachexia in the near future.

  1. Interleukin-1 Family Cytokines in Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsui, Hiroko; Cai, Xianbin; Hayashi, Shuhei

    2015-01-01

    The gene encoding IL-1 was sequenced more than 30 years ago, and many related cytokines, such as IL-18, IL-33, IL-36, IL-37, IL-38, IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), and IL-36Ra, have since been identified. IL-1 is a potent proinflammatory cytokine and is involved in various inflammatory diseases. Other IL-1 family ligands are critical for the development of diverse diseases, including inflammatory and allergic diseases. Only IL-1Ra possesses the leader peptide required for secretion from cells, and many ligands require posttranslational processing for activation. Some require inflammasome-mediated processing for activation and release, whereas others serve as alarmins and are released following cell membrane rupture, for example, by pyroptosis or necroptosis. Thus, each ligand has the proper molecular process to exert its own biological functions. In this review, we will give a brief introduction to the IL-1 family cytokines and discuss their pivotal roles in the development of various liver diseases in association with immune responses. For example, an excess of IL-33 causes liver fibrosis in mice via activation and expansion of group 2 innate lymphoid cells to produce type 2 cytokines, resulting in cell conversion into pro-fibrotic M2 macrophages. Finally, we will discuss the importance of IL-1 family cytokine-mediated molecular and cellular networks in the development of acute and chronic liver diseases. PMID:26549942

  2. Induction of inflammatory cytokines by cartilage extracts.

    PubMed

    Merly, Liza; Simjee, Shabana; Smith, Sylvia L

    2007-03-01

    Shark cartilage extracts were examined for induction of cytokines and chemokines in human peripheral blood leukocytes. Primary leukocyte cultures were exposed to a variety of aqueous and organic extracts prepared from several commercial brands of shark cartilage. From all commercial sources of shark cartilage tested the acid extracts induced higher levels of TNFalpha than other extracts. Different commercial brands of shark cartilage varied significantly in cytokine-inducing activity. TNFalpha induction was seen as early as 4 h and IFNgamma at detectable levels for up to four days. Shark cartilage extracts did not induce physiologically significant levels of IL-4. Results suggest that shark cartilage, preferentially, induces Th1 type inflammatory cytokines. When compared to bovine cartilage extract, collagen, and chondroitin sulfate, shark cartilage induced significantly higher levels of TNFalpha. Treatment with digestive proteases (trypsin and chymotrypsin) reduced the cytokine induction response by 80%, suggesting that the active component(s) in cartilage extracts is proteinaceous. The induction of Th1 type cytokine response in leukocytes is a significant finding since shark cartilage, taken as a dietary supplement for a variety of chronic degenerative diseases, would be contraindicated in cases where the underlying pathology of the chronic condition is caused by inflammation.

  3. Interleukin-1 Family Cytokines in Liver Diseases.

    PubMed

    Tsutsui, Hiroko; Cai, Xianbin; Hayashi, Shuhei

    2015-01-01

    The gene encoding IL-1 was sequenced more than 30 years ago, and many related cytokines, such as IL-18, IL-33, IL-36, IL-37, IL-38, IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), and IL-36Ra, have since been identified. IL-1 is a potent proinflammatory cytokine and is involved in various inflammatory diseases. Other IL-1 family ligands are critical for the development of diverse diseases, including inflammatory and allergic diseases. Only IL-1Ra possesses the leader peptide required for secretion from cells, and many ligands require posttranslational processing for activation. Some require inflammasome-mediated processing for activation and release, whereas others serve as alarmins and are released following cell membrane rupture, for example, by pyroptosis or necroptosis. Thus, each ligand has the proper molecular process to exert its own biological functions. In this review, we will give a brief introduction to the IL-1 family cytokines and discuss their pivotal roles in the development of various liver diseases in association with immune responses. For example, an excess of IL-33 causes liver fibrosis in mice via activation and expansion of group 2 innate lymphoid cells to produce type 2 cytokines, resulting in cell conversion into pro-fibrotic M2 macrophages. Finally, we will discuss the importance of IL-1 family cytokine-mediated molecular and cellular networks in the development of acute and chronic liver diseases.

  4. Cytokines in alopecia areata: contrasting cytokine profiles in localized form and extensive form (alopecia universalis).

    PubMed

    Teraki, Y; Imanishi, K; Shiohara, T

    1996-11-01

    Recent studies have suggested that cytokines play a critical role in the pathophysiology of alopecia areata; however, no information is available regarding the difference in cytokine profiles in these patients. Serum levels of cytokines, including interferon gamma (IFN-gamma), tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 1 alpha (IL-1 alpha), IL-2, IL-4, and IL-6, were measured using radioimmunoassay or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay techniques in patients with the localized form and the extensive form (alopecia universalis). The serum levels of IL-1 alpha and IL-4 were significantly elevated in patients with the localized form. In contrast, the serum levels of IFN-gamma and IL-2 were significantly elevated in patients with the extensive form. These results indicate that immune responses in the localized form and the extensive form of alopecia areata are regulated by Th2 cytokines and Th1 cytokines, respectively.

  5. Phototherapeutic hardening modulates systemic cytokine levels in patients with polymorphic light eruption.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Peter; Gruber-Wackernagel, Alexandra; Rinner, Beate; Griesbacher, Antonia; Eberhard, Katharina; Groselj-Strele, Andrea; Mayer, Gerlinde; Stauber, Rudolf E; Byrne, Scott N

    2013-01-01

    The etiopathogenesis of polymorphic light eruption (PLE) has been linked to impaired UV-immunosuppression, Langerhans cell (LC) retention, and an absence of neutrophil infiltration into UV-exposed PLE skin. We have previously shown that photohardening restores the impaired neutrophil responsiveness to the chemoattractants leucotriene B4 and formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanin in PLE patients. The aim of this study was to investigate whether photohardening modulates baseline chemokine and cytokine levels which would alter chemoresponsiveness and hence immune function in PLE patients. Sixteen PLE patients received photohardening therapy for 4-9 weeks by 311 nm UVB. Plasma samples were taken both before and within 48 h of the penultimate phototherapeutic exposure. Plasma from these 16 patients, 8 non-irradiated PLE patients, and 14 control subjects was analyzed for IL-1β, CXCL8 (IL-8), IL-10, IL-17, TNF, CCL2 (MCP-1), CCL5 (RANTES), CCL11 (eotaxin), and CCL22 (MDC). These cytokines and chemokines were measured in early spring (March to April) and again in late spring (April to June). PLE patients had a significantly elevated level of CCL11 (p = 0.003) and IL-1β (p = 0.002) in early spring (before phototherapy). In late spring, after phototherapy, PLE patients had significantly elevated CCL2 (p = 0.002) and TNF (p = 0.002) but a trend for lowered plasma levels of CXCL8 (p = 0.021). When comparing the cytokine shifts from early to late spring, while healthy controls and non-UV-irradiated PLE patients showed an increase, PLE patients undergoing photohardening exhibited a trend for decrease in IL-1β (p = 0.012). Taken together, our results indicate that photohardening may alter the complex cytokine milieu in PLE, in particular via IL-1β, helping to normalise the pathophysiologic response to subsequent UV exposure.

  6. Cytokine profile of conditioned medium from human tumor cell lines after acute and fractionated doses of gamma radiation and its effect on survival of bystander tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Desai, Sejal; Kumar, Amit; Laskar, S; Pandey, B N

    2013-01-01

    Cytokines are known to play pivotal roles in cancer initiation, progression and pathogenesis. Accumulating evidences suggest differences in basal and stress-induced cytokine profiles of cancers with diverse origin. However, a comprehensive investigation characterising the cytokine profile of various tumor types after acute and fractionated doses of gamma-irradiation, and its effect on survival of bystander cells is not well known in literature. In the present study, we have evaluated the cytokine secretion profile of human tumor cell lines (HT1080, U373MG, HT29, A549 and MCF-7) either before (basal) or after acute (2, 6 Gy) and fractionated doses (3×2 Gy) of gamma-irradiation in culture medium obtained from these cells by multiplex bead array/ELISA. Moreover, clonogenic assays were performed to evaluate the effect of conditioned medium (CM) on the survival and growth of respective cells. Based on the screening of 28 analytes, our results showed that the basal profiles of these cell lines varied considerably in terms of the number and magnitude of secreted factors, which was minimum in MCF-7. Interestingly, TNF-α, IL-1β, PDGF-AA, TGF-β1, fractalkine, IL-8, VEGF and GCSF were found in CM of all the cell lines. However, secretion of certain cytokines was cell line-specific. Moreover, CM caused increase in clonogenic survival of respective tumor cells (in the order HT1080>U373MG>HT29>A549>MCF-7), which was correlated with the levels of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, GMCSF and VEGF in their CM. After irradiation, the levels of most of the cytokines increased markedly in a dose dependent manner. The fold change in cytokine levels was lower in irradiated conditioned medium (ICM) of tumor cells collected after fractionated than respective acute dose, except in MCF-7. Interestingly, amongst these cell lines, the radiation-induced fold increase in cytokine levels was maximum in ICM of A549 cells. Moreover, bystander A549 cells treated with respective ICM showed dose dependent

  7. [Postoperative period in previously irradiated lung cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Bronskaia, K L; Zaikina, L V; Grigor'eva, S P

    1978-01-01

    The postoperative period in 62 patients with lung cancer was studied in a comparative aspect. Preoperative use of radiotherapy influences but insignificantly the postoperative course. As a whole, the incidence of postoperative complications and mortality does not differ considerably from that in patients not irradiated with a Betatron. The state of blood coagulation was studied before and prior to surgery in 34 patients previously irradiated with a Betatron. Following the irradiation some changes indicative of hypocoagulation were revealed. In the early postoperative period (2d--10th day postoperatively) a marked increase in the fibrinogen "A" content is observed.

  8. Post-irradiation crosslinking of partially cured unsaturated polyester resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurkin, Tanja; Pucić, Irina

    2006-09-01

    The post-irradiation crosslinking of unsaturated polyester (UP) resin samples irradiated to different doses was monitored during the 15-days period. The post-reaction sensitivity of three experimental techniques was evaluated. Significant changes were detected by extraction analysis that also included determination of the free styrene content. The most substantial changes were detected by differential scanning calorimetry, even up to 5 days after the irradiation. The sensitivity and reproducibility of FTIR was the lowest. The first two techniques detected the influence of particular reaction periods, at which the radiation crosslinking was terminated, on the post-reaction.

  9. Diffuse and global solar spectral irradiance under cloudless skies

    SciTech Connect

    Brine, D.T.; Iqbal, M.

    1982-01-01

    A simple empirical model to calculate solar spectral diffuse and global irradiance under cloudless skies was investigated. This formulation takes into account absorption of radiation by molecules such as O/sub 3/, H/sub 2/O and the uniformly-mixed absorbing gases CO/sub 2/ and O/sub 2/. Attenuation by Rayleigh-scattering and aerosol extinction are included. Aerosol attenuation is calculated through Angstroem's turbidity parameters ..cap alpha.. and ..beta... The diffuse radiation is assumed to be composed of three parts: (1) Rayleigh-scattered diffuse irradiance; (2) aerosol-scattered diffuse irradiance; and (3) irradiance arising out of multiple reflections between the atmosphere and the ground. The global irradiance is the sum of these three components of diffuse irradiance plus the direct irradiance. The input parameters include an extraterrestrial spectrum, zenith angle theta, turbidity coefficient ..beta.., wavelength exponent ..cap alpha.., ground albedo rho/sub g/, water vapor content and ozone content. The model is shown to yield very good results up to air mass two when compared to accurate theoretical calculations. No comparisons with measured spectra are presented because of a lack of accurate specifications of the input parameters. Results are presented to show the effect of variation of certain of the input parameters.

  10. ORNL irradiation creep facility

    SciTech Connect

    Reiley, T.C.; Auble, R.L.; Beckers, R.M.; Bloom, E.E.; Duncan, M.G.; Saltmarsh, M.J.; Shannon, R.H.

    1980-09-01

    A machine was developed at ORNL to measure the rates of elongation observed under irradiation in stressed materials. The source of radiation is a beam of 60 MeV alpha particles from the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron (ORIC). This choice allows experiments to be performed which simulate the effects of fast neutrons. A brief review of irradiation creep and experimental constraints associated with each measurement technique is given. Factors are presented which lead to the experimental choices made for the Irradiation Creep Facility (ICF). The ICF consists of a helium-filled chamber which houses a high-precision mechanical testing device. The specimen to be tested must be thermally stabilized with respect to the temperature fluctuations imposed by the particle beam which passes through the specimen. Electrical resistance of the specimen is the temperature control parameter chosen. Very high precision in length measurement and temperature control are required to detect the small elongation rates relevant to irradiation creep in the test periods available (approx. 1 day). The apparatus components and features required for the above are presented in some detail, along with the experimental procedures. The damage processes associated with light ions are discussed and displacement rates are calculated. Recent irradiation creep results are given, demonstrating the suitability of the apparatus for high resolution experiments. Also discussed is the suitability of the ICF for making high precision thermal creep measurements.

  11. Investigation of the development of irradiation-induced precipitates in VVER-440 type reactor pressure vessel steels and weld metals after irradiation and annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Grosse, M.; Nitzsche, P.; Boehmert, J.; Brauer, G.

    1999-10-01

    The development of irradiation-induced precipitates in VVER-440 type reactor pressure vessel steels 15Kh2MFA and weld metals SV-10KhMFT during irradiation and post-irradiation annealing is studied by small angle neutron and X-ray scattering. The kinetic conditions for the precipitation of particles, which already exist in the unirradiated state, seem to be improved at temperatures of about 270 C due to the irradiation. The size distribution of the irradiation-induced precipitates depends on the copper content and differs between weld and base metal. A strong correlation between the formation of irradiation-induced precipitates and the irradiation hardening is found. The hardness nearly linearly depends on the number of these precipitates.

  12. Cytokine and lipid mediator networks in tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Mayer-Barber, Katrin D.; Sher, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Summary A major approach for immunologic intervention in tuberculosis involves redirecting the outcome of the host immune response from the induction of disease to pathogen control. Cytokines and lipid mediators known as eicosanoids play key roles in regulating this balance and as such represent important targets for immunologic intervention. While the evidence for cytokine/eicosanoid function derives largely from the investigation of murine and zebra fish experimental infection models, clinical studies have confirmed the existence of many of the same pathways in tuberculosis patients. Here we summarize new data that reveal important intersections between the cytokine and eicosanoid networks in the host response to mycobacteria and discuss how targeting this crosstalk can promote resistance to lethal Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. This approach could lead to new host-directed therapies to be used either as an adjunct for improving the efficacy of standard antibiotic treatment or for the management of drug-resistant infections. PMID:25703565

  13. Treatment of Cancer Pain by Targeting Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Vendrell, I.; Macedo, D.; Alho, I.; Dionísio, M. R.; Costa, L.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is one of the most important causes of the majority of cancer symptoms, including pain, fatigue, cachexia, and anorexia. Cancer pain affects 17 million people worldwide and can be caused by different mediators which act in primary efferent neurons directly or indirectly. Cytokines can be aberrantly produced by cancer and immune system cells and are of particular relevance in pain. Currently, there are very few strategies to control the release of cytokines that seems to be related to cancer pain. Nevertheless, in some cases, targeted drugs are available and in use for other diseases. In this paper, we aim to review the importance of cytokines in cancer pain and targeted strategies that can have an impact on controlling this symptom. PMID:26538839

  14. The role of cytokines in postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Brincat, S D; Borg, M; Camilleri, G; Calleja-Agius, J

    2014-08-01

    Postmenopausal osteoporosis is a silent systemic progressive disease characterised by a decrease in bone mass per unit volume. This condition compromises the physical strength of the skeleton and increases the susceptibility to fractures on minor trauma. The imbalance between bone formation and bone resorption is known to be responsible for postmenopausal bone loss. Estrogen deficiency contributes to bone loss by increasing the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines by bone marrow and bone cells. Clinical and molecular evidence indicates that estrogen-regulated cytokines exert regulatory effects on bone turnover implicating their role as being the primary mediators of the accelerated bone loss at menopause. The current perspective on the role and interaction of cytokines such as IL-1, IL-4, IL-6, IL-17, TNF, IFN-γ and TGF-β in bone loss linked with estrogen deficiency is reviewed. Current treatment options and emerging drug therapies in the management of postmenopausal osteoporosis are also evaluated.

  15. Treatment of Cancer Pain by Targeting Cytokines.

    PubMed

    Vendrell, I; Macedo, D; Alho, I; Dionísio, M R; Costa, L

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is one of the most important causes of the majority of cancer symptoms, including pain, fatigue, cachexia, and anorexia. Cancer pain affects 17 million people worldwide and can be caused by different mediators which act in primary efferent neurons directly or indirectly. Cytokines can be aberrantly produced by cancer and immune system cells and are of particular relevance in pain. Currently, there are very few strategies to control the release of cytokines that seems to be related to cancer pain. Nevertheless, in some cases, targeted drugs are available and in use for other diseases. In this paper, we aim to review the importance of cytokines in cancer pain and targeted strategies that can have an impact on controlling this symptom.

  16. OSTEOARTHRITIS JOINT PAIN: THE CYTOKINE CONNECTION

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Rachel E; Miller, Richard J; Malfait, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a chronic and painful disease of synovial joints. Chondrocytes, synovial cells and other cells in the joint can express and respond to cytokines and chemokines, and all of these molecules can also be detected in synovial fluid of patients with osteoarthritis. The presence of inflammatory cytokines in the osteoarthritic joint raises the question whether they may directly participate in pain generation by acting on innervating joint nociceptors. Here, we first provide a systematic discussion of the known proalgesic effects of cytokines and chemokines that have been detected in osteoarthritic joints, including TNF-α, IL-1, IL-6, IL-15, IL-10, and the chemokines, MCP-1 and fractalkine. Subsequently, we discuss what is known about their contribution to joint pain based on studies in animal models. Finally, we briefly discuss limited data available from clinical studies in human osteoarthritis. PMID:25066335

  17. Osteoarthritis joint pain: the cytokine connection.

    PubMed

    Miller, Rachel E; Miller, Richard J; Malfait, Anne-Marie

    2014-12-01

    Osteoarthritis is a chronic and painful disease of synovial joints. Chondrocytes, synovial cells and other cells in the joint can express and respond to cytokines and chemokines, and all of these molecules can also be detected in synovial fluid of patients with osteoarthritis. The presence of inflammatory cytokines in the osteoarthritic joint raises the question whether they may directly participate in pain generation by acting on innervating joint nociceptors. Here, we first provide a systematic discussion of the known proalgesic effects of cytokines and chemokines that have been detected in osteoarthritic joints, including TNF-α, IL-1, IL-6, IL-15, IL-10, and the chemokines, MCP-1 and fractalkine. Subsequently, we discuss what is known about their contribution to joint pain based on studies in animal models. Finally, we briefly discuss limited data available from clinical studies in human osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The role of cytokines in pulp inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kokkas, A; Goulas, A; Stavrianos, C; Anogianakis, G

    2011-01-01

    Pulpitis is a typical inflammatory disease of dental pulp, characterized by the local accumulation of inflammatory mediators, including cytokines and chemokines. In addition to serving as intercellular messengers mediating the inflammatory response, cytokines and chemokines induce the expression and stimulate the activity of molecular and cellular agents which participate actively in destructive and reparative processes in the pulp. It is the balance between these processes which eventually determines the extent of pulp inflammation and the viability of the affected tooth. Over the last decade, a number of studies have attempted to correlate cytokine gene expression in the pulp with various stages of inflammation, with possible diagnostic applications in mind. A small survey of relevant information is presented in this paper.

  19. Modulation of the pro-inflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases production in co-cultivated human keratinocytes and melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Decean, H; Perde-Schrepler, M; Tatomir, C; Fischer-Fodor, E; Brie, I; Virag, P

    2013-10-01

    The human epidermis exerts immunoregulatory functions through the variety of cytokines and other molecules elaborated by keratinocytes and melanocytes. Their constitutive production is very low; however, considerably increased upon stimulation. In vivo, keratinocytes and melanocytes have a typical exposure in the skin, referred as melanocyte epidermal unit. In the present study we co-cultivated these cells in vitro proposing to elucidate some communication links in close cell-to-cell association. We assessed the amounts of IL-6, IL-8, and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9) in individually and co-cultured cells, exposed or not to UVB radiation. Normal human epidermal keratinocytes and melanocytes were grown in specific media and supplements. Cells were exposed to UVB radiation (100 mJ/cm(2)) to create comparable stress to the environmental one. Cytokines were determined with ELISA and confirmed with Western blot and metalloproteinases with gel zimography. Pure cultures of keratinocytes and melanocytes released low amounts of cytokines and metalloproteinases, these secretions being enhanced by UVB irradiation. In co-cultures, the cell-to-cell proximity triggered signals which markedly augmented the cytokines' secretions, whereas metalloproteinases were down-regulated. UVB irradiation did not influence either of these secretions in co-cultures. Concurrently with the highest levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, MMP-9 was up-regulated creating pro-inflammatory conditions and premises for changes in cellular survival, differentiation and phenotype. A complex network of interactions occurred between keratinocytes and melanocytes in co-cultures, resulting in modulated pro-inflammatory cytokines and metalloproteinases productions. Therefore, any disturbances in the microenvironmental signaling system and its molecular constituents may result in inflammation or even tumorigenesis in the epidermis.

  20. Proposed role for small cytoplasmic vesicles in cytokine secretion by mouse macrophages.

    PubMed

    Fedorko, Martha E

    2004-01-01

    This report represents an extension of a prior report hypothesizing that cytokines in mouse macrophages are secreted by a morphologic array of small vesicles which fuse with the cell membrane and which originate in the Golgi complex [Med Hypoth 53 (1999) 107]. The Golgi complex in macrophages is distinguished by a characteristically multicentric configuration and shows budding of vesicles from the closely approximated tips of the lamellae. The location of small vesicles which extend from the Golgi complex to the cell membrane supports the hypothesis that there is one type of vesicle which fuses with the cell membrane and secretes its content of cytokines. The other type of vesicle has been shown to fuse with pinocytic vacuoles to form hydrolase positive cytoplasmic granules. Consideration of cytokines produced by macrophages will help to clarify the immunologic functions of these cells.

  1. Attenuation of neutrophil infiltration and proinflammatory cytokines by Cissus quadrangularis: a possible prevention against gastric ulcerogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jainu, Mallika; Shyamala Devi, Chennam Srinivasulu

    2005-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species, neutrophil infiltration and proinflammatory cytokines play an important role in the pathogenesis of gastric ulcers caused by aspirin. The present study demonstrates the healing effect of Cissus quadrangularis extract (CQE) through inhibitory action on generation of lipid peroxidation, proinflammatory cytokines and neutrophil infiltration. The concentration ofmalondialdehye (MDA), protein carbonyl content, conjugated dienes, mucosal (SH) sulphydryls, uric acid, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and activities of myeloperoxidase (MPO), xanthine oxidase (XO) and antioxidative enzymes were determined in the gastric mucosa. Administration of CQE significantly attenuated the gastric lesions induced by aspirin and this was accompanied by the rise in uric acid, antioxidative enzymes, SH groups, and a significant decrease in lipid peroxidase, TNF-alpha, MPO and XO activities. These findings suggest that the significant gastroprotective activity could be mediated by the antioxidant activity as well as by the attenuation of oxidative mechanism and proinflammatory cytokines.

  2. Future prospects for anti-cytokine treatment

    PubMed Central

    Feldmann, M.; Miotla, J.; Paleolog, E.; Williams, R.; Malfait, A.; Taylor, P.; Brennan, F.; Maini, R.

    2000-01-01

    The era of anti-cytokine treatment in rheumatology has just begun. The first generation therapeutic agents, biological agents that block tumour necrosis factor α such as monoclonal antibodies or receptor Ig fusion proteins are safe and effective, and so this has generated much interest in how to increase the benefit or deliver it more cost effectively. This article provides a personal view of the coming trends in anti-cytokine treatment. Which of these will be realised in the future will be of interest.

 PMID:11053102

  3. Cytokine measurement using cytometric bead arrays.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Luis; MacCallum, Donna M

    2012-01-01

    Cytokines can be measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) or multiplex assay. Both techniques are commonly used in immunology to detect the presence of antibody or antigen in a sample. However, multiplex bead array technology provides the means to simultaneously measure multiple analytes in a single reaction, thereby saving time and resources. This method can detect up to 30 proteins at once, using a relatively small sample volume, without losing sensitivity, accuracy, or reproducibility. In this chapter, we describe the cytometric bead array (CBA) approach to simultaneously measure multiple cytokines in biological samples such as spleen, kidney, or serum from mice infected with the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans.

  4. Proinflammatory Cytokines as Regulators of Vaginal Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Kremleva, E A; Sgibnev, A V

    2016-11-01

    It was shown that IL-1β, IL-8, and IL-6 in concentrations similar to those in the vagina of healthy women stimulated the growth of normal microflora (Lactobacillus spp.) and suppressed the growth and biofilm production by S. aureus and E. coli. On the contrary, these cytokines in higher concentrations typical of vaginal dysbiosis suppressed normal microflora and stimulated the growth of opportunistic microorganisms. TGF-β1 in both doses produced a stimulating effects on study vaginal microsymbionts. It is hypothesized that pro-inflammatory cytokines serve as the molecules of interspecies communication coordinating the interactions of all components of the vaginal symbiotic system.

  5. Fuel or irradiation subassembly

    DOEpatents

    Seim, O.S.; Hutter, E.

    1975-12-23

    A subassembly for use in a nuclear reactor is described which incorporates a loose bundle of fuel or irradiation pins enclosed within an inner tube which in turn is enclosed within an outer coolant tube and includes a locking comb consisting of a head extending through one side of the inner sleeve and a plurality of teeth which extend through the other side of the inner sleeve while engaging annular undercut portions in the bottom portion of the fuel or irradiation pins to prevent movement of the pins.

  6. FOOD IRRADIATION REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Leyse, C.F.; Putnam, G.E.

    1961-05-01

    An irradiation apparatus is described. It comprises a pressure vessel, a neutronic reactor active portion having a substantially greater height than diameter in the pressure vessel, an annular tank surrounding and spaced from the pressure vessel containing an aqueous indium/sup 1//sup 1//sup 5/ sulfate solution of approximately 600 grams per liter concentration, means for circulating separate coolants through the active portion and the space between the annular tank and the pressure vessel, radiator means adapted to receive the materials to be irradiated, and means for flowing the indium/sup 1//sup 1//sup 5/ sulfate solution through the radiator means.

  7. Economics of food irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunstadt, Peter; Eng, P.; Steeves, Colyn; Beaulieu, Daniel; Eng, P.

    1993-07-01

    The number of products being radiation processed worldwide is constantly increasing and today includes such diverse items as medical disposables, fruits and vegetables, spices, meats, seafoods and waste products. This range of products to be processed has resulted in a wide range of irradiator designs and capital and operating cost requirements. This paper discusses the economics of low dose food irradiation applications and the effects of various parameters on unit processing costs. It provides a model for calculating specific unit processing costs by correlating known capital costs with annual operating costs and annual throughputs. It is intended to provide the reader with a general knowledge of how unit processing costs are derived.

  8. Cytokine-release kinetics of platelet-rich plasma according to various activation protocols

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Y. H.; Kim, W.; Park, K. U.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study was conducted to evaluate the cytokine-release kinetics of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) according to different activation protocols. Methods Two manual preparation procedures (single-spin (SS) at 900 g for five minutes; double-spin (DS) at 900 g for five minutes and then 1500 g for 15 minutes) were performed for each of 14 healthy subjects. Both preparations were tested for platelet activation by one of three activation protocols: no activation, activation with calcium (Ca) only, or calcium with a low dose (50 IU per 1 ml PRP) of thrombin. Each preparation was divided into four aliquots and incubated for one hour, 24 hours, 72 hours, and seven days. The cytokine-release kinetics were evaluated by assessing PDGF, TGF, VEGF, FGF, IL-1, and MMP-9 concentrations with bead-based sandwich immunoassay. Results The concentration of cytokine released from PRP varied over time and was influenced by various activation protocols. Ca-only activation had a significant effect on the DS PRPs (where the VEGF, FGF, and IL-1 concentrations were sustained) while Ca/thrombin activation had effects on both SS and DS PRPs (where the PDGF and VEGF concentrations were sustained and the TGF and FGF concentrations were short). The IL-1 content showed a significant increase with Ca-only or Ca/thrombin activation while these activations did not increase the MMP-9 concentration. Conclusion The SS and DS methods differed in their effect on cytokine release, and this effect varied among the cytokines analysed. In addition, low dose of thrombin/calcium activation increased the overall cytokine release of the PRP preparations over seven days, relative to that with a calcium-only supplement or non-activation. Cite this article: Professor J. H. Oh. Cytokine-release kinetics of platelet-rich plasma according to various activation protocols. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:37–45. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.52.2000540 PMID:26862077

  9. Role of Cytokine Hemoadsorption in Cardiopulmonary Bypass-Induced Ventricular Dysfunction in a Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Vocelka, Craig R.; Jones, Krystal M.; Mikhova, Krasimira M.; Ebisu, Ryan M.; Shar, Ashley; Kellum, John A.; Verrier, Edward D.; Rabkin, David G.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: Little is known about the effect of cardiopulmonary bypass alone on cardiac function; in an attempt to illuminate this relationship and test a possible mechanism, we used Cytosorb™, a device capable of removing virtually all types of circulating cytokines to test the hypothesis that hemoadsorption of cytokines during bypass attenuates bypass-induced acute organ dysfunction. Twelve Yorkshire pigs (50–65 kg) were instrumented with a left ventricular conductance catheter. Baseline mechanics and cytokine expression (tumor necrosis factor [TNF], interleukin-6 [IL-6], and interleukin-10) were measured before and hourly after 1 hour of normothermic cardiopulmonary bypass. Animals underwent bypass without (cardiopulmonary bypass [CPB], n = 6) or with (CPB+HA, n = 6) the Cytosorb™ device. Data were compared with “historical” controls (n = 6) that were similarly instrumented but underwent observation instead of bypass. Five hours after separation from bypass (or observation), animals were euthanized. Myocardial water content was determined postmortem. Neither TNF nor IL-6 was significantly elevated in either experimental group versus controls at any time point. Preload recruitable stroke work and dP/dtmax were significantly depressed immediately after separation from bypass in both CPB+HA and CPB and remained depressed for the duration of the experiment. Although Tau remained unchanged, dP/dTmin was significantly diminished in both bypass groups at all time points after separation from bypass. Cytokine hemoadsorption had no effect on any measurable index of function. Differences in postmortem data were not evident between groups. One hour of normothermic CPB results in a significant and sustained decline in left ventricular function that appears unrelated to changes in cytokine expression. Because we did not appreciate a significant change in cytokine concentrations postbypass, the capacity of cytokine hemoadsorption to attenuate CPB-induced ventricular

  10. Effect of gamma irradiation on physical characteristics of Jordanian durum wheat and quality of semolina and lasagna products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzeh, F. S.; Amr, A. S.

    2009-09-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effect of using varying gamma irradiation doses on the physiochemical and rheological properties of semolina and its products. Ash, protein and water content were not influenced with gamma irradiation, while falling number and fungi counts decreased with increasing irradiation dose. Irradiation adversely affected wet gluten at 5 kGy dose. Dough stability was deteriorated vigorously with increasing irradiation dose. Sensory evaluation showed that lasagna produced from 0.25- and 1 kGy-irradiated semolina did not show any significant differences as compared with the control sample.

  11. Cytokine profile of murine malaria: stage-related production of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Bakir, Hanaa Y; Tomiyama, Chikako; Abo, Toru

    2011-06-01

    Balance between inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines may be important in malaria presentation and outcome. To clarify cytokine interactions that produce pathology of malaria and control infection, C57BL/6 mice were infected with 10(4) parasitized RBCs from a non-lethal strain of Plasmodium yoelii. Kinetics was monitored showing the course of parasitemia, and cytokines were determined by RT-PCR from liver and spleen tissues. Inflammatory cytokines such as interferon-γ (IFNγ), interleukin (IL)-12, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) and anti-inflammatory cytokines, including IL-4 and IL-10, were investigated as key molecules that interact with immune cells in the activation of the immune responses. The production of IFNγ mRNA was found to be higher on day 7 than on day 21 after infection, and IL-12 and IL-6 showed higher expression in the liver than in the spleen. Though TNFα was highly expressed on day 14 after infection and on day 21 in the liver, such expression was decreased on day 21 in the spleen. Anti-inflammatory cytokines showed high expression in both the liver and spleen. The results suggest that a relative balance between inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines is crucial and that the increase of inflammatory cytokine levels during the acute phase of malaria may reflect an early and effective immune response.The counteraction effect of anti-inflammatory cytokines is thought to play a role in limiting progression from uncomplicated malaria to severe life-threatening complications.

  12. Postnatal irradiation-induced hippocampal neuropathology, cognitive impairment and aging.

    PubMed

    Tang, Feng Ru; Loke, Weng Keong; Khoo, Boo Cheong

    2017-04-01

    Irradiation of the brain in early human life may set abnormal developmental events into motion that last a lifetime, leading to a poor quality of life for affected individuals. While the effect of irradiation at different early developmental stages on the late human life has not been investigated systematically, animal experimental studies suggest that acute postnatal irradiation with ⩾0.1Gy may significantly reduce neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus and endotheliogenesis in cerebral vessels and induce cognitive impairment and aging. Fractionated irradiation also reduces neurogenesis. Furthermore, irradiation induces hippocampal neuronal loss in CA1 and CA3 areas, neuroinflammation and reduces gliogenesis. The hippocampal neurovascular niche and the total number of microvessels are also changed after radiation exposures. Each or combination of these pathological changes may cause cognitive impairment and aging. Interestingly, acute irradiation of aged brain with a certain amount of radiation has also been reported to induce brain hormesis or neurogenesis. At molecular levels, inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, neural growth factors, neurotransmitters, their receptors and signal transduction systems, reactive oxygen species are involved in radiation-induced adverse effect on brain development and functions. Further study at different omics levels after low dose/dose rate irradiation may not only unravel the mechanisms of radiation-induced adverse brain effect or hormesis, but also provide clues for detection or diagnosis of radiation exposure and for therapeutic approaches to effectively prevent radiation-induced cognitive impairment and aging. Investigation focusing on radiation-induced changes of critical brain development events may reveal many previously unknown adverse effects.

  13. Microwave Irradiation on Halloysite-Polypropylene Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espino, Omar; Yust, Brian; Chipara, Dorina; Ajayan, Pullickel; Chipara, Alin; Chipara, Mircea; Utrgv Collaboration; Rice Collaboration

    Halloysite is an unique cyllindrical nanoclay characterized by poor electrical and thermal conductivity, which may become the filler of choice for the reinforcement of polymeric matrix, where electrical or thermal insulation are required. The main limits in the use of halloysite as replacement for carbon nanotube (CNT) are: 1. Smaller aspect ratio as halloysites are typically shorter than CNTs. 2. Smaller Young modulus of halloysites compared with CNTs. 3. Reduced thermal stability due to the loss of water upon heating. A research on halloysite dispersed within isotactic polypropylene is reported. To improve the interface between the halloysite and the polymeric matrix a microwave irradiation step has been considered. The local heating of the halloysite nanotubes is mediated by the absorbed/structural water content of the nanoclay. Nanocomposites loaded by various amounts of halloysite ranging from 0 % to 20 % wt. have been prepared by melt mixing by using a Haake RheoMixer. The as obtained nanocomposites have been subjected to microwave irradiation at 75 W in an Anton Paar Monowave 300 system and various irradiation times ranging from 5, 10, 15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes. The effect of microwave irradiation has been studied by Raman and FTIR spectroscopy

  14. Profiling the cytokines in gingival crevicular fluid using a cytokine antibody array.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Akihiko; Ohshima, Mitsuhiro; Sugano, Naoyuki; Otsuka, Kichibee; Ito, Koichi

    2006-05-01

    Various compounds have been detected in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) as indicators of periodontal disease activity. Therefore, the analysis of GCF may be especially beneficial for diagnosing current periodontal status and addressing the effects of treatment. Moreover, the identification of new markers in GCF may also contribute to elucidating novel mechanisms involved in periodontal disease. This study sought novel marker proteins specific to chronic periodontitis by profiling cytokines in GCF using a cytokine antibody array system. Human cytokine array V, which detects 79 cytokines on one membrane, was used to determine the profile of cytokines in GCF from seven subjects with chronic periodontitis and seven subjects with healthy periodontia. The profile was exposed to x-ray film and quantified using image analysis software. Healthy and diseased sites were compared statistically. We detected 10 cytokines in periodontally healthy sites and 36 cytokines in periodontally diseased sites. Interleukin-8 (IL-8) and transforming growth factor-beta 2 (TGF-beta2) were detected at high levels in healthy and diseased subjects. There were significant differences between healthy and diseased subjects in the levels of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-2 (TIMP-2), tumor necrosis factor-beta (TNF-beta), growth-related oncogene (GRO), interferon-inducible protein-10 (IP-10), angiogenin (Ang), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3), osteoprotegerin (OPG), epidermal growth factor (EGF), glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), pulmonary and activation-regulated chemokine (PARC), oncostatin M (OSM), fibroblast growth factor-4 (FGF-4), IL-16, homologous to lymphotoxins (LIGHT), and placenta growth factor (PlGF). Of these, the newly detected cytokines were GRO, Ang, IGFBP-3, GDNF, PARC, OSM, FGF-4, IL-16, LIGHT, and PlGF. In this study, we detected several cytokines in GCF using a cytokine antibody array system

  15. Superoxide Dismutase Protects Osteoprogenitors from Irradiation with Low-LET but Not High-LET Species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreurs, A.-S.; Tran, L.; Alwood, J. S.; Tahimic, C. G.; Globus, R. K.

    2016-01-01

    Ionizing radiation-induced bone loss appears to be a two-stage process: first an early increase in pro-resorption cytokines and increased bone resorption by osteoclasts, followed by a decrease in bone formation by osteoblasts. This results in a net loss of mass in mineralized bone tissue. The molecular mechanisms underlying the imbalance in bone remodeling caused by exposure to radiation are not fully understood. We hypothesized that the radiation-induced rise in reactive oxygen species (ROS) damages osteoblast progenitors, leading to a decrease in number and activity of differentiated progeny. We have shown that a diet high in antioxidant capacity prevents radiation-induced bone loss in adult mice (Schreurs et al. 2016) by reducing the early increase in pro-resotption cytokines. Here, we investigated the damaging effects of radiation exposure on cells in the osteoblast lineage, testing if addition of the exogenous antioxidant enzyme, superoxide dismutase (SOD) can mitigate radiation damage. Osteoprogenitors were grown in vitro from the marrow of 16wk old, male C57Bl/6 mice. Cells were irradiated 3 days after plating (day 0) with either gamma (Cs-137, 0.1-5Gy) or iron (Fe-56, 600 MeV/n, 0.5-2Gy), and then grown until day 10. SOD or vehicle was added 2 hours before irradiation (SOD at 200U/ml), twice a day and up to day 5, for a total of 2 days treatment. Cell behavior was assessed by: (a) colony number (counted on day 7), (b) DNA content (surrogate for cell number) to assess cell growth (percent change between day 3 and day 10) and (c) alkaline phosphatase activity (osteoblast differentiation marker). Results show that SOD protected cells from the adverse effects of low-LET ionizing radiation, but not high-LET radiation. These novel results provide an interesting platform to explore further diverse effects and damages caused by low-LET and high-LET, pointing toward different mechanisms and possible intervention strategies for radiation-induced bone loss.

  16. Cytokines as biomarkers of nanoparticle immunotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Elsabahy, Mahmoud; Wooley, Karen L.

    2013-01-01

    Nanoscale objects, whether of biologic origin or synthetically created, are being developed into devices for a variety of bionanotechnology diagnostic and pharmaceutical applications. However, the potential immunotoxicity of these nanomaterials and mechanisms by which they may induce adverse reactions have not received sufficient attention. Nanomaterials, depending on their characteristics and compositions, can interact with the immune system in several ways and either enhance or suppress immune system function. Cytokines perform pleiotropic functions to mediate and regulate the immune response and are generally recognized as biomarkers of immunotoxicity. While the specificity and validity of certain cytokines as markers of adverse immune response has been established for chemicals, small and macromolecular drugs, research on their applicability for predicting and monitoring the immunotoxicity of engineered nanomaterials is still ongoing. The goal of this review is to provide guidelines as to important cytokines that can be utilized for evaluating the immunotoxicity of nanomaterials and to highlight the role of those cytokines in mediating adverse reactions, which is of particular importance for the clinical development of nanopharmaceuticals and other nanotechnology-based products. Importantly, the rational design of nanomaterials of low immunotoxicity will be discussed, focusing on synthetic nanodevices, with emphasis on both the nanoparticle-forming materials and the embedded cargoes. PMID:23549679

  17. Cytokines and Chemokines in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection.

    PubMed

    Domingo-Gonzalez, Racquel; Prince, Oliver; Cooper, Andrea; Khader, Shabaana A

    2016-10-01

    Chemokines and cytokines are critical for initiating and coordinating the organized and sequential recruitment and activation of cells into Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected lungs. Correct mononuclear cellular recruitment and localization are essential to ensure control of bacterial growth without the development of diffuse and damaging granulocytic inflammation. An important block to our understanding of TB pathogenesis lies in dissecting the critical aspects of the cytokine/chemokine interplay in light of the conditional role these molecules play throughout infection and disease development. Much of the data highlighted in this review appears at first glance to be contradictory, but it is the balance between the cytokines and chemokines that is critical, and the "goldilocks" (not too much and not too little) phenomenon is paramount in any discussion of the role of these molecules in TB. Determination of how the key chemokines/cytokines and their receptors are balanced and how the loss of that balance can promote disease is vital to understanding TB pathogenesis and to identifying novel therapies for effective eradication of this disease.

  18. Cytokines as biochemical markers for knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mabey, Thomas; Honsawek, Sittisak

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a debilitating degenerative joint disease particularly affecting weightbearing joints within the body, principally the hips and knees. Current radiographic techniques are insufficient to show biochemical changes within joint tissue which can occur many years before symptoms become apparent. The need for better diagnostic and prognostic tools is heightened with the prevalence of OA set to increase in aging and obese populations. As inflammation is increasingly being considered an important part of OAs pathophysiology, cytokines are being assessed as possible candidates for biochemical markers. Cytokines, both pro- and anti-inflammatory, as well as angiogenic and chemotactic, have in recent years been studied for relevant characteristics. Biochemical markers show promise in determination of the severity of disease in addition to monitoring of the efficacy and safety of disease-modifying OA drugs, with the potential to act as diagnostic and prognostic tools. Currently, the diagnostic power of interleukin (IL)-6 and the relationship to disease burden of IL-1β, IL-15, tumor necrosis factor-α, and vascular endothelial growth factor make these the best candidates for assessment. Grouping appropriate cytokine markers together and assessing them collectively alongside other bone and cartilage degradation products will yield a more statistically powerful tool in research and clinical applications, and additionally aid in distinguishing between OA and a number of other diseases in which cytokines are known to have an involvement. Further large scale studies are needed to assess the validity and efficacy of current biomarkers, and to discover other potential biomarker candidates. PMID:25621214

  19. Cytokines in Graft-versus-Host Disease.

    PubMed

    Henden, Andrea S; Hill, Geoffrey R

    2015-05-15

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a complication of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation whereby transplanted naive and marrow-derived T cells damage recipient tissue through similar mechanisms to those that allow destruction of malignant cells, the therapeutic intent of bone marrow transplantation. The manifestations and severity of GVHD are highly variable and are influenced by the proportions of naive cells maturing along regulatory T cell, Th1, Th2, or Th17 phenotypes. This maturation is largely influenced by local cytokines, which, in turn, activate transcription factors and drive development toward a dominant phenotype. In addition, proinflammatory cytokines exert direct effects on GVHD target tissues. Our knowledge of the role that cytokines play in orchestrating GVHD is expanding rapidly and parallels other infective and inflammatory conditions in which a predominant T cell signature is causative of pathology. Because a broad spectrum of cytokine therapies is now routinely used in clinical practice, they are increasingly relevant to transplant medicine. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  20. Cytokine therapeutics: lessons from interferon alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Gutterman, J U

    1994-01-01

    Cytokines are soluble proteins that allow for communication between cells and the external environment. Interferon (IFN) alpha, the first cytokine to be produced by recombinant DNA technology, has emerged as an important regulator of growth and differentiation, affecting cellular communication and signal transduction pathways as well as immunological control. This review focuses on the biological and clinical activities of the cytokine. Originally discovered as an antiviral substance, the efficacy of IFN-alpha in malignant, viral, immunological, angiogenic, inflammatory, and fibrotic diseases suggests a spectrum of interrelated pathophysiologies. The principles learned from in vivo studies will be discussed, particularly hairy cell leukemia, chronic myelogenous leukemia, certain angiogenic diseases, and hepatitis. After the surprising discovery of activity in a rare B-cell neoplasm, IFN-alpha emerged as a prototypic tumor suppressor protein that represses the clinical tumorigenic phenotype in some malignancies capable of differentiation. Regulatory agencies throughout the world have approved IFN-alpha for treatment of 13 malignant and viral disorders. The principles established with this cytokine serve as a paradigm for future development of natural proteins for human disease. PMID:8108387

  1. Immunoregulatory properties of the cytokine IL-34.

    PubMed

    Guillonneau, Carole; Bézie, Séverine; Anegon, Ignacio

    2017-03-03

    Interleukin-34 is a cytokine with only partially understood functions, described for the first time in 2008. Although IL-34 shares very little homology with CSF-1 (CSF1, M-CSF), they share a common receptor CSF-1R (CSF-1R) and IL-34 has also two distinct receptors (PTP-ζ) and CD138 (syndecan-1). To make the situation more complex, IL-34 has also been shown as pairing with CSF-1 to form a heterodimer. Until now, studies have demonstrated that this cytokine is released by some tissues that differ to those where CSF-1 is expressed and is involved in the differentiation and survival of macrophages, monocytes, and dendritic cells in response to inflammation. The involvement of IL-34 has been shown in areas as diverse as neuronal protection, autoimmune diseases, infection, cancer, and transplantation. Our recent work has demonstrated a new and possible therapeutic role for IL-34 as a Foxp3(+) Treg-secreted cytokine mediator of transplant tolerance. In this review, we recapitulate most recent findings on IL-34 and its controversial effects on immune responses and address its immunoregulatory properties and the potential of targeting this cytokine in human.

  2. Hormones and cytokines in childhood obesity.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Nur; Erdur, Baris; Aydin, Adem

    2010-10-01

    Obesity is a growing worldwide health problem affecting both adults and children. Effective prevention and treatment modalities can be achieved by understanding the pathogenesis of obesity better. This review addresses some of the issues related to the hormones and cytokines taking part in the pathogenesis of obesity, energy balance and inflammation. We reviewed current literature on this broad subject especially concentrating on the functions of the hormones and cytokines taking part in the pathogenesis of the childhood obesity. Using the key words obesity, children, hormones, cytokines publications and cross references were evaluated from PubMed database between 1957 and 2009. In children, leptin and ghrelin are two hormones which have major influence on energy balance. Leptin is responsible from long term regulation of energy balance and ghrelin functions as an appetite stimulatory signal. In contrast to ghrelin, obestatin acts as an anorexigenic hormone by suppressing food intake. Adipokines secreted from adipose tissue are the key regulators of inflammation in obesity. Increased TNF-alpha and IL-6 levels but decreased levels of adiponectin and IL-10 are associated with increased inflammation, tissue injury and complications of obesity. Development, pathogenesis and complications of childhood obesity consist of complex mechanisms including numerous cytokines and hormones. New treatment modalities depend on understanding these complex mechanisms.

  3. Cytokines and immune surveillance in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1994-01-01

    Evidence from both human and rodent studies has indicated that alterations in immunological parameters occur after space flight. Among the parameters shown, by us and others, to be affected is the production of interferons. Interferons are a family of cytokines that are antiviral and play a major role in regulating immune responses that control resistance to infection. Alterations in interferon and other cytokine production and activity could result in changes in immunity and a possible compromise of host defenses against both opportunistic and external infections. The purpose of the present study is to explore further the effects of space flight on cyotokines and cytokine-directed immunological function. Among the tests carried out are interferon-alpha production, interferon-gamma production, interleukin-1 and -2 production, signal transduction in neutrophils, signal transduction in monocytes, and monocyte phagocytic activity. The experiments will be performed using peripheral blood obtained from human subjects. It is our intent to eventually carry out these experiments using astronauts as subjects to determine the effects of space flight on cytokine production and activity. However, these subjects are not currently available. Until they become available, we will carry out these experiments using subjects maintained in the bed-rest model for microgravity.

  4. CYTOKINE PROFILING FOR CHEMICAL RESPIRATORY SENSITIZERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    CYTOKINE PROFILING FOR CHEMICAL RESPIRATORY SENSITIZERS. LM Plitnick1, SE Loveless2, GS Ladics2, MP Holsapple3, MJ Selgrade4, DM Sailstad4 & RJ Smialowicz4. 1UNC, Chapel Hill, NC; 2DuPont Co., Haskell Laboratory, Newark, DE; 3Dow Chemical, Midland, MI & 4USEPA, NHEERL, RTP, NC.

  5. Early cytokine responses during intestinal parasitic infections.

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, N; Goyal, P K; Mahida, Y R; Li, K F; Wakelin, D

    1998-01-01

    Infections with gastro-intestinal nematodes elicit immune and inflammatory responses mediated by cytokines released from T-helper type-2 (Th2) cells. In vitro assays of cells from the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) of experimentally infected rodents confirm that, after about 1 week, the dominant cytokine responses to mitogens and antigens are those associated with this Th-cell subset. Polarization of the Th response in this way implies an initial local cytokine environment that favours Th2 development. However, experimental infections with Trichinella spiralis and Nippostrongylus brasiliensis show that, within 2 days of worms reaching the intestine, MLN cells (MLNC) respond with a Th1 rather than a Th2 response [i.e. there is an increase in mRNA for the type 1 cytokine interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), and mitogen-stimulated MLNC release IFN-gamma rather than interleukin-5 (IL-5)]. Antigen stimulation at this time does not elicit IFN-gamma release and the MLNC cannot adoptively transfer immunity. Within a few days the MLNC phenotype changes. There is a Th2 response (IL-5 release) to both mitogen and antigen stimulation and MLNC can adoptively transfer immunity. Early release of IFN-gamma is T-cell dependent, with CD4+ T cells playing the major role. The data are discussed in relation to factors regulating the mucosal response to invasion by parasites. PMID:9616376

  6. E-selectin gene induction by ionizing radiation is independent of cytokine induction.

    PubMed

    Hallahan, D; Clark, E T; Kuchibhotla, J; Gewertz, B L; Collins, T

    1995-12-26

    The mechanism of the x-ray-mediated inflammatory response in normal tissues is unknown. To determine whether leukocyte infiltration into irradiated tissue is regulated by adhesion molecule expression, we quantified the synthesis of glycoproteins that participate in inflammation. We found that E-selectin is synthesized in a time-dependent manner following exposure to doses as low as 0.5 Gy. Northern blot analysis demonstrated that E-selectin mRNA expression increased at 2 h after x-irradiation and increased expression required no de novo protein synthesis. Transcription of the promoter region of E-selectin (-578 to +35) was transiently induced following x-irradiation, whereas deletion of the NFkB binding site eliminated x-ray induction. Electrophoretic mobility gel shift analysis confirmed increased binding of nuclear proteins from irradiated endothelial cells to the NFkB binding sequence from the E-selectin promoter. Nuclear protein binding to the NFkB binding sequence was altered by antibodies to the p50 and p65 components of NFkB. These data demonstrate that E-selectin expression does not require cytokine synthesis, but involves NFkB activation.

  7. Generic phytosanitary irradiation treatments

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The history of the development of generic phytosanitary irradiation (PI) treatments is discussed beginning with its initial proposal in 1986. Generic PI treatments in use today are 150 Gy for all hosts of Tephritidae, 250 Gy for all arthropods on mango and papaya shipped from Australia to New Zeala...

  8. NSUF Irradiated Materials Library

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, James Irvin

    2015-09-01

    The Nuclear Science User Facilities has been in the process of establishing an innovative Irradiated Materials Library concept for maximizing the value of previous and on-going materials and nuclear fuels irradiation test campaigns, including utilization of real-world components retrieved from current and decommissioned reactors. When the ATR national scientific user facility was established in 2007 one of the goals of the program was to establish a library of irradiated samples for users to access and conduct research through competitively reviewed proposal process. As part of the initial effort, staff at the user facility identified legacy materials from previous programs that are still being stored in laboratories and hot-cell facilities at the INL. In addition other materials of interest were identified that are being stored outside the INL that the current owners have volunteered to enter into the library. Finally, over the course of the last several years, the ATR NSUF has irradiated more than 3500 specimens as part of NSUF competitively awarded research projects. The Logistics of managing this large inventory of highly radioactive poses unique challenges. This document will describe materials in the library, outline the policy for accessing these materials and put forth a strategy for making new additions to the library as well as establishing guidelines for minimum pedigree needed to be included in the library to limit the amount of material stored indefinitely without identified value.

  9. Irradiating insect pests

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This is a non-technical article focusing on phytosanitary uses of irradiation. In a series of interview questions, I present information on the scope of the invasive species problem and the contribution of international trade in agricultural products to the movement of invasive insects. This is foll...

  10. Phytosanitary applications of irradiation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Phytosanitary treatments are used to disinfest agricultural commodities of quarantine pests so the commodities can be shipped across quarantine barriers to trade. Ionizing irradiation is a promising treatment that is increasing in use. Almost 19,000 tons of sweet potatoes and several fruits, plus ...

  11. Update on meat irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, D.G.

    1997-12-01

    The irradiation of meat and poultry in the United States is intended to eliminate pathogenic bacteria from raw product, preferably after packaging to prevent recontamination. Irradiation will also increase the shelf life of raw meat and poultry products approximately two to three times the normal shelf life. Current clearances in the United States are for poultry (fresh or frozen) at doses from 1.5 to 3.0 kGy and for fresh pork at doses from 0.3 to 1.0 kGy. A petition for the clearance of all red meat was submitted to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in July 1994. The petition is for clearances of fresh meat at doses from 1.5 to 4.5 kGy and for frozen meat at {approximately}2.5 to 7.5 kGy. Clearance for red meat is expected before the end of 1997. There are 28 countries that have food irradiation clearances, of which 18 countries have clearances for meat or poultry. However, there are no uniform categories or approved doses for meat and poultry among the countries that could hamper international trade of irradiated meat and poultry.

  12. Effects of gamma irradiation on deteriorated paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bicchieri, Marina; Monti, Michela; Piantanida, Giovanna; Sodo, Armida

    2016-08-01

    Even though gamma radiation application, also at the minimum dosage required for disinfection, causes depolymerization and degradation of the paper substrate, recently published papers seemed, instead, to suggest that γ-rays application could be envisaged in some conditions for Cultural Heritage original documents and books. In some of the published papers, the possible application of γ-rays was evaluated mainly by using mechanical tests that scarcely reflect the chemical modifications induced in the cellulosic support. In the present article the effect of low dosage γ-irradiation on cellulosic substrates was studied and monitored applying different techniques: colorimetry, spectroscopic measurements, carbonyl content and average viscometric degree of polymerization. Two different papers were investigated, a non-sized, non-filled cotton paper, and a commercial permanent paper. To simulate a real deteriorated document, which could need γ-rays irradiation, some samples were submitted to a hydrolysis treatment. We developed a treatment based on the exposition of paper to hydrochloric acid vapors, avoiding any contact of the samples with water. This method induces a degradation similar to that observed on original documents. The samples were then irradiated with 3 kGy γ-rays at a 5258 Gy/h rate. The aforementioned analyses were performed on the samples just irradiated and after artificial ageing. All tests showed negative effects of gamma irradiation on paper. Non-irradiated paper preserves better its appearance and chemical properties both in the short term and after ageing, while the irradiated samples show appreciable color change and higher oxidation extent. Since the Istituto centrale restauro e conservazione patrimonio archivistico e librario is responsible for the choice of all restoration treatments that could be applied on library and archival materials under the protection of the Italian State (http://www.icpal.beniculturali.it/allegati/DM-7

  13. Biological effects of the interferons and other cytokines.

    PubMed

    Friedman, R M; Grimley, P; Baron, S

    1996-01-01

    There were seven workshops that primarily concerned the biological effects of the interferons and the other cytokines. These were: Workshop 6, The refractory state in the response to interferons (IFNs) and antibodies in treated patients; Workshop 7, IFNs, multiple sclerosis, and the nervous system; Workshop 9, Viral inhibition of the response to IFNs and other cytokines; Workshop 10, Cell growth inhibition by IFNs and other cytokines; Workshop 12, Cytokines and cell death; Workshop 13, Interactions between cytokines; and, Workshop 14, Cytokine gene therapy. Summaries of each of these sessions follow.

  14. Curcumin suppression of cytokine release and cytokine storm. A potential therapy for patients with Ebola and other severe viral infections.

    PubMed

    Sordillo, Peter P; Helson, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    The terminal stage of Ebola and other viral diseases is often the onset of a cytokine storm, the massive overproduction of cytokines by the body's immune system. The actions of curcumin in suppressing cytokine release and cytokine storm are discussed. Curcumin blocks cytokine release, most importantly the key pro-inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-1, interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α. The suppression of cytokine release by curcumin correlates with clinical improvement in experimental models of disease conditions where a cytokine storm plays a significant role in mortality. The use of curcumin should be investigated in patients with Ebola and cytokine storm. Intravenous formulations may allow achievement of therapeutic blood levels of curcumin. Copyright © 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  15. Workers’ cytokines profiling upon exposure to MWCNT aerosol in occupational settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatkhutdinova, L. M.; Khaliullin, T. O.; Zalyalov, R. R.; Vasilyeva, O. L.; Valeeva, I. Kh; Mustafin, I. G.

    2015-11-01

    Recent studies have found that upon pulmonary exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) animals develop primarily fibrosis and granulomas in lungs. In vitro and in vivo studies also give reason to assume that local exposure could be related to remote effects, including immune system and the endothelium. To investigate the remote effect hypothesis, we have analyzed blood, nasal lavage and induced sputum samples taken from workers in the frame of the Russian epidemiological study on Carbon Nanotubes Exposure and Risk Assessment (CNT-ERA). In serum and nasal lavage no significant differences between exposure and control groups were observed with a high variability to the cytokines content. In the samples of induced sputum from exposed workers the content of IL-1b, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-a, IL-4, IL-5, IFN-g exceeded the control group values, but after the regression models construction and bootstrap analysis, significant differences were found only for IL-1b. This study could not provide evidences of blood cytokines changes following local cytokine production in airways in workers exposed to MWCNTs. Cytokines variability in serum and nasal lavage may indicate the absence of severe systemic inflammatory response upon the existing occupational exposure to MWCNTs. Other systemic responses (including allergy-like or autoimmune reactions) should be regarded as well.

  16. Cold weather exercise and airway cytokine expression.

    PubMed

    Davis, Michael S; Malayer, Jerry R; Vandeventer, Lori; Royer, Christopher M; McKenzie, Erica C; Williamson, Katherine K

    2005-06-01

    Athletes who perform repeated exercise while breathing cold air have a high prevalence of asthmalike chronic airway disease, but the mechanism linking such activity to airway inflammation is unknown. We used a novel animal model (exercising horses) to test the hypothesis that exercise-induced chronic airway disease is caused by exposure of intrapulmonary airways to unconditioned air, resulting in the upregulation of cytokine expression. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was obtained from eight horses 5 h after submaximal exercise while they breathed room temperature or subfreezing air in a random crossover design. BALF total and differential nucleated cell counts were determined, and relative cytokine mRNA expression in BALF nucleated cells was quantified by real-time RT-PCR using primer and probe sequences specific for equine targets. There were no significant changes in total or differential cell concentrations between BALF recovered after warm and cold air exercise, although there was a strong trend toward increased concentrations of airway epithelial cells after cold air exercise (P = 0.0625). T(H)2 cytokines IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10 were preferentially upregulated after cold air exercise 12-, 9-, and 10-fold, respectively, compared with warm air exercise. Other cytokines (IL-2 and IL-6) were upregulated to a lesser extent (6- and 3-fold, respectively) or not at all (IL-1, IL-8, IFN-gamma, and TNF-alpha). These results suggest that cold weather exercise can lead to asthmalike airway disease through the local induction of cytokines typical of the T(H)2 phenotype.

  17. Serum levels of cytokines and secondary messages after T-cell-depleted and non-T-cell-depleted bone marrow transplantation: influence of conditioning and hematopoietic reconstitution.

    PubMed

    Schwaighofer, H; Kernan, N A; O'Reilly, R J; Brankova, J; Nachbaur, D; Herold, M; Eibl, B; Niederwieser, D

    1996-10-15

    Cytokines are increasingly recognized as important mediators of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Measurements of cytokine serum levels in patients with GVHD, and successful prevention and treatment of the disease with the use of cytokine antagonists to either the cytokine or its receptor, are only two of several factors demonstrating the involvement of cytokines in GVHD. To further investigate the role of cytokines in the pathomechanism of acute GVHD, we investigated endogenous serum levels of various cytokines and dependent molecules in sera of 14 patients after T-cell-depleted (TCD) bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and compared the results with those of 12 patients undergoing non-TCD BMT. The effect of various conditioning regimens and of hematopoietic reconstitution on cytokine serum levels was analyzed in detail in these cohorts of patients by measuring interferon (IFN)-gamma, IFN-alpha, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-6, neopterin, and beta2-microglobulin. The analyses showed that an increase in IFN-gamma and neopterin serum levels was a specific feature of cyclophosphamide administration and was not observed after other cytostatic drugs or total body irradiation, and that an increase in IFN-gamma, neopterin, beta2-microglobulin, and IFN-alpha release depends on the presence of T cells in the graft. We conclude that significant cytokine serum alterations were noted after TCD BMT as compared with after non-TCD BMT. These alterations, besides depletion of cytotoxic effector cells, might be involved in preventing GVHD after TCD BMT. In addition, more attention should be devoted to the cytokine release-inducing capacity of the conditioning regimen, because such a release might influence the occurrence of transplant-related complications after BMT.

  18. Effect of gamma irradiation on viscosity reduction of cereal porridges for improving energy density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ju-Woon; Kim, Jae-Hun; Oh, Sang-Hee; Byun, Eui-Hong; Yook, Hong-Sun; Kim, Mee-Ree; Kim, Kwan-Soo; Byun, Myung-Woo

    2008-03-01

    Cereal porridges have low energy and nutrient density because of its viscosity. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of irradiation on the reduction of viscosity and on the increasing solid content of cereal porridge. Four cereals, wheat, rice, maize (the normal starchy type) and waxy rice, were used in this study. The porridge with 3000 cP was individually prepared from cereal flour, gamma-irradiated at 20 kGy and tested. Gamma irradiation of 20 kGy was allowed that the high viscous and rigid cereal porridges turned into semi-liquid consistencies. The solid contents of all porridges could increase by irradiation, compared with non-irradiated ones. No significant differences of starch digestibility were observed in all cereal porridge samples. The results indicated that gamma irradiation might be helpful for improving energy density of cereal porridge with acceptable consistency.

  19. Fluorescence properties and electron paramagnetic resonance studies of γ-irradiated Sm3+-doped oxyfluoroborate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, B. Hari; Ravi Kanth Kumar, V. V.

    2012-11-01

    The permanent photoinduced valence manipulation of samarium doped oxyfluoroborate glasses as a function of γ-ray irradiation has been investigated using a steady-state fluorescence and electron paramagnetic resonance techniques. An increase in SrF2 content in the glass led to the red shift of the peaks in as prepared glass, while in irradiated glasses this led to the decrease in defect formation as well as increase in photoreduction of Sm3+ to Sm2+ ion. The energy transfer mechanism of induced permanent photoreduction of Sm3+ to Sm2+ ions in oxyfluoroborate glasses has been discussed. The decay analysis shows exponential behavior before irradiation and non-exponential behavior after irradiation. The energy transfer in irradiated glasses increases with the increase in SrF2 content in the glass and also with the irradiation dose.

  20. A comparitive assessement of cytokine expression in human-derived cell lines exposed to alpha particles and X-rays.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Vinita; Howland, Matthew; Wilkins, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Alpha- (α-) particle radiation exposure has been linked to the development of lung cancer and has been identified as a radiation type likely to be employed in radiological dispersal devices. Currently, there exists a knowledge gap concerning cytokine modulations associated with exposure to α-particles. Bio-plex technology was employed to investigate changes in proinflammatory cytokines in two human-derived cell lines. Cells were irradiated at a dose of 1.5 Gy to either α-particles or X-rays at equivalent dose rates. The two cell lines exhibited a unique pattern of cytokine expression and the response varied with radiation type. Of the 27 cytokines assessed, only vascular endothelin growth factor (VEGF) was observed to be modulated in both cell lines solely after α-particle exposure, and the expression of VEGF was shown to be dose responsive. These results suggest that certain proinflammatory cytokines may be involved in the biological effects related to α- particle exposure and the responses are cell type and radiation type specific.

  1. A Comparitive Assessement of Cytokine Expression in Human-Derived Cell Lines Exposed to Alpha Particles and X-Rays

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Vinita; Howland, Matthew; Wilkins, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Alpha- (α-) particle radiation exposure has been linked to the development of lung cancer and has been identified as a radiation type likely to be employed in radiological dispersal devices. Currently, there exists a knowledge gap concerning cytokine modulations associated with exposure to α-particles. Bio-plex technology was employed to investigate changes in proinflammatory cytokines in two human-derived cell lines. Cells were irradiated at a dose of 1.5 Gy to either α-particles or X-rays at equivalent dose rates. The two cell lines exhibited a unique pattern of cytokine expression and the response varied with radiation type. Of the 27 cytokines assessed, only vascular endothelin growth factor (VEGF) was observed to be modulated in both cell lines solely after α-particle exposure, and the expression of VEGF was shown to be dose responsive. These results suggest that certain proinflammatory cytokines may be involved in the biological effects related to α- particle exposure and the responses are cell type and radiation type specific. PMID:22619631

  2. Food irradiation: Activities and potentialities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doellstaedt, R.; Huebner, G.

    After the acceptance of food irradiation up to an overall average dose of 10 kGy recommended by the Joint FAO/IAEA/WHO Expert Committee on the Wholesomeness of Irradiated Food in October 1980, the G.D.R. started a programme for the development of techniques for food irradiation. A special onion irradiator was designed and built as a pilot plant for studying technological and economic parameters of the irradiation of onions. The new principle of bulk-cargo irradiation allows the integration of this technology into the usual harvest technology for onions on the way from field to storage. Scientific and applied research work has been carried out in the past 3 yr on the irradiation of spices, potatoes, eviscerated chicken, animal feeds, fodder yeast, drugs and vaccines. In connection with the irradiation of eviscerated chicken, fodder yeast and animal feeds the basis of an antisalmonella programme has been discussed. Germ-count-reduced spices were employed for the production of test charges of preserves and tinned products. The results have led to the decision to design and build a new multipurpose irradiator for food irradiation. In order to cover the legal aspects of food irradiation the Ministry of Health issued regulations concerning the recommendation of irradiated food in the G.D.R.

  3. Expression of cytokine messenger RNA after heart transplantation: relationship with rejection and serum cytokines.

    PubMed

    Grant, S C; Guy, S P; Lamb, W R; Brooks, N H; Brenchley, P E; Hutchinson, I V

    1996-10-15

    Different groups of cytokines may initiate or inhibit the rejection process. We used the polymerase chain reaction to study the expression of cytokine mRNA for interleukin (IL)-2, -4, -6 and -10, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interferon-gamma in 187 biopsy specimens from 24 human cardiac transplant recipients 5-555 days after transplantation. Cytokine levels in the serum were also measured. Cytokine mRNA was detected in 38.5% of biopsy specimens. IL-10 mRNA was detected more frequently with mild or absent rejection (11.6% in grades 0 and 1 - vs. 1.4% in grades 2 and 3, P=0.01). Up to 90 days after transplantation, IL-2 mRNA was detected more frequently with moderate rejection (13% in grades 2 and 3 vs. 0% in grades 0 and 1, P=0.076), and IL-4 mRNA was detected more frequently with mild or absent rejection (16% in grades 0 and 1 - vs. 0% in grades 2 and 3, P=0.061). More than 90 days after transplantation, IL-2 mRNA was detected more frequently with mild or absent rejection (10% in grades 0 and 1 vs. 0% in grades 2 and 3, P=0.078). Serum IL-4 levels corresponding to biopsy specimens positive for IL-4 mRNA were higher than those corresponding to specimens negative for IL-4 mRNA (59 pg/ml vs. 32 pg/ml medians, P=0.028). Our results suggest that IL-10 and possibly IL-4 (T helper 2 cytokines) may suppress graft rejection, whereas IL-2 (T helper 1 cytokine) may promote cellular rejection. In addition, cytokine profiles may change with length of time after transplantation. The association of elevated serum levels of IL-4 with increased expression of intragraft IL-4 mRNA may suggest release of this cytokine from the graft into the circulation.

  4. Cytokines in therapy of radiation injury

    SciTech Connect

    Neta, R.; Oppenheim, J.J.

    1988-09-01

    Repeated injections or infusion of hematopoietic growth factors, such as interleukin-3 (IL-3), granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), or granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), accelerate restoration of hematopoiesis in animals compromised by sublethal doses of cytotoxic drugs or irradiation. Previous work by the investigators has shown that IL-1 induced circulating CSF in normal mice and, when used after sublethal irradiation, accelerated the recovery of endogenous splenic colonies. Therefore, IL-1, as well as IFN-gamma, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), G-CSF, and GM-CSF, were evaluated as potential therapeutic agents in irradiated C3H-HeN mice. A single intraperitoneal injection, administered within three hours after a lethal dose (LD)95/30 of irradiation that would kill 95% of mice within 30 days, protected in a dose-dependent manner up to 100% of mice from radiation-induced death due to hematopoietic syndrome. Significant therapeutic effects were also achieved with a single dose of IFN-gamma or of TNF. In contrast, GM-CSF and G-CSF, administered shortly after irradiation, had no effect in the doses used on mice survival.

  5. Effect of gamma irradiation on molecular structure and physicochemical properties of corn starch.

    PubMed

    Chung, H-J; Liu, Q

    2009-06-01

    Carboxyl content and amylose leaching of gamma-irradiated corn starch increased and swelling factor decreased with increasing radiation dose. The apparent amylose content decreased gradually from 28.7% for native starch to 20.9% for 50 kGy irradiated starch. The proportion of short amylopectin branch chains (DP 6 to 12) increased, while the proportion of longer branch chains (DP > or = 37) decreased with increasing radiation dose. The relative crystallinity and the degree of granule surface order decreased from 28.5% and 0.631 in native starch to 26.9% and 0.605 in 50 kGy irradiated starch, respectively. Pasting viscosity and gelatinization temperatures decreased with an increase in radiation dose. At a high dose (50 kGy), melting of amylose-lipid complex in DSC thermogram was not observed. The rapidly digestible starch (RDS) content slightly decreased up to 10 kGy but increased at 50 kGy. The resistant starch (RS) content slightly decreased at 2 kGy and then increased up to 50 kGy. The slowly digestible starch (SDS) content showed the opposite trend to RS content. Slower irradiation dose rate reduced carboxyl content, swelling factor, and amylose leaching. The apparent amylose content and amylopectin chain length distribution were not significantly affected by dose rate of gamma irradiation. However, the relative crystallinity and gelatinization enthalpy increased with slower dose rate. Slower dose rate decreased RDS and SDS contents, and increased RS content.

  6. Low-fluence CO2 laser irradiation decreases enamel solubility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteves-Oliveira, M.; Apel, C.; Gutknecht, N.; Velloso, W. F.; Cotrim, M. E. B.; Eduardo, C. P.; Zezell, D. M.

    2008-04-01

    This study investigated whether subablative-pulsed CO2 laser (10.6 μm) irradiation, using fluences lower than 1 J/cm2, was capable of reducing enamel acid solubility. Fifty-one samples of bovine dental enamel were divided into three groups: control group, which was not irradiated (CG); group laser A (LA) irradiated with 0.3 J/cm2; and group laser B (LB) irradiated with 0.7 J/cm2. After irradiation, the samples were subjected to demineralization in an acetate buffer solution and were then analyzed by SEM. A finite-element model was used to calculate the temperature increase. The calcium and phosphorous content in the demineralization solution were measured with an ICP-OES. ANOVA and the t-test pairwise comparison ( p < 0.016) revealed that LB showed significantly lower mean Ca and P content values in the demineralization solution than other groups. A reduction in the enamel solubility can be obtained with pulsed CO2 laser irradiation (0.7 J/cm2, 135 mJ/pulse, 74 Hz, 100 μs) without any surface photomodification and a less than 2°C temperature increase at a 3-mm depth from the surface.

  7. Ultraviolet irradiation in transplantation biology. Manipulation of immunity and immunogenicity

    SciTech Connect

    Deeg, H.J.

    1988-05-01

    Ultraviolet irradiation, particularly in the UVB range, has profound effects on immunological mechanisms. Optimum and tolerable doses of exposure vary from species to species, and from organ to organ. As a result of limited depth penetration and possibly significant energy absorption in nontargeted cells, every model requires diligent determination of an effective nontoxic approach. Nevertheless, it is clear that UVB and UVC irradiation can abolish proliferative and stimulatory ability as well as accessory/antigen-presenting ability of leukocytes in vitro. UV treatment alters cell-surface properties, calcium mobilization, cytokine production and release, and other subcellular processes. Preliminary data suggest that these manipulations also suppress immunity and reduce immunogenicity in vivo. Exposure of solid organs and of large volumes of blood is difficult due to technical problems--in particular poor depth penetration and absorption of UV energy in generally available transfusion bags. 111 references.

  8. Increased cytokine/chemokines in serum from asthmatic and non-asthmatic patients with viral respiratory infection

    PubMed Central

    Giuffrida, María J; Valero, Nereida; Mosquera, Jesús; Alvarez de Mon, Melchor; Chacín, Betulio; Espina, Luz Marina; Gotera, Jennifer; Bermudez, John; Mavarez, Alibeth

    2014-01-01

    Background Respiratory viral infections can induce different cytokine/chemokine profiles in lung tissues and have a significant influence on patients with asthma. There is little information about the systemic cytokine status in viral respiratory-infected asthmatic patients compared with non-asthmatic patients. Objectives The aim of this study was to determine changes in circulating cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-4, IL-5) and chemokines (MCP1: monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and RANTES: regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted) in patients with an asthmatic versus a non-asthmatic background with respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza virus or adenovirus respiratory infection. In addition, human monocyte cultures were incubated with respiratory viruses to determine the cytokine/chemokine profiles. Patients/Methods Patients with asthmatic (n = 34) and non-asthmatic (n = 18) history and respiratory infections with respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza, and adenovirus were studied. Healthy individuals with similar age and sex (n = 10) were used as controls. Cytokine/chemokine content in blood and culture supernatants was determined by ELISA. Monocytes were isolated by Hystopaque gradient and cocultured with each of the above-mentioned viruses. Results Similar increased cytokine concentrations were observed in asthmatic and non-asthmatic patients. However, higher concentrations of chemokines were observed in asthmatic patients. Virus-infected monocyte cultures showed similar cytokine/chemokine profiles to those observed in the patients. Conclusions Circulating cytokine profiles induced by acute viral lung infection were not related to asthmatic status, except for chemokines that were already increased in the asthmatic status. Monocytes could play an important role in the increased circulating concentration of cytokines found during respiratory viral infections. PMID:23962134

  9. Role of gamma irradiation on the natural antioxidants in cumin seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae Hun; Shin, Mee-Hye; Hwang, Young-Jeong; Srinivasan, Periasamy; Kim, Jae Kyung; Park, Hyun Jin; Byun, Myung Woo; Lee, Ju Woon

    2009-02-01

    Antioxidants quench oxidation by transferring hydrogen atoms to free radicals. In the present investigation, the effect of gamma irradiation on the natural antioxidants of irradiated cumin was studied. Cumin samples were purchased from retailers and then irradiated in a cobalt-60 irradiator to 0, 1, 3, 5 and 10 kGy at ambient temperature. The effect of irradiation on the antioxidant properties of the cumin seed were investigated by evaluating the radical-scavenging effect on the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals, determination of ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), total polyphenol content (TPC) and the antioxidant index by β-carotene/linoleic acid co-oxidation. Electron spin resonance (ESR) was performed to assess ionization of cumin seeds by gamma irradiation. Irradiation was found to nonsignificantly increase and/or maintain all antioxidant parameters, TPC and the ESR signal intensity was found to be increased in cumin seeds.

  10. Anti-inflammatory action of γ-irradiated genistein in murine peritoneal macrophage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Nak-Yun; Byun, Eui-Baek; Song, Du-Sup; Jin, Yeung-Bae; Park, Jae-Nam; Kim, Jae-Kyung; Park, Jong-Heum; Song, Beom-Seok; Park, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Ju-Woon; Kim, Jae-Hun

    2014-12-01

    This present study was to examine the cytotoxicity and anti-inflammatory activity of gamma (γ)-irradiated genistein in murine peritoneal macrophage. Inflammation to macrophage was induced by adding the lipopolysaccharide (LPS). γ-Irradiated genistein significantly decreased the cytotoxicity to murine peritoneal macrophage in dose ranges from 5 to 10 μM than that of non-irradiated genistein. Anti-inflammatory activity within the doses less than 2 μM showed that γ-irradiated genistein treatment remarkably reduced the lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation by decreasing the nitric oxide (NO) and cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6) production. In a structural analysis through the high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC), γ-irradiated genistein showed a new peak production distinguished from main peak of genistein (non-irradiated). Therefore, increase of anti-inflammatory activity may closely mediate with structural changes induced by γ irradiation exposure. Based on the above result, γ-irradiation could be an effective tool for reduction of toxicity and increase of physiological activity of biomolecules.

  11. Therapeutic antibodies that target inflammatory cytokines in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yuping; Dong, Chen

    2016-04-01

    Inflammatory cytokines are key regulators of immune responses. Persistent and excessive production of inflammatory cytokines underscores the development of autoimmune diseases. Therefore, neutralizing inflammatory cytokines or antagonizing their receptor function is considered as a useful therapeutic strategy to treat autoimmune diseases. To achieve the success of such a strategy, understanding of the complex actions of these cytokines and cytokine networks is required. In this review we focus on four inflammatory cytokines--tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-23 and IL-17--and dissect how the dysregulation of these cytokines regulates autoimmune diseases. On the basis of pre-clinical and clinical data, we specifically discuss the therapeutic rationale for targeting these cytokines and describe the potential adverse effects. © The Japanese Society for Immunology. 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Drug targets in the cytokine universe for autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuebin; Fang, Lei; Guo, Taylor B; Mei, Hongkang; Zhang, Jingwu Z

    2013-03-01

    In autoimmune disease, a network of diverse cytokines is produced in association with disease susceptibility to constitute the 'cytokine milieu' that drives chronic inflammation. It remains elusive how cytokines interact in such a complex network to sustain inflammation in autoimmune disease. This has presented huge challenges for successful drug discovery because it has been difficult to predict how individual cytokine-targeted therapy would work. Here, we combine the principles of Chinese Taoism philosophy and modern bioinformatics tools to dissect multiple layers of arbitrary cytokine interactions into discernible interfaces and connectivity maps to predict movements in the cytokine network. The key principles presented here have important implications in our understanding of cytokine interactions and development of effective cytokine-targeted therapies for autoimmune disorders. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Cytokine Correlations in Youth with Tic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Parker-Athill, E. Carla; Ehrhart, Jared; Tan, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Studies have noted immunological disruptions in patients with tic disorders, including increased serum cytokine levels. This study aimed to determine whether or not cytokine levels could be correlated with tic symptom severity in patients with a diagnosed tic disorder. Methods: Twenty-one patients, ages 4–17 years (average 10.63±2.34 years, 13 males), with a clinical diagnosis of Tourette's syndrome (TS) or chronic tic disorder (CTD), were selected based on having clinic visits that coincided with a tic symptom exacerbation and a remission. Ratings of tic severity were assessed using the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale (YGTSS) and serum cytokine levels (interleukin [IL]-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, IL-12p70, IL-13, interferon [IFN]-γ, tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-α, and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor [GM-CSF]) were measured using Luminex xMAP technology. Results: During tic symptom exacerbation, patients had higher median serum TNF-α levels (z=−1.962, p=0.05), particularly those on antipsychotics (U=9.00, p=0.033). Increased IL-13 was also associated with antipsychotic use during exacerbation (U=4.00, p=0.043) despite being negatively correlated to tic severity scores (ρ=−0.599, p=018), whereas increased IL-5 was associated with antibiotic use (U=6.5, p=0.035). During tic symptom remission, increased serum IL-4 levels were associated with antipsychotic (U=6.00, p=0.047) and antibiotic (U=1.00, p=0.016) use, whereas increased IL-12p70 (U=4.00, p=0.037) was associated with antibiotic use. Conclusions: These findings suggest a role for cytokine dysregulation in the pathogenesis of tic disorders. It also points toward the mechanistic involvement and potential diagnostic utility of cytokine monitoring, particularly TNF-α levels. Larger, systematic studies are necessary to further delineate the role of cytokines and medication influences on immunological profiling in tic disorders. PMID:25658821

  14. Cytokine correlations in youth with tic disorders.

    PubMed

    Parker-Athill, E Carla; Ehrhart, Jared; Tan, Jun; Murphy, Tanya K

    2015-02-01

    Studies have noted immunological disruptions in patients with tic disorders, including increased serum cytokine levels. This study aimed to determine whether or not cytokine levels could be correlated with tic symptom severity in patients with a diagnosed tic disorder. Twenty-one patients, ages 4-17 years (average 10.63±2.34 years, 13 males), with a clinical diagnosis of Tourette's syndrome (TS) or chronic tic disorder (CTD), were selected based on having clinic visits that coincided with a tic symptom exacerbation and a remission. Ratings of tic severity were assessed using the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale (YGTSS) and serum cytokine levels (interleukin [IL]-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, IL-12p70, IL-13, interferon [IFN]-γ, tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-α, and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor [GM-CSF]) were measured using Luminex xMAP technology. During tic symptom exacerbation, patients had higher median serum TNF-α levels (z=-1.962, p=0.05), particularly those on antipsychotics (U=9.00, p=0.033). Increased IL-13 was also associated with antipsychotic use during exacerbation (U=4.00, p=0.043) despite being negatively correlated to tic severity scores (ρ=-0.599, p=018), whereas increased IL-5 was associated with antibiotic use (U=6.5, p=0.035). During tic symptom remission, increased serum IL-4 levels were associated with antipsychotic (U=6.00, p=0.047) and antibiotic (U=1.00, p=0.016) use, whereas increased IL-12p70 (U=4.00, p=0.037) was associated with antibiotic use. These findings suggest a role for cytokine dysregulation in the pathogenesis of tic disorders. It also points toward the mechanistic involvement and potential diagnostic utility of cytokine monitoring, particularly TNF-α levels. Larger, systematic studies are necessary to further delineate the role of cytokines and medication influences on immunological profiling in tic disorders.

  15. ACL reconstruction with BPTB autograft and irradiated fresh frozen allograft*

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Kang; Tian, Shao-qi; Zhang, Ji-hua; Xia, Chang-suo; Zhang, Cai-long; Yu, Teng-bo

    2009-01-01

    laboratory examinations of all patients were almost normal. Blood routine was normal, the values of erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) were 5~16 mm/h and the contents of C reactive protein (CRP) were 3~10 mg/L. Conclusion: We conclude that the short term clinical outcomes of the ACL reconstruction with irradiated BPTB allograft were adversely affected. The less than satisfactory results led the senior authors to discontinue the use of irradiated BPTB allograft in ACL surgery and not to advocate using the gamma irradiation as a secondary sterilizing method. PMID:19353750

  16. Cytokines are early diagnostic biomarkers of graft-versus-host disease in liver recipients.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xue-Qin; Chen, Xin-Hua; Sahebally, Zayd; Xu, Yu-Ning; Yin, Sheng-Yong; Wu, Li-Ming; Zheng, Shu-Sen

    2017-02-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is associated with high mortality. Early diagnosis is essential to start treatment and to improve outcomes. Because of the inflammatory nature, we hypothesis that cytokine profile of patients with GVHD may serve as diagnostic markers. The present study was to evaluate the role of cytokine profile in the diagnosis of GVHD. An immunoassay was used to detect 29 cytokines simultaneously in the serum; the measuring sensitivity of all cytokines was pg/mL. Healthy subjects undergoing annual routine physical examinations served as negative controls; 23 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) who had undergone liver transplantation (the LT group) comprised the test subjects. A total of 22 kidney recipients with biopsy-confirmed GVHD (the RT group) were included for comparison. HCC patients with radical surgery (the HCC group, n=22) served as positive control. The liver contents of the three cytokines, IL-2, IL-18, and IFN-gamma, were detected with immunohistochemistry. Serum granzyme B and perforin were measured by flow cytometry. Of the 29 cytokines, the levels of IL-2 and IL-18 were increased significantly in liver recipients with GVHD compared with healthy controls (P<0.05). The serum levels of these three cytokines in the healthy, HCC, LT, and RT groups were IL-2: 0.90+/-0.02, 4.14+/-0.61, 5.10+/-0.89, and 1.48+/-0.09 pg/mL; IL-18: 80.61+/-9.35, 109.51+/-10.93, 230.11+/-12.92, and 61.98+/-7.88 pg/mL; IFN-gamma: 24.06+/-3.88, 24.84+/-3.21, 40.37+/-5.88, and 15.33+/-4.72 pg/mL, respectively. Immunohistochemistry showed that these 3 cytokines expressions in the liver were parallel to the serum cytokine. After standard anti-GVHD treatment, the expressions of IL-2, IL-18, and IFN-gamma were decreased in the liver (P<0.05). Serum granzyme B and perforin were significantly increased in GVHD patients (P<0.05). IL-2, IL-18 and IFN-gamma were from liver and might serve as biomarkers for monitoring GVHD development and the effects of anti

  17. Storage of pork by irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shupei, Liu; Renli, Yang; Chixum, Chen; Yongzhi, Wang; Zhen, Sun

    In this paper the study of storage of pork, irradiated with Co-60 gamma rays, is recommended. The changes of the appearance and the main qualitative, indexes of pork, irradiated with 1.5 M rad radiation and after two month's storage, were analysed. The evaluation of storage. Transportation and nutritional acceptability of the two kinds of irradiated pork products was made. Systematic toxicological tests of rats and dogs, fed with irradiated pork, were given. The comparison of the economic facilitation of refrigerated pork and irradiated pork was made

  18. Borrelia burgdorferi Induces the Production and Release of Proinflammatory Cytokines in Canine Synovial Explant Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Straubinger, Reinhard K.; Straubinger, Alix F.; Summers, Brian A.; Erb, Hollis N.; Härter, Luc; Appel, Max J. G.

    1998-01-01

    Canine synovial membrane explants were exposed to high- or low-passage Borrelia burgdorferi for 3, 6, 12, and 24 h. Spirochetes received no treatment, were UV light irradiated for 16 h, or were sonicated prior to addition to synovial explant cultures. In explant tissues, mRNA levels for the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1α (IL-1α), IL-1β, and IL-8 were surveyed semiquantitatively by reverse transcription-PCR. Culture supernatants were examined for numbers of total and motile (i.e., viable) spirochetes, TNF-like and IL-1-like activities, polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) chemotaxis-inducing activities, and IL-8. During exposure to synovial explant tissues, the total number of spirochetes in the supernatants decreased gradually by ∼30%, and the viability also declined. mRNAs for TNF-α, IL-1α, IL-1β, and IL-8 were up-regulated in synovial explant tissues within 3 h after infection with untreated or UV light-irradiated B. burgdorferi, and mRNA levels corresponded to the results obtained with bioassays. During 24 h of coincubation, cultures challenged with untreated or UV light-irradiated spirochetes produced similar levels of TNF-like and IL-1-like activities. In contrast, explant tissues exposed to untreated B. burgdorferi generated significantly higher levels of chemotactic factors after 24 h of incubation than did explant tissues exposed to UV light-treated spirochetes. In identical samples, a specific signal for IL-8 was identified by Western blot analysis. High- and low-passage borreliae did not differ in their abilities to induce proinflammatory cytokines. No difference in cytokine induction between untreated and sonicated high-passage spirochetes was observed, suggesting that fractions of the organism can trigger the production and release of inflammatory mediators. The titration of spirochetes revealed a dose-independent cytokine response, where 103 to 107 B. burgdorferi organisms induced similar TNF

  19. Superoxide dismutase activity in radioresistant tissues of irradiated rabbits.

    PubMed

    Stoklasová, A; Kovárová, H; Ledvina, M

    1992-01-01

    The activities of Cu, Zn-containing superoxide dismutase were studied in radioresistant tissues (liver, brain, erythrocytes) of whole-body irradiated rabbits with 6.0 Gy and 24.0 Gy with local shielding. No significant changes were observed after irradiation with 6.0 Gy. Both the changes in Cu, Zn-SOD activity and the protein concentrations were more pronounced after exposure to 24.0 Gy with local shielding of the head and abdominal region. The dose on the shielded regions was about 6.0 Gy. Local shielding of rabbits irradiated with a lethal dose 24.0 Gy influenced positively the survival of animals. However, the decrease in SOD activity on 60th day after irradiation seems to be unfavourable for further survival of rabbits, if we accept that SOD content in tissue is maintained at a rather constant level.

  20. Effect of gamma irradiation on the structure of fucoidan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jong-il; Gu Lee, Sung; Jong Han, Se; Cho, Minho; Cheon Lee, Pyung

    2014-07-01

    The change of molecular structure of fucoidan by gamma irradiation was analyzed by spectral and chemical methods. Fucoidan samples with different molecular weights of 85, 30, 15, and 7 kDa were prepared by radiation degradation of 217 kDa fucoidan. In the molecular weight analysis, the polydispersity decreased by gamma radiation because of further degradation of higher weight molecules. Ultraviolet absorption and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy analyses were carried out to define the changes of the functional groups in fucoidan by gamma irradiation. Carboxyl groups and carbon double bonds increased by gamma irradiation; however, sulfate content remained unchanged. The granular fissures were observed from scanning electron microscopy in gamma-irradiated fucoidan.

  1. Improvement in properties of plastic teeth by electron beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Yuko; Ishikawa, Shun-ichi; Seguchi, Tadao

    2011-11-01

    Improvement of the comfort and esthetics of artificial plastic teeth is desirable for the recently increasing numbers of elderly in society. Plastic teeth made of polycarbonate (PC) were modified by electron beam (EB) irradiation under specific conditions, and the change in the chemical properties of the PC was investigated. The water absorption, glucose attachment, level of bis-phenol-A (BPA) extraction, maltose adhesion, and mucin adhesion on the PC teeth were measured before and after EB irradiation. EB irradiation to a dose of 3.5 kGy at 150 °C in a nitrogen gas atmosphere reduced the water absorption by 20%, glucose absorption by 40%, maltose adhesion by 20%, and the amount of various amino acids, formed as the hydrolysis products of mucin, adhering on the PC teeth were reduced by 60-99%. The BPA content was lower than the detection limit for analysis of both the original and the EB irradiated PC teeth.

  2. ELECTRON IRRADIATION OF SOLIDS

    DOEpatents

    Damask, A.C.

    1959-11-01

    A method is presented for altering physical properties of certain solids, such as enhancing the usefulness of solids, in which atomic interchange occurs through a vacancy mechanism, electron irradiation, and temperature control. In a centain class of metals, alloys, and semiconductors, diffusion or displacement of atoms occurs through a vacancy mechanism, i.e., an atom can only move when there exists a vacant atomic or lattice site in an adjacent position. In the process of the invention highenergy electron irradiation produces additional vacancies in a solid over those normally occurring at a given temperature and allows diffusion of the component atoms of the solid to proceed at temperatures at which it would not occur under thermal means alone in any reasonable length of time. The invention offers a precise way to increase the number of vacancies and thereby, to a controlled degree, change the physical properties of some materials, such as resistivity or hardness.

  3. BIOLOGICAL IRRADIATION FACILITY

    DOEpatents

    McCorkle, W.H.; Cern, H.S.

    1962-04-24

    A facility for irradiating biological specimens with neutrons is described. It includes a reactor wherein the core is off center in a reflector. A high-exposure room is located outside the reactor on the side nearest the core while a low-exposure room is located on the opposite side. Means for converting thermal neutrons to fast neutrons are movably disposed between the reactor core and the high and low-exposure rooms. (AEC)

  4. Photobiomodulation regulates cytokine release and new blood vessel formation during oral wound healing in rats.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Vivian Petersen; Curra, Marina; Webber, Liana Preto; Nör, Carolina; Matte, Ursula; Meurer, Luise; Martins, Manoela Domingues

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of photobiomodulation (PBM) on cytokine levels and angiogenesis during oral wound healing. Ulcers were made on the dorsum of the tongue in 48 Wistar rats. Irradiation with an indium-gallium-aluminum-phosphide (InGaAlP) laser (660 nm; output power, 40 mW; spot size, 0.04 cm(2)) was performed once a day on two points of the ulcer for 14 days. Two different energy densities were used: 4 J/cm(2) (energy per point 0.16 J, total energy 0.32 J) and 20 J/cm(2) (energy per point 0.8 J, total energy 1.6 J). Tissue levels of interleukin (IL)-1β and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were investigated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Image analysis of CD31-immunostained sections was used to investigate microvessel density (MVD). PBM increased the tissue levels of IL-1β at the early stage of oral wound healing (p < 0.01) and increased the tissue levels of TNF-α during all stages of oral wound healing (p < 0.05). PBM at a dose of 4 J/cm(2) produced more significant results regarding cytokine modulation and was associated with higher MVD at day 5. Collectively, these findings indicate that cytokine modulation and increased angiogenesis are among the basic mechanisms whereby PBM improves oral wound repair.

  5. Crustacean hematopoiesis and the astakine cytokines.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xionghui; Söderhäll, Irene

    2011-06-16

    Major contributions to research in hematopoiesis in invertebrate animals have come from studies in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, and the freshwater crayfish, Pacifastacus leniusculus. These animals lack oxygen-carrying erythrocytes and blood cells of the lymphoid lineage, which participate in adaptive immune defense, thus making them suitable model animals to study the regulation of blood cells of the innate immune system. This review presents an overview of crustacean blood cell formation, the role of these cells in innate immunity, and how their synthesis is regulated by the astakine cytokines. Astakines are among the first invertebrate cytokines shown to be involved in hematopoiesis, and they can stimulate the proliferation, differentiation, and survival of hematopoietic tissue cells. The astakines and their vertebrate homologues, prokineticins, share similar functions in hematopoiesis; thus, studies of astakine-induced hematopoiesis in crustaceans may not only advance our understanding of the regulation of invertebrate hematopoiesis but may also provide new evolutionary perspectives about this process.

  6. Cytokine signalling in mammary gland development.

    PubMed

    Watson, Christine J; Oliver, Carrie H; Khaled, Walid T

    2011-03-01

    Mammary gland development occurs in three distinct stages during the lifetime of the female mammal: in embryonic, pubertal and reproductive life. At each of these developmental stages, different signalling molecules induce changes in both the epithelium and the surrounding stroma. However, it is during pregnancy that the most dramatic changes occur, resulting in a massive increase in the number of epithelial cells and in their function. Pregnancy initiates the development of a new epithelial lineage, the alveolar cells, which form the milk-producing lobuloalveolar structures. These cells become redundant at the end of lactation and are removed in an exquisitely controlled process of tissue remodelling coupled with extensive cell death. All of these events require not only steroid hormones but also sequential signalling by cytokines. A recent surprising discovery was that the signalling pathways and cytokines that regulate lineage determination in T helper cells are also involved in mammary gland development during pregnancy.

  7. Inflammatory cytokines in atherosclerosis: current therapeutic approaches.

    PubMed

    Tousoulis, Dimitris; Oikonomou, Evangelos; Economou, Evangelos K; Crea, Filippo; Kaski, Juan Carlos

    2016-06-07

    The notion of atherosclerosis as a chronic inflammatory disease has intensified research on the role of cytokines and the way these molecules act and interact to initiate and sustain inflammation in the microenvironment of an atherosclerotic plaque. Cytokines are expressed by all types of cells involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, act on a variety of targets exerting multiple effects, and are largely responsible for the crosstalk among endothelial, smooth muscle cells, leucocytes, and other vascular residing cells. It is now understood that widely used drugs such as statins, aspirin, methotrexate, and colchicine act in an immunomodulatory way that may beneficially affect atherogenesis and/or cardiovascular disease progression. Moreover, advancement in pharmaceutical design has enabled the production of highly specific antibodies against key molecules involved in the perpetuation of the inflammatory cascade, raising hope for advances in the treatment of atherosclerosis. This review describes the actions and effects of these agents, their potential clinical significance, and future prospects.

  8. Alcoholic Liver Disease: Role of Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, Manuela G.; Maor, Yaakov; Nanau, Radu M.; Melzer, Ehud; Mell, Haim; Opris, Mihai; Cohen, Lawrence; Malnick, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    The present review spans a broad spectrum of topics dealing with alcoholic liver disease (ALD), including clinical and translational research. It focuses on the role of the immune system and the signaling pathways of cytokines in the pathogenesis of ALD. An additional factor that contributes to the pathogenesis of ALD is lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which plays a central role in the induction of steatosis, inflammation, and fibrosis in the liver. LPS derived from the intestinal microbiota enters the portal circulation, and is recognized by macrophages (Kupffer cells) and hepatocytes. In individuals with ALD, excessive levels of LPS in the liver affect immune, parenchymal, and non-immune cells, which in turn release various inflammatory cytokines and recruit neutrophils and other inflammatory cells. In this review, we elucidate the mechanisms by which alcohol contributes to the activation of Kupffer cells and the inflammatory cascade. The role of the stellate cells in fibrogenesis is also discussed. PMID:26343741

  9. Nerve growth factor: neurotrophin or cytokine?

    PubMed

    Bonini, S; Rasi, G; Bracci-Laudiero, M L; Procoli, A; Aloe, L

    2003-06-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is a neutrophin exerting an important role in the development and functions of the central and peripheral nervous system. However, it has recently been documented that several immune cells - such as mast cells, lymphocytes and eosinophils - produce, store and release NGF. Moreover, NGF high and low affinity receptors are widely expressed in the immune system, thus indicating the potential of responding to this neurotrophin through an autocrine mechanism. In fact, NGF influences development differentiation, chemotaxis and mediator release of inflammatory cells as well as fibroblast activation through a complex network influenced by other pro-inflammatory cytokines. Finally, NGF is increased in biological fluids of several allergic, immune and inflammatory diseases. Data reviewed suggest, therefore, that NGF might also be viewed as a (Th2?) cytokine with a modulatory role in allergic inflammation and tissue remodeling. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  10. Cytokines: The Future of Intranasal Vaccine Adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Afton L.; Staats, Herman F.

    2011-01-01

    Due to its potential as an effective, needle-free route of immunization for use with subunit vaccines, nasal immunization continues to be evaluated as a route of immunization in both research and clinical studies. However, as with other vaccination routes, subunit vaccines often require the addition of adjuvants to induce potent immune responses. Unfortunately, many commonly used experimental vaccine adjuvants, such as cholera toxin and E. coli heat-labile toxin, are too toxic for use in humans. Because new adjuvants are needed, cytokines have been evaluated for their ability to provide effective adjuvant activity when delivered by the nasal route in both animal models and in limited human studies. It is the purpose of this paper to discuss the potential of cytokines as nasal vaccine adjuvants. PMID:21826181

  11. Rosacea: the Cytokine and Chemokine Network

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, Peter Arne; Buhren, Bettina Alexandra; Steinhoff, Martin; Homey, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Rosacea is one of the most common dermatoses of adults. Recent studies have improved our understanding of the pathophysiology of rosacea. Current concepts suggest that known clinical trigger factors of rosacea such as UV radiation, heat, cold, stress, spicy food, and microbes modulate Toll-like receptor signaling, induce reactive oxygen species, as well as enhance antimicrobial peptide and neuropeptide production. Downstream of these events cytokines and chemokines orchestrate an inflammatory response that leads to the recruitment and activation of distinct leukocyte subsets and induces the characteristic histopathological features of rosacea. Here we summarize the current knowledge of the cytokine and chemokine network in rosacea and propose pathways that may be of therapeutic interest. PMID:22076326

  12. Suppression of Cytokine Signaling: the SOCS perspective

    PubMed Central

    Linossi, Edmond M.; Babon, Jeffrey J.; Hilton, Douglas J.; Nicholson, Sandra E.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of the Suppressor Of Cytokine Signaling (SOCS) family of proteins has resulted in a significant body of research dedicated to dissecting their biological functions and the molecular mechanisms by which they achieve potent and specific inhibition of cytokine and growth factor signaling. The Australian contribution to this field has been substantial, with the initial discovery of SOCS1 by Hilton, Starr and colleagues (discovered concurrently by two other groups) and the following work, providing a new perspective on the regulation of JAK/STAT signaling. In this review, we reflect on the critical discoveries that have lead to our current understanding of how SOCS proteins function and discuss what we see as important questions for future research. PMID:23545160

  13. Accumulation of dislocation loops in the α phase of Zr Excel alloy under heavy ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hongbing; Yao, Zhongwen; Idrees, Yasir; Zhang, He K.; Kirk, Mark A.; Daymond, Mark R.

    2017-08-01

    In-situ heavy ion irradiations were performed on the high Sn content Zr alloy 'Excel', measuring type dislocation loop accumulation up to irradiation damage doses of 10 dpa at a range of temperatures. The high content of Sn, which diffuses slowly, and the thin foil geometry of the sample provide a unique opportunity to study an extreme case where displacement cascades dominate the loop formation and evolution. The dynamic observation of dislocation loop evolution under irradiation at 200 °C reveals that type dislocation loops can form at very low dose (0.0025 dpa). The size of the dislocation loops increases slightly with irradiation damage dose. The mechanism controlling loop growth in this study is different from that in neutron irradiation; in this study, larger dislocation loops can condense directly from the interaction of displacement cascades and the high concentration of point defects in the matrix. The size of the dislocation loop is dependent on the point defect concentration in the matrix. A negative correlation between the irradiation temperature and the dislocation loop size was observed. A comparison between cascade dominated loop evolution (this study), diffusion dominated loop evolution (electron irradiation) and neutron irradiation suggests that heavy ion irradiation alone may not be enough to accurately reproduce neutron irradiation induced loop structures. An alternative method is proposed in this paper. The effects of Sn on the displacement cascades, defect yield, and the diffusion behavior of point defects are established.

  14. Some microbial, chemical and sensorial properties of gamma irradiated sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) seeds.

    PubMed

    Al-Bachir, Mahfouz

    2016-04-15

    The effect on microbial, chemical and sensorial properties of sesame seeds was determined after irradiation and storage. The sesame seeds were analyzed before and after irradiation with 3, 6 and 9 kGy of gamma irradiation, and after 6 and 12 months of storage. The results showed that gamma irradiation had no significant (p>0.05) effect on the moisture, ash and fat content on sesame seeds. While, small differences, but sometimes significant (p<0.05), on protein and sugar contents were recorded between irradiated and non-irradiated samples. Total acidity percentage decreased significantly (p<0.05), while total volatile basic nitrogen (TVBN) increased significantly (p<0.05) due to irradiation. During storage, total acidity increased (p<0.05) and TVBN decreased (p<0.05). Gamma irradiation reduced the microorganisms of sesame seeds. Samples treated with 3 kGy or more remained completely free of fungi throughout the storage. While, only the samples treated with 9 kGy remained completely free of bacteria at the end of storage period (after 12 months). The scores for taste, flavor, color and texture of irradiated samples were higher, but not significantly (p>0.05) than those of non-irradiated samples.

  15. Comparison of the effects of gamma irradiation and steam sterilization on Southern pine sapwood

    Treesearch

    Simon Curling; Jerrold E. Winandy

    2008-01-01

    Gamma irradiation is a commonly used method of sterilization of wood specimens prior to decay testing. As part of a larger series of studies, an investigation was made into the effects of gamma irradiation on flexural bending strength properties and its corresponding relationship to changes in lignin and hemicellulosic contents of wood after exposure to various dose...

  16. Gamma irradiation of peanut kernel to control mold growth and to diminish aflatoxin contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Y.-Y. Chiou, R.

    1996-09-01

    Peanut kernel inoculated with Aspergillus parasiticus conidia were gamma irradiated with 0, 2.5, 5.0 and 10 kGy using Co60. Levels higher than 2.5 kGy were effective in retarding the outgrowth of A. parasiticus and reducing the population of natural mold contaminants. However, complete elimination of these molds was not achieved even at the dose of 10 kGy. After 4 wk incubation of the inoculated kernels in a humidified condition, aflatoxins produced by the surviving A. parasiticus were 69.12, 2.42, 57.36 and 22.28 μ/g, corresponding to the original irradiation levels. Peroxide content of peanut oils prepared from the irradiated peanuts increased with increased irradiation dosage. After storage, at each irradiation level, peroxide content in peanuts stored at -14°C was lower than that in peanuts stored at an ambient temperature. TBA values and CDHP contents of the oil increased with increased irradiation dosage and changed slightly after storage. However, fatty acid contents of the peanut oil varied in a limited range as affected by the irradiation dosage and storage temperature. The SDS-PAGE protein pattern of peanuts revealed no noticeable variation of protein subunits resulting from irradiation and storage.

  17. Surface segregation during irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Rehn, L.E.; Lam, N.Q.

    1985-10-01

    Gibbsian adsorption is known to alter the surface composition of many alloys. During irradiation, four additional processes that affect the near-surface alloy composition become operative: preferential sputtering, displacement mixing, radiation-enhanced diffusion and radiation-induced segregation. Because of the mutual competition of these five processes, near-surface compositional changes in an irradiation environment can be extremely complex. Although ion-beam induced surface compositional changes were noted as long as fifty years ago, it is only during the past several years that individual mechanisms have been clearly identified. In this paper, a simple physical description of each of the processes is given, and selected examples of recent important progress are discussed. With the notable exception of preferential sputtering, it is shown that a reasonable qualitative understanding of the relative contributions from the individual processes under various irradiation conditions has been attained. However, considerably more effort will be required before a quantitative, predictive capability can be achieved. 29 refs., 8 figs.

  18. Vanillin protects human keratinocyte stem cells against ultraviolet B irradiation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jienny; Cho, Jae Youl; Lee, Sang Yeol; Lee, Kyung-Woo; Lee, Jongsung; Song, Jae-Young

    2014-01-01

    Ultraviolet-B (UVB) irradiation is one of major factors which induce cellular damages in the epidermis. We investigated protective effects and mechanisms of vanillin, a main constituent of vanilla beans, against UVB-induced cellular damages in keratinocyte stem cells (KSC). Here, vanillin significantly attenuated UVB irradiation-induced cytotoxicity. The vanillin effects were also demonstrated by the results of the senescence-associated β-galactosidase and alkaline comet assays. In addition, vanillin induced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Attempts to elucidate a possible mechanism underlying the vanillin-mediated effects revealed that vanillin significantly reduced UVB-induced phosphorylation of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), serine threonine kinase checkpoint kinase 2 (Chk2), tumor suppressor protein 53 (p53), p38/mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38), c-Jun N-terminal kinase/stress-activated protein kinase (JNK), S6 ribosomal protein (S6RP), and histone 2A family member X (H2A.X). UVB-induced activation of p53 luciferase reporter was also significantly inhibited by vanillin. In addition, while ATM inhibitor had no effect on the vanillin effects, mouse double minute 2 homolog (MDM2) inhibitor significantly attenuated suppressive effects of vanillin on UVB-induced activation of p53 reporter in KSC. Taken together, these findings suggest that vanillin protects KSC from UVB irradiation and its effects may occur through the suppression of downstream step of MDM2 in UVB irradiation-induced p53 activation.

  19. Tumor Vaccination With Cytokine-Loaded Microspheres

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    indirect effects of IFN-gamma. J Immunol. 2003;170:400–412. 23. Yan J, Vetvicka V, Xia Y, et al. Beta - glucan , a ‘‘specific’’ biologic response...12, GM-CSF, Breast Cancer , Spontaneous tumors 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF... cancer vaccines, cytokines, adjuvants, immunotherapy, tumor models (J Immunother 2006;29:10–20) I t is now well established that numerous immune

  20. JAK/STAT signaling by cytokine receptors.

    PubMed

    Liu, K D; Gaffen, S L; Goldsmith, M A

    1998-06-01

    The JAK/STAT pathway is recognized as one of the major mechanisms by which cytokine receptors transduce intracellular signals. This system is regulated at multiple levels, including JAK activation, nuclear trafficking of STAT factors, and negative feedback loops. Gene deletion studies have implicated selected STAT factors as predominant mediators for a limited number of lymphokines. This signaling pathway influences normal cell survival and growth mechanisms and may contribute to oncogenic transformation.

  1. Effects of hemorrhage on cytokine gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Shenkar, R; Abraham, E

    1993-08-01

    Injury and blood loss are often followed by infection and the rapid development of organ system dysfunction, frequently involving mucosal sites, such as the lung and intestine. To examine possible mechanisms contributing to these conditions, we used semiquantitative polymerase chain reactions to determine cytokine mRNA expression among cellular populations isolated from mucosal and systemic anatomic sites of mice at predetermined time points following 30% blood volume hemorrhage with resuscitation 1 hr later. Within 1 hr after hemorrhage, significant increases were observed in mRNA levels for IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta, IL-5, and TGF-beta in intraparenchymal pulmonary mononuclear cells. The levels of TGF-beta transcripts among alveolar macrophages were increased 1 hr following blood loss, and increase in IL-1 alpha transcripts was found starting 2 hr posthemorrhage. Cells from Peyer's patches showed significant increases in mRNA levels for IL-1 beta, IL-2, IL-5, IL-6, IFN-gamma, and TGF-beta during the 4 hr following hemorrhage. Significant increases in mRNA levels for IL-1 beta, TNF-alpha, and TGF-beta were present within 4 hr of blood loss among cells isolated from mesenteric lymph nodes. The expression of mRNA for most cytokines was not significantly altered in splenocytes or peripheral blood mononuclear cells at any time point following hemorrhage. These experiments demonstrate that blood loss, even if resuscitated, produces significant increases in proinflammatory and immunoregulatory cytokine gene transcription as early as 1 hr following hemorrhage. These posthemorrhage alterations in cytokine mRNA expression were particularly prominent at mucosal sites, suggesting a mechanism for the increased incidence of pulmonary and intestinal involvement in organ system failure following severe blood loss and injury.

  2. Cytokine profile in gingival crevicular fluid and plasma of patients with aggressive periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Zein Elabdeen, Hager R; Mustafa, Manal; Ali, Raouf; Bolstad, Anne Isine

    2017-09-03

    This study aimed to determine the content of cytokines in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) as well as in plasma of Sudanese patients with aggressive periodontitis (AgP) and healthy controls (HC). Nineteen AgP patients and 19 HC were included. The mean probing pocket depth and clinical attachment level of the GCF sampled sites in patients were both ≥5 mm. The GCF and plasma levels of 27 cytokines were determined using 27-multiplex fluorescent bead-based immunoassays. Ratios were calculated among cytokines of the T-helper cell subsets Th1 and Th2. Descriptive statistics, the Mann-Whitney U-test and Spearman's rho rank correlation coefficient analysis were used. Interferon-γ was the only cytokine found in significantly lower levels in GCF of patients compared with HC. Levels of interleukin (IL)-10, IL-13, IL-1Ra, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), regulated on activation normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES), granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), and granulocyte-macrophage-CSF (GM-CSF) were significantly lower in plasma of AgP compared with HC. The ratios of Th1:Th2 in GCF and Treg:Th17 in plasma were significantly lower in AgP. The lower levels of cytokines detected systemically in plasma of AgP patients may have an impact on the immune response. The lower ratio of Th1:Th2 cytokines in GCF samples of AgP patients suggests a role for Th2 at the local site of disease.

  3. Biomodulation of Inflammatory Cytokines Related to Oral Mucositis by Low-Level Laser Therapy.

    PubMed

    Basso, Fernanda G; Pansani, Taisa N; Soares, Diana G; Scheffel, Débora L; Bagnato, Vanderlei S; de Souza Costa, Carlos Alberto; Hebling, Josimeri

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of LLLT on the expression of inflammatory cytokines related to the development of oral mucositis by gingival fibroblasts. Primary gingival fibroblasts were seeded on 24-well plates (10(5) cells/well) for 24 h. Fresh serum-free culture medium (DMEM) was then added, and cells were placed in contact with LPS (Escherichia coli, 1 μg mL(-1)), followed by LLLT irradiation (LaserTABLE-InGaAsP diode prototype-780 nm, 25 mW) delivering 0, 0.5, 1.5 or 3 J cm(-2)². Cells without contact with LPS were also irradiated with the same energy densities. Gene expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 was evaluated by Real-Time PCR, and protein synthesis of these cytokines was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent (ELISA) assay. Data were statistically analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis test, complemented by the Mann-Whitney test (P < 0.05). LPS treatment increased the gene expression and protein synthesis of TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8, while the expression of IL-1β was not affected. For LPS-treated groups, LLLT promoted significant decreases in the expression of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-8 at 1.5 J cm(-2) and 3 J cm(-2). These results demonstrate that LLLT promoted a beneficial biomodulatory effect on the expression of inflammatory cytokines related to oral mucositis by human gingival fibroblasts.

  4. The cytokine interleukin-33 mediates anaphylactic shock

    PubMed Central

    Pushparaj, Peter N.; Tay, Hwee Kee; H'ng, Shiau Chen; Pitman, Nick; Xu, Damo; McKenzie, Andrew; Liew, Foo Y.; Melendez, Alirio J.

    2009-01-01

    Anaphylactic shock is characterized by elevated immunoglobulin-E (IgE) antibodies that signal via the high affinity Fcε receptor (FcεRI) to release inflammatory mediators. Here we report that the novel cytokine interleukin-33 (IL-33) potently induces anaphylactic shock in mice and is associated with the symptom in humans. IL-33 is a new member of the IL-1 family and the ligand for the orphan receptor ST2. In humans, the levels of IL-33 are substantially elevated in the blood of atopic patients during anaphylactic shock, and in inflamed skin tissue of atopic dermatitis patients. In murine experimental atopic models, IL-33 induced antigen-independent passive cutaneous and systemic anaphylaxis, in a T cell–independent, mast cell–dependent manner. In vitro, IL-33 directly induced degranulation, strong eicosanoid and cytokine production in IgE-sensitized mast cells. The molecular mechanisms triggering these responses include the activation of phospholipase D1 and sphingosine kinase1 to mediate calcium mobilization, Nuclear factor–κB activation, cytokine and eicosanoid secretion, and degranulation. This report therefore reveals a hitherto unrecognized pathophysiological role of IL-33 and suggests that IL-33 may be a potential therapeutic target for anaphylaxis, a disease of considerable unmet medical need. PMID:19506243

  5. Cytokine-Induced Modulation of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mager, Lukas F.; Wasmer, Marie-Hélène; Rau, Tilman T.; Krebs, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of novel immunomodulatory cancer therapies over the last decade, above all immune checkpoint blockade, has significantly advanced tumor treatment. For colorectal cancer (CRC), a novel scoring system based on the immune cell infiltration in tumors has greatly improved disease prognostic evaluation and guidance to more specific therapy. These findings underline the relevance of tumor immunology in the future handling and therapeutic approach of malignant disease. Inflammation can either promote or suppress CRC pathogenesis and inflammatory mediators, mainly cytokines, critically determine the pro- or anti-tumorigenic signals within the tumor environment. Here, we review the current knowledge on the cytokines known to be critically involved in CRC development and illustrate their mechanisms of action. We also highlight similarities and differences between CRC patients and murine models of CRC and point out cytokines with an ambivalent role for intestinal cancer. We also identify some of the future challenges in the field that should be addressed for the development of more effective immunomodulatory therapies. PMID:27148488

  6. Cytokines as Biomarkers in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Burska, Agata; Boissinot, Marjorie; Ponchel, Frederique

    2014-01-01

    RA is a complex disease that develops as a series of events often referred to as disease continuum. RA would benefit from novel biomarker development for diagnosis where new biomarkers are still needed (even if progresses have been made with the inclusion of ACPA into the ACR/EULAR 2010 diagnostic criteria) and for prognostic notably in at risk of evolution patients with autoantibody-positive arthralgia. Risk biomarkers for rapid evolution or cardiovascular complications are also highly desirable. Monitoring biomarkers would be useful in predicting relapse. Finally, predictive biomarkers for therapy outcome would allow tailoring therapy to the individual. Increasing numbers of cytokines have been involved in RA pathology. Many have the potential as biomarkers in RA especially as their clinical utility is already established in other diseases and could be easily transferable to rheumatology. We will review the current knowledge's relation to cytokine used as biomarker in RA. However, given the complexity and heterogeneous nature of RA, it is unlikely that a single cytokine may provide sufficient discrimination; therefore multiple biomarker signatures may represent more realistic approach for the future of personalised medicine in RA. PMID:24733962

  7. Cytokines as biomarkers in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Burska, Agata; Boissinot, Marjorie; Ponchel, Frederique

    2014-01-01

    RA is a complex disease that develops as a series of events often referred to as disease continuum. RA would benefit from novel biomarker development for diagnosis where new biomarkers are still needed (even if progresses have been made with the inclusion of ACPA into the ACR/EULAR 2010 diagnostic criteria) and for prognostic notably in at risk of evolution patients with autoantibody-positive arthralgia. Risk biomarkers for rapid evolution or cardiovascular complications are also highly desirable. Monitoring biomarkers would be useful in predicting relapse. Finally, predictive biomarkers for therapy outcome would allow tailoring therapy to the individual. Increasing numbers of cytokines have been involved in RA pathology. Many have the potential as biomarkers in RA especially as their clinical utility is already established in other diseases and could be easily transferable to rheumatology. We will review the current knowledge's relation to cytokine used as biomarker in RA. However, given the complexity and heterogeneous nature of RA, it is unlikely that a single cytokine may provide sufficient discrimination; therefore multiple biomarker signatures may represent more realistic approach for the future of personalised medicine in RA.

  8. Testicular proteins, nucleic acids and their synthesis following gamma irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bansal, M.R.; Kaul, A.; Nehru, B. )

    1989-01-01

    The effects of two doses (250 and 1000 rads) of local gamma irradiation on testes of adult rats are reported after 1, 2, 4 and 16 weeks. There was a significant increase in DNA content per gm testes at 1 weeks; a gradual decrease at 2 and 4 week intervals was followed by a trend towards recovery at 16 weeks post-irradiation. The rate of synthesis of both DNA and RNA as studied by the incorporation of (3H)- thymidine and (3H)-uridine, showed similar results. Total protein content per gm testis declined with both doses and at all post-irradiation intervals. Histological observation showed loss of spermatogenic cells suggestive of DNA loss.

  9. Crosslinking of polyamide-6 initiated by proton beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porubská, Mária; Szöllös, Ondrej; Janigová, Ivica; Jomová, Klaudia; Chodák, Ivan

    2017-04-01

    Initiation of crosslinking of polyamide-6 (PA6) by proton beam irradiation was investigated for a virgin material as well as for PA6 containing up to 5 wt% of triallyl cyanurate (TAC) as a crosslinking coagent. The gel point was found to be 144 and 40 kGy for virgin PA6 and for PA6 with 1 wt% of TAC, while for higher TAC content gel content was determined to be around zero absorbed dose. The ratio between crosslinking and scission of macroradicals formed by irradiation was found to be around 0.65 regardless on presence or absence of TAC and its concentration. The more detailed discussion on chemical processes as well as on final structure formation after irradiation is based on data from differential scanning calorimetry, detecting a decrease of both lamellar thickness and crystalline portion, but an increase of glass transition temperature.

  10. Extractable proteins from irradiated field natural rubber latex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogero, Sizue O.; Lugão, Ademar B.; Yoshii, Fumio; Makuuchi, Keizo

    2003-06-01

    In this study field natural rubber latex was irradiated with different doses near a 60Co gamma source to reduce the water-soluble protein content in the final product. The protein content of the films obtained by casting method was extracted with phosphate buffer solution, pH 7 and was measured using Micro BCA Protein Assay kit. Also was measured protein in the serum samples of field NRL. The concentration of extractable proteins increased with increasing radiation dose.

  11. Cytokines as adjuvants for ruminant vaccines.

    PubMed

    Lofthouse, S A; Andrews, A E; Elhay, M J; Bowles, V M; Meeusen, E N; Nash, A D

    1996-01-01

    Successful vaccination against any potential pathogen is critically dependent on inducing an appropriate immune response. The pivotal role of cytokines in the immune response to vaccination suggests that non-protective responses or responses that exacerbate disease subsequent to infectious challenge may be the result of limiting or preferential production of one or a number of these mediators. This suggests that the use of recombinant cytokines as vaccine adjuvants may offer a mechanism whereby the magnitude and phenotype of the immune response to vaccination can be specifically modified. In mice, recombinant cytokines have been used extensively as therapeutics, while studies describing vaccine adjuvant activity are more limited. Recombinant (r) interleukin (IL)-1, IL-2 and interferon (IFN) gamma have been used primarily to enhance humoral responses with enhanced protection assessed where appropriate. Cytokine adjuvant studies in ruminants have been restricted to recombinant ovine (rov) and bovine (rbov) IL-1 and IL-2. In sheep, their application has been optimised with respect to dose, route of delivery and formulation, for induction of humoral and cell mediated immunity (DTH and cytotoxicity) to the model protein antigen (Ag) avidin. The level of adjuvant activity of IL-1 in particular compares favourably to that of a variety of other traditional and new chemical adjuvants and detailed analysis has indicated no adverse local or systemic side-effects. Recent studies in our laboratory demonstrating the effectiveness of rovIL-1 as an adjuvant in single and multi-component bacterial toxoid vaccines, and studies from other laboratories demonstrating the application of rbovIL-1 as an adjuvant for the response in cattle to live attenuated viral vaccines, suggest that rIL-1 may become the adjuvant of choice for diseases where protection is mediated by high levels of circulating antibody (Ab). With respect to helminth parasites, IL-1 may prove useful as a component of

  12. Periapical cytokine expression in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Shirlene Barbosa Pimentel; de Brito, Luciana Carla Neves; Oliveira, Michelle Pimenta; Maciel, Kamilla Faria; Martelli Júnior, Hercílio; Vieira, Leda Quercia; Sobrinho, Antônio Paulino Ribeiro

    2015-03-01

    Sickle cell anemia (SCA) is the most prevalent genetic disease worldwide. Patients with SCA exhibit increased levels of proinflammatory mediators as part of a permanently activated immunoinflammatory status. The aim of this study was to evaluate the mRNA expression levels of the cytokines interferon (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor, interleukin (IL-1β, IL-17A, IL-10), receptor activator for nuclear factor kappa B ligand, and the chemokines CCL2/MCP-1 and CCL5 in the periapical interstitial fluid from SCA individuals compared with healthy individuals. Samples were collected from 12 teeth of SCA patients and 12 non-SCA patients with apical periodontitis. In addition, 12 teeth were sampled from the periapical region of healthy patients with vital pulp (control). The expression of cytokine mRNA was detected by using real-time polymerase chain reaction. The expression of mRNA for the Th1-associated cytokines IFN-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α, and IL-1β were significantly higher in SCA individuals than in the control individuals (P < .05). Among Th1-associated cytokines, only IFN-γ was significantly increased in non-SCA compared with control patients (vital pulp). The expression of IL-17A mRNA was significant higher in SCA cases than in control samples (P < .05), whereas the IL-10 mRNA expression was significantly increased in SCA and non-SCA individuals when compared with the control group. Similar levels of receptor activator for nuclear factor kappa B ligand, CCL2, and CCL5 mRNA expression were observed in all samples. However, no significant differences were observed in the expression of cytokine or chemokine mRNA between SCA and non-SCA individuals (P > .05). The results were able to demonstrate that SCA patients presented prone proinflammatory ability, despite the fact that any differences in periapical immune responses between SCA and non-SCA individuals were not observed. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  13. Naringenin Inhibits UVB Irradiation-Induced Inflammation and Oxidative Stress in the Skin of Hairless Mice.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Renata M; Pinho-Ribeiro, Felipe A; Steffen, Vinicius S; Caviglione, Carla V; Vignoli, Josiane A; Barbosa, Décio S; Baracat, Marcela M; Georgetti, Sandra R; Verri, Waldiceu A; Casagrande, Rubia

    2015-07-24

    Ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation may cause inflammation- and oxidative-stress-dependent skin cancer and premature aging. Naringenin (1) has been reported to have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, but its effects and mechanisms on UVB irradiation-induced inflammation and oxidative stress are still not known. Thus, the present study aimed to investigate the potential of naringenin to mitigate UVB irradiation-induced inflammation and oxidative damage in the skin of hairless mice. Skin edema, myeloperoxidase (neutrophil marker) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activity, and cytokine production were measured after UVB irradiation. Oxidative stress was evaluated by 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) radical (ABTS) scavenging ability, ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), reduced glutathione levels, catalase activity, lipid peroxidation products, superoxide anion production, and gp91phox (NADPH oxidase subunit) mRNA expression by quantitative PCR. The intraperitoneal treatment with naringenin reduced skin inflammation by inhibiting skin edema, neutrophil recruitment, MMP-9 activity, and pro-inflammatory (TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-1β, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-12, IL-13, IL-17, IL-22, and IL-23) and anti-inflammatory (TGF-β and IL-10) cytokines. Naringenin also inhibited oxidative stress by reducing superoxide anion production and the mRNA expression of gp91phox. Therefore, naringenin inhibits UVB irradiation-induced skin damage and may be a promising therapeutic approach to control skin disease.

  14. Electroacupuncture Prevents Cognitive Impairments by Regulating the Early Changes after Brain Irradiation in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xing-Wen; Chen, Fu; Chen, Yan; Chen, Guan-Hao; Liu, Huan-Huan; Guan, Shi-Kuo; Deng, Yun; Liu, Yong; Zhang, Sheng-Jian; Peng, Wei-Jun; Jiang, Guo-Liang; Wu, Kai-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive impairments severely affect the quality of life of patients who undergo brain irradiation, and there are no effective preventive strategies. In this study, we examined the therapeutic potential of electroacupuncture (EA) administered immediately after brain irradiation in rats. We detected changes in cognitive function, neurogenesis, and synaptic density at different time points after irradiation, but found that EA could protect the blood-brain barrier (BBB), inhibit neuroinflammatory cytokine expression, upregulate angiogenic cytokine expression, and modulate the levels of neurotransmitter receptors and neuropeptides in the early phase. Moreover, EA protected spatial memory and recognition in the delayed phase. At the cellular/molecular level, the preventative effect of EA on cognitive dysfunction was not dependent on hippocampal neurogenesis; rather, it was related to synaptophysin expression. Our results suggest that EA applied immediately after brain irradiation can prevent cognitive impairments by protecting against the early changes induced by irradiation and may be a novel approach for preventing or ameliorating cognitive impairments in patients with brain tumors who require radiotherapy. PMID:25830357

  15. Low and moderate doses of ionizing radiation up to 2 Gy modulate transmigration and chemotaxis of activated macrophages, provoke an anti-inflammatory cytokine milieu, but do not impact upon viability and phagocytic function.

    PubMed

    Wunderlich, R; Ernst, A; Rödel, F; Fietkau, R; Ott, O; Lauber, K; Frey, B; Gaipl, U S

    2015-01-01

    Benign painful and inflammatory diseases have been treated for decades with low/moderate doses of ionizing radiation (LD-X-irradiation). Tissue macrophages regulate initiation and resolution of inflammation by the secretion of cytokines and by acting as professional phagocytes. Having these pivotal functions, we were interested in how activated macrophages are modulated by LD-X-irradiation, also with regard to radiation protection issues and carcinogenesis. We set up an ex-vivo model in which lipopolysaccharide pre-activated peritoneal macrophages (pMΦ) of radiosensitive BALB/c mice, mimicking activated macrophages under inflammatory conditions, were exposed to X-irradiation from 0·01 Gy up to 2 Gy. Afterwards, the viability of the pMΦ, their transmigration and chemotaxis, the phagocytic behaviour, the secretion of inflammatory cytokines and underlying signalling pathways were determined. Exposure of pMΦ up to a single dose of 2 Gy did not influence their viability and phagocytic function, an important fact regarding radiation protection. However, significantly reduced migration, but increased chemotaxis of pMΦ after exposure to 0·1 or 0·5 Gy, was detected. Both might relate to the resolution of inflammation. Cytokine analyses revealed that, in particular, the moderate dose of 0·5 Gy applied in low-dose radiotherapy for inflammatory diseases results in an anti-inflammatory cytokine microenvironment of pMΦ, as the secretion of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-1β was reduced and that of the anti-inflammatory cytokine transforming growth factor (TGF)-β increased. Further, the reduced secretion of IL-1β correlated with reduced nuclear translocation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB p65, starting at exposure of pMΦ to 0·5 Gy of X-irradiation. We conclude that inflammation is modulated by LD-X-irradiation via changing the inflammatory phenotype of macrophages.

  16. ATF Neutron Irradiation Program Irradiation Vehicle Design Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Geringer, J. W.; Katoh, Yutai; Howard, Richard H.; Cetiner, N. O.; Petrie, Christian M.; Smith, Kurt R.; McDuffee, J. M.

    2016-03-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) under the Civil Nuclear Energy Working Group (CNWG) is engaged in a cooperative research effort with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to explore issues related to nuclear energy, including research on accident-tolerant fuels and materials for use in light water reactors. This work develops a draft technical plan for a neutron irradiation program on the candidate accident-tolerant fuel cladding materials and elements using the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The research program requires the design of a detailed experiment, development of test vehicles, irradiation of test specimens, possible post irradiation examination and characterization of irradiated materials and the shipment of irradiated materials to Japan. This report discusses the conceptual design, the development and irradiation of the test vehicles.

  17. FDA perspective on food irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Pauli, G.H.

    1994-12-31

    The Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (CFSAN) monitors the safety of food irradiation. A few limited uses are regulated, and occasionally CFSAN receives a petition for a new use. Despite extensive studies (more than 400) showing the safety of food irradiation, a cloud of suspicion continues to hang over this issue in the mind of the public. People perceive food irradiation and direct body irradiation as having similar implications. Food irradiation is banned in two states in the United States. Food is irradiated for the following purposes: delay of ripening, prevention of sprouting, eradication of pests and sterilization, and allowing commodities to be stored unrefrigerated for long periods of time. The dosage depends on the purpose of the irradiation. Radiolytic products are formed during irradiation and during storage afterward. Most of these products are also formed during conventional preservation. In 1980, CFSAN, then the Bureau of Foods, introduced the term unique radiolytic products for compounds not identified in foods after conventional processing. Although the existence of URPs was never proven chemically, the term has caused anxiety. Irradiation of foods in the commercially useful range does not generate radioactivity above natural background. Because radiolytic products formed from beef, chicken, and pork are primarily the same, irradiated foods of similar food groups may be evaluated generically.

  18. Molecular transduction mechanisms of cytokine-hormone interactions: role of gp130 cytokines.

    PubMed

    Gerez, Juan; Bonfiglio, José; Sosa, Sebastian; Giacomini, Damiana; Acuña, Matias; Nagashima, Alberto Carbia; Perone, Marcelo J; Silberstein, Susana; Renner, Ulrich; Stalla, Günter K; Arzt, Eduardo

    2007-09-01

    Highly sophisticated mechanisms confer on the immune system the capacity to respond with a certain degree of autonomy. However, the final outcome of an immune response depends on the interaction of the immune system with other systems. The immune and neuroendocrine systems have an intimate cross-communication that makes possible a satisfactory response to environmental changes. Part of this interaction occurs through cytokines and steroid hormones. The last step of this cross-talk is the molecular level. As a model of interaction, this review focuses on the gp130 cytokine family. These cytokines, as well as their receptors, are expressed in pituitary cells. They regulate hormone production as well as growth of pituitary cells. During acute or chronic inflammation or infection, systemic, hypothalamic and hypophyseal gp130 cytokines act on anterior pituitary cells, integrating the neuroendocrine-immune response. Disruptions of these pathways may lead not only to abnormal growth of pituitary cells but also to immune disorders, for which, based on recent findings, targeting these cytokines might be a novel therapeutic approach.

  19. Rheumatoid arthritis pathophysiology: update on emerging cytokine and cytokine-associated cell targets.

    PubMed

    Furst, Daniel E; Emery, Paul

    2014-09-01

    Biologic therapies that target pathogenic cytokines such as TNF, IL-1β or IL-6 have greatly improved the treatment of RA. Unfortunately, not all RA patients respond to current biologic therapies and responses are not always maintained, suggesting that there are alternative drivers of RA pathogenesis that might serve as promising therapeutic targets. Discovery of the new Th17 subset of Th cells, and their role in autoimmune disease development, has implicated the proinflammatory IL-12 and IL-17 families of cytokines in RA disease pathogenesis. Members of these cytokine families are elevated in the blood and joints of RA patients and have been shown to remain elevated in patients who do not respond to current biologics. In addition, these cytokines have been shown to play roles in joint destruction and erosion. A new subclass of biologics that target the IL-12 and/or IL-17 signalling pathways are under development. Here we review evidence for a role of Th17 cells as well as IL-12 and IL-17 cytokines in RA pathogenesis as the rationale for a subsequent discussion of the ongoing and completed clinical trials of newly emerging biologic therapies directed at IL-12 or IL-17 pathway inhibition.

  20. Stimulation of Hepatoma Cell Invasiveness and Metastatic Potential by Proteins Secreted From Irradiated Nonparenchymal Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Leyuan; Wang Zhiming; Gao Yabo; Wang Lingyan; Zeng Zhaochong

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To determine whether factors secreted by irradiated liver nonparenchymal cells (NPCs) may influence invasiveness and/or metastatic potential of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells and to elucidate a possible mechanism for such effect. Methods and Materials: Primary rat NPCs were cultured and divided into irradiated (10-Gy X-ray) and nonirradiated groups. Forty-eight hours after irradiation, conditioned medium from irradiated (SR) or nonirradiated (SnonR) cultures were collected and added to sublethally irradiated cultures of the hepatoma McA-RH7777 cell line. Then, hepatoma cells were continuously passaged for eight generations (RH10Gy-SR and RH10Gy-SnonR). The invasiveness and metastatic potential of McA-RH7777, RH10Gy-SnonR, and RH10Gy-SR cells were evaluated using an in vitro gelatinous protein (Matrigel) invasion and an in vivo metastasis assay. In addition, SR and SnonR were tested using rat cytokine antibody arrays and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results: In vitro gelatinous protein invasion assay indicated that the numbers of invading cells was significantly higher in RH10Gy-SR (40 {+-} 4.74) than in RH10Gy-SnonR (30.6 {+-} 3.85) cells, and lowest in McA-RH7777 (11.4 {+-} 3.56) cells. The same pattern was observed in vivo in a lung metastasis assay, as evaluated by number of metastatic lung nodules seen with RH10Gy-SR (28.83 {+-} 5.38), RH10Gy-SnonR (22.17 {+-} 4.26), and McA-RH7777 (8.3 {+-} 3.8) cells. Rat cytokine antibody arrays and ELISA demonstrated that metastasis-promoting cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} and interleukin-6), circulating growth factors (vascular endothelial growth factor and epidermal growth factor), and metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9) were upregulated in SR compared with SnonR. Conclusions: Radiation can increase invasiveness and metastatic potential of sublethally irradiated hepatoma cells, and soluble mediators released from irradiated NPCs promote this potential. Increased secretion of

  1. Physical and Biological Characterization of the Gamma-Irradiated Human Cornea.

    PubMed

    Chae, J Jeremy; Choi, Joseph S; Lee, Justin D; Lu, Qiaozhi; Stark, Walter J; Kuo, Irene C; Elisseeff, Jennifer H

    2015-10-01

    To compare the physical and biological characteristics of commercial gamma-irradiated corneas with those of fresh human corneas and to determine suitability for transplantation. The physical properties of gamma-irradiated and fresh corneas were evaluated with respect to light transmittance, hydration (swelling ratio), elastic modulus (compressive modulus by the indentation method), matrix organization (differential scanning calorimetry), and morphology (light and transmission electron microscopy). The biological properties of the gamma-irradiated cornea, including residual cell content and cellular biocompatibility, were evaluated by quantifying DNA content and measuring the proliferation rate of human corneal epithelial cells, respectively. The hydration, light transmittance, elastic modulus, and proliferation rate of human corneal epithelial cells were not significantly different between fresh and gamma-irradiated corneas. However, differences were observed in tissue morphology, DNA content, and thermal properties. The density of collagen fibrils of the gamma-irradiated corneal sample (160.6 ± 33.2 fibrils/μm) was significantly lower than that of the fresh corneal sample (310.0 ± 44.7 fibrils/μm). Additionally, in the gamma-irradiated corneas, cell fragments-but not viable cells-were observed, supported by lower DNA content of the gamma-irradiated cornea (1.0 ± 0.1 μg/mg) than in fresh corneas (1.9 μg/mg). Moreover, the denaturation temperature of gamma-irradiated corneas (61.8 ± 1.1 °C) was significantly lower than that of fresh corneas (66.1 ± 1.9 °C). Despite structural changes due to irradiation, the physical and biological properties of the gamma-irradiated cornea remain similar to the fresh cornea. These factors, combined with a decreased risk of rejection and longer shelf life, make the gamma-irradiated tissue a viable and clinically desired option in various ophthalmic procedures.

  2. Post-irradiation effects in polyethylenes irradiated under various atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suljovrujic, E.

    2013-08-01

    If a large amount of polymer free radicals remain trapped after irradiation of polymers, the post-irradiation effects may result in a significant alteration of physical properties during long-term shelf storage and use. In the case of polyethylenes (PEs) some failures are attributed to the post-irradiation oxidative degradation initiated by the reaction of residual free radicals (mainly trapped in crystal phase) with oxygen. Oxidation products such as carbonyl groups act as deep traps and introduce changes in carrier mobility and significant deterioration in the PEs electrical insulating properties. The post-irradiation behaviour of three different PEs, low density polyethylene (LDPE), linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE) and high density polyethylene (HDPE) was studied; previously, the post-irradiation behaviour of the PEs was investigated after the irradiation in air (Suljovrujic, 2010). In this paper, in order to investigate the influence of different irradiation media on the post-irradiation behaviour, the samples were irradiated in air and nitrogen gas, to an absorbed dose of 300 kGy. The annealing treatment of irradiated PEs, which can substantially reduce the concentration of free radicals, is used in this study, too. Dielectric relaxation behaviour is related to the difference in the initial structure of PEs (such as branching, crystallinity etc.), to the changes induced by irradiation in different media and to the post-irradiation changes induced by storage of the samples in air. Electron spin resonance (ESR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), infra-red (IR) spectroscopy and gel measurements were used to determine the changes in the free radical concentration, crystal fraction, oxidation and degree of network formation, respectively.

  3. Replacement of 137Cs irradiators with x-ray irradiators.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Brian; Vetter, Richard J

    2009-02-01

    Self-shielded 137Cs irradiators have been used for many years to irradiate blood products to prevent graft vs. host disease and to irradiate cells and small animals in research. A report by the National Academy of Sciences recommends that careful consideration be given to replacement of 137Cs irradiators with x-ray irradiators. Several manufacturers and users of x-ray irradiators were contacted to determine costs of replacing and maintaining 137Cs irradiators with x-ray units and to assess users' experience with x-ray irradiators. Purchase costs of x-ray units are similar to 137Cs irradiators, but maintenance costs are significantly higher if annual service contracts are used. Performance of the two irradiator types appears to be equivalent, but in some cases x-ray irradiations may need to be performed in multiple configurations to achieve adequate uniformity in dose. No literature reports were found that evaluated the biological effectiveness of x rays vs. 137Cs gamma rays; therefore, a careful study should be conducted to determine the biological effectiveness of x rays vs. 137Cs gamma rays for biological responses relevant to transfusion medicine and immunological research. Throughput may be problematic for large transfusion medicine programs, and back-up plans may be necessary in case the x-ray unit needs to be taken out of service for extended maintenance. Disposition of a 137Cs irradiator will add to the cost of replacement with an x-ray unit, but disposal may be possible through the U.S. Department of Energy's Off-Site Source Recovery Program.

  4. Cytokines: The Good, the Bad, and the Deadly.

    PubMed

    Ramani, Thulasi; Auletta, Carol S; Weinstock, Daniel; Mounho-Zamora, Barbara; Ryan, Patricia C; Salcedo, Theodora W; Bannish, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, the world of pharmaceutical toxicology has seen an explosion in the area of cytokines. An overview of the many aspects of cytokine safety evaluation currently in progress and evolving strategies for evaluating these important entities was presented at this symposium. Cytokines play a broad role to help the immune system respond to diseases, and drugs which modulate their effect have led to some amazing therapies. Cytokines may be "good" when stimulating the immune system to fight a foreign pathogen or attack tumors. Other "good" cytokine effects include reduction of an immune response, for example interferon β reduction of neuron inflammation in patients with multiple sclerosis. They may be "bad" when their expression causes inflammatory diseases, such as the role of tumor necrosis factor α in rheumatoid arthritis or asthma and Crohn's disease. Therapeutic modulation of cytokine expression can help the "good" cytokines to generate or quench the immune system and block the "bad" cytokines to prevent damaging inflammatory events. However, care must be exercised, as some antibody therapeutics can cause "ugly" cytokine release which can be deadly. Well-designed toxicology studies should incorporate careful assessment of cytokine modulation that will allow effective therapies to treat unmet needs. This symposium discussed lessons learned in cytokine toxicology using case studies and suggested future directions. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Insights into Cytokine–Receptor Interactions from Cytokine Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Spangler, Jamie B.; Moraga, Ignacio; Mendoza, Juan L.; Garcia, K. Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Cytokines exert a vast array of immunoregulatory actions critical to human biology and disease. However, the desired immunotherapeutic effects of native cytokines are often mitigated by toxicity or lack of efficacy, either of which results from cytokine receptor pleiotropy and/or undesired activation of off-target cells. As our understanding of the structural principles of cytokine–receptor interactions has advanced, mechanism-based manipulation of cytokine signaling through protein engineering has become an increasingly feasible and powerful approach. Modified cytokines, both agonists and antagonists, have been engineered with narrowed target cell specificities, and they have also yielded important mechanistic insights into cytokine biology and signaling. Here we review the theory and practice of cytokine engineering and rationalize the mechanisms of several engineered cytokines in the context of structure. We discuss specific examples of how structure-based cytokine engineering has opened new opportunities for cytokines as drugs, with a focus on the immunotherapeutic cytokines interferon, interleukin-2, and interleukin-4. PMID:25493332

  6. Effect of ozone on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and related inflammatory cytokines in rats with diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Xie, T Y; Yan, W; Lou, J; Chen, X Y

    2016-05-13

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of ozone on inflammatory cytokines in diabetic retinopathy (DR) rats. Male rats (40) weighing 300-360 g were included in this study. Thirty rats were randomly divided into the model and ozone groups after DR was induced by streptozotocin. Ten rats served as the blank group. After the diabetic models were established for one month, the rats in the ozone group were treated with 50 mg/kg ozone coloclysis for one month (three times a week). After the rats were anesthetized by intraperitoneal injection, blood samples from the abdominal aorta were collected, and the supernatant was obtained by centrifugation. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and inflammatory cytokine content in the serum was detected by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. The values of VEGF, intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1, interleukin-1 beta, tumor necrosis factor-a, and IL-6 were significantly different among the three groups (P < 0.05). The cytokine levels in the model group were higher than those in the blank group (P < 0.05). The level of each cytokine in the ozone group was higher than that in the blank group. Compared with the model group, the cytokine levels in the ozone group were significantly reduced (P < 0.05). Ozone had no effect on the blood glucose of diabetic rats. Treatment with ozone coloclysis may effectively reduce the secretion of VEGF and inflammatory cytokines in diabetic retinopathy rats.

  7. Increased Systemic Cytokine/Chemokine Expression in Asthmatic and Non-asthmatic Patients with Bacterial, Viral or Mixed Lung Infection.

    PubMed

    Giuffrida, M J; Valero, N; Mosquera, J; Duran, A; Arocha, F; Chacín, B; Espina, L M; Gotera, J; Bermudez, J; Mavarez, A; Alvarez-Mon, M

    2017-04-01

    This study was aimed to determine the profiles of serum cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-4, IL-5) and chemokines (MCP-1: monocyte chemoattract protein-1 and RANTES: regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted) in individuals with an asthmatic versus a non-asthmatic background with bacterial, viral or mixed acute respiratory infection. Asthmatic (n = 14) and non-asthmatic (n = 29) patients with acute viral, bacterial or mixed (bacterial and viruses) respiratory infection were studied. Patients were also analysed as individuals with pneumonia or bronchitis. Healthy individuals with similar age and sex (n = 10) were used as controls. Cytokine/chemokine content in serum was determined by ELISA. Increased cytokine/chemokine concentration in asthmatic and non-asthmatic patients was observed. However, higher concentrations of chemokines (MCP-1 and RANTES) in asthmatic patients infected by viruses, bacteria or bacteria and viruses (mixed) than in non-asthmatic patients were observed. In general, viral and mixed infections were better cytokine/chemokine inducers than bacterial infection. Cytokine/chemokine expression was similarly increased in both asthmatic and non-asthmatic patients with pneumonia or bronchitis, except that RANTES remained at normal levels in bronchitis. Circulating cytokine profiles induced by acute viral, bacterial or mixed lung infection were not related to asthmatic background, except for chemokines that were increased in asthmatic status. © 2017 The Foundation for the Scandinavian Journal of Immunology.

  8. Influence of the physical structure of irradiated starches on their electron spin resonance spectra kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Raffi, J.J.; Agnel, J.P.L.

    1983-06-23

    This study deals with the shape and kinetic changes of the ESR spectra of eight irradiated starchs, from several hours to several months after ..gamma..-irradiation. Whatever the origin and water content of the starches two major radicals or groups of radicals are observed. The kinetic law depends on the water content; two main zones are pointed out which are relative to the amorphous and crystalline parts of starches.

  9. Historical review: Cytokines as therapeutics and targets of therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Vilcek, Jan; Feldmann, Marc

    2004-04-01

    Cytokine research has spawned the introduction of new therapies that have revolutionized the treatment of many important diseases. These therapeutic advances have resulted from two very different strategies. The first therapeutic strategy embodies the administration of purified, recombinant cytokines. The second relies on the administration of therapeutics that inhibit the harmful effects of upregulated, endogenous cytokines. Examples of successful cytokine therapeutics include hematopoietic growth factors (colony stimulating factors) and interferons. Prime examples of cytokine antagonists that have profoundly altered the treatment of some inflammatory disorders are agents that inhibit the effects of tumor necrosis factor (TNF). In this article, we highlight some of the studies that have been responsible for the introduction of cytokine and anti-cytokine therapies, with emphasis on the development of interferons and anti-TNF agents.

  10. Multiple Circulating Cytokines Are Coelevated in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Todd, Ian; John, Michelle; Bolton, Charlotte E.; Harrison, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory biomarkers, including cytokines, are associated with COPD, but the association of particular circulating cytokines with systemic pathology remains equivocal. To investigate this, we developed a protein microarray system to detect multiple cytokines in small volumes of serum. Fourteen cytokines were measured in serum from never-smokers, ex-smokers, current smokers, and COPD patients (GOLD stages 1–3). Certain individual circulating cytokines (particularly TNFα and IL-1β) were significantly elevated in concentration in the serum of particular COPD patients (and some current/ex-smokers without COPD) and may serve as markers of particularly significant systemic inflammation. However, numerous circulating cytokines were raised such that their combined, but not individual, elevation was significantly associated with severity of disease, and these may be further indicators of, and contributors to, the systemic inflammatory manifestations of COPD. The coelevation of numerous circulating cytokines in COPD is consistent with the insidious development, chronic nature, and systemic comorbidities of the disease. PMID:27524865

  11. Multiple Circulating Cytokines Are Coelevated in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Selvarajah, Senthooran; Todd, Ian; Tighe, Patrick J; John, Michelle; Bolton, Charlotte E; Harrison, Timothy; Fairclough, Lucy C

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory biomarkers, including cytokines, are associated with COPD, but the association of particular circulating cytokines with systemic pathology remains equivocal. To investigate this, we developed a protein microarray system to detect multiple cytokines in small volumes of serum. Fourteen cytokines were measured in serum from never-smokers, ex-smokers, current smokers, and COPD patients (GOLD stages 1-3). Certain individual circulating cytokines (particularly TNFα and IL-1β) were significantly elevated in concentration in the serum of particular COPD patients (and some current/ex-smokers without COPD) and may serve as markers of particularly significant systemic inflammation. However, numerous circulating cytokines were raised such that their combined, but not individual, elevation was significantly associated with severity of disease, and these may be further indicators of, and contributors to, the systemic inflammatory manifestations of COPD. The coelevation of numerous circulating cytokines in COPD is consistent with the insidious development, chronic nature, and systemic comorbidities of the disease.

  12. Low level laser therapy on injured rat muscle: assessment of irradiation parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantineo, M.; Pinheiro, J. P.; Morgado, A. M.

    2013-11-01

    Although studies show the clinical effectiveness of low level laser therapy (LLLT) in facilitating the muscle healing process, scientific evidence is still required to prove the effectiveness of LLLT and to clarify the cellular and molecular mechanisms triggered by irradiation. Here we evaluate the effect of different LLLT wavelengths, using continuous coherent Laser illumination (830 nm and 980 nm) and non-coherent LED illumination (850 nm), in the treatment of inflammation induced in the gastrocnemius muscle of Wistar rats, through the quantification of cytokines in systemic blood. We verified that all applied doses of coherent radiation produce an effect on reducing the concentration of pro-inflammatory TNF-α and IL-1β cytokines, while no treatment effect was observed after irradiation with non-coherent radiation. The best results were obtained for 40 mW at 830 nm. The results may suggest an important role of coherence properties of laser in LLLT.

  13. Results and analyses for irradiation/anneal experiments conducted on Yankee Rowe reactor pressure vessel surrogate materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Biemiller, E.C.

    1995-12-01

    The Yankee Atomic Electric Company test irradiation program was implemented to characterize the irradiation response of representative Yankee Rowe reactor vessel beltline plate and weld materials and to remove uncertainties in the analysis of existing irradiation data on the Yankee Rowe reactor vessel steel. The effect of plate nickel content and microstructure on irradiation damage sensitivity was assessed. Typical reactor vessel plate materials each containing 0.24% (by weight) copper, but different nickel contents at 0.63% and 0.19%, were heat treated to produce different microstructures in the test materials. A Linde 80 weld containing 0.30% copper and 1.00% nickel was produced and heat treated to test microstructure effects on the irradiation response of weld metal. Materials taken from plate surface locations (vs 1/4 thickness) were included to test whether or not the improved toughness properties of the plate surface layer, resulting from a rapid quench, is maintained after irradiation. Irradiations were conducted at two irradiation temperatures (500{degrees}F and 550{degrees}F) to determine the effect of irradiation temperature on embrittlement. An annealing test matrix was also initiated to study the potential for a 650{degrees}F anneal. A major irradiation/annealing/reirradiation study was conducted by the DOE`s LWR Technology Center at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), using an irradiation temperature of 550{degrees}F and a 850{degrees}F anneal. The results of the irradiation testing and the DOE/SNL annealing study show an irradiation temperature effect that is not consistent but, varies with the materials tested. The test results demonstrate that for nickel bearing steels, the superior toughness of plate surface material is maintained even after irradiation to high fluences and for the copper content tested, nickel has little effect on irradiation response.

  14. Rapid Phytochrome-mediated Changes in Adenosine 5'-Triphosphate Content of Etiolated Bean Buds.

    PubMed

    White, J M; Pike, C S

    1974-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the effects of red and far red irradiation on ATP metabolism in etiolated bean buds (Phaseolus vulgaris L. var. Red Kidney). Compared to dark controls, red irradiated buds show an initial decline in ATP content at 15 seconds following a 5-minute irradiation. ATP content then rapidly rises to a peak at 1 minute, and then slowly returns to the baseline. The 1-minute promotion of ATP content is red/far red reversible. Acetylcholine does not appear to mimic red light in this system; it causes a marked decrease in ATP content.

  15. Cytokines, cytokine gene polymorphisms and Helicobacter pylori infection: friend or foe?

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Camila A; Marques, Cintia Rodrigues; Costa, Ryan dos Santos; da Silva, Hugo Bernardino F; Alcantara-Neves, Neuza M

    2014-05-14

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a flagellated, spiral-shaped, microaerophilic Gram-negative bacillus that colonises the gastric mucosa of more than 50% of the human population. Infection is a risk factor for gastritis, ulcer disease and stomach cancer. Immunity against H. pylori is mainly related to Th1/Th17 skewing, and the activation of regulatory T cells is the main strategy used to limit inflammatory responses, which can result in the pathogen persistence and can lead to chronic gastrointestinal diseases, including cancer. Furthermore, host genetic factors that affect cytokines may determine differences in the susceptibility to many diseases. In this review, we present the cytokine profiles and the main cytokine gene polymorphisms associated with resistance/susceptibility to H. pylori and discuss how such polymorphisms may influence infection/disease outcomes.

  16. Profiling of cytokines in human epithelial ovarian cancer ascites

    PubMed Central

    Matte, Isabelle; Lane, Denis; Laplante, Claude; Rancourt, Claudine; Piché, Alain

    2012-01-01

    Background The behavior of tumor cells is influenced by the composition of the surrounding tumor environment. The importance of ascites in ovarian cancer (OC) progression is being increasingly recognized. The characterization of soluble factors in ascites is essential to understand how this environment affects OC progression. The development of cytokine arrays now allows simultaneous measurement of multiple cytokines per ascites using a single array. Methods We applied a multiplex cytokine array technology that simultaneously measures the level of 120 cytokines in ascites from 10 OC patients. The ascites concentration of a subset (n = 5) of cytokines that was elevated based on the multiplex array was validated by commercially available ELISA. The ascites level of these 5 cytokines was further evaluated by ELISA in a cohort of 38 patients. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to assess the association of cytokine expression with progression-free survival (PFS) in this cohort. Results We observed a wide variability of expression between different cytokines and levels of specific cytokines also varied in the 10 malignant ascites tested. Fifty-three (44%) cytokines were not detected in any of the 10 ascites. The level of several factors including, among others, angiogenin, angiopoietin-2, GRO, ICAM-1, IL-6, IL-6R, IL-8, IL-10, leptin, MCP-1, MIF NAP-2, osteprotegerin (OPG), RANTES, TIMP-2 and UPAR were elevated in most malignant ascites. Higher levels of OPG, IL-10 and leptin in OC ascites were associated with shorter PFS. IL-10 was shown to promote the anti-apoptotic activity of malignant ascites whereas OPG did not. Conclusion Our data demonstrated that there is a complex network of cytokine expression in OC ascites. Characterization of cytokine profiles in malignant ascites may provide information from which to prioritize key functional cytokines and understand the mechanism by which they alter tumor cells behavior. A better understanding of the cytokine network is

  17. The 10Be contents of SNC meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pal, D. K.; Tuniz, C.; Moniot, R. K.; Savin, W.; Vajda, S.; Kruse, T.; Herzog, G. F.

    1986-01-01

    Several authors have explored the possibility that the Shergottites, Nakhlites, and Chassigny (SNC) came from Mars. The spallogenic gas contents of the SNC meteorites have been used to: constrain the sizes of the SNC's during the last few million years; to establish groupings independent of the geochemical ones; and to estimate the likelihood of certain entries in the catalog of all conceivable passages from Mars to Earth. The particular shielding dependence of Be-10 makes the isotope a good probe of the irradiation conditions experienced by the SNC meteorites. The Be-10 contents of nine members of the group were measured using the technique of accelerator mass spectrometry. The Be-10 contents of Nakhla, Governador Valadares, Chassigny, and probably Lafayette, about 20 dpm/kg, exceed the values expected from irradiation of the surface of a large body. The Be-10 data therfore do not support scenario III of Bogard et al., one in which most of the Be-10 in the SNC meteorites would have formed on the Martian surface; they resemble rather the Be-10 contents found in many ordinary chondrites subjected to 4 Pi exposures. The uncertainties of the Be-10 contents lead to appreciable errors in the Be-10 ages, t(1) = -1/lambda ln(1 Be-10/Be-10). Nonetheless, the Be-10 ages are consistent with the Ne-21 ages calculated assuming conventional, small-body production rates and short terrestrial ages for the finds. It is believed that this concordance strengthens the case for at least 3 different irradiation ages for the SNC meteorites. Given the similar half-thicknesses of the Be-10 and Ne-21 production rates, the ratios of the Be-10 and Ne-21 contents do not appear consistent with common ages for any of the groups. In view of the general agreement between the Be-10 and Ne-21 ages it does not seem useful at this time to construct multiple-stage irradiation histories for the SNC meteorites.

  18. Models of Solar Irradiance Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solanki, Sami K.

    2015-08-01

    Models of solar irradiance variability have an important role to play due to the relatively short (although steadily increasing) length of measured irradiance time series. Advanced models also allow identifying the source of solar irradiance variations and give insight into the variation of irradiance as a function of wavelength. The first generation of models of solar irradiance were proxy-based, i.e. purely empirical. These were followed by models that combine spectra computed from semi-empirical model atmospheres, with a measure of solar activity variations. In future, models will build increasingly on 3D MHD simulations instead of 1D model atmospheres to compute the spectra. On longer timescales models are generally simpler, although there too considerable progress has been made, with irradiance reconstructions now available for multiple millennia, albeit with lower resolution and accuracy than at shorter timescales.

  19. [Peculiarities of cytokine status in patients with vitiligo and stress in anamnesis].

    PubMed

    Tsiskarishvili, N V; Katsitadze, A; Tsiskarishvili, N I; Chitanava, L

    2014-10-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the content of some proinflammatory cytokines (IL-2, IL-6) in the serum of patients with vitiligo and stress in anamnesis. Cytokine levels in serum were measured in 50 patients with vitiligo (20 men and 30 women aged from 18 to 65 years old.) All the patients were divided according to anamnesis (27 patients with stress in anamnesis and 23 patients, where the onset of the disease was not preceded by stress). Patients of both groups were similar in terms of shape (according to T. Fitzpatrick classification) and in terms of the dermatosis stages. Concomitant autoimmune or inflammatory diseases of the skin in our vitiligo patients were not observed. The cytokines in the blood serum of vitiligo patients were determined by ELISA using the corresponding monoclonal antibodies. Student's t-test was used for evaluation of statistical significance of received results (p < 0.05 was considered as a statistically significant). Content of IL-2 in the serum of patients with vitiligo, in which stress was not preceded dermatosis, was significantly higher than that in healthy individuals (25,5 ± 7,6 vs 10,5 ± 3,6 pg/ml, p < 0,05). But the same parameter in patients with stress in anamnesis was significantly lower than those in healthy individuals (3,5 ± 1,5 vs 10,5 ± 3,6 pg/l, p < 0.05). Changes in the content of IL-6 in the serum of vitiligo patients was a similar to changes in IL-2 content, and the most significant this indicator was in patients with generalized and progressive stage of the disease. Data on increased concentrations of IL-6 agree with the majority of studies conducted earlier. For a complete analysis of our results on the reduction of the cytokines (IL-2, IL-6) content in patients with a stress in anamnesis, that will allow to identify the most effective ways to treat patients with this pathology (including their cytokine status), further research is necessary.

  20. Cytokine Changes following Acute Ethanol Intoxication in Healthy Men: A Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Skulberg, Andreas; Skulberg, Knut Ragnvald; Aass, Hans Christian D.; Bramness, Jørgen G.

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol is a known modulator of the innate immune system. Owing to the absence of human studies, alcohol's effect on circulating cytokine profile remains unclear. We investigated the effect of acute high dose alcohol consumption on systemic cytokine release. After an overnight fasting, alcohol-experienced healthy male volunteers (N = 20) aged 25–45 years were given oral ethanol in the form of vodka (4.28 mL/kg) which they drank over a period of 30 minutes reaching peak blood alcohol concentration of 0.12% (SD 0.028). Blood samples were obtained prior to alcohol intake as well as 2, 7, and 12 hours thereafter. Serum levels of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-1Ra, IL-6, IL-10, IL-17, IFN-γ, MCP-1, and TNF-α were determined by the multibead-based assay. Baseline cytokine levels were not related to BMI, hepatic parameters, electrolytes, glucose, or morning cortisol levels. Within 2 hours of alcohol intake, levels of IL-1Ra were elevated and remained so throughout the assessment period (p for trend = 0.015). In contrast, the levels of the chemokine MCP-1 dropped acutely followed by steadily increasing levels during the observation period (p < 0.001). The impact of sustained elevated levels of MCP-1 even after the clearance of blood alcohol content deserves attention. PMID:28090151

  1. Protein Quality of Irradiated Brazilian Beans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delincée, Henry; Villavicencio, Anna-Lucia C. H.; Mancini-Filho, Jorge

    1998-06-01

    Beans are a major source of dietary protein in Brazil. However, high losses due to insect infestation occur after each harvest. To combat these losses, radiation processing of beans offers promise as an alternative to chemical treatment, provided the nutritional quality of beans is not impaired by the radiation treatment. Conflicting results have been published about the effect of radiation on the biological value of legume proteins. Therefore, two varieties of Brazilian beans were studied: 1) Phaseolus vulgaris L., var. carioca and 2) Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp, var. macaçar. The beans were irradiated with doses of 0, 0.5, 1.0, 2.5, 5.0 and 10 kGy. Since irradiated beans will be consumed after appropriate storage, the beans under study were stored for 6 months at ambient temperature. Protein quality was measured by a biological assay employing the nitrogen balance approach in weanling rats. The animals were fed with optimally cooked beans, which were the only source of protein (˜10%). Nitrogen contents of legumes, diets, animal urine and faeces were determined by Kjeldahl analysis. The indices for apparent protein quality: net protein utilisation, digestibility and biological value were not influenced by irradiation. Thus, radiation treatment of Brazilian beans offers considerable promise as an effective insect disinfection process, without impairing the biological quality of the valuable bean protein.

  2. Multivariate Analysis of Solar Spectral Irradiance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilewskie, P.; Rabbette, M.

    2001-01-01

    Principal component analysis is used to characterize approximately 7000 downwelling solar irradiance spectra retrieved at the Southern Great Plains site during an Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) shortwave intensive operating period. This analysis technique has proven to be very effective in reducing a large set of variables into a much smaller set of independent variables while retaining the information content. It is used to determine the minimum number of parameters necessary to characterize atmospheric spectral irradiance or the dimensionality of atmospheric variability. It was found that well over 99% of the spectral information was contained in the first six mutually orthogonal linear combinations of the observed variables (flux at various wavelengths). Rotation of the principal components was effective in separating various components by their independent physical influences. The majority of the variability in the downwelling solar irradiance (380-1000 nm) was explained by the following fundamental atmospheric parameters (in order of their importance): cloud scattering, water vapor absorption, molecular scattering, and ozone absorption. In contrast to what has been proposed as a resolution to a clear-sky absorption anomaly, no unexpected gaseous absorption signature was found in any of the significant components.

  3. Infarction-induced cytokines cause local depletion of tyrosine hydroxylase in cardiac sympathetic nerves

    PubMed Central

    Parrish, Diana C.; Alston, Eric N.; Rohrer, Hermann; Nkadi, Paul; Woodward, William R.; Schütz, Günther; Habecker, Beth A.

    2010-01-01

    Myocardial infarction causes heterogeneity of noradrenergic transmission that contributes to the development of ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. Ischemia-induced alterations in sympathetic transmission include regional variations in cardiac norepinephrine (NE) and in tyrosine hydroxylase, the rate-limiting enzyme in NE synthesis. Inflammatory cytokines that act through gp130 are elevated in the heart after myocardial infarction. These cytokines decrease expression of tyrosine hydroxylase in sympathetic neurons, and indirect evidence suggests they contribute to the local depletion of tyrosine hydroxylase in the damaged left ventricle. However, gp130 cytokines are also important for the survival of cardiac myocytes following damage to the heart. To examine the effect of cytokines on tyrosine hydroxylase and NE content in cardiac nerves we used gp130DBH-Cre/lox mice, which have a deletion of the gp130 receptor in neurons expressing dopamine beta hydroxylase. The absence of neuronal gp130 prevented the loss of tyrosine hydroxylase in cardiac sympathetic nerves innervating the left ventricle one week after ischemia-reperfusion. Surprisingly, restoring tyrosine hydroxylase in the damaged ventricle did not return neuronal NE content to normal levels. NE uptake into cardiac nerves was significantly lower in gp130 KO mice, contributing to the lack of neuronal NE stores. There were no significant differences in left ventricular peak systolic pressure, dP/dtMAX, or dP/dtMIN between the two genotypes after myocardial infarction, but ganglionic blockade revealed differences in autonomic tone between the genotypes. Stimulating the heart with dobutamine or releasing endogenous NE with tyramine generated similar responses in both genotypes. Thus, the removal of gp130 from sympathetic neurons prevents the post-infarct depletion of TH in the left ventricle, but does not alter NE content or cardiac function. PMID:19880537

  4. Craniospinal irradiation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Scarlatescu, Ioana Avram, Calin N.; Virag, Vasile

    2015-12-07

    In this paper we present one treatment plan for irradiation cases which involve a complex technique with multiple beams, using the 3D conformational technique. As the main purpose of radiotherapy is to administrate a precise dose into the tumor volume and protect as much as possible all the healthy tissues around it, for a case diagnosed with a primitive neuro ectoderm tumor, we have developed a new treatment plan, by controlling one of the two adjacent fields used at spinal field, in a way that avoids the fields superposition. Therefore, the risk of overdose is reduced by eliminating the field divergence.

  5. Immune-enhancing activities of low molecular weight β-glucan depolymerized by gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Nak-Yun; Byun, Eui-Hong; Kwon, Sun-Kyu; Song, Beom-Seok; Choi, Jong-il; Kim, Jae-Hun; Byun, Myung-Woo; Yoo, Young-Choon; Kim, Mee-Ree; Lee, Ju-Woon

    2009-07-01

    β-glucans are structural cell wall polymers of many microorganisms and cereals which possess immunomodulatory properties and have been used in the food, cosmetic and medical industry. In our previous study, β-glucan was depolymerized by gamma irradiation and leads to improve the solubility and viscosity. This study was carried out to evaluate the functional properties, mainly immune-enhancing activities of low molecular weight β-glucan fragmented by gamma irradiation. The results showed that RAW 264.7 macrophage cell stimulation activities of irradiated β-glucan were higher than that of non-irradiated β-glucan. In addition, the oral administration of gamma-irradiated β-glucan significantly increased the proliferation and cytokine (IFN-γ and IL-2) release of spleen and Peyer's patch cells compared with non-irradiated β-glucan. In conclusion, gamma irradiation could be used as an effective method for the production of depolymerized β-glucan improved functional property such as immunomodulatory activity.

  6. Lung irradiation increases mortality following influenza A virus challenge occurring late after exposure

    PubMed Central

    Manning, Casey M.; Johnston, Carl J.; Reed, Christina K.; Lawrence, B. Paige; Williams, Jacqueline P.; Finkelstein, Jacob N.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Whole-body irradiated individuals are at increased risk of infection in the acute phase, whereas pulmonary complications are associated with late events. This study addressed whether irradiation-induced changes in the lung environment alter responses to a viral challenge delivered late after exposure, but prior to the appearance of late lung radiation injury. Methods and Materials C57BL/6 mice received either lung alone or combined lung + whole-body irradiation (0–15 Gy). At 10 weeks post-irradiation, animals were infected with 120 HAU influenza virus strain A/HKx31. Innate and adaptive immune cell recruitment was determined using flow cytometry. Cytokine and chemokine production and protein leakage into the lung following infection were assessed. Results Prior irradiation led to a dose-dependent failure to regain body weight post-infection, exacerbated mortality, but it did not affect virus-specific immune responses or virus clearance. Surviving irradiated animals displayed a persistent increase in total protein in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and edema. Conclusions Lung irradiation increased susceptibility to death following infection with influenza virus and impaired the ability to complete recovery. This altered response does not appear due to a radiation effect on the immune response, but it may possibly be an effect on epithelial repair. PMID:23195776

  7. Induction of Lipocalin2 in a Rat Model of Lung Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Sultan, Sadaf; Ahmad, Shakil; Rave-Fränk, Margret; Malik, Ihtzaz Ahmed; Hess, Clemens F.; Christiansen, Hans; Cameron, Silke

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we showed that lipocalin2 (LCN2) serum levels increased after liver irradiation and during acute-phase conditions. Here, we evaluate LCN2 expression and serum levels after single-dose lung irradiation with 25 Gy, percutaneously administered to the lung of randomly-paired male Wistar rats. Due to the concave anatomy of the lung recesses, the irradiation field included the upper part of the liver. No rat died due to irradiation. In control tissue, lung immunohistochemistry showed a high constitutive expression of LCN2+ granulocytes. LCN2 mRNA levels in lung tissue increased up to 24 h (9 ± 2.3-fold) after irradiation. However, serum LCN2 levels remained undetectable after lung irradiation. LCN2 expression in the upper part of the liver increased up to 4.2-fold after lung irradiation, but the lower liver showed an early decrease. Acute-phase cytokines (IL-1β and TNF-α) showed a significant increase on transcript level in both lung and upper liver, whilst the lower liver did not show any considerable increase. In conclusion, constitutive expression of LCN2 in local immune cells demonstrates its local role during stress conditions in the lung. The absence of LCN2 in the serum strengthens our previous findings that the liver is the key player in secreting LCN2 during stress conditions with liver involvement. PMID:27136530

  8. Reduction of IL-20 Expression in Rheumatoid Arthritis by Linear Polarized Infrared Light Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Imaoka, Asayo; Zhang, Lin; Kuboyama, Noboru; Abiko, Yoshimitsu

    2014-07-01

    Low-level laser is being evaluated for treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Recently, the linear polarized infrared light (Super Lizer, SL) irradiation may also be useful for RA treatment. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the effectiveness of SL on RA is unclear. It has been IL-20 may involved in RA disease progression. To understand how SL action, we constructed the experimental model in vitro using human rheumatoid fibroblast-like synoviocyte (MH7A) and collagen induced (CIA) RA rat in vivo. We examined the effect of SL irradiation on IL-20 gene expression in MH7A and IL-20 protein production in CIA) rat joints. MH7A was cultured and challenged with IL-1ß, then examined IL-20 and IL-20R mRNA level by DNA microarray. IL-20 protein expression was exam