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Sample records for cytosine nucleotides

  1. Cytosine-substituted metalloporphyrins: receptors for recognition of nucleotides in ion-selective electrodes.

    PubMed

    Král, Vladimír; Shishkanova, Tatiana V; Sessler, Jonathan L; Brown, Christopher T

    2004-04-21

    A new series of cytosine-substituted metalloporphyrin conjugates (containing Co(II) and Zn(II) as the coordinated metals) were designed and investigated as nucleotide receptors in PVC-membrane-based ion-selective electrodes under neutral conditions. The potentiometric results indicate that these systems, in particular the Co(II)-containing complex, may be potentially useful sensors for complementary nucleotide substrates in the presence of 10 mol% tridodecylmethylammonium chloride (K(Pot.)(5'-GMP/5'-AMP)= 0.045).

  2. Solution structures of oligonucleotides containing either a guanine or a cytosine in front of a gap of one nucleotide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulard, Y.; Faibis, V.; Fazakerley, G. V.

    1999-10-01

    We report NMR and molecular modelling studies on two DNA duplexes containing a gap of one nucleotides. The difference between the two oligonucleotides lies in the central base face to the gap, a guanine or a cytosine. For the gapG, we observed in solution a B-form conformation where the guanine stacks in the helix. For the gapC, we reveal the existence of two species, one majority where the cytosine is inside the helix and a second for which the cytosine is extrahelical. Nous présentons une étude par RMN et modélisation moléculaire sur deux duplexes d'ADN contenant une lacune de un nucléotide. La différence entre les deux oligonucléotides réside dans la base centrale en face de la lacune, une guanine ou une cytosine. Pour le duplex appelé gapG, nous observons en solution une hélice de type B dans laquelle la guanine est empilée à l'intérieur de l'hélice. Dans le cas du duplex gapC, nous montrons l'existence de deux formes, l'une où la cytosine est à l'intérieur de l'hélice; la seconde où la cytosine est extra hélicale.

  3. Alkylsulfanylphenyl derivatives of cytosine and 7-deazaadenine nucleosides, nucleotides and nucleoside triphosphates: synthesis, polymerase incorporation to DNA and electrochemical study.

    PubMed

    Macíčková-Cahová, Hana; Pohl, Radek; Horáková, Petra; Havran, Luděk; Špaček, Jan; Fojta, Miroslav; Hocek, Michal

    2011-05-16

    Aqueous Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reactions of halogenated nucleosides, nucleotides and nucleoside triphosphates derived from 5-iodocytosine and 7-iodo-7-deazaadenine with methyl-, benzyl- and tritylsufanylphenylboronic acids gave the corresponding alkylsulfanylphenyl derivatives of nucleosides and nucleotides. The modified nucleoside triphosphates were incorporated into DNA by primer extension by using Vent(exo-) polymerase. The electrochemical behaviour of the alkylsulfanylphenyl nucleosides indicated formation of compact layers on the electrode. Modified nucleotides and DNA with incorporated benzyl- or tritylsulfanylphenyl moieties produced signals in [Co(NH(3))(6)](3+) ammonium buffer, attributed to the Brdička catalytic response, depending on the negative potential applied. Repeated constant current chronopotentiometric scans in this medium showed increased Brdička catalytic response, which suggests the deprotection of the alkylsulfanyl derivatives to free thiols under the conditions. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Refinement of DNA structures through near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure analysis: applications on guanine and cytosine nucleobases, nucleosides, and nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Hua, Weijie; Gao, Bin; Li, Shuhua; Agren, Hans; Luo, Yi

    2010-10-21

    In this work we highlight the potential of NEXAFS—near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure—analysis to perform refinements of hydrogen-bond structure in DNA. For this purpose we have carried out first-principle calculations of the N1s NEXAFS spectra of the guanine and cytosine nucleobases and their tautomers, nucleosides, and nucleotides in the gas phase, as well as for five crystal structures of guanine, cytosine, or guanosine. The spectra all clearly show imine (π1*) and amine (π2*) nitrogen absorption bands with a characteristic energy difference (Δ). Among all of the intramolecule covalent connections, the tautomerism of hydrogens makes the largest influence, around ±0.4−0.5 eV change of Δ, to the spectra due to a switch of single−double bonds. Deoxyribose and ribose sugars can cause at most 0.2 eV narrowing of Δ, while the phosphate groups have nearly negligible effects on the spectra. Two kinds of intermolecule interactions are analyzed, the hydrogen bonds and the stacking effect, by comparing “compressed” and “expanded” models or by comparing models including or excluding the nearest stacking molecules. The shortening of hydrogen-bond length by 0.2−0.3 Å can result in the reduction of Δ by 0.2−0.8 eV. This is because the hydrogen bonds make the electrons more delocalized, and the amine and imine nitrogens become less distinguishable. Moreover, the hydrogen bond has a different ability to influence the spectra of different crystals, with guanine crystals as the largest (change by 0.8 eV) and the guanosine crystal as the smallest (change by 0.2 eV). The stacking has negligible effects on the spectra in all studied systems. A comparison of guanosine to guanine crystals shows that the sugars in the crystal could create “blocks” in the π-and hydrogen bonds network of bases and thus makes the imine and amine nitrogens more distinguishable with a larger Δ. Our theoretical calculations offer a good match with experimental findings

  5. Specific and nonspecific metal ion-nucleotide interactions at aqueous/solid interfaces functionalized with adenine, thymine, guanine, and cytosine oligomers.

    PubMed

    Holland, Joseph G; Malin, Jessica N; Jordan, David S; Morales, Esmeralda; Geiger, Franz M

    2011-03-02

    This article reports nonlinear optical measurements that quantify, for the first time directly and without labels, how many Mg(2+) cations are bound to DNA 21-mers covalently linked to fused silica/water interfaces maintained at pH 7 and 10 mM NaCl, and what the thermodynamics are of these interactions. The overall interaction of Mg(2+) with adenine, thymine, guanine, and cytosine is found to involve -10.0 ± 0.3, -11.2 ± 0.3, -14.0 ± 0.4, and -14.9 ± 0.4 kJ/mol, and nonspecific interactions with the phosphate and sugar backbone are found to contribute -21.0 ± 0.6 kJ/mol for each Mg(2+) ion bound. The specific and nonspecific contributions to the interaction energy of Mg(2+) with oligonucleotide single strands is found to be additive, which suggests that within the uncertainty of these surface-specific experiments, the Mg(2+) ions are evenly distributed over the oligomers and not isolated to the most strongly binding nucleobase. The nucleobases adenine and thymine are found to bind only three Mg(2+) ions per 21-mer oligonucleotide, while the bases cytosine and guanine are found to bind eleven Mg(2+) ions per 21-mer oligonucleotide.

  6. REMPI spectroscopy of cytosine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nir, E.; Müller, M.; Grace, L. I.; de Vries, M. S.

    2002-03-01

    We report resonant two-photon ionization spectra of laser desorbed, jet cooled, cytosine, 1-methyl cytosine, 5-methyl cytosine, and dimers of these. Unlike other pyrimidine bases, cytosine exhibits vibronic spectra with sharp features in two spectral regions, separated by about 5000 cm-1. We interpret these as being due to two tautomeric forms, one keto and one enol. The dimers absorb at wavelengths that are intermediate between those of the two monomer forms. By UV-UV hole burning we determined the numbers of isomers contributing to each spectrum and by delayed two color ionization we determined triplet lifetimes. We observed hydrogen transfer between bases both in collisions between monomers and after photo-excitation in clusters.

  7. The Cytosine Water Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, A. M.; Mata, S.; Bermudez, C.; Berdakin, M.; Pena, I.; Cabezas, C.; Alonso, J. L.

    2013-06-01

    A multi FID system has been adapted into the operation sequence of the LA-MB-FTMW spectrometer. Thanks to the reached sensitivity, one monohydrate of cytosine (A= 3725.61 (26) MHz, B=980.385 (76) MHz, C=777.231 (46) MHz) has been detected in the supersonic expansion. J. --U. Grabow, W. Stahl, H. Dreizler, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 1996, 67, 4072 -- 4084. J. L. Alonso, C. Pérez, M. E. Sanz, J. C. López, S. Blanco, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2009, 11, 617 -- 627.

  8. APOBEC3G cytosine deamination hotspots are defined by both sequence context and single-stranded DNA secondary structure.

    PubMed

    Holtz, Colleen M; Sadler, Holly A; Mansky, Louis M

    2013-07-01

    Apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing, enzyme-catalytic, polypeptide-like 3G (i.e., APOBEC3G or A3G) is an evolutionarily conserved cytosine deaminase that potently restricts human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), retrotransposons and other viruses. A3G has a nucleotide target site specificity for cytosine dinucleotides, though only certain cytosine dinucleotides are 'hotspots' for cytosine deamination, and others experience little or no editing by A3G. The factors that define these critical A3G hotspots are not fully understood. To investigate how A3G hotspots are defined, we used an in vitro fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based oligonucleotide assay to probe the site specificity of A3G. Our findings strongly suggest that the target single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) secondary structure as well as the bases directly 3' and 5' of the cytosine dinucleotide are critically important A3G recognition. For instance, A3G cannot readily deaminate a cytosine dinucleotide in ssDNA stem structures or in nucleotide base loops composed of three bases. Single-stranded nucleotide loops up to seven bases in length were poor targets for A3G activity unless cytosine residues flanked the cytosine dinucleotide. Furthermore, we observed that A3G favors adenines, cytosines and thymines flanking the cytosine dinucleotide target in unstructured regions of ssDNA. Low cytosine deaminase activity was detected when guanines flanked the cytosine dinucleotide. Taken together, our findings provide the first demonstration that A3G cytosine deamination hotspots are defined by both the sequence context of the cytosine dinucleotide target as well as the ssDNA secondary structure. This knowledge can be used to better trace the origins of mutations to A3G activity, and illuminate its impact on processes such as HIV-1 genetic variation.

  9. Cytosine modifications in myeloid malignancies.

    PubMed

    Meldi, Kristen M; Figueroa, Maria E

    2015-08-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation is a hallmark of many cancers, including the myeloid malignancies acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). The discovery of TET-mediated demethylation of 5-methylcytosine (5mC) and technological advancements in next-generation sequencing have permitted the examination of other cytosine modifications, namely 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), in these myeloid malignancies on a genome-wide scale. Due to the prominence of mutations in epigenetic modifiers that can influence cytosine modifications in these disorders, including IDH1/2, TET2, and DNMT3A, many recent studies have evaluated the relative levels, distribution, and functional consequences of cytosine modifications in leukemic cells. Furthermore, several therapies are being used to treat AML and MDS that target various proteins within the cytosine modification pathway in an effort to revert the abnormal epigenetic patterns that contribute to the diseases. In this review, we provide an overview of cytosine modifications and selected technologies currently used to distinguish and analyze these epigenetic marks in the genome. Then, we discuss the role of mutant enzymes, including DNMT3A, TET2, IDH1/2, and the transcription factor, WT1, in disrupting normal patterns of 5mC and 5hmC in AML and MDS. Finally, we describe several therapies, both standard, front-line treatments and new drugs in clinical trials, aimed at inhibiting the proteins that ultimately lead to aberrant cytosine modifications in these diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Detection of Cytosine Methylation in Ancient DNA from Five Native American Populations Using Bisulfite Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Rick W. A.; Monroe, Cara; Bolnick, Deborah A.

    2015-01-01

    While cytosine methylation has been widely studied in extant populations, relatively few studies have analyzed methylation in ancient DNA. Most existing studies of epigenetic marks in ancient DNA have inferred patterns of methylation in highly degraded samples using post-mortem damage to cytosines as a proxy for cytosine methylation levels. However, this approach limits the inference of methylation compared with direct bisulfite sequencing, the current gold standard for analyzing cytosine methylation at single nucleotide resolution. In this study, we used direct bisulfite sequencing to assess cytosine methylation in ancient DNA from the skeletal remains of 30 Native Americans ranging in age from approximately 230 to 4500 years before present. Unmethylated cytosines were converted to uracils by treatment with sodium bisulfite, bisulfite products of a CpG-rich retrotransposon were pyrosequenced, and C-to-T ratios were quantified for a single CpG position. We found that cytosine methylation is readily recoverable from most samples, given adequate preservation of endogenous nuclear DNA. In addition, our results indicate that the precision of cytosine methylation estimates is inversely correlated with aDNA preservation, such that samples of low DNA concentration show higher variability in measures of percent methylation than samples of high DNA concentration. In particular, samples in this study with a DNA concentration above 0.015 ng/μL generated the most consistent measures of cytosine methylation. This study presents evidence of cytosine methylation in a large collection of ancient human remains, and indicates that it is possible to analyze epigenetic patterns in ancient populations using direct bisulfite sequencing approaches. PMID:26016479

  11. The CHH motif in sugar beet satellite DNA: a modulator for cytosine methylation.

    PubMed

    Zakrzewski, Falk; Schubert, Veit; Viehoever, Prisca; Minoche, André E; Dohm, Juliane C; Himmelbauer, Heinz; Weisshaar, Bernd; Schmidt, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    Methylation of DNA is important for the epigenetic silencing of repetitive DNA in plant genomes. Knowledge about the cytosine methylation status of satellite DNAs, a major class of repetitive DNA, is scarce. One reason for this is that arrays of tandemly arranged sequences are usually collapsed in next-generation sequencing assemblies. We applied strategies to overcome this limitation and quantified the level of cytosine methylation and its pattern in three satellite families of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) which differ in their abundance, chromosomal localization and monomer size. We visualized methylation levels along pachytene chromosomes with respect to small satellite loci at maximum resolution using chromosome-wide fluorescent in situ hybridization complemented with immunostaining and super-resolution microscopy. Only reduced methylation of many satellite arrays was obtained. To investigate methylation at the nucleotide level we performed bisulfite sequencing of 1569 satellite sequences. We found that the level of methylation of cytosine strongly depends on the sequence context: cytosines in the CHH motif show lower methylation (44-52%), while CG and CHG motifs are more strongly methylated. This affects the overall methylation of satellite sequences because CHH occurs frequently while CG and CHG are rare or even absent in the satellite arrays investigated. Evidently, CHH is the major target for modulation of the cytosine methylation level of adjacent monomers within individual arrays and contributes to their epigenetic function. This strongly indicates that asymmetric cytosine methylation plays a role in the epigenetic modification of satellite repeats in plant genomes.

  12. Electron attachment to the cytosine-centered DNA single strands: does base stacking matter?

    PubMed

    Gu, Jiande; Wang, Jing; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2012-02-02

    Electron attachment to the trimer of nucleotide, dGpdCpdG, has been investigated by a quantum mechanical approach at a reliable level of theory. The study of the electron attached dGpdCpdG species demonstrates that cytosine contained DNA single strands have a strong tendency to capture low-energy electrons and to form electronically stable cytosine-centered radical anions. The comparative study of the model molecules pdCpdG and dGpdCp reveals that base stacking has little contribution to the adiabatic electron affinity (AEA) of cytosine in DNA single strands. Additionally, the base-base stacking does not affect the vertical detachment energy (VDE) of the cytosine-centered radicals. Intrastrand H-bonding is found to be critical in increasing the values of the AEA and VDE. However, base-base stacking is revealed to be important in enlarging the vertical electron affinity (VEA) of cytosine. The electron attachment to the cytosine moiety intensifies the intrastrand H-bonding between the neighboring G and C bases. This process disrupts the base-base stacking interaction in the radical anion of dGpdCpdG.

  13. Functional analysis of BamHI DNA cytosine-N4 methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Lindstrom, William M; Malygin, Ernst G; Ovechkina, Lidiya G; Zinoviev, Victor V; Reich, Norbert O

    2003-01-24

    We show that the kinetic mechanism of the DNA (cytosine-N(4)-)-methyltransferase M.BamHI, which modifies the underlined cytosine (GGATCC), differs from cytosine C(5) methyltransferases, and is similar to that observed with adenine N(6) methyltransferases. This suggests that the obligate order of ternary complex assembly and disassembly depends on the type of methylation reaction. In contrast, the single-turnover rate of catalysis for M.BamHI (0.10s(-1)) is closer to the DNA (cytosine-C(5)-)-methyltransferases (0.14s(-1)) than the DNA (adenine-N(6)-)-methyltransferases (>200s(-1)). The nucleotide flipping transition dominates the single-turnover constant for adenine N(6) methyltransferases, and, since the disruption of the guanine-cytosine base-pair is essential for both types of cytosine DNA methyltransferases, this transition may be a common, rate-limiting step for methylation for these two enzyme subclasses. The similar overall rate of catalysis by M.BamHI and other DNA methyltransferases is consistent with a common rate-limiting catalytic step of product dissociation. Our analyses of M.BamHI provide functional insights into the relationship between the three different classes of DNA methyltransferases that complement both prior structural and evolutionary insights.

  14. Comparative study of spontaneous deamination of adenine and cytosine in unbuffered aqueous solution at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shiliang; Hu, Anguang

    2016-06-01

    Adenine in unbuffered nanopure water at a concentration of 2 mM is completely deaminated (>99%) to hypoxanthine at room temperature in ca. 10 weeks, with an estimated half-life (t1/2) less than 10 days, about six orders of magnitude faster than previously reported. Cytosine is not deaminated under the same condition, even after 3 years. This is in contrast to previous observations that cytosine deaminates 20-40 times faster than adenine free base, in nucleoside, in nucleotide and in single-stranded DNA in buffered neutral aqueous solutions.

  15. Influence of cytosine methylation on ultraviolet-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer formation in genomic DNA.

    PubMed

    Rochette, Patrick J; Lacoste, Sandrine; Therrien, Jean-Philippe; Bastien, Nathalie; Brash, Douglas E; Drouin, Régen

    2009-06-01

    The ultraviolet (UV) component of sunlight is the main cause of skin cancer. More than 50% of all non-melanoma skin cancers and >90% of squamous cell carcinomas in the US carry a sunlight-induced mutation in the p53 tumor suppressor gene. These mutations have a strong tendency to occur at methylated cytosines. Ligation-mediated PCR (LMPCR) was used to compare at nucleotide resolution DNA photoproduct formation at dipyrimidine sites either containing or lacking a methylated cytosine. For this purpose, we exploited the fact that the X chromosome is methylated in females only on the inactive X chromosome, and that the FMR1 (fragile-X mental retardation 1) gene is methylated only in fragile-X syndrome male patients. Purified genomic DNA was irradiated with UVC (254nm), UVB (290-320nm) or monochromatic UVB (302 and 313nm) to determine the effect of different wavelengths on cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) formation along the X-linked PGK1 (phosphoglycerate kinase 1) and FMR1 genes. We show that constitutive methylation of cytosine increases the frequency of UVB-induced CPD formation by 1.7-fold, confirming that methylation per se is influencing the probability of damage formation. This was true for both UVB sources used, either broadband or monochromatic, but not for UVC. Our data prove unequivocally that following UVB exposure methylated cytosines are significantly more susceptible to CPD formation compared with unmethylated cytosines.

  16. Experimental Thermochemistry of Gas Phase Cytosine Tautomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, A. M.; Douberly, G. E.

    2011-06-01

    Enthalpies of interconversion are measured for the three lowest energy tautomers of isolated cytosine. The equilibrium distribution of tautomers near 600 K is frozen upon the capture of the gas phase species by low temperature helium nanodroplets. The temperature dependence of the gas phase cytosine tautomer populations is determined with infrared laser spectroscopy of the helium solvated species. The interconverison enthalpies obtained from the van't Hoff relation are 1.14 ± 0.21 and 1.63 ± 0.12 for the C31 rightleftharpoons C32 and C31 rightleftharpoons C1 equilibria, respectively. C31 and C32 are rotamers of an enol tautomer, and C1 is a keto tautomer. The interconversion enthalpies are compared to recent CCSD(T) thermochemistry calculations of cytosine tautomers.

  17. Nucleotide capacitance calculation for DNA sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Jun-Qiang; Zhang, Xiaoguang

    2008-01-01

    Using a first-principles linear response theory, the capacitance of the DNA nucleotides, adenine, cytosine, guanine and thymine, are calculated. The difference in the capacitance between the nucleotides is studied with respect to conformational distortion. The result suggests that although an alternate current capacitance measurement of a single-stranded DNA chain threaded through a nano-gap electrodes may not sufficient to be used as a stand alone method for rapid DNA sequencing, the capacitance of the nucleotides should be taken into consideration in any GHz-frequency electric measurements and may also serve as an additional criterion for identifying the DNA sequence.

  18. Detection of cytosine and CpG density in proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in promoter sequences of acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Senol; Cilic, Anis; Marjanovic, Damir; Kurtovic-Kozaric, Amina

    2017-03-21

    Aberrant methylation is one of the driving forces of cancer genome development. Although the rate of methylation appears massively variable across the genome, it is mainly observed in histone modification, chromatin organization, DNA accessibility, or promoter sequence. Methylation of promoter sequence occurs mostly to cytosine nucleotides, which can affect transcription factors' binding affinities. In this study, we demonstrated that cytosine repeats (C types density), consisting of CC, CCC, CCCC, CCCCC, CCCCCC, CCCCCCC motifs and CpG islands density in 25 proto-oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes and control genes may play a role in the pathogenesis of acute myeloid leukemia. The promoter sequences were divided into a 100 nucleotide window from -500 to +100 nucleotides and 20 nucleotide window from -100 to +100. Each window is analyzed to find the higher C type and CpG islands density, which may cause the increased methylation in the promoter sequence. Our novel findings show that promoter sequence cytosine repeats and CpG density increase closer to transcription sites, especially just before and after the transcription start site (TSS). The results demonstrate that cytosine density increases while proto-oncogenes and TSG promoter sequences are closer to TSS 50.8% and 41.0% respectively, if (-500 to -200) and (-100 to +100) windows of the nucleotide sequences are compared. This proves that around TSS location has special nucleotide motifs and could be an important implication for our understanding of potential methylating locations in promoters.

  19. Genome-wide variation of cytosine modifications between European and African populations and the implications for complex traits.

    PubMed

    Moen, Erika L; Zhang, Xu; Mu, Wenbo; Delaney, Shannon M; Wing, Claudia; McQuade, Jennifer; Myers, Jamie; Godley, Lucy A; Dolan, M Eileen; Zhang, Wei

    2013-08-01

    Elucidating cytosine modification differences between human populations can enhance our understanding of ethnic specificity in complex traits. In this study, cytosine modification levels in 133 HapMap lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from individuals of European or African ancestry were profiled using the Illumina HumanMethylation450 BeadChip. Approximately 13% of the analyzed CpG sites showed differential modification between the two populations at a false discovery rate of 1%. The CpG sites with greater modification levels in European descent were enriched in the proximal regulatory regions, while those greater in African descent were biased toward gene bodies. More than half of the detected population-specific cytosine modifications could be explained primarily by local genetic variation. In addition, a substantial proportion of local modification quantitative trait loci exhibited population-specific effects, suggesting that genetic epistasis and/or genotype × environment interactions could be common. Distinct correlations were observed between gene expression levels and cytosine modifications in proximal regions and gene bodies, suggesting epigenetic regulation of interindividual expression variation. Furthermore, quantitative trait loci associated with population-specific modifications can be colocalized with expression quantitative trait loci and single nucleotide polymorphisms previously identified for complex traits with known racial disparities. Our findings revealed abundant population-specific cytosine modifications and the underlying genetic basis, as well as the relatively independent contribution of genetic and epigenetic variations to population differences in gene expression.

  20. Genome-Wide Variation of Cytosine Modifications Between European and African Populations and the Implications for Complex Traits

    PubMed Central

    Moen, Erika L.; Zhang, Xu; Mu, Wenbo; Delaney, Shannon M.; Wing, Claudia; McQuade, Jennifer; Myers, Jamie; Godley, Lucy A.

    2013-01-01

    Elucidating cytosine modification differences between human populations can enhance our understanding of ethnic specificity in complex traits. In this study, cytosine modification levels in 133 HapMap lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from individuals of European or African ancestry were profiled using the Illumina HumanMethylation450 BeadChip. Approximately 13% of the analyzed CpG sites showed differential modification between the two populations at a false discovery rate of 1%. The CpG sites with greater modification levels in European descent were enriched in the proximal regulatory regions, while those greater in African descent were biased toward gene bodies. More than half of the detected population-specific cytosine modifications could be explained primarily by local genetic variation. In addition, a substantial proportion of local modification quantitative trait loci exhibited population-specific effects, suggesting that genetic epistasis and/or genotype × environment interactions could be common. Distinct correlations were observed between gene expression levels and cytosine modifications in proximal regions and gene bodies, suggesting epigenetic regulation of interindividual expression variation. Furthermore, quantitative trait loci associated with population-specific modifications can be colocalized with expression quantitative trait loci and single nucleotide polymorphisms previously identified for complex traits with known racial disparities. Our findings revealed abundant population-specific cytosine modifications and the underlying genetic basis, as well as the relatively independent contribution of genetic and epigenetic variations to population differences in gene expression. PMID:23792949

  1. Cytosine modifications in neurodevelopment and diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Bing; Jin, Peng

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation has been studied comprehensively and linked to both normal neurodevelopment and neurological diseases. The recent identification of several new DNA modifications, including 5-hydroxylmethylcytosine (5hmC), 5-formylcytosine (5fC), and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC), has given us a new perspective on the previously observed plasticity in 5mC-dependent regulatory processes. Here we review the latest research into these cytosine modifications, focusing mainly on their roles in neurodevelopment and diseases. PMID:23912899

  2. Arabidopsis MET1 cytosine methyltransferase mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Kankel, Mark W; Ramsey, Douglas E; Stokes, Trevor L; Flowers, Susan K; Haag, Jeremy R; Jeddeloh, Jeffrey A; Riddle, Nicole C; Verbsky, Michelle L; Richards, Eric J

    2003-01-01

    We describe the isolation and characterization of two missense mutations in the cytosine-DNA-methyltransferase gene, MET1, from the flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Both missense mutations, which affect the catalytic domain of the protein, led to a global reduction of cytosine methylation throughout the genome. Surprisingly, the met1-2 allele, with the weaker DNA hypomethylation phenotype, alters a well-conserved residue in methyltransferase signature motif I. The stronger met1-1 allele caused late flowering and a heterochronic delay in the juvenile-to-adult rosette leaf transition. The distribution of late-flowering phenotypes in a mapping population segregating met1-1 indicates that the flowering-time phenotype is caused by the accumulation of inherited defects at loci unlinked to the met1 mutation. The delay in flowering time is due in part to the formation and inheritance of hypomethylated fwa epialleles, but inherited defects at other loci are likely to contribute as well. Centromeric repeat arrays hypomethylated in met1-1 mutants are partially remethylated when introduced into a wild-type background, in contrast to genomic sequences hypomethylated in ddm1 mutants. ddm1 met1 double mutants were constructed to further our understanding of the mechanism of DDM1 action and the interaction between two major genetic loci affecting global cytosine methylation levels in Arabidopsis. PMID:12663548

  3. Nucleosides and nucleotides. 158. 1-(3-C-ethynyl-beta-D-ribo-pentofuranosyl)-cytosine, 1-(3-C-ethynyl-beta-D-ribo-pentofuranosyl)uracil, and their nucleobase analogues as new potential multifunctional antitumor nucleosides with a broad spectrum of activity.

    PubMed

    Hattori, H; Tanaka, M; Fukushima, M; Sasaki, T; Matsuda, A

    1996-12-06

    We previously designed 1-(3-C-ethynyl-beta-D-ribo-pentofuranosyl)uracil (EUrd) as a potential multifunctional antitumor nucleoside antimetabolite. It showed a potent and broad spectrum of antitumor activity against various human tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. To determine the structure-activity relationship, various nucleobase analogues of EUrd, such as 5-fluorouracil, thymine, cytosine, 5-fluorocytosine, adenine, and guanine derivatives, were synthesized by condensation of 1-O-acetyl-2,3,5-tri-O-benzoyl-3-C-ethynyl-alpha,beta-D-ribo-pentofur anose (6) and the corresponding pertrimethylsilylated nucleobases in the presence of SnCl4 or TMSOTf as a Lewis acid in CH3CN followed by debenzoylation. The in vitro tumor cell growth inhibitory activity of these 3'-C-ethynyl nucleosides against mouse leukemia L1210 and human nasopharyngeal KB cells showed that 1-(3-C-ethynyl-beta-D-ribo-pentofuranosyl)cytosine (ECyd) and EUrd were the most potent inhibitors in the series, with IC50 values for L1210 cells of 0.016 and 0.13 microM and for KB cells of 0.028 and 0.029 microM, respectively. 5-Fluorocytosine, 5-fluorouracil, and adenine nucleosides showed much lower activity, with IC50 values of 0.4-2.5 microM, while thymine and guanine nucleosides did not exhibit any activity up to 300 microM. We next evaluated the tumor cell growth inhibitory activity of ECyd and EUrd against 36 human tumor cell lines in vitro and found that they were highly effective against these cell lines with IC50 values in the nanomolar to micromolar range. These nucleosides have a similar inhibitory spectrum. The in vivo antitumor activities of ECyd and EUrd were compared to that of 5-fluorouracil against 11 human tumor xenografts including three stomach, three colon, two pancreas, one renal, one breast, and one bile duct cancers. ECyd and EUrd showed a potent tumor inhibition ratio (73-92% inhibition relative to the control) in 9 of 11 and 8 of 11 human tumors, respectively, when administered

  4. Linking the genetic architecture of cytosine modifications with human complex traits

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xu; Moen, Erika L.; Liu, Cong; Mu, Wenbo; Gamazon, Eric R.; Delaney, Shannon M.; Wing, Claudia; Godley, Lucy A.; Dolan, M. Eileen; Zhang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Interindividual variation in cytosine modifications could contribute to heterogeneity in disease risks and other complex traits. We assessed the genetic architecture of cytosine modifications at 283 540 CpG sites in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) derived from independent samples of European and African descent. Our study suggests that cytosine modification variation was primarily controlled in local by single major modification quantitative trait locus (mQTL) and additional minor loci. Local genetic epistasis was detectable for a small proportion of CpG sites, which were enriched by more than 9-fold for CpG sites mapped to population-specific mQTL. Genetically dependent CpG sites whose modification levels negatively (repressive sites) or positively (facilitative sites) correlated with gene expression levels significantly co-localized with transcription factor binding, with the repressive sites predominantly associated with active promoters whereas the facilitative sites rarely at active promoters. Genetically independent repressive or facilitative sites preferentially modulated gene expression variation by influencing local chromatin accessibility, with the facilitative sites primarily antagonizing H3K27me3 and H3K9me3 deposition. In comparison with expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL), mQTL detected from LCLs were enriched in associations for a broader range of disease categories including chronic inflammatory, autoimmune and psychiatric disorders, suggesting that cytosine modification variation, while possesses a degree of cell linage specificity, is more stably inherited over development than gene expression variation. About 11% of unique single-nucleotide polymorphisms reported in the Genome-Wide Association Study Catalog were annotated, 78% as mQTL and 31% as eQTL in LCLs, which covered 37% of the investigated diseases/traits and provided insights to the biological mechanisms. PMID:24943591

  5. Information Thermodynamics of Cytosine DNA Methylation.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Robersy; Mackenzie, Sally A

    2016-01-01

    Cytosine DNA methylation (CDM) is a stable epigenetic modification to the genome and a widespread regulatory process in living organisms that involves multicomponent molecular machines. Genome-wide cytosine methylation patterning participates in the epigenetic reprogramming of a cell, suggesting that the biological information contained within methylation positions may be amenable to decoding. Adaptation to a new cellular or organismal environment also implies the potential for genome-wide redistribution of CDM changes that will ensure the stability of DNA molecules. This raises the question of whether or not we would be able to sort out the regulatory methylation signals from the CDM background ("noise") induced by thermal fluctuations. Here, we propose a novel statistical and information thermodynamic description of the CDM changes to address the last question. The physical basis of our statistical mechanical model was evaluated in two respects: 1) the adherence to Landauer's principle, according to which molecular machines must dissipate a minimum energy ε = kBT ln2 at each logic operation, where kB is the Boltzmann constant, and T is the absolute temperature and 2) whether or not the binary stretch of methylation marks on the DNA molecule comprise a language of sorts, properly constrained by thermodynamic principles. The study was performed for genome-wide methylation data from 152 ecotypes and 40 trans-generational variations of Arabidopsis thaliana and 93 human tissues. The DNA persistence length, a basic mechanical property altered by CDM, was estimated with values from 39 to 66.9 nm. Classical methylome analysis can be retrieved by applying information thermodynamic modelling, which is able to discriminate signal from noise. Our finding suggests that the CDM signal comprises a language scheme properly constrained by molecular thermodynamic principles, which is part of an epigenomic communication system that obeys the same thermodynamic rules as do current

  6. Information Thermodynamics of Cytosine DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Robersy; Mackenzie, Sally A.

    2016-01-01

    Cytosine DNA methylation (CDM) is a stable epigenetic modification to the genome and a widespread regulatory process in living organisms that involves multicomponent molecular machines. Genome-wide cytosine methylation patterning participates in the epigenetic reprogramming of a cell, suggesting that the biological information contained within methylation positions may be amenable to decoding. Adaptation to a new cellular or organismal environment also implies the potential for genome-wide redistribution of CDM changes that will ensure the stability of DNA molecules. This raises the question of whether or not we would be able to sort out the regulatory methylation signals from the CDM background (“noise”) induced by thermal fluctuations. Here, we propose a novel statistical and information thermodynamic description of the CDM changes to address the last question. The physical basis of our statistical mechanical model was evaluated in two respects: 1) the adherence to Landauer’s principle, according to which molecular machines must dissipate a minimum energy ε = kBT ln2 at each logic operation, where kB is the Boltzmann constant, and T is the absolute temperature and 2) whether or not the binary stretch of methylation marks on the DNA molecule comprise a language of sorts, properly constrained by thermodynamic principles. The study was performed for genome-wide methylation data from 152 ecotypes and 40 trans-generational variations of Arabidopsis thaliana and 93 human tissues. The DNA persistence length, a basic mechanical property altered by CDM, was estimated with values from 39 to 66.9 nm. Classical methylome analysis can be retrieved by applying information thermodynamic modelling, which is able to discriminate signal from noise. Our finding suggests that the CDM signal comprises a language scheme properly constrained by molecular thermodynamic principles, which is part of an epigenomic communication system that obeys the same thermodynamic rules as do

  7. Deciphering Epigenetic Cytosine Modifications by Direct Molecular Recognition.

    PubMed

    Kubik, Grzegorz; Summerer, Daniel

    2015-07-17

    Epigenetic modification at the 5-position of cytosine is a key regulatory element of mammalian gene expression with important roles in genome stability, development, and disease. The repertoire of cytosine modifications has long been confined to only 5-methylcytosine (mC) but has recently been expanded by the discovery of 5-hydroxymethyl-, 5-formyl-, and 5-carboxylcytosine. These are key intermediates of active mC demethylation but may additionally represent new epigenetic marks with distinct biological roles. This leap in chemical complexity of epigenetic cytosine modifications has not only created a pressing need for analytical approaches that enable unraveling of their functions, it has also created new challenges for such analyses with respect to sensitivity and selectivity. The crucial step of any such approach that defines its analytic potential is the strategy used for the actual differentiation of the cytosine 5-modifications from one another, and this selectivity can in principle be provided either by chemoselective conversions or by selective, molecular recognition events. While the former strategy has been particularly successful for accurate genomic profiling of cytosine modifications in vitro, the latter strategy provides interesting perspectives for simplified profiling of natural, untreated DNA, as well as for emerging applications such as single cell analysis and the monitoring of cytosine modification in vivo. We here review analytical techniques for the deciphering of epigenetic cytosine modifications with an emphasis on approaches that are based on the direct molecular recognition of these modifications in DNA.

  8. Nucleotide Selectivity in Abiotic RNA Polymerization Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coari, Kristin M.; Martin, Rebecca C.; Jain, Kopal; McGown, Linda B.

    2017-02-01

    In order to establish an RNA world on early Earth, the nucleotides must form polymers through chemical rather than biochemical reactions. The polymerization products must be long enough to perform catalytic functions, including self-replication, and to preserve genetic information. These functions depend not only on the length of the polymers, but also on their sequences. To date, studies of abiotic RNA polymerization generally have focused on routes to polymerization of a single nucleotide and lengths of the homopolymer products. Less work has been done the selectivity of the reaction toward incorporation of some nucleotides over others in nucleotide mixtures. Such information is an essential step toward understanding the chemical evolution of RNA. To address this question, in the present work RNA polymerization reactions were performed in the presence of montmorillonite clay catalyst. The nucleotides included the monophosphates of adenosine, cytosine, guanosine, uridine and inosine. Experiments included reactions of mixtures of an imidazole-activated nucleotide (ImpX) with one or more unactivated nucleotides (XMP), of two or more ImpX, and of XMP that were activated in situ in the polymerization reaction itself. The reaction products were analyzed using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to identify the lengths and nucleotide compositions of the polymerization products. The results show that the extent of polymerization, the degree of heteropolymerization vs. homopolymerization, and the composition of the polymeric products all vary among the different nucleotides and depend upon which nucleotides and how many different nucleotides are present in the mixture.

  9. Nucleotide Selectivity in Abiotic RNA Polymerization Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coari, Kristin M.; Martin, Rebecca C.; Jain, Kopal; McGown, Linda B.

    2017-09-01

    In order to establish an RNA world on early Earth, the nucleotides must form polymers through chemical rather than biochemical reactions. The polymerization products must be long enough to perform catalytic functions, including self-replication, and to preserve genetic information. These functions depend not only on the length of the polymers, but also on their sequences. To date, studies of abiotic RNA polymerization generally have focused on routes to polymerization of a single nucleotide and lengths of the homopolymer products. Less work has been done the selectivity of the reaction toward incorporation of some nucleotides over others in nucleotide mixtures. Such information is an essential step toward understanding the chemical evolution of RNA. To address this question, in the present work RNA polymerization reactions were performed in the presence of montmorillonite clay catalyst. The nucleotides included the monophosphates of adenosine, cytosine, guanosine, uridine and inosine. Experiments included reactions of mixtures of an imidazole-activated nucleotide (ImpX) with one or more unactivated nucleotides (XMP), of two or more ImpX, and of XMP that were activated in situ in the polymerization reaction itself. The reaction products were analyzed using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to identify the lengths and nucleotide compositions of the polymerization products. The results show that the extent of polymerization, the degree of heteropolymerization vs. homopolymerization, and the composition of the polymeric products all vary among the different nucleotides and depend upon which nucleotides and how many different nucleotides are present in the mixture.

  10. Nucleotide Selectivity in Abiotic RNA Polymerization Reactions.

    PubMed

    Coari, Kristin M; Martin, Rebecca C; Jain, Kopal; McGown, Linda B

    2017-02-03

    In order to establish an RNA world on early Earth, the nucleotides must form polymers through chemical rather than biochemical reactions. The polymerization products must be long enough to perform catalytic functions, including self-replication, and to preserve genetic information. These functions depend not only on the length of the polymers, but also on their sequences. To date, studies of abiotic RNA polymerization generally have focused on routes to polymerization of a single nucleotide and lengths of the homopolymer products. Less work has been done the selectivity of the reaction toward incorporation of some nucleotides over others in nucleotide mixtures. Such information is an essential step toward understanding the chemical evolution of RNA. To address this question, in the present work RNA polymerization reactions were performed in the presence of montmorillonite clay catalyst. The nucleotides included the monophosphates of adenosine, cytosine, guanosine, uridine and inosine. Experiments included reactions of mixtures of an imidazole-activated nucleotide (ImpX) with one or more unactivated nucleotides (XMP), of two or more ImpX, and of XMP that were activated in situ in the polymerization reaction itself. The reaction products were analyzed using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to identify the lengths and nucleotide compositions of the polymerization products. The results show that the extent of polymerization, the degree of heteropolymerization vs. homopolymerization, and the composition of the polymeric products all vary among the different nucleotides and depend upon which nucleotides and how many different nucleotides are present in the mixture.

  11. Spatial and Functional Relationships Among Pol V-Associated loci, Pol IV-Dependent siRNAs, and Cytosine Methylation in the Arabidopsis Epigenome

    SciTech Connect

    Wierzbicki, A. T.; Cocklin, Ross; Mayampurath, Anoop; Lister, Ryan; Rowley, M. J.; Gregory, Brian D.; Ecker, Joseph R.; Tang, Haixu; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2012-08-15

    Multisubunit RNA polymerases IV and V (Pols IV and V) mediate RNA-directed DNA methylation and transcriptional silencing of retrotransposons and heterochromatic repeats in plants. We identified genomic sites of Pol V occupancy in parallel with siRNA deep sequencing and methylcytosine mapping, comparing wild-type plants with mutants defective for Pol IV, Pol V, or both Pols IV and V. Approximately 60% of Pol V-associated regions encompass regions of 24-nucleotide (nt) siRNA complementarity and cytosine methylation, consistent with cytosine methylation being guided by base-pairing of Pol IV-dependent siRNAs with Pol V transcripts. However, 27% of Pol V peaks do not overlap sites of 24-nt siRNA biogenesis or cytosine methylation, indicating that Pol V alone does not specify sites of cytosine methylation. Surprisingly, the number of methylated CHH motifs, a hallmark of RNA-directed de novo methylation, is similar in wild-type plants and Pol IV or Pol V mutants. In the mutants, methylation is lost at 50%-60% of the CHH sites that are methylated in the wild type but is gained at new CHH positions, primarily in pericentromeric regions. These results indicate that Pol IV and Pol V are not required for cytosine methyltransferase activity but shape the epigenome by guiding CHH methylation to specific genomic sites.

  12. Human repair endonuclease incises DNA at cytosine photoproducts

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, P.E.; Weiss, R.B.; Brent, T.P.; Duker, N.J.

    1987-05-01

    The nature of DNA damage by uvB and uvC irradiation was investigated using a defined sequence of human DNA. A UV-irradiated, 3'-end-labeled, 92 base pair sequence from the human alphoid segment was incubated with a purified human lymphoblast endonuclease that incises DNA at non-dimer photoproducts. Analysis by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis identified all sites of endonucleolytic incision as cytosines. These were found in regions of the DNA sequence lacking adjacent pyrimidines and therefore are neither cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers nor 6-4'-pyrimidines. Incision at cytosine photoproducts was not detected at loci corresponding to alkali-labile sites in either control or irradiated substrates. This demonstrates that the bands detected after the enzymic reactions were not the result of DNA strand breaks, base loss sites or ring-opened cytosines. The optimal wavelengths for formation of cytosine photoproducts are 270-295 nm, similar to those associated with maximal tumor yields in animal ultraviolet carcinogenesis studies. Irradiation by monochromatic 254 nm light resulted in reduced cytosine photoproduct formation. This human UV endonuclease has an apparently identical substrate specificity to E. coli endonuclease III. Both the human and bacterial enzymes incise cytosine moieties in UV irradiated DNA and modified thymines in oxidized DNA.

  13. Profiling cytosine oxidation in DNA by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Samson-Thibault, Francois; Madugundu, Guru S; Gao, Shanshan; Cadet, Jean; Wagner, J Richard

    2012-09-17

    Spontaneous and oxidant-induced damage to cytosine is probably the main cause of CG to TA transition mutations in mammalian genomes. The reaction of hydroxyl radical (·OH) and one-electron oxidants with cytosine derivatives produces numerous oxidation products, which have been identified in large part by model studies with monomers and short oligonucleotides. Here, we developed an analytical method based on LC-MS/MS to detect 10 oxidized bases in DNA, including 5 oxidation products of cytosine. The utility of this method is demonstrated by the measurement of base damage in isolated calf thymus DNA exposed to ionizing radiation in aerated aqueous solutions (0-200 Gy) and to well-known Fenton-like reactions (Fe(2+) or Cu(+) with H(2)O(2) and ascorbate). The following cytosine modifications were quantified as modified 2'-deoxyribonucleosides upon exposure of DNA to ionizing radiation in aqueous aerated solution: 5-hydroxyhydantoin (Hyd-Ura) > 5-hydroxyuracil (5-OHUra) > 5-hydroxycytosine (5-OHCyt) > 5,6-dihydroxy-5,6-dihydrouracil (Ura-Gly) > 1-carbamoyl-4,5-dihydroxy-2-oxoimidazolidine (Imid-Cyt). The total yield of cytosine oxidation products was comparable to that of thymine oxidation products (5,6-dihydroxy-5,6-dihydrothymine (Thy-Gly), 5-hydroxy-5-methylhydantotin (Hyd-Thy), 5-(hydroxymethyl)uracil (5-HmUra), and 5-formyluracil (5-ForUra)) as well as the yield of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoGua). The major oxidation product of cytosine in DNA was Hyd-Ura. In contrast, the formation of Imid-Cyt was a minor pathway of DNA damage, although it is the major product arising from irradiation of the monomers, cytosine, and 2'-deoxycytidine. The reaction of Fenton-like reagents with DNA gave a different distribution of cytosine derived products compared to ionizing radiation, which likely reflects the reaction of metal ions with intermediate peroxyl radicals or hydroperoxides. The analysis of the main cytosine oxidation products will help elucidate the complex

  14. Genetic code correlations - Amino acids and their anticodon nucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, A. L.; Lacey, J. C., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The data here show direct correlations between both the hydrophobicity and the hydrophilicity of the homocodonic amino acids and their anticodon nucleotides. While the differences between properties of uracil and cytosine derivatives are small, further data show that uracil has an affinity for charged species. Although these data suggest that molecular relationships between amino acids and anticodons were responsible for the origin of the code, it is not clear what the mechanism of the origin might have been.

  15. Genetic code correlations - Amino acids and their anticodon nucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, A. L.; Lacey, J. C., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The data here show direct correlations between both the hydrophobicity and the hydrophilicity of the homocodonic amino acids and their anticodon nucleotides. While the differences between properties of uracil and cytosine derivatives are small, further data show that uracil has an affinity for charged species. Although these data suggest that molecular relationships between amino acids and anticodons were responsible for the origin of the code, it is not clear what the mechanism of the origin might have been.

  16. N-Sulfomethylation of guanine, adenine and cytosine with formaldehyde-bisulfite. A selective modification of guanine in DNA.

    PubMed

    Hayatsu, H; Yamashita, Y; Yui, S; Yamagata, Y; Tomita, K; Negishi, K

    1982-10-25

    When guanine-, adenine- and cytosine-nucleosides and nucleotides were treated with formaldehyde and then with bisulfite, stable N-sulfomethyl compounds were formed. N2-Sulfomethylguanine, N6-sulfomethyladenine, N4-sulfomthylcytosine and N6-sulfomethyl-9-beta-D-arabinofuranosyladenine were isolated as crystals and characterized. A guanine-specific sulfomethylation was brought about by treatment and denatured single-stranded DNA with formaldehyde and then with bisulfite at pH 7 and 4 degrees C. Since native double-stranded DNA was not modified by this treatment, this new method of modification is expected to be useful as a conformational probe for polynucleotides.

  17. N-Sulfomethylation of guanine, adenine and cytosine with formaldehyde-bisulfite. A selective modification of guanine in DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Hayatsu, H; Yamashita, Y; Yui, S; Yamagata, Y; Tomita, K; Negishi, K

    1982-01-01

    When guanine-, adenine- and cytosine-nucleosides and nucleotides were treated with formaldehyde and then with bisulfite, stable N-sulfomethyl compounds were formed. N2-Sulfomethylguanine, N6-sulfomethyladenine, N4-sulfomthylcytosine and N6-sulfomethyl-9-beta-D-arabinofuranosyladenine were isolated as crystals and characterized. A guanine-specific sulfomethylation was brought about by treatment and denatured single-stranded DNA with formaldehyde and then with bisulfite at pH 7 and 4 degrees C. Since native double-stranded DNA was not modified by this treatment, this new method of modification is expected to be useful as a conformational probe for polynucleotides. PMID:7177848

  18. Cytosine usage modulates the correlation between CDS length and CG content in prokaryotic genomes.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xuhua; Wang, Huaichun; Xie, Zheng; Carullo, Malisa; Huang, Huang; Hickey, Donal

    2006-07-01

    Previous studies have argued that, given the AT-rich nature of stop codons, the length and CG% of coding sequences (CDSs) should be positively correlated. This prediction is generally supported empirically by prokaryotic genomes. However, the correlation is weak for a number of species, with 4 species showing a negative correlation. Here we formulate a more general hypothesis incorporating selection against cytosine (C) usage to explain the lack of strong positive correlation between the length and GC% of CDSs. Two factors contribute to the selection against C usage in long CDSs. First, C is the least abundant nucleotide in the cell, and a long CDS should have fewer Cs to increase transcription efficiency. Second, C is prone to mutation to U/T and selection for increased reliability should reduce C usage in long CDSs. Empirical data from prokaryotic genomes lend strong support for this new hypothesis.

  19. Targeting of the activation-induced cytosine deaminase is strongly influenced by the sequence and structure of the targeted DNA.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hong Ming; Ratnam, Sarayu; Storb, Ursula

    2005-12-01

    Activation-induced deaminase (AID) initiates immunoglobulin somatic hypermutation (SHM). Since in vitro AID was shown to deaminate cytosines on single-stranded DNA or the nontranscribed strand, it remained a puzzle how in vivo AID targets both DNA strands equally. Here we investigate the roles of transcription and DNA sequence in cytosine deamination. Strikingly different results are found with different substrates. Depending on the target sequence, the transcribed DNA strand is targeted as well as or better than the nontranscribed strand. The preferential targeting is not related to the frequency of AID hot spots. Comparison of cytosine deamination by AID and bisulfite shows different targeting patterns suggesting that AID may locally unwind the DNA. We conclude that somatic hypermutation on both DNA strands is the natural outcome of AID action on a transcribed gene; furthermore, the DNA sequence or structure and topology play major roles in targeting AID in vitro and in vivo. On the other hand, the lack of mutations in the first approximately 100 nucleotides and beyond about 1 to 2 kb from the promoter of immunoglobulin genes during SHM must be due to special conditions of transcription and chromatin in vivo.

  20. Synthesis of magnetic cytosine-imprinted chitosan nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Mei-Hwa; Ahluwalia, Arti; Chen, Jian-Zhou; Shih, Neng-Lang; Lin, Hung-Yin

    2017-02-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticles incorporating magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been investigated for their selective adsorption properties. Here we describe the synthesis and characterization of magnetic cytosine-imprinted chitosan nanoparticles (CIPs) for gene delivery. In particular, CIPs carrying the mammalian expression plasmid of enhanced green fluorescent protein were prepared by the co-precipitation of MNPs, chitosan and a template nucleobase (cytosine). The results show that the selective reabsorption of cytosine to magnetic CIPs was at least double that of non-imprinted polymers and other nucleobases (such as adenine and thymine). The gene carrier CIPs were used for the transfection of human embryonic kidney 293 cells showing dramatic increase their efficiency with that of conventional chitosan nanoparticles. Furthermore, the gene carrier magnetic CIPs also exhibit low toxicity compared to that of commercially available cationic lipids.

  1. Synthesis of magnetic cytosine-imprinted chitosan nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mei-Hwa; Ahluwalia, Arti; Chen, Jian-Zhou; Shih, Neng-Lang; Lin, Hung-Yin

    2017-02-24

    Molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticles incorporating magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been investigated for their selective adsorption properties. Here we describe the synthesis and characterization of magnetic cytosine-imprinted chitosan nanoparticles (CIPs) for gene delivery. In particular, CIPs carrying the mammalian expression plasmid of enhanced green fluorescent protein were prepared by the co-precipitation of MNPs, chitosan and a template nucleobase (cytosine). The results show that the selective reabsorption of cytosine to magnetic CIPs was at least double that of non-imprinted polymers and other nucleobases (such as adenine and thymine). The gene carrier CIPs were used for the transfection of human embryonic kidney 293 cells showing dramatic increase their efficiency with that of conventional chitosan nanoparticles. Furthermore, the gene carrier magnetic CIPs also exhibit low toxicity compared to that of commercially available cationic lipids.

  2. Combined QM(DFT)/MM molecular dynamics simulations of the deamination of cytosine by yeast cytosine deaminase (yCD).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Zhao, Yuan; Yan, Honggao; Cao, Zexing; Mo, Yirong

    2016-05-15

    Extensive combined quantum mechanical (B3LYP/6-31G*) and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to elucidate the hydrolytic deamination mechanism of cytosine to uracil catalyzed by the yeast cytosine deaminase (yCD). Though cytosine has no direct binding to the zinc center, it reacts with the water molecule coordinated to zinc, and the adjacent conserved Glu64 serves as a general acid/base to shuttle protons from water to cytosine. The overall reaction consists of several proton-transfer processes and nucleophilic attacks. A tetrahedral intermediate adduct of cytosine and water binding to zinc is identified and similar to the crystal structure of yCD with the inhibitor 2-pyrimidinone. The rate-determining step with the barrier of 18.0 kcal/mol in the whole catalytic cycle occurs in the process of uracil departure where the proton transfer from water to Glu64 and nucleophilic attack of the resulting hydroxide anion to C2 of the uracil ring occurs synchronously. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Assemblies of cytosine within H-bonded network of adipic acid and citric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Babulal; Baruah, Jubaraj B.

    2011-08-01

    Adipic acid binds to cytosine to form H-bonded discrete cytosine-cytosinium assemblies embedded in 1D infinite chain of adipic acid, whereas citric acid stabilizes trimeric cytosine-cytosinium assemblies having length of 19.44 Å stabilized between layered structures of citric acid molecules.

  4. Photophysical properties of pyrrolocytosine, a cytosine fluorescent base analogue†

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Quynh L.; Spata, Vincent A.

    2016-01-01

    The photophysical behavior of pyrrolocytosine (PC), a fluorescent base analogue of cytosine, has been investigated using theoretical approaches. The similarities between the PC and cytosine structures allow PC to maintain the pseudo-Watson–Crick base-pairing arrangement with guanine. Cytosine, similar to the other natural nucleobases, is practically non-fluorescent, because of ultrafast radiationless decay occurring through conical intersections. PC displays a much higher fluorescence quantum yield than cytosine, making it an effective fluorescent marker to study the structure, function, and dynamics of DNA/RNA complexes. Similar to 2-aminopurine, a constitutional isomer of adenine that base-pairs with thymine, PC's fluorescence is quenched when it is incorporated into a dinucleotide or a trinucleotide. In this work we examine the photophysical properties of isolated PC, microhydrated PC, as well as, complexes where PC is either base-stacked or hydrogen-bonded with guanine. Our results indicate that hydration affects the radiationless decay pathways in PC by destabilizing conical intersections. The calculations of dimers and trimers show that the radiative decay is affected by π stacking, while the presence of charge transfer states between PC and guanine may contribute to radiationless decay. PMID:27251599

  5. High-Resolution Analysis of Cytosine Methylation in Ancient DNA

    PubMed Central

    Cropley, Jennifer E.; Cooper, Alan; Suter, Catherine M.

    2012-01-01

    Epigenetic changes to gene expression can result in heritable phenotypic characteristics that are not encoded in the DNA itself, but rather by biochemical modifications to the DNA or associated chromatin proteins. Interposed between genes and environment, these epigenetic modifications can be influenced by environmental factors to affect phenotype for multiple generations. This raises the possibility that epigenetic states provide a substrate for natural selection, with the potential to participate in the rapid adaptation of species to changes in environment. Any direct test of this hypothesis would require the ability to measure epigenetic states over evolutionary timescales. Here we describe the first single-base resolution of cytosine methylation patterns in an ancient mammalian genome, by bisulphite allelic sequencing of loci from late Pleistocene Bison priscus remains. Retrotransposons and the differentially methylated regions of imprinted loci displayed methylation patterns identical to those derived from fresh bovine tissue, indicating that methylation patterns are preserved in the ancient DNA. Our findings establish the biochemical stability of methylated cytosines over extensive time frames, and provide the first direct evidence that cytosine methylation patterns are retained in DNA from ancient specimens. The ability to resolve cytosine methylation in ancient DNA provides a powerful means to study the role of epigenetics in evolution. PMID:22276161

  6. Strand-biased cytosine deamination at the replication fork causes cytosine to thymine mutations in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bhagwat, Ashok S; Hao, Weilong; Townes, Jesse P; Lee, Heewook; Tang, Haixu; Foster, Patricia L

    2016-02-23

    The rate of cytosine deamination is much higher in single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) than in double-stranded DNA, and copying the resulting uracils causes C to T mutations. To study this phenomenon, the catalytic domain of APOBEC3G (A3G-CTD), an ssDNA-specific cytosine deaminase, was expressed in an Escherichia coli strain defective in uracil repair (ung mutant), and the mutations that accumulated over thousands of generations were determined by whole-genome sequencing. C:G to T:A transitions dominated, with significantly more cytosines mutated to thymine in the lagging-strand template (LGST) than in the leading-strand template (LDST). This strand bias was present in both repair-defective and repair-proficient cells and was strongest and highly significant in cells expressing A3G-CTD. These results show that the LGST is accessible to cellular cytosine deaminating agents, explains the well-known GC skew in microbial genomes, and suggests the APOBEC3 family of mutators may target the LGST in the human genome.

  7. Transcription-dependent cytosine deamination: a novel mechanism in ultraviolet light-induced mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hendriks, Giel; Calléja, Fabienne; Besaratinia, Ahmad; Vrieling, Harry; Pfeifer, Gerd P.; Mullenders, Leon H.F.; Jansen, Jacob G.; de Wind, Niels

    2009-01-01

    Summary Skin cancer is the most ubiquitous cancer type in the Caucasian population and its incidence is increasing rapidly [1]. Transcribed, proliferation-related, genes in dermal stem cells are targets for the induction of ultraviolet light (UV)-induced mutations that drive carcinogenesis. We have recently found that gene transcription increases UV-induced mutagenesis in mammalian stem cells, suggesting a role of transcription in skin carcinogenesis [2]. Here we show that transcription-associated, UV-induced, nucleotide substitutions are caused by increased deamination of cytosines to uracil within photolesions at the transcribed strand, presumably at sites of stalled transcription complexes. Additionally, via an independent mechanism, transcription of UV-damaged DNA induces the generation of intragenic deletions. We provide evidence that transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER) provides protection against both classes of transcription-associated mutagenesis. Combined, these results unveil the existence of two mutagenic pathways, operating specifically at the transcribed DNA strand of active genes. Moreover, these results uncover a novel role for TC-NER in the suppression of UV light-induced genome aberrations and provide a rationale for the efficient induction of apoptosis by stalled transcription complexes. PMID:20045328

  8. IRE1α nucleotide sequence cleavage specificity in the unfolded protein response.

    PubMed

    Poothong, Juthakorn; Sopha, Pattarawut; Kaufman, Randal J; Tirasophon, Witoon

    2017-01-01

    Inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1) is a conserved sensor of the unfolded protein response that has protein kinase and endoribonuclease (RNase) enzymatic activities and thereby initiates HAC1/XBP1 splicing. Previous studies demonstrated that human IRE1α (hIRE1α) does not cleave Saccharomyces cerevisiae HAC1 mRNA. Using an in vitro cleavage assay, we show that adenine to cytosine nucleotide substitution at the +1 position in the 3' splice site of HAC1 RNA is required for specific cleavage by hIRE1α. A similar restricted nucleotide specificity in the RNA substrate was observed for XBP1 splicing in vivo. Together these findings underscore the essential role of cytosine nucleotide at +1 in the 3' splice site for determining cleavage specificity of hIRE1α.

  9. Base-pairing energies of protonated nucleobase pairs and proton affinities of 1-methylated cytosines: model systems for the effects of the sugar moiety on the stability of DNA i-motif conformations.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Moehlig, Aaron R; Frieler, C E; Rodgers, M T

    2015-02-05

    Expansion of (CCG)n·(CGG)n trinucleotide repeats leads to hypermethylation of cytosine residues and results in Fragile X syndrome, the most common cause of inherited intellectual disability in humans. The (CCG)n·(CGG)n repeats adopt i-motif conformations that are preferentially stabilized by base-pairing interactions of noncanonical protonated nucleobase pairs of cytosine (C(+)·C). Previously, we investigated the effects of 5-methylation of cytosine on the base-pairing energies (BPEs) using threshold collision-induced dissociation (TCID) techniques. In the present work, we extend our investigations to include protonated homo- and heteronucleobase pairs of cytosine, 1-methylcytosine, 5-methylcytosine, and 1,5-dimethylcytosine. The 1-methyl substituent prevents most tautomerization processes of cytosine and serves as a mimic for the sugar moiety of DNA nucleotides. In contrast to permethylation of cytosine at the 5-position, 1-methylation is found to exert very little influence on the BPE. All modifications to both nucleobases lead to a small increase in the BPEs, with 5-methylation producing a larger enhancement than either 1-methyl or 1,5-dimethylation. In contrast, modifications to a single nucleobase are found to produce a small decrease in the BPEs, again with 5-methylation producing a larger effect than 1-methylation. However, the BPEs of all of the protonated nucleobase pairs examined here significantly exceed those of canonical G·C and neutral C·C base pairs, and thus should still provide the driving force stabilizing DNA i-motif conformations even in the presence of such modifications. The proton affinities of the methylated cytosines are also obtained from the TCID experiments by competitive analyses of the primary dissociation pathways that occur in parallel for the protonated heteronucleobase pairs.

  10. Uncovering the polymerase-induced cytotoxicity of an oxidized nucleotide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freudenthal, Bret D.; Beard, William A.; Perera, Lalith; Shock, David D.; Kim, Taejin; Schlick, Tamar; Wilson, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress promotes genomic instability and human diseases. A common oxidized nucleoside is 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine, which is found both in DNA (8-oxo-G) and as a free nucleotide (8-oxo-dGTP). Nucleotide pools are especially vulnerable to oxidative damage. Therefore cells encode an enzyme (MutT/MTH1) that removes free oxidized nucleotides. This cleansing function is required for cancer cell survival and to modulate Escherichia coli antibiotic sensitivity in a DNA polymerase (pol)-dependent manner. How polymerases discriminate between damaged and non-damaged nucleotides is not well understood. This analysis is essential given the role of oxidized nucleotides in mutagenesis, cancer therapeutics, and bacterial antibiotics. Even with cellular sanitizing activities, nucleotide pools contain enough 8-oxo-dGTP to promote mutagenesis. This arises from the dual coding potential where 8-oxo-dGTP(anti) base pairs with cytosine and 8-oxo-dGTP(syn) uses its Hoogsteen edge to base pair with adenine. Here we use time-lapse crystallography to follow 8-oxo-dGTP insertion opposite adenine or cytosine with human pol β, to reveal that insertion is accommodated in either the syn- or anti-conformation, respectively. For 8-oxo-dGTP(anti) insertion, a novel divalent metal relieves repulsive interactions between the adducted guanine base and the triphosphate of the oxidized nucleotide. With either templating base, hydrogen-bonding interactions between the bases are lost as the enzyme reopens after catalysis, leading to a cytotoxic nicked DNA repair intermediate. Combining structural snapshots with kinetic and computational analysis reveals how 8-oxo-dGTP uses charge modulation during insertion that can lead to a blocked DNA repair intermediate.

  11. Three-Dimensional Structure and Catalytic Mechanism of Cytosine Deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    R Hall; A Fedorov; C Xu; E Fedorov; S Almo; F Raushel

    2011-12-31

    Cytosine deaminase (CDA) from E. coli is a member of the amidohydrolase superfamily. The structure of the zinc-activated enzyme was determined in the presence of phosphonocytosine, a mimic of the tetrahedral reaction intermediate. This compound inhibits the deamination of cytosine with a K{sub i} of 52 nM. The zinc- and iron-containing enzymes were characterized to determine the effect of the divalent cations on activation of the hydrolytic water. Fe-CDA loses activity at low pH with a kinetic pKa of 6.0, and Zn-CDA has a kinetic pKa of 7.3. Mutation of Gln-156 decreased the catalytic activity by more than 5 orders of magnitude, supporting its role in substrate binding. Mutation of Glu-217, Asp-313, and His-246 significantly decreased catalytic activity supporting the role of these three residues in activation of the hydrolytic water molecule and facilitation of proton transfer reactions. A library of potential substrates was used to probe the structural determinants responsible for catalytic activity. CDA was able to catalyze the deamination of isocytosine and the hydrolysis of 3-oxauracil. Large inverse solvent isotope effects were obtained on k{sub cat} and k{sub cat}/K{sub m}, consistent with the formation of a low-barrier hydrogen bond during the conversion of cytosine to uracil. A chemical mechanism for substrate deamination by CDA was proposed.

  12. An efficient prebiotic synthesis of cytosine and uracil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, M. P.; Miller, S. L.

    1995-01-01

    In contrast to the purines, the routes that have been proposed for the prebiotic synthesis of pyrimidines from simple precursors give only low yields. Cytosine can be synthesized from cyanoacetylene and cyanate; the former precursor is produced from a spark discharge in a CH4/N2 mixture and is an abundant interstellar molecule. But this reaction requires relatively high concentrations of cyanate (> 0.1 M), which are unlikely to occur in aqueous media as cyanate is hydrolysed rapidly to CO2 and NH3. An alternative route that has been explored is the reaction of cyanoacetaldehyde (formed by hydrolysis of cyanoacetylene) with urea. But at low concentrations of urea, this reaction produces no detectable quantities of cytosine. Here we show that in concentrated urea solution--such as might have been found in an evaporating lagoon or in pools on drying beaches on the early Earth--cyanoacetaldehyde reacts to form cytosine in yields of 30-50%, from which uracil can be formed by hydrolysis. These reactions provide a plausible route to the pyrimidine bases required in the RNA world.

  13. Fragmentation mechanisms of cytosine, adenine and guanine ionized bases.

    PubMed

    Sadr-Arani, Leila; Mignon, Pierre; Chermette, Henry; Abdoul-Carime, Hassan; Farizon, Bernadette; Farizon, Michel

    2015-05-07

    The different fragmentation channels of cytosine, adenine and guanine have been studied through DFT calculations. The electronic structure of bases, their cations, and the fragments obtained by breaking bonds provides a good understanding of the fragmentation process that can complete the experimental approach. The calculations allow assigning various fragments to the given peaks. The comparison between the energy required for the formation of fragments and the peak intensity in the mass spectrum is used. For cytosine and guanine the elimination of the HNCO molecule is a major route of dissociation, while for adenine multiple loss of HCN or HNC can be followed up to small fragments. For cytosine, this corresponds to the initial bond cleavage of N3-C4/N1-C2, which represents the main dissociation route. For guanine the release of HNCO is obtained through the N1-C2/C5-C6 bond cleavage (reverse order also possible) leading to the largest peak of the spectrum. The corresponding energies of 3.5 and 3.9 eV are typically in the range available in the experiments. The loss of NH3 or HCN is also possible but requires more energy. For adenine, fragmentation consists of multiple loss of the HCN molecule and the main route corresponding to HC8N9 loss is followed by the release of HC2N1.

  14. An efficient prebiotic synthesis of cytosine and uracil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, M. P.; Miller, S. L.

    1995-01-01

    In contrast to the purines, the routes that have been proposed for the prebiotic synthesis of pyrimidines from simple precursors give only low yields. Cytosine can be synthesized from cyanoacetylene and cyanate; the former precursor is produced from a spark discharge in a CH4/N2 mixture and is an abundant interstellar molecule. But this reaction requires relatively high concentrations of cyanate (> 0.1 M), which are unlikely to occur in aqueous media as cyanate is hydrolysed rapidly to CO2 and NH3. An alternative route that has been explored is the reaction of cyanoacetaldehyde (formed by hydrolysis of cyanoacetylene) with urea. But at low concentrations of urea, this reaction produces no detectable quantities of cytosine. Here we show that in concentrated urea solution--such as might have been found in an evaporating lagoon or in pools on drying beaches on the early Earth--cyanoacetaldehyde reacts to form cytosine in yields of 30-50%, from which uracil can be formed by hydrolysis. These reactions provide a plausible route to the pyrimidine bases required in the RNA world.

  15. Cytosine modifications in the honey bee (Apis mellifera) worker genome.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Erik M K; Amdam, Gro V

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic changes enable genomes to respond to changes in the environment, such as altered nutrition, activity, or social setting. Epigenetic modifications, thereby, provide a source of phenotypic plasticity in many species. The honey bee (Apis mellifera) uses nutritionally sensitive epigenetic control mechanisms in the development of the royal caste (queens) and the workers. The workers are functionally sterile females that can take on a range of distinct physiological and/or behavioral phenotypes in response to environmental changes. Honey bees have a wide repertoire of epigenetic mechanisms which, as in mammals, include cytosine methylation, hydroxymethylated cytosines, together with the enzymatic machinery responsible for these cytosine modifications. Current data suggests that honey bees provide an excellent system for studying the "social repertoire" of the epigenome. In this review, we elucidate what is known so far about the honey bee epigenome and its mechanisms. Our discussion includes what may distinguish honey bees from other model animals, how the epigenome can influence worker behavioral task separation, and how future studies can answer central questions about the role of the epigenome in social behavior.

  16. Three-dimensional structure and catalytic mechanism of cytosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Hall, Richard S; Fedorov, Alexander A; Xu, Chengfu; Fedorov, Elena V; Almo, Steven C; Raushel, Frank M

    2011-06-07

    Cytosine deaminase (CDA) from E. coli is a member of the amidohydrolase superfamily. The structure of the zinc-activated enzyme was determined in the presence of phosphonocytosine, a mimic of the tetrahedral reaction intermediate. This compound inhibits the deamination of cytosine with a K(i) of 52 nM. The zinc- and iron-containing enzymes were characterized to determine the effect of the divalent cations on activation of the hydrolytic water. Fe-CDA loses activity at low pH with a kinetic pK(a) of 6.0, and Zn-CDA has a kinetic pK(a) of 7.3. Mutation of Gln-156 decreased the catalytic activity by more than 5 orders of magnitude, supporting its role in substrate binding. Mutation of Glu-217, Asp-313, and His-246 significantly decreased catalytic activity supporting the role of these three residues in activation of the hydrolytic water molecule and facilitation of proton transfer reactions. A library of potential substrates was used to probe the structural determinants responsible for catalytic activity. CDA was able to catalyze the deamination of isocytosine and the hydrolysis of 3-oxauracil. Large inverse solvent isotope effects were obtained on k(cat) and k(cat)/K(m), consistent with the formation of a low-barrier hydrogen bond during the conversion of cytosine to uracil. A chemical mechanism for substrate deamination by CDA was proposed.

  17. Detection of Modified Forms of Cytosine Using Sensitive Immunohistochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Abakir, Abdulkadir; Wheldon, Lee; Johnson, Andrew D.; Laurent, Patrick; Ruzov, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    Methylation of cytosine bases (5-methylcytosine, 5mC) occurring in vertebrate genomes is usually associated with transcriptional silencing. 5-hydroxylmethylcytosine (5hmC), 5-formylcytosine (5fC), and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC) are the recently discovered modified cytosine bases produced by enzymatic oxidation of 5mC, whose biological functions remain relatively obscure. A number of approaches ranging from biochemical to antibody based techniques have been employed to study the genomic distribution and global content of these modifications in various biological systems. Although some of these approaches can be useful for quantitative assessment of these modified forms of 5mC, most of these methods do not provide any spatial information regarding the distribution of these DNA modifications in different cell types, required for correct understanding of their functional roles. Here we present a highly sensitive method for immunochemical detection of the modified forms of cytosine. This method permits co-detection of these epigenetic marks with protein lineage markers and can be employed to study their nuclear localization, thus, contributing to deciphering their potential biological roles in different experimental contexts. PMID:27585398

  18. Effects of cytosine methylation on transcription factor binding sites

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background DNA methylation in promoters is closely linked to downstream gene repression. However, whether DNA methylation is a cause or a consequence of gene repression remains an open question. If it is a cause, then DNA methylation may affect the affinity of transcription factors (TFs) for their binding sites (TFBSs). If it is a consequence, then gene repression caused by chromatin modification may be stabilized by DNA methylation. Until now, these two possibilities have been supported only by non-systematic evidence and they have not been tested on a wide range of TFs. An average promoter methylation is usually used in studies, whereas recent results suggested that methylation of individual cytosines can also be important. Results We found that the methylation profiles of 16.6% of cytosines and the expression profiles of neighboring transcriptional start sites (TSSs) were significantly negatively correlated. We called the CpGs corresponding to such cytosines “traffic lights”. We observed a strong selection against CpG “traffic lights” within TFBSs. The negative selection was stronger for transcriptional repressors as compared with transcriptional activators or multifunctional TFs as well as for core TFBS positions as compared with flanking TFBS positions. Conclusions Our results indicate that direct and selective methylation of certain TFBS that prevents TF binding is restricted to special cases and cannot be considered as a general regulatory mechanism of transcription. PMID:24669864

  19. Updating Our View of Organelle Genome Nucleotide Landscape

    PubMed Central

    Smith, David Roy

    2012-01-01

    Organelle genomes show remarkable variation in architecture and coding content, yet their nucleotide composition is relatively unvarying across the eukaryotic domain, with most having a high adenine and thymine (AT) content. Recent studies, however, have uncovered guanine and cytosine (GC)-rich mitochondrial and plastid genomes. These sequences come from a small but eclectic list of species, including certain green plants and animals. Here, I review GC-rich organelle DNAs and the insights they have provided into the evolution of nucleotide landscape. I emphasize that GC-biased mitochondrial and plastid DNAs are more widespread than once thought, sometimes occurring together in the same species, and suggest that the forces biasing their nucleotide content can differ both among and within lineages, and may be associated with specific genome architectural features and life history traits. PMID:22973299

  20. Computational Modeling Approach in Probing the Effects of Cytosine Methylation on the Transcription Factor Binding to DNA.

    PubMed

    Tenayuca, John; Cousins, Kimberley; Yang, Shumei; Zhang, Lubo

    2017-01-01

    Cytosine methylation at CpG dinucleotides is a chief mechanism in epigenetic modification of gene expression patterns. Previous studies demonstrated that increased CpG methylation of Sp1 sites at -268 and -346 of protein kinase C ε promoter repressed the gene expression. The present study investigated the impact of CpG methylation on the Sp1 binding via molecular modeling and electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Each of the Sp1 sites contain two CpGs. Methylation of either CpG lowered the binding affinity of Sp1, whereas methylation of both CpGs produced a greater decrease in the binding affinity. Computation of van der Waals (VDW) energy of Sp1 in complex with the Sp1 sites demonstrated increased VDW values from one to two sites of CpG methylation. Molecular modeling indicated that single CpG methylation caused underwinding of the DNA fragment, with the phosphate groups at C1, C4 and C5 reoriented from their original positions. Methylation of both CpGs pinched the minor groove and increased the helical twist concomitant with a shallow, hydrophobic major groove. Additionally, double methylation eliminated hydrogen bonds on recognition helix residues located at positions -1 and 1, which were essential for interaction with O6/N7 of G-bases. Bonding from linker residues Arg565, Lys595 and Lys596 were also reduced. Methylation of single or both CpGs significantly affected hydrogen bonding from all three Sp1 DNA binding domains, demonstrating that the consequences of cytosine modification extend beyond the neighboring nucleotides. The results indicate that cytosine methylation causes subtle structural alterations in Sp1 binding sites consequently resulting in inhibition of side chain interactions critical for specific base recognition and reduction of the binding affinity of Sp1. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  1. Induced Pib Expression and Resistance to Magnaporthe grisea are Compromised by Cytosine Demethylation at Critical Promoter Regions in Rice.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; Xia, Qiong; Kou, Hongping; Wang, Dan; Lin, Xiuyun; Wu, Ying; Xu, Chunming; Xing, Shaochen; Liu, Bao

    2011-10-01

    Pib is a well-characterized rice blast-resistance gene belonging to the nucleotide binding site (NBS) and leucine-rich repeat (LRR) superfamily. Expression of Pib was low under non-challenged conditions, but strongly induced by the blast-causing fungal pathogen Magnaporthe grisea, thereby conferring resistance to the pathogen. It is generally established that cytosine methylation of the promoter-region often plays a repressive role in modulating expression of the gene in question. We report here that two critical regions of the Pib promoter were heavily CG cytosine-methylated in both cultivars studied. Surprisingly, induced expression of Pib by M. grisea infection did not entail its promoter demethylation, and partial demethylation by 5-azacytidine-treatment actually reduced Pib expression relative to wild-type plants. Accordingly, the blast disease-resistance was compromised in the 5'-azaC-treated plants relative to wild-type. In contrast, the disease susceptibility was not affected by the 5'-azaC treatment in another two rice cultivars that did not contain the Pib gene, ruling out effects of other R genes and non-specific genotoxic effects by the drug-treatment as a cause for the compromised Pib-conditioned blast-resistance. Taken together, our results suggest that promoter DNA methylation plays a novel enhancing role in conditioning high-level of induced expression of the Pib gene in times of M. grisea infection, and its conferred resistance to the pathogen.

  2. Density Functional Study of the Influence of C5 Cytosine Substitution in Base Pairs with Guanine

    PubMed Central

    Moser, Adam; Guza, Rebecca; Tretyakova, Natalia; York, Darrin M.

    2009-01-01

    The present study employs density-functional electronic structure methods to investigate the effect of chemical modification at the C5 position of cytosine. A series of experimentally motivated chemical modifications are considered, including alkyl, halogen, aromatic, fused ring, and strong σ and π withdrawing functional groups. The effect of these modifications on cytosine geometry, electronic structure, proton affinities, gas phase basicities, cytosine-guanine base-pair hydrogen bond network and corresponding nucleophilicity at guanine are examined. Ultimately, these results play a part in dissecting the effect of endogenous cytosine methylation on the reactivity of neighboring guanine toward carcinogens and DNA alkylating agents. PMID:19890472

  3. The adsorption of nucleotides and polynucleotides on montmorillonite clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferris, James P.; Ertem, Gözen; Agarwal, Vipin K.

    1989-03-01

    The binding of adenine derivatives to Na+-montmorillonite increases in the order 5'-AMP, 3'-AMP, 5'-ADPcytosine, cytosine derivatives bind less strongly than the corresponding adenine derivatives in the order 5'-CMPcytosine. There is little difference in the binding of uracil derivatives and these compounds bind less strongly than the corresponding adenine analogs. It is concluded that the adenine ring in adenine derivatives is protonated by the acidic montmorillonite surface and binding is a consequence of the electrostatic interaction between the protonated base and the negative charges on the surface of the montmorillonite. Different binding trends were observed with Cu2+-montmorillonite with AMP binding more strongly than adenosine and UMP binding more strongly than uridine. It is concluded that ligation to the Cu2+ is a major force in the binding of nucleotides to Cu2+-montmorillonite. RNA homopolymers exhibit strong adsorption to Na+- and Cu2+-montmorillonite and are not readily washed from the clay. Factors contributing to the binding are discussed. Watson-Crick hydrogen bonding of 5'-AMP to poly(U) and 5'-GMP to poly(C) was observed when the homopolymers are bound to the surface of the clay. No association of 5'-UMP to poly(U) bound to clay was detected. The possible role of montmorillonite clays in the prebiotic formation of RNA is discussed.

  4. Low energy electron induced cytosine base release in 2′-deoxycytidine-3′-monophosphate via glycosidic bond cleavage: A time-dependent wavepacket study

    SciTech Connect

    Bhaskaran, Renjith; Sarma, Manabendra

    2014-09-14

    Low energy electron (LEE) induced cytosine base release in a selected pyrimidine nucleotide, viz., 2′-deoxycytidine-3′-monophosphate is investigated using ab initio electronic structure methods and time dependent quantum mechanical calculations. It has been noted that the cytosine base scission is comparatively difficult process than the 3′ C–O bond cleavage from the lowest π{sup *} shape resonance in energy region <1 eV. This is mainly due to the high activation energy barrier associated with the electron transfer from the π{sup *} orbital of the base to the σ{sup *} orbital of the glycosidic N–C bond. In addition, the metastable state formed after impinging LEE (0–1 eV) has very short lifetime (10 fs) which may decay in either of the two competing auto-detachment or dissociation process simultaneously. On the other hand, the selected N–C mode may cleave to form the cytosine base anion at higher energy regions (>2 eV) via tunneling of the glycosidic bond. Resonance states generated within this energy regime will exist for a duration of ∼35–55 fs. Comparison of salient features of the two dissociation events, i.e., 3′ C–O single strand break and glycosidic N–C bond cleavage in 3′-dCMPH molecule are also provided.

  5. Genome-wide nucleosome map and cytosine methylation levels of an ancient human genome.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Jakob Skou; Valen, Eivind; Velazquez, Amhed M Vargas; Parker, Brian J; Rasmussen, Morten; Lindgreen, Stinus; Lilje, Berit; Tobin, Desmond J; Kelly, Theresa K; Vang, Søren; Andersson, Robin; Jones, Peter A; Hoover, Cindi A; Tikhonov, Alexei; Prokhortchouk, Egor; Rubin, Edward M; Sandelin, Albin; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Krogh, Anders; Willerslev, Eske; Orlando, Ludovic

    2014-03-01

    Epigenetic information is available from contemporary organisms, but is difficult to track back in evolutionary time. Here, we show that genome-wide epigenetic information can be gathered directly from next-generation sequence reads of DNA isolated from ancient remains. Using the genome sequence data generated from hair shafts of a 4000-yr-old Paleo-Eskimo belonging to the Saqqaq culture, we generate the first ancient nucleosome map coupled with a genome-wide survey of cytosine methylation levels. The validity of both nucleosome map and methylation levels were confirmed by the recovery of the expected signals at promoter regions, exon/intron boundaries, and CTCF sites. The top-scoring nucleosome calls revealed distinct DNA positioning biases, attesting to nucleotide-level accuracy. The ancient methylation levels exhibited high conservation over time, clustering closely with modern hair tissues. Using ancient methylation information, we estimated the age at death of the Saqqaq individual and illustrate how epigenetic information can be used to infer ancient gene expression. Similar epigenetic signatures were found in other fossil material, such as 110,000- to 130,000-yr-old bones, supporting the contention that ancient epigenomic information can be reconstructed from a deep past. Our findings lay the foundation for extracting epigenomic information from ancient samples, allowing shifts in epialleles to be tracked through evolutionary time, as well as providing an original window into modern epigenomics.

  6. Genome-wide nucleosome map and cytosine methylation levels of an ancient human genome

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Jakob Skou; Valen, Eivind; Velazquez, Amhed M. Vargas; Parker, Brian J.; Rasmussen, Morten; Lindgreen, Stinus; Lilje, Berit; Tobin, Desmond J.; Kelly, Theresa K.; Vang, Søren; Andersson, Robin; Jones, Peter A.; Hoover, Cindi A.; Tikhonov, Alexei; Prokhortchouk, Egor; Rubin, Edward M.; Sandelin, Albin; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.; Krogh, Anders; Willerslev, Eske; Orlando, Ludovic

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic information is available from contemporary organisms, but is difficult to track back in evolutionary time. Here, we show that genome-wide epigenetic information can be gathered directly from next-generation sequence reads of DNA isolated from ancient remains. Using the genome sequence data generated from hair shafts of a 4000-yr-old Paleo-Eskimo belonging to the Saqqaq culture, we generate the first ancient nucleosome map coupled with a genome-wide survey of cytosine methylation levels. The validity of both nucleosome map and methylation levels were confirmed by the recovery of the expected signals at promoter regions, exon/intron boundaries, and CTCF sites. The top-scoring nucleosome calls revealed distinct DNA positioning biases, attesting to nucleotide-level accuracy. The ancient methylation levels exhibited high conservation over time, clustering closely with modern hair tissues. Using ancient methylation information, we estimated the age at death of the Saqqaq individual and illustrate how epigenetic information can be used to infer ancient gene expression. Similar epigenetic signatures were found in other fossil material, such as 110,000- to 130,000-yr-old bones, supporting the contention that ancient epigenomic information can be reconstructed from a deep past. Our findings lay the foundation for extracting epigenomic information from ancient samples, allowing shifts in epialleles to be tracked through evolutionary time, as well as providing an original window into modern epigenomics. PMID:24299735

  7. Communication: UV photoionization of cytosine catalyzed by Ag{sup +}

    SciTech Connect

    Taccone, Martín I.; Berdakin, Matías; Pino, Gustavo A.; Féraud, Geraldine; Dedonder-Lardeux, Claude; Jouvet, Christophe

    2015-07-28

    The photo-induced damages of DNA in interaction with metal cations, which are found in various environments, still remain to be characterized. In this paper, we show how the complexation of a DNA base (cytosine (Cyt)) with a metal cation (Ag{sup +}) changes its electronic properties. By means of UV photofragment spectroscopy of cold ions, it was found that the photoexcitation of the CytAg{sup +} complex at low energy (315-282) nm efficiently leads to ionized cytosine (Cyt{sup +}) as the single product. This occurs through a charge transfer state in which an electron from the p orbital of Cyt is promoted to Ag{sup +}, as confirmed by ab initio calculations at the TD-DFT/B3LYP and RI-ADC(2) theory level using the SV(P) basis set. The low ionization energy of Cyt in the presence of Ag{sup +} could have important implications as point mutation of DNA upon sunlight exposition.

  8. Low temperature FTIR spectroscopy and hydrogen bonding in cytosine polycrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozenberg, M.; Shoham, G.; Reva, I.; Fausto, R.

    2004-01-01

    The FTIR spectra of both the pure NH and isotopically substituted ND (<10% and >90% D) polycrystalline cytosine were recorded in the range 400-4000 cm -1 as a function of temperature (10-300 K). For the first time, uncoupled NH(D) stretching mode bands of amine and imine groups were observed in the spectra of isotopically diluted cytosine at low temperatures. These bands correspond to the three distinct H-bonds that are present in the crystal, in agreement with the available data obtained by structural methods. At least nine bands were observed below 1000 cm -1 and, in consonance with their temperature and isotopic exchange behavior, were assigned to the NH proton out-of-the-plane bending modes. Six of these bands were found to correspond to additional "disordered" H-bonds, which could not be observed by structural methods. Empirical correlations of spectral and thermodynamic parameters enabled to estimate the contribution of the H-bonds to the sublimation enthalpy of the crystal, in agreement with independent experimental data.

  9. Effects of cytosine methylation on DNA charge transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hihath, Joshua; Guo, Shaoyin; Zhang, Peiming; Tao, Nongjian

    2012-04-01

    The methylation of cytosine bases in DNA commonly takes place in the human genome and its abnormality can be used as a biomarker in the diagnosis of genetic diseases. In this paper we explore the effects of cytosine methylation on the conductance of DNA. Although the methyl group is a small chemical modification, and has a van der Waals radius of only 2 Å, its presence significantly changes the duplex stability, and as such may also affect the conductance properties of DNA. To determine if charge transport through the DNA stack is sensitive to this important biological modification we perform multiple conductance measurements on a methylated DNA molecule with an alternating G:C sequence and its non-methylated counterpart. From these studies we find a measurable difference in the conductance between the two types of molecules, and demonstrate that this difference is statistically significant. The conductance values of these molecules are also compared with a similar sequence that has been previously studied to help elucidate the charge transport mechanisms involved in direct DNA conductance measurements.

  10. B3LYP, BLYP and PBE DFT band structures of the nucleotide base stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szekeres, Zs; Bogár, F.; Ladik, J.

    DFT crystal orbital (band structure) calculations have been performed for the nucleotide base stacks of cytosine, thymine, adenine, and guanine arranged in DNA B geometry. The band structures obtained with PBE, BLYP, and B3LYP functionals are presented and compared to other related experimental and theoretical results. The influence of the quality of the basis set on the fundamental gap values was also investigated using Clementi's double ζ, 6-31G and 6-31G* basis sets.

  11. The nature of the circular-dichoric spectra of complexes between ribonuclease A and nucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Dudkin, S M; Karabashyan, L V; Karpeisky, M Y; Mikhailov, S N; Padyukova, N S; Sakharovsky, V G

    1977-01-01

    The circular-dichroism and proton-magnetic-resonance spectra of complexes of ribonuclease A with dihydrouridine 3'-phosphate, 2'- and 3'-CMP, arabinosyl-3'-CMP, 1-(2-hydroxyethyl)cytosine 2'-phosphate and 1-(3-hydroxypropyl)cytosine 3'-phosphate were studied. Comparison of the results shows that non-additivity of the circular-dichroic spectrum of an enzyme-nucleotide complex may be due to: (a), alteration of the circular dichroic spectrum of the nucleotide under the influence of the asymmetric protein matrix (induced dichroism), and (b) a change in the nucleotide conformation. The contribution of each of the two factors was estimated to calculate the circular-dichoroic spectra of 2'-CMP and 3'-CMP in complex with ribonuclease A. 3'-CMP in this complex was characterized by negative circular dichroism in the long-wavelength absorption band of the nucleotide, whereas 2'-CMP was characterized by positive circular dichroism. Since both nucleotides in the complex are known to be in an anti conformation, it follows that even small changes in the conformation considerably modify the circular-dichroic spectrum of the nucleotide in complex with the enzyme. PMID:603635

  12. Base-pairing energies of proton-bound homodimers determined by guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometry: application to cytosine and 5-substituted cytosines.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Wu, R R; Rodgers, M T

    2013-11-19

    Base-pairing interactions in proton-bound dimers of cytosine (C(+)·C) are the major forces responsible for stabilization of DNA i-motif conformations. Permethylation of cytosine in extended (CCG)·(CGG)n trinucleotide repeats has been shown to cause fragile-X syndrome, the most widespread inherited cause of mental retardation in humans. Oligonucleotides containing 5-bromo- or 5-fluorocytosine can bind to proteins that selectively bind methylated DNA, suggesting that halogenated cytosine damage products can potentially mimic methylation signals. However, the influence of methylation or halogenation on the base-pairing energies (BPEs) of proton-bound dimers of cytosine and their impact on the stability of DNA i-motif conformations is presently unknown. To address this, proton-bound homodimers of cytosine and 5-methyl-, 5-fluoro-, 5-bromo-, and 5-iodocytosine are investigated in detail both experimentally and theoretically. The BPEs of proton-bound homodimers of cytosine and the modified cytosines are measured by threshold collision-induced dissociation (TCID) techniques. 5-Methylation of cytosine is found to increase the BPE and would therefore tend to stabilize DNA i-motif conformations. In contrast, 5-halogenation lowers the BPE. However, the BPEs of the proton-bound 5-halocytosine homodimers examined here still significantly exceed that of Watson-Crick G·C base pairs, such that DNA i-motif conformations should be preserved in the presence of these modifications. Excellent agreement between TCID measured and B3LYP calculated BPEs is found, suggesting that B3LYP calculations can be used to provide reliable energetic predictions for related systems.

  13. OmpF, a nucleotide-sensing nanoprobe, computational evaluation of single channel activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdolvahab, R. H.; Mobasheri, H.; Nikouee, A.; Ejtehadi, M. R.

    2016-09-01

    The results of highthroughput practical single channel experiments should be formulated and validated by signal analysis approaches to increase the recognition precision of translocating molecules. For this purpose, the activities of the single nano-pore forming protein, OmpF, in the presence of nucleotides were recorded in real time by the voltage clamp technique and used as a means for nucleotide recognition. The results were analyzed based on the permutation entropy of current Time Series (TS), fractality, autocorrelation, structure function, spectral density, and peak fraction to recognize each nucleotide, based on its signature effect on the conductance, gating frequency and voltage sensitivity of channel at different concentrations and membrane potentials. The amplitude and frequency of ion current fluctuation increased in the presence of Adenine more than Cytosine and Thymine in milli-molar (0.5 mM) concentrations. The variance of the current TS at various applied voltages showed a non-monotonic trend whose initial increasing slope in the presence of Thymine changed to a decreasing one in the second phase and was different from that of Adenine and Cytosine; e.g., by increasing the voltage from 40 to 140 mV in the 0.5 mM concentration of Adenine or Cytosine, the variance decreased by one third while for the case of Thymine it was doubled. Moreover, according to the structure function of TS, the fractality of current TS differed as a function of varying membrane potentials (pd) and nucleotide concentrations. Accordingly, the calculated permutation entropy of the TS, validated the biophysical approach defined for the recognition of different nucleotides at various concentrations, pd's and polarities. Thus, the promising outcomes of the combined experimental and theoretical methodologies presented here can be implemented as a complementary means in pore-based nucleotide recognition approaches.

  14. Nucleotide correlations and electronic transport of DNA sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albuquerque, E. L.; Vasconcelos, M. S.; Lyra, M. L.; de Moura, F. A. B. F.

    2005-02-01

    We use a tight-binding formulation to investigate the transmissivity and wave-packet dynamics of sequences of single-strand DNA molecules made up from the nucleotides guanine G , adenine A , cytosine C , and thymine T . In order to reveal the relevance of the underlying correlations in the nucleotides distribution, we compare the results for the genomic DNA sequence with those of two artificial sequences: (i) the Rudin-Shapiro one, which has long-range correlations; (ii) a random sequence, which is a kind of prototype of a short-range correlated system, presented here with the same first-neighbor pair correlations of the human DNA sequence. We found that the long-range character of the correlations is important to the persistence of resonances of finite segments. On the other hand, the wave-packet dynamics seems to be mostly influenced by the short-range correlations.

  15. Abiogenic synthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides in solid state by vacuum ultraviolet radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simakov, M. B.; Kuzicheva, E. A.; Malko, I. L.

    1997-05-01

    The abiogenic synthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides in solid state has been investigated. Our experiment indicates that natural nucleotides are produced in thin films prepared from nucleoside and inorganic phosphate by irradiating with vacuum ultraviolet light (VUV, lambda=100-200 nm). We have investigated the influence of the type of nucleic acids base (thymidine, cytosine, uracil) and the structure of sugar moiety (ribose or deoxyribose) on the course and yield of reaction. We compared the action of vacuum ultraviolet light with action of gamma-radiation, heat and biology significant UV (254 nm) which have been investigated earlier. The occurence of these reaction in open space is discussed.

  16. Dynamics of UV-excited uracil, thymine, and cytosine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudock, Hanneli

    The excited state dynamics of nucleic acids has been a subject of much experimental and theoretical interest. Nucleic acid bases readily absorb UV radiation, which can lead to mutagenic dimer formation. The dynamics of UV-excited nucleic acids is an important step in understanding how these dimers form. The pyrimidine bases (uracil, thymine, and cytosine) have been studied with ab initio multiple spawning molecular dynamics and high level electronic structure methods. This work has involved both gas-phase and aqueous dynamics as well as simulation of the time-resolved photoelectron spectrum, transient absorption, fluorescence, and reaction rates. With these findings, complete relaxation mechanisms are proposed for the pyrimidines and comparisons are made directly to experimental results.

  17. Photodynamic therapy-driven induction of suicide cytosine deaminase gene.

    PubMed

    Bil, Jacek; Wlodarski, Pawel; Winiarska, Magdalena; Kurzaj, Zuzanna; Issat, Tadeusz; Jozkowicz, Alicja; Wegiel, Barbara; Dulak, Jozef; Golab, Jakub

    2010-04-28

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) of tumors is associated with induction of hypoxia that results in activation of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). Several observations indicate that increased HIFs transcriptional activity in tumor cells is associated with cytoprotective responses that limit cytotoxic effectiveness of PDT. Therefore, we decided to examine whether this cytoprotective mechanism could be intentionally used for designing more efficient tumor cell cytotoxicity. To this end we transfected tumor cells with a plasmid vector carrying a suicide cytosine deaminase gene driven by a promoter containing hypoxia response elements (HRE). The presence of such a genetic molecular beacon rendered tumor cells sensitive to cytotoxic effects of a non-toxic prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC). The results of this study provides a proof of concept that inducible cytoprotective mechanisms can be exploited to render tumor cells more susceptible to cytotoxic effects of prodrugs activated by products of suicide genes.

  18. The Triplex-Hairpin Transition in Cytosine-Rich DNA

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Anton S.; Lamm, Gene; Pack, George R.

    2004-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of the self-complementary single-stranded 30-mer d(TC*TTC*C*TTTTCCTTCTC*CCGAGAAGGTTTT) (PDB ID: 1b4y) that was designed to form an intramolecular triplex by folding back twice on itself. At neutral pH the molecule exists in a duplex hairpin conformation, whereas at acidic pH the cytosines labeled by an asterisk (*) are protonated, forming Hoogsteen hydrogen bonds with guanine of a GC Watson-Crick basepair to generate a triplex. As a first step in an investigation of the energetics of the triplex-hairpin transition, we applied the Bashford-Karplus multiple site model of protonation to calculate the titration curves for the two conformations. Based on these data, a two-state model is used to study the equilibrium properties of transition. Although this model properly describes the thermodynamics of the protonation-deprotonation steps that drive the folding-unfolding of the oligomer, it cannot provide insight into the time-dependent mechanism of the process. A series of molecular dynamics simulations using the ff94 force field of the AMBER 6.0 package was therefore run to explore the dynamics of the folding/unfolding pathway. The molecular dynamics method was combined with Poisson-Boltzmann calculations to determine when a change in protonation state was warranted during a trajectory. This revealed a sequence of elementary protonation steps during the folding/unfolding transition and suggests a strong coupling between ionization and folding in cytosine-rich triple-helical triplexes. PMID:15377537

  19. Watson-Crick and sugar-edge base pairing of cytosine in the gas phase: UV and infrared spectra of cytosine·2-pyridone.

    PubMed

    Frey, Jann A; Ottiger, Philipp; Leutwyler, Samuel

    2014-01-23

    While keto-amino cytosine is the dominant species in aqueous solution, spectroscopic studies in molecular beams and in noble gas matrices show that other cytosine tautomers prevail in apolar environments. Each of these offers two or three H-bonding sites (Watson-Crick, wobble, sugar-edge). The mass- and isomer-specific S1 ← S0 vibronic spectra of cytosine·2-pyridone (Cyt·2PY) and 1-methylcytosine·2PY are measured using UV laser resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI), UV/UV depletion, and IR depletion spectroscopy. The UV spectra of the Watson-Crick and sugar-edge isomers of Cyt·2PY are separated using UV/UV spectral hole-burning. Five different isomers of Cyt·2PY are observed in a supersonic beam. We show that the Watson-Crick and sugar-edge dimers of keto-amino cytosine with 2PY are the most abundant in the beam, although keto-amino-cytosine is only the third most abundant tautomer in the gas phase. We identify the different isomers by combining three different diagnostic tools: (1) methylation of the cytosine N1-H group prevents formation of both the sugar-edge and wobble isomers and gives the Watson-Crick isomer exclusively. (2) The calculated ground state binding and dissociation energies, relative gas-phase abundances, excitation and the ionization energies are in agreement with the assignment of the dominant Cyt·2PY isomers to the Watson-Crick and sugar-edge complexes of keto-amino cytosine. (3) The comparison of calculated ground state vibrational frequencies to the experimental IR spectra in the carbonyl stretch and NH/OH/CH stretch ranges strengthen this identification.

  20. Base-pairing energies of proton-bound heterodimers of cytosine and modified cytosines: implications for the stability of DNA i-motif conformations.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Rodgers, M T

    2014-01-08

    The DNA i-motif conformation was discovered in (CCG)•(CGG)n trinucleotide repeats, which are associated with fragile X syndrome, the most widespread inherited cause of mental retardation in humans. The DNA i-motif is a four-stranded structure whose strands are held together by proton-bound dimers of cytosine (C(+)•C). The stronger base-pairing interactions in C(+)•C proton-bound dimers as compared to Watson-Crick G•C base pairs are the major forces responsible for stabilization of i-motif conformations. Methylation of cytosine results in silencing of the FMR1 gene and causes fragile X syndrome. However, the influence of methylation or other modifications such as halogenation of cytosine on the base-pairing energies (BPEs) in the i-motif remains elusive. To address this, proton-bound heterodimers of cytosine and 5-methylcytosine, 5-fluorocytosine, 5-bromocytosine, and 5-iodocytosine are probed in detail. Experimentally, the BPEs of proton-bound heterodimers of cytosine and modified cytosines are determined using threshold collision-induced dissociation (TCID) techniques. All modifications at the 5-position of cytosine are found to lower the BPE and therefore would tend to destabilize DNA i-motif conformations. However, the BPEs in these proton-bound heterodimers still significantly exceed those of the Watson-Crick G•C and neutral C•C base pairs, suggesting that C(+)•C mismatches are still energetically favored such that i-motif conformations are preserved. Excellent agreement between TCID measured BPEs and B3LYP calculated values is found with the def2-TZVPPD and 6-311+G(2d,2p) basis sets, suggesting that calculations at these levels of theory can be employed to provide reliable energetic predictions for related systems.

  1. Surface study of gallium- and aluminum- doped graphenes upon adsorption of cytosine: DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokuhi Rad, Ali; Zareyee, Daryoush; Peyravi, Majid; Jahanshahi, Mohsen

    2016-12-01

    The adsorption of cytosine molecule on Al- and Ga- doped graphenes is studied using first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The energetically most stable geometries of cytosine on both Al- and Ga- doped graphenes are determined and the adsorption energies are calculated. The net charge of transfer as well as local charge of doped atoms upon adsorption of cytosine are studied by natural bond orbitals (NBO) analysis. Orbital hybridizing of complexes was searched by frontier molecular orbital theory (FMO), and density of states (DOS). Depending on the side of cytosine, there are four possible sites for its adsorption on doped graphene; denoted as P1, P2, P3, and P4, respectively. The order of binding energy in the case of Al-doped graphene is found as P1 ˃ P4 ˃ P3 ˃ P2. Interestingly, the order in the case of Ga-doped graphene changes to: P4 ∼ P1˃ P3˃ P2. Both surfaces show superior adsorbent property, resulting chemisorption of cytosine, especially at P1 and P4 position configurations. The NBO charge analysis reveals that the charge transfers from Al- and Ga- doped graphene sheets to cytosine. The electronic properties of both surfaces undertake important changes after cytosine adsorption, which indicates notable change in its electrical conductivity.

  2. Prebiotic cytosine synthesis: A critical analysis and implications for the origin of life

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Robert

    1999-01-01

    A number of theories propose that RNA, or an RNA-like substance, played a role in the origin of life. Usually, such hypotheses presume that the Watson–Crick bases were readily available on prebiotic Earth, for spontaneous incorporation into a replicator. Cytosine, however, has not been reported in analyses of meteorites nor is it among the products of electric spark discharge experiments. The reported prebiotic syntheses of cytosine involve the reaction of cyanoacetylene (or its hydrolysis product, cyanoacetaldehyde), with cyanate, cyanogen, or urea. These substances undergo side reactions with common nucleophiles that appear to proceed more rapidly than cytosine formation. To favor cytosine formation, reactant concentrations are required that are implausible in a natural setting. Furthermore, cytosine is consumed by deamination (the half-life for deamination at 25°C is ≈340 yr) and other reactions. No reactions have been described thus far that would produce cytosine, even in a specialized local setting, at a rate sufficient to compensate for its decomposition. On the basis of this evidence, it appears quite unlikely that cytosine played a role in the origin of life. Theories that involve replicators that function without the Watson–Crick pairs, or no replicator at all, remain as viable alternatives. PMID:10200273

  3. Alkali metal cation binding affinities of cytosine in the gas phase: revisited.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Rodgers, M T

    2014-08-14

    Binding of metal cations to the nucleobases can influence base pairing, base stacking and nucleobase tautomerism. Gas-phase condensation of dc discharge generated alkali metal cations and thermally vaporized cytosine (DC/FT) has been found to produce kinetically trapped excited tautomeric conformations of the M(+)(cytosine) complexes, which influences the threshold collision-induced dissociation (TCID) behavior. In order to elucidate the effects of the size of alkali metal cation on the strength of binding to the canonical form of cytosine, the binding affinities of Na(+) and K(+) to cytosine are re-examined here, and studies are extended to include Rb(+) and Cs(+) again using TCID techniques. The M(+)(cytosine) complexes are generated in an electrospray ionization source, which has been shown to produce ground-state tautomeric conformations of M(+)(cytosine). The energy-dependent cross sections are interpreted to yield bond dissociation energies (BDEs) using an analysis that includes consideration of unimolecular decay rates, the kinetic and internal energy distributions of the reactants, and multiple M(+)(cytosine)-Xe collisions. Revised BDEs for the Na(+)(cytosine) and K(+)(cytosine) complexes exceed those previously measured by 31.9 and 25.5 kJ mol(-1), respectively, consistent with the hypothesis proposed by Yang and Rodgers that excited tautomeric conformations are accessed when the complexes are generated by DC/FT ionization. Experimentally measured BDEs are compared to theoretical values calculated at the B3LYP and MP2(full) levels of theory using the 6-311+G(2d,2p)_HW* and def2-TZVPPD basis sets. The B3LYP/def2-TZVPPD level of theory is found to provide the best agreement with the measured BDEs, suggesting that this level of theory can be employed to provide reliable energetics for similar metal-ligand systems.

  4. Hydrogen bonding in proton-transfer complexes of cytosine with trimesic and pyromellitic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Reji; Kulkarni, G. U.

    2008-02-01

    Protons-transfer complexes (1:1) of cytosine with trimesic and pyromellitic acids have been crystallized and single crystal structures have been solved by X-ray crystallography. Both cocrystals exhibit layered structures, each layer containing a plethora of N-H⋯O and O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds between the proton-transfer duplets. The cytosine-trimesic acid complex exhibits a bilayered structure (2.87 Å) in contrast to the commonly observed layered structure seen in the cytosine-pyromellitic acid complex (3.98 Å). Another layered system, an adduct of pyromellitic acid and 1,4-dihydroxy benzene, has also been studied.

  5. The reaction of cytosine with bisulfite by base flipping from the duplex.

    PubMed

    Oka, Yoshimi; Peng, Tao; Takei, Fumie; Nakatani, Kazuhiko

    2008-01-01

    Methylation of cytosine at the C5-position in DNA plays a major role in epigenetic gene control. The detection of 5-methylcytosine was designed with the base flipping from the duplex using NC and CGG/CGG triad. Using bisulfite and hydroxylamine, the reaction of cytosine in 11-mer duplex produced the adduct of bisulfite and hydroxylamine, which was isolated by HPLC and identified by MALDI-TOF MS. The duplex containing (5m)C in (5m)CGG/(5m)CGG did not react with bisulfite and hydroxylamine under the same conditions. Further this method enables cytosine adjacent to mismatch guanine to react with bisulfite and hydroxylamine selectively.

  6. Evaluation of UDP-GlcN derivatives for selective labeling of 5-(hydroxymethyl)cytosine.

    PubMed

    Dai, Nan; Bitinaite, Jurate; Chin, Hang-Gyeong; Pradhan, Sriharsa; Corrêa, Ivan R

    2013-11-04

    5-(hydroxymethyl)cytosine (5-hmC) is a newly identified oxidative product of 5-methylcytosine (5-mC) in the mammalian genome, and is believed to be an important epigenetic marker influencing a variety of biological processes. In addition to its relatively low abundance, the fluctuation of 5-hmC levels over time during cell development poses a formidable challenge for its accurate mapping and quantification. Here we describe a specific chemoenzymatic approach to 5-hmC detection in DNA samples by using new uridine 5'-diphosphoglucosamine (UDP-GlcN) probes. Our approach requires modification of the glucose moiety of UDP-Glc with small amino groups and transfer of these glucose derivatives to the hydroxy moiety of 5-hmC by using T4 phage glucosyltransferases. We evaluated the transfer efficiencies of three glucosyltransferases (wild-type α- and β-GTs and a Y261L mutant β-GT) with five different UDP-Glc derivatives containing functionalized groups for subsequent bioconjugation and detection. Our results indicate that UDP-6-N3 -Glc, UDP-6-GlcN, and UDP-2-GlcN can be transferred by β-GT with efficiencies similar to that seen with the native UDP-Glc cofactor. 6-N3 -Glc- and 6-GlcN-containing oligonucleotides were selectively labeled with reactive fluorescent probes. In addition, a 2 kb DNA fragment modified with 2-GlcN groups was specifically detected by use of a commercially available antiglucosamine antibody. Alternative substrates for β-GT and correlated glycosyltransferases might prove useful for the study of the function and dynamics of 5-hmC and other modified nucleotides, as well as for multiplex analysis. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Cytosine deamination and base excision repair cause R-loop-induced CAG repeat fragility and instability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiaofeng A; Freudenreich, Catherine H

    2017-09-18

    CAG/CTG repeats are structure-forming repetitive DNA sequences, and expansion beyond a threshold of ∼35 CAG repeats is the cause of several human diseases. Expanded CAG repeats are prone to breakage, and repair of the breaks can cause repeat contractions and expansions. In this study, we found that cotranscriptional R-loops formed at a CAG-70 repeat inserted into a yeast chromosome. R-loops were further elevated upon deletion of yeast RNaseH genes and caused repeat fragility. A significant increase in CAG repeat contractions was also observed, consistent with previous human cell studies. Deletion of yeast cytosine deaminase Fcy1 significantly decreased the rate of CAG repeat fragility and contractions in the rnh1Δrnh201Δ background, indicating that Fcy1-mediated deamination is one cause of breakage and contractions in the presence of R-loops. Furthermore, base excision repair (BER) is responsible for causing CAG repeat contractions downstream of Fcy1, but not fragility. The Rad1/XPF and Rad2/XPG nucleases were also important in protecting against contractions, but through BER rather than nucleotide excision repair. Surprisingly, the MutLγ (Mlh1/Mlh3) endonuclease caused R-loop-dependent CAG fragility, defining an alternative function for this complex. These findings provide evidence that breakage at expanded CAG repeats occurs due to R-loop formation and reveal two mechanisms for CAG repeat instability: one mediated by cytosine deamination of DNA engaged in R-loops and the other by MutLγ cleavage. Since disease-causing CAG repeats occur in transcribed regions, our results suggest that R-loop-mediated fragility is a mechanism that could cause DNA damage and repeat-length changes in human cells.

  8. 5-methyl-cytosine and 5-hydroxy-methyl-cytosine in the genome of Biomphalaria glabrata, a snail intermediate host of Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Fneich, Sara; Dheilly, Nolwenn; Adema, Coen; Rognon, Anne; Reichelt, Michael; Bulla, Jan; Grunau, Christoph; Cosseau, Céline

    2013-06-06

    Biomphalaria glabrata is the mollusc intermediate host for Schistosoma mansoni, a digenean flatworm parasite that causes human intestinal schistosomiasis. An estimated 200 million people in 74 countries suffer from schistosomiasis, in terms of morbidity this is the most severe tropical disease after malaria. Epigenetic information informs on the status of gene activity that is heritable, for which changes are reversible and that is not based on the DNA sequence. Epigenetic mechanisms generate variability that provides a source for potentially heritable phenotypic variation and therefore could be involved in the adaptation to environmental constraint. Phenotypic variations are particularly important in host-parasite interactions in which both selective pressure and rate of evolution are high. In this context, epigenetic changes are expected to be major drivers of phenotypic plasticity and co-adaptation between host and parasite. Consequently, with characterization of the genomes of invertebrates that are parasite vectors or intermediate hosts, it is also essential to understand how the epigenetic machinery functions to better decipher the interplay between host and parasite. The CpGo/e ratios were used as a proxy to investigate the occurrence of CpG methylation in B. glabrata coding regions. The presence of DNA methylation in B. glabrata was also confirmed by several experimental approaches: restriction enzymatic digestion with isoschizomers, bisulfite conversion based techniques and LC-MS/MS analysis. In this work, we report that DNA methylation, which is one of the carriers of epigenetic information, occurs in B. glabrata; approximately 2% of cytosine nucleotides are methylated. We describe the methylation machinery of B. glabrata. Methylation occurs predominantly at CpG sites, present at high ratios in coding regions of genes associated with housekeeping functions. We also demonstrate by bisulfite treatment that methylation occurs in multiple copies of Nimbus, a

  9. Uncovering the polymerase-induced cytotoxicity of an oxidized nucleotide

    DOE PAGES

    Freudenthal, Bret D.; Beard, William A.; Perera, Lalith; ...

    2014-11-17

    Oxidative stress promotes genomic instability and human diseases. A common oxidized nucleoside is 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2’-deoxyguanosine found both in DNA (8-oxo-G) and as a free nucleotide (8-oxo-dGTP). Nucleotide pools are especially vulnerable to oxidative damage. Therefore cells encode an enzyme (MutT/MTH1) that removes free oxidized nucleotides. This cleansing function is required for cancer cell survival and to modulate E. coli antibiotic sensitivity in a DNA polymerase (pol)-dependent manner. How polymerase discriminates between damaged and non-damaged nucleotides is not well understood. This analysis is essential given the role of oxidized nucleotides in mutagenesis, cancer therapeutics, and bacterial antibiotics. Even with cellular sanitizing activities,more » nucleotide pools contain enough 8-oxo-dGTP to promote mutagenesis. This arises from the dual coding potential where 8-oxo-dGTP(anti) base pairs with cytosine (Cy) and 8-oxodGTP(syn) utilizes its Hoogsteen edge to base pair with adenine (Ad). Here in this paper we utilized time-lapse crystallography to follow 8-oxo-dGTP insertion opposite Ad or Cy with human DNA pol β, to reveal that insertion is accommodated in either the syn- or anti-conformation, respectively. For 8-oxo-dGTP(anti) insertion, a novel divalent metal relieves repulsive interactions between the adducted guanine base and the triphosphate of the oxidized nucleotide. With either templating base, hydrogen bonding interactions between the bases are lost as the enzyme reopens after catalysis, leading to a cytotoxic nicked DNA repair intermediate. Combining structural snapshots with kinetic and computational analysis reveals how 8-oxodGTP utilizes charge modulation during insertion that can lead to a blocked DNA repair intermediate.« less

  10. Uncovering the polymerase-induced cytotoxicity of an oxidized nucleotide

    SciTech Connect

    Freudenthal, Bret D.; Beard, William A.; Perera, Lalith; Shock, David D.; Kim, Taejin; Schlick, Tamar; Wilson, Samuel H.

    2014-11-17

    Oxidative stress promotes genomic instability and human diseases. A common oxidized nucleoside is 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2’-deoxyguanosine found both in DNA (8-oxo-G) and as a free nucleotide (8-oxo-dGTP). Nucleotide pools are especially vulnerable to oxidative damage. Therefore cells encode an enzyme (MutT/MTH1) that removes free oxidized nucleotides. This cleansing function is required for cancer cell survival and to modulate E. coli antibiotic sensitivity in a DNA polymerase (pol)-dependent manner. How polymerase discriminates between damaged and non-damaged nucleotides is not well understood. This analysis is essential given the role of oxidized nucleotides in mutagenesis, cancer therapeutics, and bacterial antibiotics. Even with cellular sanitizing activities, nucleotide pools contain enough 8-oxo-dGTP to promote mutagenesis. This arises from the dual coding potential where 8-oxo-dGTP(anti) base pairs with cytosine (Cy) and 8-oxodGTP(syn) utilizes its Hoogsteen edge to base pair with adenine (Ad). Here in this paper we utilized time-lapse crystallography to follow 8-oxo-dGTP insertion opposite Ad or Cy with human DNA pol β, to reveal that insertion is accommodated in either the syn- or anti-conformation, respectively. For 8-oxo-dGTP(anti) insertion, a novel divalent metal relieves repulsive interactions between the adducted guanine base and the triphosphate of the oxidized nucleotide. With either templating base, hydrogen bonding interactions between the bases are lost as the enzyme reopens after catalysis, leading to a cytotoxic nicked DNA repair intermediate. Combining structural snapshots with kinetic and computational analysis reveals how 8-oxodGTP utilizes charge modulation during insertion that can lead to a blocked DNA repair intermediate.

  11. Sequence motifs characteristic of DNA[cytosine-N4]methyltransferases: similarity to adenine and cytosine-C5 DNA-methylases.

    PubMed Central

    Klimasauskas, S; Timinskas, A; Menkevicius, S; Butkienè, D; Butkus, V; Janulaitis, A

    1989-01-01

    The sequences coding for DNA[cytosine-N4]methyltransferases MvaI (from Micrococcus varians RFL19) and Cfr9I (from Citrobacter freundii RFL9) have been determined. The predicted methylases are proteins of 454 and 300 amino acids, respectively. Primary structure comparison of M.Cfr9I and another m4C-forming methylase, M.Pvu II, revealed extended regions of homology. The sequence comparison of the three DNA[cytosine-N4]-methylases using originally developed software revealed two conserved patterns, DPF-GSGT and TSPPY, which were found similar also to those of adenine and DNA[cytosine-C5]-methylases. These data provided a basis for global alignment and classification of DNA-methylase sequences. Structural considerations led us to suggest that the first region could be the binding site of AdoMet, while the second is thought to be directly involved in the modification of the exocyclic amino group. PMID:2690010

  12. Cytosine methylation regulates oviposition in the pathogenic blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Geyer, Kathrin K.; Rodríguez López, Carlos M.; Chalmers, Iain W.; Munshi, Sabrina E.; Truscott, Martha; Heald, James; Wilkinson, Mike J.; Hoffmann, Karl F.

    2011-01-01

    Similar to other metazoan pathogens, Schistosoma mansoni undergoes transcriptional and developmental regulation during its complex lifecycle and host interactions. DNA methylation as a mechanism to control these processes has, to date, been discounted in this parasite. Here we show the first evidence for cytosine methylation in the S. mansoni genome. Transcriptional coregulation of novel DNA methyltransferase (SmDnmt2) and methyl-CpG-binding domain proteins mirrors the detection of cytosine methylation abundance and implicates the presence of a functional DNA methylation machinery. Genome losses in cytosine methylation upon SmDnmt2 silencing and the identification of a hypermethylated, repetitive intron within a predicted forkhead gene confirm this assertion. Importantly, disruption of egg production and egg maturation by 5-azacytidine establishes an essential role for 5-methylcytosine in this parasite. These findings provide the first functional confirmation for this epigenetic modification in any worm species and link the cytosine methylation machinery to platyhelminth oviposition processes. PMID:21829186

  13. DNA duplex stability of the thio-iso-guanine•methyl-iso-Cytosine base pair.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dongkye; Switzer, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    We report the synthesis, incorporation into oligonucleotides, and base-pairing properties of the 2-thio-variant of iso-guanine. Iso-guanine is the purine component of a nonstandard base pair with 5-methyl-iso-cytosine. The 2-thio-iso-guanine • 5-methyl-iso-cytosine base pair is found to have similar stability to an adenine • thymine pair.

  14. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis reveals a cytosine deaminase mutant with altered substrate preference.

    PubMed

    Mahan, Sheri D; Ireton, Greg C; Stoddard, Barry L; Black, Margaret E

    2004-07-20

    Suicide gene therapy of cancer is a method whereby cancerous tumors can be selectively eradicated while sparing damage to normal tissue. This is accomplished by delivering a gene, encoding an enzyme capable of specifically converting a nontoxic prodrug into a cytotoxin, to cancer cells followed by prodrug administration. The Escherichia coli gene, codA, encodes cytosine deaminase and is introduced into cancer cells followed by administration of the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC). Cytosine deaminase converts 5-FC into cytotoxic 5-fluorouracil, which leads to tumor-cell eradication. One limitation of this enzyme/prodrug combination is that 5-FC is a poor substrate for bacterial cytosine deaminase. The crystal structure of bacterial cytosine deaminase (bCD) reveals that a loop structure in the active site pocket of wild-type bCD comprising residues 310-320 undergoes a conformational change upon cytosine binding, making several contacts to the pyrimidine ring. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis was used to investigate the structure-function relationship of amino acid residues within this region, especially with regard to substrate specificity. Using an E. coli genetic complementation system, seven active mutants were identified (F310A, G311A, H312A, D314A, V315A, F316A, and P318A). Further characterization of these mutants reveals that mutant F316A is 14-fold more efficient than the wild-type at deaminating cytosine to uracil. The mutant D314A enzyme demonstrates a dramatic decrease in cytosine activity (17-fold) as well as a slight increase in activity toward 5-FC (2-fold), indicating that mutant D314A prefers the prodrug over cytosine by almost 20-fold, suggesting that it may be a superior suicide gene.

  15. Cytosine-to-uracil deamination by SssI DNA methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Stier, Ildikó; Kiss, Antal

    2013-01-01

    The prokaryotic DNA(cytosine-5)methyltransferase M.SssI shares the specificity of eukaryotic DNA methyltransferases (CG) and is an important model and experimental tool in the study of eukaryotic DNA methylation. Previously, M.SssI was shown to be able to catalyze deamination of the target cytosine to uracil if the methyl donor S-adenosyl-methionine (SAM) was missing from the reaction. To test whether this side-activity of the enzyme can be used to distinguish between unmethylated and C5-methylated cytosines in CG dinucleotides, we re-investigated, using a sensitive genetic reversion assay, the cytosine deaminase activity of M.SssI. Confirming previous results we showed that M.SssI can deaminate cytosine to uracil in a slow reaction in the absence of SAM and that the rate of this reaction can be increased by the SAM analogue 5'-amino-5'-deoxyadenosine. We could not detect M.SssI-catalyzed deamination of C5-methylcytosine ((m5)C). We found conditions where the rate of M.SssI mediated C-to-U deamination was at least 100-fold higher than the rate of (m5)C-to-T conversion. Although this difference in reactivities suggests that the enzyme could be used to identify C5-methylated cytosines in the epigenetically important CG dinucleotides, the rate of M.SssI mediated cytosine deamination is too low to become an enzymatic alternative to the bisulfite reaction. Amino acid replacements in the presumed SAM binding pocket of M.SssI (F17S and G19D) resulted in greatly reduced methyltransferase activity. The G19D variant showed cytosine deaminase activity in E. coli, at physiological SAM concentrations. Interestingly, the C-to-U deaminase activity was also detectable in an E. coli ung (+) host proficient in uracil excision repair.

  16. Genome-Wide Discriminatory Information Patterns of Cytosine DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Robersy; Mackenzie, Sally A.

    2016-01-01

    Cytosine DNA methylation (CDM) is a highly abundant, heritable but reversible chemical modification to the genome. Herein, a machine learning approach was applied to analyze the accumulation of epigenetic marks in methylomes of 152 ecotypes and 85 silencing mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana. In an information-thermodynamics framework, two measurements were used: (1) the amount of information gained/lost with the CDM changes IR and (2) the uncertainty of not observing a SNP LCR. We hypothesize that epigenetic marks are chromosomal footprints accounting for different ontogenetic and phylogenetic histories of individual populations. A machine learning approach is proposed to verify this hypothesis. Results support the hypothesis by the existence of discriminatory information (DI) patterns of CDM able to discriminate between individuals and between individual subpopulations. The statistical analyses revealed a strong association between the topologies of the structured population of Arabidopsis ecotypes based on IR and on LCR, respectively. A statistical-physical relationship between IR and LCR was also found. Results to date imply that the genome-wide distribution of CDM changes is not only part of the biological signal created by the methylation regulatory machinery, but ensures the stability of the DNA molecule, preserving the integrity of the genetic message under continuous stress from thermal fluctuations in the cell environment. PMID:27322251

  17. Functions and Malfunctions of Mammalian DNA-Cytosine Deaminases.

    PubMed

    Siriwardena, Sachini U; Chen, Kang; Bhagwat, Ashok S

    2016-10-26

    The AID/APOBEC family enzymes convert cytosines in single-stranded DNA to uracils, causing base substitutions and strand breaks. They are induced by cytokines produced during the body's inflammatory response to infections, and they help combat infections through diverse mechanisms. AID is essential for the maturation of antibodies and causes mutations and deletions in antibody genes through somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class-switch recombination (CSR) processes. One member of the APOBEC family, APOBEC1, edits mRNA for a protein involved in lipid transport. Members of the APOBEC3 subfamily in humans (APOBEC3A, APOBEC3B, APOBEC3C, APOBEC3D, APOBEC3F, APOBEC3G, and APOBEC3H) inhibit infections of viruses such as HIV-1, HBV, and HCV, and retrotransposition of endogenous retroelements through mutagenic and nonmutagenic mechanisms. There is emerging consensus that these enzymes can cause mutations in the cellular genome at replication forks or within transcription bubbles depending on the physiological state of the cell and the phase of the cell cycle during which they are expressed. We describe here the state of knowledge about the structures of these enzymes, regulation of their expression, and both the advantageous and deleterious consequences of their expression, including carcinogenesis. We highlight similarities among them and present a holistic view of their regulation and function.

  18. CGGBP1 mitigates cytosine methylation at repetitive DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Prasoon; Collier, Paul; Fritz, Markus Hsi-Yang; Benes, Vladimir; Wiklund, Helena Jernberg; Westermark, Bengt; Singh, Umashankar

    2015-05-16

    CGGBP1 is a repetitive DNA-binding transcription regulator with target sites at CpG-rich sequences such as CGG repeats and Alu-SINEs and L1-LINEs. The role of CGGBP1 as a possible mediator of CpG methylation however remains unknown. At CpG-rich sequences cytosine methylation is a major mechanism of transcriptional repression. Concordantly, gene-rich regions typically carry lower levels of CpG methylation than the repetitive elements. It is well known that at interspersed repeats Alu-SINEs and L1-LINEs high levels of CpG methylation constitute a transcriptional silencing and retrotransposon inactivating mechanism. Here, we have studied genome-wide CpG methylation with or without CGGBP1-depletion. By high throughput sequencing of bisulfite-treated genomic DNA we have identified CGGBP1 to be a negative regulator of CpG methylation at repetitive DNA sequences. In addition, we have studied CpG methylation alterations on Alu and L1 retrotransposons in CGGBP1-depleted cells using a novel bisulfite-treatment and high throughput sequencing approach. The results clearly show that CGGBP1 is a possible bidirectional regulator of CpG methylation at Alus, and acts as a repressor of methylation at L1 retrotransposons.

  19. Cytosine Methylation Dysregulation in Neonates Following Intrauterine Growth Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Bhagat, Tushar D.; Fazzari, Melissa J.; Verma, Amit; Barzilai, Nir; Greally, John M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Perturbations of the intrauterine environment can affect fetal development during critical periods of plasticity, and can increase susceptibility to a number of age-related diseases (e.g., type 2 diabetes mellitus; T2DM), manifesting as late as decades later. We hypothesized that this biological memory is mediated by permanent alterations of the epigenome in stem cell populations, and focused our studies specifically on DNA methylation in CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells from cord blood from neonates with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) and control subjects. Methods and Findings Our epigenomic assays utilized a two-stage design involving genome-wide discovery followed by quantitative, single-locus validation. We found that changes in cytosine methylation occur in response to IUGR of moderate degree and involving a restricted number of loci. We also identify specific loci that are targeted for dysregulation of DNA methylation, in particular the hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4A) gene, a well-known diabetes candidate gene not previously associated with growth restriction in utero, and other loci encoding HNF4A-interacting proteins. Conclusions Our results give insights into the potential contribution of epigenomic dysregulation in mediating the long-term consequences of IUGR, and demonstrate the value of this approach to studies of the fetal origin of adult disease. PMID:20126273

  20. TET proteins: on the frenetic hunt for new cytosine modifications

    PubMed Central

    Delatte, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic genome marking and chromatin regulation are central to establishing tissue-specific gene expression programs, and hence to several biological processes. Until recently, the only known epigenetic mark on DNA in mammals was 5-methylcytosine, established and propagated by DNA methyltransferases and generally associated with gene repression. All of a sudden, a host of new actors—novel cytosine modifications and the ten eleven translocation (TET) enzymes—has appeared on the scene, sparking great interest. The challenge is now to uncover the roles they play and how they relate to DNA demethylation. Knowledge is accumulating at a frantic pace, linking these new players to essential biological processes (e.g. cell pluripotency and development) and also to cancerogenesis. Here, we review the recent progress in this exciting field, highlighting the TET enzymes as epigenetic DNA modifiers, their physiological roles, and their functions in health and disease. We also discuss the need to find relevant TET interactants and the newly discovered TET–O-linked N-acetylglucosamine transferase (OGT) pathway. PMID:23625996

  1. Plant Cyclic Nucleotide Signalling

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Atienza, Juliana; Van Ingelgem, Carl; Roef, Luc

    2007-01-01

    The presence of the cyclic nucleotides 3′,5′-cyclic adenyl monophosphate (cAMP) and 3′,5′-cyclic guanyl monophosphate (cGMP) in plants is now generally accepted. In addition, cAMP and cGMP have been implicated in the regulation of important plant processes such as stomatal functioning, monovalent and divalent cation fluxes, chloroplast development, gibberellic acid signalling, pathogen response and gene transcription. However, very little is known regarding the components of cyclic nucleotide signalling in plants. In this addendum, the evidence for specific mechanisms of plant cyclic nucleotide signalling is evaluated and discussed. PMID:19704553

  2. Benchmark Thermochemistry for Biologically Relevant Adenine and Cytosine. A Combined Experimental and Theoretical Study.

    PubMed

    Emel'yanenko, Vladimir N; Zaitsau, Dzmitry H; Shoifet, Evgeni; Meurer, Florian; Verevkin, Sergey P; Schick, Christoph; Held, Christoph

    2015-09-17

    The thermochemical properties available in the literature for adenine and cytosine are in disarray. A new condensed phase standard (p° = 0.1 MPa) molar enthalpy of formation at T = 298.15 K was measured by using combustion calorimetry. New molar enthalpies of sublimation were derived from the temperature dependence of vapor pressure measured by transpiration and by the quarz-crystal microbalance technique. The heat capacities of crystalline adenine and cytosine were measured by temperature-modulated DSC. Thermodynamic data on adenine and cytosine available in the literature were collected, evaluated, and combined with our experimental results. Thus, the evaluated collection of data together with the new experimental results reported here has helped to resolve contradictions in the available enthalpies of formation. A set of reliable thermochemical data is recommended for adenine and cytosine for further thermochemical calculations. Quantum-chemical calculations of the gas phase molar enthalpies of formation of adenine and cytosine have been performed by using the G4 method and results were in excellent agreement with the recommended experimental data. The standard molar entropies of formation and the standard molar Gibbs functions of formation in crystal and gas state have been calculated. Experimental vapor-pressure data measured in this work were used to estimate pure-component PC-SAFT parameters. This allowed modeling solubility of adenine and cytosine in water over the temperature interval 278-310 K.

  3. Genomic bipyrimidine nucleotide frequency and microbial reactions to germicidal UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Ralf; Douki, Thierry; Rettberg, Petra; Reitz, Günther; Cadet, Jean; Nicholson, Wayne L; Horneck, Gerda

    2010-07-01

    The role of the genomic bipyrimidine nucleotide frequency in pyrimidine dimer formation caused by germicidal UV radiation was studied in three microbial reference organisms (Escherichia coli K12, Deinococcus radiodurans R1, spores and cells of Bacillus subtilis 168). The sensitive HPLC tandem mass spectrometry assay was used to identify and quantify the different bipyrimidine photoproducts induced in the DNA of microorganisms by germicidal UV radiation. The yields of photoproducts per applied fluence were very similar among vegetative cells but twofold reduced in spores. This similarity in DNA photoreactivity greatly contrasted with the 11-fold range determined in the fluence causing a decimal reduction of survival. It was also found that the spectrum of UV-induced bipyrimidine lesions was species-specific and the formation rates of bi-thymine and bi-cytosine photoproducts correlated with the genomic frequencies of thymine and cytosine dinucleotides in the bacterial model systems.

  4. Evolving nucleotide binding surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kieber-Emmons, T.; Rein, R.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the stability and nature of binding of a nucleotide to several known dehydrogenases. The employed approach includes calculation of hydrophobic stabilization of the binding motif and its intermolecular interaction with the ligand. The evolutionary changes of the binding motif are studied by calculating the Euclidean deviation of the respective dehydrogenases. Attention is given to the possible structural elements involved in the origin of nucleotide recognition by non-coded primordial polypeptides.

  5. Dynamics of Methylated Cytosine Flipping by UHRF1.

    PubMed

    Kilin, Vasyl; Gavvala, Krishna; Barthes, Nicolas P F; Michel, Benoît Y; Shin, Dongwon; Boudier, Christian; Mauffret, Olivier; Yashchuk, Valeriy; Mousli, Marc; Ruff, Marc; Granger, Florence; Eiler, Sylvia; Bronner, Christian; Tor, Yitzhak; Burger, Alain; Mély, Yves

    2017-02-15

    DNA methylation patterns, which are critical for gene expression, are replicated by DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) and ubiquitin-like containing PHD and RING finger domains 1 (UHRF1) proteins. This replication is initiated by the recognition of hemimethylated CpG sites and further flipping of methylated cytosines (mC) by the Set and Ring Associated (SRA) domain of UHRF1. Although crystallography has shed light on the mechanism of mC flipping by SRA, tools are required to monitor in real time how SRA reads DNA and flips the modified nucleobase. To accomplish this aim, we have utilized two distinct fluorescent nucleobase surrogates, 2-thienyl-3-hydroxychromone nucleoside (3HCnt) and thienoguanosine ((th)G), incorporated at different positions into hemimethylated (HM) and nonmethylated (NM) DNA duplexes. Large fluorescence changes were associated with mC flipping in HM duplexes, showing the outstanding sensitivity of both nucleobase surrogates to the small structural changes accompanying base flipping. Importantly, the nucleobase surrogates marginally affected the structure of the duplex and its affinity for SRA at positions where they were responsive to base flipping, illustrating their promise as nonperturbing probes for monitoring such events. Stopped-flow studies using these two distinct tools revealed the fast kinetics of SRA binding and sliding to NM duplexes, consistent with its reader role. In contrast, the kinetics of mC flipping was found to be much slower in HM duplexes, substantially increasing the lifetime of CpG-bound UHRF1, and thus the probability of recruiting DNMT1 to faithfully duplicate the DNA methylation profile. The fluorescence-based approach using these two different fluorescent nucleoside surrogates advances the mechanistic understanding of the UHRF1/DNMT1 tandem and the development of assays for the identification of base flipping inhibitors.

  6. Synthesis and characterization of a novel chitosan based E. coli cytosine deaminase nanocomposite for potential application in prodrug enzyme therapy.

    PubMed

    Yata, Vinod Kumar; Ghosh, Siddhartha Sankar

    2011-01-01

    Cytosine deaminase is a non-mammalian enzyme of widespread interest for prodrug enzyme therapy due to its ability to convert prodrug 5-fluorocytosine into anticancer drug 5-fluorouracil. Cytosine deaminase enzyme has been purified to homogeneity from E. coli K-12 MTCC 1302 strain. K(m) values for cytosine and 5-fluorocytosine were found to be 0.26 mM and 1.82 mM, respectively. We developed a chitosan-entrapped cytosine deaminase nanocomposite. Atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy images showed an elongated sphere shape nanocomposite with an average size of 80 nm diameter. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction results confirmed gel formation and entrapment of cytosine deaminase within the nanocomposite. Sustained release of cytosine deaminase from the nanocomposite up to one week depicted its potential implication in prodrug inducted enzyme therapy.

  7. Structure of the 2-Aminopurine-Cytosine Base Pair Formed in the Polymerase Active Site of the RB69 Y567A-DNA Polymerase

    SciTech Connect

    Reha-Krantz, Linda J.; Hariharan, Chithra; Subuddhi, Usharani; Xia, Shuangluo; Zhao, Chao; Beckman, Jeff; Christian, Thomas; Konigsberg, William

    2011-11-21

    The adenine base analogue 2-aminopurine (2AP) is a potent base substitution mutagen in prokaryotes because of its enhanceed ability to form a mutagenic base pair with an incoming dCTP. Despite more than 50 years of research, the structure of the 2AP-C base pair remains unclear. We report the structure of the 2AP-dCTP base pair formed within the polymerase active site of the RB69 Y567A-DNA polymerase. A modified wobble 2AP-C base pair was detected with one H-bond between N1 of 2AP and a proton from the C4 amino group of cytosine and an apparent bifurcated H-bond between a proton on the 2-amino group of 2-aminopurine and the ring N3 and O2 atoms of cytosine. Interestingly, a primer-terminal region rich in AT base pairs, compared to GC base pairs, facilitated dCTP binding opposite template 2AP. We propose that the increased flexibility of the nucleotide binding pocket formed in the Y567A-DNA polymerase and increased 'breathing' at the primer-terminal junction of A+T-rich DNA facilitate dCTP binding opposite template 2AP. Thus, interactions between DNA polymerase residues with a dynamic primer-terminal junction play a role in determining base selectivity within the polymerase active site of RB69 DNA polymerase.

  8. Inhibitory and Restorative Effects of Adenine Nucleotides on Rickettsial Adsorption and Hemolysis

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Herbert H.

    1974-01-01

    The adenine nucleotides, adenosine diphosphate, adenosine triphosphate, (ATP), and the methylene-bridge analogues are inhibitors of rickettsial adsorption to and the hemolysis of sheep erythrocytes. Other nucleotides, adenosine monophosphate, cyclic adenosine monophosphate, cytosine triphosphate, and guanosine triphosphate, are without effect. Adsorption and hemolysis require the generation of energy by the rickettsiae which is usually derived from glutamate. When the generation of energy from the metabolism of glutamate is inhibited by arsenite or cyanide, the addition of ATP can supply the energy to restore hemolysis. However, in the presence of the uncouplers, ATP can not restore hemolysis. Even when functioning in a restorative role, ATP still has its inhibitory properties. These results suggest that a high-energy intermediate (X ∼ I), rather than ATP itself, is the energy source. The interactions of inhibitory nucleotides suggest that these compounds share a common transport system. PMID:4357933

  9. Statistical analysis of nucleotide runs in coding and noncoding DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Sprizhitsky YuA; Nechipurenko YuD; Alexandrov, A A; Volkenstein, M V

    1988-10-01

    A statistical analysis of the occurrence of particular nucleotide runs in DNA sequences of different species has been carried out. There are considerable differences of run distributions in DNA sequences of procaryotes, invertebrates and vertebrates. There is an abundance of short runs (1-2 nucleotides long) in the coding sequences and there is a deficiency of such runs in the noncoding regions. However, some interesting exceptions from this rule exist for the run distribution of adenine in procaryotes and for the arrangement of purine-pyrimidine runs in eucaryotes. The similarity in the distributions of such runs in the coding and noncoding regions may be due to some structural features of the DNA molecule as a whole. Runs of guanine (or cytosine) of three to six nucleotides occur predominantly in noncoding DNA regions in eucaryotes, especially in vertebrates.

  10. Prokaryotic Nucleotide Excision Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kisker, Caroline; Kuper, Jochen; Van Houten, Bennett

    2013-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) has allowed bacteria to flourish in many different niches around the globe that inflict harsh environmental damage to their genetic material. NER is remarkable because of its diverse substrate repertoire, which differs greatly in chemical composition and structure. Recent advances in structural biology and single-molecule studies have given great insight into the structure and function of NER components. This ensemble of proteins orchestrates faithful removal of toxic DNA lesions through a multistep process. The damaged nucleotide is recognized by dynamic probing of the DNA structure that is then verified and marked for dual incisions followed by excision of the damage and surrounding nucleotides. The opposite DNA strand serves as a template for repair, which is completed after resynthesis and ligation. PMID:23457260

  11. Prokaryotic nucleotide excision repair.

    PubMed

    Kisker, Caroline; Kuper, Jochen; Van Houten, Bennett

    2013-03-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) has allowed bacteria to flourish in many different niches around the globe that inflict harsh environmental damage to their genetic material. NER is remarkable because of its diverse substrate repertoire, which differs greatly in chemical composition and structure. Recent advances in structural biology and single-molecule studies have given great insight into the structure and function of NER components. This ensemble of proteins orchestrates faithful removal of toxic DNA lesions through a multistep process. The damaged nucleotide is recognized by dynamic probing of the DNA structure that is then verified and marked for dual incisions followed by excision of the damage and surrounding nucleotides. The opposite DNA strand serves as a template for repair, which is completed after resynthesis and ligation.

  12. Global cytosine methylation in Daphnia magna depends on genotype, environment, and their interaction.

    PubMed

    Asselman, Jana; De Coninck, Dieter I M; Vandegehuchte, Michiel B; Jansen, Mieke; Decaestecker, Ellen; De Meester, Luc; Vanden Bussche, Julie; Vanhaecke, Lynn; Janssen, Colin R; De Schamphelaere, Karel A C

    2015-05-01

    The authors characterized global cytosine methylation levels in 2 different genotypes of the ecotoxicological model organism Daphnia magna after exposure to a wide array of biotic and abiotic environmental stressors. The present study aimed to improve the authors' understanding of the role of cytosine methylation in the organism's response to environmental conditions. The authors observed a significant genotype effect, an environment effect, and a genotype × environment effect. In particular, global cytosine methylation levels were significantly altered after exposure to Triops predation cues, Microcystis, and sodium chloride compared with control conditions. Significant differences between the 2 genotypes were observed when animals were exposed to Triops predation cues, Microcystis, Cryptomonas, and sodium chloride. Despite the low global methylation rate under control conditions (0.49-0.52%), global cytosine methylation levels upon exposure to Triops demonstrated a 5-fold difference between the genotypes (0.21% vs 1.02%). No effects were found in response to arsenic, cadmium, fish, lead, pH of 5.5, pH of 8, temperature, hypoxia, and white fat cell disease. The authors' results point to the potential role of epigenetic effects under changing environmental conditions such as predation (i.e., Triops), diet (i.e., Cryptomonas and Microcystis), and salinity. The results of the present study indicate that, despite global cytosine methylation levels being low, epigenetic effects may be important in environmental studies on Daphnia. © 2015 SETAC.

  13. Cytosine deaminase MX cassettes as positive/negative selectable markers in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Hartzog, Phillip E; Nicholson, Bradly P; McCusker, John H

    2005-07-30

    We describe positive/negative selectable cytosine deaminase MX cassettes for use in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The basis of positive selection for cytosine deaminase (Fcy1) activity is that (a) fcy1 strains are unable to grow on medium containing cytosine as a sole nitrogen source and (b) fcy1 ura3 strains are unable to grow on medium containing cytosine as the sole pyrimidine source. Conversely, as 5-fluorocytosine (5FC) is toxic to cytosine deaminase-producing cells, fcy1 strains are resistant to 5FC. FCY1MX and FCA1MX cassettes, containing open reading frames (ORFs) of S. cerevisiae FCY1 and Candida albicans FCA1, respectively, were constructed and used to disrupt targeted genes in S. cerevisiae fcy1 strains. In addition, new direct repeat cassettes, kanPR, FCA1PR, FCY1PR and CaURA3PR, were developed to allow efficient deletion of target genes in cells containing MX3 repeats. Finally, the FCY1- and FCA1MX3 or PR direct repeat cassettes can be readily recycled after 5FC counter-selection on both synthetic and rich media.

  14. Hydroxymethylated cytosines are associated with elevated C to G transversion rates.

    PubMed

    Supek, Fran; Lehner, Ben; Hajkova, Petra; Warnecke, Tobias

    2014-09-01

    It has long been known that methylated cytosines deaminate at higher rates than unmodified cytosines and constitute mutational hotspots in mammalian genomes. The repertoire of naturally occurring cytosine modifications, however, extends beyond 5-methylcytosine to include its oxidation derivatives, notably 5-hydroxymethylcytosine. The effects of these modifications on sequence evolution are unknown. Here, we combine base-resolution maps of methyl- and hydroxymethylcytosine in human and mouse with population genomic, divergence and somatic mutation data to show that hydroxymethylated and methylated cytosines show distinct patterns of variation and evolution. Surprisingly, hydroxymethylated sites are consistently associated with elevated C to G transversion rates at the level of segregating polymorphisms, fixed substitutions, and somatic mutations in tumors. Controlling for multiple potential confounders, we find derived C to G SNPs to be 1.43-fold (1.22-fold) more common at hydroxymethylated sites compared to methylated sites in human (mouse). Increased C to G rates are evident across diverse functional and sequence contexts and, in cancer genomes, correlate with the expression of Tet enzymes and specific components of the mismatch repair pathway (MSH2, MSH6, and MBD4). Based on these and other observations we suggest that hydroxymethylation is associated with a distinct mutational burden and that the mismatch repair pathway is implicated in causing elevated transversion rates at hydroxymethylated cytosines.

  15. HhaI DNA methyltransferase uses the protruding Gln237 for active flipping of its target cytosine.

    PubMed

    Daujotyte, Dalia; Serva, Saulius; Vilkaitis, Giedrius; Merkiene, Egle; Venclovas, Ceslovas; Klimasauskas, Saulius

    2004-06-01

    Access to a nucleotide by its rotation out of the DNA helix (base flipping) is used by numerous DNA modification and repair enzymes. Despite extensive studies of the paradigm HhaI methyltransferase, initial events leading to base flipping remained elusive. Here we demonstrate that the replacement of the target C:G pair with the 2-aminopurine:T pair in the DNA or shortening of the side chain of Gln237 in the protein severely perturb base flipping, but retain specific DNA binding. Kinetic analyses and molecular modeling suggest that a steric interaction between the protruding side chain of Gln237 and the target cytosine in B-DNA reduces the energy barrier for flipping by 3 kcal/mol. Subsequent stabilization of an open state by further 4 kcal/mol is achieved through specific hydrogen bonding of the side chain to the orphan guanine. Gln237 thus plays a key role in actively opening the target C:G pair by a "push-and-bind" mechanism.

  16. A new rapid amplification of cDNA ends method for extremely guanine plus cytosine-rich genes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xianzong; Jarvis, Donald L

    2006-09-15

    Rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) is widely used to determine the 5'- and 3'-terminal nucleotide sequences of genes. Many different RACE methods have been developed to meet various requirements, but none addresses the difficult problems that arise when trying to isolate the ends of extremely guanine plus cytosine (GC)-rich genes. In this study, we found that we were unable to isolate the correct 5' or 3' end of an insect gene, which appeared to include extremely GC-rich sequences, using current RACE methods. Thus, we developed a new RACE method that can be used for this purpose. This new method entails first-strand cDNA synthesis at 70 degrees C with Thermo-X reverse transcriptase in the presence of homoectoine, followed by a polymerase chain reaction with 98 degrees C denaturation steps and Phusion DNA polymerase in the presence of 1M betaine and 5% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). The use of these conditions yielded 5'- and 3'-RACE products that were approximately 80% GC over 213 and 162bp, respectively, and included shorter internal regions of 82 to 89% GC.

  17. Unraveling the complexity of the interactions of DNA nucleotides with gold by single molecule force spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bano, Fouzia; Sluysmans, Damien; Wislez, Arnaud; Duwez, Anne-Sophie

    2015-11-01

    Addressing the effect of different environmental factors on the adsorption of DNA to solid supports is critical for the development of robust miniaturized devices for applications ranging from biosensors to next generation molecular technology. Most of the time, thiol-based chemistry is used to anchor DNA on gold - a substrate commonly used in nanotechnology - and little is known about the direct interaction between DNA and gold. So far there have been no systematic studies on the direct adsorption behavior of the deoxyribonucleotides (i.e., a nitrogenous base, a deoxyribose sugar, and a phosphate group) and on the factors that govern the DNA-gold bond strength. Here, using single molecule force spectroscopy, we investigated the interaction of the four individual nucleotides, adenine, guanine, cytosine, and thymine, with gold. Experiments were performed in three salinity conditions and two surface dwell times to reveal the factors that influence nucleotide-Au bond strength. Force data show that, at physiological ionic strength, adenine-Au interactions are stronger, asymmetrical and independent of surface dwell time as compared to cytosine-Au and guanine-Au interactions. We suggest that in these conditions only adenine is able to chemisorb on gold. A decrease of the ionic strength significantly increases the bond strength for all nucleotides. We show that moderate ionic strength along with longer surface dwell period suggest weak chemisorption also for cytosine and guanine.Addressing the effect of different environmental factors on the adsorption of DNA to solid supports is critical for the development of robust miniaturized devices for applications ranging from biosensors to next generation molecular technology. Most of the time, thiol-based chemistry is used to anchor DNA on gold - a substrate commonly used in nanotechnology - and little is known about the direct interaction between DNA and gold. So far there have been no systematic studies on the direct

  18. Highly efficient incorporation of the fluorescent nucleotide analogs tC and tCO by Klenow fragment

    PubMed Central

    Sandin, Peter; Stengel, Gudrun; Ljungdahl, Thomas; Börjesson, Karl; Macao, Bertil; Wilhelmsson, L. Marcus

    2009-01-01

    Studies of the mechanisms by which DNA polymerases select the correct nucleotide frequently employ fluorescently labeled DNA to monitor conformational rearrangements of the polymerase–DNA complex in response to incoming nucleotides. For this purpose, fluorescent base analogs play an increasingly important role because they interfere less with the DNA–protein interaction than do tethered fluorophores. Here we report the incorporation of the 5′-triphosphates of two exceptionally bright cytosine analogs, 1,3-diaza-2-oxo-phenothiazine (tC) and its oxo-homolog, 1,3-diaza-2-oxo-phenoxazine (tCO), into DNA by the Klenow fragment. Both nucleotide analogs are polymerized with slightly higher efficiency opposite guanine than cytosine triphosphate and are shown to bind with nanomolar affinity to the DNA polymerase active site, according to fluorescence anisotropy measurements. Using this method, we perform competitive binding experiments and show that they can be used to determine the dissociation constant of any given natural or unnatural nucleotide. The results demonstrate that the active site of the Klenow fragment is flexible enough to tolerate base pairs that are size-expanded in the major groove. In addition, the possibility to enzymatically polymerize a fluorescent nucleotide with high efficiency complements the tool box of biophysical probes available to study DNA replication. PMID:19401439

  19. Highly efficient incorporation of the fluorescent nucleotide analogs tC and tCO by Klenow fragment.

    PubMed

    Sandin, Peter; Stengel, Gudrun; Ljungdahl, Thomas; Börjesson, Karl; Macao, Bertil; Wilhelmsson, L Marcus

    2009-07-01

    Studies of the mechanisms by which DNA polymerases select the correct nucleotide frequently employ fluorescently labeled DNA to monitor conformational rearrangements of the polymerase-DNA complex in response to incoming nucleotides. For this purpose, fluorescent base analogs play an increasingly important role because they interfere less with the DNA-protein interaction than do tethered fluorophores. Here we report the incorporation of the 5'-triphosphates of two exceptionally bright cytosine analogs, 1,3-diaza-2-oxo-phenothiazine (tC) and its oxo-homolog, 1,3-diaza-2-oxo-phenoxazine (tC(O)), into DNA by the Klenow fragment. Both nucleotide analogs are polymerized with slightly higher efficiency opposite guanine than cytosine triphosphate and are shown to bind with nanomolar affinity to the DNA polymerase active site, according to fluorescence anisotropy measurements. Using this method, we perform competitive binding experiments and show that they can be used to determine the dissociation constant of any given natural or unnatural nucleotide. The results demonstrate that the active site of the Klenow fragment is flexible enough to tolerate base pairs that are size-expanded in the major groove. In addition, the possibility to enzymatically polymerize a fluorescent nucleotide with high efficiency complements the tool box of biophysical probes available to study DNA replication.

  20. Conversion of 1-[((S)-2-hydroxy-2-oxo-1,4,2-dioxaphosphorinan-5-yl)methyl]cytosine to cidofovir by an intracellular cyclic CMP phosphodiesterase.

    PubMed Central

    Mendel, D B; Cihlar, T; Moon, K; Chen, M S

    1997-01-01

    Cidofovir (HPMPC) [1-[(S)-3-hydroxy-2-(phosphonomethoxy)propyl]-cytosine] is an acyclic nucleotide analog with potent and selective activity against herpesviruses. The prodrug, cyclic HPMPC (cHPMPC) [1-[((S)-2-hydroxy-2-oxo-1,4,2-dioxaphosphorinan-5-yl) methyl]cytosine], has antiviral activity similar to that of the parent compound but exhibits reduced toxicity in animal models. cHPMPC is converted to cidofovir by a cellular cyclic CMP phosphodiesterase (EC 3.1.4.37) which hydrolyzes a variety of substrates, including adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) and cytidine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cCMP). The K(m) and Vmax values for hydrolysis of cHPMPC by cCMP phosphodiesterase purified from human liver are 250 microM and 0.66 nmol.min-1.unit-1, respectively. These values are similar to the K(m) and Vmax values for cAMP (23 microM and 1.16 nmol.min-1.unit-1, respectively) and cCMP (75 microM and 2.32 nmol.min-1.unit of enzyme-1, respectively). The catalytic efficiency (Vmax/K(m) ratio) of this enzyme for the cHPMPC substrate is only 10- to 20-fold lower than those for the natural cyclic nucleotides, indicating that cHPMPC is a viable intracellular substrate for the human enzyme. Kinetic analysis indicates that cHPMPC, cAMP, and cCMP are competitive with respect to each other and that they are hydrolyzed by the same enzyme. cHPMPC is hydrolyzed to cidofovir in all primary human cell systems tested, including those derived from target organs that might be infected in patients with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) disease. Importantly, hydrolysis of cHPMPC is not diminished in cells infected with HCMV. PMID:9056007

  1. Expression of microRNAs in Horse Plasma and Their Characteristic Nucleotide Composition

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seungwoo; Hwang, Seungwoo; Yu, Hee Jeong; Oh, Dayoung; Choi, Yu Jung; Kim, Myung-Chul; Kim, Yongbaek; Ryu, Doug-Young

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) in blood plasma are stable under high levels of ribonuclease activity and could function in tissue-to-tissue communication, suggesting that they may have distinctive structural characteristics compared with non-circulating miRNAs. In this study, the expression of miRNAs in horse plasma and their characteristic nucleotide composition were examined and compared with non-plasma miRNAs. Highly expressed plasma miRNA species were not part of the abundant group of miRNAs in non-plasma tissues, except for the eca-let-7 family. eca-miR-486-5p, -92a, and -21 were among the most abundant plasma miRNAs, and their human orthologs also belong to the most abundant group of miRNAs in human plasma. Uracil and guanine were the most common nucleotides of both plasma and non-plasma miRNAs. Cytosine was the least common in plasma and non-plasma miRNAs, although levels were higher in plasma miRNAs. Plasma miRNAs also showed higher expression levels of miRNAs containing adenine and cytosine repeats, compared with non-plasma miRNAs. These observations indicate that miRNAs in the plasma have a unique nucleotide composition. PMID:26731407

  2. Catalysis effect of micro-hydration on the intramolecular proton transfer in cytosine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valadbeigi, Younes; Soleiman-Beigi, Mohammad; Sahraei, Reza

    2015-06-01

    Structural and thermodynamic properties of nine isomers of cytosine were studied in gas and aqueous phases and in micro-hydrated environment employing B3LYP and MP2 methods. Also, isomerizations of cytosine were studied in gas phase and the activation energies (Ea) and Gibbs free energies (ΔG#) of the internal Osbnd H rotations and proton transfer processes were calculated. The calculated Osbnd H rotational barriers were smaller than 50 kJ/mol while the activation energies of intramolecular proton transfers were in the range of 110-190 kJ/mol. Effect of mono- and di-hydration of the cytosine isomers on the transition state structures and the energy barriers was investigated.

  3. Quantum chemical investigations on the nonradiative deactivation pathways of cytosine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Akira; Yamazaki, Shohei; Taketsugu, Tetsuya

    2014-10-09

    The nonradiative deactivation pathways of cytosine derivatives (cytosine, 5-fluorocytosine, 5-methylcytosine, and 1-methycytosine) and their tautomers are investigated by quantum chemical calculations, and the substituent effects on the deactivation process are examined. The MS-CASPT2 method is employed in the excited-state geometry optimization and also in the search for conical intersection points, and the potential energy profiles connecting the Franck-Condon point, excited-state minimum energy structures, and the conical intersection points are investigated. Our calculated vertical and adiabatic excitation energies are in quite good agreement with the experimental results, and the relative barrier heights leading to the conical intersections are correlated with the experimentally observed excite-state lifetimes, where the calculated barrier heights are in the order of cytosine < 5-methylcytosine < 5-fluorocytosine.

  4. AID enzymatic activity is inversely proportional to the size of cytosine C5 orbital cloud.

    PubMed

    Rangam, Gopinath; Schmitz, Kerstin-Maike; Cobb, Alexander J A; Petersen-Mahrt, Svend K

    2012-01-01

    Activation induced deaminase (AID) deaminates cytosine to uracil, which is required for a functional humoral immune system. Previous work demonstrated, that AID also deaminates 5-methylcytosine (5 mC). Recently, a novel vertebrate modification (5-hydroxymethylcytosine - 5 hmC) has been implicated in functioning in epigenetic reprogramming, yet no molecular pathway explaining the removal of 5 hmC has been identified. AID has been suggested to deaminate 5 hmC, with the 5 hmU product being repaired by base excision repair pathways back to cytosine. Here we demonstrate that AID's enzymatic activity is inversely proportional to the electron cloud size of C5-cytosine - H > F > methyl > hydroxymethyl. This makes AID an unlikely candidate to be part of 5 hmC removal.

  5. Cytosine deamination and the precipitous decline of spontaneous mutation during Earth's history

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Charles A.; Crayle, Jesse; Zhou, Shuntai; Swanstrom, Ronald; Wolfenden, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The hydrolytic deamination of cytosine and 5-methylcytosine residues in DNA appears to contribute significantly to the appearance of spontaneous mutations in microorganisms and in human disease. In the present work, we examined the mechanism of cytosine deamination and the response of the uncatalyzed reaction to changing temperature. The positively charged 1,3-dimethylcytosinium ion was hydrolyzed at a rate similar to the rate of acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of 1-methylcytosine, for which it furnishes a satisfactory kinetic model and a probable mechanism. In agreement with earlier reports, uncatalyzed deamination was found to proceed at very similar rates for cytosine, 1-methylcytosine, cytidine, and cytidine 5′-phosphate, and also for cytosine residues in single-stranded DNA generated from a phagemid, in which we sequenced an insert representing the gene of the HIV-1 protease. Arrhenius plots for the uncatalyzed deamination of cytosine were linear over the temperature range from 90 °C to 200 °C and indicated a heat of activation (ΔH‡) of 23.4 ± 0.5 kcal/mol at pH 7. Recent evidence indicates that the surface of the earth has been cool enough to support life for more than 4 billion years and that life has been present for almost as long. If the temperature at Earth's surface is assumed to have followed Newton's law of cooling, declining exponentially from 100 °C to 25 °C during that period, then half of the cytosine-deaminating events per unit biomass would have taken place during the first 0.2 billion years, and <99.4% would have occurred during the first 2 billion years. PMID:27382162

  6. Ionization of cytosine monomer and dimer studied by VUV photoionization and electronic structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Kostko, Oleg; Bravaya, Ksenia; Krylov, Anna; Ahmed, Musahid

    2009-12-14

    We report a combined theoretical and experimental study of ionization of cytosine monomers and dimers. Gas-phase molecules are generated by thermal vaporization of cytosine followed by expansion of the vapor in a continuous supersonic jet seeded in Ar. The resulting species are investigated by single photon ionization with tunable vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation and mass analyzed using reflectron mass spectrometry. Energy onsets for the measured photoionization efficiency (PIE) spectra are 8.60+-0.05 eV and 7.6+-0.1 eV for the monomer and the dimer, respectively, and provide an estimate for the adiabatic ionization energies (AIE). The first AIE and the ten lowest vertical ionization energies (VIEs) for selected isomers of cytosine dimer computed using equation-of-motion coupled-cluster (EOM-IP-CCSD) method are reported. The comparison of the computed VIEs with the derivative of the PIE spectra, suggests that multiple isomers of the cytosine dimer are present in the molecular beam. The calculations reveal that the large red shift (0.7 eV) of the first IE of the lowest-energy cytosine dimer is due to strong inter-fragment electrostatic interactions, i.e., the hole localized on one of the fragments is stabilized by the dipole moment of the other. A sharp rise in the CH+ signal at 9.20+-0.05 eV is ascribed to the formation of protonated cytosine by dissociation of the ionized dimers. The dominant role of this channel is supported by the computed energy thresholds for the CH+ appearance and the barrierless or nearly barrierless ionization-induced proton transfer observed for five isomers of the dimer.

  7. Cytosine deamination and the precipitous decline of spontaneous mutation during Earth's history.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Charles A; Crayle, Jesse; Zhou, Shuntai; Swanstrom, Ronald; Wolfenden, Richard

    2016-07-19

    The hydrolytic deamination of cytosine and 5-methylcytosine residues in DNA appears to contribute significantly to the appearance of spontaneous mutations in microorganisms and in human disease. In the present work, we examined the mechanism of cytosine deamination and the response of the uncatalyzed reaction to changing temperature. The positively charged 1,3-dimethylcytosinium ion was hydrolyzed at a rate similar to the rate of acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of 1-methylcytosine, for which it furnishes a satisfactory kinetic model and a probable mechanism. In agreement with earlier reports, uncatalyzed deamination was found to proceed at very similar rates for cytosine, 1-methylcytosine, cytidine, and cytidine 5'-phosphate, and also for cytosine residues in single-stranded DNA generated from a phagemid, in which we sequenced an insert representing the gene of the HIV-1 protease. Arrhenius plots for the uncatalyzed deamination of cytosine were linear over the temperature range from 90 °C to 200 °C and indicated a heat of activation (ΔH(‡)) of 23.4 ± 0.5 kcal/mol at pH 7. Recent evidence indicates that the surface of the earth has been cool enough to support life for more than 4 billion years and that life has been present for almost as long. If the temperature at Earth's surface is assumed to have followed Newton's law of cooling, declining exponentially from 100 °C to 25 °C during that period, then half of the cytosine-deaminating events per unit biomass would have taken place during the first 0.2 billion years, and <99.4% would have occurred during the first 2 billion years.

  8. Zwitterionic character of nucleotides: possible significance in the evolution of nucleic acids.

    PubMed Central

    Sundaralingam, M; Prusiner, P

    1978-01-01

    X-ray crystallography has shown that the free acids of adenosine 5'- and 3'-monophosphates and of cytidine 5'- and 3'-monophosphates exist as zwiterions in the solid state with protonation of the adenine base at the N(1) site and of the cytosine base at the corresponding site N(3) and the phosphate group negatively charged. In this paper, evidence is presented for the zwitterionic character of the free acids of the monomeric nucleotides guanosine 5'-monophosphate and inosine 5'-monophosphate with protonation of the base at the N(7) site of the imidazole moiety. PMID:724518

  9. Ultrafast internal conversion of excited cytosine via the lowest pipi electronic singlet state.

    PubMed

    Merchán, Manuela; Serrano-Andrés, Luis

    2003-07-09

    Computational evidence at the CASPT2 level supports that the lowest excited state pipi* contributes to the S1/S0 crossing responsible for the ultrafast decay of singlet excited cytosine. The computed radiative lifetime, 33 ns, is consistent with the experimentally derived value, 40 ns. The nOpi* state does not play a direct role in the rapid repopulation of the ground state; it is involved in a S2/S1 crossing. Alternative mechanisms through excited states pisigma* or nNpi* are not competitive in cytosine.

  10. Influence of C5-methylation of cytosine on the formation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoyi; Eriksson, Leif A.

    2005-01-01

    The reaction pathways for thermal and photochemical formation of 5-methylcytosine (m 5C) pyrimidine dimers (CPD) are explored using density functional theory techniques. It is shown that the methylation of cytosine does not contribute to an increased yield of CPDs after UV irradiation due to an even lower excitation energy at the reactant complex of m 5C as compared to cytosine, a larger barrier to reach the decay channel corresponding to the transition state structure along the ground state reaction path, and a higher-lying decay channel.

  11. Global DNA cytosine methylation as an evolving trait: phylogenetic signal and correlated evolution with genome size in angiosperms

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Conchita; Pérez, Ricardo; Bazaga, Pilar; Herrera, Carlos M.

    2015-01-01

    DNA cytosine methylation is a widespread epigenetic mechanism in eukaryotes, and plant genomes commonly are densely methylated. Genomic methylation can be associated with functional consequences such as mutational events, genomic instability or altered gene expression, but little is known on interspecific variation in global cytosine methylation in plants. In this paper, we compare global cytosine methylation estimates obtained by HPLC and use a phylogenetically-informed analytical approach to test for significance of evolutionary signatures of this trait across 54 angiosperm species in 25 families. We evaluate whether interspecific variation in global cytosine methylation is statistically related to phylogenetic distance and also whether it is evolutionarily correlated with genome size (C-value). Global cytosine methylation varied widely between species, ranging between 5.3% (Arabidopsis) and 39.2% (Narcissus). Differences between species were related to their evolutionary trajectories, as denoted by the strong phylogenetic signal underlying interspecific variation. Global cytosine methylation and genome size were evolutionarily correlated, as revealed by the significant relationship between the corresponding phylogenetically independent contrasts. On average, a ten-fold increase in genome size entailed an increase of about 10% in global cytosine methylation. Results show that global cytosine methylation is an evolving trait in angiosperms whose evolutionary trajectory is significantly linked to changes in genome size, and suggest that the evolutionary implications of epigenetic mechanisms are likely to vary between plant lineages. PMID:25688257

  12. Nucleotide signalling during inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Idzko, Marco; Ferrari, Davide; Eltzschig, Holger K.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory conditions are associated with the extracellular release of nucleotides, particularly ATP. In the extracellular compartment, ATP predominantly functions as a signalling molecule through the activation of purinergic P2 receptors. Metabotropic P2Y receptors are G-protein-coupled, whereas ionotropic P2X receptors are ATP-gated ion channels. Here we discuss how signalling events through P2 receptors alter the outcomes of inflammatory or infectious diseases. Recent studies implicate a role for P2X/P2Ysignalling in mounting appropriate inflammatory responses critical for host defence against invading pathogens or tumours. Conversely, P2X/P2Y signalling can promote chronic inflammation during ischaemia and reperfusion injury, inflammatory bowel disease or acute and chronic diseases of the lungs. Although nucleotide signalling has been used clinically in patients before, research indicates an expanding field of opportunities for specifically targeting individual P2 receptors for the treatment of inflammatory or infectious diseases. PMID:24828189

  13. The analytical and biomedical potential of cytosine-rich oligonucleotides: A review.

    PubMed

    Dembska, Anna

    2016-08-03

    Polycytosine DNA strands are often found among natural sequences, including the ends of telomeres, centromeres, and introns or in the regulatory regions of genes. A characteristic feature of oligonucleotides that are rich in cytosine (C-rich) is their ability to associate under acidic conditions to form a tetraplex i-motif consisting of two parallel stranded cytosine-hemiprotonated cytosine (C·C+) base-paired duplexes that are mutually intercalated in an antiparallel orientation. Nanotechnology has been exploiting the advantages of i-motif pH-dependent formation to fabricate nanomachines, nanoswitches, electrodes and intelligent nanosurfaces or nanomaterials. Although a few reviews regarding the structure, properties and applications of i-motifs have been published, this review focuses on recently developed biosensors (e.g., to detect pH, glucose or silver ions) and drug-delivery biomaterials. Furthermore, we have included examples of sensors based on parallel C-rich triplexes and silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) fabricated on cytosine-rich DNA strands. The potential diagnostic and therapeutic applications of this type of material are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Improved cytotoxic effects of Salmonella-producing cytosine deaminase in tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Mesa-Pereira, Beatriz; Medina, Carlos; Camacho, Eva María; Flores, Amando; Santero, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    In order to increase the cytotoxic activity of a Salmonella strain carrying a salicylate-inducible expression system that controls cytosine deaminase production, we have modified both, the vector and the producer bacterium. First, the translation rates of the expression module containing the Escherichia coli codA gene cloned under the control of the Pm promoter have been improved by using the T7 phage gene 10 ribosome binding site sequence and replacing the original GUG start codon by AUG. Second, to increase the time span in which cytosine deaminase may be produced by the bacteria in the presence of 5-fluorocytosine, a 5-fluorouracyl resistant Salmonella strain has been constructed by deleting its upp gene sequence. This new Salmonella strain shows increased cytosine deaminase activity and, after infecting tumour cell cultures, increased cytotoxic and bystander effects under standard induction conditions. In addition, we have generated a purD mutation in the producer strain to control its intracellular proliferation by the presence of adenine and avoid the intrinsic Salmonella cell death induction. This strategy allows the analysis and comparison of the cytotoxic effects of cytosine deaminase produced by different Salmonella strains in tumour cell cultures. © 2014 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  15. A molecular dynamics study of the ligand release path in yeast cytosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lishan; Yan, Honggao; Cukier, Robert I

    2007-04-01

    Yeast cytosine deaminase, a zinc metalloenzyme, catalyzes the deamination of cytosine to uracil. Experimental and computational evidence indicates that the rate-limiting step is product release, instead of the chemical reaction step. In this work, we use molecular dynamics to suggest ligand exit paths. Simulation at 300 K shows that the active site is well protected by the C-terminal helix (residues 150-158) and F-114 loop (residues 111-117) and that on the molecular dynamics timescale water does not flow in or out of the active site. In contrast, simulation at 320 K shows a significant increase in flexibility of the C-terminal helix and F-114 loop. The motions of these two regions at 320 K open the active site and permit water molecules to diffuse into and out of the active site through two paths with one much more favored than the other. Cytosine is pushed out of the active site by a restraint method in two directions specified by these two paths. In path 1 the required motion of the protein is local-involving only the C-terminal helix and F-114 loop-and two residues, F-114 and I-156, are identified that have to be moved away to let cytosine out; whereas in path 2, the protein has to rearrange itself much more extensively, and the changes are also much larger compared to the path 1 simulation.

  16. A molecular dynamics exploration of the catalytic mechanism of yeast cytosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lishan; Sklenak, Stepan; Yan, Honggao; Cukier, Robert I

    2005-04-21

    Yeast cytosine deaminase (yCD), a zinc metalloenzyme of significant biomedical interest, is investigated by a series of molecular dynamics simulations in its free form and complexed with its reactant (cytosine), product (uracil), several reaction intermediates, and an intermediate analogue. Quantum chemical calculations, used to construct a model for the catalytic Zn ion with its ligands (two cysteines, a histidine, and one water) show, by comparison with crystal structure data, that the cysteines are deprotonated and the histidine is monoprotonated. The simulations suggest that Glu64 plays a critical role in the catalysis by yCD. The rotation of the Glu64 side-chain carboxyl group that can be protonated or deprotonated permits it to act as a proton shuttle between the Zn-bound water and cytosine and subsequent reaction intermediates. Free energy methods are used to obtain the barriers for these rotations, and they are sufficiently small to permit rotation on a nanosecond time scale. In the course of the reaction, cytosine reorients to a geometry to favor nucleophilic attack by a Zn-bound hydroxide. A stable position for a reaction product, ammonia, was located in the active site, and the free energy of exchange with a water molecule was evaluated. The simulations also reveal small motions of the C-terminus and the loop that contains Phe114 that may be important for reactant binding and product release.

  17. Nucleotide cleaving agents and method

    DOEpatents

    Que, Jr., Lawrence; Hanson, Richard S.; Schnaith, Leah M. T.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides a unique series of nucleotide cleaving agents and a method for cleaving a nucleotide sequence, whether single-stranded or double-stranded DNA or RNA, using and a cationic metal complex having at least one polydentate ligand to cleave the nucleotide sequence phosphate backbone to yield a hydroxyl end and a phosphate end.

  18. Cytosine methylation alteration in natural populations of Leymus chinensis induced by multiple abiotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yingjie; Yang, Xuejiao; Wang, Huaying; Shi, Fengxue; Liu, Ying; Liu, Jushan; Li, Linfeng; Wang, Deli; Liu, Bao

    2013-01-01

    Human activity has a profound effect on the global environment and caused frequent occurrence of climatic fluctuations. To survive, plants need to adapt to the changing environmental conditions through altering their morphological and physiological traits. One known mechanism for phenotypic innovation to be achieved is environment-induced rapid yet inheritable epigenetic changes. Therefore, the use of molecular techniques to address the epigenetic mechanisms underpinning stress adaptation in plants is an important and challenging topic in biological research. In this study, we investigated the impact of warming, nitrogen (N) addition, and warming+nitrogen (N) addition stresses on the cytosine methylation status of Leymus chinensis Tzvel. at the population level by using the amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP), methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism (MSAP) and retrotransposon based sequence-specific amplification polymorphism (SSAP) techniques. Our results showed that, although the percentages of cytosine methylation changes in SSAP are significantly higher than those in MSAP, all the treatment groups showed similar alteration patterns of hypermethylation and hypomethylation. It meant that the abiotic stresses have induced the alterations in cytosine methylation patterns, and the levels of cytosine methylation changes around the transposable element are higher than the other genomic regions. In addition, the identification and analysis of differentially methylated loci (DML) indicated that the abiotic stresses have also caused targeted methylation changes at specific loci and these DML might have contributed to the capability of plants in adaptation to the abiotic stresses. Our results demonstrated that abiotic stresses related to global warming and nitrogen deposition readily evoke alterations of cytosine methylation, and which may provide a molecular basis for rapid adaptation by the affected plant populations to the changed environments.

  19. Yeast Cytosine Deaminase Mutants with Increased Thermostability Impart Sensitivity to 5-Fluorocytosine

    PubMed Central

    Stolworthy, Tiffany S.; Korkegian, Aaron M.; Willmon, Candice L.; Ardiani, Andressa; Cundiff, Jennifer; Stoddard, Barry L.; Black, Margaret E.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Prodrug gene therapy (PGT) is a treatment strategy in which tumor cells are transfected with a 'suicide' gene that encodes a metabolic enzyme capable of converting a nontoxic prodrug into a potent cytotoxin. One of the most promising PGT enzymes is cytosine deaminase (CD), a microbial salvage enzyme that converts cytosine to uracil. CD also converts 5-fluorocytosine (5FC) to 5-fluorouracil (5FU), an inhibitor of DNA synthesis and RNA function. Over 150 studies of cytosine deaminase-mediated PGT applications have been reported since 2000, all using wild-type enzymes. However, various forms of cytosine deaminase are limited by inefficient turnover of 5FC and/or limited thermostability. In a previous study we stabilized and extended the half-life of yeast cytosine deaminase (yCD) by repacking of its hydrophobic core at several positions distant from the active site. Here we report that random mutagenesis of residues selected based on alignment with similar enzymes, followed by selection for enhanced sensitization to 5FC, also produces an enzyme variant (yCD-D92E) with elevated Tm values and increased activity half-life. The new mutation is located at the enzyme's dimer interface, indicating that independent mutational pathways can lead to an increase in the temperature that induces protein unfolding and aggregation in thermal denaturation experiments measured by circular dichroism spectroscopy, and an increase in the half-life of enzyme activity at physiological temperature, as well as more subtle effect on enzyme kinetics. Each independently derived set of mutations significantly improves the enzyme's performance in PGT assays both in cell culture and in animal models. PMID:18291415

  20. Quantum Point Contact Single-Nucleotide Conductance for DNA and RNA Sequence Identification.

    PubMed

    Afsari, Sepideh; Korshoj, Lee E; Abel, Gary R; Khan, Sajida; Chatterjee, Anushree; Nagpal, Prashant

    2017-10-06

    Several nanoscale electronic methods have been proposed for high-throughput single-molecule nucleic acid sequence identification. While many studies display a large ensemble of measurements as "electronic fingerprints" with some promise for distinguishing the DNA and RNA nucleobases (adenine, guanine, cytosine, thymine, and uracil), important metrics such as accuracy and confidence of base calling fall well below the current genomic methods. Issues such as unreliable metal-molecule junction formation, variation of nucleotide conformations, insufficient differences between the molecular orbitals responsible for single-nucleotide conduction, and lack of rigorous base calling algorithms lead to overlapping nanoelectronic measurements and poor nucleotide discrimination, especially at low coverage on single molecules. Here, we demonstrate a technique for reproducible conductance measurements on conformation-constrained single nucleotides and an advanced algorithmic approach for distinguishing the nucleobases. Our quantum point contact single-nucleotide conductance sequencing (QPICS) method uses combed and electrostatically bound single DNA and RNA nucleotides on a self-assembled monolayer of cysteamine molecules. We demonstrate that by varying the applied bias and pH conditions, molecular conductance can be switched ON and OFF, leading to reversible nucleotide perturbation for electronic recognition (NPER). We utilize NPER as a method to achieve >99.7% accuracy for DNA and RNA base calling at low molecular coverage (∼12×) using unbiased single measurements on DNA/RNA nucleotides, which represents a significant advance compared to existing sequencing methods. These results demonstrate the potential for utilizing simple surface modifications and existing biochemical moieties in individual nucleobases for a reliable, direct, single-molecule, nanoelectronic DNA and RNA nucleotide identification method for sequencing.

  1. A ribozyme composed of only two different nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Reader, John S; Joyce, Gerald F

    RNA molecules are thought to have been prominent in the early history of life on Earth because of their ability both to encode genetic information and to exhibit catalytic function. The modern genetic alphabet relies on two sets of complementary base pairs to store genetic information. However, owing to the chemical instability of cytosine, which readily deaminates to uracil, a primitive genetic system composed of the bases A, U, G and C may have been difficult to establish. It has been suggested that the first genetic material instead contained only a single base-pairing unit. Here we show that binary informational macromolecules, containing only two different nucleotide subunits, can act as catalysts. In vitro evolution was used to obtain ligase ribozymes composed of only 2,6-diaminopurine and uracil nucleotides, which catalyse the template-directed joining of two RNA molecules, one bearing a 5'-triphosphate and the other a 3'-hydroxyl. The active conformation of the fastest isolated ribozyme had a catalytic rate that was about 36,000-fold faster than the uncatalysed rate of reaction. This ribozyme is specific for the formation of biologically relevant 3',5'-phosphodiester linkages.

  2. Structural insights into the nucleotide base specificity of P2X receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kasuya, Go; Fujiwara, Yuichiro; Tsukamoto, Hisao; Morinaga, Satoshi; Ryu, Satoshi; Touhara, Kazushige; Ishitani, Ryuichiro; Furutani, Yuji; Hattori, Motoyuki; Nureki, Osamu

    2017-01-01

    P2X receptors are trimeric ATP-gated cation channels involved in diverse physiological processes, ranging from muscle contraction to nociception. Despite the recent structure determination of the ATP-bound P2X receptors, the molecular mechanism of the nucleotide base specificity has remained elusive. Here, we present the crystal structure of zebrafish P2X4 in complex with a weak affinity agonist, CTP, together with structure-based electrophysiological and spectroscopic analyses. The CTP-bound structure revealed a hydrogen bond, between the cytosine base and the side chain of the basic residue in the agonist binding site, which mediates the weak but significant affinity for CTP. The cytosine base is further recognized by two main chain atoms, as in the ATP-bound structure, but their bond lengths seem to be extended in the CTP-bound structure, also possibly contributing to the weaker affinity for CTP over ATP. This work provides the structural insights for the nucleotide base specificity of P2X receptors. PMID:28332633

  3. N3 and O2 Protonated Conformers of the Cytosine Mononucleotides Coexist in the Gas Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, R. R.; Hamlow, L. A.; He, C. C.; Nei, Y.-w.; Berden, G.; Oomens, J.; Rodgers, M. T.

    2017-08-01

    The gas-phase conformations of the protonated forms of the DNA and RNA cytosine mononucleotides, [pdCyd+H]+ and [pCyd+H]+, are examined by infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) action spectroscopy over the IR fingerprint and hydrogen-stretching regions complemented by electronic structure calculations. The low-energy conformations of [pdCyd+H]+ and [pCyd+H]+ and their relative stabilities are computed at the B3LYP/6-311+G(2d,2p)//B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) and MP2(full)/6-311+G(2d,2p)//B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) levels of theory. Comparisons of the measured IRMPD action spectra and B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) linear IR spectra computed for the low-energy conformers allow the conformers present in the experiments to be determined. Similar to that found in previous IRMPD action spectroscopy studies of the protonated forms of the cytosine nucleosides, [dCyd+H]+ and [Cyd+H]+, both N3 and O2 protonated cytosine mononucleotides exhibiting an anti orientation of cytosine are found to coexist in the experimental population. The 2'-hydroxyl substituent does not significantly influence the most stable conformations of [pCyd+H]+ versus those of [pdCyd+H]+, as the IRMPD spectral profiles of [pdCyd+H]+ and [pCyd+H]+ are similar. However, the presence of the 2'-hydroxyl substituent does influence the relative intensities of the measured IRMPD bands. Comparisons to IRMPD spectroscopy studies of the deprotonated forms of the cytosine mononucleotides, [pdCyd-H]- and [pCyd-H]-, provide insight into the effects of protonation versus deprotonation on the conformational features of the nucleobase and sugar moieties. Likewise, comparisons to results of IRMPD spectroscopy studies of the protonated cytosine nucleosides provide insight into the influence of the phosphate moiety on structure. Comparison with previous ion mobility results shows the superiority of IRMPD spectroscopy for distinguishing various protonation sites.

  4. Impact of cytosine 5-halogens on the interaction of DNA with restriction endonucleases and methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Valinluck, Victoria; Wu, Winnie; Liu, Pingfang; Neidigh, Jonathan W; Sowers, Lawrence C

    2006-04-01

    Growing evidence from both prokaryotes and eukaryotes indicates that pyrimidine 5-methyl groups can have profound biological consequences that are mediated by the affinity of DNA-protein interactions. The presence of the 5-methyl group could potentially create a steric block preventing the binding of some proteins whereas the affinity of many other proteins is substantially increased by pyrimidine methylation. In this paper, we have constructed a series of oligonucleotides containing cytosine and a series of 5-substituted cytosine analogues including all halogens. This set of oligonucleotides has been used to probe the relationship between the size of the substituent and its capacity to modulate cleavage by the methylation-sensitive restriction endonucleases MspI and HpaII. Additionally, we have examined the impact of the halogen substitution on the corresponding bacterial methyltransferase (M.HpaII). We observed that MspI cleavage is only subtly affected by substituted cytosine analogues at the inner position of the CCGG recognition site. In contrast, HpaII cleaves cytosine-containing oligonucleotides completely whereas 5-fluorocytosine-containing oligonucleotides are cleaved at a reduced rate. The presence of the larger halogens Cl, Br, or I as well as a methyl group completely prevents cleavage by HpaII. These data suggest that the steric wall is encountered by HpaII slightly beyond the fluorine substituent, at about 2.65 A from the pyrimidine C5-position. It is known that 5-fluorocytosine in an oligonucleotide can form a covalent irreversible suicide complex with either prokaryotic or eukaryotic methyltransferases. Kinetic data reported here suggest that the 5-fluorocytosine-containing oligonucleotide can also inhibit M.HpaII by formation of a reversible, noncovalent complex. Our results indicate that although a 5-Cl substituent has electronic properties similar to 5-F, 5-chlorocytosine duplexes neither form a complex with M.HpaII nor inhibit enzymatic

  5. RNA Secondary Structures Having a Compatible Sequence of Certain Nucleotide Ratios.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Christopher L; Li, Thomas J X; Reidys, Christian M

    2016-11-01

    Given a random RNA secondary structure, S, we study RNA sequences having fixed ratios of nucleotides that are compatible with S. We perform this analysis for RNA secondary structures subject to various base-pairing rules and minimum arc- and stack-length restrictions. Our main result reads as follows: in the simplex of nucleotide ratios, there exists a convex region, in which, in the limit of long sequences, a random structure asymptotically almost surely (a.a.s.) has compatible sequence with these ratios and outside of which a.a.s. a random structure has no such compatible sequence. We localize this region for RNA secondary structures subject to various base-pairing rules and minimum arc- and stack-length restrictions. In particular, for GC-sequences (GC denoting the nucleotides guanine and cytosine, respectively) having a ratio of G nucleotides smaller than 1/3, a random RNA secondary structure without any minimum arc- and stack-length restrictions has a.a.s. no such compatible sequence. For sequences having a ratio of G nucleotides larger than 1/3, a random RNA secondary structure has a.a.s. such compatible sequences. We discuss our results in the context of various families of RNA structures.

  6. Prokaryotic nucleotide composition is shaped by both phylogeny and the environment.

    PubMed

    Reichenberger, Erin R; Rosen, Gail; Hershberg, Uri; Hershberg, Ruth

    2015-04-09

    The causes of the great variation in nucleotide composition of prokaryotic genomes have long been disputed. Here, we use extensive metagenomic and whole-genome data to demonstrate that both phylogeny and the environment shape prokaryotic nucleotide content. We show that across environments, various phyla are characterized by different mean guanine and cytosine (GC) values as well as by the extent of variation on that mean value. At the same time, we show that GC-content varies greatly as a function of environment, in a manner that cannot be entirely explained by disparities in phylogenetic composition. We find environmentally driven differences in nucleotide content not only between highly diverged environments (e.g., soil, vs. aquatic vs. human gut) but also within a single type of environment. More specifically, we demonstrate that some human guts are associated with a microbiome that is consistently more GC-rich across phyla, whereas others are associated with a more AT-rich microbiome. These differences appear to be driven both by variations in phylogenetic composition and by environmental differences-which are independent of these phylogenetic composition differences. Combined, our results demonstrate that both phylogeny and the environment significantly affect nucleotide composition and that the environmental differences affecting nucleotide composition are far subtler than previously appreciated.

  7. Stable loop in the crystal structure of the intercalated four-stranded cytosine-rich metazoan telomere

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, C.H.; Lockshin, C.; Rich, A.

    1995-04-25

    In most metazoans, the telomeric cytosine-rich strand repeating sequence is d(TAACCC). The crystal structure of this sequence was solved to 1.9-{angstrom} resolution. Four strands associate via the cytosine-containing parts to form a four-stranded intercalated structure held together by C-C{sup +} hydrogen bonds. The base-paired strands are parallel to each other, and the two duplexes are intercalated into each other in opposite orientations. One TAA end forms a highly stabilized loop with the 5{prime} thymine Hoogsteen-base-paired to the third adenine. The 5{prime} end of this loop is in close proximity to the 3{prime} end of one of the other intercalated cytosine strands. Instead of being entirely in a DNA duplex, this structure suggests the possibility of an alternative conformation for the cytosine-rich telomere strands. 25 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Stable loop in the crystal structure of the intercalated four-stranded cytosine-rich metazoan telomere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, C.; Berger, I.; Lockshin, C.; Ratliff, R.; Moyzis, R.; Rich, A.

    1995-01-01

    In most metazoans, the telomeric cytosine-rich strand repeating sequence is d(TAACCC). The crystal structure of this sequence was solved to 1.9-A resolution. Four strands associate via the cytosine-containing parts to form a four-stranded intercalated structure held together by C.C+ hydrogen bonds. The base-paired strands are parallel to each other, and the two duplexes are intercalated into each other in opposite orientations. One TAA end forms a highly stabilized loop with the 5' thymine Hoogsteen-base-paired to the third adenine. The 5' end of this loop is in close proximity to the 3' end of one of the other intercalated cytosine strands. Instead of being entirely in a DNA duplex, this structure suggests the possibility of an alternative conformation for the cytosine-rich telomere strands.

  9. Stable loop in the crystal structure of the intercalated four-stranded cytosine-rich metazoan telomere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, C.; Berger, I.; Lockshin, C.; Ratliff, R.; Moyzis, R.; Rich, A.

    1995-01-01

    In most metazoans, the telomeric cytosine-rich strand repeating sequence is d(TAACCC). The crystal structure of this sequence was solved to 1.9-A resolution. Four strands associate via the cytosine-containing parts to form a four-stranded intercalated structure held together by C.C+ hydrogen bonds. The base-paired strands are parallel to each other, and the two duplexes are intercalated into each other in opposite orientations. One TAA end forms a highly stabilized loop with the 5' thymine Hoogsteen-base-paired to the third adenine. The 5' end of this loop is in close proximity to the 3' end of one of the other intercalated cytosine strands. Instead of being entirely in a DNA duplex, this structure suggests the possibility of an alternative conformation for the cytosine-rich telomere strands.

  10. Template polymerization of nucleotide analogues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orgel, L. E.

    1991-01-01

    Recent work on the template-directed reactions of the natural D-nucleotides has made it clear that l-nucleotides and nucleotide-like derivatives of other sugars would strongly inhibit the formation of long oligonucleotides. Consequently, attention is focusing on molecules simpler than nucleotides that might have acted as monomers of an information transfer system. We have begun a general exploration of the template directed reactions of diverse peptide analogues. I will present work by Dr. Taifeng Wu on oxidative oligomerization of phosphorothioates and of Dr. Mary Tohidi on the cyclic polymerization of nucleoside and related cyclic pyrophosphates.

  11. Gas-Phase Cytosine and Cytosine-N1-Derivatives Have 0.1-1 ns Lifetimes Near the S1 State Minimum.

    PubMed

    Blaser, Susan; Trachsel, Maria A; Lobsiger, Simon; Wiedmer, Timo; Frey, Hans-Martin; Leutwyler, Samuel

    2016-03-03

    Ultraviolet radiative damage to DNA is inefficient because of the ultrafast S1 ⇝ S0 internal conversion of its nucleobases. Using picosecond pump-ionization delay measurements, we find that the S1((1)ππ*) state vibrationless lifetime of gas-phase keto-amino cytosine (Cyt) is τ = 730 ps or ∼ 700 times longer than that measured by femtosecond pump-probe ionization at higher vibrational excess energy, Eexc. N1-Alkylation increases the S1 lifetime up to τ = 1030 ps for N1-ethyl-Cyt but decreases it to 100 ps for N1-isopropyl-Cyt. Increasing the vibrational energy to Eexc = 300-550 cm(-1) decreases the lifetimes to 20-30 ps. The nonradiative dynamics of S1 cytosine is not solely a property of the amino-pyrimidinone chromophore but is strongly influenced by the N1-substituent. Correlated excited-state calculations predict that the gap between the S2((1)nOπ*) and S1((1)ππ*) states decreases along the series of N1-derivatives, thereby influencing the S1 state lifetime.

  12. Imidazole rescue of a cytosine mutation in a self-cleaving ribozyme.

    PubMed

    Perrotta, A T; Shih, I; Been, M D

    1999-10-01

    Ribozymes use a number of the same catalytic strategies as protein enzymes. However, general base catalysis by a ribozyme has not been demonstrated. In the hepatitis delta virus antigenomic ribozyme, imidazole buffer rescued activity of a mutant with a cytosine-76 (C76) to uracil substitution. In addition, a C76 to adenine substitution reduced the apparent pKa (where Ka is the acid constant) of the self-cleavage reaction by an amount consistent with differences in the pKa values of these two side chains. These results suggest that, in the wild-type ribozyme, C76 acts as a general base. This finding has implications for potential catalytic functions of conserved cytosines and adenines in other ribozymes and in ribonuclear proteins with enzymatic activity.

  13. Cytosine-specific chemical probing of DNA using bromide and monoperoxysulfate.

    PubMed

    Ross, S A; Burrows, C J

    1996-12-15

    Bromination of cytosine and formation of a piperidine-labile site are observed when two simple salts, KBr and KHSO5, are allowed to react with single-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides. Selectivity for C compared with T, G or A is typically a factor of 4 or more; selectivity for Cs in a single-stranded region such as a C-bulge is nearly a factor of 10 compared with duplex Cs. Low reactivity and little base selectivity are observed using duplex DNA, although increased concentrations of reagents lead to complete degradation of the DNA. The results suggest that these conditions for in situ generation of Br2 constitute a useful tool for examination of the exposure of a non-duplex cytosine base in folded DNA structures.

  14. Cytosine-specific chemical probing of DNA using bromide and monoperoxysulfate.

    PubMed Central

    Ross, S A; Burrows, C J

    1996-01-01

    Bromination of cytosine and formation of a piperidine-labile site are observed when two simple salts, KBr and KHSO5, are allowed to react with single-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides. Selectivity for C compared with T, G or A is typically a factor of 4 or more; selectivity for Cs in a single-stranded region such as a C-bulge is nearly a factor of 10 compared with duplex Cs. Low reactivity and little base selectivity are observed using duplex DNA, although increased concentrations of reagents lead to complete degradation of the DNA. The results suggest that these conditions for in situ generation of Br2 constitute a useful tool for examination of the exposure of a non-duplex cytosine base in folded DNA structures. PMID:9016685

  15. Reaction mechanism of zinc-dependent cytosine deaminase from Escherichia coli: a quantum-chemical study.

    PubMed

    Manta, Bianca; Raushel, Frank M; Himo, Fahmi

    2014-05-29

    The reaction mechanism of cytosine deaminase from Escherichia coli is studied using density functional theory. This zinc-dependent enzyme catalyzes the deamination of cytosine to form uracil and ammonia. The calculations give a detailed description of the catalytic mechanism and establish the role of important active-site residues. It is shown that Glu217 is essential for the initial deprotonation of the metal-bound water nucleophile and the subsequent protonation of the substrate. It is also demonstrated that His246 is unlikely to function as a proton shuttle in the nucleophile activation step, as previously proposed. The steps that follow are nucleophilic attack by the metal-bound hydroxide, protonation of the leaving group assisted by Asp313, and C-N bond cleavage. The calculated overall barrier is in good agreement with the experimental findings. Finally, the calculations reproduce the experimentally determined inverse solvent deuterium isotope effect, which further corroborates the suggested reaction mechanism.

  16. Stabilization of Aspergillus parasiticus cytosine deaminase by immobilization on calcium alginate beads improved enzyme operational stability.

    PubMed

    Zanna, H; Nok, A J; Ibrahim, S; Inuwa, H M

    2013-12-01

    Cytosine deaminase (CD) from Aspergillus parasiticus, which has half-life of 1.10 h at 37°C, was stabilized by immobilization on calcium alginate beads. The immobilized CD had pH and temperature optimum of 5 and 50°C respectively. The immobilized enzyme also stoichiometrically deaminated Cytosine and 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) with the apparent K(M) values of 0.60 mM and 0.65 mM respectively, displaying activation energy of 10.72 KJ/mol. The immobilization of native CD on calcium alginate beads gave the highest yield of apparent enzymatic activity of 51.60% of the original activity and the enzymatic activity was lost exponentially at 37°C over 12 h with a half-life of 5.80 h. Hence, the operational stability of native CD can be improved by immobilization on calcium alginate beads.

  17. O2 Protonation Controls Threshold Behavior for N-Glycosidic Bond Cleavage of Protonated Cytosine Nucleosides.

    PubMed

    Wu, R R; Rodgers, M T

    2016-06-02

    IRMPD action spectroscopy studies of protonated 2'-deoxycytidine and cytidine, [dCyd+H](+) and [Cyd+H](+), have established that both N3 and O2 protonated conformers coexist in the gas phase. Threshold collision-induced dissociation (CID) of [dCyd+H](+) and [Cyd+H](+) is investigated here using guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometry techniques to elucidate the mechanisms and energetics for N-glycosidic bond cleavage. N-Glycosidic bond cleavage is observed as the major dissociation pathways resulting in competitive elimination of either protonated or neutral cytosine for both protonated cytosine nucleosides. Electronic structure calculations are performed to map the potential energy surfaces (PESs) for both N-glycosidic bond cleavage pathways observed. The molecular parameters derived from theoretical calculations are employed for thermochemical analysis of the energy-dependent CID data to determine the minimum energies required to cleave the N-glycosidic bond along each pathway. B3LYP and MP2(full) computed activation energies for N-glycosidic bond cleavage associated with elimination of protonated and neutral cytosine, respectively, are compared to measured values to evaluate the efficacy of these theoretical methods in describing the dissociation mechanisms and PESs for N-glycosidic bond cleavage. The 2'-hydroxyl of [Cyd+H](+) is found to enhance the stability of the N-glycosidic bond vs that of [dCyd+H](+). O2 protonation is found to control the threshold energies for N-glycosidic bond cleavage as loss of neutral cytosine from the O2 protonated conformers is found to require ∼25 kJ/mol less energy than the N3 protonated analogues, and the activation energies and reaction enthalpies computed using B3LYP exhibit excellent agreement with the measured thresholds for the O2 protonated conformers.

  18. Cytosine deamination is a major cause of baseline noise in next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guoli; Mosier, Stacy; Gocke, Christopher D; Lin, Ming-Tseh; Eshleman, James R

    2014-10-01

    As next-generation sequencing (NGS) becomes a major sequencing platform in clinical diagnostic laboratories, it is critical to identify artifacts that constitute baseline noise and may interfere with detection of low-level gene mutations. This is especially critical for applications requiring ultrasensitive detection, such as molecular relapse of solid tumors and early detection of cancer. We recently observed a ~10-fold higher frequency of C:G > T:A mutations than the background noise level in both wild-type peripheral blood and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples. We hypothesized that these might represent cytosine deamination events, which have been seen using other platforms. To test this hypothesis, we pretreated samples with uracil N-glycosylase (UNG). Additionally, to test whether some of the cytosine deamination might be a laboratory artifact, we simulated the heat associated with polymerase chain reaction thermocycling by subjecting samples to thermocycling in the absence of polymerase. To test the safety of universal UNG pretreatment, we tested known positive samples treated with UNG. UNG pretreatment significantly reduced the frequencies of these mutations, consistent with a biologic source of cytosine deamination. The simulated thermocycling-heated samples demonstrated significantly increased frequencies of C:G > T:A mutations without other baseline base substitutions being affected. Samples with known mutations demonstrated no decrease in our ability to detect these after treatment with UNG. Baseline noise during NGS is mostly due to cytosine deamination, the source of which is likely to be both biologic and an artifact of thermocycling, and it can be reduced by UNG pretreatment.

  19. The Role of Cytosine Methylation on Charge Transport through a DNA Strand

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Jianqing; Govind, Niranjan; Anantram, M. P.

    2015-09-04

    Cytosine methylation has been found to play a crucial role in various biological processes, including a number of human diseases. The detection of this small modifi-cation remains challenging. In this work, we computationally explore the possibility of detecting methylated DNA strands through direct electrical conductance measurements. Using density functional theory and the Landauer-Buttiker method, we study the electronic properties and charge transport through an eight base-pair methylated DNA strand and its native counterpart. Specifically, we compare the results generated with the widely used B3LYP exchange-correlation (XC) functional and CAM-B3LYP based tuned range-separated hybrid density functional. We first analyze the effect of cytosine methylation on the tight-binding parameters of two DNA strands and then model the transmission of the electrons and conductance through the strands both with and without decoherence. We find that with both functionals, the main difference of the tight-binding parameters between the native DNA and the methylated DNA lies in the on-site energies of (methylated) cytosine bases. The intra- and interstrand hopping integrals between two nearest neighboring guanine base and (methylated) cytosine base also change with the addition of the methyl groups. Our calculations show that in the phase-coherent limit, the transmission of the methylated strand is close to the native strand when the energy is nearby the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) level and larger than the native strand by 5 times in the bandgap. The trend in transmission also holds in the presence of the decoherence with both functionals. We also study the effect of contact coupling by choosing coupling strengths ranging from weak to strong coupling limit. Our results suggest that the effect of the two different functionals is to alter the on-site energies of the DNA bases at the HOMO level, while the transport properties don't depend much on the two functionals.

  20. The role of cytosine methylation on charge transport through a DNA strand

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Jianqing Anantram, M. P.; Govind, Niranjan

    2015-09-07

    Cytosine methylation has been found to play a crucial role in various biological processes, including a number of human diseases. The detection of this small modification remains challenging. In this work, we computationally explore the possibility of detecting methylated DNA strands through direct electrical conductance measurements. Using density functional theory and the Landauer-Büttiker method, we study the electronic properties and charge transport through an eight base-pair methylated DNA strand and its native counterpart. We first analyze the effect of cytosine methylation on the tight-binding parameters of two DNA strands and then model the transmission of the electrons and conductance through the strands both with and without decoherence. We find that the main difference of the tight-binding parameters between the native DNA and the methylated DNA lies in the on-site energies of (methylated) cytosine bases. The intra- and inter-strand hopping integrals between two nearest neighboring guanine base and (methylated) cytosine base also change with the addition of the methyl groups. Our calculations show that in the phase-coherent limit, the transmission of the methylated strand is close to the native strand when the energy is nearby the highest occupied molecular orbital level and larger than the native strand by 5 times in the bandgap. The trend in transmission also holds in the presence of the decoherence with the same rate. The lower conductance for the methylated strand in the experiment is suggested to be caused by the more stable structure due to the introduction of the methyl groups. We also study the role of the exchange-correlation functional and the effect of contact coupling by choosing coupling strengths ranging from weak to strong coupling limit.

  1. Overcoming transcription activator-like effector (TALE) DNA binding domain sensitivity to cytosine methylation.

    PubMed

    Valton, Julien; Dupuy, Aurélie; Daboussi, Fayza; Thomas, Séverine; Maréchal, Alan; Macmaster, Rachel; Melliand, Kevin; Juillerat, Alexandre; Duchateau, Philippe

    2012-11-09

    Within the past 2 years, transcription activator-like effector (TALE) DNA binding domains have emerged as the new generation of engineerable platform for production of custom DNA binding domains. However, their recently described sensitivity to cytosine methylation represents a major bottleneck for genome engineering applications. Using a combination of biochemical, structural, and cellular approaches, we were able to identify the molecular basis of such sensitivity and propose a simple, drug-free, and universal method to overcome it.

  2. Molecular energetics of cytosine revisited: a joint computational and experimental study.

    PubMed

    Gomes, José R B; Ribeiro da Silva, Maria D M C; Freitas, Vera L S; Ribeiro da Silva, Manuel A V

    2007-08-02

    A static bomb calorimeter has been used to measure the standard molar energy of combustion, in oxygen, at T = 298.15 K, of a commercial sample of cytosine. From this energy, the standard (p degrees = 0.1 MPa) molar enthalpy of formation in the crystalline state was derived as -(221.9 +/- 1.7) kJ.mol(-1). This value confirms one experimental value already published in the literature but differs from another literature value by 13.5 kJ.mol(-1). Using the present standard molar enthalpy of formation in the condensed phase and the enthalpy of sublimation due to Burkinshaw and Mortimer [J. Chem. Soc., Dalton Trans. 1984, 75], (155.0 +/- 3.0) kJ.mol(-1), results in a value for the gas-phase standard molar enthalpy of formation for cytosine of -66.9 kJ.mol(-1). A similar value, -65.1 kJ.mol(-1), has been estimated after G3MP2B3 calculations combined with the reaction of atomization on three different tautomers of cytosine. In agreement with experimental evidence, the hydroxy-amino tautomer is the most stable form of cytosine in the gas phase. The enthalpies of formation of the other two tautomers were also estimated as -60.7 kJ.mol(-1) and -57.2 kJ.mol(-1) for the oxo-amino and oxo-imino tautomers, respectively. The same composite approach was also used to compute other thermochemical data, which is difficult to be measured experimentally, such as C-H, N-H, and O-H bond dissociation enthalpies, gas-phase acidities, and ionization enthalpies.

  3. The role of cytosine methylation on charge transport through a DNA strand.

    PubMed

    Qi, Jianqing; Govind, Niranjan; Anantram, M P

    2015-09-07

    Cytosine methylation has been found to play a crucial role in various biological processes, including a number of human diseases. The detection of this small modification remains challenging. In this work, we computationally explore the possibility of detecting methylated DNA strands through direct electrical conductance measurements. Using density functional theory and the Landauer-Büttiker method, we study the electronic properties and charge transport through an eight base-pair methylated DNA strand and its native counterpart. We first analyze the effect of cytosine methylation on the tight-binding parameters of two DNA strands and then model the transmission of the electrons and conductance through the strands both with and without decoherence. We find that the main difference of the tight-binding parameters between the native DNA and the methylated DNA lies in the on-site energies of (methylated) cytosine bases. The intra- and inter-strand hopping integrals between two nearest neighboring guanine base and (methylated) cytosine base also change with the addition of the methyl groups. Our calculations show that in the phase-coherent limit, the transmission of the methylated strand is close to the native strand when the energy is nearby the highest occupied molecular orbital level and larger than the native strand by 5 times in the bandgap. The trend in transmission also holds in the presence of the decoherence with the same rate. The lower conductance for the methylated strand in the experiment is suggested to be caused by the more stable structure due to the introduction of the methyl groups. We also study the role of the exchange-correlation functional and the effect of contact coupling by choosing coupling strengths ranging from weak to strong coupling limit.

  4. The role of cytosine methylation on charge transport through a DNA strand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Jianqing; Govind, Niranjan; Anantram, M. P.

    2015-09-01

    Cytosine methylation has been found to play a crucial role in various biological processes, including a number of human diseases. The detection of this small modification remains challenging. In this work, we computationally explore the possibility of detecting methylated DNA strands through direct electrical conductance measurements. Using density functional theory and the Landauer-Büttiker method, we study the electronic properties and charge transport through an eight base-pair methylated DNA strand and its native counterpart. We first analyze the effect of cytosine methylation on the tight-binding parameters of two DNA strands and then model the transmission of the electrons and conductance through the strands both with and without decoherence. We find that the main difference of the tight-binding parameters between the native DNA and the methylated DNA lies in the on-site energies of (methylated) cytosine bases. The intra- and inter-strand hopping integrals between two nearest neighboring guanine base and (methylated) cytosine base also change with the addition of the methyl groups. Our calculations show that in the phase-coherent limit, the transmission of the methylated strand is close to the native strand when the energy is nearby the highest occupied molecular orbital level and larger than the native strand by 5 times in the bandgap. The trend in transmission also holds in the presence of the decoherence with the same rate. The lower conductance for the methylated strand in the experiment is suggested to be caused by the more stable structure due to the introduction of the methyl groups. We also study the role of the exchange-correlation functional and the effect of contact coupling by choosing coupling strengths ranging from weak to strong coupling limit.

  5. The Three-Dimensional Structure and Catalytic Mechanism of Cytosine Deaminase†

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Richard S.; Fedorov, Alexander A.; Xu, Chengfu; Fedorov, Elena V.; Almo, Steven C.; Raushel, Frank M.

    2011-01-01

    Cytosine deaminase (CDA) from E. coli is a member of the amidohydrolase superfamily. The structure of the zinc-activated enzyme was determined in the presence of phosphonocytosine, a mimic of the tetrahedral reaction intermediate. This compound inhibits the deamination of cytosine with a Ki of 52 nM. The zinc and iron containing enzymes were characterized to determine the effect of the divalent cations on activation of the hydrolytic water. Fe-CDA loses activity at low pH with a kinetic pKa of 6.0 and Zn-CDA has a kinetic pKa of 7.3. Mutation of Gln-156 decreased the catalytic activity by more than 5 orders of magnitude, supporting its role in substrate binding. Mutation of Glu-217, Asp-313, and His-246 significantly decreased catalytic activity supporting the role of these three residues in activation of the hydrolytic water molecule and facilitation of proton transfer reactions. A library of potential substrates was used to probe the structural determinants responsible for catalytic activity. CDA was able to catalyze the deamination of isocytosine and the hydrolysis of 3-oxauracil. Large inverse solvent isotope effects were obtained on kcat and kcat/Km, consistent with the formation of a low-barrier hydrogen bond during the conversion of cytosine to uracil. A chemical mechanism for substrate deamination by CDA was proposed. PMID:21545144

  6. Isolation and identification by sequence homology of a putative cytosine methyltransferase from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Finnegan, E J; Dennis, E S

    1993-01-01

    A plant cytosine methyltransferase cDNA was isolated using degenerate oligonucleotides, based on homology between prokaryote and mouse methyltransferases, and PCR to amplify a short fragment of a methyltransferase gene. A fragment of the predicted size was amplified from genomic DNA from Arabidopsis thaliana. Overlapping cDNA clones, some with homology to the PCR amplified fragment, were identified and sequenced. The assembled nucleic acid sequence is 4720 bp and encodes a protein of 1534 amino acids which has significant homology to prokaryote and mammalian cytosine methyltransferases. Like mammalian methylases, this enzyme has a C terminal methyltransferase domain linked to a second larger domain. The Arabidopsis methylase has eight of the ten conserved sequence motifs found in prokaryote cytosine-5 methyltransferases and shows 50% homology to the murine enzyme in the methyltransferase domain. The amino terminal domain is only 24% homologous to the murine enzyme and lacks the zinc binding region that has been found in methyltransferases from both mouse and man. In contrast to mouse where a single methyltransferase gene has been identified, a small multigene family with homology to the region amplified in PCR has been identified in Arabidopsis thaliana. Images PMID:8389441

  7. Error rates for nanopore discrimination among cytosine, methylcytosine, and hydroxymethylcytosine along individual DNA strands.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Jacob; Wescoe, Zachary L; Abu-Shumays, Robin; Vivian, John T; Baatar, Baldandorj; Karplus, Kevin; Akeson, Mark

    2013-11-19

    Cytosine, 5-methylcytosine, and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine were identified during translocation of single DNA template strands through a modified Mycobacterium smegmatis porin A (M2MspA) nanopore under control of phi29 DNA polymerase. This identification was based on three consecutive ionic current states that correspond to passage of modified or unmodified CG dinucleotides and their immediate neighbors through the nanopore limiting aperture. To establish quality scores for these calls, we examined ~3,300 translocation events for 48 distinct DNA constructs. Each experiment analyzed a mixture of cytosine-, 5-methylcytosine-, and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine-bearing DNA strands that contained a marker that independently established the correct cytosine methylation status at the target CG of each molecule tested. To calculate error rates for these calls, we established decision boundaries using a variety of machine-learning methods. These error rates depended upon the identity of the bases immediately 5' and 3' of the targeted CG dinucleotide, and ranged from 1.7% to 12.2% for a single-pass read. We estimate that Q40 values (0.01% error rates) for methylation status calls could be achieved by reading single molecules 5-19 times depending upon sequence context.

  8. Effects of cytosine modifications on DNA flexibility and nucleosome mechanical stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo, Thuy T. M.; Yoo, Jejoong; Dai, Qing; Zhang, Qiucen; He, Chuan; Aksimentiev, Aleksei; Ha, Taekjip

    2016-02-01

    Cytosine can undergo modifications, forming 5-methylcytosine (5-mC) and its oxidized products 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC), 5-formylcytosine (5-fC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (5-caC). Despite their importance as epigenetic markers and as central players in cellular processes, it is not well understood how these modifications influence physical properties of DNA and chromatin. Here we report a comprehensive survey of the effect of cytosine modifications on DNA flexibility. We find that even a single copy of 5-fC increases DNA flexibility markedly. 5-mC reduces and 5-hmC enhances flexibility, and 5-caC does not have a measurable effect. Molecular dynamics simulations show that these modifications promote or dampen structural fluctuations, likely through competing effects of base polarity and steric hindrance, without changing the average structure. The increase in DNA flexibility increases the mechanical stability of the nucleosome and vice versa, suggesting a gene regulation mechanism where cytosine modifications change the accessibility of nucleosomal DNA through their effects on DNA flexibility.

  9. VUV photoionization of gas phase adenine and cytosine: A comparison between oven and aerosol vaporization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touboul, D.; Gaie-Levrel, F.; Garcia, G. A.; Nahon, L.; Poisson, L.; Schwell, M.; Hochlaf, M.

    2013-03-01

    We studied the single photon ionization of gas phase adenine and cytosine by means of vacuum ultraviolet synchrotron radiation coupled to a velocity map imaging electron/ion coincidence spectrometer. Both in-vacuum temperature-controlled oven and aerosol thermodesorption were successfully applied to promote the intact neutral biological species into the gas phase. The photoion yields are consistent with previous measurements. In addition, we deduced the threshold photoelectron spectra and the slow photoelectron spectra for both species, where the close to zero kinetic energy photoelectrons and the corresponding photoions are measured in coincidence. The photoionization close and above the ionization energies are found to occur mainly via direct processes. Both vaporization techniques lead to similar electronic spectra for the two molecules, which consist of broadbands due to the complex electronic structure of the cationic species and to the possible contribution of several neutral tautomers for cytosine prior to ionization. Accurate ionization energies are measured for adenine and cytosine at, respectively, 8.267 ± 0.005 eV and 8.66 ± 0.01 eV, and we deduce precise thermochemical data for the adenine radical cation. Finally, we performed an evaluation and a comparison of the two vaporization techniques addressing the following criteria: measurement precision, thermal fragmentation, sensitivity, and sample consumption. The aerosol thermodesorption technique appears as a promising alternative to vaporize large thermolabile biological compounds, where extended thermal decomposition or low sensitivity could be encountered when using a simple oven vaporization technique.

  10. Spontaneous tunneling and near-infrared-induced interconversion between the amino-hydroxy conformers of cytosine

    SciTech Connect

    Reva, Igor; Fausto, Rui; Nowak, Maciej J.; Lapinski, Leszek

    2012-02-14

    Spontaneous and near-infrared/infrared (NIR/IR)-induced interconversions between two amino-hydroxy conformers of monomeric cytosine have been investigated for the compound isolated in a low-temperature argon matrix. Combined use of a laser source (which provides narrowband NIR radiation) and a broadband NIR/IR source of excitation light allowed a detailed investigation of mutual conversions of the two conformers in question. The experiments carried out within the current work demonstrated that upon broadband NIR/IR irradiation (with the IR source of FTIR spectrometer) the population ratio of the two amino-hydroxy conformers changes towards a ratio corresponding to a photostationary state. Evolution of the conformer population ratio towards the photostationary ratio occurred independent of the initial ratio of conformers, which could be prepared by a population shift (in favor of one of the forms) induced by narrowband NIR excitation. Moreover, spontaneous tunneling conversion of the higher-energy conformer into a lower-energy form was observed for cytosine isolated in a low-temperature argon matrix kept in the dark. This process is slow and occurs on a time scale of days. The tunneling process, studied for matrix-isolated cytosine, clearly follows a dispersive type of kinetics rather than the classical monoexponential kinetics.

  11. Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia induced cytosine deaminase expression in microencapsulated E. coli for enzyme-prodrug therapy.

    PubMed

    Nemani, Krishnamurthy V; Ennis, Riley C; Griswold, Karl E; Gimi, Barjor

    2015-06-10

    Engineered bacterial cells that are designed to express therapeutic enzymes under the transcriptional control of remotely inducible promoters can mediate the de novo conversion of non-toxic prodrugs to their cytotoxic forms. In situ cellular expression of enzymes provides increased stability and control of enzyme activity as compared to isolated enzymes. We have engineered Escherichia coli (E. coli), designed to express cytosine deaminase at elevated temperatures, under the transcriptional control of thermo-regulatory λpL-cI857 promoter cassette which provides a thermal switch to trigger enzyme synthesis. Enhanced cytosine deaminase expression was observed in cultures incubated at 42°C as compared to 30°C, and enzyme expression was further substantiated by spectrophotometric assays indicating enhanced conversion of 5-fluorocytosine to 5-fluorouracil. The engineered cells were subsequently co-encapsulated with magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in immunoprotective alginate microcapsules, and cytosine deaminase expression was triggered remotely by alternating magnetic field-induced hyperthermia. The combination of 5-fluorocytosine with AMF-activated microcapsules demonstrated tumor cell cytotoxicity comparable to direct treatment with 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy. Such enzyme-prodrug therapy, based on engineered and immunoisolated E. coli, may ultimately yield an improved therapeutic index relative to monotherapy, as AMF mediated hyperthermia might be expected to pre-sensitize tumors to chemotherapy under appropriate conditions.

  12. The biased nucleotide composition of the HIV genome: a constant factor in a highly variable virus.

    PubMed

    van der Kuyl, Antoinette C; Berkhout, Ben

    2012-11-06

    Viruses often deviate from their hosts in the nucleotide composition of their genomes. The RNA genome of the lentivirus family of retroviruses, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), contains e.g. an above average percentage of adenine (A) nucleotides, while being extremely poor in cytosine (C). Such a deviant base composition has implications for the amino acids that are encoded by the open reading frames (ORFs), both in the requirement of specific tRNA species and in the preference for amino acids encoded by e.g. A-rich codons. Nucleotide composition does obviously affect the secondary and tertiary structure of the RNA genome and its biological functions, but it does also influence phylogenetic analysis of viral genome sequences, and possibly the activity of the integrated DNA provirus. Over time, the nucleotide composition of the HIV-1 genome is exceptionally conserved, varying by less than 1% per base position per isolate within either group M, N, or O during 1983-2009. This extreme stability of the nucleotide composition may possibly be achieved by negative selection, perhaps conserving semi-stable RNA secondary structure as reverse transcription would be significantly affected for a less A-rich genome where secondary structures are expected to be more stable and thus more difficult to unfold.This review will discuss all aspects of the lentiviral genome composition, both of the RNA and of its derived double-stranded DNA genome, with a focus on HIV-1, the nucleotide composition over time, the effects of artificially humanized codons as well as contributions of immune system pressure on HIV nucleotide bias.

  13. Genetic Analysis of the Cardiac Methylome at Single Nucleotide Resolution in a Model of Human Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Adamowicz-Brice, Martyna; Collins, Melissa J.; Gellert, Pascal; Maratou, Klio; Srivastava, Prashant K.; Rotival, Maxime; Butt, Shahena; Game, Laurence; Atanur, Santosh S.; Silver, Nicholas; Norsworthy, Penny J.; Langley, Sarah R.; Petretto, Enrico; Pravenec, Michal; Aitman, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic marks such as cytosine methylation are important determinants of cellular and whole-body phenotypes. However, the extent of, and reasons for inter-individual differences in cytosine methylation, and their association with phenotypic variation are poorly characterised. Here we present the first genome-wide study of cytosine methylation at single-nucleotide resolution in an animal model of human disease. We used whole-genome bisulfite sequencing in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR), a model of cardiovascular disease, and the Brown Norway (BN) control strain, to define the genetic architecture of cytosine methylation in the mammalian heart and to test for association between methylation and pathophysiological phenotypes. Analysis of 10.6 million CpG dinucleotides identified 77,088 CpGs that were differentially methylated between the strains. In F1 hybrids we found 38,152 CpGs showing allele-specific methylation and 145 regions with parent-of-origin effects on methylation. Cis-linkage explained almost 60% of inter-strain variation in methylation at a subset of loci tested for linkage in a panel of recombinant inbred (RI) strains. Methylation analysis in isolated cardiomyocytes showed that in the majority of cases methylation differences in cardiomyocytes and non-cardiomyocytes were strain-dependent, confirming a strong genetic component for cytosine methylation. We observed preferential nucleotide usage associated with increased and decreased methylation that is remarkably conserved across species, suggesting a common mechanism for germline control of inter-individual variation in CpG methylation. In the RI strain panel, we found significant correlation of CpG methylation and levels of serum chromogranin B (CgB), a proposed biomarker of heart failure, which is evidence for a link between germline DNA sequence variation, CpG methylation differences and pathophysiological phenotypes in the SHR strain. Together, these results will stimulate further

  14. Labeled nucleotide phosphate (NP) probes

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas [Ithaca, NY; Webb, Watt W [Ithaca, NY; Levene, Michael [Ithaca, NY; Turner, Stephen [Ithaca, NY; Craighead, Harold G [Ithaca, NY; Foquet, Mathieu [Ithaca, NY

    2009-02-03

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  15. Cytosine DNA methylation is found in Drosophila melanogaster but absent in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and other yeast species.

    PubMed

    Capuano, Floriana; Mülleder, Michael; Kok, Robert; Blom, Henk J; Ralser, Markus

    2014-04-15

    The methylation of cytosine to 5-methylcytosine (5-meC) is an important epigenetic DNA modification in many bacteria, plants, and mammals, but its relevance for important model organisms, including Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster, is still equivocal. By reporting the presence of 5-meC in a broad variety of wild, laboratory, and industrial yeasts, a recent study also challenged the dogma about the absence of DNA methylation in yeast species. We would like to bring to attention that the protocol used for gas chromatography/mass spectrometry involved hydrolysis of the DNA preparations. As this process separates cytosine and 5-meC from the sugar phosphate backbone, this method is unable to distinguish DNA- from RNA-derived 5-meC. We employed an alternative LC-MS/MS protocol where by targeting 5-methyldeoxycytidine moieties after enzymatic digestion, only 5-meC specifically derived from DNA is quantified. This technique unambiguously identified cytosine DNA methylation in Arabidopsis thaliana (14.0% of cytosines methylated), Mus musculus (7.6%), and Escherichia coli (2.3%). Despite achieving a detection limit at 250 attomoles (corresponding to <0.00002 methylated cytosines per nonmethylated cytosine), we could not confirm any cytosine DNA methylation in laboratory and industrial strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Saccharomyces boulardii, Saccharomyces paradoxus, or Pichia pastoris. The protocol however unequivocally confirmed DNA methylation in adult Drosophila melanogaster at a value (0.034%) that is up to 2 orders of magnitude below the detection limit of bisulphite sequencing. Thus, 5-meC is a rare DNA modification in drosophila but absent in yeast.

  16. Cytosine hypomethylation at CHG and CHH sites in the pleiotropic mutants of Mendelian inheritance in Catharanthus roseus.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Renu; Yadav, Gitanjali; Sharma, Vishakha; Sharma, Vinay; Kumar, Sushil

    2013-12-01

    The 5S and 18S rDNA sequences of Catharanthus roseus cv 'Nirmal' (wild type) and its leafless inflorescence (lli), evergreen dwarf (egd) and irregular leaf lamina (ill) single mutants and lli egd, lli ill and egd ill double mutants were characterized. The lli, egd and ill mutants of Mendelian inheritance bore the names after their most conspicuous morphological feature(s). They had been chemically induced and isolated for their salt tolerance. The double mutants were isolated as morphological segregants from crosses between single mutants. The morphological features of the two parents accompanied salt tolerance in the double mutants. All the six mutants were hypomethylated at repeat sequences, upregulated and downregulated for many genes and carried pleiotropic alterations for several traits. Here the 5S and 18S rDNAs of C. roseus were found to be relatively low in cytosine content. Cytosines were preponderantly in CG context (53%) and almost all of them were methylated (97%). The cytosines in CHH and CHG (where H = A, T or C) contexts were largely demethylated (92%) in mutants. The demethylation was attributable to reduced expression of RDR2 and DRM2 led RNA dependant DNA methylation and CMT3 led maintenance methylation pathways. Mutants had gained some cytosines by substitution of C at T sites. These perhaps arose on account of errors in DNA replication, mediated by widespread cytosine demethylation at CHG and CHH sites. It was concluded that the regulation of cytosine ethylation mechanisms was disturbed in the mutants. ILL, EGD and LLI genes were identified as the positive regulators of other genes mediating the RdDM and CMT3 pathways, for establishment and maintenance of cytosine methylation in C. roseus.

  17. [Nucleotide receptors and renal function].

    PubMed

    Jankowski, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    Kidney plays a key role in homeostasis of human body. It has heterogenic structure and is characterized by complicated vascular beds and numbers of sympathetic nerves endings. Nucleotides receptors are involved in the regulation of blood flow, a fundamental process for renal function. Plasma is filtrated in renal glomerulus and activity of nucleotides receptors located on cells of glomerular filter modifies the physi- cochemical properties of filter and affects the filtration process. Electrolytes, water and low molecular weight molecules are reabsorbed from tubular fluid or secreted into fluid in proximal and distal tubules. Glomerular filtration rate and activity of tubular processes are regulated via nucleotides receptors by glomerulotubularbalance and tubuloglomerular feedback. Nucleotides receptors are involved in systemic regulation of blood pressure and carbohydrate metabolism.

  18. Cytosine methylation is a conserved epigenetic feature found throughout the phylum Platyhelminthes.

    PubMed

    Geyer, Kathrin K; Chalmers, Iain W; Mackintosh, Neil; Hirst, Julie E; Geoghegan, Rory; Badets, Mathieu; Brophy, Peter M; Brehm, Klaus; Hoffmann, Karl F

    2013-07-09

    The phylum Platyhelminthes (flatworms) contains an important group of bilaterian organisms responsible for many debilitating and chronic infectious diseases of human and animal populations inhabiting the planet today. In addition to their biomedical and veterinary relevance, some platyhelminths are also frequently used models for understanding tissue regeneration and stem cell biology. Therefore, the molecular (genetic and epigenetic) characteristics that underlie trophic specialism, pathogenicity or developmental maturation are likely to be pivotal in our continued studies of this important metazoan group. Indeed, in contrast to earlier studies that failed to detect evidence of cytosine or adenine methylation in parasitic flatworm taxa, our laboratory has recently defined a critical role for cytosine methylation in Schistosoma mansoni oviposition, egg maturation and ovarian development. Thus, in order to identify whether this epigenetic modification features in other platyhelminth species or is a novelty of S. mansoni, we conducted a study simultaneously surveying for DNA methylation machinery components and DNA methylation marks throughout the phylum using both parasitic and non-parasitic representatives. Firstly, using both S. mansoni DNA methyltransferase 2 (SmDNMT2) and methyl-CpG binding domain protein (SmMBD) as query sequences, we illustrate that essential DNA methylation machinery components are well conserved throughout the phylum. Secondly, using both molecular (methylation specific amplification polymorphism, MSAP) and immunological (enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay, ELISA) methodologies, we demonstrate that representative species (Echinococcus multilocularis, Protopolystoma xenopodis, Schistosoma haematobium, Schistosoma japonicum, Fasciola hepatica and Polycelis nigra) within all four platyhelminth classes (Cestoda, Monogenea, Trematoda and 'Turbellaria') contain methylated cytosines within their genome compartments. Collectively, these findings

  19. Methylated Cytosines Mutate to Transcription Factor Binding Sites that Drive Tetrapod Evolution

    PubMed Central

    He, Ximiao; Tillo, Desiree; Vierstra, Jeff; Syed, Khund-Sayeed; Deng, Callie; Ray, G. Jordan; Stamatoyannopoulos, John; FitzGerald, Peter C.; Vinson, Charles

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, the cytosine in CG dinucleotides is typically methylated producing 5-methylcytosine (5mC), a chemically less stable form of cytosine that can spontaneously deaminate to thymidine resulting in a T•G mismatched base pair. Unlike other eukaryotes that efficiently repair this mismatched base pair back to C•G, in mammals, 5mCG deamination is mutagenic, sometimes producing TG dinucleotides, explaining the depletion of CG dinucleotides in mammalian genomes. It was suggested that new TG dinucleotides generate genetic diversity that may be critical for evolutionary change. We tested this conjecture by examining the DNA sequence properties of regulatory sequences identified by DNase I hypersensitive sites (DHSs) in human and mouse genomes. We hypothesized that the new TG dinucleotides generate transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) that become tissue-specific DHSs (TS-DHSs). We find that 8-mers containing the CG dinucleotide are enriched in DHSs in both species. However, 8-mers containing a TG and no CG dinucleotide are preferentially enriched in TS-DHSs when compared with 8-mers with neither a TG nor a CG dinucleotide. The most enriched 8-mer with a TG and no CG dinucleotide in tissue-specific regulatory regions in both genomes is the AP-1 motif (TGAC/GTCAN), and we find evidence that TG dinucleotides in the AP-1 motif arose from CG dinucleotides. Additional TS-DHS-enriched TFBS containing the TG/CA dinucleotide are the E-Box motif (GCAGCTGC), the NF-1 motif (GGCA—TGCC), and the GR (glucocorticoid receptor) motif (G-ACA—TGT-C). Our results support the suggestion that cytosine methylation is mutagenic in tetrapods producing TG dinucleotides that create TFBS that drive evolution. PMID:26507798

  20. Cytosine methylation is a conserved epigenetic feature found throughout the phylum Platyhelminthes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The phylum Platyhelminthes (flatworms) contains an important group of bilaterian organisms responsible for many debilitating and chronic infectious diseases of human and animal populations inhabiting the planet today. In addition to their biomedical and veterinary relevance, some platyhelminths are also frequently used models for understanding tissue regeneration and stem cell biology. Therefore, the molecular (genetic and epigenetic) characteristics that underlie trophic specialism, pathogenicity or developmental maturation are likely to be pivotal in our continued studies of this important metazoan group. Indeed, in contrast to earlier studies that failed to detect evidence of cytosine or adenine methylation in parasitic flatworm taxa, our laboratory has recently defined a critical role for cytosine methylation in Schistosoma mansoni oviposition, egg maturation and ovarian development. Thus, in order to identify whether this epigenetic modification features in other platyhelminth species or is a novelty of S. mansoni, we conducted a study simultaneously surveying for DNA methylation machinery components and DNA methylation marks throughout the phylum using both parasitic and non-parasitic representatives. Results Firstly, using both S. mansoni DNA methyltransferase 2 (SmDNMT2) and methyl-CpG binding domain protein (SmMBD) as query sequences, we illustrate that essential DNA methylation machinery components are well conserved throughout the phylum. Secondly, using both molecular (methylation specific amplification polymorphism, MSAP) and immunological (enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay, ELISA) methodologies, we demonstrate that representative species (Echinococcus multilocularis, Protopolystoma xenopodis, Schistosoma haematobium, Schistosoma japonicum, Fasciola hepatica and Polycelis nigra) within all four platyhelminth classes (Cestoda, Monogenea, Trematoda and ‘Turbellaria’) contain methylated cytosines within their genome compartments

  1. Cytosine methylation at CpCpG sites triggers accumulation of non-CpG methylation in gene bodies

    PubMed Central

    Prischi, Filippo

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Methylation of cytosine is an epigenetic mark involved in the regulation of transcription, usually associated with transcriptional repression. In mammals, methylated cytosines are found predominantly in CpGs but in plants non-CpG methylation (in the CpHpG or CpHpH contexts, where H is A, C or T) is also present and is associated with the transcriptional silencing of transposable elements. In addition, CpG methylation is found in coding regions of active genes. In the absence of the demethylase of lysine 9 of histone 3 (IBM1), a subset of body-methylated genes acquires non-CpG methylation. This was shown to alter their expression and affect plant development. It is not clear why only certain body-methylated genes gain non-CpG methylation in the absence of IBM1 and others do not. Here we describe a link between CpG methylation and the establishment of methylation in the CpHpG context that explains the two classes of body-methylated genes. We provide evidence that external cytosines of CpCpG sites can only be methylated when internal cytosines are methylated. CpCpG sites methylated in both cytosines promote spreading of methylation in the CpHpG context in genes protected by IBM1. In contrast, CpCpG sites remain unmethylated in IBM1-independent genes and do not promote spread of CpHpG methylation. PMID:28053115

  2. Specific and modular binding code for cytosine recognition in Pumilio/FBF (PUF) RNA-binding domains.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shuyun; Wang, Yang; Cassidy-Amstutz, Caleb; Lu, Gang; Bigler, Rebecca; Jezyk, Mark R; Li, Chunhua; Hall, Traci M Tanaka; Wang, Zefeng

    2011-07-29

    Pumilio/fem-3 mRNA-binding factor (PUF) proteins possess a recognition code for bases A, U, and G, allowing designed RNA sequence specificity of their modular Pumilio (PUM) repeats. However, recognition side chains in a PUM repeat for cytosine are unknown. Here we report identification of a cytosine-recognition code by screening random amino acid combinations at conserved RNA recognition positions using a yeast three-hybrid system. This C-recognition code is specific and modular as specificity can be transferred to different positions in the RNA recognition sequence. A crystal structure of a modified PUF domain reveals specific contacts between an arginine side chain and the cytosine base. We applied the C-recognition code to design PUF domains that recognize targets with multiple cytosines and to generate engineered splicing factors that modulate alternative splicing. Finally, we identified a divergent yeast PUF protein, Nop9p, that may recognize natural target RNAs with cytosine. This work deepens our understanding of natural PUF protein target recognition and expands the ability to engineer PUF domains to recognize any RNA sequence.

  3. Specific and Modular Binding Code for Cytosine Recognition in Pumilio/FBF (PUF) RNA-binding Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Shuyun; Wang, Yang; Cassidy-Amstutz, Caleb; Lu, Gang; Bigler, Rebecca; Jezyk, Mark R.; Li, Chunhua; Tanaka Hall, Traci M.; Wang, Zefeng

    2011-10-28

    Pumilio/fem-3 mRNA-binding factor (PUF) proteins possess a recognition code for bases A, U, and G, allowing designed RNA sequence specificity of their modular Pumilio (PUM) repeats. However, recognition side chains in a PUM repeat for cytosine are unknown. Here we report identification of a cytosine-recognition code by screening random amino acid combinations at conserved RNA recognition positions using a yeast three-hybrid system. This C-recognition code is specific and modular as specificity can be transferred to different positions in the RNA recognition sequence. A crystal structure of a modified PUF domain reveals specific contacts between an arginine side chain and the cytosine base. We applied the C-recognition code to design PUF domains that recognize targets with multiple cytosines and to generate engineered splicing factors that modulate alternative splicing. Finally, we identified a divergent yeast PUF protein, Nop9p, that may recognize natural target RNAs with cytosine. This work deepens our understanding of natural PUF protein target recognition and expands the ability to engineer PUF domains to recognize any RNA sequence.

  4. P2 receptors activated by uracil nucleotides--an update.

    PubMed

    Brunschweiger, Andreas; Müller, Christa E

    2006-01-01

    Pyrimidine nucleotides, including UTP, UDP and UDP-glucose, are important signaling molecules which activate G protein-coupled membrane receptors (GPCRs) of the P2Y family. Four distinct pyrimidine nucleotide-sensitive P2Y receptor subtypes have been cloned, P2Y2, P2Y4, P2Y6 and P2Y14. P2Y2 and P2Y4 receptors are activated by UTP (the P2Y2, and the rat but not the human P2Y4 receptor are also activated by ATP), the P2Y6 receptor is activated by UDP, and the P2Y14 receptor by UDP-glucose. Furthermore, non-P2Y GPCRs, the cysteinylleukotriene receptors (CysLT1R and CysLT2R) have been described to be activated by UDP in addition to activation by cysteinylleukotrienes. While P2Y2, P2Y4, and P2Y6 receptor activation results in stimulation of phospholipase C, the P2Y14 receptor is coupled to inhibition of adenylate cyclase. Derivatives and analogs of the physiological nucleotides UTP, UDP and ATP have been synthesized and evaluated in order to obtain enzymatically stable, subtype-selective agonists. The P2Y2 receptor agonists diuridine tetraphosphate (diquafosol) and the uracil-cytosine dinucleotide denufosol are currently undergoing clinical trials for dry eye disease, retinal detachment disease, upper respiratory tract symptoms, and cystic fibrosis, respectively. The first antagonists for P2Y2 and P2Y6 receptors that appear to be selective versus other P2Y receptor subtypes have recently been described. Selective antagonists for P2Y4 and P2Y14 receptors are still lacking. Uracil nucleotide-sensitive P2Y receptor subtypes may constitute future targets for the treatment of certain cancer types, vascular diseases, inflammatory diseases, and immunomodulatory intervention. They have also been proposed to play a role in neurodegenerative diseases. This article is an updated version of "P2-Pyrimidinergic Receptors and Their Ligands" by C. E. Müller published in Curr. Pharm. Des. 2002, 8, 2353-2369.

  5. Solvent effect on the anharmonic vibrational frequencies in guanine-cytosine base pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bende, A.; Muntean, C. M.

    2012-02-01

    We present an ab initio study of the vibrational properties of cytosine and guanine in the Watson-Crick and Hoogsteen base pair configurations. The results are obtained by considering the DFT method together with the Polarizable Continuum Model (PCM) using PBE and B3PW91 exchange-correlation functionals and triple-ζ valence basis set. We investigate the importance of anharmonic corrections for the vibrational modes taking into account the solvent effect of the water environment. In particular, the unusual anharmonic effect of the H+ vibration in the case of the Hoogsteen base pair configuration is discussed.

  6. Removal of deaminated cytosines and detection of in vivo methylation in ancient DNA

    PubMed Central

    Briggs, Adrian W.; Stenzel, Udo; Meyer, Matthias; Krause, Johannes; Kircher, Martin; Pääbo, Svante

    2010-01-01

    DNA sequences determined from ancient organisms have high error rates, primarily due to uracil bases created by cytosine deamination. We use synthetic oligonucleotides, as well as DNA extracted from mammoth and Neandertal remains, to show that treatment with uracil–DNA–glycosylase and endonuclease VIII removes uracil residues from ancient DNA and repairs most of the resulting abasic sites, leaving undamaged parts of the DNA fragments intact. Neandertal DNA sequences determined with this protocol have greatly increased accuracy. In addition, our results demonstrate that Neandertal DNA retains in vivo patterns of CpG methylation, potentially allowing future studies of gene inactivation and imprinting in ancient organisms. PMID:20028723

  7. Expression systems for industrial Gram-positive bacteria with low guanine and cytosine content.

    PubMed

    de Vos, W M; Kleerebezem, M; Kuipers, O P

    1997-10-01

    Recent years have seen an increase in the development of gene expression systems for industrial Gram-positive bacteria with low guanine and cytosine content that belong to the genera Bacillus, Clostridium, Lactococcus, Lactobacillus, Staphylococcus and Streptococcus. In particular, considerable advances have been made in the construction of inducible gene expression systems based on the capacity of these bacteria to utilize specific sugars or to secrete autoinducing peptides that are involved in quorum sensing. These controlled expression systems allow for present and future exploitation of these bacteria as cell factories in medical, agricultural, and food biotechnology.

  8. Annexin V-targeted enzyme prodrug therapy using cytosine deaminase in combination with 5-fluorocytosine.

    PubMed

    Van Rite, Brent D; Harrison, Roger G

    2011-08-01

    A fusion protein, consisting of cytosine deaminase (CD) linked to human annexin V, was created for use in an enzyme prodrug therapy targeted to the tumor vasculature and associated cancer cells in the primary tumor and distant metastases. The major finding of this study is that the CD-annexin V fusion protein in combination with the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine has significant cytotoxic activity against endothelial cells and two breast cancer cells lines in vitro that expose phosphatidylserine on their surface. The cytotoxicity experiments verified this novel enzyme prodrug system has the ability to produce therapeutic levels of 5-fluorouracil and thus appears promising.

  9. A nucleotide deletion and frame-shift cause analbuminemia in a Turkish family

    PubMed Central

    Caridi, Gianluca; Gulec, Elif Yilmaz; Campagnoli, Monica; Lugani, Francesca; Onal, Hasan; Kilic, Duzgun; Galliano, Monica; Minchiotti, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Congenital analbuminemia is an autosomal recessive disorder, in which albumin, the major blood protein, is present only in a minute amount. The condition is a rare allelic heterogeneous defect, only about seventy cases have been reported worldwide. To date, more than twenty different mutations within the albumin gene have been found to cause the trait. In our continuing study of the molecular genetics of congenital analbuminemia, we report here the clinical and biochemical findings and the mutation analysis of the gene in two Turkish infants. For the molecular analysis, we used our strategy, based on the screening of the gene by single-strand conformation polymorphism, heteroduplex analysis and direct DNA sequencing. The results showed that both patients are homozygous for the deletion of a cytosine residue in exon 5, in a stretch of four cytosines starting from nucleotide position 524 and ending at position 527 (NM_000477.5(ALB):c.527delC). The subsequent frame-shift inserts a stop codon in position 215, markedly reducing the size of the predicted protein product. The parents are both heterozygous for the same mutation, for which we propose the name Erzurum from the city of origin of the family. In conclusion, our results show that in this family congenital analbuminemia is caused by a novel frame-shift/deletion defect, confirm the inheritance of the trait, and contribute to advance our understanding of the molecular basis underlying this condition. PMID:27346974

  10. A novel polymorphism in human cytosine DNA-methyltransferase-3B promoter is associated with an increased risk of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hongbing; Wang, Luo; Spitz, Margaret R; Hong, Waun K; Mao, Li; Wei, Qingyi

    2002-09-01

    DNA repair is central to genomic integrity. Reduced expression of several nucleotide excision repair genes has been demonstrated to be associated with increased risk of lung cancer. Because methylation of gene promoters is one of the major regulatory mechanisms of gene expression and most nucleotide excision repair gene promoters have not been fully characterized, we hypothesized that genetic variants of the genes that are responsible for regulating genomic methylation are associated with increased risk of lung cancer. Recently, we identified a C-->T transition at a novel promoter region of cytosine DNA-methyltransferase-3B (DNMT3B) and found that this polymorphic transition significantly increases the promoter activity. In this hospital-based case-control study of 319 patients with incident lung cancer and 340 healthy controls frequency matched on age (+/-5 years), sex, ethnicity, and smoking status, we genotyped subjects for this DNMT3B promoter polymorphism to determine the association between this genetic variant and risk of lung cancer. Compared with CC homozygotes, CT heterozygotes had a >2-fold increased risk of lung cancer [adjusted odds ratio (OR), 2.13; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.47-3.08] and TT homozygotes an OR of 1.42 (95% CI, 0.91-2.21). The combined variant genotype (CT + TT) was associated with a nearly 2-fold increased risk (adjusted OR, 1.88; 95% CI, 1.32-2.66). These results suggest that this novel variant of DNMT3B is associated with increased risk of lung cancer and may contribute to identifying individuals genetically susceptible to tobacco-induced cancers. Additional studies on the underlying molecular mechanism of this polymorphism are warranted.

  11. Ambivalent incorporation of the fluorescent cytosine analogues tC and tCo by human DNA polymerase alpha and Klenow fragment.

    PubMed

    Stengel, Gudrun; Purse, Byron W; Wilhelmsson, L Marcus; Urban, Milan; Kuchta, Robert D

    2009-08-11

    We studied the incorporation of the fluorescent cytidine analogues 1,3-diaza-2-oxophenothiazine (tC) and 1,3-diaza-2-oxophenoxazine (tCo) by human DNA polymerase alpha and Klenow fragment of DNA polymerase I (Escherichia coli). These tricyclic nucleobases possess the regular hydrogen bonding interface of cytosine but are significantly expanded in size toward the major groove. Despite the size alteration, both DNA polymerases insert dtCTP and dtCoTP with remarkable catalytic efficiency. Polymerization opposite guanine is comparable to the insertion of dCTP, while the insertion opposite adenine is only approximately 4-11 times less efficient than the formation of a T-A base pair. Both enzymes readily extend the formed tC(o)-G and tC(o)-A base pairs and can incorporate at least four consecutive nucleotide analogues. Consistent with these results, both DNA polymerases efficiently polymerize dGTP and dATP when tC and tCo are in the template strand. Klenow fragment inserts dGTP with a 4-9-fold higher probability than dATP, while polymerase alpha favors dGTP over dATP by a factor of 30-65. Overall, the properties of tC(o) as a templating base and as an incoming nucleotide are surprisingly symmetrical and may be universal for A and B family DNA polymerases. This finding suggests that the aptitude for ambivalent base pairing is a consequence of the electronic properties of tC(o).

  12. Ambivalent Incorporation of the Fluorescent Cytosine Analogues tC and tCo by Human DNA Polymerase α and Klenow Fragment #

    PubMed Central

    Stengel, Gudrun; Purse, Byron W.; Wilhelmsson, L. Marcus; Urban, Milan; Kuchta, Robert D.

    2009-01-01

    We studied the incorporation of the fluorescent cytidine analogues 1, 3-diaza-2-oxo-phenothiazine (tC) and 1, 3-diaza-2-oxo-phenoxazine (tCo) by human DNA polymerase α and Klenow fragment of DNA polymerase I (E. coli). These tricyclic nucleobases possess the regular hydrogen bonding interface of cytosine but are significantly size expanded toward the major groove. Despite the size alteration both DNA polymerases insert dtCTP and dtCoTP with remarkable catalytic efficiency. Polymerization opposite guanine is comparable to the insertion of dCTP, while the insertion opposite adenine is only ∼4-11 times less efficient than the formation of a T-A base pair. Both enzymes readily extend the formed tC(o)-G and tC(o)-A base pairs, and can incorporate at least 4 consecutive nucleotide analogues. Consistent with these results, both DNA polymerases efficiently polymerize dGTP and dATP when tC and tCo are in the template strand. KF inserts dGTP with a 4- to 9-fold higher probability than dATP, while pol α favors dGTP over dATP by a factor of 30-65. Overall, the properties of tC(o) as templating base and as incoming nucleotide are surprisingly symmetrical and may be universal for A and B family DNA polymerases. This finding suggests that the aptitude for ambivalent base pairing is a consequence of the electronic properties of tC(o). PMID:19580325

  13. Base flip in DNA studied by molecular dynamics simulationsof differently-oxidized forms of methyl-Cytosine.

    PubMed

    Helabad, Mahdi Bagherpoor; Kanaan, Natalia; Imhof, Petra

    2014-07-03

    Distortions in the DNA sequence, such as damage or mispairs, are specifically recognized and processed by DNA repair enzymes. Many repair proteins and, in particular, glycosylases flip the target base out of the DNA helix into the enzyme's active site. Our molecular dynamics simulations of DNA with intact and damaged (oxidized) methyl-cytosine show that the probability of being flipped is similar for damaged and intact methyl-cytosine. However, the accessibility of the different 5-methyl groups allows direct discrimination of the oxidized forms. Hydrogen-bonded patterns that vary between methyl-cytosine forms carrying a carbonyl oxygen atom are likely to be detected by the repair enzymes and may thus help target site recognition.

  14. The Role of Hydrogen Bonds in the Stabilization of Silver-Mediated Cytosine Tetramers.

    PubMed

    Espinosa Leal, Leonardo Andrés; Karpenko, Alexander; Swasey, Steven; Gwinn, Elisabeth G; Rojas-Cervellera, Victor; Rovira, Carme; Lopez-Acevedo, Olga

    2015-10-15

    DNA oligomers can form silver-mediated duplexes, stable in gas phase and solution, with potential for novel biomedical and technological applications. The nucleobase-metal bond primarily drives duplex formation, but hydrogen (H-) bonds may also be important for structure selection and stability. To elucidate the role of H-bonding, we conducted theoretical and experimental studies of a duplex formed by silver-mediated cytosine homopobase DNA strands, two bases long. This silver-mediated cytosine tetramer is small enough to permit accurate, realistic modeling by DFT-based quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics methods. In gas phase, our calculations found two energetically favorable configurations distinguished by H-bonding, one with a novel interplane H-bond, and the other with planar H-bonding of silver-bridged bases. Adding solvent favored silver-mediated tetramers with interplane H-bonding. Overall agreement of electronic circular dichroism spectra for the final calculated structure and experiment validates these findings. Our results can guide use of these stabilization mechanisms for devising novel metal-mediated DNA structures.

  15. Inheritance of cytosine methylation patterns in purebred versus hybrid chicken lines.

    PubMed

    Xu, Q; Sun, D X; Li, J L; Liu, R; Wang, Y C; Zhang, Y

    2013-07-30

    We used methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism to examine DNA methylation levels and CCGG patterns in parents and offsprings of 3 groups of adult chickens, purebred White Leghorn (AA), White Plymouth Rock (EE), and crossbred individuals (EA) using 10 primer combinations. We found that about 66% of the cytosines at CCGG sites were not methylated. Fully methylated sites were less frequent than hemi-methylated sites in the chicken genome; these frequencies were different from those of plants. We observed that the probability that the offspring would inherit the methylation pattern for any given site from the parents was 88%; consequently, unexpected methylation patterns in offspring occurred at a rate of about 12%. The methylation degree in offspring was lower than in parents, and there were more sites with altered methylation patterns in EA crossbreds compared with AA and EE purebreds. Seven differentially methylated fragments between parental lines and their offspring were isolated, sequenced, and characterized, 4 of which were located in the coding regions. We conclude that most of the methylation status is transferred from parents to offspring in chickens, and that there are differences in the inheritance of methylation status in purebred versus crossbred offspring. We also concluded that methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism is highly efficient for large-scale detection of cytosine methylation in the chicken genome.

  16. Stability and isomerization of complexes formed by metal ions and cytosine isomers in aqueous phase.

    PubMed

    Ai, Hongqi; Liu, Jingjing; Chan, Kwaichow

    2013-08-01

    We present a systematic study of the stability of the formation of complexes produced by four metal ions (M(+/2+)) and 14 cytosine isomers (Cn). This work predicts theoretically that predominant product complexes are associated with higher-energy C4M(+/2+) and C5M(+/2+) rather than the most stable C1M(+/2+). The prediction resolves successfully several experimental facts puzzling two research groups. Meanwhile, in-depth studies further reveal that direct isomerization of C1↔C4 is almost impossible, and also that the isomerization induced by either metalation or hydration, or by a combination of the two unfavorable. It is the single water molecule locating between the H1(-N1) and O2 of the cytosine that plays the dual roles of being a bridge and an activator that consequently improves the isomerization greatly. Moreover, the cooperation of divalent metal ion and such a monohydration actually leads to an energy-free C1←C4 isomerization in the gas phase. Henceforth, we are able to propose schemes inhibiting the free C1←C4 isomerization, based purely on extended hydration at the divalent metal ion.

  17. Tritium labelling of nucleic acids accompanied by conversion of cytosine to uracil.

    PubMed Central

    Scheinker, V S

    1976-01-01

    A new method of incorporation of tritium into nucleic acids with an accompanying conversion of cytosine to uracil is proposed. The method is based on the reaction of nucleic acids with bisulfite in the presence of 3H2O. Under certain conditions poly(C) is quantitatively converted to a radioactive poly(U), whereas similar bisulfite treatment of poly(U) does not result in any tritium incorporation. Specificity of the reaction is confirmed by the results of analysis of modified tRNA and rRNA. Incubation of tRNA with bisulfite and 3H2O does not lead to cleavage of the polynucleotide chain. Similar treatment of the denatured DNA results in tritium incorporation into DNA which is accompanied by a conversion of cytosine to uracil. There is virtually no reaction between native DNA and bisulfite. Only certain cytosone residues in yeast tRNAVal/2a interact with bisulfate providing that reaction is carried out under sufficiently mild conditions. PMID:1272798

  18. Increased proliferation and chemosensitivity of human mesenchymal stromal cells expressing fusion yeast cytosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Kucerova, Lucia; Poturnajova, Martina; Tyciakova, Silvia; Matuskova, Miroslava

    2012-03-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are considered to be suitable vehicles for cellular therapy in various conditions. The expression of reporter and/or effector protein(s) enabled both the identification of MSCs within the organism and the exploitation in targeted tumor therapies. The aim of this study was to evaluate cellular changes induced by retrovirus-mediated transgene expression in MSCs in vitro. Human Adipose Tissue-derived MSCs (AT-MSCs) were transduced to express (i) the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reporter transgene, (ii) the fusion yeast cytosine deaminase::uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (CDy::UPRT) enzyme along with the expression of dominant positive selection gene NeoR or (iii) the selection marker NeoR alone (MOCK). CDy::UPRT expression resulted in increased proliferation of CDy::UPRT-MSCs versus naïve AT-MSCs, MOCK-MSCs or EGFP-MSCs. Furthermore, CDy::UPRT-MSCs were significantly more sensitive to 5-fluorouracil (5FU), cisplatin, cyclophosphamide and cytosine arabinoside as determined by increased Caspase 3/7 activation and/or decreased relative proliferation. CDy::UPRT-MSCs in direct cocultures with breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 increased tumor cell killing induced by low concentrations of 5FU. Our data demonstrated the changes in proliferation and chemoresistance in engineered MSCs expressing transgene with enzymatic function and suggested the possibilities for further augmentation of targeted MSC-mediated antitumor therapy.

  19. Yeast cytosine deaminase mutants with increased thermostability impart sensitivity to 5-fluorocytosine.

    PubMed

    Stolworthy, Tiffany S; Korkegian, Aaron M; Willmon, Candice L; Ardiani, Andressa; Cundiff, Jennifer; Stoddard, Barry L; Black, Margaret E

    2008-03-28

    Prodrug gene therapy (PGT) is a treatment strategy in which tumor cells are transfected with a 'suicide' gene that encodes a metabolic enzyme capable of converting a nontoxic prodrug into a potent cytotoxin. One of the most promising PGT enzymes is cytosine deaminase (CD), a microbial salvage enzyme that converts cytosine to uracil. CD also converts 5-fluorocytosine (5FC) to 5-fluorouracil, an inhibitor of DNA synthesis and RNA function. Over 150 studies of CD-mediated PGT applications have been reported since 2000, all using wild-type enzymes. However, various forms of CD are limited by inefficient turnover of 5FC and/or limited thermostability. In a previous study, we stabilized and extended the half-life of yeast CD (yCD) by repacking of its hydrophobic core at several positions distant from the active site. Here we report that random mutagenesis of residues selected based on alignment with similar enzymes, followed by selection for enhanced sensitization to 5FC, also produces an enzyme variant (yCD-D92E) with elevated T(m) values and increased activity half-life. The new mutation is located at the enzyme's dimer interface, indicating that independent mutational pathways can lead to an increase in stability, as well as a more subtle effect on enzyme kinetics. Each independently derived set of mutations significantly improves the enzyme's performance in PGT assays both in cell culture and in animal models.

  20. Metalated nucleotide chemisorption on hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Michele; Antonucci, Daniela; De Castro, Federica; Girelli, Chiara R; Lelli, Marco; Roveri, Norberto; Fanizzi, Francesco P

    2015-12-01

    The experiments here reported evidence on the importance of the residual charge of a nucleotide derivative, for the adsorption on nHAP (hydroxyapatite nanocrystals), in water solution. We found that the simple presence of phosphates on the nucleotide derivative does not guarantee adsorption on nHAP. On the other hand, we demonstrated that a cationic or neutral charge on a nucleotide derivative produces a strongly reduced chemical adsorption (chemisorption) whereas, in the presence of a net negative charge, relevant adsorption on nHAP is observed. The number of phosphates can only modulate the adsorption efficiency of a molecule provided that this latter bears an overall negative charge. The neutral zwitterionic nucleotide Pt(II) complexes, bearing negatively charged phosphates, are unable to give stable chemisorption. Previous considerations are important to model the binding ability of phosphate bearing nucleotide derivatives or molecules on hydroxyapatite. The findings reported in the present paper could be relevant in bone tissue targeting or nHAP mediated drug delivery.

  1. Functional and Structural Characterization of DR_0079 from Deinococcus radiodurans, a Novel Nudix Hydrolase with a Preference for Cytosine (Deoxy)ribonucleoside 5 -Di- and Triphophates

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko,G.; Litvinova, O.; Robinson, H.; Yakunin, A.; Kennedy, M.

    2008-01-01

    The genome of the extremely radiation resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans encodes 21 Nudix hydrolases, of which only two have been characterized in detail. Here we report the activity and crystal structure for DR{_}0079, the first Nudix hydrolase observed to have a marked preference for cytosine ribonucleoside 5'-diphosphate (CDP) and cytosine ribonucleoside 5'-triphosphate (CTP). After CDP and CTP, the next most preferred substrates for DR{_}0079, with a relative activity of <50%, were the corresponding deoxyribose nucleotides, dCDP and dCTP. Hydrolase activity at the site of the phosphodiester bond was corroborated using 31P NMR spectroscopy to follow the phosphorus resonances for three substrates, CDP, IDP, and CTP, and their hydrolysis products, CMP + Pi, IMP + Pi, and CMP + PPi, respectively. Nucleophilic substitution at the {beta}-phosphorus of CDP and CTP was established, using 31P NMR spectroscopy, by the appearance of an upfield-shifted Pi resonance and line-broadened PPi resonance, respectively, when the hydrolysis was performed in 40% H218O-enriched water. The optimal activity for CDP was at pH 9.0-9.5 with the reaction requiring divalent metal cation (Mg2+ > Mn2+ > Co2+). The biochemical data are discussed with reference to the crystal structure for DR{_}0079 that was determined in the metal-free form at 1.9 Angstroms resolution. The protein contains nine {beta}-strands, three a-helices, and two 310-helices organized into three subdomains: an N-terminal {beta}-sheet, a central Nudix core, and a C-terminal helix-turn-helix motif. As observed for all known structures of Nudix hydrolases, the a-helix of the 'Nudix box' is one of two helices that sandwich a 'four-strand' mixed {beta}-sheet. To identify residues potentially involved in metal and substrate binding, NMR chemical shift mapping experiments were performed on 15N-labeled DR{_}0079 with the paramagnetic divalent cation Co2+ and the nonhydrolyzable substrate thymidine 5'-O-({alpha}, {beta

  2. Effect of alginate microencapsulation on the catalytic efficiency and in vitro enzyme-prodrug therapeutic efficacy of cytosine deaminase and of recombinant E. coli expressing cytosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Funaro, Michael G; Nemani, Krishnamurthy V; Chen, Zhihang; Bhujwalla, Zaver M; Griswold, Karl E; Gimi, Barjor

    2016-02-01

    Cytosine deaminase (CD) catalyses the enzymatic conversion of the non-toxic prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) to the potent chemotherapeutic form, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Intratumoral delivery of CD localises chemotherapy dose while reducing systemic toxicity. Encapsulation in biocompatible microcapsules immunoisolates CD and protects it from degradation. We report on the effect of alginate encapsulation on the catalytic and functional activity of isolated CD and recombinant E. coli engineered to express CD (E. coli(CD)). Alginate microcapsules containing either CD or Escherichia coli(CD) were prepared using ionotropic gelation. Conversion of 5-FC to 5-FU was quantitated in unencapsulated and encapsulated CD/E. coli(CD) using spectrophotometry, with a slower rate of conversion observed following encapsulation. Both encapsulated CD/5-FC and E. coli(CD)/5-FC resulted in cell kill and reduced proliferation of 9 L rat glioma cells, which was comparable to direct 5-FU treatment. Our results show that encapsulation preserves the therapeutic potential of CD and E. coli(CD) is equally effective for enzyme-prodrug therapy.

  3. Single-nucleotide patch base excision repair of uracil in DNA by mitochondrial protein extracts.

    PubMed

    Stierum, R H; Dianov, G L; Bohr, V A

    1999-09-15

    Mammalian mitochondria contain several 16.5 kb circular DNAs (mtDNA) encoding electron transport chain proteins. Reactive oxygen species formed as byproducts from oxidative phosphorylation in these organelles can cause oxidative deamination of cytosine and lead to uracil in mtDNA. Upon mtDNA replication, these lesions, if unrepaired, can lead to mutations. Until recently, it was thought that there was no DNA repair in mitochondria, but lately there is evidence that some lesions are efficiently repaired in these organelles. In the study of nuclear DNA repair, the in vitro repair measurements in cell extracts have provided major insights into the mechanisms. The use of whole-cell extract based DNA repair methods has revealed that mammalian nuclear base excision repair (BER) diverges into two pathways: the single-nucleotide replacement and long patch repair mechanisms. Similar in vitro methods have not been available for the study of mitochondrial BER. We have established an in vitro DNA repair system supported by rat liver mitochondrial protein extract and DNA substrates containing a single uracil opposite to a guanine. Using this approach, we examined the repair pathways and the identity of the DNA polymerase involved in mitochondrial BER (mtBER). Employing restriction analysis of in vitro repaired DNA to map the repair patch size, we demonstrate that only one nucleotide is incorporated during the repair process. Thus, in contrast to BER in the nucleus, mtBER of uracil in DNA is solely accomplished by single-nucleotide replacement.

  4. Role of glutamate 64 in the activation of the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine by yeast cytosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jifeng; Sklenak, Stepan; Liu, Aizhuo; Felczak, Krzysztof; Wu, Yan; Li, Yue; Yan, Honggao

    2012-01-10

    Yeast cytosine deaminase (yCD) catalyzes the hydrolytic deamination of cytosine to uracil as well as the deamination of the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5FC) to the anticancer drug 5-fluorouracil. In this study, the role of Glu64 in the activation of the prodrug 5FC was investigated by site-directed mutagenesis, biochemical, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and computational studies. Steady-state kinetics studies showed that the mutation of Glu64 causes a dramatic decrease in k(cat) and a dramatic increase in K(m), indicating Glu64 is important for both binding and catalysis in the activation of 5FC. (19)F NMR experiments showed that binding of the inhibitor 5-fluoro-1H-pyrimidin-2-one (5FPy) to the wild-type yCD causes an upfield shift, indicating that the bound inhibitor is in the hydrated form, mimicking the transition state or the tetrahedral intermediate in the activation of 5FC. However, binding of 5FPy to the E64A mutant enzyme causes a downfield shift, indicating that the bound 5FPy remains in an unhydrated form in the complex with the mutant enzyme. (1)H and (15)N NMR analysis revealed trans-hydrogen bond D/H isotope effects on the hydrogen of the amide of Glu64, indicating that the carboxylate of Glu64 forms two hydrogen bonds with the hydrated 5FPy. ONIOM calculations showed that the wild-type yCD complex with the hydrated form of the inhibitor 1H-pyrimidin-2-one is more stable than the initial binding complex, and in contrast, with the E64A mutant enzyme, the hydrated inhibitor is no longer favored and the conversion has a higher activation energy, as well. The hydrated inhibitor is stabilized in the wild-type yCD by two hydrogen bonds between it and the carboxylate of Glu64 as revealed by (1)H and (15)N NMR analysis. To explore the functional role of Glu64 in catalysis, we investigated the deamination of cytosine catalyzed by the E64A mutant by ONIOM calculations. The results showed that without the assistance of Glu64, both proton transfers before and

  5. The EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database.

    PubMed

    Stoesser, Guenter; Baker, Wendy; van den Broek, Alexandra; Camon, Evelyn; Garcia-Pastor, Maria; Kanz, Carola; Kulikova, Tamara; Leinonen, Rasko; Lin, Quan; Lombard, Vincent; Lopez, Rodrigo; Redaschi, Nicole; Stoehr, Peter; Tuli, Mary Ann; Tzouvara, Katerina; Vaughan, Robert

    2002-01-01

    The EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database (aka EMBL-Bank; http://www.ebi.ac.uk/embl/) incorporates, organises and distributes nucleotide sequences from all available public sources. EMBL-Bank is located and maintained at the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) near Cambridge, UK. In an international collaboration with DDBJ (Japan) and GenBank (USA), data are exchanged amongst the collaborating databases on a daily basis. Major contributors to the EMBL database are individual scientists and genome project groups. Webin is the preferred web-based submission system for individual submitters, whilst automatic procedures allow incorporation of sequence data from large-scale genome sequencing centres and from the European Patent Office (EPO). Database releases are produced quarterly. Network services allow free access to the most up-to-date data collection via FTP, email and World Wide Web interfaces. EBI's Sequence Retrieval System (SRS), a network browser for databanks in molecular biology, integrates and links the main nucleotide and protein databases plus many other specialized databases. For sequence similarity searching, a variety of tools (e.g. Blitz, Fasta, BLAST) are available which allow external users to compare their own sequences against the latest data in the EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database and SWISS-PROT. All resources can be accessed via the EBI home page at http://www.ebi.ac.uk.

  6. Theoretical study of the catalytic mechanism of DNA-(N4-cytosine)-methyltransferase from the bacterium Proteus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Juan; Roca, Maite; López-Canut, Violeta; Tuñón, Iñaki

    2010-07-01

    In this paper the reaction mechanism for methylation of cytosine at the exocyclic N4 position catalyzed by M.PvuII has been explored by means of hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods. A reaction model was prepared by placing a single cytosine base in the active site of the enzyme. In this model the exocyclic amino group of the base establishes hydrogen bond interactions with the hydroxyl oxygen atom of Ser53 and the carbonyl oxygen atom of Pro54. The reaction mechanism involves a direct methyl transfer from AdoMet to the N4 atom and a proton transfer from this atom to Ser53, which in turn transfers a proton to Asp96. Different timings for the proton transfers and methylation steps have been explored at the AM1/MM and B3LYP/MM levels including localization and characterization of stationary structures. At our best estimate the reaction proceeds by means of a simultaneous but asynchronous proton transfer from Ser53 to Asp96 and from N4 of cytosine to Ser53 followed by a direct methyl transfer from AdoMet to the exocyclic N4 of cytosine.

  7. Energetics of the lattice: packing elements in crystals of four-stranded intercalated cytosine-rich DNA molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, I.; Cai, L.; Chen, L.; Rich, A.

    1997-01-01

    Condensation of single molecules from solution into crystals represents a transition between distinct energetic states. In solution, the atomic interactions within the molecule dominate. In the crystalline state, however, a set of additional interactions are formed between molecules in close contact in the lattice--these are the packing interactions. The crystal structures of d(CCCT), d(TAACCC), d(CCCAAT), and d(AACCCC) have in common a four-stranded intercalated cytosine segment, built by stacked layers of cytosine.cytosine+ (C.C+) base pairs coming from two parallel duplexes that intercalate into each other with opposite polarity. The intercalated cytosine segments in these structures are similar in their geometry, even though the sequences crystallized in different space groups. In the crystals, adenine and thymine residues of the sequences are used to build the three-dimensional crystal lattice by elaborately interacting with symmetry-related molecules. The packing elements observed provide novel insight about the copious ways in which nucleic acid molecules can interact with each other--for example, when folded in more complicated higher order structures, such as mRNA and chromatin.

  8. Electron transport through 5-substituted pyrimidines in DNA: electron affinities of uracil and cytosine derivatives differently affect the apparent efficiencies.

    PubMed

    Ito, Takeo; Kurihara, Ryohsuke; Utsumi, Nihiro; Hamaguchi, Yuta; Tanabe, Kazuhito; Nishimoto, Sei-ichi

    2013-11-11

    We investigated excess electron transport (EET) in DNA containing cytosine derivatives. By arranging the derivatives according to their electron affinities, the apparent EET efficiency was successfully regulated. Unexpectedly, however, providing gradients of electron affinity by inserting 5-fluorocytosine did not always enhance EET.

  9. Salt-Induced Tissue-Specific Cytosine Methylation Downregulates Expression of HKT Genes in Contrasting Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) Genotypes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Suresh; Beena, Ananda Sankara; Awana, Monika; Singh, Archana

    2017-04-01

    Plants have evolved several strategies, including regulation of genes through epigenetic modifications, to cope with environmental stresses. DNA methylation is dynamically regulated through the methylation and demethylation of cytosine in response to environmental perturbations. High-affinity potassium transporters (HKTs) have accounted for the homeostasis of sodium and potassium ions in plants under salt stress. Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is sensitive to soil salinity, which impedes its growth and development, resulting in decreased productivity. The differential expression of HKTs has been reported to confer tolerance to salt stress in plants. In this study, we investigated variations in cytosine methylation and their effects on the expression of HKT genes in contrasting wheat genotypes under salt stress. We observed a genotype- and tissue-specific increase in cytosine methylation induced by NaCl stress that downregulated the expression of TaHKT2;1 and TaHKT2;3 in the shoot and root tissues of Kharchia-65, thereby contributing to its improved salt-tolerance ability. Although TaHKT1;4 was expressed only in roots and was downregulated under the stress in salt-tolerant genotypes, it was not regulated through variations in cytosine methylation. Thus, understanding epigenetic regulation and the function of HKTs would enable an improvement in salt tolerance and the development of salt-tolerant crops.

  10. Cytosine-cytosinium dimer behavior in a cocrystal with a decavanadate anion as a function of the temperature.

    PubMed

    Bosnjaković-Pavlović, Nada; Spasojević-de Biré, Anne

    2010-10-07

    We have performed X-ray diffraction measurements on single crystals of Na(3)[V(10)O(28)](C(4)N(3)OH(5))(3)(C(4)N(3)OH(6))(3)·10H(2)O as a function of the temperature. When the sample is cooled, from room temperature to 100 K, we have observed additional peaks well indexed in P1, while the phase at room temperature crystallizes in P1. The molecular structure at 210 K indicates that the center of inversion is located between two cytosinium molecules, formally described with a charge of +0.5. When this crystal is heated to room temperature and the structure in P1 reindexed, some peaks remained unindexed. A protonation-deprotonation process gives rise to additional diffraction peaks at temperatures lower than 210 K. The triply bridged hydrogen bonded cytosine-cytosinum dimer is discussed according to the results of the charge density analysis and topological analysis at 210 K. The structure at 100 K has been completely solved based on a comparative study with other compounds containing cytosine-cytosinium dimer. This description could be considered as a reference for such dimer. It could help for discrimination between cytosine and cytosinium molecules, for any new structure containing a cytosine-cytosinium pair, and for which the quality does not allow a precise determination of the hydrogen localization.

  11. Energetics of the lattice: packing elements in crystals of four-stranded intercalated cytosine-rich DNA molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, I.; Cai, L.; Chen, L.; Rich, A.

    1997-01-01

    Condensation of single molecules from solution into crystals represents a transition between distinct energetic states. In solution, the atomic interactions within the molecule dominate. In the crystalline state, however, a set of additional interactions are formed between molecules in close contact in the lattice--these are the packing interactions. The crystal structures of d(CCCT), d(TAACCC), d(CCCAAT), and d(AACCCC) have in common a four-stranded intercalated cytosine segment, built by stacked layers of cytosine.cytosine+ (C.C+) base pairs coming from two parallel duplexes that intercalate into each other with opposite polarity. The intercalated cytosine segments in these structures are similar in their geometry, even though the sequences crystallized in different space groups. In the crystals, adenine and thymine residues of the sequences are used to build the three-dimensional crystal lattice by elaborately interacting with symmetry-related molecules. The packing elements observed provide novel insight about the copious ways in which nucleic acid molecules can interact with each other--for example, when folded in more complicated higher order structures, such as mRNA and chromatin.

  12. Cytosine deaminase as a negative selection marker for gene disruption and replacement in the genus Streptomyces and other actinobacteria.

    PubMed

    Dubeau, Marie-Pierre; Ghinet, Mariana Gabriela; Jacques, Pierre-Etienne; Clermont, Nancy; Beaulieu, Carole; Brzezinski, Ryszard

    2009-02-01

    We developed a novel negative selection system for actinobacteria based on cytosine deaminase (CodA). We constructed vectors that include a synthetic gene encoding the CodA protein from Escherichia coli optimized for expression in Streptomyces species. Gene disruption and the introduction of an unmarked in-frame deletion were successfully achieved with these vectors.

  13. Metal Ion Induced Pairing of Cytosine Bases: Formation of I-Motif Structures Identified by IR Ion Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Juehan; Berden, Giel; Oomens, J.

    2015-06-01

    While the Watson-Crick structure of DNA is among the most well-known molecular structures of our time, alternative base-pairing motifs are also known to occur, often depending on base sequence, pH, or presence of cations. Pairing of two cytosine (C) bases induced by the sharing of a single proton (C-H^+-C) gives rise to the so-called i-motif, occurring particularly in the telomeric region of DNA, and particularly at low pH. At physiological pH, silver cations were recently suggested to form cytosine dimers in a C-Ag^+-C structure analogous to the hemiprotonated cytosine dimer, which was later confirmed by IR spectroscopy.^1 Here we investigate whether Ag^+ is unique in this behavior. Using infrared action spectroscopy employing the free-electron laser FELIX and a tandem mass spectrometer in combination with quantum-chemical computations, we investigate a series of C-M^+-C complexes, where M is Cu, Li and Na. The complexes are formed by electrospray ionization (ESI) from a solution of cytosine and the metal chloride salt in acetonitrile/water. The complexes of interest are mass-isolated in the cell of a FT ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer, where they are irradiated with the tunable IR radiation from FELIX in the 600 - 1800 wn range. Spectra in the H-stretching range are obtained with a LaserVision OPO. Both experimental spectra as well as theoretical calculations indicate that while Cu behaves as Ag, the alkali metal ions induce a clearly different dimer structure, in which the two cytosine units are parallelly displaced. In addition to coordination to the ring nitrogen atom, the alkali metal ions coordinate to the carbonyl oxygen atoms of both cytosine bases, indicating that the alkali metal ion coordination favorably competes with hydrogen bonding between the two cytosine sub-units of the i-motif like structure. 1. Berdakin, Steinmetz, Maitre, Pino, J. Phys. Chem. A 2014, 118, 3804

  14. Semiclassical dynamics of electron attachment to guanine-cytosine base pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Tomohiro; Minoshima, Yusuke; Yokoi, Yuki; Takayanagi, Toshiyuki; Shiga, Motoyuki

    2015-04-01

    Electron attachment dynamics to the guanine-cytosine (G-C) base pair in the gas phase is studied using DFT and molecular dynamics. The potential energy surface of the G-C anion is constructed with the empirical-valence-bond method using force-field information obtained from long-range corrected DFT calculations. Ring-polymer molecular dynamics simulations predict that the initial dipole-bound anion readily converts into the valence-bound anion within 0.1 ps and proton-transfer occurs subsequently within 10 ps. The same process was found in classical simulations, but on a much slower time scale. This result suggests that nuclear quantum effects are important in understanding DNA damage by low-energy electrons.

  15. Surface-Enhanced Hyper-Raman Spectra of Adenine, Guanine, Cytosine, Thymine, and Uracil

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Using picosecond excitation at 1064 nm, surface-enhanced hyper-Raman scattering (SEHRS) spectra of the nucleobases adenine, guanine, cytosine, thymine, and uracil with two different types of silver nanoparticles were obtained. Comparing the SEHRS spectra with SERS data from the identical samples excited at 532 nm and with known infrared spectra, the major bands in the spectra are assigned. Due to the different selection rules for the one- and two-photon excited Raman scattering, we observe strong variation in relative signal strengths of many molecular vibrations obtained in SEHRS and SERS spectra. The two-photon excited spectra of the nucleobases are found to be very sensitive with respect to molecule–nanoparticle interactions. Using both the SEHRS and SERS data, a comprehensive vibrational characterization of the interaction of nucleobases with silver nanostructures can be achieved. PMID:28077982

  16. Preclinical modeling of cytosine arabinoside response in Mll-Enl translocator mouse leukemias.

    PubMed

    Cano, Florencia; Pannel, Richard; Follows, George A; Rabbitts, Terence H

    2008-03-01

    Mouse models of human cancer are a potential preclinical setting for drug testing and for development of methods for delivery of macromolecular drugs to tumors. We have assessed a mouse model of leukemia caused by Mll-Enl protein fusion as a preclinical situation in which myeloid-lineage leukemia results from de novo occurrence of chromosomal translocations between Mll and Enl genes. Here, we show that the mouse leukemias respond to cytosine arabinoside, a frontline treatment for human leukemia. The observations show that the myeloid cells are susceptible to the drug and the mice undergo a remission that comprises a reduction of the myeloid population of cells and recovery of the lymphoid population. This translocator model should therefore prove useful for future drug assessments against the recurrent mixed-lineage leukemia-associated translocations.

  17. Human DNA (cytosine-5)-methyltransferases: a functional and structural perspective for epigenetic cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Rondelet, Grégoire; Wouters, Johan

    2017-08-01

    Epigenetic modifications modulate chromatin states to regulate gene expression. Among them, DNA methylation and histone modifications play a crucial role in the establishment of the epigenome. In cancer, these epigenetic events may act in concert to repress tumor suppressor genes or promote oncogenic pathways. In the context of cancer initiation and progression, recruitment of DNA (cytosine-5)-methyltransferases to specific genomic regions is mainly mediated by histone epigenetic marks, transcription factors and co-regulators as part of a dynamic process. Herein, we will review these mechanisms and present state-of-the-art of DNA methylation, treatment and development of epigenetic cancer therapies targeting this epigenetic modification. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  18. Chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, vincristine, cytosine arabinoside, and prednisone (COAP) in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).

    PubMed

    Sallan, S E; Camitta, B M; Chan, D M; Traggis, D; Jaffe, N

    1977-01-01

    Three groups of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) were treated with intermittent cyclophosphamide, vincristine, cytosine arabinoside, and prednisone (COAP). Group A (no prior relapse) and Group B (prior single-agent relapse) received COAP after 12 months on another chemotherapy regimen. Children in Group C (prior relapse on multiagent regimens) received COAP following A-COAP (asparaginase plus COAP) reinduction. Median disease-free survival after beginning COAP was not reached for Group A, but was only 7 months for Groups B and C. As of November 1976, there were 8 of 15 Group A patients, 1 of 12 Group B patients, and 1 of 28 Group C patients who had remained disease-free from 38 to 60 (median 54.5) months and were off chemotherapy. COAP has activity in childhood ALL. However, effectiveness is markedly diminished in patients with prior bone marrow relapse.

  19. Hypomethylation of cytosine residues in cold-sensitive regions of Cestrum strigilatum (Solanaceae).

    PubMed

    Guarido, Paula Carolina Paes; de Paula, Adriano Alves; da Silva, Carlos Roberto Maximiano; Rodriguez, Carmen; Vanzela, André Luís Laforga

    2012-04-01

    Heterochromatin comprises a fraction of the genome usually with highly repeated DNA sequences and lacks of functional genes. This region can be revealed by using Giemsa C-banding, fluorochrome staining and cytomolecular tools. Some plant species are of particular interest through having a special type of heterochromatin denominated the cold-sensitive region (CSR). Independent of other chromosomal regions, when biological materials are subjected to low temperatures (about 0 °C), CSRs appear slightly stained and decondensed. In this study, we used Cestrum strigilatum (Solanaceae) to understand some aspects of CSR condensation associated with cytosine methylation levels, and to compare the behavior of different heterochromatin types of this species, when subjected to low temperatures.

  20. Systematic detection of hidden complexities in the unfolding mechanism of a cytosine-rich DNA strand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smiatek, Jens; Janssen-Müller, Daniel; Friedrich, Rudolf; Heuer, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the unfolding pathway of a cytosine-rich DNA structure via molecular dynamics simulations. By the study of the essential dynamics, we are able to identify a hidden complexity in the description of the dynamics in terms of the first two eigenvectors which are used as collective variables. This complexity can be mainly explained by non-Gaussian fluctuations due to contributions arising from the disregarded set of eigenvectors. We introduce the local non-Gaussian parameter as a tool for the detection of hidden complexities. The usage of this parameter allows a fast and reliable investigation for the determination of the important minimal number of eigenvectors which is needed for a sufficient description of molecular unfolding motion.

  1. Cytosine chemoreceptor McpC in Pseudomonas putida F1 also detects nicotinic acid.

    PubMed

    Parales, Rebecca E; Nesteryuk, Vasyl; Hughes, Jonathan G; Luu, Rita A; Ditty, Jayna L

    2014-12-01

    Soil bacteria are generally capable of growth on a wide range of organic chemicals, and pseudomonads are particularly adept at utilizing aromatic compounds. Pseudomonads are motile bacteria that are capable of sensing a wide range of chemicals, using both energy taxis and chemotaxis. Whilst the identification of specific chemicals detected by the ≥26 chemoreceptors encoded in Pseudomonas genomes is ongoing, the functions of only a limited number of Pseudomonas chemoreceptors have been revealed to date. We report here that McpC, a methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein in Pseudomonas putida F1 that was previously shown to function as a receptor for cytosine, was also responsible for the chemotactic response to the carboxylated pyridine nicotinic acid.

  2. Markerless Gene Deletion with Cytosine Deaminase in Thermus thermophilus Strain HB27

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Hoffmann, Jana; Watzlawick, Hildegard

    2015-01-01

    We developed a counterselectable deletion system for Thermus thermophilus HB27 based on cytosine deaminase (encoded by codA) from Thermaerobacter marianensis DSM 12885 and the sensitivity of T. thermophilus HB27 to the antimetabolite 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC). The deletion vector comprises the pUC18 origin of replication, a thermostable kanamycin resistance marker functional in T. thermophilus HB27, and codA under the control of a constitutive putative trehalose promoter from T. thermophilus HB27. The functionality of the system was demonstrated by deletion of the bglT gene, encoding a β-glycosidase, and three carotenoid biosynthesis genes, CYP175A1, crtY, and crtI, from the genome of T. thermophilus HB27. PMID:26655764

  3. Markerless Gene Deletion with Cytosine Deaminase in Thermus thermophilus Strain HB27.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Hoffmann, Jana; Watzlawick, Hildegard; Altenbuchner, Josef

    2015-12-11

    We developed a counterselectable deletion system for Thermus thermophilus HB27 based on cytosine deaminase (encoded by codA) from Thermaerobacter marianensis DSM 12885 and the sensitivity of T. thermophilus HB27 to the antimetabolite 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC). The deletion vector comprises the pUC18 origin of replication, a thermostable kanamycin resistance marker functional in T. thermophilus HB27, and codA under the control of a constitutive putative trehalose promoter from T. thermophilus HB27. The functionality of the system was demonstrated by deletion of the bglT gene, encoding a β-glycosidase, and three carotenoid biosynthesis genes, CYP175A1, crtY, and crtI, from the genome of T. thermophilus HB27. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Absolute cross sections for vibrational excitations of cytosine by low energy electron impact

    PubMed Central

    Michaud, M.; Bazin, M.; Sanche, L.

    2013-01-01

    The absolute cross sections (CSs) for vibrational excitations of cytosine by electron impact between 0.5 and 18 eV were measured by electron-energy loss (EEL) spectroscopy of the molecule deposited at monolayer coverage on an inert Ar substrate. The vibrational energies compare to those that have been reported from IR spectroscopy of cytosine isolated in Ar matrix, IR and Raman spectra of poly-crystalline cytosine, and ab initio calculation. The CSs for the various H bending modes at 142 and 160 meV are both rising from their energy threshold up to 1.7 and 2.1 × 10−17 cm2 at about 4 eV, respectively, and then decrease moderately while maintaining some intensity at 18 eV. The latter trend is displayed as well for the CS assigned to the NH2 scissor along with bending of all H at 179 meV. This overall behavior in electron-molecule collision is attributed to direct processes such as the dipole, quadrupole, and polarization contributions, etc. of the interaction of the incident electron with a molecule. The CSs for the ring deformation at 61 meV, the ring deformation with N-H symmetric wag at 77 meV, and the ring deformations with symmetric bending of all H at 119 meV exhibit common enhancement maxima at 1.5, 3.5, and 5.5 eV followed by a broad hump at about 12 eV, which are superimposed on the contribution due to the direct processes. At 3.5 eV, the CS values for the 61-, 77-, and 119-meV modes reach 4.0, 3.0, and 4.5 × 10−17 cm2, respectively. The CS for the C-C and C-O stretches at 202 meV, which dominates in the intermediate EEL region, rises sharply until 1.5 eV, reaches its maximum of 5.7 × 10−17 cm2 at 3.5 eV and then decreases toward 18 eV. The present vibrational enhancements, correspond to the features found around 1.5 and 4.5 eV in electron transmission spectroscopy (ETS) and those lying within 1.5–2.1 eV, 5.2–6.8 eV, and 9.5–10.9 eV range in dissociative electron attachment (DEA) experiments with cytosine in gas phase. While the ETS features

  5. [Protective effects of minocycline against hair follicle damage induced by cytosine arabinoside in vitro].

    PubMed

    Wu, Xian-jie; Zheng, Min; Lu, Zhong-fa

    2004-07-01

    To investigate the protective effects of minocycline against hair follicle damage induced by cytosine arabinoside (Ara-c). An in vitro organ culture of mouse vibrissa follicles was used and different concentrations of Ara-c and minocycline were added in the culture media. The total growth length, growth speed and growth period of hair were observed with invert microscopy and the survival of hair bulb cells was measured by MTT method. Minocycline (0.3 x 10(-6) approximately 10(-5) mol/L) improved hair follicle total growth length, growth speed and hair growth period and also improved survival of hair bulb cells in vitro organ culture, which were inhibited by Ara-c. Minocycline can protect hair follicle directly from damage induced by Ara-c.

  6. Mycoplasma hyorhinis-encoded cytidine deaminase efficiently inactivates cytosine-based anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Vande Voorde, Johan; Vervaeke, Peter; Liekens, Sandra; Balzarini, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasmas may colonize tumor tissue in patients. The cytostatic activity of gemcitabine was dramatically decreased in Mycoplasma hyorhinis-infected tumor cell cultures compared with non-infected tumor cell cultures. This mycoplasma-driven drug deamination could be prevented by exogenous administration of the cytidine deaminase (CDA) inhibitor tetrahydrouridine, but also by the natural nucleosides or by a purine nucleoside phosphorylase inhibitor. The M. hyorhinis-encoded CDAHyor gene was cloned, expressed as a recombinant protein and purified. CDAHyor was found to be more catalytically active than its human equivalent and efficiently deaminates (inactivates) cytosine-based anticancer drugs. CDAHyor expression at the tumor site may result in selective drug inactivation and suboptimal therapeutic efficiency.

  7. Genetic immunotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma by endothelial progenitor cells armed with cytosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rong; Yu, Hui; An, Yan-Li; Yu-Jia, Zhen; Teng, Gao-Jun

    2014-02-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) serve as cellular vehicles for targeting cancer cells and are a powerful tool for delivery of therapeutic genes. Cytosine deaminase (CD), a kind of frequent suicide gene which can kill carcinoma cells by converting a non-poisonous pro-drug 5-flucytosine (5-FC) into a poisonous cytotoxic 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). We combined super-paramagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles labeled EPCs with CD gene to treat grafted liver carcinomas and tracked them with 7.0 T Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Results showed that the therapeutic EPCs loaded with CD plus 5-Fc provided stronger carcinoma growth suppression compared with treatment using CD alone. The CD/5-Fc significantly inhibited the growth of endothelial cells and induced carcinoma cells apoptosis. These results indicate that EPCs transfected with anti-carcinoma genes can be used in carcinoma therapy as a novel therapeutic modality.

  8. Hypomethylation of cytosine residues in cold-sensitive regions of Cestrum strigilatum (Solanaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Guarido, Paula Carolina Paes; de Paula, Adriano Alves; da Silva, Carlos Roberto Maximiano; Rodriguez, Carmen; Vanzela, André Luís Laforga

    2012-01-01

    Heterochromatin comprises a fraction of the genome usually with highly repeated DNA sequences and lacks of functional genes. This region can be revealed by using Giemsa C-banding, fluorochrome staining and cytomolecular tools. Some plant species are of particular interest through having a special type of heterochromatin denominated the cold-sensitive region (CSR). Independent of other chromosomal regions, when biological materials are subjected to low temperatures (about 0 °C), CSRs appear slightly stained and decondensed. In this study, we used Cestrum strigilatum (Solanaceae) to understand some aspects of CSR condensation associated with cytosine methylation levels, and to compare the behavior of different heterochromatin types of this species, when subjected to low temperatures. PMID:22888295

  9. Mutation of Escherichia coli cytosine deaminase significantly enhances molecular chemotherapy of human glioma.

    PubMed

    Kaliberov, S A; Market, J M; Gillespie, G Y; Krendelchtchikova, V; Della Manna, D; Sellers, J C; Kaliberova, L N; Black, M E; Buchsbaum, D J

    2007-07-01

    Combined treatment using adenoviral (Ad)-directed enzyme/prodrug therapy and radiation therapy has the potential to become a powerful method of cancer therapy. We have developed an Ad vector encoding a mutant bacterial cytosine deaminase (bCD) gene (AdbCD-D314A), which has a higher affinity for cytosine than wild-type bCD (bCDwt). The purpose of this study was to evaluate cytotoxicity in vitro and therapeutic efficacy in vivo of the combination of AdbCD-D314A with the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) and ionizing radiation against human glioma. The present study demonstrates that AdbCD-D314A infection resulted in increased 5-FC-mediated cell killing, compared with AdbCDwt. Furthermore, a significant increase in cytotoxicity following AdbCD-D314A and radiation treatment of glioma cells in vitro was demonstrated as compared to AdbCDwt. Animal studies showed significant inhibition of subcutaneous or intracranial tumor growth of D54MG glioma xenografts by the combination of AdbCD-D314A/5-FC with ionizing radiation as compared with either agent alone, and with AdbCDwt/5-FC plus radiation. The results suggest that the combination of AdbCD-D314A/5-FC with radiation produces markedly increased cytotoxic effects in cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. These data indicate that combined treatment with this novel mutant enzyme/prodrug therapy and radiotherapy provides a promising approach for cancer therapy.

  10. Cytosine containing dipyrimidine sites can be hotspots of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer formation after UVB exposure.

    PubMed

    Bastien, Nathalie; Therrien, Jean-Philippe; Drouin, Régen

    2013-08-01

    Exposure to the UV component of sunlight is the principal factor leading to skin cancer development. Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) are considered to be the most important pre-mutagenic type of DNA damage involved in skin carcinogenesis. To better understand the biological mechanisms of UV carcinogenesis, it is critical to understand the CPD distribution between the four types of dipyrimidine sites. Most of our knowledge regarding CPD distribution comes from in vitro studies or from investigations using UVC, even though we are not naturally exposed to these UV wavelengths. We exposed normal human fibroblasts and purified DNA to UVB. Using ligation-mediated PCR, we quantified the CPD formation at 952 dipyrimidine sites among the PGK1 (phosphoglycerate kinase 1), JUN, HRAS, KRAS, NRAS and TP53 genes. In cellulo, we found a CPD distribution of 27 : 27 : 25 : 21 for TT : CC : TC : CT. This distribution is similar to that observed in vitro. In the analysed genes, we observed some extremely frequently damaged dipyrimidine sites and many of these occurred at potentially frequently mutated sites, i.e. at dipyrimidine sites containing cytosine. Also, most of the frequently damaged dipyrimidine sites in cellulo that are not frequently damaged in vitro are found on TP53 and NRAS. This indicates that many of the frequently damaged dipyrimidine sites in cellulo are on genes frequently mutated in skin cancer. All these results support the view that CPD are the main UVB-induced mutagenic photoproducts and provide evidence of the importance of CPD formation at sites containing cytosine.

  11. Mutation Processes in 293-Based Clones Overexpressing the DNA Cytosine Deaminase APOBEC3B

    PubMed Central

    Quist, Jelmar S.; Temiz, Nuri A.; Tutt, Andrew N. J.; Grigoriadis, Anita; Harris, Reuben S.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular, cellular, and clinical studies have combined to demonstrate a contribution from the DNA cytosine deaminase APOBEC3B (A3B) to the overall mutation load in breast, head/neck, lung, bladder, cervical, ovarian, and other cancer types. However, the complete landscape of mutations attributable to this enzyme has yet to be determined in a controlled human cell system. We report a conditional and isogenic system for A3B induction, genomic DNA deamination, and mutagenesis. Human 293-derived cells were engineered to express doxycycline-inducible A3B-eGFP or eGFP constructs. Cells were subjected to 10 rounds of A3B-eGFP exposure that each caused 80–90% cell death. Control pools were subjected to parallel rounds of non-toxic eGFP exposure, and dilutions were done each round to mimic A3B-eGFP induced population fluctuations. Targeted sequencing of portions of TP53 and MYC demonstrated greater mutation accumulation in the A3B-eGFP exposed pools. Clones were generated and microarray analyses were used to identify those with the greatest number of SNP alterations for whole genome sequencing. A3B-eGFP exposed clones showed global increases in C-to-T transition mutations, enrichments for cytosine mutations within A3B-preferred trinucleotide motifs, and more copy number aberrations. Surprisingly, both control and A3B-eGFP clones also elicited strong mutator phenotypes characteristic of defective mismatch repair. Despite this additional mutational process, the 293-based system characterized here still yielded a genome-wide view of A3B-catalyzed mutagenesis in human cells and a system for additional studies on the compounded effects of simultaneous mutation mechanisms in cancer cells. PMID:27163364

  12. Targeted endostatin-cytosine deaminase fusion gene therapy plus 5-fluorocytosine suppresses ovarian tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Sher, Y-P; Chang, C-M; Juo, C-G; Chen, C-T; Hsu, J L; Lin, C-Y; Han, Z; Shiah, S-G; Hung, M-C

    2013-02-28

    There are currently no effective therapies for cancer patients with advanced ovarian cancer, therefore developing an efficient and safe strategy is urgent. To ensure cancer-specific targeting, efficient delivery, and efficacy, we developed an ovarian cancer-specific construct (Survivin-VISA-hEndoyCD) composed of the cancer specific promoter survivin in a transgene amplification vector (VISA; VP16-GAL4-WPRE integrated systemic amplifier) to express a secreted human endostatin-yeast cytosine deaminase fusion protein (hEndoyCD) for advanced ovarian cancer treatment. hEndoyCD contains an endostatin domain that has tumor-targeting ability for anti-angiogenesis and a cytosine deaminase domain that converts the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) into the chemotherapeutic drug, 5-fluorouracil. Survivin-VISA-hEndoyCD was found to be highly specific, selectively express secreted hEndoyCD from ovarian cancer cells, and induce cancer-cell killing in vitro and in vivo in the presence of 5-FC without affecting normal cells. In addition, Survivin-VISA-hEndoyCD plus 5-FC showed strong synergistic effects in combination with cisplatin in ovarian cancer cell lines. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) treatment with Survivin-VISA-hEndoyCD coupled with liposome attenuated tumor growth and prolonged survival in mice bearing advanced ovarian tumors. Importantly, there was virtually no severe toxicity when hEndoyCD is expressed by Survivin-VISA plus 5-FC compared with CMV plus 5-FC. Thus, the current study demonstrates an effective cancer-targeted gene therapy that is worthy of development in clinical trials for treating advanced ovarian cancer.

  13. Reactions of an osmium-hexahydride complex with cytosine, deoxycytidine, and cytidine: the importance of the minor tautomers.

    PubMed

    Esteruelas, Miguel A; García-Raboso, Jorge; Oliván, Montserrat

    2012-09-03

    Complex OsH(6)(P(i)Pr(3))(2) (1) deprotonates cytosine to give molecular hydrogen and the d(4)-trihydride derivative OsH(3)(cytosinate)(P(i)Pr(3))(2) (2), which in solution exists as a mixture of isomers containing κ(2)-N1,O (2a) and κ(2)-N3,O (2b) amino-oxo and κ(2)-N3,N4 (2c) imino-oxo tautomers. The major isomer 2b associates with the minor one 2c through N-H···N and N-H···O hydrogen bonds to form [2b·2c](2) dimers, which crystallize from saturated pentane solutions of 2. Complex 1 is also able to perform the double deprotonation of cytosine (cytosinate') to afford the dinuclear derivative (P(i)Pr(3))(2)H(3)Os(cytosinate')OsH(3)(P(i)Pr(3))(2) (3), where the anion is coordinated κ(2)-N1,O and κ(2)-N3,N4 to two different OsH(3)(P(i)Pr(3))(2) metal fragments. The deprotonation of deoxycytidine and cytidine leads to OsH(3)(deoxycytidinate)(P(i)Pr(3))(2) (4) and OsH(3)(cytidinate)(P(i)Pr(3))(2) (5), respectively, containing the anion κ(2)-N3,N4 coordinated. Dimer [2b·2c](2) and dinuclear complex 3 have been characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis.

  14. The Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Consortium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Michael

    2003-01-01

    I want to discuss both the Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) Consortium and the Human Genome Project. I am afraid most of my presentation will be thin on law and possibly too high on rhetoric. Having been engaged in a personal and direct way with these issues as a trained scientist, I find it quite difficult to be always as objective as I ought to be.

  15. The Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Consortium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Michael

    2003-01-01

    I want to discuss both the Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) Consortium and the Human Genome Project. I am afraid most of my presentation will be thin on law and possibly too high on rhetoric. Having been engaged in a personal and direct way with these issues as a trained scientist, I find it quite difficult to be always as objective as I ought to be.

  16. Identification of a nucleotide in 5′ untranslated region contributing to virus replication and virulence of Coxsackievirus A16

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhaolong; Liu, Xin; Wang, Shaohua; Li, Jingliang; Hou, Min; Liu, Guanchen; Zhang, Wenyan; Yu, Xiao-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Coxsackievirus A16 (CA16) and enterovirus 71 (EV71) are two main causative pathogens of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). Unlike EV71, virulence determinants of CA16, particularly within 5′ untranslated region (5′UTR), have not been investigated until now. Here, a series of nucleotides present in 5′UTR of lethal but not in non-lethal CA16 strains were screened by aligning nucleotide sequences of lethal circulating Changchun CA16 and the prototype G10 as well as non-lethal SHZH05 strains. A representative infectious clone based on a lethal Changchun024 sequence and infectious mutants with various nucleotide alterations in 5′UTR were constructed and further investigated by assessing virus replication in vitro and virulence in neonatal mice. Compared to the lethal infectious clone, the M2 mutant with a change from cytosine to uracil at nucleotide 104 showed weaker virulence and lower replication capacity. The predicted secondary structure of the 5′UTR of CA16 RNA showed that M2 mutant located between the cloverleaf and stem-loop II, affected interactions between the 5′UTR and the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) and A1 (hnRNP A1) that are important for translational activity. Thus, our research determined a virulence-associated site in the 5′UTR of CA16, providing a crucial molecular target for antiviral drug development. PMID:26861413

  17. Applications of adenine nucleotide measurements in oceanography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holm-Hansen, O.; Hodson, R.; Azam, F.

    1975-01-01

    The methodology involved in nucleotide measurements is outlined, along with data to support the premise that ATP concentrations in microbial cells can be extrapolated to biomass parameters. ATP concentrations in microorganisms and nucleotide analyses are studied.

  18. Cloning and characterization of two tandemly arranged DNA methyltransferase genes of Neisseria lactamica: an adenine-specific M.NlaIII and a cytosine-type methylase.

    PubMed

    Labbé, D; Höltke, H J; Lau, P C

    1990-10-01

    The gene encoding the Neisseria lactamica III DNA methyltransferase (M.NlaIII) which recognizes the sequence CATG has been cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. DNA sequencing of a 3.125 kb EcoRI-PstI fragment localizes the M. NlaIII gene to a 334 codon open reading frame (ORF) and identifies, 468 bp downstream, a second ORF of 313 amino acids, which is referred to as M.NlaX. Both proteins are detectable in the E. coli coupled in vitro transcription-translation system; they are apparently expressed from separate N. lactamica promoters. The N-terminal half of the previously characterized M.FokI, which methylates adenine in one of the DNA strands with its asymmetric recognition sequence (GGATG), is found to have 41% sequence identity and a further 11.7% sequence similarity with M.NlaIII. Among the conserved amino acids is the wellknown DPPY sequence motif. With one exception, analysis of the nucleotides coding for the DP dipeptide in all known DPPY sequences shows the presence of an inherent DNA adenine methylation (dam) recognition site of GATC. A low level of expression of M.NlaX in E. coli prevents the elucidation of its sequence recognition specificity. Sequence analysis of M.NlaX shows that it is closely related to the group of monospecific 5-methylcytosine DNA methyltransferases (M.EcoRII, Dcm, M.HpaII and M.HhaI) which all have a modified cytosine at the second position of the recognition sequences. Both M.EcoRII and Dcm amino acid sequences are about 50% identical with M.NlaX; a considerable degree of sequence identity is found in the so-called variable region which is believed to be responsible for sequence recognition specificity. M.NlaX is probably the counterpart to the E. coli Dcm in N. lactamica.

  19. N-terminal and C-terminal cytosine deaminase domain of APOBEC3G inhibit hepatitis B virus replication

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Yan-Chang; Tian, Yong-Jun; Ding, Hong-Hui; Wang, Bao-Ju; Yang, Yan; Hao, You-Hua; Zhao, Xi-Ping; Lu, Meng-Ji; Gong, Fei-Li; Yang, Dong-Liang

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of human apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic-polypeptide 3G (APOBEC3G) and its N-terminal or C-terminal cytosine deaminase domain-mediated antiviral activity against hepatitis B virus (HBV) in vitro and in vivo. METHODS: The mammalian hepatoma cells HepG2 and HuH7 were cotransfected with APOBEC3G and its N-terminal or C-terminal cytosine deaminase domain expression vector and 1.3-fold-overlength HBV DNA as well as the linear monomeric HBV of genotype B and C. For in vivo study, an HBV vector-based mouse model was used in which APOBEC3G and its N-terminal or C-terminal cytosine deaminase domain expression vectors were co-delivered with 1.3-fold-overlength HBV DNA via high-volume tail vein injection. Levels of hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) and hepatitis B virus e antigen (HBeAg) in the media of the transfected cells and in the sera of mice were determined by ELISA. The expression of hepatitis B virus core antigen (HBcAg) in the transfected cells was determined by Western blot analysis. Core-associated HBV DNA was examined by Southern blot analysis. Levels of HBV DNA in the sera of mice as well as HBV core-associated RNA in the liver of mice were determined by quantitative PCR and quantitative RT-PCR analysis, respectively. RESULTS: Human APOBEC3G exerted an anti-HBV activity in a dose-dependent manner in HepG2 cells, and comparable suppressive effects were observed on genotype B and C as that of genotype A. Interestingly, the N-terminal or C-terminal cytosine deaminase domain alone could also inhibit HBV replication in HepG2 cells as well as Huh7 cells. Consistent with in vitro results, the levels of HBsAg in the sera of mice were dramatically decreased, with more than 50 times decrease in the levels of serum HBV DNA and core-associated RNA in the liver of mice treated with APOBEC3G and its N-terminal or C-terminal cytosine deaminase domain as compared to the controls. CONCLUSION: Our findings provide probably the

  20. Absolute cross sections for electronic excitations of cytosine by low energy electron impact

    PubMed Central

    Bazin, M.; Michaud, M.; Sanche, L.

    2013-01-01

    The absolute cross sections (CS) for electronic excitations of cytosine by electron impact between 5 and 18 eV were measured by electron-energy loss (EEL) spectroscopy of the molecule deposited at low coverage on an inert Ar substrate. The lowest EEL features found at 3.55 and 4.02 eV are ascribed to transitions from the ground state to the two lowest triplet 1 3A′(π→π*) and 2 3A′(π→π*) valence states of the molecule. Their energy dependent CS exhibit essentially a common maximum at about 6 eV with a value of 1.84 × 10−17 cm2 for the former and 4.94 × 10−17 cm2 for the latter. In contrast, the CS for the next EEL feature at 4.65 eV, which is ascribed to the optically allowed transition to the 2 1A′(π→π*) valence state, shows only a steep rise to about 1.04 × 10−16 cm2 followed by a monotonous decrease with the incident electron energy. The higher EEL features at 5.39, 6.18, 6.83, and 7.55 eV are assigned to the excitations of the 3 3, 1A′(π→π*), 4 1A′(π→π*), 5 1A′(π→π*), and 6 1A′(π→π*) valence states, respectively. The CS for the 3 3, 1A′ and 4 1A′ states exhibit a common enhancement at about 10 eV superimposed on a more or less a steep rise, reaching respectively a maximum of 1.27 and 1.79 × 10−16 cm2, followed by a monotonous decrease. This latter enhancement and the maximum seen at about 6 eV in the lowest triplet states correspond to the core-excited electron resonances that have been found by dissociative electron attachment experiments with cytosine in the gas phase. The weak EEL feature found at 5.01 eV with a maximum CS of 3.8 × 10−18 cm2 near its excitation threshold is attributed to transitions from the ground state to the 1 3, 1A″(n→π*) states. The monotonous rise of the EEL signal above 8 eV is attributed to the ionization of the molecule. It is partitioned into four excitation energy regions at about 8.55, 9.21, 9.83, and 11.53 eV, which correspond closely to the ionization energies of

  1. European Nucleotide Archive in 2016

    PubMed Central

    Toribio, Ana Luisa; Alako, Blaise; Amid, Clara; Cerdeño-Tarrága, Ana; Clarke, Laura; Cleland, Iain; Fairley, Susan; Gibson, Richard; Goodgame, Neil; ten Hoopen, Petra; Jayathilaka, Suran; Kay, Simon; Leinonen, Rasko; Liu, Xin; Martínez-Villacorta, Josué; Pakseresht, Nima; Rajan, Jeena; Reddy, Kethi; Rosello, Marc; Silvester, Nicole; Smirnov, Dmitriy; Vaughan, Daniel; Zalunin, Vadim; Cochrane, Guy

    2017-01-01

    The European Nucleotide Archive (ENA; http://www.ebi.ac.uk/ena) offers a rich platform for data sharing, publishing and archiving and a globally comprehensive data set for onward use by the scientific community. With a broad scope spanning raw sequencing reads, genome assemblies and functional annotation, the resource provides extensive data submission, search and download facilities across web and programmatic interfaces. Here, we outline ENA content and major access modalities, highlight major developments in 2016 and outline a number of examples of data reuse from ENA. PMID:27899630

  2. Plastid sequence evolution: a new pattern of nucleotide substitutions in the Cucurbitaceae.

    PubMed

    Decker-Walters, Deena S; Chung, Sang-Min; Staub, Jack E

    2004-05-01

    Nucleotide substitutions (i.e., point mutations) are the primary driving force in generating DNA variation upon which selection can act. Substitutions called transitions, which entail exchanges between purines (A = adenine, G = guanine) or pyrimidines (C = cytosine, T = thymine), typically outnumber transversions (e.g., exchanges between a purine and a pyrimidine) in a DNA strand. With an increasing number of plant studies revealing a transversion rather than transition bias, we chose to perform a detailed substitution analysis for the plant family Cucurbitaceae using data from several short plastid DNA sequences. We generated a phylogenetic tree for 19 taxa of the tribe Benincaseae and related genera and then scored conservative substitution changes (e.g., those not exhibiting homoplasy or reversals) from the unambiguous branches of the tree. Neither the transition nor (A+T)/(G+C) biases found in previous studies were supported by our overall data. More importantly, we found a novel and symmetrical substitution bias in which Gs had been preferentially replaced by A, As by C, Cs by T, and Ts by G, resulting in the G-->A-->C-->T-->G substitution series. Understanding this pattern will lead to new hypotheses concerning plastid evolution, which in turn will affect the choices of substitution models and other tree-building algorithms for phylogenetic analyses based on nucleotide data.

  3. Nucleotide variability in the 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase gene from Eleusine indica (L.) Gaertn.

    PubMed

    Chong, J L; Wickneswari, R; Ismail, B S; Salmijah, S

    2008-02-01

    This study reports the results of the partial DNA sequence analysis of the 5-enolpyruvyl-shikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) gene in glyphosate-resistant (R) and glyphosate-susceptible (S) biotypes of Eleusine indica (L.) Gaertn from Peninsular Malaysia. Sequencing results revealed point mutation at nucleotide position 875 in the R biotypes of Bidor, Chaah and Temerloh. In the Chaah R population, substitution of cytosine (C) to adenine (A) resulted in the change of threonine (Thr106) to proline (Pro106) and from C to thymidine (T) in the Bidor R population, leading to serine (Ser106) from Pro106. As for the Temerloh R, C was substituted by T resulting in the change of Pro106 to Ser106. A new mutation previously undetected in the Temerloh R was revealed with C being substituted with A, resulting in the change of Pro106 to Thr106 indicating multiple founding events rather than to the spread of a single resistant allele. There was no point mutation recorded at nucleotide position 875 previously demonstrated to play a pivotal role in conferring glyphosate resistance to E. indica for the Lenggeng, Kuala Selangor, Melaka R populations. Thus, there may be another resistance mechanism yet undiscovered in the resistant Lenggeng, Kuala Selangor and Melaka populations.

  4. Synthesis of adenine, guanine, cytosine, and other nitrogen organic compounds by a Fischer-Tropsch-like process.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, C. C.; Oro, J.

    1971-01-01

    Study of the formation of purines, pyrimidines, and other bases from CO, H2, and NH3 under conditions similar to those used in the Fischer-Tropsch process. It is found that industrial nickel/iron alloy catalyzes the synthesis of adenine, guanine, cytosine, and other nitrogenous compounds from mixtures of CO, H2, and NH3 at temperatures of about 600 C. Sufficient sample was accumulated to isolate as solid products adenine, guanine, and cytosine, which were identified by infrared spectrophotometry. In the absence of nickel/iron catalyst, at 650 C, or in the presence of this catalyst, at 450 C, no purines or pyrimidines were synthesized. These results confirm and extend some of the work reported by Kayatsu et al. (1968).

  5. Automated quantum chemistry based molecular dynamics simulations of electron ionization induced fragmentations of the nucleobases Uracil, Thymine, Cytosine, and Guanine.

    PubMed

    Grimme, Stefan; Bauer, Christopher Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The gas-phase decomposition pathways of electron ionization (EI)-induced radical cations of the nucleobases uracil, thymine, cytosine, and guanine are investigated by means of mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics. No preconceived fragmentation channels are used in the calculations. The results compare well to a plethora of experimental and theoretical data for these important biomolecules. With our combined stochastic and dynamic approach, one can access in an unbiased way the energetically available decomposition mechanisms. Additionally, we are able to separate the EI mass spectra of different tautomers of cytosine and guanine. Our method (previously termed quantum chemistry electron ionization mass spectra) reproduces free nucleobase experimental mass spectra well and provides detailed mechanistic in-sight into high-energy unimolecular decomposition processes.

  6. New nucleotide analogues with enhanced signal properties.

    PubMed

    Cherkasov, Dmitry; Biet, Thorsten; Bäuml, Englbert; Traut, Walther; Lohoff, Michael

    2010-01-01

    We describe synthesis and testing of a novel type of dye-modified nucleotides which we call macromolecular nucleotides (m-Nucs). Macromolecular nucleotides comprise a nucleotide moiety, a macromolecular linear linker, and a large macromolecular ligand carrying multiple fluorescent dyes. With incorporation of the nucleotide moiety into the growing nucleic acid strand during enzymatic synthesis, the macromolecular ligand together with the coupled dyes is bound to the nucleic acid. By the use of this new class of modified nucleotides, signals from multiple dye molecules can be obtained after a single enzymatic incorporation event. The modified nucleotides are considered especially useful in the fields of nanobiotechnology, where signal stability and intensity is a limiting factor.

  7. Electron attachment to the guanine-cytosine nucleic acid base pair and the effects of monohydration and proton transfer.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ashutosh; Jaeger, Heather M; Compaan, Katherine R; Schaefer, Henry F

    2012-05-17

    The guanine-cytosine (GC) radical anion and its interaction with a single water molecule is studied using ab initio and density functional methods. Z-averaged second-order perturbation theory (ZAPT2) was applied to GC radical anion for the first time. Predicted spin densities show that the radical character is localized on cytosine. The Watson-Crick monohydrated GC anion is compared to neutral GC·H2O, as well as to the proton-transferred analogue on the basis of structural and energetic properties. In all three systems, local minima are identified that correspond to water positioned in the major and minor grooves of macromolecular DNA. On the anionic surface, two novel structures have water positioned above or below the GC plane. On the neutral and anionic surfaces, the global minimum can be described as water interacting with the minor groove. These structures are predicted to have hydration energies of 9.7 and 11.8 kcal mol(-1), respectively. Upon interbase proton-transfer (PT), the anionic global minimum has water positioned in the major groove, and the hydration energy increases to 13.4 kcal mol(-1). PT GC·H2O(•-) has distonic character; the radical character resides on cytosine, while the negative charge is localized on guanine. The effects of proton transfer are further investigated through the computed adiabatic electron affinities (AEA) of GC and monohydrated GC, and the vertical detachment energies (VDE) of the corresponding anions. Monohydration increases the AEAs and VDEs by only 0.1 eV, while proton-transfer increases the VDEs substantially (0.8 eV). The molecular charge distribution of monohydrated guanine-cytosine radical anion depends heavily on interbase proton transfer.

  8. Involvement of a cytosine side chain in proton transfer in the rate-determining step of ribozyme self-cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Shih, I-hung; Been, Michael D.

    2001-01-01

    Ribozymes of hepatitis delta virus have been proposed to use an active-site cytosine as an acid-base catalyst in the self-cleavage reaction. In this study, we have examined the role of cytosine in more detail with the antigenomic ribozyme. Evidence that proton transfer in the rate-determining step involved cytosine 76 (C76) was obtained from examining cleavage activity of the wild-type and imidazole buffer-rescued C76-deleted (C76Δ) ribozymes in D2O and H2O. In both reactions, a similar kinetic isotope effect and shift in the apparent pKa indicate that the buffer is functionally substituting for the side chain in proton transfer. Proton inventory of the wild-type reaction supported a mechanism of a single proton transfer at the transition state. This proton transfer step was further characterized by exogenous base rescue of a C76Δ mutant with cytosine and imidazole analogues. For the imidazole analogues that rescued activity, the apparent pKa of the rescue reaction, measured under kcat/KM conditions, correlated with the pKa of the base. From these data a Brønsted coefficient (β) of 0.51 was determined for the base-rescued reaction of C76Δ. This value is consistent with that expected for proton transfer in the transition state. Together, these data provide strong support for a mechanism where an RNA side chain participates directly in general acid or general base catalysis of the wild-type ribozyme to facilitate RNA cleavage. PMID:11171978

  9. Genome-Wide Identification and Comparative Analysis of Cytosine-5 DNA Methyltransferase and Demethylase Families in Wild and Cultivated Peanut

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pengfei; Gao, Chao; Bian, Xiaotong; Zhao, Shuzhen; Zhao, Chuanzhi; Xia, Han; Song, Hui; Hou, Lei; Wan, Shubo; Wang, Xingjun

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation plays important roles in genome protection, regulation of gene expression and is associated with plants development. Plant DNA methylation pattern was mediated by cytosine-5 DNA methyltransferase and demethylase. Although the genomes of AA and BB wild peanuts have been fully sequenced, these two gene families have not been studied. In this study we report the identification and analysis of putative cytosine-5 DNA methyltransferases (C5-MTases) and demethylases in AA and BB wild peanuts. Cytosine-5 DNA methyltransferases in AA and BB wild peanuts could be classified in MET, CMT, and DRM2 groups based on their domain organization. This result was supported by the gene and protein structural characteristics and phylogenetic analysis. We found that some wild peanut DRM2 members didn't contain UBA domain which was different from other plants such as Arabidopsis, maize and soybean. Five DNA demethylase encoding genes were found in AA genome and five in BB genome. The selective pressure analysis showed that wild peanut C5-MTase genes mainly underwent purifying selection but many positive selection sites can be detected. Conversely, DNA demethylase genes mainly underwent positive selection during evolution. Additionally, the expression dynamic of cytosine-5 DNA methyltransferase and demethylase genes in different cultivated peanut tissues were analyzed. Expression result showed that cold, heat or PEG stress could influence the expression level of C5-MTase and DNA demethylase genes in cultivated peanut. These results are useful for better understanding the complexity of these two gene families, and will facilitate epigenetic studies in peanut in the future. PMID:26870046

  10. Inhibition of transcription of cytosine-containing DNA in vitro by the alc gene product of bacteriophage T4.

    PubMed Central

    Drivdahl, R H; Kutter, E M

    1990-01-01

    The alc gene product (gpalc) of bacteriophage T4 inhibits the transcription of cytosine-containing DNA in vivo. We examined its effect on transcription in vitro by comparing RNA polymerase isolated from Escherichia coli infected with either wild-type T4D+ or alc mutants. A 50 to 60% decline in RNA polymerase activity, measured on phage T7 DNA, was observed by 1 min after infection with either T4D+ or alc mutants; this did not occur when the infecting phage lacked gpalt. In the case of the T4D+ strain but not alc mutants, this was followed by a further decrease. By 5 min after infection the activity of alc mutants was 1.5 to 2.5 times greater than that of the wild type on various cytosine-containing DNA templates, whereas there was little or no difference in activity on T4 HMdC-DNA, in agreement with the in vivo specificity. Effects on transcript initiation and elongation were distinguished by using a T7 phage DNA template. Rifampin challenge, end-labeling with [gamma-32P]ATP, and selective initiation with a dinucleotide all indicate that the decreased in vitro activity of the wild-type polymerase relative to that of the alc mutants was due to inhibition of elongation, not to any difference in initiation rates. Wild-type (but not mutated) gpalc copurified with RNA polymerase on heparin agarose but not in subsequent steps. Immunoprecipitation of modified RNA polymerase also indicated that gpalc was not tightly bound to RNA polymerase intracellularly. It thus appears likely that gpalc inhibits transcript elongation on cytosine-containing DNA by interacting with actively transcribing core polymerase as a complex with the enzyme and cytosine-rich stretches of the template. Images PMID:2185231

  11. Nucleotide Metabolism and DNA Replication.

    PubMed

    Warner, Digby F; Evans, Joanna C; Mizrahi, Valerie

    2014-10-01

    The development and application of a highly versatile suite of tools for mycobacterial genetics, coupled with widespread use of "omics" approaches to elucidate the structure, function, and regulation of mycobacterial proteins, has led to spectacular advances in our understanding of the metabolism and physiology of mycobacteria. In this article, we provide an update on nucleotide metabolism and DNA replication in mycobacteria, highlighting key findings from the past 10 to 15 years. In the first section, we focus on nucleotide metabolism, ranging from the biosynthesis, salvage, and interconversion of purine and pyrimidine ribonucleotides to the formation of deoxyribonucleotides. The second part of the article is devoted to DNA replication, with a focus on replication initiation and elongation, as well as DNA unwinding. We provide an overview of replication fidelity and mutation rates in mycobacteria and summarize evidence suggesting that DNA replication occurs during states of low metabolic activity, and conclude by suggesting directions for future research to address key outstanding questions. Although this article focuses primarily on observations from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, it is interspersed, where appropriate, with insights from, and comparisons with, other mycobacterial species as well as better characterized bacterial models such as Escherichia coli. Finally, a common theme underlying almost all studies of mycobacterial metabolism is the potential to identify and validate functions or pathways that can be exploited for tuberculosis drug discovery. In this context, we have specifically highlighted those processes in mycobacterial DNA replication that might satisfy this critical requirement.

  12. Methyl-Cytosine-Driven Structural Changes Enhance Adduction Kinetics of an Exon 7 fragment of the p53 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Malla, Spundana; Kadimisetty, Karteek; Fu, You-Jun; Choudhary, Dharamainder; Schenkman, John B.; Rusling, James F.

    2017-01-01

    Methylation of cytosine (C) at C-phosphate-guanine (CpG) sites enhances reactivity of DNA towards electrophiles. Mutations at CpG sites on the p53 tumor suppressor gene that can result from these adductions are in turn correlated with specific cancers. Here we describe the first restriction-enzyme-assisted LC-MS/MS sequencing study of the influence of methyl cytosines (MeC) on kinetics of p53 gene adduction by model metabolite benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol-9,10-epoxide (BPDE), using methodology applicable to correlate gene damage sites for drug and pollutant metabolites with mutation sites. This method allows direct kinetic measurements by LC-MS/MS sequencing for oligonucleotides longer than 20 base pairs (bp). We used MeC and non-MeC (C) versions of a 32 bp exon 7 fragment of the p53 gene. Methylation of 19 cytosines increased the rate constant 3-fold for adduction on G at the major reactive CpG in codon 248 vs. the non-MeC fragment. Rate constants for non-CpG codons 244 and 243 were not influenced significantly by MeC. Conformational and hydrophobicity changes in the MeC-p53 exon 7 fragment revealed by CD spectra and molecular modeling increase the BPDE binding constant to G in codon 248 consistent with a pathway in which preceding reactant binding greatly facilitates the rate of covalent SN2 coupling. PMID:28102315

  13. Epigenetic contribution to successful polyploidizations: variation in global cytosine methylation along an extensive ploidy series in Dianthus broteri (Caryophyllaceae).

    PubMed

    Alonso, Conchita; Balao, Francisco; Bazaga, Pilar; Pérez, Ricardo

    2016-11-01

    Polyploidization is a significant evolutionary force in plants which involves major genomic and genetic changes, frequently regulated by epigenetic factors. We explored whether natural polyploidization in Dianthus broteri complex resulted in substantial changes in global DNA cytosine methylation associated to ploidy. Global cytosine methylation was estimated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in 12 monocytotypic populations with different ploidies (2×, 4×, 6×, 12×) broadly distributed within D. broteri distribution range. The effects of ploidy level and local variation on methylation were assessed by generalized linear mixed models (GLMMs). Dianthus broteri exhibited a higher methylation percent (˜33%) than expected by its monoploid genome size and a large variation among study populations (range: 29.3-35.3%). Global methylation tended to increase with ploidy but did not significantly differ across levels due to increased variation within the highest-order polyploidy categories. Methylation varied more among hexaploid and dodecaploid populations, despite such cytotypes showing more restricted geographic location and increased genetic relatedness than diploids and tetraploids. In this study, we demonstrate the usefulness of an HPLC method in providing precise and genome reference-free global measure of DNA cytosine methylation, suitable to advance current knowledge of the roles of this epigenetic mechanism in polyploidization processes.

  14. Studying Z-DNA and B- to Z-DNA transitions using a cytosine analogue FRET-pair

    PubMed Central

    Dumat, Blaise; Larsen, Anders Foller; Wilhelmsson, L. Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we report on the use of a tricyclic cytosine FRET pair, incorporated into DNA with different base pair separations, to study Z-DNA and B-Z DNA junctions. With its position inside the DNA structure, the FRET pair responds to a B- to Z-DNA transition with a distinct change in FRET efficiency for each donor/acceptor configuration allowing reliable structural probing. Moreover, we show how fluorescence spectroscopy and our cytosine analogues can be used to determine rate constants for the B- to Z-DNA transition mechanism. The modified cytosines have little influence on the transition and the FRET pair is thus an easily implemented and virtually non-perturbing fluorescence tool to study Z-DNA. This nucleobase analogue FRET pair represents a valuable addition to the limited number of fluorescence methods available to study Z-DNA and we suggest it will facilitate, for example, deciphering the B- to Z-DNA transition mechanism and investigating the interaction of DNA with Z-DNA binding proteins. PMID:26896804

  15. Semi-quantitative immunohistochemical detection of 5-hydroxymethyl-cytosine reveals conservation of its tissue distribution between amphibians and mammals.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Rimple D; Sottile, Virginie; Loose, Matthew; De Sousa, Paul A; Johnson, Andrew D; Ruzov, Alexey

    2012-02-01

    5-Hydroxymethyl-cytosine (5-hmC) is a form of modified cytosine, which has recently attracted a considerable attention due to its potential role in transcriptional regulation. According to several reports 5-hydroxymethyl-cytosine distribution is tissue-specific in mammals. Thus, 5-hmC is enriched in embryonic cell populations and in adult neuronal tissue. Here, we describe a novel method of semi-quantitative immunohistochemical detection of 5-hmC and utilize it to assess the levels of this modification in amphibian tissues. We show that, similar to mammalian embryos, 5-hmC is enriched in axolotl tadpoles compared with adult tissues. Our data demonstrate that 5-hmC distribution is tissue-specific in amphibians, and that strong 5-hmC enrichment in neuronal cells is conserved between amphibians and mammals. In addition, we identify 5-hmC-enriched cell populations that are distributed in amphibian skin and connective tissue in a mosaic manner. Our results illustrate that immunochemistry can be successfully used not only for spatial identification of cells enriched with 5-hmC, but also for the semi-quantitative assessment of the levels of this epigenetic modification in single cells of different tissues.

  16. Methyl-Cytosine-Driven Structural Changes Enhance Adduction Kinetics of an Exon 7 fragment of the p53 Gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malla, Spundana; Kadimisetty, Karteek; Fu, You-Jun; Choudhary, Dharamainder; Schenkman, John B.; Rusling, James F.

    2017-01-01

    Methylation of cytosine (C) at C-phosphate-guanine (CpG) sites enhances reactivity of DNA towards electrophiles. Mutations at CpG sites on the p53 tumor suppressor gene that can result from these adductions are in turn correlated with specific cancers. Here we describe the first restriction-enzyme-assisted LC-MS/MS sequencing study of the influence of methyl cytosines (MeC) on kinetics of p53 gene adduction by model metabolite benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol-9,10-epoxide (BPDE), using methodology applicable to correlate gene damage sites for drug and pollutant metabolites with mutation sites. This method allows direct kinetic measurements by LC-MS/MS sequencing for oligonucleotides longer than 20 base pairs (bp). We used MeC and non-MeC (C) versions of a 32 bp exon 7 fragment of the p53 gene. Methylation of 19 cytosines increased the rate constant 3-fold for adduction on G at the major reactive CpG in codon 248 vs. the non-MeC fragment. Rate constants for non-CpG codons 244 and 243 were not influenced significantly by MeC. Conformational and hydrophobicity changes in the MeC-p53 exon 7 fragment revealed by CD spectra and molecular modeling increase the BPDE binding constant to G in codon 248 consistent with a pathway in which preceding reactant binding greatly facilitates the rate of covalent SN2 coupling.

  17. APOBEC3B lysine residues are dispensable for DNA cytosine deamination, HIV-1 restriction, and nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Molan, Amy M; Hanson, Heather M; Chweya, Cynthia M; Anderson, Brett D; Starrett, Gabriel J; Richards, Christopher M; Harris, Reuben S

    2017-11-01

    The APOBEC3 DNA cytosine deaminase family comprises a fundamental arm of the innate immune response and is best known for retrovirus restriction. Several APOBEC3 enzymes restrict HIV-1 and related retroviruses by deaminating viral cDNA cytosines to uracils compromising viral genomes. Human APOBEC3B (A3B) shows strong virus restriction activities in a variety of experimental systems, and is subjected to tight post-translational regulation evidenced by cell-specific HIV-1 restriction activity and active nuclear import. Here we ask whether lysines and/or lysine post-translational modifications are required for these A3B activities. A lysine-free derivative of human A3B was constructed and shown to be indistinguishable from the wild-type enzyme in DNA cytosine deamination, HIV-1 restriction, and nuclear localization activities. However, lysine loss did render the protein resistant to degradation by SIV Vif. Taken together, we conclude that lysine side chains and modifications thereof are unlikely to be central to A3B function or regulation in human cells. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Neuronal apoptosis and gray matter heterotopia in microcephaly produced by cytosine arabinoside in mice.

    PubMed

    Takano, Tomoyuki; Akahori, Shie; Takeuchi, Yoshihiro; Ohno, Masaki

    2006-05-17

    Primary microcephaly can be accompanied by numerous migration anomalies. This experiment was undertaken to examine the pathogenesis of gray matter heterotopia and microcephaly that is produced after administering cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C) to mice. Pregnant mice were intraperitoneally injected with Ara-C at 30 mg/kg body weight on days 13.5 and 14.5 of gestation, and then their offspring were examined. On embryonic day 15.5, in the ventricular zone of the cingulate cortex, the neuroepithelial cells lacked BrdU immunoreactivity. Nestin-immunoreactive radial glial fibers and calretinin-positive subplate fibers were disrupted. TUNEL reaction was remarkable throughout the cerebral hemisphere. Subcortical heterotopia in the cingulate cortex and subependymal nodular heterotopia in the dorsolateral part of the lateral ventricles became detectable by the first day after birth. Thirty-two days after birth, microcephaly was apparent; subcortical heterotopia was observed to have increased in size while it was still located in the frontal and cingulate cortices. This experiment demonstrated that Ara-C induces neuronal apoptosis throughout the cerebral hemisphere. The immunohistochemical characteristics in the gray matter heterotopia suggest that both the subcortical and the subependymal heterotopias were formed by neurons originally committed to the neocortex. We conclude that the gray matter heterotopia that accompanies the microcephaly was produced by a disturbance of radial, tangential, and interkinetic neuronal migrations due to the toxicity of Ara-C in the immature developing brain.

  19. Engineering the DNA cytosine-5 methyltransferase reaction for sequence-specific labeling of DNA

    PubMed Central

    Lukinavičius, Gražvydas; Lapinaitė, Audronė; Urbanavičiūtė, Giedrė; Gerasimaitė, Rūta; Klimašauskas, Saulius

    2012-01-01

    DNA methyltransferases catalyse the transfer of a methyl group from the ubiquitous cofactor S-adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet) onto specific target sites on DNA and play important roles in organisms from bacteria to humans. AdoMet analogs with extended propargylic side chains have been chemically produced for methyltransferase-directed transfer of activated groups (mTAG) onto DNA, although the efficiency of reactions with synthetic analogs remained low. We performed steric engineering of the cofactor pocket in a model DNA cytosine-5 methyltransferase (C5-MTase), M.HhaI, by systematic replacement of three non-essential positions, located in two conserved sequence motifs and in a variable region, with smaller residues. We found that double and triple replacements lead to a substantial improvement of the transalkylation activity, which manifests itself in a mild increase of cofactor binding affinity and a larger increase of the rate of alkyl transfer. These effects are accompanied with reduction of both the stability of the product DNA–M.HhaI–AdoHcy complex and the rate of methylation, permitting competitive mTAG labeling in the presence of AdoMet. Analogous replacements of two conserved residues in M.HpaII and M2.Eco31I also resulted in improved transalkylation activity attesting a general applicability of the homology-guided engineering to the C5-MTase family and expanding the repertoire of sequence-specific tools for covalent in vitro and ex vivo labeling of DNA. PMID:23042683

  20. Aplidin synergizes with cytosine arabinoside: functional relevance of mitochondria in Aplidin-induced cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Humeniuk, R; Menon, L G; Mishra, P J; Saydam, G; Longo-Sorbello, G S A; Elisseyeff, Y; Lewis, L D; Aracil, M; Jimeno, J; Bertino, J R; Banerjee, D

    2007-12-01

    Aplidin (plitidepsin) is a novel marine-derived antitumor agent presently undergoing phase II clinical trials in hematological malignancies and solid tumors. Lack of bone marrow toxicity has encouraged further development of this drug for treatment of leukemia and lymphoma. Multiple signaling pathways have been shown to be involved in Aplidin-induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in G1 and G2 phase. However, the exact mechanism(s) of Aplidin action remains to be elucidated. Here we demonstrate that mitochondria-associated or -localized processes are the potential cellular targets of Aplidin. Whole genome gene-expression profiling (GEP) revealed that fatty acid metabolism, sterol biosynthesis and energy metabolism, including the tricarboxylic acid cycle and ATP synthesis are affected by Aplidin treatment. Moreover, mutant MOLT-4, human leukemia cells lacking functional mitochondria, were found to be resistant to Aplidin. Cytosine arabinoside (araC), which also generates oxidative stress but does not affect the ATP pool, showed synergism with Aplidin in our leukemia and lymphoma models in vitro and in vivo. These studies provide new insights into the mechanism of action of Aplidin. The efficacy of the combination of Aplidin and araC is currently being evaluated in clinical phase I/II program for the treatment of patients with relapsed leukemia and high-grade lymphoma.

  1. Endogenous APOBEC3A DNA cytosine deaminase is cytoplasmic and nongenotoxic.

    PubMed

    Land, Allison M; Law, Emily K; Carpenter, Michael A; Lackey, Lela; Brown, William L; Harris, Reuben S

    2013-06-14

    APOBEC3A (A3A) is a myeloid lineage-specific DNA cytosine deaminase with a role in innate immunity to foreign DNA. Previous studies have shown that heterologously expressed A3A is genotoxic, suggesting that monocytes may have a mechanism to regulate this enzyme. Indeed, we observed no significant cytotoxicity when interferon was used to induce the expression of endogenous A3A in CD14(+)-enriched primary cells or the monocytic cell line THP-1. In contrast, doxycycline-induced A3A in HEK293 cells caused major cytotoxicity at protein levels lower than those observed when CD14(+) cells were stimulated with interferon. Immunofluorescent microscopy of interferon-stimulated CD14(+) and THP-1 cells revealed that endogenous A3A is cytoplasmic, in stark contrast to stably or transiently transfected A3A, which has a cell-wide localization. A3A constructs engineered to be cytoplasmic are also nontoxic in HEK293 cells. These data combine to suggest that monocytic cells use a cytoplasmic retention mechanism to control A3A and avert genotoxicity during innate immune responses.

  2. Intracranial hypertension secondary to high dose cytosine arabinoside - A case study.

    PubMed

    Nurgat, Z A; Alzahrani, H; Lawrence, M; Mannan, A; Ashour, M; Rasheed, W; Aljurf, M

    2017-05-01

    We report a rare case of intracranial hypertension following high dose cytosine arabinoside (HiDAC) in a 20-year-old man, with precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). A five drug induction protocol for ALL was initiated; post induction consolidation was with HiDAC (3 g/m(2) IV every 12 h on days 1, 3 and 5). Post consolidation, cytogenetic remission was attained and he received an intensification and maintenance regimen for ALL, for a period of approximately 24 months. Four months following the completion of his treatment, the patient relapsed within the central nervous system (CNS). Intravenous salvage chemotherapy was initiated using a combination of fludarabine 30 mg/m(2), followed by cytarabine 2 g/m(2) 4 h later on days 1 through 5 (FA). On day # 23 of FA, he developed a severe headache. A gadolinium-enhanced brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed increased intracranial pressure. On day # 25, ophthalmology examination suggested bilateral papilledema. He was started on acetazolamide 250 mg twice daily. He had spontaneous resolution of his symptoms. The patient had no recurrence of papilledema or any other neurological symptoms. Intracranial hypertension secondary to HiDAC, is an exceedingly rare complication and is not regularly associated as a common side effect of cytarabine administration. Prompt action in diagnosing and treating intracranial hypertension will save the patient from consequences, such as loss of vision, that are prevalent in this condition.

  3. RNA-mediated epigenetic heredity requires the cytosine methyltransferase Dnmt2.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Jafar; Grandjean, Valérie; Liebers, Reinhard; Tuorto, Francesca; Ghanbarian, Hossein; Lyko, Frank; Cuzin, François; Rassoulzadegan, Minoo

    2013-05-01

    RNA-mediated transmission of phenotypes is an important way to explain non-Mendelian heredity. We have previously shown that small non-coding RNAs can induce hereditary epigenetic variations in mice and act as the transgenerational signalling molecules. Two prominent examples for these paramutations include the epigenetic modulation of the Kit gene, resulting in altered fur coloration, and the modulation of the Sox9 gene, resulting in an overgrowth phenotype. We now report that expression of the Dnmt2 RNA methyltransferase is required for the establishment and hereditary maintenance of both paramutations. Our data show that the Kit paramutant phenotype was not transmitted to the progeny of Dnmt2(-/-) mice and that the Sox9 paramutation was also not established in Dnmt2(-/-) embryos. Similarly, RNA from Dnmt2-negative Kit heterozygotes did not induce the paramutant phenotype when microinjected into Dnmt2-deficient fertilized eggs and microinjection of the miR-124 microRNA failed to induce the characteristic giant phenotype. In agreement with an RNA-mediated mechanism of inheritance, no change was observed in the DNA methylation profiles of the Kit locus between the wild-type and paramutant mice. RNA bisulfite sequencing confirmed Dnmt2-dependent tRNA methylation in mouse sperm and also indicated Dnmt2-dependent cytosine methylation in Kit RNA in paramutant embryos. Together, these findings uncover a novel function of Dnmt2 in RNA-mediated epigenetic heredity.

  4. Hydrogen-bonding patterns in 5-fluoro-cytosine-melamine co-crystal (4/1).

    PubMed

    Mohana, Marimuthu; Muthiah, Packianathan Thomas; Sanjeewa, Liurukara D; McMillen, Colin D

    2016-04-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title compound, 4C4H4FN3O·C3H6N6, comprises of two independent 5-fluoro-cytosine (5FC) mol-ecules (A and B) and one half-mol-ecule of melamine (M). The other half of the melamine mol-ecule is generated by a twofold axis. 5FC mol-ecules A and B are linked through two different homosynthons [R 2 (2)(8) ring motif]; one is formed via a pair of N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds and the second via a pair of N-H⋯N hydrogen bonds. In addition to this pairing, the O atoms of 5FC mol-ecules A and B inter-act with the N2 amino group on both sides of the melamine mol-ecule, forming a DDAA array of quadruple hydrogen bonds and generating a supra-molecular pattern. The 5FC (mol-ecules A and B) and two melamine mol-ecules inter-act via N-H⋯O, N-H⋯N and N-H⋯O, N-H⋯N, C-H⋯F hydrogen bonds forming R 6 (6)(24) and R 4 (4)(15) ring motifs. The crystal structure is further strengthened by C-H⋯F, C-F⋯π and π-π stacking inter-actions.

  5. Variation in cytosine methylation patterns during ploidy level conversions in Eragrostis curvula.

    PubMed

    Ochogavía, Ana C; Cervigni, Gerardo; Selva, Juan P; Echenique, Viviana C; Pessino, Silvina C

    2009-05-01

    In many species polyploidization involves rearrangements of the progenitor genomes, at both genetic and epigenetic levels. We analyzed the cytosine methylation status in a 'tetraploid-diploid-tetraploid' series of Eragrostis curvula with a common genetic background by using the MSAP (Methylation-sensitive Amplified Polymorphism) technique. Considerable levels of polymorphisms were detected during ploidy conversions. The total level of methylation observed was lower in the diploid genotype compared to the tetraploid ones. A significant proportion of the epigenetic modifications occurring during the tetraploid-diploid conversion reverted during the diploid-tetraploid one. Genetic and expression data from previous work were used to analyze correlation with methylation variation. All genetic, epigenetic and gene expression variation data correlated significantly when compared by pairs in simple Mantel tests. Dendrograms reflecting genetic, epigenetic and expression distances as well as principal coordinate analysis suggested that plants of identical ploidy levels present similar sets of data. Twelve (12) different genomic fragments displaying different methylation behavior during the ploidy conversions were isolated, sequenced and characterized.

  6. Persistence of cytosine methylation of DNA following fertilisation in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; O'Neill, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Normal development of the mammalian embryo requires epigenetic reprogramming of the genome. The level of cytosine methylation of CpG-rich (5meC) regions of the genome is a major epigenetic regulator and active global demethylation of 5meC throughout the genome is reported to occur within the first cell-cycle following fertilization. An enzyme or mechanism capable of catalysing such rapid global demethylation has not been identified. The mouse is a widely used model for studying developmental epigenetics. We have reassessed the evidence for this phenomenon of genome-wide demethylation following fertilisation in the mouse. We found when using conventional methods of immunolocalization that 5meC showed a progressive acid-resistant antigenic masking during zygotic maturation which gave the appearance of demethylation. Changing the unmasking strategy by also performing tryptic digestion revealed a persistence of a methylated state. Analysis of methyl binding domain 1 protein (MBD1) binding confirmed that the genome remained methylated following fertilisation. The maintenance of this methylated state over the first several cell-cycles required the actions of DNA methyltransferase activity. The study shows that any 5meC remodelling that occurs during early development is not explained by a global active loss of 5meC staining during the cleavage stage of development and global loss of methylation following fertilization is not a major component of epigenetic reprogramming in the mouse zygote.

  7. [Molecular mechanisms of transitions induced by cytosine analogue: comparative quantum-chemical study].

    PubMed

    Brovarets', O O; Govorun, D M

    2010-01-01

    Using the simplest molecular models at the MP2/6-311++G(2df,pd)//B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of the theory it has been shown for the first time that in addition to traditional incorporational errors caused by facilitated (compared with the canonical DNA bases cytosine (Cyt)) tautomerization of 6-(2-deoxy-beta-D-ribofuranosyl)-3,4-dihydro-6H,8H-pyrimido[4,5-c][1,2]oxazin-7-one (DCyt), this mutagen causes the replication errors, increasing one million times the population of mispair Gua.DCyt* (asterisk marked mutagenic tautomer) as compared with mispair Gua.Cyt*. It is also proved that DCyt in addition to traditional incorporational errors also induces similar errors by an additional mechanism - due to a facilitated tautomerization of the wobble base pair Ade.DCyt (compared to the same pair Ade.Cyt) to a mispair Ade.DCyt* which is quasirisomorphic Watson-Crick base pair. Moreover, the obtained results allowed interpreting non-inconsistently the existing experimental NMR data.

  8. Adenoviral-Mediated Imaging of Gene Transfer Using a Somatostatin Receptor-Cytosine Deaminase Fusion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Lears, Kimberly A.; Parry, Jesse J.; Andrews, Rebecca; Nguyen, Kim; Wadas, Thaddeus J.; Rogers, Buck E.

    2015-01-01

    Suicide gene therapy is a process by which cells are administered a gene that encodes a protein capable of converting a nontoxic prodrug into an active toxin. Cytosine deaminase (CD) has been widely investigated as a means of suicide gene therapy due to the enzyme’s ability to convert the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) into the toxic compound 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). However, the extent of gene transfer is a limiting factor in predicting therapeutic outcome. The ability to monitor gene transfer, non-invasively, would strengthen the efficiency of therapy. In this regard, we have constructed and evaluated a replication-deficient adenovirus (Ad) containing the human somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (SSTR2) fused with a C-terminal yeast CD gene for the non-invasive monitoring of gene transfer and therapy. The resulting Ad (AdSSTR2-yCD) was evaluated in vitro in breast cancer cells to determine the function of the fusion protein. These studies demonstrated that the both the SSTR2 and yCD were functional in binding assays, conversion assays, and cytotoxicity assays. In vivo studies similarly demonstrated the functionality using conversion assays, biodistribution studies, and small animal positron-emission tomography (PET) imaging studies. In conclusion, the fusion protein has been validated as useful for the non-invasive imaging of yCD expression and will be evaluated in the future for monitoring yCD-based therapy. PMID:25837665

  9. Regulation of expression and activity of DNA (cytosine-5) methyltransferases in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Kinney, Shannon R Morey; Pradhan, Sriharsa

    2011-01-01

    Three active DNA (cytosine-5) methyltransferases (DNMTs) have been identified in mammalian cells, Dnmt1, Dnmt3a, and Dnmt3b. DNMT1 is primarily a maintenance methyltransferase, as it prefers to methylate hemimethylated DNA during DNA replication and in vitro. DNMT3A and DNMT3B are de novo methyltransferases and show similar activity on unmethylated and hemimethylated DNA. DNMT3L, which lacks the catalytic domain, binds to DNMT3A and DNMT3B variants and facilitates their chromatin targeting, presumably for de novo methylation. There are several mechanisms by which mammalian cells regulate DNMT levels, including varied transcriptional activation of the respective genes and posttranslational modifications of the enzymes that can affect catalytic activity, targeting, and enzyme degradation. In addition, binding of miRNAs or RNA-binding proteins can also alter the expression of DNMTs. These regulatory processes can be disrupted in disease or by environmental factors, resulting in altered DNMT expression and aberrant DNA methylation patterns.

  10. On the electron affinity of cytosine in bulk water and at hydrophobic aqueous interfaces.

    PubMed

    Vöhringer-Martinez, Esteban; Dörner, Ciro; Abel, Bernd

    2014-10-01

    In the past one possible mechanism of DNA damage in bulk water has been attributed to the presence of hydrated electrons in water. Recently, one important property of hydrated electrons, namely their binding energy, was reported to be smaller at hydrophobic interfaces than in bulk aqueous solution. This possibly opens up new reaction possibilities with different solutes such as the DNA at hydrophobic, aqueous interfaces. Here, we use QM/MM molecular dynamics simulation to study how the molecular environment at the vacuum-water interface and in the bulk alters the electron affinity of cytosine being a characteristic part of the DNA. The electron affinity at the interface is closer to the corresponding binding energy of the partially hydrated electron. The increased energy resonance makes the electron capture process more probable and suggests that hydrated electrons at hydrophobic interfaces may be more reactive than the fully hydrated ones. Additionally, we found that the relaxation of the anionic form after electron attachment also induces a proton transfer from the surrounding solvent that was confirmed by comparison with the experimental reduction potential.

  11. Analysis of DNA Cytosine Methylation Patterns Using Methylation-Sensitive Amplification Polymorphism (MSAP).

    PubMed

    Guevara, María Ángeles; de María, Nuria; Sáez-Laguna, Enrique; Vélez, María Dolores; Cervera, María Teresa; Cabezas, José Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Different molecular techniques have been developed to study either the global level of methylated cytosines or methylation at specific gene sequences. One of them is the methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism technique (MSAP) which is a modification of amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP). It has been used to study methylation of anonymous CCGG sequences in different fungi, plants, and animal species. The main variation of this technique resides on the use of isoschizomers with different methylation sensitivity (such as HpaII and MspI) as a frequent-cutter restriction enzyme. For each sample, MSAP analysis is performed using both EcoRI/HpaII- and EcoRI/MspI-digested samples. A comparative analysis between EcoRI/HpaII and EcoRI/MspI fragment patterns allows the identification of two types of polymorphisms: (1) methylation-insensitive polymorphisms that show common EcoRI/HpaII and EcoRI/MspI patterns but are detected as polymorphic amplified fragments among samples and (2) methylation-sensitive polymorphisms which are associated with the amplified fragments that differ in their presence or absence or in their intensity between EcoRI/HpaII and EcoRI/MspI patterns. This chapter describes a detailed protocol of this technique and discusses the modifications that can be applied to adjust the technology to different species of interest.

  12. Cytosine arabinoside induces costimulatory molecule expression in acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Vereecque, R; Saudemont, A; Quesnel, B

    2004-07-01

    Chemotherapeutic drugs kill cancer cells mainly by direct cytotoxicity, but they might also induce a stronger host immune response by causing the tumor to produce costimulatory cell surface molecules like CD80. We previously reported that in myeloid leukemic cells, gamma-irradiation induced CD80 expression. In this study, we show that cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C), even at low doses, induced CD80 expression in vitro in mouse DA1-3b leukemic cells, by a mechanism that involved reactive oxygen species. In vivo experiments in the mouse DA1-3b/C3H whole-animal acute myeloid leukemia (AML) model showed that injection of Ara-C induced expression of CD80 and CD86, and decreased expression of B7-H1, indicating that chemotherapy can modify costimulatory molecule expression in vivo, in a way not necessarily observed in vitro. Mouse leukemic cells exposed in vivo to Ara-C were more susceptible to specific cytotoxic lymphocyte (CTL)-mediated killing. Ara-C also induced CD80 or CD86 expression in 14 of 21 primary cultured human AML samples. In humans being treated for AML, induction chemotherapy increased CD86 expression in the leukemic cells. These findings indicate possible synergistic strategies between CTL-based immunotherapy and chemotherapy for treatment. They also suggest an additional mechanism by which chemotherapy can eradicate AML blasts.

  13. A cytosine methyltransferase homologue is essential for repeat-induced point mutation in Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Freitag, Michael; Williams, Rebecca L.; Kothe, Gregory O.; Selker, Eric U.

    2002-01-01

    During sexual development, Neurospora crassa inactivates genes in duplicated DNA segments by a hypermutation process, repeat-induced point mutation (RIP). RIP introduces C:G to T:A transition mutations and creates targets for subsequent DNA methylation in vegetative tissue. The mechanism of RIP and its relationship to DNA methylation are not fully understood. Mutations in DIM-2, a DNA methyltransferase (DMT) responsible for all known cytosine methylation in Neurospora, does not prevent RIP. We used RIP to disrupt a second putative DMT gene in the Neurospora genome and tested mutants for defects in DNA methylation and RIP. No effect on DNA methylation was detected in the tissues that could be assayed, but the mutants showed recessive defects in RIP. Duplications of the am and mtr genes were completely stable in crosses homozygous for the mutated potential DMT gene, which we call rid (RIP defective). The same duplications were inactivated normally in heterozygous crosses. Disruption of the rid gene did not noticeably affect fertility, growth, or development. In contrast, crosses homozygous for a mutation in a related gene in Ascobolus immersus, masc1, reportedly fail to develop and heterozygous crosses reduce methylation induced premeiotically [Malagnac, F., Wendel, B., Goyon, C., Faugeron, G., Zickler, D., et al. (1997) Cell 91, 281–290]. We isolated homologues of rid from Neurospora tetrasperma and Neurospora intermedia to identify conserved regions. Homologues possess all motifs characteristic of eukaryotic DMTs and have large distinctive C- and N-terminal domains. PMID:12072568

  14. Poly-cytosine DNA as a High-Affinity Ligand for Inorganic Nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chang; Huang, Zhicheng; Liu, Biwu; Liu, Yibo; Ying, Yibin; Liu, Juewen

    2017-05-22

    Attaching DNA to nanomaterials is the basis for DNA-directed assembly, sensing, and drug delivery using such hybrid materials. Poly-cytosine (poly-C) DNA is a high affinity ligand for four types of commonly used nanomaterials, including nanocarbons (graphene oxide and single-walled carbon nanotubes), transition metal dichalcogenides (MoS2 and WS2 ), metal oxides (Fe3 O4 and ZnO), and metal nanoparticles (Au and Ag). Compared to other homo-DNA sequences, poly-C DNA has the highest affinity for the first three types of materials. Using a diblock DNA containing a poly-C block to attach to surfaces, the target DNA was successfully hybridized to the other block on graphene oxide more efficiently than that containing a typical poly-A block, especially in the presence of non-specific background DNA, proteins, or surfactants. This work provides a simple solution for functionalizing nanomaterials with non-modified DNA and offers new insights into DNA biointerfaces. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Hydroxymethyl cytosine marks in the human mitochondrial genome are dynamic in nature.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sourav; Sengupta, Shantanu; Scaria, Vinod

    2016-03-01

    Apart from DNA methylation, hydroxymethylation has increasingly been studied as an important epigenetic mark. 5- hydroxymethylcytosines, though initially were thought to be an intermediary product of demethylation, recent studies suggest this to be a highly regulated process and modulated by the TET family of enzymes. Recent genome wide studies have shown that hydroxymethylcytosine marks are closely associated with the regulation of important biological processes like transcription and embryonic development. It is also known that aberrant hydroxymethylation marks have been associated with diseases like cancer. The presence of hydroxymethylcytosines in the mitochondrial genome has been earlier suggested, though the genome-scale map has not been laid out. In this present study, we have mapped and analyzed the hydroxymethylcytosine marks in the mitochondrial genome using 23 different publicly available datasets. We cross validated our data by checking for consistency across a subset of genomic regions previously annotated to hydroxymethylcytosines and show good consistency. We observe a dynamic distribution of hydroxymethylation marks in the mitochondrial genome. Unlike the methylcytosine marks, hydroxymethylcytosine marks are characterized by the lack of conservation across the samples considered, though similar cell types shared the pattern. We additionally observed that the hydroxymethylation marks are enriched in the upstream of GSS (gene start site) regions and in gene body as similar as nuclear genes. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first genome-scale map of hydroxymethyl cytosines in the human mitochondrial genome.

  16. Photosensitized [2 + 2] cycloaddition of N-acetylated cytosine affords stereoselective formation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Junpei; Nishiguchi, Kosuke; Manabe, Koichiro; Masutani, Chikahide; Hanaoka, Fumio; Iwai, Shigenori

    2011-02-01

    Photocycloaddition between two adjacent bases in DNA produces a cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD), which is one of the major UV-induced DNA lesions, with either the cis-syn or trans-syn structure. In this study, we investigated the photosensitized intramolecular cycloaddition of partially-protected thymidylyl-(3'→5')-N(4)-acetyl-2'-deoxy-5-methylcytidine, to clarify the effect of the base modification on the cycloaddition reaction. The reaction resulted in the stereoselective formation of the trans-syn CPD, followed by hydrolysis of the acetylamino group. The same result was obtained for the photocycloaddition of thymidylyl-(3'→5')-N(4)-acetyl-2'-deoxycytidine, whereas both the cis-syn and trans-syn CPDs were formed from thymidylyl-(3'→5')-thymidine. Kinetic analyses revealed that the activation energy of the acid-catalyzed hydrolysis is comparable to that reported for the thymine-cytosine CPD. These findings provided a new strategy for the synthesis of oligonucleotides containing the trans-syn CPD. Using the synthesized oligonucleotide, translesion synthesis by human DNA polymerase η was analyzed.

  17. Theoretical investigation of hydrogen transfer mechanism in the guanine cytosine base pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villani, Giovanni

    2006-05-01

    We have studied the quantum-dynamics of the hydrogen bonds in the guanine-cytosine base pair. Due to the position of hydrogen atoms, different tautomers are possible: the stable Watson-Crick G-C, the imino-enol G*-C*, the imino-enol-imino-enol G #-C # and some zwitterionic structures. The common idea in the literature is that only the G-C and the G*-C* tautomers are stable with an estimate of G-C → G*-C* transition probability of 10 -6-10 -9 by the help of Boltzmann statistics. Here we show a detailed quantum theoretical study that suggests the following conclusion: G-C is the stablest tautomer, some partially charged systems (due to the movement of only one hydrogen atom) are important and a large amount of the imino-enol G*-C* (and less of the imino-enol-imino-enol G #-C # structure) tautomer is present at any time. The corresponding transition probabilities from different tautomers are not due to thermal passage, but they are a pure quantum phenomenon. These large probabilities definitively disprove the idea of these tautomers as mutation points. The mechanisms of passage from the G-C tautomer to the others have also been investigated.

  18. Photosensitized [2 + 2] cycloaddition of N-acetylated cytosine affords stereoselective formation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Junpei; Nishiguchi, Kosuke; Manabe, Koichiro; Masutani, Chikahide; Hanaoka, Fumio; Iwai, Shigenori

    2011-01-01

    Photocycloaddition between two adjacent bases in DNA produces a cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD), which is one of the major UV-induced DNA lesions, with either the cis-syn or trans-syn structure. In this study, we investigated the photosensitized intramolecular cycloaddition of partially-protected thymidylyl-(3′→5′)-N4-acetyl-2′-deoxy-5-methylcytidine, to clarify the effect of the base modification on the cycloaddition reaction. The reaction resulted in the stereoselective formation of the trans-syn CPD, followed by hydrolysis of the acetylamino group. The same result was obtained for the photocycloaddition of thymidylyl-(3′→5′)-N4-acetyl-2′-deoxycytidine, whereas both the cis-syn and trans-syn CPDs were formed from thymidylyl-(3′→5′)-thymidine. Kinetic analyses revealed that the activation energy of the acid-catalyzed hydrolysis is comparable to that reported for the thymine-cytosine CPD. These findings provided a new strategy for the synthesis of oligonucleotides containing the trans-syn CPD. Using the synthesized oligonucleotide, translesion synthesis by human DNA polymerase η was analyzed. PMID:20880992

  19. A computational NQR study on the hydrogen-bonded lattice of cytosine-5-acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Mirzaei, Mahmoud; Hadipour, Nasser L

    2008-04-15

    A computational study at the level of density functional theory (DFT) employing 6-311++G** standard basis set was carried out to evaluate nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectroscopy parameters in cytosine-5-acetic acid (C5AA). Since the electric field gradient (EFG) tensors are very sensitive to the electrostatic environment at the sites of quadruple nuclei, the most possible interacting molecules with the target one were considered in a five-molecule model system of C5AA using X-ray coordinates transforming. The hydrogen atoms positions were optimized and two model systems of original and H-optimized C5AA were considered in NQR calculations. The calculated EFG tensors at the sites of (17)O, (14)N, and (2)H nuclei were converted to their experimentally measurable parameters, quadrupole coupling constants and asymmetry parameters. The evaluated NQR parameters reveal that the nuclei in original and H-optimized systems contribute to different hydrogen bonding (HB) interaction. The comparison of calculated parameters between optimized isolated gas-phase and crystalline monomer also shows the relationship between the structural deformation and NQR parameters in C5AA. The basis set superposition error (BSSE) calculations yielded no significant errors for employed basis set in the evaluation of NQR parameters. All the calculations were performed by Gaussian 98 package of program. (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Two-color fluorescent cytosine extension assay for the determination of global DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Gu; Parfett, Craig; Cummings-Lorbetskie, Cathy; Xiao, Gong-Hua; Desaulniers, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Here, we present a DNA restriction enzyme-based, fluorescent cytosine extension assay (CEA) to improve normalization and technical variation among sample-to-sample measurements. The assay includes end-labeling of parallel methylation-sensitive and methylation-insensitive DNA restriction enzyme digests along with co-purification and subsequent co-measurement of incorporated fluorescence. This non-radioactive, two-color fluorescent CEA (TCF-CEA) was shown to be a relatively rapid and accurate, with 3-fold greater precision than the one-color CEA. In addition, TCF-CEA provided an index of global DNA methylation that was sensitive to differences >5%. TCF-CEA results were highly correlated with LUminometric Methylation Assay (LUMA) results using human liver cell lines (HepG2, HepaRG, HC-04) as well as a human liver primary cell culture. Hypomethylation was observed in cells treated with the de-methylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine. These results demonstrate that TCF-CEA provides a simple method for measuring relative degrees of global DNA methylation that could potentially be scaled up to higher-throughput formats.

  1. Morphologic and phenotypic changes of human neuroblastoma cells in culture induced by cytosine arabinoside

    SciTech Connect

    Ponzoni, M.; Lanciotti, M.; Melodia, A.; Casalaro, A.; Cornaglia-Ferraris, P. )

    1989-03-01

    The effects of cytosine-arabinoside (ARA-C) on the growth and phenotypic expression of a new human neuroblastoma (NB) cell line (GI-ME-N) have been extensively tested. Low doses of ARA-C allowing more than 90% cell viability induce morphological differentiation and growth inhibition. Differentiated cells were larger and flattened with elongated dendritic processes; such cells appeared within 48 hours after a dose of ARA-C as low as 0.1 {mu}g/ml. The new morphological aspect reached the maximum expression after 5-6 days of culture being independent from the addition of extra drug to the culture. A decrease in ({sup 3}H)thymidine incorporation was also observed within 24 hours and the cell growth was completely inhibited on the sixth day. Moreover, ARA-C strongly inhibited anchorage-independent growth in soft agar assay. Membrane immunofluorescence showed several dramatic changes in NB-specific antigen expression after 5 days of treatment with ARA-C. At the same time ARA-C also modulated cytoskeletal proteins and slightly increased catecholamine expression. These findings suggest that noncytotoxic doses of ARA-C do promote the differentiation of GI-ME-N neuroblastoma cells associated with reduced expression of the malignant phenotype.

  2. Retrovirus-mediated transduction of a cytosine deaminase gene preserves the stemness of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Sung; Chang, Da-Young; Kim, Ji-Hoi; Jung, Jin Hwa; Park, JoonSeong; Kim, Se-Hyuk; Lee, Young-Don; Kim, Sung-Soo; Suh-Kim, Haeyoung

    2013-02-22

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have emerged as attractive cellular vehicles to deliver therapeutic genes for ex-vivo therapy of diverse diseases; this is, in part, because they have the capability to migrate into tumor or lesion sites. Previously, we showed that MSCs could be utilized to deliver a bacterial cytosine deaminase (CD) suicide gene to brain tumors. Here we assessed whether transduction with a retroviral vector encoding CD gene altered the stem cell property of MSCs. MSCs were transduced at passage 1 and cultivated up to passage 11. We found that proliferation and differentiation potentials, chromosomal stability and surface antigenicity of MSCs were not altered by retroviral transduction. The results indicate that retroviral vectors can be safely utilized for delivery of suicide genes to MSCs for ex-vivo therapy. We also found that a single retroviral transduction was sufficient for sustainable expression up to passage 10. The persistent expression of the transduced gene indicates that transduced MSCs provide a tractable and manageable approach for potential use in allogeneic transplantation.

  3. Enhancing VSV oncolytic activity with an improved cytosine deaminase suicide gene strategy.

    PubMed

    Leveille, S; Samuel, S; Goulet, M-L; Hiscott, J

    2011-06-01

    Oncolytic viruses (OVs) are promising therapeutic agents for cancer treatment, with recent studies emphasizing the combined use of chemotherapeutic compounds and prodrug suicide gene strategies to improve OV efficacy. In the present study, the synergistic activity of recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-MΔ51 virus expressing the cytosine deaminase/uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (CD::UPRT) suicide gene and 5-fluorocytosine (5FC) prodrug was investigated in triggering tumor cell oncolysis. In a panel of VSV-sensitive and -resistant cells-prostate PC3, breast MCF7 and TSA, B-lymphoma Karpas and melanoma B16-F10-the combination treatment increased killing of non-infected bystander cells in vitro via the release of 5FC toxic derivatives. In addition, we showed a synergistic effect on cancer cell killing with VSV-MΔ51 and the active form of the drug 5-fluorouracil. Furthermore, by monitoring VSV replication at the tumor site and maximizing 5FC bioavailability, we optimized the treatment regimen and improved survival of animals bearing TSA mammary adenocarcinoma. Altogether, this study emphasizes the potency of the VSV-CD::UPRT and 5FC combination, and demonstrates the necessity of optimizing each step of a multicomponent therapy to design efficient treatment.

  4. Adenoviral-mediated imaging of gene transfer using a somatostatin receptor-cytosine deaminase fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Lears, K A; Parry, J J; Andrews, R; Nguyen, K; Wadas, T J; Rogers, B E

    2015-03-01

    Suicide gene therapy is a process by which cells are administered a gene that encodes a protein capable of converting a nontoxic prodrug into an active toxin. Cytosine deaminase (CD) has been widely investigated as a means of suicide gene therapy owing to the enzyme's ability to convert the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) into the toxic compound 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). However, the extent of gene transfer is a limiting factor in predicting therapeutic outcome. The ability to monitor gene transfer, non-invasively, would strengthen the efficiency of therapy. In this regard, we have constructed and evaluated a replication-deficient adenovirus (Ad) containing the human somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (SSTR2) fused with a C-terminal yeast CD gene for the non-invasive monitoring of gene transfer and therapy. The resulting Ad (AdSSTR2-yCD) was evaluated in vitro in breast cancer cells to determine the function of the fusion protein. These studies demonstrated that both the SSTR2 and yCD were functional in binding assays, conversion assays and cytotoxicity assays. In vivo studies similarly demonstrated the functionality using conversion assays, biodistribution studies and small animal positron-emission tomography (PET) imaging studies. In conclusion, the fusion protein has been validated as useful for the non-invasive imaging of yCD expression and will be evaluated in the future for monitoring yCD-based therapy.

  5. Endothelial Progenitor Cells Combined with Cytosine Deaminase-Endostatin for Suppression of Liver Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rong; Yu, Hui; An, Yan-Li; Chen, Hua-Jun; Jia, ZhenYu; Teng, Gao-Jun

    2016-06-01

    Transplantation of gene transfected endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) provides a novel method for treatment of human tumors. To study treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma using cytosine deaminase (CD)- and endostatin (ES)-transfected endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), mouse bone marrow-derived EPCs were cultured and transfected with Lenti6.3-CD-EGFP and Lenti6.3-ES-Monomer-DsRed labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles. DiD (lipophilic fluorescent dye)-labeled EPCs were injected into normal mice and mice with liver carcinoma. The EPCs loaded with CD-ES were infused into the mice through caudal veins and tumor volumes were measured. The tumor volumes in the EPC + SPIO + CD/5-Fc + ES group were found to be smaller as a result and grew more slowly than those from the EPC + SPIO + LV (lentivirus, empty vector control) group. Survival times were also measured after infusion of the cells into the mice. The median survival time was found to be longer in the EPC + SPIO + CD/5-Fc + ES group than in the others. In conclusion, the EPCs transfected with CD-ES suppressed the liver carcinoma cells in vitro, migrated primarily to the carcinoma, inhibited tumor growth, and also extended the median survival time for the mice with liver carcinoma.

  6. Fluorescence detection of cytosine/guanine transversion based on a hydrogen bond forming ligand.

    PubMed

    Nishizawa, Seiichi; Yoshimoto, Keitaro; Seino, Takehiro; Xu, Chun-Yan; Minagawa, Masakazu; Satake, Hiroyuki; Tong, Aijun; Teramae, Norio

    2004-05-10

    In combination with abasic site (AP site)-containing oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs), we demonstrate potential use of a hydrogen bond forming ligand, 2-amino-7-methyl-1,8-naphthyridine (AMND), for the fluorescence detection of the cytosine (C)/guanine (G) mutation sequence of the cancer repression gene p53. Our method is based on construction of the AP site in ODN duplexes, which allows small synthetic ligands to bind to target nucleobases accompanied by fluorescence signaling: an AP site-containing ODN is hybridized with a target ODN so as to place the AP site toward a target nucleobase, by which hydrophobic microenvironments are provided for ligands to recognize target nucleobases through hydrogen-bonding. In 10mM sodium cacodylate buffer solutions (pH, 7.0) containing 100mM NaCl and 1.0mM EDTA, AMND is found to strongly bind to C (K(d)=1.5x10(-6)M) in the target ODN while the binding affinity for G is relatively moderate (K(d)=50x10(-6)M). Significant fluorescence quenching of AMND is observed only when binding to C, making it possible to judge the C/G transversion with the naked eye.

  7. Persistence of Cytosine Methylation of DNA following Fertilisation in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; O'Neill, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Normal development of the mammalian embryo requires epigenetic reprogramming of the genome. The level of cytosine methylation of CpG-rich (5meC) regions of the genome is a major epigenetic regulator and active global demethylation of 5meC throughout the genome is reported to occur within the first cell-cycle following fertilization. An enzyme or mechanism capable of catalysing such rapid global demethylation has not been identified. The mouse is a widely used model for studying developmental epigenetics. We have reassessed the evidence for this phenomenon of genome-wide demethylation following fertilisation in the mouse. We found when using conventional methods of immunolocalization that 5meC showed a progressive acid-resistant antigenic masking during zygotic maturation which gave the appearance of demethylation. Changing the unmasking strategy by also performing tryptic digestion revealed a persistence of a methylated state. Analysis of methyl binding domain 1 protein (MBD1) binding confirmed that the genome remained methylated following fertilisation. The maintenance of this methylated state over the first several cell-cycles required the actions of DNA methyltransferase activity. The study shows that any 5meC remodelling that occurs during early development is not explained by a global active loss of 5meC staining during the cleavage stage of development and global loss of methylation following fertilization is not a major component of epigenetic reprogramming in the mouse zygote. PMID:22292019

  8. Evolutionary breakpoints in the gibbon suggest association between cytosine methylation and karyotype evolution.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Lucia; Harris, R Alan; Vessere, Gery M; Mootnick, Alan R; Humphray, Sean; Rogers, Jane; Kim, Sung K; Wall, Jeffrey D; Martin, David; Jurka, Jerzy; Milosavljevic, Aleksandar; de Jong, Pieter J

    2009-06-01

    Gibbon species have accumulated an unusually high number of chromosomal changes since diverging from the common hominoid ancestor 15-18 million years ago. The cause of this increased rate of chromosomal rearrangements is not known, nor is it known if genome architecture has a role. To address this question, we analyzed sequences spanning 57 breaks of synteny between northern white-cheeked gibbons (Nomascus l. leucogenys) and humans. We find that the breakpoint regions are enriched in segmental duplications and repeats, with Alu elements being the most abundant. Alus located near the gibbon breakpoints (<150 bp) have a higher CpG content than other Alus. Bisulphite allelic sequencing reveals that these gibbon Alus have a lower average density of methylated cytosine that their human orthologues. The finding of higher CpG content and lower average CpG methylation suggests that the gibbon Alu elements are epigenetically distinct from their human orthologues. The association between undermethylation and chromosomal rearrangement in gibbons suggests a correlation between epigenetic state and structural genome variation in evolution.

  9. [Triplet expansion cytosine-guanine-guanine: Three cases of OMIM syndrome in the same family].

    PubMed

    González-Pérez, Jesús; Izquierdo-Álvarez, Silvia; Fuertes-Rodrigo, Cristina; Monge-Galindo, Lorena; Peña-Segura, José Luis; López-Pisón, Francisco Javier

    2016-04-01

    The dynamic increase in the number of triplet repeats of cytosine-guanine-guanine (CGG) in the FMR1 gene mutation is responsible for three OMIM syndromes with a distinct clinical phenotype: Fragile X syndrome (FXS) and two pathologies in adult carriers of the premutation (55-200 CGG repeats): Primary ovarian insufficiency (FXPOI) and tremor-ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) associated with FXS. CGG mutation dynamics of the FMR1 gene were studied in DNA samples from peripheral blood from the index case and other relatives of first, second and third degree by TP-PCR, and the percentage methylation. Diagnosis of FXS was confirmed in three patients (21.4%), eight patients (57.1%) were confirmed in the premutation range transmitters, one male patient with full mutation/permutation mosaicism (7.1%) and two patients (14.3%) with normal study. Of the eight permutated patients, three had FXPOI and one male patient had FXTAS. Our study suggests the importance of making an early diagnosis of SXF in order to carry out a family study and genetic counselling, which allow the identification of new cases or premutated patients with FMR1 gene- associated syndromes (FXTAS, FXPOI). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. How Does Guanine-Cytosine Base Pair Affect Excess-Electron Transfer in DNA?

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Hsun; Fujitsuka, Mamoru; Majima, Tetsuro

    2015-06-25

    Charge transfer and proton transfer in DNA have attracted wide attention due to their relevance in biological processes and so on. Especially, excess-electron transfer (EET) in DNA has strong relation to DNA repair. However, our understanding on EET in DNA still remains limited. Herein, by using a strongly electron-donating photosensitizer, trimer of 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (3E), and an electron acceptor, diphenylacetylene (DPA), two series of functionalized DNA oligomers were synthesized for investigation of EET dynamics in DNA. The transient absorption measurements during femtosecond laser flash photolysis showed that guanine:cytosine (G:C) base pair affects EET dynamics in DNA by two possible mechanisms: the excess-electron quenching by proton transfer with the complementary G after formation of C(•-) and the EET hindrance by inserting a G:C base pair as a potential barrier in consecutive thymines (T's). In the present paper, we provided useful information based on the direct kinetic measurements, which allowed us to discuss EET through oligonucleotides for the investigation of DNA damage/repair.

  11. The Human SLC25A33 and SLC25A36 Genes of Solute Carrier Family 25 Encode Two Mitochondrial Pyrimidine Nucleotide Transporters*

    PubMed Central

    Di Noia, Maria Antonietta; Todisco, Simona; Cirigliano, Angela; Rinaldi, Teresa; Agrimi, Gennaro; Iacobazzi, Vito; Palmieri, Ferdinando

    2014-01-01

    The human genome encodes 53 members of the solute carrier family 25 (SLC25), also called the mitochondrial carrier family, many of which have been shown to transport inorganic anions, amino acids, carboxylates, nucleotides, and coenzymes across the inner mitochondrial membrane, thereby connecting cytosolic and matrix functions. Here two members of this family, SLC25A33 and SLC25A36, have been thoroughly characterized biochemically. These proteins were overexpressed in bacteria and reconstituted in phospholipid vesicles. Their transport properties and kinetic parameters demonstrate that SLC25A33 transports uracil, thymine, and cytosine (deoxy)nucleoside di- and triphosphates by an antiport mechanism and SLC25A36 cytosine and uracil (deoxy)nucleoside mono-, di-, and triphosphates by uniport and antiport. Both carriers also transported guanine but not adenine (deoxy)nucleotides. Transport catalyzed by both carriers was saturable and inhibited by mercurial compounds and other inhibitors of mitochondrial carriers to various degrees. In confirmation of their identity (i) SLC25A33 and SLC25A36 were found to be targeted to mitochondria and (ii) the phenotypes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells lacking RIM2, the gene encoding the well characterized yeast mitochondrial pyrimidine nucleotide carrier, were overcome by expressing SLC25A33 or SLC25A36 in these cells. The main physiological role of SLC25A33 and SLC25A36 is to import/export pyrimidine nucleotides into and from mitochondria, i.e. to accomplish transport steps essential for mitochondrial DNA and RNA synthesis and breakdown. PMID:25320081

  12. A quantum chemical insight to intermolecular hydrogen bonding interaction between cytosine and nitrosamine: Structural and energetic investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalili, Behzad

    2016-03-01

    Hydrogen bond interactions which are formed during complex formation between cytosine and nitrosamine have been fully investigated using B3LYP, B3PW91 and MP2 methods in conjunction with various basis sets including 6-311++G (d,p), 6-311++G (2d,2p), 6-311++G (df,pd) and AUG-cc-pVDZ. Three regions around the most stable conformer of cytosine in the gas phase with six possible double H-bonded interactions were considered. Two intermolecular hydrogen bonds of type NC-N-HNA and O-H(N-H)C-ONA were found on the potential energy surface in a cyclic system with 8-member in CN1, CN3, CN5 and 7-member in CN2, CN4, CN6 systems. Results of binding energy calculation at all applied methods reveal that the CN1 structure is the most stable one which is formed by interaction of nitrosamine with cytosine in S1 region. The BSSE-corrected binding energy for six complex system is ranging from -23.8 to -43.6 kJ/mol at MP2/6-311++G (df,pd) level and the stability order is as CN1 > CN2 > CN3 > CN4 > CN5 > CN6 in all studied levels of theories. The NBO results reveal that the charge transfer occurred from cytosine to nitrosamine in CN1, CN3, CN5 and CN6 whereas this matter in the case of CN2 and CN4 was reversed. The relationship between BEs with red shift of H-bond involved bonds vibrational frequencies, charge transfer energies during complex formation and electron densities at H-bond BCPs were discussed. In addition activation energetic properties related to the proton transfer process between cytosine and nitrosamine have been calculated at MP2/6-311++G (df,pd) level. AIM results imply that H-bond interactions are electrostatic with partially covalent characteristic in nature.

  13. Mosaic organization of DNA nucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, C. K.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Havlin, S.; Simons, M.; Stanley, H. E.; Goldberger, A. L.

    1994-01-01

    Long-range power-law correlations have been reported recently for DNA sequences containing noncoding regions. We address the question of whether such correlations may be a trivial consequence of the known mosaic structure ("patchiness") of DNA. We analyze two classes of controls consisting of patchy nucleotide sequences generated by different algorithms--one without and one with long-range power-law correlations. Although both types of sequences are highly heterogenous, they are quantitatively distinguishable by an alternative fluctuation analysis method that differentiates local patchiness from long-range correlations. Application of this analysis to selected DNA sequences demonstrates that patchiness is not sufficient to account for long-range correlation properties.

  14. Mosaic organization of DNA nucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, C. K.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Havlin, S.; Simons, M.; Stanley, H. E.; Goldberger, A. L.

    1994-01-01

    Long-range power-law correlations have been reported recently for DNA sequences containing noncoding regions. We address the question of whether such correlations may be a trivial consequence of the known mosaic structure ("patchiness") of DNA. We analyze two classes of controls consisting of patchy nucleotide sequences generated by different algorithms--one without and one with long-range power-law correlations. Although both types of sequences are highly heterogenous, they are quantitatively distinguishable by an alternative fluctuation analysis method that differentiates local patchiness from long-range correlations. Application of this analysis to selected DNA sequences demonstrates that patchiness is not sufficient to account for long-range correlation properties.

  15. Nucleotide Excision Repair in Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Schärer, Orlando D.

    2013-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is the main pathway used by mammals to remove bulky DNA lesions such as those formed by UV light, environmental mutagens, and some cancer chemotherapeutic adducts from DNA. Deficiencies in NER are associated with the extremely skin cancer-prone inherited disorder xeroderma pigmentosum. Although the core NER reaction and the factors that execute it have been known for some years, recent studies have led to a much more detailed understanding of the NER mechanism, how NER operates in the context of chromatin, and how it is connected to other cellular processes such as DNA damage signaling and transcription. This review emphasizes biochemical, structural, cell biological, and genetic studies since 2005 that have shed light on many aspects of the NER pathway. PMID:24086042

  16. Nucleotide excision repair in humans

    PubMed Central

    Spivak, Graciela

    2015-01-01

    The demonstration of DNA damage excision and repair replication by Setlow, Howard-Flanders, Hanawalt and their colleagues in the early 1960s, constituted the discovery of the ubiquitous pathway of nucleotide excision repair (NER). The serial steps in NER are similar in organisms from unicellular bacteria to complex mammals and plants, and involve recognition of lesions, adducts or structures that disrupt the DNA double helix, removal of a short oligonucleotide containing the offending lesion, synthesis of a repair patch copying the opposite undamaged strand, and ligation, to restore the DNA to its original form. The transcription-coupled repair (TCR) subpathway of NER, discovered nearly two decades later, is dedicated to the removal of lesions from the template DNA strands of actively transcribed genes. In this review I will outline the essential factors and complexes involved in NER in humans, and will comment on additional factors and metabolic processes that affect the efficiency of this important process. PMID:26388429

  17. Remarkable effects of solvent and substitution on the photo-dynamics of cytosine: a femtosecond broadband time-resolved fluorescence and transient absorption study.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chensheng; Cheng, Chopen Chan-Wut; Chan, Chris Tsz-Leung; Chan, Ruth Chau-Ting; Kwok, Wai-Ming

    2015-07-15

    Cytosine (Cyt) among all the nucleic acid bases features the most complex and least understood nonradiative deactivation, a process that is crucially important for its photostability. Herein, the excited state dynamics of Cyt and a series of its N1- and C5-derivatives, including the full set of Cyt nucleosides and nucleotides in DNA and RNA and the nucleosides of 5-methyl cytosine, 5-methylcytidine and 2'-deoxy-5-methylcytidine, have been investigated in water and in methanol employing femtosecond broadband time-resolved fluorescence coupled with fs transient absorption spectroscopy. The results reveal remarkable state-specific effects of the substitution and solvent in tuning distinctively the timescales and pathways of the nonradiative decays. For Cyt and the N1-derivatives, the nonradiative deactivations occur in a common two-state process through three channels, two from the light-absorbing ππ* state with respectively the sub-picosecond (∼0.2 ps) and the picosecond (∼1.5 ps) time constant, and the third is due to an optically dark nπ* state with the lifetime ranging from several to hundreds of picoseconds depending on solvents and substitutions. Compared to Cyt, the presence of the ribose or deoxyribose moiety at the N1 position of N1-derivatives facilitates the formation of the nπ* at the sub-picosecond timescale and at the same time increases its lifetime by ∼4-6 times in both water and methanol. In sharp contrast, the existence of the methyl group at the C5 position of the C5-derivatives eliminates completely the sub-picosecond ππ* channel and the channel due to the nπ*, but on the other hand slows down the decay of the ππ* state which after relaxation exhibits a single time constant of ∼4.1 to ∼7.6 ps depending on solvents. Varying the solvent from water to methanol accelerates only slightly the decay of the ππ* state in all the compounds; while for Cyt and its N1-derivatives, this change of solvent also retards strongly the n

  18. Mutagenicity associated with O6-methylguanine-DNA damage and mechanism of nucleotide flipping by AGT during repair.

    PubMed

    Jena, N R; Bansal, Manju

    2011-08-01

    Methylated guanine damage at O6 position (i.e. O6MG) is dangerous due to its mutagenic and carcinogenic character that often gives rise to G:C-A:T mutation. However, the reason for this mutagenicity is not known precisely and has been a matter of controversy. Further, although it is known that O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (AGT) repairs O6MG paired with cytosine in DNA, the complete mechanism of target recognition and repair is not known completely. All these aspects of DNA damage and repair have been addressed here by employing high level density functional theory in gas phase and aqueous medium. It is found that the actual cause of O6MG mediated mutation may arise due to the fact that DNA polymerases incorporate thymine opposite to O6MG, misreading the resulting O6MG:T complex as an A:T base pair due to their analogous binding energies and structural alignments. It is further revealed that AGT mediated nucleotide flipping occurs in two successive steps. The intercalation of the finger residue Arg128 into the DNA double helix and its interaction with the O6MG:C base pair followed by rotation of the O6MG nucleotide are found to be crucial for the damage recognition and nucleotide flipping.

  19. Mutagenicity associated with O6-methylguanine-DNA damage and mechanism of nucleotide flipping by AGT during repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jena, N. R.; Bansal, Manju

    2011-08-01

    Methylated guanine damage at O6 position (i.e. O6MG) is dangerous due to its mutagenic and carcinogenic character that often gives rise to G:C-A:T mutation. However, the reason for this mutagenicity is not known precisely and has been a matter of controversy. Further, although it is known that O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (AGT) repairs O6MG paired with cytosine in DNA, the complete mechanism of target recognition and repair is not known completely. All these aspects of DNA damage and repair have been addressed here by employing high level density functional theory in gas phase and aqueous medium. It is found that the actual cause of O6MG mediated mutation may arise due to the fact that DNA polymerases incorporate thymine opposite to O6MG, misreading the resulting O6MG:T complex as an A:T base pair due to their analogous binding energies and structural alignments. It is further revealed that AGT mediated nucleotide flipping occurs in two successive steps. The intercalation of the finger residue Arg128 into the DNA double helix and its interaction with the O6MG:C base pair followed by rotation of the O6MG nucleotide are found to be crucial for the damage recognition and nucleotide flipping.

  20. An increase of oxidised nucleotides activates DNA damage checkpoint pathway that regulates post-embryonic development in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Sanada, Yu; Zhang-Akiyama, Qiu-Mei

    2014-03-01

    8-Oxo-dGTP, an oxidised form of dGTP generated in the nucleotide pool, can be incorporated opposite adenine or cytosine in template DNA, which can in turn induce mutations. In this study, we identified a novel MutT homolog (NDX-2) of Caenorhabditis elegans that hydrolyzes 8-oxo-dGDP to 8-oxo-dGMP. In addition, we found that NDX-1, NDX-2 and NDX-4 proteins have 8-oxo-GTPase or 8-oxo-GDPase activity. The sensitivity of ndx-2 knockdown C. elegans worms to methyl viologen and menadione bisulphite was increased compared with that of control worms. This sensitivity was rescued by depletion of chk-2 and clk-2, suggesting that growth of the worms is regulated by the checkpoint pathway in response to the accumulation of oxidised nucleotides. Moreover, we found that the sensitivity to menadione bisulphite of ndx-1 and ndx-2-double knockdown worms was enhanced by elimination of XPA-1, a factor involved in nucleotide excision repair. The rescue effect by depletion of chk-2 and clk-2 was limited in the xpa-1 mutant, suggesting that the chk-2 and clk-2 checkpoint pathway is partially linked to the function of XPA-1.

  1. Nucleotide sequences encoding a thermostable alkaline protease

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, D.B.; Lao, G.

    1998-01-06

    Nucleotide sequences, derived from a thermophilic actinomycete microorganism, which encode a thermostable alkaline protease are disclosed. Also disclosed are variants of the nucleotide sequences which encode a polypeptide having thermostable alkaline proteolytic activity. Recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide may be obtained by culturing in a medium a host cell genetically engineered to contain and express a nucleotide sequence according to the present invention, and recovering the recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide from the culture medium. 3 figs.

  2. Nucleotide sequences encoding a thermostable alkaline protease

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, David B.; Lao, Guifang

    1998-01-01

    Nucleotide sequences, derived from a thermophilic actinomycete microorganism, which encode a thermostable alkaline protease are disclosed. Also disclosed are variants of the nucleotide sequences which encode a polypeptide having thermostable alkaline proteolytic activity. Recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide may be obtained by culturing in a medium a host cell genetically engineered to contain and express a nucleotide sequence according to the present invention, and recovering the recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide from the culture medium.

  3. Identifying single nucleotides by tunnelling current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsui, Makusu; Taniguchi, Masateru; Yokota, Kazumichi; Kawai, Tomoji

    2010-04-01

    A major goal in medical research is to develop a DNA sequencing technique that is capable of reading an entire human genome at low cost. Recently, it was proposed that DNA sequencing could be performed by measuring the electron transport properties of the individual nucleotides in a DNA molecule. Here, we report electrical detection of single nucleotides using two configurable nanoelectrodes and show that electron transport through single nucleotides occurs by tunnelling. We also demonstrate statistical identification of the nucleotides based on their electrical conductivity, thereby providing an experimental basis for a DNA sequencing technology based on measurements of electron transport.

  4. Epigenetic variation, inheritance, and parent-of-origin effects of cytosine methylation in maize (Zea mays).

    PubMed

    Lauria, Massimiliano; Piccinini, Sara; Pirona, Raul; Lund, Gertrud; Viotti, Angelo; Motto, Mario

    2014-03-01

    Pure epigenetic variation, or epigenetic variation that is independent of genetic context, may provide a mechanism for phenotypic variation in the absence of DNA mutations. To estimate the extent of pure epigenetic variation within and across generations and to identify the DNA regions targeted, a group of eight plants derived from a highly inbred line of maize (Zea mays) was analyzed by the methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism (MSAP) technique. We found that cytosine methylation (mC) differences among individuals accounted for up to 7.4% of CCGG sites investigated by MSAP. Of the differentially methylated fragments (DMFs) identified in the S0 generation, ∼12% were meiotically inherited for at least six generations. We show that meiotically heritable mC variation was consistently generated for an average of 0.5% CCGG sites per generation and that it largely occurred somatically. We provide evidence that mC variation can be established and inherited in a parent-of-origin manner, given that the paternal lineage is more prone to both forward and reverse mC changes. The molecular characterization of selected DMFs revealed that the variation was largely determined by CG methylation changes that map within gene regions. The expression analysis of genes overlapping with DMFs did not reveal an obvious correlation between mC variation and transcription, reinforcing the idea that the primary function of gene-body methylation is not to control gene expression. Because this study focuses on epigenetic variation in field-grown plants, the data presented herein pertain to spontaneous epigenetic changes of the maize genome in a natural context.

  5. Influence of photoperiod on expression of DNA (cytosine-5) methyltransferases in Atlantic cod.

    PubMed

    Giannetto, Alessia; Nagasawa, Kazue; Fasulo, Salvatore; Fernandes, Jorge M O

    2013-05-01

    Photoperiod manipulation during early juvenile stages can influence growth in Atlantic cod. In the present study, one group of cod juveniles were reared under natural photoperiod conditions for Bodø (67° N, 14° E), whereas their counterparts were kept under continuous illumination. The mean weight of juvenile cod reared under continuous illumination was found to be 13% greater than those kept under natural photoperiod after 120days of light treatment. The molecular basis of this phenotypic plasticity is currently unknown but it is likely that DNA (cytosine-5)-methyltransferases (dnmts) are involved, since these genes play a crucial role in epigenetic regulation of gene expression. Phylogenetic analysis of Atlantic cod dnmt1, dnmt2 and dnmt3a revealed that within each group, the phylogeny follows the taxonomic relationship between the various species and comparative mapping of dnmt paralogues showed that these genes lie within regions of conserved synteny amongst teleosts. Of the three dnmt paralogues, dnmt3a had the highest expression in fast muscle of adult cod. In addition, dnmt1 and dnmt2 were differentially expressed between tissues but with prominent expression in gonads. Dnmt1 and dnmt3a transcript levels showed a significant increase in fast muscle of juvenile cod from the continuous light group at several time points. Remarkably, dnmt1 and dnmt3a transcript levels were 2-fold higher at 120days, by which point photoperiod conditions between the two light groups had become identical. Our data revealed that photoperiod can have an extended effect on expression of dnmt genes, which may be involved in the epigenetic regulation of muscle growth by photoperiod in Atlantic cod.

  6. Cytosine Deaminase/5-Fluorocytosine Exposure Induces Bystander and Radiosensitization Effects in Hypoxic Glioblastoma Cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jennifer K.; Hu, Lily J.; Wang Dongfang; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Deen, Dennis F. . E-mail: dennisdeen@juno.com

    2007-04-01

    Purpose: Treatment of glioblastoma (GBM) is limited by therapeutic ratio; therefore, successful therapy must be specifically cytotoxic to cancer cells. Hypoxic cells are ubiquitous in GBM, and resistant to radiation and chemotherapy, and, thus, are logical targets for gene therapy. In this study, we investigated whether cytosine deaminase (CD)/5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) enzyme/prodrug treatment induced a bystander effect (BE) and/or radiosensitization in hypoxic GBM cells. Methods and Materials: We stably transfected cells with a gene construct consisting of the SV40 minimal promoter, nine copies of a hypoxia-responsive element, and the yeast CD gene. During hypoxia, a hypoxia-responsive element regulates expression of the CD gene and facilitates the conversion of 5-FC to 5-fluorouracil, a highly toxic antimetabolite. We used colony-forming efficiency (CFE) and immunofluorescence assays to assess for BE in co-cultures of CD-expressing clone cells and parent, pNeo- or green fluorescent protein-stably transfected GBM cells. We also investigated the radiosensitivity of CD clone cells treated with 5-FC under hypoxic conditions, and we used flow cytometry to investigate treatment-induced cell cycle changes. Results: Both a large BE and radiosensitization occurred in GBM cells under hypoxic conditions. The magnitude of the BE depended on the number of transfected cells producing CD, the functionality of the CD, the administered concentration of 5-FC, and the sensitivity of cell type to 5-fluorouracil. Conclusion: Hypoxia-inducible CD/5-FC therapy in combination with radiation therapy shows both a pronounced BE and a radiosensitizing effect under hypoxic conditions.

  7. Mechanism of human methyl-directed DNA methyltransferase and the fidelity of cytosine methylation.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, S S; Kaplan, B E; Sowers, L C; Newman, E M

    1992-01-01

    The properties of the methyl-directed DNA (cytosine-5-)-methyltransferase (EC 2.1.1.37) suggest that it is the enzyme that maintains patterns of methylation in the human genome. Proposals for the enzyme's mechanism of action suggest that 5-methyldeoxycytidine is produced from deoxycytidine via a dihydrocytosine intermediate. We have used an oligodeoxynucleotide containing 5-fluorodeoxycytidine as a suicide substrate to capture the enzyme and the dihydrocytosine intermediate. Gel retardation experiments demonstrate the formation of the expected covalent complex between duplex DNA containing 5-fluorodeoxycytidine and the human enzyme. Formation of the complex was dependent upon the presence of the methyl donor S-adenosylmethionine, suggesting that it comprises an enzyme-linked 5-substituted dihydrocytosine moiety in DNA. Dihydrocytosine derivatives are extremely labile toward hydrolytic deamination in aqueous solution. Because C-to-T transition mutations are especially prevalent at CG sites in human DNA, we have used high-performance liquid chromatography to search for thymidine that might be generated by hydrolysis during the methyl transfer reaction. Despite the potential for deamination inherent in the formation of the intermediate, the methyltransferase did not produce detectable amounts of thymidine. The data suggest that the ability of the human methyltransferase to preserve genetic information when copying a methylation pattern (i.e., its fidelity) is comparable to the ability of a mammalian DNA polymerase to preserve genetic information when copying a DNA sequence. Thus the high frequency of C-to-T transitions at CG sites in human DNA does not appear to be due to the normal enzymatic maintenance of methylation patterns. Images PMID:1584813

  8. Dual targeting of tumor angiogenesis and chemotherapy by endostatin-cytosine deaminase-uracil phosphoribosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Te; Yamaguchi, Hirohito; Lee, Hong-Jen; Du, Yi; Lee, Heng-Huan; Xia, Weiya; Yu, Wen-Hsuan; Hsu, Jennifer L; Yen, Chia-Jui; Sun, Hui-Lung; Wang, Yan; Yeh, Edward T H; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2011-08-01

    Several antiangiogenic drugs targeting VEGF/VEGF receptor (VEGFR) that were approved by the Food and Drug Administration for many cancer types, including colorectal and lung cancer, can effectively reduce tumor growth. However, targeting the VEGF signaling pathway will probably influence the normal function of endothelial cells in maintaining homeostasis and can cause unwanted adverse effects. Indeed, emerging experimental evidence suggests that VEGF-targeting therapy induced less tumor cell-specific cytotoxicity, allowing residual cells to become more resistant and eventually develop a more malignant phenotype. We report an antitumor therapeutic EndoCD fusion protein developed by linking endostatin (Endo) to cytosine deaminase and uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (CD). Specifically, Endo possesses tumor antiangiogenesis activity that targets tumor endothelial cells, followed by CD, which converts the nontoxic prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) to the cytotoxic antitumor drug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in the local tumor area. Moreover, selective targeting of tumor sites allows an increasing local intratumoral concentration of 5-FU, thus providing high levels of cytotoxic activity. We showed that treatment with EndoCD plus 5-FC, compared with bevacizumab plus 5-FU treatment, significantly increased the 5-FU concentration around tumor sites and suppressed tumor growth and metastasis in human breast and colorectal orthotropic animal models. In addition, in contrast to treatment with bevacizumab/5-FU, EndoCD/5-FC did not induce cardiotoxicity leading to heart failure in mice after long-term treatment. Our results showed that, compared with currently used antiangiogenic drugs, EndoCD possesses potent anticancer activity with virtually no toxic effects and does not increase tumor invasion or metastasis. Together, these findings suggest that EndoCD/5-FC could become an alternative option for future antiangiogenesis therapy.

  9. Recent and remote spatial memory in mice treated with cytosine arabinoside.

    PubMed

    Fremouw, Thane; Fessler, Christy L; Ferguson, Robert J; Burguete, Yamil

    2012-01-01

    Clinical studies suggest that chemotherapy is associated with long-term cognitive impairment in some patients. A number of underlying mechanisms have been proposed, however, the etiology of chemotherapy-related cognitive dysfunction remains relatively unknown. As part of a multifaceted approach, animal models of chemotherapy-induced cognitive impairment are being developed. Thus far, the majority of animal studies have utilized a rat model, however, mice may prove particularly beneficial in studying genetic risk factors for developing chemotherapy-induced cognitive impairment. Various chemotherapy agents, including cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C), have been found to impair remote spatial memory in rats in the Morris water maze. The present study evaluated the effects of Ara-C on remote (30 d) spatial memory in mice. In addition, the possibility that time relative to chemotherapy treatment may modulate the effect of chemotherapy on spatial learning and/or recent (1 d) memory was explored. Male C57BL/6J mice received either Ara-C (275 mg/kg i.p. daily for 5 days) or saline. Spatial learning and memory was assessed using the Morris water maze. Half the mice performed a remote (30 d) memory version of the task and the other half performed a recent (1 d) memory version of the task. The experiment was designed such that the probe trial for the recent memory version occurred on the same day relative to chemotherapy treatment as the remote memory version. Despite significant toxic effects as assessed by weight loss, Ara-C treated mice performed as well as control mice during acquisition, recent memory, and remote memory portions of the task. As are some humans, C57BL/6J mice may be resistant to at least some aspects of chemotherapy induced cognitive decline.

  10. Induction of cytosine arabinoside-resistant human myeloid leukemia cell death through autophagy regulation by hydroxychloroquine.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yundeok; Eom, Ju-In; Jeung, Hoi-Kyung; Jang, Ji Eun; Kim, Jin Seok; Cheong, June-Won; Kim, Young Sam; Min, Yoo Hong

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the effects of the autophagy inhibitor hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) on cell death of cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C)-resistant human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. Ara-C-sensitive (U937, AML-2) and Ara-C-resistant (U937/AR, AML-2/AR) human AML cell lines were used to evaluate HCQ-regulated cytotoxicity, autophagy, and apoptosis as well as effects on cell death-related signaling pathways. We found that HCQ-induced dose- and time-dependent cell death in Ara-C-resistant cells compared to Ara-C-sensitive cell lines. The extent of cell death and features of HCQ-induced autophagic markers including increase in microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3) I conversion to LC3-II, beclin-1, ATG5, as well as green fluorescent protein-LC3 positive puncta and autophagosome were remarkably greater in U937/AR cells. Also, p62/SQSTM1 was increased in response to HCQ. p62/SQSTM1 protein interacts with both LC3-II and ubiquitin protein and is degraded in autophagosomes. Therefore, a reduction of p62/SQSTM1 indicates increased autophagic degradation, whereas an increase of p62/SQSTM1 by HCQ indicates inhibited autophagic degradation. Knock down of p62/SQSTM1 using siRNA were prevented the HCQ-induced LC3-II protein level as well as significantly reduced the HCQ-induced cell death in U937/AR cells. Also, apoptotic cell death and caspase activation in U937/AR cells were increased by HCQ, provided evidence that HCQ-induced autophagy blockade. Taken together, our data show that HCQ-induced apoptotic cell death in Ara-C-resistant AML cells through autophagy regulation.

  11. Evolution of complete proteomes: guanine-cytosine pressure, phylogeny and environmental influences blend the proteomic architecture

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Guanine-cytosine (GC) composition is an important feature of genomes. Likewise, amino acid composition is a distinct, but less valued, feature of proteomes. A major concern is that it is not clear what valuable information can be acquired from amino acid composition data. To address this concern, in-depth analyses of the amino acid composition of the complete proteomes from 63 archaea, 270 bacteria, and 128 eukaryotes were performed. Results Principal component analysis of the amino acid matrices showed that the main contributors to proteomic architecture were genomic GC variation, phylogeny, and environmental influences. GC pressure drove positive selection on Ala, Arg, Gly, Pro, Trp, and Val, and adverse selection on Asn, Lys, Ile, Phe, and Tyr. The physico-chemical framework of the complete proteomes withstood GC pressure by frequency complementation of GC-dependent amino acid pairs with similar physico-chemical properties. Gln, His, Ser, and Val were responsible for phylogeny and their constituted components could differentiate archaea, bacteria, and eukaryotes. Environmental niche was also a significant factor in determining proteomic architecture, especially for archaea for which the main amino acids were Cys, Leu, and Thr. In archaea, hyperthermophiles, acidophiles, mesophiles, psychrophiles, and halophiles gathered successively along the environment-based principal component. Concordance between proteomic architecture and the genetic code was also related closely to genomic GC content, phylogeny, and lifestyles. Conclusions Large-scale analyses of the complete proteomes of a wide range of organisms suggested that amino acid composition retained the trace of GC variation, phylogeny, and environmental influences during evolution. The findings from this study will help in the development of a global understanding of proteome evolution, and even biological evolution. PMID:24088322

  12. Vacuum-Ultraviolet photoionization studies of the microhydrationof DNA bases (Guanine, Cytosine, Adenine and Thymine)

    SciTech Connect

    Belau, L.; Wilson, K.R.; Leone, S.R.; Musahid, Ahmed

    2007-01-22

    In this work, we report on a photoionization study of the microhydration of the four DNA bases. Gas-phase clusters of water with DNA bases [guanine (G), cytosine (C), adenine (A), and thymine (T)] are generated via thermal vaporization of the bases and expansion of the resultant vapor in a continuous supersonic jet expansion of water seeded in Ar. The resulting clusters are investigated by single-photon ionization with tunable vacuum-ultraviolet synchrotron radiation and mass analyzed using reflectron mass spectrometry. Photoionization efficiency (PIE) curves are recorded for the DNA bases and the following water (W) clusters: G, GW{sub n} (n = 1-3); C, CW{sub n} (n = 1-3); A, AW{sub n} (n = 1,2); and T, TW{sub n} (n = 1-3). Appearance energies (AE) are derived from the onset of these PIE curves (all energies in eV): G (8.1 {+-} 0.1), GW (8.0 {+-} 0.1), GW{sub 2} (8.0 {+-} 0.1), and GW{sub 3} (8.0); C (8.65 {+-} 0.05), CW (8.45 {+-} 0.05), CW{sub 2} (8.4 {+-} 0.1), and CW{sub 3} (8.3 {+-} 0.1); A (8.30 {+-} 0.05), AW (8.20 {+-} 0.05), and AW{sub 2} (8.1 {+-} 0.1); T (8.90 {+-} 0.05); and TW (8.75 {+-} 0.05), TW{sub 2} (8.6 {+-} 0.1), and TW{sub 3} (8.6 {+-} 0.1). The AEs of the DNA bases decrease slightly with the addition of water molecules (up to three) but do not converge to values found for photoinduced electron removal from DNA bases in solution.

  13. Double proton transfer in the isolated and DNA-embedded guanine-cytosine base pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoete, Vincent; Meuwly, Markus

    2004-09-01

    The energetics and dynamics of double proton transfer (DPT) is investigated theoretically for the Watson-Crick conformation of the guanine-cytosine (GC) base pair. Using semiempirical density functional theory the isolated and DNA-embedded GC pair is considered. Differences in the energetics and dynamics of DPT thus addresses the question of how relevant studies of isolated base pairs are for the understanding of processes occurring in DNA. Two-dimensional potential energy surfaces involving the transferring hydrogen atoms and the proton donors and acceptors are presented for both systems. The DPT reaction is accompanied by a contraction of the distance between the two bases with virtually identical energetic barriers being 18.8 and 18.7 kcal/mol for the isolated and DNA-embedded system, respectively. However, the transition state for DPT in the DNA-embedded GC pair is offset by 0.1 Å to larger N-H separation compared to the isolated GC pair. Using activated ab initio molecular dynamics, DPT is readily observed for the isolated base pair with a minimal amount of 21.4 kcal/mol of initial average kinetic energy along the DPT normal mode vector. On a time scale of ≈100 fs DPT has occurred and the excess energy is redistributed. For the DNA-embedded GC pair considerably more kinetic energy is required (30.0 kcal/mol) for DPT and the process is completed within one hydrogen vibration. The relevance of studies of isolated base pairs and base pair analogs in regard of reactions or properties involving DNA is discussed.

  14. Adenosine potentiates the therapeutic effects of neural stem cells expressing cytosine deaminase against metastatic brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Kang, Wonyoung; Seol, Ho Jun; Seong, Dong-Ho; Kim, Jandi; Kim, Yonghyun; Kim, Seung U; Nam, Do-Hyun; Joo, Kyeung Min

    2013-09-01

    Tumor-tropic properties of neural stem cells (NSCs) provide a novel approach with which to deliver targeting therapeutic genes to brain tumors. Previously, we developed a therapeutic strategy against metastatic brain tumors using a human NSC line (F3) expressing cytosine deaminase (F3.CD). F3.CD converts systemically administered 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC), a blood-brain barrier permeable nontoxic prodrug, into the anticancer agent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). In this study, we potentiated a therapeutic strategy of treatment with nucleosides in order to chemically facilitate the endogenous conversion of 5-FU to its toxic metabolite 5-FU ribonucleoside (5-FUR). In vitro, 5-FUR showed superior cytotoxic activity against MDA-MB-435 cancer cells when compared to 5-FU. Although adenosine had little cytotoxic activity, the addition of adenosine significantly potentiated the in vitro cytotoxicity of 5-FU. When MDA-MB‑435 cells were co-cultured with F3.CD cells, F3.CD cells and 5-FC inhibited the growth of MDA-MB-435 cells more significantly in the presence of adenosine. Facilitated 5-FUR production by F3.CD was confirmed by an HPLC analysis of the conditioned media derived from F3.CD cells treated with 5-FC and adenosine. In vivo systemic adenosine treatment also significantly potentiated the therapeutic effects of F3.CD cells and 5-FC in an MDA-MB-435 metastatic brain tumor model. Simple adenosine addition improved the antitumor activity of the NSCs carrying the therapeutic gene. Our results demonstrated an increased therapeutic potential, and thereby, clinical applicability of NSC-based gene therapy.

  15. Inhibition of tumor growth by polyarginine-fused mutant cytosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenfei; Zhang, Nan; Zhao, Tingting; Liu, Mingyao; Zhang, Tong; Li, Deshan

    2015-02-01

    Gene-directed enzyme-prodrug therapy is a method whereby cancerous tumors are selectively eradicated with minimal impact to healthy tissue. Due to its thermostability, E. coli cytosine deaminase (bCD) is one of the most widely used enzyme-prodrug combinations. However, wild-type bCD (wtbCD) displays a relatively poor turnover of 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC), and also has low permeability as a hexamer macromolecule (∼ 300 kDa), like many other therapeutic proteins. To improve these shortcomings, site-specific mutagenesis was performed by infusing the bCD with R9, a typical and highly effective cell-penetrating peptide. The results obtained by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy showed that the R9 efficiently delivered the enhanced green fluorescent proteins (EGFP) into the human liver hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells, and gathered at the nucleus, while EGFP alone did not have this ability. The penetrating efficiency of R9-EGPF was time and dose dependent. The results obtained by Western blot showed that R9-bCD, but not bCD proteins alone, could be uptaken into HepG2 cells. In vitro experiments showed that polyarginine enhanced the cytotoxicity of bCD, and R9-bCDmut had a stronger cytotoxicity than R9-bCD proteins. In vivo experiments also showed that R9-bCD and R9-bCDmut could prolong the survival time of tumor mice for 8-10 days. Future therapeutic applications of cell-permeable R9-bCDmut fusion proteins together with a systemic administration of 5-FC prodrug could result in profound anti-tumor activities.

  16. Oncolytic herpes simplex virus expressing yeast cytosine deaminase: relationship between viral replication, transgene expression, prodrug bioactivation.

    PubMed

    Yamada, S; Kuroda, T; Fuchs, B C; He, X; Supko, J G; Schmitt, A; McGinn, C M; Lanuti, M; Tanabe, K K

    2012-03-01

    Yeast cytosine deaminase (yCD) is a well-characterized prodrug/enzyme system that converts 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and has been combined with oncolytic viruses. However, in vivo studies of the interactions between 5-FC bioactivation and viral replication have not been previously reported, nor have the kinetics of transgene expression and the pharmacokinetics of 5-FC and 5-FU. We constructed a replication-conditional Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) expressing yCD and examined cytotoxicity when 5-FC was initiated at different times after viral infection, and observed that earlier 5-FC administration led to greater cytotoxicity than later 5-FC administration in vitro and in vivo. In animal models, 12 days of 5-FC administration was superior to 6 days, but dosing beyond 12 days did not further enhance efficacy. Consistent with the dosing-schedule results, both viral genomic DNA copy number and viral titers were observed to peak on Day 3 after viral injection and gradually decrease thereafter. The virus is replication-conditional and was detected in tumors for as long as 2 weeks after viral injection. The maximum relative extent of yCD conversion of 5-FC to 5-FU in tumors was observed on Day 6 after viral injection and it decreased progressively thereafter. The observation that 5-FU generation within tumors did not lead to appreciable levels of systemic 5-FU (<10 ng ml⁻¹) is important and has not been previously reported. The approaches used in these studies of the relationship between the viral replication kinetics, transgene expression, prodrug administration and anti-tumor efficacy are useful in the design of clinical trials of armed, oncolytic viruses.

  17. Molecular chemotherapy of pancreatic cancer using novel mutant bacterial cytosine deaminase gene.

    PubMed

    Kaliberova, Lyudmila N; Della Manna, Debbie L; Krendelchtchikova, Valentina; Black, Margaret E; Buchsbaum, Donald J; Kaliberov, Sergey A

    2008-09-01

    The combination of molecular chemotherapy with radiation therapy has the potential to become a powerful approach for treatment of pancreatic cancer. We have developed an adenoviral vector (AdbCD-D314A) encoding a mutant bacterial cytosine deaminase (bCD) gene, which converts the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) into the active drug 5-fluorouracil. The aim of this study was to investigate AdbCD-D314A/5-FC-mediated cytotoxicity in vitro and therapeutic efficacy in vivo alone and in combination with radiation against human pancreatic cancer cells and xenografts. AdbCD-D314A/5-FC-mediated cytotoxicity alone and in combination with radiation was analyzed using crystal violet inclusion and clonogenic survival assays. CD enzyme activity was determined by measuring conversion of [3H]5-FC to [3H]5-fluorouracil after adenoviral infection of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and pancreatic tumor xenografts by TLC. S.c. pancreatic tumor xenografts were used to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of AdbCD-D314A/5-FC molecular chemotherapy in combination with radiation therapy. AdbCD-D314A infection resulted in increased 5-FC-mediated pancreatic cancer cell killing that correlated with significantly enhanced CD enzyme activity compared with AdbCDwt encoding wild-type of bCD. Animal studies showed significant inhibition of growth of human pancreatic tumors treated with AdbCD-D314A/5-FC in comparison with AdbCDwt/5-FC. Also, a significantly greater inhibition of growth of Panc2.03 and MIA PaCA-2 tumor xenografts was produced by the combination of AdbCD-D314A/5-FC with radiation compared with either agent alone. The results indicate that the combination of AdbCD-D314A/5-FC molecular chemotherapy with radiation therapy significantly enhanced cytotoxicity of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and increased therapeutic efficacy against human pancreatic tumor xenografts.

  18. Epigenetic Variation, Inheritance, and Parent-of-Origin Effects of Cytosine Methylation in Maize (Zea mays)

    PubMed Central

    Lauria, Massimiliano; Piccinini, Sara; Pirona, Raul; Lund, Gertrud; Viotti, Angelo; Motto, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Pure epigenetic variation, or epigenetic variation that is independent of genetic context, may provide a mechanism for phenotypic variation in the absence of DNA mutations. To estimate the extent of pure epigenetic variation within and across generations and to identify the DNA regions targeted, a group of eight plants derived from a highly inbred line of maize (Zea mays) was analyzed by the methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism (MSAP) technique. We found that cytosine methylation (mC) differences among individuals accounted for up to 7.4% of CCGG sites investigated by MSAP. Of the differentially methylated fragments (DMFs) identified in the S0 generation, ∼12% were meiotically inherited for at least six generations. We show that meiotically heritable mC variation was consistently generated for an average of 0.5% CCGG sites per generation and that it largely occurred somatically. We provide evidence that mC variation can be established and inherited in a parent-of-origin manner, given that the paternal lineage is more prone to both forward and reverse mC changes. The molecular characterization of selected DMFs revealed that the variation was largely determined by CG methylation changes that map within gene regions. The expression analysis of genes overlapping with DMFs did not reveal an obvious correlation between mC variation and transcription, reinforcing the idea that the primary function of gene-body methylation is not to control gene expression. Because this study focuses on epigenetic variation in field-grown plants, the data presented herein pertain to spontaneous epigenetic changes of the maize genome in a natural context. PMID:24374354

  19. Concerted bis-alkylating reactivity of clerocidin towards unpaired cytosine residues in DNA

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Sara N.; Menegazzo, Ileana; Fabris, Daniele; Palumbo, Manlio

    2004-01-01

    Clerocidin (CL) is a topoisomerase II poison, which cleaves DNA irreversibly at guanines (G) and reversibly at cytosines (C). Furthermore, the drug can induce enzyme-independent strand breaks at the G and C level. It has been previously shown that G-damage is induced by alkylation of the guanine N7, followed by spontaneous depurination and nucleic acid cleavage, whereas scission at C is obtained only after treatment with hot alkali, and no information is available to explain the nature of this damage. We present here a systematic study on the reactivity of CL towards C both in the DNA environment and in solution. Selected synthetic derivatives were employed to evaluate the role of each chemical group of the drug. The structure of CL–dC adduct was then characterized by tandem mass spectrometry and NMR: the adduct is a stable condensed ring system resulting from a concerted electrophilic attack of the adjacent carbonyl and epoxide groups of CL towards the exposed NH2 and N3, respectively. This reaction mechanism, shown here for the first time, is characterized by faster kinetic rates than alkylation at G, due to the fact that the rate-determining step, alkylation at the epoxide, is an intramolecular process, provided a Schiff base linking CL and C can rapidly form, whereas the corresponding reaction of G N7 is intermolecular. These results provide helpful hints to explain the reversible/irreversible nature of topoisomerase II mediated DNA damage produced by CL at C/G steps. PMID:15494453

  20. Extrahelical cytosine bases in DNA duplexes containing d[GCC](n).d[GCC](n) repeats: detection by a mechlorethamine crosslinking reaction.

    PubMed

    Rojsitthisak, P; Romero, R M; Haworth, I S

    2001-11-15

    The cytosine-cytosine (C-C) pair is one of the least stable DNA mismatch pairs. The bases of the C-C mismatch are only weakly hydrogen bonded, and previous work has shown that, in certain sequence contexts, they can become unstacked from the core helix, and adopt an 'extrahelical' location. Here, using DNA duplexes with d[GCC](n).d[GCC](n) fragments containing C-C mismatches in a 1,4 bp relationship, we show that cytosine bases of different formal mismatch pairs can be crosslinked by mechlorethamine. For example, in the duplex d[CTCTCGCCGCCGCCGTATC].d[GATACGCCGCCGCCGAGAG], where underlined cytosine bases are present as the formal C-C mismatch pairs C(7)-C(32), C(10)-C(29) and C(13)-C(26), we show that two mechlorethamine crosslinks form between C(13) and C(29) and between C(10) and C(32), in addition to crosslinks at C(7)-C(32), C(10)-C(29) and C(13)-C(26) (we have reported previously the crosslinking of formal C-C pairs by mechlorethamine). We interpret the formation of the C(13)-C(29) and C(10)-C(32) crosslinks as evidence of an extrahelical location of the crosslinkable cytosines. Such extrahelical cytosine bases have been observed previously for a single C-C mismatch pair (in the so-called E-motif conformation). In the E-motif, the extrahelical cytosines are folded back towards the 5'-end of the duplex, consistent with our crosslinking data, and also consistent with the absence of C(7)-C(29) and C(10)-C(26) crosslinks in the current work. Hence, our data provide evidence for an extended E-motif DNA (eE-DNA) conformation in short d[GCC](n).d[GCC](n) repeat fragments, and raise the possibility that such structures might occur in much longer d[GCC](n).d[GCC](n) repeat tracts.

  1. Essential role of vesicular nucleotide transporter in vesicular storage and release of nucleotides in platelets

    PubMed Central

    Hiasa, Miki; Togawa, Natsuko; Miyaji, Takaaki; Omote, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Akitsugu; Moriyama, Yoshinori

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Nucleotides are stored in the dense granules of platelets. The release of nucleotides triggers one of the first steps in a series of cascades responsible for blood coagulation. However, the mechanism of how the nucleotides are accumulated in the granules is still far less understood. The transporter protein responsible for storage of nucleotides in the neuroendocrine cells has been identified and characterized. We hypothesized that the vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT) is also involved in the vesicular storage of nucleotides in platelets. In this article, we present three lines of evidence that VNUT is responsible for the vesicular storage of nucleotides in platelets and that vesicular ATP transport is crucial for platelet function, detection and characterization of VNUT activity in platelets isolated from healthy humans and MEG‐01 cells, RNA interference experiments on MEG‐01 cells, and studies on nucleotide transport and release with a selective inhibitor. PMID:24907298

  2. [Synthese of 1-(5-deoxy-beta-D-ribo-hexofuranosyl)cytosine and 1-(2,5-dideoxy-beta-D-erythro-hexofuranosyl)cytosine, and their phosphates. Specificity of an mammalian (rat) ribonucleotide-reductase].

    PubMed

    David, S; de Sennyey, G

    1979-12-01

    Mild, acidic hydrolysis of 3-O-benzoyl-1,2,:5,6-di-O-isopropylidene-alpha-D-allofuranose gave a diol that was selectively benzoylated at O-6 in high yield by intermediate conversion to the stannylene derivative. The 3,6-dibenzoate was converted to the 5-O-tosyl derivative and thence to a mixture of iodides, which were reduced with tributylstannane to 3,6-di-O-benzoyl-1,2-O-isopropylidene-alpha-D-ribo-hexofuranose (6). Acetolysis gave an anomeric mixture of diacetates, which, when treated with N-acetylbis(trimethylsilyl)cytosine gave the protected nucleoside, which was deprotected to free "homocytidine", 1-(5-deoxy-beta-D-ribo-hexofuranosyl)cytosine (11), by alklaine methanolysis. This was N-acetylated and then treated with acetone to give a protected nucleoside, which was labelled by oxidation to the aldehyde, reduction with sodium borotritide, and deprotection. Acidic methanolysis of 6 gave a mixture of methyl 2,6- and 3,6-di-O-benzoylfuranosides, the hydroxyl groups of which were treated by the tetrachloromethane-triphenylphosphine reagent to give the 2-chloro-2-deoxy (21) and 3-chloro-3-deoxy derivatives. Reduction of 21 gave methyl 3,6-di-O-benzoyl-2,5-dideoxy-D-erythro-furanoside, further transformed in 1-(2,5-dideoxy-beta-D-erythro-hexofuranosyl)cytosine mixed with the alpha anomer. Phosphates and diphosphates of the nucleosides were prepared by extensions of known methods. The phosphate and the diphosphate of 11 act neither as substrates nor as inhibitors of a ribonucleotide-reductase from rat asicites tumor.

  3. Resistance to Nucleotide Excision Repair of Bulky Guanine Adducts Opposite Abasic Sites in DNA Duplexes and Relationships between Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi; Ding, Shuang; Kropachev, Konstantin; Lei, Jia; Amin, Shantu; Broyde, Suse; Geacintov, Nicholas E.

    2015-01-01

    The nucleotide excision repair of certain bulky DNA lesions is abrogated in some specific non-canonical DNA base sequence contexts, while the removal of the same lesions by the nucleotide excision repair mechanism is efficient in duplexes in which all base pairs are complementary. Here we show that the nucleotide excision repair activity in human cell extracts is moderate-to-high in the case of two stereoisomeric DNA lesions derived from the pro-carcinogen benzo[a]pyrene (cis- and trans-B[a]P-N2-dG adducts) in a normal DNA duplex. By contrast, the nucleotide excision repair activity is completely abrogated when the canonical cytosine base opposite the B[a]P-dG adducts is replaced by an abasic site in duplex DNA. However, base excision repair of the abasic site persists. In order to understand the structural origins of these striking phenomena, we used NMR and molecular spectroscopy techniques to evaluate the conformational features of 11mer DNA duplexes containing these B[a]P-dG lesions opposite abasic sites. Our results show that in these duplexes containing the clustered lesions, both B[a]P-dG adducts adopt base-displaced intercalated conformations, with the B[a]P aromatic rings intercalated into the DNA helix. To explain the persistence of base excision repair in the face of the opposed bulky B[a]P ring system, molecular modeling results suggest how the APE1 base excision repair endonuclease, that excises abasic lesions, can bind productively even with the trans-B[a]P-dG positioned opposite the abasic site. We hypothesize that the nucleotide excision repair resistance is fostered by local B[a]P residue—DNA base stacking interactions at the abasic sites, that are facilitated by the absence of the cytosine partner base in the complementary strand. More broadly, this study sets the stage for elucidating the interplay between base excision and nucleotide excision repair in processing different types of clustered DNA lesions that are substrates of nucleotide

  4. Resistance to Nucleotide Excision Repair of Bulky Guanine Adducts Opposite Abasic Sites in DNA Duplexes and Relationships between Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi; Ding, Shuang; Kropachev, Konstantin; Jia, Lei; Lei, Jia; Amin, Shantu; Broyde, Suse; Geacintov, Nicholas E

    2015-01-01

    The nucleotide excision repair of certain bulky DNA lesions is abrogated in some specific non-canonical DNA base sequence contexts, while the removal of the same lesions by the nucleotide excision repair mechanism is efficient in duplexes in which all base pairs are complementary. Here we show that the nucleotide excision repair activity in human cell extracts is moderate-to-high in the case of two stereoisomeric DNA lesions derived from the pro-carcinogen benzo[a]pyrene (cis- and trans-B[a]P-N2-dG adducts) in a normal DNA duplex. By contrast, the nucleotide excision repair activity is completely abrogated when the canonical cytosine base opposite the B[a]P-dG adducts is replaced by an abasic site in duplex DNA. However, base excision repair of the abasic site persists. In order to understand the structural origins of these striking phenomena, we used NMR and molecular spectroscopy techniques to evaluate the conformational features of 11mer DNA duplexes containing these B[a]P-dG lesions opposite abasic sites. Our results show that in these duplexes containing the clustered lesions, both B[a]P-dG adducts adopt base-displaced intercalated conformations, with the B[a]P aromatic rings intercalated into the DNA helix. To explain the persistence of base excision repair in the face of the opposed bulky B[a]P ring system, molecular modeling results suggest how the APE1 base excision repair endonuclease, that excises abasic lesions, can bind productively even with the trans-B[a]P-dG positioned opposite the abasic site. We hypothesize that the nucleotide excision repair resistance is fostered by local B[a]P residue-DNA base stacking interactions at the abasic sites, that are facilitated by the absence of the cytosine partner base in the complementary strand. More broadly, this study sets the stage for elucidating the interplay between base excision and nucleotide excision repair in processing different types of clustered DNA lesions that are substrates of nucleotide excision

  5. Nucleotide Selectivity of Antibiotic Kinases▿

    PubMed Central

    Shakya, Tushar; Wright, Gerard D.

    2010-01-01

    Antibiotic kinases, which include aminoglycoside and macrolide phosphotransferases (APHs and MPHs), pose a serious threat to currently used antimicrobial therapies. These enzymes show structural and functional homology with Ser/Thr/Tyr kinases, which is suggestive of a common ancestor. Surprisingly, recent in vitro studies using purified antibiotic kinase enzymes have revealed that a number are able to utilize GTP as the antibiotic phospho donor, either preferentially or exclusively compared to ATP, the canonical phosphate donor in most biochemical reactions. To further explore this phenomenon, we examined three enzymes, APH(3′)-IIIa, APH(2″)-Ib, and MPH(2′)-I, using a competitive assay that mimics in vivo nucleotide triphosphate (NTP) concentrations and usage by each enzyme. Downstream analysis of reaction products by high-performance liquid chromatography enabled the determination of partitioning of phosphate flux from NTP donors to antibiotics. Using this ratio along with support from kinetic analysis and inhibitor studies, we find that under physiologic concentrations of NTPs, APH(3′)-IIIa exclusively uses ATP, MPH(2′)-I exclusively uses GTP, and APH(2″)-Ib is able to use both species with a preference for GTP. These differences reveal likely different pathways in antibiotic resistance enzyme evolution and can be exploited in selective inhibitor design to counteract resistance. PMID:20231391

  6. Automated Identification of Nucleotide Sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osman, Shariff; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Fox, George; Zhu, Dian-Hui

    2007-01-01

    STITCH is a computer program that processes raw nucleotide-sequence data to automatically remove unwanted vector information, perform reverse-complement comparison, stitch shorter sequences together to make longer ones to which the shorter ones presumably belong, and search against the user s choice of private and Internet-accessible public 16S rRNA databases. ["16S rRNA" denotes a ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) sequence that is common to all organisms.] In STITCH, a template 16S rRNA sequence is used to position forward and reverse reads. STITCH then automatically searches known 16S rRNA sequences in the user s chosen database(s) to find the sequence most similar to (the sequence that lies at the smallest edit distance from) each spliced sequence. The result of processing by STITCH is the identification of the most similar well-described bacterium. Whereas previously commercially available software for analyzing genetic sequences operates on one sequence at a time, STITCH can manipulate multiple sequences simultaneously to perform the aforementioned operations. A typical analysis of several dozen sequences (length of the order of 103 base pairs) by use of STITCH is completed in a few minutes, whereas such an analysis performed by use of prior software takes hours or days.

  7. Nucleotide selectivity of antibiotic kinases.

    PubMed

    Shakya, Tushar; Wright, Gerard D

    2010-05-01

    Antibiotic kinases, which include aminoglycoside and macrolide phosphotransferases (APHs and MPHs), pose a serious threat to currently used antimicrobial therapies. These enzymes show structural and functional homology with Ser/Thr/Tyr kinases, which is suggestive of a common ancestor. Surprisingly, recent in vitro studies using purified antibiotic kinase enzymes have revealed that a number are able to utilize GTP as the antibiotic phospho donor, either preferentially or exclusively compared to ATP, the canonical phosphate donor in most biochemical reactions. To further explore this phenomenon, we examined three enzymes, APH(3')-IIIa, APH(2'')-Ib, and MPH(2')-I, using a competitive assay that mimics in vivo nucleotide triphosphate (NTP) concentrations and usage by each enzyme. Downstream analysis of reaction products by high-performance liquid chromatography enabled the determination of partitioning of phosphate flux from NTP donors to antibiotics. Using this ratio along with support from kinetic analysis and inhibitor studies, we find that under physiologic concentrations of NTPs, APH(3')-IIIa exclusively uses ATP, MPH(2')-I exclusively uses GTP, and APH(2'')-Ib is able to use both species with a preference for GTP. These differences reveal likely different pathways in antibiotic resistance enzyme evolution and can be exploited in selective inhibitor design to counteract resistance.

  8. Nucleotide excision repair in humans.

    PubMed

    Spivak, Graciela

    2015-12-01

    The demonstration of DNA damage excision and repair replication by Setlow, Howard-Flanders, Hanawalt and their colleagues in the early 1960s, constituted the discovery of the ubiquitous pathway of nucleotide excision repair (NER). The serial steps in NER are similar in organisms from unicellular bacteria to complex mammals and plants, and involve recognition of lesions, adducts or structures that disrupt the DNA double helix, removal of a short oligonucleotide containing the offending lesion, synthesis of a repair patch copying the opposite undamaged strand, and ligation, to restore the DNA to its original form. The transcription-coupled repair (TCR) subpathway of NER, discovered nearly two decades later, is dedicated to the removal of lesions from the template DNA strands of actively transcribed genes. In this review I will outline the essential factors and complexes involved in NER in humans, and will comment on additional factors and metabolic processes that affect the efficiency of this important process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Long-range correlations in nucleotide sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, C.-K.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Goldberger, A. L.; Havlin, S.; Sciortino, F.; Simons, M.; Stanley, H. E.

    1992-03-01

    DNA SEQUENCES have been analysed using models, such as an it-step Markov chain, that incorporate the possibility of short-range nucleotide correlations1. We propose here a method for studying the stochastic properties of nucleotide sequences by constructing a 1:1 map of the nucleotide sequence onto a walk, which we term a 'DNA walk'. We then use the mapping to provide a quantitative measure of the correlation between nucleotides over long distances along the DNA chain. Thus we uncover in the nucleotide sequence a remarkably long-range power law correlation that implies a new scale-invariant property of DNA. We find such long-range correlations in intron-containing genes and in nontranscribed regulatory DNA sequences, but not in complementary DNA sequences or intron-less genes.

  10. Long-range correlations in nucleotide sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, C. K.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Goldberger, A. L.; Havlin, S.; Sciortino, F.; Simons, M.; Stanley, H. E.

    1992-01-01

    DNA sequences have been analysed using models, such as an n-step Markov chain, that incorporate the possibility of short-range nucleotide correlations. We propose here a method for studying the stochastic properties of nucleotide sequences by constructing a 1:1 map of the nucleotide sequence onto a walk, which we term a 'DNA walk'. We then use the mapping to provide a quantitative measure of the correlation between nucleotides over long distances along the DNA chain. Thus we uncover in the nucleotide sequence a remarkably long-range power law correlation that implies a new scale-invariant property of DNA. We find such long-range correlations in intron-containing genes and in nontranscribed regulatory DNA sequences, but not in complementary DNA sequences or intron-less genes.

  11. Long-range correlations in nucleotide sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, C. K.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Goldberger, A. L.; Havlin, S.; Sciortino, F.; Simons, M.; Stanley, H. E.

    1992-01-01

    DNA sequences have been analysed using models, such as an n-step Markov chain, that incorporate the possibility of short-range nucleotide correlations. We propose here a method for studying the stochastic properties of nucleotide sequences by constructing a 1:1 map of the nucleotide sequence onto a walk, which we term a 'DNA walk'. We then use the mapping to provide a quantitative measure of the correlation between nucleotides over long distances along the DNA chain. Thus we uncover in the nucleotide sequence a remarkably long-range power law correlation that implies a new scale-invariant property of DNA. We find such long-range correlations in intron-containing genes and in nontranscribed regulatory DNA sequences, but not in complementary DNA sequences or intron-less genes.

  12. Effect of C5-Methylation of Cytosine on the UV-Induced Reactivity of Duplex DNA: Conformational and Electronic Factors.

    PubMed

    Banyasz, Akos; Esposito, Luciana; Douki, Thierry; Perron, Marion; Lepori, Clément; Improta, Roberto; Markovitsi, Dimitra

    2016-05-12

    C5-methylation of cytosines is strongly correlated with UV-induced mutations detected in skin cancers. Mutational hot-spots appearing at TCG sites are due to the formation of pyrimidine cyclobutane dimers (CPDs). The present study, performed for the model DNA duplex (TCGTA)3·(TACGA)3 and the constitutive single strands, examines the factors underlying the effect of C5-methylation on pyrimidine dimerization at TCG sites. This effect is quantified for the first time by quantum yields ϕ. They were determined following irradiation at 255, 267, and 282 nm and subsequent photoproduct analysis using HPLC coupled to mass spectrometry. C5-methylation leads to an increase of the CPD quantum yield up to 80% with concomitant decrease of that of pyrimidine(6-4) pyrimidone adducts (64PPs) by at least a factor of 3. The obtained ϕ values cannot be explained only by the change of the cytosine absorption spectrum upon C5-methylation. The conformational and electronic factors that may affect the dimerization reaction are discussed in light of results obtained by fluorescence spectroscopy, molecular dynamics simulations, and quantum mechanical calculations. Thus, it appears that the presence of an extra methyl on cytosine affects the sugar puckering, thereby enhancing conformations of the TC step that are prone to CPD formation but less favorable to 64PPs. In addition, C5-methylation diminishes the amplitude of conformational motions in duplexes; in the resulting stiffer structure, ππ* excitations may be transferred from initially populated exciton states to reactive pyrimidines giving rise to CPDs.

  13. Quantum chemical investigation of the electronic spectra of the keto, enol, and keto-imine tautomers of cytosine.

    PubMed

    Tomić, Katarina; Tatchen, Jörg; Marian, Christel M

    2005-09-22

    The low-lying excited singlet states of the keto, enol, and keto-imine tautomers of cytosine have been investigated employing a combined density functional/multireference configuration interaction (DFT/MRCI) method. Unconstrained geometry optimizations have yielded out-of-plain distorted structures of the pi --> pi and n --> pi excited states of all cytosine forms. For the keto tautomer, the DFT/MRCI adiabatic excitation energy of the pi --> pi state (4.06 eV including zero-point vibrational energy corrections) supports the resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI) spectrum (Nir et al. Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2002, 5, 4780). On its S1 potential energy surface, a conical intersection between the 1pipi state and the electronic ground state has been identified. The barrier height of the reaction along a constrained minimum energy path amounts to merely 0.2 eV above the origin and explains the break-off of the R2PI spectrum. The 1pipi minimum of the enol tautomer is found at considerably higher excitation energies (4.50 eV). Because of significant geometry shifts with respect to the ground state, long vibrational progressions are expected, in accord with experimental observations. For the keto-imine tautomer, a crossing of the 1pipi potential energy surface with the ground-state surface has been found, too. Its n --> pi minimum (3.27 eV) is located well below the conical intersection between the pi --> pi and S0 states, but it will be difficult to observe because of its small transition moment. The identified conical intersections of the pi --> pi excited states of the keto cytosine tautomers are made responsible for the ultrafast decay to the electronic ground states and thus may explain their subpicoseconds lifetimes.

  14. Dissecting the Contingent Interactions of Protein Complexes with the Optimized Yeast Cytosine Deaminase Protein-Fragment Complementation Assay.

    PubMed

    Ear, Po Hien; Kowarzyk, Jacqueline; Michnick, Stephen W

    2016-11-01

    Here, we present a detailed protocol for studying in yeast cells the contingent interaction between a substrate and its multisubunit enzyme complex by using a death selection technique known as the optimized yeast cytosine deaminase protein-fragment complementation assay (OyCD PCA). In yeast, the enzyme cytosine deaminase (encoded by FCY1) is involved in pyrimidine metabolism. The PCA is based on an engineered form of yeast cytosine deaminase optimized by directed evolution for maximum activity (OyCD), which acts as a reporter converting the pro-drug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), a toxic compound that kills the cell. Cells that have OyCD PCA activity convert 5-FC to 5-FU and die. Using this assay, it is possible to assess how regulatory subunits of an enzyme contribute to the overall interaction between the catalytic subunit and the potential substrates. Furthermore, OyCD PCA can be used to dissect different functions of mutant forms of a protein as a mutant can disrupt interaction with one partner, while retaining interaction with others. As it is scalable to a medium- or high-throughput format, OyCD PCA can be used to study hundreds to thousands of pairwise protein-protein interactions in different deletion strains. In addition, OyCD PCA vectors (pAG413GAL1-ccdB-OyCD-F[1] and pAG415GAL1-ccdB-OyCD-F[2]) have been designed to be compatible with the proprietary Gateway technology. It is therefore easy to generate fusion genes with the OyCD reporter fragments. As an example, we will focus on the yeast cyclin-dependent protein kinase 1 (Cdk1, encoded by CDC28), its regulatory cyclin subunits, and its substrates or binding partners.

  15. Pilot trial of genetically modified, attenuated Salmonella expressing the E. coli cytosine deaminase gene in refractory cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Nemunaitis, John; Cunningham, Casey; Senzer, Neil; Kuhn, Joseph; Cramm, Jennifer; Litz, Craig; Cavagnolo, Robert; Cahill, Ann; Clairmont, Caroline; Sznol, Mario

    2003-10-01

    We performed a pilot trial in refractory cancer patients to investigate the feasibility of intratumoral injection of TAPET-CD, an attenuated Salmonella bacterium expressing the E. coli cytosine deaminase gene. A total of three patients received three dose levels of TAPET-CD (3 x 10(6)-3 x 10(7) CFU/m(2)) via intratumoral injection once every 28 days as long as progression of disease or intolerable toxicity was not observed. From days 4 to 14 of each 28 day cycle, patients also received 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) at a dose of 100 mg/kg/day p.o. divided three times daily. Six cycles of treatment were administered. No significant adverse events clearly attributable to TAPET-CD were demonstrated. Two patients had intratumor evidence of bacterial colonization with TAPET-CD, which persisted for at least 15 days after initial injection. Conversion of 5-FC to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) as a result of cytosine deaminase expression was demonstrated in these two patients. The tumor to plasma ratio of 5-FU for these two colonized patients was 3.0, demonstrating significantly increased levels of 5-FU at the site of TAPET-CD colonization and insignificant systemic spread of the bacteria. In contrast, the tumor to plasma ratio of 5-FU of the patient who did not show colonization of TAPET-CD was less than 1.0. These results support the principle that a Salmonella bacterium can be utilized as a delivery vehicle of the cytosine deaminase gene to malignant tissue and that the delivered gene is functional (i.e. able to convert 5-FC to 5-FU) at doses at or below 3 x 10(7) CFU/m(2).

  16. Synthesis of peptide nucleic acids containing pyridazine derivatives as cytosine and thymine analogs, and their duplexes with complementary oligodeoxynucleotides.

    PubMed

    Tomori, Takahito; Miyatake, Yuya; Sato, Yuta; Kanamori, Takashi; Masaki, Yoshiaki; Ohkubo, Akihiro; Sekine, Mitsuo; Seio, Kohji

    2015-03-20

    Synthesis of peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) is reported with new pyridazine-type nucleobases: 3-aminopyridazine (aPz) and 1-aminophthalazine (aPh) as cytosine analogs, and pyridazin-3-one (Pz(O)) and phthalazin-1-one (Ph(O)) as thymine analogs. The PNAs having an aPz or a Pz(O) formed duplexes with each complementary oligodeoxynucleotide forming a base pair with G or A, respectively, as evaluated by using UV melting analyses and circular dichroism (CD) spectra.

  17. Combined Monte Carlo and quantum mechanics study of the hydration of the guanine-cytosine base pair.

    PubMed

    Coutinho, Kaline; Ludwig, Valdemir; Canuto, Sylvio

    2004-06-01

    We present a computer simulation study of the hydration of the guanine-cytosine (GC) hydrogen-bonded complex. Using first principles density-functional theory, with gradient-corrected exchange-correlation and Monte Carlo simulation, we include thermal contribution, structural effects, solvent polarization, and the water-water and water-GC hydrogen bond interaction to show that the GC interaction in an aqueous environment is weakened to about 70% of the value obtained for an isolated complex. We also analyze in detail the preferred hydration sites of the GC pair and show that on the average it makes around five hydrogen bonds with water.

  18. [Atrophy of the granular layer of the cerebellar cortex in patients with nonlymphoblastic leukemia treated with cytosine arabinoside].

    PubMed

    Nowacki, P; Dolińska, D; Honczarenko, K; Zyluk, B

    1992-01-01

    The reported analysis comprised 81 patients dying of acute non-lymphoblastic leukaemia type M1, M2, M4 and blastic crises in chronic myelocytic leukaemia. It was observed that the number of cases of cerebellar granular layer atrophy rose markedly in the years 1984-1990 as compared with 1976-1983 (45.4% vs 16.2%). It is suggested that this was due to the introduction of cytostatic treatment schedules with higher doses of cytosine arabinoside (ARAC), especially TAD (6-thioguanine, ARAC, daunorubicin). Cerebellar granular layer atrophy seems to be dependent rather on the cumulative dose of ARAC and not on a single high dose of that drug.

  19. Acute ascending myelitis and encephalopathy after intrathecal cytosine arabinoside and methotrexate in an adolescent boy with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ozön, A; Topaloğlu, H; Cila, A; Günay, M; Cetin, M

    1994-01-01

    A 14-year-old boy with acute lymphoblastic leukemia developed acute ascending myelitis followed by encephalopathy after intrathecal administration of methotrexate 15 mg and cytosine arabinoside 50 mg. The patient had none of the risk factors noted previously in other patients with intrathecal therapy (IT) induced neurotoxicity. The doses administered were within the standard scales, and toxicity developed in the second boost of IT 20 days after the first one. There may not be any parameters to predict the occurrence of such severe and rare form of CNS neurotoxicity attributed to IT.

  20. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the (cytosine-5)-DNA methyltransferase NlaX from Neisseria lactamica.

    PubMed

    Kachalova, Galina S; Artyukh, Rimma I; Lavrova, Natalia V; Ryazanova, Elena M; Karyagina, Anna S; Kubareva, Elena A; Bartunik, Hans D

    2005-09-01

    Crystals of the (cytosine-5)-DNA methyltransferase NlaX from Neisseria lactamica (molecular weight 36.5 kDa) have been grown at 291 K using 2.5 M NaCl as precipitant. The crystals diffract to 3.0 A resolution at 100 K. The crystals belong to space group P321, with unit-cell parameters a = 121.98, b = 121.98, c = 56.71 A. There is one molecule in the asymmetric unit and the solvent content is estimated to be 62.1% by volume.

  1. Following Ultrafast Radiationless Relaxation Dynamics With Strong Field Dissociative Ionization: A Comparison Between Adenine, Uracil, and Cytosine

    SciTech Connect

    Kotur, Marija; Weinacht, Thomas C.; Zhou, Congyi; Matsika, Spiridoula

    2011-03-22

    We present the application of ultrafast time- and mass-resolved ion yield laser spectroscopy in conjunction with ab initio electronic structure calculations to track molecular excited-state dynamics. We discuss how molecular fragment ions can be associated with conformations the molecule assumes during its relaxation, and how various features of the pump-probe signal for those fragments can be used to infer details of the excited state dynamics. We present results for radiationless relaxation in DNA and RNA bases adenine, cytosine, and uracil in the gas phase, pumped near a one-photon resonance transition to an excited state, and probed via strong-field near-IR dissociative ionization.

  2. Stereoselective formation of a cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer by using N4-acetyl protection of the cytosine base.

    PubMed

    Nishiguchi, Kosuke; Yamamoto, Junpei; Iwai, Shigenori

    2008-01-01

    The cytosine base in DNA undergoes hydrolytic deamination at a considerable rate when UV radiation induces formation of a cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) with an adjacent pyrimidine base. As a part of our study on the synthesis of CPD-containing oligonucleotides, we have prepared properly-protected thymidylyl-(3' 5')-N(4)-acetyl-2'-deoxycytidine, and the solution of this compound was UV-irradiated using acetophenone as a sensitizer. In this reaction, hydrolysis of the acetylamino group occurred, and a trans-syn cyclobutane thymine-uracil dimer with the syn-anti conformation around the glycosidic bonds was formed stereoselectively.

  3. Uptake of cytosine arabinoside (ara-C) by LSA lymphoma after irradiation in the stationary phase of growth

    SciTech Connect

    Young, J.A.; Maruyama, Y.

    1982-03-01

    An in vitro system was used to assess uptake of cytosine arabinoside by LSA ascites tumor cells growing in vivo. Changes in tumor uptake with aging after depopulation and perturbation of the cell population with 1,000 rad were studied. Both DNA synthesis and drug uptake were highest during early rapid tumor growth and decreased with aging and the stationary phase of growth. However, irradiation caused a second peak of cellular activity and drug uptake. These results indicate that irradiation stimulates regrowth of tumor.

  4. Pulsed magnetic field from video display terminals enhances teratogenic effects of cytosine arabinoside in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, H.; Wu, R.Y.; Shao, B.J.; Fu, Y.D.; Yao, G.D.; Lu, D.J.

    1995-05-01

    Eighty-nine Swiss Webster mice were randomly divided into four groups: a control group, a pulsed magnetic field (PMF) group, a cytosine arabinoside (ara-C, a teratogen) group, and a combined PMF + ara-C group. Mice in the PMF and PMF + ara-C groups were irradiated with a PMF (a sawtooth waveform with 52 {mu}s rise time, 12{mu}s decay time, and 15.6 kHz frequency) at a peak magnetic flux density of 40 {mu}T for 4 hours daily on days 6-17 of gestation. The mice in the ara-C and the PMF + ara-C groups were injected intraperitoneally on day 9 of gestation with 10 mg/kg of ara-C. The incidence of resorption and dead fetuses was not affected by PMF but was increased by ara-C injection. The malformation incidence of cleft palate (CP) and/or cleft lip (CL) was significantly higher in all three of the treated groups than in the control group (P < 0.05). If, however, statistical analyses had been done on litters rather than on individual fetuses, they would show that the incidence of CP and/or CL in the PMF group is not significantly greater than that in the control group. A significantly higher incidence of CP and/or CL was found in the PMF + ara-C group (49%) than the ara-C alone group (26.1%). These data suggest that PMF might enhance the development of ara-C-induced CP and/or CL. The incidence of minor variations in skeletal development, including reduction of skeletal calcification and loss of skeleton, was not statistically significant in the PMF group. However, it was higher in the two ara-C-treated groups, and there was no significant difference between the ara-C alone group and the ara-C + PMF group. From these results it is concluded that the very weak embryotoxic effects of PMF exposure may be revealed and enhanced in combination with a teratogenic agent.

  5. Proton transfer in guanine-cytosine radical anion embedded in B-form DNA.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsing-Yin; Kao, Chai-Lin; Hsu, Sodio C N

    2009-11-04

    The electron-attachment-induced proton transfer in the guanine-cytosine (G:C) base pair is thought to be relevant to the issues of charge transport and radiation damage in DNA. However, our understanding on the reaction mainly comes from the data of isolated bases and base pairs, and the behavior of the reaction in the DNA duplex is not clear. In the present study, the proton-transfer reaction in reduced G:C stacks is investigated by quantum mechanical calculations with the aim to clarify how each environmental factor affects the proton transfer in G:C(*-). The calculations show that while the proton transfer in isolated G:C(*-) is exothermic with a small energetic barrier, it becomes endothermic with a considerably enhanced energetic barrier in G:C stacks. The substantial effect of G:C stacking is proved to originate from the electrostatic interactions between the dipole moments of outer G:C base pairs and the middle G:C(*-) base-pair radical anion; the extent of charge delocalization is very small and plays little role in affecting the proton transfer in G:C(*-). On the basis of the electrostatic model, the sequence dependence of the proton transfer in the ionized G:C base pair is predicted. In addition, the water molecules in the first hydration shell around G:C(*-) display a pronounced effect that facilitates the proton-transfer reaction; further consideration of bulk hydration only slightly lowers the energetic barrier and reaction energy. We also notice that the water arrangement around an embedded G:C(*-) is different from that around an isolated G:C(*-), which could result in a very different solvent effect on the energetics of the proton transfer. In contrast to the important influences of base stacking and hydration, the effects of sugar-phosphate backbone and counterions are found to be minor. Our calculations also reveal that a G:C base pair embedded in DNA is capable of accommodating two excess electrons only in bulk hydration; the resultant G(N1-H

  6. Intersystem crossing rates of S1 state keto-amino cytosine at low excess energy.

    PubMed

    Lobsiger, Simon; Etinski, Mihajlo; Blaser, Susan; Frey, Hans-Martin; Marian, Christel; Leutwyler, Samuel

    2015-12-21

    The amino-keto tautomer of supersonic jet-cooled cytosine undergoes intersystem crossing (ISC) from the v = 0 and low-lying vibronic levels of its S1((1)ππ(∗)) state. We investigate these ISC rates experimentally and theoretically as a function of S1 state vibrational excess energy Eexc. The S1 vibronic levels are pumped with a ∼5 ns UV laser, the S1 and triplet state ion signals are separated by prompt or delayed ionization with a second UV laser pulse. After correcting the raw ISC yields for the relative S1 and T1 ionization cross sections, we obtain energy dependent ISC quantum yields QISC (corr)=1%-5%. These are combined with previously measured vibronic state-specific decay rates, giving ISC rates kISC = 0.4-1.5 ⋅ 10(9) s(-1), the corresponding S1⇝S0 internal conversion (IC) rates are 30-100 times larger. Theoretical ISC rates are computed using SCS-CC2 methods, which predict rapid ISC from the S1; v = 0 state with kISC = 3 ⋅ 10(9) s(-1) to the T1((3)ππ(∗)) triplet state. The surprisingly high rate of this El Sayed-forbidden transition is caused by a substantial admixture of (1)nOπ(∗) character into the S1((1)ππ(∗)) wave function at its non-planar minimum geometry. The combination of experiment and theory implies that (1) below Eexc = 550 cm(-1) in the S1 state, S1⇝S0 internal conversion dominates the nonradiative decay with kIC ≥ 2 ⋅ 10(10) s(-1), (2) the calculated S1⇝T1 ((1)ππ(∗)⇝(3)ππ(∗)) ISC rate is in good agreement with experiment, (3) being El-Sayed forbidden, the S1⇝T1 ISC is moderately fast (kISC = 3 ⋅ 10(9) s(-1)), and not ultrafast, as claimed by other calculations, and (4) at Eexc ∼ 550 cm(-1) the IC rate increases by ∼50 times, probably by accessing the lowest conical intersection (the C5-twist CI) and thereby effectively switching off the ISC decay channels.

  7. Antitumor activity of mutant bacterial cytosine deaminase gene for colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Long-Ying; Wang, Jian-Ping; Gui, Zhi-Fu; Shen, Li-Zong

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate bacterial cytosine deaminase (bCD) mutant D314A and 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) for treatment of colon cancer in a mouse model. METHODS: Recombinant lentivirus vectors that contained wild-type bCD gene (bCDwt), and bCD mutant D314A gene (bCD-D314A) with green fluorescence protein gene were constructed and used to infect human colon carcinoma LoVo cells, to generate stable transfected cells, LoVo/null, LoVo/bCDwt or LoVo/bCD-D314A. These were injected subcutaneously into Balb/c nude mice to establish xenograft models. Two weeks post-LoVo cell inoculation, PBS or 5-FC (500 mg/kg) was administered by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection once daily for 14 d. On the day after LoVo cell injection, mice were monitored daily for tumor volume and survival. RESULTS: Sequence analyses confirmed the construction of recombinant lentiviral plasmids that contained bCDwt or bCD-D314A. The lentiviral vector had high efficacy for gene delivery, and RT-PCR showed that bCDwt or bCD-D314A gene was transferred to LoVo cells. Among these treatment groups, gene delivery or 5-FC administration alone had no effect on tumor growth. However, bCDwt/5-FC or bCD-D314A/5-FC treatment inhibited tumor growth and prolonged survival of mice significantly (P < 0.05). Importantly, the tumor volume in the bCD-D314A/5-FC-treated group was lower than that in the bCDwt/5-FC group (P < 0.05), and bCD-D314A plus 5-FC significantly prolonged survival of mice in comparison with bCDwt plus 5-FC (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: The bCD mutant D314A enhanced significantly antitumor activity in human colon cancer xenograft models, which provides a promising approach for human colon carcinoma therapy. PMID:21734808

  8. IR Vibrational spectra of H-bonded complexes of adenine, 2-aminopurine and 2-aminopurine+ with cytosine and thymine: Quantum-chemical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brovarets', O. O.; Hovorun, D. M.

    2011-11-01

    Using theoretical study on the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory, we have compared vibrational spectra of 2-aminopurine (as neutral or protonated at N1 atom species) with adenine and H-bonded complexes of 2-aminopurine (as neutral or protoned at N1 atom species) · cytosine or 2-aminopurine · thymine with adenine · cytosine and adenine · thymine base pairs. The nature of the base pairing between adenine, 2-aminopurine, 2-aminopurine+ and cytosine or thymine have been investigated by means of quantum-mechanical calculations. We have investigated the effect of the hydrogen bond formation on the vibrational spectra of the investigated base pairs. The main differences in the vibrational spectra as for bases so for base pairs have been observed in the high-frequency region.

  9. Plant cyclic nucleotide signalling: facts and fiction.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Atienza, Juliana; Van Ingelgem, Carl; Roef, Luc; Maathuis, Frans Jm

    2007-11-01

    The presence of the cyclic nucleotides 3',5'-cyclic adenyl monophosphate (cAMP) and 3',5'-cyclic guanyl monophosphate (cGMP) in plants is now generally accepted. In addition, cAMP and cGMP have been implicated in the regulation of important plant processes such as stomatal functioning, monovalent and divalent cation fluxes, chloroplast development, gibberellic acid signalling, pathogen response and gene transcription. However, very little is known regarding the components of cyclic nucleotide signalling in plants. In this addendum, the evidence for specific mechanisms of plant cyclic nucleotide signalling is evaluated and discussed.

  10. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms and Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ting; Liang, Yuting; Li, Hong; Li, Haibo; He, Quanze; Xue, Ying; Shen, Cong; Zhang, Chunhua; Xiang, Jingjing; Ding, Jie; Qiao, Longwei; Zheng, Qiping

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Osteoarthritis (OA) is a complex disorder characterized by degenerative articular cartilage and is largely attributed to genetic risk factors. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are common DNA variants that have shown promising and efficiency, compared with positional cloning, to map candidate genes of complex diseases, including OA. In this study, we aim to provide an overview of multiple SNPs from a number of genes that have recently been linked to OA susceptibility. We also performed a comprehensive meta-analysis to evaluate the association of SNP rs7639618 of double von Willebrand factor A domains (DVWA) gene with OA susceptibility. A systematic search of studies on the association of SNPs with susceptibility to OA was conducted in PubMed and Google scholar. Studies subjected to meta-analysis include human and case-control studies that met the Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium model and provide sufficient data to calculate an odds ratio (OR). A total of 9500 OA cases and 9365 controls in 7 case-control studies relating to SNP rs7639618 were included in this study and the ORs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Over 50 SNPs from different genes have been shown to be associated with either hip (23), or knee (20), or both (13) OA. The ORs of these SNPs for OA and the subtypes are not consistent. As to SNP rs7639618 of DVWA, increased knee OA risk was observed in all genetic models analyzed. Specifically, people from Asian with G-allele showed significantly increased risk of knee OA (A versus G: OR = 1.28, 95% CI 1.13–1.46; AA versus GG: OR = 1.60, 95% CI 1.25–2.05; GA versus GG: OR = 1.31, 95% CI 1.18–1.44; AA versus GA+GG: OR = 1.34, 95% CI 1.12–1.61; AA+GA versus GG: OR = 1.40, 95% CI 1.19–1.64), but not in Caucasians or with hip OA. Our results suggest that multiple SNPs play different roles in the pathogenesis of OA and its subtypes; SNP rs7639618 of DVWA gene is associated with a significantly increased

  11. Spontaneous Oligomerization of Nucleotide Alternatives in Aqueous Solutions.

    PubMed

    Smith, Karen E; House, Christopher H; Dworkin, Jason P; Callahan, Michael P

    2017-03-01

    On early Earth, a primitive polymer that could spontaneously form from likely available precursors may have preceded both RNA and DNA as the first genetic material. Here, we report that heated aqueous solutions containing 5-hydroxymethyluracil (HMU) result in oligomers of uracil, heated solutions containing 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (HMC) result in oligomers of cytosine, and heated solutions containing both HMU and HMC result in mixed oligomers of uracil and cytosine. Oligomerization of hydroxymethylated pyrimidines, which may have been abundant on the primitive Earth, might have been important in the development of simple informational polymers.

  12. Spontaneous Oligomerization of Nucleotide Alternatives in Aqueous Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Karen E.; House, Christopher H.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Callahan, Michael P.

    2017-03-01

    On early Earth, a primitive polymer that could spontaneously form from likely available precursors may have preceded both RNA and DNA as the first genetic material. Here, we report that heated aqueous solutions containing 5-hydroxymethyluracil (HMU) result in oligomers of uracil, heated solutions containing 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (HMC) result in oligomers of cytosine, and heated solutions containing both HMU and HMC result in mixed oligomers of uracil and cytosine. Oligomerization of hydroxymethylated pyrimidines, which may have been abundant on the primitive Earth, might have been important in the development of simple informational polymers.

  13. First-In-Class Small Molecule Inhibitors of the Single-Strand DNA Cytosine Deaminase APOBEC3G

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ming; Shandilya, Shivender M.D.; Carpenter, Michael A.; Rathore, Anurag; Brown, William L.; Perkins, Angela L.; Harki, Daniel A.; Solberg, Jonathan; Hook, Derek J.; Pandey, Krishan K.; Parniak, Michael A.; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Krogan, Nevan J.; Somasundaran, Mohan; Ali, Akbar; Schiffer, Celia A.; Harris, Reuben S.

    2012-04-04

    APOBEC3G is a single-stranded DNA cytosine deaminase that comprises part of the innate immune response to viruses and transposons. Although APOBEC3G is the prototype for understanding the larger mammalian polynucleotide deaminase family, no specific chemical inhibitors exist to modulate its activity. High-throughput screening identified 34 compounds that inhibit APOBEC3G catalytic activity. Twenty of 34 small molecules contained catechol moieties, which are known to be sulfhydryl reactive following oxidation to the orthoquinone. Located proximal to the active site, C321 was identified as the binding site for the inhibitors by a combination of mutational screening, structural analysis, and mass spectrometry. Bulkier substitutions C321-to-L, F, Y, or W mimicked chemical inhibition. A strong specificity for APOBEC3G was evident, as most compounds failed to inhibit the related APOBEC3A enzyme or the unrelated enzymes E. coli uracil DNA glycosylase, HIV-1 RNase H, or HIV-1 integrase. Partial, but not complete, sensitivity could be conferred to APOBEC3A by introducing the entire C321 loop from APOBEC3G. Thus, a structural model is presented in which the mechanism of inhibition is both specific and competitive, by binding a pocket adjacent to the APOBEC3G active site, reacting with C321, and blocking access to substrate DNA cytosines.

  14. The DNA cytosine deaminase APOBEC3H haplotype I likely contributes to breast and lung cancer mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Starrett, Gabriel J.; Luengas, Elizabeth M.; McCann, Jennifer L.; Ebrahimi, Diako; Temiz, Nuri A.; Love, Robin P.; Feng, Yuqing; Adolph, Madison B.; Chelico, Linda; Law, Emily K.; Carpenter, Michael A.; Harris, Reuben S

    2016-01-01

    Cytosine mutations within TCA/T motifs are common in cancer. A likely cause is the DNA cytosine deaminase APOBEC3B (A3B). However, A3B-null breast tumours still have this mutational bias. Here we show that APOBEC3H haplotype I (A3H-I) provides a likely solution to this paradox. A3B-null tumours with this mutational bias have at least one copy of A3H-I despite little genetic linkage between these genes. Although deemed inactive previously, A3H-I has robust activity in biochemical and cellular assays, similar to A3H-II after compensation for lower protein expression levels. Gly105 in A3H-I (versus Arg105 in A3H-II) results in lower protein expression levels and increased nuclear localization, providing a mechanism for accessing genomic DNA. A3H-I also associates with clonal TCA/T-biased mutations in lung adenocarcinoma suggesting this enzyme makes broader contributions to cancer mutagenesis. These studies combine to suggest that A3B and A3H-I, together, explain the bulk of ‘APOBEC signature' mutations in cancer. PMID:27650891

  15. Retroviral Replicating Vectors Deliver Cytosine Deaminase Leading to Targeted 5-Fluorouracil-Mediated Cytotoxicity in Multiple Human Cancer Types.

    PubMed

    Twitty, Chris G; Diago, Oscar R; Hogan, Daniel J; Burrascano, Cindy; Ibanez, Carlos E; Jolly, Douglas J; Ostertag, Derek

    2016-02-01

    Toca 511 is a modified retroviral replicating vector based on Moloney γ-retrovirus with an amphotropic envelope. As an investigational cancer treatment, Toca 511 preferentially infects cancer cells without direct cell lysis and encodes an enhanced yeast cytosine deaminase that converts the antifungal drug 5-fluorocytosine to the anticancer drug, 5-fluorouracil. A panel of established human cancer cell lines, derived from glioblastoma, colon, and breast cancer tissue, was used to evaluate parameters critical for effective anticancer activity. Gene transfer, cytosine deaminase production, conversion of 5-fluorocytosine to 5-fluorouracil, and subsequent cell killing occurred in all lines tested. We observed >50% infection within 25 days in all lines and 5-fluorocytosine LD50 values between 0.02 and 6 μg/ml. Although we did not identify a small number of key criteria, these studies do provide a straightforward approach to rapidly gauge the probability of a Toca 511 and 5-fluorocytosine treatment effect in various cancer indications: a single MTS assay of maximally infected cancer cell lines to determine 5-fluorocytosine LD50. The data suggest that, although there can be variation in susceptibility to Toca 511 and 5-fluorocytosine because of multiple mechanistic factors, this therapy may be applicable to a broad range of cancer types and individuals.

  16. Retroviral Replicating Vectors Deliver Cytosine Deaminase Leading to Targeted 5-Fluorouracil-Mediated Cytotoxicity in Multiple Human Cancer Types

    PubMed Central

    Twitty, Chris G.; Diago, Oscar R.; Hogan, Daniel J.; Burrascano, Cindy; Ibanez, Carlos E.; Jolly, Douglas J.; Ostertag, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Toca 511 is a modified retroviral replicating vector based on Moloney γ-retrovirus with an amphotropic envelope. As an investigational cancer treatment, Toca 511 preferentially infects cancer cells without direct cell lysis and encodes an enhanced yeast cytosine deaminase that converts the antifungal drug 5-fluorocytosine to the anticancer drug, 5-fluorouracil. A panel of established human cancer cell lines, derived from glioblastoma, colon, and breast cancer tissue, was used to evaluate parameters critical for effective anticancer activity. Gene transfer, cytosine deaminase production, conversion of 5-fluorocytosine to 5-fluorouracil, and subsequent cell killing occurred in all lines tested. We observed >50% infection within 25 days in all lines and 5-fluorocytosine LD50 values between 0.02 and 6 μg/ml. Although we did not identify a small number of key criteria, these studies do provide a straightforward approach to rapidly gauge the probability of a Toca 511 and 5-fluorocytosine treatment effect in various cancer indications: a single MTS assay of maximally infected cancer cell lines to determine 5-fluorocytosine LD50. The data suggest that, although there can be variation in susceptibility to Toca 511 and 5-fluorocytosine because of multiple mechanistic factors, this therapy may be applicable to a broad range of cancer types and individuals. PMID:26467507

  17. First-In-Class Small Molecule Inhibitors of the Single-Strand DNA Cytosine Deaminase APOBEC3G

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Shandilya, Shivender M.D.; Carpenter, Michael A.; Rathore, Anurag; Brown, William L.; Perkins, Angela L.; Harki, Daniel A.; Solberg, Jonathan; Hook, Derek J.; Pandey, Krishan K.; Parniak, Michael A.; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Krogan, Nevan J.; Somasundaran, Mohan; Ali, Akbar; Schiffer, Celia A.; Harris, Reuben S.

    2012-01-01

    APOBEC3G is a single-stranded DNA cytosine deaminase that comprises part of the innate immune response to viruses and transposons. Although APOBEC3G is the prototype for understanding the larger mammalian polynucleotide deaminase family, no specific chemical inhibitors exist to modulate its activity. High-throughput screening identified 34 compounds that inhibit APOBEC3G catalytic activity. 20/34 small molecules contained catechol moieties, which are known to be sulfhydryl reactive following oxidation to the orthoquinone. Located proximal to the active site, C321 was identified as the binding site for the inhibitors by a combination of mutational screening, structural analysis, and mass spectrometry. Bulkier substitutions C321-to-L, F, Y, or W mimicked chemical inhibition. A strong specificity for APOBEC3G was evident, as most compounds failed to inhibit the related APOBEC3A enzyme or the unrelated enzymes E. coli uracil DNA glycosylase, HIV-1 RNase H, or HIV-1 integrase. Partial, but not complete, sensitivity could be conferred to APOBEC3A by introducing the entire C321 loop from APOBEC3G. Thus, a structural model is presented in which the mechanism of inhibition is both specific and competitive, by binding a pocket adjacent to the APOBEC3G active site, reacting with C321, and blocking access substrate DNA cytosines. PMID:22181350

  18. The effects of tautomerization and protonation on the adenine-cytosine mismatches: a density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Masoodi, Hamid Reza; Bagheri, Sotoodeh; Abareghi, Mahsa

    2016-06-01

    In the present work, we demonstrate the results of a theoretical study concerned with the question how tautomerization and protonation of adenine affect the various properties of adenine-cytosine mismatches. The calculations, in gas phase and in water, are performed at B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level. In gas phase, it is observed that any tautomeric form of investigated mismatches is more stabilized when adenine is protonated. As for the neutral mismatches, the mismatches containing amino form of cytosine and imino form of protonated adenine are more stable. The role of aromaticity on the stability of tautomeric forms of mismatches is investigated by NICS(1)ZZ index. The stability of mispairs decreases by going from gas phase to water. It can be explained using dipole moment parameter. The influence of hydrogen bonds on the stability of mismatches is examined by atoms in molecules and natural bond orbital analyses. In addition to geometrical parameters and binding energies, the study of the topological properties of electron charge density aids in better understanding of these mispairs.

  19. Electronic properties of a cytosine decavanadate: toward a better understanding of chemical and biological properties of decavanadates.

    PubMed

    Bosnjaković-Pavlović, Nada; Spasojević-de Biré, Anne; Tomaz, Isabel; Bouhmaida, Nouzha; Avecilla, Fernando; Mioc, Ubavka B; Pessoa, João Costa; Ghermani, Nour Eddine

    2009-10-19

    We have synthesized and crystallized a cytosine-decavanadate compound, Na(3) [V(10)O(28)] (C(4)N(3)OH(5))(3)(C(4)N(3)OH(6))(3).10H(2)O, and its crystal structure has been determined from a single-crystal X-ray diffraction. A high resolution X-ray diffraction experiment at 210 K (in P1 space group phase) was carried out. The data were refined using a pseudo-atom multipole model to get the electron density and the electrostatic properties of the decavanadate-cytosine complex. Static deformation density maps and Atoms in Molecules (AIM) topological analysis were used for this purpose. To get insight into the reactivity of the decavanadate anion, we have determined the atomic net charges and the molecular electrostatic potential. Special attention was paid to the hydrogen bonding occurring in the solid state between the decavanadate anion and its environment. The comparison of the experimental electronic characteristics of the decavanadate anions to those found in literature reveals that this anion is a rigid entity conserving its intrinsic properties. This is of particular importance for the future investigations of the biological activities of the decavanadate anion.

  20. Structural basis for targeted DNA cytosine deamination and mutagenesis by APOBEC3A and APOBEC3B.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ke; Carpenter, Michael A; Banerjee, Surajit; Shaban, Nadine M; Kurahashi, Kayo; Salamango, Daniel J; McCann, Jennifer L; Starrett, Gabriel J; Duffy, Justin V; Demir, Özlem; Amaro, Rommie E; Harki, Daniel A; Harris, Reuben S; Aihara, Hideki

    2017-02-01

    APOBEC-catalyzed cytosine-to-uracil deamination of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) has beneficial functions in immunity and detrimental effects in cancer. APOBEC enzymes have intrinsic dinucleotide specificities that impart hallmark mutation signatures. Although numerous structures have been solved, mechanisms for global ssDNA recognition and local target-sequence selection remain unclear. Here we report crystal structures of human APOBEC3A and a chimera of human APOBEC3B and APOBEC3A bound to ssDNA at 3.1-Å and 1.7-Å resolution, respectively. These structures reveal a U-shaped DNA conformation, with the specificity-conferring -1 thymine flipped out and the target cytosine inserted deep into the zinc-coordinating active site pocket. The -1 thymine base fits into a groove between flexible loops and makes direct hydrogen bonds with the protein, accounting for the strong 5'-TC preference. These findings explain both conserved and unique properties among APOBEC family members, and they provide a basis for the rational design of inhibitors to impede the evolvability of viruses and tumors.

  1. The DNA cytosine deaminase APOBEC3H haplotype I likely contributes to breast and lung cancer mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Starrett, Gabriel J; Luengas, Elizabeth M; McCann, Jennifer L; Ebrahimi, Diako; Temiz, Nuri A; Love, Robin P; Feng, Yuqing; Adolph, Madison B; Chelico, Linda; Law, Emily K; Carpenter, Michael A; Harris, Reuben S

    2016-09-21

    Cytosine mutations within TCA/T motifs are common in cancer. A likely cause is the DNA cytosine deaminase APOBEC3B (A3B). However, A3B-null breast tumours still have this mutational bias. Here we show that APOBEC3H haplotype I (A3H-I) provides a likely solution to this paradox. A3B-null tumours with this mutational bias have at least one copy of A3H-I despite little genetic linkage between these genes. Although deemed inactive previously, A3H-I has robust activity in biochemical and cellular assays, similar to A3H-II after compensation for lower protein expression levels. Gly105 in A3H-I (versus Arg105 in A3H-II) results in lower protein expression levels and increased nuclear localization, providing a mechanism for accessing genomic DNA. A3H-I also associates with clonal TCA/T-biased mutations in lung adenocarcinoma suggesting this enzyme makes broader contributions to cancer mutagenesis. These studies combine to suggest that A3B and A3H-I, together, explain the bulk of 'APOBEC signature' mutations in cancer.

  2. DNA cytosine and methylcytosine deamination by APOBEC3B: enhancing methylcytosine deamination by engineering APOBEC3B.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yang; Ito, Fumiaki; Zhang, Gewen; Fernandez, Braulio; Yang, Hanjing; Chen, Xiaojiang S

    2015-10-01

    APOBEC (apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like) is a family of enzymes that deaminates cytosine (C) to uracil (U) on nucleic acid. APOBEC3B (A3B) functions in innate immunity against intrinsic and invading retroelements and viruses. A3B can also induce genomic DNA mutations to cause cancer. A3B contains two cytosine deaminase domains (CD1, CD2), and there are conflicting reports about whether both domains are active. Here we demonstrate that only CD2 of A3B (A3BCD2) has C deamination activity. We also reveal that both A3B and A3BCD2 can deaminate methylcytosine (mC). Guided by structural and functional analysis, we successfully engineered A3BCD2 to gain over two orders of magnitude higher activity for mC deamination. Important determinants that contribute to the activity and selectivity for mC deamination have been identified, which reveals that multiple elements, rather than single ones, contribute to the mC deamination activity and selectivity in A3BCD2 and possibly other APOBECs.

  3. First-in-class small molecule inhibitors of the single-strand DNA cytosine deaminase APOBEC3G.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Shandilya, Shivender M D; Carpenter, Michael A; Rathore, Anurag; Brown, William L; Perkins, Angela L; Harki, Daniel A; Solberg, Jonathan; Hook, Derek J; Pandey, Krishan K; Parniak, Michael A; Johnson, Jeffrey R; Krogan, Nevan J; Somasundaran, Mohan; Ali, Akbar; Schiffer, Celia A; Harris, Reuben S

    2012-03-16

    APOBEC3G is a single-stranded DNA cytosine deaminase that comprises part of the innate immune response to viruses and transposons. Although APOBEC3G is the prototype for understanding the larger mammalian polynucleotide deaminase family, no specific chemical inhibitors exist to modulate its activity. High-throughput screening identified 34 compounds that inhibit APOBEC3G catalytic activity. Twenty of 34 small molecules contained catechol moieties, which are known to be sulfhydryl reactive following oxidation to the orthoquinone. Located proximal to the active site, C321 was identified as the binding site for the inhibitors by a combination of mutational screening, structural analysis, and mass spectrometry. Bulkier substitutions C321-to-L, F, Y, or W mimicked chemical inhibition. A strong specificity for APOBEC3G was evident, as most compounds failed to inhibit the related APOBEC3A enzyme or the unrelated enzymes E. coli uracil DNA glycosylase, HIV-1 RNase H, or HIV-1 integrase. Partial, but not complete, sensitivity could be conferred to APOBEC3A by introducing the entire C321 loop from APOBEC3G. Thus, a structural model is presented in which the mechanism of inhibition is both specific and competitive, by binding a pocket adjacent to the APOBEC3G active site, reacting with C321, and blocking access to substrate DNA cytosines.

  4. Mutagenic effects induced by the attack of NO2 radical to the guanine-cytosine base pair

    PubMed Central

    Cerón-Carrasco, José P.; Requena, Alberto; Zúñiga, José; Jacquemin, Denis

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the attack of the nitrogen dioxide radical (NO•2) to the guanine—cytosine (GC) base pair and the subsequent tautomeric reactions able to induce mutations, by means of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The conducted simulations allow us to identify the most reactive sites of the GC base pair. Indeed, the computed relative energies demonstrate that the addition of the NO•2 radical to the C8 position of the guanine base forms to the most stable adduct. Although the initial adducts might evolve to non-canonical structures via inter-base hydrogen bonds rearrangements, the probability for the proton exchange to occur lies in the same range as that observed for undamaged DNA. As a result, tautomeric errors in NO2-attacked DNA arises at the same rate as in canonical DNA, with no macroscopic impact on the overall stability of DNA. The potential mutagenic effects of the GC–NO•2 radical adducts likely involve side reactions, e.g., the GC deprotonation to the solvent, rather than proton exchange between guanine and cytosine basis. PMID:25798437

  5. Planarizing cytosine: The S1 state structure, vibrations, and nonradiative dynamics of jet-cooled 5,6-trimethylenecytosine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trachsel, Maria A.; Lobsiger, Simon; Schär, Tobias; Blancafort, Lluís; Leutwyler, Samuel

    2017-06-01

    We measure the S0 → S1 spectrum and time-resolved S1 state nonradiative dynamics of the "clamped" cytosine derivative 5,6-trimethylenecytosine (TMCyt) in a supersonic jet, using two-color resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI), UV/UV holeburning, and ns time-resolved pump/delayed ionization. The experiments are complemented with spin-component scaled second-order approximate coupled cluster (SCS-CC2), time-dependent density functional theory, and multi-state second-order perturbation-theory (MS-CASPT2) ab initio calculations. While the R2PI spectrum of cytosine breaks off ˜500 cm-1 above its 000 band, that of TMCyt extends up to +4400 cm-1 higher, with over a hundred resolved vibronic bands. Thus, clamping the cytosine C5-C6 bond allows us to explore the S1 state vibrations and S0 → S1 geometry changes in detail. The TMCyt S1 state out-of-plane vibrations ν1', ν3', and ν5' lie below 420 cm-1, and the in-plane ν11', ν12', and ν23' vibrational fundamentals appear at 450, 470, and 944 cm-1. S0 → S1 vibronic simulations based on SCS-CC2 calculations agree well with experiment if the calculated ν1', ν3', and ν5' frequencies are reduced by a factor of 2-3. MS-CASPT2 calculations predict that the ethylene-type S1 ⇝ S0 conical intersection (CI) increases from +366 cm-1 in cytosine to >6000 cm-1 in TMCyt, explaining the long lifetime and extended S0 → S1 spectrum. The lowest-energy S1 ⇝ S0 CI of TMCyt is the "amino out-of-plane" (OPX) intersection, calculated at +4190 cm-1. The experimental S1 ⇝ S0 internal conversion rate constant at the S1(v'=0 ) level is kI C=0.98 -2.2 ṡ1 08 s-1, which is ˜10 times smaller than in 1-methylcytosine and cytosine. The S1(v'=0 ) level relaxes into the T1(3π π *) state by intersystem crossing with kI S C=0.41 -1.6 ṡ1 08 s-1. The T1 state energy is measured to lie 24 580 ±560 cm-1 above the S0 state. The S1(v'=0 ) lifetime is τ =2.9 ns, resulting in an estimated fluorescence quantum yield of Φf l=24 %. Intense

  6. Planarizing cytosine: The S1 state structure, vibrations, and nonradiative dynamics of jet-cooled 5,6-trimethylenecytosine.

    PubMed

    Trachsel, Maria A; Lobsiger, Simon; Schär, Tobias; Blancafort, Lluís; Leutwyler, Samuel

    2017-06-28

    We measure the S0 → S1 spectrum and time-resolved S1 state nonradiative dynamics of the "clamped" cytosine derivative 5,6-trimethylenecytosine (TMCyt) in a supersonic jet, using two-color resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI), UV/UV holeburning, and ns time-resolved pump/delayed ionization. The experiments are complemented with spin-component scaled second-order approximate coupled cluster (SCS-CC2), time-dependent density functional theory, and multi-state second-order perturbation-theory (MS-CASPT2) ab initio calculations. While the R2PI spectrum of cytosine breaks off ∼500 cm(-1) above its 00(0) band, that of TMCyt extends up to +4400 cm(-1) higher, with over a hundred resolved vibronic bands. Thus, clamping the cytosine C(5)-C(6) bond allows us to explore the S1 state vibrations and S0 → S1 geometry changes in detail. The TMCyt S1 state out-of-plane vibrations ν1('), ν3('), and ν5(') lie below 420 cm(-1), and the in-plane ν11('), ν12('), and ν23(') vibrational fundamentals appear at 450, 470, and 944 cm(-1). S0  →  S1 vibronic simulations based on SCS-CC2 calculations agree well with experiment if the calculated ν1('), ν3('), and ν5(') frequencies are reduced by a factor of 2-3. MS-CASPT2 calculations predict that the ethylene-type S1 ⇝ S0 conical intersection (CI) increases from +366 cm(-1) in cytosine to >6000 cm(-1) in TMCyt, explaining the long lifetime and extended S0 → S1 spectrum. The lowest-energy S1 ⇝ S0 CI of TMCyt is the "amino out-of-plane" (OPX) intersection, calculated at +4190 cm(-1). The experimental S1 ⇝ S0 internal conversion rate constant at the S1(v(')=0) level is kIC=0.98-2.2⋅10(8) s(-1), which is ∼10 times smaller than in 1-methylcytosine and cytosine. The S1(v(')=0) level relaxes into the T1((3)ππ*) state by intersystem crossing with kISC=0.41-1.6⋅10(8) s(-1). The T1 state energy is measured to lie 24 580±560 cm(-1) above the S0 state. The S1(v(')=0) lifetime is τ=2.9 ns

  7. Arabidopsis RNA Polymerases IV and V Are Required To Establish H3K9 Methylation, but Not Cytosine Methylation, on Geminivirus Chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Jackel, Jamie N.; Storer, Jessica M.; Coursey, Tami

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In plants, RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) employs small RNAs to target enzymes that methylate cytosine residues. Cytosine methylation and dimethylation of histone 3 lysine 9 (H3K9me2) are often linked. Together they condition an epigenetic defense that results in chromatin compaction and transcriptional silencing of transposons and viral chromatin. Canonical RdDM (Pol IV-RdDM), involving RNA polymerases IV and V (Pol IV and Pol V), was believed to be necessary to establish cytosine methylation, which in turn could recruit H3K9 methyltransferases. However, recent studies have revealed that a pathway involving Pol II and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 6 (RDR6) (RDR6-RdDM) is likely responsible for establishing cytosine methylation at naive loci, while Pol IV-RdDM acts to reinforce and maintain it. We used the geminivirus Beet curly top virus (BCTV) as a model to examine the roles of Pol IV and Pol V in establishing repressive viral chromatin methylation. As geminivirus chromatin is formed de novo in infected cells, these viruses are unique models for processes involved in the establishment of epigenetic marks. We confirm that Pol IV and Pol V are not needed to establish viral DNA methylation but are essential for its amplification. Remarkably, however, both Pol IV and Pol V are required for deposition of H3K9me2 on viral chromatin. Our findings suggest that cytosine methylation alone is not sufficient to trigger de novo deposition of H3K9me2 and further that Pol IV-RdDM is responsible for recruiting H3K9 methyltransferases to viral chromatin. IMPORTANCE In plants, RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) uses small RNAs to target cytosine methylation, which is often linked to H3K9me2. These epigenetic marks silence transposable elements and DNA virus genomes, but how they are established is not well understood. Canonical RdDM, involving Pol IV and Pol V, was thought to establish cytosine methylation that in turn could recruit H3K9 methyltransferases, but

  8. Homodimers of cytosine and 1-methylcytosine. A DFT study of geometry, relative stability and H-NMR shifts in gas-phase and selected solvents.

    PubMed

    Paytakov, Guvanchmyrat; Gorb, Leonid; Stepanyugin, Andriy; Samiylenko, Svitlana; Hovorun, Dmytro; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2014-03-01

    Dimers of cytosine and its N¹-methylated counterpart were investigated in gas-phase and in various solvents including chloroform, dimethylsulfoxide, and water. The studies were performed at DFT/M06-2X/6-31+G(d,p) level of theory. Relative stabilities of tautomers of cytosine solvated explicitly by a small number of solvent molecules were evaluated. Further solvation effect calculations for homodimers were carried out with conductor-like polarizable continuum model (CPCM). H-NMR shifts and IR frequencies for optimized structures were calculated and compared with available experimental data.

  9. Advances in targeting cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases

    PubMed Central

    Maurice, Donald H.; Ke, Hengming; Ahmad, Faiyaz; Wang, Yousheng; Chung, Jay; Manganiello, Vincent C.

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) catalyse the hydrolysis of cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP, thereby regulating the intracellular concentrations of these cyclic nucleotides, their signalling pathways and, consequently, myriad biological responses in health and disease. Currently, a small number of PDE inhibitors are used clinically for treating the pathophysiological dysregulation of cyclic nucleotide signalling in several disorders, including erectile dysfunction, pulmonary hypertension, acute refractory cardiac failure, intermittent claudication and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, pharmaceutical interest in PDEs has been reignited by the increasing understanding of the roles of individual PDEs in regulating the subcellular compartmentalization of specific cyclic nucleotide signalling pathways, by the structure-based design of novel specific inhibitors and by the development of more sophisticated strategies to target individual PDE variants. PMID:24687066

  10. Complete nucleotide sequence of a Spanish isolate of Parietaria mottle virus infecting tomato.

    PubMed

    Galipienso, Luis; Rubio, Luis; López, Luis; Soler, Salvador; Aramburu, José

    2009-10-01

    The genome of a Spanish isolate of Parietaria mottle virus (PMoV) obtained from tomato (strain PMoV-T) was completely sequenced. Protein motifs conserved for RNA viruses were identified: the p1 protein contained a metyltransferase domain in its N-terminal half and a triphosphatase/ helicase domain in its C-terminal half, the p2 protein contained a RNA polymerase domain; the 3a protein contained a RNA-binding domain with α-helix and β-sheet secondary structures. In addition, stem-loop structures with potential capacity of protein interactions were predicted on the untranslated terminal regions. Comparison with the other sequenced PMoV isolate showed nucleotide identities of 93, 90, and 93% for genomic RNAs 1, 2 and 3, respectively, and amino acid identities ranging from 88 to 97% for the different proteins. A cytosine deletion was detected at position 1,366 of RNA 3, involving a start codon for the coat protein (CP) gene different from the other PMoV isolate, resulting in a CP 16 amino acids shorter. Comparison of synonymous and nonsynonymous mutations revealed different selective constraints along the genome.

  11. Specific CEA-producing colorectal carcinoma cell killing with recombinant adenoviral vector containing cytosine deaminase gene

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Li-Zong; Wu, Wen-Xi; Xu, De-Hua; Zheng, Zhong-Cheng; Liu, Xin-Yuan; Ding, Qiang; Hua, Yi-Bing; Yao, Kun

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To kill CEA positive colorectal carcinoma cells specifically using the E coli cytosine deaminase (CD) suicide gene, a new replication-deficient recombinant adenoviral vector was constructed in which CD gene was controlled under CEA promoter and its in vitro cytotoxic effects were evaluated. METHODS: Shuttle plasmid containing CD gene and regulatory sequence of the CEA gene was constructed and recombined with the right arm of adenovirus genome DNA in 293 cell strain. Dot blotting and PCR were used to identify positive plaques. The purification of adenovirus was performed with ultra-concentration in CsCl step gradients and the titration was measured with plaque formation assay. Cytotoxic effects were assayed with MTT method, The fifty percent inhibition concentration (IC50) of 5-FC was calculated using a curve-fitting parameter. The human colorectal carcinoma cell line, which was CEA-producing, and the CEA-nonproducing Hela cell line were applied in cytological tests. An established recombinant adenovirus vector AdCMVCD, in which the CD gene was controlled under CMV promoter, was used as virus control. Quantitative results were expressed as the mean ± SD of the mean. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA test. RESULTS: The desired recombinant adenovirus vector was named AdCEACD. The results of dot blotting and PCR showed that the recombinant adenovirus contained CEA promoter and CD gene. Virus titer was about 5.0 × 1014 pfu/L-1 after purification. The CEA-producing Lovo cells were sensitive to 5-FC and had the same cytotoxic effect after infection with AdCEACD and AdCMVCD (The IC50 values of 5-FC in parent Lovo cells, Lovo cells infected with 100 M.O.I AdCEACD and Lovo cells infected with 10 M.O.I AdCMVCD were > 15000, 216.5 ± 38.1 and 128.8 ± 25.4 μmol•L⁻¹, P < 0.001, respectively), and the cytotoxicity of 5-FC increased accordingly when the M.O.I of adenoviruses were enhanced (The value of IC50 of 5-FC was reduced to 27.9 ± 4.2 μmol•L-1

  12. Elimination and utilization of oxidized guanine nucleotides in the synthesis of RNA and its precursors.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Takeshi; Ito, Riyoko; Hayakawa, Hiroshi; Sekiguchi, Mutsuo

    2013-03-22

    Reactive oxygen species are produced as side products of oxygen utilization and can lead to the oxidation of nucleic acids and their precursor nucleotides. Among the various oxidized bases, 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine seems to be the most critical during the transfer of genetic information because it can pair with both cytosine and adenine. During the de novo synthesis of guanine nucleotides, GMP is formed first, and it is converted to GDP by guanylate kinase. This enzyme hardly acts on an oxidized form of GMP (8-oxo-GMP) formed by the oxidation of GMP or by the cleavage of 8-oxo-GDP and 8-oxo-GTP by MutT protein. Although the formation of 8-oxo-GDP from 8-oxo-GMP is thus prevented, 8-oxo-GDP itself may be produced by the oxidation of GDP by reactive oxygen species. The 8-oxo-GDP thus formed can be converted to 8-oxo-GTP because nucleoside-diphosphate kinase and adenylate kinase, both of which catalyze the conversion of GDP to GTP, do not discriminate 8-oxo-GDP from normal GDP. The 8-oxo-GTP produced in this way and by the oxidation of GTP can be used for RNA synthesis. This misincorporation is prevented by MutT protein, which has the potential to cleave 8-oxo-GTP as well as 8-oxo-GDP to 8-oxo-GMP. When (14)C-labeled 8-oxo-GTP was applied to CaCl2-permeabilized cells of a mutT(-) mutant strain, it could be incorporated into RNA at 4% of the rate for GTP. Escherichia coli cells appear to possess mechanisms to prevent misincorporation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine into RNA.

  13. A type of nucleotide motif that distinguishes tobamovirus species more efficiently than nucleotide signatures.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, A J; Armstrong, J S; Gibbs, M J

    2004-10-01

    The complete genomic sequences of forty-eight tobamoviruses were classified and found to form at least twelve species clusters. Individual species were not conveniently defined by 'nucleotide signatures' (i.e. strings of one or more nucleotides unique to a taxon) as these were scattered sparsely throughout the genomes and were mostly single nucleotides. By contrast all the species were concisely and uniquely distinguished by short nucleotide motifs consisting of conserved genus-specific sites intercalated with variable sites that provided species-specific combinations of nucleotides (nucleotide combination motifs; NC-motifs). We describe the procedure for finding NC-motifs in a convenient and phylogenetically conserved region of the tobamovirus RNA polymerase gene, the '4404-50 motif'. NC-motifs have been found in other sets of homologous sequences, and are convenient for use in published taxonomic descriptions.

  14. Palindromic-nucleotide substitutions (PNS) of hepatitis C virus genotypes 1 and 5a from South Africa.

    PubMed

    Prabdial-Sing, N; Giangaspero, M; Puren, A J; Mahlangu, J; Barrow, P; Bowyer, S M

    2011-08-01

    The HCV stem-loop subdomains III-a, -b and -c have been shown to reflect the characteristics of the virus and identify isolates by genus, genotype and subtype. The aim of this study was to investigate the genotype-specific PNS within the 5'UTR of prevalent HCV genotypes (1 and 5a) found in South Africa. The genotype 5a (N = 35) and genotype 1 sequences (N=20) were from patients presenting with liver disease or haemophilia, respectively. PNS HCV typing characteristics, defined previously, were observed. The PNS method differentiated subtypes 1a and 1c from subtype 1b by the base change at nucleotide position 243. A lack of structural data from the variable loci V1 of the 5'UTR did not allow us to further differentiate the subtypes of 1. A nucleotide change from a thymine (T) to a cytosine (C) at position 183 was found among genotype 5a sequences. This mutation changed the stable U-AA bond to a Y AA bulge at base-pair position 32. There was an insertion of a single adenine (A) at position 207. At present PNS analysis is labour intensive but, with development of further software to aid the computer analysis, it has the potential to provide a rapid, reliable alternative to phylogenetic analysis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Post-transcriptional modification of the wobble nucleotide in anticodon-substituted yeast tRNAArgII after microinjection into Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, M; Haumont, E; de Henau, S; Gangloff, J; Grosjean, H

    1983-01-01

    An enzymatic procedure for the replacement of the ICG anticodon of yeast tRNAArgII by NCG trinucleotide (N = A, C, G or U) is described. Partial digestion with S1-nuclease and T1-RNAase provides fragments which, when annealed together, form an "anticodon-deprived" yeast tRNAArgII. A novel anticodon, phosphorylated with (32P) label on its 5' terminal residue, is then inserted using T4-RNA ligase. Such "anticodon-substituted" yeast tRNAArgII are microinjected into the cytoplasm of Xenopus laevis oocytes and shown to be able to interact with the anticodon maturation enzymes under in vivo conditions. Our results indicate that when adenosine occurs in the wobble position (A34) in yeast tRNAArgII it is efficiently modified into inosine (I34) while uridine (U34) is transformed into two uridine derivatives, one of which is probably mcm5U. In contrast, when a cytosine (C34) or guanosine (G34) occurs, they are not modified. These results are at variance with those obtained previously under similar conditions with anticodon derivatives of yeast tRNAAsp harbouring A, C, G or U as the first anticodon nucleotide. In this case, guanosine and uridine were modified while adenosine and cytosine were not. Images PMID:6300762

  16. Post-transcriptional modification of the wobble nucleotide in anticodon-substituted yeast tRNAArgII after microinjection into Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    PubMed

    Fournier, M; Haumont, E; de Henau, S; Gangloff, J; Grosjean, H

    1983-02-11

    An enzymatic procedure for the replacement of the ICG anticodon of yeast tRNAArgII by NCG trinucleotide (N = A, C, G or U) is described. Partial digestion with S1-nuclease and T1-RNAase provides fragments which, when annealed together, form an "anticodon-deprived" yeast tRNAArgII. A novel anticodon, phosphorylated with (32P) label on its 5' terminal residue, is then inserted using T4-RNA ligase. Such "anticodon-substituted" yeast tRNAArgII are microinjected into the cytoplasm of Xenopus laevis oocytes and shown to be able to interact with the anticodon maturation enzymes under in vivo conditions. Our results indicate that when adenosine occurs in the wobble position (A34) in yeast tRNAArgII it is efficiently modified into inosine (I34) while uridine (U34) is transformed into two uridine derivatives, one of which is probably mcm5U. In contrast, when a cytosine (C34) or guanosine (G34) occurs, they are not modified. These results are at variance with those obtained previously under similar conditions with anticodon derivatives of yeast tRNAAsp harbouring A, C, G or U as the first anticodon nucleotide. In this case, guanosine and uridine were modified while adenosine and cytosine were not.

  17. SVOP Is a Nucleotide Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jia; Bajjalieh, Sandra M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Synaptic Vesicle Protein 2 (SV2) and SV2-related protein (SVOP) are transporter-like proteins that localize to neurotransmitter-containing vesicles. Both proteins share structural similarity with the major facilitator (MF) family of small molecule transporters. We recently reported that SV2 binds nucleotides, a feature that has also been reported for another MF family member, the human glucose transporter 1 (Glut1). In the case of Glut1, nucleotide binding affects transport activity. In this study, we determined if SVOP also binds nucleotides and assessed its nucleotide binding properties. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed in vitro photoaffinity labeling experiments with the photoreactive ATP analogue, 8-azido-ATP[γ] biotin and purified recombinant SVOP-FLAG fusion protein. We found that SVOP is a nucleotide-binding protein, although both its substrate specificity and binding site differ from that of SV2. Within the nucleotides tested, ATP, GTP and NAD show same level of inhibition on SVOP-FLAG labeling. Dose dependent studies indicated that SVOP demonstrates the highest affinity for NAD, in contrast to SV2, which binds both NAD and ATP with equal affinity. Mapping of the binding site revealed a single region spanning transmembrane domains 9–12, which contrasts to the two binding sites in the large cytoplasmic domains in SV2A. Conclusions/Significance SVOP is the third MF family member to be found to bind nucleotides. Given that the binding sites are unique in SVOP, SV2 and Glut1, this feature appears to have arisen separately. PMID:19390693

  18. Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs): coincidence detectors acting to spatially and temporally integrate cyclic nucleotide and non-cyclic nucleotide signals.

    PubMed

    Maurice, Donald H; Wilson, Lindsay S; Rampersad, Sarah N; Hubert, Fabien; Truong, Tammy; Kaczmarek, Milosz; Brzezinska, Paulina; Freitag, Silja I; Umana, M Bibiana; Wudwud, Alie

    2014-04-01

    The cyclic nucleotide second messengers cAMP and cGMP each affect virtually all cellular processes. Although these hydrophilic small molecules readily diffuse throughout cells, it is remarkable that their ability to activate their multiple intracellular effectors is spatially and temporally selective. Studies have identified a critical role for compartmentation of the enzymes which hydrolyse and metabolically inactivate these second messengers, the PDEs (cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases), in this specificity. In the present article, we describe several examples from our work in which compartmentation of selected cAMP- or cGMP-hydrolysing PDEs co-ordinate selective activation of cyclic nucleotide effectors, and, as a result, selectively affect cellular functions. It is our belief that therapeutic strategies aimed at targeting PDEs within these compartments will allow greater selectivity than those directed at inhibiting these enzymes throughout the cells.

  19. On-Chip Sequence-Specific Immunochemical Epigenomic Analysis Utilizing Outward-Turned Cytosine in a DNA Bulge with Handheld Surface Plasmon Resonance Equipment.

    PubMed

    Kurita, Ryoji; Yanagisawa, Hiroyuki; Yoshioka, Kyoko; Niwa, Osamu

    2015-11-17

    This paper reports a sequence-specific immunoassay chip for DNA methylation assessment by microfluidic-based surface plasmon resonance (SPR) detection. This was achieved by utilizing an affinity measurement involving the target, (methyl)cytosine, in a single-base bulge region and an anti-methylcytosine antibody in a microchannel, following hybridization with a biotinylated bulge-inducing DNA probe. The probe alters the target cytosine in a looped-out state because of the π-π stacking between flanking bases of the target. The probe design is simple and consists of the elimination of guanine paired with the target cytosine from a fragmented full-match sequence. We obtained the single methylation status in 6 amol (48 fg) of synthesized oligo DNA in 45 min, which is the fastest DNA methylation assessment yet reported, without employing a conventional bisulfite reaction, PCR, or sequencing. We also succeeded in discrimination of the methylation status of single cytosine in genomic λ DNA and HCT116 human colon cancer cells. The advantages of the proposed method are its small equipment, simple microfluidics design, ease of handling (two injections of DNA and antibody), lack of need for a methylation-sensitive enzyme, and neutral buffer conditions.

  20. The retroviral hypermutation specificity of APOBEC3F and APOBEC3G is governed by the C-terminal DNA cytosine deaminase domain.

    PubMed

    Haché, Guylaine; Liddament, Mark T; Harris, Reuben S

    2005-03-25

    The human proteins APOBEC3F and APOBEC3G restrict retroviral infection by deaminating cytosine residues in the first cDNA strand of a replicating virus. These proteins have two putative deaminase domains, and it is unclear whether one or both catalyze deamination, unlike their homologs, AID and APOBEC1, which are well characterized single domain deaminases. Here, we show that only the C-terminal cytosine deaminase domain of APOBEC3F and -3G governs retroviral hypermutation. A chimeric protein with the N-terminal cytosine deaminase domain from APOBEC3G and the C-terminal cytosine deaminase domain from APOBEC3F elicited a dinucleotide hypermutation preference nearly indistinguishable from that of APOBEC3F. This 5'-TC-->TT mutational specificity was confirmed in a heterologous Escherichia coli-based mutation assay, in which the 5'-CC-->CT dinucleotide hypermutation preference of APOBEC3G also mapped to the C-terminal deaminase domain. An N-terminal APOBEC3G deletion mutant displayed a preference indistinguishable from that of the full-length protein, and replacing the C-terminal deaminase domain of APOBEC3F with AID resulted in an AID-like mutational signature. Together, these data indicate that only the C-terminal domain of APOBEC3F and -3G dictates the retroviral minus strand 5'-TC and 5'-CC dinucleotide hypermutation preferences, respectively, leaving the N-terminal domain to perform other aspects of retroviral restriction.

  1. Proofreading of misincorporated nucleotides in DNA transcription

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voliotis, Margaritis; Cohen, Netta; Molina-París, Carmen; Liverpool, Tanniemola B.

    2012-06-01

    The accuracy of DNA transcription is crucial for the proper functioning of the cell. Although RNA polymerases demonstrate selectivity for correct nucleotides, additional active mechanisms of transcriptional error correction are required to achieve observed levels of fidelity. Recent experimental findings have shed light on a particular mechanism of transcriptional error correction involving: (i) diffusive translocation of the RNA polymerase along the DNA (backtracking) and (ii) irreversible RNA cleavage. This mechanism achieves preferential cleavage of misincorporated nucleotides by biasing the local rates of translocation. Here, we study how misincorporated nucleotides affect backtracking dynamics and how this effect determines the level of transcriptional fidelity. We consider backtracking as a diffusive process in a periodic, one-dimensional energy landscape, which at a coarse-grained level gives rise to a hopping process between neighboring local minima. We propose a model for how misincorporated nucleotides deform this energy landscape and hence affect the hopping rates. In particular, we show that this model can be used to derive both the theoretical limit on the fidelity (i.e. the minimum fraction of misincorporated nucleotides) and the actual fidelity relative to this optimum, achieved for specific combinations of the cleavage and polymerization rates. Finally, we study how external factors influencing backtracking dynamics affect transcriptional fidelity. We show that biologically relevant loads, similar to those exerted by nucleosomes or other transcriptional barriers, increase error correction.

  2. Proofreading of misincorporated nucleotides in DNA transcription

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voliotis, Margaritis; Cohen, Netta; Molina-París, Carmen; Liverpool, Tanniemola B.

    2012-06-01

    The accuracy of DNA transcription is crucial for the proper functioning of the cell. Although RNA polymerases demonstrate selectivity for correct nucleotides, additional active mechanisms of transcriptional error correction are required to achieve observed levels of fidelity. Recent experimental findings have shed light on a particular mechanism of transcriptional error correction involving: (i) diffusive translocation of the RNA polymerase along the DNA (backtracking) and (ii) irreversible RNA cleavage. This mechanism achieves preferential cleavage of misincorporated nucleotides by biasing the local rates of translocation. Here, we study how misincorporated nucleotides affect backtracking dynamics and how this effect determines the level of transcriptional fidelity. We consider backtracking as a diffusive process in a periodic, one-dimensional energy landscape, which at a coarse-grained level gives rise to a hopping process between neighbouring local minima. We propose a model for how misincorporated nucleotides deform this energy landscape and hence affect the hopping rates. In particular, we show that this model can be used to derive both the theoretical limit on the fidelity (i.e. the minimum fraction of misincorporated nucleotides) and the actual fidelity relative to this optimum, achieved for specific combinations of the cleavage and polymerization rates. Finally, we study how external factors influencing backtracking dynamics affect transcriptional fidelity. We show that biologically relevant loads, similar to those exerted by nucleosomes or other transcriptional barriers, increase error correction.

  3. Spectroscopic (UV/VIS, Raman) and Electrophoresis Study of Cytosine-Guanine Oligonucleotide DNA Influenced by Magnetic Field.

    PubMed

    Banihashemian, Seyedeh Maryam; Periasamy, Vengadesh; Boon Tong, Goh; Abdul Rahman, Saadah

    2016-01-01

    Studying the effect of a magnetic field on oligonucleotide DNA can provide a novel DNA manipulation technique for potential application in bioengineering and medicine. In this work, the optical and electrochemical response of a 100 bases oligonucleotides DNA, cytosine-guanine (CG100), is investigated via exposure to different magnetic fields (250, 500, 750, and 1000 mT). As a result of the optical response of CG100 to the magnetic field, the ultra-violet-visible spectrum indicated a slight variation in the band gap of CG100 of about 0.3 eV. Raman spectroscopy showed a significant deviation in hydrogen and phosphate bonds' vibration after exposure to the magnetic field. Oligonucleotide DNA mobility was investigated in the external electric field using the gel electrophoresis technique, which revealed a small decrease in the migration of CG100 after exposure to the magnetic field.

  4. Structural determination of the ultraviolet light-induced thymine-cytosine pyrimidine-pyrimidone (6-4) photoproduct.

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, W A; Doetsch, P W; Haseltine, W A

    1985-01-01

    Ultraviolet light induces damage to DNA, with the majority of the damage expressed as the formation of cyclobutane dimers and pyrimidine-pyrimidone (6-4) photoproducts. The (6-4) photoproducts have been implicated as important UV light-induced premutagenic DNA lesions. The most abundant of the (6-4) products is the thymine-cytosine pyrimidine-pyrimidone (6-4) photoproduct, or TC (6-4) product. The structure of the TC (6-4) product was deduced by proton NMR, IR, and fast atom bombardment mass spectroscopy, and the product was found to differ from the previously described photoadduct, Thy(6-4)Pyo, by the presence of an amino group at the 5 position of the 5' pyrimidine. The implications of this structure on DNA base pairing and the induction of ultraviolet light-induced mutations are discussed. PMID:4022781

  5. Excited State Dynamics of Cold Protonated Cytosine Tautomers: Characterization of Charge Transfer, Intersystem Crossing, and Internal Conversion Processes.

    PubMed

    Broquier, Michel; Soorkia, Satchin; Pino, Gustavo; Dedonder-Lardeux, Claude; Jouvet, Christophe; Grégoire, Gilles

    2017-08-31

    Charge transfer reactions are ubiquitous in chemical reactivity and often viewed as ultrafast processes. For DNA, femtochemistry has undeniably revealed the primary stage of the deactivation dynamics of the locally excited state following electronic excitation. We here demonstrate that the full time scale excited state dynamics can be followed up to milliseconds through an original pump-probe photodissociation scheme applied to cryogenic ion spectroscopy. Protonated cytosine is chosen as a benchmark system in which the locally excited (1)ππ* state decays in the femtosecond range toward long-lived charge transfer and triplet states with lifetimes ranging from microseconds to milliseconds, respectively. A three-step mechanism ((1)ππ* → (1)CT → (3)ππ*) is proposed where internal conversion from each state can occur leading ultimately to fragmentation in the ground electronic state.

  6. Bystander cytotoxicity in human medullary thyroid carcinoma cells mediated by fusion yeast cytosine deaminase and 5-fluorocytosine.

    PubMed

    Kucerova, Lucia; Matuskova, Miroslava; Hlubinova, Kristina; Bohovic, Roman; Feketeova, Lucia; Janega, Pavol; Babal, Pavel; Poturnajova, Martina

    2011-12-01

    In our work, we have evaluated efficiency of gene-directed enzyme/prodrug therapy (GDEPT) based on combination of fusion yeast cytosine deaminase (yCD) and 5-fluorocytosine (5FC) on model human medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) cell line TT. We determined the efficiency of this GDEPT approach in suicide and bystander cytotoxicity induction. We have shown significant bystander effect in vitro and 5FC administration resulted in potent antitumor effect in vivo. Furthermore, we have unraveled high efficiency of cell-mediated GDEPT, when human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) were used as delivery vehicles in direct cocultures in vitro. Nevertheless, effector MSC exhibited inhibitory effect on TT cell proliferation and abrogated TT xenotransplant growth in vivo. We suggest that yCD/5FC combination represents another experimental treatment modality to be tested in MTC and our data further support the exploration of MSC antitumor potential for future use in metastatic MTC therapy.

  7. [Cytotoxicity of cytosine deaminase and herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase genes in melanoma cells is independent on promoter strength].

    PubMed

    Alekseenko, I V; Kuz'min, D V; Pleshkan, V V; Zinov'eva, M V; Sverdlov, E D

    2013-01-01

    In preparation of the therapeutic genetic constructs aimed to the gene-programmed enzymatic transformation of the non-toxic prodrug into toxin within cancer cells the right choice of regulatory elements (promoters and enhancers) is essential. This is widely accepted that the efficiency of the gene therapy constructions is dependent, in particular, on the strength of promoters driving the expression of the therapeutic genes. In this work we demonstrated, using the melanoma-specific promoters and enhancers of human melanoma inhibitory activity and mouse tyrosinase gene, that for the development of cytotoxic effect the promoter strength is not of primary importance. In the case of HSVtk, coding for the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase, and FCU1, coding for cytosine deaminase/uracil phosphoribosyltransferase hybrid protein genes, their cytotoxic activity was determined by the quantity of the added prodrug.

  8. Strong enhancement of recombinant cytosine deaminase activity in Bifidobacterium longum for tumor-targeting enzyme/prodrug therapy.

    PubMed

    Hamaji, Yoshinori; Fujimori, Minoru; Sasaki, Takayuki; Matsuhashi, Hitomi; Matsui-Seki, Keiichi; Shimatani-Shibata, Yuko; Kano, Yasunobu; Amano, Jun; Taniguchi, Shun'ichiro

    2007-04-01

    In our previous studies, a strain of the nonpathogenic, anaerobic, intestinal bacterium, Bifidobacterium longum (B. longum), was found to be localized selectively and to proliferate within solid tumors after systemic administration. In addition, B. longum transformed with the shuttle-plasmid encoding the cytosine deaminase (CD) gene expressed active CD, which deaminated the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) to the anticancer agent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). We also reported antitumor efficacy with the same plasmid in several animal experiments. In this study, we constructed a novel shuttle-plasmid, pAV001-HU-eCD-M968, which included the mutant CD gene with a mutation at the active site to increase the enzymatic activity. In addition, the plasmid-transformed B. longum produces mutant CD and strongly increased (by 10-fold) its 5-FC to 5-FU enzymatic activity. The use of B. longum harboring the new shuttle-plasmid increases the effectiveness of our enzyme/prodrug strategy.

  9. Crystal structure of the DNA cytosine deaminase APOBEC3F: the catalytically active and HIV-1 Vif-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Bohn, Markus-Frederik; Shandilya, Shivender M D; Albin, John S; Kouno, Takahide; Anderson, Brett D; McDougle, Rebecca M; Carpenter, Michael A; Rathore, Anurag; Evans, Leah; Davis, Ahkillah N; Zhang, Jingying; Lu, Yongjian; Somasundaran, Mohan; Matsuo, Hiroshi; Harris, Reuben S; Schiffer, Celia A

    2013-06-04

    Human APOBEC3F is an antiretroviral single-strand DNA cytosine deaminase, susceptible to degradation by the HIV-1 protein Vif. In this study the crystal structure of the HIV Vif binding, catalytically active, C-terminal domain of APOBEC3F (A3F-CTD) was determined. The A3F-CTD shares structural motifs with portions of APOBEC3G-CTD, APOBEC3C, and APOBEC2. Residues identified to be critical for Vif-dependent degradation of APOBEC3F all fit within a predominantly negatively charged contiguous region on the surface of A3F-CTD. Specific sequence motifs, previously shown to play a role in Vif susceptibility and virion encapsidation, are conserved across APOBEC3s and between APOBEC3s and HIV-1 Vif. In this structure these motifs pack against each other at intermolecular interfaces, providing potential insights both into APOBEC3 oligomerization and Vif interactions.

  10. Cytosine Nucleobase Ligand: A Suitable Choice for Modulating Magnetic Anisotropy in Tetrahedrally Coordinated Mononuclear Co(II) Compounds.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Rosaria; Vallejo, Julia; Marino, Nadia; De Munno, Giovanni; Krzystek, J; Cano, Joan; Pardo, Emilio; Armentano, Donatella

    2017-02-20

    A family of tetrahedral mononuclear Co(II) complexes with the cytosine nucleobase ligand is used as the playground for an in-depth study of the effects that the nature of the ligand, as well as their noninnocent distortions on the Co(II) environment, may have on the slow magnetic relaxation effects. Hence, those compounds with greater distortion from the ideal tetrahedral geometry showed a larger-magnitude axial magnetic anisotropy (D) together with a high rhombicity factor (E/D), and thus, slow magnetic relaxation effects also appear. In turn, the more symmetric compound possesses a much smaller value of the D parameter and, consequently, lacks single-ion magnet behavior.

  11. Spectroscopic (UV/VIS, Raman) and Electrophoresis Study of Cytosine-Guanine Oligonucleotide DNA Influenced by Magnetic Field

    PubMed Central

    Banihashemian, Seyedeh Maryam; Periasamy, Vengadesh; Boon Tong, Goh; Abdul Rahman, Saadah

    2016-01-01

    Studying the effect of a magnetic field on oligonucleotide DNA can provide a novel DNA manipulation technique for potential application in bioengineering and medicine. In this work, the optical and electrochemical response of a 100 bases oligonucleotides DNA, cytosine-guanine (CG100), is investigated via exposure to different magnetic fields (250, 500, 750, and 1000 mT). As a result of the optical response of CG100 to the magnetic field, the ultra-violet-visible spectrum indicated a slight variation in the band gap of CG100 of about 0.3 eV. Raman spectroscopy showed a significant deviation in hydrogen and phosphate bonds’ vibration after exposure to the magnetic field. Oligonucleotide DNA mobility was investigated in the external electric field using the gel electrophoresis technique, which revealed a small decrease in the migration of CG100 after exposure to the magnetic field. PMID:26999445

  12. A periplasmic aldehyde oxidoreductase represents the first molybdopterin cytosine dinucleotide cofactor containing molybdo-flavoenzyme from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Meina; Mittelstädt, Gerd; Iobbi-Nivol, Chantal; Saggu, Miguel; Lendzian, Friedhelm; Hildebrandt, Peter; Leimkühler, Silke

    2009-05-01

    Three DNA regions carrying genes encoding putative homologs of xanthine dehydrogenases were identified in Escherichia coli, named xdhABC, xdhD, and yagTSRQ. Here, we describe the purification and characterization of gene products of the yagTSRQ operon, a molybdenum-containing iron-sulfur flavoprotein from E. coli, which is located in the periplasm. The 135 kDa enzyme comprised a noncovalent (alpha beta gamma) heterotrimer with a large (78.1 kDa) molybdenum cofactor (Moco)-containing YagR subunit, a medium (33.9 kDa) FAD-containing YagS subunit, and a small (21.0 kDa) 2 x [2Fe2S]-containing YagT subunit. YagQ is not a subunit of the mature enzyme, and the protein is expected to be involved in Moco modification and insertion into YagTSR. Analysis of the form of Moco present in YagTSR revealed the presence of the molybdopterin cytosine dinucleotide cofactor. Two different [2Fe2S] clusters, typical for this class of enzyme, were identified by EPR. YagTSR represents the first example of a molybdopterin cytosine dinucleotide-containing protein in E. coli. Kinetic characterization of the enzyme revealed that YagTSR converts a broad spectrum of aldehydes, with a preference for aromatic aldehydes. Ferredoxin instead of NAD(+) or molecular oxygen was used as terminal electron acceptor. Complete growth inhibition of E. coli cells devoid of genes from the yagTSRQ operon was observed by the addition of cinnamaldehyde to a low-pH medium. This finding shows that YagTSR might have a role in the detoxification of aromatic aldehydes for E. coli under certain growth conditions.

  13. Kinetics of extension of O sup 6 -methylguanine paired with cytosine or thymine in defined oligonucleotide sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Dosanjh, M.K.; Galeros, G.; Singer, B. ); Goodman, M.F. )

    1991-12-10

    The frequency of extending m{sup 6}G{center dot}C or m{sup 6}G{center dot}T pairs, when the 3{prime} and 5{prime} flanking neighbors of m{sup 6}G are either cytosines or thymines, was investigated using primed 25-base-long oligonucleotides and the Klenow fragment of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I (Kf). The efficiency, V{sub max}/K{sub m}, of extension to the following normal base pair was up to 40-fold greater than for the formation of the m{sup 6}G{center dot}T or m{sup 6}G{center dot}C pair. The frequencies of inserting either dCMP or dTMP opposite these m{sup 6}G bases did not appear to be different in the two sequences, C-m{sup 6}G-C and T-m{sup 6}G-T, but extension was favored in the C-m{sup 6}G-C sequence. The m{sup 6}G{center dot}T pair extended to a C{center dot}G pair most efficiently, indicating that it was not a strong block to continued replication past the template lesion. Thus, m{sup 6}G{center dot}T flanked by cytosines replicates more readily than when flanked by thymines, increasing G {yields} A transitions. These data lend further support to the importance of sequence context in mutagenesis.

  14. Dynamic DNA cytosine methylation in the Populus trichocarpa genome: tissue-level variation and relationship to gene expression

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background DNA cytosine methylation is an epigenetic modification that has been implicated in many biological processes. However, large-scale epigenomic studies have been applied to very few plant species, and variability in methylation among specialized tissues and its relationship to gene expression is poorly understood. Results We surveyed DNA methylation from seven distinct tissue types (vegetative bud, male inflorescence [catkin], female catkin, leaf, root, xylem, phloem) in the reference tree species black cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa). Using 5-methyl-cytosine DNA immunoprecipitation followed by Illumina sequencing (MeDIP-seq), we mapped a total of 129,360,151 36- or 32-mer reads to the P. trichocarpa reference genome. We validated MeDIP-seq results by bisulfite sequencing, and compared methylation and gene expression using published microarray data. Qualitative DNA methylation differences among tissues were obvious on a chromosome scale. Methylated genes had lower expression than unmethylated genes, but genes with methylation in transcribed regions ("gene body methylation") had even lower expression than genes with promoter methylation. Promoter methylation was more frequent than gene body methylation in all tissues except male catkins. Male catkins differed in demethylation of particular transposable element categories, in level of gene body methylation, and in expression range of genes with methylated transcribed regions. Tissue-specific gene expression patterns were correlated with both gene body and promoter methylation. Conclusions We found striking differences among tissues in methylation, which were apparent at the chromosomal scale and when genes and transposable elements were examined. In contrast to other studies in plants, gene body methylation had a more repressive effect on transcription than promoter methylation. PMID:22251412

  15. Vesicular nucleotide transporter regulates the nucleotide content in airway epithelial mucin granules

    PubMed Central

    Sesma, Juliana I.; Kreda, Silvia M.; Okada, Seiko F.; van Heusden, Catharina; Moussa, Lama; Jones, Lisa C.; O'Neal, Wanda K.; Togawa, Natsuko; Hiasa, Miki; Moriyama, Yoshinori

    2013-01-01

    Nucleotides within the airway surface liquid promote fluid secretion via activation of airway epithelial purinergic receptors. ATP is stored within and released from mucin granules as co-cargo with mucins, but the mechanism by which ATP, and potentially other nucleotides, enter the lumen of mucin granules is not known. We assessed the contribution of the recently identified SLC17A9 vesicle nucleotide transporter (VNUT) to the nucleotide availability within isolated mucin granules and further examined the involvement of VNUT in mucin granule secretion-associated nucleotide release. RT-PCR and Western blot analyses indicated that VNUT is abundantly expressed in airway epithelial goblet-like Calu-3 cells, migrating as a duplex with apparent mobility of 55 and 60 kDa. Subcellular fractionation studies indicated that VNUT55 was associated with high-density mucin granules, whereas VNUT60 was associated with low-density organelles. Immunofluorescence studies showed that recombinant VNUT localized to mucin granules and other organelles. Mucin granules isolated from VNUT short hairpin RNA-expressing cells exhibited a marked reduction of ATP, ADP, AMP, and UTP levels within granules. Ca2+-regulated vesicular ATP release was markedly reduced in these cells, but mucin secretion was not affected. These results suggest that VNUT is the relevant nucleotide transporter responsible for the uptake of cytosolic nucleotides into mucin granules. By controlling the entry of nucleotides into mucin granules, VNUT contributes to the release of purinergic signaling molecules necessary for the proper hydration of co-released mucins. PMID:23467297

  16. Vesicular nucleotide transporter regulates the nucleotide content in airway epithelial mucin granules.

    PubMed

    Sesma, Juliana I; Kreda, Silvia M; Okada, Seiko F; van Heusden, Catharina; Moussa, Lama; Jones, Lisa C; O'Neal, Wanda K; Togawa, Natsuko; Hiasa, Miki; Moriyama, Yoshinori; Lazarowski, Eduardo R

    2013-05-15

    Nucleotides within the airway surface liquid promote fluid secretion via activation of airway epithelial purinergic receptors. ATP is stored within and released from mucin granules as co-cargo with mucins, but the mechanism by which ATP, and potentially other nucleotides, enter the lumen of mucin granules is not known. We assessed the contribution of the recently identified SLC17A9 vesicle nucleotide transporter (VNUT) to the nucleotide availability within isolated mucin granules and further examined the involvement of VNUT in mucin granule secretion-associated nucleotide release. RT-PCR and Western blot analyses indicated that VNUT is abundantly expressed in airway epithelial goblet-like Calu-3 cells, migrating as a duplex with apparent mobility of 55 and 60 kDa. Subcellular fractionation studies indicated that VNUT55 was associated with high-density mucin granules, whereas VNUT60 was associated with low-density organelles. Immunofluorescence studies showed that recombinant VNUT localized to mucin granules and other organelles. Mucin granules isolated from VNUT short hairpin RNA-expressing cells exhibited a marked reduction of ATP, ADP, AMP, and UTP levels within granules. Ca(2+)-regulated vesicular ATP release was markedly reduced in these cells, but mucin secretion was not affected. These results suggest that VNUT is the relevant nucleotide transporter responsible for the uptake of cytosolic nucleotides into mucin granules. By controlling the entry of nucleotides into mucin granules, VNUT contributes to the release of purinergic signaling molecules necessary for the proper hydration of co-released mucins.

  17. The GC-Rich Mitochondrial and Plastid Genomes of the Green Alga Coccomyxa Give Insight into the Evolution of Organelle DNA Nucleotide Landscape

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, David Roy; Burki, Fabien; Yamada, Takashi; Grimwood, Jane; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Van Etten, James L.; Keeling, Patrick J.

    2011-05-13

    Most of the available mitochondrial and plastid genome sequences are biased towards adenine and thymine (AT) over guanine and cytosine (GC). Examples of GC-rich organelle DNAs are limited to a small but eclectic list of species, including certain green algae. Here, to gain insight in the evolution of organelle nucleotide landscape, we present the GC-rich mitochondrial and plastid DNAs from the trebouxiophyte green alga Coccomyxa sp. C-169. We compare these sequences with other GC-rich organelle DNAs and argue that the forces biasing them towards G and C are nonadaptive and linked to the metabolic and/or life history features of this species. The Coccomyxa organelle genomes are also used for phylogenetic analyses, which highlight the complexities in trying to resolve the interrelationships among the core chlorophyte green algae, but ultimately favour a sister relationship between the Ulvophyceae and Chlorophyceae, with the Trebouxiophyceae branching at the base of the chlorophyte crown.

  18. Nucleotide Metabolism in Salt-Stressed Zea mays L. Root Tips: I. Adenine and Uridine Nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Peterson, T A; Nieman, R H; Clark, R A

    1987-12-01

    Corn plants (Zea mays L. cv Pioneer 3906) were grown in a glass house on control and saline nutrient solutions, in winter and summer. There were two saline treatments, both with osmotic potential = -0.4 megapascal but with different Ca(2+)/Na(+) ratios: 0.03 and 0.73. Root tips and shoot meristems (culm tissue) of 26 day-old plants were analyzed for nucleotides to ascertain if there were correlations between nucleotide pool size and the reduced growth on saline cultures. Several other cell components also were determined. Plants grown in winter were only half as large as those grown in summer mainly because of the lower light intensity and lower temperature. But the relative yield reduction on salt treatment compared to the control was similar in winter and summer. The two different salt treatments caused similar yield reductions. Neither salt treatment affected nucleotide pools in culm tissue, with the possible exception of UDPG in winter. In the case of root tips, salt treatment had little or no effect on nucleotide pool sizes in winter when many already seemed near a critical minimum, but in summer it reduced several pools including ATP, total adenine nucleotide, UTP, total uridine nucleotide, and UDP-glucose. The reductions were greatest on the salt treatment with low Ca(2+)/Na(+). There was no simple correlation between the effects of salt stress on growth and on nucleotide pool size. The nucleotide pools of culm tissue indicated that in some respects this tissue was effectively insulated from the salt stress. Roots that were in direct contact with the saline solution indicated significant reductions in nucleotide pools only in the summer whereas growth was reduced both summer and winter. It is possible that the nucleotide concentrations of root cells in winter were already near a critical minimum so that nucleotide synthesis and growth were tightly linked. Significant reductions in nucleotide pools that would be expected to affect growth were more evident in

  19. The International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Cochrane, Guy; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene; Takagi, Toshihisa; Sequence Database Collaboration, International Nucleotide

    2016-01-01

    The International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration (INSDC; http://www.insdc.org) comprises three global partners committed to capturing, preserving and providing comprehensive public-domain nucleotide sequence information. The INSDC establishes standards, formats and protocols for data and metadata to make it easier for individuals and organisations to submit their nucleotide data reliably to public archives. This work enables the continuous, global exchange of information about living things. Here we present an update of the INSDC in 2015, including data growth and diversification, new standards and requirements by publishers for authors to submit their data to the public archives. The INSDC serves as a model for data sharing in the life sciences. PMID:26657633

  20. The International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yasukazu; Cochrane, Guy; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene

    2013-01-01

    The International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration (INSDC; http://www.insdc.org), one of the longest-standing global alliances of biological data archives, captures, preserves and provides comprehensive public domain nucleotide sequence information. Three partners of the INSDC work in cooperation to establish formats for data and metadata and protocols that facilitate reliable data submission to their databases and support continual data exchange around the world. In this article, the INSDC current status and update for the year of 2012 are presented. Among discussed items of international collaboration meeting in 2012, BioSample database and changes in submission are described as topics.

  1. Recombination-Independent Recognition of DNA Homology for Repeat-Induced Point Mutation (RIP) Is Modulated by the Underlying Nucleotide Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Kleckner, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Haploid germline nuclei of many filamentous fungi have the capacity to detect homologous nucleotide sequences present on the same or different chromosomes. Once recognized, such sequences can undergo cytosine methylation or cytosine-to-thymine mutation specifically over the extent of shared homology. In Neurospora crassa this process is known as Repeat-Induced Point mutation (RIP). Previously, we showed that RIP did not require MEI-3, the only RecA homolog in Neurospora, and that it could detect homologous trinucleotides interspersed with a matching periodicity of 11 or 12 base-pairs along participating chromosomal segments. This pattern was consistent with a mechanism of homology recognition that involved direct interactions between co-aligned double-stranded (ds) DNA molecules, where sequence-specific dsDNA/dsDNA contacts could be established using no more than one triplet per turn. In the present study we have further explored the DNA sequence requirements for RIP. In our previous work, interspersed homologies were always examined in the context of a relatively long adjoining region of perfect homology. Using a new repeat system lacking this strong interaction, we now show that interspersed homologies with overall sequence identity of only 36% can be efficiently detected by RIP in the absence of any perfect homology. Furthermore, in this new system, where the total amount of homology is near the critical threshold required for RIP, the nucleotide composition of participating DNA molecules is identified as an important factor. Our results specifically pinpoint the triplet 5'-GAC-3' as a particularly efficient unit of homology recognition. Finally, we present experimental evidence that the process of homology sensing can be uncoupled from the downstream mutation. Taken together, our results advance the notion that sequence information can be compared directly between double-stranded DNA molecules during RIP and, potentially, in other processes where homologous

  2. Recombination-Independent Recognition of DNA Homology for Repeat-Induced Point Mutation (RIP) Is Modulated by the Underlying Nucleotide Sequence.

    PubMed

    Gladyshev, Eugene; Kleckner, Nancy

    2016-05-01

    Haploid germline nuclei of many filamentous fungi have the capacity to detect homologous nucleotide sequences present on the same or different chromosomes. Once recognized, such sequences can undergo cytosine methylation or cytosine-to-thymine mutation specifically over the extent of shared homology. In Neurospora crassa this process is known as Repeat-Induced Point mutation (RIP). Previously, we showed that RIP did not require MEI-3, the only RecA homolog in Neurospora, and that it could detect homologous trinucleotides interspersed with a matching periodicity of 11 or 12 base-pairs along participating chromosomal segments. This pattern was consistent with a mechanism of homology recognition that involved direct interactions between co-aligned double-stranded (ds) DNA molecules, where sequence-specific dsDNA/dsDNA contacts could be established using no more than one triplet per turn. In the present study we have further explored the DNA sequence requirements for RIP. In our previous work, interspersed homologies were always examined in the context of a relatively long adjoining region of perfect homology. Using a new repeat system lacking this strong interaction, we now show that interspersed homologies with overall sequence identity of only 36% can be efficiently detected by RIP in the absence of any perfect homology. Furthermore, in this new system, where the total amount of homology is near the critical threshold required for RIP, the nucleotide composition of participating DNA molecules is identified as an important factor. Our results specifically pinpoint the triplet 5'-GAC-3' as a particularly efficient unit of homology recognition. Finally, we present experimental evidence that the process of homology sensing can be uncoupled from the downstream mutation. Taken together, our results advance the notion that sequence information can be compared directly between double-stranded DNA molecules during RIP and, potentially, in other processes where homologous

  3. Measurements of single nucleotide electronic states as nanoelectronic fingerprints for identification of DNA nucleobases, their protonated and unprotonated states, isomers, and tautomers.

    PubMed

    Ribot, Josep Casamada; Chatterjee, Anushree; Nagpal, Prashant

    2015-04-16

    Several nanoelectronic techniques have been explored to distinguish the sequence of nucleic acids in DNA macromolecules. Identification of unique electronic signatures using nanopore conductance, tunneling spectroscopy, or other nanoelectronic techniques depends on electronic states of the DNA nucleotides. While several experimental and computational studies have focused on interaction of nucleobases with different substrates, the effect of nucleic acid biochemistry on its electronic properties has been largely unexplored. Here, we present correlated measurements of frontier molecular orbitals and higher-order electronic states for four DNA nucleobases (adenine, cytosine, thymine, and guanine), and first-principle quantum chemical density functional theoretical (DFT) computations. Using different pH conditions in our experiments, we show that small changes in the biochemical state of these nucleic acids strongly affect the intrinsic electronic structure, measured using scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS). In our experimental measurements and computations, significant differences were observed between the position of frontier orbitals and higher-energy states between protonated and unprotonated nucleic acids, isomers, and different keto-enol tautomer's formed in these nucleotides, leading to their facile identification. Furthermore, we show unique "electronic fingerprints" for all nucleotides (A, G, T, C) using STS, with most distinct states identified at acidic pH. These results can have important implications for identification of nucleic acid sequences in DNA molecules using a high-throughput nanoelectronic identification technique.

  4. Mitochondrial DNA nucleotide changes in primary congenital glaucoma patients.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manoj; Tanwar, Mukesh; Faiq, Muneeb Ahmad; Pani, Jhumur; Shamsi, Monis Bilal; Dada, Tanuj; Dada, Rima

    2013-01-01

    Primary congenital glaucoma (PCG) is the second most common cause of blindness, accounting for 0.01%-0.04% of total blindness worldwide. Most congenital glaucoma cases are mapped to the GLC3A locus, and many aspects of PCG are still unknown. Recent studies have reported an increased frequency of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence changes in primary open-angle glaucoma, primary angle-closure glaucoma, and pseudoexfoliation glaucoma compared to controls. Thus, this study was planned with the aim of detecting mitochondrial DNA variations in PCG cases. Twenty primary congenital glaucoma cases were selected from Dr. R. P. Centre for Ophthalmic Sciences of All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), New Delhi, India. DNA was isolated from whole blood samples. The entire coding region of the mitochondrial genome was amplified by PCR in 20 patients and 20 controls. The full mtDNA genome was sequenced and analyzed against mitochondrial reference sequence NC_012920. MtDNA sequencing revealed a total of 195 nucleotide variations in PCG patients and 58 in controls. Of the 195 changes, 43 (22.05%) were nonsynonymous, 82 (42.05%) were synonymous, and 30 were in RNA genes. A total of 39/195 (20.00%) variations were observed in the D-loop (hypervariable region), 19/195 (9.74%) in different ribosomal RNA (rRNAs), 11/195 (5.64%) in transfer RNA (tRNAs), 66/195 (33.84%) in complex I, 17/195 (8.71%) in complex III, 27/195 (13.84%) in complex IV, and 15/195 (7.69%) in complex V. Of 58 variations in the controls, 14 were nonsynonymous changes. The Sorting Intolerant from Tolerant and Polymorphism Phenotyping analyses of all nonsynonymous changes from patients revealed two pathogenic changes in NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase chain 2 (ND2) and cytochrome oxidase subunit III (COXIII) subunits. In one of the patients, the insertion of cytosine introduced a frame shift change (p.Ile104AsnfsX26) in the cytochrome b (CYB) subunit of the electron transport chain. In another patient, a

  5. Regulation of innate immunity by extracellular nucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Gorini, Stefania; Gatta, Lucia; Pontecorvo, Laura; Vitiello, Laura; la Sala, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular ATP (eATP) is the most abundant among extracellular nucleotides and is commonly considered as a classical danger signal, which stimulates immune responses in the presence of tissue injury. In fact, increased nucleotide concentration in the extracellular space is generally closely associated with tissue stress or damage. However non-lytic nucleotide release may also occur in many cell types under a variety of conditions. Extracellular nucleotides are sensed by a class of plasma membrane receptors called P2 purinergic receptors (P2Rs). P2 receptors are expressed by all immunological cells and their activation elicits different responses. Extracellular ATP can act as an initiator or terminator of immune responses being able to induce different effects on immune cells depending on the pattern of P2 receptors engaged, the duration of the stimulus and its concentration in the extracellular milieu. Millimolar (high) concentrations of extracellular ATP, induce predominantly proinflammatory effects, while micromolar (low) doses exert mainly tolerogenic/immunosuppressive action. Moreover small, but significant differences in the pattern of P2 receptor expression in mice and humans confer diverse capacities of ATP in regulating the immune response. PMID:23358447

  6. Characterization of the Dominant and Rare Members of a Young Hawaiian Soil Bacterial Community with Small-Subunit Ribosomal DNA Amplified from DNA Fractionated on the Basis of Its Guanine and Cytosine Composition

    PubMed Central

    Nüsslein, Klaus; Tiedje, James M.

    1998-01-01

    The small-subunit ribosomal DNA (rDNA) diversity was found to be very high in a Hawaiian soil community that might be expected to have lower diversity than the communities in continental soils because the Hawaiian soil is geographically isolated and only 200 years old, is subjected to a constant climate, and harbors low plant diversity. Since an underlying community structure could not be revealed by analyzing the total eubacterial rDNA, we first fractionated the DNA on the basis of guanine-plus-cytosine (G+C) content by using bis-benzimidazole and equilibrium centrifugation and then analyzed the bacterial rDNA amplified from a fraction with a high biomass (63% G+C fraction) and a fraction with a low biomass (35% G+C fraction). The rDNA clone libraries were screened by amplified rDNA restriction analysis to determine phylotype distribution. The dominant biomass reflected by the 63% G+C fraction contained several dominant phylotypes, while the community members that were less successful (35% G+C fraction) did not show dominance but there was a very high diversity of phylotypes. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed taxa belonging to the groups expected for the G+C contents used. The dominant phylotypes in the 63% G+C fraction were members of the Pseudomonas, Rhizobium-Agrobacterium, and Rhodospirillum assemblages, while all of the clones sequenced from the 35% G+C fraction were affiliated with several Clostridium assemblages. The two-step rDNA analysis used here uncovered more diversity than can be detected by direct rDNA analysis of total community DNA. The G+C separation step is also a way to detect some of the less dominant organisms in a community. PMID:9546163

  7. Robust quantitative assessments of cytosine modifications and changes in the expressions of related enzymes in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Du, Chunping; Kurabe, Nobuya; Matsushima, Yoshitaka; Suzuki, Masako; Kahyo, Tomoaki; Ohnishi, Ippei; Tanioka, Fumihiko; Tajima, Shogo; Goto, Masanori; Yamada, Hidetaka; Tao, Hong; Shinmura, Kazuya; Konno, Hiroyuki; Sugimura, Haruhiko

    2015-07-01

    The rediscovery of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, the ten-eleven translocation (TET) family, thymine-DNA glycosylase (TDG) and isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) have opened new avenues in the study of DNA demethylation pathways in gastric cancer (GC). We performed a comprehensive and robust analysis of these genes and modified cytosines in gastric cancer. Liquid chromatography mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used to assess 5-methyldeoxycytidine (5-mC), 5-hydroxymethyldeoxycytidine (5-hmC), 5-formyldeoxycytidine (5-fC) and 5-carboxyldeoxycytidine (5-caC) quantitatively in tumorous and non-tumorous regions of GCs; [D2]-5-hmC was used as an internal standard. Expression levels of the genes TET1, TET2, TET3, TDG, IDH1 and IDH2 were measured using a real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and were compared to the clinical attributes of each case. Using HEK293T cells the effects of introducing plasmids containing full-length TET1, TET2, and TET3 and 7 variants of the TET2 catalytic domain were evaluated in terms of their effect on cytosine demethylation. LC-MS/MS showed that 5-hmC was significantly decreased in tumorous portions. 5-mC was also moderately decreased in tumors, while 5-fC and 5-caC were barely detectable. The expressions of TET1, TET2, TET3, TDG and IDH2, but not IDH1, were notably decreased in GCs, compared with the adjacent non-tumor portion. TET1 expression and the 5-hmC levels determined using LC-MS/MS had a significantly positive correlation and TET1 protein had a greater effect on the increase in 5-hmC than TET2 and TET3 in HEK293T cells. The loss of 5-hmC and the down-regulation of TET1-3, TDG and IDH2 were found in GCs. The loss of 5-hmC in GCs was mainly correlated with the down-regulation of TET1.

  8. An oligodeoxyribonucleotide containing 5-formyl-2'-deoxycytidine (fC) at the CpG site forms a covalent complex with DNA cytosine-5 methyltransferases (DNMTs).

    PubMed

    Sato, Kousuke; Kawamoto, Kyoji; Shimamura, Shintaro; Ichikawa, Satoshi; Matsuda, Akira

    2016-11-15

    5-Methylcytosine (mC) is known to induce epigenetic changes. Ten-eleven translocation (TET) enzymes produce the further oxidized 5-substituted cytosine derivatives, 5-formylcytosine (fC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (caC). However, their roles are unclear thus far. Here, we synthesized oligodeoxyribonucleotides (ODNs) containing 5-formyl-2'-deoxycytidine and examined their interactions with DNA cytosine-5 methyltransferase (DNMT). We found that the ODN sequence containing fCpG formed a covalent complex with both bacterial and mouse recombinant DNMTs in the absence of any cofactors. The covalent bonding with DNMT suggests that the fCpG sequence in DNA may play a role in epigenetic regulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Investigating the Co-Adsorption Behavior of Nucleic-Acid Base (Thymine and Cytosine) and Melamine at Liquid/Solid Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Huiling; Li, Yinli; Chen, Dong; Liu, Bo

    2016-12-01

    The co-adsorption behavior of nucleic-acid base (thymine; cytosine) and melamine was investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) technique at liquid/solid (1-octanol/graphite) interface. STM characterization results indicate that phase separation happened after dropping the mixed solution of thymine-melamine onto highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surface, while the hetero-component cluster-like structure was observed when cytosine-melamine binary assembly system is used. From the viewpoints of non-covalent interactions calculated by using density functional theory (DFT) method, the formation mechanisms of these assembled structures were explored in detail. This work will supply a methodology to design the supramolecular assembled structures and the hetero-component materials composed by biological and chemical compound.

  10. Nucleotide sequence of papaya mosaic virus RNA.

    PubMed

    Sit, T L; Abouhaidar, M G; Holy, S

    1989-09-01

    The RNA genome of papaya mosaic virus is 6656 nucleotides long [excluding the poly(A) tail] with six open reading frames (ORFs) more than 200 nucleotides long. The four nearest the 5' end each overlap with adjacent ORFs and could code for proteins with Mr 176307, 26248, 11949 and 7224 (ORFs 1 to 4). The fifth ORF produces the capsid protein of Mr 23043 and the sixth ORF, located completely within ORF1, could code for a protein with Mr 14113. The translation products of ORFs 1 to 3 show strong similarity with those of other potexviruses but the ORF 4 protein has only limited similarity with the other potexvirus ORF 4 proteins of 7K to 11K.

  11. Radiation and thermal stabilities of adenine nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Demidov, V V; Potaman, V N; Solyanina, I P; Trofimov, V I

    1995-03-01

    We have investigated in detail radiation and thermal stabilities and transformations of adenosine mono- and triphosphates in liquid and frozen solid aqueous solutions within a wide range of absorbed radiation dose (up to 75 kGy) and temperature (up to 160 degrees C). Dephosphorylation is the main pathway of high temperature hydrolysis of adenine nucleotides. Basic thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of this process have been determined. Radiolysis of investigated compounds at room temperature results in scission of N-glycosidic bond with a radiation yield about of 1 mol/100 eV. Solution freezing significantly enhances radiation stability of nucleotides as well as other biomolecules. This circumstance is essential in the discussion of panspermia concepts.

  12. Accurate CpG and non-CpG cytosine methylation analysis by high-throughput locus-specific pyrosequencing in plants.

    PubMed

    How-Kit, Alexandre; Daunay, Antoine; Mazaleyrat, Nicolas; Busato, Florence; Daviaud, Christian; Teyssier, Emeline; Deleuze, Jean-François; Gallusci, Philippe; Tost, Jörg

    2015-07-01

    Pyrosequencing permits accurate quantification of DNA methylation of specific regions where the proportions of the C/T polymorphism induced by sodium bisulfite treatment of DNA reflects the DNA methylation level. The commercially available high-throughput locus-specific pyrosequencing instruments allow for the simultaneous analysis of 96 samples, but restrict the DNA methylation analysis to CpG dinucleotide sites, which can be limiting in many biological systems. In contrast to mammals where DNA methylation occurs nearly exclusively on CpG dinucleotides, plants genomes harbor DNA methylation also in other sequence contexts including CHG and CHH motives, which cannot be evaluated by these pyrosequencing instruments due to software limitations. Here, we present a complete pipeline for accurate CpG and non-CpG cytosine methylation analysis at single base-resolution using high-throughput locus-specific pyrosequencing. The devised approach includes the design and validation of PCR amplification on bisulfite-treated DNA and pyrosequencing assays as well as the quantification of the methylation level at every cytosine from the raw peak intensities of the Pyrograms by two newly developed Visual Basic Applications. Our method presents accurate and reproducible results as exemplified by the cytosine methylation analysis of the promoter regions of two Tomato genes (NOR and CNR) encoding transcription regulators of fruit ripening during different stages of fruit development. Our results confirmed a significant and temporally coordinated loss of DNA methylation on specific cytosines during the early stages of fruit development in both promoters as previously shown by WGBS. The manuscript describes thus the first high-throughput locus-specific DNA methylation analysis in plants using pyrosequencing.

  13. Mass spectrometry analysis of nucleosides and nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Dudley, Ed; Bond, Liz

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has been widely utilised in the study of nucleobases, nucleosides and nucleotides as components of nucleic acids and as bioactive metabolites in their own right. In this review, the application of mass spectrometry to such analysis is overviewed in relation to various aspects regarding the analytical mass spectrometric and chromatographic techniques applied and also the various applications of such analysis. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Hydration properties of natural and synthetic DNA sequences with methylated adenine or cytosine bases in the R.DpnI target and BDNF promoter studied by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Shanak, Siba; Helms, Volkhard

    2014-12-14

    Adenine and cytosine methylation are two important epigenetic modifications of DNA sequences at the levels of the genome and transcriptome. To characterize the differential roles of methylating adenine or cytosine with respect to their hydration properties, we performed conventional MD simulations and free energy perturbation calculations for two particular DNA sequences, namely the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) promoter and the R.DpnI-bound DNA that are known to undergo methylation of C5-methyl cytosine and N6-methyl adenine, respectively. We found that a single methylated cytosine has a clearly favorable hydration free energy over cytosine since the attached methyl group has a slightly polar character. In contrast, capping the strongly polar N6 of adenine with a methyl group gives a slightly unfavorable contribution to its free energy of solvation. Performing the same demethylation in the context of a DNA double-strand gave quite similar results for the more solvent-accessible cytosine but much more unfavorable results for the rather buried adenine. Interestingly, the same demethylation reactions are far more unfavorable when performed in the context of the opposite (BDNF or R.DpnI target) sequence. This suggests a natural preference for methylation in a specific sequence context. In addition, free energy calculations for demethylating adenine or cytosine in the context of B-DNA vs. Z-DNA suggest that the conformational B-Z transition of DNA transition is rather a property of cytosine methylated sequences but is not preferable for the adenine-methylated sequences investigated here.

  15. Hydration properties of natural and synthetic DNA sequences with methylated adenine or cytosine bases in the R.DpnI target and BDNF promoter studied by molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanak, Siba; Helms, Volkhard

    2014-12-01

    Adenine and cytosine methylation are two important epigenetic modifications of DNA sequences at the levels of the genome and transcriptome. To characterize the differential roles of methylating adenine or cytosine with respect to their hydration properties, we performed conventional MD simulations and free energy perturbation calculations for two particular DNA sequences, namely the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) promoter and the R.DpnI-bound DNA that are known to undergo methylation of C5-methyl cytosine and N6-methyl adenine, respectively. We found that a single methylated cytosine has a clearly favorable hydration free energy over cytosine since the attached methyl group has a slightly polar character. In contrast, capping the strongly polar N6 of adenine with a methyl group gives a slightly unfavorable contribution to its free energy of solvation. Performing the same demethylation in the context of a DNA double-strand gave quite similar results for the more solvent-accessible cytosine but much more unfavorable results for the rather buried adenine. Interestingly, the same demethylation reactions are far more unfavorable when performed in the context of the opposite (BDNF or R.DpnI target) sequence. This suggests a natural preference for methylation in a specific sequence context. In addition, free energy calculations for demethylating adenine or cytosine in the context of B-DNA vs. Z-DNA suggest that the conformational B-Z transition of DNA transition is rather a property of cytosine methylated sequences but is not preferable for the adenine-methylated sequences investigated here.

  16. Vacuum ultraviolet photoionization of carbohydrates and nucleotides

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Joong-Won; Bernstein, Elliot R.

    2014-01-28

    Carbohydrates (2-deoxyribose, ribose, and xylose) and nucleotides (adenosine-, cytidine-, guanosine-, and uridine-5{sup ′}-monophosphate) are generated in the gas phase, and ionized with vacuum ultraviolet photons (VUV, 118.2 nm). The observed time of flight mass spectra of the carbohydrate fragmentation are similar to those observed [J.-W. Shin, F. Dong, M. Grisham, J. J. Rocca, and E. R. Bernstein, Chem. Phys. Lett. 506, 161 (2011)] for 46.9 nm photon ionization, but with more intensity in higher mass fragment ions. The tendency of carbohydrate ions to fragment extensively following ionization seemingly suggests that nucleic acids might undergo radiation damage as a result of carbohydrate, rather than nucleobase fragmentation. VUV photoionization of nucleotides (monophosphate-carbohydrate-nucleobase), however, shows that the carbohydrate-nucleobase bond is the primary fragmentation site for these species. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate that the removed carbohydrate electrons by the 118.2 nm photons are associated with endocyclic C–C and C–O ring centered orbitals: loss of electron density in the ring bonds of the nascent ion can thus account for the observed fragmentation patterns following carbohydrate ionization. DFT calculations also indicate that electrons removed from nucleotides under these same conditions are associated with orbitals involved with the nucleobase-saccharide linkage electron density. The calculations give a general mechanism and explanation of the experimental results.

  17. Isolation of fast purine nucleotide synthase ribozymes.

    PubMed

    Lau, Matthew W L; Cadieux, Kelly E C; Unrau, Peter J

    2004-12-08

    Here we report the in vitro selection of fast ribozymes capable of promoting the synthesis of a purine nucleotide (6-thioguanosine monophosphate) from tethered 5-phosphoribosyl 1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) and 6-thioguanine ((6S)Gua). The two most proficient purine synthases have apparent efficiencies of 284 and 230 M(-1) min(-1) and are both significantly more efficient than pyrimidine nucleotide synthase ribozymes selected previously by a similar approach. Interestingly, while both ribozymes showed good substrate discrimination, one ribozyme had no detectable affinity for 6-thioguanine while the second had a K(m) of approximately 80 muM, indicating that these ribozymes use considerably different modes of substrate recognition. The purine synthases were isolated after 10 rounds of selection from two high-diversity RNA pools. The first pool contained a long random sequence region. The second pool contained random sequence elements interspersed with the mutagenized helical elements of a previously characterized 4-thiouridine synthase ribozyme. While nearly all of the ribozymes isolated from this biased pool population appeared to have benefited from utilizing one of the progenitor's helical elements, little evidence for more complicated secondary structure preservation was evident. The discovery of purine synthases, in addition to pyrimidine synthases, demonstrates the potential for nucleotide synthesis in an 'RNA World' and provides a context from which to study small molecule RNA catalysis.

  18. Evolution of functional six-nucleotide DNA.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liqin; Yang, Zunyi; Sefah, Kwame; Bradley, Kevin M; Hoshika, Shuichi; Kim, Myong-Jung; Kim, Hyo-Joong; Zhu, Guizhi; Jiménez, Elizabeth; Cansiz, Sena; Teng, I-Ting; Champanhac, Carole; McLendon, Christopher; Liu, Chen; Zhang, Wen; Gerloff, Dietlind L; Huang, Zhen; Tan, Weihong; Benner, Steven A

    2015-06-03

    Axiomatically, the density of information stored in DNA, with just four nucleotides (GACT), is higher than in a binary code, but less than it might be if synthetic biologists succeed in adding independently replicating nucleotides to genetic systems. Such addition could also add functional groups not found in natural DNA, but useful for molecular performance. Here, we consider two new nucleotides (Z and P, 6-amino-5-nitro-3-(1'-β-D-2'-deoxyribo-furanosyl)-2(1H)-pyridone and 2-amino-8-(1'-β-D-2'-deoxyribofuranosyl)-imidazo[1,2-a]-1,3,5-triazin-4(8H)-one). These are designed to pair via complete Watson-Crick geometry. These were added to a library of oligonucleotides used in a laboratory in vitro evolution (LIVE) experiment; the GACTZP library was challenged to deliver molecules that bind selectively to liver cancer cells, but not to untransformed liver cells. Unlike in classical in vitro selection, low levels of mutation allow this system to evolve to create binding molecules not necessarily present in the original library. Over a dozen binding species were recovered. The best had Z and/or P in their sequences. Several had multiple, nearby, and adjacent Zs and Ps. Only the weaker binders contained no Z or P at all. This suggests that this system explored much of the sequence space available to this genetic system and that GACTZP libraries are richer reservoirs of functionality than standard libraries.

  19. Nucleotide excision repair in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Van Houten, B

    1990-01-01

    One of the best-studied DNA repair pathways is nucleotide excision repair, a process consisting of DNA damage recognition, incision, excision, repair resynthesis, and DNA ligation. Escherichia coli has served as a model organism for the study of this process. Recently, many of the proteins that mediate E. coli nucleotide excision have been purified to homogeneity; this had led to a molecular description of this repair pathway. One of the key repair enzymes of this pathway is the UvrABC nuclease complex. The individual subunits of this enzyme cooperate in a complex series of partial reactions to bind to and incise the DNA near a damaged nucleotide. The UvrABC complex displays a remarkable substrate diversity. Defining the structural features of DNA lesions that provide the specificity for damage recognition by the UvrABC complex is of great importance, since it represents a unique form of protein-DNA interaction. Using a number of in vitro assays, researchers have been able to elucidate the action mechanism of the UvrABC nuclease complex. Current research is devoted to understanding how these complex events are mediated within the living cell. PMID:2181258

  20. [Connective tissue dysplasia, magnesium, and nucleotide polymorphisms].

    PubMed

    Torshin, I Iu; Gromova, O A

    2008-01-01

    Undifferentiated connective tissue dysplasia (UCTD) is one of most common diseases of the connective tissue. High frequency of UCTD in population along with the fact that it can provoke a number of other diseases make UCTD an important object of the modern biomedical research in the areas of cardiology, neurology, rheumatology and pulmonology. Modern diagnostics and determination of the predisposition to UCTD allow elaboration of personalized therapy. In particular, Mg-containing supplements and medications can be effectively used in the therapy of UCTD. In one of our previous works we have analyzed possible molecular mechanisms of UCTD etiology as well as therapeutic action of magnesium. The use of data on nucleotide polymorphisms as complementation of standard medical diagnostics is one of perspective trends of the post-genomic medical research. The present work suggest a number of nucleotide polymorphisms that can be used in genetic association analyses of the UCTD as of well as therapeutic efficiency of magnesium treatment. Selection and analysis of the polymorphisms was done on the base of molecular mechanisms we had proposed earlier, comprehensive analysis of published data and also with the use of an integral approach to analysis of the functional effects of the nucleotide polymorphisms and corresponding amino acid substitutions.

  1. [Nucleotide receptors in learning and neuronal plasticity].

    PubMed

    Czajkowski, Rafał

    2014-01-01

    Nucleotide signalling plays an important role in neuronal plasticity and learning. Nucleotides are released at the synaptic terminals and may act pre- and postsynaptically by activating Pland P2 receptors. The A1 receptor, activated tonically by resting concentration of adenosine regulates basal neurotransmission. The A2A receptor is activated by increased adenosine levels and participates in plastic changes. ATP may act as an independent neurotransmitter on the P2X1 receptor, or via P2X3 subtype as a neuromodulator that affects NMDA receptor signalling. The G protein coupled P2Y receptors also evoke neuromodulatory effect on the neuronal plasticity, inhibiting LTD in prefrontal cortex. P2X7 receptor is responsible for communication between astrocytes and for synchronizing their activity. ATP and adenosine released by astrocytes act as neuromodulators both at the release site and heterosynaptically. Taken together, these multiple actions of nucleotides constitute a mechanism regulating homeostatic processes that are necessary for proper brain functioning: synaptic scaling and metaplasticity.

  2. Nucleotide-Dependent Bioautocatalytic Timer Reaction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ting-Ru; Hsu, Ching-Fong; Chen, Chih-Lin; Witek, Henryk A; Urban, Pawel L

    2016-09-16

    We describe a biochemical timer composed of three biocatalytic reactions involving three types of adenylate nucleotides: adenosine triphosphate (ATP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP), and adenosine monophosphate (AMP). The timer is triggered by a small amount of ATP or ADP. An abrupt increase in the ATP concentration (following numerous amplification cycles) leads to a sudden increase of luminescence from the reaction mixture. The time point when the luminescence appears is found to be a function of the initial concentration of the triggering nucleotide (5.0 × 10(-8)-1.0 × 10(-6) M), even in the presence of a complex biological matrix. The mechanism of the observed dependence of the time of luminescence increase on the concentration has been confirmed with simple kinetic models. Due to the biocompatibility of the proposed trienzymatic reaction scheme (sensitivity to common nucleotides and occurrence in a neutral pH aqueous environment), the scheme can be used in bioengineered systems that require modulation of the response time (light emission) by concentration.

  3. Vacuum ultraviolet photoionization of carbohydrates and nucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Joong-Won; Bernstein, Elliot R.

    2014-01-01

    Carbohydrates (2-deoxyribose, ribose, and xylose) and nucleotides (adenosine-, cytidine-, guanosine-, and uridine-5'-monophosphate) are generated in the gas phase, and ionized with vacuum ultraviolet photons (VUV, 118.2 nm). The observed time of flight mass spectra of the carbohydrate fragmentation are similar to those observed [J.-W. Shin, F. Dong, M. Grisham, J. J. Rocca, and E. R. Bernstein, Chem. Phys. Lett. 506, 161 (2011)] for 46.9 nm photon ionization, but with more intensity in higher mass fragment ions. The tendency of carbohydrate ions to fragment extensively following ionization seemingly suggests that nucleic acids might undergo radiation damage as a result of carbohydrate, rather than nucleobase fragmentation. VUV photoionization of nucleotides (monophosphate-carbohydrate-nucleobase), however, shows that the carbohydrate-nucleobase bond is the primary fragmentation site for these species. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate that the removed carbohydrate electrons by the 118.2 nm photons are associated with endocyclic C-C and C-O ring centered orbitals: loss of electron density in the ring bonds of the nascent ion can thus account for the observed fragmentation patterns following carbohydrate ionization. DFT calculations also indicate that electrons removed from nucleotides under these same conditions are associated with orbitals involved with the nucleobase-saccharide linkage electron density. The calculations give a general mechanism and explanation of the experimental results.

  4. Formation of Amino Acids and Nucleotide Bases in a Titan Atmosphere Simulation Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Yelle, R.V.; Buch, A.; Carrasco, N.; Cernogora, G.; Dutuit, O.; Quirico, E.; Sciamma-O'Brien, E.; Smith, M.A.; Somogyi, Á.; Szopa, C.; Thissen, R.; Vuitton, V.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The discovery of large (>100 u) molecules in Titan's upper atmosphere has heightened astrobiological interest in this unique satellite. In particular, complex organic aerosols produced in atmospheres containing C, N, O, and H, like that of Titan, could be a source of prebiotic molecules. In this work, aerosols produced in a Titan atmosphere simulation experiment with enhanced CO (N2/CH4/CO gas mixtures of 96.2%/2.0%/1.8% and 93.2%/5.0%/1.8%) were found to contain 18 molecules with molecular formulae that correspond to biological amino acids and nucleotide bases. Very high-resolution mass spectrometry of isotopically labeled samples confirmed that C4H5N3O, C4H4N2O2, C5H6N2O2, C5H5N5, and C6H9N3O2 are produced by chemistry in the simulation chamber. Gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses of the non-isotopic samples confirmed the presence of cytosine (C4H5N3O), uracil (C5H4N2O2), thymine (C5H6N2O2), guanine (C5H5N5O), glycine (C2H5NO2), and alanine (C3H7NO2). Adenine (C5H5N5) was detected by GC-MS in isotopically labeled samples. The remaining prebiotic molecules were detected in unlabeled samples only and may have been affected by contamination in the chamber. These results demonstrate that prebiotic molecules can be formed by the high-energy chemistry similar to that which occurs in planetary upper atmospheres and therefore identifies a new source of prebiotic material, potentially increasing the range of planets where life could begin. Key Words: Astrochemistry—Planetary atmospheres—Titan—Astrobiology. Astrobiology 12, 809–817. PMID:22917035

  5. Formation of amino acids and nucleotide bases in a Titan atmosphere simulation experiment.

    PubMed

    Hörst, S M; Yelle, R V; Buch, A; Carrasco, N; Cernogora, G; Dutuit, O; Quirico, E; Sciamma-O'Brien, E; Smith, M A; Somogyi, A; Szopa, C; Thissen, R; Vuitton, V

    2012-09-01

    The discovery of large (>100 u) molecules in Titan's upper atmosphere has heightened astrobiological interest in this unique satellite. In particular, complex organic aerosols produced in atmospheres containing C, N, O, and H, like that of Titan, could be a source of prebiotic molecules. In this work, aerosols produced in a Titan atmosphere simulation experiment with enhanced CO (N(2)/CH(4)/CO gas mixtures of 96.2%/2.0%/1.8% and 93.2%/5.0%/1.8%) were found to contain 18 molecules with molecular formulae that correspond to biological amino acids and nucleotide bases. Very high-resolution mass spectrometry of isotopically labeled samples confirmed that C(4)H(5)N(3)O, C(4)H(4)N(2)O(2), C(5)H(6)N(2)O(2), C(5)H(5)N(5), and C(6)H(9)N(3)O(2) are produced by chemistry in the simulation chamber. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses of the non-isotopic samples confirmed the presence of cytosine (C(4)H(5)N(3)O), uracil (C(5)H(4)N(2)O(2)), thymine (C(5)H(6)N(2)O(2)), guanine (C(5)H(5)N(5)O), glycine (C(2)H(5)NO(2)), and alanine (C(3)H(7)NO(2)). Adenine (C(5)H(5)N(5)) was detected by GC-MS in isotopically labeled samples. The remaining prebiotic molecules were detected in unlabeled samples only and may have been affected by contamination in the chamber. These results demonstrate that prebiotic molecules can be formed by the high-energy chemistry similar to that which occurs in planetary upper atmospheres and therefore identifies a new source of prebiotic material, potentially increasing the range of planets where life could begin.

  6. A single nucleotide polymorphism in NEUROD1 is associated with production traits in Nelore beef cattle.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, P S N; Tizioto, P C; Malago, W; do Nascimento, M L; Cesar, A S M; Diniz, W J S; de Souza, M M; Lanna, D P D; Tullio, R R; Mourão, G B; de A Mudadu, M; Coutinho, L L; de A Regitano, L C

    2016-07-14

    Feed efficiency and carcass characteristics are late-measured traits. The detection of molecular markers associated with them can help breeding programs to select animals early in life, and to predict breeding values with high accuracy. The objective of this study was to identify polymorphisms in the functional and positional candidate gene NEUROD1 (neurogenic differentiation 1), and investigate their associations with production traits in reference families of Nelore cattle. A total of 585 steers were used, from 34 sires chosen to represent the variability of this breed. By sequencing 14 animals with extreme residual feed intake (RFI) values, seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in NEUROD1 were identified. The investigation of marker effects on the target traits RFI, backfat thickness (BFT), ribeye area (REA), average body weight (ABW), and metabolic body weight (MBW) was performed with a mixed model using the restricted maximum likelihood method. SNP1062, which changes cytosine for guanine, had no significant association with RFI or REA. However, we found an additive effect on ABW (P ≤ 0.05) and MBW (P ≤ 0.05), with an estimated allele substitution effect of -1.59 and -0.93 kg0.75, respectively. A dominant effect of this SNP for BFT was also found (P ≤ 0.010). Our results are the first that identify NEUROD1 as a candidate that affects BFT, ABW, and MBW. Once confirmed, the inclusion of this SNP in dense panels may improve the accuracy of genomic selection for these traits in Nelore beef cattle as this SNP is not currently represented on SNP chips.

  7. Evaluation of the flanking nucleotide sequences of sarcomeric hypertrophic cardiomyopathy substitution mutations.

    PubMed

    Meurs, Kathryn M; Mealey, Katrina L

    2008-07-03

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a familial myocardial disease with a prevalence of 1 in 500. More than 400 causative mutations have been identified in 13 sarcomeric and myofilament related genes, 350 of these are substitution mutations within eight sarcomeric genes. Within a population, examples of recurring identical disease causing mutations that appear to have arisen independently have been noted as well as those that appear to have been inherited from a common ancestor. The large number of novel HCM mutations could suggest a mechanism of increased mutability within the sarcomeric genes. The objective of this study was to evaluate the most commonly reported HCM genes, beta myosin heavy chain (MYH7), myosin binding protein C, troponin I, troponin T, cardiac regulatory myosin light chain, cardiac essential myosin light chain, alpha tropomyosin and cardiac alpha-actin for sequence patterns surrounding the substitution mutations that may suggest a mechanism of increased mutability. The mutations as well as the 10 flanking nucleotides were evaluated for frequency of di-, tri- and tetranucleotides containing the mutation as well as for the presence of certain tri- and tetranculeotide motifs. The most common substitutions were guanine (G) to adenine (A) and cytosine (C) to thymidine (T). The CG dinucleotide had a significantly higher relative mutability than any other dinucleotide (p<0.05). The relative mutability of each possible trinucleotide and tetranucleotide sequence containing the mutation was calculated; none were at a statistically higher frequency than the others. The large number of G to A and C to T mutations as well as the relative mutability of CG may suggest that deamination of methylated CpG is an important mechanism for mutation development in at least some of these cardiac genes.

  8. Cytosine arabinoside reduces the numbers of granulocyte macrophage colony forming cells (GM-CFC) and high proliferative potential colony forming cells (HPP-CFC) in vivo in mice.

    PubMed

    Teleka, Stanley; Chijuwa, Alexander; Senga, Edward; Chisi, John E

    2011-12-01

    Cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C) is an S-phase specific cytotoxic drug used in the treatment of malignancies. It is converted to Cytosine Arabinoside triphosphate (Ara-CTP) in the cell. Cytosine Arabinoside triphosphate, reversibly displaces deoxy cytidine triphosphate from DNA polymerase for incorporation into DNA. This process leads to cell death. To investigate the in vivo effects of Ara-C on the Granulocyte Macrophage Colony Forming Cells (GM-CFC) and High Proliferative Potential Colony Forming Cells (HPP-CFC) respectively in mice. Ara-C (150mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally (i.p) once to mice and bone marrow cells sampled on days 1, 3 and 6. Ara-C reduced the numbers of both GM-CFC and HPP-CFC in the bone marrow. HPP-CFCs were initially more sensitive to Ara-C treatment than GM-CFCs. In the six days after treatment the effect on GM-CFC persisted, while there was a partial recovery in the number of HPP-CFCs. It is possible that Ara-C disturbs the stem cells niche by damaging the stromal cells of the bone marrow microenvironment. This would result in derangement of HPP-CFC proliferation.

  9. DNA methylation at the C-5 position of cytosine by methyl radicals: a possible role for epigenetic change during carcinogenesis by environmental agents.

    PubMed

    Kasai, Hiroshi; Kawai, Kazuaki

    2009-06-01

    During carcinogenesis, methylation of the C-5 position of cytosines in the promoter region of tumor suppressor genes is often observed. Enzymatic DNA methylation is a widely accepted mechanism for this phenomenon. It is interesting to propose a free radical mechanism for 5-methyldeoxycytidine (m(5)dC) production, because the C-5 position of cytosine is an active site for free radical reactions. When deoxycytidine (dC) and cumene hydroperoxide (CuOOH), a tumor promoter and a methyl radical producer, were reacted in the presence of ferrous ion at pH 7.4, the formation of m(5)dC was observed. The same reaction also proceeded with t-butyl hydroperoxide (BuOOH). The formation of m(5)dC was also observed in DNA by the CuOOH treatment. This is the first report of chemical DNA methylation at cytosine C-5 by environmental tumor promoters. We propose here that this reaction is one of the important mechanisms of de novo DNA methylation during carcinogenesis, because methyl radicals are produced by the biotransformation of various endogenous and exogenous compounds.

  10. Reactivity of cytosine and thymine in single-base-pair mismatches with hydroxylamine and osmium tetroxide and its application to the study of mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Cotton, R G; Rodrigues, N R; Campbell, R D

    1988-01-01

    The chemical reactivity of thymine (T), when mismatched with the bases cytosine, guanine, and thymine, and of cytosine (C), when mismatched with thymine, adenine, and cytosine, has been examined. Heteroduplex DNAs containing such mismatched base pairs were first incubated with osmium tetroxide (for T and C mismatches) or hydroxylamine (for C mismatches) and then incubated with piperidine to cleave the DNA at the modified mismatched base. This cleavage was studied with an internally labeled strand containing the mismatched T or C, such that DNA cleavage and thus reactivity could be detected by gel electrophoresis. Cleavage at a total of 13 T and 21 C mismatches isolated (by at least three properly paired bases on both sides) single-base-pair mismatches was identified. All T or C mismatches studied were cleaved. By using end-labeled DNA probes containing T or C single-base-pair mismatches and conditions for limited cleavage, we were able to show that cleavage was at the base predicted by sequence analysis and that mismatches in a length of DNA could be readily detected by such an approach. This procedure may enable detection of all single-base-pair mismatches by use of sense and antisense probes and thus may be used to identify the mutated base and its position in a heteroduplex. Images PMID:3260032

  11. Reactivity of cytosine and thymine in single-base-pair mismatches with hydroxylamine and osmium tetroxide and its application to the study of mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Cotton, R.G.H.; Rodrigues, N.R.; Campbell, R.D. )

    1988-06-01

    The chemical reactivity of thymine (T), when mismatched with the bases cytosine, guanine, and thymine, and of cytosine (C), when mismatched with thymine, adenine, and cytosine, has been examined. Heteroduplex DNAs containing such mismatched base pairs were first incubated with osmium tetroxide (for T and C mismatches) or hydroxylamine (for C mismatches) and then incubated with piperidine to cleave the DNA at the modified mismatched base. This cleavage was studied with an internally labeled strand containing the mismatched T or C, such that DNA cleavage and thus reactivity could be detected by gel electrophoresis. Cleavage at a total of 13 T and 21 C mismatches isolated (by at least three properly paired bases on both sides) single-base-pair mismatches was identified. All T or C mismatches studied were cleaved. By using end-labeled DNA probes containing T or C single-base-pair mismatches and conditions for limited cleavage, the authors were able to show that cleavage was at the base predicted by sequence analysis and that mismatches in a length of DNA could be readily detected by such an approach. This procedure may enable detection of all single-base-pair mismatches by use of sense and antisense probes and thus may be used by identify the mutated base and its position in a heteroduplex.

  12. The calculated free energy effects of 5-methyl cytosine on the B to Z transition in DNA.

    PubMed

    Pearlman, D A; Kollman, P A

    We have examined the free energy effects of 5-methylation of cytosine on the B in equilibrium Z conformational equilibrium in DNA. Free energy differences were calculated using the free energy perturbation approach, which uses an easily derived equation from classical statistical mechanics to relate the free energy difference between two states to the ensemble average of the potential energy difference between the states. Calculations were carried both in explicit solvent and (for comparison) in vacuo. The free energy values obtained for the explicit solvent systems are total free energies, with contributions from all parts of the system (solvent + solute), and so are relevant to the B in equilibrium Z transitions observed under real (physiological) conditions. We calculate that in solution, methylation makes the B in equilibrium Z transition more favorable by about -0.4 kcal/mole base pair (bp) in free energy. This value compares well with approximate experimentally derived values of about -0.3 kcal/mole-bp. We also discuss a method for determining the free energy difference between conformational states poorly maintained by a potential energy model. Finally, the effects of methylation on the melting temperature of DNA are examined.

  13. The efficacy and adverse event profile of dexamethasone, melphalan, actinomycin D, and cytosine arabinoside (DMAC) chemotherapy in relapsed canine lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Parsons-Doherty, Melissa; Poirier, Valerie J.; Monteith, Gabrielle

    2014-01-01

    In this retrospective study, a chemotherapy protocol using dexamethasone, melphalan, actinomycin D, and cytosine arabinoside (DMAC) was evaluated for efficacy and adverse event profile as a first line rescue protocol in 86 client-owned dogs previously treated with a CHOP-based protocol. Forty-three dogs (43%) achieved remission (16% complete remission, 27% partial remission), and 57% were non-responders. The median overall progression-free survival (PFS) was 24 days. Adverse events included thrombocytopenia in 41% of dogs, neutropenia in 17% of dogs, and gastrointestinal toxicity in 13% of dogs. Overall, 16% (13/79) dogs experienced grade III to IV thrombocytopenia, 8% (6/74) dogs grade III to IV neutropenia and 1% (1/79) dogs grade III to IV gastrointestinal toxicity. The efficacy of the DMAC protocol is similar to that of other rescue protocols in dogs with relapsed lymphoma but is associated with shorter PFS. The main toxicity is thrombocytopenia, which may limit treatment. PMID:24489398

  14. Genomic Change, Retrotransposon Mobilization and Extensive Cytosine Methylation Alteration in Brassica napus Introgressions from Two Intertribal Hybridizations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xueli; Ge, Xianhong; Shao, Yujiao; Sun, Genlou; Li, Zaiyun

    2013-01-01

    Hybridization and introgression represent important means for the transfer and/or de novo origination of traits and play an important role in facilitating speciation and plant breeding. Two sets of introgression lines in Brassica napus L. were previously established by its intertribal hybridizations with two wild species and long-term selection. In this study, the methods of amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP), sequence-specific amplification polymorphism (SSAP) and methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism (MSAP) were used to determine their genomic change, retrotransposon mobilization and cytosine methylation alteration in these lines. The genomic change revealed by the loss or gain of AFLP bands occurred for ∼10% of the total bands amplified in the two sets of introgressions, while no bands specific for wild species were detected. The new and absent SSAP bands appeared for 9 out of 11 retrotransposons analyzed, with low frequency of new bands and their total percentage of about 5% in both sets. MSAP analysis indicated that methylation changes were common in these lines (33.4–39.8%) and the hypermethylation was more frequent than hypomethylation. Our results suggested that certain extents of genetic and epigenetic alterations were induced by hybridization and alien DNA introgression. The cryptic mechanism of these changes and potential application of these lines in breeding were also discussed. PMID:23468861

  15. Improved survival in young children with acute granulocytic leukemia treated with combination therapy using cyclophosphamide, oncovin, cytosine arabinoside, and prednisone.

    PubMed

    Madanat, F F; Sullivan, M P

    1979-09-01

    Seven of 17 children (41%) under 5 years of age with acute granulocytic leukemia (AGL) treated with either cytosine arabinoside-cytoxan (CA-CYT) or Mini-COAP (CA-CYT with vincristine sulfate [VCR] and prednisone) have been in continuous complete remission 4 years or more. CA and CYT were each given in the dosage of 120 mg/m2 intravenously, daily in 3 divided doses, for 4 days. Induction consisted of two courses given at intervals of 2 weeks; during maintenance the courses were repeated at intervals of 4 weeks. In the Mini-COAP regimen, standard 28-day VCR-prednisone therapy was superimposed on CA-CYT induction and 4-day VCR-prednisone pulses were superimposed on CA-CYT maintenance. Transient moderate to severe myelosuppression was frequent; other manifestations of toxicity were mild. Administration of drugs at home was feasible in many instances. Mini-COAP was proved to be an effective therapeutic regimen for young children with AGL and should be considered as initial therapy.

  16. Protein synthesis in cells infected by Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus (Ac-NPV): the effect of cytosine arabinoside.

    PubMed

    Dobos, P; Cochran, M A

    1980-06-01

    Twenty-two virion polypeptides (VP) were detected reproducibly when the occluded form (OV) of [35S]methionine-labeled Ac-NPV, purified from polyhedral inclusion bodies (PIB), was analyzed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. Ten of the VPs and the polyhedral protein (PP) were phosphorylated and 6 VPs were glycoproteins. Purified, nonoccluded virus (NOV) revealed 25 polypeptides. During a single cycle of virus replication, the synthesis of 33 infected cell polypeptides (1CP) was detected in different relative proportions at different times. They were arbitrarily designated as early (0-12hr), middle (12-18 hr), and late 18-24 hr) polypeptides. Most of the middle and late proteins seemed to be viral structural proteins. Rapid post-translational cleavage of IPCs was not observed; however, pulse-chase experiments revealed post-translational modifications of at least four polypeptides. Inhibition of DNA synthesis at the time of infection did not prevent the synthesis of ICPs, VPs, or the formation of PIBs. Progeny PIB from both control and cytosine arabinoside (Ara C)-treated cells that were infected with radiochemically pure [3H]thymidine-labeled NOV contained parental virus DNA. Electron micrographs of thin sections showed that, whereas PIBs from control cultures contained complete virions, those from Ara (C-treated cells contained both full and empty virus.

  17. Bivalent Regions of Cytosine Methylation and H3K27 Acetylation Suggest an Active Role for DNA Methylation at Enhancers.

    PubMed

    Charlet, Jessica; Duymich, Christopher E; Lay, Fides D; Mundbjerg, Kamilla; Dalsgaard Sørensen, Karina; Liang, Gangning; Jones, Peter A

    2016-05-05

    The role of cytosine methylation in the structure and function of enhancers is not well understood. In this study, we investigate the role of DNA methylation at enhancers by comparing the epigenomes of the HCT116 cell line and its highly demethylated derivative, DKO1. Unlike promoters, a portion of regular and super- or stretch enhancers show active H3K27ac marks co-existing with extensive DNA methylation, demonstrating the unexpected presence of bivalent chromatin in both cultured and uncultured cells. Furthermore, our findings also show that bivalent regions have fewer nucleosome-depleted regions and transcription factor-binding sites than monovalent regions. Reduction of DNA methylation genetically or pharmacologically leads to a decrease of the H3K27ac mark. Thus, DNA methylation plays an unexpected dual role at enhancer regions, being anti-correlated focally at transcription factor-binding sites but positively correlated globally with the active H3K27ac mark to ensure structural enhancer integrity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Antitumor effects and radiosensitization of cytosine deaminase and thymidine kinase fusion suicide gene on colorectal carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, De-Hua; Liu, Li; Chen, Long-Hua

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the killing effect and radiosensitization of double suicide gene mediated by adenovirus on colorectal carcinoma cells. METHODS: Colorectal carcinoma cell line SW480 was transfected with adenovirus expression vector containing cytosine deaminase (CD) and thymidine kinase (TK) fusion gene. The expression of CD-TK fusion gene was detected by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. The toxic effect of ganciclovir (GCV) and 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) on infected cells was determined by MTT assay. The radiosensitization of double suicide gene was evaluated by clonogenic assay. RESULTS: After prodrugs were used, the survival rate of colorectal carcinoma cells was markedly decreased. When GCV and 5-FC were used in combination, the cytotoxicity and bystander effect were markedly superior to a single prodrug (χ2 = 30.371, P<0.01). Both GCV and 5-FC could sensitize colorectal carcinoma cells to the toxic effect of radiation, and greater radiosensitization was achieved when both prodrug were used in combination. CONCLUSION: CD-TK double suicide gene can kill and radiosensitize colorectal carcinoma cells. PMID:15918188

  19. Biochemical behavior of N-oxidized cytosine and adenine bases in DNA polymerase-mediated primer extension reactions

    PubMed Central

    Tsunoda, Hirosuke; Kudo, Tomomi; Masaki, Yoshiaki; Ohkubo, Akihiro; Seio, Kohji; Sekine, Mitsuo

    2011-01-01

    To clarify the biochemical behavior of 2′-deoxyribonucleoside 5′-triphosphates and oligodeoxyribonucleotides (ODNs) containing cytosine N-oxide (Co) and adenine N-oxide (Ao), we examined their base recognition ability in DNA duplex formation using melting temperature (Tm) experiments and their substrate specificity in DNA polymerase-mediated replication. As the result, it was found that the Tm values of modified DNA–DNA duplexes incorporating 2′-deoxyribonucleoside N-oxide derivatives significantly decreased compared with those of the unmodified duplexes. However, single insertion reactions by DNA polymerases of Klenow fragment (KF) (exo−) and Vent (exo−) suggested that Co and Ao selectively recognized G and T, respectively. Meanwhile, the kinetic study showed that the incorporation efficiencies of the modified bases were lower than those of natural bases. Ab initio calculations suggest that these modified bases can form the stable base pairs with the original complementary bases. These results indicate that the modified bases usually recognize the original bases as partners for base pairing, except for misrecognition of dATP by the action of KF (exo−) toward Ao on the template, and the primers could be extended on the template DNA. When they misrecognized wrong bases, the chain could not be elongated so that the modified base served as the chain terminator. PMID:21300642

  20. A bacterial gene codA encoding cytosine deaminase is an effective conditional negative selectable marker in Glycine max.

    PubMed

    Shao, Min; Michno, Jean-Michel; Hotton, Sara K; Blechl, Ann; Thomson, James

    2015-10-01

    Research describes the practical application of the codA negative selection marker in Soybean. Conditions are given for codA selection at both the shooting and rooting stages of regeneration. Conditional negative selection is a powerful technique whereby the absence of a gene product allows survival in otherwise lethal conditions. In plants, the Escherichia coli gene codA has been employed as a negative selection marker. Our research demonstrates that codA can be used as a negative selection marker in soybean, Glycine max. Like most plants, soybean does not contain cytosine deaminase activity and we show here that wild-type seedlings are not affected by inclusion of 5-FC in growth media. In contrast, transgenic G. max plants expressing codA and grown in the presence of more than 200 μg/mL 5-FC exhibit reductions in hypocotyl and taproot lengths, and severe suppression of lateral root development. We also demonstrate a novel negative selection-rooting assay in which codA-expressing aerial tissues or shoot cuttings are inhibited for root formation in media containing 5-FC. Taken together these techniques allow screening during either the regeneration or rooting phase of tissue culture.

  1. Micronucleated Erythrocytes in Peripheral Blood from Neonate Rats Exposed by Breastfeeding to Cyclophosphamide, Colchicine, or Cytosine-Arabinoside.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Meda, Belinda C; Bañales-Martínez, Luis R; Zamora-Perez, Ana L; Lemus-Varela, María de Lourdes; Trujillo, Xóchitl; Sánchez-Parada, María G; Torres-Mendoza, Blanca M; Armendáriz-Borunda, Juan; Zúñiga-González, Guillermo M

    2016-01-01

    Genotoxic exposure to chemical substances is common, and nursing mothers could transmit harmful substances or their metabolites to their offspring through breast milk. We explored the possibility of determining genotoxic effects in the erythrocytes of breastfeeding rat pups whose mothers received a genotoxic compound while nursing. Ten groups of female rats and five pups per dam were studied. The control group received sterile water, and the experimental groups received one of three different doses of cyclophosphamide, colchicine, or cytosine-arabinoside. Blood smears were prepared from samples taken from each dam and pup every 24 h for six days. There were increased numbers of micronucleated erythrocytes (MNEs) and micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MNPCEs) in the samples from pups in the experimental groups (P < 0.02) and increased MNPCE frequencies in the samples from the dams (P < 0.05). These results demonstrate the vertical transmission of the genotoxic effect of the compounds tested. In conclusion, assessing MNEs in breastfeeding neonate rats to assess DNA damage may be a useful approach for identifying genotoxic compounds and/or cytotoxic effects. This strategy could help in screening for therapeutic approaches that are genotoxic during the lactation stage and these assessments might also be helpful for developing preventive strategies to counteract harmful effects.

  2. Ultrafast decay of electronically excited singlet cytosine via a pi,pi* to n(O),pi* state switch.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Nina; Blancafort, Lluís; Olivucci, Massimo; Kohler, Bern; Robb, Michael A

    2002-06-19

    Singlet fluorescence lifetimes of adenosine, cytidine, guanosine, and thymidine, determined by femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy (Pecourt, J.-M. L.; Peon, J.; Kohler, B. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2000, 122, 9348. Pecourt, J.-M. L.; Peon, J.; Kohler, B. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2001, 123, 10370), show that the excited states produced by 263 nm light in these nucleosides decay in the subpicosecond range (290-720 fs). Ultrafast radiationless decay to the ground state greatly reduces the probability of photochemical damage. In this work we present a theoretical study of isolated cytosine, the chromophore of cytidine. The experimental lifetime of 720 fs indicates that there must be an ultrafast decay channel for this species. We have documented the possible decay channels and approximate energetics, using a valence-bond derived analysis to rationalize the structural details of the paths. The mechanism favored by our calculations and the experimental data involves (1) a two-mode decay coordinate composed of initial bond length inversion followed by internal vibrational energy redistribution (IVR) to populate a carbon pyramidalization mode, (2) a state switch between the pi,pi* and nO,pi* (excitation from oxygen lone pair) excited states, and (3) decay to the ground state through a conical intersention. A second decay path through the nN,pi* state (excitation from the nitrogen lone pair), with a higher barrier, involves out-of-plane bending of the amino substituent.

  3. Influence of developmental lead exposure on expression of DNA methyltransferases and methyl cytosine-binding proteins in hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Schneider, J S; Kidd, S K; Anderson, D W

    2013-02-13

    Developmental exposure to lead (Pb) has adverse effects on cognitive functioning and behavior that can persist into adulthood. Exposures that occur during fetal or early life periods may produce changes in brain related to physiological re-programming from an epigenetic influence such as altered DNA methylation status. Since DNA methylation is regulated by DNA methyltransferases and methyl cytosine-binding proteins, this study assessed the extent to which developmental Pb exposure might affect expression of these proteins in the hippocampus. Long Evans dams were fed chow with or without added Pb acetate (0, 150, 375, 750 ppm) prior to breeding and remained on the same diet through weaning (perinatal exposure group). Other animals were exposed to the same doses of Pb but exposure started on postnatal day 1 and continued through weaning (early postnatal exposure group). All animals were euthanized on day 55 and hippocampi were removed. Western blot analyses showed significant effects of Pb exposure on DNMT1, DNMT3a, and MeCP2 expression, with effects often seen at the lowest level of exposure and modified by sex and developmental window of Pb exposure. These data suggest potential epigenetic effects of developmental Pb exposure on DNA methylation mediated at least in part through dysregulation of methyltransferases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The Mouse Cytosine-5 RNA Methyltransferase NSun2 Is a Component of the Chromatoid Body and Required for Testis Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Shobbir; Tuorto, Francesca; Menon, Suraj; Blanco, Sandra; Cox, Claire; Flores, Joana V.; Watt, Stephen; Kudo, Nobuaki R.; Lyko, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Posttranscriptional regulatory mechanisms are crucial for protein synthesis during spermatogenesis and are often organized by the chromatoid body. Here, we identify the RNA methyltransferase NSun2 as a novel component of the chromatoid body and, further, show that NSun2 is essential for germ cell differentiation in the mouse testis. In NSun2-depleted testes, genes encoding Ddx4, Miwi, and Tudor domain-containing (Tdr) proteins are repressed, indicating that RNA-processing and posttranscriptional pathways are impaired. Loss of NSun2 specifically blocked meiotic progression of germ cells into the pachytene stage, as spermatogonial and Sertoli cells were unaffected in knockout mice. We observed the same phenotype when we simultaneously deleted NSun2 and Dnmt2, the only other cytosine-5 RNA methyltransferase characterized to date, indicating that Dnmt2 was not functionally redundant with NSun2 in spermatogonial stem cells or Sertoli cells. Specific NSun2- and Dnmt2-methylated tRNAs decreased in abundance when both methyltransferases were deleted, suggesting that RNA methylation pathways play an essential role in male germ cell differentiation. PMID:23401851

  5. Thymidine kinase/ganciclovir and cytosine deaminase/5-fluorocytosine suicide gene therapy-induced cell apoptosis in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kong, H; Tao, L; Qi, K; Wang, Y; Li, Q; Du, J; Huang, Z

    2013-09-01

    The present study was conducted to explore the efficacy of suicide gene therapy with thymidine kinase (TK) in combination with cytosine deaminase (CD) for breast cancer. The expression of CD/TK was detected in the infected cells by RT-PCR. The killing effect on MCF-7 cells following treatment was analyzed by MTT assay. The morphological characteristics of the cells were observed by electron microscopy, and the distribution of the cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry. Caspase‑3 and -8 activities were detected by absorption spectrometry. Cytotoxic assays showed that cells transfected with CD/TK became more sensitive to the prodrugs. Morphological features characteristic of apoptosis were noted in the MCF‑7 cells via electron microscopy. The experimental data showed that the proportion of MCF-7 cells during the different phases of the cell cycle varied significantly following treatment with the prodrugs. The activity of caspase‑3 gradually increased following treatment with increasing concentrations of the prodrugs. We conclude that the TK/ganciclovir and CD/5-fluorocytosine suicide gene system used here induces apoptosis in breast cancer cells, and provides a promising treatment modality for breast cancer.

  6. [Mesenchymal stem cells expressing cytosine deaminase inhibit growth of murine melanoma B16F10 in vivo].

    PubMed

    Krasikova, L S; Karshieva, S S; Cheglakov, I B; Belyavsky, A V

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the efficacy of mesenchymal stem cell-based suicide gene therapy in mice bearing murine melanoma B16F10. Adipose mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were transfected with plasmid constructs expressing cytosine deaminase fused with uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (CDA/UPRT) or CDA/UPRT fused with HSV-1 tegument protein VP22 (CDA/UPRT/VP22). In this study, we demonstrate that direct intratumoral transplantation of MSCs expressing CDA/UPRT or CDA/UPRT/VP22 followed by systemic administration of 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) results in a significant inhibition of tumor growth. There was a 53% reduction in tumor volume in mice treated with CDA/UPRT-MSCs and 58% reduction in tumor volume in mice treated with CDA/UPRT/VP22-MSCs as compared with control animals transplanted with B16F10 melanoma alone. Injection of CDA/UPRT-MSC and CDA/UPRT/VP22-MSC prolonged the life span of mice bearing B16F10 melanoma by 15 and 26%, respectively. The data indicate that in murine B16F10 melanoma model, MSCs encoding CDA/UPRT suicide gene have a significant antitumor effect.

  7. The growth of brain tumors can be suppressed by multiple transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells expressing cytosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Chang, Da-Young; Yoo, Seung-Wan; Hong, Youngtae; Kim, Sujeong; Kim, Se Joong; Yoon, Sung-Hwa; Cho, Kyung-Gi; Paek, Sun Ha; Lee, Young-Don; Kim, Sung-Soo; Suh-Kim, Haeyoung

    2010-10-15

    Suicide genes have recently emerged as an attractive alternative therapy for the treatment of various types of intractable cancers. The efficacy of suicide gene therapy relies on efficient gene delivery to target tissues and the localized concentration of final gene products. Here, we showed a potential ex vivo therapy that used mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as cellular vehicles to deliver a bacterial suicide gene, cytosine deaminase (CD) to brain tumors. MSCs were engineered to produce CD enzymes at various levels using different promoters. When co-cultured, CD-expressing MSCs had a bystander, anti-cancer effect on neighboring C6 glioma cells in proportion to the levels of CD enzymes that could convert a nontoxic prodrug, 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) into cytotoxic 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in vitro. Consistent with the in vitro results, for early stage brain tumors induced by intracranial inoculation of C6 cells, transplantation of CD-expressing MSCs reduced tumor mass in proportion to 5-FC dosages. However, for later stage, established tumors, a single treatment was insufficient, but only multiple transplantations were able to successfully repress tumor growth. Our findings indicate that the level of total CD enzyme activity is a critical parameter that is likely to affect the clinical efficacy for CD gene therapy. Our results also highlight the potential advantages of autograftable MSCs compared with other types of allogeneic stem cells for the treatment of recurrent glioblastomas through repetitive treatments.

  8. Oncolytic virotherapy for ovarian carcinomatosis using a replication-selective vaccinia virus armed with a yeast cytosine deaminase gene.

    PubMed

    Chalikonda, S; Kivlen, M H; O'Malley, M E; Eric Dong, X D; McCart, J A; Gorry, M C; Yin, X-Y; Brown, C K; Zeh, H J; Guo, Z S; Bartlett, D L

    2008-02-01

    In this study, we assessed the ability of a highly tumor-selective oncolytic vaccinia virus armed with a yeast cytosine deaminase gene to infect and lyse human and murine ovarian tumors both in vitro and in vivo. The virus vvDD-CD could infect, replicate in and effectively lyse both human and mouse ovarian cancer cells in vitro. In two different treatment schedules involving either murine MOSEC or human A2780 ovarian carcinomatosis models, regional delivery of vvDD-CD selectively targeted tumor cells and ovarian tissue, effectively delaying the development of either tumor or ascites and leading to significant survival advantages. Oncolytic virotherapy using vvDD-CD in combination with the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine conferred an additional long-term survival advantage upon tumor-bearing immunocompetent mice. These findings demonstrate that a tumor-selective oncolytic vaccinia combined with gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy is a highly effective strategy for treating advanced ovarian cancers in both syngeneic mouse and human xenograft models. Given the biological safety, tumor selectivity and oncolytic potency of this armed oncolytic virus, this dual therapy merits further investigation as a promising new treatment for metastatic ovarian cancer.

  9. Human neural stem cells transduced with IFN-beta and cytosine deaminase genes intensify bystander effect in experimental glioma.

    PubMed

    Ito, S; Natsume, A; Shimato, S; Ohno, M; Kato, T; Chansakul, P; Wakabayashi, T; Kim, S U

    2010-05-01

    Previously, we have shown that the genetically modified human neural stem cells (NSCs) show remarkable migratory and tumor-tropic capability to track down brain tumor cells and deliver therapeutic agents with significant therapeutic benefit. Human NSCs that were retrovirally transduced with cytosine deaminase (CD) gene showed remarkable 'bystander killer effect' on the glioma cells after application of the prodrug, 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC). Interferon-beta (IFN-beta) is known for its antiproliferative effects in a variety of cancers. In our pilot clinical trial in glioma, the IFN-beta gene has shown potent antitumor activity in patients with malignant glioma. In the present study, we sought to examine whether human NSCs genetically modified to express both CD and IFN-beta genes intensified antitumor effect on experimental glioma. In vitro studies showed that CD/IFN-beta-expressing NSCs exerted a remarkable bystander effect on human glioma cells after the application of 5-FC, as compared with parental NSCs and CD-expressing NSCs. In animal models with human glioma orthotopic xenograft, intravenously infused CD/IFN-beta-expressing NSCs produced striking antitumor effect after administration of the prodrug 5-FC. Furthermore, the same gene therapy regimen prolonged survival periods significantly in the experimental animals. The results of the present study indicate that the multimodal NSC-based treatment strategy might have therapeutic potential against gliomas.

  10. Cytosine deaminase-expressing human neural stem cells inhibit tumor growth in prostate cancer-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hong Jun; Doo, Seung Whan; Kim, Dae Hong; Cha, Young Joo; Kim, Jae Heon; Song, Yun Seob; Kim, Seung U

    2013-07-10

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy among men. Prostate cancer-related deaths are largely attributable to the development of hormone resistance in the tumor. No effective chemotherapy has yet been developed for advanced prostate cancer. It is desirable if a drug can be delivered directly and specifically to prostate cancer cells. Stem cells have selective migration ability toward cancer cells and therapeutic genes can be easily transduced into stem cells. In one form of gene therapy for cancer, the stem cells carry a gene encoding an enzyme that transforms an inert prodrug into a toxic product. Cytosine deaminase (CD) transforms the pro-drug 5-fluorocytosine into highly cytotoxic 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). The migration of the genetically modified stem cells was monitored by molecular magnetic resonance imaging, after labeling the stem cells with fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). Human neural stem cells encoding CD (HB1.F3.CD) were prepared and labeled with MNP. In tumor-bearing C57B mice, systemically transplanted HB1.F3.CD stem cells migrated toward the tumor and in combination with prodrug 5-FC, the volume of tumor implant was significantly reduced. These findings may contribute to development of a new selective chemotherapeutic strategy against prostate cancer.

  11. Role of DNA methylation in growth and differentiation in Physcomitrella patens and characterization of cytosine DNA methyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Malik, Garima; Dangwal, Meenakshi; Kapoor, Sanjay; Kapoor, Meenu

    2012-11-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation are known to regulate important developmental processes in higher eukaryotes. However, little is known about the necessity and role of this process in early land plants. Using the methyltransferase (MTase) inhibitor zebularine (1-(β-d-ribofuranosyl)-1,2-dihydropyrimidine-2-one), the impact of loss of genome-wide methylation on the overall development in Physcomitrella patens was analyzed. It is observed that various aspects of growth and differentiation during gametophyte development become aberrant. A search for the core molecular components of methylation machinery, cytosine DNA MTases, revealed the presence of seven loci in the P. patens genome. Five of the loci code for MTases that are similar to corresponding proteins in higher plants, while two MTases appear specific to P. patens and are closely related to human DNMT3a and DNMT3b, respectively. These proteins possess all the conserved catalytic motifs characteristic of MTases and a domain of unknown function, DUF3444. Association of these highly conserved motifs with a DUF has not been reported in any of the MTases known so far. All the seven genes are differentially but ubiquitously expressed in gametophytes at low levels. Subcellular localization of GFP-fused proteins shows patterns of distribution that can be correlated with their putative cellular functions. This work bridges the knowledge of MTases in P. patens and makes this simple model plant accessible for studies on epigenetic aspects that remain intractable in higher plants.

  12. Computational modeling and functional analysis of Herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase and Escherichia coli cytosine deaminase fusion protein

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jufeng; Wang, Zhanli; Wei, Fang; Qiu, Wei; Zhang, Liangren; Huang, Qian . E-mail: qhuang@sjtu.edu.cn

    2007-08-17

    Herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (HSV-1TK) and Escherichia coli cytosine deaminase (CD) fusion protein was designed using InsightII software. The structural rationality of the fusion proteins incorporating a series of flexible linker peptide was analyzed, and a suitable linker peptide was chosen for further investigated. The recombinant plasmid containing the coding regions of HSV-1TK and CD cDNA connected by this linker peptide coding sequence was generated and subsequently transfected into the human embryonic kidney 293 cells (HEK293). The Western blotting indicated that the recombinant fusion protein existed as a dimer with a molecular weight of approximately 90 kDa. The toxicity of the prodrug on the recombinant plasmid-transfected human lung cancer cell line NCIH460 was evaluated, which showed that TKglyCD-expressing cells conferred upon cells prodrug sensitivities equivalent to that observed for each enzyme independently. Most noteworthy, cytotoxicity could be enhanced by concurrently treating TKglyCD-expressing cells with prodrugs GCV and 5-FC. The results indicate that we have successfully constructed a HSV-1TKglyCD fusion gene which might have a potential application for cancer gene therapy.

  13. Comparison of inhibition of murine leukaemia cell growth by 9-isothiocyanatoacridine and its cytosine adduct: involvement of thiols.

    PubMed

    Bajdichova, M; Paulikova, H; Jakubikova, J; Sabolova, D

    2007-01-01

    Cytotoxicity of two fluorescent acridine derivatives - 9-isothiocyanatoacridine (AcITC) and N-(9-acridinylthiocarbamoyl) cytosine (AcTCC) - a novel acridine compound, were investigated. Both substances have cytotoxic activity against the L1210 cellular line, IC50 values were in the micromolar range. Despite the high reactivity of AcITC towards thiols, its effects on leukemia cells were similar to naturally occurring isothiocyanates. AcITC changed the intracellular level of glutathione (GSH), and induced apoptosis. Arrest of cell cycle (G2/M-phase) was also observed. AcITC primarily reacted with -SH groups on cellular surface, and the study of the interaction of the isotiocyanate with human erythrocyte ghosts confirmed that the plasma membrane was the first place where AcITC bound. AcTCC does not react with cellular thiols; images obtained with fluorescent microscopy confirmed interaction of AcTCC with chromatine. Although AcTCC induced cellular arrest in the G2/M phase, apoptosis was not confirmed.

  14. Raman spectroscopy and quantum-mechanical analysis of tautomeric forms in cytosine and 5-methylcytosine on gold surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Dinh Bao; Nguyen, Thanh Danh; Kim, Sangsoo; Joo, Sang-Woo

    2017-03-01

    Spectral differences between cytosine (Cyt) and 5-methylcytosine (5MC) were investigated by means of Raman spectroscopy with a combination of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) revealed discriminating peaks of 5MC from those of Cyt upon adsorption on gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). Among the notable features, the multiple bands between 850 and 700 cm- 1 for the ring-breathing modes of 5MC and Cyt could be correlated well with the simulated spectra based on the DFT calculations of the adsorbates on the gold cluster atoms. The relative energetic stabilities of the enol/keto and the amino/imino tautomeric forms of Cyt and 5MC have been estimated using DFT calculations, before and after binding six atom gold clusters. Among the six tautomeric forms, the 7H keto amino and the 4H imino trans forms are expected to be predominant in binding gold atoms, whereas the enol trans/cis conformers would coexist in the free gas phase. Our approach may provide useful theoretical guidelines for identifying 5MC from Cyt by analyzing Raman spectra on gold surfaces on the basis of quantum-mechanical calculations.

  15. How the CCA-Adding Enzyme Selects Adenine over Cytosine at Position 76 of tRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Baocheng; Xiong, Yong; Steitz, Thomas A.

    2010-11-22

    CCA-adding enzymes [ATP(CTP):tRNA nucleotidyltransferases] add CCA onto the 3{prime} end of transfer RNA (tRNA) precursors without using a nucleic acid template. Although the mechanism by which cytosine (C) is selected at position 75 of tRNA has been established, the mechanism by which adenine (A) is selected at position 76 remains elusive. Here, we report five cocrystal structures of the enzyme complexed with both a tRNA mimic and nucleoside triphosphates under catalytically active conditions. These structures suggest that adenosine 5{prime}-monophosphate is incorporated onto the A76 position of the tRNA via a carboxylate-assisted, one-metal-ion mechanism with aspartate 110 functioning as a general base. The discrimination against incorporation of cytidine 5{prime}-triphosphate (CTP) at position 76 arises from improper placement of the {alpha} phosphate of the incoming CTP, which results from the interaction of C with arginine 224 and prevents the nucleophilic attack by the 3{prime} hydroxyl group of cytidine75.

  16. How the CCA-Adding Enzyme Selects Adenine over Cytosine at Position 76 of tRNA

    SciTech Connect

    B Pan; Y Xiong; T Steitz

    2011-12-31

    CCA-adding enzymes [ATP(CTP):tRNA nucleotidyltransferases] add CCA onto the 3' end of transfer RNA (tRNA) precursors without using a nucleic acid template. Although the mechanism by which cytosine (C) is selected at position 75 of tRNA has been established, the mechanism by which adenine (A) is selected at position 76 remains elusive. Here, we report five cocrystal structures of the enzyme complexed with both a tRNA mimic and nucleoside triphosphates under catalytically active conditions. These structures suggest that adenosine 5'-monophosphate is incorporated onto the A76 position of the tRNA via a carboxylate-assisted, one-metal-ion mechanism with aspartate 110 functioning as a general base. The discrimination against incorporation of cytidine 5'-triphosphate (CTP) at position 76 arises from improper placement of the {alpha} phosphate of the incoming CTP, which results from the interaction of C with arginine 224 and prevents the nucleophilic attack by the 3' hydroxyl group of cytidine75.

  17. Micronucleated Erythrocytes in Peripheral Blood from Neonate Rats Exposed by Breastfeeding to Cyclophosphamide, Colchicine, or Cytosine-Arabinoside

    PubMed Central

    Bañales-Martínez, Luis R.; Lemus-Varela, María de Lourdes; Trujillo, Xóchitl; Sánchez-Parada, María G.; Armendáriz-Borunda, Juan; Zúñiga-González, Guillermo M.

    2016-01-01

    Genotoxic exposure to chemical substances is common, and nursing mothers could transmit harmful substances or their metabolites to their offspring through breast milk. We explored the possibility of determining genotoxic effects in the erythrocytes of breastfeeding rat pups whose mothers received a genotoxic compound while nursing. Ten groups of female rats and five pups per dam were studied. The control group received sterile water, and the experimental groups received one of three different doses of cyclophosphamide, colchicine, or cytosine-arabinoside. Blood smears were prepared from samples taken from each dam and pup every 24 h for six days. There were increased numbers of micronucleated erythrocytes (MNEs) and micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MNPCEs) in the samples from pups in the experimental groups (P < 0.02) and increased MNPCE frequencies in the samples from the dams (P < 0.05). These results demonstrate the vertical transmission of the genotoxic effect of the compounds tested. In conclusion, assessing MNEs in breastfeeding neonate rats to assess DNA damage may be a useful approach for identifying genotoxic compounds and/or cytotoxic effects. This strategy could help in screening for therapeutic approaches that are genotoxic during the lactation stage and these assessments might also be helpful for developing preventive strategies to counteract harmful effects. PMID:28018917

  18. Recognizing nucleotides by cross-tunneling currents for DNA sequencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagci, V. M. K.; Kaun, Chao-Cheng

    2011-07-01

    Using first-principles calculations, we study electron transport through nucleotides inside a rectangular nanogap formed by two pairs of gold electrodes which are perpendicular and parallel to the nucleobase plane. We propose that this setup will enhance the nucleotide selectivity of tunneling signals to a great extent. Information from three electrical probing processes offers full nucleotide recognition, which survives the noise from neighboring nucleotides and configuration fluctuations.

  19. HPLC purification of RNA aptamers up to 59 nucleotides with single-nucleotide resolution.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhen; Lin, Chi-Yen; Jaremko, William; Niu, Li

    2015-01-01

    An RNA sample is usually heterogeneous. RNA heterogeneity refers to difference in length or size (i.e., number of nucleotides [nt]), sequence, or alternative but coexisting conformations. Separation and purification of RNA is generally required for investigating the structure and function of RNA, such as RNA catalysis and RNA structure determination by nuclear magnetic resonance or crystallography. Separation and purification of RNA is also required for using RNAs as functional probes and therapeutics as well as building blocks for RNA nanoparticles. Previously established protocols are limited in separating RNAs longer than 25 nt by single-nucleotide resolution. When the length of RNAs becomes longer, single-nucleotide separation of RNAs becomes more challenging. Here we describe protocols, by the use of ion-pair, reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), to extend our ability to separate regular RNAs up to 59 nt with single-nucleotide resolution. For chemically modified RNAs at 2' positions on the ribose, we can resolve RNAs of similar sizes even with a 26 Da difference. This is much less than 320 Da, an average single-nucleotide molecular weight difference.

  20. Nucleotide sequence of polypyrimidines from cloned mouse DNA as determined by base-specific blockage of exonuclease action

    SciTech Connect

    Deugau, K.V.; Mitchel, R.E.J.; Birnboim, H.C.

    1983-01-01

    Cloned fragments of mouse DNA have been screened for the presence of long polypyrimidine/polypurine segments. The polypyrimidine portion of one such segment (about 2000 nucleotides in length) has been isolated by acidic depurination of the entire cloned fragment and plasmid vector followed by selective precipitation and 5'-/sup 32/P labeling. This polypyrimidine has been used to demonstrate a new procedure for sequencing. Covalent modification of thymine with a water-soluble carbodiimide, or cytosine with glutaric anhydride, at low levels blocked in the action of snake venom exonuclease. After deblocking, separation of the products of digestion by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis yields a sequence ladder which can be used to determine the position of C and T residues as in other sequencing methods. A sequence of 72 residues adjacent to the 5' end had been established, consisting principally of the repeating tetranucleotide (CCTT)n. A low ratio of endonuclease to exonuclease is essential for application of this method to sequences of this size. Accordingly, a very sensitive modification of a fluorometric endonuclease assay was developed and used to optimize pH and Mg/sup 2 +/ conditions to favor exonuclease activity over the accompanying endonuclease activity. The results clearly indicate that long polypyrimidine tracts can be efficiently prepared and their sequences determined with this method using commercially available exonuclease preparations without additional purification. 26 references, 5 figures.

  1. Evolution of Functional Six-Nucleotide DNA

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liqin; Yang, Zunyi; Sefah, Kwame; Bradley, Kevin M.; Hoshika, Shuichi; Kim, Myong-Jung; Kim, Hyo-Joong; Zhu1, Guizhi; Jiménez, Elizabeth; Cansiz, Sena; Teng, I-Ting; Champanhac, Carole; McLendon, Christopher; Liu, Chen; Zhang, Wen; Gerloff, Dietlind L.

    2015-01-01

    Axiomatically, the density of information stored in DNA, with just four nucleotides (GACT), is higher than in a binary code, but less than it might be if synthetic biologists succeed in adding independently replicating nucleotides to genetic systems. Such addition could also add additional functional groups, not found in natural DNA but useful for molecular performance. Here, we consider two new nucleotides (Z and P, 6-amino-5-nitro-3-(1′-β-D-2′-deoxyribo-furanosyl)-2(1H)-pyridone and 2-amino-8-(1′-β-D-2′-deoxyribofuranosyl)-imidazo[1,2-a]-1,3,5-triazin-4(8H)-one). These are designed to pair via strict Watson-Crick geometry. These were added to lies in a ibrarlaboratory in vitro evolution (LIVE) experiment; the GACTZP library was challenged to deliver molecules that bind selectively to liver cancer cells, but not to untransformed liver cells. Unlike in classical in vitro selection systems, low levels of mutation allow this system to evolve to create binding molecules not necessarily present in the original library. Over a dozen binding species were recovered. The best had Z and/or P in their sequences. Several had multiple, nearby, and adjacent Z’s and P’s. Only the weaker binders contained no Z or P at all. This suggests that this system explored much of the sequence space available to this genetic system, and that GACTZP libraries are richer reservoir of functionality than standard libraries. PMID:25966323

  2. A Single Nucleotide in Stem Loop II of 5′-Untranslated Region Contributes to Virulence of Enterovirus 71 in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Ming-Te; Wang, Shainn-Wei; Yu, Chun-Keung; Lin, Kuei-Hsiang; Lei, Huan-Yao; Su, Ih-Jen; Wang, Jen-Ren

    2011-01-01

    Background Enterovirus 71 (EV71) has emerged as a neuroinvasive virus responsible for several large outbreaks in the Asia-Pacific region while virulence determinant remains unexplored. Principal Findings In this report, we investigated increased virulence of unadapted EV71 clinical isolate 237 as compared with isolate 4643 in mice. A fragment 12 nucleotides in length in stem loop (SL) II of 237 5′-untranslated region (UTR) visibly reduced survival time and rate in mice was identified by constructing a series of infectious clones harboring chimeric 5′-UTR. In cells transfected with bicistronic plasmids, and replicon RNAs, the 12-nt fragment of isolate 237 enhanced translational activities and accelerated replication of subgenomic EV71. Finally, single nucleotide change from cytosine to uridine at base 158 in this short fragment of 5′-UTR was proven to reduce viral translation and EV71 virulence in mice. Results collectively indicated a pivotal role of novel virulence determinant C158 on virus translation in vitro and EV71 virulence in vivo. Conclusions These results presented the first reported virulence determinant in EV71 5′-UTR and first position discovered from unadapted isolates. PMID:22069490

  3. Double-coding nucleic acids: introduction of a nucleobase sequence in the major groove of the DNA duplex using double-headed nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pawan; Sorinas, Antoni Figueras; Nielsen, Lise J; Slot, Maria; Skytte, Kirstine; Nielsen, Annie S; Jensen, Michael D; Sharma, Pawan K; Vester, Birte; Petersen, Michael; Nielsen, Poul

    2014-09-05

    A series of double-headed nucleosides were synthesized using the Sonogashira cross-coupling reaction. In the reactions, additional nucleobases (thymine, cytosine, adenine, or guanine) were attached to the 5-position of 2'-deoxyuridine or 2'-deoxycytidine through a propyne linker. The modified nucleosides were incorporated into oligonucleotides, and these were combined in different duplexes that were analyzed by thermal denaturation studies. All of the monomers were well tolerated in the DNA duplexes and induced only small changes in the thermal stability. Consecutive incorporations of the monomers led to increases in duplex stability owing to increased stacking interactions. The modified nucleotide monomers maintained the Watson-Crick base pair fidelity. Stable duplexes were observed with heavily modified oligonucleotides featuring 14 consecutive incorporations of different double-headed nucleotide monomers. Thus, modified duplexes with an array of nucleobases on the exterior of the duplex were designed. Molecular dynamics simulations demonstrated that the additional nucleobases could expose their Watson-Crick and/or Hoogsteen faces for recognition in the major groove. This presentation of nucleobases may find applications in providing molecular information without unwinding the duplex.

  4. In Vitro Selection Using Modified or Unnatural Nucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Stovall, Gwendolyn M.; Bedenbaugh, Robert S.; Singh, Shruti; Meyer, Adam J.; Hatala, Paul J.; Ellington, Andrew D.; Hall, Bradley

    2014-01-01

    Incorporation of modified nucleotides into in vitro RNA or DNA selections offer many potential advantages, such as the increased stability of selected nucleic acids against nuclease degradation, improved affinities, expanded chemical functionality, and increased library diversity. This unit provides useful information and protocols for in vitro selection using modified nucleotides. It includes a discussion of when to use modified nucleotides; protocols for evaluating and optimizing transcription reactions, as well as confirming the incorporation of the modified nucleotides; protocols for evaluating modified nucleotide transcripts as template in reverse transcription reactions; protocols for the evaluation of the fidelity of modified nucleotides in the replication and the regeneration of the pool; and a protocol to compare modified nucleotide pools and selection conditions. PMID:25606981

  5. Nucleotide sequence alignment using sparse coding and belief propagation.

    PubMed

    Roozgard, Aminmohammad; Barzigar, Nafise; Wang, Shuang; Jiang, Xiaoqian; Ohno-Machado, Lucila; Cheng, Samuel

    2013-01-01

    Advances in DNA information extraction techniques have led to huge sequenced genomes from organisms spanning the tree of life. This increasing amount of genomic information requires tools for comparison of the nucleotide sequences. In this paper, we propose a novel nucleotide sequence alignment method based on sparse coding and belief propagation to compare the similarity of the nucleotide sequences. We used the neighbors of each nucleotide as features, and then we employed sparse coding to find a set of candidate nucleotides. To select optimum matches, belief propagation was subsequently applied to these candidate nucleotides. Experimental results show that the proposed approach is able to robustly align nucleotide sequences and is competitive to SOAPaligner [1] and BWA [2].

  6. Sequential regimen of clofarabine, cytosine arabinoside and reduced-intensity conditioned transplantation for primary refractory acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Mohty, Mohamad; Malard, Florent; Blaise, Didier; Milpied, Noel; Socié, Gérard; Huynh, Anne; Reman, Oumédaly; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Furst, Sabine; Guillaume, Thierry; Tabrizi, Resa; Vigouroux, Stéphane; Peterlin, Pierre; El-Cheikh, Jean; Moreau, Philippe; Labopin, Myriam; Chevallier, Patrice

    2017-01-01

    The prognosis of patients with acute myeloid leukemia in whom primary treatment fails remains very poor. In order to improve such patients’ outcome, we conducted a phase 2, prospective, multicenter trial to test the feasibility of a new sequential regimen, combining a short course of intensive chemotherapy and a reduced intensity-conditioning regimen, before allogeneic stem-cell transplantation. Twenty-four patients (median age, 47 years) with acute myeloid leukemia in primary treatment failure were included. Cytogenetic risk was poor in 15 patients (62%) and intermediate in nine (38%). The sequential regimen consisted of clofarabine (30 mg/m2/day) and cytosine arabinoside (1 g/m2/day) for 5 days, followed, after a 3-day rest, by reduced-intensity conditioning and allogeneic stem-cell transplantation combining cyclophosphamide (60 mg/kg), intravenous busulfan (3.2 mg/kg/day) for 2 days and anti-thymocyte globulin (2.5 mg/kg/day) for 2 days. Patients in complete remission at day +120 received prophylactic donor lymphocyte infusion. Eighteen patients (75%) achieved complete remission. With a median follow-up of 24.6 months, the Kaplan-Meier estimate of overall survival was 54% (95% CI: 33–71) at 1 year and 38% (95% CI: 18–46) at 2 years. The Kaplan-Meier estimate of leukemia-free survival was 46% (95% CI: 26–64) at 1 year and 29% (95% CI: 13–48) at 2 years. The cumulative incidence of non-relapse mortality was 8% (95% CI: 1–24) at 1 year and 12% (95% CI: 3–19) at 2 years. Results from this phase 2 prospective multicenter trial endorsed the safety and efficacy of a clofarabine-based sequential reduced-toxicity conditioning regimen, which warrants further investigation. This study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov, identifier number: NCT01188174. PMID:27561720

  7. Theoretical study of the protonation of the one-electron-reduced guanine-cytosine base pair by water.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Sodio C N; Wang, Tzu-Pin; Kao, Chai-Lin; Chen, Hui-Fen; Yang, Po-Yu; Chen, Hsing-Yin

    2013-02-21

    Prototropic equilibria in ionized DNA play an important role in charge transport and radiation damage of DNA and, therefore, continue to attract considerable attention. Although it is well-established that electron attachment will induce an interbase proton transfer from N1 of guanine (G) to N3 of cytosine (C), the question of whether the surrounding water in the major and minor grooves can protonate the one-electron-reduced G:C base pair still remains open. In this work, density functional theory (DFT) calculations were employed to investigate the energetics and mechanism for the protonation of the one-electron-reduced G:C base pair by water. Through the calculations of thermochemical cycles, the protonation free energies were estimated to be in the range of 11.6-14.2 kcal/mol. The calculations for the models of C(•-)(H(2)O)(8) and G(-H1)(-)(H(2)O)(16), which were used to simulate the detailed processes of protonation by water before and after the interbase proton transfer, respectively, revealed that the protonation proceeds through a concerted double proton transfer involving the water molecules in the first and second hydration shells. Comparing the present results with the rates of interbase proton transfer and charge transfer along DNA suggests that protonation on the C(•-) moiety is not competitive with interbase proton transfer, but the possibility of protonation on the G(-H1)(-) moiety after interbase proton transfer cannot be excluded. Electronic-excited-state calculations were also carried out by the time-dependent DFT approach. This information is valuable for experimental identification in the future.

  8. Effect of a constant rate infusion of cytosine arabinoside on mortality in dogs with meningoencephalitis of unknown origin.

    PubMed

    Lowrie, M; Thomson, S; Smith, P; Garosi, L

    2016-07-01

    Administration of cytosine arabinoside (CA) by continuous rate infusion (CRI) has pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic advantages over traditional intermittent dosing. Whether these advantages translate into clinical efficacy remains unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of CRI of CA in dogs with meningoencephalitis of unknown origin (MUO) and to compare outcomes with a group of historical control dogs treated with conventional intermittent subcutaneous (SC) administration of CA; both groups received adjunctive prednisolone. It was hypothesised that a CRI of CA for 24 h at 100 mg/m(2) would improve survival and lesion resolution compared with conventional SC delivery of 50 mg/m(2) every 12 h for 48 h. Eighty dogs with suspected MUO were recruited from consecutive dogs presenting with suspected MUO from 2006 to 2015. All dogs underwent routine clinical evaluation, magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and cerebrospinal fluid analysis. There were 39 dogs in the SC group and 41 dogs in the CRI group; baseline characteristics were similar in both groups. Survival at 3 months was 22/39 (44%) with SC delivery versus 37/41 (90%) with CRI. No dose-limiting toxicities were noted for either group. The resolution rate of magnetic resonance imaging and cerebrospinal fluid abnormalities at the 3 month re-examination were substantially improved in the CRI group versus the SC group. The CRI regimen produced a survival advantage over the SC route of administration without clinically significant toxicity. These data supports the routine use of CRI at first presentation for the treatment of MUO in dogs. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Infection with a Virulent Strain of Wolbachia Disrupts Genome Wide-Patterns of Cytosine Methylation in the Mosquito Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yixin H; Woolfit, Megan; Huttley, Gavin A; Rancès, Edwige; Caragata, Eric P; Popovici, Jean; O'Neill, Scott L; McGraw, Elizabeth A

    2013-01-01

    Cytosine methylation is one of several reversible epigenetic modifications of DNA that allow a greater flexibility in the relationship between genotype and phenotype. Methylation in the simplest models dampens gene expression by modifying regions of DNA critical for transcription factor binding. The capacity to methylate DNA is variable in the insects due to diverse histories of gene loss and duplication of DNA methylases. Mosquitoes like Drosophila melanogaster possess only a single methylase, DNMT2. Here we characterise the methylome of the mosquito Aedes aegypti and examine its relationship to transcription and test the effects of infection with a virulent strain of the endosymbiont Wolbachia on the stability of methylation patterns. We see that methylation in the A. aegypti genome is associated with reduced transcription and is most common in the promoters of genes relating to regulation of transcription and metabolism. Similar gene classes are also methylated in aphids and honeybees, suggesting either conservation or convergence of methylation patterns. In addition to this evidence of evolutionary stability, we also show that infection with the virulent wMelPop Wolbachia strain induces additional methylation and demethylation events in the genome. While most of these changes seem random with respect to gene function and have no detected effect on transcription, there does appear to be enrichment of genes associated with membrane function. Given that Wolbachia lives within a membrane-bound vacuole of host origin and retains a large number of genes for transporting host amino acids, inorganic ions and ATP despite a severely reduced genome, these changes might represent an evolved strategy for manipulating the host environments for its own gain. Testing for a direct link between these methylation changes and expression, however, will require study across a broader range of developmental stages and tissues with methods that detect splice variants.

  10. Molecular dynamics simulation reveals conformational switching of water-mediated uracil-cytosine base-pairs in an RNA duplex.

    PubMed

    Schneider, C; Brandl, M; Sühnel, J

    2001-01-26

    A 4 ns molecular dynamics simulation of an RNA duplex (r-GGACUUCGGUCC)(2 )in solution with Na+ and Cl- as counterions was performed. The X-ray structure of this duplex includes two water-mediated uracil-cytosine pairs. In contrast to the other base-pairs in the duplex the water-mediated pairs switch between different conformations. One conformation corresponds to the geometry of the water-mediated UC pairs in the duplex X-ray structure with water acting both as hydrogen-bond donor and acceptor. Another conformation is close to that of a water-mediated UC base-pair found in the X-ray structure of the 23 S rRNA sarcin/ricin domain. In this case the oxygen of the water molecule is linked to two-base donor sites. For a very short time also a direct UC base-pair and a further conformation that is similar to the one found in the RNA duplex structure but exhibits an increased H3(U)...N3(C) distance is observed. Water molecules with unusually long residence times are involved in the water-mediated conformations. These results indicate that the dynamic behaviour of the water-mediated UC base-pairs differs from that of the duplex Watson-Crick and non-canonical guanine-uracil pairs with two or three direct hydrogen bonds. The conformational variability and increased flexibility has to be taken into account when considering these base-pairs as RNA building blocks and as recognition motifs. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  11. Targeted tumor therapy with a fusion protein of an antiangiogenic human recombinant scFv and yeast cytosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Schellmann, Nicole; Panjideh, Hossein; Fasold, Patricia; Bachran, Diana; Bachran, Christopher; Deckert, Peter M; Fuchs, Hendrik

    2012-09-01

    In adults, endothelial cell division occurs only in wound healing, during menstruation, or in diseases such as wet age-related macular degeneration or development of benign or malignant tissues. Angiogenesis is one of the major requirements to supply the fast developing tumor tissue with oxygen and nutrients, and enables it to spread into other tissues far from its origin. We selected the extradomain B (ED-B), a splice variant of fibronectin, which is exclusively expressed in ovaries, uterus, during wound healing, and in tumor tissues, as a target for the development of an innovative antiangiogenic, prodrug-based targeted tumor therapy approach. We designed a fusion protein termed L19CDy-His, consisting of the antibody single chain fragment L19 for targeting ED-B and yeast cytosine deaminase for the conversion of 5-fluorocytosine into cytotoxic 5-fluorouracil. We purified high amounts of the fusion protein from Pichia pastoris that is stable, enzymatically active, and retains 75% of its activity after incubation with human plasma for up to 72 hours. The binding of L19CDy-His to ED-B was confirmed by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and quantified by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy determining a KD value of 81±7 nM. L19CDy-His successfully decreased cell survival of the murine ED-B-expressing teratocarcinoma cell line F9 upon addition of the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine. Our data demonstrate the suitability of targeting ED-B by L19CDy-His for effective prodrug-based tumor therapy.

  12. Hypoxia imaging predicts success of hypoxia-induced cytosine deaminase/5-fluorocytosine gene therapy in a murine lung tumor model.

    PubMed

    Lee, B-F; Lee, C-H; Chiu, N-T; Hsia, C-C; Shen, L-H; Shiau, A-L

    2012-04-01

    Tc-99m-HL91 is a hypoxia imaging biomarker. The aim of this study was to investigate the value of Tc-99m-HL91 imaging for hypoxia-induced cytosine deaminase (CD)/5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) gene therapy in a murine lung tumor model. C57BL/6 mice were implanted with Lewis lung carcinoma cells transduced with the hypoxia-inducible promoter-driven CD gene (LL2/CD) or luciferase gene (LL2/Luc) serving as the control. When tumor volumes reached 100 mm(3), pretreatment images were acquired after injection of Tc-99m-HL91. The mice were divided into low and high hypoxic groups based on the tumor-to-non-tumor ratio of Tc-99m-HL91. They were injected daily with 5-FC (500 mg kg(-1)) or the vehicle for 1 week. When tumor volumes reached 1000 mm(3), autoradiography and histological examinations were performed. Treatment with 5-FC delayed tumor growth and enhanced the survival of mice bearing high hypoxic LL2/CD tumors. The therapeutic effect of hypoxia-induced CD/5-FC gene therapy was more pronounced in high hypoxic tumors than in low hypoxic tumors. This study provides the first evidence that Tc-99m-HL91 can serve as an imaging biomarker for predicting the treatment responses of hypoxia-regulated CD/5-FC gene therapy in animal tumor models. Our results suggest that hypoxia imaging using Tc-99m-HL91 has the predictive value for the success of hypoxia-directed treatment regimens.

  13. Enhancement of anti-tumor activity of Newcastle disease virus by the synergistic effect of cytosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Lv, Zheng; Zhang, Tian-Yuan; Yin, Jie-Chao; Wang, Hui; Sun, Tian; Chen, Li-Qun; Bai, Fu-Liang; Wu, Wei; Ren, Gui-Ping; Li, De-Shan

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate enhancement of anti-tumor effects of the lentogenic Newcastle disease virus Clone30 strain (NDV rClone30) expressing cytosine deaminase (CD) gene against tumor cells and in murine groin tumor-bearing models. Cytotoxic effects of the rClone30-CD/5-FC on the HepG2 cell line were examined by an MTT method. Anti-tumor activity of rClone30-CD/5-FC was examined in H22 tumor-bearing mice. Compared to the rClone30-CD virus treatment alone, NDV rClone30-CD/5-FC at 0.1 and 1 MOIs exerted significant cytotoxic effects (P<0.05) on HepG2 cells. For treatment of H22 tumor-bearing mice, recombinant NDV was injected together with 5-FC given by either intra-tumor injection or tail vein injection. When 5-FC was administered by intra-tumor injection, survival for the rClone30-CD/5-FC-treated mice was 4/6 for 80 days period vs 1/6 , 0/6 and 0/6 for the mice treated with rClone30-CD, 5-FC and saline alone, respectively. When 5-FC was given by tail vein injection, survival for the rClone30-CD/5-FC-treated mice was 3/6 vs 2/6 , 0/6 and 0/6 for the mice treated with rClone30-CD, 5-FC or saline alone, respectively. In this study, NDV was used for the first time to deliver the suicide gene for cancer therapy. Incorporation of the CD gene in the lentogenic NDV genome together with 5-FC significantly enhances cell death of HepG2 tumor cells in vitro, decreases tumor volume and increases survival of H22 tumor-bearing mice in vivo.

  14. Hydrocortisone in culture protects the blast cells in acute myeloblastic leukemia from the lethal effects of cytosine arabinoside

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, G.S.; Wang, C.; Minkin, S.; Minden, M.D.; McCulloch, E.A. )

    1991-07-01

    The blast cells in acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) respond to many of the same regulatory mechanisms that control normal hemopoiesis. These include the growth factors that bind to membrane receptors and steroid hormones or vitamins that have intracellular receptors. The authors report the effects in culture of the steroid glucocorticoid hydrocortisone on freshly explanted AML blasts from patients and on two continuous AML cell lines. Only small changes in clonogenic cell numbers in suspension cultures were seen in the presence of hydrocortisone. The most striking effect of the hormone was on the sensitivity of blasts cells to cytosine arabinoside (ara-C). In contrast to the response of AML blast cells to retinoic acid, a ligand for intracellular steroid receptors that sensitizes some blast populations to ara-C, hydrocortisone reduced the toxic effects of the drug. The protective action of hydrocortisone was not mediated through the cell cycle since exposure of blasts to hydrocortisone did not affect the percentage of cells in DNA synthesis as measured with the tritiated thymidine (3HTdR) suicide technique. The hydrocortisone effect could be demonstrated using a pulse (20 min) exposure protocol. Blasts pulsed with increasing specific activities of 3HTdR showed the usual response pattern with an initial loss in plating efficiency to about 50% of control, followed by a plateau, regardless of whether the cells had been exposed to hydrocortisone. Control blasts exposed to increasing ara-C concentrations gave very similar dose-response curves; in striking contrast, blast cells cultured in hydrocortisone, then pulsed with ara-C did not lose colony-forming ability even though the same population was sensitive to 3HTdR.

  15. Cyclopentenyl cytosine induces senescence in breast cancer cells through the nucleolar stress response and activation of p53.

    PubMed

    Huang, Min; Whang, Patrick; Lewicki, Patrick; Mitchell, Beverly S

    2011-07-01

    The induction of senescence has emerged as a potentially important contributor to the effects of chemotherapeutic agents against tumors. We have demonstrated that depletion of CTP induced by cyclopentenyl cytosine (CPEC; NSC 375575), a specific inhibitor of the enzyme CTP synthetase, induces irreversible growth arrest and senescence characterized by altered morphology and expression of senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity in MCF-7 breast cancer cells expressing wild-type p53. In contrast, differentiation in the absence of senescence resulted from CPEC treatment in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells that express a mutated p53. Both senescence of MCF-7 cells and differentiation of MDA-MB-231 cells were prevented by repletion of CTP through the cytidine salvage pathway. Senescence in MCF-7 cells was associated with a G(2)- and S-phase arrest, whereas differentiation in MDA-MB-231 cells was associated with arrest in G(1) phase at 5 days. Mechanistic studies revealed that CTP depletion induced a rapid translocation of nucleolar proteins, including nucleostemin and nucleolin into the nucleoplasm. This nucleolar stress response resulted in a sustained elevation of p53 and the p53 target genes, p21 and Mdm2, in cells with wild-type p53. Furthermore, short interfering RNA-induced knockdown of p53 in MCF-7 cells treated with CPEC prevented cellular senescence and increased apoptotic cell death. We conclude that CTP depletion and the resulting nucleolar stress response results in a senescence-like growth arrest through activation of p53, whereas cells with mutated p53 undergo differentiation or apoptotic cell death.

  16. Variance estimation for nucleotide substitution models.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weishan; Wang, Hsiuying

    2015-09-01

    The current variance estimators for most evolutionary models were derived when a nucleotide substitution number estimator was approximated with a simple first order Taylor expansion. In this study, we derive three variance estimators for the F81, F84, HKY85 and TN93 nucleotide substitution models, respectively. They are obtained using the second order Taylor expansion of the substitution number estimator, the first order Taylor expansion of a squared deviation and the second order Taylor expansion of a squared deviation, respectively. These variance estimators are compared with the existing variance estimator in terms of a simulation study. It shows that the variance estimator, which is derived using the second order Taylor expansion of a squared deviation, is more accurate than the other three estimators. In addition, we also compare these estimators with an estimator derived by the bootstrap method. The simulation shows that the performance of this bootstrap estimator is similar to the estimator derived by the second order Taylor expansion of a squared deviation. Since the latter one has an explicit form, it is more efficient than the bootstrap estimator.

  17. Estimation of evolutionary distances between nucleotide sequences.

    PubMed

    Zharkikh, A

    1994-09-01

    A formal mathematical analysis of the substitution process in nucleotide sequence evolution was done in terms of the Markov process. By using matrix algebra theory, the theoretical foundation of Barry and Hartigan's (Stat. Sci. 2:191-210, 1987) and Lanave et al.'s (J. Mol. Evol. 20:86-93, 1984) methods was provided. Extensive computer simulation was used to compare the accuracy and effectiveness of various methods for estimating the evolutionary distance between two nucleotide sequences. It was shown that the multiparameter methods of Lanave et al.'s (J. Mol. Evol. 20:86-93, 1984), Gojobori et al.'s (J. Mol. Evol. 18:414-422, 1982), and Barry and Hartigan's (Stat. Sci. 2:191-210, 1987) are preferable to others for the purpose of phylogenetic analysis when the sequences are long. However, when sequences are short and the evolutionary distance is large, Tajima and Nei's (Mol. Biol. Evol. 1:269-285, 1984) method is superior to others.

  18. Cyclic nucleotide imaging and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Berisha, Filip; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O

    2017-02-16

    The universal second messengers cyclic nucleotides 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and 3',5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) play central roles in cardiovascular function and disease. They act in discrete, functionally relevant subcellular microdomains which regulate, for example, calcium cycling and excitation-contraction coupling. Such localized cAMP and cGMP signals have been difficult to measure using conventional biochemical techniques. Recent years have witnessed the advent of live cell imaging techniques which allow visualization of these functionally relevant second messengers with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution at cellular, subcellular and tissue levels. In this review, we discuss these new imaging techniques and give examples how they are used to visualize cAMP and cGMP in physiological and pathological settings to better understand cardiovascular function and disease. Two primary techniques include the use of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) based cyclic nucleotide biosensors and nanoscale scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM). These methods can provide deep mechanistic insights into compartmentalized cAMP and cGMP signaling.

  19. [Identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms in centenarians].

    PubMed

    Gambini, Juan; Gimeno-Mallench, Lucía; Inglés, Marta; Olaso, Gloria; Abdelaziz, Kheira Mohamed; Avellana, Juan Antonio; Belenguer, Ángel; Cruz, Raquel; Mas-Bargues, Cristina; Borras, Consuelo; Viña, José

    2016-01-01

    Longevity is determined by genetic and external factors, such as nutritional, environmental, social, etc. Nevertheless, when living conditions are optimal, longevity is determined by genetic variations between individuals. In a same population, with relative genotypic homogeneity, subtle changes in the DNA sequence affecting a single nucleotide can be observed. These changes, called single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) are present in 1-5% of the population. A total of 92 subjects were recruited, including 28 centenarians and 64 controls, in order to find SNP that maybe implicated in the extreme longevity, as in the centenarians. Blood samples were collected to isolate and amplify the DNA in order to perform the analysis of SPN by Axiom™ Genotyping of Affymetrix technology. Statistical analyses were performed using the Plink program and libraries SNPassoc and skatMeta. Our results show 12 mutations with a p<.001, where 5 of these (DACH1, LOC91948, BTB16, NFIL3 y HDAC4) have regulatory functions of the expressions of others genes. Therefore, these results suggest that the genetic variation between centenarians and controls occurs in five genes that are involved in the regulation of gene expression to adapt to environmental changes better than controls. Copyright © 2015 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Mutations of PKA cyclic nucleotide-binding domains reveal novel aspects of cyclic nucleotide selectivity.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Robin; Moon, Eui-Whan; Kim, Jeong Joo; Schmidt, Sven H; Sankaran, Banumathi; Pavlidis, Ioannis V; Kim, Choel; Herberg, Friedrich W

    2017-07-06

    Cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP are ubiquitous second messengers that regulate the activity of effector proteins in all forms of life. The main effector proteins, the 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and the 3',5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKG), are preferentially activated by cAMP and cGMP, respectively. However, the molecular basis of this cyclic nucleotide selectivity is still not fully understood. Analysis of isolated cyclic nucleotide-binding (CNB) domains of PKA regulatory subunit type Iα (RIα) reveals that the C-terminal CNB-B has a higher cAMP affinity and selectivity than the N-terminal CNB-A. Here, we show that introducing cGMP-specific residues using site-directed mutagenesis reduces the selectivity of CNB-B, while the combination of two mutations (G316R/A336T) results in a cGMP-selective binding domain. Furthermore, introducing the corresponding mutations (T192R/A212T) into the PKA RIα CNB-A turns this domain into a highly cGMP-selective domain, underlining the importance of these contacts for achieving cGMP specificity. Binding data with the generic purine nucleotide 3',5'-cyclic inosine monophosphate (cIMP) reveal that introduced arginine residues interact with the position 6 oxygen of the nucleobase. Co-crystal structures of an isolated CNB-B G316R/A336T double mutant with either cAMP or cGMP reveal that the introduced threonine and arginine residues maintain their conserved contacts as seen in PKG I CNB-B. These results improve our understanding of cyclic nucleotide binding and the molecular basis of cyclic nucleotide specificity. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  1. Polyamine/Nucleotide Coacervates Provide Strong Compartmentalization of Mg²⁺, Nucleotides, and RNA.

    PubMed

    Frankel, Erica A; Bevilacqua, Philip C; Keating, Christine D

    2016-03-01

    Phase separation of aqueous solutions containing polyelectrolytes can lead to formation of dense, solute-rich liquid droplets referred to as coacervates, surrounded by a dilute continuous phase of much larger volume. This type of liquid-liquid phase separation is thought to help explain the appearance of polyelectrolyte-rich intracellular droplets in the cytoplasm and nucleoplasm of extant biological cells and may be relevant to protocellular compartmentalization of nucleic acids on the early Earth. Here we describe complex coacervates formed upon mixing the polycation poly(allylamine) (PAH, 15 kDa) with the anionic nucleotides adenosine 5'-mono-, di-, and triphosphate (AMP, ADP, and ATP). Droplet formation was observed over a wide range of pH and MgCl2 concentrations. The nucleotides themselves as well as Mg(2+) and RNA oligonucleotides were all extremely concentrated within the coacervates. Nucleotides present at just 2.5 mM in bulk solution had concentrations greater than 1 M inside the coacervate droplets. A solution with a total Mg(2+) concentration of 10 mM had 1-5 M Mg(2+) in the coacervates, and RNA random sequence (N54) partitioned ∼10,000-fold into the coacervates. Coacervate droplets are thus rich in nucleotides, Mg(2+), and RNA, providing a medium favorable for generating functional RNAs. Compartmentalization of nucleotides at high concentrations could have facilitated their polymerization to form oligonucleotides, which preferentially accumulate in the droplets. Locally high Mg(2+) concentrations could have aided folding and catalysis in an RNA world, making coacervate droplets an appealing platform for exploring protocellular environments.

  2. Insertion kinetics of small nucleotides through single walled carbon nanotube.

    PubMed

    Clavier, A; Kraszewski, S; Ramseyer, C; Picaud, F

    2013-03-10

    We report molecular dynamic simulations showing that a DNA molecule constituted by five unique bases can be spontaneously inserted into single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) in normal conditions (P, T and water environment) depending on the tube radius value. The van der Waals and electrostatic interactions play a central role for the rapid insertion process. Our study shows also that the Guanine molecule inserts the fastest compared to thymine, adenine and cytosine bases, respectively. The differences of insertion time could be exploited for applications concerning for example DNA sequencing. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Adsorption of adenine, cytosine, thymine, and uracil on sulfide-modified montmorillonite: FT-IR, Mössbauer and EPR spectroscopy and X-ray diffractometry studies.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Cristine E A; Berndt, Graciele; de Souza Junior, Ivan G; de Souza, Cláudio M D; Paesano, Andrea; da Costa, Antonio C S; di Mauro, Eduardo; de Santana, Henrique; Zaia, Cássia T B V; Zaia, Dimas A M

    2011-10-01

    In the present work the interactions of nucleic acid bases with and adsorption on clays were studied at two pHs (2.00, 7.00) using different techniques. As shown by Mössbauer and EPR spectroscopies and X-ray diffractometry, the most important finding of this work is that nucleic acid bases penetrate into the interlayer of the clays and oxidize Fe(2+) to Fe(3+), thus, this interaction cannot be regarded as a simple physical adsorption. For the two pHs the order of the adsorption of nucleic acid bases on the clays was: adenine ≈ cytosine > thymine > uracil. The adsorption of adenine and cytosine on clays increased with decreasing of the pH. For unaltered montmorillonite this result could be explained by electrostatic forces between adenine/cytosine positively charged and clay negatively charged. However for montmorillonite modified with Na(2)S, probably van der Waals forces also play an important role since both adenine/cytosine and clay were positively charged. FT-IR spectra showed that the interaction between nucleic acid bases and clays was through NH(+) or NH (2) (+) groups. X-ray diffractograms showed that nucleic acid bases adsorbed on clays were distributed into the interlayer surface, edge sites and external surface functional groups (aluminol, silanol) EPR spectra showed that the intensity of the line g ≈ 2 increased probably because the oxidation of Fe(2+) to Fe(3+) by nucleic acid bases and intensity of the line g = 4.1 increased due to the interaction of Fe(3+) with nucleic acid bases. Mössbauer spectra showed a large decreased on the Fe(2+) doublet area of the clays due to the reaction of nucleic acid bases with Fe(2+).

  4. Cloning of the BssHII restriction-modification system in Escherichia coli : BssHII methyltransferase contains circularly permuted cytosine-5 methyltransferase motifs.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, S; Xiao, J; Posfai, J; Maunus, R; Benner, J

    1997-01-01

    BssHII restriction endonuclease cleaves 5'-GCGCGC-3' on double-stranded DNA between the first and second bases to generate a four base 5'overhang. BssHII restriction endonuclease was purified from the native Bacillus stearothermophilus H3 cells and its N-terminal amino acid sequence was determined. Degenerate PCR primers were used to amplify the first 20 codons of the BssHII restriction endonuclease gene. The BssHII restriction endonuclease gene (bssHIIR) and the cognate BssHII methyltransferase gene (bssHIIM) were cloned in Escherichia coli by amplification of Bacillus stearothermophilus genomic DNA using PCR and inverse PCR. BssHII methyltransferase (M.BssHII) contains all 10 conserved cytosine-5 methyltransferase motifs, but motifs IX and X precede motifs I-VIII. Thus, the conserved motifs of M. BssHII are circularly permuted relative to the motif organizations of other cytosine-5 methyltransferases. M.BssHII and the non-cognate multi-specific phiBssHII methyltransferase, M.phiBss HII [Schumann,J. et al . (1995) Gene, 157, 103-104] share 34% identity in amino acid sequences from motifs I-VIII, and 40% identity in motifs IX-X. A conserved arginine is located upstream of a TV dipeptide in the N-terminus of M.BssHII that may be responsible for the recognition of the guanine 5' of the target cytosine. The BssHII restriction endonuclease gene was expressed in E.coli via a T7 expression vector. PMID:9321648

  5. Photoinduced electron detachment and proton transfer: the proposal for alternative path of formation of triplet states of guanine (G) and cytosine (C) pair.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jiande; Wang, Jing; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2015-02-12

    A viable pathway is proposed for the formation of the triplet state of the GC Watson-Crick base pair. It includes the following steps: (a) a low-energy electron is captured by cytosine in the GC pair, forming the cytosine base-centered radical anion GC(-•); and (b) photoradiation with energy around 5 eV initiates the electron detachment from either cytosine (in the gas phase) or guanine (in aqueous solutions). This triggers interbase proton transfer from G to C, creating the triplet state of the GC pair. Double proton transfer involving the triplet state of GC pair leads to the formation of less stable tautomer G(N2-H)(•)C(O2H)(•). Tautomerization is accomplished through a double proton transfer process in which one proton at the N3 of C(H)(•) migrates to the N1 of G(-H)(•); meanwhile, the proton at the N2 of G transfers to the O2 of C. This process is energetically viable; the corresponding activation energy is around 12-13 kcal/mol. The base-pairing energy of the triplet is found to be ∼3-5 kcal/mol smaller than that of the singlet state. Thus, the formation of the triplet state GC pair in DNA double strand only slightly weakens its stability. The obtained highly reactive radicals are expected to cause serious damage in the DNA involved in biochemical processes, such as DNA replication where radicals are exposed in the single strands.

  6. [Nucleotide receptors and actin cytoskeleton dynamics].

    PubMed

    Kłopocka, Wanda; Korczyński, Jarosław

    2014-01-01

    Signaling cascades evoked by P2Y2 receptor plays an important role in the phenomena dependent on the actin cytoskeleton dynamics endocy-tosis, cell division, adhesion, intracellular transport and migration. P2Y2R coupled with G proteins, in response to ATP or UTP activates Rac1 and RhoA proteins important factors in actin cytoskeletal reorganization and regulates the level of phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) that binds directly to a variety of actin regulatory proteins and modulates their function. The