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Sample records for cytoskeletal proteins critical

  1. Cytoskeletal Linker Protein Dystonin Is Not Critical to Terminal Oligodendrocyte Differentiation or CNS Myelination

    PubMed Central

    Bonin, Sawyer R.; Gibeault, Sabrina; De Repentigny, Yves; Kothary, Rashmi

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte differentiation and central nervous system myelination require massive reorganization of the oligodendrocyte cytoskeleton. Loss of specific actin- and tubulin-organizing factors can lead to impaired morphological and/or molecular differentiation of oligodendrocytes, resulting in a subsequent loss of myelination. Dystonin is a cytoskeletal linker protein with both actin- and tubulin-binding domains. Loss of function of this protein results in a sensory neuropathy called Hereditary Sensory Autonomic Neuropathy VI in humans and dystonia musculorum in mice. This disease presents with severe ataxia, dystonic muscle and is ultimately fatal early in life. While loss of the neuronal isoforms of dystonin primarily leads to sensory neuron degeneration, it has also been shown that peripheral myelination is compromised due to intrinsic Schwann cell differentiation abnormalities. The role of this cytoskeletal linker in oligodendrocytes, however, remains unclear. We sought to determine the effects of the loss of neuronal dystonin on oligodendrocyte differentiation and central myelination. To address this, primary oligodendrocytes were isolated from a severe model of dystonia musculorum, Dstdt-27J, and assessed for morphological and molecular differentiation capacity. No defects could be discerned in the differentiation of Dstdt-27J oligodendrocytes relative to oligodendrocytes from wild-type littermates. Survival was also compared between Dstdt-27J and wild-type oligodendrocytes, revealing no significant difference. Using a recently developed migration assay, we further analysed the ability of primary oligodendrocyte progenitor cell motility, and found that Dstdt-27J oligodendrocyte progenitor cells were able to migrate normally. Finally, in vivo analysis of oligodendrocyte myelination was done in phenotype-stage optic nerve, cerebral cortex and spinal cord. The density of myelinated axons and g-ratios of Dstdt-27J optic nerves was normal, as was myelin basic

  2. Cytoskeletal Proteins of Actinobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Letek, Michal; Fiuza, María; Villadangos, Almudena F.; Mateos, Luís M.; Gil, José A.

    2012-01-01

    Although bacteria are considered the simplest life forms, we are now slowly unraveling their cellular complexity. Surprisingly, not only do bacterial cells have a cytoskeleton but also the building blocks are not very different from the cytoskeleton that our own cells use to grow and divide. Nonetheless, despite important advances in our understanding of the basic physiology of certain bacterial models, little is known about Actinobacteria, an ancient group of Eubacteria. Here we review current knowledge on the cytoskeletal elements required for bacterial cell growth and cell division, focusing on actinobacterial genera such as Mycobacterium, Corynebacterium, and Streptomyces. These include some of the deadliest pathogens on earth but also some of the most prolific producers of antibiotics and antitumorals. PMID:22481946

  3. Purification of Tetrahymena cytoskeletal proteins.

    PubMed

    Honts, Jerry E

    2012-01-01

    Like all eukaryotic cells, Tetrahymena thermophila contains a rich array of cytoskeletal proteins, some familiar and some novel. A detailed analysis of the structure, function, and interactions of these proteins requires procedures for purifying the individual protein components. Procedures for the purification of actin and tubulin from Tetrahymena are reviewed, followed by a description of a procedure that yields proteins from the epiplasmic layer and associated structures, including the tetrins. Finally, the challenges and opportunities for future advances are assessed.

  4. Cytoskeletal integrity in interphase cells requires protein phosphatase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, J E; Brautigan, D L; Vallee, R; Olmsted, J; Fujiki, H; Goldman, R D

    1992-01-01

    Phosphorylation by protein kinases has been established as a key factor in the regulation of cytoskeletal structure. However, little is known about the role of protein phosphatases in cytoskeletal regulation. To assess the possible functions of protein phosphatases in this respect, we studied the effects of the phosphatase inhibitors calyculin A, okadaic acid, and dinophysistoxin 1 (35-methylokadaic acid) on BHK-21 fibroblasts. Within minutes of incubation with these inhibitors, changes are seen in the structural organization of intermediate filaments, followed by a loss of microtubules, as assayed by immunofluorescence. These changes in cytoskeletal structure are accompanied by a rapid and selective increase in vimentin phosphorylation on interphase-specific sites, and they are fully reversible after removal of calyculin A. The results indicate that there is a rapid phosphate turnover on cytoskeletal intermediate filaments and further suggest that protein phosphatases are essential for the maintenance and structural integrity of two major cytoskeletal components. Images PMID:1332069

  5. Sex Hormones Regulate Cytoskeletal Proteins Involved in Brain Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Hansberg-Pastor, Valeria; González-Arenas, Aliesha; Piña-Medina, Ana Gabriela; Camacho-Arroyo, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    In the brain of female mammals, including humans, a number of physiological and behavioral changes occur as a result of sex hormone exposure. Estradiol and progesterone regulate several brain functions, including learning and memory. Sex hormones contribute to shape the central nervous system by modulating the formation and turnover of the interconnections between neurons as well as controlling the function of glial cells. The dynamics of neuron and glial cells morphology depends on the cytoskeleton and its associated proteins. Cytoskeletal proteins are necessary to form neuronal dendrites and dendritic spines, as well as to regulate the diverse functions in astrocytes. The expression pattern of proteins, such as actin, microtubule-associated protein 2, Tau, and glial fibrillary acidic protein, changes in a tissue-specific manner in the brain, particularly when variations in sex hormone levels occur during the estrous or menstrual cycles or pregnancy. Here, we review the changes in structure and organization of neurons and glial cells that require the participation of cytoskeletal proteins whose expression and activity are regulated by estradiol and progesterone. PMID:26635640

  6. Cholera toxin can catalyze ADP-ribosylation of cytoskeletal proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Kaslow, H.R.; Groppi, V.E.; Abood, M.E.; Bourne, H.R.

    1981-11-01

    Cholera toxin catalyzes transfer of radiolabel from (/sup 32/P)NAD/sup +/ to several peptides in particulate preparations of human foreskin fibroblasts. Resolution of these peptides by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis allowed identification of two peptides of M/sub r/ = 42,000 and 52,000 as peptide subunits of a regulatory component of adenylate cyclase. The radiolabeling of another group of peptides (M/sub r/ = 50,000 to 65,000) suggested that cholera toxin could catalyze ADP-ribosylation of cytoskeletal proteins. This suggestion was confirmed by showing that incubation with cholera toxin and (/sup 32/P)NAD/sup +/ caused radiolabeling of purified microtubule and intermediate filament proteins.

  7. Run-and-pause dynamics of cytoskeletal motor proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafner, Anne E.; Santen, Ludger; Rieger, Heiko; Shaebani, M. Reza

    2016-11-01

    Cytoskeletal motor proteins are involved in major intracellular transport processes which are vital for maintaining appropriate cellular function. When attached to cytoskeletal filaments, the motor exhibits distinct states of motility: active motion along the filaments, and pause phase in which it remains stationary for a finite time interval. The transition probabilities between motion and pause phases are asymmetric in general, and considerably affected by changes in environmental conditions which influences the efficiency of cargo delivery to specific targets. By considering the motion of individual non-interacting molecular motors on a single filament as well as a dynamic filamentous network, we present an analytical model for the dynamics of self-propelled particles which undergo frequent pause phases. The interplay between motor processivity, structural properties of filamentous network, and transition probabilities between the two states of motility drastically changes the dynamics: multiple transitions between different types of anomalous diffusive dynamics occur and the crossover time to the asymptotic diffusive or ballistic motion varies by several orders of magnitude. We map out the phase diagrams in the space of transition probabilities, and address the role of initial conditions of motion on the resulting dynamics.

  8. Run-and-pause dynamics of cytoskeletal motor proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hafner, Anne E.; Santen, Ludger; Rieger, Heiko; Shaebani, M. Reza

    2016-01-01

    Cytoskeletal motor proteins are involved in major intracellular transport processes which are vital for maintaining appropriate cellular function. When attached to cytoskeletal filaments, the motor exhibits distinct states of motility: active motion along the filaments, and pause phase in which it remains stationary for a finite time interval. The transition probabilities between motion and pause phases are asymmetric in general, and considerably affected by changes in environmental conditions which influences the efficiency of cargo delivery to specific targets. By considering the motion of individual non-interacting molecular motors on a single filament as well as a dynamic filamentous network, we present an analytical model for the dynamics of self-propelled particles which undergo frequent pause phases. The interplay between motor processivity, structural properties of filamentous network, and transition probabilities between the two states of motility drastically changes the dynamics: multiple transitions between different types of anomalous diffusive dynamics occur and the crossover time to the asymptotic diffusive or ballistic motion varies by several orders of magnitude. We map out the phase diagrams in the space of transition probabilities, and address the role of initial conditions of motion on the resulting dynamics. PMID:27849013

  9. Whirlin, a cytoskeletal scaffolding protein, stabilizes the paranodal region and axonal cytoskeleton in myelinated axons.

    PubMed

    Green, James A; Yang, Jun; Grati, M'hamed; Kachar, Bechara; Bhat, Manzoor A

    2013-09-06

    Myelinated axons are organized into distinct subcellular and molecular regions. Without proper organization, electrical nerve conduction is delayed, resulting in detrimental physiological outcomes. One such region is the paranode where axo-glial septate junctions act as a molecular fence to separate the sodium (Na+) channel-enriched node from the potassium (K+) channel-enriched juxtaparanode. A significant lack of knowledge remains as to cytoskeletal proteins which stabilize paranodal domains and underlying cytoskeleton. Whirlin (Whrn) is a PDZ domain-containing cytoskeletal scaffold whose absence in humans results in Usher Syndromes or variable deafness-blindness syndromes. Mutant Whirlin (Whrn) mouse model studies have linked such behavioral deficits to improper localization of critical transmembrane protein complexes in the ear and eye. Until now, no reports exist about the function of Whrn in myelinated axons. RT-PCR and immunoblot analyses revealed expression of Whrn mRNA and Whrn full-length protein, respectively, in several stages of central and peripheral nervous system development. Comparing wild-type mice to Whrn knockout (Whrn-/-) mice, we observed no significant differences in the expression of standard axonal domain markers by immunoblot analysis but observed and quantified a novel paranodal compaction phenotype in 4 to 8 week-old Whrn-/- nerves. The paranodal compaction phenotype and associated cytoskeletal disruption was observed in Whrn-/- mutant sciatic nerves and spinal cord fibers from early (2 week-old) to late (1 year-old) stages of development. Light and electron microscopic analyses of Whrn knockout mice reveal bead-like swellings in cerebellar Purkinje axons containing mitochondria and vesicles by both. These data suggest that Whrn plays a role in proper cytoskeletal organization in myelinated axons. Domain organization in myelinated axons remains a complex developmental process. Here we demonstrate that loss of Whrn disrupts proper axonal

  10. Mapping cytoskeletal protein function in cells by means of nanobodies.

    PubMed

    Van Audenhove, Isabel; Van Impe, Katrien; Ruano-Gallego, David; De Clercq, Sarah; De Muynck, Kevin; Vanloo, Berlinda; Verstraete, Hanne; Fernández, Luis Á; Gettemans, Jan

    2013-10-01

    Nanobodies or VHHs are single domain antigen binding fragments derived from heavy-chain antibodies naturally occurring in species of the Camelidae. Due to their ease of cloning, high solubility and intrinsic stability, they can be produced at low cost. Their small size, combined with high affinity and antigen specificity, enables recognition of a broad range of structural (undruggable) proteins and enzymes alike. Focusing on two actin binding proteins, gelsolin and CapG, we summarize a general protocol for the generation, cloning and production of nanobodies. Furthermore, we describe multiple ways to characterize antigen-nanobody binding in more detail and we shed light on some applications with recombinant nanobodies. The use of nanobodies as intrabodies is clarified through several case studies revealing new cytoskeletal protein properties and testifying to the utility of nanobodies as intracellular bona fide protein inhibitors. Moreover, as nanobodies can traverse the plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells by means of the enteropathogenic E. coli type III protein secretion system, we show that in this promising way of nanobody delivery, actin pedestal formation can be affected following nanobody injection.

  11. Cytoskeletal protein binding kinetics at planar phospholipid membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Mc Kiernan, A E; MacDonald, R I; MacDonald, R C; Axelrod, D

    1997-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that nonspecific reversible binding of cytoskeletal proteins to lipids in cells may guide their binding to integral membrane anchor proteins. In a model system, we measured desorption rates k(off) (off-rates) of the erythrocyte cytoskeletal proteins spectrin and protein 4.1 labeled with carboxyfluorescein (CF), at two different compositions of planar phospholipid membranes (supported on glass), using the total internal reflection/fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (TIR/FRAP) technique. The lipid membranes consisted of either pure phosphatidylcholine (PC) or a 3:1 mixture of PC with phosphatidylserine (PS). In general, the off-rates were not single exponentials and were fit to a combination of fast, slow, and irreversible fractions, reported both separately and as a weighted average. By a variation of TIR/FRAP, we also measured equilibrium affinities (the ratio of surface-bound to bulk protein concentration) and thereby calculated on-rates, k(on). The average off-rate of CF-4.1 from PC/PS (approximately 0.008/s) is much slower than that from pure PC (approximately 1.7/s). Despite the consequent increase in equilibrium affinity at PC/PS, the on-rate at PC/PS is also substantially decreased (by a factor of 40) relative to that at pure PC. The simultaneous presence of (unlabeled) spectrin tends to substantially decrease the on-rate (and the affinity) of CF-4.1 at both membrane types. Similar experiments for CF-spectrin alone showed much less sensitivity to membrane type and generally faster off-rates than those exhibited by CF-4.1. However, when mixed with (unlabeled) 4.1, both the on-rate and off-rate of CF-spectrin decreased drastically at PC/PS (but not PC), leading to a somewhat increased affinity. Clearly, changes in affinity often involve countervailing changes in both on-rates and off-rates. In many of these studies, the effect of varying ionic strength and bulk concentrations was examined; it appears that the binding is an

  12. Regulation of protein kinase C by the cytoskeletal protein calponin.

    PubMed

    Leinweber, B; Parissenti, A M; Gallant, C; Gangopadhyay, S S; Kirwan-Rhude, A; Leavis, P C; Morgan, K G

    2000-12-22

    Previous studies from this laboratory have shown that, upon agonist activation, calponin co-immunoprecipitates and co-localizes with protein kinase Cepsilon (PKCepsilon) in vascular smooth muscle cells. In the present study we demonstrate that calponin binds directly to the regulatory domain of PKC both in overlay assays and, under native conditions, by sedimentation with lipid vesicles. Calponin was found to bind to the C2 region of both PKCepsilon and PKCalpha with possible involvement of C1B. The C2 region of PKCepsilon binds to the calponin repeats with a requirement for the region between amino acids 160 and 182. We have also found that calponin can directly activate PKC autophosphorylation. By using anti-phosphoantibodies to residue Ser-660 of PKCbetaII, we found that calponin, in a lipid-independent manner, increased auto-phosphorylation of PKCalpha, -epsilon, and -betaII severalfold compared with control conditions. Similarly, calponin was found to increase the amount of (32)P-labeled phosphate incorporated into PKC from [gamma-(32)P]ATP. We also observed that calponin addition strongly increased the incorporation of radiolabeled phosphate into an exogenous PKC peptide substrate, suggesting an activation of enzyme activity. Thus, these results raise the possibility that calponin may function in smooth muscle to regulate PKC activity by facilitating the phosphorylation of PKC.

  13. Force profiles of protein pulling with or without cytoskeletal links studied by AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Afrin, Rehana; Ikai, Atsushi . E-mail: aikai@bio.titech.ac.jp

    2006-09-15

    To test the capability of the atomic force microscope for distinguishing membrane proteins with/without cytoskeletal associations, we studied the pull-out mechanics of lipid tethers from the red blood cell (RBC). When wheat germ agglutinin, a glycophorin A (GLA) specific lectin, was used to pull out tethers from RBC, characteristic force curves for tether elongation having a long plateau force were observed but without force peaks which are usually attributed to the forced unbinding of membrane components from the cytoskeleton. The result was in agreement with the reports that GLA is substantially free of cytoskeletal interactions. On the contrary, when the Band 3 specific lectin, concanavalin A, was used, the force peaks were indeed observed together with a plateau supporting its reported cytoskeletal association. Based on these observations, we postulate that the state of cytoskeletal association of particular membrane proteins can be identified from the force profiles of their pull-out mechanics.

  14. Connecting G protein signaling to chemoattractant-mediated cell polarity and cytoskeletal reorganization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Youtao; Lacal, Jesus; Firtel, Richard A; Kortholt, Arjan

    2016-10-07

    The directional movement towards extracellular chemical gradients, a process called chemotaxis, is an important property of cells. Central to eukaryotic chemotaxis is the molecular mechanism by which chemoattractant-mediated activation of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) induces symmetry breaking in the activated downstream signaling pathways. Studies with mainly Dictyostelium and mammalian neutrophils as experimental systems have shown that chemotaxis is mediated by a complex network of signaling pathways. Recently, several labs have used extensive and efficient proteomic approaches to further unravel this dynamic signaling network. Together these studies showed the critical role of the interplay between heterotrimeric G-protein subunits and monomeric G proteins in regulating cytoskeletal rearrangements during chemotaxis. Here we highlight how these proteomic studies have provided greater insight into the mechanisms by which the heterotrimeric G protein cycle is regulated, how heterotrimeric G proteins-induced symmetry breaking is mediated through small G protein signaling, and how symmetry breaking in G protein signaling subsequently induces cytoskeleton rearrangements and cell migration.

  15. Inhibition of cytoskeletal protein carbonylation may protect against oxidative damage in traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiusheng; Zhang, Meng; Huang, Xianjian; Liu, Xiaojia; Li, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is the principal factor in traumatic brain injury (TBI) that initiates protracted neuronal dysfunction and remodeling. Cytoskeletal proteins are known to be carbonylated under oxidative stress; however, the complex molecular and cellular mechanisms of cytoskeletal protein carbonylation remain poorly understood. In the present study, the expression levels of glutathione (GSH) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) were investigated in PC12 cells treated with H2O2. Western blot analysis was used to monitor the carbonylation levels of β-actin and β-tubulin. The results indicated that oxidative stress was increased in PC12 cells that were treated with H2O2 for 24 or 48 h. In addition, increased carbonylation levels of β-actin and β-tubulin were detected in H2O2-treated cells. However, these carbonylation levels were reduced by pretreatment with aminoguanidine, a type of reactive carbonyl species chelating agent, and a similar trend was observed following overexpression of proteasome β5 via transgenic technology. In conclusion, the present study results suggested that the development of TBI may cause carbonylation of cytoskeletal proteins, which would then undermine the stability of cytoskeletal proteins. Thus, the development of TBI may be improved via the inhibition of cytoskeletal protein carbonylation. PMID:28101189

  16. Analysis of Cytoskeletal and Motility Proteins in the Sea Urchin Genome Assembly

    PubMed Central

    RL, Morris; MP, Hoffman; RA, Obar; SS, McCafferty; IR, Gibbons; AD, Leone; J, Cool; EL, Allgood; AM, Musante; KM, Judkins; BJ, Rossetti; AP, Rawson; DR, Burgess

    2007-01-01

    The sea urchin embryo is a classical model system for studying the role of the cytoskeleton in such events as fertilization, mitosis, cleavage, cell migration and gastrulation. We have conducted an analysis of gene models derived from the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus genome assembly and have gathered strong evidence for the existence of multiple gene families encoding cytoskeletal proteins and their regulators in sea urchin. While many cytoskeletal genes have been cloned from sea urchin with sequences already existing in public databases, genome analysis reveals a significantly higher degree of diversity within certain gene families. Furthermore, genes are described corresponding to homologs of cytoskeletal proteins not previously documented in sea urchins. To illustrate the varying degree of sequence diversity that exists within cytoskeletal gene families, we conducted an analysis of genes encoding actins, specific actin-binding proteins, myosins, tubulins, kinesins, dyneins, specific microtubule-associated proteins, and intermediate filaments. We conducted ontological analysis of select genes to better understand the relatedness of urchin cytoskeletal genes to those of other deuterostomes. We analyzed developmental expression (EST) data to confirm the existence of select gene models and to understand their differential expression during various stages of early development. PMID:17027957

  17. Cocaine affects the dynamics of cytoskeletal proteins via sigma(1) receptors.

    PubMed

    Su, T P; Hayashi, T

    2001-09-01

    Cytoskeletal proteins are important in protein trafficking, membrane protein clustering, dendrite growth and the morphological maintenance of neurons. Sigma(1) receptors are unique endoplasmic reticular (ER) proteins that bind (+)benzomorphans, neurosteroids and psychotropic drugs such as cocaine. Cocaine, via sigma(1) receptors, can cause the dissociation of a cytoskeletal adaptor protein ankyrin from inositol (1,4,5)-trisphosphate [Ins(1,4,5)P(3)] receptors on the ER as a sigma(1)-receptor-ankyrin complex, which then translocates to the plasma membrane and nucleus. The dissociation of sigma(1)-receptor-ankyrin from Ins(1,4,5)P(3) receptors also increases the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration [[Ca(2+)](i)], which affects the activity of cytoskeletal proteins. Furthermore, cocaine might increase [Ca(2+)](i) via phospholipase C (PLC)-linked dopamine D1 receptors. We hypothesize that cocaine might cause life-long changes in neurons via cytoskeletal proteins by interacting with both D1 receptors and sigma(1) receptors.

  18. p-Chloromercuribenzoate-induced dissociation of cytoskeletal proteins in red blood cells of rats.

    PubMed

    Kunimoto, M; Shibata, K; Miura, T

    1987-12-11

    Effects of p-chloromercuribenzoate (PCMB) on the cytoskeletal organization of rat red blood cells were studied. Upon incubation with 50 microM PCMB in 10 mM Tris-HCl (pH 7.4) at 37 degrees C for 30 min, 80% of actin and 45% of spectrin were released from the ghosts, resulting in the fragmentation of ghost membranes. Addition of 2 mM Mg2+ or 0.1 M KCl, or lowering incubation temperature to 0 degree C substantially inhibited the solubilization of the cytoskeletal proteins and the fragmentation of ghost membranes, which enable to examine the effects of PCMB on the interaction between transmembrane proteins and the peripheral cytoskeletal network. Decreased recoveries of transmembrane proteins, such as band 3 and glycophorin, in Triton shell fraction were observed in the ghosts incubated with PCMB either in the presence of Mg2+ or at 0 degree C. PCMB also inhibited the in vitro association of purified spectrin with spectrin-depleted inside-out vesicles through interaction with proteins in the vesicle, such as bands 2.1 and 3. In the PCMB-treated ghosts, intramembrane particles were highly aggregated, which further supports the PCMB-induced dissociation of the transmembrane proteins from the cytoskeletal network. The decreased recovery of glycophorin in the Triton shell fraction also observed in intact red blood cells upon incubation with PCMB. These results suggest that the main action of PCMB on red cell membranes under physiological condition, at higher ionic strength and in the presence of Mg2+, is to dissociate transmembrane proteins from the peripheral cytoskeletal network, which may modify functions of these proteins.

  19. Cytochalasin releases mRNA from the cytoskeletal framework and inhibits protein synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Ornelles, D A; Fey, E G; Penman, S

    1986-01-01

    Cytochalasin D was shown to be a reversible inhibitor of protein synthesis in HeLa cells. The inhibition was detectable at drug levels typically used to perturb cell structure and increased in a dose-dependent manner. The drug also released mRNA from the cytoskeletal framework in direct proportion to the inhibition of protein synthesis. The released mRNA was unaltered in its translatability as measured in vitro but was no longer translated in the cytochalasin-treated HeLa cells. The residual protein synthesis occurred on polyribosomes that were reduced in amount but displayed a normal sedimentation distribution. The results support the hypothesis that mRNA binding to the cytoskeletal framework is necessary although not sufficient for translation. Analysis of the cytoskeletal framework, which binds the polyribosomes, revealed no alterations in composition or amount of protein as a result of treatment with cytochalasin D. Electron microscopy with embedment-free sections shows the framework in great detail. The micrographs revealed the profound reorganization effected by the drug but did not indicate substantial disaggregation of the cytoskeletal elements. Images PMID:3785175

  20. Post mortem development of meat quality as related to changes in cytoskeletal proteins of chicken muscles.

    PubMed

    Tomaszewska-Gras, J; Schreurs, F J G; Kijowski, J

    2011-04-01

    1. A procedure was developed to separate high and medium molecular weight myofibrillar proteins from chicken muscular tissue with a high resolution by flat bed sodium-dodecyl-sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and subsequent detection by either a general protein stain or Western blotting. These procedures were used to analyse the degradation process of cytoskeletal proteins in chicken breast and leg muscles during meat ageing. 2. This study demonstrates the degradation of all the examined cytoskeletal proteins: titin, nebulin and desmin as well as vinculin, a protein component of the costamere structure. All the examined proteins were found to be degraded during ageing of chicken breast and leg muscles. 3. Degradation of titin, nebulin and desmin started at 3 h post mortem in breast muscle. Intact titin and nebulin disappeared within 1 d. Intact desmin and vinculin were not detectable after 3 d post mortem. In leg muscle, the degradation process of all the examined proteins evolved much more slowly than in breast chicken muscles. 4. The changes observed in shear force, myofibrillar fragmentation and cooking loss were related to changes in cytoskeletal proteins and used to identify marker proteins or degradation products for the purpose of monitoring the development of meat ageing. The ageing process was faster in breast muscle than in leg muscle. 5. Significant correlations were found between degradation processes of titin, nebulin, and desmin and shear force, as well as myofibril fragmentation index of breast and leg muscles.

  1. Homology Modeling Procedures for Cytoskeletal Proteins of Tetrahymena and Other Ciliated Protists.

    PubMed

    Pagano, Giovanni J; Hufnagel, Linda A; King, Roberta S

    2016-01-01

    In recent years there has been an explosive increase in the number of annotated protein sequences available through genome sequencing, as well as an accumulation of published protein structural data based on crystallographic and NMR methods. When taken together with the development of computational methods for the prediction of protein structural and functional properties through homology modeling, an opportunity exists for prediction of properties of cytoskeletal proteins in a suitable model organism, such as Tetrahymena thermophila and its ciliated protist relatives. In particular, the recently sequenced genome of T. thermophila, long a model for cytoskeletal studies, provides a good starting point for undertaking such homology modeling studies. Homology modeling can produce functional predictions, for example regarding potential molecular interactions, that are of great interest to the drug industry and Tetrahymena is an attractive model system in which to follow up computational predictions with experimental analyses. We provide here procedures that can be followed to gain entry into this promising avenue of analysis.

  2. Topographic regulation of cytoskeletal protein phosphorylation by multimeric complexes in the squid giant fiber system.

    PubMed

    Grant, P; Diggins, M; Pant, H C

    1999-07-01

    In mammalian and squid nervous systems, the phosphorylation of neurofilament proteins (NFs) seems to be topographically regulated. Although NFs and relevant kinases are synthesized in cell bodies, phosphorylation of NFs, particularly in the lys-ser-pro (KSP) repeats in NF-M and NF-H tail domains, seem to be restricted to axons. To explore the factors regulating the cellular compartmentalization of NF phosphorylation, we separated cell bodies (GFL) from axons in the squid stellate ganglion and compared the kinase activity in the respective lysates. Although total kinase activity was similar in each lysate, the profile of endogenous phosphorylated substrates was strikingly different. Neurofilament protein 220 (NF220), high-molecular-weight NF protein (HMW), and tubulin were the principal phosphorylated substrates in axoplasm, while tubulin was the principal GFL phosphorylated substrate, in addition to highly phosphorylated low-molecular-weight proteins. Western blot analysis showed that whereas both lysates contained similar kinases and cytoskeletal proteins, phosphorylated NF220 and HMW were completely absent from the GFL lysate. These differences were highlighted by P13(suc1) affinity chromatography, which revealed in axoplasm an active multimeric phosphorylation complex(es), enriched in cytoskeletal proteins and kinases; the equivalent P13 GFL complex exhibited six to 20 times less endogenous and exogenous phosphorylation activity, respectively, contained fewer cytoskeletal proteins and kinases, and expressed a qualitatively different cdc2-like kinase epitope, 34 kDa rather than 49 kDa. Cell bodies and axons share a similar repertoire of molecular consitutents; however, the data suggest that the cytoskeletal/kinase phosphorylation complexes extracted from each cellular compartment by P13 are fundamentally different. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  3. Cytoskeletal scaffolding proteins interact with Lynch-Syndrome associated mismatch repair protein MLH1.

    PubMed

    Brieger, Angela; Adryan, Boris; Wolpert, Fabian; Passmann, Sandra; Zeuzem, Stefan; Trojan, Jörg

    2010-09-01

    The involvement of MLH1 in several mismatch repair-independent cellular processes has been reported. In an attempt to gain further insight into the protein's cellular functions, we screened for novel interacting partners of MLH1 utilizing a bacterial two-hybrid system. Numerous unknown interacting proteins were identified, suggesting novel biological roles of MLH1. The network of MLH1 and its partner proteins involves a multitude of cellular processes. Integration of our data with the "General Repository for Interaction Datasets" highlighted that MLH1 exhibits relationships to three interacting pairs of proteins involved in cytoskeletal and filament organization: Thymosin beta 4 and Actin gamma, Cathepsin B and Annexin A2 as well as Spectrin alpha and Desmin. Coimmunoprecipitation and colocalization experiments validated the interaction of MLH1 with these proteins. Differential mRNA levels of many of the identified proteins, detected by microarray analysis comparing MLH1-deficient and -proficient cell lines, support the assumed interplay of MLH1 and the identified candidate proteins. By siRNA knock down of MLH1, we demonstrated the functional impact of MLH1-Actin interaction on filament organization and propose that dysregulation of MLH1 plays an essential role in cytoskeleton dynamics. Our data suggest novel roles of MLH1 in cellular organization and colorectal cancerogenesis.

  4. [Cytoskeletal actin and its associated proteins. Some examples in Protista].

    PubMed

    Guillén, N; Carlier, M F; Brugerolle, G; Tardieux, I; Ausseil, J

    1998-06-01

    Many processes, cell motility being an example, require cells to remodel the actin cytoskeleton in response to both intracellular and extracellular signals. Reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton involves the rapid disassembly and reassembly of actin filaments, a phenomenon regulated by the action of particular actin-binding proteins. In recent years, an interest in studying actin regulation in unicellular organisms has arisen. Parasitic protozoan are among these organisms and studies of the cytoskeleton functions of these protozoan are relevant related to either cell biology or pathogenicity. To discuss recent data in this field, a symposium concerning "Actin and actin-binding proteins in protists" was held on May 8-11 in Paris, France, during the XXXV meeting of the French Society of Protistology. As a brief summary of the symposium we report here findings concerning the in vitro actin dynamic assembly, as well as the characterization of several actin-binding proteins from the parasitic protozoan Entamoeba histolytica, Trichomonas vaginalis and Plasmodium knowlesi. In addition, localization of actin in non-pathogen protists such as Prorocentrum micans and Crypthecodinium cohnii is also presented. The data show that some actin-binding proteins facilitate organization of filaments into higher order structures as pseudopods, while others have regulatory functions, indicating very particular roles for actin-binding proteins. One of the proteins discussed during the symposium, the actin depolymerizing factor ADF, was shown to enhance the treadmilling rate of actin filaments. In vitro, ADF binds to the ADP-bound forms of G-actin and F-actin, thereby participating in and changing the rate of actin assembly. Biochemical approaches allowed the identification of a protein complex formed by HSP/C70-cap32-34 which might also be involved in depolymerization of F-actin in P. knowlesi. Molecular and cellular approaches were used to identify proteins such as ABP-120 and myosin

  5. Identification of paralogous life-cycle stage specific cytoskeletal proteins in the parasite Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Portman, Neil; Gull, Keith

    2014-01-01

    The life cycle of the African trypanosome Trypanosoma brucei, is characterised by a transition between insect and mammalian hosts representing very different environments that present the parasite with very different challenges. These challenges are met by the expression of life-cycle stage-specific cohorts of proteins, which function in systems such as metabolism and immune evasion. These life-cycle transitions are also accompanied by morphological rearrangements orchestrated by microtubule dynamics and associated proteins of the subpellicular microtubule array. Here we employed a gel-based comparative proteomic technique, Difference Gel Electrophoresis, to identify cytoskeletal proteins that are expressed differentially in mammalian infective and insect form trypanosomes. From this analysis we identified a pair of novel, paralogous proteins, one of which is expressed in the procyclic form and the other in the bloodstream form. We show that these proteins, CAP51 and CAP51V, localise to the subpellicular corset of microtubules and are essential for correct organisation of the cytoskeleton and successful cytokinesis in their respective life cycle stages. We demonstrate for the first time redundancy of function between life-cycle stage specific paralogous sets in the cytoskeleton and reveal modification of cytoskeletal components in situ prior to their removal during differentiation from the bloodstream form to the insect form. These specific results emphasise a more generic concept that the trypanosome genome encodes a cohort of cytoskeletal components that are present in at least two forms with life-cycle stage-specific expression.

  6. Membrane protein carboxyl methylation does not appear to be involved in the response of erythrocytes to cytoskeletal stress.

    PubMed

    Barber, J R; Clarke, S

    1984-08-30

    We have investigated the effect of changes of human erythrocyte cell shape on the degree of covalent modification by carboxyl methylation of membrane cytoskeletal proteins. The results indicate that the cell probably does not utilize carboxyl methylation to respond to cytoskeletal perturbations caused by such agents as A23187, 2,4-dinitrophenol, and chlorpromazine, all of which are known to cause large changes in cell shape. Protein carboxyl methylation also remained unchanged in the presence of cytochalasin B, which prevents such changes in cell shape. These results are not consistent with a cytoskeletal regulatory role for protein methylation reactions in the intact erythrocyte.

  7. {alpha}-Actinin-2, a cytoskeletal protein, binds to angiogenin

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Huajun; Gao Xiangwei; Sun Yishan; Zhou Jiliang; Yang Min; Xu Zhengping . E-mail: zpxu@zju.edu.cn

    2005-04-08

    Angiogenin is an angiogenic factor which is involved in tumorigenesis. However, no particular intracellular protein is known to interact directly with angiogenin. In the present study, we reported the identification of {alpha}-actinin-2, an actin-crosslinking protein, as a potential angiogenin-interacting partner by yeast two-hybrid screening. This interaction was confirmed by different approaches. First, angiogenin was pulled down together with His-tagged {alpha}-actinin-2 by Ni{sup 2+}-agarose resins. Second, {alpha}-actinin-2 was coimmunoprecipitated with angiogenin by anti-angiogenin monoclonal antibody. Third, the in vivo interaction of these two proteins was revealed by fluorescence resonance energy transfer analysis. Since members of {alpha}-actinin family play pivotal roles in cell proliferation, migration, and invasion, the interaction between {alpha}-actinin-2 and angiogenin may underline one possible mechanism of angiogenin in angiogenesis. Our finding presents the first evidence of an interaction of a cytosolic protein with angiogenin, which might be a novel interference target for anti-angiogenesis and anti-tumor therapy.

  8. Cooperation of the BTB-Zinc finger protein, Abrupt, with cytoskeletal regulators in Drosophila epithelial tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Turkel, Nezaket; Portela, Marta; Poon, Carole; Li, Jason; Brumby, Anthony M.; Richardson, Helena E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The deregulation of cell polarity or cytoskeletal regulators is a common occurrence in human epithelial cancers. Moreover, there is accumulating evidence in human epithelial cancer that BTB-ZF genes, such as Bcl6 and ZBTB7A, are oncogenic. From our previous studies in the vinegar fly, Drosophila melanogaster, we have identified a cooperative interaction between a mutation in the apico-basal cell polarity regulator Scribble (Scrib) and overexpression of the BTB-ZF protein Abrupt (Ab). Herein, we show that co-expression of ab with actin cytoskeletal regulators, RhoGEF2 or Src64B, in the developing eye-antennal epithelial tissue results in the formation of overgrown amorphous tumours, whereas ab and DRac1 co-expression leads to non-cell autonomous overgrowth. Together with ab, these genes affect the expression of differentiation genes, resulting in tumours locked in a progenitor cell fate. Finally, we show that the expression of two mammalian genes related to ab, Bcl6 and ZBTB7A, which are oncogenes in mammalian epithelial cancers, significantly correlate with the upregulation of cytoskeletal genes or downregulation of apico-basal cell polarity neoplastic tumour suppressor genes in colorectal, lung and other human epithelial cancers. Altogether, this analysis has revealed that upregulation of cytoskeletal regulators cooperate with Abrupt in Drosophila epithelial tumorigenesis, and that high expression of human BTB-ZF genes, Bcl6 and ZBTB7A, shows significant correlations with cytoskeletal and cell polarity gene expression in specific epithelial tumour types. This highlights the need for further investigation of the cooperation between these genes in mammalian systems. PMID:26187947

  9. Distinct contractile and cytoskeletal protein patterns in the Antarctic midge are elicited by desiccation and rehydration.

    PubMed

    Li, Aiqing; Benoit, Joshua B; Lopez-Martinez, Giancarlo; Elnitsky, Michael A; Lee, Richard E; Denlinger, David L

    2009-05-01

    Desiccation presents a major challenge for the Antarctic midge, Belgica antarctica. In this study, we use proteomic profiling to evaluate protein changes in the larvae elicited by dehydration and rehydration. Larvae were desiccated at 75% relative humidity (RH) for 12 h to achieve a body water loss of 35%, approximately half of the water that can be lost before the larvae succumb to dehydration. To evaluate the rehydration response, larvae were first desiccated, then rehydrated for 6 h at 100% RH and then in water for 6 h. Controls were held continuously at 100% RH. Protein analysis was performed using 2-DE and nanoscale capillary LC/MS/MS. Twenty-four identified proteins changed in abundance in response to desiccation: 16 were more abundant and 8 were less abundant; 84% of these proteins were contractile or cytoskeletal proteins. Thirteen rehydration-regulated proteins were identified: 8 were more abundant and 5 were less abundant, and 69% of these proteins were also contractile or cytoskeletal proteins. Additional proteins responsive to desiccation and rehydration were involved in functions including stress responses, energy metabolism, protein synthesis, glucogenesis and membrane transport. We conclude that the major protein responses elicited by both desiccation and rehydration are linked to body contraction and cytoskeleton rearrangements.

  10. Cell cycle regulation and cytoskeletal remodelling are critical processes in the nutritional programming of embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Swali, Angelina; McMullen, Sarah; Hayes, Helen; Gambling, Lorraine; McArdle, Harry J; Langley-Evans, Simon C

    2011-01-01

    Many mechanisms purport to explain how nutritional signals during early development are manifested as disease in the adult offspring. While these describe processes leading from nutritional insult to development of the actual pathology, the initial underlying cause of the programming effect remains elusive. To establish the primary drivers of programming, this study aimed to capture embryonic gene and protein changes in the whole embryo at the time of nutritional insult rather than downstream phenotypic effects. By using a cross-over design of two well established models of maternal protein and iron restriction we aimed to identify putative common "gatekeepers" which may drive nutritional programming.Both protein and iron deficiency in utero reduced the nephron complement in adult male Wistar and Rowett Hooded Lister rats (P<0.05). This occurred in the absence of damage to the glomerular ultrastructure. Microarray, proteomic and pathway analyses identified diet-specific and strain-specific gatekeeper genes, proteins and processes which shared a common association with the regulation of the cell cycle, especially the G1/S and G2/M checkpoints, and cytoskeletal remodelling. A cell cycle-specific PCR array confirmed the down-regulation of cyclins with protein restriction and the up-regulation of apoptotic genes with iron deficiency.The timing and experimental design of this study have been carefully controlled to isolate the common molecular mechanisms which may initiate the sequelae of events involved in nutritional programming of embryonic development. We propose that despite differences in the individual genes and proteins affected in each strain and with each diet, the general response to nutrient deficiency in utero is perturbation of the cell cycle, at the level of interaction with the cytoskeleton and the mitotic checkpoints, thereby diminishing control over the integrity of DNA which is allowed to replicate. These findings offer novel insight into the primary

  11. Analysis of the expression of cytoskeletal proteins of Taenia crassiceps ORF strain cysticerci (Cestoda).

    PubMed

    Reynoso-Ducoing, Olivia; Valverde-Islas, Laura; Paredes-Salomon, Cristina; Pérez-Reyes, América; Landa, Abraham; Robert, Lilia; Mendoza, Guillermo; Ambrosio, Javier R

    2014-05-01

    The Taenia crassiceps ORF strain is used to generate a murine model of cysticercosis, which is used for diagnosis, evaluation of drugs, and vaccination. This particular strain only exists as cysticerci, is easily maintained under in vivo and in vitro conditions, and offers an excellent model for studying the cytoskeletons of cestodes. In this study, several experimental approaches were used to determine the tissue expression of its cytoskeletal proteins. The techniques used were microscopy (video, confocal, and transmission electron), one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) electrophoresis, immunochemistry, and mass spectrometry. The tissue expression of actin, tubulin, and paramyosin was assessed using microscopy, and their protein isoforms were determined with 1D and 2D electrophoresis and immunochemistry. Nineteen spots were excised from a proteomic gel and identified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and immunochemistry. The proteins identified were classic cytoskeletal proteins, metabolic enzymes, and proteins with diverse biological functions, but mainly involved in detoxification activities. Research suggests that most noncytoskeletal proteins interact with actin or tubulin, and the results of the present study suggest that the proteins identified may be involved in supporting the dynamics and plasticity of the cytoskeleton of T. crassiceps cysticerci. These results contribute to our knowledge of the cellular biology and physiology of cestodes.

  12. Differential impact of REM sleep deprivation on cytoskeletal proteins of brain regions involved in sleep regulation.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Vázquez, Jennifer; Camacho-Arroyo, Ignacio; Velázquez-Moctezuma, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is involved in memory consolidation, which implies synaptic plasticity. This process requires protein synthesis and the reorganization of the neural cytoskeleton. REM sleep deprivation (REMSD) has an impact on some neuronal proteins involved in synaptic plasticity, such as glutamate receptors and postsynaptic density protein 95, but its effects on cytoskeletal proteins is unknown. In this study, the effects of REMSD on the content of the cytoskeletal proteins MAP2 and TAU were analyzed. Adult female rats were submitted to selective REMSD by using the multiple platform technique. After 24, 48 or 72 h of REMSD, rats were decapitated and the following brain areas were dissected: pons, preoptic area, hippocampus and frontal cortex. Protein extraction and Western blot were performed. Results showed an increase in TAU content in the pons, preoptic area and hippocampus after 24 h of REMSD, while in the frontal cortex a significant increase in TAU content was observed after 72 h of REMSD. A TAU content decrease was observed in the hippocampus after 48 h of REMSD. Interestingly, a marked increase in TAU content was observed after 72 h of REMSD. MAP2 content only increased in the preoptic area at 24 h, and in the frontal cortex after 24 and 72 h of REMSD, without significant changes in the pons and hippocampus. These results support the idea that REM sleep plays an important role in the organization of neural cytoskeleton, and that this effect is tissue-specific.

  13. Intermediate filament-like proteins in bacteria and a cytoskeletal function in Streptomyces

    PubMed Central

    Bagchi, Sonchita; Tomenius, Henrik; Belova, Lyubov M; Ausmees, Nora

    2008-01-01

    Actin and tubulin cytoskeletons are conserved and widespread in bacteria. A strikingly intermediate filament (IF)-like cytoskeleton, composed of crescentin, is also present in Caulobacter crescentus and determines its specific cell shape. However, the broader significance of this finding remained obscure, because crescentin appeared to be unique to Caulobacter. Here we demonstrate that IF-like function is probably a more widespread phenomenon in bacteria. First, we show that 21 genomes of 26 phylogenetically diverse species encoded uncharacterized proteins with a central segmented coiled coil rod domain, which we regarded as a key structural feature of IF proteins and crescentin. Experimental studies of three in silico predicted candidates from Mycobacterium and other actinomycetes revealed a common IF-like property to spontaneously assemble into filaments in vitro. Furthermore, the IF-like protein FilP formed cytoskeletal structures in the model actinomycete Streptomyces coelicolor and was needed for normal growth and morphogenesis. Atomic force microscopy of living cells revealed that the FilP cytoskeleton contributed to mechanical fitness of the hyphae, thus closely resembling the function of metazoan IF. Together, the bioinformatic and experimental data suggest that an IF-like protein architecture is a versatile design that is generally present in bacteria and utilized to perform diverse cytoskeletal tasks. PMID:18976278

  14. Modulation of cytoskeletal dynamics by mammalian nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDPK) proteins.

    PubMed

    Snider, Natasha T; Altshuler, Peter J; Omary, M Bishr

    2015-02-01

    Nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDPK) proteins comprise a family of ten human isoforms that participate in the regulation of multiple cellular processes via enzymatic and nonenzymatic functions. The major enzymatic function of NDPKs is the generation of nucleoside triphosphates, such as guanosine triphosphate (GTP). Mechanisms behind the nonenzymatic NDPK functions are not clear but likely involve context-dependent signaling roles of NDPK within multi-protein complexes. This is most evident for NDPK-A, which is encoded by the human NME1 gene, the first tumor metastasis suppressor gene to be identified. Understanding which protein interactions are most relevant for the biological and metastasis-related functions of NDPK will be important in the potential utilization of NDPK as a disease target. Accumulating evidence suggests that NDPK interacts with and affects various components and regulators of the cytoskeleton, including actin-binding proteins, intermediate filaments, and cytoskeletal attachment structures (adherens junctions, desmosomes, and focal adhesions). We review the existing literature on this topic and highlight outstanding questions and potential future directions that should clarify the impact of NDPK on the different cytoskeletal systems.

  15. Effects of estrogen receptor modulators on cytoskeletal proteins in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Segura-Uribe, Julia J; Pinto-Almazán, Rodolfo; Coyoy-Salgado, Angélica; Fuentes-Venado, Claudia E; Guerra-Araiza, Christian

    2017-08-01

    Estrogen receptor modulators are compounds of interest because of their estrogenic agonistic/antagonistic effects and tissue specificity. These compounds have many clinical applications, particularly for breast cancer treatment and osteoporosis in postmenopausal women, as well as for the treatment of climacteric symptoms. Similar to estrogens, neuroprotective effects of estrogen receptor modulators have been described in different models. However, the mechanisms of action of these compounds in the central nervous system have not been fully described. We conducted a systematic search to investigate the effects of estrogen receptor modulators in the central nervous system, focusing on the modulation of cytoskeletal proteins. We found that raloxifene, tamoxifen, and tibolone modulate some cytoskeletal proteins such as tau, microtuble-associated protein 1 (MAP1), MAP2, neurofilament 38 (NF38) by different mechanisms of action and at different levels: neuronal microfilaments, intermediate filaments, and microtubule-associated proteins. Finally, we emphasize the importance of the study of these compounds in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases since they present the benefits of estrogens without their side effects.

  16. The degree of resistance of erythrocyte membrane cytoskeletal proteins to supra-physiologic concentrations of calcium: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Mostafavi, Ebrahim; Nargesi, Arash Aghajani; Ghazizadeh, Zaniar; Larry, Mehrdad; Farahani, Roya Horabad; Morteza, Afsaneh; Esteghamati, Alireza; Vigneron, Claude; Nakhjavani, Manouchehr

    2014-08-01

    Calcium is a key regulator of cell dynamics. Dysregulation of its cytosolic concentration is implicated in the pathophysiology of several diseases. This study aimed to assess the effects of calcium on the network of membrane cytoskeletal proteins. Erythrocyte membranes were obtained from eight healthy donors and incubated with 250 µM and 1.25 mM calcium solutions. Membrane cytoskeletal proteins were quantified using SDS-PAGE at baseline and after 3 and 5 days of incubation. Supra-physiologic concentrations of calcium (1.25 mM) induced a significant proteolysis in membrane cytoskeletal proteins, compared with magnesium (p < 0.001). Actin exhibited the highest sensitivity to calcium-induced proteolysis (6.8 ± 0.3 vs. 5.3 ± 0.6, p < 0.001), while spectrin (39.9 ± 1.0 vs. 40.3 ± 2.0, p = 0.393) and band-6 (6.3 ± 0.3 vs. 6.8 ± 0.8, p = 0.191) were more resistant to proteolysis after incubation with calcium in the range of endoplasmic reticulum concentrations (250 µM). Aggregation of membrane cytoskeletal proteins was determined after centrifugation and was significantly higher after incubation with calcium ions compared with control, EDTA and magnesium solutions (p < 0.001). In a supra-physiologic range of 1.25-10 mM of calcium ions, there was a nearly perfect linear relationship between calcium concentration and aggregation of erythrocyte membrane cytoskeletal proteins (R(2) = 0.971, p < 0.001). Our observation suggests a strong interaction between calcium ions and membrane cytoskeletal network. Cumulative effects of disrupted calcium homeostasis on cytoskeletal proteins need to be further investigated at extended periods of time in disease states.

  17. Cytoskeletal proteins in thymic epithelial cells of the Australian lungfish Neoceratodus forsteri

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad, Mohammad G; Raftos, David A; Joss, Jean

    2009-01-01

    The vertebrate thymus consists of distinctive subpopulations of epithelial cells that contain a diverse repertoire of cytoskeletal proteins. In this study of the thymus in the Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri, immunohistochemistry was used to distinguish the cytoskeletal proteins present in each class of thymic epithelial cell. A panel of antibodies (Abs), each specific for a different cytoskeletal polypeptide (keratins, vimentin, desmin, actin and tubulins), was used on paraffin and ultrathin resin sections of thymus. Ab AE I (reactive against human type I cytokeratins (CK) 14, 16 and 19) selectively stained the cytoplasm of capsular, trabecular and the outermost epithelial cells of Hassall's corpuscles. Anti-CK 10 Abs strongly labelled the capsular epithelial cells and less than 20% of cortical and medullary epithelial cells. The anti-50-kDa desmin Ab did not react with any thymic cells, whereas the anti-53-kDa desmin Ab labelled some capsular, cortical and medullary thymic epithelial cells. The anti-vimentin Ab stained most of the capsular and ∼60% of the cortical epithelium. Thymic nurse cells and Hassall's corpuscles were found to be devoid of actin, which was strongly detected in medullary and perivascular epithelium. Both α and β tubulins were detected in all thymic cells. This study extends the concept of thymic epithelial heterogeneity. The complexity of thymic epithelium in N. forsteri may indicate a relationship between thymic epithelial subpopulations and the thymic microenvironment. These data identify anti-keratin Abs as a valuable tool for studying differentiation and ontogeny of the thymic epithelium in N. forsteri. PMID:19166477

  18. Conditioning nerve crush accelerates cytoskeletal protein transport in sprouts that form after a subsequent crush

    SciTech Connect

    McQuarrie, I.G.; Jacob, J.M. )

    1991-03-01

    To examine the relationship between axonal outgrowth and the delivery of cytoskeletal proteins to the growing axon tip, outgrowth was accelerated by using a conditioning nerve crush. Because slow component b (SCb) of axonal transport is the most rapid vehicle for carrying cytoskeletal proteins to the axon tip, the rate of SCb was measured in conditioned vs. sham-conditioned sprouts. In young Sprague-Dawley rats, the conditioning crush was made to sciatic nerve branches at the knee; 14 days later, the test crush was made where the L4 and L5 spinal nerves join to form the sciatic nerve in the flank. Newly synthesized proteins were labeled in motor neurons by injecting {sup 35}S-methionine into the lumbar spinal cord 7 days before the test crush. The wave of pulse-labeled SCb proteins reached the crush by the time it was made and subsequently entered sprouts. The nerve was removed and sectioned for SDS-PAGE and fluorography 4-12 days after the crush. Tubulins, neurofilament proteins, and representative 'cytomatrix' proteins (actin, calmodulin, and putative microtubule-associated proteins) were removed from gels for liquid scintillation counting. Labeled SCb proteins entered sprouts without first accumulating in parent axon stumps, presumably because sprouts begin to grow within hours after axotomy. The peak of SCb moved 11% faster in conditioned than in sham-conditioned sprouts: 3.0 vs. 2.7 mm/d (p less than 0.05). To confirm that sprouts elongate more rapidly when a test crush is preceded by a conditioning crush, outgrowth distances were measured in a separate group of rats by labeling fast axonal transport with {sup 3}H-proline 24 hours before nerve retrieval.

  19. Mechanical diagnosis of human erythrocytes by ultra-high speed manipulation unraveled critical time window for global cytoskeletal remodeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Hiroaki; Murakami, Ryo; Sakuma, Shinya; Tsai, Chia-Hung Dylan; Gutsmann, Thomas; Brandenburg, Klaus; Pöschl, Johannes M. B.; Arai, Fumihito; Kaneko, Makoto; Tanaka, Motomu

    2017-02-01

    Large deformability of erythrocytes in microvasculature is a prerequisite to realize smooth circulation. We develop a novel tool for the three-step “Catch-Load-Launch” manipulation of a human erythrocyte based on an ultra-high speed position control by a microfluidic “robotic pump”. Quantification of the erythrocyte shape recovery as a function of loading time uncovered the critical time window for the transition between fast and slow recoveries. The comparison with erythrocytes under depletion of adenosine triphosphate revealed that the cytoskeletal remodeling over a whole cell occurs in 3 orders of magnitude longer timescale than the local dissociation-reassociation of a single spectrin node. Finally, we modeled septic conditions by incubating erythrocytes with endotoxin, and found that the exposure to endotoxin results in a significant delay in the characteristic transition time for cytoskeletal remodeling. The high speed manipulation of erythrocytes with a robotic pump technique allows for high throughput mechanical diagnosis of blood-related diseases.

  20. Mechanical diagnosis of human erythrocytes by ultra-high speed manipulation unraveled critical time window for global cytoskeletal remodeling.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hiroaki; Murakami, Ryo; Sakuma, Shinya; Tsai, Chia-Hung Dylan; Gutsmann, Thomas; Brandenburg, Klaus; Pöschl, Johannes M B; Arai, Fumihito; Kaneko, Makoto; Tanaka, Motomu

    2017-02-24

    Large deformability of erythrocytes in microvasculature is a prerequisite to realize smooth circulation. We develop a novel tool for the three-step "Catch-Load-Launch" manipulation of a human erythrocyte based on an ultra-high speed position control by a microfluidic "robotic pump". Quantification of the erythrocyte shape recovery as a function of loading time uncovered the critical time window for the transition between fast and slow recoveries. The comparison with erythrocytes under depletion of adenosine triphosphate revealed that the cytoskeletal remodeling over a whole cell occurs in 3 orders of magnitude longer timescale than the local dissociation-reassociation of a single spectrin node. Finally, we modeled septic conditions by incubating erythrocytes with endotoxin, and found that the exposure to endotoxin results in a significant delay in the characteristic transition time for cytoskeletal remodeling. The high speed manipulation of erythrocytes with a robotic pump technique allows for high throughput mechanical diagnosis of blood-related diseases.

  1. A photoactivable phospholipid analogue that specifically labels membrane cytoskeletal proteins of intact erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Pradhan, D.; Williamson, P.; Schlegel, R.A. )

    1989-08-22

    A radioactive photoactivable analogue of phosphatidylethanolamine, 2-(2-azido-4-nitrobenzoyl)-1-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho({sup 14}C)ethanolamine(({sup 14}C)AzPE), was synthesized. Upon incubation with erythrocytes in the dark, about 90% of ({sup 14}C)AzPE spontaneously incorporated into the cells; of this fraction, about 90% associated with the membrane, all of it noncovalently. Upon photoactivation, 3-4% of the membrane-associated probe was incorporated into protein. Analysis of this fraction by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, as well as extraction of labeled membranes with alkali or detergent, showed that the probe preferentially labeled cytoskeletal proteins. ({sup 14}C)AzPE appears to be a useful tool for the study of lipid-protein interactions at the cytoplasmic face of the plasma membrane of intact cells.

  2. Oestradiol and progesterone differentially alter cytoskeletal protein expression and flame cell morphology in Taenia crassiceps.

    PubMed

    Ambrosio, Javier R; Ostoa-Saloma, Pedro; Palacios-Arreola, M Isabel; Ruíz-Rosado, Azucena; Sánchez-Orellana, Pedro L; Reynoso-Ducoing, Olivia; Nava-Castro, Karen E; Martínez-Velázquez, Nancy; Escobedo, Galileo; Ibarra-Coronado, Elizabeth G; Valverde-Islas, Laura; Morales-Montor, Jorge

    2014-09-01

    We examined the effects of oestradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4) on cytoskeletal protein expression in the helminth Taenia crassiceps - specifically actin, tubulin and myosin. These proteins assemble into flame cells, which constitute the parasite excretory system. Total protein extracts were obtained from E2- and P4-treated T. crassiceps cysticerci and untreated controls, and analysed by one- and two-dimensional protein electrophoresis, flow cytometry, immunofluorescence and videomicroscopy. Exposure of T. crassiceps cysticerci to E2 and P4 induced differential protein expression patterns compared with untreated controls. Changes in actin, tubulin and myosin expression were confirmed by flow cytometry of parasite cells and immunofluorescence. In addition, parasite morphology was altered in response to E2 and P4 versus controls. Flame cells were primarily affected at the level of the ciliary tuft, in association with the changes in actin, tubulin and myosin. We conclude that oestradiol and progesterone act directly on T. crassiceps cysticerci, altering actin, tubulin and myosin expression and thus affecting the assembly and function of flame cells. Our results increase our understanding of several aspects of the molecular crosstalk between host and parasite, which might be useful in designing anthelmintic drugs that exclusively impair parasitic proteins which mediate cell signaling and pathogenic reproduction and establishment.

  3. The muscle regulatory and structural protein MLP is a cytoskeletal binding partner of betaI-spectrin.

    PubMed

    Flick, M J; Konieczny, S F

    2000-05-01

    Muscle LIM protein (MLP) is a striated muscle-specific factor that enhances myogenic differentiation and is critical to maintaining the structural integrity of the contractile apparatus. The ability of MLP to regulate myogenesis is particularly interesting since it exhibits multiple subcellular localizations, being found in both nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments. Despite extensive biochemical analyses on MLP, the mechanism(s) by which it influences the myogenic program remains largely undefined. To further examine the role of MLP as a positive myogenic regulator, a yeast two-hybrid screen was employed to identify cytoplasmic-associated MLP binding partners. From this screen, the cytoskeletal protein betaI-spectrin was isolated. Protein interaction assays demonstrate that MLP and betaI-spectrin associate with one another in vivo as well as when tested under several in vitro binding conditions. betaI-spectrin binds specifically to MLP but not to the MLP related proteins CRP1 and CRP2 or to other LIM domain containing proteins. The MLP:beta-spectrin interaction is mediated by the second LIM motif of MLP and by repeat 7 of beta-spectrin. Confocal microscopy studies also reveal that MLP co-localizes with beta-spectrin at the sarcolemma overlying the Z- and M-lines of myofibrils in both cardiac and skeletal muscle tissue. Given that beta-spectrin is a known costamere protein, we propose that sarcolemma-associated MLP also serves as a key costamere protein, stabilizing the association of the contractile apparatus with the sarcolemma by linking the beta-spectrin network to the alpha-actinin crosslinked actin filaments of the myofibril.

  4. Sex hormones and expression pattern of cytoskeletal proteins in the rat brain throughout pregnancy.

    PubMed

    González-Arenas, Aliesha; Piña-Medina, Ana Gabriela; González-Flores, Oscar; Galván-Rosas, Agustín; Porfirio Gómora-Arrati; Camacho-Arroyo, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    Pregnancy involves diverse changes in brain function that implicate a re-organization in neuronal cytoskeleton. In this physiological state, the brain is in contact with several hormones that it has never been exposed, as well as with very high levels of hormones that the brain has been in touch throughout life. Among the latter hormones are progesterone and estradiol which regulate several brain functions, including learning, memory, neuroprotection, and the display of sexual and maternal behavior. These functions involve changes in the structure and organization of neurons and glial cells that require the participation of cytoskeletal proteins whose expression and activity is regulated by estradiol and progesterone. We have found that the expression pattern of Microtubule Associated Protein 2, Tau, and Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein changes in a tissue-specific manner in the brain of the rat throughout gestation and the start of lactation, suggesting that these proteins participate in the plastic changes observed in the brain during pregnancy. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Pregnancy and Steroids'.

  5. Oxytocin Increases Neurite Length and Expression of Cytoskeletal Proteins Associated with Neuronal Growth.

    PubMed

    Lestanova, Z; Bacova, Z; Kiss, A; Havranek, T; Strbak, V; Bakos, J

    2016-06-01

    Neuropeptide oxytocin acts as a growth and differentiation factor; however, its effects on neurite growth are poorly understood. The aims of the present study were (1) to evaluate time effects of oxytocin on expression of nestin and MAP2; (2) to measure the effect of oxytocin on gene expression of β-actin, vimentin, cofilin, and drebrin; and (3) to measure changes in neurite length and number in response to oxytocin/oxytocin receptor antagonist L-371,257. Exposure of SH-SY5Y cells to 1 μM oxytocin resulted in a significant increase in gene expression and protein levels of nestin after 12, 24, and 48 h. Oxytocin treatment induced no changes in gene expression of MAP2; however, a decrease of protein levels was observed in all time intervals. Gene expression of β-actin, vimentin, and drebrin increased in response to oxytocin. Oxytocin induced significant elongation of neurites after 12, 24, and 48 h. No change in neurite length was observed in the presence of the combination of retinoic acid and oxytocin receptor antagonist L-371,257. Oxytocin treatment for 12 h increased the number of neurites. Overall, the present data suggest that oxytocin contributes to the regulation of expression of cytoskeletal proteins associated with growth of neuronal cones and induces neurite elongation mediated by oxytocin receptors at least in certain types of neuronal cells.

  6. Coronin1 Proteins Dictate Rac1 Intracellular Dynamics and Cytoskeletal Output

    PubMed Central

    Ojeda, Virginia; Castro-Castro, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Rac1 regulates lamellipodium formation, myosin II-dependent contractility, and focal adhesions during cell migration. While the spatiotemporal assembly of those processes is well characterized, the signaling mechanisms involved remain obscure. We report here that the cytoskeleton-related Coronin1A and -1B proteins control a myosin II inactivation-dependent step that dictates the intracellular dynamics and cytoskeletal output of active Rac1. This step is signaling-branch specific, since it affects the functional competence of active Rac1 only when forming complexes with downstream ArhGEF7 and Pak proteins in actomyosin-rich structures. The pathway is used by default unless Rac1 is actively rerouted away from the structures by upstream activators and signals from other Rho GTPases. These results indicate that Coronin1 proteins are at the center of a regulatory hub that coordinates Rac1 activation, effector exchange, and the F-actin organization state during cell signaling. Targeting this route could be useful to hamper migration of cancer cells harboring oncogenic RAC1 mutations. PMID:24980436

  7. Proprotein convertase 5/6 is critical for embryo implantation in women: regulating receptivity by cleaving EBP50, modulating ezrin binding, and membrane-cytoskeletal interactions.

    PubMed

    Heng, Sophea; Cervero, Ana; Simon, Carlos; Stephens, Andrew N; Li, Ying; Zhang, Jin; Paule, Sarah; Rainczuk, Adam; Singh, Harmeet; Quinonero, Alicia; Tapia, Alejandro; Velasquez, Luis; Salamonsen, Lois; Rombauts, Luk J F; Nie, Guiying

    2011-12-01

    Establishment of endometrial receptivity is vital for successful embryo implantation; its failure causes infertility. Epithelial receptivity acquisition involves dramatic structural changes in the plasma membrane and cytoskeleton. Proprotein convertase 5/6 (PC6), a serine protease of the proprotein convertase (PC) family, is up-regulated in the human endometrium specifically at the time of epithelial receptivity and stromal cell decidualization. PC6 is the only PC member tightly regulated in this manner. The current study addressed the importance and mechanisms of PC6 action in regulating receptivity in women. PC6 was dysregulated in the endometrial epithelium during the window of implantation in infertile women of three demographically different cohorts. Its critical role in receptivity was evidenced by a significant reduction in mouse blastocyst attachment of endometrial epithelial cells after PC6 knockdown by small interfering RNA. Using a proteomic approach, we discovered that PC6 cleaved the key scaffolding protein, ezrin-radixin-moesin binding phosphoprotein 50 (EBP50), thereby profoundly affecting its interaction with binding protein ezrin (a key protein bridging actin filaments and plasma membrane), EBP50/ezrin cellular localization, and cytoskeleton-membrane connections. We further validated this novel PC6 regulation of receptivity in human endometrium in vivo in fertile vs. infertile patients. These results strongly indicate that PC6 plays a key role in regulating fundamental cellular remodeling processes, such as plasma membrane transformation and membrane-cytoskeletal interface reorganization. PC6 cleavage of a crucial scaffolding protein EBP50, thereby profoundly regulating membrane-cytoskeletal reorganization, greatly extends the current knowledge of PC biology and provides substantial new mechanistic insight into the fields of reproduction, basic cellular biology, and PC biochemistry.

  8. Mechanical diagnosis of human erythrocytes by ultra-high speed manipulation unraveled critical time window for global cytoskeletal remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Hiroaki; Murakami, Ryo; Sakuma, Shinya; Tsai, Chia-Hung Dylan; Gutsmann, Thomas; Brandenburg, Klaus; Pöschl, Johannes M. B.; Arai, Fumihito; Kaneko, Makoto; Tanaka, Motomu

    2017-01-01

    Large deformability of erythrocytes in microvasculature is a prerequisite to realize smooth circulation. We develop a novel tool for the three-step “Catch-Load-Launch” manipulation of a human erythrocyte based on an ultra-high speed position control by a microfluidic “robotic pump”. Quantification of the erythrocyte shape recovery as a function of loading time uncovered the critical time window for the transition between fast and slow recoveries. The comparison with erythrocytes under depletion of adenosine triphosphate revealed that the cytoskeletal remodeling over a whole cell occurs in 3 orders of magnitude longer timescale than the local dissociation-reassociation of a single spectrin node. Finally, we modeled septic conditions by incubating erythrocytes with endotoxin, and found that the exposure to endotoxin results in a significant delay in the characteristic transition time for cytoskeletal remodeling. The high speed manipulation of erythrocytes with a robotic pump technique allows for high throughput mechanical diagnosis of blood-related diseases. PMID:28233788

  9. Flat cells come full sphere: Are mutant cytoskeletal-related proteins oncoprotein-monsters or useful immunogens?

    PubMed

    Parry, Michele L; Blanck, George

    2016-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta is inherited as a dominant disease because if one allele is mutated, it contributes a mutant, destructive subunit polypeptide to collagen, which requires many subunits to form normal, polymeric, collagenous structures. Recent cancer genome atlas (TCGA) data indicate that cytoskeletal-related proteins are among the most commonly mutated proteins in human cancers, in distinct mutation frequency groups, i.e., including low mutation frequency groups. Part of the explanation for this observation is likely to be the fact that many of the coding regions for these proteins are very large, and indeed, it is likely these coding regions are mutated in many cells that never become cancerous. However, it would not be surprising if mutations in cytoskeletal proteins, when combined with oncoprotein or tumor suppressor protein mutations, had significant impacts on cancer development, for a number of reasons, including results obtained almost 5 decades ago indicating that well-spread cells in tissue culture, with well-formed cytoskeletons, were less tumorigenic than spherical cells with disrupted cytoskeletons. This raises the question, are mutant cytoskeletal proteins, which would likely interfere with polymer formation, a new class of oncoproteins, in particular, dominant negative oncoproteins? If these proteins are so commonly mutant, could they be the bases for common cancer vaccines?

  10. Increase in cell-surface localization of parathyroid hormone receptor by cytoskeletal protein 4.1G

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    The cell-surface localization of GPCRs (G-protein-coupled receptors) has emerged as one of critical factors of the GPCR-mediated signal transduction. It has been reported that the C-termini of GPCRs contain the sequences for sorting the receptors to cell surface. In the present study, we have searched for proteins that interact with the C-terminus of PTH (parathyroid hormone)/PTH-related protein receptor (PTHR) by using the yeast two-hybrid system, and identified a cytoskeletal protein 4.1G (generaltype 4.1 protein) as an interactant with the C-terminus. Immunohistochemical study revealed that both PTHR and 4.1G were co-localized on plasma membranes, when they were transiently expressed in COS-7 cells. When 4.1G or the C-terminal domain of 4.1G (4.1G-CTD), a dominant-negative form of 4.1G, was co-expressed with PTHR in COS-7 cells, 4.1G, but not 4.1G-CTD, facilitated the cell-surface localization of PTHR, determined by cell-surface biotinylation assay. PTH-(1–34) caused phosphorylation of ERK (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase) 1/2 in PTHR-expressed cells mainly mediated through EGF (epidermal growth factor) receptor. The phosphorylation was enhanced by the expression of 4.1G, but not 4.1G-CTD. PTH-(1–34) elevated [Ca2+]i (intracellular Ca2+ concentration) independent of EGF receptor activation, and the elevation was enhanced by the expression of 4.1G, but not 4.1G-CTD. These data indicate that 4.1G facilitates the cell-surface localization of PTHR through its interaction with the C-terminus of the receptor, resulting in the potentiation of PTHR-mediated signal transduction. PMID:16029167

  11. Depolymerization dynamics of individual filaments of bacterial cytoskeletal protein FtsZ

    PubMed Central

    Mateos-Gil, Pablo; Paez, Alfonso; Hörger, Ines; Rivas, Germán; Vicente, Miguel; Tarazona, Pedro; Vélez, Marisela

    2012-01-01

    We report observation and analysis of the depolymerization filaments of the bacterial cytoskeletal protein FtsZ (filament temperature-sensitive Z) formed on a mica surface. At low concentration, proteins adsorbed on the surface polymerize forming curved filaments that close into rings that remain stable for some time before opening irreversibly and fully depolymerizing. The distribution of ring lifetimes (T) as a function of length (N), shows that the rate of ring aperture correlates with filament length. If this ring lifetime is expressed as a bond survival time, (Tb ≡ NT), this correlation is abolished, indicating that these rupture events occur randomly and independently at each monomer interface. After rings open irreversibly, depolymerization of the remaining filaments is fast, but can be slowed down and followed using a nonhydrolyzing GTP analogue. The histogram of depolymerization velocities of individual filaments has an asymmetric distribution that can be fit with a computer model that assumes two rupture rates, a slow one similar to the one observed for ring aperture, affecting monomers in the central part of the filaments, and a faster one affecting monomers closer to the open ends. From the quantitative analysis, we conclude that the depolymerization rate is affected both by nucleotide hydrolysis rate and by its exchange along the filament, that all monomer interfaces are equally competent for hydrolysis, although depolymerization is faster at the open ends than in central filament regions, and that all monomer–monomer interactions, regardless of the nucleotide present, can adopt a curved configuration. PMID:22566654

  12. [Contractile properties of fibers and cytoskeletal proteins of gerbil's hindlimb muscles after space flight].

    PubMed

    Lipets, E N; Ponomareva, E V; Ogneva, I V; Vikhliantsev, I M; Karaduleva, E V; Kratashkina, N L; Kuznetsov, S L; Podlubnaia, Z A; Shenkman, B S

    2009-01-01

    The work had the goal to compare the microgravity effects on gerbil's muscles-antagonists, m. soleus and m. tibialis anterior. The animals were exposed in 12-d space microgravity aboard Earth's artificial satellite "Foton-M3". Findings of the analysis of single skinned fibers contractility are 19.7% diminution of the diameter and 21.8% loss of the total contractive force of m. soleus fibers post flight. However, there was no significant difference in calcium sensitivity which agrees with the absence of changes in the relative content of several major cytoskeletal proteins (titin and nebulin ratios to heavy chains of myosin were identical in the flight and control groups) and a slight shifting of the myosin phenotype toward the "fast type" (9%, p < 0.05). These parameters were mostly unaffected by the space flight in m. tibialis anterior. To sum up, the decline of contractility and diminution of gerbil's myofibers after the space flight were less significant as compared with rats and did not impact the sytoskeletal protein ratios.

  13. The cytoskeletal protein talin contains at least two distinct vinculin binding domains

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    We have mapped the vinculin-binding sites in the cytoskeletal protein talin as well as those sequences which target the talin molecule to focal contacts. Using a series of overlapping talin-fusion proteins expressed in E. coli and 125I-vinculin in both gel-overlay and microtitre well binding assays, we present evidence for three separable binding sites for vinculin. All three are in the tail segment of talin (residues 434-2541) and are recognized by the same fragment of vinculin (residues 1-258). Two sites are adjacent to each other and span residues 498-950, and the third site is more than 700 residues distant in the primary sequence. Scatchard analysis of 125I-vinculin binding to talin also indicates three sites, each with a similar affinity (Kd = 2- 6 x 10(-7) M). We also detect a substoichiometric interaction of higher affinity (Kd = 3 x 10(-8) M) which remains unexplained. By expressing regions of the chicken talin molecule in heterologous cells, we have shown that the sequences required to target talin to focal contacts overlap those which bind vinculin. PMID:8320257

  14. Deciphering the nuclear import pathway for the cytoskeletal red cell protein 4.1R.

    PubMed

    Gascard, P; Nunomura, W; Lee, G; Walensky, L D; Krauss, S W; Takakuwa, Y; Chasis, J A; Mohandas, N; Conboy, J G

    1999-06-01

    The erythroid membrane cytoskeletal protein 4.1 is the prototypical member of a genetically and topologically complex family that is generated by combinatorial alternative splicing pathways and is localized at diverse intracellular sites including the nucleus. To explore the molecular determinants for nuclear localization, we transfected COS-7 cells with epitope-tagged versions of natural red cell protein 4.1 (4.1R) isoforms as well as mutagenized and truncated derivatives. Two distant topological sorting signals were required for efficient nuclear import of the 4.1R80 isoform: a basic peptide, KKKRER, encoded by alternative exon 16 and acting as a weak core nuclear localization signal (4.1R NLS), and an acidic peptide, EED, encoded by alternative exon 5. 4.1R80 isoforms lacking either of these two exons showed decreased nuclear import. Fusion of various 4.1R80 constructs to the cytoplasmic reporter protein pyruvate kinase confirmed a requirement for both motifs for full NLS function. 4.1R80 was efficiently imported in the nuclei of digitonin-permeabilized COS-7 cells in the presence of recombinant Rch1 (human importin alpha2), importin beta, and GTPase Ran. Quantitative analysis of protein-protein interactions using a resonant mirror detection technique showed that 4.1R80 bound to Rch1 in vitro with high affinity (KD = 30 nM). The affinity decreased at least 7- and 20-fold, respectively, if the EED motif in exon 5 or if 4.1R NLS in exon 16 was lacking or mutated, confirming that both motifs were required for efficient importin-mediated nuclear import of 4.1R80.

  15. Espin cytoskeletal proteins in the sensory cells of rodent taste buds.

    PubMed

    Sekerková, Gabriella; Freeman, David; Mugnaini, Enrico; Bartles, James R

    2005-09-01

    Espins are multifunctional actin-bundling proteins that are highly enriched in the microvilli of certain chemosensory and mechanosensory cells, where they are believed to regulate the integrity and/or dimensions of the parallel-actin-bundle cytoskeletal scaffold. We have determined that, in rats and mice, affinity purified espin antibody intensely labels the lingual and palatal taste buds of the oral cavity and taste buds in the pharyngo-laryngeal region. Intense immunolabeling was observed in the apical, microvillar region of taste buds, while the level of cytoplasmic labeling in taste bud cells was considerably lower. Taste buds contain tightly packed collections of sensory cells (light, or type II plus type III) and supporting cells (dark, or type I), which can be distinguished by microscopic features and cell type-specific markers. On the basis of results obtained using an antigen-retrieval method in conjunction with double immunofluorescence for espin and sensory taste cell-specific markers, we propose that espins are expressed predominantly in the sensory cells of taste buds. In confocal images of rat circumvallate taste buds, we counted 21.5 +/- 0.3 espin-positive cells/taste bud, in agreement with a previous report showing 20.7 +/- 1.3 light cells/taste bud when counted at the ultrastructural level. The espin antibody labeled spindle-shaped cells with round nuclei and showed 100% colocalization with cell-specific markers recognizing all type II [inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor type III (IP(3)R(3))(,) alpha-gustducin, protein-specific gene product 9.5 (PGP9.5)] and a subpopulation of type III (IP(3)R(3), PGP9.5) taste cells. On average, 72%, 50%, and 32% of the espin-positive taste cells were labeled with antibodies to IP(3)R(3), alpha-gustducin, and PGP9.5, respectively. Upon sectional analysis, the taste buds of rat circumvallate papillae commonly revealed a multi-tiered, espin-positive apical cytoskeletal apparatus. One espin-positive zone, a

  16. PDZD8 is a novel moesin-interacting cytoskeletal regulatory protein that suppresses infection by herpes simplex virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Henning, Matthew S; Stiedl, Patricia; Barry, Denis S; McMahon, Robert; Morham, Scott G; Walsh, Derek; Naghavi, Mojgan H

    2011-07-05

    The host cytoskeleton plays a central role in the life cycle of many viruses yet our knowledge of cytoskeletal regulators and their role in viral infection remains limited. Recently, moesin and ezrin, two members of the ERM (Ezrin/Radixin/Moesin) family of proteins that regulate actin and plasma membrane cross-linking and microtubule (MT) stability, have been shown to inhibit retroviral infection. To further understand how ERM proteins function and whether they also influence infection by other viruses, we identified PDZD8 as a novel moesin-interacting protein. PDZD8 is a poorly understood protein whose function is unknown. Exogenous expression of either moesin or PDZD8 reduced the levels of stable MTs, suggesting that these proteins functioned as part of a cytoskeletal regulatory complex. Additionally, exogenous expression or siRNA-mediated knockdown of either factor affected Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection, identifying a cellular function for PDZD8 and novel antiviral properties for these two cytoskeletal regulatory proteins.

  17. Electrophoretic pattern and distribution of cytoskeletal proteins in flat-epitheloid and stellate process-bearing astrocytes in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Ciesielski-Treska, J; Ulrich, G; Mensch, C; Aunis, D

    1984-01-01

    One- and two-dimensional electrophoresis patterns and distribution of major cytoskeletal proteins were studied in primary astrocytes with either flat-epitheloid or stellate appearance. No major differences in the electrophoretic patterns of actin, tubulin, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and vimentin were detected between flat-epitheloid and stellate process-bearing astrocytes produced by the exposure of cultures to dibutyryl cyclic AMP (dBcAMP). However the morphological changes of astrocytes were accompanied by marked changes in the quantitative distribution of cytoskeletal proteins. The most prominent change was a large and specific decrease in the amount of actin, detected by [(35)S]methionine incorporation, densitometric scanning of one-dimensional gels and DNase inhibition assay. In stellate astrocytes produced by a 4 day treatment with dibutyryl cyclic AMP, the amount of actin decreased by 50%. This decrease was not apparently related to the depolymerization of actin.

  18. Keratin-associated protein 5-5 controls cytoskeletal function and cancer cell vascular invasion

    PubMed Central

    Berens, Eric B.; Sharif, Ghada M.; Schmidt, Marcel O.; Yan, Gai; Shuptrine, Casey W.; Weiner, Louis M.; Glasgow, Eric; Riegel, Anna T.; Wellstein, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cell vascular invasion is a crucial step in the malignant progression towards metastasis. Here we used a genome-wide RNAi screen with E0771 mammary cancer cells to uncover drivers of endothelial monolayer invasion. We identified keratin-associated protein 5-5 (Krtap5-5) as a candidate. Krtap5-5 belongs to a large protein family that is implicated in crosslinking keratin intermediate filaments during hair formation, yet these keratin-associated proteins have no reported role in cancer. Depletion of Krtap5-5 from cancer cells led to cell blebbing and a loss of keratins 14 and 18, in addition to the upregulation of vimentin intermediate filaments. This intermediate filament subtype switching induced dysregulation of the actin cytoskeleton and reduced the expression of hemidesmosomal α6/β4-integrins. We further demonstrate that knockdown of keratin 18 phenocopies the loss of Krtap5-5, suggesting that Krtap5-5 crosstalks with keratin 18 in E0771 cells. Disruption of the keratin cytoskeleton by perturbing Krtap5-5 function broadly altered the expression of cytoskeleton regulators and the localization of cell surface markers. Krtap5-5 depletion did not impact cell viability but reduced cell motility and extracellular matrix invasion, as well as extravasation of cancer cells into tissues in zebrafish and mice. We conclude that Krtap5-5 is a previously unknown regulator of cytoskeletal function in cancer cells that modulates motility and vascular invasion. Thus, in addition to its physiologic function, a keratin-associated protein can serve as a switch towards malignant progression. PMID:27375028

  19. Protein Kinase CK2 Regulates Cytoskeletal Reorganization during Ionizing Radiation-Induced Senescence of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Daojing; Jang, Deok-Jin

    2009-08-21

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) are critical for tissue regeneration. How hMSC respond to genotoxic stresses and potentially contribute to aging and cancer remain underexplored. We demonstrated that ionizing radiation induced cellular senescence of hMSC over a period of 10 days, showing a critical transition between day 3 and day 6. This was confirmed by senescence-associated beta-galactosidase (SA-{beta}-gal) staining, protein expression profiles of key cell cycle regulators (retinoblastoma (Rb) protein, p53, p21{sup waf1/Cip1}, and p16{sup INK4A}), and senescence-associated secretory phenotypes (SASPs) (IL-8, IL-12, GRO, and MDC). We observed dramatic cytoskeletal reorganization of hMSC through reduction of myosin-10, redistribution of myosin-9, and secretion of profilin-1. Using a SILAC-based phosphoproteomics method, we detected significant reduction of myosin-9 phosphorylation at Ser1943, coinciding with its redistribution. Importantly, through treatment with cell permeable inhibitors (4,5,6,7-tetrabromo-1H-benzotriazole (TBB) and 2-dimethylamino-4,5,6,7-tetrabromo-1H-benzimidazole (DMAT)), and gene knockdown using RNA interference, we identified CK2, a kinase responsible for myosin-9 phosphorylation at Ser1943, as a key factor contributing to the radiation-induced senescence of hMSC. We showed that individual knockdown of CK2 catalytic subunits CK2{alpha} and CK2{alpha}{prime} induced hMSC senescence. However, only knockdown of CK2{alpha} resulted in morphological phenotypes resembling those of radiation-induced senescence. These results suggest that CK2{alpha} and CK2{alpha}{prime} play differential roles in hMSC senescence progression, and their relative expression might represent a novel regulatory mechanism for CK2 activity.

  20. Methamphetamine enhances the cleavage of the cytoskeletal protein tau in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Wallace, T L; Vorhees, C V; Zemlan, F P; Gudelsky, G A

    2003-01-01

    The view that methamphetamine is neurotoxic to dopaminergic and serotonergic axon terminals has been based largely on biochemical and histological studies. In the present study, methamphetamine-induced structural damage to axons was quantified using a sensitive sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay developed for the detection of the cleaved form of the cytoskeletal protein tau. The administration of a monoamine-depleting regimen of methamphetamine (4 x 10 mg/kg, i.p. every 2 hours for a total of four injections) produced a time-dependent increase in the concentration of cleaved tau in the striatum. Maximal concentrations of cleaved tau were detected 3 days following methamphetamine administration. Cleaved tau concentrations also were significantly elevated in the dorsal hippocampus and, to a lesser extent, in the prefrontal cortex of methamphetamine-treated rats. Maintenance of rats in a cold (4 degrees C) environment not only prevented the methamphetamine-induced depletion of striatal dopamine and serotonin but also prevented the methamphetamine-induced increase in striatal cleaved tau concentrations. The novel findings from this study are supportive of the view that methamphetamine produces acute structural damage to neurons that may lead to the long-term neurotoxic effects of repeated, high-dose administration of the drug and that cleaved tau reliably quantifies the time-dependent neurotoxic effects of methamphetamine.

  1. Cytoskeletal proteins in gastric H/sup +/ secretion: cAMP dependent phosphorylation, immunolocalization, and protein blotting

    SciTech Connect

    Cuppoletti, J.; Sachs, G.; Malinowska, D.H.

    1986-05-01

    The rabbit gastric parietal cell is an excellent model for the study of regulation of secretion and the role of cytoskeleton in secretion. Changes in morphology (appearance of expanded secretory canaliculi lined with microvilli) accompany H/sup +/ secretion stimulated by histamine (cAMP mediated). Parietal cells contain immunoreactive tubulin and are highly enriched in F-actin at secretory canaliculi, detected with fluorescently labelled phallacidin. They have previously shown increased protein phosphorylation in histamine-stimulated purified parietal cells concommitant with increases in H/sup +/ secretion. They report here possible functions of the phosphoproteins. Four of these proteins of apparent size on SDS PAGE of 24, 30, 48 and 130 Kd were membrane associated. /sup 125/I-actin binding to three proteins (24, 30 and 48 Kd) was shown using overlays. A 130 Kd protein reacted with anti-vinculin monoclonal antibody on immunoblots, and was immunolocalized at secretory canaliculi. As a working hypothesis, parietal cells possess membrane-associated proteins which change their state of phosphorylation upon stimulation of H/sup +/. These proteins may be cytoskeletal elements involved in regulation of H/sup +/ secretion. The 130 Kd vinculin-like protein may serve a microfilament-membrane linking role.

  2. RBC-NOS-dependent S-nitrosylation of cytoskeletal proteins improves RBC deformability.

    PubMed

    Grau, Marijke; Pauly, Sebastian; Ali, Jamal; Walpurgis, Katja; Thevis, Mario; Bloch, Wilhelm; Suhr, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBC) possess a nitric oxide synthase (RBC-NOS) whose activation depends on the PI3-kinase/Akt kinase pathway. RBC-NOS-produced NO exhibits important biological functions like maintaining RBC deformability. Until now, the cellular target structure for NO, to exert its influence on RBC deformability, remains unknown. In the present study we analyzed the modification of RBC-NOS activity by pharmacological treatments, the resulting influence on RBC deformability and provide first evidence for possible target proteins of RBC-NOS-produced NO in the RBC cytoskeletal scaffold. Blood from fifteen male subjects was incubated with the NOS substrate L-arginine to directly stimulate enzyme activity. Direct inhibition of enzyme activity was induced by L-N5-(1-Iminoethyl)-ornithin (L-NIO). Indirect stimulation and inhibition of RBC-NOS were achieved by applying insulin and wortmannin, respectively, substances known to affect PI3-kinase/Akt kinase pathway. The NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and the NO scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPTIO) were additionally applied as NO positive and negative controls, respectively. Immunohistochemical staining was used to determine phosphorylation and thus activation of RBC-NOS. As a marker for NO synthesis nitrite was measured in plasma and RBCs using chemiluminescence detection. S-nitrosylation of erythrocyte proteins was determined by biotin switch assay and modified proteins were identified using LC-MS. RBC deformability was determined by ektacytometry. The data reveal that activated RBC-NOS leads to increased NO production, S-nitrosylation of RBC proteins and RBC deformability, whereas RBC-NOS inhibition resulted in contrary effects. This study first-time provides strong evidence that RBC-NOS-produced NO modifies RBC deformability through direct S-nitrosylation of cytoskeleton proteins, most likely α- and β-spectrins. Our data, therefore, gain novel insights into biological

  3. Loss of cytoskeletal transport during egress critically attenuates ectromelia virus infection in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lynn, Helena; Horsington, Jacquelyn; Ter, Lee Kuan; Han, Shuyi; Chew, Yee Lian; Diefenbach, Russell J; Way, Michael; Chaudhri, Geeta; Karupiah, Gunasegaran; Newsome, Timothy P

    2012-07-01

    Egress of wrapped virus (WV) to the cell periphery following vaccinia virus (VACV) replication is dependent on interactions with the microtubule motor complex kinesin-1 and is mediated by the viral envelope protein A36. Here we report that ectromelia virus (ECTV), a related orthopoxvirus and the causative agent of mousepox, encodes an A36 homologue (ECTV-Mos-142) that is highly conserved despite a large truncation at the C terminus. Deleting the ECTV A36R gene leads to a reduction in the number of extracellular viruses formed and to a reduced plaque size, consistent with a role in microtubule transport. We also observed a complete loss of virus-associated actin comets, another phenotype dependent on A36 expression during VACV infection. ECTV ΔA36R was severely attenuated when used to infect the normally susceptible BALB/c mouse strain. ECTV ΔA36R replication and spread from the draining lymph nodes to the liver and spleen were significantly reduced in BALB/c mice and in Rag-1-deficient mice, which lack T and B lymphocytes. The dramatic reduction in ECTV ΔA36R titers early during the course of infection was not associated with an augmented immune response. Taken together, these findings demonstrate the critical role that subcellular transport pathways play not only in orthopoxvirus infection in an in vitro context but also during orthopoxvirus pathogenesis in a natural host. Furthermore, despite the attenuation of the mutant virus, we found that infection nonetheless induced protective immunity in mice, suggesting that orthopoxvirus vectors with A36 deletions may be considered another safe vaccine alternative.

  4. Keratin-associated protein 5-5 controls cytoskeletal function and cancer cell vascular invasion.

    PubMed

    Berens, E B; Sharif, G M; Schmidt, M O; Yan, G; Shuptrine, C W; Weiner, L M; Glasgow, E; Riegel, A T; Wellstein, A

    2017-02-02

    Cancer cell vascular invasion is a crucial step in the malignant progression toward metastasis. Here we used a genome-wide RNA interference screen with E0771 mammary cancer cells to uncover drivers of endothelial monolayer invasion. We identified keratin-associated protein 5-5 (Krtap5-5) as a candidate. Krtap5-5 belongs to a large protein family that is implicated in crosslinking keratin intermediate filaments during hair formation, yet these Krtaps have no reported role in cancer. Depletion of Krtap5-5 from cancer cells led to cell blebbing and a loss of keratins 14 and 18, in addition to the upregulation of vimentin intermediate filaments. This intermediate filament subtype switching induced dysregulation of the actin cytoskeleton and reduced the expression of hemidesmosomal α6/β4-integrins. We further demonstrate that knockdown of keratin 18 phenocopies the loss of Krtap5-5, suggesting that Krtap5-5 crosstalks with keratin 18 in E0771 cells. Disruption of the keratin cytoskeleton by perturbing Krtap5-5 function broadly altered the expression of cytoskeleton regulators and the localization of cell surface markers. Krtap5-5 depletion did not impact cell viability but reduced cell motility and extracellular matrix invasion, as well as extravasation of cancer cells into tissues in zebrafish and mice. We conclude that Krtap5-5 is a previously unknown regulator of cytoskeletal function in cancer cells that modulates motility and vascular invasion. Thus, in addition to its physiologic function, a Krtap can serve as a switch toward malignant progression.

  5. Effect of Rapid Chilling on Beef Quality and Cytoskeletal Protein Degradation in M. longissimus of Chinese Yellow Crossbred Bulls

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yanwei; Zhang, Yimin; Liang, Rongrong; Ren, Lulu; Zhu, He; Li, Ke; Zhu, Lixian; Luo, Xin

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of rapid chilling (RC) on beef quality and the degradation of cytoskeletal proteins. Twenty Chinese Yellow crossbred bulls were selected and randomly divided into two groups. RC and conventional chilling (CC) were applied to left and right sides of the carcasses respectively after slaughtering. To determine whether electrical stimulation (ES) treatment can alleviate the potential hazard of RC on meat quality, ES was applied to one group. The effects of RC and ES were determined by meat color, shear force and cytoskeletal protein degradation postmortem (PM). The results showed that RC decreased beef tenderness at 1 d and 3 d postmortem, but had no detrimental effect on meat color. Western blotting showed that RC decreased the degradation rate of desmin and troponin-T, but the effects weakened gradually as postmortem aging extended. Degradation rates of both desmin and troponin-T were accelerated by ES. The combination of RC and ES could improve beef color, accelerate degradation rate of cytoskeletal protein and improve beef tenderness. PMID:25049681

  6. Biotechnological aspects of cytoskeletal regulation in plants.

    PubMed

    Komis, George; Luptovciak, Ivan; Doskocilova, Anna; Samaj, Jozef

    2015-11-01

    The cytoskeleton is a protein-based intracellular superstructure that evolved early after the appearance of bacterial prokaryotes. Eventually cytoskeletal proteins and their macromolecular assemblies were established in eukaryotes and assumed critical roles in cell movements, intracellular organization, cell division and cell differentiation. In biomedicine the small-molecules targeting cytoskeletal elements are in the frontline of anticancer research with plant-derived cytoskeletal drugs such as Vinca alkaloids and toxoids, being routinely used in the clinical practice. Moreover, plants are also major material, food and energy resources for human activities ranging from agriculture, textile industry, carpentry, energy production and new material development to name some few. Most of these inheritable traits are associated with cell wall synthesis and chemical modification during primary and secondary plant growth and inevitably are associated with the dynamics, organization and interactions of the plant cytoskeleton. Taking into account the vast intracellular spread of microtubules and actin microfilaments the cytoskeleton collectively assumed central roles in plant growth and development, in determining the physical stance of plants against the forces of nature and becoming a battleground between pathogenic invaders and the defense mechanisms of plant cells. This review aims to address the role of the plant cytoskeleton in manageable features of plants including cellulose biosynthesis with implications in wood and fiber properties, in biofuel production and the contribution of plant cytoskeletal elements in plant defense responses against pathogens or detrimental environmental conditions. Ultimately the present work surveys the potential of cytoskeletal proteins as platforms of plant genetic engineering, nominating certain cytoskeletal proteins as vectors of favorable traits in crops and other economically important plants.

  7. Reversible binding kinetics of a cytoskeletal protein at the erythrocyte submembrane.

    PubMed Central

    Stout, A. L.; Axelrod, D.

    1994-01-01

    removed most of the band 3. CF-4.1 binded significantly less to these trypsinized membranes and most of the decrease was a loss of the irreversibly binding sites. The third treatment simply preserved the native 4.1 and ankyrin. CF-4.1 binded less to this sample too, and the loss involved both the irreversible and reversible sites. The fourth treatment blocked the gycophorin C sites on the native 4.1-stripped membranes with an antibody. CF-4.1 again binded less to this sample than to a nonimmune serum control, and almost all of the decrease is a loss of irreversible sites. These rest suggest that 1) protein 4.1 binds to membrane or submembrane sites at least in part reversibly ; 2) the most reversible sites are probably not proteinaceous and not glycophorin C, but possibly are phospholipids (especially phosphatidylserine); and 3) TIWRFRAP can successfully examine the fast reversible dynamics of cytoskeletal components binding to biological membranes. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 PMID:7811947

  8. Critical motor number for fractional steps of cytoskeletal filaments in gliding assays.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Kierfeld, Jan

    2012-01-01

    In gliding assays, filaments are pulled by molecular motors that are immobilized on a solid surface. By varying the motor density on the surface, one can control the number N of motors that pull simultaneously on a single filament. Here, such gliding assays are studied theoretically using brownian (or Langevin) dynamics simulations and taking the local force balance between motors and filaments as well as the force-dependent velocity of the motors into account. We focus on the filament stepping dynamics and investigate how single motor properties such as stalk elasticity and step size determine the presence or absence of fractional steps of the filaments. We show that each gliding assay can be characterized by a critical motor number, N(c). Because of thermal fluctuations, fractional filament steps are only detectable as long as N < N(c). The corresponding fractional filament step size is l/N where l is the step size of a single motor. We first apply our computational approach to microtubules pulled by kinesin-1 motors. For elastic motor stalks that behave as linear springs with a zero rest length, the critical motor number is found to be N(c) = 4, and the corresponding distributions of the filament step sizes are in good agreement with the available experimental data. In general, the critical motor number N(c) depends on the elastic stalk properties and is reduced to N(c) = 3 for linear springs with a nonzero rest length. Furthermore, N(c) is shown to depend quadratically on the motor step size l. Therefore, gliding assays consisting of actin filaments and myosin-V are predicted to exhibit fractional filament steps up to motor number N = 31. Finally, we show that fractional filament steps are also detectable for a fixed average motor number as determined by the surface density (or coverage) of the motors on the substrate surface.

  9. Cytoskeletal actin networks in motile cells are critically self-organized systems synchronized by mechanical interactions

    PubMed Central

    Cardamone, Luca; Laio, Alessandro; Torre, Vincent; Shahapure, Rajesh; DeSimone, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Growing networks of actin fibers are able to organize into compact, stiff two-dimensional structures inside lamellipodia of crawling cells. We put forward the hypothesis that the growing actin network is a critically self-organized system, in which long-range mechanical stresses arising from the interaction with the plasma membrane provide the selective pressure leading to organization. We show that a simple model based only on this principle reproduces the stochastic nature of lamellipodia protrusion (growth periods alternating with fast retractions) and several of the features observed in experiments: a growth velocity initially insensitive to the external force; the capability of the network to organize its orientation; a load-history-dependent growth velocity. Our model predicts that the spectrum of the time series of the height of a growing lamellipodium decays with the inverse of the frequency. This behavior is a well-known signature of self-organized criticality and is confirmed by unique optical tweezer measurements performed in vivo on neuronal growth cones. PMID:21825142

  10. Cytoskeletal actin networks in motile cells are critically self-organized systems synchronized by mechanical interactions.

    PubMed

    Cardamone, Luca; Laio, Alessandro; Torre, Vincent; Shahapure, Rajesh; DeSimone, Antonio

    2011-08-23

    Growing networks of actin fibers are able to organize into compact, stiff two-dimensional structures inside lamellipodia of crawling cells. We put forward the hypothesis that the growing actin network is a critically self-organized system, in which long-range mechanical stresses arising from the interaction with the plasma membrane provide the selective pressure leading to organization. We show that a simple model based only on this principle reproduces the stochastic nature of lamellipodia protrusion (growth periods alternating with fast retractions) and several of the features observed in experiments: a growth velocity initially insensitive to the external force; the capability of the network to organize its orientation; a load-history-dependent growth velocity. Our model predicts that the spectrum of the time series of the height of a growing lamellipodium decays with the inverse of the frequency. This behavior is a well-known signature of self-organized criticality and is confirmed by unique optical tweezer measurements performed in vivo on neuronal growth cones.

  11. E-4-hydroxy-2-nonenal is cytotoxic and cross-links cytoskeletal proteins in P19 neuroglial cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Montine, T. J.; Amarnath, V.; Martin, M. E.; Strittmatter, W. J.; Graham, D. G.

    1996-01-01

    Lipid peroxidation increases with age in brain and is elevated further in Alzheimer's disease. E-4-hydroxy-2-nonenal and malondialdehyde are products of lipid peroxidation that can adduct and cross-link protein. Neurofibrillary tangles, a feature of Alzheimer's disease composed mostly of tau protein, contain cross-linked and ubiquitin-conjugated protein. In P19 neuroglial cultures, E-4-hydroxy-2-nonenal was a potent cytotoxin that cross-linked cytoskeletal proteins, including tau into high molecular weight species that were conjugated with ubiquitin. Malondialdehyde formed monoadducts with cell protein but did not cross-link and was not cytotoxic. A non-crosslinking analogue of E-4-hydroxy-2-nonenal was not cytotoxic. E-4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal may contribute to neurodegeneration and neurofibrillary tangle formation in Alzheimer's disease. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8546230

  12. Dystrophin- and MLP-deficient mouse hearts: marked differences in morphology and function, but similar accumulation of cytoskeletal proteins.

    PubMed

    Wilding, James R; Schneider, Jürgen E; Sang, A Elizabeth; Davies, Kay E; Neubauer, Stefan; Clarke, Kieran

    2005-01-01

    In humans, cytoskeletal dystrophin and muscle LIM protein (MLP) gene mutations can cause dilated cardiomyopathy, yet these mutations may have different effects in mice, owing to increased accumulation of other, compensatory cytoskeletal proteins. Consequently, we characterized left-ventricular (LV) morphology and function in vivo using high-resolution cine-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 2- to 3-month old dystrophin-deficient (mdx) and MLP-null mice, and their respective controls. LV passive stiffness was assessed in isolated, perfused hearts, and cytoskeletal protein levels were determined using Western blot analyses. In mdx mouse hearts, LV-to-body weight ratio, cavity volume, ejection fraction, stroke volume, and cardiac output were normal. However, MLP-null mouse hearts had 1.2-fold higher LV-to-body weight ratios (P<0.01), 1.5-fold higher end-diastolic volumes (P<0.01), and decreased ejection fraction compared with controls (25% vs. 66%, respectively, P<0.01), indicating dilated cardiomyopathy and heart failure. In both models, isolated, perfused heart end-diastolic pressure-volume relationships and passive left-ventricular stiffness were normal. Hearts from both models accumulated desmin and beta-tubulin, mdx mouse hearts accumulated utrophin and MLP, and MLP-null mouse hearts accumulated dystrophin and syncoilin. Although the increase in MLP and utrophin in the mdx mouse heart was able to compensate for the loss of dystrophin, accumulation of desmin, syncoilin and dystrophin were unable to compensate for the loss of MLP, resulting in heart failure.

  13. Early Cytoskeletal Protein Modifications Precede Overt Structural Degeneration in the DBA/2J Mouse Model of Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Gina N.; Smith, Matthew A.; Inman, Denise M.; Dengler-Crish, Christine M.; Crish, Samuel D.

    2016-01-01

    Axonal transport deficits precede structural loss in glaucoma and other neurodegenerations. Impairments in structural support, including modified cytoskeletal proteins, and microtubule-destabilizing elements, could be initiating factors in glaucoma pathogenesis. We investigated the time course of changes in protein levels and post-translational modifications in the DBA/2J mouse model of glaucoma. Using anterograde tract tracing of the retinal projection, we assessed major cytoskeletal and transported elements as a function of transport integrity in different stages of pathological progression. Using capillary-based electrophoresis, single- and multiplex immunosorbent assays, and immunofluorescence, we quantified hyperphosphorylated neurofilament-heavy chain, phosphorylated tau (ptau), calpain-mediated spectrin breakdown product (145/150 kDa), β–tubulin, and amyloid-β42 proteins based on age and transport outcome to the superior colliculus (SC; the main retinal target in mice). Phosphorylated neurofilament-heavy chain (pNF-H) was elevated within the optic nerve (ON) and SC of 8–10 month-old DBA/2J mice, but was not evident in the retina until 12–15 months, suggesting that cytoskeletal modifications first appear in the distal retinal projection. As expected, higher pNF-H levels in the SC and retina were correlated with axonal transport deficits. Elevations in hyperphosphorylated tau (ptau) occurred in ON and SC between 3 and 8 month of age while retinal ptau accumulations occurred at 12–15 months in DBA/2J mice. In vitro co-immunoprecipitation experiments suggested increased affinity of ptau for the retrograde motor complex protein dynactin. We observed a transport-related decrease of β-tubulin in ON of 10–12 month-old DBA/2J mice, suggesting destabilized microtubule array. Elevations in calpain-mediated spectrin breakdown product were seen in ON and SC at the earliest age examined, well before axonal transport loss is evident. Finally, transport

  14. Several Novel Nuclear Envelope Transmembrane Proteins Identified in Skeletal Muscle Have Cytoskeletal Associations*

    PubMed Central

    Wilkie, Gavin S.; Korfali, Nadia; Swanson, Selene K.; Malik, Poonam; Srsen, Vlastimil; Batrakou, Dzmitry G.; de las Heras, Jose; Zuleger, Nikolaj; Kerr, Alastair R. W.; Florens, Laurence; Schirmer, Eric C.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear envelopes from liver and a neuroblastoma cell line have previously been analyzed by proteomics; however, most diseases associated with the nuclear envelope affect muscle. To determine whether muscle has unique nuclear envelope proteins, rat skeletal muscle nuclear envelopes were prepared and analyzed by multidimensional protein identification technology. Many novel muscle-specific proteins were identified that did not appear in previous nuclear envelope data sets. Nuclear envelope residence was confirmed for 11 of these by expression of fusion proteins and by antibody staining of muscle tissue cryosections. Moreover, transcript levels for several of the newly identified nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins increased during muscle differentiation using mouse and human in vitro model systems. Some of these proteins tracked with microtubules at the nuclear surface in interphase cells and accumulated at the base of the microtubule spindle in mitotic cells, suggesting they may associate with complexes that connect the nucleus to the cytoskeleton. The finding of tissue-specific proteins in the skeletal muscle nuclear envelope proteome argues the importance of analyzing nuclear envelopes from all tissues linked to disease and suggests that general investigation of tissue differences in organellar proteomes might yield critical insights. PMID:20876400

  15. Cytoskeletal protein filamin A is a nucleolar protein that suppresses ribosomal RNA gene transcription

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Wensheng; Lopez-Camacho, Cesar; Tang, Jen-Yang; Mendoza-Villanueva, Daniel; Maya-Mendoza, Apolinar; Jackson, Dean A.; Shore, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Filamin A (FLNA) is an actin-binding protein with a well-established role in the cytoskeleton, where it determines cell shape and locomotion by cross-linking actin filaments. Mutations in FLNA are associated with a wide range of genetic disorders. Here we demonstrate a unique role for FLNA as a nucleolar protein that associates with the RNA polymerase I (Pol I) transcription machinery to suppress rRNA gene transcription. We show that depletion of FLNA by siRNAs increased rRNA expression, rDNA promoter activity and cell proliferation. Immunodepletion of FLNA from nuclear extracts resulted in a decrease in rDNA promoter-driven transcription in vitro. FLNA coimmunoprecipitated with the Pol I components actin, TIF-IA, and RPA40, and their occupancy of the rDNA promoter was increased in the absence of FLNA in vivo. The FLNA actin-binding domain is essential for the suppression of rRNA expression and for inhibiting recruitment of the Pol I machinery to the rDNA promoter. These findings reveal an additional role for FLNA as a regulator of rRNA gene expression and have important implications for our understanding of the role of FLNA in human disease. PMID:22307607

  16. Antibody-based analysis reveals “filamentous vs. non-filamentous” and “cytoplasmic vs. nuclear” crosstalk of cytoskeletal proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Kumeta, Masahiro; Hirai, Yuya; Yoshimura, Shige H.; Horigome, Tsuneyoshi; Takeyasu, Kunio

    2013-12-10

    To uncover the molecular composition and dynamics of the functional scaffold for the nucleus, three fractions of biochemically-stable nuclear protein complexes were extracted and used as immunogens to produce a variety of monoclonal antibodies. Many helix-based cytoskeletal proteins were identified as antigens, suggesting their dynamic contribution to nuclear architecture and function. Interestingly, sets of antibodies distinguished distinct subcellular localization of a single isoform of certain cytoskeletal proteins; distinct molecular forms of keratin and actinin were found in the nucleus. Their nuclear shuttling properties were verified by the apparent nuclear accumulations under inhibition of CRM1-dependent nuclear export. Nuclear keratins do not take an obvious filamentous structure, as was revealed by non-filamentous cytoplasmic keratin-specific monoclonal antibody. These results suggest the distinct roles of the helix-based cytoskeletal proteins in the nucleus. - Highlights: • A set of monoclonal antibodies were raised against nuclear scaffold proteins. • Helix-based cytoskeletal proteins were involved in nuclear scaffold. • Many cytoskeletal components shuttle into the nucleus in a CRM1-dependent manner. • Sets of antibodies distinguished distinct subcellular localization of a single isoform. • Nuclear keratin is soluble and does not form an obvious filamentous structure.

  17. Kaempferol enhances intestinal barrier function through the cytoskeletal association and expression of tight junction proteins in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takuya; Tanabe, Soichi; Hara, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Kaempferol, a natural flavonoid present in fruits, vegetables, and teas, provides beneficial effects for human health. We investigated the promotive effect of kaempferol on tight junction (TJ) barrier integrity in human intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayers. Transepithelial electrical resistance (TER; a TJ integrity marker) across the monolayers rapidly and markedly increased during the first 6 h after kaempferol administration and remained elevated until 48 h without any changes in the lucifer yellow or dextran fluxes. Immunoblot analysis demonstrated that kaempferol promoted the actin cytoskeletal association of the TJ proteins, zonula occludens (ZO)-1, ZO-2, occludin, claudin-1, claudin-3, and claudin-4, which was associated with the increase in TER. Kaempferol-mediated ZO-2 and claudin-4 expression was relatively smaller or occurred later than the kaempferol-promoted cytoskeletal association. Confocal microscopy showed that kaempferol-induced assembly of occludin and claudin-3 occurred at the TJ at 6 h postadministration. Extraction of cholesterol with methyl-β-cyclodextrin suppressed the kaempferol-mediated increase in TER. Sucrose density gradient centrifugation showed that the kaempferol treatment increased the TJ protein distributions in the cholesterol-rich lipid microdomain fraction. Taken together, these results indicate that the membrane lipid microdomain is involved in the kaempferol-mediated promotion of TJ protein assembly and intestinal TJ integrity.

  18. Effects of transforming growth factor type beta on expression of cytoskeletal proteins in endosteal mouse osteoblastic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lomri, A.; Marie, P.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta) has been shown to influence the growth and differentiation of many cell types in vitro. We have examined the effects of TGF beta on cell morphology and cytoskeletal organization in relation to parameters of cell proliferation and differentiation in endosteal osteoblastic cells isolated from mouse caudal vertebrae. Treatment of mouse osteoblastic cells cultured in serum free medium for 24 hours with TGF beta (1.5-30 ng/mL) slightly (-23%) inhibited alkaline phosphatase activity. In parallel, TGF beta (0.5-30 ng/mL, 24 hours) greatly increased cell replication as evaluated by (3H)-thymidine incorporation into DNA (157% to 325% of controls). At a median dose (1.5 ng/mL) that affected both alkaline phosphatase and DNA synthesis (235% of controls) TGF beta induced rapid (six hours) cell respreading of quiescent mouse osteoblastic cells. This effect was associated with increased polymerization of actin, alpha actinin, and tubulins, as evaluated by both biochemical and immunofluorescence methods. In addition, TGF beta (1.5 ng/mL) increased the de novo biosynthesis of actin, alpha actinin, vimentin, and tubulins, as determined by {sup 35}S methionine labeling and fractionation of cytoskeletal proteins using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. These effects were rapid and transient, as they occurred at six hours and were reversed after 24 hours of TGF beta exposure. The results indicate that the stimulatory effect of TGF beta on DNA synthesis in endosteal mouse osteoblastic cells is associated with a transient increase in cell spreading associated with enhanced polymerization and synthesis of cytoskeletal proteins.

  19. Cytoskeletal Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mofrad, Mohammad R. K.; Kamm, Roger D.

    2011-08-01

    1. Introduction and the biological basis for cell mechanics Mohammad R. K. Mofrad and Roger Kamm; 2. Experimental measurements of intracellular mechanics Paul Janmey and Christoph Schmidt; 3. The cytoskeleton as a soft glassy material Jeffrey Fredberg and Ben Fabry; 4. Continuum elastic or viscoelastic models for the cell Mohammad R. K. Mofrad, Helene Karcher and Roger Kamm; 5. Multiphasic models of cell mechanics Farshid Guuilak, Mansoor A. Haider, Lori A. Setton, Tod A. Laursen and Frank P. T. Baaijens; 6. Models of cytoskeletal mechanics based on tensegrity Dimitrije Stamenovic; 7. Cells, gels and mechanics Gerald H. Pollack; 8. Polymer-based models of cytoskeletal networks F. C. MacKintosh; 9. Cell dynamics and the actin cytoskeleton James L. McGrath and C. Forbes Dewey, Jr; 10. Active cellular motion: continuum theories and models Marc Herant and Micah Dembo; 11. Summary Mohammad R. K. Mofrad and Roger Kamm.

  20. Cytoskeletal Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mofrad, Mohammad R. K.; Kamm, Roger D.

    2006-10-01

    1. Introduction and the biological basis for cell mechanics Mohammad R. K. Mofrad and Roger Kamm; 2. Experimental measurements of intracellular mechanics Paul Janmey and Christoph Schmidt; 3. The cytoskeleton as a soft glassy material Jeffrey Fredberg and Ben Fabry; 4. Continuum elastic or viscoelastic models for the cell Mohammad R. K. Mofrad, Helene Karcher and Roger Kamm; 5. Multiphasic models of cell mechanics Farshid Guuilak, Mansoor A. Haider, Lori A. Setton, Tod A. Laursen and Frank P. T. Baaijens; 6. Models of cytoskeletal mechanics based on tensegrity Dimitrije Stamenovic; 7. Cells, gels and mechanics Gerald H. Pollack; 8. Polymer-based models of cytoskeletal networks F. C. MacKintosh; 9. Cell dynamics and the actin cytoskeleton James L. McGrath and C. Forbes Dewey, Jr; 10. Active cellular motion: continuum theories and models Marc Herant and Micah Dembo; 11. Summary Mohammad R. K. Mofrad and Roger Kamm.

  1. Basic proteins of the perinuclear theca of mammalian spermatozoa and spermatids: a novel class of cytoskeletal elements

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    The nuclei of bovine spermatids and spermatozoa are surrounded by dense cytoplasmic webs sandwiched between the nuclear envelope and the acrosome and plasma membrane, respectively, filling most of the cytoplasmic space of the sperm head. This web contains a complex structure, the perinuclear theca, which is characterized by resistance to extractions in nondenaturing detergents and high salt buffers, and can be divided into two major subcomponents, the subacrosomal layer and the postacrosomal calyx. Using calyces isolated from bull and rat spermatozoa we have identified two kinds of basic proteins as major constituents of the thecal structure and have localized them by specific antibodies at the light and electron microscopic level. These are an Mr 60,000 protein, termed calicin, localized almost exclusively to the calyx, and a group of multiple-band polypeptides (MBP; Mr 56,000- 74,000), which occur in both the calyx and the subacrosomal layer. The polypeptides of the MBP group are immunologically related to each other, but unrelated, by antibody reactions and peptide maps, to calicin. We show that these basic cytoskeletal proteins are first detectable in the round spermatid stage. As we have not detected any intermediate filament proteins and proteins related to nuclear lamins of somatic cells in sperm heads, we conclude that the perinuclear theca and its constituents, calicin and MBP proteins, are the predominant cytoskeletal elements of the sperm head. Immunologically cross-reacting polypeptides with similar properties have been identified in the heads of rat and human spermatozoa. We speculate that these insoluble basic proteins contribute, during spermiogenesis, to the formation of the perinuclear theca as an architectural element involved in the shape changes and the intimate association of the nucleus with the acrosome and the plasma membrane. PMID:3308904

  2. Cytoskeletal Expression and Remodeling in Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Boraas, Liana C.; Guidry, Julia B.; Pineda, Emma T.; Ahsan, Tabassum

    2016-01-01

    Many emerging cell-based therapies are based on pluripotent stem cells, though complete understanding of the properties of these cells is lacking. In these cells, much is still unknown about the cytoskeletal network, which governs the mechanoresponse. The objective of this study was to determine the cytoskeletal state in undifferentiated pluripotent stem cells and remodeling with differentiation. Mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and reprogrammed induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), as well as the original un-reprogrammed embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), were evaluated for expression of cytoskeletal markers. We found that pluripotent stem cells overall have a less developed cytoskeleton compared to fibroblasts. Gene and protein expression of smooth muscle cell actin, vimentin, lamin A, and nestin were markedly lower for ESCs than MEFs. Whereas, iPSC samples were heterogeneous with most cells expressing patterns of cytoskeletal proteins similar to ESCs with a small subpopulation similar to MEFs. This indicates that dedifferentiation during reprogramming is associated with cytoskeletal remodeling to a less developed state. In differentiation studies, it was found that shear stress-mediated differentiation resulted in an increase in expression of cytoskeletal intermediate filaments in ESCs, but not in iPSC samples. In the embryoid body model of spontaneous differentiation of pluripotent stem cells, however, both ESCs and iPSCs had similar gene expression for cytoskeletal proteins during early differentiation. With further differentiation, however, gene levels were significantly higher for iPSCs compared to ESCs. These results indicate that reprogrammed iPSCs more readily reacquire cytoskeletal proteins compared to the ESCs that need to form the network de novo. The strategic selection of the parental phenotype is thus critical not only in the context of reprogramming but also the ultimate functionality of the iPSC-differentiated cell population. Overall, this

  3. Expression of cytoskeletal and matrix genes following exposure to ionizing radiation: Dose-rate effects and protein synthesis requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E. |; Felcher, P.; Chin-Mei Chang-Liu

    1995-06-01

    Experiments examined the effects of radiation dose-rate and protein synthesis inhibition expression of cytoskeletal and matrix elements in Syrian hamster embryo cells. Results demonstrated little effect of dose-rate for neutrons when comparing expression of {alpha}-tubulin and fibronectin genes. Cycloheximide repressed accumulation of {alpha}-tubulin-mRNA following exposure to high dose-rate neutrons or {gamma} rays. Cycloheximide did not affect accumulation of actin mRNA. Cycloheximide abrogated induction of fibronectin-mRNA which occurred following exposure to {gamma} rays and high dose-rate neutrons. These results suggest a role for labile proteins in the maintenance of {alpha}-tubulin and fibronectin mRNA accumulation following exposure to radiation. 24 refs., 3 tabs.

  4. Growth factors and steroid mediated regulation of cytoskeletal protein expression in serum-deprived primary astrocyte cultures.

    PubMed

    Bramanti, Vincenzo; Bronzi, Daniela; Tomassoni, Daniele; Costa, Antonino; Raciti, Giuseppina; Avitabile, Marcello; Amenta, Francesco; Avola, Roberto

    2008-12-01

    In this research we aimed to investigate the interactions between growth factors (GFs) and dexamethasone (DEX) on cytoskeletal proteins GFAP and vimentin (VIM) expression under different experimental conditions. Condition I: 24 h pretreatment with bFGF, subsequent 72 h switching in serum-free medium (SFM) and final addition of GFs, alone or by two in the last 24 h, after a prolonged (60 h) DEX treatment. Condition II: 36 h pretreatment with DEX (with bFGF in the last 24 h), followed by SFM for 60 h and final addition for 24 h with growth factors alone or two of them together. Western blot analysis data showed a marked GFAP expression in cultures submitted to Condition I comparing results to untreated or treated controls. VIM expression was instead significantly reduced after GFs addition in the last 24 h of 60 h DEX treatment, respect to control DEX-pretreated ones. Referring data to untreated controls, VIM expression was significantly enhanced after GFs addition. GFAP showed also a significant increase in astrocytes submitted to Condition II, respect to untreated or treated control cultures. VIM expression was up and down regulated under Condition II. Collectively, our findings evidence an interactive dialogue between GFs and DEX in astroglial cultures, co-pretreated with DEX and bFGF, regulating cytoskeletal network under stressful conditions.

  5. Persistent oxygen-glucose deprivation induces astrocytic death through two different pathways and calpain-mediated proteolysis of cytoskeletal proteins during astrocytic oncosis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xu; Zhang, Ying; Zou, Liangyu; Xiao, Haibing; Chu, Yinghao; Chu, Xiaofan

    2010-07-26

    Astrocytes are thought to play a role in the maintenance of homeostasis and the provision of metabolic substrates for neurons as well as the coupling of cerebral blood flow to neuronal activity. Accordingly, astrocytic death due to various types of injury can critically influence neuronal survival. The exact pathway of cell death after brain ischemia is under debate. In the present study, we used astrocytes from rat primary culture treated with persistent oxygen-glucose-deprivation (OGD) as a model of ischemia to examine the pathway of cell death and the relevant mechanisms. We observed changes in the cellular morphology, the energy metabolism of astrocytes, and the percentage of apoptosis or oncosis of the astrocytes induced by OGD. Electron microscopy revealed the co-existence of ultrastructural features in both apoptosis and oncosis in individual cells. The cellular ATP content was gradually decreased and the percentages of apoptotic and oncotic cells were increased during OGD. After 4h of OGD, ATP depletion to less than 35% of the control was observed, and oncosis became the primary pathway for astrocytic death. Increased plasma membrane permeability due to oncosis was associated with increased calpain-mediated degradation of several cytoskeletal proteins, including paxillin, vinculin, vimentin and GFAP. Pre-treatment with the calpain inhibitor 3-(4-iodophenyl)-2-mercapto-(Z)-2-propenoic acid (PD150606) could delay the OGD-induced astrocytic oncosis. These results suggest that there is a narrow range of ATP that determines astrocytic oncotic death induced by persistent OGD and that calpain-mediated hydrolysis of the cytoskeletal-associated proteins may contribute to astrocytes oncosis.

  6. Changes of cytoskeletal proteins in nerve tissues and serum of rats treated with 2,5-hexanedione.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing-Shan; Hou, Li-Yan; Zhang, Cui-Li; Song, Fu-Yong; Xie, Ke-Qin

    2008-02-28

    To investigate the mechanisms and biomarker of the neuropathy induced by 2,5-hexanedione (HD), male Wistar rats were administrated HD at dosage of 200 or 400mg/kg for 8 weeks (five-times per week). All rats were sacrificed after 8 weeks of treatment and the cerebrum cortex (CC), spinal cord (SC) and sciatic nerves (SN) were dissected, homogenized and used for the determination of cytoskeletal proteins by western blotting. The levels of neurofilaments (NFs) subunits (NF-L, NF-M and NF-H) in nerve tissues of 200 and 400mg/kg HD rats significantly decreased in both the supernatant and pellet fractions. Furthermore, significant negative correlations between NFs levels and gait abnormality were observed. As for microtubule (MT) and microfilament (MF) proteins, the levels of alpha-tubulin, beta-tubulin and beta-actin in the supernatant and pellet fraction of SN significantly decreased in 200 and 400mg/kg HD rats and correlated negatively with gait abnormality. However, the contents of MT and MF proteins in CC and SC were inconsistently affected and had no significant correlation with gait abnormality. The levels of NF-L and NF-H in serum significantly increased, while NF-M, alpha-tubulin, beta-tubulin and beta-actin contents remain unchanged. A significant positive correlation (R=0.9427, P<0.01) was observed between gait abnormality and NF-H level in serum as the intoxication went on. These findings suggested that HD intoxication resulted in a progressive decline of cytoskeletal protein contents, which might be relevant to the mechanisms of HD-induced neuropathy. NF-H was the most sensitive index, which may serve as a good indicator for neurotoxicity of n-hexane or HD.

  7. Protein requirement in critical illness.

    PubMed

    Hoffer, Leonard John

    2016-05-01

    How much protein do critically ill patients require? For the many decades that nutritional support has been used there was a broad consensus that critically ill patients need much more protein than required for normal health. Now, however, some clinical investigators recommend limiting all macronutrient provision during the early phase of critical illness. How did these conflicting recommendations emerge? Which of them is correct? This review explains the longstanding recommendation for generous protein provision in critical illness, analyzes the clinical trials now being claimed to refute it, and concludes with suggestions for clinical investigation and practice.

  8. Association of blebbing with assembly of cytoskeletal proteins in ATP-depleted EL-4 ascites tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Gabai, V L; Kabakov, A E; Mosin, A F

    1992-01-01

    ATP depletion in EL-4 ascites tumour cells rapidly induced the changes in cell morphology (blebbing), cytoskeletal protein assembly and finally resulted in cell death. After 1 hr of incubation with 2 microM rotenone (inhibitor of respiration) in glucose-free medium, when ATP level was 4% of the initial level, there were increases in triton-insoluble actin and vinculin levels (2.5-fold and 2.8-fold, respectively) and 44% of cells showed blebs; such treatment damaged cells irreversibly. Ca2+ removal did not diminish the effect of ATP depletion on cytoskeleton, blebbing and cell death, although the elevation of free intracellular Ca2+ in rotenone-treated cells was prevented. The role of ATP in maintaining cytoskeleton and cell shape is discussed.

  9. Alteration of a yeast SH3 protein leads to conditional viability with defects in cytoskeletal and budding patterns.

    PubMed

    Bauer, F; Urdaci, M; Aigle, M; Crouzet, M

    1993-08-01

    Mutations in genes necessary for survival in stationary phase were isolated to understand the ability of wild-type Saccharomyces cerevisiae to remain viable during prolonged periods of nutritional deprivation. Here we report results concerning one of these mutants, rvs167, which shows reduced viability and abnormal cell morphology upon carbon and nitrogen starvation. The mutant exhibits the same response when cells are grown in high salt concentrations and other unfavorable growth conditions. The RVS167 gene product displays significant homology with the Rvs161 protein and contains a SH3 domain at the C-terminal end. Abnormal actin distribution is associated with the mutant phenotype. In addition, while the budding pattern of haploid strains remains axial in standard growth conditions, the budding pattern of diploid mutant strains is random. The gene RVS167 therefore could be implicated in cytoskeletal reorganization in response to environmental stresses and could act in the budding site selection mechanism.

  10. Alteration of a yeast SH3 protein leads to conditional viability with defects in cytoskeletal and budding patterns.

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, F; Urdaci, M; Aigle, M; Crouzet, M

    1993-01-01

    Mutations in genes necessary for survival in stationary phase were isolated to understand the ability of wild-type Saccharomyces cerevisiae to remain viable during prolonged periods of nutritional deprivation. Here we report results concerning one of these mutants, rvs167, which shows reduced viability and abnormal cell morphology upon carbon and nitrogen starvation. The mutant exhibits the same response when cells are grown in high salt concentrations and other unfavorable growth conditions. The RVS167 gene product displays significant homology with the Rvs161 protein and contains a SH3 domain at the C-terminal end. Abnormal actin distribution is associated with the mutant phenotype. In addition, while the budding pattern of haploid strains remains axial in standard growth conditions, the budding pattern of diploid mutant strains is random. The gene RVS167 therefore could be implicated in cytoskeletal reorganization in response to environmental stresses and could act in the budding site selection mechanism. Images PMID:8336735

  11. Kingdom Chromista and its eight phyla: a new synthesis emphasising periplastid protein targeting, cytoskeletal and periplastid evolution, and ancient divergences.

    PubMed

    Cavalier-Smith, Thomas

    2017-09-05

    In 1981 I established kingdom Chromista, distinguished from Plantae because of its more complex chloroplast-associated membrane topology and rigid tubular multipartite ciliary hairs. Plantae originated by converting a cyanobacterium to chloroplasts with Toc/Tic translocons; most evolved cell walls early, thereby losing phagotrophy. Chromists originated by enslaving a phagocytosed red alga, surrounding plastids by two extra membranes, placing them within the endomembrane system, necessitating novel protein import machineries. Early chromists retained phagotrophy, remaining naked and repeatedly reverted to heterotrophy by losing chloroplasts. Therefore, Chromista include secondary phagoheterotrophs (notably ciliates, many dinoflagellates, Opalozoa, Rhizaria, heliozoans) or walled osmotrophs (Pseudofungi, Labyrinthulea), formerly considered protozoa or fungi respectively, plus endoparasites (e.g. Sporozoa) and all chromophyte algae (other dinoflagellates, chromeroids, ochrophytes, haptophytes, cryptophytes). I discuss their origin, evolutionary diversification, and reasons for making chromists one kingdom despite highly divergent cytoskeletons and trophic modes, including improved explanations for periplastid/chloroplast protein targeting, derlin evolution, and ciliary/cytoskeletal diversification. I conjecture that transit-peptide-receptor-mediated 'endocytosis' from periplastid membranes generates periplastid vesicles that fuse with the arguably derlin-translocon-containing periplastid reticulum (putative red algal trans-Golgi network homologue; present in all chromophytes except dinoflagellates). I explain chromist origin from ancestral corticates and neokaryotes, reappraising tertiary symbiogenesis; a chromist cytoskeletal synapomorphy, a bypassing microtubule band dextral to both centrioles, favoured multiple axopodial origins. I revise chromist higher classification by transferring rhizarian subphylum Endomyxa from Cercozoa to Retaria; establishing retarian

  12. The Cytoskeletal Adapter Protein Spinophilin Regulates Invadopodia Dynamics and Tumor Cell Invasion in Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Cheerathodi, Mujeeburahiman; Avci, Naze G; Guerrero, Paola A; Tang, Leung K; Popp, Julia; Morales, John E; Chen, Zhihua; Carnero, Amancio; Lang, Frederick F; Ballif, Bryan A; Rivera, Gonzalo M; McCarty, Joseph H

    2016-12-01

    Glioblastoma is a primary brain cancer that is resistant to all treatment modalities. This resistance is due, in large part, to invasive cancer cells that disperse from the main tumor site, escape surgical resection, and contribute to recurrent secondary lesions. The adhesion and signaling mechanisms that drive glioblastoma cell invasion remain enigmatic, and as a result there are no effective anti-invasive clinical therapies. Here we have characterized a novel adhesion and signaling pathway comprised of the integrin αvβ8 and its intracellular binding partner, Spinophilin (Spn), which regulates glioblastoma cell invasion in the brain microenvironment. We show for the first time that Spn binds directly to the cytoplasmic domain of β8 integrin in glioblastoma cells. Genetically targeting Spn leads to enhanced invasive cell growth in preclinical models of glioblastoma. Spn regulates glioblastoma cell invasion by modulating the formation and dissolution of invadopodia. Spn-regulated invadopodia dynamics are dependent, in part, on proper spatiotemporal activation of the Rac1 GTPase. Glioblastoma cells that lack Spn showed diminished Rac1 activities, increased numbers of invadopodia, and enhanced extracellular matrix degradation. Collectively, these data identify Spn as a critical adhesion and signaling protein that is essential for modulating glioblastoma cell invasion in the brain microenvironment.

  13. Role of Mycoplasma genitalium MG218 and MG317 cytoskeletal proteins in terminal organelle organization, gliding motility and cytadherence.

    PubMed

    Pich, Oscar Q; Burgos, Raul; Ferrer-Navarro, Mario; Querol, Enrique; Piñol, Jaume

    2008-10-01

    The terminal organelle is a differentiated structure that plays a key role in mycoplasma cytadherence and locomotion. For this reason, the analysis of Mycoplasma genitalium mutants displaying anomalous terminal organelles could improve our knowledge regarding the structural elements required for proper locomotion. In this study, we isolated several M. genitalium mutants having transposon insertions within the mg218 or mg317 genes, which encode the orthologues of Mycoplasma pneumoniae HMW2 and HMW3 cytoskeletal proteins, respectively. As expected, mg218(-) and mg317(-) mutants exhibit a reduced gliding motility, although their ability to attach to solid surfaces was not completely abolished. Interestingly, most of the mg218(-) mutants expressed N-terminal MG218 derivatives and showed the presence of short terminal organelles retaining many of the functions displayed by this structure in the wild-type strain, suggesting that the N-terminal region of this protein is an essential element in the architecture of the terminal organelle. Separately, the analysis of mg317(-) mutants indicates that MG317 protein is involved in the formation of the terminal button and contributes to anchoring the electron-dense core to the cell membrane. The results presented here clearly show that MG218 and MG317 proteins are implicated in the maintenance of gliding motility and cytadherence in M. genitalium.

  14. The bacterial cell division proteins FtsA and FtsZ self-organize into dynamic cytoskeletal patterns.

    PubMed

    Loose, Martin; Mitchison, Timothy J

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial cytokinesis is commonly initiated by the Z-ring, a cytoskeletal structure that assembles at the site of division. Its primary component is FtsZ, a tubulin superfamily GTPase, which is recruited to the membrane by the actin-related protein FtsA. Both proteins are required for the formation of the Z-ring, but if and how they influence each other's assembly dynamics is not known. Here, we reconstituted FtsA-dependent recruitment of FtsZ polymers to supported membranes, where both proteins self-organize into complex patterns, such as fast-moving filament bundles and chirally rotating rings. Using fluorescence microscopy and biochemical perturbations, we found that these large-scale rearrangements of FtsZ emerge from its polymerization dynamics and a dual, antagonistic role of FtsA: recruitment of FtsZ filaments to the membrane and negative regulation of FtsZ organization. Our findings provide a model for the initial steps of bacterial cell division and illustrate how dynamic polymers can self-organize into large-scale structures.

  15. Microgravity elicits reproducible alterations in cytoskeletal and metabolic gene and protein expression in space-flown Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Higashibata, Akira; Hashizume, Toko; Nemoto, Kanako; Higashitani, Nahoko; Etheridge, Timothy; Mori, Chihiro; Harada, Shunsuke; Sugimoto, Tomoko; Szewczyk, Nathaniel J; Baba, Shoji A; Mogami, Yoshihiro; Fukui, Keiji; Higashitani, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Although muscle atrophy is a serious problem during spaceflight, little is known about the sequence of molecular events leading to atrophy in response to microgravity. We carried out a spaceflight experiment using Caenorhabditis elegans onboard the Japanese Experiment Module of the International Space Station. Worms were synchronously cultured in liquid media with bacterial food for 4 days under microgravity or on a 1-G centrifuge. Worms were visually observed for health and movement and then frozen. Upon return, we analyzed global gene and protein expression using DNA microarrays and mass spectrometry. Body length and fat accumulation were also analyzed. We found that in worms grown from the L1 larval stage to adulthood under microgravity, both gene and protein expression levels for muscular thick filaments, cytoskeletal elements, and mitochondrial metabolic enzymes decreased relative to parallel cultures on the 1-G centrifuge (95% confidence interval (P⩽0.05)). In addition, altered movement and decreased body length and fat accumulation were observed in the microgravity-cultured worms relative to the 1-G cultured worms. These results suggest protein expression changes that may account for the progressive muscular atrophy observed in astronauts. PMID:28725720

  16. Dematin, a human erythrocyte cytoskeletal protein, is a substrate for a recombinant FIKK kinase from Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Gabriel S; Bailey, Scott

    2013-09-01

    P. falciparum causes the most deadly form of malaria, resulting from the adherence of infected red blood cells to blood vessels. During the blood stage of infection, the parasite secretes a large number of proteins into the host erythrocyte. The secretion of a 20-member family of protein kinases known as FIKK kinases, after a conserved Phe-Ile-Lys-Lys sequence motif, is unique to P. falciparum. Identification of physiological substrates of these kinases may provide perspective on the importance of FIKK kinase activity to P. falciparum virulence. We demonstrate, for the first time, the heterologous expression and purification of a FIKK kinase (PfFk4.1, PFD1165w). The recombinant kinase is active against general substrates and phosphorylates itself. Having demonstrated kinase activity, we incubated recombinant Fk4.1 with parasite and human erythrocyte lysates. No parasite-derived substrates were identified. However, treatment of erythrocyte ghosts shows that the FIKK kinase Fk4.1 phosphorylates dematin, a cytoskeletal protein found at the red blood cell spectrin-actin junction.

  17. The Repetitive Cytoskeletal Protein H49 of Trypanosoma cruzi Is a Calpain-Like Protein Located at the Flagellum Attachment Zone

    PubMed Central

    Galetović, Alexandra; Souza, Renata T.; Santos, Marcia R. M.; Cordero, Esteban M.; Bastos, Izabela M. D.; Santana, Jaime M.; Ruiz, Jeronimo C.; Lima, Fabio M.; Marini, Marjorie M.; Mortara, Renato A.; da Silveira, José Franco

    2011-01-01

    Background Trypanosoma cruzi has a single flagellum attached to the cell body by a network of specialized cytoskeletal and membranous connections called the flagellum attachment zone. Previously, we isolated a DNA fragment (clone H49) which encodes tandemly arranged repeats of 68 amino acids associated with a high molecular weight cytoskeletal protein. In the current study, the genomic complexity of H49 and its relationships to the T. cruzi calpain-like cysteine peptidase family, comprising active calpains and calpain-like proteins, is addressed. Immunofluorescence analysis and biochemical fractionation were used to demonstrate the cellular location of H49 proteins. Methods and Findings All of H49 repeats are associated with calpain-like sequences. Sequence analysis demonstrated that this protein, now termed H49/calpain, consists of an amino-terminal catalytic cysteine protease domain II, followed by a large region of 68-amino acid repeats tandemly arranged and a carboxy-terminal segment carrying the protease domains II and III. The H49/calpains can be classified as calpain-like proteins as the cysteine protease catalytic triad has been partially conserved in these proteins. The H49/calpains repeats share less than 60% identity with other calpain-like proteins in Leishmania and T. brucei, and there is no immunological cross reaction among them. It is suggested that the expansion of H49/calpain repeats only occurred in T. cruzi after separation of a T. cruzi ancestor from other trypanosomatid lineages. Immunofluorescence and immunoblotting experiments demonstrated that H49/calpain is located along the flagellum attachment zone adjacent to the cell body. Conclusions H49/calpain contains large central region composed of 68-amino acid repeats tandemly arranged. They can be classified as calpain-like proteins as the cysteine protease catalytic triad is partially conserved in these proteins. H49/calpains could have a structural role, namely that of ensuring that the cell

  18. The repetitive cytoskeletal protein H49 of Trypanosoma cruzi is a calpain-like protein located at the flagellum attachment zone.

    PubMed

    Galetović, Alexandra; Souza, Renata T; Santos, Marcia R M; Cordero, Esteban M; Bastos, Izabela M D; Santana, Jaime M; Ruiz, Jeronimo C; Lima, Fabio M; Marini, Marjorie M; Mortara, Renato A; da Silveira, José Franco

    2011-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi has a single flagellum attached to the cell body by a network of specialized cytoskeletal and membranous connections called the flagellum attachment zone. Previously, we isolated a DNA fragment (clone H49) which encodes tandemly arranged repeats of 68 amino acids associated with a high molecular weight cytoskeletal protein. In the current study, the genomic complexity of H49 and its relationships to the T. cruzi calpain-like cysteine peptidase family, comprising active calpains and calpain-like proteins, is addressed. Immunofluorescence analysis and biochemical fractionation were used to demonstrate the cellular location of H49 proteins. All of H49 repeats are associated with calpain-like sequences. Sequence analysis demonstrated that this protein, now termed H49/calpain, consists of an amino-terminal catalytic cysteine protease domain II, followed by a large region of 68-amino acid repeats tandemly arranged and a carboxy-terminal segment carrying the protease domains II and III. The H49/calpains can be classified as calpain-like proteins as the cysteine protease catalytic triad has been partially conserved in these proteins. The H49/calpains repeats share less than 60% identity with other calpain-like proteins in Leishmania and T. brucei, and there is no immunological cross reaction among them. It is suggested that the expansion of H49/calpain repeats only occurred in T. cruzi after separation of a T. cruzi ancestor from other trypanosomatid lineages. Immunofluorescence and immunoblotting experiments demonstrated that H49/calpain is located along the flagellum attachment zone adjacent to the cell body. H49/calpain contains large central region composed of 68-amino acid repeats tandemly arranged. They can be classified as calpain-like proteins as the cysteine protease catalytic triad is partially conserved in these proteins. H49/calpains could have a structural role, namely that of ensuring that the cell body remains attached to the flagellum by

  19. A new kymogram-based method reveals unexpected effects of marker protein expression and spatial anisotropy of cytoskeletal dynamics in plant cell cortex.

    PubMed

    Cvrčková, Fatima; Oulehlová, Denisa

    2017-01-01

    Cytoskeleton can be observed in live plant cells in situ with high spatial and temporal resolution using a combination of specific fluorescent protein tag expression and advanced microscopy methods such as spinning disc confocal microscopy (SDCM) or variable angle epifluorescence microscopy (VAEM). Existing methods for quantifying cytoskeletal dynamics are often either based on laborious manual structure tracking, or depend on costly commercial software. Current automated methods also do not readily allow separate measurements of structure lifetime, lateral mobility, and spatial anisotropy of these parameters. We developed a new freeware-based, operational system-independent semi-manual technique for analyzing VAEM or SDCM data, QuACK (Quantitative Analysis of Cytoskeletal Kymograms), and validated it on data from Arabidopsis thaliana fh1 formin mutants, previously shown by conventional methods to exhibit altered actin and microtubule dynamics compared to the wild type. Besides of confirming the published mutant phenotype, QuACK was used to characterize surprising differential effects of various fluorescent protein tags fused to the Lifeact actin probe on actin dynamics in A. thaliana cotyledon epidermis. In particular, Lifeact-YFP slowed down actin dynamics compared to Lifeact-GFP at marker expression levels causing no macroscopically noticeable phenotypic alterations, although the two fluorophores are nearly identical. We could also demonstrate the expected, but previously undocumented, anisotropy of cytoskeletal dynamics in elongated epidermal cells of A. thaliana petioles and hypocotyls. Our new method for evaluating plant cytoskeletal dynamics has several advantages over existing techniques. It is intuitive, rapid compared to fully manual approaches, based on the free ImageJ software (including macros we provide here for download), and allows measurement of multiple parameters. Our approach was already used to document unexpected differences in actin

  20. Cytoplasmic Ig-Domain Proteins: Cytoskeletal Regulators with a Role in Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Otey, Carol A.; Dixon, Richard; Stack, Christianna; Goicoechea, Silvia M.

    2009-01-01

    Immunoglobulin domains are found in a wide variety of functionally diverse transmembrane proteins, and also in a smaller number of cytoplasmic proteins. Members of this latter group are usually associated with the actin cytoskeleton, and most of them bind directly to either actin or myosin, or both. Recently, studies of inherited human disorders have identified disease-causing mutations in five cytoplasmic Ig-domain proteins: myosin-binding protein C, titin, myotilin, palladin, and myopalladin. Together with results obtained from cultured cells and mouse models, these clinical studies have yielded novel insights into the unexpected roles of Ig domain proteins in mechanotransduction and signaling to the nucleus. An emerging theme in this field is that cytoskeleton-associated Ig domain proteins are more than structural elements of the cell, and may have evolved to fill different needs in different cellular compartments. PMID:19466753

  1. Expression of cytoskeletal and matrix genes following exposure to ionizing radiation: Dose-rate effects and protein synthesis requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E. |; Felcher, P.; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei

    1993-12-31

    Experiments were designed to examine the effects of radiation dose-rate and of the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide on expression of cytoskeletal elements ({gamma}- and {beta}-actin and {alpha}-tubulin) and matrix elements (fibronectin) in Syrian hamster embryo cells. Results demonstrated little effect of dose-rate for JANUS fission-spectrum neutrons when comparing expression of either a-tubulin or fibronectin genes. Past work had already documented similar results for expression of actin transcripts. Cycloheximide, however, repressed accumulation of {alpha}-tubulin following exposure to high dose-rate neutrons or {gamma} rays; this did not occur following similar low dose-rate exposures. Cycloheximide did not affect accumulation of mRNA for actin genes. Cycloheximide abrogated the moderate induction of fibronectin-mRNA which occurred following exposure to {gamma} rays and high dose-rate neutrons. These results suggest a role for labile proteins in the maintenance of {alpha}-tubulin and fibronectin mRNA accumulation following exposure to ionizing radiation and that the cellular/molecular response to low dose-rate neutrons may be different from the response to high dose-rate neutrons.

  2. Giardia duodenalis Surface Cysteine Proteases Induce Cleavage of the Intestinal Epithelial Cytoskeletal Protein Villin via Myosin Light Chain Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, Amol; Cotton, James A.; Dixon, Brent R.; Gedamu, Lashitew; Yates, Robin M.; Buret, Andre G.

    2015-01-01

    Giardia duodenalis infections are among the most common causes of waterborne diarrhoeal disease worldwide. At the height of infection, G. duodenalis trophozoites induce multiple pathophysiological processes within intestinal epithelial cells that contribute to the development of diarrhoeal disease. To date, our understanding of pathophysiological processes in giardiasis remains incompletely understood. The present study reveals a previously unappreciated role for G. duodenalis cathepsin cysteine proteases in intestinal epithelial pathophysiological processes that occur during giardiasis. Experiments first established that Giardia trophozoites indeed produce cathepsin B and L in strain-dependent fashion. Co-incubation of G. duodenalis with human enterocytes enhanced cathepsin production by Assemblage A (NF and S2 isolates) trophozoites, but not when epithelial cells were exposed to Assemblage B (GSM isolate) trophozoites. Direct contact between G. duodenalis parasites and human intestinal epithelial monolayers resulted in the degradation and redistribution of the intestinal epithelial cytoskeletal protein villin; these effects were abolished when parasite cathepsin cysteine proteases were inhibited. Interestingly, inhibition of parasite proteases did not prevent degradation of the intestinal tight junction-associated protein zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1), suggesting that G. duodenalis induces multiple pathophysiological processes within intestinal epithelial cells. Finally, this study demonstrates that G. duodenalis-mediated disruption of villin is, at least, in part dependent on activation of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK). Taken together, this study indicates a novel role for parasite cathepsin cysteine proteases in the pathophysiology of G. duodenalis infections. PMID:26334299

  3. Neuroactive molecules and growth factors modulate cytoskeletal protein expression during astroglial cell proliferation and differentiation in culture.

    PubMed

    Bramanti, Vincenzo; Grasso, Sonia; Tibullo, Daniele; Giallongo, Cesarina; Pappa, Rita; Brundo, Maria Violetta; Tomassoni, Daniele; Viola, Maria; Amenta, Francesco; Avola, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Steroid hormones and neurotrophic factors regulate astroglial cell survival, proliferation, and differentiation in culture. The present study examines the interaction between glucocorticoids and growth factors (GFs) on cytoskeletal proteins and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK2) expression in stressed astroglial cultures at 25 days in vitro, according to the following experimental condition. Pretreatment with basic fibroblast growth factor alone or in combination with dexamethasone 10(-9) M for 48 hr induced an enhancement of glial fibrillary acidic protein, vimetin, and ERK2 expression. Treatment with "progression" GFs alone and in the last 12 hr significantly increased the above-mentioned markers' expression. The present study shows that glucocorticoids may cooperate with GFs or may abrogate their effects, depending on the experimental culture conditions used as well as the exposure time and the types of GFs added. Our findings provide evidence of interactive dialogue between GFs and neurosteroids in cultured astrocytes. This may have implications in the therapeutic approach to neurologic disorders associated with astrogliosis.

  4. Expression of cytoskeletal and matrix genes following exposure to ionizing radiation: Dose-rate effects and protein synthesis requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E. |; Felcher, P.; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei

    1994-05-01

    Experiments were designed to examine the effects Of radiation dose-rate and of the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide on expression of cytoskeletal elements ({gamma}- and {beta}-actin and {alpha}-tubulin) and matrix elements (fibronectin) in Syrian hamster embryo cells. Past work from our laboratory had already demonstrated optimum time points and doses for examination of radiation effects on accumulation of specific transcripts. Our results here demonstrated little effect of dose-rate for JANUS fission spectrum neutrons when comparing expression of either {alpha}-tubulin or fibronectin genes. Past work had already documented similar results for expression of actin transcripts. Effects of cycloheximide revealed that cycloheximide repressed accumulation of {alpha}-tubulin following exposure to high dose-rate neutrons or {gamma} rays; this did not occur following similar low dose-rate exposure. (2) Cycloheximide did not affect accumulation of MRNA for actin genes; and that cycloheximide abrogated the moderate induction of fibronectin-mRNA which occurred following exposure to {gamma} rays and high dose-rate neutrons. These results suggest a role for labile proteins in the maintenance of {alpha}-tubulin and fibronectin MRNA accumulation following exposure to ionizing radiation. in addition, they suggest that the cellular/molecular response to low dose-rate neutrons may be different from the response to high dose-rate neutrons.

  5. Expression of cytoskeletal and matrix genes following exposure to ionizing radiation: Dose-rate effects and protein synthesis requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E. |; Felcher, P.; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei

    1992-12-31

    Experiments were designed to examine the effects of radiation dose-rate and of the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide on expression of cytoskeletal elements ({gamma}- and {beta}-actin and {alpha}-tubulin) and matrix elements (fibronectin) in Syrian hamster embryo cells. Past work from our laboratory had already demonstrated optimum time points and doses for examination of radiation effects on accumulation of specific transcripts. Our results here demonstrated little effect of dose-rate for JANUS fission spectrum neutrons when comparing expression of either {alpha}-tubulin or fibronectin genes. Past work had already documented similar results for expression of actin transcripts. Effects of cycloheximide, however, revealed several interesting and novel findings: (1) Cycloheximide repressed accumulation of {alpha}-tubulin following exposure to high dose-rate neutrons or {gamma} rays; this did not occur following similar low dose-rate exposure (2) Cycloheximide did not affect accumulation of mRNA for actin genes. Cycloheximide abrogated the moderate induction of fibronectin-mRNA which occurred following exposure to {gamma} rays and high dose-rate neutrons. These results suggest a role for labile proteins in the maintenance of {alpha}-tubulin and fibronectin mRNA accumulation following exposure to ionizing radiation. In addition, they suggest that the cellular/molecular response to low dose-rate neutrons may be different from the response to high dose-rate neutrons.

  6. Giardia duodenalis Surface Cysteine Proteases Induce Cleavage of the Intestinal Epithelial Cytoskeletal Protein Villin via Myosin Light Chain Kinase.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, Amol; Cotton, James A; Dixon, Brent R; Gedamu, Lashitew; Yates, Robin M; Buret, Andre G

    2015-01-01

    Giardia duodenalis infections are among the most common causes of waterborne diarrhoeal disease worldwide. At the height of infection, G. duodenalis trophozoites induce multiple pathophysiological processes within intestinal epithelial cells that contribute to the development of diarrhoeal disease. To date, our understanding of pathophysiological processes in giardiasis remains incompletely understood. The present study reveals a previously unappreciated role for G. duodenalis cathepsin cysteine proteases in intestinal epithelial pathophysiological processes that occur during giardiasis. Experiments first established that Giardia trophozoites indeed produce cathepsin B and L in strain-dependent fashion. Co-incubation of G. duodenalis with human enterocytes enhanced cathepsin production by Assemblage A (NF and S2 isolates) trophozoites, but not when epithelial cells were exposed to Assemblage B (GSM isolate) trophozoites. Direct contact between G. duodenalis parasites and human intestinal epithelial monolayers resulted in the degradation and redistribution of the intestinal epithelial cytoskeletal protein villin; these effects were abolished when parasite cathepsin cysteine proteases were inhibited. Interestingly, inhibition of parasite proteases did not prevent degradation of the intestinal tight junction-associated protein zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1), suggesting that G. duodenalis induces multiple pathophysiological processes within intestinal epithelial cells. Finally, this study demonstrates that G. duodenalis-mediated disruption of villin is, at least, in part dependent on activation of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK). Taken together, this study indicates a novel role for parasite cathepsin cysteine proteases in the pathophysiology of G. duodenalis infections.

  7. Isolation of a cDNA clone encoding a human protein-tyrosine phosphatase with homology to the cytoskeletal-associated proteins band 4. 1, ezrin, and talin

    SciTech Connect

    Qing Yang; Tonks, N.K. )

    1991-07-15

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR), from primers corresponding to conserved sequences within the catalytic domains of the protein-tyrosine phosphatases, was used to amplify protein-tyrosine phosphatase-related cDNAs from a HeLa cell library. After probing the same cDNA library with one of the PCR products, 10 positive clones were identified. The longest of these clones (3984 base pairs) contained 2739 base pairs of open reading frame and, after a stop codon, a 3{prime} nontranslated segment of 1222 base pairs. A 4.3-kilobase transcript was detected by Northern blot analysis of HeLa cell poly(A){sup +} RNA. The open reading frame predicts a protein of 913 amino acids ({approx} 104 kDa), termed PTPH1. The sequence of PTPH1 can be described in terms of three segments. (1) The N-terminal segment displays homology to the domains in the cytoskeletal-associated proteins band 4.1, erzin, and talin that direct their association with proteins at the interface between the plasma membrane and the cytoskeleton in structures such as focal adhesions. (2) There is a central segment bearing putative phosphorylation sites for protein-serine/threonine kinases. (3) A segment that is homologous to the members of the protein-tyrosine phosphatase family is located at the C terminus. The structure is discussed in the light of the potential role of PTPH1 in controlling cytoskeletal integrity and the possibility that overexpression of PTPH1 may reverse transformation induced by oncogenic protein-tyrosine kinases, such as the members of the src family.

  8. EGF-like peptide-enhanced cell movement in Dictyostelium is mediated by protein kinases and the activity of several cytoskeletal proteins.

    PubMed

    Huber, Robert J; O'Day, Danton H

    2012-09-01

    DdEGFL1, a synthetic epidermal growth factor-like (EGFL) peptide based on the first EGFL repeat of the extracellular matrix, cysteine-rich, calmodulin-binding protein CyrA, has previously been shown to sustain the threonine phosphorylation of a 210kDa protein during the starvation of Dictyostelium cells. Immunoprecipitation coupled with a LC/MS/MS analysis identified the 210kDa protein as vinculin B (VinB). VinB shares sequence similarity with mammalian vinculin, a protein that links the actin cytoskeleton to the plasma membrane. Both threonine phosphorylated VinB (P-VinB) and VinB-GFP localized to the cytoplasm and cytoskeleton of Dictyostelium amoebae. VinB-GFP was also shown to be threonine phosphorylated and co-immunoprecipitated with established vinculin-binding cytoskeletal proteins (e.g. myosin II heavy chain, actin, alpha-actinin, talin). P-VinB and VinB-GFP were detected in DdEGFL1 pull-down assays, which also identified a 135kDa phosphothreonine protein and two phosphotyrosine proteins (35 and 32kDa) as potential components of the DdEGFL1 signaling pathway. DdEGFL1-enhanced cell movement required the cytoskeletal proteins talin B and paxillin B and tyrosine kinase activity mediated by PKA signaling, however VinB threonine phosphorylation was shown to be independent of PI3K/PLA2 signaling and PI3K and PKA kinase activity. Finally, VinB-GFP over-expression suppressed DdEGFL1-enhanced random cell movement, but not folic acid-mediated chemotaxis. Together, this study provides the first evidence for VinB function plus new insight into the signaling pathway(s) mediating EGFL repeat/peptide-enhanced cell movement in Dictyostelium. This information is integrated into an emerging model that summarizes existing knowledge.

  9. KHARON Is an Essential Cytoskeletal Protein Involved in the Trafficking of Flagellar Membrane Proteins and Cell Division in African Trypanosomes*

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Marco A.; Tran, Khoa D.; Valli, Jessica; Hobbs, Sam; Johnson, Errin; Gluenz, Eva; Landfear, Scott M.

    2016-01-01

    African trypanosomes and related kinetoplastid parasites selectively traffic specific membrane proteins to the flagellar membrane, but the mechanisms for this trafficking are poorly understood. We show here that KHARON, a protein originally identified in Leishmania parasites, interacts with a putative trypanosome calcium channel and is required for its targeting to the flagellar membrane. KHARON is located at the base of the flagellar axoneme, where it likely mediates targeting of flagellar membrane proteins, but is also on the subpellicular microtubules and the mitotic spindle. Hence, KHARON is probably a multifunctional protein that associates with several components of the trypanosome cytoskeleton. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of KHARON mRNA results in failure of the calcium channel to enter the flagellar membrane, detachment of the flagellum from the cell body, and disruption of mitotic spindles. Furthermore, knockdown of KHARON mRNA induces a lethal failure of cytokinesis in both bloodstream (mammalian host) and procyclic (insect vector) life cycle stages, and KHARON is thus critical for parasite viability. PMID:27489106

  10. Cytoskeletal control of plant cell shape: getting the fine points.

    PubMed

    Smith, Laurie G

    2003-02-01

    The shapes of plant cells, which are defined by their surrounding walls, are often important for cell function. The cytoskeleton plays key roles in determining plant cell shape, mainly by influencing the patterns in which wall materials are deposited in expanding cells. Studies employing cytoskeleton-disrupting drugs, together with studies of mutants with cytoskeletal defects, have demonstrated that both microtubules and actin filaments are critical for all modes of cell expansion, although their precise roles remain poorly understood. In recent years, however, significant progress has been made in understanding the contributions of a variety of proteins that influence cell shape by regulating the organization and polymerization of cytoskeletal filaments in expanding cells.

  11. Active components of ginger potentiate β-agonist-induced relaxation of airway smooth muscle by modulating cytoskeletal regulatory proteins.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Elizabeth A; Zhang, Yi; Xu, Carrie; Wakita, Ryo; Emala, Charles W

    2014-01-01

    β-Agonists are the first-line therapy to alleviate asthma symptoms by acutely relaxing the airway. Purified components of ginger relax airway smooth muscle (ASM), but the mechanisms are unclear. By elucidating these mechanisms, we can explore the use of phytotherapeutics in combination with traditional asthma therapies. The objectives of this study were to: (1) determine if 6-gingerol, 8-gingerol, or 6-shogaol potentiate β-agonist-induced ASM relaxation; and (2) define the mechanism(s) of action responsible for this potentiation. Human ASM was contracted in organ baths. Tissues were relaxed dose dependently with β-agonist, isoproterenol, in the presence of vehicle, 6-gingerol, 8-gingerol, or 6-shogaol (100 μM). Primary human ASM cells were used for cellular experiments. Purified phosphodiesterase (PDE) 4D or phospholipase C β enzyme was used to assess inhibitory activity of ginger components using fluorescent assays. A G-LISA assay was used to determine the effects of ginger constituents on Ras homolog gene family member A activation. Significant potentiation of isoproterenol-induced relaxation was observed with each of the ginger constituents. 6-Shogaol showed the largest shift in isoproterenol half-maximal effective concentration. 6-Gingerol, 8-gingerol, or 6-shogaol significantly inhibited PDE4D, whereas 8-gingerol and 6-shogaol also inhibited phospholipase C β activity. 6-Shogaol alone inhibited Ras homolog gene family member A activation. In human ASM cells, these constituents decreased phosphorylation of 17-kD protein kinase C-potentiated inhibitory protein of type 1 protein phosphatase and 8-gingerol decreased myosin light chain phosphorylation. Isolated components of ginger potentiate β-agonist-induced relaxation in human ASM. This potentiation involves PDE4D inhibition and cytoskeletal regulatory proteins. Together with β-agonists, 6-gingerol, 8-gingerol, or 6-shogaol may augment existing asthma therapy, resulting in relief of symptoms through

  12. Utilizing Ultrasound to Transiently Increase Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability, Modulate of the Tight Junction Proteins, and Alter Cytoskeletal Structure.

    PubMed

    Bae, Mi Jung; Lee, Young Mi; Kim, Yeoun Hee; Han, Hyung Soo; Lee, Hak Jong

    2015-01-01

    The central nervous system is protected by the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The tight junction (TJ) proteins claudin-5 and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) as well as the cytoskeletal component F-actin play key roles in maintaining homeostasis of the BBB. Increases in BBB permeability may be beneficial for the delivery of pharmacological substances into the brain. Therefore, here, we assessed the use of ultrasound to induce transient enhancement of BBB permeability. We used fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran 40 to detect changes in the membrane permeability of bEnd.3 cells during ultrasound treatment. Ultrasound increased FITC-dextran 40 uptake into bEnd.3 cells for 2-6 h after treatment; however, normal levels returned after 24 h. An insignificant increase in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage also occurred 3 and 6 h after ultrasound treatment, whereas at 24 h, LDH leakage was indistinguishable between the control and treatment groups. Expression of claudin-5, ZO-1, and F-actin at the messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels was assessed with real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. Ultrasound induced a transient decrease in claudin-5 mRNA and protein expression within 2 h of treatment; however, no significant changes in ZO-1 and F-actin expression were observed. Claudin-5, ZO-1, and F-actin immunofluorescence demonstrated that the cellular structures incorporating these proteins were transiently impaired by ultrasound. In conclusion, our ultrasound technique can temporarily increase BBB permeability without cytotoxicity to exposed cells, and the method can be exploited in the delivery of drugs to the brain with minimal damage.

  13. The actin binding cytoskeletal protein Moesin is involved in nuclear mRNA export.

    PubMed

    Kristó, Ildikó; Bajusz, Csaba; Borsos, Barbara N; Pankotai, Tibor; Dopie, Joseph; Jankovics, Ferenc; Vartiainen, Maria K; Erdélyi, Miklós; Vilmos, Péter

    2017-10-01

    Current models imply that the evolutionarily conserved, actin-binding Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin (ERM) proteins perform their activities at the plasma membrane by anchoring membrane proteins to the cortical actin network. Here we show that beside its cytoplasmic functions, the single ERM protein of Drosophila, Moesin, has a novel role in the nucleus. The activation of transcription by heat shock or hormonal treatment increases the amount of nuclear Moesin, indicating biological function for the protein in the nucleus. The distribution of Moesin in the nucleus suggests a function in transcription and the depletion of mRNA export factors Nup98 or its interacting partner, Rae1, leads to the nuclear accumulation of Moesin, suggesting that the nuclear function of the protein is linked to mRNA export. Moesin localizes to mRNP particles through the interaction with the mRNA export factor PCID2 and knock down of Moesin leads to the accumulation of mRNA in the nucleus. Based on our results we propose that, beyond its well-known, manifold functions in the cytoplasm, the ERM protein of Drosophila is a new, functional component of the nucleus where it participates in mRNA export. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Alternative cytoskeletal landscapes: cytoskeletal novelty and evolution in basal excavate protists

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Scott C.; Paredez, Alexander R.

    2016-01-01

    Microbial eukaryotes encompass the majority of eukaryotic evolutionary and cytoskeletal diversity. The cytoskeletal complexity observed in multicellular organisms appears to be an expansion of components present in genomes of diverse microbial eukaryotes such as the basal lineage of flagellates, the Excavata. Excavate protists have complex and diverse cytoskeletal architectures and life cycles – essentially alternative cytoskeletal “landscapes” – yet still possess conserved microtubule- and actin-associated proteins. Comparative genomic analyses have revealed that a subset of excavates, however, lack many canonical actin-binding proteins central to actin cytoskeleton function in other eukaryotes. Overall, excavates possess numerous uncharacterized and “hypothetical” genes, and may represent an undiscovered reservoir of novel cytoskeletal genes and cytoskeletal mechanisms. The continued development of molecular genetic tools in these complex microbial eukaryotes will undoubtedly contribute to our overall understanding of cytoskeletal diversity and evolution. PMID:23312067

  15. Effects of Ca2+- binding agent EGTA on fiber contractility and content of sarcomeric cytoskeletal proteins of hindlimb suspended rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinova, K. S.; Vikhlyantsev, I. M.; Podlubnaya, Z. A.; Shenkman, B. S.

    2005-08-01

    The study was purposed to analyze the effects of binding agent (10% EGTA) on soleus fiber contractile characteristics and cytoskeletal sarcomeric proteins in hindlimb suspended rats. Cage control and hindlimb- suspended rats were administered with saline or EGTA i.p. injections. Whereas the fiber diameter of unloaded rat soleus was 17% less than in control group and there were no significant differences between EGTA-treated rats and saline-treated animals. Values of fiber tension in saline- treated unloaded rats were less than in the control group by 45%, and in EGTA-treated rats - by 28%. The Ca/tension curve in hindlimb suspended saline-treated rats shifted to the right, which indicated to the less Ca2+ sensitivity of myofibrils of unloaded soleus. At the same time Ca2+ sensitivity in EGTA-treated suspended rats even exceeded the control levels. The hindlimb- suspended EGTA-treated rats tended to decrease their titin content to less degree (17%) than group of suspended rats injected with physiological saline (51%). The relative nebulin content decreased significantly (more than 50%) after hindlimb suspension but was not changed in EGTA-treated unloaded rats.

  16. EF-1[alpha] Is Associated with a Cytoskeletal Network Surrounding Protein Bodies in Maize Endosperm Cells.

    PubMed Central

    Clore, A. M.; Dannenhoffer, J. M.; Larkins, B. A.

    1996-01-01

    By using indirect immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy, we documented changes in the distribution of elongation factor-1[alpha] (EF-1[alpha]), actin, and microtubules during the development of maize endosperm cells. In older interphase cells actively forming starch grains and protein bodies, the protein bodies are enmeshed in EF-1[alpha] and actin and are found juxtaposed with a multidirectional array of microtubules. Actin and EF-1[alpha] appear to exist in a complex, because we observed that the two are colocalized, and treatment with cytochalasin D resulted in the redistribution of EF-1[alpa]. These data suggest that EF-1[alpha] and actin are associated in maize endosperm cells and may help to explain the basis of the correlation we found between the concentration of EF-1[alpha] and lysine content. The data also support the hypothesis that the cytoskeleton plays a role in storage protein deposition. The distributions of EF-1[alpha] actin, and microtubules change during development. We observed that in young cells before the accumulation of starch and storage protein, EF-1[alpha], actin, and microtubules are found mainly in the cell cortex or in association with nuclei. PMID:12239373

  17. Neural stem cells over-expressing brain-derived neurotrophic factor promote neuronal survival and cytoskeletal protein expression in traumatic brain injury sites.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tao; Yu, Yan; Tang, Liu-Jiu; Kong, Li; Zhang, Cheng-Hong; Chu, Hai-Ying; Yin, Liang-Wei; Ma, Hai-Ying

    2017-03-01

    Cytoskeletal proteins are involved in neuronal survival. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor can increase expression of cytoskeletal proteins during regeneration after axonal injury. However, the effect of neural stem cells genetically modified by brain-derived neurotrophic factor transplantation on neuronal survival in the injury site still remains unclear. To examine this, we established a rat model of traumatic brain injury by controlled cortical impact. At 72 hours after injury, 2 × 10(7) cells/mL neural stem cells overexpressing brain-derived neurotrophic factor or naive neural stem cells (3 mL) were injected into the injured cortex. At 1-3 weeks after transplantation, expression of neurofilament 200, microtubule-associated protein 2, actin, calmodulin, and beta-catenin were remarkably increased in the injury sites. These findings confirm that brain-derived neurotrophic factor-transfected neural stem cells contribute to neuronal survival, growth, and differentiation in the injury sites. The underlying mechanisms may be associated with increased expression of cytoskeletal proteins and the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway.

  18. Neural stem cells over-expressing brain-derived neurotrophic factor promote neuronal survival and cytoskeletal protein expression in traumatic brain injury sites

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tao; Yu, Yan; Tang, Liu-jiu; Kong, Li; Zhang, Cheng-hong; Chu, Hai-ying; Yin, Liang-wei; Ma, Hai-ying

    2017-01-01

    Cytoskeletal proteins are involved in neuronal survival. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor can increase expression of cytoskeletal proteins during regeneration after axonal injury. However, the effect of neural stem cells genetically modified by brain-derived neurotrophic factor transplantation on neuronal survival in the injury site still remains unclear. To examine this, we established a rat model of traumatic brain injury by controlled cortical impact. At 72 hours after injury, 2 × 107 cells/mL neural stem cells overexpressing brain-derived neurotrophic factor or naive neural stem cells (3 mL) were injected into the injured cortex. At 1–3 weeks after transplantation, expression of neurofilament 200, microtubule-associated protein 2, actin, calmodulin, and beta-catenin were remarkably increased in the injury sites. These findings confirm that brain-derived neurotrophic factor-transfected neural stem cells contribute to neuronal survival, growth, and differentiation in the injury sites. The underlying mechanisms may be associated with increased expression of cytoskeletal proteins and the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. PMID:28469658

  19. Biochemical and structural properties of the integrin-associated cytoskeletal protein talin.

    PubMed

    Critchley, David R

    2009-01-01

    Interaction of cells with the extracellular matrix is fundamental to a wide variety of biological processes, such as cell proliferation, cell migration, embryogenesis, and organization of cells into tissues, and defects in cell-matrix interactions are an important element in many diseases. Cell-matrix interactions are frequently mediated by the integrin family of cell adhesion molecules, transmembrane alphabeta-heterodimers that are typically linked to the actin cytoskeleton by one of a number of adaptor proteins including talin, alpha-actinin, filamin, tensin, integrin-linked kinase, melusin, and skelemin. The focus of this review is talin, which appears unique among these proteins in that it also induces a conformational change in integrins that is propagated across the membrane, and increases the affinity of the extracellular domain for ligand. Particular emphasis is given to recent progress on the structure of talin, its interaction with binding partners, and its mode of regulation.

  20. Phosphorylation of the cytoskeletal protein CAP1 controls its association with cofilin and actin.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guo-Lei; Zhang, Haitao; Wu, Huhehasi; Ghai, Pooja; Field, Jeffrey

    2014-12-01

    Cell signaling can control the dynamic balance between filamentous and monomeric actin by modulating actin regulatory proteins. One family of actin regulating proteins that controls actin dynamics comprises cyclase-associated proteins 1 and 2 (CAP1 and 2, respectively). However, cell signals that regulate CAPs remained unknown. We mapped phosphorylation sites on mouse CAP1 and found S307 and S309 to be regulatory sites. We further identified glycogen synthase kinase 3 as a kinase phosphorylating S309. The phosphomimetic mutant S307D/S309D lost binding to its partner cofilin and, when expressed in cells, caused accumulation of actin stress fibers similar to that in cells with reduced CAP expression. In contrast, the non-phosphorylatable S307A/S309A mutant showed drastically increased cofilin binding and reduced binding to actin. These results suggest that the phosphorylation serves to facilitate release of cofilin for a subsequent cycle of actin filament severing. Moreover, our results suggest that S307 and S309 function in tandem; neither the alterations in binding cofilin and/or actin, nor the defects in rescuing the phenotype of the enlarged cell size in CAP1 knockdown cells was observed in point mutants of either S307 or S309. In summary, we identify a novel regulatory mechanism of CAP1 through phosphorylation.

  1. Phosphorylation of the cytoskeletal protein CAP1 controls its association with cofilin and actin

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Guo-Lei; Zhang, Haitao; Wu, Huhehasi; Ghai, Pooja; Field, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cell signaling can control the dynamic balance between filamentous and monomeric actin by modulating actin regulatory proteins. One family of actin regulating proteins that controls actin dynamics comprises cyclase-associated proteins 1 and 2 (CAP1 and 2, respectively). However, cell signals that regulate CAPs remained unknown. We mapped phosphorylation sites on mouse CAP1 and found S307 and S309 to be regulatory sites. We further identified glycogen synthase kinase 3 as a kinase phosphorylating S309. The phosphomimetic mutant S307D/S309D lost binding to its partner cofilin and, when expressed in cells, caused accumulation of actin stress fibers similar to that in cells with reduced CAP expression. In contrast, the non-phosphorylatable S307A/S309A mutant showed drastically increased cofilin binding and reduced binding to actin. These results suggest that the phosphorylation serves to facilitate release of cofilin for a subsequent cycle of actin filament severing. Moreover, our results suggest that S307 and S309 function in tandem; neither the alterations in binding cofilin and/or actin, nor the defects in rescuing the phenotype of the enlarged cell size in CAP1 knockdown cells was observed in point mutants of either S307 or S309. In summary, we identify a novel regulatory mechanism of CAP1 through phosphorylation. PMID:25315833

  2. Cytoskeletal architecture of isolated mitotic spindle with special reference to microtubule-associated proteins and cytoplasmic dynein.

    PubMed

    Hirokawa, N; Takemura, R; Hisanaga, S

    1985-11-01

    We have studied cytoskeletal architectures of isolated mitotic apparatus from sea urchin eggs using quick-freeze, deep-etch electron microscopy. This method revealed the existence of an extensive three-dimensional network of straight and branching crossbridges between spindle microtubules. The surface of the spindle microtubules was almost entirely covered with hexagonally packed, small, round button-like structures which were very uniform in shape and size (approximately 8 nm in diameter), and these microtubule buttons frequently provided bases for crossbridges between adjacent microtubules. These structures were removed from the surface of microtubules by high salt (0.6 M NaCl) extraction. Microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) and microtubules isolated from mitotic spindles which were mainly composed of a large amount of 75-kD protein and some high molecular mass (250 kD, 245 kD) proteins were polymerized in vitro and examined by quick-freeze, deep-etch electron microscopy. The surfaces of microtubules were entirely covered with the same hexagonally packed round buttons, the arrangement of which is intimately related to that of tubulin dimers. Short crossbridges and some longer crossbridges were also observed. High salt treatment (0.6 M NaCl) extracted both 75-kD protein and high molecular weight proteins and removed microtubule buttons and most of crossbridges from the surface of microtubules. Considering the relatively high amount of 75-kD protein among MAPs isolated from mitotic spindles, it is concluded that these microtubule buttons probably consist of 75-kD MAP and that some of the crossbridges in vivo could belong to MAPs. Another kind of granule, larger in size (11-26 nm in diameter), was also on occasion associated with the surface of microtubules of mitotic spindles. A fine sidearm sometimes connected the larger granule to adjacent microtubules. Localization of cytoplasmic dynein ATPase in the mitotic spindle was investigated by electron microscopic

  3. Dictyostelium mutants lacking the cytoskeletal protein coronin are defective in cytokinesis and cell motility

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Coronin is an actin-binding protein in Dictyostelium discoideum that is enriched at the leading edge of the cells and in projections of the cell surface called crowns. The polypeptide sequence of coronin is distinguished by its similarities to the beta-subunits of trimeric G proteins (E. L. de Hostos, B. Bradtke, F. Lottspeich, R. Guggenheim, and G. Gerisch, 1991. EMBO (Eur. Mol. Biol. Organ.) J. 10:4097-4104). To elucidate the in vivo function of coronin, null mutants have been generated by gene replacement. The mutant cells lacking coronin grow and migrate more slowly than wild-type cells. When these cor- cells grow in liquid medium they become multinucleate, indicating a role of coronin in cytokinesis. To explore this role, coronin has been localized in mitotic wild-type cells by immunofluorescence labeling. During separation of the daughter cells, coronin is strongly accumulated at their distal portions including the leading edges. This contrasts with the localization of myosin II in the cleavage furrow and suggests that coronin functions independently of the conventional myosin in facilitating cytokinesis. PMID:8380174

  4. The 13-kD FK506 Binding Protein, FKBP13, Interacts with a Novel Homologue of the Erythrocyte Membrane Cytoskeletal Protein 4.1

    PubMed Central

    Walensky, Loren D.; Gascard, Philippe; Field, Michael E.; Blackshaw, Seth; Conboy, John G.; Mohandas, Narla; Snyder, Solomon H.

    1998-01-01

    We have identified a novel generally expressed homologue of the erythrocyte membrane cytoskeletal protein 4.1, named 4.1G, based on the interaction of its COOH-terminal domain (CTD) with the immunophilin FKBP13. The 129-amino acid peptide, designated 4.1G–CTD, is the first known physiologic binding target of FKBP13. FKBP13 is a 13-kD protein originally identified by its high affinity binding to the immunosuppressant drugs FK506 and rapamycin (Jin, Y., M.W. Albers, W.S. Lane, B.E. Bierer, and S.J. Burakoff. 1991. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 88:6677– 6681); it is a membrane-associated protein thought to function as an ER chaperone (Bush, K.T., B.A. Henrickson, and S.K. Nigam. 1994. Biochem. J. [Tokyo]. 303:705–708). We report the specific association of FKBP13 with 4.1G–CTD based on yeast two-hybrid, in vitro binding and coimmunoprecipitation experiments. The histidyl-proline moiety of 4.1G–CTD is required for FKBP13 binding, as indicated by yeast experiments with truncated and mutated 4.1G–CTD constructs. In situ hybridization studies reveal cellular colocalizations for FKBP13 and 4.1G–CTD throughout the body during development, supporting a physiologic role for the interaction. Interestingly, FKBP13 cofractionates with the red blood cell homologue of 4.1 (4.1R) in ghosts, inside-out vesicles, and Triton shell preparations. The identification of FKBP13 in erythrocytes, which lack ER, suggests that FKBP13 may additionally function as a component of membrane cytoskeletal scaffolds. PMID:9531554

  5. The 13-kD FK506 binding protein, FKBP13, interacts with a novel homologue of the erythrocyte membrane cytoskeletal protein 4.1.

    PubMed

    Walensky, L D; Gascard, P; Fields, M E; Blackshaw, S; Conboy, J G; Mohandas, N; Snyder, S H

    1998-04-06

    We have identified a novel generally expressed homologue of the erythrocyte membrane cytoskeletal protein 4.1, named 4.1G, based on the interaction of its COOH-terminal domain (CTD) with the immunophilin FKBP13. The 129-amino acid peptide, designated 4.1G-CTD, is the first known physiologic binding target of FKBP13. FKBP13 is a 13-kD protein originally identified by its high affinity binding to the immunosuppressant drugs FK506 and rapamycin (Jin, Y., M.W. Albers, W.S. Lane, B.E. Bierer, and S.J. Burakoff. 1991. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 88:6677- 6681); it is a membrane-associated protein thought to function as an ER chaperone (Bush, K.T., B.A. Henrickson, and S.K. Nigam. 1994. Biochem. J. [Tokyo]. 303:705-708). We report the specific association of FKBP13 with 4.1G-CTD based on yeast two-hybrid, in vitro binding and coimmunoprecipitation experiments. The histidyl-proline moiety of 4.1G-CTD is required for FKBP13 binding, as indicated by yeast experiments with truncated and mutated 4.1G-CTD constructs. In situ hybridization studies reveal cellular colocalizations for FKBP13 and 4.1G-CTD throughout the body during development, supporting a physiologic role for the interaction. Interestingly, FKBP13 cofractionates with the red blood cell homologue of 4.1 (4.1R) in ghosts, inside-out vesicles, and Triton shell preparations. The identification of FKBP13 in erythrocytes, which lack ER, suggests that FKBP13 may additionally function as a component of membrane cytoskeletal scaffolds.

  6. Cytoskeletal protein Flightless (Flii) is elevated in chronic and acute human wounds and wound fluid: neutralizing its activity in chronic but not acute wound fluid improves cellular proliferation.

    PubMed

    Ruzehaji, Nadira; Grose, Randall; Krumbiegel, Doreen; Zola, Heddy; Dasari, Pallave; Wallace, Hilary; Stacey, Michael; Fitridge, Robert; Cowin, Allison J

    2012-01-01

    Chronic non-healing wounds form a medical need which will expand as the population ages and the obesity epidemic grows. Whilst the complex mechanisms underlying wound repair are not fully understood, remodelling of the actin cytoskeleton plays a critical role. Elevated expression of the actin cytoskeletal protein Flightless I (Flii) is known to impair wound outcomes. To determine if Flii is involved in the impaired healing observed in chronic wounds, its expression in non-healing human wounds from patients with venous leg ulcers was determined and compared to its expression in acute wounds and unwounded skin. Increased expression of Flii was observed in both chronic and acute wounds with wound fluid and plasma also containing secreted Flii protein. Inflammation is a key aspect of wound repair and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis revealed Flii was located in neutrophils within the blood and that it co-localised with CD16+ neutrophils in chronic wounds. The function of secreted Flii was investigated as both chronic wound fluid and Flii have previously been shown to inhibit fibroblast proliferation. To determine if the inhibitory effect of wound fluid was due in part to the presence of Flii, wound fluids were depleted of Flii using Flii-specific neutralizing antibodies (FnAb). Flii depleted chronic wound fluid no longer inhibited fibroblast proliferation, suggesting that Flii may contribute to the inhibitory effect of chronic wound fluid on fibroblast function. Application of FnAbs to chronic wounds may therefore be a novel approach used to improve the local environment of non-healing wounds and potentially improve healing outcomes.

  7. Improved immunoelectron microscopic method for localizing cytoskeletal proteins in Lowicryl K4M embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    Loesser, K E; Doane, K J; Wilson, F J; Roisen, F J; Malamed, S

    1986-11-01

    We have modified the Lowicryl K4M low-temperature dehydration and embedding procedure for immunoelectron microscopy to provide improved ultrastructural detail and facilitate the localization of actin and tubulin in isolated rat adrenocortical cells, chick spinal cord with attached dorsal root ganglia (SC-DRG), and cultured dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Cells and tissues were fixed for immunocytochemistry either in a mixture of 2% paraformaldehyde and 0.25% glutaraldehyde (0.1 M PIPES buffer, pH 7.3) or in a mixture of 0.3% glutaraldehyde and 1.0% ethyldimethylaminopropylcarbodiimide (0.1 M phosphate buffered saline, pH 7.3). Dehydration was in ethanol at progressively lower temperatures to -35 degrees C. Infiltration at -35 degrees C was followed by ultraviolet polymerization at -20 degrees C. Comparable samples were fixed in glutaraldehyde and osmium tetroxide and embedded in Epon 812 or Epon-Araldite. Post-embedding immunostaining of thin sections utilized commercially available monoclonal antibodies to tubulin and actin followed by the protein A-gold technique (Roth et al., Endocrinology 108:247, 1981). Actin immunoreactivity was observed at the periphery of mitochondria and between mitochondria and lipid droplets in rat adrenocortical cells and at the periphery of neuronal cell processes of SC-DRG. Tubulin immunoreactivity was associated with microtubules throughout neurites of cultured DRG. Our modified technique allows preservation of ultrastructural details as well as localization of antigens by immunoelectron microscopy.

  8. The lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis) erythrocyte; morphology, ultrastructure, major plasma membrane proteins and phospholipids, and cytoskeletal organization.

    PubMed

    Hägerstrand, H; Danieluk, M; Bobrowska-Hägerstrand, M; Holmström, T; Kralj-Iglic, V; Lindqvist, C; Nikinmaa, M

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the erythrocyte of the lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis), a primitive vertebrate. The lamprey erythrocyte predominantly has a non-axisymmetric stomatocytelike shape. It has a nucleus and a haemoglobin-filled cytosol with a few organelles and vesicular structures. Surprisingly, there is no marginal band of microtubules. Sodium dodecylsulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by Coomassie blue staining of isolated plasma membranes revealed a single band at the level of the human spectrin doublet. Major bands also occurred at approximately 175 kDa and comigrating with human erythrocyte actin (approximately 45 kDa). The presence of spectrin, actin and vimentin was shown by immunoblotting. Band 3 protein, the anion exchanger in higher vertebrates, seemed to be highly deficient or lacking, as was also the case with ankyrin. Confocal laser scanning microscopy combined with immunocytochemical methods showed spectrin, actin and vimentin mainly to be localized around the nucleus, from where actin- and vimentin-strands extended out into the cytoplasm. Actin also seemed to be present at the plasma membrane. Phospholipid analyses of plasma membrane preparations showed the presence of the same four major phospholipid groups as in the human erythrocyte, although with higher and lower amounts of phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin, respectively. The low fluorescein isothiocyanate conjugated annexin V binding, as monitored by flow cytometry, indicated that phosphatidylserine is mainly confined to the inner membrane leaflet in the lamprey erythrocyte plasma membrane.

  9. Recruitment of septin cytoskeletal proteins by botulinum toxin A protease determines its remarkable stability.

    PubMed

    Vagin, Olga; Tokhtaeva, Elmira; Garay, Patton E; Souda, Puneet; Bassilian, Sara; Whitelegge, Julian P; Lewis, Ramilla; Sachs, George; Wheeler, Larry; Aoki, Roger; Fernandez-Salas, Ester

    2014-08-01

    Proteolytic cleavage of synaptosomal-associated protein 25 by the light chain of botulinum neurotoxin type A (LCA) results in a blockade of neurotransmitter release that persists for several months in motor neurons. The L428A/L429A mutation in LCA is known to significantly shorten both the proteolytic and neuroparalytic effects of the neurotoxin in mice. To elucidate the cellular mechanism for LCA longevity, we studied the effects of L428A/L429A mutation on the interactome, localization and stability of LCA expressed in cultured neuronal cells. Mass spectrometry analysis of the LCA interactome showed that the mutation prevented the interaction of LCA with septins. The wild-type LCA was concentrated in plasma-membrane-associated clusters, colocalizing with septins-2 and septin-7, which accumulated in these clusters only in the presence of LCA. The L428A/L429A mutation decreased co-clustering of LCA and septins and accelerated proteasomal and non-proteasomal degradation of LCA. Similarly, the impairment of septin oligomerization by forchlorfenuron or silencing of septin-2 prevented LCA interaction and clustering with septins and increased LCA degradation. Therefore, the dileucine-mediated LCA-septin co-clustering is crucial for the long-lasting stabilization of LCA-related proteolytic and presumably neuroparalytic activity. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  10. Loss of the Cytoskeletal Protein Pdlim7 Predisposes Mice to Heart Defects and Hemostatic Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Krcmery, Jennifer; Gupta, Rajesh; Sadleir, Rudyard W.; Ahrens, Molly J.; Misener, Sol; Kamide, Christine; Fitchev, Philip; Losordo, Douglas W.; Crawford, Susan E.; Simon, Hans-Georg

    2013-01-01

    The actin-associated protein Pdlim7 is essential for heart and fin development in zebrafish; however, the expression and function of this PDZ-LIM family member in the mammal has remained unclear. Here, we show that Pdlim7 predominantly localizes to actin-rich structures in mice including the heart, vascular smooth muscle, and platelets. To test the requirement for Pdlim7 in mammalian development and function, we analyzed a mouse strain with global genetic inactivation of Pdlim7. We demonstrate that Pdlim7 loss-of-function leads to significant postnatal mortality. Inactivation of Pdlim7 does not disrupt cardiac development, but causes mild cardiac dysfunction in adult mice. Adult Pdlim7-/- mice displayed increased mitral and tricuspid valve annulus to body weight ratios. These structural aberrations in Pdlim7-/- mice were supported by three-dimensional reconstructions of adult cardiac valves, which revealed increased surface area to volume ratios for the mitral and tricuspid valve leaflets. Unexpectedly, we found that loss of Pdlim7 triggers systemic venous and arterial thrombosis, leading to significant mortality shortly after birth in Pdlim7+/- (11/60) and Pdlim7-/- (19/35) mice. In line with a prothrombotic phenotype, adult Pdlim7-/- mice exhibit dramatically decreased tail bleed times compared to controls. These findings reveal a novel and unexpected function for Pdlim7 in maintaining proper hemostasis in neonatal and adult mice. PMID:24278323

  11. Activated ADF/cofilin sequesters phosphorylated microtubule-associated-protein during the assembly of Alzheimer-like neuritic cytoskeletal striations

    PubMed Central

    Whiteman, Ineka T.; Gervasio, Othon L.; Cullen, Karen M.; Guillemin, Gilles J.; Jeong, Erica V.; Witting, Paul K.; Antao, Shane T.; Minamide, Laurie S.; Bamburg, James R.; Goldsbury, Claire

    2009-01-01

    In Alzheimer disease (AD), rod-like cofilin aggregates (cofilin-actin rods) and thread-like inclusions containing phosphorylated microtubule-associated protein (pMAP) tau form in the brain (neuropil threads) and the extent of their presence correlates with cognitive decline and disease progression. The assembly mechanism of these respective pathological lesions and the relationship between them is poorly understood, yet vital to understanding the causes of sporadic AD. We demonstrate that during mitochondrial inhibition, activated actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin assemble into rods along processes of cultured primary neurons that recruit pMAP/tau and mimic neuropil threads. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) analysis revealed co-localization of cofilin-GFP and pMAP in rods, suggesting their close proximity within a cytoskeletal inclusion complex. The relationship between pMAP and cofilin-actin rods was further investigated using actin-modifying drugs and siRNA knockdown of ADF/cofilin in primary neurons. The results suggest that activation of ADF/cofilin and generation of cofilin-actin rods is required for the subsequent recruitment of pMAP into the inclusions. Additionally we were able to induce the formation of pMAP-positive ADF/cofilin rods by exposing cells to exogenous Aβ peptides. These results reveal a common pathway for pMAP and cofilin accumulation in neuronal processes. The requirement of activated ADF/cofilin for the sequestration of pMAP suggests that neuropil thread structures in the AD brain may be initiated by elevated cofilin activation and F-actin bundling that can be caused by oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction or Aβ peptides, all suspected initiators of synaptic loss and neurodegeneration in AD. PMID:19828813

  12. A model for mammalian cochlear hair cell differentiation in vitro: effects of retinoic acid on cytoskeletal proteins and potassium conductances.

    PubMed

    Helyer, R; Cacciabue-Rivolta, D; Davies, D; Rivolta, M N; Kros, C J; Holley, M C

    2007-02-01

    We have established a model for the in-vitro differentiation of mouse cochlear hair cells and have used it to explore the influence of retinoic acid on proliferation, cytoskeletal proteins and voltage-gated potassium conductances. The model is based on the conditionally immortal cell line University of Sheffield/ventral otocyst-epithelial cell line clone 36 (US/VOT-E36), derived from ventral otic epithelial cells of the mouse at embryonic day 10.5 and transfected with a reporter for myosin VIIa. Retinoic acid did not increase cell proliferation but led to up-regulation of myosin VIIa and formation of prominent actin rings that gave rise to numerous large, linear actin bundles. Cells expressing myosin VIIa had larger potassium conductances and did not express the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27(kip1). US/VOT-E36 endogenously expressed the voltage-gated potassium channel alpha-subunits Kv1.3 and Kv2.1, which we subsequently identified in embryonic and neonatal hair cells in both auditory and vestibular sensory epithelia in vivo. These subunits could underlie the embryonic and neonatal delayed-rectifiers recorded in nascent hair cells in vivo. Kv2.1 was particularly prominent on the basolateral membrane of cochlear inner hair cells. Kv1.3 was distributed throughout all hair cells but tended to be localized to the cuticular plates. US/VOT-E36 recapitulates a coherent pattern of cell differentiation under the influence of retinoic acid and will provide a convenient model for screening the effects of other extrinsic factors on the differentiation of cochlear epithelial cell types in vitro.

  13. Phosphoproteome Profiling of SH-SY5y Neuroblastoma Cells Treated with Anesthetics: Sevoflurane and Isoflurane Affect the Phosphorylation of Proteins Involved in Cytoskeletal Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joomin; Ahn, Eunsook; Park, Wyun Kon; Park, Seyeon

    2016-01-01

    Inhalation anesthetics are used to decrease the spinal cord transmission of painful stimuli. However, the molecular or biochemical processes within cells that regulate anesthetic-induced responses at the cellular level are largely unknown. Here, we report the phosphoproteome profile of SH-SY5y human neuroblastoma cells treated with sevoflurane, a clinically used anesthetic. Phosphoproteins were isolated from cell lysates and analyzed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The phosphorylation of putative anesthetic-responsive marker proteins was validated using western blot analysis in cells treated with both sevoflurane and isoflurane. A total of 25 phosphoproteins were identified as differentially phosphorylated proteins. These included key regulators that signal cytoskeletal remodeling steps in pathways related to vesicle trafficking, axonal growth, and cell migration. These proteins included the Rho GTPase, Ras-GAP SH3 binding protein, Rho GTPase activating protein, actin-related protein, and actin. Sevoflurane and isoflurane also resulted in the dissolution of F-actin fibers in SH-SY5y cells. Our results show that anesthetics affect the phosphorylation of proteins involved in cytoskeletal remodeling pathways. PMID:27611435

  14. Loss of prion protein leads to age-dependent behavioral abnormalities and changes in cytoskeletal protein expression

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cellular prion protein (PrPC) is a multifunctional protein, whose exact physiological role remains elusive. Since previous studies indicated a neuroprotective function of PrPC, we investigated whether Prnp knockout mice(Prnp0/0)display age-dependent behavioral abnormalities. Matched sets of Prnp0/0 ...

  15. Smoking correlates with increased cytoskeletal protein-related coding region mutations in the lung and head and neck datasets of the cancer genome atlas.

    PubMed

    Yavorski, John M; Blanck, George

    2016-12-01

    Cancer from smoking tobacco is considered dependent on mutagens, but significant molecular aspects of smoking-specific, cancer development remain unknown. We defined sets of coding regions for oncoproteins, tumor suppressor proteins, and cytoskeletal-related proteins that were compared between nonsmokers and smokers, for mutation occurrences, in the lung adenocarcinoma (LUAD), head and neck squamous carcinoma (HNSC), bladder carcinoma (BLCA), and pancreatic adenocarcinoma ( PAAD) datasets from the cancer genome atlas (TCGA). We uncovered significant differences in overall mutation rates, and in mutation rates in cytoskeletal protein-related coding regions (CPCRs, including extracellular matrix protein coding regions), between nonsmokers and smokers in LUAD and HNSC (P < 0.001), raising the question of whether the CPCR mutation differences lead to different clinical courses for nonsmoker and smoker cancers. Another important question inspired by these results is, whether high smoker cancer mutation rates would facilitate genotoxicity or neoantigen-based therapies. No significant, mutation-based differences were found in the BLCA or PAAD datasets, between nonsmokers and smokers. However, a significant difference was uncovered for the average number of overall cancer mutations, in LUAD, for persons who stopped smoking more than 15 years ago, compared with more recent smokers (P < 0.032).

  16. Disruption of the three cytoskeletal networks in mammalian cells does not affect transcription, translation, or protein translocation changes induced by heat shock.

    PubMed Central

    Welch, W J; Feramisco, J R

    1985-01-01

    Mammalian cells show a complex series of transcriptional and translational switching events in response to heat shock treatment which ultimately lead to the production and accumulation of a small number of proteins, the so-called heat shock (or stress) proteins. We investigated the heat shock response in both qualitative and quantitative ways in cells that were pretreated with drugs that specifically disrupt one or more of the three major cytoskeletal networks. (These drugs alone, cytochalasin E and colcemid, do not result in induction of the heat shock response.) Our results indicated that disruption of the actin microfilaments, the vimentin-containing intermediate filaments, or the microtubules in living cells does not hinder the ability of the cell to undergo an apparently normal heat shock response. Even when all three networks were simultaneously disrupted (resulting in a loose, baglike appearance of the cells), the cells still underwent a complete heat shock response as assayed by the appearance of the heat shock proteins. In addition, the major induced 72-kilodalton heat shock protein was efficiently translocated from the cytoplasm into its proper location in the nucleus and nucleolus irrespective of the condition of the three cytoskeletal elements. Images PMID:4040602

  17. Widespread mRNA Association with Cytoskeletal Motor Proteins and Identification and Dynamics of Myosin-Associated mRNAs in S. cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Casolari, Jason M.; Thompson, Michael A.; Salzman, Julia; Champion, Lowry M.; Moerner, W. E.; Brown, Patrick O.

    2012-01-01

    Programmed mRNA localization to specific subcellular compartments for localized translation is a fundamental mechanism of post-transcriptional regulation that affects many, and possibly all, mRNAs in eukaryotes. We describe her e a systematic approach to identify the RNA cargoes associated with the cytoskeletal motor proteins of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in combination with live-cell 3D super-localization microscopy of endogenously tagged mRNAs. Our analysis identified widespread association of mRNAs with cytoskeletal motor proteins, including association of Myo3 with mRNAs encoding key regulators of actin branching and endocytosis such as WASP and WIP. Using conventional fluorescence microscopy and expression of MS2-tagged mRNAs from endogenous loci, we observed a strong bias for actin patch nucleator mRNAs to localize to the cell cortex and the actin patch in a Myo3- and F-actin dependent manner. Use of a double-helix point spread function (DH-PSF) microscope allowed super-localization measurements of single mRNPs at a spatial precision of 25 nm in x and y and 50 nm in z in live cells with 50 ms exposure times, allowing quantitative profiling of mRNP dynamics. The actin patch mRNA exhibited distinct and characteristic diffusion coefficients when compared to a control mRNA. In addition, disruption of F-actin significantly expanded the 3D confinement radius of an actin patch nucleator mRNA, providing a quantitative assessment of the contribution of the actin cytoskeleton to mRNP dynamic localization. Our results provide evidence for specific association of mRNAs with cytoskeletal motor proteins in yeast, suggest that different mRNPs have distinct and characteristic dynamics, and lend insight into the mechanism of actin patch nucleator mRNA localization to actin patches. PMID:22359641

  18. Apo and calcium-bound crystal structures of cytoskeletal protein alpha-14 giardin (annexin E1) from the intestinal protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Pathuri, Puja; Nguyen, Emily Tam; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Svärd, Staffan G; Luecke, Hartmut

    2009-01-30

    Alpha-14 giardin (annexin E1), a member of the alpha giardin family of annexins, has been shown to localize to the flagella of the intestinal protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia. Alpha giardins show a common ancestry with the annexins, a family of proteins most of which bind to phospholipids and cellular membranes in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner and are implicated in numerous membrane-related processes including cytoskeletal rearrangements and membrane organization. It has been proposed that alpha-14 giardin may play a significant role during the cytoskeletal rearrangement during differentiation of Giardia. To gain a better understanding of alpha-14 giardin's mode of action and its biological role, we have determined the three-dimensional structure of alpha-14 giardin and its phospholipid-binding properties. Here, we report the apo crystal structure of alpha-14 giardin determined in two different crystal forms as well as the Ca(2+)-bound crystal structure of alpha-14 giardin, refined to 1.9, 1.6 and 1.65 A, respectively. Although the overall fold of alpha-14 giardin is similar to that of alpha-11 giardin, multiwavelength anomalous dispersion phasing was required to solve the alpha-14 giardin structure, indicating significant structural differences between these two members of the alpha giardin family. Unlike most annexin structures, which typically possess N-terminal domains, alpha-14 giardin is composed of only a core domain, followed by a C-terminal extension that may serve as a ligand for binding to cytoskeletal protein partners in Giardia. In the Ca(2+)-bound structure we detected five bound calcium ions, one of which is a novel, highly coordinated calcium-binding site not previously observed in annexin structures. This novel high-affinity calcium-binding site is composed of seven protein donor groups, a feature rarely observed in crystal structures. In addition, phospholipid-binding assays suggest that alpha-14 giardin exhibits calcium-dependent binding to

  19. Effect of long-term monotherapy with the aldosterone receptor blocker eplerenone on cytoskeletal proteins and matrix metalloproteinases in dogs with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Sharad; Mishra, Sudhish; Zacà, Valerio; Alesh, Issa; Gupta, Ramesh C; Goldstein, Sidney; Sabbah, Hani N

    2007-12-01

    Long-term monotherapy with the aldosterone receptor blocker eplerenone in dogs with HF was previously shown to improve LV systolic and diastolic function. This study examined the effects of long-term monotherapy with the aldosterone receptor blocker eplerenone on mRNA and protein expression of the cytoskeletal proteins titin, tubulin, fibronectin and vimentin, the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)-1, -2 and -9, and the tissue inhibitors of MMPs (TIMPs)-1 and -2 in left ventricular (LV) myocardium of dogs with heart failure (HF). HF was produced in 12 dogs by intracoronary microembolizations. Dogs were randomized to 3 months oral therapy with eplerenone (10 mg/kg twice daily, n = 6) or to no therapy at all (HF-control, n = 6). LV tissue from six normal dogs was used for comparison. mRNA expression was measured using reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and protein expression using Western blots. Compared to NL dogs, control dogs showed upregulation of mRNA and protein expression for tubulin, fibronectin, MMP-1, -2 and -9, and down-regulation of mRNA and protein expression for total titin. Normalization of mRNA and protein expression for all these genes was seen after treatment with eplerenone. N2BA/N2B-titin mRNA expression ratio increased significantly in dogs with HF treated with eplerenone. No differences in expression for vimentin, TIMP-1 and -2 were observed among groups. In dogs with HF, long-term eplerenone therapy normalizes mRNA and protein expression of key cytoskeletal proteins and MMPs. Reversal of these molecular maladaptations may partly explain the improvement in LV diastolic function seen after long-term therapy with eplerenone.

  20. ENH, containing PDZ and LIM domains, heart/skeletal muscle-specific protein, associates with cytoskeletal proteins through the PDZ domain.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, N; Hoshijima, M; Oyasu, M; Saito, N; Tanizawa, K; Kuroda, S

    2000-06-07

    The Enigma homologue protein (ENH), containing an N-terminal PDZ domain and three C-terminal LIM domains, is a heart and skeletal muscle-specific protein that has been shown to preferentially interact with protein kinase C beta (PKCbeta) through the LIM domains (Kuroda et al., J. Biol. Chem. 271, 31029-31032, 1996). We here demonstrate that ENH is colocalized with a cytoskeletal protein alpha-actinin in the Z-disk region of rat neonatal cardiomyocytes. Pull-down assays using the glutathione-S-transferase-fusion system also showed the interaction of the PDZ domain of ENH with actin and alpha-actinin. Furthermore, by combined use of the in silico and conventional cDNA cloning methods, we have isolated three ENH-related clones from a mouse heart-derived cDNA library: mENH1 (591 amino acid residues) corresponding to rat ENH, mENH2 (337 residues), and mENH3 (239 residues); the latter two containing only a single PDZ domain. Deciphering their cDNA sequences, these mENH1-3 mRNAs appear to be generated from a single mENH gene by alternative splicing. Northern blot analyses using human cancer cells and mouse embryos have shown expression of each mENH mRNA to vary considerably among the cell types and during the developmental stage. Together with a recent finding that PKCbeta is markedly activated in the cardiac hypertrophic signaling, these results suggest that ENH1 plays an important role in the heart development by scaffolding PKCbeta to the Z-disk region and that ENH2 and ENH3 negatively modulate the scaffolding activity of ENH1.

  1. Kinetic Proofreading of Cytoskeletal Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, Douglas; Wingreen, Ned

    2010-03-01

    Cytoskeletal polymer dynamics play a role in cellular processes as varied as reproduction, locomotion, and intracellular transport. Microtubules are cytoskeletal biopolymers that grow by accumulating tubulin subunits bound to guanosine triphosphate (GTP). The subunits hydrolyze GTP to guanosine diphosphate (GDP), causing a conformational change in the protein that destabilizes the microtubule. GDP-bound subunits tend to depolymerize, leading to stochastic microtubule disassembly in a process known as dynamic instability. Over time polymerization and depolymerization come to steady state, leading to a local steady-state concentration of tubulin subunits. This may be viewed as a kind of ``kinetic proofreading,'' in which the system consumes energy actively to ``proofread'' the steady-state subunit concentration. We suggest that the same mechanism could also ``proofread'' between different cytoskeletal structures. For example, we show that a small free-energy difference between two polymer orientations, combined with dynamic instability, can strongly drive the system towards the lower free-energy state. This might help to explain the long-time stability of many cytoskeletal structures despite the short-time rapid turnover of the individual subunits.

  2. Role for the Abi/wave protein complex in T cell receptor-mediated proliferation and cytoskeletal remodeling.

    PubMed

    Zipfel, Patricia A; Bunnell, Stephen C; Witherow, D Scott; Gu, Jing Jin; Chislock, Elizabeth M; Ring, Colleen; Pendergast, Ann Marie

    2006-01-10

    The molecular reorganization of signaling molecules after T cell receptor (TCR) activation is accompanied by polymerization of actin at the site of contact between a T cell and an antigen-presenting cell (APC), as well as extension of actin-rich lamellipodia around the APC. Actin polymerization is critical for the fidelity and efficiency of the T cell response to antigen. The ability of T cells to polymerize actin is critical for several steps in T cell activation including TCR clustering, mature immunological synapse formation, calcium flux, IL-2 production, and proliferation. Activation of the Rac GTPase has been linked to regulation of actin polymerization after TCR stimulation. However, the molecules required for TCR-mediated actin polymerization downstream of activated Rac have remained elusive. Here we identify a novel role for the Abi/Wave protein complex, which signals downstream of activated Rac, in the regulation of actin polymerization and T cell activation in response to TCR stimulation. Here we show that Abi and Wave rapidly translocate from the T cell cytoplasm to the T cell:B cell contact site in the presence of antigen. Abi and Wave colocalize with actin at the T cell:B cell conjugation site. Moreover, Wave and Abi are necessary for actin polymerization after T cell activation, and loss of Abi proteins in mice impairs TCR-induced cell proliferation and IL-2 production in primary T cells. Significantly, the impairment in actin polymerization in cells lacking Abi proteins is due to the inability of Wave proteins to localize to the T cell:B cell contact site in the presence of antigen, rather than the destabilization of the components of the Wave protein complex. The Abi/Wave complex is a novel regulator of TCR-mediated actin dynamics, IL-2 production, and proliferation.

  3. Toxaphene, but not beryllium, induces human neutrophil chemotaxis and apoptosis via reactive oxygen species (ROS): involvement of caspases and ROS in the degradation of cytoskeletal proteins.

    PubMed

    Lavastre, Valérie; Roberge, Charles J; Pelletier, Martin; Gauthier, Marc; Girard, Denis

    2002-07-01

    Chemicals of environmental concern are known to alter the immune system. Recent data indicate that some contaminants possess proinflammatory properties by activating neutrophils, an area of research that is still poorly investigated. We have previously documented that toxaphene activates human neutrophils to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) and accelerates apoptosis by a yet unknown mechanism. In this study, we found that toxaphene induces another neutrophil function, chemotaxis. Furthermore, we found that toxaphene induces both chemotaxis and apoptosis via a ROS-dependent mechanism, since these responses were blocked by the addition of catalase to the culture. In addition, toxaphene was found to induce the degradation of the cytoskeletal proteins gelsolin, paxillin, and vimentin during apoptosis, and this was reversed by the addition of z-VAD-FMK (caspase inhibitor) or catalase, demonstrating the importance of caspases and ROS in this process. In contrast to toxaphene, we found that beryllium does not induce superoxide production, and, this correlates with its inability to induce chemotaxis and apoptosis. We conclude that toxaphene induces chemotaxis and apoptosis via ROS and that caspases and ROS are involved in the degradation of cytoskeletal proteins.

  4. Clinicopathological Analysis and Multipronged Quantitative Proteomics Reveal Oxidative Stress and Cytoskeletal Proteins as Possible Markers for Severe Vivax Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Sandipan; Patel, Sandip K.; Venkatesh, Apoorva; Bhave, Amruta; Kumar, Vipin; Singh, Vaidhvi; Chatterjee, Gangadhar; Shah, Veenita G.; Sharma, Sarthak; Renu, Durairaj; Nafis, Naziya; Gandhe, Prajakta; Gogtay, Nithya; Thatte, Urmila; Sehgal, Kunal; Verma, Sumit; Karak, Avik; Khanra, Dibbendhu; Talukdar, Arunansu; Kochar, Sanjay K.; S. B, Vijeth; Kochar, Dhanpat K.; Rojh, Dharmendra; Varma, Santosh G.; Gandhi, Mayuri N.; Srikanth, Rapole; Patankar, Swati; Srivastava, Sanjeeva

    2016-01-01

    In Plasmodium vivax malaria, mechanisms that trigger transition from uncomplicated to fatal severe infections are obscure. In this multi-disciplinary study we have performed a comprehensive analysis of clinicopathological parameters and serum proteome profiles of vivax malaria patients with different severity levels of infection to investigate pathogenesis of severe malaria and identify surrogate markers of severity. Clinicopathological analysis and proteomics profiling has provided evidences for the modulation of diverse physiological pathways including oxidative stress, cytoskeletal regulation, lipid metabolism and complement cascades in severe malaria. Strikingly, unlike severe falciparum malaria the blood coagulation cascade was not found to be affected adversely in acute P. vivax infection. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive proteomics study, which identified some possible cues for severe P. vivax infection. Our results suggest that Superoxide dismutase, Vitronectin, Titin, Apolipoprotein E, Serum amyloid A, and Haptoglobin are potential predictive markers for malaria severity. PMID:27090372

  5. Clinicopathological Analysis and Multipronged Quantitative Proteomics Reveal Oxidative Stress and Cytoskeletal Proteins as Possible Markers for Severe Vivax Malaria.

    PubMed

    Ray, Sandipan; Patel, Sandip K; Venkatesh, Apoorva; Bhave, Amruta; Kumar, Vipin; Singh, Vaidhvi; Chatterjee, Gangadhar; Shah, Veenita G; Sharma, Sarthak; Renu, Durairaj; Nafis, Naziya; Gandhe, Prajakta; Gogtay, Nithya; Thatte, Urmila; Sehgal, Kunal; Verma, Sumit; Karak, Avik; Khanra, Dibbendhu; Talukdar, Arunansu; Kochar, Sanjay K; S B, Vijeth; Kochar, Dhanpat K; Rojh, Dharmendra; Varma, Santosh G; Gandhi, Mayuri N; Srikanth, Rapole; Patankar, Swati; Srivastava, Sanjeeva

    2016-04-19

    In Plasmodium vivax malaria, mechanisms that trigger transition from uncomplicated to fatal severe infections are obscure. In this multi-disciplinary study we have performed a comprehensive analysis of clinicopathological parameters and serum proteome profiles of vivax malaria patients with different severity levels of infection to investigate pathogenesis of severe malaria and identify surrogate markers of severity. Clinicopathological analysis and proteomics profiling has provided evidences for the modulation of diverse physiological pathways including oxidative stress, cytoskeletal regulation, lipid metabolism and complement cascades in severe malaria. Strikingly, unlike severe falciparum malaria the blood coagulation cascade was not found to be affected adversely in acute P. vivax infection. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive proteomics study, which identified some possible cues for severe P. vivax infection. Our results suggest that Superoxide dismutase, Vitronectin, Titin, Apolipoprotein E, Serum amyloid A, and Haptoglobin are potential predictive markers for malaria severity.

  6. The cytoskeletal protein alpha-actinin regulates acid-sensing ion channel 1a through a C-terminal interaction.

    PubMed

    Schnizler, Mikael K; Schnizler, Katrin; Zha, Xiang-Ming; Hall, Duane D; Wemmie, John A; Hell, Johannes W; Welsh, Michael J

    2009-01-30

    The acid-sensing ion channel 1a (ASIC1a) is widely expressed in central and peripheral neurons where it generates transient cation currents when extracellular pH falls. ASIC1a confers pH-dependent modulation on postsynaptic dendritic spines and has critical effects in neurological diseases associated with a reduced pH. However, knowledge of the proteins that interact with ASIC1a and influence its function is limited. Here, we show that alpha-actinin, which links membrane proteins to the actin cytoskeleton, associates with ASIC1a in brain and in cultured cells. The interaction depended on an alpha-actinin-binding site in the ASIC1a C terminus that was specific for ASIC1a versus other ASICs and for alpha-actinin-1 and -4. Co-expressing alpha-actinin-4 altered ASIC1a current density, pH sensitivity, desensitization rate, and recovery from desensitization. Moreover, reducing alpha-actinin expression altered acid-activated currents in hippocampal neurons. These findings suggest that alpha-actinins may link ASIC1a to a macromolecular complex in the postsynaptic membrane where it regulates ASIC1a activity.

  7. Differential expression of cytoskeletal proteins in the dendrites of parvalbumin-positive interneurons versus granule cells in the adult rat dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    de Haas Ratzliff, A; Soltesz, I

    2000-01-01

    Parvalbumin-positive interneurons and granule cells of the dentate gyrus exhibit characteristic differences in morphological, cytochemical, physiological, and pathophysiological properties. Several of these defining features, including dendritic morphology, spine density, and sensitivity to insults, are likely to be influenced by the neuronal cytoskeleton. The data in this paper demonstrate striking differences in the expression levels of all three neurofilament triplet proteins, as well as alpha-internexin and beta-tubulin III, between the parvalbumin-positive interneurons and dentate granule cells. Therefore, the molecular composition of intermediate filaments and microtubules in the dendritic domain of parvalbumin-positive dentate interneurons is distinct from the cytoskeleton of neighboring granule cells, indicating the existence of highly cell type-specific cytoskeletal architecture within the dentate gyrus.

  8. A conserved proline-rich region of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cyclase-associated protein binds SH3 domains and modulates cytoskeletal localization.

    PubMed

    Freeman, N L; Lila, T; Mintzer, K A; Chen, Z; Pahk, A J; Ren, R; Drubin, D G; Field, J

    1996-02-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cyclase-associated protein (CAP or Srv2p) is multifunctional. The N-terminal third of CAP binds to adenylyl cyclase and has been implicated in adenylyl cyclase activation in vivo. The widely conserved C-terminal domain of CAP binds to monomeric actin and serves an important cytoskeletal regulatory function in vivo. In addition, all CAP homologs contain a centrally located proline-rich region which has no previously identified function. Recently, SH3 (Src homology 3) domains were shown to bind to proline-rich regions of proteins. Here we report that the proline-rich region of CAP is recognized by the SH3 domains of several proteins, including the yeast actin-associated protein Abp1p. Immunolocalization experiments demonstrate that CAP colocalizes with cortical actin-containing structures in vivo and that a region of CAP containing the SH3 domain binding site is required for this localization. We also demonstrate that the SH3 domain of yeast Abp1p and that of the yeast RAS protein guanine nucleotide exchange factor Cdc25p complex with adenylyl cyclase in vitro. Interestingly, the binding of the Cdc25p SH3 domain is not mediated by CAP and therefore may involve direct binding to adenylyl cyclase or to an unidentified protein which complexes with adenylyl cyclase. We also found that CAP homologous from Schizosaccharomyces pombe and humans bind SH3 domains. The human protein binds most strongly to the SH3 domain from the abl proto-oncogene. These observations identify CAP as an SH3 domain-binding protein and suggest that CAP mediates interactions between SH3 domain proteins and monomeric actin.

  9. A conserved proline-rich region of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cyclase-associated protein binds SH3 domains and modulates cytoskeletal localization.

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, N L; Lila, T; Mintzer, K A; Chen, Z; Pahk, A J; Ren, R; Drubin, D G; Field, J

    1996-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cyclase-associated protein (CAP or Srv2p) is multifunctional. The N-terminal third of CAP binds to adenylyl cyclase and has been implicated in adenylyl cyclase activation in vivo. The widely conserved C-terminal domain of CAP binds to monomeric actin and serves an important cytoskeletal regulatory function in vivo. In addition, all CAP homologs contain a centrally located proline-rich region which has no previously identified function. Recently, SH3 (Src homology 3) domains were shown to bind to proline-rich regions of proteins. Here we report that the proline-rich region of CAP is recognized by the SH3 domains of several proteins, including the yeast actin-associated protein Abp1p. Immunolocalization experiments demonstrate that CAP colocalizes with cortical actin-containing structures in vivo and that a region of CAP containing the SH3 domain binding site is required for this localization. We also demonstrate that the SH3 domain of yeast Abp1p and that of the yeast RAS protein guanine nucleotide exchange factor Cdc25p complex with adenylyl cyclase in vitro. Interestingly, the binding of the Cdc25p SH3 domain is not mediated by CAP and therefore may involve direct binding to adenylyl cyclase or to an unidentified protein which complexes with adenylyl cyclase. We also found that CAP homologous from Schizosaccharomyces pombe and humans bind SH3 domains. The human protein binds most strongly to the SH3 domain from the abl proto-oncogene. These observations identify CAP as an SH3 domain-binding protein and suggest that CAP mediates interactions between SH3 domain proteins and monomeric actin. PMID:8552082

  10. Diverse mitotic functions of the cytoskeletal cross-linking protein Shortstop suggest a role in Dynein/Dynactin activity.

    PubMed

    Dewey, Evan B; Johnston, Christopher A

    2017-09-15

    Proper assembly and orientation of the bipolar mitotic spindle is critical to the fidelity of cell division. Mitotic precision fundamentally contributes to cell fate specification, tissue development and homeostasis, and chromosome distribution within daughter cells. Defects in these events are thought to contribute to several human diseases. The underlying mechanisms that function in spindle morphogenesis and positioning remain incompletely defined, however. Here we describe diverse roles for the actin-microtubule cross-linker Shortstop (Shot) in mitotic spindle function in Drosophila Shot localizes to mitotic spindle poles, and its knockdown results in an unfocused spindle pole morphology and a disruption of proper spindle orientation. Loss of Shot also leads to chromosome congression defects, cell cycle progression delay, and defective chromosome segregation during anaphase. These mitotic errors trigger apoptosis in Drosophila epithelial tissue, and blocking this apoptotic response results in a marked induction of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition marker MMP-1. The actin-binding domain of Shot directly interacts with Actin-related protein-1 (Arp-1), a key component of the Dynein/Dynactin complex. Knockdown of Arp-1 phenocopies Shot loss universally, whereas chemical disruption of F-actin does so selectively. Our work highlights novel roles for Shot in mitosis and suggests a mechanism involving Dynein/Dynactin activation. © 2017 Dewey and Johnston. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  11. Paxillin LD4 motif binds PAK and PIX through a novel 95-kD ankyrin repeat, ARF-GAP protein: A role in cytoskeletal remodeling.

    PubMed

    Turner, C E; Brown, M C; Perrotta, J A; Riedy, M C; Nikolopoulos, S N; McDonald, A R; Bagrodia, S; Thomas, S; Leventhal, P S

    1999-05-17

    Paxillin is a focal adhesion adaptor protein involved in the integration of growth factor- and adhesion-mediated signal transduction pathways. Repeats of a leucine-rich sequence named paxillin LD motifs (Brown M.C., M.S. Curtis, and C.E. Turner. 1998. Nature Struct. Biol. 5:677-678) have been implicated in paxillin binding to focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and vinculin. Here we demonstrate that the individual paxillin LD motifs function as discrete and selective protein binding interfaces. A novel scaffolding function is described for paxillin LD4 in the binding of a complex of proteins containing active p21 GTPase-activated kinase (PAK), Nck, and the guanine nucleotide exchange factor, PIX. The association of this complex with paxillin is mediated by a new 95-kD protein, p95PKL (paxillin-kinase linker), which binds directly to paxillin LD4 and PIX. This protein complex also binds to Hic-5, suggesting a conservation of LD function across the paxillin superfamily. Cloning of p95PKL revealed a multidomain protein containing an NH2-terminal ARF-GAP domain, three ankyrin-like repeats, a potential calcium-binding EF hand, calmodulin-binding IQ motifs, a myosin homology domain, and two paxillin-binding subdomains (PBS). Green fluorescent protein- (GFP-) tagged p95PKL localized to focal adhesions/complexes in CHO.K1 cells. Overexpression in neuroblastoma cells of a paxillin LD4 deletion mutant inhibited lamellipodia formation in response to insulin-like growth fac- tor-1. Microinjection of GST-LD4 into NIH3T3 cells significantly decreased cell migration into a wound. These data implicate paxillin as a mediator of p21 GTPase-regulated actin cytoskeletal reorganization through the recruitment to nascent focal adhesion structures of an active PAK/PIX complex potentially via interactions with p95PKL.

  12. Identification of a new subtilisin-like protease NbSLP2 interacting with cytoskeletal protein septin in Microsporidia Nosema bombycis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fangyan; Ma, Qiang; Dang, Xiaoqun; Wang, Ying; Song, Yue; Meng, Xianzhi; Bao, Jialing; Chen, Jie; Pan, Guoqing; Zhou, Zeyang

    2017-09-01

    Nosema bombycis is the pathogen of pébrine which brings heavy losses to sericulture every year. As a member of serine proteases, subtilisin-like protease (SLP) is related to the pathogenicity in fungi. In this study, we characterized a novel 63.8kDa subtilisin-like protease NbSLP2 with a predicted transmembrane domain from Microsporidia, N. bombycis. RT-PCR showed that the transcript of NbSLP2 was detected from third day post infection. Immunofluorescence assay (IFA) indicated that NbSLP2 mainly scattered around the spore wall of N. bombycis. Co-immunoprecipitation data and liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis revealed that NbSLP2 directly interacts with septin2 of N. bombycis, which is a cytoskeletal protein. IFA showed that NbSLP2 and Nbseptin2 co-localized beneath the spore wall. NbSLP2 can be pulled down by Nbseptin2, further confirming the interaction between NbSLP2 and Nbseptin2. As an important serine protease with a transmembrane domain, NbSLP2 interacting with Nbseptin2, a scaffold protein adjacent to the membrane may provide advantages to stabilize the NbSLP2 for its hydrolysis function. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Kakapo, a novel cytoskeletal-associated protein is essential for the restricted localization of the neuregulin-like factor, vein, at the muscle-tendon junction site.

    PubMed

    Strumpf, D; Volk, T

    1998-11-30

    In the Drosophila embryo, the correct association of muscles with their specific tendon cells is achieved through reciprocal interactions between these two distinct cell types. Tendon cell differentiation is initiated by activation of the EGF-receptor signaling pathway within these cells by Vein, a neuregulin-like factor secreted by the approaching myotube. Here, we describe the cloning and the molecular and genetic analyses of kakapo, a Drosophila gene, expressed in the tendons, that is essential for muscle-dependent tendon cell differentiation. Kakapo is a large intracellular protein and contains structural domains also found in cytoskeletal-related vertebrate proteins (including plakin, dystrophin, and Gas2 family members). kakapo mutant embryos exhibit abnormal muscle-dependent tendon cell differentiation. A major defect in the kakapo mutant tendon cells is the failure of Vein to be localized at the muscle-tendon junctional site; instead, Vein is dispersed and its levels are reduced. This may lead to aberrant differentiation of tendon cells and consequently to the kakapo mutant deranged somatic muscle phenotype.

  14. Kakapo, a Novel Cytoskeletal-associated Protein Is Essential for the Restricted Localization of the Neuregulin-like Factor, Vein, at the Muscle–Tendon Junction Site

    PubMed Central

    Strumpf, Dan; Volk, Talila

    1998-01-01

    In the Drosophila embryo, the correct association of muscles with their specific tendon cells is achieved through reciprocal interactions between these two distinct cell types. Tendon cell differentiation is initiated by activation of the EGF-receptor signaling pathway within these cells by Vein, a neuregulin-like factor secreted by the approaching myotube. Here, we describe the cloning and the molecular and genetic analyses of kakapo, a Drosophila gene, expressed in the tendons, that is essential for muscle-dependent tendon cell differentiation. Kakapo is a large intracellular protein and contains structural domains also found in cytoskeletal-related vertebrate proteins (including plakin, dystrophin, and Gas2 family members). kakapo mutant embryos exhibit abnormal muscle-dependent tendon cell differentiation. A major defect in the kakapo mutant tendon cells is the failure of Vein to be localized at the muscle–tendon junctional site; instead, Vein is dispersed and its levels are reduced. This may lead to aberrant differentiation of tendon cells and consequently to the kakapo mutant deranged somatic muscle phenotype. PMID:9832554

  15. Differential carbonylation of cytoskeletal proteins in blood group O erythrocytes: potential role in protection against severe malaria.

    PubMed

    Méndez, Darío; Hernáez, María L; Kamali, Ali N; Diez, Amalia; Puyet, Antonio; Bautista, José M

    2012-12-01

    The molecular basis for the prevalence of blood group O in regions where malaria is endemic remains unclear. In some genetic backgrounds oxidative modifications have been linked to a reduced susceptibility to severe malaria disease. Through redox proteomics, we detected differences in carbonylated membrane proteins among the different blood groups, both in Plasmodium-infected and uninfected erythrocytes (RBC). Carbonylation profiles of RBC membrane proteins revealed that group O blood shows a reduced protein oxidation pattern compared to groups A, B and AB. Upon infection with Plasmodium falciparum Dd2, erythrocytes of all blood groups showed increased oxidation of membrane proteins. By examining 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) modified proteins by LC-MS/MS (liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry) we observed that, upon malaria infection, the protein components of lipid rafts and cytoskeleton were the main targets of 4-HNE carbonylation in all blood groups. Ankyrins and protein bands 4.2 and 4.1 were differentially carbonylated in group O as compared to A and B groups. During trophozoite maturation in group O erythrocytes, a steady increase was observed in the number of 4-HNE-modified proteins, suggesting a parasite-driven 4-HNE-carbonylation process. Our findings indicate a possible correlation between the protection against severe malaria in blood group O individuals and a specific pattern of 4-HNE-carbonylation of cytoskeleton proteins.

  16. Intracellular fibril formation, calcification, and enrichment of chaperones, cytoskeletal, and intermediate filament proteins in the adult hippocampus CA1 following neonatal exposure to the nonprotein amino acid BMAA.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Oskar; Berg, Anna-Lena; Hanrieder, Jörg; Arnerup, Gunnel; Lindström, Anna-Karin; Brittebo, Eva B

    2015-03-01

    The environmental neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) has been implicated in the etiology of neurodegenerative disease, and recent studies indicate that BMAA can be misincorporated into proteins. BMAA is a developmental neurotoxicant that can induce long-term learning and memory deficits, as well as regionally restricted neuronal degeneration and mineralization in the hippocampal CA1. The aim of the study was to characterize long-term changes (2 weeks to 6 months) further in the brain of adult rats treated neonatally (postnatal days 9-10) with BMAA (460 mg/kg) using immunohistochemistry (IHC), transmission electron microscopy, and laser capture microdissection followed by LC-MS/MS for proteomic analysis. The histological examination demonstrated progressive neurodegenerative changes, astrogliosis, microglial activation, and calcification in the hippocampal CA1 3-6 months after exposure. The IHC showed an increased staining for α-synuclein and ubiquitin in the area. The ultrastructural examination revealed intracellular deposition of abundant bundles of closely packed parallel fibrils in neurons, axons, and astrocytes of the CA1. Proteomic analysis of the affected site demonstrated an enrichment of chaperones (e.g., clusterin, GRP-78), cytoskeletal and intermediate filament proteins, and proteins involved in the antioxidant defense system. Several of the most enriched proteins (plectin, glial fibrillar acidic protein, vimentin, Hsp 27, and ubiquitin) are known to form complex astrocytic inclusions, so-called Rosenthal fibers, in the neurodegenerative disorder Alexander disease. In addition, TDP-43 and the negative regulator of autophagy, GLIPR-2, were exclusively detected. The present study demonstrates that neonatal exposure to BMAA may offer a novel model for the study of hippocampal fibril formation in vivo.

  17. Organization of pp60src and selected cytoskeletal proteins within adhesion plaques and junctions of Rous sarcoma virus-transformed rat cells

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    The localization of pp60src within adhesion structures of epithelioid rat kidney cells transformed by the Schmidt-Ruppin strain of Rous sarcoma virus was compared to the organization of actin, alpha-actinin, vinculin (a 130,000-dalton protein), tubulin, and the 58,000-dalton intermediate filament protein. The adhesion structures included both adhesion plaques and previously uncharacterized adhesive regions formed at cell-cell junctions. We have termed these latter structures "adhesion junctions." Both adhesion plaques and adhesion junctions were identified by interference-reflection microscopy and compared to the location of pp60src and the various cytoskeletal proteins by double fluorescence. The results demonstrated that the src gene product was found within both adhesion plaques and the adhesion junctions. In addition, actin, alpha-actinin, and vinculin were also localized within the same pp60src-containing adhesion structures. In contrast, tubulin and the 58,000-dalton intermediate filament protein were not associated with either adhesion plaques or adhesion junctions. Both adhesion plaques and adhesion junctions were isolated as substratum-bound structures and characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Immunofluorescence revealed that pp60src, actin, alpha-actinin, and vinculin were organized within specific regions of the adhesion junctions. Heavy accumulations of actin and alpha-actinin were found on both sides of the junctions with a narrow gap of unstained material at the midline, whereas pp60src stain was more intense in this central region. Antibody to vinculin stained double narrow lines defining the periphery of the junctional complexes but was excluded from the intervening region. In addition, the distribution of vinculin relative to pp60src within adhesion plaques suggested an inverse relationship between the presence of these two proteins. Overall, these results establish a close link between the src gene product and components of the

  18. Protein Folding and Self-Organized Criticality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajracharya, Arun; Murray, Joelle

    Proteins are known to fold into tertiary structures that determine their functionality in living organisms. However, the complex dynamics of protein folding and the way they consistently fold into the same structures is not fully understood. Self-organized criticality (SOC) has provided a framework for understanding complex systems in various systems (earthquakes, forest fires, financial markets, and epidemics) through scale invariance and the associated power law behavior. In this research, we use a simple hydrophobic-polar lattice-bound computational model to investigate self-organized criticality as a possible mechanism for generating complexity in protein folding.

  19. The activity-regulated cytoskeletal-associated protein (Arc/Arg3.1) is required for memory consolidation of pavlovian fear conditioning in the lateral amygdala.

    PubMed

    Ploski, Jonathan E; Pierre, Vicki J; Smucny, Jason; Park, Kevin; Monsey, Melissa S; Overeem, Kathie A; Schafe, Glenn E

    2008-11-19

    The activity-regulated cytoskeletal-associated protein (Arc/Arg3.1) is an immediate early gene that has been widely implicated in hippocampal-dependent learning and memory and is believed to play an integral role in synapse-specific plasticity. Here, we examined the role of Arc/Arg3.1 in amygdala-dependent Pavlovian fear conditioning. We first examined the regulation of Arc/Arg3.1 mRNA and protein after fear conditioning and LTP-inducing stimulation of thalamic inputs to the lateral amygdala (LA). Quantitative real-time PCR, in situ hybridization, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry revealed a significant upregulation of Arc/Arg3.1 mRNA and protein in the LA relative to controls. In behavioral experiments, intra-LA infusion of an Arc/Arg3.1 antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) was observed to be anatomically restricted to the LA, taken up by LA cells, and to promote significant knockdown of Arc/Arg3.1 protein. Rats given intra-LA infusions of multiple doses of the Arc/Arg3.1 ODN showed an impairment of LTM (tested approximately 24 later), but no deficit in STM (tested 3 h later) relative to controls infused with scrambled ODN. Finally, to determine whether upregulation of Arc/Arg3.1 occurs downstream of ERK/MAPK activation, we examined Arc/Arg3.1 expression in rats given intra-LA infusion of the MEK inhibitor U0126. Relative to vehicle controls, infusion of U0126 impaired training-induced increases in Arc/Arg3.1 expression. These findings suggest that Arc/Arg3.1 expression in the amygdala is required for fear memory consolidation, and further suggest that Arc/Arg3.1 regulation in the LA is downstream of the ERK/MAPK signaling pathway.

  20. Arsenic trioxide (AT) is a novel human neutrophil pro-apoptotic agent: effects of catalase on AT-induced apoptosis, degradation of cytoskeletal proteins and de novo protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Binet, François; Cavalli, Hélène; Moisan, Eliane; Girard, Denis

    2006-02-01

    The anti-cancer drug arsenic trioxide (AT) induces apoptosis in a variety of transformed or proliferating cells. However, little is known regarding its ability to induce apoptosis in terminally differentiated cells, such as neutrophils. Because neutropenia has been reported in some cancer patients after AT treatment, we hypothesised that AT could induce neutrophil apoptosis, an issue that has never been investigated. Herein, we found that AT-induced neutrophil apoptosis and gelsolin degradation via caspases. AT did not increase neutrophil superoxide production and did not induce mitochondrial generation of reactive oxygen species. AT-induced apoptosis in PLB-985 and X-linked chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) cells (PLB-985 cells deficient in gp91(phox) mimicking CGD) at the same potency. Addition of catalase, an inhibitor of H2O2, reversed AT-induced apoptosis and degradation of the cytoskeletal proteins gelsolin, alpha-tubulin and lamin B1. Unexpectedly, AT-induced de novo protein synthesis, which was reversed by catalase. Cycloheximide partially reversed AT-induced apoptosis. We conclude that AT induces neutrophil apoptosis by a caspase-dependent mechanism and via de novo protein synthesis. H2O2 is of major importance in AT-induced neutrophil apoptosis but its production does not originate from nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate dehydrogenase activation and mitochondria. Cytoskeletal structures other than microtubules can now be considered as novel targets of AT.

  1. A cytoskeletal localizing domain in the cyclase-associated protein, CAP/Srv2p, regulates access to a distant SH3-binding site.

    PubMed

    Yu, J; Wang, C; Palmieri, S J; Haarer, B K; Field, J

    1999-07-09

    In the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, adenylyl cyclase consists of a 200-kDa catalytic subunit (CYR1) and a 70-kDa subunit (CAP/SRV2). CAP/Srv2p assists the small G protein Ras to activate adenylyl cyclase. CAP also regulates the cytoskeleton through an actin sequestering activity and is directed to cortical actin patches by a proline-rich SH3-binding site (P2). In this report we analyze the role of the actin cytoskeleton in Ras/cAMP signaling. Two alleles of CAP, L16P(Srv2) and R19T (SupC), first isolated in genetic screens for mutants that attenuate cAMP levels, reduced adenylyl cyclase binding, and cortical actin patch localization. A third mutation, L27F, also failed to localize but showed no loss of either cAMP signaling or adenylyl cyclase binding. However, all three N-terminal mutations reduced CAP-CAP multimer formation and SH3 domain binding, although the SH3-binding site is about 350 amino acids away. Finally, disruption of the actin cytoskeleton with latrunculin-A did not affect the cAMP phenotypes of the hyperactive Ras2(Val19) allele. These data identify a novel region of CAP that controls access to the SH3-binding site and demonstrate that cytoskeletal localization of CAP or an intact cytoskeleton per se is not necessary for cAMP signaling.

  2. Seasonal Changes in the Immunolocalization of Cytoskeletal Proteins and Laminin in the Testis of the Black-Backed Jackal (Canis mesomelas).

    PubMed

    Madekurozwa, M-C; Booyse, D

    2017-02-01

    Manipulation of the reproductive activity of jackals is dependent on a thorough understanding of the reproductive biology of this species. This study describes seasonal morphological changes in the adult testis of the black-backed jackal in relation to the immunoexpression of the basement membrane marker, laminin and the cytoskeletal proteins, cytokeratin, smooth muscle actin and vimentin. Laminin was immunolocalized in basement membranes surrounding seminiferous tubules, as well as in basement membranes associated with Leydig, peritubular myoid and vascular smooth muscle cells. Scalloped basement membranes enclosed seminiferous tubules in regressing testes. The seminiferous epithelium and interstitial tissue in all animals studied were cytokeratin immunonegative. Smooth muscle actin was demonstrated in vascular smooth muscle cells, as well as in peritubular myoid cells encircling seminiferous tubules. Vimentin immunoreactivity was exhibited in the cytoplasm of Sertoli cells, Leydig cells, vascular endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells and fibrocytes. Vimentin immunostaining in Sertoli, Leydig and peritubular myoid cells varied depending on the functional state of the testis. The results of the study have shown that dramatic seasonal histological changes occur in the testes of the jackal. In addition, the use of immunohistochemistry accentuates these morphological changes.

  3. Sub-lethal concentrations of CdCl2 disrupt cell migration and cytoskeletal proteins in cultured mouse TM4 Sertoli cells.

    PubMed

    Egbowon, Biola F; Harris, Wayne; Arnott, Gordon; Mills, Chris Lloyd; Hargreaves, Alan J

    2016-04-01

    The aims of this study were to examine the effects of CdCl2 on the viability, migration and cytoskeleton of cultured mouse TM4 Sertoli cells. Time- and concentration-dependent changes were exhibited by the cells but 1 μM CdCl2 was sub-cytotoxic at all time-points. Exposure to 1 and 12 μM CdCl2 for 4 h resulted in disruption of the leading edge, as determined by chemical staining. Cell migration was inhibited by both 1 and 12 μM CdCl2 in a scratch assay monitored by live cell imaging, although exposure to the higher concentration was associated with cell death. Western blotting and immunofluorescence staining indicated that CdCl2 caused a concentration dependent reduction in actin and tubulin levels. Exposure to Cd(2+) also resulted in significant changes in the levels and/or phosphorylation status of the microtubule and microfilament destabilising proteins cofilin and stathmin, suggesting disruption of cytoskeletal dynamics. Given that 1-12 μM Cd(2+) is attainable in vivo, our findings are consistent with the possibility that Cd(2+) induced impairment of testicular development and reproductive health may involve a combination of reduced Sertoli cell migration and impaired Sertoli cell viability depending on the timing, level and duration of exposure.

  4. Myotonic dystrophy protein kinase (DMPK) induces actin cytoskeletal reorganization and apoptotic-like blebbing in lens cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, S.; Shimizu, M.; Balasubramanyam, A.; Epstein, H. F.

    2000-01-01

    DMPK, the product of the DM locus, is a member of the same family of serine-threonine protein kinases as the Rho-associated enzymes. In DM, membrane inclusions accumulate in lens fiber cells producing cataracts. Overexpression of DMPK in cultured lens epithelial cells led to apoptotic-like blebbing of the plasma membrane and reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton. Enzymatically active DMPK was necessary for both effects; inactive mutant DMPK protein did not produce either effect. Active RhoA but not constitutive GDP-state mutant protein produced similar effects as DMPK. The similar actions of DMPK and RhoA suggest that they may function in the same regulatory network. The observed effects of DMPK may be relevant to the removal of membrane organelles during normal lens differentiation and the retention of intracellular membranes in DM lenses. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Myotonic dystrophy protein kinase (DMPK) induces actin cytoskeletal reorganization and apoptotic-like blebbing in lens cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, S.; Shimizu, M.; Balasubramanyam, A.; Epstein, H. F.

    2000-01-01

    DMPK, the product of the DM locus, is a member of the same family of serine-threonine protein kinases as the Rho-associated enzymes. In DM, membrane inclusions accumulate in lens fiber cells producing cataracts. Overexpression of DMPK in cultured lens epithelial cells led to apoptotic-like blebbing of the plasma membrane and reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton. Enzymatically active DMPK was necessary for both effects; inactive mutant DMPK protein did not produce either effect. Active RhoA but not constitutive GDP-state mutant protein produced similar effects as DMPK. The similar actions of DMPK and RhoA suggest that they may function in the same regulatory network. The observed effects of DMPK may be relevant to the removal of membrane organelles during normal lens differentiation and the retention of intracellular membranes in DM lenses. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. The cytoskeletal protein septin 11 is associated with human obesity and is involved in adipocyte lipid storage and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Castellanos, Natalia; Rodríguez, Amaia; Rabanal-Ruiz, Yoana; Fernández-Vega, Alejandro; López-Miranda, José; Vázquez-Martínez, Rafael; Frühbeck, Gema; Malagón, María M

    2017-02-01

    Septins are newly identified members of the cytoskeleton that have been proposed as biomarkers of a number of diseases. However, septins have not been characterised in adipose tissue and their relationship with obesity and insulin resistance remains unknown. Herein, we characterised a member of this family, septin 11 (SEPT11), in human adipose tissue and analysed its potential involvement in the regulation of adipocyte metabolism. Gene and protein expression levels of SEPT11 were analysed in human adipose tissue. SEPT11 distribution was evaluated by immunocytochemistry, electron microscopy and subcellular fractionation techniques. Glutathione S-transferase (GST) pull-down, immunoprecipitation and yeast two-hybrid screening were used to identify the SEPT11 interactome. Gene silencing was used to assess the role of SEPT11 in the regulation of insulin signalling and lipid metabolism in adipocytes. We demonstrate the expression of SEPT11 in human adipocytes and its upregulation in obese individuals, with SEPT11 mRNA content positively correlating with variables of insulin resistance in subcutaneous adipose tissue. SEPT11 content was regulated by lipogenic, lipolytic and proinflammatory stimuli in human adipocytes. SEPT11 associated with caveolae in mature adipocytes and interacted with both caveolin-1 and the intracellular fatty acid chaperone, fatty acid binding protein 5 (FABP5). Lipid loading of adipocytes caused the association of the three proteins with the surface of lipid droplets. SEPT11 silencing impaired insulin signalling and insulin-induced lipid accumulation in adipocytes. Our findings support a role for SEPT11 in lipid traffic and metabolism in adipocytes and open new avenues for research on the control of lipid storage in obesity and insulin resistance.

  7. Tenotomy of m.soleus antagonists prevents the changes in fiber type characteristics and sarcomeric cytoskeletal proteins in unloaded rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moukhina, Alexandra; Ardabievskaya, Anna; Vikhlyantsev, Ivan; Podlubnaya, Zoya; Nemirovskaya, Tatiana; Shenkman, Boris

    2005-08-01

    It is known that activity of postural extensors (m. soleus) decreases and activity of flexors (m. tibialis anterior) increases under unloading conditions. We have tested the hypothesis supposing that increased flexor activities during unloading exert suppressive influence on postural extensor activities and thus lead to dramatic changes in fiber size, MHC expression, sarcomeric proteins content in m.soleus. We have inactivated hindlimb flexor muscles (m.soleus antagonists) by bilateral tenotomy. 20 male Wistar rats were divided on 3 groups: cage control (C), hindlimb suspension for 14 days (HS), tenotomy of hindlimb flexor muscles with 14 days hindlimb suspension afterwards (HST). Several soleus muscle fiber characteristics decreased significantly in HS group (p<0.05) as compared with C group: cross sectional area (CSA) of type I muscle fibers, titin/MyHC ratio and nebulin/MyHC ratio. MyHC isoform pattern shifted slow-to-fast significantly. NFATc1 content increased in nuclear protein extract of m. soleus in HS group. None of these parameters was significantly different in HST group from those of C group. It has been concluded that the tenotomy of flexors under hindlimb suspension prevents atrophy of type I muscle fibers, decrease the degradation of titin and nebulin and prevent slow-to-fast shift of fiber MyHC isoform pattern, possibly through prevention of increase NFATc1 content in muscle fiber nuclear protein extract. Therefore, suppressive influence of increased flexor activity could be one of mechanisms that lead to the changes in m. soleus under unloading conditions. The work was supported by RFBR grants: 02-04-50025, 03- 04-48487 and the special program of RAS "Integration mechanisms of functional control in the living system".

  8. The cytotoxic effect of memantine and its effect on cytoskeletal proteins expression in metastatic breast cancer cell line

    PubMed Central

    Seifabadi, Sima; Vaseghi, Golnaz; Javanmard, Shaghayegh Haghjooy; Omidi, Elham; Tajadini, Mohammadhasan; Zarrin, Bahareh

    2017-01-01

    Objective(s): Breast cancer is an important leading cause of death from cancer. Stathmin and tau proteins are regulators of cell motility, and their overexpression is associated with the progression and bad prognosis of breast cancer. Memantine, an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, is the potential inhibitor of tau protein in neurons. This study determines the effect of memantine on breast cancer cell migration and proliferation, tau and stathmin gene expression in cancer cells and its synergistic effect with paclitaxel. Materials and Methods: The cell proliferation was evaluated by MTT assay and for this purpose, MCF-7 breast cancer cells were treated with various concentration of memantine (2, 20 and 100 μg/ml). Tau and stathmin mRNA expression was evaluated through quantitative real time RT-PCR method. The migration of cancer cells treated with memantine for 24 hr was compared to non-treated cells using an in vitro transmembrane migration assay. Results: Incubation of breast cancer cells with memantine resulted in a dose dependent reduction in cell survival (P=0.0001). Paclitaxel (100 nM) showed synergistic effect with memantine (P=0.0001). Memantine significantly decreased tau and stathmin mRNA expression (by RT-PCR), so that 100 µmol/l of memantine decreased tau and stathmin expression by 46% (P=0.0341) and 33% (P=0.043), respectively. Migration of cells was also decreased by memantine (P=0.0001). Conclusion: The presented data shows that memantine reduced mRNA levels of tau and stathmin proteins and also reduced cellular migration. PMID:28133523

  9. short stop is allelic to kakapo, and encodes rod-like cytoskeletal-associated proteins required for axon extension.

    PubMed

    Lee, S; Harris, K L; Whitington, P M; Kolodziej, P A

    2000-02-01

    short stop (shot) is required for sensory and motor axons to reach their targets in the Drosophila embryo. Growth cones in shot mutants initiate at the normal times, and they appear normal with respect to overall morphology and their abilities to orient and fasciculate. However, sensory axons are unable to extend beyond a short distance from the cell body, and motor axons are unable to reach target muscles. The shot gene encodes novel actin binding proteins that are related to plakins and dystrophin and expressed in axons during development. The longer isoforms identified are predicted to contain an N-terminal actin binding domain, a long central triple helical coiled-coil domain, and a C-terminal domain that contains two EF-hand Ca(2+) binding motifs and a short stretch of homology to the growth arrest-specific 2 protein. Other isoforms lack all or part of the actin binding domains or are truncated and contain a different C-terminal domain. Only the isoforms containing full-length actin binding domains are detectably expressed in the nervous system. shot is allelic to kakapo, a gene that may function in integrin-mediated adhesion in the wing and embryo. We propose that Shot's interactions with the actin cytoskeleton allow sensory and motor axons to extend.

  10. Effects of sub-lethal neurite outgrowth inhibitory concentrations of chlorpyrifos oxon on cytoskeletal proteins and acetylcholinesterase in differentiating N2a cells

    SciTech Connect

    Flaskos, J.; Nikolaidis, E.; Harris, W.; Sachana, M.; Hargreaves, A.J.

    2011-11-15

    protein are reduced Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neurofilament heavy chain forms aggregates in cell bodies Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thus at least two axon-associated cytoskeletal proteins are disrupted by this agent.

  11. Rate and extent of pH decline affect proteolysis of cytoskeletal proteins and water-holding capacity in pork.

    PubMed

    Bee, Giuseppe; Anderson, Abbey L; Lonergan, Steven M; Huff-Lonergan, Elisabeth

    2007-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the extent to which early postmortem (PM) pH decline influences proteolysis of the intermediate filament protein desmin, the costameric proteins vinculin and talin and autolysis of μ-calpain in the longissimus muscle (LM) of pigs from two genetic lines. Based on the LM 3h pH (H=3h pH of LM>6.0; L=3h pH of LM pH<5.7) PM, 10 carcasses per line and pH group were selected. The average 3h pH within pH group was 6.23 (H) and 5.44 (L). The LM samples were collected 24, 48, 72, and 120h PM and percent drip loss was measured after 1, 2, and 4d of storage. Samples collected at 24, 48, 72, and 120h PM were used to monitor desmin, vinculin, and talin degradation and samples collected at 24h PM were used to determine the extent of μ-calpain autolysis by immunoblotting. Higher (P<0.01) pH values at 45min, 6h, and 24h PM and lower (P<0.01) drip losses after 1, 2, and 4d of storage were recorded in the H-compared to the L-group. Abundance of the 76kDa μ-calpain autolysis product was greater (P<0.01), proteolysis of talin at all measured time points and proteolysis of desmin after 24 and 48h PM was greater (P⩽0.03) in the H-group than in the L-group. The current findings indicate activation rate of μ-calpain may be associated with proteolysis of desmin and talin and could play a role in the development of drip loss. The rate of early PM pH decline can partly explain the variation of desmin and talin degradation by affecting the activation of μ-calpain.

  12. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs attenuate amyloid-β protein-induced actin cytoskeletal reorganization through Rho signaling modulation.

    PubMed

    Ferrera, Patricia; Zepeda, Angélica; Arias, Clorinda

    2017-01-25

    Amyloid-β protein (Aβ) neurotoxicity occurs along with the reorganization of the actin-cytoskeleton through the activation of the Rho GTPase pathway. In addition to the classical mode of action of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), indomethacin, and ibuprofen have Rho-inhibiting effects. In order to evaluate the role of the Rho GTPase pathway on Aβ-induced neuronal death and on neuronal morphological modifications in the actin cytoskeleton, we explored the role of NSAIDS in human-differentiated neuroblastoma cells exposed to Aβ. We found that Aβ induced neurite retraction and promoted the formation of different actin-dependent structures such as stress fibers, filopodia, lamellipodia, and ruffles. In the presence of Aβ, both NSAIDs prevented neurite collapse and formation of stress fibers without affecting the formation of filopodia and lamellipodia. Similar results were obtained when the downstream effector, Rho kinase inhibitor Y27632, was applied in the presence of Aβ. These results demonstrate the potential benefits of the Rho-inhibiting NSAIDs in reducing Aβ-induced effects on neuronal structural alterations.

  13. Bactofilins, a ubiquitous class of cytoskeletal proteins mediating polar localization of a cell wall synthase in Caulobacter crescentus

    PubMed Central

    Kühn, Juliane; Briegel, Ariane; Mörschel, Erhard; Kahnt, Jörg; Leser, Katja; Wick, Stephanie; Jensen, Grant J; Thanbichler, Martin

    2010-01-01

    The cytoskeleton has a key function in the temporal and spatial organization of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Here, we report the identification of a new class of polymer-forming proteins, termed bactofilins, that are widely conserved among bacteria. In Caulobacter crescentus, two bactofilin paralogues cooperate to form a sheet-like structure lining the cytoplasmic membrane in proximity of the stalked cell pole. These assemblies mediate polar localization of a peptidoglycan synthase involved in stalk morphogenesis, thus complementing the function of the actin-like cytoskeleton and the cell division machinery in the regulation of cell wall biogenesis. In other bacteria, bactofilins can establish rod-shaped filaments or associate with the cell division apparatus, indicating considerable structural and functional flexibility. Bactofilins polymerize spontaneously in the absence of additional cofactors in vitro, forming stable ribbon- or rod-like filament bundles. Our results suggest that these structures have evolved as an alternative to intermediate filaments, serving as versatile molecular scaffolds in a variety of cellular pathways. PMID:19959992

  14. Cytoskeletal protein flightless I inhibits apoptosis, enhances tumor cell invasion and promotes cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma progression

    PubMed Central

    Kopecki, Zlatko; Yang, Gink N.; Jackson, Jessica E.; Melville, Elizabeth L.; Cal1ey, Matthew P.; Murrell, Dedee F.; Darby, Ian A.; O'Toole, Edel A.; Samuel, Michael S.; Cowin, Allison J.

    2015-01-01

    Flightless I (Flii) is an actin remodeling protein that affects cellular processes including adhesion, proliferation and migration. In order to determine the role of Flii during carcinogenesis, squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) were induced in Flii heterozygous (Flii+/−), wild-type and Flii overexpressing (FliiTg/Tg) mice by intradermal injection of 3-methylcholanthrene (MCA). Flii levels were further assessed in biopsies from human SCCs and the human SCC cell line (MET-1) was used to determine the effect of Flii on cellular invasion. Flii was highly expressed in human SCC biopsies particularly by the invading cells at the tumor edge. FliiTg/Tg mice developed large, aggressive SCCs in response to MCA. In contrast Flii+/− mice had significantly smaller tumors that were less invasive. Intradermal injection of Flii neutralizing antibodies during SCC initiation and progression significantly reduced the size of the tumors and, in vitro, decreased cellular sphere formation and invasion. Analysis of the tumors from the Flii overexpressing mice showed reduced caspase I and annexin V expression suggesting Flii may negatively regulate apoptosis within these tumors. These studies therefore suggest that Flii enhances SCC tumor progression by decreasing apoptosis and enhancing tumor cell invasion. Targeting Flii may be a potential strategy for reducing the severity of SCCs. PMID:26497552

  15. Differential gene expression analysis by RNA-seq reveals the importance of actin cytoskeletal proteins in erythroleukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Calleja, Vanessa; Hernández, Pablo; Schvartzman, Jorge B.; García de Lacoba, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Development of drug resistance limits the effectiveness of anticancer treatments. Understanding the molecular mechanisms triggering this event in tumor cells may lead to improved therapeutic strategies. Here we used RNA-seq to compare the transcriptomes of a murine erythroleukemia cell line (MEL) and a derived cell line with induced resistance to differentiation (MEL-R). RNA-seq analysis identified a total of 596 genes (Benjamini–Hochberg adjusted p-value < 0.05) that were differentially expressed by more than two-fold, of which 81.5% (486/596) of genes were up-regulated in MEL cells and 110 up-regulated in MEL-R cells. These observations revealed that for some genes the relative expression of mRNA amount in the MEL cell line has decreased as the cells acquired the resistant phenotype. Clustering analysis of a group of genes showing the highest differential expression allowed identification of a sub-group among genes up-regulated in MEL cells. These genes are related to the organization of the actin cytoskeleton network. Moreover, the majority of these genes are preferentially expressed in the hematopoietic lineage and at least three of them, Was (Wiskott Aldrich syndrome), Btk (Bruton’s tyrosine kinase) and Rac2, when mutated in humans, give rise to severe hematopoietic deficiencies. Among the group of genes that were up-regulated in MEL-R cells, 16% of genes code for histone proteins, both canonical and variants. A potential implication of these results on the blockade of differentiation in resistant cells is discussed. PMID:28663935

  16. Immediate Early Gene Activity-Regulated Cytoskeletal-Associated Protein Regulates Estradiol-Induced Lordosis Behavior in Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Amy; Dewing, Phoebe; Micevych, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Sensory feedback is an important component of any behavior, with each instance influencing subsequent activity. Female sexual receptivity is mediated both by the steroid hormone milieu and interaction with the male. We tested the influence of repeated mating on the level of sexual receptivity in ovariectomized rats treated with estradiol benzoate (EB) once every fourth day to mimic the normal phasic changes of circulating estradiol. Females were divided into two groups: naïve, which were tested for lordosis behavior once, and experienced rats, which were tested for lordosis after each EB injection. To monitor the effect of mating, the number of neurons expressing the immediate early gene activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc) were counted in the mediobasal hypothalamus. Females were unreceptive following the first EB treatment, but the mating induced Arc expression. In naïve rats, each subsequent EB injection increased the levels of sexual receptivity. This ramping was not observed in experienced rats, which achieved only a moderate level of sexual receptivity. However, experienced females treated with EB and progesterone were maximally receptive and did not have Arc expresion. To test whether the expression of Arc attenuated lordosis, Arc antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (asODN) were microinjected into experienced females’ arcuate nuclei. Arc expression was attenuated, and the experienced EB-treated females achieved maximal sexual receptivity. These results demonstrate that Arc expression in the hypothalamus might influence future sexual receptivity and provides evidence of learning in the arcuate nucleus. The loss of Arc results in unrestrained sexual receptivity. PMID:25088303

  17. Early and Late Loss of the Cytoskeletal Scaffolding Protein, Ankyrin G Reveals its Role in Maturation and Maintenance of Nodes of Ranvier in Myelinated Axons.

    PubMed

    Saifetiarova, Julia; Taylor, Anna M; Bhat, Manzoor A

    2017-02-01

    The mechanisms that govern node of Ranvier organization, stability and long-term maintenance remain to be fully elucidated. One of the molecular components of the node is the cytoskeletal scaffolding protein, Ankyrin G (AnkG), which interacts with multiple members of the nodal complex. The role of AnkG in nodal organization and maintenance is still not clearly defined, as to whether AnkG functions as an initial nodal organizer or whether it functions as a nodal stabilizer after the nodal complex has been assembled. Using a mouse model system, we report here that perinatal and juvenile neuronal ablation of AnkG has differential consequences on nodal stability. Early loss of AnkG creates immature nodes with abnormal morphology, which undergo accelerated destabilization within a month, resulting in rapid NaV channel and βIV Spectrin loss with reduced effects on Neurofascin 186. On the other hand, late ablation of AnkG from established nodal complexes leads to slow but progressive nodal destabilization over 10 months, primarily affecting βIV Spectrin, followed by NaV channels, with modest impact on Neurofascin 186. We also show that Ankyrin R and βI Spectrin are not sufficient to prevent nodal disorganization after AnkG ablation. Additionally, nodal disorganization in both early and late AnkG mutants is accompanied by axonal pathology and neurological dysfunction. Together, our results suggest that AnkG plays an indispensable role in maturation and long-term stabilization of the newly assembled nodal complex, and that loss of AnkG after nodal stabilization does not lead to rapid nodal disassembly but loss of specific nodal components in a time-dependent manner.

  18. Expression of the cytoskeletal protein MAP5 and its regulation by neurotrophin 3 (NT3) in the inner ear sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    San José, I; Vázquez, E; García-Atarés, N; Rodriguez, S; Vega, J A; Represa, J

    1997-03-01

    Microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) are essential cytoskeletal components during development for neurogenesis and neuronal plasticity. Inner ear innervation is accomplished by cochleovestibular ganglion (CVG) neurons in a highly specific, well-defined pattern, which is regulated by neurotrophic factors belonging to the neurotrophin family. The inner ear offers a suitable model for studying the expression of MAPs and assessing their role in neurotrophin-induced effects that are required for neuron-target innervation. The present study was undertaken to analyze the expression and localization of MAP5 isoforms during development of CVG neurons in vivo an in vitro; as well as the regulation of MAP5 by neurotrophin-3 (NT3) in cell culture. MAP5 expression in the inner ear of chick embryos and postnatal specimens was monitored using immunoblots and immunohistochemistry on frozen sections. MAP5 was highly expressed during the early stages of CVG development, at embryonic day (E)4, being located in both neuronal perikarya and neurites. Expression was maintained during the neurite outgrowth phase (E6-E12), when strong MAP5 immunostaining was observed at the same cellular locations. MAP5 expression decreased suddenly at E14, after the establishment of specific connections between the CVG neurons and their targets, the sensory epithelium of the inner ear. In cultured CVG neurons addition of NT3 led to increased MAP5 expression and produced neurite outgrowth. Both effects are differentially regulated in parallel by low (0.5 ng/ml) and high (5 ng/ml) NT3 concentrations. Present results suggest that MAP5 may be involved in neurotrophin-induced microtubule bundling during neurite outgrowth of auditory neurons.

  19. Cytoskeletal proteins regulate chromatin access of BR-C transcription factor and Rpd3-Sin3A histone deacetylase complex in Drosophila salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Farkaš, Robert; Kuchárová-Mahmood, Silvia; Mentelová, Lucia; Juda, Pavel; Raška, Ivan; Mechler, Bernard M

    2011-01-01

    At the onset of Drosophila metamorphosis the steroid hormone ecdysone induces a process leading to a rapid degeneration of the larval salivary glands (SGs). Ecdysone acts through the ecdysone receptor heterodimer, which activates primary response genes. In particular these genes include the Broad-Complex (BR-C) gene encoding a set of BTB/POZ-transcription factors, among which the Z1 isoform is critical for SG cell death. The timing of SG disappearance depends upon of p127 (l(2)gl) , a cytoskeletal tumor suppressor that interacts with nonmuscle myosin II heavy chain (nmMHC) encoded by the zipper (zip) gene. Reduced l(2)gl expression delays SG histolysis whereas over-expression accelerates this process without affecting larval and pupal development. However, the mechanism by which l(2)gl controls SG histolysis remains yet unknown. Here we analyze the regulation controlled by p127 (l(2)gl) and nmMHC in the cytoplasm on the association of BR-C Z1 with chromatin and remodeling factors, such as Rpd3, Sin3A, and Smrter. In wild-type SGs these factors bind to chromatin but in l(2)gl SGs they accumulate in the cytoplasm and the cortical nuclear zone (CNZ). Similar chromatin exclusion occurs in SGs of developmentally delayed zip (E(br)) /+ larvae or can be achieved by high levels of nmMHC synthesis. The present data show that p127 (l(2)gl) and nmMHC regulate the access of BR-C Z1, Rpd3, Sin3A, and Smrter to chromatin. As the interaction between p127 (l(2)gl) and nmMHC occurs in the cytoplasm, we propose that these nuclear factors are processed by p127 (l(2)gl) and then released from p127 (l(2)gl) by nmMHC to allow their binding to chromatin. This process may constitute a novel mechanism of gene regulation, which in the absence of p127 (l(2)gl) , or excessive amounts of nmMHC, could lead to a fixed configuration in the pattern of gene expression that prevents further progression of SG differentiation, and programmed cell death (PCD). Such a transcriptional block could play a

  20. Involvement of cytoskeletal proteins in the barrier function of the human erythrocyte membrane. III. Permeability of spectrin-depleted inside-out membrane vesicles to hydrophilic nonelectrolytes. Formation of leaks by chemical or enzymatic modification of membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Klonk, S; Deuticke, B

    1992-04-29

    Spectrin-depleted inside-out vesicles (IOV's) prepared from human erythrocyte membranes were characterized in terms of size, ground permeability to hydrophilic nonelectrolytes and their sensitivity to modification by SH reagents, DIDS and trypsin. IOV's proved to have the same permeability of their lipid domain to erythritol as native erythrocytes, in contrast to resealed ghosts (Klonk, S. and Deuticke, B. (1992) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1106, 126-136 (Part I in this series)), which have a residual leak. On the other hand, IOV's have a slightly elevated permeability for mannitol and sucrose, nonelectrolytes which are almost (mannitol) or fully (sucrose) impermeant in the native membrane. These increased fluxes, which have a high activation energy and can be stimulated by phloretin, are, however, also much smaller than the corresponding leak fluxes observed in resealed ghosts. In view of these differences, formation of IOV's can be concluded to go along with partial annealing of barrier defects persisting in the erythrocyte membrane after preparation of resealed ghosts. Oxidation of SH groups of the IOV membrane by diamide produces an enhancement of permeability for hydrophilic nonelectrolytes which is much less pronounced than that induced by a similar treatment of erythrocytes or ghosts (Klonk, S. and Deuticke, B. (1992) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1106, 126-136 (Part I in this series)). Moreover, proteolytic treatment of the vesicle membrane, although leading to a marked digestion of integral membrane proteins, only induces a minor, saturating increase of permeability, much lower than that in trypsinized resealed ghosts (Klonk, S. and Deuticke, B. (1992) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1106, 137-142 (Part II of this series)). Since absence of the cytoskeletal proteins, spectrin and actin, is the major difference between IOV's and resealed ghosts, these results may be taken as further evidence for a dependence of the barrier properties of the erythrocyte membrane bilayer domain

  1. Genetic study of interactions between the cytoskeletal assembly protein sla1 and prion-forming domain of the release factor Sup35 (eRF3) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Bailleul, P A; Newnam, G P; Steenbergen, J N; Chernoff, Y O

    1999-01-01

    Striking similarities between cytoskeletal assembly and the "nucleated polymerization" model of prion propagation suggest that similar or overlapping sets of proteins may assist in both processes. We show that the C-terminal domain of the yeast cytoskeletal assembly protein Sla1 (Sla1C) specifically interacts with the N-terminal prion-forming domain (Sup35N) of the yeast release factor Sup35 (eRF3) in the two-hybrid system. Sla1C and several other Sup35N-interacting proteins also exhibit two-hybrid interactions with the poly-Gln-expanded N-proximal fragment of human huntingtin, which promotes Huntington disease-associated aggregation. The Sup35N-Sla1C interaction is inhibited by Sup35N alterations that make Sup35 unable to propagate the [PSI(+)] state and by the absence of the chaperone protein Hsp104, which is essential for [PSI] propagation. In a Sla1(-) background, [PSI] curing by dimethylsulfoxide or excess Hsp104 is increased, while translational readthrough and de novo [PSI] formation induced by excess Sup35 or Sup35N are decreased. These data show that, in agreement with the proposed function of Sla1 during cytoskeletal formation, Sla1 assists in [PSI] formation and propagation, but is not required for these processes. Sla1(-) strains are sensitive to some translational inhibitors, and some sup35 mutants, obtained in a Sla1(-) background, are sensitive to Sla1, suggesting that the interaction between Sla1 and Sup35 proteins may play a role in the normal function of the translational apparatus. We hypothesize that Sup35N is involved in regulatory interactions with intracellular structural networks, and [PSI] prion may be formed as a by-product of this process. PMID:10471702

  2. Intracellular cytoskeletal elements and cytoskeletons in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Madkour, Mohamed H F; Mayer, Frank

    2007-01-01

    Within a short period of time after the discovery of bacterial cytoskletons, major progress had been made in areas such as general spatial layout of cytoskeletons, their involvement in a variety of cellfunctions (shape control, cell division, chromosome segregation, cell motility). This progress was achieved by application of advanced investigation techniques. Homologs of eukaryotic actin, tubulin, and intermediate filaments were found in bacteria; cytoskeletal proteins not closely or not at all related to any of these major cytoskeletal proteins were discovered in a number of bacteria such as Mycoplasmas, Spiroplasmas, Spirochetes, Treponema, Caulobacter. A structural role for bacterial elongation factor Tu was indicated. On the basis of this new thinking, new approaches in biotechnology and new drugs are on the way.

  3. Mechanical Response of Cytoskeletal Networks

    PubMed Central

    Gardel, Margaret L.; Kasza, Karen E.; Brangwynne, Clifford P.; Liu, Jiayu; Weitz, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The cellular cytoskeleton is a dynamic network of filamentous proteins, consisting of filamentous actin (F-actin), microtubules, and intermediate filaments. However, these networks are not simple linear, elastic solids; they can exhibit highly nonlinear elasticity and athermal dynamics driven by ATP-dependent processes. To build quantitative mechanical models describing complex cellular behaviors, it is necessary to understand the underlying physical principles that regulate force transmission and dynamics within these networks. In this chapter, we review our current understanding of the physics of networks of cytoskeletal proteins formed in vitro. We introduce rheology, the technique used to measure mechanical response. We discuss our current understanding of the mechanical response of F-actin networks, and how the biophysical properties of F-actin and actin cross-linking proteins can dramatically impact the network mechanical response. We discuss how incorporating dynamic and rigid microtubules into F-actin networks can affect the contours of growing microtubules and composite network rigidity. Finally, we discuss the mechanical behaviors of intermediate filaments. PMID:19118688

  4. Cytoskeletal forces during signaling activation in Jurkat T-cells

    PubMed Central

    Hui, King Lam; Balagopalan, Lakshmi; Samelson, Lawrence E.; Upadhyaya, Arpita

    2015-01-01

    T-cells are critical for the adaptive immune response in the body. The binding of the T-cell receptor (TCR) with antigen on the surface of antigen-presenting cells leads to cell spreading and signaling activation. The underlying mechanism of signaling activation is not completely understood. Although cytoskeletal forces have been implicated in this process, the contribution of different cytoskeletal components and their spatial organization are unknown. Here we use traction force microscopy to measure the forces exerted by Jurkat T-cells during TCR activation. Perturbation experiments reveal that these forces are largely due to actin assembly and dynamics, with myosin contractility contributing to the development of force but not its maintenance. We find that Jurkat T-cells are mechanosensitive, with cytoskeletal forces and signaling dynamics both sensitive to the stiffness of the substrate. Our results delineate the cytoskeletal contributions to interfacial forces exerted by T-cells during activation. PMID:25518938

  5. Cytoskeletal Network Morphology Regulates Intracellular Transport Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ando, David; Korabel, Nickolay; Huang, Kerwyn Casey; Gopinathan, Ajay

    2015-10-20

    Intracellular transport is essential for maintaining proper cellular function in most eukaryotic cells, with perturbations in active transport resulting in several types of disease. Efficient delivery of critical cargos to specific locations is accomplished through a combination of passive diffusion and active transport by molecular motors that ballistically move along a network of cytoskeletal filaments. Although motor-based transport is known to be necessary to overcome cytoplasmic crowding and the limited range of diffusion within reasonable timescales, the topological features of the cytoskeletal network that regulate transport efficiency and robustness have not been established. Using a continuum diffusion model, we observed that the time required for cellular transport was minimized when the network was localized near the nucleus. In simulations that explicitly incorporated network spatial architectures, total filament mass was the primary driver of network transit times. However, filament traps that redirect cargo back to the nucleus caused large variations in network transport. Filament polarity was more important than filament orientation in reducing average transit times, and transport properties were optimized in networks with intermediate motor on and off rates. Our results provide important insights into the functional constraints on intracellular transport under which cells have evolved cytoskeletal structures, and have potential applications for enhancing reactions in biomimetic systems through rational transport network design.

  6. Cytoskeletal Network Morphology Regulates Intracellular Transport Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ando, David; Korabel, Nickolay; Huang, Kerwyn Casey; Gopinathan, Ajay

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular transport is essential for maintaining proper cellular function in most eukaryotic cells, with perturbations in active transport resulting in several types of disease. Efficient delivery of critical cargos to specific locations is accomplished through a combination of passive diffusion and active transport by molecular motors that ballistically move along a network of cytoskeletal filaments. Although motor-based transport is known to be necessary to overcome cytoplasmic crowding and the limited range of diffusion within reasonable timescales, the topological features of the cytoskeletal network that regulate transport efficiency and robustness have not been established. Using a continuum diffusion model, we observed that the time required for cellular transport was minimized when the network was localized near the nucleus. In simulations that explicitly incorporated network spatial architectures, total filament mass was the primary driver of network transit times. However, filament traps that redirect cargo back to the nucleus caused large variations in network transport. Filament polarity was more important than filament orientation in reducing average transit times, and transport properties were optimized in networks with intermediate motor on and off rates. Our results provide important insights into the functional constraints on intracellular transport under which cells have evolved cytoskeletal structures, and have potential applications for enhancing reactions in biomimetic systems through rational transport network design. PMID:26488648

  7. Structures of the nucleoid occlusion protein SlmA bound to DNA and the C-terminal domain of the cytoskeletal protein FtsZ

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Maria A.; Zeng, Wenjie

    2016-01-01

    Cell division in most prokaryotes is mediated by FtsZ, which polymerizes to create the cytokinetic Z ring. Multiple FtsZ-binding proteins regulate FtsZ polymerization to ensure the proper spatiotemporal formation of the Z ring at the division site. The DNA-binding protein SlmA binds to FtsZ and prevents Z-ring formation through the nucleoid in a process called “nucleoid occlusion” (NO). As do most FtsZ-accessory proteins, SlmA interacts with the conserved C-terminal domain (CTD) that is connected to the FtsZ core by a long, flexible linker. However, SlmA is distinct from other regulatory factors in that it must be DNA-bound to interact with the FtsZ CTD. Few structures of FtsZ regulator–CTD complexes are available, but all reveal the CTD bound as a helix. To deduce the molecular basis for the unique SlmA–DNA–FtsZ CTD regulatory interaction and provide insight into FtsZ–regulator protein complex formation, we determined structures of Escherichia coli, Vibrio cholera, and Klebsiella pneumonia SlmA–DNA–FtsZ CTD ternary complexes. Strikingly, the FtsZ CTD does not interact with SlmA as a helix but binds as an extended conformation in a narrow, surface-exposed pocket formed only in the DNA-bound state of SlmA and located at the junction between the DNA-binding and C-terminal dimer domains. Binding studies are consistent with the structure and underscore key interactions in complex formation. Combined, these data reveal the molecular basis for the SlmA–DNA–FtsZ interaction with implications for SlmA’s NO function and underscore the ability of the FtsZ CTD to adopt a wide range of conformations, explaining its ability to bind diverse regulatory proteins. PMID:27091999

  8. Nitrogen Balance and Protein Requirements for Critically Ill Older Patients.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, Roland N

    2016-04-18

    Critically ill older patients with sarcopenia experience greater morbidity and mortality than younger patients. It is anticipated that unabated protein catabolism would be detrimental for the critically ill older patient. Healthy older subjects experience a diminished response to protein supplementation when compared to their younger counterparts, but this anabolic resistance can be overcome by increasing protein intake. Preliminary evidence suggests that older patients may respond differently to protein intake than younger patients during critical illness as well. If sufficient protein intake is given, older patients can achieve a similar nitrogen accretion response as younger patients even during critical illness. However, there is concern among some clinicians that increasing protein intake in older patients during critical illness may lead to azotemia due to decreased renal functional reserve which may augment the propensity towards worsened renal function and worsened clinical outcomes. Current evidence regarding protein requirements, nitrogen balance, ureagenesis, and clinical outcomes during nutritional therapy for critically ill older patients is reviewed.

  9. Nitrogen Balance and Protein Requirements for Critically Ill Older Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dickerson, Roland N.

    2016-01-01

    Critically ill older patients with sarcopenia experience greater morbidity and mortality than younger patients. It is anticipated that unabated protein catabolism would be detrimental for the critically ill older patient. Healthy older subjects experience a diminished response to protein supplementation when compared to their younger counterparts, but this anabolic resistance can be overcome by increasing protein intake. Preliminary evidence suggests that older patients may respond differently to protein intake than younger patients during critical illness as well. If sufficient protein intake is given, older patients can achieve a similar nitrogen accretion response as younger patients even during critical illness. However, there is concern among some clinicians that increasing protein intake in older patients during critical illness may lead to azotemia due to decreased renal functional reserve which may augment the propensity towards worsened renal function and worsened clinical outcomes. Current evidence regarding protein requirements, nitrogen balance, ureagenesis, and clinical outcomes during nutritional therapy for critically ill older patients is reviewed. PMID:27096868

  10. Cytoskeletal Mechanics Regulating Amoeboid Cell Locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-González, Begoña; Bastounis, Effie; Meili, Ruedi; del Álamo, Juan C.; Firtel, Richard; Lasheras, Juan C.

    2014-01-01

    Migrating cells exert traction forces when moving. Amoeboid cell migration is a common type of cell migration that appears in many physiological and pathological processes and is performed by a wide variety of cell types. Understanding the coupling of the biochemistry and mechanics underlying the process of migration has the potential to guide the development of pharmacological treatment or genetic manipulations to treat a wide range of diseases. The measurement of the spatiotemporal evolution of the traction forces that produce the movement is an important aspect for the characterization of the locomotion mechanics. There are several methods to calculate the traction forces exerted by the cells. Currently the most commonly used ones are traction force microscopy methods based on the measurement of the deformation induced by the cells on elastic substrate on which they are moving. Amoeboid cells migrate by implementing a motility cycle based on the sequential repetition of four phases. In this paper, we review the role that specific cytoskeletal components play in the regulation of the cell migration mechanics. We investigate the role of specific cytoskeletal components regarding the ability of the cells to perform the motility cycle effectively and the generation of traction forces. The actin nucleation in the leading edge of the cell, carried by the ARP2/3 complex activated through the SCAR/WAVE complex, has shown to be fundamental to the execution of the cyclic movement and to the generation of the traction forces. The protein PIR121, a member of the SCAR/WAVE complex, is essential to the proper regulation of the periodic movement and the protein SCAR, also included in the SCAR/WAVE complex, is necessary for the generation of the traction forces during migration. The protein Myosin II, an important F-actin cross-linker and motor protein, is essential to cytoskeletal contractility and to the generation and proper organization of the traction forces during

  11. Electron Tomographic Analysis of Cytoskeletal Cross-Bridges in the Paranodal Region of the Node of Ranvier in Peripheral Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Guy A.; Sosinsky, Gina E.; Ghassemzadeh, Sassan; Perez, Alex; Jones, Ying; Ellisman, Mark H.

    2008-01-01

    The node of Ranvier is a site for ionic conductances along myelinated nerves and governs the saltatory transmission of action potentials. Defects in the cross-bridging and spacing of the cytoskeleton is a prominent pathologic feature in diseases of the peripheral nerve. Electron tomography was used to examine cytoskeletal-cytoskeletal, membrane-cytoskeletal, and heterologous cell connections in the paranodal region of the node of Ranvier in peripheral nerves. Focal attachment of cytoskeletal filaments to each other and to the axolemma and paranodal membranes of the Schwann cell via narrow cross-bridges was visualized in both neuronal and glial cytoplasms. A subset of intermediate filaments associates with the cytoplasmic surfaces of supramolecular complexes of transmembrane structures that are presumed to include known and unknown junctional proteins. Mitochondria were linked to both microtubules and neurofilaments in the axoplasm and to neighboring smooth endoplasmic reticulum by narrow cross-bridges. Tubular cisternae in the glial cytoplasm were also linked to the paranodal glial cytoplasmic loop juxtanodal membrane by short cross-bridges. In the extracellular matrix between axon and Schwann cell, junctional bridges formed long cylinders inking the two membranes. Interactions between cytoskeleton, membranes, and extracellular matrix associations in the paranodal region is likely critical not only for scaffolding, but also for intracellular and extracellular communication. PMID:18096402

  12. Heterogeneous Porphyromonas gingivalis LPS modulates immuno-inflammatory response, antioxidant defense and cytoskeletal dynamics in human gingival fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Herath, Thanuja D. K.; Darveau, Richard P.; Seneviratne, Chaminda J.; Wang, Cun-Yu; Wang, Yu; Jin, Lijian

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal (gum) disease is a highly prevalent infection and inflammation accounting for the majority of tooth loss in adult population worldwide. Porphyromonas gingivalis is a keystone periodontal pathogen and its lipopolysaccharide (PgLPS) acts as a major virulence attribute to the disease. Herein, we deciphered the overall host response of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) to two featured isoforms of tetra-acylated PgLPS1435/1449 and penta-acylated PgLPS1690 with reference to E. coli LPS through quantitative proteomics. This study unraveled differentially expressed novel biomarkers of immuno-inflammatory response, antioxidant defense and cytoskeletal dynamics in HGFs. PgLPS1690 greatly upregulated inflammatory proteins (e.g. cyclophilin, inducible nitric oxide synthase, annexins, galectin, cathepsins and heat shock proteins), whereas the anti-inflammatory proteins (e.g. Annexin A2 and Annexin A6) were significantly upregulated by PgLPS1435/1449. Interestingly, the antioxidants proteins such as mitochondrial manganese-containing superoxide dismutase and peroxiredoxin 5 were only upregulated by PgLPS1690. The cytoskeletal rearrangement-related proteins like myosin were differentially regulated by these PgLPS isoforms. The present study gives new insight into the biological properties of P. gingivalis LPS lipid A moiety that could critically modulate immuno-inflammatory response, antioxidant defense and cytoskeletal dynamics in HGFs, and thereby enhances our understanding of periodontal pathogenesis. PMID:27538450

  13. Autoimmune Regulator (AIRE) Is Expressed in Spermatogenic Cells, and It Altered the Expression of Several Nucleic-Acid-Binding and Cytoskeletal Proteins in Germ Cell 1 Spermatogonial (GC1-spg) Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishnan, Karthika; Bhagya, Kongattu P.; Kumar, Anil TR; Devi, Anandavalli N.; Sengottaiyan, Jeeva; Kumar, Pradeep G.

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune regulator (AIRE) is a gene associated with autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED). AIRE is expressed heavily in the thymic epithelial cells and is involved in maintaining self-tolerance through regulating the expression of tissue-specific antigens. The testes are the most predominant extrathymic location where a heavy expression of AIRE is reported. Homozygous Aire-deficient male mice were infertile, possibly due to impaired spermatogenesis, deregulated germ cell apoptosis, or autoimmunity. We report that AIRE is expressed in the testes of neonatal, adolescent, and adult mice. AIRE expression was detected in glial cell derived neurotrophic factor receptor alpha (GFRα)+ (spermatogonia), GFRα−/synaptonemal complex protein (SCP3)+ (meiotic), and GFRα−/Phosphoglycerate kinase 2 (PGK2)+ (postmeiotic) germ cells in mouse testes. GC1-spg, a germ-cell-derived cell line, did not express AIRE. Retinoic acid induced AIRE expression in GC1-spg cells. Ectopic expression of AIRE in GC1-spg cells using label-free LC-MS/MS identified a total of 371 proteins that were differentially expressed. 100 proteins were up-regulated, and 271 proteins were down-regulated. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002511. Functional analysis of the differentially expressed proteins showed increased levels of various nucleic-acid-binding proteins and transcription factors and a decreased level of various cytoskeletal and structural proteins in the AIRE overexpressing cells as compared with the empty vector-transfected controls. The transcripts of a select set of the up-regulated proteins were also elevated. However, there was no corresponding decrease in the mRNA levels of the down-regulated set of proteins. Molecular function network analysis indicated that AIRE influenced gene expression in GC1-spg cells by acting at multiple levels, including transcription, translation, RNA processing, protein transport, protein localization

  14. Cytoskeletal to Nuclear Strain Transfer Regulates YAP Signaling in Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, Tristan P.; Cosgrove, Brian D.; Heo, Su-Jin; Shurden, Zach E.; Mauck, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical forces transduced to cells through the extracellular matrix are critical regulators of tissue development, growth, and homeostasis, and can play important roles in directing stem cell differentiation. In addition to force-sensing mechanisms that reside at the cell surface, there is growing evidence that forces transmitted through the cytoskeleton and to the nuclear envelope are important for mechanosensing, including activation of the Yes-associated protein (YAP)/transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ) pathway. Moreover, nuclear shape, mechanics, and deformability change with differentiation state and have been likewise implicated in force sensing and differentiation. However, the significance of force transfer to the nucleus through the mechanosensing cytoskeletal machinery in the regulation of mesenchymal stem cell mechanobiologic response remains unclear. Here we report that actomyosin-generated cytoskeletal tension regulates nuclear shape and force transmission through the cytoskeleton and demonstrate the differential short- and long-term response of mesenchymal stem cells to dynamic tensile loading based on the contractility state, the patency of the actin cytoskeleton, and the connections it makes with the nucleus. Specifically, we show that while some mechanoactive signaling pathways (e.g., ERK signaling) can be activated in the absence of nuclear strain transfer, cytoskeletal strain transfer to the nucleus is essential for activation of the YAP/TAZ pathway with stretch. PMID:26083918

  15. Protein Requirements of the Critically Ill Pediatric Patient.

    PubMed

    Coss-Bu, Jorge A; Hamilton-Reeves, Jill; Patel, Jayshil J; Morris, Claudia R; Hurt, Ryan T

    2017-04-01

    This article includes a review of protein needs in children during health and illness, as well as a detailed discussion of protein metabolism, including nitrogen balance during critical illness, and assessment and prescription/delivery of protein to critically ill children. The determination of protein requirements in children has been difficult and challenging. The protein needs in healthy children should be based on the amount needed to ensure adequate growth during infancy and childhood. Compared with adults, children require a continuous supply of nutrients to maintain growth. The protein requirement is expressed in average requirements and dietary reference intake, which represents values that cover the needs of 97.5% of the population. Critically ill children have an increased protein turnover due to an increase in whole-body protein synthesis and breakdown with protein degradation leading to loss of lean body mass (LBM) and development of growth failure, malnutrition, and worse clinical outcomes. The results of protein balance studies in critically ill children indicate higher protein needs, with infants and younger children requiring higher intakes per body weight compared with older children. Monitoring the side effects of increased protein intake should be performed. Recent studies found a survival benefit in critically ill children who received a higher percentage of prescribed energy and protein goal by the enteral route. Future randomized studies should evaluate the effect of protein dosing in different age groups on patient outcomes, including LBM, muscle structure and function, duration of mechanical ventilation, intensive care unit and hospital length of stay, and mortality.

  16. Viscum album agglutinin-I (VAA-I) increases cell surface expression of cytoskeletal proteins in apoptotic human neutrophils: moesin and ezrin are two novel targets of VAA-I.

    PubMed

    Simon, M M; Simard, J C; Girard, D

    2013-10-01

    Viscum album agglutinin-I (VAA-I) is a plant lectin, which possesses anti-inflammatory properties, including the ability to induce neutrophil apoptosis by a mechanism that is not completely understood. Among the three actin-binding membrane-anchoring proteins ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM), neutrophils are known to express ezrin and moesin. The behavior of these proteins in apoptotic neutrophils is not well established. In the present study, the expression and localization of ezrin and moesin by Western blot and immunofluorescence revealed a clear degradation and relocalization of both the proteins during VAA-I-induced apoptosis. Also, flow cytometry analysis revealed that VAA-I markedly and significantly induced the cell surface expression of ezrin and moesin and this was reversed when cells were pretreated with the Syk inhibitor piceatannol. The expression of ezrin and moesin on the cell surface of apoptotic neutrophils may represent a mechanism responsible for the appearance of autoantibodies directed against ERM proteins, which have been found in the serum of patients suffering from autoimmune diseases. Therefore, the ability of VAA-I to increase cell surface expression of cytoskeletal proteins in apoptotic neutrophils provides important insight into a possible toxic mechanism of this plant lectin and this has to be considered for its potential utilization for in vivo treatment.

  17. Design Principles of Length Control of Cytoskeletal Structures

    PubMed Central

    Mohapatra, Lishibanya; Goode, Bruce L.; Jelenkovic, Predrag; Phillips, Rob; Kondev, Jane

    2017-01-01

    Cells contain elaborate and interconnected networks of protein polymers, which make up the cytoskeleton. The cytoskeleton governs the internal positioning and movement of vesicles and organelles and controls dynamic changes in cell polarity, shape, and movement. Many of these processes require tight control of the size and shape of cytoskeletal structures, which is achieved despite rapid turnover of their molecular components. Here we review mechanisms by which cells control the size of filamentous cytoskeletal structures, from the point of view of simple quantitative models that take into account stochastic dynamics of their assembly and disassembly. Significantly, these models make experimentally testable predictions that distinguish different mechanisms of length control. Although the primary focus of this review is on cytoskeletal structures, we believe that the broader principles and mechanisms discussed herein will apply to a range of other subcellular structures whose sizes are tightly controlled and are linked to their functions. PMID:27145876

  18. Autoimmune Regulator (AIRE) Is Expressed in Spermatogenic Cells, and It Altered the Expression of Several Nucleic-Acid-Binding and Cytoskeletal Proteins in Germ Cell 1 Spermatogonial (GC1-spg) Cells.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Karthika; Bhagya, Kongattu P; Kumar, Anil Tr; Devi, Anandavalli N; Sengottaiyan, Jeeva; Kumar, Pradeep G

    2016-08-01

    Autoimmune regulator (AIRE) is a gene associated with autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED). AIRE is expressed heavily in the thymic epithelial cells and is involved in maintaining self-tolerance through regulating the expression of tissue-specific antigens. The testes are the most predominant extrathymic location where a heavy expression of AIRE is reported. Homozygous Aire-deficient male mice were infertile, possibly due to impaired spermatogenesis, deregulated germ cell apoptosis, or autoimmunity. We report that AIRE is expressed in the testes of neonatal, adolescent, and adult mice. AIRE expression was detected in glial cell derived neurotrophic factor receptor alpha (GFRα)(+) (spermatogonia), GFRα(-)/synaptonemal complex protein (SCP3)(+) (meiotic), and GFRα(-)/Phosphoglycerate kinase 2 (PGK2)(+) (postmeiotic) germ cells in mouse testes. GC1-spg, a germ-cell-derived cell line, did not express AIRE. Retinoic acid induced AIRE expression in GC1-spg cells. Ectopic expression of AIRE in GC1-spg cells using label-free LC-MS/MS identified a total of 371 proteins that were differentially expressed. 100 proteins were up-regulated, and 271 proteins were down-regulated. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002511. Functional analysis of the differentially expressed proteins showed increased levels of various nucleic-acid-binding proteins and transcription factors and a decreased level of various cytoskeletal and structural proteins in the AIRE overexpressing cells as compared with the empty vector-transfected controls. The transcripts of a select set of the up-regulated proteins were also elevated. However, there was no corresponding decrease in the mRNA levels of the down-regulated set of proteins. Molecular function network analysis indicated that AIRE influenced gene expression in GC1-spg cells by acting at multiple levels, including transcription, translation, RNA processing, protein transport, protein

  19. LIMK1 and CLIP-115: linking cytoskeletal defects to Williams syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hoogenraad, Casper C; Akhmanova, Anna; Galjart, Niels; De Zeeuw, Chris I

    2004-02-01

    Williams Syndrome is a developmental disorder that is characterized by cardiovascular problems, particular facial features and several typical behavioral and neurological abnormalities. In Williams Syndrome patients, a heterozygous deletion is present of a region on chromosome 7q11.23 (the Williams Syndrome critical region), which spans approximately 20 genes. Two of these genes encode proteins that regulate dynamic aspects of the cytoskeleton of the cell, either via the actin filament system (LIM kinase 1, or LIMK1), or through the microtubule network (cytoplasmic linker protein of 115 kDa, or CLIP-115). The recent findings that knockout mice lacking LIMK1 or CLIP-115 have distinct neurological and behavioural phenotypes, indicates that cytoskeletal defects might play a role in the development of neurological symptoms in Williams Syndrome patients. In this review, we discuss the properties of LIMK and CLIP family proteins, their function in the regulation of the actin and microtubule cytoskeletal systems, respectively, and the relationship with neurodevelopmental aspects of Williams Syndrome. Copyright 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. The role of cytoskeletal elements in shaping bacterial cells.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hongbaek

    2015-03-01

    Beginning from the recognition of FtsZ as a bacterial tubulin homolog in the early 1990s, many bacterial cytoskeletal elements have been identified, including homologs to the major eukaryotic cytoskeletal elements (tubulin, actin, and intermediate filament) and the elements unique in prokaryotes (ParA/MinD family and bactofilins). The discovery and functional characterization of the bacterial cytoskeleton have revolutionized our understanding of bacterial cells, revealing their elaborate and dynamic subcellular organization. As in eukaryotic systems, the bacterial cytoskeleton participates in cell division, cell morphogenesis, DNA segregation, and other important cellular processes. However, in accordance with the vast difference between bacterial and eukaryotic cells, many bacterial cytoskeletal proteins play distinct roles from their eukaryotic counterparts; for example, control of cell wall synthesis for cell division and morphogenesis. This review is aimed at providing an overview of the bacterial cytoskeleton, and discussing the roles and assembly dynamics of bacterial cytoskeletal proteins in more detail in relation to their most widely conserved functions, DNA segregation and coordination of cell wall synthesis.

  1. Self-organized critical model for protein folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moret, M. A.

    2011-09-01

    The major factor that drives a protein toward collapse and folding is the hydrophobic effect. At the folding process a hydrophobic core is shielded by the solvent-accessible surface area of the protein. We study the fractal behavior of 5526 protein structures present in the Brookhaven Protein Data Bank. Power laws of protein mass, volume and solvent-accessible surface area are measured independently. The present findings indicate that self-organized criticality is an alternative explanation for the protein folding. Also we note that the protein packing is an independent and constant value because the self-similar behavior of the volumes and protein masses have the same fractal dimension. This power law guarantees that a protein is a complex system. From the analyzed data, q-Gaussian distributions seem to fit well this class of systems.

  2. Critical Fluctuations in the Native State of Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Qian-Yuan; Zhang, Yang-Yang; Wang, Jun; Wang, Wei; Chialvo, Dante R.

    2017-02-01

    Based on protein structural ensembles determined by nuclear magnetic resonance, we study the position fluctuations of residues by calculating distance-dependent correlations and conducting finite-size scaling analysis. The fluctuations exhibit high susceptibility and long-range correlations up to the protein sizes. The scaling relations between the correlations or susceptibility and protein sizes resemble those in other physical and biological systems near their critical points. These results indicate that, at the native states, motions of each residue are felt by every other one in the protein. We also find that proteins with larger susceptibility are more frequently observed in nature. Overall, our results suggest that the protein's native state is critical.

  3. Solution NMR structures of the C-domain of Tetrahymena cytoskeletal protein Tcb2 reveal distinct calcium-induced structural rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Kilpatrick, Adina M; Honts, Jerry E; Sleister, Heidi M; Fowler, C Andrew

    2016-11-01

    Tcb2 is a calcium-binding protein that localizes to the membrane-associated skeleton of the ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila with hypothesized roles in ciliary movement, cell cortex signaling, and pronuclear exchange. Tcb2 has also been implicated in a unique calcium-triggered, ATP-independent type of contractility exhibited by filamentous networks isolated from the Tetrahymena cytoskeleton. To gain insight into Tcb2's structure-function relationship and contractile properties, we determined solution NMR structures of its C-terminal domain in the calcium-free and calcium-bound states. The overall architecture is similar to other calcium-binding proteins, with paired EF-hand calcium-binding motifs. Comparison of the two structures reveals that Tcb2-C's calcium-induced conformational transition differs from the prototypical calcium sensor calmodulin, suggesting that the two proteins play distinct functional roles in Tetrahymena and likely have different mechanisms of target recognition. Future studies of the full-length protein and the identification of Tcb2 cellular targets will help establish the molecular basis of Tcb2 function and its unique contractile properties. Proteins 2016; 84:1748-1756. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Modeling Cytoskeletal Active Matter Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackwell, Robert

    Active networks of filamentous proteins and crosslinking motor proteins play a critical role in many important cellular processes. One of the most important microtubule-motor protein assemblies is the mitotic spindle, a self-organized active liquid-crystalline structure that forms during cell division and that ultimately separates chromosomes into two daughter cells. Although the spindle has been intensively studied for decades, the physical principles that govern its self-organization and function remain mysterious. To evolve a better understanding of spindle formation, structure, and dynamics, I investigate course-grained models of active liquid-crystalline networks composed of microtubules, modeled as hard spherocylinders, in diffusive equilibrium with a reservoir of active crosslinks, modeled as hookean springs that can adsorb to microtubules and and translocate at finite velocity along the microtubule axis. This model is investigated using a combination of brownian dynamics and kinetic monte carlo simulation. I have further refined this model to simulate spindle formation and kinetochore capture in the fission yeast S. pombe. I then make predictions for experimentally realizable perturbations in motor protein presence and function in S. pombe.

  5. Structure of Cytoskeletal Supramolecular Assemblies in the Nerve Cell Axon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojeda-López, Miguel A.; Case, Ryan; Miller, Herb P.; Wilson, Leslie; Safinya, Cyrus R.

    2001-03-01

    The cytoskeleton of eucaryotic cells is an intricate network of supramolecular assemblies of protein filaments, e.g., actin, intermediate filaments (IFs), tubulin, and a multi-associated family of cross-linking proteins. Most of its multiple functions rely on its structural stability, which depends on a variety of specific interactions of the subunit proteins and its local physico-chemical environment. In neurodegenerative diseases the cytoskeletal supramolecular structure is almost universally altered. Preliminary results on the supramolecular structure of cytoskeletal filaments in isolated axons from bovine white matter will be presented as obtained using synchrotron small angle x-ray diffraction. These results will be compared to our ongoing cell-free studies on the structures formed by neurofilaments in vitro. Supported by NIH GM59288, NSF-DMR-9972246, and University of California Biotechnology Grant 99-14 & UC.

  6. Gamma-diketone axonopathy: analyses of cytoskeletal motors and highways in CNS myelinated axons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lihai; Gavin, Terrence; DeCaprio, Anthony P; LoPachin, Richard M

    2010-09-01

    2,5-Hexanedione (HD) intoxication is associated with axon atrophy that might be responsible for the characteristic gait abnormalities, hindlimb skeletal muscle weakness and other neurological deficits that accompany neurotoxicity. Although previous mechanistic research focused on neurofilament triplet proteins (NFL, NFM, NFH), other cytoskeletal targets are possible. Therefore, to identify potential non-NF protein targets, we characterized the effects of HD on protein-protein interactions in cosedimentation assays using microtubules and NFs prepared from spinal cord of rats intoxicated at different daily dose rates (175 and 400 mg/kg/day). Results indicate that HD did not alter the presence of alpha- or beta-tubulins in these preparations, nor were changes noted in the distribution of either anterograde (KIF1A, KIF3, KIF5) or retrograde (dynein) molecular motors. The cosedimentation of dynactin, a dynein-associated protein, also was not affected. Immunoblot analysis of microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) in microtubule preparations revealed substantial reductions (45-80%) in MAP1A, MAP1B heavy chain, MAP2, and tau regardless of HD dose rate. MAP1B light chain content was not altered. Finally, HD intoxication did not influence native NF protein content in either preparation. As per previous research, microtubule and NF preparations were enriched in high-molecular weight NF species. However, these NF derivatives were common to both HD and control samples, suggesting a lack of pathognomonic relevance. These data indicate that, although motor proteins were not affected, HD selectively impaired MAP-microtubule binding, presumably through adduction of lysine residues that mediate such interactions. Given their critical role in cytoskeletal physiology, MAPs could represent a relevant target for the induction of gamma-diketone axonopathy.

  7. Cytoskeletal stability and heat shock-mediated thermoprotection of central pattern generation in Locusta migratoria.

    PubMed

    Garlick, Kristopher M; Robertson, R Meldrum

    2007-06-01

    Prior exposure to extreme temperatures can induce thermoprotection in migratory locusts, which is important for survival in their natural environment. An important motor activity that needs to be protected is ventilation. The mechanism underlying heat shock is not fully understood, and our goal was to test the idea that cytoskeletal stability is critical for such thermoprotection. Cytoskeletal stabilizers (concanavalin A) and destabilizers (colchicine) were bath-applied in semi-intact locust preparations in both control (C) and pre-treated heat-shocked (3 h, 45 degrees C) animals. We measured parameters of the ventilatory motor pattern during maintained high temperature (43 degrees C) and recorded the times taken for motor pattern generation to fail and then recover on returning to room temperature. We found that concanavalin A mimicked the effects of a prior heat stress in control animals by increasing time to failure and decreasing time to recovery of motor pattern generation. However, colchicine destroyed protection in heat-shocked animals by decreasing time to failure and increasing time to recovery. Our findings confirm that the cytoskeleton has a mechanistic role in preserving neural function at high temperatures, possibly through stabilizing ion channels and other integral membrane proteins (e.g. Na(+)/K(+) ATPase) and their interactions with heat shock proteins.

  8. Elevated Glucose Levels Promote Contractile and Cytoskeletal Gene Expression in Vascular Smooth Muscle via Rho/Protein Kinase C and Actin Polymerization*

    PubMed Central

    Hien, Tran Thi; Turczyńska, Karolina M.; Dahan, Diana; Ekman, Mari; Grossi, Mario; Sjögren, Johan; Nilsson, Johan; Braun, Thomas; Boettger, Thomas; Garcia-Vaz, Eliana; Stenkula, Karin; Swärd, Karl; Gomez, Maria F.; Albinsson, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. This is in part attributed to the effects of hyperglycemia on vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. In diabetic animal models, hyperglycemia results in hypercontractility of vascular smooth muscle possibly due to increased activation of Rho-kinase. The aim of the present study was to investigate the regulation of contractile smooth muscle markers by glucose and to determine the signaling pathways that are activated by hyperglycemia in smooth muscle cells. Microarray, quantitative PCR, and Western blot analyses revealed that both mRNA and protein expression of contractile smooth muscle markers were increased in isolated smooth muscle cells cultured under high compared with low glucose conditions. This effect was also observed in hyperglycemic Akita mice and in diabetic patients. Elevated glucose activated the protein kinase C and Rho/Rho-kinase signaling pathways and stimulated actin polymerization. Glucose-induced expression of contractile smooth muscle markers in cultured cells could be partially or completely repressed by inhibitors of advanced glycation end products, L-type calcium channels, protein kinase C, Rho-kinase, actin polymerization, and myocardin-related transcription factors. Furthermore, genetic ablation of the miR-143/145 cluster prevented the effects of glucose on smooth muscle marker expression. In conclusion, these data demonstrate a possible link between hyperglycemia and vascular disease states associated with smooth muscle contractility. PMID:26683376

  9. Proteolysis of submembrane cytoskeletal proteins ankyrin-G and alpha-II-spectrin following diffuse brain injury: A role in white matter vulnerability at Nodes of Ranvier

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Thomas M.; Greer, John E.; Vanderveer, Andrew S.; Phillips, Linda L.

    2012-01-01

    A high membrane-to-cytoplasm ratio makes axons particularly vulnerable to traumatic injury. Posttraumatic shifts in ionic homeostasis promote spectrin cleavage, disrupt ankyrin linkages, and destabilize axolemmal proteins. This study contrasted ankyrin-G and αII-spectrin degradation in cortex and corpus callosum following diffuse axonal injury produced by fluid percussion insult. Ankyrin-G lysis occurred preferentially in white matter, with acute elevation of all fragments and long term reduction of a low kD form. Calpain-generated αII-spectrin fragments increased in both regions. Caspase-3 lysis of αII-spectrin showed a small, acute rise in cortex, but was absent in callosum. White matter displayed nodal damage, with horseradish peroxidase permeability into the submyelin space. Ankyrin-G binding protein neurofascin and spectrin binding protein ankyrin-B showed acute alterations in expression. These results support ankyrin-G vulnerability in white matter following trauma and suggest that ankyrin-G and αII-spectrin proteolysis disrupts Node of Ranvier integrity. The time course of such changes were comparable to previously observed functional deficits in callosal fibers. PMID:20557305

  10. kakapo, a gene required for adhesion between and within cell layers in Drosophila, encodes a large cytoskeletal linker protein related to plectin and dystrophin.

    PubMed

    Gregory, S L; Brown, N H

    1998-11-30

    Mutations in kakapo were recovered in genetic screens designed to isolate genes required for integrin-mediated adhesion in Drosophila. We cloned the gene and found that it encodes a large protein (>5,000 amino acids) that is highly similar to plectin and BPAG1 over the first 1,000-amino acid region, and contains within this region an alpha-actinin type actin-binding domain. A central region containing dystrophin-like repeats is followed by a carboxy domain that is distinct from plectin and dystrophin, having neither the intermediate filament-binding domain of plectin nor the dystroglycan/syntrophin-binding domain of dystrophin. Instead, Kakapo has a carboxy terminus similar to the growth arrest-specific protein Gas2. Kakapo is strongly expressed late during embryogenesis at the most prominent site of position-specific integrin adhesion, the muscle attachment sites. It is concentrated at apical and basal surfaces of epidermal muscle attachment cells, at the termini of the prominent microtubule bundles, and is required in these cells for strong attachment to muscles. Kakapo is also expressed more widely at a lower level where it is essential for epidermal cell layer stability. These results suggest that the Kakapo protein forms essential links among integrins, actin, and microtubules.

  11. kakapo, a Gene Required for Adhesion Between and Within Cell Layers in Drosophila, Encodes a Large Cytoskeletal Linker Protein Related to Plectin and Dystrophin

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Stephen L.; Brown, Nicholas H.

    1998-01-01

    Mutations in kakapo were recovered in genetic screens designed to isolate genes required for integrin-mediated adhesion in Drosophila. We cloned the gene and found that it encodes a large protein (>5,000 amino acids) that is highly similar to plectin and BPAG1 over the first 1,000–amino acid region, and contains within this region an α-actinin type actin-binding domain. A central region containing dystrophin-like repeats is followed by a carboxy domain that is distinct from plectin and dystrophin, having neither the intermediate filament-binding domain of plectin nor the dystroglycan/syntrophin-binding domain of dystrophin. Instead, Kakapo has a carboxy terminus similar to the growth arrest–specific protein Gas2. Kakapo is strongly expressed late during embryogenesis at the most prominent site of position-specific integrin adhesion, the muscle attachment sites. It is concentrated at apical and basal surfaces of epidermal muscle attachment cells, at the termini of the prominent microtubule bundles, and is required in these cells for strong attachment to muscles. Kakapo is also expressed more widely at a lower level where it is essential for epidermal cell layer stability. These results suggest that the Kakapo protein forms essential links among integrins, actin, and microtubules. PMID:9832555

  12. Activation of integrins in endothelial cells by fluid shear stress mediates Rho-dependent cytoskeletal alignment

    PubMed Central

    Tzima, Eleni; del Pozo, Miguel Angel; Shattil, Sanford J.; Chien, Shu; Schwartz, Martin Alexander

    2001-01-01

    Fluid shear stress is a critical determinant of vascular remodeling and atherogenesis. Both integrins and the small GTPase Rho are implicated in endothelial cell responses to shear but the mechanisms are poorly understood. We now show that shear stress rapidly stimulates conformational activation of integrin αvβ3 in bovine aortic endothelial cells, followed by an increase in its binding to extracellular cell matrix (ECM) proteins. The shear-induced new integrin binding to ECM induces a transient inactivation of Rho similar to that seen when suspended cells are plated on ECM proteins. This transient inhibition is necessary for cytoskeletal alignment in the direction of flow. The results therefore define the role of integrins and Rho in a pathway leading to endothelial cell adaptation to flow. PMID:11532928

  13. Actin cytoskeletal defects in immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Moulding, Dale A; Record, Julien; Malinova, Dessislava; Thrasher, Adrian J

    2013-01-01

    The importance of the cytoskeleton in mounting a successful immune response is evident from the wide range of defects that occur in actin-related primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs). Studies of these PIDs have revealed a pivotal role for the actin cytoskeleton in almost all stages of immune system function, from hematopoiesis and immune cell development, through to recruitment, migration, intercellular and intracellular signaling, and activation of both innate and adaptive immune responses. The major focus of this review is the immune defects that result from mutations in the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome gene (WAS), which have a broad impact on many different processes and give rise to clinically heterogeneous immunodeficiencies. We also discuss other related genetic defects and the possibility of identifying new genetic causes of cytoskeletal immunodeficiency. PMID:24117828

  14. Cell-substrate interactions and locomotion of Dictyostelium wild-type and mutants defective in three cytoskeletal proteins: a study using quantitative reflection interference contrast microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Schindl, M; Wallraff, E; Deubzer, B; Witke, W; Gerisch, G; Sackmann, E

    1995-01-01

    Reflection interference contrast microscopy combined with digital image processing was applied to study the motion of Dictyostelium discoideum cells in their pre-aggregative state on substrata of different adhesiveness (glass, albumin-covered glass, and freshly cleaved mica). The temporal variations of the size and shape of the cell/substratum contact area and the time course of advancement of pseudopods protruding in contact with the substratum were analyzed. The major goal was to study differences between the locomotion of wild-type cells and strains of triple mutants deficient in two F-actin cross-linking proteins (alpha-actinin and the 120-kDa gelation factor) and one F-actin fragmenting protein (severin). The size of contact area, AC, of both wild-type and mutant cells fluctuates between minimum and maximum values on the order of minutes, pointing toward an intrinsic switching mechanism associated with the mechanochemical control system. The fluctuation amplitudes are much larger on freshly cleaved mica than on glass. Wild-type and mutant cells exhibit remarkable differences on mica but not on glass. These differences comprise the population median of AC and alterations in pseudopod protrusion. AC is smaller by a factor of two or more for all mutants. Pseudopods protrude slower and shorter in the mutants. It is concluded that cell shape and pseudopods are destabilized by defects in the actin-skeleton, which can be overcompensated by strongly adhesive substrata. Several features of amoeboid cell locomotion on substrata can be understood on the basis of the minimum bending energy concept of soft adhering shells and by assuming that adhesion induces local alterations of the composite membrane consisting of the protein/lipid bilayer on the cell surface and the underlying actin-cortex. Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 PMID:7756537

  15. Espin actin-cytoskeletal proteins are in rat type I spiral ganglion neurons and include splice-isoforms with a functional nuclear localization signal.

    PubMed

    Sekerková, Gabriella; Zheng, Lili; Mugnaini, Enrico; Bartles, James R

    2008-08-20

    The espins are Ca(2+)-resistant actin-bundling proteins that are enriched in hair cell stereocilia and sensory cell microvilli. Here, we report a novel localization of espins to a large proportion of rat type I spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) and their projections to the cochlear nucleus (CN). Moreover, we show that a fraction of these espins is in the nucleus of SGNs owing to the presence of splice-isoforms that contain a functional nuclear localization signal (NLS). Espin antibody labeled approximately 83% of type I SGNs, and the labeling intensity increased dramatically during early postnatal development. Type II SGNs and vestibular ganglion neurons were unlabeled. In the CN, espin-positive auditory nerve fibers showed a projection pattern typical of type I SGNs, with intense labeling in the nerve root region and posteroventral CN (PVCN). The anteroventral CN (AVCN) showed moderate labeling, whereas the dorsal CN showed weak labeling that was restricted to the deep layer. Espin-positive synaptic terminals were enriched around nerve root neurons and octopus cells in the PVCN and were also found on globular bushy cells and multipolar neurons in the PVCN and AVCN. SGNs expressed multiple espin transcripts and proteins, including splice-isoforms that contain a nonapeptide, which is rich in positively charged amino acids and creates a bipartite NLS. The nonapeptide was necessary to target espin isoforms to the nucleus and was sufficient to target an unrelated protein to the nucleus when joined with the upstream di-arginine-containing octapeptide. The presence of cytoplasmic and nuclear espins in SGNs suggests additional roles for espins in auditory neuroscience.

  16. Elevated Glucose Levels Promote Contractile and Cytoskeletal Gene Expression in Vascular Smooth Muscle via Rho/Protein Kinase C and Actin Polymerization.

    PubMed

    Hien, Tran Thi; Turczyńska, Karolina M; Dahan, Diana; Ekman, Mari; Grossi, Mario; Sjögren, Johan; Nilsson, Johan; Braun, Thomas; Boettger, Thomas; Garcia-Vaz, Eliana; Stenkula, Karin; Swärd, Karl; Gomez, Maria F; Albinsson, Sebastian

    2016-02-12

    Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. This is in part attributed to the effects of hyperglycemia on vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. In diabetic animal models, hyperglycemia results in hypercontractility of vascular smooth muscle possibly due to increased activation of Rho-kinase. The aim of the present study was to investigate the regulation of contractile smooth muscle markers by glucose and to determine the signaling pathways that are activated by hyperglycemia in smooth muscle cells. Microarray, quantitative PCR, and Western blot analyses revealed that both mRNA and protein expression of contractile smooth muscle markers were increased in isolated smooth muscle cells cultured under high compared with low glucose conditions. This effect was also observed in hyperglycemic Akita mice and in diabetic patients. Elevated glucose activated the protein kinase C and Rho/Rho-kinase signaling pathways and stimulated actin polymerization. Glucose-induced expression of contractile smooth muscle markers in cultured cells could be partially or completely repressed by inhibitors of advanced glycation end products, L-type calcium channels, protein kinase C, Rho-kinase, actin polymerization, and myocardin-related transcription factors. Furthermore, genetic ablation of the miR-143/145 cluster prevented the effects of glucose on smooth muscle marker expression. In conclusion, these data demonstrate a possible link between hyperglycemia and vascular disease states associated with smooth muscle contractility. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Effects of sub-lethal neurite outgrowth inhibitory concentrations of chlorpyrifos oxon on cytoskeletal proteins and acetylcholinesterase in differentiating N2a cells.

    PubMed

    Flaskos, J; Nikolaidis, E; Harris, W; Sachana, M; Hargreaves, A J

    2011-11-01

    Previous work in our laboratory has shown that sub-lethal concentrations (1-10 μM) of chlorpyrifos (CPF), diazinon (DZ) and diazinon oxon (DZO) inhibit the outgrowth of axon-like neurites in differentiating mouse N2a neuroblastoma cells concomitant with altered levels and/or phosphorylation state of axonal cytoskeleton and growth-associated proteins. The aim of the present work was to determine whether chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO) was capable of inhibiting N2a cell differentiation in a similar manner. Using experimental conditions similar to our previous work, sub-lethal concentrations (1-10 μM) of CPO were found to inhibit N2a cell differentiation. However, unlike previous studies with DZ and DZO, there was a high level of sustained inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in CPO treated cells. Impairment of neurite outgrowth was also associated with reduced levels of growth associated protein-43 and neurofilament heavy chain (NFH), and the distribution of NFH in cells stained by indirect immunofluorescence was disrupted. However, in contrast to previous findings for DZO, the absolute level of phosphorylated NFH was unaffected by CPO exposure. Taken together, the findings suggest that sub-lethal concentrations of CPO inhibit axon outgrowth in differentiating N2a cells and that this effect involves reduced levels of two proteins that play key roles in axon outgrowth and maintenance. Although the inhibition of neurite outgrowth is unlikely to involve AChE inhibition directly, further work will help to determine whether the persistent inhibition of AChE by CPO can account for the different effects induced by CPO and DZO on the levels of total and phosphorylated NFH.

  18. An ultraviolet-sensitive maternal mRNA encoding a cytoskeletal protein may be involved in axis formation in the ascidian embryo

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffery, W.R. )

    1990-09-01

    Ultraviolet (uv) irradiation of the vegetal hemisphere of fertilized eggs during ooplasmic segregation inhibits subsequent gastrulation and axis formation in ascidian embryos. The molecular basis of this phenomenon was investigated in by comparing in vivo protein synthesis and in vitro mRNA translation in normal and uv-irradiated embryos of the ascidian Styela clava. Analysis of protein synthesis by (35S)methionine incorporation, two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis, and autoradiography showed that only 21 of 433 labeled polypeptides were missing or decreased in labeling intensity in uv-irradiated embryos. The most prominent of these was a 30,000 molecular weight (pI 6.0) polypeptide (p30). Extraction of gastrulae with the nonionic detergent Triton X-100 showed that p30 is retained in the detergent insoluble residue, suggesting that it is associated with the cytoskeleton. Several lines of evidence suggest that p30 may be involved in axis formation. First, p30 labeling peaks during gastrulation, when the embryonic axis is being established. Second, axis formation and p30 labeling are abolished by the same threshold uv dose, which is distinct from that required to inactivate muscle cell development. Third, the uv sensitivity period for abolishing p30 labeling and axis formation are both restricted to ooplasmic segregation. In vitro translation of egg RNA followed by 2D gel electrophoresis and autoradiography of the protein products showed that p30 is encoded by a maternal mRNA. The translation of p30 mRNA was abolished by uv irradiation of fertilized eggs during ooplasmic segregation suggesting that this message is a uv-sensitive target. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that uv irradiation blocks gastrulation and axis formation by inhibiting the translation of maternal mRNA localized in the vegetal hemisphere of the fertilized egg.

  19. N-WASP, a novel actin-depolymerizing protein, regulates the cortical cytoskeletal rearrangement in a PIP2-dependent manner downstream of tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed Central

    Miki, H; Miura, K; Takenawa, T

    1996-01-01

    Here we identify a 65 kDa protein (N-WASP) from brain that binds the SH3 domains of Ash/Grb2. The sequence is homologous to Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP). N-WASP has several functional motifs, such as a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain and cofilin-homologous region, through which N-WASP depolymerizes actin filaments. When overexpressed in COS 7 cells, the wild-type N-WASP causes several surface protrusions where N-WASP co-localizes with actin filaments. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) treatment induces the complex formation of EGF receptors and N-WASP, and produces microspikes. On the other hand, two mutants, C38W (a point mutation in the PH domain) and deltaVCA (deletion of the actin binding domain), localize predominantly in the nucleus and do not cause a change in the cytoskeleton, irrespective of EGF treatment. Interestingly, the C38W PH domain binds less effectively to phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) than the wild-type PH domain. These results suggest the importance of the PIP2 binding ability of the PH domain and the actin binding for retention in membranes. Collectively, we conclude that N-WASP transmits signals from tyrosine kinases to cause a polarized rearrangement of cortical actin filaments dependent on PIP2. Images PMID:8895577

  20. G proteins: critical control points for transmembrane signals.

    PubMed Central

    Neer, E. J.

    1994-01-01

    Heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins (G proteins) that are made up of alpha and beta gamma subunits couple many kinds of cell-surface receptors to intracellular effector enzymes or ion channels. Every cell contains several types of receptors, G proteins, and effectors. The specificity with which G protein subunits interact with receptors and effectors defines the range of responses a cell is able to make to an external signal. Thus, the G proteins act as a critical control point that determines whether a signal spreads through several pathways or is focused to a single pathway. In this review, I will summarize some features of the structure and function of mammalian G protein subunits, discuss the role of both alpha and beta gamma subunits in regulation of effectors, the role of the beta gamma subunit in macromolecular assembly, and the mechanisms that might make some responses extremely specific and others rather diffuse. PMID:8142895

  1. The cytoskeletal proteins in the contractile tissues of the testis and its excurrent ducts of the passerine bird, Masked Weaver (Ploceus velatus).

    PubMed

    Ozegbe, P C; Aire, T A; Deokar, M S

    2012-02-01

    The cellular composition of the testicular capsule, seminiferous peritubular tissue, the epithelia as well as periductal muscle cell layers of the excurrent ducts was studied, in sexually mature and active Masked Weaver (Ploceus velatus) birds of the passerine family, Ploceidae. Ultrastructure of the contractile cells in the testicular capsule, peritubular and periductal tissues showed that these cells were smooth muscles of typical morphological characteristics. Variability in the immunohistochemical co-expression of microfilaments and intermediate filaments in the different tissues was evident. Actin and desmin proteins were co-expressed immunohistochemically in the testicular capsule and seminiferous peritubular smooth muscle layer. Actin was singly and very weakly expressed in the rete testis epithelium while cytokeratins and desmin were co-expressed in the epithelium of the excurrent ducts. The periductal muscle layer of all ducts of the epididymis, the ductus deferens as well as the seminal glomus, strongly co-expressed actin and desmin. Vimentin was absent in all cells and tissue types studied. There is clear evidence that the tissues of the male gonad and its excurrent ducts in the Masked Weaver, as has been reported for members of the Galloanserae and Ratitae, contain well-formed contractile tissues whose function would include the transportation of luminal through-flow from the testis into, and through, its excurrent ducts. The microtubule helix in the head and of the mid-piece, of elongating spermatids, as well as of the mature spermatozoa in the various excurrent ducts, including some spermatozoa in the seminal glomus, also co-expressed these three proteins.

  2. The time course of activity-regulated cytoskeletal (ARC) gene and protein expression in the whisker-barrel circuit using two paradigms of whisker stimulation.

    PubMed

    Khodadad, Aida; Adelson, P David; Lifshitz, Jonathan; Thomas, Theresa Currier

    2015-05-01

    Immediate early genes have previously demonstrated a rapid increase in gene expression after various behavioral paradigms. The main focus of this article is to identify a molecular marker of circuit activation after manual whisker stimulation or exploration of a novel environment. To this end, we investigated the dynamics of ARC transcription in adult male rats during whisker somatosensation throughout the whisker barrel circuit. At various time points, tissue was biopsied from the ventral posterior medial nucleus (VPM) of the thalamus, primary somatosensory barrel field (S1BF) cortex and hippocampus for quantification using real-time PCR and western blot. Our results show that there were no significant differences in ARC gene or protein expression in the VPM after both types of stimulation. However, manual whisker stimulation resulted in increased ARC gene expression at 15, 30, 60 and 300 min in the S1BF, and 15 min in the hippocampus (p<0.05). Also, exploration of a novel environment resulted in increased ARC mRNA expression at 15 and 30 min in the S1BF and at 15 min in the hippocampus (p<0.05). The type of stimulation (manual versus exploration of a novel environment) influenced the magnitude of ARC gene expression in the S1BF (p<0.05). These data are the first to demonstrate that ARC is a specific, quantifiable and input dependent molecular marker of circuit activation which can serve to quantify the impact of brain injury and subsequent rehabilitation on whisker sensation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Pattern formation in actin gels: A study in the mechanics of gels formed by the important cytoskeletal protein actin, especially as applied to cellular motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balter, Ariel

    We have studied pattern formation in actin gels to better understand how they function in biological systems, especially in the motility mechanism used by some pathogenic bacteria such as Listeria. By coating themselves with certain enzymes, these bacteria appropriate actin (a protein) from the surrounding host cell's cytoplasm and cause a network or "gel" of actin filaments to grow on their outer surface. As the resulting "comet tail" shaped protrusion grows, it pushes the bacterium away. In experiments, polystyrene beads coated with the same enzymes will also generate comet tails and swim in a very similar manner. However, these bead experiments have also generated anomalous results such as the formation of many comet tails. In some experiments, when two comet tails formed they systematically grew into regular, oppositely handed helices. The formation of any comet tails on a bead poses a physical conundrum. The bacterial enzyme coating is asymmetrical so the comet tail forms in a particular place. But the beads are symmetrical, so comet tails formation constitutes symmetry breaking and spontaneous pattern formation. We have modeled this process as a competition between elastic energy (which favors many tails) and chemical energy (which favors few tails). Our analytical model explains the factors that experimentally determine the number of tails, and numerical simulations confirm these predictions. To understand the helical tails, we did extensive data analysis involving image processing, statistical analysis and mathematical modeling of images of the helical tails. We identified some important features of how the twin tails form. For instance, the tail growth rate is independent of drag force, and bead rotation must accompany helical tail formation. We also created a physical model for helical growth. Numerical simulations of our model show that at very low Reynolds number, a cylindrical object growing under the conditions of an actin comet tail can spontaneously

  4. A set of fluorescent protein-based markers expressed from constitutive and arbuscular mycorrhiza-inducible promoters to label organelles, membranes and cytoskeletal elements in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Sergey; Harrison, Maria J

    2014-12-01

    Medicago truncatula is widely used for analyses of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis and nodulation. To complement the genetic and genomic resources that exist for this species, we generated fluorescent protein fusions that label the nucleus, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, trans-Golgi network, plasma membrane, apoplast, late endosome/multivesicular bodies (MVB), transitory late endosome/ tonoplast, tonoplast, plastids, mitochondria, peroxisomes, autophagosomes, plasmodesmata, actin, microtubules, periarbuscular membrane (PAM) and periarbuscular apoplastic space (PAS) and expressed them from the constitutive AtUBQ10 promoter and the AM symbiosis-specific MtBCP1 promoter. All marker constructs showed the expected expression patterns and sub-cellular locations in M. truncatula root cells. As a demonstration of their utility, we used several markers to investigate AM symbiosis where root cells undergo major cellular alterations to accommodate their fungal endosymbiont. We demonstrate that changes in the position and size of the nuclei occur prior to hyphal entry into the cortical cells and do not require DELLA signaling. Changes in the cytoskeleton, tonoplast and plastids also occur in the colonized cells and in contrast to previous studies, we show that stromulated plastids are abundant in cells with developing and mature arbuscules, while lens-shaped plastids occur in cells with degenerating arbuscules. Arbuscule development and secretion of the PAM creates a periarbuscular apoplastic compartment which has been assumed to be continuous with apoplast of the cell. However, fluorescent markers secreted to the periarbuscular apoplast challenge this assumption. This marker resource will facilitate cell biology studies of AM symbiosis, as well as other aspects of legume biology. © 2014 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Links between critical proteins drive the controllability of protein interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Wuchty, Stefan; Boltz, Toni; Küçük-McGinty, Hande

    2017-04-10

    Focusing on the interactomes of H. sapiens, S. cerevisiae, and E. coli, we investigated interactions between controlling proteins. In particular, we determined critical, intermittent, and redundant proteins based on their tendency to participate in minimum dominating sets (MDSets). Independently of the organisms considered, we found that interactions that involved critical nodes had the most prominent effects on the topology of their corresponding networks. Furthermore, we observed that phosphorylation and regulatory events were considerably enriched when the corresponding transcription factors and kinases were critical proteins, while such interactions were depleted when they were redundant proteins. Moreover, interactions involving critical proteins were enriched with essential genes, disease genes and drug targets, suggesting that such characteristics may be key for the detection of novel drug targets as well as assess their efficacy. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. Spectraplakins: Master orchestrators of cytoskeletal dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Suozzi, Kathleen C.; Wu, Xiaoyang

    2012-01-01

    The dynamics of different cytoskeletal networks are coordinated to bring about many fundamental cellular processes, from neuronal pathfinding to cell division. Increasing evidence points to the importance of spectraplakins in integrating cytoskeletal networks. Spectraplakins are evolutionarily conserved giant cytoskeletal cross-linkers, which belong to the spectrin superfamily. Their genes consist of multiple promoters and many exons, yielding a vast array of differential splice forms with distinct functions. Spectraplakins are also unique in their ability to associate with all three elements of the cytoskeleton: F-actin, microtubules, and intermediate filaments. Recent studies have begun to unveil their role in a wide range of processes, from cell migration to tissue integrity. PMID:22584905

  7. Cytoskeletal and membrane dynamics during higher plant cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    McMichael, Colleen M; Bednarek, Sebastian Y

    2013-03-01

    Following mitosis, cytoplasm, organelles and genetic material are partitioned into daughter cells through the process of cytokinesis. In somatic cells of higher plants, two cytoskeletal arrays, the preprophase band and the phragmoplast, facilitate the positioning and de novo assembly of the plant-specific cytokinetic organelle, the cell plate, which develops across the division plane and fuses with the parental plasma membrane to yield distinct new cells. The coordination of cytoskeletal and membrane dynamics required to initiate, assemble and shape the cell plate as it grows toward the mother cell cortex is dependent upon a large array of proteins, including molecular motors, membrane tethering, fusion and restructuring factors and biosynthetic, structural and regulatory elements. This review focuses on the temporal and molecular requirements of cytokinesis in somatic cells of higher plants gleaned from recent studies using cell biology, genetics, pharmacology and biochemistry.

  8. Simulated Microgravity Induced Cytoskeletal Rearrangements are Modulated by Protooncogenes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melhado, C. D.; Sanford, G. L.; Bosah, F.; Harris-Hooker, S.

    1998-01-01

    Microgravity is the environment living systems encounter during space flight and gravitational unloading is the effect of this environment on living systems. The cell, being a multiphasic chemical system, is a useful starting point to study the potential impact of gravity unloading on physiological function. In the absence of gravity, sedimentation of organelles including chromosomes, mitochondria, nuclei, the Golgi apparatus, vacuoles, and the endoplasmic reticulum may be affected. Most of these organelles, however, are somewhat held in place by cytoskeleton. Hansen and Igber suggest that intermediate filaments act to stabilize the nuleus against rotational movement, and integrate cell and nuclear structure. The tensegrity theory supports the idea that mechanical or physical forces alters the cytoskeletal structures of a cell resulting in the changes in cell: matrix interactions and receptor-signaling coupling. This type of stress to the cytoskeleton may be largely responsible regulating cell shape, growth, movement and metabolism. Mouse MC3T3 El cells under microgravity exhibited significant cytoskeletal changes and alterations in cell growth. The alterations in cytoskeleton architecture may be due to changes in the expression of actin related proteins or integrins. Philopott and coworkers reported on changes in the distribution of microtubule and cytoskeleton elements in the cells of heart tissue from space flight rats and those centrifuged at 1.7g. Other researchers have showed that microgravity reduced EGF-induced c-fos and c-jun expression compared to 1 g controls. Since c-fos and c-jun are known regulators of cell growth, it is likely that altered signal transduction involving protooncogenes may play a crucial role in the reduced growth and alterations in cytoskeletal arrangements found during space flight. It is clear that a microgravity environment induces a number of changes in cell shape, cell surface molecules, gene expression, and cytoskeletal

  9. Simulated Microgravity Induced Cytoskeletal Rearrangements are Modulated by Protooncogenes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melhado, C. D.; Sanford, G. L.; Bosah, F.; Harris-Hooker, S.

    1998-01-01

    Microgravity is the environment living systems encounter during space flight and gravitational unloading is the effect of this environment on living systems. The cell, being a multiphasic chemical system, is a useful starting point to study the potential impact of gravity unloading on physiological function. In the absence of gravity, sedimentation of organelles including chromosomes, mitochondria, nuclei, the Golgi apparatus, vacuoles, and the endoplasmic reticulum may be affected. Most of these organelles, however, are somewhat held in place by cytoskeleton. Hansen and Igber suggest that intermediate filaments act to stabilize the nuleus against rotational movement, and integrate cell and nuclear structure. The tensegrity theory supports the idea that mechanical or physical forces alters the cytoskeletal structures of a cell resulting in the changes in cell: matrix interactions and receptor-signaling coupling. This type of stress to the cytoskeleton may be largely responsible regulating cell shape, growth, movement and metabolism. Mouse MC3T3 El cells under microgravity exhibited significant cytoskeletal changes and alterations in cell growth. The alterations in cytoskeleton architecture may be due to changes in the expression of actin related proteins or integrins. Philopott and coworkers reported on changes in the distribution of microtubule and cytoskeleton elements in the cells of heart tissue from space flight rats and those centrifuged at 1.7g. Other researchers have showed that microgravity reduced EGF-induced c-fos and c-jun expression compared to 1 g controls. Since c-fos and c-jun are known regulators of cell growth, it is likely that altered signal transduction involving protooncogenes may play a crucial role in the reduced growth and alterations in cytoskeletal arrangements found during space flight. It is clear that a microgravity environment induces a number of changes in cell shape, cell surface molecules, gene expression, and cytoskeletal

  10. c-myc mRNA in cytoskeletal-bound polysomes in fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Hesketh, J E; Campbell, G P; Whitelaw, P F

    1991-03-01

    3T3 fibroblasts were treated sequentially with 25 mM-KCl/0.05% Nonidet P40, 130 mM-KCl/0.05% Nonidet P40 and finally with 1% Nonidet P40/1% deoxycholate in order to release free, cytoskeletal-bound and membrane-bound polysomes respectively. The membrane-bound fraction was enriched in the mRNA for the membrane protein beta 2-microglobulin, whereas the cytoskeletal-bound polysomes were enriched in c-myc mRNA. Actin mRNA was present in both free and cytoskeletal-bound polysomes. The results suggest that cytoskeletal-bound polysomes are involved in the translation of specific mRNA species.

  11. Protein hydration dynamics in solution: a critical survey.

    PubMed Central

    Halle, Bertil

    2004-01-01

    The properties of water in biological systems have been studied for well over a century by a wide range of physical techniques, but progress has been slow and erratic. Protein hydration--the perturbation of water structure and dynamics by the protein surface--has been a particularly rich source of controversy and confusion. Our aim here is to critically examine central concepts in the description of protein hydration, and to assess the experimental basis for the current view of protein hydration, with the focus on dynamic aspects. Recent oxygen-17 magnetic relaxation dispersion (MRD) experiments have shown that the vast majority of water molecules in the protein hydration layer suffer a mere twofold dynamic retardation compared with bulk water. The high mobility of hydration water ensures that all thermally activated processes at the protein-water interface, such as binding, recognition and catalysis, can proceed at high rates. The MRD-derived picture of a highly mobile hydration layer is consistent with recent molecular dynamics simulations, but is incompatible with results deduced from intermolecular nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy, dielectric relaxation and fluorescence spectroscopy. It is also inconsistent with the common view of hydration effects on protein hydrodynamics. Here, we show how these discrepancies can be resolved. PMID:15306377

  12. Direct binding of the verprolin-homology domain in N-WASP to actin is essential for cytoskeletal reorganization.

    PubMed

    Miki, H; Takenawa, T

    1998-02-04

    Verprolin is a yeast protein whose inactivation leads to a cytoskeletal defect characterized by the abnormal organization of actin filaments. Recently, two mammalian proteins previously shown to regulate the actin cytoskeleton, Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Protein (WASP) and its homolog expressed in neurons (N-WASP), were found to possess short peptide motifs homologous to one part of verprolin. However, the physiological function of the homologous regions (verprolin-homology domain, VPH domain) remains unknown. Here we report the importance of the VPH domain as the direct actin binding region. In the case of N-WASP, the VPH domain co-acts with the cofilinhomologous region to sever actin filaments in vitro. Furthermore, the VPH domain is indispensable for the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton by N-WASP downstream of tyrosine kinases in living cells. All data demonstrate that the VPH domain plays critical roles in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton.

  13. Methods of measuring Protein Disulfide Isomerase activity: a critical overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Monica; Laurindo, Francisco; Fernandes, Denise

    2014-09-01

    Protein disulfide isomerase is an essential redox chaperone from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and is responsible for correct disulfide bond formation in nascent proteins. PDI is also found in other cellular locations in the cell, particularly the cell surface. Overall, PDI contributes to ER and global cell redox homeostasis and signaling. The knowledge about PDI structure and function progressed substantially based on in vitro studies using recombinant PDI and chimeric proteins. In these experimental scenarios, PDI reductase and chaperone activities are readily approachable. In contrast, assays to measure PDI isomerase activity, the hallmark of PDI family, are more complex. Assessment of PDI roles in cells and tissues mainly relies on gain- or loss-of-function studies. However, there is limited information regarding correlation of experimental readouts with the distinct types of PDI activities. In this mini-review, we evaluate the main methods described for measuring the different kinds of PDI activity: thiol reductase, thiol oxidase, thiol isomerase and chaperone. We emphasize the need to use appropriate controls and the role of critical interferents (e.g., detergent, presence of reducing agents). We also discuss the translation of results from in vitro studies with purified recombinant PDI to cellular and tissue samples, with critical comments on the interpretation of results.

  14. Scaling and self-organized criticality in proteins: Lysozyme c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, J. C.

    2009-11-01

    Proteins appear to be the most dramatic natural example of self-organized criticality (SOC), a concept that explains many otherwise apparently unlikely phenomena. Protein functionality is often dominated by long-range hydro(phobic/philic) interactions, which both drive protein compaction and mediate protein-protein interactions. In contrast to previous reductionist short-range hydrophobicity scales, the holistic Moret-Zebende hydrophobicity scale [Phys. Rev. E 75, 011920 (2007)] represents a hydroanalytic tool that bioinformatically quantifies SOC in a way fully compatible with evolution. Hydroprofiling identifies chemical trends in the activities and substrate binding abilities of model enzymes and antibiotic animal lysozymes c , as well as defensins, which have been the subject of tens of thousands of experimental studies. The analysis is simple and easily performed and immediately yields insights not obtainable by traditional methods based on short-range real-space interactions, as described either by classical force fields used in molecular-dynamics simulations, or hydrophobicity scales based on transference energies from water to organic solvents or solvent-accessible areas.

  15. A critical comparison of protein microarray fabrication technologies.

    PubMed

    Romanov, Valentin; Davidoff, S Nikki; Miles, Adam R; Grainger, David W; Gale, Bruce K; Brooks, Benjamin D

    2014-03-21

    Of the diverse analytical tools used in proteomics, protein microarrays possess the greatest potential for providing fundamental information on protein, ligand, analyte, receptor, and antibody affinity-based interactions, binding partners and high-throughput analysis. Microarrays have been used to develop tools for drug screening, disease diagnosis, biochemical pathway mapping, protein-protein interaction analysis, vaccine development, enzyme-substrate profiling, and immuno-profiling. While the promise of the technology is intriguing, it is yet to be realized. Many challenges remain to be addressed to allow these methods to meet technical and research expectations, provide reliable assay answers, and to reliably diversify their capabilities. Critical issues include: (1) inconsistent printed microspot morphologies and uniformities, (2) low signal-to-noise ratios due to factors such as complex surface capture protocols, contamination, and static or no-flow mass transport conditions, (3) inconsistent quantification of captured signal due to spot uniformity issues, (4) non-optimal protocol conditions such as pH, temperature, drying that promote variability in assay kinetics, and lastly (5) poor protein (e.g., antibody) printing, storage, or shelf-life compatibility with common microarray assay fabrication methods, directly related to microarray protocols. Conventional printing approaches, including contact (e.g., quill and solid pin), non-contact (e.g., piezo and inkjet), microfluidics-based, microstamping, lithography, and cell-free protein expression microarrays, have all been used with varying degrees of success with figures of merit often defined arbitrarily without comparisons to standards, or analytical or fiduciary controls. Many microarray performance reports use bench top analyte preparations lacking real-world relevance, akin to "fishing in a barrel", for proof of concept and determinations of figures of merit. This review critiques current protein

  16. Self-organized criticality in proteins: Hydropathic roughening profiles of G-protein-coupled receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, J. C.

    2013-03-01

    Proteins appear to be the most dramatic natural example of self-organized criticality (SOC), a concept that explains many otherwise apparently unlikely phenomena. Protein conformational functionality is often dominated by long-range hydrophobic or hydrophilic interactions which both drive protein compaction and mediate protein-protein interactions. Superfamily transmembrane G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest family of proteins in the human genome; their amino acid sequences form the largest database for protein-membrane interactions. While there are now structural data on the heptad transmembrane structures of representatives of several heptad families, here we show how fresh insights into global and some local chemical trends in GPCR properties can be obtained accurately from sequences alone, especially by algebraically separating the extracellular and cytoplasmic loops from transmembrane segments. The global mediation of long-range water-protein interactions occurs in conjunction with modulation of these interactions by roughened interfaces. Hydropathic roughening profiles are defined here solely in terms of amino acid sequences, and knowledge of protein coordinates is not required. Roughening profiles both for GPCR and some simpler protein families display accurate and transparent connections to protein functionality, and identify natural length scales for protein functionality.

  17. Supramolecular Assembly in Cytoskeletal Filaments and their Associated Biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safinya, Cyrus R.

    2002-03-01

    With the completion of the Human Genome Project and the emerging proteomics era, the biosciences community is beginning the daunting task of understanding the functions of a large number of interacting proteins. Cellular activity, which is usually tightly regulated, results from protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interactions, which often lead to the formation of very large assemblies of biomolecules for distinct functions. Examples include DNA condensation states during the cell cycle, and bundle and network formation of filamentous proteins in cell attachment, motility, and cytokinesis. We present recent synchrotron x-ray diffraction and optical imaging data, in cell-free systems of cytoskeletal filaments and their associated biomolecules, which reveal novel supramolecular assemblies, spanning lengths from the nanometer to the micrometer scale. Supported by NSF DMR-9972246 and NIH GM59288.

  18. Biophysical models of length control of cytoskeletal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohapatra, Lishibanya

    Cells contain elaborate and interconnected networks of protein polymers which make up the cytoskeleton. The cytoskeleton governs the internal positioning and movement of vesicles and organelles, and controls dynamic changes in cell polarity, shape and movement. Many of these processes require tight control of the size and shape of these cytoskeletal structures. A key question in cell biology is how these structures maintain a particular size and shape despite the rapid turnover of their components. In this thesis I show that the emerging mechanisms by which cells control and regulate the size of filamentous cytoskeletal structures can be classified using key parameters related to their assembly and disassembly kinetics. First, I examine quantitative models based on these specific molecular mechanisms of length control and make experimentally testable predictions that can be used to distinguish different mechanisms of length-control. Second, I study the length control of actin cables in budding yeast cells. Inspired by recent experimental observations in cells, I propose a novel antenna mechanism for cable length control which involves three key proteins: formins, which polymerize actin, Smy1 proteins, which bind formins and inhibit actin polymerization, and myosin motors, which deliver Smy1 to formins, leading to a length-dependent actin polymerization rate. My results provide testable predictions of the antenna mechanism of actin-cable length control. Next I consider the question of how different sized structures can co-exist in the same cytoplasm while making use of the same building blocks. Using theory, I discover limitations imposed by physics on the finite monomer pool as a mechanism of size control and conclude that additional length control mechanisms are required if a cell is to maintain multiple structures. While the primary focus of this thesis is on cytoskeletal structures, the broader principles and mechanisms discussed herein will apply to a range of

  19. Protein for the critically ill patient--what and when?

    PubMed

    Plank, L D

    2013-05-01

    Critical illness is characterised by catabolism of the skeletal muscle that releases amino acids for protein synthesis to support tissue repair, immune defence and inflammatory and acute-phase responses. Protein requirements for these patients have generally been based on levels that result in the lowest catabolic rates or most favourable nitrogen balance. The definition of these levels, in particular, in relation to indexing to a measure of patient weight or lean body mass, is controversial. Furthermore, optimal nitrogen balance may not necessarily equate to best clinical outcome. There is some evidence that administration of specific amino acids may be advantageous at least during the early or most catabolic phases of illness, in order to support the specific amino acid requirements of the metabolic pathways activated by the injury or infection. Current widely used guidelines differ in the protein prescription they recommend and in the timing of administration in relation to intensive care admission. A pressing need exists for well-designed randomised trials that compare differing levels of protein or amino acid provision, and the timing of this provision, for their effects on clinical endpoints.

  20. Cell cytoskeletal conformation under reversible thermal control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ting-Ya; Yang, Chung-Yao; Liao, Kai-Wei; Andrew Yeh, J.; Cheng, Chao-Min

    2013-12-01

    In order to assess the role of cytoskeletal structure in modulating cell surface topography during cell transformation, we investigated cytoskeletal organization of Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) epithelial cells at different thermal gradients. Specifically, we examined actin polymerization as a function of temperature in a controlled thermal environment. After applying an increase in temperature of 5 °C, we observed fewer actin filaments in the network, as these molecular polymers depolymerized. Partial stress fibers of MDCK cells could be rearranged, but some of them were disrupted irreversibly after a second thermal treatment, and MDCK cells underwent apoptosis at higher temperatures as well.

  1. Looking into laminin receptor: critical discussion regarding the non-integrin 37/67-kDa laminin receptor/RPSA protein.

    PubMed

    DiGiacomo, Vincent; Meruelo, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    The 37/67-kDa laminin receptor (LAMR/RPSA) was originally identified as a 67-kDa binding protein for laminin, an extracellular matrix glycoprotein that provides cellular adhesion to the basement membrane. LAMR has evolutionary origins, however, as a 37-kDa RPS2 family ribosomal component. Expressed in all domains of life, RPS2 proteins have been shown to have remarkably diverse physiological roles that vary across species. Contributing to laminin binding, ribosome biogenesis, cytoskeletal organization, and nuclear functions, this protein governs critical cellular processes including growth, survival, migration, protein synthesis, development, and differentiation. Unsurprisingly given its purview, LAMR has been associated with metastatic cancer, neurodegenerative disease and developmental abnormalities. Functioning in a receptor capacity, this protein also confers susceptibility to bacterial and viral infection. LAMR is clearly a molecule of consequence in human disease, directly mediating pathological events that make it a prime target for therapeutic interventions. Despite decades of research, there are still a large number of open questions regarding the cellular biology of LAMR, the nature of its ability to bind laminin, the function of its intrinsically disordered C-terminal region and its conversion from 37 to 67 kDa. This review attempts to convey an in-depth description of the complexity surrounding this multifaceted protein across functional, structural and pathological aspects. © 2015 Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  2. Looking into laminin receptor: critical discussion regarding the non-integrin 37/67-kDa laminin receptor/RPSA protein

    PubMed Central

    DiGiacomo, Vincent; Meruelo, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The 37/67-kDa laminin receptor (LAMR/RPSA) was originally identified as a 67-kDa binding protein for laminin, an extracellular matrix glycoprotein that provides cellular adhesion to the basement membrane. LAMR has evolutionary origins, however, as a 37-kDa RPS2 family ribosomal component. Expressed in all domains of life, RPS2 proteins have been shown to have remarkably diverse physiological roles that vary across species. Contributing to laminin binding, ribosome biogenesis, cytoskeletal organization, and nuclear functions, this protein governs critical cellular processes including growth, survival, migration, protein synthesis, development, and differentiation. Unsurprisingly given its purview, LAMR has been associated with metastatic cancer, neurodegenerative disease and developmental abnormalities. Functioning in a receptor capacity, this protein also confers susceptibility to bacterial and viral infection. LAMR is clearly a molecule of consequence in human disease, directly mediating pathological events that make it a prime target for therapeutic interventions. Despite decades of research, there are still a large number of open questions regarding the cellular biology of LAMR, the nature of its ability to bind laminin, the function of its intrinsically disordered C-terminal region and its conversion from 37 to 67 kDa. This review attempts to convey an in-depth description of the complexity surrounding this multifaceted protein across functional, structural and pathological aspects. PMID:25630983

  3. Kidney keratins: cytoskeletal stress responders with biomarker potential.

    PubMed

    Snider, Natasha T

    2016-04-01

    Keratins are cytoskeletal filamentous proteins that support the structural integrity of epithelial cells. Deficiency of the major simple epithelial keratins K8, K18, and K19 increases susceptibility to hepatobiliary injury, but keratin function in kidney injury has not been addressed. Djudjaj et al. examined renal keratins in health and disease, in both mice and humans. Their findings lay the foundation for pursuing keratins as markers and regulators of renal tubular epithelial injury. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Building Blocks of Functioning Brain: Cytoskeletal Dynamics in Neuronal Development

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Shalini; Gupton, Stephanie L.

    2016-01-01

    Neural connectivity requires proper polarization of neurons, guidance to appropriate target locations, and establishment of synaptic connections. From when neurons are born to when they finally reach their synaptic partners, neurons undergo constant rearrangment of the cytoskeleton to achieve appropriate shape and polarity. Of particular importance to neuronal guidance to target locations is the growth cone at the tip of the axon. Growth-cone steering is also dictated by the underlying cytoskeleton. All these changes require spatiotemporal control of the cytoskeletal machinery. This review summarizes the proteins that are involved in modulating the actin and microtubule cytoskeleton during the various stages of neuronal development. PMID:26940519

  5. Measurement of Force-Dependent Release Rates of Cytoskeletal Motors.

    PubMed

    Can, Sinan; Yildiz, Ahmet

    2017-01-01

    Optical tweezers permit measuring motor-filament rupture forces with piconewton sensitivity. For deeper structural and mechanistic understanding of motors, different structural constraints can be induced by pulling motor proteins at various positions and manipulating the direction of the exerted force. Here, we present an optical-trapping approach to investigate the effect of the magnitude and direction of tension applied to the linker element of cytoskeletal motors on motor-filament interactions. Using this approach, force-dependent microtubule release rates of monomeric kinesins can be directly measured by pulling on kinesin's "neck linker" with a constant force.

  6. Inducible T cell tyrosine kinase regulates actin-dependent cytoskeletal events induced by the T cell antigen receptor.

    PubMed

    Grasis, Juris A; Browne, Cecille D; Tsoukas, Constantine D

    2003-04-15

    The tec family kinase, inducible T cell tyrosine kinase (Itk), is critical for both development and activation of T lymphocytes. We have found that Itk regulates TCR/CD3-induced actin-dependent cytoskeletal events. Expression of Src homology (SH) 2 domain mutant Itk transgenes into Jurkat T cells inhibits these events. Furthermore, Itk(-/-) murine T cells display significant defects in TCR/CD3-induced actin polymerization. In addition, Jurkat cells deficient in linker for activation of T cells expression, an adaptor critical for Itk activation, display impaired cytoskeletal events and expression of SH3 mutant Itk transgenes reconstitutes this impairment. Interestingly, expression of an Itk kinase-dead mutant transgene into Jurkat cells has no effect on cytoskeletal events. Collectively, these data suggest that Itk regulates TCR/CD3-induced actin-dependent cytoskeletal events, possibly in a kinase-independent fashion.

  7. Length-Dependent Modulation of Cytoskeletal Remodeling and Mechanical Energetics in Airway Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hak Rim; Liu, Katrina; Roberts, Thomas J.; Hai, Chi-Ming

    2011-01-01

    Actin cytoskeletal remodeling is an important mechanism of airway smooth muscle (ASM) contraction. We tested the hypothesis that mechanical strain modulates the cholinergic receptor–mediated cytoskeletal recruitment of actin-binding and integrin-binding proteins in intact airway smooth muscle, thereby regulating the mechanical energetics of airway smooth muscle. We found that the carbachol-stimulated cytoskeletal recruitment of actin-related protein-3 (Arp3), metavinculin, and talin were up-regulated at short muscle lengths and down-regulated at long muscle lengths, suggesting that the actin cytoskeleton–integrin complex becomes enriched in cross-linked and branched actin filaments in shortened ASM. The mechanical energy output/input ratio during sinusoidal length oscillation was dependent on muscle length, oscillatory amplitude, and cholinergic activation. The enhancing effect of cholinergic stimulation on mechanical energy output/input ratio at short and long muscle lengths may be explained by the length-dependent modulation of cytoskeletal recruitment and crossbridge cycling, respectively. We postulate that ASM functions as a hybrid biomaterial, capable of switching between operating as a cytoskeleton-based mechanical energy store at short muscle lengths to operating as an actomyosin-powered mechanical energy generator at long muscle lengths. This postulate predicts that targeting the signaling molecules involved in cytoskeletal recruitment may provide a novel approach to dilating collapsed airways in obstructive airway disease. PMID:20705939

  8. Length-dependent modulation of cytoskeletal remodeling and mechanical energetics in airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hak Rim; Liu, Katrina; Roberts, Thomas J; Hai, Chi-Ming

    2011-06-01

    Actin cytoskeletal remodeling is an important mechanism of airway smooth muscle (ASM) contraction. We tested the hypothesis that mechanical strain modulates the cholinergic receptor-mediated cytoskeletal recruitment of actin-binding and integrin-binding proteins in intact airway smooth muscle, thereby regulating the mechanical energetics of airway smooth muscle. We found that the carbachol-stimulated cytoskeletal recruitment of actin-related protein-3 (Arp3), metavinculin, and talin were up-regulated at short muscle lengths and down-regulated at long muscle lengths, suggesting that the actin cytoskeleton--integrin complex becomes enriched in cross-linked and branched actin filaments in shortened ASM. The mechanical energy output/input ratio during sinusoidal length oscillation was dependent on muscle length, oscillatory amplitude, and cholinergic activation. The enhancing effect of cholinergic stimulation on mechanical energy output/input ratio at short and long muscle lengths may be explained by the length-dependent modulation of cytoskeletal recruitment and crossbridge cycling, respectively. We postulate that ASM functions as a hybrid biomaterial, capable of switching between operating as a cytoskeleton-based mechanical energy store at short muscle lengths to operating as an actomyosin-powered mechanical energy generator at long muscle lengths. This postulate predicts that targeting the signaling molecules involved in cytoskeletal recruitment may provide a novel approach to dilating collapsed airways in obstructive airway disease.

  9. Visualization of Actin Cytoskeletal Dynamics in Fixed and Live Drosophila Egg Chambers.

    PubMed

    Groen, Christopher M; Tootle, Tina L

    2015-01-01

    Visualization of actin cytoskeletal dynamics is critical for understanding the spatial and temporal regulation of actin remodeling. Drosophila oogenesis provides an excellent model system for visualizing the actin cytoskeleton. Here, we present methods for imaging the actin cytoskeleton in Drosophila egg chambers in both fixed samples by phalloidin staining and in live egg chambers using transgenic actin labeling tools.

  10. Identifying relevant positions in proteins by Critical Variable Selection.

    PubMed

    Grigolon, Silvia; Franz, Silvio; Marsili, Matteo

    2016-06-21

    Evolution in its course has found a variety of solutions to the same optimisation problem. The advent of high-throughput genomic sequencing has made available extensive data from which, in principle, one can infer the underlying structure on which biological functions rely. In this paper, we present a new method aimed at the extraction of sites encoding structural and functional properties from a set of protein primary sequences, namely a multiple sequence alignment. The method, called critical variable selection, is based on the idea that subsets of relevant sites correspond to subsequences that occur with a particularly broad frequency distribution in the dataset. By applying this algorithm to in silico sequences, to the response regulator receiver and to the voltage sensor domain of ion channels, we show that this procedure recovers not only the information encoded in single site statistics and pairwise correlations but also captures dependencies going beyond pairwise correlations. The method proposed here is complementary to statistical coupling analysis, in that the most relevant sites predicted by the two methods differ markedly. We find robust and consistent results for datasets as small as few hundred sequences that reveal a hidden hierarchy of sites that are consistent with the present knowledge on biologically relevant sites and evolutionary dynamics. This suggests that critical variable selection is capable of identifying a core of sites encoding functional and structural information in a multiple sequence alignment.

  11. Rho-kinase mediated cytoskeletal stiffness in skinned smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Bo; Wang, Lu; Zhang, Jenny; Pascoe, Chris D.; Norris, Brandon A.; Liu, Jeffrey C.-Y.; Solomon, Dennis; Paré, Peter D.; Deng, Linhong

    2013-01-01

    The structurally dynamic cytoskeleton is important in many cell functions. Large gaps still exist in our knowledge regarding what regulates cytoskeletal dynamics and what underlies the structural plasticity. Because Rho-kinase is an upstream regulator of signaling events leading to phosphorylation of many cytoskeletal proteins in many cell types, we have chosen this kinase as the focus of the present study. In detergent skinned tracheal smooth muscle preparations, we quantified the proteins eluted from the muscle cells over time and monitored the muscle's ability to respond to acetylcholine (ACh) stimulation to produce force and stiffness. In a partially skinned preparation not able to generate active force but could still stiffen upon ACh stimulation, we found that the ACh-induced stiffness was independent of calcium and myosin light chain phosphorylation. This indicates that the myosin light chain-dependent actively cycling crossbridges are not likely the source of the stiffness. The results also indicate that Rho-kinase is central to the ACh-induced stiffness, because inhibition of the kinase by H1152 (1 μM) abolished the stiffening. Furthermore, the rate of relaxation of calcium-induced stiffness in the skinned preparation was faster than that of ACh-induced stiffness, with or without calcium, suggesting that different signaling pathways lead to different means of maintenance of stiffness in the skinned preparation. PMID:24072407

  12. Adaptor protein cerebral cavernous malformation 3 (CCM3) mediates phosphorylation of the cytoskeletal proteins ezrin/radixin/moesin by mammalian Ste20-4 to protect cells from oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Fidalgo, Miguel; Guerrero, Ana; Fraile, María; Iglesias, Cristina; Pombo, Celia M; Zalvide, Juan

    2012-03-30

    While studying the functions of CCM3/PDCD10, a gene encoding an adaptor protein whose mutation results in vascular malformations, we have found that it is involved in a novel response to oxidative stress that results in phosphorylation and activation of the ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM) family of proteins. This phosphorylation protects cells from accidental cell death induced by oxidative stress. We also present evidence that ERM phosphorylation is performed by the GCKIII kinase Mst4, which is activated and relocated to the cell periphery after oxidative stress. The cellular levels of Mst4 and its activation after oxidative stress depend on the presence of CCM3, as absence of the latter impairs the phosphorylation of ERM proteins and enhances death of cells exposed to reactive oxygen species. These findings shed new light on the response of cells to oxidative stress and identify an important pathophysiological situation in which ERM proteins and their phosphorylation play a significant role.

  13. Critical Features of Fragment Libraries for Protein Structure Prediction.

    PubMed

    Trevizani, Raphael; Custódio, Fábio Lima; Dos Santos, Karina Baptista; Dardenne, Laurent Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    The use of fragment libraries is a popular approach among protein structure prediction methods and has proven to substantially improve the quality of predicted structures. However, some vital aspects of a fragment library that influence the accuracy of modeling a native structure remain to be determined. This study investigates some of these features. Particularly, we analyze the effect of using secondary structure prediction guiding fragments selection, different fragments sizes and the effect of structural clustering of fragments within libraries. To have a clearer view of how these factors affect protein structure prediction, we isolated the process of model building by fragment assembly from some common limitations associated with prediction methods, e.g., imprecise energy functions and optimization algorithms, by employing an exact structure-based objective function under a greedy algorithm. Our results indicate that shorter fragments reproduce the native structure more accurately than the longer. Libraries composed of multiple fragment lengths generate even better structures, where longer fragments show to be more useful at the beginning of the simulations. The use of many different fragment sizes shows little improvement when compared to predictions carried out with libraries that comprise only three different fragment sizes. Models obtained from libraries built using only sequence similarity are, on average, better than those built with a secondary structure prediction bias. However, we found that the use of secondary structure prediction allows greater reduction of the search space, which is invaluable for prediction methods. The results of this study can be critical guidelines for the use of fragment libraries in protein structure prediction.

  14. Critical Features of Fragment Libraries for Protein Structure Prediction

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Karina Baptista

    2017-01-01

    The use of fragment libraries is a popular approach among protein structure prediction methods and has proven to substantially improve the quality of predicted structures. However, some vital aspects of a fragment library that influence the accuracy of modeling a native structure remain to be determined. This study investigates some of these features. Particularly, we analyze the effect of using secondary structure prediction guiding fragments selection, different fragments sizes and the effect of structural clustering of fragments within libraries. To have a clearer view of how these factors affect protein structure prediction, we isolated the process of model building by fragment assembly from some common limitations associated with prediction methods, e.g., imprecise energy functions and optimization algorithms, by employing an exact structure-based objective function under a greedy algorithm. Our results indicate that shorter fragments reproduce the native structure more accurately than the longer. Libraries composed of multiple fragment lengths generate even better structures, where longer fragments show to be more useful at the beginning of the simulations. The use of many different fragment sizes shows little improvement when compared to predictions carried out with libraries that comprise only three different fragment sizes. Models obtained from libraries built using only sequence similarity are, on average, better than those built with a secondary structure prediction bias. However, we found that the use of secondary structure prediction allows greater reduction of the search space, which is invaluable for prediction methods. The results of this study can be critical guidelines for the use of fragment libraries in protein structure prediction. PMID:28085928

  15. Regulation of protein phosphatase 2A methylation by LCMT1 and PME-1 plays a critical role in differentiation of neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sontag, Jean-Marie; Nunbhakdi-Craig, Viyada; Mitterhuber, Martina; Ogris, Egon; Sontag, Estelle

    2010-12-01

    Neuritic alterations are a major feature of many neurodegenerative disorders. Methylation of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) catalytic C subunit by the leucine carboxyl methyltransferase (LCMT1), and demethylation by the protein phosphatase methylesterase 1, is a critical PP2A regulatory mechanism. It modulates the formation of PP2A holoenzymes containing the Bα subunit, which dephosphorylate key neuronal cytoskeletal proteins, including tau. Significantly, we have reported that LCMT1, methylated C and Bα expression levels are down-regulated in Alzheimer disease-affected brain regions. In this study, we show that enhanced expression of LCMT1 in cultured N2a neuroblastoma cells, which increases endogenous methylated C and Bα levels, induces changes in F-actin organization. It promotes serum-independent neuritogenesis and development of extended tau-positive processes upon N2a cell differentiation. These stimulatory effects can be abrogated by LCMT1 knockdown and S-adenosylhomocysteine, an inhibitor of methylation reactions. Expression of protein phosphatase methylesterase 1 and the methylation-site L309Δ C subunit mutant, which decrease intracellular methylated C and Bα levels, block N2a cell differentiation and LCMT1-mediated neurite formation. Lastly, inducible and non-inducible knockdown of Bα in N2a cells inhibit process outgrowth. Altogether, our results establish a novel mechanistic link between PP2A methylation and development of neurite-like processes.

  16. Embryonic and larval neural connectivity: progressive changes in synapse form and function at the neuromuscular junction mediated by cytoskeletal regulation.

    PubMed

    Long, Jennifer B; Van Vactor, David

    2013-01-01

    During development, precise formation of millions of synaptic connections is critical for the formation of a functional nervous system. Synaptogenesis is a complex multistep process in which axons follow gradients of secreted and cell surface guidance cues to reach their target area, at which point they must accurately distinguish their specific target. Upon target recognition, the axonal growth cone undergoes rapid growth and morphological changes, ultimately forming a functional synapse that continues to remodel during activity-dependent plasticity. Significant evidence suggests that the underlying actin and microtubule (MT) cytoskeletons are key effectors throughout synaptogenesis downstream of numerous receptors and signaling pathways. An increasing number of cytoskeletal-associated proteins have been shown to influence actin and MT stability and dynamics and many of these regulators have been implicated during synaptic morphogenesis using both mammalian and invertebrate model systems. In this review, we present an overview of the role cytoskeletal regulators play during the formation of the Drosophila neuromuscular junction. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Cytoskeletal Tension inhibits Hippo signaling through an Ajuba-Warts complex

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Gongping; Pan, Yuanwang; Irvine, Kenneth D.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical forces have been proposed to modulate organ growth, but a molecular mechanism that links them to growth regulation in vivo has been lacking. We report that increasing tension within the cytoskeleton increases Drosophila wing growth, whereas decreasing cytoskeletal tension decreases wing growth. These changes in growth can be accounted for by changes in the activity of Yorkie, a transcription factor regulated by the Hippo pathway. The influence of myosin activity on Yorkie depends genetically on the Ajuba LIM protein Jub, a negative regulator of Warts within the Hippo pathway. We further show that Jub associates with α-catenin, and that its localization to adherens junctions and association with α-catenin are promoted by cytoskeletal tension. Jub recruits Warts to junctions in a tension-dependent manner. Our observations delineate a mechanism that links cytoskeletal tension to regulation of Hippo pathway activity, providing a molecular understanding of how mechanical forces can modulate organ growth. PMID:24995985

  18. Cytoskeletal elements in the bacterium Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegermann, Jan; Herrmann, Richard; Mayer, Frank

    2002-09-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a pathogenic eubacterium lacking a cell wall. Three decades ago, a "rod", an intracellular cytoskeletal structure, was discovered that was assumed to define and stabilize the elongated cell shape. Later, by treatment with detergent, a "Triton shell" (i.e. a fraction of detergent-insoluble cell material) could be obtained, believed to contain additional cytoskeletal elements. Now, by application of a modified Triton X-100 treatment, we are able to demonstrate that M. pneumoniae possesses a cytoskeleton consisting of a blade-like rod and a peripheral lining located close to the inner face of the cytoplasmic membrane, exhibiting features of a highly regular network. Attached "stalks" may support the cytoplasmic membrane. The rod was connected to the cell periphery by "spokes" and showed a defined ultrastructure. Its proximal end was found to be attached to a wheel-like complex. Fibrils extended from the proximal end of the rod into the cytoplasm.

  19. The cytoskeletal arrangements necessary to neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Compagnucci, Claudia; Piemonte, Fiorella; Sferra, Antonella; Piermarini, Emanuela; Bertini, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    During the process of neurogenesis, the stem cell committed to the neuronal cell fate starts a series of molecular and morphological changes. The understanding of the physio-pathology of mechanisms controlling the molecular and morphological changes occurring during neuronal differentiation is fundamental to the development of effective therapies for many neurologic diseases. Unfortunately, our knowledge of the biological events occurring in the cell during neuronal differentiation is still poor. In this study, we focus preliminarily on the relevance of the cytoskeletal rearrangements, which earlier drive the morphology of the neuronal precursors, and later the migrating/mature neurons. In fact, neuritogenesis, neurite branching, outgrowth and retraction are seminal to the development of a fully functional nervous system. With this in mind, we highlight the importance of iPSC technology to study the processes of cytoskeletal-driven morphological changes during neuronal differentiation. PMID:26760504

  20. The cytoskeletal arrangements necessary to neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Compagnucci, Claudia; Piemonte, Fiorella; Sferra, Antonella; Piermarini, Emanuela; Bertini, Enrico

    2016-04-12

    During the process of neurogenesis, the stem cell committed to the neuronal cell fate starts a series of molecular and morphological changes. The understanding of the physio-pathology of mechanisms controlling the molecular and morphological changes occurring during neuronal differentiation is fundamental to the development of effective therapies for many neurologic diseases. Unfortunately, our knowledge of the biological events occurring in the cell during neuronal differentiation is still poor. In this study, we focus preliminarily on the relevance of the cytoskeletal rearrangements, which earlier drive the morphology of the neuronal precursors, and later the migrating/mature neurons. In fact, neuritogenesis, neurite branching, outgrowth and retraction are seminal to the development of a fully functional nervous system. With this in mind, we highlight the importance of iPSC technology to study the processes of cytoskeletal-driven morphological changes during neuronal differentiation.

  1. Cell Forces and Cytoskeletal Order Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Discher, Dennis

    2012-02-01

    Nematic, Smectic and Isotropic Order parameters have found wide-spread use in characterizing all manner of soft matter systems, but have not yet been applied to characterize and understand the structures within living cells, particularly cytoskeletal structures. Several examples will be used to illustrate the utility of such analyses, ranging from experiments on stem cells attached to or in various elastic matrices to embryonic heart tissue and simulations of membrane cytoskeletons under all manner of stressing. Recently developed theory will be shown to apply in general with account of cell contractility, matrix elasticity and dimensionality as well as cell shape and a newly defined ``cytoskeletal polarizability.'' The latter property of cells is likely different between different cell types due to different amounts of key cytoskeletal components with some types of stem cells being more polarizable than others. Evidence of coupling to the nucleus as a viscoelastic inclusion will also be presented. [4pt] References: (1) P. Dalhaimer, D.E. Discher, T. Lubensky. Crosslinked actin networks exhibit liquid crystal elastomer behavior, including soft-mode elasticity. Nature Physics 3: 354-360 (2007). (2) A. Zemel, F.Rehfeldt, A.E.X. Brown, D.E. Discher, and S.A. Safran. Optimal matrix rigidity in the self-polarization of stem cells. Nature Physics 6: 468 - 473 (2010).

  2. HSF-1-mediated cytoskeletal integrity determines thermotolerance and life span.

    PubMed

    Baird, Nathan A; Douglas, Peter M; Simic, Milos S; Grant, Ana R; Moresco, James J; Wolff, Suzanne C; Yates, John R; Manning, Gerard; Dillin, Andrew

    2014-10-17

    The conserved heat shock transcription factor-1 (HSF-1) is essential to cellular stress resistance and life-span determination. The canonical function of HSF-1 is to regulate a network of genes encoding molecular chaperones that protect proteins from damage caused by extrinsic environmental stress or intrinsic age-related deterioration. In Caenorhabditis elegans, we engineered a modified HSF-1 strain that increased stress resistance and longevity without enhanced chaperone induction. This health assurance acted through the regulation of the calcium-binding protein PAT-10. Loss of pat-10 caused a collapse of the actin cytoskeleton, stress resistance, and life span. Furthermore, overexpression of pat-10 increased actin filament stability, thermotolerance, and longevity, indicating that in addition to chaperone regulation, HSF-1 has a prominent role in cytoskeletal integrity, ensuring cellular function during stress and aging.

  3. Cytoskeletal pinning controls phase separation in multicomponent lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Arumugam, Senthil; Petrov, Eugene P; Schwille, Petra

    2015-03-10

    We study the effect of a minimal cytoskeletal network formed on the surface of giant unilamellar vesicles by the prokaryotic tubulin homolog, FtsZ, on phase separation in freestanding lipid membranes. FtsZ has been modified to interact with the membrane through a membrane targeting sequence from the prokaryotic protein MinD. FtsZ with the attached membrane targeting sequence efficiently forms a highly interconnected network on membranes with a concentration-dependent mesh size, much similar to the eukaryotic cytoskeletal network underlying the plasma membrane. Using giant unilamellar vesicles formed from a quaternary lipid mixture, we demonstrate that the artificial membrane-associated cytoskeleton, on the one hand, suppresses large-scale phase separation below the phase transition temperature, and, on the other hand, preserves phase separation above the transition temperature. Our experimental observations support the ideas put forward in our previous simulation study: In particular, the picket fence effect on phase separation may explain why micrometer-scale membrane domains are observed in isolated, cytoskeleton-free giant plasma membrane vesicles, but not in intact cell membranes. The experimentally observed suppression of large-scale phase separation much below the transition temperatures also serves as an argument in favor of the cryoprotective role of the cytoskeleton. Copyright © 2015 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Visualization of Cytoskeletal Elements by the Atomic Force Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdyyeva, Tamara; Woodworth, Craig; Sokolov, Igor

    2004-03-01

    We describe a novel application of atomic force microscopy (AFM) to directly visualize cytoskeletal fibers in human foreskin epithelial cells. The nonionic detergent Triton X-100 in a low concentration was used to remove the membrane, soluble proteins, and organelles from the cell. The remaining cytoskeleton can then be directly visualized in either liquid or air-dried ambient conditions. These two types of scanning provide complimentary information. Scanning in liquids visualizes the surface filaments of the cytoskeleton, whereas scanning in air shows both the surface filaments and the total volume of the cytoskeletal fibers. The smallest fibers observed were ca. 50 nm in diameter. The lateral resolution of this technique was ca.20 nm, which can be increased to a single nanometer level by choosing sharper AFM tips. Because the AFM is a true 3 dimensional technique, we are able to quantify the observed cytoskeleton by its density and volume. The types of fibers can be identified by their size, similar to electron microscopy.

  5. Cytoskeletal Reorganization Drives Mesenchymal Condensation and Regulates Downstream Molecular Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Poulomi; Chapman, Susan C.

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal condensation occurs when specified mesenchyme cells self-organize over several days to form a distinctive cartilage template. Here, we determine how and when specified mesenchyme cells integrate mechanical and molecular information from their environment, forming cartilage condensations in the pharyngeal arches of chick embryos. By disrupting cytoskeletal reorganization, we demonstrate that dynamic cell shape changes drive condensation and modulate the response of the condensing cells to Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF), Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) and Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGF-β) signaling pathways. Rho Kinase (ROCK)-driven actomyosin contractions and Myosin II-generated differential cell cortex tension regulate these cell shape changes. Disruption of the condensation process inhibits the differentiation of the mesenchyme cells into chondrocytes, demonstrating that condensation regulates the fate of the mesenchyme cells. We also find that dorsal and ventral condensations undergo distinct cell shape changes. BMP signaling is instructive for dorsal condensation-specific cell shape changes. Moreover, condensations exhibit ventral characteristics in the absence of BMP signaling, suggesting that in the pharyngeal arches ventral morphology is the ground pattern. Overall, this study characterizes the interplay between cytoskeletal dynamics and molecular signaling in a self-organizing system during tissue morphogenesis. PMID:26237312

  6. Cdk6 contributes to cytoskeletal stability in erythroid cells.

    PubMed

    Uras, Iris Z; Scheicher, Ruth M; Kollmann, Karoline; Glösmann, Martin; Prchal-Murphy, Michaela; Tigan, Anca S; Fux, Daniela A; Altamura, Sandro; Neves, Joana; Muckenthaler, Martina; Bennett, Keiryn L; Kubicek, Stefan; Hinds, Philip W; von Lindern, Marieke; Sexl, Veronika

    2017-03-02

    Mice lacking Cdk6 kinase activity suffer from mild anemia accompanied by elevated numbers of Ter119+ cells in the bone marrow. The animals show hardly any alterations in erythroid development, indicating that Cdk6 is not required for proliferation and maturation of erythroid cells. There is also no difference in stress erythropoiesis following hemolysis in vivo. However, Cdk6-/- erythrocytes have a shortened lifespan and are more sensitive to mechanical stress in vitro, suggesting differences in the cytoskeletal architecture. Erythroblasts contain both Cdk4 and Cdk6, while mature erythrocytes apparently lack Cdk4 and their Cdk6 is partly associated with the cytoskeleton. We used mass spectrometry to show that Cdk6 interacts with a number of proteins involved in cytoskeletal organization. Cdk6-/- erythroblasts show impaired F-actin formation and lower levels of gelsolin, which interacts with Cdk6. We show further that Cdk6 regulates the transcription of a panel of genes involved in actin (de-) polymerization. Cdk6-deficient cells are sensitive to drugs that interfere with the cytoskeleton, suggesting that our findings are relevant to the treatment of patients with anemia and may be relevant to cancer patients treated with the new generation of CDK6 inhibitors.

  7. Cytoskeletal Reorganization Drives Mesenchymal Condensation and Regulates Downstream Molecular Signaling.

    PubMed

    Ray, Poulomi; Chapman, Susan C

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal condensation occurs when specified mesenchyme cells self-organize over several days to form a distinctive cartilage template. Here, we determine how and when specified mesenchyme cells integrate mechanical and molecular information from their environment, forming cartilage condensations in the pharyngeal arches of chick embryos. By disrupting cytoskeletal reorganization, we demonstrate that dynamic cell shape changes drive condensation and modulate the response of the condensing cells to Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF), Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) and Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGF-β) signaling pathways. Rho Kinase (ROCK)-driven actomyosin contractions and Myosin II-generated differential cell cortex tension regulate these cell shape changes. Disruption of the condensation process inhibits the differentiation of the mesenchyme cells into chondrocytes, demonstrating that condensation regulates the fate of the mesenchyme cells. We also find that dorsal and ventral condensations undergo distinct cell shape changes. BMP signaling is instructive for dorsal condensation-specific cell shape changes. Moreover, condensations exhibit ventral characteristics in the absence of BMP signaling, suggesting that in the pharyngeal arches ventral morphology is the ground pattern. Overall, this study characterizes the interplay between cytoskeletal dynamics and molecular signaling in a self-organizing system during tissue morphogenesis.

  8. TRPV4 regulates calcium homeostasis, cytoskeletal remodeling, conventional outflow and intraocular pressure in the mammalian eye

    PubMed Central

    Ryskamp, Daniel A.; Frye, Amber M.; Phuong, Tam T. T.; Yarishkin, Oleg; Jo, Andrew O.; Xu, Yong; Lakk, Monika; Iuso, Anthony; Redmon, Sarah N.; Ambati, Balamurali; Hageman, Gregory; Prestwich, Glenn D.; Torrejon, Karen Y.; Križaj, David

    2016-01-01

    An intractable challenge in glaucoma treatment has been to identify druggable targets within the conventional aqueous humor outflow pathway, which is thought to be regulated/dysregulated by elusive mechanosensitive protein(s). Here, biochemical and functional analyses localized the putative mechanosensitive cation channel TRPV4 to the plasma membrane of primary and immortalized human TM (hTM) cells, and to human and mouse TM tissue. Selective TRPV4 agonists and substrate stretch evoked TRPV4-dependent cation/Ca2+ influx, thickening of F-actin stress fibers and reinforcement of focal adhesion contacts. TRPV4 inhibition enhanced the outflow facility and lowered perfusate pressure in biomimetic TM scaffolds populated with primary hTM cells. Systemic delivery, intraocular injection or topical application of putative TRPV4 antagonist prodrug analogs lowered IOP in glaucomatous mouse eyes and protected retinal neurons from IOP-induced death. Together, these findings indicate that TRPV4 channels function as a critical component of mechanosensitive, Ca2+-signaling machinery within the TM, and that TRPV4-dependent cytoskeletal remodeling regulates TM stiffness and outflow. Thus, TRPV4 is a potential IOP sensor within the conventional outflow pathway and a novel target for treating ocular hypertension. PMID:27510430

  9. TRPV4 regulates calcium homeostasis, cytoskeletal remodeling, conventional outflow and intraocular pressure in the mammalian eye.

    PubMed

    Ryskamp, Daniel A; Frye, Amber M; Phuong, Tam T T; Yarishkin, Oleg; Jo, Andrew O; Xu, Yong; Lakk, Monika; Iuso, Anthony; Redmon, Sarah N; Ambati, Balamurali; Hageman, Gregory; Prestwich, Glenn D; Torrejon, Karen Y; Križaj, David

    2016-08-11

    An intractable challenge in glaucoma treatment has been to identify druggable targets within the conventional aqueous humor outflow pathway, which is thought to be regulated/dysregulated by elusive mechanosensitive protein(s). Here, biochemical and functional analyses localized the putative mechanosensitive cation channel TRPV4 to the plasma membrane of primary and immortalized human TM (hTM) cells, and to human and mouse TM tissue. Selective TRPV4 agonists and substrate stretch evoked TRPV4-dependent cation/Ca(2+) influx, thickening of F-actin stress fibers and reinforcement of focal adhesion contacts. TRPV4 inhibition enhanced the outflow facility and lowered perfusate pressure in biomimetic TM scaffolds populated with primary hTM cells. Systemic delivery, intraocular injection or topical application of putative TRPV4 antagonist prodrug analogs lowered IOP in glaucomatous mouse eyes and protected retinal neurons from IOP-induced death. Together, these findings indicate that TRPV4 channels function as a critical component of mechanosensitive, Ca(2+)-signaling machinery within the TM, and that TRPV4-dependent cytoskeletal remodeling regulates TM stiffness and outflow. Thus, TRPV4 is a potential IOP sensor within the conventional outflow pathway and a novel target for treating ocular hypertension.

  10. Abnormal cytoskeletal assembly in platelets from uremic patients.

    PubMed Central

    Escolar, G.; Díaz-Ricart, M.; Cases, A.; Castillo, R.; Ordinas, A.; White, J. G.

    1993-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in the hemostatic abnormality of uremic patients remain obscure. We have explored the response of normal and uremic platelets to surface activation at the ultrastructural level and analyzed changes in the composition of proteins associated with normal and uremic platelet cytoskeletons after stimulation with thrombin (0.01 and 0.1 U/ml). Cytoskeletons were obtained by extraction with Triton X-100, processed by sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and the presence of cytoskeletal proteins analyzed by densitometry. Under static conditions, uremic platelets spread with difficulty on formvar-coated grids. The percentage of platelets that spread fully on this polymer surface was statistically reduced compared with that of control platelets (11 +/- 1.4 vs. 21 +/- 1.6; P < 0.05). An impairment of cytoskeletal organization was observed in resting uremic platelets but abnormalities were more evident after thrombin activation. The incorporation of actin into the cytoskeletons of thrombin-stimulated uremic platelets was significantly reduced with respect to controls (6 +/- 3% vs. 29 +/- 5%; P < 0.01 after 0.01 U/ml and 28 +/- 9% vs. 59 +/- 10%; P < 0.05 after 0.1 U/ml). Decreased associations of actin-binding protein (P < 0.01), alpha-actinin (P < 0.05), and tropomyosin (P < 0.05) with the cytoskeletons of uremic platelets were also noted. No difference was observed for the incorporation of myosin into the cytoskeletons of activated uremic platelets. These results suggest functional and biochemical alterations of the platelet cytoskeleton in uremia, which may contribute to the impairment of platelet function observed in uremic patients. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8362980

  11. PTP-PEST controls EphA3 activation and ephrin-induced cytoskeletal remodelling.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Mariam; Nievergall, Eva; Gegenbauer, Kristina; Llerena, Carmen; Atapattu, Lakmali; Hallé, Maxime; Tremblay, Michel L; Janes, Peter W; Lackmann, Martin

    2016-01-15

    Eph receptors and their corresponding membrane-bound ephrin ligands regulate cell positioning and establish tissue patterns during embryonic and oncogenic development. Emerging evidence suggests that assembly of polymeric Eph signalling clusters relies on cytoskeletal reorganisation and underlies regulation by protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). PTP-PEST (also known as PTPN12) is a central regulator of actin cytoskeletal dynamics. Here, we demonstrate that an N-terminal fragment of PTP-PEST, generated through an ephrinA5-triggered and spatially confined cleavage mediated by caspase-3, attenuates EphA3 receptor activation and its internalisation. Isolation of EphA3 receptor signalling clusters within intact plasma membrane fragments obtained by detergent-free cell fractionation reveals that stimulation of cells with ephrin triggers effective recruitment of this catalytically active truncated form of PTP-PEST together with key cytoskeletal and focal adhesion proteins. Importantly, modulation of actin polymerisation using pharmacological and dominant-negative approaches affects EphA3 phosphorylation in a similar manner to overexpression of PTP-PEST. We conclude that PTP-PEST regulates EphA3 activation both by affecting cytoskeletal remodelling and through its direct action as a PTP controlling EphA3 phosphorylation, indicating its multifaceted regulation of Eph signalling. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. Tristetraprolin functions in cytoskeletal organization during mouse oocyte maturation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaohui; Li, Xiaoyan; Ma, Rujun; Xiong, Bo; Sun, Shao-Chen; Liu, Honglin; Gu, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Tristetraprolin (TTP), a member of TIS11 family containing CCCH tandem zinc finger, is one of the best characterized RNA-binding proteins. However, to date, the role of TTP in mammalian oocytes remains completely unknown. In the present study, we report the altered maturational progression and cytokinesis, upon specific knockdown of TTP in mouse oocytes. Furthermore, by confocal scanning, we observe the failure to form cortical actin cap during meiosis of TTP-depleted oocytes. Loss of TTP in oocytes also results in disruption of meiotic spindle morphology and chromosome alignment. In support of these findings, incidence of aneuploidy is accordingly increased when TTP is abated in oocytes. Our results suggest that TTP as a novel cytoskeletal regulator is required for spindle morphology/chromosome alignment and actin polymerization in oocytes. PMID:27458159

  13. HSF-1 mediated cytoskeletal integrity determines thermotolerance and lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Baird, Nathan A.; Douglas, Peter M.; Simic, Milos S.; Grant, Ana R.; Moresco, James J.; Wolff, Suzanne C.; Yates, John R.; Manning, Gerard; Dillin, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The conserved transcription factor HSF-1 is essential to cellular stress resistance and organismal lifespan determination. The canonical function of HSF-1 is to regulate a network of molecular chaperones that maintain protein homeostasis during extrinsic environmental stresses or intrinsic age related deterioration. In the metazoan C. elegans, we engineered a modified HSF-1 strain that increases stress resistance and longevity without enhancing chaperone induction. This HSF-1 dependent health assurance acts through the regulation of pat-10. Upon heat stress pat-10 upregulation maintains a functional actin cytoskeleton and endocytic network. Loss of pat-10 causes a collapse of organismal health and failure of stress resistance. Furthermore, overexpression of pat-10 is sufficient to increase both thermotolerance and longevity by mechanisms that affect actin stability. Our findings indicate that in addition to chaperone induction, HSF-1 plays a prominent role in cytoskeletal integrity to ensure proper cellular function during times of stress and aging. PMID:25324391

  14. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans lipopolysaccharide affects human gingival fibroblast cytoskeletal organization.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Venegas, Gloria; Contreras-Marmolejo, Luis Arturo; Román-Alvárez, Patricia; Barajas-Torres, Carolina

    2008-04-01

    The cytoskeleton is a dynamic structure that plays a key role in maintaining cell morphology and function. This study investigates the effect of bacterial wall lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a strong inflammatory agent, on the dynamics and organization of actin, tubulin, vimentin, and vinculin proteins in human gingival fibroblasts (HGF). A time-dependent study showed a noticeable change in actin architecture after 1.5 h of incubation with LPS (1 microg/ml) with the formation of orthogonal fibers and further accumulation of actin filament at the cell periphery by 24 h. When 0.01-10 microg/ml of LPS was added to human gingival fibroblast cultures, cells acquired a round, flat shape and gradually developed cytoplasmic ruffling. Lipopolysaccharides extracted from Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans periodontopathogenic bacteria promoted alterations in F-actin stress fibres of human gingival cells. Normally, human gingival cells have F-actin fibres that are organized in linear distribution throughout the cells, extending along the cell's length. LPS-treated cells exhibited changes in cytoskeletal protein organization, and F-actin was reorganized by the formation of bundles underneath and parallel to the cell membrane. We also found the reorganization of the vimentin network into vimentin bundling after 1.5 h of treatment. HGF cells exhibited diffuse and granular gamma-tubulin stain. There was no change in LPS-treated HGF. However, vinculin plaques distributed in the cell body diminished after LPS treatment. We conclude that the dynamic and structured organization of cytoskeletal filaments and actin assembly in human gingival fibroblasts is altered by LPS treatment and is accompanied by a decrease in F-actin pools.

  15. Cell shape, cytoskeletal mechanics, and cell cycle control in angiogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingber, D. E.; Prusty, D.; Sun, Z.; Betensky, H.; Wang, N.

    1995-01-01

    Capillary endothelial cells can be switched between growth and differentiation by altering cell-extracellular matrix interactions and thereby, modulating cell shape. Studies were carried out to determine when cell shape exerts its growth-regulatory influence during cell cycle progression and to explore the role of cytoskeletal structure and mechanics in this control mechanism. When G0-synchronized cells were cultured in basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-containing defined medium on dishes coated with increasing densities of fibronectin or a synthetic integrin ligand (RGD-containing peptide), cell spreading, nuclear extension, and DNA synthesis all increased in parallel. To determine the minimum time cells must be adherent and spread on extracellular matrix (ECM) to gain entry into S phase, cells were removed with trypsin or induced to retract using cytochalasin D at different times after plating. Both approaches revealed that cells must remain extended for approximately 12-15 h and hence, most of G1, in order to enter S phase. After this restriction point was passed, normally 'anchorage-dependent' endothelial cells turned on DNA synthesis even when round and in suspension. The importance of actin-containing microfilaments in shape-dependent growth control was confirmed by culturing cells in the presence of cytochalasin D (25-1000 ng ml-1): dose-dependent inhibition of cell spreading, nuclear extension, and DNA synthesis resulted. In contrast, induction of microtubule disassembly using nocodazole had little effect on cell or nuclear spreading and only partially inhibited DNA synthesis. Interestingly, combination of nocodazole with a suboptimal dose of cytochalasin D (100 ng ml-1) resulted in potent inhibition of both spreading and growth, suggesting that microtubules are redundant structural elements which can provide critical load-bearing functions when microfilaments are partially compromised. Similar synergism between nocodazole and cytochalasin D was observed

  16. Cell shape, cytoskeletal mechanics, and cell cycle control in angiogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingber, D. E.; Prusty, D.; Sun, Z.; Betensky, H.; Wang, N.

    1995-01-01

    Capillary endothelial cells can be switched between growth and differentiation by altering cell-extracellular matrix interactions and thereby, modulating cell shape. Studies were carried out to determine when cell shape exerts its growth-regulatory influence during cell cycle progression and to explore the role of cytoskeletal structure and mechanics in this control mechanism. When G0-synchronized cells were cultured in basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-containing defined medium on dishes coated with increasing densities of fibronectin or a synthetic integrin ligand (RGD-containing peptide), cell spreading, nuclear extension, and DNA synthesis all increased in parallel. To determine the minimum time cells must be adherent and spread on extracellular matrix (ECM) to gain entry into S phase, cells were removed with trypsin or induced to retract using cytochalasin D at different times after plating. Both approaches revealed that cells must remain extended for approximately 12-15 h and hence, most of G1, in order to enter S phase. After this restriction point was passed, normally 'anchorage-dependent' endothelial cells turned on DNA synthesis even when round and in suspension. The importance of actin-containing microfilaments in shape-dependent growth control was confirmed by culturing cells in the presence of cytochalasin D (25-1000 ng ml-1): dose-dependent inhibition of cell spreading, nuclear extension, and DNA synthesis resulted. In contrast, induction of microtubule disassembly using nocodazole had little effect on cell or nuclear spreading and only partially inhibited DNA synthesis. Interestingly, combination of nocodazole with a suboptimal dose of cytochalasin D (100 ng ml-1) resulted in potent inhibition of both spreading and growth, suggesting that microtubules are redundant structural elements which can provide critical load-bearing functions when microfilaments are partially compromised. Similar synergism between nocodazole and cytochalasin D was observed

  17. Regulation of protein phosphatase 2A methylation by LCMT1 and PME-1 plays a critical role in differentiation of neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Sontag, Jean-Marie; Nunbhakdi-Craig, Viyada; Mitterhuber, Martina; Ogris, Egon; Sontag, Estelle

    2010-01-01

    Neuritic alterations are a major feature of many neurodegenerative disorders. Methylation of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) catalytic C subunit by the leucine carboxyl methyltransferase LCMT1, and demethylation by the methylesterase PME-1, is a critical PP2A regulatory mechanism. It modulates the formation of PP2A holoenzymes containing the Bα subunit, which dephosphorylate key neuronal cytoskeletal proteins, including tau. Significantly, we have reported that LCMT1, methylated C and Bα expression levels are down-regulated in Alzheimer disease-affected brain regions. Here, we show that enhanced expression of LCMT1 in cultured N2a neuroblastoma cells, which increases endogenous methylated C and Bα levels, induces changes in F-actin organization. It promotes serum-independent neuritogenesis and development of extended tau-positive processes upon N2a cell differentiation. These stimulatory effects can be abrogated by LCMT1 knockdown and S-adenosylhomocysteine, an inhibitor of methylation reactions. Expression of PME-1 and the methylation-site L309Δ C subunit mutant, which decrease intracellular methylated C and Bα levels, block N2a cell differentiation and LCMT1-mediated neurite formation. Lastly, inducible and non-inducible knockdown of Bα in N2a cells inhibit process outgrowth. Altogether, our results establish a novel mechanistic link between PP2A methylation and development of neurite-like processes. PMID:21044074

  18. Critical examination of the colloidal particle model of globular proteins.

    PubMed

    Sarangapani, Prasad S; Hudson, Steven D; Jones, Ronald L; Douglas, Jack F; Pathak, Jai A

    2015-02-03

    Recent studies of globular protein solutions have uniformly adopted a colloidal view of proteins as particles, a perspective that neglects the polymeric primary structure of these biological macromolecules, their intrinsic flexibility, and their ability to sample a large configurational space. While the colloidal perspective often serves as a useful idealization in many cases, the macromolecular identity of proteins must reveal itself under thermodynamic conditions in which the native state is no longer stable, such as denaturing solvents and high protein concentrations where macromolecules tend to have screened excluded volume, charge, and hydrodynamic interactions. Under extreme pH conditions, charge repulsion interactions within the protein chain can overcome the attractive hydrogen-bonding interactions, holding it in its native globular state. Conformational changes can therefore be expected to have great significance on the shear viscosity and other rheological properties of protein solutions. These changes are not envisioned in conventional colloidal protein models and we have initiated an investigation of the scattering and rheological properties of model proteins. We initiate this effort by considering bovine serum albumin because it is a globular protein whose solution properties have also been extensively investigated as a function of pH, temperature, ionic strength, and concentration. As we anticipated, near-ultraviolet circular dichroism measurements and intrinsic viscosity measurements clearly indicate that the bovine serum albumin tertiary structure changes as protein concentration and pH are varied. Our findings point to limited validity of the colloidal protein model and to the need for further consideration and quantification of the effects of conformational changes on protein solution viscosity, protein association, and the phase behavior. Small-angle Neutron Scattering measurements have allowed us to assess how these conformational changes

  19. Critical Examination of the Colloidal Particle Model of Globular Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sarangapani, Prasad S.; Hudson, Steven D.; Jones, Ronald L.; Douglas, Jack F.; Pathak, Jai A.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies of globular protein solutions have uniformly adopted a colloidal view of proteins as particles, a perspective that neglects the polymeric primary structure of these biological macromolecules, their intrinsic flexibility, and their ability to sample a large configurational space. While the colloidal perspective often serves as a useful idealization in many cases, the macromolecular identity of proteins must reveal itself under thermodynamic conditions in which the native state is no longer stable, such as denaturing solvents and high protein concentrations where macromolecules tend to have screened excluded volume, charge, and hydrodynamic interactions. Under extreme pH conditions, charge repulsion interactions within the protein chain can overcome the attractive hydrogen-bonding interactions, holding it in its native globular state. Conformational changes can therefore be expected to have great significance on the shear viscosity and other rheological properties of protein solutions. These changes are not envisioned in conventional colloidal protein models and we have initiated an investigation of the scattering and rheological properties of model proteins. We initiate this effort by considering bovine serum albumin because it is a globular protein whose solution properties have also been extensively investigated as a function of pH, temperature, ionic strength, and concentration. As we anticipated, near-ultraviolet circular dichroism measurements and intrinsic viscosity measurements clearly indicate that the bovine serum albumin tertiary structure changes as protein concentration and pH are varied. Our findings point to limited validity of the colloidal protein model and to the need for further consideration and quantification of the effects of conformational changes on protein solution viscosity, protein association, and the phase behavior. Small-angle Neutron Scattering measurements have allowed us to assess how these conformational changes

  20. Quantifying morphological features of actin cytoskeletal filaments in plant cells based on mathematical morphology.

    PubMed

    Kimori, Yoshitaka; Hikino, Kazumi; Nishimura, Mikio; Mano, Shoji

    2016-01-21

    By quantifying the morphological properties of biological structures, we can better evaluate complex shapes and detect subtle morphological changes in organisms. In this paper, we propose a shape analysis method based on morphological image processing, and apply it to image analysis of actin cytoskeletal filaments in root hair cells of Arabidopsis thaliana. In plant cells, the actin cytoskeletal filaments have critical roles in various cellular processes such as vesicle trafficking and organelle motility. The dynamics of vesicles and organelles in plant cells depend on actin cytoskeletal filaments, regulating cell division and cell enlargement. To better understand the actin-dependent organelle motility, we attempted to quantify the organization of actin filaments in the root hair cells of the root hair defective 3 (rhd3) mutant. RHD3 is involved in actin organization, and its defect has been reported to affect the dynamics of various vesicles and organelles. We measured three shape features of the actin filaments in wild-type and mutant plants. One feature (thickness) was depicted on a grayscale; the others (describing the complexity of the filament network patterns in two-dimensional space) were depicted as binary features. The morphological phenotypes of the cytoskeletal filaments clearly differed between wild-type and mutant. Subtle variations of filament morphology among the mutants were detected and statistically quantified. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A Bpag1 isoform involved in cytoskeletal organization surrounding the nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Kevin G.; Pinheiro, Bruno; Kothary, Rashmi . E-mail: rkothary@ohri.ca

    2006-01-15

    Bpag1/dystonin proteins are giant cytoskeletal interacting proteins postulated to cross-link cytoskeletal filaments and thereby maintain cellular integrity. Loss of function of non-epithelial Bpag1 isoforms results in neuromuscular dysfunction and early postnatal death in mice. Multiple Bpag1 transcripts have been described, including those encoding protein isoforms that vary at the N-terminal end. Here, we have analyzed the subcellular localizations and cytoskeletal interactions of two isoforms, termed Bpag1a1 and Bpag1a2. We demonstrate that novel sequence at the 5' end of the Bpag1a2 transcript codes for an N-terminal transmembrane domain and targets the protein to the perinuclear region of the cell. Furthermore, we show that the endogenous Bpag1a2 protein is also present in the perinuclear region in myoblast cells. Differences in Bpag1a1 and Bpag1a2 with respect to the extent of their interactions with microtubules and microfilaments are also described, with Bpag1a2 fusion protein serving largely to associate with microfilaments surrounding the nucleus and Golgi apparatus. The overall structure and subcellular localizations of Bpag1a2 indicate possible functions in nuclear envelope structuring, nuclear tethering, and organization of membranous structures surrounding the nucleus.

  2. Cytostasis and morphological changes induced by mifepristone in human metastatic cancer cells involve cytoskeletal filamentous actin reorganization and impairment of cell adhesion dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Changes in cell shape and plasticity in cytoskeletal dynamics are critically involved in cell adhesion, migration, invasion and the overall process of metastasis. Previous work in our laboratory demonstrated that the synthetic steroid mifepristone inhibited the growth of highly metastatic cancer cells, while simultaneously causing striking changes in cellular morphology. Here we assessed whether such morphological alterations developed in response to cytostatic concentrations of mifepristone are reversible or permanent, involve rearrangement of cytoskeletal proteins, and/or affect the adhesive capacity of the cells. Methods Cancer cell lines of the ovary (SKOV-3), breast (MDA-MB-231), prostate (LNCaP), and nervous system (U87MG) were exposed to cytostatic concentrations of mifepristone and studied by phase-contrast microscopy. The transient or permanent nature of the cytostasis and morphological changes caused by mifepristone was assessed, as well as the rearrangement of cytoskeletal proteins. De-adhesion and adhesion assays were utilized to determine if mifepristone-arrested and morphologically dysregulated cells had abnormal de-adhesion/adhesion dynamics when compared to vehicle-treated controls. Results Mifepristone-treated cells displayed a long, thin, spindle-like shape with boundaries resembling those of loosely adhered cells. Growth arrest and morphology changes caused by mifepristone were reversible in SKOV-3, MDA-MB-231 and U87MG, but not in LNCaP cells that instead became senescent. All cancer cell types exposed to mifepristone displayed greatly increased actin ruffling in association with accelerated de-adhesion from the culture plate, and delayed adhesion capacity to various extracellular matrix components. Conclusions Cytostatic concentrations of mifepristone induced alterations in the cellular structure of a panel of aggressive, highly metastatic cancer cells of different tissues of origin. Such changes were associated with re

  3. Cytoskeletal transition in patterned cells correlates with interfacial energy model.

    PubMed

    Müller, Andreas; Meyer, Jörg; Paumer, Tina; Pompe, Tilo

    2014-04-14

    A cell's morphology is intricately regulated by microenvironmental cues and intracellular feedback signals. Besides biochemical factors, cell fate can be influenced by the mechanics and geometry of the surrounding matrix. The latter point was addressed herein, by studying cell adhesion on two-dimensional micropatterns. Endothelial cells were grown on maleic acid copolymer surfaces structured with stripes of fibronectin by microcontact printing. Experiments showed a biphasic behaviour of actin stress fibre spacing in dependence on the stripe width with a critical size of approx. 15 μm. In a concurrent modelling effort, cells on stripes were simulated as droplet-like structures, including variations of interfacial energy, total volume and dimensions of the nucleus. A biphasic behaviour with regard to cell morphology and area was found, triggered by the minimum of interfacial energy, with the phase transition occurring at a critical stripe width close to the critical stripe width found in the cell experiment. The correlation of experiment and simulation suggests a possible mechanism of the cytoskeletal rearrangements based on interfacial energy arguments.

  4. Dietary tryptophan restriction in rats triggers astrocyte cytoskeletal hypertrophy in hippocampus and amygdala.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Limei; Corona-Morales, Aleph A; Vega-González, Arturo; García-Estrada, Joaquín; Escobar, Alfonso

    2009-02-06

    We have previously reported that dietary tryptophan (TRP) restriction in a rat crucial postnatal developmental stage induces depression-like behavior and alters dendritic spine density in CA1 pyramidal neurons and granule cells of the hippocampus. Due to astrocyte involvement in critical brain mechanisms, it seems worth to investigate possible adaptive changes in the glial population with TRP restriction. Experimental rats were fed with low TRP diet (20% of TRP level of the laboratory rat chow) from postnatal days 30-60. Antibody against glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a principal intermediate filament in astrocytes, was used to evaluate cytoskeletal hypertrophy and glial proliferation. Our results showed an increase in size and branching of GFAP-immunoreactive (IR) cells in the dorsal hippocampus and amygdala, characteristics of an astrocytic activation. No significant differences were found regarding the number of GFAP-IR cells in both regions. These results indicate that dietary TRP restriction can induce astrocytic activation, hence, provide further evidences supporting the hypothesis that serotonin may also modulate glial morphology.

  5. Precortical phase of Alzheimer’s disease (AD)-related tau cytoskeletal pathology

    PubMed Central

    Stratmann, Katharina; Heinsen, Helmut; Korf, Horst-Werner; Del Turco, Domenico; Ghebremedhin, Estifanos; Seidel, Kay; Bouzrou, Mohamed; Grinberg, Lea T.; Bohl, Jürgen; Wharton, Stephen B; den Dunnen, Wilfred; Rüb, Udo

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) represents the most frequent progressive neuropsychiatric disorder worldwide leading to dementia and accounts for 60 to 70% of demented individuals. In view of the early appearance of neuronal deposits of the hyperphosphorylated cytoskeletal protein tau in the transentorhinal and entorhinal regions of the allocortex (i.e. in Braak and Braak AD stage I in the evolution of the AD-related cortical tau cytoskeletal pathology) it has been believed for a long time that these allocortical regions represent the first brain targets of the AD-related tau cytoskeletal pathology. However, recent pathoanatomical studies suggested that the subcortical brain nuclei that send efferent projections to the transentorhinal and entorhinal regions may also comprise AD-related cytoskeletal changes already at very early Braak and Braak AD stages. In order to corroborate these initial results we systematically investigated the presence and extent of the AD-related cytoskeletal pathology in serial thick tissue sections through all the subcortical nuclei known to send efferent projections to these vulnerable allocortical regions of three individuals with Braak and Braak AD stage 0 and fourteen individuals with Braak and Braak AD stage I by means of immunostainings with the anti-tau antibody AT8. These investigations revealed consistent AT8 immunoreactive neuronal tau cytoskeletal pathology in a subset of these subcortical nuclei (i.e. medial septal nucleus, nuclei of the vertical and horizontal limbs of the diagonal band of Broca, basal nucleus of Meynert; claustrum; hypothalamic ventromedial, tuberomamillary and supramamillary nuclei, perifornical region and lateral area; thalamic central medial, laterodorsal, subparafascicular, and central lateral nuclei, medial pulvinar and limitans-suprageniculate complex; peripeduncular nucleus, dopaminergic substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area, periaqueductal gray, midbrain and pontine dorsal raphe nuclei, locus

  6. "Protein" Measurement in Biological Wastewater Treatment Systems: A Critical Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Le, Chencheng; Kunacheva, Chinagarn; Stuckey, David C

    2016-03-15

    Five commercially available assay kits were tested on the same protein sample with the addition of 17 different types of interfering substances typically found in the biological wastewater treatment, and a comparison of the use of these assays with 22 different protein and peptide samples is also presented. It was shown that a wide variety of substances can interfere dramatically with these assays; the metachromatic response was also clearly influenced by different proteinaceous material. Measurement of the "protein" content in the effluent of an anaerobic membrane bioreactor was then carried out using these assay methods. Quantitative results of the "protein" concentration in the different effluent samples, with or without spiked additions of Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA), showed considerable disagreement. We concluded that the "protein" measured in wastewater samples using standard colorimetric assays often shows false positive results and has little correlation to their real value. A new analytical method needs to be developed in order to gain greater insight into the biological transformations occurring in anaerobic digestion, and how soluble microbial products (SMPs) are produced.

  7. Aggregation propensity of critical regions of the protein Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthee, Micaiah; Ahmed, Azka; Larini, Luca

    The Alzheimer's disease is an irreversible, progressive brain disorder that slowly destroys memory and thinking skills, which eventually leads to the ability to not able to carry out the simplest tasks. The Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the formation of protein aggregates both within and outside of the brain's cells, the neurons. Within the neurons, the aggregation of the protein tau leads to the destruction of the microtubules in the axon of the neuron. Tau belongs to a group of proteins referred to as Microtubule-Associated Proteins. It is extremely flexible and is classified as an intrinsically unstructured protein due to its low propensity to form secondary structure. Tau promotes tubulin assembly into microtubules thereby stabilizing the cytoskeleton of the axon of the neurons. The microtubule binding region of tau consists of 4 pseudo-repeats. In this study, we will focus on the aggregation propensity of two fragments. In this study we will focus on the PHF43 fragment that contains the third pseudo-repeat and has been shown experimentally to aggregate readily. Another fragment that contains the second pseudo-repeat will be considered as well. Mutations in this region are associated with various form of dementia and for this reason we will consider the mutant P301L.

  8. Protein bio-corona: critical issue in immune nanotoxicology.

    PubMed

    Neagu, Monica; Piperigkou, Zoi; Karamanou, Konstantina; Engin, Ayse Basak; Docea, Anca Oana; Constantin, Carolina; Negrei, Carolina; Nikitovic, Dragana; Tsatsakis, Aristidis

    2017-03-01

    With the expansion of the nanomedicine field, the knowledge focusing on the behavior of nanoparticles in the biological milieu has rapidly escalated. Upon introduction to a complex biological system, nanomaterials dynamically interact with all the encountered biomolecules and form the protein "bio-corona." The decoration with these surface biomolecules endows nanoparticles with new properties. The present review will address updates of the protein bio-corona characteristics as influenced by nanoparticle's physicochemical properties and by the particularities of the encountered biological milieu. Undeniably, bio-corona generation influences the efficacy of the nanodrug and guides the actions of innate and adaptive immunity. Exploiting the dynamic process of protein bio-corona development in combination with the new engineered horizons of drugs linked to nanoparticles could lead to innovative functional nanotherapies. Therefore, bio-medical nanotechnologies should focus on the interactions of nanoparticles with the immune system for both safety and efficacy reasons.

  9. Heterotrimeric G protein subunit Gγ13 is critical to olfaction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Feng; Ponissery-Saidu, Samsudeen; Yee, Karen; Wang, Hong; Chen, Meng-Ling; Iguchi, Naoko; Zhang, Genhua; Jiang, Ping; Reisert, Johannes; Huang, Liquan

    2013-01-01

    The activation of G-protein-coupled olfactory receptors on the olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) triggers a signaling cascade, which is mediated by a heterotrimeric G protein consisting of α, β and γ subunits. Although its α subunit, Gαolf, has been identified and well characterized, the identities of its β and γ subunits and their function in olfactory signal transduction, however, have not been well established yet. We and others have found the expression of Gγ13 in the olfactory epithelium, particularly in the cilia of the OSNs. In this study, we generated a conditional gene knockout mouse line to specifically nullify Gγ13 expression in the olfactory marker protein-expressing OSNs. Immunohistochemical and Western blot results showed that Gγ13 subunit was indeed eliminated in the mutant mice’s olfactory epithelium. Intriguingly, Gαolf, β1 subunits, Ric-8B and CEP290 proteins were also absent in the epithelium whereas the presence of the effector enzyme adenylyl cyclase III remained largely unaltered. Electro-olfactogram studies showed that the mutant animals had greatly reduced responses to a battery of odorants including three presumable pheromones. Behavioral tests indicated that the mutant mice had a remarkably reduced ability to perform an odor-guided search task although their motivation and agility seemed normal. Our results indicate that Gαolf exclusively forms a functional heterotrimeric G protein with Gβ1 and Gγ13 in OSNs, mediating olfactory signal transduction. The identification of the olfactory G protein’s βγ moiety has provided a novel approach to understanding the feedback regulation of olfactory signal transduction pathways as well as the control of subcellular structures of OSNs. PMID:23637188

  10. A Critical Assessment of Protein Crystal Growth in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc

    1997-01-01

    Experiments to grow higher diffraction quality protein crystals in the microgravity environment of an orbiting spacecraft are one of the most frequently flown space experiments. Ground-based research has shown that convective flows occur even about protein crystals growing in the Earth's gravitational field. Further, this research has shown that the resultant flow velocities can cause growth cessation, and probably affect the measured X-ray data quality obtained. How flow deleteriously affects protein crystal growth (PCG) is still not known, and is the subject of ongoing research. Failing a rational method for ameliorating flow effects on Earth, one can, through NASA and other nations space agency sponsored programs, carry out protein crystal growth in the microgravity environment of an orbiting spacecraft. Early first generation PCG hardware was characterized by a very low success rate and a steep design learning curve. Subsequent hardware designs have improved upon their predecessors. Now the crystal grower has a wide variety of hardware configurations and crystal growth protocols to choose from, many of which implement "standard" laboratory protein crystal growth methods. While many of these are first or early second generation hardware the success rate, defined as growing crystals giving data better than has been obtained on Earth, is at least 20% overall and may be considerably higher if one only considers latter experiments. There are a large number of protein crystals grown every year, with hundreds of structures determined. Those crystallized in microgravity represent a small proportion of this total, and there is concern that the costs of the microgravity PCG program(s) do not justify such limited returns. Empirical evidence suggests that optimum crystal growth conditions in microgravity differ from those determined on Earth, further exacerbating the chances of success. Microgravity PCG is probably best suited for "mature" crystallizations, where one has

  11. A Critical Assessment of Protein Crystal Growth in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc

    1997-01-01

    Experiments to grow higher diffraction quality protein crystals in the microgravity environment of an orbiting spacecraft are one of the most frequently flown space experiments. Ground-based research has shown that convective flows occur even about protein crystals growing in the Earth's gravitational field. Further, this research has shown that the resultant flow velocities can cause growth cessation, and probably affect the measured X-ray data quality obtained. How flow deleteriously affects protein crystal growth (PCG) is still not known, and is the subject of ongoing research. Failing a rational method for ameliorating flow effects on Earth, one can, through NASA and other nations space agency sponsored programs, carry out protein crystal growth in the microgravity environment of an orbiting spacecraft. Early first generation PCG hardware was characterized by a very low success rate and a steep design learning curve. Subsequent hardware designs have improved upon their predecessors. Now the crystal grower has a wide variety of hardware configurations and crystal growth protocols to choose from, many of which implement "standard" laboratory protein crystal growth methods. While many of these are first or early second generation hardware the success rate, defined as growing crystals giving data better than has been obtained on Earth, is at least 20% overall and may be considerably higher if one only considers latter experiments. There are a large number of protein crystals grown every year, with hundreds of structures determined. Those crystallized in microgravity represent a small proportion of this total, and there is concern that the costs of the microgravity PCG program(s) do not justify such limited returns. Empirical evidence suggests that optimum crystal growth conditions in microgravity differ from those determined on Earth, further exacerbating the chances of success. Microgravity PCG is probably best suited for "mature" crystallizations, where one has

  12. Critical importance of RAB proteins for synaptic function.

    PubMed

    Mignogna, Maria Lidia; D'Adamo, Patrizia

    2017-02-01

    Neurons are highly polarized cells that exhibit one of the more complex morphology and function. Neuronal intracellular trafficking plays a key role in dictating the directionality and specificity of vesicle formation, transport and fusion, allowing the transmission of information in sophisticate cellular network. Thus, the integrity of protein trafficking and spatial organization is especially important in neuronal cells. RAB proteins, small monomeric GTPases belonging to the RAS superfamily, spatially and temporally orchestrate specific vesicular trafficking steps. In this review we summarise the known roles of RAB GTPases involved in the maintenance of neuronal vesicular trafficking in the central nervous system. In particular, we discriminate the axonal pre-synaptic trafficking and dendritic post-synaptic trafficking, to better underlie how a correct orchestration of vesicle movement is necessary to maintain neuronal polarity and then, to permit an accurate architecture and functionality of synaptic activity.

  13. Regulation of cytoskeletal dynamics by redox signaling and oxidative stress: implications for neuronal development and trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Carlos; González-Billault, Christian

    2015-01-01

    A proper balance between chemical reduction and oxidation (known as redox balance) is essential for normal cellular physiology. Deregulation in the production of oxidative species leads to DNA damage, lipid peroxidation and aberrant post-translational modification of proteins, which in most cases induces injury, cell death and disease. However, physiological concentrations of oxidative species are necessary to support important cell functions, such as chemotaxis, hormone synthesis, immune response, cytoskeletal remodeling, Ca2+ homeostasis and others. Recent evidence suggests that redox balance regulates actin and microtubule dynamics in both physiological and pathological contexts. Microtubules and actin microfilaments contain certain amino acid residues that are susceptible to oxidation, which reduces the ability of microtubules to polymerize and causes severing of actin microfilaments in neuronal and non-neuronal cells. In contrast, inhibited production of reactive oxygen species (ROS; e.g., due to NOXs) leads to aberrant actin polymerization, decreases neurite outgrowth and affects the normal development and polarization of neurons. In this review, we summarize emerging evidence suggesting that both general and specific enzymatic sources of redox species exert diverse effects on cytoskeletal dynamics. Considering the intimate relationship between cytoskeletal dynamics and trafficking, we also discuss the potential effects of redox balance on intracellular transport via regulation of the components of the microtubule and actin cytoskeleton as well as cytoskeleton-associated proteins, which may directly impact localization of proteins and vesicles across the soma, dendrites and axon of neurons. PMID:26483635

  14. Mdm proteins: critical regulators of embryogenesis and homoeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Moyer, Sydney M.; Larsson, Connie A.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Mdm2 and Mdm4 are negative regulators of the tumour suppressor p53; hence, this relationship is the focus of many cancer-related studies. A multitude of experiments across various developmental stages have been conducted to explore the tissue-specific roles of these proteins in the mouse. When Mdm2 or Mdm4 are deleted in the germline or specific tissues, they display different phenotypic defects, some of which lead to embryonic lethality. Mdm2 loss is often more deleterious than loss of its homologue Mdm4. All tissues experience activation of p53 target genes upon loss of Mdm2 or Mdm4; however, the degree to which the p53 pathway is perturbed is highly tissue-specific and does not correlate to the severity of the morphological phenotypes. Therefore, a need for further understanding of how these proteins regulate p53 activity is warranted, as therapeutic targeting of the p53 pathway is rapidly evolving and gaining attention in the field of cancer research. In this review, we discuss the tissue-specificity of Mdm proteins in regulating p53 and expose the need for investigation at the cell-specific level. PMID:28093454

  15. Glycosylation of Dentin Matrix Protein 1 is critical for osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yao; Weng, Yuteng; Zhang, Chenyang; Liu, Yi; Kang, Chen; Liu, Zhongshuang; Jing, Bo; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Zuolin

    2015-12-04

    Proteoglycans play important roles in regulating osteogenesis. Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is a highly expressed bone extracellular matrix protein that regulates both bone development and phosphate metabolism. After glycosylation, an N-terminal fragment of DMP1 protein was identified as a new proteoglycan (DMP1-PG) in bone matrix. In vitro investigations showed that Ser(89) is the key glycosylation site in mouse DMP1. However, the specific role of DMP1 glycosylation is still not understood. In this study, a mutant DMP1 mouse model was developed in which the glycosylation site S(89) was substituted with G(89) (S89G-DMP1). The glycosylation level of DMP1 was down-regulated in the bone matrix of S89G-DMP1 mice. Compared with wild type mice, the long bones of S89G-DMP1 mice showed developmental changes, including the speed of bone remodeling and mineralization, the morphology and activities of osteocytes, and activities of both osteoblasts and osteoclasts. These findings indicate that glycosylation of DMP1 is a key posttranslational modification process during development and that DMP1-PG functions as an indispensable proteoglycan in osteogenesis.

  16. Glycosylation of Dentin Matrix Protein 1 is critical for osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yao; Weng, Yuteng; Zhang, Chenyang; Liu, Yi; Kang, Chen; Liu, Zhongshuang; Jing, Bo; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Zuolin

    2015-01-01

    Proteoglycans play important roles in regulating osteogenesis. Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is a highly expressed bone extracellular matrix protein that regulates both bone development and phosphate metabolism. After glycosylation, an N-terminal fragment of DMP1 protein was identified as a new proteoglycan (DMP1-PG) in bone matrix. In vitro investigations showed that Ser89 is the key glycosylation site in mouse DMP1. However, the specific role of DMP1 glycosylation is still not understood. In this study, a mutant DMP1 mouse model was developed in which the glycosylation site S89 was substituted with G89 (S89G-DMP1). The glycosylation level of DMP1 was down-regulated in the bone matrix of S89G-DMP1 mice. Compared with wild type mice, the long bones of S89G-DMP1 mice showed developmental changes, including the speed of bone remodeling and mineralization, the morphology and activities of osteocytes, and activities of both osteoblasts and osteoclasts. These findings indicate that glycosylation of DMP1 is a key posttranslational modification process during development and that DMP1-PG functions as an indispensable proteoglycan in osteogenesis. PMID:26634432

  17. Cyclophilins: Less Studied Proteins with Critical Roles in Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Khushwant; Winter, Mark; Zouhar, Miloslav; Ryšánek, Pavel

    2017-09-29

    Cyclophilins (EC 5.2.1.8) belong to a subgroup of proteins known as immunophilins, which also include FK506-binding proteins and parvulins. Members of the immunophilins have two main characteristic properties: (i) peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase activity and (ii) the ability to bind immunosuppressant molecules of fungal origin. Cyclophilins are some of the most conserved proteins present in eukaryotes and prokaryotes, and they have been implicated in diverse cellular processes and responses to multiple biotic and abiotic stresses. Cyclophilins have been exploited in humans and plants extensively, but they have only recently received attention in regard to phytopathogens. In Phellinus sulphurascens and species of the genus Leptosphaeria and Phytophthora, high expression of cyclophilins was found to be related to infection. Moreover, recent studies of cyclophilins in certain phytopathogens, such as Magnaporthe oryzae, Botrytis cinerea, Cryphonectria parasitica, and Puccinia triticina, demonstrated their roles as a pathogenicity factors. In addition to pathogenicity, cyclophilins have high affinity for the immunosuppressive drug cyclosporin A, which is a potent antifungal agent. Although cyclophilins are highly conserved in phytopathogens, because they have been less studied, their role remains largely unknown. In this review, we provide detailed information on the cyclophilins in several phytopathogens, including fungi and oomycetes, as well as their role in suppressing plant immunity.

  18. The use of neural networks and texture analysis for rapid objective selection of regions of interest in cytoskeletal images.

    PubMed

    Derkacs, Amanda D Felder; Ward, Samuel R; Lieber, Richard L

    2012-02-01

    Understanding cytoskeletal dynamics in living tissue is prerequisite to understanding mechanisms of injury, mechanotransduction, and mechanical signaling. Real-time visualization is now possible using transfection with plasmids that encode fluorescent cytoskeletal proteins. Using this approach with the muscle-specific intermediate filament protein desmin, we found that a green fluorescent protein-desmin chimeric protein was unevenly distributed throughout the muscle fiber, resulting in some image areas that were saturated as well as others that lacked any signal. Our goal was to analyze the muscle fiber cytoskeletal network quantitatively in an unbiased fashion. To objectively select areas of the muscle fiber that are suitable for analysis, we devised a method that provides objective classification of regions of images of striated cytoskeletal structures into "usable" and "unusable" categories. This method consists of a combination of spatial analysis of the image using Fourier methods along with a boosted neural network that "decides" on the quality of the image based on previous training. We trained the neural network using the expert opinion of three scientists familiar with these types of images. We found that this method was over 300 times faster than manual classification and that it permitted objective and accurate classification of image regions.

  19. Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) and N-WASP are critical for peripheral B-cell development and function

    PubMed Central

    Dahlberg, Carin; Baptista, Marisa; Moran, Christopher J.; Detre, Cynthia; Keszei, Marton; Eston, Michelle A.; Alt, Frederick W.; Terhorst, Cox; Notarangelo, Luigi D.

    2012-01-01

    The Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) is a key cytoskeletal regulator of hematopoietic cells. Although WASP-knockout (WKO) mice have aberrant B-cell cytoskeletal responses, B-cell development is relatively normal. We hypothesized that N-WASP, a ubiquitously expressed homolog of WASP, may serve some redundant functions with WASP in B cells. In the present study, we generated mice lacking WASP and N-WASP in B cells (conditional double knockout [cDKO] B cells) and show that cDKO mice had decreased numbers of follicular and marginal zone B cells in the spleen. Receptor-induced activation of cDKO B cells led to normal proliferation but a marked reduction of spreading compared with wild-type and WKO B cells. Whereas WKO B cells showed decreased migration in vitro and homing in vivo compared with wild-type cells, cDKO B cells showed an even more pronounced decrease in the migratory response in vivo. After injection of 2,4,6-trinitrophenol (TNP)–Ficoll, cDKO B cells had reduced antigen uptake in the splenic marginal zone. Despite high basal serum IgM, cDKO mice mounted a reduced immune response to the T cell–independent antigen TNP-Ficoll and to the T cell–dependent antigen TNP–keyhole limpet hemocyanin. Our results reveal that the combined activity of WASP and N-WASP is required for peripheral B-cell development and function. PMID:22411869

  20. Cytoskeletal Mechanisms for Breaking Cellular Symmetry

    PubMed Central

    Mullins, R. Dyche

    2010-01-01

    Cytoskeletal systems are networks of polymers found in all eukaryotic and many prokaryotic cells. Their purpose is to transmit and integrate information across cellular dimensions and help turn a disorderly mob of macromolecules into a spatially organized, living cell. Information, in this context, includes physical and chemical properties relevant to cellular physiology, including: the number and activity of macromolecules, cell shape, and mechanical force. Most animal cells are 10–50 microns in diameter, whereas the macromolecules that comprise them are 10,000-fold smaller (2–20 nm). To establish long-range order over cellular length scales, individual molecules must, therefore, self-assemble into larger polymers, with lengths (0.1–20 m) comparable to the size of a cell. These polymers must then be cross-linked into organized networks that fill the cytoplasm. Such cell-spanning polymer networks enable different parts of the cytoplasm to communicate directly with each other, either by transmitting forces or by carrying cargo from one spot to another. PMID:20182610

  1. Conformational phases of membrane bound cytoskeletal filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quint, David A.; Grason, Gregory; Gopinathan, Ajay

    2013-03-01

    Membrane bound cytoskeletal filaments found in living cells are employed to carry out many types of activities including cellular division, rigidity and transport. When these biopolymers are bound to a membrane surface they may take on highly non-trivial conformations as compared to when they are not bound. This leads to the natural question; What are the important interactions which drive these polymers to particular conformations when they are bound to a surface? Assuming that there are binding domains along the polymer which follow a periodic helical structure set by the natural monomeric handedness, these bound conformations must arise from the interplay of the intrinsic monomeric helicity and membrane binding. To probe this question, we study a continuous model of an elastic filament with intrinsic helicity and map out the conformational phases of this filament for various mechanical and structural parameters in our model, such as elastic stiffness and intrinsic twist of the filament. Our model allows us to gain insight into the possible mechanisms which drive real biopolymers such as actin and tubulin in eukaryotes and their prokaryotic cousins MreB and FtsZ to take on their functional conformations within living cells.

  2. Reinforcement versus fluidization in cytoskeletal mechanoresponsiveness.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Ramaswamy; Park, Chan Young; Lin, Yu-Chun; Mead, Jere; Jaspers, Richard T; Trepat, Xavier; Lenormand, Guillaume; Tambe, Dhananjay; Smolensky, Alexander V; Knoll, Andrew H; Butler, James P; Fredberg, Jeffrey J

    2009-01-01

    Every adherent eukaryotic cell exerts appreciable traction forces upon its substrate. Moreover, every resident cell within the heart, great vessels, bladder, gut or lung routinely experiences large periodic stretches. As an acute response to such stretches the cytoskeleton can stiffen, increase traction forces and reinforce, as reported by some, or can soften and fluidize, as reported more recently by our laboratory, but in any given circumstance it remains unknown which response might prevail or why. Using a novel nanotechnology, we show here that in loading conditions expected in most physiological circumstances the localized reinforcement response fails to scale up to the level of homogeneous cell stretch; fluidization trumps reinforcement. Whereas the reinforcement response is known to be mediated by upstream mechanosensing and downstream signaling, results presented here show the fluidization response to be altogether novel: it is a direct physical effect of mechanical force acting upon a structural lattice that is soft and fragile. Cytoskeletal softness and fragility, we argue, is consistent with early evolutionary adaptations of the eukaryotic cell to material properties of a soft inert microenvironment.

  3. Studying the Mechanochemistry of Processive Cytoskeletal Motors With an Optical Trap.

    PubMed

    Belyy, V; Yildiz, A

    2017-01-01

    Cytoskeletal motors utilize the energy stored in ATP to generate linear motion along rigid filaments. Because their enzymatic cycles are tightly coupled to the production of force and forward movement, the optical-trapping technique is uniquely suited for studying their mechanochemical cycle. Here, we discuss the practical aspects of optical trapping in connection with single-motor assays and describe three distinct experimental modes (fixed-trap, force feedback, and square wave) that are typically used to investigate the enzymatic and biophysical properties of cytoskeletal motors. The principal outstanding questions in the field involve motor regulation by cargo adaptor proteins and cargo transport by teams of motors, ensuring that the optical trap's ability to apply precise forces and measure nanometer-scale displacements will remain crucial to the study of intracellular motility in the foreseeable future. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. “Acting” on GLUT4: Membrane & Cytoskeletal Components of Insulin Action

    PubMed Central

    Brozinick, Joseph T.; Berkemeier, Bradley A.; Elmendorf, Jeffrey S.

    2008-01-01

    The dissection of mechanisms that regulate glucose transport by insulin has revealed an intricate network of signaling molecules scattered from the insulin receptor to the intracellular glucose transporter GLUT4. It is also appreciated that some insulin receptor signals jaunt in different directions to regulate events essential for the efficient redistribution of GLUT4 to the plasma membrane. Moreover key assists in the process appear to be arranged by membrane lipids and cytoskeletal proteins. Following current considerations of insulin signals regulating GLUT4, this review will focus on in vitro and in vivo evidence that supports an essential role for phosphoinositides and actin filaments in the control of glucose transport. The discussion will visit recent cell culture, whole animal, and human data highlighting membrane and cytoskeletal aspects of insulin resistance. PMID:18220662

  5. "Actin"g on GLUT4: membrane & cytoskeletal components of insulin action.

    PubMed

    Brozinick, Joseph T; Berkemeier, Bradley A; Elmendorf, Jeffrey S

    2007-05-01

    The dissection of mechanisms that regulate glucose transport by insulin has revealed an intricate network of signaling molecules scattered from the insulin receptor to the intracellular glucose transporter GLUT4. It is also appreciated that some insulin receptor signals jaunt in different directions to regulate events essential for the efficient redistribution of GLUT4 to the plasma membrane. Moreover key assists in the process appear to be arranged by membrane lipids and cytoskeletal proteins. Following current considerations of insulin signals regulating GLUT4, this review will focus on in vitro and in vivo evidence that supports an essential role for phosphoinositides and actin filaments in the control of glucose transport. The discussion will visit recent cell culture, whole animal, and human data highlighting membrane and cytoskeletal aspects of insulin resistance.

  6. Critical roles of TIPE2 protein in murine experimental colitis

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Yunwei; Sun, Honghong; Morrissey, Samantha; Porturas, Thomas; Liu, Suxia; Hua, Xianxin; Chen, Youhai H.

    2014-01-01

    Both commensal bacteria and infiltrating inflammatory cells play essential roles in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. The molecular mechanisms whereby these pathogenic factors are regulated during the disease are not fully understood. We report here that a member of the TNFAIP8 (tumor necrosis factor-α-induced protein 8) family called TIPE2 (TNFAIP8-like 2, or TNFAIP8L2) plays a crucial role in regulating commensal bacteria dissemination and inflammatory cell function in experimental colitis induced by dextran sodium sulfate (DSS). Following DSS treatment, TIPE2-deficient mice, or chimeric mice that are deficient in TIPE2 only in their hematopoietic cells, lost less body weight and survived longer than wild type controls. Consistent with this clinical observation, TIPE2-deficient mice exhibited significantly less severe colitis and colonic damage. This was associated with a marked reduction in the colonic expression of inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-12. Importantly, the ameliorated DSS-induced colitis in TIPE2−/− mice was also associated with reduced local dissemination of commensal bacteria and a weaker systemic inflammatory response. Combined with our previous report that TIPE2 is a negative regulator of anti-bacterial immunity, these results indicate that TIPE2 promotes colitis by inhibiting mucosal immunity to commensal bacteria. PMID:24973456

  7. Itk/Emt: a link between T cell antigen receptor-mediated Ca2+ events and cytoskeletal reorganization.

    PubMed

    Tsoukas, C D; Grasis, J A; Ching, K A; Kawakami, Y; Kawakami, T

    2001-01-01

    Itk/Emt, a tec family tyrosine kinase, is important for T-cell development and activation through the antigen receptor. Here, we review data suggesting that Itk/Emt is involved in the generation of critical second messengers (Ca(2+), PKC) whose duration it modulates by regulation of cytoskeletal reorganization. We propose that Itk/Emt constitutes an important link between these critical signaling events.

  8. Structural basis of a rationally rewired protein-protein interface critical to bacterial signaling

    PubMed Central

    Podgornaia, Anna I.; Casino, Patricia; Marina, Alberto; Laub, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Two-component signal transduction systems typically involve a sensor histidine kinase that specifically phosphorylates a single, cognate response regulator. This protein-protein interaction relies on molecular recognition via a small set of residues in each protein. To better understand how these residues determine the specificity of kinase-substrate interactions, we rationally rewired the interaction interface of a Thermotoga maritima two-component system, HK853-RR468, to match that found in a different two-component system, E. coli PhoR-PhoB. The rewired proteins interacted robustly with each other, but no longer interacted with the parent proteins. Analysis of the crystal structures of the wild-type and mutant protein complexes, along with a systematic mutagenesis study, reveals how individual mutations contribute to the rewiring of interaction specificity. Our approach and conclusions have implications for studies of other protein-protein interactions, protein evolution, and the design of novel protein interfaces. PMID:23954504

  9. Guaifenesin stone matrix proteomics: a protocol for identifying proteins critical to stone formation.

    PubMed

    Kolbach-Mandel, A M; Mandel, N S; Cohen, S R; Kleinman, J G; Ahmed, F; Mandel, I C; Wesson, J A

    2017-04-01

    Drug-related kidney stones are a diagnostic problem, since they contain a large matrix (protein) fraction and are frequently incorrectly identified as matrix stones. A urine proteomics study patient produced a guaifenesin stone during her participation, allowing us to both correctly diagnose her disease and identify proteins critical to this drug stone-forming process. The patient provided three random midday urine samples for proteomics studies; one of which contained stone-like sediment with two distinct fractions. These solids were characterized with optical microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Immunoblotting and quantitative mass spectrometry were used to quantitatively identify the proteins in urine and stone matrix. Infrared spectroscopy showed that the sediment was 60 % protein and 40 % guaifenesin and its metabolite guaiacol. Of the 156 distinct proteins identified in the proteomic studies, 49 were identified in the two stone-components with approximately 50 % of those proteins also found in this patient's urine. Many proteins observed in this drug-related stone have also been reported in proteomic matrix studies of uric acid and calcium containing stones. More importantly, nine proteins were highly enriched and highly abundant in the stone matrix and 8 were reciprocally depleted in urine, suggesting a critical role for these proteins in guaifenesin stone formation. Accurate stone analysis is critical to proper diagnosis and treatment of kidney stones. Many matrix proteins were common to all stone types, but likely not related to disease mechanism. This protocol defined a small set of proteins that were likely critical to guaifenesin stone formation based on their high enrichment and high abundance in stone matrix, and it should be applied to all stone types.

  10. Cytoskeletal Configuration Modulates Mechanically Induced Changes in Mesenchymal Stem Cell Osteogenesis, Morphology, and Stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pongkitwitoon, Suphannee; Uzer, Gunes; Rubin, Janet; Judex, Stefan

    2016-10-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) responding to mechanical cues generated by physical activity is critical for skeletal development and remodeling. Here, we utilized low intensity vibrations (LIV) as a physiologically relevant mechanical signal and hypothesized that the confined cytoskeletal configuration imposed by 2D culture will enable human bone marrow MSCs (hBMSC) to respond more robustly when LIV is applied in-plane (horizontal-LIV) rather than out-of-plane (vertical-LIV). All LIV signals enhanced hBMSC proliferation, osteogenic differentiation, and upregulated genes associated with cytoskeletal structure. The cellular response was more pronounced at higher frequencies (100 Hz vs 30 Hz) and when applied in the horizontal plane. Horizontal but not vertical LIV realigned the cell cytoskeleton, culminating in increased cell stiffness. Our results show that applying very small oscillatory motions within the primary cell attachment plane, rather than perpendicular to it, amplifies the cell’s response to LIV, ostensibly facilitating a more effective transfer of intracellular forces. Transcriptional and structural changes in particular with horizontal LIV, together with the strong frequency dependency of the signal, emphasize the importance of intracellular cytoskeletal configuration in sensing and responding to high-frequency mechanical signals at low intensities.

  11. Hierarchical self-organization of cytoskeletal active networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Daniel; Bernheim-Groswasser, Anne; Keasar, Chen; Farago, Oded

    2012-04-01

    The structural reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton is facilitated through the action of motor proteins that crosslink the actin filaments and transport them relative to each other. Here, we present a combined experimental-computational study that probes the dynamic evolution of mixtures of actin filaments and clusters of myosin motors. While on small spatial and temporal scales the system behaves in a very noisy manner, on larger scales it evolves into several well distinct patterns such as bundles, asters and networks. These patterns are characterized by junctions with high connectivity, whose formation is possible due to the organization of the motors in ‘oligoclusters’ (intermediate-size aggregates). The simulations reveal that the self-organization process proceeds through a series of hierarchical steps, starting from local microscopic moves and ranging up to the macroscopic large scales where the steady-state structures are formed. Our results shed light on the mechanisms involved in processes such as cytokinesis and cellular contractility, where myosin motors organized in clusters operate cooperatively to induce the structural organization of cytoskeletal networks.

  12. Cytoskeletal Dynamics and Fluid Flow in Drosophila Oocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Canio, Gabriele; Goldstein, Raymond; Lauga, Eric

    2015-11-01

    The biological world includes a broad range of phenomena in which transport in a fluid plays a central role. Among these is the fundamental issue of cell polarity arising during development, studied historically using the model organism Drosophila melanogaster. The polarity of the oocyte is known to be induced by the translocation of mRNAs by kinesin motor proteins along a dense microtubule cytoskeleton, a process which also induces cytoplasmic streaming. Recent experimental observations have revealed the remarkable fluid-structure interactions that occur as the streaming flows back-react on the microtubules. In this work we use a combination of theory and simulations to address the interplay between the fluid flow and the configuration of cytoskeletal filaments leading to the directed motion inside the oocyte. We show in particular that the mechanical coupling between the fluid motion and the orientation of the microtubules can lead to a transition to coherent motion within the oocyte, as observed. Supported by EPSRC and ERC Advanced Investigator Grant 247333.

  13. Cytoskeletal dysfunction dominates in DAP12-deficient osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Wei; Zhu, Tingting; Craft, Clarissa S.; Broekelmann, Thomas J.; Mecham, Robert P.; Teitelbaum, Steven L.

    2010-01-01

    Despite evidence that DAP12 regulates osteoclasts, mice lacking the ITAM-bearing protein exhibit only mild osteopetrosis. Alternatively, Dap12−/− mice, also lacking FcRγ, are severely osteopetrotic, suggesting that FcRγ compensates for DAP12 deficiency in the bone-resorbing polykaryons. Controversy exists, however, as to whether these co-stimulatory molecules regulate differentiation of osteoclasts or the capacity of the mature cell to degrade bone. We find that Dap12−/− osteoclasts differentiate normally when generated on osteoblasts but have a dysfunctional cytoskeleton, impairing their ability to transmigrate through the osteoblast layer and resorb bone. To determine whether the FcRγ co-receptor, OSCAR mediates osteoclast function in the absence of DAP12, we overexpressed OSCAR fused to FLAG (OSCAR-FLAG), in Dap12−/− osteoclasts. OSCAR-FLAG partially rescues the abnormal cytoskeleton of Dap12−/− osteoclasts grown on bone, but not those grown on osteoblasts. Thus, cytoskeletal dysfunction, and not arrested differentiation, is the dominant consequence of DAP12 deficiency in osteoclasts. The failure of osteoblasts to normalize Dap12−/− osteoclasts indicates that functionally relevant quantities of OSCAR ligand do not reside in bone-forming cells. PMID:20720152

  14. Cytoskeletal Modulation of Lipid Interactions Regulates Lck Kinase Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Chichili, Gurunadh R.; Cail, Robert C.; Rodgers, William

    2012-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton promotes clustering of proteins associated with cholesterol-dependent rafts, but its effect on lipid interactions that form and maintain rafts is not understood. We addressed this question by determining the effect of disrupting the cytoskeleton on co-clustering of dihexadecyl-(C16)-anchored DiO and DiI, which co-enrich in ordered lipid environments such as rafts. Co-clustering was assayed by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) in labeled T cells, where rafts function in the phosphoregulation of the Src family kinase Lck. Our results show that probe co-clustering was sensitive to depolymerization of actin filaments with latrunculin B (Lat B), inhibition of myosin II with blebbistatin, and treatment with neomycin to sequester phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate. Cytoskeletal effects on lipid interactions were not restricted to order-preferring label because co-clustering of C16-anchored DiO with didodecyl (C12)-anchored DiI, which favors disordered lipids, was also reduced by Lat B and blebbistatin. Furthermore, conditions that disrupted probe co-clustering resulted in activation of Lck. These data show that the cytoskeleton globally modulates lipid interactions in the plasma membrane, and this property maintains rafts that function in Lck regulation. PMID:22613726

  15. ZEB1 drives prometastatic actin cytoskeletal remodeling by downregulating miR-34a expression

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Young-Ho; Gibbons, Don L.; Chakravarti, Deepavali; Creighton, Chad J.; Rizvi, Zain H.; Adams, Henry P.; Pertsemlidis, Alexander; Gregory, Philip A.; Wright, Josephine A.; Goodall, Gregory J.; Flores, Elsa R.; Kurie, Jonathan M.

    2012-01-01

    Metastatic cancer is extremely difficult to treat, and the presence of metastases greatly reduces a cancer patient’s likelihood of long-term survival. The ZEB1 transcriptional repressor promotes metastasis through downregulation of microRNAs (miRs) that are strong inducers of epithelial differentiation and inhibitors of stem cell factors. Given that each miR can target multiple genes with diverse functions, we posited that the prometastatic network controlled by ZEB1 extends beyond these processes. We tested this hypothesis using a mouse model of human lung adenocarcinoma metastasis driven by ZEB1, human lung carcinoma cells, and human breast carcinoma cells. Transcriptional profiling studies revealed that ZEB1 controls the expression of numerous oncogenic and tumor-suppressive miRs, including miR-34a. Ectopic expression of miR-34a decreased tumor cell invasion and metastasis, inhibited the formation of promigratory cytoskeletal structures, suppressed activation of the RHO GTPase family, and regulated a gene expression signature enriched in cytoskeletal functions and predictive of outcome in human lung adenocarcinomas. We identified several miR-34a target genes, including Arhgap1, which encodes a RHO GTPase activating protein that was required for tumor cell invasion. These findings demonstrate that ZEB1 drives prometastatic actin cytoskeletal remodeling by downregulating miR-34a expression and provide a compelling rationale to develop miR-34a as a therapeutic agent in lung cancer patients. PMID:22850877

  16. Sporadic inclusion body myositis: morphology, regeneration, and cytoskeletal structure of muscle fibres

    PubMed Central

    Arnardottir, S; Borg, K; Ansved, T

    2004-01-01

    Methods: 14 muscle biopsies from 11 patients with s-IBM were characterised for morphological abnormalities and fibre type composition as well as muscle fibre regeneration and cytoskeletal structure, using histochemical and immunohistochemical techniques. Results: Morphological abnormalities included inflammatory infiltrates and "rimmed vacuoles," and pronounced variation in fibre size. There were no significant differences in fibre type composition between s-IBM patients and controls based on the myofibrillar ATPase staining. A differential effect on muscle fibre sizes was noted, type II fibres being smaller in the s-IBM patients than in the controls. Conversely, the mean type I muscle fibre diameter in the s-IBM patients was larger than in the controls, though this difference was not significant. An ongoing intense regeneration process was present in s-IBM muscle, as indicated by the expression of neonatal myosin heavy chain, vimentin, and CD56 (Leu-19) in most of the muscle fibres. The cytoskeletal proteins dystrophin and desmin were normally expressed in s-IBM muscle fibres that were not undergoing degeneration or regeneration. Conclusions: There are extensive morphological and morphometric alterations in s-IBM, affecting different muscle fibre types in different ways. The cytoskeletal structure of type I and II muscle fibres remains unaffected in different stages of the disease. PMID:15146016

  17. Protein palmitoylation is critical for the polar growth of root hairs in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Ling; Li, En; Feng, Qiang-Nan; Zhao, Xin-Ying; Ge, Fu-Rong; Zhang, Yan; Li, Sha

    2015-02-13

    Protein palmitoylation, which is critical for membrane association and subcellular targeting of many signaling proteins, is catalyzed mainly by protein S-acyl transferases (PATs). Only a few plant proteins have been experimentally verified to be subject to palmitoylation, such as ROP GTPases, calcineurin B like proteins (CBLs), and subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins. However, emerging evidence from palmitoyl proteomics hinted that protein palmitoylation as a post-translational modification might be widespread. Nonetheless, due to the large number of genes encoding PATs and the lack of consensus motifs for palmitoylation, progress on the roles of protein palmitoylation in plants has been slow. We combined pharmacological and genetic approaches to examine the role of protein palmitoylation in root hair growth. Multiple PATs from different endomembrane compartments may participate in root hair growth, among which the Golgi-localized PAT24/TIP GROWTH DEFECTIVE1 (TIP1) plays a major role while the tonoplast-localized PAT10 plays a secondary role in root hair growth. A specific inhibitor for protein palmitoylation, 2-bromopalmitate (2-BP), compromised root hair elongation and polarity. Using various probes specific for cellular processes, we demonstrated that 2-BP impaired the dynamic polymerization of actin microfilaments (MF), the asymmetric plasma membrane (PM) localization of phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate (PIP2), the dynamic distribution of RabA4b-positive post-Golgi secretion, and endocytic trafficking in root hairs. By combining pharmacological and genetic approaches and using root hairs as a model, we show that protein palmitoylation, regulated by protein S-acyl transferases at different endomembrane compartments such as the Golgi and the vacuole, is critical for the polar growth of root hairs in Arabidopsis. Inhibition of protein palmitoylation by 2-BP disturbed key intracellular activities in root hairs. Although some of these effects are likely

  18. Moesin is activated in cardiomyocytes in experimental autoimmune myocarditis and mediates cytoskeletal reorganization with protrusion formation.

    PubMed

    Miyawaki, Akimitsu; Mitsuhara, Yusuke; Orimoto, Aya; Nakayasu, Yusuke; Tsunoda, Shin-Ichi; Obana, Masanori; Maeda, Makiko; Nakayama, Hiroyuki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Tsutsumi, Yasuo; Fujio, Yasushi

    2016-08-01

    Acute myocarditis is a self-limiting disease. Most patients with myocarditis recover without cardiac dysfunction in spite of limited capacity of myocardial regeneration. Therefore, to address intrinsic reparative machinery of inflamed hearts, we investigated the cellular dynamics of cardiomyocytes in response to inflammation using experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) model. EAM was induced by immunization of BALB/c mice with α-myosin heavy chain peptides twice. The inflammatory reaction was evoked with myocardial damage with the peak at 3 wk after the first immunization (EAM3w). Morphological and functional restoration started from EAM3w, when active protrusion formation, a critical process of myocardial healing, was observed in cardiomyocytes. Shotgun proteomics revealed that cytoskeletal proteins were preferentially increased in cardiomyocytes at EAM3w, compared with preimmunized (EAM0w) hearts, and that moesin was the most remarkably upregulated among them. Immunoblot analyses demonstrated that the expression of both total and phosphorylated moesin was upregulated in isolated cardiomyocytes from EAM3w hearts. Immunofluorescence staining showed that moesin was localized at cardiomyocyte protrusions at EAM3w. Adenoviral vectors expressing wild-type, constitutively active and inactive form of moesin (wtMoesin, caMoesin, and iaMoesin, respectively) were transfected in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. The overexpression of wtMoesin and caMoesin resulted in protrusion formation, while not iaMoesin. Finally, we found that cardiomyocyte protrusions were accompanied by cell-cell contact formation. The expression of moesin was upregulated in cardiomyocytes under inflammation, inducing protrusion formation in a phosphorylation-dependent fashion. Moesin signal could be a novel therapeutic target that stimulates myocardial repair by promoting contact formation of cardiomyocytes.

  19. Whole body protein turnover in critically ill patients with multiple organ failure.

    PubMed

    Rooyackers, Olav; Kouchek-Zadeh, Ramin; Tjäder, Inga; Norberg, Åke; Klaude, Maria; Wernerman, Jan

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the effect of nutrition therapy on protein turnover in critically ill patients isotopically labeled amino acids can be used. Here parallel measurements using (13)C-leucine and (2)H5-phenylalanine were performed to evaluate if one tracer was to be preferred. As a reference group, healthy volunteers (n = 8) were studied in the postabsorptive state and during parenteral nutrition delivery. ICU patients with multiple organ failure (n = 8) were studied during parenteral nutrition delivery only. For the volunteers, the net protein balances changed from negative to positive during parenteral nutrition delivery (compared to the postabsorptive state) when evaluated with leucine and phenylalanine (P < 0.0001). For phenylalanine this change was attributable to an increased protein synthesis (P < 0.0001), while for leucine the change was attributable to a decreased protein degradation (P < 0.0001). For the patients, only measured during parenteral nutrition delivery, the estimates by the two amino acid tracers agreed, showing a protein balance not statistically significantly different from zero. The whole body protein turnover was higher than that of the healthy volunteers during parenteral nutrition delivery. In the patients, the net protein balance correlated positively to the amount of amino acids given. Critically ill patients with multiple organ failure have an increased protein turnover. The findings in the healthy volunteers indicate that the use of the two different amino acid tracers in parallel in future studies should be considered. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  20. Glucose autoxidation induces functional damage to proteins via modification of critical arginine residues.

    PubMed

    Chetyrkin, Sergei; Mathis, Missy; Pedchenko, Vadim; Sanchez, Otto A; McDonald, W Hayes; Hachey, David L; Madu, Hartman; Stec, Donald; Hudson, Billy; Voziyan, Paul

    2011-07-12

    Nonenzymatic modification of proteins in hyperglycemia is a major mechanism causing diabetic complications. These modifications can have pathogenic consequences when they target active site residues, thus affecting protein function. In the present study, we examined the role of glucose autoxidation in functional protein damage using lysozyme and RGD-α3NC1 domain of collagen IV as model proteins in vitro. We demonstrated that glucose autoxidation induced inhibition of lysozyme activity as well as NC1 domain binding to α(V)β(3) integrin receptor via modification of critical arginine residues by reactive carbonyl species (RCS) glyoxal (GO) and methylglyoxal while nonoxidative glucose adduction to the protein did not affect protein function. The role of RCS in protein damage was confirmed using pyridoxamine which blocked glucose autoxidation and RCS production, thus protecting protein function, even in the presence of high concentrations of glucose. Glucose autoxidation may cause protein damage in vivo since increased levels of GO-derived modifications of arginine residues were detected within the assembly interface of collagen IV NC1 domains isolated from renal ECM of diabetic rats. Since arginine residues are frequently present within protein active sites, glucose autoxidation may be a common mechanism contributing to ECM protein functional damage in hyperglycemia and oxidative environment. Our data also point out the pitfalls in functional studies, particularly in cell culture experiments, that involve glucose treatment but do not take into account toxic effects of RCS derived from glucose autoxidation.

  1. Rapidly transported organelles containing membrane and cytoskeletal components: their relation to axonal growth

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    We have examined the movements, composition, and cellular origin of phase-dense varicosities in cultures of chick sympathetic and sensory neurons. These organelles are variable in diameter (typically between 0.2 and 2 microns) and undergo saltatory movements both towards and away from the neuronal cell body. Their mean velocities vary inversely with the size of the organelle and are greater in the retrograde than the anterograde direction. Organelles stain with the lipophilic dye 1, 1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethyl-indocarbocyanine and with antibodies to cytoskeletal components. In cultures double-stained with antibodies to alpha-tubulin and 70-kD neurofilament protein (NF-L), approximately 40% of the organelles stain for tubulin, 30% stain for NF- L, 10% stain for both tubulin and NF-L, and 40% show no staining with either antibody. The association of cytoskeletal proteins with the organelles shows that these proteins are able to move by a form of rapid axonal transport. Under most culture conditions the predominant direction of movement is towards the cell body, suggesting that the organelles are produced at or near the growth cone. Retrograde movements continue in culture medium lacking protein or high molecular mass components and increase under conditions in which the advance of the growth cone is arrested. There is a fourfold increase in the number of organelles moving retrogradely in neurites that encounter a substratum-associated barrier to elongation; retrograde movements increase similarly in cultures exposed to cytochalasin at levels known to block growth cone advance. No previously described organelle shows behavior coordinated with axonal growth in this way. We propose that the organelles contain membrane and cytoskeletal components that have been delivered to the growth cone, by slow or fast anterograde transport, in excess of the amounts required to synthesize more axon. In view of their rapid mobility and variable contents, we suggest that they

  2. The TRPM7 interactome defines a cytoskeletal complex linked to neuroblastoma progression.

    PubMed

    Middelbeek, Jeroen; Vrenken, Kirsten; Visser, Daan; Lasonder, Edwin; Koster, Jan; Jalink, Kees; Clark, Kristopher; van Leeuwen, Frank N

    2016-11-01

    Neuroblastoma is the second-most common solid tumor in children and originates from poorly differentiated neural crest-derived progenitors. Although most advanced stage metastatic neuroblastoma patients initially respond to treatment, a therapy resistant pool of poorly differentiated cells frequently arises, leading to refractory disease. A lack of insight into the molecular mechanisms that underlie neuroblastoma progression hampers the development of effective new therapies for these patients. Normal neural crest development and maturation is guided by physical interactions between the cell and its surroundings, in addition to soluble factors such as growth factors. This mechanical crosstalk is mediated by actin-based adhesion structures and cell protrusions that probe the cellular environment to modulate migration, proliferation, survival and differentiation. Whereas such signals preserve cellular quiescence in non-malignant cells, perturbed adhesion signaling promotes de-differentiation, uncontrolled cell proliferation, tissue invasion and therapy resistance. We previously reported that high expression levels of the channel-kinase TRPM7, a protein that maintains the progenitor state of embryonic neural crest cells, are closely associated with progenitor-like features of tumor cells, accompanied by extensive cytoskeletal reorganization and adhesion remodeling. To define mechanisms by which TRPM7 may contribute to neuroblastoma progression, we applied a proteomics approach to identify TRPM7 interacting proteins. We show that TRPM7 is part of a large complex of proteins, many of which function in cytoskeletal organization, cell protrusion formation and adhesion dynamics. Expression of a subset of these TRPM7 interacting proteins strongly correlates with neuroblastoma progression in independent neuroblastoma patient datasets. Thus, TRPM7 is part of a large cytoskeletal complex that may affect the malignant potential of tumor cells by regulating actomyosin dynamics

  3. Involvement of cytoskeletal proteins in the barrier function of the human erythrocyte membrane. I. Impairment of resealing and formation of aqueous pores in the ghost membrane after modification of SH groups.

    PubMed

    Klonk, S; Deuticke, B

    1992-04-29

    Resealed human erythrocyte ghosts prepared by a two-step procedure were shown to have small residual barrier defects with the properties of aqueous pores, such as size discrimination of hydrophilic nonelectrolytes (erythritol to sucrose), indicative of an apparent pore radius of about 0.7 nm, and a low activation energy (about 12-20 kJ/mol (mannitol, sucrose)) of the leak fluxes. As in other cases (Deuticke et al. (1991) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1067, 111-122) these leak fluxes can be inhibited by phloretin. Treatment of such resealed ghosts with the mild SH oxidizing agent, diamide, induces additional membrane leaks to the same extent and with the same properties as in native erythrocytes (Deuticke et al. (1983) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 731, 196-210), including reversibility of the leak by SH reducing agents, inhibition by phloretin and stimulation by alkanols. In contrast, resealed ghosts prepared either from diamide-treated erythrocytes or by adding diamide to the 'open' membranes prior to reconstitution of high ionic strength and raising the temperature, exhibit a state of greater leakiness. This leakiness is somewhat different in its origin from the former class of leaks, since it can also be produced by N-ethylmaleimide, which is essentially ineffective when added to the membrane in its 'tight' state. The leaks induced in the 'open' state of the membrane, which can be regarded as a consequence of an impaired resealing, are nevertheless reversible by reducing agents added after resealing and are comparable in many, but not all their characteristics to leaks induced in the 'tight' state of the membrane. Resealing in the presence of the isothiocyanostilbenes DIDS or SITS mimicks the leak forming effect of diamide by modifying a small population of SH groups, while amino groups seem not to be involved. The findings indicate and substantiate an important role of the redox state of membrane skeletal protein sulfhydryls in the maintenance and the re-establishment of the

  4. Cytoskeletal architecture and immunocytochemical localization of microtubule-associated proteins in regions of axons associated with rapid axonal transport: the beta,beta'-iminodipropionitrile-intoxicated axon as a model system

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    Axons from rats treated with the neurotoxic agent beta,beta'- iminodipropionitrile (IDPN) were examined by quick-freeze, deep-etch electron microscopy. Microtubules formed bundles in the central region of the axons, whereas neurofilaments were segregated to the periphery. Most membrane-bounded organelles, presumably including those involved in rapid axonal transport, were associated with the microtubule domain. The high resolution provided by quick-freeze, deep-etch electron microscopy revealed that the microtubules were coated with an extensive network of fine strands that served both to cross-link the microtubules and to interconnect them with the membrane-bounded organelles. The strands were decorated with granular materials and were irregular in dimension. They appeared either singly or as an extensive anastomosing network in fresh axons. The microtubule-associated strands were observed in fresh, saponin-extracted, or aldehyde-fixed tissue. To explore further the identity of the microtubule-associated strands, microtubules purified from brain tissue and containing the high molecular weight microtubule-associated proteins MAP 1 and MAP 2 were examined by quick-freeze, deep-etch electron microscopy. The purified microtubules were connected by a network of strands quite similar in appearance to those observed in the IDPN axons. Control microtubule preparations consisting only of tubulin and lacking the MAPs were devoid of associated strands. To learn which of the MAPs were present in the microtubule bundles in the axon, sections of axons from IDPN- treated rats were examined by immunofluorescence microscopy using antibodies to MAP 1A, MAP 1B, MAP 2, and tubulin. Anti-MAP 2 staining was only marginally detectable in the IDPN-treated axons, consistent with earlier observations. Anti-MAP 1A and anti-MAP 1B brightly stained the IDPN-treated axons, with the staining exclusively limited to the microtubule domains. Furthermore, thin section-immunoelectron microscopy

  5. Support vector machines for learning to identify the critical positions of a protein.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Anshul; Realff, Matthew J; Lee, Jay H; Bommarius, Andreas S

    2005-06-07

    A method for identifying the positions in the amino acid sequence, which are critical for the catalytic activity of a protein using support vector machines (SVMs) is introduced and analysed. SVMs are supported by an efficient learning algorithm and can utilize some prior knowledge about the structure of the problem. The amino acid sequences of the variants of a protein, created by inducing mutations, along with their fitness are required as input data by the method to predict its critical positions. To investigate the performance of this algorithm, variants of the beta-lactamase enzyme were created in silico using simulations of both mutagenesis and recombination protocols. Results from literature on beta-lactamase were used to test the accuracy of this method. It was also compared with the results from a simple search algorithm. The algorithm was also shown to be able to predict critical positions that can tolerate two different amino acids and retain function.

  6. The phosphorylation status and cytoskeletal remodeling of striatal astrocytes treated with quinolinic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Pierozan, Paula; Ferreira, Fernanda; Ortiz de Lima, Bárbara; Gonçalves Fernandes, Carolina; Totarelli Monteforte, Priscila; Castro Medaglia, Natalia de; Bincoletto, Claudia; Soubhi Smaili, Soraya; Pessoa-Pureur, Regina

    2014-04-01

    Quinolinic acid (QUIN) is a glutamate agonist which markedly enhances the vulnerability of neural cells to excitotoxicity. QUIN is produced from the amino acid tryptophan through the kynurenine pathway (KP). Dysregulation of this pathway is associated with neurodegenerative conditions. In this study we treated striatal astrocytes in culture with QUIN and assayed the endogenous phosphorylating system associated with glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and vimentin as well as cytoskeletal remodeling. After 24 h incubation with 100 µM QUIN, cells were exposed to {sup 32}P-orthophosphate and/or protein kinase A (PKA), protein kinase dependent of Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin II (PKCaMII) or protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors, H89 (20 μM), KN93 (10 μM) and staurosporin (10 nM), respectively. Results showed that hyperphosphorylation was abrogated by PKA and PKC inhibitors but not by the PKCaMII inhibitor. The specific antagonists to ionotropic NMDA and non-NMDA (50 µM DL-AP5 and CNQX, respectively) glutamate receptors as well as to metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGLUR; 50 µM MCPG), mGLUR1 (100 µM MPEP) and mGLUR5 (10 µM 4C3HPG) prevented the hyperphosphorylation provoked by QUIN. Also, intra and extracellular Ca{sup 2+} quelators (1 mM EGTA; 10 µM BAPTA-AM, respectively) prevented QUIN-mediated effect, while Ca{sup 2+} influx through voltage-dependent Ca{sup 2+} channel type L (L-VDCC) (blocker: 10 µM verapamil) is not implicated in this effect. Morphological analysis showed dramatically altered actin cytoskeleton with concomitant change of morphology to fusiform and/or flattened cells with retracted cytoplasm and disruption of the GFAP meshwork, supporting misregulation of actin cytoskeleton. Both hyperphosphorylation and cytoskeletal remodeling were reversed 24 h after QUIN removal. Astrocytes are highly plastic cells and the vulnerability of astrocyte cytoskeleton may have important implications for understanding the neurotoxicity of QUIN in neurodegenerative

  7. In silico protein fragmentation reveals the importance of critical nuclei on domain reassembly.

    PubMed

    Contreras Martínez, Lydia M; Borrero Quintana, Ernesto E; Escobedo, Fernando A; DeLisa, Matthew P

    2008-03-01

    Protein complementation assays (PCAs) based on split protein fragments have become powerful tools that facilitate the study and engineering of intracellular protein-protein interactions. These assays are based on the observation that a given protein can be split into two inactive fragments and these fragments can reassemble into the original properly folded and functional structure. However, one experimentally observed limitation of PCA systems is that the folding of a protein from its fragments is dramatically slower relative to that of the unsplit parent protein. This is due in part to a poor understanding of how PCA design parameters such as split site position in the primary sequence and size of the resulting fragments contribute to the efficiency of protein reassembly. We used a minimalist on-lattice model to analyze how the dynamics of the reassembly process for two model proteins was affected by the location of the split site. Our results demonstrate that the balanced distribution of the "folding nucleus," a subset of residues that are critical to the formation of the transition state leading to productive folding, between protein fragments is key to their reassembly.

  8. A Critical Appraisal of Quantitative Studies of Protein Degradation in the Framework of Cellular Proteostasis

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Castelao, Beatriz; Ruiz-Rivas, Carmen; Castaño, José G.

    2012-01-01

    Protein homeostasis, proteostasis, is essential to understand cell function. Protein degradation is a crucial component of the proteostatic mechanisms of the cell. Experiments on protein degradation are nowadays present in many investigations in the field of molecular and cell biology. In the present paper, we focus on the different experimental approaches to study protein degradation and present a critical appraisal of the results derived from steady-state and kinetic experiments using detection of unlabelled and labelled protein methodologies with a proteostatic perspective. This perspective allows pinpointing the limitations in interpretation of results and the need of further experiments and/or controls to establish “definitive evidence” for the role of protein degradation in the proteostasis of a given protein or the entire proteome. We also provide a spreadsheet for simple calculations of mRNA and protein decays for mimicking different experimental conditions and a checklist for the analysis of experiments dealing with protein degradation studies that may be useful for researchers interested in the area of protein turnover. PMID:23119163

  9. Protein S-ACYL Transferase10 is critical for development and salt tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Liang-Zi; Li, Sha; Feng, Qiang-Nan; Zhang, Yu-Ling; Zhao, Xinying; Zeng, Yong-lun; Wang, Hao; Jiang, Liwen; Zhang, Yan

    2013-03-01

    Protein S-acylation, commonly known as palmitoylation, is a reversible posttranslational modification that catalyzes the addition of a saturated lipid group, often palmitate, to the sulfhydryl group of a Cys. Palmitoylation regulates enzyme activity, protein stability, subcellular localization, and intracellular sorting. Many plant proteins are palmitoylated. However, little is known about protein S-acyl transferases (PATs), which catalyze palmitoylation. Here, we report that the tonoplast-localized PAT10 is critical for development and salt tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana. PAT10 loss of function resulted in pleiotropic growth defects, including smaller leaves, dwarfism, and sterility. In addition, pat10 mutants are hypersensitive to salt stresses. We further show that PAT10 regulates the tonoplast localization of several calcineurin B-like proteins (CBLs), including CBL2, CBL3, and CBL6, whose membrane association also depends on palmitoylation. Introducing a C192S mutation within the highly conserved catalytic motif of PAT10 failed to complement pat10 mutants, indicating that PAT10 functions through protein palmitoylation. We propose that PAT10-mediated palmitoylation is critical for vacuolar function by regulating membrane association or the activities of tonoplast proteins.

  10. Coactosin-like protein, a human F-actin-binding protein: critical role of lysine-75.

    PubMed Central

    Provost, P; Doucet, J; Stock, A; Gerisch, G; Samuelsson, B; Rådmark, O

    2001-01-01

    Coactosin-like protein (CLP) was recently identified in a yeast two-hybrid screen using 5-lipoxygenase as bait. In the present study, we report the functional characterization of CLP as a human filamentous actin (F-actin)-binding protein. CLP mRNA shows a wide tissue distribution and is predominantly expressed in placenta, lung, kidney and peripheral-blood leucocytes. Endogenous CLP is localized in the cytosol of myeloid cells. Using a two-hybrid approach, actin was identified as a CLP-interacting protein. Binding experiments indicated that CLP associates with F-actin, but does not form a stable complex with globular actin. In transfected mammalian cells, CLP co-localized with actin stress fibres. CLP bound to actin filaments with a stoichiometry of 1:2 (CLP: actin subunits), but could be cross-linked to only one subunit of actin. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed the involvement of Lys(75) of CLP in actin binding, a residue highly conserved in related proteins and supposed to be exposed on the surface of the CLP protein. Our results identify CLP as a new human protein that binds F-actin in vitro and in vivo, and indicate that Lys(75) is essential for this interaction. PMID:11583571

  11. Cytoskeletal Dynamics: Concepts in Measles Virus Replication and Immunomodulation

    PubMed Central

    Avota, Elita; Gassert, Evelyn; Schneider-Schaulies, Sibylle

    2011-01-01

    In common with most viruses, measles virus (MV) relies on the integrity of the cytoskeleton of its host cells both with regard to efficient replication in these cells, but also retention of their motility which favors viral dissemination. It is, however, the surface interaction of the viral glycoprotein (gp) complex with receptors present on lymphocytes and dendritic cells (DCs), that signals effective initiation of host cell cytoskeletal dynamics. For DCs, these may act to regulate processes as diverse as viral uptake and sorting, but also the ability of these cells to successfully establish and maintain functional immune synapses (IS) with T cells. In T cells, MV signaling causes actin cytoskeletal paralysis associated with a loss of polarization, adhesion and motility, which has been linked to activation of sphingomyelinases and subsequent accumulation of membrane ceramides. MV modulation of both DC and T cell cytoskeletal dynamics may be important for the understanding of MV immunosuppression at the cellular level. PMID:22049305

  12. Signaling, cytoskeletal and membrane mechanisms regulating GLUT4 exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Nolan J; Elmendorf, Jeffrey S

    2011-03-01

    Solving how insulin regulates glucose transport into skeletal muscle and adipose tissue remains a fundamental challenge in biology and a significant issue in medicine. A central feature of this process is the coordinated accumulation of the glucose transporter GLUT4 into the plasma membrane. New signaling and cytoskeletal mechanisms of insulin-stimulated GLUT4 exocytosis are of emerging interest, particularly those at or just beneath the plasma membrane. This review examines signals that functionally engage GLUT4 exocytosis, considers cytoskeletal regulation of the stimulated GLUT4 itinerary, and appraises the involvement of plasma membrane parameters in GLUT4 control. We also explore how these newly-defined signaling, cytoskeletal and membrane mechanisms could be of therapeutic interest in the treatment and/or prevention of GLUT4 dysregulation in disease. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Signaling, cytoskeletal, and membrane mechanisms regulating GLUT4 exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Nolan J.; Elmendorf, Jeffrey S.

    2011-01-01

    Solving how insulin regulates glucose transport into skeletal muscle and adipose tissue remains a fundamental challenge in biology and a significant issue in medicine. A central feature of this process is the coordinated accumulation of the glucose transporter GLUT4 into the plasma membrane. New signaling and cytoskeletal mechanisms of insulin-stimulated GLUT4 exocytosis are of emerging interest, particularly those at or just beneath the plasma membrane. This review examines signals that functionally engage GLUT4 exocytosis, considers cytoskeletal regulation of the stimulated GLUT4 itinerary, and appraises involvement of plasma membrane parameters in GLUT4 control. We also explore how these newly defined signaling, cytoskeletal, and membrane mechanisms may be of therapeutic interest in the treatment and/or prevention of GLUT4 dysregulation in disease. PMID:21216617

  14. Protein Requirements for Critically Ill Patients With Renal and Liver Failure.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jayshil J; McClain, Craig J; Sarav, Menaka; Hamilton-Reeves, Jill; Hurt, Ryan T

    2017-04-01

    Diseases leading to critical illness induce proteolysis resulting in muscle wasting and negative nitrogen balance. Muscle wasting has been associated with poor intensive care unit (ICU)-related outcomes, including an increased risk for mortality. Acute kidney injury (AKI) represents a common organ dysfunction associated with ICU-related disorders, such as sepsis, trauma, and respiratory failure. AKI and renal replacement therapy lead to amino acid loss. Decompensated liver cirrhosis (DLC) and acute liver failure (ALF) represent more severe forms of liver dysfunction leading to ICU admission. DLC and ALF are associated with proteolysis and amino acid loss. AKI, DLC, and ALF uniquely contribute to negative nitrogen balance. The purpose of this review is to outline proteolysis associated with critical illness; define specific protein abnormalities in AKI, DLC, and ALF; define protein requirements in AKI, DLC, and ALF; and discuss barriers associated with optimal protein supplementation in these disorders.

  15. A critical examination of dietary protein requirements, benefits, and excesses in athletes.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Stuart M; Moore, Daniel R; Tang, Jason E

    2007-08-01

    There is likely no other dietary component that inspires as much debate, insofar as athletes are concerned, as protein. How much dietary protein is required, optimal, or excessive? Dietary guidelines from a variety of sources have settled on an adequate dietary protein intake for those over the age of 19 of ~0.8-0.9 g protein.kg body weight(-1).d(-1). According to U.S. and Canadian dietary reference intakes (33), the recommended allowance for protein of 0.8 g protein.kg(-1).d(-1) is "the average daily intake level that is sufficient to meet the nutrient requirement of nearly all [~98%] . . . healthy individuals" (p. 22). The panel also stated, "in view of the lack of compelling evidence to the contrary, no additional dietary protein is suggested for healthy adults undertaking resistance or endurance exercise" (33, p. 661). Currently, no group or groups of scientists involved in establishing dietary guidelines see a need for any statement that athletes or people engaging in regular physical activity require more protein than their sedentary counterparts. Popular magazines, numerous Web sites, trainers, and many athletes decry protein intakes even close to those recommended. Even joint position stands from policy-setting groups state that "protein recommendations for endurance athletes are 1.2 to 1.4 g/kg body weight per day, whereas those for resistance and strength-trained athletes may be as high as 1.6 to 1.7 g/kg body weight per day" (1, p. 1544). The divide between those setting dietary protein requirements and those who might be making practical recommendations for athletes appears substantial, but ultimately, most athletes indicate that they consume protein at levels beyond even the highest recommendations. Thus, one might conclude that any debate on protein "requirements" for athletes is inconsequential; however, a critical analysis of existing and new data reveals novel ideas and concepts that may represent some common ground between these apparently

  16. Disrupted cytoskeletal homeostasis, astrogliosis and apoptotic cell death in the cerebellum of preweaning rats injected with diphenyl ditelluride.

    PubMed

    Heimfarth, Luana; Loureiro, Samanta Oliveira; Dutra, Márcio Ferreira; Petenuzzo, Letícia; de Lima, Bárbara Ortiz; Fernandes, Carolina Gonçalves; da Rocha, João Batista Teixeira; Pessoa-Pureur, Regina

    2013-01-01

    In the present report 15 day-old rats were injected with 0.3μmol of diphenyl ditelluride (PhTe)(2)/kg body weight and parameters of neurodegeneration were analyzed in slices from cerebellum 3 and 6 days afterwards. The earlier responses, at day 3 after injection, included hyperphosphorylation of intermediate filament (IF) proteins from astrocyte (glial fibrillary acidic protein - GFAP - and vimentin) and neuron (low-, medium- and high molecular weight neurofilament subunits: NF-L, NF-M and NF-H); increased mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) (Erk and p38MAPK) and cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) activities. Also, reactive astrogliosis takes part of the early responses to the insult with (PhTe)(2), evidenced by upregulated GFAP in Western blot, PCR and immunofluorescence analysis. Six days after (PhTe)(2) injection we found persistent astrogliosis, increased propidium iodide (PI) positive cells in NeuN positive population evidenced by flow cytometry and reduced immunofluorescence for NeuN, suggesting that the in vivo exposure to (PhTe)(2) progressed to neuronal death. Moreover, activated caspase 3 suggested apoptotic neuronal death. Neurodegeneration was related with decreased [(3)H]glutamate uptake and decreased Akt immunoreactivity, however phospho-GSK-3-β (Ser9) was not altered in (PhTe)(2) injected rat. Therefore, the present results show that the earlier cerebellar responses to (PhTe)(2) include disruption of cytoskeletal homeostasis that could be related with MAPK and PKA activation and reactive astrogliosis. Akt inhibition observed at this time could also play a role in the neuronal death evidenced afterwards. The later events of the neurodegenerative process are characterized by persistent astrogliosis and activation of apoptotic neuronal death through caspase 3 mediated mechanisms, which could be related with glutamate excitotoxicity. The progression of these responses are therefore likely to be critical for the outcome of the neurodegeneration

  17. HTLV-I Tax and Cytokeratin: Tax-Expressing Cells Show Morphological Changes in Keratin-Containing Cytoskeletal Networks.

    PubMed

    Trihn, D.; Jeang, K.-T.; Semmes, O.J.

    1997-01-01

    Human T cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) has been linked to the development of an aggressive lymphoproliferative disorder (adult T cell leukemia), a chronic neurodegenerative presentation (HTLV-I-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis) and numerous less well-defined inflammatory conditions. The viral regulatory protein Tax has been implicated in cellular transformation events leading to the onset of adult T cell leukemia. Details on the stepwise processes through which Tax induces morphological changes in cells are poorly understood. We show here that Tax can bind to a class of intermediate filaments, the cytokeratins (Ker). Tax interacts with the 1B helical coil of keratin 8, a domain critical for higher-order intermediate filament matrix formation. Expression of Tax in epithelial cells visibly altered the structural pattern of the Ker network. In a T lymphocyte cell line, induction of Tax expression resulted in increased cellular adherence/invasion of Matrigel filters. We propose that one aspect of Tax function is the induction of morphological changes in cellular cytoskeletal structures. This finding for Tax-expressing cells might be one factor contributing directly to the pathogenesis of HTLV-I disease(s). Copyright 1997 S. Karger AG, Basel

  18. Beta-Actin Deficiency with Oxidative Posttranslational Modifications in Rett Syndrome Erythrocytes: Insights into an Altered Cytoskeletal Organization

    PubMed Central

    Pecorelli, Alessandra; Belmonte, Giuseppe; Signorini, Cinzia; Leoncini, Silvia; Zollo, Gloria; Capone, Antonietta; Giovampaola, Cinzia Della; Sticozzi, Claudia; Valacchi, Giuseppe; Ciccoli, Lucia; Guerranti, Roberto; Hayek, Joussef

    2014-01-01

    Beta-actin, a critical player in cellular functions ranging from cell motility and the maintenance of cell shape to transcription regulation, was evaluated in the erythrocyte membranes from patients with typical Rett syndrome (RTT) and methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene mutations. RTT, affecting almost exclusively females with an average frequency of 1∶10,000 female live births, is considered the second commonest cause of severe cognitive impairment in the female gender. Evaluation of beta-actin was carried out in a comparative cohort study on red blood cells (RBCs), drawn from healthy control subjects and RTT patients using mass spectrometry-based quantitative analysis. We observed a decreased expression of the beta-actin isoforms (relative fold changes for spots 1, 2 and 3: −1.82±0.15, −2.15±0.06, and −2.59±0.48, respectively) in pathological RBCs. The results were validated by western blotting and immunofluorescence microscopy. In addition, beta-actin from RTT patients also showed a dramatic increase in oxidative posttranslational modifications (PTMs) as the result of its binding with the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE). Our findings demonstrate, for the first time, a beta-actin down-regulation and oxidative PTMs for RBCs of RTT patients, thus indicating an altered cytoskeletal organization. PMID:24671107

  19. Hydropathic self-organized criticality: a magic wand for protein physics.

    PubMed

    Phillips, J C

    2012-10-01

    Self-organized criticality (SOC) is a popular concept that has been the subject of more than 3000 articles in the last 25 years. The characteristic signature of SOC is the appearance of self-similarity (power-law scaling) in observable properties. A characteristic observable protein property that describes protein-water interactions is the water-accessible (hydropathic) interfacial area of compacted globular protein networks. Here we show that hydropathic power-law (size- or length-scale-dependent) exponents derived from SOC enable theory to connect standard Web-based (BLAST) short-range amino acid (aa) sequence similarities to long-range aa sequence hydropathic roughening form factors that hierarchically describe evolutionary trends in water - membrane protein interactions. Our method utilizes hydropathic aa exponents that define a non-Euclidean metric realistically rooted in the atomic coordinates of 5526 protein segments. These hydropathic aa exponents thereby encapsulate universal (but previously only implicit) non-Euclidean long-range differential geometrical features of the Protein Data Bank. These hydropathic aa exponents easily organize small mutated aa sequence differences between human and proximate species proteins. For rhodopsin, the most studied transmembrane signaling protein associated with night vision, analysis shows that this approach separates Euclidean short- and non-Euclidean long-range aa sequence properties, and shows that they correlate with 96% success for humans, monkeys, cats, mice and rabbits. Proper application of SOC using hydropathic aa exponents promises unprecedented simplifications of exponentially complex protein sequence-structure-function problems, both conceptual and practical.

  20. Proteins associated with critical sperm functions and sperm head shape are differentially expressed in morphologically abnormal bovine sperm induced by scrotal insulation.

    PubMed

    Shojaei Saadi, Habib A; van Riemsdijk, Evine; Dance, Alysha L; Rajamanickam, Gayathri D; Kastelic, John P; Thundathil, Jacob C

    2013-04-26

    The objective was to investigate expression patterns of proteins in pyriform sperm, a common morphological abnormality in bull sperm. Ejaculates were collected from sexually mature Holstein bulls (n=3) twice weekly for 10 weeks (pre-thermal insult samples). Testicular temperature was elevated in all bulls by scrotal insulation for 72 consecutive hours during week 2. Total sperm proteins were extracted from pre- and post-thermal insult sperm samples and subjected to two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Among the protein spots detected, 131 spots were significantly expressed (False Detection Rate <0.01) with ≥ 2 fold changes between normal and pyriform sperm. Among them, 25 spots with ≥ 4 fold difference in expression patterns were identified using liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Expression of several proteins involved in sperm capacitation, sperm-egg interaction and sperm cytoskeletal structure was decreased in pyriform sperm, whereas proteins regulating antioxidant activity, apoptosis and metabolic activity were increased. Contents of reactive oxygen species and ubiquitinated proteins were higher in pyriform sperm. In addition to understanding the molecular basis of functional deficiencies in sperm with specific morphological abnormalities, comparing normal versus morphologically abnormal sperm appeared to be a suitable experimental model for identifying important sperm functional proteins. To our knowledge, this study is the first report on differential expression of proteins in pyriform bovine sperm versus morphologically normal sperm. We report that expression of several proteins involved in sperm capacitation, sperm-egg interaction and sperm cytoskeletal structure was decreased in pyriform sperm, whereas proteins which regulate antioxidant activity, apoptosis and metabolic activity were increased. Contents of reactive oxygen species and ubiquitinated proteins were higher in pyriform sperm. In addition to understanding

  1. Binary liquid phase separation and critical phenomena in a protein/water solution.

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, J A; Schurtenberger, P; Thurston, G M; Benedek, G B

    1987-01-01

    We have investigated the phase diagram of aqueous solutions of the bovine lens protein gamma II-crystallin. For temperatures T less than Tc = 278.5 K, we find that these solutions exhibit a reversible coexistence between two isotropic liquid phases differing in protein concentration. The dilute and concentrated branches of the coexistence curve were characterized, consistently, both by measurements of the two coexisting concentrations, c(T), and by measuring the cloud temperatures for various initial concentrations. We estimate that the critical concentration, cc, is 244 mg of protein per ml solution. The coexistence curve is well represented by the absolute value of (c - cc)/cc = 5.2 square root (Tc - T)/Tc. Using the temperature dependence of the scattered light intensity along isochores parallel to the critical isochore, we estimated the location of the spinodal line and found it to have the form (c - cc)/cc = 3.0 square root (Tc - T)/Tc. The ratio of the widths of the coexistence curve and the spinodal line, (5.2/3.0), is close to the mean-field value square root 3. We have also observed the growth of large crystals of gamma II-crystallin in some of these aqueous solutions and have made preliminary observations as to the factors that promote or delay the onset of crystallization. These findings suggest that selected protein/water systems can serve as excellent model systems for the study of phase transitions and critical phenomena. PMID:3478681

  2. A Conserved Region between the Heptad Repeats of Paramyxovirus Fusion Proteins is Critical for Proper F Protein Folding†

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Amanda E.; Martin, Kimberly L.; Dutch, Rebecca E.

    2008-01-01

    Paramyxoviruses are a diverse family which utilizes a fusion (F) protein to enter cells via fusion of the viral lipid bilayer with a target cell membrane. Although certain regions of F are known to play critical roles in membrane fusion, the function of much of the protein remains unclear. Sequence alignment of a set of paramyxovirus F proteins and analysis utilizing Block Maker identified a region of conserved amino acid sequence in a large domain between the heptad repeats of F1, designated CBF1. We employed site-directed mutagenesis to analyze the function of completely conserved residues of CBF1 in both the simian virus 5 (SV5) and Hendra virus F proteins. The majority of CBF1 point mutants were deficient in homotrimer formation, proteolytic processing, and transport to the cell surface. For some SV5 F mutants, proteolytic cleavage and surface expression could be restored by expression at 30°C, and varying levels of fusion promotion were observed at this temperature. In addition, the mutant SV5 F V402A displayed a hyperfusogenic phenotype at both 30°C and 37°C, indicating this mutation allows for efficient fusion with only an extremely small amount of cleaved, active protein. The recently published prefusogenic structure of PIV5/SV5 F [Yin, H.S., et al. (2006) Nature 439, 38–44] indicates that residues within and flanking CBF1 interact with the fusion peptide domain. Together, these data suggest that CBF1-fusion peptide interactions are critical for the initial folding of paramyxovirus F proteins from across this important viral family, and can also modulate subsequent membrane fusion promotion. PMID:17417875

  3. Force generation by kinesin and myosin cytoskeletal motor proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kull, F. Jon; Endow, Sharyn A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Kinesins and myosins hydrolyze ATP, producing force that drives spindle assembly, vesicle transport and muscle contraction. How do motors do this? Here we discuss mechanisms of motor force transduction, based on their mechanochemical cycles and conformational changes observed in crystal structures. Distortion or twisting of the central β-sheet – proposed to trigger actin-induced Pi and ADP release by myosin, and microtubule-induced ADP release by kinesins – is shown in a movie depicting the transition between myosin ATP-like and nucleotide-free states. Structural changes in the switch I region form a tube that governs ATP hydrolysis and Pi release by the motors, explaining the essential role of switch I in hydrolysis. Comparison of the motor power strokes reveals that each stroke begins with the force-amplifying structure oriented opposite to the direction of rotation or swing. Motors undergo changes in their mechanochemical cycles in response to small-molecule inhibitors, several of which bind to kinesins by induced fit, trapping the motors in a state that resembles a force-producing conformation. An unusual motor activator specifically increases mechanical output by cardiac myosin, potentially providing valuable information about its mechanism of function. Further study is essential to understand motor mechanochemical coupling and energy transduction, and could lead to new therapies to treat human disease. PMID:23487037

  4. Cytoskeletal Components of an Invasion Machine—The Apical Complex of Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ke; Johnson, Jeff; Florens, Laurence; Fraunholz, Martin; Suravajjala, Sapna; DiLullo, Camille; Yates, John; Roos, David S; Murray, John M

    2006-01-01

    The apical complex of Toxoplasma gondii is widely believed to serve essential functions in both invasion of its host cells (including human cells), and in replication of the parasite. The understanding of apical complex function, the basis for its novel structure, and the mechanism for its motility are greatly impeded by lack of knowledge of its molecular composition. We have partially purified the conoid/apical complex, identified ~200 proteins that represent 70% of its cytoskeletal protein components, characterized seven novel proteins, and determined the sequence of recruitment of five of these proteins into the cytoskeleton during cell division. Our results provide new markers for the different subcompartments within the apical complex, and revealed previously unknown cellular compartments, which facilitate our understanding of how the invasion machinery is built. Surprisingly, the extreme apical and extreme basal structures of this highly polarized cell originate in the same location and at the same time very early during parasite replication. PMID:16518471

  5. Cytoskeletal reorganizations in human umbilical vein endothelial cells as a result of cytokine exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Molony, L.; Armstrong, L. )

    1991-09-01

    Treatment of HUVECs in culture with several cytokines and phorbol esters caused reorganizations of the actin and microtubule networks, as well as a redistribution of focal contract proteins. However, expression of the cytoskeletal proteins which link cells, via integrins, to the substrate, was not significantly affected. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy of endothelial cells after treatment with interleukin-1 alpha and beta, gamma-interferon, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, and phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate allowed us to observe reductions in the areas of cell-cell contact, redistribution of the stress fiber network, and concomitant changes in focal contacts. Microtubule arrays in TNF-treated cells became bundled. Phorbol esters induced formation of microtubule organizing centers not seen in resting or TNF-treated HUVECs. Talin was distributed along stress fibers and not exclusively in focal contacts. Vitronectin receptor was observed in focal contacts, occasionally at cell-cell contacts, and in vesicular structures close to the lumenal surface, after both types of treatment. Although these morphological changes were easily observed by indirect immunofluorescence, no quantitative differences in specific cytoskeletal proteins were detected by immunoblots and (35S)cysteine metabolic labeling experiments.

  6. Actin cytoskeletal remodeling with protrusion formation is essential for heart regeneration in Hippo-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Morikawa, Yuka; Zhang, Min; Heallen, Todd; Leach, John; Tao, Ge; Xiao, Yang; Bai, Yan; Li, Wei; Willerson, James T.; Martin, James F.

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian heart regenerates poorly, and damage commonly leads to heart failure. Hippo signaling is an evolutionarily conserved kinase cascade that regulates organ size during development and prevents adult mammalian cardiomyocyte regeneration by inhibiting the transcriptional coactivator Yap, which also responds to mechanical signaling in cultured cells to promote cell proliferation. To identify Yap target genes that are activated during cardiomyocyte renewal and regeneration, we performed Yap chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-Seq) and mRNA expression profiling in Hippo signaling-deficient mouse hearts. We found that Yap directly regulated genes encoding cell cycle progression proteins, as well as genes encoding proteins that promote F-actin polymerization and that link the actin cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix. Included in the latter group were components of the dystrophin glycoprotein complex (DGC), a large molecular complex that, when defective, results in muscular dystrophy in humans. Cardiomyocytes near scar tissue of injured Hippo signaling-deficient mouse hearts showed cellular protrusions suggestive of cytoskeletal remodeling. The hearts of mdx mutant mice, which lack functional dystrophin and are a model for muscular dystrophy, showed impaired regeneration and cytoskeleton remodeling, but normal cardiomyocyte proliferation after injury. Our data showed that, in addition to genes encoding cell cycle progression proteins, Yap regulated genes that enhance cytoskeletal remodeling Thus, blocking the Hippo pathway input to Yap may tip the balance so that Yap responds to the mechanical changes associated with heart injury to promote repair. PMID:25943351

  7. Actin cytoskeletal remodeling with protrusion formation is essential for heart regeneration in Hippo-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Morikawa, Yuka; Zhang, Min; Heallen, Todd; Leach, John; Tao, Ge; Xiao, Yang; Bai, Yan; Li, Wei; Willerson, James T; Martin, James F

    2015-05-05

    The mammalian heart regenerates poorly, and damage commonly leads to heart failure. Hippo signaling is an evolutionarily conserved kinase cascade that regulates organ size during development and prevents adult mammalian cardiomyocyte regeneration by inhibiting the transcriptional coactivator Yap, which also responds to mechanical signaling in cultured cells to promote cell proliferation. To identify Yap target genes that are activated during cardiomyocyte renewal and regeneration, we performed Yap chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-Seq) and mRNA expression profiling in Hippo signaling-deficient mouse hearts. We found that Yap directly regulated genes encoding cell cycle progression proteins, as well as genes encoding proteins that promote F-actin polymerization and that link the actin cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix. Included in the latter group were components of the dystrophin glycoprotein complex, a large molecular complex that, when defective, results in muscular dystrophy in humans. Cardiomyocytes near the scar tissue of injured Hippo signaling-deficient mouse hearts showed cellular protrusions suggestive of cytoskeletal remodeling. The hearts of mdx mutant mice, which lack functional dystrophin and are a model for muscular dystrophy, showed impaired regeneration and cytoskeleton remodeling, but normal cardiomyocyte proliferation, after injury. Our data showed that, in addition to genes encoding cell cycle progression proteins, Yap regulated genes that enhance cytoskeletal remodeling. Thus, blocking the Hippo pathway input to Yap may tip the balance so that Yap responds to mechanical changes associated with heart injury to promote repair. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  8. Thermally Driven and Cytoskeletal-Assisted Dynamics of the Mitochondrial Reticulum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knowles, Michelle K.; Marcus, Andrew H.

    2003-05-01

    We report Fourier imaging correlation spectroscopy (FICS) and digital video fluorescence microscopy (DVFM) measurements of the dynamics of the mitochondrial reticulum in living osteosarcoma cells. Mitochondrial dynamics are strongly influenced by interactions with cytoskeletal filaments and their associated motor proteins, which lead to complex multi-exponential relaxations that occur over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. The cytoskeleton consists of an interconnected polymer network whose primary components are microfilaments (actin) and microtubules (tubulin). These filaments work with motor proteins to translate organelles through the cell. We studied the dynamics of osteosarcoma cells labeled with red fluorescent protein in the mitochondrial matrix space using DVFM and FICS. Cells were then treated with cytoskeletal destabilizing drugs. Analysis of microscopy data allows for us to determine whether dynamic processes are diffusive or driven (by the cytoskeleton or collective dynamics). In FICS experiments, the control cells exhibit a unique pattern of dynamics that are then simplified when the cytoskeleton is depolymerized. Upon depolymerization, the dynamics of the organelle appear primarily diffusive.

  9. Anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-19 inhibits smooth muscle cell migration and activation of cytoskeletal regulators of VSMC motility

    PubMed Central

    Gabunia, Khatuna; Jain, Surbhi; England, Ross N.

    2011-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration is an important cellular event in multiple vascular diseases, including atherosclerosis, restenosis, and transplant vasculopathy. Little is known regarding the effects of anti-inflammatory interleukins on VSMC migration. This study tested the hypothesis that an anti-inflammatory Th2 interleukin, interleukin-19 (IL-19), could decrease VSMC motility. IL-19 significantly decreased platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-stimulated VSMC chemotaxis in Boyden chambers and migration in scratch wound assays. IL-19 significantly decreased VSMC spreading in response to PDGF. To determine the molecular mechanism(s) for these cellular effects, we examined the effect of IL-19 on activation of proteins that regulate VSMC cytoskeletal dynamics and locomotion. IL-19 decreased PDGF-driven activation of several cytoskeletal regulatory proteins that play an important role in smooth muscle cell motility, including heat shock protein-27 (HSP27), myosin light chain (MLC), and cofilin. IL-19 decreased PDGF activation of the Rac1 and RhoA GTPases, important integrators of migratory signals. IL-19 was unable to inhibit VSMC migration nor was able to inhibit activation of cytoskeletal regulatory proteins in VSMC transduced with a constitutively active Rac1 mutant (RacV14), suggesting that IL-19 inhibits events proximal to Rac1 activation. Together, these data are the first to indicate that IL-19 can have important inhibitory effects on VSMC motility and activation of cytoskeletal regulatory proteins. This has important implications for the use of anti-inflammatory cytokines in the treatment of vascular occlusive disease. PMID:21209363

  10. Critical roles of non-histone protein lysine methylation in human tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Hamamoto, Ryuji; Saloura, Vassiliki; Nakamura, Yusuke

    2015-02-01

    Several protein lysine methyltransferases and demethylases have been identified to have critical roles in histone modification. A large body of evidence has indicated that their dysregulation is involved in the development and progression of various diseases, including cancer, and these enzymes are now considered to be potential therapeutic targets. Although most studies have focused on histone methylation, many reports have revealed that these enzymes also regulate the methylation dynamics of non-histone proteins such as p53, RB1 and STAT3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3), which have important roles in human tumorigenesis. In this Review, we summarize the molecular functions of protein lysine methylation and its involvement in human cancer, with a particular focus on lysine methylation of non-histone proteins.

  11. The Emerging Role of Protein Phosphorylation as a Critical Regulatory Mechanism Controlling Cellulose Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Danielle M.; Murray, Christian M.; Ketelaar, KassaDee J.; Thomas, Joseph J.; Villalobos, Jose A.; Wallace, Ian S.

    2016-01-01

    Plant cell walls are extracellular matrices that surround plant cells and critically influence basic cellular processes, such as cell division and expansion. Cellulose is a major constituent of plant cell walls, and this paracrystalline polysaccharide is synthesized at the plasma membrane by a large protein complex known as the cellulose synthase complex (CSC). Recent efforts have identified numerous protein components of the CSC, but relatively little is known about regulation of cellulose biosynthesis. Numerous phosphoproteomic surveys have identified phosphorylation events in CSC associated proteins, suggesting that protein phosphorylation may represent an important regulatory control of CSC activity. In this review, we discuss the composition and dynamics of the CSC in vivo, the catalog of CSC phosphorylation sites that have been identified, the function of experimentally examined phosphorylation events, and potential kinases responsible for these phosphorylation events. Additionally, we discuss future directions in cellulose synthase kinase identification and functional analyses of CSC phosphorylation sites. PMID:27252710

  12. Dynamic association of L-selectin with the lymphocyte cytoskeletal matrix.

    PubMed

    Evans, S S; Schleider, D M; Bowman, L A; Francis, M L; Kansas, G S; Black, J D

    1999-03-15

    L-selectin mediates lymphocyte extravasation into lymphoid tissues through binding to sialomucin-like receptors on the surface of high endothelial venules (HEV). This study examines the biochemical basis and regulation of interactions between L-selectin, an integral transmembrane protein, and the lymphocyte cytoskeleton. Using a detergent-based extraction procedure, constitutive associations between L-selectin and the insoluble cytoskeletal matrix could not be detected. However, engagement of the L-selectin lectin domain by Abs or by glycosylation-dependent cell adhesion molecule-1, an HEV-derived ligand for L-selectin, rapidly triggered redistribution of L-selectin to the detergent-insoluble cytoskeleton. L-selectin attachment to the cytoskeleton was not prevented by inhibitors of actin/microtubule polymerization (cytochalasin B, colchicine, or nocodozole) or serine/threonine and tyrosine kinase activity (staurosporine, calphostin C, or genistein), although L-selectin-mediated adhesion of human PBL was markedly suppressed by these agents. Exposure of human PBL or murine pre-B transfectants expressing full-length human L-selectin to fever-range hyperthermia also markedly increased L-selectin association with the cytoskeleton, directly correlating with enhanced L-selectin-mediated adhesion. In contrast, a deletion mutant of L-selectin lacking the COOH-terminal 11 amino acids failed to associate with the cytoskeletal matrix in response to Ab cross-linking or hyperthermia stimulation and did not support adhesion to HEV. These studies, when taken together with the previously demonstrated interaction between the L-selectin cytoplasmic domain and the cytoskeletal linker protein alpha-actinin, strongly implicate the actin-based cytoskeleton in dynamically controlling L-selectin adhesion.

  13. Protein tyrosine kinase regulation by ubiquitination: Critical roles of Cbl-family ubiquitin ligases

    PubMed Central

    Mohapatra, Bhopal; Ahmad, Gulzar; Nadeau, Scott; Zutshi, Neha; An, Wei; Scheffe, Sarah; Dong, Lin; Feng, Dan; Goetz, Benjamin; Arya, Priyanka; Bailey, Tameka A.; Palermo, Nicholas; Borgstahl, Gloria E.O.; Natarajan, Amarnath; Raja, Srikumar M.; Naramura, Mayumi; Band, Vimla; Band, Hamid

    2012-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) coordinate a broad spectrum of cellular responses to extracellular stimuli and cell–cell interactions during development, tissue homeostasis, and responses to environmental challenges. Thus, an understanding of the regulatory mechanisms that ensure physiological PTK function and potential aberrations of these regulatory processes during diseases such as cancer are of broad interest in biology and medicine. Aside from the expected role of phospho-tyrosine phosphatases, recent studies have revealed a critical role of covalent modification of activated PTKs with ubiquitin as a critical mechanism of their negative regulation. Members of the Cbl protein family (Cbl, Cbl-b and Cbl-c in mammals) have emerged as dominant “activated PTK-selective” ubiquitin ligases. Structural, biochemical and cell biological studies have established that Cbl protein-dependent ubiquitination targets activated PTKs for degradation either by facilitating their endocytic sorting into lysosomes or by promoting their proteasomal degradation. This mechanism also targets PTK signaling intermediates that become associated with Cbl proteins in a PTK activation-dependent manner. Cellular and animal studies have established that the relatively broadly expressed mammalian Cbl family members Cbl and Cbl-b play key physiological roles, including their critical functions to prevent the transition of normal immune responses into autoimmune disease and as tumor suppressors; the latter function has received validation from human studies linking mutations in Cbl to human leukemia. These newer insights together with embryonic lethality seen in mice with a combined deletion of Cbl and Cbl-b genes suggest an unappreciated role of the Cbl family proteins, and by implication the ubiquitin-dependent control of activated PTKs, in stem/progenitor cell maintenance. Future studies of existing and emerging animal models and their various cell lineages should help test the broader

  14. Collective dynamics of processive cytoskeletal motors.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, R Tyler; Diehl, Michael R; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B

    2016-01-07

    Major cellular processes are supported by various biomolecular motors that usually operate together as teams. We present an overview of the collective dynamics of processive cytokeletal motor proteins based on recent experimental and theoretical investigations. Experimental studies show that multiple motors function with different degrees of cooperativity, ranging from negative to positive. This effect depends on the mechanical properties of individual motors, the geometry of their connections, and the surrounding cellular environment. Theoretical models based on stochastic approaches underline the importance of intermolecular interactions, the properties of single motors, and couplings with cellular medium in predicting the collective dynamics. We discuss several features that specify the cooperativity in motor proteins. Based on this approach a general picture of collective dynamics of motor proteins is formulated, and the future directions and challenges are discussed.

  15. Cytoskeletal prestress regulates nuclear shape and stiffness in cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyungsuk; Adams, William J; Alford, Patrick W; McCain, Megan L; Feinberg, Adam W; Sheehy, Sean P; Goss, Josue A; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2015-11-01

    Mechanical stresses on the myocyte nucleus have been associated with several diseases and potentially transduce mechanical stimuli into cellular responses. Although a number of physical links between the nuclear envelope and cytoplasmic filaments have been identified, previous studies have focused on the mechanical properties of individual components of the nucleus, such as the nuclear envelope and lamin network. The mechanical interaction between the cytoskeleton and chromatin on nuclear deformability remains elusive. Here, we investigated how cytoskeletal and chromatin structures influence nuclear mechanics in cardiac myocytes. Rapid decondensation of chromatin and rupture of the nuclear membrane caused a sudden expansion of DNA, a consequence of prestress exerted on the nucleus. To characterize the prestress exerted on the nucleus, we measured the shape and the stiffness of isolated nuclei and nuclei in living myocytes during disruption of cytoskeletal, myofibrillar, and chromatin structure. We found that the nucleus in myocytes is subject to both tensional and compressional prestress and its deformability is determined by a balance of those opposing forces. By developing a computational model of the prestressed nucleus, we showed that cytoskeletal and chromatin prestresses create vulnerability in the nuclear envelope. Our studies suggest the cytoskeletal-nuclear-chromatin interconnectivity may play an important role in mechanics of myocyte contraction and in the development of laminopathies by lamin mutations. © 2015 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  16. In vivo definition of cardiac myosin-binding protein C's critical interactions with myosin.

    PubMed

    Bhuiyan, Md Shenuarin; McLendon, Patrick; James, Jeanne; Osinska, Hanna; Gulick, James; Bhandary, Bidur; Lorenz, John N; Robbins, Jeffrey

    2016-10-01

    Cardiac myosin-binding protein C (cMyBP-C) is an integral part of the sarcomeric machinery in cardiac muscle that enables normal function. cMyBP-C regulates normal cardiac contraction by functioning as a brake through interactions with the sarcomere's thick, thin, and titin filaments. cMyBP-C's precise effects as it binds to the different filament systems remain obscure, particularly as it impacts on the myosin heavy chain's head domain, contained within the subfragment 2 (S2) region. This portion of the myosin heavy chain also contains the ATPase activity critical for myosin's function. Mutations in myosin's head, as well as in cMyBP-C, are a frequent cause of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC). We generated transgenic lines in which endogenous cMyBP-C was replaced by protein lacking the residues necessary for binding to S2 (cMyBP-C(S2-)). We found, surprisingly, that cMyBP-C lacking the S2 binding site is incorporated normally into the sarcomere, although systolic function is compromised. We show for the first time the acute and chronic in vivo consequences of ablating a filament-specific interaction of cMyBP-C. This work probes the functional consequences, in the whole animal, of modifying a critical structure-function relationship, the protein's ability to bind to a region of the critical enzyme responsible for muscle contraction, the subfragment 2 domain of the myosin heavy chain. We show that the binding is not critical for the protein's correct insertion into the sarcomere's architecture, but is essential for long-term, normal function in the physiological context of the heart.

  17. Cytoskeletal Regulation Dominates Temperature-Sensitive Proteomic Changes of Hibernation in Forebrain of 13-Lined Ground Squirrels

    PubMed Central

    Hindle, Allyson G.; Martin, Sandra L.

    2013-01-01

    13-lined ground squirrels, Ictidomys tridecemlineatus, are obligate hibernators that transition annually between summer homeothermy and winter heterothermy – wherein they exploit episodic torpor bouts. Despite cerebral ischemia during torpor and rapid reperfusion during arousal, hibernator brains resist damage and the animals emerge neurologically intact each spring. We hypothesized that protein changes in the brain underlie winter neuroprotection. To identify candidate proteins, we applied a sensitive 2D gel electrophoresis method to quantify protein differences among forebrain extracts prepared from ground squirrels in two summer, four winter and fall transition states. Proteins that differed among groups were identified using LC-MS/MS. Only 84 protein spots varied significantly among the defined states of hibernation. Protein changes in the forebrain proteome fell largely into two reciprocal patterns with a strong body temperature dependence. The importance of body temperature was tested in animals from the fall; these fall animals use torpor sporadically with body temperatures mirroring ambient temperatures between 4 and 21°C as they navigate the transition between summer homeothermy and winter heterothermy. Unlike cold-torpid fall ground squirrels, warm-torpid individuals strongly resembled the homeotherms, indicating that the changes observed in torpid hibernators are defined by body temperature, not torpor per se. Metabolic enzymes were largely unchanged despite varied metabolic activity across annual and torpor-arousal cycles. Instead, the majority of the observed changes were cytoskeletal proteins and their regulators. While cytoskeletal structural proteins tended to differ seasonally, i.e., between summer homeothermy and winter heterothermy, their regulatory proteins were more strongly affected by body temperature. Changes in the abundance of various isoforms of the microtubule assembly and disassembly regulatory proteins dihydropyrimidinase

  18. Cytoskeletal regulation dominates temperature-sensitive proteomic changes of hibernation in forebrain of 13-lined ground squirrels.

    PubMed

    Hindle, Allyson G; Martin, Sandra L

    2013-01-01

    13-lined ground squirrels, Ictidomys tridecemlineatus, are obligate hibernators that transition annually between summer homeothermy and winter heterothermy - wherein they exploit episodic torpor bouts. Despite cerebral ischemia during torpor and rapid reperfusion during arousal, hibernator brains resist damage and the animals emerge neurologically intact each spring. We hypothesized that protein changes in the brain underlie winter neuroprotection. To identify candidate proteins, we applied a sensitive 2D gel electrophoresis method to quantify protein differences among forebrain extracts prepared from ground squirrels in two summer, four winter and fall transition states. Proteins that differed among groups were identified using LC-MS/MS. Only 84 protein spots varied significantly among the defined states of hibernation. Protein changes in the forebrain proteome fell largely into two reciprocal patterns with a strong body temperature dependence. The importance of body temperature was tested in animals from the fall; these fall animals use torpor sporadically with body temperatures mirroring ambient temperatures between 4 and 21°C as they navigate the transition between summer homeothermy and winter heterothermy. Unlike cold-torpid fall ground squirrels, warm-torpid individuals strongly resembled the homeotherms, indicating that the changes observed in torpid hibernators are defined by body temperature, not torpor per se. Metabolic enzymes were largely unchanged despite varied metabolic activity across annual and torpor-arousal cycles. Instead, the majority of the observed changes were cytoskeletal proteins and their regulators. While cytoskeletal structural proteins tended to differ seasonally, i.e., between summer homeothermy and winter heterothermy, their regulatory proteins were more strongly affected by body temperature. Changes in the abundance of various isoforms of the microtubule assembly and disassembly regulatory proteins dihydropyrimidinase

  19. Critical controllability in proteome-wide protein interaction network integrating transcriptome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishitsuka, Masayuki; Akutsu, Tatsuya; Nacher, Jose C.

    2016-04-01

    Recently, the number of essential gene entries has considerably increased. However, little is known about the relationships between essential genes and their functional roles in critical network control at both the structural (protein interaction network) and dynamic (transcriptional) levels, in part because the large size of the network prevents extensive computational analysis. Here, we present an algorithm that identifies the critical control set of nodes by reducing the computational time by 180 times and by expanding the computable network size up to 25 times, from 1,000 to 25,000 nodes. The developed algorithm allows a critical controllability analysis of large integrated systems composed of a transcriptome- and proteome-wide protein interaction network for the first time. The data-driven analysis captures a direct triad association of the structural controllability of genes, lethality and dynamic synchronization of co-expression. We believe that the identified optimized critical network control subsets may be of interest as drug targets; thus, they may be useful for drug design and development.

  20. Critical controllability in proteome-wide protein interaction network integrating transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Ishitsuka, Masayuki; Akutsu, Tatsuya; Nacher, Jose C.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the number of essential gene entries has considerably increased. However, little is known about the relationships between essential genes and their functional roles in critical network control at both the structural (protein interaction network) and dynamic (transcriptional) levels, in part because the large size of the network prevents extensive computational analysis. Here, we present an algorithm that identifies the critical control set of nodes by reducing the computational time by 180 times and by expanding the computable network size up to 25 times, from 1,000 to 25,000 nodes. The developed algorithm allows a critical controllability analysis of large integrated systems composed of a transcriptome- and proteome-wide protein interaction network for the first time. The data-driven analysis captures a direct triad association of the structural controllability of genes, lethality and dynamic synchronization of co-expression. We believe that the identified optimized critical network control subsets may be of interest as drug targets; thus, they may be useful for drug design and development. PMID:27040162

  1. DNA binding residues in the RQC domain of Werner protein are critical for its catalytic activities.

    PubMed

    Tadokoro, Takashi; Kulikowicz, Tomasz; Dawut, Lale; Croteau, Deborah L; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2012-06-01

    Werner protein (WRN), member of the RecQ helicase family, is a helicase and exonuclease, and participates in multiple DNA metabolic processes including DNA replication, recombination and DNA repair. Mutations in the WRN gene cause Werner syndrome, associated with premature aging, genome instability and cancer predisposition. The RecQ C-terminal (RQC) domain of WRN, containing α2-α3 loop and β-wing motifs, is important for DNA binding and for many protein interactions. To better understand the critical functions of this domain, we generated recombinant WRN proteins (using a novel purification scheme) with mutations in Arg-993 within the α2-α3 loop of the RQC domain and in Phe-1037 of the -wing motif. We then studied the catalytic activities and DNA binding of these mutant proteins as well as some important functional protein interactions. The mutant proteins were defective in DNA binding and helicase activity, and interestingly, they had deficient exonuclease activity and strand annealing function. The RQC domain of WRN has not previously been implicated in exonuclease or annealing activities. The mutant proteins could not stimulate NEIL1 incision activity as did the wild type. Thus, the Arg-993 and Phe-1037 in the RQC domain play essential roles in catalytic activity, and in functional interactions mediated by WRN.

  2. DNA binding residues in the RQC domain of Werner protein are critical for its catalytic activities

    PubMed Central

    Tadokoro, Takashi; Kulikowicz, Tomasz; Dawut, Lale; Croteau, Deborah L.; Bohr, Vilhelm A.

    2012-01-01

    Werner protein (WRN), member of the RecQ helicase family, is a helicase and exonuclease, and participates in multiple DNA metabolic processes including DNA replication, recombination and DNA repair. Mutations in the WRN gene cause Werner syndrome, associated with premature aging, genome instability and cancer predisposition. The RecQ C-terminal (RQC) domain of WRN, containing α2-α3 loop and β-wing motifs, is important for DNA binding and for many protein interactions. To better understand the critical functions of this domain, we generated recombinant WRN proteins (using a novel purification scheme) with mutations in Arg-993 within the α2-α3 loop of the RQC domain and in Phe-1037 of the μ-wing motif. We then studied the catalytic activities and DNA binding of these mutant proteins as well as some important functional protein interactions. The mutant proteins were defective in DNA binding and helicase activity, and interestingly, they had deficient exonuclease activity and strand annealing function. The RQC domain of WRN has not previously been implicated in exonuclease or annealing activities. The mutant proteins could not stimulate NEIL1 incision activity as did the wild type. Thus, the Arg-993 and Phe-1037 in the RQC domain play essential roles in catalytic activity, and in functional interactions mediated by WRN. PMID:22713343

  3. Kinetic stability analysis of protein assembly on the center manifold around the critical point.

    PubMed

    Tsuruyama, Tatsuaki

    2017-02-02

    Non-linear kinetic analysis is a useful method for illustration of the dynamic behavior of cellular biological systems. To date, center manifold theory (CMT) has not been sufficiently applied for stability analysis of biological systems. The aim of this study is to demonstrate the application of CMT to kinetic analysis of protein assembly and disassembly, and to propose a novel framework for nonlinear multi-parametric analysis. We propose a protein assembly model with nonlinear kinetics provided by the fluctuation in monomer concentrations during their diffusion. When the diffusion process of a monomer is self-limited to give kinetics non-linearity, numerical simulations suggest the probability that the assembly and disassembly oscillate near the critical point. We applied CMT to kinetic analysis of the center manifold around the critical point in detail, and successfully demonstrated bifurcation around the critical point, which explained the observed oscillation. The stability kinetics of the present model based on CMT illustrates a unique feature of protein assembly, namely non-linear behavior. Our findings are expected to provide methodology for analysis of biological systems.

  4. Tumorigenicity of Ewing sarcoma is critically dependent on the trithorax proteins MLL1 and menin

    PubMed Central

    Svoboda, Laurie K.; Bailey, Natashay; Van Noord, Raelene A.; Krook, Melanie A.; Harris, Ashley; Cramer, Cassondra; Jasman, Brooke; Patel, Rajiv M.; Thomas, Dafydd; Borkin, Dmitry; Cierpicki, Tomasz; Grembecka, Jolanta; Lawlor, Elizabeth R.

    2017-01-01

    Developmental transcription programs are epigenetically regulated by the competing actions of polycomb and trithorax (TrxG) protein complexes, which repress and activate genes, respectively. Ewing sarcoma is a developmental tumor that is associated with widespread de-regulation of developmental transcription programs, including HOX programs. Posterior HOXD genes are abnormally over-expressed by Ewing sarcoma and HOXD13, in particular, contributes to the tumorigenic phenotype. In MLL1 fusion-driven leukemia, aberrant activation of HOXA genes is epigenetically mediated by the TrxG complex and HOXA gene expression and leukemogenesis are critically dependent on the protein-protein interaction between the TrxG proteins MLL1 and menin. Based on these data, we investigated whether posterior HOXD gene activation and Ewing sarcoma tumorigenicity are similarly mediated by and dependent on MLL1 and/or menin. Our findings demonstrate that Ewing sarcomas express high levels of both MLL1 and menin and that continued expression of both proteins is required for maintenance of tumorigenicity. In addition, exposure of Ewing sarcoma cells to MI-503, an inhibitor of the MLL1-menin protein-protein interaction developed for MLL1-fusion driven leukemia, leads to loss of tumorigenicity and down-regulated expression of the posterior HOXD gene cluster. Together these data demonstrate an essential role for MLL1 and menin in mediating tumor maintenance and posterior HOXD gene activation in Ewing sarcoma. A critical dependency of these tumors on the MLL1-menin interaction presents a potentially novel therapeutic target. PMID:27888797

  5. Peroxiredoxin Chaperone Activity Is Critical for Protein Homeostasis in Zinc-deficient Yeast* ♦

    PubMed Central

    MacDiarmid, Colin W.; Taggart, Janet; Kerdsomboon, Kittikhun; Kubisiak, Michael; Panascharoen, Supawee; Schelble, Katherine; Eide, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Zinc is required for the folding and function of many proteins. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, homeostatic and adaptive responses to zinc deficiency are regulated by the Zap1 transcription factor. One Zap1 target gene encodes the Tsa1 peroxiredoxin, a protein with both peroxidase and protein chaperone activities. Consistent with its regulation, Tsa1 is critical for growth under low zinc conditions. We previously showed that Tsa1's peroxidase function decreases the oxidative stress that occurs in zinc deficiency. In this report, we show that Tsa1 chaperone, and not peroxidase, activity is the more critical function in zinc-deficient cells. Mutations restoring growth to zinc-deficient tsa1 cells inactivated TRR1, encoding thioredoxin reductase. Because Trr1 is required for oxidative stress tolerance, this result implicated the Tsa1 chaperone function in tolerance to zinc deficiency. Consistent with this hypothesis, the tsa1Δ zinc requirement was complemented by a Tsa1 mutant allele that retained only chaperone function. Additionally, growth of tsa1Δ was also restored by overexpression of holdase chaperones Hsp26 and Hsp42, which lack peroxidase activity, and the Tsa1 paralog Tsa2 contributed to suppression by trr1Δ, even though trr1Δ inactivates Tsa2 peroxidase activity. The essentiality of the Tsa1 chaperone suggested that zinc-deficient cells experience a crisis of disrupted protein folding. Consistent with this model, assays of protein homeostasis suggested that zinc-limited tsa1Δ mutants accumulated unfolded proteins and induced a corresponding stress response. These observations demonstrate a clear physiological role for a peroxiredoxin chaperone and reveal a novel and unexpected role for protein homeostasis in tolerating metal deficiency. PMID:24022485

  6. Hypocaloric, high-protein nutrition therapy in older vs younger critically ill patients with obesity.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, Roland N; Medling, Theresa L; Smith, Ashley C; Maish, George O; Croce, Martin A; Minard, Gayle; Brown, Rex O

    2013-01-01

    Older patients require more protein than younger patients to achieve anabolism, but age-associated renal dysfunction may limit the amount of protein that can be safely provided. This study examined whether older, critically ill trauma patients with obesity can safely achieve nitrogen equilibrium and have positive clinical outcomes similar to younger obese patients during hypocaloric, high-protein nutrition therapy. Adult patients with traumatic injury and obesity (body mass index [BMI] >30 kg/m(2)), admitted to the Presley Trauma Center from January 2009 to April 2011, were evaluated. Patients were targeted to receive hypocaloric, high-protein nutrition therapy (<25 kcal/kg ideal body weight [IBW]/d and >2 g/kg IBW/d of protein) for >10 days. Patients were stratified as older (≥60 years) or younger (18-59 years). Seventy-four patients (33 older, 41 younger) were studied. Older and younger patients were similar in BMI and injury severity. When given isonitrogenous regimens (2.3 ± 0.2 g/kg IBW/d), nitrogen balance was similar between older and younger patients (-3.2 ± 5.7 g/d vs -4.9 ± 9.0 g/d; P = .363). Older patients experienced a greater mean serum urea nitrogen concentration than younger patients (30 ± 14 mg/dL vs 20 ± 9 mg/dL; P = .001) during nutrition therapy. Clinical outcomes were not different between groups. Older critically ill trauma patients exhibited an equivalent net protein response as younger patients during hypocaloric, high-protein nutrition therapy. Older patients are at greater risk for developing azotemia. Close monitoring is warranted.

  7. Mechanics of composite cytoskeletal and extracellular networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Moumita

    2014-03-01

    Living cells sense and respond to mechanical forces in their surroundings. This mechanical response is mainly due to the cell cytoskeleton, and its interaction with the extracellular matrix (ECM). The cell cytoskeleton is a composite polymeric scaffold made of many different types of protein filaments and crosslinking proteins. Two major filament systems in the cytoskeleton are actin filaments (F-actin) and microtubules (MTs). Actin filaments are semiflexible, while the much stiffer MTs behave as rigid rods. I shall discuss theories that help understand how the direct coupling to the surrounding F-actin matrix allows intracellular MTs to bear large compressive forces and controls the range of force transmission along the MTs, and how the MTs not only enhance the stiffness of the cell cytoskeleton, but can also dramatically endow an initially nearly incompressible F-actin matrix with enhanced compressibility relative to its shear compliance. A second source of compositeness in the cytoskeleton is the presences of different types of crosslinkers that can interact cooperatively leading to enhanced mechanical rigidity and tunable response. Like the cytoskeleton, the ECM is also a polymeric composite. It is primarily composed of a mesh of fibrous proteins, mainly stiff collagen filaments, and a comparatively flexible gel of proteoglycans and hyaluronan. I shall discuss a model that shows how the interplay between the collagen network and the background elastic gel leads to a mechanically robust ECM.

  8. Atomic-resolution structure of cytoskeletal bactofilin by solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chaowei; Fricke, Pascal; Lin, Lin; Chevelkov, Veniamin; Wegstroth, Melanie; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Thanbichler, Martin; Lange, Adam

    2015-12-01

    Bactofilins are a recently discovered class of cytoskeletal proteins of which no atomic-resolution structure has been reported thus far. The bacterial cytoskeleton plays an essential role in a wide range of processes, including morphogenesis, cell division, and motility. Among the cytoskeletal proteins, the bactofilins are bacteria-specific and do not have a eukaryotic counterpart. The bactofilin BacA of the species Caulobacter crescentus is not amenable to study by x-ray crystallography or solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) because of its inherent noncrystallinity and insolubility. We present the atomic structure of BacA calculated from solid-state NMR-derived distance restraints. We show that the core domain of BacA forms a right-handed β helix with six windings and a triangular hydrophobic core. The BacA structure was determined to 1.0 Å precision (heavy-atom root mean square deviation) on the basis of unambiguous restraints derived from four-dimensional (4D) HN-HN and 2D C-C NMR spectra.

  9. Transcriptional networks regulating the costamere, sarcomere, and other cytoskeletal structures in striated muscle.

    PubMed

    Estrella, Nelsa L; Naya, Francisco J

    2014-05-01

    Structural abnormalities in striated muscle have been observed in numerous transcription factor gain- and loss-of-function phenotypes in animal and cell culture model systems, indicating that transcription is important in regulating the cytoarchitecture. While most characterized cytoarchitectural defects are largely indistinguishable by histological and ultrastructural criteria, analysis of dysregulated gene expression in each mutant phenotype has yielded valuable information regarding specific structural gene programs that may be uniquely controlled by each of these transcription factors. Linking the formation and maintenance of each subcellular structure or subset of proteins within a cytoskeletal compartment to an overlapping but distinct transcription factor cohort may enable striated muscle to control cytoarchitectural function in an efficient and specific manner. Here we summarize the available evidence that connects transcription factors, those with established roles in striated muscle such as MEF2 and SRF, as well as other non-muscle transcription factors, to the regulation of a defined cytoskeletal structure. The notion that genes encoding proteins localized to the same subcellular compartment are coordinately transcriptionally regulated may prompt rationally designed approaches that target specific transcription factor pathways to correct structural defects in muscle disease.

  10. Nesprin-3 regulates endothelial cell morphology, perinuclear cytoskeletal architecture, and flow-induced polarization

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Joshua T.; Pfeiffer, Emily R.; Thirkill, Twanda L.; Kumar, Priyadarsini; Peng, Gordon; Fridolfsson, Heidi N.; Douglas, Gordon C.; Starr, Daniel A.; Barakat, Abdul I.

    2011-01-01

    Changes in blood flow regulate gene expression and protein synthesis in vascular endothelial cells, and this regulation is involved in the development of atherosclerosis. How mechanical stimuli are transmitted from the endothelial luminal surface to the nucleus is incompletely understood. The linker of nucleus and cytoskeleton (LINC) complexes have been proposed as part of a continuous physical link between the plasma membrane and subnuclear structures. LINC proteins nesprin-1, -2, and -4 have been shown to mediate nuclear positioning via microtubule motors and actin. Although nesprin-3 connects intermediate filaments to the nucleus, no functional consequences of nesprin-3 mutations on cellular processes have been described. Here we show that nesprin-3 is robustly expressed in human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) and localizes to the nuclear envelope. Nesprin-3 regulates HAEC morpho­logy, with nesprin-3 knockdown inducing prominent cellular elongation. Nesprin-3 also organizes perinuclear cytoskeletal organization and is required to attach the centrosome to the nuclear envelope. Finally, nesprin-3 is required for flow-induced polarization of the centrosome and flow-induced migration in HAECs. These results represent the most complete description to date of nesprin-3 function and suggest that nesprin-3 regulates vascular endothelial cell shape, perinuclear cytoskeletal architecture, and important aspects of flow-mediated mechanotransduction. PMID:21937718

  11. Endocytosis Plays a Critical Role in Proteolytic Processing of the Hendra Virus Fusion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Meulendyke, Kelly Ann; Wurth, Mark Allen; McCann, Richard O.; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2005-01-01

    The Hendra virus fusion (F) protein is synthesized as a precursor protein, F0, which is proteolytically processed to the mature form, F1+F2. Unlike the case for the majority of paramyxovirus F proteins, the processing event is furin independent, does not require the addition of exogenous proteases, is not affected by reductions in intracellular Ca2+, and is strongly affected by conditions that raise the intracellular pH (C. T. Pager, M. A. Wurth, and R. E. Dutch, J. Virol. 78:9154-9163, 2004). The Hendra virus F protein cytoplasmic tail contains a consensus motif for endocytosis, YXXΦ. To analyze the potential role of endocytosis in the processing and membrane fusion promotion of the Hendra virus F protein, mutation of tyrosine 525 to alanine (Hendra virus F Y525A) or phenylalanine (Hendra virus F Y525F) was performed. The rate of endocytosis of Hendra virus F Y525A was significantly reduced compared to that of the wild-type (wt) F protein, confirming the functional importance of the endocytosis motif. An intermediate level of endocytosis was observed for Hendra virus F Y525F. Surprisingly, dramatic reductions in the rate of proteolytic processing were observed for Hendra virus F Y525A, although initial transport to the cell surface was not affected. The levels of surface expression for both Hendra virus F Y525A and Hendra virus F Y525F were higher than that of the wt protein, and these mutants displayed enhanced syncytium formation. These results suggest that endocytosis is critically important for Hendra virus F protein cleavage, representing a new paradigm for proteolytic processing of paramyxovirus F proteins. PMID:16188966

  12. Cytoskeletal self-organization in neuromorphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Dehmelt, Leif

    2014-01-01

    Self-organization of dynamic microtubules via interactions with associated motors plays a critical role in spindle formation. The microtubule-based mechanisms underlying other aspects of cellular morphogenesis, such as the formation and development of protrusions from neuronal cells is less well understood. In a recent study, we investigated the molecular mechanism that underlies the massive reorganization of microtubules induced in non-neuronal cells by expression of the neuronal microtubule stabilizer MAP2c. In that study we directly observed cortical dynein complexes and how they affect the dynamic behavior of motile microtubules in living cells. We found that stationary dynein complexes transiently associate with motile microtubules near the cell cortex and that their rapid turnover facilitates efficient microtubule transport. Here, we discuss our findings in the larger context of cellular morphogenesis with specific focus on self-organizing principles from which cellular shape patterns such as the thin protrusions of neurons can emerge.

  13. Botrytis cinerea protein O-mannosyltransferases play critical roles in morphogenesis, growth, and virulence.

    PubMed

    González, Mario; Brito, Nélida; Frías, Marcos; González, Celedonio

    2013-01-01

    Protein O-glycosylation is crucial in determining the structure and function of numerous secreted and membrane-bound proteins. In fungi, this process begins with the addition of a mannose residue by protein O-mannosyltransferases (PMTs) in the lumen side of the ER membrane. We have generated mutants of the three Botrytis cinerea pmt genes to study their role in the virulence of this wide-range plant pathogen. B. cinerea PMTs, especially PMT2, are critical for the stability of the cell wall and are necessary for sporulation and for the generation of the extracellular matrix. PMTs are also individually required for full virulence in a variety of hosts, with a special role in the penetration of intact plant leaves. The most significant case is that of grapevine leaves, whose penetration requires the three functional PMTs. Furthermore, PMT2 also contributes significantly to fungal adherence on grapevine and tobacco leaves. Analysis of extracellular and membrane proteins showed significant changes in the pattern of protein secretion and glycosylation by the pmt mutants, and allowed the identification of new protein substrates putatively glycosylated by specific PMTs. Since plants do no possess these enzymes, PMTs constitute a promising target in the development of novel control strategies against B. cinerea.

  14. Botrytis cinerea Protein O-Mannosyltransferases Play Critical Roles in Morphogenesis, Growth, and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    González, Mario; Brito, Nélida; Frías, Marcos; González, Celedonio

    2013-01-01

    Protein O-glycosylation is crucial in determining the structure and function of numerous secreted and membrane-bound proteins. In fungi, this process begins with the addition of a mannose residue by protein O-mannosyltransferases (PMTs) in the lumen side of the ER membrane. We have generated mutants of the three Botrytis cinerea pmt genes to study their role in the virulence of this wide-range plant pathogen. B. cinerea PMTs, especially PMT2, are critical for the stability of the cell wall and are necessary for sporulation and for the generation of the extracellular matrix. PMTs are also individually required for full virulence in a variety of hosts, with a special role in the penetration of intact plant leaves. The most significant case is that of grapevine leaves, whose penetration requires the three functional PMTs. Furthermore, PMT2 also contributes significantly to fungal adherence on grapevine and tobacco leaves. Analysis of extracellular and membrane proteins showed significant changes in the pattern of protein secretion and glycosylation by the pmt mutants, and allowed the identification of new protein substrates putatively glycosylated by specific PMTs. Since plants do no possess these enzymes, PMTs constitute a promising target in the development of novel control strategies against B. cinerea. PMID:23762450

  15. Critical lysine residues of Klf4 required for protein stabilization and degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Key-Hwan; Kim, So-Ra; Ramakrishna, Suresh; Baek, Kwang-Hyun

    2014-01-24

    Highlights: • Klf4 undergoes the 26S proteasomal degradation by ubiquitination on its multiple lysine residues. • Essential Klf4 ubiquitination sites are accumulated between 190–263 amino acids. • A mutation of lysine at 232 on Klf4 elongates protein turnover. • Klf4 mutants dramatically suppress p53 expression both under normal and UV irradiated conditions. - Abstract: The transcription factor, Krüppel-like factor 4 (Klf4) plays a crucial role in generating induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). As the ubiquitination and degradation of the Klf4 protein have been suggested to play an important role in its function, the identification of specific lysine sites that are responsible for protein degradation is of prime interest to improve protein stability and function. However, the molecular mechanism regulating proteasomal degradation of the Klf4 is poorly understood. In this study, both the analysis of Klf4 ubiquitination sites using several Klf4 deletion fragments and bioinformatics predictions showed that the lysine sites which are signaling for Klf4 protein degradation lie in its N-terminal domain (aa 1–296). The results also showed that Lys32, 52, 232, and 252 of Klf4 are responsible for the proteolysis of the Klf4 protein. These results suggest that Klf4 undergoes proteasomal degradation and that these lysine residues are critical for Klf4 ubiquitination.

  16. Molecular Mechanotransduction: how forces trigger cytoskeletal dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrlicher, Allen

    2012-02-01

    Mechanical stresses elicit cellular reactions mediated by chemical signals. Defective responses to forces underlie human medical disorders, such as cardiac failure and pulmonary injury. Despite detailed knowledge of the cytoskeleton's structure, the specific molecular switches that convert mechanical stimuli into chemical signals have remained elusive. Here we identify the actin-binding protein, filamin A (FLNa) as a central mechanotransduction element of the cytoskeleton by using Fluorescence Loss After photoConversion (FLAC), a novel high-speed alternative to FRAP. We reconstituted a minimal system consisting of actin filaments, FLNa and two FLNa-binding partners: the cytoplasmic tail of ß-integrin, and FilGAP. Integrins form an essential mechanical linkage between extracellular and intracellular environments, with ß integrin tails connecting to the actin cytoskeleton by binding directly to filamin. FilGAP is a FLNa-binding GTPase-activating protein specific for Rac, which in vivo regulates cell spreading and bleb formation. We demonstrate that both externally-imposed bulk shear and myosin II driven forces differentially regulate the binding of integrin and FilGAP to FLNa. Consistent with structural predictions, strain increases ß-integrin binding to FLNa, whereas it causes FilGAP to dissociate from FLNa, providing a direct and specific molecular basis for cellular mechanotransduction. These results identify the first molecular mechanotransduction element within the actin cytoskeleton, revealing that mechanical strain of key proteins regulates the binding of signaling molecules. Moreover, GAP activity has been shown to switch cell movement from mesenchymal to amoeboid motility, suggesting that mechanical forces directly impact the invasiveness of cancer.

  17. CONSERVED ROLES FOR CYTOSKELETAL COMPONENTS IN DETERMINING LATERALITY

    PubMed Central

    McDowell, Gary S.; Lemire, Joan M.; Paré, Jean-Francois; Cammarata, Garrett; Lowery, Laura Anne; Levin, Michael

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Consistently-biased left-right (LR) patterning is required for the proper placement of organs including the heart and viscera. The LR axis is especially fascinating as an example of multi-scale pattern formation, since here chiral events at the subcellular level are integrated and amplified into asymmetric transcriptional cascades and ultimately into the anatomical patterning of the entire body. In contrast to the other two body axes, there is considerable controversy about the earliest mechanisms of embryonic laterality. Many molecular components of asymmetry have not been widely tested among phyla with diverse bodyplans, and it is unknown whether parallel (redundant) pathways may exist that could reverse abnormal asymmetry states at specific checkpoints in development. To address conservation of the early steps of LR patterning, we used the Xenopus laevis (frog) embryo to functionally test a number of protein targets known to direct asymmetry in plants, fruit fly, and rodent. Using the same reagents that randomize asymmetry in Arabidopsis, Drosophila, and mouse embryos, we show that manipulation of the microtubule and actin cytoskeleton immediately post-fertilization, but not later, results in laterality defects in Xenopus embryos. Moreover, we observed organ-specific randomization effects and a striking dissociation of organ situs from effects on the expression of left side control genes, which parallel data from Drosophila and mouse. Remarkably, some early manipulations that disrupt laterality of transcriptional asymmetry determinants can be subsequently “rescued” by the embryo, resulting in normal organ situs. These data reveal the existence of novel corrective mechanisms, demonstrate that asymmetric expression of Nodal is not a definitive marker of laterality, and suggest the existence of amplification pathways that connect early cytoskeletal processes to control of organ situs bypassing Nodal. Counter to alternative models of symmetry breaking

  18. Probing bilayer-cytoskeletal interactions in erythrocytes using a two-component dissipative particle dynamics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhangli; Li, Xuejin; Pivkin, Igor; Dao, Ming; Karniadakis, George

    2013-11-01

    We develop a two-component dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) model of the red blood cell (RBC) membrane by modeling the lipid bilayer and the cytoskeleton separately. By applying this model to simulate four different experiments on RBCs, including micropipette aspiration, membrane fluctuations, tank-treading motions in shear flow and bilayer tethering in a flow channel, we validated our model and studied the mechanical properties of the bilayer-cytoskeletal interaction in a systematic and controlled manner, such as its elastic stiffness, viscous friction and strength. In the same time, we also resolved several controversies in RBC mechanics, e.g., the dependence of tank-treading frequency on shear rates and the possibility of bilayer-cytoskeletal slip. Furthermore, to investigate RBC dynamics in the microcirculation, we simulated the passages of RBCs through narrow channels of the flow cytometer in vitro and their passages through the splenic inter-endothelial slits in vivo. The effects of RBC geometry and membrane stiffness on the critical pressure gradient of passage were studied, and the simulation results agree well with experimental measurements. This work was supported by National Institutes of Health Grant R01HL094270 and the new Department of Energy Collaboratory on Mathematics for Mesoscopic Modeling of Materials (CM4).

  19. Podocyte-Specific Deletion of Dicer Alters Cytoskeletal Dynamics and Causes Glomerular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Scott J.; Jarad, George; Cunningham, Jeanette; Goldberg, Seth; Schermer, Bernhard; Harfe, Brian D.; McManus, Michael T.; Benzing, Thomas; Miner, Jeffrey H.

    2008-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression by binding the 3′ untranslated region of mRNAs. To define their role in glomerular function, miRNA biogenesis was disrupted in mouse podocytes using a conditional Dicer allele. Mutant mice developed proteinuria by 3 wk after birth and progressed rapidly to end-stage kidney disease. Podocyte pathology included effacement, vacuolization, and hypertrophy with crescent formation. Despite normal expression of WT1, podocytes underwent dedifferentiation, exemplified by cytoskeletal disruption with early transcriptional downregulation of synaptopodin. These abnormalities differed from Cd2ap−/− mice, indicating they were not a general consequence of glomerular disease. Glomerular labeling of ezrin, moesin, and gelsolin was altered at 3 wk, but expression of nestin and α-actinin was unchanged. Abnormal cell proliferation or apoptosis was not responsible for the glomerular injury. Mutant podocytes were incapable of synthesizing mature miRNA, as revealed by their loss of miR-30a. In contrast, expression of glomerular endothelial and mesangial cell miRNAs (miR-126 and miR-145, respectively) was unchanged. These findings demonstrate a critical role for miRNA in glomerular function and suggest a pathway that may participate in the pathogenesis of kidney diseases of podocyte origin. The unique architecture of podocytes may make them especially susceptible to cytoskeletal alterations initiated by aberrant miRNA dynamics. PMID:18776121

  20. AIRE is a critical spindle-associated protein in embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Gu, Bin; Lambert, Jean-Philippe; Cockburn, Katie; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Rossant, Janet

    2017-07-25

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells go though embryo-like cell cycles regulated by specialized molecular mechanisms. However, it is not known whether there are ES cell-specific mechanisms regulating mitotic fidelity. Here we showed that Autoimmune Regulator (Aire), a transcription coordinator involved in immune tolerance processes, is a critical spindle-associated protein in mouse ES(mES) cells. BioID analysis showed that AIRE associates with spindle-associated proteins in mES cells. Loss of function analysis revealed that Aire was important for centrosome number regulation and spindle pole integrity specifically in mES cells. We also identified the c-terminal LESLL motif as a critical motif for AIRE's mitotic function. Combined maternal and zygotic knockout further revealed Aire's critical functions for spindle assembly in preimplantation embryos. These results uncovered a previously unappreciated function for Aire and provide new insights into the biology of stem cell proliferation and potential new angles to understand fertility defects in humans carrying Aire mutations.

  1. AIRE is a critical spindle-associated protein in embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Bin; Lambert, Jean-Philippe; Cockburn, Katie; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Rossant, Janet

    2017-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells go though embryo-like cell cycles regulated by specialized molecular mechanisms. However, it is not known whether there are ES cell-specific mechanisms regulating mitotic fidelity. Here we showed that Autoimmune Regulator (Aire), a transcription coordinator involved in immune tolerance processes, is a critical spindle-associated protein in mouse ES(mES) cells. BioID analysis showed that AIRE associates with spindle-associated proteins in mES cells. Loss of function analysis revealed that Aire was important for centrosome number regulation and spindle pole integrity specifically in mES cells. We also identified the c-terminal LESLL motif as a critical motif for AIRE’s mitotic function. Combined maternal and zygotic knockout further revealed Aire’s critical functions for spindle assembly in preimplantation embryos. These results uncovered a previously unappreciated function for Aire and provide new insights into the biology of stem cell proliferation and potential new angles to understand fertility defects in humans carrying Aire mutations. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.28131.001 PMID:28742026

  2. Cytoskeletal organization by motor and polymerization forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenderink, Gijsje

    2014-03-01

    Cells need to constantly change their change to perform vital functions, such as growth, division, and movement. Dysregulation of cell shape can have severe consequences such as cancer. Our goal is to resolve physical mechanisms that contribute to cell shape control. For this purpose, we study simplified experimental model systems reconstituted from purified cellular components. In this talk, I will give two examples of our recent work. The first example concerns active contractility of the actin cortex, which lies underneath the cell membrane and drives shape changes by means of myosin motors. Using in vitro models, we studied how myosin motors and actin filaments collectively self-organize into force-generating arrays. I will show that motors contract actin networks only above a sharp threshold in crosslink density. We discovered that right at this threshold, the motors rupture the network into clusters that exhibit a broad distribution of sizes, as expected in filamentous networks near a percolation threshold. The second example I will discuss concerns cell shape polarization directed by interactions between the actin and microtubule (MT) cytoskeletons. A prominent example is the guidance of MT growth along F-actin bundles towards specific targets, i.e. focal adhesions. It has been suggested that MT end-tracking proteins (+TIPs) that also bind F-actin are responsible for this process. We built an in vitro system involving a simplified actin-MT crosslinker molecule and could show that the interaction between MT ends and actin is sufficient to capture and re-direct MT growth along actin bundles. By keeping MT growth tightly coupled to F-actin, this mechanism allows linear arrays of actin bundles to act as templates for MT organization. Instead, when interacting with single actin filaments, MT ends become the dominant organizing factor, exerting forces that align, pull and even transport actin filaments in the direction of MT growth. We conclude that actin and MTs

  3. Dual-feedback microrheology in cytoskeletal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Natsuki; Nishizawa, Kenji; Ariga, Takayuki; Mizuno, Daisuke

    Cytoskeletons are critical for understanding cell behaviors since they generate forces together with molecular motors and supply mechanical integrity to cells. Since response of cytoskeletons to motor-generated forces is highly nonlinear, cell behaviors intricately depend on activities and mechanics of cytoskeletons. Investigating local response of cytoskeletons to forces generated by molecular motors, which optical trap can imitatively reproduce, is therefore essential. Here, we performed this by developing a novel optical-trap-based microrheology implemented with dual-feedback control. With the slow feedback of piezo-stage, probes under drift, caused by the traction force applied by the optical trap, were stably tracked. By the rapid feedback of trapping laser, artifacts in probes motion, that had been caused by strong optical trap potential, were completely removed. We observed that fluctuations of probes embedded in various cytoskeletons were significantly reduced when subjected to forces. Under the assumption that the fluctuation-dissipation theorem is satisfied, our results indicate the stress stiffening of cytoskeletons, that became now possible to be studied in micro-scales and in a frequency range appropriate for cell behaviors.

  4. Critical differences between two low protein diet protocols in the programming of hypertension in the rat.

    PubMed

    Langley-Evans, S C

    2000-01-01

    upon the developing cardiovasculature. The balance of protein and other nutrients may be a critical determinant of the long-term health effects of maternal undernutrition in pregnancy.

  5. Critical roles for WDR72 in calcium transport and matrix protein removal during enamel maturation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shih-Kai; Hu, Yuanyuan; Yang, Jie; Smith, Charles E; Nunez, Stephanie M; Richardson, Amelia S; Pal, Soumya; Samann, Andrew C; Hu, Jan C-C; Simmer, James P

    2015-01-01

    Defects in WDR72 (WD repeat-containing protein 72) cause autosomal recessive hypomaturation amelogenesis imperfecta. We generated and characterized Wdr72-knockout/lacZ-knockin mice to investigate the role of WDR72 in enamel formation. In all analyses, enamel formed by Wdr72 heterozygous mice was indistinguishable from wild-type enamel. Without WDR72, enamel mineral density increased early during the maturation stage but soon arrested. The null enamel layer was only a tenth as hard as wild-type enamel and underwent rapid attrition following eruption. Despite the failure to further mineralize enamel deposited during the secretory stage, ectopic mineral formed on the enamel surface and penetrated into the overlying soft tissue. While the proteins in the enamel matrix were successfully degraded, the digestion products remained inside the enamel. Interactome analysis of WDR72 protein revealed potential interactions with clathrin-associated proteins and involvement in ameloblastic endocytosis. The maturation stage mandibular incisor enamel did not stain with methyl red, indicating that the enamel did not acidify beneath ruffle-ended ameloblasts. Attachment of maturation ameloblasts to the enamel layer was weakened, and SLC24A4, a critical ameloblast calcium transporter, did not localize appropriately along the ameloblast distal membrane. Fewer blood vessels were observed in the papillary layer supporting ameloblasts. Specific WDR72 expression by maturation stage ameloblasts explained the observation that enamel thickness and rod decussation (established during the secretory stage) are normal in the Wdr72 null mice. We conclude that WDR72 serves critical functions specifically during the maturation stage of amelogenesis and is required for both protein removal and enamel mineralization. PMID:26247047

  6. Secreted protein-based reporter systems for monitoring inflammatory events: critical interference by endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Hiramatsu, Nobuhiko; Kasai, Ayumi; Hayakawa, Kunihiro; Nagai, Kaoru; Kubota, Takeo; Yao, Jian; Kitamura, Masanori

    2006-08-31

    A number of recent reports have used secreted protein-based reporter assays for monitoring intercellular and intracellular events involved in inflammation. However, we found that these assay systems are critically affected by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. When reporter mesangial cells that express secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) under the control of NF-kappaB were exposed to IL-1beta or TNF-alpha, induction of SEAP activity was markedly reduced under ER stress conditions. Downregulation of SEAP activity was observed regardless of cell types and type of regulatory elements; e.g., when reporter hepatocytes that express SEAP under the control of the dioxin responsive elements were exposed to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin or benzo[a]pyrene, ER stress similarly suppressed the increase in SEAP activity despite its transcriptional upregulation. Activity of constitutively expressed SEAP in various cells was also reduced by ER stress in a magnitude-dependent manner, and it was associated with disturbed subcellular transport of SEAP to the Golgi. Furthermore, interference by ER stress was similarly observed in other reporter assay using secreted luciferase. These results evidenced critical interference by ER stress in secreted protein-based reporter systems. The suppression of reporter responses by ER stress should be considered carefully for experimental design and interpretation of data when secreted protein-based reporter systems are used for investigation.

  7. Sumoylation of critical proteins in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: emerging pathways of pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Foran, Emily; Rosenblum, Lauren; Bogush, Alexey I.; Trotti, Davide

    2013-01-01

    Emerging lines of evidence suggest a relationship between amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and protein sumoylation. Multiple studies have demonstrated that several of the proteins involved in the pathogenesis of ALS, including superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), fused in liposarcoma (FUS), and TAR DNA binding protein 43 (TDP43), are substrates for sumoylation. Additionally, recent studies in cellular and animal models of ALS revealed that sumoylation of these proteins impact their localization, longevity and how they functionally perform in disease, providing novel areas for mechanistic investigations and therapeutics. In this article, we summarize the current literature examining the impact of sumoylation of critical proteins involved in ALS and discuss the potential impact for the pathogenesis of the disease. In addition, we report and discuss the implications of new evidence demonstrating that sumoylation of a fragment derived from the proteolytic cleavage of the astroglial glutamate transporter, EAAT2, plays a direct role in downregulating the expression levels of full length EAAT2 by binding to a regulatory region of its promoter. PMID:24062161

  8. Gadd45 Proteins as Critical Signal Transducers Linking NF-κB to MAPK Cascades

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Z.; Song, L.; Huang, C.

    2013-01-01

    The growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible 45 (Gadd45) proteins are a group of critical signal transducers that are involved in regulations of many cellular functions. Accumulated data indicate that all three Gadd45 proteins (i.e., Gadd45α, Gadd45β, and Gadd45γ) play essential roles in connecting an upstream sensor module, the transcription Nuclear Factor-κB (NF-κB), to a transcriptional regulating module, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). This NF-κB-Gadd45(s)-MAPK pathway responds to various kinds of extracellular stimuli and regulates such cell activities as growth arrest, differentiation, cell survival, and apoptosis. Defects in this pathway can also be related to oncogenesis. In the first part of this review, the functions of Gadd45 proteins, and briefly NF-κB and MAPK, are summarized. In the second part, the mechanisms by which Gadd45 proteins are regulated by NF-κB, and how they affect MAPK activation, are reviewed. PMID:20025601

  9. Processive cytoskeletal motors studied with single-molecule fluorescence techniques

    PubMed Central

    Belyy, Vladislav; Yildiz, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Processive cytoskeletal motors from the myosin, kinesin, and dynein families walk on actin filaments and microtubules to drive cellular transport and organization in eukaryotic cells. These remarkable molecular machines are able to take hundreds of successive steps at speeds of up to several microns per second, allowing them to effectively move vesicles and organelles throughout the cytoplasm. Here, we focus on single-molecule fluorescence techniques and discuss their wide-ranging applications to the field of cytoskeletal motor research. We cover both traditional fluorescence and sub-diffraction imaging of motors, providing examples of how fluorescence data can be used to measure biophysical parameters of motors such as coordination, stepping mechanism, gating, and processivity. We also outline some remaining challenges in the field and suggest future directions. PMID:24882363

  10. Processive cytoskeletal motors studied with single-molecule fluorescence techniques.

    PubMed

    Belyy, Vladislav; Yildiz, Ahmet

    2014-10-01

    Processive cytoskeletal motors from the myosin, kinesin, and dynein families walk on actin filaments and microtubules to drive cellular transport and organization in eukaryotic cells. These remarkable molecular machines are able to take hundreds of successive steps at speeds of up to several microns per second, allowing them to effectively move vesicles and organelles throughout the cytoplasm. Here, we focus on single-molecule fluorescence techniques and discuss their wide-ranging applications to the field of cytoskeletal motor research. We cover both traditional fluorescence and sub-diffraction imaging of motors, providing examples of how fluorescence data can be used to measure biophysical parameters of motors such as coordination, stepping mechanism, gating, and processivity. We also outline some remaining challenges in the field and suggest future directions.

  11. Implementing cell contractility in filament-based cytoskeletal models.

    PubMed

    Fallqvist, B

    2016-02-01

    Cells are known to respond over time to mechanical stimuli, even actively generating force at longer times. In this paper, a microstructural filament-based cytoskeletal network model is extended to incorporate this active response, and a computational study to assess the influence on relaxation behaviour was performed. The incorporation of an active response was achieved by including a strain energy function of contractile activity from the cross-linked actin filaments. A four-state chemical model and strain energy function was adopted, and generalisation to three dimensions and the macroscopic deformation field was performed by integration over the unit sphere. Computational results in MATLAB and ABAQUS/Explicit indicated an active cellular response over various time-scales, dependent on contractile parameters. Important features such as force generation and increasing cell stiffness due to prestress are qualitatively predicted. The work in this paper can easily be extended to encompass other filament-based cytoskeletal models as well.

  12. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases and Mitogen Kinase Phosphatase 1: A Critical Interplay in Macrophage Biology

    PubMed Central

    Lloberas, Jorge; Valverde-Estrella, Lorena; Tur, Juan; Vico, Tania; Celada, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are necessary in multiple processes during the immune response or inflammation. This review emphasizes the critical role of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and mitogen kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) in the functional activities of macrophages. While the phosphorylation of MAPKs is required for macrophage activation or proliferation, MKP-1 dephosphorylates these kinases, thus playing a balancing role in the control of macrophage behavior. MKP-1 is a nuclear-localized dual-specificity phosphatase whose expression is regulated at multiple levels, including at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. The regulatory role of MKP-1 in the interplay between MAPK phosphorylation/dephosphorylation makes this molecule a critical regulator of macrophage biology and inflammation. PMID:27446931

  13. Cytoskeletal Actin Gates a Cl− Channel in Neocortical Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lascola, Christopher D.; Nelson, Deborah J.; Kraig, Richard P.

    2009-01-01

    Increases in astroglial Cl− conductance accompany changes in cell morphology and disassembly of cytoskeletal actin, but Cl− channels underlying these conductance increases have not been described. We characterize an outwardly rectifying Cl− channel in rodent neocortical cultured astrocytes and describe how cell shape and cytoskeletal actin modulate channel gating. In inside-out patch-clamp recordings from cultured astrocytes, outwardly rectifying Cl− channels either were spontaneously active or inducible in quiescent patches by depolarizing voltage steps. Average single-channel conductance was 36 pS between −60 and −80 mV and was 75 pS between 60 and 80 mV in symmetrical (150 mm NaCl) solutions. The permeability ratio (PNa/PCl) was 0.14 at lower ionic strength but increased at higher salt concentrations. Both ATP and 4,4-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2′-disulfonic acid produced a flicker block, whereas Zn2+ produced complete inhibition of channel activity. The frequency of observing both spontaneous and inducible Cl− channel activity was markedly higher in stellate than in flat, polygonally shaped astrocytes. In addition, cytoskeletal actin modulated channel open-state probability (PO) and conductance at negative membrane potentials, controlling the degree of outward rectification. Direct application of phalloidin, which stabilizes actin, preserved low PO and promoted lower conductance levels at negative potentials. Lower PO also was induced by direct application of polymerized actin. The actions of phalloidin and actin were reversed by coapplication of gelsolin and cytochalasin D, respectively. These results provide the first report of an outwardly rectifying Cl− channel in neocortical astrocytes and demonstrate how changes in cell shape and cytoskeletal actin may control Cl− conductance in these cells. PMID:9464993

  14. Cytoskeletal actin gates a Cl- channel in neocortical astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Lascola, C D; Nelson, D J; Kraig, R P

    1998-03-01

    Increases in astroglial Cl- conductance accompany changes in cell morphology and disassembly of cytoskeletal actin, but Cl- channels underlying these conductance increases have not been described. We characterize an outwardly rectifying Cl- channel in rodent neocortical cultured astrocytes and describe how cell shape and cytoskeletal actin modulate channel gating. In inside-out patch-clamp recordings from cultured astrocytes, outwardly rectifying Cl- channels either were spontaneously active or inducible in quiescent patches by depolarizing voltage steps. Average single-channel conductance was 36 pS between -60 and -80 mV and was 75 pS between 60 and 80 mV in symmetrical (150 mM NaCl) solutions. The permeability ratio (PNa/PCl) was 0.14 at lower ionic strength but increased at higher salt concentrations. Both ATP and 4, 4-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid produced a flicker block, whereas Zn2+ produced complete inhibition of channel activity. The frequency of observing both spontaneous and inducible Cl- channel activity was markedly higher in stellate than in flat, polygonally shaped astrocytes. In addition, cytoskeletal actin modulated channel open-state probability (PO) and conductance at negative membrane potentials, controlling the degree of outward rectification. Direct application of phalloidin, which stabilizes actin, preserved low PO and promoted lower conductance levels at negative potentials. Lower PO also was induced by direct application of polymerized actin. The actions of phalloidin and actin were reversed by coapplication of gelsolin and cytochalasin D, respectively. These results provide the first report of an outwardly rectifying Cl- channel in neocortical astrocytes and demonstrate how changes in cell shape and cytoskeletal actin may control Cl- conductance in these cells.

  15. In vivo definition of cardiac myosin-binding protein C’s critical interactions with myosin

    PubMed Central

    Bhuiyan, Shenuarin; McLendon, Patrick; James, Jeanne; Osinska, Hanna; Gulick, James; Bhandary, Bidur; Lorenz, John N.

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac myosin-binding protein C (cMyBP-C) is an integral part of the sarcomeric machinery in cardiac muscle that enables normal function. cMyBP-C regulates normal cardiac contraction by functioning as a brake through interactions with the sarcomere’s thick, thin, and titin filaments. cMyBP-C’s precise effects as it binds to the different filament systems remain obscure, particularly as it impacts on the myosin heavy chain’s head domain, contained within the subfragment 2 (S2) region. This portion of the myosin heavy chain also contains the ATPase activity critical for myosin’s function. Mutations in myosin’s head, as well as in cMyBP-C, are a frequent cause of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC). We generated transgenic lines in which endogenous cMyBP-C was replaced by protein lacking the residues necessary for binding to S2 (cMyBP-CS2−). We found, surprisingly, that cMyBP-C lacking the S2 binding site is incorporated normally into the sarcomere, although systolic function is compromised. We show for the first time the acute and chronic in vivo consequences of ablating a filament-specific interaction of cMyBP-C. This work probes the functional consequences, in the whole animal, of modifying a critical structure-function relationship, the protein’s ability to bind to a region of the critical enzyme responsible for muscle contraction, the subfragment 2 domain of the myosin heavy chain. We show that the binding is not critical for the protein’s correct insertion into the sarcomere’s architecture, but is essential for long-term, normal function in the physiological context of the heart. PMID:27568194

  16. Eight proteins play critical roles in RCC with bone metastasis via mitochondrial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiang; Zhao, Xiaolin; Qi, Jun; Yang, Caihong; Cheng, Hao; Ren, Ye; Huang, Lei

    2015-08-01

    Most kidney cancers are renal cell carcinomas (RCC). RCC lacks early warning signs and 70 % of patients with RCC develop metastases. Among them, 50 % of patients having skeletal metastases developed a dismal survival of less than 10 % at 5 years. Therefore, exploring the key driving proteins and pathways involved in RCC bone metastasis could benefit patients' therapy and prolong their survival. We examined the difference between the OS-RC-2 cells and the OS-RC-2-BM5 cells (subpopulation from OS-RC-2) of RCC with proteomics. Then we employed Western-blot, immunohistochemistry and the clinical database (oncomine) to screen and verify the key proteins and then we analyzed the functions and the related pathways of selected key proteins with system biology approaches. Our proteomic data revealed 26 significant changed spots (fold change <0.5 and >1.9, P < 0.05) between two cells. The Western blotting results validated for these identified spots were consistent with the proteomics'. From the public clinical database, 23 out of 26 proteins were connected with RCC metastases and 9 out of 23 with survival time directly (P < 0.05). Finally, only 8 out of 9 proteins had significantly positive results in tissues of RCC patients with bone metastasis compared with primary tumor (P < 0.05). System biology analyzing results showed these eight proteins mainly distributed in oxidative phosphorylation which indicates that mitochondria dysfunction played the critical role to regulate cells metastasis. Our article used a variety of experimental techniques to find eight proteins which abnormally regulated mitochondrial function to achieve a successful induction for RCC metastasis to bone.

  17. Cytoskeletal prestress regulates nuclear shape and stiffness in cardiac myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyungsuk; Adams, William J; Alford, Patrick W; McCain, Megan L; Feinberg, Adam W; Sheehy, Sean P; Goss, Josue A

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical stresses on the myocyte nucleus have been associated with several diseases and potentially transduce mechanical stimuli into cellular responses. Although a number of physical links between the nuclear envelope and cytoplasmic filaments have been identified, previous studies have focused on the mechanical properties of individual components of the nucleus, such as the nuclear envelope and lamin network. The mechanical interaction between the cytoskeleton and chromatin on nuclear deformability remains elusive. Here, we investigated how cytoskeletal and chromatin structures influence nuclear mechanics in cardiac myocytes. Rapid decondensation of chromatin and rupture of the nuclear membrane caused a sudden expansion of DNA, a consequence of prestress exerted on the nucleus. To characterize the prestress exerted on the nucleus, we measured the shape and the stiffness of isolated nuclei and nuclei in living myocytes during disruption of cytoskeletal, myofibrillar, and chromatin structure. We found that the nucleus in myocytes is subject to both tensional and compressional prestress and its deformability is determined by a balance of those opposing forces. By developing a computational model of the prestressed nucleus, we showed that cytoskeletal and chromatin prestresses create vulnerability in the nuclear envelope. Our studies suggest the cytoskeletal–nuclear–chromatin interconnectivity may play an important role in mechanics of myocyte contraction and in the development of laminopathies by lamin mutations. PMID:25908635

  18. Integrin extension enables ultrasensitive regulation by cytoskeletal force.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Springer, Timothy A

    2017-05-02

    Integrins undergo large-scale conformational changes upon activation. Signaling events driving integrin activation have previously been discussed conceptually, but not quantitatively. Here, recent measurements of the intrinsic ligand-binding affinity and free energy of each integrin conformational state on the cell surface, together with the length scales of conformational change, are used to quantitatively compare models of activation. We examine whether binding of cytoskeletal adaptors to integrin cytoplasmic domains is sufficient for activation or whether exertion of tensile force by the actin cytoskeleton across the integrin-ligand complex is also required. We find that only the combination of adaptor binding and cytoskeletal force provides ultrasensitive regulation. Moreover, switch-like activation by force depends on the large, >130 Å length-scale change in integrin extension, which is well tailored to match the free-energy difference between the inactive (bent-closed) and active (extended-open) conformations. The length scale and energy cost in integrin extension enable activation by force in the low pN range and appear to be the key specializations that enable cell adhesion through integrins to be coordinated with cytoskeletal dynamics.

  19. Cadmium-induced glutathionylation of actin occurs through a ROS-independent mechanism: Implications for cytoskeletal integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Choong, Grace; Liu, Ying; Xiao, Weiqun; Templeton, Douglas M.

    2013-10-15

    Cadmium disrupts the actin cytoskeleton in rat mesangial cells, and we have previously shown that this involves a complex interplay involving activation of kinase signaling, protein translocation, and disruption of focal adhesions. Here we investigate the role that glutathionylation of actin plays in Cd{sup 2+}-associated cytoskeletal reorganization. Low concentrations of Cd{sup 2+} (0.5–2 μM) caused an increase in actin glutathionylation by 6 h, whereas at higher concentrations glutathionylation remained at basal levels. Although oxidation with diamide increased glutathionylation, reactive oxygen species (ROS) were not involved in the Cd{sup 2+}-dependent effect, as only Cd{sup 2+} concentrations above 2 μM were sufficient to increase ROS. However, low [Cd{sup 2+}] increased total glutathione levels without affecting the ratio of reduced/oxidized glutathione, and inhibition of glutathione synthesis suppressed actin glutathionylation. Cadmium increased the activity of the enzyme glutaredoxin, which influences the equilibrium between glutathionylated and deglutathionylated proteins and thus may influence levels of glutathionylated actin. Together these observations show that cadmium-dependent effects on actin glutathionylation are affected by glutathione metabolism and not by direct effects of ROS on thiol chemistry. In vitro polymerization assays with glutathionylated actin show a decreased rate of polymerization. In contrast, immunofluorescence of cytoskeletal structure in intact cells suggests that increases in actin glutathionylation accompanying increased glutathione levels occurring under low Cd{sup 2+} exposure are protective in vivo, with cytoskeletal disruption ensuing only when higher Cd{sup 2+} concentrations increase ROS levels and prevent an increase in actin–glutathione conjugates. - Highlights: • Cadmium disrupts the actin cytoskeleton in mesangial cells. • Cadmium induces glutathionylation of actin at low concentrations.

  20. Cytoskeletal Regulation of Inflammation and Its Impact on Skin Blistering Disease Epidermolysis Bullosa Acquisita

    PubMed Central

    Kopecki, Zlatko; Ludwig, Ralf J.; Cowin, Allison J.

    2016-01-01

    Actin remodelling proteins regulate cytoskeletal cell responses and are important in both innate and adaptive immunity. These responses play a major role in providing a fine balance in a cascade of biological events that results in either protective acute inflammation or chronic inflammation that leads to a host of diseases including autoimmune inflammation mediated epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA). This review describes the role of the actin cytoskeleton and in particular the actin remodelling protein called Flightless I (Flii) in regulating cellular inflammatory responses and its subsequent effect on the autoimmune skin blistering disease EBA. It also outlines the potential of an antibody based therapy for decreasing Flii expression in vivo to ameliorate the symptoms associated with EBA. PMID:27420054

  1. MIEN1 drives breast tumor cell migration by regulating cytoskeletal-focal adhesion dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Van Treuren, Timothy; Vishwanatha, Jamboor K.

    2016-01-01

    Migration and invasion enhancer 1 (MIEN1) is an important regulator of cell migration and invasion. MIEN1 overexpression represents an oncogenic event that promotes tumor cell dissemination and metastasis. The underlying mechanism by which MIEN1 regulates migration and invasion has yet to be deciphered. Here, we demonstrate that MIEN1 acts as a cytoskeletal-signaling adapter protein to drive breast cancer cell migration. MIEN1 localization is concentrated underneath the actin-enriched protrusive structures of the migrating breast cancer cells. Depletion of MIEN1 led to the loss of actin-protrusive structures whereas the over-expression of MIEN1 resulted in rich and thick membrane extensions. Knockdown of MIEN1 also decreased the cell-substratum adhesion, suggesting a role for MIEN1 in actin cytoskeletal dynamics. Our results show that MIEN1 supports the transition of G-actin to F-actin polymerization and stabilizes F-actin polymers. Additionally, MIEN1 promotes cellular adhesion and actin dynamics by inducing phosphorylation of FAK at Tyr-925 and reducing phosphorylation of cofilin at Ser-3, which results in breast cancer cell migration. Collectively, our data show that MIEN1 plays an essential role in maintaining the plasticity of the dynamic membrane-associated actin cytoskeleton, which leads to an increase in cell motility. Hence, targeting MIEN1 might represent a promising means to prevent breast tumor metastasis. PMID:27462783

  2. Glycoprotein Ib in the Triton-insoluble (cytoskeletal) fraction of blood platelets.

    PubMed

    Solum, N O; Olsen, T M

    1984-06-29

    Glycoprotein Ib could be demonstrated in the Triton-insoluble (cytoskeletal) fraction of platelets prepared with EGTA by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and staining with the periodic acid Schiff's reagent. Crossed immunoelectrophoresis showed that glycoprotein Ib could be extracted from such Triton-insoluble residues when the extraction solution contained 1% Triton X-100 plus 5 mM CaCl2, but not if it also contained leupeptin. This indicates that glycoprotein Ib was associated to structures in the cytoskeletal fraction in such a way that it could be extracted only after activation of a calcium-dependent protease, and degradation of the actin-binding protein was demonstrated. After crossed immunoelectrophoresis of platelet extracts prepared in the presence of leupeptin or EDTA, a glycoprotein Ib-related, rocket-shaped immunoprecipitate was seen originating from the application well. This was interpreted as being related to glycoprotein Ib associated to actin polymers which did not sediment at low-speed centrifugation. Incubation of platelets with 32P as sodium phosphate led to incorporation of phosphatase-sensitive 32P in all of the glycoprotein Ib-related immunoprecipitates except for that of glycocalicin. This supports the idea that glycoprotein Ib traverses the plasma membrane and can be phosphorylated at the inner surface whereas glycocalicin represents the terminal part of the glycoprotein Ib alpha-chain exposed at the outer surface.

  3. α-Synuclein and Its A30P Mutant Affect Actin Cytoskeletal Structure and Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Vítor L.; Bellani, Serena; Giannandrea, Maila; Yousuf, Malikmohamed; Valtorta, Flavia; Meldolesi, Jacopo

    2009-01-01

    The function of α-synuclein, a soluble protein abundant in the brain and concentrated at presynaptic terminals, is still undefined. Yet, α-synuclein overexpression and the expression of its A30P mutant are associated with familial Parkinson's disease. Working in cell-free conditions, in two cell lines as well as in primary neurons we demonstrate that α-synuclein and its A30P mutant have different effects on actin polymerization. Wild-type α-synuclein binds actin, slows down its polymerization and accelerates its depolymerization, probably by monomer sequestration; A30P mutant α-synuclein increases the rate of actin polymerization and disrupts the cytoskeleton during reassembly of actin filaments. Consequently, in cells expressing mutant α-synuclein, cytoskeleton-dependent processes, such as cell migration, are inhibited, while exo- and endocytic traffic is altered. In hippocampal neurons from mice carrying a deletion of the α-synuclein gene, electroporation of wild-type α-synuclein increases actin instability during remodeling, with growth of lamellipodia-like structures and apparent cell enlargement, whereas A30P α-synuclein induces discrete actin-rich foci during cytoskeleton reassembly. In conclusion, α-synuclein appears to play a major role in actin cytoskeletal dynamics and various aspects of microfilament function. Actin cytoskeletal disruption induced by the A30P mutant might alter various cellular processes and thereby play a role in the pathogenesis of neurodegeneration. PMID:19553474

  4. Labeling cytoskeletal F-actin with rhodamine phalloidin or fluorescein phalloidin for imaging.

    PubMed

    Chazotte, Brad

    2010-05-01

    The eukaryotic cell has evolved to compartmentalize its functions and transport various metabolites among cellular compartments. Therefore, in cell biology, the study of organization and structure/function relationships is of great importance. The cytoskeleton is composed of a series of filamentous structures, including intermediate filaments, actin filaments, and microtubules. Immunofluorescent staining has been most frequently used to study cytoskeletal components. However, it is also possible to fluorescently label isolated cytoskeletal proteins and either microinject them back into the cell or add them to fixed, permeabilized cells. Alternatively, it is possible to use the mushroom-derived fluorescinated toxins, phalloidin or phallacidin, to label F-actin of the cytoskeleton, as is described in this article. Phalloidin is available labeled with different fluorophores. The choice of the specific fluorophore should depend on whether phalloidin labeling for actin is part of a double-label experiment. In most cells, the abundance of actin filaments should provide a very strong signal. In double-label experiments, the fluorophore should be chosen to take this into account. In general, rhodamine labels are more resistant to photobleaching and can be subjected to the longer exposures required for finer structures.

  5. Molecular Pathways: New Signaling Considerations When Targeting Cytoskeletal Balance to Reduce Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Kristi R; Hessler, Lindsay; Bhandary, Lekhana; Martin, Stuart S

    2015-12-01

    The dynamic balance between microtubule extension and actin contraction regulates mammalian cell shape, division, and motility, which has made the cytoskeleton an attractive and very successful target for cancer drugs. Numerous compounds in clinical use to reduce tumor growth cause microtubule breakdown (vinca alkaloids, colchicine-site, and halichondrins) or hyperstabilization of microtubules (taxanes and epothilones). However, both of these strategies indiscriminately alter the assembly and dynamics of all microtubules, which causes significant dose-limiting toxicities on normal tissues. Emerging data are revealing that posttranslational modifications of tubulin (detyrosination, acetylation) or microtubule-associated proteins (Tau, Aurora kinase) may allow for more specific targeting of microtubule subsets, thereby avoiding the broad disruption of all microtubule polymerization. Developing approaches to reduce tumor cell migration and invasion focus on disrupting actin regulation by the kinases SRC and ROCK. Because the dynamic balance between microtubule extension and actin contraction also regulates cell fate decisions and stem cell characteristics, disrupting this cytoskeletal balance could yield unexpected effects beyond tumor growth. This review will examine recent data demonstrating that cytoskeletal cancer drugs affect wound-healing responses, microtentacle-dependent reattachment efficiency, and stem cell characteristics in ways that could affect the metastatic potential of tumor cells, both beneficially and detrimentally. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. Strong adhesion by regulatory T cells induces dendritic cell cytoskeletal polarization and contact-dependent lethargy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiahuan; Ganguly, Anutosh; Mucsi, Ashley D; Meng, Junchen; Yan, Jiacong; Detampel, Pascal; Munro, Fay; Zhang, Zongde; Wu, Mei; Hari, Aswin; Stenner, Melanie D; Zheng, Wencheng; Kubes, Paul; Xia, Tie; Amrein, Matthias W; Qi, Hai; Shi, Yan

    2017-02-01

    Dendritic cells are targeted by regulatory T (T reg) cells, in a manner that operates as an indirect mode of T cell suppression. In this study, using a combination of single-cell force spectroscopy and structured illumination microscopy, we analyze individual T reg cell-DC interaction events and show that T reg cells exhibit strong intrinsic adhesiveness to DCs. This increased DC adhesion reduces the ability of contacted DCs to engage other antigen-specific cells. We show that this unusually strong LFA-1-dependent adhesiveness of T reg cells is caused in part by their low calpain activities, which normally release integrin-cytoskeleton linkage, and thereby reduce adhesion. Super resolution imaging reveals that such T reg cell adhesion causes sequestration of Fascin-1, an actin-bundling protein essential for immunological synapse formation, and skews Fascin-1-dependent actin polarization in DCs toward the T reg cell adhesion zone. Although it is reversible upon T reg cell disengagement, this sequestration of essential cytoskeletal components causes a lethargic state of DCs, leading to reduced T cell priming. Our results reveal a dynamic cytoskeletal component underlying T reg cell-mediated DC suppression in a contact-dependent manner. © 2017 Chen et al.

  7. Strong adhesion by regulatory T cells induces dendritic cell cytoskeletal polarization and contact-dependent lethargy

    PubMed Central

    Mucsi, Ashley D.; Meng, Junchen; Yan, Jiacong; Zhang, Zongde; Wu, Mei; Hari, Aswin; Stenner, Melanie D.; Zheng, Wencheng; Kubes, Paul; Xia, Tie; Amrein, Matthias W.

    2017-01-01

    Dendritic cells are targeted by regulatory T (T reg) cells, in a manner that operates as an indirect mode of T cell suppression. In this study, using a combination of single-cell force spectroscopy and structured illumination microscopy, we analyze individual T reg cell–DC interaction events and show that T reg cells exhibit strong intrinsic adhesiveness to DCs. This increased DC adhesion reduces the ability of contacted DCs to engage other antigen-specific cells. We show that this unusually strong LFA-1–dependent adhesiveness of T reg cells is caused in part by their low calpain activities, which normally release integrin–cytoskeleton linkage, and thereby reduce adhesion. Super resolution imaging reveals that such T reg cell adhesion causes sequestration of Fascin-1, an actin-bundling protein essential for immunological synapse formation, and skews Fascin-1–dependent actin polarization in DCs toward the T reg cell adhesion zone. Although it is reversible upon T reg cell disengagement, this sequestration of essential cytoskeletal components causes a lethargic state of DCs, leading to reduced T cell priming. Our results reveal a dynamic cytoskeletal component underlying T reg cell–mediated DC suppression in a contact-dependent manner. PMID:28082358

  8. SAS-1 is a C2 domain protein critical for centriole integrity in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    von Tobel, Lukas; Mikeladze-Dvali, Tamara; Delattre, Marie; Balestra, Fernando R; Blanchoud, Simon; Finger, Susanne; Knott, Graham; Müller-Reichert, Thomas; Gönczy, Pierre

    2014-11-01

    Centrioles are microtubule-based organelles important for the formation of cilia, flagella and centrosomes. Despite progress in understanding the underlying assembly mechanisms, how centriole integrity is ensured is incompletely understood, including in sperm cells, where such integrity is particularly critical. We identified C. elegans sas-1 in a genetic screen as a locus required for bipolar spindle assembly in the early embryo. Our analysis reveals that sperm-derived sas-1 mutant centrioles lose their integrity shortly after fertilization, and that a related defect occurs when maternal sas-1 function is lacking. We establish that sas-1 encodes a C2 domain containing protein that localizes to centrioles in C. elegans, and which can bind and stabilize microtubules when expressed in human cells. Moreover, we uncover that SAS-1 is related to C2CD3, a protein required for complete centriole formation in human cells and affected in a type of oral-facial-digital (OFD) syndrome.

  9. SAS-1 Is a C2 Domain Protein Critical for Centriole Integrity in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Delattre, Marie; Balestra, Fernando R.; Blanchoud, Simon; Finger, Susanne; Knott, Graham; Müller-Reichert, Thomas; Gönczy, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Centrioles are microtubule-based organelles important for the formation of cilia, flagella and centrosomes. Despite progress in understanding the underlying assembly mechanisms, how centriole integrity is ensured is incompletely understood, including in sperm cells, where such integrity is particularly critical. We identified C. elegans sas-1 in a genetic screen as a locus required for bipolar spindle assembly in the early embryo. Our analysis reveals that sperm-derived sas-1 mutant centrioles lose their integrity shortly after fertilization, and that a related defect occurs when maternal sas-1 function is lacking. We establish that sas-1 encodes a C2 domain containing protein that localizes to centrioles in C. elegans, and which can bind and stabilize microtubules when expressed in human cells. Moreover, we uncover that SAS-1 is related to C2CD3, a protein required for complete centriole formation in human cells and affected in a type of oral-facial-digital (OFD) syndrome. PMID:25412110

  10. Neuronal migration and protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    Ohshima, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    The formation of the six-layered structure of the mammalian cortex via the inside-out pattern of neuronal migration is fundamental to neocortical functions. Extracellular cues such as Reelin induce intracellular signaling cascades through the protein phosphorylation. Migrating neurons also have intrinsic machineries to regulate cytoskeletal proteins and adhesion properties. Protein phosphorylation regulates these processes. Moreover, the balance between phosphorylation and dephosphorylation is modified by extracellular cues. Multipolar-bipolar transition, radial glia-guided locomotion and terminal translocation are critical steps of radial migration of cortical pyramidal neurons. Protein kinases such as Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) involve these steps. In this review, I shall give an overview the roles of protein kinases in neuronal migration. PMID:25628530

  11. RNA-binding protein hnRNPLL as a critical regulator of lymphocyte homeostasis and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xing

    2016-05-01

    RNA-binding proteins orchestrate posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression, such as messenger RNA (mRNA) splicing, RNA stability regulation, and translation regulation. Heterogeneous nuclear RNA-binding proteins (hnRNPs) refer to a collection of unrelated RNA-binding proteins predominantly located in the nucleus (Han et al. Biochem J 2010, 430:379-392). Although canonical functions of hnRNPs are to promote pre-mRNA splicing, they are involved in all the processes of RNA metabolism through recognizing specific cis-elements on RNA (Dreyfuss et al. Annu Rev Biochem 1993, 62:289-321; Huelga et al. Cell Rep 2012, 1:167-178; Krecic and Swanson. Curr Opin Cell Biol 1999, 11:363-371). Heterogeneous nuclear RNA-binding protein L like (hnRNPLL) is a tissue-specific hnRNP, which was identified as a regulator of CD45RA to CD45RO switching during memory T-cell development (Oberdoerffer et al. Science 2008, 321:686-691; Topp et al. RNA 2008, 14:2038-2049; Wu et al. Immunity 2008, 29:863-875). Since then, hnRNPLL has emerged as a critical regulator of lymphocyte homeostasis and terminal differentiation, controlling alternative splicing or expression of critical genes for the lymphocytes development (Wu et al. Immunity 2008, 29:863-875; Chang et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2015, 112:E1888-E1897). This review will summarize recent advances in understanding the functions of hnRNPLL, focusing on its biochemical functions and physiological roles in lymphocyte differentiation and homeostasis. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:295-302. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1335 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Vitreous-induced cytoskeletal rearrangements via the Rac1 GTPase-dependent signaling pathway in human retinal pigment epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xionggao; Wei, Yantao; Ma, Haizhi; Zhang, Shaochong

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Vitreous induces morphological changes and cytoskeletal rearrangements in RPE cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rac1 is activated in vitreous-transformed RPE cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rac inhibition prevents morphological changes in vitreous-transformed RPE cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rac inhibition suppresses cytoskeletal rearrangements in vitreous-transformed RPE cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The vitreous-induced effects are mediated by a Rac1 GTPase/LIMK1/cofilin pathway. -- Abstract: Proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) is mainly caused by retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell migration, invasion, proliferation and transformation into fibroblast-like cells that produce the extracellular matrix (ECM). The vitreous humor is known to play an important role in PVR. An epithelial-to-mesenchymal transdifferentiation (EMT) of human RPE cells induced by 25% vitreous treatment has been linked to stimulation of the mesenchymal phenotype, migration and invasion. Here, we characterized the effects of the vitreous on the cell morphology and cytoskeleton in human RPE cells. The signaling pathway that mediates these effects was investigated. Serum-starved RPE cells were incubated with 25% vitreous, and the morphological changes were examined by phase-contrast microscopy. Filamentous actin (F-actin) was examined by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. Protein phosphorylation of AKT, ERK1/2, Smad2/3, LIM kinase (LIMK) 1 and cofilin was analyzed by Western blot analysis. Vitreous treatment induced cytoskeletal rearrangements, activated Rac1 and enhanced the phosphorylation of AKT, ERK1/2 and Smad2/3. When the cells were treated with a Rac activation-specific inhibitor, the cytoskeletal rearrangements were prevented, and the phosphorylation of Smad2/3 was blocked. Vitreous treatment also enhanced the phosphorylation of LIMK1 and cofilin and the Rac inhibitor blocked this effect. We propose that vitreous

  13. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA1006 Is a Persulfide-Modified Protein That Is Critical for Molybdenum Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Tombline, Gregory; Schwingel, Johanna M.; Lapek, John D.; Friedman, Alan E.; Darrah, Thomas; Maguire, Michael; Van Alst, Nadine E.; Filiatrault, Melanie J.; Iglewski, Barbara H.

    2013-01-01

    A companion manuscript revealed that deletion of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pae) PA1006 gene caused pleiotropic defects in metabolism including a loss of all nitrate reductase activities, biofilm maturation, and virulence. Herein, several complementary approaches indicate that PA1006 protein serves as a persulfide-modified protein that is critical for molybdenum homeostasis in Pae. Mutation of a highly conserved Cys22 to Ala or Ser resulted in a loss of PA1006 activity. Yeast-two-hybrid and a green-fluorescent protein fragment complementation assay (GFP-PFCA) in Pae itself revealed that PA1006 interacts with Pae PA3667/CsdA and PA3814/IscS Cys desulfurase enzymes. Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) “top-down” analysis of PA1006 purified from Pae revealed that conserved Cys22 is post-translationally modified in vivo in the form a persulfide. Inductively-coupled-plasma (ICP)-MS analysis of ΔPA1006 mutant extracts revealed that the mutant cells contain significantly reduced levels of molybdenum compared to wild-type. GFP-PFCA also revealed that PA1006 interacts with several molybdenum cofactor (MoCo) biosynthesis proteins as well as nitrate reductase maturation factor NarJ and component NarH. These data indicate that a loss of PA1006 protein’s persulfide sulfur and a reduced availability of molybdenum contribute to the phenotype of a ΔPA1006 mutant. PMID:23409003

  14. The anaphase promoting complex: a critical target for viral proteins and anti-cancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Heilman, Destin W; Green, Michael R; Teodoro, Jose G

    2005-04-01

    The study of animal viruses has provided extraordinary insights into cell cycle dynamics and tumor biology. The significance of the p53 and Rb tumor suppressor proteins, for example, was discovered due to their interactions with viral oncogenes. In the past several years, investigations with four viral proteins, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vpr, adenovirus E4orf4, chicken anemia virus (CAV) apoptin and human T lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) Tax, have indicated that there are also critical viral targets involved in G2/M control. In particular, recent studies with E4orf4 and apoptin have shown that they induce G2/M arrest by targeting and inhibiting the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C). Notably, these two viral proteins induce apoptosis selectively in transformed cells in a p53-independent manner; thus pathways affected by these proteins are of significant therapeutic interest. Further investigation of the underlying mechanism of G2/M arrest and subsequent apoptosis induced by viral APC/C inhibitors may shed light on the mechanisms of current cancer therapies and provide the foundation for developing novel therapeutic targets.

  15. VPS36-Dependent Multivesicular Bodies Are Critical for Plasmamembrane Protein Turnover and Vacuolar Biogenesis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huei-Jing; Guo, Cian-Ling; Jane, Wann-Neng; Wang, Hao; Jiang, Liwen

    2017-01-01

    Most eukaryotic cells target ubiquitinated plasma membrane (PM) proteins for vacuolar degradation in response to environmental and developmental cues. This process involves endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT). However, little is known about the cellular mechanisms of ESCRTs in plants. Here, we studied the function of one ESCRT-II component, VPS36, which shows ubiquitin-binding activity and may form a putative ESCRT-II with VPS22 and VPS25 in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Recessive mutation of the ubiquitously expressed VPS36 causes multiple defects, including delayed embryogenesis, defective root elongation, and limited expansion of cotyledons, and these effects can be complemented by its genomic DNA. Abnormal intracellular compartments containing several membrane transporters, including members of the PIN-FORMEDs, AUXIN RESISTANT 1, and PIP1 families, were found in vps36-1 plants. Employing a genetic approach to cross vps36-1/+ with transgenic plants harboring various fluorescent protein-tagged organelle markers, as well as fluorescent probe and ultrastructural approaches, revealed PM proteins in microsomal fractions from vps36-1 seedlings and demonstrated that VPS36 is critical for forming multivesicular bodies and vacuolar biogenesis for protein degradation. Our study shows that functional VPS36 is essential for a proper endosomal sorting pathway and for vacuolar biogenesis in Arabidopsis. PMID:27879389

  16. Fluorescent Protein Aided Insights on Plastids and their Extensions: A Critical Appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Delfosse, Kathleen; Wozny, Michael R.; Jaipargas, Erica-Ashley; Barton, Kiah A.; Anderson, Cole; Mathur, Jaideep

    2016-01-01

    Multi-colored fluorescent proteins targeted to plastids have provided new insights on the dynamic behavior of these organelles and their interactions with other cytoplasmic components and compartments. Sub-plastidic components such as thylakoids, stroma, the inner and outer membranes of the plastid envelope, nucleoids, plastoglobuli, and starch grains have been efficiently highlighted in living plant cells. In addition, stroma filled membrane extensions called stromules have drawn attention to the dynamic nature of the plastid and its interactions with the rest of the cell. Use of dual and triple fluorescent protein combinations has begun to reveal plastid interactions with mitochondria, the nucleus, the endoplasmic reticulum and F-actin and suggests integral roles of plastids in retrograde signaling, cell to cell communication as well as plant-pathogen interactions. While the rapid advances and insights achieved through fluorescent protein based research on plastids are commendable it is necessary to endorse meaningful observations but subject others to closer scrutiny. Here, in order to develop a better and more comprehensive understanding of plastids and their extensions we provide a critical appraisal of recent information that has been acquired using targeted fluorescent protein probes. PMID:26834765

  17. Critical molecular regions for elicitation of the sweetness of the sweet-tasting protein, thaumatin I.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Keisuke; Masuda, Tetsuya; Ide, Nobuyuki; Kitabatake, Naofumi

    2008-07-01

    Thaumatin is an intensely sweet-tasting protein. To identify the critical amino acid residue(s) responsible for elicitation of the sweetness of thaumatin, we prepared mutant thaumatin proteins, using Pichia pastoris, in which alanine residues were substituted for lysine or arginine residues, and the sweetness of each mutant protein was evaluated by sensory analysis in humans. Four lysine residues (K49, K67, K106 and K163) and three arginine residues (R76, R79 and R82) played significant roles in thaumatin sweetness. Of these residues, K67 and R82 were particularly important for eliciting the sweetness. We also prepared two further mutant thaumatin I proteins: one in which an arginine residue was substituted for a lysine residue, R82K, and one in which a lysine residue was substituted for an arginine residue, K67R. The threshold value for sweetness was higher for R82K than for thaumatin I, indicating that not only the positive charge but also the structure of the side chain of the arginine residue at position 82 influences the sweetness of thaumatin, whereas only the positive charge of the K67 side chain affects sweetness.

  18. Distribution of language-related Cntnap2 protein in neural circuits critical for vocal learning.

    PubMed

    Condro, Michael C; White, Stephanie A

    2014-01-01

    Variants of the contactin associated protein-like 2 (Cntnap2) gene are risk factors for language-related disorders including autism spectrum disorder, specific language impairment, and stuttering. Songbirds are useful models for study of human speech disorders due to their shared capacity for vocal learning, which relies on similar cortico-basal ganglia circuitry and genetic factors. Here we investigate Cntnap2 protein expression in the brain of the zebra finch, a songbird species in which males, but not females, learn their courtship songs. We hypothesize that Cntnap2 has overlapping functions in vocal learning species, and expect to find protein expression in song-related areas of the zebra finch brain. We further expect that the distribution of this membrane-bound protein may not completely mirror its mRNA distribution due to the distinct subcellular localization of the two molecular species. We find that Cntnap2 protein is enriched in several song control regions relative to surrounding tissues, particularly within the adult male, but not female, robust nucleus of the arcopallium (RA), a cortical song control region analogous to human layer 5 primary motor cortex. The onset of this sexually dimorphic expression coincides with the onset of sensorimotor learning in developing males. Enrichment in male RA appears due to expression in projection neurons within the nucleus, as well as to additional expression in nerve terminals of cortical projections to RA from the lateral magnocellular nucleus of the nidopallium. Cntnap2 protein expression in zebra finch brain supports the hypothesis that this molecule affects neural connectivity critical for vocal learning across taxonomic classes. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. A critical analysis of computational protein design with sparse residue interaction graphs.

    PubMed

    Jain, Swati; Jou, Jonathan D; Georgiev, Ivelin S; Donald, Bruce R

    2017-03-01

    Protein design algorithms enumerate a combinatorial number of candidate structures to compute the Global Minimum Energy Conformation (GMEC). To efficiently find the GMEC, protein design algorithms must methodically reduce the conformational search space. By applying distance and energy cutoffs, the protein system to be designed can thus be represented using a sparse residue interaction graph, where the number of interacting residue pairs is less than all pairs of mutable residues, and the corresponding GMEC is called the sparse GMEC. However, ignoring some pairwise residue interactions can lead to a change in the energy, conformation, or sequence of the sparse GMEC vs. the original or the full GMEC. Despite the widespread use of sparse residue interaction graphs in protein design, the above mentioned effects of their use have not been previously analyzed. To analyze the costs and benefits of designing with sparse residue interaction graphs, we computed the GMECs for 136 different protein design problems both with and without distance and energy cutoffs, and compared their energies, conformations, and sequences. Our analysis shows that the differences between the GMECs depend critically on whether or not the design includes core, boundary, or surface residues. Moreover, neglecting long-range interactions can alter local interactions and introduce large sequence differences, both of which can result in significant structural and functional changes. Designs on proteins with experimentally measured thermostability show it is beneficial to compute both the full and the sparse GMEC accurately and efficiently. To this end, we show that a provable, ensemble-based algorithm can efficiently compute both GMECs by enumerating a small number of conformations, usually fewer than 1000. This provides a novel way to combine sparse residue interaction graphs with provable, ensemble-based algorithms to reap the benefits of sparse residue interaction graphs while avoiding their

  20. A critical analysis of computational protein design with sparse residue interaction graphs

    PubMed Central

    Georgiev, Ivelin S.

    2017-01-01

    Protein design algorithms enumerate a combinatorial number of candidate structures to compute the Global Minimum Energy Conformation (GMEC). To efficiently find the GMEC, protein design algorithms must methodically reduce the conformational search space. By applying distance and energy cutoffs, the protein system to be designed can thus be represented using a sparse residue interaction graph, where the number of interacting residue pairs is less than all pairs of mutable residues, and the corresponding GMEC is called the sparse GMEC. However, ignoring some pairwise residue interactions can lead to a change in the energy, conformation, or sequence of the sparse GMEC vs. the original or the full GMEC. Despite the widespread use of sparse residue interaction graphs in protein design, the above mentioned effects of their use have not been previously analyzed. To analyze the costs and benefits of designing with sparse residue interaction graphs, we computed the GMECs for 136 different protein design problems both with and without distance and energy cutoffs, and compared their energies, conformations, and sequences. Our analysis shows that the differences between the GMECs depend critically on whether or not the design includes core, boundary, or surface residues. Moreover, neglecting long-range interactions can alter local interactions and introduce large sequence differences, both of which can result in significant structural and functional changes. Designs on proteins with experimentally measured thermostability show it is beneficial to compute both the full and the sparse GMEC accurately and efficiently. To this end, we show that a provable, ensemble-based algorithm can efficiently compute both GMECs by enumerating a small number of conformations, usually fewer than 1000. This provides a novel way to combine sparse residue interaction graphs with provable, ensemble-based algorithms to reap the benefits of sparse residue interaction graphs while avoiding their

  1. The Arabidopsis PLAT domain protein1 is critically involved in abiotic stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Tae Kyung; van der Graaff, Eric; Albacete, Alfonso; Eom, Seung Hee; Großkinsky, Dominik K; Böhm, Hannah; Janschek, Ursula; Rim, Yeonggil; Ali, Walid Wahid; Kim, Soo Young; Roitsch, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Despite the completion of the Arabidopsis genome sequence, for only a relatively low percentage of the encoded proteins experimental evidence concerning their function is available. Plant proteins that harbour a single PLAT (Polycystin, Lipoxygenase, Alpha-toxin and Triacylglycerol lipase) domain and belong to the PLAT-plant-stress protein family are ubiquitously present in monocot and dicots. However, the function of PLAT-plant-stress proteins is still poorly understood. Therefore, we have assessed the function of the uncharacterised Arabidopsis PLAT-plant-stress family members through a combination of functional genetic and physiological approaches. PLAT1 overexpression conferred increased abiotic stress tolerance, including cold, drought and salt stress, while loss-of-function resulted in opposite effects on abiotic stress tolerance. Strikingly, PLAT1 promoted growth under non-stressed conditions. Abiotic stress treatments induced PLAT1 expression and caused expansion of its expression domain. The ABF/ABRE transcription factors, which are positive mediators of abscisic acid signalling, activate PLAT1 promoter activity in transactivation assays and directly bind to the ABRE elements located in this promoter in electrophoretic mobility shift assays. This suggests that PLAT1 represents a novel downstream target of the abscisic acid signalling pathway. Thus, we showed that PLAT1 critically functions as positive regulator of abiotic stress tolerance, but also is involved in regulating plant growth, and thereby assigned a function to this previously uncharacterised PLAT domain protein. The functional data obtained for PLAT1 support that PLAT-plant-stress proteins in general could be promising targets for improving abiotic stress tolerance without yield penalty.

  2. Critical analysis of the successes and failures of homology models of G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Supriyo; Lam, Alfonso Ramon; Li, Hubert; Balaraman, Gouthaman; Niesen, Michiel Jacobus Maria; Vaidehi, Nagarajan

    2013-05-01

    We present a critical assessment of the performance of our homology model refinement method for G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), called LITICon that led to top ranking structures in a recent structure prediction assessment GPCRDOCK2010. GPCRs form the largest class of drug targets for which only a few crystal structures are currently available. Therefore, accurate homology models are essential for drug design in these receptors. We submitted five models each for human chemokine CXCR4 (bound to small molecule IT1t and peptide CVX15) and dopamine D3DR (bound to small molecule eticlopride) before the crystal structures were published. Our models in both CXCR4/IT1t and D3/eticlopride assessments were ranked first and second, respectively, by ligand RMSD to the crystal structures. For both receptors, we developed two types of protein models: homology models based on known GPCR crystal structures, and ab initio models based on the prediction method MembStruk. The homology-based models compared better to the crystal structures than the ab initio models. However, a robust refinement procedure for obtaining high accuracy structures is needed. We demonstrate that optimization of the helical tilt, rotation, and translation is vital for GPCR homology model refinement. As a proof of concept, our in-house refinement program LITiCon captured the distinct orientation of TM2 in CXCR4, which differs from that of adrenoreceptors. These findings would be critical for refining GPCR homology models in future. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Gasp, a Grb2-associating protein, is critical for positive selection of thymocytes

    PubMed Central

    Patrick, Michael S.; Oda, Hiroyo; Hayakawa, Kunihiro; Sato, Yoshinori; Eshima, Koji; Kirikae, Teruo; Iemura, Shun-ichiro; Shirai, Mutsunori; Abe, Takaya; Natsume, Tohru; Sasazuki, Takehiko; Suzuki, Harumi

    2009-01-01

    T cells develop in the thymus through positive and negative selection, which are responsible for shaping the T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms involved in selection remains an area of intense interest. Here, we identified and characterized a gene product Gasp (Grb2-associating protein, also called Themis) that is critically required for positive selection. Gasp is a cytosolic protein with no known functional motifs that is expressed only in T cells, especially immature CD4/CD8 double positive (DP) thymocytes. In the absence of Gasp, differentiation of both CD4 and CD8 single positive cells in the thymus was severely inhibited, whereas all other TCR-induced events such as β-selection, negative selection, peripheral activation, and homeostatic proliferation were unaffected. We found that Gasp constitutively associates with Grb2 via its N-terminal Src homology 3 domain, suggesting that Gasp acts as a thymocyte-specific adaptor for Grb2 or regulates Ras signaling in DP thymocytes. Collectively, we have described a gene called Gasp that is critical for positive selection. PMID:19805304

  4. Specific Binding of Cholesterol to C99 Domain of Amyloid Precursor Protein Depends Critically on Charge State of Protein.

    PubMed

    Panahi, Afra; Bandara, Asanga; Pantelopulos, George A; Dominguez, Laura; Straub, John E

    2016-09-15

    Recent NMR chemical shift measurements of the 99 residue C-terminal fragment of amyloid precursor protein (APP-C99) in the presence of cholesterol provide evidence of binary complex formation between C99 and cholesterol in membrane mimetic environments. It has also been observed that the production of Aβ protein is enhanced under conditions of high cholesterol concentration. In this study, we investigated the impact of the charge state of C99 on the structure and stability of the C99-cholesterol complex. We observed that the binding of C99 to cholesterol depends critically on the charge state of Glu 693 (E22) and Asp 694 (D23). Evaluation of the pKa values of the Asp and Glu side chains suggests that these residues may be predominantly neutral in existing experimental observations of a stable C99-cholesterol complex at lower pH (characteristic of the endosomal environment), while binding is destabilized near neutral pH (characteristic of the cytoplasm). These observations suggest that specific binding of cholesterol to C99 is a sensitive function of the pH encountered in vivo, with key E22 and D23 residues serving as a "pH switch" controlling C99-cholesterol binding.

  5. Beta atomic contacts: identifying critical specific contacts in protein binding interfaces.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qian; Kwoh, Chee Keong; Hoi, Steven C H

    2013-01-01

    Specific binding between proteins plays a crucial role in molecular functions and biological processes. Protein binding interfaces and their atomic contacts are typically defined by simple criteria, such as distance-based definitions that only use some threshold of spatial distance in previous studies. These definitions neglect the nearby atomic organization of contact atoms, and thus detect predominant contacts which are interrupted by other atoms. It is questionable whether such kinds of interrupted contacts are as important as other contacts in protein binding. To tackle this challenge, we propose a new definition called beta (β) atomic contacts. Our definition, founded on the β-skeletons in computational geometry, requires that there is no other atom in the contact spheres defined by two contact atoms; this sphere is similar to the van der Waals spheres of atoms. The statistical analysis on a large dataset shows that β contacts are only a small fraction of conventional distance-based contacts. To empirically quantify the importance of β contacts, we design βACV, an SVM classifier with β contacts as input, to classify homodimers from crystal packing. We found that our βACV is able to achieve the state-of-the-art classification performance superior to SVM classifiers with distance-based contacts as input. Our βACV also outperforms several existing methods when being evaluated on several datasets in previous works. The promising empirical performance suggests that β contacts can truly identify critical specific contacts in protein binding interfaces. β contacts thus provide a new model for more precise description of atomic organization in protein quaternary structures than distance-based contacts.

  6. Beta Atomic Contacts: Identifying Critical Specific Contacts in Protein Binding Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qian; Kwoh, Chee Keong; Hoi, Steven C. H.

    2013-01-01

    Specific binding between proteins plays a crucial role in molecular functions and biological processes. Protein binding interfaces and their atomic contacts are typically defined by simple criteria, such as distance-based definitions that only use some threshold of spatial distance in previous studies. These definitions neglect the nearby atomic organization of contact atoms, and thus detect predominant contacts which are interrupted by other atoms. It is questionable whether such kinds of interrupted contacts are as important as other contacts in protein binding. To tackle this challenge, we propose a new definition called beta (β) atomic contacts. Our definition, founded on the β-skeletons in computational geometry, requires that there is no other atom in the contact spheres defined by two contact atoms; this sphere is similar to the van der Waals spheres of atoms. The statistical analysis on a large dataset shows that β contacts are only a small fraction of conventional distance-based contacts. To empirically quantify the importance of β contacts, we design βACV, an SVM classifier with β contacts as input, to classify homodimers from crystal packing. We found that our βACV is able to achieve the state-of-the-art classification performance superior to SVM classifiers with distance-based contacts as input. Our βACV also outperforms several existing methods when being evaluated on several datasets in previous works. The promising empirical performance suggests that β contacts can truly identify critical specific contacts in protein binding interfaces. β contacts thus provide a new model for more precise description of atomic organization in protein quaternary structures than distance-based contacts. PMID:23630569

  7. The Interaction between Bamboo Mosaic Virus Replication Protein and Coat Protein Is Critical for Virus Movement in Plant Hosts ▿

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cheng-Cheng; Ho, Yuan-Ning; Hu, Rei-Hsing; Yen, Yu-Ting; Wang, Zheng-Cheng; Lee, Ya-Chien; Hsu, Yau-Heiu; Meng, Menghsiao

    2011-01-01

    Bamboo mosaic virus (BaMV) is a positive-sense RNA virus belonging to the genus Potexvirus. Open reading frame 1 (ORF1) encodes the viral replication protein that consists of a capping enzyme domain, a helicase-like domain (HLD), and an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase domain from the N to C terminus. ORF5 encodes the viral coat protein (CP) required for genome encapsidation and the virus movement in plants. In this study, application of a yeast-two hybrid assay detected an interaction between the viral HLD and CP. However, the interaction did not affect the NTPase activity of the HLD. To identify the critical amino acids of CP interacting with the HLD, a random mutational library of CP was created using error-prone PCR, and the mutations adversely affecting the interaction were screened by a bacterial two-hybrid system. As a result, the mutations A209G and N210S in CP were found to weaken the interaction. To determine the significance of the interaction, the mutations were introduced into a BaMV infectious clone, and the mutational effects on viral replication, movement, and genome encapsidation were investigated. There was no effect on accumulations of BaMV CP and genomic RNAs within protoplasts; however, the virus cell-to-cell movement in plants was restricted. Sequence alignment revealed that A209 of BaMV CP is conserved in many potexviruses. Mutation of the corresponding residue in Foxtail mosaic virus CP also reduced the viral HLD-CP interaction and restricted the virus movement, suggesting that interaction between CP and a widely conserved HLD in the potexviral replication protein is crucial for viral trafficking through plasmodesmata. PMID:21917973

  8. Pathways of Ca2+ entry and cytoskeletal damage following eccentric contractions in mouse skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bao-Ting; Whitehead, Nicholas P.; Gervasio, Othon L.; Reardon, Trent F.; Vale, Molly; Fatkin, Diane; Dietrich, Alexander; Yeung, Ella W.

    2012-01-01

    Muscles that are stretched during contraction (eccentric contractions) show deficits in force production and a variety of structural changes, including loss of antibody staining of cytoskeletal proteins. Extracellular Ca2+ entry and activation of calpains have been proposed as mechanisms involved in these changes. The present study used isolated mouse extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles subjected to 10 eccentric contractions and monitored force production, immunostaining of cytoskeletal proteins, and resting stiffness. Possible pathways for Ca2+ entry were tested with streptomycin (200 μM), a blocker of stretch-activated channels, and with muscles from mice deficient in the transient receptor potential canonical 1 gene (TRPC1 KO), a candidate gene for stretch-activated channels. At 30 min after the eccentric contractions, the isometric force was decreased to 75 ± 3% of initial control and this force loss was reduced by streptomycin but not in the TRPC1 KO. Desmin, titin, and dystrophin all showed patchy loss of immunostaining 30 min after the eccentric contractions, which was substantially reduced by streptomycin and in the TRPC1 KO muscles. Muscles showed a reduction of resting stiffness following eccentric contractions, and this reduction was eliminated by streptomycin and absent in the TRPC1 KO muscles. Calpain activation was determined by the appearance of a lower molecular weight autolysis product and μ-calpain was activated at 30 min, whereas the muscle-specific calpain-3 was not. To test whether the loss of stiffness was caused by titin cleavage, protein gels were used but no significant titin cleavage was detected. These results suggest that Ca2+ entry following eccentric contractions is through a stretch-activated channel that is blocked by streptomycin and encoded or modulated by TRPC1. PMID:22461447

  9. Quinolinic acid induces disrupts cytoskeletal homeostasis in striatal neurons. Protective role of astrocyte-neuron interaction.

    PubMed

    Pierozan, Paula; Ferreira, Fernanda; de Lima, Bárbara Ortiz; Pessoa-Pureur, Regina

    2015-02-01

    Quinolinic acid (QUIN) is an endogenous metabolite of the kynurenine pathway involved in several neurological disorders. Among the several mechanisms involved in QUIN-mediated toxicity, disruption of the cytoskeleton has been demonstrated in striatally injected rats and in striatal slices. The present work searched for the actions of QUIN in primary striatal neurons. Neurons exposed to 10 µM QUIN presented hyperphosphorylated neurofilament (NF) subunits (NFL, NFM, and NFH). Hyperphosphorylation was abrogated in the presence of protein kinase A and protein kinase C inhibitors H89 (20 μM) and staurosporine (10 nM), respectively, as well as by specific antagonists to N-methyl-D-aspartate (50 µM DL-AP5) and metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (100 µM MPEP). Also, intra- and extracellular Ca(2+) chelators (10 µM BAPTA-AM and 1 mM EGTA, respectively) and Ca(2+) influx through L-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channel (10 µM verapamil) are implicated in QUIN-mediated effects. Cells immunostained for the neuronal markers βIII-tubulin and microtubule-associated protein 2 showed altered neurite/neuron ratios and neurite outgrowth. NF hyperphosphorylation and morphological alterations were totally prevented by conditioned medium from QUIN-treated astrocytes. Cocultured astrocytes and neurons interacted with one another reciprocally, protecting them against QUIN injury. Cocultured cells preserved their cytoskeletal organization and cell morphology together with unaltered activity of the phosphorylating system associated with the cytoskeleton. This article describes cytoskeletal disruption as one of the most relevant actions of QUIN toxicity in striatal neurons in culture with soluble factors secreted by astrocytes, with neuron-astrocyte interaction playing a role in neuroprotection. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Cytoskeletal disruption activates the DLK/JNK pathway, which promotes axonal regeneration and mimics a preconditioning injury

    PubMed Central

    Valakh, Vera; Frey, Erin; Babetto, Elisabetta; Walker, Lauren J; DiAntonio, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Nerve injury can lead to axonal regeneration, axonal degeneration, and/or neuronal cell death. Remarkably, the MAP3K dual leucine zipper kinase, DLK, promotes each of these responses, suggesting that DLK is a sensor of axon injury. In Drosophila, mutations in proteins that stabilize the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons activate the DLK pathway, suggesting that DLK may be activated by cytoskeletal disruption. Here we test this model in mammalian sensory neurons. We find that pharmacological agents designed to disrupt either the actin or microtubule cytoskeleton activate the DLK pathway, and that activation is independent of calcium influx or induction of the axon degeneration program. Moreover, activation of the DLK pathway by targeting the cytoskeleton induces a pro-regenerative state, enhancing axon regeneration in response to a subsequent injury in a process akin to preconditioning. This highlights the potential utility of activating the DLK pathway as a method to improve axon regeneration. Moreover, DLK is required for these responses to cytoskeletal perturbations, suggesting that DLK functions as a key neuronal sensor of cytoskeletal damage. PMID:25726747

  11. Vibration induced osteogenic commitment of mesenchymal stem cells is enhanced by cytoskeletal remodeling but not fluid shear.

    PubMed

    Uzer, Gunes; Pongkitwitoon, Suphannee; Ete Chan, M; Judex, Stefan

    2013-09-03

    Consistent across studies in humans, animals and cells, the application of vibrations can be anabolic and/or anti-catabolic to bone. The physical mechanisms modulating the vibration-induced response have not been identified. Recently, we developed an in vitro model in which candidate parameters including acceleration magnitude and fluid shear can be controlled independently during vibrations. Here, we hypothesized that vibration induced fluid shear does not modulate mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) proliferation and mineralization and that cell's sensitivity to vibrations can be promoted via actin stress fiber formation. Adipose derived human MSCs were subjected to vibration frequencies and acceleration magnitudes that induced fluid shear stress ranging from 0.04 Pa to 5 Pa. Vibrations were applied at magnitudes of 0.15 g, 1g, and 2g using frequencies of both 100 Hz and 30 Hz. After 14 d and under low fluid shear conditions associated with 100 Hz oscillations, mineralization was greater in all vibrated groups than in controls. Greater levels of fluid shear produced by 30 Hz vibrations enhanced mineralization only in the 2g group. Over 3d, vibrations led to the greatest increase in total cell number with the frequency/acceleration combination that induced the smallest level of fluid shear. Acute experiments showed that actin remodeling was necessary for early mechanical up-regulation of RUNX-2 mRNA levels. During osteogenic differentiation, mechanically induced up-regulation of actin remodeling genes including Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) protein, a critical regulator of Arp2/3 complex, was related to the magnitude of the applied acceleration but not to fluid shear. These data demonstrate that fluid shear does not regulate vibration induced proliferation and mineralization and that cytoskeletal remodeling activity may play a role in MSC mechanosensitivity.

  12. EWS-FLI1 perturbs MRTFB/YAP-1/TEAD target gene regulation inhibiting cytoskeletal autoregulatory feedback in Ewing sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Katschnig, A M; Kauer, M O; Schwentner, R; Tomazou, E M; Mutz, C N; Linder, M; Sibilia, M; Alonso, J; Aryee, D N T; Kovar, H

    2017-07-03

    Ewing sarcoma (EWS) is a paediatric bone cancer with high metastatic potential. Cellular plasticity resulting from dynamic cytoskeletal reorganization, typically regulated via the Rho pathway, is a prerequisite for metastasis initiation. Here, we interrogated the role of the Ewing sarcoma driver oncogene EWS-FLI1 in cytoskeletal reprogramming. We report that EWS-FLI1 strongly represses the activity of the Rho-F-actin signal pathway transcriptional effector MRTFB, affecting the expression of a large number of EWS-FLI1-anticorrelated genes including structural and regulatory cytoskeletal genes. Consistent with this finding, chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) revealed strong overlaps in myocardin-related transcription factor B (MRTFB) and EWS-FLI1 chromatin occupation, especially for EWS-FLI1-anticorrelated genes. Binding of the transcriptional co-activator Yes-associated protein (YAP)-1, enrichment of TEAD-binding motifs in these shared genomic binding regions and overlapping transcriptional footprints of MRTFB and TEAD factors led us to propose synergy between MRTFB and the YAP/TEAD complex in the regulation of EWS-FLI1-anticorrelated genes. We propose that EWS-FLI1 suppresses the Rho-actin pathway by perturbation of a MRTFB/YAP-1/TEAD transcriptional module, which directly affects the actin-autoregulatory feedback loop. As spontaneous fluctuations in EWS-FLI1 levels of Ewing sarcoma cells in vitro and in vivo, associated with a switch between a proliferative, non-migratory EWS-FLI1-high and a non-proliferative highly migratory EWS-FLI1-low state, were recently described, our data provide a mechanistic basis for the underlying EWS-FLI1-dependent reversible cytoskeletal reprogramming of Ewing sarcoma cells.Oncogene advance online publication, 3 July 2017; doi:10.1038/onc.2017.202.

  13. Cytoskeletal polarization of T cells is regulated by an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lowin-Kropf, B; Shapiro, V S; Weiss, A

    1998-02-23

    Binding of a T cell to an appropriate antigen-presenting cell (APC) induces the rapid reorientation of the T cell cytoskeleton and secretory apparatus towards the cell-cell contact site in a T cell antigen receptor (TCR) and peptide/major histocompatibility complex-dependent process. Such T cell polarization directs the delivery of cytokines and cytotoxic mediators towards the APC and contributes to the highly selective and specific action of effector T cells. To study the signaling pathways that regulate cytoskeletal rearrangements in T lymphocytes, we set up a conjugate formation assay using Jurkat T cells as effectors and cell-sized latex beads coated with various antibodies as artificial APCs. Here, we report that beads coated with antibodies specific for the TCR-CD3 complex were sufficient to induce T cell polarization towards the bead attachment site, as judged by reorientation of the microtubule-organizing center (MTOC) and localized actin polymerization. Thus, these cytoskeletal changes did not depend on activation of additional coreceptors. Moreover, single subunits of the TCR complex, namely TCR-zeta and CD3epsilon, were equally effective in inducing cytoskeletal polarization. However, mutagenesis of the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAMs), present three times in TCR-zeta and once in CD3epsilon, revealed that the induction of cytoskeletal rearrangements required the presence of at least one intact ITAM. In agreement with this result, lack of functional Lck, the protein tyrosine kinase responsible for ITAM phosphorylation, abolished both MTOC reorientation and polarized actin polymerization. Both inhibitor and transient overexpression studies demonstrated that MTOC reorientation could occur in the absence of Ras activation. Our results suggest that APC-induced T cell polarization is a TCR-mediated event that is coupled to the TCR by the same signaling motif as TCR-induced gene activation, but diverges in its distal signaling

  14. Protein O-GlcNAcylation: A critical regulator of the cellular response to stress

    PubMed Central

    Chatham, John C.; Marchase, Richard B.

    2012-01-01

    The post-translational modification of serine and threonine residues of nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins by the O-linked attachment of the monosaccharide ß-N-acetyl-glucosamine (O-GlcNAc) is a highly dynamic and ubiquitous protein modification that plays a critical role in regulating numerous biological processes. Much of our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the role of O-GlcNAc on cellular function has been in the context of chronic disease processes. However, there is increasing evidence that O-GlcNAc levels are increased in response to stress and that acute augmentation of this response is cytoprotective, at least in the short term. Conversely, a reduction in O-GlcNAc levels appears to be associated with decreased cell survival in response to an acute stress. Here we summarize our current understanding of protein O-GlcNAcylation on the cellular response to stress and in mediating cellular protective mechanisms focusing primarily on the cardiovascular system as an example. We consider the potential link between O-GlcNAcylation and cardiomyocyte calcium homeostasis and explore the parallels between O-GlcNAc signaling and redox signaling. We also discuss the apparent paradox between the reported adverse effects of increased O-GlcNAcylation with its recently reported role in mediating cell survival mechanisms. PMID:22308107

  15. Vitronectin is A Critical Protein Adhesion Substrate for IL-4-INDUCED Foreign Body Giant Cell Formation

    PubMed Central

    McNally, Amy K.; Jones, Jacqueline A.; MacEwan, Sarah R.; Colton, Erica; Anderson, James M.

    2014-01-01

    An in vitro system of interleukin (IL)-4-induced foreign body giant cell (FBGC) formation was utilized to define the adhesion protein substrate(s) that promotes this aspect of the foreign body reaction on biomedical polymers. Human monocytes were cultured on cell culture polystyrene surfaces that had been pre-adsorbed with a synthetic arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD) peptide previously found to support optimal FBGC formation, or with various concentrations of potential physiological protein substrates, i.e. complement C3bi, collagen types I or IV, fibrinogen, plasma fibronectin, fibroblast fibronectin, laminin, thrombospondin, vitronectin, or von Willebrand factor. Cultures were evaluated on days 0 (1.5 hr), 3, and 7 by May-Grünwald/Giemsa staining. Initial monocyte adhesion occurred on all adsorbed proteins. However, by day 7 of culture, only vitronectin was striking in its ability to support significant macrophage adhesion, development, and fusion leading to FBGC formation. Vitronectin supported high degrees of FBGC formation at an absorption concentration between 5 and 25 μg per ml. These findings suggest that adsorbed vitronectin is critical in the collective events that support and promote FBGC formation on biomedical polymers, and that the propensity for vitronectin adsorption may underlie the material surface chemistry dependency of FBGC formation. PMID:17994558

  16. Cdc42hs Facilitates Cytoskeletal Reorganization and Neurite Outgrowth by Localizing the 58-Kd Insulin Receptor Substrate to Filamentous Actin

    PubMed Central

    Govind, Sheila; Kozma, Robert; Monfries, Clinton; Lim, Louis; Ahmed, Sohail

    2001-01-01

    Cdc42Hs is involved in cytoskeletal reorganization and is required for neurite outgrowth in N1E-115 cells. To investigate the molecular mechanism by which Cdc42Hs regulates these processes, a search for novel Cdc42Hs protein partners was undertaken by yeast two-hybrid assay. Here, we identify the 58-kD substrate of the insulin receptor tyrosine kinase (IRS-58) as a Cdc42Hs target. IRS-58 is a brain-enriched protein comprising at least four protein–protein interaction sites: a Cdc42Hs binding site, an Src homology (SH)3-binding site, an SH3 domain, and a tryptophan, tyrptophan (WW)-binding domain. Expression of IRS-58 in Swiss 3T3 cells leads to reorganization of the filamentous (F)-actin cytoskeleton, involving loss of stress fibers and formation of filopodia and clusters. In N1E-115 cells IRS-58 induces neurite outgrowth with high complexity. Expression of a deletion mutant of IRS-58, which lacks the SH3- and WW-binding domains, induced neurite extension without complexity in N1E-115 cells. In Swiss 3T3 cells and N1E-115 cells, IRS-58 colocalizes with F-actin in clusters and filopodia. An IRS-581267N mutant unable to bind Cdc42Hs failed to localize with F-actin to induce neurite outgrowth or significant cytoskeletal reorganization. These results suggest that Cdc42Hs facilitates cytoskeletal reorganization and neurite outgrowth by localizing protein complexes via adaptor proteins such as IRS-58 to F-actin. PMID:11157984

  17. Residue network in protein native structure belongs to the universality class of a three-dimensional critical percolation cluster.

    PubMed

    Morita, Hidetoshi; Takano, Mitsunori

    2009-02-01

    Single protein molecules are regarded as contact networks of amino-acid residues. Relationships between the shortest path lengths and the numbers of residues within single molecules in the native structures are examined for various sized proteins. A universal scaling among proteins is obtained, which shows that the residue networks are fractal networks. This universal fractal network is characterized with three kinds of dimensions: the network topological dimension D{c} approximately 1.9 , the fractal dimension D{f} approximately 2.5 , and the spectral dimension D{s} approximately 1.3 . These values are in surprisingly good coincidence with those of the three-dimensional critical percolation cluster. Hence the residue contact networks in the protein native structures belong to the universality class of the three-dimensional percolation cluster. The criticality is relevant to the ambivalence in the protein native structures, the coexistence of stability and instability, both of which are necessary for protein functions.

  18. Residue network in protein native structure belongs to the universality class of a three-dimensional critical percolation cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Hidetoshi; Takano, Mitsunori

    2009-02-01

    Single protein molecules are regarded as contact networks of amino-acid residues. Relationships between the shortest path lengths and the numbers of residues within single molecules in the native structures are examined for various sized proteins. A universal scaling among proteins is obtained, which shows that the residue networks are fractal networks. This universal fractal network is characterized with three kinds of dimensions: the network topological dimension Dc≈1.9 , the fractal dimension Df≈2.5 , and the spectral dimension Ds≈1.3 . These values are in surprisingly good coincidence with those of the three-dimensional critical percolation cluster. Hence the residue contact networks in the protein native structures belong to the universality class of the three-dimensional percolation cluster. The criticality is relevant to the ambivalence in the protein native structures, the coexistence of stability and instability, both of which are necessary for protein functions.

  19. Identification of critical functional determinants of kainate receptor modulation by auxiliary protein Neto2.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Theanne N; Swanson, Geoffrey T

    2015-11-15

    Kainate receptors (KARs) are ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) that modulate synaptic transmission and intrinsic neuronal excitability. KARs associate with the auxiliary proteins neuropilin- and tolloid-like 1 and 2 (Neto1 and Neto2), which act as allosteric modulators of receptor function impacting all biophysical properties of these receptors studied to date. M3-S2 linkers play a critical role in KAR gating; we found that individual residues in these linkers bidirectionally influence Neto2 modulation of KAR desensitization in an agonist specific manner. We also identify the D1 dimer interface as a novel site of Neto2 modulation and functionally correlate the actions of Neto2 modulation of desensitization with modulation of cation sensitivity. We identify these domains as determinants of Neto2 modulation. Thus, our work contributes to the understanding of auxiliary subunit modulation of KAR function and could aid the development of KAR-specific modulators to alter receptor function. Kainate receptors (KARs) are important modulators of synaptic transmission and intrinsic neuronal excitability in the CNS. Their activity is shaped by the auxiliary proteins Neto1 and Neto2, which impact KAR gating in a receptor subunit- and Neto isoform-specific manner. The structural basis for Neto modulation of KAR gating is unknown. Here we identify the M3-S2 gating linker as a critical determinant contributing to Neto2 modulation of KARs. M3-S2 linkers control both the valence and magnitude of Neto2 modulation of homomeric GluK2 receptors. Furthermore, a single mutation in this domain abolishes Neto2 modulation of heteromeric receptor desensitization. Additionally, we found that cation sensitivity of KAR gating is altered by Neto2 association, suggesting that stability of the D1 dimer interface in the ligand-binding domain (LBD) is an important determinant of Neto2 actions. Moreover, modulation of cation sensitivity was eliminated by mutations in the M3-S2 linkers, thereby

  20. Role of Cyclic Nucleotide-Dependent Actin Cytoskeletal Dynamics: [Ca2+]i and Force Suppression in Forskolin-Pretreated Porcine Coronary Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Hocking, Kyle M.; Baudenbacher, Franz J.; Putumbaka, Gowthami; Venkatraman, Sneha; Cheung-Flynn, Joyce; Brophy, Colleen M.; Komalavilas, Padmini

    2013-01-01

    Initiation of force generation during vascular smooth muscle contraction involves a rise in intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) and phosphorylation of myosin light chains (MLC). However, reversal of these two processes alone does not account for the force inhibition that occurs during relaxation or inhibition of contraction, implicating that other mechanisms, such as actin cytoskeletal rearrangement, play a role in the suppression of force. In this study, we hypothesize that forskolin-induced force suppression is dependent upon changes in actin cytoskeletal dynamics. To focus on the actin cytoskeletal changes, a physiological model was developed in which forskolin treatment of intact porcine coronary arteries (PCA) prior to treatment with a contractile agonist resulted in complete suppression of force. Pretreatment of PCA with forskolin suppressed histamine-induced force generation but did not abolish [Ca2+]i rise or MLC phosphorylation. Additionally, forskolin pretreatment reduced filamentous actin in histamine-treated tissues, and prevented histamine-induced changes in the phosphorylation of the actin-regulatory proteins HSP20, VASP, cofilin, and paxillin. Taken together, these results suggest that forskolin-induced complete force suppression is dependent upon the actin cytoskeletal regulation initiated by the phosphorylation changes of the actin regulatory proteins and not on the MLC dephosphorylation. This model of complete force suppression can be employed to further elucidate the mechanisms responsible for smooth muscle tone, and may offer cues to pathological situations, such as hypertension and vasospasm. PMID:23593369

  1. Role of cyclic nucleotide-dependent actin cytoskeletal dynamics:Ca(2+)](i) and force suppression in forskolin-pretreated porcine coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Hocking, Kyle M; Baudenbacher, Franz J; Putumbaka, Gowthami; Venkatraman, Sneha; Cheung-Flynn, Joyce;